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Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "wetlands coastal sand" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


1

Threats to Wetland Ecosystems - Coastal Wetlands  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Wetland Loss Accroding to studies performed at Louisiana State University, the coastal zone of Louisiana lost an estimated 1,526 square miles of wetla ...

2

Abating Louisiana Coastal Wetland Loss  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Number: 1982-10. WHEREAS, the coastal wetlands of the state of Louisiana are a nationally important resource, they support 25 percent of the total ...

3

Hurricane Katrina: Louisiana Coastal Wetlands  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

During the 75-year period between 1930 and 2005, more than 1.2 million acres of Louisiana’s coastal wetlands disappear. From 1932 to 1956, Louisiana ...

4

Coastal Wetlands | New Orleans CityBusiness  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Board to again consider ‘Big Oil’ lawsuit POSTED: 09:09 AM Thursday, November 21, 2013 BY: The Associated Press TAGS: coastal wetlands, John Barry, ...

5

An Economic Analysis of Private Market Wetland Values in Southwestern Coastal Louisiana.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Coastal Louisiana wetlands contain more than 30% of the U.S. coastal wetlands, but its wetland loss accounts for about 90% of the continental states. Although… (more)

Xu, Baifu

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

6

Scientific assessment of coastal wetland loss, restoration and ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Get this from a library! Scientific assessment of coastal wetland loss, restoration and management in Louisiana. [Donald F Boesch; Louisiana State ...

7

Trends and causes of historical wetland loss in coastal ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Get this from a library! Trends and causes of historical wetland loss in coastal Louisiana. [Julie Christine Bernier; Geological Survey (U.S.),

8

PPT – Wetland Restoration in Coastal Louisiana PowerPoint ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Wetland Restoration in Coastal Louisiana – A free PowerPoint PPT presentation (displayed as a Flash slide show) on PowerShow.com

9

Cost-Efficacy of Wetland Preservation and Restoration in Coastal Louisiana.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Louisiana faces a tremendous crisis of coastal wetland loss, where an estimated 1,900 square miles of coastal land has been lost in the past century.… (more)

Aust, Christiane

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

10

Chapter 16 -Conservation and Use of Coastal Wetland Forests in Louisiana*  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Chapter 16 - Conservation and Use of Coastal Wetland Forests in Louisiana* Stephen P. Faulkner1 concerns regarding the long-term viability of Louisiana's coastal wetland forests (Brinson et al. 1985; De). The Louisiana Coastal Wetlands Conservation and Restora- tion Task Force (1998) concluded that up to 93,000 ha

Keim, Richard

11

Subsidence in coastal Louisiana: causes, rates, and effects on wetlands  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Coastal wetlands are being lost at a rapid and accelerating rate in Louisiana. Much of this loss is attributable to a relative lowering of the wetland surface below the level adequate to support vegetation. Such rapid subsidence is a natural phenomenon, related to the progradation and abandonment of distributary lobes of the Mississippi river Deltaic Plain. For a considerable period after abandonment of new sediment sources, wetlands are able to keep pace with subsidence by accreting sediments reworked by marine processes. But inundation of interior wetlands removed from such an active sediment supply, wave exposure, and saltwater intrusion eventually result in deterioration of the wetlands. Human activities may accelerate this process by disrupting sediment supplies for wetland accretion, raising global sea level, causing saltwater intrusion, and withdrawals of subsurface materials. Present subsidence rates from tide gauge records exceed 40 mm/yr at the modern Mississippi River delta and approximate 10 mm/yr in wetlands near the gulf coast. Subsidence rates over the last 1000 years appear to have been half the rates presently observed. This either results from natural variability, inaccuracy of tide gauge records, or human influences. The effect of the high rate of increase in locally apparent sea level on wetlands is difficult to quantitatively predict because of local variations in subsidence and accretion, uncertainty regarding future global sea level, and lack of knowledge of the accretionary limits of wetlands. 66 references, 10 figures, 2 tables.

Boesch, D.F.; Levin, D.; Nummedal, D.; Bowles, K.

1983-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

12

Coastal Tidelands and Wetlands (South Carolina)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This legislation enacts a state management program to oversee water and land use and development in South Carolina's coastal zone. Under the program, the Department of Health and Environmental...

13

The use of hydrologically altered wetlands to treat wastewater in coastal Louisiana  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Two major environmental problems currently affecting Louisiana are a high rate of coastal wetland loss and high levels of surface water pollution. The application of secondarily treated wastewater to wetlands is proposed to dealing with these problems. The benefits of wetland wastewater treatment include improved surface water quality, increased accretion rates to balance subsidence, improved plant productivity, and decreased capital outlays for conventional engineering treatment systems. Wetland treatment systems can be designed and operated to restore deteriorating wetlands to previous levels of productivity. Hydrologically altered wetlands in the Louisiana coastal zone are appropriate for receiving municipal and some industrial effluent. While the US EPA has determined that wetland wastewater treatment is effective in treating municipal effluent, it has discouraged the use of natural wetlands for this purpose. As a result, hydrologically altered wetlands in the Louisiana coastal zone are being neglected and ultimately lost, while scarce funds are used to construct artificial wetlands to treat municipal effluent. Effluent discharge to existing wetlands can be incorporated into a comprehensive management plan designed to increase sediment and nutrient input into subsiding wetlands in the Louisiana coastal zone. Secondarily treated effluent discharged from industrial and municipal facilities in the Louisiana coastal zone were reviewed for suitability for wetland wastewater treatment. Selection criteria for wetland treatment systems were developed for both dischargers and receiving wetlands. Designs for two potential case studies based on established selection criteria for wetland wastewater treatment systems are presented. An economic analysis of the four case studies indicates a high potential for financial savings when wetlands replace conventional engineering methods for tertiary treatment.

Breaux, A.M.

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

14

Gas-rich sediment and coastal wetland loss in Louisiana  

SciTech Connect

High rates of wetland loss in southern Louisiana provide the impetus for examining the role that trapped, biogenic gases play in regulating subsidence of coastal areas. A significant cause for wetland loss in this region is relative sea-level rise produced by sediment-volume reduction. Dewatering, grain reorientation and packing, and oxidation of organic-rich sediments are thought to be the main processes for volume loss. It is argued that natural and anthropogenic causes for sediment degasification play a critical role in sediment-volume reduction. Compressional wave velocities were measured at 34 sites in both the abandoned (Holocene) and modern parts of the Mssissippi Delta. A low-frequency source (<200 Hz) was used to maximize sound-wave dispersion caused by interstitial gas bubbles. Compressional wave velocities measured at low frequencies relative to the gas-bubble resonant-frequency undergo maximum change from the velocity for a gas-free sediment.

Thompson, M.D.; McGinnis, L.D.; Wilkey, P.L.; Miller, S.F.

1993-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

15

Innovative approach for restoring coastal wetlands using treated drill cuttings  

SciTech Connect

The leading environmental problem facing coastal Louisiana regions is the loss of wetlands. Oil and gas exploration and production activities have contributed to wetland damage through erosion at numerous sites where canals have been cut through the marsh to access drilling sites. An independent oil and gas producer, working with Southeastern Louisiana University and two oil field service companies, developed a process to stabilize drill cuttings so that they could be used as a substrate to grow wetlands vegetation. The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) funded a project under which the process would be validated through laboratory studies and field demonstrations. The laboratory studies demonstrated that treated drill cuttings support the growth of wetlands vegetation. However, neither the Army Corps of Engineers (COE) nor the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) would grant regulatory approval for afield trial of the process. Argonne National Laboratory was asked to join the project team to try to find alternative mechanisms for gaining regulatory approval. Argonne worked with EPA's Office of Reinvention and learned that EPA's Project XL would be the only regulatory program under which the proposed field trial could be done. One of the main criteria for an acceptable Project XL proposal is to have a formal project sponsor assume the responsibility and liability for the project. Because the proposed project involved access to private land areas, the team felt that an oil and gas company with coastal Louisiana land holdings would need to serve as sponsor. Despite extensive communication with oil and gas companies and industry associations, the project team was unable to find any organization willing to serve as sponsor. In September 1999, the Project XL proposal was withdrawn and the project was canceled.

Veil, J. A.; Hocking, E. K.

1999-11-02T23:59:59.000Z

16

Why Is It Washing Away? Advocacy Groups and the Framing of Louisiana's Coastal Wetlands Loss in Local Newspapers.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Louisianas coastal wetlands provide a habitat for diverse wildlife, recreational opportunities for Louisiana residents and tourists, and an important natural buffer between communities and powerful… (more)

Harang, Paul

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

17

Proceedings of the conference on coastal erosion and wetland modification in Louisiana: causes, consequences, and options  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Sixteen papers and panel discussions from a conference held in Baton Rouge, LA, 5 to 6 October 1981 are presented. The presentations consider the causes and consequences of coastal erosion and wetland modification in Louisiana and the mitigative options available to slow or reverse the rapid rate of coastal land loss. Detailed habitat mapping studies have allowed accurate estimates of coastal habitat change and land loss through 1978. Projections from these rates of change indicate an annual rate of land loss in coastal Louisiana in the early 1980's of approximately 130 km/sup 2//y (50 m/sup 2//y). The projected effects of wetland modification on the bountiful living resources of coastal Louisiana (fisheries, fur and hide bearers and waterfowl) are major because of the close dependence of these resources on estuarine wetlands. These changes and others related to flood protection, transportation and ownership of mineral resources are projected to have extensive social and economic consequences. Options proposed to slow coastal land loss include major and minor diversions of the Mississippi River, barrier island and shoreline restoration and protection, hydrological management of wetlands and more restrictive permitting of dredging activities.

Boesch, D.F. (ed.)

1982-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

18

Causes of wetland loss in the coastal central Gulf of Mexico. Volume 3. Appendices. Final report  

SciTech Connect

In 1985, the Minerals Management Service initiated an investigation to study the causes of wetland loss in the coastal Gulf of Mexico as part of its Outer Continental Shelf environmental-studies program. The purpose of the two-year study was to investigate the factors that contribute to wetland loss and to determine specifically what percentage of the loss is directly and indirectly related to Federal offshore oil and gas development. The primary goal of the Coastal Effects Program is to delineate the onshore impacts of offshore oil and gas development activities. Volume 3 contains five appendices providing methodological details and data listings.

Turner, R.E.; Cahoon, D.R.

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

19

America's WETLAND Newsletter - June 2006 | America's Wetland  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

America's WETLAND Newsletter - June 2006. By: America's WETLAND Campaign Staff, America's WETLAND: Campaign to Save Coastal Louisiana | 7.1.2006

20

Towards sustainable management of Louisiana’s coastal wetland forests: problems, constraints, and a new beginning  

SciTech Connect

Over 345,000 ha of forested swamps occur throughout the Mississippi River Deltaic Plain. Natural and anthropogenic changes in hydrology and geomorphology at local and landscape levels have reduced the productivity in many of these coastal wetland forests areas and have caused the complete loss of forest cover in some places. A summary and interpretation of the available science, suggestions for policy change, and a multidisciplinary (multi-responsibility) approach were needed to address these issues [in the context of private land]. In response, the Louisiana Governor's office formed a Coastal Wetland Forest Conservation and Use Science Working Group (SWG) and an associated Advisory Panel to provide the Governor with information and suggestions of strategies for environmental and economic utilization, conservation, and protection of Louisiana's coastal wetland forest ecosystem in the long-term. The process of engaging scientists, resource managers, and other stakeholders in this effort is described, and the recommendations of the SWG are presented relative to forestry practices and the potential for sustainable management of coastal wetland forests.

Chambers, J. L.; Keim, R. F.; Faulkner, S. P.; Day Jr., J. W.; Gardiner, E. S.; Hughes, M. S.; King, S. L.; McLeod, K. W.; Miller, C. A.; Nyman, J. A.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "wetlands coastal sand" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Causes of wetland loss in the coastal Gulf of Mexico, Volume 1: executive summary. Final report  

SciTech Connect

In 1985, the Minerals Management Service initiated an investigation to study the causes of wetland loss in the coastal Gulf of Mexico as part of its Outer Continental Shelf environmental-studies program. The purpose of the two-year study was to investigate the factors that contribute to wetland loss and to determine specifically what percentage of the loss is directly and indirectly related to Federal offshore oil and gas development. The primary goal of the Coastal Effects Program is to delineate the onshore impacts of offshore oil and gas development activities. The final report, prepared in three volumes, describes the extent of the contribution of OCS development to coastal land loss. Volume I is the Executive Summary. The report provides a detailed description of both direct and indirect impacts.

Turner, R.E.; Cahoon, D.R.

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

22

Coastal Tidelands and Wetlands (South Carolina) | Open Energy...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

permitting program. Policy Contact Department South Carolina Department of Health and Environmental Control Division Ocean & Coastal Resource Management Address 2600 Bull...

23

Modeling wetland loss in coastal Louisiana: Geology, geography ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Habitat change in coastal Louisiana from 1955/6 to 1978 was analyzed to determine the influence of geological and man-made changes on landscape ...

24

Environmental concerns and future oil and gas developments in Coastal Wetlands of Louisiana  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Recent studies have confirmed that much oil and natural gas have been overlooked and increases in future recoverable reserves will come from drilling in these areas. Increased production will result from identifying unexploited compartmentalized reservoirs, new infield reservoirs, and bypassed reservoirs, and by using enhanced recovery technologies for hydrocarbon recovery in incompletely drained reservoirs previously left unproduced for economic reasons. Most of southern Louisiana's hydrocarbon reserves underlie coastal wetland areas of the state. Major environmental concerns associated with the future development of existing reserves are canal dredging and destruction of wildlife habitat, use and disposal of oil-based muds, mitigation for wetland damage, and the recent emerging issue of surface contamination by naturally occurring radioactive materials with potential liabilities and future remedial regulation. To reduce wetland environmental damage caused by access canals to drilling sites, the Coastal Management Division of the Louisiana Department of Natural Resources instituted a geologic reviews program to review drilling permit application in the coastal wetlands. This process provides a mechanism for state and federal agencies to comment on the requested drilling permit. As a result of this process, the total average wetland disturbed area has been reduced from 767 ac per year in 1982 to approximately 76 ac per year in 1991. Average lengths of access canals also have been reduced by approximately 78% during the period. Oil and gas companies are becoming increasingly aware of the environmental consequences of drilling in wetlands and are considering them in planning for development activities. In the current climate of increasing public consciousness about the environment, addressing environmental concerns in the planning state will go a long way in helping alleviate future environmental problems.

John, C.J.; Harder, B.J.; Groat, C.G. (Louisiana State Univ., Baton Rouge, LA (United States))

1993-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

25

The dominant processes responsible for subsidence of coastal wetlands in south Louisiana  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Wetland loss in coastal areas of Terrebonne and Lafourche Parishes, Louisiana, largely results from two subsurface processes: (1) consolidation of recently deposited Holocene deltaic sediments and (2) active growth faulting. Locally, settlement is high where the thickness of valley fill is great and in broad interdistributary basins where the thickness of consolidation-prone, peaty soils is great. The delta cycle is identified as the fundamental sedimentologic unit that constitutes the lower delta plain. Peaty soils from the waning phase of the delta cycle are identified as the deltaic facies most subject to consolidation settlement. Data indicate direct relationships between the thickness of deltaic sediments in individual delta cycles, and the thickness of peaty soils capping these cycles, with present patterns of coastal tract land loss. In addition, active growth faulting is correlated with new areas of interior tract wetland loss. Consolidation and faulting largely explain the curious nature of wetland loss patterns in south Louisiana. Subsidence in The Netherlands has been attributed to similar causes, i.e. thick deposits of consolidation-prone sediments that accumulate on the downthrown sides of basin margin faults.

Kuecher, G.J.

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

26

America's Wetland  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

“Save Our Coast!” Every fifteen minutes, Louisiana loses a football field worth of wetlands. Eighty percent of coastal land loss in the United States ...

27

Wetlands  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Wetlands Wetlands Nature Bulletin No. 670 March 10, 1962 Forest Preserve District of Cook County George W. Dunne, President Roland F. Eisenbeis, Supt. of Conservation WETLANDS This bulletin is addressed to the young people who will determine and must share the future of our country. As citizens you will have responsibilities. Among them will be the conservation of its natural resources. You have learned a lot about why and how we are endeavoring to conserve and use wisely the forests, soils, waters, minerals and wildlife. You may not know much about still another resource, nor that it is being destroyed -- largely by drainage for agricultural purposes but also by flood control projects, industrial and residential developments, dumps and pollution. That resource is what remains of our precious natural WETLANDS.

28

Causes of wetland loss in the coastal central Gulf of Mexico. Volume 2. Technical narrative. Final report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In 1985, the Minerals Management Service initiated an investigation to study the causes of wetland loss in the coastal Gulf of Mexico as part of its Outer Continental Shelf environmental-studies program. The purpose of the two-year study was to investigate the factors that contribute to wetland loss and to determine specifically what percentage of the loss is directly and indirectly related to Federal offshore oil and gas development. The primary goal of the Coastal Effects Program is to delineate the onshore impacts of offshore oil and gas development activities. Volume II provides an introduction to the study, direct impacts of OCS activities, saltwater intrusion, subsidence and sedimentation, and landscape patterns and aerial imagery.

Turner, R.E.; Cahoon, D.R.

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

29

ERIC - Wetland Loss., Coast & Sea, 1994  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Examines what wetland conservation means to different groups of Louisiana's coastal residents. Describes coastal resources, reasons for their ...

30

Chernobyl {sup 137}Cs used to determine sediment accretion rates at selected northern European coastal wetlands  

SciTech Connect

Sediment cores were collected form five coastal wetlands along the North Sea (England and Netherlands) and Baltic Sea (Poland). {sup 137}Cs dating was used to assess sediment accretion rates, including rates based on the {sup 137}Cs peak from the 1986 accident at Chernobyl. Peaks form the Chernobyl fallout were found in cores from the Oder and Vistula Rivers in Poland, from the Eastern Scheldt in the Netherlands, and in one of the two cores from Stiffkey Marsh, UK. No evidence of Chernobyl fallout was found in cores from Dengie Marsh, UK. The Chernobyl {sup 137}Cs peak serves as an excellent marker for short-term accretion rates because of its high activity. Vertical accretion rates (cm yr{sup {minus}1}) based on 1963 and 1986 peaks were similar at most sites; differences may be due to large inputs of sediment from storms or recent accumulation of organic matter. Large differences in sediment characteristics and accretion rates were found between samples from Poland and western Europe. Vertical accretion rates over the period 1963-1986 ranged from 0.26 to 0.85 cm{sup {minus}1} and from 0.30 to 1.90 cm yr{sup {minus}1} over the 1986-1991 period. Vertical accretion rates for the period these sites are in imminent danger of excessive flooding. The Chernobyl {sup 137}Cs peak will be especially useful for studies of short-term (i.e. very recent) sedimentation in the near future and for comparisons of sediment processes over different time scales. 33 refs., 4 figs., 4 tabs.

Callaway, J.C.; DeLaune, R.D.; Patrick, W.H. Jr. [Louisiana State Univ., Baton Rouge, LA (United States)

1996-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

31

Federal coastal wetland mapping programs: A report by the National Ocean Pollution Policy Board's Habitat Loss and Modification Working Group  

SciTech Connect

The manuscripts contained in the report describe what the Federal government is doing to map the Nation's coastal wetlands. Various aspects of a series of Federally funded programs are described, including the purpose and intent of the programs, technologies used, the type of data and other mapping products generated, and how the information is used. The report summarizes the major programs and present the Habitat Loss and Modification Working Group's conclusions and recommendations for actions that could be taken to improve the effectiveness of Federal activities.

Buffington, J.D.; Kiraly, S.J.; Cross, F.A.

1990-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

32

Assessing Transformation of Trace Metals and Crude Oil in Mississippi and Louisiana Coastal Wetlands in Response to the Deepwater Horizon Oil Spill  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

resulting in the release of about 5 million barrels of crude oil into the environment. Coastal wetlands are particularly susceptible to oil contamination because they are composed largely of fine-grained sediments, which have a high capacity to adsorb oil and associated metals. Microbial activities may be enhanced by an increase in amounts of organic matter and subsequently influence the biogeochemical cycling of trace metals. This research assesses the levels of oil and trace metals, along with associated biogeochemical changes, in six coastal marshes in Mississippi and Louisiana. Total digestion analysis of wetland sediments shows higher concentrations of certain

Jeffrey Paul Keevan

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

33

The effect of bioremediation on microbial populations in an oil-contaminated coastal wetland  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A series of controlled, crude oil applications was carried out in a Texas coastal wetland near the Houston Ship Channel to determine the effectiveness of bioremediation in these sensitive areas. The first application, conducted in 1996, was performed to assess the use of diammonium phosphate and diammonium phosphate plus nitrate (potential electron acceptor) as treatments to stimulate microbial growth and hydrocarbon degradation. The second application, conducted in 1997, was performed to determine the potential of two commercial bioaugmentation products to supplement native microbial populations and enhance hydrocarbon biodegradation. Diammonium phosphate was also re-evaluated during this phase as a biostimulation treatment. For each application, 2 1 test plots were used and data from bioremediation treatment plots were compared to oiled control plots to assess treatment differences. Sediment samples from each phase of research (each application) were analyzed for petroleum hydrocarbon concentrations, microbial numbers, nutrient levels, and acute toxicity. Only data from the microbial enumerations are presented here. For both applications, sediment samples from all oiled test plots showed exponential increases in the numbers of aliphatic hydrocarbon and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH)-degrading microorganisms. These increases were observed at 0-5 cm and 5- 10 cm depths. For the first application, the average numbers of aliphatic-degrading and PAH-degrading microorganisms on nutrient amended plots were slightly higher, though not significantly higher, than populations on oiled control plots on most sample days. Total heterotroph numbers increased slightly following the oil application and were slightly higher on nutrient-amended plots. The numbers of hydrocarbon degraders and total heterotrophs returned to near pre-application levels by the end of the monitoring period. The bin/augmentation products examined during the second application did not significantly increase the numbers of hydrocarbon-degrading microorganisms (aliphatic-degrading or PAH- degrading) on any sample day. The microbial dynamics from both phases of research illustrated a well-documented response to a petroleum hydrocarbon input. Overall, the bioremediation treatments examined in both phases of research did not appear to have a significant impact on the numbers of hydrocarbon degraders or total heterotrophs.

Townsend, Richard Todd

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

34

Mapping Floating and Emergent Aquatic Vegetation in Coastal Wetlands of Eastern Georgian Bay,  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

), marine systems (Wang et al. 2004), upland coastal habitats (Grenier et al. 2007; Rokitnicki- Wojcik 2009 using Ikonos imagery. Canadian Journal of Remote Sensing 34(2):143­158 Fournier RA, Grenier M, Lavoie A Creek, Michigan. U.S. Geological Survey, Scientific Investigations Report 2006­5051, 8 p Grenier M

McMaster University

35

An Hedonic Analysis of Southwestern Louisiana Wetland Prices Using GIS.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Louisiana is the beneficiary of more than 30% of the U.S. coastal wetlands, but the states wetland loss accounts for about 90% of the total… (more)

Xu, Baifu

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

36

Effects of oil spills on coastal wetlands and their recovery: Year 4, final report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Oil spills can have a significant short-term impact on coastal marshes, but the long term effects and perhaps eventual recovery are not well documented. The overall goal of the investigation is to document the long-term recovery rate of a Louisiana brackish marsh impacted by an oil spill on 23 April 1985, to separate the effect of the oil spill on marsh deterioration from ambient rates of marsh degradation, and to test means by which recovery can be accelerated and the damage mitigated. These goals have been accomplished through both remote sensing and ground truth assessments, ground based vegetation stress measurements, and manipulative field experiments. A total of 68 permanent plots that were established in the oiled and control marshes at the study site in 1985 were re-surveyed for plant and soil recovery in the fall of 1989 and assessed for species composition, live and dead percentage cover, and residual oil impact. Significant vegetative recovery of the oil-impacted marsh four years after the spill was evident as indicated by significant increases in vegetative cover.

Mendelssohn, I.A.; Hester, M.W.; Hill, J.M.

1993-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

37

coastal loss | NOLA DEFENDER  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

BP Oil Doubled Wetland Loss, Study Says Posted Tuesday, ... coastal loss; Deepwater Horizon; louisiana coast; Oil; proceedings of the national academy ...

38

Communicating Conservation: Public Relations Practitioners Communication Efforts to Inform the Public of the Detriments of Coastal Erosion and Wetlands Loss.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Coastal erosion is a serious problem that directly affects Louisiana and indirectly affects the entire United States. Between 1990 and 2000, Louisiana lost 24 square… (more)

Shaddock, Stephanie Ellene

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

39

Pipeline corridors through wetlands  

SciTech Connect

This paper presents preliminary findings from six vegetational surveys of gas pipeline rights-of-way (ROW) through wetlands and quantifies the impacts of a 20-year-old pipeline ROW through a boreal forest wetland. Six sites of various ages were surveyed in ecosystems ranging from coastal marsh to forested wetland. At all sites except one, both the number and the percentage of wetland species on the Row approximated or exceeded those in the adjacent natural area. The boreal forest study showed that (1) adjacent natural wetland areas were not altered in type; (2) water sheet flow restriction had been reversed by nature; (3) no nonnative plant species invaded the natural area; (4) three-quarters of the ROW area was a wetland, and (5) the ROW increased diversity.

Zimmerman, R.E.; Wilkey, P.L. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States); Isaacson, H.R. [Gas Research Institute (United States)

1992-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

40

Pipeline corridors through wetlands  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper presents preliminary findings from six vegetational surveys of gas pipeline rights-of-way (ROW) through wetlands and quantifies the impacts of a 20-year-old pipeline ROW through a boreal forest wetland. Six sites of various ages were surveyed in ecosystems ranging from coastal marsh to forested wetland. At all sites except one, both the number and the percentage of wetland species on the Row approximated or exceeded those in the adjacent natural area. The boreal forest study showed that (1) adjacent natural wetland areas were not altered in type; (2) water sheet flow restriction had been reversed by nature; (3) no nonnative plant species invaded the natural area; (4) three-quarters of the ROW area was a wetland, and (5) the ROW increased diversity.

Zimmerman, R.E.; Wilkey, P.L. (Argonne National Lab., IL (United States)); Isaacson, H.R. (Gas Research Institute (United States))

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "wetlands coastal sand" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Louisiana Coastal Land Loss Video Release  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Today, the U.S. Geological Survey National Wetlands Research Center is pleased to announce the release of a new Louisiana coastal land loss video, ...

42

America's Wetland  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Wetlands Loss in Louisiana By Michael Gillis 11-23-11 c-3? Why are the wetlands disappearing from the coast of Louisiana at a startling rate? There ...

43

The Deepwater Horizon disaster and wetlands Statement from the Environmental Concerns Committee Society of Wetland Scientists  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Coastal wetlands are essential components of healthy and productive coastal fisheries, and nowhere within the lower 48 states has the critical linkage between wetlands and fisheries resources been more clearly demonstrated than in the Gulf Mexico (e.g., Chesney et al. 2000, Crain et al. 1979). Louisiana alone, for example, generates 30 % of the nation’s seafood production (Day et. al., 2005) and accounts for 40 % of the total wetlands in the conterminous United States (Richardson and Pahl 2006). The ongoing loss of wetland resources in the Gulf of Mexico and the potential economic and environmental costs, especially in Louisiana and Florida, is an issue of international concern. The impacts of the current oil spill are unknown but the potential for direct and indirect environmental damage to coastal ecosystem services are extraordinary. Both the oil and the activities used in the cleanup have the potential to adversely affect wetland flora and fauna. Thus far, most of the oil has remained offshore but reports of oil reaching the coast have been geographically extensive ranging from Florida to Louisiana. The potential geographic extent of the spill could result in the exposure of many types of coastal wetlands to oil, ranging from mangroves in Florida, Texas, Mexico and islands in the Caribbean basin to tidal freshwater wetlands along the Gulf Coast. Most wetlands that will potentially be exposed to oil are saline and brackish tidal wetlands, which are nursery

Dennis F. Whigham; Stephen W. Broome; Curtis J. Richardson; Robert L. Simpson; Loren M. Smith

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

44

A New Framework for Planning the Future of Coastal Louisiana after  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the Louisiana coast #12;SETTING THE STAGE The coastal zone of Louisiana is comprised of two wetland greatly modified coastal hydrology, thereby accelerating wetland loss. Locally, forced drainage elsewhere, most wetland losses in Louisiana have resulted from soil water logging, as vertical accretion

45

Paleo-Storminess in the Southern Lake Michigan Basin, as Recorded by Eolian Sand Downwind of Dunes.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Eolian sand deposited in lakes downwind of coastal sand dunes record a history of paleoclimatic fluctuations. Studies from embayed lakes along the east-central coast of… (more)

Hanes, Barbara E.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

46

California Wetland and Riparian Protection Policy Technical Advisory Team  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

California Wetland and Riparian Protection Policy Technical Advisory Team Name Title Organization Department Southern California Coastal Water Research Project Aaron Allen Chief, North Coast Branch University Todd Keeler Wolf Senior Vegetation Ecologist Biogeographic Data Branch , California Department

47

EXAMINING PREFERENCES FOR PREVENTION OF LOUISIANAS WETLAND LOSS.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

?? This study analyzed preferences for wetland-loss prevention in coastal Louisiana. Data were obtained through a contingent-valuation mail survey of a random sample of Louisiana… (more)

Moore, Ross Gordon

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

48

Salinity and hydrodynamics of the Holocene and upper Pleistocene beneath the Louisiana wetlands from electrical measurements  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A conceptual hydrodynamic model in the Holocene and upper Pleistocene beneath the Louisiana wetlands is described in terms of safety distributions. Porewater safety is calculated from electrical measurements, including resistivity soundings, electric logs, and electromagnetic profiling. Electrical measurements support the primary, basin-wide groundwater flow model; however, the data also indicate secondary contributions from expulsion of fluids under geopressure along active growth faults and from original waters of deposition. Expulsion of water from growth faults has been described previously for deeper sections of the Pleistocene, but has not been reported for the Holocene or upper Pleistocene beneath the Louisiana wetlands. Porewater chemistry variations beneath the coastal wetlands are a consequence of the following (in order of importance): (1) environment of deposition; (2) a basin-wide, regional flow system; (3) expulsion from deep-seated growth faults; and (4) pore water extrusion due to compaction. Water chemistry in Holocene clays and muds is influenced primarily by the deposition environment In Pleistocene sands, the chemistry is a function of the other three factors.

McGinnis, L.D.; Thompson, M.D.; Kuecher, G.J.; Wilkey, P.L. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States); Isaacson, H.R. [Gas Research Inst., Chicago, IL (United States)

1995-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

49

Louisiana Coastal Area, Louisiana Ecosystem Restoration  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1 Louisiana Coastal Area, Louisiana Ecosystem Restoration Six Projects Authorized by Section 7006(e for the Louisiana Coastal Area, dated January 31, 2005, (hereinafter referred to as the "restoration plan"), described a program to address the most critical restoration needs to reduce the severe wetland losses

US Army Corps of Engineers

50

Level and Degradation of Deepwater Horizon Spilled Oil in Coastal Marsh Sediments and Pore-Water  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

eight months after the spill. By contrast, pore-water separated from heavily oiled Louisiana wetland-waters extracted from heavily oiled Louisiana wetlands. Environmental Science & Technology Article dx.doi.org/10 wetlands decades after the Amoco-Cadiz oil spill. The fate and biotransformation of oils in coastal

Wang, Yang

51

Silica Sand  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

the molds and cores in foundries that make steel castings, and for casting gray iron, brass, aluminum and magnesium metals. Since silica sand has a very high melting point, it is...

52

The Ecology of Two Estuarine-Dependent Tonguefishes, the Blackcheek Tonguefish (Symphurus Plagiusa) and the Offshore Tonguefish (S. Civitatium), in Coastal Louisiana.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The pattern and process of wetland loss in coastal Louisiana has the potential to influence the distribution and abundance of fishes and macroinvertebrates that utilize… (more)

Switzer, Theodore Scott

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

53

The effects of petroleum coke amendments on macrophytes and aquatic invertebrates in northern Alberta, Canada constructed wetlands.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Oil-sands operators of Fort McMurray, Alberta produce six million t/y of petroleum coke. The use of coke to stabilize clay-dominated mine tailings in constructed wetlands… (more)

Baker, Leanne F.

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

54

Effects of Terraces on Submerged Aquatic Vegetation in Shallow Marsh Ponds in Coastal Southwest Louisiana.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The wetlands of coastal Louisiana are disappearing at a rate of 65 to 80 km2yr-1. Most of the loss is the conversion of emergent marsh… (more)

Cannaday, Christopher Dean

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

55

Scarboro Creek Wetland  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Plant Management: Scarboro Creek Wetland * Purple loosestrife was treated with foliar spray of Accord (glyphosphate) by ESD in 2007. Photos by Harry Quarles Invasive Non-native...

56

Tidal Wetlands Regulations (Connecticut)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Most activities occurring in or near tidal wetlands are regulated, and this section contains information on such activities and required permit applications for proposed activities. Applications...

57

Coastal Area Management Program (Alabama) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Coastal Area Management Program (Alabama) Coastal Area Management Program (Alabama) Coastal Area Management Program (Alabama) < Back Eligibility Commercial Construction Industrial Savings Category Water Buying & Making Electricity Program Info State Alabama Program Type Siting and Permitting Provider Department of Environmental Management This program regulates coastal activities, permits required, discharges to coastal waters and siting, construction and operation of energy facilities. ADEM's Coastal Program rules include the review and permitting for the following types of activities when they are to occur within the Coastal Area: beach and dune construction projects, developments and subdivision of properties greater than five (5) acres in size, dredging and filling of state water bottoms and wetlands, the drilling and operation of groundwater

58

Louisiana Wetland Loss at Askives  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Louisiana Wetland Loss? - Find Questions and Answers at Askives, the first startup that gives you an straight answer

59

Psuty, N.P., Steinberg, P.E., and Wright, D.J., in press, Coastal and marine geography in Gaile, G.L. and Willmott, C.J. (Eds.), Geography in America at the Dawn of the 21st Century, New York: Oxford University Press, Spring 2002.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. Reed (1990; 1995a) focused on wetland characteristics and composition in coastal Louisiana, leading of sedimentation and wetland development as part of the mix of sea-level rise and changing sediment availability to models of wetland changes and adaptations on decadal time scales in association with varying sediment

Wright, Dawn Jeannine

60

Coastal Engineering Journal, Vol. 45, No. 4 (2003) 533563 c World Scientific Publishing Company and Japan Society of Civil Engineers  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, North Carolina, after construction of the south jetty. #12;544 W. C. Seabergh & N. C. Kraus sand tight and how spurs can be designed to alter sediment bypassing. Keywords: Coastal inlets; sand bypassing; weir; Richardson, 1991). Hereafter, such sediment will be assumed to consist primarily of sand (and perhaps gravel

US Army Corps of Engineers

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "wetlands coastal sand" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

A logit model for predicting wetland location using ASTER and GIS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Data from the Advanced Spaceborne Thermal Emission and Reflection Radiometer (ASTER) were used to develop a logistic regression model to predict the location of wetlands in the Coastal Plain of Virginia. We used the first five bands from two ASTER scenes ...

E. Pantaleoni; R. H. Wynne; J. M. Galbraith; J. B. Campbell

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

62

The role of seasonal wetlands in the ecology of the American alligator  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The American alligator (Alligator mississippiensis) has been frequently studied in large reservoirs and coastal marshes. Large ontogenetic shifts in their diet and morphology have been linked with changes in habitat use, with adult males using deep, open water and juveniles and nesting females relying on vegetated marsh. In certain regions of the inland portion of the alligator’s range, these different aquatic habitats are represented by seasonal wetlands and riverine systems that are separated by a terrestrial matrix. Ontogenetic habitat shifts, therefore, would require overland movements between systems, which has important implications for conservation of the species. I tested several commonly used methods of surveying alligator populations to determine the most effective method of studying alligators in seasonal wetlands. I then used systematic trapping, nest surveys and radio telemetry to determine habitat use and overland movement rates by different sex and size classes. I found that seasonal wetlands provided nesting and nursery sites for these inland alligator populations, but that both juveniles undergoing an ontogenetic shift and nesting females move between the wetlands and riverine systems. Overland movements by alligators between the wetland and riverine habitats establish a level of functional connectivity between these aquatic ecosystems. I constructed a habitat suitability index of both the wetlands and the surrounding landscape to determine which patch and landscape characteristics were important to wetland use by alligators. I found that both descriptive wetland characteristics and the spatial relationships between wetlands were important predictors of alligator use. Overland movement was related to upland landuse as well as distance between aquatic habitats. Conserving a variety of wetland sizes and types within an intact upland matrix is critical to maintaining connectivity across the landscape. Furthermore, understanding how species may act as mobile links between ecosystems, particularly those with ontogenetic niche shifts, illustrates the importance of approaching conservation from a landscape perspective.

Subalusky, Amanda Lee

2007-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

63

Shoreline erosion and wetland loss in Mississippi  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Set within a geologic framework that includes Pleistocene and Holocene barrier complexes, estuarine bays, and fluvio-deltaic tidal wetlands, coastal Mississippi shares environmental problems of shoreline erosion and wetland loss with her neighboring Gulf Coast states. The mainland coast consists of several Pleistocene headlands and barrier complexes interspersed with the St. Louis Bay and Back Bay of Biloxi estuaries. Tidal wetlands are found in the protected bays and tributary streams, as well as in the Pleistocene/Holocene deltaic environments associated with the Escatawpa, Pascagoula, Pearl, and Mississippi fluvial systems. Four barrier islands, formed by erosion and modification of a late Pleistocene/Holocene beach ridge, lie 6 to 12 mi offshore. Historically, these islands with a combined length of 30 mi have both migrated westward in response to prevailing longshore currents and also transgressed across the shallow platform of Mississippi Sound. Wave erosion, both normal and storm-induced, has historically caused shoreline retreat on both the barrier islands and on the mainland. Erosion rates in excess of 30 ft/yr have been measured at the updrift ends of the barrier islands while accretion has characterized the downdrift ends. Net shoreline retreat rates of 6 ft/yr have been measured on the Gulf side of the islands, although the Sound side rates are nearly as high. Since the earliest accurate maps were made in 1848, Mississippi's barrier islands have experienced a 20% reduction in area, amounting to about 2,000 acres (800 ha). Mainland shoreline retreat rates are similarly high, except for along the more stable and now artificially nourished beaches of Harrison County. Erosion rates exceeding 10 ft/yr since 1940 have been noted at the Point aux Chenes headland and the Grand Batture Islands. These islands, which formerly sheltered valuable oyster grounds and protected fragile marshes, have been reduced to shoals over the last several decades.

Meyer-Arendt, K.J. (Mississippi State Univ., Mississippi State (USA)); Gazzier, C.A.

1990-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

64

Team Sand Point (SP)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The purpose of this flight report is to summarize the field activities of the ShoreZone aerial video imaging (AVI) survey conducted out of Sand Point and Cold Bay in

Team Cold Bay (cb

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

65

Tar Sands | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Tar Sands Tar Sands Jump to: navigation, search More info on OpenEI Oil and Gas Gateway Federal Environmental Statues Federal Oil and Gas Statutes Oil and Gas Companies United States Oil and Gas Boards International Oil and Gas Boards Related Reports Keystone Pipeline System Canada's Oil Sands Royal Society of Canada: Environmental and Health Impacts of Canada's Oil Sands Industry Dictionary.png Tar Sands: A resource, found in particular abundance in Canada, where viscous petroleum is mixed in with a layer of sand, clay, and water. The form of petroleum is often referred to as "bitumen". The resource has only recently been considered part of the world's oil reserves Other definitions:Wikipedia Reegle Tarsands1.png About Tar Sands The Tar Sands, also referred to as Oil Sands, or Bitumen Sands, are a

66

LOUISIANA COASTAL FACTS  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

LOUISIANA COASTAL FACTS Historical Land Loss in Coastal Louisiana - Louisiana has lost 1,829 square miles of land since the 1930's (Barras et al. ...

67

Sand consolidation methods  

SciTech Connect

This patent describes a method for consolidating unconsolidated mineral particles including sand in a subterranean petroleum formation penetrated by a well in fluid communication with at least a portion of the formation. It comprises: providing a sand consolidating fluid comprising a polymerizable monomer, diluent for the monomer, and a nonvolatile strong acid catalyst capable of causing polymerization of the monomer at fluid injection temperatures; mixing the sand consolidating fluid with steam to form a multiphase treating fluid; injecting the treating fluid into the formation to occupy the void space of at least a portion of the formation adjacent to the well; and allowing the injected fluids to remain in the formations for a period of time sufficient to accomplish at least partial polymerization of the monomer, forming a permeable consolidated mass around the wellbore. Also described is a method for forming a fluid impermeable zone in a permeable, subterranean oil-containing formation adjacent to a wellbore penetrating the formation.

