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1

Use of mineralizer in black meal process for improved clinkerization and conservation of energy  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The high cost of energy and the consumption of almost three times the net theoretical heat required in clinkering process continue to be a nagging problem faced by VSK plants. There is, therefore, a need for energy conservation which could be rapidly and economically accomplished by promoting the clinker formation at lower temperature. The use of fluxes for lowering the melting point of the raw mix is an important measure to save energy, giving economic benefits. Fluxes and mineralizers improve burnability and quality of clinker, solving particularly the free lime problem faced by cement plants. The purpose of the present paper is to highlight the role of CaF{sub 2} and CaSO{sub 4} as mineralizers with industrial raw mix in VSK technology in conserving energy and improving the quality of clinker. The use of CaF{sub 2}, CaSO{sub 4}, or a mixture of CaF{sub 2} and CaSO{sub 4} promotes the clinker formation at lower temperature, giving direct implication on commercial production with economic benefits without affecting the quality.

Raina, K.; Janakiraman, L.K. [National Council for Cement and Building Materials, New Delhi (India)] [National Council for Cement and Building Materials, New Delhi (India)

1998-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

2

Hydrothermal Processing of Wet Wastes  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Breakout Session 3A桟onversion Technologies III: Energy from Our Waste梂ill we Be Rich in Fuel or Knee Deep in Trash by 2025? Hydrothermal Processing of Wet Wastes James R. Oyler, President, Genifuel Corporation

3

TRL Acid and Solvent Wet Processing Rules and Guidelines  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

: General rules and guidelines for wet chemical processing in TRL. Author: KFlo hood and when transporting or handling chemicals. An acid-proof apron, sleeveTRL Acid and Solvent Wet Processing Rules and Guidelines Purpose

Reif, Rafael

4

Electro-osmotic transport in wet processing of textiles  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Electro-osmotic (or electrokinetic) transport is used to efficiently force a solution (or water) through the interior of the fibers or yarns of textile materials for wet processing of textiles. The textile material is passed between electrodes that apply an electric field across the fabric. Used alone or in parallel with conventional hydraulic washing (forced convection), electro-osmotic transport greatly reduces the amount of water used in wet processing. The amount of water required to achieve a fixed level of rinsing of tint can be reduced, for example, to 1--5 lbs water per pound of fabric from an industry benchmark of 20 lbs water/lb fabric. 5 figs.

Cooper, J.F.

1998-09-22T23:59:59.000Z

5

Problems with low-temperature clinkers  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In the cement industry, there are real problems connected with reducing the fuel/energy consumption and producing high-strength and rapid setting cements. A series of physicochemical examinations and pilot plant trials have shown that the use of BaSO/sub 4/ + CaSO/sub 4/ as a compound additive (barium-containing waste + gypsum) makes it possible to prepare a belite clinker at a temperature of 1250/sup 0/C; the BaSO/sub 4/ + CaSO/sub 4/ additive stabilizes the dicalcium silicate in the ..cap alpha..'-modification; introduction of the compound additive into the belite raw material mixture leads to the formation of hydraulically active minerals in the clinker-calcium sulfoaluminate, monocalcium aluminate, and ..cap alpha..'-C/sub 2/S, which in combination with alite ensure that a high-activity belite clinker is obtained at low burning temperatures.

Sychev, M.M.; Tandilova, K.B.; Minkina, V.N.

1987-07-20T23:59:59.000Z

6

Development studies for a novel wet oxidation process. Phase 2  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

DETOX{sup SM} is a catalyzed wet oxidation process which destroys organic materials in an acidic water solution of iron at 373 to 473 K. The solution can be used repeatedly to destroy great amounts of organic materials. Since the process is conducted in a contained vessel, air emissions from the process can be well controlled. The solution is also capable of dissolving and concentrating many heavy and radioactive metals for eventual stabilization and disposal. The Phase 2 effort for this project is site selection and engineering design for a DETOX demonstration unit. Site selection was made using a set of site selection criteria and evaluation factors. A survey of mixed wastes at DOE sites was conducted using the Interim Mixed Waste Inventory Report. Sites with likely suitable waste types were identified. Potential demonstration sites were ranked based on waste types, interest, regulatory needs, scheduling, ability to provide support, and available facilities. Engineering design for the demonstration unit is in progress and is being performed by Jacobs Applied Technology. The engineering design proceeded through preliminary process flow diagrams (PFDs), calculation of mass and energy balances for representative waste types, process and instrumentation diagrams (P and IDs), preparation of component specifications, and a firm cost estimate for fabrication of the demonstration unit.

NONE

1994-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

7

Wet-process dust-collecting apparatus especially for converter exhaust gases  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Metallurgical converter gas is scrubbed in a wet-process electrostatic precipitator utilizing a cylindrical housing and axially separated collecting fields which themselves are vertically subdivided.

Baab, H.

1985-03-19T23:59:59.000Z

8

Development studies for a novel wet oxidation process  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A catalytic wet oxidation process (DETOX), which uses an acidic iron solution to oxidize organic compounds to carbon dioxide, water, and other simple products, was investigated as a potential method for the treatment of multicomponent hazardous and mixed wastes. The organic compounds picric acid, poly(vinyl chloride), tetrachlorothiophene, pentachloropyridine, Aroclor 1260 (a polychlorinated biphenyl), and hexachlorobenzene were oxidized in 125 ml reaction vessels. The metals arsenic, barium, beryllium, cadmium, cerium (as a surrogate for plutonium), chromium, lead, mercury, neodymium (as a surrogate for uranium), nickel, and vanadium were tested in the DETOX solution. Barium, beryllium, cerium, chromium, mercury, neodymium, nickel, and vanadium were all found to be very soluble (>100 g/l) in the DETOX chloride-based solution. Arsenic, barium, cadmium, and lead solubilities were lower. Lead could be selectively precipitated from the DETOX solution. Chromium(VI) was reduced to relatively non-toxic chromium(III) by the solution. Six soils were contaminated with arsenic, barium, beryllium, chromium, lead, and neodymium oxides at approximately 0.1% by weight, and benzene, trichloroethene, mineral oil, and Aroclor 1260 at approximately 5% by weight total, and 5.g amounts treated with the DETOX solution in unstirred 125. ml reaction bombs. It is felt that soil treatment in a properly designed system is entirely possible despite incomplete oxidation of the less volatile organic materials in these unstirred tests.

Dhooge, P.M.; Hakim, L.B.

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

9

Quantifying wet scavenging processes in aircraft observations of nitric acid and cloud condensation nuclei  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Quantifying wet scavenging processes in aircraft observations of nitric acid and cloud condensation indicator for quantifying wet scavenging. Specifically, nitric acid (HNO3), produced as a by-product of combustion, is highly soluble and removed efficiently from clouds by rain. Regional carbon monoxide (CO

Palmer, Paul

10

Model for cradle-to-gate life cycle assessment of clinker production  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A model for input- and technology-dependent cradle-to-gate life cycle assessments (LCA) was constructed to quantify emissions and resource consumption of various clinker production options. The model was compiled using data of more than 100 clinker production lines and complemented with literature data and best judgment from experts. It can be applied by the cement industry for the selection of alternative fuels and raw materials (AFR) and by authorities for decision-support regarding the permission of waste co-processing in cement kilns. In the field of sustainable construction, the model can be used to compare clinker production options. Two case studies are presented. First, co-processing of four different types of waste is analyzed at a modern precalciner kiln system. Second, clinker production is compared between five kiln systems. Results show that the use of waste (tires, prepared industrial waste, dried sewage sludge, blast furnace slag) led to reduced greenhouse gas emissions, decreased resource consumption, and mostly to reduced aggregated environmental impacts. Regarding the different kiln systems, the environmental impact generally increased with decreasing energy efficiency. 35 refs., 2 figs., 2 tabs.

Michael Elias Boesch; Annette Koehler; Stefanie Hellweg [ETH Zurich, Zurich (Switzerland). Institute of Environmental Engineering

2009-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

11

Chemical Processing in High-Pressure Aqueous Environments. 7. Process Development for Catalytic Gasification of Wet Biomass  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Gasification of Wet Biomass Feedstocks Douglas C. Elliott,* Gary G. Neuenschwander, Todd R. Hart, R. Scott the preliminary results of continuous-flow reactor studies with wet biomass feedstocks using new catalyst systems of con- tinuous reactor tests with biomass feedstocks provide preliminary short-term processing results,8

12

New waste based clinkers: Belite and lime formulations  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This work describes the formulation of new belite-based (CR2) and lime-based (CR3) cementitious materials derived from industrial wastes, such as sludges (generated in the Al-anodising and surface coating industrial processes, potable water filtration/cleaning operations and in marble sawing processes) and foundry sand. Powder mixtures were prepared and fired at different temperatures. For comparison, similar formulations were prepared with pre-treated and commercially available natural raw materials and processed in similar conditions. The thermal process was followed by differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) and high-temperature powder X-ray diffraction (HT-XRD) studies. The CR2 clinker was found to contain belite as the main cementitious phase, the main polymorph being identified by NMR. The CR3 clinker contained common cementitious phases, such as C{sub 3}A and C{sub 3}S, but free lime and calcium aluminium oxide sulphates were also identified by high temperature XRD and NMR. Then the corresponding cement was prepared and the evolution of the mechanical strength with time was evaluated. The lime-based cement obtained from wastes shows a stronger hardening character than the standard material, which tends to show dusting phenomena due to the presence of a reasonable amount of free lime (as the result of its expansive reaction with ambient moisture). Some fluxing impurities (e.g. alkalis) present in the waste materials improve the overall reactivity of the mixture and induces the combination of the lime in CR3. Raman, XPS and FIB techniques were used to fully characterise the aged cements.

Raupp-Pereira, Fabiano [Ceramics and Glass Engineering Department, CICECO, University of Aveiro, 3810-193 Aveiro (Portugal); Ball, Richard James [University of Bristol, Interface Analysis Centre, Oldbury House, 121 St Michael's Hill, Bristol, BS2 8BS (United Kingdom)], E-mail: richard.ball@bristol.ac.uk; Rocha, Joao [Department of Chemistry, CICECO, University of Aveiro, 3810-193 Aveiro (Portugal); Labrincha, Joao A. [Ceramics and Glass Engineering Department, CICECO, University of Aveiro, 3810-193 Aveiro (Portugal); Allen, Geoffrey C. [University of Bristol, Interface Analysis Centre, Oldbury House, 121 St Michael's Hill, Bristol, BS2 8BS (United Kingdom)

2008-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

13

Synthesis of belite cement clinker of high hydraulic reactivity  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This study is concerned with the increase of the cooling rate of belite clinker, by using the water quenching for the chemical stabilization of reactive belite, which improves the hydraulic properties of this clinker. The addition of adequate mineralizers, as NaF and Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3}, contributes to the improvement of the clinker properties obtained at low burning temperature. X-ray fluorescence spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction analysis and optical microscopy were used to determine the chemical and mineralogical compositions of this clinker. The samples were analyzed by means of a scanning electronic microscope connected with an energy-dispersive X-ray spectrometer to detect the composition of the belite phase and its morphology. Physical and mechanical properties of this clinker cement were determined. The results show that the belite clinker obtained at 1150 {sup o}C, with lime saturation factor 0.67, is characterized by a great hydraulic reactivity, similar to that of the ordinary alite clinker. The addition of 2% of NaF and the water quenching improved the chemical, mineralogical and structural properties, while improving the cement hydraulic properties.

Kacimi, Larbi [Laboratoire de Genie des Procedes, Departement de Chimie, Universite des Sciences et de la Technologie d'Oran, B.P. 1505, El-M'nouar, U.S.T. Oran (Algeria)], E-mail: kacimi20002000@yahoo.fr; Simon-Masseron, Angelique [Laboratoire des Materiaux a Porosite Controlee, CNRS UMR 7016, Universite de Haute-Alsace, 3, rue Alfred-Werner, F-68093 Mulhouse cedex (France)], E-mail: A.Simon@univ-mulhouse.fr; Salem, Souria [Departement d'Architecture, Faculte de Genie Civile, USTO-Oran (Algeria)], E-mail: zinaisalem@yahoo.fr; Ghomari, Abdelhamid [Departement de Chimie, U.A.I.B., Route de Belahcel, Mostaganem (Algeria)], E-mail: belkey@hotmail.com; Derriche, Zoubir [Laboratoire de Genie des Procedes, Departement de Chimie, Universite des Sciences et de la Technologie d'Oran, B.P. 1505, El-M'nouar, U.S.T. Oran (Algeria)

2009-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

14

Process for the recovery of uranium from wet-process phosphoric acid  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In a process for the recovery of uranium from a wet-process phosphoric acid, comprising treating in an extraction step the preliminarily oxidized acid first with an organic solvent consisting essentially of a dialkylphosphoric acid and a trialkyphosphine oxide dissolved in an inert and unreactive organic solvent whereby there are obtained a uranium-free phosphoric acid and an organic extract consisting essentially of the solvent containing the major portion of uranium; then, in a reextraction step, separating the uranium from the organic extract as ammonium uranyl tricarbonate by reacting the organic extract with ammonium hydroxide and ammonium carbonate; and recycling the uranium-free solvent to the extraction step; an improvement comprises treating the organic extract in a reextraction apparatus having at least two stages, by (A) introducing the extract at the head of the first stage; (B) countercurrently introducing ammonia or ammonium hydroxide solution at the bottom of the first stage; the ph of the first stage being controlled and maintained at a value of 8.0 to 8.5; (C) introducing an ammonium carbonate aqueous solution at the bottom of the last stage; the amount of ammonium carbonate employed being 50-80 percent by weight of the theoretical molar quantity which is necessary to neutralize the dialkylphosphoric acid contained in the solvent and to convert the uranium to ammonium uranyl tricarbonate; and (D) regenerating the ammoniated solvent obtained after the reextraction step by treating it with an acid before recycling it to the extraction step.

Francois, A.; Sialino, A.

1980-12-09T23:59:59.000Z

15

Grinding of cement clinkers : linking multi-scale fracture properties to system chemistry, mineralogy and microstructure  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Growing environmental concerns encourage the cement industry to improve its environmental performance, which in turn renews the interest in clinker grinding efficiency. Current knowledge on clinker grinding was built over ...

Wilson, William, S.M. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

16

Preliminary Evaluation of Cesium Distribution for Wet Sieving Process Planned for Soil Decontamination in Japan - 13104  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

For the purpose of decontaminating radioactive cesium from a huge amount of soil, which has been estimated to be 1.2x10{sup 8} m{sup 3} by excavating to a 5-cm depth from the surface of Fukushima Prefecture where a severe nuclear accident occurred at TEPCO's power generating site and has emitted a significant amount of radioactive materials, mainly radioactive cesium, a wet sieving process was selected as one of effective methods available in Japan. Some private companies have demonstrated this process for soil treatment in the Fukushima area by testing at their plants. The results were very promising, and a full-fledged application is expected to follow. In the present study, we spiked several aqueous samples containing soil collected from an industrial wet sieving plant located near our university for the recycling of construction wastes with non-radioactive cesium hydroxide. The present study provides scientific data concerning the effectiveness in volume reduction of the contaminated soil by a wet sieving process as well as the cesium distribution between the liquid phase and clay minerals for each sub-process of the full-scale one, but a simulating plant equipped with a process of coagulating sedimentation and operational safety fundamentals for the plant. Especially for the latter aspect, the study showed that clay minerals of submicron size strongly bind a high content of cesium, which was only slightly removed by coagulation with natural sedimentation (1 G) nor centrifugal sedimentation (3,700 G) and some of the cesium may be transferred to the effluent or recycled water. By applying ultracentrifugation (257,000 G), most of submicron clay minerals containing cesium was removed, and the cesium amount which might be transferred to the effluent or recycled water, could be reduced to less than 2.3 % of the original design by the addition of a cesium barrier consisting of ultracentrifugation or a hollow fiber membrane. (authors)

Enokida, Y.; Tanada, Y.; Hirabayashi, D. [Graduate School of Engineering, 1 Furo-cho Nagoya-shi, Aichi-ken, 4648603 (Japan)] [Graduate School of Engineering, 1 Furo-cho Nagoya-shi, Aichi-ken, 4648603 (Japan); Sawada, K. [EcoTopia Science Institute, Nagoya University, 1 Furo-cho Nagoya-shi, Aichi-ken, 4648603 (Japan)] [EcoTopia Science Institute, Nagoya University, 1 Furo-cho Nagoya-shi, Aichi-ken, 4648603 (Japan)

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

17

Influence of certain additives and combinations of them on the structure and properties of clinker  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The results of investigations of the influence of BaO, Mn/sub 2/O/sub 3/, and the BaO + Mn/sub 2/O/sub 3/ combination on the phase composition of clinker, the contents of different forms of alite, and the burning temperature are reported. A specific feature of the clinkers taken for the investigation is that they contain over 4% MgO. The additives used in the investigation were barium-containing wastes from lithopone production and ''tailings'' from concentration of manganese ores. The barium-containing wastes contained from 30 to 40% BaO, and the Mn/sub 2/O/sub 3/ content in tailings from manganese ores reached 15-16%; moreover, they contained up to 60% SiO/sub 2/, which is important for raising the silica ratio. At the same time, the use of manganese wastes in the cement raw mix makes the use of cinders unnecessary. The amounts of wastes introduced into the raw mix were calculated to give BaO contents in the clinkers from 0.3 to 0.9% and Mn/sub 2/O/sub 3/ contents from 0.7 to 1.4%. Introduction of alloying and modifying additives containing Ba and Mn into cement raw mixes intensifies the burning process, lowering the temperature by 100/sup 0/C. The change of the burning temperature in presence of additives is accompanied by changes of the modification composition of the principal silicate phase, alite. Lowering of the sintering temperature reveals a high degree of imperfection of the structure of cement minerals arising as the result of introduction of BaO and Mn/sub 2/O/sub 3/. Cements containing alloying and modifying additions of barium and manganese and obtained at lower temperatures have higher activity than cements without additives.

Minkina, V.N.; Sychev, M.M.; Tandilova, K.B.; Papuashvili, S.N.

1983-04-20T23:59:59.000Z

18

Process to eliminate production of fly ash by wet bottom boilers  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This patent describes a process for the reduction of fly ash in a wet bottom boiler of the type having a primary and secondary furnace. It comprises collecting the fly ash from one of an electrostatic precipitator, a bag house, a cyclone collector, a multi- cyclone collector, a gravity separator and a sharply curved duct; removing the fly ash in a stream of carrier gas into the furnace; adding a fuel to the stream of carrier gas and fly ash; introducing the carrier gas and fly ash and fuel into one of the primary and secondary furnaces, wherein the fuel and the heat from at least one of the surrounding gas and molten slag provide energy to melt the fly ash; and discharging the melted fly ash with slag from the furnace bottom.

Breen, B.P.; Schrecengost, R.A.; Gabrielson, J.E.

1991-09-03T23:59:59.000Z

19

E-Print Network 3.0 - ames wet oxidation process Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

25 run 32 ICL wet photo oxEtch-BOE ... Source: Culpepper, Martin L. - Department of Mechanical Engineering, Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) Collection:...

20

Chemical Processing in High-Pressure Aqueous Environments. 7. Process Development for Catalytic Gasification of Wet Biomass Feedstocks  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Through the use of a metal catalyst, gasification of wet biomass can be accomplished with high levels of carbon conversion to gas at relatively low temperature (350 C). In the pressurized-water environment (20 MPa) near-total conversion of the organic structure of biomass to gases has been accomplished in the presence of a ruthenium metal catalyst. The process is essentially steam reforming as there is no added oxidizer or reagent other than water. In addition, the gas produced is a medium-heating value gas due to the synthesis of high-levels of methane, as dictated by thermodynamic equilibrium. Biomass trace components cause processing difficulties using the fixed catalyst bed tubular reactor system. Results are described for both bench-scale and scaled-up reactor systems.

Elliott, Douglas C.; Neuenschwander, Gary G.; Hart, Todd R.; Butner, Scott S.; Zacher, Alan H.; Engelhard, Mark H.; Young, James S.; McCready, David E.

2004-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "wet process clinker" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Characterization using thermomechanical and differential thermal analysis of the sinterization of Portland clinker doped with CaF{sub 2}  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In this work, the sintering process of Portland cement was studied by combining thermomechanical analysis (TMA) and differential thermal analysis (DTA), together with X-ray diffraction (XRD) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Thermal analysis results employing both techniques indicted that phase transformations appeared at lower temperatures when CaF{sub 2} was incorporated in the raw materials. Besides, it was observed at high temperature that in some phase transformations TMA conducts to better resolution compared with the DTA measurements. Furthermore, mechanical properties and X-ray diffraction patterns corroborate the TMA and DTA results, corroborating that the final amount of alite (Ca{sub 3}SiO{sub 5}) is higher when a certain amount of CaF{sub 2} was present during the clinkerization process.

Dominguez, O., E-mail: nanoquimica@yahoo.com [Fac. de Quimica-UASLP, Av. Dr. Salvador Nava 6, CP 78210, San Luis Potosi, SLP (Mexico); Torres-Castillo, A. [Fac. de Quimica-UASLP, Av. Dr. Salvador Nava 6, CP 78210, San Luis Potosi, SLP (Mexico); Flores-Velez, L.M. [Instituto de Metalurgia-UASLP, Sierra Leona 550, CP 78210, San Luis Potosi, SLP (Mexico); Torres, R. [Mexichem Fluor S.A., Eje 106 s/n CP 78395, San Luis Potosi, SLP (Mexico)

2010-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

22

Initial evaluation of dry storage issues for spent nuclear fuels in wet storage at the Idaho Chemical Processing Plant  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Pacific Northwest Laboratory has evaluated the basis for moving selected spent nuclear fuels in the CPP-603 and CPP-666 storage pools at the Idaho Chemical Processing Plant from wet to dry interim storage. This work is being conducted for the Lockheed Idaho Technologies Company as part of the effort to determine appropriate conditioning and dry storage requirements for these fuels. These spent fuels are from 22 test reactors and include elements clad with aluminum or stainless steel and a wide variety of fuel materials: UAl{sub x}, UAl{sub x}-Al and U{sub 3}O{sub 8}-Al cermets, U-5% fissium, UMo, UZrH{sub x}, UErZrH, UO{sub 2}-stainless steel cermet, and U{sub 3}O{sub 8}-stainless steel cermet. The study also included declad uranium-zirconium hydride spent fuel stored in the CPP-603 storage pools. The current condition and potential failure mechanisms for these spent fuels were evaluated to determine the impact on conditioning and dry storage requirements. Initial recommendations for conditioning and dry storage requirements are made based on the potential degradation mechanisms and their impacts on moving the spent fuel from wet to dry storage. Areas needing further evaluation are identified.

Guenther, R.J.; Johnson, A.B. Jr.; Lund, A.L.; Gilbert, E.R. [and others

1996-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

23

Study of an ammonia-based wet scrubbing process in a continuous flow system  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A continuous gas and liquid flow, regenerative scrubbing process for CO{sub 2} capture was demonstrated at the bench-scale level. An aqueous ammonia-based solution captures CO{sub 2} from simulated flue gas in an absorber and releases a nearly pure stream of CO{sub 2} in the regenerator. After the regeneration, the solution of ammonium compounds is recycled to the absorber. The design of a continuous flow unit was based on earlier exploratory results from a semi-batch reactor, where a CO{sub 2} and N{sub 2} simulated flue gas mixture flowed through a well-mixed batch of ammonia-based solution. During the semi-batch tests, the solution was cycled between absorption and regeneration steps to measure the carrying capacity of the solution at various initial ammonia concentrations and temperatures. Consequentially, a series of tests were conducted on the continuous unit to observe the effect of various parameters on CO{sub 2} removal efficiency and regenerator effectiveness within the flow system. The parameters that were studied included absorber temperature, regenerator temperature, initial NH{sub 3} concentration, simulated flue gas flow rate, liquid solvent inventory in the flow system, and height of the packed-bed absorber. From this testing and subsequent testing, ammonia losses from both the absorption and regeneration steps were quantified, and attempts were made to maintain steady state during operations. Implications of experimental results with respect to process design are discussed.

Mao, James X.; Lee, Anita S.; Kitchin, John R.; Nulwala, Hunaid B.; Luebke, David R.; Damodaran, Krishnan

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

24

Wet processing of palladium for use in the tritium facility at Westinghouse, Savannah River, SC. Preparation of palladium using the Mound Muddy Water process  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Palladium used at Savannah River for tritium storage is currently obtained from a commercial source. In order to better understand the processes involved in preparing this material, Savannah River is supporting investigations into the chemical reactions used to synthesize this material and into the conditions necessary to produce palladium powder that meets their specifications. This better understanding may help to guarantee a continued reliable source for this material in the future. As part of this evaluation, a work-for-others contract between Westinghouse Savannah River Company and the Ames Laboratory Metallurgy and Ceramics Program was initiated. During FY98, the process for producing palladium powder developed in 1986 by Dan Grove of Mound Applied Technologies (USDOE) was studied to understand the processing conditions that lead to changes in morphology in the final product. This report details the results of this study of the Mound Muddy Water process, along with the results of a round-robin analysis of well-characterized palladium samples that was performed by Savannah River and Ames Laboratory. The Mound Muddy Water process is comprised of three basic wet chemical processes, palladium dissolution, neutralization, and precipitation, with a number of filtration steps to remove unwanted impurity precipitates.

Baldwin, D.P.; Zamzow, D.S.

1998-11-10T23:59:59.000Z

25

Mineralogical phase analysis of alkali and sulfate bearing belite rich laboratory clinkers  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The activation of laboratory belite clinkers has been carried out by adding variable amounts of alkaline salts (K{sub 2}CO{sub 3}, Na{sub 2}CO{sub 3}), and/or SO{sub 3} as gypsum in the raw materials but keeping almost constant the main elements ratios, Ca/Si/Al/Fe. Quantitative phase analyses by the Rietveld method using high resolution synchrotron and strictly monochromatic CuK{alpha}{sub 1} laboratory X-ray powder diffraction data has been performed. Quantitative phase analysis results have been compared to validate the protocol using laboratory X-ray data. The agreement in the results is noteworthy, which indicates that good quantitative phase analyses can be obtained from laboratory X-ray powder data. Qualitative studies have confirmed that the addition of alkaline salts to raw mixtures promotes the stabilization, at room temperature, of the highest temperature polymorphs: {alpha}'{sub H}-C{sub 2}S and {alpha}-C{sub 2}S. Quantitative studies gave the phase assemblage for ten different laboratory belite clinkers. As an example, an active belite clinker with 1.0 wt.% of K{sub 2}O and 1.0 wt.% of Na{sub 2}O (amounts added to the raw mixtures) contains 8.5(3) wt.% of {beta}-C{sub 2}S, 21.2(3) wt.% of {alpha}'{sub H}-C{sub 2}S, 24.1(2) wt.% of {alpha}-C{sub 2}S, 18.9(3) wt.% of total C{sub 3}S, 17.3(2) wt.% of C{sub 3}A and 10.0(2) wt.% of C{sub 4}AF. A belite clinker with 0.8 wt.% SO{sub 3} (nominal loading) contains 60.7(1) wt.% of {beta}-C{sub 2}S, 6.7(2) wt.% of {alpha}'{sub H}-C{sub 2}S, 12.3(7) wt.% of C{sub 3}S, 9.1(2) wt.% of C{sub 3}A and 11.2(2) wt.% of C{sub 4}AF. Overall, quantitative phase analyses have shown that alkaline oxides stabilize {alpha}'{sub H}-C{sub 2}S and {alpha}-C{sub 2}S, sulfur stabilizes {beta}-C{sub 2}S, with a large unit cell volume, and the joint presence of alkaline oxides and sulfur promotes mainly the stabilization of the {alpha}'{sub H}-C{sub 2}S polymorph.

Morsli, Khadija [Departamento de Quimica Inorganica, Cristalografia y Mineralogia, Universidad de Malaga, 29071 Malaga (Spain); L.P.C.M. Departement de Chimie, Faculte des Sciences, Universite Chouaib Doukkali, El Jadida 24000 (Morocco); Torre, Angeles G. de la [Departamento de Quimica Inorganica, Cristalografia y Mineralogia, Universidad de Malaga, 29071 Malaga (Spain); Zahir, Mohammed [L.P.C.M. Departement de Chimie, Faculte des Sciences, Universite Chouaib Doukkali, El Jadida 24000 (Morocco); Aranda, Miguel A.G. [Departamento de Quimica Inorganica, Cristalografia y Mineralogia, Universidad de Malaga, 29071 Malaga (Spain)]. E-mail: g_aranda@uma.es

2007-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

26

Optical wet steam monitor  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A wet steam monitor determines steam particle size by using laser doppler velocimeter (LDV) device to produce backscatter light. The backscatter light signal is processed with a spectrum analyzer to produce a visibility waveform in the frequency domain. The visibility waveform includes a primary peak and a plurality of sidebands. The bandwidth of at least the primary frequency peak is correlated to particle size by either visually comparing the bandwidth to those of known particle sizes, or by digitizing the waveform and comparing the waveforms electronically. 4 figures.

Maxey, L.C.; Simpson, M.L.

1995-01-17T23:59:59.000Z

27

Optical wet steam monitor  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A wet steam monitor determines steam particle size by using laser doppler velocimeter (LDV) device to produce backscatter light. The backscatter light signal is processed with a spectrum analyzer to produce a visibility waveform in the frequency domain. The visibility waveform includes a primary peak and a plurality of sidebands. The bandwidth of at least the primary frequency peak is correlated to particle size by either visually comparing the bandwidth to those of known particle sizes, or by digitizing the waveform and comparing the waveforms electronically.

Maxey, Lonnie C. (Powell, TN); Simpson, Marc L. (Knoxville, TN)

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

28

Simultaneous assessment of phase chemistry, phase abundance and bulk chemistry with statistical electron probe micro-analyses: Application to cement clinkers  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

According to recent developments in cement clinker engineering, the optimization of chemical substitutions in the main clinker phases offers a promising approach to improve both reactivity and grindability of clinkers. Thus, monitoring the chemistry of the phases may become part of the quality control at the cement plants, along with the usual measurements of the abundance of the mineralogical phases (quantitative X-ray diffraction) and the bulk chemistry (X-ray fluorescence). This paper presents a new method to assess these three complementary quantities with a single experiment. The method is based on electron microprobe spot analyses, performed over a grid located on a representative surface of the sample and interpreted with advanced statistical tools. This paper describes the method and the experimental program performed on industrial clinkers to establish the accuracy in comparison to conventional methods. -- Highlights: 旳 new method of clinker characterization 旵ombination of electron probe technique with cluster analysis 昐imultaneous assessment of phase abundance, composition and bulk chemistry 旹xperimental validation performed on industrial clinkers.

Wilson, William; Krakowiak, Konrad J.; Ulm, Franz-Josef, E-mail: ulm@mit.edu

2014-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

29

www.kostic.niu.edu/DRnanofluids Wet-Nanotechnology  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 www.kostic.niu.edu/DRnanofluids Wet-Nanotechnology: nanofluids at NIU www.kostic.niu.edu/DRnanofluids Dry- vs. Wet-nanotechnology 路 Fluids (gases & liquids) vs. Solids in Nature and (Chemical & Bio, and processes 路 Synergy of dry-nanotechnology (solid-state) & wet-nanotechnology (POLY-nanofluids) #12;2 www

Kostic, Milivoje M.

30

Fabrication of the ZnO thin films using wet-chemical etching processes on application for organic light emitting diode (OLED) devices  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

- sively used in solar cells, touch panels, heat mirrors, organic electro- luminescence devices (OLED), for example, has been commercially used in OLEDs. However, because of the cost and the scarcity of indium reactants and produce new species. Wet-chemical etching has great advantages such as low cost

Boo, Jin-Hyo

31

Wet Gasification of Ethanol Residue: A Preliminary Assessment  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A preliminary technoeconomic assessment has been made of several options for the application of catalytic hydrothermal gasification (wet gasification) to ethanol processing residues.

Brown, Michael D.; Elliott, Douglas C.

2008-09-22T23:59:59.000Z

32

Elucidating the mysteries of wetting.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Nearly every manufacturing and many technologies central to Sandia's business involve physical processes controlled by interfacial wetting. Interfacial forces, e.g. conjoining/disjoining pressure, electrostatics, and capillary condensation, are ubiquitous and can surpass and even dominate bulk inertial or viscous effects on a continuum level. Moreover, the statics and dynamics of three-phase contact lines exhibit a wide range of complex behavior, such as contact angle hysteresis due to surface roughness, surface reaction, or compositional heterogeneities. These thermodynamically and kinetically driven interactions are essential to the development of new materials and processes. A detailed understanding was developed for the factors controlling wettability in multicomponent systems from computational modeling tools, and experimental diagnostics for systems, and processes dominated by interfacial effects. Wettability probed by dynamic advancing and receding contact angle measurements, ellipsometry, and direct determination of the capillary and disjoining forces. Molecular scale experiments determined the relationships between the fundamental interactions between molecular species and with the substrate. Atomistic simulations studied the equilibrium concentration profiles near the solid and vapor interfaces and tested the basic assumptions used in the continuum approaches. These simulations provide guidance in developing constitutive equations, which more accurately take into account the effects of surface induced phase separation and concentration gradients near the three-phase contact line. The development of these accurate models for dynamic multicomponent wetting allows improvement in science based engineering of manufacturing processes previously developed through costly trial and error by varying material formulation and geometry modification.

Webb, Edmund Blackburn, III (,; ); Bourdon, Christopher Jay; Grillet, Anne Mary; Sackinger, Philip A.; Grest, Gary Stephen; Emerson, John Allen; Ash, Benjamin Jesse; Heine, David R.; Brooks, Carlton, F.; Gorby, Allen D.

2005-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

33

WET SOLIDS FLOW ENHANCEMENT  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The yield locus, tensile strength and fracture mechanisms of wet granular materials were studied. The yield locus of a wet material was shifted to the left of that of the dry specimen by a constant value equal to the compressive isostatic stress due to pendular bridges. for materials with straight yield loci, the shift was computed from the uniaxial tensile strength, either measured in a tensile strength tester or calculated from the correlation, and the angle of internal friction of the material. The predicted shift in the yield loci due to different moisture contents compare well with the measured shift in the yield loci of glass beads, crushed limestone, super D catalyst and Leslie coal. Measurement of the void fraction during the shear testing was critical to obtain the correct tensile strength theoretically or experimentally.

Unknown

2001-03-25T23:59:59.000Z

34

E-Print Network 3.0 - anisotropic wet etching Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

ZnO thin films using wet-chemical etching processes on application for organic light emitting diode (OLED) devices Summary: Fabrication of the ZnO thin films using wet-chemical...

35

Investigation of Mineral Transformations in Wet Supercritical...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Mineral Transformations in Wet Supercritical CO2 by Electron Microscopy. Investigation of Mineral Transformations in Wet Supercritical CO2 by Electron Microscopy. Abstract: The...

36

Wetting kinetics of water nano-droplet containing non-surfactant nanoparticles: A molecular dynamics study  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In this Letter, dynamic wetting of water nano-droplets containing non-surfactant gold nanoparticles on a gold substrate is examined via molecular dynamics simulations. The results show that the addition of non-surfactant nanoparticles hinders the nano-second droplet wetting process, attributed to the increases in both surface tension of the nanofluid and friction between nanofluid and substrate. The droplet wetting kinetics decreases with increasing nanoparticle loading and water-particle interaction energy. The observed wetting suppression and the absence of nanoparticle ordering near the contact line of nano-sized droplets differ from the wetting behaviors reported from nanofluid droplets of micron size or larger.

Lu, Gui [Key Laboratory for Thermal Science and Power Engineering of MOE, Beijing Key Laboratory for CO2 Utilization and Reduction Technology, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China) [Key Laboratory for Thermal Science and Power Engineering of MOE, Beijing Key Laboratory for CO2 Utilization and Reduction Technology, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China); Department of Mechanical Engineering and Mechanics, Drexel University, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 19104 (United States); Hu, Han; Sun, Ying, E-mail: yyduan@tsinghua.edu.cn, E-mail: ysun@coe.drexel.edu [Department of Mechanical Engineering and Mechanics, Drexel University, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 19104 (United States)] [Department of Mechanical Engineering and Mechanics, Drexel University, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 19104 (United States); Duan, Yuanyuan, E-mail: yyduan@tsinghua.edu.cn, E-mail: ysun@coe.drexel.edu [Key Laboratory for Thermal Science and Power Engineering of MOE, Beijing Key Laboratory for CO2 Utilization and Reduction Technology, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China)] [Key Laboratory for Thermal Science and Power Engineering of MOE, Beijing Key Laboratory for CO2 Utilization and Reduction Technology, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China)

2013-12-16T23:59:59.000Z

37

Carbon dioxide capture from a cement manufacturing process  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A process of manufacturing cement clinker is provided in which a clean supply of CO.sub.2 gas may be captured. The process also involves using an open loop conversion of CaO/MgO from a calciner to capture CO.sub.2 from combustion flue gases thereby forming CaCO.sub.3/CaMg(CO.sub.3).sub.2. The CaCO.sub.3/CaMg(CO.sub.3).sub.2 is then returned to the calciner where CO.sub.2 gas is evolved. The evolved CO.sub.2 gas, along with other evolved CO.sub.2 gases from the calciner are removed from the calciner. The reactants (CaO/MgO) are feed to a high temperature calciner for control of the clinker production composition.

Blount, Gerald C. (North Augusta, SC); Falta, Ronald W. (Seneca, SC); Siddall, Alvin A. (Aiken, SC)

2011-07-12T23:59:59.000Z

38

Wetting and lubricating film instabilities in microchannels  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, and silicone oils . Dynamic wetting transitions: a pearl flow thick lubricating film , b spider flow thinWetting and lubricating film instabilities in microchannels Thomas Cubaud Department of Mechanical of partially wetting threads in planar microchannels of height h=100 or 250 m fluids: ethanol, mineral oils

Cubaud, Thomas

39

3D Imaging Of Wet Granular Matter  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

3D Imaging Of Wet Granular Matter Leonard Goff Advisor: Dr. Wolfgang Losert With Application to Penetrometer Insertion #12;3D Imaging Of Wet Granular Matter Leonard Goff, Advisor: Dr. Wolfgang Losert CoffeeSand Gravel Oops! #12;3D Imaging Of Wet Granular Matter Leonard Goff, Advisor: Dr. Wolfgang Losert

Anlage, Steven

40

Constraining Mercury Oxidation Using Wet Deposition  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Constraining Mercury Oxidation Using Wet Deposition Noelle E. Selin and Christopher D. Holmes mercury oxidation [Selin & Jacob, Atmos. Env. 2008] 30 60 90 120 150 30 60 90 120 150 30 60 90 120 150 30 Influences on Mercury Wet Deposition 路 Hg wet dep = f(precipitation, [Hg(II)+Hg(P)]) Correlation (r2) between

Selin, Noelle Eckley

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "wet process clinker" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

The microrheology of wet forms  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Kelvin cell is the only known topology for stable, perfectly ordered, dry foams. During topological transitions (T1s) associated with large elastic-plastic deformations, these cells switch neighbors and some faces gain or lose two sides, but the resulting bubbles with different shape are still Kelvin cells. The bubbles in a stable, perfectly ordered. wet foam are not limited to one topology (or even the two described here). The topological transitions considered here result in gain or loss of two dry films per bubble. The transition from Kelvin to RD topology is triggered by films shrinking in area, as in the dry case. However, the reverse transition from RD to Kelvin topology involves a different mechanism--opposite interfaces of an eight-way vertex touch and a new film grows from the point of contact as the foam is compressed. Microrheological analysis based on 2D models of foam structure has been useful preparation for 3D, despite obvious differences between 2D and 3D. Linear elastic behavior is anisotropic for perfectly ordered 3D foams--nonlinear elastic behavior is isotropic for 2D foams with polydisperse hexagonal structure. The shear moduli of a wet Kelvin foam decrease with increasing {phi}--the shear modulus of a wet 2D foam (with three-way Plateau borders) does not depend on {phi} at all. The effective isotropic shear moduli G of perfectly ordered wet foams tend to decrease with increasing {phi} but do not exhibit linear dependence, which may stem from the disorder of real systems.

Kraynik, A.M. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Reinelt, D.A. [Southern Methodist Univ., Dallas, TX (United States). Dept. of Mathematics

1996-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

42

Coal combustion by wet oxidation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The combustion of coal by wet oxidation was studied by the Center for Waste Management Programs, of Michigan Technological University. In wet oxidation a combustible material, such as coal, is reacted with oxygen in the presence of liquid water. The reaction is typically carried out in the range of 204/sup 0/C (400/sup 0/F) to 353/sup 0/C (650/sup 0/F) with sufficient pressure to maintain the water present in the liquid state, and provide the partial pressure of oxygen in the gas phase necessary to carry out the reaction. Experimental studies to explore the key reaction parameters of temperature, time, oxidant, catalyst, coal type, and mesh size were conducted by running batch tests in a one-gallon stirred autoclave. The factors exhibiting the greatest effect on the extent of reaction were temperature and residence time. The effect of temperature was studied from 204/sup 0/C (400/sup 0/F) to 260/sup 0/C (500/sup 0/F) with a residence time from 600 to 3600 seconds. From this data, the reaction activation energy of 2.7 x 10/sup 4/ calories per mole was determined for a high-volatile-A-Bituminous type coal. The reaction rate constant may be determined at any temperature from the activation energy using the Arrhenius equation. Additional data were generated on the effect of mesh size and different coal types. A sample of peat was also tested. Two catalysts were evaluated, and their effects on reaction rate presented in the report. In addition to the high temperature combustion, low temperature desulfurization is discussed. Desulfurization can improve low grade coal to be used in conventional combustion methods. It was found that 90% of the sulfur can be removed from the coal by wet oxidation with the carbon untouched. Further desulfurization studies are indicated.

Bettinger, J.A.; Lamparter, R.A.; McDowell, D.C.

1980-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

43

Carbon nanotube fiber spun from wetted ribbon  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A fiber of carbon nanotubes was prepared by a wet-spinning method involving drawing carbon nanotubes away from a substantially aligned, supported array of carbon nanotubes to form a ribbon, wetting the ribbon with a liquid, and spinning a fiber from the wetted ribbon. The liquid can be a polymer solution and after forming the fiber, the polymer can be cured. The resulting fiber has a higher tensile strength and higher conductivity compared to dry-spun fibers and to wet-spun fibers prepared by other methods.

Zhu, Yuntian T; Arendt, Paul; Zhang, Xiefei; Li, Qingwen; Fu, Lei; Zheng, Lianxi

2014-04-29T23:59:59.000Z

44

Wetting and free surface flow modeling for potting and encapsulation.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

As part of an effort to reduce costs and improve quality control in encapsulation and potting processes the Technology Initiative Project ''Defect Free Manufacturing and Assembly'' has completed a computational modeling study of flows representative of those seen in these processes. Flow solutions are obtained using a coupled, finite-element-based, numerical method based on the GOMA/ARIA suite of Sandia flow solvers. The evolution of the free surface is solved with an advanced level set algorithm. This approach incorporates novel methods for representing surface tension and wetting forces that affect the evolution of the free surface. In addition, two commercially available codes, ProCAST and MOLDFLOW, are also used on geometries representing encapsulation processes at the Kansas City Plant. Visual observations of the flow in several geometries are recorded in the laboratory and compared to the models. Wetting properties for the materials in these experiments are measured using a unique flowthrough goniometer.

Brooks, Carlton, F.; Brooks, Michael J. (Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM); Graham, Alan Lyman (Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM); Noble, David F. (David Frederick) (.; )); Notz, Patrick K.; Hopkins, Matthew Morgan; Castaneda, Jaime N.; Mahoney, Leo James (Kansas City Plant, Kansas City, MO); Baer, Thomas A.; Berchtold, Kathryn (Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM); Adolf, Douglas Brian; Wilkes, Edward Dean; Rao, Rekha Ranjana; Givler, Richard C.; Sun, Amy Cha-Tien; Cote, Raymond O.; Mondy, Lisa Ann; Grillet, Anne Mary; Kraynik, Andrew Michael

2007-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

45

Assessment of an Industrial Wet Oxidation System for Burning Waste and Low-Grade Fuels  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

"Stone & Webster Engineering Corporation, under Department of Energy sponsorship, is developing a wet oxidation system to generate steam for industrial processes by burning industrial waste materials and low-grade fuels. The program involves...

Bettinger, J.; Koppel, P.; Margulies, A.

46

Wet scrubbers: Choose the best chemical reagent  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

For more than a century, facilities in the chemical process industries have had to contend with a variety of regulated pollutants -- SOx, NOx, heavy metals and flyash -- in their flue-gases. Historically, operators of fossil-fuel-combustion processes have dealt with flue-gas pollution by operating a separate treatment facility for each pollutant. In recent years, however, an integrated, flue-gas-treatment system has emerged as a viable alternative to the traditional approach. By eliminating the use of an electrostatic precipitator in favor of several wet scrubbers and a downstream catalytic-reduction system for NOx, the new system shows operational and cost advantages over the conventional techniques. In this new method that uses three-stage flue-gas treatment, lime (calcium hydroxide, or Ca(OH){sub 2}) shows cost and operational advantages, and could displace limestone (calcium carbonate, or CaCO{sub 3}), the traditional favorite. For flue-gas treatment in the electric utility market, limestone currently dominates the scene. However, this may change as utility and industrial operators become more familiar with the potential advantages of using lime-based scrubbing solutions.

Rinaldi, N.U. [Tecnochim s.r.l., Milano (Italy)

1995-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

47

Cement advanced furnace and process  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This patent describes a suspension shaft furnace for producing discrete cement clinkers from discrete pellets of cement-forming batch materials which are gravity-migrated therethrough. It comprises a vertical furnace housing enclosing a top pellet-feeding and preheating zone comprising an elongate vertical shaft section opening into an intermediate fluidized bed section comprising fuel inlet conduits, an air-permeable clinker-impermeable support; a lower clinker-cooling section beneath the fluidized bed section; clinker-discharge means communicating between the fluidized bed section and the cooling section and air inlet means.

