Sample records for wetlands coastal sand

  1. River otter foraging opportunities at a coastal wetland

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Johnson, Matthew

    monitored otter latrines at two wetland types (a saltwater lake and freshwater treatment ponds), 5 times perRiver otter foraging opportunities at a coastal wetland Results DiscussionIntroduction River otters (Lontra canadensis) are the top predator in functioning wetland ecosystems. Kruuk (1995) proposed

  2. Virginia Wetlands Report Sea Level Rise & Other Coastal Hazards

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Virginia Wetlands Report Sea Level Rise & Other Coastal Hazards: The Risks of Coastal Living See. Climate change is bringing increased temperatures, rising sea level, more frequent storms and increased in tide levels. From these records it is not only clear that water levels are rising, they appear

  3. Dynamics of carbon sequestration in a coastal wetland using radiocarbon measurements

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Yang

    Dynamics of carbon sequestration in a coastal wetland using radiocarbon measurements Yonghoon Choi1. Wang (2004), Dynamics of carbon sequestration in a coastal wetland using radiocarbon measurements carbon cycle. However, the dynamics of carbon (C) cycling in coastal wetlands and its response to sea

  4. Coastal Tidelands and Wetlands (South Carolina)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This legislation enacts a state management program to oversee water and land use and development in South Carolina's coastal zone. Under the program, the Department of Health and Environmental...

  5. Innovative approach for restoring coastal wetlands using treated drill cuttings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Veil, J. A.; Hocking, E. K.

    1999-11-02T23:59:59.000Z

    The leading environmental problem facing coastal Louisiana regions is the loss of wetlands. Oil and gas exploration and production activities have contributed to wetland damage through erosion at numerous sites where canals have been cut through the marsh to access drilling sites. An independent oil and gas producer, working with Southeastern Louisiana University and two oil field service companies, developed a process to stabilize drill cuttings so that they could be used as a substrate to grow wetlands vegetation. The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) funded a project under which the process would be validated through laboratory studies and field demonstrations. The laboratory studies demonstrated that treated drill cuttings support the growth of wetlands vegetation. However, neither the Army Corps of Engineers (COE) nor the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) would grant regulatory approval for afield trial of the process. Argonne National Laboratory was asked to join the project team to try to find alternative mechanisms for gaining regulatory approval. Argonne worked with EPA's Office of Reinvention and learned that EPA's Project XL would be the only regulatory program under which the proposed field trial could be done. One of the main criteria for an acceptable Project XL proposal is to have a formal project sponsor assume the responsibility and liability for the project. Because the proposed project involved access to private land areas, the team felt that an oil and gas company with coastal Louisiana land holdings would need to serve as sponsor. Despite extensive communication with oil and gas companies and industry associations, the project team was unable to find any organization willing to serve as sponsor. In September 1999, the Project XL proposal was withdrawn and the project was canceled.

  6. Vegetation succession and carbon sequestration in a coastal wetland in northwest Florida: Evidence from carbon isotopes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Yang

    Vegetation succession and carbon sequestration in a coastal wetland in northwest Florida: Evidence from carbon isotopes Yonghoon Choi and Yang Wang Department of Geological Sciences, Florida State. Measurements of stable carbon isotopic ratios as well as carbon (C), nitrogen (N), and phosphorus (P) contents

  7. Transplanting native dominant plants to facilitate community development in restored coastal plain wetlands.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    De Steven, Diane; Sharitz, Rebecca R.

    2007-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Abstract: Drained depressional wetlands are typically restored by plugging ditches or breaking drainage tiles to allow recovery of natural ponding regimes, while relying on passive recolonization from seed banks and dispersal to establish emergent vegetation. However, in restored depressions of the southeastern United States Coastal Plain, certain characteristic rhizomatous graminoid species may not recolonize because they are dispersal-limited and uncommon or absent in the seed banks of disturbed sites. We tested whether selectively planting such wetland dominants could facilitate restoration by accelerating vegetative cover development and suppressing non-wetland species. In an operational-scale project in a South Carolina forested landscape, drained depressional wetlands were restored in early 2001 by completely removing woody vegetation and plugging surface ditches. After forest removal, tillers of two rhizomatous wetland grasses (Panicum hemitomon, Leersia hexandra) were transplanted into singlespecies blocks in 12 restored depressions that otherwise were revegetating passively. Presence and cover of all plant species appearing in planted plots and unplanted control plots were recorded annually. We analyzed vegetation composition after two and four years, during a severe drought (2002) and after hydrologic recovery (2004). Most grass plantings established successfully, attaining 15%–85% cover in two years. Planted plots had fewer total species and fewer wetland species compared to control plots, but differences were small. Planted plots achieved greater total vegetative cover during the drought and greater combined cover of wetland species in both years. By 2004, planted grasses appeared to reduce cover of non-wetland species in some cases, but wetter hydrologic conditions contributed more strongly to suppression of non-wetland species. Because these two grasses typically form a dominant cover matrix in herbaceous depressions, our results indicated that planting selected species could supplement passive restoration by promoting a vegetative structure closer to that of natural wetlands.

  8. Geospatial analysis of a coastal sand dune field evolution: Jockey's Ridge, North Carolina

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mitasova, Helena

    Geospatial analysis of a coastal sand dune field evolution: Jockey's Ridge, North Carolina Helena, geospatial analysis, feature extraction, and quantification of change. These techniques were applied requires in-depth understanding of their evolution. Modern geospatial technologies such as lidar, real time

  9. GROUNDWATER FLOW AND TRANSPORT MODELING Application to Submarine Groundwater Discharge, Coastal Wetland Hydrology, and Deep Well Injection

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sukop, Mike

    GROUNDWATER FLOW AND TRANSPORT MODELING Application to Submarine Groundwater Discharge, Coastal, but is also lost to surface water drainage and potential submarine groundwater discharge. There are also to deal with issues such as submarine groundwater discharge and coastal wetland hydrology. SEAWAT also has

  10. HYDROLOGY AND EROSION IMPACTS OF MINING DERIVED COASTAL SAND DUNES, C H ~ A R A LBAY, CHILE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    HYDROLOGY AND EROSION IMPACTS OF MINING DERIVED COASTAL SAND DUNES, C H ~ A R A LBAY, CHILE Daniel, nitrates, iodine, and lithium. Some of the gold and silverandallofthemolybdenumareproducedasby- products

  11. Evaluation and integration of ancillary datasets for coastal wetland landcover classification using Landsat TM Imagery

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hinson, James Mithland

    1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    %, thereby meeting the NOAA C-CAP objective. iv ACKNOWIEDGMENT I would like to thank Warren Pulich and Al Green of the Texas Parks and Wildlife Department for providing the resources and oversight for this project. I am especially grateful to Doug Slack... are to be made (Kean et al. , 1988). For this reason, the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) has launched a cooperative interagency effort to map coastal wetlands and landcover on I-5-year intervals (Thomas and Ferguson, 1990). The Texas...

  12. Soil Organic Matter of Natural and Restored Coastal Wetland Soils in Southern California

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Elgin, Barbara K.

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    df III SS Mean F-Ratio p-value Squares Treatment WetlandDepth Treatment*Wetland Treatment*DepthWetland*Depth Treatment*Wetland*Depth Error Table 2: A. Data

  13. INTRODUCTION Nearshore placement of sand is becoming a more popular option in two related types of coastal

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    US Army Corps of Engineers

    of coastal engineering projects: beach nourishment and inlet dredging. Placing the sand in the nearshore instead of directly on the beach can reduce the costs of a beach nourishment project (Douglass 1995 is also an option in navigation dredging projects for similar reasons. Several design and planning

  14. Coastal Marshlands Protection Act (Georgia

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Coastal Marshlands Protection Act provides the Coastal Resources Division with the authority to protect tidal wetlands. The Coastal Marshlands Protection Act limits certain activities and...

  15. Soil Organic Matter of Natural and Restored Coastal Wetland Soils in Southern California

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Elgin, Barbara K.

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    wetland (Mugu Lagoon, Carpinteria Salt Marsh, TijuanaB) Tijuana Estuary C) Carpinteria Salt Marsh Figure 2: MeanTijuana Estuary and Carpinteria Salt Marsh. Horizontal bars

  16. Virginia Wetlands Report Center for Coastal Resources Management www.ccrm.vims.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Inventories or TMIs. This issue of the Virginia Wetlands Report highlights this research by describing the process and why these inventories are important for management and sustainability of the Commonwealth's tidal wetland resources. What are they? Tidal Marsh Inventories contain maps and information about

  17. The Virginia Wetlands Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    of Locally Important Wetlands Carl H. Hershner Editor's note: The Virginia Coastal Resources Management ............. 7 Peat: Processing and Potential for Restoration .................................. 9 Calendar and by the Virginia Coastal Resources Management Program of the Depart- ment of Environmental Quality through Grant

  18. Soil Organic Matter of Natural and Restored Coastal Wetland Soils in Southern California

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Elgin, Barbara K.

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    year record of carbon sequestration from a coastal lagoonR.E. , Milarn, C.S. 2012. Carbon sequestration and SedimentJ.C. 2003. Global carbon sequestration in tidal saline

  19. Journal of Coastal Research 20 1 4460 West Palm Beach, Florida Winter 2004 Potential Impacts of Sand Mining Offshore of

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hilton, Eric J.

    of dredging or sand mining, we evaluated the differences in the output of various numerical models run with the natural and hypothetical post-dredging bottom conditions. Fenwick and Isle of Wight Shoals offshore dredging scenarios, a one-time removal of 2 106 m3 of sand from each of two shoals and a cumulative removal

  20. SAND REPORT SAND2002-xxxx

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Istrail, Sorin

    SAND REPORT SAND2002-xxxx Unlimited Release August 2002 Discrete Optimization Models for Protein by Sandia Corporation, a Lockheed Martin Company, for the United States Department of Energy under Contract National Laboratories, operated for the United States Department of Energy by Sandia Corporation. NOTICE

  1. Vermont Wetland Rules (Vermont)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    A permit is required for any activity within a Class I or Class II wetland or wetland buffer zone which is not an allowed use. Activity in Class I or Class II wetland or its associated buffer zone...

  2. The Importance of Emergent Vegetation in Reducing Sediment Resuspension in Wetlands

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ,-Resuspension in Wetlands, USA 57007 r I .. ABSTRACT Wind-induced resuspension of bottom sediment was measured with sediment traps in Sand Lake National Wildlife Refuge, South Dakota. Resuspension was significantly greater

  3. NEW COURSE: WETLAND HYDROLOGY AND BIOGEOCHEMISTRY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Buehrer, R. Michael

    wetland delineation, wetland restoration, and constructed wetlands for water treatment. Course contentNEW COURSE: WETLAND HYDROLOGY AND BIOGEOCHEMISTRY EXPLORING THE PROCESSES THAT CONTROL WETLAND (FOR 5984; CRN 19997) Course Overview and Objectives: Wetland ecosystems provide myriad functions from

  4. The Virginia Wetlands Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    . I was hired into the fledgling Wetlands Re- search Department consisting of Ken Marcellus, George- port with regard to the Wetlands Act. One of my very first assignments was to work with Marcellus

  5. Wetland Preservation Areas (Minnesota)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    A wetland owner can apply to the host county for designation of a wetland preservation area. Once designated, the area remains designated until the owner initiates expiration, except where a state...

  6. Tar sand

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McLendon, T.R.; Bartke, T.C.

    1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Research on tar sand is briefly discussed. The research program supported by the US Department of Energy (DOE) includes a variety of surface extraction schemes. The University of Utah has process development units (PDU) employing fluidized bed, hot, water-assisted, and fluidized-bed/heat-pipe, coupled combustor technology. Considerable process variable test data have been gathered on these systems: (1) a rotary kiln unit has been built recently; (2) solvent extraction processing is being examined; and (3) an advanced hydrogenation upgrading scheme (hydropyrolysis) has been developed. The University of Arkansas, in collaboration with Diversified Petroleum, Inc., has been working on a fatty acid, solvent extraction process. Oleic acid is the solvent/surfactant. Solvent is recovered by adjusting processing fluid concentrations to separate without expensive operations. Western Research Institute has a PDU-scale scheme called the Recycle Oil Pyrolysis and Extraction (ROPE) process, which combines solvent (hot recycle bitumen) and pyrolytic extraction. 14 refs., 19 figs.

  7. Virginia Wetlands Report Tools of the Tidal Shoreline

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Virginia Wetlands Report Tools of the Tidal Shoreline Management Trade Friday, October 13, 2006 of new tools produced by the Center for Coastal Resources Managment (CCRM) and other programs) technology with digital aerial photographs and the power of the Internet. They are accessible from desktop

  8. Organic carbon flux at the mangrove soil-water column interface in the Florida Coastal Everglades 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Romigh, Melissa Marie

    2006-08-16T23:59:59.000Z

    Coastal outwelling of organic carbon from mangrove wetlands contributes to near-shore productivity and influences biogeochemical cycling of elements. I used a flume to measure fluxes of dissolved organic carbon (DOC) between ...

  9. Tidal Wetlands Regulations (Connecticut)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Most activities occurring in or near tidal wetlands are regulated, and this section contains information on such activities and required permit applications for proposed activities. Applications...

  10. Wetland Conservation Act (Minnesota)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This chapter of the Minnesota Administrative Rules implements the Wetland Conservation Act of 1991, setting standards for water preservation, withdrawal, and replacement.

  11. SAND REPORT SAND2005-7937

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    systems, but remain unlikely given the difficulty in operating large infrastructures even with modern Supervisory Control And Data Acquisition (SCADA) systems. The solution is management by distributed softwareSAND REPORT SAND2005-7937 Unlimited Release Printed January 2006 Agent-Based Control of Distributed

  12. SAND REPORT SAND2001-3515

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hart, William E.

    SAND REPORT SAND2001-3515 Unlimited Release Printed April 2002 DAKOTA, A Multilevel Parallel Object by Sandia Corporation, a Lockheed Martin Company, for the United States Department of Energy under Contract National Laboratories, operated for the United States Department of Energy by Sandia Corporation. NOTICE

  13. SAND REPORT SAND2001-3796

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hart, William E.

    SAND REPORT SAND2001-3796 Unlimited Release Printed April 2002 DAKOTA, A Multilevel Parallel Object by Sandia Corporation, a Lockheed Martin Company, for the United States Department of Energy under Contract National Laboratories, operated for the United States Department of Energy by Sandia Corporation. NOTICE

  14. SAND REPORT SAND2004-2871

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bochev, Pavel

    SAND REPORT SAND2004-2871 Unlimited Release August 19, 2004 A Mathematical Framework for Multiscale Department of Energy under Contract DE-AC04-94AL85000. Approved for public release; further dissemination unlimited. #12;Issued by Sandia National Laboratories, operated for the United States Department of Energy

  15. SAND REPORT SAND2003-0112

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fuerschbach, Phillip

    SAND REPORT SAND2003-0112 Unlimited Release Printed January 2003 Cold War Context Statement Sandia of Energy by Sandia Corporation. NOTICE: This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by Sandia Corporation, a Lockheed Martin Company, for the United States Department of Energy's National

  16. SAND REPORT SAND2003-3410

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ho, Cliff

    SAND REPORT SAND2003-3410 Unlimited Release Printed September 2003 Chemiresistor Microsensors for In-Situ Monitoring of Volatile Organic Compounds: Final LDRD Report Clifford K. Ho, Lucas K. Mc Department of Energy under Contract DE-AC04-94AL85000. Approved for public release; further dissemination

  17. SAND REPORT SAND2001-3514

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hart, William E.

    SAND REPORT SAND2001-3514 Unlimited Release Printed April 2002 DAKOTA, A Multilevel Parallel Object by Sandia Corporation, a Lockheed Martin Company, for the United States Department of Energy under Contract National Laboratories, operated for the United States Department of Energy by Sandia Corporation. NOTICE

  18. SAND REPORT SAND2003-2927

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kolda, Tamara G.

    SAND REPORT SAND2003-2927 Unlimited Release Printed August 2003 An Overview of Trilinos Michael Department of Energy under Contract DE-AC04-94AL85000. Approved for public release; further dissemination unlimited. #12;Issued by Sandia National Laboratories, operated for the United States Department of Energy

  19. SAND REPORT SAND2004-1777

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Walker, Homer F.

    SAND REPORT SAND2004-1777 Unlimited Release Printed May 2004 Globalization techniques for Newton by Sandia Corporation, a Lockheed Martin Company, for the United States Department of Energy under Contract National Laboratories, operated for the United States Department of Energy by Sandia Corporation. NOTICE

  20. SAND REPORT SAND2003-0799

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ho, Cliff

    SAND REPORT SAND2003-0799 Unlimited Release Printed March 2003 Field Demonstrations Department of Energy under Contract DE-AC04-94AL85000. Approved for public release; further dissemination unlimited. #12;2 Issued by Sandia National Laboratories, operated for the United States Department of Energy

  1. Ecologically Significant Wetlands

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Agreement 280016 © 1999 Montana Natural Heritage Program State Library Building · P.O. Box 201800 · 1515 on vegeta- tion, documenting the types of wetland communities present, their quality and condition, and rare integrity. Our observations indicate that some types of wetlands, like wet meadows and valley bottom

  2. 1. Introduction 1A. Coastal wetlands in a changing world--Coastal wetlands

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ), National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), and National Aeronautics and Space Administration

  3. Vulnerability of the New York City Metropolitan Area to Coastal Hazards,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    moved from a manufacturing to a service industry-based economy. Mid-town and Lower Manhattan are two on Long Island, NY, and the north- ern New Jersey shore. Beaches and coastal wetlands provide recreational at or near sea level. Major coastal urban centers have long been vulnerable to natural hazards, such as storm

  4. The Virginia Wetlands Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Adjacent Wetlands Tidal marsh inventory Navigation and Safety Distance to 2m contour is > 50% creek width- ing ones. The tool is a series of maps of the Virginia coastline shown in seg- ments which are rated

  5. Wastewater Reclamation/Wetlands

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hickey, D.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Wetland easement (2000 acres) 3.7 miles 1.4 miles Direction of flow NORTH FM 3039 US 175 Five Major Components ? Diversion Pump Station & Diversion Structure ? Constructed Wetland ? Conveyance Pump Station ? Electrical Substation... ? Vertical Turbine Pumps 3 ? 3000 Hp 2 ? future 6000 Hp ? Equipped with SCADA system Electrical Substation Electrical Substation ? Provides power to the Conveyance Pump Station ? Power is approximately 60% of annual operating budget ? Power...

  6. SAND78-1563

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    to current standards. SAND78-1563 VIND CHARACTERISTICS FOR FIELD TESTING OF WIND ENERGY CONVERSION SYSTEMS Robert E. Akins Environmental Research Division Sandia...

  7. SAND90-7111

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    M. Gregorek Department of Aeronautical and Astronautical Engineering The Ohio State University Columbus, OH 43220 SNLA LIBRARY II lllll 1 III SAND90-7111 Printed April 1991...

  8. Wetlands and Riparian Rights (Maryland)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Department of the Environment regulates dredging, dumping, filling, and similar activities in wetland areas to protect the environmental and public values of the wetlands and to sustain their...

  9. Regulatory and Wetlands Policy (Minnesota)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    These statutes establish wetlands as a natural resource of public value in the State, and state that it is in the public interest to restore and preserve these wetlands and their biological...

  10. Regulating Constructed Wetlands in Scotland

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Heal, Kate

    / minewater treatment ­ Stormwater management wetlands (SUDS) ­ Reedbeds for "polishing" farmyard runoff of a treatment system · CAR Engineering licence ­ if wetland associated with river/loch ­ Environmental service · Improved riparian habitat Insh Marshes, River Spey #12;23/05/2012 5 Wetlands for Sewage Treatment

  11. SAND20096226 Unlimited Release

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Plimpton, Steve

    SAND2009­6226 Unlimited Release Printed October 2009 Crossing the Mesoscale No-Man's Land via method and its variants are powerful tools for modeling materials at the mesoscale, meaning at length

  12. Petrographic, stratigraphic, and structural study of the Smackover gray sand (Jurassic) in north Louisiana

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Miciotto, S.A.

    1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The gas-producing gray sand, a dark gray to black, very fine-grained sand, occurs as 3 sand tongues in the lower member of the Smackover Formation in the subsurface of Bossier, Webster, Claiborne, and Lincoln parishes, Louisiana. A Flaser-bedded silty shale facies indicates deposition on a mid-tidal flat environment. Smackover deposition during the Jurassic in the study area was located on the gently dipping slope between a broad coastal shelf to the north and a basin to the south. The gray sand was deposited over the Norphlet formation and Louann salt before flowage and swelling of the Louann salt began. Uplift and swelling of the Louann salt later in the Jurassic created growing anticlines; sediment slumped off the structural highs of the growing salt anticlines into basinal muds and silts. The Smackover gray sand continues to challenge exploration geologists because of the lateral pinch out of its sand tongues. 11 references.

  13. Maintenance of Stormwater Wetlands and Wet Ponds

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hunt, William F.

    constructed across North Carolina. OVERVIEW As its name implies, a stormwater wetland is a wetland system of stormwater wetlands and wet ponds is performed to achieve four goals: efficient hydraulic flow and pollutant

  14. Techniques for Wetlands Construction and Management

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Locke, Shawn; Frentress, C.; Cathey, James; Mason, C.; Hirsch, R.; Wagner, M.

    2007-09-04T23:59:59.000Z

    Wetlands are important ecosystems that contain a vast array of plants and animals. Wetlands perform a variety of vital functions, such as purifying water. This publication explains the role of wetlands and how to construct and manage them....

  15. Onsite Wastewater Treatment Systems: Constructed Wetlands

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lesikar, Bruce J.

    2008-10-23T23:59:59.000Z

    A constructed wetland system for domestic wastewater treatment is designed to mimic the natural wetland treatment process of Mother Nature. This publication explains the treatment, design, operation and maintenance of constructed wetlands....

  16. 11/17/11 Treatment Wetlands

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gray, Matthew

    11/17/11 1 Treatment Wetlands Dr. Andrea Ludwig Biosystems Engineering TerOary) ­ nutrient removal Uses of Treatment Wetlands for Improved Water Wetland Ecology ­ November 17, 2011 Mississippi River Flooding 2011 Gulf

  17. Introduction Wetlands are increasingly used for wastewater

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hall, Sharon J.

    Introduction Wetlands are increasingly used for wastewater treatment Plant community changes and related nutrient retention within an aridland constructed wastewater treatment wetland How does plant community composition change in an aridland constructed wastewater treatment wetland and how do those

  18. Wastewater Reclamation/Wetlands 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hickey, D.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ? Conveyance Pipeline & Outfall Structure Diversion Pump Station & Diversion Structure Diversion Structure ? Withdraws and lifts water from the East Fork of the Trinity River into the constructed wetland Diversion Pump Station ? Pumps river... supplied by Trinity Valley Electric Cooperative ? Incoming power 138 kV reduced to 5 kV Conveyance Pipeline Conveyance Pipeline ? Transfers polished water to outfall structure at Lavon Lake ? Pipeline divided into 3 segments ? Northern ? Central...

  19. Characterization of the L-1 sand using well logs and amplitude attribute analysis 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ratliff, Thomas Lee

    1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    University Chair of Advisory Committee: Dr. Joel S. Watkins The L-1 sand (located in the Gulf Coastal Plain of Texas) is the first sand of the Miocene and lies just above the Anahuac marine shale. Its thickness ranges from 9? 64 feet throughout the study... area. A relatively thick bed of shale ranging from 126 ? 160 feet lies immediately above it, The data set used for this study consists of a three dimensional seismic survey and existing well control. The L-1 sand thickness, sub-sea depth, reservoir...

  20. Characterization of the L-1 sand using well logs and amplitude attribute analysis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ratliff, Thomas Lee

    1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    University Chair of Advisory Committee: Dr. Joel S. Watkins The L-1 sand (located in the Gulf Coastal Plain of Texas) is the first sand of the Miocene and lies just above the Anahuac marine shale. Its thickness ranges from 9? 64 feet throughout the study... area. A relatively thick bed of shale ranging from 126 ? 160 feet lies immediately above it, The data set used for this study consists of a three dimensional seismic survey and existing well control. The L-1 sand thickness, sub-sea depth, reservoir...

  1. CONTRACTOR REPORT SAND927005

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    CONTRACTOR REPORT SAND92­7005 Unlimited Release UC­261 Fatigue of Fiberglass Wind Turbine Blade WIND TURBINE BLADE MATERIALS J.F. Mandell, R.M. Reed, D.D. Samborsky Montana State University Bozeman in wind turbine blades has been explored. Coupon testing was carried out under constant amplitude tensile

  2. SAND932591 Unlimited Release

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McCurley, Kevin

    SAND93­2591 Unlimited Release First Printed October 1992 Revised October 29, 1993 Revised June 22. This new algorithm is called SHA­1. In this report we describe a portable and efficient implementation information used in their construction. \\Lambda This work was performed under U.S. Department of Energy

  3. The Amenity Value of Wetlands

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gao, Shan

    2010-07-14T23:59:59.000Z

    .......................................................... 50 4.3.1 Chatham County Board of Assessor ................................... 50 4.3.2 Chatham County Metropolitan Planning Council............... 51 4.3.3 National Wetland Inventory................................................ 51 4... 6.3.4 The Implicit Prices of Wetland Attributes .......................... 100 6.4 Hedonic Models in Savannah ................................................... 100 6.4.1 Basic Hedonic Model...

  4. Plants in constructed wetlands help to treat agricultural processing wastewater

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Grismer, Mark E; Shepherd, Heather L

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Evaluation of constructed wetland treatment performance forof a con- structed wetland for treatment of winery effluent.constructed wetlands for process wastewater treatment at two

  5. Marine Habitats and Land Use (Virginia)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Virginia Marine Resources Commission has jurisdiction over submerged lands off the state's coast and in inland rivers and streams, wetlands and tidal wetlands, coastal sand dunes and beaches,...

  6. Hydrogeologic characterization of Illinois wetlands

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Miner, J.J.; Miller, M.V.; Rorick, N.L.; Fucciolo, C.S. (Illinois State Geological Survey, Champaign, IL (United States))

    1994-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Illinois State Geological Survey (ISGS), under contract from the Illinois Department of Transportation (IDOT), is evaluating a series of selected wetlands and sites proposed for wetland construction and/or restoration. The program is associated with wetland mitigation for unavoidable effects of state highway construction. The goal of this ongoing program is: (1) to collect commonly lacking geologic, geomorphic, hydrologic, and geochemical data from various wetland sites; and (2) to create a database of this information for use by government agencies and the private sector. Some of the potential uses of this database include: (1) determination of history, role, and possible life cycle of various wetland types allowing more effective design criteria; (2) functional comparison of constructed or restored wetlands versus natural wetlands; (3) testing of wetland hypotheses and delineation techniques under a variety of known hydrogeologic conditions in Illinois; (4) hydrogeologic assessment of potential mitigation sites against a suite of known sites; and (5) determination of data and collection methods appropriate for hydrogeologic wetland studies. A series of tasks is required to complete each study. Historical information is collected from ISGS records, including data regarding topography, soils, sediments, bedrock, and local well records. A field-testing plan is prepared, which includes goals of the study, methods, research potential, and potential results. An initial report is prepared after geologic and geochemical characterization and the installation of needed ground water monitoring wells and surface water gauges. After one year of water-level monitoring, a final report is prepared regarding the present conditions of a site. Further monitoring may be required to determine the performance at constructed and/or restored sites.

  7. Community-dependent Positive Interactions in Southern California Coastal Ecosystems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bryson, Sarah

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Estuarine Wetland At Carpinteria, California - Plant-Estuarine Wetland At Carpinteria, California - Plant-Estuarine Wetland At Carpinteria, California - Plant-

  8. PAUL B. HOOK Wetland and Watershed Scientist, Intermountain Aquatics, Inc.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Maxwell, Bruce D.

    design for water resource protection Native-plant-based streambank bioengineering and treatment wetland and plant effects in wastewater treatment wetlands and riparian buffers Wetland and riparian restoration in surface and groundwater hydrology.** Residential wastewater treatment wetland, Jackson, WY (research

  9. Control of hardwood regeneration in restored carolina bay depression wetlands.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Moser, Lee, J.; Barton, Christopher, D.; Blake, John, I.

    2012-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Carolina bays are depression wetlands located in the coastal plain region of the eastern United States. Disturbance of this wetland type has been widespread, and many sites contain one or more drainage ditches. Restoration of bays is of interest because they are important habitats for rare flora and fauna. Previous bay restoration projects have identified flood-tolerant woody competitors in the seedbank and re-sprouting as impediments to the establishment of desired herbaceous wetland vegetation communities. We restored 3 bays on the Savannah River Site, South Carolina, by plugging drainage ditches, harvesting residual pine/hardwood stands within the bays, and monitoring the vegetative response of the seedbank to the hydrologic change. We applied a foliar herbicide on one-half of each bay to control red maple (Acerrubrum), sweetgum (Liquidambar styraciflua), and water oak (Quercus nigra) sprouting, and we tested its effectiveness across a hydrologic gradient in each bay. Hardwood regeneration was partially controlled by flooding in bays that exhibited long growing season hydroperiods. The findings also indicated that herbicide application was an effective means for managing hardwood regeneration and re-sprouting in areas where hydrologic control was ineffective. Herbicide use had no effect on species richness in the emerging vegetation community. In late-season drawdown periods, or in bays where hydroperiods are short, more than one herbicide application may be necessary.

  10. Wetlands Mitigation Banking and the Problem of Consolidation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Steinhoff, Gordon

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of waterbirds in Aspen Park wetlands. Hydrobiologia, 567(1),introducing small fish into Aspen Parkland pothole wetlands

  11. The Relative Importance of Road Density and Physical Watershed Features in Determining Coastal Marsh Water

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McMaster University

    with overall Water Quality Index scores. Road density also showed positive correlations with total nitrate Marsh Water Quality in Georgian Bay Rachel DeCatanzaro Ă? Maja Cvetkovic Ă? Patricia Chow-Fraser Received and physical watershed features (watershed size, wetland cover, and bedrock type) on water quality in coastal

  12. Hydrocarbon removal with constructed wetlands 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Eke, Paul Emeka

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Wetlands have long played a significant role as natural purification systems, and have been effectively used to treat domestic, agricultural and industrial wastewater. However, very little is known about the biochemical ...

  13. Compressive behavior of fine sand.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Martin, Bradley E. (Air Force Research Laboratory, Eglin, FL); Kabir, Md. E. (Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN); Song, Bo; Chen, Wayne (Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN)

    2010-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The compressive mechanical response of fine sand is experimentally investigated. The strain rate, initial density, stress state, and moisture level are systematically varied. A Kolsky bar was modified to obtain uniaxial and triaxial compressive response at high strain rates. A controlled loading pulse allows the specimen to acquire stress equilibrium and constant strain-rates. The results show that the compressive response of the fine sand is not sensitive to strain rate under the loading conditions in this study, but significantly dependent on the moisture content, initial density and lateral confinement. Partially saturated sand is more compliant than dry sand. Similar trends were reported in the quasi-static regime for experiments conducted at comparable specimen conditions. The sand becomes stiffer as initial density and/or confinement pressure increases. The sand particle size become smaller after hydrostatic pressure and further smaller after dynamic axial loading.