Friedman, R.H.; Surles, B.W.; Fader, P.D.

1990-02-27T23:59:59.000Z

68

Stormwater Diversion as a Potential Coastal Wetland Restoration Method.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The Barataria-Terrebonne estuary has been eroding at a rate of up to 103.6 km2 yr-1 for several decades. If the current rate of loss is… (more)

Woods, Jennifer Howard

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

69

EO 11990: Protection Of Wetlands  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

90-Protection Of Wetlands 90-Protection Of Wetlands SOURCE: The provisions of Executive Order 11990 of May 24, 1977, appear at 42 FR 26961, 3 CFR, 1977 Comp., p. 121, unless otherwise noted. By virtue of the authority vested in me by the Constitution and statutes of the United States of America, and as President of the United States of America, in furtherance of the National Environmental Policy Act of 1969, as amended (42 U.S.C. 4321 et s eq.), in order to avoid to the extent possible the long and short term adverse impacts associated with the destruction or modification of wetlands and to avoid direct or indirect support of new construction in wetlands wherever there is a practicable alternative, it is hereby ordered as follows: SECTION 1. (a) Each agency shall provide leadership and shall take action to minimize the

70

Wading Into Wetlands .  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Fall 2011 Volume 8 Issue 4 Fall 2011 Volume 8 Issue 4 Wading Into Wetlands . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2 Of the Fungi and the Forests . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 Barking Beetle Sugar Fix . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 Schmutz Leading Plant Program . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 In the News . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6-7 The oceans capture significant amounts of carbon, but the processes involved in their contribution to managing the global carbon budget are still not fully understood. One of the questions that remains only partially answered is how marine microbes process carbon without the aid of the sun. Many marine organ- isms rely on sunlight to produce the food they need to survive, but the light does not penetrate all the way to the bottom of the ocean. In the September 2, 2011 issue of Science, DOE JGI scientists and longtime collaborators employed single cell sequencing techniques to identify a pathway by which microbes in the "twilight

71

PROCESSING OF MONAZITE SAND  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process for the recovery of thorium, uranium, and rare earths from monazite sands is presented. The sands are first digested and dissolved in concentrated NaOH, and the solution is then diluted causing precipitation of uranium, thorium and rare earth hydroxides. The precipitate is collected and dissolved in HCl, and the pH of this solution is adjusted to about 6, precipitating the hydroxides of thorium and uranium but leaving the rare earths in solution. The rare earths are then separated from the solution by precipitation at a still higher pH. The thorium and uranium containing precipitate is redissolved in HNO/sub 3/ and the two elements are separated by extraction into tributyl phosphate and back extraction with a weakly acidic solution to remove the thorium.

Calkins, G.D.; Bohlmann, E.G.

1957-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

72

Sand consolidation method  

SciTech Connect

This patent describes a method of treating a subterranean, unconsolidated sand and petroleum-containing formation whose temperature is less than 200{degrees}F penetrated by at least one well, which is in fluid communication with at least a portion of the unconsolidated sand-containing subterranean formation, in order to form a permeable barrier in the treatment zone around the well which restrains the movement of sand particles into the well while permitting the passage of formation fluids including petroleum therethrough. It comprises introducing a non aqueous gas into the treatment zone of the formation to reduce the water content of the portion of the formation where the permeable barrier is to be formed to less than 5 percent by volume based on the volume of pore space to be treated; introducing an effective volume of treating fluid into the treatment zone, comprising a compound which is capable of being acid catalyzed to undergo condensation polymerization at formation temperatures, an anhydride of a strong acid, and a diluent for the polymerizable compound and the anhydride; and allowing the treating fluid to remain in the treatment zone for a period of time sufficient to ensure substantially complete polymerization.

Friedman, R.H.; Surles, B.W.

1991-08-20T23:59:59.000Z

73

Wetlands of the Oak Ridge Reservation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Wetlands of the Oak Ridge Reservation A "wetland" is a general term for vegetated habitat that contains water for some period of time each year. Marshes, bogs, swamps, flooded...

74

Coastal Management Act (Georgia)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The Coastal Management Act provides enabling authority for the State to prepare and administer a coastal management program. The Act does not establish new regulations or laws; it is designed to...

75

Coastal Management (Louisiana)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The Coastal Use Permit (CUP) process is part of the Louisiana Coastal Resources Program (LCRP), which is an effort among Louisiana citizens, as well as state, federal and local advisory and...

76

Louisiana Wetland Loss Fact at Askives  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Louisiana Wetland Loss Fact? - Find Questions and Answers at Askives, the first startup that gives you an straight answer

77

Unusual sedimentation of a Galveston Bay wetland at Pine Gully, Seabrook, Texas: implications for beach renourishment  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Excess sedimentation began affecting the wetland dynamics of Pine Gully in Seabrook, Texas during the first quarter of 2004. This sedimentation was sudden and became a serious problem for the dynamics of the Pine Gully wetland because the fine, well sorted, quartz rich sediments began plugging the main channel of the previously tidally dominated wetland. Progressive sedimentation has produced overbank deposits in the marine grasses, contributing to the death of wetland grasses by sediment chocking. The main purpose of this study is to determine the new source and mechanism of sedimentation in Pine Gully, document changes from sedimentation, and determine a solution to prevent future sedimentation. Sedimentation in Pine Gully and coastal areas adjacent to Pine Gully has occurred in a region that has experienced subsidence and sea level rise. The sedimentation in Pine Gully is a direct result of new and sustained sediment at the mouth of Pine Gully. These new sediments are transported into Pine Gully by displacement waves from ships moving through the Houston Ship Channel. Beach renourishment at Wright Beach, located a half mile north of Pine Gully, occurred as Pine Gully experienced sedimentation. Construction of a breakwater at the mouth of Pine Gully and subsequent removal of sediment in Pine Gully itself is ultimately the solution to revitalizing the wetland to its pre-sedimentation state. Replanting of native vegetation killed off by sedimentation is recommended and would hasten the recovery of the wetland. Documenting the effects of this unique sedimentation in Pine Gully has implications for the future. Beach renourishment or coastal projects that may contribute excess sediment to the coastline should be concerned with unintended effects they may cause. Although an historically eroding shoreline exists, the effects of excess sedimentation can be severe. A coastal study should be done before sediment is added to the shoreline to identify any areas within the sphere of influence of the project. Ecosystems determined to be within the sphere of influence by a coastal study should implement preventative measures at those locations to avoid an ecological disaster similar to that in Pine Gully.

Culver, Wesley Richard

2007-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

78

Experimental Study on Wave Transformation and Nearshore Circulation on a Variable Bathymetry in Wetlands  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Hurricanes are one of the primary threats to the Texas coastal environment and economy. They generate large wave and storm surges that have caused much damage on the Texas coast in the past. Understanding both the hydrodynamic processes that damage coastal habitats and hurricane hazard and risk are critical to preserve coastal vegetation and quantify its benefits to coastal storm protection. The goal of this project is to quantify the impact of wave attenuation and wave refraction as well as the development of coherent structures in marsh fringes and the formation of a rip current system over wetlands on storm protection. The 3D Shallow Water Wave Basin at Texas A&M University hosted a series of large-scale experiments considering an idealized wetland model to pursue this goal. Study of the marsh geometry of the Texas coast was done in order to scale the experiments to the size of the Haynes Laboratory 3D-Water Wave Basin using a Froude and a Reynolds scalings. Particularly, averaged size and idealized shape of marsh segments in the area of Dalehite Cove in Galveston Bay were considered. Three sets of different wave conditions and water levels were tested to approximate different intensities of storm surge. Identical tests with both vegetated and non-vegetated marshes were run to compare the influence of the vegetation in storm conditions, and three different spacings between marsh segments were tested. In the basin, normally incident regular waves were generated at three water circulation structures. Data analysis allows the determination of the impact of discontinuous marsh segments on wave attenuation and wave refraction. Coherent structures such as rip current and the circulation pattern were analyzed to study the change in the flow field during passage of the waves. The experimental measurements were able to describe the wave transformations over the marsh segments. The influence of coastal wetlands was identified to affect the hydrodynamic process and reduce the total wave energy which is dissipated and redistributed by vegetation. The presence of the mounds induced an important decrease in the wave height, in addition to the damping of the waves by the vegetation stems. The variation in spatial coverage of the wetland model has been shown to highly affect the flow dynamics by generating offshore directed flow in the channel and onshore directed flow on the marsh mounds. This experimental approach provides a further understanding of flow dynamics by waves and surge in wetlands, at a large scale.

Truong, Melanie Khanh Phuong

2011-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

79

Sand Hills EA  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

- - Office Name and State goes here Environmental Assessment Sand Hills Wind Energy Facility Albany County, Wyoming May 2011 High Desert District Rawlins Field Office The BLM's multiple-use mission is to sustain the health and productivity of the public lands for the use and enjoyment of present and future generations. The Bureau accomplishes this by managing such activities as outdoor recreation, livestock grazing, mineral development, and energy production, and by conserving natural, historical, cultural, and other resources on public lands. BLM/WY/PL-11/035+1430 WY-030-EA09-314 Contents Chapter Page Acronyms and Abbreviations .................................................................................................. ix

80

Restored Drill Cuttings for Wetlands Creation: Year One Results of a Mesocosm Approach to Emulate Field Conditions Under Varying Hydrologic Regimes  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The purpose of this study was to demonstrate that restored drill cuttings, a byproduct of the petroleum industry, can be safely used in coastal as well as inland wetland restoration projects. Prior to conducting laboratory experiments, composite soil samples of the recycled sediments were analyzed for pH and heavy metal concentrations.

Shaffer, Gary P.; Hester Mark W.; Greene, Michael C.; Childers Gary W.

2001-02-21T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "wetlands coastal sand" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Wetland Importance Matthew J. Gray  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Stabilization ·Sediment and Nutrient Retention & Export ·Wetland-dependent Wildlife Habitat ·Aquatic Billion in Damage in U.S. 2004 Hurricanes ·Charley (22) ·Frances (15) ·Ivan (60) ·Jeanne (6) Environmental Environmental Values Sediment & Nutrient Retention & Export Climate Control Water Quality Chemical & Nutrient

Gray, Matthew

82

Wetland Importance Matthew J. Gray  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Stabilization ·Sediment and Nutrient Retention & Export ·Wetland-dependent Wildlife Habitat ·Aquatic in Damage in U.S. 2004 Hurricanes ·Charley (22) ·Frances (15) ·Ivan (60) ·Jeanne (6) Environmental Values Sediment & Nutrient Retention & Export Climate Control Water Quality Chemical & Nutrient Update by Plants

Gray, Matthew

83

Live Theater Wetland Kayak Trip  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Live Theater Wetland Kayak Trip Adapted from http://water.usgs.gov/outreach/poster2/grade footprints(squish squish) in the mud with every pass. The shore was lined with tall cattails, but we found doused in sun screen, with me in the front and Mrs. Findley doing all the work steering in the back

Texas at Austin, University of

84

Nevada Test Site Wetlands Assessment  

SciTech Connect

This report identifies 16 Nevada Test Site (NTS) natural water sources that may be classified by the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (USACE) as jurisdictional wetlands and identifies eight water sources that may be classified as waters of the United States. These water sources are rare, localized habitats on the NTS that are important to regional wildlife and to isolated populations of water tolerant plants and aquatic organisms. No field investigations on the NTS have been conducted in the past to identify those natural water sources which would be protected as rare habitats and which may fall under regulatory authority of the Clean Water Act (CWA) of 1997. This report identifies and summarizes previous studies of NTS natural water sources, and identifies the current DOE management practices related to the protection of NTS wetlands. This report also presents management goals specific for NTS wetlands that incorporate the intent of existing wetlands legislation, the principles of ecosystem management, and the interests of regional land managers and other stakeholders.

D. J. Hansen

1997-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

85

Guide to Preparing SAND Reports  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Guide to Preparing SAND Reports contains guidelines for producing SAND Reports and other information releases. Its guidelines reflect DOE regulations and Sandia policy. The Guide includes in Section 1, policies for protecting and reproducing official information at Sandia, SAND number information, and Review & Approval procedures; in Section 2, basic writing instructions, which are illustrated in an annotated sample report; in Section 3, an explanation of the format, layout, and graphics of SAND Reports and a table that details the markings and legends needed for report covers and title pages; in Section 4, the procedures for reproducing and distributing SAND Reports; and in Section 5, information on presentations and conference papers, journal articles, book chapters, and brochures. The appendixes contain sections on Sandia's preferred style, usage, and grammar; equations; report references; and trademarks and copyrights. 4 May 1998 Intentionally Left Blank May 1998 5 Conten...

Tamara Locke Editor; Tamara K. Locke

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

86

EIS-0120: Wetland Assessment | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

EIS-0120: Wetland Assessment EIS-0120: Wetland Assessment EIS-0120: Wetland Assessment F- and H-Area Groundwater Remediation Project at the Savannah River Site, Savannah River Operations Office, Aiken, South Carolina The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) has prepared this wetland assessment in compliance with DOE requirements (10 CFR Part 1022) for the floodplain and wetland environmental review of the proposed F- and H-Area Groundwater Remediation Project at the Savannah River Site (SRS), located near Aiken, South Carolina (Figure 1-1). DOE is proposing to install underground barrier wall/base injection systems to replace the pump/treat/reinjection systems previously used to remediate the contaminated groundwater associated with the closed F- and H-Area Seepage Basins at SRS. EIS-0120; Final Environmental Impact Statement, Wetland Assessment for the

87

EIS-0120: Wetland Assessment | Department of Energy  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

120: Wetland Assessment 120: Wetland Assessment EIS-0120: Wetland Assessment F- and H-Area Groundwater Remediation Project at the Savannah River Site, Savannah River Operations Office, Aiken, South Carolina The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) has prepared this wetland assessment in compliance with DOE requirements (10 CFR Part 1022) for the floodplain and wetland environmental review of the proposed F- and H-Area Groundwater Remediation Project at the Savannah River Site (SRS), located near Aiken, South Carolina (Figure 1-1). DOE is proposing to install underground barrier wall/base injection systems to replace the pump/treat/reinjection systems previously used to remediate the contaminated groundwater associated with the closed F- and H-Area Seepage Basins at SRS. EIS-0120; Final Environmental Impact Statement, Wetland Assessment for the

88

Vermont Wetland Rules (Vermont) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Wetland Rules (Vermont) Wetland Rules (Vermont) Vermont Wetland Rules (Vermont) < Back Eligibility Utility Fed. Government Commercial Agricultural Investor-Owned Utility State/Provincial Govt Industrial Construction Municipal/Public Utility Local Government Residential Installer/Contractor Rural Electric Cooperative Tribal Government Low-Income Residential Schools Retail Supplier Institutional Multi-Family Residential Systems Integrator Fuel Distributor Nonprofit General Public/Consumer Transportation Savings Category Alternative Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Buying & Making Electricity Water Home Weatherization Solar Wind Program Info State Vermont Program Type Environmental Regulations Provider Department of Environmental Conservation A permit is required for any activity within a Class I or Class II wetland

89

Inland Wetlands and Water Courses Regulations (Connecticut)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Regulated activities in or near inland wetlands and water courses include the removal or depositing of material, land or water obstruction or alteration, construction, pollution, or water diversion...

90

Wetland Conservation Act (Minnesota) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

& Permitting This chapter of the Minnesota Administrative Rules implements the Wetland Conservation Act of 1991, setting standards for water preservation, withdrawal, and...

91

Wetland loss dynamics in southwestern Barataria basin ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

ABSTRACT We determined spatial associations of wetland loss rates in a 950-km2 study area in the southwestern Barataria basin of Louisiana's ...

92

Wetland biomass - suitable for biogas production?.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

?? Wetlands have long been used as natural waste water treatment systems to remove excess nutrients from agriculture or other waste waters. Common reed (Phragmites… (more)

Akula, Viswa Raj

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

93

METHOD OF PROCESSING MONAZITE SAND  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method is given for the pretreatment of monazite sand with sodium hydroxide. When momazite sand is reacted with sodium hydroxide, the thorium, uranium, and rare earths are converted to water-insoluble hydrous oxides; but in the case of uranium, the precipitate compound may at least partly consist of a slightly soluble uranate. According to the patent, monazite sand is treated with an excess of aqueous sodium hydroxide solution, and the insoluble compounds of thorium, uranium, and the rare earths are separated from the aqueous solution. This solution is then concentrated causing sodium phosphate to crystallize out. The crystals are removed from the remaining solution, and the solution is recycled for reaction with a mew supply of momazite sand.

Calkins, G.D.

1957-10-29T23:59:59.000Z

94

Vertical Flow Wetland Pilot Study  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This is an interim report to present the preliminary results of a study conducted by Duke Energy to test the potential effectiveness of vertical flow wetlands (VFWs) for the removal of selenium, mercury, and other related compounds from a flue gas desulfurization (FGD) discharge. These compounds commonly are found in and regulated for coal-fired utility water discharges. There is a widespread need for a cost-effective alternative to physiochemical treatment to maintain compliance for these parameters, on...

2008-12-08T23:59:59.000Z

95

Greenhouse effect, sea level rise, and coastal zone management  

SciTech Connect

Increasing concentrations of carbon dioxide and other gases are expected to warm the earth several degrees in the next century by a mechanism known as the greenhouse effect. Such a warming could cause sea level to rise two to five feet by expanding ocean water, melting mountain glaciers, and perhaps eventually causing polar glaciers to melt and slide into the oceans. A rise in sea level of even three feet could cause substantial erosion of beaches and coastal wetlands, increased flooding, and intrusion of salt water into rivers, bays, and aquifer. Fortunately, many of the adverse consequences can be avoided by taking timely measures in anticipation of sea level rise. Nevertheless, many coastal zone managers are reluctant to take these measures until the prospect of sea level rise becomes more certain. This article examines the implications of future sea level rise and identifies anticipatory measures that may be appropriate today in spite of current uncertainties. 46 references, 4 figures, 1 table.

Titus, J.G.

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

96

Kinetics and Mechanisms of Potassium Release from Sandy Middle Atlantic Coastal Plain Soils1  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Kinetics and Mechanisms of Potassium Release from Sandy Middle Atlantic Coastal Plain Soils1 M. C.) grown on these soils did not respond to K applications. The soils contained high levels of total K, and was contained in the sand fractionsof the soils. Kineticsof K release from the whole soils and from the coarse

Sparks, Donald L.

97

Coastal Louisiana and South Florida  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

1 Separate news excerpts portray different results for two major wetland restoration initiatives proposed by Florida and Louisiana in 2000. This

98

An evolutionary approach to wetlands design  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Wetlands are artificial basins that exploit the capabilities of some species of plants to purify water from pollutants. The design process is currently long and laborious: such vegetated areas are inserted within the basin by trial and error, since there ... Keywords: ecological modelling, evolutionary algorithms, wetlands design

Marco Gaudesi; Andrea Marion; Tommaso Musner; Giovanni Squillero; Alberto Tonda

2013-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

99

Wetland Preservation Areas (Minnesota) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Wetland Preservation Areas (Minnesota) Wetland Preservation Areas (Minnesota) Wetland Preservation Areas (Minnesota) < Back Eligibility Utility Fed. Government Commercial Agricultural Investor-Owned Utility State/Provincial Govt Industrial Construction Municipal/Public Utility Local Government Residential Installer/Contractor Rural Electric Cooperative Tribal Government Low-Income Residential Schools Retail Supplier Institutional Multi-Family Residential Systems Integrator Fuel Distributor Nonprofit General Public/Consumer Transportation Savings Category Alternative Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Buying & Making Electricity Water Home Weatherization Solar Wind Program Info State Minnesota Program Type Siting and Permitting A wetland owner can apply to the host county for designation of a wetland preservation area. Once designated, the area remains designated until the

100

Restoration of resaca wetlands and associated wet prairie habitats at Palo Alto Battlefield National Historic Site  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Cultivation and drainage projects associated with livestock production have substantially disturbed resaca wetlands and wet prairie habitats in southern Texas. As a consequence of the anthropogenic disturbances, the area of these wetlands has been reduced and the ecological integrity of the remaining wetlands has been compromised. The goal of this study was to explore effective strategies for ecological restoration of coastal prairie and resaca ecosystems in south Texas and provide restoration recommendations to the National Park Service at Palo Alto Battlefield National Historic Site (NHS). Field experiments were conducted to evaluate the effectiveness of different approaches for restoring Spartina spartinae on disturbed saline flats. A resaca hydrologic study was initiated to evaluate the groundwater hydrology in disturbed versus undisturbed resaca wetlands and explore potential restoration strategies. Transplanting S. spartinae in the fall season was more successful (80% survivability) than seeding (0% initial establishment), spring transplanting (0% survival), spring and fall mechanical transplanting (0% and 6% survivability, respectively). Soil disturbance significantly affected (p < 0.05) survival of transplanted tillers and basal diameter of both the bare root and container-grown transplants in the fall manual treatments. The initial hydrologic study of the resaca wetlands found that vegetation rooting zone hydrology was likely dependent on surface water rather than groundwater. These findings suggest that strategies that restore surface hydrologic regimes will likely restore the ecosystem structure and function of disturbed resacas. Manually transplanting bare-root stock of S. spartinae in the late fall season without soil disturbance will increase the likelihood of successful saline flat restoration.

Margo, Michael Ray

2003-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "wetlands coastal sand" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Definition: Tar Sands | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Definition Definition Edit with form History Facebook icon Twitter icon » Definition: Tar Sands Jump to: navigation, search Dictionary.png Tar Sands A resource, found in particular abundance in Canada, where viscous petroleum is mixed in with a layer of sand, clay, and water. The form of petroleum is often referred to as "bitumen". The resource has only recently been considered part of the world's oil reserves View on Wikipedia Wikipedia Definition Oil sands, tar sands or, more technically, bituminous sands, are a type of unconventional petroleum deposit. The oil sands are loose sand or partially consolidated sandstone containing naturally occurring mixtures of sand, clay, and water, saturated with a dense and extremely viscous form of petroleum technically referred to as bitumen (or colloquially tar due to

102

Advancing the use of minirhizotrons in wetlands  

SciTech Connect

Background: Wetlands store a substantial amount of carbon (C) in deep soil organic matter deposits, and play an important role in global fluxes of carbon dioxide and methane. Fine roots (i.e., ephemeral roots that are active in water and nutrient uptake) are recognized as important components of biogeochemical cycles in nutrient-limited wetland ecosystems. However, quantification of fine-root dynamics in wetlands has generally been limited to destructive approaches, possibly because of methodological difficulties associated with the unique environmental, soil, and plant community characteristics of these systems. Non-destructive minirhizotron technology has rarely been used in wetland ecosystems. Scope: Our goal was to develop a consensus on, and a methodological framework for, the appropriate installation and use of minirhizotron technology in wetland ecosystems. Here, we discuss a number of potential solutions for the challenges associated with the deployment of minirhizotron technology in wetlands, including minirhizotron installation and anchorage, capture and analysis of minirhizotron images, and upscaling of minirhizotron data for analysis of biogeochemical pools and parameterization of land surface models. Conclusions: The appropriate use of minirhizotron technology to examine relatively understudied fine-root dynamics in wetlands will advance our knowledge of ecosystem C and nutrient cycling in these globally important ecosystems.

Iversen, Colleen M [ORNL; Murphy, Meaghan T. [McGill University, Montreal, Quebec; Allen, Michael F. [University of California, Riverside; Childs, Joanne [ORNL; Eissenstat, David M. [Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA; Lilleskov, Erik A. [USDA Forest Service; Sarjala, Tytti M. [Finnish Forest Research Institute, Parkano, Finland; Sloan, Victoria L. [University of Sheffield; Sullivan, Patrick F. [University of Alaska

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

103

Sand consolidation method employing latex  

SciTech Connect

A method is described of treating a subterranean, unconsolidated sand and petroleum containing formation penetrated by at least one well, which is in fluid communication with at least a portion of the unconsolidated sand containing subterranean formation. This forms a flexible, permeable barrier around the well which restrains the movement of sand particles into the well while permitting the passage of formation fluids including petroleum there through. The method comprises: a. forming a predetermined quantity of a treating fluid comprising a water external phase emulsion having as its dispersed or discontinuous phase, a predetermined amount of an oil-insoluble rubber. The emulsion also contains a predetermined quantity of a material which hydrolyzes at reservoir temperature to form an acid; b. injecting the treating fluid into the formation to be consolidated; and c. leaving the fluid undisturbed in the formation for a predetermined period of time sufficient to allow the emulsion to break so the oil insoluble rubber coats the sand grains, forming a competent permeable barrier around the wellbore.

Friedman, R.H.

1987-03-17T23:59:59.000Z

104

Characteristics and Applications of Copper Stamp Sand  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The chemical, physical properties and antimicrobial activity of stamp sand were investigated, ... Characterization of Fluorescent Lamp Glass Waste Powders for ...

105

Feasibility of using geothermal effluents for waterfowl wetlands  

SciTech Connect

This project was conducted to evaluate the feasibility of using geothermal effluents for developing and maintaining waterfowl wetlands. Information in the document pertains to a seven State area the West where geothermal resources have development potential. Information is included on physiochemical characteristics of geothermal effluents; known effects of constituents in the water on a wetland ecosystem and water quality criteria for maintaining a viable wetland; potential of sites for wetland development and disposal of effluent water from geothermal facilities; methods of disposal of effluents, including advantages of each method and associated costs; legal and institutional constraints which could affect geothermal wetland development; potential problems associated with depletion of geothermal resources and subsidence of wetland areas; potential interference (adverse and beneficial) of wetlands with ground water; special considerations for wetlands requirements including size, flows, and potential water usage; and final conclusions and recommendations for suitable sites for developing demonstration wetlands.

None

1981-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

106

Remediating while preserving wetland habitat at an LLR waste site in Canada  

SciTech Connect

The Low-Level Radioactive Waste Management Office was established in 1982 to carry out the federal government's responsibilities for low-level radioactive (LLR) waste management in Canada. The Office operates programs to characterize, delineate, decontaminate and consolidate historic LLR waste for interim and long-term storage. In this capacity, the Office is currently considering the remediation of 9,000 cubic metres of contaminated sediment in a coastal marsh in the context of a major remediation project involving multiple urban sites. The marsh is situated between the Lake Ontario shoreline and the urban fringe of the Town of Port Hope. The marsh is designated a Cattail Mineral Shallow Marsh under the Ecological Land Classification system for Southern Ontario and was recently named the A.K. Sculthorpe Marsh in memory of a local community member. The marsh remediation will therefore require trade off between the disruption of a sensitive wetland and the removal of contaminated sediment. This paper discusses the issues and trade-off relating to the waste characterization, environmental assessment and regulatory findings and thus the remediation objectives for the marsh. Considerations include the spatial distribution of contaminated sediment, the bioavailability of contaminants, the current condition of the wetland and the predicted effects of remediation. Also considered is the significance of the wetland from provincial and municipal regulatory perspectives and the resulting directives for marsh remediation. (authors)

Kleb, H.R.; Zelmer, R.L. [Atomic Energy of Canada Limited, Low-Level Radioactive Waste Management Office, Ontario (Canada)

2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

107

Coal Ash Contaminants in Wetlands | SREL Research  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Tracey Tuberville, and Bill Hopkins The ash plume wetland (APW). The APW received coal combustion wastes from a breach in a receiving basin in the 1970s. Several trace metals...

108

Louisiana Wetland Loss : Image of the Day  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Large images November 18, 1999 (2.65 MB) April 9, 1976 (1.93 MB) Wetlands are one of the most productive ecosystems on Earth. In addition to providing ...

109

METHOD OF PROCESSING MONAZITE SAND  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process is described for recovering thorium, uranium, and rare earth values from monazite sand. The monazite sand is first digested with sulfuric acid and the resulting "monazite sulfate" solution is adjusted to a pH of between 0.4 and 3.0, and oxalate anions are added causing precipitation of the thorium and the rare earths as the oxalates. The oxalate precipitate is separated from the uranium containing supernatant solution, and is dried and calcined to the oxides. The thorium and rare earth oxides are then dissolved in nitric acid and the solution is contacted with tribntyl phosphate whereby an organic extract phase containing the cerium and thorium values is obtained, together with an aqueous raffinate containing the other rare earth values. The organic phase is then separated from the aqueous raffinate and the cerium and thorium are back extracted with an aqueous medium.

Welt, M.A.; Smutz, M.

1958-08-26T23:59:59.000Z

110

Geothermal wetlands: an annotated bibliography of pertinent literature  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This annotated bibliography covers the following topics: algae, wetland ecosystems; institutional aspects; macrophytes - general, production rates, and mineral absorption; trace metal absorption; wetland soils; water quality; and other aspects of marsh ecosystems. (MHR)

Stanley, N.E.; Thurow, T.L.; Russell, B.F.; Sullivan, J.F.

1980-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

111

Development and use of the Wetland Fish Index to assess the quality of coastal wetlands in the  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of concern (AOC) because of excessive algal growth (see Fig. 1). A RAP was implemented in 1989 to reduce nu

McMaster University

112

Gas Research Institute wetland research program  

SciTech Connect

As part of three ongoing research projects, the Gas Research Institute (GRI) is studying the natural gas industry`s impacts on wetlands and how to manage operations so that impacts can be minimized or eliminated. The objective of the first project is to gain a better understanding of the causes and processes of wetland loss in the Louisiana deltaic plain and what role gas pipeline canals play in wetland loss. On the basis of information gathered from the first projects, management and mitigation implications for pipeline construction and maintenance will be evaluated. The objective of the second project is to assess the floral and faunal communities on existing rights-of-way (ROWs) that pass through numerous types of wetlands across the United States. The emphasis of the project is on pipelines that were installed within the past five years. The objective of the third project is to evaluate the administrative, jurisdictional, technical, and economic issues of wetland mitigation banking. This paper discusses these projects, their backgrounds, some of the results to date, and the deliverables.

Wilkey, P.L.; Zimmerman, R.E. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States); Isaacson, H.R. [Gas Research Inst., Chicago, IL (United States)

1992-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

113

Gas Research Institute wetland research program  

SciTech Connect

As part of three ongoing research projects, the Gas Research Institute (GRI) is studying the natural gas industry's impacts on wetlands and how to manage operations so that impacts can be minimized or eliminated. The objective of the first project is to gain a better understanding of the causes and processes of wetland loss in the Louisiana deltaic plain and what role gas pipeline canals play in wetland loss. On the basis of information gathered from the first projects, management and mitigation implications for pipeline construction and maintenance will be evaluated. The objective of the second project is to assess the floral and faunal communities on existing rights-of-way (ROWs) that pass through numerous types of wetlands across the United States. The emphasis of the project is on pipelines that were installed within the past five years. The objective of the third project is to evaluate the administrative, jurisdictional, technical, and economic issues of wetland mitigation banking. This paper discusses these projects, their backgrounds, some of the results to date, and the deliverables.

Wilkey, P.L.; Zimmerman, R.E. (Argonne National Lab., IL (United States)); Isaacson, H.R. (Gas Research Inst., Chicago, IL (United States))

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

114

Recent government efforts regarding tar sands  

SciTech Connect

Conclusions from a workshop on tar sands are discussed. The workshop participants came to 3 conclusions: any oil-impregnated rock that is mined or quarried and then processed on the surface should be considered tar sands; some physical parameter should be used to differentiate tar sands from heavy oils, e.g., viscosity; and the dividing line between tar sands and heavy oil should be a point above which there is not currently significant commercial production. The resulting definition states that tar sand is any consolidated or unconsolidated rock other than coal, oil shale, or gilsonite, that contains a hydrocarbonaceous material with a gas-free viscosity, measured at reservoir temperature, greater than 10,000 cp, or contains a hydrocarbonaceous material that is extracted from the mined or quarried rock. Some consideration of resuming tar sands leasing also is discussed.

Pumphrey, D.

1980-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

115

Relationship between canal and levee density and coastal land loss in Louisiana  

SciTech Connect

Nearly 1% of Louisiana's coastal land becomes water each year. This land loss affects everything from wildlife, fisheries, and recreation to the economy and culture. A part of this loss results from natural, unmanageable factors, but manageable factors are also responsible. This report discusses one of the manageable factors: canals and their dredged-material levees. In coastal Louisiana wetlands, canals are constructed primarily to facilitate navigation and oil and gas recovery. The density of canals in this region is now about equal to the natural network of bayous and creeks. The primary effect of these canals and associated levees is to alter the process of flooding and drainage. The influence of canals and their levees on coastal Louisiana erosion rates are modified by local geologic, hydrologic, and biologic interactions. The empirical relationship between canals and erosion is, however, clear; land loss is directly related to canal density. Comparisons with mosquito ditches, which are smaller analogues of canals, reveal similar patterns of wetland changes and suggest management options.

Turner, R.E.

1987-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

116

Wetlands and Riparian Rights (Maryland) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Wetlands and Riparian Rights (Maryland) Wetlands and Riparian Rights (Maryland) Wetlands and Riparian Rights (Maryland) < Back Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Construction Developer Industrial Investor-Owned Utility Local Government Municipal/Public Utility Rural Electric Cooperative Utility Savings Category Alternative Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Buying & Making Electricity Water Home Weatherization Solar Wind Program Info State Maryland Program Type Environmental Regulations Provider Maryland Department of the Environment The Department of the Environment regulates dredging, dumping, filling, and similar activities in wetland areas to protect the environmental and public values of the wetlands and to sustain their ability to control floods. Regulations will be enacted with the consent of the Maryland Agricultural

117

technology offer SandTES -High Temperature Sand Thermal Energy Storage  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

technology offer SandTES - High Temperature Sand Thermal Energy Storage key words: High Temperature together with Dr. Eisl of ENRAG GmbH. Background Thermal energy storage (TES) systems are essential Energy Storage | Fluidized Bed | Sand | The invention consists of a fluidized bed with internal heat

Szmolyan, Peter

118

Wetlands Ecology and ISSN 0923-4861  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

carried by Landsat (Baker et al. 2006; Grenier et al. 2007; Poulin et al. 2002) and SPOT (Grenier et al used to map wetlands such as tropical mangrove swamps (Wang et al. 2004) and boreal peatlands (Grenier et al. 2007; Grenier et al. 2008). Within a Canadian context evaluating this approach is essential

McMaster University

119

Phytoremediation of Trace Elements by Wetland Plants  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Some plants naturally absorb and hyperaccumulate trace elements in their tissues. In a process known as phytoremediation, scientists are harnessing this ability to remove toxic heavy metals and trace elements from contaminated soils and waters. This screening program quantified the capacity of various wetland plant species for removing trace elements from polluted water.

2001-08-23T23:59:59.000Z

120

Coastal Impacts, Adaptation, and Vulnerabilities  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

· Robert R. Twilley, Louisiana State University · Jordan West, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency Chapter and Restoration Authority of Louisiana · Richard Raynie, Coastal Protection and Restoration Authority of Louisiana.3.7 Emergency Response, Recovery, and Vulnerability Reduction 4.3.8 Coastal and Nearshore Oil and Ga0 4.4 Human

Kossin, James P.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "wetlands coastal sand" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Materials Science and Engineering in the Canadian Oil Sands  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

While people have heard about these "tar sands" in the news, relatively few know what oil sands are, and how they are extracted/processed. This presentation ...

122

The cost of wetland creation and restoration. Final report  

SciTech Connect

This report examines the economics of wetland creation, restoration, and enhancement projects, especially as they are used within the context of mitigation for unavoidable wetland losses. Complete engineering-cost-accounting profiles of over 90 wetland projects were developed in collaboration with leading wetland restoration and creation practitioners around the country to develop a primary source database. Data on the costs of over 1,000 wetland projects were gathered from published sources and other available databases to develop a secondary source database. Cases in both databases were carefully analyzed and a set of baseline cost per acre estimates were developed for wetland creation, restoration, and enhancement. Observations of costs varied widely, ranging from $5 per acre to $1.5 million per acre. Differences in cost were related to the target wetland type, and to site-specific and project-specific factors that affected the preconstruction, construction, and post-construction tasks necessary to carry out each particular project. Project-specific and site-specific factors had a much larger effect on project costs than wetland type for non-agricultural projects. Costs of wetland creation and restoration were also shown to differ by region, but not by as much as expected, and in response to the regulatory context. The costs of wetland creation, restoration, and enhancement were also analyzed in a broader economic context through examination of the market for wetland mitigation services, and through the development of a framework for estimating compensation ratios-the number of acres of created, restored, or enhanced wetland required to compensate for an acre of lost natural wetland. The combination of per acre creation, restoration, and enhancement costs and the compensation ratio determine the overall mitigation costs associated with alternative mitigation strategies.

King, D.; Bohlen, C.

1995-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

123

Facies and architecture of deep-water Sandstone lobes: Comparison of a shale-rich and a sand-rich system  

SciTech Connect

Two different foreland-basin deep-water sandstone systems have been studied for reservoir characterization purposes: the Broto lobes of the Eocene Hecho group, spain, and two sand bodies of the Oligocene-Miocene Arakintos Sandstone, Greece. The shale-rich Broto lobes are characterized by distinct vertical developments in terms of facies and expression of heterogeneity. Bed-thickness trends, lateral extent of sand beds, and facies variability are related to overall sand/shale ratio. A feature common to most of the sandstone packages is the occurrence of a basal slump and/or pebbly mudstone. The dominant sediment source is considered fluvial. Variation in sand quality within and between lobes is high. Deposition is considered to be strongly controlled by tectonics. The sand-rich Arakintos Sandstone consists of massive and pebbly sandstones, forming thick, sandy sheets alternating with relatively coarse-grained, thin-bedded turbidites. Facies, geometries, vertical organization, and the relation between grain size and bed thickness indicate a constrained development of the lobes, partly influenced by preexisting topography. A coastal sediment source is inferred. Little variation exists in sand quality within and between the lobes. The overall regularity in terms of facies, and the absence of slumps, suggest that fluctuations in relative sea level may have formed a major control on deposition. The two lobe systems illustrate the effect of tectonics, sediment type, topographic confinement, and possible sea level on facies and sand body architecture of deep-water sandstone lobes.

Schuppers, J.D. (Delft Univ. of Technology (Netherlands))

1993-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

124

Generation of sand bars under surface waves  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

(cont.) Experiments were performed in a large wave flume to validate the theory and to study additional aspects of sand bar evolution. The wave envelope and bar profile were recorded for low and high beach reflection, ...

Hancock, Matthew James, 1975-

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

125

Regulatory and Wetlands Policy (Minnesota) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Regulatory and Wetlands Policy (Minnesota) Regulatory and Wetlands Policy (Minnesota) Regulatory and Wetlands Policy (Minnesota) < Back Eligibility Utility Fed. Government Commercial Agricultural Investor-Owned Utility State/Provincial Govt Industrial Construction Municipal/Public Utility Local Government Residential Installer/Contractor Rural Electric Cooperative Tribal Government Low-Income Residential Schools Retail Supplier Institutional Multi-Family Residential Systems Integrator Fuel Distributor Nonprofit General Public/Consumer Transportation Savings Category Alternative Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Buying & Making Electricity Water Home Weatherization Solar Wind Program Info State Minnesota Program Type Environmental Regulations These statutes establish wetlands as a natural resource of public value in

126

Selenium Removal by Constructed Wetlands: Role of Biological Volatilization  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

P.J. Chevron's Richmond Refinery Water Enhancement Wetland;effluents from oil refineries are polluting San Franciscoselenite-contaminated oil refinery wastewater: 89% of the Se

Terry, Norman; Hansen, Drew; Duda, Peter J; Zayed, Adel

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

127

Compliance With Floodplain and Wetland Environmental Review Requiremen...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

requirements to add flexibility and remove unnecessary procedural burdens by simplifying DOE public notification procedures for proposed floodplain and wetland actions, exempting...

128

Modeling a Mississippi River Diversion into a Louisisana Wetland.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Wetland loss has significant impacts. Numerous loss mechanisms have been hypothesized, and a greater number of solutions have been proposed. One proposed solution is to… (more)

Capps, Stephan Alexander

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

129

Abatement of wetland loss in Louisiana through diversions of ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Get this from a library! Abatement of wetland loss in Louisiana through diversions of Mississippi River water using siphons. [David W Roberts; ...

130

Primary causes of wetland loss at Madison Bay, Terrebonne ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Get this from a library! Primary causes of wetland loss at Madison Bay, Terrebonne Parish, Louisiana. [Robert A Morton; Ginger Tiling; Nicholas F ...

131

Oil spill threatens already weakened wetlands Page 1 of 2 ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

SHELL BEACH, La. — Battered by hurricanes, weakened by erosion and flood-control projects, the sprawling wetlands that nurture Gulf of Mexico marine ...

