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1

Use of mineralizer in black meal process for improved clinkerization and conservation of energy  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The high cost of energy and the consumption of almost three times the net theoretical heat required in clinkering process continue to be a nagging problem faced by VSK plants. There is, therefore, a need for energy conservation which could be rapidly and economically accomplished by promoting the clinker formation at lower temperature. The use of fluxes for lowering the melting point of the raw mix is an important measure to save energy, giving economic benefits. Fluxes and mineralizers improve burnability and quality of clinker, solving particularly the free lime problem faced by cement plants. The purpose of the present paper is to highlight the role of CaF{sub 2} and CaSO{sub 4} as mineralizers with industrial raw mix in VSK technology in conserving energy and improving the quality of clinker. The use of CaF{sub 2}, CaSO{sub 4}, or a mixture of CaF{sub 2} and CaSO{sub 4} promotes the clinker formation at lower temperature, giving direct implication on commercial production with economic benefits without affecting the quality.

Raina, K.; Janakiraman, L.K. [National Council for Cement and Building Materials, New Delhi (India)] [National Council for Cement and Building Materials, New Delhi (India)

1998-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

2

Hydrothermal Processing of Wet Wastes  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Breakout Session 3A—Conversion Technologies III: Energy from Our Waste—Will we Be Rich in Fuel or Knee Deep in Trash by 2025? Hydrothermal Processing of Wet Wastes James R. Oyler, President, Genifuel Corporation

3

Enzymatic corn wet milling: engineering process and cost model  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Enzymatic corn wet milling (E-milling) is a process derived from conventional wet milling for the recovery and purification of starch ... the total starch production in USA by conventional wet milling equaled 23 ...

Edna C Ramírez; David B Johnston; Andrew J McAloon…

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

4

TRL Acid and Solvent Wet Processing Rules and Guidelines  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

: General rules and guidelines for wet chemical processing in TRL. Author: KFlo hood and when transporting or handling chemicals. An acid-proof apron, sleeveTRL Acid and Solvent Wet Processing Rules and Guidelines Purpose

Reif, Rafael

5

Microfiltration of gluten processing streams from corn wet milling  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In corn wet milling, dry matter can be separated from liquids in process streams with centrifuges or vacuum belt filtration (VBF). Because separations usually are not complete, dry matter can be lost in the liquid streams (overflow from the gluten thickener centrifuge and filtrate from VBF). This represents a loss of nutrients, especially protein, to low valued coproducts and reduces quality of water for recycling within the process. The objective was to compare microfiltration of light and heavy gluten process streams to conventional separation methods. Batches of light and heavy gluten were obtained from a wet mill plant and processed by microfiltration. Samples of permeate and concentrate from microfiltration were analyzed and compared to corresponding streams from wet milling. Microfiltration of light gluten resulted in concentrate and permeate streams similar in composition to conventionally processed light gluten using a centrifuge, suggesting that microfiltration is as effective as centrifugation in partitioning solids and water in light gluten. Dewatering of heavy gluten found that conventional VBF caused dry matter concentrations in gluten cake to be higher than concentrate from microfiltration. Permeate from microfiltration of heavy gluten had higher concentrations of ash and lower soluble nitrogen than filtrate from VBF. Microfiltration was able to remove more ash from concentrate, which may improve the value of wet milling coproducts. These data demonstrated microfiltration has potential for separation of light and heavy gluten streams, but more data are needed on effectiveness and practicality.

C.I. Thompson; K.D. Rausch; R.L. Belyea; M.E. Tumbleson

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

6

Clinkering properties of rammed coking coal and coal batches  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The clinkering properties of rammed coking coal and coal batches are investigated. There is a close relation between the clinkering properties and coke quality.

V. M. Shmal’ko; M. A. Solov’ev

2009-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

7

Microfiltration of gluten processing streams from corn wet milling C.I. Thompson a  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Microfiltration of gluten processing streams from corn wet milling C.I. Thompson a , K.D. Rausch b 2005; accepted 6 February 2005 Available online 12 April 2005 Abstract In corn wet milling, dry matter composition; Corn processing; Membrane filtration; Corn gluten meal; Wet milling 1. Introduction Wet milling

8

ENGINEERING AND PROCESSING A 100-g Laboratory Corn Wet-Milling Procedure  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ENGINEERING AND PROCESSING A 100-g Laboratory Corn Wet-Milling Procedure S. R. ECKHOFF,' S. K in replicates of 0.36% when the replicates were per- The feasibility of corn wet-milling facilities processing of biotechnology and genetic engineering in corn hybrid development. Identification of better wet-milling hybrids

9

Quality design of belite–melilite clinker  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We have developed a new cement clinker, consisting mainly of belite and melilite, which is capable of increasing the amount of recycled waste as a part of its raw materials. We analyzed clinkers with a wide range of compositions, and clarified the quantitative relationship between the chemical and mineral compositions. Clinkers consisting mostly of belite and melilite were successfully obtained at the CaO/SiO{sub 2} mass ratio of 1.7 to 1.9. Test cements were prepared using these clinkers and mixed with OPC for the evaluation of fluidity and strength. The belite–melilite cement was found to have good fluidity, and the belite–melilite cement mixed with OPC at up to 30% exhibited a satisfactory long term strength equivalent to the OPC, demonstrating the potential as an alternative to OPC. Electron probe microanalysis revealed the relatively high concentration of diphosphorus pentaoxide in belite, suggesting this component might contribute to the strength enhancement of the cement. -- Highlights: •A new cement clinker consisting mainly of belite and melilite was designed. •The clinker enables the use of various recycled wastes as part of its raw materials. •The relationship between the chemical and mineral compositions was clarified. •This cement mixed with OPC at up to 30% exhibited a good quality equivalent to OPC.

Kurokawa, Daisuke, E-mail: daisuke_kurokawa@taiheiyo-cement.co.jp [R and D center, Taiheiyo Cement Corporation, Chiba 285-8655 (Japan) [R and D center, Taiheiyo Cement Corporation, Chiba 285-8655 (Japan); Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Nagoya Institute of Technology, Nagoya 466-8555 (Japan); Honma, Kenichi; Hirao, Hiroshi [R and D center, Taiheiyo Cement Corporation, Chiba 285-8655 (Japan)] [R and D center, Taiheiyo Cement Corporation, Chiba 285-8655 (Japan); Fukuda, Koichiro [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Nagoya Institute of Technology, Nagoya 466-8555 (Japan)] [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Nagoya Institute of Technology, Nagoya 466-8555 (Japan)

2013-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

10

Problems with low-temperature clinkers  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In the cement industry, there are real problems connected with reducing the fuel/energy consumption and producing high-strength and rapid setting cements. A series of physicochemical examinations and pilot plant trials have shown that the use of BaSO/sub 4/ + CaSO/sub 4/ as a compound additive (barium-containing waste + gypsum) makes it possible to prepare a belite clinker at a temperature of 1250/sup 0/C; the BaSO/sub 4/ + CaSO/sub 4/ additive stabilizes the dicalcium silicate in the ..cap alpha..'-modification; introduction of the compound additive into the belite raw material mixture leads to the formation of hydraulically active minerals in the clinker-calcium sulfoaluminate, monocalcium aluminate, and ..cap alpha..'-C/sub 2/S, which in combination with alite ensure that a high-activity belite clinker is obtained at low burning temperatures.

Sychev, M.M.; Tandilova, K.B.; Minkina, V.N.

1987-07-20T23:59:59.000Z

11

Engineering process and cost model for a conventional corn wet milling facility  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Conventional wet milling of corn is a process designed for the recovery and purification of starch and several coproducts (germ, gluten, fiber and steep liquor). The total starch produced by the wet milling industry in the USA in 2004 equaled 21.5 billion kg, including modified starches and starches used for sweeteners and ethanol production. Process engineering and cost models for a corn wet milling process (for steeping and milling facilities) have been developed for a “generic” processing plant with a capacity of 2.54 million kg of corn per day (100,000 bu/day). The process includes grain cleaning, steeping, germ separation and recovery, fiber separation and recovery, gluten separation and recovery and starch separation. Information for the development of the models was obtained from a variety of technical sources including commercial wet milling companies, industry experts and equipment suppliers. The models were developed using process and cost simulation software (SuperPro Designer®) and include processing information such as composition and flow rates of the various process streams, descriptions of the various unit operations and detailed breakdowns of the operating and capital cost of the facility. Based on the information from the model, we can estimate the cost of production per kilogram of starch using the input prices for corn and other wet milling coproducts. We have also used the model to conduct a variety of sensitivity studies utilizing modifications such as feedstock costs, corn compositional variations, and the sale of wet corn gluten feed. The model is also being used as a base-case for the development of models to test alternative processing technologies and to help in the scale-up and commercialization of new wet milling technologies. This model is available upon request from the authors for educational, non-commercial and research uses.

Edna C. Ramirez; David B. Johnston; Andrew J. McAloon; Winnie Yee; Vijay Singh

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

12

Comparative LCA of sewage sludge valorisation as both fuel and raw material substitute in clinker production  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A life cycle assessment to evaluate the environmental impact of urban sewage sludge use as alternative fuel or raw material in clinker production was carried out. In order to quantify in detail the overall environmental impact of both scenarios, the sewage sludge treatment process and the transport to cement facilities for both alternatives were considered. The substitution ratio of fuel (petcoke) and raw material (limestone) was fixed between 5 and 15% according to the cement production plant limitations. Both scenarios show CO2 savings when compared to the clinker production without substitution. The mid-point and end-point analysis were favourable to the fuel substitution with savings ranging from 3 to 7% compared to the raw material substitution and also to base case without substitution. The influence of the amount of sewage sludge used for both scenarios indicates that fuel substitution reduced the CO2 emissions when the amount of substitution is increased, while other mid-point and end-point categories were proportionally favourable to the fuel substitution scenario. Additionally, the influence of the substituted material characteristics showed that low heating value (fuel substitution) and CaO addition in lime stabilized sludge (raw material substitution) are critical parameters in terms of environmental impact in clinker production. The fuel substitution represents a significant environmental improvement compared to the raw material substitution scenario and clinker production without substitution.

Cesar Valderrama; Ricard Granados; Jose Luis Cortina; Carles M. Gasol; Manel Guillem; Alejandro Josa

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

13

New waste based clinkers: Belite and lime formulations  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This work describes the formulation of new belite-based (CR2) and lime-based (CR3) cementitious materials derived from industrial wastes, such as sludges (generated in the Al-anodising and surface coating industrial processes, potable water filtration/cleaning operations and in marble sawing processes) and foundry sand. Powder mixtures were prepared and fired at different temperatures. For comparison, similar formulations were prepared with pre-treated and commercially available natural raw materials and processed in similar conditions. The thermal process was followed by differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) and high-temperature powder X-ray diffraction (HT-XRD) studies. The CR2 clinker was found to contain belite as the main cementitious phase, the main polymorph being identified by NMR. The CR3 clinker contained common cementitious phases, such as C{sub 3}A and C{sub 3}S, but free lime and calcium aluminium oxide sulphates were also identified by high temperature XRD and NMR. Then the corresponding cement was prepared and the evolution of the mechanical strength with time was evaluated. The lime-based cement obtained from wastes shows a stronger hardening character than the standard material, which tends to show dusting phenomena due to the presence of a reasonable amount of free lime (as the result of its expansive reaction with ambient moisture). Some fluxing impurities (e.g. alkalis) present in the waste materials improve the overall reactivity of the mixture and induces the combination of the lime in CR3. Raman, XPS and FIB techniques were used to fully characterise the aged cements.

Raupp-Pereira, Fabiano [Ceramics and Glass Engineering Department, CICECO, University of Aveiro, 3810-193 Aveiro (Portugal); Ball, Richard James [University of Bristol, Interface Analysis Centre, Oldbury House, 121 St Michael's Hill, Bristol, BS2 8BS (United Kingdom)], E-mail: richard.ball@bristol.ac.uk; Rocha, Joao [Department of Chemistry, CICECO, University of Aveiro, 3810-193 Aveiro (Portugal); Labrincha, Joao A. [Ceramics and Glass Engineering Department, CICECO, University of Aveiro, 3810-193 Aveiro (Portugal); Allen, Geoffrey C. [University of Bristol, Interface Analysis Centre, Oldbury House, 121 St Michael's Hill, Bristol, BS2 8BS (United Kingdom)

2008-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

14

Chemical Processing in High-Pressure Aqueous Environments. 7. Process Development for Catalytic Gasification of Wet Biomass Feedstocks  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

7. Process Development for Catalytic Gasification of Wet Biomass Feedstocks ... 4 Here we report the preliminary results of continuous-flow reactor studies with wet biomass feedstocks using new catalyst systems developed specifically for these processing conditions. ... Developing catalysts for this processing environment has also been an important factor in making this processing technology viable.2 Previous reports of continuous reactor tests with biomass feedstocks provide preliminary short-term processing results,8,9 but also show the problems of long-term operation of the process with the contaminants inherent in biomass. ...

Douglas C. Elliott; Gary G. Neuenschwander; Todd R. Hart; R. Scott Butner; Alan H. Zacher; Mark H. Engelhard; James S. Young; David E. McCready

2004-03-25T23:59:59.000Z

15

Synthesis of belite cement clinker of high hydraulic reactivity  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This study is concerned with the increase of the cooling rate of belite clinker, by using the water quenching for the chemical stabilization of reactive belite, which improves the hydraulic properties of this clinker. The addition of adequate mineralizers, as NaF and Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3}, contributes to the improvement of the clinker properties obtained at low burning temperature. X-ray fluorescence spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction analysis and optical microscopy were used to determine the chemical and mineralogical compositions of this clinker. The samples were analyzed by means of a scanning electronic microscope connected with an energy-dispersive X-ray spectrometer to detect the composition of the belite phase and its morphology. Physical and mechanical properties of this clinker cement were determined. The results show that the belite clinker obtained at 1150 {sup o}C, with lime saturation factor 0.67, is characterized by a great hydraulic reactivity, similar to that of the ordinary alite clinker. The addition of 2% of NaF and the water quenching improved the chemical, mineralogical and structural properties, while improving the cement hydraulic properties.

Kacimi, Larbi [Laboratoire de Genie des Procedes, Departement de Chimie, Universite des Sciences et de la Technologie d'Oran, B.P. 1505, El-M'nouar, U.S.T. Oran (Algeria)], E-mail: kacimi20002000@yahoo.fr; Simon-Masseron, Angelique [Laboratoire des Materiaux a Porosite Controlee, CNRS UMR 7016, Universite de Haute-Alsace, 3, rue Alfred-Werner, F-68093 Mulhouse cedex (France)], E-mail: A.Simon@univ-mulhouse.fr; Salem, Souria [Departement d'Architecture, Faculte de Genie Civile, USTO-Oran (Algeria)], E-mail: zinaisalem@yahoo.fr; Ghomari, Abdelhamid [Departement de Chimie, U.A.I.B., Route de Belahcel, Mostaganem (Algeria)], E-mail: belkey@hotmail.com; Derriche, Zoubir [Laboratoire de Genie des Procedes, Departement de Chimie, Universite des Sciences et de la Technologie d'Oran, B.P. 1505, El-M'nouar, U.S.T. Oran (Algeria)

2009-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

16

Process for the recovery of uranium from wet-process phosphoric acid  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In a process for the recovery of uranium from a wet-process phosphoric acid, comprising treating in an extraction step the preliminarily oxidized acid first with an organic solvent consisting essentially of a dialkylphosphoric acid and a trialkyphosphine oxide dissolved in an inert and unreactive organic solvent whereby there are obtained a uranium-free phosphoric acid and an organic extract consisting essentially of the solvent containing the major portion of uranium; then, in a reextraction step, separating the uranium from the organic extract as ammonium uranyl tricarbonate by reacting the organic extract with ammonium hydroxide and ammonium carbonate; and recycling the uranium-free solvent to the extraction step; an improvement comprises treating the organic extract in a reextraction apparatus having at least two stages, by (A) introducing the extract at the head of the first stage; (B) countercurrently introducing ammonia or ammonium hydroxide solution at the bottom of the first stage; the ph of the first stage being controlled and maintained at a value of 8.0 to 8.5; (C) introducing an ammonium carbonate aqueous solution at the bottom of the last stage; the amount of ammonium carbonate employed being 50-80 percent by weight of the theoretical molar quantity which is necessary to neutralize the dialkylphosphoric acid contained in the solvent and to convert the uranium to ammonium uranyl tricarbonate; and (D) regenerating the ammoniated solvent obtained after the reextraction step by treating it with an acid before recycling it to the extraction step.

Francois, A.; Sialino, A.

1980-12-09T23:59:59.000Z

17

Modification of poorly clinkering coal for use in coking  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

If coal is modified by the volatile products formed in pyrolysis, high-quality blast-furnace coke may be produced from batch with a smaller proportion of expensive clinkering coal. In such coking, the batch is mo...

E. I. Malyi

2014-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

18

Grinding of cement clinkers : linking multi-scale fracture properties to system chemistry, mineralogy and microstructure  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Growing environmental concerns encourage the cement industry to improve its environmental performance, which in turn renews the interest in clinker grinding efficiency. Current knowledge on clinker grinding was built over ...

Wilson, William, S.M. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

19

Preliminary Evaluation of Cesium Distribution for Wet Sieving Process Planned for Soil Decontamination in Japan - 13104  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

For the purpose of decontaminating radioactive cesium from a huge amount of soil, which has been estimated to be 1.2x10{sup 8} m{sup 3} by excavating to a 5-cm depth from the surface of Fukushima Prefecture where a severe nuclear accident occurred at TEPCO's power generating site and has emitted a significant amount of radioactive materials, mainly radioactive cesium, a wet sieving process was selected as one of effective methods available in Japan. Some private companies have demonstrated this process for soil treatment in the Fukushima area by testing at their plants. The results were very promising, and a full-fledged application is expected to follow. In the present study, we spiked several aqueous samples containing soil collected from an industrial wet sieving plant located near our university for the recycling of construction wastes with non-radioactive cesium hydroxide. The present study provides scientific data concerning the effectiveness in volume reduction of the contaminated soil by a wet sieving process as well as the cesium distribution between the liquid phase and clay minerals for each sub-process of the full-scale one, but a simulating plant equipped with a process of coagulating sedimentation and operational safety fundamentals for the plant. Especially for the latter aspect, the study showed that clay minerals of submicron size strongly bind a high content of cesium, which was only slightly removed by coagulation with natural sedimentation (1 G) nor centrifugal sedimentation (3,700 G) and some of the cesium may be transferred to the effluent or recycled water. By applying ultracentrifugation (257,000 G), most of submicron clay minerals containing cesium was removed, and the cesium amount which might be transferred to the effluent or recycled water, could be reduced to less than 2.3 % of the original design by the addition of a cesium barrier consisting of ultracentrifugation or a hollow fiber membrane. (authors)

Enokida, Y.; Tanada, Y.; Hirabayashi, D. [Graduate School of Engineering, 1 Furo-cho Nagoya-shi, Aichi-ken, 4648603 (Japan)] [Graduate School of Engineering, 1 Furo-cho Nagoya-shi, Aichi-ken, 4648603 (Japan); Sawada, K. [EcoTopia Science Institute, Nagoya University, 1 Furo-cho Nagoya-shi, Aichi-ken, 4648603 (Japan)] [EcoTopia Science Institute, Nagoya University, 1 Furo-cho Nagoya-shi, Aichi-ken, 4648603 (Japan)

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

20

Influence of certain additives and combinations of them on the structure and properties of clinker  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The results of investigations of the influence of BaO, Mn/sub 2/O/sub 3/, and the BaO + Mn/sub 2/O/sub 3/ combination on the phase composition of clinker, the contents of different forms of alite, and the burning temperature are reported. A specific feature of the clinkers taken for the investigation is that they contain over 4% MgO. The additives used in the investigation were barium-containing wastes from lithopone production and ''tailings'' from concentration of manganese ores. The barium-containing wastes contained from 30 to 40% BaO, and the Mn/sub 2/O/sub 3/ content in tailings from manganese ores reached 15-16%; moreover, they contained up to 60% SiO/sub 2/, which is important for raising the silica ratio. At the same time, the use of manganese wastes in the cement raw mix makes the use of cinders unnecessary. The amounts of wastes introduced into the raw mix were calculated to give BaO contents in the clinkers from 0.3 to 0.9% and Mn/sub 2/O/sub 3/ contents from 0.7 to 1.4%. Introduction of alloying and modifying additives containing Ba and Mn into cement raw mixes intensifies the burning process, lowering the temperature by 100/sup 0/C. The change of the burning temperature in presence of additives is accompanied by changes of the modification composition of the principal silicate phase, alite. Lowering of the sintering temperature reveals a high degree of imperfection of the structure of cement minerals arising as the result of introduction of BaO and Mn/sub 2/O/sub 3/. Cements containing alloying and modifying additions of barium and manganese and obtained at lower temperatures have higher activity than cements without additives.

Minkina, V.N.; Sychev, M.M.; Tandilova, K.B.; Papuashvili, S.N.

1983-04-20T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "wet process clinker" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

EFFECT OF NaF AND SnO{sub 2} ON PORTLAND CEMENT CLINKER FABRICATION  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The paper aimed at studying the effect of NaF and SnO{sub 2} employed as mineralisers on Portland cement clinker fabrication. In order to do this, the raw mix included in turn 0.5% NaF, 0.5% SnO{sub 2}, and a combination of 0.5% NaF and 0.5% SnO{sub 2}, all expressed as weight percentages of the raw mix. The effects of the presence of NaF and SnO{sub 2} mineralisers on the raw mix were studied by investigations of the loss on ignition at 700 deg. C and 800 deg. C with calculating the corresponding decarbonation ratio of the raw mix, determination of free lime and XRD analysis. NaF was found to have a positive effect both during the decarbonation of the raw mix and during the formation of minerals in clinker. On the other hand, SnO{sub 2} has but a little effect on the decarbonation process. Finally, the combined use of NaF and SnO{sub 2} modifies the kinetics of binding the free lime to the effect of accelerating the process as compared to the separate use of each mineraliser.

Paceagiu, Jenica; Amzica, Florin; Chendrean, Teofil; Paraschiv, Tatiana [CEPROCIM SA, Bucharest (Romania)

2008-08-28T23:59:59.000Z

22

Stabilité et durabilité des hydrates du systčme clinker sulfoalumineux-gypse.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??Cette thčse s'inscrit dans un projet de recherche de solutions de bétons ŕ impacts environnementaux réduits. Nous focalisons la présente étude sur le clinker sulfoalumineux… (more)

Desbois, Tiffany

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

23

A Process for the Aqueous Enzymatic Extraction of Corn Oil from Dry Milled Corn Germ and Enzymatic Wet Milled Corn Germ (E-Germ)  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A bench-scale aqueous enzymatic method was developed to extract corn oil from corn germ from either a commercial corn dry mill or corn germ from a newly-developed experimental enzymatic wet milling process (E-Ger...

Robert A. Moreau; Leland C. Dickey…

2009-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

24

Incorporation of V, Zn and Pb into the crystalline phases of Portland clinker  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Burning of industrial wastes in cement kilns has an increasing environmental importance, brought about by the incorporation of potentially hazardous elements into clinker crystalline phases and partial substitution of primary fuel and raw materials. In this study, experimental clinkers were synthesized, with the addition of V, Zn and Pb to a standard raw meal, from which a control clinker was obtained for comparison. The three metals were chosen as they are present in the alternative fuel petcoke (V) and in industrial wastes (Zn, Pb) commonly burned in cement kilns. Electron microprobe and scanning electron microscope analysis revealed the preferential partition of these metals among the clinker crystalline phases. It was observed that V has shown a preferential partition towards C{sub 2}S. Zn appears in higher amounts in periclase, and C{sub 3}S has higher Zn contents than C{sub 2}S. Pb concentrates in minute spherules and partitions toward C{sub 3}S in small amounts.

Andrade, F.R.D.; Maringolo, V.; Kihara, Y

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

25

SCHEDULE OF FEES Wet Milling  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

SCHEDULE OF FEES Wet Milling 100 g.......................$120..per sample* 1 kilogram of Illinois offers five milling procedures to determine processing characteristics of corn. Laboratory times. WET MILLING The wet milling process is used to produce starch (99.6% purity) as the primary

Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, University of

26

Sewage sludge minimisation by means of wet oxidation: process performance and economic sustainability  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Today, several technologies and management strategies are proposed and applied in WWTPs to minimise sludge production and contamination and their techno-economic feasibility has to be carefully evaluated. In this work (which is being conducted within the European Union project 'ROUTES'), based on bench results, a mass balance was drawn for a WWTP (500,000 PE), where it was supposed to install a wet oxidation (WO) stage for sludge minimisation. The design of treatment units and the estimation of capital and operation costs were then performed. Subsequently, a procedure for technical-economic assessment was developed. Basically, this procedure consists in the definition and ranking of several technical (e.g., reliability of the technology, complexity and integration with the existing facilities, amount of residues to be disposed of or recovered, etc.) and economic aspects. Preliminary results have shown WO to be a suitable solution for sludge minimisation.

Giorgio Bertanza; Sabrina Zanaboni; Matteo Canato; Giuseppe Laera; Raniero Galessi

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

27

Influence of corn drying on its quality for the wet-milling process  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Flint and dent corn were forced air-dried at 70–110 °C to a final moisture of about 12.0%. The rates of water absorption of both hybrids in the presence of 0.25% SO2 aqueous solution were evaluated in terms of the diffusion coefficient. Drying temperature affected negatively the rate of absorption of both hybrids. A laboratory wet-milling procedure was developed to evaluate starch recovery of corn samples. For flint corn starch recovery drop from 96.5% (undried) to 82% (dried at 110 °C); for dent corn the drop was from 97.5% to 90%. The starch isolated from air-dried corn contained greater amounts of protein than starch originated from undried corn. The effect was more marked for flint than for dent corn and increased with the drying temperature. Sorptional characteristics of starch were practically unaffected by drying temperature. DSC transition temperatures of starch showed an increasing tendency with drying temperature. For both hybrids the gelatinization enthalpy of starch decreased with the increasing of drying temperature, the effect being more marked for flint than for dent corn.

Mónica Haros; Marcela P Tolaba; Constantino Suárez

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

28

Characterization using thermomechanical and differential thermal analysis of the sinterization of Portland clinker doped with CaF{sub 2}  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In this work, the sintering process of Portland cement was studied by combining thermomechanical analysis (TMA) and differential thermal analysis (DTA), together with X-ray diffraction (XRD) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Thermal analysis results employing both techniques indicted that phase transformations appeared at lower temperatures when CaF{sub 2} was incorporated in the raw materials. Besides, it was observed at high temperature that in some phase transformations TMA conducts to better resolution compared with the DTA measurements. Furthermore, mechanical properties and X-ray diffraction patterns corroborate the TMA and DTA results, corroborating that the final amount of alite (Ca{sub 3}SiO{sub 5}) is higher when a certain amount of CaF{sub 2} was present during the clinkerization process.

Dominguez, O., E-mail: nanoquimica@yahoo.com [Fac. de Quimica-UASLP, Av. Dr. Salvador Nava 6, CP 78210, San Luis Potosi, SLP (Mexico); Torres-Castillo, A. [Fac. de Quimica-UASLP, Av. Dr. Salvador Nava 6, CP 78210, San Luis Potosi, SLP (Mexico); Flores-Velez, L.M. [Instituto de Metalurgia-UASLP, Sierra Leona 550, CP 78210, San Luis Potosi, SLP (Mexico); Torres, R. [Mexichem Fluor S.A., Eje 106 s/n CP 78395, San Luis Potosi, SLP (Mexico)

2010-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

29

An integrated approach to the degradation of phytates in the corn wet milling process  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

An integrated process was developed to hydrolyze the phytates in light steep water (LSW) and to simultaneously isolate inorganic phosphate (Pi) and myo-inositol products. The proposed integrated process will be helpful in resolving the environmental and nutritional concerns in the use of corn gluten feed (CGF) in the animal diets. This process comprised of partial and total hydrolysis of LSW and intermediate anion exchange separation technique. The phytates in LSW were initially degraded to negatively charged myo-inositol phosphates (InsP2–InsP5). The optimized experimental parameters for the partial hydrolysis of LSW were determined to be 2 h hydrolysis with 1 FTU Aspergillus niger/g substrate at 35 °C. The negatively charged species of the partially hydrolyzed substrate were separated on a strong base anion exchange resin. The negatively charged species, retained by the resin, were eluded with 1 M NaCl solution and were subjected to complete hydrolysis with the Escherichia coli, A. niger derived phytases and their respective combinations. The maximum amount of myo-inositol released from the anion exchange column was 3.73 ± 0.03 mg/NaCl elution which was detected after 48 h reactions catalyzed by 100 FTU E. coli, 150 FTU E. coli, and 150 FTU the combination of A. niger and E. coli. The time course of Pi released showed a similar trend to that of myo-inositol and the released Pi reached a maximum amount of 3.30 ± 0.05 mg/g NaCl elution after 48 h incubation at the enzyme loadings for which the maximum concentration of myo-inositol were reached.

H. Noureddini; J. Dang

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

30

Mass and Energy Balances of Wet Torrefaction of Lignocellulosic Biomass  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Mass and Energy Balances of Wet Torrefaction of Lignocellulosic Biomass† ... Wet torrefaction is a pretreatment process to convert biomass to energy-dense solid fuel, with relatively uniform handling characteristics. ... A wealth of research have been conducted in the wet torrefaction of lignocellulosic biomass,(5-9) but relatively few address the comprehensive mass and energy balance involved in the wet torrefaction. ...

Wei Yan; Jason T. Hastings; Tapas C. Acharjee; Charles J. Coronella; Victor R. Vásquez

2010-02-10T23:59:59.000Z

31

Hydrothermal Processing of Wet Wastes  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Mill Waste, Plastic Bottles Aquatic Water Hyacinths, Kelp (Marine), Red Algae (Marine), Green Algae (Brackish), Green Algae (Marine), Green Algae (Fresh), Diatoms, Cyanobacteria...

32

www.kostic.niu.edu/DRnanofluids Wet-Nanotechnology  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 www.kostic.niu.edu/DRnanofluids Wet-Nanotechnology: nanofluids at NIU www.kostic.niu.edu/DRnanofluids Dry- vs. Wet-nanotechnology · Fluids (gases & liquids) vs. Solids in Nature and (Chemical & Bio, and processes · Synergy of dry-nanotechnology (solid-state) & wet-nanotechnology (POLY-nanofluids) #12;2 www

Kostic, Milivoje M.

33

Biodiesel Production from Rubber Seed Oil using Activated Cement Clinker as Catalyst  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This paper presents the potential of limestone based catalyst for transesterification of high free fatty acid (FFA) rubber seed oil (RSO). Pre-calcinated limestone known as clinker was activated using methanol and transesterification was performed under reflux with constant stirring. Mineral composition of the catalyst was analysed using x-ray fluorescence (XRF) with in build x-ray diffraction (XRD). The rubber seed oil was obtained using both microwave and soxhlet extraction using hexane as solvent. FFA content and fatty acid methyl ester content were determined using gas chromatography mass spectrometry (GC-MS). The results showed an efficient conversion (up to 96.9%) of high FFA rubber seed oil to biodiesel. The results suggest that the catalyst employed in this work is not negatively affected by moisture and free fatty acids and can be recycled very easily without significant loss in its activity. The highest conversion of 96.9% was achieved from catalyst activated at 700 °C, with catalyst loading of 5 wt. %; methanol to oil molar ratio of 4:1; reaction temperature of 65 °C and reaction time of 4 hours. The biodiesel produced in this work is within the limits of specification described by American standard test method (ASTM D6751).

Jolius Gimbun; Shahid Ali; Chitra Charan Suri Charan Kanwal; Liyana Amer Shah; Nurul Hidayah Muhamad @ Ghazali; Chin Kui Cheng; Said Nurdin

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

34

96 CEREAL CHEMISTRY Comparison Between Alkali and Conventional Corn Wet-Milling: 100-g Procedures  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

96 CEREAL CHEMISTRY Comparison Between Alkali and Conventional Corn Wet-Milling: 100-g Procedures S ABSTRACT Cereal Chem. 76(1):96-99 A corn wet-milling process in which alkali was used was studied as an alternative to the conventional corn wet-milling procedure. In the alkali wet-milling process, corn was soaked

35

Advanced tests of wet welded joints  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Wet Welding has in former times only been applied to secondary structural components. Nowadays wet welding has become an upcoming repair process due to high process flexibility, its low investment costs and its high versatility. Even the quality of the wet welded joints has been improved remarkably due to intensive and concentrated development activities. However, especially in the North Sea regions owners of offshore structures and classifying authorities still hesitate to recognize the process as a reliable alternative to dry hyperbaric welding repair methods. It therefore requires further activities especially in the field of data development for life prediction of such repaired components. Advanced testing methods are necessary, additional design criteria are to be developed and achievable weldment quality data are to be included in acknowledged and approved standards and recommendations to improve the credibility of the process and to solve the problem of quality assurance for wet welded joints. A comprehensive project, sponsored by the European Community under the Thermie Programme, is in progress to develop new testing procedures to generate the required data and design criteria for the future application of the wet welding process to main components of offshore structures. It is the aim of the project to establish additional fitness for purpose data for this process.

Pachniuk, I. [Stolt Comex Seaway S.A., Marseille (France); Petershagen, H.; Pohl, R. [Univ. Hamburg (Germany); Szelagowski, P.; Drews, O. [GKSS Research Centre, Geesthacht (Germany)

1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

36

Design consideration for wet welded joints  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Wet welding has become a joining technique that under certain circumstances can provide results which cannot be distinguished between wet or dry production and the achievable mechanical quality is comparable to dry atmospheric welds. Wet welding is not a process which can be applied easily and which can be properly handled by untrained diver welders. Wet welding is more than any other kind of welding process or procedure a joining technique that requires the full job-concentration and -knowledge of an excellent trained and skilled diver welder throughout the whole production time, who is 100% identifying himself with his task. Furthermore he must be fully aware of the production requirements and possible metallurgical/environmental reactions and outcomes. He must be able to be fully concentrated on the process performance throughout his total work shift. In short: he must be an outstanding expert in his field. The following paper will highlight these subjects and show the necessity of their exact observation to achieve excellent quality in wet welding.

Szelagowski, P.; Osthus, V. [GKSS Research Center, Geesthacht (Germany); Petershagen, H.; Pohl, R. [Univ. Hamburg (Germany). Inst. fuer Schiffbau; Lafaye, G. [Stolt Comex Seaway S.A., Marseille (France)

1996-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

37

Chemical characterisation and in vitro assessment of the nutritive value of co-products yield from the corn wet-milling process  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract The chemical characteristics of co-products recovered during a laboratory-scale wet milling procedure as well as that of whole corn flour were characterised and their digestibility and fermentability value determined using a 2 steps in vitro digestibility and fermentation model of the pig digestive tract. Five co-products differing in their chemical composition were collected and analysed. These co-products differed in their in vitro dry matter Digestibility and in their kinetic of fermentation. High coefficients of digestibility were observed for starchy samples, while low coefficients of digestibility were observed for samples rich in lignocellulosic components. Fermentation patterns of samples analysed were different as well as the profile of volatile fatty acids produced during the fermentation. The production of straight-chain fatty acids produced was significantly correlated with the proportion of starch in the sample, while branched-chain fatty acids were correlated to proteins concentration of samples.

Paul Malumba; Christelle Boudry; Olivier Roiseux; Jérôme Bindelle; Yves Beckers; François Béra

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

38

WET SOLIDS FLOW ENHANCEMENT  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The yield locus, tensile strength and fracture mechanisms of wet granular materials were studied. The yield locus of a wet material was shifted to the left of that of the dry specimen by a constant value equal to the compressive isostatic stress due to pendular bridges. for materials with straight yield loci, the shift was computed from the uniaxial tensile strength, either measured in a tensile strength tester or calculated from the correlation, and the angle of internal friction of the material. The predicted shift in the yield loci due to different moisture contents compare well with the measured shift in the yield loci of glass beads, crushed limestone, super D catalyst and Leslie coal. Measurement of the void fraction during the shear testing was critical to obtain the correct tensile strength theoretically or experimentally.

Unknown

2001-03-25T23:59:59.000Z

39

Corn Wet Milling: Separation Chemistry and Technology  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Publisher Summary This chapter focuses on the separation chemistry and technology of corn wet milling. The purpose of corn wet milling is to separate the kernel into its constituent chemical components. Wet milling processing begins with steeping whole kernel corn in an aqueous solution of sulfur dioxide and lactic acid (produced by microorganisms) at 50°C for 24–48 hours. The corn is then coarsely ground and the lipid-containing germ and fibrous hull portions are separated. After the remaining components are more finely ground, the starch and protein are separated using hydrocyclones, essentially continuous centrifuges; corn starch is slightly denser than corn protein. Germ is further processed into oil and the protein and fiber components are usually blended and used as animal feeds. The wet starch is either dried, chemically modified to change its functional properties, converted into intermediate-sized glucose polymers, or fully depolymerized into sugars. Starch is also often used as a raw ingredient for adjacent processing facilities that produce ethanol or other alcohols and other industrial chemicals.

David S. Jackson; Donald L. Shandera Jr.

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

40

New development activities in the field of wet welding  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Wet Welding process has now become an interesting alternative repair process due to its high flexibility, its low investment costs and its high versatility. However, due to the prior bad reputation of the in former times achievable low weldment quality, due to extremely high hardness, high porosity, high hydrogen contamination and in combination with this high cracking susceptibility the wet welding process nowadays requires further activities to improve its reputation and credibility. New acceptance criteria, more detailed information on the achievable weldment quality and especially the development of life prediction data for wet welded components are now required. Advanced testing methods are necessary, additional design criteria are to be developed and achievable weldment quality data are to be included in acknowledged and approved standards and recommendations. Only by the provision of such data the credibility of the process and the problem of quality assurance for wet welded joints can be improved. In two comprehensive projects, sponsored by the European Community under the Thermie Programme, process development and new testing procedures have bene procured and are still under progress to generate the required data and new design criteria for the future application of the wet welding process to main components of offshore structures. The water depths in the range of 50 to 100 msw have been selected for the application of the wet welding process to structural components, as these depths include that range of application in which this process can become competitive to the hyperbaric dry welding process. The international trend to mechanize and automate the hyperbaric welding processes in dry environments can even be completed by the application of a semiautomatic wet welding process, which has already shown very promising results. This process is applicable to mechanized systems (e.g. to a wet robot system).

Szelagowski, P.; Osthus, V. [GKSS Research Center, Geesthacht (Germany); Petershagen, H.; Pohl, R. [Univ. Hamburg (Germany). Inst. fuer Schiffbau; Lafaye, G. [Stolt Comex Seaway, S.A., Marseille (France)

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "wet process clinker" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Suspension process for cement synthesis. Final report, November 1986-March 1989  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Gas Research Institute has initiated a program to develop an advanced gas-fired cement synthesis process which will markedly reduce product processing time, lower maintenance and initial capital costs, minimize alkali sulfate formation, and mitigate greenhouse gaseous emissions compared to conventional cement pyroprocessing technology. In the advanced process, pellets of agglomerated batch enter at the top of a vertical shaft and fall in counterflow with the combustion gases. During this time, which is of order a few seconds and an order of magnitude less than the state-of-the-art kiln process, the pellets heat-up, dry, calcine and are partially clinkered. They land on a fixed bed where clinkering is completed and heat is recovered from the pellets to the counter-flowing combustion air. Energy input to the process is through the direct combustion of natural gas in the clinkering and calcining zones of the shaft. This report describes the work performed in the first phase of the development program. Flow stability, batch agglomeration, and clinkering tests were performed to validate the process concept. An interim economic analysis comparing likely commercial installation options to the state-of-the-art process was made.

Zappa, O.L.

1989-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

42

Investigation of Mineral Transformations in Wet Supercritical...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Mineral Transformations in Wet Supercritical CO2 by Electron Microscopy. Investigation of Mineral Transformations in Wet Supercritical CO2 by Electron Microscopy. Abstract: The...

43

Categorical Exclusion 4497: Lithium Wet Chemistry Project  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

8/2012 07:36 8/2012 07:36 8655749041 ENVIRONMENTAL COMPL U.S. Department of Energy Categorical Exclusion Detennination Form Proposed Action Tills: Lithium W@t Chemistry Project (4597) Program or Fi~ld Oftke: Y-12 Site Office L&cationfs) (CiWLCount:r/State): Oak Ridge, Anderson County; Tennessee Proposed Action Description: PAGE 03/04 r: :;: :: !: s .a : brnl, i ~ y. : $ ~-rtl~il : t·:~::;J The proposed action is to develop a small lithium wet chemistry operation for the following purposes: (1) to capture wet chemistry operations, (2) to provide processing path for Lithium materials such as machine dust, (3) to provide lithium based materials, and (4) to produce the littlium hydroxide needed to support production. CategQrj~l Exclusion(s) Applied

44

Wetting kinetics of water nano-droplet containing non-surfactant nanoparticles: A molecular dynamics study  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In this Letter, dynamic wetting of water nano-droplets containing non-surfactant gold nanoparticles on a gold substrate is examined via molecular dynamics simulations. The results show that the addition of non-surfactant nanoparticles hinders the nano-second droplet wetting process, attributed to the increases in both surface tension of the nanofluid and friction between nanofluid and substrate. The droplet wetting kinetics decreases with increasing nanoparticle loading and water-particle interaction energy. The observed wetting suppression and the absence of nanoparticle ordering near the contact line of nano-sized droplets differ from the wetting behaviors reported from nanofluid droplets of micron size or larger.

Lu, Gui [Key Laboratory for Thermal Science and Power Engineering of MOE, Beijing Key Laboratory for CO2 Utilization and Reduction Technology, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China) [Key Laboratory for Thermal Science and Power Engineering of MOE, Beijing Key Laboratory for CO2 Utilization and Reduction Technology, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China); Department of Mechanical Engineering and Mechanics, Drexel University, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 19104 (United States); Hu, Han; Sun, Ying, E-mail: yyduan@tsinghua.edu.cn, E-mail: ysun@coe.drexel.edu [Department of Mechanical Engineering and Mechanics, Drexel University, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 19104 (United States)] [Department of Mechanical Engineering and Mechanics, Drexel University, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 19104 (United States); Duan, Yuanyuan, E-mail: yyduan@tsinghua.edu.cn, E-mail: ysun@coe.drexel.edu [Key Laboratory for Thermal Science and Power Engineering of MOE, Beijing Key Laboratory for CO2 Utilization and Reduction Technology, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China)] [Key Laboratory for Thermal Science and Power Engineering of MOE, Beijing Key Laboratory for CO2 Utilization and Reduction Technology, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China)

2013-12-16T23:59:59.000Z

45

Fabrication of Semiconductors by Wet Chemical Etch  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Arsenide. New York: John Wiley & Sons, Inc, 1994. CONCLUSIONS AND FUTURE WORK A selective wet etch process to re- move GaAs epitaxial cap layers from underlying InGaP layers has been de- veloped using a solution of H2SO4: H2O2:deionized water at a rate... the computing and electronics industries. Semiconducting materials, such as silicon, germanium, gallium ar- senide, and indium phosphide, are neither good insulators nor good con- ductors, but they have intrinsic electri- cal properties so that by controlled...

