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Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "wetland environmental review" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


1

Compliance With Floodplain and Wetland Environmental Review Requiremen...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

list of sources that may be used in determining the location of floodplains and wetlands, and allowing floodplain and wetland assessments for actions proposed to be taken...

2

Exam Review WFS 340: Wetlands Ecology and Management  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Exam Review WFS 340: Wetlands Ecology and Management What is a Jurisdictional Wetland? 1) Know the 3 USACE criteria that are necessary for an area to be classified as a jurisdictional wetland. 2 to meet USACE jurisdictional wetland criteria, and how to calculate percent dominance using the 50

Gray, Matthew

3

Department of Environmental Conservation, University of Massachusetts-Amherst Concentration in Water, Wetlands and Watersheds 1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

in Water, Wetlands and Watersheds 1 Environmental Conservation Graduate Program Water, Wetlands want scientific training in the multi-disciplinary field of water, wetlands and watershed conservation such as wetlands, hydrology, nonpoint source pollution, modeling, ecosystems, water resource management, watershed

Schweik, Charles M.

4

Vegetation of Upper Coastal Plain depression wetlands: Environmental templates and wetland dynamics within a landscape framework.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Reference wetlands play an important role in efforts to protect wetlands and assess wetland condition. Because wetland vegetation integrates the influence of many ecological factors, a useful reference system would identify natural vegetation types and include models relating vegetation to important regional geomorphic, hydrologic, and geochemical properties. Across the U.S. Atlantic Coastal Plain, depression wetlands are a major hydrogeomorphic class with diverse characteristics. For 57 functional depression wetlands in the Upper Coastal Plain of South Carolina, we characterized the principal vegetation types and used a landscape framework to assess how local (wetland-level) factors and regional landscape settings potentially influence vegetation composition and dynamics. Wetland sites were stratified across three Upper Coastal Plain landscape settings that differ in soils, surface geology, topography, and land use. We sampled plant composition, measured relevant local variables, and analyzed historical transitions in vegetative cover types. Cluster analysis identified six vegetation types, ranging from open-water ponds and emergent marshes to closed forests. Significant vegetation-environment relationships suggested environmental ''templates'' for plant community development. Of all local factors examined, wetland hydrologic regime was most strongly correlated with vegetation type, but depression size, soil textural type, and disturbance history were also significant. Because hydrogeologic settings influence wetland features, local factors important to vegetation were partly predictable from landscape setting, and thus wetland types were distributed non-randomly across landscape settings. Analysis of long-term vegetation change indicated relative stability in some wetlands and succession in others. We developed a landscape-contingent model for vegetation dynamics, with hydroperiod and fire as major driving variables. The wetland classification, environmental templates, and dynamics model provide a reference framework to guide conservation priorities and suggest possible outcomes of restoration or management.

De Steven, Diane; Toner, Maureen, M.

2004-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

5

40 ELR 11106 ENVIRONMENTAL LAW REPORTER 11-2010 Gaining Ground: Wetlands,  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

40 ELR 11106 ENVIRONMENTAL LAW REPORTER 11-2010 Gaining Ground: Wetlands, Hurricanes .5% dis- count rate). Marine waters, wetlands, swamps, agricultural lands, and forests provide natural goods and services . The 1 . David Batker et al ., Gaining Ground: Wetlands, Hurricanes

Vermont, University of

6

Final Independent External Peer Review for the Biscayne Bay Coastal Wetlands Project  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Final Independent External Peer Review for the Biscayne Bay Coastal Wetlands Project Implementation-TERM ANALYSIS SERVICE (STAS) on Final Independent External Peer Review Report Biscayne Bay Coastal Wetlands COASTAL WETLANDS PROJECT IMPLEMENTATION REPORT EXECUTIVE SUMMARY The Biscayne Bay Coastal Wetlands (BBCW

US Army Corps of Engineers

7

EWONAP Environmental Review  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

HUD's Eastern Woodlands Office of Native American Programs in collaboration with the Seminole Tribe of Florida Native Learning Center invites you to attend the Environmental Review Training...

8

Review: Knowledge and Environmental Policy  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Review: Knowledge and Environmental Policy: Re-Imagining theRobert. Knowledge and Environmental Policy: Re-Imagining thepaperback. Knowledge and Environmental Policy continues the

Little, Peter C.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

9

RM Environmental Review (NEPA)  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsrucLas ConchasPassive Solar HomePromising Science for1 20115, 2001 Environmental Review-NEPA

10

Analysis of environmental constraints on expanding reserves in current and future reservoirs in wetlands. Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Louisiana wetlands require careful management to allow exploitation of non-renewable resources without destroying renewable resources. Current regulatory requirements have been moderately successful in meeting this goal by restricting development in wetland habitats. Continuing public emphasis on reducing environmental impacts of resource development is causing regulators to reassess their regulations and operators to rethink their compliance strategies. We examined the regulatory system and found that reducing the number of applications required by going to a single application process and having a coherent map of the steps required for operations in wetland areas would reduce regulatory burdens. Incremental changes can be made to regulations to allow one agency to be the lead for wetland permitting at minimal cost to operators. Operators need cost effective means of access that will reduce environmental impacts, decrease permitting time, and limit future liability. Regulators and industry must partner to develop incentive based regulations that can provide significant environmental impact reduction for minimal economic cost. In addition regulators need forecasts of future E&P trends to estimate the impact of future regulations. To determine future activity we attempted to survey potential operators when this approach was unsuccessful we created two econometric models of north and south Louisiana relating drilling activity, success ratio, and price to predict future wetland activity. Results of the econometric models indicate that environmental regulations have a small but statistically significant effect on drilling operations in wetland areas of Louisiana. We examined current wetland practices and evaluated those practices comparing environmental versus economic costs and created a method for ranking the practices.

Harder, B.J.

1995-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

11

Environmental assessment for the A-01 outfall constructed wetlands project at the Savannah River Site  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Department of Energy (DOE) prepared this environmental assessment (EA) to analyze the potential environmental impacts associated with the proposed A-01 outfall constructed wetlands project at the Savannah River site (SRS), located near aiken, South Carolina. The proposed action would include the construction and operation of an artificial wetland to treat effluent from the A-01 outfall located in A Area at SRS. The proposed action would reduce the outfall effluent concentrations in order to meet future outfall limits before these go into effect on October 1, 1999. This document was prepared in compliance with the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) of 1969, as amended; the requirements of the Council on Environmental Quality Regulations for Implementing NEPA (40 CFR Parts 1500--1508); and the DOE Regulations for Implementing NEPA (10 CFR Part 1021).

NONE

1998-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

12

Addendum to Environmental Review Documents Concerning Exports...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Addendum to Environmental Review Documents Concerning Exports of Natural Gas From the US Addendum to Environmental Review Documents Concerning Exports of Natural Gas From the US...

13

Environmental Review Form f  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:YearRound-UpHeat PumpRecord ofESPCof EnergyHouse Environmental Justice ForumMaturity Valuef o r

14

The Virginia Wetlands Report  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

VWR -- 1 The Virginia Wetlands Report The Virginia Wetlands Report Summer 2000 Vol. 15, No. 2 Department of Environmental Quality (DEQ) Implementing Nontidal Wetlands Protection Mandate Ellen Gilinsky wetland resources, but which occur outside of federal regulation. The General Assembly was motivated

15

Recognizing Wetlands An Informational Pamphlet  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Recognizing Wetlands An Informational Pamphlet What is a Wetland? The US Army Corps of Engineers(Corps) and the US Environmental Protection Agency define wetlands as follows: Those areas that are inundated conditions. Wetlands generally include swamps, marshes, bogs, and similar areas. Wetlands are areas

US Army Corps of Engineers

16

Review: Knowledge and Environmental Policy  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and Environmental Policy: Re-Imagining the Boundaries ofand Environmental Policy: Re-Imagining the Boundaries ofKnowledge and Environmental Policy continues the complex and

Little, Peter C.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

17

Independent Oversight Review, Rocky Flats Environmental Technology...  

Energy Savers [EERE]

- March 2000 March 2000 Review of the Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site Transportation Emergency Management Program This report provides the results of an independent...

18

ENVIRONMENTAL REVIEW FOR CATEGORICAL EXCLUSION DETERMINATION  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

excluded waste storage, disposal, recovery, or treatment actions or facilities; ENVIRONMENTAL REVIEW FOR CATEGORICAL EXCLUSION DETERMINATION Rocky Mountain Region, Western Area...

19

ENVIRONMENTAL REVIEW FOR CATEGORICAL EXCLUSION DETERMINATION  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

sites outside of rights-of-way in nearby previously disturbed or developed areas. 1 ENVIRONMENTAL REVIEW FOR CATEGORICAL EXCLUSION DETERMINATION Rocky Mountain Region, Western Area...

20

ENVIRONMENTAL REVIEW FOR CATEGORICAL EXCLUSION DETERMINATION  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

with its foundation well above a sole-source aquifer or upland surface soil 1 ENVIRONMENTAL REVIEW FOR CATEGORICAL EXCLUSION DETERMINATION Rocky Mountain Region, Western Area...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "wetland environmental review" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

ENVIRONMENTAL REVIEW FOR CATEGORICAL EXCLUSION DETERMINATION  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

with DOE Order 435.1, "Radioactive Waste Management," or its successor; 2 ENVIRONMENTAL REVIEW FOR CATEGORICAL EXCLUSION DETERMINATION Rocky Mountain Region, Western Area...

22

Environmental Review A Monthly Newsletter of Environmental Science and Policy  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Environmental Review A Monthly Newsletter of Environmental Science and Policy Volume Seven Number from logging. We spoke with Lisa Curran about her article in Science magazine and her work nongovernmental organiza- tions and later with the U.S. Agency for International Development on environmental

Kammen, Daniel M.

23

A Synthesis of Environmental and Plant Community Data for Tidal Wetland Restoration Planning in the Lower Columbia River and Estuary  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report reanalyzes and synthesizes previously existing environmental and plant community data collected by PNNL at 55 tidal wetlands and 3 newly restored sites in the lower Columbia River and estuary (LCRE) between 2005 and 2011. Whereas data were originally collected for various research or monitoring objectives of five studies, the intent of this report is to provide only information that will have direct utility in planning tidal wetland restoration projects. Therefore, for this report, all tidal wetland data on plants and the physical environment, which were originally developed and reported by separate studies, were tabulated and reanalyzed as a whole. The geographic scope of the data collected in this report is from Bonneville Lock and Dam to the mouth of the Columbia River

Diefenderfer, Heida L.; Borde, Amy B.; Cullinan, Valerie I.

2013-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

24

Compliance With Floodplain and Wetland Environmental Review Requirements  

Energy Savers [EERE]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious RankCombustion |Energyon ArmedWaste andAccessCO2 InjectionDepartment ofFresnoEnergyServices »(10 CFR

25

Environmental Assessment and Finding of No Significant Impact: Implementation of the Wetland Mitigation Bank Program at the Savannah River Site  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Department of Energy (DOE) has prepared an environmental assessment (EA) (DOE/EA-1205) for the proposed implementation of a wetland mitigation bank program at the Savannah River Site (SRS), located near Aiken, South Carolina. Based on the analyses in the EA, DOE has determined that the proposed action is not a major Federal action significantly affecting the quality of the human environment within the meaning of the National Environmental Policy Act of 1969 (NEPA). Therefore, the preparation of an environmental impact statement (EIS) is not required, and DOE is issuing this Finding of No Significant Impact (FONSI) and Floodplain Statement of Findings.

N /A

1999-04-28T23:59:59.000Z

26

Draft Addendum to Environmental Review Documents Concerning Exports...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Draft Addendum to Environmental Review Documents Concerning Exports of Natural Gas from the United States Draft Addendum to Environmental Review Documents Concerning Exports of...

27

Independent Oversight Review, Oak Ridge Office of Environmental...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

of Environmental Management - February 2012 Independent Oversight Review, Oak Ridge Office of Environmental Management - February 2012 February 2012 Review of the Implementation...

28

ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT/REGULATORY IMPACT REVIEW/ FINAL REGULATORY FLEXIBILITY ANALYSIS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT/REGULATORY IMPACT REVIEW/ FINAL REGULATORY FLEXIBILITY ANALYSIS.0 NEPA REQUIREMENTS: ENVIRONMENTAL IMPACTS OF THE ALTERNATIVES . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12 2.1 Environmental Impacts of the Alternatives

29

SECRETARIAL REVIEW DRAFT ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT/REGULATORY IMPACT REVIEW/  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

SECRETARIAL REVIEW DRAFT ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT/REGULATORY IMPACT REVIEW/ INITIAL REGULATORY The purpose of the non-AFA crab sideboard limits was to prevent vessels with crab QS from disadvantaging non for non-American Fisheries Act (AFA) crab vessels. In April 2007, the Council began developing options

30

Wetlands and Riparian Rights (Maryland)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The Department of the Environment regulates dredging, dumping, filling, and similar activities in wetland areas to protect the environmental and public values of the wetlands and to sustain their...

31

Wetland model in an earth systems modeling framework for regional environmental policy analysis  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The objective of this research is to investigate incorporating a wetland component into a land energy and water fluxes model, the Community Land Model (CLM). CLM is the land fluxes component of the Integrated Global Systems ...

Awadalla, Sirein Salah

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

32

The attitude and knowledge relationships between secondary agriculture and science students' participation in multidisciplinary education and environmental/wetland restoration  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and the control and experimental groups from each, for all of the environmental attitude questions. Tbl 1 A 'tud r-tst con 1 ou s Env. Science Hort. Science n=10 Ii=13 Mean M an Pr Exi ' w 1 h 1 oe 1 70 62 2+ (4=strongly agree, 3~oderately agree, 2... inexpensive, For every acre of wetland that is deslroyed from farming or development another h 1 2. 70 1. 50 3. 77 0. 01" 2, 31 0. 02* 2. 90 3. 62 0. 01~ Env. Science Hort. Science n=10 Ii=13 Mean M Pro 1, 70 2. 54 0. 06* (4=strongly agree, 3...

Campbell, Amy Noelle

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

33

The Deepwater Horizon disaster and wetlands Statement from the Environmental Concerns Committee  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

a major spill in 1986. Coastal wetlands in the Gulf of Mexico are also sensitive to oil as are species the Louisiana coastal zone (Richardson and Pahl 2006). The current oil spill in the Gulf of Mexico has also and fisheries resources been more clearly demonstrated than in the Gulf Mexico (e.g., Chesney et al. 2000, Crain

34

ENVIRONMENTAL REVIEW FOR CATEGORICAL EXCLUSION DETERMINATION  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

species (such as under the Bald and Golden Eagle Protection Act or the Migratory Bird Treaty Act); (iii) Floodplains and wetlands (as defined in 10 CPR 1022.4, X Compliance...

35

ENVIRONMENTAL REVIEW FOR CATEGORICAL EXCLUSION DETERMINATION  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

species (such as under the Bald and Golden Eagle Protection Act or the Migratory Bird Treaty Act); (iii) Floodplains and wetlands (as defined in 10 CPR 1022.4, X -Compliance...

36

ENVIRONMENTAL REVIEW FOR CATEGORICAL EXCLUSION DETERMINATION  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

species (such as under the Bald and Golden Eagle Protection Act or the Migratory Bird Treaty Act); (iii) Floodplains and wetlands (as defined in 10 CFR 1022.4, X -Compliance...

37

ENVIRONMENTAL REVIEW FOR CATEGORICAL EXCLUSION DETERMINATION  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

species (such as under the Bald and Golden Eagle Protection Act or the Migratory Bird Treaty Act); (iii) Floodplains and wetlands (as defined inlO CFR 1022.4, X -Compliance...

38

ENVIRONMENTAL REVIEW FOR CATEGORICAL EXCLUSION DETERMINATION  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

species (such as under the Bald and Golden Eagle Protection Act or the Migratory Bird Treaty Act); (iii) Floodplains and wetlands (as defined in 10 CFR X 1022.4, -Compliance...

39

The Virginia Wetlands Report  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

=palustrine forested wetlands PEM=palustrine emergent wetlands PUB=palustrine unconsolidated wetlands #12;The Virginia

40

Reviews of environmental contamination and toxicology  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Review of Environmental Contamination and Toxicology attempts to provide concise, critical reviews of timely advances, philosophy and significant areas of accomplished or needed endeavour in the total field of xenobiotics, in any segment of the environment, as well as toxicological implications. This edition contains a paper 'Health effects of arsenic, fluorine and selenium from indoor burning of Chinese coal, by Liu Guijian, Zheng Liugen, Nurdan S. Duzgoren-Aydin, Gao Lianfen, Liu Junhua, and Peng Zicheng. Other papers are: Chemistry and fate of simazine; Ethanol production: energy, economic, and environmental losses; Arsenic behaviour from groundwater and soil to crops: impacts on agriculture and food safety; Mercury content of hair in different populations relative to fish consumption; and Toxicology of 1,3-butadiene, chloroprene, and isoprene. 15 ills.

Ware, G. (ed.)

2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "wetland environmental review" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Environmental Review Form for Argonne National Laboratory  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:Year in Review:Department of Energy Environmental Restoration and

42

FORECASTING THE RESPONSE OF COASTAL WETLANDS TO DECLINING3 WATER LEVELS AND ENVIRONMENTAL DISTURBANCES IN THE GREAT4  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

i 1 2 FORECASTING THE RESPONSE OF COASTAL WETLANDS TO DECLINING3 WATER LEVELS AND ENVIRONMENTALMaster University23 (Biology) Hamilton, Ontario24 TITLE: Forecasting the response of coastal wetlands to declining plants in Lake Ontario coastal36 wetlands while taking into account other factors such as urbanization

McMaster University

43

Coastal Resources "The Wetlands Program provides extensive support to  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Annual Report 2010 Center for Coastal Resources Management #12;"The Wetlands Program provides extensive support to the Commonwealth's tidal wetlands and subaqueous lands management programs through review of individual tidal wetland permit applications, training for local and state managers

44

Coastal Resources "The Wetlands Program provides extensive support to  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Annual Report 2007 Center for Coastal Resources Management #12;"The Wetlands Program provides extensive support to the Commonwealth's tidal wetlands and subaqueous lands management programs through review of individual tidal wetland permit applications, training for local and state managers

45

Elements of an environmental decision support system for seasonal wetland salt management in a river basin subjected to water quality regulation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Seasonally managed wetlands in the Grasslands Basin on the west-side of California's San Joaquin Valley provide food and shelter for migratory wildfowl during winter months and sport for waterfowl hunters during the annual duck season. Surface water supply to these wetlands contain salt which, when drained to the San Joaquin River during the annual drawdown period, can negatively impact water quality and cause concern to downstream agricultural riparian water diverters. Recent environmental regulation, limiting discharges salinity to the San Joaquin River and primarily targeting agricultural non-point sources, now also targets return flows from seasonally managed wetlands. Real-time water quality management has been advocated as a means of continuously matching salt loads discharged from agricultural, wetland and municipal operations to the assimilative capacity of the San Joaquin River. Past attempts to build environmental monitoring and decision support systems (EDSS's) to implement this concept have enjoyed limited success for reasons that are discussed in this paper. These reasons are discussed in the context of more general challenges facing the successful implementation of a comprehensive environmental monitoring, modelling and decision support system for the San Joaquin River Basin.

Quinn, N.W.T.

2009-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

46

Suitability of a Constructed Treatment Wetland as Conservation Habitat and the Impact of the Arroyo Chub (Gila orcutti) on the Invertebrate Community and Mosquito Oviposition  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The emergence of treatment wetlands. Environmental ScienceKnight R.L. 1996. Treatment Wetlands. CRC Press, Boca Raton,in constructed treatment wetlands. Ecological Engineering

Why, Adena

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

47

ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT/REGULATORY IMPACT REVIEW PROPOSAL TO CREATE DISTRICTS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

FINAL ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT/REGULATORY IMPACT REVIEW FOR THE PROPOSAL TO CREATE DISTRICTS WITHIN. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2 1.2.1Environmental Assessment. . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2 1.2.2Regulatory Impact Review . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 2.0 ENVIRONMENTAL AND BIOLOGICAL IMPACTS . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 2.1 Atka Mackerel Biology

48

Environmental Review and the Design Build Process  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

an environmental management plan and provide training to workers · Required to host open Environmental Issues · First Wme MnDOT used an internal environmental compliance manager County Key Environmental Issues · In water project

Minnesota, University of

49

California Department of Fish and Wildlife Environmental Review...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Web Site: California Department of Fish and Wildlife Environmental Review and Permitting Webpage Abstract This website provides...

50

Environmental Management Construction Project Review of the Savannah...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Evaluations Activity Report for the Shadowing of the Environmental Management Construction Project Review of the Savannah River Site Salt Waste Processing Facility on July...

51

ENVIRONMENTAL REVIEW for CATEGORICAL EXCLUSION DETERMINATION  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Being Applied: Memorandum from EXECUTIVE OFFICE OF THE PRESIDENT COUNCIL ON ENVIRONMENTAL QUALITY May 12 1 h. 2010. SUBJECT: Emergencies and the National Environmental...

52

National Wetlands Inventory Wetlands of the  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

National Wetlands Inventory MARCH 1984 Wetlands of the United States: Current Status and Recent, Childers, Tiner, USFWS #12;WETLANDS OF THE UNITED STATES : CURRENT STATUS AND RECENT TRENDS by Ralph W . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 What Is A Wetland

53

Microsoft Word - Environmental Review of B832 Canyon at LLNL...  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Release John Belluardo February 25, 2011 (925) 422-2567 ENVIRONMENTAL REVIEW OF THE BUILDING 832 CANYON OPERABLE UNIT AT LAWRENCE LIVERMORE NATIONAL LABORATORY'S SITE 300 BY U.S....

54

HVDC power transmission environmental issues review  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report strives to define the various environmental effects associated with HVDC lines, discusses the current knowledge of their potential effects on biological and non-biological systems, and compares these effects associated with ac lines where appropriate.

Bailey, W.H.; Weil, D.E. [Bailey Research Associates, Inc., New York, NY (United States); Stewart, J.R. [Power Technologies, Inc., Schenectady, NY (United States)

1997-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

55

Hurricane-induced failure of low salinity wetlands Nick C. Howesa,1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Hurricane-induced failure of low salinity wetlands Nick C. Howesa,1 , Duncan M. FitzGeralda , Zoe J States Army Engineer Research and Development Center, Environmental Laboratory, Wetlands Environmental of wetlands within the Louisiana coastal plain. Low salinity wetlands were preferentially eroded, while higher

Kulp, Mark

56

ENVIRONMENTAL REVIEW FOR CATEGORICAL EXCLUSION DETERMINATION  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "of EnergyEnergy CooperationRequirementsDraft Environmental ImpactEM Active SitesofEM'sENMAX EnergyLANL

57

ENVIRONMENTAL REVIEW FOR CATEGORICAL EXCLUSION DETERMINATION  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "of EnergyEnergy CooperationRequirementsDraft Environmental ImpactEM Active SitesofEM'sENMAX

58

ENVIRONMENTAL REVIEW FOR CATEGORICAL EXCLUSION DETERMINATION  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "of EnergyEnergy CooperationRequirementsDraft Environmental ImpactEM Active SitesofEM'sENMAXWestem Area Power

59

Environmental Review Form for Argonne National Laboratory  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:YearRound-UpHeat PumpRecord ofESPCof EnergyHouse Environmental Justice ForumMaturity Valuef o

60

Environmental Review Form for Argonne National Laboratory  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:YearRound-UpHeat PumpRecord ofESPCof EnergyHouse Environmental Justice ForumMaturity Valuef

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "wetland environmental review" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

HUD's Environmental Review Training | Department of Energy  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:YearRound-UpHeatMulti-Dimensional Subject:Ground SourceHBLED HotSeptember 2005 |HUD's Environmental

62

The Virginia Wetlands Report  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

VWR -- 1 The Virginia Wetlands Report The Virginia Wetlands Report Winter/Spring 2000 Vol. 15, No. 1 Virginia Debates Nontidal Wetlands Regulation Carl Hershner Wetland regulation is once again- trolling impacts on existing wetlands, as well as creating new wetlands. There is general agreement

63

REVIEW Open Access Assessing environmental impacts of offshore wind  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

REVIEW Open Access Assessing environmental impacts of offshore wind farms: lessons learned and recommendations for the future Helen Bailey1* , Kate L Brookes2 and Paul M Thompson3 Abstract Offshore wind power literature and our experience with assessing impacts of offshore wind developments on marine mammals

Aberdeen, University of

64

Review article Consequences of environmental stress on oak  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Review article Consequences of environmental stress on oak: predisposition to pathogens PM Wargo also can act as a predisposing stress. Stress causes physical, physiological, and chemical changes mortalité. dépérissement / stress / pathogènes secondaires / Quercus INTRODUCTION Decline diseases of trees

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

65

ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT/REGULATORY IMPACT REVIEW/ FINAL REGULATORY FLEXIBILITY ANALYSIS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT/REGULATORY IMPACT REVIEW/ FINAL REGULATORY FLEXIBILITY ANALYSIS Amendment and Need The purpose of the non-AFA crab sideboard limits was to prevent vessels with crab QS from paper of all GOA sideboards for non-American Fisheries Act (AFA) crab vessels. In April 2007

66

ERDC/ELTR-08-28 Wetlands Regulatory Assistance Program  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ERDC/ELTR-08-28 Wetlands Regulatory Assistance Program Regional Supplement to the Corps of Engineers Wetland Delineation Manual: Arid West Region (Version 2.0) U.S. Army Corps of Engineers September 2008 EnvironmentalLaboratory Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. #12;Wetlands

US Army Corps of Engineers

67

ERDC/ELTR-12-5 Wetlands Regulatory Assistance Program  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ERDC/ELTR-12-5 Wetlands Regulatory Assistance Program Regional Supplement to the Corps of Engineers Wetland Delineation Manual: Hawai`i and Pacific Islands Region (Version 2.0) EnvironmentalLaboratory U;#12;Wetlands Regulatory Assistance Program ERDC/EL TR-12-5 February 2012 Regional Supplement to the Corps

US Army Corps of Engineers

68

ERDC/ELTR-10-1 Wetlands Regulatory Assistance Program  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ERDC/ELTR-10-1 Wetlands Regulatory Assistance Program Regional Supplement to the Corps of Engineers Wetland Delineation Manual: Great Plains Region (Version 2.0) U.S. Army Corps of Engineers March 2010 EnvironmentalLaboratory Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. #12;Wetlands Regulatory

US Army Corps of Engineers

69

ERDC/ELTR-12-9 Wetlands Regulatory Assistance Program  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ERDC/ELTR-12-9 Wetlands Regulatory Assistance Program Regional Supplement to the Corps of Engineers Wetland Delineation Manual: Eastern Mountains and Piedmont Region (Version 2.0) EnvironmentalLaboratory U;#12;Wetlands Regulatory Assistance Program ERDC/EL TR-12-9 April 2012 Regional Supplement to the Corps

US Army Corps of Engineers

70

ERDC/ELTR-10-16 Wetlands Regulatory Assistance Program  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ERDC/ELTR-10-16 Wetlands Regulatory Assistance Program Regional Supplement to the Corps of Engineers Wetland Delineation Manual: Midwest Region (Version 2.0) EnvironmentalLaboratory U.S. Army Corps of Engineers August 2010 Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. #12;Wetlands Regulatory

US Army Corps of Engineers

71

ERDC/ELTR-07-24 Wetlands Regulatory Assistance Program  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ERDC/ELTR-07-24 Wetlands Regulatory Assistance Program Regional Supplement to the Corps of Engineers Wetland Delineation Manual: Alaska Region (Version 2.0) U.S. Army Corps of Engineers September 2007 EnvironmentalLaboratory Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. #12;Wetlands

US Army Corps of Engineers

72

What is a Wetland? Matthew J. Gray  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and Filling of Wetlands Permits Issued by Army Corps of Engineers Environmental Impact Statement and organisms live Substrate is non-soil (H2O depth prevents emergent hydrophyte growth) >2 m (6.6 ft) in Depth (Non-tidal Wetlands) #12;3 What are Hydrophytes? USACE Definition "...macrophytic plant life

Gray, Matthew

73

D-1 2012 SITE ENVIRONMENTAL REPORT Federal, State, and Local Laws and  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

with Floodplain/Wetlands Environmental Review Requirements 10 CFR 830 Subpart A: Quality Assurance Requirements 10 and Transportation Management EO 13514 Federal leadership in Environmental, Energy, and Economic Performance 10 CFR 1021 National Environmental Protection Act, Implementing and Procedures 10 CFR 1022 Compliance

74

D-1 2004 SITE ENVIRONMENTAL REPORT Federal, State, and Local Laws and  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1022 Compliance with Floodplain/Wetlands Environmental Review Requirements 10 CFR 830 Subpart A in Environmental Management 10 CFR 1021 National Environmental Protection Act, Implementing and Procedures 10 CFR: Quality Assurance Requirements 10 CFR 834 Radiation Protection of the Public and the Environment 16 USC

75

D-2006 Site environmental report Federal, State, and Local Laws and  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1022 Compliance with Floodplain/Wetlands Environmental Review Requirements 10 CFR 830 Subpart A in Environmental Management 10 CFR 1021 National Environmental Protection Act, Implementing and Procedures 10 CFR: Quality Assurance Requirements 10 CFR 834 Radiation Protection of the Public and the Environment 16 USC

76

D-1 2010 SITE ENVIRONMENTAL REPORT Federal, State, and Local Laws and  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

/Wetlands Environmental Review Requirements 10 CFR 830 Subpart A: Quality Assurance Requirements 10 CFR 834 Radiation EO 13514 Federal leadership in Environmental, Energy, and Economic Performance 10 CFR 1021 National Environmental Protection Act, Implementing and Procedures 10 CFR 1022 Compliance with Floodplain

77

D-2007 Site environmental report Federal, State, and Local Laws and  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1022 Compliance with Floodplain/Wetlands Environmental Review Requirements 10 CFR 830 Subpart A in Environmental Management 10 CFR 1021 National Environmental Protection Act, Implementing and Procedures 10 CFR: Quality Assurance Requirements 10 CFR 834 Radiation Protection of the Public and the Environment 16 USC

78

D-1 2011 SITE ENVIRONMENTAL REPORT Federal, State, and Local Laws and  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

with Floodplain/Wetlands Environmental Review Requirements 10 CFR 830 Subpart A: Quality Assurance Requirements 10 and Transportation Management EO 13514 Federal leadership in Environmental, Energy, and Economic Performance 10 CFR 1021 National Environmental Protection Act, Implementing and Procedures 10 CFR 1022 Compliance

79

D-1 2013 SITE ENVIRONMENTAL REPORT Federal, State, and Local Laws and  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

with Floodplain/Wetlands Environmental Review Requirements 10 CFR 830 Subpart A: Quality Assurance Requirements 10 and Transportation Management EO 13514 Federal leadership in Environmental, Energy, and Economic Performance 10 CFR 1021 National Environmental Protection Act, Implementing and Procedures 10 CFR 1022 Compliance

80

D-2005 Site environmental report Federal, State, and Local Laws and  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1022 Compliance with Floodplain/Wetlands Environmental Review Requirements 10 CFR 830 Subpart A in Environmental Management 10 CFR 1021 National Environmental Protection Act, Implementing and Procedures 10 CFR: Quality Assurance Requirements 10 CFR 834 Radiation Protection of the Public and the Environment 16 USC

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "wetland environmental review" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

The Virginia Wetlands Report  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The Virginia Wetlands Report Summer 1997 Vol. 12, No. 2The Virginia Wetlands Report Wetlands mitigation banking is a relatively new tool for wetlands managers. It is finding increasing application in the struggle to achieve a "no net loss" goal for our remaining wetland resources. The concept of creating

82

The Virginia Wetlands Report  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

VWR -- 1 The Virginia Wetlands Report The Virginia Wetlands Report Fall 2005 Vol. 20, No. 2 VMRC Adopts Wetland Mitigation/ Compensation Policy Changes By Tom Barnard When the Virginia Wetlands Act went into effect on July 1, thirty- three years ago, no one had ever heard of compensatory mitigation, wetland

83

The Virginia Wetlands Report  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

VWR -- 1 The Virginia Wetlands Report The Virginia Wetlands Report Spring 2005 Vol. 20, No. 1 Annual Summary of Permitted Tidal Wetland Impacts - 2004 By Karen Duhring The Wetlands Program has main impact areas based on a site visit and information provided in the permit documents. The Wetlands Program

84

Comments of the Independent Peer-Review Team for the Arid West Regional Supplement to the 1987 Corps of Engineers Wetlands Delineation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Corps of Engineers Wetlands Delineation Manual, and Responses by the Corps of Engineers and Arid West are still very active in professional wetland delineation work which would have clarified original intent. "Further, the Working Group and contributors" included NO private sector wetland scientists much less ones

US Army Corps of Engineers

85

Vermont Wetland Rules (Vermont)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

A permit is required for any activity within a Class I or Class II wetland or wetland buffer zone which is not an allowed use. Activity in Class I or Class II wetland or its associated buffer zone...