132

Innovative techniques cut costs in wetlands drilling  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper reports on an approach to drilling oil and gas wells in sensitive wetlands areas contributed to a savings of over $1.2 million on a three-well, $3 million drilling project in south Louisiana. ARCO Oil and Gas Co. drilled a three-well project in the Bayou Sale field with a truck-mounted workover rig and a modified solids-control system. This smaller equipment eliminated the need to build a large location in the marsh. Traditional drilling techniques require a large drillsite to accommodate all the equipment of a modern drilling complex. However, recently imposed environmental regulations substantially limit, and in some cases prohibit, the use of these conventional techniques for drilling wells in wetlands areas. Based on the potentially huge economic and operational impact on the drilling industry because of these stricter regulations, alternatives to these traditional practices are essential.

Navarro, A.R. (ARCO Oil and Gas Co., Lafayette, LA (US))

1991-10-14T23:59:59.000Z

133

Climate Change and San Francisco Bay-Delta Tidal Wetlands  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Energy, National Institute for Climate Change Research, Coastal Center. DECEMBER 2011 REFERENCES Charles H, Dukes

Parker, V. Thomas; Callaway, John C.; Schile, Lisa M.; Vasey, Michael C.; Herbert, Ellen R.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

134

New method for sand control and well stimulation in unconsolidated dirty sands  

SciTech Connect

A new technique, the Solder Glass sand consolidation well completion method, has been developed which allows unlimited drawdown and improves productivity in wells completed in unconsolidated formations containing shales and clays. This technique eliminates the problems of sand production and fines migration by artificially consolidating a volume of reservoir sand near the wellbore. The consolidation is resistant to high temperature, chemical attack, and degradation resulting from high velocity fluid flow. Additionally, porosity and permeability in the consolidated volume of reservoir sand are improved as a result of irreversible dehydration of clays. 12 refs.

Aslesen, K.S.; Short, C.J.; Terwilliger, P.L.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

135

Secure Fuels from Domestic Resources- Oil Shale and Tar Sands  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Profiles of Companies Engaged in Domestic Oil Shale and Tar Sands Resource and Technology Development

136

Sand-control alternatives for horizontal wells  

SciTech Connect

This paper reports that it has been well documented that horizontal completions increase production rates, as much as two to five times those of conventional techniques, because more of the producing formation is exposed to the wellbore. Although productivity improvements are highly sensitive to reservoir parameters, it is becoming generally accepted that optimum horizontal lengths will be 2,000 to 4,000 ft. The length of these completions generally causes the velocity of the fluid at the sandface to be an order of magnitude less than that observed in conventional completions. Because drag forces contributed to sand production, horizontal wells can produce at higher sand-free flow rates than conventional completions in the same reservoir. While it is frequently argued that horizontal wells do not need sand control, the potential for sand production increases significantly as reserves deplete and rock stresses increase. This is becoming more evident today in several major North Sea oil fields with conventional completions. Also, many unconsolidated formations produce sand for the first time with the onset of water production, a typical problem in such areas as the Gulf of Mexico. Operators must decide whether to implement sand control in the original horizontal-completion program because of an immediate concern or because the potential exists for a problem to arise as the well matures.

Zaleski, T.E. Jr. (Baker Sand Control (US))

1991-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

137

Capacity-building: an inquiry into the local coastal program component of coastal zone management in Louisiana  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Social research specifically aimed at evaluating the efficacy of coastal zone management programs at the parish (county) level in building local capacities has been meager in academic literatures and absent from Louisiana Department of Natural Resources evaluative reports. This study addresses this deficiency by examining the effectiveness of Louisiana's Local Coastal Program (LCP) in building local coastal zone management capacity. Using levels of LCP development as a proxy for capacity-building, the study examines the influence of: 1) aggregate level social and demographic characteristics, 2) structural differences, and 3) different types of issue framing (i.e. "regulator" framing versus "regulated" framing). A multiple case design, using survey, interview, observation, and archival methods of data collection, produces two multi-layered data sets - one at the parish level (nineteen Coastal Zone parishes) and the other at the individual level (a target population of parish officials, CZM administrators and advisory panel members). Patterns in findings from quantitative and qualitative analysis are matched to rival theories, namely, resource mobilization theory and social construction theory. The analyses show that parishes with LCPs have a much stronger presence of "regulator" framing than do parishes without LCPs. The "regulator" frame is particularly strong among LCP/CZM advisory panel members, while agreement with regulator frames is lowest among parish council or police jury members. Coastal hazards vulnerability is highly salient to parishes both with and without LCPs, but the translation of hazard impacts to economic vulnerabilities, such as infrastructure damage, property loss and business interruption, is far weaker for non-LCP parishes. Themes prevalent in the data include contentions over wetland mitigation issues, disjunctions between the restorative and regulatory arm of LADNR, and disparate perceptions between non-LCP parishes and LCP parishes concerning the benefits of a parish LCP over developmental and maintenance costs. Overall findings indicate that while resource mobilization is necessary to programmatic participation and the building of capacity, social construction theory can explain the differences between respondent agreement with the regulator frame, and thus the presence of institutional capacity.

Norris-Raynbird, Carla

2003-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

138

Potential environmental hazards associated with geopressured-geothermal resource development in coastal Louisiana  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Gulf Coast high temperature (> 275 F) geopressured brines are more or less saturated with dissolved natural gas. These can be exploited at high flow rated (> 20,000 barrels per day) using wells completed with modified conventional technology for extracting gas from brine. Surface subsidence, fault reactivation, induced subsurface faulting and fracturing, brine spills, wetland loss, and the contamination of fresh water aquifers are the major potential hazards involved in this resource development which were all taken into consideration for implementing the environmental monitoring program being currently carried out at the well test sites. High volume production from a geopressured reservoir causes depressurization, compaction, and dewatering which could translate into surface subsidence rates that are greater than base line rates unless pressure is maintained by water ingress at the boundaries of producing reservoirs. Subsidence is of critical concern in coastal Louisiana where much of the land surface is at or below sea level. Increased subsidence will result in urban flooding, wetland loss, and loss of ecosystem habitats. Induced stresses could result in new faulting and fracturing enabling fluid flow between previously unconnected reservoirs and possibly contaminating fresh water aquifers. Fault displacements and minor earth movements can be detected with microseismic monitoring which is being done. Brine spills at well sites which could not be contained within levees will seriously impact the surrounding marshes and some minor wetland loss may occur in establishing production sites. Continued no major environmental impact attributable to resource testing.

John, C.J.; Groat, C.G.; Lindstedt, D.; Jensen, B. (Louisiana Geological Survey, Baton Rouge, LA (United States))

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

139

Foundry Sand Reclamation: CMP Report No. 90-6  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Current environmental regulations have created a situation where the disposal of waste foundry sand has become difficult and expensive. One solution to this problem is the use of a sand reclamation system which "cleans" the sand to a sufficient degree to allow re-use of the sand in the foundry sand system. A large number of sand binder systems are in use for various reasons of cost and performance characteristics. There are also three main methods of sand reclamation and combinations of these. A basic un...

1991-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

140

Coastal Winds in South Florida  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Thirteen-month records for the period of April 1994–April 1995 from eight (out of nine) Coastal-Marine Automatic Network (C-MAN) stations in south Florida are analyzed statistically to study alongshore variability of observed atmospheric ...

Ge Peng; Christopher N. K. Mooers; Hans C. Graber

1999-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "wetlands coastal sand" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Soil Organic Matter of Natural and Restored Coastal Wetland Soils in Southern California  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

= Carpinteria Salt Marsh, CA; CIM=Coon Island Mid, CA; PRM=depth. AB AB SC BB SC % SOC CIM TE CSM PRM WTM CCM ML A TE= Carpinteria Salt Marsh, CA; CIM=Coon Island Mid, CA; PRM=

Elgin, Barbara K.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

142

FACTORS AFFECTING MACROPHYTE AND FISH DISTRIBUTION IN COASTAL WETLANDS OF GEORGIAN BAY  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Article history: 11 Received 10 November 2008 12 Received in revised form 2 December 2008 13 Accepted 2 no prior history of biosolids applica- 88 tion. The Esquatzel silt loam is classified as a coarse, silty plugged with glass wool, and the final soil arrangement 111 mimicked a typical tilled agricultural

McMaster University

143

Microbial dynamics during intrinsic remediation of oil contaminated coastal wetland sediments (a microcosm study)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Arabian medium crude oil was applied to historically exposed estuarine sediments contained in a controlled laboratory environment and intrinsically remediated for 56 days. In situ microbial and petroleum dynamics were monitored via Most Probable Number (MPN) statistical analysis, Gas Chromatography-Mass Spectroscopy (GC-MS) and denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis of polymerase chain reaction-amplified 16S rRNA gene fragments (PCR-DGGE). The microbial community was monitored to determine (i) the extent of intrinsic remediation and (ii) if hydrocarbon contamination caused structural changes to chronically exposed microbial communities. MPN statistical analysis revealed that the addition of oil caused 3-fold increases in both aliphatic and aromatic-degrading bacteria. Petroleum chemistry demonstrated a concomitant decrease of aliphatic and aromatic hydrocarbon fractions. Therefore, an inverse relationship between hydrocarbon-degrading bacterial populations and hydrocarbon concentrations was observed throughout the experiment, illustrating that oil was being intrinsically remediated. Kinetic analysis showed that the aliphatic and aromatic hydrocarbons had a half-life of 18 and 56 days, respectively. While MPN and GC-MS analysis showed that microbial populations were increasing and hydrocarbon concentrations were decreasing, PCR-DGGE analysis revealed that the addition of oil to a complex microbial community had no detectable effect upon the microbial structure. Community changes that occurred in sediments with oil were consistent with those observed in unoiled sediments. Band pattern analysis revealed that microbial community dynamics were independent of oil contamination. Therefore, when historically contaminated sediments are re-exposed to hydrocarbon pollution, the overall structure of the microbial community as detected by PCR-DGGE is negligibly affected, however dominance of specific subpopulations (i.e. aliphatic and aromatic hydrocarbon-degraders) can change significantly.

Thornburg, Nathaniel David

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

144

Global Sea Level Stabilization-Sand Dune Fixation: A Solar-powered Sahara Seawater Textile Pipeline  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Could anthropogenic saturation with pumped seawater of the porous ground of active sand dune fields in major deserts (e.g., the westernmost Sahara) cause a beneficial reduction of global sea level? Seawater extraction from the ocean, and its deposition on deserted sand dune fields in Mauritania and elsewhere via a Solar-powered Seawater Textile Pipeline (SSTP) can thwart the postulated future global sea level. Thus, Macro-engineering offers an additional cure for anticipated coastal change, driven by global sea level rise, that could supplement, or substitute for (1) stabilizing the shoreline with costly defensive public works (armoring macroprojects) and (2) permanent retreat from the existing shoreline (real and capital property abandonment). We propose Macro-engineering use tactical technologies that sculpt and vegetate barren near-coast sand dune fields with seawater, seawater that would otherwise, as commonly postulated, enlarge Earth seascape area! Our Macro-engineering speculation blends eremology with hydrogeology and some hydromancy. We estimate its cost at 1 billion dollars - about 0.01 per sent of the USA 2007 Gross Domestic Product.

Viorel Badescu; Richard B. Cathcart; Alexander A. Bolonkin

2007-07-21T23:59:59.000Z

145

Japanese coastal fishery stocks.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In United Nations Convention on the Law of the Sea (UNCLOS), it was enshrined that "States shall take measures which are designed, on the best scientific evidence available to the States concerned, to maintain or restore populations of harvested species at levels which can produce the maximum sustainable yield (MSY)". However considering the current status of scientific knowledge for the fishery target species in Japan, it is practical that MSY can be defined as the optimal yield under the proper fishery stock management (Japanese Fishery Agency 2012). In Japan, the allowable biological catch (ABC) is estimated for important coastal fishery stocks. The threshold level of stock (Blimit: the minimum stock biomass to ensure an appropriate amount of recruitment) is defined and if the biomass is above Blimit, ABC is calculated based on various reference points which ensure sustainable yields. If the biomass is below Blimit, tighter ABC is set to recover the stock. If the stock biomass is extremely low (below Bban), fishing moratorium or similar measure will be recommended.

Minoru Kanaiwa; Minoru Kanaiwa

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

146

Frame moduli of unconsolidated sands and sandstones  

SciTech Connect

In this study, the authors investigate the elastic moduli of the empty grain framework (the frame moduli) in unconsolidated sands and consolidated sandstones. The work was done to improve the interpretation of seismic amplitude anomalies and amplitude variations with offset (AVO) associated with hydrocarbon reservoirs. They developed a laboratory apparatus to measure the frame Poisson's ratio and Young's modulus of unconsolidated sands at seismic frequencies (0.2 to 155 Hz) in samples approximately 11 cm long. They used ultrasonic pulse velocity measurements to measure the frame moduli of consolidated sandstones. They found that the correlation coefficient between the frame Poisson's ratio [sigma][sub A] and the mineral Poisson's ratio [sigma][sub M] is 0.84 in consolidated sandstones and only 0.28 in unconsolidated sands. The range of [sigma][sub A] values in unconsolidated sands is 0.115 to 0.237 (mean = 0.187, standard deviation = 0.030), and [sigma][sub A] cannot be estimated without core or log analyses. Frame moduli analyses of core samples can be used to calibrate the interpretation of seismic amplitude anomalies and AVO effects. For use in areas without core or log analyses, the authors developed an empirical relation that can be used to estimate [sigma][sub A] in unconsolidated sands and sandstones from [sigma][sub M] and the frame P-wave modulus.

Spencer, J.W. Jr.; Cates, M.E.; Thompson, D.D. (Chevron Petroleum Technology Co., La Habra, CA (United States))

1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

147

Development near Wetlands and Waterways (Maryland) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

You are here You are here Home » Development near Wetlands and Waterways (Maryland) Development near Wetlands and Waterways (Maryland) < Back Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Construction Developer Utility Savings Category Alternative Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Buying & Making Electricity Water Home Weatherization Solar Wind Program Info State Maryland Program Type Siting and Permitting Provider Maryland Department of the Environment The Wetlands and Waterways Program requires permits for commercial activity or development proposed on or near a wetland or waterway. For the purpose of the permitting process, major projects are defined as projects that will permanently impact 5,000 square feet or more of wetlands or waterways, including the 100-year floodplain and are located in an area identified as

148

Battling Coastal Erosion Holding back the sea with sand, mats, piling, and concrete  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

as we did not want any oil leakage at the beach, and from a cost perspective, the old method Service (USFWS) has teamed up with the Louisiana Department of Natural Resources (LDNR) to test four as much cargo as the Panama Canal. "A portion of the GIWW goes through Louisiana, and it cuts through our

149

Wetlands Protection Act (Massachusetts) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Protection Act (Massachusetts) Protection Act (Massachusetts) Wetlands Protection Act (Massachusetts) < Back Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Construction Fed. Government Fuel Distributor General Public/Consumer Industrial Installer/Contractor Institutional Investor-Owned Utility Local Government Low-Income Residential Multi-Family Residential Municipal/Public Utility Nonprofit Residential Retail Supplier Rural Electric Cooperative Schools State/Provincial Govt Systems Integrator Transportation Tribal Government Utility Savings Category Alternative Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Buying & Making Electricity Water Home Weatherization Solar Wind Program Info State Massachusetts Program Type Environmental Regulations Provider Department of Environmental Protection This Act establishes regulations regarding the removal, dredging, filling,

150

Sand control method employing special hydraulic fracturing technique  

SciTech Connect

A novel sand control method is disclosed wherein high viscosity, high sand concentration, fracturing fluids are pumped through sets of vertically oriented perforations in borehole casings located in unconsolidated or loosely consolidated pay zones. Various techniques are utilized to insure that sand fills disposed on either side of the borehole casing cover and substantially overlap each borehole casing perforation set. Procedures are then followed to bring the well into production without washing out the sand fills in these areas, whereby the resulting perforation-sand fill configurations effectively control sand production from the treated zone.

Medlin, W.L.; Mullins, L.D.; Zumwalt, G.L.

1983-04-05T23:59:59.000Z

151

Granular size segregation in underwater sand ripples  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We report an experimental study of a binary sand bed under an oscillating water flow. The formation and evolution of ripples is observed. The appearance of a granular segregation is shown to strongly depend on the sand bed preparation. The initial wavelength of the mixture is measured. In the final steady state, a segregation in volume is observed instead of a segregation at the surface as reported before. The correlation between this phenomenon and the fluid flow is emphasised. Finally, different ``exotic'' patterns and their geophysical implications are presented.

G. Rousseaux; H. Caps; J. -E. Wesfreid

2004-03-29T23:59:59.000Z

152

Pore-scale mechanisms of gas flow in tight sand reservoirs  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

pore space. Although the grains in tight sand samples do notfluid displacement. For tight sands, the simulations predictflow properties of tight sand imply that a small amount of

Silin, D.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

153

The Formation of New England Coastal Fronts  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Coastal fronts are a frequent late fall and early winter feature of eastern New England weather. Data from a mesoscale observing network is used to describe the process of coastal frontogenesis and to determine the causes of formation. Three ...

John W. Nielsen

1989-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

154

Sand Bluff Wind Farm | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Sand Bluff Wind Farm Sand Bluff Wind Farm Jump to: navigation, search Name Sand Bluff Wind Farm Facility Sand Bluff Wind Farm Sector Wind energy Facility Type Commercial Scale Wind Facility Status In Service Owner E.On Climate & Renewables Developer E.On Climate & Renewables Energy Purchaser Direct Energy Location Near Big Spring TX Coordinates 32.201622°, -101.404799° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":32.201622,"lon":-101.404799,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

155

Assessing the sedimentation deficit problem in Louisiana's coastal salt marshes  

SciTech Connect

The imbalance between relative sea-level rise and vertical marsh accretion is frequently cited as a major factor in the problem of wetland loss in coastal Louisiana. Relative sea-level rise rates are high, compared to the rest of the Gulf coast, owing to subsidence of Holocene Mississippi deltaic plain sediments, and although marsh accretion rates are also high, in comparison with other coastal areas of the US, they are usually insufficient to maintain the relative elevation of the marsh surface. This situation is commonly referred to as a sedimentation deficit. One of the problems with evaluating the magnitude of the sedimentation deficit problem in Louisiana, and its spatial variation, is that measurements of subsidence and marsh accretion or sedimentation are rarely made on similar time scales. Subsidence affecting the marsh surface is composed of a number of factors, including compaction of recently deposited sediments, regional downwarping, and diagenesis of underlying Pleistocene and earlier sediments. The total effect of these factors, in combination with eustatic sea-level rise, is frequently obtained from tide gauge measurements over the last 50 years or so. Subsidence is also measured by dating sedimentary horizons of known depth that characterize surface environments. Carbon-14 is a common tool for this type of study and subsidence is then averaged over periods of up to several thousand years. In comparison, marsh accretion or sediment deposition can be measured over periods from several hundred years, using Lead-210 dating, to several days, using marsh surface sediment traps. The many techniques available for measuring the sedimentary status of the marsh surface can provide a variety of information concerning the processes responsible for sediment deposition and vertical accretion.

Reed, D.J.

1990-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

156

The Time of Sands: Quartz-rich Sand Deposits as a Renewable Resource  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

rich Sand Deposits as a Renewable Resource Nelson R. Shaffercan even be considered a renewable resource. The reader willbuild our society, and its renewable nature. We are not the

Shaffer, Nelson R.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

157

Surface Water and Wetland Standards (North Carolina) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

and Wetland Standards (North Carolina) and Wetland Standards (North Carolina) Surface Water and Wetland Standards (North Carolina) < Back Eligibility Commercial Industrial Construction Transportation Savings Category Alternative Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Buying & Making Electricity Water Home Weatherization Solar Wind Program Info State North Carolina Program Type Siting and Permitting Provider Department of Environment and Natural Resources These rules state the standards for classification of water supply. Each stream in North Carolina has a classification based upon its designated uses. These rules provide the Environmental Management Commission a method of setting standards. The rules also establish the physical, chemical, and biological standards required to protect each stream class. Each stream in

158

Imaging of Acoustic Waves in Sand  

SciTech Connect

There is considerable interest in detecting objects such as landmines shallowly buried in loose earth or sand. Various techniques involving microwave, acoustic, thermal and magnetic sensors have been used to detect such objects. Acoustic and microwave sensors have shown promise, especially if used together. In most cases, the sensor package is scanned over an area to eventually build up an image or map of anomalies. We are proposing an alternate, acoustic method that directly provides an image of acoustic waves in sand or soil, and their interaction with buried objects. The INEEL Laser Ultrasonic Camera utilizes dynamic holography within photorefractive recording materials. This permits one to image and demodulate acoustic waves on surfaces in real time, without scanning. A video image is produced where intensity is directly and linearly proportional to surface motion. Both specular and diffusely reflecting surfaces can be accomodated and surface motion as small as 0.1 nm can be quantitatively detected. This system was used to directly image acoustic surface waves in sand as well as in solid objects. Waves as frequencies of 16 kHz were generated using modified acoustic speakers. These waves were directed through sand toward partially buried objects. The sand container was not on a vibration isolation table, but sat on the lab floor. Interaction of wavefronts with buried objects showed reflection, diffraction and interference effects that could provide clues to location and characteristics of buried objects. Although results are preliminary, success in this effort suggests that this method could be applied to detection of buried landmines or other near-surface items such as pipes and tanks.

Deason, Vance Albert; Telschow, Kenneth Louis; Watson, Scott Marshall

2003-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

159

Well completion process for formations with unconsolidated sands  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method for consolidating sand around a well, involving injecting hot water or steam through well casing perforations in to create a cement-like area around the perforation of sufficient rigidity to prevent sand from flowing into and obstructing the well. The cement area has several wormholes that provide fluid passageways between the well and the formation, while still inhibiting sand inflow.

Davies, David K. (Kingwood, TX); Mondragon, III, Julius J. (Redondo Beach, CA); Hara, Philip Scott (Monterey Park, CA)

2003-04-29T23:59:59.000Z

160

Oil shale and tar sands technology: recent developments  

SciTech Connect

The detailed, descriptive information in this book is based on US patents, issued since March 1975, that deal with the technology of oil shale and tar sands. The book contains an introductory overview of the subject. Topics included are oil shale retorting, in situ processing of oil shale, shale oil refining and purification processes, in situ processing of tar sands, tar sands separation processes.

Ranney, M.W.

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "wetlands coastal sand" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Microsoft Word - MRCSP Wetlands FactSheet 09.doc  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Wetlands Terrestrial 1 November 2009 Wetlands Terrestrial 1 November 2009 FACT SHEET FOR PARTNERSHIP FIELD VALIDATION TEST Midwest Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnership (MRCSP) NETL Cooperative Agreement DE-FC26-05NT42589 DOE/NETL Project Manager: Traci Rodosta, Traci.Rodosta@NETL.DOE.GOV Submitted by Battelle November 2009 Terrestrial Field Test: Wetlands-Blackwater Refuge Principal Investigator Brian Needelman University of Maryland bneed@umd.edu Field Test Name Wetlands: Carbon sequestration in restored tidal marshes at Blackwater National Wildlife Refuge. Test Location Cambridge, MD Amount and Source of CO 2 Tons: N/A Source: Atmospheric Field Test Partners (Primary Sponsors) Maryland Department of Natural Resources Power Plant Research Program

162

EA-0941: Lower Yakima Valley Wetlands and Riparian Restoration Project,  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

41: Lower Yakima Valley Wetlands and Riparian Restoration 41: Lower Yakima Valley Wetlands and Riparian Restoration Project, Washington EA-0941: Lower Yakima Valley Wetlands and Riparian Restoration Project, Washington SUMMARY This EA evaluates the environmental impacts of the proposal for the U.S. Department of Energy's Bonneville Power Administration to fund that portion of the Washington Wildlife Mitigation Agreement pertaining to the Lower Yakima Valley Wetlands and Riparian Restoration Project (Project) in a cooperative effort with the Yakama Indian Nation and the Bureau of Indian Affairs. The proposed action would allow the sponsors to ensure property and conduct wildlife management activities for the Project within the boundaries of the Yakama Indian Reservation. PUBLIC COMMENT OPPORTUNITIES None available at this time.

163

DOE-Supported Project Demonstrates Benefits of Constructed Wetlands to  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Project Demonstrates Benefits of Constructed Wetlands Project Demonstrates Benefits of Constructed Wetlands to Treat Non-Traditional Water Sources DOE-Supported Project Demonstrates Benefits of Constructed Wetlands to Treat Non-Traditional Water Sources March 10, 2009 - 1:00pm Addthis Washington, DC -- In a pilot-scale test supported by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Fossil Energy, Clemson University researchers have shown that manmade or "constructed" wetlands can be used to treat non-traditional water sources which could then be used in power plants or for other purposes. The successful test, which was managed by DOE's National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL), could help power plants economically meet criteria for water reuse or discharge established by the National Pollution Discharge Elimination System and the Clean Water Act.

164

Microsoft Word - S08266_FER_WetlandMititgationMonitorReport  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

required the need for large amounts of soil amendments, in the form of yard waste compost. Wetland PREW6 is not within the footprint of FPA. However, it is included with the...

165

Abatement of wetland loss in Louisiana through diversions of ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Abatement of wetland loss in Louisiana through diversions of Mississippi River water using siphons (SuDoc I 19.76:92-274) [U.S. Geological Survey] on ...

166

I Lower Yakima Valley Wetlands and Riparian  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

I I Lower Yakima Valley Wetlands and Riparian - Restoration Project \ , Final Environmental Assessment DOENo. 0941 c Bonneville Power kdmi.nistration, Yakama Indian Nation, Bureawof Indian Affairs % J e;r%mBlYTlON OF THIS DOCUMENT IS UNLIMITED DISCLAIMER This report was .prepared as a n account of work sponsored by an agency of t h e United States Government. Neither t h e United States Government nor any agency thereof, nor any of their employees, make any warranty, express or implied, or assumes a n y legal liability or responsibility for t h e accuracy, completeness, or usefulness of any information, apparatus, product, or process disclosed, or represents that its use would not infringe privately owned rights. Reference herein to any specific commercial

167

Coiled tubing flowline cuts wetlands disturbance  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Operators in environmentally sensitive wetland areas of South Louisiana have used jointed, or stickpipe flowlines to transmit oil and gas to and from wellsites and production facilities. Recently, a new method featuring coiled tubing was introduced, using it as a recyclable gas flowline. The coiled tubing method eliminates potential environmental damage that could occur when stickpipe is used and it allows the tubing to be easily recovered and reused when the well is taken out of service. This article describes economic advantages of using coiled tubing and how its use simplified environmental constraints encountered in swamps. It is an expanded version of the authors` presentation to World Oil`s Coiled Tubing Conference, Houston, March, 1993.

Coats, E.A. [Halliburton Services, New Orleans, LA (United States); Marinello, S.A. [Colorado School of Mines, Golden, CO (United States)

1993-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

168

I SAND95-2448C  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

SAND95-2448C SAND95-2448C eddfigt6qI7-*+ To be presented at the 32"d AIANASMEISAEIASEE Joint Propulsion Conference, Lake Buena Vista, FL, July 1-3, 1996 A SURVEY OF COMBUSTIBLE METALS, THERMITES, AND INTERMETALLICS FOR PYROTECHNIC APPLICATIONS* S. H. Fischer and M. C. Grubelich Sandia National Laboratories Albuquerque, NM 87185-1453 ABSTRACT Thermite mixtures, intermetallic reactants, and metal fuels have long been used in pyrotechnic applications. Advantage of these systems typically include high energy density, impact insensitivity, high combustion temperature, and a wide range of gas production. They generally exhibit high temperature stability, and possess insensitive ignition properties. In this paper, we review the applications, benefits, and characteristics

169

SAND76-0260 Unlimited Release  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

SAND76-0260 SAND76-0260 Unlimited Release Printed July 1976 . POWER SUPPLIES FOR SPACE SYSTEMS QUALITY ASSURANCE BY SANDIA LABORATORIES Robert L. Hannigan Robert R. Harnar Electronic and Electrical Devices Division 951 2 Sandia Laboratories Albuquerque, NM 87115 AB STRAC T This report summarizes the Sandia Laboratories participation in Quality Assurance programs for Radioisotopic Thermoelectric Generators which have been used i n space systems over the past 10 years. Basic elements of this QA program a r e briefly de- scribed and recognition of assistance from other Sandia organizations is included. Descriptions of the various systems f o r which Sandia has had the QA responsibility a r e presented, including SNAP 1 9 (Nimbus, Pioneer, Viking), SNAP 27 (Apollo),

170

Solvent extraction of Southern US tar sands  

SciTech Connect

The Department of Chemical Engineering at the University of Arkansas, in association with Diversified Petroleum Recovery, Inc. (DPR) of Little Rock, Arkansas, has been developing a solvent extraction process for the recovery of bitumen from tar sands for the past five years. The unique feature of the process is that the bitumen is recovered from the solvent by contacting with a co-solvent, which causes the bitumen to precipitate. The overall purpose of this project is to study both the technical and economic feasibility of applying this technology for recovery of bitumen from tar sands by (1) investigating the socioeconmic factors which affect (a) plant siting and (b) the market value of recovered bitumen; (2) operating a process demonstration unit at the rate of 1 lb/hr recovered bitumen while producing clean sand and recyclable solvents; and (3) determine the economic conditions which will make a bitumen recovery project economical. DPR has analyzed the historical trends of domestic production, consumption, discoveries and reserves of crude oil. They have started an investigation of the volatility in the price of crude oil and of gasoline prices and of the differential between gasoline and crude oil. DPR continues to analyze the geographical movement and demand for asphalt products. Utah does not appear economically attractive as a site for a bitumen from tar sands asphalt plant. Oklahoma sites are now being studied. This report also contains the quarterly progress report from a University of Nevada study to determine bitumen composition, oxygen uptake rates, and viscosities of Alabama and Utah bitumens. Both reports have been indexed separately for inclusion on the data base.

Penney, W.R.

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

171

Western gas sands: Technology status report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Research on western gas sands is conducted by the US Department of Energy's Morgantown Technology Center to encourage the development of very low permeability gas sands in the western United States. The current search is an outgrowth of earlier Government research on tight sands in which nuclear and massive hydraulics fracturing stimulations were tested without definitive results. Based on input from the gas industry, universities, and geologic and engineering consulting firms, activites were broadened to include fundamental research and development. Consequently, the focus of the research for the last several years has been on improving diagnostic instruments for evaluating reservoir and stimulation performances, interpreting geophysical and engineering data, and stimulation techniques. Intergrated geologic studies of three depositional basins that contain tight lenticular sandstone units have also been pursued as part of this new effort. To date, the following tentative conclusions have been formulated: The permeability of the tight gas sands can be as much as three to four orders of magnitude lower than that of conventional gas deposits. Nineteen western geologic basins and trends have been identified that contain significant volumes of tight gas. Gas resources in the priority geologic basins have been estimated as follows: Piceance Basin, 420 Tcf.; Greater Green River Basin, 4971 Tcf.; and Uinta Basin, 21 Tcf. The critical parameters for successfully developing tight sandstone resources are the presence of natural fractures within a reservoir and the effective propped length of hydraulically induced fractures. Stimulation technology is presently insufficient to efficiently recover gas from lenticular, tight reservoirs. 15 refs., 14 figs., 3 tabs.

Not Available

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

172

EA-1581: Sand Hills Wind Project, Wyoming  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The Bureau of Land Management, with DOE’s Western Area Power Administration as a cooperating agency, is preparing this EA to evaluate the environmental impacts of a proposal to construct, operate, and maintain the Sand Hills Wind Energy Facility on private and federal lands in Albany County, Wyoming. If the proposed action is implemented, Western would interconnect the proposed facility to an existing transmission line.

173

Guide to preparing SAND reports. Revised  

SciTech Connect

This guide contains basic information needed to produce a SAND report. Its guidelines reflect DOE regulation and Sandia policy. The guide includes basic writing instructions in an annotated sample report; guidance for organization, format, and layout of reports produced by line organizations; and information about conference papers, journal articles, and brochures. The appendixes contain sections on Sandia`s preferred usage, equations, references, copyrights and permissions, and publishing terms.

Locke, T.K. [ed.

1996-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

174

The Energy Source for the Coastal-Trapped Waves in the Australian Coastal Experiment Region  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The sea level on the southern Australian coast is examined for the source of the coastal-trapped wave energy observed during the Australian Coastal Experiment. Sea level, adjusted for atmospheric pressure, and atmospheric pressure are observed to ...

John A. Church; Howard J. Freeland

1987-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

175

The Australian Coastal Experiment: A Search for Coastal-Trapped Waves  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Australian Coastal Experiment (ACE) was conducted in the coastal waters of New South Wales from September 1983 to 1984. The data obtained allow a detailed examination of the dynamics of flow on the continental shelf and slope and in ...

H.J. Freeland; F.M. Boland; J.A. Church; A.J. Clarke; A.M.G. Forbes; A. Huyer; R.L. Smith; R.O.R.Y. Thompson; N.J. White

1986-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

176

Coastal Barrier Resources Act | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Barrier Resources Act Barrier Resources Act Jump to: navigation, search Statute Name Coastal Barrier Resources Act Year 1982 Url [[File:|160px|link=]] Description References Wikipedia[1] FWS Coastal Barrier Resources Act Webpage[2] The Coastal Barrier Resources Act of the United States was enacted October 18, 1982. The United States Congress passed this Act in order to address the many problems associated with coastal barrier development. CBRA designated various undeveloped coastal barriers, which were illustrated by a set of maps adopted by law, to be included in the John H. Chafee Coastal Barrier Resources System (CBRS). These designated areas were made ineligible for both direct and indirect Federal expenditures and financial assistance, which are believed to encourage development of fragile,

177

Policy Analysis of the Canadian Oil Sands Experience  

SciTech Connect

For those who support U.S. oil sands development, the Canadian oil sands industry is often identified as a model the U.S. might emulate, yielding financial and energy security benefits. For opponents of domestic oil sands development, the Canadian oil sands experience illustrates the risks that opponents of development believe should deter domestic policymakers from incenting U.S. oil sands development. This report does not seek to evaluate the particular underpinnings of either side of this policy argument, but rather attempts to delve into the question of whether the Canadian experience has relevance as a foundational model for U.S. oil sands development. More specifically, this report seeks to assess whether and how the Canadian oil sands experience might be predictive or instructive in the context of fashioning a framework for a U.S. oil sands industry. In evaluating the implications of these underpinnings for a prospective U.S. oil sands industry, this report concentrates on prospective development of the oil sands deposits found in Utah.

None, None

2013-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

178

Modeling the Effects of Lakes and Wetlands on the Water Balance of Arctic Environments  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Lakes, ponds, and wetlands are common features in many low-gradient arctic watersheds. Storage of snowmelt runoff in lakes and wetlands exerts a strong influence on both the interannual and interseasonal variability of northern rivers. This ...

Laura C. Bowling; Dennis P. Lettenmaier

2010-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

179

The physical role of transverse deep zones in improving constructed treatment wetland performance  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Velocity heterogeneity is often present in wetland systems and results in some influent water remaining in the wetland for less than the expected residence time. This phenomenon, known as short-circuiting, alters the ...

Lightbody, Anne F. (Anne Fraser), 1977-

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

180

Thermal Mediation by Littoral Wetlands and Impact on Lake Intrusion Depth  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Lake inflow dynamics can be affected by the thermal mediation provided by shallow littoral regions such as wetlands. In this study, wetland thermal mediation is evaluated using a linearized dead-zone model. Its impact on ...

Andradottir, Hrund O.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "wetlands coastal sand" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Analysis on Distribution Characteristics of Soil Carbon Pool in Mining Subsidence Wetlands  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

There are short cycle, intensity disturbance and other characteristics about formation of subsided wetlands in mining coal area with higher groundwater table, ?nthere are also differences to general wetlands about conversion of ¡§carbon sources, ... Keywords: Carbon Pool, Distribution, Mining Areas

Qu Junfeng, Zhang Shaoliang, Xu Zhanjun, Zhang Ying

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

182

Wetland Loss Is Not The Fault of Any One Company | America's ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Wetland Loss Is Not The Fault of Any One Company. By: Berwick Duvall II, Houma Courrier | 9.28.2007 September 28, 2007 Wetlands loss is not the fault ...

183

Species profiles: Life histories and environmental requirements of coastal fishes and invertebrates (Mid-Atlantic)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Species profiles are literature summaries of the life history, distribution and environmental requirements of coastal fishes and invertebrates. Profiles are prepared to assist with environmental impact assessment. The Atlantic menhaden (Brevoortia tyrannus) is an important commercial fish along the Atlantic coast. In the South Atlantic Region, Atlantic menhaden spawn during winter in continental shelf waters. Adults then move inshore and northward in spring; some move into estuaries as far as the brackish-freshwater boundary. Atlantic menhaden larvae in the South Atlantic Region enter estuaries after 1 to 3 months at sea. Young fish move into the shallow regions of estuaries and seem to prefer vegetated marsh habitats. Atlantic menhaden are size-selective plankton feeders as larvae, and filter feeders as juveniles and adults. Due to their large population size, individual growth rates, and seasonal movements, Atlantic menhaden annually consume and redistribute large amounts of energy and materials. They are also important prey for large game fishes such as bluefish (Pomatomus saltatrix), striped bass (Morone saxatilis), and bluefin tuna (Thunnus thynnus). The Atlantic menhaden is associated with estuarine and nearshore systems during all phases of its life cycle. Young menhaden require these food-rich habitats to survive and grown. Destruction of estuarine wetlands has decreased nursery habitat available to Atlantic menhaden and other estuarine wetlands has decreased nursery habitat available to Atlantic menhaden and other estuarine-dependent species. 115 refs., 2 figs., 2 tabs.

Rogers, S.G.; Van Den Avyle, M.J.

1989-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

184

California - Coastal Region Onshore Nonassociated Natural Gas...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) California - Coastal Region Onshore Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation,...

185

,"California - Coastal Region Onshore Nonassociated Natural Gas...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","California - Coastal Region Onshore Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation,...

186

Coastal Management (Louisiana) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

2013. EZFeed Policy Place Louisiana Applies to States or Provinces Louisiana Name Coastal Management (Louisiana) Policy Category Other Policy Policy Type Environmental Regulations...

187

,"California - Coastal Region Coalbed Methane Proved Reserves...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

- Coastal Region Coalbed Methane Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet)" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","...

188

A Numerical Study of a Southeast Australian Coastal Ridging Event  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A numerical study of the 9–11 November 1982 southeast Australian coastal ridging event is presented. The mesoscale coastal features of this event have been previously described as a coastally trapped disturbance (CTD). However, the analysis ...

K. J. Tory; C. J. C. Reason; P. L. Jackson

2001-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

189

A Simple Model for Coastal Sea Level Prediction  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Reliable forecasting of wind-forced coastal sea level on the synoptic scale is available for most of the coastal areas of the United States through the National Weather Service Extratropical Storm Surge Model (ESSM). However, in many coastal ...

Charles E. Tilburg; Richard W. Garvine

2004-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

190

Oil shale, tar sands, and related materials  

SciTech Connect

This sixteen-chapter book focuses on the many problems and the new methodology associated with the commercialization of the oil shale and tar sand industry. Topics discussed include: an overview of the Department of Energy's oil shale R, D, and D program; computer simulation of explosive fracture of oil shale; fracturing of oil shale by treatment with liquid sulfur dioxide; chemistry of shale oil cracking; hydrogen sulfide evolution from Colorado oil shale; a possible mechanism of alkene/alkane production in oil shale retorting; oil shale retorting kinetics; kinetics of oil shale char gasification; a comparison of asphaltenes from naturally occurring shale bitumen and retorted shale oils: the influence of temperature on asphaltene structure; beneficiation of Green River oil shale by density methods; beneficiation of Green River oil shale pelletization; shell pellet heat exchange retorting: the SPHER energy-efficient process for retorting oil shale; retorted oil shale disposal research; an investigation into the potential economics of large-scale shale oil production; commercial scale refining of Paraho crude shale oil into military specification fuels; relation between fuel properties and chemical composition; chemical characterization/physical properties of US Navy shale-II fuels; relation between fuel properties and chemical composition: stability of oil shale-derived jet fuel; pyrolysis of shale oil residual fractions; synfuel stability: degradation mechanisms and actual findings; the chemistry of shale oil and its refined products; the reactivity of Cold Lake asphaltenes; influence of thermal processing on the properties of Cold Lake asphaltenes: the effect of distillation; thermal recovery of oil from tar sands by an energy-efficient process; and hydropyrolysis: the potential for primary upgrading of tar sand bitumen.