  14. Spectroscopic Evidence of Uranium Immobilization in Acidic Wetlands by Natural Organic Matter and Plant Roots

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Li, Dien; Kaplan, Daniel I.; Chang, Hyun-Shik; Seaman, John C.; Jaffé, Peter R.; Koster van Groos, Paul; Scheckel, Kirk G.; Segre, Carlo U.; Chen, Ning; Jiang, De-Tong; et al

    2015-03-03T23:59:59.000Z

    Biogeochemistry of uranium in wetlands plays important roles in U immobilization in storage ponds of U mining and processing facilities but has not been well understood. The objective of this work was to study molecular mechanisms responsible for high U retention by Savannah River Site (SRS) wetland sediments under varying redox and acidic (pH = 2.6–5.8) conditions using U L?-edge X-ray absorption spectroscopy. Uranium in the SRS wetland sediments existed primarily as U(VI) bonded as a bidentate to carboxylic sites (U–C bond distance at ?2.88 Ĺ), rather than phenolic or other sites of natural organic matter (NOM). In microcosms simulatingmore »the SRS wetland processes, U immobilization on roots was 2 orders of magnitude higher than on the adjacent brown or more distant white sands in which U was U(VI). Uranium on the roots were both U(IV) and U(VI), which were bonded as a bidentate to carbon, but the U(VI) may also form a U phosphate mineral. After 140 days of air exposure, all U(IV) was reoxidized to U(VI) but remained as a bidentate bonding to carbon. This study demonstrated NOM and plant roots can highly immobilize U(VI) in the SRS acidic sediments, which has significant implication for the long-term stewardship of U-contaminated wetlands.« less

  15. SAND88-1807

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What's PossibleRadiation Protection TechnicalResonantNovember11-3779SAND88-1807 * UC-261 Unlimited

  16. SAND92-1381

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What's PossibleRadiation Protection TechnicalResonantNovember11-3779SAND88-1807 * UC-261 Unlimited2-1

  17. SAND94-1057

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What's PossibleRadiation Protection TechnicalResonantNovember11-3779SAND88-1807 * UC-261 Unlimited2-1c.1

  18. SAND94-3039

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What's PossibleRadiation Protection TechnicalResonantNovember11-3779SAND88-1807 * UC-261

  19. Coastal Area Management Program (Alabama)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This program regulates coastal activities, permits required, discharges to coastal waters and siting, construction and operation of energy facilities. ADEM's Coastal Program rules include the...

  20. COMMUNITY PATTERNS IN TREATMENT WETLANDS, NATURAL WETLANDS, AND CROPLANDS IN FLORIDA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gawlik, Dale E.

    COMMUNITY PATTERNS IN TREATMENT WETLANDS, NATURAL WETLANDS, AND CROPLANDS IN FLORIDA TYLER J. BECK of treatment wetlands called Stormwater Treatment Areas (STAs) have been constructed on agricultural land greatly decreased, the creation of constructed wetlands for wastewater treatment has been increasing since

  1. Industry and forest wetlands: Cooperative research initiatives

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shepard, J.P. (National Council of the Paper Industry for Air and Stream Improvement, Gainesville, FL (United States)); Lucier, A.A. (National Council of the Paper Industry for Air and Stream Improvement, New York, NY (United States)); Haines, L.W. (International Paper, Bainbridge, GA (United States))

    1993-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In 1989 the forest products industry responded to a challenge of the National Wetlands Policy Forum to initiate a cooperative research program on forest wetlands management organized through the National Council of the Paper Industry for Air and Stream Improvement (NCASI). The objective is to determine how forest landowners can manage wetlands for timber production while protecting other wetland functions such as flood storage, water purification, and food chain/wildlife habitat support. Studies supported by the NCASI in 9 states are summarized. Technical support on wetland regulatory issues to member companies is part of the research program. Since guidelines for recognizing wetlands for regulatory proposed have changed frequently, the NCASI has recommend an explicit link between wetland delineation and a classification system that considers difference among wetland types in vegetation, soils, hydrology, appearance, landscape position, and other factors. 16 refs.

  2. Development near Wetlands and Waterways (Maryland)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Wetlands and Waterways Program requires permits for commercial activity or development proposed on or near a wetland or waterway. For the purpose of the permitting process, major projects are...

  3. Wetland Flow and Salinity Budgets and Elements of a Decision Support System toward Implementation of Real-Time Seasonal Wetland Salinity Management

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Quinn, N.W.T.

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    this  study  the  “treatment  wetland  ”  has  continued  wetland   impoundment,   and   a   treatment   (

  4. Colorado Natural Heritage Program Wetland Program Plan

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    of Land Management (BLM), and numerous county and local governments. The surveys have also involvedColorado Natural Heritage Program Wetland Program Plan A Vision for Building Comprehensive Wetland Information for the State of Colorado Planning Years 2011­2015 #12;Colorado Natural Heritage Program Wetland

  5. WETLAND DELINEATION REPORT UMORE MINING AREA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Netoff, Theoden

    Project 08-0092 September 29, 2009 #12;UMore Gravel EIS ­ Empire Township Wetland Delineation #12;UMore Gravel EIS ­ Empire Township Wetland Delineation TABLE OF CONTENTS 1.0. INTRODUCTION Determination Form #12;UMore Gravel EIS ­ Empire Township Wetland Delineation #12;UMore Gravel EIS ­ Empire

  6. Constructed Wetlands for Industry in Thailand

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Heal, Kate

    Treatment System 2. The Artificially Constructed Wetland System 3. The Grass Filtration System 4. The Red treatment ponds 1 water quality improvement pond #12;23/05/2012 5 The Constructed Wetland System - Shallow wetlands (Natural treatment system) Ubol Ratana #12;23/05/2012 8 Immediate Objectives - Treat community

  7. Coastal Management (Louisiana)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Coastal Use Permit (CUP) process is part of the Louisiana Coastal Resources Program (LCRP), which is an effort among Louisiana citizens, as well as state, federal and local advisory and...

  8. Coastal Management Act (Georgia)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Coastal Management Act provides enabling authority for the State to prepare and administer a coastal management program. The Act does not establish new regulations or laws; it is designed to...

  9. Restored Drill Cuttings for Wetlands Creation: Year One Results of a Mesocosm Approach to Emulate Field Conditions Under Varying Hydrologic Regimes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shaffer, Gary P.; Hester Mark W.; Greene, Michael C.; Childers Gary W.

    2001-02-21T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this study was to demonstrate that restored drill cuttings, a byproduct of the petroleum industry, can be safely used in coastal as well as inland wetland restoration projects. Prior to conducting laboratory experiments, composite soil samples of the recycled sediments were analyzed for pH and heavy metal concentrations.

  10. Evaluation of Subsurface Flow and Free-water Surface Wetlands Treating NPR-3 Produced Water - Year No. 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Myers, J. E.; Jackson, L. M.

    2001-10-13T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper is a summary of some of the activities conducted during the first year of a three-year cooperative research and development agreement (CRADA) between the Department of Energy (DOE) Rocky Mountain Oilfield Testing Center (RMOTC) and Texaco relating to the treatment of produced water by constructed wetlands. The first year of the CRADA is for design, construction and acclimation of the wetland pilot units. The second and third years of the CRADA are for tracking performance of pilot wetlands as the plant and microbial communities mature. A treatment wetland is a proven technology for the secondary and tertiary treatment of produced water, storm water and other wastewaters. Treatment wetlands are typically classified as either free-water surface (FWS) or subsurface flow (SSF). Both FWS and SSF wetlands work well when properly designed and operated. This paper presents a collection of kinetic data gathered from pilot units fed a slipstream of Wyoming (NPR-3) produced water. The pilot units are set up outdoors to test climatic influences on treatment. Monitoring parameters include evapotranspiration, plant growth, temperature, and NPDES discharge limits. The pilot wetlands (FWS and SSF) consist of a series of 100-gal plastic tubs filled with local soils, gravel, sharp sand and native wetland plants (cattail (Typha spp.), bulrush (Scirpus spp.), dwarf spikerush (Eleocharis)). Feed pumps control hydraulic retention time (HRT) and simple water control structures control the depth of water. The treated water is returned to the existing produced water treatment system. All NPDES discharge limits are met. Observations are included on training RMOTC summer students to do environmental work.

  11. Wetland Water Cooling Partnership: The Use of Constructed Wetlands to Enhance Thermoelectric Power Plant Cooling and Mitigate the Demand of Surface Water Use

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Apfelbaum, Steven; Duvall, Kenneth; Nelson, Theresa; Mensing, Douglas; Bengtson, Harlan; Eppich, John; Penhallegon, Clayton; Thompson, Ry

    2013-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Through the Phase I study segment of contract #DE-NT0006644 with the U.S. Department of Energy’s National Energy Technology Laboratory, Applied Ecological Services, Inc. and Sterling Energy Services, LLC (the AES/SES Team) explored the use of constructed wetlands to help address stresses on surface water and groundwater resources from thermoelectric power plant cooling and makeup water requirements. The project objectives were crafted to explore and develop implementable water conservation and cooling strategies using constructed wetlands (not existing, naturally occurring wetlands), with the goal of determining if this strategy has the potential to reduce surface water and groundwater withdrawals of thermoelectric power plants throughout the country. Our team’s exploratory work has documented what appears to be a significant and practical potential for augmenting power plant cooling water resources for makeup supply at many, but not all, thermoelectric power plant sites. The intent is to help alleviate stress on existing surface water and groundwater resources through harvesting, storing, polishing and beneficially re-using critical water resources. Through literature review, development of conceptual created wetland plans, and STELLA-based modeling, the AES/SES team has developed heat and water balances for conventional thermoelectric power plants to evaluate wetland size requirements, water use, and comparative cooling technology costs. The ecological literature on organism tolerances to heated waters was used to understand the range of ecological outcomes achievable in created wetlands. This study suggests that wetlands and water harvesting can provide a practical and cost-effective strategy to augment cooling waters for thermoelectric power plants in many geographic settings of the United States, particularly east of the 100th meridian, and in coastal and riverine locations. The study concluded that constructed wetlands can have significant positive ancillary socio-economic, ecosystem, and water treatment/polishing benefits when used to complement water resources at thermoelectric power plants. Through the Phase II pilot study segment of the contract, the project team partnered with Progress Energy Florida (now Duke Energy Florida) to quantify the wetland water cooling benefits at their Hines Energy Complex in Bartow, Florida. The project was designed to test the wetland’s ability to cool and cleanse power plant cooling pond water while providing wildlife habitat and water harvesting benefits. Data collected during the monitoring period was used to calibrate a STELLA model developed for the site. It was also used to inform management recommendations for the demonstration site, and to provide guidance on the use of cooling wetlands for other power plants around the country. As a part of the pilot study, Duke Energy is scaling up the demonstration project to a larger, commercial scale wetland instrumented with monitoring equipment. Construction is expected to be finalized in early 2014.

  12. Canadian Oil Sands: Canada An Emerging Energy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boisvert, Jeff

    (collectively "statements") with respect to: expectations regarding crude oil production, global energy demand1 Canadian Oil Sands: Canada ­ An Emerging Energy Superpower 0 University of Alberta February 8 Oil Sands Limited ("Canadian Oil Sands"), Syncrude Canada Ltd. ("Syncrude") and the oil sands industry

  13. Wetland Importance Matthew J. Gray

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gray, Matthew

    /Tourism (consumptive & non-consumptive uses) ·Aesthetics ·Economic Value #12;2 Biological Values Wetland Dependent in Damage in U.S. 2004 Hurricanes ·Charley (22) ·Frances (15) ·Ivan (60) ·Jeanne (6) Environmental Values, Heavy Metals, Grease, Oil 99.9% E. coli Eutrophication 40% of Global C 25% in Peatlands Release CO2

  14. Wetland Importance Matthew J. Gray

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gray, Matthew

    /Tourism (consumptive & non-consumptive uses) ·Aesthetics ·Economic Value #12;2 Biological Values Wetland Dependent Billion in Damage in U.S. 2004 Hurricanes ·Charley (22) ·Frances (15) ·Ivan (60) ·Jeanne (6) Environmental) Pesticides, Heavy Metals, Grease, Oil 99.9% E. coli Eutrophication 40% of Global C 25% in Peatlands Release

  15. Wetland Losses and Human Impacts

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gray, Matthew

    Effects? Fuel 1.9 Trillion Tons ·Canada (510 bT) ·Russia (770 bT) World Peat Resources 1) Finland 2 After Discharges ·Chemical ·Temperature #12;6 Human Influences on Wetlands Peat Mining Horticulture) Ireland 3) Russia World Peat Mining 16.8 mil tons 6.9 mil tons 23.7 mil tons Fuel= Hort= 70% 30%

  16. Nevada Test Site Wetlands Assessment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    D. J. Hansen

    1997-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report identifies 16 Nevada Test Site (NTS) natural water sources that may be classified by the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (USACE) as jurisdictional wetlands and identifies eight water sources that may be classified as waters of the United States. These water sources are rare, localized habitats on the NTS that are important to regional wildlife and to isolated populations of water tolerant plants and aquatic organisms. No field investigations on the NTS have been conducted in the past to identify those natural water sources which would be protected as rare habitats and which may fall under regulatory authority of the Clean Water Act (CWA) of 1997. This report identifies and summarizes previous studies of NTS natural water sources, and identifies the current DOE management practices related to the protection of NTS wetlands. This report also presents management goals specific for NTS wetlands that incorporate the intent of existing wetlands legislation, the principles of ecosystem management, and the interests of regional land managers and other stakeholders.

  17. Floodplain and Wetlands Assessment for Construction of a Second...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    and Wetlands Assessment for Construction of a Second Full Service Access Road over Lena Gulch Floodplain and Wetlands Assessment for Construction of a Second Full Service Access...

  18. artificial wetlands pilot: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    A process-based pilot-scale (more) Beebe, Donald 2013-01-01 6 National Wetlands Inventory Wetlands of the Environmental Sciences and Ecology Websites Summary: National...

  19. artificial wetland ecosystems: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    METHANE SOURCE Lakes and other wetlands are an important source Centre for Climate Change Research) DIFFERENT ASPECTS OF METHANE IN LAKES AND WETLANDS INVITED SPEAKERS...

  20. Inland Wetlands and Water Courses Regulations (Connecticut)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Regulated activities in or near inland wetlands and water courses include the removal or depositing of material, land or water obstruction or alteration, construction, pollution, or water diversion...

  1. Orleans Local Coastal Program (Louisiana)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Local Coastal Programs Section provides technical assistance, guidance, and management to parishes in the development, approval, and implementation of local coastal programs (LCP). Once an LCP...

  2. Onsite Wastewater Treatment Systems: Sand Filters 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lesikar, Bruce J.

    2008-10-23T23:59:59.000Z

    Sand filters are beds of granular material, or sand, drained from underneath so that pretreated wastewater can be treated, collected and distributed to a land application system. This publication explains the treatment, design, operation...

  3. Compression and Creep of Venice Lagoon Sands

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sanzeni, Alex

    A laboratory test program was conducted to evaluate the one-dimensional (1D) compression and creep properties of intact sand (and silty-sand) samples from a deep borehole at the Malamocco Inlet to the Venice Lagoon. The ...

  4. Onsite Wastewater Treatment Systems: Sand Filters

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lesikar, Bruce J.

    2008-10-23T23:59:59.000Z

    Sand filters are beds of granular material, or sand, drained from underneath so that pretreated wastewater can be treated, collected and distributed to a land application system. This publication explains the treatment, design, operation...

  5. WASTEWATER TREATMENT OVER SAND COLUMNS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    of the biological mechanisms responsible for wastewater treatment. The first part of the study, conducted on site93/0096 WASTEWATER TREATMENT OVER SAND COLUMNS TREATMENT YIELDS, LOCALISATION OF THE BIOMASS Domestic wastewater treatment by infiltration-percolation is a process that becomming common in France

  6. What is a Wetland? Matthew J. Gray

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gray, Matthew

    and Filling of Wetlands Permits Issued by Army Corps of Engineers Environmental Impact Statement and organisms live Substrate is non-soil (H2O depth prevents emergent hydrophyte growth) >2 m (6.6 ft) in Depth (Non-tidal Wetlands) #12;3 What are Hydrophytes? USACE Definition "...macrophytic plant life

  7. Constructed wetlands for industry and commerce

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Heal, Kate

    23/05/2012 1 Constructed wetlands for industry and commerce Brian D'Arcy and Kate Heal Types of pollution sources and water quality reductions needed Increasing Concentration Treatment & dilution Self drainage Resource recovery #12;23/05/2012 2 How do constructed wetlands improve water quality? Treatment

  8. Treating tar sands formations with karsted zones

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Vinegar, Harold J. (Bellaire, TX); Karanikas, John Michael (Houston, TX)

    2010-03-09T23:59:59.000Z

    Methods for treating a tar sands formation are described herein. The tar sands formation may have one or more karsted zones. Methods may include providing heat from one or more heaters to one or more karsted zones of the tar sands formation to mobilize fluids in the formation. At least some of the mobilized fluids may be produced from the formation.

  9. Channel Design to Increase Wastewater Treatment Wetland Capacity and Connectivity in Stockton, CA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cubbison, Erin O.

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Control Facility. Treatment Wetland System Startup PeriodDesign to Increase Wastewater Treatment Wetland Capacity andof wastewater treatment wetlands at the Stockton Regional

  10. Selection of Native Wetland Plants for Water Treatment of Urban Runoff

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rejmankova, Eliska; Bayer, David E

    1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    UC Davis KEYWORDS: Wetlands, Water Treatment, Urban Runoff,of Native Wetland Plants for Water Treatment of UrbanValley Wetlands Biomass Response to Heavy Metal Treatment

  11. Wetlands as Best Management Practices to Mitigate Agricultural Nonpoint Source Pollution

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Karpuzcu, Mahmut Ekrem

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of first-order treatment wetland models. EcologicalR. L. Knight. 1996. Treatment Wetlands. Lewis Publishers CRCS. D. Wallace. 2008. Treatment Wetlands. CRC Press Taylor &

  12. Physics 6321 Coastal oceanography

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    deYoung, Brad

    Physics 6321 Coastal oceanography · Instructor: Dr. Iakov Afanassiev · Office: Physics C-4065 · email: yakov@physics.mun.ca · Course Times: TBD Room TBD · Office Hours: unlimited · Web Page: http://www.physics

  13. Jurisdictional wetland delineation in the Texas Gulf Coast Prairie utilizing aerial photography

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Watson, Samuel Jewell

    1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ,jurisdictional wetlands, areas of inclusion (wetlands which occurred within the remote sensing and the onsite method), omission (wetlands omitted by the remote sensing method), and commission (upland areas delineated as wetlands by the remote sensing method). An equation...

  14. Feasibility of using geothermal effluents for waterfowl wetlands

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    1981-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This project was conducted to evaluate the feasibility of using geothermal effluents for developing and maintaining waterfowl wetlands. Information in the document pertains to a seven State area the West where geothermal resources have development potential. Information is included on physiochemical characteristics of geothermal effluents; known effects of constituents in the water on a wetland ecosystem and water quality criteria for maintaining a viable wetland; potential of sites for wetland development and disposal of effluent water from geothermal facilities; methods of disposal of effluents, including advantages of each method and associated costs; legal and institutional constraints which could affect geothermal wetland development; potential problems associated with depletion of geothermal resources and subsidence of wetland areas; potential interference (adverse and beneficial) of wetlands with ground water; special considerations for wetlands requirements including size, flows, and potential water usage; and final conclusions and recommendations for suitable sites for developing demonstration wetlands.

  15. The southern Lake Michigan coastal erosion study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Folger, D.W. (Geological Survey, Woods Hole, MA (United States))

    1993-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    As a result of damage inflicted on the Chicago shoreline by exceptionally high waters in 1985-87, the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) initiated a cooperative 5-year (1988--1992) study to evaluate the geologic framework of the area, the frequency of lake level fluctuations, and the processes responsible for the intense coastal erosion. The study involved 19 scientists from the USGS, Illinois State Geological Survey, Indiana Geological Survey, Indiana University, Purdue University, Northeastern Illinois University, Oregon State University, and the University of Washington. Some important results of the study follow: (1) the failure of revetments protecting the Chicago lakeshore is mainly structural and not erosional. (2) Prehistoric lake level fluctuations exceeded historic fluctuations by as much as a factor of two. For example, in the 17th century, lake level changed over a range of [approximately]3 m, whereas between the 1964 low and the 1986 high it changed only [approximately]1.6 m. (3) Bluff retreat between Wilmette and Waukegan varies from 10--75 cm/yr and averages 20--25 cm/yr; erosion rates north of Waukegan have been as high as 3 m/yr. (4) Eroding bluffs provide most of the sand to the nearshore zone; however, possibly due to construction of shore protection, the nearshore sand wedge has shown a dramatic decrease in volume during the last two decades. (5) Ice ridges as high as 7 m form along the lakeshore but do not effectively protect the beach from winter erosion as previously thought. (6) The Indiana Dunes National Lakeshore apparently was a major sink for sand moving southward along both sides of the lake; sediment input now appears to come mostly from the eastern shore.

  16. COURSE SYLLABUS WETLANDS AND WATER QUALITY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ma, Lena

    COURSE SYLLABUS WETLANDS AND WATER QUALITY SOS 5242 3 Credits I. COURSE DESCRIPTION: Introduction page of this syllabus to contact the instructor if you are not able to make it to an exam ­ prior

  17. Identification and characterization of wetlands in the Bear Creek watershed

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rosensteel, B.A. [JAYCOR, Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Trettin, C.C. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)

    1993-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The primary objective of this study was to identify, characterize, and map the wetlands in the Bear Creek watershed. A preliminary wetland categorization system based on the Cowardin classification system (Cowardin et al. 1979) with additional site-specific topographic, vegetation, and disturbance characteristic modifiers was developed to characterize the type of wetlands that exist in the Bear Creek watershed. An additional objective was to detect possible relationships among site soils, hydrology, and the occurrence of wetlands in the watershed through a comparison of existing data with the field survey. Research needs are discussed in the context of wetland functions and values and regulatory requirements for wetland impact assessment and compensatory mitigation.

  18. Sesame fertilization on lakeland sand

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Huerta, Ramon Moreno

    1961-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Ma/or Sub]ect: Agronomy SESAME FERTILIZATION ON LAKELAND SAND A Thesis RAMON HUERTA M. Approved as to style and content hy: Chairssn of Conunittee Head of partment January 1961 ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS The author wishes to express his sincere... difference was approached in the third. 8 Ye s 1. 856 + 0, 0509 X 16 POUEDS GF SULFUR PER ACRE Figure 4. Effect of sulfur on yield of sesame seed, winter of 1958-59. The data result1ng fram the sulfur effect during the winter of 1958-59 crop...

  19. SAND 2004-0281P

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilA Approved: 5-13-14 FEDERALAmerica High EnergyNationalSpring 2014 NationalFallSAND

  20. technology offer SandTES -High Temperature Sand Thermal Energy Storage

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Szmolyan, Peter

    technology offer SandTES - High Temperature Sand Thermal Energy Storage key words: High Temperature Energy Storage | Fluidized Bed | Sand | The invention consists of a fluidized bed with internal heat together with Dr. Eisl of ENRAG GmbH. Background Thermal energy storage (TES) systems are essential

  1. Geothermal wetlands: an annotated bibliography of pertinent literature

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stanley, N.E.; Thurow, T.L.; Russell, B.F.; Sullivan, J.F.

    1980-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This annotated bibliography covers the following topics: algae, wetland ecosystems; institutional aspects; macrophytes - general, production rates, and mineral absorption; trace metal absorption; wetland soils; water quality; and other aspects of marsh ecosystems. (MHR)

  2. Wetland Conservation The Food Security Act was enacted on

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    US Army Corps of Engineers

    XII of this Act introduced 3 conservation provisions to address environmental concerns associatedWetland Conservation Compliance #12;The Food Security Act was enacted on December 23, 1985. Title) Conservation ­ "Sodbuster" provision ­ Wetland Conservation, or "Swampbuster" #12;The Swampbuster provision

  3. Survey of Critical Wetlands Bureau of Land Management Lands

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Survey of Critical Wetlands Bureau of Land Management Lands South Park, Park County, Colorado 2003 Delivery Colorado State University #12;Survey of Critical Wetlands Bureau of Land Management Lands South

  4. Application of integrated constructed wetlands for contaminant treatment and diffusion 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dong, Yu

    2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The sediment accumulation is an important characteristic in the ageing process of integrated constructed wetlands (ICW). Retained nutrient and other contaminants in wetland sediments have the potential to be remobilized ...

  5. 5, 123134, 2008 Coastal upwelling

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    measured a few months later within the wind driven southwest coast of India coastal upwelling region 7 N­14 (intensification) of the Indian trade winds and of the wind-induced coastal upwelling. This ENSO related modulation of the wind-driven coastal upwelling appears to contribute to the connection observed at the basin

  6. Canadian Oil Sands: Canada's Energy Advantage

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boisvert, Jeff

    crude oil production, global energy demand, the estimated reserves and resources at Syncrude, views that the world will need oil for decades to come, the expectations regarding oil sands productive capacityCanadian Oil Sands: Canada's Energy Advantage 0 #12;Forward looking information 1 In the interest

  7. Video Matching Peter Sand and Seth Teller

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ouhyoung, Ming

    Video Matching Peter Sand and Seth Teller MIT Computer Science and Artificial Intelligence robotic motion control systems that would normally be used to ensure registra- tion of multiple video due to moving people, changes in lighting, and/or different exposure settings. e-mail: {sand

  8. SANDIA REPORT SAND2006-7744

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kolda, Tamara G.

    SANDIA REPORT SAND2006-7744 Unlimited Release Printed December 2006 Supersedes SAND2006-2161 Dated of Energy by Sandia Corporation. NOTICE: This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by Sandia Corporation, a Lockheed Martin Company, for the United States Department of Energy's National

  9. SANDIA REPORT SAND2000-2094

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    SANDIA REPORT SAND2000-2094 Unlimited Release Printed August 2000 Application of the Smart, for the United States Department of Energy under Contract DE-AC04-94AL85000. Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. #12;August 2000 i SAND2000-2094 Unlimited Release Printed August 2000 Application

  10. SANDIA REPORT SAND99-2758

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    SANDIA REPORT SAND99-2758 Unlimited Release Printed November 1999 Modeling Decomposition Department of Energy under Contract DE-AC04-94AL85000. Approved for public release; further dissemination unlimited. #12;Inside front cover (disclaimer goes here) 2 #12;SAND99-2758 Unlimited Release Printed

  11. SANDIA REPORT SAND2012-1000

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tesfatsion, Leigh

    SANDIA REPORT SAND2012-1000 Unlimited Release Printed September 2012 Project Report: A Survey for the United States Department of Energy by Sandia Corporation. NOTICE: This report was prepared as an account · · UNITED STATES OF AM ERICA 2 #12;SAND2012-1000 Unlimited Release Printed September 2012 Project Report

  12. SANDIA REPORT SAND2014-17401

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    SANDIA REPORT SAND2014-17401 Unlimited Release Printed September 2014 Wave Energy Converter (WEC States Department of Energy by Sandia Corporation. NOTICE: This report was prepared as an account of work://www.ntis.gov/help/ordermethods.asp?loc=7-4-0#online #12;3 SAND2014-17401 Unlimited Release Printed September 2014 Wave Energy Converter

  13. SANDIA REPORT SAND2014-2864

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    SANDIA REPORT SAND2014-2864 Unlimited Release Printed March 2014 User Guidelines and Best Practices to apply Dakota to a simulation problem. This SAND report consti Corporation, for the U.S. Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration under contract DE

  14. Welcome to SWAMP The Stream and Wetland Assessment Management Park

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    This stream restoration increases water contact with the floodplain and vegetation to remove fertilizer, auto Park SWAMP Duke University Wetland Center The Sandy Creek Stream Channel Restoration Before After.nicholas.duke.edu/wetland native bird species? The effect of stream and wetland restoration can vary depending on the bird species

  15. Characterizing Microclimate and Plant Community Variation in Wetlands

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fridley, Jason D.

    Climate . Wetlands . Soil . Temperature . Modeling . Boreal Introduction Groundwater-fed calcareous of Wetland Scientists 2013 Abstract Groundwater-fed calcareous wetlands (fens) sup- port diverse plant developed accurate daily resolution soil temperature models (min and max) from a 29-sensor network

  16. Page 4 Summer 2004Wetland Wire Revisiting the Iraqi Marshlands

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    wetlands ecology and management. They encountered water treatment and sewage treatment facilities that hadPage 4 Summer 2004Wetland Wire Revisiting the Iraqi Marshlands DUWC Director says restoration efforts are progressing, but the record is mixed hen Duke University Wetland Center Director Curtis

  17. H-02 CONSTRUCTED WETLAND STUDIES AMPHIBIANS AND PLANTS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Georgia, University of

    .................................... 14 #12;iii EXECUTIVE SUMMARY Construction of the H-02 constructed treatment wetlands adjacent to HH-02 CONSTRUCTED WETLAND STUDIES AMPHIBIANS AND PLANTS FY-2008 ANNUAL REPORT Savannah River Ecology ................................................................................................. 4 CHAPTER II -- AMPHIBIAN AND REPTILE USE OF THE H-02 WETLAND .................................... 5

  18. Shock response of dry sand.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Reinhart, William Dodd; Thornhill, Tom Finley, III (,; ); Chhabildas, Lalit C.. (..); Vogler, Tracy John; Brown, Justin L.

    2007-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The dynamic compaction of sand was investigated experimentally and computationally to stresses of 1.8 GPa. Experiments have been performed in the powder's partial compaction regime at impact velocities of approximately 0.25, 0.5, and 0.75 km/s. The experiments utilized multiple velocity interferometry probes on the rear surface of a stepped target for an accurate measurement of shock velocity, and an impedance matching technique was used to deduce the shock Hugoniot state. Wave profiles were further examined for estimates of reshock states. Experimental results were used to fit parameters to the P-Lambda model for porous materials. For simple 1-D simulations, the P-Lambda model seems to capture some of the physics behind the compaction process very well, typically predicting the Hugoniot state to within 3%.

  19. Post-project evaluation of Tule Ponds in Fremont, California : Integration of stormwater treatment and wetland restoration

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lunde, Kevin B; Weinstein, Adam H

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of stormwater treatment and wetland restoration A paperSurface-Flow Constructed Treatment Wetlands, University oftools in the context of treatment wetlands, and if designed

  20. The Department of Energy`s floodplain/wetlands review

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Votteler, T.H.