86

Review: American Environmental Policy, 1990-2006: Beyond Gridlock by Christopher McGrory Klyza and David Sousa  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Review: American Environmental Policy, 1990-2006: BeyondDavid. American Environmental Policy, 1990-2006: Beyondtaken to generate environmental policy from 1990 to 2006.

Anderson, Byron P.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

87

Pace Environmental Law Review Online Companion Issue 1 Practically Grounded: Best Practices for Skill  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Pace Environmental Law Review Online Companion Volume 2 Issue 1 Practically Grounded: Best Practices for Skill Building in Teaching Land Use, Environmental, and Sustainable Development Law Summer been accepted for inclusion in Pace Environmental Law Review Online Companion by an authorized

Rissman, Adena

88

The Virginia Wetlands Report  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The Virginia Wetlands Report Fall 1997 Vol. 12, No. 3The Virginia Wetlands Report Almost everyone their actions. It is this com- mon sense notion which is motivating a new Wetlands Initiative under the auspices of the Chesapeake Bay Program Wetlands Workgroup. State and federal wet- lands program man- agers are working

89

The Virginia Wetlands Report  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

VWR -- 1 The Virginia Wetlands Report The Virginia Wetlands Report Fall 2001 Vol. 16, No. 3 A GIS Approach for Targeting Potential Wetlands Mitigation or Restoration Sites By Marcia Berman and Tamia vegeta- tion, islands, and wetlands. Most activi- ties enhance habitat for living resources, but also

90

The Virginia Wetlands Report  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

VWR -- 1 The Virginia Wetlands Report The Virginia Wetlands Report Spring 2002 Vol. 17, No. 1 Update On Virginia's New and Improved Nontidal Wetlands Program By Ellen Gilinsky, Ph.D. PWS Virginia wetlands program. Key changes included the provi- sion of additional jurisdic- tion over: excavation in all

91

The Virginia Wetlands Report  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The Virginia Wetlands Report Continued on page 2 Spring 1996 Vol. 11, No. 2The Virginia Wetlands Report Completely Updated The Wetlands Program of the Vir- ginia Institute of Marine Science has completed its update of the Vir- ginia Wetlands Management Hand- book, and with the aid of the Marine

92

The Virginia Wetlands Report  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

VWR -- 1 The Virginia Wetlands Report The Virginia Wetlands Report Winter/Spring 2001 Vol. 16, No. 1 The VIMS Teaching Marsh: A Tidal Wetland Restoration and Education Project Karen Duhring Purpose wetlands education opportunities, including field lessons. Due to the vari- ety and geographic distribution

93

MEMORANDUM FOR SWG-2007-1623 Subject: Jurisdictional Determination (JD) for SWG-2007-1623 on Interdunal Wetlands  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-1623 on Interdunal Wetlands Adjacent to Traditional Navigable Waters (TNWs) Summary The U.S. Environmental Protection wetlands for JD SWG-2007- 1623. This determination is based on our finding that these wetlands are adjacent interdunal wetlands for JD SWG-2007-1623. First, we provide a baseline assessment (in Section II

US Army Corps of Engineers

94

Habitat Evaluation: Guidance for the Review of Environmental...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

More Documents & Publications EA-1705: Draft Environmental Assessment Incorporating Biodiversity Considerations Into Environmental Impact Analysis Under NEPA EA-1023: Final...

95

Environmental impact of geopressure - geothermal cogeneration facility on wetland resources and socioeconomic characteristics in Louisiana Gulf Coast region. Final report, October 10, 1983-September 31, 1984  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Baseline data relevant to air quality are presented. The following are also included: geology and resource assessment, design well prospects in southwestern Louisiana, water quality monitoring, chemical analysis subsidence, microseismicity, geopressure-geothermal subsidence modeling, models of compaction and subsidence, sampling handling and preparation, brine chemistry, wetland resources, socioeconomic characteristics, impacts on wetlands, salinity, toxic metals, non-metal toxicants, temperature, subsidence, and socioeconomic impacts. (MHR)

Smalley, A.M.; Saleh, F.M.S.; Fontenot, M.

1984-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

96

FILENAME.PPT CONSTRUCTED WETLANDS:CONSTRUCTED WETLANDS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

treatment media #12;FILENAME.PPT Marsh Pond Meadow Rip-RapRip-Rap Wetland Plants Wetland Plants EffluentFILENAME.PPT CONSTRUCTED WETLANDS:CONSTRUCTED WETLANDS: An Overview of the TechnologyAn Overview Is A Constructed Wetland? What Is A Constructed Wetland? Saturated Substrates Definition: A designed and man

Detwiler, Russell

97

Wetlands and Fish: A Vital Connection 2 What is a Wetland? 3  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

#12;Wetlands and Fish: A Vital Connection 2 What is a Wetland? 3 Are Wetlands Important? 4 Wetlands and their Surroundings 5 Wetlands in the U.S. Caribbean Region 6 Distribution 6 Common Wetland Types 7 Saltwater wetlands 7 Freshwater wetlands 7 Wetland Loss and Consequences 9 Fish Need Wetlands 10 Wetlands as Habitat 10

98

Review: Lynton Keith Caldwell: An Environmental Visionary and the National Environmental Policy Act  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and the National Environmental Policy Act By Wendy Readand the National Environmental Policy Act. Bloomington, IN:of the 1969 National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA), the

Anderson, Byron

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

99

NEW COURSE: WETLAND HYDROLOGY AND BIOGEOCHEMISTRY  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

wetland delineation, wetland restoration, and constructed wetlands for water treatment. Course contentNEW COURSE: WETLAND HYDROLOGY AND BIOGEOCHEMISTRY EXPLORING THE PROCESSES THAT CONTROL WETLAND (FOR 5984; CRN 19997) Course Overview and Objectives: Wetland ecosystems provide myriad functions from

Buehrer, R. Michael

100

Review of Environmental Goals and Sustainable Prosperity Act A submission to  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ERG/201105 Review of Environmental Goals and Sustainable Prosperity Act A submission to the Nova to the call for comments on the Government of Nova Scotia's 2011 review of the Environmental Goals uninterrupted physical availability at a price which is affordable, while respecting environment concerns" (IEA

Hughes, Larry

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "wetland environmental review" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Environmental Assessment/Regulatory Impact Review/Final Regulatory Flexibility Analysis  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Environmental Assessment/Regulatory Impact Review/Final Regulatory Flexibility Analysis (EA . . . . . . . . . . . 11 2.0 NEPA REQUIREMENTS: ENVIRONMENTAL IMPACTS OF THE ALTERNATIVES . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 15 2.1 Environmental Impacts of the Alternatives . . . . . 15 2.2 Whale watching activity in Alaska

102

REVIEW OF STRATEGIES FOR MODELLING THE ENVIRONMENTAL FATE OF PESTICIDES DISCHARGED INTO RIVERINE SYSTEMS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

can enter the nearby riverine system possibly causing considerable environmental damage (for exampleREVIEW OF STRATEGIES FOR MODELLING THE ENVIRONMENTAL FATE OF PESTICIDES DISCHARGED INTO RIVERINE Warren Spring Laboratory, Gunnels Wood Road, Stevenage, SG1 2BX, UK. 3 School of Environmental Sciences

Paris-Sud XI, Universit de

103

Wetland Preservation Areas (Minnesota)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

A wetland owner can apply to the host county for designation of a wetland preservation area. Once designated, the area remains designated until the owner initiates expiration, except where a state...

104

Ecologically Significant Wetlands  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Ecologically Significant Wetlands in the Flathead, Stillwater, and Swan River Valleys FINAL REPORT Also: Ecologically Significant Wetlands in the North Fork of the Flathead River Valley Appendix 29b #12;Ecologically Significant Wetlands in the Flathead, Stillwater, and Swan River Valleys JUNE 1, 1999 DEQ

105

Santa Rosa Wetlands .. .................................1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

· Santa Rosa Wetlands .. .................................1 · Botrychium................6 · What cognitiorem tradit. -- Linnaeus January 5, 2004Number 29 VASCULAR PLANTS OF SOME SANTA ROSA WETLANDS, EAST wetland habitat in New Mexico is less well known. Relatively large expanses of municipal and private

Johnson, Eric E.

106

Fish ecology of a wetland in the southern Western Ghats, India.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??Fish assemblages and abiotic environmental conditions in a wetland in the Western Ghats, southern India, were investigated from August 2000 to July 2001. Rainfall showed (more)

Grubh, Archis Robert

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

107

Electricity from biomass: An environmental review and strategy  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report presents an environmental assessment and strategy for the US Department of Energy Biomass Power Program. The regulatory context and the environmental impact of biomass power technologies are described, and an environmental plan for the program is suggested. The plan suggest a proactive, synergistic approach, involving multiple parties with a stake in the successful commercialization of a biomass power industry. These parties include feedstock growers, state regulators. Forest Service and agricultural agents, utilities and independent power producers, rural electric cooperatives, and environmental activists.

None

1993-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

108

EA-0941: Final Environmental Assessment | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Environmental Assessment EA-0941: Final Environmental Assessment Lower Yakima Valley Wetlands and Riparian Restoration Project This EA evaluates the environmental impacts of the...

109

Ecologically Significant Wetlands in the  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Ecologically Significant Wetlands in the North Fork Flathead River Watershed Prepared See Also: Ecologically Significant Wetlands in the Flathead, Stillwater, & Swan River Valleys Appendix 29 #12;Ecologically Significant Wetlands in the North Fork Flathead River Watershed Prepared

110

Pipeline corridors through wetlands  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper presents preliminary findings from six vegetational surveys of gas pipeline rights-of-way (ROW) through wetlands and quantifies the impacts of a 20-year-old pipeline ROW through a boreal forest wetland. Six sites of various ages were surveyed in ecosystems ranging from coastal marsh to forested wetland. At all sites except one, both the number and the percentage of wetland species on the Row approximated or exceeded those in the adjacent natural area. The boreal forest study showed that (1) adjacent natural wetland areas were not altered in type; (2) water sheet flow restriction had been reversed by nature; (3) no nonnative plant species invaded the natural area; (4) three-quarters of the ROW area was a wetland, and (5) the ROW increased diversity.

Zimmerman, R.E.; Wilkey, P.L. (Argonne National Lab., IL (United States)); Isaacson, H.R. (Gas Research Institute (United States))

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

111

Pipeline corridors through wetlands  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper presents preliminary findings from six vegetational surveys of gas pipeline rights-of-way (ROW) through wetlands and quantifies the impacts of a 20-year-old pipeline ROW through a boreal forest wetland. Six sites of various ages were surveyed in ecosystems ranging from coastal marsh to forested wetland. At all sites except one, both the number and the percentage of wetland species on the Row approximated or exceeded those in the adjacent natural area. The boreal forest study showed that (1) adjacent natural wetland areas were not altered in type; (2) water sheet flow restriction had been reversed by nature; (3) no nonnative plant species invaded the natural area; (4) three-quarters of the ROW area was a wetland, and (5) the ROW increased diversity.

Zimmerman, R.E.; Wilkey, P.L. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States); Isaacson, H.R. [Gas Research Institute (United States)

1992-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

112

The Yalahau Regional Wetland Survey: Ancient Maya Land Use in Northern Quintana Roo, Mexico  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Features in Southern Campeche: New Perspectives on theArchaeological Reconnaissance in Campeche, Quintana Roo, andpatterns in wetlands in Campeche and Belize (see review by

Leonard, Daniel Ian

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

113

Wetland Conservation Act (Minnesota)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This chapter of the Minnesota Administrative Rules implements the Wetland Conservation Act of 1991, setting standards for water preservation, withdrawal, and replacement.

114

Tidal Wetlands Regulations (Connecticut)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Most activities occurring in or near tidal wetlands are regulated, and this section contains information on such activities and required permit applications for proposed activities. Applications...

115

Compliance With Floodplain and Wetland Environmental Review Requirements (10 CFR Parts 1021 and 1022) - FR Notice, August 27, 2003  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "ofEarly Career Scientists'Montana. DOCUMENTS AVAILABLEReport 2009 Department ofHallam NuclearMarch 5,August51429

116

International Wetlands Conference WETLANDS IN A COMPLEX WORLD  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

9th INTECOL International Wetlands Conference WETLANDS IN A COMPLEX WORLD June 3-8, 2012 Orlando .................................................................................... 27 Society of Wetland Scientists (SWS) Section-Organized Symposia and Section-Sponsored Sessions.................................................................................................................. 222 #12;9 th INTECOL: International Wetlands Conference 2 WELCOME TO THE JOINT CONFERENCE OF: 9TH

Slatton, Clint

117

A comparative review of accident studies from recent environmental impact statements  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) has recently prepared or is in the process of preparing a number of programmatic and site-specific environmental impact statements (EISs). This study was conducted for the purpose of reviewing the self-consistency of programmatic alternatives, associated relative impacts, and supporting data, methods, and assumptions in EISs prepared for related activities. The following EISs, which deal with waste management issues, are reviewed in this paper (the parenthetical acronyms are referred to in Table 1): (1) Final Environmental Impact Statement, Savannah River Site Waste Management, DOE/EIS-0217, Vol. II, July 1995. (SRS WM-EIS), (2) Draft Waste Management Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement for Managing Treatment, Storage, and Disposal of Radioactive and Hazardous Waste, DOE/EIS-0200-D, Vol. IV, Aug. 1995. (WM PEIS), (3) Final Environmental Impact Statement, Interim Management of Nuclear Materials at the Savannah River Site. DOE/EIS-0220, Oct. 1995. (IMNM EIS), (4) Department of Energy Programmatic Spent Nuclear Fuel Management and Idaho National Engineering Laboratory Environmental Restoration and Waste Management Programs Environmental Impact Statement, DOE/EIS-0203-F, April 1995. (INEL Site-Wide-EIS), (5) Draft Environmental Impact Statement, Disposition of Surplus Highly Enriched Uranium, DOE/EIS-0240-D, Oct. 1995. (HEU Disposition EIS), (6) Final Environmental Impact Statement, Safe Interim Storage of Hanford Tank Wastes, Hanford Site, Richland, Washington, DOE/EIS-0212, Oct. 1995. (SIS EIS). This study compares the facility accident analysis approaches used in these EISs vis-a-vis the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) guidance developed by DOE (Recommendations for the Preparation of Environmental Assessments and Environmental Impact Statements, Office of NEPA Oversight). The purpose of the comparative review of these approaches with NEPA guidance is to identify potential preferred paths for future EISs.

Mueller, C.; Folga, S.; Nabelssi, B.

1996-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

118

Energy and Environmental Systems Division 1981 research review  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

To effectively manage the nation's energy and natural resources, government and industry leaders need accurate information regarding the performance and economics of advanced energy systems and the costs and benefits of public-sector initiatives. The Energy and Environmental Systems Division (EES) of Argonne National Laboratory conducts applied research and development programs that provide such information through systems analysis, geophysical field research, and engineering studies. During 1981, the division: analyzed the production economics of specific energy resources, such as biomass and tight sands gas; developed and transferred to industry economically efficient techniques for addressing energy-related resource management and environmental protection problems, such as the reclamation of strip-mined land; determined the engineering performance and cost of advanced energy-supply and pollution-control systems; analyzed future markets for district heating systems and other emerging energy technologies; determined, in strategic planning studies, the availability of resources needed for new energy technologies, such as the imported metals used in advanced electric-vehicle batteries; evaluated the effectiveness of strategies for reducing scarce-fuel consumption in the transportation sector; identified the costs and benefits of measures designed to stabilize the financial condition of US electric utilities; estimated the costs of nuclear reactor shutdowns and evaluated geologic conditions at potential sites for permanent underground storage of nuclear waste; evaluated the cost-effectiveness of environmental regulations, particularly those affecting coal combustion; and identified the environmental effects of energy technologies and transportation systems.

Not Available

1982-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

119

Annual Review 2013/14 eci Environmental Change Institute  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

04 About us 06 Training environmental leaders 08 Doctoral training programme 10 Not just any graduate the functioning of forest ecosystems 17 Governing tropical forests 18 How vulnerable are our animals, plants to make adaptation happen 30 Planning global food systems to feed the world 32 Analysing water risks

Oxford, University of

120

Assessing cumulative impacts within state environmental review frameworks in the United States  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Cumulative impact assessment (CIA) is the process of systematically assessing a proposed action's cumulative environmental effects in the context of past, present, and future actions, regardless of who undertakes such actions. Previous studies have examined CIA efforts at the federal level but little is known about how states assess the cumulative impacts of nonfederal projects. By examining state environmental review statutes, administrative rules, agency-prepared materials, and a national survey of the administrators of state environmental review programs, this study identifies the legal and administrative frameworks for CIA. It examines current CIA practice, discusses the relationship between CIA policy and its implementation, and explores the opportunities for improvement. The results of the study show that twenty-nine state environmental review programs across twenty-six states required the assessment of cumulative environmental impacts. More than half of these programs have adopted specific procedures for implementing their policies. Some programs assessed cumulative impacts using a standard review document, and others have created their own documentations incorporated into applications for state permits or funding. The majority of programs have adopted various scales, baselines, significance criteria, and coordination practices in their CIA processes. Mixed methods were generally used for data collection and analysis; qualitative methods were more prevalent than quantitative methods. The results also suggest that a program with comprehensive and consistent environmental review policies and procedures does not always imply extensive CIA requirements and practices. Finally, this study discusses the potential for improving existing CIA processes and promoting CIA efforts in states without established environmental review programs.

Ma Zhao, E-mail: zma@nrc.umass.ed [Department of Natural Resources Conservation, University of Massachusetts Amherst, 160 Holdsworth Way, Amherst, MA 01003-9285 (United States); Becker, Dennis R., E-mail: drbecker@umn.ed [Department of Forest Resources, University of Minnesota, 1530 Cleveland Avenue North, St. Paul, MN 55108-6112 (United States); Kilgore, Michael A., E-mail: mkilgore@umn.ed [Department of Forest Resources, University of Minnesota, 1530 Cleveland Avenue North, St. Paul, MN 55108-6112 (United States)

2009-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "wetland environmental review" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Draft Environmental Impact Statement Available for Public Review |  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:Year in Review: TopEnergy DOEDealingVehicle1 Closing the Circle: The Department

122

Use of environmental sensors and sensor networks to develop water and salinity budgets for seasonal wetland real-time water quality management  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Successful management of river salt loads in complex and highly regulated river basins such as the San Joaquin of California presents significant challenges to Information Technology. Models are used as means of simulating major hydrologic processes in the basin which affect water quality and can be useful as tools for organizing basin information in a structured and readily accessible manner. Models can also be used to extrapolate the results of system monitoring since it is impossible to collect data for every point and non-point source of a pollutant in the Basin. Fundamental to every model is the concept of mass balance. This paper describes the use of state-of-the-art sensor technologies deployed in concert to obtain the first water and salinity budgets for a 60,000 hectare tract of seasonally managed wetlands in the San Joaquin Basin of California.

Quinn, N.W.T.; Ortega, R.; Rahilly, P.J.A,; Royer, C.W.

2009-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

123

Independent Oversight Review, Oak Ridge Office of Environmental Management  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "ofEarly Career Scientists'Montana.ProgramJulietipDepartment ofTheDepartment of Energy 4 Review|- February

124

The Virginia Wetlands Report  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

wetlands in the commonwealth. The newly enacted Virginia Wet- landsAct of 1972 went into effect July estuarine tributary of the park. The construction of the marina would have required dredging a defined

125

D.M. Whitacre (ed) Reviews of Environmental Contamination and Toxicology 214, 87-124  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

in such reinforcement is to evaluate toxic effects at the community level by applying community ecology conceptsD.M. Whitacre (ed) Reviews of Environmental Contamination and Toxicology 214, 87-124 DOI 10.1007/978-1-4614-0668-6_5, © Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2011 Effects of Organic Herbicides on Phototrophic Microbial

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

126

Environmental Assessment/Regulatory Impact Review AMENDMENT 45 TO THE FISHERY MANAGEMENT PLAN  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Environmental Assessment/Regulatory Impact Review FOR AMENDMENT 45 TO THE FISHERY MANAGEMENT PLAN it would conflict with the Bering Sea non-roe season. At its January 1996 meeting, the Council considered/C Regulatory Areas must be made. Amendment 19 to the FMP, implemented as a measure to prevent roe stripping

127

EIS-0389: Notice of Intent To Prepare an Environmental Impact...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Environmental Impact Statement and Conduct Scoping Meetings; Notice of Floodplain and Wetlands Involvement EIS-0389: Notice of Intent To Prepare an Environmental Impact Statement...

128

EIS-0301: Notice of Intent to Prepare an Environmental Impact...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

of Intent to Prepare an Environmental Impact Statement and Notice of Floodplain and Wetlands Involvement EIS-0301: Notice of Intent to Prepare an Environmental Impact Statement...

129

EIS-0390: Notice of Intent to Prepare an Environmental Impact...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Intent to Prepare an Environmental Impact Statement; Floodplain and Wetlands Involvement; and Public Scoping Meetings EIS-0390: Notice of Intent to Prepare an Environmental Impact...

130

EIS-0409: Notice of Intent to Prepare an Environmental Impact...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

to Prepare an Environmental Impact Statement and Notice of Proposed Floodplain and Wetlands Involvement EIS-0409: Notice of Intent to Prepare an Environmental Impact Statement...

131

EIS-0475: Notice of Intent To Prepare an Environmental Impact...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

5: Notice of Intent To Prepare an Environmental Impact Statement and Notice of Wetlands Involvement EIS-0475: Notice of Intent To Prepare an Environmental Impact Statement and...

132

Standard Review Plan for Environmental Restoration Program Quality Management Plans. Revision 2  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Department of Energy, Richland Operations Office (RL) Manual Environmental Restoration Program Quality System Requirements (QSR) for the Hanford Site, defines all quality requirements governing Hanford Environmental Restoration (ER) Program activities. The QSR requires that ER Program participants develop Quality Management Plans (QMPs) that describe how the QSR requirements will be implemented for their assigned scopes of work. This standard review plan (SRP) describes the ER program participant responsibilities for submittal of QMPs to the RL Environmental Restoration Division for review and the RL methodology for performing the reviews of participant QMPS. The SRP serves the following functions: acts as a guide in the development or revision of QMPs to assure that the content is complete and adequate; acts as a checklist to be used by the RL staff in their review of participant QMPs; acts as an index or matrix between the requirements of the QSR and implementing methodologies described in the QMPs; decreases the time and subjectivity of document reviews; and provides a formal, documented method for describing exceptions, modifications, or waivers to established ER Program quality requirements.

Not Available

1993-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

133

WaterbirdsWaterbirds on different wetland typeson different wetland types MethodsMethods  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

wetland type? We observedWe observed waterbirdswaterbirds on 5 wetland types:on 5 wetland types: treatmentAdditional treatment ponds may attract larger numbers of wetland birds,larger numbers of wetland birds, particularlyWaterbirdsWaterbirds on different wetland typeson different wetland types MethodsMethods Result

Johnson, Matthew

134

The Amenity Value of Wetlands  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

family homes using actual sales prices of properties from 1991 to 2005 in Chatham County, Georgia, where wetland resources are unevenly distributed in terms of types and quantities of wetlands. Separate hedonic models are investigated to understand...

Gao, Shan

2010-07-14T23:59:59.000Z

135

Regulatory and Wetlands Policy (Minnesota)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

These statutes establish wetlands as a natural resource of public value in the State, and state that it is in the public interest to restore and preserve these wetlands and their biological...

136

Mitigating avian impacts: Applying the wetlands experience to wind farms  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) and state environmental laws spawned by NEPA, such as the California Environmental Quality Act (CEQA) and Washington State`s Environmental Policy Act (SEPA) have made us familiar with the concept of {open_quotes}mitigating{close_quotes} a project`s adverse environmental impacts. As wind energy projects expand to state with widely varying environmental regulation, the wind industry can look to other experiences in land use regulation, such as wetlands, for approaches to mitigation. Wetlands have been a point of friction between environmentalists, property rights advocates, local and state governments, and a host of federal agencies. A highly developed conceptual framework to mitigating environmental impacts has risen from this regulatory swamp of conflicting interests and overlapping jurisdictions.

Wolff, B. [Conservation and Renewable Energy System, Vancouver, WA (United States)

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

137

White Ranch Wetlands Biological Survey  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

White Ranch Wetlands Biological Survey and Permanent Vegetation Monitoring Plots Prepared for: U Services Building Colorado State University Fort Collins, CO 80523 March 1998 #12;WHITE RANCH WETLANDS assessment of the White Ranch wetlands. In addition we set up permanent plots along transects to collect

138

WETLANDS, Vol. 26, No. 1, March 2006, pp. 97106 2006, The Society of Wetland Scientists  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

97 WETLANDS, Vol. 26, No. 1, March 2006, pp. 97­106 2006, The Society of Wetland Scientists SPATIAL

Manley, Steven L.

139

Environmental Review  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsruc DocumentationP-Series toESnet4: NetworkingEnvironment EnvironmentFIB/SEM

140

Interagency Review of the Department of Energy Environmental Restoration and Waste Management Program  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report presents the findings of the Interagency Requirements Review of the Department of Energy (DOE) Environmental Restoration and Waste Management (ERWM) Program. The review was requested by Admiral Watkins to help determine the FY 1993 funding levels necessary to meet all legal requirements. The review was undertaken by analysts from the Office of Management and Budget (OMB) and Army Corps of Engineers, reporting to an Interagency Group (IAG) of senior Administration officials concerned with environmental cleanup issues. The purpose of the study was to determine the level of finding needed in FY 1993 for each ERWM Field Office to comply with all Federal, State, and local government legal requirements; all DOE Orders that establish standards for environment, safety and health (ES and H) management; and for prudent investments in other discretionary and management activities such as upgrading administrative buildings, information systems, etc. The study also reviewed the cost estimates supporting the ERWM proposed budget, including direct costs (labor, equipment) and indirect costs (administrative, landlord services, contractor overhead). The study did not analyze whether the Federal/State legal requirements and DOE Orders were necessary or whether the proposed clean-up remedies represent the most cost effective alternatives available.

NONE

1992-04-29T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "wetland environmental review" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Wetlands Status and Trends for Coastal Wetlands P. Chow-Fraser  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Wetlands Status and Trends ­ for Coastal Wetlands P. Chow-Fraser Background Coastal wetlands as wetlands that occur within 2 km of the 1:100 year floodline of the Great Lake/channel shoreline, and include all four wetland types identified in the Ontario Wetland Evaluation System. An estimate of current

McMaster University

142

The Virginia Wetlands Report  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Board is Excellent Learning Tool for Virginia Beach Students by Karla L. Schillinger The apple-headed gavel struck the desk top precisely at 10:00 a.m. with a bang. The Waterton Wetlands Board public "help the environment and the economy of Waterton," Dozer was proposing to subdivide the 55 acre farm

143

Federal Register Notice for Addendum to Environmental Review Documents Concerning Exports of Natural Gas from the United States  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The Office of Fossil Energy (FE) of the Department of Energy (DOE) announces the availability of the Addendum To Environmental Review Documents Concerning Exports Of Natural Gas From The United...

144

Techniques for Wetlands Construction and Management  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Wetlands are important ecosystems that contain a vast array of plants and animals. Wetlands perform a variety of vital functions, such as purifying water. This publication explains the role of wetlands and how to construct and manage them....

Locke, Shawn; Frentress, C.; Cathey, James; Mason, C.; Hirsch, R.; Wagner, M.

2007-09-04T23:59:59.000Z

145

Introduction Wetlands are increasingly used for wastewater  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Introduction Wetlands are increasingly used for wastewater treatment Plant community changes and related nutrient retention within an aridland constructed wastewater treatment wetland How does plant community composition change in an aridland constructed wastewater treatment wetland and how do those

Hall, Sharon J.

146

Preliminary standard review guide for Environmental Restoration/Decontamination and Decommissioning safety analyses  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The review guide is based on the shared experiences, approaches, and philosophies of the Environmental Restoration/Decontamination and Decommissioning (ER/D&D) subgroup members. It is presented in the form of a review guide to maximize the benefit to both the safety analyses practitioner and reviewer. The guide focuses on those challenges that tend to be unique to ER/D&D cleanup activities. Some of these experiences, approaches, and philosophies may find application or be beneficial to a broader spectrum of activities such as terminal cleanout or even new operations. Challenges unique to ER/D&D activities include (1) consent agreements requiring activity startup on designated dates; (2) the increased uncertainty of specific hazards; and (3) the highly variable activities covered under the broad category of ER/D&D. These unique challenges are in addition to the challenges encountered in all activities; e.g., new and changing requirements and multiple interpretations. The experiences in approaches, methods, and solutions to the challenges are documented from the practitioner and reviewer`s perspective, thereby providing the viewpoints on why a direction was taken and the concerns expressed. Site cleanup consent agreements with predetermined dates for restoration activity startup add the dimension of imposed punitive actions for failure to meet the date. Approval of the safety analysis is a prerequisite to startup. Actions that increase expediency are (1) assuring activity safety; (2) documenting that assurance; and (3) acquiring the necessary approvals. These actions increase the timeliness of startup and decrease the potential for punitive action. Improvement in expediency has been achieved by using safety analysis techniques to provide input to the line management decision process rather than as a review of line management decisions. Expediency is also improved by sharing the safety input and resultant decisions with reviewers and regulators.

Ellingson, D.R.