Litka, A.F.; Cohen, S.M.

1992-06-02T23:59:59.000Z

48

Breakdown in the Wetting Transparency of Graphene  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We develop a theory to model the van der Waals interactions between liquid and graphene, including quantifying the wetting behavior of a graphene-coated surface. Molecular dynamics simulations and contact angle measurements ...

Shih, Chih-Jen

49

Wet electroscrubbers for state of the art gas cleaning  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The electrostatic scrubber (electroscrubber) discussed combines advantages of electrostatic precipitators and inertial wet scrubbers, and removes many shortcomings inherent to both of these systems operating independently. The electroscrubber is a device in which Coulomb attraction or repulsion forces between electrically charged scrubbing droplets (collector) and dust particles are utilized for the removal of particles from a gas. Unlike wet electrostatic precipitators in which particles are precipitated only on the collection electrode, in electroscrubbers, the collection of dust particles takes place in the entire precipitator chamber. Compared to inertial scrubbers, the electroscrubbers can operate at lower droplet velocities, but the collection efficiency for a single droplet can be larger than 1. The paper reviews the state-of-the-art of wet electrostatic scrubbing (electroscrubbing) technique used for gas cleaning from dust or smoke particles. Three groups of problems are discussed: (1) The fundamental problems concerning the charged dust particle deposition on a charged collector, usually a drop, with a focus on different models describing the process. (2) The experimental works of fundamental importance referring to the scrubbing process, which can be used for validating the theory. (3) The laboratory demonstrations and industrial tests of different constructions of electroscrubbers designed for effective gas cleaning. It was shown in the paper that a higher collection efficiency of an electroscrubber could be obtained for higher values of Coulomb number and for a Stokes number lower than 5. 103 refs., 4 figs.

Anatol Jaworek; Wamadeva Balachandran; Andrzej Krupa; Janusz Kulon; Marcin Lackowski [Polish Academy of Sciences, Gdansk (Poland). Institute of Fluid Flow Machinery

2006-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

50

Mercury removal in utility wet scrubber using a chelating agent  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method for capturing and reducing the mercury content of an industrial flue gas such as that produced in the combustion of a fossil fuel or solid waste adds a chelating agent, such as ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA) or other similar compounds like HEDTA, DTPA and/or NTA, to the flue gas being scrubbed in a wet scrubber used in the industrial process. The chelating agent prevents the reduction of oxidized mercury to elemental mercury, thereby increasing the mercury removal efficiency of the wet scrubber. Exemplary tests on inlet and outlet mercury concentration in an industrial flue gas were performed without and with EDTA addition. Without EDTA, mercury removal totaled 42%. With EDTA, mercury removal increased to 71%. The invention may be readily adapted to known wet scrubber systems and it specifically provides for the removal of unwanted mercury both by supplying S.sup.2- ions to convert Hg.sup.2+ ions into mercuric sulfide (HgS) and by supplying a chelating agent to sequester other ions, including but not limited to Fe.sup.2+ ions, which could otherwise induce the unwanted reduction of Hg.sup.2+ to the form, Hg.sup.0.

Amrhein, Gerald T. (Louisville, OH)

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

51

Wet powder seal for gas containment  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A gas seal is formed by a compact layer of an insoluble powder and liquid filling the fine interstices of that layer. The smaller the particle size of the selected powder, such as sand or talc, the finer will be the interstices or capillary spaces in the layer and the greater will be the resulting sealing capacity, i.e., the gas pressure differential which the wet powder layer can withstand. Such wet powder seal is useful in constructing underground gas reservoirs or storage cavities for nuclear wastes as well as stopping leaks in gas mains buried under ground or situated under water. The sealing capacity of the wet powder seal can be augmented by the hydrostatic head of a liquid body established over the seal.

Stang, Louis G. (Sayville, NY)

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

52

Chaoticity of the Wet Granular Gas  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In this work we derive an analytic expression for the Kolmogorov-Sinai entropy of dilute wet granular matter, valid for any spatial dimension. The grains are modelled as hard spheres and the influence of the wetting liquid is described according to the Capillary Model, in which dissipation is due to the hysteretic cohesion force of capillary bridges. The Kolmogorov-Sinai entropy is expanded in a series with respect to density. We find a rapid increase of the leading term when liquid is added. This demonstrates the sensitivity of the granular dynamics to humidity, and shows that the liquid significantly increases the chaoticity of the granular gas.

A. Fingerle; S. Herminghaus; V. Yu. Zaburdaev

2007-05-22T23:59:59.000Z

53

Predictive modeling of reactive wetting and metal joining.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The performance, reproducibility and reliability of metal joints are complex functions of the detailed history of physical processes involved in their creation. Prediction and control of these processes constitutes an intrinsically challenging multi-physics problem involving heating and melting a metal alloy and reactive wetting. Understanding this process requires coupling strong molecularscale chemistry at the interface with microscopic (diffusion) and macroscopic mass transport (flow) inside the liquid followed by subsequent cooling and solidification of the new metal mixture. The final joint displays compositional heterogeneity and its resulting microstructure largely determines the success or failure of the entire component. At present there exists no computational tool at Sandia that can predict the formation and success of a braze joint, as current capabilities lack the ability to capture surface/interface reactions and their effect on interface properties. This situation precludes us from implementing a proactive strategy to deal with joining problems. Here, we describe what is needed to arrive at a predictive modeling and simulation capability for multicomponent metals with complicated phase diagrams for melting and solidification, incorporating dissolutive and composition-dependent wetting.

van Swol, Frank B.

2013-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

54

"EVERY WET YEAR IS A MIRACLE"  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

contribute 80% of the usable water supply usually in a few heavy downpours. 路 Thus, the presence or lack"EVERY WET YEAR IS A MIRACLE" Drought, Climate, and Water Use in Colorado Cat Shrier Colorado State University/Colorado Climate Center Little Thompson Water District Water Forum March 15, 2003 #12;Presentation

55

Design of wetted wall bioaerosol concentration cyclones  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

...................................................................................... 24 Aerosol-to-aerosol collection efficiency.................................................... 24 Wetting pattern on the impacting wall ? effect of an atomizer.................. 24..................................................................................... 67 Figure 3.4. Cold temperature experiemental setup ........................................................... 68 Figure 3.5. Preliminary heating system for the 1250 L/min cyclone and thermo-couple locations...

Seo, Youngjin

2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

56

Erosion dynamics of a wet granular medium  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Liquid may give strong cohesion properties to a granular medium, and confer a solid-like behavior. We study the erosion of a fixed circular aggregate of wet granular matter subjected to a flow of dry grains inside a half-filled rotating drum. During the rotation, the dry grains flow around the fixed obstacle. We show that its diameter decreases linearly with time for low liquid content, as wet grains are pulled-out of the aggregate. This erosion phenomenon is governed by the properties of the liquids. The erosion rate decreases exponentially with the surface tension while it depends on the viscosity to the power -1. We propose a model based on the force fluctuations arising inside the flow, explaining both dependencies: the capillary force acts as a threshold and the viscosity controls the erosion time scale. We also provide experiments using different flowing grains confirming our model.

Gautier Lefebvre; Pierre Jop

2014-12-08T23:59:59.000Z

57

Wave Energy Test Site (WETS) Marine Corps Base Hawaii (MCBH)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Wave Energy Test Site (WETS) Marine Corps Base Hawaii (MCBH) Alexandra DeVisser, NAVFAC-EXWC Brian June 10, 2013 #12;Wave Energy Test Site (WETS) Objective: Provide location for year-long in WETS? Year-round data collection in a wide range of wave conditions is possible. #12;4 Daily Wave Power

58

Accepted Manuscript Variational formulations for surface tension, capillarity and wetting  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Accepted Manuscript Variational formulations for surface tension, capillarity and wetting Gustavo C formulations for surface tension, capillarity and wetting, Comput. Methods Appl. Mech. Engrg. (2011), doi: 10 formulations for surface tension, capillarity and wetting Gustavo C. Buscagliaa,b, , Roberto F. Ausasa,b a

Frey, Pascal

59

Cost benefits from applying advanced heat rejection concepts to a wet/dry-cooled binary geothermal plant  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Optimized ammonia heat rejection system designs were carried out for three water allocations equivalent to 9, 20, and 31% of that of a 100% wet-cooled plant. The Holt/Procon design of a 50-MWe binary geothermal plant for the Heber site was used as a design basis. The optimization process took into account the penalties for replacement power, gas turbine capital, and lost capacity due to increased heat rejection temperature, as well as added base plant capacity and fuel to provide fan and pump power to the heat rejection system. Descriptions of the three plant designs are presented. For comparison, a wet tower loop was costed out for a 100% wet-cooled plant using the parameters of the Holt/Procon design. Wet/dry cooling was found to increase the cost of electricity by 28% above that of a 100% wet-cooled plant for all three of the water allocations studied (9, 20, and 31%). The application selected for a preconceptual evaluation of the BCT (binary cooling tower) system was the use of agricultural waste water from the New River, located in California's Imperial Valley, to cool a 50-MWe binary geothermal plant. Technical and cost evaluations at the preconceptual level indicated that performance estimates provided by Tower Systems Incorporated (TSI) were reasonable and that TSI's tower cost, although 2 to 19% lower than PNL estimates, was also reasonable. Electrical cost comparisonswere made among the BCT system, a conventional 100% wet system, and a 9% wet/dry ammonia system, all using agricultural waste water with solar pond disposal. The BCT system cost the least, yielding a cost of electricity only 13% above that of a conventional wet system using high quality water and 14% less than either the conventional 100% wet or the 9% wet/dry ammonia system.

Faletti, D.W.

1981-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

60

Wet electrostatic precipitator eliminates over 90% of previous emissions  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

After ten years of searching for an effective air pollution control device, engineers at Teledyne Wah Chang Albany (TWCA) found that zirconium was the best metal in withstanding the gases generated in the manufacturing process of zirconium and hafnium. The best equipment was a two-stage, modular wet electrostatic precipitator to collect the submicron-size particulates in the form of metal oxides, ammonium sulfate, ammonium sulfite and ammonium bisulfite. All nonmetal components of the precipitator were fabricated entirely from industrial grade reinforced thermoset plastics. All metal components, including process water spray components, pipe fittings, and emitting electrodes - to be charged at 45,000 V - were fabricated from zirconium. Stack emission tests indicate the precipitator has eliminated over 90% of previous particulate emissions. Operation has been virtually maintenance free. The zirconium components show no signs of corrosion to date. (DP)

Not Available

1983-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "wet process clinker" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Wet Granulation in a Twin-Screw Extruder: Implications of Screw Design  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Wet Granulation in a Twin-Screw Extruder: Implications of Screw Design M.R. THOMPSON, J. SUN MMRI of auxiliary units like feeders and pumps. In comparison, single-screw variants of an extruder have received granulation in twin-screw extrusion machinery is an attractive tech- nology for the continuous processing

Thompson, Michael

62

Microbial Enhanced Oil Recovery in Fractional-Wet Systems: A Pore-Scale Investigation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Microbial enhanced oil recovery (MEOR) is a technology that could potentially increase the tertiary recovery of oil from mature oil formations. However, the efficacy of this technology in fractional-wet systems is unknown, and the mechanisms involved in oil mobilization therefore need further investigation. Our MEOR strategy consists of the injection of ex situ produced metabolic byproducts produced by Bacillus mojavensis JF-2 (which lower interfacial tension (IFT) via biosurfactant production) into fractional-wet cores containing residual oil. Two different MEOR flooding solutions were tested; one solution contained both microbes and metabolic byproducts while the other contained only the metabolic byproducts. The columns were imaged with X-ray computed microtomography (CMT) after water flooding, and after MEOR, which allowed for the evaluation of the pore-scale processes taking place during MEOR. Results indicate that the larger residual oil blobs and residual oil held under relatively low capillary pressures were the main fractions recovered during MEOR. Residual oil saturation, interfacial curvatures, and oil blob sizes were measured from the CMT images and used to develop a conceptual model for MEOR in fractional-wet systems. Overall, results indicate that MEOR was effective at recovering oil from fractional-wet systems with reported additional oil recovered (AOR) values between 44 and 80%; the highest AOR values were observed in the most oil-wet system.

Armstrong, Ryan T.; Wildenschild, Dorthe (Oregon State U.)

2012-10-24T23:59:59.000Z

63

Optimizing wettability of externally wetted microfabricated silicon electrospray thrusters  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Electrospray propulsion devices with externally wetted architectures have shown favorable performance. The design of microfabricated silicon thrusters and their feed systems requires an understanding of propellant flow ...

Garza, Tanya Cruz

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

64

,"New York Nonassociated Natural Gas Proved Reserves, Wet After...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","New York Nonassociated Natural Gas Proved Reserves, Wet After Lease Separation",10,"Annual",2013...

65

Environmental aspects of alternative wet technologies for producing energy/fuel from peat. Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Peat in situ contains up to 90% moisture, with about 50% of this moisture trapped as a colloidal gel. This colloidal moisture cannot be removed by conventional dewatering methods (filter presses, etc.) and must be removed by thermal drying, solvent extraction, or solar drying before the peat can be utilized as a fuel feedstock for direct combustion or gasification. To circumvent the drying problem, alternative technologies such as wet oxidation, wet carbonization, and biogasification are possible for producing energy or enhanced fuel from peat. This report describes these three alternative technologies, calculates material balances for given raw peat feed rates of 1000 tph, and evaluates the environmental consequences of all process effluent discharges. Wastewater discharges represent the most significant effluent due to the relatively large quantities of water removed during processing. Treated process water returned to the harvested bog may force in situ, acidic bog water into recieving streams, disrupting local aquatic ecosystems.

Smith, R.T.

1981-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

66

Wetting of metals and glasses on Mo  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The wetting of low melting point metals and Si-Ca-Al-Ti-O glasses on molybdenum has been investigated. The selected metals (Au, Cu, Ag) form a simple eutectic with Mo. Metal spreading occurs under nonreactive conditions without interdiffusion or ridge formation. The metals exhibit low (non-zero) contact angles on Mo but this requires temperatures higher than 1100 C in reducing atmospheres in order to eliminate a layer of adsorbed impurities on the molybdenum surface. By controlling the oxygen activity in the furnace, glass spreading can take place under reactive or nonreactive conditions. We have found that in the glass/Mo system the contact angle does not decrease under reactive conditions. In all cases, adsorption from the liquid seems to accelerate the diffusivity on the free molybdenum surface.

Saiz, Eduardo; Tomsia, Antoni P.; Saiz, Eduardo; Lopez-Esteban, Sonia; Benhassine, Mehdi; de Coninck, Joel; Rauch, Nicole; Ruehle, Manfred

2008-01-08T23:59:59.000Z

67

BERYLLIUM MEASUREMENT IN COMMERCIALLY AVAILABLE WET WIPES  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Analysis for beryllium by fluorescence is now an established method which is used in many government-run laboratories and commercial facilities. This study investigates the use of this technique using commercially available wet wipes. The fluorescence method is widely documented and has been approved as a standard test method by ASTM International and the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH). The procedure involves dissolution of samples in aqueous ammonium bifluoride solution and then adding a small aliquot to a basic hydroxybenzoquinoline sulfonate fluorescent dye (Berylliant{trademark} Inc. Detection Solution Part No. CH-2) , and measuring the fluorescence. This method is specific to beryllium. This work explores the use of three different commercial wipes spiked with beryllium, as beryllium acetate or as beryllium oxide and subsequent analysis by optical fluorescence. The effect of possible interfering metals such as Fe, Ti and Pu in the wipe medium is also examined.

Youmans-Mcdonald, L.

2011-02-18T23:59:59.000Z

68

Kinetics of wet sodium vapor complex plasma  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In this paper, we have investigated the kinetics of wet (partially condensed) Sodium vapor, which comprises of electrons, ions, neutral atoms, and Sodium droplets (i) in thermal equilibrium and (ii) when irradiated by light. The formulation includes the balance of charge over the droplets, number balance of the plasma constituents, and energy balance of the electrons. In order to evaluate the droplet charge, a phenomenon for de-charging of the droplets, viz., evaporation of positive Sodium ions from the surface has been considered in addition to electron emission and electron/ion accretion. The analysis has been utilized to evaluate the steady state parameters of such complex plasmas (i) in thermal equilibrium and (ii) when irradiated; the results have been graphically illustrated. As a significant outcome irradiated, Sodium droplets are seen to acquire large positive potential, with consequent enhancement in the electron density.

Mishra, S. K., E-mail: nishfeb@rediffmail.com [Institute for Plasma Research (IPR), Gandhinagar 382428 (India); Sodha, M. S. [Centre of Energy Studies, Indian Institute of Technology Delhi (IITD), New Delhi 110016 (India)] [Centre of Energy Studies, Indian Institute of Technology Delhi (IITD), New Delhi 110016 (India)

2014-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

69

Secondary imbibition in NAPL-invaded mixed-wet sediments  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Secondary imbibition in NAPL-invaded mixed-wet sediments Ahmed Al-Futaisia,b , Tad W. Patzekb to study the spontaneous and forced secondary imbibition of a NAPL-invaded sediment, as in the displacement-wet sediment, i.e., the receding contact angles are very small. However, depending on the surface mineralogy

Patzek, Tadeusz W.

70

Potential Effects of Wet Conditions on Signalized Intersection LOS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Potential Effects of Wet Conditions on Signalized Intersection LOS Panos D. Prevedouros, Ph rain and other precipitation is common, analyses of signalized intersections based on the Highway Capacity Manual require clear weather and dry pavement conditions. Three factors may be affected by wet

Prevedouros, Panos D.

71

Introduction High-shear wet granulation by twin screw extrusion  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and compaction16,17 . Wet granulation in a twin screw extruder is particularly useful with many investigates foam granulation in a twin screw extruder as a new continuous wet granulation technique drop or spray liquid addition in batch granulation. This work demonstrates a twin screw extruder

Thompson, Michael

72

Energy efficiency improvement and cost saving opportunities for the Corn Wet Milling Industry: An ENERGY STAR Guide for Energy and Plant Managers  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Corn wet milling is the most energy intensive industry within the food and kindred products group (SIC 20), using 15 percent of the energy in the entire food industry. After corn, energy is the second largest operating cost for corn wet millers in the United States. A typical corn wet milling plant in the United States spends approximately $20 to $30 million per year on energy, making energy efficiency improvement an important way to reduce costs and increase predictable earnings, especially in times of high energy-price volatility. This report shows energy efficiency opportunities available for wet corn millers. It begins with descriptions of the trends, structure and production of the corn wet milling industry and the energy used in the milling and refining process. Specific primary energy savings for each energy efficiency measure based on case studies of plants and references to technical literature are provided. If available, typical payback periods are also listed. The report draws upon the experiences of corn, wheat and other starch processing plants worldwide for energy efficiency measures. The findings suggest that given available resources and technology, there are opportunities to reduce energy consumption cost-effectively in the corn wet milling industry while maintaining the quality of the products manufactured. Further research on the economics of the measures, as well as the applicability of these to different wet milling practices, is needed to assess the feasibility of implementation of selected technologies at individual plants.

Galitsky, Christina; Worrell, Ernst; Ruth, Michael

2003-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

73

Wet-gas compression in twin-screw multiphase pumps  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

encountered when operating under conditions with high gas volume fractions (GVF). Twin-screw multiphase pumps experience a severe decrease in efficiency when operating under wet-gas conditions, GVF over 95%. Field operations have revealed severe vibration...

Chan, Evan

2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

74

Chemical Processing in High-Pressure Aqueous Environments. 7...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Aqueous Environments. 7. Process Development for Catalytic Gasification of Wet Biomass Feedstocks."Industrial and Engineering Chemistry Research 43(9):1999-2004. Authors: DC...

75

Pilot Testing of Mercury Oxidation Catalysts for Upstream of Wet FGD Systems  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document is the final technical report for Cooperative Agreement DE-FC26-04NT41992, 'Pilot Testing of Mercury Oxidation Catalysts for Upstream of Wet FGD Systems,' which was conducted over the time-period January 1, 2004 through December 31, 2010. The objective of this project has been to demonstrate at pilot scale the use of solid catalysts and/or fixed-structure mercury sorbents to promote the removal of total mercury and oxidation of elemental mercury in flue gas from coal combustion, followed by wet flue gas desulfurization (FGD) to remove the oxidized mercury at high efficiency. The project was co-funded by the U.S. DOE National Energy Technology Laboratory (DOE-NETL), EPRI, Great River Energy (GRE), TXU Energy (now called Luminant), Southern Company, Salt River Project (SRP) and Duke Energy. URS Group was the prime contractor. The mercury control process under development uses fixed-structure sorbents and/or catalysts to promote the removal of total mercury and/or oxidation of elemental mercury in the flue gas from coal-fired power plants that have wet lime or limestone FGD systems. Oxidized mercury not adsorbed is removed in the wet FGD absorbers and leaves with the byproducts from the FGD system. The project has tested candidate materials at pilot scale and in a commercial form, to provide engineering data for future full-scale designs. Pilot-scale catalytic oxidation tests have been completed for periods of approximately 14 to19 months at three sites, with an additional round of pilot-scale fixed-structure sorbent tests being conducted at one of those sites. Additionally, pilot-scale wet FGD tests have been conducted downstream of mercury oxidation catalysts at a total of four sites. The sites include the two of three sites from this project and two sites where catalytic oxidation pilot testing was conducted as part of a previous DOE-NETL project. Pilot-scale wet FGD tests were also conducted at a fifth site, but with no catalyst or fixed-structure mercury sorbent upstream. This final report presents and discusses detailed results from all of these efforts, and makes a number of conclusions about what was learned through these efforts.

Gary Blythe; Conor Braman; Katherine Dombrowski; Tom Machalek

2010-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

76

Surface Characterization of a Paper Web at the Wet End  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We present an algorithm for the detection and representation of structures and non-uniformities on the surface of a paper web at the wet end (slurry). This image processing/analysis algorithm is developed as part of a complete on-line web characterization system. Images of the slurry, carried by a fast moving table, are obtained using a stroboscopic light and a CCD camera. The images have very poor contrast and contain noise from a variety of sources. Those sources include the acquisition system itself, the lighting, the vibrations of the moving table being imaged, and the scattering water from the same table's movement. After many steps of enhancement, conventional edge detection methods were still inconclusive and were discarded. The facet model algorithm, is applied to the images and is found successful in detecting the various topographic characteristics of the surface of the slurry. Pertinent topographic elements are retained and a filtered image is computed based on the general appearance and characteristics of the structures in question. Morphological operators are applied to detect and segment regions of interest. Those regions are then filtered according to their size, elongation, and orientation.Their bounding rectangles are computed and superimposed on the original image. Real time implementation of this algorithm for on-line use is also addressed in this paper. The algorithm is tested on over 500 images of slurry and is found to detect nonuniformities on all 500 images. Locating and characterizing all different size structures is also achieved on all 500 images of the web.

Abidi, B.R.; Goddard, J.S.; Sari-Sarraf, H.

1999-06-23T23:59:59.000Z

77

Reduction of NO{sub x} emissions from cement kiln/calciner through the use of the NO{sub x}OUT process  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The post combustion reduction of NO{sub x} using urea has proven to be an effective method in controlling NO{sub x} from various combustion sources. This process, a selective non-catalytic reduction process known as NO{sub x}OUT, has been successfully demonstrated in a cement kiln/calciner operated by Ash Grove Cement. Testing was done under ten different kiln/calciner operating conditions. Using three to four injectors, NO{sub x} was efficiently reduced from 350--600 pounds per hour (3.5--6.0 lb/ton of clinker) to less than 100 pounds per hour (1.0 lb/ton of clinker). This calculates to a NO{sub x} reduction of > 80% for most cases. Chemical utilization was greater than 50%. A high degree of mixing and a long residence time at an appropriate temperature present in the preheater tower contributed to these excellent results. An average ammonia slip was four ppm above a baseline level at normalized stoichiometric ratio of 1. Based on this demonstration, cement kiln/calciners have been identified as an ideal application for the NO{sub x}OUT Process. NO{sub x} was efficiently and effectively reduced with minimal byproduct emissions and virtually no effect on plant operations.

Sun, W.H. [Nalco Fuel Tech., Naperville, IL (United States); Bisnett, M.J.; Kirk, D.W. [Nalco Fuel Tech, Santa Fe Springs, CA (United States); Steuch, H.E. [Ash Grove Cement Co., Portland, OR (United States); Hille, J. [Ash Grove Cement Co., Seattle, WA (United States)

1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

78

Variational formulations for surface tension, capillarity and wetting  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Variational formulations for surface tension, capillarity and wetting Gustavo C. Buscagliaa of flows with significant surface tension effects has grown significantly in recent years. This has been, since at small length scales surface phenomena are dominant. In this article, surface tension

Buscaglia, Gustavo C.

79

Interference evaluation between manifold and wet Christmas tree CP systems  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Offshore production wells are controlled by valves installed in the marine soil, called wet Christmas trees (WCTs). A manifold receives the production of several wells and transports it to the platform. The manifold is cathodically protected by Al anodes and the WCT by Zn anodes. A computer simulation was carried out to evaluate the interference between the equipment cathodic protection systems.

Brasil, S.L.D.C.; Baptista, W.

2000-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

80

Thermo-Wetting and Friction Reduction Characterization of  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

such surfaces include frost prevention on aircraft flight surfaces to self-cleaning features on solar energy panels [1,5]. One way to achieve superhydrophobicity is through the micro- geometry modification of low energy surfaces. Two models repre- sent the wetting behavior of such microtextured surfaces: the Wenzel

Hidrovo, Carlos H.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "wet process clinker" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Directional Wetting in Anisotropic Inverse Opals Katherine R. Phillips,  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

the nano- to microscale voids. Here, we investigate how liquid wetting in highly ordered inverse opals template of colloidal particles. This highly ordered structure acts as a photonic crystal, strongly or not a given liquid will fill the structure spontaneously upon contact. Using alkylchlorosi- lanes,18 silica

Aizenberg, Joanna

82

Wet-Weather Pollution Prevention through Materials Substitution  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 Wet-Weather Pollution Prevention through Materials Substitution Shirley E. Clark, Ph.D., P the potential pollutant release from common building materials both when the materials are new and after aging often used to increase the operating range of asphalts and to prevent stripping of asphalt from binders

Clark, Shirley E.

83

3.1.1.2 Feed Processing and Handling DL2 Final Report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This milestone report is the deliverable for our Feed Processing and Handling project. It includes results of wet biomass feedstock analysis, slurry pumping information, fungal processing to produce a lignin-rich biorefinery residue and two subcontracted efforts to quantify the amount of wet biomass feedstocks currently available within the corn processing and paper processing industries.

Elliott, Douglas C.; Magnuson, Jon K.; Wend, Christopher F.

2006-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

84

Computing with ThingsComputing with Things Small, Wet and RandomSmall, Wet and Random  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. 颅 "Novel functionality through design". 颅 Repositories of standardized parts. 路 Driven by experimental/output specification. 路 CAD tools are not part of the design process; they are the design process. Building Digital ... #12;Building Bridges "Think of how engineers build bridges. They design quantitative models to help

Minnesota, University of

85

Forsterite [Mg2SiO4)] Carbonation in Wet Supercritical CO2: An...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Forsterite Mg2SiO4) Carbonation in Wet Supercritical CO2: An in situ High Pressure X-Ray Diffraction Study. Forsterite Mg2SiO4) Carbonation in Wet Supercritical CO2: An in situ...

86

September 10, 2007 Annotated Bibliography of Urban Wet Weather Flow Literature from 1996  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Agency Wet-Weather Flow Program Urban Watershed Management Branch Water Supply & Water Resources Division........................................................................................................................................................................ 21 Heavy metals

Pitt, Robert E.

87

Computer simulations of the wetting properties of neon on heterogeneous surfaces Stefano Curtarolo,1,2,  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Computer simulations of the wetting properties of neon on heterogeneous surfaces Stefano Curtarolo Received 31 August 1998 We use the grand canonical Monte Carlo method to study the nature of wetting the grand canonical Monte Carlo method of statistical mechanics to compute the nature of wetting transitions

Curtarolo, Stefano

88

Wet-steam erosion of steam turbine disks and shafts  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A study of wet-steam erosion of the disks and the rotor bosses or housings of turbines in thermal and nuclear power plants shows that the rate of wear does not depend on the diagrammed degree of moisture, but is determined by moisture condensing on the surfaces of the diaphragms and steam inlet components. Renovating the diaphragm seals as an assembly with condensate removal provides a manifold reduction in the erosion.

Averkina, N. V. [JSC 'NPO TsKTI' (Russian Federation); Zheleznyak, I. V. [Leningradskaya AES branch of JSC 'Kontsern Rosenergoatom' (Russian Federation); Kachuriner, Yu. Ya.; Nosovitskii, I. A.; Orlik, V. G., E-mail: orlikvg@mail.ru [JSC 'NPO TsKTI' (Russian Federation); Shishkin, V. I. [Leningradskaya AES branch of JSC 'Kontsern Rosenergoatom' (Russian Federation)

2011-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

89

Direct Use of Wet Ethanol in a Homogeneous Charge Compression Ignition (HCCI) Engine: Experimental and Numerical Results  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The energy balance of corn ethanol revisited, Transaction offor autoignition. The wet ethanol modeling study [REF] usedengine running on wet ethanol. Fuel mixtures studied range

Mack, John Hunter; Flowers, Daniel L; Aceves, Salvador M; Dibble, Robert W

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

90

Pulsed plasma treatment of polluted gas using wet-/low-temperature corona reactors  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Application of pulsed plasma for gas cleaning is gaining prominence in recent years, mainly from the energy consideration point of view. Normally, the gas treatment is carried out at or above room temperature by the conventional dry-type corona reactor. However, this treatment is still inadequate for the removal of certain stable gases present in the exhaust/flue gas mixture. The authors report here some interesting results of treatment of such stable gases like N{sub 2}O with pulsed plasma at subambient temperature. Also reported in this paper are improvements in DeNO/DeNO{sub x} efficiency using unconventional wet-type reactors, designed and fabricated by us, and operating at different subambient temperatures. DeNO/DeNO{sub x} by the pulsed-plasma process is mainly due to oxidation, but reduction takes place at the same time. When the wet-type reactor was used, the NO{sub 2} product was absorbed by water film and higher DeNO{sub x} efficiency could be achieved. Apart from laboratory tests on simulated gas mixtures, field tests were also carried out on the exhaust gas of an 8-kW diesel engine. A comparative analysis of the various tests are presented, together with a note on the energy consideration.

Shimizu, Kazuo; Kinoshita, Katsuhiro; Yanagihara, Kenya; Rajanikanth, B.S.; Katsura, Shinji; Mizuno, Akira [Toyohashi Univ. of Technology, Aichi (Japan). Dept. of Ecological Engineering] [Toyohashi Univ. of Technology, Aichi (Japan). Dept. of Ecological Engineering

1997-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

91

Treatment of electrochemical cell components with lithium tetrachloroaluminate (LiAlCl.sub.4) to promote electrolyte wetting  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Electrochemical cell components such as interelectrode separators, retaining screens and current collectors are contacted with lithium tetrachloroaluminate prior to contact with molten electrolytic salt to improve electrolyte wetting. The LiAlCl.sub.4 can be applied in powdered, molten or solution form but, since this material has a lower melting point than the electrolytic salt used in high-temperature cells, the powdered LiAlCl.sub.4 forms a molten flux prior to contact by the molten electrolyte when both materials are initially provided in solid form. Components of materials such as boron nitride and other materials which are difficult to wet with molten salts are advantageously treated by this process.

Eberhart, James G. (Naperville, IL); Battles, James E. (Oak Forest, IL)

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

92

Bianchi Type-I Universe with Wet Dark Fluid  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The Bianchi type-I universe filled with dark energy from a wet dark fluid has been considered. A new equation of state for the dark energy component of the universe has been used. It is modeled on the equation of state $p=\\gamma (\\rho -\\rho_\\star)$ which can describe a liquid, for example water. The exact solutions to the corresponding field equations are obtained in quadrature form. The solution for constant deceleration parameter have been studied in detail for power-law and exponential forms both. The cases $\\gamma =1$ and $\\gamma =0$ have been also analysed.

T. Singh; R. Chaubey

2010-07-08T23:59:59.000Z

93

Bianchi Type-I Universe with Wet Dark Fluid  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The Bianchi type-I universe filled with dark energy from a wet dark fluid has been considered. A new equation of state for the dark energy component of the universe has been used. It is modeled on the equation of state $p=\\gamma (\\rho -\\rho_\\star)$ which can describe a liquid, for example water. The exact solutions to the corresponding field equations are obtained in quadrature form. The solution for constant deceleration parameter have been studied in detail for power-law and exponential forms both. The cases $\\gamma =1$ and $\\gamma =0$ have been also analysed.

Singh, T

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

94

Analysis of wet deposition at an urban location  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Wet deposition data collected at the Detroit Edison urban site provided a clear chemical profile at this location for the period studied. Correlations of major anions with acidity indicate that decreases in pH are associated with increases in sulfates and nitrates. However, other components not measured may have a bearing on pH reductions. The differences between two locations 70 km apart were quite small on the average. Strong local source influences at the urban location were not evident in the limited data set available for study. Wind direction can help determine the ultimate origins of pollutants.

Foltman, R.A.

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

95

US PRACTICE FOR INTERIM WET STORAGE OF RRSNF  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Aluminum research reactor spent nuclear fuel is currently being stored or is anticipated to be returned to the United States and stored at Department of Energy storage facilities at the Savannah River Site and the Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center. This paper summarizes the current practices to provide for continued safe interim wet storage in the U.S. Aluminum fuel stored in poor quality water is subject to aggressive corrosion attack and therefore water chemistry control systems are essential to maintain water quality. Fuel with minor breaches are safely stored directly in the basin. Fuel pieces and heavily damaged fuel is safely stored in isolation canisters.

Vinson, D.

2010-08-05T23:59:59.000Z

96

Wyoming Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation,  

Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) " ,"ClickPipelinesProved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet After Lease

97

Monticello Unit 3 recovery project: The rebuild of a first generation wet flue gas desulfurization system  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Since November 1993, TU Electric and Sargent & Lundy have been engaged in the repair or replacement of equipment that was damaged by the collapse of the Monticello Unit 3 chimney. In addition to the replacement of the chimney, electrostatic precipitator, and various balance-of-plant systems, the scope of the project includes the demolition, engineering and design, procurement, and construction activities to rebuild major equipment within the wet limestone flue gas desulfurization (FGD) system. This paper reviews and discusses various aspects of the design, procurement and schedule associated with the rebuild of the FGD system. The paper reviews the design selections in the areas of process technology, the absorber island, and technical enhancements to improve the operability of this 1970s-vintage system. Finally, the challenges and solutions in implementing a 17-month schedule for the design, construction, and startup of an FGD system will be discussed.

Guletsky, P.W.; Katzberger, S.M. [Sargent & Lundy, Chicago, IL (United States); Jeanes, R.L. [TU Electric, Dallas, TX (United States)

1995-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

98

1988 Wet deposition temporal and spatial patterns in North America  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The focus of this report is on North American wet deposition temporal patterns from 1979 to 1988 and spatial patterns for 1988. It is the third in a series of reports that investigate the patterns of annual precipitation-weighted average concentration and annual deposition for nine ion species: hydrogen, sulfate, nitrate, ammonium, calcium, chloride, sodium, potassium, and magnesium. Mosaic maps, based on surface estimation using kriging, display concentration and deposition spatial patterns of pH, hydrogen, sulfate, nitrate, ammonium, and calcium ion species for 1988 annual, winter, and summer periods. Temporal pattern analyses use a subset of 35 sites over a 10-year (1979--1988) period and an expanded subset of 137 sites, with greater spatial coverage, over a 7-year (1982--1988) period. The 10-year period represents the longest period with wet deposition monitoring data available that has a sufficient number of sites with data of known quality to allow a descriptive summary of annual temporal patterns. Sen's median trend estimate and Kendall's seasonal tau (KST) test are calculated for each ion species concentration and deposition at each site in both subsets.

Simpson, J.C.; Olsen, A.R.; Bittner, E.A.

1992-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

99

1988 Wet deposition temporal and spatial patterns in North America  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The focus of this report is on North American wet deposition temporal patterns from 1979 to 1988 and spatial patterns for 1988. It is the third in a series of reports that investigate the patterns of annual precipitation-weighted average concentration and annual deposition for nine ion species: hydrogen, sulfate, nitrate, ammonium, calcium, chloride, sodium, potassium, and magnesium. Mosaic maps, based on surface estimation using kriging, display concentration and deposition spatial patterns of pH, hydrogen, sulfate, nitrate, ammonium, and calcium ion species for 1988 annual, winter, and summer periods. Temporal pattern analyses use a subset of 35 sites over a 10-year (1979--1988) period and an expanded subset of 137 sites, with greater spatial coverage, over a 7-year (1982--1988) period. The 10-year period represents the longest period with wet deposition monitoring data available that has a sufficient number of sites with data of known quality to allow a descriptive summary of annual temporal patterns. Sen`s median trend estimate and Kendall`s seasonal tau (KST) test are calculated for each ion species concentration and deposition at each site in both subsets.

Simpson, J.C.; Olsen, A.R.; Bittner, E.A.

1992-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

100

Moving zone Marangoni drying of wet objects using naturally evaporated solvent vapor  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A surface tension gradient driven flow (a Marangoni flow) is used to remove the thin film of water remaining on the surface of an object following rinsing. The process passively introduces by natural evaporation and diffusion of minute amounts of alcohol (or other suitable material) vapor in the immediate vicinity of a continuously refreshed meniscus of deionized water or another aqueous-based, nonsurfactant rinsing agent. Used in conjunction with cleaning, developing or wet etching application, rinsing coupled with Marangoni drying provides a single-step process for 1) cleaning, developing or etching, 2) rinsing, and 3) drying objects such as flat substrates or coatings on flat substrates without necessarily using heat, forced air flow, contact wiping, centrifugation or large amounts of flammable solvents. This process is useful in one-step cleaning and drying of large flat optical substrates, one-step developing/rinsing and drying or etching/rinsing/drying of large flat patterned substrates and flat panel displays during lithographic processing, and room-temperature rinsing/drying of other large parts, sheets or continuous rolls of material.

Britten, Jerald A. (Oakley, CA)

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "wet process clinker" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Moving zone Marangoni drying of wet objects using naturally evaporated solvent vapor  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A surface tension gradient driven flow (a Marangoni flow) is used to remove the thin film of water remaining on the surface of an object following rinsing. The process passively introduces by natural evaporation and diffusion of minute amounts of alcohol (or other suitable material) vapor in the immediate vicinity of a continuously refreshed meniscus of deionized water or another aqueous-based, nonsurfactant rinsing agent. Used in conjunction with cleaning, developing or wet etching application, rinsing coupled with Marangoni drying provides a single-step process for (1) cleaning, developing or etching, (2) rinsing, and (3) drying objects such as flat substrates or coatings on flat substrates without necessarily using heat, forced air flow, contact wiping, centrifugation or large amounts of flammable solvents. This process is useful in one-step cleaning and drying of large flat optical substrates, one-step developing/rinsing and drying or etching/rinsing/drying of large flat patterned substrates and flat panel displays during lithographic processing, and room-temperature rinsing/drying of other large parts, sheets or continuous rolls of material. 5 figs.

Britten, J.A.

1997-08-26T23:59:59.000Z

102

E-Print Network 3.0 - australian wet tropics Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

OF THE WET ... Source: James Cook University, Centre for Tropical Biodiversity and Climate Change Collection: Environmental Sciences and Ecology ; Biology and Medicine 3...

103

Photomicrography for the measurement of steam wetness fraction in low pressure turbines.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??The measurement of steam wetness fraction at the exit of a low-pressure (LP) turbine stage is important if the highest turbine performance is to be (more)

Veeder, Tricia Sue

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

104

Penetration depth scaling for impact into wet granular packings  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We present experimental measurements of penetration depths for the impact of spheres into wetted granular media. We observe that the penetration depth in the liquid saturated case scales with projectile density, size, and drop height in a fashion consistent with the scaling observed in the dry case, but that penetration depths into saturated packings tend to be smaller. This result suggests that, for the range of impact energies observed, the stopping force is set by static contact forces between grains within the bed, and that the presence of liquid serves, primarily, to enhance these contact forces. The enhancement to the stopping force has a complicated dependence on liquid fraction, accompanied by a change in the drop-height dependence, that must be the consequence of accompanying changes in the conformation of the liquid phase in the interstices.

Theodore A. Brzinski III; Jorin Schug; Kelly Mao; Douglas J. Durian

2015-01-25T23:59:59.000Z

105

Impacts of WRF Physics and Measurement Uncertainty on California Wintertime Model Wet Bias  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Weather and Research Forecast (WRF) model version 3.0.1 is used to explore California wintertime model wet bias. In this study, two wintertime storms are selected from each of four major types of large-scale conditions; Pineapple Express, El Nino, La Nina, and synoptic cyclones. We test the impacts of several model configurations on precipitation bias through comparison with three sets of gridded surface observations; one from the National Oceanographic and Atmospheric Administration, and two variations from the University of Washington (without and with long-term trend adjustment; UW1 and UW2, respectively). To simplify validation, California is divided into 4 regions (Coast, Central Valley, Mountains, and Southern California). Simulations are driven by North American Regional Reanalysis data to minimize large-scale forcing error. Control simulations are conducted with 12-km grid spacing (low resolution) but additional experiments are performed at 2-km (high) resolution to evaluate the robustness of microphysics and cumulus parameterizations to resolution changes. We find that the choice of validation dataset has a significant impact on the model wet bias, and the forecast skill of model precipitation depends strongly on geographic location and storm type. Simulations with right physics options agree better with UW1 observations. In 12-km resolution simulations, the Lin microphysics and the Kain-Fritsch cumulus scheme have better forecast skill in the coastal region while Goddard, Thompson, and Morrison microphysics, and the Grell-Devenyi cumulus scheme perform better in the rest of California. The effect of planetary boundary layer, soil-layer, and radiation physics on model precipitation is weaker than that of microphysics and cumulus processes for short- to medium-range low-resolution simulations. Comparison of 2-km and 12-km resolution runs suggests a need for improvement of cumulus schemes, and supports the use of microphysics schemes in coarser-grid applications.

Chin, H S; Caldwell, P M; Bader, D C

2009-07-22T23:59:59.000Z

106

ANALYSIS OF HIGH PRESSURE TESTS ON WET GAS FLOW METERING WITH A VENTURI METER  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ANALYSIS OF HIGH PRESSURE TESTS ON WET GAS FLOW METERING WITH A VENTURI METER P. Gajan , Q, 64018 Pau cedex, France pierre.gajan@onera.fr Abstract This work deals with the flow metering of wet gas on the CEESI facilities are presented. They are performed at 75 bars with 0.6 beta ratio Venturi meter

107

Dry purification of aspirational air in coke-sorting systems with wet slaking of coke  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Coke transportation after wet slaking is accompanied by the release of dust in the production building and in the surrounding atmosphere. Wet methods are traditionally used to purify very humid air. Giprokoks has developed designs for highly efficient dry dust-removal methods in such conditions.

T.F. Trembach; A.G. Klimenko [Giprokoks, the State Institute for the Design of Coke-Industry Enterprises, Kharkov (Ukraine)

2009-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

108

Avoided Critical Behavior in Dynamically Forced Wetting Jacco H. Snoeijer,1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

speed. In this Letter we study the dynamical wetting transition at which a liquid film gets deposited the Landau-Levich film. DOI: 10.1103/PhysRevLett.96.174504 PACS numbers: 47.10.每g, 68.08.Bc Wetting speed beyond which the interface gives way to liquid deposition. Drops sliding down a window develop

109

RELATIONSHIPS BETWEEN ZOOPLANKTON DISPLACEMENT VOLUME, WET WEIGHT, DRY WEIGHT, AND CARBONI  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of the regression line for log transformed values for carbon vs. dry weight and wet weight vs. displacement volumeRELATIONSHIPS BETWEEN ZOOPLANKTON DISPLACEMENT VOLUME, WET WEIGHT, DRY WEIGHT, AND CARBONI PETER H are identical. We have employed this type of analysis in determinations on samples from diverse sea areas

110

Experimental Study of Wettability Alteration to Preferential Gas-Wetting in  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of Critical- Condensate Saturation and Relative Permeabilities in Gas- Condensate Systems,'' paper SPE 56014 from preferential liquid-wetting to preferen- tial gas-wetting, then gas-well deliverability in gas-condensate and liquid relative permeabilities for gas-condensate systems in a simple network. The results imply

Firoozabadi, Abbas

111

Selenium Speciation and Management in Wet FGD Systems  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report discusses results from bench- and pilot-scale simulation tests conducted to determine the factors that impact selenium speciation and phase partitioning in wet FGD systems. The selenium chemistry in wet FGD systems is highly complex and not completely understood, thus extrapolation and scale-up of these results may be uncertain. Control of operating parameters and application of scrubber additives have successfully demonstrated the avoidance or decrease of selenite oxidation at the bench and pilot scale. Ongoing efforts to improve sample handling methods for selenium speciation measurements are also discussed. Bench-scale scrubber tests explored the impacts of oxidation air rate, trace metals, scrubber additives, and natural limestone on selenium speciation in synthetic and field-generated full-scale FGD liquors. The presence and concentration of redox-active chemical species as well as the oxidation air rate contribute to the oxidation-reduction potential (ORP) conditions in FGD scrubbers. Selenite oxidation to the undesirable selenate form increases with increasing ORP conditions, and decreases with decreasing ORP conditions. Solid-phase manganese [Mn(IV)] appeared to be the significant metal impacting the oxidation of selenite to selenate. Scrubber additives were tested for their ability to inhibit selenite oxidation. Although dibasic acid and other scrubber additives showed promise in early clear liquor (sodium based and without calcium solids) bench-scale tests, these additives did not show strong inhibition of selenite oxidation in tests with higher manganese concentrations and with slurries from full-scale wet FGD systems. In bench-tests with field liquors, addition of ferric chloride at a 250:1 iron-to-selenium mass ratio sorbed all incoming selenite to the solid phase, although addition of ferric salts had no impact on native selenate that already existed in the field slurry liquor sample. As ORP increases, selenite may oxidize to selenate more rapidly than it sorbs to ferric solids. Though it was not possible to demonstrate a decrease in selenium concentrations to levels below the project?垄????s target of 50 ???碌g/L during pilot testing, some trends observed in bench-scale testing were evident at the pilot scale. Specifically, reducing oxidation air rate and ORP tends to either retain selenium as selenite in the liquor or shift selenium phase partitioning to the solid phase. Oxidation air flow rate control may be one option for managing selenium behavior in FGD scrubbers. Units that cycle load widely may find it more difficult to impact ORP conditions with oxidation air flow rate control alone. Because decreasing oxidation air rates to the reaction tank showed that all ?垄????new?垄???聺 selenium reported to the solids, the addition of ferric chloride to the pilot scrubber could not show further improvements in selenium behavior. Ferric chloride addition did shift mercury to the slurry solids, specifically to the fine particles. Several competing pathways may govern the reporting of selenium to the slurry solids: co-precipitation with gypsum into the bulk solids and sorption or co-precipitation with iron into the fine particles. Simultaneous measurement of selenium and mercury behavior suggests a holistic management strategy is best to optimize the fate of both of these elements in FGD waters. Work conducted under this project evaluated sample handling and analytical methods for selenium speciation in FGD waters. Three analytical techniques and several preservation methods were employed. Measurements of selenium speciation over time indicated that for accurate selenium speciation, it is best to conduct measurements on unpreserved, filtered samples as soon after sampling as possible. The capital and operating costs for two selenium management strategies were considered: ferric chloride addition and oxidation air flow rate control. For ferric chloride addition, as migh

Searcy, K.; Richardson, M.; Blythe, G.; Wallschlaeger, D.; Chu, P.; Dene, C.