    1992-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Two Executive Orders (E.O.) issued in 1977, Floodplain Management (E.O. 11988) and Protection of Wetlands (E.O. 11990), require that Federal agencies examine the impacts of proposed actions on floodplains and wetlands. To comply with these Orders, the US Department of Energy (DOE) promulgated 10 CFR 1022, DOE Regulations for Compliance with Floodplain/Wetlands Environmental Review Requirements. DOE`s floodplain/wetlands review consists of two procedures: the floodplain/wetlands determination, and the floodplain/wetlands assessment. The floodplain/wetlands determination ascertains the applicability of DOE`s floodplain management and wetlands protection requirements for a proposed action. If DOE`s requirements apply to a proposed action, DOE shall prepare a floodplain/wetlands assessment. The floodplain/wetlands assessment ascertains an action`s impact, any alternatives, and mitigation, if appropriate. The assessment consists of a project description, an analysis of the potential impacts, and a consideration of alternatives to the proposed action. This paper describes the components of the DOE floodplain/wetlands review process.

  1. The Department of Energy's floodplain/wetlands review

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Votteler, T.H.

    1992-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Two Executive Orders (E.O.) issued in 1977, Floodplain Management (E.O. 11988) and Protection of Wetlands (E.O. 11990), require that Federal agencies examine the impacts of proposed actions on floodplains and wetlands. To comply with these Orders, the US Department of Energy (DOE) promulgated 10 CFR 1022, DOE Regulations for Compliance with Floodplain/Wetlands Environmental Review Requirements. DOE's floodplain/wetlands review consists of two procedures: the floodplain/wetlands determination, and the floodplain/wetlands assessment. The floodplain/wetlands determination ascertains the applicability of DOE's floodplain management and wetlands protection requirements for a proposed action. If DOE's requirements apply to a proposed action, DOE shall prepare a floodplain/wetlands assessment. The floodplain/wetlands assessment ascertains an action's impact, any alternatives, and mitigation, if appropriate. The assessment consists of a project description, an analysis of the potential impacts, and a consideration of alternatives to the proposed action. This paper describes the components of the DOE floodplain/wetlands review process.

  2. A finite element analysis of pneumatic-tire/sand interactions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Grujicic, Mica

    A finite element analysis of pneumatic-tire/sand interactions during off-road vehicle travel M pneumatic tire and sand during off-road vehicle travel. Keywords Finite element analysis, Road vehicles and for other tire/sand combinations. Since the finite element analysis of the tire/sand interaction enables

  3. Nigeria to step up tar sands activity

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1987-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Nigerian government has directed its Ministry of Mines, Power and Steel to assume responsibility for the exploration and exploitation of tar sands deposits in Bendel, Ondo and Oyo States. The directive resulted from a survey report by the University of Ife's geological consultancy unit on bituminous sand deposits in the area. The statement said the government was satisfied that there were large commercial quantities of the sands in the three states. The survey had reported that Nigeria could recover between 31 and 40 billion barrels of heavy crude from the tar sand deposits. Exploration for hydrocarbons is currently going on in Anambra and Lake Chad basins as well as the Benue Trough. Apart from the Nigerian National Petroleum Corporation, Shell Petroleum and Gulf Oil have begun exploration activities in the Ondo area. Meanwhile, Nigeria has had to import heavy crude from Venezuela, for processing at the Kaduna refinery.

  4. New method for sand control and well stimulation in unconsolidated dirty sands

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aslesen, K.S.; Short, C.J.; Terwilliger, P.L.

    1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A new technique, the Solder Glass sand consolidation well completion method, has been developed which allows unlimited drawdown and improves productivity in wells completed in unconsolidated formations containing shales and clays. This technique eliminates the problems of sand production and fines migration by artificially consolidating a volume of reservoir sand near the wellbore. The consolidation is resistant to high temperature, chemical attack, and degradation resulting from high velocity fluid flow. Additionally, porosity and permeability in the consolidated volume of reservoir sand are improved as a result of irreversible dehydration of clays. 12 refs.

  5. Treating tar sands formations with dolomite

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Vinegar, Harold J.; Karanikas, John Michael

    2010-06-08T23:59:59.000Z

    Methods for treating a tar sands formation are described herein. The tar sands formation may include dolomite and hydrocarbons. Methods may include providing heat at less than the decomposition temperature of dolomite from one or more heaters to at least a portion of the formation. At least some of the hydrocarbon fluids are mobilized in the formation. At least some of the hydrocarbon fluids may be produced from the formation.

  6. The cost of wetland creation and restoration. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    King, D.; Bohlen, C.

    1995-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report examines the economics of wetland creation, restoration, and enhancement projects, especially as they are used within the context of mitigation for unavoidable wetland losses. Complete engineering-cost-accounting profiles of over 90 wetland projects were developed in collaboration with leading wetland restoration and creation practitioners around the country to develop a primary source database. Data on the costs of over 1,000 wetland projects were gathered from published sources and other available databases to develop a secondary source database. Cases in both databases were carefully analyzed and a set of baseline cost per acre estimates were developed for wetland creation, restoration, and enhancement. Observations of costs varied widely, ranging from $5 per acre to $1.5 million per acre. Differences in cost were related to the target wetland type, and to site-specific and project-specific factors that affected the preconstruction, construction, and post-construction tasks necessary to carry out each particular project. Project-specific and site-specific factors had a much larger effect on project costs than wetland type for non-agricultural projects. Costs of wetland creation and restoration were also shown to differ by region, but not by as much as expected, and in response to the regulatory context. The costs of wetland creation, restoration, and enhancement were also analyzed in a broader economic context through examination of the market for wetland mitigation services, and through the development of a framework for estimating compensation ratios-the number of acres of created, restored, or enhanced wetland required to compensate for an acre of lost natural wetland. The combination of per acre creation, restoration, and enhancement costs and the compensation ratio determine the overall mitigation costs associated with alternative mitigation strategies.

  7. A Comparison of Vegetation in Artificially Isolated Wetlands on West Galveston Island

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wilson, Ashley

    2012-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this study was to compare vegetation systems among three artificially isolated wetlands on the west end of Galveston Island. Sample sites were identified as isolated wetlands and anthropogenic impact was observed. Wetland plant...

  8. Constructed Wetlands and Waste Stabilization Ponds for municipal wastewater treatment in France: comparison of

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    13 Constructed Wetlands and Waste Stabilization Ponds for municipal wastewater treatment in France In France, vertical flow constructed wetlands and waste stabilisation ponds are both extensive treatment Vertical Flow Constructed Wetlands, Waste Stabilization Ponds, operation and maintenance, sludge management

  9. TECHNICAL REPORTS Constructed treatment wetlands are a relatively low-cost

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Florida, University of

    TECHNICAL REPORTS 1904 Constructed treatment wetlands are a relatively low significantly affect the biogeochemistry of treatment wetlands and needs further investigation. Soil Biogeochemical Characteristics Influenced by Alum Application in a Municipal WastewaterTreatmentWetland Lynette M

  10. Workshop report: planning for Coastal Climatologies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gamble, Douglas W.

    : agriculture, coastal transportation, energy conservation and planning, environmental quality, fishery as stakeholder response and feedback received at the workshop. Based on stakeholder input, a coastal climatology

  11. Global Sea Level Stabilization-Sand Dune Fixation: A Solar-powered Sahara Seawater Textile Pipeline

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Viorel Badescu; Richard B. Cathcart; Alexander A. Bolonkin

    2007-07-21T23:59:59.000Z

    Could anthropogenic saturation with pumped seawater of the porous ground of active sand dune fields in major deserts (e.g., the westernmost Sahara) cause a beneficial reduction of global sea level? Seawater extraction from the ocean, and its deposition on deserted sand dune fields in Mauritania and elsewhere via a Solar-powered Seawater Textile Pipeline (SSTP) can thwart the postulated future global sea level. Thus, Macro-engineering offers an additional cure for anticipated coastal change, driven by global sea level rise, that could supplement, or substitute for (1) stabilizing the shoreline with costly defensive public works (armoring macroprojects) and (2) permanent retreat from the existing shoreline (real and capital property abandonment). We propose Macro-engineering use tactical technologies that sculpt and vegetate barren near-coast sand dune fields with seawater, seawater that would otherwise, as commonly postulated, enlarge Earth seascape area! Our Macro-engineering speculation blends eremology with hydrogeology and some hydromancy. We estimate its cost at 1 billion dollars - about 0.01 per sent of the USA 2007 Gross Domestic Product.

  12. Delineating wetlands using geographic information system and remote sensing technologies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Villeneuve, Julie

    2006-04-12T23:59:59.000Z

    . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 73 a. Riverine Wetlands versus Upland Wetlands . . . . 73 b. Large Size Wetlands . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 74 c. Ground Truth Data Accuracy . . . . . . . . . . . 76 C. Results and Discussion . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 78 V... the ArcGIS ?ow accumulation function on the ?ow direction raster : : : 20 6 Line shape?le of high ?ow accumulation (more than 3055) ob- tained from the ?ow accumulation raster : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : 21 7 DEM derived from LIDAR data (15cm vertical...

  13. Wetland Plant Influence on Sediment Ecosystem Structure and Trophic Function

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Whitcraft, Christine R.

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    alterniflora and benthic microalgae in salt marsh food webs:assemblages of marine wetland microalgae and photosyntheticalternijlora and benthic microalgae in salt marsh food webs:

  14. Wetland plant influence on sediment ecosystem structure and trophic function

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Whitcraft, Christine René

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    alterniflora and benthic microalgae in salt marsh food webs:assemblages of marine wetland microalgae and photosyntheticalterniflora and benthic microalgae in salt marsh food webs:

  15. Plants in constructed wetlands help to treat agricultural processing wastewater

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Grismer, Mark E; Shepherd, Heather L

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    constructed wetlands help to treat agricultural processingacross the western to treat winery process wastewater Uniteddocumented relative to treat- discharged downstream. ment

  16. Controls on arsenic mobility in contaminated wetland and riverbed streams

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Keon, Nicole E. (Nicole Elise), 1974-

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Arsenic mobility and transport in the environment are strongly influenced by associations with solid phases. This dissertation investigates the mechanisms affecting arsenic retention in contaminated wetland and riverbed ...

  17. altitude saline wetland: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    D. A. Zuwerink; Robert J. Gates 107 Functional Assessment for a Proposed Stormwater Treatment Wetland. Open Access Theses and Dissertations Summary: ??Urbanization can...

  18. On-Site Wastewater Treatment Systems: Constructed Wetland Media

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lesikar, Bruce J.; Weaver, Richard; Richter, Amanda; O'Neill, Courtney

    2005-02-19T23:59:59.000Z

    This publication explains the functions, characteristics, choices, configurations and maintenance needs for constructed wetland media in on-site wastewater treatment systems....

  19. Analytical mesoscale modeling of aeolian sand transport

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Marc Lämmel; Anne Meiwald; Klaus Kroy

    2014-05-03T23:59:59.000Z

    We analyze the mesoscale structure of aeolian sand transport, based on a recently developed two-species continuum model. The calculated sand flux and important average characteristics of the grain trajectories are found to be in remarkable agreement with field and wind-tunnel data. We conclude that the essential mesoscale physics is insensitive to unresolved details on smaller scales and well captured by the coarse-grained analytical model, thus providing a sound basis for precise and numerically efficient mesoscale modeling of aeolian structure formation.

  20. Creating fluid injectivity in tar sands formations

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Stegemeier, George Leo; Beer, Gary Lee; Zhang, Etuan

    2012-06-05T23:59:59.000Z

    Methods for treating a tar sands formation are described herein. Methods for treating a tar sands may include heating a portion of a hydrocarbon layer in the formation from one or more heaters located in the portion. The heat may be controlled to increase the permeability of at least part of the portion to create an injection zone in the portion with an average permeability sufficient to allow injection of a fluid through the injection zone. A drive fluid and/or an oxidizing fluid may be provided into the injection zone. At least some hydrocarbons including mobilized hydrocarbons are produced from the portion.

  1. Skin friction for steel piles in sand

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sulaiman, Ibrahim Hikmat

    1967-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    MOVEMENT 4) For dry pile tests at initial void ratio of 0. 63, the assumption of a Coulomb type failure applies and the envelope is shown in Figure 23. The skin friction computed is the total friction caused by applied load. and. the static load caused... Sand 43 22. Skin Friction-Chamber Pressure Ratio Versus Pile Movement for Dense Dry Sand 44 23 ~ 24. Mohr Envelope for Skin Friction Measured. and Assumed. Pile Deformation 49 25 ~ Computed and Actual Load-Movement Curves for Test Pile 1 26...

  2. Creating fluid injectivity in tar sands formations

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Stegemeier, George Leo; Beer, Gary Lee; Zhang, Etuan

    2010-06-08T23:59:59.000Z

    Methods for treating a tar sands formation are described herein. Methods for treating a tar sands may include heating a portion of a hydrocarbon layer in the formation from one or more heaters located in the portion. The heat may be controlled to increase the permeability of at least part of the portion to create an injection zone in the portion with an average permeability sufficient to allow injection of a fluid through the injection zone. A drive fluid and/or an oxidizing fluid may be provided into the injection zone. At least some hydrocarbons are produced from the portion.

  3. Sand Mountain Electric Cooperative- Residential Heat Pump Loan Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Sand Mountain Electric Cooperative offers a heat pump loan program to eligible residential members. To qualify, members must have had power with Sand Mountain Electric Cooperative for at least...

  4. athabasca tar sands: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    tar sands resources are estimated at 60 to 80 unknown authors 2 Request received (from Norway, regarding e-mail titled "Grandparents Oppose Tar Sands"): Thanks. I have seen them in...

  5. Figure 1. Typical Slow Sand Filter Schematic Supernatant Water

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Figure 1. Typical Slow Sand Filter Schematic Headspace Supernatant Water Schmutzdecke Raw water Supernatant drain Filter drain & backfill Sand media Support gravel Drain tile Adjustable weir Overflow weir Vent Control valve Treated Water Effluent flow control structure Overflow Assessing Temperature

  6. Laboratory investigations of effective flow behavior in unsaturated heterogeneous sands

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wildenschild, Dorthe

    Laboratory investigations of effective flow behavior in unsaturated heterogeneous sands D, Lyngby Abstract. Two-dimensional unsaturated flow and transport through heterogeneous sand was investigated under controlled laboratory conditions. The unsaturated hydraulic conductivity of five homogeneous

  7. Scour of simulated Gulf Coast sand beaches due to wave action in front of sea walls and dune barriers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chesnutt, Charles Burgess

    1971-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE May 1971 Ma)or Sub)ect: Civil Engineering SCOUR OF SIM(JLATED GULF COAST SAND BEACHES DUE TO WAVE ACTION IN FRONT OF SEA WALLS AND DUNE BARRIERS Q m Q F z A Thesis z m Q C by CHARLES BURGESS CHESNUTT L' m ) m... angle 53 LIST OF FIGURES (CONTINUED) Figure Page 15 Scour depth at the sea wall versus beach slope for constant wave steepness and varying sea wall angle 54 INTRODUCTION The problem of scour in front of sea walls has plagued coastal engineers...

  8. Atlantic coastal plain

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Libby-French, J.; Amato, R.V.

    1981-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Exploratory drilling in the Atlantic coastal plain region decreased in 1980. Seven wells were drilled, five of which were completed, for a total footage of 80,968 ft (24,679 m). Six of the wells were located in the Baltimore Canyon Trough, and one was located in the Southeast Georgia Embayment. No exploratory wells were drilled in the Georges Bank Basin or in the onshore portion of this region in 1980. Tenneco and Exxon reported gas shows in two wells in the Baltimore Canyon Trough; the remaining completed wells were reported as dry holes. No lease sales were held in 1980, but two sales are scheduled for 1981 in the Middle and South Atlantic. 1 figure, 2 tables.

  9. University of Minnesota UMore Park Sand and Gravel Resources

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Netoff, Theoden

    for the extraction or mining of sand, gravel, stone, or other nonmetallic minerals, other than peat, which

  10. Wind-Blown Sand: Threshold of Motion

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Swann, Christy Michelle

    2014-11-12T23:59:59.000Z

    ....................................................................................... 43 13 Bedload trap designed for this study .................................................................................. 45 14 Schematic of internal adjustable chimney adjusted to the height of the surface... predicting the threshold for wind-blown sand in natural environments are rooted in the original wind tunnel work of Bagnold (1936). He introduced an empirically-calibrated model of the threshold using shear velocity, 𝑢?: a height independent variable...

  11. CONTRACTOR REPORT SAND97-3002

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    presents a detailed analysis of the results from fatigue studies of wind turbine blade composite materials are evident in the range of materials currently used in many blades. A preliminary evaluation of knockdownsCONTRACTOR REPORT SAND97-3002 Unlimited Distribution UC-1210 DOE/MSU COMPOSITE MATERIAL FATIGUE

  12. SANDIA REPORT SAND2003-8550

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kolda, Tamara G.

    SANDIA REPORT SAND2003-8550 Unlimited Release Printed October 2003 Stationarity Results Company, for the United States Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration under by Sandia National Laboratories, operated for the United States Department of Energy by Sandia Corporation

  13. SANDIA REPORT SAND2007-0905

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bochev, Pavel

    SANDIA REPORT SAND2007-0905 Unlimited Release Printed February, 2007 Blended Atomistic Laboratories, operated for the United States Department of Energy by Sandia Corporation. NOTICE: This report, for the United States Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration under Contract DE-AC04

  14. SANDIA REPORT SAND2014-17474

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    SANDIA REPORT SAND2014-17474 Unlimited Release Printed September 2014 Investigation of Wave Energy for the United States Department of Energy by Sandia Corporation. NOTICE: This report was prepared as an account.S. Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration under contract DE-AC04-94AL85000. Approved

  15. SANDIA REPORT SAND2006-5315

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lewis, Robert Michael

    SANDIA REPORT SAND2006-5315 Unlimited Release Printed August 2006 A generating set direct search, a Lockheed Martin Company, for the United States Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security. #12;Issued by Sandia National Laboratories, operated for the United States Department of Energy

  16. SANDIA REPORT SAND2007-6422

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kolda, Tamara G.

    SANDIA REPORT SAND2007-6422 Printed October 2007 Resolving the Sign Ambiguity in the Singular Value States Department of Energy by Sandia Corporation. NOTICE: This report was prepared as an account of work Martin Company, for the United States Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration

  17. SANDIA REPORT SAND2007-3257

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kolda, Tamara G.

    SANDIA REPORT SAND2007-3257 Unlimited Release Printed May 2007 Nonlinearly-Constrained Optimization for the United States Department of Energy by Sandia Corporation. NOTICE: This report was prepared as an account Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration under Contract DE-AC04-94-AL85000. Approved

  18. SANDIA REPORT SAND2006-5315

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kolda, Tamara G.

    SANDIA REPORT SAND2006-5315 ct search ian algorithm for combination of nstraints . M. Lewis, and V,for the United States Departmentof Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration under Contract DE-AC04-94-AL;Issued by Sandia National Laboratories, operated for the United States Department of Energy by Sandia

  19. SANDIA REPORT SAND2009-0857

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kolda, Tamara G.

    SANDIA REPORT SAND2009-0857 Unlimited Release Printed February 2009 An Optimization Approach for the United States Department of Energy by Sandia Corporation. NOTICE: This report was prepared as an account Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration under Contract DE-AC04-94-AL85000. Approved

  20. SANDIA REPORT SAND2011-3119

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    SANDIA REPORT SAND2011-3119 Unlimited Release Printed May 2011 Proton Exchange Membrane Fuel Cells Corporation, for the U.S. Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration under contract DE National Laboratories, operated for the United States Department of Energy by Sandia Corporation. NOTICE

  1. SANDIA REPORT SAND2009-6670

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kolda, Tamara G.

    SANDIA REPORT SAND2009-6670 Unlimited Release Printed October 2009 Generalized Bad of Energy by Sandia Corporation. NOTICE: This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by Sandia Corporation, a Lockheed Martin Company, for the United States Department of Energy's National

  2. SANDIA REPORT SAND2013-0501

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    SANDIA REPORT SAND2013-0501 Unlimited Release Printed February 2013 Vessel Cold-Ironing Using of Energy by Sandia Corporation. NOTICE: This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored, a wholly owned subsidiary of Lockheed Martin Corporation, for the U.S. Department of Energy's National

  3. SANDIA REPORT SAND2007-2706

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kolda, Tamara G.

    SANDIA REPORT SAND2007-2706 Unlimited Release Printed May 2007 Cross-Language Information Retrieval States Department of Energy by Sandia Corporation. NOTICE: This report was prepared as an account of work operated by Sandia Corporation, a Lockheed Martin Company, for the United States Department of Energy

  4. SANDIA REPORT SAND2005-6864

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kolda, Tamara G.

    SANDIA REPORT SAND2005-6864 Unlimited Release Printed November 2005 Robust Large-scale Parallel for the United States Department of Energy by Sandia Corporation. NOTICE: This report was prepared as an account Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration under Contract DE-AC04-94-AL85000. Approved

  5. SANDIA REPORT SAND2007-6702

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kolda, Tamara G.

    SANDIA REPORT SAND2007-6702 Unlimited Release Printed November 2007 Tensor Decompositions Corporation, a Lockheed Martin Company, for the United States Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security. #12;Issued by Sandia National Laboratories, operated for the United States Department of Energy

  6. SANDIA REPORT SAND2008-6553

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kolda, Tamara G.

    SANDIA REPORT SAND2008-6553 Unlimited Release Printed October 2008 Asynchronous parallel hybrid States Department of Energy by Sandia Corporation. NOTICE: This report was prepared as an account of work operated by Sandia Corporation, a Lockheed Martin Company, for the United States Department of Energy

  7. SANDIA REPORT SAND2006-4466

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Howle, Victoria E.

    SANDIA REPORT SAND2006-4466 Unlimited Release Printed July 2006 The Effect of Boundary Conditions Laboratories, operated for the United States Department of Energy by Sandia Corporation. NOTICE: This report, for the United States Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration under Contract DE-AC04

  8. SANDIA REPORT SAND2014-16840

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    SANDIA REPORT SAND2014-16840 Unlimited Release Printed August 2014 Investigation of Wave Energy for the United States Department of Energy by Sandia Corporation. NOTICE: This report was prepared as an account.S. Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration under contract DE-AC04-94AL85000. Approved

  9. SANDIA REPORT SAND2004-8055

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kolda, Tamara G.

    SANDIA REPORT SAND2004-8055 Unlimited Release Printed February 2004 Revisiting Asynchronous of Energy by Sandia Corporation. NOTICE: This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by Sandia Corporation, a Lockheed Martin Company, for the United States Department of Energy's National

  10. SANDIA REPORT SAND2006-7592

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kolda, Tamara G.

    SANDIA REPORT SAND2006-7592 2006 Efficient MATLAB computations with sparse and factored tensorsWaUonunder A #12;Issued by Sandia National Laboratories, operated for the United StatesDepartment of Energy by Sandia Corporation. NOTICE:This report was prepared as an accountof work sponsoredby an agency

  11. SANDIA REPORT SAND2006-2161

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kolda, Tamara G.

    SANDIA REPORT SAND2006-2161 Unlimited Release Printed June 2006 Temporal Analysis of Social for the United States Department of Energy by Sandia Corporation. NOTICE: This report was prepared as an account Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration under Contract DE-AC04-94-AL85000. Approved

  12. SANDIA REPORT SAND2006-4055

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kolda, Tamara G.

    SANDIA REPORT SAND2006-4055 Unlimited Release Printed October 2006 DAKOTA, A Multilevel Parallel Laboratories, operated for the United States Department of Energy by Sandia Corporation. NOTICE: This report, for the United States Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration under Contract DE-AC04

  13. SANDIA REPORT SAND2004-3487

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kolda, Tamara G.

    SANDIA REPORT SAND2004-3487 Unlimited Release Printed July 2004 A Preliminary Report Laboratories, operated for the United States Department of Energy by Sandia Corporation. NOTICE: This report, for the United States Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration under Contract DE-AC04-94AL

  14. SANDIA REPORT SAND2011-1877

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kolda, Tamara G.

    SANDIA REPORT SAND2011-1877 Unlimited Release Printed March 2011 Making Tensor Factorizations Corporation, for the U.S. Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration under contract DE National Laboratories, operated for the United States Department of Energy by Sandia Corporation. NOTICE

  15. SANDIA REPORT SAND99-2953

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    SANDIA REPORT SAND99-2953 Unlimited Release Printed November 1999 a Shaped-Charge Parallel by Sandia Corporation, a Lockheed Martin Company, for the United States Department of Energy under Contract laboratories #12;Issued by Sandia National Laboratories, operated for the United States Department of Energy

  16. SANDIA REPORT SAND2008-5844

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kolda, Tamara G.

    SANDIA REPORT SAND2008-5844 Unlimited Release Printed September 2008 Concurrent Optimization for the United States Department of Energy by Sandia Corporation. NOTICE: This report was prepared as an account Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration under Contract DE-AC04-94-AL85000. Approved

  17. SANDIA REPORT SAND2009-4494

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    SANDIA REPORT SAND2009-4494 Unlimited Release Printed July 2009 Algebraic Connectivity and Graph of Energy by Sandia Corporation. NOTICE: This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by Sandia Corporation, a Lockheed Martin Company, for the United States Department of Energy's National

  18. SANDIA REPORT SAND2004-6391

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kolda, Tamara G.

    SANDIA REPORT SAND2004-6391 Unlimited Release Printed December 2004 APPSPACK 4.0: Asynchronous for the United States Department of Energy by Sandia Corporation. NOTICE: This report was prepared as an account Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration under Contract DE-AC04-94-AL85000. Approved

  19. SANDIA REPORT SAND2011-4130

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    SANDIA REPORT SAND2011-4130 Unlimited Release DAKOTA JAGUAR 2.1 User's Manual Brian M. Adams Ethan, operated for the United States Department of Energy by Sandia Corporation. NOTICE: This report was prepared.S. Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration under contract DE-AC04-94AL85000. Approved

  20. SANDIA REPORT SAND2013-2789

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tesfatsion, Leigh

    SANDIA REPORT SAND2013-2789 Printed April 2013 New Wholesale Power Market Design Using Linked of Energy by Sandia Corporation. NOTICE: This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored Forward Markets A Study for the DOE Energy Storage Systems Program Leigh S. Tesfatsion, C´esar A. Silva

  1. SANDIA REPORT SAND2014-17460

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    SANDIA REPORT SAND2014-17460 Unlimited Release Printed September 2014 Wave Energy Converter Effects for the United States Department of Energy by Sandia Corporation. NOTICE: This report was prepared as an account of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration under contract DE-AC04-94AL85000. Approved for public

  2. SANDIA REPORT SAND2004-6574

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wilcox, Lucas C.

    SANDIA REPORT SAND2004-6574 Unlimited Release Printed January 4, 2005 Sensitivity Technologies Laboratories, operated for the United States Department of Energy by Sandia Corporation. NOTICE: This report, for the United States Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration under Contract DE-AC04

  3. SANDIA REPORT SAND 2011-3446

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    SANDIA REPORT SAND 2011- 3446 Unlimited Release Printed October 2011 Phoenix: Complex Adaptive for the United States Department of Energy by Sandia Corporation. NOTICE: This report was prepared as an account of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration under Contract DE-AC04-94AL85000. Approved for public

  4. SANDIA REPORT SAND2003-8516

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kolda, Tamara G.

    SANDIA REPORT SAND2003-8516 Unlimited Release Printed September 2003 Optimizing and Empirical Laboratories, operated for the United States Department of Energy by Sandia Corporation. NOTICE: This report, for the United States Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration under Contract DE-AC04-94AL

  5. SANDIA REPORT SAND2004-4596

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ho, Cliff

    SANDIA REPORT SAND2004-4596 Unlimited Release Printed September 2004 Sensors for Environmental Laboratories, operated for the United States Department of Energy by Sandia Corporation. NOTICE: This report, for the United States Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration under Contract DE-AC04-94AL

  6. SANDIA REPORT SAND2006-6286

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    SANDIA REPORT SAND2006-6286 Unlimited Release Printed October 2006 Solution-Verified Reliability, a Lockheed Martin Company, for the United States Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security. #12;Issued by Sandia National Laboratories, operated for the United States Department of Energy

  7. SANDIA REPORT SAND2006-4621

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kolda, Tamara G.

    SANDIA REPORT SAND2006-4621 Unlimited Release Printed August 2006 Asynchronous parallel generating Company, for the United States Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration under by Sandia National Laboratories, operated for the United States Department of Energy by Sandia Corporation

  8. SANDIA REPORT SAND2005-0336

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ho, Cliff

    SANDIA REPORT SAND2005-0336 Unlimited Release Printed Month/Year FY04 Field Evaluations of an In Laboratories, operated for the United States Department of Energy by Sandia Corporation. NOTICE: This report, for the United States Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration under Contract DE-AC04-94AL

  9. SANDIA REPORT SAND2001-0643

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ho, Cliff

    SANDIA REPORT SAND2001-0643 Unlimited Release Printed March 2001 Review of Chemical Sensors for In of Energy by Sandia Corporation. NOTICE: This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored, for the United States Department of Energy under Contract DE-AC04-94AL85000. Approved for public release; further

  10. SANDIA REPORT SAND98-2668

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    SANDIA REPORT SAND98-2668 Unlimited Release Reprinted December 1998 G. Richard Eisler, Paul S 94550 for the United States Department of Energy under Contract DE-AC04-94AL85000 Approved for public for the United States Department of Energy by Sandia Cor- poration, a Lockheed Martin Company. NOTICE

  11. SANDIA REPORT SAND2009-5805

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    SANDIA REPORT SAND2009-5805 Unlimited Release Printed September 2009 Efficient Algorithms for Mixed of Energy by Sandia Corporation. NOTICE: This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by Sandia Corporation, a Lockheed Martin Company, for the United States Department of Energy's National

  12. SANDIA REPORT SAND2010-1422

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kolda, Tamara G.

    SANDIA REPORT SAND2010-1422 Unlimited Release Printed March 2010 Poblano v1.0: A Matlab Toolbox States Department of Energy by Sandia Corporation. NOTICE: This report was prepared as an account of work operated by Sandia Corporation, a Lockheed Martin Company, for the United States Department of Energy

  13. SAND93-2591 Unlimited Release

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McCurley, Kevin

    was performed under U.S. Department of Energy contract number DE-AC04-76DP00789. This report has been revisedSAND93-2591 Unlimited Release First Printed October 1992 Revised October 29, 1993 Revised June 22. In this report we describe a portable and efficient implementation of SHA-1 in the C language. Performance

  14. SANDIA REPORT SAND2007-1423

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shashkov, Mikhail

    SANDIA REPORT SAND2007-1423 Unlimited Release Printed March 2007 A Multi-Scale Q1/P0 Approach for the United States Department of Energy by Sandia Corporation. NOTICE: This report was prepared as an account Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration under Contract DE-AC04-94AL85000. Approved

  15. SANDIA REPORT SAND2006-2079

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kolda, Tamara G.