Francoviglia, Laura

2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

46

Constraining Mercury Oxidation Using Wet Deposition  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Constraining Mercury Oxidation Using Wet Deposition Noelle E. Selin and Christopher D. Holmes mercury oxidation [Selin & Jacob, Atmos. Env. 2008] 30 60 90 120 150 30 60 90 120 150 30 60 90 120 150 30 Influences on Mercury Wet Deposition · Hg wet dep = f(precipitation, [Hg(II)+Hg(P)]) Correlation (r2) between

Selin, Noelle Eckley

47

3D Imaging Of Wet Granular Matter  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

3D Imaging Of Wet Granular Matter Leonard Goff Advisor: Dr. Wolfgang Losert With Application to Penetrometer Insertion #12;3D Imaging Of Wet Granular Matter Leonard Goff, Advisor: Dr. Wolfgang Losert CoffeeSand Gravel Oops! #12;3D Imaging Of Wet Granular Matter Leonard Goff, Advisor: Dr. Wolfgang Losert

Anlage, Steven

48

Carbon nanotube fiber spun from wetted ribbon  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A fiber of carbon nanotubes was prepared by a wet-spinning method involving drawing carbon nanotubes away from a substantially aligned, supported array of carbon nanotubes to form a ribbon, wetting the ribbon with a liquid, and spinning a fiber from the wetted ribbon. The liquid can be a polymer solution and after forming the fiber, the polymer can be cured. The resulting fiber has a higher tensile strength and higher conductivity compared to dry-spun fibers and to wet-spun fibers prepared by other methods.

Zhu, Yuntian T; Arendt, Paul; Zhang, Xiefei; Li, Qingwen; Fu, Lei; Zheng, Lianxi

2014-04-29T23:59:59.000Z

49

,"California Federal Offshore Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","California Federal Offshore Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic...

50

Wetting and free surface flow modeling for potting and encapsulation.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

As part of an effort to reduce costs and improve quality control in encapsulation and potting processes the Technology Initiative Project ''Defect Free Manufacturing and Assembly'' has completed a computational modeling study of flows representative of those seen in these processes. Flow solutions are obtained using a coupled, finite-element-based, numerical method based on the GOMA/ARIA suite of Sandia flow solvers. The evolution of the free surface is solved with an advanced level set algorithm. This approach incorporates novel methods for representing surface tension and wetting forces that affect the evolution of the free surface. In addition, two commercially available codes, ProCAST and MOLDFLOW, are also used on geometries representing encapsulation processes at the Kansas City Plant. Visual observations of the flow in several geometries are recorded in the laboratory and compared to the models. Wetting properties for the materials in these experiments are measured using a unique flowthrough goniometer.

Brooks, Carlton, F.; Brooks, Michael J. (Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM); Graham, Alan Lyman (Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM); Noble, David F. (David Frederick) (.; )); Notz, Patrick K.; Hopkins, Matthew Morgan; Castaneda, Jaime N.; Mahoney, Leo James (Kansas City Plant, Kansas City, MO); Baer, Thomas A.; Berchtold, Kathryn (Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM); Adolf, Douglas Brian; Wilkes, Edward Dean; Rao, Rekha Ranjana; Givler, Richard C.; Sun, Amy Cha-Tien; Cote, Raymond O.; Mondy, Lisa Ann; Grillet, Anne Mary; Kraynik, Andrew Michael

2007-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

51

Wet Corn Milling Energy Guide  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

307 307 ERNEST ORLANDO LAWRENCE BERKELEY NATIONAL LABORATORY Energy Efficiency Improvement and Cost Saving Opportunities for the Corn Wet Milling Industry An ENERGY STAR Guide for Energy and Plant Managers Christina Galitsky, Ernst Worrell and Michael Ruth Environmental Energy Technologies Division Sponsored by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency July 2003 Disclaimer This document was prepared as an account of work sponsored by the United States Government. While this document is believed to contain correct information, neither the United States Government nor any agency thereof, nor The Regents of the University of California, nor any of their employees, makes any warranty, express or implied, or assumes any legal responsibility for the accuracy, completeness, or usefulness of any information, apparatus, product,

52

Assessment of an Industrial Wet Oxidation System for Burning Waste and Low-Grade Fuels  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

"Stone & Webster Engineering Corporation, under Department of Energy sponsorship, is developing a wet oxidation system to generate steam for industrial processes by burning industrial waste materials and low-grade fuels. The program involves...

Bettinger, J.; Koppel, P.; Margulies, A.

53

Coproducts From Corn Processing 47 Applied Biochemistry and Biotechnology Vol. 128, 2006  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. Ethanol is produced from corn by either wet milling or dry-grind processing. In wet milling, the corn primarily by two processes: wet milling and dry grinding. In wet milling, the corn kernel is fractionated kernel is fraction- ated into different components, resulting in several coproducts. Wet-milling plants

Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, University of

54

Wetting of rough surfaces: a homogenization approach  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...plane xd = 0, and it is rough at a scale , where is...A (2005) Wetting of rough surfaces: a homogenization...where S1 is a closed set in Rd such that {xd 0...is finite, then L is a set with finite perimeter...A (2005) Wetting of rough surfaces: a homogenization...

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

55

Regimes of the North Australian Wet Season  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The variability of the north Australian wet season is examined by performing cluster analysis on the wind and thermodynamic information contained in the 2300 UTC radiosonde data at Darwin for 49 wet seasons (September–April) from 1957/58 to 2005/...

Mick Pope; Christian Jakob; Michael J. Reeder

2009-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

56

Membrane separation of solids from corn processing streams Tricia L. Templin a,1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

time is re- duced and starch yields are similar to those of wet mill- ing. Corn processing streams from by a conventional wet milling process and a wet milling process that used enzymes to eliminate use of SO2 steeping Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved. Keywords: Membrane filtration; Processing; Wet milling; Enzymes

57

Indian Centre for Wind Energy Technology C WET | Open Energy...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

WET Jump to: navigation, search Name: Indian Centre for Wind Energy Technology (C-WET) Place: Chennai, India Zip: 601 302 Sector: Wind energy Product: Government backed wind...

58

Colorado Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Proved Reserves...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Colorado Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1...

59

Oklahoma Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Proved Reserves...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Oklahoma Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1...

60

Oklahoma Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Oklahoma Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Oklahoma Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation,...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "wet process clinker" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Texas State Offshore Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Texas State Offshore Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic...

62

Texas State Offshore Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet After...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Texas State Offshore Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves...

63

California--State Offshore Natural Gas Wet After Lease Separation...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Wet After Lease Separation, Reserves in Nonproducing Reservoirs (Billion Cubic Feet) California--State Offshore Natural Gas Wet After Lease Separation, Reserves in Nonproducing...

64

Reducing the atmospheric impact of wet slaking  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Means of reducing the atmospheric emissions due to the wet slaking of coke are considered. One option, investigated here, is to remove residual active silt and organic compounds from the biologically purified wastewater sent for slaking, by coagulation and flocculation.

B.D. Zubitskii; G.V. Ushakov; B.G. Tryasunov; A.G.Ushakov [Kuznetsk Basin State Technical University, Kemerovo (Russian Federation)

2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

65

Breakdown in the Wetting Transparency of Graphene  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We develop a theory to model the van der Waals interactions between liquid and graphene, including quantifying the wetting behavior of a graphene-coated surface. Molecular dynamics simulations and contact angle measurements ...

Shih, Chih-Jen

66

Energy efficiency improvement and cost saving opportunities for the Corn Wet Milling Industry: An ENERGY STAR Guide for Energy and Plant Managers  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1995). Estimating the Net Energy Balance of Corn Ethanol. Anfood industry. After corn, energy is the second largestManufacturing Processes and Energy Use Corn wet milling is

Galitsky, Christina; Worrell, Ernst; Ruth, Michael

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

67

Cement advanced furnace and process  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This patent describes a suspension shaft furnace for producing discrete cement clinkers from discrete pellets of cement-forming batch materials which are gravity-migrated therethrough. It comprises a vertical furnace housing enclosing a top pellet-feeding and preheating zone comprising an elongate vertical shaft section opening into an intermediate fluidized bed section comprising fuel inlet conduits, an air-permeable clinker-impermeable support; a lower clinker-cooling section beneath the fluidized bed section; clinker-discharge means communicating between the fluidized bed section and the cooling section and air inlet means.

Litka, A.F.; Cohen, S.M.

1992-06-02T23:59:59.000Z

68

Mercury removal in utility wet scrubber using a chelating agent  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method for capturing and reducing the mercury content of an industrial flue gas such as that produced in the combustion of a fossil fuel or solid waste adds a chelating agent, such as ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA) or other similar compounds like HEDTA, DTPA and/or NTA, to the flue gas being scrubbed in a wet scrubber used in the industrial process. The chelating agent prevents the reduction of oxidized mercury to elemental mercury, thereby increasing the mercury removal efficiency of the wet scrubber. Exemplary tests on inlet and outlet mercury concentration in an industrial flue gas were performed without and with EDTA addition. Without EDTA, mercury removal totaled 42%. With EDTA, mercury removal increased to 71%. The invention may be readily adapted to known wet scrubber systems and it specifically provides for the removal of unwanted mercury both by supplying S.sup.2- ions to convert Hg.sup.2+ ions into mercuric sulfide (HgS) and by supplying a chelating agent to sequester other ions, including but not limited to Fe.sup.2+ ions, which could otherwise induce the unwanted reduction of Hg.sup.2+ to the form, Hg.sup.0.

Amrhein, Gerald T. (Louisville, OH)

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

69

The future of coproducts from corn processing  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Increased demand for ethanol as a fuel additive has resulted in dramatic growth in ethanol production. Ethanol is produced from corn by either wet milling or dry-grind processing. In wet milling, the corn kernel ...

Kent D. Rausch; Ronald L. Belyea

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

70

Wet welding qualification trials at 35 MSW  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Wet welding is gaining increased attention and attraction for application on marine buildings and offshore structures all over the world because of its versatility, flexibility and mobility in combination with low investment costs. In a common research and development project between PETROBRAS/CENPES, Rio de Janeiro, Brazil and GKSS Research Centre, Geesthacht, Germany wet welding qualification trials have been performed in different water depths up to 35 msw. The tests have been performed with newly developed electrodes in two different wet welding procedures. The experiments have been carried out on SS- as well as on 5F-specimens acc. ANSI/AWS D 3.6-89. Results will be presented in respect to the performance of the two welding procedures especially with regard to the avoidance of hydrogen induced cold cracking and high hardness values.

Dos Santos, V.R.; Teixeira, C.J. [Petrobras/CENPES, Rio de Janeiro (Brazil); Szelagowski, P.J.F. [GKSS Research Center, Geesthacht (Germany)

1993-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

71

Sphere impact and penetration into wet sand  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We present experimental results for the penetration of a solid sphere when released onto wet sand. We show, by measuring the final penetration depth, that the cohesion induced by the water can result in either a deeper or shallower penetration for a given release height compared to dry granular material. Thus the presence of water can either lubricate or stiffen the granular material. By assuming the shear rate is proportional to the impact velocity and using the depth-averaged stopping force in calculating the shear stress, we derive effective viscosities for the wet granular materials.

J. O. Marston; I. U. Vakarelski; S. T. Thoroddsen

2012-08-07T23:59:59.000Z

72

Chaoticity of the Wet Granular Gas  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In this work we derive an analytic expression for the Kolmogorov-Sinai entropy of dilute wet granular matter, valid for any spatial dimension. The grains are modelled as hard spheres and the influence of the wetting liquid is described according to the Capillary Model, in which dissipation is due to the hysteretic cohesion force of capillary bridges. The Kolmogorov-Sinai entropy is expanded in a series with respect to density. We find a rapid increase of the leading term when liquid is added. This demonstrates the sensitivity of the granular dynamics to humidity, and shows that the liquid significantly increases the chaoticity of the granular gas.

A. Fingerle; S. Herminghaus; V. Yu. Zaburdaev

2007-05-22T23:59:59.000Z

73

Catalytic wet oxidation of phenolic wastes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Possible catalyst deactivation problems High capital, low operating Supercritical water oxidation (SCWO) Feasible only at high organic concentra- tions High Fast reaction, complete oxidation Severe reaction conditions, canosion problems... of milder reaction conditions and is much less energy intensive. Thus, catalytic wet oxidation would be an alternative to solvent extraction, supercritical water oxidation, homogeneous oxidation, and incineration. It should also be feasible at low...

Thomas, Brook James

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

74

Design of wetted wall bioaerosol concentration cyclones  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

...................................................................................... 24 Aerosol-to-aerosol collection efficiency.................................................... 24 Wetting pattern on the impacting wall ? effect of an atomizer.................. 24..................................................................................... 67 Figure 3.4. Cold temperature experiemental setup ........................................................... 68 Figure 3.5. Preliminary heating system for the 1250 L/min cyclone and thermo-couple locations...

Seo, Youngjin

2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

75

Optimization of direct conversion of wet algae to biodiesel under supercritical methanol conditions  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This study demonstrated a one-step process for direct liquefaction and conversion of wet algal biomass containing about 90% of water to biodiesel under supercritical methanol conditions. This one-step process enables simultaneous extraction and transesterification of wet algal biomass. The process conditions are milder than those required for pyrolysis and prevent the formation of by-products. In the proposed process, fatty acid methyl esters (FAMEs) can be produced from polar phospholipids, free fatty acids, and triglycerides. A response surface methodology (RSM) was used to analyze the influence of the three process variables, namely, the wet algae to methanol (wt./vol.) ratio, the reaction temperature, and the reaction time, on the \\{FAMEs\\} conversion. Algal biodiesel samples were analyzed by ATR-FTIR and GC–MS. Based on the experimental analysis and RSM study, optimal conditions for this process are reported as: wet algae to methanol (wt./vol.) ratio of around 1:9, reaction temperature and time of about 255 °C, and 25 min respectively. This single-step process can potentially be an energy efficient and economical route for algal biodiesel production.

Prafulla D. Patil; Veera Gnaneswar Gude; Aravind Mannarswamy; Shuguang Deng; Peter Cooke; Stuart Munson-McGee; Isaac Rhodes; Pete Lammers; Nagamany Nirmalakhandan

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

76

Improvements to laboratory-scale maize wet-milling procedures  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The wet milling of maize is difficult to study in the laboratory because some of the required separation steps are challenging to implement at bench-scale. This work was conducted to develop an improved 100-g wet-milling procedure that better models the industrial process. Several separation steps were modified from previously reported methods. Among the changes, germ was recovered by a flotation/skimming technique that is normally used on larger-scale procedures. Starch was recovered by tabling, but the flow profile at the end of the table was changed to reduce gluten settling and the partitioning and pumping of slurry fractions was changed to allow the tabling process to begin immediately after fiber recovery. Gluten was dewatering directly on the table overflow, and starch was recovered from the table before drying. These modifications eliminated some problems associated with other procedures, e.g. the scraping of tabled starch to reduce protein contamination, the loss of germ due to size reduction, and the separate recovery of coarse and fine fiber fractions. Compared with routine tabling methods, the modified method used in this work produced starch with less protein (0.42 versus 0.55% for the maize variety tested); however, the improvement was achieved at the expense of a slightly lower starch yield (64.4 versus 65.4%). Standard deviations for the product yields were 0.28% for starch, 0.27% for gluten, 0.24% for fiber, 0.13% for germ, and 0.07% for total solubles. The procedure will be beneficial for some maize wet-milling experiments.

Michael K. Dowd

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

77

Biodiesel from mixed culture algae via a wet lipid extraction procedure  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Microalgae are a source of renewable oil for liquid fuels. However, costs for dewatering/drying, extraction, and processing have limited commercial scale production of biodiesel from algal biomass. A wet lipid extraction procedure was developed that was capable of extracting 79% of transesterifiable lipids from wet algal biomass (84% moisture) via acid and base hydrolysis (90 °C and ambient pressures), and 76% of those extracted lipids were isolated, by further processing, and converted to FAMEs. Furthermore, the procedure was capable of removing chlorophyll contamination of the algal lipid extract through precipitation. In addition, the procedure generated side streams that serve as feedstocks for microbial conversion to additional bioproducts. The capability of the procedure to extract lipids from wet algal biomass, to reduce/remove chlorophyll contamination, to potentially reduce organic solvent demand, and to generate feedstocks for high-value bioproducts presents opportunities to reduce costs of scaling up algal lipid extraction for biodiesel production.

Ashik Sathish; Ronald C. Sims

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

78

Accepted Manuscript Variational formulations for surface tension, capillarity and wetting  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Accepted Manuscript Variational formulations for surface tension, capillarity and wetting Gustavo C formulations for surface tension, capillarity and wetting, Comput. Methods Appl. Mech. Engrg. (2011), doi: 10 formulations for surface tension, capillarity and wetting Gustavo C. Buscagliaa,b, , Roberto F. Ausasa,b a

Frey, Pascal

79

Wet Granulation in a Twin-Screw Extruder: Implications of Screw Design  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Wet Granulation in a Twin-Screw Extruder: Implications of Screw Design M.R. THOMPSON, J. SUN MMRI of auxiliary units like feeders and pumps. In comparison, single-screw variants of an extruder have received granulation in twin-screw extrusion machinery is an attractive tech- nology for the continuous processing

Thompson, Michael

80

Microbial Enhanced Oil Recovery in Fractional-Wet Systems: A Pore-Scale Investigation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Microbial enhanced oil recovery (MEOR) is a technology that could potentially increase the tertiary recovery of oil from mature oil formations. However, the efficacy of this technology in fractional-wet systems is unknown, and the mechanisms involved in oil mobilization therefore need further investigation. Our MEOR strategy consists of the injection of ex situ produced metabolic byproducts produced by Bacillus mojavensis JF-2 (which lower interfacial tension (IFT) via biosurfactant production) into fractional-wet cores containing residual oil. Two different MEOR flooding solutions were tested; one solution contained both microbes and metabolic byproducts while the other contained only the metabolic byproducts. The columns were imaged with X-ray computed microtomography (CMT) after water flooding, and after MEOR, which allowed for the evaluation of the pore-scale processes taking place during MEOR. Results indicate that the larger residual oil blobs and residual oil held under relatively low capillary pressures were the main fractions recovered during MEOR. Residual oil saturation, interfacial curvatures, and oil blob sizes were measured from the CMT images and used to develop a conceptual model for MEOR in fractional-wet systems. Overall, results indicate that MEOR was effective at recovering oil from fractional-wet systems with reported additional oil recovered (AOR) values between 44 and 80%; the highest AOR values were observed in the most oil-wet system.

Armstrong, Ryan T.; Wildenschild, Dorthe (Oregon State U.)

2012-10-24T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "wet process clinker" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

ENHANCED CONTROL OF MERCURY BY WET FLUE GAS DESULFURIZATION SYSTEMS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The U.S. Department of Energy and EPRI co-funded this project to improve the control of mercury emissions from coal-fired power plants equipped with wet flue gas desulfurization (FGD) systems. The project has investigated catalytic oxidation of vapor-phase elemental mercury to a form that is more effectively captured in wet FGD systems. If successfully developed, the process could be applicable to over 90,000 MW of utility generating capacity with existing FGD systems, and to future FGD installations. Field tests were conducted to determine whether candidate catalyst materials remain active towards mercury oxidation after extended flue gas exposure. Catalyst life will have a large impact on the cost effectiveness of this potential process. A mobile catalyst test unit was used to test the activity of four different catalyst materials for a period of up to six months each at three utility sites. Catalyst testing was completed at the first site, which fires Texas lignite, in December 1998; at the second test site, which fires a Powder River Basin subbituminous coal, in November 1999; and at the third site, which fires a medium- to high-sulfur bituminous coal, in January 2001. Results of testing at each of the three sites were reported in previous technical notes. At Site 1, catalysts were tested only as powders dispersed in sand bed reactors. At Sites 2 and 3, catalysts were tested in two forms, including powders dispersed in sand and in commercially available forms such as extruded pellets and coated honeycomb structures. This final report summarizes and presents results from all three sites, for the various catalyst forms tested. Field testing was supported by laboratory tests to screen catalysts for activity at specific flue gas compositions, to investigate catalyst deactivation mechanisms and methods for regenerating spent catalysts. Laboratory results are also summarized and discussed in this report.

Unknown

2001-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

82

W.E.T. Automotive Systems | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Automotive Systems Jump to: navigation, search Name: W.E.T. Automotive Systems Place: Odelzhausen, Germany Information About Partnership with NREL Partnership with NREL Yes...

83

,"Colorado Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Proved Reserves...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Colorado Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic...

84

,"Colorado Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet After Lease...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Colorado Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves...

85

,"Colorado Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Colorado Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic...

86

,"New York Nonassociated Natural Gas Proved Reserves, Wet After...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","New York Nonassociated Natural Gas Proved Reserves, Wet After Lease Separation",10,"Annual",2013...

87

,"New Mexico Nonassociated Natural Gas Proved Reserves, Wet After...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","New Mexico Nonassociated Natural Gas Proved Reserves, Wet After Lease Separation",10,"Annual",201...

88

New Mexico Natural Gas Wet After Lease Separation, Reserves in...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

After Lease Separation, Reserves in Nonproducing Reservoirs (Billion Cubic Feet) New Mexico Natural Gas Wet After Lease Separation, Reserves in Nonproducing Reservoirs (Billion...

89

,"New York Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet After Lease...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","New York Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion...

90

,"New York Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","New York Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic...

91

,"New York Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Proved Reserves...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","New York Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic...

92

,"U.S. Federal Offshore Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","U.S. Federal Offshore Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic...

93

,"California Federal Offshore Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","California Federal Offshore Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic...

94

,"California State Offshore Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","California State Offshore Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic...

95

,"Louisiana State Offshore Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Louisiana State Offshore Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic...

96

,"Texas State Offshore Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

ame","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Texas State Offshore Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves...

97

,"Texas State Offshore Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

ame","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Texas State Offshore Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic...

98

,"California State Offshore Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","California State Offshore Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic...

99

,"Texas State Offshore Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

ame","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Texas State Offshore Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic...

100

,"Louisiana State Offshore Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Louisiana State Offshore Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "wet process clinker" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

,"California Nonassociated Natural Gas Proved Reserves, Wet After...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","California Nonassociated Natural Gas Proved Reserves, Wet After Lease Separation",10,"Annual",2...

102

,"New York Nonassociated Natural Gas Proved Reserves, Wet After...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","New York Nonassociated Natural Gas Proved Reserves, Wet After Lease Separation",10,"Annual",2012...

103

BERYLLIUM MEASUREMENT IN COMMERCIALLY AVAILABLE WET WIPES  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Analysis for beryllium by fluorescence is now an established method which is used in many government-run laboratories and commercial facilities. This study investigates the use of this technique using commercially available wet wipes. The fluorescence method is widely documented and has been approved as a standard test method by ASTM International and the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH). The procedure involves dissolution of samples in aqueous ammonium bifluoride solution and then adding a small aliquot to a basic hydroxybenzoquinoline sulfonate fluorescent dye (Berylliant{trademark} Inc. Detection Solution Part No. CH-2) , and measuring the fluorescence. This method is specific to beryllium. This work explores the use of three different commercial wipes spiked with beryllium, as beryllium acetate or as beryllium oxide and subsequent analysis by optical fluorescence. The effect of possible interfering metals such as Fe, Ti and Pu in the wipe medium is also examined.

Youmans-Mcdonald, L.

2011-02-18T23:59:59.000Z

104

Kinetics of wet sodium vapor complex plasma  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In this paper, we have investigated the kinetics of wet (partially condensed) Sodium vapor, which comprises of electrons, ions, neutral atoms, and Sodium droplets (i) in thermal equilibrium and (ii) when irradiated by light. The formulation includes the balance of charge over the droplets, number balance of the plasma constituents, and energy balance of the electrons. In order to evaluate the droplet charge, a phenomenon for de-charging of the droplets, viz., evaporation of positive Sodium ions from the surface has been considered in addition to electron emission and electron/ion accretion. The analysis has been utilized to evaluate the steady state parameters of such complex plasmas (i) in thermal equilibrium and (ii) when irradiated; the results have been graphically illustrated. As a significant outcome irradiated, Sodium droplets are seen to acquire large positive potential, with consequent enhancement in the electron density.

Mishra, S. K., E-mail: nishfeb@rediffmail.com [Institute for Plasma Research (IPR), Gandhinagar 382428 (India); Sodha, M. S. [Centre of Energy Studies, Indian Institute of Technology Delhi (IITD), New Delhi 110016 (India)] [Centre of Energy Studies, Indian Institute of Technology Delhi (IITD), New Delhi 110016 (India)

2014-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

105

640 CEREAL CHEMISTRY Quick Fiber Process: Effect of Mash Temperature, Dry Solids,  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

production costs even more. There are two corn-to-ethanol processes currently used: wet milling (Fig. 1.6 gal/bu) when compared to the wet milling process (2.5 gal/bu). This lower ethanol production in the wet milling process is due to starch loss in the fiber and gluten fractions. Dry grind suffers from

106

Sulfur Behavior in the Sasol?Lurgi Fixed-Bed Dry-Bottom Gasification Process  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This article reports on the findings of a study regarding the sulfur behavior across a Sasol?Lurgi gasifier. ... (2) This ash, referred to as “coarse ash”, is a combination of red and white to gray sintered clinkers with heterogeneous texture varying from fine material to large irregularly shaped aggregates of sizes ranging from 4 to 75 mm. ... South African coals that are used for the Sasol?Lurgi gasification process are normally low-grade medium rank C (bituminous) coal with a total sulfur content of approximately 1?2 wt %, on an as-received basis. ...

M. Pat Skhonde; R. Henry Matjie; J. Reginald Bunt; A. Christien Strydom; Herold Schobert

2008-12-05T23:59:59.000Z

107

Two-step Glass Wet-etching for Micro-fluidic Devices A. Berthold1, P.M. Sarro1, M.J. Vellekoop2  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Two-step Glass Wet-etching for Micro-fluidic Devices A. Berthold1, P.M. Sarro1, M.J. Vellekoop2--In this paper a two-step glass wet-etch- ing process is presented. This process allows the fabrication of well) in the same glass wafer. The etching solutions and the masking materials used are described for the three

108

Secondary imbibition in NAPL-invaded mixed-wet sediments  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Secondary imbibition in NAPL-invaded mixed-wet sediments Ahmed Al-Futaisia,b , Tad W. Patzekb to study the spontaneous and forced secondary imbibition of a NAPL-invaded sediment, as in the displacement-wet sediment, i.e., the receding contact angles are very small. However, depending on the surface mineralogy

Patzek, Tadeusz W.

109

Wave Energy Test Site (WETS) Marine Corps Base Hawaii (MCBH)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Wave Energy Test Site (WETS) Marine Corps Base Hawaii (MCBH) Alexandra DeVisser, NAVFAC-EXWC Brian June 10, 2013 #12;Wave Energy Test Site (WETS) Objective: Provide location for year-long in Cable, Sound & Sea Technology (SST) Luis A. Vega, HNEI-University of Hawaii Energy Ocean International

110

Introduction High-shear wet granulation by twin screw extrusion  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and compaction16,17 . Wet granulation in a twin screw extruder is particularly useful with many investigates foam granulation in a twin screw extruder as a new continuous wet granulation technique drop or spray liquid addition in batch granulation. This work demonstrates a twin screw extruder

Thompson, Michael

111

Hydrogen penetration into silicon during wet-chemical etching  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Hydrogen incorporation during wet-chemical etching into p-type silicon was studied by CV measurements. Etching rates between 0.08 and 0.5 µm/s were generated by different ratios of HF:HNO3:CH3COOH solutions. CV measurements ... Keywords: Schottky diodes, hydrogen, silicon, wet chemical etching

J. Weber; S. Knack; O. V. Feklisova; N. A. Yarykin; E. B. Yakimov

2003-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

112

Characterization of gluten processing streams K.D. Rausch a  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Abstract Corn gluten meal (CGM) is a major coproduct of corn wet milling; it has value because of high streams in a corn wet milling plant. Samples were obtained from one plant over a six month period Science Ltd. All rights reserved. Keywords: Coproducts; Gluten processing; Corn wet milling; Corn gluten

113

Alabama Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation,  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Alabama Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1970's 13 1980's 23 25 1990's 25 23 30 46 56 44 38 30 28 27 2000's 29 26 31 32 32 29 18 20 19 29 2010's 38 48 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 8/1/2013 Next Release Date: 8/1/2014 Referring Pages: Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas Proved Reserves, Wet After Lease Separation, as of Dec. 31 Alabama Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas Proved Reserves, Wet After

114

California State Offshore Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Proved  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) California State Offshore Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1970's 234 1980's 166 256 254 243 235 1990's 194 60 63 65 63 59 49 56 44 77 2000's 91 85 91 83 87 90 90 83 57 57 2010's 66 82 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 8/1/2013 Next Release Date: 8/1/2014 Referring Pages: Natural Gas Proved Reserves, Wet After Lease Separation, as of Dec. 31 CA, State Offshore Natural Gas Reserves Summary as of Dec. 31 Natural Gas Proved Reserves, Wet After Lease Separation, as of Dec.

115

Miscellaneous States Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation,  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Miscellaneous States Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1970's 142 1980's 146 181 47 50 63 52 95 53 56 48 1990's 50 62 82 87 56 37 40 13 22 13 2000's 23 64 80 120 98 118 120 226 263 271 2010's 353 270 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 8/1/2013 Next Release Date: 8/1/2014 Referring Pages: Nonassociated Natural Gas Proved Reserves, Wet After Lease Separation, as of Dec. 31 Miscellaneous Nonassociated Natural Gas Proved Reserves, Wet After

116

Ohio Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Ohio Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1970's 432 1980's 282 165 158 396 364 395 522 477 749 686 1990's 844 805 780 763 780 699 715 594 548 777 2000's 717 631 772 823 767 714 801 926 886 799 2010's 742 684 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 8/1/2013 Next Release Date: 8/1/2014 Referring Pages: Nonassociated Natural Gas Proved Reserves, Wet After Lease Separation, as of Dec. 31 Ohio Nonassociated Natural Gas Proved Reserves, Wet After Lease

117

Florida Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Florida Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1970's 0 1980's 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1990's 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2000's 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2010's 26 4 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 8/1/2013 Next Release Date: 8/1/2014 Referring Pages: Nonassociated Natural Gas Proved Reserves, Wet After Lease Separation, as of Dec. 31 Florida Nonassociated Natural Gas Proved Reserves, Wet After Lease

118

California Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) California Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1970's 1,881 1980's 1,792 1,424 1,230 1,120 1,006 1990's 911 901 799 817 808 736 610 570 453 355 2000's 754 842 796 759 767 799 780 686 621 612 2010's 503 510 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 8/1/2013 Next Release Date: 8/1/2014 Referring Pages: Nonassociated Natural Gas Proved Reserves, Wet After Lease Separation, as of Dec. 31 California Nonassociated Natural Gas Proved Reserves, Wet After

119

Texas State Offshore Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Proved  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Texas State Offshore Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1980's 1,112 1,073 739 634 564 610 1990's 461 477 350 337 230 313 293 290 350 419 2000's 400 468 436 456 321 265 305 261 220 164 2010's 131 118 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 8/1/2013 Next Release Date: 8/1/2014 Referring Pages: Natural Gas Proved Reserves, Wet After Lease Separation, as of Dec. 31 TX, State Offshore Natural Gas Reserves Summary as of Dec. 31 Natural Gas Proved Reserves, Wet After Lease Separation, as of Dec.

120

Louisiana State Offshore Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Louisiana State Offshore Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1980's 2,820 1,100 1,218 1,002 1,042 1990's 812 875 691 789 820 714 626 613 473 541 2000's 592 627 428 448 333 370 386 327 248 215 2010's 279 468 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 8/1/2013 Next Release Date: 8/1/2014 Referring Pages: Nonassociated Natural Gas Proved Reserves, Wet After Lease Separation, as of Dec. 31 LA, State Offshore Nonassociated Natural Gas Proved Reserves, Wet

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "wet process clinker" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

California State Offshore Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) California State Offshore Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1970's 8 1980's 6 12 22 22 29 1990's 6 5 4 2 4 3 2 2 5 19 2000's 5 5 6 7 2 1 5 4 3 4 2010's 3 3 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 8/1/2013 Next Release Date: 8/1/2014 Referring Pages: Nonassociated Natural Gas Proved Reserves, Wet After Lease Separation, as of Dec. 31 CA, State Offshore Nonassociated Natural Gas Proved Reserves, Wet

122

Recovering corn germ enriched in recombinant protein by wet-fractionation  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Corn wet-fractionation processes (quick-germ fractionation and traditional wet milling) were evaluated as means of recovering fractions rich in recombinant collagen-related proteins that were targeted for expression in the germ (embryo) of transgenic corn. Transgenic corn lines accumulating a recombinant full-length human collagen type-I-alpha-1 (full-length rCI?1) or a 44-kDa rCI?1 fragment targeted for seed expression with an embryo-specific promoter were used. Factors to consider in efficient recovery processes are the distribution of the peptides among botanical parts and process recovery efficiency. Both recombinant proteins were distributed 62–64% in germ comprising about 8.6% of the dry grain mass; 34–38% in the endosperm comprising 84% of the dry grain mass; 1.7% in the pericarp comprising about 5% of the dry mass; and 1% in the tip-cap comprising 1.5–2% of the dry mass. The quick-germ method employed a short steeping period either in water or SO2–lactic acid solution followed by wet-milling degermination to recover a germ-rich fraction. Of the total recombinant protein expressed in germ, the quick-germ process recovered 40–43% of the total recombinant protein within 6–8% of the corn mass. The traditional corn wet-milling process produced higher purity germ but with lower recovery (24–26%) of the recombinant protein. The two quick-germ methods, using water alone or SO2–lactic acid steeping, did not substantially differ in rCI?1 recovery, and the quick-germ processes recovered germ with less leaching and proteolytic losses of the recombinant proteins than did traditional wet milling. Thus, grain fractionation enriched the recombinant proteins 6-fold higher than that of unfractionated kernels. Such enrichment may improve downstream processing efficiency and enable utilizing the protein-lean co-products to produce biofuels and biorenewable chemicals by fermenting the remaining starch-rich fractions.

Ilankovan Paraman; Steven R. Fox; Matthew T. Aspelund; Charles E. Glatz; Lawrence A. Johnson

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

123

On atomic structure of Ge huts growing on the Ge/Si(001) wetting layer  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Structural models of growing Ge hut clusters—pyramids and wedges—are proposed on the basis of data of recent STM investigations of nucleation and growth of Ge huts on the Si(001) surface in the process of molecular beam epitaxy. It is shown that extension of a hut base along <110> directions goes non-uniformly during the cluster growth regardless of its shape. Growing pyramids, starting from the second monolayer, pass through cyclic formation of slightly asymmetrical and symmetrical clusters, with symmetrical ones appearing after addition of every fourth monolayer. We suppose that pyramids of symmetrical configurations composed by 2, 6, 10, etc., monolayers over the wetting layer are more stable than asymmetrical ones. This might explain less stability of pyramids in comparison with wedges in dense arrays forming at low temperatures of Ge deposition. Possible nucleation processes of pyramids and wedges on wetting layer patches from identical embryos composed by 8 dimers through formation of 1 monolayer high 16-dimer nuclei different only in their symmetry is discussed. Schematics of these processes are presented. It is concluded from precise STM measurements that top layers of wetting layer patches are relaxed when huts nucleate on them.

Arapkina, Larisa V.; Yuryev, Vladimir A. [A. M. Prokhorov General Physics Institute of the Russian Academy of Sciences, 38 Vavilov Street, Moscow, 119991 (Russian Federation)] [A. M. Prokhorov General Physics Institute of the Russian Academy of Sciences, 38 Vavilov Street, Moscow, 119991 (Russian Federation)

2013-09-14T23:59:59.000Z

124

Prevention of Food-Processing Wastes  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...beans 99.8 99.8 Corn on the cob 46.0...green beans, and corn on the cob. Tests...starch and glu by new, wet processing of wheat...food exist.) Dry milling and air classification...con-ventional wheat-milling equipment. rom Two...from the conventional wet process and the proposed...

Sam R. Hoover

1974-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

125

Additional wet milling step for fractionation of barley flour after hull separation  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Fuel ethanol production from barley is increasing and there is a need to develop more efficient production processes. In the conventional ethanol production process, the hulls (fiber) in barley do not get fermented. The objective of this study is to evaluate a wet fractionation method, similar to the one used in corn wet milling in the endosperm fiber separation step, on the flour remaining after hull separation from barley in order to increase the starch content of barley flour. Hulls were separated from hammer milled barley flour using a combination of sieving and air classification. The remaining flour was soaked in water and the slurry was ground using an attrition mill. The cell wall material was screened out from the fine slurry. The fermentation material produced by hull separation followed by wet fractionation comprised 80.9% by weight of the original flour and contained 10.1% higher starch and 7.9% lower fiber (neutral detergent fiber; NDF) contents than the original flour. The cell wall coproduct has potential as a functional food ingredient because it has high fiber (NDF of 42.7%), high beta-glucan (4.5%) and high protein (20.2%) contents. The increase in starch content may be beneficial in fuel ethanol production.

Radhakrishnan Srinivasan; Kaleb Smith

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

126

California Federal Offshore Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet After  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) California Federal Offshore Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1970's 249 1980's 307 1,110 1,249 1,312 1,252 1990's 1,229 995 987 976 1,077 1,195 1,151 498 437 488 2000's 500 490 459 456 412 776 756 752 702 731 2010's 722 711 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 8/1/2013 Next Release Date: 8/1/2014 Referring Pages: Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas Proved Reserves, Wet After Lease

127

Michigan Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation,  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Michigan Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1970's 733 1980's 883 758 719 824 774 689 577 569 491 432 1990's 408 437 352 328 357 326 347 281 228 227 2000's 214 159 214 269 193 153 192 179 148 77 2010's 72 77 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 8/1/2013 Next Release Date: 8/1/2014 Referring Pages: Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas Proved Reserves, Wet After Lease Separation, as of Dec. 31

128

Louisiana State Offshore Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Proved  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Louisiana State Offshore Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1980's 3,269 1,351 1,478 1,209 1,273 1990's 1,019 1,082 845 946 988 862 783 743 571 661 2000's 721 772 512 527 394 433 442 392 934 728 2010's 386 519 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 8/1/2013 Next Release Date: 8/1/2014 Referring Pages: Natural Gas Proved Reserves, Wet After Lease Separation, as of Dec. 31 LA, State Offshore Natural Gas Reserves Summary as of Dec. 31

129

Miscellaneous States Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Proved  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Miscellaneous States Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1970's 156 1980's 180 193 74 81 77 77 136 66 84 87 1990's 72 76 93 96 67 69 68 44 39 67 2000's 42 83 100 134 110 132 139 241 272 349 2010's 363 393 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 8/1/2013 Next Release Date: 8/1/2014 Referring Pages: Natural Gas Proved Reserves, Wet After Lease Separation, as of Dec. 31 Miscellaneous Natural Gas Reserves Summary as of Dec. 31

130

North Dakota Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Proved Reserves  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) North Dakota Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1970's 485 1980's 594 654 696 673 643 650 610 578 593 625 1990's 650 533 567 585 568 518 512 531 501 475 2000's 487 495 524 497 465 508 539 572 603 1,213 2010's 1,869 2,652 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 8/1/2013 Next Release Date: 8/1/2014 Referring Pages: Natural Gas Proved Reserves, Wet After Lease Separation, as of Dec. 31 North Dakota Natural Gas Reserves Summary as of Dec. 31

131

North Dakota Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) North Dakota Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1970's 284 1980's 355 401 448 416 376 319 317 302 327 312 1990's 316 290 301 311 293 255 257 274 240 225 2000's 223 225 209 181 145 165 182 155 119 143 2010's 152 141 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 8/1/2013 Next Release Date: 8/1/2014 Referring Pages: Nonassociated Natural Gas Proved Reserves, Wet After Lease Separation, as of Dec. 31

132

Miscellaneous States Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet After Lease  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Miscellaneous States Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1970's 14 1980's 34 12 27 31 14 25 41 13 28 39 1990's 22 14 11 9 11 32 28 31 17 54 2000's 19 19 20 14 12 14 19 15 9 78 2010's 10 104 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 8/1/2013 Next Release Date: 8/1/2014 Referring Pages: Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas Proved Reserves, Wet After Lease Separation, as of Dec. 31

133

Wyoming Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation,  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Wyoming Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1970's 1,038 1980's 1,374 1,228 1,060 959 867 710 691 691 616 581 1990's 573 572 624 502 611 879 824 850 794 713 2000's 652 488 561 450 362 384 347 365 223 362 2010's 334 318 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 8/1/2013 Next Release Date: 8/1/2014 Referring Pages: Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas Proved Reserves, Wet After Lease

134

Arkansas Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation,  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Arkansas Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1970's 166 1980's 194 184 174 194 189 157 150 145 157 145 1990's 67 136 133 93 85 104 89 56 38 41 2000's 39 30 38 37 40 46 44 37 12 20 2010's 29 46 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 8/1/2013 Next Release Date: 8/1/2014 Referring Pages: Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas Proved Reserves, Wet After Lease Separation, as of Dec. 31

135

California - Coastal Region Onshore Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) California - Coastal Region Onshore Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1970's 307 1980's 265 265 325 344 256 254 261 243 220 233 1990's 228 220 196 135 145 109 120 129 116 233 2000's 244 185 197 173 188 269 208 211 150 168 2010's 178 172 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 8/1/2013 Next Release Date: 8/1/2014 Referring Pages: Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas Proved Reserves, Wet After Lease

136

Montana Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Proved Reserves (Billion  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Montana Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1970's 837 1980's 1,308 1,336 870 921 825 884 823 801 834 889 1990's 920 848 875 684 727 792 806 769 789 851 2000's 892 907 914 1,068 1,002 998 1,069 1,067 1,014 993 2010's 959 792 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 8/1/2013 Next Release Date: 8/1/2014 Referring Pages: Natural Gas Proved Reserves, Wet After Lease Separation, as of Dec. 31 Montana Natural Gas Reserves Summary as of Dec. 31

137

Montana Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation,  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Montana Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1970's 51 1980's 122 89 81 108 77 91 98 97 101 68 1990's 86 66 61 53 55 53 51 42 52 67 2000's 70 85 94 112 130 161 195 219 197 312 2010's 302 270 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 8/1/2013 Next Release Date: 8/1/2014 Referring Pages: Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas Proved Reserves, Wet After Lease Separation, as of Dec. 31

138

Louisiana - North Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet After Lease  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Louisiana - North Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1970's 765 1980's 916 1,040 832 775 690 632 567 488 249 237 1990's 241 192 160 120 134 133 255 287 183 260 2000's 186 168 159 139 107 98 90 73 78 53 2010's 73 98 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 8/1/2013 Next Release Date: 8/1/2014 Referring Pages: Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas Proved Reserves, Wet After Lease

139

New York Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) New York Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1970's 211 1980's 208 262 226 295 387 367 457 410 351 364 1990's 354 331 329 264 240 195 229 223 217 212 2000's 320 311 315 365 324 346 361 365 360 196 2010's 271 245 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 8/1/2013 Next Release Date: 8/1/2014 Referring Pages: Nonassociated Natural Gas Proved Reserves, Wet After Lease Separation, as of Dec. 31

140

California - Los Angeles Basin Onshore Natural Gas, Wet After Lease  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) California - Los Angeles Basin Onshore Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1970's 176 1980's 207 163 104 115 163 188 149 155 158 141 1990's 110 120 103 108 108 115 112 146 154 174 2000's 204 195 218 196 184 186 161 154 81 91 2010's 92 102 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 8/1/2013 Next Release Date: 8/1/2014 Referring Pages: Natural Gas Proved Reserves, Wet After Lease Separation, as of Dec. 31 CA, Los Angeles Basin Onshore Natural Gas Reserves Summary as of

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "wet process clinker" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Montana Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Montana Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1970's 786 1980's 1,186 1,247 789 813 748 793 725 704 733 821 1990's 834 782 814 631 672 739 755 727 737 784 2000's 822 822 820 956 872 837 874 848 817 681 2010's 657 522 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 8/1/2013 Next Release Date: 8/1/2014 Referring Pages: Nonassociated Natural Gas Proved Reserves, Wet After Lease Separation, as of Dec. 31

142

Accident Simulation Tests on a Wet-Wall LNG Design  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The “wet wall” design concept for containing cryogenic Hquids has been successfully employed in the Apollo space program [1...] and may be described as a double-hulled tank with a liquid-tight insulation system. ...