2012-02-29T23:59:59.000Z

112

Nitrogen oxides removal by pulsed corona enhanced wet electrostatics precipitation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper presents the results of a bench-scale pulsed-corona enhanced wet electrostatic precipitator (wESP) application for removal of nitrogen oxides. This wESP is designed to operate wet/dry, positive/negative, and pulsed/non-pulsed conditions. The applied pulsed voltage is varied from 0 to 60 kV at 70 Hz. Gas flow rate is a nominal 7 m{sup 3}/hr and the collecting electrode area is 0.20 m{sup 2}. A simulated flue gas with NO concentration up to 1,200 ppm{sub v} has been used to determine the feasibility of NO{sub x} removal in the wESP. NO has to be oxidized to N{sub 2} before any removal takes place. NO{sub x} removal efficiency increased with gas residence time, inlet NO concentration and applied corona power. In the air stream with 10 seconds gas residence time, up to 20% of 1,000 ppm NO (or 22% NO{sub x}) was removed from an air stream of 1.9x10{sup {minus}3} m{sup 3}/s with a water flow of 6.3 x 10{sup {minus}5} m{sup 3}/sec and 20 W, 70 Hz pulsed corona. Both ammonia and ozone injections improve the NO{sub x} removal for both the corona and non-corona cases. With the inclusion of NH{sub 3} (NH{sub 3}/NO{sub x} ratio 1.3) and 25 watts corona power, NO removal efficiency was increased from 28% to 57%. The amount of in-situ ozone is not enough to be considered as a major NO{sub x} removal mechanism in this wESP. However, the additional injection of ozone improves the NO removal from 29% to 38% for both the corona and non-corona cases. When the oxygen concentration is dropped to 3% in a simulated flue gas with 12% CO{sub 2} and 800 ppm NO and 70% relative humidity at 11.5 s of gas residence time, the removal efficiency of NO is only 5%. Adding NH{sub 3} (NH{sub 3}/NO{sub x} ratio 1) at 76 watts corona power, NO removal is increased to 13%.

Tseng, C.H.; Keener, T.C.; Khang, S.J.

1999-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

113

Integrated flue gas processing method  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A system and process for flue gas processing to remove both gaseous contaminants such as sulfur dioxide and particulate matter such as flyash integrates spray scrubbing apparatus and wet electrostatic precipitation apparatus and provides for the advantageous extraction and utilization of heat present in the flue gas which is being processed. The integrated system and process utilizes a spray scrubbing tower into which the flue gas is introduced and into which aqueous alkali slurry is introduced as spray for sulfur dioxide removal therein. The flue gas leaves the tower moisture laden and enters a wet electrostatic precipitator which includes a heat exchanger where flyash and entrained droplets in the flue gas are removed by electrostatic precipitation and heat is removed from the flue gas. The cleaned flue gas exits from the precipitator and discharges into a stack. The heat removed from the flue gas finds use in the system or otherwise in the steam generation plant. The wet electrostatic precipitator of the integrated system and process includes a portion constructed as a cross flow heat exchanger with flue gas saturated with water vapor moving vertically upwards inside tubes arranged in a staggered pattern and ambient air being pulled horizontally across the outside of those tubes to cool the tube walls and thereby remove heat from the flue gas and cause condensation of water vapor on the inside wall surfaces. The condensate washes the electrostatically collected flyash particles down from the inside tube walls. The heat that is extracted from the saturated flue gas in the wet electrostatic precipitator heat exchanger may be utilized in several different ways, including: (1) for flue gas reheat after the wet electrostatic precipitator; (2) for preheating of combustion air to the steam generator boiler; and, (3) for heating of buildings.

Bakke, E.; Willett, H.P.

1982-12-21T23:59:59.000Z

114

SAFETY STUDIES TO MEASURE EXOTHERMIC REACTIONS OF SPENT PLUTONIUM CONTAMINATION CHEMICALS USING WET AND DRY DECONTAMINATION METHODS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Plutonium Finishing Plant (PFP) at the Hanford site in Eastern Washington is currently being decommissioned by Fluor Hanford. Chemicals being considered for decontamination of gloveboxes in PFP include cerium (IV) nitrate in a nitric acid solution, and proprietary commercial solutions that include acids and sequestering agents. Aggressive chemicals are commonly used to remove transuranic contaminants from process equipment to allow disposal of the equipment as low level waste. Fluor's decontamination procedure involves application of chemical solutions as a spray on the contaminated surfaces, followed by a wipe-down with rags. Alternatively, a process of applying oxidizing Ce IV ions contained in a gel matrix and vacuuming a dry gel material is being evaluated. These processes effectively transfer the transuranic materials to rags or a gel matrix which is then packaged as TRU waste and disposed. Fluor is investigating plutonium decontamination chemicals as a result of concerns regarding the safety of chemical procedures following a fire at Rocky Flats in 2003. The fire at Rocky Flats occurred in a glovebox that had been treated with cerium nitrate, which is one of the decontamination chemicals that Fluor Hanford has proposed to use. Although the investigation of the fire was not conclusive as to cause, the reviewers noted that rags were found in the glovebox, suggesting that the combination of rags and chemicals may have contributed to the fire. Because of this underlying uncertainty, Fluor began an investigation into the potential for fire when using the chemicals and materials using wet disposition and dry disposition of the waste generated in the decontamination process and the storage conditions to which the waste drum would be exposed. The focus of this work has been to develop a disposal strategy that will provide a chemically stable waste form at expected Hanford waste storage temperatures. Hanford waste storage conditions are such that there is added heat to the containers from ambient conditions during storage especially during the summer months. Treatability tests under the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation and Liability Act (CERCLA) were used to assess the use of certain chemicals and wipes (wet method) and chemical-gel matrices (dry method) during the decontamination process. Chemicals being considered for decontamination of gloveboxes at PFP include cerium (IV) nitrate in a nitric acid solution, and proprietary commercial decontamination agents such as RadPro? , Glygel? and ASPIGEL 100?. As part of the treatability study, Fluor and the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) personnel have evaluated the potential for self-heating and exothermic reactions in the residual decontamination materials. From these wet and dry method treatability studies, certain limiting conditions have been defined that will aid in assuring safe operations and waste packaging during the decommissioning and waste disposition process.

Hopkins, Andrea M.; Jackson, George W.; Minette, Michael J.; Ewalt, John R.; Cooper, Thurman D.; Scott, Paul A.; Jones, Susan A.; Scheele, Randall D.; Charboneau, Stacy L.

2005-10-12T23:59:59.000Z

115

Wetting problem for multi-component fluid mixtures  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In this paper we propose an extension of the Cahn method to binary mixtures and study the problem of wetting near a two-phase critical point without any assumption on the form of intermolecular potentials. A comparison between Cahn's method and later works by Sullivan, Evans et al is made. By using an expression of the energy of interaction between solid surface and liquids proposed recently by Gouin, we obtain the equations of density profiles and the boundary conditions on a solid surface. In the case of a convex free energy, a one-dimensional solution of a linear problem is proposed for the density profiles between a bulk and on a solid wall. A non-linear model of binary mixtures extending Cahn's results for simple fluids is also studied. For the case of a purely attractive wall we have established a criterion of a first order transition in terms of the structure of the level set of the homogeneous part of the free energy. Additively, explicit expressions of density profiles near the wall are proposed. They allow one to consider the adsorption of mixture components by a solid wall.

Henri Gouin; Sergey Gavrilyuk

2008-03-03T23:59:59.000Z

116

Contact angles in the pseudopotential lattice Boltzmann modeling of wetting  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In this paper, we aim to investigate the implementation of contact angles in the pseudopotential lattice Boltzmann modeling of wetting at a large density ratio. The pseudopotential lattice Boltzmann model [X. Shan and H. Chen, Phys. Rev. E 49, 2941 (1994)] is a popular mesoscopic model for simulating multiphase flows and interfacial dynamics. In this model, the contact angle is usually realized by a fluid-solid interaction. Two widely used fluid-solid interactions: the density-based interaction and the pseudopotential-based interaction, as well as a modified pseudopotential-based interaction formulated in the present paper, are numerically investigated and compared in terms of the achievable contact angles, the maximum and the minimum densities, and the spurious currents. It is found that the pseudopotential-based interaction works well for simulating small static (liquid) contact angles, however, is unable to reproduce static contact angles close to 180 degrees. Meanwhile, it is found that the proposed modified pseudopotential-based interaction performs better in light of the maximum and the minimum densities and is overall more suitable for simulating large contact angles as compared with the other two types of fluid-solid interactions. Furthermore, the spurious currents are found to be enlarged when the fluid-solid interaction force is introduced. Increasing the kinematic viscosity ratio between the vapor and liquid phases is shown to be capable of reducing the spurious currents caused by the fluid-solid interactions.

Q. Li; K. H. Luo; Q. J. Kang; Q. Chen

2014-10-21T23:59:59.000Z

117

Wetting and strength issues at Al/alpha-alumina interfaces  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The wetting behavior and strength at aluminum/alumina interfaces has been an active subject of research. Al/alumina applications include ceramic-metal composites and several applications for electronic industries. In this paper the interface strength and microstructure of Al/alpha-alumina was investigated. We discovered that in a solid-state joining, the strength of the joint increases with increasing joining temperature. In a liquid-state joining, the strength of the joint gradually decreases due to the formation of unbonded areas. The strength, sigma sub b, is expressed by the following equation as a function of unbonded area, A: sigma sub b = 2.22 A + 143 (70 percent {le} A {le} 100 percent). The highest strength reached 400 MPa when the interface was formed at around the melting temperature of aluminum. An aluminum layer close to the interface became a single crystal when it was bonded to a sapphire. The following crystallographic orientation relationship is established: (1{bar 1}1){sub Al}//(001){sub {alpha}}-Al{sub 2} O{sub 3}, (110){sub Al}//<100>{sub {alpha}}-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}. Amorphous alumina islands were formed at the interface. In the amorphous alumina, gamma-alumina nanocrystals grew from the sapphire, with the same orientation relationship to sapphire as above.

Saiz, Eduardo; Tomsia, Antoni P.; Suganuma, Katsuaki

2003-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

118

Direct Use of Wet Ethanol in a Homogeneous Charge Compression Ignition (HCCI) Engine: Experimental and Numerical Results  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

for 4 different water-in-ethanol fuel blends at a variety ofmotivation for using wet ethanol fuel is that significantengine running on wet ethanol. Fuel mixtures studied range

Mack, John Hunter; Flowers, Daniel L; Aceves, Salvador M; Dibble, Robert W

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

119

Novel Approaches to Conserve Energy in Textile Processing Through The Use Of Supercritical Fluids  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

alternative to wet-processing is the use of supercritical fluids, such as carbon dioxide, as the carrier. This option would eliminate water discharge and convective drying and could achieve improved energy efficiency. A description of textile processing using...

Brown, M.; Sikorski, M.

120

Low-temperature catalytic gasification of wet industrial wastes. FY 1991--1992 interim report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A catalytic gasification system operating in a pressurized water environment has been developed and refined at Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) for over 12 years. Initial experiments were aimed at developing kinetics information for steam gasification of biomass in the presence of catalysts. The combined use of alkali and metal catalysts was reported for gasification of biomass and its components at low temperatures (350{degrees}C to 450{degrees}C). From the fundamental research evolved the concept of a pressurized, catalytic gasification system for converting wet biomass feedstocks to fuel gas. Extensive batch reactor testing and limited continuous reactor system (CRS) testing were undertaken in the development of this system under sponsorship of the US Department of Energy. A wide range of biomass feedstocks were tested, and the importance of the nickel metal catalyst was identified. Specific use of this process for treating food processing wastes was also studied. The concept application was further expanded to encompass cleanup of hazardous wastewater streams, and results were reported for batch reactor tests and continuous reactor tests. Ongoing work at PNL focuses on refining the catalyst and scaling the system to long-term industrial needs. The process is licensed as the Thermochemical Environmental Energy System (TEES{reg_sign}) to Onsite*Ofsite, Inc., of Duarte, California. This report is a follow-on to the 1989--90 interim report [Elliott et al. 1991], which reviewed the results of the studies conducted with a fixed-bed, continuous-feed, tubular reactor. The discussion here provides an overview of experiments on the wide range of potential feedstock materials conducted in a batch reactor; development of new catalyst materials; and tests performed in continuous-flow reactors at three scales. The appendices contain the history and background of the process development, as well as more detailed descriptions and results of the recent studies.

Elliott, D.C.; Neuenschwander, G.G.; Hart, T.R.; Phelps, M.R.; Sealock, L.J. Jr.

1993-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "wet process clinker" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

FULL-SCALE TESTING OF ENHANCED MERCURY CONTROL TECHNOLOGIES FOR WET FGD SYSTEMS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Wet flue gas desulfurization (wet FGD) systems are currently installed on about 25% of the coal-fired utility generating capacity in the U.S., representing about 15% of the number of coal-fired units. Depending on the effect of operating parameters such as mercury content of the coal, form of mercury (elemental or oxidized) in the flue gas, scrubber spray tower configuration, liquid-to-gas ratio, and slurry chemistry, FGD systems can provide cost-effective, near-term mercury emissions control options with a proven history of commercial operation. For boilers already equipped with FGD systems, the incremental cost of any vapor phase mercury removal achieved is minimal. To be widely accepted and implemented, technical approaches that improve mercury removal performance for wet FGD systems should also have low incremental costs and have little or no impact on operation and SO{sub 2} removal performance. The ultimate goal of the Full-scale Testing of Enhanced Mercury Control for Wet FGD Systems Program was to commercialize methods for the control of mercury in coal-fired electric utility systems equipped with wet flue gas desulfurization (wet FGD). The program was funded by the U.S. Department of Energy's National Energy Technology Laboratory, the Ohio Coal Development Office within the Ohio Department of Development, and Babcock & Wilcox. Host sites and associated support were provided by Michigan South Central Power Agency (MSCPA) and Cinergy. Field-testing was completed at two commercial coal-fired utilities with wet FGD systems: (1) MSCPA's 55 MW{sub e} Endicott Station and (2) Cinergy's 1300 MW{sub e} Zimmer Station. Testing was conducted at these two locations because of the large differences in size and wet scrubber chemistry. Endicott employs a limestone, forced oxidation (LSFO) wet FGD system, whereas Zimmer uses Thiosorbic{reg_sign} Lime (magnesium enhanced lime) and ex situ oxidation. Both locations burn Ohio bituminous coal.

D.K. McDonald; G.T. Amrhein; G.A. Kudlac; D. Madden Yurchison

2003-05-07T23:59:59.000Z

122

The Streaming Potential Generated by Flow of Wet Steam in Capillary Tubes  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

For a constant pressure differential, the flow of wet steam generated electric potentials which increased with time and did not reach equilibrium values. These potentials were found to increase to values greater than 100 volts. The reason for this kind of potential build-up behavior was the presence of tiny flowing water slugs which were interspersed with electrically nonconductive steam vapor slugs. The measured electric potential for wet steam increased with pressure differential, but the relationship was not linear. The increase in potential with pressure drop was attributed both to an increase in fluid flow rate and changes in the wet steam quality.

Marsden, S.S. Jr.; Tyran, Craig K.

1986-01-21T23:59:59.000Z

123

Reduction of Water Use in Wet FGD Systems  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Cooperative Agreement DE-FC26-06NT42726 was established in January 2006, and is current through Amendment 2, April 2006. The current reporting period, April 1, 2008 through June 30, 2008, is the eighth progress-reporting period for the project. However, this report will be the final report (instead of a quarterly report) because this project is being terminated. Efforts to bring this project to a close over the past several months focused on internal project discussions, and subsequent communications with NETL, regarding the inherent difficulty with completing this project as originally scoped, and the option of performing an engineering study to accomplish some of the chief project objectives. However, NETL decided that the engineering study did indeed constitute a significant scope deviation from the original concepts, and that pursuit of this option was not recommended. These discussions are summarized in the Results and Discussion, and the Conclusion sections. The objective of this project by a team lead by URS Group was to demonstrate the use of regenerative heat exchange to reduce flue gas temperature and minimize evaporative water consumption in wet flue gas desulphurization (FGD) systems on coal-fired boilers. Furthermore, the project intended to demonstrate that regenerative heat exchange to cool flue gas upstream of the electrostatic precipitator (ESP) and reheat flue gas downstream of the FGD system would result in the following benefits to air pollution control (APC) systems on coal-fired power plants: (1) Improve ESP performance due to reduced gas volume and improved ash resistivity characteristics, (2) Control SO3 emissions through condensation on the fly ash, and (3) Avoid the need to install wet stacks or to provide flue gas reheat. Finally, operation at cooler flue gas temperatures offered the potential benefit of increasing mercury (Hg) removal across the ESP and FGD systems. This project planned to conduct pilot-scale tests of regenerative heat exchange to determine the reduction in FGD water consumption that can be achieved and assess the resulting impact on APC systems. An analysis of the improvement in the performance of the APC systems and the resulting reduction in capital and operating costs were going to be conducted. The tests were intended to determine the impact of operation of cooling flue gas temperatures on FGD water consumption, ESP particulate removal, SO{sub 3} removal, and Hg removal, and to assess the potential negative impact of excessive corrosion rates in the regenerative heat exchanger. Testing was going to be conducted on Columbian coal (with properties similar to low-sulfur Eastern bituminous coal) and SO{sub 3} will be spiked onto the flue gas to simulate operation with higher SO{sub 3} concentrations resulting from firing a higher sulfur coal, or operating with a selective catalytic reduction (SCR) unit. The project was also going to include associate planning, laboratory analytical support, reporting, and management activities. The URS project team finalized a conceptual alternative approach to demonstrate, via an engineering study, the use of regenerative heat exchange to reduce flue gas temperature and minimize evaporative water consumption. This idea was presented in summary format to NETL for consideration. NETL determined that this alternative approach deviated from the original project objectives, and that it would be in the best interest of all parties involved to cancel the project.

David Rencher

2008-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

124

Coproducts From Corn Processing 47 Applied Biochemistry and Biotechnology Vol. 128, 2006  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Increased demand for ethanol as a fuel additive has resulted in dramatic growth in ethanol production production was 3 billion gal/yr (1). Much of the fuel ethanol production capacity in the United States. Ethanol is produced from corn by either wet milling or dry-grind processing. In wet milling, the corn

Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, University of

125

Effects of pulverized coal fly-ash addition as a wet-end filler in papermaking  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This experimental study is based on the innovative idea of using pulverized coal fly ash as a wet-end filler in papermaking. This is the first evaluation of the possible use of fly ash in the paper industry. Coal-based thermal power plants throughout the world are generating fly ash as a solid waste product. The constituents of fly ash can be used effectively in papermaking. Fly ash has a wide variation in particle size, which ranges from a few micrometers to one hundred micrometers. Fly ash acts as an inert material in acidic, neutral, and alkaline papermaking processes. Its physical properties such as bulk density (800-980 kg/m{sup 3}), porosity (45%-57%), and surface area (0.138-2.3076 m{sup 2}/g) make it suitable for use as a paper filler. Fly ash obtained from thermal power plants using pulverized coal was fractionated by a vibratory-sieve stack. The fine fraction with a particle size below 38 micrometers was used to study its effect on the important mechanical-strength and optical properties of paper. The effects of fly-ash addition on these properties were compared with those of kaolin clay. Paper opacity was found to be much higher with fly ash as a filler, whereas brightness decreased as the filler percentage increased Mechanical strength properties of the paper samples with fly ash as filler were superior to those with kaolin clay.

Sinha, A.S.K. [SLIET, Longowal (India). Dept. of Chemical Technology

2008-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

126

The corrosion of aluminum-clad spent nuclear fuel in wet basin storage  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Large quantities of Defense related spent nuclear fuels are being stored in water basins around the United States. Under the non-proliferation policy, there has been no processing since the late 1980`s and these fuels are caught in the pipeline awaiting stabilization or other disposition. At the Savannah River Site, over 200 metric tons of aluminum clad fuel are being stored in four water filled basins. Some of this fuel has experienced visible pitting corrosion. An intensive effort is underway at SRS to understand the corrosion problems and to improve the basin storage conditions for extended storage requirements. Significant improvements have been accomplished during 1993-1996. This paper presents a discussion of the fundamentals of aluminum alloy corrosion as it pertains to the wet storage of spent nuclear fuel. It examines the effects of variables on corrosion in the storage environment and presents the results of corrosion surveillance testing activities at SRS, as well as discussions of fuel storage basins at other production sites of the Department of Energy.

Howell, J.P.; Burke, S.D.

1996-02-20T23:59:59.000Z

127

Wetting and phase-change phenomena on micro/nanostructures for enhanced heat transfer  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Micro/nanostructures have been extensively studied to amplify the intrinsic wettability of materials to create superhydrophilic or superhydrophobic surfaces. Such extreme wetting properties can influence the heat transfer ...

Xiao, Rong, Ph. D. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

128

Feeding Value of Wet Sorghum Distillers Grains for Growing and Finishing Beef Cattle  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Feeding Value of Wet Sorghum Distillers Grains for Growing and Finishing Beef Cattle Ethanol, but sorghum grain is commonly either blended with corn before use or used as the sole grain for ethanol

129

Modeling of wet gas compression in twin-screw multiphase pump  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Twin-screw multiphase pumps experience a severe decrease in efficiency, even the breakdown of pumping function, when operating under wet gas conditions. Additionally, field operations have revealed significant vibration and thermal issues which can...

Xu, Jian

2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

130

Simulation of Oil Displacement from Oil-Wet Cores by Interfacial Tension Reduction and Wettability Alteration  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

wettability toward water-wet may increase spontaneous imbibition of water. This change in rock wettability leads to positive capillary pressure and results in higher brine counter-current imbibition and therefore a higher oil production rate. A three...

Kalaei, Mohammad Hosein

2010-01-29T23:59:59.000Z

131

Energy Efficiency Improvements and Cost Saving Opportunities in the Corn Wet Milling Industry  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Corn wet milling is the most energy intensive industry in the food and kindred products group (SIC 20). Plants typically spend approximately $15 to 25 million per year on energy, one of its largest operating costs, making energy efficiency...

Galitsky, C.; Worrell, E.

132

Wetting transition behavior of Xe on Cs and Cs/graphite Stefano Curtarolo,1,  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Wetting transition behavior of Xe on Cs and Cs/graphite Stefano Curtarolo,1, * Milton W. Cole,2 surface, covered by a monolayer of Cs. With data obtained from grand canonical Monte Carlo simulations

Curtarolo, Stefano

133

E-Print Network 3.0 - ashing wet Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Sciences and Ecology 4 By-Products Utilization Summary: A3, containing 20% clean coal ash and 5% wet collected Class F ash had compressive strengths... 0 Center for...

134

A pore-scale model of two-phase flow in water-wet rock  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

705708. DMITRIY SILIN AND TAD PATZEK 4. F. G. Avkhadiev andWET ROCK DMITRIY SILIN AND TAD PATZEK Lawrence Berkeleypermeability. DMITRIY SILIN AND TAD PATZEK a generic network

Silin, Dmitriy

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

135

WETTABILITY AND IMBIBITION: MICROSCOPIC DISTRIBUTION OF WETTING AND ITS CONSEQUENCES AT THE CORE AND FIELD SCALES  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The questions of reservoir wettability have been approached in this project from three directions. First, we have studied the properties of crude oils that contribute to wetting alteration in a reservoir. A database of more than 150 different crude oil samples has been established to facilitate examination of the relationships between crude oil chemical and physical properties and their influence on reservoir wetting. In the course of this work an improved SARA analysis technique was developed and major advances were made in understanding asphaltene stability including development of a thermodynamic Asphaltene Solubility Model (ASM) and empirical methods for predicting the onset of instability. The CO-Wet database is a resource that will be used to guide wettability research in the future. The second approach is to study crude oil/brine/rock interactions on smooth surfaces. Contact angle measurements were made under controlled conditions on mica surfaces that had been exposed to many of the oils in the CO-Wet database. With this wealth of data, statistical tests can now be used to examine the relationships between crude oil properties and the tendencies of those oils to alter wetting. Traditionally, contact angles have been used as the primary wetting assessment tool on smooth surfaces. A new technique has been developed using an atomic forces microscope that adds a new dimension to the ability to characterize oil-treated surfaces. Ultimately we aim to understand wetting in porous media, the focus of the third approach taken in this project. Using oils from the CO-Wet database, experimental advances have been made in scaling the rate of imbibition, a sensitive measure of core wetting. Application of the scaling group to mixed-wet systems has been demonstrated for a range of core conditions. Investigations of imbibition in gas/liquid systems provided the motivation for theoretical advances as well. As a result of this project we have many new tools for studying wetting at microscopic and macroscopic scales and a library of well-characterized fluids for use in studies of crude oil/brine/rock interactions.

Jill S. Buckley; Norman R. Morrow; Chris Palmer; Purnendu K. Dasgupta

2003-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

136

Process for the production of fuel gas from coal  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An improved apparatus and process for the conversion of hydrocarbonaceous materials, such as coal, to more valuable gaseous products in a fluidized bed gasification reaction and efficient withdrawal of agglomerated ash from the fluidized bed is disclosed. The improvements are obtained by introducing an oxygen containing gas into the bottom of the fluidized bed through a separate conduit positioned within the center of a nozzle adapted to agglomerate and withdraw the ash from the bottom of the fluidized bed. The conduit extends above the constricted center portion of the nozzle and preferably terminates within and does not extend from the nozzle. In addition to improving ash agglomeration and withdrawal, the present invention prevents sintering and clinkering of the ash in the fluidized bed and permits the efficient recycle of fine material recovered from the product gases by contacting the fines in the fluidized bed with the oxygen as it emanates from the conduit positioned within the withdrawal nozzle. Finally, the present method of oxygen introduction permits the efficient recycle of a portion of the product gases to the reaction zone to increase the reducing properties of the hot product gas.

Patel, Jitendra G. (Bolingbrook, IL); Sandstrom, William A. (Chicago, IL); Tarman, Paul B. (Elmhurst, IL)

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

137

Permeability and wet-out characterization of SRIM automotive bumper beams  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

PERMEABILITY AND WET-OUT CHARACTERIZATION OF SRIM AUTOMOTIVE BUMPER BEAMS A Thesis CHRISTOPHER TODD MORSE Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of MASTER... OF SCIENCE December 1992 Major Subject: Mechanical Engineering PERMEABILITY AND WET-OUT CHARACTERIZATION OF SRIM AUTOMOTIVE BUMPER BEAMS A Thesis by CHRISTOPHER TODD MORSE Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University...

Morse, Christopher Todd

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

138

Interrelationships between air velocity and natural wet-bulb thermometer response  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

INTERRELATIONSHIPS BETWEEN AIR VFLOCITY ANO NATURAL WET-BULB THERMOMETER RESPONSE A Thesis by NATHAN GLENN JONES Submitted to the Graduate Colleqe of Texas ASM University i n partial fulfillment of the requirement for the degree of MASTER... OF SCIENCE AUGUST 1983 Major Subject: Industrial Hygiene INTERRELATIONSHIPS BETWEEN AIR VELOCITY AND NATURAL WET-BULB THERMOMETER RESPONSE A Thesis by NATHAN GLENN JONES Approved as to style an content by: airman o ommittee er Member ~~' A~ Member...

Jones, Nathan Glenn

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

139

The Use of Electrochemical Techniques to Characterize Wet Steam Environments  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The composition of a steam phase in equilibrium with a water phase at high temperature is remarkably affected by the varying capabilities of the water phase constituents to partition into the steam. Ionic impurities (sodium, chloride, sulfate, etc.) tend to remain in the water phase, while weakly ionic or gaseous species (oxygen) partition into the steam. Analysis of the water phase can provide misleading results concerning the steam phase composition or environment. This paper describes efforts that were made to use novel electrochemical probes and sampling techniques to directly characterize a wet steam phase environment in equilibrium with high temperature water. Probes were designed to make electrochemical measurements in the thin film of water existing on exposed surfaces in steam over a water phase. Some of these probes were referenced against a conventional high temperature electrode located in the water phase. Others used two different materials (typically tungsten and platinum) to make measurements without a true reference electrode. The novel probes were also deployed in a steam space removed from the water phase. It was necessary to construct a reservoir and an external, air-cooled condenser to automatically keep the reservoir full of condensed steam. Conventional reference and working electrodes were placed in the water phase of the reservoir and the novel probes protruded into the vapor space above it. Finally, water phase probes (both reference and working electrodes) were added to the hot condensed steam in the external condenser. Since the condensing action collapsed the volatiles back into the water phase, these electrodes proved to be extremely sensitive at detecting oxygen, which is one of the species of highest concern in high temperature power systems. Although the novel steam phase probes provided encouraging initial results, the tendency for tungsten to completely corrode away in the steam phase limited their usefulness. However, the conventional water phase electrodes, installed both in the reservoir and in the external condensing coil, provided useful data showing the adverse impact of oxygen and carbon dioxide on the REDOX potential and high temperature pH, respectively.

Bruce W. Bussert; John A. Crowley; Kenneth J. Kimball; Brian J. Lashway

2003-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

140

Low-temperature catalytic gasification of wet industrial wastes  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Bench-scale reactor tests are in progress at Pacific Northwest Laboratory to develop a low-temperature, catalytic gasification system. The system, licensed under the trade name Thermochemical Environmental Energy System (TEES{reg sign}), is designed for treating a wide variety of feedstocks ranging from dilute organics in water to waste sludges from food processing. This report describes a test program which used a continuous-feed tubular reactor. This test program is an intermediate stage in the process development. The reactor is a laboratory-scale version of the commercial concept as currently envisioned by the process developers. An energy benefit and economic analysis was also completed on the process. Four conceptual commercial installations of the TEES process were evaluated for three food processing applications and one organic chemical manufacturing application. Net energy production (medium-Btu gas) was achieved in all four cases. The organic chemical application was found to be economically attractive in the present situation. Based on sensitivity studies included in the analysis, the three food processing cases will likely become attractive in the near future as waste disposal regulations tighten and disposal costs increase. 21 refs., 2 figs., 9 tabs.

Elliott, D C; Neuenschwander, G G; Baker, E G; Sealock, Jr, L J; Butner, R S

1991-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "wet process clinker" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Reduction of NO{sub x} emissions from a dry process preheater kiln with calciner through the use of the urea-based SNCR process  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The post combustion reduction of NO{sub x} using urea has proven to be an effective method in controlling NO{sub x} from various combustion sources. Such a reduction process has been successfully demonstrated in a week-long test at Ash Grove`s dry process cement kiln system located in Seattle. This system is equipped with planetary coolers, a 5-stage preheater and an air-through-the-kiln calciner. Testing was done under ten different kiln/calciner operating conditions. Using three to four injectors, NO{sub x} was efficiently reduced from 350--600 lb per hour lb/ton of clinker to less than 100 lb per hour. This calculates to a NO{sub x} reduction of greater than 80% for most cases. Chemical utilization was greater than 50%. A high degree of mixing and a long residence time at an appropriate temperature present in the preheater tower contributed to these excellent results. An average ammonia slip was four ppm above a baseline level at a normalized stoichiometric ratio of 1. This demonstration confirms expectations that dry process cement kilns with 4+ preheater stages are an ideal application for the selective noncatalytic reduction of NO{sub x} with urea. NO{sub x} was efficiently and effectively reduced with minimal byproduct emissions and virtually no effect on plant operations.

Steuch, H.E. [Ash Grove Cement Co., Portland, OR (United States)] [Ash Grove Cement Co., Portland, OR (United States); Hille, J.T. [Ash Grove Cement Co., Seattle, WA (United States)] [Ash Grove Cement Co., Seattle, WA (United States); Sun, W.H. [Nalco Fuel Tech, Naperville, IL (United States)] [Nalco Fuel Tech, Naperville, IL (United States); Bisnett, M.J.; Kirk, D.W. [Nalco Fuel Tech, Santa Fe Springs, CA (United States)] [Nalco Fuel Tech, Santa Fe Springs, CA (United States)

1996-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

142

Pilot Testing of Mercury Oxidation Catalysts for Upstream of Wet FGD Systems  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This final report presents and discusses results from a mercury control process development project entitled ''Pilot Testing of Mercury Oxidation Catalysts for Upstream of Wet FGD Systems''. The objective of this project was to demonstrate at pilot scale a mercury control technology that uses solid honeycomb catalysts to promote the oxidation of elemental mercury in the flue gas from coal combustion. Oxidized mercury is removed in downstream wet flue gas desulfurization (FGD) absorbers and leaves with the FGD byproducts. The goal of the project was to achieve 90% oxidation of elemental mercury in the flue gas and 90% overall mercury capture with the downstream wet FGD system. The project was co-funded by EPRI and the U.S. Department of Energy's National Energy Technology Laboratory (DOE NETL) under Cooperative Agreement DE-FC26-01NT41185. Great River Energy (GRE) and City Public Service (now CPS Energy) of San Antonio were also project co-funders and provided host sites. URS Group, Inc. was the prime contractor. Longer-term pilot-scale tests were conducted at two sites to provide catalyst life data. GRE provided the first site, at their Coal Creek Station (CCS), which fires North Dakota lignite, and CPS Energy provided the second site, at their Spruce Plant, which fires Powder River Basin (PRB) coal. Mercury oxidation catalyst testing began at CCS in October 2002 and continued through the end of June 2004, representing nearly 21 months of catalyst operation. An important finding was that, even though the mercury oxidation catalyst pilot unit was installed downstream of a high-efficiency ESP, fly ash buildup began to plug flue gas flow through the horizontal catalyst cells. Sonic horns were installed in each catalyst compartment and appeared to limit fly ash buildup. A palladium-based catalyst showed initial elemental mercury oxidation percentages of 95% across the catalyst, declining to 67% after 21 months in service. A carbon-based catalyst began with almost 98% elemental mercury oxidation across the catalyst, but declined to 79% oxidation after nearly 13 months in service. The other two catalysts, an SCR-type catalyst (titanium/vanadium) and an experimental fly-ash-based catalyst, were significantly less active. The palladium-based and SCR-type catalysts were effectively regenerated at the end of the long-term test by flowing heated air through the catalyst overnight. The carbon-based catalyst was not observed to regenerate, and no regeneration tests were conducted on the fourth, fly-ash-based catalyst. Preliminary process economics were developed for the palladium and carbon-based catalysts for a scrubbed, North Dakota lignite application. As described above, the pilot-scale results showed the catalysts could not sustain 90% or greater oxidation of elemental mercury in the flue gas for a period of two years. Consequently, the economics were based on performance criteria in a later DOE NETL solicitation, which required candidate mercury control technologies to achieve at least a 55% increase in mercury capture for plants that fire lignite. These economics show that if the catalysts must be replaced every two years, the catalytic oxidation process can be 30 to 40% less costly than conventional (not chemically treated) activated carbon injection if the plant currently sells their fly ash and would lose those sales with carbon injection. If the plant does not sell their fly ash, activated carbon injection was estimated to be slightly less costly. There was little difference in the estimated cost for palladium versus the carbon-based catalysts. If the palladium-based catalyst can be regenerated to double its life to four years, catalytic oxidation process economics are greatly improved. With regeneration, the catalytic oxidation process shows over a 50% reduction in mercury control cost compared to conventional activated carbon injection for a case where the plant sells its fly ash. At Spruce Plant, mercury oxidation catalyst testing began in September 2003 and continued through the end of April 2005, interrupted only by a

Richard Rhudy

2006-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

143

Sampling for Beryllium Surface Contamination using Wet, Dry and Alcohol Wipe Sampling  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This research project was conducted at the National Nuclear Security Administration's Kansas City Plant, operated by Honeywell Federal Manufacturing and Technologies, in conjunction with the Safety Sciences Department of Central Missouri State University, to compare relative removal efficiencies of three wipe sampling techniques currently used at Department of Energy facilities. Efficiencies of removal of beryllium contamination from typical painted surfaces were tested by wipe sampling with dry Whatman 42 filter paper, with water-moistened (Ghost Wipe) materials, and by methanol-moistened wipes. Test plates were prepared using 100 mm X 15 mm Pyrex Petri dishes with interior surfaces spray painted with a bond coat primer. To achieve uniform deposition over the test plate surface, 10 ml aliquots of solution containing 1 beryllium and 0.1 ml of metal working fluid were transferred to the test plates and subsequently evaporated. Metal working fluid was added to simulate the slight oiliness common on surfaces in metal working shops where fugitive oil mist accumulates over time. Sixteen test plates for each wipe method (dry, water, and methanol) were processed and sampled using a modification of wiping patterns recommended by OSHA Method 125G. Laboratory and statistical analysis showed that methanol-moistened wipe sampling removed significantly more (about twice as much) beryllium/oil-film surface contamination as water-moistened wipes (p< 0.001), which removed significantly more (about twice as much) residue as dry wipes (p <0.001). Evidence for beryllium sensitization via skin exposure argues in favor of wipe sampling with wetting agents that provide enhanced residue removal efficiency.

Kerr, Kent

2004-12-17T23:59:59.000Z

144

Filling and wetting transitions on sinusoidal substrates: a mean-field study of the Landau-Ginzburg model  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We study the interfacial phenomenology of a fluid in contact with a microstructured substrate within the mean-field approximation. The sculpted substrate is a one-dimensional array of infinitely long grooves of sinusoidal section of periodicity length L and amplitude A. The system is modelled using the Landau-Ginzburg functional, with fluid-substrate couplings which correspond to either first-order or critical wetting for a flat substrate. We investigate the effect of the roughness of the substrate in the interfacial phenomenology, paying special attention to filling and wetting phenomena, and compare the results with the predictions of the macroscopic and interfacial Hamiltonian theories. At bulk coexistence, for values of L much larger than the bulk correlation, we observe first-order filling transitions between dry and partially filled interfacial states, which extend off-coexistence, ending at a critical point; and wetting transitions between partially filled and completely wet interfacial states with the same order as for the flat substrate (if first-order, wetting extends off-coexistence in a prewetting line). On the other hand, if the groove height is of order of the correlation length, only wetting transitions between dry and complete wet states are observed. However, their characteristics depend on the order of the wetting transition for the flat substrate. So, if it is first-order, the wetting transition temperature for the rough substrate is reduced with respect to the wetting transition temperature for a flat substrate, and coincides with the Wenzel law prediction for very shallow substrates. On the contrary, if the flat substrate wetting transition is continuous, the roughness does not change the wetting temperature.

Alvaro Rodriguez-Rivas; Jose Antonio Galvan Moreno; Jose M. Romero-Enrique

2014-08-05T23:59:59.000Z

145

MULTI-POLLUTANT CONTROL USING MEMBRANE--BASED UP-FLOW WET ELECTROSTATIC PRECIPITATION  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This is the second quarterly report of the ''Multi-Pollutant Control Using Membrane-Based Upflow Wet Electrostatic Precipitation'' project funded by the US Department of Energy's National Energy Technology Laboratory under DOE Award No. DE-FC26-02NT41592 to Croll-Reynolds Clean Air Technologies (CRCAT). In this 18 month project, CRCAT and its team members will conduct detailed emission tests of metallic and new membrane collection material within a wet electrostatic precipitator (WESP) at First Energy's Penn Power's Bruce Mansfield (BMP) plant in Shippingport, Pa. Test results performed on the existing metallic WESP during November of 2002 showed consistent results with previous test results. Average collection efficiency of 89% on SO{sub 3} mist was achieved. Additionally, removal efficiencies of 62% were achieved at very high velocity, greater than 15 ft./sec. During the first quarter of 2003 final design and start of fabrication of the membrane wet ESP was undertaken.

James Reynolds

2003-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

146

Elastocapillary deformations on partially-wetting substrates: rival contact-line models  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A partially-wetting liquid can deform the underlying elastic substrate upon which it rests. This situation requires the development of theoretical models to describe the wetting forces imparted by the drop onto the solid substrate, particularly those at the contact-line. We construct a general solution using a displacement potential function for the elastic deformations within a finite elastic substrate associated with these wetting forces, and compare the results for several different contact-line models. Our work incorporates internal contributions to the surface stress from both liquid/solid $\\Sigma_{ls}$ and solid/gas $\\Sigma_{sg}$ solid surface tensions (surface stress), which results in a non-standard boundary-value problem that we solve using a dual integral equation. We compare our results to relevant experiments and conclude that the generalization of solid surface tension $\\Sigma_{ls} \

Joshua B. Bostwick; Michael Shearer; Karen E. Daniels

2014-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

147

A round robin evaluation of the corrosiveness of wet residential insulation by electrochemical measurements  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The results of a round cabin evaluation of the use of an electrochemical method of calculating the corrosion rate of low carbon steel in environments related to cellulosic building insulations are reported. Environments included the leachate from a wet cellulosic insulation and solutions based on pure and commercial grades of borax, ammonium sulfate and aluminum sulfate. The pH values of these environments were in the range of 2.5 to 9.5. Electrochemical measurements were made using a direct reading corrosion rate instrument. The calculated corrosion rates were compared with those determined directly by weight loss measurements. Electrochemical measurements were made over a period of 48 hours and weight loss exposures were for two weeks. Poor agreement was observed for the corrosion rates determined electrochemically and the values were consistently larger than those based on weight loss. Reasons proposed for these results included the complex nature of the corrosion product deposits and the control these deposits have on oxygen diffusion to the metal interface. Both factors influence the validity of the calculation of the corrosion rate by the direct reading instrument. It was concluded that development of a viable electrochemical method of general applicability to the evaluation of the corrosiveness of wet residential building thermal insulations were doubtful. Because of the controlling influence of dissolved oxygen on the corrosion rate in the insulation leachate, an alternate evaluation method is proposed in which a thin steel specimen is partially immersed in wet insulation for three weeks. The corrosiveness of the wet insulation is evaluated in terms of the severity of attack near the metal-air-wet insulation interface. With thin metal specimens, complete penetration along the interface is proposed as a pass/fail criterion. An environment of sterile cotton wet with distilled water is proposed as a comparative standard. 9 refs., 2 figs., 3 tabs.

Stansbury, E.E. (Stansbury (E.E.), Knoxville, TN (United States))

1991-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

148

Effects of vapor-liquid equilibrium on wetting efficiency in hydrodesulfurization trickle-bed reactors  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and the hydrogen was allowed to flow through the reactor tube. The liquid pump was started and the flow rate measured by monitoring the level in the feed tank. The gas flow rate was measured using a wet test meter installed downstream of the gas/liquid separator...EFFECTS OF VAPOR-LIQUID EQUILIBRIUM ON WETTING EFFICIENCY IN HYDRODESULFURIZATION TRICKLE-BED REACTORS A Thesis by ANNA LISA MILLS Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements...

Mills, Anna Lisa

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

149

Transient nature of salt movement with wetting front in an unsaturated soil  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

TRANSIENT NATURE OF SALT MOVEMENT WITH WETTING FRONT IN AN UNSATURATED SOIL A Thesis bY VISHWAS VINAYAK SOMAN Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M UniversitY in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree... of MASTER OF SCIENCE August 1992 Major Subject: Agricultural Engineering TRANSIENT NATURE OF SALT MOVEMENT WITH WETTING FRONT IN AN UNSATURATED SOIL A Thesis VISHWAS VINAYAK SOMAN Approved as to style and content by: Marshall J. McFarland (Chair...