    SANDIA REPORT SAND2006-2079 Unclassified Unlimited Release Printed April 2006 Multilinear algebra for the United States Department of Energy by Sandia Corporation. NOTICE: This report was prepared as an account Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration under Contract DE-AC04-94-AL85000. Approved

  16. SANDIA REPORT SAND2014-16610

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lehoucq, Rich

    SANDIA REPORT SAND2014-16610 Unlimited Release Printed August 2014 Installing the Anasazi Corporation, for the U.S. Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration under contract DE National Laboratories, operated for the United States Department of Energy by Sandia Corporation. NOTICE

  17. SANDIA REPORT SAND2013-0339

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    SANDIA REPORT SAND2013-0339 Unlimited Release Printed February 28, 2013 Proceedings States Department of Energy by Sandia Corporation. NOTICE: This report was prepared as an account of work Corporation, a wholly owned subsidiary of Lockheed Martin Corporation, for the U.S. Department of Energy

  18. SANDIA REPORT SAND2006-2161

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kolda, Tamara G.

    SANDIA REPORT SAND2006-2161 Unlimited Release Printed April 2006 Temporal Analysis of Social for the United States Department of Energy by Sandia Corporation. NOTICE: This report was prepared as an account Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration under Contract DE-AC04-94-AL85000. Approved

  19. SANDIA REPORT SAND2004-5187

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kolda, Tamara G.

    SANDIA REPORT SAND2004-5187 Unlimited Release Printed October 2004 MATLAB Tensor Classes for Fast of Energy by Sandia Corporation. NOTICE: This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by Sandia Corporation, a Lockheed Martin Company, for the United States Department of Energy's National

  20. SANDIA REPORT SAND2006-6135

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    SANDIA REPORT SAND2006-6135 Unlimited Release Printed November 2006 Extension /ith Corre Hypercube National Laboratories, operated for the United States Department of Energy by Sandia Corporation. NOTICE: This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the United States Government. Neither

  1. SANDIA REPORT SAND2006-7592

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kolda, Tamara G.

    SANDIA REPORT SAND2006-7592 Unlimited Release Printed December 2006 Efficient MATLAB computations of Energy by Sandia Corporation. NOTICE: This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by Sandia Corporation, a Lockheed Martin Company, for the United States Department of Energy's National

  2. SANDIA REPORT SAND2014-17400

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    SANDIA REPORT SAND2014-17400 Unlimited Release Printed September 2014 Investigation of Wave Energy Laboratories, operated for the United States Department of Energy by Sandia Corporation. NOTICE: This report, for the U.S. Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration under contract DE-AC04-94AL

  3. SANDIA REPORT SAND99-1941

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fuerschbach, Phillip

    SANDIA REPORT SAND99-1941 Unlimited Release 828, ,-.-,,LS :xico 87185 and Livermore, California for the United States Department of Energy by Sandia Corporation. NOTICE: This report was prepared as an account, for the United States Department of Energy under Contract DE-AC04-94AL85000. Approved for public release: further

  4. SANDIA REPORT SAND2008-6109

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kolda, Tamara G.

    SANDIA REPORT SAND2008-6109 Unlimited Release Printed September 2008 Proceedings of the 2008 Sandia for the United States Department of Energy by Sandia Corporation. NOTICE: This report was prepared as an account Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration under Contract DE-AC04-94-AL85000. Approved

  5. SANDIA REPORT SAND2005-4548

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kolda, Tamara G.

    SANDIA REPORT SAND2005-4548 Unlimited Release Printed July 2005 Higher-Order Web Link Analysis States Department of Energy by Sandia Corporation. NOTICE: This report was prepared as an account of work operated by Sandia Corporation, a Lockheed Martin Company, for the United States Department of Energy

  6. SANDIA REPORT SAND2007-2761

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Howle, Victoria E.

    SANDIA REPORT SAND2007-2761 Unlimited Release Printed May 2007 A Taxonomy and Comparison of Energy by Sandia Corporation. NOTICE: This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by Sandia Corporation, a Lockheed Martin Company, for the United States Department of Energy's National

  7. SANDIA REPORT SAND2006-2081

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kolda, Tamara G.

    SANDIA REPORT SAND2006-2081 Unclassified Unlimited Release Printed April 2006 Multilinear operators Corporation, a Lockheed Martin Company, for the United States Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security. #12;Issued by Sandia National Laboratories, operated for the United States Department of Energy

  8. SANDIA REPORT SAND2009-6764

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kolda, Tamara G.

    SANDIA REPORT SAND2009-6764 Unlimited Release Printed October 2009 Scalable Tensor Factorizations States Department of Energy by Sandia Corporation. NOTICE: This report was prepared as an account of work operated by Sandia Corporation, a Lockheed Martin Company, for the United States Department of Energy

  9. APPLIED ISSUES Biomanipulation: a useful tool for freshwater wetland

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McMaster University

    . In this paper we show that biomanipulation may have a strong potential for wetland eutrophication abatement variability, eutrophication sources and gradients of wind exposure and water colour. Keywords: eutrophication the structure and function of many natural wetlands have been severely altered by eutrophication, which has

  10. TECHNICAL ARTICLES PLANTS USED IN CONSTRUCTED WETLANDS AND THEIR

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brix, Hans

    TECHNICAL ARTICLES #12;2 PLANTS USED IN CONSTRUCTED WETLANDS AND THEIR FUNCTIONS Hans Brix Department of Plant Ecology, Institute of Biological Sciences, University of Aarhus, Nordlandsvej 68, 8240 Risskov, Denmark ABSTRACT Vegetation plays an important role in wastewater treatment wetlands. Plants

  11. Creating Wildlife Habitat with Native Florida Freshwater Wetland Plants1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Watson, Craig A.

    CIR 912 Creating Wildlife Habitat with Native Florida Freshwater Wetland Plants1 Martin B. Main by establishing and managing desirable native plants. Native wetland plants play important ecological roles many more species than non-native plants because native wildlife evolved with native plant communities

  12. Wetland Ecology in Jericho Town Forest Weston, Massachusetts

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fraden, Seth

    heavy metals and other pollutants by trapping and holding the material in soil and forming insoluble is discussed. What is a wetland? A wetland ecosystem arises when inundation by water produces soils dominated: overstory trees, saplings, shrubs, herbs (ferns, wildflowers, grasses), and ground cover (mosses and lichens

  13. Nutrient Removal Mechanisms in a Cold Climate Gravel Wetland

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nutrient Removal Mechanisms in a Cold Climate Gravel Wetland Alison Watts, Robert Roseen, Kim Farah and development of stormwater treatment systems Gregg Hall 35 Colovos Road Durham, New Hampshire 03824-3534 603.862.4024 http://www.unhsc.unh.edu #12;POROUS ASPHALT Watershed Boundary #12;#12;Gravel Wetland Effluent sampling

  14. Nutrient Removal Mechanisms in a Cold Climate Gravel Wetland

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nutrient Removal Mechanisms in a Cold Climate Gravel Wetland Alison Watts, Robert Roseen, Kim Farah and development of stormwater treatment systems Gregg Hall 35 Colovos Road Durham, New Hampshire 03824-3534 603;Gravel Wetland Sampling within the system #12;NEIWPCC-UNH Project Goals Validation of constructed gravel

  15. DRIVEN PIPE PILES IN DENSE SAND BYRON BYRNE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Byrne, Byron

    DRIVEN PIPE PILES IN DENSE SAND BYRON BYRNE GEOMECHANICS GROUP THE UNIVERSITY OF WESTERN AUSTRALIA #12;Driven Pipe Piles in Dense Sand Byron Byrne Geomechanics Group The University of Western Australia #12;Driven Pipe Piles in Dense Sand Byron Byrne Geomechanics Group The University of Western Australia

  16. Well completion process for formations with unconsolidated sands

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Davies, David K. (Kingwood, TX); Mondragon, III, Julius J. (Redondo Beach, CA); Hara, Philip Scott (Monterey Park, CA)

    2003-04-29T23:59:59.000Z

    A method for consolidating sand around a well, involving injecting hot water or steam through well casing perforations in to create a cement-like area around the perforation of sufficient rigidity to prevent sand from flowing into and obstructing the well. The cement area has several wormholes that provide fluid passageways between the well and the formation, while still inhibiting sand inflow.

  17. Coastal Facilities Review Act (Maryland)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This Act aims to preserve Maryland's coastal areas and to balance competing demands for resources by requiring environmental impact evaluations to be conducted prior to the approval of the...

  18. BIOGEOCHEMISTRY OF WETLANDS AND AQUATIC SYSTEMS UF-Wetland Biogeochemistry Laboratory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ma, Lena

    of wetlands and aquatic systems in relation to elemental cycling as related to water quality, carbon sequestration, greenhouse gas emissions, and sea level rise. OVERALL COURSE OBJECTIVES: 1) To provide students with the basic concepts involved in biogeochemical cycling of macroelements (carbon, nitrogen, phosphorus

  19. BIOGEOCHEMISTRY OF WETLANDS -SWS 6448-OnCampus version BIOGEOCHEMISTRY OF WETLANDS -SWS 6448

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ma, Lena

    , water quality, carbon sequestration, global climate change, and sea level rise. LEARNING OBJECTIVES of wetlands and aquatic systems in relation to elemental cycling as related to water quality, carbon sequestration, greenhouse gas emissions, and sea level rise. OVERALL COURSE OBJECTIVES: To provide students

  20. Ecological Modelling 105 (1997) 121 Interaction and spatial distribution of wetland nitrogen

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Florida, University of

    Elsevier Science B.V. Keywords: Wetland model; Nitrogen cycling; Wastewater treatment 1. Introduction methods of wetland treatment systems. This design ap- proach, referred to as `black box' methodology in wetlands, and (ii) factors affecting N removal from treatment wetlands. A mechanistic model was developed

  1. Microbial dynamics during intrinsic remediation of oil contaminated coastal wetland sediments (a microcosm study)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thornburg, Nathaniel David

    2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Arabian medium crude oil was applied to historically exposed estuarine sediments contained in a controlled laboratory environment and intrinsically remediated for 56 days. In situ microbial and petroleum dynamics were monitored via Most Probable...

  2. Virginia Wetlands Report Center for Coastal Resources Management www.ccrm.vims.edu

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    in shallow waters, it supports the growth of photosynthetic bottom-dwelling microalgae. These microalgae

  3. Best Practices for Southern California Coastal Wetland Restoration and Management in the Face of Climate Change

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fejtek, Stacie M.; Gold, Mark; MacDonald, Glen M.; Jacobs, Dave K.; Ambrose, Richard F.

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Incorporation of more engineered water control structures (Assessment Method CWA – Clean Water Act EIR – EnvironmentalIntegrity MHW – Mean High Water MLPA – Marine Life

  4. Soil Organic Matter of Natural and Restored Coastal Wetland Soils in Southern California

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Elgin, Barbara K.

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    CA; PRM=Petaluma River Mid, CA; CCM=China Camp Mid, Ca; WTM=SC % SOC CIM TE CSM PRM WTM CCM ML A TE SB ML CSM PK PK BulkCA; PRM=Petaluma River Mid, CA; CCM=China Camp Mid, Ca; WTM=

  5. An evaluation of the potential of coastal wetlands for hurricane surge and wave energy reduction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Loder, Nicholas Mason

    2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    potential, a segmented marsh may offer comparable surge protection to that of a continuous marsh. Wave heights are generally increased within the marsh due to the transmission of wave energy through marsh channels. Results presented in this thesis may assist...

  6. The effect of bioremediation on microbial populations in an oil-contaminated coastal wetland

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Townsend, Richard Todd

    1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    hydrocarbon and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH)-degrading microorganisms. These increases were observed at 0-5 cm and 5- 10 cm depths. For the first application, the average numbers of aliphatic-degrading and PAH-degrading microorganisms on nutrient...

  7. Soil Organic Matter of Natural and Restored Coastal Wetland Soils in Southern California

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Elgin, Barbara K.

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of natural and created marsh soils. J. Exp. Mar. Biol. Ecol.2007. Freshwater Input Structures Soil Properties, VerticalS.S. , Hoover, K.L. 1996. Soil properties of reference

  8. Binational GIS database of coastal wetlands for Lake Ontario and the St. Lawrence: a demonstration project

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McMaster University

    surveys taken during the early to mid-1980s. Forty-four regional maps were produced that shows their food base. Environmental management agencies must be able to measure losses and gain in these habitats at regular intervals because such an inventory is necessary to guide land-use planning to ensure

  9. Microbial dynamics during intrinsic remediation of oil contaminated coastal wetland sediments (a microcosm study) 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thornburg, Nathaniel David

    2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    and aromatic-degrading bacteria. Petroleum chemistry demonstrated a concomitant decrease of aliphatic and aromatic hydrocarbon fractions. Therefore, an inverse relationship between hydrocarbon-degrading bacterial populations and hydrocarbon concentrations...

  10. The effect of bioremediation on microbial populations in an oil-contaminated coastal wetland 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Townsend, Richard Todd

    1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    , was performed to assess the use of diammonium phosphate and diammonium phosphate plus nitrate (potential electron acceptor) as treatments to stimulate microbial growth and hydrocarbon degradation. The second application, conducted in 1997, was performed...

  11. Application of conditional sampling for measuring ecosystem-scale carbon dioxide exchange in coastal wetlands

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cobos, Douglas Russell

    1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    1. 6 mm LD. Teflon tubing (Cole Parmer Instrument Company, Vernon Hills, IL) at a rate of 0. 5 L/min before reaching the 100T. Wind data from the sonic anemometer were output 123 ms after wind velocity was measured. This delay combined with other... proper separation of updrafls and downdrafts (McInnes et al. 1998). Afler separation, the samples were filtered (Acro 50, Gelman Sciences, Ann Arbor, MI) before being routed through 12 mm I. D. Bev IV tubing (Cole Parmer Instrument Company...

  12. Suitability of a Constructed Treatment Wetland as Conservation Habitat and the Impact of the Arroyo Chub (Gila orcutti) on the Invertebrate Community and Mosquito Oviposition

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Why, Adena

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The emergence of treatment wetlands. Environmental ScienceKnight R.L. 1996. Treatment Wetlands. CRC Press, Boca Raton,in constructed treatment wetlands. Ecological Engineering

  13. QER- Comment of America's Wetland Foundation

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Thank you for the opportunity to make oral remarks on behalf of the Americaąs WETLAND Foundation in New Orleans on May 27, 2014 during the public comment period at the meeting held by the U.S. Department of Energy as the Secretariat for the Quadrennial Energy Review (QER). In follow up, attached is a summation of those comments, along with three reports released by the Foundation for your review that will provide information helpful to the committee. Please do not hesitate to contact me if there are questions or if more information is desired, Sidney Coffee

  14. Coastal ocean margins program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1988-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The marine research program supported by the Office of Energy Research, Ecological Research Division, is focused to provide scientific information on major environmental issues facing development and expansion of most energy technologies and energy policy. These issues include waste disposal, siting/operations, and possible long term effects on global systems. The research is concentrated along the United States coastal margins where marine waters provide abundant food and resources while assimilating discharges from atmospheric, terrestrial, and aquatic sources. The program focuses on the formation and transport of particles within the waters of the continental shelf and the fate of these particles, whether on the shelf, on the slope, or in the open ocean. The program is conducted with multidisciplinary teams of researchers who investigate water mass movements, biological productivity, and naturally forming particles, as well as contaminant transport, to develop a clear understanding of the exchanges of contaminants and other materials that take place between continental shelf and open ocean waters. Seventy-five percent of the projects are funded to university grantees and twenty-five percent to National Laboratories.

  15. Coastal mesoscale changes on Matagorda Island

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lariscy, Kevin William

    2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    120 230 Millim etc rs &2 0. 5 0. 25 0. 125 0. 0625 &. 0625 Phi Size &4 Particle Size Pebbles Gravel Ve Coarse Sand Coarse Sand Sand Fine Sand Ve Fine Sand Silt/Cia Table l. The Wentworth Scale Phi & 0. 35 0. 35 ? 0. 50 Cate o... Ve well sorted Well sorted 0. 50 - 0. 71 Moderatel Well Sorted 0. 71 - 1. 00 1. 0 0- 2. 00 2. 00 - 4. 00 Moderate Sorted Poorl Sorted Ve Poorl Sorted Table 2. Sorting Skewness 1. 00 to -0. 31 -0. 30 to -0. 11 ?. 10 to 0. 09 0. 10 to 0...

  16. Stratified chaos in a sand pile formation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ate Poortinga; Jan G. Wesseling; Coen J. Ritsema

    2014-03-04T23:59:59.000Z

    Sand pile formation is often used to describe stratified chaos in dynamic systems due to self-emergent and scale invariant behaviour. Cellular automata (Bak-Tang-Wiesenfeld model) are often used to describe chaotic behaviour, as simulating physical interactions between individual particles is computationally demanding. In this study, we use a state-of-the-art parallel implementation of the discrete element method on the graphical processing unit to simulate sand pile formation. Interactions between individual grains were simulated using a contact model in an Euler integration scheme. Results show non-linear self-emergent behaviour which is in good agreement with experimental results, theoretical work and self organized criticality (SOC) approaches. Moreover, it was found that the fully deterministic model, where the position and forces on every individual particle can be determined every iteration has a brown noise signal in the x and y direction, where the signal is the z direction is closer to a white noise spectrum.

  17. Guide to preparing SAND reports. Revised

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Locke, T.K. [ed.

    1996-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This guide contains basic information needed to produce a SAND report. Its guidelines reflect DOE regulation and Sandia policy. The guide includes basic writing instructions in an annotated sample report; guidance for organization, format, and layout of reports produced by line organizations; and information about conference papers, journal articles, and brochures. The appendixes contain sections on Sandia`s preferred usage, equations, references, copyrights and permissions, and publishing terms.

  18. Aspects of tar sands development in Nigeria

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Adewusi, V.A. (Dept. of Chemical Engineering, Obafemi Awolowo Univ., Ile-Ife (NG))

    1992-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Development of Nigerian massive reserves of crude bitumen and associated heavy oil is imminent in view of the impacts that the huge importation of these materials and their products have on the nation's economy, coupled with the depleting reserves of Nigeria and highlights the appropriate production technology options and their environmental implications. The utilization potentials of these resources are also enumerated, as well as the government's role in achieving accelerated, long-term tar sands development in the country.

  19. EA-1581: Sand Hills Wind Project, Wyoming

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Bureau of Land Management, with DOE’s Western Area Power Administration as a cooperating agency, was preparing this EA to evaluate the environmental impacts of a proposal to construct, operate, and maintain the Sand Hills Wind Energy Facility on private and federal lands in Albany County, Wyoming. If the proposed action had been implemented, Western would have interconnected the proposed facility to an existing transmission line. This project has been canceled.

  20. 4 -Coastal Ocean Processes The Oregon Coastal Ocean: A Sink for Atmospheric CO

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pierce, Stephen

    4 - Coastal Ocean Processes The Oregon Coastal Ocean: A Sink for Atmospheric CO 2 ? As part of the Coastal Ocean Processes (CoOP)-sponsored Coastal Ocean Advances in Shelf Transport project (COAST) we laboratory, we developed analytical sys- tems that were capable of measuring nutrient con- centrations and CO

  1. Policy Analysis of the Canadian Oil Sands Experience

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None, None

    2013-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    For those who support U.S. oil sands development, the Canadian oil sands industry is often identified as a model the U.S. might emulate, yielding financial and energy security benefits. For opponents of domestic oil sands development, the Canadian oil sands experience illustrates the risks that opponents of development believe should deter domestic policymakers from incenting U.S. oil sands development. This report does not seek to evaluate the particular underpinnings of either side of this policy argument, but rather attempts to delve into the question of whether the Canadian experience has relevance as a foundational model for U.S. oil sands development. More specifically, this report seeks to assess whether and how the Canadian oil sands experience might be predictive or instructive in the context of fashioning a framework for a U.S. oil sands industry. In evaluating the implications of these underpinnings for a prospective U.S. oil sands industry, this report concentrates on prospective development of the oil sands deposits found in Utah.

  2. Efficacy of Low and High Complexity Vegetation Treatments for Reestablishing Terrestrial Arthropod Assemblages during Montane Wetland Restoration

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Holmquist, Jeffrey G; Schmidt-Gengenbach, Jutta; Demetry, Athena

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    wetland types—than was observed between any restoration treatment andDual treatment was added to enhance restoration of wetlandTreatments for Reestablishing Terrestrial Arthropod Assemblages during Montane Wetland

  3. Wetlands Standard Dredge and Fill Permit (New Hampshire)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The purpose of the permits is to protect and preserve submerged lands under tidal and freshwaters and wetlands, both salt and fresh water, from unregulated alteration that would adversely affect...

  4. Main Ecosystem Characteristics and Distribution of Wetlands in Boreal and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    9 Main Ecosystem Characteristics and Distribution of Wetlands in Boreal and Alpine Landscapes) was conducted during 25 years and generated results that indicate that about 15% of #12;Ecosystems Biodiversity

  5. Exam Review WFS 340: Wetlands Ecology and Management

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gray, Matthew

    populations. #12;7) Be able to describe how global warming may affect amphibians. 8) Know what amphibians, and how (and likely why) it causes malformations in amphibians. Wetland Losses and Human Impacts 1) Know

  6. The potential use of tar sand bitumen as paving asphalt

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Petersen, J.C.

    1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The properties of several tar sand asphalts prepared in past studies by several different investigators were compared with each other and with the properties of petroleum asphalts. These results were reviewed and discussed with regard to the potential use of tar sand bitumen in pavement applications. The data show that tar sand bitumen has good potential for use in highway pavements that meet today's performance specifications. No deficiencies in the tar sand asphalts were found that would be expected to seriously affect performance. On the other hand, the data indicate that some tar sand asphalts may have superior aging characteristics, being relatively resistant to oxidative age hardening compared with typical petroleum asphalts. Asphalt-aggregate mixtures prepared using two tar sand asphalts also showed acceptable strength properties and excellent resistance to moisture-induced damage.

  7. Argus Energy WV, LLC wins 2007 Wetlands West Virginia Award

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    2007-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Argus Energy's Kiah Creek Operation has received the 2007 Wetlands West Virginia Award presented by the West Virginian Coal Association. The operation was originally a 1267 acre underground mine in the Coalburg seam. Underground mining commenced in 2000 until the end of 2003 with more than two million tons of coal being produced. The creation of the wetlands was achieved during the operations. 8 photos.

  8. Coastal Ohio Wind Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gorsevski, Peter; Afjeh, Abdollah; Jamali, Mohsin; Bingman, Verner

    2014-04-04T23:59:59.000Z

    The Coastal Ohio Wind Project intends to address problems that impede deployment of wind turbines in the coastal and offshore regions of Northern Ohio. The project evaluates different wind turbine designs and the potential impact of offshore turbines on migratory and resident birds by developing multidisciplinary research, which involves wildlife biology, electrical and mechanical engineering, and geospatial science. Firstly, the project conducts cost and performance studies of two- and three-blade wind turbines using a turbine design suited for the Great Lakes. The numerical studies comprised an analysis and evaluation of the annual energy production of two- and three-blade wind turbines to determine the levelized cost of energy. This task also involved wind tunnel studies of model wind turbines to quantify the wake flow field of upwind and downwind wind turbine-tower arrangements. The experimental work included a study of a scaled model of an offshore wind turbine platform in a water tunnel. The levelized cost of energy work consisted of the development and application of a cost model to predict the cost of energy produced by a wind turbine system placed offshore. The analysis found that a floating two-blade wind turbine presents the most cost effective alternative for the Great Lakes. The load effects studies showed that the two-blade wind turbine model experiences less torque under all IEC Standard design load cases considered. Other load effects did not show this trend and depending on the design load cases, the two-bladed wind turbine showed higher or lower load effects. The experimental studies of the wake were conducted using smoke flow visualization and hot wire anemometry. Flow visualization studies showed that in the downwind turbine configuration the wake flow was insensitive to the presence of the blade and was very similar to that of the tower alone. On the other hand, in the upwind turbine configuration, increasing the rotor blade angle of attack reduced the wake size and enhanced the vortices in the flow downstream of the turbine-tower compared with the tower alone case. Mean and rms velocity distributions from hot wire anemometer data confirmed that in a downwind configuration, the wake of the tower dominates the flow, thus the flow fields of a tower alone and tower-turbine combinations are nearly the same. For the upwind configuration, the mean velocity shows a narrowing of the wake compared with the tower alone case. The downwind configuration wake persisted longer than that of an upwind configuration; however, it was not possible to quantify this difference because of the size limitation of the wind tunnel downstream of the test section. The water tunnel studies demonstrated that the scale model studies could be used to adequately produce accurate motions to model the motions of a wind turbine platform subject to large waves. It was found that the important factors that affect the platform is whether the platform is submerged or surface piercing. In the former, the loads on the platform will be relatively reduced whereas in the latter case, the structure pierces the wave free surface and gains stiffness and stability. The other important element that affects the movement of the platform is depth of the sea in which the wind turbine will be installed. Furthermore, the wildlife biology component evaluated migratory patterns by different monitoring systems consisting of marine radar, thermal IR camera and acoustic recorders. The types of radar used in the project are weather surveillance radar and marine radar. The weather surveillance radar (1988 Doppler), also known as Next Generation Radar (NEXRAD), provides a network of weather stations in the US. Data generated from this network were used to understand general migratory patterns, migratory stopover habitats, and other patterns caused by the effects of weather conditions. At a local scale our marine radar was used to complement the datasets from NEXRAD and to collect additional monitoring parameters such as passage rates, flight paths, flight directi

  9. Oil shale, tar sands, and related materials

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stauffer, H.C.

    1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This sixteen-chapter book focuses on the many problems and the new methodology associated with the commercialization of the oil shale and tar sand industry. Topics discussed include: an overview of the Department of Energy's oil shale R, D, and D program; computer simulation of explosive fracture of oil shale; fracturing of oil shale by treatment with liquid sulfur dioxide; chemistry of shale oil cracking; hydrogen sulfide evolution from Colorado oil shale; a possible mechanism of alkene/alkane production in oil shale retorting; oil shale retorting kinetics; kinetics of oil shale char gasification; a comparison of asphaltenes from naturally occurring shale bitumen and retorted shale oils: the influence of temperature on asphaltene structure; beneficiation of Green River oil shale by density methods; beneficiation of Green River oil shale pelletization; shell pellet heat exchange retorting: the SPHER energy-efficient process for retorting oil shale; retorted oil shale disposal research; an investigation into the potential economics of large-scale shale oil production; commercial scale refining of Paraho crude shale oil into military specification fuels; relation between fuel properties and chemical composition; chemical characterization/physical properties of US Navy shale-II fuels; relation between fuel properties and chemical composition: stability of oil shale-derived jet fuel; pyrolysis of shale oil residual fractions; synfuel stability: degradation mechanisms and actual findings; the chemistry of shale oil and its refined products; the reactivity of Cold Lake asphaltenes; influence of thermal processing on the properties of Cold Lake asphaltenes: the effect of distillation; thermal recovery of oil from tar sands by an energy-efficient process; and hydropyrolysis: the potential for primary upgrading of tar sand bitumen.

  10. alberta oil sands: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    of maintenance example of strain softening material in the context of an underfoot environment for large mobile mining Joseph, Tim Grain 40 The effect of sand grain size...

  11. alberta oil sand: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    of maintenance example of strain softening material in the context of an underfoot environment for large mobile mining Joseph, Tim Grain 40 The effect of sand grain size...

  12. auriferous alluvial sands: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    STATES OF AMERICA 12; SAND2002-xxxx Unlimited Release Printed August 2002 by Sandia Corporation, a Lockheed Martin Company, for the United States Department of Energy under...

  13. The new small-angle diffractometer SAND at IPNS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Crawford, R.K.; Thiyagarajan, P.; Epperson, J.E.; Trouw, F.; Kleb, R.; Wozniak, D.; Leach, D.

    1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    A new small-angle neutron diffractometer SAND is undergoing commissioning at IPNS pulsed source. This paper provides details of the design and expected performance of this instrument.

  14. SANDIA REPORT SAND2014-3416 Unlimited Release

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    SAND2014-3416 Unlimited Release Printed April 2014 Safety, Codes and Standards for Hydrogen Installations: Hydrogen Fueling System Footprint Metric Development A.P. Harris,...

  15. WETLANDS. Vol. 18. No.3. September 1998. pp. 329-334 1998. The Society of Wetland Scientists

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    .S. Fish and Wildlife Service. NOl1h American Waterfowl and Wetlands Office. Patuxent Wildlife Research River and Big Sioux River Watersheds. 1982, typed report on file, USFWS. Pierre. SD, USA), and the USFWS

  16. Heating tar sands formations while controlling pressure

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Stegemeier, George Leo (Houston, TX) [Houston, TX; Beer, Gary Lee (Houston, TX) [Houston, TX; Zhang, Etuan (Houston, TX) [Houston, TX

    2010-01-12T23:59:59.000Z

    Methods for treating a tar sands formation are described herein. Methods may include heating at least a section of a hydrocarbon layer in the formation from a plurality of heaters located in the formation. A pressure in the majority of the section may be maintained below a fracture pressure of the formation. The pressure in the majority of the section may be reduced to a selected pressure after the average temperature reaches a temperature that is above 240.degree. C. and is at or below pyrolysis temperatures of hydrocarbons in the section. At least some hydrocarbon fluids may be produced from the formation.

  17. Heating tar sands formations to visbreaking temperatures

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Karanikas, John Michael (Houston, TX); Colmenares, Tulio Rafael (Houston, TX); Zhang, Etuan (Houston, TX); Marino, Marian (Houston, TX); Roes, Augustinus Wilhelmus Maria (Houston, TX); Ryan, Robert Charles (Houston, TX); Beer, Gary Lee (Houston, TX); Dombrowski, Robert James (Houston, TX); Jaiswal, Namit (Houston, TX)

    2009-12-22T23:59:59.000Z

    Methods for treating a tar sands formation are described herein. Methods may include heating at least a section of a hydrocarbon layer in the formation from a plurality of heaters located in the formation. The heat may be controlled so that at least a majority of the section reaches an average temperature of between 200.degree. C. and 240.degree. C., which results in visbreaking of at least some hydrocarbons in the section. At least some visbroken hydrocarbon fluids may be produced from the formation.

  18. Investigation of sands subjected to dynamic loading 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Reeves, Gary Neil

    1967-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    INVESTIGATION OF SP&NDS SUBJECTED TO DTNAMIC LOADING A Tucsis By Gary N. Reeves Submitted to the Grad ate Coll Ee of the T xas AGM University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the deEree of MASTER OF SCIPNCE AuBust 19G7 Major... Subject: Civil EnEineering LABORATORY INVESTIGATION OF SANDS SUBJECTED TO DYNAMIC LOADING A Thesis by Gary N. Reeves Approved as to style and content by: Chairman of Committee Head of Department Membe Me er August 1967 ACIINOWLEDGR&J. 'NTS I...