1993-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

147

Columbia River System Operation Review : Final Environmental Impact Statement, Main Report Exhibits.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This Volume is a part of the Final Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) for the Columbia River System. This volume contains technical exhibits of cultural resources and commentary on the (System Operation Review) SOR process. The Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation comment is the majority of the material in the volume, in the Consultation Plan, Identification of trust resources; Criteria for the selection of a System Operating Strategy; comment on rights protection and implementation of Federal Trust responsibility; analysis of the draft EIS. Comment by other Native American Tribes and groups is also included: Confederated Tribes of the Colville Reservation; Kootenai Tribe of Idaho; Spokane Tribe of Indians; Coeur d` Alene tribe.

Columbia River System Operation Review (U.S.)

1995-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

148

Quality of environmental impact statements and variability of scrutiny by reviewers  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Adequate provision of information is essential for decision making. This paper provides the results of the quality assessment of Environmental Impact Statements (EIS), documents prescribed by EIA Directive (337/85/EEC). The assessment was completed by several categories of reviewers in Estonia, which has been an EU member state since 2004. The quality assessment of EIS was based on the EC Guidance on EIS Review (2001). Firstly, the quality assessment of 50 randomly selected EIS was carried out by a single reviewer. Secondly, the individual grading among 24 independent reviewers of a single EIS was tested. Thirdly, a comparison of the results of 15 individual and 5 group assessments of the same EIS was conducted. The results from the quality assessment of the selected EIS demonstrate a satisfactory level of information provided for decision making; 68% of the sample EIS were positively graded. However, more than half of the 50 EIS were graded as 'just satisfactory'. Comparison between the individual and group assessment of the same EIS demonstrates that the group assessment is more critical than the individual assessment. This possibly results from a wider technical expertise and balancing of subjective values and perspectives among group members. Arguably, the current practice of EIA competent authorities assessing the quality of EIS with individuals could be revised. We discuss the effect of the group assessment on expanding the narrow technical expertise and the subjectivity of a single expert.

Peterson, Kaja, E-mail: kaja.peterson@seit.e [Stockholm Environment Institute Tallinn Centre, Lai Street 34, Tallinn 10133 (Estonia)

2010-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

149

Review: Precautionary Tools for Reshaping Environmental Policy, by Nancy J. Myers and Carolyn Raffensperger (eds.)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

who cares about environmental policy which should includeTools for Reshaping Environmental Policy Edited by Nancy J.Tools for Reshaping Environmental Policy. Cambridge, MA: MIT

Carchidi, Victoria

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

150

WETLANDS, Vol. 23, No. 4, December 2003, pp. 10031014 2003, The Society of Wetland Scientists  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1003 WETLANDS, Vol. 23, No. 4, December 2003, pp. 1003­1014 2003, The Society of Wetland Scientists WETLAND AND UPLAND USE PATTERNS IN SEMI-AQUATIC SNAKES: IMPLICATIONS FOR WETLAND CONSERVATION John H. Roe1) in northwestern Ohio and southern Michigan, USA, to investigate differences in the use of wetland and upland

Canberra, University of

151

WETLANDS, Vol. 21, No. 1, March 2001, pp. 6674 2001, The Society of Wetland Scientists  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

66 WETLANDS, Vol. 21, No. 1, March 2001, pp. 66­74 2001, The Society of Wetland Scientists LINKING ACTIONS TO OUTCOMES IN WETLAND MANAGEMENT: AN OVERVIEW OF U.S. STATE WETLAND MANAGEMENT Megan K. La Peyre1,3 , Margaret A. Reams2 , and Irving A. Mendelssohn1 1 Wetland Biogeochemistry Institute Louisiana State

La Peyre, Megan

152

COMMUNITY PATTERNS IN TREATMENT WETLANDS, NATURAL WETLANDS, AND CROPLANDS IN FLORIDA  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

COMMUNITY PATTERNS IN TREATMENT WETLANDS, NATURAL WETLANDS, AND CROPLANDS IN FLORIDA TYLER J. BECK of treatment wetlands called Stormwater Treatment Areas (STAs) have been constructed on agricultural land wetlands continues, it has the potential to alter the distribution of wetland birds, a group that has

Gawlik, Dale E.

153

Wetlands Ecology and ISSN 0923-4861  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 23 Wetlands Ecology and Management ISSN 0923-4861 Volume 19 Number 3 Wetlands Ecol Manage (2011 / Published online: 5 March 2011 ? Springer Science+Business Media B.V. 2011 Abstract Coastal wetlands sensing imagery to map wetland habitat. In this study, we use IKONOS satellite imagery to classify coastal

McMaster University

154

National Wetlands Inventory Draft Strategic Plan  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

National Wetlands Inventory Draft Strategic Plan: Conserving America's Wetlands for Future America's Wetlands for Future Generations Cover Photo: Blackwater National Wildlife Refuge, on Virginia's Chesapeake Bay, showing combined climate change and other impacts on wetlands, with dead or dying trees from

Gray, Matthew

155

EA-1759: Final Environmental Assessment | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Assessment EA-1759: Final Environmental Assessment Southwest Alaska Regional Geothermal Energy Project The purpose of this report is to identify and describe wetlands at a...

156

EIS-0355: Notice of Intent to Prepare an Environmental Impact...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

and Notice of Floodplain and Wetlands Involvement Remediation of the Moab Uranium Mill Tailings Site in Grand County, UT DOE announces its intent to prepare an Environmental...

157

EIS-0395: Notice of Intent to Prepare an Environmental Impact...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Impact Statement and to Conduct Public Scoping Meetings and Notice of Floodplain and Wetlands Involvement EIS-0395: Notice of Intent to Prepare an Environmental Impact Statement...

158

WHICH HYDRAULIC MODEL TO USE IN VERTICAL FLOW CONSTRUCTED WETLANDS?  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

WHICH HYDRAULIC MODEL TO USE IN VERTICAL FLOW CONSTRUCTED WETLANDS? Ania Morvannoua , Nicolas-equilibrium model, preferential flow path, vertical flow constructed wetlands INTRODUCTION Constructed wetlands (CWs

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

159

Plants in constructed wetlands help to treat agricultural processing wastewater  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Evaluation of constructed wetland treatment performance forof a con- structed wetland for treatment of winery effluent.constructed wetlands for process wastewater treatment at two

Grismer, Mark E; Shepherd, Heather L

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

160

Strategic environmental assessment for sustainability: A review of a decade of academic research  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper examines the strategic environmental assessment (SEA)sustainability relationship over the past decade, from 2000 to 2010, focusing in particular on the incorporation of sustainability in SEA. A total of 86 papers from the academic literature containing the terms sustainability or sustainable development and strategic environmental assessment were identified and reviewed. Several common themes emerged by which SEA can support sustainability, including providing a framework to support decision making for sustainability; setting sustainability objectives, ensuring the consideration of more sustainable alternatives, and integrating sustainability criteria in PPP development; and promoting sustainability outcomes through tiering and institutional learning. At the same time, our review identified many underlying barriers that challenge SEA for sustainability, including the variable interpretations of the scope of sustainability in SEA; the limited use of assessment criteria directly linked to sustainability objectives; and challenges for decision-makers in operationalizing sustainability in SEA and adapting PPP development decision-making processes to include sustainability issues. To advance SEA for sustainability there is a need to better define the scope of sustainability in SEA; clarify how to operationalize the different approaches to sustainability in SEA, as opposed to simply describing those approaches; provide guidance on how to operationalize broad sustainability goals through assessment criteria in SEA; and understand better how to facilitate institutional learning regarding sustainability through SEA application. -- Highlights: ? There is significant potential for SEA to support sustainability in PPP development. ? However, there are still many barriers in place that challenge SEA for sustainability. ? The scope and approaches to sustainability in SEA must be better defined and described. ? Guidance is needed to link impact assessment criteria to sustainability objectives. ? Focus on how to facilitate institutional learning regarding sustainability is required.

White, Lisa, E-mail: lisa.white@usask.ca [School of Environment and Sustainability, University of Saskatchewan, 117 Science Place, Saskatoon, Saskatchewan, Canada S7N 5A5 (Canada)] [School of Environment and Sustainability, University of Saskatchewan, 117 Science Place, Saskatoon, Saskatchewan, Canada S7N 5A5 (Canada); Noble, Bram F., E-mail: b.noble@usask.ca [Department of Geography and Planning, School of Environment and Sustainability, University of Saskatchewan, 117 Science Place, Saskatoon, Saskatchewan, Canada S7N 5A5 (Canada)

2013-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "wetland environmental review" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Rules and Regulations for Governing the Administration and Enforcement of the Fresh Water Wetlands Act (Rhode Island)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

These regulations assert the Department of Environmental Management's authority to administer and enforce the Fresh Water Wetlands Act (R.I. Gen. Laws, ch. 2-1-18 through 2-1-25), and describe...

162

PAUL B. HOOK Wetland and Watershed Scientist, Intermountain Aquatics, Inc.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

design for water resource protection Native-plant-based streambank bioengineering and treatment wetland and plant effects in wastewater treatment wetlands and riparian buffers Wetland and riparian restoration in surface and groundwater hydrology.** Residential wastewater treatment wetland, Jackson, WY (research

Maxwell, Bruce D.

163

Hydrocarbon removal with constructed wetlands  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Wetlands have long played a significant role as natural purification systems, and have been effectively used to treat domestic, agricultural and industrial wastewater. However, very little is known about the biochemical ...

Eke, Paul Emeka

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

164

Magnuson-Stevens Fishery Conservation and Management Reauthorization Act Environmental Review Procedures  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

provides that the resulting procedures will be the sole environmental impact assessment procedure or the Secretary shall be the sole environmental impact assessment procedure for fishery management plans eliminating the distinction between an environmental assessment (EA) and environmental impact statement (EIS

165

Development and use of the Wetland Fish Index to assess the quality of coastal wetlands in the  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Development and use of the Wetland Fish Index to assess the quality of coastal wetlands 40 wetlands of the Laurentian Great Lakes to develop the Wetland Fish Index (WFI), a tool that can of water quality degradation and wetlands condition, as indicated by an independent index of wetland

McMaster University

166

E-Print Network 3.0 - aerated constructed wetlands Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

wetland TRODUINCTION Wetland ecosystems, including constructed wetlands for wastewater... in constructed ... Source: Brix, Hans - Biologisk Institut, Aarhus Universitet...

167

Wetlands Research Program Technical Report WRP-DE-4 A Hydrogeomorphic Classification for Wetlands  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Wetlands Research Program Technical Report WRP-DE-4 A Hydrogeomorphic Classification for Wetlands of the number designating technical reports of research published under the Wetlands Research Program identify;.-- Wetlands Research Program Technical Report WRP-DE-4 August 1993 A Hydrogeomorphic Classification

Gray, Matthew

168

WETLANDS, Vol. 26, No. 1, March 2006, pp. 230243 2006, The Society of Wetland Scientists  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

230 WETLANDS, Vol. 26, No. 1, March 2006, pp. 230­243 2006, The Society of Wetland Scientists HYDROLOGIC INTERACTIONS BETWEEN AN ALLUVIAL FAN AND A SLOPE WETLAND IN THE CENTRAL ROCKY MOUNTAINS, USA Scott Abstract: Slope wetlands generally occur at breaks in slope where discharging ground water maintains moist

MacDonald, Lee

169

WETLANDS, Vol. 23, No. 1, March 2003, pp. 112 2003, The Society of Wetland Scientists  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 WETLANDS, Vol. 23, No. 1, March 2003, pp. 1­12 2003, The Society of Wetland Scientists PLANT DIVERSITY, COMPOSITION, AND INVASION OF RESTORED AND NATURAL PRAIRIE POTHOLE WETLANDS: IMPLICATIONS of Botany 353 Bessey Hall Iowa State University Ames, Iowa, USA 50011-1020 Abstract: Hundreds of wetlands

170

WETLANDS, Vol. 24, No. 1, March 2004, pp. 7791 2004, The Society of Wetland Scientists  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

77 WETLANDS, Vol. 24, No. 1, March 2004, pp. 77­91 2004, The Society of Wetland Scientists AQUATIC MACROINVERTEBRATE DIVERSITY OF PLAYA WETLANDS: THE ROLE OF LANDSCAPE AND ISLAND BIOGEOGRAPHIC CHARACTERISTICS Dianne District Palatka, Florida, USA 32178 Abstract: Wetland habitats continue to be lost at a unsettling rate

Willig, Michael

171

WETLANDS, Vol. 24, No. 3, September 2004, pp. 562572 2004, The Society of Wetland Scientists  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

562 WETLANDS, Vol. 24, No. 3, September 2004, pp. 562­572 2004, The Society of Wetland Scientists INVERTEBRATE EGG BANKS OF RESTORED, NATURAL, AND DRAINED WETLANDS IN THE PRAIRIE POTHOLE REGION OF THE UNITED relic egg banks in the sediments and dispersal of eggs into wetlands is believed to be important

172

WETLANDS, Vol. 26, No. 2, June 2006, pp. 465474 2006, The Society of Wetland Scientists  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

465 WETLANDS, Vol. 26, No. 2, June 2006, pp. 465­474 2006, The Society of Wetland Scientists MAPPING WETLANDS AND RIPARIAN AREAS USING LANDSAT ETM IMAGERY AND DECISION-TREE-BASED MODELS Corey Baker of wetlands and riparian zones influence the ecological functions present on a landscape. Accurate and easily

Lawrence, Rick L.

173

Regulatory analysis for amendments to regulations for the environmental review for renewal of nuclear power plant operating licenses. Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This regulatory analysis provides the supporting information for a proposed rule that will amend the Nuclear Regulatory Commission`s environmental review requirements for applications for renewal of nuclear power plant operating licenses. The objective of the proposed rulemaking is to improve regulatory efficiency by providing for the generic evaluation of certain environmental impacts associated with nuclear plant license renewal. After considering various options, the staff identified and analyzed two major alternatives. With Alternative A, the existing regulations would not be amended. This option requires that environmental reviews be performed under the existing regulations. Alternative B is to assess, on a generic basis, the environmental impacts of renewing the operating license of individual nuclear power plants, and define the issues that will need to be further analyzed on a case-by-case basis. In addition, Alternative B removes from NRC`s review certain economics-related issues. The findings of this assessment are to be codified in 10 CFR 51. The staff has selected Alternative B as the preferred alternative.

NONE

1996-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

174

Industry and forest wetlands: Cooperative research initiatives  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In 1989 the forest products industry responded to a challenge of the National Wetlands Policy Forum to initiate a cooperative research program on forest wetlands management organized through the National Council of the Paper Industry for Air and Stream Improvement (NCASI). The objective is to determine how forest landowners can manage wetlands for timber production while protecting other wetland functions such as flood storage, water purification, and food chain/wildlife habitat support. Studies supported by the NCASI in 9 states are summarized. Technical support on wetland regulatory issues to member companies is part of the research program. Since guidelines for recognizing wetlands for regulatory proposed have changed frequently, the NCASI has recommend an explicit link between wetland delineation and a classification system that considers difference among wetland types in vegetation, soils, hydrology, appearance, landscape position, and other factors. 16 refs.

Shepard, J.P. (National Council of the Paper Industry for Air and Stream Improvement, Gainesville, FL (United States)); Lucier, A.A. (National Council of the Paper Industry for Air and Stream Improvement, New York, NY (United States)); Haines, L.W. (International Paper, Bainbridge, GA (United States))

1993-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

175

Development near Wetlands and Waterways (Maryland)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The Wetlands and Waterways Program requires permits for commercial activity or development proposed on or near a wetland or waterway. For the purpose of the permitting process, major projects are...

176

Minnesota Environmental Policy Act (MEPA)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Minnesota Environmental Policy Act (MEPA) Jennie Ross, Environmental Assessment Unit Mn/DOT Office of Environmental Services March 31, 2009 #12;Minnesota State Environmental Review Minnesota Environmental Policy Environmental Impact Statement Threshold Criteria - Environmental Impact Statement is required for construction

Minnesota, University of

177

A review of the environmental survivability of telerobotic control sensor systems for use in nuclear waste tanks  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report was prepared by the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) and funded by the Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Technology Development (OTD) Robotics Technology Development Program (RTDP). During the next few years field deployment of remotely operated systems in nuclear waste cleanup operations will increase dramatically as DOE strives to efficiently and safely remediate the many waste storage sites. Typically, the most fragile components in remote systems are the sensors that provide feedback to the operators or to computer control algorithms. The purpose of this review is to determine the availability of environmentally hardened sensors to support control of a manipulator or vehicle system in a waste tank environment. The emphasis of the report is on the environmental ruggedness of currently available sensors. For the purpose of this review a set of nominal requirements for survivability were adopted conditions in the single-shell tanks at Hanford. This report is designed to be a practical guide to the state of the art in commercially available environmentally tolerant sensors for use with robotic systems. It is neither intended to be an exhaustive review of the technical literature on potential measurement techniques nor a complete physical review of the functioning of particular sensor systems. This report is intended to be a living document. As additional, corrected, or updated information is received from sensor manufacturers, it will be incorporated into the report database. The physical report will then be periodically revised and released in updated format. The authors wish to apologize to any sources of environmentally hardened sensors that were omitted during this review and encourage submission of new or updated data.

Holcomb, D.E.; Burks, B.L.

1994-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

178

Wetland Flow and Salinity Budgets and Elements of a Decision Support System toward Implementation of Real-Time Seasonal Wetland Salinity Management  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

this study the treatment wetland has continued wetland impoundment, and a treatment (

Quinn, N.W.T.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

179

Onsite Wastewater Treatment Systems: Constructed Wetlands  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Two-compartment septic tank Soil absorption field Constructed wetland Onsite wastewater treatment systems Constructed wetlands Natural wetlands generally have visible water in the system. However, for those at homes, the water flows beneath... the media surface, which limits contact between residents and wastewater. The constructed wetland waste- water treatment system has three main components that work together to purify wastewater: ? A septic tank, which is an en- closed watertight...

Lesikar, Bruce J.

2008-10-23T23:59:59.000Z

180

Nebraska's Wetlands By Ted LaGrange,  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

completely dry. Many wetlands receive their water from groundwater aquifers while others are totally moves through the wetland, a series of chemical transformations take place that tie-up or alter marshes, playa wetlands in the south-west, and many more types. However, through much of the state

Nebraska-Lincoln, University of

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "wetland environmental review" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

WETLAND DELINEATION REPORT UMORE MINING AREA  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Project 08-0092 September 29, 2009 #12;UMore Gravel EIS Empire Township Wetland Delineation #12;UMore Gravel EIS Empire Township Wetland Delineation TABLE OF CONTENTS 1.0. INTRODUCTION Determination Form #12;UMore Gravel EIS Empire Township Wetland Delineation #12;UMore Gravel EIS Empire

Netoff, Theoden

182

Wetlands Ecology and Management Spring 2006  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

WFS 340 Wetlands Ecology and Management Spring 2006 Instructor: Dr. Matthew Gray (mattjgray-3897) Required Text: Wetlands, 2000, 3rd edition (ISBN 047129232X) Authors: William J. Mitsch and James C. Gosselink Course Goal: To expose students to the basic principles of wetland ecology and management via

Gray, Matthew

183

Wetlands Ecology and Management Spring 2008  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

WFS 340 Wetlands Ecology and Management Spring 2008 Instructor: Dr. Matthew Gray (mgray11@utk-3897) Drew Wirwa (dwirwa@utk.edu, 201 Ellington PSB, 974-3897) Recommended Text: Wetlands, 2007, 4th edition students to the basic principles of wetland ecology and management via class lectures, labs, and field

Gray, Matthew

184

Wetlands Ecology and Management Spring 2005  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

WFS 340 Wetlands Ecology and Management Spring 2005 Instructor: Dr. Matthew Gray (mattjgray-2635) Required Text: Wetlands, 2000, 3rd edition (ISBN 047129232X) Authors: William J. Mitsch and James C. Gosselink Course Goal: To expose students to the basic principles of wetland ecology and management via

Gray, Matthew

185

Route to: WOC Wetlands Oversight Committee  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Route to: WOC PPS PS Wetlands Oversight Committee Phone: 425-352-3557 / Fax: 425-352-5431 Wetlands Restoration Area (WRA) ACCESS REQUEST FORM All tours are required to complete this form and have Phone No. E-mail Purpose of Tour ­ (Access to these wetlands is limited for research and educational

Queitsch, Christine

186

An Evaluation of the Interior Wetlands  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

#12;An Evaluation of the Interior Wetlands Program Accomplishments and Impacts to Date Prepared Interior Wetlands Program Evaluation Page i EXECUTIVE SUMMARY EXECUTIVE SUMMARY An Evaluation of the Interior Wetlands Program (IWP): Accomplishments and Impacts to Date This document presents the results

187

Wetlands Ecology and Management Spring 2007  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

WFS 340 Wetlands Ecology and Management Spring 2007 Instructor: Dr. Matthew Gray (mgray11@utk Text: Wetlands, 2000, 3rd edition (ISBN 047129232X) Authors: William J. Mitsch and James C. Gosselink Course Goal: To expose students to the basic principles of wetland ecology and management via class

Gray, Matthew

188

An Evaluation of the Interior Wetlands  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

#12;An Evaluation of the Interior Wetlands Program Accomplishments and Impacts to Date Executive;Dovetail Consulting Interior Wetlands Program Evaluation Page i EXECUTIVE SUMMARY EXECUTIVE SUMMARY An Evaluation of the Interior Wetlands Program (IWP): Accomplishments and Impacts to Date This document presents

189

Reference: RGL 82-02 Subject: WETLANDS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Reference: RGL 82-02 Subject: WETLANDS Title: CLARIFICATION OF "NORMAL CIRCUMSTANCES" IN THE WETLAND DEFINITION Issued: 02/11/82 Expires: 12/31/84 Originator: DAEN-CWO-N Description: DEFINES NORMAL CIRCUMSTANCES, CONVERTED WETLANDS, AND ABNORMAL PRESENCE OF AQUATIC VEGETATION 1. This letter will serve

US Army Corps of Engineers

190

GLOBAL CHANGE AND TIDAL FRESHWATER WETLANDS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Chapter 23 GLOBAL CHANGE AND TIDAL FRESHWATER WETLANDS: SCENARIOS AND IMPACTS Scott C. Neubauer Tidal Freshwater Wetlands, edited by Aat Barendregt, Dennis Whigham & Andrew Baldwin 2009, viii + 320pp Publishers GmbH This chapter was originally published in the book ,,Tidal Freshwater Wetlands". The copy

Neubauer, Scott C.

191

Wetlands Ecology and Management Spring 2009  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

WFS 340 Wetlands Ecology and Management Spring 2009 Instructor: Dr. Matthew Gray (mgray11@utk-3897) Drew Wirwa (dwirwa@utk.edu, 201 Ellington PSB, 974-3897) Recommended Text: Wetlands, 2007, 4th edition students to the basic principles of wetland ecology and management via class lectures, labs, and field

Gray, Matthew

192

Route to: WOC Wetlands Oversight Committee  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Route to: WOC PPS PS Wetlands Oversight Committee Phone: 425-352-5557 / Fax: 425-352-5431 Wetlands Restoration Area SCIENTIFIC RESEARCH PERMIT REQUEST FORM Name of Principal Investigator Position is it important that this study be done at the UWB-CCC wetland site? . What parts of the site will you need access

Queitsch, Christine

193

Wetland Survey of Selected Areas in the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant Area of Responsibilty, Oak Ridge, Tennessee  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document was prepared to summarize wetland surveys performed in the Y- 1 2 Plant area of responsibility in June and July 1994. Wetland surveys were conducted in three areas within the Oak Ridge Y- 12 Plant area of responsibility in June and July 1994: the Upper East Fork Poplar Creek (UEFPC) Operable Unit (OU), part of the Bear Creek Valley OU (the upper watershed of Bear Creek from the culvert under Bear Creek Road upstream through the Y-12 West End Environmental Management Area, and the catchment of Bear Creek North Tributary 1), and part of Chestnut Ridge OU 2 (the McCoy Branch area south of Bethel Valley Road). Using the criteria and methods set forth in the Wetlands Delineation Manual, 18 wetland areas were identified in the 3 areas surveyed; these areas were classified according to the system developed by Cowardin. Fourteen wetlands and one wetland/pond area that are associated with disturbed or remnant stream channels and seeps were identified in the UEFPC OU. Three wetlands were identified in the Bear Creek Valley OU portion of the survey area. One wetland was identified in the riparian zone of McCoy Branch in the southern portion of Chestnut Ridge OU 2.

Rosensteel

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

194

Addendum To Environmental Review Documents Concerning Exports Of Natural Gas From The United States  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The purpose of the Addendum is to provide additional information to the public regarding the potential environmental impacts of unconventional natural gas exploration and production activities. DOE...

195

Oil and Gas Environmental Review and Approval Processes (New Brunswick, Canada)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Oil and natural gas companies engaged in exploration, development and production in New Brunswick will be required by the Department of Environment to undergo a Phased Environmental Impact...

196

Nevada Test Site Wetlands Assessment  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report identifies 16 Nevada Test Site (NTS) natural water sources that may be classified by the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (USACE) as jurisdictional wetlands and identifies eight water sources that may be classified as waters of the United States. These water sources are rare, localized habitats on the NTS that are important to regional wildlife and to isolated populations of water tolerant plants and aquatic organisms. No field investigations on the NTS have been conducted in the past to identify those natural water sources which would be protected as rare habitats and which may fall under regulatory authority of the Clean Water Act (CWA) of 1997. This report identifies and summarizes previous studies of NTS natural water sources, and identifies the current DOE management practices related to the protection of NTS wetlands. This report also presents management goals specific for NTS wetlands that incorporate the intent of existing wetlands legislation, the principles of ecosystem management, and the interests of regional land managers and other stakeholders.

D. J. Hansen

1997-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

197

Regulating Constructed Wetlands in Scotland  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

plant - polishing · Encouraged by SEPA in its guidance · Normally small scale ­ several houses · Benefits of natural wetlands · Enhance self-purification capacity of watercourses · Reduce flood risk · But some large scale examples · Valleyfield Reedbed, Fife · 8000pe, 4.5 hectares · CAR licence conditions

Heal, Kate

198

Contents of environmental impact statements prepared for the Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action Project  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document presents two versions of the outline for the environmental impact statements (EISS) to be prepared for the Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project. The first displays the basic structure of the statements; it lists only the titles of sections. The second is a guide to the contents of the statements which provides, under each title, a brief summary of contents. The outline is intended to comply with the planning requirements and the definitions of terms established by the Council on Environmental Quality as well as DOE Order 5440.lB (Implementation of the National Environmental Policy Act), and compliance with Floodplain/Wetlands Environmental Review Requirements. These requirements and definitions are implicity part of the outline. The outline presented in this document will guide the preparation of EISs Guidelines for preparation of environmental assessments for the UMTRA Project are available.

Not Available

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

199

environment.team@ntu.ac.uk Reviewed and updated March 2014 NOTTINGHAM TRENT UNIVERSITY: ENVIRONMENTAL POLICY  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and over 3,000 staff, NTU acknowledges its education and business activities will significantly impact environmental management systems and initiatives to promote environmental and sustainability awareness and education, in accordance with our strategic plan. These build on current policies and will be disseminated

Evans, Paul

200

Innovative approach for restoring coastal wetlands using treated drill cuttings  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The leading environmental problem facing coastal Louisiana regions is the loss of wetlands. Oil and gas exploration and production activities have contributed to wetland damage through erosion at numerous sites where canals have been cut through the marsh to access drilling sites. An independent oil and gas producer, working with Southeastern Louisiana University and two oil field service companies, developed a process to stabilize drill cuttings so that they could be used as a substrate to grow wetlands vegetation. The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) funded a project under which the process would be validated through laboratory studies and field demonstrations. The laboratory studies demonstrated that treated drill cuttings support the growth of wetlands vegetation. However, neither the Army Corps of Engineers (COE) nor the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) would grant regulatory approval for afield trial of the process. Argonne National Laboratory was asked to join the project team to try to find alternative mechanisms for gaining regulatory approval. Argonne worked with EPA's Office of Reinvention and learned that EPA's Project XL would be the only regulatory program under which the proposed field trial could be done. One of the main criteria for an acceptable Project XL proposal is to have a formal project sponsor assume the responsibility and liability for the project. Because the proposed project involved access to private land areas, the team felt that an oil and gas company with coastal Louisiana land holdings would need to serve as sponsor. Despite extensive communication with oil and gas companies and industry associations, the project team was unable to find any organization willing to serve as sponsor. In September 1999, the Project XL proposal was withdrawn and the project was canceled.

Veil, J. A.; Hocking, E. K.

1999-11-02T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "wetland environmental review" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

A review of plutonium environmental data with a bibliography for use in risk assessments  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Plutonium fueled radioisotopic heat sources find space, terrestrial, and undersea applications to generate electrical power. Such systems under postulated accident conditions could release radioactivity into the environment resulting in risks to the general population in the form of radiological doses and associated health effects. The evaluation of the radiological impact of postulated scenarios involving releases of activity into the environment includes identification of postulated accident release modes, including the probability of release and the release location; source term definition, including the activity of each radionuclide released and the corresponding chemical form and particle size distribution; analysis of the environmental behavior of the released radioactivity to determine the concentrations in environmental media (air, soil, and water) as a function of time; and analysis of the interaction between the environmental concentrations and man, leading to ingestion, inhalation, and external doses through each environmental exposure pathway. 443 refs., 2 figs., 4 tabs.

Bartram, B.W.; Wilkinson, M.J.

1983-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

202

Chemical Emissions of Residential Materials and Products: Review of Available Information Environmental Energy Technologies Division  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Chemical Emissions of Residential Materials and Products: Review of Available Information Contract 500-08-06. Chemical Emissions of Residential Materials and Products: Review of Available Information Henry Willem and Brett C. Singer LBNL-3938E #12;Chemical Emissions of Residential Materials

203

Floodplain and Wetlands Assessment for Construction of a Second...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

and Wetlands Assessment for Construction of a Second Full Service Access Road over Lena Gulch Floodplain and Wetlands Assessment for Construction of a Second Full Service Access...

204

CARBON SEQUESTRATION IN NATURAL AND CREATED WETLANDS.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

?? Wetland ecosystems are significant carbon sinks. Their high productivity and presence of water gives them the ability to efficiently sequester carbon in the soil, (more)

Bernal, Blanca

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

205

Inland Wetlands and Water Courses Regulations (Connecticut)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Regulated activities in or near inland wetlands and water courses include the removal or depositing of material, land or water obstruction or alteration, construction, pollution, or water diversion...

206

Literature review of environmental qualification of safety-related electric cables: Literature analysis and appendices. Volume 2  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In support of the US NRC Environmental Qualification (EQ) Research Program, a literature review was performed to identify past relevant work that could be used to help fully or partially resolve issues of interest related to the qualification of low-voltage electric cable. A summary of the literature reviewed is documented in Volume 1 of this report. In this, Volume 2 of the report, dossiers are presented which document the issues selected for investigation in this program, along with recommendations for future work to resolve the issues, when necessary. The dossiers are based on an analysis of the literature reviewed, as well as expert opinions. This analysis includes a critical review of the information available from past and ongoing work in thirteen specific areas related to EQ. The analysis for each area focuses on one or more questions which must be answered to consider a particular issue resolved. Results of the analysis are presented, along with recommendations for future work. The analysis is documented in the form of a dossier for each of the areas analyzed.