Stauffer, H.C.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

191

EA-1581: Sand Hills Wind Project, Wyoming | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

81: Sand Hills Wind Project, Wyoming 81: Sand Hills Wind Project, Wyoming EA-1581: Sand Hills Wind Project, Wyoming Location of the proposed Sand Hills Wind Project, near Laramie, Wyoming Location of the proposed Sand Hills Wind Project, near Laramie, Wyoming Summary The Bureau of Land Management, with DOE's Western Area Power Administration as a cooperating agency, is preparing this EA to evaluate the environmental impacts of a proposal to construct, operate, and maintain the Sand Hills Wind Energy Facility on private and federal lands in Albany County, Wyoming. If the proposed action is implemented, Western would interconnect the proposed facility to an existing transmission line. Public Comment Opportunities No public comment opportunities available at this time. List of Available Documents

192

Sand Mountain Electric Cooperative - Residential Heat Pump Loan Program |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Sand Mountain Electric Cooperative - Residential Heat Pump Loan Sand Mountain Electric Cooperative - Residential Heat Pump Loan Program Sand Mountain Electric Cooperative - Residential Heat Pump Loan Program < Back Eligibility Residential Savings Category Heating & Cooling Commercial Heating & Cooling Heat Pumps Program Info State Alabama Program Type Utility Loan Program Rebate Amount 7% interest rate 5 or 10 year pay schedule maximum of $12,000 Provider Sand Mountain Electric Cooperative The Sand Mountain Electric Cooperative offers a heat pump loan program to eligible residential members. To qualify, members must have had power with Sand Mountain Electric Cooperative for at least one year, have the home electric bill and deeds in the same name, and pass a credit check. Heat pumps must be installed by a [http://www.smec.coop/heatpumpcontractors.htm

193

Unconsolidated sand grain shape, size impact frac-pack design  

SciTech Connect

The shape and size of sand grains, as well as the saturating fluid, influence the mechanical properties of unconsolidated sands and need to be considered in frac-pack design. These mechanical properties of unconsolidated properties of unconsolidated sands play an important role in determining the geometry of frac-pack treatments. Stress-strain curves obtained for unconsolidated sands at elevated stresses show highly nonlinear hysteretic behavior. The impact of these findings on frac-pack design can be significant. The nonlinear elastic properties of unconsolidated sand can give rise to some unique features in the pressure response and in the fracture geometry that may not be observed in hard rocks. This article focuses on the impact of mechanical properties of poorly consolidated and unconsolidated sands on the geometry of frac packs. The paper discusses frac packs, mechanical properties (Young`s modulus, shear failure) and effective treatments.

Wang, E.; Sharma, M.M. [Univ. of Texas, Austin, TX (United States)

1997-05-19T23:59:59.000Z

194

Oil shales and tar sands: a bibliography  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Five thousand one hundred forty-two citations of reports, journal articles, patents, conference papers, and monographs resulting from research on oil shales and tar sands are presented. These citations and approximately 5100 additional citations are a part of the Department of Energy's Energy Data Base. The citations, with abstracts, are arranged by subject category. Within the categories references to reports are listed in alphanumeric order by report number. Other citations follow in inverse chronological order. Five indexes are provided: Corporate, Author, Subject, Contract Number, and Report Number.

Grissom, M.C. (ed.)

1981-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

195

ANNUAL WATER BUDGETS FOR A FORESTED SINKHOLE WETLAND  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Annual water budgets spanning two years, 2004 and 2005, are constructed for a sinkhole wetland in the Tennessee Highland Rim following conversion of 13 % of its watershed to impervious surfaces. The effect of watershed development on the hydrology of the study wetland was significant. Surface runoff was the dominant input, with a contribution of 61.4 % of the total. An average of 18.9 % of gross precipitation was intercepted by the canopy and evaporated. Seepage from the surface water body to the local groundwater system accounted for 83.1 % of the total outflow. Deep recharge varied from 43.2 % (2004) to 12.1 % (2005) of total outflow. Overall, evapotranspiration accounted for 72.4 % of the total losses, with an average of 65.7 % lost from soil profile storage. The annual water budgets indicate that deep recharge is a significant hydrologic function performed by isolated sinkhole wetlands, or karst pans, on the Tennessee Highland Rim. Continued hydrologic monitoring of sinkhole wetlands are needed to evaluate hydrologic function and response to anthropogenic impacts. The regression technique developed to estimate surface runoff entering the wetland is shown to provide reasonable annual runoff estimates, but further testing is needed.

Hill, Dr. Andrew Jason [University of Southern Indiana; Neary, Vincent S [ORNL

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

196

Flotation behavior of digested asphalt ridge tar sands  

SciTech Connect

The hot water process for Utah tar sands differs from that used for Canadian tar sands due to inherent differences in respective bitumen viscosities and the nature of bitumen-sand association. Although contact angle measurements of solvent extracted Asphalt Ridge bitumen indicated moderate hydrophobicity, air bubble attachment to the bitumen concentrate is not possible. This suggests that flotation separation is dependent on air bubble entrapment. Improved separation at higher flotation temperatures was due to the decrease in bitumen viscosity. 16 refs.

Smith, R.J.; Miller, J.D.

1981-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

197

Resource Management Services: Land Use, Part 505: Coastal Erosion...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

5: Coastal Erosion Management (New York) Resource Management Services: Land Use, Part 505: Coastal Erosion Management (New York) Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Construction...

198

California--Coastal Region Onshore Natural Gas Plant Liquids...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Coastal Region Onshore Natural Gas Plant Liquids, Proved Reserves (Million Barrels) California--Coastal Region Onshore Natural Gas Plant Liquids, Proved Reserves (Million Barrels)...

199

NERSC Supercomputers to Analyze Hurricane Coastal Surges, Help...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

NERSC Supercomputers to Analyze Hurricane Coastal Surges, Help Plan Rebuilding in Louisiana, Gulf Coast NERSC Supercomputers to Analyze Hurricane Coastal Surges, Help Plan...

200

SANDIA REPORT SAND93-1076  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

SANDIA SANDIA REPORT SAND93-1076 * u_qo UnlimitedRelease 1 Pdnted November 1993 :ii l Standard Testing Procedures for Optical Fiber and Unshielded Twisted Pair at Sandia National Laboratories R. L. Adams Pe,_e,d by Sand!a Nm#ocml L.abomlodN Albuquerque, NewMexlooI71U and Uvermore,California$M860 for the UnitedStatesDepartment ofEnergy underContract DE.ACOI-MALIIf_D SF2900Q(8-81 } _IITRIEIUTION OF THiS DGCU,VltZNT 18 UNLIMITED k Issued by Sandia National Laboratories, operated for the United States Department of Energy by Sandia Corporation. NOTICE. This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the United States Government. Neither the United States Government nor any agency thereof, nor any of their employees, nor any of their c_ntractors, subcontractors, or their employees, makes any warranty, express or implied, or assumes any legal liability

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "wetlands coastal sand" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Microstructural characterization of a Canadian oil sand  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The microstructure of oil sand samples extracted at a depth of 75 m from the estuarine Middle McMurray formation (Alberta, Canada) has been investigated by using high resolution 3D X-Ray microtomography ($\\mu$CT) and Cryo Scanning Electron Microscopy (CryoSEM). $\\mu$CT images evidenced some dense areas composed of highly angular grains surrounded by fluids that are separated by larger pores full of gas. 3D Image analysis provided in dense areas porosity values compatible with in-situ log data and macroscopic laboratory determinations, showing that they are representative of intact states. $\\mu$CT hence provided some information on the morphology of the cracks and disturbance created by gas expansion. The CryoSEM technique, in which the sample is freeze fractured within the SEM chamber prior to observation, provided pictures in which the (frozen) bitumen clearly appears between the sand grains. No evidence of the existence of a thin connate water layer between grains and the bitumen, frequently mentioned in th...

Dinh, Hong Doan; Nauroy, Jean-François; Tang, Anh-Minh; Souhail, Youssef; 10.1139/T2012-072

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

202

TESTING OF TMR SAND MANTIS FINAL REPORT  

SciTech Connect

Screening tests of Sand Mantis candidate materials selected for erosion resistance have been completed. The results of this testing identified that over a relatively short period of operation (<1 hour), measurable erosion will occur in each of the candidate zoom tube materials given equal operating exposure. Additionally, this testing has shown that erosion of the rubber discharge hose directly downstream of the vehicle could be expected to limit the service life of the discharge hose. On the basis of these test results, SRNL recommends the following; {lg_bullet} redesign of critical system components (e.g., zoom tube, discharge hose) should be conducted to improve system characteristics relative to erosion and capitalize on the results of this testing, {lg_bullet} continued efforts to deploy the Sand Mantis should include testing to better define and optimize operating parameters, and gain an understanding of system dynamics, {lg_bullet} discontinue wear testing with the selected materials pending redesign of critical system components (1st recommendation) and inclusion of other candidate materials. The final selection of additional candidate materials should be made following design changes, but might include a Stellite alloy or zirconia.

Krementz, D; William Daugherty, W

2007-06-12T23:59:59.000Z

203

Wetlands proximity mapping of 86 waste sites on the Savannah River Plant  

SciTech Connect

This project developed wetlands proximity maps and provided wetlands information by means of a Geographic Environmental Data Base (GEDB) for each of 11 interaction zones identified in DPST-84-684. It includes an analysis of 86 hazardous waste sites at the Savannah River Plant (SRP). The map of each interaction zone is intended to indicate major wetland and land cover types, with emphasis on locations of hazardous waste sites with wetland areas identified within a 1000 meter radius. Statistics of aerial extent for wetland and land cover for each interaction zone are provided. 80 figs., 93 tabs.

Jensen, J.R. (South Carolina Univ., Columbia, SC (USA). Dept. of Geography)

1985-09-16T23:59:59.000Z

204

Coastal Zone Management Act | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Zone Management Act Zone Management Act Jump to: navigation, search Statute Name Coastal Zone Management Act Year 1972 Url [[File:|160px|link=]] Description The Coastal Zone Management Act of 1972 (CZMA; Pub.L. 92-583, 86 Stat. 1280, enacted October 27, 1972, 16 U.S.C. §§ 1451-1464, Chapter 33) is an Act of Congress passed in 1972 to encourage coastal states to develop and implement coastal zone management plans (CZMPs). This act was established as a United States National policy to preserve, protect, develop, and where possible, restore or enhance, the resources of the Nation's coastal zone for this and succeeding generations. References Wikipedia[1] National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration[2] The U.S. Congress recognized the importance of meeting the challenge of

205

Section 404 permitting in coastal Texas from 1996 - 2003: patterns and effects on streamflow  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This study explores the spatial-temporal patterns of Section 404 permitting program under the Clean Water Act and examines its impact on mean and peak annual streamflow. The study area consists of 47 sub-basins that are delineated based on USGS streamflow gauges. These sub-basins span from the southern portion of coastal Texas to the easternmost portion of coastal Texas. Descriptive, spatial and spatial-temporal statistical methods are used to explore patterns in Section 404 permitting between 1996 and 2003. The effects of Section 404 permit types on mean and peak annual streamflow over the same 8 year period are also statistically modeled with a host of other relevant control variables. Exploratory analyses of Section 404 permits demonstrated characteristics that were indicative of suburban and, to a larger extent, exurban development. Explanatory analyses of the effects of Section 404 permitting on mean and peak streamflow showed that Section 404 permits increase both measures. These increases were minimal on a per-permit basis but have the ability to accumulate over time and result in much larger increases. Section 404 permits also displayed an ordered effect based on the permit type. Permit types that represent larger impacts had larger effects. The effects of permits of streamflow followed a descending pattern of Individual permits, Letters of Permission, Nationwide permits, and General permits. This “type of permit impact” supports the use of this measure as an indicator of wetland impact and loss and corroborates previous studies that have incorporated this measure.

Highfield, Wesley E.

2008-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

206

This fact sheet describes wetlands in and around Monticello, Utah, and what the  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

wetlands in and around Monticello, Utah, and what the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) is wetlands in and around Monticello, Utah, and what the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) is doing to restore wetlands that are adversely affected by Monticello cleanup project activities. The purpose of the Monticello cleanup projects is to minimize risks to the public and the environment from exposure to uranium mill tailings and radon gas. The cleanup is being performed in accordance with the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA), also known as Superfund. Wetlands Background A wetland is an area along a waterway, body of water, spring, or seep where soils are saturated by surface water or ground water often enough to support vegetation that has adapted to such conditions. While some wetlands are extensive, a wetland also can be an

207

The Allegheny Power Service Constructed Wetland at Springdale: The Role of Plants in the Removal of Trace Elements  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Constructed wetlands are proving an effective technology for the removal of many aqueous contaminants. The ability of wetlands to remove contaminants such as trace elements appears to be a function of both the physical trapping of suspended materials and the biological and chemical processes occurring within the wetlands. Thus, wetlands are commonly described as "biogeochemical reactors." This report details a study of trace element removal and sequestration within a highly engineered wetland designed to...

2001-11-05T23:59:59.000Z

208

Designation of the Southwest National Wildlife Refuge Complex as Wetlands of International Importance under Ramsar, Convention on Wetlands of International Importance.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

?? The historical loss and continued threat of loss of Louisiana wetlands is a major environmental concern for the United States and the world. In… (more)

Coffman, Mitchell Ward

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

209

Pipeline corridors through wetlands - summary of seventeen plant-community studies at ten wetland crossings. Topical report, February 1990--August 1994  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

As part of the Gas Research Institute Wetland Corridors Program, Argonne National Laboratory conducted field studies on 10 wetland crossings located in six states to document impacts of natural gas pipeline rights-of-way (ROWS) on 15 wetland plant communities. This study is unique in the number, range, ages, and variety of wetland crossings surveyed and compared. Vegetation data and recorded observations were analyzed to reveal patterns associated with age, installation technology, maintenance practices, and wetland type. This report summarizes the findings of this study. Results revealed that ROWs of pipelines installed according to recent wetland regulations rapidly revegetated with dense and diverse plant communities. The ROW plant communities were similar to those in the adjacent natural areas in species richness, wetland indicator values, and percentages of native species. The ROW plant communities developed from naturally available propagules without fertilization, liming, or artificial seeding. ROWs contributed to increased habitat and plant species diversity in the wetland. There was little evidence that they degrade the wetland by providing avenues for the spread of invasive and normative plant species. Most impacts are temporal in nature, decreasing rapidly during the first several years and more slowly thereafter to the extent permitted by maintenance and other ROW activities.

Van Dyke, G.D. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States)]|[Trinity Christian College, Palos Heights, IL (United States); Shem, L.M.; Wilkey, P.L.; Zimmerman, R.E.; Alsum, S.K. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States)

1994-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

210

Thermal reclaimer apparatus for a thermal sand reclamation system  

SciTech Connect

A thermal reclaimer apparatus is disclosed for thermally removing from the used foundry sand the organic matter that is present therein. The subject thermal reclaimer apparatus includes chamber means in which the used foundry sand is heated to a predetermined temperature for a preestablished period in order to accomplish the burning away of the organic matter that the used foundry sand contains. The chamber means includes inlet means provided at one end thereof and outlet means provided at the other end thereof. Feed means are cooperatively associated with the pipe means and thereby with the inlet means for feeding the used foundry sand through the inlet means into the chamber means. The subject thermal reclaimer apparatus further includes rotating means operative for effecting the rotation of the chamber means as the used foundry sand is being heated therein. The chamber means has cooperatively associated therewith burner means located at the same end thereof as the outlet means. The burner means is operative to effect the heating of the used foundry sand to the desired temperature within the chamber means. Tumbling means are provided inside the chamber means to ensure that the used foundry sand is constantly turned over, i.e., tumbled, and that the lumps therein are broken up as the chamber means rotates. Lastly, the used foundry sand from which the organic matter has been removed leaves the chamber means through the outlet means.

Deve, V.

1984-02-07T23:59:59.000Z

211

Tight gas sands study breaks down drilling and completion costs  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Given the high cost to drill and complete tight gas sand wells, advances in drilling and completion technology that result in even modest cost savings to the producer have the potential to generate tremendous savings for the natural gas industry. The Gas Research Institute sponsored a study to evaluate drilling and completion costs in selected tight gas sands. The objective of the study was to identify major expenditures associated with tight gas sand development and determine their relative significance. A substantial sample of well cost data was collected for the study. Individual well cost data were collected from nearly 300 wells in three major tight gas sand formations: the Cotton Valley sand in East Texas, the Frontier sand in Wyoming, and the Wilcox sand in South Texas. The data were collected and organized by cost category for each formation. After the information was input into a data base, a simple statistical analysis was performed. The statistical analysis identified data discrepancies that were then resolved, and it helped allow conclusions to be drawn regarding drilling and completion costs in these tight sand formations. Results are presented.

Brunsman, B. (Gas Research Inst., Chicago, IL (United States)); Saunders, B. (S.A. Holditch Associates Inc., College Station, TX (United States))

1994-06-06T23:59:59.000Z

212

Triaxial behavior of sand-mica mixtures using genetic programming  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This study investigates an application of genetic programming (GP) for modeling of coarse rotund sand-mica mixtures. An empirical model equation is developed by means of GP technique. The experimental database used for GP modeling is based on a laboratory ... Keywords: Genetic programming, Leighton Buzzard Sand, Mica, Modeling, Triaxial testing

Ali Firat Cabalar; Abdulkadir Cevik

2011-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

213

Changes in the Vegetation Cover in a Constructed Wetland at Argonne National Laboratory, Illinois  

SciTech Connect

Wetlands are valuable resources that are disappearing at an alarming rate. Land development has resulted in the destruction of wetlands for approximately 200 years. To combat this destruction, the federal government passed legislation that requires no net loss of wetlands. The United States Army Corps of Engineers (USACE) is responsible for regulating wetland disturbances. In 1991, the USACE determined that the construction of the Advanced Photon Source at Argonne National Laboratory would damage three wetlands that had a total area of one acre. Argonne was required to create a wetland of equal acreage to replace the damaged wetlands. For the first five years after this wetland was created (1992-1996), the frequency of plant species, relative cover, and water depth was closely monitored. The wetland was not monitored again until 2002. In 2003, the vegetation cover data were again collected with a similar methodology to previous years. The plant species were sampled using quadrats at randomly selected locations along transects throughout the wetland. The fifty sampling locations were monitored once in June and percent cover of each of the plant species was determined for each plot. Furthermore, the extent of standing water in the wetland was measured. In 2003, 21 species of plants were found and identified. Eleven species dominated the wetland, among which were reed canary grass (Phalaris arundinacea), crown vetch (Coronilla varia), and Canada thistle (Cirsium arvense). These species are all non-native, invasive species. In the previous year, 30 species were found in the same wetland. The common species varied from the 2002 study but still had these non-native species in common. Reed canary grass and Canada thistle both increased by more than 100% from 2002. Unfortunately, the non-native species may be contributing to the loss of biodiversity in the wetland. In the future, control measures should be taken to ensure the establishment of more desired native species.

Bergman, C.L.; LaGory, K.

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

214

Sand Mountain Electric Coop | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Mountain Electric Coop Mountain Electric Coop Jump to: navigation, search Name Sand Mountain Electric Coop Place Alabama Utility Id 16629 Utility Location Yes Ownership C NERC Location SERC NERC SERC Yes Activity Distribution Yes References EIA Form EIA-861 Final Data File for 2010 - File1_a[1] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Utility Rate Schedules Grid-background.png Drainage Pumping Station LS - Outdoor Lighting Service Lighting RS - Residential Service Residential Schedule GSA - General Power Service - Part 1 Commercial Schedule GSA - General Power Service - Part 2 Commercial Schedule GSA - General Power Service - Part 3 Commercial Schedule GSB Commercial Schedule GSD Commercial

215

Direct Production of Silicones From Sand  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Silicon, in the form of silica and silicates, is the second most abundant element in the earth's crust. However the synthesis of silicones (scheme 1) and almost all organosilicon chemistry is only accessible through elemental silicon. Silicon dioxide (sand or quartz) is converted to chemical-grade elemental silicon in an energy intensive reduction process, a result of the exceptional thermodynamic stability of silica. Then, the silicon is reacted with methyl chloride to give a mixture of methylchlorosilanes catalyzed by cooper containing a variety of tract metals such as tin, zinc etc. The so-called direct process was first discovered at GE in 1940. The methylchlorosilanes are distilled to purify and separate the major reaction components, the most important of which is dimethyldichlorosilane. Polymerization of dimethyldichlorosilane by controlled hydrolysis results in the formation of silicone polymers. Worldwide, the silicones industry produces about 1.3 billion pounds of the basic silicon polymer, polydimethylsiloxane.

Larry N. Lewis; F.J. Schattenmann: J.P. Lemmon

2001-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

216

Acoustic sand detector for fluid flowstreams  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The particle volume and particle mass production rate of particulate solids entrained in fluid flowstreams such as formation sand or fracture proppant entrained in oil and gas production flowstreams is determined by a system having a metal probe interposed in a flow conduit for transmitting acoustic emissions created by particles impacting the probe to a sensor and signal processing circuit which produces discrete signals related to the impact of each of the particles striking the probe. The volume or mass flow rate of particulates is determined from making an initial particle size distribution and particle energy distribution and comparing the initial energy distribution and/or the initial size distribution with values related to the impact energies of a predetermined number of recorded impacts. The comparison is also used to recalibrate the system to compensate for changes in flow velocity.

Beattie, Alan G. (Corrales, NM); Bohon, W. Mark (Frisco, TX)

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

217

Sand control in horizontal wells in heavy-oil reservoirs  

SciTech Connect

Recent advances in horizontal-well technology has greatly improved the potential for heavy oil recovery. Such recovery may be hampered, however, by sanding problems associated with most heavy-oil reservoirs. These reservoir sands are mostly unconsolidated and may lead to severe productivity-loss problems if produced freely. This paper offers recommendations for sand control in three Canadian heavy-oil reservoirs. Experimental evidence has shown that minimizing the annular space between the casing and the open hole is important, especially in the case of smaller wire space, lower oil viscosity, and thinner pay zone. Several types of wire-wrapped screens and flexible liners were tested for sand control. Only flexible liners reduced sand production to a negligible amount.

Islam, M.R. (Nova Husky Research Corp. (CA)); George, A.E. (Energy, Mines, and Resources (CA))

1991-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

218

Method and apparatus for hydrocarbon recovery from tar sands  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method and apparatus for utilizing tar sands having a broad range of bitumen content is disclosed. More particularly, tar sands are pyrolyzed in a cyclone retort with high temperature gases recycled from the cyclone retort to produce oil and hydrocarbon products. The spent tar sands are then burned at 2000.degree. F. in a burner to remove residual char and produce a solid waste that is easily disposable. The process and apparatus have the advantages of being able to utilize tar sands having a broad range of bitumen content and the advantage of producing product gases that are free from combustion gases and thereby have a higher heating value. Another important advantage is rapid pyrolysis of the tar sands in the cyclone so as to effectively utilize smaller sized reactor vessels for reducing capitol and operating costs.

Westhoff, James D. (Laramie, WY); Harak, Arnold E. (Laramie, WY)

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

219

Method and apparatus for hydrocarbon recovery from tar sands  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method and apparatus for utilizing tar sands having a broad range of bitumen content is disclosed. More particularly, tar sands are pyrolyzed in a cyclone retort with high temperature gases recycled from the cyclone retort to produce oil and hydrocarbon products. The spent tar sands are then burned at 2000/degree/F in a burner to remove residual char and produce a solid waste that is easily disposable. The process and apparatus have the advantages of being able to utilize tar sands having a broad range of bitumen content and the advantage of producing product gases that are free from combustion gases and thereby have a higher heating value. Another important advantage is rapid pyrolysis of the tar sands in the cyclone so as to effectively utilize smaller sized reactor vessels for reducing capitol and operating costs. 1 fig., 1 tab.

Westhoff, J.D.; Harak, A.E.

1988-05-04T23:59:59.000Z

220

California - Coastal Region Onshore Crude Oil + Lease Condensate ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

California - Coastal Region Onshore Crude Oil + Lease Condensate Reserves Acquisitions (Million Barrels)

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "wetlands coastal sand" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

California - Coastal Region Onshore Natural Gas, Wet After Lease ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

California - Coastal Region Onshore Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Reserves Sales (Billion Cubic Feet)

222

Simulation of hydrologic influences on wetland ecosystem succession. Master's thesis  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This research focuses on the development of a simulation model to determine the affects of hydrological influences on a wetland ecosystem. The model allows perturbations to the inputs of various wetland data which in turn, influences the successional development of the ecosystem. This research consisted of converting a grassland ecosystem model to one which simulates wetland conditions. The critical factor in determining the success of wetland creation is the hydrology of the system. There are four of the areas of the original model which are affected by the hydrology. The model measures the health or success of the ecosystem through the measurement of the systems gross plant production, the respiration and the net primary production of biomass. Altering the auxiliary variables of water level and the rate of flow through the system explicitly details the affects hydrologic influences on those production rates. Ten case tests depicting exogenous perturbations of the hydrology were run to identify these affects. Although the tests dealt with the fluctuation of water through the system, any one of the auxiliary variables in the model could be changed to reflect site specific data. Productivity, Hazardous material management, Hazardous material pharmacy.

Pompilio, R.A.

1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

223

SIGNIFICANT PLANT, ANIMAL, AND WETLAND RESOURCES OF LARIMER COUNTY  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Lighthawk for providing an aerial view of the County; other staff of the CNHP who contributed and concerned landowners of Larimer County who participated in this natural heritage survey. Funding. Funding for the Wetland and Riparian Area Survey was provided by a grant from the Colorado Department

224

Coastal Management Act (Georgia) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Management Act (Georgia) Management Act (Georgia) Coastal Management Act (Georgia) < Back Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Construction Developer Fed. Government Fuel Distributor General Public/Consumer Industrial Installer/Contractor Institutional Investor-Owned Utility Local Government Low-Income Residential Multi-Family Residential Municipal/Public Utility Nonprofit Residential Retail Supplier Rural Electric Cooperative Schools State/Provincial Govt Systems Integrator Transportation Tribal Government Utility Savings Category Water Buying & Making Electricity Wind Program Info State Georgia Program Type Environmental Regulations Siting and Permitting Provider Georgia Department of Natural Resources The Coastal Management Act provides enabling authority for the State to prepare and administer a coastal management program. The Act does not

225

Determination of critical cracking temperature of oil sands at low temperature conditions.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??This research is intended to predict the viscoelastic behavior of oil sand mixesunder low temperature conditions. The oil sand used in this project is a… (more)

Chandika, Charan kumar

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

226

The cost of wetland creation and restoration. Final report, [February 12, 1992--April 30, 1994]- Draft  

SciTech Connect

This report examines the economics of wetland creation, restoration, and enhancement projects, especially as they are used within the context of mitigation for unavoidable wetland losses. Complete engineering-cost-accounting profiles of over 90 wetland projects were developed in collaboration with leading wetland restoration and creation practitioners around the country to develop a primary source database. Data on the costs of over 1,000 wetland projects were gathered from published sources and other available databases to develop a secondary source database. Cases in both databases were carefully analyzed and a set of baseline cost per acre estimates were developed for wetland creation, restoration, and enhancement. Observations of costs varied widely, ranging from $5 per acre to $1.5 million per acre. Differences in cost were related to the target wetland type, and to site-specific and project-specific factors that affected the preconstruction, construction, and post-construction tasks necessary to carry out each particular project. Project-specific and site-specific factors had a much larger effect on project costs than wetland type for non-agricultural projects. Costs of wetland creation and restoration were also shown to differ by region, but not by as much as expected, and in response to the regulatory context. The costs of wetland creation, restoration, and enhancement were also analyzed in a broader economic context through examination of the market for wetland mitigation services, and through the development of a framework for estimating compensation ratios-the number of acres of created, restored, or enhanced wetland required to compensate for an acre of lost natural wetland. The combination of per acre creation, restoration, and enhancement costs and the compensation ratio determine the overall mitigation costs associated with alternative mitigation strategies.

King, D.; Costanza, R.

1994-07-11T23:59:59.000Z

227

Oregon Coastal Management Program | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Coastal Management Program Coastal Management Program Jump to: navigation, search Logo: Oregon Coastal Management Program Name Oregon Coastal Management Program Address 635 Capitol St. NE Place Salem, Oregon Zip 97301-2540 Website http://www.oregon.gov/LCD/OCMP Coordinates 44.943778°, -123.026308° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":44.943778,"lon":-123.026308,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

228

Mesoscale Coastal Processes during GALE IOP 2  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

During Intensive Observation Period 2 of the Genesis of Atlantic Lows Experiment, a number of mesoscale phenomena were observed with special and conventional observing systems over the land and coastal waters. This study involved analysis of ...

James D. Doyle; Thomas T. Warner

1990-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

229

Coastal Energy (CCAP) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

CCAP) CCAP) Jump to: navigation, search Name Coastal Energy (CCAP) Facility Coastal Energy (CCAP) Sector Wind energy Facility Type Commercial Scale Wind Facility Status In Service Owner Coastal Community Action Program Developer Coastal Energy LLC Energy Purchaser Bonneville Power Admin Location Grayland Coordinates 46.793272°, -124.065341° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":46.793272,"lon":-124.065341,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

230

International Coastal Biofuels | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Coastal Biofuels Coastal Biofuels Jump to: navigation, search Name International Coastal Biofuels Place Tazewell, Virginia Zip 24651 Sector Biofuels Product International Coastal Biofuels is a development stage biofuels company that has proposed a biodiesel plant for Wilmington, North Carolina and is currently in negotiations for a second site in South Carolina. Coordinates 37.116177°, -81.518678° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":37.116177,"lon":-81.518678,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

231

New York City's Vulnerability to Coastal Flooding  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

New York City, New York (NYC), is extremely vulnerable to coastal flooding; thus, verification and improvements in storm surge models are needed in order to protect both life and property. This paper highlights the Stony Brook Storm Surge (SBSS) ...

Brian A. Colle; Frank Buonaiuto; Malcolm J. Bowman; Robert E. Wilson; Roger Flood; Robert Hunter; Alexander Mintz; Douglas Hill

2008-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

232

On the Transport of Buoyant Coastal Plumes  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The role of discharge conditions and shelf geometry on the transport of coastal plumes is studied with a fully nonlinear, primitive equation hydrodynamic model. The physical setting is an estuarine channel with a small discharge Rossby number. By ...

Felipe M. Pimenta; A. D. Kirwan Jr.; Pablo Huq

2011-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

233

Coastal Sediment Transport Concepts and Mechanisms  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Waterways and Harbors Div. , ASCE, v. 88, n. WW1, p. 117-Conf. Coastal Engineering, ASCE, 3641 pp. Eagleson, P.S. ,Jour. Waterways, Port, etc. , ASCE, v. 106, n. WW3, p. 299-

Inman, Douglas L.; Masters, Patricia M.

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

234

Dispersion into Severe Coastal Complex Terrain  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A field study of dispersion using tracer gases from offshore sources into severe coastal complex terrain was conducted in central California. Data were collected on dispersion, surface concentrations trajectories, and stability. An examination of ...

Timothy C. Spangler; James W. Keating

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

235

Internal Wave Attenuation by Coastal Kelp Stands  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Coastal kelp stands are a unique physical environment having high drag distributed throughout the water column. Temperature records from locations at increasing distances into the kelp show a damping of high-frequency variance and a slowing of ...

George A. Jackson

1984-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

236

Lagrangian Stochastic Modeling in Coastal Oceanography  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Lagrangian stochastic (LS) modeling is a common technique in atmospheric boundary layer modeling but is relatively new in coastal oceanography. This paper presents some fundamental aspects of LS modeling as they pertain to oceanography. The ...

David Brickman; P. C. Smith

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

237

An Objective Climatology of Carolina Coastal Fronts  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This study describes a simple objective method to identify cases of coastal frontogenesis offshore of the Carolinas and to characterize the sensible weather associated with frontal passage at measurement sites near the coast. The identification ...

K. Wyat Appel; Allen J. Riordan; Timothy A. Holley

2005-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

238

The apparent surface roughness of moving sand transported by wind  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present a comprehensive analytical model of aeolian sand transport in saltation. It quantifies the momentum transfer from the wind to the transported sand by providing expressions for the thickness of the saltation layer and the apparent surface roughness. These expressions are for the first time entirely derived from basic physical principles. The model further predicts the sand transport rate (mass flux) and the impact threshold shear velocity. We show that the model predictions are in very good agreement with experiments and numerical state of the art simulations of aeolian saltation.

Thomas Pähtz; Jasper F. Kok; Hans J. Herrmann

2011-11-05T23:59:59.000Z

239

Tidal Wetland Vegetation in the San Francisco Bay-Delta Estuary  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Benefits and Costs of Balanced, Random Sampling quently encountered at local scales, but that Sand Mound

Vasey, Michael C.; Parker, V. Thomas; Callaway, John C.; Herbert, Ellen R.; Schile, Lisa M.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

240

GASIFICATION IN THE CANADIAN OIL SANDS:  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Long Lake integrated bitumen and upgrading project, now under construction by OPTI Canada Inc. and Nexen Inc., is the first application of large-scale gasification in Canada. It also represents the first implementation of a gasification project in conjunction with a heavy oil recovery and upgrading project. The Canadian oil sands are a vast petroleum resource that currently produces over one million barrels per day (bpd) using proven mining and in-situ recovery technologies. Production is projected to rise to over two million bpd by the end of the decade. However the large volumes of natural gas normally needed by the bitumen recovery and upgrading facilities are a significant barrier to economic development of the resource. The Long Lake Project uses a unique combination of technologies to provide a solution to the natural gas supply and cost issue. A key component is a gasification facility using the Shell Gasification Process (SGP) which is integrated with the bitumen upgrading to convert the liquid asphaltene by-product stream into hydrogen for the secondary upgrading step and syngas fuel. An Air Liquide air separation unit (ASU) will provide

unknown authors

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "wetlands coastal sand" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Getty mines oil sands in California  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A large deposit of oil-laden diatomaceous earth in the McKittrick oil field 40 miles west of Bakersfield, California, has resisted all efforts at production by standard means. Getty Oil Co. is in the pilot phase of a project to recover the Diatomite's oil by an open pit mining operation. It also could have significant implications for other California oil fields, possibly setting the stage for the mining of oil sands in shallow fields like Kern River, S. Belridge, and Lost Hills to maximize oil recovery. A report on the project is summarized. The Diatomite is estimated to have 500 million bbl of oil in reserves, of which 380 million bbl are recoverable. The estimated amount of recoverable oil exceeds the McKittrick field's cumulative production of 240 million bbl. A pilot plant was built to test solvent extraction method of recovering heavy oil. The multistep process involves a series of 6 extractors. The Lurgi retorting plant employs a 2-step heating process to separate hydrocarbons from crushed ore.

Rintoul, B.

1983-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

242

Western Gas Sands Project. Status report  

SciTech Connect

The progress during December, 1977 of the major government sponsored endeavors undertaken to increase gas production from the low permeability gas sands of the western United States is summarized. The USGS is continuing geological and geophysical studies in the four major western basins to better characterize the resource base. Shipping arrangements for the core donated to the USGS by Inexco WASP (a well drilled for possible nuclear explosive stimulation in Wyoming) have been made, and cores for macrofossil and ostracode analysis from the Bowdoin Dome area have been collected. The National Laboratories, funded by DOE, are continuing their work in the area of research and development. The emphasis is on the development of new tools and instrumentation systems, rock mechanics, mathematical modeling and data analysis. Field tests and demonstrations active in the Uinta and Piceance Basins are Gas Producing Enterprises (GPE) Natural Buttes, Wells No. 14, 18, 19, 20, 21, and 22; Mobil Research and Development, Well No. F-31-13G; and Rio Blanco Natural Gas Company, Well No. 498-4-1. Colorado Interstate Gas Company has initiated activity on its project with the installation of equipment, and Mitchell Energy Company's proposal to conduct an MHF test in the Cotton Valley lime gas reservoir in Texas is nearing the contract negotiation stage.

1978-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

243

EIS-0385: Notice of Proposed Floodplain and Wetland Actions | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

385: Notice of Proposed Floodplain and Wetland Actions 385: Notice of Proposed Floodplain and Wetland Actions EIS-0385: Notice of Proposed Floodplain and Wetland Actions Site Selection for the Expansion of the Strategic Petroleum Reserve Announcement The Department of Energy (DOE) is preparing an environmental impact statement (EIS) for site selection for expansion of the Strategic Petroleum Reserve, as required by the Energy Policy Act of 2005. DOE hereby gives early notice that it will include in the Draft EIS a floodplain and wetland assessment prepared in accordance with the DOE Regulations for Compliance with Floodplain and Wetland Environmental Review Requirements (10 CFR Part 1022) and provides for early public input. DOE/EIS-0385, Department of Energy, Notice of Proposed Floodplain and Wetland Actions for the Site Selection for the Expansion of the Strategic

244

EIS-0385: Notice of Proposed Floodplain and Wetland Actions | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Proposed Floodplain and Wetland Actions Proposed Floodplain and Wetland Actions EIS-0385: Notice of Proposed Floodplain and Wetland Actions Site Selection for the Expansion of the Strategic Petroleum Reserve Announcement The Department of Energy (DOE) is preparing an environmental impact statement (EIS) for site selection for expansion of the Strategic Petroleum Reserve, as required by the Energy Policy Act of 2005. DOE hereby gives early notice that it will include in the Draft EIS a floodplain and wetland assessment prepared in accordance with the DOE Regulations for Compliance with Floodplain and Wetland Environmental Review Requirements (10 CFR Part 1022) and provides for early public input. DOE/EIS-0385, Department of Energy, Notice of Proposed Floodplain and Wetland Actions for the Site Selection for the Expansion of the Strategic

245

RFC Sand Creek Development LLC | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

RFC Sand Creek Development LLC RFC Sand Creek Development LLC Jump to: navigation, search Name RFC Sand Creek Development LLC Place Aurora, Colorado Zip 80014 Product Subsidiary of Republic Financial Corporation set up to invest in Sand Creek Energy LLC, a planned gas to liquid facility. Coordinates 39.325162°, -79.54975° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":39.325162,"lon":-79.54975,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

246

Sand Ridges and Dunes in the Calumet Region  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

when the U. S. Steel corporation purchased 8000 acres of sand dunes and swamps for its mills and a new city, Gary, you can still see ridge after ridge paralleling the lake shore...

247

Sand Dunes Hot Spring Aquaculture Low Temperature Geothermal Facility |  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Sand Dunes Hot Spring Aquaculture Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Sand Dunes Hot Spring Aquaculture Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Sand Dunes Hot Spring Aquaculture Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Facility Sand Dunes Hot Spring Sector Geothermal energy Type Aquaculture Location Hooper, Colorado Coordinates 37.7427775°, -105.8752987° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[]}

248

CONTRACTOR REPORT SAND96-2555 UC-1243 Unlimited Release  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

CONTRACTOR REPORT SAND96-2555 UC-1243 Unlimited Release A Study of Productionlnjection Data from Slim Holes and Large-Diameter Wells at the Takigami Geothermal Field, Kyushu,...

249

The effects of psammophilous plants on sand dune dynamics  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Psammophilous plants are special plants that flourish in sand moving environments. There are two main mechanisms by which the wind affects these plants: (i) sand drift exposes roots and covers branches--the exposed roots turn into new plants and the covered branches turn into new roots; both mechanisms result in an enhanced growth rate of the psammophilous plant cover of the dunes; (ii) strong winds, often associated with sand movement, tear branches and seed them in nearby locations, resulting in new plants and an enhanced growth rate of the psammophilous plant cover of the dunes. Despite their important role in dune dynamics, to our knowledge, psammophilous plants have never been incorporated into mathematical models of sand dunes. Here, we attempt to model the effects of these plants on sand dune dynamics. We construct a set of three ordinary differential equations for the fractions of surface cover of regular vegetation, biogenic soil crust and psammophilous plants. The latter reach their optimal growth under (i) specific sand drift or (ii) specific wind power. We show that psammophilous plants enrich the sand dune dynamics. Depending on the climatological conditions, it is possible to obtain one, two, or three steady dune states. The activity of the dunes can be associated with the surface cover--bare dunes are active, and dunes with significant cover of vegetation, biogenic soil crust, or psammophilous plants are fixed. Our model shows that under suitable precipitation rates and wind power, the dynamics of the different cover types is in accordance with the common view that dunes are initially stabilized by psammophilous plants that reduce sand activity, thus enhancing the growth of regular vegetation that eventually dominates the cover of the dunes and determines their activity.

Golan Bel; Yosef Ashkenazy

2013-08-30T23:59:59.000Z

250

Western tight gas sands advanced logging workshop proceedings  

SciTech Connect

An advanced logging research program is one major aspect of the Western Tight Sands Program. Purpose of this workshop is to help BETC define critical logging needs for tight gas sands and to allow free interchange of ideas on all aspects of the current logging research program. Sixteen papers and abstracts are included together with discussions. Separate abstracts have been prepared for the 12 papers. (DLC)

Jennings, J B; Carroll, Jr, H B [eds.