  19. Oil Sands Feedstocks | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn'tOrigin of Contamination in ManyDepartment of OrderSUBCOMMITTEEEnergy0Department ofSands

  20. Sand Mountain Electric Coop | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnualProperty Edit with form HistoryRistma AG Jump to:EnergysourceRamon, California:Sand Mountain

  1. Sand Bluff Wind Farm | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to:Ezfeedflag JumpID-f < RAPID‎ |Rippey Jump to:WY)Project JumpSanMiguel, California:Sand

  2. Variation in grain shape and surface textures of fine guartz sands in the South Texas Eolian Sand Sheet

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sims, Donald Ralph

    1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    action on sand grains. Samples were taken from 4 transects subnormal to the prevailing wind direction at approximately 20 mile intervals. Two quartz-grain shape types were recognized in the fine sand fraction: one consisted of predominately angular... and 45 miles southward from Baffin Bay to Port Mansfield (Figure 1). The major factors affecting the formation and accumulation of the South Texas Eolian Sand Sheet are a prevailing wind from the east-southeast, a semi-arid climate and a source...

  3. TESTING OF TMR SAND MANTIS FINAL REPORT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Krementz, D; William Daugherty, W

    2007-06-12T23:59:59.000Z

    Screening tests of Sand Mantis candidate materials selected for erosion resistance have been completed. The results of this testing identified that over a relatively short period of operation (<1 hour), measurable erosion will occur in each of the candidate zoom tube materials given equal operating exposure. Additionally, this testing has shown that erosion of the rubber discharge hose directly downstream of the vehicle could be expected to limit the service life of the discharge hose. On the basis of these test results, SRNL recommends the following; {lg_bullet} redesign of critical system components (e.g., zoom tube, discharge hose) should be conducted to improve system characteristics relative to erosion and capitalize on the results of this testing, {lg_bullet} continued efforts to deploy the Sand Mantis should include testing to better define and optimize operating parameters, and gain an understanding of system dynamics, {lg_bullet} discontinue wear testing with the selected materials pending redesign of critical system components (1st recommendation) and inclusion of other candidate materials. The final selection of additional candidate materials should be made following design changes, but might include a Stellite alloy or zirconia.

  4. Microstructural characterization of a Canadian oil sand

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dinh, Hong Doan; Nauroy, Jean-François; Tang, Anh-Minh; Souhail, Youssef; 10.1139/T2012-072

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The microstructure of oil sand samples extracted at a depth of 75 m from the estuarine Middle McMurray formation (Alberta, Canada) has been investigated by using high resolution 3D X-Ray microtomography ($\\mu$CT) and Cryo Scanning Electron Microscopy (CryoSEM). $\\mu$CT images evidenced some dense areas composed of highly angular grains surrounded by fluids that are separated by larger pores full of gas. 3D Image analysis provided in dense areas porosity values compatible with in-situ log data and macroscopic laboratory determinations, showing that they are representative of intact states. $\\mu$CT hence provided some information on the morphology of the cracks and disturbance created by gas expansion. The CryoSEM technique, in which the sample is freeze fractured within the SEM chamber prior to observation, provided pictures in which the (frozen) bitumen clearly appears between the sand grains. No evidence of the existence of a thin connate water layer between grains and the bitumen, frequently mentioned in th...

  5. Process for upgrading tar sand bitumen

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bartholic, D.B.; Reagan, W.J.

    1989-04-04T23:59:59.000Z

    A process is described for upgrading a charge of a tar sand bitumen concentrate containing mineral matter including fine particles which comprises contacting the charge in a riser in the presence of a low boiling organic solvent diluent with finely divided attrition-resistant particles of a hot fluidizable substantially catalytically inert solid which is substantially chemically inert to a solution of mineral acid. The contact of the charge with the particles is at high temperature and short contact time to vaporize the high hydrogen containing components of the bitumen, the period of time being less than that which induces substantial thermal cracking of the charge, at the end of the time separating the vaporizing product from the fluidizable particles. The fluidizable particles now bear a deposit of both combustible solid, adherent particles of fine particles of mineral matter and metals. The particles of inert solid are passed with deposit of combustibles and fine particles of mineral matter to a regenerator to oxidize the combustible portion of the deposits, removing at least a portion of deposit of mineral matter and metals by removing the inert solid from the regenerator and contacting removed inert solid with a hot mineral acid, and recirculating fluidizable solid depleted at least in part of deposited mineral matter to contact with incoming charge of tar sand bitumen concentrate and diluent.

  6. Solvent extraction of bitumen from tar sands

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hoon, A.Y.; Thomas, S. [Univ. of West Indies, St. Augustine (Trinidad and Tobago)

    1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper reports on the measurement of mass transfer rates for the extraction of bitumen from tar sands using organic solvents. The experiment was carried out in an agitated vessel using a six-blade turbine mixer on a laboratory scale. To facilitate the determination of absolute mass transfer coefficients, tar sands were specially prepared in the form of spherical particles so that mass transfer area can be computed. The variables investigated in the study included: (1) solvent type (kerosene, toluene, benzene), (2) stirrer speed, 25 rpm to 1000 rpm, and (3) particle diameter, 0.4 cm to 1.2 cm. The results indicated that solvency power varied markedly with the various solvents used and that high aromatic content promoted rapid dissolution when compared with paraffinic solvents. The mass transfer rates increased with increasing stirrer speed in accordance with the relationship: k {alpha} N{sup 0.56} where k is the mass transfer coefficient and N the stirrer speed. Increasing particle diameter also resulted in decreased mass transfer rates. The results were satisfactorily correlated in terms of a Frossling type equation, Sh {alpha} Re{sub p}{sup a}Sc{sup b}.

  7. Fourier grain-shape analysis of quartz sand from the eastern and central Santa Barbara Littoral Cell, southern California

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Robinson, R.A.; Osborne, R.H. (Univ. of South California, Los Angeles, CA (United States). Dept. of Geological Sciences)

    1993-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The shape composition of detrital quartz grains from the medium sand fraction of 61 samples collected from the eastern and central Santa Barbara Littoral Cell was determined using Fourier analysis. Nine sample sets were obtained by various organizations from the shoreface (0 to [minus]9 m MLLW) of beaches, rivers, coastal cliffs and dunes as well as the inner continental shelf ([minus]16 to [minus]23 m MLLW) between June, 1969 and March, 1992. The Ventura and Santa Clara River samples are statistically homogeneous with respect to quartz grain shape. Littoral and inner shelf samples from the Ventura area are composed principally of resedimented sand from the Ventura and Santa Clara Rivers, but also contain sand from an unidentified source exposed on the adjacent inner shelf. No statistically significant change in the grain-shape composition of upper shoreface (0 m MLLW) samples in the Ventura area occurs within the observed sample sets, which represent a period of 23 years. Seasonal variation within the Ventura area is marked by an increase in the abundance of more elongate grains on the upper shoreface during the summer months, and a decrease in the abundance of such grains during the oceanographic winter. The increase in more elongate grains during the summer most likely reflects the onshore transport of shelf-derived grains through ridge and runnel systems, whereas the decrease in the abundance of such grains reflects mixing with pre-existing backshore sand containing more equate grains during winter storms. The selective transport of more elongate grains is evidenced by the enrichment of such grains within Ventura Harbor ([minus]7 m MLLW).

  8. Restoration of resaca wetlands and associated wet prairie habitats at Palo Alto Battlefield National Historic Site

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Margo, Michael Ray

    2006-08-16T23:59:59.000Z

    Cultivation and drainage projects associated with livestock production have substantially disturbed resaca wetlands and wet prairie habitats in southern Texas. As a consequence of the anthropogenic disturbances, the area of these wetlands has been...

  9. Evaluation of two commercial bioaugmentation products for enhanced removal of petroleum from a wetland

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Simon, Mark Allen

    1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of biostimulation for enhanced biodegradation of petroleum in a wetland. The primary goal of this research was to evaluate the performance of two commercial bioaugmentation products for their ability to enhance bioremediation of petroleum in a wetland. Additional...

  10. The physical role of transverse deep zones in improving constructed treatment wetland performance

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lightbody, Anne F. (Anne Fraser), 1977-

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Velocity heterogeneity is often present in wetland systems and results in some influent water remaining in the wetland for less than the expected residence time. This phenomenon, known as short-circuiting, alters the ...

  11. Unusual sedimentation of a Galveston Bay wetland at Pine Gully, Seabrook, Texas: implications for beach renourishment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Culver, Wesley Richard

    2009-06-02T23:59:59.000Z

    , well sorted, quartz rich sediments began plugging the main channel of the previously tidally dominated wetland. Progressive sedimentation has produced overbank deposits in the marine grasses, contributing to the death of wetland grasses by sediment...

  12. Recirculation on a single stage of vertical flow constructed wetland: treatment limits and operation modes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    1 Recirculation on a single stage of vertical flow constructed wetland: treatment limits French vertical flow constructed wetlands (VFCWs) plant comprises two stages of treatment which the first and treatment performances in different operating conditions. Results showed good performances

  13. Do constructed flow through wetlands improve water quality in the San Joaquin River?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    O'Geen, Anthony T

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of tailwaters. Wetland treatment of irrigation tailwaterswetlands have the potential to be excellent contaminant sinks and represent the last opportunity for treatmenttreatment. In addition, these components contribute to biological oxygen demand (BOD) in wetland

  14. Fluid escape from reservoirs: implications from cold seeps, fractures and injected sands

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mazzini, Adriano

    Abstract Fluid escape from reservoirs: implications from cold seeps, fractures and injected sands fluids escape from hydrocarbon reservoirs through permeable networks of fractures, injected sands. Within fractures and injected sands, oxidation of chained hydrocarbons supplies bicarbonate to the co

  15. Biocalcification of Sand through Ureolysis Chiung-Wen Chou1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aydilek, Ahmet

    . A laboratory study was conducted to evaluate the changes in geomechanical properties of sand attributable that the bacterial cells effectively improved the geomechanical properties of the sand. Growing cells improved and have a tremendous effect on the composition, properties, and geomechanical behavior of earth materials

  16. ALUMINOSILICATE-COATED SILICA SAND FOR REACTIVE TRANSPORT EXPERIMENTS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Flury, Markus

    ALUMINOSILICATE-COATED SILICA SAND FOR REACTIVE TRANSPORT EXPERIMENTS By JORGE ANTONIO JEREZ transport experiments; Dr. Barbara Williams and Jason Shira from University of Idaho for providing access-COATED SILICA SAND FOR REACTIVE TRANSPORT EXPERIMENTS Abstract by Jorge Antonio Jerez Briones, Ph.D. Washington

  17. The extraction of bitumen from western tar sands

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Oblad, A.G.; Bunger, J.W.; Deo, M.D.; Hanson, F.V.; Miller, J.D.; Seader, J.D.

    1990-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Topics discussed include: characterization of bitumen impregnated sandstone, water based tar sand separation technology, electrophoretic characterization of bitumen and fine mineral particles, bitumen and tar sand slurry viscosity, the hot water digestion-flotation process, electric field use on breaking water-in-oil emulsions, upgrading of bitumens and bitumen-derived liquids, solvent extraction.

  18. The extraction of bitumen from western tar sands. Annual report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Oblad, A.G.; Bunger, J.W.; Deo, M.D.; Hanson, F.V.; Miller, J.D.; Seader, J.D.

    1990-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Topics discussed include: characterization of bitumen impregnated sandstone, water based tar sand separation technology, electrophoretic characterization of bitumen and fine mineral particles, bitumen and tar sand slurry viscosity, the hot water digestion-flotation process, electric field use on breaking water-in-oil emulsions, upgrading of bitumens and bitumen-derived liquids, solvent extraction.

  19. BENEFICIAL UTILIZATION OF USED FOUNDRY SANDS AS CONSTRUCTION MATERIALS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wisconsin-Milwaukee, University of

    and state environmental agencies began to pay increasing attention to industrial pollution, safety and wasteBENEFICIAL UTILIZATION OF USED FOUNDRY SANDS AS CONSTRUCTION MATERIALS By Tarun R. Naik Director - 6696 Fax: (414) 229 - 6958 #12;-2- Beneficial Utilization of Used Foundry Sands as Construction

  20. Mechanic Waves in Sand, 3d Simulations O Mouraillea,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Luding, Stefan

    Mechanic Waves in Sand, 3d Simulations O Mouraillea, , W A Mulderb & S Ludinga a Particle propagation. The propagation of rotational energy in itself is studied as well. The control on the inter in granular materials. #12;Wave propagation, MD-Simulations 2 1. Introduction Sand, like other granular

  1. Multispecies Reactive Tracer Test in a Sand and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Multispecies Reactive Tracer Test in a Sand and Gravel Aquifer, Cape Cod, Massachusetts United;Multispecies Reactive Tracer Test in a Sand and Gravel Aquifer, Cape Cod, Massachusetts Part 2 Transport- effectiveness for prevention and control of pollution to air, land, water, and subsurface resources; protection

  2. SHORT COMMUNICATION First Collection Records of Phlebotomine Sand Flies (Diptera

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    SHORT COMMUNICATION First Collection Records of Phlebotomine Sand Flies (Diptera: Psychodidae) From (2011); DOI: 10.1603/ME10170 ABSTRACT The phlebotomine sand ßies Lutzomyia (Psathyromyia) shannoni (Dyar species were collected from ultraviolet CO2-baited Centers for Disease Control light traps during a state

  3. Household scale slow sand filtration in the Dominican Republic

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Donison, Kori S. (Kori Shay), 1981-

    2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Slow sand filtration is a method of water treatment that has been used for hundreds of years. In the past two decades, there has been resurgence in interest in slow sand filtration, particularly as a low-cost, household-scale ...

  4. Completion methods in thick, multilayered tight gas sands

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ogueri, Obinna Stavely

    2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Tight gas sands, coal-bed methane, and gas shales are commonly called unconventional reservoirs. Tight gas sands (TGS) are often described as formations with an expected average permeability of 0.1mD or less. Gas production rates from TGS reservoirs...

  5. Completion methods in thick, multilayered tight gas sands

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ogueri, Obinna Stavely

    2008-10-10T23:59:59.000Z

    Tight gas sands, coal-bed methane, and gas shales are commonly called unconventional reservoirs. Tight gas sands (TGS) are often described as formations with an expected average permeability of 0.1mD or less. Gas production rates from TGS reservoirs...

  6. www.nasa.gov WHITE SANDS MISSILE RANGE ACCESS CAPABILITIES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    and missile launch, tracking, and recovery · Nuclear effects testing · High-speed sled track · Directed energy weapons testing · Climatic and dynamic environments testing · Atmospheric research · Electronicwww.nasa.gov WHITE SANDS MISSILE RANGE ACCESS CAPABILITIES SUMMARY White Sands Test Facility (WSTF

  7. Method and apparatus for hydrocarbon recovery from tar sands

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Westhoff, J.D.; Harak, A.E.

    1988-05-04T23:59:59.000Z

    A method and apparatus for utilizing tar sands having a broad range of bitumen content is disclosed. More particularly, tar sands are pyrolyzed in a cyclone retort with high temperature gases recycled from the cyclone retort to produce oil and hydrocarbon products. The spent tar sands are then burned at 2000/degree/F in a burner to remove residual char and produce a solid waste that is easily disposable. The process and apparatus have the advantages of being able to utilize tar sands having a broad range of bitumen content and the advantage of producing product gases that are free from combustion gases and thereby have a higher heating value. Another important advantage is rapid pyrolysis of the tar sands in the cyclone so as to effectively utilize smaller sized reactor vessels for reducing capitol and operating costs. 1 fig., 1 tab.

  8. Method and apparatus for hydrocarbon recovery from tar sands

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Westhoff, James D. (Laramie, WY); Harak, Arnold E. (Laramie, WY)

    1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A method and apparatus for utilizing tar sands having a broad range of bitumen content is disclosed. More particularly, tar sands are pyrolyzed in a cyclone retort with high temperature gases recycled from the cyclone retort to produce oil and hydrocarbon products. The spent tar sands are then burned at 2000.degree. F. in a burner to remove residual char and produce a solid waste that is easily disposable. The process and apparatus have the advantages of being able to utilize tar sands having a broad range of bitumen content and the advantage of producing product gases that are free from combustion gases and thereby have a higher heating value. Another important advantage is rapid pyrolysis of the tar sands in the cyclone so as to effectively utilize smaller sized reactor vessels for reducing capitol and operating costs.

  9. Heats of dissolution of tar sand bitumen in various solvents

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ensley, E.K.; Scott, M.

    1988-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The dissolution of tar sand bitumen from a tar sand matrix was examined using three solvents: (1) dichloromethane, a polar-polarizable solvent; (2) toluene, a nonpolar-polarizable solvent; and (3) hexane, a nonpolar-nonpolarizable solvent. The dichloromethane had the highest dissolution energy, followed by toluene, with hexane having the lowest dissolution energy. These data were combined with heat of dissolution of recovered bitumen and heat of wetting of spent sand to calculate the bonding energy between bitumen and the mineral matrix. The interfacial bonding energy between tar sand bitumen and the mineral matrix was found to be in the region of 0 to 0.09 cal/g of bitumen, which is very small. This conclusion may find application in recovery of energy or bitumen from bitumen-wet tar sand deposits. 9 refs., 2 tabs.

  10. QUAKER RUN Stream and Wetland Restoration As-Built Completion Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kirby, Carl S.

    QUAKER RUN Stream and Wetland Restoration As-Built Completion Report and First Year Monitoring Data. The project restored 2,000 linear feet of stream and created 3 new acres of wetlands. An as-built survey of Understanding language for stream and wetlands restorations services, between Coal Township and the US Fish

  11. Interactions between wetlands CH4 emissions and climate at global scale

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Canet, LĂ©onie

    emissions? Observations Introduction Tool Wetlands emissions [CH4 ]atmo Feedback Conclusion #12;[CO2 ]atmo e.g.: Climate (T) CO2 anthropogenic emissions wetlands CH4 emissions Under future climate change, Shindell et al. (2004) => +78% under climate change generated by 2xCO2 Introduction Tool Wetlands emissions [CH4

  12. Enhancing phosphorus removal in constructed wetlands with ochre from mine drainage treatment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Heal, Kate

    Enhancing phosphorus removal in constructed wetlands with ochre from mine drainage treatment K in a wastewater constructed wetland (175 m2 area) in Berwickshire, UK. The hydraulic and treatment performance wetlands are widely used for tertiary wastewater treatment but, although effective for nitrogen removal

  13. Ecological Engineering 15 (2000) 121132 Phosphorus removal by wollastonite: A constructed wetland

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Walter, M.Todd

    wastewater treatment; Wastewater; Constructed wetlands; Phosphorus removal; Sewage; Water quality; Secondary to those levels. The use of both natural and created wetlands as tools in the treatment of polluted waters). Constructed wet- land ecosystems, offer better opportunities for wastewater treatment than natural wetlands

  14. Sustainable Best Management Practices for Wetland Seasonal Drainage in Response to San Joaquin

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Quinn, Nigel

    wetland sites ­ treatment drawdown is delayed to coincide with VAMP period (April 15-May 15) HighSustainable Best Management Practices for Wetland Seasonal Drainage in Response to San Joaquin wetlands in the Grasslands Ecological Area within the San Joaquin Basin #12;WATER MANAGEMENT FOR MOIST SOIL

  15. Macrophyte Decomposition Rates in the Tres Rios Constructed Treatment Wetland: Preliminary Results!

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hall, Sharon J.

    Macrophyte Decomposition Rates in the Tres Rios Constructed Treatment Wetland: Preliminary Results wetland. Plant Ecology 200:69-82. Literature Cited! Figure 1A: Aerial photo of the treatment flow cell, such as those associated with municipal wastewater treatment.! Constructed treatment wetlands perform important

  16. AN EVALUATION OF RAPID METHODS FOR ASSESSING THE ECOLOGICAL CONDITION OF WETLANDS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gray, Matthew

    ) definition of the assessment area, 2) treatment of wetland type, 3) approaches to scoring, 4) considerationAN EVALUATION OF RAPID METHODS FOR ASSESSING THE ECOLOGICAL CONDITION OF WETLANDS M. Siobhan analyzed 40 existing wetland rapid assessment methods that were developed for a variety of purposes

  17. Evaluating Florida's Coastal Protected Areas: A Model for Coastal Management Plan Evaluation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bernhardt, Sarah Praeger

    2011-02-22T23:59:59.000Z

    This research presents the first coastal and marine protected areas specific quantitative management plan evaluation protocol. This critical research gap in the coastal and marine protected area (CMPA) research literature was addressed by creating a...

  18. Acoustic sand detector for fluid flowstreams

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Beattie, Alan G. (Corrales, NM); Bohon, W. Mark (Frisco, TX)

    1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The particle volume and particle mass production rate of particulate solids entrained in fluid flowstreams such as formation sand or fracture proppant entrained in oil and gas production flowstreams is determined by a system having a metal probe interposed in a flow conduit for transmitting acoustic emissions created by particles impacting the probe to a sensor and signal processing circuit which produces discrete signals related to the impact of each of the particles striking the probe. The volume or mass flow rate of particulates is determined from making an initial particle size distribution and particle energy distribution and comparing the initial energy distribution and/or the initial size distribution with values related to the impact energies of a predetermined number of recorded impacts. The comparison is also used to recalibrate the system to compensate for changes in flow velocity.

  19. ADVANCED WETLAND ECOLOGY Instructors: Dr. Matthew Gray (mgray11@utk.edu); Dr. Heath Hagy (hhagy@utk.edu)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gray, Matthew

    (all day workshop) Biebighauser (USFS) 17 Treatment Wetlands Ludwig (UT) 22 Optional Field TripWFS 536 ADVANCED WETLAND ECOLOGY Fall 2011 Instructors: Dr. Matthew Gray (mgray11@utk.edu); Dr Text: Wetlands, 2000, 3rd edition, Wiley (www.wiley.com, ISBN 047129232X) or Wetlands, 2007, 4th

  20. Phase 1: Dam, Lake, and Wetland The project's first phase was a dam and stormwater impoundment to control

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    . Phase 3: Constructed Treatment Wetland (not publicly accessible) Six stormwater wetland cells surround Phase 1: Dam, Lake, and Wetland The project's first phase was a dam and stormwater impoundment to control surface water and groundwater hydrology. The surrounding wetlands were restored

  1. Spatial and temporal variability of annual greenhouse gas fluxes from a constructed wetland in an arid region

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hall, Sharon J.

    (CO2). - Many constructed treatment wetland systems (CWS) have been developed to remove nutrients fromSpatial and temporal variability of annual greenhouse gas fluxes from a constructed wetland of Sustainability, 3Wetland Ecosystem Ecology Lab, Arizona State University, Tempe, AZ, USA. - Wetlands support

  2. The contribution of evapotranspiration and evaporation to the water budget of a treatment wetland in Phoenix, AZ, USA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hall, Sharon J.

    The contribution of evapotranspiration and evaporation to the water budget of a treatment wetland evapotranspiration and evaporation rates in a constructed treatment wetland in Phoenix during the summer, when both budget for the Tres Rios treatment wetland, and will improve our general knowledge of wetland water

  3. Eutrophication risk assessment in coastal embayments using simple statistical models

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Arhonditsis, George B.

    Eutrophication risk assessment in coastal embayments using simple statistical models G. Arhonditsis for assessing the risk of eutrophication in marine coastal embayments. The procedure followed of exogenous nutrient loading. Ă? 2003 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved. Keywords: Eutrophication; Coastal

  4. NREL PV Projects - FUPWG Meeting: "Going Coastal for Energy Efficiency...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    NREL PV Projects - FUPWG Meeting: "Going Coastal for Energy Efficiency" NREL PV Projects - FUPWG Meeting: "Going Coastal for Energy Efficiency" fupwgdestinwestby.pdf More...

  5. Potential Oil Production from the Coastal Plain of the Arctic...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Potential Oil Production from the Coastal Plain of the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge: Updated Assessment Preface Potential Oil Production from the Coastal Plain of the Arctic...

  6. aires coastal waters: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    the first coastal and marine protected areas specific quantitative management plan evaluation protocol. This critical research gap in the coastal and marine protected area (CMPA)...

  7. Recovery of bitumen from oil sand by steam with chemicals

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yamazaki, T.

    1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Recently, oil sand bitumen has become the center of attention as a possible oil energy substitute for the future. Until now, the development of oil sand has been performed by surface miing and conventional steam injection, these methods are limited in respect to resource recovery. A more effective method needs to be developed utilizing in situ recovery. In this study, a new attempt is made for the purpose of enhancing the recovery of bitumen from oil sand by adopting the method of injecting high pressure steam and chemicals such as solvents, surfactants, and others.

  8. Stormwater, Climate Change and Wisconsin's Coastal Communities

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sheridan, Jennifer

    Stormwater, Climate Change and Wisconsin's Coastal Communities Johnson Foundation at Wingspread · Precipitation and high water · Adapting to our changing climate · Assisting coastal communities Photo: WDNR #12 source of risk from changing climate. City of Green Bay watershed - #12;Predicted climate includes

  9. aeolian sand transport: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    that trigger dust storms, and the lifting of dust by dust devils and other small-scale vortices. We also discuss the physics of wind-blown sand and dune formation on Venus...

  10. aeolian sands underlain: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    that trigger dust storms, and the lifting of dust by dust devils and other small-scale vortices. We also discuss the physics of wind-blown sand and dune formation on Venus...

  11. asian sand dust: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    that trigger dust storms, and the lifting of dust by dust devils and other small-scale vortices. We also discuss the physics of wind-blown sand and dune formation on Venus...

  12. Mineral Dissolution and Secondary Precipitation on Quartz Sand...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Sand in Simulated Hanford Tank Solutions Affecting Subsurface Porosity."Journal of Hydrology 472-473:159-168. doi:10.1016j.jhydrol.2012.09.021 Authors: G Wang W Um...

  13. Kellogg and Russ Forest projects. 2002 Project sand highlights

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kellogg and Russ Forest projects. 2002 Project sand highlights MacCready Reserve a new property of insects Galeerucella calmariensis,and G.pusilla to control purple loosestrife on May 13. #12;New Project

  14. Tree Harvest in an Experimental Sand Ecosystem: Plant Effects on

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vermont, University of

    Tree Harvest in an Experimental Sand Ecosystem: Plant Effects on Nutrient Dynamics and Solute control during this interval. During the 1st year after harvest, K concentrations tripled in shallow soil

  15. Response of Oil Sands Derived Fuels in Diesel HCCI Operation

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    UT-Battelle for the Department of Energy 2007 DOE DEER Conference Oil sands fuels and refinery intermediates * Provided by Shell Canada (now Royal Dutch Shell) * 17 fuels and...

  16. The potential use of tar sand bitumen as paving asphalt

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Petersen, J.C.

    1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In this paper several research reports describing the preparation of potential paving asphalts from tar sand bitumen are reviewed and the results of the studies compared. The tar sand asphalts described in the studies were prepared from 1) hot water-recovered bitumen from deposits near San Luis Obispo, California (Edna deposits), and deposits near Vernal and Sunnyside, Utah; and 2) bitumen recovered from the Northwest Asphalt Ridge deposits near Vernal, Utah, by both in situ steamflood and in situ combustion recovery processes. Important properties of the tar sand asphalts compare favorably with those of specification petroleum asphalts. Laboratory data suggest that some tar sand asphalts may have superior aging characteristics and produce more water-resistant paving mixtures than typical petroleum asphalts.

  17. Study of properties of sand asphalt using a torsional rheometer 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kasula, Lavan Kumar Reddy

    2004-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The modeling of Sand Asphalt and experiments to measure their rheological properties are of vital concern to many industrial processes especially highway and roadway pavement construction industry. A variety of hot mix ...

  18. Bathymetric evolution of sand bed forms under partially standing waves

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Landry, Blake Jude

    2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Experiments were conducted in a large wave flume where the interaction between water waves and a movable sand bed were investigated. Monochromatic and poly- chromatic waves of specified amplitudes and period were generated ...

  19. RESEARCH ARTICLE Drag reduction using superhydrophobic sanded Teflon surfaces

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rothstein, Jonathan

    RESEARCH ARTICLE Drag reduction using superhydrophobic sanded Teflon surfaces Dong Song · Robert J- phobic surfaces with random surface microstructure. These superhydrophobic surfaces were fabricated was found to produce the largest pressure drop reduction. 1 Introduction Superhydrophobic surfaces can

  20. An evaluation of the potential end uses of a Utah tar sand bitumen. [Tar sand distillate

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thomas, K.P.; Harnsberger, P.M.; Guffey, F.D.

    1986-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    To date the commercial application of tar sand deposits in the United States has been limited to their use as paving materials for county roads, parking lots, and driveways because the material, as obtained from the quarries, does not meet federal highway specifications. The bitumen in these deposits has also been the subject of upgrading and refining studies to produce transportation fuels, but the results have not been encouraging from an economic standpoint. The conversion of tar sand bitumen to transportation fuels cannot compete with crude oil refining. The purposes of this study were two-fold. The first was to produce vacuum distillation residues and determine if their properties met ASTM asphalt specifications. The second was to determine if the distillates could serve as potential feedstocks for the production of aviation turbine fuels. The bitumen used for this study was the oil produced during an in situ steamflood project at the Northwest Asphalt Ridge (Utah) tar sand deposit. Two distillation residues were produced, one at +316/sup 0/C and one at +399/sup 0/C. However, only the lower boiling residue met ASTM specifications, in this case as an AC-30 asphalt. The original oil sample met specifications as an AC-5 asphalt. These residue samples showed some unique properties in the area of aging; however, these properties need to be investigated further to determine the implications. It was also suggested that the low aging indexes and high flow properties of the asphalts may be beneficial for pavements that require good low-temperature performance. Two distillate samples were produced, one at IBP-316/sup 0/C and one at IBP-399/sup 0/C. The chemical and physical properties of these samples were determined, and it was concluded that both samples appear to be potential feedstocks for the production of aviation turbine fuels. However, hydrogenation studies need to be conducted and the properties of the finished fuels determined to verify the prediction. 14 refs., 12 tabs.

  1. Acoustic detection of Immiscible Liquids in Sand

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Geller, Jil T.; Kowalsky, Michael B.; Seifert, Patricia K.; Nihei, Kurt T.

    1999-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Laboratory cross-well P-wave transmission at 90 kHz was measured in a 61 cm diameter by 76 cm tall water-saturated sand pack, before and after introducing a non-aqueous phase organic liquid (NAPL) (n-dodecane). In one experiment NAPL was introduced to form a lens trapped by a low permeability layer; a second experiment considered NAPL residual trapped behind the front of flowing NAPL. The NAPL caused significant changes in the travel time and amplitude of first arrivals, as well as the generation of diffracted waves arriving after the direct wave. The spatial variations in NAPL saturation obtained from excavation at the end of the experiment correlated well with the observed variations in the P-wave amplitudes and travel times. NAPL residual saturation changes from NAPL flow channels of 3 to 4% were detectable and the 40 to 80% NAPL saturation in the NAPL lens was clearly visible at acoustic frequencies. The results of these experiments demonstrate that small NAPL saturations may be more easily detected with amplitude rather than travel time data, but that the relationships between the amplitude changes and NAPL saturation maybe more complex than those for velocity.