Lofaro, R.; Bowerman, B.; Carbonaro, J. [Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States)] [and others

1996-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

207

Review: ??????? ????: ????????????????? ??????? ?????? ?. ?. ????????? ?????. ?????? ?? ??????? ? ??????????? ??????????  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

145 Ocene, zapiski, poro?ila Reviews, Notes, Reports ??????? ????: ????????- ????????? ??????? ?????? ?. ?. ????????? ?????. ?????? ?? ??????? ? ??????????? ??????????. ?????-?????????, 2008. 247 ?. ? ?????????? ??????? ???? ????...- ??????, ???????????????? ?????? 146 Slavia Centralis 1/2011 Ocene, zapiski, poro?ila Reviews, Notes, Reports ????????? ?? ? ????????? ????? ? ????, ? ???????? ?? ?????? ?????- ????????? ??????????? ?????? ????. ??? ???????? ?? ?????????? ???...

????????, ??????????; Toichkina, Aleksandra

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

208

Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2014: Next Generation Environmentally Friendly Driving Feedback Systems Research and Development  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Presentation given by University of California at Riverside at 2014 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Office Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting about next...

209

State versus federal mechanisms of regulating uses of wetlands in the United States  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

reluctant in the past to ! ei ogni ze the Congressional mandate of the F'~(PCA which advocates preservation for environmental reasons. State mechanisms for the allocation of wetland resources are vested in each state's powers of eminant domain, state.... In California, for example, 67/ of t: he important habitat area oF wet. lands has fallen to dredging and filling, and in the San Francisco Bay area the figure jumps to 80%. 43 It is obvious then that the results of wetlands destruction is disasterous to man...

Nachtsheim, Henry John

1978-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

210

SYNTHESIS How and why environmental noise impacts animals: an integrative, mechanistic review  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. Abstract The scope and magnitude of anthropogenic noise pollution are often much greater than those the effects of acoustic stimuli on animal physiology, development, neural function and genetic effects, we are affected by environmental noise. Keywords Anthropogenic noise, fitness, human disturbance, noise pollution

Swaddle, John

211

Columbia River System Operation Review : Final Environmental Impact Statement, Appendix J: Recreation.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This Appendix J of the Final Environmental Impact Statement for the Columbia River System discusses impacts on the recreational activities in the region. Major sections include the following: scope and processes; recreation in the Columbia River Basin today - by type, location, participation, user characteristics, factors which affect usage, and managing agencies; recreation analysis procedures and methodology; and alternatives and their impacts.

Columbia River System Operation Review (U.S.)

1995-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

212

Review: Business and Environmental Policy: Corporate Interests in the American Political System, by Michael E. Kraft and Sheldon Kamieniecki (eds.)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Business and Environmental Policy: Corporate Interests ineds). Business and Environmental Policy: Corporate Interestsalso holds in the environmental policy-making realm and many

Meij, Jan-Martin

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

213

Pavement Through the Prairie, Wheels in the Wetlands: The battle over a road in Lawrence, Kansas  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of the Haskell-Baker Wetlands and the South Lawrence Trafficway." Genuine Kansas. No date. http://www.genuinekansas.com/history_baker_w etlands_controversy_timeline_kansas.htm 113 contemporaneous with the initial release of the Draft Environmental Impact...." Environmental History. (2010) 15 (2): 194. that recognized the environment as a critical national issue, historian Ann Vileisis argues, "... citizen activists in their communities dealt with broad choices facing the society at large: to embrace boundless...

Heiman, Kelly

2012-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

214

Constructed wetlands for industry and commerce  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

23/05/2012 1 Constructed wetlands for industry and commerce Brian D'Arcy and Kate Heal Types of pollution sources and water quality reductions needed Increasing Concentration Treatment & dilution Self drainage Resource recovery #12;23/05/2012 2 How do constructed wetlands improve water quality? Treatment

Heal, Kate

215

Uncertainty and Sensitivity Analyses Plan. Draft for Peer Review: Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction Project  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction (HEDR) Project staff are developing mathematical models to be used to estimate the radiation dose that individuals may have received as a result of emissions since 1944 from the US Department of Energy`s (DOE) Hanford Site near Richland, Washington. An uncertainty and sensitivity analyses plan is essential to understand and interpret the predictions from these mathematical models. This is especially true in the case of the HEDR models where the values of many parameters are unknown. This plan gives a thorough documentation of the uncertainty and hierarchical sensitivity analysis methods recommended for use on all HEDR mathematical models. The documentation includes both technical definitions and examples. In addition, an extensive demonstration of the uncertainty and sensitivity analysis process is provided using actual results from the Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction Integrated Codes (HEDRIC). This demonstration shows how the approaches used in the recommended plan can be adapted for all dose predictions in the HEDR Project.

Simpson, J.C.; Ramsdell, J.V. Jr.

1993-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

216

Guide to Sustainable Development and Environmental Policy  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Review: Guide to Sustainable Development and EnvironmentalEds. ). Guide to Sustainable Development and EnvironmentalThe Guide to Sustainable Development and Environmental

Mirza, Umar Karim

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

217

Plants in constructed wetlands help to treat agricultural processing wastewater  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Plants in constructed wetlands help to treat agriculturalhas been available to help guide that selection. We

Grismer, Mark E; Shepherd, Heather L

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

218

Evidence of Surface Connectivity for Texas Gulf Coast Depressional Wetlands  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ARTICLE Evidence of Surface Connectivity for Texas Gulf Coast Depressional Wetlands Bradford P # Society of Wetland Scientists 2011 Abstract Depressional wetlands are distributed through- out the United and a regulatory perspective, to understand the surface water pathways that connect such wetlands to each other

219

PROTECTING AMERICA'S WETLANDS: A FAIR, FLEXIBLE, AND EFFECTIVE APPROACH  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

PROTECTING AMERICA'S WETLANDS: A FAIR, FLEXIBLE, AND EFFECTIVE APPROACH WHITE HOUSE OFFICE. The Interagency Working Group on Federal Wetlands Policy IV. Five Principles for Federal Wetlands Policy V wetlands program that reflects a new broad-based consensus among Federal agencies. For years, many have

US Army Corps of Engineers

220

U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service National Wetlands  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service National Wetlands Inventory: A Strategy for the 21st Century #12;Estuarine emergent wetlands account for only five percent of the wetland area in the lower 48 States. Those like this estuarine wetland in South Carolina provide essential rearing habitat for important

Gray, Matthew

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "wetland environmental review" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Alkaline industrial waters and wetlands: prospects for effective treatment  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 Alkaline industrial waters and wetlands: prospects for effective treatment Will Mayes1 & Jon · Circum-neutral pH, high Fe concentrations Treatment wetlands and post-industrial pollution Taff Merthyr The basis for treatment wetlands · `Volunteer' wetlands · pH 12 lime spoil leachate · pH 12 steel slag

Heal, Kate

222

A decision support system for adaptive real-time management ofseasonal wetlands in California  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper describes the development of a comprehensive flow and salinity monitoring system and application of a decision support system (DSS) to improve management of seasonal wetlands in the San Joaquin Valley of California. The Environmental Protection Agency regulates salinity discharges from non-point sources to the San Joaquin River using a procedure known as the Total Maximum Daily Load (TMDL) to allocate the assimilative capacity of the River for salt among watershed sources. Management of wetland sources of salt load will require the development of monitoring systems, more integrative management strategies and coordination with other entities. To obtain local cooperation the Grassland Water District, whose primary function is to supply surface water to private duck clubs and managed wetlands, needs to communicate to local landowners the likely impacts of salinity regulation on the long term health and function of wildfowl habitat. The project described in this paper will also provide this information. The models that form the backbone of the DSS develop salinity balances at both a regional and local scale. The regional scale concentrates on deliveries to and exports from the Grasland Water District while the local scale focuses on an individual wetland unit where more intensive monitoring is being conducted. The design of the DSS is constrained to meet the needs of busy wetland managers and is being designed from the bottom up utilizing tools and procedures familiar to these individuals.

Quinn, Nigel W.T.; Hanna, W. Mark

2001-10-16T23:59:59.000Z

223

Mitigation and monitoring plan for impacted wetlands at the Gunnison UMTRA Project site, Gunnison, Colorado  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The U.S Department of Energy (DOE) administers the Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project. The UMTRA Project is the result of the Uranium Mill Tailings Radiation Control Act(UMTRA) which was passed in response to the public`s concern over the potential public health hazards related to uranium mill tailings and associated contaminated material at abandoned or otherwise uncontrolled inactive processing sites throughout the United States. The Gunnison, Colorado abandoned uranium mill site is one of the sites slated for cleanup by the DOE under authority of UMTRA. The contaminated material at this site will be transported to a disposal site on US Bureau of Land Management (BLM) land east of Gunnison. Remedial action activities will temporarily disturb 0.8 acre and permanently eliminate 5.1 acres of wetlands. This report describes the proposed mitigation plan for the 5.9 acres of impacted wetlands. In conjunction with the mitigation of the permanently impacted wetlands through the enhancement of wetland and adjacent riparian areas, impacts to wildlife as a result of this project will also be mitigated. However, wildlife mitigation is not the focus of this document and is covered in relevant BLM permits for this project. This plan proposes the enhancement of a 3:1 ratio of impacted wetlands in accordance with US Environmental Protection Agency guidelines, plus the enhancement of riparian areas for wildlife mitigation. Included in this mitigation plan is a monitoring plan to ensure that the proposed measures are working and being maintained.

Not Available

1992-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

224

Wetland Water Cooling Partnership: The Use of Constructed Wetlands to Enhance Thermoelectric Power Plant Cooling and Mitigate the Demand of Surface Water Use  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Through the Phase I study segment of contract #DE-NT0006644 with the U.S. Department of Energys National Energy Technology Laboratory, Applied Ecological Services, Inc. and Sterling Energy Services, LLC (the AES/SES Team) explored the use of constructed wetlands to help address stresses on surface water and groundwater resources from thermoelectric power plant cooling and makeup water requirements. The project objectives were crafted to explore and develop implementable water conservation and cooling strategies using constructed wetlands (not existing, naturally occurring wetlands), with the goal of determining if this strategy has the potential to reduce surface water and groundwater withdrawals of thermoelectric power plants throughout the country. Our teams exploratory work has documented what appears to be a significant and practical potential for augmenting power plant cooling water resources for makeup supply at many, but not all, thermoelectric power plant sites. The intent is to help alleviate stress on existing surface water and groundwater resources through harvesting, storing, polishing and beneficially re-using critical water resources. Through literature review, development of conceptual created wetland plans, and STELLA-based modeling, the AES/SES team has developed heat and water balances for conventional thermoelectric power plants to evaluate wetland size requirements, water use, and comparative cooling technology costs. The ecological literature on organism tolerances to heated waters was used to understand the range of ecological outcomes achievable in created wetlands. This study suggests that wetlands and water harvesting can provide a practical and cost-effective strategy to augment cooling waters for thermoelectric power plants in many geographic settings of the United States, particularly east of the 100th meridian, and in coastal and riverine locations. The study concluded that constructed wetlands can have significant positive ancillary socio-economic, ecosystem, and water treatment/polishing benefits when used to complement water resources at thermoelectric power plants. Through the Phase II pilot study segment of the contract, the project team partnered with Progress Energy Florida (now Duke Energy Florida) to quantify the wetland water cooling benefits at their Hines Energy Complex in Bartow, Florida. The project was designed to test the wetlands ability to cool and cleanse power plant cooling pond water while providing wildlife habitat and water harvesting benefits. Data collected during the monitoring period was used to calibrate a STELLA model developed for the site. It was also used to inform management recommendations for the demonstration site, and to provide guidance on the use of cooling wetlands for other power plants around the country. As a part of the pilot study, Duke Energy is scaling up the demonstration project to a larger, commercial scale wetland instrumented with monitoring equipment. Construction is expected to be finalized in early 2014.

Apfelbaum, Steven; Duvall, Kenneth; Nelson, Theresa; Mensing, Douglas; Bengtson, Harlan; Eppich, John; Penhallegon, Clayton; Thompson, Ry

2013-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

225

E-Print Network 3.0 - a-01 constructed wetland Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Summary: . Wetland ecology Hammer, D.A. ed. 1989. Constructed wetlands for wastewater treatment: municipal... OF WETLAND SYSTEMS Autumn 2008 Instructor: Tom Whillans ESC B202.1...

226

Channel Design to Increase Wastewater Treatment Wetland Capacity and Connectivity in Stockton, CA  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Control Facility. Treatment Wetland System Startup PeriodDesign to Increase Wastewater Treatment Wetland Capacity andof wastewater treatment wetlands at the Stockton Regional

Cubbison, Erin O.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

227

Selection of Native Wetland Plants for Water Treatment of Urban Runoff  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

UC Davis KEYWORDS: Wetlands, Water Treatment, Urban Runoff,of Native Wetland Plants for Water Treatment of UrbanValley Wetlands Biomass Response to Heavy Metal Treatment

Rejmankova, Eliska; Bayer, David E

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

228

Wetlands as Best Management Practices to Mitigate Agricultural Nonpoint Source Pollution  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of first-order treatment wetland models. EcologicalR. L. Knight. 1996. Treatment Wetlands. Lewis Publishers CRCS. D. Wallace. 2008. Treatment Wetlands. CRC Press Taylor &

Karpuzcu, Mahmut Ekrem

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

229

Environmental Release Prevention and Control Plan (ERP and CP) annual review and update for 1993  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In the Environmental Release Prevention and Control Plan (ERP and CP), WSRC made a commitment to conduct the following follow-up activities and actions: (1) Complete the action items developed in response to the findings and recommendation of the Environmental Release Prevention Taskteam (WSRC-RP-92-356). (2) Complete all batch and continuous release procedure revisions to incorporate the attributes that WSRC senior management required of each procedure. (3) DOE-SR Assistance Managers and WSRC counterparts to reach consensus and closure on the identified engineered solutions documented in the ERP and CP, develop and drive implementation of facility changes per the agreements. (4) Continue to analyze releases and monitor performance in accordance with the ERP and CP, and utilize the ALARA Release Guides Committee to drive improvements. (5) Conduct annual re-evaluations of the cost benefit analyses of the identified engineered solutions, and identify new options and alternatives for each outfall in response to site mission and facility changes. This report documents the efforts that have been completed over the past year in response to these commitments.

Jannik, G.T. [comp.; Mamatey, A.; Arnett, M.

1993-10-05T23:59:59.000Z

230

Review of technical justification of assumptions and methods used by the Environmental Protection Agency for estimating risks avoided by implementing MCLs for radionuclides  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) has proposed regulations for allowable levels of radioactive material in drinking water (40 CFR Part 141, 56 FR 33050, July 18, 1991). This review examined the assumptions and methods used by EPA in calculating risks that would be avoided by implementing the proposed Maximum Contaminant Levels for uranium, radium, and radon. Proposed limits on gross alpha and beta-gamma emitters were not included in this review.

Morris, S.C.; Rowe, M.D.; Holtzman, S.; Meinhold, A.F.

1992-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

232

Columbia River System Operation Review : Final Environmental Impact Statement, Appendix N: Wildlife.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Columbia River System is a vast and complex combination of Federal and non-Federal facilities used for many purposes including power production, irrigation, navigation, flood control, recreation, fish and wildlife habitat and municipal and industrial water supply. Each river use competes for the limited water resources in the Columbia River Basin. This technical appendix addresses only the effects of alternative system operating strategies for managing the Columbia River system. The environmental impact statement (EIS) itself and some of the other appendices present analyses of the alternative approaches to the other three decisions considered as part of the SOR. This document is the product of the Wildlife Work Group, focusing on wildlife impacts but not including fishes. Topics covered include the following: scope and process; existing and affected environment, including specific discussion of 18 projects in the Columbia river basin. Analysis, evaluation, and alternatives are presented for all projects. System wide impacts to wildlife are also included.

Columbia River System Operation Review (U.S.)

1995-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

233

Application and state of development for remote chemical sensors in environmental monitoring: A literature review  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A study was performed on chemical sensor technology currently available and under development. The information was compiled into a format wherein information on the sensors is listed in a comparable manner. An introductory section is provided to illustrate the regulatory environment in which such sensor technology will be used. This information should allow corporations or federal agencies ready access to useful information for the potential licensing of sensor technology for commercial development or specific environmental monitoring operations. Although every attempt was made to identify as many chemical sensors as possible, we recognize that some may be missed inadvertently. The accuracy of the information provided by the various sources regarding the state of development for the various sensors was not verified. Judgments or opinions regarding the actual state of development or utility of these devices are not included in this report. However, we feel that this report accurately reflects the state of the art at the present time.

Schabron, J.F.; Niss, N.D.; Hart, B.K.

1991-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

234

Application and state of development for remote chemical sensors in environmental monitoring: A literature review  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A study was performed on chemical sensor technology currently available and under development. The information was compiled into a format wherein information on the sensors is listed in a comparable manner. As introductory section is provided to illustrate the regulatory environment in which such sensor technology will be used. This information should allow corporations or federal agencies ready access to useful information for the potential licensing of sensor technology for commercial development or specific environmental monitoring operations. Although every attempt was made to identify as many chemical sensors as possible, we recognize that some may be missed inadvertently. The accuracy of the information provided by the various sources regarding the state of development for the various sensors was not verified. Judgments or opinions regarding the actual state of development or utility of these devices are not included in this report. However, we feel that this report accurately reflects the state of the art at the present time.

Schabron, J.F.; Niss, N.D.; Hart, B.K.

1991-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

235

Columbia River System Operation Review : Final Environmental Impact Statement, Appendix O: Economic and Social Impact.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This Appendix O of the Final Environmental Impact Statement for the Columbia River System measures the economic and social effects of the alternative system operation strategies and includes both geographic and methodology components. Areas discussed in detail include the following: purpose, scope and process; an economic history of the Columbia River Basin and its use today including the Columbia River and Socio-economic development in the Northwest and Major uses of the River System; Analysis procedures and methodologies including national economic evaluation, the concepts, analysis of assumptions, analysis for specific river uses, water quality, Regional evaluation, analysis, and social impacts; alternatives and impacts including implementation costs, andromous fish, resident fish and wildlife, flood control, irrigation and municipal and industrial water supply, navigation impacts, power, recreation, annual costs, regional economic analysis. Extensive comparison of alternatives is included.

Columbia River System Operation Review (U.S.)

1995-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

236

Wetland Flow and Salinity Budgets and Elements of a Decision Support System toward Implementation of Real-Time Seasonal Wetland Salinity Management  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The project has provided science-based tools for the long-term management of salinity in drainage discharges from wetlands to the San Joaquin River. The results of the project are being used to develop best management practices (BMP) and a decision support system to assist wetland managers adjust the timing of salt loads delivered to the San Joaquin River during spring drawdown. Adaptive drainage management scheduling has the potential to improve environmental compliance with salinity objectives in the Lower San Joaquin River by reducing the frequency of violation of Vernalis salinity standards, especially in dry and critically dry years. The paired approach to project implementation whereby adaptively managed and traditional practices were monitored in a side-by-side fashion has provided a quantitative measure of the impacts of the project on the timing of salt loading to the San Joaquin River. The most significant accomplishments of the project has been the technology transfer to wetland biologists, ditch tenders and water managers within the Grasslands Ecological Area. This learning by doing has build local community capacity within the Grassland Water District and California Department of Fish and Game providing these institutions with new capability to assess and effectively manage salinity within their wetlands while simultaneously providing benefits to salinity management of the San Joaquin River.

Quinn, N.W.T.; Ortega, R.; Rahilly, P.; Johnson, C.B.

2011-12-17T23:59:59.000Z

237

Contents of environmental impact statements prepared for the Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action Project. [Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document presents two versions of the outline for the environmental impact statements (EISS) to be prepared for the Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project. The first displays the basic structure of the statements; it lists only the titles of sections. The second is a guide to the contents of the statements which provides, under each title, a brief summary of contents. The outline is intended to comply with the planning requirements and the definitions of terms established by the Council on Environmental Quality as well as DOE Order 5440.lB (Implementation of the National Environmental Policy Act), and compliance with Floodplain/Wetlands Environmental Review Requirements. These requirements and definitions are implicity part of the outline. The outline presented in this document will guide the preparation of EISs Guidelines for preparation of environmental assessments for the UMTRA Project are available.

Not Available

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

238

Literature and data review for the surface-water pathway: Columbia River and adjacent coastal areas. Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction Project  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

As part of the Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction Project, Pacific Northwest Laboratory reviewed literature and data on radionuclide concentrations and distribution in the water, sediment, and biota of the Columbia River and adjacent coastal areas. Over 600 documents were reviewed including Hanford reports, reports by offsite agencies, journal articles, and graduate theses. Certain radionuclide concentration data were used in preliminary estimates of individual dose for the 1964--1966 time period. This report summarizes the literature and database review and the results of the preliminary dose estimates.

Walters, W.H.; Dirkes, R.L.; Napier, B.A.

1992-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

239

Environmental Environmental  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

cloned genes be used to safety test chemicals? The Drive to Prevent: · Cancer · Heart Disease · AlzheimerThe New Environmental Health The New Environmental Health How You'll Live Longer, Smarter Can's · Parkinson's · and other chronic diseases #12;As the environment gets healthier, so do we... The New

Bezrukov, Sergey M.

240

Columbia River System Operation Review : Final Environmental Impact Statement, Appendix D: Exhibits.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Columbia River and its tributaries are the primary water system in the Pacific Northwest, draining some 219,000 square miles in seven states and another 39,500 square miles in British Columbia. Beginning in the 1930`s, the Columbia River has been significantly modified by construction of 30 major dams on the river and its tributaries, along with dozens of non-Federal projects. Construction and subsequent operation of these water development projects have contributed to eight primary uses of the river system, including navigation, flood control, irrigation, electric power generation, fish migration, fish and wildlife habitat, recreation, and water supply and quality considerations. Increasing stress on the water development of the Columbia River and its tributaries has led primary Federal agencies to undertake intensive analysis and evaluation of the operation of these projects. These agencies are the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers and the Bureau of Reclamation, who operate the large Federal dams on the river, and the Bonneville Power Administration who sells the power generated at the dams. This review, termed the System Operation Review (SOR), has as its ultimate goal to define a strategy for future operation of the major Columbia River projects which effectively considers the needs of all river uses. This volume, Appendix D: Cultural resources appendix, Technical imput includes the following: Development of geomorphology based framework for cultural resources management, Dworshak Reservoir, Idaho; Impact profiles for SOR reservoirs; comments from the following Native American tribes: Burns Paiute Tribe; Coville Confederated Tribes; Confederated Tribes of the Warm Springs Indian Reservation; Confederated Tribes and bands of the Yakama Indian Nation (comments); Nez Perce Tribe; Coeur D`Alene Tribe; Spokane Tribe of Indians; The confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation.

Columbia River System Operation Review (U.S.)

1995-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "wetland environmental review" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Review and analysis of parameters for assessing transport of environmentally released radionuclides through agriculture  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Most of the default parameters incorporated into the TERRA computer code are documented including a literature review and systematic analysis of element-specific transfer parameters B/sub v/, B/sub r/, F/sub m/, F/sub f/, and K/sub d/. This review and analysis suggests default values which are consistent with the modeling approaches taken in TERRA and may be acceptable for most assessment applications of the computer code. However, particular applications of the code and additional analysis of elemental transport may require alternative default values. Use of the values reported herein in other computer codes simulating terrestrial transport is not advised without careful interpretation of the limitations and scope these analyses. An approach to determination of vegetation-specific interception fractions is also discussed. The limitations of this approach are many, and its use indicates the need for analysis of deposition, interception, and weathering processes. Judgement must be exercised in interpretation of plant surface concentrations generated. Finally, the location-specific agricultural, climatological, and population parameters in the default SITE data base documented. These parameters are intended as alternatives to average values currently used. Indeed, areas in the United States where intensive crop, milk, or beef production occurs will be reflected in the parameter values as will areas where little agricultural activity occurs. However, the original information sources contained some small error and the interpolation and conversion methods used will add more. Parameters used in TERRA not discussed herein are discussed in the companion report to this one - ORNL-5785. In the companion report the models employed in and the coding of TERRA are discussed. These reports together provide documentation of the TERRA code and its use in assessments. 96 references, 78 figures, 21 tables.

Baes, C.F. III; Sharp, R.D.; Sjoreen, A.L.; Shor, R.W.

1984-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

242

CHARACTERIZATION OF MICROTOPOGRAPHY AND ITS INFLUENCE ON VEGETATION PATTERNS IN CREATED WETLANDS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

CHARACTERIZATION OF MICROTOPOGRAPHY AND ITS INFLUENCE ON VEGETATION PATTERNS IN CREATED WETLANDS, Virginia, USA 20192 Abstract: Created wetlands are increasingly used to mitigate wetland loss. Thus, identifying wetland creation methods that enhance ecosystem development might increase the likelihood

243

Soil Organic Matter of Natural and Restored Coastal Wetland Soils in Southern California  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

df III SS Mean F-Ratio p-value Squares Treatment WetlandDepth Treatment*Wetland Treatment*DepthWetland*Depth Treatment*Wetland*Depth Error Table 2: A. Data

Elgin, Barbara K.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

244

Evaluation of Subsurface Flow and Free-water Surface Wetlands Treating NPR-3 Produced Water - Year No. 1  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper is a summary of some of the activities conducted during the first year of a three-year cooperative research and development agreement (CRADA) between the Department of Energy (DOE) Rocky Mountain Oilfield Testing Center (RMOTC) and Texaco relating to the treatment of produced water by constructed wetlands. The first year of the CRADA is for design, construction and acclimation of the wetland pilot units. The second and third years of the CRADA are for tracking performance of pilot wetlands as the plant and microbial communities mature. A treatment wetland is a proven technology for the secondary and tertiary treatment of produced water, storm water and other wastewaters. Treatment wetlands are typically classified as either free-water surface (FWS) or subsurface flow (SSF). Both FWS and SSF wetlands work well when properly designed and operated. This paper presents a collection of kinetic data gathered from pilot units fed a slipstream of Wyoming (NPR-3) produced water. The pilot units are set up outdoors to test climatic influences on treatment. Monitoring parameters include evapotranspiration, plant growth, temperature, and NPDES discharge limits. The pilot wetlands (FWS and SSF) consist of a series of 100-gal plastic tubs filled with local soils, gravel, sharp sand and native wetland plants (cattail (Typha spp.), bulrush (Scirpus spp.), dwarf spikerush (Eleocharis)). Feed pumps control hydraulic retention time (HRT) and simple water control structures control the depth of water. The treated water is returned to the existing produced water treatment system. All NPDES discharge limits are met. Observations are included on training RMOTC summer students to do environmental work.

Myers, J. E.; Jackson, L. M.

2001-10-13T23:59:59.000Z

245

Feasibility of using geothermal effluents for waterfowl wetlands  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This project was conducted to evaluate the feasibility of using geothermal effluents for developing and maintaining waterfowl wetlands. Information in the document pertains to a seven State area the West where geothermal resources have development potential. Information is included on physiochemical characteristics of geothermal effluents; known effects of constituents in the water on a wetland ecosystem and water quality criteria for maintaining a viable wetland; potential of sites for wetland development and disposal of effluent water from geothermal facilities; methods of disposal of effluents, including advantages of each method and associated costs; legal and institutional constraints which could affect geothermal wetland development; potential problems associated with depletion of geothermal resources and subsidence of wetland areas; potential interference (adverse and beneficial) of wetlands with ground water; special considerations for wetlands requirements including size, flows, and potential water usage; and final conclusions and recommendations for suitable sites for developing demonstration wetlands.

None

1981-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

246

Columbia River System Operation Review : Final Environmental Impact Statement, Appendix D: Cultural Resources.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This study attempts to identify and analyze the impacts of the System Operating Strategy (SOS) alternatives on cultural resources. The impacts include effects on Native American traditional cultural values, properties and practices. They also include effects on archeological or historic properties meeting the criteria of the National Register of Historic Places. In addition to responding to the requirements of the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA), this analysis addresses the requirements of the National Historic Preservation Act (NHPA), the Archeological Resources Protection Act (ARPA), the Native American Graves Protection and Repatriation Act (NAGPRA), the Native American Religious Freedom Act (NARFA), and other relevant legislation. To meet their legally mandated cultural resources requirements, the SOR agencies will develop agreements and Implementation Plans with the appropriate State Historic Preservation Officers (SHPOs), Tribes, and the Advisory Council on Historic Preservation (ACHP) detailing the measures necessary to best manage the resource. The planning and implementation activities will be staged over a number of years in consultation with affected Tribes.

Columbia River System Operation Review (U.S.)

1995-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

247

Statement of Work-National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) Support...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

Policy Act (NEPA) Support Services Acquisition: Preparation and Review of Environmental Impact Statements, Environmental Assessments, Environmental Reports, and other...

248

Environmental Ethics Professor Harrell  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

17 WEEK 12 (11/12) None Paper 2 Peer Reviews (in class) Environmental Issues (11/14) Fracking (Movie

Spirtes, Peter

249

Rational readings on environmental concerns  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This book offers a wide range of insights on the state of environmental science today, including many alternative interpretations. Chapters include the following subjects: agricultural chemicals, asbestos, biotechnology; DDT; dioxin; electromagnetic radiation; ground water contamination; nuclear energy; ionizing radiation; global warming; wetlands.

Lehr, J.H. [ed.

1992-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

250

COURSE SYLLABUS WETLANDS AND WATER QUALITY  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

COURSE SYLLABUS WETLANDS AND WATER QUALITY SOS 5242 3 Credits I. COURSE DESCRIPTION: Introduction page of this syllabus to contact the instructor if you are not able to make it to an exam ­ prior

Ma, Lena

251

Environmental Technology and Emergency  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA), the Clean Air Act, Water Quality, and Method 9 Visible Emissions in environmental applications and emergency management. Past projects include assistance in environmental rule, border environmental and security studies, emergency communications, and energy assurance reviews

McGraw, Kevin J.

252

Review of the environmental behavior and fate of methyl tert-butyl ether  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A review of pertinent equations and current research indicates that when gasoline oxygenated with methyl tert-butyl ether (MTBE) comes into contact with water, large amounts of MTBe can dissolve. At 25 C, the water solubility of MTBE is about 5,000 mg/L for a gasoline that is 10% MTBE by weight, whereas for a nonoxygenated gasoline, the total hydrocarbon solubility in water is typically about 120 mg/L. Methyl tert-butyl ether sorbs only weakly to subsurface solids; therefore, sorption does not substantially retard the transport of MTBE by ground water. In addition, MTBE generally resists biodegradation in ground water. The half-life of MTBE in the atmosphere can be as short as 3 d in a regional airshed. In the air, MTBE tends to partition into atmospheric water, including precipitation. However, the washing out of gas-phase MTBE by precipitation will not, by itself, greatly alter the gas-phase concentration of the compound in the air. The partitioning of MTBE to precipitation can nevertheless result in concentrations as high as 3 {micro}g/L or more in urban precipitation and can contribute to the presence of MTBE in surface and ground water.

Squillace, P.J.; Zogorski, J.S. [Geological Survey, Rapid City, SD (United States); Pankow, J.F. [Oregon Graduate Inst. of Science and Technology, Beaverton, OR (United States). Dept. of Environmental Science and Engineering; Korte, N.E. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States). Environmental Science Div.