1982-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

251

Compliance With Floodplain and Wetland Environmental Review Requirements (10 CFR Parts 1021 and 1022)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The Department of Energy (DOE) revised its floodplain and wetland environmental review requirements to add flexibility and remove unnecessary procedural burdens by simplifying DOE public...

252

Linking nitrogen biogeochemistry to different stages of wetland soil development in the Mississippi River delta, Louisiana.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Extensive wetland loss and nutrient-enhanced eutrophication occur across the Mississippi River delta and include newly emergent landscapes, in the early stages of ecological succession, and… (more)

Henry, Kelly Marie

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

253

Orleans Local Coastal Program (Louisiana) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Orleans Local Coastal Program (Louisiana) Orleans Local Coastal Program (Louisiana) Orleans Local Coastal Program (Louisiana) < Back Eligibility Commercial Developer Industrial Investor-Owned Utility Municipal/Public Utility Rural Electric Cooperative Utility Savings Category Alternative Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Buying & Making Electricity Water Home Weatherization Solar Wind Program Info State Louisiana Program Type Environmental Regulations Provider Louisiana Department of Natural Resources The Local Coastal Programs Section provides technical assistance, guidance, and management to parishes in the development, approval, and implementation of local coastal programs (LCP). Once an LCP has received federal and state approval, the parish becomes the permitting authority for coastal uses of

254

Western gas sands project status report  

SciTech Connect

The Western Gas Sands Project Plan, Project Implementation Plans and Project Plan Document FY 78 are in various stages of preparation. Information gathering by U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) of the initial data base for many of the project activities is nearing completion. Some base maps are complete and field investigations in the principal areas of interest are being conducted. Research and development by Energy Research Centers and National Laboratories were directed toward new tools and instrumentation systems, rock mechanics experiments, mathematical modeling, and data analysis. The Uinta Basin in Utah and Piceance Basin in Colorado have ongoing massive hydraulic fracture (MHF) experiments in the Upper Cretaceous tight gas formations. These are: CER Corporation, MHF 3; Gas Producing Enterprises, Natural Buttes No. 14, 18, 19, 20; Mobil Oil, F-31-13G; and Rio Blanco Natural Gas, 498-4-1. Colorado Interstate Gas Company has been awarded a contract to determine if productivity in low permeability reservoirs can be improved by reducing the interstitialwater saturation. They will be using two wells, the Sprague No. 1 and Miller No. 1, completed in the Dakota J formation in the Wattenberg Field in north central Colorado. All of the massive hydraulic fracture wells, with the exception of the Pacific Transmission well, have been fractured as planned. The Mobil and GPE No. 14, 18, and 20 wells show significant improvement as compared to original flow rates. The Mobil well is being tested for additional MHF treatments. Sandia Laboratories is continuing their research program in hydraulic fracturing at DOE's Nevada Test Site (NTS).

1977-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

255

FISH-BASED INDICATORS IN GREAT LAKES COASTAL WETLANDS DEVELOPMENT AND USE OF FISH-BASED INDICATORS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, the International Joint Commission designated Hamilton Harbour (HH) as one of78 43 Areas of Concern (AOC was identified by the International Joint Commission as130 an AOC because of problems with nutrient enrichment conditions have improved132 sufficiently such that in 2003, Severn Sound was delisted as an AOC. MB is large

McMaster University

256

The extraction of bitumen from western tar sands. Annual report, July 1990--July 1991  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Contents of this report include the following: executive summary; characterization of the native bitumen from the Whiterocks oil sand deposit; influence of carboxylic acid content on bitumen viscosity; water based oil sand separation technology; extraction of bitumen from western oil sands by an energy-efficient thermal method; large- diameter fluidized bed reactor studies; rotary kiln pyrolysis of oil sand; catalytic upgrading of bitumen and bitumen derived liquids; ebullieted bed hydrotreating and hydrocracking; super critical fluid extraction; bitumen upgrading; 232 references; Appendix A--Whiterocks tar sand deposit bibliography; Appendix B--Asphalt Ridge tar sand deposit bibliography; and Appendix C--University of Utah tar sands bibliography.

Oblad, A.G.; Bunger, J.W.; Deo, M.D.; Hanson, F.V.; Miller, J.D.; Seader, J.D.

1992-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

257

Habitat Use and Spatial Relationships of American Alligator withHabitat Use and Spatial Relationships of American Alligator within Inland Wetlands of East Texasin Inland Wetlands of East Texas Introduction  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Relationships of American Alligator within Inland Wetlands of East Texasin Inland Wetlands of East Texas rebounded to allow hunting throughout most of their range In Texas, management strategies are based upon

Hung, I-Kuai

258

DOE/EA-1584: Final Environmental Assessment for Sand Point Wind Installation Project, Sand Point, Alaska (September 2009)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Sand Point Wind Installation Project Sand Point, Alaska DOE/EA -1584 U.S. Department of Energy Golden Field Office 1617 Cole Boulevard Golden, Colorado 80401-3305 September 2009 TABLE OF CONTENTS Page 1.0 INTRODUCTION .............................................................................................................. 1 1.1 NATIONAL ENVIRONMENTAL POLICY ACT AND RELATED PROCEDURES....................................................................................................... 1 1.2 BACKGROUND .................................................................................................... 1 1.3 PURPOSE AND NEED.......................................................................................... 2 1.4 PUBLIC SCOPING AND CONSULTATION.......................................................

259

Improved cryogenic coring device for sampling wetland soils  

SciTech Connect

This paper is the third in a series on the design and construction (Knaus 1986) and improvements (Knaus and Cahoon 1990) of a cryogenic soil-coring device (cryocorer). Freezing wetland soils in place during sampling eliminates compaction, dewatering, and loss of flocculent material at the water-sediment interface. The cryocorer is suitable for sampling soils of emergent marsh and mangrove forests as well as shallow water bottoms, although it has been used primarily for the former. A small-diameter frozen soil core minimizes disruption of the surface, can be evaluated immediately for overall quality, and can be used to measure soil profiles and subsample for further analysis. The cryocorer continues to be used in studies of wetland accretion and soil bulk density throughout the US. Concomitant with the increased use of the device, improvements in cryocorer design and application have occurred. Reported here are improvements in design that have been made since 1992 with references to wetland research in which the cryocorer has been used extensively.

Cahoon, D.R.; Lynch, J.C. [National Biological Service, Lafayette, LA (United States); Knaus, R.M. [Louisiana State Univ., Baton Rouge, LA (United States)

1996-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

260

Potential for substitution of geothermal energy at domestic defense installations and White Sands Missile Range  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Geothermal resources that might provide substitute energy at any of 76 defense installations are identified and evaluated. The geologic characteristics and related economics of potential geothermal resources located at or near the 76 installations were estimated. The geologic assessment identified 18 installations with possible geothermal resources and 4 Atlantic Coastal Plain resource configurations that represented the alternatives available to East Coast bases. These 18 locations and 4 resource configurations, together with 2 possible resources at the White Sands Missile Range and a potential resource at Kings Bay, Georgia, were examined to determine the relative economics of substituting potential geothermal energy for part or all of the existing oil, gas, and electrical energy usage. Four of the military installations - Mountain Home, Norton, Hawthorne, and Sierra - appear to be co-located with possible geothermal resources which, if present, might provide substitute energy at or below current market prices for oil. Six additional locations - Ellsworth, Luke, Williams, Bliss, Fallon, and Twentynine Palms - could become economically attractive under certain conditions. No geothermal resource was found to be economically competitive with natural gas at current controlled prices. Generation of electric power at the locations studied is estimated to be uneconomic at present.

Bakewell, C.A.; Renner, J.L.

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "wetlands coastal sand" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Method of tagging sand with ruthenium-103 and the resultant product  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A procedure for tagging sand with a radioisotope for use in the study of sediment transport involves the precipitation of a metal radioisotope in the form of an iodide directly on the sand, followed by heating the sand to a temperature sufficient to effect a phase transformation of the sand and a decomposition of the metal iodide, leaving the metal firmly attached to the sand.

Case, Forrest N. (Oak Ridge, TN); McFarland, Clyde E. (Knoxville, TN)

1976-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

262

Professional Master's Degree in Wetlands Conservation This program is designed for students who want professional training in the  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

want professional training in the multidisciplinary field of wetlands science and management Management POLSCI 786 Policy Evaluation POLSCI 784 Environmental Policy POLSCI 787 Policy Analysis & ChoiceProfessional Master's Degree in Wetlands Conservation This program is designed for students who

Schweik, Charles M.

263

Potential Oil Production from the Coastal Plain of the Arctic...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Potential Oil Production from the Coastal Plain of the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge: Updated Assessment 3. Summary The 1.5 million-acre coastal plain of the 19 million-acre...

264

The Vertical Structure of New England Coastal Fronts  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Aircraft data from the New England Winter Storms Experiment (NEWSEX) are used to examine the vertical structure of four New England coastal fronts. The aircraft made multiple passes at varying elevations through the coastal fronts. The ...

John W. Nielsen; Peter P. Neilley

1990-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

265

Mechanisms of metal release from contaminated coastal sediments  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The fate of trace metals in contaminated coastal sediments is poorly understood, yet critical for effective coastal management. The aim of this thesis is to investigate and quantify the mechanisms leading to the release ...

Kalnejais, Linda H

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

266

The Diffraction of Kelvin Waves and Bores at Coastal Bends  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Bends in coastal mountain ranges may diffract propagating atmospheric Kelvin waves and trapped coastal currents. Analytic solutions exist for the diffraction of both linear Kelvin waves and linear nonrotating gravity waves. Within the context of ...

William C. Skamarock; Joseph B. Klemp; Richard Rotunno

1996-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

267

California Coastal Commission | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Logo: California Coastal Commission Name California Coastal Commission Address 45 Fremont Street, Suite 2000 Place San Francisco, California Zip 94105-2219 Phone number 415-904-5400 Website http://www.coastal.ca.gov/ Coordinates 37.7912419°, -122.397133° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":37.7912419,"lon":-122.397133,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

268

Coastal Electric Coop, Inc | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Coastal Electric Coop, Inc Coastal Electric Coop, Inc Place South Carolina Utility Id 3844 Utility Location Yes Ownership C NERC Location SERC Activity Distribution Yes References EIA Form EIA-861 Final Data File for 2010 - File1_a[1] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Utility Rate Schedules Grid-background.png CP-1 Commercial CTOU Commercial ED1 Commercial GA Commercial GAM Commercial Industrial Industrial Large Commercial Industrial P1 Commercial Residential Residential Small Commercial Commercial Average Rates Residential: $0.1320/kWh Commercial: $0.1110/kWh References ↑ "EIA Form EIA-861 Final Data File for 2010 - File1_a" Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Coastal_Electric_Coop,_Inc&oldid=410483

269

CONSTRUCTED WETLAND TREATMENT SYSTEMS FOR WATER QUALITY IMPROVEMENT  

SciTech Connect

The Savannah River National Laboratory implemented a constructed wetland treatment system (CWTS) in 2000 to treat industrial discharge and stormwater from the Laboratory area. The industrial discharge volume is 3,030 m{sup 3} per day with elevated toxicity and metals (copper, zinc and mercury). The CWTS was identified as the best treatment option based on performance, capital and continuing cost, and schedule. A key factor for this natural system approach was the long-term binding capacity of heavy metals (especially copper, lead, and zinc) in the organic matter and sediments. The design required that the wetland treat the average daily discharge volume and be able to handle 83,280 m{sup 3} of stormwater runoff in a 24 hour period. The design allowed all water flow within the system to be driven entirely by gravity. The CWTS for A-01 outfall is composed of eight one-acre wetland cells connected in pairs and planted with giant bulrush to provide continuous organic matter input to the system. The retention basin was designed to hold stormwater flow and to allow controlled discharge to the wetland. The system became operational in October of 2000 and is the first wetland treatment system permitted by South Carolina DHEC for removal of metals. Because of the exceptional performance of the A-01 CWTS, the same strategy was used to improve water quality of the H-02 outfall that receives discharge and stormwater from the Tritium Area of SRS. The primary contaminants in this outfall were also copper and zinc. The design for this second system required that the wetland treat the average discharge volume of 415 m{sup 3} per day, and be able to handle 9,690 m{sup 3} of stormwater runoff in a 24 hour period. This allowed the building of a system much smaller than the A-01 CWTS. The system became operational in July 2007. Metal removal has been excellent since water flow through the treatment systems began, and performance improved with the maturation of the vegetation during the first season of growth of each system. Sediment samples after the first and third years of operation indicated that copper was being bound in the sediments very rapidly after entering the treatment system. The design of the system encourages low redox and sulfide production in the sediments. The objective is to stabilize metals, including mercury, as sulfide compounds in the sediments. Costs for maintenance and operation of the systems are minimal, consisting primarily of ensuring that the pipes are not clogged and that water is flowing through the system. The treatment cost per thousand gallons is many times less than conventional wastewater treatment facilities. Life expectancy and function of the biological system is based on the life of the engineering aspects and not the wetland ecology.

Nelson, E.

2010-07-19T23:59:59.000Z

270

Assessment of the geothermal/geopressure potential of the Gulf Coastal Plan of Alabama. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Geothermal and geopressure as well as geologic and geophysical data were studied to evaluate the potential for future development of geothermal resources underlying the Alabama Coastal Plain. Wire-line log data compiled and interpreted from more than 1300 oil and gas test wells included maximum recorded temperatures, mud weights, rock resistivities as related to geopressure, formation tops, fault locations, and depths to basement rock. The Alabama Coastal Plain area is underlain by a conduction dominated, deep sedimentary basin where geothermal gradients are low to moderate (1.0 to 1.8/sup 0/F/100 feet). In some areas of southwest Alabama, abnormally high temperatures are found in association with geopressured zones within the Haynesville Formation of Jurassic age; however, rocks of poor reservoir quality dominate this formation, with the exception of a 200-square-mile area centered in southernmost Clarke County where a porous and permeable sand unit is encased within massive salt deposits of the lower Haynesville. The results of a petrograhic study of the Smackover Formation, which underlies the Haynesville, indicate that this carbonate rock unit has sufficient porosity in some areas to be considered a potential geothermal reservoir. Future development of geothermal resources in south Alabama will be restricted to low or moderate temperature, non-electric applications, which constitute a significant potential energy source for applications in space heating and cooling and certain agricultural and industrial processes.

Wilson, G.V.; Wang, G.C.; Mancini, E.A.; Benson, D.J.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

271

4.154 Architecture Design Option Studio --Wetlands Awareness Center Instructor: Trey Trahan, ttrahan@trahanarchitects.com  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

's wetlands and accounts for 90% of the total wetlands lost. Today, Louisiana is losing wetlands at a rate the public on the historic and contemporary relationships between infrastructure, industry, community and/or electricity). There should be some consideration of building in areas susceptible to high winds

Entekhabi, Dara

272

MINERALOGY AND GENESIS OF SMECTITES IN AN ALKALINE-SALINE ENVIRONMENT OF PANTANAL WETLAND, BRAZIL  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

MINERALOGY AND GENESIS OF SMECTITES IN AN ALKALINE-SALINE ENVIRONMENT OF PANTANAL WETLAND, BRAZIL, Universidade de Sa~o Paulo (USP), Av. Prof. Dr. Lineu Prestes, 338, 05508-900, Sa~o Paulo, Brazil 2 Soil-saline lake of Nhecola^ndia, a sub-region of the Pantanal wetland, Brazil, and then to identify the mechanisms

Ahmad, Sajjad

273

Hydrologic and Water-Quality Conditions During Restoration of the Wood River Wetland,  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

.S. Geological Survey #12;Front Cover: Aerial view of the lower Wood River Valley showing the Wood River Wetland.S. Geological Survey, January 2003. #12;Hydrologic and Water-Quality Conditions During Restoration of the Wood­5004 U.S. Department of the Interior U.S. Geological Survey #12;U.S. Department of the Interior KEN

274

FITOVERT: A dynamic numerical model of subsurface vertical flow constructed wetlands  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper introduces a mathematical model (FITOVERT) specifically developed to simulate the behaviour of vertical subsurface flow constructed wetlands (VSSF-CWs). One of the main goals of the development of FITOVERT was to keep the complexity of the ... Keywords: Constructed wetlands, Hydrodynamics, Modelling, Reactive transport, Unsaturated flow, Vertical subsurface flow

D. Giraldi; M. de Michieli Vitturi; R. Iannelli

2010-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

275

Coastal Upwelling: Onshore–Offshore Circulation, Equatorward Coastal Jet and Poleward Undercurrent over a Continental Shelf-Slope  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The onshore-offshore circulation, equatorward coastal jet and poleward undercurrent associated with coastal upwelling are studied with numerical models. The model ocean has a continental shelf-slope uniform in the longshort direction and is ...

Nobuo Suginohara

1982-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

276

TR-034 Geomorphology March 2006 Coastal fan destabilization  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the watershed boundary). 3.0 STUDY DESIGN AND METHODS To evaluate fans from a broad range of coastal conditionsTR-034 Geomorphology March 2006 Coastal fan destabilization and forest management by T.H. Millard Columbia V9L 1V2 Citation: Millard, T.H., D.J. Wilford and M.E. Oden. 2006. Coastal fan destabilization

277

Observed Dynamics of Coastal Flow at Cape Mendocino during Coastal Waves 1996  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Airborne in situ and remote meteorological measurements from around Cape Mendocino, California, sampled during the Coastal Waves 1996 field program are analyzed for three different days: 7, 12, and 26 June 1996. Two days conformed to typical ...

Linda Ström; Michael Tjernström; David P. Rogers

2001-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

278

Method for manufacturing a well production and sand screen assembly  

SciTech Connect

A method for forming and assembling a well production and sand screen assembly in a well having a screen therein forming an outer annulus and a wash pipe internally of the screen forming an inner annulus comprising further (A) mounting a high pressure fluid pump means and a valve means on each wash pipe, inner annulus, and outer annulus, and (B) connecting the valve means in fluid communication with the high pressure fluid pump means for controlling the ingress and egress of the high pressure fluids and removed formation material for forming a sand pack in the well and simultaneously for applying and maintaining a positive fluid pressure against the overburden during work in the well for preventing cave-ins and sloughing of the unconsolidated formation well walls until the sand pack is formed.

Widmyer, R.H.

1982-10-12T23:59:59.000Z

279

Specifically Designed Constructed Wetlands: A Novel Treatment Approach for Scrubber Wastewater  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A pilot-scale wetland treatment system was specifically designed and constructed at Clemson University to evaluate removal of mercury, selenium, and other constituents from flue gas desulfurization (FGD) wastewater. Specific objectives of this research were: (1) to measure performance of a pilot-scale constructed wetland treatment system in terms of decreases in targeted constituents (Hg, Se and As) in the FGD wastewater from inflow to outflow; (2) to determine how the observed performance is achieved (both reactions and rates); and (3) to measure performance in terms of decreased bioavailability of these elements (i.e. toxicity of sediments in constructed wetlands and toxicity of outflow waters from the treatment system). Performance of the pilot-scale constructed wetland treatment systems was assessed using two criteria: anticipated NPDES permit levels and toxicity evaluations using two sentinel toxicity-testing organisms (Ceriodaphnia dubia and Pimephales promelas). These systems performed efficiently with varied inflow simulations of FGD wastewaters removing As, Hg, and Se concentrations below NPDES permit levels and reducing the toxicity of simulated FGD wastewater after treatment with the constructed wetland treatment systems. Sequential extraction procedures indicated that these elements (As, Hg, and Se) were bound to residual phases within sediments of these systems, which should limit their bioavailability to aquatic biota. Sediments collected from constructed wetland treatment systems were tested to observe toxicity to Hyalella azteca or Chironomus tetans. Complete survival (100%) was observed for H. azteca in all cells of the constructed wetland treatment system and C. tentans had an average of 91% survival over the three treatment cells containing sediments. Survival and growth of H. azteca and C. tentans did not differ significantly between sediments from the constructed wetland treatment system and controls. Since the sediments of the constructed wetland treatment system are repositories for As, Hg, and Se and the bioavailability of these elements decreased after deposition, the pilot-scale constructed wetland treatment system contributed significantly to mitigation of risks to aquatic life from these elements.

John H. Rodgers Jr; James W. Castle; Chris Arrington: Derek Eggert; Meg Iannacone

2005-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

280

Coastal Upwelling Viewed as a Stochastic Phenomenon  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Four years of winds from the northeastern Pacific are used to drive a reduced-gravity ocean model which includes a high-resolution eastern coastal zone that span 17° longitude and 30° latitude. Spectra of the alongshore velocity and interface ...

J. A. Carton; S. G. H. Philander

1984-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "wetlands coastal sand" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Eastern Boundary Currents and Coastal Upwelling  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The adjustment of the eastern coastal zone of an inviscid ocean with vertical walls to a change in wind conditions occurs in two stages. After the propagation of a Kelvin wave across the forced region in a time Tk which is of the order of a day ...

S. G. H. Philander; J-H. Yoon

1982-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

282

Dynamics of the South American Coastal Desert  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The world's driest coastal desert is in South America along the coasts of Peru and Chile. The desert's maintenance is investigated by studying the local dynamics of the low-level southerly flow along the coast. A linear boundary-layer model is ...

Magda Luzimar de Abreu; Peter R. Bannon

1993-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

283

UNDERSTANDING ENTRAINMENT AT COASTAL POWER PLANTS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Thermal power plants larger than 50 megawatts (MW) are required to obtain a California Energy Commission UNDERSTANDING ENTRAINMENT AT COASTAL POWER PLANTS: INFORMING A PROGRAM TO STUDY Landing Power Plant (at center). Image from the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Digital Visual Library. #12

284

California - Coastal Region Coalbed Methane Proved Reserves ...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Coastal Region Coalbed Methane Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 2000's 0 0 0 0 0 2010's 0 0 - No...

285

Pesticide Education in the Coastal Zone of the Arroyo Colorado Watershed Final Report  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Arroyo Colorado is an ancient channel of the Rio Grande River that extends eastward for about 90 miles from near the city of Mission, Texas through southern Hidalgo County to the city of Harlingen in Cameron County, eventually discharging into the Laguna Madre near the Cameron-Willacy County line. The tidal segment of the Arroyo Colorado, as classified by the Texas Commission on Environmental Quality (TCEQ), is between the confluence with Laguna Madre in Cameron/Willacy County to a point 100 meters (110 yards) downstream of Cemetery Road, south of Port Harlingen in Cameron County. This part of the river is also defined as a coastal natural resource area (CNRA) and a coastal wetland in the Coastal Coordination Act. Water quality monitoring over the past decade has confirmed low oxygen levels and escalated ammonia and nitrate concentrations that have contributed to multiple fish kills in the tidal segment. These sub-optimal aquatic conditions resulted in this portion of the Arroyo Colorado being placed on the Texas Water Quality Inventory and 303(d) List for high aquatic life use impairment in 2002. Numerous urban sources, such as point source wastewater discharges, have contributed to this impairment; however, according to the Arroyo Colorado Watershed Protection Plan (ACWPP), nonpoint source agricultural runoff accounts for much of the water quality issues in the tidal segment. These coastal issues and other water quality issues in the watershed have been addressed by the more than 715-member Arroyo Colorado Watershed Partnership in the ACWPP. The plan identifies needs specific to water quality protection and improvement for the agricultural community as well as addressing nonpoint source pollution from the urban environment such as landscapes. In response to the ACWPP, Texas Water Resources Institute (TWRI) proposed to work with the Texas AgriLife Extension Service to implement an educational program aimed at agricultural producers, which included turfgrass producers and local independent school districts that manage athletic fields. The agricultural effort was an integrated farm management program focused on pesticide education and proper nutrient management for Cameron and Willacy counties to address water quality issues related to agricultural production in the tidal segment of the Arroyo Colorado. While the turfgrass and athletic field managers were invited to the educational programs provided through the agricultural effort, a separate educational workshop was held for turf producers and managers to increase awareness of how nutrient, pesticide and irrigation management can reduce the amount of nonpoint source pollution. This education plan helps fulfill two goals of the Texas Coastal Management Program. First, agricultural and turfgrass producers and managers in Cameron and Willacy county were educated on water quality issues and how the proper application of pesticides meets current laws and regulations, and can improve the water quality and fish community in the Arroyo Coastal Natural Resources Area (CNRA). Second, the producers and managers were taught that implementing proper pesticide application practices will reduce the potential for nonpoint source pollution, which will improve the water quality in the Arroyo CNRA. This project also enhances the area's ability to continue to support valuable aquatic life and meet water quality goals outlined in the ACWPP. An additional environmental success for this area, given the over-allocation and availability of clean surface waters, will be the added water savings attributed to the irrigation management educational program provided through this effort.

Berthold, Allen

2011-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

286

Compliance With Floodplain and Wetland Environmental Review Requirements (10 CFR Parts 1021 and 1022) - FR Notice, August 27, 2003  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

51429 51429 Vol. 68, No. 166 Wednesday, August 27, 2003 DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY 10 CFR Parts 1021 and 1022 RIN 1901-AA94 Compliance With Floodplain and Wetland Environmental Review Requirements AGENCY: Department of Energy. ACTION: Final rule. SUMMARY: The Department of Energy (DOE) is revising its floodplain and wetland environmental review requirements to add flexibility and remove unnecessary procedural burdens by simplifying DOE public notification procedures for proposed floodplain and wetland actions, exempting additional actions from the floodplain and wetland assessment provisions of these regulations, providing for immediate action in an emergency, expanding the existing list of sources that may be used in determining the location of floodplains and wetlands, and allowing

287

ESM 254 Course Syllabus COASTAL MARINE ECOSYSTEM PROCESSES  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Lecture ­ Wetland mitigation and restoration in southern CA - Dr Thursday Discussion - Rigs to reefs: should decommissioned POCS oil platforms be used as reefs? Papers: (1) Kaiser MJ. 2006. The Louisiana artificial

California at Santa Barbara, University of

288

Wetlands Standard Dredge and Fill Permit (New Hampshire) | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Standard Dredge and Fill Permit (New Hampshire) Standard Dredge and Fill Permit (New Hampshire) Wetlands Standard Dredge and Fill Permit (New Hampshire) < Back Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Construction Fed. Government Fuel Distributor General Public/Consumer Industrial Installer/Contractor Institutional Investor-Owned Utility Local Government Low-Income Residential Multi-Family Residential Municipal/Public Utility Nonprofit Residential Retail Supplier Rural Electric Cooperative Schools State/Provincial Govt Systems Integrator Transportation Tribal Government Utility Savings Category Alternative Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Buying & Making Electricity Water Home Weatherization Solar Wind Program Info State New Hampshire Program Type Environmental Regulations Provider Department of Environmental Services

289

Microbial Characteristics of Native Aquatic Species of Savannah River Wetlands  

SciTech Connect

In 1974 the Savannah River Site (SRS) was established as a National Environmental Research Park (NERP) in the United States. NERP provided locations for long-term ecological research investigation. Many of the ecological studies that have been conducted in the past mainly focused on the macroscopic view. The Savannah River Site contains wetlands that are home to many diverse organisms. We conducted a preliminary survey of microbial habitats in order to explore the biodiversity of species-specific symbionts. Bacterial surveys included viable counts, direct counts, isolation, identification, and metabolic profiles.

McKinsey, P.C.

2000-12-12T23:59:59.000Z

290

NEW ORLEANS, LA, DISTRICT This district comprises a portion of Louisiana that  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, 1990), which established the Louisiana Coastal Wetlands Conservation and Restoration Task Force for the long-term conservation of Louisiana's coastal wetlands. Projects are added to Priority Project lists Preparedness Program ......................................................... 11-12 16. Coastal Wetlands

US Army Corps of Engineers

291

Enhancing permeability in oil shale and applications to tar sands  

SciTech Connect

Explosive fracturing and rubblization are used to enhance oil shale permeability. Blasting strategy and results are discussed, in particular the Geokinetics blasting. The field data desired are listed. Comments are offered on the extension of the blasting techniques to tar sands. (DLC)

Schamaun, J.T.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

292

Mechanism of acoustic emissions from booming sand dunes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The classical elastic mechanics shows that the fundamental frequency of a sand grain chain is similar to the typical frequency of acoustic emission generated by the booming dunes. The "song of dunes" is therefore considered to originate from the resonance of grain chains occurring within a solid layer only several centimeters thick.

Zhen-Ting Wang

2013-05-10T23:59:59.000Z

293

CO{sub 2}/sand fracturing in low permeability reservoirs  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The objectives of this study are: to demonstrate the effectiveness of a non-damaging liquid, carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) in creating sand-propped hydraulic fractures in ``tight`` gas bearing formations within the Appalachian Basin; and to compare and rank the gas production responses from wells treated with liquid CO{sub 2} with other types of treatments (shooting, water based, nitrogen, etc.). The preliminary results are encouraging, and although only a few months of production is available, the rate of gas production from the CO{sub 2} treated candidate wells is greater than that from the control wells. The CO{sub 2}/sand fracs appear to be 56 percent better than the nitrogen fracs in Pike County. In addition, the CO{sub 2}/sand fracs are 4.8 times better than conventional shot wells in the Pike County study area. It should be recognized that these results are from a very limited data set and overall conclusions may change as more control wells are added to the analysis. From a stimulation process achievement viewpoint, the maximum amount of sand pumped is 46,000 pounds at an average concentration of 3.1 pound per gallon. It should be pointed out that additional foam and nitrogen stimulations have recently been performed by the operator in the Pike County area, and subsequent discussions in the future will include additional control wells to the baseline data sets.

Mazza, R.L.; Gehr, J.B.

1993-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

294

Nitrate-Cancrinite Precipitation on Quartz Sand in Simulated Hanford  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Nitrate-Cancrinite Precipitation on Quartz Sand in Simulated Hanford Tank Solutions B A R R Y R . B minerals at the U.S. Department of Energy's Hanford site in Washington. Nitrate-cancrinite began's (DOE) Hanford Site in southeast Washington since the late 1950s (1). To predict the fate

Illinois at Chicago, University of

295

SAND2006-1982J Solid-State Environmentally Safe  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

battery packs in parallel.The commercial target cost is expected to open at $50 per 1.5-volt cellSAND2006-1982J #12;Solid-State Environmentally Safe Battery for Replacing Lithium Batteries 1 Entry with High Power Battery Systems Company 5 Silkin Street, Apt. 40 Sarov, Nizhny Novgorod Russia

296

Western Gas Sands Project. Quarterly basin activities report  

SciTech Connect

A summation is presented of the coring program site identification, and drilling and testing activity in the four primary study areas of the Western Gas Sands Project (WGSP). Pertinent information for January, February, and March, 1978 is included for each study area. The areas are the Northern Great Plains Province, the Greater Green River Basin, the Piceance Basin, and the Uinta Basin.

1978-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

297

Beneficial Use of Drilling Waste - A Wetland Restoration Technology  

SciTech Connect

This project demonstrated that treated drill cuttings derived from oil and gas operations could be used as source material for rebuilding eroding wetlands in Louisiana. Planning to supply a restoration site, drill a source well, and provide part of the funding. Scientists from southeastern Louisiana University's (SLU) Wetland Biology Department were contracted to conduct the proposed field research and to perform mesocosm studies on the SLU campus. Plans were to use and abandoned open water drill slip as a restoration site. Dredged material was to be used to create berms to form an isolated cell that would then be filled with a blend of dredged material and drill cuttings. Three elevations were used to test the substrates ability to support various alternative types of marsh vegetation, i.e., submergent, emergent, and upland. The drill cuttings were not raw cuttings, but were treated by either a dewatering process (performed by Cameron, Inc.) or by a stabilization process to encapsulate undesirable constituents (performed by SWACO, Division of Smith International).

Pioneer Natural Resources

2000-08-14T23:59:59.000Z

298

Geochemical and physical properties of wetland soils at the Savannah River site  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Savannah River Site (SRS), located in Aiken, Allendale, and Barnwell Counties, South Carolina, is a nuclear production facility operated for the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) by Westinghouse Savannah River Company (WSRC). To facilitate future human health and ecological risk assessments, treatability studies, remedial investigations, and feasibility studies for its wetland areas, SRS needs a database of background geochemical and physical properties of wetland soils. These data are needed for comparison to data collected from wetland soils that may have been affected by SRS operations. SRS contains 36,000 acres of wetlands and an additional 5,000 acres of bottom land soils subject to flooding. Recent studies of wetland soils near various waste units at SRS show that some wetlands have been impacted by releases of contaminants resulting from SRS operations (WSRC, 1992). Waste waters originating from the operations facilities typically have been discharged into seepage basins located in upland soils, direct discharge of waste water to wetland areas has been minimal. This suggests that impacted wetland areas have been affected indirectly as a result of transport mechanisms such as surface runoff, groundwater seeps, fluvial or sediment transport, and leaching. Looney et al. (1990) conducted a study to characterize the geochemical and physical properties of upland soils and shallow sediments on the SRS. A primary objective of the upland study was to collect the data needed to assess the qualitative and quantitative impacts of SRS operations on the environment. By comparing the upland soils data to data collected from waste units located in similar soils, SRS impacts could be assessed. The data were also intended to aid in selection of remediation alternatives. Because waste units at SRS have historically been located in upland areas, wetland soils were not sampled. (Abstract Truncated)

Dixon, K.L; Rogers, V.A.; Conner, S.P.; Cummings, C.L.; Gladden, J.B.; Weber, J.M.

1996-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

299

Extensional wave attenuation and velocity in partially-saturated sand in the sonic frequency range  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

sands can be viewed as an end-member of the spectrum of naturally-occurring granular materials, with tight

Liu, Z.; Rector, J.W.; Nihei, K.T.; Tomutsa, L.; Myer, L.R.; Nakagawa, S.

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

300

Extensional wave attenuation and velocity in partially saturated sand in the sonic frequency range  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

sands can be viewed as an end-member of the spectrum of naturally-occurring granular materials, with tight

Liu, Z.; Rector, J.W.; Nihei, K.T.; Tomutsa, L.; Myer, L.R.; Nakagawa, S.

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "wetlands coastal sand" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Geochemical Evidence for an Eolian Sand Dam across the North and South Platte Rivers in Nebraska  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

microcracks saturating the ECC (Fig. 1(b)) before localization. This tight crack width is essential designation M45) along with green ECC mixture proportions (ECC with green foundry sand, ECC with bag house calcinator sand) Mixture proportions, *high-range water reducer M45 M45G M45 Calcin Cement 1 1 1 F-110 sand 0

Nebraska-Lincoln, University of

302

Velocities of deep water reservoir sands De-hua Han, University of Houston  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and shale, which is not focus for this study. Sorting HP Shale ShallowDeep Sorting HP Shale Sorting HP Shale sands. Grain density is 2.65 gm/cc, typical for clean sands. Measured gas permeability ranged from 100 have revealed gradual effect of clay content on porosity and velocity of shaly sands and sandy shales

303

The extraction of bitumen from western oil sands. Final report, July 1989--September 1993  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Research and development of surface extraction and upgrading processes of western tar sands are described. Research areas included modified hot water, fluidized bed, and rotary kiln pyrolysis of tar sands for extraction of bitumen. Bitumen upgrading included solvent extraction of bitumen, and catalytic hydrotreating of bitumen. Characterization of Utah tar sand deposits is also included.

Oblad, A.G.; Bunger, J.W.; Dahlstrom, D.A.; Deo, M.D.; Fletcher, J.V.; Hanson, F.V.; Miller, J.D.; Seader, J.D.

1994-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

304

Examination of pulverized waste recycled glass as filter media in slow sand filtration. Final report  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this study was to investigate the pulverization of waste recycled glass to produce glass sand for slow sand filters. Pulverization experiments were performed using a fail mill pulverizer. The glass sand product from the pulverizer meets the size distribution requirements of ASTM-C-33 without size distribution adjustment. The size distribution must be adjusted to meet the grain size distribution requirements of the Ten States Standards and the USEPA for filter media used in slow sand filters. Pulverized glass that meet slow sand filter media specifications is an effective alternative to silica sand as a filter media for slow sand filtration. Three pilot plant slow sand filters with glass sand filter media were compared to a fourth filter containing silica sand filter media. Over an 8 month period of continuous operation, the performance of the glass sand filter media was as good or better than the silica sands, with removals of 56% to 96% for turbidity; 99.78% to 100.0% for coliform bacteria; 99.995% to 99.997% for giardia cysts; 99.92% and 99.97% for cryptosporidium oocysts. Based on a cost-benefit analysis, converting waste glass into filter media may be economically advantageous for recycling facilities.

Piccirillo, J.B.; Letterman, R.D.

1997-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

305

Coastal Conservation League | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Conservation League Conservation League Jump to: navigation, search Logo: Coastal Conservation League Name Coastal Conservation League Address 328 East Bay Street PO Box 1765 Place Charleston, South Carolina Zip 29402 Number of employees 11-50 Year founded 1989 Phone number 843-723-8035 Website http://coastalconservationleag Coordinates 32.7867524°, -79.9291032° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":32.7867524,"lon":-79.9291032,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

306

The Coastal Ocean Prediction Systems program: Understanding and managing our coastal ocean. Volume 1: Strategic summary  

SciTech Connect

The proposed COPS (Coastal Ocean Prediction Systems) program is concerned with combining numerical models with observations (through data assimilation) to improve our predictive knowledge of the coastal ocean. It is oriented toward applied research and development and depends upon the continued pursuit of basic research in programs like COOP (Coastal Ocean Processes); i.e., to a significant degree it is involved with ``technology transfer`` from basic knowledge to operational and management applications. This predictive knowledge is intended to address a variety of societal problems: (1) ship routing, (2) trajectories for search and rescue operations, (3) oil spill trajectory simulations, (4) pollution assessments, (5) fisheries management guidance, (6) simulation of the coastal ocean`s response to climate variability, (7) calculation of sediment transport, (8) calculation of forces on structures, and so forth. The initial concern is with physical models and observations in order to provide a capability for the estimation of physical forces and transports in the coastal ocean. For all these applications, there are common needs for physical field estimates: waves, tides, currents, temperature, and salinity, including mixed layers, thermoclines, fronts, jets, etc. However, the intent is to work with biologists, chemists, and geologists in developing integrated multidisciplinary prediction systems as it becomes feasible to do so. From another perspective, by combining observations with models through data assimilation, a modern approach to monitoring is provided through whole-field estimation.

Not Available

1990-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

307

Thermal Spray Coatings for Coastal Infrastructure  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Several protection strategies for coastal infrastructure using thermal-spray technology are presented from research at the Albany Research Center. Thermal-sprayed zinc coatings for anodes in impressed current cathodic protection systems are used to extend the service lives of reinforced concrete bridges along the Oregon coast. Thermal-sprayed Ti is examined as an alternative to the consumable zinc anode. Sealed thermal-sprayed Al is examined as an alternative coating to zinc dust filled polyurethane paint for steel structures.

Holcomb, G.R.; Covino, BernardS. Jr.; Cramer, S.D.; Bullard, S.J.

1997-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

308

The Influence of Flooding on Contributions of Spartina Alterniflora Roots to Salt Marsh Soil Volume in a Field Setting.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Rapid rates of coastal wetland loss in Louisiana are widely recognized. One important question of wetland sustainability is how volumetric contributions of roots to wetland… (more)

Gill, Daniel

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

309

An Objective Climatology of Carolina Coastal Fronts  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This study describes a simple objective method to identify cases of coastal frontogenesis offshore of the Carolinas and to characterize the sensible weather associated with frontal passage at measurement sites near the coast. The identification method, based on surface hourly data from offshore and adjacent land stations, was applied to an 11-yr dataset (1984–94). A total of 379 coastal fronts was found, 70 of which eventually made landfall along the North Carolina coast; 112 that remained offshore, and 197 were termed diurnal since they remained offshore but disappeared during daylight hours. Results show that most coastal and offshore sites experience a wind shift of about 40°–70 ° and a warming of about 2°–3°C during the hour of frontal passage. Exceptions include sites near colder waters where the rates are markedly reduced and frontal passage is often less discernible. Excluding diurnal fronts, just over half the cases were associated with cold-air damming (CAD) during the cold season of 16 October–15 April. Most of these winter cases linked with CAD were onshore fronts. During the warm season, most fronts were diurnal, but the association with CAD was still significant. To explore the synoptic-scale environment, composite maps for the cold season were generated for all three frontal subtypes from NCEP–NCAR reanalysis data. Results show a strong surface anticyclone

K. Wyat Appel; Allen J. Riordan; Timothy A. Holley

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

310

DU presents Louisiana Gulf Coast science-based solutions on ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Wetland loss and importance. Coastal wetland loss is occurring at alarming rates and threatening the coastal region of Louisiana, an area that ...

311

Analysis of the efficacy of a constructed wetland in treating human fecal contamination  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The efficiency of a system of constructed wetlands in treating non-point source pollution, particularly, human fecal contamination, was evaluated by collecting and analyzing water samples using both conventional culture-based ...