P. O. Metz; R. W. Lautensleger; D. A. Sarno

1977-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

143

Wet-gas compression in twin-screw multiphase pumps  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

encountered when operating under conditions with high gas volume fractions (GVF). Twin-screw multiphase pumps experience a severe decrease in efficiency when operating under wet-gas conditions, GVF over 95%. Field operations have revealed severe vibration...

Chan, Evan

2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

144

Wet and Dry Pollutant Deposition to the Mixed Conifer Forest  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The Mediterranean climate in southern California regulates wet and dry deposition characteristics in the San Bernardino Mountains (SBM). Long dry periods in combination with the large air pollution emissions f...

A. Bytnerowicz; M. E. Fenn; P. R. Miller…

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

145

Gulf of Mexico Federal Offshore Natural Gas, Wet After Lease...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

(Billion Cubic Feet) Gulf of Mexico Federal Offshore Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5...

146

California - Los Angeles Basin Onshore Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) California - Los Angeles Basin Onshore Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1970's 1 1980's 0 1 1 1 1 3 0 0 0 0 1990's 0 0 3 0 0 0 0 3 1 0 2000's 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2010's 0 0 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 8/1/2013 Next Release Date: 8/1/2014 Referring Pages: Nonassociated Natural Gas Proved Reserves, Wet After Lease Separation, as of Dec. 31 CA, Los Angeles Basin Onshore Nonassociated Natural Gas Proved

147

California - Coastal Region Onshore Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) California - Coastal Region Onshore Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1970's 395 1980's 330 325 384 405 284 277 275 255 232 238 1990's 232 231 215 201 205 163 168 176 118 233 2000's 244 185 197 174 196 277 214 212 151 169 2010's 180 173 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 8/1/2013 Next Release Date: 8/1/2014 Referring Pages: Natural Gas Proved Reserves, Wet After Lease Separation, as of Dec. 31 CA, Coastal Region Onshore Natural Gas Reserves Summary as of Dec.

148

California Federal Offshore Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) California Federal Offshore Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1970's 73 1980's 107 227 217 258 267 1990's 240 179 149 147 110 94 115 58 52 48 2000's 76 50 56 55 47 49 55 53 3 9 2010's 3 0 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 8/1/2013 Next Release Date: 8/1/2014 Referring Pages: Nonassociated Natural Gas Proved Reserves, Wet After Lease Separation, as of Dec. 31 Federal Offshore California Nonassociated Natural Gas Proved

149

Conversion of wet ethanol to syngas via filtration combustion: An experimental and computational investigation  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Ethanol is often promoted as the biofuel of the future, yet its acceptance as a fuel for combustion devices is limited by the cost of production. Since most combustion engines cannot tolerate high concentrations of water, the ethanol must be distilled and dehydrated, requiring large amounts of energy. Ethanol also has great potential as a feedstock for syngas consisting of hydrogen, carbon monoxide, and other species. The conversion, called reforming, of ethanol to syngas does not necessarily require dehydration or distillation, thus eliminating or reducing the costs associated with those processes. In addition, there is potential for obtaining additional hydrogen from the water in the mixture. In this paper, we investigate the conversion of wet ethanol, or ethanol that has not been fully distilled or dehydrated, to syngas in an inert porous reactor. Experimental and computational results over a range of equivalence ratios, inlet velocities, and water fractions are presented. The results indicate that wet ethanol is a promising biological source for hydrogen.

Colin H. Smith; Daniel M. Leahey; Liane E. Miller; Janet L. Ellzey

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

150

Chemical Processing in High-Pressure Aqueous Environments. 7...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Aqueous Environments. 7. Process Development for Catalytic Gasification of Wet Biomass Feedstocks."Industrial and Engineering Chemistry Research 43(9):1999-2004. Authors: DC...

151

Pilot Testing of Mercury Oxidation Catalysts for Upstream of Wet FGD Systems  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document is the final technical report for Cooperative Agreement DE-FC26-04NT41992, 'Pilot Testing of Mercury Oxidation Catalysts for Upstream of Wet FGD Systems,' which was conducted over the time-period January 1, 2004 through December 31, 2010. The objective of this project has been to demonstrate at pilot scale the use of solid catalysts and/or fixed-structure mercury sorbents to promote the removal of total mercury and oxidation of elemental mercury in flue gas from coal combustion, followed by wet flue gas desulfurization (FGD) to remove the oxidized mercury at high efficiency. The project was co-funded by the U.S. DOE National Energy Technology Laboratory (DOE-NETL), EPRI, Great River Energy (GRE), TXU Energy (now called Luminant), Southern Company, Salt River Project (SRP) and Duke Energy. URS Group was the prime contractor. The mercury control process under development uses fixed-structure sorbents and/or catalysts to promote the removal of total mercury and/or oxidation of elemental mercury in the flue gas from coal-fired power plants that have wet lime or limestone FGD systems. Oxidized mercury not adsorbed is removed in the wet FGD absorbers and leaves with the byproducts from the FGD system. The project has tested candidate materials at pilot scale and in a commercial form, to provide engineering data for future full-scale designs. Pilot-scale catalytic oxidation tests have been completed for periods of approximately 14 to19 months at three sites, with an additional round of pilot-scale fixed-structure sorbent tests being conducted at one of those sites. Additionally, pilot-scale wet FGD tests have been conducted downstream of mercury oxidation catalysts at a total of four sites. The sites include the two of three sites from this project and two sites where catalytic oxidation pilot testing was conducted as part of a previous DOE-NETL project. Pilot-scale wet FGD tests were also conducted at a fifth site, but with no catalyst or fixed-structure mercury sorbent upstream. This final report presents and discusses detailed results from all of these efforts, and makes a number of conclusions about what was learned through these efforts.

Gary Blythe; Conor Braman; Katherine Dombrowski; Tom Machalek

2010-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

152

Elements of Dry-Grind Corn-Processing Streams 113 Applied Biochemistry and Biotechnology Vol. 134, 2006  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

is produced from corn by either wet-milling or dry-grind processing. In wet milling, several coproducts. Samples of corn, ground corn, beer, wet grains, syrup, and DDGS were obtained from nine dry-grind plantsElements of Dry-Grind Corn-Processing Streams 113 Applied Biochemistry and Biotechnology Vol. 134

153

Microwave processing of cement and concrete materials – towards an industrial reality?  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Each year a substantial body of literature is published on the use of microwave to process cement and concrete materials. Yet to date, very few if any have lead the realisation of a commercial scale industrial system and is the context under which this review has been undertaken. The state-of the–art is evaluated for opportunities, and the key barriers to the development of new microwave-based processing techniques to enhance production, processing and recycling of cement and concrete materials. Applications reviewed include pyro-processing of cement clinker; accelerated curing, non-destructive testing and evaluation (NDT&E), and end-of-life processing including radionuclide decontamination.

Adam Buttress; Aled Jones; Sam Kingman

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

154

Kentucky Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation,  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Kentucky Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1970's 2 1980's 11 14 12 19 17 13 17 19 19 22 1990's 8 10 8 6 47 27 24 26 20 29 2000's 27 25 25 25 19 30 36 34 34 32 2010's 111 98 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 8/1/2013 Next Release Date: 8/1/2014 Referring Pages: Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas Proved Reserves, Wet After Lease Separation, as of Dec. 31 Kentucky Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas Proved Reserves, Wet After

155

Florida Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation,  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Florida Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1970's 108 1980's 122 99 86 64 90 81 69 62 69 57 1990's 53 45 55 59 117 110 119 112 106 100 2000's 93 96 102 92 88 87 50 110 1 7 2010's 30 2 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 8/1/2013 Next Release Date: 8/1/2014 Referring Pages: Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas Proved Reserves, Wet After Lease Separation, as of Dec. 31 Florida Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas Proved Reserves, Wet After

156

Fundamentals of wetting and spreading with emphasis on soldering  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Soldering is often referred to as a mature technology whose fundamentals were established long ago. Yet a multitude of soldering problems persist, not the least of which are related to the wetting and spreading of solder. The Buff-Goodrich approach to thermodynamics of capillarity is utilized in a review of basic wetting principles. These thermodynamics allow a very compact formulation of capillary phenomena which is used to calculate various meniscus shapes and wetting forces. These shapes and forces lend themselves to experimental techniques, such as the sessile drop and the Wilhelmy plate, for measuring useful surface and interfacial energies. The familiar equations of Young, Wilhelmy, and Neumann are all derived with this approach. The force-energy duality of surface energy is discussed and the force method is developed and used to derive the Herring relations for anisotropic surfaces. The importance of contact angle hysteresis which results from surface roughness and chemical inhomogeneity is presented and Young's equation is modified to reflect these ever present effects. Finally, an analysis of wetting with simultaneous metallurigical reaction is given and used to discuss solder wetting phenomena. 60 refs., 13 figs.

Yost, F.G.

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

157

Surface Characterization of a Paper Web at the Wet End  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We present an algorithm for the detection and representation of structures and non-uniformities on the surface of a paper web at the wet end (slurry). This image processing/analysis algorithm is developed as part of a complete on-line web characterization system. Images of the slurry, carried by a fast moving table, are obtained using a stroboscopic light and a CCD camera. The images have very poor contrast and contain noise from a variety of sources. Those sources include the acquisition system itself, the lighting, the vibrations of the moving table being imaged, and the scattering water from the same table's movement. After many steps of enhancement, conventional edge detection methods were still inconclusive and were discarded. The facet model algorithm, is applied to the images and is found successful in detecting the various topographic characteristics of the surface of the slurry. Pertinent topographic elements are retained and a filtered image is computed based on the general appearance and characteristics of the structures in question. Morphological operators are applied to detect and segment regions of interest. Those regions are then filtered according to their size, elongation, and orientation.Their bounding rectangles are computed and superimposed on the original image. Real time implementation of this algorithm for on-line use is also addressed in this paper. The algorithm is tested on over 500 images of slurry and is found to detect nonuniformities on all 500 images. Locating and characterizing all different size structures is also achieved on all 500 images of the web.

Abidi, B.R.; Goddard, J.S.; Sari-Sarraf, H.

1999-06-23T23:59:59.000Z

158

MHK Technologies/WET NZ | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

NZ NZ < MHK Technologies Jump to: navigation, search << Return to the MHK database homepage WET NZ.jpg Technology Profile Primary Organization Wave Energy Technology New Zealand WET NZ Technology Resource Click here Wave Technology Type Click here Point Absorber - Floating Technology Readiness Level Click here TRL 5 6 System Integration and Technology Laboratory Demonstration Technology Description The WET NZ device is planned to have a modular generation capability of up to 500 kW with onboard controls that will be able to accurately forecast incoming waves and adjust the response to changing wave patterns The device will be largely sub surface so that as much of the device as possible interacts directly with the wave energy Technology Dimensions

159

Wetting of Emulsions Droplets: From Macroscopic to Colloidal Scale  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

By using large oil-in-water droplets covered with ionic surfactant we measure contact angles to deduce the adhesive energy between macroscopic interfaces as a function of the temperature T and the salt concentration C. A wetting transition takes place at a well defined temperature T*(C). At the colloidal scale, we have observed that submicron droplets covered by the same monolayers undergo a phases separation. We show that the phases diagram can be quantitatively predicted from the macroscopic contact angles. However, to describe the colloidal phase separation we have to account for both the entropy and the deformation induced by the wetting of the droplets. Finally, our results show how the macroscopic wetting transition can be shifted at the colloidal scale where droplets entropy plays an important role.

P. Poulin and J. Bibette

1997-10-27T23:59:59.000Z

160

Effect of drying, initial moisture and variety in corn wet milling  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A laboratory wet-milling process was used to determine starch yield and starch recovery of dent and flint corn dried under different drying conditions. A comparison with undried samples was performed. For the undried samples the starch recovery was not significantly different between both varieties. It decreased as both initial moisture content of the grains and drying air temperature increased. The reduction in starch recovery as well as the contamination by protein was greater for the flint than for the dent corn. Swelling, solubility and initial gelatinization temperatures of the starch derived from both varieties were affected by the drying conditions.

Mónica Haros; Costantino Suarez

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "wet process clinker" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Texas - RRC District 9 Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Texas - RRC District 9 Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1970's 633 1980's 502 796 965 845 786 753 761 717 686 617 1990's 703 674 613 636 715 730 749 785 665 1,180 2000's 1,645 2,428 3,070 3,514 4,445 4,608 6,660 7,846 9,390 11,100 2010's 12,587 9,963 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 8/1/2013 Next Release Date: 8/1/2014 Referring Pages: Nonassociated Natural Gas Proved Reserves, Wet After Lease

162

Gulf of Mexico Federal Offshore - Texas Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Gulf of Mexico Federal Offshore - Texas Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1980's 6,411 6,191 6,956 6,739 6,745 6,504 1990's 6,884 6,305 6,353 6,138 5,739 5,674 5,240 4,799 4,452 4,507 2000's 5,030 5,404 4,967 4,235 3,258 2,807 2,360 2,173 1,937 1,822 2010's 1,456 1,015 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 8/1/2013 Next Release Date: 8/1/2014 Referring Pages: Nonassociated Natural Gas Proved Reserves, Wet After Lease

163

West Virginia Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) West Virginia Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1970's 1,593 1980's 2,437 1,881 2,169 2,238 2,173 2,104 2,207 2,210 2,299 2,244 1990's 2,243 2,513 2,293 2,408 2,569 2,514 2,722 2,887 2,925 2,952 2000's 2,929 2,777 3,477 3,376 3,489 4,553 4,638 4,865 5,243 6,066 2010's 7,134 10,480 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 8/1/2013 Next Release Date: 8/1/2014 Referring Pages: Nonassociated Natural Gas Proved Reserves, Wet After Lease

164

Michigan Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Proved Reserves (Billion  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Michigan Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1970's 1,334 1980's 1,551 1,252 1,200 1,353 1,193 1,064 1,242 1,571 1,434 1,443 1990's 1,330 1,404 1,290 1,218 1,379 1,344 2,125 2,256 2,386 2,313 2000's 2,772 3,032 3,311 3,488 3,154 2,961 3,117 3,691 3,253 2,805 2010's 2,975 2,549 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 8/1/2013 Next Release Date: 8/1/2014 Referring Pages: Natural Gas Proved Reserves, Wet After Lease Separation, as of Dec.

165

California Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Proved Reserves (Billion  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) California Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1970's 4,842 1980's 5,137 4,084 3,893 3,666 3,513 1990's 3,311 3,114 2,892 2,799 2,506 2,355 2,193 2,390 2,332 2,505 2000's 2,952 2,763 2,696 2,569 2,773 3,384 2,935 2,879 2,538 2,926 2010's 2,785 3,042 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 8/1/2013 Next Release Date: 8/1/2014 Referring Pages: Natural Gas Proved Reserves, Wet After Lease Separation, as of Dec. 31 California Natural Gas Reserves Summary as of Dec. 31

166

Louisiana Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Proved Reserves (Billion  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Louisiana Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1980's 19,676 13,334 12,852 12,620 12,912 1990's 12,151 11,363 10,227 9,541 10,145 9,891 10,077 10,036 9,480 9,646 2000's 9,512 10,040 9,190 9,538 9,792 10,679 10,710 10,292 11,816 20,970 2010's 29,517 30,545 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 8/1/2013 Next Release Date: 8/1/2014 Referring Pages: Natural Gas Proved Reserves, Wet After Lease Separation, as of Dec. 31 Louisiana Natural Gas Reserves Summary as of Dec. 31

167

Michigan Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Michigan Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1970's 601 1980's 668 494 481 529 419 375 665 1,002 943 1,011 1990's 922 967 938 890 1,022 1,018 1,778 1,975 2,158 2,086 2000's 2,558 2,873 3,097 3,219 2,961 2,808 2,925 3,512 3,105 2,728 2010's 2,903 2,472 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 8/1/2013 Next Release Date: 8/1/2014 Referring Pages: Nonassociated Natural Gas Proved Reserves, Wet After Lease

168

Virginia Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Virginia Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1980's 122 175 216 235 253 248 230 217 1990's 138 225 904 1,322 1,833 1,836 1,930 1,923 1,973 2,017 2000's 1,704 1,752 1,673 1,717 1,742 2,018 2,302 2,529 2,378 3,091 2010's 3,215 2,832 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 8/1/2013 Next Release Date: 8/1/2014 Referring Pages: Nonassociated Natural Gas Proved Reserves, Wet After Lease Separation, as of Dec. 31

169

Virginia Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Proved Reserves (Billion  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Virginia Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1980's 122 175 216 235 253 248 230 217 1990's 138 225 904 1,322 1,833 1,836 1,930 2,446 1,973 2,017 2000's 1,704 1,752 1,673 1,717 1,742 2,018 2,302 2,529 2,378 3,091 2010's 3,215 2,832 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 8/1/2013 Next Release Date: 8/1/2014 Referring Pages: Natural Gas Proved Reserves, Wet After Lease Separation, as of Dec. 31 Virginia Natural Gas Reserves Summary as of Dec. 31

170

West Virginia Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Proved Reserves  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) West Virginia Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1970's 1,669 1980's 2,559 1,944 2,252 2,324 2,246 2,177 2,272 2,360 2,440 2,342 1990's 2,329 2,672 2,491 2,598 2,702 2,588 2,793 2,946 2,968 3,040 2000's 3,062 2,825 3,498 3,399 3,509 4,572 4,654 4,881 5,266 6,090 2010's 7,163 10,532 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 8/1/2013 Next Release Date: 8/1/2014 Referring Pages: Natural Gas Proved Reserves, Wet After Lease Separation, as of Dec.

171

Arkansas Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Proved Reserves (Billion  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Arkansas Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1970's 1,725 1980's 1,796 1,821 1,974 2,081 2,240 2,032 2,011 2,018 2,000 1,782 1990's 1,739 1,672 1,752 1,555 1,610 1,566 1,472 1,479 1,332 1,546 2000's 1,584 1,619 1,654 1,666 1,837 1,967 2,271 3,306 5,628 10,872 2010's 14,181 16,374 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 8/1/2013 Next Release Date: 8/1/2014 Referring Pages: Natural Gas Proved Reserves, Wet After Lease Separation, as of Dec.

172

Kansas Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Proved Reserves (Billion  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Kansas Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1970's 10,824 1980's 10,065 10,443 10,128 10,183 9,981 9,844 11,093 11,089 10,530 10,509 1990's 10,004 9,946 10,302 9,872 9,705 9,093 8,145 7,328 6,862 6,248 2000's 5,682 5,460 5,329 5,143 5,003 4,598 4,197 4,248 3,795 3,500 2010's 3,937 3,747 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 8/1/2013 Next Release Date: 8/1/2014 Referring Pages: Natural Gas Proved Reserves, Wet After Lease Separation, as of Dec.

173

Colorado Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Colorado Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1970's 2,657 1980's 2,970 2,969 3,345 3,200 2,932 2,928 3,008 2,912 3,572 4,290 1990's 4,249 5,329 5,701 5,817 5,948 6,520 7,009 6,627 7,436 8,591 2000's 9,877 11,924 13,251 14,707 13,956 15,796 16,141 20,642 22,159 22,199 2010's 23,001 23,633 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 8/1/2013 Next Release Date: 8/1/2014 Referring Pages: Nonassociated Natural Gas Proved Reserves, Wet After Lease

174

Colorado Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation,  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Colorado Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1970's 181 1980's 200 259 206 173 208 167 190 219 177 236 1990's 510 682 762 1,162 1,088 1,072 1,055 533 772 781 2000's 960 1,025 1,097 1,186 1,293 1,326 1,541 1,838 2,010 1,882 2010's 2,371 2,518 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 8/1/2013 Next Release Date: 8/1/2014 Referring Pages: Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas Proved Reserves, Wet After Lease

175

Wyoming Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Proved Reserves (Billion  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Wyoming Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1970's 7,834 1980's 9,413 9,659 10,155 10,728 11,014 11,229 10,393 10,572 10,903 11,276 1990's 10,433 10,433 11,305 11,387 11,351 12,712 13,084 14,321 14,371 14,809 2000's 17,211 19,399 21,531 22,716 23,640 24,722 24,463 30,896 32,399 36,748 2010's 36,526 36,930 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 8/1/2013 Next Release Date: 8/1/2014 Referring Pages: Natural Gas Proved Reserves, Wet After Lease Separation, as of Dec.

176

Arkansas Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Arkansas Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1970's 1,559 1980's 1,602 1,637 1,800 1,887 2,051 1,875 1,861 1,873 1,843 1,637 1990's 1,672 1,536 1,619 1,462 1,525 1,462 1,383 1,423 1,294 1,505 2000's 1,545 1,589 1,616 1,629 1,797 1,921 2,227 3,269 5,616 10,852 2010's 14,152 16,328 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 8/1/2013 Next Release Date: 8/1/2014 Referring Pages: Nonassociated Natural Gas Proved Reserves, Wet After Lease

177

Texas Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Proved Reserves (Billion  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Texas Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1980's 46,803 46,620 44,319 42,192 41,404 41,554 1990's 41,411 39,288 38,141 37,847 39,020 39,736 41,592 41,108 40,793 43,350 2000's 45,419 46,462 47,491 48,717 53,275 60,178 65,805 76,357 81,843 85,034 2010's 94,287 104,454 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 8/1/2013 Next Release Date: 8/1/2014 Referring Pages: Natural Gas Proved Reserves, Wet After Lease Separation, as of Dec. 31 Texas Natural Gas Reserves Summary as of Dec. 31

178

Mississippi Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Proved Reserves  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Mississippi Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1970's 1,511 1980's 1,776 2,042 1,803 1,603 1,496 1,364 1,304 1,223 1,146 1,108 1990's 1,129 1,061 873 800 653 667 634 583 662 681 2000's 620 663 746 748 692 758 816 958 1,035 922 2010's 858 868 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 8/1/2013 Next Release Date: 8/1/2014 Referring Pages: Natural Gas Proved Reserves, Wet After Lease Separation, as of Dec. 31 Mississippi Natural Gas Reserves Summary as of Dec. 31

179

Texas Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Texas Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1980's 35,971 35,867 34,584 32,852 32,309 32,349 1990's 32,412 30,729 29,474 29,967 31,071 31,949 33,432 33,322 33,429 35,470 2000's 38,585 40,376 41,104 42,280 46,728 53,175 58,736 68,827 74,284 76,272 2010's 84,157 90,947 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 8/1/2013 Next Release Date: 8/1/2014 Referring Pages: Nonassociated Natural Gas Proved Reserves, Wet After Lease

180

California Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation,  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) California Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1970's 2,961 1980's 3,345 2,660 2,663 2,546 2,507 1990's 2,400 2,213 2,093 1,982 1,698 1,619 1,583 1,820 1,879 2,150 2000's 2,198 1,922 1,900 1,810 2,006 2,585 2,155 2,193 1,917 2,314 2010's 2,282 2,532 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 8/1/2013 Next Release Date: 8/1/2014 Referring Pages: Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas Proved Reserves, Wet After Lease

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "wet process clinker" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Pennsylvania Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Proved Reserves  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Pennsylvania Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1970's 1,516 1980's 951 1,265 1,430 1,882 1,576 1,618 1,562 1,650 2,074 1,644 1990's 1,722 1,631 1,533 1,722 1,806 1,488 1,702 1,861 1,848 1,780 2000's 1,740 1,782 2,225 2,497 2,371 2,793 3,064 3,377 3,594 7,018 2010's 14,068 26,719 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 8/1/2013 Next Release Date: 8/1/2014 Referring Pages: Natural Gas Proved Reserves, Wet After Lease Separation, as of Dec.

182

Kentucky Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Proved Reserves (Billion  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Kentucky Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1970's 504 1980's 536 561 592 600 647 806 883 940 957 1,015 1990's 1,047 1,187 1,126 1,036 1,025 1,102 1,046 1,429 1,295 1,530 2000's 1,837 1,950 1,999 1,971 1,982 2,240 2,369 2,588 2,846 2,919 2010's 2,785 2,128 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 8/1/2013 Next Release Date: 8/1/2014 Referring Pages: Natural Gas Proved Reserves, Wet After Lease Separation, as of Dec. 31 Kentucky Natural Gas Reserves Summary as of Dec. 31

183

Kentucky Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Kentucky Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1970's 502 1980's 525 547 580 581 630 793 866 921 938 993 1990's 1,039 1,177 1,118 1,030 978 1,075 1,022 1,403 1,275 1,501 2000's 1,810 1,925 1,974 1,946 1,963 2,210 2,333 2,554 2,812 2,887 2010's 2,674 2,030 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 8/1/2013 Next Release Date: 8/1/2014 Referring Pages: Nonassociated Natural Gas Proved Reserves, Wet After Lease

184

Louisiana Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Louisiana Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1980's 16,316 10,943 10,724 10,826 11,171 1990's 10,597 9,969 9,060 8,615 9,165 8,890 9,038 9,020 8,569 8,667 2000's 8,704 9,245 8,520 8,952 9,235 10,091 10,149 9,651 10,581 19,898 2010's 28,838 29,906 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 8/1/2013 Next Release Date: 8/1/2014 Referring Pages: Nonassociated Natural Gas Proved Reserves, Wet After Lease

185

Variational formulations for surface tension, capillarity and wetting  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Variational formulations for surface tension, capillarity and wetting Gustavo C. Buscagliaa of flows with significant surface tension effects has grown significantly in recent years. This has been, since at small length scales surface phenomena are dominant. In this article, surface tension

Buscaglia, Gustavo C.

186

Wet-Weather Pollution Prevention through Materials Substitution  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 Wet-Weather Pollution Prevention through Materials Substitution Shirley E. Clark, Ph.D., P the potential pollutant release from common building materials both when the materials are new and after aging often used to increase the operating range of asphalts and to prevent stripping of asphalt from binders

Clark, Shirley E.

187

California Federal Offshore Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Proved  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) California Federal Offshore Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1970's 322 1980's 414 1,337 1,466 1,570 1,519 1990's 1,469 1,174 1,136 1,123 1,187 1,289 1,266 556 489 536 2000's 576 540 515 511 459 825 811 805 705 740 2010's 725 711 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 8/1/2013 Next Release Date: 8/1/2014 Referring Pages: Natural Gas Proved Reserves, Wet After Lease Separation, as of Dec. 31 Federal Offshore, Pacific (California) Natural Gas Reserves Summary

188

Texas - RRC District 1 Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Texas - RRC District 1 Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1970's 732 1980's 683 870 708 960 714 754 716 639 1,002 1,037 1990's 744 660 606 540 586 498 523 950 1,101 1,165 2000's 1,037 1,024 1,047 1,047 1,184 1,148 1,048 1,029 987 1,456 2010's 2,332 5,227 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 8/1/2013 Next Release Date: 8/1/2014 Referring Pages: Nonassociated Natural Gas Proved Reserves, Wet After Lease

189

Alabama Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Alabama Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1970's 680 1980's 659 658 1990's 4,159 5,437 5,840 5,166 4,842 4,886 5,062 4,983 4,615 4,338 2000's 4,241 3,931 3,891 4,313 4,127 3,977 3,945 4,016 3,360 2,919 2010's 2,686 2,522 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 8/1/2013 Next Release Date: 8/1/2014 Referring Pages: Nonassociated Natural Gas Proved Reserves, Wet After Lease Separation, as of Dec. 31

190

Alaska Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Alaska Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1970's 5,058 1980's 4,828 4,373 4,188 3,883 4,120 3,131 2,462 2,983 2,910 2,821 1990's 2,466 2,924 3,002 3,492 3,326 3,310 3,216 2,957 2,768 2,646 2000's 2,564 2,309 2,157 2,081 2,004 1,875 1,447 1,270 1,139 1,090 2010's 1,021 976 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 8/1/2013 Next Release Date: 8/1/2014 Referring Pages: Nonassociated Natural Gas Proved Reserves, Wet After Lease

191

California - San Joaquin Basin Onshore Natural Gas, Wet After Lease  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) California - San Joaquin Basin Onshore Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1970's 4,037 1980's 4,434 4,230 4,058 3,964 3,808 3,716 3,404 3,229 3,033 2,899 1990's 2,775 2,703 2,511 2,425 2,130 2,018 1,864 2,012 2,016 2,021 2000's 2,413 2,298 2,190 2,116 2,306 2,831 2,470 2,430 2,249 2,609 2010's 2,447 2,685 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 8/1/2013 Next Release Date: 8/1/2014 Referring Pages: Natural Gas Proved Reserves, Wet After Lease Separation, as of Dec.

192

Alabama Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Proved Reserves (Billion  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Alabama Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1970's 693 1980's 682 683 1990's 4,184 5,460 5,870 5,212 4,898 4,930 5,100 5,013 4,643 4,365 2000's 4,269 3,958 3,922 4,345 4,159 4,006 3,963 4,036 3,379 2,948 2010's 2,724 2,570 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 8/1/2013 Next Release Date: 8/1/2014 Referring Pages: Natural Gas Proved Reserves, Wet After Lease Separation, as of Dec. 31 Alabama Natural Gas Reserves Summary as of Dec. 31

193

Louisiana Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation,  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Louisiana Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1980's 3,360 2,391 2,128 1,794 1,741 1990's 1,554 1,394 1,167 926 980 1,001 1,039 1,016 911 979 2000's 807 796 670 586 557 588 561 641 1,235 1,072 2010's 679 639 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 8/1/2013 Next Release Date: 8/1/2014 Referring Pages: Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas Proved Reserves, Wet After Lease Separation, as of Dec. 31

194

Louisiana - South Onshore Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Proved  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Louisiana - South Onshore Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1970's 14,580 1980's 13,407 13,049 12,153 11,553 10,650 10,120 9,416 9,024 8,969 8,934 1990's 8,492 7,846 7,019 6,219 6,558 6,166 6,105 6,137 5,966 5,858 2000's 5,447 5,341 4,395 3,874 3,557 3,478 3,473 3,463 2,916 2,969 2010's 2,995 2,615 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 8/1/2013 Next Release Date: 8/1/2014 Referring Pages: Natural Gas Proved Reserves, Wet After Lease Separation, as of Dec.

195

Reduction of NO{sub x} emissions from cement kiln/calciner through the use of the NO{sub x}OUT process  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The post combustion reduction of NO{sub x} using urea has proven to be an effective method in controlling NO{sub x} from various combustion sources. This process, a selective non-catalytic reduction process known as NO{sub x}OUT, has been successfully demonstrated in a cement kiln/calciner operated by Ash Grove Cement. Testing was done under ten different kiln/calciner operating conditions. Using three to four injectors, NO{sub x} was efficiently reduced from 350--600 pounds per hour (3.5--6.0 lb/ton of clinker) to less than 100 pounds per hour (1.0 lb/ton of clinker). This calculates to a NO{sub x} reduction of > 80% for most cases. Chemical utilization was greater than 50%. A high degree of mixing and a long residence time at an appropriate temperature present in the preheater tower contributed to these excellent results. An average ammonia slip was four ppm above a baseline level at normalized stoichiometric ratio of 1. Based on this demonstration, cement kiln/calciners have been identified as an ideal application for the NO{sub x}OUT Process. NO{sub x} was efficiently and effectively reduced with minimal byproduct emissions and virtually no effect on plant operations.

Sun, W.H. [Nalco Fuel Tech., Naperville, IL (United States); Bisnett, M.J.; Kirk, D.W. [Nalco Fuel Tech, Santa Fe Springs, CA (United States); Steuch, H.E. [Ash Grove Cement Co., Portland, OR (United States); Hille, J. [Ash Grove Cement Co., Seattle, WA (United States)

1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

196

Brucite [Mg(OH2)] Carbonation in Wet Supercritical CO2: An in...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Brucite Mg(OH2) Carbonation in Wet Supercritical CO2: An in situ High Pressure X-Ray Diffraction Study. Brucite Mg(OH2) Carbonation in Wet Supercritical CO2: An in situ High...

197

Extraction and Functional Properties of Non-Zein Proteins in Corn Germ from Wet-Milling  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This study was conducted to evaluate the extractability of wet-milled corn germ protein, characterize the recovered protein and ... potential applications. Protein was extracted from both wet germ and finished (d...

Mila P. Hojilla-Evangelista

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

198

Impact of additives for enhanced sulfur dioxide removal on re-emissions of mercury in wet flue gas desulfurization  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract The wet flue gas desulfurization process (FGD) in fossil fired power plants offers the advantage of simultaneously removing SO2 and other water soluble pollutants, such as certain oxidized mercury compounds (Hg2+). In order to maximize SO2 removal efficiency of installed FGD units, organic additives can be utilized. In the context of multi-pollutant control by wet FGD, the effect of formic and adipic acid on redox reactions of dissolved mercury compounds is investigated with a continuously operated lab-scale test-rig. For sulfite ( SO 3 2 - ) concentrations above a certain critical value, their potential as reducing agent leads to rapidly increasing formation and re-emission of elemental mercury (Hg0). Increasing chloride concentration and decreasing pH and slurry temperature have been identified as key factors for depressing Hg0 re-emissions. Both organic additives have a negative impact on Hg-retention and cause increased Hg0 re-emissions in the wet FGD process, with formic acid being the significantly stronger reducing agent. Different pathways of Hg2+ reduction were identified by qualitative interpretation of the pH-dependence and by comparison of activation enthalpies and activation entropies. While the first mechanism proposed identifies SO 3 2 - as reducing agent and is therefore relevant for any FGD process, the second mechanism involves the formate anion, thus being exclusively relevant for \\{FGDs\\} utilizing formic acid as additive.

Barna Heidel; Melanie Hilber; Günter Scheffknecht

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

199

Physical Aspects of Blade Erosion by Wet Steam in Turbines [and Discussion  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...Aspects of Blade Erosion by Wet Steam in Turbines [and Discussion] A. Smith J. Caldwell...Christie Blade erosion in wet steam turbines is considered to be preceded by the collection...the trailing edges has been obtained on turbine blade cascades in a wet air tunnel...

1966-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

200

Vol. 82, No. 4, 2005 431 Phosphorus Concentrations and Flow in Maize Wet-Milling Streams  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

gluten meal (CGM) and corn gluten feed (CGF) is important to the maize wet-milling industry. HighVol. 82, No. 4, 2005 431 Phosphorus Concentrations and Flow in Maize Wet-Milling Streams Kent D in animal wastes. The objective was to measure the concentration and flow of phosphorus in the wet-milling

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "wet process clinker" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Characterization of light gluten and light steep water from a corn wet milling plant  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Characterization of light gluten and light steep water from a corn wet milling plant K.D. Rausch March 2003; accepted 10 March 2003 Abstract The primary commodity of corn wet milling is starch, but two Ltd. All rights reserved. Keywords: Coproducts; Corn gluten meal; Corn gluten feed; Corn wet milling

202

Reduction of Water Use in Wet FGD Systems  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Reduction of WateR use in Wet fGd Reduction of WateR use in Wet fGd systems Background Coal-fired power plants require large volumes of water for efficient operation, primarily for cooling purposes. Public concern over water use is increasing, particularly in water stressed areas of the country. Analyses conducted by the U.S. Department of Energy's National Energy Technology Laboratory predict significant increases in power plant freshwater consumption over the coming years, encouraging the development of technologies to reduce this water loss. Power plant freshwater consumption refers to the quantity of water withdrawn from a water body that is not returned to the source but is lost to evaporation, while water withdrawal refers to the total quantity of water removed from a water source.

203

CRITICAL BEHAVIOR OF INTERFACES: ROUGHENING AND WETTING PHENOMENA  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The critical behavior of interfaces is discussed from a theoretical point of view. Two classes of critical phenomena will be considered: (i) Roughening phenomena related to changes in the interfacial morphology; and (ii) Wetting phenomena related to changes in the interfacial structure. In two dimensions, the critical behavior can be determined exactly for a variety of models. As a result, one obtains different universality classes depending on the nature of the intermolecular forces. 1.

unknown authors

204

Wet-steam erosion of steam turbine disks and shafts  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A study of wet-steam erosion of the disks and the rotor bosses or housings of turbines in thermal and nuclear power plants shows that the rate of wear does not depend on the diagrammed degree of moisture, but is determined by moisture condensing on the surfaces of the diaphragms and steam inlet components. Renovating the diaphragm seals as an assembly with condensate removal provides a manifold reduction in the erosion.

Averkina, N. V. [JSC 'NPO TsKTI' (Russian Federation); Zheleznyak, I. V. [Leningradskaya AES branch of JSC 'Kontsern Rosenergoatom' (Russian Federation); Kachuriner, Yu. Ya.; Nosovitskii, I. A.; Orlik, V. G., E-mail: orlikvg@mail.ru [JSC 'NPO TsKTI' (Russian Federation); Shishkin, V. I. [Leningradskaya AES branch of JSC 'Kontsern Rosenergoatom' (Russian Federation)

2011-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

205

Louisiana - South Onshore Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Louisiana - South Onshore Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1970's 12,276 1980's 11,273 11,178 10,364 9,971 9,162 8,328 7,843 7,644 7,631 7,661 1990's 7,386 6,851 6,166 5,570 5,880 5,446 5,478 5,538 5,336 5,259 2000's 4,954 4,859 3,968 3,506 3,168 3,051 3,058 2,960 2,445 2,463 2010's 2,496 2,125 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 8/1/2013 Next Release Date: 8/1/2014 Referring Pages:

206

Texas - RRC District 5 Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

5 Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) 5 Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Texas - RRC District 5 Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1970's 1,127 1980's 1,117 1,265 1,322 1,477 1,911 2,100 2,169 2,106 1,989 1,789 1990's 1,835 1,841 1,692 1,790 1,926 1,876 2,088 1,681 1,906 2,301 2000's 3,089 4,206 4,588 5,398 6,525 9,560 12,591 17,224 20,420 22,602 2010's 24,686 28,147 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 8/1/2013 Next Release Date: 8/1/2014 Referring Pages:

207

Texas - RRC District 8 Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Texas - RRC District 8 Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1970's 8,073 1980's 7,216 6,620 6,084 6,064 5,362 5,246 5,254 4,973 4,738 4,403 1990's 4,323 4,023 3,792 3,569 3,267 3,218 3,069 2,886 2,727 2,947 2000's 3,345 3,405 3,284 3,032 3,266 3,829 3,891 4,267 4,506 3,950 2010's 3,777 3,006 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 8/1/2013 Next Release Date: 8/1/2014 Referring Pages:

208

New Mexico - West Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation,  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

- West Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) - West Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) New Mexico - West Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1970's 9,934 1980's 10,001 10,536 9,231 8,654 8,341 7,947 9,344 9,275 15,000 13,088 1990's 14,804 16,131 16,854 16,494 15,156 15,421 14,620 13,586 13,122 13,292 2000's 14,396 14,541 14,339 14,476 15,632 15,114 14,727 13,923 12,855 12,004 2010's 11,704 11,111 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 8/1/2013 Next Release Date: 8/1/2014

209

Wyoming Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Wyoming Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1970's 6,796 1980's 8,039 8,431 9,095 9,769 10,147 10,519 9,702 9,881 10,287 10,695 1990's 9,860 9,861 10,681 10,885 10,740 11,833 12,260 13,471 13,577 14,096 2000's 16,559 18,911 20,970 22,266 23,278 24,338 24,116 30,531 32,176 36,386 2010's 36,192 36,612 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 8/1/2013 Next Release Date: 8/1/2014 Referring Pages:

210

Oklahoma Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Oklahoma Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1970's 12,299 1980's 11,656 13,066 14,714 14,992 14,858 14,929 15,588 15,686 15,556 14,948 1990's 15,147 14,112 13,249 12,549 12,981 13,067 12,929 13,296 13,321 12,252 2000's 13,430 13,256 14,576 15,176 16,301 17,337 17,735 19,225 21,155 23,115 2010's 26,873 27,683 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 8/1/2013 Next Release Date: 8/1/2014

211

New Mexico - East Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation,  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

East Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) East Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) New Mexico - East Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1970's 2,634 1980's 2,266 2,377 2,331 2,214 2,117 2,001 1,750 1,901 2,030 2,131 1990's 2,290 2,073 1,948 1,860 1,791 1,648 1,612 1,694 1,694 1,880 2000's 2,526 2,571 2,632 2,205 2,477 2,569 2,605 2,633 2,737 2,658 2010's 2,612 2,475 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 8/1/2013 Next Release Date: 8/1/2014 Referring Pages:

212

New Mexico Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) New Mexico Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1970's 12,568 1980's 12,267 12,913 11,562 10,868 10,458 9,948 11,094 11,176 17,030 15,219 1990's 17,094 18,204 18,802 18,354 16,947 17,069 16,232 15,280 14,816 15,172 2000's 16,922 17,112 16,971 16,681 18,109 17,683 17,332 16,556 15,592 14,662 2010's 14,316 13,586 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 8/1/2013 Next Release Date: 8/1/2014

213

Texas - RRC District 6 Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

6 Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) 6 Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Texas - RRC District 6 Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1970's 2,710 1980's 3,622 3,653 3,749 4,279 4,087 4,274 4,324 4,151 4,506 5,201 1990's 5,345 4,856 4,987 5,170 5,131 5,425 5,690 5,616 5,691 5,562 2000's 5,901 6,016 6,161 6,572 7,564 8,999 9,205 11,468 12,207 12,806 2010's 14,958 15,524 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 8/1/2013 Next Release Date: 8/1/2014 Referring Pages:

214

Lower 48 States Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation,  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Lower 48 States Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1970's 143,852 1980's 139,421 143,515 142,984 143,469 141,226 138,464 139,070 135,256 141,211 139,798 1990's 141,941 140,584 138,883 136,953 138,213 139,369 141,136 140,382 139,015 142,098 2000's 154,113 159,612 163,863 166,512 171,547 183,197 189,329 213,851 224,873 249,406 2010's 280,880 305,010 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 8/1/2013

215

An implicit wetting and drying approach for non-hydrostatic flows in high aspect ratio domains  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A wetting and drying approach for free surface flows governed by the three-dimensional, non-hydrostatic Navier-Stokes equations in high aspect ratio domains is developed. This has application in the modelling of inundation processes in geophysical domains, where dynamics takes place over a large horizontal extent relative to vertical resolution, such as in the evolution of a tsunami, or an urban fluvial flooding scenario. The approach is novel in that it solves for three dimensional dynamics in these very high aspect ratio domains, to include non-hydrostatic effects and accurately model dispersive processes. These become important in shallow regions with steep gradients, a particularly acute problem where man-made structures exist such as buildings or flood defences in an urban environment. It is implicit in time to allow efficient time integration over a range of mesh element sizes. Specific regularisation methods are introduced to improve conditioning of the full three-dimensional pressure Poisson problem i...