Soman, Vishwas Vinayak

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

150

,"Oklahoma Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National and Regional Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: EnergyShale Proved Reserves (Billion CubicPrice SoldPriceGas, Wet AfterShaleVolumeGas, Wet After Lease

151

Mercury Control for Plants Firing Texas Lignite and Equipped with ESP-wet FGD  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report presents the results of a multi-year test program conducted as part of Cooperative Agreement DE-FC26-06NT42779, 'Mercury Control for Plants Firing Texas Lignite and Equipped with ESP-wet FGD.' The objective of this program was to determine the level of mercury removal achievable using sorbent injection for a plant firing Texas lignite fuel and equipped with an ESP and wet FGD. The project was primarily funded by the U.S. DOE National Energy Technology Laboratory. EPRI, NRG Texas, Luminant (formerly TXU), and AEP were project co-funders. URS Group was the prime contractor, and Apogee Scientific and ADA-ES were subcontractors. The host site for this program was NRG Texas Limestone Electric Generating Station (LMS) Units 1 and 2, located in Jewett, Texas. The plant fires a blend of Texas lignite and Powder River Basin (PRB) coal. Full-scale tests were conducted to evaluate the mercury removal performance of powdered sorbents injected into the flue gas upstream of the ESP (traditional configuration), upstream of the air preheater, and/or between electric fields within the ESP (Toxecon{trademark} II configuration). Phases I through III of the test program, conducted on Unit 1 in 2006-2007, consisted of three short-term parametric test phases followed by a 60-day continuous operation test. Selected mercury sorbents were injected to treat one quarter of the flue gas (e.g., approximately 225 MW equivalence) produced by Limestone Unit 1. Six sorbents and three injection configurations were evaluated and results were used to select the best combination of sorbent (Norit Americas DARCO Hg-LH at 2 lb/Macf) and injection location (upstream of the ESP) for a two-month performance evaluation. A mercury removal rate of 50-70% was targeted for the long-term test. During this continuous-injection test, mercury removal performance and variability were evaluated as the plant operated under normal conditions. Additional evaluations were made to determine any balance-of-plant impacts of the mercury control process, including those associated with ESP performance and fly ash reuse properties. Upon analysis of the project results, the project team identified several areas of interest for further study. Follow-on testing was conducted on Unit 2 in 2009 with the entire unit treated with injected sorbent so that mercury removal across the FGD could be measured and so that other low-ash impact technologies could be evaluated. Three approaches to minimizing ash impacts were tested: (1) injection of 'low ash impact' sorbents, (2) alterations to the injection configuration, and (3) injection of calcium bromide in conjunction with sorbent. These conditions were tested with the goal of identifying the conditions that result in the highest mercury removal while maintaining the sorbent injection at a rate that preserves the beneficial use of ash.

Katherine Dombrowski

2009-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

152

Texas - RRC District 1 Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease  

Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) " ,"ClickPipelines AboutDecemberSteamYear Jan FebThousandProcessed (Million(Million Barrels)

153

Texas - RRC District 10 Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease  

Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) " ,"ClickPipelines AboutDecemberSteamYear Jan FebThousandProcessed (Million(MillionCubic

154

Texas - RRC District 5 Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease  

Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) " ,"ClickPipelines AboutDecemberSteamYear Jan FebThousandProcessedLeaseSeparation, Proved Reserves (Billion

155

Texas - RRC District 6 Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease  

Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) " ,"ClickPipelines AboutDecemberSteamYear Jan FebThousandProcessedLeaseSeparation, ProvedReserves

156

Nebraska Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation,  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data CenterFranconia,(Million Barrels) Crude Oil Reserves in Nonproducing ReservoirsYear-Month Week 1 Week 2 Week 3Processing:UsedNAProved

157

Wetting and energetics in nanoparticle etching of graphene  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Molten metallic nanoparticles have recently been used to construct graphene nanostructures with crystallographic edges. The mechanism by which this happens, however, remains unclear. Here, we present a simple model that explains how a droplet can etch graphene. Two factors possibly contribute to this process: a difference between the equilibrium wettability of graphene and the substrate that supports it, or the large surface energy associated with the graphene edge. We calculate the etching velocities due to either of these factors and make testable predictions for evaluating the significance of each in graphene etching. This model is general and can be applied to other materials systems as well. As an example, we show how our model can be used to extend a current theory of droplet motion on binary semiconductor surfaces.

Sujit S. Datta

2010-08-12T23:59:59.000Z

158

Variational formulations for surface tension, capillarity and wetting Gustavo C. Buscaglia  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Variational formulations for surface tension, capillarity and wetting Gustavo C. Buscaglia Keywords: Surface tension Marangoni force Capillarity Virtual-work principle Surface gradient Laplace-Beltrami operator a b s t r a c t The interest in the simulation of flows with significant surface tension effects

Buscaglia, Gustavo C.

159

Entropy of H2O Wetting Layers Peter J. Feibelman*, and Ali Alavi  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, configurational entropy favors wetting by deposited H2O over formation of 3-D crystalline mounds. A Pauling periodic adlayers on metals are observed, residual entropy reduces their free energies relative to a 3-D 1 and 2. The residual entropy of a real, two-dimensional layer of water molecules is therefore

Alavi, Ali

160

Understanding wet granulation in the kneading block of twin screw extruders  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Understanding wet granulation in the kneading block of twin screw extruders H. Li a,1 , M done in a 27 mm twin screw extruder with different powder formulations consisting of lactose H I G H L I G H T S In situ examination of granule development inside extruder. Granule based

Thompson, Michael

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "wet process clinker" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Elephant spatial use in wet and dry savannas of southern K. D. Young1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Elephant spatial use in wet and dry savannas of southern Africa K. D. Young1 , S. M. Ferreira1 Keywords elephants; home range; Loxodonta africana; NDVI; spatial use intensity; vegetation productivity; accepted 16 February 2009 doi:10.1111/j.1469-7998.2009.00568.x Abstract The influence of elephants on woody

Pretoria, University of

162

Portable XRF and wet materials: application to dredged contaminated sediments1 from waterways2  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 Portable XRF and wet materials: application to dredged contaminated sediments1 from waterways2 of the main pollutants to facilitate their safe reuse or treatment. Portable X-ray fluorescence (pXRF) is9 operations and produces sample pellets with 30 to 50% water contents. The relationship between17 pXRF

Paris-Sud XI, Universit茅 de

163

FLUID DYNAMIC ASPECTS OF THE POROUS WETTED WALL PROTECTION SCHEME FOR IFE REACTORS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

FLUID DYNAMIC ASPECTS OF THE POROUS WETTED WALL PROTECTION SCHEME FOR IFE REACTORS S. Shin, F of Mechanical Engineering Georgia Institute of Technology Atlanta, GA 30332-0405 USA Number of Pages: 18 Number. Abdel-Khalik School of Mechanical Engineering Georgia Institute of Technology 771 Ferst Drive Atlanta

164

Rheology of weakly wetted granular materials - a comparison of experimental and numerical data  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Shear cell simulations and experiments of weakly wetted particles (a few volume percent liquid binders) are compared, with the goal to understand their flow rheology. Application examples are cores for metal casting by core shooting made of sand and liquid binding materials. The experiments are carried out with a Couette-like rotating viscometer. The weakly wetted granular materials are made of quartz sand and small amounts of Newtonian liquids. For comparison, experiments on dry sand are also performed with a modified configuration of the viscometer. The numerical model involves spherical, monodisperse particles with contact forces and a simple liquid bridge model for individual capillary bridges between two particles. Different liquid content and properties lead to different flow rheology when measuring the shear stress-strain relations. In the experiments of the weakly wetted granular material, the apparent shear viscosity $\\eta_g$ scales inversely proportional to the inertial number $I$, for all shear rates. On the contrary, in the dry case, an intermediate scaling regime inversely quadratic in $I$ is observed for moderate shear rates. In the simulations, both scaling regimes are found for dry and wet granular material as well.

Ruediger Schwarze; Anton Gladkyy; Fabian Uhlig; Stefan Luding

2014-09-12T23:59:59.000Z

165

M.-T. DO, P. MARSAC, Y. DELANNE Prediction of Tire/Wet Road Friction from  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

M.-T. DO, P. MARSAC, Y. DELANNE 1 Prediction of Tire/Wet Road Friction from Road Surface, validation of a contact model for the prediction of low-speed friction from road surface microtexture the friction 颅 speed curve from road- and tire measurable parameters. The model development is briefly

Paris-Sud XI, Universit茅 de

166

Production and Pressure Decline Curves for Wet Gas Sands With Closed Outer Boundaries  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. SPE SPE 23442 Production and Pressure Decline Curves for Wet Gas Sands With Closed Outer, Richardson, TX 7S0834S36 U.5A. Telex, 730989 SPEDAL. ABSTRACT A family of pressure and production decline as gas reservoirs which produce substan- tial amounts of water together with ~as. Production of water

Mohaghegh, Shahab

167

Energy dynamics and modeled evapotranspiration from a wet tropical forest in Costa Rica  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Energy dynamics and modeled evapotranspiration from a wet tropical forest in Costa Rica H). #12;1. Introduction The energy balance of tropical forests is complex due to feedback mechanisms among.W. Loeschera, *, H.L. Gholza,b , J.M. Jacobsc , S.F. Oberbauerd,e a School of Forest Resources and Conservation

168

A model for reactive porous transport during re-wetting of hardened concrete  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A model for reactive porous transport during re-wetting of hardened concrete Michael Chapwanya residing in the porous concrete matrix. The main hypothesis in this model is that the reaction product hydration; Porous media; Reaction-diffusion equations; Vari- able porosity. 1. Introduction Concrete

Stockie, John

169

Reuse of textile powder remainders for acoustic applications using the Wet-Laid technology  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

are like a powder with difficult recycling, but it can be recycled by means of Wet-Laid Technology study about the acoustic behaviour of nonwoven materials combined with recycled polyester. The recycled polyester used in these combinations has been manufactured from remains of plastic bottles (PET

Paris-Sud XI, Universit茅 de

170

MODEL OF AGGREGATION OF SOLID PARTICLES IN NON-WETTING LIQUID MEDIUM  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

MODEL OF AGGREGATION OF SOLID PARTICLES IN NON- WETTING LIQUID MEDIUM M. Cournil, F.Gruy, P 30320, 57283 Maizi猫res l猫s Metz, France Problem of modelling solid particles aggregation in non physical situations were little studied and deserve further works. This is the case of aggregation in non

Paris-Sud XI, Universit茅 de

171

Effect of Roughness as Determined by Atomic Force Microscopy on the Wetting Properties of PTFE Thin  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Engineering College of Mines and Earth Sciences University of Utah Salt Lake City, Utah 84112 and G. YAMAUCHI decreases the spreading of a non-wetting liquid on low energy solids (14). Similar work with high energy ratio (r a/A (da/dA) 1), a is the apparent contact angle, a is the actual area of surface

Drelich, Jaroslaw W.

172

Eos, Vol. 91, No. 29, 20 July 2010 Water and wet sediments under ice sheets  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Eos, Vol. 91, No. 29, 20 July 2010 Water and wet sediments under ice sheets can play an important role in regulating the rate of ice stream flow in Antarctica, particularly over short time scales. Indeed, the discharge of subglacial lakes has been linked to an increase in ice velocity of Byrd Glacier

Priscu, John C.

173

BIOETHANOL PRODUCTION FROM WET OXIDSED CORN STOVER USING PRE-TREATED MANURE AS A NUTRIENT SOURCE  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

to 65% of total available ethanol yield (based on the cellulose content in 100 g untreated corn stover resource for renewable fuel-ethanol production. Cellulose and hemicellulose, which are the principal, Roskilde, Denmark ABSTRACT: In the present study ethanol was produced from wet oxidised corn stover

174

Experimental investigation of burning velocities of ultra-wet methane-air-steam mixtures  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Experimental investigation of burning velocities of ultra-wet methane-air-steam mixtures Eric Abstract Global burning velocities of methane-air-steam mixtures are measured on prismatic laminar Bunsen flames and lifted turbulent V-flames for various preheating temperatures, equivalence ratios and steam

Paris-Sud XI, Universit茅 de

175

THE MARS ENVIRONMENTAL COMPATIBILITY ASSESSMENT (MECA) WET CHEMISTRY EXPERIMENT ON THE MARS '01 LANDER  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

THE MARS ENVIRONMENTAL COMPATIBILITY ASSESSMENT (MECA) WET CHEMISTRY EXPERIMENT ON THE MARS '01, Morgantown, WV, 26507 Introduction. The Mars Environmental Compatibility Assessment (MECA) is an instrument of the sensors are compact and rugged and are not subject to radiation damage. Actuator Assembly. The actuator

Kounaves, Samuel P.

176

Process for strengthening silicon based ceramics  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A process for strengthening silicon based ceramic monolithic materials and composite materials that contain silicon based ceramic reinforcing phases that requires that the ceramic be exposed to a wet hydrogen atmosphere at about 1400{degrees}C. The process results in a dense, tightly adherent silicon containing oxide layer that heals, blunts, or otherwise negates the detrimental effect of strength limiting flaws on the surface of the ceramic body.

Kim, Hyoun-Ee; Moorhead, A.J.

1991-03-07T23:59:59.000Z

177

Field Testing of a Wet FGD Additive for Enhanced Mercury Control - Pilot-Scale Test Results  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This Topical Report summarizes progress on Cooperative Agreement DE-FC26-04NT42309, ''Field Testing of a Wet FGD Additive.'' The objective of the project is to demonstrate the use of a flue gas desulfurization (FGD) additive, Degussa Corporation's TMT-15, to prevent the reemissions of elemental mercury (Hg{sup 0}) in flue gas exiting wet FGD systems on coal-fired boilers. Furthermore, the project intends to demonstrate that the additive can be used to precipitate most of the mercury (Hg) removed in the wet FGD system as a fine TMT salt that can be separated from the FGD liquor and bulk solid byproducts for separate disposal. The project will conduct pilot and full-scale tests of the TMT-15 additive in wet FGD absorbers. The tests are intended to determine required additive dosage requirements to prevent Hg{sup 0} reemissions and to separate mercury from the normal FGD byproducts for three coal types: Texas lignite/Power River Basin (PRB) coal blend, high-sulfur Eastern bituminous coal, and low-sulfur Eastern bituminous coal. The project team consists of URS Group, Inc., EPRI, TXU Generation Company LP, Southern Company, and Degussa Corporation. TXU Generation has provided the Texas lignite/PRB co-fired test site for pilot FGD tests, Monticello Steam Electric Station Unit 3. Southern Company is providing the low-sulfur Eastern bituminous coal host site for wet scrubbing tests, as well as the pilot and full-scale jet bubbling reactor (JBR) FGD systems to be tested. A third utility, to be named later, will provide the high-sulfur Eastern bituminous coal full-scale FGD test site. Degussa Corporation is providing the TMT-15 additive and technical support to the test program. The project is being conducted in six tasks. Of the six project tasks, Task 1 involves project planning and Task 6 involves management and reporting. The other four tasks involve field testing on FGD systems, either at pilot or full scale. The four tasks include: Task 2 - Pilot Additive Testing in Texas Lignite Flue Gas; Task 3 - Full-scale FGD Additive Testing in High Sulfur Eastern Bituminous Flue Gas; Task 4 - Pilot Wet Scrubber Additive Tests at Yates; and Task 5 - Full-scale Additive Tests at Plant Yates. This topical report presents the results from the Task 2 and Task 4 pilot-scale additive tests. The Task 3 and Task 5 full-scale additive tests will be conducted later in calendar year 2006.

Gary M. Blythe

2006-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

178

New MV cable design for wet environments in underground distribution systems  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper describes the development of new wet design MV power cables, up to 35 kV, using EPDM compound as insulation and longitudinal water tightness. The combination of the cable design and the type of insulation compound allow for reduction of the insulation thickness in such a way, as to have an electrical stress at the conductor of 4 kV/mm which is significantly greater than used in MV distribution cables. Following a methodology established, at the author's company, the reliability of this design, cable and EPDM's formulation, in wet location, without metallic water barriers, was well demonstrated. Mini-installation of model cables in service-like conditions, to estimate the ageing rate, are presented and discussed.

Teixeira, M.D.R. Jr. (Ficap Fios e Cabos Plasticos do Brasil SA, Rio De Janeiro (BR))

1990-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

179

MULTI-POLLUTANT CONTROL USING MEMBRANE-BASED UP-FLOW WET ELECTROSTATIC PRECIPITATION  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This is the first quarterly report of the ''Multi-Pollutant Control Using Membrane--Based Upflow Wet Electrostatic Precipitation'' project funded by the US Department of Energy's National Energy Technology Laboratory under DOE Award No. DE-FC26-02NT41592 to Croll-Reynolds Clean Air Technologies (CRCAT). In this 18 month project, CRCAT and its team members will conduct detailed emission tests of metallic and new membrane collection material within a wet electrostatic precipitator (WESP) at First Energy's Penn Power's Bruce Mansfield (BMP) plant in Shippingport, Pa. Test results performed on the existing metallic WESP during November of 2002 showed consistent results with previous test results. Average collection efficiency of 89% on SO{sub 3} mist was achieved. Additionally, removal efficiencies of 62% were achieved at very high velocity, greater than 15 ft./sec.

James Reynolds

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

180

Notes on the efficacy of wet versus dry screening of fly ash  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The methodology used to obtain fly ash subsamples of different sizes is generally based on wet or dry sieving methods. However, the worth of such methods is not certain if the methodology applied is not mentioned in the analytical procedure. After performing a fly ash mechanical dry, sieving, the authors compared those results with the ones obtained by laser diffraction on the same samples and found unacceptable discrepancies. A preliminary, study of a wet sieving analysis carried out on an economizer fly ash sample showed that this method was more effective than the dry sieving. The importance of standardizing the way samples are handled, pretreated and presented to the instrument of analysis are suggested and interlaboratory reproducibility trials are needed to create a common standard methodology to obtain large amounts of fly ash size fraction subsamples.

Valentim, B.; Hower, J.C.; Flores, D.; Guedes, A. [Center and Department of Geology, Oporto (Portugal)

2008-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "wet process clinker" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Evaporation characteristics of wetlands:experience from a wet grassland and a reedbed using eddy correlation measurements Hydrology and Earth System Sciences, 7(1), 1121 (2003) EGU  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Evaporation characteristics of wetlands:experience from a wet grassland and a reedbed using eddy characteristics of wetlands: experience from a wet grassland and a reedbed using eddy correlation measurements M July to November 1999 using the eddy correlation method on two wetland types 颅 wet grassland

Paris-Sud XI, Universit茅 de

182

Wall adsorption of a colloidal particle moving in a quiescent partially wetting fluid  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In thermal equilibrium, a colloidal particle between two parallel plates immersed in a fluid which partially wets both the particle and the plates, is attracted by the walls. However, if the particle moves parallel to the plates, a hydrodynamic lift force away from the plates arises in the limit of low Reynolds number. We study theoretically the competition of these two effects and identify the range of velocity in which the velocity may serve as a parameter controlling the adsorption in microflows.

Alvaro Dominguez; Siegfried Dietrich

2003-04-29T23:59:59.000Z

183

Study of the effect of seasonal desiccation and wetting on the strength of highway subgrade soils  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

for possible deteriora- tion of soil strength due to cyolic drying and wetting. Likewise the test procedure (28) used by the Kansas State Highway Commission provides for saturation ranging from a few minutes to two weeks, depending on the density... (il, ). East Pakistan can be divided into three broad geological divisions: (a) the deltaic coastal areas; (b) the broad alluvial valleys of the Ganges and Brahmaputra Rivers through the central, western and northern portion of the country; and (c...

Biswas, Bhupati Ranjan

1962-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

184

,"Kansas Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National and Regional Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy SourcesWyoming"CoalbedOhio"Associated-DissolvedSummary"Gas, Wet After Lease

185

Wetting of Sodium on ??-Al2O3/YSZ Composites for Low Temperature Planar Sodium-Metal Halide Batteries  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Wetting of Na on B-Al2O3/YSZ composites was investigated using the sessile drop technique. The effects of moisture and surface preparation were studied at low temperatures. Electrical conductivity of Na/B-Al2O3-YSZ/Na cells was also investigated at low temperatures and correlated to the wetting behavior. The use of planar B-Al2O3 substrates at low temperature with low cost polymeric seals is realized due to improved wetting at low temperature and conductivity values consistent with the literature.

Reed, David M.; Coffey, Greg W.; Mast, Eric S.; Canfield, Nathan L.; Mansurov, Jirgal; Lu, Xiaochuan; Sprenkle, Vincent L.

2013-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

186

Simulation of electron-matter interaction during wet-STEM electron tomography  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Tomography is an efficient tool to probe the 3 dimensional (3D) structure of materials. In the laboratory, a device has been developed to perform electron tomography in an environmental scanning electron microscopy (ESEM). The configuration of Scanning Transmission Electron Microscopy (STEM) in Environmental Scanning Electron Microscopy (ESEM) provides a novel approach for the characterization of the 3D structure of materials and optimizes a compromise between the resolution level of a few nm and the large tomogram due to the high thickness of transparency. Moreover, STEM allows the observation in 2D of wet samples in an ESEM by finely controlling the sample temperature and the water pressure of the sample environment. It has been recently demonstrated that it was possible to acquire image series of hydrated objects and thus to attain 3D characterization of wet samples. In order to get reliable and quantitative data, the present study deals with the simulation of electron-matter interactions. From such simulation on the MCM-41 material, we determine the minimum quantity of water layer which can be detected on wet materials.

Septiyanto, Rahmat Firman, E-mail: karine.masenelli-varlot@insa-lyon.fr [MATEIS, INSA-Lyon, CNRS UMR5510, F-69621, France and Physics of Electronic Material, Departement of Physics, Faculty of Mathematic and Natural Sciences, ITB Jalan Ganesha No. 10, Bandung 40132 (Indonesia); Masenelli-Varlot, Karine [MATEIS, INSA-Lyon, CNRS UMR5510, F-69621 (France); Iskandar, Ferry [Physics of Electronic Material, Departement of Physics, Faculty of Mathematic and Natural Sciences, ITB Jalan Ganesha No. 10, Bandung 40132 (Indonesia)

2014-02-24T23:59:59.000Z

187

Economic evaluation of four types of dry/wet cooling applied to the 5-MWe Raft River geothermal power plant  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A cost study is described which compared the economics of four dry/wet cooling systems to use at the existing Raft River Geothermal Plant. The results apply only at this site and should not be generalized without due consideration of the complete geothermal cycle. These systems are: the Binary Cooling Tower, evaporative condenser, Combin-aire, and a metal fin-tube dry cooling tower with deluge augmentation. The systems were evaluated using cooled, treated geothermal fluid instead of ground or surface water in the cooling loops. All comparisons were performed on the basis of a common plant site - the Raft River 5 MWe geothermal plant in Idaho. The Binary Cooling Tower and the Combin-aire cooling system were designed assuming the use of the isobutane/water surface condenser currently installed at the Raft River Plant. The other two systems had the isobutane ducted to the evaporative condensers. Capital credit was not given to the system employing the direct condensing process. The cost of the systems were estimated from designs provided by the vendors. The levelized energy cost range for each cooling system is listed below. The levelized energy cost reflects the incremental cost of the cooling system for the life of the plant. The estimates are presented in 1981 dollars.

Bamberger, J.A.; Allemann, R.T.

1982-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

188

Chemical Effect of Dry and Wet Cleaning of the Ru Protective Layer of the Extreme ultraviolet (EUV) Lithography Reflector  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The authors report the chemical influence of cleaning of the Ru capping layer on the extreme ultraviolet (EUV) reflector surface. The cleaning of EUV reflector to remove the contamination particles has two requirements: to prevent corrosion and etching of the reflector surface and to maintain the reflectivity functionality of the reflector after the corrosive cleaning processes. Two main approaches for EUV reflector cleaning, wet chemical treatments [sulfuric acid and hydrogen peroxide mixture (SPM), ozonated water, and ozonated hydrogen peroxide] and dry cleaning (oxygen plasma and UV/ozone treatment), were tested. The changes in surface morphology and roughness were characterized using scanning electron microscopy and atomic force microscopy, while the surface etching and change of oxidation states were probed with x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. Significant surface oxidation of the Ru capping layer was observed after oxygen plasma and UV/ozone treatment, while the oxidation is unnoticeable after SPM treatment. Based on these surface studies, the authors found that SPM treatment exhibits the minimal corrosive interactions with Ru capping layer. They address the molecular mechanism of corrosive gas and liquid-phase chemical interaction with the surface of Ru capping layer on the EUV reflector.

Belau, Leonid; Park, Jeong Y.; Liang, Ted; Seo, Hyungtak; Somorjai, Gabor A.

2009-04-10T23:59:59.000Z

189

LARGE-SCALE MECURY CONTROL TECHNOLOGY TESTING FOR LIGNITE-FIRED UTILITIES-OXIDATION SYSTEMS FOR WET FGD  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Energy & Environmental Research Center (EERC) is conducting a consortium-based effort directed toward resolving the mercury (Hg) control issues facing the lignite industry. Specifically, the EERC team--the EERC, EPRI, URS, ADA-ES, Babcock & Wilcox, the North Dakota Industrial Commission, SaskPower, and the Mercury Task Force, which includes Basin Electric Power Cooperative, Otter Tail Power Company, Great River Energy, Texas Utilities (TXU), Montana-Dakota Utilities Co., Minnkota Power Cooperative, BNI Coal Ltd., Dakota Westmoreland Corporation, and the North American Coal Company--has undertaken a project to significantly and cost-effectively oxidize elemental mercury in lignite combustion gases, followed by capture in a wet scrubber. This approach will be applicable to virtually every lignite utility in the United States and Canada and potentially impact subbituminous utilities. The oxidation process is proven at the pilot-scale and in short-term full-scale tests. Additional optimization is continuing on oxidation technologies, and this project focuses on longer-term full-scale testing. The lignite industry has been proactive in advancing the understanding of and identifying control options for Hg in lignite combustion flue gases. Approximately 1 year ago, the EERC and EPRI began a series of Hg-related discussions with the Mercury Task Force as well as utilities firing Texas and Saskatchewan lignites. This project is one of three being undertaken by the consortium to perform large-scale Hg control technology testing to address the specific needs and challenges to be met in controlling Hg from lignite-fired power plants. This project involves Hg oxidation upstream of a system equipped with an electrostatic precipitator (ESP) followed by wet flue gas desulfurization (FGD). The team involved in conducting the technical aspects of the project includes the EERC, Babcock & Wilcox, URS, and ADA-ES. The host sites include Minnkota Power Cooperative Milton R. Young Unit 2 and TXU Monticello Unit 3. The work involves establishing Hg oxidation levels upstream of air pollution control devices (APCDs) and removal rates across existing ESP and FGD units, determining costs associated with those removal rates, investigating the possibility of the APCD acting as a multipollutant control device, quantifying the balance of plant impacts of the control technologies, and facilitating technology commercialization.

Michael J. Holmes; Steven A. Benson; Jeffrey S. Thompson

2004-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

190

An investigation into the predictive performance of pavement marking retroreflectivity measured under various conditions of continuous wetting  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This thesis research investigated the predictive performance of pavement marking retroreflectivity measured under various conditions of continuous wetting. The researcher compared nighttime detection distance of pavement markings in simulated rain...

Pike, Adam Matthew

2007-04-25T23:59:59.000Z

191

Effect of degree of synthetic lightweight aggregate pre-wetting on the freeze-thaw durability of lightweight concrete  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

EFFECT OF DEGREE OF SYNTHETIC LIGHTWEIGHT AGGREGATE PRE-WETTING ON THE FREEZE-THAW DURABILITY OF LIGHTWEIGHT CONCRETE A Thesis By CHANDRAKANT N. KANABAR Submitted to the Graduate College of the Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment... of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE May 1966 Major Subject: Civil Engineering EFFECT OF DEGREE OF SYNTHETIC LIGHTWEIGHT AGGREGATE PRE-WETTING ON THE FREEZE-THAW DURABILITY OF LIGHTWEIGHT CONCRETE A Thesis By CHANDRAKANT N. KANABAR Approved...

Kanabar, C. N

1966-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

192

Microfracturing in Westerly granite experimentally extended wet and dry at temperatures to 800C? and pressures to 200 MPa  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

MICROFRACTURING IN WESTERLY GRANITE EXPERIMENTALLY EXTENDED WET AND DRY AT TEMPERATURES TO 800'C AND PRESSURES TO ZOO MPA A Thesis by THEODOR WILLIAM HOPKINS Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas ARM University in partial fulfillment... of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE May 1986 Maj or Subject: Geology MICROFRACTURING IN WESTERLY GRANITE EXPERIMENTALLY EXTENDED WET AND DRY AT TEMPERATURES TO 800'C AND PRESSURES TO 200 MPA A Thesis by THEODOR WILLIAM HOPKINS Approved...

Hopkins, Theodor William

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

193

Process for treating moisture laden coal fines  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A process is provided for making a free flowing granular product from moisture laden caked coal fines, such as wet cake, by mixing a water immiscible substance, such as oil, with the caked coal, preferably under low shear forces for a period of time sufficient to produce a plurality of free flowing granules. Each granule is preferably comprised of a dry appearing admixture of one or more coal particle, 2-50% by weight water and the water immiscible substance.

Davis, Burl E. (New Kensington, PA); Henry, Raymond M. (Gibsonia, PA); Trivett, Gordon S. (South Surrey, CA); Albaugh, Edgar W. (Birmingham, AL)

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

194

Field Testing of a Wet FGD Additive for Enhanced Mercury Control  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document is the final report for DOE-NETL Cooperative Agreement DE-FC26-04NT42309, 'Field Testing of a Wet FGD Additive'. The objective of the project has been to demonstrate the use of two flue gas desulfurization (FGD) additives, Evonik Degussa Corporation's TMT-15 and Nalco Company's Nalco 8034, to prevent the re-emission of elemental mercury (Hg{sup 0}) in flue gas exiting wet FGD systems on coal-fired boilers. Furthermore, the project was intended to demonstrate whether such additives can be used to precipitate most of the mercury (Hg) removed in the wet FGD system as a fine salt that can be separated from the FGD liquor and bulk solid byproducts for separate disposal. The project involved pilot- and full-scale tests of the additives in wet FGD absorbers. The tests were intended to determine required additive dosages to prevent Hg{sup 0} re-emissions and to separate mercury from the normal FGD byproducts for three coal types: Texas lignite/Powder River Basin (PRB) coal blend, high-sulfur Eastern bituminous coal, and low-sulfur Eastern bituminous coal. The project team consists of URS Group, Inc., EPRI, Luminant Power (was TXU Generation Company LP), Southern Company, IPL (an AES company), Evonik Degussa Corporation and the Nalco Company. Luminant Power provided the Texas lignite/PRB co-fired test site for pilot FGD tests and project cost sharing. Southern Company provided the low-sulfur Eastern bituminous coal host site for wet scrubbing tests, the pilot- and full-scale jet bubbling reactor (JBR) FGD systems tested, and project cost sharing. IPL provided the high-sulfur Eastern bituminous coal full-scale FGD test site and cost sharing. Evonik Degussa Corporation provided the TMT-15 additive, and the Nalco Company provided the Nalco 8034 additive. Both companies also supplied technical support to the test program as in-kind cost sharing. The project was conducted in six tasks. Of the six tasks, Task 1 involved project planning and Task 6 involved management and reporting. The other four tasks involved field testing on FGD systems, either at pilot or full scale. These four tasks included: Task 2 - Pilot Additive Testing in Texas Lignite Flue Gas; Task 3 - Full-scale FGD Additive Testing in High-sulfur Eastern Bituminous Flue Gas; Task 4 - Pilot Wet Scrubber Additive Tests at Plant Yates; and Task 5 - Full-scale Additive Tests at Plant Yates. The pilot-scale tests were completed in 2005 and the full-scale test using high-sulfur coal was completed in 2006; only the TMT-15 additive was tested in these efforts. The Task 5 full-scale additive tests conducted at Southern Company's Plant Yates Unit 1 were completed in 2007, and both the TMT-15 and Nalco 8034 additives were tested.

Gary Blythe; MariJon Owens

2007-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

195

Automated catalyst processing for cloud electrode fabrication for fuel cells  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A process for making dry carbon/polytetrafluoroethylene floc material, particularly useful in the manufacture of fuel cell electrodes, comprises of the steps of floccing a co-suspension of carbon particles and polytetrafluoroethylene particles, filtering excess liquids from the co-suspension, molding pellet shapes from the remaining wet floc solids without using significant pressure during the molding, drying the wet floc pellet shapes within the mold at temperatures no greater than about 150.degree. F., and removing the dry pellets from the mold.

Goller, Glen J. (West Springfield, MA); Breault, Richard D. (Coventry, CT)

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

196

Process Energy Audit for Large Industries  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

can provide the necessary feedback signal to the VSO. Cement Manufacture. Figure 2 illustrates the basic generic flow diagram ofPortland cement manufacture (both wet and dry processes). Table 1 is the electricity consumption for various processes... for 230 ESL-IE-93-03-32 Proceedings from the Fifteenth National Industrial Energy Technology Conference, Houston, Tx, March 24-25, 1993 Figure 2 Process Flow Diagram for a Portland Cement Plant SHALE Attl IAON llAE -----+r------ll"'~~ ..., Il...

Chari, S.

197

Improve corrosion control in refining processes  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

New guidelines show how to control corrosion and environmental cracking of process equipment when processing feedstocks containing sulfur and/or naphthenic acids. To be cost competitive refiners must be able to process crudes of opportunity. These feedstocks when processed under high temperatures and pressures and alkaline conditions can cause brittle cracks and blisters in susceptible steel-fabricated equipment. Even with advances in steel metallurgy, wet H{sub 2}S cracking continues to be a problem. New research data shows that process conditions such as temperature, pH and flowrate are key factors in the corrosion process. Before selecting equipment material, operators must understand the corrosion mechanisms present within process conditions. Several case histories investigate the corrosion reactions found when refining naphthenic crudes and operating amine gas-sweetening systems. These examples show how to use process controls, inhibitors and/or metallurgy to control corrosion and environmental cracking, to improve material selection and to extend equipment service life.

Kane, R.D.; Cayard, M.S. [CLI International, Houston, TX (United States)

1995-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

198

FY04 Inspection Results for Wet Uruguay Fuel in L-Basin  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The 2004 visual inspection of four Uruguay nuclear fuel assemblies stored in L-Basin was completed. This was the third inspection of this wet stored fuel since its arrival in the summer of 1998. Visual inspection photographs of the fuel from the previous and the recent inspections were compared and no evidence of significant corrosion was found on the individual fuel plate photographs. Fuel plates that showed areas of pitting in the cladding during the original receipt inspection were also identified during the 2004 inspection. However, a few pits were found on the non-fuel aluminum clamping plates that were not visible during the original and 2001 inspections.

VORMELKER, PHILIP

2005-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

199

Wet electrostatic precipitator having removable nested hexagonal collector plates and magnetic aligning and rapping means  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A wet electrostatic precipitator including a plurality of removable nested collecting electrodes or plates forming a repeating pattern of hexagonal collecting zones throughout the precipitator. Each collecting plate is formed with a sixty degree bend along two opposing longitudinal edges so as to allow three plates to form a self-nesting Y-shaped intersection point. Six points form a hexagonal collecting zone. The plates are removable thereby expediting replacement. A plurality of strategically placed spray nozzles provide wash fluid to the plates. Magnet sets provide for discharge electrode alignment and rapping.

Young, C.E.; Drzewiecki, G.

1984-04-10T23:59:59.000Z

200

WET-NZ Multi-Mode Wave Energy Converter Advancement Project  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The overall objective of the project was to verify the ocean wavelength functionality of the WET-NZ through targeted hydrodynamic testing at wave tank scale and controlled open sea deployment of a 1/2 scale (1:2) experimental device. This objective was accomplished through a series of tasks designed to achieve four specific goals: ?Wave Tank Testing to Characterize Hydrodynamic Characteristics; ? Open-Sea Testing of a New 1:2 Scale Experimental Model; ? Synthesis and Analysis to Demonstrate and Confirm TRL5/6 Status; ? Market Impact & Competitor Analysis, Business Plan and Commercialization Strategy.

Kopf, Steven

2013-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "wet process clinker" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Enhanced-wetting, boron-based liquid-metal ion source and method  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A binary, boron-based alloy as a source for field-emission-type, ion-beam generating devices, wherein boron predominates in the alloy, preferably with a presence of about 60 atomic percent is disclosed. The other constituent in the alloy is selected from the group of elements consisting of nickel, palladium and platinum. Predominance of boron in these alloys, during operation, promotes combining of boron with trace impurities of carbon in the alloys to form B{sub 4}C and thus to promote wetting of an associated carbon support substrate. 1 fig.

Bozack, M.J.; Swanson, L.W.; Bell, A.E.; Clark, W.M. Jr.; Utlaut, M.W.; Storms, E.K.

1999-02-16T23:59:59.000Z

202

The effects of digital elevation model resolution on the calculation and predictions of topographic wetness indices.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

One of the largest exports in the Southeast U.S. is forest products. Interest in biofuels using forest biomass has increased recently, leading to more research into better forest management BMPs. The USDA Forest Service, along with the Oak Ridge National Laboratory, University of Georgia and Oregon State University are researching the impacts of intensive forest management for biofuels on water quality and quantity at the Savannah River Site in South Carolina. Surface runoff of saturated areas, transporting excess nutrients and contaminants, is a potential water quality issue under investigation. Detailed maps of variable source areas and soil characteristics would therefore be helpful prior to treatment. The availability of remotely sensed and computed digital elevation models (DEMs) and spatial analysis tools make it easy to calculate terrain attributes. These terrain attributes can be used in models to predict saturated areas or other attributes in the landscape. With laser altimetry, an area can be flown to produce very high resolution data, and the resulting data can be resampled into any resolution of DEM desired. Additionally, there exist many maps that are in various resolutions of DEM, such as those acquired from the U.S. Geological Survey. Problems arise when using maps derived from different resolution DEMs. For example, saturated areas can be under or overestimated depending on the resolution used. The purpose of this study was to examine the effects of DEM resolution on the calculation of topographic wetness indices used to predict variable source areas of saturation, and to find the best resolutions to produce prediction maps of soil attributes like nitrogen, carbon, bulk density and soil texture for low-relief, humid-temperate forested hillslopes. Topographic wetness indices were calculated based on the derived terrain attributes, slope and specific catchment area, from five different DEM resolutions. The DEMs were resampled from LiDAR, which is a laser altimetry remote sensing method, obtained from the USDA Forest Service at Savannah River Site. The specific DEM resolutions were chosen because they are common grid cell sizes (10m, 30m, and 50m) used in mapping for management applications and in research. The finer resolutions (2m and 5m) were chosen for the purpose of determining how finer resolutions performed compared with coarser resolutions at predicting wetness and related soil attributes. The wetness indices were compared across DEMs and with each other in terms of quantile and distribution differences, then in terms of how well they each correlated with measured soil attributes. Spatial and non-spatial analyses were performed, and predictions using regression and geostatistics were examined for efficacy relative to each DEM resolution. Trends in the raw data and analysis results were also revealed.

Drover, Damion, Ryan

2011-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

203

The wetting behavior of NiAl and NiPtAl on polycrystalline alumina  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In order to understand the beneficial effect of Pt on the adherence of thermally grown alumina scales, sessile drop experiments were performed to study the wetting of poly-crystalline alumina by nickel-aluminum alloys with or without platinum addition where the amount of Pt ranged from 2.4 to 10 at.%. Subsequent interfacial structure was evaluated using atomic force microscopy. Platinum addition enhances the wettability of NiAl alloys on alumina, reduces the oxide/alloy interface energy and increases the interfacial mass transport rates.

Saiz, Eduardo; Gauffier, Antoine; Saiz, Eduardo; Tomsia, Antoni P.; Hou, Peggy Y.

2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

204

,"Alaska Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National and Regional Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy SourcesWyoming"Coalbed Methane Proved Reserves (BillionShare ofNetGas, Wet After Lease

205

,"Arkansas Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National and Regional Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy SourcesWyoming"Coalbed Methane Proved ReservesPricePrice (Dollars perNetGas, Wet After

206

,"Colorado Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National and Regional Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy SourcesWyoming"Coalbed Methane ProvedDry Natural GasMarketedCoalbedNetGas, Wet After Lease

207

,"Mississippi Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National and Regional Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: EnergyShale Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet)"ShaleCoalbed MethaneGas, Wet After Lease

208

,"Ohio Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National and Regional Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: EnergyShale Proved Reserves (Billion CubicPrice SoldPriceGas, Wet After LeasePriceNetWellhead

209

,"U.S. Nonassociated Natural Gas Proved Reserves, Wet After Lease Separation"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National and Regional Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: EnergyShale ProvedTexas"Brunei (DollarsLiquids LeaseAnnual",2014Gas, Wet After LeaseGas

210

Surface contouring by controlled application of processing fluid using Marangoni effect  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An apparatus and method for modifying the surface of an object by contacting said surface with a liquid processing solution using the liquid applicator geometry and Marangoni effect (surface tension gradient-driven flow) to define and confine the dimensions of the wetted zone on said object surface. In particular, the method and apparatus involve contouring or figuring the surface of an object using an etchant solution as the wetting fluid and using realtime metrology (e.g. interferometry) to control the placement and dwell time of this wetted zone locally on the surface of said object, thereby removing material from the surface of the object in a controlled manner. One demonstrated manifestation is in the deterministic optical figuring of thin glasses by wet chemical etching using a buffered hydrofluoric acid solution and Marangoni effect.

Rushford, Michael C. (Livermore, CA); Britten, Jerald A. (Oakley, CA)

2003-04-29T23:59:59.000Z

211

Advanced ThioClear process testing. Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Wet scrubbing is the leading proven commercial post-combustion FGD technology available to meet the sulfur dioxide reductions required by the Clean Air Act Amendments. To reduce costs associated with wet FGD, Dravo Lime Company has developed the ThioClear process. ThioClear is an ex-situ forced oxidation magnesium-enhanced lime FGD process. ThioClear process differs from the conventional magnesium-enhanced lime process in that the recycle liquor has minimal suspended solids and the by-products are wallboard quality gypsum and magnesium hydroxide, an excellent reagent for water treatment. The process has demonstrated sulfur dioxide removal efficiencies of +95% in both a vertical spray scrubber tower and a horizontal absorber operating at gas velocities of 16 fps, respectively. This report details the optimization studies and associated economics from testing conducted at Dravo Lime Company`s pilot plant located at the Miami Fort Station of the Cincinnati Gas and Electric Company.

Lani, B.

1998-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

212

The role of the wet electrostatic precipitator in the coal-fired magnetohydrodynamics system  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

According to the New Source Performance Standards (NSPS), particulate emissions from advanced energy conversion technologies must be less than 13 ng/J of energy input. Theoretical calculations as well as measurements made at the University of Tennessee Space Institute (UTSI) in the U.S. Department of Energy's Coal-Fired Flow Facility (CFFF) have indicated that a considerable fraction of the entrained particles in the coal-fired MHD system will be in sizes below 1 {mu}m. Thus, capturing very fine particles at an overall efficiency exceeding 99% presents a significant challenge for MHD. At the CFFF, A baghouse (BH) and a dry (ESP) are presently operated in parallel to capture such fine particulates. By the summer of 1992, a wet ESP (WESP) will be installed to replace the existing venturi scrubber/cyclone. In this paper, we have discussed the major differences between the dry and wet ESP; the principle of operation; advantages and disadvantages; and the preliminary bench scale results to identify the WESP's potential in separating soluble potassium salts. (VC)

Sheth, A.C.; Holt, J.K.; Douglas, J.R.; Thompson, B.R.

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

213

The role of the wet electrostatic precipitator in the coal-fired magnetohydrodynamics system  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

According to the New Source Performance Standards (NSPS), particulate emissions from advanced energy conversion technologies must be less than 13 ng/J of energy input. Theoretical calculations as well as measurements made at the University of Tennessee Space Institute (UTSI) in the U.S. Department of Energy`s Coal-Fired Flow Facility (CFFF) have indicated that a considerable fraction of the entrained particles in the coal-fired MHD system will be in sizes below 1 {mu}m. Thus, capturing very fine particles at an overall efficiency exceeding 99% presents a significant challenge for MHD. At the CFFF, A baghouse (BH) and a dry (ESP) are presently operated in parallel to capture such fine particulates. By the summer of 1992, a wet ESP (WESP) will be installed to replace the existing venturi scrubber/cyclone. In this paper, we have discussed the major differences between the dry and wet ESP; the principle of operation; advantages and disadvantages; and the preliminary bench scale results to identify the WESP`s potential in separating soluble potassium salts. (VC)

Sheth, A.C.; Holt, J.K.; Douglas, J.R.; Thompson, B.R.

1992-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

214

A comparison between semi-spheroid- and dome-shaped quantum dots coupled to wetting layer  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

During the epitaxial growth method, self-assembled semi-spheroid-shaped quantum dots (QDs) are formed on the wetting layer (WL). However for sake of simplicity, researchers sometimes assume semi-spheroid-shaped QDs to be dome-shaped (hemisphere). In this work, a detailed and comprehensive study on the difference between electronic and transition properties of dome- and semi-spheroid-shaped quantum dots is presented. We will explain why the P-to-S intersubband transition behaves the way it does. The calculated results for intersubband P-to-S transition properties of quantum dots show two different trends for dome-shaped and semi-spheroid-shaped quantum dots. The results are interpreted using the probability of finding electron inside the dome/spheroid region, with emphasis on the effects of wetting layer. It is shown that dome-shaped and semi-spheroid-shaped quantum dots feature different electronic and transition properties, arising from the difference in lateral dimensions between dome- and semi-spheroid-shaped QDs. Moreover, an analogy is presented between the bound S-states in the quantum dots and a simple 3D quantum mechanical particle in a box, and effective sizes are calculated. The results of this work will benefit researchers to present more realistic models of coupled QD/WL systems and explain their properties more precisely.