  2. Process for upgrading tar sand bitumen

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bartholic, D.B.; Reagan, W.J.

    1989-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

    A process is described for upgrading a charge of a tar sand bitumen concentrate containing metal impurities, colloidal calcium-containing clay and water. It consists of contacting the charge in a riser contacting zone in the presence of a low boiling organic solvent with hot fluidizable attrition-resistant substantially catalytically-inert microspheres, which are 20 to 150 microns in diameter and are composed of previously calcined kaolin clay. The contact takes place at high temperature and short contact time, which permits vaporization of the high hydrogen containing components of the bitumen. The period of time is less than that which induces substantial thermal cracking of the charge. At the end of the time the vaporized produce is separated from the microspheres of calcined kaolin clay, the microspheres of calcined kaolin clay now bearing a deposit of combustible solid, metal impurities and adherent particles of colloidal calcium-containing clay originally contained in the bitumen concentrate, immediately reducing the temperature of the vaporized product to minimize thermal cracking and recovering the product for further refining to produce one or more premium products.

  3. The extraction of bitumen from western tar sands. Annual report, July 1990--July 1991

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Oblad, A.G.; Bunger, J.W.; Deo, M.D.; Hanson, F.V.; Miller, J.D.; Seader, J.D.

    1992-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Contents of this report include the following: executive summary; characterization of the native bitumen from the Whiterocks oil sand deposit; influence of carboxylic acid content on bitumen viscosity; water based oil sand separation technology; extraction of bitumen from western oil sands by an energy-efficient thermal method; large- diameter fluidized bed reactor studies; rotary kiln pyrolysis of oil sand; catalytic upgrading of bitumen and bitumen derived liquids; ebullieted bed hydrotreating and hydrocracking; super critical fluid extraction; bitumen upgrading; 232 references; Appendix A--Whiterocks tar sand deposit bibliography; Appendix B--Asphalt Ridge tar sand deposit bibliography; and Appendix C--University of Utah tar sands bibliography.

  4. Creating and maintaining a gas cap in tar sands formations

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Vinegar, Harold J. (Bellaire, TX); Karanikas, John Michael (Houston, TX); Dinkoruk, Deniz Sumnu (Houston, TX); Wellington, Scott Lee (Bellaire, TX)

    2010-03-16T23:59:59.000Z

    Methods for treating a tar sands formation are disclosed herein. Methods for treating a tar sands formation may include providing heat to at least part of a hydrocarbon layer in the formation from one or more heaters located in the formation. Pressure may be allowed to increase in an upper portion of the formation to provide a gas cap in the upper portion. At least some hydrocarbons are produced from a lower portion of the formation.

  5. The Duke Forest Stormwater Improvement and Wetlands Restoration Project

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    from the Duke Forest and the Pratt School of Engineering, restored 2000 feet (600 m) of stream Forest Sandy Creek Wetland Restoration site as well as the restoration of over 2000 feet of stream below. 1. Phase I: Re-contour and Restore more than 600 meters (2000 ft) of degraded stream

  6. ROUX et al. Modelling of a constructed wetland for pesticide

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    to anthropological stress, via industrial, domestic and agricultural wastewater. Europe assumes its responsibility chemical pollution. In the agricultural context, pesticide are a real stress for surrounding environment, and the implantation of buffer zones like artificial wetland at the outlet of the agricultural watershed. A PhD thesis

  7. SOIL MICROBIAL ECOPHYSIOLOGY OF A WETLAND RECOVERING FROM PHOSPHORUS EUTROPHICATION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Florida, University of

    ) with background soil P contents (698 mg kg21 ). Nutrient loading to this wetland was terminated in 1994. Microbial profiles at the enriched site did not change appreciably over the two year period. The results obtained marshlands. However, once the external load has been divert

  8. Climate Change Threatens Coexistence within Communities of Mediterranean Forested Wetlands

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paparella, Francesco

    Climate Change Threatens Coexistence within Communities of Mediterranean Forested Wetlands Arianna on Agriculture, Forest, and Natural Ecosystems, Euromediterranean Center for Climate Change, Viterbo, Italy, 3 The Mediterranean region is one of the hot spots of climate change. This study aims at understanding what

  9. Preprints of the 8 International Conference on Wetland Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    Preprints of the 8 th International Conference on Wetland Systems Arusha ­ Tanzania ­ 16 th to 19 th Spetember 2002 1 DESIGN CRITERIA AND PERFORMANCES OF REED BED FILTERS FOR THE TREATMENT OF WASHING.houdoy@inst-elevage.asso.fr ABSTRACT Initially designed for the treatment of domestic wastewater, Vertical Flow Reed Bed Filters [VFRBF

  10. Petrological comparison of some tertiary and quaternary sands from Brazos and adjourning counties, Texas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Elsik, William Clinton

    1960-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    //ipyramids of quartz in the Catahoula sands differ- / / entiates them from P ~ternary sands. The Claiborne sands contain much , , ' / muscovite. Volcarj g glass is common in the Jackson sends. / Angular-s+' gular roundness ratios vary for both Tertiary... and / / / Quaternary sar g. Occasional angular-subangular ratio va1ues in excess / / of 2. 00 are saracteristic of the Quaternary sands. / / Glaua' gite is more common in Tertiary than in Quaternary sands. / / / Add' Lional petrological studies of the clay...

  11. Hydraulic Geometry and Microtopography of Tidal Freshwater Forested Wetlands and Implications for Restoration, Columbia River, U.S.A.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Diefenderfer, Heida L.; Coleman, Andre M.; Borde, Amy B.; Sinks, Ian A.

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The hydrologic reconnection of tidal channels, riverine floodplains, and main stem channels are among responses by ecological restoration practitioners to the increasing fragmentation and land conversion occurring in coastal and riparian zones. Design standards and monitoring of such ecological restoration depend upon the characterization of reference sites that vary within and among regions. Few locales, such as the 235 km tidal portion of the Columbia River on the West Coast U.S.A., remain in which the reference conditions and restoration responses of tidal freshwater forested wetlands on temperate zone large river floodplains can be compared. This study developed hydraulic geometry relationships for Picea sitchensis (Sitka spruce) dominated tidal forests (swamps) in the vicinity of Grays Bay on the Columbia River some 37 km from the Pacific Coast using field surveys and Light Detection and Ranging (LiDAR) data. Scaling relationships between catchment area and the parameters of channel cross-sectional area at outlet and total channel length were comparable to tidally influenced systems of San Francisco Bay and the United Kingdom. Dike breaching, culvert replacement, and tide gate replacement all affected channel cross-sectional geometry through changes in the frequency of over-marsh flows. Radiocarbon dating of buried wood provided evidence of changes in sedimentation rates associated with diking, and restoration trajectories may be confounded by historical subsidence behind dikes rendering topographical relationships with water level incomparable to reference conditions. At the same time, buried wood is influencing the development of channel morphology toward characteristics resembling reference conditions. Ecological restoration goals and practices in tidal forested wetland regions of large river floodplains should reflect the interactions of these controlling factors.

  12. The cost of wetland creation and restoration. Final report, [February 12, 1992--April 30, 1994]- Draft

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    King, D.; Costanza, R.

    1994-07-11T23:59:59.000Z

    This report examines the economics of wetland creation, restoration, and enhancement projects, especially as they are used within the context of mitigation for unavoidable wetland losses. Complete engineering-cost-accounting profiles of over 90 wetland projects were developed in collaboration with leading wetland restoration and creation practitioners around the country to develop a primary source database. Data on the costs of over 1,000 wetland projects were gathered from published sources and other available databases to develop a secondary source database. Cases in both databases were carefully analyzed and a set of baseline cost per acre estimates were developed for wetland creation, restoration, and enhancement. Observations of costs varied widely, ranging from $5 per acre to $1.5 million per acre. Differences in cost were related to the target wetland type, and to site-specific and project-specific factors that affected the preconstruction, construction, and post-construction tasks necessary to carry out each particular project. Project-specific and site-specific factors had a much larger effect on project costs than wetland type for non-agricultural projects. Costs of wetland creation and restoration were also shown to differ by region, but not by as much as expected, and in response to the regulatory context. The costs of wetland creation, restoration, and enhancement were also analyzed in a broader economic context through examination of the market for wetland mitigation services, and through the development of a framework for estimating compensation ratios-the number of acres of created, restored, or enhanced wetland required to compensate for an acre of lost natural wetland. The combination of per acre creation, restoration, and enhancement costs and the compensation ratio determine the overall mitigation costs associated with alternative mitigation strategies.

  13. Potential for substitution of geothermal energy at domestic defense installations and White Sands Missile Range

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bakewell, C.A.; Renner, J.L.

    1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Geothermal resources that might provide substitute energy at any of 76 defense installations are identified and evaluated. The geologic characteristics and related economics of potential geothermal resources located at or near the 76 installations were estimated. The geologic assessment identified 18 installations with possible geothermal resources and 4 Atlantic Coastal Plain resource configurations that represented the alternatives available to East Coast bases. These 18 locations and 4 resource configurations, together with 2 possible resources at the White Sands Missile Range and a potential resource at Kings Bay, Georgia, were examined to determine the relative economics of substituting potential geothermal energy for part or all of the existing oil, gas, and electrical energy usage. Four of the military installations - Mountain Home, Norton, Hawthorne, and Sierra - appear to be co-located with possible geothermal resources which, if present, might provide substitute energy at or below current market prices for oil. Six additional locations - Ellsworth, Luke, Williams, Bliss, Fallon, and Twentynine Palms - could become economically attractive under certain conditions. No geothermal resource was found to be economically competitive with natural gas at current controlled prices. Generation of electric power at the locations studied is estimated to be uneconomic at present.

  14. Coastal Change During the 2008 Hurricane Season: An Overview USGS National Assessment of Coastal-Change Hazards

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fleskes, Joe

    Coastal Change During the 2008 Hurricane Season: An Overview USGS National Assessment of Coastal, and then measured, the coastal changes that occurred during the most intense land falling hurricanes of 2008 Village on the North Carolina Outer Banks during Hurricane Isabel in 2003. (See http://coastal.er.usgs.gov/hurricanes

  15. An examination of patterns in coastal management: a content analysis of the Coastal Zone Management Journal

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Evander, Jerri Lynn

    1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    'ected by the growing national 2 demand for coal to accommodate new coal development. As the CZNA and its amendments show, any system of management in the coastal zone must reflect the ecological processes as well as the political and social constraints that occur... anthropocentric viewpoint to a perspective that incorporates ecological considerations as and the extent to which this shift was reflected in coastal studies as revealed through a content analysis of articles in the Coastal Zone Nanagement Journal (CZNJ...

  16. The extraction of bitumen from western tar sands

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Oblad, A.G.; Bunger, J.W.; Hanson, F.V.; Miller, J.D.; Seader, J.D.

    1989-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report represents the work done during the year of May 8, 1987 to June 9, 1988. This year was the first year of a five-year program. The overall objective of the latter is to advance the technologies for recovering bitumen from the tar sands by thermal and water assisted extraction means and upgrading of bitumen to synthetic crude, and conversion of bitumens to specialty products such as asphalt and resins to levels where realistic evaluations of technical and commercial potential can be made. Additionally, it is desired to have the data at a level which is adequate for design of pilot plants of appropriate size deemed necessary for commercial scale-up of the various processes being studied. The main areas for studies covered in this report are modelling and optimization of the hydropyrolysis process for upgrading bitumens, bitumen recovery by pyrolysis of the circle Cliffs tar sands in a fluid bed, pyrolysis of Whiterocks tar sand in a rotary kiln, modelling of the combustor in the coupled fluidized bed with interbed heat transfer using heat pipes, development of superior diluents for use in the water extraction of Utah's tar sands, and fractionation and characterization of the bitumens from Asphalt Ridge and Sunnyside tar sands. 169 refs., 60 figs., 31 tars.

  17. Coastal Public Lands Management Act (Texas)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The coastal public lands of the state are managed in accordance with the following principles: (a) The natural resources of the surface land, including their aesthetic value and their ability to...

  18. Coastal Permit Program Rules (New Jersey)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Coastal Permit Program Rules provide the processes for permit reviews. They include details on what activities need permits; the qualifications for general permits or permits-by-rule; the...

  19. The Yalahau Regional Wetland Survey: Ancient Maya Land Use in Northern Quintana Roo, Mexico

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Leonard, Daniel Ian

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Features in Southern Campeche: New Perspectives on theArchaeological Reconnaissance in Campeche, Quintana Roo, andpatterns in wetlands in Campeche and Belize (see review by

  20. E-Print Network 3.0 - a-01 wetland treatment Sample Search Results

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Inventory for Research and Education Network Collection: Environmental Management and Restoration Technologies 5 Welcome to SWAMP The Stream and Wetland Assessment Management...

  1. E-Print Network 3.0 - assessing wetland functions Sample Search...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Management Park has been completed. In Spring 2009, DUWC undertook nearly 18 months... restoration site at DUWC's Stream and Wetland Assessment and Management Park near West...

  2. Sand pack residual oil saturations as affected by extraction with various solvents

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Murray, Clarence

    1958-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of Water Flood Extraction Test (Sand Packs J, K, L, and N) 8. Results of Water Flood Extraction Test (Sand Pack M) TABLES I. Behavior of Oils Mixed with Various Solvents 18 II. Sand and Sand Pack Properties III. Fluid Properties IV. Results of Water... solvents which do not alter the rock-fluM properties. The present work was performed on sand, packs composed of pure ~ Oica sand to provide wetting properties simflar to natural cores and to provide packs with reproducible characteristics. Fluids studied...

  3. Mitigating avian impacts: Applying the wetlands experience to wind farms

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wolff, B. [Conservation and Renewable Energy System, Vancouver, WA (United States)

    1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) and state environmental laws spawned by NEPA, such as the California Environmental Quality Act (CEQA) and Washington State`s Environmental Policy Act (SEPA) have made us familiar with the concept of {open_quotes}mitigating{close_quotes} a project`s adverse environmental impacts. As wind energy projects expand to state with widely varying environmental regulation, the wind industry can look to other experiences in land use regulation, such as wetlands, for approaches to mitigation. Wetlands have been a point of friction between environmentalists, property rights advocates, local and state governments, and a host of federal agencies. A highly developed conceptual framework to mitigating environmental impacts has risen from this regulatory swamp of conflicting interests and overlapping jurisdictions.

  4. Investigation of guided waves propagation in pipe buried in sand

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Leinov, Eli; Cawley, Peter; Lowe, Michael J.S. [NDE Group, Department of Mechanical Engineering, Imperial College London, London SW7 2AZ (United Kingdom)

    2014-02-18T23:59:59.000Z

    The inspection of pipelines by guided wave testing is a well-established method for the detection of corrosion defects in pipelines, and is currently used routinely in a variety of industries, e.g. petrochemical and energy. When the method is applied to pipes buried in soil, test ranges tend to be significantly compromised because of attenuation of the waves caused by energy radiating into the soil. Moreover, the variability of soil conditions dictates different attenuation characteristics, which in-turn results in different, unpredictable, test ranges. We investigate experimentally the propagation and attenuation characteristics of guided waves in pipes buried in fine sand using a well characterized full scale experimental apparatus. The apparatus consists of an 8 inch-diameter, 5.6-meters long steel pipe embedded over 3 meters of its length in a rectangular container filled with fine sand, and an air-bladder for the application of overburden pressure. Longitudinal and torsional guided waves are excited in the pipe and recorded using a transducer ring (Guided Ultrasonics Ltd). Acoustic properties of the sand are measured independently in-situ and used to make model predictions of wave behavior in the buried pipe. We present the methodology and the systematic measurements of the guided waves under a range of conditions, including loose and compacted sand. It is found that the application of overburden pressure modifies the compaction of the sand and increases the attenuation, and that the measurement of the acoustic properties of sand allows model prediction of the attenuation of guided waves in buried pipes with a high level of confidence.

  5. Case study of a multiple sand waterflood, Hewitt Unit, OK

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ruble, D.B.

    1982-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Twenty-two sands in the Hewitt field have been flooded simultaneously by Exxon Co. U.S.A.'s Hewitt Unit, and a case history of the operations is detailed. A multiple sand waterflood project requires special optimization methods to improve oil recovery. Injection and production surveillance programs and optimization methods used are highlighted. These include injection wellbore design, injection distribution, production stimulation, polymer augmented injection, and infill drilling. Successful application of these techniques has increased ultimate recovery from this waterflood operation. 3 refs.

  6. Operations research applied to a sand and gravel plant

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cordes, Alfred Henry

    1968-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    GRAVEL BIN 2 Gat)6 GRAVE L BIN 4 SCREEN 3 DECK 2 ( GO TO Fig. 2) Figure 1. Diagram of the Primary Gravel Circuit Gate 2 Gate 1 16 ROTARY WASHER ( main circuit) Gate 6 17 SCREEN 3 DECK 1 20 SCREEN 3 DECK 2 28 22 GRAVEL BIN 4 GRA VEL...- veyor is used as a method for dewatering the sand product and elevating the product out of the sand bins and into storage bins for loading. Circuit Gates The gates 1 through 6 are' embedded in the circuits to provide for partial changes of flow...

  7. Behavior of a full scale tieback wall in sand

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chung, Moonkyung

    1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    BEHAVIOR OP A PULL SCALE TIEBACK WALL IN SAND A Thesis by MOONKYUNG CHUNG Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE December 1991 Major... Subject: Civil Engineering BEHAUIOR OF A FULL SCALE TIEBACR WALL IN SAND A Thesis MOONKYUNG CHUNG Approved as to style and content by ean-Louis Briaud hair of Committee) Derek V. Morris (Member) Christo her C. Mathewson (Member) Jam T. P. ao...

  8. Western Gas Sands Project: stratigrapy of the Piceance Basin

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Anderson, S. (comp.)

    1980-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Western Gas Sands Project Core Program was initiated by US DOE to investigate various low permeability, gas bearing sandstones. Research to gain a better geological understanding of these sandstones and improve evaluation and stimulation techniques is being conducted. Tight gas sands are located in several mid-continent and western basins. This report deals with the Piceance Basin in northwestern Colorado. This discussion is an attempt to provide a general overview of the Piceance Basin stratigraphy and to be a useful reference of stratigraphic units and accompanying descriptions.

  9. SAND96-2345 Distribution Unlimited Release Category UC-261

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What's PossibleRadiation Protection TechnicalResonantNovember11-3779SAND88-1807 * UC-2613 SAND96-2345

  10. Under the Boardwalk – Case History – St. John’s Sideroad at the McKenzie Wetland, Aurora, Ontario, Canada

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Buchanan, Ian D.

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    is located in the Town of Aurora, Ontario, Canada and liesWetland (also known as Aurora Wetland or McKenzie Marsh), anwith a connection to the Aurora Pumping Station. This $20

  11. Subsurface flow constructed wetland: treatment of domestic wastewater by gravel and tire chip media and ultraviolet disinfection of effluent

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Richmond, Amanda Yvette

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Subsurface flow constructed wetlands (SFCWs) are becoming increasingly common in on-site treatment of wastewater. Gravel is the most popular form of wetland fill medium, but tire chips provide more porosity, are less dense, and cheaper. Before...

  12. Coastal Dynamics 2013 COASTAL INLET NAVIGATION RESEARCH IN THE U.S. ARMY CORPS OF ENGINEERS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    US Army Corps of Engineers

    of sediment was dredged at a cost of $1,322 Million. Of this total, roughly 84% was for channel maintenance manages over 40,000 km of coastal and inland navigation channels, dredging 174 Million cubic meters of sediment costing $1,322 Million in 2011. The Coastal Inlets Research Program (CIRP) advances the state

  13. Assessment of the geothermal/geopressure potential of the Gulf Coastal Plan of Alabama. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wilson, G.V.; Wang, G.C.; Mancini, E.A.; Benson, D.J.

    1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Geothermal and geopressure as well as geologic and geophysical data were studied to evaluate the potential for future development of geothermal resources underlying the Alabama Coastal Plain. Wire-line log data compiled and interpreted from more than 1300 oil and gas test wells included maximum recorded temperatures, mud weights, rock resistivities as related to geopressure, formation tops, fault locations, and depths to basement rock. The Alabama Coastal Plain area is underlain by a conduction dominated, deep sedimentary basin where geothermal gradients are low to moderate (1.0 to 1.8/sup 0/F/100 feet). In some areas of southwest Alabama, abnormally high temperatures are found in association with geopressured zones within the Haynesville Formation of Jurassic age; however, rocks of poor reservoir quality dominate this formation, with the exception of a 200-square-mile area centered in southernmost Clarke County where a porous and permeable sand unit is encased within massive salt deposits of the lower Haynesville. The results of a petrograhic study of the Smackover Formation, which underlies the Haynesville, indicate that this carbonate rock unit has sufficient porosity in some areas to be considered a potential geothermal reservoir. Future development of geothermal resources in south Alabama will be restricted to low or moderate temperature, non-electric applications, which constitute a significant potential energy source for applications in space heating and cooling and certain agricultural and industrial processes.

  14. Diversity and function from the ground up : microbial mediation of wetland plant structure and ecosystem function via nitrogen fixation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Moseman, Serena Maria

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of global warming, most coasts may experience sea level riseglobal warming lowers effective wetland elevations beneath rising sea levels.

  15. Diversity and function from the ground up : Microbial mediation of wetland plant structure and ecosystem function via nitrogen fixation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Moseman, Serena M

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of global warming, most coasts may experience sea level riseglobal warming lowers effective wetland elevations beneath rising sea levels.

  16. The Influence of Coastal Wetlands on Hurricane Surge and Damage with Application to Planning under Climate Change

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ferreira, Celso

    2012-10-19T23:59:59.000Z

    Surge" is designed to store geospatial information for hurricane storm surge modeling and GIS tools are designed to integrate the high performance computing (HPC) input and output files to GIS; pre-process geospatial data and post-process model results, thereby...

  17. Use of remote sensing to link watershed land use change and wetland vegetation response in a California coastal watershed

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kelly, N. Maggi; Byrd, Kristin B

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    bare soil (including mudflat), pickleweed (Salicorniaimages, only pickleweed and mudflat areas were classified.1971 and 1931 images, the mudflat/pickleweed boundary was

  18. Acoustic emission and compaction creep of quartz sand at subcritical stress

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lenz, Steven Christopher

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    -assisted mechanisms. We have investigated the role of cracking during creep compaction of quartz sand by monitoring acoustic emissions (AE). Experiments on water saturated St. Peter quartz sand packs (255 ± 60 []m grain size, initial porosity ~32%) and quartz powder...

  19. Hot alkaline treatment to stimulate and consolidate the heavy oil Bachaquero-01 sand

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Valera Villarroel, Cesar Amabilis

    2005-02-17T23:59:59.000Z

    An experimental study was conducted to verify experimentally whether sand consolidation by high-temperature alkaline treatment was possible in the heavy oil Bachaquero-01 reservoir. The experiments were conducted using sand samples from a core taken...

  20. Solvent and water/surfactant process for removal of bitumen from tar sands contaminated with clay

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Guymon, E.P.

    1990-11-06T23:59:59.000Z

    This patent describes a process for removing bitumen from a tar sand contaminated with clay. It comprises: obtaining a tar sand consisting of bitumen and clay mixed with sand; introducing the tar sand into a stripper vessel; dissolving the bitumen with a solvent, the solvent also removing the clay from the sand into a liquid medium formed with the solvent and bitumen; removing the liquid medium from the sand; and washing the sand with water to which a nonionic surface active agent has been added to remove residual bitumen from the sand, the surfactive agent comprising a linear alcohol having carbon atoms within the range on the order of about eight to fifteen carbon atoms and ethoxylate units on the carbon atoms within the range on the order of about two to eight ethoxylate units, the surfactant being present in the water in an effective amount less than about 0.5 percent by volume.

  1. Air quality over the Canadian oil sands: A first assessment using satellite observations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boersma, Folkert

    to as "oil sands" (or "tar sands")­ are located in the Canadian province of Alberta (see Figure 1a). The oil development and operations [e.g., Kelly et al., 2010], including air quality and acid deposition. Combustion

  2. Air Quality Impact Study for UMore Park Sand and Gravel Resources

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Netoff, Theoden

    Air Quality Impact Study for UMore Park Sand and Gravel Resources University of Minnesota Rosemount Elliott Hendrickson Inc. Air Quality Impact Study for UMore Park Sand and Gravel Resources UOFMN 103496 ...........................................................................3 2.8 Air Emissions

  3. In situ recovery of oil from Utah tar sand: a summary of tar sand research at the Laramie Energy Technology Center

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Marchant, L.C.; Westhoff, J.D.

    1985-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report describes work done by the United States Department of Energy's Laramie Energy Technology Center from 1971 through 1982 to develop technology for future recovery of oil from US tar sands. Work was concentrated on major US tar sand deposits that are found in Utah. Major objectives of the program were as follows: determine the feasibility of in situ recovery methods applied to tar sand deposits; and establish a system for classifying tar sand deposits relative to those characteristics that would affect the design and operation of various in situ recovery processes. Contents of this report include: (1) characterization of Utah tar sand; (2) laboratory extraction studies relative to Utah tar sand in situ methods; (3) geological site evaluation; (4) environmental assessments and water availability; (5) reverse combustion field experiment, TS-1C; (6) a reverse combustion followed by forward combustion field experiment, TS-2C; (7) tar sand permeability enhancement studies; (8) two-well steam injection experiment; (9) in situ steam-flood experiment, TS-1S; (10) design of a tar sand field experiment for air-stream co-injection, TS-4; (11) wastewater treatment and oil analyses; (12) economic evaluation of an in situ tar sand recovery process; and (13) appendix I (extraction studies involving Utah tar sands, surface methods). 70 figs., 68 tabs.

  4. USE OF NITROGEN BUDGETS AND N2 FLUX MEASUREMENTS TO ESTIMATE THE ROLE OF DENITRIFICATION IN BROWNFIELD STORMWATER WETLANDS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hall, Sharon J.

    IN BROWNFIELD STORMWATER WETLANDS Monica M. Palta 1, Peter Groffman2, Stuart Findlay2 1 School of Life Sciences in inorganic nitrogen cycling and removal in urban brownfield wetlands INTRODUCTION · Urban areas are net BROWNFIELD SITES SUPPORTING SEMI-PERMANENTLY FLOODED WETLANDS. White outlines delineate low-lying semi

  5. Contrasting wetland CH4 emission responses to simulated glacial atmospheric CO2 in temperate bogs and fens

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gauci, Vincent

    Contrasting wetland CH4 emission responses to simulated glacial atmospheric CO2 in temperate bogs, glacial, Last Glacial Maximum (LGM), methane (CH4), peatland, wetland. Summary · Wetlands were the largest (n = 8 per treatment) and measured gaseous CH4 flux, pore water dissolved CH4 and volatile fatty acid

  6. Observations of short-circuiting flow paths within a free-surface wetland in Augusta, Georgia, U.S.A.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Licciardi, Joseph M.

    constructed treatment wetland in Augusta, Georgia were used to quantify the size, distribution, velocity). In treatment wetlands, such heterogeneity nearly always results in reduced contaminant removal (WoObservations of short-circuiting flow paths within a free-surface wetland in Augusta, Georgia, U

  7. Depositional environment of the "stringer sand" member, Lower Tuscaloosa Formation (Cretaceous), Mallalieu field, Mississippi 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cook, Billy Charles

    1968-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    with the lower Unit being subdivided into an upper "sand and shale section" a middle "marine section", and a lower "massive sand section". The Mississippi Geological Society (1957) subdivided the subsurface Tuscaloosa Group into the Upper, Marine, and Lower...) described the Lower Tuscaloosa Formation of southern Mississippi as a unit of "rapidly alternating sands and shales of shallow marine origin, overlying a nearly unbroken sand sec- tion of still shallower marine or continental origin". Braunstein ai. so...

  8. The application of triaxial compression tests to the design of sand-asphalt paving mixtures 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ritter, Leo J

    1940-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of Changes in Sand. Orading upon the JLngle of Internal Friction III. Effect of the Initial Void Ratio upon ths ' ingle of Internal friction (Pine Sand. ) . . . . . . . Page 31 35 IV. Xffect oi Dust on the Angle of Internal Jriction in Sand Nixes... after Failure . . , 24 S. Nffsct of Changes in Sand. Grading on the Angle of Internal Friction . . . . . . '. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 32 Relation between ths Angle of Internal Friction ank Initial Yolk Ratio (Fine Sank...

  9. COSTS MODELS IN DESIGN AND MANUFACTURING OF SAND CASTING PRODUCTS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    COSTS MODELS IN DESIGN AND MANUFACTURING OF SAND CASTING PRODUCTS Nicolas PERRY Ass. Prof., IRCCy.Bernard@irccyn.ec-nantes.fr Abstract: In the early phases of the product life cycle, the costs controls became a major decision tool difficulties, we will present an approach using a concept of cost entity related to the design and realization

  10. forControl,DynamicalSyste sandComputation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Akhmedov, Azer

    "Optimization and Control Theory for Smart (Power) Grids" ESB 1001 April 2 Mustafa Khammash, UCSB 3:00 PM John Lygeros, ETH Zurich 11:00 AM "Stochastic Model Predictive Control: Tractability and HFH 4164Center forControl,DynamicalSyste m sandComputation CC DC Coordinator: Prof. Mustafa Khammash

  11. SAND AND GRAVEL MINING IN COLORADO RIPARIAN HABITATS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Reclamation Specialist Colorado Division of Mined Land Reclamation 723 Centennial Building 1313 Sherman Reclamation Board (MLRB) administers the Colo rado Mined Land Reclamation Act of 1976. This law requires types of mining including sand and gravel mining. The Mined Land Reclamation Division (MLRD

  12. Noise Impact Study for UMore Park Sand and Gravel Resources

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Netoff, Theoden

    the sand and gravel mining operation. Mineral extraction is proposed on approximately 1,722 acres of land/landfill lining, clearing and grubbing, mineral extraction, material transporting, material processing including materials to and from the proposed extraction site, importation of non toxic compactable material

  13. Numerical and analytical modeling of sanding onset prediction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yi, Xianjie

    2004-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    results vary with the selection of one or another rock strength criterion. In this work, we present four commonly used rock strength criteria in sanding onset prediction and wellbore stability studies: Mohr-Coulomb, Hoek-Brown, Drucker-Prager, and Modified...

  14. SAND2003-8146C Symposium on Thin Films

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Volinsky, Alex A.