Candy, Adam S

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

216

Direct Use of Wet Ethanol in a Homogeneous Charge Compression Ignition (HCCI) Engine: Experimental and Numerical Results  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The energy balance of corn ethanol revisited, Transaction offor autoignition. The wet ethanol modeling study [REF] usedengine running on wet ethanol. Fuel mixtures studied range

Mack, John Hunter; Flowers, Daniel L; Aceves, Salvador M; Dibble, Robert W

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

217

Atmospheric corrosion monitoring of a weathering steel under an electrolyte film in cyclic wet–dry condition  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Electrochemical Impedance Spectroscopy (EIS) and film thickness measurements have been employed to study the corrosion monitoring of steel under an electrolyte film in wet–dry cycles simulating a coastal atmosphere. The results indicate that within each cycle, the corrosion rate increases during drying process due to an increase in Cl? concentration and an enhancement of oxygen diffusion by thinning out of the electrolyte. As corrosion process proceeds, the corrosion rate increases greatly and reaches a maximum. During subsequent corrosion stage, the corrosion rate decreases greatly and keeps at a low value due to the formation of a stable rust layer.

Ch. Thee; Long Hao; Junhua Dong; Xin Mu; Xin Wei; Xiaofang Li; Wei Ke

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

218

US PRACTICE FOR INTERIM WET STORAGE OF RRSNF  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Aluminum research reactor spent nuclear fuel is currently being stored or is anticipated to be returned to the United States and stored at Department of Energy storage facilities at the Savannah River Site and the Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center. This paper summarizes the current practices to provide for continued safe interim wet storage in the U.S. Aluminum fuel stored in poor quality water is subject to aggressive corrosion attack and therefore water chemistry control systems are essential to maintain water quality. Fuel with minor breaches are safely stored directly in the basin. Fuel pieces and heavily damaged fuel is safely stored in isolation canisters.

Vinson, D.

2010-08-05T23:59:59.000Z

219

Analysis of wet deposition at an urban location  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Wet deposition data collected at the Detroit Edison urban site provided a clear chemical profile at this location for the period studied. Correlations of major anions with acidity indicate that decreases in pH are associated with increases in sulfates and nitrates. However, other components not measured may have a bearing on pH reductions. The differences between two locations 70 km apart were quite small on the average. Strong local source influences at the urban location were not evident in the limited data set available for study. Wind direction can help determine the ultimate origins of pollutants.

Foltman, R.A.

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

220

Exergy analysis of thermal processes in the building materials industry  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A method is proposed to calculate the chemical exergy with allowance for the chemical composition and the ambient temperature. The exergy analysis of cement clinker burning is performed. ... The analysis of therm...

P. A. Trubaev

2006-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "wet process clinker" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Cyclic testing of continuously wetted synthetic fiber ropes  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A laboratory study of the cyclic loading endurance properties of continuously wetted synthetic, or manmade, fibre ropes has been conducted on ropes of various materials and forms of construction. The materials investigated were polyamides, polyester and polypropylene. Forms of construction studied were braid-on-braid, eight strand (square) and parallel lay. Rope sizes researched were 100 kN (10 tonf) nominal breaking force and up to 1.0 MN (100 tonf) nominal breaking force. All specimens were single leg. The test results indicate the superior bollard abrasion resistance and interstrand friction wear resistance of polyester and polypropylene over the polyamides. Trends, where observed, are also reported upon for the cyclic endurance performance of the forms of construction investigated. The improvements (or otherwise) in endurance effected by sheathing, coating and thimble protection of the eyes are also discussed. The results and performance trends observed on this test programme will be of interest to designers and users of mooring or tethering systems which operate continuously wet.

Crawford, H.; McTernan, L.M.

1983-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

222

Moving zone Marangoni drying of wet objects using naturally evaporated solvent vapor  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A surface tension gradient driven flow (a Marangoni flow) is used to remove the thin film of water remaining on the surface of an object following rinsing. The process passively introduces by natural evaporation and diffusion of minute amounts of alcohol (or other suitable material) vapor in the immediate vicinity of a continuously refreshed meniscus of deionized water or another aqueous-based, nonsurfactant rinsing agent. Used in conjunction with cleaning, developing or wet etching application, rinsing coupled with Marangoni drying provides a single-step process for 1) cleaning, developing or etching, 2) rinsing, and 3) drying objects such as flat substrates or coatings on flat substrates without necessarily using heat, forced air flow, contact wiping, centrifugation or large amounts of flammable solvents. This process is useful in one-step cleaning and drying of large flat optical substrates, one-step developing/rinsing and drying or etching/rinsing/drying of large flat patterned substrates and flat panel displays during lithographic processing, and room-temperature rinsing/drying of other large parts, sheets or continuous rolls of material.

Britten, Jerald A. (Oakley, CA)

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

223

Moving zone Marangoni drying of wet objects using naturally evaporated solvent vapor  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A surface tension gradient driven flow (a Marangoni flow) is used to remove the thin film of water remaining on the surface of an object following rinsing. The process passively introduces by natural evaporation and diffusion of minute amounts of alcohol (or other suitable material) vapor in the immediate vicinity of a continuously refreshed meniscus of deionized water or another aqueous-based, nonsurfactant rinsing agent. Used in conjunction with cleaning, developing or wet etching application, rinsing coupled with Marangoni drying provides a single-step process for (1) cleaning, developing or etching, (2) rinsing, and (3) drying objects such as flat substrates or coatings on flat substrates without necessarily using heat, forced air flow, contact wiping, centrifugation or large amounts of flammable solvents. This process is useful in one-step cleaning and drying of large flat optical substrates, one-step developing/rinsing and drying or etching/rinsing/drying of large flat patterned substrates and flat panel displays during lithographic processing, and room-temperature rinsing/drying of other large parts, sheets or continuous rolls of material. 5 figs.

Britten, J.A.

1997-08-26T23:59:59.000Z

224

Sustained impact of drought on wet shrublands mediated by soil physical changes  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Projected climate warming may substantially increase carbon emissions from wet organic soils, contributing to a positive feedback between the terrestrial carbon cycle and climate change. Evidence suggests that...

María T. Domínguez; Alwyn Sowerby; Andrew R. Smith; David A. Robinson…

2014-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

225

Photomicrography for the measurement of steam wetness fraction in low pressure turbines.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??The measurement of steam wetness fraction at the exit of a low-pressure (LP) turbine stage is important if the highest turbine performance is to be… (more)

Veeder, Tricia Sue

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

226

Systematic Errors in Measuring the Energy of Wet Steam with Dry-Steam Meters  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Systematic errors are considered in measuring mass flow rate, specific enthalpy, thermal power, and energy for wet steam by means of meters intended for dry saturated steam.

E. G. Abarinov; K. S. Sarelo

2002-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

227

Application of hazard analysis (HACCP) in starch production by the wet milling of maize.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??This study is based on the Hazard Analysis in the Wet Milling of maize for the production of starch at the Bellville plant of African… (more)

Samuels, R. C.

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

228

Contamination issues in a continuous ethanol production corn wet milling facility  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Low ethanol yields and poor yeast viability were investigated at a continuous ethanol production corn wet milling facility. Using starch slurries and recycle streams...

Esha Khullar; Angela D. Kent…

2013-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

229

,"U.S. Federal Offshore Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","U.S. Federal Offshore Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic...

230

,"U.S. Federal Offshore Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","U.S. Federal Offshore Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves...

231

,"U.S. Nonassociated Natural Gas Proved Reserves, Wet After Lease...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Gas Proved Reserves, Wet After Lease Separation" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for"...

232

,"U.S. Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas Proved Reserves, Wet...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Gas Proved Reserves, Wet After Lease Separation" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for"...

233

SPOILAGE OF WET DISTILLERS GRAINS PLUS SOLUBLES WHEN STORED IN A BUNKER.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??Five studies evaluated the impact of spoilage of wet distillers grains plus solubles (WDGS) on nutrient composition, nutrient losses, and cattle performance. Exp. 1 and… (more)

Harding, Jana L

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

234

Technology Maturation Plan (TMP) Wet Air Oxidation (WAO) Technology for Tank 48H Treatment Project (TTP)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This assessment determines the technology maturity level of the candidate Tank 48H treatment technologies that are being considered for implementation at DOE's SRS - specifically Wet Air Oxidation.

235

MHK Technologies/WET EnGen | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

EnGen EnGen < MHK Technologies Jump to: navigation, search << Return to the MHK database homepage WET EnGen.jpg Technology Profile Primary Organization Wave Energy Technologies Inc Project(s) where this technology is utilized *MHK Projects/Sandy Cove Technology Resource Click here Wave Technology Type Click here Point Absorber Technology Readiness Level Click here TRL 5/6: System Integration and Technology Laboratory Demonstration Technology Description The EnGen point absorber, which features 'Smart Float' technology that allows the device to travel along a rigid spar at an incline of 45 degrees. The spar is moored at a single point of contact which allows the device to be fully compliant on all three axes (pitch, roll and yaw). Mooring Configuration Proprietary

236

Z(N) model of grain-boundary wetting  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Even though van der Waals forces should prevent the wetting of a grain boundary by a liquid at the melting temperature, experiment and simulations indicate an instability in grain-boundary structure in the vicinity of this temperature. We study the structure of analogous boundaries in a Z(N) model in which a region of solid with a given orientation is replaced by a spin in that orientation. Different interfacial behaviors are found for different regions of a model parameter which is related to N. For the value appropriate to grain boundaries, our model suggests that boundaries of a sufficiently large angle should be unstable, not to the intrusion of a layer of liquid, however, but to the intrusion of solid of intermediate orientation. Such an intrusion can occur below the melting temperature.

M. Schick and Wei-Heng Shih

1987-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

237

Contact angles in the pseudopotential lattice Boltzmann modeling of wetting  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In this paper, we aim to investigate the implementation of contact angles in the pseudopotential lattice Boltzmann modeling of wetting at a large density ratio. The pseudopotential lattice Boltzmann model [X. Shan and H. Chen, Phys. Rev. E 49, 2941 (1994)] is a popular mesoscopic model for simulating multiphase flows and interfacial dynamics. In this model, the contact angle is usually realized by a fluid-solid interaction. Two widely used fluid-solid interactions: the density-based interaction and the pseudopotential-based interaction, as well as a modified pseudopotential-based interaction formulated in the present paper, are numerically investigated and compared in terms of the achievable contact angles, the maximum and the minimum densities, and the spurious currents. It is found that the pseudopotential-based interaction works well for simulating small static (liquid) contact angles, however, is unable to reproduce static contact angles close to 180 degrees. Meanwhile, it is found that the proposed modif...

Li, Q; Kang, Q J; Chen, Q

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

238

Penetration depth scaling for impact into wet granular packings  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We present experimental measurements of penetration depths for the impact of spheres into wetted granular media. We observe that the penetration depth in the liquid saturated case scales with projectile density, size, and drop height in a fashion consistent with the scaling observed in the dry case, but that penetration depths into saturated packings tend to be smaller. This result suggests that, for the range of impact energies observed, the stopping force is set by static contact forces between grains within the bed, and that the presence of liquid serves, primarily, to enhance these contact forces. The enhancement to the stopping force has a complicated dependence on liquid fraction, accompanied by a change in the drop-height dependence, that must be the consequence of accompanying changes in the conformation of the liquid phase in the interstices.

Theodore A. Brzinski III; Jorin Schug; Kelly Mao; Douglas J. Durian

2015-01-25T23:59:59.000Z

239

Influence of wet underwater welding on fracture values  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The fracture behavior of welds is influenced by residual stresses. The influence of residual stresses on fracture parameters is investigated through the comparison of wet underwater welds, dry welds and welds without residual stresses. The fracture parameters for a sharp, stationary crack on the surface of a bead on plate weld under bending are determined by the finite element method. The geometric influence of weld on fracture parameters is investigated. The stress intensity factor for linear elastic fracture mechanics, the J-integral and the crack tip opening displacement for plastic fracture mechanics are calculated. The material behavior is assumed as linear elastic or linear elastic/ideal plastic or elastic plastic with multilinear isotropic hardening. The numerical data are compared with the experiments.

Lindhorst, L.; Hamann, R.; Mahrenholtz, O. [Technical Univ. of Hamburg-Harburg, Hamburg (Germany). Offshore Engineering Section 2; Kocak, M. [GKSS Research Center, Geesthacht (Germany). Inst. of Material Research

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

240

Impacts of WRF Physics and Measurement Uncertainty on California Wintertime Model Wet Bias  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Weather and Research Forecast (WRF) model version 3.0.1 is used to explore California wintertime model wet bias. In this study, two wintertime storms are selected from each of four major types of large-scale conditions; Pineapple Express, El Nino, La Nina, and synoptic cyclones. We test the impacts of several model configurations on precipitation bias through comparison with three sets of gridded surface observations; one from the National Oceanographic and Atmospheric Administration, and two variations from the University of Washington (without and with long-term trend adjustment; UW1 and UW2, respectively). To simplify validation, California is divided into 4 regions (Coast, Central Valley, Mountains, and Southern California). Simulations are driven by North American Regional Reanalysis data to minimize large-scale forcing error. Control simulations are conducted with 12-km grid spacing (low resolution) but additional experiments are performed at 2-km (high) resolution to evaluate the robustness of microphysics and cumulus parameterizations to resolution changes. We find that the choice of validation dataset has a significant impact on the model wet bias, and the forecast skill of model precipitation depends strongly on geographic location and storm type. Simulations with right physics options agree better with UW1 observations. In 12-km resolution simulations, the Lin microphysics and the Kain-Fritsch cumulus scheme have better forecast skill in the coastal region while Goddard, Thompson, and Morrison microphysics, and the Grell-Devenyi cumulus scheme perform better in the rest of California. The effect of planetary boundary layer, soil-layer, and radiation physics on model precipitation is weaker than that of microphysics and cumulus processes for short- to medium-range low-resolution simulations. Comparison of 2-km and 12-km resolution runs suggests a need for improvement of cumulus schemes, and supports the use of microphysics schemes in coarser-grid applications.

Chin, H S; Caldwell, P M; Bader, D C

2009-07-22T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "wet process clinker" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Characterization of light gluten and light steep water from a corn wet milling plant  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The primary commodity of corn wet milling is starch, but two coproducts (corn gluten feed, CGF and corn gluten meal, CGM) also are produced. CGM and CGF are marketed as animal foodstuffs and are important economically; however, variation in composition reduces quality. There are few data on the effect of composition of the parent process streams, light steep water (LSW) and light gluten (LG), respectively, on composition of CGF and CGM. The objective was to characterize LG and LSW. Samples of LG and LSW were collected: (1) hourly for one day, (2) every 3 h for 3 days, and (3) daily for 3 weeks. Dry matter, N and ash were determined. Variation in composition of LG and LSW was greatest during longer periods of time (days and weeks) rather than shorter (hourly or every 3 h). There was significant variation in DM (solids) content, which directly affected the concentration of other components. Variation in N (protein) of LG and LSW accounted for much of the variation in CGF and CG. Processes that modify processing and reduce variation could increase the quality of CGF and CGM.

K.D Rausch; C.I Thompson; R.L Belyea; M.E Tumbleson

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

242

Experimental Study of Wettability Alteration to Preferential Gas-Wetting in  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of Critical- Condensate Saturation and Relative Permeabilities in Gas- Condensate Systems,'' paper SPE 56014 from preferential liquid-wetting to preferen- tial gas-wetting, then gas-well deliverability in gas-condensate and liquid relative permeabilities for gas-condensate systems in a simple network. The results imply

Firoozabadi, Abbas

243

Avoided Critical Behavior in Dynamically Forced Wetting Jacco H. Snoeijer,1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

speed. In this Letter we study the dynamical wetting transition at which a liquid film gets deposited the Landau-Levich film. DOI: 10.1103/PhysRevLett.96.174504 PACS numbers: 47.10.Ăżg, 68.08.Bc Wetting speed beyond which the interface gives way to liquid deposition. Drops sliding down a window develop

244

RELATIONSHIPS BETWEEN ZOOPLANKTON DISPLACEMENT VOLUME, WET WEIGHT, DRY WEIGHT, AND CARBONI  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of the regression line for log transformed values for carbon vs. dry weight and wet weight vs. displacement volumeRELATIONSHIPS BETWEEN ZOOPLANKTON DISPLACEMENT VOLUME, WET WEIGHT, DRY WEIGHT, AND CARBONI PETER H are identical. We have employed this type of analysis in determinations on samples from diverse sea areas

245

Droughts and Persistent Wet Spells over the United States and Mexico  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Droughts and persistent wet spells over the United States and northwest Mexico have preferred regions of occurrence and persistence. Wet or dry conditions that persist more than 1 yr tend to occur over the interior United States west of 90°–95°W ...

Kingtse C. Mo; Jae E. Schemm

2008-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

246

ANALYSIS OF HIGH PRESSURE TESTS ON WET GAS FLOW METERING WITH A VENTURI METER  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ANALYSIS OF HIGH PRESSURE TESTS ON WET GAS FLOW METERING WITH A VENTURI METER P. Gajan , Q, 64018 Pau cedex, France pierre.gajan@onera.fr Abstract This work deals with the flow metering of wet gas on the CEESI facilities are presented. They are performed at 75 bars with 0.6 beta ratio Venturi meter

247

Dry purification of aspirational air in coke-sorting systems with wet slaking of coke  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Coke transportation after wet slaking is accompanied by the release of dust in the production building and in the surrounding atmosphere. Wet methods are traditionally used to purify very humid air. Giprokoks has developed designs for highly efficient dry dust-removal methods in such conditions.

T.F. Trembach; A.G. Klimenko [Giprokoks, the State Institute for the Design of Coke-Industry Enterprises, Kharkov (Ukraine)

2009-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

248

Attached growth fungal system for corn wet milling wastewater treatment.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??High organic strength food-processing wastewaters are typically treated with conventional aerobic systems such as an activated sludge process that produces substantial quantities of low value… (more)

Jasti, Nagapadma

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

249

Selenium Speciation and Management in Wet FGD Systems  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report discusses results from bench- and pilot-scale simulation tests conducted to determine the factors that impact selenium speciation and phase partitioning in wet FGD systems. The selenium chemistry in wet FGD systems is highly complex and not completely understood, thus extrapolation and scale-up of these results may be uncertain. Control of operating parameters and application of scrubber additives have successfully demonstrated the avoidance or decrease of selenite oxidation at the bench and pilot scale. Ongoing efforts to improve sample handling methods for selenium speciation measurements are also discussed. Bench-scale scrubber tests explored the impacts of oxidation air rate, trace metals, scrubber additives, and natural limestone on selenium speciation in synthetic and field-generated full-scale FGD liquors. The presence and concentration of redox-active chemical species as well as the oxidation air rate contribute to the oxidation-reduction potential (ORP) conditions in FGD scrubbers. Selenite oxidation to the undesirable selenate form increases with increasing ORP conditions, and decreases with decreasing ORP conditions. Solid-phase manganese [Mn(IV)] appeared to be the significant metal impacting the oxidation of selenite to selenate. Scrubber additives were tested for their ability to inhibit selenite oxidation. Although dibasic acid and other scrubber additives showed promise in early clear liquor (sodium based and without calcium solids) bench-scale tests, these additives did not show strong inhibition of selenite oxidation in tests with higher manganese concentrations and with slurries from full-scale wet FGD systems. In bench-tests with field liquors, addition of ferric chloride at a 250:1 iron-to-selenium mass ratio sorbed all incoming selenite to the solid phase, although addition of ferric salts had no impact on native selenate that already existed in the field slurry liquor sample. As ORP increases, selenite may oxidize to selenate more rapidly than it sorbs to ferric solids. Though it was not possible to demonstrate a decrease in selenium concentrations to levels below the project�¢����s target of 50 ���µg/L during pilot testing, some trends observed in bench-scale testing were evident at the pilot scale. Specifically, reducing oxidation air rate and ORP tends to either retain selenium as selenite in the liquor or shift selenium phase partitioning to the solid phase. Oxidation air flow rate control may be one option for managing selenium behavior in FGD scrubbers. Units that cycle load widely may find it more difficult to impact ORP conditions with oxidation air flow rate control alone. Because decreasing oxidation air rates to the reaction tank showed that all �¢����new�¢��� selenium reported to the solids, the addition of ferric chloride to the pilot scrubber could not show further improvements in selenium behavior. Ferric chloride addition did shift mercury to the slurry solids, specifically to the fine particles. Several competing pathways may govern the reporting of selenium to the slurry solids: co-precipitation with gypsum into the bulk solids and sorption or co-precipitation with iron into the fine particles. Simultaneous measurement of selenium and mercury behavior suggests a holistic management strategy is best to optimize the fate of both of these elements in FGD waters. Work conducted under this project evaluated sample handling and analytical methods for selenium speciation in FGD waters. Three analytical techniques and several preservation methods were employed. Measurements of selenium speciation over time indicated that for accurate selenium speciation, it is best to conduct measurements on unpreserved, filtered samples as soon after sampling as possible. The capital and operating costs for two selenium management strategies were considered: ferric chloride addition and oxidation air flow rate control. For ferric chloride addition, as migh

Searcy, K.; Richardson, M.; Blythe, G.; Wallschlaeger, D.; Chu, P.; Dene, C.

2012-02-29T23:59:59.000Z

250

Direct conversion of wet algae to crude biodiesel under supercritical ethanol conditions  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract This paper presents a single-step, environmentally friendly approach for the direct conversion of wet algae to crude biodiesel under supercritical ethanol conditions. Ethanol was used for the simultaneous extraction and transesterification of lipids in algae to produce fatty acid ethyl esters at supercritical conditions. In this work the effects of process parameters dry algae to ethanol (wt./vol.) ratio (1:6–1:15), reaction temperature (245–270 °C), and reaction time (2–30 min.) on the yield of fatty acid ethyl esters (FAEE) were studied. 67% conversion was achieved at 265 °C and 20 min of reaction time. The calorific value of a purified biodiesel sample produced at optimum conditions was measured to be 43 MJ/kg, which is higher than that of fatty acid methyl esters produced from the same biomass. The purified fatty acid ethyl esters were analyzed using GC–MS and FTIR. TGA analysis of algal biomass and purified FAEE was presented along with TEM images of the biomass captured before and after supercritical ethanol transesterification. This green conversion process has the potential to provide an energy-efficient and economical route for the production of renewable biodiesel production.

Harvind K. Reddy; Tapaswy Muppaneni; Prafulla D. Patil; Sundaravadivelnathan Ponnusamy; Peter Cooke; Tanner Schaub; Shuguang Deng

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

251

Water-oil drainage dynamics in oil-wet random microfluidic porous media analogs  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Displacement experiments carried out in microfluidic porous media analogs show that reduced surface tension leads to a more stable displacement, opposite to the process in Hele-Shaw cells where surface tension stabilizes the displacement of a more viscous fluid by a less viscous fluid. In addition, geometry of porous media is observed to play an important role. Three random microfluidic porous media analogs were made to study water-oil drainage dynamics, featuring a pattern of randomly connected channels with a uniform width, a pattern with Gaussian channel width distribution, and a pattern with large isolated pores. The microfluidic chips fabricated using Polydimenthylsiloxane with glass covers have the internal surface treated by Trichlorosilane to achieve a uniform oil-wet condition. The aqueous phase displaces the oil phase, with a viscosity ratio of about 1:40 and a density ratio of 1:0.85. Videos 1-3 show water flooding processes. It is observed that both channel size distribution (Video 2) and heteroge...

Xu, Wei; Neeves, Keith; Yin, Xiaolong

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

252

Wet ethanol in HCCI engines with exhaust heat recovery to improve the energy balance of ethanol fuels  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This study explores the use of wet ethanol as a fuel for HCCI engines while using exhaust heat recovery to provide the high input energy required for igniting wet ethanol. Experiments were conducted on a 4-cylinder Volkswagen engine modified for HCCI operation and retrofitted with an exhaust gas heat exchanger connected to one cylinder. Tested fuel blends ranged from 100% ethanol to 80% ethanol by volume, with the balance being water. These blends are directly formed in the process of ethanol production from biomass. Comprehensive data was collected for operating conditions ranging from intake pressures of 1.4–2.0 bar and equivalence ratios from 0.25 to 0.55. The heat exchanger was used to preheat the intake air allowing HCCI combustion without electrical air heating. The results suggest that the best operating conditions for the HCCI engine and heat exchanger system in terms of high power output, low ringing, and low nitrogen oxide emissions occur with high intake pressures, high equivalence ratios, and highly delayed combustion timings. Removing the final 20% of water from ethanol is a major energy sink. The results of this study show that HCCI engines can use ethanol fuels with up to 20% water while maintaining favorable operating conditions. This can remove the need for the most energy-intensive portion of the water removal process.

Samveg Saxena; Silvan Schneider; Salvador Aceves; Robert Dibble

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

253

Fermentation and costs of fuel ethanol from corn with quick-germ process  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The Quick-Germ process developed at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign is a way to obtain corn oil, but with lower capital costs than the traditional wet-milling process. Quick-Germ has the potential ...

Frank Taylor; Andrew J. Mcaloon…

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

254

PROCESS DEVELOPMENT FOR THE FRACTIONATION AND ISOLATION OF CORN FIBER HEMICELLULOSE.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??Corn fiber is a co-product of the corn wet-milling process that holds potential to become a value-added product. A process was developed to fractionate and… (more)

Montanti, Justin

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

255

Novel Approaches to Conserve Energy in Textile Processing Through The Use Of Supercritical Fluids  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

alternative to wet-processing is the use of supercritical fluids, such as carbon dioxide, as the carrier. This option would eliminate water discharge and convective drying and could achieve improved energy efficiency. A description of textile processing using...

Brown, M.; Sikorski, M.

256

SAFETY STUDIES TO MEASURE EXOTHERMIC REACTIONS OF SPENT PLUTONIUM CONTAMINATION CHEMICALS USING WET AND DRY DECONTAMINATION METHODS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Plutonium Finishing Plant (PFP) at the Hanford site in Eastern Washington is currently being decommissioned by Fluor Hanford. Chemicals being considered for decontamination of gloveboxes in PFP include cerium (IV) nitrate in a nitric acid solution, and proprietary commercial solutions that include acids and sequestering agents. Aggressive chemicals are commonly used to remove transuranic contaminants from process equipment to allow disposal of the equipment as low level waste. Fluor's decontamination procedure involves application of chemical solutions as a spray on the contaminated surfaces, followed by a wipe-down with rags. Alternatively, a process of applying oxidizing Ce IV ions contained in a gel matrix and vacuuming a dry gel material is being evaluated. These processes effectively transfer the transuranic materials to rags or a gel matrix which is then packaged as TRU waste and disposed. Fluor is investigating plutonium decontamination chemicals as a result of concerns regarding the safety of chemical procedures following a fire at Rocky Flats in 2003. The fire at Rocky Flats occurred in a glovebox that had been treated with cerium nitrate, which is one of the decontamination chemicals that Fluor Hanford has proposed to use. Although the investigation of the fire was not conclusive as to cause, the reviewers noted that rags were found in the glovebox, suggesting that the combination of rags and chemicals may have contributed to the fire. Because of this underlying uncertainty, Fluor began an investigation into the potential for fire when using the chemicals and materials using wet disposition and dry disposition of the waste generated in the decontamination process and the storage conditions to which the waste drum would be exposed. The focus of this work has been to develop a disposal strategy that will provide a chemically stable waste form at expected Hanford waste storage temperatures. Hanford waste storage conditions are such that there is added heat to the containers from ambient conditions during storage especially during the summer months. Treatability tests under the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation and Liability Act (CERCLA) were used to assess the use of certain chemicals and wipes (wet method) and chemical-gel matrices (dry method) during the decontamination process. Chemicals being considered for decontamination of gloveboxes at PFP include cerium (IV) nitrate in a nitric acid solution, and proprietary commercial decontamination agents such as RadPro? , Glygel? and ASPIGEL 100?. As part of the treatability study, Fluor and the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) personnel have evaluated the potential for self-heating and exothermic reactions in the residual decontamination materials. From these wet and dry method treatability studies, certain limiting conditions have been defined that will aid in assuring safe operations and waste packaging during the decommissioning and waste disposition process.

Hopkins, Andrea M.; Jackson, George W.; Minette, Michael J.; Ewalt, John R.; Cooper, Thurman D.; Scott, Paul A.; Jones, Susan A.; Scheele, Randall D.; Charboneau, Stacy L.

2005-10-12T23:59:59.000Z

257

Energy efficiency improvement and cost saving opportunities for the Corn Wet Milling Industry: An ENERGY STAR Guide for Energy and Plant Managers  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Alkali and Conventional Corn Wet-Milling: 100-g Procedures.Membrane Application in Corn Wet Milling Proceedings of theP. H. (1992). Technology of Corn Wet Milling and Associated

Galitsky, Christina; Worrell, Ernst; Ruth, Michael

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

258

First-order catchment mass balance during the wet season in the Panama Canal Watershed  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Summary Tropical hydrology is poorly understood for a number of reasons. Intense biological activity in the tropics introduces complexities to the hydrologic process. Bioturbation, rapid rates of decay, and intensive insect activity all tend to promote rapid flow paths in the upper soil. Aggressive weathering leads to clays depleted of light cations and deep soil profiles. Processes in the seasonal tropics are further complicated by seasonal transitions, and very large changes in catchment storage between seasons. Beginning in 2005, we installed a suite of hydrologic sensors in a 16.7 ha first-order catchment in the Panama Canal Watershed to observe hydrologic variables and identify the dominant streamflow generation processes. The site is located near the village of Gamboa, which is located on the east bank of the Panama Canal at the confluence of Lake Gatun and the Chagres River. The study catchment is located on the north side of a ridge off the eastern flank of a 230 m tall hill known as Cerro Pelado, and is covered by 70–120 year old re-growth triple-canopy forest. Measurements included: rainfall above the canopy, throughfall, stemflow, evapotranspiration, shallow groundwater levels and streamflow. Deep groundwater storage was not measured. This paper describes measurements made, data collected, and the worth of those data in estimating the mass balance closure of a first-order catchment during the wet season. We compare measurements of the different components of the water cycle with observations from other published studies from the tropics. Data analysis results indicate water balance closure errors of approximately 8%.

Justin M. Niedzialek; Fred L. Ogden

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

259

Subcritical water extraction of lipids from wet algae for biodiesel production  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract An energy efficient extraction of algal lipids from wet algal biomass was performed at subcritical conditions of water. This was achieved using microwave assisted heating as well as conventional heating. The conventional heating subcritical water (C-SCW) extraction and microwave assisted subcritical water (MW-SCW) experiments were designed and conducted to study the effects of extraction temperature, time, and biomass loading on lipid extraction. The Response surface methodology was used to optimize the parameters for maximum extraction of lipids. The influence of extraction temperature is more when compared to other experimental parameters in both processes. The maximum extraction efficiencies were achieved at 220 °C using conventional heating and 205 °C using microwave heating. Complete extraction of lipids was observed with microwave assisted heating and 70% extraction efficiency was achieved using conventional heating. The energy required for extraction is greatly reduced (2–8 folds) when compared to the conventional solvent extraction. The potential by-products like protein rich residual algae, omega-3 fatty acids, and sugars in residual water phase were identified. The biomass and the crude extracts were characterized using GC–MS, Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry (FT-ICR MS), and thermogravimetric analysis (TGA).

Harvind K. Reddy; Tapaswy Muppaneni; Yingqiang Sun; Yin Li; Sundaravadivelnathan Ponnusamy; Prafulla D. Patil; Peter Dailey; Tanner Schaub; F. Omar Holguin; Barry Dungan; Peter Cooke; Peter Lammers; Wayne Voorhies; Xiuyang Lu; Shuguang Deng

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

260

Wet etching of GaAs using synchrotron radiation x rays  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The results of room-temperature wet etching of GaAs using synchrotron-radiation x rays are described. Under x-rayillumination etching occurs on the n- GaAs surface in contact with an acid or base solution or even deionized water. The etching process is studied as functions of the electrolytes their concentration semiconductor doping level and x-ray intensity and energy. The etching mechanism is determined to be primarily electrochemical in nature but the x-ray radiation chemistry plays a role in the etching. Smoothly etchedsurfaces are achievable with a root-mean-square surface roughness of 0.7–2.0 nm. We also found that the etching rate increases substantially with the ratio of the sample size to the x-ray exposure size. This is accounted for by the rate-limiting effect on the charge transfer across the semiconductor-electrolyte junction. The chemistry of etchedsurfaces is studied using x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and compared to that of as-received surfaces.

Qing Ma; Nicolaie Moldovan; Derrick C. Mancini; Richard A. Rosenberg

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "wet process clinker" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Effects of pulverized coal fly-ash addition as a wet-end filler in papermaking  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This experimental study is based on the innovative idea of using pulverized coal fly ash as a wet-end filler in papermaking. This is the first evaluation of the possible use of fly ash in the paper industry. Coal-based thermal power plants throughout the world are generating fly ash as a solid waste product. The constituents of fly ash can be used effectively in papermaking. Fly ash has a wide variation in particle size, which ranges from a few micrometers to one hundred micrometers. Fly ash acts as an inert material in acidic, neutral, and alkaline papermaking processes. Its physical properties such as bulk density (800-980 kg/m{sup 3}), porosity (45%-57%), and surface area (0.138-2.3076 m{sup 2}/g) make it suitable for use as a paper filler. Fly ash obtained from thermal power plants using pulverized coal was fractionated by a vibratory-sieve stack. The fine fraction with a particle size below 38 micrometers was used to study its effect on the important mechanical-strength and optical properties of paper. The effects of fly-ash addition on these properties were compared with those of kaolin clay. Paper opacity was found to be much higher with fly ash as a filler, whereas brightness decreased as the filler percentage increased Mechanical strength properties of the paper samples with fly ash as filler were superior to those with kaolin clay.

Sinha, A.S.K. [SLIET, Longowal (India). Dept. of Chemical Technology

2008-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

262

An experimental study of heat pipe thermal management system with wet cooling method for lithium ion batteries  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract An effective battery thermal management (BTM) system is required for lithium-ion batteries to ensure a desirable operating temperature range with minimal temperature gradient, and thus to guarantee their high efficiency, long lifetime and great safety. In this paper, a heat pipe and wet cooling combined BTM system is developed to handle the thermal surge of lithium-ion batteries during high rate operations. The proposed BTM system relies on ultra-thin heat pipes which can efficiently transfer the heat from the battery sides to the cooling ends where the water evaporation process can rapidly dissipate the heat. Two sized battery packs, 3 Ah and 8 Ah, with different lengths of cooling ends are used and tested through a series high-intensity discharges in this study to examine the cooling effects of the combined BTM system, and its performance is compared with other four types of heat pipe involved BTM systems and natural convection cooling method. A combination of natural convection, fan cooling and wet cooling methods is also introduced to the heat pipe BTM system, which is able to control the temperature of battery pack in an appropriate temperature range with the minimum cost of energy and water spray.

Rui Zhao; Junjie Gu; Jie Liu

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

263

Texas - RRC District 2 Onshore Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet After  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2 Onshore Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) 2 Onshore Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Texas - RRC District 2 Onshore Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1970's 955 1980's 921 806 780 747 661 570 517 512 428 430 1990's 407 352 308 288 299 245 252 235 204 202 2000's 115 65 70 81 76 109 118 137 72 72 2010's 134 924 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 8/1/2013 Next Release Date: 8/1/2014 Referring Pages: Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas Proved Reserves, Wet After Lease

264

New York Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Proved Reserves (Billion  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) New York Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1970's 211 1980's 208 264 229 295 389 369 457 410 351 368 1990's 354 331 329 264 242 197 232 224 218 221 2000's 322 318 315 365 324 349 363 375 389 196 2010's 281 253 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 8/1/2013 Next Release Date: 8/1/2014 Referring Pages: Natural Gas Proved Reserves, Wet After Lease Separation, as of Dec. 31 New York Natural Gas Reserves Summary as of Dec. 31

265

New Mexico - West Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet After Lease  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

West Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) West Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) New Mexico - West Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1970's 151 1980's 156 150 146 180 194 181 214 213 259 178 1990's 184 156 127 107 97 119 108 106 98 92 2000's 115 99 103 89 90 98 82 87 86 82 2010's 105 143 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 8/1/2013 Next Release Date: 8/1/2014 Referring Pages: Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas Proved Reserves, Wet After Lease

266

Louisiana State Offshore Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet After Lease  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Louisiana State Offshore Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1980's 449 251 260 207 231 1990's 207 207 154 157 168 148 157 130 98 120 2000's 129 145 84 79 61 63 56 65 686 513 2010's 107 51 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 8/1/2013 Next Release Date: 8/1/2014 Referring Pages: Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas Proved Reserves, Wet After Lease Separation, as of Dec. 31 LA, State Offshore Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas Proved Reserves,

267

Utah Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Utah Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1970's 367 1980's 414 335 325 360 341 391 410 471 475 442 1990's 455 469 309 289 286 277 301 310 209 321 2000's 348 303 359 299 290 308 317 368 321 601 2010's 631 909 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 8/1/2013 Next Release Date: 8/1/2014 Referring Pages: Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas Proved Reserves, Wet After Lease Separation, as of Dec. 31

268

Kansas Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Kansas Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1970's 167 1980's 185 139 112 132 110 115 132 115 103 101 1990's 114 115 94 93 75 67 82 51 60 52 2000's 40 105 66 85 80 83 82 83 85 83 2010's 79 127 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 8/1/2013 Next Release Date: 8/1/2014 Referring Pages: Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas Proved Reserves, Wet After Lease Separation, as of Dec. 31

269

North Dakota Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation,  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) North Dakota Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1970's 201 1980's 239 253 248 257 267 331 293 276 266 313 1990's 334 243 266 274 275 263 255 257 261 250 2000's 264 270 315 316 320 343 357 417 484 1,070 2010's 1,717 2,511 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 8/1/2013 Next Release Date: 8/1/2014 Referring Pages: Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas Proved Reserves, Wet After Lease

270

Ohio Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Ohio Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1970's 1,047 1980's 1,417 800 984 1,635 1,178 938 898 594 480 589 1990's 371 376 381 343 315 355 399 391 342 402 2000's 469 340 346 304 208 184 174 101 99 97 2010's 90 74 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 8/1/2013 Next Release Date: 8/1/2014 Referring Pages: Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas Proved Reserves, Wet After Lease Separation, as of Dec. 31

271

Texas - RRC District 4 Onshore Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet After  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

4 Onshore Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) 4 Onshore Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Texas - RRC District 4 Onshore Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1970's 1,416 1980's 1,292 1,005 890 765 702 684 596 451 393 371 1990's 301 243 228 215 191 209 246 368 394 182 2000's 176 140 150 136 165 148 110 117 127 96 2010's 91 61 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 8/1/2013 Next Release Date: 8/1/2014 Referring Pages: Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas Proved Reserves, Wet After Lease

272

California State Offshore Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet After Lease  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) California State Offshore Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1970's 226 1980's 160 244 232 221 206 1990's 188 55 59 63 59 56 47 54 39 58 2000's 86 80 85 76 85 89 85 79 54 53 2010's 63 79 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 8/1/2013 Next Release Date: 8/1/2014 Referring Pages: Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas Proved Reserves, Wet After Lease Separation, as of Dec. 31

273

Dynamics and kinetic roughening of interfaces in two-dimensional forced wetting  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We consider the dynamics and kinetic roughening of wetting fronts in the case of...×..., which separates two regimes of dissipative behavior and governs the kinetic roughening of the interfaces by giving an upper...

T. Laurila; C. Tong; I. Huopaniemi…

2005-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

274

Calculating the higher heat of coal combustion in the wet ash-free state  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Analysis of the coal concentrates used in the Ukrainian coke industry yields a mathematical formula for predicting the higher heat of coal combustion in the wet ash-free state on the basis of the coal’s charac...

D. V. Miroshnichenko; Ya. S. Balaeva

2013-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

275

Assessing Evapotranspiration Estimates from the Global Soil Wetness Project Phase 2 (GSWP-2) Simulations  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We assess the simulations of global-scale evapotranspiration from the Global Soil Wetness Project Phase 2 (GSWP-2) within a global water-budget framework. The scatter in the GSWP-2 global evapotranspiration estimates from ...

Gao, Xiang

276

Improved Solubility and Emulsification of Wet-Milled Corn Germ Protein Recovered by Ultrafiltration–Diafiltration  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This study evaluated Ultrafiltration–Diafiltration (UFDF) as a means to improve the extractability of wet-milled corn germ protein and determined its effects on ... functional properties of the recovered protein ...

Mila P. Hojilla-Evangelista

2014-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

277

,"U.S. Natural Gas Proved Reserves, Wet After Lease Separation...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","U.S. Natural Gas Proved Reserves, Wet After Lease Separation",10,"Annual",2013,"6301979" ,"Release...

278

Modeling of wet gas compression in twin-screw multiphase pump  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Twin-screw multiphase pumps experience a severe decrease in efficiency, even the breakdown of pumping function, when operating under wet gas conditions. Additionally, field operations have revealed significant vibration and thermal issues which can...

Xu, Jian

2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

279

E-Print Network 3.0 - ashing wet Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Sciences and Ecology 4 By-Products Utilization Summary: A3, containing 20% clean coal ash and 5% wet collected Class F ash had compressive strengths... 0 Center for...

280

Theory of Time-Dependent Freezing. Part I: Description of Scheme for Wet Growth of Hail  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

At subzero temperatures, cloud particles can contain both ice and liquid water fractions. Wet growth of precipitation particles occurs when supercooled cloud liquid is accreted faster than it can freeze on impact.

Vaughan T. J. Phillips; Alexander Khain; Nir Benmoshe; Eyal Ilotoviz

2014-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "wet process clinker" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Wetting and phase-change phenomena on micro/nanostructures for enhanced heat transfer  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Micro/nanostructures have been extensively studied to amplify the intrinsic wettability of materials to create superhydrophilic or superhydrophobic surfaces. Such extreme wetting properties can influence the heat transfer ...

Xiao, Rong, Ph. D. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

282

The corrosion products of weathering steel and pure iron in simulated wet-dry cycles  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Mössbauer spectroscopy and X-ray diffraction were used to establish the composition of the rust formed on pure iron and weathering steel after exposure to several wet-dry cycles...2-polluted atmosphere. ?-FeOOH p...

J. Dávalos; J. F. Marco; M. Gracia; J. R. Gancedo

1991-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

283

The influence of surface energy on the wetting behaviour of the spore adhesive  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Department of Chemical and Nuclear Engineering, The University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM 87131, USA 3The influence of surface energy on the wetting behaviour of the spore adhesive of the marine alga

Chaudhury, Manoj K.

284

Texas - RRC District 1 Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet After Lease  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Texas - RRC District 1 Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1970's 209 1980's 172 180 216 175 170 260 241 205 204 251 1990's 333 401 361 191 151 248 446 68 51 67 2000's 69 43 47 48 45 57 61 72 60 67 2010's 267 900 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 8/1/2013 Next Release Date: 8/1/2014 Referring Pages: Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas Proved Reserves, Wet After Lease

285

West Virginia Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation,  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) West Virginia Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1970's 76 1980's 122 63 83 86 73 73 65 150 141 98 1990's 86 159 198 190 133 74 71 59 43 88 2000's 98 48 21 23 20 19 16 16 23 24 2010's 29 52 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 8/1/2013 Next Release Date: 8/1/2014 Referring Pages: Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas Proved Reserves, Wet After Lease Separation, as of Dec. 31

286

Texas - RRC District 7B Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

B Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) B Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Texas - RRC District 7B Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1970's 608 1980's 530 655 733 872 645 574 589 546 576 364 1990's 413 379 380 393 332 263 378 299 306 275 2000's 242 203 237 314 288 859 1,589 2,350 2,682 2,322 2010's 2,504 3,754 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 8/1/2013 Next Release Date: 8/1/2014 Referring Pages: Nonassociated Natural Gas Proved Reserves, Wet After Lease

287

Evaporation and contraction of a droplet that wets a surface monitored by photoacoustic detection  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The evaporation and contraction of a droplet wetting a flat metallic surface is monitored using photoacoustic detection. The results are interpreted in terms of an effective backing model together with the lubrication theory for droplet dynamics.