Shahzadeh, Mohammadreza; Sabaeian, Mohammad, E-mail: Sabaeian@scu.ac.ir [Physics Department, Faculty of Science, Shahid Chamran University of Ahvaz, Ahvaz, 61357-43135 (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

2014-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

215

MULTI-POLLUTANT CONTROL USING MEMBRANE--BASED UP-FLOW WET ELECTROSTATIC PRECIPITATION  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This is the Final Report of the ''Multi-Pollutant Control Using Membrane-Based Up-flow Wet Electrostatic Precipitation'' project funded by the US Department of Energy's National Energy Technology Laboratory under DOE Award No. DE-FC26-02NT41592 to Croll-Reynolds Clean Air Technologies (CRCAT). In this 18 month project, CRCAT and its team members conducted detailed emission tests of metallic and new membrane collection material within a wet electrostatic precipitator (WESP) at First Energy's Penn Power's Bruce Mansfield (BMP) plant in Shippingport, Pa. The Membrane WESP was designed to be as similar as the metallic WESP in terms of collection area, air-flow, and electrical characteristics. Both units are two-field units. The membrane unit was installed during the 2nd and 3rd quarters of 2003. Testing of the metallic unit was performed to create a baseline since the Mansfield plant had installed selective catalytic reduction equipment for NOx control and a sodium bisulfate injection system for SO3 control during the spring of 2003. Tests results on the metallic WESP were consistent with previous testing for PM2.5, SO3 mist and mercury. Testing on the membrane WESP demonstrated no adverse impact and equivalent removal efficiencies as that of the metallic WESP. Testing on both units was performed at 8,000 acfm and 15,000 acfm. Summary results are shown.

James Reynolds

2004-10-29T23:59:59.000Z

216

Impact of Hybrid Wet/Dry Cooling on Concentrating Solar Power Plant Performance  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper examines the sensitivity of Rankine cycle plant performance to dry cooling and hybrid (parallel) wet/dry cooling combinations with the traditional wet-cooled model as a baseline. Plants with a lower temperature thermal resource are more sensitive to fluctuations in cooling conditions, and so the lower temperature parabolic trough plant is analyzed to assess the maximum impact of alternative cooling configurations. While low water-use heat rejection designs are applicable to any technology that utilizes a Rankine steam cycle for power generation, they are of special interest to concentrating solar power (CSP) technologies that are located in arid regions with limited water availability. System performance is evaluated using hourly simulations over the course of a year at Daggett, CA. The scope of the analysis in this paper is limited to the power block and the heat rejection system, excluding the solar field and thermal storage. As such, water used in mirror washing, maintenance, etc., is not included. Thermal energy produced by the solar field is modeled using NREL's Solar Advisor Model (SAM).

Wagner, M. J.; Kutscher, C.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

217

The lime-soda sinter process for resource recovery from fly ash: A new look  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The lime-soda sinter process is one of the earliest and most thoroughly researched and evaluated of the several methods available for resource recovery from fly ash. The principle product, metallurgical grade alumina, is obtained with yields as high as 90% depending upon how much alumina needs to be left in the residue to form acceptable byproduct cement clinker. The process has the advantages of requiring a relatively low sintering temperature (1100-1200{degree}C), using conventional equipment of carbon steel construction, utilizing a variety of calcium and mineralizer raw materials, and producing only a single byproduct consisting of dicalcium silicate that has been shown to be an attractive raw material for the manufacture of portland cement. An economic feasibility study for a combined facility to produce alumina and cement from the fly ash generated by a 1000 MWe coal-fired power station shows a 10.5% return on average investment. This is increased to 14.2% when a disposal charge of $10/ton of fly ash consumed is credited to the process. Research has shown that the soda ash can be replaced by coal cleaning refuse or that the soda ash and one-fourth of the limestone can be replaced by FGD sludge with a savings in raw material cost in both cases. The return on average investment becomes 14.5% when the refuse is used and 15.2% when the sludge is used. The return could be increased further if an inexpensive fluxing agent were substituted for the alumina deliberately left in the residue. 12 refs., 2 figs., 7 tabs.

Burnet, G.

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

218

Full-Scale Testing of a Mercury Oxidation Catalyst Upstream of a Wet FGD System  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document presents and discusses results from Cooperative Agreement DE-FC26-06NT42778, 'Full-scale Testing of a Mercury Oxidation Catalyst Upstream of a Wet FGD System,' which was conducted over the time-period July 24, 2006 through June 30, 2010. The objective of the project was to demonstrate at full scale the use of solid honeycomb catalysts to promote the oxidation of elemental mercury in pulverized-coal-fired flue gas. Oxidized mercury is removed downstream in wet flue gas desulfurization (FGD) absorbers and collected with the byproducts from the FGD system. The project was co-funded by EPRI, the Lower Colorado River Authority (LCRA), who also provided the host site, Great River Energy, Johnson Matthey, Southern Company, Salt River Project (SRP), the Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA), NRG Energy, Ontario Power and Westar. URS Group was the prime contractor and also provided cofunding. The scope of this project included installing and testing a gold-based catalyst upstream of one full-scale wet FGD absorber module (about 200-MW scale) at LCRA's Fayette Power Project (FPP) Unit 3, which fires Powder River Basin coal. Installation of the catalyst involved modifying the ductwork upstream of one of three wet FGD absorbers on Unit 3, Absorber C. The FGD system uses limestone reagent, operates with forced sulfite oxidation, and normally runs with two FGD modules in service and one spare. The full-scale catalyst test was planned for 24 months to provide catalyst life data. Over the test period, data were collected on catalyst pressure drop, elemental mercury oxidation across the catalyst module, and mercury capture by the downstream wet FGD absorber. The demonstration period began on May 6, 2008 with plans for the catalyst to remain in service until May 5, 2010. However, because of continual increases in pressure drop across the catalyst and concerns that further increases would adversely affect Unit 3 operations, LCRA decided to end the demonstration early, during a planned unit outage. On October 2, 2009, Unit 3 was taken out of service for a fall outage and the catalyst upstream of Absorber C was removed. This ended the demonstration after approximately 17 months of the planned 24 months of operation. This report discusses reasons for the pressure drop increase and potential measures to mitigate such problems in any future application of this technology. Mercury oxidation and capture measurements were made on Unit 3 four times during the 17-month demonstration. Measurements were performed across the catalyst and Absorber C and 'baseline' measurements were performed across Absorber A or B, which did not have a catalyst upstream. Results are presented in the report from all four sets of measurements during the demonstration period. These results include elemental mercury oxidation across the catalyst, mercury capture across Absorber C downstream of the catalyst, baseline mercury capture across Absorber A or B, and mercury re-emissions across both absorbers in service. Also presented in the report are estimates of the average mercury control performance of the oxidation catalyst technology over the 17-month demonstration period and the resulting mercury control costs.

Gary Blythe; Jennifer Paradis

2010-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

219

Wetting behavior of selected crude oil/brine/rock systems. Topical report, March 1, 1995--March 31, 1996  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Previous studies of crude oil/brine/rock (COBR) and related ensembles showed that wettability and its effect on oil recovery depend on numerous complex interactions. In the present work, the wettability of COBR ensembles prepared using Prudhoe Bay crude oil, a synthetic formation brine, and Berea Sandstone was varied by systematic change in initial water saturation and length of aging time at reservoir temperature (88 C). All displacement tests were run at ambient temperature. Various degrees of water wetness were achieved and quantified by a modified Amott wettability index to water, the relative pseudo work of imbibition, and a newly defined apparent advancing dynamic contact angle. Pairs of spontaneous imbibition (oil recovery by spontaneous imbibition of water) and waterflood (oil recovery vs. pore volumes of water injected) curves were measured for each of the induced wetting states. Several trends were observed. Imbibition rate, and hence water wetness, decreased with increase in aging time and with decrease in initial water saturation. Breakthrough recoveries and final oil recovery by waterflooding increased with decrease in water wetness. Correlations between water wetness and oil recovery by waterflooding and spontaneous imbibition are presented.

Zhou, X.; Morrow, N.R.; Ma, S.

1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

220

Nexant Parabolic Trough Solar Power Plant Systems Analysis; Task 2: Comparison of Wet and Dry Rankine Cycle Heat Rejection, 20 January 2005 - 31 December 2005  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Subcontract report by Nexant, Inc., regarding a system analysis comparing solar parabolic trough plants with wet and dry rankine cycle heat rejection.

Kelly, B.

2006-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "wet process clinker" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Controlling RPV embrittlement through wet annealing in support of life attainment and life extension decisions  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

As a main barrier against radioactivity outlet reactor pressure vessel (RPV) is a key component in terms of Nuclear Power Plant (NPP) safety. Therefore present-day demands in RPV reliability enhance have to be met by all possible actions for RPV in-service embrittlement mitigation. Annealing treatment is known to be the effective measure to restore the RPV metal properties deteriorated by neutron irradiation. Low temperature 'wet' annealing at a maximum coolant temperature which can be obtained using the reactor core or primary circuit pumps, although it cannot be expected to produce complete recovery, is more attractive from the practical point of view especially in cases when the removal of the internals is impossible. As a rule there is no recovery effect up to annealing and irradiation temperature difference of 70 deg. C. It is known, however, that along with radiation embrittlement neutron irradiation may mitigate the radiation damage in metals. Therefore we have tried to test the possibility to use the effect of radiation-induced ductilization in 'wet' annealing technology by means of nuclear heat utilization as heat and neutron irradiation sources at once. In support of the above-mentioned conception the 3-year duration reactor experiment on 15Cr3NiMoV type steel with preliminary irradiation at operating Pressurized Water Reactor (PWR) at 270 deg. C and following extra irradiation (87 h at 330 deg. C) at IR-8 test reactor was fulfilled. In fact, embrittlement was partly suppressed up to value equivalent to 1,5 fold neutron fluence decrease. The degree of recovery in case of radiation enhanced annealing is equal to 27% whereas furnace annealing results in zero effect under existing conditions. Mechanism of the radiation-induced damage mitigation is proposed. It is hoped that 'wet' annealing technology will help provide a better management of the RPV degradation as a factor affecting the lifetime of nuclear power plants which, together with associated management methods, will help facilitate safe and economic long-term operation of PWRs. (authors)

Krasikov, E. A. [National Research Centre Kurchatov Inst., 1, Kurchatov Sq., Moscow, 123182 (Russian Federation)

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

222

2010 Dry and 2009 - 2010 Wet Season Branchiopod Survey Report, Site 300  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) requested that Condor Country Consulting, Inc. (CCCI) perform wet season surveys and manage the dry season sampling for listed branchiopods in two ponded locations within the Site 300 Experimental Test Site. Site 300 is located in Alameda and San Joaquin Counties, located between the Cities of Livermore and Tracy. The two pool locations have been identified for possible amphibian enhancement activities in support of the Compensation Plan for impacts tied to the Building 850 soil clean-up project. The Building 850 project design resulted in formal consultation with the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS) as an amendment (File 81420-2009-F-0235) to the site-wide Biological Opinion (BO) (File 1-1-02-F-0062) in the spring of 2009 and requires mitigation for the California tiger salamander (AMCA, Ambystoma californiense) and California red-legged frog (CRLF, Rana draytonii) habitat loss. Both pools contain breeding AMCA, but do not produce metamorphs due to limited hydroperiod. The pool to the southeast (Pool BC-FS-2) is the preferred site for amphibian enhancement activities, and the wetland to northwest (Pool OA-FS-1) is the alternate location for enhancement. However, prior to enhancement, LLNL has been directed by USFWS (BO Conservation Measure 17 iii) to 'conduct USFWS protocol-level branchiopod surveys to determine whether listed brachiopod species are present within the compensation area.' CCCI conducted surveys for listed branchiopods in the 2009-2010 wet season to determine the presence of federally-listed branchiopods at the two pools (previous surveys with negative findings were performed by CCCI in 2001-2002 and 2002-2003 onsite). Surveys were conducted to partially satisfy the survey requirements of the USFWS 'Interim Survey Guidelines to Permittees for Recovery Permits under Section 10(a)(1)(A) of the Endangered Species Act for the Listed Vernal Pool Branchiopods' ('Guidelines, USFWS 1996 and BO Conservation Measure 17 iii). The dry sampling (included as an Appendix D) followed the wet season surveys in the summer of 2010.

Dexter, W

2011-03-14T23:59:59.000Z

223

Hort-Range Wetting at Liquid Gallium-Bismuth Alloy Surfaces: X-ray Measurements and Square-Gradient Theory  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We present an x-ray reflectivity study of wetting at the free surface of the binary liquid metal alloy gallium-bismuth (Ga-Bi) in the region where the bulk phase separates into Bi-rich and Ga-rich liquid phases. The measurements reveal the evolution of the microscopic structure of the wetting films of the Bi-rich, low-surface-tension phase along several paths in the bulk phase diagram. The wetting of the Ga-rich bulk's surface by a Bi-rich wetting film, the thickness of which is limited by gravity to only 50 Angstroms, creates a Ga-rich/Bi-rich liquid/liquid interface close enough to the free surface to allow its detailed study by x rays. The structure of the interface is determined with Angstromsngstrem resolution, which allows the application of a mean-field square gradient model extended by the inclusion of capillary waves as the dominant thermal fluctuations. The sole free parameter of the gradient model, the influence parameter K, that characterizes the influence of concentration gradients on the interfacial excess energy, is determined from our measurements. This, in turn, allows a calculation of the liquid/liquid interfacial tension, and a separation of the intrinsic and capillary wave contributions to the interfacial structure. In spite of expected deviations from MF behavior, based on the upper critical dimensionality (Du = 3 ) of the bulk, we find that the capillary wave excitations only marginally affect the short-range complete wetting behavior. A critical wetting transition that is sensitive to thermal fluctuations appears to be absent in this binary liquid-metal alloy.

Huber, P.; Shpyrko, O; Pershan, P; Ocko, B; DiMasi, E; Deutsch, M

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

224

Corrosiveness of wet residential building thermal insulation---Mechanisms and evaluation of electrochemical methods for assessing corrosion behavior  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

An evaluation has been made of the corrosiveness of selected wet residential building thermal insulation materials in contact with low carbon steel. Investigations were conducted both in wet insulations and in filtered leachates from insulations derived from thirteen cellulosic, three mineral fiber and four foam products. Potentiodynamic polarization measurements are reported from which the overall corrosion response was assessed and then the techniques of Tafel and polarization resistance analysis applied to estimate corrosion rates. Corrosion rates were also estimated electrochemically using a direct reading instrument which performs the rate calculation based on the polarization resistance principle. Direct determinations of corrosion rate were based on weight loss measurements.

Stansbury, E.E. [Stansbury (E.E.), Knoxville, TN (United States)

1991-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

225

,"Oklahoma Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National and Regional Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: EnergyShale Proved Reserves (Billion CubicPrice SoldPriceGas, Wet AfterShaleVolumeGas, Wet After

226

Rapid Migration of Radionuclides Leaked from High-Level Water Tanks; A Study of Salinity Gradients, Wetted Path Geometry and Water Vapor Transport  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The basis of this study was the hypothesis that the physical and chemical properties of hypersaline tank waste could lead to wetting from instability and fingered flow following a tank leak. Thus, the goal of this project was to develop an understanding of the impacts of the properties of hypersaline fluids on transport through the unsaturated zone beneath Hanford's Tank Farms. There were three specific objectives (i) to develop an improved conceptualization of hypersaline fluid transport in laboratory (ii) to identify the degree to which field conditions mimic the flow processes observed in the laboratory and (iii) to provide a validation data set to establish the degree to which the conceptual models, embodied in a numerical simulator, could explain the observed field behavior. As hypothesized, high ionic strength solutions entering homogeneous pre-wetted porous media formed unstable wetting fronts atypical of low ionic strength infiltration. In the field, this mechanism could for ce flow in vertical flow paths, 5-15 cm in width, bypassing much of the media and leading to waste penetration to greater depths than would be predicted by current conceptual models. Preferential flow may lead to highly accelerated transport through large homogeneous units, and must be included in any conservative analysis of tank waste losses through coarse-textured units. However, numerical description of fingered flow using current techniques has been unreliable, thereby precluding tank-scale 3-D simulation of these processes. A new approach based on nonzero, hysteretic contract angles and fluid-dependent liquid entry has been developed for the continuum scale modeling of fingered flow. This approach has been coupled with and adaptive-grid finite-difference solver to permit the prediction of finger formation and persistence form sub centimeter scales to the filed scale using both scalar and vector processors. Although laboratory experiments demonstrated that elevated surface tens ion of imbibing solutions can enhance vertical fingered flow, this phenomenon was not observed in the field. Field tests showed that the fingered flow behavior was overwhelmed by the variability in texture resulting from differences in the depositional environment. Field plumes were characterized by lateral spreading with an average width to depth aspect ratio of 4. For both vertical fingers and lateral flow, the high ionic strength contributed to the vapor phase dilution of the waste, which increased waste volume and pushed the wetting from well beyond what would have occurred if the volume of material had remained unchanged from that initially released into the system. It was also observed that following significant vapor-phase dilution of this waste simulants that streams of colloids were ejected from the sediment surfaces. It was shown that due to the high-sodium content of the tank wastes the colloids were deflocculated below a critical salt concentration in Hanford sediments. Th e released colloids, which at the site would be expected to carry the bulk of the sorbed heavy metals and radioisotopes, were mobile though coarse Hanford sediments, but clogged finer layers. The developments resulting from this study are already being applied at Hanford in the nonisothermal prediction of the hypersaline, high pH waste migration in tank farms and in the development of inverse methods for history matching under DOE's Groundwater/Vadose Zone Integration Project at Hanford.

Anderson l. Ward; Glendon W. Gee; John S. Selker; Clay Cooper

2002-04-24T23:59:59.000Z

227

Rapid Migration of Radionuclides Leaked from High-Level Water Tanks: A Study of Salinity Gradients, Wetted Path Geometry and Water Vapor Transport  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The basis of this study was the hypothesis that the physical and chemical properties of hypersaline tank waste could lead to wetting from instability and fingered flow following a tank leak. Thus, the goal of this project was to develop an understanding of the impacts of the properties of hypersaline fluids on transport through the unsaturated zone beneath Hanford's Tank Farms. There were three specific objectives (i) to develop an improved conceptualization of hypersaline fluid transport in laboratory (ii) to identify the degree to which field conditions mimic the flow processes observed in the laboratory and (iii) to provide a validation data set to establish the degree to which the conceptual models, embodied in a numerical simulator, could explain the observed field behavior. As hypothesized, high ionic strength solutions entering homogeneous pre-wetted porous media formed unstable wetting fronts a typical of low ionic strength infiltration. In the field, this mechanism could force flow in vertical flow paths, 5-15 cm in width, bypassing much of the media and leading to waste penetration to greater depths than would be predicted by current conceptual models. Preferential flow may lead to highly accelerated transport through large homogeneous units, and must be included in any conservative analysis of tank waste losses through coarse-textured units. However, numerical description of fingered flow using current techniques has been unreliable, thereby precluding tank-scale 3-D simulation of these processes. A new approach based on nonzero, hysteretic contact angles and fluid-dependent liquid entry has been developed for the continuum scale modeling of fingered flow. This approach has been coupled with and adaptive-grid finite-difference solver to permit the prediction of finger formation and persistence form sub centimeter scales to the filed scale using both scalar and vector processors. Although laboratory experiments demonstrated that elevated surface tension of imbibing solutions can enhance vertical fingered flow, this phenomenon was not observed in the field. Field tests of showed that the fingered flow behavior was overwhelmed by the variability in texture resulting from differences in the depositional environment. Field plumes were characterized by lateral spreading with an average width to depth aspect ratio of 4. For both vertical fingers and lateral flow, the high ionic strength contributed to the vapor phase dilution of the waste, which increased waste volume and pushed the wetting from well beyond what would have occurred if the volume of material had remained unchanged from that initially released into the system. It was also observed that following significant vapor-phase dilution of the waste simulants that streams of colloids were ejected from the sediment surfaces. It was shown that due to the high-sodium content of the tank wastes the colloids were deflocculated below a critical salt concentration in Hanford sediment s. The released colloids, which at the site would be expected to carry the bulk of the sorbed heavy metals and radioisotopes, were mobile though coarse Hanford sediments, but clogged finer layers. The developments resulting from this study are already being applied at Hanford in the nonisothermal prediction of the hypersaline, high pH waste migration in tank farms and in the development of inverse methods for history matching under DOE's Groundwater/Vadose Zone Integration Project at Hanford.

Anderson L. Ward; Glendon W. Gee; John S. Selker; Caly Cooper

2002-04-24T23:59:59.000Z

228

Linear relationship between water wetting behavior and microscopic interactions of super-hydrophilic surfaces  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Using molecular dynamics simulations, we show a fine linear relationship between surface energies and microscopic Lennard-Jones parameters of super-hydrophilic surfaces. The linear slope of the super-hydrophilic surfaces is consistent with the linear slope of the super-hydrophobic, hydrophobic, and hydrophilic surfaces where stable water droplets can stand, indicating that there is a universal linear behavior of the surface energies with the water-surface van der Waals interaction that extends from the super-hydrophobic to super-hydrophilic surfaces. Moreover, we find that the linear relationship exists for various substrate types, and the linear slopes of these different types of substrates are dependent on the surface atom density, i.e., higher surface atom densities correspond to larger linear slopes. These results enrich our understanding of water behavior on solid surfaces, especially the water wetting behaviors on uncharged super-hydrophilic metal surfaces.

Liu, Jian; Guo, Pan [Division of Interfacial Water and Key Laboratory of Interfacial Physics and Technology, Shanghai Institute of Applied Physics, Chinese Academy of Science, Shanghai 201800 (China) [Division of Interfacial Water and Key Laboratory of Interfacial Physics and Technology, Shanghai Institute of Applied Physics, Chinese Academy of Science, Shanghai 201800 (China); University of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100049 (China); Wang, Chunlei; Shi, Guosheng, E-mail: shiguosheng@sinap.ac.cn; Fang, Haiping [Division of Interfacial Water and Key Laboratory of Interfacial Physics and Technology, Shanghai Institute of Applied Physics, Chinese Academy of Science, Shanghai 201800 (China)] [Division of Interfacial Water and Key Laboratory of Interfacial Physics and Technology, Shanghai Institute of Applied Physics, Chinese Academy of Science, Shanghai 201800 (China)

2013-12-21T23:59:59.000Z

229

Experimental evaluation of dry/wet air-cooled heat exchangers. Progress report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The ultimate goal of this project was to contribute to the development of improved cooling facilities for power plants. Specifically, the objective during FY-81 was to experimentally determine the thermal performance and operating characteristics of an air-cooled heat exchanger surface manufactured by the Unifin Company. The performance of the spiral-wound finned tube surface (Unifin) was compared with two inherently different platefin surfaces (one developed by the Trane Co. and the other developed by the HOETERV Institute) which were previously tested as a part of the same continuing program. Under dry operation the heat transfer per unit frontal area per unit inlet temperature difference (ITD) of the Unifin surface was 10% to 20% below that of the other two surfaces at low fan power levels. At high fan power levels, the performances of the Unifin and Trane surfaces were essentially the same, and 25% higher than the HOETERV surface. The design of the Unifin surface caused a significantly larger air-side pressure drop through the heat exchanger both in dry and deluge operation. Generally higher overall heat transfer coefficients were calculated for the Unifin surface under deluged operation. They ranged from 2.0 to 3.5 Btu/hr-ft/sup 2/-/sup 0/F as compared to less than 2.0 Btu hr-ft/sup 2/-/sup 0/F for the Trane and HOETERV surfaces under similar conditions. The heat transfer enhancement due to the evaporative cooling effect was also measureably higher with the Unifin surface as compared to the Trane surface. This can be primarily attributed to the better wetting characteristics of the Unifin surface. If the thermal performance of the surfaces are compared at equal face velocities, the Unifin surface is as much as 35% better. This method of comparison accounts for the wetting characteristics while neglecting the effect of pressure drop. Alternatively the surfaces when compared at equal pressure drop essentially the same thermal performance.

Hauser, S.G.; Gruel, R.L.; Huenefeld, J.C.; Eschbach, E.J.; Johnson, B.M.; Kreid, D.K.

1982-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

230

X-ray Studies of Regenerated Cellulose Fibers Wet Spun from Cotton Linter Pulp in NaOH/Thiourea Aqueous Solutions  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Regenerated cellulose fibers were fabricated by dissolution of cotton linter pulp in NaOH (9.5 wt%) and thiourea (4.5 wt%) aqueous solution followed by wet-spinning and multi-roller drawing. The multi-roller drawing process involved three stages: coagulation (I), coagulation (II) and post-treatment (III). The crystalline structure and morphology of regenerated cellulose fiber was investigated by synchrotron wide-angle X-ray diffraction (WAXD) and small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) techniques. Results indicated that only the cellulose II crystal structure was found in regenerated cellulose fibers, proving that the cellulose crystals were completely transformed from cellulose I to II structure during spinning from NaOH/thiourea aqueous solution. The crystallinity, orientation and crystal size at each stage were determined from the WAXD analysis. Drawing of cellulose fibers in the coagulation (II) bath (H{sub 2}SO{sub 4}/H{sub 2}O) was found to generate higher orientation and crystallinity than drawing in the post-treatment (III). Although the post-treatment process also increased crystal orientation, it led to a decrease in crystallinity with notable reduction in the anisotropic fraction. Compared with commercial rayon fibers fabricated by the viscose process, the regenerated cellulose fibers exhibited higher crystallinity but lower crystal orientation. SAXS results revealed a clear scattering maximum along the meridian direction in all regenerated cellulose fibers, indicating the formation of lamellar structure during spinning.

Chen,X.; Burger, C.; Fang, D.; Ruan, D.; Zhang, L.; Hsiao, B.; Chu, B.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

231

Contact angle measurements and wetting behavior of inner surfaces of pipelines exposed to heavy crude oil and water  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved. Keywords: Heavy oil; Asphaltenes; Naphthenic acids; Wettability; Oil颅waterContact angle measurements and wetting behavior of inner surfaces of pipelines exposed to heavy crude oil and water RonaldoG.dosSantos a , Rahoma S. Mohamed a,F , Antonio C. Bannwart b , Watson Loh c

Loh, Watson

232

Elephant seasonal vegetation preferences across dry and wet savannas Scott R. Loarie a,*, Rudi J. van Aarde b  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Elephant seasonal vegetation preferences across dry and wet savannas Scott R. Loarie a,*, Rudi J Accepted 8 August 2009 Available online 6 October 2009 Keywords: African elephants Conservation ecology Land use change Habitat selection a b s t r a c t As African savanna elephants (Loxodonta africana

Pretoria, University of

233

NOAA Climate Data Prepares Oahu Construction Industry for Wet Season Each year NOAA's Climate Prediction Center, a part of the  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

NOAA Climate Data Prepares Oahu Construction Industry for Wet Season Each year NOAA. This year, for example, climate data have been immensely valuable to the construction industry on Oahu October that the winter season would be much wetter than usual, his firm went into mitigation mode. PVT

234

Dry Versus Wet Aging of Beef: Retail Cutting Yields and Palatability Evaluations of Steaks Using Alternative Cutting Styles  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Boneless ribeye rolls (n = 12) and boneless top sirloin butts (n = 12) were obtained from heavy weight carcasses (mean = 407.8 kg), assigned to one of two aging treatments (dry or wet) and aged for 35 days at a commercial aging facility. Cutting...

Smith, Amanda 1987-

2012-12-05T23:59:59.000Z

235

SURFACE SCIENCE, WETTING, CONDENSATION, ENGINEERED Correspondence and requests for materials: konradr@asu.edu and varanasi@mit.edu  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

coefficients has potential for efficiency enhancements. Here we investigate condensation behavior of a variety of fluids with high or moderate surface tension27颅31 or Marangoni dropwise condensation of binary mixtures1 SURFACE SCIENCE, WETTING, CONDENSATION, ENGINEERED SURFACES Correspondence and requests

236

Alternative Fuel for Portland Cement Processing  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The production of cement involves a combination of numerous raw materials, strictly monitored system processes, and temperatures on the order of 1500 掳C. Immense quantities of fuel are required for the production of cement. Traditionally, energy from fossil fuels was solely relied upon for the production of cement. The overarching project objective is to evaluate the use of alternative fuels to lessen the dependence on non-renewable resources to produce portland cement. The key objective of using alternative fuels is to continue to produce high-quality cement while decreasing the use of non-renewable fuels and minimizing the impact on the environment. Burn characteristics and thermodynamic parameters were evaluated with a laboratory burn simulator under conditions that mimic those in the preheater where the fuels are brought into a cement plant. A drop-tube furnace and visualization method were developed that show potential for evaluating time- and space-resolved temperature distributions for fuel solid particles and liquid droplets undergoing combustion in various combustion atmospheres. Downdraft gasification has been explored as a means to extract chemical energy from poultry litter while limiting the throughput of potentially deleterious components with regards to use in firing a cement kiln. Results have shown that the clinkering is temperature independent, at least within the controllable temperature range. Limestone also had only a slight effect on the fusion when used to coat the pellets. However, limestone addition did display some promise in regards to chlorine capture, as ash analyses showed chlorine concentrations of more than four times greater in the limestone infused ash as compared to raw poultry litter. A reliable and convenient sampling procedure was developed to estimate the combustion quality of broiler litter that is the best compromise between convenience and reliability by means of statistical analysis. Multi-day trial burns were conducted at a full-scale cement plant with alternative fuels to examine their compatibility with the cement production process. Construction and demolition waste, woodchips, and soybean seeds were used as alternative fuels at a full-scale cement production facility. These fuels were co-fired with coal and waste plastics. The alternative fuels used in this trial accounted for 5 to 16 % of the total energy consumed during these burns. The overall performance of the portland cement produced during the various trial burns performed for practical purposes very similar to the cement produced during the control burn. The cement plant was successful in implementing alternative fuels to produce a consistent, high-quality product that increased cement performance while reducing the environmental footprint of the plant. The utilization of construction and demolition waste, woodchips and soybean seeds proved to be viable replacements for traditional fuels. The future use of these fuels depends on local availability, associated costs, and compatibility with a facility??s production process.

Anton K. Schindler; Steve R. Duke; Thomas E. Burch; Edward W. Davis; Ralph H. Zee; David I. Bransby; Carla Hopkins; Rutherford L. Thompson; Jingran Duan; Vignesh Venkatasubramanian; Stephen Giles.

2012-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

237

Applying MODFLOW to wet grassland in-field habitats: a case study from the Pevensey Levels, UK Hydrology and Earth System Sciences, 7(1), 4355 (2003) EGU  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Hydrology and Earth System Sciences, 7(1), 43颅55 (2003) 漏 EGU Applying MODFLOW to wet grassland in and Hydrology, Wallingford, OX10 8BB, UK Email for corresponding author: rbb@ceh.ac.uk Abstract Historical drainage improvements have created complex hydrological regimes in many low-lying, wet coastal grassland

Paris-Sud XI, Universit茅 de

238

Intraseasonal and Interannual Variability of Extreme Dry and Wet Events over Southeastern South America and the Subtropical Atlantic during Austral Summer  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-eastern South America. Extreme wet events on intraseasonal time scales over southeastern Brazil are more The wet season in most of tropical and subtropical South America peaks in the austral summer, typically season of eastern tropical South America. It can be ob- served as a northwest颅southeast-oriented cloud

California at Santa Barbara, University of

239

Dry/wet performance of a plate-fin air-cooled heat exchanger with continuous corrugated fins  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The performance and operating characteristics of a plate-fin heat exchanger in dry/wet or deluge operations was experimentally determined. Development of the deluge heat/mass transfer model continued. The experiments were conducted in a specially-designed wind tunnel at the PNL. Air that was first heated and humidified to specified conditions was circulated at a controlled rate through a 2 ft x 6 ft heat exchanger module. The heat exchanger used in the tests was a wavy surface, plate fin on tube configuration. Hot water was circulated through the tubes at high flow rates to maintain an essentially isothermal condition on the tube side. Deionized water sprayed on the top of the vertically oriented plate fins was collected at the bottom of the core and recirculated. Instrumentation was provided for measurement of flow rates and thermodynamic conditions in the air, in the core circulation water, and in the deluge water. Measurements of the air side pressure drop and heat rejection rate were made as a function of air flow rate, air inlet temperature and humidity, deluge water flow rate, and the core inclination from the vertical. An overall heat transfer coefficient and an effective deluge film convective coefficient was determined. The deluge model, for predicting heat transfer from a wet finned heat exchanger was further developed and refined, and a major extension of the model was formulated that permits simultaneous calculation of both the heat transfer and evaporation rates from the wetted surface. The experiments showed an increase in the heat rejection rate due to wetting, accompanied by a proportional increase in the air side pressure drop. For operation at the same air side pressure drop, the enhancement ratio Q/sub w//Q/sub d/ varied between 2 and 5 for the conditions tested. Thus, the potential enhancement of heat transfer due to wetting can be substantial.

Hauser, S.G.; Kreid, D.K.; Johnson, B.M.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

240

Oxidation Behavior of Mo-Si-B Alloys in Wet Air  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Multiphase composite alloys based on the Mo-Si-B system are candidate materials for ultra-high temperature applications. In non load-bearing uses such as thermal barrier coatings or heat exchangers in fossil fuel burners, these materials may be ideally suited. The present work investigated the effect of water vapor on the oxidation behavior of Mo-Si-B phase assemblages. Three alloys were studied: Alloy 1 = Mo{sub 5}Si{sub 3}B{sub x} (T1)- MoSi{sub 2}- MoB, Alloy 2 = T1- Mo{sub 5}SiB{sub 2} (T2)- Mo{sub 3}Si, and Alloy 3 = Mo- T2- Mo{sub 3}Si. Tests were conducted at 1000 and 1100C in controlled atmospheres of dry air and wet air nominally containing 18, 55, and 150 Torr H{sub 2}O. The initial mass loss of each alloy was approximately independent of the test temperature and moisture content of the atmosphere. The magnitude of these initial losses varied according to the Mo content of the alloys. All alloys formed a continuous, external silica scale that protected against further mass change after volatilization of the initially formed MoO{sub 3}. All alloys experienced a small steady state mass change, but the calculated rates cannot be quantitatively compared due to statistical uncertainty in the individual mass measurements. Of particular interest is that Alloy 3, which contains a significant volume fraction of Mo metal, formed a protective scale. All alloys formed varying amounts of subscale Mo and MoO{sub 2}. This implies that oxygen transport through the external silica scale has been significantly reduced. For all alloys, water vapor accelerated the growth of a multiphase interlayer at the silica scale/unoxidized alloy interface. This interlayer is likely composed of fine Mo and MoO{sub 2} that is dispersed within a thin silica matrix. Alloy 3 was particularly sensitive to water accelerated growth of this interlayer. At 1100 C, the scale thickness after 300 hours increased from about 20 mm in dry air to nearly 100 mm in wet air.

M. Kramer; A. Thom; O. Degirmen; V. Behrani; M. Akinc

2002-04-22T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "wet process clinker" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Process oil manufacturing process  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A method is described for producing a naphthenic process oil having reduced sulfur, nitrogen and polynuclear aromatics contents from a naphthenic feed containing same and having an atmospheric boiling range of about 650/sup 0/ to about 1200/sup 0/F. comprising: A. passing the feed into a first hydrotreating stage having a hydrotreating catalyst therein, the stage maintained at a temperature of about 600/sup 0/ to about 750/sup 0/F. and at a hydrogen partial pressure of about 400 to about 1500 psig, to convert at least a portion of the sulfur to hydrogen sulfide and the nitrogen to ammonia; B. passing the hydrotreated feed from the first hydrotreating stage in an intermediate stripping stage wherein hydrogen sulfide, ammonia, or both is removed; C. passing the hydrotreated feed from the intermediate stage into a second hydrotreating stage having therein a hydrotreating catalyst selected from the group consisting of nickel-molybdenum, cobalt-molybdenum, nickel-tungsten and mixtures thereof, the second hydrotreating stage maintained at a temperature lower than that of the first hydrotreating stage and at a hydrogen partial pressure ranging between about 400 and about 1,500 psig; D. monitoring the polynuclear aromatics content, the degree of saturation, or both of the product exiting the second hydrotreating stage; and, E. adjusting the temperature in the second hydrotreating stage to keep the polynuclear aromatics content, the degree of saturation, or both below a limit suitable for process oil.

Corman, B.G.; Korbach, P.F.; Webber, K.M.

1989-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

242

A study of toxic emissions from a coal-fired power plant utilizing an ESP/Wet FGD system. Volume 1, Sampling, results, and special topics: Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This was one of a group of assessments of toxic emissions from coal-fired power plants, conducted for DOE-PETC in 1993 as mandated by the 1990 Clean Air Act. It is organized into 2 volumes; Volume 1 describes the sampling effort, presents the concentration data on toxic chemicals in several power plant streams, and reports the results of evaluations and calculations. The study involved solid, liquid, and gaseous samples from input, output, and process streams at Coal Creek Station Unit No. 1, Underwood, North Dakota (1100 MW mine-mouth plant burning lignite from the Falkirk mine located adjacent to the plant). This plant had an electrostatic precipitator and a wet scrubber flue gas desulfurization unit. Measurements were conducted on June 21--24, 26, and 27, 1993; chemicals measured were 6 major and 16 trace elements (including Hg, Cr, Cd, Pb, Se, As, Be, Ni), acids and corresponding anions (HCl, HF, chloride, fluoride, phosphate, sulfate), ammonia and cyanide, elemental C, radionuclides, VOCs, semivolatiles (incl. PAH, polychlorinated dioxins, furans), and aldehydes. Volume 2: Appendices includes process data log sheets, field sampling data sheets, uncertainty calculations, and quality assurance results.

Not Available

1994-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

243

Critically safe volume vacuum pickup for use in wet or dry cleanup of radioactive enclosures  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A physical compact vacuum pickup device of critically safe volume and geometric shape is provided for use in radioactive enclosures, such as a small glove box, to facilitate manual cleanup of either wet or dry radioactive material. The device is constructed and arranged so as to remain safe when filled to capacity with plutonium-239 oxide. Two fine mesh filter bags are supported on the exterior of a rigid fine mesh stainless steel cup. This assembly is sealed within, and spaced from, the interior walls of a stainless steel canister. An air inlet communicates with the interior of the canister. A modified conventional vacuum head is physically connected to, and associated with, the interior of the mesh cup. The volume of the canister, as defined by the space between the mesh cup and the interior walls of the canister, forms a critically safe volume and geometric shape for dry radioactive particles that are gathered within the canister. A critically safe liquid volume is maintained by operation of a suction terminating float valve, and/or by operation of redundant vacuum check/liquid drain valves and placement of the air inlet. 5 figures.

Zeren, J.D.

1993-12-28T23:59:59.000Z

244

Conditions under which cracks occur in modified 13% chromium steel in wet hydrogen sulfide environments  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Occurrence of cracks in an API 13% Cr steel, modified 13% Cr steel, and duplex stainless steel were compared in various wet, mild hydrogen sulfide (H{sub 2}S) environments. The conditions under which cracks occurred in the modified 13% Cr steel in oil and gas production environments were made clear. No cracks occurred if pH > depassivation pH (pH{sub d}) and redox potential of sulfur (E{sub S(red/ax)}) < pitting potential (V{sub c}). Hydrogen embrittlement-type cracks occurred in pH > Ph{sub d} and E{sub S(red/ax)} > V{sub c}. The pH inside the pit decreased drastically and hydrogen embrittlement occurred. Cracks of the hydrogen embrittlement type occurred if pH < pH{sub d} and threshold hydrogen concentration under which cracks occur (H{sub th}) < hydrogen concentration in steel (H{sub 0}). No cracks occurred if pH < pH{sub d} and H{sub th} > H{sub 0}.

Hara, T.; Asahi, H.

2000-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

246

Processing Science  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Processing Science Related to the Electron Beam Melting Additive Manufacturing Process October 14 th , 2014 Ryan Dehoff Metal Additive Manufacturing Thrust Lead Manufacturing...

247

Selection Process  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Selection Process Selection Process Fellowships will be awarded based on academic excellence, relevance of candidate's research to the laboratory mission in fundamental nuclear...

248

Proposal Process  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Proposal Process Network R&D Overview Experimental Network Testbeds 100G SDN Testbed Testbed Description Testbed Results Current Testbed Research Proposal Process Terms and...

249

,"Kansas Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National and Regional Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy SourcesWyoming"CoalbedOhio"Associated-DissolvedSummary"Gas, Wet After

250

,"Kentucky Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National and Regional Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy SourcesWyoming"CoalbedOhio"Associated-DissolvedSummary"Gas, Wet

251

,"Ohio Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National and Regional Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: EnergyShale Proved Reserves (Billion CubicPrice SoldPriceGas, Wet After

252

Final Treatment Center Project for Liquid and Wet Radioactive Waste in Slovakia  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Final Treatment Center (FTC) for Mochovce nuclear power plant (NPP) is designed for treatment and final conditioning of radioactive liquid and wet waste produced from plant operation. Mochovce NNP uses a Russian VVER-440 type reactor. Treated wastes comprise radioactive concentrates, spent resin and sludge. VUJE Inc. as an experienced company in field of treatment of radioactive waste in Slovakia has been chosen as main contractor for technological part of FTC. This paper describes the capacity, flow chart, overall waste flow and parameters of the main components in the FTC. The initial project was submitted for approval to the Slovak Electric plc. in 2003. The design and manufacture of main components were performed in 2004 and 2005. FTC construction work started early in 2004. Initial non-radioactive testing of the system is planned for summer 2006 and then radioactive tests are to be followed. A one-year trial operation of facility is planned for completion in 2007. SE - VYZ will be operates the FTC during trial operation and after its completion. SE - VYZ is subsidiary company of Slovak Electric plc. and it is responsible for treatment with radioactive waste and spent fuel in the Slovak republic. SE - VYZ has, besides of other significant experience with operation of Jaslovske Bohunice Treatment Centre. The overall capacity of the FTC is 870 m{sup 3}/year of concentrates and 40 m{sup 3}/year of spent resin and sludge. Bituminization and cementation were provided as main technologies for treatment of these wastes. Treatment of concentrate is performed by bituminization. Concentrate and bitumen are metered into a thin film evaporator with rotating wiping blades. Surplus water is evaporated and concentrate salts are embedded in bitumen. Bitumen product is discharged into 200 l steel drums. Spent resin and sludge are decanted, dried and mixed with bitumen. These mixtures are also discharged into 200 l steel drums. Drums are moved along bituminization line on a roller conveyor. After the drums cool, they are capped and removed from the conveyor and placed in a storage hall. Drums with bitumen product are loaded into Fiber Reinforced Concrete containers (FRC) and grouted with cement. Cement grout is prepared from mixture of cement, additive and radioactive concentrates. By formulating the cement grout with evaporator concentrates the maximum radioactivity is fixed in cement matrix and volume of final waste product is minimized. A batch mixer with rotating blades is used produce the cement grout. FRCs loaded with bitumen drums are placed on roller conveyor and moved along the cementation line. Grouted FRCs are stored in the expedition hall for 28 days of curing and then transported to final disposal. After placed in operation the FTC provides treatment for all liquid and wet LLW produced from the operation of the Mochovce NPP. The final product of the FTC is a FRC loaded with 7 drums of waste fixed in bitumen and the space between the drums is grouted with cement. This container meets all limits for final disposal in the National Radioactive Waste Repository at Mochovce. (authors)

Kravarik, K.; Stubna, M.; Pekar, A.; Krajc, T.; Zatkulak, M.; Holicka, Z. [VUJE, Inc., Okruzna 5, 918 64 Trnava (Slovakia); Slezak, M. [SE - VYZ, 919 31 Jaslovske Bohunice (Slovakia)

2006-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

253

JV Task-123 Determination of Trace Element Concentrations at an Eastern Bituminous Coal Plant Employing an SCR and Wet FGD  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Energy & Environmental Research Center (EERC), in partnership with Babcock & Wilcox (B&W) and with funding from U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), conducting tests to prove that a high level of mercury control (>90%) can be achieved at a power plant burning a high-sulfur eastern bituminous coal. With funding from the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI), DOE, and Center for Air Toxic Metals{reg_sign} (CATM{reg_sign}) Affiliates Program, the EERC completed an additional sampling project to provide data as to the behavior of a number of trace elements across the various pollution control devices, with a special emphasis on the wet flue gas desulfurization (FGD) system. Results showed that the concentrations of almost all the elements of interest leaving the stack were very low, and a high percentage of the trace elements were captured in the electrostatic precipitator (ESP) (for most, >80%). Although, with a few exceptions, the overall mass balances were generally quite good, the mass balances across the wet FGD were more variable. This is most likely a result of some of the concentrations being very low and also the uncertainties in determining flows within a wet FGD.

Dennis Laudal

2008-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

254

Effect of gaps on the performance of the vertically installed wet thermal insulator  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In SMART, the main flow path of the reactor coolant and the pressurizer partially share common walls in the reactor coolant system. To reduce this heat transfer, the wet thermal insulator (WTI) is installed on the inner wall of the pressurizer. The WTI is constituted of stacked thin stainless steel plates. The water layer width between the plates is chosen to suppress natural convection in each layer. The plates of the WTI require clearance for thermal expansion. When the WTI is installed on a vertical wall, this clearance might cause gaps at the top and bottom at the operating condition. In this study, we focused on the effect of gaps at the both ends on the WTI performance. A numerical simulation was conducted for an 8-layer WTI with gaps at the both ends. To compare with this, a simulation of a WTI without a gap, which is an ideal case, was also conducted. The simulation was conducted in a 2-dimensional manner by a commercial computational fluid dynamics code, FLUENT. The simulations showed that the WTI thermal performance was substantially decreased by a flow that circulated through the top and bottom gaps and water layers at the sides of the WTI. This circulation caused a high temperature difference between the wall and the circulating flow. To find a way to prevent this performance deterioration of the WTI we simulated several cases with the smaller gap heights. However, the flow circulation and the higher heat transfer rate were still observed even at a case with the smallest gap, which seems to be hardly achievable in a real installation. Another way of reducing the flow circulation was suggested and also simulated in this study. (authors)

Kim, S. H.; Kim, Y. I.; Park, C. T.; Choi, S.; Yoon, J. [Korea Atomic Energy Research Inst., Daeduk-daero 989-111, Yuseong-Gu, Daejeon, 305-353 (Korea, Republic of)

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

255

Excerpted from: R. Pitt, M. Lilburn. S.R. Durrans, S. Burian, S. Nix, J. Vorhees, and J. Martinson (I had a lot of help from my friends). Guidance Manual for Integrated Wet Weather Flow (WWF) Collection and Treatment Systems for  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

......................................................................................................................................32 "Best Management Practices.....................................................................................................................................................................5 Ancient Wet Weather Management Practices ...........................................................................................................................9 Wet Weather Management Practices: Middle Ages to the Nineteenth Century

Pitt, Robert E.