1997-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

253

Results of a literature review on the environmental qualification of low-voltage electric cables  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In the design of nuclear power plants in the US, safety-related electric equipment must be qualified to provide reasonable assurance it can withstand the effects of a design basis event (DBE) and still be able to perform its prescribed safety function, even if the accident were to occur at the end of its service life. The requirement for environmental qualification (EQ) originates from the General Design Criteria in the Code of Federal Regulations, Title 10, Part 50 (10 CFR 50). The acceptable method of performing the qualification of this equipment has evolved over the years, starting with the NRC Division of Operating Reactors (DOR) Guidelines, which were issued in Bulletin 79--01B, and NUREG-0588 requirements and ending with the current EQ Rule, 10 CFR 50.49. While the EQ methods described in these documents have the same overall objective, there are some notable differences for which a clear technical basis has not been established. One difference is the preaging requirement for equipment prior to LOCA testing. In addition, specific issues related to current EQ practices have been raised by the US NRC which need to be addressed. These issues, which are discussed in detail later in this paper, are related to the sources of conservatism and uncertainty in IEEE Standard 323--1974, which is the qualification standard currently endorsed by the NRC. To address these issues, the NRC Office of Nuclear Reactor Regulation (NRR) implemented a Task Action Plan (TAP), and the Office of Nuclear Reactor Research (RES) initiated a complementary research program. The current focus of this program is on the qualification of low-voltage instrumentation and control cables. These cables were selected since they are not typically replaced on a routine basis, and their degradation could impact plant safety.

Lofaro, R.; Lee, B.; Villaran, M. [Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States); Gleason, J. [GLS Enterprises, Inc. (United States); Aggarwal, S. [Nuclear Regulatory Commission, Washington, DC (United States)

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

254

Columbia River System Operation Review : Final Environmental Impact Statement, Appendix R: Pacific Northwest Coordination agreement (PNCA).  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Currently, the Federal government coordinates the planning and operation of the Federal Columbia River Power System (FCRPS) with projects owned and operated by the region`s non-Federal hydrogenerating utilities pursuant to the Pacific North-west Coordination Agreement (PNCA). The Bureau of Reclamation (Reclamation), the Corps of Engineers (Corps), and the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) are parties to the PNCA on behalf of the government of the United States. The PNCA is a complex agreement that provides an opportunity for the region`s power producers to maximize the power system`s reliability and economy while meeting their multiple-use objectives. The PNCA does not dictate the operation of the resources it coordinates. It is essentially an accounting mechanism that exchanges the power produced among the parties in order to improve the reliability of the system and reduce regional power costs. Project owners retain complete autonomy to operate as needed to meet their multiple-use requirements. The PNCA was executed in 1964 as an important component of regional plans to maximize the Northwest`s hydro resource capability. Maximization also included the development of storage projects on the Columbia River in Canada pursuant to the terms of the 1964 Columbia River Treaty. Because of the link between power coordination and Treaty issues, the current parties to the PNCA, currently are contemplating entering into a replacement or renewed power coordination agreement. Because the power coordination agreement is a consensual arrangement, its ultimate provisions must be acceptable to all of its signatories. This Appendix R to the Final Environmental Impact Statement of the Columbia River System is a presentation of the Pacific North-west Coordination Agreement.

Columbia River System Operation Review (U.S.)

1995-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

255

The National Inventory of Landscapes in Sweden (NILS) is a new, nationwide environmental monitoring programme focused on  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

) recreational areas Wetlands and riparian zones: draining natural or regulated water regime management The National Inventory of Landscapes in Sweden (NILS) is a new, nationwide environmental monitoring programme. The initiator of the programme is the Swedish Environmental Protection Agency, which

256

Columbia River System Operation Review : Final Environmental Impact Statement, Main Report.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The System Operation Review (SOR) Final EIS addresses four actions: (a) need to develop coordinated strategy for managing the multiple uses of the Federal Columbia River system (System Operating Strategy [SOS]); (b) need to provide interested parties other than management agencies with a long-term role in system planning (Forum); (c) need to renew or change current Canadian Entitlement Allocation Agreements (CEAA); and (d) need to renegotiate and renew the Pacific Northwest Coordination Agreement (PNCA). SOS alternatives analyzed are: (1) operation prior to Endangered Species Act listings of salmon stocks; (2) current operations (no action); (3) stable storage project operation; (4) natural river operation; (5) fixed drawdown; (6) operating strategies proposed by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, National Marine Fisheries Service, State fisheries agencies, Native American tribes, and Federal operating agencies; and (7) Preferred Alternative. The seven Forum alternatives analyzed are: (1) decisionmaking by the SOR lead agencies (preferred alternative); (2) decisionmaking by SOR lead agencies and recommendations by an existing regional entity; (3) decisionmaking by SOR lead agencies and recommendations by a new regional entity; (4) decisionmaking by a Federal consultation forum; (5) decisionmaking by a new entity; (6) decisionmaking by one Federal operating agency; (7) decisionmaking by a Federal agency other than an operating agency. PNCA alternatives analyzed are: (1) no replacement contract; (2) contract to maximize regional power benefits; (3) roll over existing PNCA; (4) current PNCA with modified operating procedures (preferred alternative); (5) current PNCA with nonpower modifications. CEAA alternatives include: (1) no action (no replacement of current allocation agreements); (2) entitlement allocation: 55 percent Federal; 45 percent non-Federal; (3) entitlement allocation: 70 percent Federal, 30 percent non-Federal (preferred alternative); (4) no agreement.

Columbia River System Operation Review (U.S.); United States. Bonneville Power Administration; United States. Army. Corps of Engineers. North Pacific Division; United States. Bureau of Reclamation. Pacific Northwest Region.

1995-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

257

Literature review of environmental qualification of safety-related electric cables: Summary of past work. Volume 1  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report summarizes the findings from a review of published documents dealing with research on the environmental qualification of safety-related electric cables used in nuclear power plants. Simulations of accelerated aging and accident conditions are important considerations in qualifying the cables. Significant research in these two areas has been performed in the US and abroad. The results from studies in France, Germany, and Japan are described in this report. In recent years, the development of methods to monitor the condition of cables has received special attention. Tests involving chemical and physical examination of cable`s insulation and jacket materials, and electrical measurements of the insulation properties of cables are discussed. Although there have been significant advances in many areas, there is no single method which can provide the necessary information about the condition of a cable currently in service. However, it is possible that further research may identify a combination of several methods that can adequately characterize the cable`s condition.

Subudhi, M. [Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States)

1996-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

258

By the National Wetlands Working Group / Edited by B.G. Warner and C.D.A. Rubec The Canadian Wetland Classification System  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

By the National Wetlands Working Group / Edited by B.G. Warner and C.D.A. Rubec The Canadian Wetland Classification System Second Edition #12; 1997 by the Wetlands Research Centre, University Wetlands Conservation Council (Canada) · Wetlands Research Centre, University of Waterloo Copies

Laval, Université

259

Geothermal wetlands: an annotated bibliography of pertinent literature  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This annotated bibliography covers the following topics: algae, wetland ecosystems; institutional aspects; macrophytes - general, production rates, and mineral absorption; trace metal absorption; wetland soils; water quality; and other aspects of marsh ecosystems. (MHR)

Stanley, N.E.; Thurow, T.L.; Russell, B.F.; Sullivan, J.F.

1980-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

260

Delineating wetlands using geographic information system and remote sensing technologies  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

During the last century wetlands have considerably decreased. The principal cause is urbanization, especially in large urban regions such as the Houston area. In order to protect the remaining wetlands, they have to be monitored carefully. However...

Villeneuve, Julie

2006-04-12T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "wetland environmental review" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Special points of inter-National Wetlands In-  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Special points of inter- est National Wetlands In- daba 2011 18 to 21 October 2011 Didima Resort & Confer- ence Centre Central Drakensberg, KwaZulu-Natal, South Africa www.wetlands.za.net/indaba Welcome

Wagner, Stephan

262

Application of integrated constructed wetlands for contaminant treatment and diffusion  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The sediment accumulation is an important characteristic in the ageing process of integrated constructed wetlands (ICW). Retained nutrient and other contaminants in wetland sediments have the potential to be remobilized ...

Dong, Yu

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

263

Methane in lakes and wetlands Microbiological production, ecosystem  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Methane in lakes and wetlands Microbiological production, ecosystem uptake, climatological significance LAKES AND WETLANDS ­ A RELEVANT METHANE SOURCE Lakes and other wetlands are an important source of methane, the third most important greenhouse gas in the atmosphere. However, the absolute contribution

Mühlemann, Oliver

264

Characterizing Microclimate and Plant Community Variation in Wetlands  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Climate . Wetlands . Soil . Temperature . Modeling . Boreal Introduction Groundwater-fed calcareous of Wetland Scientists 2013 Abstract Groundwater-fed calcareous wetlands (fens) sup- port diverse plant developed accurate daily resolution soil temperature models (min and max) from a 29-sensor network

Fridley, Jason D.

265

DEVELOPING BIOLOGICAL INDICATORS FOR ISOLATED FORESTED WETLANDS IN FLORIDA  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

DEVELOPING BIOLOGICAL INDICATORS FOR ISOLATED FORESTED WETLANDS IN FLORIDA By KELLY CHINNERS REISS at the H.T. Odum Center for Wetlands for stimulating discussion and valuable input along the way of gratitude to the land owners and managers who allowed access to the 118 wetlands throughout Florida

Slatton, Clint

266

Survey of Critical Wetlands and Riparian Areas in Mesa County  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Survey of Critical Wetlands and Riparian Areas in Mesa County Colorado Natural Heritage Program, Colorado 80523 #12;Survey of Critical Wetlands and Riparian Areas in Mesa County Prepared for: Colorado Department of Natural Resources Division of Wildlife, Wetlands Program 6060 Broadway Denver, Colorado 80203

267

Survey of Critical Wetlands Bureau of Land Management Lands  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Survey of Critical Wetlands Bureau of Land Management Lands South Park, Park County, Colorado 2003 Delivery Colorado State University #12;Survey of Critical Wetlands Bureau of Land Management Lands South place from unique wetlands to high quality grasslands to the bristlecone pine forests to its alpine

268

ERDC/ELTR-10-17 Wetlands Regulatory Assistance Program  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ERDC/ELTR-10-17 Wetlands Regulatory Assistance Program A Regional Guidebook for Applying the Hydrogeomorphic Approach to the Functional Assessment of Forested Wetlands in Alluvial Valleys of East Texas Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. #12;Wetlands Regulatory Assistance Program ERDC

US Army Corps of Engineers

269

TIDAL FRESHWATER WETLANDS OF THE MID-ATLANTIC AND  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Chapter 14 TIDAL FRESHWATER WETLANDS OF THE MID-ATLANTIC AND SOUTHEASTERN UNITED STATES James E Publishers, Weikersheim, 2009 Tidal Freshwater Wetlands, edited by Aat Barendregt in the book ,,Tidal Freshwater Wetlands". The copy attached is provided by Margraf Publishers Gmb

Newman, Michael C.

270

GREAT LAKES COASTAL WETLANDS MONITORING AND ASSESSMENT TECHNIQUES  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

GREAT LAKES COASTAL WETLANDS MONITORING AND ASSESSMENT TECHNIQUES By KRISTINA KOSTUK, B OF SCIENCE (2006) McMaster University (Biology) Hamilton, Ontario TITLE: Great Lakes Coastal Wetlands coastal wetlands. The first chapter examines the influence of gear type and sampling protocol on fish

McMaster University

271

RESEARCH REPORT 1740-1 WETLANDS MITIGATION FORHIGHWAY IMPACTS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

RESEARCH REPORT 1740-1 WETLANDS MITIGATION FORHIGHWAY IMPACTS: A NATIONWIDESURVEY OF STATE; 8QFODVVLILHG 1RRISDJHV 3ULFH )RUP'27)#12; 5HSURGXFWLRQRIFRPSOHWHGSDJHDXWKRUL]HG #12;WETLANDS Title: Development of a Mechanism to Compare On-Site vs. Off-Site Wetlands Mitigation Conducted

Texas at Austin, University of

272

The Tennessee Wetlands Conservation Strategy, first published in  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

3 #12;PREFACE The Tennessee Wetlands Conservation Strategy, first published in February 1994, and actions to better understand and conserve Tennessee's wetlands resources. This is the third edition goals for the upcoming years. The development of a Wetlands Strategy in Tennessee began in the fall

Gray, Matthew

273

ERDC/ELTR-11-11 Wetlands Regulatory Assistance Program  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ERDC/ELTR-11-11 Wetlands Regulatory Assistance Program Regional Guidebook for Applying the Hydrogeomorphic Approach to Assessing the Functions of Headwater Slope Wetlands on the South Carolina Coastal Ainslie September 2011 Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. #12;Wetlands Regulatory

US Army Corps of Engineers

274

Virginia Wetlands Report Case Studies: Balancing Risks Associated with  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Virginia Wetlands Report Case Studies: Balancing Risks Associated with Shoreline Protection Publication Focused on Virginia Wetland Issues and Training Fall 2007 Erosion happens and the sea level of the property owner with the public interest in the Bay and its living resources. The Tidal Wetlands Act (1972

275

TECHNICAL ARTICLES PLANTS USED IN CONSTRUCTED WETLANDS AND THEIR  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

TECHNICAL ARTICLES #12;2 PLANTS USED IN CONSTRUCTED WETLANDS AND THEIR FUNCTIONS Hans Brix Risskov, Denmark ABSTRACT Vegetation plays an important role in wastewater treatment wetlands. Plants treatment systems aesthetically pleasing. Wetland species of all growth forms have been used in treatment

Brix, Hans

276

Nine objectives are being implemented to achieve the wetlands  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

CHAPTER 3 OBJECTIVES Nine objectives are being implemented to achieve the wetlands goal. The action the Interagency Wetlands Committee recognized the validity of these objectives and the need for their continued the state's wetlands resource base more completely and identify the critical functions of the major types

Gray, Matthew

277

Main Ecosystem Characteristics and Distribution of Wetlands in Boreal and  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

9 Main Ecosystem Characteristics and Distribution of Wetlands in Boreal and Alpine Landscapes. Nilsson and J. Svensson Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences Sweden 1. Introduction Wetlands filters in the landscape. Many kinds of wetlands and peatlands can be found, each with a particular

278

Page 4 Summer 2004Wetland Wire Revisiting the Iraqi Marshlands  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

wetlands ecology and management. They encountered water treatment and sewage treatment facilities that hadPage 4 Summer 2004Wetland Wire Revisiting the Iraqi Marshlands DUWC Director says restoration efforts are progressing, but the record is mixed hen Duke University Wetland Center Director Curtis

279

H-02 CONSTRUCTED WETLAND STUDIES AMPHIBIANS AND PLANTS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

.................................... 14 #12;iii EXECUTIVE SUMMARY Construction of the H-02 constructed treatment wetlands adjacent to HH-02 CONSTRUCTED WETLAND STUDIES AMPHIBIANS AND PLANTS FY-2008 ANNUAL REPORT Savannah River Ecology ................................................................................................. 4 CHAPTER II -- AMPHIBIAN AND REPTILE USE OF THE H-02 WETLAND .................................... 5

Georgia, University of

280

River otter foraging opportunities at a coastal wetland  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

monitored otter latrines at two wetland types (a saltwater lake and freshwater treatment ponds), 5 times perRiver otter foraging opportunities at a coastal wetland Results DiscussionIntroduction River otters (Lontra canadensis) are the top predator in functioning wetland ecosystems. Kruuk (1995) proposed

Johnson, Matthew

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "wetland environmental review" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

CRSP Environmental Review (NEPA)  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsruc DocumentationP-Series to someone6Energy,MUSEUM DISPLAY STATUS AND "HOW-TO"

282

UGP Environmental Review (NEPA)  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsrucLasDelivered energy consumption by sectorlong version) The U.S.1,summerconducting oxides

283

SN Environmental Review (NEPA)  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsrucLas ConchasPassive Solar HomePromisingStoriesSANDIA REPORT SANDSDNTM7/31/13SLACM J-M-1SMB Rates

284

Environmental Review - NEPA  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsruc DocumentationP-Series toESnet4: NetworkingEnvironment EnvironmentFIB/SEMEnvironmental

285

Post-project evaluation of Tule Ponds in Fremont, California : Integration of stormwater treatment and wetland restoration  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of stormwater treatment and wetland restoration A paperSurface-Flow Constructed Treatment Wetlands, University oftools in the context of treatment wetlands, and if designed

Lunde, Kevin B; Weinstein, Adam H

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

286

Evaluation of using cyclocranes to support drilling & production of oil & gas in wetland areas. Sixth quarterly technical progress report, incorporating milestone schedule/status, October 1993--December 1993  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report is a progress report on a planned program falling under wetlands area research related to drilling, production, and transportation of oil and gas resources. Specifically the planned program addresses an evaluation of using cyclocraft to transport drill rigs, mud, pipes and other materials and equipment in a cost effective and environmentally safe manner to support oil and gas drilling and production operations in wetland areas. During this period, task 5, subscale tests, and task 7, environmental impacts, were completed. Work was continued on task 10, technology transfer, and the preparation of the final report as part of task 11.

Eggington, W.J.

1994-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

287

Wetlands Research Program Technical Report Y-87-1 (on-line edition) Corps of Engineers  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Wetlands Research Program Technical Report Y-87-1 (on-line edition) Corps of Engineers Wetlands used as part of the number designating technical reports of research published under the Wetlands;Wetlands Research Program Technical Report Y-87-1 January 1987 Corps of Engineers Wetlands Delineation

US Army Corps of Engineers

288

Wetlands Ecology and Management 12: 543546, 2004. # 2004 Kluwer Academic Publishers. Printed in the Netherlands.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Wetlands Ecology and Management 12: 543­546, 2004. # 2004 Kluwer Academic Publishers. Printed in the Netherlands. 543 Neotropical wetlands: building links among wetland scientists J.F. Gottgens1, * and R in revised form 7 November 2003 Key words: Conservation, Millennium wetland conference, Neotropical wetlands

Gottgens, Hans

289

Final report on evaluation of cyclocraft support of oil and gas operations in wetland areas  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The cyclocraft is a proven hybrid aircraft, capable of VTOL, lifting heavy and bulky loads, highly controllable, having high safety characteristics and low operating costs. Mission Research Corporation (MRC), under Department of Energy sponsorship, is evaluating the potential use of cyclocraft in the transport of drill rigs, mud, pipes and other materials and equipment, in a cost effective and environmentally safe manner, to support oil and gas drilling, production, and transportation operations in wetland areas. Based upon the results of an earlier parametric study, a cyclocraft design, having a payload capacity of 45 tons and designated H.1 Cyclocraft, was selected for further study, including the preparation of a preliminary design and a development plan, and the determination of operating costs. This report contains all of the results derived from the program to evaluate the use of cyclocraft in the support of oil and gas drilling and production operations in wetland areas.

Eggington, W.J.; Stevens, P.M.; John, C.J.; Harder, B.J.; Lindstedt, D.M.

1994-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

290

11/17/11 Treatment Wetlands  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of Wetlands Across the US But there is hope... Everything Is Connected Need Drives wastewater treatment faciliOes, combined sewer overflows, municipal stormwater, industry Annual cost of eutrophica1on in US freshwaters is es1mated to be $2.2B (Dodds

Gray, Matthew

291

Agriculture and Environmental Quality  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

practices, land application of biosolids and organic wastes, bioenergy, pesticides, and wetlands. Course Water Act, wetlands, bioenergy, food waste and pesticides. Students will examine the nitrogen

Ma, Lena

292

Winter 2011 ESM 202 Environmental Biogeochemistry  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Acid Mine Drainage (TH) Week 5 Air pollution: urban smog, stratospheric ozone (AK) Week 5 Industrial policy/email appt. Textbook: Environmental & Pollution Science (2006), Pepper et al. LECTURES Week 1 of chemicals (TH) Week 9 Emerging pollutants (TH) Week 9 Wetland biogeochemistry (AK) Week 10 Modeling

California at Santa Barbara, University of

293

Polishing of synthetic electroplating wastewater in microcosm upflow constructed wetlands: Effect of operating conditions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Polishing of synthetic electroplating wastewater in microcosm upflow constructed wetlands: Effect of polishing electroplating wastewater in subsurface vertical flow constructed wetland. Electroplating wastewater treatment or polishing in constructed wetlands (CWs) was studied to a very limited degree. Four

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

294

A Comparison of Vegetation in Artificially Isolated Wetlands on West Galveston Island  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The purpose of this study was to compare vegetation systems among three artificially isolated wetlands on the west end of Galveston Island. Sample sites were identified as isolated wetlands and anthropogenic impact was observed. Wetland plant...

Wilson, Ashley

2012-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

295

WETLANDS AND FISH: CATCH THE LINK For additional copies of this document, contact  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

#12;WETLANDS AND FISH: CATCH THE LINK For additional copies of this document, contact: National Cover Page: Photographs: Kathryn Conant Striped bass graphic: Duane Raver I #12;WETLANDS AND FISH: CATCH THE LINK Table of Contents Fish Need Wetlands

296

TECHNICAL REPORTS Constructed treatment wetlands are a relatively low-cost  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

TECHNICAL REPORTS 1904 Constructed treatment wetlands are a relatively low significantly affect the biogeochemistry of treatment wetlands and needs further investigation. Soil Biogeochemical Characteristics Influenced by Alum Application in a Municipal WastewaterTreatmentWetland Lynette M

Florida, University of

297

12 PLANET EARTH Autumn 2014 New Centre for Environmental  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

12 PLANET EARTH Autumn 2014 New Centre for Environmental Geochemistry opens in Nottingham T he on environmental change, from understanding ocean circulation to modelling the roles of lakes and wetlands, in finding and extracting energy in a way that's secure even over geological timespans. Research will look

Brierley, Andrew

298

ENVIRONMENTAL MANAGEMENT Environmental Policy  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ENVIRONMENTAL MANAGEMENT Environmental Policy February 2013 The University of Leeds is responsible to reflect best environmental practice, implement an environmental management system to pursue sustainability and continuous improvement and seek innovative ways of meeting environmental objectives. These include: To meet

Haase, Markus

299

E-Print Network 3.0 - artificial wetland modelling Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Ecology 42 A simple hydrologic framework for simulating wetlands in climate and earth system models Summary: A simple hydrologic framework for simulating wetlands in climate and...

300

E-Print Network 3.0 - artificial wetlands pilot Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

17 A simple hydrologic framework for simulating wetlands in climate and earth system models Summary: A simple hydrologic framework for simulating wetlands in climate and...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "wetland environmental review" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

E-Print Network 3.0 - assessing wetland functions Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

several watersheds for functional assessments of wetlands and their position on the landscape... of hydrogeomorphic assessments, habitat availability and wetland functional...

302

Plants in constructed wetlands help to treat agricultural processing wastewater  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

constructed wetlands help to treat agricultural processingacross the western to treat winery process wastewater Uniteddocumented relative to treat- discharged downstream. ment

Grismer, Mark E; Shepherd, Heather L

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

303

Controls on arsenic mobility in contaminated wetland and riverbed streams  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Arsenic mobility and transport in the environment are strongly influenced by associations with solid phases. This dissertation investigates the mechanisms affecting arsenic retention in contaminated wetland and riverbed ...

Keon, Nicole E. (Nicole Elise), 1974-

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

304

On-Site Wastewater Treatment Systems: Constructed Wetland Media  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This publication explains the functions, characteristics, choices, configurations and maintenance needs for constructed wetland media in on-site wastewater treatment systems....

Lesikar, Bruce J.; Weaver, Richard; Richter, Amanda; O'Neill, Courtney

2005-02-19T23:59:59.000Z

305

Wetland Plant Influence on Sediment Ecosystem Structure and Trophic Function  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

alterniflora and benthic microalgae in salt marsh food webs:assemblages of marine wetland microalgae and photosyntheticalternijlora and benthic microalgae in salt marsh food webs:

Whitcraft, Christine R.

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

306

Wetland plant influence on sediment ecosystem structure and trophic function  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

alterniflora and benthic microalgae in salt marsh food webs:assemblages of marine wetland microalgae and photosyntheticalterniflora and benthic microalgae in salt marsh food webs:

Whitcraft, Christine Ren

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

307

Burlington Bottoms Wildlife Mitigation Project. Final Environmental Assessment/Management Plan and Finding of No Significant Impact.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) proposes to fund wildlife management and enhancement activities for the Burlington bottoms wetlands mitigation site. Acquired by BPA in 1991, wildlife habitat at Burlington bottoms would contribute toward the goal of mitigation for wildlife losses and inundation of wildlife habitat due to the construction of Federal dams in the lower Columbia and Willamette River Basins. Target wildlife species identified for mitigation purposes are yellow warbler, great blue heron, black-capped chickadee, red-tailed hawk, valley quail, spotted sandpiper, wood duck, and beaver. The Draft Management Plan/Environmental Assessment (EA) describes alternatives for managing the Burlington Bottoms area, and evaluates the potential environmental impacts of the alternatives. Included in the Draft Management Plan/EA is an implementation schedule, and a monitoring and evaluation program, both of which are subject to further review pending determination of final ownership of the Burlington Bottoms property.

Not Available

1994-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

308

Development of a deterministic and stochastic computer model for phosphorus retention in a surface flow wetland system  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

pollution load to inland surface waters in the U.S. (U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, 1989). Water contaminated by NPSP can contain high organic and nutrient (primarily nitrogen and phosphorus) loads (Surrency, 1993). Excessive nutrient loading to a..., the land requirement for phosphorus removal is the largest wetland design parameter in terms of cost and areal loading. The use of detention basins or other pretreatment of the waste stream can homogenize phosphorus loading rates. Influent phosphorus can...

Verma, Rahul

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

309

Technical Review of Lower Snake River Juvenile Salmon Migration Feasibility Report / Environmental Impact Statement Appendix I Economics  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

/ Environmental Impact Statement Appendix I ­ Economics April 20, 2000 By The Independent Economic Analysis Board and the costs and economic impacts of the alternative scenarios analyzed, the IEAB finds that the draft Economic in and interpretation of the EA. 3.1 Power System Impacts The effects on electricity generation and its costs

310

Template for Expedited National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) Review of Certain State Energy Program Projects Template for Expedited National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) Review of Certain State...

311

Columbia River System Operation Review : Final Environmental Impact Statement, Appendix F: Irrigation, Municipal and Industrial/Water Supply.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Since the 1930`s, the Columbia River has been harnessed for the benefit of the Northwest and the nation. Federal agencies have built 30 major dams on the river and its tributaries. Dozens of non-Federal projects have been developed as well. The dams provide flood control, irrigation, navigation, hydro-electric power generation, recreation, fish and wildlife, and streamflows for wildlife, anadromous fish, resident fish, and water quality. This is Appendix F of the Environmental Impact Statement for the Columbia River System, focusing on irrigation issues and concerns arrising from the Irrigation and Mitigation of impacts (M&I) working Group of the SOR process. Major subheadings include the following: Scope and process of irrigation/M&I studies; Irrigation/M&I in the Columbia Basin Today including overview, irrigated acreage and water rights, Irrigation and M&I issues basin-wide and at specific locations; and the analysis of impacts and alternative for the Environmental Impact Statement.

Columbia River System Operations Review (U.S.); United States. Bonneville Power Administration; United States. Army. Corps of Engineers. North Pacific Division; United States. Bureau of Reclamation. Pacific Northwest Region.

1995-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

312

Literature Review of Uncertainty of Analysis Methods, (DOE-2 Program), Report to the Texas Commission on Environmental Quality  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This literature review covers the DOE-2 simulation program, which is one of the legacy programs in the ESLs Emissions Calculator (eCalc), a web-based emissions reductions calculator. The eCalc program is a tool for those who want to see how...

Haberl, J. S.; Cho, S.

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

313

Columbia River System Operation Review : Final Environmental Impact Statement, Appendix C: Anadromous Fish and Juvenile Fish Transportation.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This Appendix C of the Final Environmental Impact Statement for the Columbia River System discusses impacts on andromous fish and juvenile fish transportation. The principal andromous fish in the Columbia basin include salmonid species (Chinook, coho, and sockeye salmon, and steelhead) and nonsalmoinid andromous species (sturgeon, lamprey, and shad). Major sections in this document include the following: background, scope and process; affected environment for salmon and steelhead, shaded, lamprey, sturgeon; study methods; description of alternatives: qualitative and quantitative findings.

Columbia River System Operation Review (U.S.)

1995-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

314

Cost-Efficacy in Wetland Restoration Projects in Coastal Louisiana  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ARTICLE Cost-Efficacy in Wetland Restoration Projects in Coastal Louisiana Joy Merino & Christiane, such as wetland loss, influence CWPPRA project selection for funding. We found that the program was selecting cost- effective projects overall. Cost efficacy varied significantly by restoration project type, with barrier

315

Wetland Conservation The Food Security Act was enacted on  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Wetland Conservation Compliance #12;The Food Security Act was enacted on December 23, 1985. Title in 1987, assigning Natural Resources Conservation Service (NRCS) responsibility for making wetland Surveys · Farm Service Agency crop compliance slides · U.S. Weather Service data · U.S. Fish and Wildlife

US Army Corps of Engineers

316

APPLIED ISSUES Biomanipulation: a useful tool for freshwater wetland  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. In this paper we show that biomanipulation may have a strong potential for wetland eutrophication abatement variability, eutrophication sources and gradients of wind exposure and water colour. Keywords: eutrophication the structure and function of many natural wetlands have been severely altered by eutrophication, which has

McMaster University

317

A Classification of Riparian Wetland Plant Associations of Colorado  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A Classification of Riparian Wetland Plant Associations of Colorado A Users Guide: Colorado Natural Heritage Program 254 General Services Bldg. Colorado State University Fort Collins, CO of Riparian Wetland Plant Associations of Colorado: User Guide to the Classification Project. Colorado Natural

318

Nutrient Removal Mechanisms in a Cold Climate Gravel Wetland  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Nutrient Removal Mechanisms in a Cold Climate Gravel Wetland Alison Watts, Robert Roseen, Kim Farah and development of stormwater treatment systems Gregg Hall 35 Colovos Road Durham, New Hampshire 03824-3534 603.862.4024 http://www.unhsc.unh.edu #12;POROUS ASPHALT Watershed Boundary #12;#12;Gravel Wetland Effluent sampling

319

Nutrient Removal Mechanisms in a Cold Climate Gravel Wetland  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Nutrient Removal Mechanisms in a Cold Climate Gravel Wetland Alison Watts, Robert Roseen, Kim Farah and development of stormwater treatment systems Gregg Hall 35 Colovos Road Durham, New Hampshire 03824-3534 603;Gravel Wetland Sampling within the system #12;NEIWPCC-UNH Project Goals Validation of constructed gravel

320

Environmental Conditions Environmental Conditions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Environmental Conditions Environmental Conditions Appendix II The unique geology, hydrology and instream habitat. This chapter examines how environmental conditions in the Deschutes watershed affect, the discussion characterizes the environmental conditions within three watershed areas: the Lower Deschutes

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "wetland environmental review" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Exam Review WFS 340: Wetlands Ecology and Management  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

change mixing rates by order of magnitude (vertical diffusivity 10-4 at right "...an ocean less charted than the surface of the moon", H. Sverdrup, California Monthly, December 1940

Gray, Matthew

322

Environmental Survey preliminary report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report presents the preliminary findings from the first phase of the Environmental Survey of the United States Department of Energy (DOE) Sandia National Laboratories conducted August 17 through September 4, 1987. The objective of the Survey is to identify environmental problems and areas of environmental risk associated with Sandia National Laboratories-Albuquerque (SNLA). The Survey covers all environmental media and all areas of environmental regulation. It is being performed in accordance with the DOE Environmental Survey Manual. This phase of the Survey involves the review of existing site environmental data, observations of the operations carried on at SNLA, and interviews with site personnel. 85 refs., 49 figs., 48 tabs.