L. C. M. Miranda and N. Cella

1993-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

288

Simulation of Oil Displacement from Oil-Wet Cores by Interfacial Tension Reduction and Wettability Alteration  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Waterflooding in oil-wet naturally fractured reservoirs is not successful because the ability of matrix blocks to imbibe the injected water and displace the oil into the fracture system is poor. Chemical enhanced oil recovery methods...

Kalaei, Mohammad Hosein

2010-01-29T23:59:59.000Z

289

Impact resistance of fiber reinforced wet-mix shotcrete part 1: Beam tests  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In this study, impact resistance of wet-mix shotcrete reinforced with ten different types of ... reinforcement is highly effective in improving the fracture energy absorption and toughness under impact loading. H...

N. Banthia; P. Gupta; C. Yan

1999-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

290

WETTABILITY AND IMBIBITION: MICROSCOPIC DISTRIBUTION OF WETTING AND ITS CONSEQUENCES AT THE CORE AND FIELD SCALES  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The questions of reservoir wettability have been approached in this project from three directions. First, we have studied the properties of crude oils that contribute to wetting alteration in a reservoir. A database of more than 150 different crude oil samples has been established to facilitate examination of the relationships between crude oil chemical and physical properties and their influence on reservoir wetting. In the course of this work an improved SARA analysis technique was developed and major advances were made in understanding asphaltene stability including development of a thermodynamic Asphaltene Solubility Model (ASM) and empirical methods for predicting the onset of instability. The CO-Wet database is a resource that will be used to guide wettability research in the future. The second approach is to study crude oil/brine/rock interactions on smooth surfaces. Contact angle measurements were made under controlled conditions on mica surfaces that had been exposed to many of the oils in the CO-Wet database. With this wealth of data, statistical tests can now be used to examine the relationships between crude oil properties and the tendencies of those oils to alter wetting. Traditionally, contact angles have been used as the primary wetting assessment tool on smooth surfaces. A new technique has been developed using an atomic forces microscope that adds a new dimension to the ability to characterize oil-treated surfaces. Ultimately we aim to understand wetting in porous media, the focus of the third approach taken in this project. Using oils from the CO-Wet database, experimental advances have been made in scaling the rate of imbibition, a sensitive measure of core wetting. Application of the scaling group to mixed-wet systems has been demonstrated for a range of core conditions. Investigations of imbibition in gas/liquid systems provided the motivation for theoretical advances as well. As a result of this project we have many new tools for studying wetting at microscopic and macroscopic scales and a library of well-characterized fluids for use in studies of crude oil/brine/rock interactions.

Jill S. Buckley; Norman R. Morrow; Chris Palmer; Purnendu K. Dasgupta

2003-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

291

Interrelationships between air velocity and natural wet-bulb thermometer response  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

INTERRELATIONSHIPS BETWEEN AIR VFLOCITY ANO NATURAL WET-BULB THERMOMETER RESPONSE A Thesis by NATHAN GLENN JONES Submitted to the Graduate Colleqe of Texas ASM University i n partial fulfillment of the requirement for the degree of MASTER... OF SCIENCE AUGUST 1983 Major Subject: Industrial Hygiene INTERRELATIONSHIPS BETWEEN AIR VELOCITY AND NATURAL WET-BULB THERMOMETER RESPONSE A Thesis by NATHAN GLENN JONES Approved as to style an content by: airman o ommittee er Member ~~' A~ Member...

Jones, Nathan Glenn

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

292

Modelling the Wetting and Cooking of a Single Cereal Grain  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

penetration rate is approximately linear are noted, suggesting that nonlinear diffusion equations to processing into breakfast cereals. Moisture penetration curves are obtained and compared. Regions where

McGuinness, Mark

293

Wet Chemical Synthesis of Graphene for Battery Applications.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

?? In this thesis, an improved Hummers method is used to produce graphene oxide, while thermal treatment has been used as the reduction process to… (more)

Johansen, Ida

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

294

The Use of Electrochemical Techniques to Characterize Wet Steam Environments  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The composition of a steam phase in equilibrium with a water phase at high temperature is remarkably affected by the varying capabilities of the water phase constituents to partition into the steam. Ionic impurities (sodium, chloride, sulfate, etc.) tend to remain in the water phase, while weakly ionic or gaseous species (oxygen) partition into the steam. Analysis of the water phase can provide misleading results concerning the steam phase composition or environment. This paper describes efforts that were made to use novel electrochemical probes and sampling techniques to directly characterize a wet steam phase environment in equilibrium with high temperature water. Probes were designed to make electrochemical measurements in the thin film of water existing on exposed surfaces in steam over a water phase. Some of these probes were referenced against a conventional high temperature electrode located in the water phase. Others used two different materials (typically tungsten and platinum) to make measurements without a true reference electrode. The novel probes were also deployed in a steam space removed from the water phase. It was necessary to construct a reservoir and an external, air-cooled condenser to automatically keep the reservoir full of condensed steam. Conventional reference and working electrodes were placed in the water phase of the reservoir and the novel probes protruded into the vapor space above it. Finally, water phase probes (both reference and working electrodes) were added to the hot condensed steam in the external condenser. Since the condensing action collapsed the volatiles back into the water phase, these electrodes proved to be extremely sensitive at detecting oxygen, which is one of the species of highest concern in high temperature power systems. Although the novel steam phase probes provided encouraging initial results, the tendency for tungsten to completely corrode away in the steam phase limited their usefulness. However, the conventional water phase electrodes, installed both in the reservoir and in the external condensing coil, provided useful data showing the adverse impact of oxygen and carbon dioxide on the REDOX potential and high temperature pH, respectively.

Bruce W. Bussert; John A. Crowley; Kenneth J. Kimball; Brian J. Lashway

2003-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

295

Process for the production of fuel gas from coal  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An improved apparatus and process for the conversion of hydrocarbonaceous materials, such as coal, to more valuable gaseous products in a fluidized bed gasification reaction and efficient withdrawal of agglomerated ash from the fluidized bed is disclosed. The improvements are obtained by introducing an oxygen containing gas into the bottom of the fluidized bed through a separate conduit positioned within the center of a nozzle adapted to agglomerate and withdraw the ash from the bottom of the fluidized bed. The conduit extends above the constricted center portion of the nozzle and preferably terminates within and does not extend from the nozzle. In addition to improving ash agglomeration and withdrawal, the present invention prevents sintering and clinkering of the ash in the fluidized bed and permits the efficient recycle of fine material recovered from the product gases by contacting the fines in the fluidized bed with the oxygen as it emanates from the conduit positioned within the withdrawal nozzle. Finally, the present method of oxygen introduction permits the efficient recycle of a portion of the product gases to the reaction zone to increase the reducing properties of the hot product gas.

Patel, Jitendra G. (Bolingbrook, IL); Sandstrom, William A. (Chicago, IL); Tarman, Paul B. (Elmhurst, IL)

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

296

Pilot Testing of Mercury Oxidation Catalysts for Upstream of Wet FGD Systems  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This final report presents and discusses results from a mercury control process development project entitled ''Pilot Testing of Mercury Oxidation Catalysts for Upstream of Wet FGD Systems''. The objective of this project was to demonstrate at pilot scale a mercury control technology that uses solid honeycomb catalysts to promote the oxidation of elemental mercury in the flue gas from coal combustion. Oxidized mercury is removed in downstream wet flue gas desulfurization (FGD) absorbers and leaves with the FGD byproducts. The goal of the project was to achieve 90% oxidation of elemental mercury in the flue gas and 90% overall mercury capture with the downstream wet FGD system. The project was co-funded by EPRI and the U.S. Department of Energy's National Energy Technology Laboratory (DOE NETL) under Cooperative Agreement DE-FC26-01NT41185. Great River Energy (GRE) and City Public Service (now CPS Energy) of San Antonio were also project co-funders and provided host sites. URS Group, Inc. was the prime contractor. Longer-term pilot-scale tests were conducted at two sites to provide catalyst life data. GRE provided the first site, at their Coal Creek Station (CCS), which fires North Dakota lignite, and CPS Energy provided the second site, at their Spruce Plant, which fires Powder River Basin (PRB) coal. Mercury oxidation catalyst testing began at CCS in October 2002 and continued through the end of June 2004, representing nearly 21 months of catalyst operation. An important finding was that, even though the mercury oxidation catalyst pilot unit was installed downstream of a high-efficiency ESP, fly ash buildup began to plug flue gas flow through the horizontal catalyst cells. Sonic horns were installed in each catalyst compartment and appeared to limit fly ash buildup. A palladium-based catalyst showed initial elemental mercury oxidation percentages of 95% across the catalyst, declining to 67% after 21 months in service. A carbon-based catalyst began with almost 98% elemental mercury oxidation across the catalyst, but declined to 79% oxidation after nearly 13 months in service. The other two catalysts, an SCR-type catalyst (titanium/vanadium) and an experimental fly-ash-based catalyst, were significantly less active. The palladium-based and SCR-type catalysts were effectively regenerated at the end of the long-term test by flowing heated air through the catalyst overnight. The carbon-based catalyst was not observed to regenerate, and no regeneration tests were conducted on the fourth, fly-ash-based catalyst. Preliminary process economics were developed for the palladium and carbon-based catalysts for a scrubbed, North Dakota lignite application. As described above, the pilot-scale results showed the catalysts could not sustain 90% or greater oxidation of elemental mercury in the flue gas for a period of two years. Consequently, the economics were based on performance criteria in a later DOE NETL solicitation, which required candidate mercury control technologies to achieve at least a 55% increase in mercury capture for plants that fire lignite. These economics show that if the catalysts must be replaced every two years, the catalytic oxidation process can be 30 to 40% less costly than conventional (not chemically treated) activated carbon injection if the plant currently sells their fly ash and would lose those sales with carbon injection. If the plant does not sell their fly ash, activated carbon injection was estimated to be slightly less costly. There was little difference in the estimated cost for palladium versus the carbon-based catalysts. If the palladium-based catalyst can be regenerated to double its life to four years, catalytic oxidation process economics are greatly improved. With regeneration, the catalytic oxidation process shows over a 50% reduction in mercury control cost compared to conventional activated carbon injection for a case where the plant sells its fly ash. At Spruce Plant, mercury oxidation catalyst testing began in September 2003 and continued through the end of April 2005, interrupted only by a

Richard Rhudy

2006-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

297

Reduction of NO{sub x} emissions from a dry process preheater kiln with calciner through the use of the urea-based SNCR process  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The post combustion reduction of NO{sub x} using urea has proven to be an effective method in controlling NO{sub x} from various combustion sources. Such a reduction process has been successfully demonstrated in a week-long test at Ash Grove`s dry process cement kiln system located in Seattle. This system is equipped with planetary coolers, a 5-stage preheater and an air-through-the-kiln calciner. Testing was done under ten different kiln/calciner operating conditions. Using three to four injectors, NO{sub x} was efficiently reduced from 350--600 lb per hour lb/ton of clinker to less than 100 lb per hour. This calculates to a NO{sub x} reduction of greater than 80% for most cases. Chemical utilization was greater than 50%. A high degree of mixing and a long residence time at an appropriate temperature present in the preheater tower contributed to these excellent results. An average ammonia slip was four ppm above a baseline level at a normalized stoichiometric ratio of 1. This demonstration confirms expectations that dry process cement kilns with 4+ preheater stages are an ideal application for the selective noncatalytic reduction of NO{sub x} with urea. NO{sub x} was efficiently and effectively reduced with minimal byproduct emissions and virtually no effect on plant operations.

Steuch, H.E. [Ash Grove Cement Co., Portland, OR (United States)] [Ash Grove Cement Co., Portland, OR (United States); Hille, J.T. [Ash Grove Cement Co., Seattle, WA (United States)] [Ash Grove Cement Co., Seattle, WA (United States); Sun, W.H. [Nalco Fuel Tech, Naperville, IL (United States)] [Nalco Fuel Tech, Naperville, IL (United States); Bisnett, M.J.; Kirk, D.W. [Nalco Fuel Tech, Santa Fe Springs, CA (United States)] [Nalco Fuel Tech, Santa Fe Springs, CA (United States)

1996-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

298

Sampling for Beryllium Surface Contamination using Wet, Dry and Alcohol Wipe Sampling  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This research project was conducted at the National Nuclear Security Administration's Kansas City Plant, operated by Honeywell Federal Manufacturing and Technologies, in conjunction with the Safety Sciences Department of Central Missouri State University, to compare relative removal efficiencies of three wipe sampling techniques currently used at Department of Energy facilities. Efficiencies of removal of beryllium contamination from typical painted surfaces were tested by wipe sampling with dry Whatman 42 filter paper, with water-moistened (Ghost Wipe) materials, and by methanol-moistened wipes. Test plates were prepared using 100 mm X 15 mm Pyrex Petri dishes with interior surfaces spray painted with a bond coat primer. To achieve uniform deposition over the test plate surface, 10 ml aliquots of solution containing 1 beryllium and 0.1 ml of metal working fluid were transferred to the test plates and subsequently evaporated. Metal working fluid was added to simulate the slight oiliness common on surfaces in metal working shops where fugitive oil mist accumulates over time. Sixteen test plates for each wipe method (dry, water, and methanol) were processed and sampled using a modification of wiping patterns recommended by OSHA Method 125G. Laboratory and statistical analysis showed that methanol-moistened wipe sampling removed significantly more (about twice as much) beryllium/oil-film surface contamination as water-moistened wipes (p< 0.001), which removed significantly more (about twice as much) residue as dry wipes (p <0.001). Evidence for beryllium sensitization via skin exposure argues in favor of wipe sampling with wetting agents that provide enhanced residue removal efficiency.

Kerr, Kent

2004-12-17T23:59:59.000Z

299

Filling and wetting transitions on sinusoidal substrates: a mean-field study of the Landau-Ginzburg model  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We study the interfacial phenomenology of a fluid in contact with a microstructured substrate within the mean-field approximation. The sculpted substrate is a one-dimensional array of infinitely long grooves of sinusoidal section of periodicity length L and amplitude A. The system is modelled using the Landau-Ginzburg functional, with fluid-substrate couplings which correspond to either first-order or critical wetting for a flat substrate. We investigate the effect of the roughness of the substrate in the interfacial phenomenology, paying special attention to filling and wetting phenomena, and compare the results with the predictions of the macroscopic and interfacial Hamiltonian theories. At bulk coexistence, for values of L much larger than the bulk correlation, we observe first-order filling transitions between dry and partially filled interfacial states, which extend off-coexistence, ending at a critical point; and wetting transitions between partially filled and completely wet interfacial states with the same order as for the flat substrate (if first-order, wetting extends off-coexistence in a prewetting line). On the other hand, if the groove height is of order of the correlation length, only wetting transitions between dry and complete wet states are observed. However, their characteristics depend on the order of the wetting transition for the flat substrate. So, if it is first-order, the wetting transition temperature for the rough substrate is reduced with respect to the wetting transition temperature for a flat substrate, and coincides with the Wenzel law prediction for very shallow substrates. On the contrary, if the flat substrate wetting transition is continuous, the roughness does not change the wetting temperature.

Alvaro Rodriguez-Rivas; Jose Antonio Galvan Moreno; Jose M. Romero-Enrique

2014-08-05T23:59:59.000Z

300

Oil recovery process employing cyclic wettability alteration  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This patent describes a process for recovering oil from an oil-wet fractured subterranean oil-bearing formation penetrated by at least two wells from the surface which are in fluid communication with the formation and with one another comprising: (a)injecting a first slug of a surfactant solution into the fractured formation via a first of the at least two wells, the surfactant solution capable of becoming the preferred wetting phase of an oil-wet matrix block in the fractured formation; (b) contacting a face of the oil-well matrix block the surfactant solution for a time sufficient for the surfactant solution to penetrate and become the preferred wetting phase of at least a portion of the matrix block thereby displacing oil from the portion of the matrix block toward the face of the matrix block; (c) injecting a second slug of water into the formation via a second of at least two wells; (d) contacting the face of the matrix block with the water for a time sufficient for the water to penetrate and restore the portion of the matrix block to an oil-wet condition; (e) displacing the oil away from the face of the matrix block the water toward the first well; (f) recovering the oil from the formation via the first well; and (g) repeating steps (a), (b), (c), (d), (e), and (f).

McClure, D.C.

1989-06-27T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "wet process clinker" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Evaluation of ettringite-related swelling mechanisms for treated chromite ore processing residue  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Accelerated one-dimensional unconfined swell tests were conducted for ferrous sulfate chromite ore processing residue (COPR) field-treated samples. The field-treated samples were subjected to wet and dry cycle...

Deok Hyun Moon; Mahmoud Wazne…

2014-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

302

Safety Aspects of Wet Storage of Spent Nuclear Fuel, OAS-L-13-11  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Safety Aspects of Wet Storage of Safety Aspects of Wet Storage of Spent Nuclear Fuel OAS-L-13-11 July 2013 Department of Energy Washington, DC 20585 July 10, 2013 MEMORANDUM FOR THE SENIOR ADVISOR FOR ENVIRONMENTAL MANAGEMENT FROM: Daniel M. Weeber Assistant Inspector General for Audits and Administration Office of Inspector General SUBJECT: INFORMATION: Audit Report on "Safety Aspects of Wet Storage of Spent Nuclear Fuel" BACKGROUND The Department of Energy (Department) is responsible for managing and storing spent nuclear fuel (SNF) generated by weapons and research programs and recovered through nonproliferation programs. The SNF consists of irradiated reactor fuel and cut up assemblies containing uranium, thorium and/or plutonium. The Department stores 34 metric tons of heavy metal SNF primarily

303

Direct Use of Wet Ethanol in a Homogeneous Charge Compression Ignition (HCCI) Engine: Experimental and Numerical Results  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of the VW TDi running on a mixture of 60% ethanol-in-water.the VW TDi running on different fuel blends of wet ethanol

Mack, John Hunter; Flowers, Daniel L; Aceves, Salvador M; Dibble, Robert W

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

304

Magnetic Particle Process Improvement  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The magnetic particle testing process is performed to find linear, surface and near surface discontinuities in ferromagnetic test materials. A wet fluorescent method is used at Honeywell Federal Manufacturing & Technologies (FM&T). This method employs a liquid carrier mixed with iron oxide particles in suspension, and the particles used in the method are coated with a fluorescent dye to make them visible under a black light. The process in its current state employs the use of a tank of liquid solution of a mineral oil carrier with iron oxide particles in suspension. The change to the use of an aerosol delivery system with the same material reduces the amount of waste involved in the process while preserving the sensitivity of the testing, shortens the flowtime for the test, and saves labor and material costs.

Hubert, R.R.

2002-08-13T23:59:59.000Z

305

Effects of vapor-liquid equilibrium on wetting efficiency in hydrodesulfurization trickle-bed reactors  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and the hydrogen was allowed to flow through the reactor tube. The liquid pump was started and the flow rate measured by monitoring the level in the feed tank. The gas flow rate was measured using a wet test meter installed downstream of the gas/liquid separator...EFFECTS OF VAPOR-LIQUID EQUILIBRIUM ON WETTING EFFICIENCY IN HYDRODESULFURIZATION TRICKLE-BED REACTORS A Thesis by ANNA LISA MILLS Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements...

Mills, Anna Lisa

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

306

Transient nature of salt movement with wetting front in an unsaturated soil  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

TRANSIENT NATURE OF SALT MOVEMENT WITH WETTING FRONT IN AN UNSATURATED SOIL A Thesis bY VISHWAS VINAYAK SOMAN Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M UniversitY in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree... of MASTER OF SCIENCE August 1992 Major Subject: Agricultural Engineering TRANSIENT NATURE OF SALT MOVEMENT WITH WETTING FRONT IN AN UNSATURATED SOIL A Thesis VISHWAS VINAYAK SOMAN Approved as to style and content by: Marshall J. McFarland (Chair...

Soman, Vishwas Vinayak

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

307

Wetting and energetics in nanoparticle etching of graphene  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Molten metallic nanoparticles have recently been used to construct graphene nanostructures with crystallographic edges. The mechanism by which this happens, however, remains unclear. Here, we present a simple model that explains how a droplet can etch graphene. Two factors possibly contribute to this process: a difference between the equilibrium wettability of graphene and the substrate that supports it, or the large surface energy associated with the graphene edge. We calculate the etching velocities due to either of these factors and make testable predictions for evaluating the significance of each in graphene etching. This model is general and can be applied to other materials systems as well. As an example, we show how our model can be used to extend a current theory of droplet motion on binary semiconductor surfaces.

Sujit S. Datta

2010-08-12T23:59:59.000Z

308

U.S. Federal Offshore Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet After Lease  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) U.S. Federal Offshore Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1990's 6,773 6,487 6,315 6,120 6,738 7,471 7,437 7,913 7,495 7,093 2000's 7,010 8,649 8,090 7,417 6,361 5,904 4,835 4,780 5,106 5,223 2010's 5,204 5,446 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 8/1/2013 Next Release Date: 8/1/2014 Referring Pages: Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas Proved Reserves, Wet After Lease Separation, as of Dec. 31

309

U.S. Federal Offshore Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) U.S. Federal Offshore Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1990's 25,076 23,427 21,871 21,466 22,075 22,047 21,982 21,098 19,931 19,505 2000's 20,456 18,990 17,772 15,616 13,386 12,348 10,915 10,033 8,786 7,633 2010's 6,916 5,374 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 8/1/2013 Next Release Date: 8/1/2014 Referring Pages: Nonassociated Natural Gas Proved Reserves, Wet After Lease Separation, as of Dec. 31

310

Texas - RRC District 2 Onshore Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Texas - RRC District 2 Onshore Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1970's 3,034 1980's 2,566 2,726 2,565 2,637 2,626 2,465 2,277 2,373 2,131 1,849 1990's 1,825 1,479 1,484 1,425 1,468 1,371 1,430 1,732 1,720 1,974 2000's 2,045 1,863 1,867 1,849 1,934 2,175 2,166 2,386 2,364 1,909 2010's 2,235 3,690 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 8/1/2013 Next Release Date: 8/1/2014 Referring Pages: Natural Gas Proved Reserves, Wet After Lease Separation, as of Dec.

311

Ohio Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Ohio Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1970's 1,479 1980's 1,699 965 1,142 2,031 1,542 1,333 1,420 1,071 1,229 1,275 1990's 1,215 1,181 1,161 1,106 1,095 1,054 1,114 985 890 1,179 2000's 1,186 971 1,118 1,127 975 898 975 1,027 985 896 2010's 832 758 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 8/1/2013 Next Release Date: 8/1/2014 Referring Pages: Natural Gas Proved Reserves, Wet After Lease Separation, as of Dec. 31 Ohio Natural Gas Reserves Summary as of Dec. 31

312

Louisiana - South Onshore Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet After Lease  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

South Onshore Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) South Onshore Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Louisiana - South Onshore Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1970's 2,304 1980's 2,134 1,871 1,789 1,582 1,488 1,792 1,573 1,380 1,338 1,273 1990's 1,106 995 853 649 678 720 627 599 630 599 2000's 492 483 427 368 389 427 415 503 471 506 2010's 499 490 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 8/1/2013 Next Release Date: 8/1/2014 Referring Pages: Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas Proved Reserves, Wet After Lease

313

Texas - RRC District 7B Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Proved  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Texas - RRC District 7B Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1970's 842 1980's 862 947 947 1,210 937 850 833 828 840 560 1990's 627 536 550 580 513 539 610 559 510 465 2000's 356 290 294 383 364 932 1,663 2,412 2,750 2,424 2010's 2,625 3,887 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 8/1/2013 Next Release Date: 8/1/2014 Referring Pages: Natural Gas Proved Reserves, Wet After Lease Separation, as of Dec. 31 TX, RRC District 7B Natural Gas Reserves Summary as of Dec. 31

314

Texas Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Texas Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1980's 10,832 10,753 9,735 9,340 9,095 9,205 1990's 8,999 8,559 8,667 7,880 7,949 7,787 8,160 7,786 7,364 7,880 2000's 6,833 6,089 6,387 6,437 6,547 7,003 7,069 7,530 7,559 8,762 2010's 10,130 13,507 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 8/1/2013 Next Release Date: 8/1/2014 Referring Pages: Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas Proved Reserves, Wet After Lease

315

New Mexico - West Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Proved Reserves  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) New Mexico - West Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1970's 10,085 1980's 10,157 10,686 9,377 8,834 8,535 8,128 9,558 9,488 15,259 13,266 1990's 14,988 16,287 16,981 16,601 15,253 15,540 14,728 13,692 13,220 13,384 2000's 14,511 14,640 14,442 14,565 15,722 15,212 14,809 14,010 12,941 12,086 2010's 11,809 11,254 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 8/1/2013 Next Release Date: 8/1/2014 Referring Pages: Natural Gas Proved Reserves, Wet After Lease Separation, as of Dec.

316

Texas - RRC District 8A Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Proved  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Texas - RRC District 8A Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1970's 1,556 1980's 1,465 1,545 1,457 1,345 1,315 1,353 1,309 1,301 1,291 1,550 1990's 1,547 1,542 1,598 1,463 1,587 1,333 1,294 1,247 1,115 1,557 2000's 1,215 1,190 1,167 1,137 1,281 1,471 1,384 1,531 1,257 1,289 2010's 1,228 1,289 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 8/1/2013 Next Release Date: 8/1/2014 Referring Pages: Natural Gas Proved Reserves, Wet After Lease Separation, as of Dec.

317

U.S. Federal Offshore Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Proved  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) U.S. Federal Offshore Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1990's 31,849 29,914 28,186 27,586 28,813 29,518 29,419 29,011 27,426 26,598 2000's 27,467 27,640 25,862 23,033 19,747 18,252 15,750 14,813 13,892 12,856 2010's 12,120 10,820 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 8/1/2013 Next Release Date: 8/1/2014 Referring Pages: Natural Gas Proved Reserves, Wet After Lease Separation, as of Dec. 31 Federal Offshore U.S. Natural Gas Reserves Summary as of Dec. 31

318

Texas - RRC District 7C Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Proved  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Texas - RRC District 7C Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1970's 3,080 1980's 2,543 2,750 2,928 2,855 3,169 3,255 3,039 3,032 3,101 3,497 1990's 3,829 3,592 3,621 3,578 3,660 3,468 4,063 3,843 3,496 3,593 2000's 4,132 3,757 4,167 4,791 5,190 5,702 5,727 6,028 5,529 5,430 2010's 5,432 5,236 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 8/1/2013 Next Release Date: 8/1/2014 Referring Pages: Natural Gas Proved Reserves, Wet After Lease Separation, as of Dec.

319

Gulf of Mexico Federal Offshore - Louisiana and Alabama Natural Gas, Wet  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Gulf of Mexico Federal Offshore - Louisiana and Alabama Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1980's 28,772 1990's 23,050 22,028 20,006 19,751 21,208 21,664 22,119 22,428 21,261 20,172 2000's 20,466 20,290 19,113 17,168 15,144 14,073 12,201 11,458 10,785 9,665 2010's 9,250 8,555 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 8/1/2013 Next Release Date: 8/1/2014 Referring Pages: Natural Gas Proved Reserves, Wet After Lease Separation, as of Dec.

320

Texas - RRC District 5 Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Proved  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Texas - RRC District 5 Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1970's 1,189 1980's 1,192 1,309 1,369 1,529 1,955 2,140 2,238 2,224 2,090 1,925 1990's 1,951 1,930 1,818 1,931 2,074 1,923 2,141 1,749 1,995 2,350 2000's 3,217 4,289 4,653 5,460 6,583 9,611 12,648 17,274 20,460 22,623 2010's 24,694 28,187 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 8/1/2013 Next Release Date: 8/1/2014 Referring Pages: Natural Gas Proved Reserves, Wet After Lease Separation, as of Dec.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "wet process clinker" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Texas - RRC District 9 Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Proved  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Texas - RRC District 9 Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1970's 808 1980's 751 1,070 1,264 1,100 1,060 1,043 1,024 984 927 829 1990's 917 874 797 814 863 868 870 932 864 1,360 2000's 1,854 2,552 3,210 3,639 4,555 4,734 6,765 7,985 9,548 11,522 2010's 13,172 10,920 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 8/1/2013 Next Release Date: 8/1/2014 Referring Pages: Natural Gas Proved Reserves, Wet After Lease Separation, as of Dec.

322

Texas - RRC District 4 Onshore Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Texas - RRC District 4 Onshore Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1970's 8,559 1980's 8,366 8,256 8,692 8,612 8,796 8,509 8,560 7,768 7,284 7,380 1990's 7,774 7,339 7,041 7,351 7,870 8,021 8,123 8,483 8,824 9,351 2000's 10,118 10,345 9,861 9,055 9,067 9,104 8,474 8,327 7,930 7,057 2010's 7,392 10,054 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 8/1/2013 Next Release Date: 8/1/2014 Referring Pages: Natural Gas Proved Reserves, Wet After Lease Separation, as of Dec.

323

Utah Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Utah Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1970's 1,017 1980's 1,284 2,057 2,253 2,472 2,325 2,288 2,205 2,341 1,984 1,940 1990's 1,887 2,001 2,018 2,198 1,917 1,701 1,747 2,005 2,502 3,371 2000's 4,472 4,753 4,274 3,617 3,951 4,359 5,211 6,463 6,714 7,411 2010's 7,146 8,108 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 8/1/2013 Next Release Date: 8/1/2014 Referring Pages: Natural Gas Proved Reserves, Wet After Lease Separation, as of Dec.

324

New Mexico Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Proved Reserves (Billion  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) New Mexico Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1970's 14,391 1980's 13,956 14,562 13,082 12,371 12,027 11,438 12,540 12,621 18,483 16,597 1990's 18,529 19,758 20,399 19,939 18,588 18,747 17,925 16,700 16,259 16,750 2000's 18,509 18,559 18,453 18,226 19,687 19,344 19,104 18,397 17,347 16,644 2010's 16,529 16,138 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 8/1/2013 Next Release Date: 8/1/2014 Referring Pages: Natural Gas Proved Reserves, Wet After Lease Separation, as of Dec.

325

Effect of Synthetic Drilling Fluid Base Oils on Asphaltene Stability and Wetting in Sandstone Cores  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Effect of Synthetic Drilling Fluid Base Oils on Asphaltene Stability and Wetting in Sandstone Cores† ... In synthetic oil-based drilling fluids, diesel has been replaced, for environmental reasons, by base oils that are very low in aromatic hydrocarbons. ... Paraffinic and olefinic base oils used to make up some synthetic oil-based drilling muds can destabilize asphaltenes. ...

Yongsheng Zhang; Jianxin Wang; Norman R. Morrow; Jill S. Buckley

2005-03-18T23:59:59.000Z

326

Variational formulations for surface tension, capillarity and wetting Gustavo C. Buscaglia  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Variational formulations for surface tension, capillarity and wetting Gustavo C. Buscaglia Keywords: Surface tension Marangoni force Capillarity Virtual-work principle Surface gradient Laplace-Beltrami operator a b s t r a c t The interest in the simulation of flows with significant surface tension effects

Buscaglia, Gustavo C.

327

Portable XRF and wet materials: application to dredged contaminated sediments1 from waterways2  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 Portable XRF and wet materials: application to dredged contaminated sediments1 from waterways2 7 ABSTRACT: The sustainable management of dredged waterway sediments requires on-site determination8 sediments precludes any application of standard methods. Measurements for Pb, Zn, Cu and As were11 performed

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

328

Experimental investigation of burning velocities of ultra-wet methane-air-steam mixtures  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Experimental investigation of burning velocities of ultra-wet methane-air-steam mixtures Eric Abstract Global burning velocities of methane-air-steam mixtures are measured on prismatic laminar Bunsen flames and lifted turbulent V-flames for various preheating temperatures, equivalence ratios and steam

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

329

Feeding Value of Wet Sorghum Distillers Grains for Growing and Finishing Beef Cattle  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

production in the southern High Plains. Wet distillers grains represent a unique feed ingredient for cattle feedlots in the southern High Plains that possesses novel chemical and physical attributes, compared in the southern High Plains are needed to allow cattle feeders to ac- curately assess the economic implications

330

Understanding wet granulation in the kneading block of twin screw extruders  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Understanding wet granulation in the kneading block of twin screw extruders H. Li a,1 , M done in a 27 mm twin screw extruder with different powder formulations consisting of lactose H I G H L I G H T S In situ examination of granule development inside extruder. Granule based

Thompson, Michael

331

Elephant spatial use in wet and dry savannas of southern K. D. Young1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Elephant spatial use in wet and dry savannas of southern Africa K. D. Young1 , S. M. Ferreira1 Keywords elephants; home range; Loxodonta africana; NDVI; spatial use intensity; vegetation productivity; accepted 16 February 2009 doi:10.1111/j.1469-7998.2009.00568.x Abstract The influence of elephants on woody

Pretoria, University of

332

Controlled roughening of poly(ethylene terephthalate) by photoablation : study of wetting and contact angle hysteresis  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1065 Controlled roughening of poly(ethylene terephthalate) by photoablation : study of wetting of crystalline poly(ethylene terephthalate) films is readily roughened by ablative photodecomposition obtained poly(ethylene terephthalate) films. It is also shown that the three phases contact line of a liquid

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

333

M.-T. DO, P. MARSAC, Y. DELANNE Prediction of Tire/Wet Road Friction from  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

M.-T. DO, P. MARSAC, Y. DELANNE 1 Prediction of Tire/Wet Road Friction from Road Surface, validation of a contact model for the prediction of low-speed friction from road surface microtexture the friction ­ speed curve from road- and tire measurable parameters. The model development is briefly

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

334

Facile Fabrication of Free-Standing Light Emitting Diode by Combination of Wet Chemical Etchings  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Facile Fabrication of Free-Standing Light Emitting Diode by Combination of Wet Chemical Etchings ... Free-standing GaN light-emitting diode (LED) structure with high crystalline quality was fabricated by combining electrochemical and photoelectrochemical etching followed by regrowth of LED structure and subsequent mechanical detachment from a substrate. ...

Lee-Woon Jang; Dae-Woo Jeon; Tae-Hoon Chung; Alexander Y. Polyakov; Han-Su Cho; Jin-Hyeon Yun; Jin-Woo Ju; Jong-Hyeob Baek; Joo-Won Choi; In-Hwan Lee

2013-12-25T23:59:59.000Z

335

Revealing pharmacodynamics of medicinal plants using in silico approach: A case study with wet lab validation  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Background: Exploration of therapeutic mechanism is an integral part of medicinal plant based drug discovery for better understanding of pharmacological behavior of these agents. But, its study using conventional hit and trial wet laboratory experiments ... Keywords: Anticonvulsant, Ficus religiosa L. (Moraceae), GABA aminotransferase, In silico predictions, Medicinal plants, Prediction of Activity Spectra for Substances (PASS)

Damanpreet Singh, Dinesh Y. Gawande, Tanveer Singh, Vladimir Poroikov, Rajesh Kumar Goel

2014-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

336

Insect wet steps: loss of fluid from insect feet adhering to a substrate  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...contact for a wet spatula of a Colorado beetle attachment pad [16...accumulated during a few minutes floods the attachment pads (figure...the attachment ability of the Colorado potato beetle Leptinotarsa...affects attachment ability of Colorado potato beetles Leptinotarsa...

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

337

An objective approach for selecting ice or wet–snow design loads on transmission lines  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...assessing iceloads for a transmission-line route in southern Norway...wet-snow loads along a transmission-line route, it will be useful...Figure 9. The 420 kV transmission line from Kristiansand to Holen. The nal route follows the alternatives...

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

338

Texas - RRC District 8 Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Proved  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Texas - RRC District 8 Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1970's 10,718 1980's 9,785 9,250 8,992 9,078 8,294 8,250 8,330 7,871 7,810 7,531 1990's 7,391 6,793 6,534 6,131 6,018 6,052 6,050 6,030 5,547 6,122 2000's 6,136 6,007 6,056 5,835 6,002 6,800 6,855 7,303 7,586 7,440 2010's 8,105 8,088 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 8/1/2013 Next Release Date: 8/1/2014 Referring Pages: Natural Gas Proved Reserves, Wet After Lease Separation, as of Dec.

339

Texas - RRC District 10 Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Proved  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Texas - RRC District 10 Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1970's 7,289 1980's 6,927 6,720 6,731 6,485 6,060 6,044 5,857 5,512 5,300 5,213 1990's 4,919 5,061 4,859 4,478 4,669 4,910 4,845 4,613 4,744 4,688 2000's 4,433 4,263 4,299 4,510 5,383 5,430 5,950 6,932 7,601 7,594 2010's 8,484 8,373 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 8/1/2013 Next Release Date: 8/1/2014 Referring Pages: Natural Gas Proved Reserves, Wet After Lease Separation, as of Dec.

340

Field Testing of a Wet FGD Additive for Enhanced Mercury Control - Pilot-Scale Test Results  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This Topical Report summarizes progress on Cooperative Agreement DE-FC26-04NT42309, ''Field Testing of a Wet FGD Additive.'' The objective of the project is to demonstrate the use of a flue gas desulfurization (FGD) additive, Degussa Corporation's TMT-15, to prevent the reemissions of elemental mercury (Hg{sup 0}) in flue gas exiting wet FGD systems on coal-fired boilers. Furthermore, the project intends to demonstrate that the additive can be used to precipitate most of the mercury (Hg) removed in the wet FGD system as a fine TMT salt that can be separated from the FGD liquor and bulk solid byproducts for separate disposal. The project will conduct pilot and full-scale tests of the TMT-15 additive in wet FGD absorbers. The tests are intended to determine required additive dosage requirements to prevent Hg{sup 0} reemissions and to separate mercury from the normal FGD byproducts for three coal types: Texas lignite/Power River Basin (PRB) coal blend, high-sulfur Eastern bituminous coal, and low-sulfur Eastern bituminous coal. The project team consists of URS Group, Inc., EPRI, TXU Generation Company LP, Southern Company, and Degussa Corporation. TXU Generation has provided the Texas lignite/PRB co-fired test site for pilot FGD tests, Monticello Steam Electric Station Unit 3. Southern Company is providing the low-sulfur Eastern bituminous coal host site for wet scrubbing tests, as well as the pilot and full-scale jet bubbling reactor (JBR) FGD systems to be tested. A third utility, to be named later, will provide the high-sulfur Eastern bituminous coal full-scale FGD test site. Degussa Corporation is providing the TMT-15 additive and technical support to the test program. The project is being conducted in six tasks. Of the six project tasks, Task 1 involves project planning and Task 6 involves management and reporting. The other four tasks involve field testing on FGD systems, either at pilot or full scale. The four tasks include: Task 2 - Pilot Additive Testing in Texas Lignite Flue Gas; Task 3 - Full-scale FGD Additive Testing in High Sulfur Eastern Bituminous Flue Gas; Task 4 - Pilot Wet Scrubber Additive Tests at Yates; and Task 5 - Full-scale Additive Tests at Plant Yates. This topical report presents the results from the Task 2 and Task 4 pilot-scale additive tests. The Task 3 and Task 5 full-scale additive tests will be conducted later in calendar year 2006.

Gary M. Blythe

2006-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "wet process clinker" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Evaporation characteristics of wetlands:experience from a wet grassland and a reedbed using eddy correlation measurements Hydrology and Earth System Sciences, 7(1), 1121 (2003) EGU  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Evaporation characteristics of wetlands:experience from a wet grassland and a reedbed using eddy characteristics of wetlands: experience from a wet grassland and a reedbed using eddy correlation measurements M July to November 1999 using the eddy correlation method on two wetland types ­ wet grassland

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

342

Technology Maturation Plan (TMP) Wet Air Oxidation (WAO) Technology for Tank 48H Treatment Project (TTP)  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Westinghouse Savannah River Company LLC Westinghouse Savannah River Company LLC Savannah River Site Aiken, SC 29808 LWO-SPT-2007-00247 Rev. 1 Technology Maturation Plan (TMP) Wet Air Oxidation (WAO) For Tank 48H Treatment Project (TTP) November, 2007 Technology Maturation Plan (TMP) Wet Air Oxidation (WAO) Technology for Tank 48H Treatment Project (TTP) LWO-SPT-2007-00247 Rev. 1 DISCLAIMER This report was prepared by Washington Savannah River Company (WSRC) for the United States Department of Energy under Contract No. DEA-AC09-96SR18500 and is an account of work performed under that contract. Neither the United States Department of Energy, nor WSRC, nor any of their employees makes any warranty, expressed or implied, or assumes any legal liability or responsibility for the accuracy, completeness, or

343

,"Crude Oil and Lease Condensate","Wet Natural Gas"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Changes to proved reserves, 2011" Changes to proved reserves, 2011" ,"Crude Oil and Lease Condensate","Wet Natural Gas" ,"(billion barrels)","(trillion cubic feet)" "U.S. proved reserves at December 31, 2011",25.18,317.647 " Total discoveries",3.68,49.9 " Net revisions",1.41,-0.1 " Net Adjustments, Sales, Acquisitions",0.74,6 " Production",-2.06,-24.6 "Net additions to U.S. proved reserves",3.77,31.2 "Reserves at December 31, 2011",28.95,348.8 "Percentage change in proved reserves",0.15,0.098 "Notes: Wet natural gas includes natural gas plant liquids. Columns may not add to total due to independent rounding." "Percent change calculated from unrounded numbers."

344

U.S. Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, New  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Reservoir Discoveries in Old Fields (Billion Cubic Feet) Reservoir Discoveries in Old Fields (Billion Cubic Feet) U.S. Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, New Reservoir Discoveries in Old Fields (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1970's 264 1980's 369 271 365 326 296 341 189 155 339 174 1990's 250 334 292 163 202 634 338 187 218 424 2000's 249 477 331 124 97 79 65 73 820 169 2010's 186 160 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 8/1/2013 Next Release Date: 8/1/2014 Referring Pages: Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas New Reservoir Discoveries in Old Fields, Wet After Lease Separation

345

Table 3. Changes to proved reserves of wet natural gas by source, 2011  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Changes to proved reserves of wet natural gas by source, 2011" Changes to proved reserves of wet natural gas by source, 2011" "trillion cubic feet" ,"Proved",,"Revisions &",,"Proved" ,"Reserves","Discoveries","Other Changes","Production","Reserves" "Source of Gas","Year-End 2010",2011,2011,2011,"Year-End 2011" "Coalbed Methane",17.5,0.7,0.4,-1.8,16.8 "Shale",97.4,33.7,8.5,-8,131.6 "Other (Conventional & Tight)" " Lower 48 Onshore",181.7,14.7,-3.5,-12.8,180.1 " Lower 48 Offshore",12.1,0.8,-0.4,-1.7,10.8 " Alaska",8.9,0,0.9,-0.3,9.5 "TOTAL",317.6,49.9,5.9,-24.6,348.8 "Source: U.S. Energy Information Administration, Form EIA-23, "Annual Survey of Domestic Oil and Gas Reserves."