256

Development of statistical wet weather model to evaluate frictional properties at the pavement-tire interface on hot mix asphalt concrete  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Skid resistance on wet pavements is influenced by friction at the tire-pavement interface as well as overall hot mix asphalt (HMA) performance. It is important to control aggregate, asphalt, and mix properties to achieve desirable frictional...

Bedi, Harpreet

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

257

Epitaxial TiN(001) wetting layer for growth of thin single-crystal Cu(001) J. S. Chawla, X. Y. Zhang, and D. Galla)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Epitaxial TiN(001) wetting layer for growth of thin single-crystal Cu(001) J. S. Chawla, X. Y.5-nm-thick TiN(001) buffer layer. X-ray diffraction and reflection indicate that the TiN(001) surface continuous Cu layer on MgO. The wet- ting of Cu on TiN is expected to be better, due to the surface energy

Gall, Daniel

258

An investigation of the reactions of butylene and isobutane in the presence of concentrated sulfuric acid using a wetted wall reactor  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

AN INVESTIGATION OF THE REACTIONS OF BUTYLENE AND ISOBUTANE IN THE PRESENCE OF CONCENTRATED SULFURIC ACID USING A WETTED WALL REACTOR Approved as Head of the A Thesis By Murlin Thomas Howerton ?if May, 19U9 to^gtyle and content recommended...: Department of Chemical Engineering AN INVESTIGATION OF THE REACTIONS OF BUTYLENE AND ISOBUTANE IN THE PRESENCE OF CONCENTRATED SULFURIC, ACID USING A WETTED WALL REACTOR A Thesis By Murlin Thomas Howerton May, 19U9 AN INVESTIGATION OF THE REACTIONS...

Howerton, Murlin T.

1949-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

259

916 Shorter Communications I. T. S. Thompson, An analysis of the wet-side heat  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Nucleure 20,540-553 (1973). 8. T. S. Thompson, On the process of rewetting a hot surface by a falling

Wesfreid, Jos茅 Eduardo

260

Process Modeling for Process Improvement A Process Conformance Approach  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Process Modeling for Process Improvement - A Process Conformance Approach Sigurd Thunem September processes. In order to improve these processes, knowledge about them is necessary. To support process improve- ment the organization should collect process data, transform process data into knowledge

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "wet process clinker" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Photolytic Processes  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Photolytic processes use the energy in sunlight to separate water into hydrogen and oxygen. These processes are in the very early stages of research but offer long-term potential for sustainable...

262

Hydrocarbon Processing`s petrochemical processes `97  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The paper compiles information on numerous petrochemical processes, describing the application, the process, yields, economics, commercial plants, references, and licensor. Petrochemicals which are synthesized include: alkylbenzene, methylamines, ammonia, benzene, bisphenol-A, BTX aromatics, butadiene, butanediol, butyraldehyde, caprolactam, cumene, dimethyl terephthalate, ethanolamines, ethylbenzene, ethylene, ethylene glycols, ethylene oxide, formaldehyde, maleic anhydride, methanol, olefins, paraxylene, phenol, phthalic anhydride, polycaproamide, polyethylene, polyethylene terephthalate, polypropylene, PVC, styrene, terephthalic acid, urea, vinyl chloride, and xylene isomers.

NONE

1997-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

263

Electric utility engineer`s FGD manual -- Volume 1: FGD process design. Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Part 1 of the Electric Utility Engineer`s Flue Gas Desulfurization (FGD) Manual emphasizes the chemical and physical processes that form the basis for design and operation of lime- and limestone-based FGD systems applied to coal- or oil-fired steam electric generating stations. The objectives of Part 1 are: to provide a description of the chemical and physical design basis for lime- and limestone-based wet FGD systems; to identify and discuss the various process design parameters and process options that must be considered in developing a specification for a new FGD system; and to provide utility engineers with process knowledge useful for operating and optimizing a lime- or limestone-based wet FGD system.

NONE

1996-03-04T23:59:59.000Z

264

Mass fractal characteristics of wet sonogels as determined by small-angle x-ray scattering and differential scanning calorimetry  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Low density silica sonogels were prepared from acid sonohydrolysis of tetraethoxysilane. Wet gels were studied by small-angle x-ray scattering (SAXS) and differential scanning calorimetry (DSC). The DSC tests were carried out under a heating rate of 2 deg. C/min from -120 deg. C up to 30 deg. C. Aerogels were obtained by CO{sub 2} supercritical extraction and characterized by nitrogen adsorption and SAXS. The DSC thermogram displays two distinct endothermic peaks. The first, a broad peak extending from about -80 deg. C up to practically 0 deg. C, was associated to the melting of ice nanocrystals with a crystal size distribution with 'pore' diameter ranging from 1 or 2 nm up to about 60 nm, as estimated from Thomson's equation. The second, a sharp peak with onset temperature close to 0 deg. C, was attributed to the melting of macroscopic crystals. The DSC incremental 'nanopore' volume distribution is in reasonable agreement with the incremental pore volume distribution of the aerogel as determined from nitrogen adsorption. No macroporosity was detected by nitrogen adsorption, probably because the adsorption method applies stress on the sample during measurement, leading to a underestimation of pore volume, or because often positive curvature of the solid surface is in aerogels, making the nitrogen condensation more difficult. According to the SAXS results, the solid network of the wet gels behaves as a mass fractal structure with mass fractal dimension D=2.20{+-}0.01 in a characteristic length scale below {xi}=7.9{+-}0.1 nm. The mass fractal characteristics of the wet gels have also been probed from DSC data by means of an earlier applied modeling for generation of a mass fractal from the incremental ''pore'' volume distribution curves. The results are shown to be in interesting agreement with the results from SAXS.

Vollet, D. R.; Donatti, D. A.; Ibanez Ruiz, A.; Gatto, F. R. [Departamento de Fisica, Unesp-Univerisdade Estadual Paulista, IGCE, P.O. Box 178 CEP 13500-970 Rio Claro, SP (Brazil)

2006-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

265

Improved Wetting of Mixed Ionic/Electronic Conductors Used in Electrochemical Devices with Ternary Reactive Air Braze Filler Metals  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper reports on the wetting behavior, reactivity, and long-term electrical conductance of a series of ternary filler metals being considered for brazing lanthanum strontium cobalt ferrite (LSCF) based oxygen separation membranes. Mixed ionic/electronic conducting perovskite oxides such as LSCF and various doped barium cerates are currently being considered for use in high-temperature electrochemical devices such as oxygen and hydrogen concentrators and solid oxide fuel cells. However to take full advantage of the unique properties of these materials, reliable joining techniques need to be developed. Furthermore, if the proposed joining technique were to yield a hermetic ceramic-to-metal junction that was also electrically conductive, it would additionally benefit the device by allowing current to be drawn from or carried to the electrochemically active mixed conducting oxide component without requiring an separate current collector. A newly developed brazing technique known as air brazing is one such method of joining. In its present form, air brazing uses a silver-copper oxide based filler metal that can be melted directly in air to form a compliant joint that is electrically conductive. Recently, it has been shown that the addition of titania can enhance the wetting behavior of Ag-CuO filler metals on alumina. Here the effect of this wetting agent on the surface wettability, long-term electrical resistance at 750癈, and reactivity with La0.6Sr0.4Co0.2Fe0.8O3-? (LSCF-6428 or LSCF) substrates is discussed.

Hardy, John S.; Kim, Jin Yong Y.; Thomsen, Ed C.; Weil, K. Scott

2007-01-19T23:59:59.000Z

266

Comparison of thermoelectric and permeation dryers for sulfur dioxide removal during sample conditioning of wet gas streams  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Flue gas conditioning for moisture removal is commonly performed for criteria pollutant measurements, in particular for extractive CEM systems at combustion sources. An implicit assumption is that conditioning systems specifically remove moisture without affecting pollutant and diluent concentrations. Gas conditioning is usually performed by passing the flue gas through a cold trap (Peltier or thermoelectric dryer) to remove moisture by condensation, which is subsequently extracted by a peristaltic pump. Many air pollutants are water-soluble and potentially susceptible to removal in a condensation dryer from gas interaction with liquid water. An alternative technology for gas conditioning is the permeation dryer, where the flue gas passes through a selectively permeable membrane for moisture removal. In this case water is transferred through the membrane while other pollutants are excluded, and the gas does not contact condensed liquid. Laboratory experiments were performed to measure the relative removal of a water-soluble pollutant (sulfur dioxide, SO{sub 2}) by the two conditioning techniques. A wet gas generating system was used to create hot, wet gas streams of known composition (15% and 30% moisture, balance nitrogen) and flow rate. Pre-heated SO{sub 2} was dynamically spiked into the wet stream using mass flow meters to achieve concentrations of 20, 50, and 100 ppm. The spiked gas was directed through a heated sample line to either a thermoelectric or a permeation conditioning system. Two gas analyzers (Western Research UV gas monitor, KVB/Analect FTIR spectrometer) were used to measure the SO{sub 2} concentration after conditioning. Both analytic methods demonstrated that SO{sub 2} is removed to a significantly greater extent by the thermoelectric dryer. These results have important implications for SO{sub 2} monitoring and emissions trading.

Dunder, T.A. [Entropy, Inc., Research Triangle Park, NC (United States). Research Div.; Leighty, D.A. [Perma Pure, Inc., Toms River, NJ (United States)

1997-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

267

Influence of wetting effect at the outer surface of the pipe on increase in leak rate - experimental results and discussion  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Experimental and computed results applicable to Leak Before Break analysis are presented. The specific area of investigation is the effect of the temperature distribution changes due to wetting of the test pipe near the crack on the increase in the crack opening area and leak rate. Two 12-inch straight pipes subjected to both internal pressure and thermal load, but not to bending load, are modelled. The leak rate was found to be very susceptible to the metal temperature of the piping. In leak rate tests, therefore, it is recommended that temperature distribution be measured precisely for a wide area.

Isozaki, Toshikuni; Shibata, Katsuyuki

1997-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

268

,"Alaska Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National and Regional Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy SourcesWyoming"Coalbed Methane Proved Reserves (BillionShare ofNetGas, Wet After

269

,"Arkansas Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National and Regional Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy SourcesWyoming"Coalbed Methane Proved ReservesPricePrice (Dollars perNetGas, Wet

270

,"Colorado Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National and Regional Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy SourcesWyoming"Coalbed Methane ProvedDry Natural GasMarketedCoalbedNetGas, Wet After

271

,"Louisiana Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National and Regional Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: EnergyShale Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet)" ,"ClickNonassociated Natural Gas, Wet

272

,"Mississippi Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National and Regional Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: EnergyShale Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet)"ShaleCoalbed MethaneGas, Wet After

273

,"Montana Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National and Regional Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: EnergyShale Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet)"ShaleCoalbed MethaneGas, WetNetWellhead

274

,"New Mexico Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National and Regional Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: EnergyShale Proved Reserves (Billion CubicPrice Sold toResidential ConsumptionNetGas, Wet After Lease

275

,"New Mexico Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National and Regional Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: EnergyShale Proved Reserves (Billion CubicPrice Sold toResidential ConsumptionNetGas, Wet After

276

,"New York Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National and Regional Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: EnergyShale Proved Reserves (Billion CubicPrice SoldPrice Sold to Electric PowerNetGas, Wet After

277

,"New York Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National and Regional Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: EnergyShale Proved Reserves (Billion CubicPrice SoldPrice Sold to Electric PowerNetGas, Wet

278

,"North Dakota Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National and Regional Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: EnergyShale Proved Reserves (Billion CubicPrice SoldPriceGas, Wet After Lease Separation Proved

279

,"North Dakota Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National and Regional Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: EnergyShale Proved Reserves (Billion CubicPrice SoldPriceGas, Wet After Lease Separation

280

,"Ohio Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National and Regional Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: EnergyShale Proved Reserves (Billion CubicPrice SoldPriceGas, Wet After Lease SeparationShale

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "wet process clinker" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

,"Oklahoma Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National and Regional Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: EnergyShale Proved Reserves (Billion CubicPrice SoldPriceGas, Wet AfterShale Proved Reserves

282

,"Texas - RRC District 10 Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National and Regional Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: EnergyShale ProvedTexas"Brunei (Dollars per ThousandPrice SoldDry NaturalNatural Gas, Wet After

283

,"Texas - RRC District 10 Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National and Regional Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: EnergyShale ProvedTexas"Brunei (Dollars per ThousandPrice SoldDry NaturalNatural Gas, Wet

284

,"U.S. Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National and Regional Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: EnergyShale ProvedTexas"Brunei (DollarsLiquids LeaseAnnual",2014Gas, Wet After Lease

285

,"U.S. Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National and Regional Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: EnergyShale ProvedTexas"Brunei (DollarsLiquids LeaseAnnual",2014Gas, Wet After LeaseGasGas,

286

Assessment of TEES reg sign applications for Wet Industrial Wastes: Energy benefit and economic analysis report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Fundamental work is catalyzed biomass pyrolysis/gasification led to the Thermochemical Environmental Energy System (TEES{reg sign}) concept, a means of converting moist biomass feedstocks to high-value fuel gases such as methane. A low-temperature (350{degrees}C), pressurized (3100 psig) reaction environment and a nickel catalyst are used to reduce volumes of very high-moisture wastes such as food processing byproducts while producing useful quantities of energy. A study was conducted to assess the economic viability of a range of potential applications of the process. Cases examined included feedstocks of cheese whey, grape pomace, spent grain, and an organic chemical waste stream. The analysis indicated that only the organic chemical waste process is economically attractive in the existing energy/economic environment. However, food processing cases will become attractive as alternative disposal practices are curtailed and energy prices rise.

Elliott, D.C.; Scheer, T.H.

1992-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

287

Tailoring hydrodynamics of non-wetting droplets with nano-engineered surfaces  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Considering that contacts between liquid and solid are ubiquitous in almost all energy processes, including steam turbines, oil pumping, condensers and boilers, the efficiency of energy transportation can be maximized such ...

Kwon, Hyuk-Min

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

288

Water injection in fractured/layered porous media. Co-current and counter-current imbibition in a water-wet matrix block. Quarterly report, January 1--March 31, 1996  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Review of the literature indicates that imbibition in water-wet matrix blocks is commonly considered to be counter-current. Despite this general belief, our experimental and theoretical studies indicate that co-current imbibition may be the dominant mechanism. Using numerical simulation of the imbibition process it is found that oil is predominantly recovered by co-current imbibition, and the time for this recovery is only a fraction of that required for counter-current imbibition. This is because in counter-current imbibition, oil is forced to flow in the two-phase region. In co-current imbibition, however, oil is free to flow in the single phase region. This study reveals that co-current imbibition is much more efficient than counter-current imbibition.

Pooladi-Darvish, M.; Firoozabadi, A.

1996-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

289

Proposal Process  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Testbed Results Current Testbed Research Proposal Process Terms and Conditions Dark Fiber Testbed Performance (perfSONAR) Software & Tools Development Partnerships...

290

Silane Modification of Glass and Silica Surfaces to Obtain Equally Oil-Wet Surfaces in Glass-Covered Silicon Micromodel Applications  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The wettability of silicon and glass surfaces can be modified by silanization. However, similar treatments of glass and silica surfaces using the same silane do not necessarily yield the same wettability as determined by the oil-water contact angle. In this technical note, surface cleaning pretreatments were investigated to determine conditions that would yield oil-wet surfaces on glass with similar wettability to silica surfaces treated with the same silane, and both air-water and oil-water contact angles were determined. Air-water contact angles were less sensitive to differences between silanized silica and glass surfaces, often yielding similar values while the oil-water contact angles were quite different. Borosilicate glass surfaces cleaned with standard cleaning solution 1 (SC1) yield intermediate-wet surfaces when silanized with hexamethyldisilazane, while the same cleaning and silanization yields oil-wet surfaces on silica. However, cleaning glass in boiling concentrated nitric acid creates a surface that can be silanized to obtain oil-wet surfaces using HDMS. Moreover, this method is effective on glass with prior thermal treatment at an elevated temperature of 400oC. In this way, silica and glass can be silanized to obtain equally oil-wet surfaces using HMDS. It is demonstrated that pretreatment and silanization is feasible in silicon-silica/glass micromodels previously assembled by anodic bonding, and that the change in wettability has a significant observable effect on immiscisble fluid displacements in the pore network.

Grate, Jay W.; Warner, Marvin G.; Pittman, Jonathan W.; Dehoff, Karl J.; Wietsma, Thomas W.; Zhang, Changyong; Oostrom, Martinus

2013-08-05T23:59:59.000Z

291

Experimental litterfall manipulation drives large and rapid changes in soil carbon cycling in a wet tropical  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

biomass, microbial biomass, soil moisture, and nutrient fluxes. However, the litter manipulations had only, and microbial processes in response to litter manipulation reflect shifts in the quantity rather than quality analysis showed that variations in CO2 fluxes were strongly correlated with microbial biomass pools, soil C

Townsend, Alan

292

Direct application of West Coast geothermal resources in a wet-corn-milling plant. Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The engineering and economic feasibility of using the geothermal resources in East Mesa, California, in a new corn processing plant is evaluated. Institutional barriers were also identified and evaluated. Several alternative plant designs which used geothermal energy were developed. A capital cost estimate and rate of return type of economic analysis were performed to evaluate each alternative. (MHR)

Not Available

1981-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

293

Macdonald processes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Macdonald processes are probability measures on sequences of partitions defined in terms of nonnegative specializations of the Macdonald symmetric functions and two Macdonald parameters q,t ? [0,1). We prove several results ...

Borodin, Alexei

294

User's guide for the BNW-III optimization code for modular dry/wet-cooled power plants  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This user's guide describes BNW-III, a computer code developed by the Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) as part of the Dry Cooling Enhancement Program sponsored by the US Department of Energy (DOE). The BNW-III code models a modular dry/wet cooling system for a nuclear or fossil fuel power plant. The purpose of this guide is to give the code user a brief description of what the BNW-III code is and how to use it. It describes the cooling system being modeled and the various models used. A detailed description of code input and code output is also included. The BNW-III code was developed to analyze a specific cooling system layout. However, there is a large degree of freedom in the type of cooling modules that can be selected and in the performance of those modules. The costs of the modules are input to the code, giving the user a great deal of flexibility.

Braun, D.J.; Faletti, D.W.

1984-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

295

Substrate-dependent wetting layer formation during GaN growth: Impact on the morphology of the films  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We have compared epitaxial growth of GaN films on 6H-SiC(0001)-({radical}(3)x{radical}(3))R30 deg. -Ga and on (0001)-sapphire. Predeposited Ga layers were nitrided by ion beam assisted molecular beam epitaxy. Whereas on SiC the initially deposited Ga covers the substrate surface completely, on sapphire only Ga droplets are present. The different distribution of the predeposited Ga affects the morphology of GaN significantly. Scanning electron microscopy and atomic force microscopy analysis of the grown films show that the complete wetting of the SiC substrate with Ga enhances finally the size and the flatness of GaN terraces and thus the quality of the film. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy measurements reveal that metallic Ga resides also on top of the GaN films during the growth.

Sidorenko, A.; Peisert, H.; Neumann, H.; Chasse, T. [Universitaet Tuebingen, Institut fuer Physikalische und Theoretische Chemie, Auf der Morgenstelle 8, D-72076 Tuebingen (Germany); Leibniz-Institut fuer Oberflaechenmodifizierung e.V. Permoserstrasse 15, D-04318 Leipzig (Germany); Universitaet Tuebingen, Institut fuer Physikalische und Theoretische Chemie, Auf der Morgenstelle 8, D-72076 Tuebingen (Germany)

2007-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

296

Design and test of a wet type helium turbo-expander with an alternator as a brake  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A wet type helium turbo-expander with expected adiabatic efficiency of 70% at inlet pressure, temperature, and outlet pressure of 1.3 MPa, 6.0 K, and 0.2 MPa, respectively, has been developed. An alternator is adopted as a brake where a permanent magnet is held in the turbine shaft. And a self-acting gas bearing is used at thrust and journal bearings. An electromagnet supports thrust bearing to lift up the thrust disk when initiating operation. Design mass flow rate of the turbine is determined to be 60 g/s, corresponding to the JT mass flow rate in the existing helium liquefier/refrigerator. In the cryogenic performance test, the turbine had increased helium liquefaction rate by four times larger than the liquefaction rate without turbine operation.

Kato, T.; Miyake, A.; Kawano, K.; Hamada, K.; Hiyama, T.; Iwamoto, S.; Ebisu, H.; Tsuji, H. [Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute, Ibaraki-ken (Japan); Saji, N.; Kaneko, Y. [Ishikawajima-Harima Heavy Industries Co. Ltd., Tokyo (Japan)] [and others

1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

297

Macdonald processes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Macdonald processes are probability measures on sequences of partitions defined in terms of nonnegative specializations of the Macdonald symmetric functions and two Macdonald parameters q,t in [0,1). We prove several results about these processes, which include the following. (1) We explicitly evaluate expectations of a rich family of observables for these processes. (2) In the case t=0, we find a Fredholm determinant formula for a q-Laplace transform of the distribution of the last part of the Macdonald-random partition. (3) We introduce Markov dynamics that preserve the class of Macdonald processes and lead to new "integrable" 2d and 1d interacting particle systems. (4) In a large time limit transition, and as q goes to 1, the particles of these systems crystallize on a lattice, and fluctuations around the lattice converge to O'Connell's Whittaker process that describe semi-discrete Brownian directed polymers. (5) This yields a Fredholm determinant for the Laplace transform of the polymer partition function, and taking its asymptotics we prove KPZ universality for the polymer (free energy fluctuation exponent 1/3 and Tracy-Widom GUE limit law). (6) Under intermediate disorder scaling, we recover the Laplace transform of the solution of the KPZ equation with narrow wedge initial data. (7) We provide contour integral formulas for a wide array of polymer moments. (8) This results in a new ansatz for solving quantum many body systems such as the delta Bose gas.

Alexei Borodin; Ivan Corwin

2013-01-06T23:59:59.000Z

298

Large-Scale Mercury Control Technology Testing for Lignite-Fired Utilities - Oxidation Systems for Wet FGD  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Mercury (Hg) control technologies were evaluated at Minnkota Power Cooperative's Milton R. Young (MRY) Station Unit 2, a 450-MW lignite-fired cyclone unit near Center, North Dakota, and TXU Energy's Monticello Steam Electric Station (MoSES) Unit 3, a 793-MW lignite--Powder River Basin (PRB) subbituminous coal-fired unit near Mt. Pleasant, Texas. A cold-side electrostatic precipitator (ESP) and wet flue gas desulfurization (FGD) scrubber are used at MRY and MoSES for controlling particulate and sulfur dioxide (SO{sub 2}) emissions, respectively. Several approaches for significantly and cost-effectively oxidizing elemental mercury (Hg{sup 0}) in lignite combustion flue gases, followed by capture in an ESP and/or FGD scrubber were evaluated. The project team involved in performing the technical aspects of the project included Babcock & Wilcox, the Energy & Environmental Research Center (EERC), the Electric Power Research Institute, and URS Corporation. Calcium bromide (CaBr{sub 2}), calcium chloride (CaCl{sub 2}), magnesium chloride (MgCl{sub 2}), and a proprietary sorbent enhancement additive (SEA), hereafter referred to as SEA2, were added to the lignite feeds to enhance Hg capture in the ESP and/or wet FGD. In addition, powdered activated carbon (PAC) was injected upstream of the ESP at MRY Unit 2. The work involved establishing Hg concentrations and removal rates across existing ESP and FGD units, determining costs associated with a given Hg removal efficiency, quantifying the balance-of-plant impacts of the control technologies, and facilitating technology commercialization. The primary project goal was to achieve ESP-FGD Hg removal efficiencies of {ge}55% at MRY and MoSES for about a month.

Steven A. Benson; Michael J. Holmes; Donald P. McCollor; Jill M. Mackenzie; Charlene R. Crocker; Lingbu Kong; Kevin C. Galbreath

2007-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

299

Texas - RRC District 1 Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet After Lease  

Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) " ,"ClickPipelines AboutDecemberSteamYear Jan FebThousandProcessed (Million

300

Texas - RRC District 1 Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Proved  

Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) " ,"ClickPipelines AboutDecemberSteamYear Jan FebThousandProcessed (Million(Million Barrels) Crude

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "wet process clinker" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Texas - RRC District 10 Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet After Lease  

Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) " ,"ClickPipelines AboutDecemberSteamYear Jan FebThousandProcessed (Million(Million Barrels)Separation,

302

Texas - RRC District 10 Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Proved  

Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) " ,"ClickPipelines AboutDecemberSteamYear Jan FebThousandProcessed (Million(MillionCubic Feet)

303

Texas - RRC District 2 Onshore Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet After  

Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) " ,"ClickPipelines AboutDecemberSteamYear Jan FebThousandProcessed (Million(MillionCubicLease Separation,

304

Texas - RRC District 2 Onshore Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation  

Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) " ,"ClickPipelines AboutDecemberSteamYear Jan FebThousandProcessed (Million(MillionCubicLease(Billion

305

Texas - RRC District 2 Onshore Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease  

Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) " ,"ClickPipelines AboutDecemberSteamYear Jan FebThousandProcessed

306

Texas - RRC District 3 Onshore Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet After  

Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) " ,"ClickPipelines AboutDecemberSteamYear Jan FebThousandProcessedLease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion

307

Texas - RRC District 3 Onshore Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation  

Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) " ,"ClickPipelines AboutDecemberSteamYear Jan FebThousandProcessedLease Separation, Proved

308

Texas - RRC District 3 Onshore Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease  

Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) " ,"ClickPipelines AboutDecemberSteamYear Jan FebThousandProcessedLease Separation, ProvedSeparation, Proved

309

Texas - RRC District 4 Onshore Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet After  

Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) " ,"ClickPipelines AboutDecemberSteamYear Jan FebThousandProcessedLease Separation, ProvedSeparation,

310

Texas - RRC District 4 Onshore Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation  

Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) " ,"ClickPipelines AboutDecemberSteamYear Jan FebThousandProcessedLease Separation,(Billion Cubic

311

Texas - RRC District 4 Onshore Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease  

Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) " ,"ClickPipelines AboutDecemberSteamYear Jan FebThousandProcessedLease Separation,(Billion CubicSeparation,

312

Texas - RRC District 5 Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet After Lease  

Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) " ,"ClickPipelines AboutDecemberSteamYear Jan FebThousandProcessedLease Separation,(Billion

313

Texas - RRC District 5 Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Proved  

Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) " ,"ClickPipelines AboutDecemberSteamYear Jan FebThousandProcessedLease

314

Texas - RRC District 6 Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet After Lease  

Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) " ,"ClickPipelines AboutDecemberSteamYear Jan FebThousandProcessedLeaseSeparation, Proved Reserves

315

Texas - RRC District 6 Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Proved  

Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) " ,"ClickPipelines AboutDecemberSteamYear Jan FebThousandProcessedLeaseSeparation, ProvedReserves (Billion

316

Texas - RRC District 7B Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet After Lease  

Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) " ,"ClickPipelines AboutDecemberSteamYear Jan FebThousandProcessedLeaseSeparation, ProvedReservesSeparation,

317

Texas - RRC District 7B Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Proved  

Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) " ,"ClickPipelines AboutDecemberSteamYear Jan FebThousandProcessedLeaseSeparation,Cubic Feet)

318

Texas - RRC District 7B Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease  

Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) " ,"ClickPipelines AboutDecemberSteamYear Jan FebThousandProcessedLeaseSeparation,Cubic Feet)Separation,

319

Texas - RRC District 7C Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet After Lease  

Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) " ,"ClickPipelines AboutDecemberSteamYear Jan FebThousandProcessedLeaseSeparation,Cubic

320

Texas - RRC District 7C Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Proved  

Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) " ,"ClickPipelines AboutDecemberSteamYear Jan FebThousandProcessedLeaseSeparation,Cubic(MillionReserves

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "wet process clinker" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

DESTRUCTION OF TETRAPHENYLBORATE IN TANK 48H USING WET AIR OXIDATION BATCH BENCH SCALE AUTOCLAVE TESTING WITH ACTUAL RADIOACTIVE TANK 48H WASTE  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Wet Air Oxidation (WAO) is one of the two technologies being considered for the destruction of Tetraphenylborate (TPB) in Tank 48H. Batch bench-scale autoclave testing with radioactive (actual) Tank 48H waste is among the tests required in the WAO Technology Maturation Plan. The goal of the autoclave testing is to validate that the simulant being used for extensive WAO vendor testing adequately represents the Tank 48H waste. The test objective was to demonstrate comparable test results when running simulated waste and real waste under similar test conditions. Specifically: (1) Confirm the TPB destruction efficiency and rate (same reaction times) obtained from comparable simulant tests, (2) Determine the destruction efficiency of other organics including biphenyl, (3) Identify and quantify the reaction byproducts, and (4) Determine off-gas composition. Batch bench-scale stirred autoclave tests were conducted with simulated and actual Tank 48H wastes at SRNL. Experimental conditions were chosen based on continuous-flow pilot-scale simulant testing performed at Siemens Water Technologies Corporation (SWT) in Rothschild, Wisconsin. The following items were demonstrated as a result of this testing. (1) Tetraphenylborate was destroyed to below detection limits during the 1-hour reaction time at 280 C. Destruction efficiency of TPB was > 99.997%. (2) Other organics (TPB associated compounds), except biphenyl, were destroyed to below their respective detection limits. Biphenyl was partially destroyed in the process, mainly due to its propensity to reside in the vapor phase during the WAO reaction. Biphenyl is expected to be removed in the gas phase during the actual process, which is a continuous-flow system. (3) Reaction byproducts, remnants of MST, and the PUREX sludge, were characterized in this work. Radioactive species, such as Pu, Sr-90 and Cs-137 were quantified in the filtrate and slurry samples. Notably, Cs-137, boron and potassium were shown as soluble as a result of the WAO reaction. (4) Off-gas composition was measured in the resulting gas phase from the reaction. Benzene and hydrogen were formed during the reaction, but they were reasonably low in the off-gas at 0.096 and 0.0063 vol% respectively. Considering the consistency in replicating similar test results with simulated waste and Tank 48H waste under similar test conditions, the results confirm the validity of the simulant for other WAO test conditions.

Adu-Wusu, K; Paul Burket, P

2009-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

322

No Confinement Needed: Observation of a Metastable Hydrophobic Wetting Two-Layer Ice on Graphene  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The structure of water at interfaces is crucial for processes ranging from photocatalysis to protein folding. Here, we investigate the structure and lattice dynamics of two-layer crystalline ice films grown on a hydrophobic substrate - graphene on Pt(111) - with low energy electron diffraction, reflection-absorption infrared spectroscopy, rare-gas adsorption/desorption, and ab-initio molecular dynamics. Unlike hexagonal ice, which consists of stacks of puckered hexagonal "bilayers", this new ice polymorph consists of two flat hexagonal sheets of water molecules in which the hexagons in each sheet are stacked directly on top of each other. Such two-layer ices have been predicted for water confined between hydrophobic slits, but not previously observed. Our results show that the two-layer ice forms even at zero pressure at a single hydrophobic interface by maximizing the number of hydrogen bonds at the expense of adopting a non-tetrahedral geometry with weakened bonds.

Kimmel, Gregory A.; Matthiesen, Jesper; Baer, Marcel; Mundy, Christopher J.; Petrik, Nikolay G.; Smith, R. Scott; Dohnalek, Zdenek; Kay, Bruce D.

2009-09-09T23:59:59.000Z

323

Hydrothermal Processing of Macroalgal Feedstocks in Continuous-Flow Reactors  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Wet macroalgal slurries can be converted into a biocrude by hydrothermal liquefaction (HTL). High levels of carbon conversion to gravity-separable oil product were accomplished at relatively low temperature (350 ?C) in a pressurized (sub-critical liquid water) environment (20 MPa). As opposed to earlier work in batch reactors reported by others, direct oil recovery was achieved without the use of a solvent and biomass trace mineral components were removed by processing steps so that they did not cause processing difficulties. In addition, catalytic hydrothermal gasification was effectively applied for HTL byproduct water cleanup and fuel gas production from water soluble organics. As a result, high conversion of macroalgae to liquid and gas fuel products was found with low levels of organic contamination in byproduct water. Both process steps were accomplished in continuous-flow reactor systems such that design data for process scale-up was generated.

Elliott, Douglas C.; Hart, Todd R.; Neuenschwander, Gary G.; Rotness, Leslie J.; Roesijadi, Guritno; Zacher, Alan H.; Magnuson, Jon K.

2014-02-18T23:59:59.000Z

324

Fabrication of the ZnO thin films using wet-chemical etching processes on application for organic light emitting diode (OLED) devices  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

- sively used in solar cells, touch panels, heat mirrors, organic electro- luminescence devices (OLED- chemical etching behaviors of ZnO films were also investigated using various chemicals. In order

Hong, Byungyou

325

Figure 1. The wet area is flooded by damming up a small stream adjacent to the study area once a year for a period of 2-3 months. By  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Figure 1. The wet area is flooded by damming up a small stream adjacent to the study area once. Figure 1.g The wet area is flooded by damming up a small streamded by damming up a smded by damwet area Vegetation data are obtained from two ri- parian grassland sites with strong hydro- logical gradients

Schierup, Mikkel Heide

326

Purification process  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A process for the removal of hydrogen sulphide from gases or liquid hydrocarbons, comprises contacting the gas or liquid hydrocarbon with an aqueous alkaline solution, preferably having a pH value of 8 to 10, comprising (A) an anthraquinone disulphonic acid or a water-soluble sulphonamide thereof (B) a compound of a metal which can exist in at least two valency states and (C) a sequestering agent.

Marshall, A.

1981-02-17T23:59:59.000Z

327

Hydropyrolysis process  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An improved process for producing a methane-enriched gas wherein a hydrogen-deficient carbonaceous material is treated with a hydrogen-containing pyrolysis gas at an elevated temperature and pressure to produce a product gas mixture including methane, carbon monoxide and hydrogen. The improvement comprises passing the product gas mixture sequentially through a water-gas shift reaction zone and a gas separation zone to provide separate gas streams of methane and of a recycle gas comprising hydrogen, carbon monoxide and methane for recycle to the process. A controlled amount of steam also is provided which when combined with the recycle gas provides a pyrolysis gas for treatment of additional hydrogen-deficient carbonaceous material. The amount of steam used and the conditions within the water-gas shift reaction zone and gas separation zone are controlled to obtain a steady-state composition of pyrolysis gas which will comprise hydrogen as the principal constituent and a minor amount of carbon monoxide, steam and methane so that no external source of hydrogen is needed to supply the hydrogen requirements of the process. In accordance with a particularly preferred embodiment, conditions are controlled such that there also is produced a significant quantity of benzene as a valuable coproduct.

Ullman, Alan Z. (Northridge, CA); Silverman, Jacob (Woodland Hills, CA); Friedman, Joseph (Huntington Beach, CA)

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

328

Analysis Of Post-Wet-Chemistry Heat Treatment Effects On Nb SRF Surface Resistance  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Most of the current research in superconducting radio frequency (SRF) cavities is focused on ways to reduce the construction and operating cost of SRF-based accelerators as well as on the development of new or improved cavity processing techniques. The increase in quality factors is the result of the reduction of the surface resistance of the materials. A recent test on a 1.5 GHz single cell cavity made from ingot niobium of medium purity and heat treated at 1400 deg C in a ultra-high vacuum induction furnace resulted in a residual resistance of ~ 1n{Omega} and a quality factor at 2.0 K increasing with field up to ~ 510{sup 10} at a peak magnetic field of 90 mT. In this contribution, we present some results on the investigation of the origin of the extended Q{sub 0}-increase, obtained by multiple HF rinses, oxypolishing and heat treatment of ?all Nb? cavities.

Dhakal, Pashupati; Ciovati, Gianluigi; Kneisel, Peter K.; Myneni, Ganapati Rao

2014-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

329

DISCOLORATION OF THE WETTED SURFACE IN THE 6.1D DISSOLVER  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

During a camera inspection of a failed coil in the 6.1D dissolver, an orange discoloration was observed on a portion of the dissolver wall and coils. At the request of H-Canyon Engineering, the inspection video of the dissolver was reviewed by SRNL to assess if the observed condition (a non-uniform, orange-colored substance on internal surfaces) was a result of corrosion. Although the dissolver vessel and coil corrode during dissolution operations, the high acid conditions are not consistent with the formation of ferrous oxides (i.e., orange/rust-colored corrosion products). In a subsequent investigation, SRNL performed dissolution experiments to determine if residues from the nylon bags used for Pu containment could have generated the orange discoloration following dissolution. When small pieces of a nylon bag were placed in boiling 8 M nitric acid solutions containing other components representative of the H-Canyon process, complete dissolution occurred almost immediately. No residues were obtained even when a nylon mass to volume ratio greater than 100 times the 6.1D dissolver value was used. Degradation products from the dissolution of nylon bags are not responsible for the discoloration observed in the dissolver.

Rudisill, T.; Mickalonis, J.; Crapse, K.

2013-12-18T23:59:59.000Z

330

Scaling of Counter-Current Imbibition Process in Low-Permeability Porous Media, TR-121  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This project presents the recent work on imaging imbibition in low permeability porous media (diatomite) with X-ray completed tomography. The viscosity ratio between nonwetting and wetting fluids is varied over several orders of magnitude yielding different levels of imbibition performance. Also performed is mathematical analysis of counter-current imbibition processes and development of a modified scaling group incorporating the mobility ratio. This modified group is physically based and appears to improve scaling accuracy of countercurrent imbibition significantly.

Kvoscek, A.R.; Zhou, D.; Jia, L.; Kamath, J.

2001-01-17T23:59:59.000Z

331

Antimicrobial product and process  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A composition for controlling a plant disease caused by a plant pathogenic bacterium is disclosed. The composition comprises an activity for inhibiting the growth of the plant pathogenic bacterium and is extracted in an aqueous solvent from particles of malted cereal grain. The composition is used either in dry or wet form by application to plant parts, such as potato seed pieces, that are to be protected from the pathogenic bacteria. 6 figs.

Barrett, K.B.

1997-12-16T23:59:59.000Z

332

Antimicrobial product and process  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A composition for controlling a plant disease caused by a plant pathogenic bacterium is disclosed. The composition comprises an activity for inhibiting the growth of the plant pathogenic bacterium and is extracted in an aqueous solvent from particles of malted cereal grain. The composition is used either in dry or wet form by application to plant parts, such as potato seed pieces, that are to be protected from the pathogenic bacteria.

Barrett, Karen B. (Idaho Falls, ID)

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

333

Desulfurization of flue gas by the confined zone dispersion process  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This Confined Zone Dispersion (CZD) process involves injecting a finely atomized slurry of reactive lime into the ductwork of a coal-fired utility boiler. The principle of the confined zone is to form a wet zone of slurry droplets in the middle of the duct confined in an envelope of hot gas between the wet zone and the duct walls. The lime slurry reacts with part of the sulfur dioxide (SO{sub 2}) in the gas, and the reaction products dry to form solid particles. An electrostatic precipitator (ESP) downstream from the point of injection captures the reaction products, along with the fly ash entrained in the flue gas. The purpose of this project was to prove the CZD process concept by testing it on a limited scale, and then demonstrating the process on a large scale. The scope of work included projecting the cost of commercial implementation. The test facility for the proof-of-concept tests was on a scale equivalent to a 7 MWe generating plant. The large-scale demonstration was made on a scale of 70 MWe. This report describes how data from the two test sites were correlated, and presents conceptual designs for two full-scale retrofit installations. The rationale and data supporting the conclusions are also given in Part 4.

Not Available

1989-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

334

Dry flue gas desulfurization process for various coals  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Flue gas desulfurization (FGD) processes have been widely used since the early 1970's for control of sulfur dioxide emissions from coal-fired power plants. First generation FGD systems employ ''wet processes'' whereby the flue gas is contacted with a solution or slurry of an alkali reagent. Most of these installations use either lime or limestone. Calcium-based wet systems have, in general, satisfied SO/sub 2/ removal requirements; however, reliability of the early systems was affected by some operational problems. Additionally, sludge dewatering and disposal equipment results in overall system complexity. A dry FGD process which minimizes these problems was developed in late 1970's. It incorporates a spray drying concept for removal of SO/sub 2/ by reaction with lime slurry or soda ash solution. The spray dryer absorber is followed by an electrostatic precipitator or a fabric filter where particulates are collected. The waste product, which is a mixture of FGD reaction products, unreacted reagent and fly ash, is dry thus eliminating the need for dewatering equipment.

Widico, M.J.; Dhargalkar, P.H.

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

335

Integration of stripping of fines slurry in a coking and gasification process  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

In an integrated fluid coking and gasification process wherein a stream of fluidized solids is passed from a fluidized bed coking zone to a second fluidized bed and wherein entrained solid fines are recovered by a wet scrubbing process and wherein the resulting solids-liquid slurry is stripped to remove acidic gases, the stripped vapors of the stripping zone are sent to the gas cleanup stage of the gasification product gas. The improved stripping integration is particularly useful in the combination coal liquefaction process, fluid coking of bottoms of the coal liquefaction zone and gasification of the product coke.

DeGeorge, Charles W. (Chester, NJ)

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

336

An assessment of the use of direct contact condensers with wet cooling systems for utility steam power plants  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Potential use of a direct contact condenser for steam recovery at the turbine exhaust of a utility power plant using a wet cooling system is investigated. To maintain condensate separate from the cooling water, a bank of plate heat exchangers is used. In a case study for a nominal 130-MW steam power plant, two heat rejection systems, one using a conventional surface condenser and another using a direct contact condenser together with a set of plate heat exchangers are compared on the basis of their performance, operation and maintenance, and system economics. Despite a higher initial cost for the direct contact system, the advantages it offers suggests that this system is viable both technically and economically. Key to the improvements the direct contact system offers is a higher equivalent availability for the power system. Reduction of dissolved oxygen and other metallic ions in the condensate, reduced use of chemical scavengers and polishers, and potential elimination of a plant floor are also major benefits of this system. Drawbacks include added plant components and higher initial cost. The potential for long-term cost reduction for the direct contact system is also identified.

Bharathan, D.; Hoo, E. [National Renewable Energy Lab., Golden, CO (United States)] [National Renewable Energy Lab., Golden, CO (United States); D`Errico, P. [Stone and Webster Engineering Corp., Boston, MA (United States)] [Stone and Webster Engineering Corp., Boston, MA (United States)

1992-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

337

Oligomerization process  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A liquid phase process for oligomerization of C.sub.4 and C.sub.5 isoolefins or the etherification thereof with C.sub.1 to C.sub.6 alcohols wherein the reactants are contacted in a reactor with a fixed bed acid cation exchange resin catalyst at an LHSV of 5 to 20, pressure of 0 to 400 psig and temperature of 120 to 300.degree. F. wherein the improvement is the operation of the reactor at a pressure to maintain the reaction mixture at its boiling point whereby at least a portion but less than all of the reaction mixture is vaporized. By operating at the boiling point and allowing a portion of the reaction mixture to vaporize, the exothermic heat of reaction is dissipated by the formation of more boil up and the temperature in the reactor is controlled.

Smith, Jr., Lawrence A. (Bellaire, TX); hearn, Dennis (Houston, TX); Jones, Jr., Edward M. (Friendswood, TX)

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

338

Etherification process  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A liquid phase process for oligomerization of C.sub.4 and C.sub.5 isoolefins or the etherification thereof with C.sub.1 to C.sub.6 alcohols wherein the reactants are contacted in a reactor with a fixed bed acid cation exchange resin catalyst at an LHSV of 5 to 20, pressure of 0 to 400 psig and temperature of 120.degree. to 300.degree. F. wherein the improvement is the operation of the reactor at a pressure to maintain the reaction mixture at its boiling point whereby at least a portion but less than all of the reaction mixture is vaporized. By operating at the boiling point and allowing a portion of the reaction mixture to vaporize, the exothermic heat of reaction is dissipated by the formation of more boil up and the temperature in the reactor is controlled.

Smith, Jr., Lawrence A. (Houston, TX); Hearn, Dennis (Houston, TX); Jones, Jr., Edward M. (Friendswood, TX)

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

339

Wet-sand impulse loading of metallic plates and corrugated core sandwich panels J.J. Rimoli a  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. A porthole extrusion process followed by friction stir welding was utilized to fabricate 6061-T6 aluminum

Wadley, Haydn

340

Direct application of west coast geothermal resources in a wet corn milling plant supplementary analyses and information dissemination. Final report, addendum  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In an extension to the scope of the previous studies, supplementary analyses were to be performed for both plants which would assess the economics of geothermal energy if coal had been the primary fuel rather than oil and gas. The studies include: supplementary analysis for a coal fired wet corn milling plant, supplementary analysis for an East Coast frozen food plant with coal fired boilers, and information dissemination activities.