Kondepudi, Kathyayani Shobhna

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

312

Constructed Wetland Treatment Systems for the Remediation of Metal-Bearing Aqueous Discharges  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Constructed wetland treatment systems potentially offer utilities an effective, relatively low-cost option for treating aqueous discharges that contain metals. This report provides a ready source of information on these systems and their use within the electric utility industry.

1995-10-05T23:59:59.000Z

313

Division of Water, Parts 662-665: Freshwater Wetlands (New York)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

No person may alter any freshwater wetland or adjacent area without having first submitted an application and obtained an interim permit for the alteration from the department. Some exemptions...

314

Wetland model in an earth systems modeling framework for regional environmental policy analysis  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The objective of this research is to investigate incorporating a wetland component into a land energy and water fluxes model, the Community Land Model (CLM). CLM is the land fluxes component of the Integrated Global Systems ...

Awadalla, Sirein Salah

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

315

Evaluation of CO2 Exchange Rates in a Wetland Ecosystem Using the Closed Geosphere Experiment Facility  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

To evaluate annual CO2 exchange rates in a wetland ecosystem, ecosystem respiration rate (Re), net ecosystem productivity (NEP), and gross primary productivity (GPP) were investigated using the Closed Geosphere Experiment Facility (CGEF) located ...

Shizuo Suzuki; Masayuki Yokozawa; Kazuyuki Inubushi; Toshihiko Hara; Michitoshi Kimura; Shoichi Tsuga; Yasuhiro Tako; Yuji Nakamura

2012-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

316

Application for State Land Use Lease: Surface Lease (SL) - Coastal...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

for State Land Use Lease: Surface Lease (SL) - Coastal Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Reference Material: Application for State Land Use Lease:...

317

Potential Oil Production from the Coastal Plain of the Arctic...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Survey (USGS) resource assessments. This report contains EIA projections of future daily production rates using recent USGS resource estimates. The Coastal Plain study area...

318

,"California - Coastal Region Onshore Crude Oil + Lease Condensate...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","California - Coastal Region Onshore Crude Oil + Lease Condensate Proved Reserves (Million...

319

California - Coastal Region Onshore Crude Oil + Lease Condensate...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Crude Oil + Lease Condensate Proved Reserves (Million Barrels) California - Coastal Region Onshore Crude Oil + Lease Condensate Proved Reserves (Million Barrels) Decade Year-0...

320

,"California - Coastal Region Onshore Associated-Dissolved Natural...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","California - Coastal Region Onshore Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet After Lease...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "wetlands coastal sand" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

,"California - Coastal Region Onshore Natural Gas, Wet After...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","California - Coastal Region Onshore Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Proved Reserves...

322

,"California - Coastal Region Onshore Dry Natural Gas Proved...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","California - Coastal Region Onshore Dry Natural Gas Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic...

323

,"California--Coastal Region Onshore Natural Gas Plant Liquids...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","California--Coastal Region Onshore Natural Gas Plant Liquids, Proved Reserves (Million...

324

Potential Oil Production from the Coastal Plain of the Arctic...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2. Analysis Discussion Resource Assessment The USGS most recent assessment of oil and gas resources of ANWR Coastal Plain (The Oil and Gas Resource Potential of the Arctic...

325

Calif--Coastal Region Onshore Natural Gas Liquids Lease Condensate...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Natural Gas Liquids Lease Condensate, Proved Reserves (Million Barrels) Calif--Coastal Region Onshore Natural Gas Liquids Lease Condensate, Proved Reserves (Million Barrels) Decade...

326

California - Coastal Region Onshore Natural Gas Plant Liquids...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Gas Plant Liquids, Proved Reserves (Million Barrels) California - Coastal Region Onshore Natural Gas Plant Liquids, Proved Reserves (Million Barrels) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2...

327

Potential Oil Production from the Coastal Plain of the Arctic...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Potential Oil Production from the Coastal Plain of the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge: Updated Assessment Glossary ANILCA: Alaska National Interest Lands Conservation Act ANS:...

328

Connectivity mechanisms in a population complex of coastal cod.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??In this thesis I have studied connectivity processes affecting the population structure of coastal cod on the Norwegian Skagerrak coast. I have focused on three… (more)

Espeland, Sigurd Heiberg

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

329

Prehistoric coastal archaeology of the Farasan Islands, Saudi Arabia.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Despite being the oldest multidisciplinary archaeological discipline the study of coastal archaeology and shell mounds has received relatively little attention until recently. The recognition of… (more)

Williams, Matthew Gregory Meredith

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

330

Six Lessons Learned in Applying Science in Coastal Ecosystem Restoration  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the Louisiana Coastal Area Science & Technology Program;guest-blog/2013/04/30/ science-communication-both-an-Keller AC. 2009. Science in environmental policy: the

Boesch, Donald F.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

331

Potential Oil Production from the Coastal Plain of the Arctic...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Setting Geology 2. Analysis Discussion Resource Assessment Method of Analysis ANWR Coastal Plain Assessment 3. Summary Glossary References Access the PDF version of the...

332

Calif--Coastal Region Onshore Crude Oil Reserves in Nonproducing...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Crude Oil Reserves in Nonproducing Reservoirs (Million Barrels) Calif--Coastal Region Onshore Crude Oil Reserves in Nonproducing Reservoirs (Million Barrels) Decade Year-0 Year-1...

333

Wetland and Conservation Banking in Transmission Corridor Rights-of-Way: Feasibility Assessment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Electric power transmission corridor rights-of-way (ROWs) offer potential locations for wetland mitigation banks and conservation banks. Barriers to use of these ROWs for banking include whether the ROW operator has legal rights of access to lands for these uses and for long term management for conservation; the need to assure successful and reliable operation and maintenance of the ROW transmission facilities; the costs of establishing, permitting and managing wetland and conservation banks; and ecologi...

2008-12-10T23:59:59.000Z

334

Containerized Wetland Bioreactor Evaluated for Perchlorate and Nitrate Degradation  

SciTech Connect

The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and Lawrence Livermore Laboratory (LLNL) designed and constructed an innovative containerized wetlands (bioreactor) system that began operation in November 2000 to biologically degrade perchlorate and nitrate under relatively low-flow conditions at a remote location at Site 300 known as Building 854. Since initial start-up, the system has processed over 3,463,000 liters of ground water and treated over 38 grams of perchlorate and 148 kilograms of nitrate. Site 300 is operated by the University of California as a high-explosives and materials testing facility supporting nuclear weapons research. The 11-square mile site located in northern California was added to the NPL in 1990 primarily due to the presence of elevated concentrations of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in ground water. At the urging of the regulatory agencies, perchlorate was looked for and detected in the ground water in 1999. VOCs, nitrate and perchlorate were released into the soil and ground water in the Building 854 area as the result of accidental leaks during stability testing of weapons or from waste discharge practices that are no longer permitted at Site 300. Design of the wetland bioreactors was based on earlier studies showing that indigenous chlorate-respiring bacteria could effectively degrade perchlorate into nontoxic concentrations of chlorate, chlorite, oxygen, and chloride. Studies also showed that the addition of organic carbon would enhance microbial denitrification. Early onsite testing showed acetic acid to be a more effective carbon source than dried leaf matter, dried algae, or milk replacement starter; a nutrient and carbon source used in a Department of Defense phytoremediation demonstration. No inocula were added to the system. Groundwater was allowed to circulate through the bioreactor for three weeks to acclimate the wetland plants and to build a biofilm from indigenous flora. Using solar energy, ground water is pumped into granular activated carbon canisters to remove VOCs (Figure x). Following solar treatment, ground water containing approximately 46 mg/L of nitrate and 13 {micro}g/L of perchlorate is gravity-fed continuously into two parallel series of two-1,900 liter tank bioreactors. Each bioreactor contains coarse, aquarium-grade gravel and locally-obtained plant species such as cattails (Typha spp.), sedges (Cyperus spp.), and indigenous denitrifying microorganisms. No inocula were added to the system. Groundwater was allowed to circulate through the bioreactor for three weeks to acclimate the wetland plants and to build a biofilm from indigenous flora. Sodium acetate is added to the first bioreactor in each of the two series to promote growth and metabolic activity of rhizome microorganisms. The split flow from each series is combined, and flows through two back-up ion exchange columns to assure complete perchlorate removal. Effluent from the ground water treatment system is monitored and discharged an infiltration trench in accordance with the Substantive Requirements for Waste Discharge issued by the California Regional Water Quality Control Board.

Dibley, V R; Krauter, P W

2004-12-02T23:59:59.000Z

335

Floodplain and wetlands assessment of the White Oak Creek Embayment  

SciTech Connect

This report describes the proposed methods for dealing with contaminants that have accumulated in White Oak Creek, White Oak Lake, and the White Oak Creek Embayment as a result of process releases and discharges from the Oak Ridge National Laboratory. Alternative methods of cleaning up the area which were considered in accordance with regulatory guidelines are listed, and information supporting the selected methods is provided. Also included are results of a site survey conducted at the White Oak Creek Embayment and the expected effects of the proposed control structures on the floodplain and wetlands. The appendix contains figures showing the nine cross-sections of the stream channel surveyed during studies of the White Oak Creek area.

1991-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

336

SAND97-8490 UC-404 Unlimited Release  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

SAND97-8490 UC-404 SAND97-8490 UC-404 Unlimited Release Printed March 1997 J Mechanical Properties and Energy Absorption Characteristics of a Polyurethane Foam S. H. Goods, C. L. Neuschwanger, C. Henderson, D. M. Skala DISCLAIMER This report was prepared as a n account of work sponsored by a n agenq of the United States Government. Neither the United States Government nor any agency thereof, nor any of their employees, make any warrantyy express or impIied, or assumes any legal liabili- ty or responsibility for the accuracy, completeness, or usefulness of any information, appa- ratus, product, or process disdased, or represents that its use would not infringe privately owned rights. Reference herein to any specific commercial product, process, or service by trade name, trademark, manufacturer, or otherwise does not necrsariiy constitute or

337

Shredded tires and rubber-sand as lightweight backfill  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The growing interest in utilizing waste materials in civil engineering applications has opened the possibility of constructing reinforced soil structures with unconventional backfills. Scrap tires are a high-profile waste material for which several uses have been studied, including the use of shredded tires as backfill. A triaxial testing program was conducted to investigate the stress-strain relationship and strength of tire chips and a mixture of sand and tire chips. The test results and additional information from the literature were used in the numerical modeling of wall backfills, both unreinforced and reinforced with geosynthetics. The numerical modeling results suggest tire shreds, particularly when mixed with sand, may be effectively used as a backfill.

Lee, J.H.; Salgado, R.; Lovell, C.W. [Purdue Univ., West Lafayette, IN (United States). School of Civil Engineering; Bernal, A. [GeoHidra, Caracas (Venezuela)

1999-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

338

White Sands, New Mexico: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Sands, New Mexico: Energy Resources Sands, New Mexico: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 32.38319°, -106.481499° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":32.38319,"lon":-106.481499,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

339

Shallow horizontal drilling in unconsolidated sands offshore California  

SciTech Connect

Four shallow horizontal wells were drilled from Platform C in Dos Cuadras field offshore California to recover reserves inaccessible with conventional drilling techniques. The wells had true vertical depths (TVD's) ranging from 746 to 989 ft with total horizontal displacements from 1,613 to 3,788 ft. The wells had horizontal displacement TVD ratios up to 3.95. The targets were unconsolidated, high-permeability sands. This paper details well planning, drilling, and completion.

Payne, J.D.; Bunyak, M.J. (Unocal Corp., Los Angeles, CA (United States)); Huston, C.W. (Smith International Inc., Tyler, TX (United States))

1993-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

340

Method for diverting a gaseous sand-consolidating fluid  

SciTech Connect

An unconsolidated gas-producing sand in which the permeability is layered and the productivity can be impaired by liquid blocking can be consolidated by wetting the rock surfaces with a limited amount of water, injecting a smoke which selectively reduces the permeability of the most permeable layers by depositing on their faces unconsolidated masses of substantially inert solid particles and injecting a gaseous silicon polyhalide to convert a significant proportion of the rock surface-wettingwater to a grain bonding silica gel.

Davies, D. R.; Richardson, E. A.

1980-12-30T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "wetlands coastal sand" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Biomass production and chemical cycling in a man-made geothermal wetland  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Biomass production and, to a lesser extent, chemical cycling have been evaluated in a man-made wetland created using geothermal water in southcentral Idaho. The wetland system consisted of a 0.25 ha area divided into two ponds. The upper pond contained submerged species (Egeria, pondweeds and coontail); the lower pond was planted with emergents (cattail, bulrush, and common reed). Biomass production from emergent plants in the two-year-old system was promising and compared favorably with production values reported in the literature for natural wetlands. Chemical cycling of potassium (K) was evaluated through the lower pond system. Uptake of several other constituents (F and Na) of the geothermal water by the emergent plants was observed. However, there was little difference in elemental concentrations of the system's influent and effluent, probably due to evapotranspiration of water which effectively concentrates elements in the remaining water. Twenty-one species of diatoms were identified in the geothermal wetland, and numerous species of insects were observed. The man-made wetland also created substantial habitat for wildlife. This type of system could be used as an alternative to injection of spent geothermal fluids from small-scale projects. Study results indicate that a wetland system can be developed to produce substantial quantities of biomass in a cold desert environment.

Breckenridge, R.P.; Wheeler, L.R.; Ginsburg, J.F.

1983-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

342

Project Drum Inlet: explosive excavation in saturated sand  

SciTech Connect

Seasonal storms during February of 1971 completely closed the Drum Inlet navigation channel through the Outer Banks off the North Carolina coast. This channel is highly useful to commercial and sport fishing industries in the Carteret County vicinity of North Carolina, and is vital to maintenance of the ecological balance in the inland Core Sound waters. To reopen Drum Inlet, an alignment about 2.1 miles south of the original location was selected. A contract dredge excavated a channel from the inland Core Sound waterway to and part way through the Outer Banks. The final 385-ft-long section of sand separating the Core Sound from the Atlantic Ocean was excavated with large explosive charges, This report describes the explosive excavation of that portion of the channel. Twenty-two separate canisters, each containing 1 ton of aluminized ammonium-nitrate slurry blasting agent, were emplaced in two rows. All charges were detonated simultaneously at 1327 hours, 23 Decembcr 1971. The detonation successfully removed the sand barrier, forming a continuous channel over 80 ft in width. This channel subsequently washed out to a width of about 1000 ft and was used:is an access route to the Raleigh Bay fishing grounds. The Drum Inlet project demonstrated the practicality of explosive channel excavation in saturated sand under the special conditions encountered at this site. (auth)

Snell, C.M.; Gillespie, R.H.

1973-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

343

Improved core recovery in laminated sand and shale sequences  

SciTech Connect

Coring and core analysis are essential to the exploration, development, and production phases of the oil and gas industry. Large-diameter (4-in. (10-cm)) core provides engineers and geologists with direct means to measure physical properties of reservoir rocks at both the microscopic and macroscopic levels. This information provides engineers with clues to improve their understanding of the reservoir and prediction of its performance. If stored properly, core may assist in development of the reservoir many years after the well is drilled. In microlaminated reservoirs, laboratory core analysis is very important because of inherent limitations in wireline log resolution. In these cases, petrophysical information, such as saturation, porosity, and net feet of pay, cannot be calculated from wireline data. Instead, these data must be measured directly from core plugs in the laboratory. Historically, core recovery in these types of reservoirs has not been good (Fig. 1A) using methods designed for firmly consolidated formations. These methods did not achieve satisfactory recovery in unconsolidated sand interbedded with hard shale stringers for two reasons: unconsolidated sand was eroded by mechanical or hydraulic means and shale ''jammed'' in the core barrel, thereby preventing more core from entering. Changes in coring strategies and equipment have nearly eliminated recovery problems in unconsolidated sand while reducing jams in shale (Fig. 1B). This paper discusses several of these changes and presents ideas for further improvements.

Bradburn, F.R.; Cheatham, C.A. (Shell Offshore Inc. (US))

1988-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

344

File:OilSands.pdf | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

OilSands.pdf OilSands.pdf Jump to: navigation, search File File history File usage File:OilSands.pdf Size of this preview: 463 × 599 pixels. Other resolution: 464 × 600 pixels. Go to page 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 32 33 34 35 36 37 38 39 40 41 42 43 44 45 46 47 48 49 50 51 52 53 54 55 56 57 58 59 60 61 62 63 64 65 66 67 68 69 70 71 72 73 74 75 76 77 78 79 80 81 82 83 84 85 Go! next page → next page → Full resolution ‎(1,275 × 1,650 pixels, file size: 1.69 MB, MIME type: application/pdf, 85 pages) File history Click on a date/time to view the file as it appeared at that time. Date/Time Thumbnail Dimensions User Comment current 14:24, 14 February 2012 Thumbnail for version as of 14:24, 14 February 2012 1,275 × 1,650, 85 pages (1.69 MB) Graham7781 (Talk | contribs)

345

Canyon dissolution of sand, slag, and crucible residues  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An alternative to the FB-Line scrap recovery dissolver was desired for the dissolution of sand, slag, and crucible (SS{ampersand}C) residues from the plutonium reduction process due to the potential generation of hydrogen gas concentrations above the lower flammability limit. To address this concern, a flowsheet was developed for the F-Canyon dissolvers. The dissolvers are continually purged with nominally 33 SCFM of air; therefore the generation of flammable gas concentrations should not be a concern. Following removal of crucible fragments, small batches of the remaining sand fines or slag chunks containing less than approximately 350 grams of plutonium can be dissolved using the center insert in each of the four annular dissolver ports to address nuclear criticality safety concerns. Complete dissolution of the sand fines and slag chunks was achieved in laboratory experiments by heating between 75 and 85 degrees Celsius in a 9.3M nitric acid/0.013M (hydrogen) fluoride solution. Under these conditions, the sand and slag samples dissolved between 1 and 3 hours. Complete dissolution of plutonium and calcium fluorides in the slag required adjusting the dissolver solution to 7.5 wt% aluminum nitrate nonahydrate (ANN). Once ANN was added to a dissolver solution, further dissolution of any plutonium oxide (PuO2) in successive charges was not practical due to complexation of the fluoride by aluminum. During the laboratory experiments, well mixed solutions were necessary to achieve rapid dissolution rates. When agitation was not provided, sand fines dissolved very slowly. Measurement of the hydrogen gas generation rate during dissolution of slag samples was used to estimate the amount of metal in the chunks. Depending upon the yield of the reduction, the values ranged between approximately 1 (good yield) and 20% (poor yield). Aging of the slag will reduce the potential for hydrogen generation as calcium metal oxidizes over time. The potential for excessive corrosion in the dissolvers was evaluated using experimental data reported in the literature. Corrosion data at the exact flowsheet conditions were not available; however, the corrosion rate for 304L stainless steel (wrought material) corrosion coupons in 10M nitric acid/0.01M hydrofluoric acid at 95 degrees Celsius was reported as 21 mils per year. If the fluoride in the dissolver is complexed with aluminum, the corrosion rate will decrease to approximately 5 mils per year.

Rudisill, T.S.; Gray, J.H.; Karraker, D.G.; Chandler, G.T.

1997-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

346

ENERGY IN THE PACIFIC COASTAL ZONE DOES D.O.E. HAVE A ROLE?  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

formul a specific energy policy for the coastal zone becausenot formulated an energy policy that relates specifically toadequately address coastal energy policy. here is to produce

Ritschard, Ronald L.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

347

The Ocean and Coastal Conservation Guide: The Blue Movement Directory (2005-2006)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Magazine, California Coast & Ocean, California Wild, andReview: The Ocean and Coastal Conservation Guide: The BlueMiller San Francisco, USA The Ocean and Coastal Conservation

Miller, Ryder W.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

348

CRC handbook of coastal processes and erosion  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This text includes the following contents: Beach Processes - Erosion - An Introduction. Edge Waves and the Configuration of the Shoreline. Morphodynamics of Beaches and Surf Zones in Australia. The Erosion of Siletz Spit, Oregon. Barrier Islands. Patterns and Prediction of Shoreline Change. Models for Beach Profile Response. Erosion on the Great Lakes Due to Changes in the Water Level. Coastal Erosion in Response to the Construction of Jetties and Breakwaters. Computer Models of Shoreline Changes. Principles of Beach Nourishment. Processes of Sea Cliff and Platform Erosion. Beach Processes and Sea Cliff Erosion in San Diego County, California. Erosion of the United States Shoreline. Index.

Komar, P.D.

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

349

Jurisdictional waters of the United States Wetlands Assessment Analysis and Delineation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

To improve and develop my professional skills, a wetland assessment and delineation was performed for Lakewood Heights, a proposed residential subdivision consisting of 133 hectares, more or less, located in northeast Harris County, Texas. The subject property was evaluated for its content of jurisdictional wetlands, based on U.S. Army corps of Engineers criteria, using interpretation of historical aerial photography, topographic maps, hydrology indicators, and data gathered from site reconnaissance activities. The identified wetland areas were delineated as accurately as possible, based on available information, and were mapped on a survey plat of the property. These areas were contrasted with surrounding uplands, which were mapped as well. Broad scale mapping of soil types by the SCS appears to have been moderately accurate. Through site reconnaissance activities, I verified the scs soil mapping, identified previously unmapped hydric soils, and evaluated and documented vegetation communities that further delineated wetland/upland boundaries. By employing the methods outlined in the 1987 Corps of Engineers Delineation manual that call for evaluations of hydric soils, hydrology indicators, and hydrophytic vegetation, I concluded that approximately 14.68 hectares of the subject property were jurisdictional wetlands. The remaining 118.32 hectares were classified as upland (non-wetland). The wetland delineations made on the subject property were approached in a conservative manner, taking into account transitional or overflow areas which are sometimes hard to define. Those areas which appeared adjacent to a saturated or inundated wetland within the same hydrologic and hydrophytic vegetation regime were included in wetland boundaries. This method of delineation, in my opinion, provides the highest reliability for, even under varying seasonal circumstances, those areas that would appear as jurisdictional waters of the United states. upon completion of the field assessment, the data were assembled into a technical report and presented to the client for his use. we discussed my findings, reviewed the methodology used to determine that wetlands did, in fact, exist on the property and examined land management options, including u.s. Army Corps of Engineers permit procedures.

Siems-Alford, Susan

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

350

National Metal Casting Research Institute final report. Volume 1, Sand reclamation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A mobile thermal foundry sand reclamation unit was designed and constructed. This unit consisted of thermal and mechanical sand reclamation equipment installed on the bed of a 50 foot low-boy trailer. It was transported to a number of Midwest foundries for on-site demonstration of the sand reclamation process. This allowed participating foundries to have their own refuse sand (10-100 tons) processed and then reused in production for evaluation. The purpose for building the unit was to demonstrate to foundries through ``hands on`` experience that refuse sands can be reclaimed and successfully reused particularly in regard to product quality. Most of the participating foundries indicated a high level of satisfaction with the reclaimed sand. Laboratory testing of samples of the used sand, before and after processing by the demonstration unit, verified the usability of the reclaimed sand. One of the foundries participating was a brass foundry, the sand from this foundry contained lead and is classified as a hazardous material. After reclamation the sand was no longer hazardous and could also be reused in the foundry.

Vondra, L.F.; Burningham, J.S. [University of Northern Iowa, Cedar Falls, IA (United States). Dept. of Industrial Technology

1995-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

351

The extraction of bitumen from western oil sands: Volume 2. Final report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The program is composed of 20 projects, of which 17 are laboratory bench or laboratory pilot scale processes or computer process simulations that are performed in existing facilities on the University of Utah campus in north-east Salt Lake City. These tasks are: (1) coupled fluidized-bed bitumen recovery and coked sand combustion; (2) water-based recovery of bitumen; (3) oil sand pyrolysis in a continuous rotary kiln reactor; (4) oil sand pyrolysis in a large diameter fluidized bed reactor; (5) oil sand pyrolysis in a small diameter fluidized bed reactor; (6) combustion of spent sand in a transport reactor; (7) recovery and upgrading of oil sand bitumen using solvent extraction methods; (8) fixed-bed hydrotreating of Uinta Basin bitumens and bitumen-derived hydrocarbon liquids; (9) ebullieted bed hydrotreating of bitumen and bitumen derived liquids; (10) bitumen upgrading by hydropyrolysis; (11) evaluation of Utah`s major oil sand deposits for the production of asphalt, high-energy jet fuels and other specialty products; (12) characterization of the bitumens and reservoir rocks from the Uinta Basin oil sand deposits; (13) bitumen upgrading pilot plant recommendations; (14) liquid-solid separation and fine tailings thickening; (15) in-situ production of heavy oil from Uinta Basin oil sand deposits; (16) oil sand research and development group analytical facility; and (17) process economics. This volume contains reports on nine of these projects, references, and a bibliography. 351 refs., 192 figs., 65 tabs.

Oblad, A.G.; Dahlstrom, D.A.; Deo, M.D.; Fletcher, J.V.; Hanson, F.V.; Miller, J.D.; Seader, J.D.

1997-11-26T23:59:59.000Z

352

Living on the edge with the Oregon coastal atlas  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this paper, we describe an educational DVD entitled Living on the Edge: Building and Buying Property on the Oregon Coast, intended to alert homeowners, buyers, developers, realtors to the hazards associated with storms and other natural processes ... Keywords: atlas, coastal GIS, coastal resource management, geospatial data, internet map servers, natural hazards, public education, state government educational DVD, web GIS

Paul Klarin; Tanya Haddad; Joseph Cone; Dawn J. Wright

2006-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

353

Analysis of environmental constraints on expanding reserves in current and future reservoirs in wetlands. Final report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Louisiana wetlands require careful management to allow exploitation of non-renewable resources without destroying renewable resources. Current regulatory requirements have been moderately successful in meeting this goal by restricting development in wetland habitats. Continuing public emphasis on reducing environmental impacts of resource development is causing regulators to reassess their regulations and operators to rethink their compliance strategies. We examined the regulatory system and found that reducing the number of applications required by going to a single application process and having a coherent map of the steps required for operations in wetland areas would reduce regulatory burdens. Incremental changes can be made to regulations to allow one agency to be the lead for wetland permitting at minimal cost to operators. Operators need cost effective means of access that will reduce environmental impacts, decrease permitting time, and limit future liability. Regulators and industry must partner to develop incentive based regulations that can provide significant environmental impact reduction for minimal economic cost. In addition regulators need forecasts of future E&P trends to estimate the impact of future regulations. To determine future activity we attempted to survey potential operators when this approach was unsuccessful we created two econometric models of north and south Louisiana relating drilling activity, success ratio, and price to predict future wetland activity. Results of the econometric models indicate that environmental regulations have a small but statistically significant effect on drilling operations in wetland areas of Louisiana. We examined current wetland practices and evaluated those practices comparing environmental versus economic costs and created a method for ranking the practices.

Harder, B.J.

1995-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

354

Wetland treatment of oil and gas well waste waters. Final report  

SciTech Connect

Constructed wetlands are small on-site systems that possess three of the most desirable components of an industrial waste water treatment scheme: low cost, low maintenance and upset resistance. The main objective of the present study is to extend the knowledge base of wetland treatment systems to include processes and substances of particular importance to small, on-site systems receiving oil and gas well wastewaters. A list of the most relevant and comprehensive publications on the design of wetlands for water quality improvement was compiled and critically reviewed. Based on our literature search and conversations with researchers in the private sector, toxic organics such as Phenolics and b-naphthoic acid, (NA), and metals such as CU(II) and CR(VI) were selected as target adsorbates. A total of 90 lysimeters equivalent to a laboratory-scale wetland were designed and built to monitor the uptake and transformation of toxic organics and the immobilization of metal ions. Studies on the uptake of toxic organics such as phenol and b-naphthoic acid (NA) and heavy metals such as Cu(II) and Cr(VI), the latter two singly or as non-stoichiometric mixtures by laboratory-type wetlands (LWs) were conducted. These LWs were designed and built during the first year of this study. A road map and guidelines for a field-scale implementation of a wetland system for the treatment of oil and gas wastewaters have been suggested. Two types of wetlands, surface flow (SF) and sub surface flow (SSF), have been considered, and the relative merits of each configuration have been reviewed.

Kadlec, R.; Srinivasan, K.

1995-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

355

The Coastal Ocean Prediction Systems program: Understanding and managing our coastal ocean. Volume 2: Overview and invited papers  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This document is a compilation of summaries of papers presented at the Coastal Ocean Prediction Systems workshop. Topics include; marine forecasting, regulatory agencies and regulations, research and application models, research and operational observing, oceanic and atmospheric data assimilation, and coastal physical processes.

Not Available

1990-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

356

Wetland Flow and Salinity Budgets and Elements of a Decision Support System toward Implementation of Real-Time Seasonal Wetland Salinity Management  

SciTech Connect

The project has provided science-based tools for the long-term management of salinity in drainage discharges from wetlands to the San Joaquin River. The results of the project are being used to develop best management practices (BMP) and a decision support system to assist wetland managers adjust the timing of salt loads delivered to the San Joaquin River during spring drawdown. Adaptive drainage management scheduling has the potential to improve environmental compliance with salinity objectives in the Lower San Joaquin River by reducing the frequency of violation of Vernalis salinity standards, especially in dry and critically dry years. The paired approach to project implementation whereby adaptively managed and traditional practices were monitored in a side-by-side fashion has provided a quantitative measure of the impacts of the project on the timing of salt loading to the San Joaquin River. The most significant accomplishments of the project has been the technology transfer to wetland biologists, ditch tenders and water managers within the Grasslands Ecological Area. This “learning by doing” has build local community capacity within the Grassland Water District and California Department of Fish and Game providing these institutions with new capability to assess and effectively manage salinity within their wetlands while simultaneously providing benefits to salinity management of the San Joaquin River.

Quinn, N.W.T.; Ortega, R.; Rahilly, P.; Johnson, C.B.

2011-12-17T23:59:59.000Z

357

Wetland survey of the X-10 Bethel Valley and Melton Valley groundwater operable units at Oak Ridge National Labortory Oak Ridge, Tennessee  

SciTech Connect

Executive Order 11990, Protection of Wetlands, (May 24, 1977) requires that federal agencies avoid, to the extent possible, adverse impacts associated with the destruction and modification of wetlands and that they avoid direct and indirect support of wetlands development when there is a practicable alternative. In accordance with Department of Energy (DOE) Regulations for Compliance with Floodplains and Wetlands Environmental Review Requirements (Subpart B, 10 CFR 1022.11), surveys for wetland presence or absence were conducted in both the Melton Valley and the Bethel Valley Groundwater Operable Units (GWOU) on the DOE Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR) from October 1994 through September 1995. As required by the Energy and Water Development Appropriations Act of 1992, wetlands were identified using the criteria and methods set forth in the Wetlands Delineation Manual (Army Corps of Engineers, 1987). Wetlands were identified during field surveys that examined and documented vegetation, soils, and hydrologic evidence. Most of the wetland boundary locations and wetland sizes are approximate. Boundaries of wetlands in Waste Area Grouping (WAG) 2 and on the former proposed site of the Advanced Neutron Source in the upper Melton Branch watershed were located by civil survey during previous wetland surveys; thus, the boundary locations and areal sizes in these areas are accurate. The wetlands were classified according to the system developed by Cowardin et al. (1979) for wetland and deepwater habitats of the United States. A total of 215 individual wetland areas ranging in size from 0.002 ha to 9.97 ha were identified in the Bethel Valley and Melton Valley GWOUs. The wetlands are classified as palustrine forested broad-leaved deciduous (PFO1), palustrine scrub-shrub broad-leaved deciduous (PSS1), and palustrine persistent emergent (PEM1).

Rosensteel, B.A.

1996-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

358

Non-Darcy flow analysis through tight sand formations  

SciTech Connect

An experimental setup was designed and constructed to measure the flow parameters through tight sand porous media. The two kinds of coreholders being used are Hassler-type and one in which the core sample is encapsulated in layers of epoxy resin and metal alloy. A gas flow measuring system was also developed for accurately measuring very low gas flow rates. Using Darcy's Law as a tool for analysis of the experimental data, we obtained that the gas permeability of the SFE No. 3 (Staged Field Experiment No. 3) core samples is a linear function of reciprocal mean pressure, and decreases with overburden pressure. The water permeability is also decreased with overburden pressure and is about 6 times smaller than gas permeability for the samples that we have tested. No significant hysteresis effect was obtained for dry gas permeability after several two phase flow runs. We successfully tested our encapsulated coreholder and measured gas flow rate through a tight sand core sample at different pressure drops. The results showed that the experimental runs using Hassler-type coreholder at overburden pressures higher than 2000 psig will probably give us the reliable experimental data. The experimental data obtained from the two different types of tight sandstones were analyzed using the Non-Darcy flow equation. The results showed the importance and reliability of the Non-Darcy formulation for describing the flow behavior under different overburden and system pressures. Non-Darcy's velocity for both gas and liquid phase were incorporated into an existing FORTRAN code for simulation of the tight gas reservoirs. The modified program was tested to compare the initial production data of SFE No. 2 well. Our simulation showed in the case of local turbulence and non-uniformities in the tight sand formation, the value of [beta] increases and Non-Darcy effect becomes important.

Wang, Ching-Huei.

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

359

Completion methods in thick, multilayered tight gas sands  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Tight gas sands, coal-bed methane, and gas shales are commonly called unconventional reservoirs. Tight gas sands (TGS) are often described as formations with an expected average permeability of 0.1mD or less. Gas production rates from TGS reservoirs are usually low due to poor permeability. As such, state-of-the-art technology must be used to economically develop the resource. TGS formations need to be hydraulically fractured in order to enhance the gas production rates. A majority of these reservoirs can be described as thick, multilayered gas systems. Many reservoirs are hundreds of feet thick and some are thousands of feet thick. The technology used to complete and stimulate thick, tight gas reservoirs is quite complex. It is often difficult to determine the optimum completion and stimulating techniques in thick reservoirs. The optimum methods are functions of many parameters, such as depth, pressure, temperature, in-situ stress and the number of layers. In multilayered reservoirs, it is important to include several sand layers in a single completion. The petroleum literature contains information on the various diversion techniques involved in the completion of these multilayered reservoirs. In this research, we have deduced and evaluated eight possible techniques that have been used in the oil and gas industry to divert multilayered fracture treatments in layered reservoirs. We have developed decision charts, economic analyses and computer programs that will assist completion engineers in determining which of the diversion methods are feasible for a given well stimulation. Our computer programs have been tested using case histories from the petroleum literature with results expressed in this thesis. A limited entry design program has also being developed from this research to calculate the fluid distribution into different layers when fracture treating multilayered tight gas reservoirs using the limited entry technique. The research is aimed at providing decision tools which will eventually be input into an expert advisor for well completions in tight gas reservoirs worldwide.

Ogueri, Obinna Stavely

2007-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

360

CO{sub 2}/sand fracturing in Devonian shales  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A total of five carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2})/sand well stimulations were successfully executed with two Devonian shale operators in Perry and Pike Counties, Kentucky. This new stimulation method offers a minimum formation damage proppant stimulation approach for natural gas producers in the United States. Some operators have been concerned about the frac fluid formation damage associated with the water and chemicals used in conventional foam stimulations, whereas other operators have been concerned about the lack of proppant in straight nitrogen fracs used by service companies today. Two carefully screened geological areas of established Devonian shale production were selected based on active ongoing drilling and completion operations. One selected control area contained an existing set of wells with established production histories. More specifically, one operator furnished three offset wells which were stimulated with the carbon dioxide/sand frac method. The quantity of proppant and fluids pumped during each well stimulation ranged from 23,000 to 43,000 pounds of proppant and from 120 to 160 tons of liquid carbon dioxide. Another operator furnished two offset wells which were each stimulated with approximately 47,000 pounds of proppant and 120 tons of carbon dioxide. The logistics and field layout of a typical carbon dioxide/sand frac treatment has been described and highlighted. The importance and unique aspects of the closed system blender that is required for job execution is discussed. Five stimulation treatments have been reviewed, and stimulation and preliminary production data compared to offset wells stimulated with nitrogen, and explosives. Initial production results indicate more than a 50 percent increase in production rate compared to nitrogen fraced wells in the Pike County area.

Yost, A.B. II [USDOE Morgantown Energy Technology Center, WV (United States); Mazza, R.L. [Petroleum Consulting Services, Canton, OH (United States); Gehr, J.B. [Natural Gas Resources Corporation (United States)

1993-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "wetlands coastal sand" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Production process for glass sand from the quartz waste from the beneficiation of kingiseppsk phosphorites  

SciTech Connect

This paper presents a process developed for the production of molding sand from the quartz waste which makes it possible to simplify the system for obtaining glass sand. According to this system, the main operation in the removal of most of the residual phosphate shell and alkaline earth metal oxides from the quartz waste is foam separation, using the residual concentration of reagents in the pulp (tallow and kerosene). After the subsequent washing and hydraulic classification, the sands meet the requirements set for molding sands grade Ob2K. The characteristics of the original flotation tailings and molding sand are presented. The mineralogical analysis of the molding sand showed that the iron-containing impurities are grains of glauconite, films of iron oxide on the surface of the grains, grains of ferrous-dolomite cement, and iron from the apparatus.

Ershov, V.I.; Lezhnev, Y.P.; Novofastovskaya, E.M.; Rants, G.F.; Shalamova, V.G.; Sinyakova, E.I.; Sokolova, E.I.

1985-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

362

Renewable Energy Opportunities at White Sands Missile Range, New Mexico  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The document provides an overview of renewable resource potential at White Sands Missile Range (WSMR) based primarily upon analysis of secondary data sources supplemented with limited on-site evaluations. The effort was funded by the U.S. Army Installation Management Command (IMCOM) as follow-on to the 2005 DoD Renewable Energy Assessment. This effort focuses on grid-connected generation of electricity from renewable energy sources and also ground source heat pumps (GSHPs) for heating and cooling buildings, as directed by IMCOM.

Chvala, William D.; Solana, Amy E.; States, Jennifer C.; Warwick, William M.; Weimar, Mark R.; Dixon, Douglas R.

2008-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

363

Costs Models in Design and Manufacturing of Sand Casting Products  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In the early phases of the product life cycle, the costs controls became a major decision tool in the competitiveness of the companies due to the world competition. After defining the problems related to this control difficulties, we will present an approach using a concept of cost entity related to the design and realization activities of the product. We will try to apply this approach to the fields of the sand casting foundry. This work will highlight the enterprise modelling difficulties (limits of a global cost modelling) and some specifics limitations of the tool used for this development. Finally we will discuss on the limits of a generic approach.

Perry, Nicolas; Bernard, Alain

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

364

Costs Models in Design and Manufacturing of Sand Casting Products  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In the early phases of the product life cycle, the costs controls became a major decision tool in the competitiveness of the companies due to the world competition. After defining the problems related to this control difficulties, we will present an approach using a concept of cost entity related to the design and realization activities of the product. We will try to apply this approach to the fields of the sand casting foundry. This work will highlight the enterprise modelling difficulties (limits of a global cost modelling) and some specifics limitations of the tool used for this development. Finally we will discuss on the limits of a generic approach.

Nicolas Perry; Magali Mauchand; Alain Bernard

2010-11-26T23:59:59.000Z

365

Production from multiple zones of a tar sands formation  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method for treating a tar sands formation includes providing heat to at least part of a hydrocarbon layer in the formation from a plurality of heaters located in the formation. The heat is allowed to transfer from the heaters to at least a portion of the formation. Fluids are produced from the formation through at least one production well that is located in at least two zones in the formation. The first zone has an initial permeability of at least 1 darcy. The second zone has an initial of at most 0.1 darcy. The two zones are separated by a substantially impermeable barrier.

Karanikas, John Michael; Vinegar, Harold J

2013-02-26T23:59:59.000Z

366

Systems and methods for producing hydrocarbons from tar sands formations  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A system for treating a tar sands formation is disclosed. A plurality of heaters are located in the formation. The heaters include at least partially horizontal heating sections at least partially in a hydrocarbon layer of the formation. The heating sections are at least partially arranged in a pattern in the hydrocarbon layer. The heaters are configured to provide heat to the hydrocarbon layer. The provided heat creates a plurality of drainage paths for mobilized fluids. At least two of the drainage paths converge. A production well is located to collect and produce mobilized fluids from at least one of the converged drainage paths in the hydrocarbon layer.

Li, Ruijian (Katy, TX); Karanikas, John Michael (Houston, TX)

2009-07-21T23:59:59.000Z

367

A Bioeconomic Supply Model for Louisiana Nutria and Impacts on Wetlands Conservation Associated with Economic Incentives.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Nutria (Mayocastor) were first introduced to Louisiana in 1938. With few natural predators and high prolific productivity, they became well established in the surrounding coastal… (more)

Ould Dedah, Cheikhna

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

368

Pore-scale mechanisms of gas flow in tight sand reservoirs  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

include tight gas sands, gas shales, and coal-bed methane.Figure 3. Although the gas-shale production grows at a

Silin, D.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

369

Non-Incineration Treatment to Reduce Benzene and VOC Emissions from Green Sand Molding Systems  

SciTech Connect

Final report describing laboratory, pilot scale and production scale evaluation of advanced oxidation systems for emissions and cost reduction in metal casting green sand systems.