346

Notes on the efficacy of wet versus dry screening of fly ash  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The methodology used to obtain fly ash subsamples of different sizes is generally based on wet or dry sieving methods. However, the worth of such methods is not certain if the methodology applied is not mentioned in the analytical procedure. After performing a fly ash mechanical dry, sieving, the authors compared those results with the ones obtained by laser diffraction on the same samples and found unacceptable discrepancies. A preliminary, study of a wet sieving analysis carried out on an economizer fly ash sample showed that this method was more effective than the dry sieving. The importance of standardizing the way samples are handled, pretreated and presented to the instrument of analysis are suggested and interlaboratory reproducibility trials are needed to create a common standard methodology to obtain large amounts of fly ash size fraction subsamples.

Valentim, B.; Hower, J.C.; Flores, D.; Guedes, A. [Center and Department of Geology, Oporto (Portugal)

2008-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

347

Influence of outer rust layers on corrosion of carbon steel and weathering steel during wet–dry cycles  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract The influence of the rust layers of carbon steel and weathering steel on the corrosion were investigated. It was found that corrosion of carbon steel slows down when its outer rust layer is removed. This phenomenon might be attributed to the shortening of the wetting time in wet–dry cycles when the outer rust layers are removed. What is more, growth time of the corrosion products is shortened as well, which results in the formation of the fine corrosion products. However, the behavior of corrosion of weathering steel is not obviously influenced by the outer rust layer and the wetting time.

Xu Zhang; Shanwu Yang; Wenhua Zhang; Hui Guo; Xinlai He

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

348

Energy Efficiency Improvements and Cost Saving Opportunities in the Corn Wet Milling Industry  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Energy Efficiency Improvements and Cost Saving Opportunities in the Corn Wet Milling Industry Christina Galitsky Ernst Worrell Principal Research Associate Staff Scientist Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory MS: 90-4000, One Cyclotron Road... to achieve a moisture content of 2-4%, typically using a rotary steam tube dryer. This dryer consists of a large rotating cylinder that has numerous tubes running inside it. These tubes are heated internally by steam. As the cylinder rotates, the moist...

Galitsky, C.; Worrell, E.

349

First-order wetting transition in CF4 solid films adsorbed on the (0001) graphite surface  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1497 First-order wetting transition in CF4 solid films adsorbed on the (0001) graphite surface J. M films de CF4 condens�s sur la face de clivage d'un monocristal de graphite a �t� observ�e par transition de mouillage du premier ordre � 37 K, une temp�rature bien en dessous du point triple de CF4

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

350

Wall adsorption of a colloidal particle moving in a quiescent partially wetting fluid  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In thermal equilibrium, a colloidal particle between two parallel plates immersed in a fluid which partially wets both the particle and the plates, is attracted by the walls. However, if the particle moves parallel to the plates, a hydrodynamic lift force away from the plates arises in the limit of low Reynolds number. We study theoretically the competition of these two effects and identify the range of velocity in which the velocity may serve as a parameter controlling the adsorption in microflows.

Alvaro Dominguez; Siegfried Dietrich

2003-04-29T23:59:59.000Z

351

Heterogeneous catalytic wet peroxide oxidation of phenol over delaminated Fe–Ti-PILC employing microwave irradiation  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Delaminated Fe-exchanged Ti-pillared interlayered montmorillonite (Fe–Ti-PILC) was prepared and its catalytic performance as heterogeneous catalyst in wet hydrogen peroxide oxidation of phenol employing microwave irradiation was firstly evaluated. The obtained results indicated that the application of the catalyst allows a comparatively high removal of COD and a total elimination of phenol under mild conditions, without obvious leaching of iron species. The introduction of microwave irradiation could greatly shorten the reaction time.

Jian Guo Mei; Shao Ming Yu; Jun Cheng

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

352

Texas - RRC District 2 Onshore Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2 Onshore Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) 2 Onshore Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Texas - RRC District 2 Onshore Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1970's 2,079 1980's 1,645 1,920 1,785 1,890 1,965 1,895 1,760 1,861 1,703 1,419 1990's 1,418 1,127 1,176 1,137 1,169 1,126 1,178 1,497 1,516 1,772 2000's 1,930 1,798 1,797 1,768 1,858 2,066 2,048 2,249 2,292 1,837 2010's 2,101 2,766 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 8/1/2013 Next Release Date: 8/1/2014

353

Lower 48 States Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Proved Reserves  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Lower 48 States Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1970's 176,060 1980's 172,864 176,385 174,252 174,755 171,508 167,979 167,754 162,713 167,820 166,409 1990's 168,183 165,672 163,584 160,504 162,126 163,901 165,851 165,048 162,400 166,304 2000's 177,179 182,842 187,028 188,797 192,727 205,071 210,083 235,767 247,269 274,696 2010's 308,730 339,298 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 8/1/2013 Next Release Date: 8/1/2014

354

Texas - RRC District 7C Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

7C Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) 7C Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Texas - RRC District 7C Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1970's 2,427 1980's 2,023 2,065 2,224 2,150 2,393 2,475 2,373 2,295 2,374 2,776 1990's 3,061 2,833 2,873 2,945 3,029 2,828 3,371 3,247 2,939 2,977 2000's 3,439 3,123 3,430 3,864 4,196 4,665 4,531 4,714 4,147 3,724 2010's 3,502 2,857 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 8/1/2013 Next Release Date: 8/1/2014 Referring Pages:

355

Alaska Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Alaska Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1970's 27,217 1980's 28,567 28,676 30,814 30,408 30,356 31,092 30,893 30,732 6,269 6,198 1990's 6,927 6,729 6,723 6,494 6,487 6,265 6,080 7,716 7,275 7,209 2000's 6,768 6,592 6,376 6,267 6,469 6,362 8,886 10,752 6,627 8,093 2010's 7,896 8,535 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 8/1/2013 Next Release Date: 8/1/2014 Referring Pages:

356

New Mexico Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation,  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) New Mexico Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1970's 1,823 1980's 1,689 1,649 1,520 1,503 1,569 1,490 1,446 1,445 1,453 1,378 1990's 1,435 1,554 1,597 1,585 1,641 1,678 1,693 1,420 1,443 1,578 2000's 1,588 1,447 1,482 1,545 1,578 1,661 1,772 1,841 1,755 1,982 2010's 2,213 2,552 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 8/1/2013 Next Release Date: 8/1/2014 Referring Pages:

357

Texas - RRC District 4 Onshore Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

4 Onshore Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) 4 Onshore Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Texas - RRC District 4 Onshore Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1970's 7,143 1980's 7,074 7,251 7,802 7,847 8,094 7,825 7,964 7,317 6,891 7,009 1990's 7,473 7,096 6,813 7,136 7,679 7,812 7,877 8,115 8,430 9,169 2000's 9,942 10,206 9,711 8,919 8,902 8,956 8,364 8,210 7,803 6,961 2010's 7,301 9,993 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 8/1/2013 Next Release Date: 8/1/2014

358

New Mexico - East Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet After Lease  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) New Mexico - East Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1970's 1,672 1980's 1,533 1,499 1,374 1,323 1,375 1,309 1,232 1,232 1,194 1,200 1990's 1,251 1,398 1,470 1,478 1,544 1,559 1,585 1,314 1,345 1,486 2000's 1,473 1,348 1,379 1,456 1,488 1,563 1,690 1,754 1,669 1,900 2010's 2,108 2,409 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 8/1/2013 Next Release Date: 8/1/2014 Referring Pages:

359

Simulation of electron-matter interaction during wet-STEM electron tomography  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Tomography is an efficient tool to probe the 3 dimensional (3D) structure of materials. In the laboratory, a device has been developed to perform electron tomography in an environmental scanning electron microscopy (ESEM). The configuration of Scanning Transmission Electron Microscopy (STEM) in Environmental Scanning Electron Microscopy (ESEM) provides a novel approach for the characterization of the 3D structure of materials and optimizes a compromise between the resolution level of a few nm and the large tomogram due to the high thickness of transparency. Moreover, STEM allows the observation in 2D of wet samples in an ESEM by finely controlling the sample temperature and the water pressure of the sample environment. It has been recently demonstrated that it was possible to acquire image series of hydrated objects and thus to attain 3D characterization of wet samples. In order to get reliable and quantitative data, the present study deals with the simulation of electron-matter interactions. From such simulation on the MCM-41 material, we determine the minimum quantity of water layer which can be detected on wet materials.

Septiyanto, Rahmat Firman, E-mail: karine.masenelli-varlot@insa-lyon.fr [MATEIS, INSA-Lyon, CNRS UMR5510, F-69621, France and Physics of Electronic Material, Departement of Physics, Faculty of Mathematic and Natural Sciences, ITB Jalan Ganesha No. 10, Bandung 40132 (Indonesia); Masenelli-Varlot, Karine [MATEIS, INSA-Lyon, CNRS UMR5510, F-69621 (France); Iskandar, Ferry [Physics of Electronic Material, Departement of Physics, Faculty of Mathematic and Natural Sciences, ITB Jalan Ganesha No. 10, Bandung 40132 (Indonesia)

2014-02-24T23:59:59.000Z

360

Lower 48 States Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet After Lease  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Lower 48 States Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1970's 32,208 1980's 33,443 32,870 31,268 31,286 30,282 29,515 28,684 27,457 26,609 26,611 1990's 26,242 25,088 24,701 23,551 23,913 24,532 24,715 24,666 23,385 24,206 2000's 23,065 23,232 23,165 22,285 21,180 21,874 20,754 21,916 22,396 25,290 2010's 27,850 34,288 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 8/1/2013 Next Release Date: 8/1/2014

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "wet process clinker" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Process / CI Process  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

2 Process/Continual Improvement Rev. 11_0406 Page 1 of 6 2 Process/Continual Improvement Rev. 11_0406 Page 1 of 6 EOTA - Business Process Document Title: Process/Continual Improvement Document Number: P-012 Rev 11_0406 Document Owner: Elizabeth Sousa Backup Owner: David Rocha Approver(s): Melissa Otero Parent Document: Q-001 Quality Manual Notify of Changes: EOTA Staff Referenced Document(s): F-016 Process/Continual Improvement Form, P-001 Document Control Process, P-008 Corrective Action and Preventive Action, P-004 Business System Management Review P-012 Process/Continual Improvement Rev. 11_0406 Page 2 of 6 Revision History:

362

Chemical Effect of Dry and Wet Cleaning of the Ru Protective Layer of the Extreme ultraviolet (EUV) Lithography Reflector  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The authors report the chemical influence of cleaning of the Ru capping layer on the extreme ultraviolet (EUV) reflector surface. The cleaning of EUV reflector to remove the contamination particles has two requirements: to prevent corrosion and etching of the reflector surface and to maintain the reflectivity functionality of the reflector after the corrosive cleaning processes. Two main approaches for EUV reflector cleaning, wet chemical treatments [sulfuric acid and hydrogen peroxide mixture (SPM), ozonated water, and ozonated hydrogen peroxide] and dry cleaning (oxygen plasma and UV/ozone treatment), were tested. The changes in surface morphology and roughness were characterized using scanning electron microscopy and atomic force microscopy, while the surface etching and change of oxidation states were probed with x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. Significant surface oxidation of the Ru capping layer was observed after oxygen plasma and UV/ozone treatment, while the oxidation is unnoticeable after SPM treatment. Based on these surface studies, the authors found that SPM treatment exhibits the minimal corrosive interactions with Ru capping layer. They address the molecular mechanism of corrosive gas and liquid-phase chemical interaction with the surface of Ru capping layer on the EUV reflector.

Belau, Leonid; Park, Jeong Y.; Liang, Ted; Seo, Hyungtak; Somorjai, Gabor A.

2009-04-10T23:59:59.000Z

363

Treatment of an agrochemical wastewater by integration of heterogeneous catalytic wet hydrogen peroxide oxidation and rotating biological contactors  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract The treatment of a non-biodegradable agrochemical wastewater has been studied by coupling of heterogeneous catalytic wet hydrogen peroxide oxidation (CWHPO) and rotating biological contactors (RBCs). The influence of the hydrogen peroxide dosage and the organic content of the wastewater (dilution degree) were studied. The CWHPO of the raw wastewater at 80 °C and using a moderate amount of oxidant (0.23 gH2O2/gTOC) reduced significantly its total organic carbon content and increased its biodegradability. Likewise, the iron leaching of the heterogeneous catalyst (Fe2O3/SBA-15) was less than 2 mg/L in the treated effluent. Under the best operating conditions, the resultant CWHPO effluent was successfully co-treated by rotating biological contactors (RBCs) using a simulated municipal wastewater with different percentages of the CWHPO effluent (2.5, 5 and 10% v/v). The \\{RBCs\\} showed high stability for the treatment of the highest percentage of the CWHPO effluent, achieving total organic carbon (TOC) and total nitrogen (TN) reductions of ca. 78% and 50%, respectively. The integration of both processes on a continuous mode has been successfully accomplished for the treatment of the as-received agrochemical wastewater.

M.I. Pariente; J.A. Siles; R. Molina; J.A. Botas; J.A. Melero; F. Martinez

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

364

Upcoming Funding Opportunity for Competitive Marine and Hydrokinetic (MHK) Demonstrations at the Navy’s Wave Energy Test Site (WETS)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

On March 24, 2014, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) announced a Notice of Intent to issue a funding opportunity titled “Competitive Marine and Hydrokinetic (MHK) Demonstrations at the Navy’s Wave Energy Test Site (WETS).”

365

Production of carotenoids byPhaffia rhodozyma grown on media composed of corn wet-milling co-products  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Natural isolates of the carotenoid-producing yeastPhaffia rhodozyma...were analyzed for their ability to grow and to produce carotenoids in culture media composed exclusively of co-products of corn wet-milling fo...

G. Thomas Hayman; Bruno M. Mannarelli…

1995-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

366

Physical Adsorption of Ethylene on MgO(100): Effects of Substrate Ionicity and Symmetry on Wetting.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??The wetting behavior of ethylene adsorbed on MgO(100) was investigated from 83{ 135 K using high resolution volumetric adsorption isotherms. Layering transitions for ethylene on… (more)

Barbour, Andi

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

367

An investigation into the predictive performance of pavement marking retroreflectivity measured under various conditions of continuous wetting  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This thesis research investigated the predictive performance of pavement marking retroreflectivity measured under various conditions of continuous wetting. The researcher compared nighttime detection distance of pavement markings in simulated rain...

Pike, Adam Matthew

2007-04-25T23:59:59.000Z

368

Mössbauer study of the corrosion behaviour of pure iron and weathering steel under a wet-dry cycle  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Mossbauer spectroscopy (MBS) and X-ray diffraction (XRD) have been used to establish the composition of the rust layer formed on weathering steel and pure iron under several wet-dry...2-polluted atmosphere. FeSO3

J. F. Marco; J. Dávalos; J. R. Gancedo; M. Gracia

1989-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

369

Simulation of the secondary settling process with reliable numerical methods  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-scale operation of wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs). In the modelling of the activated sludge process to predict the effluent quality and the role of the SST model was to create a reasonable sludge balance, current SST models tend to fail under wet weather conditions where a significant amount of sludge mass

BĂĽrger, Raimund

370

Automated catalyst processing for cloud electrode fabrication for fuel cells  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A process for making dry carbon/polytetrafluoroethylene floc material, particularly useful in the manufacture of fuel cell electrodes, comprises of the steps of floccing a co-suspension of carbon particles and polytetrafluoroethylene particles, filtering excess liquids from the co-suspension, molding pellet shapes from the remaining wet floc solids without using significant pressure during the molding, drying the wet floc pellet shapes within the mold at temperatures no greater than about 150.degree. F., and removing the dry pellets from the mold.

Goller, Glen J. (West Springfield, MA); Breault, Richard D. (Coventry, CT)

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

371

Field Testing of a Wet FGD Additive for Enhanced Mercury Control  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document is the final report for DOE-NETL Cooperative Agreement DE-FC26-04NT42309, 'Field Testing of a Wet FGD Additive'. The objective of the project has been to demonstrate the use of two flue gas desulfurization (FGD) additives, Evonik Degussa Corporation's TMT-15 and Nalco Company's Nalco 8034, to prevent the re-emission of elemental mercury (Hg{sup 0}) in flue gas exiting wet FGD systems on coal-fired boilers. Furthermore, the project was intended to demonstrate whether such additives can be used to precipitate most of the mercury (Hg) removed in the wet FGD system as a fine salt that can be separated from the FGD liquor and bulk solid byproducts for separate disposal. The project involved pilot- and full-scale tests of the additives in wet FGD absorbers. The tests were intended to determine required additive dosages to prevent Hg{sup 0} re-emissions and to separate mercury from the normal FGD byproducts for three coal types: Texas lignite/Powder River Basin (PRB) coal blend, high-sulfur Eastern bituminous coal, and low-sulfur Eastern bituminous coal. The project team consists of URS Group, Inc., EPRI, Luminant Power (was TXU Generation Company LP), Southern Company, IPL (an AES company), Evonik Degussa Corporation and the Nalco Company. Luminant Power provided the Texas lignite/PRB co-fired test site for pilot FGD tests and project cost sharing. Southern Company provided the low-sulfur Eastern bituminous coal host site for wet scrubbing tests, the pilot- and full-scale jet bubbling reactor (JBR) FGD systems tested, and project cost sharing. IPL provided the high-sulfur Eastern bituminous coal full-scale FGD test site and cost sharing. Evonik Degussa Corporation provided the TMT-15 additive, and the Nalco Company provided the Nalco 8034 additive. Both companies also supplied technical support to the test program as in-kind cost sharing. The project was conducted in six tasks. Of the six tasks, Task 1 involved project planning and Task 6 involved management and reporting. The other four tasks involved field testing on FGD systems, either at pilot or full scale. These four tasks included: Task 2 - Pilot Additive Testing in Texas Lignite Flue Gas; Task 3 - Full-scale FGD Additive Testing in High-sulfur Eastern Bituminous Flue Gas; Task 4 - Pilot Wet Scrubber Additive Tests at Plant Yates; and Task 5 - Full-scale Additive Tests at Plant Yates. The pilot-scale tests were completed in 2005 and the full-scale test using high-sulfur coal was completed in 2006; only the TMT-15 additive was tested in these efforts. The Task 5 full-scale additive tests conducted at Southern Company's Plant Yates Unit 1 were completed in 2007, and both the TMT-15 and Nalco 8034 additives were tested.

Gary Blythe; MariJon Owens

2007-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

372

Surface contouring by controlled application of processing fluid using Marangoni effect  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An apparatus and method for modifying the surface of an object by contacting said surface with a liquid processing solution using the liquid applicator geometry and Marangoni effect (surface tension gradient-driven flow) to define and confine the dimensions of the wetted zone on said object surface. In particular, the method and apparatus involve contouring or figuring the surface of an object using an etchant solution as the wetting fluid and using realtime metrology (e.g. interferometry) to control the placement and dwell time of this wetted zone locally on the surface of said object, thereby removing material from the surface of the object in a controlled manner. One demonstrated manifestation is in the deterministic optical figuring of thin glasses by wet chemical etching using a buffered hydrofluoric acid solution and Marangoni effect.

Rushford, Michael C. (Livermore, CA); Britten, Jerald A. (Oakley, CA)

2003-04-29T23:59:59.000Z

373

Improve corrosion control in refining processes  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

New guidelines show how to control corrosion and environmental cracking of process equipment when processing feedstocks containing sulfur and/or naphthenic acids. To be cost competitive refiners must be able to process crudes of opportunity. These feedstocks when processed under high temperatures and pressures and alkaline conditions can cause brittle cracks and blisters in susceptible steel-fabricated equipment. Even with advances in steel metallurgy, wet H{sub 2}S cracking continues to be a problem. New research data shows that process conditions such as temperature, pH and flowrate are key factors in the corrosion process. Before selecting equipment material, operators must understand the corrosion mechanisms present within process conditions. Several case histories investigate the corrosion reactions found when refining naphthenic crudes and operating amine gas-sweetening systems. These examples show how to use process controls, inhibitors and/or metallurgy to control corrosion and environmental cracking, to improve material selection and to extend equipment service life.

Kane, R.D.; Cayard, M.S. [CLI International, Houston, TX (United States)

1995-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

374

Improving the equilibrium performance of active carbons for separation processes by co-adsorption with low pressure solvent: application to carbon capture  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The equilibrium performance of a novel gas separation process described quite recently (Sweatman in Chem. Eng. Sci. 65:3907, 2010...) called ‘pressure-swing wetting layer absorption’ here is investigated by means...

Martin B. Sweatman

2011-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

375

311221," Wet Corn Milling",0,0,"X",0  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

3 Relative Standard Errors for Table 11.3;" 3 Relative Standard Errors for Table 11.3;" " Unit: Percents." " "," ",,,"Renewable Energy" " "," ",,,"(excluding Wood" "NAICS"," ","Total Onsite",,"and" "Code(a)","Subsector and Industry","Generation","Cogeneration(b)","Other Biomass)(c)","Other(d)" ,,"Total United States" 311,"Food",2.8,1.1,86.8,37.8 3112," Grain and Oilseed Milling",0.7,0.7,"X",0 311221," Wet Corn Milling",0,0,"X",0 31131," Sugar Manufacturing",0,0,"X",0 3114," Fruit and Vegetable Preserving and Specialty Foods ",1.2,1.2,"X",44.1

376

The wetting behavior of NiAl and NiPtAl on polycrystalline alumina  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In order to understand the beneficial effect of Pt on the adherence of thermally grown alumina scales, sessile drop experiments were performed to study the wetting of poly-crystalline alumina by nickel-aluminum alloys with or without platinum addition where the amount of Pt ranged from 2.4 to 10 at.%. Subsequent interfacial structure was evaluated using atomic force microscopy. Platinum addition enhances the wettability of NiAl alloys on alumina, reduces the oxide/alloy interface energy and increases the interfacial mass transport rates.

Saiz, Eduardo; Gauffier, Antoine; Saiz, Eduardo; Tomsia, Antoni P.; Hou, Peggy Y.

2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

377

Continuous Collection of Soluble Atmospheric Particles with a Wetted Hydrophilic Filter  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Continuous Collection of Soluble Atmospheric Particles with a Wetted Hydrophilic Filter ... aerodynamic diameter range were generated with a vibrating orifice aerosol generator (VOAG, model 3450, TSI Inc.) using 0.5 mg/L fluorescein solution in ultrapure water as the feed without and with 0.2, 2, 5, and 10 mM NaCl added to the feed. ... The performance of a gas and aerosol monitoring system (GAMS) for the determination of acidic water soluble organic and inorganic gases and ammonia as well as related particles from the atmosphere ...

Masaki Takeuchi; S. M. Rahmat Ullah; Purnendu K. Dasgupta; Donald R. Collins; Allen Williams

2005-11-03T23:59:59.000Z

378

Patterning micron-sized features in a cross-linked poly(acrylic acid) film by a wet etching process{  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

method to create sub-micron-scale patterns of cation- cross-linked poly(acrylic acid) (CCL-PAA). PAA can) on a film of CCL-PAA, the exposed regions of CCL-PAA were etched by either an aqueous NaOH or EDTA solution photolithographically. We used these patterned films of CCL-PAA i) to host and template the reduction of metallic

Prentiss, Mara

379

Table 15. Shale natural gas proved reserves, reserves changes, and production, wet after lease separation, 2011  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

: Shale natural gas proved reserves, reserves changes, and production, wet after lease separation, 2011 : Shale natural gas proved reserves, reserves changes, and production, wet after lease separation, 2011 billion cubic feet Published New Reservoir Proved Revision Revision New Field Discoveries Estimated Proved Reserves Adjustments Increases Decreases Sales Acquisitions Extensions Discoveries in Old FieldsProduction Reserves State and Subdivision 12/31/10 (+,-) (+) (-) (-) (+) (+) (+) (+) (-) 12/31/11 Alaska 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 Lower 48 States 97,449 1,584 25,993 23,455 22,694 27,038 32,764 232 699 7,994 131,616 Alabama 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 Arkansas 12,526 655 502 141 6,087 6,220 2,073 0 0 940 14,808 California 0 1 912 0 0 0 43 0 0 101 855 Colorado 4 0 4 0 0 0 5 0 0 3 10 Florida 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 Kansas 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 Kentucky 10 0 44 11 45 45 2 0 0 4 41 Louisiana 20,070 -172 2,002 3,882 3,782 4,291 5,367 0 140 2,084 21,950 North Onshore 20,070 -172 2,002 3,882 3,782 4,291 5,367

380

Table 10. Total natural gas proved reserves, reserves changes, and production, wet after lease separation, 2011  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

: Total natural gas proved reserves, reserves changes, and production, wet after lease separation, 2011 : Total natural gas proved reserves, reserves changes, and production, wet after lease separation, 2011 billion cubic feet Published New Reservoir Proved Revision Revision New Field Discoveries Estimated Proved Reserves Adjustments Increases Decreases Sales Acquisitions Extensions Discoveries in Old Fields Production Reserves State and subdivision 12/31/10 (+,-) (+) (-) (-) (+) (+) (+) (+) (-) 12/31/11 Alaska 8,917 -2 938 207 36 222 4 0 3 328 9,511 Lower 48 States 308,730 2,717 55,077 55,920 44,539 47,651 47,631 987 1,257 24,293 339,298 Alabama 2,724 -45 472 163 595 398 3 2 0 226 2,570 Arkansas 14,181 729 631 324 6,762 6,882 2,094 0 23 1,080 16,374 California 2,785 917 1,542 1,959 49 55 75 0 0 324 3,042 Coastal Region Onshore 180 15 21 32 0 0 1 0 0 12 173 Los Angeles Basin Onshore 92 6 12 4 0 3 0 0 0 7 102 San Joaquin Basin Onshore 2,447 895 1,498

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "wet process clinker" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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381

U.S. Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation New Reservoir Discoveries in  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

New Reservoir Discoveries in Old Fields (Billion Cubic Feet) New Reservoir Discoveries in Old Fields (Billion Cubic Feet) U.S. Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation New Reservoir Discoveries in Old Fields (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1970's 2,637 1980's 2,648 3,080 3,520 3,071 2,778 3,053 1,855 1,556 1,979 2,313 1990's 2,492 1,655 1,773 1,930 3,606 2,518 3,209 2,455 2,240 2,265 2000's 2,463 2,898 1,752 1,653 1,244 1,243 1,197 1,244 1,678 2,656 2010's 1,701 1,260 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 8/1/2013 Next Release Date: 8/1/2014 Referring Pages: New Reservoir Discoveries in Old Fields of Natural Gas, Wet After

382

MHK Projects/US Navy Wave Energy Technology WET Program at Marine Corps  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

US Navy Wave Energy Technology WET Program at Marine Corps US Navy Wave Energy Technology WET Program at Marine Corps Base Hawaii MCBH < MHK Projects Jump to: navigation, search << Return to the MHK database homepage Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":5,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"500px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"File:Aquamarine-marker.png","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":21.4164,"lon":-157.784,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"http:\/\/prod-http-80-800498448.us-east-1.elb.amazonaws.com\/w\/images\/7\/74\/Aquamarine-marker.png","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

383

Table 12. Nonassociated natural gas proved reserves, reserves changes, and production, wet after lease separation, 2011  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

: Nonassociated natural gas proved reserves, reserves changes, and production, wet after lease separation, 2011 : Nonassociated natural gas proved reserves, reserves changes, and production, wet after lease separation, 2011 billion cubic feet Published New Reservoir Proved Revision Revision New Field Discoveries Estimated Proved Reserves Adjustments Increases Decreases SalesAcquisitions Extensions Discoveries in Old Fields Production Reserves State and Subdivision 12/31/10 (+,-) (+) (-) (-) (+) (+) (+) (+) (-) 12/31/11 Alaska 1,021 -1 95 128 34 171 1 0 3 152 976 Lower 48 States 280,880 2,326 47,832 50,046 43,203 45,818 41,677 376 1,097 21,747 305,010 Alabama 2,686 -48 470 163 586 378 3 0 0 218 2,522 Arkansas 14,152 705 581 311 6,724 6,882 2,094 0 23 1,074 16,328 California 503 -12 118 32 48 44 1 0 0 64 510 Coastal Region Onshore 2 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 Los Angeles Basin Onshore 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 San Joaquin Basin Onshore 498 -12 116 31 47 44 1 0 0 63 506 State Offshore

384

MULTI-POLLUTANT CONTROL USING MEMBRANE--BASED UP-FLOW WET ELECTROSTATIC PRECIPITATION  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This is the Final Report of the ''Multi-Pollutant Control Using Membrane-Based Up-flow Wet Electrostatic Precipitation'' project funded by the US Department of Energy's National Energy Technology Laboratory under DOE Award No. DE-FC26-02NT41592 to Croll-Reynolds Clean Air Technologies (CRCAT). In this 18 month project, CRCAT and its team members conducted detailed emission tests of metallic and new membrane collection material within a wet electrostatic precipitator (WESP) at First Energy's Penn Power's Bruce Mansfield (BMP) plant in Shippingport, Pa. The Membrane WESP was designed to be as similar as the metallic WESP in terms of collection area, air-flow, and electrical characteristics. Both units are two-field units. The membrane unit was installed during the 2nd and 3rd quarters of 2003. Testing of the metallic unit was performed to create a baseline since the Mansfield plant had installed selective catalytic reduction equipment for NOx control and a sodium bisulfate injection system for SO3 control during the spring of 2003. Tests results on the metallic WESP were consistent with previous testing for PM2.5, SO3 mist and mercury. Testing on the membrane WESP demonstrated no adverse impact and equivalent removal efficiencies as that of the metallic WESP. Testing on both units was performed at 8,000 acfm and 15,000 acfm. Summary results are shown.

James Reynolds

2004-10-29T23:59:59.000Z

385

A comparison between semi-spheroid- and dome-shaped quantum dots coupled to wetting layer  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

During the epitaxial growth method, self-assembled semi-spheroid-shaped quantum dots (QDs) are formed on the wetting layer (WL). However for sake of simplicity, researchers sometimes assume semi-spheroid-shaped QDs to be dome-shaped (hemisphere). In this work, a detailed and comprehensive study on the difference between electronic and transition properties of dome- and semi-spheroid-shaped quantum dots is presented. We will explain why the P-to-S intersubband transition behaves the way it does. The calculated results for intersubband P-to-S transition properties of quantum dots show two different trends for dome-shaped and semi-spheroid-shaped quantum dots. The results are interpreted using the probability of finding electron inside the dome/spheroid region, with emphasis on the effects of wetting layer. It is shown that dome-shaped and semi-spheroid-shaped quantum dots feature different electronic and transition properties, arising from the difference in lateral dimensions between dome- and semi-spheroid-shaped QDs. Moreover, an analogy is presented between the bound S-states in the quantum dots and a simple 3D quantum mechanical particle in a box, and effective sizes are calculated. The results of this work will benefit researchers to present more realistic models of coupled QD/WL systems and explain their properties more precisely.

Shahzadeh, Mohammadreza; Sabaeian, Mohammad, E-mail: Sabaeian@scu.ac.ir [Physics Department, Faculty of Science, Shahid Chamran University of Ahvaz, Ahvaz, 61357-43135 (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

2014-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

386

Impact of Hybrid Wet/Dry Cooling on Concentrating Solar Power Plant Performance  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper examines the sensitivity of Rankine cycle plant performance to dry cooling and hybrid (parallel) wet/dry cooling combinations with the traditional wet-cooled model as a baseline. Plants with a lower temperature thermal resource are more sensitive to fluctuations in cooling conditions, and so the lower temperature parabolic trough plant is analyzed to assess the maximum impact of alternative cooling configurations. While low water-use heat rejection designs are applicable to any technology that utilizes a Rankine steam cycle for power generation, they are of special interest to concentrating solar power (CSP) technologies that are located in arid regions with limited water availability. System performance is evaluated using hourly simulations over the course of a year at Daggett, CA. The scope of the analysis in this paper is limited to the power block and the heat rejection system, excluding the solar field and thermal storage. As such, water used in mirror washing, maintenance, etc., is not included. Thermal energy produced by the solar field is modeled using NREL's Solar Advisor Model (SAM).

Wagner, M. J.; Kutscher, C.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

387

Full-Scale Testing of a Mercury Oxidation Catalyst Upstream of a Wet FGD System  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document presents and discusses results from Cooperative Agreement DE-FC26-06NT42778, 'Full-scale Testing of a Mercury Oxidation Catalyst Upstream of a Wet FGD System,' which was conducted over the time-period July 24, 2006 through June 30, 2010. The objective of the project was to demonstrate at full scale the use of solid honeycomb catalysts to promote the oxidation of elemental mercury in pulverized-coal-fired flue gas. Oxidized mercury is removed downstream in wet flue gas desulfurization (FGD) absorbers and collected with the byproducts from the FGD system. The project was co-funded by EPRI, the Lower Colorado River Authority (LCRA), who also provided the host site, Great River Energy, Johnson Matthey, Southern Company, Salt River Project (SRP), the Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA), NRG Energy, Ontario Power and Westar. URS Group was the prime contractor and also provided cofunding. The scope of this project included installing and testing a gold-based catalyst upstream of one full-scale wet FGD absorber module (about 200-MW scale) at LCRA's Fayette Power Project (FPP) Unit 3, which fires Powder River Basin coal. Installation of the catalyst involved modifying the ductwork upstream of one of three wet FGD absorbers on Unit 3, Absorber C. The FGD system uses limestone reagent, operates with forced sulfite oxidation, and normally runs with two FGD modules in service and one spare. The full-scale catalyst test was planned for 24 months to provide catalyst life data. Over the test period, data were collected on catalyst pressure drop, elemental mercury oxidation across the catalyst module, and mercury capture by the downstream wet FGD absorber. The demonstration period began on May 6, 2008 with plans for the catalyst to remain in service until May 5, 2010. However, because of continual increases in pressure drop across the catalyst and concerns that further increases would adversely affect Unit 3 operations, LCRA decided to end the demonstration early, during a planned unit outage. On October 2, 2009, Unit 3 was taken out of service for a fall outage and the catalyst upstream of Absorber C was removed. This ended the demonstration after approximately 17 months of the planned 24 months of operation. This report discusses reasons for the pressure drop increase and potential measures to mitigate such problems in any future application of this technology. Mercury oxidation and capture measurements were made on Unit 3 four times during the 17-month demonstration. Measurements were performed across the catalyst and Absorber C and 'baseline' measurements were performed across Absorber A or B, which did not have a catalyst upstream. Results are presented in the report from all four sets of measurements during the demonstration period. These results include elemental mercury oxidation across the catalyst, mercury capture across Absorber C downstream of the catalyst, baseline mercury capture across Absorber A or B, and mercury re-emissions across both absorbers in service. Also presented in the report are estimates of the average mercury control performance of the oxidation catalyst technology over the 17-month demonstration period and the resulting mercury control costs.

Gary Blythe; Jennifer Paradis

2010-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

388

Nexant Parabolic Trough Solar Power Plant Systems Analysis; Task 2: Comparison of Wet and Dry Rankine Cycle Heat Rejection, 20 January 2005 - 31 December 2005  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Subcontract report by Nexant, Inc., regarding a system analysis comparing solar parabolic trough plants with wet and dry rankine cycle heat rejection.

Kelly, B.

2006-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

389

2010 Dry and 2009 - 2010 Wet Season Branchiopod Survey Report, Site 300  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) requested that Condor Country Consulting, Inc. (CCCI) perform wet season surveys and manage the dry season sampling for listed branchiopods in two ponded locations within the Site 300 Experimental Test Site. Site 300 is located in Alameda and San Joaquin Counties, located between the Cities of Livermore and Tracy. The two pool locations have been identified for possible amphibian enhancement activities in support of the Compensation Plan for impacts tied to the Building 850 soil clean-up project. The Building 850 project design resulted in formal consultation with the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS) as an amendment (File 81420-2009-F-0235) to the site-wide Biological Opinion (BO) (File 1-1-02-F-0062) in the spring of 2009 and requires mitigation for the California tiger salamander (AMCA, Ambystoma californiense) and California red-legged frog (CRLF, Rana draytonii) habitat loss. Both pools contain breeding AMCA, but do not produce metamorphs due to limited hydroperiod. The pool to the southeast (Pool BC-FS-2) is the preferred site for amphibian enhancement activities, and the wetland to northwest (Pool OA-FS-1) is the alternate location for enhancement. However, prior to enhancement, LLNL has been directed by USFWS (BO Conservation Measure 17 iii) to 'conduct USFWS protocol-level branchiopod surveys to determine whether listed brachiopod species are present within the compensation area.' CCCI conducted surveys for listed branchiopods in the 2009-2010 wet season to determine the presence of federally-listed branchiopods at the two pools (previous surveys with negative findings were performed by CCCI in 2001-2002 and 2002-2003 onsite). Surveys were conducted to partially satisfy the survey requirements of the USFWS 'Interim Survey Guidelines to Permittees for Recovery Permits under Section 10(a)(1)(A) of the Endangered Species Act for the Listed Vernal Pool Branchiopods' ('Guidelines, USFWS 1996 and BO Conservation Measure 17 iii). The dry sampling (included as an Appendix D) followed the wet season surveys in the summer of 2010.

Dexter, W

2011-03-14T23:59:59.000Z

390

Hort-Range Wetting at Liquid Gallium-Bismuth Alloy Surfaces: X-ray Measurements and Square-Gradient Theory  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We present an x-ray reflectivity study of wetting at the free surface of the binary liquid metal alloy gallium-bismuth (Ga-Bi) in the region where the bulk phase separates into Bi-rich and Ga-rich liquid phases. The measurements reveal the evolution of the microscopic structure of the wetting films of the Bi-rich, low-surface-tension phase along several paths in the bulk phase diagram. The wetting of the Ga-rich bulk's surface by a Bi-rich wetting film, the thickness of which is limited by gravity to only 50 Angstroms, creates a Ga-rich/Bi-rich liquid/liquid interface close enough to the free surface to allow its detailed study by x rays. The structure of the interface is determined with Angstromsngstrem resolution, which allows the application of a mean-field square gradient model extended by the inclusion of capillary waves as the dominant thermal fluctuations. The sole free parameter of the gradient model, the influence parameter K, that characterizes the influence of concentration gradients on the interfacial excess energy, is determined from our measurements. This, in turn, allows a calculation of the liquid/liquid interfacial tension, and a separation of the intrinsic and capillary wave contributions to the interfacial structure. In spite of expected deviations from MF behavior, based on the upper critical dimensionality (Du = 3 ) of the bulk, we find that the capillary wave excitations only marginally affect the short-range complete wetting behavior. A critical wetting transition that is sensitive to thermal fluctuations appears to be absent in this binary liquid-metal alloy.

Huber, P.; Shpyrko, O; Pershan, P; Ocko, B; DiMasi, E; Deutsch, M

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

391

The lime-soda sinter process for resource recovery from fly ash: A new look  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The lime-soda sinter process is one of the earliest and most thoroughly researched and evaluated of the several methods available for resource recovery from fly ash. The principle product, metallurgical grade alumina, is obtained with yields as high as 90% depending upon how much alumina needs to be left in the residue to form acceptable byproduct cement clinker. The process has the advantages of requiring a relatively low sintering temperature (1100-1200{degree}C), using conventional equipment of carbon steel construction, utilizing a variety of calcium and mineralizer raw materials, and producing only a single byproduct consisting of dicalcium silicate that has been shown to be an attractive raw material for the manufacture of portland cement. An economic feasibility study for a combined facility to produce alumina and cement from the fly ash generated by a 1000 MWe coal-fired power station shows a 10.5% return on average investment. This is increased to 14.2% when a disposal charge of $10/ton of fly ash consumed is credited to the process. Research has shown that the soda ash can be replaced by coal cleaning refuse or that the soda ash and one-fourth of the limestone can be replaced by FGD sludge with a savings in raw material cost in both cases. The return on average investment becomes 14.5% when the refuse is used and 15.2% when the sludge is used. The return could be increased further if an inexpensive fluxing agent were substituted for the alumina deliberately left in the residue. 12 refs., 2 figs., 7 tabs.

Burnet, G.

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

392

Corrosiveness of wet residential building thermal insulation---Mechanisms and evaluation of electrochemical methods for assessing corrosion behavior  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

An evaluation has been made of the corrosiveness of selected wet residential building thermal insulation materials in contact with low carbon steel. Investigations were conducted both in wet insulations and in filtered leachates from insulations derived from thirteen cellulosic, three mineral fiber and four foam products. Potentiodynamic polarization measurements are reported from which the overall corrosion response was assessed and then the techniques of Tafel and polarization resistance analysis applied to estimate corrosion rates. Corrosion rates were also estimated electrochemically using a direct reading instrument which performs the rate calculation based on the polarization resistance principle. Direct determinations of corrosion rate were based on weight loss measurements.

Stansbury, E.E. [Stansbury (E.E.), Knoxville, TN (United States)

1991-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

393

Single-photon emission from the natural quantum dots in the InAs/GaAs wetting layer  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A time-resolved microphotoluminescence study is presented for quantum dots that are formed in the InAs/GaAs wetting layer. These dots are due to fluctuations of In composition in the wetting layer. They show spectrally sharp luminescence lines with a low spatial density. We identify lines related to neutral exciton and biexciton as well as trions. Exciton emission antibunching [second-order correlation value of g(2)(0)=0.16] and a biexciton-exciton emission cascade prove nonclassical emission from the dots and confirm their potential as single-photon sources.

T. Kazimierczuk; A. Golnik; P. Kossacki; J. A. Gaj; Z. R. Wasilewski; A. Babi?ski

2011-09-26T23:59:59.000Z

394

Mercury Control for Plants Firing Texas Lignite and Equipped with ESP-Wet FGD  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Mercury control for Plants firing Mercury control for Plants firing texas lignite and equiPPed with esP-wet fgd Background The 2005 Clean Air Mercury Rule will require significant reductions in mercury emissions from coal-fired power plants. One promising mercury control technology involves the use of sorbents such as powdered activated carbon. Full-scale sorbent injection tests conducted for various combinations of fuel and plant air pollution control devices have provided a good understanding of variables that affect sorbent performance. However, many uncertainties exist regarding long-term performance, and data gaps remain for specific plant configurations. Sorbent injection has not been demonstrated at full-scale for plants firing Texas lignite coal, which are responsible for about 10 percent of annual U.S. power plant

395

Process / CI Process  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

7 Post Travel Summary 11_0221 Page 1 of 3 7 Post Travel Summary 11_0221 Page 1 of 3 EOTA - Business Process Document Title: Post Travel Summary Document Number: ADMF-017 Post Travel Summary 11_0221 Document Owner: Elizabeth Sousa Backup Owner: Melissa Otero Approver(s): Melissa Otero Parent Document: ADMP-004, Contractor Travel Process Notify of Changes: EOTA Staff Referenced Document(s): ADMF-007 EOTA Pre-Travel Authorization Form ADMF-017 Post Travel Summary 11_0221 Page 2 of 3 Revision History: Rev. Description of Change 11_0221 Initial Release ADMF-017 Post Travel Summary 11_0221 Page 3 of 3

396

Improved cement quality and grinding efficiency by means of closed mill circuit modeling  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Grinding of clinker is the last and most energy-consuming stage of the cement manufacturing process, drawing on average 40% of the total energy required to produce one ton of cement. During this stage, the clinker particles are substantially reduced...