    SAND2003-8146C Symposium on Thin Films ICM-9 9th International Conference on the Mechanical FRACTURE OF THIN GOLD FILMS N. R. Moody, D. P. Adams*, M. J. Cordill**, D. F. Bahr**, A. A. Volinsky of interfacial fracture energies of thin gold films as a function of film thickness is presented in this paper

  15. Solvent extraction process for recovering bitumen from tar sand

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hsieh, C.R.; Clifford, R.K.

    1987-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

    This patent describes a process for recovering bitumen from tar sand which comprises: (a) preparing a mixture containing divided tar sand and an organic solvent the ratio of the solvent to the bitumen in the tar sand is at least 2 parts solvent to 1 part bitumen form a bitument/solvent phase with a viscosity low enough to facilitate the physical separation of a significant portion of the bitumen/solvent phase from the mineral matrix of the tar sand; (b) separating by physical means at least a portion of the bitumen/solvent phase from the mineral matrix; (c) mixing the separated mineral matrix of step (b) with additional solvent in a washing stage to recover bitumen remaining with the mineral matrix; (d) introducing the recovered solvent/bitumen mixture from wash step (c) back into step (a); (e) recovering organic solvent from the mineral matrix of step (c) using an aqueous/organic solvent froth flotation phase separation where the majority of the mineral matrix remains with the aqueous phase; (f) recycling the solvent recovered from the phase separation of step (e) back to the washing step of (c); (g) separating bitumen from the bitumen/solvent phase of step (b); and (h) returning solvent collected from step (g) back to step (a).

  16. SANDIA REPORT SAND95-8224 " UC-406

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    SANDIA REPORT SAND95-8224 " UC-406 Unlimited Release k Printed April 1995 Optimal Control of a CVD of Energy by Sandia Corporation. NOTICE This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored or subcontractors. This report has been reproduced from the best available copy. Available to DOE and DOE

  17. SANDIA REPORT SAND95-8223 q UC-404

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    by coupling the OPT++ optimization library to the TAC02D finite element heat transfer code. The optimizationSANDIA REPORT SAND95-8223 q UC-404 Unlimited Release Printed April 1995 , . Optimal Heat Transfer UC-404 Optimal Heat Transfer Design of Chemical Vapor Deposition Reactors Christopher D. Moen

  18. SAND962331 Distribution Unlimited Release Category UC405

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Devine, Karen

    This manual describes the use of MPSalsa, an unstructured finite element (FE) code for solving chemically, heat transfer, mass transfer, and detailed reactions. In addition, considerable effort has been madeSAND96­2331 Distribution Unlimited Release Category UC­405 Printed September 1996 MPSalsa A FINITE

  19. The Influence of Microtopography on Soil Nutrients in Created Mitigation Wetlands

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    in Virginia, and examining the effects of disking during wetland creation. Replicate multiscale tangentially-extractable NH4­N and NO3­N, and Mehlich-3 extractable P, Ca, Mg, K, Al, Fe, and Mn. Means and variances of soil and Fe, lower Mn than cre- ated wetlands, and comparatively high variability in nutri- ent concentrations

  20. Constructed Wetlands Research Group meeting Forth Suite, SEPA Riccarton Office, Edinburgh EH14 4AP

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Heal, Kate

    , to address diffuse pollution (particularly hydrocarbons) associated with the nearby Brucefield Industry Park1 Minutes of Constructed Wetlands Research Group meeting Forth Suite, SEPA Riccarton Office. It was set up several years ago, particularly to support the implementation of constructed farm wetlands

  1. MINERALOGY AND GENESIS OF SMECTITES IN AN ALKALINE-SALINE ENVIRONMENT OF PANTANAL WETLAND, BRAZIL

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ahmad, Sajjad

    MINERALOGY AND GENESIS OF SMECTITES IN AN ALKALINE-SALINE ENVIRONMENT OF PANTANAL WETLAND, BRAZIL, Universidade de Sa~o Paulo (USP), Av. Prof. Dr. Lineu Prestes, 338, 05508-900, Sa~o Paulo, Brazil 2 Soil-saline lake of Nhecola^ndia, a sub-region of the Pantanal wetland, Brazil, and then to identify the mechanisms

  2. Characterizing hydraulic properties of filter material of a Vertical Flow1 Constructed Wetland2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Characterizing hydraulic properties of filter material of a Vertical Flow1 Constructed Wetland2 A Characterizing the hydraulic properties of filter material used in a vertical flow11 constructed wetland (VFCW of porous mineral material and13 organic matter that makes hydraulic characterization a difficult task. Here

  3. REUSE AND RECYCLE OF BIO-RESIDUE (PERCOLATE) FROM CONSTRUCTED WETLAND TREATING SEPTAGE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Richner, Heinz

    REUSE AND RECYCLE OF BIO-RESIDUE (PERCOLATE) FROM CONSTRUCTED WETLAND TREATING SEPTAGE by Sukon of percolate from constructed wetland (CW) treating septage in agricultural application with the specific focus CW treating septage could exhibit positive responses of the plant growth which increase seed yield

  4. Ecological outcomes and evaluation of success in passively restored southeastern depressional wetlands.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    De Steven, Diane; Sharitz, Rebecca R.; Barton, Christopher, D.

    2010-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Abstract: Depressional wetlands may be restored passively by disrupting prior drainage to recover original hydrology and relying on natural revegetation. Restored hydrology selects for wetland vegetation; however, depression geomorphology constrains the achievable hydroperiod, and plant communities are influenced by hydroperiod and available species pools. Such constraints can complicate assessments of restoration success. Sixteen drained depressions in South Carolina, USA, were restored experimentally by forest clearing and ditch plugging for potential crediting to a mitigation bank. Depressions were assigned to alternate revegetation methods representing desired targets of herbaceous and wet-forest communities. After five years, restoration progress and revegetation methods were evaluated. Restored hydroperiods differed among wetlands, but all sites developed diverse vegetation of native wetland species. Vegetation traits were influenced by hydroperiod and the effects of early drought, rather than by revegetation method. For mitigation banking, individual wetlands were assessed for improvement from pre-restoration condition and similarity to assigned reference type. Most wetlands met goals to increase hydroperiod, herb-species dominance, and wetland-plant composition. Fewer wetlands achieved equivalence to reference types because some vegetation targets were incompatible with depression hydroperiods and improbable without intensive management. The results illustrated a paradox in judging success when vegetation goals may be unsuited to system constraints.

  5. Growing season methyl bromide and methyl chloride fluxes at a sub-arctic wetland in Sweden 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hardacre, Catherine J.; Blei, Emanuel; Heal, Mathew R

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Methyl bromide and methyl chloride fluxes were measured at several sites in a sub-arctic wetland near Abisko, Sweden (68°28?N 18°49?E) throughout the 2008 growing season. Averaged over 92 flux measurements the sub-arctic wetland was found to be a...

  6. CONSTRUCTED FARM WETLANDS (CFWs) FOR REMEDIATION OF FARMYARD RUNOFF: WATER TREATMENT EFFICIENCY, ECOLOGICAL

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    CONSTRUCTED FARM WETLANDS (CFWs) FOR REMEDIATION OF FARMYARD RUNOFF: WATER TREATMENT EFFICIENCY, Aberdeen, AB15 8QH, UK E-mail: fabrice.gouriveau@ed.ac.uk Summary: This research evaluates the treatment efficiency, ecological value and cost-effectiveness of two Scottish Constructed Farm Wetlands (CFW 1 & 2

  7. Implementing Per Bak's Sand Pile Model as a Two-Dimensional Cellular Automaton

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tesfatsion, Leigh

    Implementing Per Bak's Sand Pile Model as a Two-Dimensional Cellular Automaton Leigh Tesfatsion 21 January 2009 Econ 308 Presentation Outline · Brief review: What is a Cellular Automaton? · Sand piles and "self-organized criticality" · Algorithmic description of Per Bak's sand pile model as a two

  8. Geochemical Evidence for an Eolian Sand Dam across the North and South Platte Rivers in Nebraska

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Loope, David B.

    Geochemical Evidence for an Eolian Sand Dam across the North and South Platte Rivers in Nebraska that the Nebraska Sand Hills once migrated across the North and South Platte rivers and dammed the largest tributary of the South Platte River, have compositions intermediate between the Nebraska Sand Hills (quartz

  9. The extraction of bitumen from western oil sands. Final report, July 1989--September 1993

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Oblad, A.G.; Bunger, J.W.; Dahlstrom, D.A.; Deo, M.D.; Fletcher, J.V.; Hanson, F.V.; Miller, J.D.; Seader, J.D.

    1994-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Research and development of surface extraction and upgrading processes of western tar sands are described. Research areas included modified hot water, fluidized bed, and rotary kiln pyrolysis of tar sands for extraction of bitumen. Bitumen upgrading included solvent extraction of bitumen, and catalytic hydrotreating of bitumen. Characterization of Utah tar sand deposits is also included.

  10. CO2 Mitigation Costs for Canada and the Alberta Oil Sands Justin David Anderson

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    climate change and climate change regulation are heterogeneous. Canada, and her oil sands industry-Kyoto targets put forward by the opposition are predicted by the model. Oil sands upgrading/refining experiencesCO2 Mitigation Costs for Canada and the Alberta Oil Sands By Justin David Anderson Bachelor

  11. Rain splash of dry sand revealed by high-speed imaging and sticky paper splash targets

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rain splash of dry sand revealed by high-speed imaging and sticky paper splash targets David Jon by raindrop impacts. We use high-speed imaging of drop impacts on dry sand to describe the drop (2007), Rain splash of dry sand revealed by high-speed imaging and sticky paper splash targets, J

  12. Abnormally High Ammonium of Natural Origin in a Coastal

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jiao, Jiu Jimmy

    quality impacts such as eutrophication of lakes and coastal zones. This nitrogen enrichment is commonly and eutrophication in coastal areas. This nitrogen enrichment has been commonly attributed to anthropogenic sources

  13. Potential Oil Production from the Coastal Plain of the Arctic...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Potential Oil Production from the Coastal Plain of the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge: Updated Assessment 3. Summary The 1.5 million-acre coastal plain of the 19 million-acre...

  14. Mechanisms of metal release from contaminated coastal sediments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kalnejais, Linda H

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The fate of trace metals in contaminated coastal sediments is poorly understood, yet critical for effective coastal management. The aim of this thesis is to investigate and quantify the mechanisms leading to the release ...

  15. Wetland Flow and Salinity Budgets and Elements of a Decision Support System toward Implementation of Real-Time Seasonal Wetland Salinity Management

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Quinn, N.W.T.

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    System  for  Real-­?Time  Management  of  Water  Quality  Management  of  hydrologic  systems  for  water  quality  system  development  for  seasonal  wetland  salt   management  in  a  river  basin  subjected  to  water  quality  

  16. Picture this...you are on a tour of wetlands. Let's make it a southeastern wetland tour, since the ecology lab where I work and conduct my research

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Georgia, University of

    , perhaps only a few square miles, one is apt to find wetlands that fall all along this hydroperiod that are "good" for bullfrogs are not suitable for spadefoot toads, and a marbled salamander would only be caught

  17. Adaptively Addressing Uncertainty in Estuarine and Near Coastal Restoration Projects

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thom, Ronald M.; Williams, Greg D.; Borde, Amy B.; Southard, John A.; Sargeant, Susan L.; Woodruff, Dana L.; Laufle, Jeffrey C.; Glasoe, Stuart

    2005-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Restoration projects have an uncertain outcome because of a lack of information about current site conditions, historical disturbance levels, effects of landscape alterations on site development, unpredictable trajectories or patterns of ecosystem structural development, and many other factors. A poor understanding of the factors that control the development and dynamics of a system, such as hydrology, salinity, wave energies, can also lead to an unintended outcome. Finally, lack of experience in restoring certain types of systems (e.g., rare or very fragile habitats) or systems in highly modified situations (e.g., highly urbanized estuaries) makes project outcomes uncertain. Because of these uncertainties, project costs can rise dramatically in an attempt to come closer to project goals. All of the potential sources of error can be addressed to a certain degree through adaptive management. The first step is admitting that these uncertainties can exist, and addressing as many of the uncertainties with planning and directed research prior to implementing the project. The second step is to evaluate uncertainties through hypothesis-driven experiments during project implementation. The third step is to use the monitoring program to evaluate and adjust the project as needed to improve the probability of the project to reach is goal. The fourth and final step is to use the information gained in the project to improve future projects. A framework that includes a clear goal statement, a conceptual model, and an evaluation framework can help in this adaptive restoration process. Projects and programs vary in their application of adaptive management in restoration, and it is very difficult to be highly prescriptive in applying adaptive management to projects that necessarily vary widely in scope, goal, ecosystem characteristics, and uncertainties. Very large ecosystem restoration programs in the Mississippi River delta (Coastal Wetlands Planning, Protection, and Restoration Act; CWPPRA) have incorporated very specific and detailed elements in a more active adaptive management effort. In Puget Sound, the Puget Sound Action Team uses site-specific case studies, monitoring, and public involvement to direct actions to reduce microbial contamination of harvestable shellfish. Small-scale projects can also be improved through application of adaptive management. For example, directed research and site assessments resulted in successful restoration of seagrasses near a ferry terminal in Puget Sound. It is recommended that all restoration programs be conducted in an adaptive management framework, and where appropriate, a more active adaptive management approach be applied. The net effect should be less uncertainty, improved project success, advancement of the science of restoration, and cost savings.

  18. Coastal Septic Systems and Submarine Groundwater Discharge: A Case Study

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    de Sieyes, Nicholas R.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Port, Coastal and Ocean Engineering. 128: 1-11. Philipstorms. China Ocean Engineering 18: 423-431. Libelo, E. L. ,

  19. Daniel T. Cox Professor, Coastal and Ocean Engineering Program

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Haller, Merrick

    Daniel T. Cox Professor, Coastal and Ocean Engineering Program 202 Owen Hall School of Civil Reviewer: Applied Geography; Applied Ocean Research; Coastal Engineering; Coastal Engineering Journal of Engineering Mechanics; Journal of Geophysical Research ­ Ocean, Journal of Geophysical Research ­ Earth

  20. ORIGINAL ARTICLE Determining air permeability in reclaimed coastal land

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhan, Hongbin

    Springer-Verlag 2011 Abstract Coastal land reclamation is a common practice in many regions around Tidal fluctuations Á Type curves Á Water table variation Introduction Coastal land reclamation in these regions and countries are from the coastal land reclamation (Plant et al. 1998; Lee 2010). The reclaimed

  1. Interactive coastal oil spill transport model 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thalasila, Nanda K.

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    INTERACTIVE COASTAL OIL SPILL TRANSPORT MODEL A Thesis by NANDA K. THALASILA Submitted to the OIIice of Graduate Studies of Texas A8zM University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE May 1992 Major... Subject: Civil Engineering INTERACTIVE COASTAL OIL SPILL TRANSPORT MODEL A Thesis by NANDA K. THALASILA Approved a, s to style and content by: Roy W. Harm Chair of C mittee) Richard A. artzman (Member) om D. olds (Member) Dr Jame T P. Yao...

  2. Coastal Energy Ltd | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnual Siteof EnergyInnovationin UrbanCity ofCityCleanInformationCommunityCoastalCoastal

  3. An assessment of potential hydrologic and ecologic impacts of constructing mitigation wetlands, Rifle, Colorado, UMTRA project sites

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1995-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This-assessment examines the consequences and risks that could result from the proposed construction of mitigation wetlands at the New and Old Rifle Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project sites near Rifle, Colorado. Remediation of surface contamination at those sites is now under way. Preexisting wetlands at or near the Old and New Rifle sites have been cleaned up, resulting in the loss of 0.7 and 10.5 wetland acres (ac) (0.28 and 4.2 hectares [ha]) respectively. Another 9.9 ac (4.0 ha) of wetlands are in the area of windblown contamination west of the New Rifle site. The US Army Corps of Engineers (USACE) has jurisdiction over the remediated wetlands. Before remedial action began, and before any wetlands were eliminated, the USACE issued a Section 404 Permit that included a mitigation plan for the wetlands to be lost. The mitigation plan calls for 34.2 ac (1 3.8 ha) of wetlands to be constructed at the south end and to the west of the New Rifle site. The mitigation wetlands would be constructed over and in the contaminated alluvial aquifer at the New Rifle site. As a result of the hydrologic characteristics of this aquifer, contaminated ground water would be expected to enter the environment through the proposed wetlands. A preliminary assessment was therefore required to assess any potential ecological risks associated with constructing the mitigation wetlands at the proposed location.

  4. The extraction of bitumen from western oil sands. Quarterly report, April--June 1993

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Oblad, A.G.; Bunger, J.W.; Deo, M.D.; Fletcher, J.V.; Hanson, F.V.; Miller, J.D.; Seader, J.D.

    1993-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Accomplishments are briefly described for the following tasks: environmental impact statement; coupled fluidized bed bitumen recovery and coked sand combustion; water-based recovery of bitumen; rotary kiln process for recovery of bitumen and combustion of coke sand; recovery of bitumen from oil sands using fluidized bed reactors and combustion of spent sands in transport reactors; recovery of bitumen from oil sand and upgrading of bitumen by solvent extraction; catalytic and thermal upgrading of bitumens and bitumen-derived liquids; evaluation of Utah`s major oil sand deposits for the production of asphalt, high energy jet fuels and other specialty products; development of mathematical models for bitumen recovery and processing; completion of the cost examination study of the pilot plant restoration; development studies of equipment for three-product gravity separation of bitumen and sand; determine thickener requirements; and environmental studies of the North Salt Lake pilot plant rehabilitation and eventual operation and those environmental problems associated with eventual commercial products.

  5. U.S./EUROPEAN PARTNERSHIPS IN COASTAL ATLASES AND COASTAL/OCEAN INFORMATICS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wright, Dawn Jeannine

    of coastal and ocean data and information), little has been done to take stock of the implications of these efforts or to identify best practices in terms of taking lessons learned into consideration (including

  6. Shredded tires and rubber-sand as lightweight backfill

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lee, J.H.; Salgado, R.; Lovell, C.W. [Purdue Univ., West Lafayette, IN (United States). School of Civil Engineering] [Purdue Univ., West Lafayette, IN (United States). School of Civil Engineering; Bernal, A. [GeoHidra, Caracas (Venezuela)] [GeoHidra, Caracas (Venezuela)

    1999-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The growing interest in utilizing waste materials in civil engineering applications has opened the possibility of constructing reinforced soil structures with unconventional backfills. Scrap tires are a high-profile waste material for which several uses have been studied, including the use of shredded tires as backfill. A triaxial testing program was conducted to investigate the stress-strain relationship and strength of tire chips and a mixture of sand and tire chips. The test results and additional information from the literature were used in the numerical modeling of wall backfills, both unreinforced and reinforced with geosynthetics. The numerical modeling results suggest tire shreds, particularly when mixed with sand, may be effectively used as a backfill.

  7. Simultaneous upgrading of tar sand bitumen and coal by corefining

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hsich, C.R.; Donaldson, W.I.

    1988-08-16T23:59:59.000Z

    A continuous process is described for simultaneously corefining a mixture of comminuted coal and tar sand bitumen to form a liquid refinery feed stock, having improved hydrocarbon content and viscosity and reduced organo-metallic and metal components, which process comprises: (a) combining bitumen substantially separated from tar sands with comminuted raw coal at a coal to liquid weight ratio of from about 1:2 to about 1 to 50 to form a slurry mixture; (b) subjecting the slurry mixture resulting from step (a) to hydrocracking conditions in the absence of added catalyst to produce off-gases and a mixture of co-refined bitumen and coal liquid and coal ash residues; and (c) recovering the corefined improve coal-bitumen liquid as a refinery feedstock.

  8. Wetland Plant Guide for Assessing Habitat Impacts of Real-Time Salinity Management

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Quinn, Nigel W.T.; Feldmann, Sara A.

    2004-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

    This wetland plant guide was developed to aid moist soil plant identification and to assist in the mapping of waterfowl and shorebird habitat in the Grassland Water District and surrounding wetland areas. The motivation for this habitat mapping project was a concern that real-time salinity management of wetland drainage might have long-term consequences for wildfowl habitat health--changes in wetland drawdown schedules might, over the long term, lead to increased soil salinity and other conditions unfavorable to propagation of the most desirable moist soil plants. Hence, the implementation of a program to monitor annual changes in the most common moist soil plants might serve as an index of habitat health and sustainability. Our review of the current scientific and popular literature failed to identify a good, comprehensive field guide that could be used to calibrate and verify high resolution remote sensing imagery, that we had started to use to develop maps of wetland moist soil plants in the Grassland Water District. Since completing the guide it has been used to conduct ground truthing field surveys using the California Native Plant Society methodology in 2004. Results of this survey and a previous wetland plant survey in 2003 are published in a companion LBNL publication summarizing 4 years of fieldwork to advance the science of real-time wetland salinity management.

  9. A preliminary survey of the National Wetlands Inventory as mapped for the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hampton, N.L.; Rope, R.C.; Glennon, J.M.; Moor, K.S.

    1995-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Approximately 135 areas within the boundaries of the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) have been mapped as wetland habitat as part of the United States Fish and Wildlife Service (FWS) National Wetlands Inventory (NWI). A preliminary survey of these wetlands was conducted to examine their general characteristics and status, to provide an estimation of relative ecological importance, to identify additional information needed to complete ecological characterization of important INEL wetlands, and to identify high priority wetland areas on the INEL. The purpose of the survey was to provide information to support the preparation of the Environmental Restoration and Waste Management (ER&WM) Environmental Impact Statement (EIS). Information characterizing general vegetation, hydrology, wildlife use, and archaeology was collected at 105 sample sites on the INEL. Sites representing NWI palustrine, lacustrine, and riverine wetlands (including manmade), and areas unmapped or unclassified by the NWI were included in the sample. The field information was used to develop a preliminary ranking of relative ecological importance for each wetland visited during this survey. Survey limitations are identified.

  10. UNDERSTANDING ENTRAINMENT AT COASTAL POWER PLANTS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    UNDERSTANDING ENTRAINMENT AT COASTAL POWER PLANTS: INFORMING A PROGRAM TO STUDY Landing Power Plant (at center). Image from the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Digital Visual Library. #12; #12;i Acknowledgments The authors would like to thank many people who assisted with locating

  11. Technical Report 20061 COASTAL HABITATS IN

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Technical Report 2006­1 COASTAL HABITATS IN PUGET SOUND: A Research Plan in Support of the Puget Sound Nearshore Partnership Prepared in support of the Puget Sound Nearshore Partnership November 2006 Logsdon, University of Washington Doug Myers, Puget Sound Action Team Jan Newton, University of Washington

  12. The Maine Coastal Current: Spring Climatological Circulation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    on the Coastal Current. The nested calculations also expose finer structure due to river sources, heat flux, river discharges) and remote (Gulf­scale) forcing are examined. Tidal rectification in the Eastern Gulf; otherwise unreal­ istic exchanges with the Gulf occur. An approximate division of local and remote dynamical

  13. SAND 2009-0463P DAKOTA 101DAKOTA 101

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    SAND 2009-0463P DAKOTA 101DAKOTA 101 C lib tiCalibration http://www.cs.sandia.gov/dakota Learning: osborne1 analytic test problem, with i = 1,...,33: i ii dxsdxsdxsxrxrxf 1 )( 2 )()( 2 )()( 2 (more coming soon) 4 #12;Example Data Set (osborne1)Example Data Set (osborne1) 1 2 1 1.2 0.8 0 4 0

  14. EA-1978: Sand Creek Winds, McCone County, Montana

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Western Area Power Administration (Western) is preparing an EA to analyze the potential environmental impacts of the proposed Sand Creek Winds Project, a 75-MW wind farm between the towns of Circle and Wolf Point in McCone County, Montana. The proposed wind farm would interconnect to Western’s existing Wolf Point to Circle 115-kV transmission line approximately 18 miles north of Wolf Point.

  15. An experimental investigation of sand transport in inclined eccentric annuli

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McClellan, John Christopher

    1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of Ihoyo and Tomren mentioned above. Also noted was the effect of a cuttings bed sliding, in inclinations up to the 60-degree range, after circulation was stopped. Other researchers have also noted this effect and the incipient dangers to drilling... suspension, heterogeneous suspension, saltation, clusters, dunes, continuous moving beds, and stationary beds. Similar to the author's research, they used sand particles continuously circulated at a set concentration. In their conclusions they state: 1...

  16. Heat transfer and oil displacement models for tar sands reservoirs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ward, C.E.; Ward, G.D.

    1984-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A convective heat transfer model and one dimensional displacement model applicable to tar sands and heavy oils for use with a microcomputer are presented. The convective heat transfer model describes the temperature profiles in a thermal operation. The displacement model offers insight into the effect of process variables on the steam/oil or air/oil ratio of thermal operations. A method is presented for predicting the fuel burn in a fireflood.

  17. Geochemical and physical properties of wetland soils at the Savannah River site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dixon, K.L; Rogers, V.A.; Conner, S.P.; Cummings, C.L.; Gladden, J.B.; Weber, J.M.

    1996-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Savannah River Site (SRS), located in Aiken, Allendale, and Barnwell Counties, South Carolina, is a nuclear production facility operated for the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) by Westinghouse Savannah River Company (WSRC). To facilitate future human health and ecological risk assessments, treatability studies, remedial investigations, and feasibility studies for its wetland areas, SRS needs a database of background geochemical and physical properties of wetland soils. These data are needed for comparison to data collected from wetland soils that may have been affected by SRS operations. SRS contains 36,000 acres of wetlands and an additional 5,000 acres of bottom land soils subject to flooding. Recent studies of wetland soils near various waste units at SRS show that some wetlands have been impacted by releases of contaminants resulting from SRS operations (WSRC, 1992). Waste waters originating from the operations facilities typically have been discharged into seepage basins located in upland soils, direct discharge of waste water to wetland areas has been minimal. This suggests that impacted wetland areas have been affected indirectly as a result of transport mechanisms such as surface runoff, groundwater seeps, fluvial or sediment transport, and leaching. Looney et al. (1990) conducted a study to characterize the geochemical and physical properties of upland soils and shallow sediments on the SRS. A primary objective of the upland study was to collect the data needed to assess the qualitative and quantitative impacts of SRS operations on the environment. By comparing the upland soils data to data collected from waste units located in similar soils, SRS impacts could be assessed. The data were also intended to aid in selection of remediation alternatives. Because waste units at SRS have historically been located in upland areas, wetland soils were not sampled. (Abstract Truncated)

  18. Beneficial Use of Drilling Waste - A Wetland Restoration Technology

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pioneer Natural Resources

    2000-08-14T23:59:59.000Z

    This project demonstrated that treated drill cuttings derived from oil and gas operations could be used as source material for rebuilding eroding wetlands in Louisiana. Planning to supply a restoration site, drill a source well, and provide part of the funding. Scientists from southeastern Louisiana University's (SLU) Wetland Biology Department were contracted to conduct the proposed field research and to perform mesocosm studies on the SLU campus. Plans were to use and abandoned open water drill slip as a restoration site. Dredged material was to be used to create berms to form an isolated cell that would then be filled with a blend of dredged material and drill cuttings. Three elevations were used to test the substrates ability to support various alternative types of marsh vegetation, i.e., submergent, emergent, and upland. The drill cuttings were not raw cuttings, but were treated by either a dewatering process (performed by Cameron, Inc.) or by a stabilization process to encapsulate undesirable constituents (performed by SWACO, Division of Smith International).

  19. atlantic coastal zone: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    . . . . . . . . . . 39 10 SEM micrographs of end member 2 (sedimentary and crystalline rock) fine sand fraction. 41 SEM micrographs of coarse silt quartz grains, . 43 12......

  20. The extraction of bitumen from western oil sands: Volume 1. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Oblad, A.G.; Dahlstrom, D.A.; Deo, M.D.; Fletcher, J.V.; Hanson, F.V.; Miller, J.D.; Seader, J.D.

    1997-11-26T23:59:59.000Z

    The program is composed of 20 projects, of which 17 are laboratory bench or laboratory pilot scale processes or computer process simulations that are performed in existing facilities on the University of Utah campus in north-east Salt Lake City. These tasks are: (1) coupled fluidized-bed bitumen recovery and coked sand combustion; (2) water-based recovery of bitumen; (3) oil sand pyrolysis in a continuous rotary kiln reactor; (4) oil sand pyrolysis in a large diameter fluidized bed reactor; (5) oil sand pyrolysis in a small diameter fluidized bed reactor; (6) combustion of spent sand in a transport reactor; (7) recovery and upgrading of oil sand bitumen using solvent extraction methods; (8) fixed-bed hydrotreating of Uinta Basin bitumens and bitumen-derived hydrocarbon liquids; (9) ebullieted bed hydrotreating of bitumen and bitumen derived liquids; (10) bitumen upgrading by hydropyrolysis; (11) evaluation of Utah`s major oil sand deposits for the production of asphalt, high-energy jet fuels and other specialty products; (12) characterization of the bitumens and reservoir rocks from the Uinta Basin oil sand deposits; (13) bitumen upgrading pilot plant recommendations; (14) liquid-solid separation and fine tailings thickening; (15) in-situ production of heavy oil from Uinta Basin oil sand deposits; (16) oil sand research and development group analytical facility; and (17) process economics. This volume contains an executive summary and reports for five of these projects. 137 figs., 49 tabs.

  1. The extraction of bitumen from western oil sands: Volume 2. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Oblad, A.G.; Dahlstrom, D.A.; Deo, M.D.; Fletcher, J.V.; Hanson, F.V.; Miller, J.D.; Seader, J.D.

    1997-11-26T23:59:59.000Z

    The program is composed of 20 projects, of which 17 are laboratory bench or laboratory pilot scale processes or computer process simulations that are performed in existing facilities on the University of Utah campus in north-east Salt Lake City. These tasks are: (1) coupled fluidized-bed bitumen recovery and coked sand combustion; (2) water-based recovery of bitumen; (3) oil sand pyrolysis in a continuous rotary kiln reactor; (4) oil sand pyrolysis in a large diameter fluidized bed reactor; (5) oil sand pyrolysis in a small diameter fluidized bed reactor; (6) combustion of spent sand in a transport reactor; (7) recovery and upgrading of oil sand bitumen using solvent extraction methods; (8) fixed-bed hydrotreating of Uinta Basin bitumens and bitumen-derived hydrocarbon liquids; (9) ebullieted bed hydrotreating of bitumen and bitumen derived liquids; (10) bitumen upgrading by hydropyrolysis; (11) evaluation of Utah`s major oil sand deposits for the production of asphalt, high-energy jet fuels and other specialty products; (12) characterization of the bitumens and reservoir rocks from the Uinta Basin oil sand deposits; (13) bitumen upgrading pilot plant recommendations; (14) liquid-solid separation and fine tailings thickening; (15) in-situ production of heavy oil from Uinta Basin oil sand deposits; (16) oil sand research and development group analytical facility; and (17) process economics. This volume contains reports on nine of these projects, references, and a bibliography. 351 refs., 192 figs., 65 tabs.