Fred S. Cannon; Robert C. Voigt

2002-06-28T23:59:59.000Z

370

Development of Optimal Energy Infrastructures for the Oil Sands Industry in a CO?-constrained World.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Western Canadian bitumen is becoming a predominant source of energy for North American markets. The bitumen extraction and upgrading processes in the oil sands industry… (more)

Ordorica Garcia, Jesus Guillermo

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

371

Adsorption of Single-ring Model Naphthenic Acid from Oil Sands ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Presentation Title, Adsorption of Single-ring Model Naphthenic Acid from Oil Sands Tailings Pond Water Using Petroleum Coke-derived Activated Carbon.

372

An investigation of the combustion of oil sand derived bitumen-in-water emulsions.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

?? Dwindling conventional oil resources has caused exploration efforts to focus elsewhere. Bitumen from oil sands has emerged as one of the primary unconventional oil… (more)

Kennelly, Timothy Robert

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

373

O-1: Using of Spent Moulding Sands for Production of Burned ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The measurements of exhaust gases emissions performed during burning the products containing spent moulding sands as well as during the normal ...

374

I-8: Research on the Influence of Moulding Sand with Furan Resin ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Presentation Title, I-8: Research on the Influence of Moulding Sand with Furan Resin ... Study of Different metallurgical Waste for Preparation of Glass-Ceramics.

375

Meso-Scale Simulations to Examine the Role of Sand Paper Grit on ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The surface between the platen and LX-10 sample includes a layer of sand particulates to .... Shock-Induced Phase Transformations in Ce-Al Metallic Glass.

376

Development Of Reclamation Substrates For Alberta Oil Sands Using Mature Fine Tailings And Coke.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Mature fine tailings and coke are waste products of the oil sands industry with potential for reclamation. A greenhouse study assessed whether substrates of various… (more)

Luna-Wolter, Gabriela L.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

377

Preparation of Activated Carbon from Oil Sands Coke by Chemical and Physical Activation Techniques.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Oil sands coke is a by-product resulting from the upgrading of heavy crude bitumen to light synthetic oil. This research investigates the preparation of activated… (more)

Morshed, Golam

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

378

Appraisal of the tight sands potential of the Sand Wash and Great Divide Basins. Final report, June 1989--June 1991  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The volume of future tight gas reserve additions is difficult to estimate because of uncertainties in the characterization and extent of the resource and the performance and cost-effectiveness of stimulation and production technologies. Ongoing R&D by industry and government aims to reduce the risks and costs of producing these tight resources, increase the certainty of knowledge of their geologic characteristics and extent, and increase the efficiency of production technologies. Some basins expected to contain large volumes of tight gas are being evaluated as to their potential contribution to domestic gas supplies. This report describes the results of one such appraisal. This analysis addresses the tight portions of the Eastern Greater Green River Basin (Sand Wash and Great Divide Subbasins in Northwestern Colorado and Southwestern Wyoming, respectively), with respect to estimated gas-in-place, technical recovery, and potential reserves. Geological data were compiled from public and proprietary sources. The study estimated gas-in-place in significant (greater than 10 feet net sand thickness) tight sand intervals for six distinct vertical and 21 areal units of analysis. These units of analysis represent tight gas potential outside current areas of development. For each unit of analysis, a ``typical`` well was modeled to represent the costs, recovery and economics of near-term drilling prospects in that unit. Technically recoverable gas was calculated using reservoir properties and assumptions about current formation evaluation and extraction technology performance. Basin-specific capital and operating costs were incorporated along with taxes, royalties and current regulations to estimate the minimum required wellhead gas price required to make the typical well in each of unit of analysis economic.

Not Available

1993-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

379

Building the Plane We're Flying: Challenges and Opportunities in Louisiana Coastal Restoration.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??In response to significant wetland loss and damage to the hurricane protection system occurring in the 2005 hurricane season, the Louisiana legislature directed the Department… (more)

Crutcher, Morgan

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

380

Hydraulic fracturing with a refractory proppant for sand control  

SciTech Connect

A sand control and heat transfer method is described for use in a borehole having an unconsolidated or loosely consolidated oil or gas reservoir which is otherwise likely to introduce substantial amounts of sand into the borehole, comprising: (a) providing a borehole casing through the reservoir; (b) perforating the casing at preselected intervals therealong to form at least one of longitudinal, in-line perforations; (c) hydraulically fracturing the reservoir by injecting a fracturing fluid containing a fine grain fused refractory material which comprises substantially silicon carbide or silicon nitride, and a clay stabilizing agent; (d) injecting a proppant comprising a gravel packing fused refractory material comprised substantially of silicon carbide or silicon nitride into the fracture, whereby a first layer of fine grain fused refractory material is held in place along the entire face of the fracture by a second layer of gravel packing fused refractory material also extending along the entire length of the fracture thereby excluding fines; and (e) producing oil or gas from the reservoir through the fracture into the borehole casing via a thermal oil recovery method which proppant and layers provide for increased heat transfer into the formation.

Jennings, A.R. Jr.; Stowe, L.R.

1989-04-04T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "wetlands coastal sand" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Trace metals in heavy crude oils and tar sand bitumens  

SciTech Connect

Fe, Ni, and V are considered trace impurities in heavy crude oils and tar sand bitumens. In order to understand the importance of these metals, we have examined several properties: (1) bulk metals levels, (2) distribution in separated fractions, (3) size behavior in feeds and during processing, (4) speciation as a function of size, and (5) correlations with rheological properties. Some of the results of these studies show: (1) V and Ni have roughly bimodal size distributions, (2) groupings were seen based on location, size distribution, and Ni/V ratio of the sample, (3) Fe profiles are distinctively different, having a unimodal distribution with a maximum at relatively large molecular size, (4) Fe concentrations in the tar sand bitumens suggest possible fines solubilization in some cases, (5) SARA separated fractions show possible correlations of metals with asphaltene properties suggesting secondary and tertiary structure interactions, and (6) ICP-MS examination for soluble ultra-trace metal impurities show the possibility of unexpected elements such as U, Th, Mo, and others at concentrations in the ppB to ppM range. 39 refs., 13 figs., 5 tabs.

Reynolds, J.G.

1990-11-28T23:59:59.000Z

382

Coastal Inlet Model Facility | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Inlet Model Facility Inlet Model Facility Jump to: navigation, search Basic Specifications Facility Name Coastal Inlet Model Facility Overseeing Organization United States Army Corp of Engineers (ERDC) Hydrodynamic Testing Facility Type Wave Basin Length(m) 103.6 Beam(m) 48.8 Depth(m) 0.6 Water Type Freshwater Cost(per day) Contact POC Towing Capabilities Towing Capabilities None Wavemaking Capabilities Wavemaking Capabilities Yes Maximum Wave Height(m) 0.2 Maximum Wave Height(m) at Wave Period(s) 2.3 Wave Period Range(s) 2.3 Current Velocity Range(m/s) 0.0 Programmable Wavemaking Yes Wave Direction Uni-Directional Simulated Beach No Channel/Tunnel/Flume Channel/Tunnel/Flume None Wind Capabilities Wind Capabilities None Control and Data Acquisition Description Automated data acquisition and control system

383

Coastal Structures Modeling Complex | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Structures Modeling Complex Structures Modeling Complex Jump to: navigation, search Basic Specifications Facility Name Coastal Structures Modeling Complex Overseeing Organization United States Army Corp of Engineers (ERDC) Hydrodynamic Testing Facility Type Wave Basin Length(m) 54.9 Beam(m) 35.4 Depth(m) 1.4 Water Type Freshwater Cost(per day) Contact POC Towing Capabilities Towing Capabilities None Wavemaking Capabilities Wavemaking Capabilities Yes Maximum Wave Height(m) 0.3 Wave Period Range(s) 0.0 Current Velocity Range(m/s) 0.0 Programmable Wavemaking Yes Wave Direction Both Simulated Beach No Channel/Tunnel/Flume Channel/Tunnel/Flume None Wind Capabilities Wind Capabilities None Control and Data Acquisition Description Automated data acquisition and control system Cameras None

384

Coastal Electric Member Corp | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Member Corp Member Corp Place Georgia Utility Id 3843 Utility Location Yes Ownership C NERC Location SERC NERC SERC Yes Activity Distribution Yes References EIA Form EIA-861 Final Data File for 2010 - File1_a[1] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Utility Rate Schedules Grid-background.png General Demand Multi Phase Industrial General Demand Single Phase Industrial General Non Demand Multi Phase Commercial General Non Demand Single Phase Commercial Residential Residential Average Rates Residential: $0.1110/kWh Commercial: $0.1010/kWh Industrial: $0.0606/kWh References ↑ "EIA Form EIA-861 Final Data File for 2010 - File1_a" Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Coastal_Electric_Member_Corp&oldid=410484"

385

Coastal Harbors Modeling Facility | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Modeling Facility Modeling Facility Jump to: navigation, search Basic Specifications Facility Name Coastal Harbors Modeling Facility Overseeing Organization United States Army Corp of Engineers (ERDC) Hydrodynamic Testing Facility Type Wave Basin Length(m) 121.9 Beam(m) 48.8 Depth(m) 0.5 Water Type Freshwater Cost(per day) Contact POC Towing Capabilities Towing Capabilities None Wavemaking Capabilities Wavemaking Capabilities Yes Maximum Wave Height(m) 0.2 Maximum Wave Height(m) at Wave Period(s) 2.3 Wave Period Range(s) 2.3 Current Velocity Range(m/s) 0.0 Programmable Wavemaking Yes Wave Direction Uni-Directional Simulated Beach No Channel/Tunnel/Flume Channel/Tunnel/Flume None Wind Capabilities Wind Capabilities None Control and Data Acquisition Description Automated data acquisition and control system

386

Water Quality Criteria for Intrastate, Interstate, and Coastal Water  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Quality Criteria for Intrastate, Interstate, and Coastal Quality Criteria for Intrastate, Interstate, and Coastal Water (Mississippi) Water Quality Criteria for Intrastate, Interstate, and Coastal Water (Mississippi) < Back Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Construction Developer Fed. Government Fuel Distributor General Public/Consumer Industrial Installer/Contractor Institutional Investor-Owned Utility Local Government Low-Income Residential Multi-Family Residential Municipal/Public Utility Nonprofit Residential Retail Supplier Rural Electric Cooperative Schools State/Provincial Govt Systems Integrator Transportation Tribal Government Utility Savings Category Alternative Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Buying & Making Electricity Water Home Weatherization Solar Wind Program Info State Mississippi Program Type Environmental Regulations

387

Florida Coastal Management Act (Florida) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Florida Coastal Management Act (Florida) Florida Coastal Management Act (Florida) Florida Coastal Management Act (Florida) < Back Eligibility Commercial Construction Developer Fed. Government Fuel Distributor Industrial Installer/Contractor Institutional Investor-Owned Utility Local Government Municipal/Public Utility Retail Supplier Rural Electric Cooperative Systems Integrator Transportation Tribal Government Utility Savings Category Alternative Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Buying & Making Electricity Water Home Weatherization Solar Wind Program Info State Florida Program Type Siting and Permitting Provider Florida Department of Environmental Protection This Act is intended to provide for the development of natural, commercial, recreational, ecological, industrial, and aesthetic resources, including,

388

Resource Management Services: Land Use, Part 505: Coastal Erosion  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

5: Coastal Erosion 5: Coastal Erosion Management (New York) Resource Management Services: Land Use, Part 505: Coastal Erosion Management (New York) < Back Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Construction Fed. Government Fuel Distributor General Public/Consumer Industrial Installer/Contractor Institutional Investor-Owned Utility Local Government Low-Income Residential Multi-Family Residential Municipal/Public Utility Nonprofit Residential Retail Supplier Rural Electric Cooperative Schools State/Provincial Govt Systems Integrator Transportation Tribal Government Utility Savings Category Alternative Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Buying & Making Electricity Water Home Weatherization Solar Wind Program Info State New York Program Type Siting and Permitting Provider NY Department of Environmental Conservation

389

EIS-0478: Notice of Intent and Notice of Floodplains and Wetland Action |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Notice of Intent and Notice of Floodplains and Wetland Notice of Intent and Notice of Floodplains and Wetland Action EIS-0478: Notice of Intent and Notice of Floodplains and Wetland Action Antelope Valley Station to Neset Transmission Project The Rural Utilities Service (RUS), an agency within the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA), intends to prepare an environmental impact statement (EIS) for Basin Electric Power Cooperative's (Basin Electric) proposed Antelope Valley Station (AVS) to Neset Transmission Project (Project) in North Dakota. The EIS will address the construction, operation, and maintenance of Basin Electric's proposed Project. The Project includes construction, operation and maintenance of approximately 190 miles of new 345-kV single pole transmission line and double circuit 345/115-kV transmission lines,

390

Evaluation of two commercial bioaugmentation products for enhanced removal of petroleum from a wetland  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The proximity of petroleum producing and processing facilities to wetlands on the Texas Gulf Coast results in chronic exposure of these sensitive environments to petroleum. In addition, concern exists because of the possibility of exposure from large-scale accidental releases of petroleum. Low-impact repudiation strategies are preferred for wetlands, because traditional repudiation strategies may do more harm than good. This is the third phase in a program developed to evaluate bioremediation as an oil spill response tool. The research is conducted at a facility established following an accidental oil spill on the San Jacinto River in October 1994. Previous research evaluated the intrinsic repudiation of petroleum in a wetland, as well as the use of biostimulation for enhanced biodegradation of petroleum in a wetland. The primary goal of this research was to evaluate the performance of two commercial bioaugmentation products for their ability to enhance bioremediation of petroleum in a wetland. Additional treatments included inorganic nutrients, and an oiled control (intrinsic). The experiment used a controlled application of oil to reduce heterogeneity normally associated with spilled petroleum. The experimental design incorporated full replication and interspersion of treatments in a block design. The first-order biodegradation rate coefficients for the total target saturate and total target aromatic hydrocarbons showed no significant differences between treatments. Comparison of first-order biodegradation rate coefficients for individual hydrocarbon target analyses also showed no differences between the treatments. Although not statistically significant, one of the commercial bioaugmentation products did show consistently higher biodegradation rates for individual target analyses. Comparison of first-order biodegradation rate coefficients for the control treatment showed biodegradation rates comparable with those obtained in previous studies conducted at the site. This research study and the previous studies conducted at the site demonstrate bioremediation can be effective in removing petroleum from the environment. However, further research is necessary to optimize treatment strategies and to increase the understanding of the processes which contribute to bioremediation of petroleum in a wetland.

Simon, Mark Allen

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

391

Prediction of Severe Synoptic Events in Coastal East Antarctica  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The coastal region of the Antarctic continent is renowned for the frequent, intense blizzards and associated extreme weather that affect it, creating treacherous conditions that place human activities there in often perilous situations. The ...

Bradley F. Murphy

2003-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

392

Reliant Coastal Plains Biomass Facility | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Coastal Plains Biomass Facility Coastal Plains Biomass Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Reliant Coastal Plains Biomass Facility Facility Reliant Coastal Plains Sector Biomass Facility Type Landfill Gas Location Galveston County, Texas Coordinates 29.3763499°, -94.8520636° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":29.3763499,"lon":-94.8520636,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

393

Coastal Permit Program Rules (New Jersey) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Coastal Permit Program Rules (New Jersey) Coastal Permit Program Rules (New Jersey) Coastal Permit Program Rules (New Jersey) < Back Eligibility Utility Fed. Government Commercial Agricultural Investor-Owned Utility State/Provincial Govt Industrial Construction Municipal/Public Utility Local Government Residential Installer/Contractor Rural Electric Cooperative Tribal Government Low-Income Residential Schools Retail Supplier Institutional Multi-Family Residential Systems Integrator Fuel Distributor Nonprofit General Public/Consumer Transportation Savings Category Alternative Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Buying & Making Electricity Water Home Weatherization Solar Wind Program Info State New Jersey Program Type Siting and Permitting Provider Department of Environmental Protection The Coastal Permit Program Rules provide the processes for permit reviews.

394

Coastal Facilities Review Act (Maryland) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Facilities Review Act (Maryland) Facilities Review Act (Maryland) Coastal Facilities Review Act (Maryland) < Back Eligibility Commercial Construction Fuel Distributor Industrial Institutional Investor-Owned Utility Municipal/Public Utility Retail Supplier Rural Electric Cooperative Systems Integrator Utility Program Info State Maryland Program Type Siting and Permitting Provider Maryland Department of the Environment This Act aims to preserve Maryland's coastal areas and to balance competing demands for resources by requiring environmental impact evaluations to be conducted prior to the approval of the construction or operation of certain facilities. Such review complements the Coastal Zone Management Act of 1972, which establishes a comprehensive plan for the proper use and development of energy resources in coastal areas. This Act applies to

395

Coastal Public Lands Management Act (Texas) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Coastal Public Lands Management Act (Texas) Coastal Public Lands Management Act (Texas) Coastal Public Lands Management Act (Texas) < Back Eligibility Utility Fed. Government Commercial Agricultural Investor-Owned Utility Industrial Construction Municipal/Public Utility Local Government Rural Electric Cooperative Tribal Government Savings Category Alternative Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Buying & Making Electricity Water Home Weatherization Solar Wind Program Info State Texas Program Type Siting and Permitting Provider Texas General Land Office The coastal public lands of the state are managed in accordance with the following principles: (a) The natural resources of the surface land, including their aesthetic value and their ability to support and nurture all types of marine life and wildlife, shall be preserved. (b) Preference

396

Numerical Simulation of Air–Sea Coupling during Coastal Upwelling  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Air–sea coupling during coastal upwelling was examined through idealized three-dimensional numerical simulations with a coupled atmosphere–ocean mesoscale model. Geometry, topography, and initial and boundary conditions were chosen to be ...

Natalie Perlin; Eric D. Skyllingstad; Roger M. Samelson; Philip L. Barbour

2007-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

397

On the Damping of Free Coastal-Trapped Waves  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A perturbative method is presented for estimating the decay time of subinertial coastal-trapped waves under a wide range of conditions where damping is relatively weak. Bottom friction is sometimes much more important than “long-wave” results ...

K. H. Brink

1990-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

398

Lagrangian Analysis and Predictability of Coastal and Ocean Dynamics 2000  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The first Lagrangian Analysis and Predictability of Coastal and Ocean Dynamics (LAPCOD) meeting took place in Ischia, Italy, 2–6 October 2000. The material presented at LAPCOD 2000 indicated both a maturing of Lagrangian-based observing systems ...

Arthur J. Mariano; Annalisa Griffa; Tamay M. Özgökmen; Enrico Zambianchi

2002-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

399

The Surface Boundary Layer in Coastal Upwelling Regions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Observations from the Oregon, northwest Africa, Peru, and northern California shelves are used to examine the characteristics of the surface boundary layer in coastal regions during the upwelling season. The observations from these four regions ...

Steven J. Lentz

1992-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

400

An Open Boundary Condition for Numerical Coastal Circulation Models  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Open boundaries (OBs) are usually unavoidable in numerical coastal circulation simulations. At OBs, an appropriate open boundary condition (OBC) is required so that outgoing waves freely pass to the exterior without creating reflections back into ...

Peifeng Ma; Ole Secher Madsen

2011-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "wetlands coastal sand" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Interaction of an Intense Extratropical Cyclone with Coastal Orography  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Observational analyses and numerical simulations are used to investigate the interaction of an intense extra-tropical cyclone with the coastal orography of the Pacific Northwest. Known as the “Inauguration Day cyclone,” the system made landfall ...

W. James Steenburgh; Clifford F. Mass

1996-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

402

Coastal Boundary Layer Characteristics during Summer Stratification in Lake Ontario  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Simultaneous measurements of Eulerian and Lagrangian currents along the north shore of Lake Ontario are analyzed to provide the mean flow properties and horizontal turbulent exchange characteristics in the coastal boundary layer (CBL). The summer ...

Y. R. Rao; C. R. Murthy

2001-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

403

Life Cycle of a Linear Coastal-Trapped Disturbance  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A recent climatology of observed coastal-trapped disturbances in the marine atmospheric boundary layer along the United States west coast motivates the detailed examination, for a specific form of imposed forcing, of a linear shallow-water ...

R. M. Samelson; A. M. Rogerson

1996-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

404

Steady Coastal Circulation Due to Oceanic Alongshore Pressure Gradients  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A depth-averaged barotropic model is used to investigate the steady response of the coastal ocean to alongshore pressure gradients imposed by the deep ocean. Solution indicate that the dimensionless continental margin width ? is the appropriate ...

Jason H. Middleton

1987-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

405

Numerical Simulation of Internal Kelvin Waves and Coastal Upwelling Fronts  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Two three-dimensional primitive equation numerical ocean models are applied to the problem of internal Kelvin waves and coastal upwelling in the Great Lakes. One is the Princeton Ocean Model (POM) with a terrain-following (sigma) vertical ...

Dmitry Beletsky; William P. O’Connor; David J. Schwab; David E. Dietrich

1997-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

406

Lagrangian Stochastic Modeling of the Coastal Fumigation Phenomenon  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Most coastal fumigation models utilize questionable assumptions and ignore some of the physics that play an important role in the diffusion process. The Lagrangian stochastic dispersion modeling technique has the potential for simulating the ...

Ashok K. Luhar; Brian L. Sawford

1995-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

407

Low-Frequency Baroclinic Waves off Coastal Boundaries  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The behavior of low-frequency baroclinic Rossby wave motion in the vicinity of coastal boundaries is investigated using linearized modulated wave theory in a stratified, constant-depth, equatorial ?-plane ocean. A primary objective is to obtain ...

R. Grimshaw; J. S. Allen

1988-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

408

Application of an Inverse Method to Coastal Modeling  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Free surface coastal models currently suffer from the difficulty of having to specify the global circulation during the initialization process and along the open boundaries. As an alternative to the long spinup periods, an original explicit ...

F. Auclair; S. Casitas; P. Marsaleix

2000-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

409

Coastal Frontogenesis and Precipitation during ERICA IOP 2  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The inverted trough and coastal front that occurred during ERICA IOP 2 were studied in order to assess the ability of an operational mesoscale model, the Canadian Regional Finite Element Model, to provide credible forecast guidance concerning the ...

Paul J. Roebber; John R. Gyakum; Diep N. Trat

1994-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

410

The Influence of Coastal Orography: The Yakutat Storm  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An unforecast windstorm in the vicinity of Yakutat, Alaska, on 14 March 1979 illustrates the importance of ageostrophic dynamics within a coastal zone proximal to significant terrain. Large pressure rises [greater than 4 mb (3 h)?1]were observed ...

James E. Overland; Nicholas Bond

1993-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

411

Dense Water Formation beneath a Time-Dependent Coastal Polynya  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Recent modeling studies of dense water formation beneath an idealized steady coastal polynya have provided simple analytical expressions for the maximum density anomaly achievable as a function of the polynya geometry and the imposed surface ...

David C. Chapman

1999-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

412

Energy Conservation in Coastal-Trapped Wave Calculations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A consideration of energy conservation for coastal-trapped waves shows that, for a slowly varying medium, the normalization of the wave modes is not arbitrary. Errors related to incorrect normalization are demonstrated for a simple analytic ...

K. H. Brink

1989-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

413

Convective Downmixing of Plumes in a Coastal Environment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper describes the results of an atmospheric tracer study in which sulfur hexafluoride (SF6) was used to investigate the transport and dispersion of effluent from a power plant located in a coastal environment. The field study demonstrated ...

Gregory J. McRae; Fredrick H. Shair; John H. Seinfeld

1981-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

414

GPS–Cellular Drifter Technology for Coastal Ocean Observing Systems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A drifter for observing small spatial and temporal scales of motion in the coastal zone is presented. The drifter uses GPS to determine its position, and the Mobitex terrestrial cellular communications system to transmit the position data in near–...

J. Carter Ohlmann; Peter F. White; Andrew L. Sybrandy; P. Peter Niiler

2005-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

415

The United States' Next Generation of Atmospheric Composition and Coastal Ecosystem Measurements: NASA's Geostationary Coastal and Air Pollution Events (GEO-CAPE) Mission  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Geostationary Coastal and Air Pollution Events (GEO-CAPE) mission was recommended by the National Research Council's (NRC's) Earth Science Decadal Survey to measure tropospheric trace gases and aerosols and coastal ocean phytoplankton, water quality, ...

J. Fishman; L. T. Iraci; J. Al-Saadi; K. Chance; F. Chavez; M. Chin; P. Coble; C. Davis; P. M. DiGiacomo; D. Edwards; A. Eldering; J. Goes; J. Herman; C. Hu; D. J. Jacob; C. Jordan; S. R. Kawa; R. Key; X. Liu; S. Lohrenz; A. Mannino; V. Natraj; D. Neil; J. Neu; M. Newchurch; K. Pickering; J. Salisbury; H. Sosik; A. Subramaniam; M. Tzortziou; J. Wang; M. Wang

2012-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

416

Fluid Resistance Analysis of Sand Control Slotted Liner with Compound Cavity Based on Fluent  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Slotted liners have been used for many years to provide sand control in many oil industry applications. They are commonly applied in reservoirs that produce high-viscosity oil from horizontal wells with unconsolidated, high-permeability sands. However, ... Keywords: slotted liner, newly-designed slot, Fluid resistance

Hang Li; Yonghong Liu; Jianmin Ma; Xinfang Wei

2010-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

417

Effect of temperature on wave velocities in sands and sandstones with heavy hydrocarbons  

SciTech Connect

A laboratory investigation was made of the effects of temperature on wave velocities in sandstones and unconsolidated sand saturated with heavy hydrocarbons. The large decreases of the compressional and shear velocities in such sandstones and sand with increasing temperature suggest that seismic methods may be very useful in detecting heat fronts in heavy hydrocarbon reservoirs undergoing steamflooding or in-situ combustion.

Wang, Z.; Nur, A.

1988-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

418

Guide to preparing SAND reports and other communication products : quick reference guide.  

SciTech Connect

This 'Quick Reference Guide' supplements the more complete 'Guide to Preparing SAND Reports and Other Communication Products'. It provides limited guidance on how to prepare SAND Reports at Sandia National Laboratories. Users are directed to the in-depth guide for explanations of processes.

Not Available

2007-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

419

Occurrence of gas hydrate in Oligocene Frio sand: Alaminos Canyon Block 818: Northern Gulf of Mexico  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

volumes of shale (gray), sand (yellow), gas hydrate-?lledgas hydrate-bearing zone is also bounded laterally with impermeable shaleshale section that overlies the Frio sand showing four-way closure that forms the trap for the AC818 gas

Boswell, R.D.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

420

A modeling approach for iron concentration in sand filtration effluent using adaptive neuro-fuzzy model  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Effluent iron concentration is an important water quality criterion used for the assessment of the performance of rapid sand filters, in addition to other criteria. This study deals with the prediction of effluent iron concentrations by adaptive neuro-fuzzy ... Keywords: ANFIS, Effluent iron concentration, Modeling, Sand filtration

Mehmet Çakmakci; Cumali Kinaci; Mahmut Bayramo?lu; Y?lmaz Yildirim

2010-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "wetlands coastal sand" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

Modelling damping ratio and shear modulus of sand-mica mixtures using genetic programming  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This study presents two Genetic Programming (GP) models for damping ratio and shear modulus of sand-mica mixtures based on experimental results. The experimental database used for GP modelling is based on a laboratory study of dynamic properties of saturated ... Keywords: Genetic programming, Leighton buzzard sand, Mica, Resonant column testing

Abdulkadir Cevik; Ali Firat Cabalar

2009-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

422

Guide to Preparing SAND Reports and other communication products : quick reference guide.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This Quick Reference Guide supplements the more complete Guide to Preparing SAND Reports and Other Communication Products. It provides limited guidance on how to prepare SAND Reports at Sandia National Laboratories. Users are directed to the in-depth guide for explanations of processes.

Not Available

2009-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

423

Preliminary relative permeability estimates of methanehydrate-bearing sand  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The relative permeability to fluids in hydrate-bearing sediments is an important parameter for predicting natural gas production from gas hydrate reservoirs. We estimated the relative permeability parameters (van Genuchten alpha and m) in a hydrate-bearing sand by means of inverse modeling, which involved matching water saturation predictions with observations from a controlled waterflood experiment. We used x-ray computed tomography (CT) scanning to determine both the porosity and the hydrate and aqueous phase saturation distributions in the samples. X-ray CT images showed that hydrate and aqueous phase saturations are non-uniform, and that water flow focuses in regions of lower hydrate saturation. The relative permeability parameters were estimated at two locations in each sample. Differences between the estimated parameter sets at the two locations were attributed to heterogeneity in the hydrate saturation. Better estimates of the relative permeability parameters require further refinement of the experimental design, and better description of heterogeneity in the numerical inversions.

Seol, Yongkoo; Kneafsey, Timothy J.; Tomutsa, Liviu; Moridis,George J.

2006-05-08T23:59:59.000Z

424

Preliminary relative permeability estimates of methanehydrate-bearing sand  

SciTech Connect

The relative permeability to fluids in hydrate-bearingsediments is an important parameter for predicting natural gas productionfrom gas hydrate reservoirs. We estimated the relative permeabilityparameters (van Genuchten alpha and m) in a hydrate-bearing sand by meansof inverse modeling, which involved matching water saturation predictionswith observations from a controlled waterflood experiment. We used x-raycomputed tomography (CT) scanning to determine both the porosity and thehydrate and aqueous phase saturation distributions in the samples. X-rayCT images showed that hydrate and aqueous phase saturations arenon-uniform, and that water flow focuses in regions of lower hydratesaturation. The relative permeability parameters were estimated at twolocations in each sample. Differences between the estimated parametersets at the two locations were attributed to heterogeneity in the hydratesaturation. Better estimates of the relative permeability parametersrequire further refinement of the experimental design, and betterdescription of heterogeneity in the numerical inversions.

Seol, Yongkoo; Kneafsey, Timothy J.; Tomutsa, Liviu; Moridis,George J.

2006-05-08T23:59:59.000Z

425

Western Gas Sands Project. Quarterly basin activities report  

SciTech Connect

A summation of information is presented on geology and drilling activity in the four primary study areas of the Western Gas Sands Project. The areas of interest are the Greater Green River Basin, the Piceance Basin, the Uinta Basin, and the Northern Great Plains Province. Drilling activity is discussed for the months of October, November, and December, 1977, with the major emphasis on wells located in low permeability sandstone areas, having significant gas production and utilizing hydraulic fracturing treatments. The drilling information was obtained primarily from ''The Rocky Mountain Region Report'' published by Petroleum Information Corporation on a daily basis. Another source of information was the ''Montana Oil and Gas Journal'' which is released weekly.

1978-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

426

Wetland Water Cooling Partnership: The Use of Restored Wetlands to Enhance Thermoelectric Power Plant Cooling and Mitigate the Demand on Surface Water Use  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Pierina noceti Pierina noceti Project Manager National Energy Technology Laboratory 626 Cochrans Mill Road P.O. Box 10940 Pittsburgh, PA 15236-0940 412-386-5428 pierina.noceti@netl.doe.gov steven I. apfelbaum Principal Investigator Applied Ecological Services, Inc. 17921 Smith Road P.O. Box 256 Brodhead, WI 53520 608-897-8641 steve@appliedeco.com Wetland Water Cooling PartnershiP: the Use of restored Wetlands to enhanCe thermoeleCtriC PoWer Plant Cooling and mitigate the demand on sUrfaCe Water Use Background Thermoelectric power plants require a significant volume of water to operate, accounting for 39 percent of freshwater (136 billion gallons per day) withdrawn in the United States in 2000, according to a U.S. Geological Survey study. This significant use of water ranks second only to the agricultural sector

427

CO{sub 2}/sand fracturing in Devonian shale  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A total of five carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) /sand well stimulations were successfully executed with two Devonian shale operators in Perry and Pike Counties, Kentucky. This new stimulation method offers a minimum formation damage proppant stimulation approach for natural gas producers in the United States. Some operators have been concerned about the frac fluid formation damage associated with the water and chemicals used in conventional foam stimulations, whereas other operators have been concerned about the lack of proppant in straight nitrogen fracs used by service companies today. Two carefully screened geological areas of established Devonian shale production were selected based on active ongoing drilling and completion operations. One selected control area contained an existing set of wells with established production histories. The logistics and field layout of a typical carbon dioxide/sand frac treatment has been described and highlighted. The importance and unique aspects of the closed system blender that is required for job execution is discussed. Five stimulation treatments have been reviewed, and stimulation and preliminary production data compared to offset wells stimulated with nitrogen, and explosives. Initial production results indicate more than a 50 percent increase in production rate compared to nitrogen fraced wells in the Pike County area. In addition, production is also 4.8 times better than conventional shot wells in the same area. These results are encouraging enough to formally combine existing pumping equipment, a closed system blender, and liquid carbon dioxide supplies to develop a new fracturing service in the eastern US A total of 22 additional jobs are planned in the eastern US in low permeability gas formations over the next year.

Yost, A.B. II [USDOE Morgantown Energy Technology Center, WV (United States); Mazza, R.L. [Petroleum Consulting Services, Canton, OH (United States); Gehr, J.B. [Natural Gas Resources Corporation (United States)

1993-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

428

Retention behavior of dilute polymers in oil sands  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Adequate mobility control between fluid banks is a pertinent factor in the successful application of secondary and tertiary oil recovery processes. Favorable mobilities can be obtained by increasing the viscosity or reducing the permeability to the displacing fluid phase. Polyacrylamide and oio-polymers have proved to be useful for these purposes. These polymers increase the water viscosity substantially at low concentrations. The resulting reduced mobility of the displacing phase suppresses the fingering phenomenon and improves piston-like displacement. However, the structural complexity of these polymers coupled with the complexity of the flow channels in the porous medium cause part of these polymers to be retained in the reservoir as the displacing fluid from advances, thereby causing a reduction in the concentration of the polymer solution and consequently a loss of mobility control. In addition to the mechanical filtering, adsorption on the grain surfaces reduce the polymer concentration in the displacing fluid. Behavior of polyacrylamide polymers has been studied extensively. Susceptibility of these polymers to salinity, pH, shear, temperature, etc., is well documented. Mechanical entrapment, retention, degradation and adsorption behavior on porous media, including fired Berea sandstone, bead packs and Ottawa sand have been reported. The present study investigates the adsorption and trapping of polymers in flow experiments through unconsolidated oil field sands. Effects of particle size and mineral content have been studied. Effect of a surfactant slug on polymer-rock interaction is also reported. Corroborative studies have been conducted to study the pressure behavior and high tertiary oil recovery in surfactant dilute-polymer systems.

Kikani, J.; Somerton, W.H.

1988-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

429

Alberta bound : the interface between Alberta's environmental policies and the environmental management of three Albertan oil sands companies  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Athabasca Oil Sands, located in northeastern Alberta, Canada, were for many years anomalous. Two oil sands operators developed their extraction techniques for 30 years, refining their technology before production became ...

Lemphers, Nathan C

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

430

The application of PHREEQCi, a geochemical computer program, to aid in the management of a wastewater treatment wetland  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In the past decade, constructed wetlands have become popular for treating coal-generated acid mine drainage and leachate from coal-ash disposal areas. The goal of the wetland manager is to design a system in which the pH is neutralized, toxic metals are removed, and wetland discharge meets or exceeds discharge standards for water quality. This is typically accomplished by using a combination of wetlands, ponds, and limestone drains. The treatment capability of a constructed wetland is based on relationships among dissolved oxygen (DO), pH, and metal speciation. The aim of this research was to determine if PHREEQCi, a geochemical computer program, could be used in wetland management and design. The wetland site chosen for this study was at a Texas Municipal Power Agency (TMPA) plant located in Grimes County, Texas and was created to treat leachate from a solid waste disposal area where coal ash and SO? scrubber sludge was deposited. The leachate contains significant concentrations of sulfate, chloride, total dissolved solids (TDS), arsenic, and selenium. Using PHREEQCi, geochemical speciation models were created to study the interrelationships between critical chemical components at the TMPA site in order to establish an optimum set of conditions to improve treatment capability and to avoid wetland failure. The results of the geochemical speciation modeling indicated a challenging situation for a wetland manager because different species precipitate under contrasting environments. In order to apply the geochemical speciation results to the design of the TMPA site, two conditions must be recognized. First, metal removal is best accomplished by generating alkaline and oxidative conditions to promote metal-oxide precipitation. Second, sulfate can be controlled under reducing environments where it is converted to sulfide and metal sulfides precipitate. Chlorides are very soluble and no viable conclusions as to the most appropriate removal method could be postulated. TDS has an ambiguous composition and could not be modeled using PHREEQCi.

Mitzman, Stephanie

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

431

GRR/Section 13-CA-a - Coastal Land Use Assessment | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

GRR/Section 13-CA-a - Coastal Land Use Assessment GRR/Section 13-CA-a - Coastal Land Use Assessment < GRR Jump to: navigation, search GRR-logo.png GEOTHERMAL REGULATORY ROADMAP Roadmap Home Roadmap Help List of Sections Section 13-CA-a - Coastal Land Use Assessment 13-CA-a Coastal Land Use Assessment.pdf Click to View Fullscreen Contact Agencies California Coastal Commission California State Lands Commission Regulations & Policies California Coastal Act California PRC § 6826 Triggers None specified Click "Edit With Form" above to add content 13-CA-a Coastal Land Use Assessment.pdf Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Flowchart Narrative Under the California Coastal Act, projects in California Coastal Zones may

432

Parameterization of Lakes and Wetlands for Energy and Water Balance Studies in the Great Lakes Region  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Lakes and wetlands are prevalent around the Great Lakes and play an important role in the regional water and energy cycle. However, simulating their impacts on regional-scale hydrology is still a major challenge and not widely attempted. In the ...

Vimal Mishra; Keith A. Cherkauer; Laura C. Bowling

2010-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

433

RETENTION AND CHEMICAL SPECIATION OF URANIUM IN A WETLAND ON THE SAVANNAH RIVER SITE  

SciTech Connect

Uranium speciation and retention mechanism onto Savannah River Site (SRS) wetland sediments was studied using batch (ad)sorption experiments, sequential extraction desorption tests and U L{sub 3}-edge X-ray absorption near-edge structure (XANES) spectroscopy of contaminated wetland sediments. U was highly retained by the SRS wetland sediments. In contrast to other similar but much lower natural organic matter (NOM) sediments, significant sorption of U onto the SRS sediments was observed at pH <4 and pH >8. Sequential extraction tests indicated that the U(VI) species were primarily associated with the acid soluble fraction (weak acetic acid extractable) and NOM fraction (Na-pyrophosphate extractable). Uranium L3- edge XANES spectra of the U-retained sediments were nearly identical to that of uranyl acetate. The primary oxidation state of U in these sediments was as U(VI), and there was little evidence that the high sorptive capacity of the sediments could be ascribed to abiotic or biotic reduction to the less soluble U(IV) species. The molecular mechanism responsible for the high U retention in the SRS wetland sediments is likely related to the chemical bonding of U to organic carbon.

Li, D.; CHANG, H.: SEAMAN, J.; Jaffe, P.; Groos, P.; Jiang, D.; Chen, N.; Lin, J.; Arthur, Z.; Scheckel, K.; Kaplan, D.

2013-06-17T23:59:59.000Z

434

Waterfowl are among the longest-recognized values provided by wetlands, with enthusiasts catalyzing the  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

an underappreciated role in the regulation of greenhouse gas emission from wetlands and in the Earth's climate system and greenhouse gas emissions at Lake Mattamuskeet, North Carolina's largest natural fresh water body and home greatly enhance the emission rates of methane, an important greenhouse gas produced in oxygen-deplet- ed

435

PUBLISHED ONLINE: XX MONTH XXXX | DOI: 10.1038/NCLIMATE1370 Constructed wetlands as biofuel production  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

LETTERS PUBLISHED ONLINE: XX MONTH XXXX | DOI: 10.1038/NCLIMATE1370 Constructed wetlands as biofuel , Hui Xue1,4 , Changhui Peng5,6 and Jianguo Wu7,8 Clean biofuel production is an effective way (GHG) emissions and3 nitrogen fertilizer consumption through biofuel production2­4 .4 Here we advocate

Wu, Jianguo "Jingle"

436

Abatement of wetland loss through diversions of Mississippi River water using siphons  

SciTech Connect

The long-term maintenance and renewal of Louisiana's wetlands cannot be accomplished without diversion of sediment laden water from the Mississippi and Atchafalaya Rivers. Because of ramifications for flood control, navigation, and established estuarine resource uses, such diversions, at least initially, are likely to be limited to structures that permit flow to be taken from the upper part of the water column. To evaluate the potential benefits from such diversions in terms of sediment introduction into the wetlands, and the possibility of abatement of wetland loss through small structures that could be implemented at a local level, an existing diversion by means of a siphon was investigated. The investigation focused on the White's Ditch Siphon, in Plaquemines Parish, Louisiana. Siphon operation was monitored for the 1989-1990 water year to determine water and sediment discharge characteristics and their relationship to those of the Mississippi River and to estuarine hydrology To determine sedimentation benefits to the adjacent marsh and the need for outfall management, sediment dispersal was evaluated and sediment deposition was compared for a site within the siphon outfall area and a control site. Results of the siphon monitoring are extended to larger scale diversions. On the basis of suspended load characteristics of the Mississippi River and the operational characteristics of a major structure, as related to the estuarine salinity regime and resource constraints, the extent to which such diversions are likely to offset subsidence and related wetland loss is evaluated.