Mejeoumov, Gleb Gennadievich

2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

397

X-ray Studies of Regenerated Cellulose Fibers Wet Spun from Cotton Linter Pulp in NaOH/Thiourea Aqueous Solutions  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Regenerated cellulose fibers were fabricated by dissolution of cotton linter pulp in NaOH (9.5 wt%) and thiourea (4.5 wt%) aqueous solution followed by wet-spinning and multi-roller drawing. The multi-roller drawing process involved three stages: coagulation (I), coagulation (II) and post-treatment (III). The crystalline structure and morphology of regenerated cellulose fiber was investigated by synchrotron wide-angle X-ray diffraction (WAXD) and small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) techniques. Results indicated that only the cellulose II crystal structure was found in regenerated cellulose fibers, proving that the cellulose crystals were completely transformed from cellulose I to II structure during spinning from NaOH/thiourea aqueous solution. The crystallinity, orientation and crystal size at each stage were determined from the WAXD analysis. Drawing of cellulose fibers in the coagulation (II) bath (H{sub 2}SO{sub 4}/H{sub 2}O) was found to generate higher orientation and crystallinity than drawing in the post-treatment (III). Although the post-treatment process also increased crystal orientation, it led to a decrease in crystallinity with notable reduction in the anisotropic fraction. Compared with commercial rayon fibers fabricated by the viscose process, the regenerated cellulose fibers exhibited higher crystallinity but lower crystal orientation. SAXS results revealed a clear scattering maximum along the meridian direction in all regenerated cellulose fibers, indicating the formation of lamellar structure during spinning.

Chen,X.; Burger, C.; Fang, D.; Ruan, D.; Zhang, L.; Hsiao, B.; Chu, B.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

398

SURFACE SCIENCE, WETTING, CONDENSATION, ENGINEERED Correspondence and requests for materials: konradr@asu.edu and varanasi@mit.edu  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

coefficients has potential for efficiency enhancements. Here we investigate condensation behavior of a variety of fluids with high or moderate surface tension27­31 or Marangoni dropwise condensation of binary mixtures1 SURFACE SCIENCE, WETTING, CONDENSATION, ENGINEERED SURFACES Correspondence and requests

399

Spontaneous penetration of a non-wetting drop into an exposed pore Pengtao Yue and Yuriko Renardy  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and entry flow, the modified Lucas-Washburn equation greatly overesti- mates the penetration rate drop (S penetration rate is higher than that fSpontaneous penetration of a non-wetting drop into an exposed pore Pengtao Yue and Yuriko Renardy

Renardy, Yuriko

400

Nitrogen gas emissions from stormwater retention basins during wet weather events in the Phoenix Metropolitan area: an additional ecosystem service?  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Nitrogen gas emissions from stormwater retention basins during wet weather events in the Phoenix Special thanks to all of our field and lab help: Rebecca Hale, Stevan Earl, Bony Ahmed, Lin Ye, Jolene. Samples were then taken throughout the day to assess water concentrations and gas losses (see photos

Hall, Sharon J.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "wet process clinker" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Elephant seasonal vegetation preferences across dry and wet savannas Scott R. Loarie a,*, Rudi J. van Aarde b  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Elephant seasonal vegetation preferences across dry and wet savannas Scott R. Loarie a,*, Rudi J Accepted 8 August 2009 Available online 6 October 2009 Keywords: African elephants Conservation ecology Land use change Habitat selection a b s t r a c t As African savanna elephants (Loxodonta africana

Pretoria, University of

402

Dry Versus Wet Aging of Beef: Retail Cutting Yields and Palatability Evaluations of Steaks Using Alternative Cutting Styles  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Boneless ribeye rolls (n = 12) and boneless top sirloin butts (n = 12) were obtained from heavy weight carcasses (mean = 407.8 kg), assigned to one of two aging treatments (dry or wet) and aged for 35 days at a commercial aging facility. Cutting...

Smith, Amanda 1987-

2012-12-05T23:59:59.000Z

403

Intraseasonal and Interannual Variability of Extreme Dry and Wet Events over Southeastern South America and the Subtropical Atlantic during Austral Summer  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-eastern South America. Extreme wet events on intraseasonal time scales over southeastern Brazil are more The wet season in most of tropical and subtropical South America peaks in the austral summer, typically season of eastern tropical South America. It can be ob- served as a northwest­southeast-oriented cloud

California at Santa Barbara, University of

404

Process oil manufacturing process  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A method is described for producing a naphthenic process oil having reduced sulfur, nitrogen and polynuclear aromatics contents from a naphthenic feed containing same and having an atmospheric boiling range of about 650/sup 0/ to about 1200/sup 0/F. comprising: A. passing the feed into a first hydrotreating stage having a hydrotreating catalyst therein, the stage maintained at a temperature of about 600/sup 0/ to about 750/sup 0/F. and at a hydrogen partial pressure of about 400 to about 1500 psig, to convert at least a portion of the sulfur to hydrogen sulfide and the nitrogen to ammonia; B. passing the hydrotreated feed from the first hydrotreating stage in an intermediate stripping stage wherein hydrogen sulfide, ammonia, or both is removed; C. passing the hydrotreated feed from the intermediate stage into a second hydrotreating stage having therein a hydrotreating catalyst selected from the group consisting of nickel-molybdenum, cobalt-molybdenum, nickel-tungsten and mixtures thereof, the second hydrotreating stage maintained at a temperature lower than that of the first hydrotreating stage and at a hydrogen partial pressure ranging between about 400 and about 1,500 psig; D. monitoring the polynuclear aromatics content, the degree of saturation, or both of the product exiting the second hydrotreating stage; and, E. adjusting the temperature in the second hydrotreating stage to keep the polynuclear aromatics content, the degree of saturation, or both below a limit suitable for process oil.

Corman, B.G.; Korbach, P.F.; Webber, K.M.

1989-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

405

Oxidation Behavior of Mo-Si-B Alloys in Wet Air  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Multiphase composite alloys based on the Mo-Si-B system are candidate materials for ultra-high temperature applications. In non load-bearing uses such as thermal barrier coatings or heat exchangers in fossil fuel burners, these materials may be ideally suited. The present work investigated the effect of water vapor on the oxidation behavior of Mo-Si-B phase assemblages. Three alloys were studied: Alloy 1 = Mo{sub 5}Si{sub 3}B{sub x} (T1)- MoSi{sub 2}- MoB, Alloy 2 = T1- Mo{sub 5}SiB{sub 2} (T2)- Mo{sub 3}Si, and Alloy 3 = Mo- T2- Mo{sub 3}Si. Tests were conducted at 1000 and 1100C in controlled atmospheres of dry air and wet air nominally containing 18, 55, and 150 Torr H{sub 2}O. The initial mass loss of each alloy was approximately independent of the test temperature and moisture content of the atmosphere. The magnitude of these initial losses varied according to the Mo content of the alloys. All alloys formed a continuous, external silica scale that protected against further mass change after volatilization of the initially formed MoO{sub 3}. All alloys experienced a small steady state mass change, but the calculated rates cannot be quantitatively compared due to statistical uncertainty in the individual mass measurements. Of particular interest is that Alloy 3, which contains a significant volume fraction of Mo metal, formed a protective scale. All alloys formed varying amounts of subscale Mo and MoO{sub 2}. This implies that oxygen transport through the external silica scale has been significantly reduced. For all alloys, water vapor accelerated the growth of a multiphase interlayer at the silica scale/unoxidized alloy interface. This interlayer is likely composed of fine Mo and MoO{sub 2} that is dispersed within a thin silica matrix. Alloy 3 was particularly sensitive to water accelerated growth of this interlayer. At 1100 C, the scale thickness after 300 hours increased from about 20 mm in dry air to nearly 100 mm in wet air.

M. Kramer; A. Thom; O. Degirmen; V. Behrani; M. Akinc

2002-04-22T23:59:59.000Z

406

A summary of SNCR applications to two coal-fired wet bottom boilers  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In response to NO{sub x} reductions mandated under Title I of the 1990 Clean Air Act Amendments (CAAA), Public Service Electric & Gas and Atlantic Electric of New Jersey evaluated Selective Non-Catalytic Reduction (SNCR) for NO{sub x} control under separate programs at Mercer Station and B.L. England Station, respectively. Mercer Station is comprised of twin 321 MW Foster Wheeler coal-fired wet bottom boilers, with natural gas capability up to 100% load. B.L. England Station has three units, two of which are cyclone boilers of 136 MW and 163 MW. These furnace designs are of particular interest in that nominally 23,000 MW of cyclone boiler capacity and 6,900 MW of wall- or turbo-fired wet bottom boiler capacity will be faced with NO{sub x} reductions to be mandated under Title IV - Phase II for Group II boilers. Both stations evaluated Nalco Fuel Tech`s SNCR system using a portable test skid, with urea as the reducing chemical. The Mercer Unit 2 demonstration was performed with a low sulfur coal (nominally 0.8%), while the B.L. England Unit 1 demonstration utilized a medium sulfur coal (nominally 2.4%), and also re-injects fly ash back into the cyclones for ultimate collection and removal as slag. To address concerns over potential Ljungstrom air heater fouling, due to reactions between ammonia and SO{sub 3} in the air heater, and fly ash salability at Mercer Station, both sites targeted no greater than 5-10 ppmv ammonia emissions at the economizer exit. At Mercer Unit 2, air heater fouling was only experienced during system start-up when the ammonia emissions at the economizer exit were estimated at levels approaching 60 ppmv. B.L. England Unit 1, however, experienced frequent fouling of the air heater. NO{sub x} reductions achieved at both sites ranged between 30%-40% from nominal baseline NO{sub x} levels of 1.1-1.6 lb/MMBtu. Each site is currently undergoing installation of commercial SNCR systems.

Himes, R.; Hubbard, D.; West, Z. [Carnot, Tustin, CA (United States)] [and others

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

407

Alternative Fuel for Portland Cement Processing  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The production of cement involves a combination of numerous raw materials, strictly monitored system processes, and temperatures on the order of 1500 °C. Immense quantities of fuel are required for the production of cement. Traditionally, energy from fossil fuels was solely relied upon for the production of cement. The overarching project objective is to evaluate the use of alternative fuels to lessen the dependence on non-renewable resources to produce portland cement. The key objective of using alternative fuels is to continue to produce high-quality cement while decreasing the use of non-renewable fuels and minimizing the impact on the environment. Burn characteristics and thermodynamic parameters were evaluated with a laboratory burn simulator under conditions that mimic those in the preheater where the fuels are brought into a cement plant. A drop-tube furnace and visualization method were developed that show potential for evaluating time- and space-resolved temperature distributions for fuel solid particles and liquid droplets undergoing combustion in various combustion atmospheres. Downdraft gasification has been explored as a means to extract chemical energy from poultry litter while limiting the throughput of potentially deleterious components with regards to use in firing a cement kiln. Results have shown that the clinkering is temperature independent, at least within the controllable temperature range. Limestone also had only a slight effect on the fusion when used to coat the pellets. However, limestone addition did display some promise in regards to chlorine capture, as ash analyses showed chlorine concentrations of more than four times greater in the limestone infused ash as compared to raw poultry litter. A reliable and convenient sampling procedure was developed to estimate the combustion quality of broiler litter that is the best compromise between convenience and reliability by means of statistical analysis. Multi-day trial burns were conducted at a full-scale cement plant with alternative fuels to examine their compatibility with the cement production process. Construction and demolition waste, woodchips, and soybean seeds were used as alternative fuels at a full-scale cement production facility. These fuels were co-fired with coal and waste plastics. The alternative fuels used in this trial accounted for 5 to 16 % of the total energy consumed during these burns. The overall performance of the portland cement produced during the various trial burns performed for practical purposes very similar to the cement produced during the control burn. The cement plant was successful in implementing alternative fuels to produce a consistent, high-quality product that increased cement performance while reducing the environmental footprint of the plant. The utilization of construction and demolition waste, woodchips and soybean seeds proved to be viable replacements for traditional fuels. The future use of these fuels depends on local availability, associated costs, and compatibility with a facilityâ??s production process.

Anton K. Schindler; Steve R. Duke; Thomas E. Burch; Edward W. Davis; Ralph H. Zee; David I. Bransby; Carla Hopkins; Rutherford L. Thompson; Jingran Duan; Vignesh Venkatasubramanian; Stephen Giles.

2012-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

408

U.S. Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, New Reservoir  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Reservoir Discoveries in Old Fields (Billion Cubic Feet) Reservoir Discoveries in Old Fields (Billion Cubic Feet) U.S. Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, New Reservoir Discoveries in Old Fields (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1970's 2,373 1980's 2,279 2,809 3,155 2,745 2,482 2,712 1,666 1,401 1,640 2,139 1990's 2,242 1,321 1,481 1,767 3,404 1,884 2,871 2,268 2,022 1,841 2000's 2,211 2,420 1,421 1,529 1,147 1,164 1,132 1,171 858 2,487 2010's 1,515 1,100 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 8/1/2013 Next Release Date: 8/1/2014 Referring Pages: Nonassociated Natural Gas New Reservoir Discoveries in Old Fields,

409

Full-Scale Testing of a Mercury Oxidation Catalyst Upstream of a Wet FGD System  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

2008 2008 contacts thomas J. Feeley III Technology Manager Environmental & Water Resources National Energy Technology Laboratory 626 Cochrans Mill Road P.O. Box 10940 Pittsburgh, PA 15236-0940 412-386-6134 thomas.feeley@netl.doe.gov charles E. Miller Project Manager National Energy Technology Laboratory 626 Cochrans Mill Road P.O. Box 10940 Pittsburgh, PA 15236-0940 412-386-5745 charles.miller@netl.doe.gov Gary Blythe Principal Investigator URS Corp. 9400 Amberglen Blvd. P.O. Box 201088 Austin, Texas 78720 512-419-5321 gary_blythe@urscorp.com Environmental and Water Resources Full-Scale TeSTing oF a Mercury oxidaTion caTalyST upSTreaM oF a WeT Fgd SySTeM Background To provide alternatives for power plant owners to comply with the Clean Air Mercury Rule promulgated by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, NETL is

410

Efficient catalytic wet oxidation of phenol using iron acetylacetonate complexes anchored on carbon nanofibres  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Iron acetylacetonate complexes anchored on oxidized carbon nanofibres (CNFs) were prepared by a three steps procedure: (i) oxidation of commercial \\{CNFs\\} by treatment with HNO3, (ii) synthesis of acetylacetonate (acac) functional groups on the oxidized \\{CNFs\\} surfaces (acac/CNFs) and (iii) iron ions complexation on the acac sites of the \\{CNFs\\} (Fe-acac/CNFs). The surface groups exposed on the functionalized \\{CNFs\\} were characterized by using attenuated total reflectance Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, temperature programmed desorption, thermogravimetric analysis and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. The functionalized \\{CNFs\\} and the iron complexes anchored on the \\{CNFs\\} were tested as heterogeneous catalysts for the wet oxidation of phenol with pure oxygen. Complete phenol conversion and high mineralization values were achieved with fresh and reused Fe-acac/CNFs catalysts, which demonstrate the improved stability of the catalysts under the phenol degradation reaction conditions. Furthermore these conditions are comparatively mild, typically 413 K of reaction temperature and 2.0 MPa of oxygen pressure.

M. Soria-Sánchez; A. Maroto-Valiente; J. Álvarez-Rodríguez; I. Rodríguez-Ramos; A. Guerrero-Ruíz

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

411

Heterogeneity effect on non-wetting phase trapping in strong water drive gas reservoirs  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract In strong water drive gas reservoirs (WDGR), the presence of entrance water in the gas zone has negative effects on the relative permeability; therefore, gas is trapped behind the water front as a non-wetting phase. Understanding WDGR could be complicated and depends on both the petrophysical and operational parameters, such as, reservoir heterogeneity, permeability, production rate and so on. In order to quantify the uncertainty associated with reservoirs, it is critical to create porous media models that incorporate stratigraphic details. In the present study, experimental models were used to simulate WDGR and describe the heterogeneity effect on residual gas saturation and the recovery factor. In models, distinct gas and water (aquifer portion) zones were designed, wherein the ratio of the permeability of the aquifer to the gas zone was varied over three ranges. All tests were conducted in the presence of connate water, and the main WDGR set-up was constructed for high pressure operational conditions. All porous media were characterized by Dykstra–Parsons coefficient as heterogeneity index. The results demonstrate that the residual gas saturation depends on both heterogeneity index and permeability ratio. Results reveal that heterogeneity is not always detrimental to gas recovery. In addition, when the ratio of the aquifer to gas zone permeability is less than one, the amount of trapped gas reduces as the heterogeneity of the porous media increases and consequently, the recovery factor may be improved.

Mohammad Rezaee; Behzad Rostami; Peyman Pourafshary

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

412

Studies on nickel nanoparticle attachment on surface modified carbon nanotubes by wet chemical method  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Wet chemical method is a relatively simple technique, which has been used for attaching nickel nanoparticles homogeneously on multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNT). The MWCNT was synthesised by catalytic chemical vapour deposition (CCVD) method. The surface of MWCNT was modified by treating with boiling conc. nitric acid. Carbon nanotubes dispersed in nickel nitrate solution were heat treated with particular heating rate of 8°C/min from room temperature to 100°C under argon atmosphere and soaked at this temperature for 1 h before heating to 500°C at 4C/min. The resultant product is found to be nanostructured nickel oxide attached to MWCNT. Subsequent reduction of the metal oxide in hydrogen atmosphere yielded nickel nanoparticles anchored to the surface of nanotubes. Chemical impregnation resulted in homogeneously dispersed nickel particles on the surface of oxidised MWCNT whereas in the case of unoxidised MWCNT uneven dispersion of nickel particle was observed. Results obtained on the characterisation of the products from XRD, SEM, TEM and EDX are presented. This simple method could allow large-scale production of functionalised MWCNT, which can be used as catalyst supports with high stability.

Jyoti Prakash; Ramani Venugopalan; D. Sathiyamoorthy

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

413

Critically safe volume vacuum pickup for use in wet or dry cleanup of radioactive enclosures  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A physical compact vacuum pickup device of critically safe volume and geometric shape is provided for use in radioactive enclosures, such as a small glove box, to facilitate manual cleanup of either wet or dry radioactive material. The device is constructed and arranged so as to remain safe when filled to capacity with plutonium-239 oxide. Two fine mesh filter bags are supported on the exterior of a rigid fine mesh stainless steel cup. This assembly is sealed within, and spaced from, the interior walls of a stainless steel canister. An air inlet communicates with the interior of the canister. A modified conventional vacuum head is physically connected to, and associated with, the interior of the mesh cup. The volume of the canister, as defined by the space between the mesh cup and the interior walls of the canister, forms a critically safe volume and geometric shape for dry radioactive particles that are gathered within the canister. A critically safe liquid volume is maintained by operation of a suction terminating float valve, and/or by operation of redundant vacuum check/liquid drain valves and placement of the air inlet. 5 figures.

Zeren, J.D.

1993-12-28T23:59:59.000Z

415

Process Deviation  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

0 Process Deviation 11_0304 Page 1 of 6 0 Process Deviation 11_0304 Page 1 of 6 EOTA - Business Process Document Title: Process Deviation Document Number: P-010 Rev 11-0304 Document Owner: Elizabeth Sousa Backup Owner: Melissa Otero Approver(s): Melissa Otero Parent Document: Q-001, Quality Manual Notify of Changes: EOTA Employees Referenced Document(s): F-013 Process Deviation Form, P-008 Corrective/Preventive Action, F-014 Process Deviation Log, ADMP-001 Procurement Process P-010 Process Deviation 11_0304 Page 2 of 6 Revision History: Rev. Description of Change A Initial Release 08_0822 Process assigned to new owner. Process and flowchart modified to require completion of all items on F-013. 09_0122 Process and flowchart modified to reflect process modifications.

416

Processing Science  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Processing Science Related to the Electron Beam Melting Additive Manufacturing Process October 14 th , 2014 Ryan Dehoff Metal Additive Manufacturing Thrust Lead Manufacturing...

417

Influence of drying temperature on the wet-milling performance and the proteins solubility indexes of corn kernels  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The effects of air drying temperature on the wet-milling performance and the proteins solubility indexes were investigated for corn kernels dried between 54 °C and 130 °C. It was observed that when the drying temperature increases, the starch yield drops significantly. The gluten recovered increased abruptly for drying temperatures up to 80 °C. The albumin, globulin and zein solubility indexes decreased continuously when corn drying temperatures increased. According to the temperatures used, the starch yield, the gluten recovered and the salt-soluble proteins solubility indexes were adjusted satisfactorily by using a two asymptotic logistic model. This model has the advantage of supplying information on the dynamic of the variation of described parameters. The solubility index of total salt-soluble proteins was shown to be a suitable indicator of the severity of the drying treatment in regard to the corn wet-milling performance.

Paul Malumba; Sébastien Janas; Thaddée Masimango; Mariane Sindic; Claude Deroanne; François Béra

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

418

THE SPACE DENSITY EVOLUTION OF WET AND DRY MERGERS IN THE CANADA-FRANCE-HAWAII TELESCOPE LEGACY SURVEY  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We analyze 1298 merging galaxies with redshifts up to z = 0.7 from the Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope Legacy Survey, taken from the catalog presented in the work of Bridge et al. By analyzing the internal colors of these systems, we show that the so-called wet and dry mergers evolve in different senses, and quantify the space densities of these systems. The local space density of wet mergers is essentially identical to the local space density of dry mergers. The evolution in the total merger rate is modest out to z {approx} 0.7, although the wet and dry populations have different evolutionary trends. At higher redshifts, dry mergers make a smaller contribution to the total merging galaxy population, but this is offset by a roughly equivalent increase in the contribution from wet mergers. By comparing the mass density function of early-type galaxies to the corresponding mass density function for merging systems, we show that not all the major mergers with the highest masses (M{sub stellar}>10{sup 11} M{sub sun}) will end up with the most massive early-type galaxies, unless the merging timescale is dramatically longer than that usually assumed. On the other hand, the usually assumed merging timescale of {approx}0.5-1 Gyr is quite consistent with the data if we suppose that only less massive early-type galaxies form via mergers. Since low-intermediate-mass ellipticals are 10-100 times more common than their most massive counterparts, the hierarchical explanation for the origin of early-type galaxies may be correct for the vast majority of early types, even if incorrect for the most massive ones.

Chou, Richard C. Y.; Abraham, Roberto G. [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, University of Toronto, 50 St. George Street, Toronto, ON M5S 3H4 (Canada); Bridge, Carrie R., E-mail: chou@astro.utoronto.ca, E-mail: abraham@astro.utoronto.ca, E-mail: bridge@astro.caltech.edu [California Institute of Technology, 1200 East California Boulevard, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States)

2011-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

419

Separation of Fine Particles from Gases in Wet Flue Gas Desulfurization System Using a Cascade of Double Towers  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Separation of Fine Particles from Gases in Wet Flue Gas Desulfurization System Using a Cascade of Double Towers ... The authors thank the High-Tech Research and Development Program of China (No. 2008AA05Z306), the Natural Science Foundation of Jiangsu Province (No. BK2008283), and the Scientific Research Foundation of Graduate School of Southeast University for their financial support. ... with high performance by cascading packed columns. ...

Jingjing Bao; Linjun Yang; Shijuan Song; Guilong Xiong

2012-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

420

JV Task-123 Determination of Trace Element Concentrations at an Eastern Bituminous Coal Plant Employing an SCR and Wet FGD  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Energy & Environmental Research Center (EERC), in partnership with Babcock & Wilcox (B&W) and with funding from U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), conducting tests to prove that a high level of mercury control (>90%) can be achieved at a power plant burning a high-sulfur eastern bituminous coal. With funding from the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI), DOE, and Center for Air Toxic Metals{reg_sign} (CATM{reg_sign}) Affiliates Program, the EERC completed an additional sampling project to provide data as to the behavior of a number of trace elements across the various pollution control devices, with a special emphasis on the wet flue gas desulfurization (FGD) system. Results showed that the concentrations of almost all the elements of interest leaving the stack were very low, and a high percentage of the trace elements were captured in the electrostatic precipitator (ESP) (for most, >80%). Although, with a few exceptions, the overall mass balances were generally quite good, the mass balances across the wet FGD were more variable. This is most likely a result of some of the concentrations being very low and also the uncertainties in determining flows within a wet FGD.

Dennis Laudal

2008-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "wet process clinker" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

Effect of gaps on the performance of the vertically installed wet thermal insulator  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In SMART, the main flow path of the reactor coolant and the pressurizer partially share common walls in the reactor coolant system. To reduce this heat transfer, the wet thermal insulator (WTI) is installed on the inner wall of the pressurizer. The WTI is constituted of stacked thin stainless steel plates. The water layer width between the plates is chosen to suppress natural convection in each layer. The plates of the WTI require clearance for thermal expansion. When the WTI is installed on a vertical wall, this clearance might cause gaps at the top and bottom at the operating condition. In this study, we focused on the effect of gaps at the both ends on the WTI performance. A numerical simulation was conducted for an 8-layer WTI with gaps at the both ends. To compare with this, a simulation of a WTI without a gap, which is an ideal case, was also conducted. The simulation was conducted in a 2-dimensional manner by a commercial computational fluid dynamics code, FLUENT. The simulations showed that the WTI thermal performance was substantially decreased by a flow that circulated through the top and bottom gaps and water layers at the sides of the WTI. This circulation caused a high temperature difference between the wall and the circulating flow. To find a way to prevent this performance deterioration of the WTI we simulated several cases with the smaller gap heights. However, the flow circulation and the higher heat transfer rate were still observed even at a case with the smallest gap, which seems to be hardly achievable in a real installation. Another way of reducing the flow circulation was suggested and also simulated in this study. (authors)

Kim, S. H.; Kim, Y. I.; Park, C. T.; Choi, S.; Yoon, J. [Korea Atomic Energy Research Inst., Daeduk-daero 989-111, Yuseong-Gu, Daejeon, 305-353 (Korea, Republic of)

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

422

COMPUTATIONAL MODELING OF CATHODIC LIMITATIONS ON LOCALIZED CORROSION OF WETTED SS 316L, AT ROOM TEMPERATURE  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The ability of a SS316L surface wetted with a thin electrolyte layer to serve as an effective cathode for an active localized corrosion site was studied computationally. The dependence of the total net cathodic current, I{sub net}, supplied at the repassivation potential E{sub rp} (of the anodic crevice) on relevant physical parameters including water layer thickness (WL), chloride concentration ([Cl{sup -}]) and length of cathode (Lc) were investigated using a three-level, full factorial design. The effects of kinetic parameters including the exchange current density (i{sub o,c}) and Tafel slope ({beta}{sub c}) of oxygen reduction, the anodic passive current density (i{sub p}) (on the cathodic surface), and E{sub rp} were studied as well using three-level full factorial designs of [Cl{sup -}] and Lc with a fixed WL of 25 {micro}m. The study found that all the three parameters WL, [Cl{sup -}] and Lc as well as the interactions of Lc x WL and Lc x [Cl{sup -}] had significant impact on I{sub net}. A five-factor regression equation was obtained which fits the computation results reasonably well, but demonstrated that interactions are more complicated than can be explained with a simple linear model. Significant effects on I{sub net} were found upon varying either i{sub o,c}, {beta}{sub c}, or E{sub rp}, whereas i{sub p} in the studied range was found to have little impact. It was observed that I{sub net} asymptotically approached maximum values (I{sub max}) when Lc increased to critical minimum values. I{sub max} can be used to determine the stability of coupled localized corrosion and the critical Lc provides important information for experimental design and corrosion protection.

F. Cui; F.J. Presuel-Moreno; R.G. Kelly

2005-10-13T23:59:59.000Z

423

Stability of ruthenium catalysts supported by aerogel mixed oxides during the wet air oxidation of p-hydroxybenzoic acid in a continuous reactor  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Continuous catalytic wet air oxidation was investigated as a suitable treatment of p-hydroxybenzoic acid chosen as a phenolic compound typically found in olive mill wastewater. The reaction was conducted in a con...

Mohamed Triki; Anton Dafinov; Jordi Llorca…

2012-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

424

Corrosion of weathering steel and iron under wet-dry cycling conditions: Influence of the rise of temperature during the dry period  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The effect of a dry-hot period on the SO2...corrosion of weatherig steel and pure iron under wet-dry cycling was investigated. Corrosion products were identified by Mössbauer spectroscopy and X-ray powder diffrac...

J. Davalos; M. Gracia; J. F. Marco; J. R. Gancedo

1992-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

425

Process Deviation  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

10 Course/Analysis Initiation Process 11_0512 Page 1 of 6 10 Course/Analysis Initiation Process 11_0512 Page 1 of 6 EOTA - Business Process Document Title: Course/Analysis Initiation Process Document Number: ISDP- 010 Rev 11_0512 Document Owner: Elizabeth Sousa Backup Owner: Vickie Pleau Approver(s): Melissa Otero Parent Document: ISDP-002, Training Production Process Notify of Changes: ISD, ITT, MGT Referenced Document(s): ISDF-001 Technical Direction, ISDF-035 Analysis Feasibility Assessment, ISDP-010, Course Analysis Initiation Process, ISDP-015, WBT/ILT/Ex Design Process ISDP-010 Course/Analysis Initiation Process 11_0512 Page 2 of 6 Revision History: Rev. Description of Change 10_0630 Initial Release 11_0512 Modified verbiage for clarification and updated referenced documents.

426

Process Deviation  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

4 Course Evaluation and Close-out Process 10_0630 Page 1 of 5 4 Course Evaluation and Close-out Process 10_0630 Page 1 of 5 EOTA - Business Process Document Title: Course Evaluation and Close-out Process Document Number: ISDP-014 Rev. 10_0630 Document Owner: Vickie Pleau Backup Owner: Melissa Otero Approver(s): Melissa Otero Parent Document: ISDP-002, Training Production Process Notify of Changes: ISD, ITT, MGT Referenced Document(s): ISDF-011, ISD History File Acceptance, ISDF-012, ISD History File Checklist ISDP-014 Course Evaluation and Close-out Process 10_0630 Page 2 of 5 Revision History: Rev. Description of Change 10_0630 Initial Release ISDP-014 Course Evaluation and Close-out Process 10_0630 Page 3 of 5 I. Purpose To effectively plan and control the process for evaluating and finalizing EOTA ILT, EX and WBT training products, assuring

427

Thermal Processes  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Some thermal processes use the energy in various resources, such as natural gas, coal, or biomass, to release hydrogen, which is part of their molecular structure. In other processes, heat, in...

428

Photolytic Processes  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Photolytic processes use the energy in sunlight to separate water into hydrogen and oxygen. These processes are in the very early stages of research but offer long-term potential for sustainable...

429

TASK TECHNICAL AND QUALITY ASSURANCE PLAN FOR OUT-OF-TANK DESTRUCTION OF TETRAPHENYLBORATE VIA WET AIR OXIDATION TECHNOLOGY: PHASE I - BENCH SCALE TESTS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Tank 48H return to service is critical to the processing of high level waste (HLW) at Savannah River Site (SRS). Liquid Waste Disposition (LWD) management has the goal of returning Tank 48H to routine service by January 2010 or as soon as practical. Tank 48H currently holds legacy material containing organic tetraphenylborate (TPB) compounds from the operation of the In-Tank Precipitation process. This material is not compatible with the waste treatment facilities at SRS and must be removed or undergo treatment to destroy the organic compounds before the tank can be returned to Tank Farm service. Tank 48H currently contains {approx}240,000 gallons of alkaline slurry with about 2 wt % potassium and cesium tetraphenylborate (KTPB and CsTPB). The main radioactive component in Tank 48H is {sup 137}Cs. The waste also contains {approx}0.15 wt % Monosodium Titanate (MST) which has adsorbed {sup 90}Sr, U, and Pu isotopes. A System Engineering Evaluation of technologies/ideas for the treatment of TPB identified Wet Air Oxidation (WAO) as a leading alternative technology to the baseline aggregation approach. Over 75 technologies/ideas were evaluated overall. Forty-one technologies/ideas passed the initial screening evaluation. The 41 technologies/ideas were then combined to 16 complete solutions for the disposition of TPB and evaluated in detail. Wet Air Oxidation (WAO) is an aqueous phase process in which soluble or suspended waste components are oxidized using molecular oxygen contained in air. The process operates at elevated temperatures and pressures ranging from 150 to 320 C and 7 to 210 atmospheres, respectively. The products of the reaction are CO{sub 2}, H{sub 2}O, and low molecular weight oxygenated organics (e.g. acetate, oxalate). The basic flow scheme for a typical WAO system is as follows. The waste solution or slurry is pumped through a high-pressure feed pump. An air stream containing sufficient oxygen to meet the oxygen requirements of the waste stream is injected into the pressurized waste stream, and the air/liquid mixture is preheated to the required reactor inlet temperature. The reactor provides sufficient retention time to allow the oxidation to approach the desired level of organic decomposition. Typical reaction time is about 30-120 minutes. Heat exchangers are routinely employed to recover energy contained in the reactor effluent to preheat the waste feed/air entering the reactor. Auxiliary energy, usually steam, is necessary for startup and can provide trim heat if required. Since the oxidation reactions are exothermic, sufficient energy may be released in the reactor to allow the WAO system to operate without any additional heat input. After cooling, the oxidized reactor effluent passes through a pressure control valve where the pressure is reduced. A separator downstream of the pressure control valve allows the depressurized and cooled vapor to separate from the liquid. Typical industrial WAO applications have a feed flow rate of 1 to 220 gallons per minute (gpm) per train, with a chemical oxygen demand (COD) from 10,000 to 150,000 mg/L (higher CODs with dilution). Note that catalysts, such as homogeneous copper and iron, their heterogeneous counterparts, or precious metals can be used to enhance the effectiveness (i.e., to lower temperature, pressure, and residence time as well as increase oxidation efficiencies) of the WAO reaction if deemed necessary.

Adu-Wusu, K

2006-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

430

Electric utility engineer`s FGD manual -- Volume 1: FGD process design. Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Part 1 of the Electric Utility Engineer`s Flue Gas Desulfurization (FGD) Manual emphasizes the chemical and physical processes that form the basis for design and operation of lime- and limestone-based FGD systems applied to coal- or oil-fired steam electric generating stations. The objectives of Part 1 are: to provide a description of the chemical and physical design basis for lime- and limestone-based wet FGD systems; to identify and discuss the various process design parameters and process options that must be considered in developing a specification for a new FGD system; and to provide utility engineers with process knowledge useful for operating and optimizing a lime- or limestone-based wet FGD system.

NONE

1996-03-04T23:59:59.000Z

431

Process Deviation  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

5 WBT/ILT/EX Course Design Process 10_0630 Page 1 of 6 5 WBT/ILT/EX Course Design Process 10_0630 Page 1 of 6 EOTA - Business Process Document Title: WBT/ILT/EX Course Design Process Document Number: ISDP-015 Rev. 10_0630 Document Owner: Elizabeth Sousa Backup Owner: Melissa Otero Approver(s): Melissa Otero Parent Document: ISDP-002, Training Production Process Notify of Changes: ISD, ITT, MGT Referenced Document(s): ISDF-046 Training Design/Development Summary, ISDF-004 Design Document, ISDF-006A WBT Script Template, ISDF- 007 Lesson Plan Template, ISDF-012, ISD History File Checklist ISDP-015 WBT/ILT/EX Course Design Process 10_0630 Page 2 of 6 Revision History: Rev. Description of Change 10_0630 Initial Release ISDP-015 WBT/ILT/EX Course Design Process 10_0630 Page 3 of 6

432

Process Deviation  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

7 Exercise Development Process 11_0414 Page 1 of 8 7 Exercise Development Process 11_0414 Page 1 of 8 EOTA - Business Process Document Title: Exercise Development Process Document Number: ISDP-017 Revision 11_0414 Document Owner: Elizabeth Sousa Backup Owner: Melissa Otero Approver(s): Melissa Otero Parent Document: ISDP-002, Training Product Process Notify of Changes: ISD, ITT, MGT Referenced Document(s): ISDF-001 Technical Direction, ISDF-004 Design Document, ISDF-006 WBT Script Template, ISDF-007 Lesson Plan Template, ITTP-016 WBT Programming ISDP-017 Exercise Development Process 11_0414 Page 2 of 8 Revision History: Rev. Description of Change 10_0630 Initial Release 11_0223 Made changes to accurately reflect TPP. 11_0414 Added Derivative Classifier to step 12.0 ISDP-017 Exercise Development Process 11_0414 Page 3 of 8

433

Process Deviation  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

5 Website Development-Maintenance Process 11_0419Page 1 of 6 5 Website Development-Maintenance Process 11_0419Page 1 of 6 EOTA - Business Process Document Title: Website Development-Maintenance Process Document Number: ITTP-015 Rev. 11_0419 Document Owner: Benjamin Aragon Backup Owner: Melissa Otero Approver(s): Melissa Otero Parent Document: Q-001, Quality Manual Notify of Changes: ITT Referenced Document(s): ITTF-016 Website Development/Maintenance Log, ISDP-002 Training Production Process ITTP-015 Website Development-Maintenance Process 11_0419Page 2 of 6 Revision History: Rev. Description of Change A Initial Release 11_0419 Deleted decision point 2.1 and 2.2, incorporated Notifying Requester into step 2.0, modified verbiage for clarification. ITTP-015 Website Development-Maintenance Process 11_0419Page 3 of 6

434

Field Testing of a Wet FGD Additive for Enhanced Mercury Control - Task 5 Full-Scale Test Results  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This Topical Report summarizes progress on Cooperative Agreement DE-FC26-04NT42309, 'Field Testing of a Wet FGD Additive'. The objective of the project is to demonstrate the use of two flue gas desulfurization (FGD) additives, Evonik Degussa Corporation's TMT-15 and Nalco Company's Nalco 8034, to prevent the re-emission of elemental mercury (Hg{sup 0}) in flue gas exiting wet FGD systems on coal-fired boilers. Furthermore, the project intends to demonstrate whether the additive can be used to precipitate most of the mercury (Hg) removed in the wet FGD system as a fine salt that can be separated from the FGD liquor and bulk solid byproducts for separate disposal. The project is conducting pilot- and full-scale tests of the additives in wet FGD absorbers. The tests are intended to determine required additive dosages to prevent Hg{sup 0} re-emissions and to separate mercury from the normal FGD byproducts for three coal types: Texas lignite/Powder River Basin (PRB) coal blend, high-sulfur Eastern bituminous coal, and low-sulfur Eastern bituminous coal. The project team consists of URS Group, Inc., EPRI, Luminant Power (was TXU Generation Company LP), Southern Company, IPL (an AES company), Evonik Degussa Corporation and the Nalco Company. Luminant Power has provided the Texas lignite/PRB co-fired test site for pilot FGD tests and cost sharing. Southern Company has provided the low-sulfur Eastern bituminous coal host site for wet scrubbing tests, as well as the pilot- and full-scale jet bubbling reactor (JBR) FGD systems tested. IPL provided the high-sulfur Eastern bituminous coal full-scale FGD test site and cost sharing. Evonik Degussa Corporation is providing the TMT-15 additive, and the Nalco Company is providing the Nalco 8034 additive. Both companies are also supplying technical support to the test program as in-kind cost sharing. The project is being conducted in six tasks. Of the six project tasks, Task 1 involves project planning and Task 6 involves management and reporting. The other four tasks involve field testing on FGD systems, either at pilot or full scale. The four tasks include: Task 2 - Pilot Additive Testing in Texas Lignite Flue Gas; Task 3 - Full-scale FGD Additive Testing in High-sulfur Eastern Bituminous Flue Gas; Task 4 - Pilot Wet Scrubber Additive Tests at Plant Yates; and Task 5 - Full-scale Additive Tests at Plant Yates. The pilot-scale tests and the full-scale test using high-sulfur coal were completed in 2005 and 2006 and have been previously reported. This topical report presents the results from the Task 5 full-scale additive tests, conducted at Southern Company's Plant Yates Unit 1. Both additives were tested there.

Gary Blythe; MariJon Owens

2007-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

435

Table 9. Total U.S. proved reserves of wet natural gas and dry natural gas, 2001-2011  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

: Total U.S. proved reserves of wet natural gas and dry natural gas, 2001-2011 : Total U.S. proved reserves of wet natural gas and dry natural gas, 2001-2011 billion cubic feet Revisions a Net of Sales b New Reservoir Proved d Change Net and and New Field Discoveries Total c Estimated Reserves from Adjustments Revisions Adjustments Acquisitions Extensions Discoveries in Old Fields Discoveries Production 12/31 Prior Year Year (1) (2) (3) (4) (5) (6) (7) (8) (9) (10) (11) Wet Natural Gas (billion cubic feet) 2001 1,849 -2,438 -589 2,715 17,183 3,668 2,898 23,749 20,642 191,743 5,233 2002 4,006 1,038 5,044 428 15,468 1,374 1,752 18,594 20,248 195,561 3,818 2003 2,323 -1,715 608 1,107 17,195 1,252 1,653 20,100 20,231 197,145 1,584 2004 170 825 995 1,975 19,068 790 1,244 21,102 20,017 201,200 4,055 2005 1,693 2,715 4,408 2,674 22,069 973 1,243 24,285 19,259 213,308 12,108 2006 946 -2,099 -1,153 3,178 22,834 425 1,197 24,456 19,373 220,416

436

Comparison of thermoelectric and permeation dryers for sulfur dioxide removal during sample conditioning of wet gas streams  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Flue gas conditioning for moisture removal is commonly performed for criteria pollutant measurements, in particular for extractive CEM systems at combustion sources. An implicit assumption is that conditioning systems specifically remove moisture without affecting pollutant and diluent concentrations. Gas conditioning is usually performed by passing the flue gas through a cold trap (Peltier or thermoelectric dryer) to remove moisture by condensation, which is subsequently extracted by a peristaltic pump. Many air pollutants are water-soluble and potentially susceptible to removal in a condensation dryer from gas interaction with liquid water. An alternative technology for gas conditioning is the permeation dryer, where the flue gas passes through a selectively permeable membrane for moisture removal. In this case water is transferred through the membrane while other pollutants are excluded, and the gas does not contact condensed liquid. Laboratory experiments were performed to measure the relative removal of a water-soluble pollutant (sulfur dioxide, SO{sub 2}) by the two conditioning techniques. A wet gas generating system was used to create hot, wet gas streams of known composition (15% and 30% moisture, balance nitrogen) and flow rate. Pre-heated SO{sub 2} was dynamically spiked into the wet stream using mass flow meters to achieve concentrations of 20, 50, and 100 ppm. The spiked gas was directed through a heated sample line to either a thermoelectric or a permeation conditioning system. Two gas analyzers (Western Research UV gas monitor, KVB/Analect FTIR spectrometer) were used to measure the SO{sub 2} concentration after conditioning. Both analytic methods demonstrated that SO{sub 2} is removed to a significantly greater extent by the thermoelectric dryer. These results have important implications for SO{sub 2} monitoring and emissions trading.