Not Available

1982-03-19T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "wet process clinker" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Adhesion and nonwetting-wetting transition in the Al -Al2O3 interface Qing Zhang, Tahir C agin, Adri van Duin, and William A. Goddard III  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Adhesion and nonwetting-wetting transition in the Al? -Al2O3 interface Qing Zhang, Tahir C赂 agin properties, of both solid and liquid Al/ -Al2O3 interfaces. The ReaxFF was developed solely with ab initio calculations on various phases of Al and Al2O3 and Al-O-H clusters. Our computed lattice constants, elastic

342

,"California - Los Angeles Basin Onshore Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National and Regional Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy SourcesWyoming"Coalbed Methane Proved ReservesPricePriceNonassociated Natural Gas, Wet

343

,"Gulf of Mexico Federal Offshore - Louisiana and Alabama Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National and Regional Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy SourcesWyoming"CoalbedOhio"Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet After Lease

344

,"Gulf of Mexico Federal Offshore - Louisiana and Alabama Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National and Regional Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy SourcesWyoming"CoalbedOhio"Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet After

345

,"Gulf of Mexico Federal Offshore - Louisiana and Alabama Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National and Regional Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy SourcesWyoming"CoalbedOhio"Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet AfterNonassociated

346

,"Gulf of Mexico Federal Offshore - Texas Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National and Regional Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy SourcesWyoming"CoalbedOhio"Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet

347

,"Gulf of Mexico Federal Offshore - Texas Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National and Regional Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy SourcesWyoming"CoalbedOhio"Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, WetDry Natural

348

,"Gulf of Mexico Federal Offshore - Texas Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National and Regional Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy SourcesWyoming"CoalbedOhio"Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, WetDry

349

Permitting and solid waste management issues for the Bailly Station wet limestone Advanced Flue Gas Desulfurization (AFGD) system  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Pure Air (a general partnership between Air Products and Chemicals, Inc., and Mitsubishi Heavy Industries America, Inc.). is constructing a wet limestone co-current advanced flue gas desulfurization (AFGD) system that has technological and commercial advantages over conventional FGD systems in the United States. The AFGD system is being installed at the Northern Indiana Public Service Company's Bailly Generating Station near Gary, Indiana. The AFGD system is scheduled to be operational by the Summer, 1992. The AFGD system will remove at least 90 percent of the sulfur dioxide (SO{sub 2}) in the flue gas from Boilers 7 and 8 at the Station while burning 3.2 percent sulfur coal. Also as part of testing the AFGD system, 95 percent removal of SO{sub 2} will be demonstrated on coals containing up to 4.5 percent sulfur. At the same time that SO{sub 2} is removed from the flue gas, a gypsum by-product will be produced which will be used for wallboard manufacturing. Since the AFGD system is a pollution control device, one would expect its installation to be received favorably by the public and regulatory agencies. Although the project was well received by regulatory agencies, on public group (Save the Dunes Council) was initially concerned since the project is located adjacent to the Indiana Dunes National Lakeshore. The purpose of this paper is to describe the project team's experiences in obtaining permits/approvals from regulatory agencies and in dealing with the public. 1 ref., 1 fig., 2 tabs.

Bolinsky, F.T. (Pure Air, Allentown, PA (United States)); Ross, J. (Northern Indiana Public Service Co., Hammond, IN (United States)); Dennis, D.S. (United Engineers and Constructors, Inc., Denver, CO (United States). Stearns-Roger Div.); Huston, J.S. (Environmental Alternatives, Inc., Warren NJ (USA))

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

350

Structure Study of Cellulose Fibers Wet-Spun from Environmentally Friendly NaOH/Urea Aqueous Solutions  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In this study, structure changes of regenerated cellulose fibers wet-spun from a cotton linter pulp (degree of polymerization {approx}620) solution in an NaOH/urea solvent under different conditions were investigated by simultaneous synchrotron wide-angle X-ray diffraction (WAXD) and small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS). WAXD results indicated that the increase in flow rate during spinning produced a better crystal orientation and a higher degree of crystallinity, whereas a 2-fold increase in draw ratio only affected the crystal orientation. When coagulated in a H{sub 2}SO{sub 4}/Na{sub 2}SO{sub 4} aqueous solution at 15 {sup o}C, the regenerated fibers exhibited the highest crystallinity and a crystal orientation comparable to that of commercial rayon fibers by the viscose method. SAXS patterns exhibited a pair of meridional maxima in all regenerated cellulose fibers, indicating the existence of a lamellar structure. A fibrillar superstructure was observed only at higher flow rates (>20 m/min). The conformation of cellulose molecules in NaOH/urea aqueous solution was also investigated by static and dynamic light scattering. It was found that cellulose chains formed aggregates with a radius of gyration, R{sub g}, of about 232 nm and an apparent hydrodynamic radius, R{sub h}, of about 172 nm. The NaOH/urea solvent system is low-cost and environmentally friendly, which may offer an alternative route to replace more hazardous existing methods for the production of regenerated cellulose fibers.

Chen,X.; Burger, C.; Wan, F.; Zhang, J.; Rong, L.; Hsiao, B.; Chu, B.; Cai, J.; Zhang, L.

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

351

Comparative Reactivity Study of Forsterite and Antigorite in Wet Supercritical CO2 by In Situ Infrared Spectroscopy  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The carbonation reactions of forsterite (Mg2SiO4) and antigorite [Mg3Si2O5(OH)4], representatives of olivine and serpentine minerals, in dry and wet supercritical carbon dioxide (scCO2) at conditions relevant to geologic carbon sequestration (35 癈 and 100 bar) were studied by in-situ Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) spectroscopy. Our results confirm that water plays a critical role in the reactions between metal silicate minerals and scCO2. For neat scCO2, no reaction was observed in 24 hr for either mineral. When water was added to the scCO2, a thin water film formed on the minerals surfaces, and the reaction rates and extents increased as the water saturation level was raised from 54% to 116% (excess water). For the first time, the presence of bicarbonate, a key reaction intermediate for metal silicate reactions with scCO2, was observed in a heterogeneous system where mineral solids, an adsorbed water film, and bulk scCO2 co-exist. In excess-water experiments, approximately 4% of forsterite and less than 2% of antigorite transformed into hydrated Mg-carbonates. A precipitate similar to nesquehonite (MgCO33H2O) was observed for forsterite within 6 hr of reaction time, but no such precipitate was formed from antigorite until after water was removed from the scCO2 following a 24-hr reaction period. The reduced reactivity and carbonate-precipitation behavior of antigorite was attributed to slower, incongruent dissolution of the mineral and lower concentrations of Mg2+ and HCO3- in the water film. The in situ measurements employed in this work make it possible to quantify metal carbonate precipitates and key reaction intermediates such as bicarbonate for the investigation of carbonation reaction mechanisms relevant to geologic carbon sequestration.

Thompson, Christopher J.; Loring, John S.; Rosso, Kevin M.; Wang, Zheming

2013-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

352

RESEARCH UPDATE Wet woodland  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

be vulnerable to abstraction and nutrient pollution (eutrophication) within the valley mire's catchment. 路 Those to the eutrophication of soils (caused by oxidation and release of nitrogen) eventually resulting in Alnus of swamp vegetation. 路 Eutrophication of incoming water sources leads towards Phragmites-Urtica fen

353

Conventional Wet Chemistry ICP-AES Development for RPP-WTP AY-102/C-106 Melter Feed Slurry Simulants - A Statistical Review of the Results from the Phase I Study  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The River Protection Project (RPP)--Hanford Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) is to prepare and process High Level Waste (HLW) streams into glass waste forms that will meet HLW disposal requirements. Samples of HLW sludge and samples of this sludge mixed with glass-forming chemicals are to be taken and analyzed for process control. Glass characterization from the melter is not included in the scope. The development of viable analytical protocols to provide the required elemental analyses of these samples with rapid turnaround times (before and after addition of the glass-forming chemicals) has been defined as an RPP statement of work for the Analytical Development Section (ADS) of the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL). Wet chemistry is serving as the baseline comparison to laser ablation for method development. One of the simulants used in this study by ADS was AY-102/C-106 melter feed slurry simulant, a simulant used to represent HLW samples after the addition of glass-forming chemicals. Several different dissolution methods were used by ADS in preparing samples of this simulant for elemental analyses by inductively coupled plasma-atomic emission spectroscopy (ICP-AES). The measurements generated by this process were provided to SRNL's Statistical Consulting Section (SCS) for analysis. The measurement data generated for samples of the RPP-WTP AY-102/C-106 melter feed slurry simulant are presented in this report and the different approaches used to prepare the samples are statistically compared. Comparisons among three of the dissolution methods are highlighted in this analysis. The methods are: sodium peroxide fusion in nickel crucibles, acidification with HNO{sub 3}/HCL at room temperature, and cesium carbonate fusion in zirconium crucibles. A summary table of the measurement averages generated by the three methods is presented. The cesium carbonate fusion method yielded measurements with significantly different mean values from the other two preparation methods for several of the elements.

Edwards, Thomas B.

2005-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

354

Trends in wetting behavior for Ag朇uO braze alloys on Ba0.5Sr0.5Co0.8Fe0.2O(3??) at elevated temperatures in air  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Ba0.5Sr0.5Co0.8Fe0.2O(3-?? (BSCF) is a potential oxygen separation membrane material for advanced coal based power plants. For this application, BSCF must be joined to a metal. In the current study, Ag-CuO, a reactive air brazing (RAB) alloy was evaluated for brazing BSCF. In-situ contact angle tests were performed on BSCF using Ag-CuO binary mixtures at 950 and 1000癈 and the interfacial microstructures were evaluated. Wetting contact angles (?<90) were obtained at short times at 950癈 and the contact angles remained constant at 1000癈 for 1, 2 and 8 mol% CuO contents. Microstructural analysis revealed the dissolution of copper oxide into the BSCF matrix to form copper-cobalt-oxygen rich dissolution products along the BSCF grain boundary. The formation of a thick interfacial reaction product layer and ridging at the sessile drop triple point indicate that the reaction kinetics are very rapid and that it will require careful process control to obtain the desired thin but continuous interfacial product layer.

Joshi, Vineet V.; Meier, Alan; Darsell, Jens T.; Weil, K. Scott; Bowden, Mark E.

2013-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

355

The effects of wetting layer on electronic and optical properties of intersubband P-to-S transitions in strained dome-shaped InAs/GaAs quantum dots  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The authors report on the impact of wetting layer thickness and quantum dot size on the electronic and optical properties of dome-shaped InAs/GaAs quantum dots (QDs) with strained potential. Two wetting layer thicknesses of 0.5 and 2.0 nm were compared. A strong size dependence of P-to-S transition energy, transition dipole moment, oscillator strength, and linear and third-order nonlinear susceptibilities were concluded. The P-to-S transition dipole moment was shown to be purely in-plane polarization. The linear and nonlinear absorption and dispersion showed a red shift when the wetting layer thickness was increased. Our results revealed that the nonlinear susceptibility is much more sensitive to QD size compared to the linear susceptibility. An interpretation of the results was presented based on the probability density of finding the electron inside the dot and wetting layer. The results are in good agreement with previously reported experimental data.

Shahzadeh, Mohammadreza; Sabaeian, Mohammad, E-mail: sabaeian@scu.ac.ir [Physics Department, Faculty of Science, Shahid Chamran University of Ahvaz (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

2014-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

356

15/10/2008 12:32Out of Africa, Across a Wet Sahara --Balter 2008 (1014): 5 --ScienceNOW Page 1 of 2http://sciencenow.sciencemag.org/cgi/content/full/2008/1014/5  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

the sands. A team led by geochemist Anne Osborne of the University of Bristol in the United Kingdom set out of migrating along the Nile River. CREDIT: ANNE OSBORNE Out of Africa, Across a Wet Sahara By Michael Balter

Rohling, Eelco

357

Award-Winning Etching Process Cuts Solar Cell Costs (Fact Sheet)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

NREL scientists have invented the 'black silicon' nanocatalytic wet-chemical etch, an inexpensive, one-step process that literally turns the solar cells black, allowing them to absorb more than 98% of incident sunlight. The process costs just a few cents per watt of solar-cell power-producing capacity. Increases in manufactured cell efficiencies of up to 0.8% are possible because of the reduced reflectance of black silicon. This would reduce silicon solar module costs by $5-$10 per module.

Not Available

2013-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

358

Infiltration processing of boron carbide-, boron-, and boride-reactive metal cermets  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A chemical pretreatment method is used to produce boron carbide-, boron-, and boride-reactive metal composites by an infiltration process. The boron carbide or other starting constituents, in powder form, are immersed in various alcohols, or other chemical agents, to change the surface chemistry of the starting constituents. The chemically treated starting constituents are consolidated into a porous ceramic precursor which is then infiltrated by molten aluminum or other metal by heating to wetting conditions. Chemical treatment of the starting constituents allows infiltration to full density. The infiltrated precursor is further heat treated to produce a tailorable microstructure. The process at low cost produces composites with improved characteristics, including increased toughness, strength.

Halverson, Danny C. (Manteca, CA); Landingham, Richard L. (Livermore, CA)

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

359

Differential Wiener process  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Stochastic Processes Will Penny Stochastic Differential Equations Wiener process Sample Paths OU Process Stochastic Chain Rule Change of variables Time-varying functions Multivariate SDE Expectations Wiener Process OU Process Neural Population Fitzhugh Nagumo Gaussian approximation FN Population Fokker

Penny, Will

360

High Speed/ Low Effluent Process for Ethanol  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

n this project, BPI demonstrated a new ethanol fermentation technology, termed the High Speed/ Low Effluent (HS/LE) process on both lab and large pilot scale as it would apply to wet mill and/or dry mill corn ethanol production. The HS/LE process allows very rapid fermentations, with 18 to 22% sugar syrups converted to 9 to 11% ethanol 慴eers in 6 to 12 hours using either a 慶onsecutive batch or 慶ontinuous cascade implementation. This represents a 5 to 8X increase in fermentation speeds over conventional 72 hour batch fermentations which are the norm in the fuel ethanol industry today. The 慶onsecutive batch technology was demonstrated on a large pilot scale (4,800 L) in a dry mill corn ethanol plant near Cedar Rapids, IA (Xethanol Biofuels). The pilot demonstrated that 12 hour fermentations can be accomplished on an industrial scale in a non-sterile industrial environment. Other objectives met in this project included development of a Low Energy (LE) Distillation process which reduces the energy requirements for distillation from about 14,000 BTU/gal steam ($0.126/gal with natural gas @ $9.00 MCF) to as low as 0.40 KW/gal electrical requirements ($0.022/gal with electricity @ $0.055/KWH). BPI also worked on the development of processes that would allow application of the HS/LE fermentation process to dry mill ethanol plants. A High-Value Corn ethanol plant concept was developed to produce 1) corn germ/oil, 2) corn bran, 3) ethanol, 4) zein protein, and 5) nutritional protein, giving multiple higher value products from the incoming corn stream.

M. Clark Dale

2006-10-30T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "wet process clinker" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Inverted Metamorphic Multijunction (IMM) Cell Processing Instructions  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This technical report details the processing schedule used to fabricate Inverted Metamorphic Multijunction (IMM) concentrator solar cells at The National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL). These devices are used as experimental test structures to support the research at NREL that is focused on increasing the efficiency of photovoltaic power conversion. They are not intended to be devices suitable for deployment in working concentrator systems primarily because of heat sinking issues. The process schedule was developed to be compatible with small sample sizes and to afford relatively rapid turn-around times, in support of research efforts. The report describes the use of electro deposition of gold for both the back and front contacts. Electro-deposition is used because of its rapid turn around time and because it is a benign metallization technique that is seldom responsible for damage to the semiconductors. The layer transfer technique is detailed including the use of a commercially available adhesive and the etching away of the parent gallium arsenide substrate. Photolithography is used to define front contact grids as well as the mesa area of the cell. Finally, the selective wet chemical etchant system is introduced and its use to reveal the back contact is described.

Duda, A.; Ward, S.; Young, M.

2012-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

362

HYDROLOGICAL PROCESSES Hydrol. Process. 21, 24472457 (2007)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

HYDROLOGICAL PROCESSES Hydrol. Process. 21, 24472457 (2007) Published online 18 May 2007 in Wiley for simulating watershed runoff. This data model, called nen, allows users to visualize and analyse the processes, such as raster, that do not give direct insight into the spatial dynamics and distribution of the processes

Reitsma, Femke E.

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

363

Extensible packet processing architecture  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A technique for distributed packet processing includes sequentially passing packets associated with packet flows between a plurality of processing engines along a flow through data bus linking the plurality of processing engines in series. At least one packet within a given packet flow is marked by a given processing engine to signify by the given processing engine to the other processing engines that the given processing engine has claimed the given packet flow for processing. A processing function is applied to each of the packet flows within the processing engines and the processed packets are output on a time-shared, arbitered data bus coupled to the plurality of processing engines.

Robertson, Perry J.; Hamlet, Jason R.; Pierson, Lyndon G.; Olsberg, Ronald R.; Chun, Guy D.

2013-08-20T23:59:59.000Z

364

Milestone Plan Process Improvement  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Milestone Plan Process Improvement Milestone Plan Process Improvement Background In response to our community's concern over the milestone plan (MP) process within the system, the...

365

Roll-to-Roll Solution-Processible Small-Molecule OLEDs  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The objective of this program is to develop key knowledge and make critical connections between technologies needed to enable low-cost manufacturing of OLED lighting products. In particular, the program was intended to demonstrate the feasibility of making high performance Small-Molecule OLEDs (SM-OLED) using a roll-to-roll (R2R) wet-coating technique by addressing the following technical risks (1) Whether the wet-coating technique can provide high performance OLEDs, (2) Whether SM-OLED can be made in a R2R manner, (3) What are the requirements for coating equipment, and (4) Whether R2R OLEDs can have the same performance as the lab controls. The program has been managed and executed according to the Program Management Plan (PMP) that was first developed at the beginning of the program and further revised accordingly as the program progressed. Significant progress and risk reductions have been accomplished by the end of the program. Specific achievements include: (1) Demonstrated that wet-coating can provide OLEDs with high LPW and long lifetime; (2) Demonstrated R2R OLEDs can be as efficient as batch controls (Figure 1) (3) Developed & validated basic designs for key equipment necessary for R2R SM-OLEDs; (4) Developed know-hows & specifications on materials & ink formulations critical to wetcoating; (5) Developed key R2R processes for each OLED layer (6) Identified key materials and components such as flexible barrier substrates necessary for R2R OLEDs.

Liu, Jie Jerry

2012-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

366

Assessment of TEES{reg_sign} applications for Wet Industrial Wastes: Energy benefit and economic analysis report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Fundamental work is catalyzed biomass pyrolysis/gasification led to the Thermochemical Environmental Energy System (TEES{reg_sign}) concept, a means of converting moist biomass feedstocks to high-value fuel gases such as methane. A low-temperature (350{degrees}C), pressurized (3100 psig) reaction environment and a nickel catalyst are used to reduce volumes of very high-moisture wastes such as food processing byproducts while producing useful quantities of energy. A study was conducted to assess the economic viability of a range of potential applications of the process. Cases examined included feedstocks of cheese whey, grape pomace, spent grain, and an organic chemical waste stream. The analysis indicated that only the organic chemical waste process is economically attractive in the existing energy/economic environment. However, food processing cases will become attractive as alternative disposal practices are curtailed and energy prices rise.

Elliott, D.C.; Scheer, T.H.

1992-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

367

Thermocatalytic conversion of food processing wastes: Topical report, FY 1988  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The efficient utilization of waste produced during food processing operations is a topic of growing importance to the industry. While incineration is an attractive option for wastes with relatively low ash and moisture contents (i.e., under about 50 wt % moisture), it is not suitable for wastes with high moisture contents. Cheese whey, brewer's spent grain, and fruit pomace are examples of food processing wastes that are generally too wet to burn efficiently and cleanly. Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) is developing a thermocatalytic conversion process that can convert high-moisture wastes (up to 98 wt % moisture) to a medium-Btu fuel gas consisting primarily of methane and carbon dioxide. At the same time, the COD of these waste streams is reduced by 90% to 99%, Organic wastes are converted by thermocatalytic treatment at 350/degree/C to 400/degree/C and 3000 to 4000 psig. The process offers a relatively simple solution to waste treatment while providing net energy production from wastes containing as little as 2 wt % organic solids (this is equivalent to a COD of approximately 25,000 mg/L). This report describes continuous reactor system (CRS) experiments that have been conducted with food processing wastes. The purpose of the CRS experiments was to provide kinetic and catalyst lifetime data, which could not be obtained with the batch reactor tests. These data are needed for commercial scaleup of the process.

Baker, E.G.; Butner, R.S.; Sealock, L.J. Jr.; Elliott, D.C.; Neuenschwander, G.G.

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

368

The effect of palladium additions on the solidus/liquidus temperatures and wetting properties of Ag-CuO based air brazes  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A new ceramic brazing technique referred to as reactive air brazing (RAB) has recently been developed for potential applications in high temperature devices such as gas concentrators, solid oxide fuel cells, gas turbines, and combustion engines. At present, the technique utilizing a silver-copper oxide system is of great interest. The maximum operating temperature of this system is limited by its eutectic temperature of ~945癈, although in practice the operating temperature will need to be lower. An obvious strategy that can be employed to increase the maximum operating temperature of the braze material is to add a higher melting noble alloying element. In this paper, we report the effects of palladium addition on the melting characteristics of the Ag-CuO system and on the wetting properties of the resulting braze with respect to alumina. It was found that the addition of Pd will cause an increase in the melting temperature of the Ag-CuO braze but possibly at a sacrifice of wetting properties depending on composition.

Darsell, Jens T.; Weil, K. Scott

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

369

Using Biosurfactants Produced from Agriculture Process Waste Streams to Improve Oil Recovery in Fractured Carbonate Reservoirs  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report describes the progress of our research during the first 30 months (10/01/2004 to 03/31/2007) of the original three-year project cycle. The project was terminated early due to DOE budget cuts. This was a joint project between the Tertiary Oil Recovery Project (TORP) at the University of Kansas and the Idaho National Laboratory (INL). The objective was to evaluate the use of low-cost biosurfactants produced from agriculture process waste streams to improve oil recovery in fractured carbonate reservoirs through wettability mediation. Biosurfactant for this project was produced using Bacillus subtilis 21332 and purified potato starch as the growth medium. The INL team produced the biosurfactant and characterized it as surfactin. INL supplied surfactin as required for the tests at KU as well as providing other microbiological services. Interfacial tension (IFT) between Soltrol 130 and both potential benchmark chemical surfactants and crude surfactin was measured over a range of concentrations. The performance of the crude surfactin preparation in reducing IFT was greater than any of the synthetic compounds throughout the concentration range studied but at low concentrations, sodium laureth sulfate (SLS) was closest to the surfactin, and was used as the benchmark in subsequent studies. Core characterization was carried out using both traditional flooding techniques to find porosity and permeability; and NMR/MRI to image cores and identify pore architecture and degree of heterogeneity. A cleaning regime was identified and developed to remove organic materials from cores and crushed carbonate rock. This allowed cores to be fully characterized and returned to a reproducible wettability state when coupled with a crude-oil aging regime. Rapid wettability assessments for crushed matrix material were developed, and used to inform slower Amott wettability tests. Initial static absorption experiments exposed limitations in the use of HPLC and TOC to determine surfactant concentrations. To reliably quantify both benchmark surfactants and surfactin, a surfactant ion-selective electrode was used as an indicator in the potentiometric titration of the anionic surfactants with Hyamine 1622. The wettability change mediated by dilute solutions of a commercial preparation of SLS (STEOL CS-330) and surfactin was assessed using two-phase separation, and water flotation techniques; and surfactant loss due to retention and adsorption on the rock was determined. Qualitative tests indicated that on a molar basis, surfactin is more effective than STEOL CS-330 in altering wettability of crushed Lansing-Kansas City carbonates from oil-wet to water-wet state. Adsorption isotherms of STEOL CS-330 and surfactin on crushed Lansing-Kansas City outcrop and reservoir material showed that surfactin has higher specific adsorption on these oomoldic carbonates. Amott wettability studies confirmed that cleaned cores are mixed-wet, and that the aging procedure renders them oil-wet. Tests of aged cores with no initial water saturation resulted in very little spontaneous oil production, suggesting that water-wet pathways into the matrix are required for wettability change to occur. Further investigation of spontaneous imbibition and forced imbibition of water and surfactant solutions into LKC cores under a variety of conditions--cleaned vs. crude oil-aged; oil saturated vs. initial water saturation; flooded with surfactant vs. not flooded--indicated that in water-wet or intermediate wet cores, sodium laureth sulfate is more effective at enhancing spontaneous imbibition through wettability change. However, in more oil-wet systems, surfactin at the same concentration performs significantly better.

Stephen Johnson; Mehdi Salehi; Karl Eisert; Sandra Fox

2009-01-07T23:59:59.000Z

370

Coal liquefaction process with enhanced process solvent  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

In an improved coal liquefaction process, including a critical solvent deashing stage, high value product recovery is improved and enhanced process-derived solvent is provided by recycling second separator underflow in the critical solvent deashing stage to the coal slurry mix, for inclusion in the process solvent pool.

Givens, Edwin N. (Bethlehem, PA); Kang, Dohee (Macungie, PA)

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

371

7 -ATOMIC PROCESSES Atomic processes can be  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 7 - ATOMIC PROCESSES Atomic processes can be: 1. Scattering 2. Absorption/Thermal Emission scattering, although the results won't change much when this condition is relaxed. #12;2 Absorption/Thermal Emission Free-free (continuum) ("Bremsstrahlung") Emission/Absorption Bound-Bound & Bound-Free Processes

Sitko, Michael L.

372

OPTIMIZATION STUDY OF COPPER PRECURSORS FOR HIGH QUALITY CuInSe2 NANOPARTICLES BY WET CHEMICAL ROUTE  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of the most promising material system for thin film photovoltaics owing to their unique structural, respectively. The synthesis process was optimized to grow 20 to 150 nm sized nanostructures of CuInSe2 inherent merits in reducing the cost per watt of the fabricated PV modules. Various size, shape

Anderson, Timothy J.

373

Process model and capacity upgrades of the CTI-4000 liquid helium coldbox  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory (FNAL) is in the process of re-commissioning a vintage CTI-4000 liquid helium coldbox, initially supplied by CTI-Cryogenics/Sulzer to Los Alamos in 1979. The coldbox was originally designed as a liquid helium refrigerator with capacity of ?1200 W at nominal 4-K. The process utilized LN{sub 2} precooling, in-series operation of two centrifugal gas bearing turboexpanders and final Joule-Thomson (J-T) expansion. At FNAL, the coldbox will be utilized as a liquefier to support 2-K operations. A process model was developed to aid in the upgrade decisions and used to determine the nominal capacity of the liquefier. Capacity upgrades are achieved by safely utilizing the internal LN2 precooler, the addition of a 3-inch reciprocating wet expansion engine and increasing the overall process pressure by recertifying two limiting pressure vessels to a higher MAWP.

Hansen, Benjamin; Klebaner, Arkadiy [Fermilab, P.O. Box 500, Batavia, IL 60510 (United States); Quack, Hans [Technische Universitaet Dresden, Dresden (Germany)

2014-01-29T23:59:59.000Z

374

Salt Waste Processing Initiatives  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

1 Patricia Suggs Salt Processing Team Lead Assistant Manager for Waste Disposition Project Office of Environmental Management Savannah River Site Salt Waste Processing Initiatives...

375

Application Process and Eligibility  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Program Application Process and Eligibility Application Process and Eligibility Both US and non-US citizens are eligible to apply, but US citizenship may be required for some...

376

process.h  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

/* process.h Symbols and structures for process management. Copyright (c) Borland International 1987 All Rights Reserved. */ #if __STDC__ #define _Cdecl

377

Approximation of Stochastic Process  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

May 8, 2012 ... The approximation of stochastic processes by trees is an important topic in ... process ? is replaced by a finitely valued stochastic scenario...

Alois Pichler

2012-05-08T23:59:59.000Z

378

SAGE Application Process  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Application Process SAGE Application Process A National Science Foundation Research Experiences for Undergraduates program Contacts Institute Director Harald Dogliani-Los Alamos...

379

Undergraduate Program Selection Process  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Selection Process Undergraduate Program Selection Process Point your career towards Los Alamos Lab: work with the best minds on the planet in an inclusive environment that is rich...

380

Lab Process AreaWhere CORAL Name It is: It does: Maker/Model Units per:(self-run) if staff EBL e-beam write24-041 Elionix 125 keV, hi-res e-beam writer Elionix F-125 7 hr 7  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Lab Process AreaWhere CORAL Name It is: It does: Maker/Model Units per:(self-run) if staff EBL e, bakes 8 hr 12 EML photo photo coater-EML spinner coats PR Solitec 8 hr 12 EML metrologyhall dektak EML diffusion Resonetics rm OxidationTube tube furnace wet & dry ox, anneals, bakesLindberg 8 hr 12

Culpepper, Martin L.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "wet process clinker" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Comparison of organic combustion products in fly ash collected by a venturi wet scrubber and an electrostatic precipitator at a coal-fired power station  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Organic compounds recovered from fly ash collected by an electrostatic precipitator (ESP) and a venturi wet scrubber (WS) at a coal-fired power station were analysed. Organic constituents in extracts of solid waste included large numbers of aliphatic and aromatic compounds. A series of normal C/sub 15/-C/sub 30/ paraffins was found in the aliphatic fractions. The aromatic compounds were of 1,2,3 and 4 rings. Polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbons containing more than 4 rings were shown to be poorly recovered. Comparison of organic constituents in extracts of fly ash from the WS and the ESP showed that ESP extracts contained more compounds in greater quantities. The types and quantities of organic compounds recovered are not expected to present any environmental hazard.

Harrison, F.L.

1985-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

382

Robust Spring Drying in the Southwestern U.S. and Seasonal Migration of Wet/Dry Patterns in a Warmer Climate  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This study compares climate simulations over the United States produced by a regional climate model with the driving global climate simulations as well as a large multi-model ensemble of global climate simulations to investigate robust changes in water availability (precipitation (P) evapotranspiration (E)). A robust spring dry signal across multiple models is identified in the Southwest that results from a decrease in P and an increase in E in the future. In the boreal winter and summer, the prominent changes in P E are associated with a north south dipole pattern, while in spring, the prominent changes in P E appear as an east west dipole pattern. The progression of the north south and east west dipole patterns through the seasons manifests clearly as a seasonal 揷lockwise migration of wet/dry patterns, which is shown to be a robust feature of water availability changes in the US consistent across regional and global climate simulations.

Gao, Yang; Leung, Lai-Yung R.; Lu, Jian; Liu, Ying; Huang, Maoyi; Qian, Yun

2014-03-16T23:59:59.000Z

383

The Use of Catalysts in Near-Critical Water Processing  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The use of heterogeneous catalysts in near-critical water processing provides many challenges of material stability in addition to the normal questions of chemical activity. Conventional catalyst materials developed in traditional organic chemistry or petroleum chemistry applications provide a source of information of materials with the required activities but often without the required stability when used in hot liquid water. The importance of the use of catalysts in near-critical water processing plays a particularly crucial role for the development of renewable fuels and chemicals based on biomass feedstocks. Stability issues include both those related to the catalytic metal and also to the catalyst support material. In fact, the stability of the support is the most likely concern when using conventional catalyst formulations in near-critical water processing. Processing test results are used to show important design parameters for catalyst formulations for use in wet biomass gasification in high-pressure water and in catalytic hydrogenations in water for production of value-added chemical products from biomass in the biorefinery concept. Analytical methods including powder x-ray diffraction for crystallite size and composition determination, surface area and porosity measurements, and elemental analysis have all been used to quantify differences in catalyst materials before and after use. By these methods both the chemical and physical stability of heterogeneous catalysts can be verified.

Elliott, Douglas C.

2005-06-26T23:59:59.000Z

384

HYDROLOGICAL PROCESSES Hydrol. Process. 23, 29022914 (2009)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

modelling effort indicate that hyporheic and dead zone heat fluxes are important, whereas solar radiationHYDROLOGICAL PROCESSES Hydrol. Process. 23, 29022914 (2009) Published online 24 July 2009 in Wiley the significance of individual heat fluxes within streams with an emphasis on testing (i.e. identification

Kienzle, Stefan W.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

385

7 -ATOMIC PROCESSES Atomic processes can be  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 7 - ATOMIC PROCESSES Atomic processes can be: 1. Scattering 2. Absorption/Thermal Emission scattering, although the results won't change much when this condition is relaxed. Absorption/Thermal Emission Free-free (continuum) ("Bremsstrahlung") Emission/Absorption #12;2 Bound-Bound & Bound

Sitko, Michael L.

386

Performance of two fluid bed sludge incinerators with air pollution control systems consisting of a venturi scrubber and wet electrostatic precipitator  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Performance tests were recently conducted on two new Hankin Fluid Bed Incineration Systems installed at publicly owned sewage treatment works in New Jersey. The purpose of the tests was to show that the systems met emission limits set by the New Jersey Department of Environmental Protection and Energy (NJDEPE), and that the systems met throughput and fuel consumption requirements. These systems, consisting of a fluid bed incinerator, heat exchanger, venturi scrubber, tray cooler, and wet electrostatic precipitator, were tested for emissions of heavy metals, sulfur oxides, nitrogen oxides, hydrogen chloride, carbon monoxide, volatile organic compounds, and opacity. Both yielded emissions that were well within the stringent limits set by the NJDEPE in the operating permits. The incinerators exhibited a high level of fuel efficiency with fuel oil consumption averaging 5.5 and 6.0 gallons per ton of wet sludge. In addition, combustion efficiency was high, with a maximum average CO of 7.39 ppmvd and VOCs of 1.39 ppmvd (both corrected to 7% O{sub 2}). The air pollution control equipment showed very high removal efficiencies. Except for Mercury, collection efficiencies for all heavy metals fell within 98.7% to 99.999%. Particulate collection efficiency averaged 99.97 and 99.99%. Collection efficiency for HCl averaged 99.2% and 99.92%, and for SO{sub 2} averages were 97.1% and 94.8%. Finally, the level of NO{sub x} in the stack was extremely low with averages of 17.33 ppmvd and 14.19 ppmvd (corrected to 7% O{sub 2}) for the two systems.

Zaman, R.U. [Hankin Environmental Systems Inc., Somerville, NJ (United States)

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

387

Engineering scale development of the vapor-liquid-solid (VLS) process for the production of silicon carbide fibrils and linear fibril assemblies  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In order to exploit the superior thermomechanical properties of the VLS fibril, the feasibility of scaled-up production of the SiC fibril is demonstrated in this study. Through time series study and computer simulation, the parameters affecting the growth process and properties of the fibrils were examined. To facilitate translation of the superior mechanical properties into higher level preform structures, conventional and unconventional processing methods were evaluated. As revealed by scanning electron microscopic examination and X-ray diffractometry, high level alignment of the fibrils was achieved by the wet-laid process.

Tenhover, M.; Biernacki, J. [Carborundum Co., Niagara Falls, NY (United States); Schatz, K.; Ko, F. [Advanced Product Development, Inc., Bristol, PA (United States)

1995-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

388

Chemical Processing in High-Pressure Aqueous Environments. 9. Process Development for Catalytic Gasification of Algae Feedstocks  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Through the use of a metal catalyst, gasification of wet algae slurries can be accomplished with high levels of carbon conversion to gas at relatively low temperature (350 C). In a pressurized-water environment (20 MPa), near-total conversion of the organic structure of the algae to gases has been achieved in the presence of a supported ruthenium metal catalyst. The process is essentially steam reforming, as there is no added oxidizer or reagent other than water. In addition, the gas produced is a medium-heating value gas due to the synthesis of high levels of methane, as dictated by thermodynamic equilibrium. As opposed to earlier work, biomass trace components were removed by processing steps so that they did not cause processing difficulties in the fixed catalyst bed tubular reactor system. As a result, the algae feedstocks, even those with high ash contents, were much more reliably processed. High conversions were obtained even with high slurry concentrations. Consistent catalyst operation in these short-term tests suggested good stability and minimal poisoning effects. High methane content in the product gas was noted with significant carbon dioxide captured in the aqueous byproduct in combination with alkali constituents and the ammonia byproduct derived from proteins in the algae. High conversion of algae to gas products was found with low levels of byproduct water contamination and low to moderate loss of carbon in the mineral separation step.

Elliott, Douglas C.; Hart, Todd R.; Neuenschwander, Gary G.; Rotness, Leslie J.; Olarte, Mariefel V.; Zacher, Alan H.

2012-07-26T23:59:59.000Z

389

Solvent composition and process for the isolation of radium  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A solvent extraction composition for radium including a high molecular wet organophilic carboxylic acid and an organophilic macrocycle dissolved in a suitable solvent.

McDowell, William J. (Knoxville, TN); Case, Gerald N. (Oak Ridge, TN)

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

390

Idaho Chemical Processing Plant Process Efficiency improvements  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In response to decreasing funding levels available to support activities at the Idaho Chemical Processing Plant (ICPP) and a desire to be cost competitive, the Department of Energy Idaho Operations Office (DOE-ID) and Lockheed Idaho Technologies Company have increased their emphasis on cost-saving measures. The ICPP Effectiveness Improvement Initiative involves many activities to improve cost effectiveness and competitiveness. This report documents the methodology and results of one of those cost cutting measures, the Process Efficiency Improvement Activity. The Process Efficiency Improvement Activity performed a systematic review of major work processes at the ICPP to increase productivity and to identify nonvalue-added requirements. A two-phase approach was selected for the activity to allow for near-term implementation of relatively easy process modifications in the first phase while obtaining long-term continuous improvement in the second phase and beyond. Phase I of the initiative included a concentrated review of processes that had a high potential for cost savings with the intent of realizing savings in Fiscal Year 1996 (FY-96.) Phase II consists of implementing long-term strategies too complex for Phase I implementation and evaluation of processes not targeted for Phase I review. The Phase II effort is targeted for realizing cost savings in FY-97 and beyond.

Griebenow, B.

1996-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

391

High-strength, creep-resistant molybdenum alloy and process for producing the same  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A wet-doping process for producing an oxide-dispersion strengthened (ODS), creep-resistant molybdenum alloy is disclosed. The alloy is made by adding nitrate or acetate salts of lanthanum, cerium, thorium, or yttrium to molybdenum oxide to produce a slurry, heating the slurry in a hydrogen atmosphere to produce a powder, mixing and cold isostatically pressing the powder, sintering in a hydrogen atmosphere, and thermomechanically processing (swaging, extruding, cold drawing) the product. The ODS molybdenum alloy produced by the process contains 2-4% by volume (.about.1-4% by weight) of an oxide of lanthanum, cerium, thorium, or yttrium. The alloy has high strength and improved creep-resistance at temperatures greater than 0.55T.sub.m of molybdenum.

Bianco, Robert (Finleyville, PA); Buckman, Jr., R. William (Pittsburgh, PA); Geller, Clint B. (Pittsburgh, PA)

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

392

High-strength, creep-resistant molybdenum alloy and process for producing the same  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A wet-doping process for producing an oxide-dispersion strengthened (ODS), creep-resistant molybdenum alloy is disclosed. The alloy is made by adding nitrate or acetate salts of lanthanum, cerium, thorium, or yttrium to molybdenum oxide to produce a slurry, heating the slurry in a hydrogen atmosphere to produce a powder, mixing and cold isostatically pressing the powder, sintering in a hydrogen atmosphere, and thermomechanically processing (swaging, extruding, cold drawing) the product. The ODS molybdenum alloy produced by the process contains 2--4% by volume (ca. 1--4% by weight) of an oxide of lanthanum, cerium, thorium, or yttrium. The alloy has high strength and improved creep-resistance at temperatures greater than 0.55T{sub m} of molybdenum. 10 figs.

Bianco, R.; Buckman, R.W. Jr.; Geller, C.B.

1999-02-09T23:59:59.000Z

393

Reduced crude processing with Ashland's RCC process  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Ashland Oil has long recognized the need to improve the process for the direct conversion of residual feedstocks into transportation fuels and other lighter products. The reduced crude oil conversion (RCC) unit now under construction at the Catlettsburg, Kentucky, refinery was developed to meet these demands. The facility incorporates RCC process innovations and recent catalyst technology improvements, and provides increased operating flexibility. Heavier, higher-sulfur crude oils can be processed under several economically attractive scenarios. They allow for an excellent balance between the production of transportation fuels, and reduced amounts of heavy fractions. An outstanding feature of the RCC process is the highoctane quality of full-boiling-range gasoline that results when converting residual feedstocks.

Zandona, O.J.; Busch, L.E.; Hettinger, W.P.

1982-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

394

The requirements discovery process  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Cost and schedule overruns are often caused by poor requirements that are produced by people who do not understand the requirement process. This paper provides a high-level overview of the requirements discovery process.

Bahill, A.T. [Univ. of Arizona, Tucson, AZ (United States). Systems and Industrial Engineering; Dean, F.F. [Sandia National Lab., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

1997-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

395

Construction work process management  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-related activities. The study addresses relationships between selected TQM concepts (TQM tools, training, process focus, and teamwork) and work process management, defined in terms of planning, control, and improvement. The investigation was performed in two...

Soares, Jorge Barbosa

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

396

FEDERAL INFORMATION PROCESSING STANDARD  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

March 2004 FEDERAL INFORMATION PROCESSING STANDARD (FIPS) 199, STANDARDS FOR SECURITY Information Technology Laboratory National Institute of Standards and Technology A new Federal Information Processing Standard (FIPS), recently approved by the Secretary of Commerce, will help federal agencies

397

Waste processing air cleaning  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Waste processing and preparing waste to support waste processing relies heavily on ventilation. Ventilation is used at the Hanford Site on the waste storage tanks to provide confinement, cooling, and removal of flammable gases.

Kriskovich, J.R.

1998-07-27T23:59:59.000Z

398

Graduate Program Selection Process  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Selection Process Graduate Program Selection Process Point your career towards Los Alamos Lab: work with the best minds on the planet in an inclusive environment that is rich in...

399

Fuel gas conditioning process  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A process for conditioning natural gas containing C.sub.3+ hydrocarbons and/or acid gas, so that it can be used as combustion fuel to run gas-powered equipment, including compressors, in the gas field or the gas processing plant. Compared with prior art processes, the invention creates lesser quantities of low-pressure gas per unit volume of fuel gas produced. Optionally, the process can also produce an NGL product.

Lokhandwala, Kaaeid A. (Union City, CA)

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

400

Direct process for explosives  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A direct process of making ethylenediamine dinitrate through the reaction of ethylenediamine and ammonium nitrate is described.

Akst, I.B.; Stinecipher, M.M.

1982-10-12T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "wet process clinker" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Engineering in Process Metallurgy  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

MATS3003 Engineering in Process Metallurgy Course Outline Session 1, 2014 School of Materials ................................................................................................... 7 Course Objective To introduce the basic operations in process metallurgy and to provide Course at a Glance What you will learn Weeks Assessment Task Introduction - What is process metallurgy

New South Wales, University of

402

Processing Poultry at Home.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

TDOC Z TA245.7 8873 N0.1383 - - 5 B-1383 Processing Poultry at Home The Texas A&M University System Texas Agricultural Extension Service Zerle L. Carpenter , Director College Station CONTENTS Facilities and Equipment... ................................................. 9 Skinning . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 0-11 Federal and state laws require inspection of poultry processed for sale. Producers are permitted to process their own...

Denton, James H.; Mellor, David B.

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

403

Evaluation of steelmaking processes  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Objective of the AISI Direct Steelmaking Program is to develop a process for producing steel directly from ore and coal; the process should be less capital intensive, consume less energy, and have higher productivity. A task force was formed to examine available processes: trough, posthearth, IRSID, Electric Arc Furnace, energy optimizing furnace. It is concluded that there is insufficient incentive to replace a working BOF with any of these processes to refine hot metal; however, if new steelmaking capacity is required, IRSID and EOF should be considered. A fully continuous process should not be considered until direct ironmaking and continuous refining are perfected.

Fruehan, R.J. [Carnegie-Mellon Univ., Pittsburgh, PA (United States)

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

404

HYDROLOGICAL PROCESSES Hydrol. Process. (in press)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of an investigation on the processes controlling heat transport in peat under a large bog in the Glacial Lake Agassiz cm within a vertical peat profile at the crest of the bog at sub-daily intervals. We also recorded air temperature 1 m above the peat surface. We calculate a peat thermal conductivity of 05 W m 1 癈 1

McKenzie, Jeffrey M.

405

HYDROLOGICAL PROCESSES Hydrol. Process. 21, 369378 (2007)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

report the results of an investigation on the processes controlling heat transport in peat under a large at 12 depth intervals from 0 to 400 cm within a vertical peat profile at the crest of the bog at sub-daily intervals. We also recorded air temperature 1 m above the peat surface. We calculate a peat thermal

Long, Bernard

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

406

Future Steelmaking Processes  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

There is an increasing demand for an ironmaking process with lower capital cost, energy consumption and emissions than a blast furnace. It is the hypothesis of the present work that an optimized combination of two reasonable proven technologies will greatly enhance the overall process. An example is a rotary hearth furnace (RHF) linked to a smelter (e.g., AISI, HIsmelt). The objective of this research is to select promising process combinations, develop energy, materials balance and productivity models for the individual processes, conduct a limited amount of basic research on the processes and evaluate the process combinations. Three process combinations were selected with input from the industrial partners. The energy-materials and productivity models for the RHF, smelter, submerged arc furnace and CIRCOFER were developed. Since utilization of volatiles in coal is critical for energy and CO{sub 2} emission reduction, basic research on this topic was also conducted. The process models developed are a major product developed in this research. These models can be used for process evaluation by the industry. The process combinations of an RHF-Smelter and a simplified CIRCOFER-Smelter appear to be promising. Energy consumption is reduced and productivity increased. Work on this project is continuing using funds from other sources.