Not Available

1988-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

323

alkaline environmental conditions: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

17 WEEK 12 (1112) None Paper 2 Peer Reviews (in class) Environmental Issues (1114) Fracking (Movie Spirtes, Peter 419 SUSTAINABILITY Environmental, Cultural, Environmental...

324

The Influence of Microtopography on Soil Nutrients in Created Mitigation Wetlands  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

(Bruland et al. 2006). In spite of these charac- teristic failings, created wetlands are increasingly used

325

Binational GIS database of coastal wetlands for Lake Ontario and the St. Lawrence: a demonstration project  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Binational GIS database of coastal wetlands for Lake Ontario and the St. Lawrence: a demonstration wetlands of Lake Ontario in ArcMap (ESRI). Information for the Canadian wetlands were obtained from two Canada, along with wetland polygons from the Ontario Ministry of Natural Resources, and geographic

McMaster University

326

Reducing Agricultural Nitrate Losses in the Embarras River Watershed through Bioreactors, Constructed Wetlands, and Outreach  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, Constructed Wetlands, and Outreach Proposed by the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign Mark David project will combine research, education, and extension on using tile-fed constructed wetlands and wood of wetlands using three constructed in 1994, while at the same time install two additional wetlands in other

David, Mark B.

327

Wetlands Ecology and Management Instructor: Dr. Matthew Gray (mgray11@utk.edu)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

WFS 340 Wetlands Ecology and Management Fall 2010 Instructor: Dr. Matthew Gray (mgray11@utk://fwf.ag.utk.edu/mgray/wfs340/340home.htm Recommended Text: Wetlands, 2007, 4th edition (ISBN 978-0-471-69967-5) or Wetlands: To expose students to the basic principles of wetland ecology and management via class lectures, labs

Gray, Matthew

328

Space-based detection of wetlands' surface water level changes from L-band SAR interferometry  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Space-based detection of wetlands' surface water level changes from L-band SAR interferometry­1996 reveals detectable surface changes in the Everglades wetlands. Although our study is limited to south Florida it has implication for other large-scale wetlands, because south Florida wetlands have diverse

Amelung, Falk

329

Wetlands Ecology and Management Instructor: Dr. Matthew Gray (mgray11@utk.edu)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

WFS 340 Wetlands Ecology and Management Fall 2011 Instructor: Dr. Matthew Gray (mgray11@utk://fwf.ag.utk.edu/mgray/wfs340/340home.htm Recommended Text: Wetlands, 2007, 4th edition (ISBN 978-0-471-69967-5) or Wetlands: To expose students to the basic principles of wetland ecology and management via class lectures, labs

Gray, Matthew

330

Wetlands Ecology and Management Instructor: Dr. Matthew Gray (mgray11@utk.edu)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

WFS 340 Wetlands Ecology and Management Fall 2012 Instructor: Dr. Matthew Gray (mgray11@utk://fwf.ag.utk.edu/mgray/wfs340/340home.htm Required Text: Wetland Restoration and Construction, 2011 (978-0-9834558-0-6) Author: Thomas Biebighauser Recommended Text: Wetlands, 2007, 4th edition (ISBN 978-0-471-69967-5) or Wetlands

Gray, Matthew

331

GOAL OF THE STATE WETLANDS STRATEGY It shall be the goal of  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

CHAPTER 2 GOAL OF THE STATE WETLANDS STRATEGY It shall be the goal of the State of Tennessee to provide the maximum practicable wetlands benefits to Tennessee and her citizens by conserving, enhancing, and restoring the acreage, quality, and biological diversity of Tennessee wetlands. The management of wetlands

Gray, Matthew

332

Ecological Modelling 105 (1997) 121 Interaction and spatial distribution of wetland nitrogen  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Elsevier Science B.V. Keywords: Wetland model; Nitrogen cycling; Wastewater treatment 1. Introduction methods of wetland treatment systems. This design ap- proach, referred to as `black box' methodology in wetlands, and (ii) factors affecting N removal from treatment wetlands. A mechanistic model was developed

Florida, University of

333

Mitigation and monitoring plan for impacted wetlands at the Gunnison UMTRA Project site, Gunnison, Colorado. [Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The U.S Department of Energy (DOE) administers the Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project. The UMTRA Project is the result of the Uranium Mill Tailings Radiation Control Act(UMTRA) which was passed in response to the public's concern over the potential public health hazards related to uranium mill tailings and associated contaminated material at abandoned or otherwise uncontrolled inactive processing sites throughout the United States. The Gunnison, Colorado abandoned uranium mill site is one of the sites slated for cleanup by the DOE under authority of UMTRA. The contaminated material at this site will be transported to a disposal site on US Bureau of Land Management (BLM) land east of Gunnison. Remedial action activities will temporarily disturb 0.8 acre and permanently eliminate 5.1 acres of wetlands. This report describes the proposed mitigation plan for the 5.9 acres of impacted wetlands. In conjunction with the mitigation of the permanently impacted wetlands through the enhancement of wetland and adjacent riparian areas, impacts to wildlife as a result of this project will also be mitigated. However, wildlife mitigation is not the focus of this document and is covered in relevant BLM permits for this project. This plan proposes the enhancement of a 3:1 ratio of impacted wetlands in accordance with US Environmental Protection Agency guidelines, plus the enhancement of riparian areas for wildlife mitigation. Included in this mitigation plan is a monitoring plan to ensure that the proposed measures are working and being maintained.

Not Available

1992-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

334

A review of occupational safety and health issues relevant to the environmental restoration program: Selected case histories and associated issues  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report describes a study conducted by Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) to determine the impact of occupational safety and health (OSH) issues on the environmental restoration process at US Department of Energy sites. PNL selected three remediation projects to study: (1) the 618-9 Burial Ground Expedited Removal Action at the Hanford Site, (2) the Chemical Consolidation Interim Response Action at the Weldon Spring Site, (3) and the 200 West Area Carbon Tetrachloride Expedited Removal Action and VOC-Arid Integration Demonstration at the Hanford Site. The first two case studies involve sites where a remediation activity has been complete. The third case study involves a remediation activity in its early stages of development. This study identifies OSH issues related to actual cleanup, time, documentation, training, and technology development. These issues need to be considered by DOE before making long-term planning efforts. Section 4.0 of this report describes recommendations for addressing these issues.

Lesperance, A.M.; Siegel, M.R.; McKinney, M.D.

1992-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

335

Development of phytotoxicity tests using wetland species  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Laboratory phytotoxicity tests used to assess contaminant effects may not effectively protect wetland communities. The authors are developing routine culture and testing methods for selected fresh water plants, that can be used in risk assessments and monitoring of existing wetland systems. Utility of these tests includes evaluating the effects of point or non-point source contamination that may cause water or sediment quality degradation. Selected species include algae (blue-green, green), phytoflagellates (Chlamydomonas, Euglena), and floating or submerged vascular plants (milfoil, coontail, wild celery, elodea, duckweed). Algae toxicity tests range from 2-d, 4-d, and 7 day tests, and macrophyte tests from 10-d to 14 days. Metribuzin and boron are the selected contaminants for developing the test methods. Metribuzin, a triazinone herbicide, is a photosystem 11 inhibitor, and is commonly used for control of grass and broad-leaf plants. As a plant micronutrient, boron is required in very small amounts, but excessive levels can result in phytotoxicity or accumulation. The investigations focus on the influence of important factors including the influence of light quality and quantity, and nutrient media. Reference toxicant exposures with potassium chloride are used to establish baseline data for sensitivity and vitality of the plants. These culture and test methods will be incorporated into recommendations for standard phytotoxicity test designs.

Nelson, M.K.; Fairchild, J.F. [National Biological Survey, Columbia, MO (United States)

1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

336

"A Methods book that is interdisciplinary and will be a standard for everyone investigating wetlands for years to come..."  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

wetlands for years to come..." David Lindbo 2013 SSSA President Wetland Volume 13 Spring 2014 WireThe Newsletter of the Duke University Wetland Center, Nicholas School of the Environment From the Director: 2 The Wetland Ecologist's Daughter 5 Carbon for Money 6 On The Inside New Wetland Methods Book Published by SSSA

337

Environmental Management Waste Management Facility (EMWMF) at...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

Technical Review Report: Oak Ridge Reservation Review of the Environmental Management Waste Management Facility (EMWMF) at Oak Ridge By Craig H. Benson, PhD, PE; William H....

338

Contents of environmental assessments prepared for the Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action Project  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document presents two versions of the outline for the environmental assessments (EAS) to be prepared for the Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project. The first displays the basic structure of the assessments; it lists only the titles of sections. The second is a guide to the contents of the assessments which provides, under each title, a brief summary of contents. The outline is intended to comply with the planning requirements (40 CFR Part 1501) and the definitions of terms (40-' CFR Part 1508) established by the Council on Environmental Quality as well as DOE order 5440.lB (Implementation of the National Environmental Policy Act), and compliance with Floodplain/Wetlands Environmental Review Requirements (10 CFR Part 1022). These requirements and definitions are implicitly part of the outline. The outline presented in this document will guide the preparation of EAs. The UMTRA Project EAs will be used in determining whether the DOE should prepare an environmental impact statement or a finding of no significant impact for the actions at each of the sites. If no impact statement is necessary, the environmental assessment for that site will aid the DOE in complying with the National Environmental Policy Act before beginning remedial actions. If an impact statement is needed, the assessment will aid its preparation. These purposes, established by the Council on Environmental Quality in 40 CFR Part 1508.9(a), have guided the construction of the outline presented in this document. Remedial actions at each site will include the cleanup of properties in the vicinity of the tailings sites that have been contaminated by the tailings.

Not Available

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

339

Contents of environmental assessments prepared for the Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action Project  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document presents two versions of the outline for the environmental assessments (EAS) to be prepared for the Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project. The first displays the basic structure of the assessments; it lists only the titles of sections. The second is a guide to the contents of the assessments which provides, under each title, a brief summary of contents. The outline is intended to comply with the planning requirements (40 CFR Part 1501) and the definitions of terms (40-` CFR Part 1508) established by the Council on Environmental Quality as well as DOE order 5440.lB (Implementation of the National Environmental Policy Act), and compliance with Floodplain/Wetlands Environmental Review Requirements (10 CFR Part 1022). These requirements and definitions are implicitly part of the outline. The outline presented in this document will guide the preparation of EAs. The UMTRA Project EAs will be used in determining whether the DOE should prepare an environmental impact statement or a finding of no significant impact for the actions at each of the sites. If no impact statement is necessary, the environmental assessment for that site will aid the DOE in complying with the National Environmental Policy Act before beginning remedial actions. If an impact statement is needed, the assessment will aid its preparation. These purposes, established by the Council on Environmental Quality in 40 CFR Part 1508.9(a), have guided the construction of the outline presented in this document. Remedial actions at each site will include the cleanup of properties in the vicinity of the tailings sites that have been contaminated by the tailings.

Not Available

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

340

Review of Recent Literature Relevant to the Environmental Effects of Marine and Hydrokinetic Energy Devices Task 2.1.3: Effects on Aquatic Organisms Fiscal Year 2011 Progress Report Environmental Effects of Marine and Hydrokinetic Energy  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A literature search was conducted by using the Web of Science Databases component of the ISI Web of KnowledgeSM to identify recent articles that would be useful to help assess the potential environmental effects of renewable energy development in the ocean, with emphasis on marine mammals, seabirds, and fish. Several relatively recent general review articles that included possible effects of marine renewable energy devices on marine mammals and seabirds were examined to begin the search process (e.g., Boehlert et al. 2008; Thompson et al. 2008; Simas et al. 2009). From these articles, several general topics of potential environmental effects on marine mammals, seabirds, and fish were derived. These topics were used as the primary search factors. Searches were conducted with reference to the potential effects of offshore wind farms and MHK devices on marine mammals, seabirds, and fish. Additional sources were identified by cross-checking the Web of Science databases for articles that cited the review articles. It also became clear that often the potential effects were offered as hypotheses that often were not supported by the presentation of appropriate documentation. Therefore, the search was refined and focused on trying to obtain the necessary information to support or challenge a proposed potential effect to a specific concern. One of the expressed concerns regarding MHK devices is that placing wave parks in coastal waters could compromise the migration patterns of whales. Disruption of the annual migration of the gray whale (Eschrichtius robustus), which swims at least 30,000 km on its round trip from breeding grounds in Baja California to feeding areas in the Bering Sea, is of particular concern. Among the hypothesized effects on the migrating gray whales are increased predation risk by constricting migration corridor to between array and shore or by forcing the whales to swim into deeper waters, increased metabolic energy costs and delays in reaching the destinations, and interrupting feeding by blocking access to benthic areas under arrays. The literature search focused on identifying published studies that could provide information to evaluate these concerns. The results were developed into a case study that evaluated the potential effects of the placement of wave parks in coastal waters along the migration route of the gray whale. Wave parks and other MHK arrays may have additional effects on gray whales and other marine mammals, including entanglement in mooring lines and interference with communications among other effects, that were not included in this case study. The case study results were rewritten into a simpler form that would be suitable for placement on a web blog

Kropp, Roy K.

2011-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "wetland environmental review" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

action review draft: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

management 2 Draft for Secretarial Review DRAFT ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT REGULATORY IMPACT REVIEW Environmental Sciences and Ecology Websites Summary: Draft for Secretarial...

342

Foreseeing critical phosphorus cycle transitions in constructed wetlands: applied to the new Tres Rios arid-land constructed wetlands with the city of Phoenix  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Foreseeing critical phosphorus cycle transitions in constructed wetlands: applied to the new Tres Rios arid-land constructed wetlands with the city of Phoenix E.Chapman1 and B.Warner2 1 School of Life Sciences, 2 School of Sustainability, Arizona State University,Tempe, AZ Abstract Constructed wetland

Hall, Sharon J.

343

Vehicle Emissions Review - 2012  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Vehicle Emissions Review - 2012 Tim Johnson October 16, 2012 2 Environmental Technologies Summary * Regulations - LEVIII finalized, Tier 3? RDE in Europe developing and very...

344

Wetlands Mitigation Banking and the Problem of Consolidation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

economic development and efficiency in the development process.economic development and efficiency in the development process.process has always been the assumption that wetland preservation should be balanced with economic

Steinhoff, Gordon

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

345

BOD5 removal in subsurface flow constructed wetlands  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The frequency of on-site systems for treatment of domestic wastewater is increasing with new residential development in both rural and low-density suburban areas. Subsurface flow constructed wetlands (SFCW) have emerged as a viable option to achieve...

Melton, Rebecca Hobbs

2005-08-29T23:59:59.000Z

346

Wetlands Standard Dredge and Fill Permit (New Hampshire)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The purpose of the permits is to protect and preserve submerged lands under tidal and freshwaters and wetlands, both salt and fresh water, from unregulated alteration that would adversely affect...

347

Subsurface flow constructed wetland: treatment of domestic wastewater by gravel and tire chip media and ultraviolet disinfection of effluent  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and volatile suspended solids, NH?, P, and fecal and total coliforms. Differences between medium types in wetland performance were found for the parameters of BOD? and P, in which tire chip wetlands outperformed gravel wetlands. The average percent reduction...

Richmond, Amanda Yvette

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

348

Efficacy of Low and High Complexity Vegetation Treatments for Reestablishing Terrestrial Arthropod Assemblages during Montane Wetland Restoration  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

wetland typesthan was observed between any restoration treatment andDual treatment was added to enhance restoration of wetlandTreatments for Reestablishing Terrestrial Arthropod Assemblages during Montane Wetland

Holmquist, Jeffrey G; Schmidt-Gengenbach, Jutta; Demetry, Athena

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

349

Vegetation survey of PEN Branch wetlands  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A survey was conducted of vegetation along Pen Branch Creek at Savannah River Site (SRS) in support of K-Reactor restart. Plants were identified to species by overstory, understory, shrub, and groundcover strata. Abundance was also characterized and richness and diversity calculated. Based on woody species basal area, the Pen Branch delta was the most impacted, followed by the sections between the reactor and the delta. Species richness for shrub and groundcover strata were also lowest in the delta. No endangered plant species were found. Three upland pine areas were also sampled. In support of K Reactor restart, this report summarizes a study of the wetland vegetation along Pen Branch. Reactor effluent enters Indian Grove Branch and then flows into Pen Branch and the Pen Branch Delta.

Not Available

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

350

Argus Energy WV, LLC wins 2007 Wetlands West Virginia Award  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Argus Energy's Kiah Creek Operation has received the 2007 Wetlands West Virginia Award presented by the West Virginian Coal Association. The operation was originally a 1267 acre underground mine in the Coalburg seam. Underground mining commenced in 2000 until the end of 2003 with more than two million tons of coal being produced. The creation of the wetlands was achieved during the operations. 8 photos.

NONE

2007-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

351

STUDY OF BIODIESEL AS A FUEL FOR CI ENGINES AND ITS ENVIRONMENTAL EFFECTS: A RESEARCH REVIEW Mukesh Kumar 1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Biodiesel will play an increasing role in fulfilling the worlds energy requirement. The world has experienced negative effect from the fossil fuel such as global warming and acid rain etc. With the increase in consumption of biodiesel, its impact on environment has raised a discussion around the world. Energy requirement of the world will increase in coming future and is projected to increase by 50 % from 2005 to 2030. The paper presents the results of biodiesel combustion emission on the environment. A review of literature available in the field of vegetable oil usage has identified many advantages. Vegetable oil is produced domestically which helps to reduce costly petroleum imports, it is biodegradable, nontoxic, contains low aromatics and sulphur and hence, is environment friendly. The biodiesel shows no obvious NOx emission difference from the pure diesel fuel at low and medium engine loads. Biodiesel blend ratios have little effect on the NO/NOx ratio at medium and high engine loads. The CO emission of biodiesel increases at low engine loads. The HC emissions show a continuous reduction with increasing biodiesel blend ratios. There is a good correlation between smoke reduction and the ratio of the biodiesel blends. The addition of biodiesel fuel increases formaldehyde emission. A series of engine tests, with and without preheating have been conducted using each of the above fuel blends for comparative performance evaluation. The results of the experiment in each case were compared with baseline data of diesel fuel. Significant improvements have been observed in the performance parameters of the engine as well as exhaust emissions, when lower blends of karanja oil were used with preheating and also without preheating. Karanja oil blends with diesel (up to K50) without preheating as well as with preheating, can replace diesel for operating the CI engines.

Onkar Singh

352

Twenty-Five Years of Ecological Recovery of East Fork Poplar Creek: Review of Environmental Problems and Remedial Actions  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In May 1985, a National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System permit was issued for the Department of Energy s Y-12 National Security Complex (Y-12 Complex) in Oak Ridge, Tennessee, USA, allowing discharge of effluents to East Fork Poplar Creek (EFPC). The effluents ranged from large volumes of chlorinated oncethrough cooling water and cooling tower blow-down to smaller discharges of treated and untreated process wastewaters, which contained a mixture of heavy metals, organics, and nutrients, especially nitrates. As a condition of the permit, a Biological Monitoring and Abatement Program (BMAP) was developed to meet two major objectives: demonstrate that the established effluent limitations were protecting the classified uses of EFPC, and document the ecological effects resulting from implementing a Water Pollution Control Program at the Y-12 Complex. The second objective is the primary focus of the other papers in this special series. This paper provides a history of pollution and the remedial actions that were implemented; describes the geographic setting of the study area; and characterizes the physicochemical attributes of the sampling sites, including changes in stream flow and temperature that occurred during implementation of the BMAP. Most of the actions taken under the Water Pollution Control Program were completed between 1986 and 1998, with as many as four years elapsing between some of the most significant actions. The Water Pollution Control Program included constructing nine new wastewater treatment facilities and implementation of several other pollution-reducing measures, such as a best management practices plan; area-source pollution control management; and various spill-prevention projects. Many of the major actions had readily discernable effects on the chemical and physical conditions of EFPC. As controls on effluents entering the stream were implemented, pollutant concentrations generally declined and, at least initially, the volume of water discharged from the Y-12 Complex declined. This reduction in discharge was of ecological concern and led to implementation of a flow management program for EFPC. Implementing flow management, in turn, led to substantial changes in chemical and physical conditions of the stream: stream discharge nearly doubled and stream temperatures decreased, becoming more similar to those in reference streams. While water quality clearly improved, meeting water quality standards alone does not guarantee protection of a waterbody s biological integrity. Results from studies on the ecological changes stemming from pollution-reduction actions, such as those presented in this series, also are needed to understand how best to restore or protect biological integrity and enhance ecological recovery in stream ecosystems. With a better knowledge of the ecological consequences of their decisions, environmental managers can better evaluate alternative actions and more accurately predict their effects.

Smith, John G [ORNL; Loar, James M [ORNL; Stewart, Arthur J [ORNL

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

353

Essays in Environmental Economics  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Regional Sci- ence and Urban Economics, 22(1):103121, MarchBridge. Journal of Transport Economics and Policy, 14(2):pp.Review of Environmental Economics and Policy, 5(1):66 88,

Foreman, Kathleen

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

354

Surface Water and Wetland Standards (North Carolina)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

These rules state the standards for classification of water supply. Each stream in North Carolina has a classification based upon its designated uses. These rules provide the Environmental...

355

The physical role of transverse deep zones in improving constructed treatment wetland performance  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Velocity heterogeneity is often present in wetland systems and results in some influent water remaining in the wetland for less than the expected residence time. This phenomenon, known as short-circuiting, alters the ...

Lightbody, Anne F. (Anne Fraser), 1977-

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

356

Implications of hypoxia tolerance for wetland refugia use in Lake Nabugabo, Uganda  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Implications of hypoxia tolerance for wetland refugia use in Lake Nabugabo, Uganda Andrea J. Reid1 in their use of hypoxic wetlands in Lake Nabugabo, Uganda: the cichlid Pseudocrenilabrus multicolor victoriae

Chapman, Lauren J.

357

Unusual sedimentation of a Galveston Bay wetland at Pine Gully, Seabrook, Texas: implications for beach renourishment  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, well sorted, quartz rich sediments began plugging the main channel of the previously tidally dominated wetland. Progressive sedimentation has produced overbank deposits in the marine grasses, contributing to the death of wetland grasses by sediment...

Culver, Wesley Richard

2009-06-02T23:59:59.000Z

358

Methane in lakes and wetlands -Microbiological production, ecosystem uptake, climatological significance  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 Methane in lakes and wetlands - Microbiological production, ecosystem Zürcher, Fortunat Joos Global methane emissions from wet ecosystems 9:50 - 10 Were tropical wetlands C4-dominated during the glacial? A view from methane

Mühlemann, Oliver

359

Presence of Avian Influenza Viruses in Waterfowl and Wetlands during Summer 2010 in California: Are  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of migratory birds. We collected water and fecal samples at ten wetlands in two regions (Yolo Bypass in fecal samples was higher from wetlands in the Sacramento Valley (11.9%) than in the Yolo Bypass (0

Mladenoff, David

360

Early development of wetland plant and invertebrate communities: effects and implications of restoration  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, Seabloom and van der Valk 2003, Zampella and Laidig 2003, Balcombe et al. 2005b, Spieles 2005), demonstrating the highly variable response of wetland development to site conditions. Commonly used approaches to wetland plant restoration include (1...

Berg, Matthew D.

2009-06-02T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "wetland environmental review" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Recirculation on a single stage of vertical flow constructed wetland: treatment limits and operation modes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 Recirculation on a single stage of vertical flow constructed wetland: treatment limits French vertical flow constructed wetlands (VFCWs) plant comprises two stages of treatment which the first and treatment performances in different operating conditions. Results showed good performances

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

362

Do constructed flow through wetlands improve water quality in the San Joaquin River?  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of tailwaters. Wetland treatment of irrigation tailwaterswetlands have the potential to be excellent contaminant sinks and represent the last opportunity for treatmenttreatment. In addition, these components contribute to biological oxygen demand (BOD) in wetland

O'Geen, Anthony T

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

363

Constructed Wetlands for Industry in Thailand  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

River Ecosystem Quality Improvement. ­ Environmental Public Policy About us Community wastewater Laem) About us #12;23/05/2012 2 Research Centre for Environmental and Hazardous Substance Management 4,500 - 10,000 cubic meters of wastewater per day Laem Phak Bia Five ponds 1 sedimentation pond, 3

Heal, Kate

364

Review of Recent Literature Relevant to the Environmental Effects of Marine and Hydrokinetic Energy Devices; Task 2.1.3: Effects on Aquatic Organisms - Fiscal Year 2012 Progress Report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A literature search was conducted by using the Web of Science databases component of the ISI Web of KnowledgeSM to identify recent articles that would be useful to help assess the potential environmental effects of renewable energy development in the ocean, with emphasis on seabirds and fish. Several relatively recent general review articles that included possible effects on seabirds and fish were examined to begin the search process. From these articles, several general topics of potential environmental effects on seabirds and fish were derived. These topics were used as the primary search factors. Additional sources were identified by cross-checking the Web of Science databases for articles that cited the review articles. It also became clear that the potential effects frequently w

Kropp, Roy K.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

365

Virginia Wetlands Report Center for Coastal Resources Management www.ccrm.vims.edu  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Virginia Wetlands Report Center for Coastal Resources Management www.ccrm.vims.edu Volume 28, Issue Wetlands Report/CCRM P.O. Box 1346 Gloucester Pt., VA 23062 (804) 684-7380 dawnf@vims.edu CCRM Director: Dr subagencies or DEQ. Printed on recycled paper Tidal Wetlands News & Events VIMS Discovery Workshops. Sponsored

366

Assessing the Ecological Condition of Wetlands in the Lower Missouri River Floodplain  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

.............................................................................................. 68 APPENDIX D: CHARACTERIZATION OF LEAST DISTURBED WATER QUALITY CONDITIONS ........................................ 72 APPENDIX E: PARAMETERS, INSTRUMENTS, METHODS AND FORMS USED IN THE STUDY ........................................ 75 vi..., developing a method to assess the condition of remnant wetlands within the Lower Missouri River floodplain may give insight into how specific hydrologic alterations impact wetland condition by characterizing the extent of wetland impairment according...

Beury, Jason Horry

2010-01-28T23:59:59.000Z

367

QUAKER RUN Stream and Wetland Restoration As-Built Completion Report  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

QUAKER RUN Stream and Wetland Restoration As-Built Completion Report and First Year Monitoring Data. The project restored 2,000 linear feet of stream and created 3 new acres of wetlands. An as-built survey of Understanding language for stream and wetlands restorations services, between Coal Township and the US Fish

Kirby, Carl S.

368

Dynamics of carbon sequestration in a coastal wetland using radiocarbon measurements  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Dynamics of carbon sequestration in a coastal wetland using radiocarbon measurements Yonghoon Choi1. Wang (2004), Dynamics of carbon sequestration in a coastal wetland using radiocarbon measurements carbon cycle. However, the dynamics of carbon (C) cycling in coastal wetlands and its response to sea

Wang, Yang

369

Survey of Critical Wetlands and Riparian Areas in La Plata County  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Survey of Critical Wetlands and Riparian Areas in La Plata County Colorado Natural Heritage Program-8002 #12;Survey of Critical Wetlands and Riparian Areas in La Plata County Prepared for: Colorado. We thank the Colorado Department of Natural Resources Division of Wildlife Wetlands Program and Alex

370

A LANDSCAPE SCALE EVALUATION OF PHOSPHORUS RETENTION IN WETLANDS OF THE  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

217 A LANDSCAPE SCALE EVALUATION OF PHOSPHORUS RETENTION IN WETLANDS OF THE LAPLATTE RIVER BASIN approach to examine phosphorus retention in wetlands of the LaPlatte River basin (13,723 ha), Vermont information system. Most wetland variables had significant (p

Wang, Deane

371

Urbanization interferes with the use of amphibians as indicators of ecological integrity of wetlands  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of wetlands Jacquelyn C. Guzy1,2 *, Earl D. McCoy1 , Anna C. Deyle1 , Shannon M. Gonzalez3 , Neal Halstead1 Consulting Group Inc., 10150 Highland Manor Drive, Suite 200, Tampa, FL 33610, USA Summary 1. Wetlands disturbance. Understanding the responses of wetland species to human disturbance is essential for effective

Dorcas, Michael E.