Dunder, T.A. [Entropy, Inc., Research Triangle Park, NC (United States). Research Div.; Leighty, D.A. [Perma Pure, Inc., Toms River, NJ (United States)

1997-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

437

Maximal Replacement of Forage and Concentrate with a New Wet Corn Milling Product for Lactating Dairy Cows  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Three experiments were conducted to determine the maximal amount of concentrate and forage that could be replaced with a new wet corn milling product. The corn milling product contained 23.1% crude protein, 9.9% ruminally undegradable protein, 13.7% acid detergent fiber, 40.3% neutral detergent fiber, and 2.6% ether extract (% of dry matter; DM). In experiment 1, 16 Holstein cows were assigned to one of four diets in a replicated 4 × 4 Latin square design with 28-d periods. The four diets contained 54.3% forage (alfalfa:corn silages, 1:1 DM basis) with the wet corn milling product replacing 0, 50, 75, or 100% of the concentrate portion (corn and soybean meal) of the diet (DM basis). The diets containing wet corn milling product resulted in 7.8% lower DM intake, equivalent milk production (28.5 kg/d), and 13.6% greater efficiency of 4% fat-corrected milk (FCM) production than the control diet. There was no effect of diet on ruminal pH. In experiment 2, 16 Holstein cows were assigned to one of four diets in a replicated 4 × 4 Latin square design with 28-d periods. The 100% concentrate replacement diet from experiment 1 was used as control diet. For the test diets, forage was replaced with 15, 30, or 45% of the corn milling product (DM basis). Efficiency of FCM production (1.16) was not affected by diet. Rumination time was reduced for the 30 and 45% forage replacement diets, but ruminal pH was unaffected. In experiment 3, 30 Holstein cows were assigned at parturition to either a control diet (no corn milling product) or a diet containing 40% corn milling feed in place of both forage and concentrate (optimal levels from experiments 1 and 2) for 9 wk. The diet containing corn milling feed resulted in 21% greater efficiency of FCM production than the control diet. These results indicate that a new feed product based on wet corn milling ingredients has the potential to effectively replace all of the concentrate and up to 45% of the forage in the diet for lactating dairy cows.

K. Boddugari; R.J. Grant; R. Stock; M. Lewis

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

438

Assessment of TEES reg sign applications for Wet Industrial Wastes: Energy benefit and economic analysis report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Fundamental work is catalyzed biomass pyrolysis/gasification led to the Thermochemical Environmental Energy System (TEES{reg sign}) concept, a means of converting moist biomass feedstocks to high-value fuel gases such as methane. A low-temperature (350{degrees}C), pressurized (3100 psig) reaction environment and a nickel catalyst are used to reduce volumes of very high-moisture wastes such as food processing byproducts while producing useful quantities of energy. A study was conducted to assess the economic viability of a range of potential applications of the process. Cases examined included feedstocks of cheese whey, grape pomace, spent grain, and an organic chemical waste stream. The analysis indicated that only the organic chemical waste process is economically attractive in the existing energy/economic environment. However, food processing cases will become attractive as alternative disposal practices are curtailed and energy prices rise.

Elliott, D.C.; Scheer, T.H.

1992-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

439

Tailoring hydrodynamics of non-wetting droplets with nano-engineered surfaces  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Considering that contacts between liquid and solid are ubiquitous in almost all energy processes, including steam turbines, oil pumping, condensers and boilers, the efficiency of energy transportation can be maximized such ...

Kwon, Hyuk-Min

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

440

Fundamentals of Nucleate Pool Boiling of Highly-Wetting Dielectric Liquids  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Direct cooling with inert, dielectric liquids may well become the technique of choice for the thermal management of future electronic systems. Due to the efficiency of phase-change processes and the simplicity...

Avram Bar-Cohen

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "wet process clinker" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

Process Deviation  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

5 Functional/Job/Task Analysis Process 11_0718 Page 1 of 8 5 Functional/Job/Task Analysis Process 11_0718 Page 1 of 8 EOTA - Business Process Document Title: Functional/Job/Task Analysis Process Document Number: ISDP-005 Rev 11_0718 Document Owner: Elizabeth Sousa Backup Owner: Melissa Otero Approver(s): Melissa Otero Parent Document: Q-001, Quality Manual Notify of Changes: PM2 Referenced Document(s): ISDF-XXX Vision User Guide (currently being developed ) ISDP-005 Functional/Job/Task Analysis Process 11_0718 Page 2 of 8 Revision History: Rev. Description of Change 08_0410 Initial Release 10_0630 Process modified to match steps within the TPP 11_0718 Minor editorial changes; changed step 8.0 from Task-to-Training Matrix to "Analysis"-to-Training Matrix.

442

Proposal Process  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Testbed Results Current Testbed Research Proposal Process Terms and Conditions Dark Fiber Testbed Performance (perfSONAR) Software & Tools Development Partnerships...

443

Table 13. Associated-dissolved natural gas proved reserves, reserves changes, and production, wet after lease separation, 2011  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

: Associated-dissolved natural gas proved reserves, reserves changes, and production, wet after lease separation, 2011 : Associated-dissolved natural gas proved reserves, reserves changes, and production, wet after lease separation, 2011 billion cubic feet Published New Reservoir Proved Revision Revision New Field Discoveries Estimated Proved Reserves Adjustments Increases Decreases Sales Acquisitions Extensions Discoveries in Old Fields Production Reserves State and Subdivision 12/31/10 (+,-) (+) (-) (-) (+) (+) (+) (+) (-) 12/31/11 Alaska 7,896 -1 843 79 2 51 3 0 0 176 8,535 Lower 48 States 27,850 391 7,245 5,874 1,336 1,833 5,954 611 160 2,546 34,288 Alabama 38 3 2 0 9 20 0 2 0 8 48 Arkansas 29 24 50 13 38 0 0 0 0 6 46 California 2,282 929 1,424 1,927 1 11 74 0 0 260 2,532 Coastal Region Onshore 178 15 21 31 0 0 1 0 0 12 172 Los Angeles Basin Onshore 92 6 12 4 0 3 0 0 0 7 102 San Joaquin Basin Onshore 1,949 907 1,382 1,892 0 0 70 0 0 237 2,179 State Offshore 63 1 9 0 1 8 3 0 0 4 79

444

Reel-to-reel wet coating by variation of solvents and compounds of photoactive inks for polymer solar cell production  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In this paper we report about some aspects and the progress reached in the reel-to-reel (R2R) solvent-based production of polymer solar cells. In awareness of the huge advantages in energy and material savings the hole-injection and the photoactive layer were successfully prepared by continuous slot-die wet coating of low viscosity inks. The objective was to obtain higher values of light power conversion efficiencies for reducing the gap between production under optimal laboratory conditions via spin-coating on rigid substrates in comparison to the more robust and practically significant large-scale coating of flexible substrates. For this purpose, solvent systems were varied and a new fullerene used as electron–acceptor, leading to the highest light power conversion efficiencies (?=4.55%) described for polymer solar cells (PSCs) on flexible substrates up to now. \\{PSCs\\} manufactured from continuously coated foils by using a small-scale laboratory R2R-coating machine yield a maximum value of ?=3.2%. With respect to environmental, safety and technological demands, reel-to-reel wet coating with a change to non-halogenated inks was also successfully carried out in order to learn more about its technological suitability and to allow the transfer of the results afterwards to other, more efficient material systems.

Mario Schrödner; Steffi Sensfuss; Hannes Schache; Karin Schultheis; Thomas Welzel; Klaus Heinemann; Roland Milker; Jan Marten; Lars Blankenburg

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

445

A study of the interaction of gallium arsenide with wet chemical formulations using thermodynamic calculations and spectroscopic ellipsometry  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This paper investigates the effectiveness of different wet chemical treatments and their ability to produce/regrow a thin, stable surface oxide layer on GaAs. Results from thermodynamic considerations indicate that a stable surface oxide layer, free of excess arsenic and arsenic oxides, can be achieved by properly choosing aqueous solutions targeted within the GaAs solubility range (pH  11) followed by deionized (DI) water rinsing. This is further corroborated by spectroscopic ellipsometric data that can qualitatively, but correctly, identify the thickness of the surface oxide layer after different wet chemical treatments. Specifically, samples treated with acidic solutions based on HCl, HF, and H3PO4 and diluted ammonium hydroxide solution produce a more stable surface layer that is thinner than the native oxide layer on GaAs. The results and subsequent discussion are presented in the context of an attempt at achieving a well passivated GaAs surface, free of excessive surface state defects responsible for Fermi-level pinning.

J. Price; J. Barnett; S. Raghavan; M. Keswani; R. Govindarajan

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

446

Getting their feet wet: Young water researchers learn the ropes, thanks to grants  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

txH2O | pg. 26 Story by Leslie Lee Writing a proposal for a competitive grant program can be complicated, but add in calculating indirect costs and securing a cost-share agreement, and the process of applying for a research grant could...

Lee, Leslie

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

447

Getting their feet wet: Young water researchers learn the ropes, thanks to grants  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

txH2O | pg. 26 Story by Leslie Lee Writing a proposal for a competitive grant program can be complicated, but add in calculating indirect costs and securing a cost-share agreement, and the process of applying for a research grant could...

Lee, Leslie

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

448

HYDROLOGICAL PROCESSES Hydrol. Process. (2011)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

HYDROLOGICAL PROCESSES Hydrol. Process. (2011) Published online in Wiley Online Library (wileyonlinelibrary.com). DOI: 10.1002/hyp.8056 Hydrological principles for sustainable management of forest of the cleanest and most plentiful freshwater supplies, sustaining many downstream communities. Given the ongoing

449

Process Deviation  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

2 ILT Course Implementation 11_0512 Page 1 of 8 2 ILT Course Implementation 11_0512 Page 1 of 8 EOTA - Business Process Document Title: ILT Course Implementation Document Number: ISDP-012 Rev. 11_0512 Document Owner: Elizabeth Sousa Backup Owner: Melissa Otero Approver(s): Melissa Otero Parent Document: ISDP-002, Training Production Process Notify of Changes: ISD, ITT, MGT Referenced Document(s): ISDF-007 Lesson Plan Template, ISDF-014 Course Announcement, ISDF-010, After Action Report, ISDF-008 ILT Student Feedback Survey, ISDF-009, Design/Development Review Checklist, ITTF-014 Publication Review and Approval, ISDF-048, After Action Report Calculation Template, ISDP-011, Exercise Course Implementation Process, ITTP-015 Website Development/Maintenance Process, ISDF-015, ILT/EX Course Support Checklist

450

Macdonald processes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Macdonald processes are probability measures on sequences of partitions defined in terms of nonnegative specializations of the Macdonald symmetric functions and two Macdonald parameters q,t ? [0,1). We prove several results ...

Borodin, Alexei

451

Ionic Processes  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Processes based on the properties of ions, encountered in brackish and seawater, are described and discussed in this chapter. Whereas in distillation the amount and kind of salts contained in the raw feed wate...

Anthony A. Delyannis; Eurydike A. Delyannis

1974-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

452

Integrated Constraint Programming Scheduling Approach for Automated Wet-Etch Stations in Semiconductor Manufacturing  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The exceptions in terms of the development of effective and efficient search strategies, which are a fundamental support for solving hard combinatorial optimization problems,(7) are the papers by Zeballos and Henning(12) and Zeballos and Méndez. ... In this respect, the proposed formulation takes advantage of the simplicity and the declarative power of the paradigm and is oriented to short-term scheduling. ... After processing in the last bath, lots enter the output buffer. ...

Luis J. Zeballos; Pedro M. Castro; Carlos A. Me?ndez

2010-12-28T23:59:59.000Z

453

Macdonald processes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Macdonald processes are probability measures on sequences of partitions defined in terms of nonnegative specializations of the Macdonald symmetric functions and two Macdonald parameters q,t in [0,1). We prove several results about these processes, which include the following. (1) We explicitly evaluate expectations of a rich family of observables for these processes. (2) In the case t=0, we find a Fredholm determinant formula for a q-Laplace transform of the distribution of the last part of the Macdonald-random partition. (3) We introduce Markov dynamics that preserve the class of Macdonald processes and lead to new "integrable" 2d and 1d interacting particle systems. (4) In a large time limit transition, and as q goes to 1, the particles of these systems crystallize on a lattice, and fluctuations around the lattice converge to O'Connell's Whittaker process that describe semi-discrete Brownian directed polymers. (5) This yields a Fredholm determinant for the Laplace transform of the polymer partition function, and taking its asymptotics we prove KPZ universality for the polymer (free energy fluctuation exponent 1/3 and Tracy-Widom GUE limit law). (6) Under intermediate disorder scaling, we recover the Laplace transform of the solution of the KPZ equation with narrow wedge initial data. (7) We provide contour integral formulas for a wide array of polymer moments. (8) This results in a new ansatz for solving quantum many body systems such as the delta Bose gas.

Alexei Borodin; Ivan Corwin

2013-01-06T23:59:59.000Z

454

Design and test of a wet type helium turbo-expander with an alternator as a brake  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A wet type helium turbo-expander with expected adiabatic efficiency of 70% at inlet pressure, temperature, and outlet pressure of 1.3 MPa, 6.0 K, and 0.2 MPa, respectively, has been developed. An alternator is adopted as a brake where a permanent magnet is held in the turbine shaft. And a self-acting gas bearing is used at thrust and journal bearings. An electromagnet supports thrust bearing to lift up the thrust disk when initiating operation. Design mass flow rate of the turbine is determined to be 60 g/s, corresponding to the JT mass flow rate in the existing helium liquefier/refrigerator. In the cryogenic performance test, the turbine had increased helium liquefaction rate by four times larger than the liquefaction rate without turbine operation.

Kato, T.; Miyake, A.; Kawano, K.; Hamada, K.; Hiyama, T.; Iwamoto, S.; Ebisu, H.; Tsuji, H. [Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute, Ibaraki-ken (Japan); Saji, N.; Kaneko, Y. [Ishikawajima-Harima Heavy Industries Co. Ltd., Tokyo (Japan)] [and others

1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

455

Substrate-dependent wetting layer formation during GaN growth: Impact on the morphology of the films  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We have compared epitaxial growth of GaN films on 6H-SiC(0001)-({radical}(3)x{radical}(3))R30 deg. -Ga and on (0001)-sapphire. Predeposited Ga layers were nitrided by ion beam assisted molecular beam epitaxy. Whereas on SiC the initially deposited Ga covers the substrate surface completely, on sapphire only Ga droplets are present. The different distribution of the predeposited Ga affects the morphology of GaN significantly. Scanning electron microscopy and atomic force microscopy analysis of the grown films show that the complete wetting of the SiC substrate with Ga enhances finally the size and the flatness of GaN terraces and thus the quality of the film. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy measurements reveal that metallic Ga resides also on top of the GaN films during the growth.

Sidorenko, A.; Peisert, H.; Neumann, H.; Chasse, T. [Universitaet Tuebingen, Institut fuer Physikalische und Theoretische Chemie, Auf der Morgenstelle 8, D-72076 Tuebingen (Germany); Leibniz-Institut fuer Oberflaechenmodifizierung e.V. Permoserstrasse 15, D-04318 Leipzig (Germany); Universitaet Tuebingen, Institut fuer Physikalische und Theoretische Chemie, Auf der Morgenstelle 8, D-72076 Tuebingen (Germany)

2007-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

456

Large-Scale Mercury Control Technology Testing for Lignite-Fired Utilities - Oxidation Systems for Wet FGD  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Mercury (Hg) control technologies were evaluated at Minnkota Power Cooperative's Milton R. Young (MRY) Station Unit 2, a 450-MW lignite-fired cyclone unit near Center, North Dakota, and TXU Energy's Monticello Steam Electric Station (MoSES) Unit 3, a 793-MW lignite--Powder River Basin (PRB) subbituminous coal-fired unit near Mt. Pleasant, Texas. A cold-side electrostatic precipitator (ESP) and wet flue gas desulfurization (FGD) scrubber are used at MRY and MoSES for controlling particulate and sulfur dioxide (SO{sub 2}) emissions, respectively. Several approaches for significantly and cost-effectively oxidizing elemental mercury (Hg{sup 0}) in lignite combustion flue gases, followed by capture in an ESP and/or FGD scrubber were evaluated. The project team involved in performing the technical aspects of the project included Babcock & Wilcox, the Energy & Environmental Research Center (EERC), the Electric Power Research Institute, and URS Corporation. Calcium bromide (CaBr{sub 2}), calcium chloride (CaCl{sub 2}), magnesium chloride (MgCl{sub 2}), and a proprietary sorbent enhancement additive (SEA), hereafter referred to as SEA2, were added to the lignite feeds to enhance Hg capture in the ESP and/or wet FGD. In addition, powdered activated carbon (PAC) was injected upstream of the ESP at MRY Unit 2. The work involved establishing Hg concentrations and removal rates across existing ESP and FGD units, determining costs associated with a given Hg removal efficiency, quantifying the balance-of-plant impacts of the control technologies, and facilitating technology commercialization. The primary project goal was to achieve ESP-FGD Hg removal efficiencies of {ge}55% at MRY and MoSES for about a month.

Steven A. Benson; Michael J. Holmes; Donald P. McCollor; Jill M. Mackenzie; Charlene R. Crocker; Lingbu Kong; Kevin C. Galbreath

2007-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

457

Deposition Process  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Pulsed Plasma Processing Pulsed Plasma Processing NEW: Downloadable: Invited Talk "Pulsed Metal Plasmas," presented at the 2006 AVS Meeting, San Francisco, California, November 15, 2006. (PDF, file size 8 MB). Plasma Sources for Window Coatings Deposition processes for low-emittance and solar control coatings can be improved through the use of advanced plasma technology developed at LBNL. A new type of constricted glow-discharge plasma source was selected for the 1997 R&D 100 Award. Invented by LBNL researchers Andre Anders, Mike Rubin, and Mike Dickinson, the source was designed to be compatible with industrial vacuum deposition equipment and practice. Construction is simple, rugged and inexpensive. It can operate indefinitely over a wide range of chamber pressure without any consumable parts such as filaments or grids. Several different gases including Argon, Oxygen and Nitrogen have been tested successfully.

458

Process Deviation  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

3 WBT Course Implementation 11_0512 Page 1 of 7 3 WBT Course Implementation 11_0512 Page 1 of 7 EOTA - Business Process Document Title: WBT Course Implementation Document Number: ISDP-013 Rev. 11_0512 Document Owner: Elizabeth Sousa Backup Owner: Vickie Pleau Approver(s): Melissa Otero Parent Document: ISDP-002, Training Product Process Notify of Changes: ISD, ITT, MGT Referenced Document(s): ISDF-014, Course Announcement Template, ITTF-014, Publication Review and Approval, ISDF-010 After Action Report, ISDF-042 Validation & Acceptance, ISDF-048, After Action Report Calculation Template, ITTP-015, Website Development Maintenance ISDP-013 WBT Course Implementation 11_0512 Page 2 of 7 Revision History: Rev. Description of Change 10_0630 Initial Release 11_0405 Added ISDF-048, After Action Report Calculation Template to process.

459

DESTRUCTION OF TETRAPHENYLBORATE IN TANK 48H USING WET AIR OXIDATION BATCH BENCH SCALE AUTOCLAVE TESTING WITH ACTUAL RADIOACTIVE TANK 48H WASTE  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Wet Air Oxidation (WAO) is one of the two technologies being considered for the destruction of Tetraphenylborate (TPB) in Tank 48H. Batch bench-scale autoclave testing with radioactive (actual) Tank 48H waste is among the tests required in the WAO Technology Maturation Plan. The goal of the autoclave testing is to validate that the simulant being used for extensive WAO vendor testing adequately represents the Tank 48H waste. The test objective was to demonstrate comparable test results when running simulated waste and real waste under similar test conditions. Specifically: (1) Confirm the TPB destruction efficiency and rate (same reaction times) obtained from comparable simulant tests, (2) Determine the destruction efficiency of other organics including biphenyl, (3) Identify and quantify the reaction byproducts, and (4) Determine off-gas composition. Batch bench-scale stirred autoclave tests were conducted with simulated and actual Tank 48H wastes at SRNL. Experimental conditions were chosen based on continuous-flow pilot-scale simulant testing performed at Siemens Water Technologies Corporation (SWT) in Rothschild, Wisconsin. The following items were demonstrated as a result of this testing. (1) Tetraphenylborate was destroyed to below detection limits during the 1-hour reaction time at 280 C. Destruction efficiency of TPB was > 99.997%. (2) Other organics (TPB associated compounds), except biphenyl, were destroyed to below their respective detection limits. Biphenyl was partially destroyed in the process, mainly due to its propensity to reside in the vapor phase during the WAO reaction. Biphenyl is expected to be removed in the gas phase during the actual process, which is a continuous-flow system. (3) Reaction byproducts, remnants of MST, and the PUREX sludge, were characterized in this work. Radioactive species, such as Pu, Sr-90 and Cs-137 were quantified in the filtrate and slurry samples. Notably, Cs-137, boron and potassium were shown as soluble as a result of the WAO reaction. (4) Off-gas composition was measured in the resulting gas phase from the reaction. Benzene and hydrogen were formed during the reaction, but they were reasonably low in the off-gas at 0.096 and 0.0063 vol% respectively. Considering the consistency in replicating similar test results with simulated waste and Tank 48H waste under similar test conditions, the results confirm the validity of the simulant for other WAO test conditions.

Adu-Wusu, K; Paul Burket, P

2009-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

460

Lime–Alumina–Silica processing incorporating minerals  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The use of naturally occurring minerals to enhance the physical and mechanical properties of industrial ceramics such as alumina is an attractive alternative to synthetic materials due to cost, chemical stability and availability. Two systems, have been chosen for investigation, alumina–kyanite to produce an alumina–mullite composite and alumina–wollastonite to produce a lime aluminosilicate. Wet processing conditions were optimised using pH/rheology and microelectrophoresis techniques followed by slip casting. The resulting green compacts were subjected to a variety of sintering regimes to produce the desired composites. Sintered products were characterised by techniques such as electron probe microanalysis, hardness tests and toughness determinations. Results are discussed, both in terms of enhanced properties realised (toughness, wear resistance, dielectric), and with respect to the viability of using natural minerals in this application.

R.H Bryden; D.G Goski; W.F Caley

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "wet process clinker" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


461

Hydrothermal Processing of Macroalgal Feedstocks in Continuous-Flow Reactors  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Wet macroalgal slurries can be converted into a biocrude by hydrothermal liquefaction (HTL). High levels of carbon conversion to gravity-separable oil product were accomplished at relatively low temperature (350 ?C) in a pressurized (sub-critical liquid water) environment (20 MPa). As opposed to earlier work in batch reactors reported by others, direct oil recovery was achieved without the use of a solvent and biomass trace mineral components were removed by processing steps so that they did not cause processing difficulties. In addition, catalytic hydrothermal gasification was effectively applied for HTL byproduct water cleanup and fuel gas production from water soluble organics. As a result, high conversion of macroalgae to liquid and gas fuel products was found with low levels of organic contamination in byproduct water. Both process steps were accomplished in continuous-flow reactor systems such that design data for process scale-up was generated.

Elliott, Douglas C.; Hart, Todd R.; Neuenschwander, Gary G.; Rotness, Leslie J.; Roesijadi, Guritno; Zacher, Alan H.; Magnuson, Jon K.

2014-02-18T23:59:59.000Z

462

No Confinement Needed: Observation of a Metastable Hydrophobic Wetting Two-Layer Ice on Graphene  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The structure of water at interfaces is crucial for processes ranging from photocatalysis to protein folding. Here, we investigate the structure and lattice dynamics of two-layer crystalline ice films grown on a hydrophobic substrate - graphene on Pt(111) - with low energy electron diffraction, reflection-absorption infrared spectroscopy, rare-gas adsorption/desorption, and ab-initio molecular dynamics. Unlike hexagonal ice, which consists of stacks of puckered hexagonal "bilayers", this new ice polymorph consists of two flat hexagonal sheets of water molecules in which the hexagons in each sheet are stacked directly on top of each other. Such two-layer ices have been predicted for water confined between hydrophobic slits, but not previously observed. Our results show that the two-layer ice forms even at zero pressure at a single hydrophobic interface by maximizing the number of hydrogen bonds at the expense of adopting a non-tetrahedral geometry with weakened bonds.

Kimmel, Gregory A.; Matthiesen, Jesper; Baer, Marcel; Mundy, Christopher J.; Petrik, Nikolay G.; Smith, R. Scott; Dohnalek, Zdenek; Kay, Bruce D.

2009-09-09T23:59:59.000Z

463

Syngas Production from Catalytic Partial Oxidation of n-Butane: Comparison between Incipient Wetness and Sol?gel Prepared Pt/Al2O3  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Syngas Production from Catalytic Partial Oxidation of n-Butane: Comparison between Incipient Wetness and Sol?gel Prepared Pt/Al2O3 ... (30, 31) To start the reaction, a Bunsen burner was used to heat the catalyst bed to its ignition temperature. ... for fuel-efficient, lean-burn vehicles, both diesel and spark-ignited. ...

Rainer J. Bass; Timothy M. Dunn; Yu-Chuan Lin; Keith L. Hohn

2008-09-10T23:59:59.000Z

464

Wet Chemical Functionalization of III–V Semiconductor Surfaces: Alkylation of Gallium Arsenide and Gallium Nitride by a Grignard Reaction Sequence  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Wet Chemical Functionalization of III–V Semiconductor Surfaces: Alkylation of Gallium Arsenide and Gallium Nitride by a Grignard Reaction Sequence ... These observations are consistent with the known solubility of oxidized As species in water. ... Remote H plasma exposure was effective for removing halogens and hydrocarbons from the surfaces of both nitrides at 450 °C, but was not efficient for oxide removal. ...

Sabrina L. Peczonczyk; Jhindan Mukherjee; Azhar I. Carim; Stephen Maldonado

2012-02-28T23:59:59.000Z

465

Permeability of a bubble assembly: From the very dry to the wet limit Florence Rouyer, Olivier Pitois, Elise Lorenceau, and Nicolas Louvet  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Permeability of a bubble assembly: From the very dry to the wet limit Florence Rouyer, Olivier Received 10 April 2009; accepted 18 February 2010; published online 6 April 2010 Bubble assemblies offer of a bubbly system in the range 0.1 0.8 and we connect these new data with a recently published set obtained

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

466

Figure 1. The wet area is flooded by damming up a small stream adjacent to the study area once a year for a period of 2-3 months. By  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Figure 1. The wet area is flooded by damming up a small stream adjacent to the study area once. Figure 1.g The wet area is flooded by damming up a small streamded by damming up a smded by damwet area Vegetation data are obtained from two ri- parian grassland sites with strong hydro- logical gradients

Schierup, Mikkel Heide

467

Process Deviation  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

1 Exercise Course Implementation 10_0630 Page 1 of 8 1 Exercise Course Implementation 10_0630 Page 1 of 8 EOTA - Business Process Document Title: Exercise Course Implementation Document Number: ISDP-011 Rev. 10_0630 Document Owner: Elizabeth Sousa Backup Owner: Melissa Otero Approver(s): Melissa Otero Parent Document: ISDP-002, Training Production Process Notify of Changes: ISD, ITT, MGT Referenced Document(s): ISDF-004 Design Document, ISDF-006 WBT Script Template, ISDF-007 Lesson Plan Template, ISDP-012, ILT Course Implementation, ISDF-008 ILT Student Feedback Survey, ISDF-010 After Action Report ISDP-011 Exercise Course Implementation 10_0630 Page 2 of 8 Revision History: Rev. Description of Change 10_0630 Initial Release ISDP-011 Exercise Course Implementation 10_0630 Page 3 of 8

468

Fermentation process  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Fermentation process consists essentially of fermenting a 10-45% w/w aqueous slurry of granular starch for the production of ethanol with an ethanol-producing microorganism in the presence of alpha-amylase and glucoamylase, the conduct of said fermentation being characterized by low levels of dextrin and fermentable sugars in solution in the fermentation broth throughout the fermentation, and thereafter recovering enzymes from the fermentation broth for use anew in fermentation of granular starch.

Lutzen, N.W.

1982-02-23T23:59:59.000Z

469

Electrolytic Processes  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Electrolysis is the process of using electricity to split water into hydrogen and oxygen. This reaction takes place in a unit called an electrolyzer. Electrolyzers can be small, appliance-size equipment and well-suited for small-scale distributed hydrogen production. Research is also under way to examine larger-scale electrolysis that could be tied directly to renewable or other non-greenhouse gas emitting electricity production. Hydrogen production at a wind farm generating electricity is an example of this.

470

Antimicrobial product and process  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A composition for controlling a plant disease caused by a plant pathogenic bacterium is disclosed. The composition comprises an activity for inhibiting the growth of the plant pathogenic bacterium and is extracted in an aqueous solvent from particles of malted cereal grain. The composition is used either in dry or wet form by application to plant parts, such as potato seed pieces, that are to be protected from the pathogenic bacteria. 6 figs.

Barrett, K.B.

1997-12-16T23:59:59.000Z

471

Antimicrobial product and process  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A composition for controlling a plant disease caused by a plant pathogenic bacterium is disclosed. The composition comprises an activity for inhibiting the growth of the plant pathogenic bacterium and is extracted in an aqueous solvent from particles of malted cereal grain. The composition is used either in dry or wet form by application to plant parts, such as potato seed pieces, that are to be protected from the pathogenic bacteria.

Barrett, Karen B. (Idaho Falls, ID)

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

472

Analysis Of Post-Wet-Chemistry Heat Treatment Effects On Nb SRF Surface Resistance  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Most of the current research in superconducting radio frequency (SRF) cavities is focused on ways to reduce the construction and operating cost of SRF-based accelerators as well as on the development of new or improved cavity processing techniques. The increase in quality factors is the result of the reduction of the surface resistance of the materials. A recent test on a 1.5 GHz single cell cavity made from ingot niobium of medium purity and heat treated at 1400 deg C in a ultra-high vacuum induction furnace resulted in a residual resistance of ~ 1n{Omega} and a quality factor at 2.0 K increasing with field up to ~ 5×10{sup 10} at a peak magnetic field of 90 mT. In this contribution, we present some results on the investigation of the origin of the extended Q{sub 0}-increase, obtained by multiple HF rinses, oxypolishing and heat treatment of ?all Nb? cavities.

Dhakal, Pashupati; Ciovati, Gianluigi; Kneisel, Peter K.; Myneni, Ganapati Rao

2014-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

473

DISCOLORATION OF THE WETTED SURFACE IN THE 6.1D DISSOLVER  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

During a camera inspection of a failed coil in the 6.1D dissolver, an orange discoloration was observed on a portion of the dissolver wall and coils. At the request of H-Canyon Engineering, the inspection video of the dissolver was reviewed by SRNL to assess if the observed condition (a non-uniform, orange-colored substance on internal surfaces) was a result of corrosion. Although the dissolver vessel and coil corrode during dissolution operations, the high acid conditions are not consistent with the formation of ferrous oxides (i.e., orange/rust-colored corrosion products). In a subsequent investigation, SRNL performed dissolution experiments to determine if residues from the nylon bags used for Pu containment could have generated the orange discoloration following dissolution. When small pieces of a nylon bag were placed in boiling 8 M nitric acid solutions containing other components representative of the H-Canyon process, complete dissolution occurred almost immediately. No residues were obtained even when a nylon mass to volume ratio greater than 100 times the 6.1D dissolver value was used. Degradation products from the dissolution of nylon bags are not responsible for the discoloration observed in the dissolver.

Rudisill, T.; Mickalonis, J.; Crapse, K.

2013-12-18T23:59:59.000Z

474

Integration of stripping of fines slurry in a coking and gasification process  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

In an integrated fluid coking and gasification process wherein a stream of fluidized solids is passed from a fluidized bed coking zone to a second fluidized bed and wherein entrained solid fines are recovered by a wet scrubbing process and wherein the resulting solids-liquid slurry is stripped to remove acidic gases, the stripped vapors of the stripping zone are sent to the gas cleanup stage of the gasification product gas. The improved stripping integration is particularly useful in the combination coal liquefaction process, fluid coking of bottoms of the coal liquefaction zone and gasification of the product coke.

DeGeorge, Charles W. (Chester, NJ)

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

475

Evaluation of Wet Chemical ICP-AES Elemental Analysis Methods usingSimulated Hanford Waste Samples-Phase I Interim Report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The wet chemistry digestion method development for providing process control elemental analyses of the Hanford Tank Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) Melter Feed Preparation Vessel (MFPV) samples is divided into two phases: Phase I consists of: (1) optimizing digestion methods as a precursor to elemental analyses by ICP-AES techniques; (2) selecting methods with the desired analytical reliability and speed to support the nine-hour or less turnaround time requirement of the WTP; and (3) providing baseline comparison to the laser ablation (LA) sample introduction technique for ICP-AES elemental analyses that is being developed at the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL). Phase II consists of: (1) Time-and-Motion study of the selected methods from Phase I with actual Hanford waste or waste simulants in shielded cell facilities to ensure that the methods can be performed remotely and maintain the desired characteristics; and (2) digestion of glass samples prepared from actual Hanford Waste tank sludge for providing comparative results to the LA Phase II study. Based on the Phase I testing discussed in this report, a tandem digestion approach consisting of sodium peroxide fusion digestions carried out in nickel crucibles and warm mixed-acid digestions carried out in plastic bottles has been selected for Time-and-Motion study in Phase II. SRNL experience with performing this analytical approach in laboratory hoods indicates that well-trained cell operator teams will be able to perform the tandem digestions in five hours or less. The selected approach will produce two sets of solutions for analysis by ICP-AES techniques. Four hours would then be allocated for performing the ICP-AES analyses and reporting results to meet the nine-hour or less turnaround time requirement. The tandem digestion approach will need to be performed in two separate shielded analytical cells by two separate cell operator teams in order to achieve the nine-hour or less turnaround time. Because of the simplicity of the warm mixed-acid method, a well-trained cell operator team may in time be able to perform both sets of digestions. However, having separate shielded cells for each of the methods is prudent to avoid overcrowding problems that would impede a minimal turnaround time.

Coleman, Charles J.; Edwards, Thomas B.

2005-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

476

An assessment of the use of direct contact condensers with wet cooling systems for utility steam power plants  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Potential use of a direct contact condenser for steam recovery at the turbine exhaust of a utility power plant using a wet cooling system is investigated. To maintain condensate separate from the cooling water, a bank of plate heat exchangers is used. In a case study for a nominal 130-MW steam power plant, two heat rejection systems, one using a conventional surface condenser and another using a direct contact condenser together with a set of plate heat exchangers are compared on the basis of their performance, operation and maintenance, and system economics. Despite a higher initial cost for the direct contact system, the advantages it offers suggests that this system is viable both technically and economically. Key to the improvements the direct contact system offers is a higher equivalent availability for the power system. Reduction of dissolved oxygen and other metallic ions in the condensate, reduced use of chemical scavengers and polishers, and potential elimination of a plant floor are also major benefits of this system. Drawbacks include added plant components and higher initial cost. The potential for long-term cost reduction for the direct contact system is also identified.

Bharathan, D.; Hoo, E. [National Renewable Energy Lab., Golden, CO (United States)] [National Renewable Energy Lab., Golden, CO (United States); D`Errico, P. [Stone and Webster Engineering Corp., Boston, MA (United States)] [Stone and Webster Engineering Corp., Boston, MA (United States)

1992-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

477

New self-aligned processes for III–V electronic high speed devices  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We report on two new self-aligned processes intended for microelectronic devices realization exhibiting a significant reduction of the number of elementary technological levels. These processes allow to obtain a very short self-aligned contact separation without using spacers or wet etched mesa overhangs. As an example only three lithographic masks are used to realize a triple mesa self-aligned heterojunctionbipolar transistor (HBT). A bilayer resist process is used to define the specific shape of the upper contact that is used for self-alignment. A combination of selective isotropic or anisotropic processes and very simple selective lift-off processes are used to define the mesa and the contacts which are also used as masks during etching. The alloying of contacts may be performed just after deposition and lift-off. These processes can reduce the production cost and increase the reliability for integration in comparison with conventional self-alignment using the selective wet etched emitter overhang in the HBT application. Furthermore the parasitic access resistance can be reduced both by using thin mesa active layers and decreasing the contacts separation. This separation length can be determined by the aspect ratio of the bilayer resist the characteristics and parameters of the contact deposition equipment. At last low induced damage inductively coupled plasma dry etch processes are partly used to reduce the dry etch damages. © 1999 American Vacuum Society. ?

J. Etrillard; C. Besombes; L. Bricard; A. M. Duchenois

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

478

Model for Cradle-to-Gate Life Cycle Assessment of Clinker Production  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Surplus oxygen is increased by 1% if the relative heat input from petcoke and alternative fuels exceeds 30%. ... Surplus oxygen is required to achieve complete oxidation for low grade fuels and increases by approximately 1% if the relative heat contribution of petcoke and alternative fuels exceeds 30% (27). ... All results of b) and c) should be compared to this base case (precalciner kiln system; fuel mix (% heat): hard coal (50.0%), petcoke (22.4%), natural gas (0.8%), prepared industrial waste (10.9%), ...

Michael Elias Boesch; Annette Koehler; Stefanie Hellweg

2009-09-03T23:59:59.000Z

479

Adhesion and nonwetting-wetting transition in the Al -Al2O3 interface Qing Zhang, Tahir C agin, Adri van Duin, and William A. Goddard III  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Adhesion and nonwetting-wetting transition in the Al� -Al2O3 interface Qing Zhang, Tahir C¸ agin properties, of both solid and liquid Al/ -Al2O3 interfaces. The ReaxFF was developed solely with ab initio calculations on various phases of Al and Al2O3 and Al-O-H clusters. Our computed lattice constants, elastic

480

First- and second-order wetting transitions in confined Ising films in the presence of nonmagnetic impurities: A Monte Carlo simulation study  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In this work, we present the results of a systematic exploration of the effect caused by the introduction of nonmagnetic impurities (or defects) on the stabilization of the interface between two magnetic domains of opposite magnetic orientation. Those defects are simulated as spin vacancies along the center of confined two-dimensional Ising films, which have competing magnetic fields acting on the confinement walls. The calculations are performed for different L×M film sizes and by using the standard Metropolis dynamics. In the absence of defects, the film is characterized by an interface running along the M direction, which is induced by the competing surface fields. That interface undergoes a localization-delocalization transition that is the precursor of a true wetting transition taking place in the thermodynamic limit. When the density of defects is relatively low, our results show that the wetting phase transition is of second order, as in the absence of defects. On the other hand, when the density of nonmagnetic impurities is relatively high, a pinning effect of the interface gives rise to a first-order wetting phase transition. The observed transitions are characterized by measuring relevant properties, such as magnetization profiles, cumulants, magnetization fluctuations, etc., as a function of the density of defects. So, our main finding is that the presence of nonmagnetic impurities introduces a rich physical scenery, such as a line of second-order wetting transitions (observed for low density of defects) that merges into a first-order one just at a tricritical point. Precisely, these two latter findings are the major contributions of our study.

S. M. Cotes and E. V. Albano

2011-06-06T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "wet process clinker" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


481

Structure Study of Cellulose Fibers Wet-Spun from Environmentally Friendly NaOH/Urea Aqueous Solutions  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In this study, structure changes of regenerated cellulose fibers wet-spun from a cotton linter pulp (degree of polymerization {approx}620) solution in an NaOH/urea solvent under different conditions were investigated by simultaneous synchrotron wide-angle X-ray diffraction (WAXD) and small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS). WAXD results indicated that the increase in flow rate during spinning produced a better crystal orientation and a higher degree of crystallinity, whereas a 2-fold increase in draw ratio only affected the crystal orientation. When coagulated in a H{sub 2}SO{sub 4}/Na{sub 2}SO{sub 4} aqueous solution at 15 {sup o}C, the regenerated fibers exhibited the highest crystallinity and a crystal orientation comparable to that of commercial rayon fibers by the viscose method. SAXS patterns exhibited a pair of meridional maxima in all regenerated cellulose fibers, indicating the existence of a lamellar structure. A fibrillar superstructure was observed only at higher flow rates (>20 m/min). The conformation of cellulose molecules in NaOH/urea aqueous solution was also investigated by static and dynamic light scattering. It was found that cellulose chains formed aggregates with a radius of gyration, R{sub g}, of about 232 nm and an apparent hydrodynamic radius, R{sub h}, of about 172 nm. The NaOH/urea solvent system is low-cost and environmentally friendly, which may offer an alternative route to replace more hazardous existing methods for the production of regenerated cellulose fibers.

Chen,X.; Burger, C.; Wan, F.; Zhang, J.; Rong, L.; Hsiao, B.; Chu, B.; Cai, J.; Zhang, L.

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

482

Permitting and solid waste management issues for the Bailly Station wet limestone Advanced Flue Gas Desulfurization (AFGD) system  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Pure Air (a general partnership between Air Products and Chemicals, Inc., and Mitsubishi Heavy Industries America, Inc.). is constructing a wet limestone co-current advanced flue gas desulfurization (AFGD) system that has technological and commercial advantages over conventional FGD systems in the United States. The AFGD system is being installed at the Northern Indiana Public Service Company's Bailly Generating Station near Gary, Indiana. The AFGD system is scheduled to be operational by the Summer, 1992. The AFGD system will remove at least 90 percent of the sulfur dioxide (SO{sub 2}) in the flue gas from Boilers 7 and 8 at the Station while burning 3.2 percent sulfur coal. Also as part of testing the AFGD system, 95 percent removal of SO{sub 2} will be demonstrated on coals containing up to 4.5 percent sulfur. At the same time that SO{sub 2} is removed from the flue gas, a gypsum by-product will be produced which will be used for wallboard manufacturing. Since the AFGD system is a pollution control device, one would expect its installation to be received favorably by the public and regulatory agencies. Although the project was well received by regulatory agencies, on public group (Save the Dunes Council) was initially concerned since the project is located adjacent to the Indiana Dunes National Lakeshore. The purpose of this paper is to describe the project team's experiences in obtaining permits/approvals from regulatory agencies and in dealing with the public. 1 ref., 1 fig., 2 tabs.

Bolinsky, F.T. (Pure Air, Allentown, PA (United States)); Ross, J. (Northern Indiana Public Service Co., Hammond, IN (United States)); Dennis, D.S. (United Engineers and Constructors, Inc., Denver, CO (United States). Stearns-Roger Div.); Huston, J.S. (Environmental Alternatives, Inc., Warren NJ (USA))

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

483

Trends in wetting behavior for Ag–CuO braze alloys on Ba0.5Sr0.5Co0.8Fe0.2O(3??) at elevated temperatures in air  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Ba0.5Sr0.5Co0.8Fe0.2O(3-?? (BSCF) is a potential oxygen separation membrane material for advanced coal based power plants. For this application, BSCF must be joined to a metal. In the current study, Ag-CuO, a reactive air brazing (RAB) alloy was evaluated for brazing BSCF. In-situ contact angle tests were performed on BSCF using Ag-CuO binary mixtures at 950 and 1000°C and the interfacial microstructures were evaluated. Wetting contact angles (?<90°) were obtained at short times at 950°C and the contact angles remained constant at 1000°C for 1, 2 and 8 mol% CuO contents. Microstructural analysis revealed the dissolution of copper oxide into the BSCF matrix to form copper-cobalt-oxygen rich dissolution products along the BSCF grain boundary. The formation of a thick interfacial reaction product layer and ridging at the sessile drop triple point indicate that the reaction kinetics are very rapid and that it will require careful process control to obtain the desired thin but continuous interfacial product layer.

Joshi, Vineet V.; Meier, Alan; Darsell, Jens T.; Weil, K. Scott; Bowden, Mark E.

2013-10-01T23:59:59.000Z