  2. Assessment of the KE Basin Sand Filter Inventory In Support of Hazard Categorization

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ross, Steven B.; Young, Jonathan

    2005-09-28T23:59:59.000Z

    In 1978, the water cleaning system for the KE Basin was upgraded by adding a sand filter and ion exchange columns. Basin water containing finely divided solids is collected by three surface skimmers and pumped to the sand filter. Filtrate from the sand filter is further treated in the ion exchange modules. The suspended solids accumulate in the sand until the pressure drop across the filter reaches established operating limits, at which time the sand filter is backwashed. The backwash is collected in the NLOP, where the solids are allowed to settle as sludge. Figure 2-1 shows a basic piping and instrumentation diagram depicting the relationship among the basin skimmers, sand filter, and NLOP. During the course of deactivation and decommissioning (D&D) of the K-Basins, the sand filter and its media will need to be dispositioned. The isotopic distribution of the sludge in the sand filter has been estimated in KE Basin Sand Filter Monolith DQO (KBC-24705). This document estimates the sand filter contribution to the KE hazard categorization using the data from the DQO.

  3. Fish ecology of a wetland in the southern Western Ghats, India

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Grubh, Archis Robert

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Fish assemblages and abiotic environmental conditions in a wetland in the Western Ghats, southern India, were investigated from August 2000 to July 2001. Rainfall showed a seasonal pattern of dry, major wet, and minor wet seasons. The hydrology...

  4. Division of Water, Parts 660-661: Tidal Wetlands (New York)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    These regulations require permits for any activity which directly or indirectly may have a significant adverse effect on the existing condition of any tidal wetland, including but not limited to...

  5. Wetland model in an earth systems modeling framework for regional environmental policy analysis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Awadalla, Sirein Salah

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of this research is to investigate incorporating a wetland component into a land energy and water fluxes model, the Community Land Model (CLM). CLM is the land fluxes component of the Integrated Global Systems ...

  6. Analysis of the efficacy of a constructed wetland in treating human fecal contamination

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kondepudi, Kathyayani Shobhna

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The efficiency of a system of constructed wetlands in treating non-point source pollution, particularly, human fecal contamination, was evaluated by collecting and analyzing water samples using both conventional culture-based ...

  7. Division of Water, Parts 662-665: Freshwater Wetlands (New York)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    No person may alter any freshwater wetland or adjacent area without having first submitted an application and obtained an interim permit for the alteration from the department. Some exemptions...

  8. Evaluation of a shoreline cleaner for enhanced removal of petroleum from a wetland

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bizzell, Cydney Jill

    2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    , and bioaugmentation. This latest phase of research (1998) is a continuation of studies to evaluate non-invasive oil removal techniques from sensitive wetland environments. For this controlled oil release experiment, 21 plots were divided into three treatment regimes...

  9. Potential for N pollution swapping from riparian buffer strips and an instream wetland 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boukelia, Willena Esther

    2012-11-29T23:59:59.000Z

    Diffuse agricultural pollution is a major contributor to poor water quality in many parts of the world. Consequently agri-environment policy promotes the use of riparian buffer strips and/or denitrifying wetlands to ...

  10. Non point source pollution modelling in the watershed managed by Integrated Conctructed Wetlands: A GIS approach. 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vyavahare, Nilesh

    2008-12-05T23:59:59.000Z

    The non-point source pollution has been recognised as main cause of eutrophication in Ireland (EPA Ireland, 2001). Integrated Constructed Wetland (ICW) is a management practice adopted in Annestown stream watershed, located in the south county...

  11. Wetland Model in an Earth Systems Modeling Framework for Regional Environmental Policy Analysis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    At the Massachusetts Institute of Technology June, 2011 © Massachusetts Institute of Technology All rights reserved variations. Wetlands play an important role in the storage and regulation of the global water budget so

  12. Jurisdictional waters of the United States Wetlands Assessment Analysis and Delineation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Siems-Alford, Susan

    1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    . The subject property was evaluated for its content of jurisdictional wetlands, based on U.S. Army corps of Engineers criteria, using interpretation of historical aerial photography, topographic maps, hydrology indicators, and data gathered from site...

  13. Establishment of submergent vegetation and invertebrates in a wetland constructed on mine soil

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thomas, James Alan

    1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    water depths (20, 50, and 80 cm) within an experimental wetland on Texas Utilities' Big Brown Mine in eastern Texas. Percent cover was determined during both seasons, and above-ground biomass (AGB) and associated macroinvertebrates were sampled at all...

  14. Wastewater treatment and flow patterns in an onsite subsurface flow constructed wetland

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stecher, Matthew C

    2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Subsurface flow constructed wetlands (SFCWs) are becoming increasingly common as a secondary treatment of onsite domestic wastewater. Even though SFCWs are being used widely, sufficient data has not been collected to determine how parameters...

  15. Plant species as a significant factor in wastewater treatment in constructed wetlands

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Varvel, Tracey W

    2013-02-22T23:59:59.000Z

    Constructed wetlands are one of the newest wastewater treatment technologies. They should reduce the Biochemical Oxygen Demand (BOD) and utilize a large amount of the influent. The BOD determines how much oxygen is used bymicro organisms while...

  16. The effects of multiple stressors on wetland communities: pesticides, pathogens and competing amphibians

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Blaustein, Andrew R.

    The effects of multiple stressors on wetland communities: pesticides, pathogens and competing. Larval amphibian growth and development were affected by carbaryl and the amphibian assemblage treatment effects among the treatments on amphibian growth and development. 4. We encourage future research

  17. Phosphorus water quality model evaluation and comparison for natural and constructed wetlands

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paasch, Mary Margaret

    1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    (Kadlec and Knight, 1996). Basins with great areal extent of wetlands produce lower phosphorus loads and mcreased wetland areas could reduce phosphorus loading (Boggess et al. , 1995). One of the many consequences of elevated phosphorus concentrations... may be considered as upper boundaries on phosphorus concentrations. Phosphorus loads are typically greatest from urban land, with lower loading from agricultural land, and the least phosphorus loading occurring from forests (Boggess et al. , 1995...

  18. Wetlands, Microbes, and the Carbon Cycle: Behind the Scenes @ Berkeley Lab

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Tringe, Susannah

    2013-05-29T23:59:59.000Z

    Susannah Tringe, who leads the Metagenome Program at the Department of Energy's Joint Genome Institute (JGI), a collaboration in which Berkeley Lab plays a leading role, takes us behind the scenes to show how DNA from unknown wild microbes is extracted and analyzed to see what role they play in the carbon cycle. Tringe collects samples of microbial communities living in the wetland muck of the Sacramento-San Joaquin River Delta, organisms that can determine how these wetlands store or release carbon.

  19. The effect of temperature on a variable permeability, two-stage sand consolidation technique

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Barger, Blane Rene

    1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    consolidation processes. In 1961, Hower con- ducted large scale sand consolidation tests to determine the reasons of successes and failures for chemical sand consolidation efforts. He con- cluded that most failures were due to i mproper completion procedures... of Petroleum Technolo (December 1977) 1664, 1672. 2. Brooks, F. A. , Muecke, T. W. , Ri ckey, W. P. , Kerver, J. K. : "Externally Catalyzed Epoxy for Sand Control, " Journal of Petroleum Technology (June 1974) 589-594. 3. Hower, W. F. : "Large Scale...

  20. Seasonally-managed wetland footprint delineation using Landsat ETM+ satellite imagery

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Quinn, N.W.T.; Epshtein, O.

    2013-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

    One major challenge in water resource management is the estimation of evapotranspiration losses from seasonally managed wetlands. Quantifying these losses is complicated by the dynamic nature of the wetlands’ areal footprint during the periods of flood-up and drawdown. In this study we present a data-lean solution to this problem using an example application in the San Joaquin River Basin of California, USA. Through analysis of high-resolution (30 meter) Landsat Enhanced Thematic Mapper Plus (ETM+) satellite imagery, we develop a metric for more fully capturing the extent of total flooded wetland area. The procedure is validated using year-long, continuously-logged field datasets at two separate wetlands within the study area. Based on this record, the proposed classification using a Landsat ETM+ Band 5 (mid-IR wavelength) to Band 2 (visible green wavelength) ratio improves estimates by 30-50% relative to previous attempts at wetland delineation. Requiring modest ancillary data, the results of our study provide a practical and efficient option for wetland management in data-sparse regions or un-gauged watersheds.

  1. Determining sand-body geometries for waterflood reservoirs: Examples from Oklahoma

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kreisa, R.D.; Pinero, E. (Mobil Research and Development Corp., Dallas, TX (USA))

    1987-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Waterflood projects require an accurate knowledge of reservoir geometry and well-to-well continuity. However, sandstones with thin, multiple-pay zones can be extremely difficult to correlate with confidence. Two case studies of Pennsylvanian sandstones in Oklahoma illustrate how a model for the depositional history of such reservoirs can be an effective tool for determining reservoir continuity. In contrast, correlation criteria such as similar wireline log signatures and relative sand-body thicknesses are not reliable in many situations. In Southwest Logan field (Beaver County), 5 to 15-ft thick reservoir sands formed as shallow marine sand ridges. Their dimensions were approximated from height-to-width ratios of modern sand ridges. Then the reservoir sands were mapped using wireline logs and core data. Individual reservoir sands were approximately 1-2 km wide and stacked en echelon vertically. Thus, a line-drive waterflood pattern oriented parallel to the axes of the ridges is recommended. Tatums field (Carter County) consists of 5 to 50-ft thick sandstones deposited in various deltaic environments. Distributary channel sands have good continuity downdip, but are narrow and lenticular across depositional strike. Crevasse splay and other bay-fill sands were deposited marginal to the channels and are extremely discontinuous. This depositional model can be used to improve flood patterns for these sands, leading to improved sweep efficiency. In both examples, for effective mapping, the depositional facies models have been used to register reservoir quality and wireline log signatures.

  2. Emissions from Heavy-Duty Diesel Engine with EGR using Oil Sands...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Oil Sands Derived Fuels 2003 DEER Conference Presentation: National Research Council Canada, Ottawa, Ontario, Canada 2003deerneill.pdf More Documents & Publications Development...

  3. Study of pore pressure variation during liquefaction using two constitutive models for sand

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Taiebat, Mahdi; Shahir, Hadi; Pak, Ali

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of liquefiable sand in the centrifuge test. Keywords: Fullyof Liquefaction Analyses by Centrifuge Studies - Laboratory18. [19] Tan TS, Scott RF. Centrifuge scaling considerations

  4. Non-Incineration Treatment to Reduce Benzene and VOC Emissions from Green Sand Molding Systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fred S. Cannon; Robert C. Voigt

    2002-06-28T23:59:59.000Z

    Final report describing laboratory, pilot scale and production scale evaluation of advanced oxidation systems for emissions and cost reduction in metal casting green sand systems.

  5. The extraction of bitumen from western oil sands. Quarterly report, July--September, 1993

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Oblad, A.G.; Bunger, J.W.; Dahlstrom, D.A.; Deo, M.D.; Fletcher, J.V.; Hanson, F.V.; Miller, J.D.; Seader, J.D.

    1993-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report cites task number followed by a brief statement of each task and the action taken this quarter. The tasks are: NEPA environmental information statement; coupled fluidized-bed bitumen recovery and coked sand combustion; water-based recovery of bitumen; rotary kiln process for recovery of bitumen and combustion of coke sand; recovery of bitumen from oil sands using fluidized bed reactors and combustion of spent sands in transport reactors; recovery of bitumen from oil sand and upgrading of bitumen by solvent extraction; catalytic and thermal upgrading of bitumens and bitumen-derived liquids; evaluation of Utah`s major oil sand deposits for the production of asphalt, high energy jet fuels, and other specialty products; development of mathematical models for bitumen recovery and processing; completion of the cost estimation study of the pilot plant restoration; development studies of equipment for three-product gravity separation of bitumen and sand; development studies of disposal of sand by conveying or pumping of high solids concentration sand-water slurries; and environmental studies of the North Salt Lake pilot plant rehabilitation and eventual operation and those environmental problems associated with eventual commercial products.

  6. Costs Models in Design and Manufacturing of Sand Casting Products

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nicolas Perry; Magali Mauchand; Alain Bernard

    2010-11-26T23:59:59.000Z

    In the early phases of the product life cycle, the costs controls became a major decision tool in the competitiveness of the companies due to the world competition. After defining the problems related to this control difficulties, we will present an approach using a concept of cost entity related to the design and realization activities of the product. We will try to apply this approach to the fields of the sand casting foundry. This work will highlight the enterprise modelling difficulties (limits of a global cost modelling) and some specifics limitations of the tool used for this development. Finally we will discuss on the limits of a generic approach.

  7. Systems and methods for producing hydrocarbons from tar sands formations

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Li, Ruijian (Katy, TX); Karanikas, John Michael (Houston, TX)

    2009-07-21T23:59:59.000Z

    A system for treating a tar sands formation is disclosed. A plurality of heaters are located in the formation. The heaters include at least partially horizontal heating sections at least partially in a hydrocarbon layer of the formation. The heating sections are at least partially arranged in a pattern in the hydrocarbon layer. The heaters are configured to provide heat to the hydrocarbon layer. The provided heat creates a plurality of drainage paths for mobilized fluids. At least two of the drainage paths converge. A production well is located to collect and produce mobilized fluids from at least one of the converged drainage paths in the hydrocarbon layer.

  8. PDC bit proves effective at South Graham Deese Sand unit

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Preslar, P.L.; McDermaid, D.

    1983-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In the past two years, Polycrystalline Diamond Compact Bits have gained acceptance in the United States with many spot applications in soft to medium hard formations. Diamond Compact Bits were chosen by Tenneco's Mid-Continent Division Drilling Department to be used at its South Graham Deese Sand Unit in Southern Oklahoma. Drilling in the field is complicated by a plunging anticline which has caused deviation problems in excess of 20. Previous wells were drilled in 24 days, excluding completion time, using conventional rotary bits and applying light bit weight to control deviation. Presently, by using a PDC bit, similar wells can be drilled in as little as 10 days.

  9. Production from multiple zones of a tar sands formation

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Karanikas, John Michael; Vinegar, Harold J

    2013-02-26T23:59:59.000Z

    A method for treating a tar sands formation includes providing heat to at least part of a hydrocarbon layer in the formation from a plurality of heaters located in the formation. The heat is allowed to transfer from the heaters to at least a portion of the formation. Fluids are produced from the formation through at least one production well that is located in at least two zones in the formation. The first zone has an initial permeability of at least 1 darcy. The second zone has an initial of at most 0.1 darcy. The two zones are separated by a substantially impermeable barrier.

  10. Renewable Energy Opportunities at White Sands Missile Range, New Mexico

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chvala, William D.; Solana, Amy E.; States, Jennifer C.; Warwick, William M.; Weimar, Mark R.; Dixon, Douglas R.

    2008-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The document provides an overview of renewable resource potential at White Sands Missile Range (WSMR) based primarily upon analysis of secondary data sources supplemented with limited on-site evaluations. The effort was funded by the U.S. Army Installation Management Command (IMCOM) as follow-on to the 2005 DoD Renewable Energy Assessment. This effort focuses on grid-connected generation of electricity from renewable energy sources and also ground source heat pumps (GSHPs) for heating and cooling buildings, as directed by IMCOM.

  11. User`s manual for SNL-SAND-II code

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Griffin, P.J.; Kelly, J.G. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); VanDenburg, J.W. [Science and Engineering Associates, Inc., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    1994-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Sandia National Laboratories, in the process of characterizing the neutron environments at its reactor facilities, has developed an enhanced version of W. McElroy`s original SAND-II code. The enhanced input, output, and plotting interfaces make the code much easier to use. The basic physics and operation of the code remain unchanged. Important code enhancements include the interfaces to the latest ENDF/B-VI and IRDF-90 dosimetry-quality cross sections and the ability to use silicon displacement-sensitive devices as dosimetry sensors.

  12. SAND97-8490 UC-404 Unlimited Release

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What's PossibleRadiation Protection TechnicalResonantNovember11-3779SAND88-1807 * UC-2613

  13. SANDIA REPORT SAND2011-3779 Unlimited Release

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What's PossibleRadiation Protection TechnicalResonantNovember11-3779SAND88-1807.VUQ.SAUQ.P6.02;3779

  14. SANDIA REPORT SAND2011-9011 Unlimited Release

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What's PossibleRadiation Protection TechnicalResonantNovember11-3779SAND88-1807.VUQ.SAUQ.P6.02;3779011

  15. adjacent coastal areas: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    on or below the western slopes Westerling, Anthony L. 12 LOUISIANA COASTAL AREA (LCA) BARATARIA BASIN BARRIER SHORELINE RESTORATION (BBBS) Engineering Websites Summary:...

  16. Potential Oil Production from the Coastal Plain of the Arctic...

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Potential Oil Production from the Coastal Plain of the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge: Updated Assessment Executive Summary This Service Report, Potential Oil Production from the...

  17. Potential Oil Production from the Coastal Plain of the Arctic...

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    Potential Oil Production from the Coastal Plain of the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge: Updated Assessment 1. Overview of the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge Background The Arctic...

  18. Potential Oil Production from the Coastal Plain of the Arctic...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Potential Oil Production from the Coastal Plain of the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge: Updated Assessment 2. Analysis Discussion Resource Assessment The USGS most recent...

  19. Potential Oil Production from the Coastal Plain of the Arctic...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Potential Oil Production from the Coastal Plain of the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge: Updated Assessment References Energy Information Administration, Annual Energy Outlook 2000,...

  20. atlantic coastal plain: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Interaction WRI 14 Groundwater salinization in a coastal multilayer aquifer; Water-rock interactions 1. Introduction Due to an increasing demographic pressure, the...

  1. atlantic coastal plains: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Interaction WRI 14 Groundwater salinization in a coastal multilayer aquifer; Water-rock interactions 1. Introduction Due to an increasing demographic pressure, the...

  2. EPA Coastal Zone Act Reauthorization Amendments (CZARA) Section...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    6217 Webpage Abstract This webpage provides an overview of the Coastal Nonpoint Pollution Control Program (16 U.S.C. Chapter 33) which addresses nonpoint pollution problems...

  3. Nematode ?Ecological Study ?of ?a ?Wetland? Restoration?In?Progress? at? Bolsa? Chica, California:? Implications? for? Biomonitoring

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    King, Ian W.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    climate estuarine wetland at Carpinteria, California: plantBrooks, director of the Carpinteria Salt Marsh Reserve, for9 Figure 2?2: Map of Carpinteria Salt Marsh indicating

  4. Nematode Ecological Study Of A Wetland Restoration-In-Progress At Bolsa Chica, California: Implications For Biomonitoring

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    King, Ian

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    climate estuarine wetland at Carpinteria, California: plantBrooks, director of the Carpinteria Salt Marsh Reserve, for9 Figure 2?2: Map of Carpinteria Salt Marsh indicating

  5. Appraisal of the tight sands potential of the Sand Wash and Great Divide Basins. Final report, June 1989--June 1991

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The volume of future tight gas reserve additions is difficult to estimate because of uncertainties in the characterization and extent of the resource and the performance and cost-effectiveness of stimulation and production technologies. Ongoing R&D by industry and government aims to reduce the risks and costs of producing these tight resources, increase the certainty of knowledge of their geologic characteristics and extent, and increase the efficiency of production technologies. Some basins expected to contain large volumes of tight gas are being evaluated as to their potential contribution to domestic gas supplies. This report describes the results of one such appraisal. This analysis addresses the tight portions of the Eastern Greater Green River Basin (Sand Wash and Great Divide Subbasins in Northwestern Colorado and Southwestern Wyoming, respectively), with respect to estimated gas-in-place, technical recovery, and potential reserves. Geological data were compiled from public and proprietary sources. The study estimated gas-in-place in significant (greater than 10 feet net sand thickness) tight sand intervals for six distinct vertical and 21 areal units of analysis. These units of analysis represent tight gas potential outside current areas of development. For each unit of analysis, a ``typical`` well was modeled to represent the costs, recovery and economics of near-term drilling prospects in that unit. Technically recoverable gas was calculated using reservoir properties and assumptions about current formation evaluation and extraction technology performance. Basin-specific capital and operating costs were incorporated along with taxes, royalties and current regulations to estimate the minimum required wellhead gas price required to make the typical well in each of unit of analysis economic.

  6. H02 WETLAND TREATMENT SYSTEM WATER CHEMISTRY SAMPLING AND RESULTS REPORT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bach, M; Michael Serrato, M; Eric Nelson, E

    2008-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The H-02 Wetland Treatment System (Figure 1) is used to remove heavy metals (e.g., copper and zinc) from the H-Area process and storm water discharge. Routine flow enters an equalization basin by inlets on either the east (Location 1) or west end (Location 2). The west end influent constitutes 75% of the average flow into the basin which has an average residence time of approximately 3 days at low pool (i.e., 120 gal/min. through a volume of 0.5 million gallons). The water then exits via the basin outlet on the east end. Next, the water flows to a splitter box (Location 3) which evenly separates the flow between two wetland cells for a design flow of 60 gal/min. per wetland cell with a residence time in the cell of approximately 2 days. The wetland effluent is then combined (Location 4) and flows through a spillway before reaching the National Pollution Discharge Elimination System (NPDES) measurement point near Road 4. During initial operation, it was observed that the pH of the water leaving the equalization basin was elevated compared to the influent pH. Furthermore, the elevated pH remained through the wetland cells so that there was an average pH of 10 leaving the wetland cells during the daytime which exceeds the upper NPDES limit of 8.5. The purpose of the current study was to evaluate the cause of the increase in pH within the equalization basin of the H-02 Wetland Treatment System. Possible mechanisms included algal activity and inorganic chemistry interactions (e.g., interactions with the clay and/or bentonite liner). Water quality parameters were evaluated throughout the H-02 Wetland Treatment system and over time in order to determine the cause of high pH values measured in the basin and wetland. Fluctuations in dissolved oxygen (DO) and accompanying changes in pH would be expected in systems where algae are an influencing factor. An unexpected increase or decrease in the concentration of inorganic substances may indicate operational changes or an inorganic chemistry influence on pH. In addition, alternative methods to alleviate or mitigate the pH increase were evaluated. This study documents the results of sampling activities undertaken and conveys the analytical results along with suggestions for operation of the H-02 Wetland Treatment System. The water samples collected and the water quality data generated from this activity are for analytical purposes only, and as such, were not collected in support of compliance activities.

  7. Potential turbine fuels from western Kentucky tar sand bitumen

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Moore, H.F.; Johnson, C.A.; Sutton, W.A.; Benslay, R.M. (Ashland Petroleum Co., KY (USA))

    1987-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The declining quality of petroleum is a particular problem for aviation turbine fuels. Since these fuels are required to meet stringent corrosion, thermal stability and purity specification, very little in the way of contaminants or heteroatoms can be tolerated. However, heavier and more sour crude supplied result in lower straight-run turbine fuel yields, higher sulfur contents, and higher aromatic contents. While all turbine fuels were originally prepared from high quality stocks by distillation, many commercial and military fuels now require hydrotreatment to meet specifications. The work described in this program extrapolates these present trends to very heavy feedstocks. Tar sands bitumen and heavy crude oils are low API gravity, high viscosity hydrocarbonaceous materials commonly exhibiting high levels of heteroatomic species, high metals content and high levels of asphaltenes, plus water and solids not readily separated by conventional technology without dilution. Tar sands bitumen is highly cyclic with many polycyclic rings and naphthenic constituents. Sulfur is primarily in thiophenic structures, with nitrogen included in the ring structure. Asphaltenes are in high proportion, with a large amount of sulfur, nitrogen and metallic inclusions. Each of these characteristics represent specific concerns to refiners.

  8. Human dimensions perspectives on the impacts of coastal zone marine renewable energy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pomeroy, Caroline; Conway, Flaxen; Hall-Arber, Madeleine

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    coastal zone marine renewable energy generation. REFERENCESOuter Continental Shelf Renewable Energy Space-Use ConflictsOF COASTAL ZONE MARINE RENEWABLE ENERGY Caroline Pomeroy,

  9. Analysis of environmental constraints on expanding reserves in current and future reservoirs in wetlands. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Harder, B.J.

    1995-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Louisiana wetlands require careful management to allow exploitation of non-renewable resources without destroying renewable resources. Current regulatory requirements have been moderately successful in meeting this goal by restricting development in wetland habitats. Continuing public emphasis on reducing environmental impacts of resource development is causing regulators to reassess their regulations and operators to rethink their compliance strategies. We examined the regulatory system and found that reducing the number of applications required by going to a single application process and having a coherent map of the steps required for operations in wetland areas would reduce regulatory burdens. Incremental changes can be made to regulations to allow one agency to be the lead for wetland permitting at minimal cost to operators. Operators need cost effective means of access that will reduce environmental impacts, decrease permitting time, and limit future liability. Regulators and industry must partner to develop incentive based regulations that can provide significant environmental impact reduction for minimal economic cost. In addition regulators need forecasts of future E&P trends to estimate the impact of future regulations. To determine future activity we attempted to survey potential operators when this approach was unsuccessful we created two econometric models of north and south Louisiana relating drilling activity, success ratio, and price to predict future wetland activity. Results of the econometric models indicate that environmental regulations have a small but statistically significant effect on drilling operations in wetland areas of Louisiana. We examined current wetland practices and evaluated those practices comparing environmental versus economic costs and created a method for ranking the practices.

  10. Wetlands mitigation: Parnership between an electric power company and a federal wildlife refuge

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Perry, M.C.; Sibrel, C.B.; Gough, G.A. [Patuxent Wildlife Research Center, Laurel, MD (United States)

    1996-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Nine hectares (23 acres) of a degraded section of Patuxent Research Refuge in Laurel, Maryland, USA, were converted to wetland habitat by the Baltimore Gas and Electric Company in 1994. The wetlands were created as mitigation for 5.7 ha (14 acres) of wetlands that were impacted as part o the construction of 8.5-km (5.3-mile) 500-kV over-head transmission line on the refuge. The area consists of a created forested wetland of 5.5 ha(13.5 acres), a seasonally inundated green-free reservoir of 7.6 ha (6.5 acres), and an impounded pond wetland of 1.2 ha (3 acres). Construction included the planting of 6131 trees, 4276 shrubs, and 15,102 emergent plants. Part of the site has been studied intensively since completion and survival of trees and shrubs after two years was 88%. Measurements of these transplants have shown growth greater than on other created sites in Maryland. Grasses and other herbaceous vegetation were dominant plants in the meter-square plots in the first two years of sampling of the created forested wetland. Wildlife surveys for birds, mammals, amphibians, and reptiles have revealed diverse communities. Although these communities represent species consistent with open habitat, more typical forest species should colonize the area as it undergoes succession into a more mature forested wetland. The creation, management, and research of this mitigation site represents an excellent example of a partnership between a private electric power company and a federal wildlife refuge. This partnership has increased local biodiversity and improved regional water quality of the Patuxent River and the Chesapeake Bay. 6 refs., 7 figs., 4 tabs.

  11. BIDIMENSIONAL SAND PILE AND ICE PILE MODELS ENRICA DUCHI, ROBERTO MANTACI, HA DUONG PHAN, DOMINIQUE ROSSIN

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    BIDIMENSIONAL SAND PILE AND ICE PILE MODELS ENRICA DUCHI, ROBERTO MANTACI, HA DUONG PHAN, DOMINIQUE ROSSIN Abstract. In this paper we define an extension of the Sand Pile Model SPM and more generally of the Ice Pile Model IPM by adding a further dimension to the system. By drawing a parallel between

  12. Guide to Preparing SAND Reports and other communication products : quick reference guide.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2009-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This Quick Reference Guide supplements the more complete Guide to Preparing SAND Reports and Other Communication Products. It provides limited guidance on how to prepare SAND Reports at Sandia National Laboratories. Users are directed to the in-depth guide for explanations of processes.

  13. Anomalous density dependence of static friction in sand Viktor K. Horvath,1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jánosi, Imre M.

    Anomalous density dependence of static friction in sand Viktor K. Horva´th,1 Imre M. Ja´nosi,2; revised manuscript received 26 April 1996 We measured experimentally the static friction force Fs on the surface of a glass rod immersed in dry sand. We observed that Fs is extremely sensitive to the closeness

  14. Atmospheric Environment 36 (2002) 503509 Trend of acid rain and neutralization by yellow sand

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Atmospheric Environment 36 (2002) 503­509 Trend of acid rain and neutralization by yellow sand 2001; accepted 11 April 2001 Abstract Acid rain and its neutralization by yellow sand in East Asia were was obtained. Firstly, the trend of the acid rain in East Asia due to the rapid increase of Chinese pollutants

  15. Marine Geology 126(1995) 249-269 Longshore sand waves at Southampton Beach, New York

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    US Army Corps of Engineers

    as early as 1939, few measurements of longshore sand waves have been made, and their dynamic behavior. The model shows wave refraction to be an important mechanism contributing to the longevity of longshore sand waves, acting to retard the otherwise expected diffusion. Model calculations of the migration

  16. The Influence of Topology on Hydraulic Conductivity in a Sand-and-Gravel Aquifer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    The Influence of Topology on Hydraulic Conductivity in a Sand-and-Gravel Aquifer by Roger H. Morin1 and tracer testing was conducted in a single well that penetrated a sand-and-gravel aquifer at the U, and tortuosity that primarily control the hydraulic conductivity. Results show that F correlates well with K

  17. Traffic Impact Study for UMore Park Sand and Gravel Resources Project

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Netoff, Theoden

    Traffic Impact Study for UMore Park Sand and Gravel Resources Project DRAFT City of Rosemount Impact Study for UMore Park Sand and Gravel Resources Project City of Rosemount and Empire Township Figure 13 Existing Lane Geometry and Intersection Control Figure 14 Mitigation Measures for 2011 and 2030

  18. Velocities of deep water reservoir sands De-hua Han, University of Houston

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    and glass bean mixture (Zimmer, et al., 2002). Texture of deep-water sands Core samples come from two wellsVelocities of deep water reservoir sands De-hua Han, University of Houston M. Batzle, Colorado the application for DHI techniques. Summary In deep-water sedimentary processes, compaction is a major force

  19. Guide to preparing SAND reports and other communication products : quick reference guide.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2007-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This 'Quick Reference Guide' supplements the more complete 'Guide to Preparing SAND Reports and Other Communication Products'. It provides limited guidance on how to prepare SAND Reports at Sandia National Laboratories. Users are directed to the in-depth guide for explanations of processes.

  20. Fluid escape from reservoirs: implications from cold seeps, fractures and injected sands

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mazzini, Adriano

    Abstract Fluid escape from reservoirs: implications from cold seeps, fractures and injected sands Abstract Fluid escape from reservoirs can take place through (hydraulic) fracturing, sand injection and seepage. Above several Tertiary hydrocarbon reservoirs in the North Sea, substantial amounts of fractures