372

Management of Wetlands for Wildlife Matthew J. Gray, Heath M. Hagy, J. Andrew Nyman,  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Chapter 4 Management of Wetlands for Wildlife Matthew J. Gray, Heath M. Hagy, J. Andrew Nyman, and Joshua D. Stafford Abstract Wetlands are highly productive ecosystems that provide habitat for a diversity of wildlife species and afford various ecosystem services. Managing wetlands effectively requires

Wang, Xiaorui "Ray"

373

Riparian wetlands for enhancing the self-purification capacity of streams  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Riparian wetlands for enhancing the self-purification capacity of streams B.J. D'Arcy*, N. Mc these flows into riparian treatment wetlands for treatment before drainage back into the watercourse at the site is undersized (4950 m2 ) compared to the required wetland area (11,800 m2 ), but accommodating

Heal, Kate

374

Assessing Soil and Hydrologic Properties for the Successful Creation of Non-Tidal Wetlands  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 Assessing Soil and Hydrologic Properties for the Successful Creation of Non-Tidal Wetlands W. Lee, VA 23529-0276 rwhittec@odu.edu Introduction Federal and state wetlands protection regulations require the mitigation of impacts to jurisdictional wetlands via avoidance and minimization of damage whenever possible

Darby, Dennis

375

Refinement and validation of a multi-level assessment method for Mid-Atlantic tidal wetlands  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Refinement and validation of a multi-level assessment method for Mid-Atlantic tidal wetlands (EPA of wetland resources across the Mid-Atlantic physiographic region, efforts are currently underway in a number of states, most notably Delaware, Maryland, Pennsylvania and Virginia, to develop and implement wetland

376

WETLANDS OF THE FRASER LOWLAND, 1989: Summary Report TECHNICAL REPORT SERIES No. 156  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

WETLANDS OF THE FRASER LOWLAND, 1989: Summary Report Peggy Ward TECHNICAL REPORT SERIES No. 156 /'auteur. . #12;Wetlands of the Fraser Lowland, 1989: Summary Report Peggy Ward Technical Report Series 156 Pacific and Yukon Region 1992 Canadian Wildlife Service This series mav be cited as: Ward, Peggy. Wetlands

377

Regulatory Guidance Letter 90-06 SUBJECT: Expiration Dates for Wetlands  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Regulatory Guidance Letter 90-06 SUBJECT: Expiration Dates for Wetlands Jurisdictional Delineations the length of time that wetlands jurisdictional delineations remain valid. In light of the need for national to the provisions in paragraphs 5., 6., and 7. 2. Since wetlands are affected over time by both natural and man

US Army Corps of Engineers

378

The potential of wetlands in reducing storm surge Ty V. Wamsley a,, Mary A. Cialone a  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The potential of wetlands in reducing storm surge Ty V. Wamsley a,?, Mary A. Cialone a , Jane M to be the potential contribution of wetlands to the lowering of surges as they propagate inland from the coast. Consequently, an accurate method to quantify the effect of wetlands on coastal surge levels is required

US Army Corps of Engineers

379

FACTORS AFFECTING MACROPHYTE AND FISH DISTRIBUTION IN COASTAL WETLANDS OF GEORGIAN BAY  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

FACTORS AFFECTING MACROPHYTE AND FISH DISTRIBUTION IN COASTAL WETLANDS OF GEORGIAN BAY #12;FACTORS AFFECTING MACROPHYTE AND FISH DISTRIBUTION IN COASTAL WETLANDS OF GEORGIAN BAY By MAJA CVETKOVIC, B and fish distribution in coastal wetlands of Georgian Bay AUTHOR: Maja Cvetkovic, B.Sc. (Mc

McMaster University

380

Ecological Engineering 15 (2000) 91104 The role of seepage in constructed wetlands receiving  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Ecological Engineering 15 (2000) 91­104 The role of seepage in constructed wetlands receiving 1999 Abstract Constructed wetlands positioned in the landscape between row crop agriculture and surface. A potential exit pathway in constructed wetlands for detained water and possibly NO3 - -N is via seepage

David, Mark B.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "wetland environmental review" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

PBRP Research Highlight Use of Lake Maurepas Wetlands by Migrating Birds  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

PBRP Research Highlight Use of Lake Maurepas Wetlands by Migrating Birds P.C. Stouffer and Jason A's largest migratory routes for Neotropical migratory birds, many of which use the Maurepas wetlands during spring and fall migrations. Large portions of swamp in the Maurepas wetlands have converted to marsh

Stouffer, Phil

382

Survey of Critical Wetlands and Riparian Areas in Dolores County Colorado Natural Heritage Program  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Survey of Critical Wetlands and Riparian Areas in Dolores County Colorado Natural Heritage Program 2005 #12;Survey of Critical Wetlands and Riparian Areas in Dolores County Prepared for: Colorado photograph: Riverine wetlands dominated by Mountain Willow along Fish Creek, SJNF. Photo taken by Sarah

383

Wetlands of the Fraser Lowland, 1989: An I.nventmy Kathleen Moore  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Wetlands of the Fraser Lowland, 1989: An I.nventmy Peggy Ward Kathleen Moore GIS Applications Ron. Wetlands of the Fraser Lowland, 1989: An Inventory. Technical Report Series No. 146. Canadian Wiidlife report. ... 111 #12;ABSTRACT The remaining wetlands of the Fraser Lowland provide vital habitat for large

384

Evaluating the sensitivity of wetlands to climate change with remote sensing techniques  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Evaluating the sensitivity of wetlands to climate change with remote sensing techniques Zutao of Toledo, 2801 West Bancroft Street, Toledo, OH 43606, USA Abstract: Wetlands are valuable ecosystems and south-central Canada, characterized by glacially sculpted landscapes and abundant wetlands, is one

Chen, Jiquan

385

Wetlands Regulatory Assistance Program ERDC TN-WRAP-12-1 August 2012  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Wetlands Regulatory Assistance Program ERDC TN-WRAP-12-1 August 2012 Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. Updating Regional Supplements to the Corps of Engineers Wetland Delineation Manual by Jacob F. Berkowitz PURPOSE: Regional supplements to the Corps of Engineers Wetland Delineation Manual

US Army Corps of Engineers

386

A Natural Heritage Assessment and Inventory of State Wildlife Area Wetlands  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A Natural Heritage Assessment and Inventory of State Wildlife Area Wetlands 1998-99 Pilot Study) was contracted to conduct a ilot study of wetlands and riparian areas on several Colorado Division of Wildlife, and will be corporated into a wetlands database and the Natural Diversity Information System n HP e s secured

387

Interactions between wetlands CH4 emissions and climate at global scale  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

emissions? Observations Introduction Tool Wetlands emissions [CH4 ]atmo Feedback Conclusion #12;[CO2 ]atmo e.g.: Climate (T) CO2 anthropogenic emissions wetlands CH4 emissions Under future climate change, Shindell et al. (2004) => +78% under climate change generated by 2xCO2 Introduction Tool Wetlands emissions [CH4

Canet, Léonie

388

Enhancing phosphorus removal in constructed wetlands with ochre from mine drainage treatment  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Enhancing phosphorus removal in constructed wetlands with ochre from mine drainage treatment K in a wastewater constructed wetland (175 m2 area) in Berwickshire, UK. The hydraulic and treatment performance wetlands are widely used for tertiary wastewater treatment but, although effective for nitrogen removal

Heal, Kate

389

Sustainable Best Management Practices for Wetland Seasonal Drainage in Response to San Joaquin  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

wetland sites ­ treatment drawdown is delayed to coincide with VAMP period (April 15-May 15) HighSustainable Best Management Practices for Wetland Seasonal Drainage in Response to San Joaquin wetlands in the Grasslands Ecological Area within the San Joaquin Basin #12;WATER MANAGEMENT FOR MOIST SOIL

Quinn, Nigel

390

Macrophyte Decomposition Rates in the Tres Rios Constructed Treatment Wetland: Preliminary Results!  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Macrophyte Decomposition Rates in the Tres Rios Constructed Treatment Wetland: Preliminary Results wetland. Plant Ecology 200:69-82. Literature Cited! Figure 1A: Aerial photo of the treatment flow cell, such as those associated with municipal wastewater treatment.! Constructed treatment wetlands perform important

Hall, Sharon J.

391

AN EVALUATION OF RAPID METHODS FOR ASSESSING THE ECOLOGICAL CONDITION OF WETLANDS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

) definition of the assessment area, 2) treatment of wetland type, 3) approaches to scoring, 4) considerationAN EVALUATION OF RAPID METHODS FOR ASSESSING THE ECOLOGICAL CONDITION OF WETLANDS M. Siobhan analyzed 40 existing wetland rapid assessment methods that were developed for a variety of purposes

Gray, Matthew

392

ENVIRONMENTAL ENGINEERING  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ENVIRONMENTAL ENGINEERING UNDERGRADUATE HANDBOOK Cornell University Department of Biological and Environmental Engineering School of Civil and Environmental Engineering enve.cornell.edu 2013-2014 #12;Environmental Engineering 2013-2014 1 UNDERGRADUATE HANDBOOK FOR ENVIRONMENTAL ENGINEERING MISSION STATEMENT

Walter, M.Todd

393

Survey of Critical Biological Resources of Garfield County, Volume II: Survey of Critical Wetlands and Riparian Areas in  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Wetlands and Riparian Areas in Garfield County Colorado Natural Heritage Program College of Natural Wetlands and Riparian Areas in Garfield County Prepared for: Colorado Department of Natural Resources 1313 plant communities, including wetland and riparian areas. Volume II focuses exclusively on wetland

394

3.1 Greater Everglades Wetlands Module CERP Monitoring and Assessment Plan, Part 1 3-3 January 15, 2004  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

3.1 Greater Everglades Wetlands Module CERP Monitoring and Assessment Plan, Part 1 3-3 January 15, 2004 3.1 GREATER EVERGLADES WETLANDS MODULE 3.1.1 Introduction The remaining portion of the Greater Everglades Wetlands includes a mosaic of inter-connected freshwater wetlands and estuaries (Figure 3

Gawlik, Dale E.

395

Wetlands Ecology and Management Instructors: Matthew Gray (mgray11@utk.edu) and Chris Graves (cgraves2@utk.edu)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

WFS 340 Wetlands Ecology and Management Fall 2013 Instructors: Matthew Gray (mgray11@utk.htm Required Text: Wetland Restoration and Construction, 2011 (978-0-9834558-0-6) Author: Thomas Biebighauser Recommended Text: Wetlands, 2007, 4th edition (ISBN 978-0-471-69967-5) or Wetlands, 2000, 3rd edition (ISBN 0

Gray, Matthew

396

Removal of nutrients from combined sewer overflows and lake water in a vertical-flow constructed wetland system  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and is planted with common reed (Phragmites australis). The constructed wetland is intermittently loaded

Brix, Hans

397

ADVANCED WETLAND ECOLOGY Instructors: Dr. Matthew Gray (mgray11@utk.edu); Dr. Heath Hagy (hhagy@utk.edu)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

(all day workshop) Biebighauser (USFS) 17 Treatment Wetlands Ludwig (UT) 22 Optional Field TripWFS 536 ADVANCED WETLAND ECOLOGY Fall 2011 Instructors: Dr. Matthew Gray (mgray11@utk.edu); Dr Text: Wetlands, 2000, 3rd edition, Wiley (www.wiley.com, ISBN 047129232X) or Wetlands, 2007, 4th

Gray, Matthew

398

Phase 1: Dam, Lake, and Wetland The project's first phase was a dam and stormwater impoundment to control  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. Phase 3: Constructed Treatment Wetland (not publicly accessible) Six stormwater wetland cells surround Phase 1: Dam, Lake, and Wetland The project's first phase was a dam and stormwater impoundment to control surface water and groundwater hydrology. The surrounding wetlands were restored

399

Spatial and temporal variability of annual greenhouse gas fluxes from a constructed wetland in an arid region  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

(CO2). - Many constructed treatment wetland systems (CWS) have been developed to remove nutrients fromSpatial and temporal variability of annual greenhouse gas fluxes from a constructed wetland of Sustainability, 3Wetland Ecosystem Ecology Lab, Arizona State University, Tempe, AZ, USA. - Wetlands support

Hall, Sharon J.

400

The contribution of evapotranspiration and evaporation to the water budget of a treatment wetland in Phoenix, AZ, USA  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The contribution of evapotranspiration and evaporation to the water budget of a treatment wetland evapotranspiration and evaporation rates in a constructed treatment wetland in Phoenix during the summer, when both budget for the Tres Rios treatment wetland, and will improve our general knowledge of wetland water

Hall, Sharon J.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "wetland environmental review" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

asthma-related environmental fungus: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

17 WEEK 12 (1112) None Paper 2 Peer Reviews (in class) Environmental Issues (1114) Fracking (Movie Spirtes, Peter 207 SUSTAINABILITY Environmental, Cultural, Environmental...

402

Regulatory Science in a Developing State: Environmental Politics in Chile, 1980-2010  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Planning theories and environmental impact assessment.theory and practice. Environmental Impact Assessment Review,Appiah-Opoku, S. (2001). Environmental impact assessment in

Barandiaran, Javiera

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

403

Coastal Tidelands and Wetlands (South Carolina)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This legislation enacts a state management program to oversee water and land use and development in South Carolina's coastal zone. Under the program, the Department of Health and Environmental...

404

Environmental Programs Environmental Programs Committee  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

162 Environmental Programs Environmental Programs Committee Walter Whitfield Isle, Chair (English) Katherine Bennett Ensor (Statistics) Mark R. Wiesner (Civil and Environmental Engineering) Donald Ostdiek (Architecture) The Environmental Programs Committee coordinates courses and curricula on environmental topics

Richards-Kortum, Rebecca

405

Wetlands protection acts: a closer look  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA hereafter), which required the federal government to cooperate with the other governmental, public, and private organizations in order to "use all practical means and measures. . . to create and main- tain... conditions under which man and nature can exist in productive harmony. . . " Under NEPA, "major Federal actions, significantly af- ?34 fecting the human environment" or those actions using federal monies or assistance require an Environmental Impact...

Linton, Margaret Temple

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

406

SRS ECOLOGY ENVIRONMENTAL INFORMATION DOCUMENT  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The SRS Ecology Environmental Information Document (EEID) provides a source of information on the ecology of Savannah River Site (SRS). The SRS is a U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)--owned property on the upper Atlantic Coastal Plain of South Carolina, centered approximately 40 kilometers (25 miles) southeast of Augusta, Georgia. The entire site was designated a National Environmental Research Park in 1972 by the Atomic Energy Commission, the predecessor of DOE. This document summarizes and synthesizes ecological research and monitoring conducted on the three main types of ecosystems found at SRS: terrestrial, wetland and aquatic. It also summarizes the available information on the threatened and endangered species found on the Savannah River Site. SRS is located along the Savannah River and encompasses an area of 80,267 hectares (310 square miles) in three South Carolina counties. It contains diverse habitats, flora, and fauna. Habitats include upland terrestrial areas, wetlands, streams, reservoirs, and the adjacent Savannah River. These diverse habitats support a variety of plants and animals, including many commercially or recreationally valuable species and several rare, threatened, or endangered species. Soils are the basic terrestrial resource, influencing the development of terrestrial biological communities. Many different soils exist on the SRS, from hydric to well-drained, and from sand to clay. In general, SRS soils are predominantly well-drained loamy sands.

Wike, L; Doug Martin, D; Eric Nelson, E; Nancy Halverson, N; John Mayer, J; Michael Paller, M; Rodney Riley, R; Michael Serrato, M

2006-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

407

Radiological health review of the Final Environmental Impact Statement Waste Isolation Pilot Plant. Volumes 1 and 2. DOE/EIS-0026  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Purpose of the Environmental Evaluation Group (EEG) is to conduct an independent technical evaluation of the potential radiation exposure to people from the proposed Federal radioactive Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) near Carlsbad, in order to protect the public health and safety and ensure that there is minimal environmental degradation. Analyses are conducted of reports issued by the US DOE and its contractors, other Federal agencies and other organizations, as they relate to the potential health, safety and environmental impacts from WIPP.

Not Available

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

408

National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) | Department of Energy  

Energy Savers [EERE]

(NEPA) National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) All Electricity Delivery and Energy Reliability (OE) projects are reviewed under the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) of...

409

EA-1635: Final Environmental Assessment | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

35: Final Environmental Assessment EA-1635: Final Environmental Assessment Williston to Tioga Transmission Line Project Pre-Approval Review Basin Electric Power Cooperative (BEPC)...

410

Evaluation of using cyclocranes to support drilling and production of oil and gas in wetland areas. Fourth quarterly technical progress report, Second quarter, 1993  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The planned program falls under wetlands area research related to drilling, production, and transportation of oil and gas resources. Specifically the planned program addresses an evaluation of using cyclocraft to transport drill rigs, mud, pipes and other materials and equipment in a cost effective and environmentally safe manner to support oil and gas drilling and production operations in wetland areas. The cyclocraft is a proven hybrid aircraft that utilizes aerostatic and aerodynamic lift. This type of aircraft has considerable payload capacity, VTOL capability, high controllability, low operating cost, low downwash and high safety. The benefits of using a cyclocraft to transport drill rigs and materials over environmentally-sensitive surfaces would be significant. The cyclocraft has considerable cost and operational advantages over the helicopter. The major activity during the second quarter of 1993 was focussed on completion of Task 4, Preliminary Design. The selected design has been designated H.1 Cyclocraft by MRC. Also during the report period, Task 6, Ground Support, was completed and a report containing the results was submitted to DOE. This task addressed the complete H.1 Cyclocraft system, i.e. it included the need personnel, facilities and equipment to support cyclocraft operations in wetland areas.

Eggington, W.J.

1993-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

411

Summary Report of visit to TAMU College of Geosciences 6-8 February 2008 to review the Environmental undergraduate degree programs  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

the Environmental undergraduate degree programs Bruce C. Coull Dean Emeritus, School of the Environment, University. Administrative Structure Currently, the Environmental programs at TAMU Geosciences depend mostly on two sources of altruism: a) the faculty who teach/advise/worry about the programs and, b) the Department Chairs who allow

412

MAPPING OF CENTRALAFRICAFORESTED WETLANDS USING REMOTE SENSING Julie; GOND1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, to characterize land cover patterns of the second largest wetland area of the world (The `Cuvette Centrale to the time period of flood and solar intensity for this region, similarly to what is observed in biogeochemical cycles, including the methane (CH4) and carbon dioxide (CO2) cycles in particular (Matthews, 2000

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

413

Welcome to SWAMP The Stream and Wetland Assessment Management Park  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

in Streams: Pools (deep and slow parts) and riffles (fast and shallow parts) provide more areas for water'S OS Improve Water Q lit Better Habitat for W tl d S i Outdoor Research F ilit Education Established 2007 Nicholas School of the Environment www.nicholas.duke.edu/wetland Sandy Creek Restoration Project

414

Climate Change Threatens Coexistence within Communities of Mediterranean Forested Wetlands  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Climate Change Threatens Coexistence within Communities of Mediterranean Forested Wetlands Arianna on Agriculture, Forest, and Natural Ecosystems, Euromediterranean Center for Climate Change, Viterbo, Italy, 3 The Mediterranean region is one of the hot spots of climate change. This study aims at understanding what

Paparella, Francesco

415

ROUX et al. Modelling of a constructed wetland for pesticide  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ROUX et al. Modelling of a constructed wetland for pesticide mitigation Laetitia ROUX*, Julien chemical pollution. In the agricultural context, pesticide are a real stress for surrounding environment construction. The bibliography's study focus on two subjects: the tracer experiments and the constructed

Boyer, Edmond

416

Virginia Wetlands Report Sea Level Rise & Other Coastal Hazards  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Virginia Wetlands Report Sea Level Rise & Other Coastal Hazards: The Risks of Coastal Living See. Climate change is bringing increased temperatures, rising sea level, more frequent storms and increased in tide levels. From these records it is not only clear that water levels are rising, they appear

417

The Duke Forest Stormwater Improvement and Wetlands Restoration Project  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

from the Duke Forest and the Pratt School of Engineering, restored 2000 feet (600 m) of stream Forest Sandy Creek Wetland Restoration site as well as the restoration of over 2000 feet of stream below. 1. Phase I: Re-contour and Restore more than 600 meters (2000 ft) of degraded stream

418

SINGH and BHATNAGAR Urban lakes and wetlands: opportunities and  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, urban water bodies commonly become cesspools due to lack of sanitation facilities. Delhi is continually it is not unusual for some of them to be referred to as lakes. Ponds and tanks are small in size compared to lakes:50,000 scale, however, the mapping for Delhi was carried out at 1:25,000 scale under the National Wetland

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

419

Preprints of the 8 International Conference on Wetland Systems  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Preprints of the 8 th International Conference on Wetland Systems Arusha ­ Tanzania ­ 16 th to 19 th Spetember 2002 1 DESIGN CRITERIA AND PERFORMANCES OF REED BED FILTERS FOR THE TREATMENT OF WASHING.houdoy@inst-elevage.asso.fr ABSTRACT Initially designed for the treatment of domestic wastewater, Vertical Flow Reed Bed Filters [VFRBF

Boyer, Edmond

420

Review of technical documents supporting proposed revisions to EPA (Environmental Protection Agency) regulations for the disposal/reuse of sewage sludge under Section 405(D) of the Clean Water Act. Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In August 1985 the Environmental Engineering Committee of the Science Advisory Board was asked by the Office of Water Regulations and Standards (OWRS) to review technical documents supporting development of EPA regulations for the disposal/reuse of sewage sludge under Section 405(d) of the Clean Water Act. The Committee was also asked by the Office of Marine and Estuarine Protection (OMEP) to review technical documents supporting revisions of the EPA ocean dumping regulations. The Committee chose to review the two sets of documents together, since they both dealt with a common subject, and since they shared, in some respects, a common methodology. The report, however, covers only the review of the OWRS documents, which consist of a set of risk-assessment methodologies (1,2,3,4) for four sludge disposal/reuse options (landfilling, land application/distribution and marketing, incineration, and ocean disposal). The reviews of the OMEP documents are covered in separate Committee reports. The Committee's principal findings are outlined.

Not Available

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "wetland environmental review" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

Environmental Participation and Environmental Motivation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Willingness to pay for environmental protection in Germany:varying the causes of environmental problems on stated WTPstudy. Journal of Environmental Economics and Management,

Torgler, Benno; Garca-Valias, Mara A.; Macintyre, Alison

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

422

Environmental Stewardship  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Environmental Stewardship Environmental Stewardship #12;Organizational Opportunities or Threats Environmental StewardshipEnvironmental Stewardship #12;ADOT Organizational StructureADOT Organizational of safety and efficiency, while retaining and promoting its irreplaceable natural landscape and protecting

Minnesota, University of

423

Abrahamse, W., L. Steg, et al. (2005). "A review of intervention studies aimed at household energy conservation." Journal of Environmental Psychology 25(3): 273-291.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. Frostell (2007). "Social sustainability and social acceptance in technology assessment: A case study of institutional and social conditions in realizing wind power projects." Renewable and Sustainable Energy Reviews

424

Benefits of Site-wide NEPA National Environmental Policy Act...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Benefits of Site-wide NEPA National Environmental Policy Act Review (1994) Benefits of Site-wide NEPA National Environmental Policy Act Review (1994) The purpose of this guidance...

425

Environmental Evaluation of Water Resources Development  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Methodology for the utilization of LANDSAT-1 imagery and aerial photography on the environmental evaluation of water resources development is presented. Environmental impact statements for water resource projects were collected and reviewed...

James, W. P.; Woods, C. E.; Blanz, R. E.

426

Wetland and Sensitive Species Survey Report for Y-12: Proposed Uranium Processing Facility (UPF)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report summarizes the results of an environmental survey conducted at sites associated with the proposed Uranium Processing Facility (UPF) at the Y-12 National Security Complex in September-October 2009. The survey was conducted in order to evaluate potential impacts of the overall project. This project includes the construction of a haul road, concrete batch plant, wet soil storage area and dry soil storage area. The environmental surveys were conducted by natural resource experts at ORNL who routinely assess the significance of various project activities on the Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR). Natural resource staff assistance on this project included the collection of environmental information that can aid in project location decisions that minimize impacts to sensitive resource such as significant wildlife populations, rare plants and wetlands. Natural resources work was conducted in various habitats, corresponding to the proposed areas of impact. Thc credentials/qualifications of the researchers are contained in Appendix A. The proposed haul road traverses a number of different habitats including a power-line right-of-way. wetlands, streams, forest and mowed areas. It extends from what is known as the New Salvage Yard on the west to the Polaris Parking Lot on the east. This haul road is meant to connect the proposed concrete batch plant to the UPF building site. The proposed site of the concrete batch plant itself is a highly disturbed fenced area. This area of the project is shown in Fig. 1. The proposed Wet Soils Disposal Area is located on the north side of Bear Creek Road at the former Control Burn Study Area. This is a second growth arce containing thick vegetation, and extensive dead and down woody material. This area of the project is shown in Fig. 2. Thc dry soils storage area is proposed for what is currently known as the West Borrow Area. This site is located on the west side of Reeves Road south of Bear Creek Road. The site is an early successional field. This area of the project is shown in Fig. 2.

Giffen, N.; Peterson, M.; Reasor, S.; Pounds, L.; Byrd, G.; Wiest, M. C.; Hill, C. C.

2009-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

427

Surface water drainage system. Environmental assessment and finding of no significant impact  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This Environmental Assessment (EA) is written pursuant to the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA). The document identifies and evaluates the action proposed to correct deficiencies in, and then to maintain, the surface water drainage system serving the Department of Energy`s Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site (Site), located north of Golden, Colorado. Many of the activities proposed would not normally be subject to this level of NEPA documentation. However, in many cases, maintenance of the system has been deferred to the point that wetlands vegetation has become established in some ditches and culverts, creating wetlands. The proposed activities would damage or remove some of these wetlands in order to return the drainage system to the point that it would be able to fully serve its intended function - stormwater control. The Department of Energy (DOE) regulations require that activities affecting environmentally sensitive areas like wetlands be the subject of an EA. Most portions of the surface water drainage system are presently inadequate to convey the runoff from a 100-year storm event. As a result, such an event would cause flooding across much of the Site and possibly threaten the integrity of the dams at the terminal ponds. Severe flooding would not only cause damage to facilities and equipment, but could also facilitate the transport of contaminants from individual hazardous substance sites (IHSSs). Uncontrolled flow through the A- and B-series ponds could cause contaminated sediments to become suspended and carried downstream. Additionally, high velocity flood flows significantly increase erosion losses.

NONE

1996-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

428

Evaluation of using cyclocranes to support drilling and production of oil and gas in wetland areas. Fifth quarterly technical progress report, Third quarter, 1993  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The planned program falls under wetlands area research related to drilling, production, and transportation of oil and gas resources. Specifically the planned program addresses an evaluation of using cyclocraft to transport drill rigs, mud, pipes and other materials and equipment in a cost effective and environmentally safe manner to support oil and gas drilling and production operations in wetland areas. The cyclocraft is a proven hybrid aircraft that utilizes aerostatic and aerodynamic lift. This type of aircraft has considerable payload capacity, VTOL capability, high controllability, low operating cost, low downwash and high safety. The benefits of using a cyclocraft to transport drill rigs and materials over environmentally-sensitive surfaces would be significant. The cyclocraft has considerable cost and operational advantages over the helicopter. In 1992, Task 1, Environmental Considerations, and Task 2, Transport Requirements, were completed. In the first two quarters of 1993, Task 3, Parametric Analysis, Task 4, Preliminary Design, and Task 6, Ground Support, were completed. Individual reports containing results obtained from each of these tasks were submitted to DOE. In addition, through June 30, 1993, a Subscale Test Plan was prepared under Task 5, Subscale Tests, and work was initiated on Task 7, Environmental Impacts, Task 8, Development Plan, Task 9, Operating Costs, and Task 10, Technology Transfer.

Eggington, W.J.

1993-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

429

Environmental assessment of remedial action at the Maybell Uranium Mill Tailings Site near Maybell, Colorado. Revision 1  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of this environmental assessment (EA) is to evaluate the environmental impacts resulting from remedial action at the Maybell uranium mill tailings site near Maybell, Colorado. A biological assessment (Attachment 1) and a floodplain/wetlands attachments describe the proposed action, affected environment, and environmental impacts associated with the proposed remedial action, including impacts to threatened and endangered species listed or proposed for listing by the US Fish and Wildlife Service (FWS).

Not Available

1994-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

430

Environmental assessment of remedial action at the Maybell uranium mill tailings site near Maybell, Colorado: Revision 2  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of this environmental assessment (EA) is to evaluate the environmental impacts resulting from remedial action at the Maybell uranium mill tailings site near Maybell, Colorado. A biological assessment and a floodplain/wetlands assessment are included as part of this EA. This report and attachments describe the proposed action, affected environment, and environmental impacts associated with the proposed remedial action, including impacts to threatened and endangered species listed or proposed for listing by the US Fish and Wildlife Service (FWS).

Not Available

1994-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

431

Pollution Prevention - Environmental Impact Reduction Checklists...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

provides a valuable opportunity for Federal agency NEPA309 reviewers to incorporate pollution prevention and environmental impact reduction into actions (or projects). This...

432

Minnesota Environmental Coordination Procedures Act (Minnesota)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This Act is designed to streamline the review procedures for a given project that requires multiple environmental permits by establishing a mechanism in state government which will coordinate...

433

Evaluation and Comparison of Ecological Models Simulating Nitrogen Processes in Treatment Wetlands,Implemented in Modelica.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

?? Two ecological models of nitrogen processes in treatment wetlands have been evaluated and compared. These models have been implemented, simulated, and visualized in the (more)

Edelfeldt, Stina

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

434

E-Print Network 3.0 - artificial wetland ecosystems Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Sciences 57 A simple hydrologic framework for simulating wetlands in climate and earth system models Summary: . This article is published with open access at Springerlink.com...

435

E-Print Network 3.0 - altitude saline wetland Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

9 A simple hydrologic framework for simulating wetlands in climate and earth system models Summary: basins of the world contain numerous freshwater, brackish and saline...

436

Soil Organic Matter of Natural and Restored Coastal Wetland Soils in Southern California  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

wetland (Mugu Lagoon, Carpinteria Salt Marsh, TijuanaB) Tijuana Estuary C) Carpinteria Salt Marsh Figure 2: MeanTijuana Estuary and Carpinteria Salt Marsh. Horizontal bars

Elgin, Barbara K.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

437

BP Cherry Point Cogeneration Project, Draft Environmental Impact Statement  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

BP West Coast Products, LLC (BP or the Applicant) proposes to construct and operate a nominal 720-megawatt (MW), natural-gas-fired, combined-cycle cogeneration facility next to the existing BP Cherry Point Refinery in Whatcom County, Washington. The Applicant also owns and operates the refinery, but the cogeneration facility and the refinery would be operated as separate business units. The cogeneration facility and its ancillary infrastructure would provide steam and 85 MW of electricity to meet the operating needs of the refinery and 635 MW of electrical power for local and regional consumption. The proposed cogeneration facility would be located between Ferndale and Blaine in northwestern Whatcom County, Washington. The Canadian border is approximately 8 miles north of the proposed project site. The Washington State Energy Facility Site Evaluation Council (EFSEC) has jurisdiction over the evaluation of major energy facilities including the proposed project. As such, EFSEC will recommend approval or denial of the proposed cogeneration facility to the governor of Washington after an environmental review. On June 3, 2002, the Applicant filed an Application for Site Certification (ASC No. 2002-01) with EFSEC in accordance with Washington Administrative Code (WAC) 463-42. On April 22, 2003, the Applicant submitted an amended ASC that included, among other things, a change from air to water cooling. With the submission of the ASC and in accordance with the State Environmental Policy Act (SEPA) (WAC 463-47), EFSEC is evaluating the siting of the proposed project and conducting an environmental review with this Environmental Impact Statement (EIS). Because the proposed project requires federal agency approvals and permits, this EIS is intended to meet the requirements under both SEPA and the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA). The Bonneville Power Administration (Bonneville) and U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (Corps) also will use this EIS as part of their respective decision-making processes associated with the Applicant's request to interconnect to Bonneville's transmission system and proposed location of the project within wetland areas. Therefore, this Draft EIS serves as the environmental review document for SEPA and for NEPA as required by Bonneville for the interconnection and the Corps for its 404 individual permit. The EIS addresses direct, indirect, and cumulative impacts of the proposed project, and potential mitigation measures proposed by the Applicant, as well as measures recommended by EFSEC. The information and resulting analysis presented in this Draft EIS are based primarily on information provided by the Applicant in the ASC No. 2002-01 (BP 2002). Where additional information was used to evaluate the potential impacts associated with the proposed action, that information has been referenced. EFSEC's environmental consultant, Shapiro and Associates, Inc., did not perform additional studies during the preparation of this Draft EIS.

N /A

2003-09-19T23:59:59.000Z

438

2005 SITE ENVIRONMENTAL REPORT  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Each year, Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) prepares an annual Site Environmental Report (SER) in accordance with DOE Order 231.1A, Environment, Safety and Health Reporting of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). The report is written to inform the public, regulators, employees, and other stakeholders of BNL's environmental performance during the calendar year in review. The SER summarizes environmental data; environmental management performance; compliance with applicable DOE, federal, state, and local regulations; and compliance, restoration, and surveillance monitoring program performance. BNL has prepared annual SERs since 1971 and has documented nearly all of its environmental history since the Laboratory's inception in 1947. The report is available in print and as a downloadable file on the BNL web page at http://www.bnl.gov/ewms/ser/. A summary of the SER is also prepared each year to provide a general overview of the report, and is distributed with a CD of the full report.

BROOKHAVEN NATIONAL LABORATORY

2006-08-29T23:59:59.000Z

439

2006 SITE ENVIRONMENTAL REPORT  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Each year, Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) prepares an annual Site Environmental Report (SER) in accordance with DOE Order 231.1A, Environment, Safety and Health Reporting of the U.S. Department of Energy. The report is written to inform the public, regulators, employees, and other stakeholders of BNL's environmental performance during the calendar year in review. The SER summarizes environmental data; environmental management performance; compliance with applicable DOE, federal, state, and local regulations; and compliance, restoration, and surveillance monitoring program performance. BNL has prepared annual SERs since 1971 and has documented nearly all of its environmental history since the Laboratory's inception in 1947. The report is available in print and as a downloadable file on the BNL web page at http://www.bnl.gov/ewms/ser/. A summary of the SER is also prepared each year to provide a general overview of the report, and is distributed with a CD of the full report.