Van Beek, J.L.; Roberts, D.W.; Fournet, S. (Coastal Environments, Inc., Baton Rouge, LA (USA))

1990-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

437

RETENTION AND CHEMICAL SPECIATION OF URANIUM IN A WETLAND ON THE SAVANNAH RIVER SITE  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Uranium speciation and retention mechanism onto Savannah River Site (SRS) wetland sediments was studied using batch (ad)sorption experiments, sequential extraction desorption tests and U L{sub 3}-edge X-ray absorption near-edge structure (XANES) spectroscopy of contaminated wetland sediments. U was highly retained by the SRS wetland sediments. In contrast to other similar but much lower natural organic matter (NOM) sediments, significant sorption of U onto the SRS sediments was observed at pH 8. Sequential extraction tests indicated that the U(VI) species were primarily associated with the acid soluble fraction (weak acetic acid extractable) and NOM fraction (Na-pyrophosphate extractable). Uranium L3- edge XANES spectra of the U-retained sediments were nearly identical to that of uranyl acetate. The primary oxidation state of U in these sediments was as U(VI), and there was little evidence that the high sorptive capacity of the sediments could be ascribed to abiotic or biotic reduction to the less soluble U(IV) species. The molecular mechanism responsible for the high U retention in the SRS wetland sediments is likely related to the chemical bonding of U to organic carbon.

Li, D.; CHANG, H.: SEAMAN, J.; Jaffe, P.; Groos, P.; Jiang, D.; Chen, N.; Lin, J.; Arthur, Z.; Scheckel, K.; Kaplan, D.

2013-06-17T23:59:59.000Z

438

Soil mineral genesis and distribution in a saline lake landscape of the Pantanal Wetland, Brazil  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Soil mineral genesis and distribution in a saline lake landscape of the Pantanal Wetland, Brazil S Geografia, Universidade de São Paulo, São Paulo, Brazil b Soil & Water Sciences Program, Department São Paulo, Piracicaba, Brazil a b s t r a c ta r t i c l e i n f o Article history: Received 20 August

Ahmad, Sajjad

439

Experience with SAND-Tcl: A Scripting Tool for Spatial Databases 1 CLAUDIO ESPERANC A (Contact Author)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Experience with SAND-Tcl: A Scripting Tool for Spatial Databases 1 CLAUDIO ESPERANC¸ A (Contact. This is illustrated by de- scribing our experience with SAND-Tcl, a scripting tool developed by us for building spatial database applications. SAND-Tcl is an extension of the Tcl embedded scripting language

Samet, Hanan

440

Habitat Evaluation Procedures (HEP) Report, Pend Oreille Wetlands Wildlife II Project, Technical Report 2002.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

In 2002, the Habitat Evaluation Procedure (HEP) was used to determine baseline habitat suitability on the Pend Oreille Wetlands Wildlife II Project, an acquisition completed by the Kalispel Tribe of Indians in 1997. Evaluation species and appropriate models include bald eagle, black-capped chickadee, Canada goose, mallard, and yellow warbler. Habitat Suitability Index (HSI) values were visually estimated and agreed upon by all HEP team members. The Pend Oreille Wetlands Wildlife II Project provides a total of 313.91 Habitat Units (HUs) for the species evaluated. Open water habitat provides 16.08 HUs for Canada goose and mallard. Shoreline and island habitat provide 7.36 HUs fore Canada goose and mallard. Wet meadow provides 117.62 HUs for Canada goose and mallard. Scrub-shrub wetlands provide 9.78 HUs for yellow warbler, mallard, and white-tailed deer. Deciduous forested wetlands provide 140.47 HUs for bald eagle, black-capped chickadee, mallard, and white-tailed deer. Conifer forest provides 22.60 HUs for bald eagle, black-capped chickadee, and white-tailed deer. The objective of using HEP at the Pend Oreille Wetlands Wildlife II Project and other protected properties is to document the quality and quantity of available habitat for selected wildlife species. In this way, HEP provides information on the relative value of the same area at future points in time so that the effect of management activities on wildlife habitat can be quantified. When combined with other tools, the baseline HEP will be used to determine the most effective on-site management, restoration, and enhancement actions to increase habitat suitability for targeted species. The same process will be replicated every five years to quantitatively evaluate the effectiveness of management strategies in improving and maintaining habitat conditions while providing additional crediting to BPA for enhanced habitat values.

Holmes, Darren

2003-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "wetlands coastal sand" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

The evaluation of waterfrac technology in low-permeability gas sands in the East Texas basin  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The petroleum engineering literature clearly shows that large proppant volumes and concentrations are required to effectively stimulate low-permeability gas sands. To pump large proppant concentrations, one must use a viscous fluid. However, many operators believe that low-viscosity, low-proppant concentration fracture stimulation treatments known as ??waterfracs?? produce comparable stimulation results in low-permeability gas sands and are preferred because they are less expensive than gelled fracture treatments. This study evaluates fracture stimulation technology in tight gas sands by using case histories found in the petroleum engineering literature and by using a comparison of the performance of wells stimulated with different treatment sizes in the Cotton Valley sands of the East Texas basin. This study shows that large proppant volumes and viscous fluids are necessary to optimally stimulate tight gas sand reservoirs. When large proppant volumes and viscous fluids are not successful in stimulating tight sands, it is typically because the fracture fluids have not been optimal for the reservoir conditions. This study shows that waterfracs do produce comparable results to conventional large treatments in the Cotton Valley sands of the East Texas basin, but we believe it is because the conventional treatments have not been optimized. This is most likely because the fluids used in conventional treatments are not appropriate or have not been used appropriately for Cotton Valley conditions.

Tschirhart, Nicholas Ray

2005-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

442

Article Geography doi: 10.1007/s11434-012-5529-9 Preliminary estimation of the organic carbon pool in China’s wetlands  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Accurate estimation of wetland carbon pools is a prerequisite for wetland resource conservation and implementation of carbon sink enhancement plans. The inventory approach is a realistic method for estimating the organic carbon pool in China’s wetlands at the national scale. An updated data and inventory approach were used to estimate the amount of organic carbon stored in China’s wetlands. Primary results are as follows: (1) the organic carbon pool of China’s wetlands is between 5.39 and 7.25 Pg, accounting for 1.3%–3.5 % of the global level; (2) the estimated values and percentages of the organic carbon contained in the soil, water and vegetation pools in China’s wetlands are 5.04–6.19 Pg and 85.4%–93.5%, 0.22–0.56 Pg and 4.1%–7.7%, 0.13–0.50 Pg and 2.4%–6.9%, respectively. The soil organic carbon pool of China’s wetlands is greater than our previous estimate of 3.67 Pg, but is lower than other previous estimates of 12.20 and 8–10 Pg. Based on the discussion and uncertainty analysis, some research areas worthy of future attention are presented. wetland carbon pool, inventory approach, remote sensing, soil carbon density, wetland vegetation Citation: Zheng Y M, Niu Z G, Gong P, et al. Preliminary estimation of the organic carbon pool in China’s wetlands. Chin Sci Bull,

Zheng Yaomin; Niu Zhenguo; Gong Peng; Dai Yongjiu; Shangguan Wei

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

443

Excess Foundry Sand Characterization and Experimental Investigation in Controlled Low-Strength Material and Hot-Mixing Asphalt  

SciTech Connect

This report provides technical data regarding the reuse of excess foundry sand. The report addresses three topics: a statistically sound evaluation of the characterization of foundry sand, a laboratory investigation to qualify excess foundry sand as a major component in controlled low-strength material (CLSM), and the identification of the best methods for using foundry sand as a replacement for natural aggregates for construction purposes, specifically in asphalt paving materials. The survival analysis statistical technique was used to characterize foundry sand over a full spectrum of general chemical parameters, metallic elements, and organic compounds regarding bulk analysis and leachate characterization. Not limited to characterization and environmental impact, foundry sand was evaluated by factor analyses, which contributes to proper selection of factor and maximization of the reuse marketplace for foundry sand. Regarding the integration of foundry sand into CLSM, excavatable CLSM and structural CLSM containing different types of excess foundry sands were investigated through laboratory experiments. Foundry sand was approved to constitute a major component in CLSM. Regarding the integration of foundry sand into asphalt paving materials, the optimum asphalt content was determined for each mixture, as well as the bulk density, maximum density, asphalt absorption, and air voids at Nini, Ndes, and Nmax. It was found that foundry sands can be used as an aggregate in hot-mix asphalt production, but each sand should be evaluated individually. Foundry sands tend to lower the strength of mixtures and also may make them more susceptible to moisture damage. Finally, traditional anti-stripping additives may decrease the moisture sensitivity of a mixture containing foundry sand, but not to the level allowed by most highway agencies.

Paul J. Tikalsky, Hussain U. Bahia, An Deng and Thomas Snyder

2004-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

444

Excess Foundry Sand Characterization and Experimental Investigation in Controlled Low-Strength Material and Hot-Mixing Asphalt  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report provides technical data regarding the reuse of excess foundry sand. The report addresses three topics: (1) a statistically sound evaluation of the characterization of foundry sand, (2) a laboratory investigation to qualify excess foundry sand as a major component in controlled low-strength material (CLSM), and (3) the identification of the best methods for using foundry sand as a replacement for natural aggregates for construction purposes, specifically in asphalt paving materials. The survival analysis statistical technique was used to characterize foundry sand over a full spectrum of general chemical parameters, metallic elements, and organic compounds regarding bulk analysis and leachate characterization. Not limited to characterization and environmental impact, foundry sand was evaluated by factor analyses, which contributes to proper selection of factor and maximization of the reuse marketplace for foundry sand. Regarding the integration of foundry sand into CLSM, excavatable CLSM and structural CLSM containing different types of excess foundry sands were investigated through laboratory experiments. Foundry sand was approved to constitute a major component in CLSM. Regarding the integration of foundry sand into asphalt paving materials, the optimum asphalt content was determined for each mixture, as well as the bulk density, maximum density, asphalt absorption, and air voids at N{sub ini}, N{sub des}, and N{sub max}. It was found that foundry sands can be used as an aggregate in hot-mix asphalt production, but each sand should be evaluated individually. Foundry sands tend to lower the strength of mixtures and also may make them more susceptible to moisture damage. Finally, traditional anti-stripping additives may decrease the moisture sensitivity of a mixture containing foundry sand, but not to the level allowed by most highway agencies.

Pauul J. Tikalsky

2004-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

445

Periodic Inspections of Concrete-Armored Coastal Structures  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

information on the long-term structural performance of selected concrete-armored navigation structures to their environment. Inspections of coastal structures at Ofu Harbor, American Samoa; Nawiliwili, Laupahoehoe, and Kahului Harbors, HI; and Manasquan Inlet, NJ, are discussed herein. The response of stone-armored coastal structures to their environment was presented in ERDC/CHL CHETN-III-65. OVERVIEW: In the “Periodic Inspections ” work unit of the Monitoring Completed Navigation Projects (MCNP) Program, selected coastal navigation structures are periodically monitored to gain an understanding of their long-term structural response. Periodic data sets are evaluated to improve knowledge in design, construction, and maintenance of both existing and proposed coastal navigation projects, and will help avoid repeating past designs that have failed and/or resulted in high maintenance costs. Low-cost remote sensing tools and techniques, with limited ground truthing surveys, are the primary inspection tools used in the periodic monitoring efforts. Most periodic inspections consist of capturing above-water conditions of the structures at periodic intervals using high-resolution aerial photography. Structural changes (primary armor unit movement) are quantified through photogrammetric techniques. When a coastal structure is photographed at low

Robert R. Bottin

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

446

Periodic Inspections of Coastal Structures with Stone Armor  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

information on the long-term structural performance of selected stone-armored navigation structures to their environment. Coastal structures at St. Paul Harbor, AK, and Burns Harbor, IN, are discussed herein. The response of concrete-armored coastal structures to their environment will be presented in a subsequent CHETN. OVERVIEW: In the “Periodic Inspections ” work unit of the Monitoring Completed Navigation Projects (MCNP) Program, selected coastal navigation structures are periodically monitored to gain an understanding of their long-term structural response. Periodic data sets are evaluated to improve knowledge in design, construction, and maintenance of both existing and proposed coastal navigation projects, and will help avoid repeating past designs that have failed and/or resulted in high maintenance costs. Relatively low-cost remote sensing tools and techniques, with limited ground truthing surveys, are the primary inspection tools used in the periodic monitoring efforts. Most periodic inspections consist of capturing above-water conditions of the structures at periodic intervals using high-resolution aerial photography. Structural changes (primary armor unit movement) are quantified through photogrammetric techniques. When a coastal structure is photographed at low tide, an accurate permanent record of all visible armor units is obtained. Through the use of

Robert R. Bottin

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

447

Coastal-inland solar radiation difference study. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The purpose of this study was to quantify the characteristics of solar insolation in the coastal zone and to determine the effect of the sea breeze circulation on the global insolation. In order to satisfy these objectives, a six station sampling network was established in the coastal plain of southeastern North Carolina, where previous evidence has indicated that the sea breeze circulation is almost a daily occurrence from late May through October. Three sites (Sloop Point, Onslow Beach, and Cape Fear Technical Institute (CFTI)) were located near the coast (coastal sites) to assess the insolation at the coast. A site (Clinton) was located in an area seldom affected by the sea breeze (about 100 km from the coast). Two additional sites, Wallace and Ellis Airport, located between the coastal sites and the control site, were to be used to assess the transient impact of the sea breeze upon the insolation. Pyranometers were located at each site to measure the global insolation. Direct normal insolation measured by a pyrheliometer and ultraviolet radiation measured by uv radiometers were observed at the Sloop Point and Clinton sites only. Data were collected during the calendar year 1978. The results of the study indicated that the global insolation had greater variability over the network during the summer season (June, July, and August). During the summer, there was a systematicdiurnal variation of the difference in global insolation between the inland and the coastal sites.

Bach, W.D. Jr.; Vukovich, F.M.

1980-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

448

Collection of technical data for tight gas sands in support of the massive hydraulic fracturing system. Final report  

SciTech Connect

Results are presented of work performed to study case histories of logging problems/requirements in tight gas sand areas, provide production histories/completion information on selected Uinta Basin tight gas sand wells, provide geologic guidance and additional technical input for computer simulation of tight gas sand well behavior, and develop information about production histories, completion techniques and reservoir rock characteristics from selected tight gas sand key wells in the Piceance and Green River Basins. A list of gas sand wells in the Uinta Basin is included along with gas production statistics, completion and reservoir data, and well production data. (JRD)

Knutson, C.F.; Boardman, C.R.

1978-09-20T23:59:59.000Z

449

Wetland assessment of the effects of construction and operation of a depleteduranium hexafluoride conversion facility at the Portsmouth, Ohio, site.  

SciTech Connect

The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Depleted Uranium Hexafluoride (DUF{sub 6}) Management Program evaluated alternatives for managing its inventory of DUF{sub 6} and issued the ''Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement for Alternative Strategies for the Long-Term Management and Use of Depleted Uranium Hexafluoride'' (DUF{sub 6} PEIS) in April 1999 (DOE 1999). The DUF{sub 6} inventory is stored in cylinders at three DOE sites: Paducah, Kentucky; Portsmouth, Ohio; and East Tennessee Technology Park (ETTP), near Oak Ridge, Tennessee. In the Record of Decision for the DUF{sub 6} PEIS, DOE stated its decision to promptly convert the DUF{sub 6} inventory to a more stable chemical form. Subsequently, the U.S. Congress passed, and the President signed, the ''2002 Supplemental Appropriations Act for Further Recovery from and Response to Terrorist Attacks on the United States'' (Public Law No. 107-206). This law stipulated in part that, within 30 days of enactment, DOE must award a contract for the design, construction, and operation of a DUF{sub 6} conversion plant at the Department's Paducah, Kentucky, and Portsmouth, Ohio, sites, and for the shipment of DUF{sub 6} cylinders stored at ETTP to the Portsmouth site for conversion. This wetland assessment has been prepared by DOE, pursuant to Executive Order 11990 (''Protection of Wetlands'') and DOE regulations for implementing this Executive Order as set forth in Title 10, Part 1022, of the ''Code of Federal Regulations'' (10 CFR Part 1022 [Compliance with Floodplain and Wetland Environmental Review Requirements]), to evaluate potential impacts to wetlands from the construction and operation of a conversion facility at the DOE Portsmouth site. Approximately 0.02 acre (0.009 ha) of a 0.08-acre (0.03-ha) palustrine emergent wetland would likely be eliminated by direct placement of fill material during facility construction at Location A. Portions of this wetland that are not filled may be indirectly affected by an altered hydrologic regime because of the proximity of construction, possibly resulting in a decreased frequency or duration of inundation or soil saturation, and potential loss of hydrology necessary to sustain wetland conditions. Construction at Locations B or C would not result in direct impacts to wetlands. However, the hydrologic characteristics of nearby wetlands could be indirectly affected by adjacent construction. Executive Order 11990, ''Protection of Wetlands'', requires federal agencies to minimize the destruction, loss, or degradation of wetlands, and to preserve and enhance the natural and beneficial uses of wetlands. DOE regulations for implementing Executive Order 11990 are set forth in 10 CFR Part 1022. The impacts at Location A may potentially be avoided by an alternative routing of the entrance road, or mitigation may be developed in coordination with the appropriate regulatory agencies. Unavoidable impacts to wetlands that are within the jurisdiction of the USACE may require a CWA Section 404 Permit, which would trigger the requirement for a CWA Section 401 Water Quality Certification from the State of Ohio. Unavoidable impacts to isolated wetlands may require an Isolated Wetlands Permit from the Ohio Environmental Protection Agency. A mitigation plan may be required prior to the initiation of construction. Cumulative impacts to wetlands are anticipated to be negligible to minor for the proposed action, in conjunction with the effects of existing conditions and other activities. Habitat disturbance would involve settings commonly found in this part of Ohio, which in many cases involve previously disturbed habitats.

Van Lonkhuyzen, R.

2005-09-09T23:59:59.000Z

450

Impacts of Delayed Drawdown on Aquatic Biota and Water Quality in Seasonally Managed Wetlands of the Grasslands Ecological Area  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Fowl Ass. , 1995. Vymazal, Jan. Algae and Element Cycling inN and P content in the algae biomass. Likewise, inorganic Cof delayed wetland drawdown on algae and other aquatic biota

Quinn, Nigel W.T.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

451

An Intercomparison of Two Tunable Diode Laser Spectrometers Used for Eddy Correlation Measurements of Methane Flux in a Prairie Wetland  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An intercomparison was made between two tunable diode laser spectrometers used to measure methane fluxes by the eddy correlation technique at a prairie wetland site. The spectrometers were built by Unisearch Associates Inc. of Concord, Ontario, ...

D. P. Billesbach; Joon Kim; R. J. Clement; S. B. Verma; F. G. Ullman

1998-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

452

Methane Emissions from Natural Wetlands in the United States: Satellite-Derived Estimation Based on Ecosystem Carbon Cycling  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Wetlands are an important natural source of methane to the atmosphere. The amounts of methane emitted from inundated ecosystems in the United States can vary greatly from area to area. Seasonal temperature, water table dynamics, and carbon ...

Christopher Potter; Steven Klooster; Seth Hiatt; Matthew Fladeland; Vanessa Genovese; Peggy Gross

2006-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

453

Flood Pulsing in the Sudd Wetland: Analysis of Seasonal Variations in Inundation and Evaporation in South Sudan  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Located on the Bahr el Jebel in South Sudan, the Sudd is one of the largest floodplain wetlands in the world. Seasonal inundation drives the hydrologic, geomorphological, and ecological processes, and the annual flood pulse is essential to the ...

L-M. Rebelo; G. B. Senay; M. P. McCartney

2012-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

454

An efficient method for change detection of soil, vegetation and water in the Northern Gulf of Mexico wetland ecosystem  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Mapping and monitoring wetland ecosystems over large geographic areas based on remote sensing is challenging because of the spatial and spectral complexities of the inherent ecosystem dynamics. The main objective of this research was to develop and evaluate ...

Limin Yang, Collin Homer, John Brock, Joyce Fry

2013-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

455

CAVITY LIKE COMPLETIONS IN WEAK SANDS PREFERRED UPSTREAM MANAGEMENT PRACTICES  

SciTech Connect

The technology referred to as Cavity Like Completions (CLC) offers a new technique to complete wells in friable and unconsolidated sands. A successfully designed CLC provides significant increases in well PI (performance index) at lower costs than alternative completion techniques. CLC technology is being developed and documented by a partnership of major oil and gas companies through a GPRI (Global Petroleum Research Institute) joint venture. Through the DOE-funded PUMP program, the experiences of the members of the joint venture will be described for other oil and gas producing companies. To date six examples of CLC completions have been investigated by the JV. The project was performed to introduce a new type of completion (or recompletion) technique to the industry that, in many cases, offers a more cost effective method to produce oil and gas from friable reservoirs. The project's scope of work included: (1) Further develop theory, laboratory and field data into a unified model to predict performance of cavity completion; (2) Perform at least one well test for cavity completion (well provided by one of the sponsor companies); (3) Provide summary of geo-mechanical models for PI increase; and (4) Develop guidelines to evaluate success of potential cavity completion. The project tracks the experiences of a joint industry consortium (GPRI No. 17) over a three year period and compiles results of the activities of this group.

Ian Palmer; John McLennan

2004-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

456

Guide to preparing SAND reports and other communication products.  

SciTech Connect

This guide describes the R&A process, Common Look and Feel requirements, and preparation and publishing procedures for communication products at Sandia National Laboratories. Samples of forms and examples of published communications products are provided. This guide takes advantage of the wealth of material now available on the Web as a resource. Therefore, it is best viewed as an electronic document. If some of the illustrations are too small to view comfortably, you can enlarge them on the screen as needed. The format of this document is considerably different than that usually expected of a SAND Report. It was selected to permit the large number of illustrations and examples to be placed closer to the text that references them. In the case of forms, covers, and other items that are included as examples, a link to the Web is provided so that you can access the items and download them for use. This guide details the processes for producing a variety of communication products at Sandia National Laboratories. Figure I-1 shows the general publication development process. Because extensive supplemental material is available from Sandia on the internal web or from external sources (Table I-1), the guide has been shortened to make it easy to find information that you need.

Not Available

2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

457

Wetland treatment of oil and gas well wastewaters. Quarterly technical report, November 25, 1992--February 24, 1993  

SciTech Connect

During the first quarter of the above contract, all the elements of Task 1 were completed. The first quarterly report presented an overview of a wetland and its increasing use in industrial wastewater treatment. An idealized, reaction engineering description of wetlands was presented to demonstrate how the various processes that occur in a wetland can be modeled. Previous work on the use of wetlands to remove BOD, TSS, Phosphorus and Nitrogen was reviewed. Recent literature on the application of wetland technology to the treatment of petroleum-related wastewater was critically evaluated and an outline of the research plans for the first year was delineated. Further, our literature search (nominally completed under Task 1) unearthed more recent studies (some unpublished) and a summary was included in the second quarterly report. In the second quarterly report, results of our efforts on the construction of a laboratory-type wetland were also reported. Initial studies on the use of wetland amendments such as modified-clays and algae cells were presented and discussed. Adsorption of heavy metal ions, Cu{sup 2+} and Cr(VI) onto soils drawn from the laboratory-type wetland built as a part of this contract has been undertaken and these results are presented and discussed in this quarterly report. A number of studies on the design and preparation of modified-clays for the adsorption of Cr(VI) and {beta}-naphthoic acid (NA) has been carried out during this quarter and these are also described and discussed in this report. The choice of {beta}-naphthoic acid (NA) as an ionogenic organic compound was made on the basis of a recent personal communication to the Project Director that NA is a major contaminant in many oil and gas well wastewaters.

Kadlec, R.H.; Srinivasan, K.R.

1993-04-02T23:59:59.000Z

458

Importance of denitrification to the efficiency of waste-water treatment in forested wetlands. Project completion report  

SciTech Connect

Wastewater, even after secondary treatment, typically contains high concentrations of nutrients that can cause eutrophication of receiving waters and deterioration of water quality. Therefore, there has been much interest in the use of natural wetlands as a simple and energy-efficient means of removing nutrients from wastewater and improving water quality. The utilization of a wetland for tertiary treatment of wastewater is based on the ability of the wetland to act as a nutrient sink. One of the most important processes in wetland ecosystems that influences their capacity as a nitrogen sink is the gaseous exchange of nitrogen with the atmosphere known as denitrification. Since denitrification represents a loss of nitrogen to the atmosphere, the mechanism tends to be most favorable for the removal of nitrogen. The objectives of the research project were to (1) determine the temporal and spatial ambient rates of denitrification and compare these rates to those of sediments amended with increased concentrations of nitrate comparable to concentrations of total nitrogen in the sewage effluent to be discharged; and (2) determine the proportion of total denitrification that can be attributed to direct utilization of nitrate loaded into the wetland, as compared to nitrate produced via nitrification within the wetland. Although nitrate is readily denitrified, short-term incubation rates are relatively low which is attributed to the presently low nitrate concentrations and subsequent reduced denitrifying microbial population in the wetland sediments. Nitrate concentrations varied seasonally associated with increased flooding during spring. Rates of nitrification coupled with denitrification were investigated with nitrogen-15 isotopes. Nitrification is limited in the wetland sedments; therefore, controls the rate of total nitrogen loss from the system.

Twilley, R.R.; Boustany, R.G.

1990-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

459

Restored Drill Cuttings for Wetlands Creation: Results of Mesocosm Approach to Emulate Field Conditions Under Varying Salinity and Hydrologic Conditions  

SciTech Connect

This study builds upon earlier research conducted by Southeastern Louisiana University concerning the efficacy of utilizing processed drill cuttings as an alternative substrate source for wetland rehabilitation (wetland creation and restoration). Previous research has indicated that processed drill cuttings exhibit a low degree of contaminant migration from the process drill cuttings to interstitial water and low toxicity, as tested by seven-day mysid shrimp chronic toxicity trials.

Hester, Mark W.; Shaffer, Gary P.; Willis Jonathan M.; DesRoches, Dennis J.

2001-02-21T23:59:59.000Z

460

A radiocarbon method and multi-tracer approach to quantifying groundwater discharge to coastal waters  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Groundwater discharge into estuaries and the coastal ocean is an important mechanism for the transport of dissolved chemical species to coastal waters. Because many dissolved species are present in groundwater in concentrations ...

Gramling, Carolyn M

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "wetlands coastal sand" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


461

Hazards to Electrical Distribution in Coastal Areas Subject to Flooding and High Wind  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

EPRI, Dewberry and Davis, and the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) have jointly prepared this study on hazards to electrical distribution in coastal areas that experience coastal and river flooding and high wind.

2000-09-08T23:59:59.000Z

462

Development of an Atlantic Canadian Coastal Water Level Neural Network Model  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Coastal water-level information is essential for coastal zone management, navigation, and oceanographic research. However, long-term water-level observations are usually only available at a limited number of locations. This study discusses a ...

Guoqi Han; Yu Shi

2008-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

463

Cessation of the 22–25 June 2006 Coastally Trapped Wind Reversal  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Coastally trapped wind reversals (CTWRs) occur periodically in the marine boundary layer off the western coast of the United States and dramatically change the low-level wind regime and coastal weather. Southerly flow becomes established with the ...

David A. Rahn; Thomas R. Parish

2010-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

464

Coastal-Trapped Waves off the Coast of South Africa: Generation, Propagation and Current Structures  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Coastal sea level variations from six sites around South Africa are used to establish the characteristics of coastal-trapped wave (CTW) propagation. Substantial amplitudes (>50 cm) are found along the south coast, but further propagation on the ...

E. H. Schumann; K. H. Brink

1990-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

465

Remote Environmental Monitoring Units: An Autonomous Vehicle for Characterizing Coastal Environments  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In oceanography, there has been a growing emphasis on coastal regions, partially because of their inherent complexity, as well as the increasing acknowledgment of anthropogenic impacts. To improve understanding and characterization of coastal ...

Mark A. Moline; Shelley M. Blackwell; Chris von Alt; Ben Allen; Thomas Austin; James Case; Ned Forrester; Robert Goldsborough; Mike Purcell; Roger Stokey

2005-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

466

Atmospheric Boundary-Layer Properties Affecting Wind Forecasting in Coastal Regions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Atmospheric boundary-layer properties and processes in gulf and coastal regions have special characteristics that are important in forecasting winds and ocean forcing. Accurate coastal-wind predictions require knowledge of local responses to a ...

Kenneth L. Davidson; Patricia J. Boyle; Peter S. Guest

1992-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

467

ENERGY IN THE PACIFIC COASTAL ZONE DOES D.O.E. HAVE A ROLE?  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

LBL-11154 UC- 11 ENERGY IN THE PACIFIC COASTAL ZONE DOESD.O.E. HAVE A ROLE? Ronald L. Ritschard, Kendall F. Haven,Washington. • Conclusions • DOE S Role in Coastal Zone

Ritschard, Ronald L.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

468

Seasonal Variations in the Formation of Internal Gravity Waves at a Coastal Site  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Atmospheric internal gravity waves that formed over a coastal and an inland site were identified from analog records of wind speed and direction. Internal gravity waves occurred at all hours at the coastal site but only during nights inland. More ...

S. SethuRaman; C. Nagle; G. S. Raynor

1982-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

469

An Observational Analysis and Evaluation of Land Surface Model Accuracy in the Nebraska Sand Hills  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this study, the influence of subsurface water on the energy budget components of three locations with heterogeneous land surfaces in the Nebraska Sand Hills are examined through observations and use of the Noah land surface model (LSM). ...

David B. Radell; Clinton M. Rowe

2008-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

470

Characterization Report on Sand, Slag, and Crucible Residues and on Fluoride Residues  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper reports on the chemical characterization of the sand, slag, and crucible (SS and C) residues and the fluoride residues that may be shipped from the Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site (RFETS) to Savannah River Site (SRS).

Murray, A.M.

1999-02-10T23:59:59.000Z

471

Technologies, markets and challenges for development of the Canadian Oil Sands industry  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper provides an overview of the current status of development of the Canadian oil sands industry, and considers possible paths of further development. We outline the key technology alternatives, critical resource ...

Lacombe, Romain H.

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

472

Engineering assessment of radioactive sands and residues, Lowman Site, Lowman, Idaho  

SciTech Connect

Ford, Bacon and Davis Utah Inc. has reevaluated the Lowman site in order to revise the December 1977 engineering assessment of the problems resulting from the existence of radioactive sands and residues at Lowman, Idaho. This engineering assessment has included the preparation of topographic maps, the performance of core drillings and radiometric measurements sufficient to determine areas and volumes of radioactive sands and residues and radiation exposure of individuals and nearby populations, and investigations of site hydrology and meteorology, and the evaluation and costing of alternative corrective actions. Radon gas released from the 191,000 tons of radioactive sands, residues, and contaminated soils at the Lowman site constitutes the most significant environmental impact, although windblown radioactive sands and external gamma radiation also are factors.

Not Available

1981-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

473

Determination of soil liquefaction characteristics by large-scale laboratory tests. [Sand  

SciTech Connect

The testing program described in this report was carried out to study the liquefaction behavior of a clean, uniform, medium sand. Horizontal beds of this sand, 42 inches by 90 inches by 4 inches were prepared by pluviation with a special sand spreader, saturated, and tested in a shaking table system designed for this program, which applied a horizontal cyclic shear stress to the specimens. Specimen size was selected to reduce boundary effects as much as possible. Values of pore pressures and shear strains developed during the tests are presented for sand specimens at relative densities of 54, 68, 82, and 90 percent, and the results interpreted to determine the values of the stress ratio causing liquefaction at the various relative densities.

1975-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

474

Temperature, Precipitation, and Lightning Modification in the Vicinity of the Athabasca Oil Sands  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Athabasca oil sands development in northeast Alberta, Canada, has disturbed more than 500 km2 of boreal forest through surface mining and tailings ponds development. In this paper, the authors compare the time series of temperatures and ...

Daniel M. Brown; Gerhard W. Reuter; Thomas K. Flesch

2011-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

475

CONTRACTOR REPORT SAND952729 Unlimited Release U G A Q O D  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

r x 12-N -. CONTRACTOR REPORT SAND952729 Unlimited Release U G A Q O D Evaluation of Polyacrylonitrile (PAN) as a Binding Polymer for Absorbers Used to-Treat Liquid Radioactive...

476

Investigation of sand consolidation using steam for the Tar Zone, Wilmington field, California.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??An experimental study was carried out to better understand and optimize the process of sand consolidation using high-pH steam in wells of the Wilmington field,… (more)

Nilsen, Knut Arild

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

477

Integration of High Temperature Gas-cooled Reactor Technology with Oil Sands Processes  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper summarizes an evaluation of siting an HTGR plant in a remote area supplying steam, electricity and high temperature gas for recovery and upgrading of unconventional crude oil from oil sands. The area selected for this evaluation is the Alberta Canada oil sands. This is a very fertile and active area for bitumen recovery and upgrading with significant quantities piped to refineries in Canada and the U.S Additionally data on the energy consumption and other factors that are required to complete the evaluation of HTGR application is readily available in the public domain. There is also interest by the Alberta oil sands producers (OSP) in identifying alternative energy sources for their operations. It should be noted, however, that the results of this evaluation could be applied to any similar oil sands area.

L.E. Demick

2011-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

478

ENERGY IN THE PACIFIC COASTAL ZONE DOES D.O.E. HAVE A ROLE?  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

LNG) terminals, thermal power plants, and facilities withinfor si plants. The 1976 Coastal ng thermal power confirmed

Ritschard, Ronald L.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

479

An Investigation for Disposal of Drill Cuttings into Unconsolidated Sandstones and Clayey Sands  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This project include experimental data and a set of models for relating elastic moduli/porosity/texture and static-to-dynamic moduli to strength and failure relationships for unconsolidated sands and clayey sands. The results of the project should provide the industry with a basis for wider use of oil base drilling fluids in water sensitive formations by implementing drill cutting injection into existing wells at abandoned formations and controlling fracture geometry to prevent ground water contamination.

Mese, Ali; Dvorkin, Jack; Shillinglaw, John

2000-09-11T23:59:59.000Z

480

Economics of tight sands gas extraction as affected by r and d. Occasional pub  

SciTech Connect

The paper examines the economics and resource potential of tight sand formations as a major near-term source of unconventional gas. The main vehicles for analyzing the issues to date are the 1980 study by the National Petroleum Council (NPC) on tight sand resources and two studies based on the NPC's work at different stages of completion for the GRI Center for Energy Systems Analysis (CESA).

Rosenberg, J.

1983-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "wetlands coastal sand" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


481

Paleontological overview of oil shale and tar sands areas in Colorado, Utah, and Wyoming.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In August 2005, the U.S. Congress enacted the Energy Policy Act of 2005, Public Law 109-58. In Section 369 of this Act, also known as the ''Oil Shale, Tar Sands, and Other Strategic Unconventional Fuels Act of 2005,'' Congress declared that oil shale and tar sands (and other unconventional fuels) are strategically important domestic energy resources that should be developed to reduce the nation's growing dependence on oil from politically and economically unstable foreign sources. In addition, Congress declared that both research- and commercial-scale development of oil shale and tar sands should (1) be conducted in an environmentally sound manner using management practices that will minimize potential impacts, (2) occur with an emphasis on sustainability, and (3) benefit the United States while taking into account concerns of the affected states and communities. To support this declaration of policy, Congress directed the Secretary of the Interior to undertake a series of steps, several of which are directly related to the development of a commercial leasing program for oil shale and tar sands. One of these steps was the completion of a programmatic environmental impact statement (PEIS) to analyze the impacts of a commercial leasing program for oil shale and tar sands resources on public lands, with an emphasis on the most geologically prospective lands in Colorado, Utah, and Wyoming. For oil shale, the scope of the PEIS analysis includes public lands within the Green River, Washakie, Uinta, and Piceance Creek Basins. For tar sands, the scope includes Special Tar Sand Areas (STSAs) located in Utah. This paleontological resources overview report was prepared in support of the Oil Shale and Tar Sands Resource Management Plan Amendments to Address Land Use Allocations in Colorado, Utah, and Wyoming and PEIS, and it is intended to be used by Bureau of Land Management (BLM) regional paleontologists and field office staff to support future projectspecific analyses. Additional information about the PEIS can be found at http://ostseis.anl.gov.

Murphey, P. C.; Daitch, D.; Environmental Science Division

2009-02-11T23:59:59.000Z

482

A Bayesian network approach for assessing the sustainability of coastal lakes in New South Wales, Australia  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Coastal lakes are ecosystems of significant value generating many ecological, social and economic benefits. Increasing demands resulting from urban development and other human activities within coastal lake catchments have the potential to result in ... Keywords: Bayesian network, Coastal lakes, Decision support, Environmental management, Integrated assessment, Pathogens, Sustainability

Jenifer L. Ticehurst; Lachlan T. H. Newham; David Rissik; Rebecca A. Letcher; Anthony J. Jakeman

2007-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

483

Remote sensing of the coastal zone: an overview and priorities for future research  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Remote sensing of the coastal zone: an overview and priorities for future research TIM J. MALTHUS of the International Journal of Remote Sensing on Remote Sensing of the Coastal Marine Environment to highlight recent advances in knowledge of remote sensing of the coastal zone and to define a series of priorities where

484

An integrated coastal modeling system for analyzing beach processes and beach restoration projects, SMC  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A user-friendly system called coastal modeling system (SMC) has been developed by the Spanish Ministry of Environment and the University of Cantabria. The system includes several numerical models specifically developed for the application of the methodology ... Keywords: Beach nourishment, Beach project design, Coastal modeling, Coastal numerical model, Littoral GUI

M. González; R. Medina; J. Gonzalez-Ondina; A. Osorio; F. J. Méndez; E. García

2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

485

An assessment of fish community structure and seasonal habitat use of headwater confined channels and headwater wetlands in the lower Flint River Basin, Southwest Georgia.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Headwater wetland streams comprise a significant proportion of aquatic habitats in the Southeast. Nonetheless, little is known about their fish communities. I examined seasonal fish… (more)

McPherson, Rodger Dale, Jr.

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

486

Unsaturated hydraulic conductivity of compacted sand-kaolin mixtures  

SciTech Connect

The unsaturated hydraulic conductivity of compacted sand-kaolin mixtures containing 0, 5, 10, and 30% kaolin (by dry weight) is measured for matric suctions, {psi}{sub m} < {approximately} 6.0 m. The measured unsaturated hydraulic conductivity (k{sub m}) values are compared with predicted unsaturated hydraulic conductivity (k{sub p}) values using the Brooks-Corey-Burdine and van Genuchten-Mualem relative hydraulic conductivity functions. In general, the accuracy of k{sub p} decreases with an increase in kaolin content or an increase in {psi}{sub m}. In addition, k{sub m} tends to be underpredicted for kaolin contents of 10 and 30% at relatively high suctions (1.0 m {le} {psi}{sub m} {le} 6.0 m) and overpredicted for kaolin contents of 0 and 5% at relatively low suctions (0.1 m {le} {psi}{sub m} < 1.0 m). For a given kaolin content and {psi}{sub m}, k{sub p} based on the Brooks-Corey-Burdine function tends to be more accurate than k{sub m} based on the van Genuchten-Mualem function. Finally, for 1.0 m {le} {psi}{sub m} {le} 6.0 m, k{sub p} based on analysis using the maximum volumetric water content ({theta}{sub m}) attained under steady-state flow conditions typically is more accurate than k{sub p} based on analysis using the saturated volumetric water content, {theta}{sub s}, where {theta}{sub m} {approximately} 84--90% of {theta}{sub s} in this study.

Chiu, T.F. [Genesis Group, Taipei (Taiwan, Province of China); Shackelford, C.D. [Colorado State Univ., Fort Collins, CO (United States). Dept. of Civil Engineering

1998-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

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