Prof. R. J. Fruehan

2004-09-20T23:59:59.000Z

407

Wet oxidation of phenol on Ce{sub 1{minus}x}Cu{sub x}O{sub 2{minus}{delta}} catalyst  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Ce{sub 1{minus}x}Cu{sub x}O{sub 2{minus}{delta}} catalysts with 0.05 < x < 0.20 for catalytic wet oxidation of phenol in aqueous solutions have been synthesized using the coprecipitation method. The three most important synthesis parameters, the concentration of the mixed metal salt solution, the rate of coprecipitant addition and the stirrer speed during coprecipitation, were optimized with central composite design using the catalytic activity as a response function. The catalytic activity strongly depends on stirrer speed during coprecipitation. A high mutual dispersion of copper oxide and ceria, having the average crystallite size of about 9 nm, enhances solid solution formation. The unit cell parameter of ceria decreases when the overall concentration of copper in the catalyst increases, most probably obeying Vegard`s law. The catalysts proved to be very stable in hydrothermal reaction conditions at low pH values. After 5 h of reaction in the semibatch CST reactor less than 100 ppm of Cu was leached out of catalyst samples that were calcined in a flow of air for 2 h above 1033 K, and only a very low quantity of carbonaceous deposits were formed on the surface of the catalysts (0.6 wt%). The kinetics of phenol degradation could be interpreted by an equation valid for homogeneous autocatalytic reactions, in which the rate constant depends linearly on the heterogeneous catalyst (Cu) concentrations. This demonstrates that the reaction proceeds through a heterogeneous-homogeneous radical-branched chain mechanism.

Hocevar, S.; Batista, J. [National Inst. of Chemistry, Ljubljana (Slovenia). Lab. of Catalysis and Chemical Reaction Engineering] [National Inst. of Chemistry, Ljubljana (Slovenia). Lab. of Catalysis and Chemical Reaction Engineering; Levec, J. [National Inst. of Chemistry, Ljubljana (Slovenia). Lab. of Catalysis and Chemical Reaction Engineering] [National Inst. of Chemistry, Ljubljana (Slovenia). Lab. of Catalysis and Chemical Reaction Engineering; [Univ. of Ljubljana (Slovenia). Dept. of Chemical Engineering

1999-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

408

Investigation of hydrogen induced cracking in 2205 duplex stainless steel in wet H{sub 2}S environments after isothermal treatment at 675, 750 and 900 deg. C  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The effect of isothermal treatment (at 675, 750 and 900 deg. C) on HIC (hydrogen induced cracking) in sour environments containing hydrogen sulphide of a 2205 duplex stainless steel has been investigated. The performance and microstructure of failed material were characterized by optical microscopy, scanning electron microscopy and also X-ray diffraction. Two kinds of Cr-, Mo-enriched intermetallic phases, {sigma} and {chi}, were found to precipitate preferentially at {alpha}/{gamma} interfaces and within {alpha} grains after different times of aging in the temperature range of 650-900 deg. C. After performing tests according to the NACE Standard TM 0284 (1987) the specimens were investigated by using quantitative metallography methods. The volume fraction of {sigma} phase was changed with the time of aging and {sigma} phase developed into coarse particles due to the high diffusibility of solute atoms at high temperatures. The variation of size and shape of {sigma} phase particles was obtained by applying different heat treatment conditions to 2205 steel specimens. The results showed that 2205 duplex stainless steel containing nearly 12 vol.% of {sigma} phase in dispersed conditions was resistant to step cracking in wet environments containing hydrogen sulphide. It was highly possible that a crack would propagate faster along the embrittled {sigma} phase. However, very small cracks were found at austenite-ferrite boundaries where o phase particles were also present.

Sozanska, Maria [Department of Materials Science, Silesian University of Technology, Krasinskiego 8, 40-019 Katowice (Poland)]. E-mail: maria.sozanska@polsl.pl; Klyk-Spyra, Katarzyna [Department of Materials Science, Silesian University of Technology, Krasinskiego 8, 40-019 Katowice (Poland)

2006-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

409

Effect of the variations of clinker composition on the poroelastic properties of hardened class G cement paste  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and geothermal wells. The American Petroleum Institute (API) Standard spec- ifies eight classes of oil

Paris-Sud XI, Universit茅 de

410

Bolt Manufacture: Process Selection  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

file 路 Selective Laser Sintering (SLS) 3 D P i ti路 3-D Printing 路 Light Engineered Net Shaping (LENS Processes and Systems Prof. J.S. Colton 漏 GIT 2009 20 #12;3D Printing Process (Soligen) ME 6222: Manufacturing Processes and Systems Prof. J.S. Colton 漏 GIT 2009 21 #12;3D Printing Head (Soligen)3D Printing

Colton, Jonathan S.

411

In Situ Processing  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Processing 4.1 Service Oriented Architecture for Data9] Thomas Erl. Service-Oriented Architecture: Concepts,resources. Service Oriented Architecture for Data Management

Childs, Hank

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

412

Rare muon processes  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The status of rare muon processes as tests of the standard model is reviewed with the emphasis on results that are expected from experiments in the near future.

Cooper, M.D.

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

413

Rare muon processes  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The status of rare muon processes as tests of the standard model is reviewed with the emphasis on results that are expected from experiments in the near future.

Cooper, M.D.; The MEGA Collaboration

1993-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

414

Ni-coated SiC{sub p} reinforced aluminum composites processed by vacuum infiltration  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A vacuum infiltration process has been developed to process aluminum-base composites reinforced with particulate SiC{sub p}. Electroless nickel coating of SiC{sub p} was used to improve wetting by molten aluminum. Experimental results showed that composites of aluminum with 5.9 wt % Si and 0.23 wt % Mg containing about 50 vol % Ni-coated SiC{sub p} were completely infiltrated at a temperature above 700 C. The effects of nickel coating thickness and infiltration temperature on infiltration behavior were investigated. The infiltration rate increased and the infiltration incubation time decreased with increasing infiltration temperature or nickel coating thickness. The microstructure, nickel distribution, bending strength and fracture were also examined. Nonuniformity bending strength and fracture morphology were attributed to nickel macrosegregation.

Chung, W.S.; Lin, S.J. [National Tsing Hua Univ., Hsinchu (Taiwan, Province of China). Dept. of Materials Science and Engineering] [National Tsing Hua Univ., Hsinchu (Taiwan, Province of China). Dept. of Materials Science and Engineering

1996-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

415

Chemical process hazards analysis  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Office of Worker Health and Safety (EH-5) under the Assistant Secretary for the Environment, Safety and Health of the US Department (DOE) has published two handbooks for use by DOE contractors managing facilities and processes covered by the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) Rule for Process Safety Management of Highly Hazardous Chemicals (29 CFR 1910.119), herein referred to as the PSM Rule. The PSM Rule contains an integrated set of chemical process safety management elements designed to prevent chemical releases that can lead to catastrophic fires, explosions, or toxic exposures. The purpose of the two handbooks, ``Process Safety Management for Highly Hazardous Chemicals`` and ``Chemical Process Hazards Analysis,`` is to facilitate implementation of the provisions of the PSM Rule within the DOE. The purpose of this handbook ``Chemical Process Hazards Analysis,`` is to facilitate, within the DOE, the performance of chemical process hazards analyses (PrHAs) as required under the PSM Rule. It provides basic information for the performance of PrHAs, and should not be considered a complete resource on PrHA methods. Likewise, to determine if a facility is covered by the PSM rule, the reader should refer to the handbook, ``Process Safety Management for Highly Hazardous Chemicals`` (DOE- HDBK-1101-96). Promulgation of the PSM Rule has heightened the awareness of chemical safety management issues within the DOE. This handbook is intended for use by DOE facilities and processes covered by the PSM rule to facilitate contractor implementation of the PrHA element of the PSM Rule. However, contractors whose facilities and processes not covered by the PSM Rule may also use this handbook as a basis for conducting process hazards analyses as part of their good management practices. This handbook explains the minimum requirements for PrHAs outlined in the PSM Rule. Nowhere have requirements been added beyond what is specifically required by the rule.

NONE

1996-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

416

Business Process Modeling for developing Process Oriented IT Systems Track: Business Process Management Tools and Technologies  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Business Process Modeling for developing Process Oriented IT Systems Track: Business Process should be like. Therefore, business process modeling becomes a pre-requisite for system requirements, the paradigm of Business Process Management contrasts with traditional information system development, which

Paris-Sud XI, Universit茅 de

417

HEPA filter dissolution process  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A process is described for dissolution of spent high efficiency particulate air (HEPA) filters and then combining the complexed filter solution with other radioactive wastes prior to calcining the mixed and blended waste feed. The process is an alternate to a prior method of acid leaching the spent filters which is an inefficient method of treating spent HEPA filters for disposal. 4 figures.

Brewer, K.N.; Murphy, J.A.

1994-02-22T23:59:59.000Z

418

Process Metallurgy Course Outline  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-6 8 Reactor design 6 Midsession exam Week 6-7 8 Blast furnace ironmaking 7-8 Assignment 9 Reactions in the blast furnace 9 10 Development of the blast furnace ironmaking to decrease carbon footprint 9 11 Alternative ironmaking processes 10 12 Steelmaking: Bessemer and BOS processes, Electric arc furnace 10-11 13

New South Wales, University of

419

Microwave processing of ceramics  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Recent work in the areas of microwave processing and joining of ceramics is briefly reviewed. Advantages and disadvantages of microwave processing as well as some of the current issues in the field are discussed. Current state and potential for future commercialization of this technology is also addressed.

Katz, J.D.

1993-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

420

Microwave processing of ceramics  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Recent work in the areas of microwave processing and joining of ceramics is briefly reviewed. Advantages and disadvantages of microwave processing as well as some of the current issues in the field are discussed. Current state and potential for future commercialization of this technology is also addressed.

Katz, J.D.

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "wet process clinker" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

Associative list processing unit  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An associative list processing unit and method comprising employing a plurality of prioritized cell blocks and permitting inserts to occur in a single clock cycle if all of the cell blocks are not full. Also, an associative list processing unit and method comprising employing a plurality of prioritized cell blocks and using a tree of prioritized multiplexers descending from the plurality of cell blocks.

Hemmert, Karl Scott; Underwood, Keith D.

2013-01-29T23:59:59.000Z

422

PHOTOSYNTHESIS AND RELATED PROCESSES  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

#12;#12;#12;#12;PHOTOSYNTHESIS AND RELATED PROCESSES VOLUME II Part 2 #12; ';- py as- b^ Section Research, 7, 288, 1954). #12;PHOTOSYNTHESIS nnd Related Processes By EUGENE I. RABINOWITCH Research Professor, Photosynthesis Research Labora- tory, Department of Botany, University of Illinois. Formerly

Govindjee

423

Microsystem process networks  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Various aspects and applications of microsystem process networks are described. The design of many types of Microsystems can be improved by ortho-cascading mass, heat, or other unit process operations. Microsystems having energetically efficient microchannel heat exchangers are also described. Detailed descriptions of numerous design features in microcomponent systems are also provided.

Wegeng, Robert S. (Richland, WA); TeGrotenhuis, Ward E. (Kennewick, WA); Whyatt, Greg A. (West Richland, WA)

2007-09-18T23:59:59.000Z

424

Microsystem process networks  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Various aspects and applications of microsystem process networks are described. The design of many types of microsystems can be improved by ortho-cascading mass, heat, or other unit process operations. Microsystems having exergetically efficient microchannel heat exchangers are also described. Detailed descriptions of numerous design features in microcomponent systems are also provided.

Wegeng, Robert S. (Richland, WA); TeGrotenhuis, Ward E. (Kennewick, WA); Whyatt, Greg A. (West Richland, WA)

2006-10-24T23:59:59.000Z

425

Microsystem process networks  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Various aspects and applications or microsystem process networks are described. The design of many types of microsystems can be improved by ortho-cascading mass, heat, or other unit process operations. Microsystems having energetically efficient microchannel heat exchangers are also described. Detailed descriptions of numerous design features in microcomponent systems are also provided.

Wegeng, Robert S [Richland, WA; TeGrotenhuis, Ward E [Kennewick, WA; Whyatt, Greg A [West Richland, WA

2010-01-26T23:59:59.000Z

426

Inventory processes: Quasiregenerative property,  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Inventory processes: Quasi颅regenerative property, performance evaluation and sensitivity estimation颅commodity, discrete颅time, multiperiod (s; S)颅 policy inventory model with backlog. The cost function may contain that the resulting inventory process is quasi颅regenerative, i.e. admits a cycle decomposition and indicate how

Rubinstein, Reuven

427

Hepa filter dissolution process  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A process for dissolution of spent high efficiency particulate air (HEPA) filters and then combining the complexed filter solution with other radioactive wastes prior to calcining the mixed and blended waste feed. The process is an alternate to a prior method of acid leaching the spent filters which is an inefficient method of treating spent HEPA filters for disposal.

Brewer, Ken N. (Arco, ID); Murphy, James A. (Idaho Falls, ID)

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

428

Contaminated nickel scrap processing  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The DOE will soon choose between treating contaminated nickel scrap as a legacy waste and developing high-volume nickel decontamination processes. In addition to reducing the volume of legacy wastes, a decontamination process could make 200,000 tons of this strategic metal available for domestic use. Contaminants in DOE nickel scrap include {sup 234}Th, {sup 234}Pa, {sup 137}Cs, {sup 239}Pu (trace), {sup 60}Co, U, {sup 99}Tc, and {sup 237}Np (trace). This report reviews several industrial-scale processes -- electrorefining, electrowinning, vapormetallurgy, and leaching -- used for the purification of nickel. Conventional nickel electrolysis processes are particularly attractive because they use side-stream purification of process solutions to improve the purity of nickel metal. Additionally, nickel purification by electrolysis is effective in a variety of electrolyte systems, including sulfate, chloride, and nitrate. Conventional electrorefining processes typically use a mixed electrolyte which includes sulfate, chloride, and borate. The use of an electrorefining or electrowinning system for scrap nickel recovery could be combined effectively with a variety of processes, including cementation, solvent extraction, ion exchange, complex-formation, and surface sorption, developed for uranium and transuranic purification. Selected processes were reviewed and evaluated for use in nickel side-stream purification. 80 refs.

Compere, A.L.; Griffith, W.L.; Hayden, H.W.; Johnson, J.S. Jr.; Wilson, D.F.

1994-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

429

Analysis of Process Variable Effects on the Roller Imprinting Process  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of metal forming processes, Computers and Structures, Vol.2006). 揂 roller embossing process for rapid fabrication ofdesign of industrial forging processes, Journal of Material

Vijayaraghavan, Athulan; Hayse-Gregson, Stuart; Valdez, Rodolfo; Dornfeld, David

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

430

Elemental sulfur recovery process  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An improved catalytic reduction process for the direct recovery of elemental sulfur from various SO[sub 2]-containing industrial gas streams. The catalytic process provides combined high activity and selectivity for the reduction of SO[sub 2] to elemental sulfur product with carbon monoxide or other reducing gases. The reaction of sulfur dioxide and reducing gas takes place over certain catalyst formulations based on cerium oxide. The process is a single-stage, catalytic sulfur recovery process in conjunction with regenerators, such as those used in dry, regenerative flue gas desulfurization or other processes, involving direct reduction of the SO[sub 2] in the regenerator off gas stream to elemental sulfur in the presence of a catalyst. 4 figures.

Flytzani-Stephanopoulos, M.; Zhicheng Hu.

1993-09-07T23:59:59.000Z

431

Computational modeling of materials processing and processes  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This is the final report of a three-year, Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). Anisotropic mechanical properties of densified BSCCO powders are of paramount importance during thermo-mechanical processing of superconducting tapes and wires. Maximum current transport requires high relative density and a high degree of alignment of the single crystal planes of the BSCCO. Unfortunately this configuration causes high stresses that can lead to cracking, and thus reduce the density, and the conductive properties of the tape. The current work develops a micromechanical material mode to model is calibrated and compared to experimental results, and then employed to analyze the effects of initial texture and confinement pressure and shear strains in the core of oxide powder-in-tube (OPIT) processed tapes are calculated by finite-element analysis. The calculated deformations were then applied as boundary conditions to the micromechanical model. Our calculated results were used to interpret a set of prototypical rolling experiments. 11 refs., 5 figs.

Lowe, T.C.; Zhu, Yuntian; Bingert, J.F. [and others

1998-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

432

Gaia Data Processing Architecture  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Gaia is ESA's ambitious space astrometry mission the main objective of which is to astrometrically and spectro-photometrically map 1000 Million celestial objects (mostly in our galaxy) with unprecedented accuracy. The announcement of opportunity for the data processing will be issued by ESA late in 2006. The Gaia Data Processing and Analysis Consortium (DPAC) has been formed recently and is preparing an answer. The satellite will downlink close to 100 TB of raw telemetry data over 5 years. To achieve its required accuracy of a few 10s of Microarcsecond astrometry, a highly involved processing of this data is required. In addition to the main astrometric instrument Gaia will host a Radial Velocity instrument, two low-resolution dispersers for multi-color photometry and two Star Mappers. Gaia is a flying Giga Pixel camera. The various instruments each require relatively complex processing while at the same time being interdependent. We describe the overall composition of the DPAC and the envisaged overall architecture of the Gaia data processing system. We shall delve further into the core processing - one of the nine, so-called, coordination units comprising the Gaia processing system.

W. O'Mullane; U. Lammers; C. Bailer-Jones; U. Bastian; A. Brown; R. Drimmel; L. Eyer; C. Huc; F. Jansen; D. Katz; L. Lindegren; D. Pourbaix; X. Luri; F. Mignard; J. Torra; F. van Leeuwen

2006-11-29T23:59:59.000Z

433

Thermal Processes | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Hydrogen Production Current Technology Thermal Processes Thermal Processes Some thermal processes use the energy in various resources, such as natural gas, coal, or biomass,...

434

Conductive Thermal Interaction in Evaporative Cooling Process  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

be considered. Usually the dry-bulb depression performed by an evaporative cooler depends solely on the ambient wet-bulb temperature. The cool underground water in an evaporative cooler can cause not only adiabatic evaporation but also sensible heat transfer...

Kim, B. S.; Degelman, L. O.

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

435

Municipal waste processing apparatus  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

This invention relates to apparatus for processing municipal waste, and more particularly to vibrating mesh screen conveyor systems for removing grit, glass, and other noncombustible materials from dry municipal waste. Municipal waste must be properly processed and disposed of so that it does not create health risks to the community. Generally, municipal waste, which may be collected in garbage trucks, dumpsters, or the like, is deposited in processing areas such as landfills. Land and environmental controls imposed on landfill operators by governmental bodies have increased in recent years, however, making landfill disposal of solid waste materials more expensive. 6 figs.

Mayberry, J.L.

1988-04-13T23:59:59.000Z

436

SCHEDULE OF FEES Wet Milling  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

.265.0697 fax: 217.244.0323 email: krausch@uiuc.edu web: www.age.uiuc.edu/fbe/ UNIVERSITY OF ILLINOIS BIOPROCESS

Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, University of

437

Using Process Modeling for Process Understanding Dewayne E. Perry  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Using Process Modeling for Process Understanding Dewayne E. Perry Systems and Software Research to improving processes is first understanding them. I report here a case study in process understanding using the process modeling language Interact. I illustrate both the language and the process iteratively, somewhat

Perry, Dewayne E.

438

Exploitation of a Self-limiting Process for Reproducible Formation of Ultrathin Ni(1-x)Pt(x) Silicide Films  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This letter reports on a process scheme to obtain highly reproducible Ni{sub 1-x}Pt{sub x} silicide films of 3-6 nm thickness formed on a Si(100) substrate. Such ultrathin silicide films are readily attained by sputter deposition of metal films, metal stripping in wet chemicals, and final silicidation by rapid thermal processing. This process sequence warrants an invariant amount of metal intermixed with Si in the substrate surface region independent of the initial metal thickness, thereby leading to a self-limiting formation of ultrathin silicide films. The crystallographic structure, thickness, uniformity, and morphological stability of the final silicide films depend sensitively on the initial Pt fraction.

Z Zhang; B Yang; Y Zhu; S Gaudet; S Rossnagel; A Kellock; A Ozcan; C Murray; P Desjardins; et al.

2011-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

439

Effects of a modular two-step ozone-water and annealing process on silicon carbide graphene  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

By combining ozone and water, the effect of exposing epitaxial graphene on silicon carbide to an aggressive wet-chemical process has been evaluated after high temperature annealing in ultra high vacuum. The decomposition of ozone in water produces a number of oxidizing species, however, despite long exposure times to the aqueous-ozone environment, no graphene oxide was observed after the two-step process. The systems were comprehensively characterized before and after processing using Raman spectroscopy, core level photoemission spectroscopy, and angle resolved photoemission spectroscopy together with low energy electron diffraction, low energy electron microscopy, and atomic force microscopy. In spite of the chemical potential of the aqueous-ozone reaction environment, the graphene domains were largely unaffected raising the prospect of employing such simple chemical and annealing protocols to clean or prepare epitaxial graphene surfaces.

Webb, Matthew J., E-mail: matthew.webb@cantab.net; Lundstedt, Anna; Grennberg, Helena [Department of Chemistry桞MC, Uppsala University, Box 576, SE-751 23 Uppsala (Sweden); Polley, Craig; Niu, Yuran; Zakharov, Alexei A.; Balasubramanian, Thiagarajan [MAX IV Laboratory, Lund University, 22100 Lund (Sweden); Dirscherl, Kai [DFM桪anish Fundamental Metrology, Matematiktorvet 307, DK-2800 Lyngby (Denmark); Burwell, Gregory; Guy, Owen J. [College of Engineering, Faraday Tower, Singleton Park, Swansea University, Swansea SA2 8PP (United Kingdom); Palmgren, P錶 [VG Scienta Scientific AB, Box 15120, Vallongatan 1, SE-750 15 Uppsala (Sweden); Yakimova, Rositsa [Department of Physics, Chemistry, and Biology, Link鰌ing University, SE-581 83 Link鰌ing (Sweden)

2014-08-25T23:59:59.000Z

440

Direct coal liquefaction process  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An improved multistep liquefaction process for organic carbonaceous mater which produces a virtually completely solvent-soluble carbonaceous liquid product. The solubilized product may be more amenable to further processing than liquid products produced by current methods. In the initial processing step, the finely divided organic carbonaceous material is treated with a hydrocarbonaceous pasting solvent containing from 10% and 100% by weight process-derived phenolic species at a temperature within the range of 300.degree. C. to 400.degree. C. for typically from 2 minutes to 120 minutes in the presence of a carbon monoxide reductant and an optional hydrogen sulfide reaction promoter in an amount ranging from 0 to 10% by weight of the moisture- and ash-free organic carbonaceous material fed to the system. As a result, hydrogen is generated via the water/gas shift reaction at a rate necessary to prevent condensation reactions. In a second step, the reaction product of the first step is hydrogenated.

Rindt, John R. (Grand Forks, ND); Hetland, Melanie D. (Grand Forks, ND)

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "wet process clinker" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

Associative list processing unit  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An associative list processing unit and method comprising employing a plurality of prioritized cell blocks and permitting inserts to occur in a single clock cycle if all of the cell blocks are not full.

Hemmert, Karl Scott; Underwood, Keith D

2014-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

442

Continuous sulfur removal process  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A continuous process for the removal of hydrogen sulfide from a gas stream using a membrane comprising a metal oxide deposited on a porous support is disclosed. 4 figures.

Jalan, V.; Ryu, J.

1994-04-26T23:59:59.000Z

443

Direct coal liquefaction process  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An improved multistep liquefaction process for organic carbonaceous mater which produces a virtually completely solvent-soluble carbonaceous liquid product. The solubilized product may be more amenable to further processing than liquid products produced by current methods. In the initial processing step, the finely divided organic carbonaceous material is treated with a hydrocarbonaceous pasting solvent containing from 10% and 100% by weight process-derived phenolic species at a temperature within the range of 300 C to 400 C for typically from 2 minutes to 120 minutes in the presence of a carbon monoxide reductant and an optional hydrogen sulfide reaction promoter in an amount ranging from 0 to 10% by weight of the moisture- and ash-free organic carbonaceous material fed to the system. As a result, hydrogen is generated via the water/gas shift reaction at a rate necessary to prevent condensation reactions. In a second step, the reaction product of the first step is hydrogenated.

Rindt, J.R.; Hetland, M.D.

1993-10-26T23:59:59.000Z

444

Physical process Mechanical mechanisms  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 Physical process Generation 路 Mechanical mechanisms F = m路a 路 Electric/Magnetic mechanisms F 颅 Quadrupoles......shear stress fluctuations 颅 High order poles...... phys. interpretation difficult Governing

Berlin,Technische Universit盲t

445

Processing Poultry at Home  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

With hot water for scalding, ice water for chilling and a sharp knife, poultry can be processed at home for dressed poultry shows or home consumption. This publication discusses facilities and equipment, New York dressing, evisceration, chilling...

Davis, Michael

2006-01-04T23:59:59.000Z

446

Dry Process Electrode Fabrication  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

250m of free standing dry process cathode at thickness >200 m thickness. + Validate cost model by running pilot coating line at >25 mmin. + Deliver 24 cells in A123 SOA EV...

447

Dry Process Electrode Fabrication  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

free standing dry process cathode that retains 50% capacity at 1C rate. + Validate cost model by running pilot coating line. + Deliver 24 cells in SOA EV cell format....

448

Dry Process Electrode Fabrication  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

free standing dry process cathode that retains 50% capacity at 1C rate. + Validate cost model by running pilot coating line. + Deliver 24 cells in SOA EV cell format. 3...

449

Sculpture as process  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Sculpture as process is rooted in the historical development of movement as a theme of art in general and of sculpture in particular since 1900. The impact of the industrial revolution and the subsequent scientific/technological ...

Kracke, Bernd

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

450

Advanced Polymer Processing Facility  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Some conclusions of this presentation are: (1) Radiation-assisted nanotechnology applications will continue to grow; (2) The APPF will provide a unique focus for radiolytic processing of nanomaterials in support of DOE-DP, other DOE and advanced manufacturing initiatives; (3) {gamma}, X-ray, e-beam and ion beam processing will increasingly be applied for 'green' manufacturing of nanomaterials and nanocomposites; and (4) Biomedical science and engineering may ultimately be the biggest application area for radiation-assisted nanotechnology development.

Muenchausen, Ross E. [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2012-07-25T23:59:59.000Z

451

Coal liquefaction process  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

This invention relates to an improved process for the production of liquid carbonaceous fuels and solvents from carbonaceous solid fuels, especially coal. The claimed improved process includes the hydrocracking of the light SRC mixed with a suitable hydrocracker solvent. The recycle of the resulting hydrocracked product, after separation and distillation, is used to produce a solvent for the hydrocracking of the light solvent refined coal.

Skinner, Ronald W. (Allentown, PA); Tao, John C. (Perkiomenville, PA); Znaimer, Samuel (Vancouver, CA)

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

452

Hydrogen recovery process  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A treatment process for a hydrogen-containing off-gas stream from a refinery, petrochemical plant or the like. The process includes three separation steps: condensation, membrane separation and hydrocarbon fraction separation. The membrane separation step is characterized in that it is carried out under conditions at which the membrane exhibits a selectivity in favor of methane over hydrogen of at least about 2.5.

Baker, Richard W. (Palo Alto, CA); Lokhandwala, Kaaeid A. (Union City, CA); He, Zhenjie (Fremont, CA); Pinnau, Ingo (Palo Alto, CA)

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

453

ARM - Engineering Processes  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcal Documentation DataDatastreamswacrspeccmaskcopolDatastreamsxsacrslrAlaskaDefensiveProcesses Engineering Processes

454

Polycrystalline semiconductor processing  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A process is described for forming large-grain polycrystalline films from amorphous films for use as photovoltaic devices. The process operates on the amorphous film and uses the driving force inherent to the transition from the amorphous state to the crystalline state as the force which drives the grain growth process. The resultant polycrystalline film is characterized by a grain size that is greater than the thickness of the film. A thin amorphous film is deposited on a substrate. The formation of a plurality of crystalline embryos is induced in the amorphous film at predetermined spaced apart locations and nucleation is inhibited elsewhere in the film. The crystalline embryos are caused to grow in the amorphous film, without further nucleation occurring in the film, until the growth of the embryos is halted by impingement on adjacently growing embryos. The process is applicable to both batch and continuous processing techniques. In either type of process, the thin amorphous film is sequentially doped with p and n type dopants. Doping is effected either before or after the formation and growth of the crystalline embryos in the amorphous film, or during a continuously proceeding crystallization step. 10 figs.

Glaeser, A.M.; Haggerty, J.S.; Danforth, S.C.

1983-04-05T23:59:59.000Z

455

Helium process cycle  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A unique process cycle and apparatus design separates the consumer (cryogenic) load return flow from most of the recycle return flow of a refrigerator and/or liquefier process cycle. The refrigerator and/or liquefier process recycle return flow is recompressed by a multi-stage compressor set and the consumer load return flow is recompressed by an independent consumer load compressor set that maintains a desirable constant suction pressure using a consumer load bypass control valve and the consumer load return pressure control valve that controls the consumer load compressor's suction pressure. The discharge pressure of this consumer load compressor is thereby allowed to float at the intermediate pressure in between the first and second stage recycle compressor sets. Utilizing the unique gas management valve regulation, the unique process cycle and apparatus design in which the consumer load return flow is separate from the recycle return flow, the pressure ratios of each recycle compressor stage and all main pressures associated with the recycle return flow are allowed to vary naturally, thus providing a naturally regulated and balanced floating pressure process cycle that maintains optimal efficiency at design and off-design process cycle capacity and conditions automatically.

Ganni, Venkatarao (Yorktown, VA)

2008-08-12T23:59:59.000Z

456

Helium process cycle  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A unique process cycle and apparatus design separates the consumer (cryogenic) load return flow from most of the recycle return flow of a refrigerator and/or liquefier process cycle. The refrigerator and/or liquefier process recycle return flow is recompressed by a multi-stage compressor set and the consumer load return flow is recompressed by an independent consumer load compressor set that maintains a desirable constant suction pressure using a consumer load bypass control valve and the consumer load return pressure control valve that controls the consumer load compressor's suction pressure. The discharge pressure of this consumer load compressor is thereby allowed to float at the intermediate pressure in between the first and second stage recycle compressor sets. Utilizing the unique gas management valve regulation, the unique process cycle and apparatus design in which the consumer load return flow is separate from the recycle return flow, the pressure ratios of each recycle compressor stage and all main pressures associated with the recycle return flow are allowed to vary naturally, thus providing a naturally regulated and balanced floating pressure process cycle that maintains optimal efficiency at design and off-design process cycle capacity and conditions automatically.

Ganni, Venkatarao (Yorktown, VA)

2007-10-09T23:59:59.000Z

457

Studsvik Processing Facility Update  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Studsvik has completed over four years of operation at its Erwin, TN facility. During this time period Studsvik processed over 3.3 million pounds (1.5 million kgs) of radioactive ion exchange bead resin, powdered filter media, and activated carbon, which comprised a cumulative total activity of 18,852.5 Ci (6.98E+08 MBq). To date, the highest radiation level for an incoming resin container has been 395 R/hr (3.95 Sv/h). The Studsvik Processing Facility (SPF) has the capability to safely and efficiently receive and process a wide variety of solid and liquid Low Level Radioactive Waste (LLRW) streams including: Ion Exchange Resins (IER), activated carbon (charcoal), graphite, oils, solvents, and cleaning solutions with contact radiation levels of up to 400 R/hr (4.0 Sv/h). The licensed and heavily shielded SPF can receive and process liquid and solid LLRWs with high water and/or organic content. This paper provides an overview of the last four years of commercial operations processing radioactive LLRW from commercial nuclear power plants. Process improvements and lessons learned will be discussed.

Mason, J. B.; Oliver, T. W.; Hill, G. M.; Davin, P. F.; Ping, M. R.

2003-02-25T23:59:59.000Z

458

Report of Separate Effects Testing for Modeling of Metallic Fuel Casting Process  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In order to give guidance regarding the best investment of time and effort in experimental determination of parameters defining the casting process, a Flow-3D model of the casting process was used to investigate the most influential parameters regarding void fraction of the solidified rods and solidification speed for fluid flow parameters, liquid heat transfer parameters, and solid heat transfer parameters. Table 1 summarizes the most significant variables for each of the situations studied. A primary, secondary, and tertiary effect is provided for fluid flow parameters (impacts void fraction) and liquid heat transfer parameters (impacts solidification). In Table 1, the wetting angle represents the angle between the liquid and mold surface as pictured in Figure 1. The viscosity is the dynamic viscosity of the liquid and the surface tension is the property of the surface of a liquid that allows it to resist an external force. When only considering solid heat transfer properties, the variations from case to case were very small. Details on this conclusion are provided in the section considering solid heat transfer properties. The primary recommendation of the study is to measure the fluid flow parameters, specifically the wetting angle, surface tension, and dynamic viscosity, in order of importance, as well as the heat transfer parameters latent heat and specific heat of the liquid alloy. The wetting angle and surface tension can be measured simultaneously using the sessile drop method. It is unclear whether there is a temperature dependency in these properties. Thus measurements for all three parameters are requested at 1340, 1420, and 1500 degrees Celsius, which correspond to the minimum, middle, and maximum temperatures of the liquid alloy during the process. In addition, the heat transfer coefficient between the mold and liquid metal, the latent heat of transformation, and the specific heat of the liquid metal all have strong influences on solidification. These parameters should be measured to achieve better simulation fidelity. Information on all the mentioned parameters is virtually nonexistent. Presently, all the parameters within the casting model are estimates based on pure U, or another alloy such as U-Ni.

Crapps, Justin M. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Galloway, Jack D. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Decroix, David S. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Korzekwa, David A. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Aikin, Robert M. Jr. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Unal, Cetin [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Fielding, R. [Idaho National Laboratory; Kennedy, R [Idaho National Laboratory

2012-06-29T23:59:59.000Z

459

Cantilever epitaxial process  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A process of growing a material on a substrate, particularly growing a Group II-VI or Group III-V material, by a vapor-phase growth technique where the growth process eliminates the need for utilization of a mask or removal of the substrate from the reactor at any time during the processing. A nucleation layer is first grown upon which a middle layer is grown to provide surfaces for subsequent lateral cantilever growth. The lateral growth rate is controlled by altering the reactor temperature, pressure, reactant concentrations or reactant flow rates. Semiconductor materials, such as GaN, can be produced with dislocation densities less than 10.sup.7 /cm.sup.2.

Ashby, Carol I.; Follstaedt, David M.; Mitchell, Christine C.; Han, Jung

2003-07-29T23:59:59.000Z

460

Chapter ProcessLevel Parallelism The process traditional UNIX execution. The concept the process (and  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Chapter Process璍evel Parallelism The process traditional UNIX execution. The concept the process (and relationship concept of a thread) are covered under ``Process璍evel Parallelism'' page 242. The purpose this chapter review how you use IRIX processes perform parallel processing single program. #12

Lu, Paul

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "wet process clinker" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


461

SRC-II process  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Extensive laboratory and pilot plant experimental work on the Solvent Refined Coal Process has led to the development of an improved version of the process known as SRC-II. This work has shown considerable promise and plans are being made to demonstrate the SRC-II process using commercial size equipment in a 6000 T/D plant to be located near Morgantown, West Virginia. On the basis of recent economic studies, the products (both liquid and gas) from a future large-scale commercial plant are expected to have an overall selling price of $4.00 to 5.00 per million Btu (first quarter 1980 basis). The major product of the primary process is distillate fuel oil of less than 0.3% sulfur for use largely as a non-polluting fuel for generating electrical power and steam, especially in the east where utilities and industry are presently using petroleum products. For the longer term, the major growth opportunity for SRC-II fuel oil in the generation of electric power will probably be through advanced combustion turbine units with heat recovery boilers (combined cycle units). The light liquid fractions (naphtha and middle distillate) produced by the SRC-II process can be upgraded to a high octane unleaded gasoline to supplement petroleum-derived supplies. Significant quantities of pipeline gas are also produced at a cost which should be competitive with SNG from direct coal gasification. Light hydrocarbons (ethane, propane) from the process may be effectively converted to ethylene in conventional cracking plants to offset ethylene demand from petroleum-derived naphtha and gas oil, both of which could otherwise be used for other refinery products. In addition, certain fraction of the fuel oil might also be used in medium speed diesel engines and automotive gas turbines.

Schmid, B.K.; Jackson, D.M.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

462

Coking and gasification process  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An improved coking process for normally solid carbonaceous materials wherein the yield of liquid product from the coker is increased by adding ammonia or an ammonia precursor to the coker. The invention is particularly useful in a process wherein coal liquefaction bottoms are coked to produce both a liquid and a gaseous product. Broadly, ammonia or an ammonia precursor is added to the coker ranging from about 1 to about 60 weight percent based on normally solid carbonaceous material and is preferably added in an amount from about 2 to about 15 weight percent.

Billimoria, Rustom M. (Houston, TX); Tao, Frank F. (Baytown, TX)

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

463

Sequential elution process  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A process and apparatus for the separation of complex mixtures of carbonaceous material by sequential elution with successively stronger solvents. In the process, a column containing glass beads is maintained in a fluidized state by a rapidly flowing stream of a weak solvent, and the sample is injected into this flowing stream such that a portion of the sample is dissolved therein and the remainder of the sample is precipitated therein and collected as a uniform deposit on the glass beads. Successively stronger solvents are then passed through the column to sequentially elute less soluble materials.

Kingsley, Ilse S. (Bethlehem, PA)

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

464

Actinide metal processing  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A process of converting an actinide metal such as thorium, uranium, or plnium to an actinide oxide material by admixing the actinide metal in an aqueous medium with a hypochlorite as an oxidizing agent for sufficient time to form the actinide oxide material and recovering the actinide oxide material is provided together with a low temperature process of preparing an actinide oxide nitrate such as uranyl nitrte. Additionally, a composition of matter comprising the reaction product of uranium metal and sodium hypochlorite is provided, the reaction product being an essentially insoluble uranium oxide material suitable for disposal or long term storage.

Sauer, Nancy N. (Los Alamos, NM); Watkin, John G. (Los Alamos, NM)

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

465

Biomass Processing Photolibrary  

DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

Research related to bioenergy is a major focus in the U.S. as science agencies, universities, and commercial labs seek to create new energy-efficient fuels. The Biomass Processing Project is one of the funded projects of the joint USDA-DOE Biomass Research and Development Initiative. The Biomass Processing Photolibrary has numerous images, but there are no accompanying abstracts to explain what you are seeing. The project website, however, makes available the full text of presentations and publications and also includes an exhaustive biomass glossary that is being developed into an ASAE Standard.

466

Reversible brazing process  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method of reversibly brazing surfaces together. An interface is affixed to each surface. The interfaces can be affixed by processes such as mechanical joining, welding, or brazing. The two interfaces are then brazed together using a brazing process that does not defeat the surface to interface joint. Interfaces of materials such as Ni-200 can be affixed to metallic surfaces by welding or by brazing with a first braze alloy. The Ni-200 interfaces can then be brazed together using a second braze alloy. The second braze alloy can be chosen so that it minimally alters the properties of the interfaces to allow multiple braze, heat and disassemble, rebraze cycles.

Pierce, Jim D. (Albuquerque, NM); Stephens, John J. (Albuquerque, NM); Walker, Charles A. (Albuquerque, NM)

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

467

Cyclic membrane separation process  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A cyclic process for controlling environmental emissions of volatile organic compounds (VOC) from vapor recovery in storage and dispensing operations of liquids maintains a vacuum in the storage tank ullage. In one of a two-part cyclic process ullage vapor is discharged through a vapor recovery system in which VOC are stripped from vented gas with a selectively gas permeable membrane. In the other part, the membrane is inoperative while gas pressure rises in the ullage. Ambient air is charged to the membrane separation unit during the latter part of the cycle.

Bowser, John

2004-04-13T23:59:59.000Z

468

Cyclic membrane separation process  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A cyclic process for controlling environmental emissions of volatile organic compounds (VOC) from vapor recovery in storage and dispensing operations of liquids maintains a vacuum in the storage tank ullage. In the first part of a two-part cyclic process ullage vapor is discharged through a vapor recovery system in which VOC are stripped from vented gas with a selectively gas permeable membrane. In the second part, the membrane is inoperative while gas pressure rises in the ullage. In one aspect of this invention, a vacuum is drawn in the membrane separation unit thus reducing overall VOC emissions.

Nemser, Stuart M.

2005-05-03T23:59:59.000Z

469

Actinide metal processing  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A process for converting an actinide metal such as thorium, uranium, or plutonium to an actinide oxide material by admixing the actinide metal in an aqueous medium with a hypochlorite as an oxidizing agent for sufficient time to form the actinide oxide material and recovering the actinide oxide material is described together with a low temperature process for preparing an actinide oxide nitrate such as uranyl nitrate. Additionally, a composition of matter comprising the reaction product of uranium metal and sodium hypochlorite is provided, the reaction product being an essentially insoluble uranium oxide material suitable for disposal or long term storage.

Sauer, N.N.; Watkin, J.G.

1992-03-24T23:59:59.000Z

470

Solar industrial process heat  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The aim of the assessment reported is to candidly examine the contribution that solar industrial process heat (SIPH) is realistically able to make in the near and long-term energy futures of the United States. The performance history of government and privately funded SIPH demonstration programs, 15 of which are briefly summarized, and the present status of SIPH technology are discussed. The technical and performance characteristics of solar industrial process heat plants and equipment are reviewed, as well as evaluating how the operating experience of over a dozen SIPH demonstration projects is influencing institutional acceptance and economoc projections. Implications for domestic energy policy and international implications are briefly discussed. (LEW)

Lumsdaine, E.

1981-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

471

Sequential elution process  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A process and apparatus are disclosed for the separation of complex mixtures of carbonaceous material by sequential elution with successively stronger solvents. In the process, a column containing glass beads is maintained in a fluidized state by a rapidly flowing stream of a weak solvent, and the sample is injected into this flowing stream such that a portion of the sample is dissolved therein and the remainder of the sample is precipitated therein and collected as a uniform deposit on the glass beads. Successively stronger solvents are then passed through the column to sequentially elute less soluble materials. 1 fig.

Kingsley, I.S.

1987-01-06T23:59:59.000Z

472

Parastillation Process in Operations  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

PARASTII.IMICN PIO:ESS rn OPERATIONS Frank canfield ChenShare Coq:oration Houston, Texas The Parastillation process is a new rrethod for ITU.11ti-stage, counter-current contact between vapor and liquid that results in 33% rrore ideal stages... than distillation for a given tray spaci.n;J. Patents have been granted in the U.S.A., U.K., Europe and other countries. Perfonnance of the process has been confimm aver the past several years by eat1puter siITU.llation, by laboratory tests...

Canfield, F.; Jenkins, O.

473

Random Trees, Levy Processes and Spatial Branching Processes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of the exploration process . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13 0.6 Marginals of trees coded by the height process and the minimum . . . . . . . . . 20 1.2 The height process and the exploration process of continuous trees 71 3.1 Duality properties of the exploration process . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 71 3

Le Gall, Jean-Fran莽ois

474

LEVY PROCESS CONDITIONED BY ITS HEIGHT PROCESS June 11, 2011  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-called exploration process defined in [10], T0 is the hitting time of 0 for X. When the process X is a compensatedL麓EVY PROCESS CONDITIONED BY ITS HEIGHT PROCESS June 11, 2011 MATHIEU RICHARD Abstract. In the present work, we consider spectrally positive L麓evy processes (Xt, t 0) not drifting to + and we

475

Do Process-Centred Environments Deserve Process-Centred Tools?  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Do Process-Centred Environments Deserve Process-Centred Tools? Wolfgang Emmerich and Anthony|acwfg@cs.city.ac.uk Abstract. Process-centred software development environments inte- grate a process engine, which enacts a process program, with tools that automate particular tasks or provide facilities for document production

Finkelstein, Anthony

476

Updatable Process Views for Adapting Large Process Models  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Updatable Process Views for Adapting Large Process Models: The proView Demonstrator Jens Kolb. The increasing adoption of process-aware information sys- tems (PAISs) has resulted in large process model collections. To support users having different perspectives on these processes and related data, a PAIS should

Ulm, Universit鋞

477

Lightweight Process Modeling for Virtual Enterprise Process Collaboration  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Lightweight Process Modeling for Virtual Enterprise Process Collaboration Lai Xu1 , Paul de Vrieze1 of mashups are often more data related than process related. In this paper, we explore the differences between data-oriented mashups and process-oriented enterprise mashups and consider how process mashups can

Paris-Sud XI, Universit de

478

Direct Observation of Completely Processed Calcium Carbonate Dust Particles  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This study presents, for the first time, field evidence of complete, irreversible processing of solid calcium carbonate (calcite)-containing particles and quantitative formation of liquid calcium nitrate particles apparently as a result of heterogeneous reaction of calcium carbonate-containing mineral dust particles with gaseous nitric acid. Formation of nitrates from individual calcite and sea salt particles was followed as a function of time in aerosol samples collected at Shoresh, Israel. Morphology and compositional changes of individual particles were observed using conventional scanning electron microscopy with energy dispersive analysis of X-rays (SEM/EDX) and computer controlled SEM/EDX. Environmental scanning electron microscopy (ESEM) was utilized to determine and demonstrate the hygroscopic behavior of calcium nitrate particles found in some of the samples. Calcium nitrate particles are exceptionally hygroscopic and deliquesce even at very low relative humidity (RH) of 9 -11% which is lower than typical atmospheric environments. Transformation of non-hygroscopic dry mineral dust particles into hygroscopic wet aerosol may have substantial impacts on light scattering properties, the ability to modify clouds and heterogeneous chemistry.

Laskin, Alexander; Iedema, Martin J.; Ichkovich, Aviad; Graber, Ellen R.; Taraniuk, Ilya; Rudich, Yinon

2005-05-27T23:59:59.000Z

479

Electrochemical Processes for Removing  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Introduction Most unit operations for water treatment either add chemicals or produce a saline liquid waste one community is often the source of potable water for downstream locales. Water treatment processes for water treatment that address the problem of increasing watery supply salinity. The problem of water

Fay, Noah

480

Improving scrap tire processing  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The market for tire-derived materials is growing rapidly, with the largest market being tire-derived fuels. There is therefore a growing demand for higher quality products. This paper describes the processing and removal of steel from scrap tires.

Astafan, C.G. [Columbus McKinnon Corp., Sarasota, FL (United States)

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

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