BROOKHAVEN NATIONAL LABORATORY; RATEL,K.

2007-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

440

2009 Site Environmental Report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Each year, Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) prepares an annual Site Environmental Report (SER) in accordance with DOE Order 231.1A, Environment, Safety and Health Reporting of the U.S. Department of Energy. The report is written to inform the public, regulators, employees, and other stakeholders of BNL's environmental performance during the calendar year in review. The SER summarizes environmental data; environmental management performance; compliance with applicable DOE, federal, state, and local regulations; and compliance, restoration, and surveillance monitoring program performance. BNL has prepared annual SERs since 1971 and has documented nearly all of its environmental history since the Laboratory's inception in 1947. The report is available in print and as a downloadable file on the BNL web page at http://www.bnl.gov/ewms/ser/. A summary of the SER is also prepared each year to provide a general overview of the report, and is distributed with a CD of the full report.

Ratel, K.M.; Brookhaven National Laboratory

2010-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "wetland environmental review" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

Environmental Certification  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Environmental Compliance Inspector Certification 2009 Candidate Handbook This booklet contains... Subject matter for the Environmental Compliance Inspector tests Education and experience requirements Contents Environmental Compliance Inspector 2009 Candidate Handbook This handbook contains information

442

ENVIRONMENTAL SUSTAINABILITY  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, meanwhile, could focus lim- Initiative and Application Model Impact Environmental Information Networ27 ICT AND ENVIRONMENTAL SUSTAINABILITY T he environment is a large complex sys- tem. Managing. Environmental Monitoring and Associated Resource Management and Risk Mitigation ICTimprovestheabilitytoobtain

443

Wetlands Research Program Bulletin. Volume 5. Number 1  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The city of Lincoln, Neb., was founded in the mid-18OOs along Salt Creek. During the last century, the saline marshes suffered extensive degradation through commercial and residential development, road construction, and agriculture. Today, Nebraska`s eastern saline wetlands are considered to be among the most restricted and imperiled ecosystems. Eastern Nebraska saline wetlands are regionally unique, located in floodplain swales and depressions within the Salt Creek and Rock Creek watersheds in Lancaster and southern Saunders counties. Water sources are a combination of discharge from the Dakota sandstone formation aquifer, precipitation, and overbank flooding. Salts are concentrated in the soil during dry periods. Vegetation in these wetlands is characterized by halophytes including spearscale (Atriplex subspicata), inland saltgrass (Distichlis spicata var. stricta), saltwort (Sa1icornia rubra), prairie bulrush (Scirpus mantimus var. paludosus), sea blite (Suaeda depressa), and narrow-leaved cattail (Typha angustifolia). Four plant species considered rare in Nebraska are saltmarsh aster (Aster subulatus var. ligulatus), seaside heliotrope (Heliotropium curassavicurn), saltwort, and Texas dropseed (Sporobolus texanus) can be found in the marshes along Salt Creek.

Gilbert, M.C.; Stutheit, R.G.; Davis, M.

1995-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

444

Control of hardwood regeneration in restored carolina bay depression wetlands.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Carolina bays are depression wetlands located in the coastal plain region of the eastern United States. Disturbance of this wetland type has been widespread, and many sites contain one or more drainage ditches. Restoration of bays is of interest because they are important habitats for rare flora and fauna. Previous bay restoration projects have identified flood-tolerant woody competitors in the seedbank and re-sprouting as impediments to the establishment of desired herbaceous wetland vegetation communities. We restored 3 bays on the Savannah River Site, South Carolina, by plugging drainage ditches, harvesting residual pine/hardwood stands within the bays, and monitoring the vegetative response of the seedbank to the hydrologic change. We applied a foliar herbicide on one-half of each bay to control red maple (Acerrubrum), sweetgum (Liquidambar styraciflua), and water oak (Quercus nigra) sprouting, and we tested its effectiveness across a hydrologic gradient in each bay. Hardwood regeneration was partially controlled by flooding in bays that exhibited long growing season hydroperiods. The findings also indicated that herbicide application was an effective means for managing hardwood regeneration and re-sprouting in areas where hydrologic control was ineffective. Herbicide use had no effect on species richness in the emerging vegetation community. In late-season drawdown periods, or in bays where hydroperiods are short, more than one herbicide application may be necessary.

Moser, Lee, J.; Barton, Christopher, D.; Blake, John, I.

2012-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

445

Klickitat Cogeneration Project : Final Environmental Assessment.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

To meet BPA`s contractual obligation to supply electrical power to its customers, BPA proposes to acquire power generated by Klickitat Cogeneration Project. BPA has prepared an environmental assessment evaluating the proposed project. Based on the EA analysis, BPA`s proposed action is not a major Federal action significantly affecting the quality of the human environment within the meaning of the National Environmental Policy Act of 1969 for the following reasons: (1)it will not have a significant impact land use, upland vegetation, wetlands, water quality, geology, soils, public health and safety, visual quality, historical and cultural resources, recreation and socioeconomics, and (2) impacts to fisheries, wildlife resources, air quality, and noise will be temporary, minor, or sufficiently offset by mitigation. Therefore, the preparation of an environmental impact statement is not required and BPA is issuing this FONSI (Finding of No Significant Impact).

United States. Bonneville Power Administration; Klickitat Energy Partners

1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

446

EIS-0120: Wetland Assessment | Department of Energy  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:Year in Review: TopEnergy DOEDealingVehicle1 ClosingAInnovations082-S2: Draft08: Final12:

447

Environmental Outreach  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Outreach Environmental Outreach Our vision is to operate a proactive and interactive environmental communication and public involvement program that is inclusive and responsive to...

448

Under the Boardwalk Case History St. Johns Sideroad at the McKenzie Wetland, Aurora, Ontario, Canada  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

is located in the Town of Aurora, Ontario, Canada and liesWetland (also known as Aurora Wetland or McKenzie Marsh), anwith a connection to the Aurora Pumping Station. This $20

Buchanan, Ian D.

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

449

Total energy cycle assessment of electric and conventional vehicles: an energy and environmental analysis. Volume 4: peer review comments on technical report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report compares the energy use, oil use and emissions of electric vehicles (EVs) with those of conventional, gasoline-powered vehicles (CVs) over the total life cycle of the vehicles. The various stages included in the vehicles` life cycles include vehicle manufacture, fuel production, and vehicle operation. Disposal is not included. An inventory of the air emissions associated with each stage of the life cycle is estimated. Water pollutants and solid wastes are reported for individual processes, but no comprehensive inventory is developed. Volume IV includes copies of all the external peer review comments on the report distributed for review in July 1997.

NONE

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

450

Diversity and function from the ground up : microbial mediation of wetland plant structure and ecosystem function via nitrogen fixation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of global warming, most coasts may experience sea level riseglobal warming lowers effective wetland elevations beneath rising sea levels.

Moseman, Serena Maria

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

451

Diversity and function from the ground up : Microbial mediation of wetland plant structure and ecosystem function via nitrogen fixation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of global warming, most coasts may experience sea level riseglobal warming lowers effective wetland elevations beneath rising sea levels.

Moseman, Serena M

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

452

CONSTRUCTED WETLAND TREATMENT SYSTEMS FOR WATER QUALITY IMPROVEMENT  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Savannah River National Laboratory implemented a constructed wetland treatment system (CWTS) in 2000 to treat industrial discharge and stormwater from the Laboratory area. The industrial discharge volume is 3,030 m{sup 3} per day with elevated toxicity and metals (copper, zinc and mercury). The CWTS was identified as the best treatment option based on performance, capital and continuing cost, and schedule. A key factor for this natural system approach was the long-term binding capacity of heavy metals (especially copper, lead, and zinc) in the organic matter and sediments. The design required that the wetland treat the average daily discharge volume and be able to handle 83,280 m{sup 3} of stormwater runoff in a 24 hour period. The design allowed all water flow within the system to be driven entirely by gravity. The CWTS for A-01 outfall is composed of eight one-acre wetland cells connected in pairs and planted with giant bulrush to provide continuous organic matter input to the system. The retention basin was designed to hold stormwater flow and to allow controlled discharge to the wetland. The system became operational in October of 2000 and is the first wetland treatment system permitted by South Carolina DHEC for removal of metals. Because of the exceptional performance of the A-01 CWTS, the same strategy was used to improve water quality of the H-02 outfall that receives discharge and stormwater from the Tritium Area of SRS. The primary contaminants in this outfall were also copper and zinc. The design for this second system required that the wetland treat the average discharge volume of 415 m{sup 3} per day, and be able to handle 9,690 m{sup 3} of stormwater runoff in a 24 hour period. This allowed the building of a system much smaller than the A-01 CWTS. The system became operational in July 2007. Metal removal has been excellent since water flow through the treatment systems began, and performance improved with the maturation of the vegetation during the first season of growth of each system. Sediment samples after the first and third years of operation indicated that copper was being bound in the sediments very rapidly after entering the treatment system. The design of the system encourages low redox and sulfide production in the sediments. The objective is to stabilize metals, including mercury, as sulfide compounds in the sediments. Costs for maintenance and operation of the systems are minimal, consisting primarily of ensuring that the pipes are not clogged and that water is flowing through the system. The treatment cost per thousand gallons is many times less than conventional wastewater treatment facilities. Life expectancy and function of the biological system is based on the life of the engineering aspects and not the wetland ecology.

Nelson, E.

2010-07-19T23:59:59.000Z

453

assessment review papers: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

and compiled recent peer-reviewed literature and white papers with a focus on risk perception Environmental Sciences and Ecology Websites Summary: -reviewed literature and...

454

Nuclear Safety Basis Program Review Overview and Management Oversight...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

Nuclear Safety Basis Program Review During Facility Operations and Transitions Volume 4 - Nuclear Safety Basis Program Review During Facility Decommissioning and Environmental...

455

USE OF NITROGEN BUDGETS AND N2 FLUX MEASUREMENTS TO ESTIMATE THE ROLE OF DENITRIFICATION IN BROWNFIELD STORMWATER WETLANDS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

IN BROWNFIELD STORMWATER WETLANDS Monica M. Palta 1, Peter Groffman2, Stuart Findlay2 1 School of Life Sciences in inorganic nitrogen cycling and removal in urban brownfield wetlands INTRODUCTION · Urban areas are net BROWNFIELD SITES SUPPORTING SEMI-PERMANENTLY FLOODED WETLANDS. White outlines delineate low-lying semi

Hall, Sharon J.

456

French vertical flow constructed wetlands: reed bed behaviour and limits due to hydraulic overloading on first stage filters  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

French vertical flow constructed wetlands: reed bed behaviour and limits due to hydraulic with the European standards. Keywords: Vertical flow constructed wetlands; hydraulic overload; hydraulic behaviour. INTRODUCTION Vertical flow constructed wetlands (VFCWs) have been very successful in France over the last five

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

457

Wetlands Ecology and Management Instructors: Matthew Gray (mgray11@utk.edu) and Chris Graves (cgraves2@utk.edu)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

WFS 340 Wetlands Ecology and Management Fall 2014 Instructors: Matthew Gray (mgray11@utk.htm Required Readings: Handed out in class or emailed. Recommended Text: Wetlands, 2007, 4th edition (ISBN 978-0-471-69967-5) or Wetlands, 2000, 3rd edition (ISBN 0-471-29232-X) Authors: William J. Mitsch and James G. Gosselink Course

Gray, Matthew

458

Developing a Model to Predict Canada Goose Breeding Pair Densities in the Midwest Using National Wetlands Inventory Data  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Wetlands Inventory Data Principal Investigator: Robert Klaver Student Investigator: Brenna Towery (M a revised and refined wetlands inventory for Iowa (circa 2002), as well as 5 years of Canada Goose (singles, pairs, and groups) to specific wetlands or streams/rivers on individual survey plots, we can

Koford, Rolf R.

459

Contrasting wetland CH4 emission responses to simulated glacial atmospheric CO2 in temperate bogs and fens  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Contrasting wetland CH4 emission responses to simulated glacial atmospheric CO2 in temperate bogs, glacial, Last Glacial Maximum (LGM), methane (CH4), peatland, wetland. Summary · Wetlands were the largest (n = 8 per treatment) and measured gaseous CH4 flux, pore water dissolved CH4 and volatile fatty acid

Gauci, Vincent

460

Observations of short-circuiting flow paths within a free-surface wetland in Augusta, Georgia, U.S.A.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

constructed treatment wetland in Augusta, Georgia were used to quantify the size, distribution, velocity). In treatment wetlands, such heterogeneity nearly always results in reduced contaminant removal (WoObservations of short-circuiting flow paths within a free-surface wetland in Augusta, Georgia, U

Licciardi, Joseph M.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "wetland environmental review" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


461

Aquifers and Wetlands SUMMARY: This chapter begins with an overview of the hydrological cycle and  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

cycle and considers the flow of water in wetlands and undergraound. Special attention is paid to flow through vegetated wetlands. 14.1 The Hydrological Cycle Rivers and streams are but a link in the global cycle of water, called the hydro- logical cycle. Approximately half of the solar energy striking

Cushman-Roisin, Benoit

462

Characterizing hydraulic properties of filter material of a Vertical Flow1 Constructed Wetland2  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Characterizing hydraulic properties of filter material of a Vertical Flow1 Constructed Wetland2 A Characterizing the hydraulic properties of filter material used in a vertical flow11 constructed wetland (VFCW of porous mineral material and13 organic matter that makes hydraulic characterization a difficult task. Here

Paris-Sud XI, Universit de

463

REUSE AND RECYCLE OF BIO-RESIDUE (PERCOLATE) FROM CONSTRUCTED WETLAND TREATING SEPTAGE  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

REUSE AND RECYCLE OF BIO-RESIDUE (PERCOLATE) FROM CONSTRUCTED WETLAND TREATING SEPTAGE by Sukon of percolate from constructed wetland (CW) treating septage in agricultural application with the specific focus CW treating septage could exhibit positive responses of the plant growth which increase seed yield

Richner, Heinz

464

Virginia Wetlands Report Center for Coastal Resources Management www.ccrm.vims.edu  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Virginia Wetlands Report Center for Coastal Resources Management www.ccrm.vims.edu Volume 23, Issue at VIMS Also Living Shoreline Summit Proceedings Now Available Tidal Wetlands News & Events · · Putting Nature to Work: Marine contractors and permitting agents are targeted with new online course and VIMS

465

Center for Coastal Resources Management www.ccrm.vims.edu From the Wetlands Advisory  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Center for Coastal Resources Management www.ccrm.vims.edu From the Wetlands Advisory Group Director and those hosted by VIMS. Integrated Coastal & Shoreline Management Guidance Integrated coastal zone Virginia Institute of Marine Science #12;If you attended the VIMS Tidal Wetlands Workshop in June 2005

466

Virginia Wetlands Report Center for Coastal Resources Management www.ccrm.vims.edu  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Virginia Wetlands Report Center for Coastal Resources Management www.ccrm.vims.edu Volume 23, Issue, rather than having our usual spring workshop at VIMS, the Center for Coastal Resources Management for upcoming announcements of a staff workshop near you! The VIMS wetlands workshop will return to the VIMS

467

Virginia Wetlands Report Center for Coastal Resources Management www.ccrm.vims.edu  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Virginia Wetlands Report Center for Coastal Resources Management www.ccrm.vims.edu Volume 24, Issue Shifting Sands: Beaches and Dunes in Virginia Thursday, February 12, 2009 at VIMS See inside for information & registration! Also Tidal Wetlands News & Events VIMS Advisory Support: Updates for 2009

468

Constructed Wetlands Research Group meeting Forth Suite, SEPA Riccarton Office, Edinburgh EH14 4AP  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, to address diffuse pollution (particularly hydrocarbons) associated with the nearby Brucefield Industry Park1 Minutes of Constructed Wetlands Research Group meeting Forth Suite, SEPA Riccarton Office. It was set up several years ago, particularly to support the implementation of constructed farm wetlands

Heal, Kate

469

Constructed Wetlands and Waste Stabilization Ponds for municipal wastewater treatment in France: comparison of  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

13 Constructed Wetlands and Waste Stabilization Ponds for municipal wastewater treatment in France In France, vertical flow constructed wetlands and waste stabilisation ponds are both extensive treatment processes well adapted to small rural communities mainly because they are easy to operate

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

470

Polishing of synthetic electroplating wastewater in microcosm upflow constructed wetlands: Metals removal mechanisms  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Polishing of synthetic electroplating wastewater in microcosm upflow constructed wetlands: Metals in microcosm upflow constructed wetlands used for polishing of synthetic electroplating wastewater. Four types (2014) 53-42" DOI : 10.1016/j.cej.2013.12.075 #12;Keywords electroplating wastewater, metals, cyanides

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

471

Avian Use of Restored Wetlands in the Ridge and Valley Region of Pennsylvania  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

fifteen wetlands, which were surveyed in 1998 for water depths, vegetation, area, and bird use. I detected significantly affected wetland bird species richness (P tended to decline as well. Overall, average water depths changed little since 1998 with except of medium

Omiecinski, Curtis

472

Virginia Wetlands Report Center for Coastal Resources Management www.ccrm.vims.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Inventories or TMIs. This issue of the Virginia Wetlands Report highlights this research by describing the process and why these inventories are important for management and sustainability of the Commonwealth's tidal wetland resources. What are they? Tidal Marsh Inventories contain maps and information about

473

POSSIBLE ROLE OF WETLANDS, PERMAFROST, AND METHANE HYDRATES IN THE METHANE  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

POSSIBLE ROLE OF WETLANDS, PERMAFROST, AND METHANE HYDRATES IN THE METHANE CYCLE UNDER FUTURE the available scientific literature on how natural sources and the atmospheric fate of methane may be affected by future climate change. We discuss how processes governing methane wetland emissions, per- mafrost thawing

Chappellaz, Jérôme

474

Ecological outcomes and evaluation of success in passively restored southeastern depressional wetlands.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Abstract: Depressional wetlands may be restored passively by disrupting prior drainage to recover original hydrology and relying on natural revegetation. Restored hydrology selects for wetland vegetation; however, depression geomorphology constrains the achievable hydroperiod, and plant communities are influenced by hydroperiod and available species pools. Such constraints can complicate assessments of restoration success. Sixteen drained depressions in South Carolina, USA, were restored experimentally by forest clearing and ditch plugging for potential crediting to a mitigation bank. Depressions were assigned to alternate revegetation methods representing desired targets of herbaceous and wet-forest communities. After five years, restoration progress and revegetation methods were evaluated. Restored hydroperiods differed among wetlands, but all sites developed diverse vegetation of native wetland species. Vegetation traits were influenced by hydroperiod and the effects of early drought, rather than by revegetation method. For mitigation banking, individual wetlands were assessed for improvement from pre-restoration condition and similarity to assigned reference type. Most wetlands met goals to increase hydroperiod, herb-species dominance, and wetland-plant composition. Fewer wetlands achieved equivalence to reference types because some vegetation targets were incompatible with depression hydroperiods and improbable without intensive management. The results illustrated a paradox in judging success when vegetation goals may be unsuited to system constraints.

De Steven, Diane; Sharitz, Rebecca R.; Barton, Christopher, D.

2010-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

475

Aquatic Botany 69 (2001) 313324 Are Phragmites-dominated wetlands a net source or  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, P.O. Box 8602, Riccarton, Christchurch, New Zealand Abstract Phragmites australis wetlands act.V. All rights reserved. Keywords: Carbon cycling; Gas transport; Methane emission; Phragmites australisAquatic Botany 69 (2001) 313­324 Are Phragmites-dominated wetlands a net source or net sink

Brix, Hans

476

CONSTRUCTED FARM WETLANDS (CFWs) FOR REMEDIATION OF FARMYARD RUNOFF: WATER TREATMENT EFFICIENCY, ECOLOGICAL  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

CONSTRUCTED FARM WETLANDS (CFWs) FOR REMEDIATION OF FARMYARD RUNOFF: WATER TREATMENT EFFICIENCY, Aberdeen, AB15 8QH, UK E-mail: fabrice.gouriveau@ed.ac.uk Summary: This research evaluates the treatment efficiency, ecological value and cost-effectiveness of two Scottish Constructed Farm Wetlands (CFW 1 & 2

477

Food safety and environmental quality impose conflicting demands on Central Coast growers  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

RH, Knight RL. 1996. Treatment Wetlands. Boston: Lewis. 893on-site subsurface wetland treatment. J Env Sci Health Partfollowing treatment by small constructed wetlands. Water Res

Beretti, Melanie; Stuart, Diana

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

478

Picture this...you are on a tour of wetlands. Let's make it a southeastern wetland tour, since the ecology lab where I work and conduct my research  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, perhaps only a few square miles, one is apt to find wetlands that fall all along this hydroperiod that are "good" for bullfrogs are not suitable for spadefoot toads, and a marbled salamander would only be caught

Georgia, University of

479

Wetland Flow and Salinity Budgets and Elements of a Decision Support System toward Implementation of Real-Time Seasonal Wetland Salinity Management  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

System for Real-?Time Management of Water Quality Management of hydrologic systems for water quality system development for seasonal wetland salt management in a river basin subjected to water quality

Quinn, N.W.T.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

480

National Wetlands Inventory The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (Corps) as of 2006 has accepted the administrative responsibility for  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

National Wetlands Inventory The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (Corps) as of 2006 has accepted the administrative responsibility for the National Wetland Plant List from the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (FWS). In early 2009 the FWS removed the published 1988 and 1996 wetland plant lists from their National Wetland

US Army Corps of Engineers

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "wetland environmental review" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


481

Geography of Wetlands in the San Francisco Estuary Joshua N. Collins, Ph.D., Robin Grossinger, M.S., Zoltan Der,  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Geography of Wetlands in the San Francisco Estuary Joshua N. Collins, Ph.D., Robin Grossinger, M to understand the nature of wetlands in the San Francisco Bay Area. An improved understanding of wetlands, and this has increased the ways that wetlands can be measured and viewed. There has been a large increase

482

Transplanting native dominant plants to facilitate community development in restored coastal plain wetlands.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Abstract: Drained depressional wetlands are typically restored by plugging ditches or breaking drainage tiles to allow recovery of natural ponding regimes, while relying on passive recolonization from seed banks and dispersal to establish emergent vegetation. However, in restored depressions of the southeastern United States Coastal Plain, certain characteristic rhizomatous graminoid species may not recolonize because they are dispersal-limited and uncommon or absent in the seed banks of disturbed sites. We tested whether selectively planting such wetland dominants could facilitate restoration by accelerating vegetative cover development and suppressing non-wetland species. In an operational-scale project in a South Carolina forested landscape, drained depressional wetlands were restored in early 2001 by completely removing woody vegetation and plugging surface ditches. After forest removal, tillers of two rhizomatous wetland grasses (Panicum hemitomon, Leersia hexandra) were transplanted into singlespecies blocks in 12 restored depressions that otherwise were revegetating passively. Presence and cover of all plant species appearing in planted plots and unplanted control plots were recorded annually. We analyzed vegetation composition after two and four years, during a severe drought (2002) and after hydrologic recovery (2004). Most grass plantings established successfully, attaining 15%85% cover in two years. Planted plots had fewer total species and fewer wetland species compared to control plots, but differences were small. Planted plots achieved greater total vegetative cover during the drought and greater combined cover of wetland species in both years. By 2004, planted grasses appeared to reduce cover of non-wetland species in some cases, but wetter hydrologic conditions contributed more strongly to suppression of non-wetland species. Because these two grasses typically form a dominant cover matrix in herbaceous depressions, our results indicated that planting selected species could supplement passive restoration by promoting a vegetative structure closer to that of natural wetlands.

De Steven, Diane; Sharitz, Rebecca R.

2007-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

483

2003 SITE ENVIRONMENTAL REPORT  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Each year, Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL), a multi-program national laboratory, prepares an annual Site Environmental Report (SER) in accordance with Order 231.1A, Environment, Safety and Health Reporting, of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). The SER is written to inform outside regulators, the public, and Laboratory employees of BNL's environmental performance during the calendar year in review, and to summarize BNL's on-site environmental data; environmental management performance; compliance with applicable DOE, Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), state, and local regulations; and environmental, restoration, and surveillance monitoring programs. BNL has prepared annual SERs since 1971 and has documented nearly all of its environmental history since the Laboratory's inception in 1947. This report is intended to be a technical document. It is available in print and as a downloadable file on the BNL web page at http://www.bnl.ser.htm. A summary of the SER is also prepared each year to provide a general overview, and is distributed with a CD version of the full-length SER. The summary supports BNL's educational and community outreach program.

ENVIRONMENT AND WASTE MANAGMENT SERVICES DIVISION; ET AL.

2004-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

484

EIS-0390: Notice of Public Meeting and Additional Opportunity...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

for Public Review and Comment EIS-0390: Notice of Intent to Prepare an Environmental Impact Statement; Floodplain and Wetlands Involvement; and Public Scoping Meetings EIS-0400...

485

EIS-0390: Notice of Public Meetings and Additional Opportunity...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

for Public Review and Comment EIS-0390: Notice of Intent to Prepare an Environmental Impact Statement; Floodplain and Wetlands Involvement; and Public Scoping Meetings EIS-0483...

486

Annual Site Environmental Report. Calendar Year 1997  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report summarizes the environmental status of Ames Laboratory for calendar year 1997. It includes descriptions of the Laboratory site, its mission, the status of its compliance with applicable environmental regulations, its planning and activities to maintain compliance, and a comprehensive review of its environmental protection, surveillance and monitoring programs.

NONE

1997-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

487

An assessment of potential hydrologic and ecologic impacts of constructing mitigation wetlands, Rifle, Colorado, UMTRA project sites  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This-assessment examines the consequences and risks that could result from the proposed construction of mitigation wetlands at the New and Old Rifle Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project sites near Rifle, Colorado. Remediation of surface contamination at those sites is now under way. Preexisting wetlands at or near the Old and New Rifle sites have been cleaned up, resulting in the loss of 0.7 and 10.5 wetland acres (ac) (0.28 and 4.2 hectares [ha]) respectively. Another 9.9 ac (4.0 ha) of wetlands are in the area of windblown contamination west of the New Rifle site. The US Army Corps of Engineers (USACE) has jurisdiction over the remediated wetlands. Before remedial action began, and before any wetlands were eliminated, the USACE issued a Section 404 Permit that included a mitigation plan for the wetlands to be lost. The mitigation plan calls for 34.2 ac (1 3.8 ha) of wetlands to be constructed at the south end and to the west of the New Rifle site. The mitigation wetlands would be constructed over and in the contaminated alluvial aquifer at the New Rifle site. As a result of the hydrologic characteristics of this aquifer, contaminated ground water would be expected to enter the environment through the proposed wetlands. A preliminary assessment was therefore required to assess any potential ecological risks associated with constructing the mitigation wetlands at the proposed location.

NONE

1995-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

488

Geology, Environmental Science, Geography, Environmental Management  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

2011 Geology, Environmental Science, Geography, Environmental Management Postgraduate Handbook #12 Environmental Management 14 Environmental Science 18 Geography 22 Geographic Information Science 26 Geology, Environmental Science, Geography, Environmental Management Postgraduate Handbook Editors David Hayward, Ilse

Goodman, James R.

489

E-Print Network 3.0 - annual environmental monitoring Sample...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

against which environmental performance will be monitored. 4. Review environmental management procedures... . Energy, Water & Waste Management 7. Maintain and develop energy &...

490

Title: Digital Infrastructure: Reducing Energy Cost and Environmental Impacts of Information Processing and Communications Systems  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Title: Digital Infrastructure: Reducing Energy Cost and Environmental Impacts of Information of various societal and environmental mandates followed by a review of technologies, systems, and hardware

491

Environmental Justice  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The Department of Energy (DOE) is committed to promoting environmental justice in all its activities in keeping with Executive Order (EO) 12898: Federal Actions to Address Environmental Justice in...

492

Environmental Stewardship  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Tours Value of the River Hydropower Transmission Environmental Stewardship Fish Renewables Irrigation, Navigation Flood Control and Recreation Energy Efficiency...

493

ENVIRONMENTAL ENGINEERING  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

engineering covers a wide range of critical services, from designing water and wastewater treatment facilitiesENVIRONMENTAL ENGINEERING www.cee.pdx.edu What do environmental engineers do? Civil and Environmental Engineering (CEE) is an exciting, challenging, and dynamic field that is critical to our quality

494

Citizenship Environmental  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ENGAGED Citizenship Environmental Heather J. Aslin and Stewart Lockie Editors es many onments essor s widely ocial and s most blishing, EngagedEnvironmentalCitizenshipH.J.AslinandS.Lockie(Editors) Charles Darwin University Press presents cdupress.cdu.edu.au #12;Engaged environmental citizenship edited

495

Synchrotron Environmental  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Synchrotron Environmental Science-II Speaker Abstracts The Role of Synchrotron Radiation in Advancing Frontiers in Environmental Soil Science Donald L. Sparks, University ofDelaware Over the past. These frontiers in molecular environmental science have major impacts on soil remediation, development

Sparks, Donald L.

496

Vegetation survey of Four Mile Creek wetlands. [Savannah River Plant  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A survey of forested wetlands along upper Four Mile Creek was conducted. The region from Road 3 to the creek headwaters was sampled to evaluate the composition of woody and herbaceons plant communities. All sites were found to fall into either the Nyssa sylvatica (Black Gum) -- Persea borbonia (Red Bay) or Nyssa sylvatica -- Acer rubrum (Red Maple) types. These community types are generally species-rich and diverse. Previous studies (Greenwood et al., 1990; Mackey, 1988) demonstrated contaminant stress in areas downslope from the F- and H-Area seepage basins. In the present study there were some indications of contaminant stress. In the wetland near H-Area, shrub basal area, ground cover stratum species richness, and diversity were low. In the area surrounding the F-Area tree kill zone, ground cover stratum cover and shrub basal area were low and ground cover stratum species richness was low. The moderately stressed site at F-Area also showed reduced overstory richness and diversity and reduced ground cover stratum richness. These results could, however, be due to the very high basal area of overstory trees in both stressed F-Area sites that would reduce light availability to understory plants. No threatened or endangered plant species were found in the areas sampled. 40 refs., 4 figs., 8 tabs.

Loehle, C.

1990-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

497

The Environmental Style: Writing Environmental Assessments and...  

Energy Savers [EERE]

The Environmental Style: Writing Environmental Assessments and Impact Statements The Environmental Style: Writing Environmental Assessments and Impact Statements A writing guide...

498

Environmental Impact Statements and Environmental Assessments...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Environmental Impact Statements and Environmental Assessments Status Chart Environmental Impact Statements and Environmental Assessments Status Chart The Status Chart provides the...

499

Enterprise Assessments Review, Waste Isolation Pilot Plant -...  

Energy Savers [EERE]

December, 2014 Review of the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Conduct of Maintenance Recovery Plan The Office of Nuclear Safety and Environmental Assessments, within the U.S. Department...

500

Independent Oversight Review, Livermore Site Office - October...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

National Laboratory Activity-level Work Planning & Control Office of Environmental Management Work Planning and Control Oversight Enterprise Assessments Targeted Review,...