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Sample records for wet definitions key

  1. Enhanced Security Notions for Dedicated-Key Hash Functions: Definitions and Relationships

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    International Association for Cryptologic Research (IACR)

    Enhanced Security Notions for Dedicated-Key Hash Functions: Definitions and Relationships Mohammad, ymu}@uow.edu.au Abstract. In this paper, we revisit security notions for dedicated-key hash functions notions for dedicated-key hash functions. The provision of this set of enhanced properties has been

  2. DEFINITION, PERFORMANCE GOALS AND KEY FINDINGS Photo Source: UBC Public Affairs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    passionate for sustainability. Performance Goals & Key Indicators for the University The following are ourDEFINITION, PERFORMANCE GOALS AND KEY FINDINGS Photo Source: UBC Public Affairs GEOGRAPHY 446 and implementing social sustainability at the University of British Columbia University of British Columbia

  3. NGNP: High Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor Key Definitions, Plant Capabilities, and Assumptions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wayne Moe

    2013-05-01

    This document provides key definitions, plant capabilities, and inputs and assumptions related to the Next Generation Nuclear Plant to be used in ongoing efforts related to the licensing and deployment of a high temperature gas-cooled reactor. These definitions, capabilities, and assumptions were extracted from a number of NGNP Project sources such as licensing related white papers, previously issued requirement documents, and preapplication interactions with the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC).

  4. NGNP: High Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor Key Definitions, Plant Capabilities, and Assumptions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Phillip Mills

    2012-02-01

    This document is intended to provide a Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) Project tool in which to collect and identify key definitions, plant capabilities, and inputs and assumptions to be used in ongoing efforts related to the licensing and deployment of a high temperature gas-cooled reactor (HTGR). These definitions, capabilities, and assumptions are extracted from a number of sources, including NGNP Project documents such as licensing related white papers [References 1-11] and previously issued requirement documents [References 13-15]. Also included is information agreed upon by the NGNP Regulatory Affairs group's Licensing Working Group and Configuration Council. The NGNP Project approach to licensing an HTGR plant via a combined license (COL) is defined within the referenced white papers and reference [12], and is not duplicated here.

  5. Key role of the wetting layer in revealing the hidden path of Ge/Si(001) Stranski-Krastanow growth onset

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brehm, Moritz; Grydlik, Martyna; Lichtenberger, Herbert; Hrauda, Nina; Fromherz, Thomas; Schaeffler, Friedrich; Bauer, Guenther [Institute of Semiconductor and Solid State Physics, Johannes Kepler University, A-4040 Linz (Austria); Montalenti, Francesco; Vastola, Guglielmo; Miglio, Leo [L-NESS and Materials Science Department, University of Milano-Bicocca, I-20125 Milano (Italy); Beck, Matthew J. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Vanderbilt University, Nashville, Tennessee 37235 (United States)

    2009-11-15

    The commonly accepted Stranski-Krastanow model, according to which island formation occurs on top of a wetting layer (WL) of a certain thickness, predicts for the morphological evolution an increasing island aspect ratio with volume. We report on an apparent violation of this thermodynamic understanding of island growth with deposition. In order to investigate the actual onset of three-dimensional islanding and the critical WL thickness in the Ge/Si(001) system, a key issue is controlling the Ge deposition with extremely high resolution [0.025 monolayer (ML)]. Atomic force microscopy and photoluminescence measurements on samples covering the deposition range 1.75-6.1 ML, taken along a Ge deposition gradient on 4 in. Si substrates and at different growth temperatures (T{sub g}), surprisingly reveal that for T{sub g}>675 deg. C steeper multifaceted domes apparently nucleate prior to shallow (105)-faceted pyramids, in a narrow commonly overlooked deposition range. The puzzling experimental findings are explained by a quantitative modeling of the total energy with deposition. We accurately matched ab initio calculations of layer and surface energies to finite-element method simulations of the elastic energy in islands, in order to compare the thermodynamic stability of different island shapes with respect to an increasing WL thickness. Close agreement between modeling and experiments is found, pointing out that the sizeable progressive lowering of the surface energy in the first few MLs of the WL reverts the common understanding of the SK growth onset. Strong similarities between islanding in SiGe and III/V systems are highlighted.

  6. Definitions

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home Room NewsInformation Current HAB Packet HanfordDOEDanielDe novo Design ofDefects Lead to|DefinitionA

  7. VISA DEEMED EXPORT QUESTIONNAIRE -Background Information and Key Definitions First-time users: Please do not complete the Visa Deemed Export Questionnaire until you have read the following material.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bordenstein, Seth

    VISA DEEMED EXPORT QUESTIONNAIRE - Background Information and Key Definitions First-time users: Please do not complete the Visa Deemed Export Questionnaire until you have read the following material. Repeat users of the Visa Deemed Export Questionnaire: Continue to Page 3 Introduction: The revised Form I

  8. Coal combustion by wet oxidation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bettinger, J.A.; Lamparter, R.A.; McDowell, D.C.

    1980-11-15

    The combustion of coal by wet oxidation was studied by the Center for Waste Management Programs, of Michigan Technological University. In wet oxidation a combustible material, such as coal, is reacted with oxygen in the presence of liquid water. The reaction is typically carried out in the range of 204/sup 0/C (400/sup 0/F) to 353/sup 0/C (650/sup 0/F) with sufficient pressure to maintain the water present in the liquid state, and provide the partial pressure of oxygen in the gas phase necessary to carry out the reaction. Experimental studies to explore the key reaction parameters of temperature, time, oxidant, catalyst, coal type, and mesh size were conducted by running batch tests in a one-gallon stirred autoclave. The factors exhibiting the greatest effect on the extent of reaction were temperature and residence time. The effect of temperature was studied from 204/sup 0/C (400/sup 0/F) to 260/sup 0/C (500/sup 0/F) with a residence time from 600 to 3600 seconds. From this data, the reaction activation energy of 2.7 x 10/sup 4/ calories per mole was determined for a high-volatile-A-Bituminous type coal. The reaction rate constant may be determined at any temperature from the activation energy using the Arrhenius equation. Additional data were generated on the effect of mesh size and different coal types. A sample of peat was also tested. Two catalysts were evaluated, and their effects on reaction rate presented in the report. In addition to the high temperature combustion, low temperature desulfurization is discussed. Desulfurization can improve low grade coal to be used in conventional combustion methods. It was found that 90% of the sulfur can be removed from the coal by wet oxidation with the carbon untouched. Further desulfurization studies are indicated.

  9. Wet storage integrity update

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bailey, W.J.; Johnson, A.B. Jr.

    1983-09-01

    This report includes information from various studies performed under the Wet Storage Task of the Spent Fuel Integrity Project of the Commercial Spent Fuel Management (CSFM) Program at Pacific Northwest Laboratory. An overview of recent developments in the technology of wet storage of spent water reactor fuel is presented. Licensee Event Reports pertaining to spent fuel pools and the associated performance of spent fuel and storage components during wet storage are discussed. The current status of fuel that was examined under the CSFM Program is described. Assessments of the effect of boric acid in spent fuel pool water on the corrosion and stress corrosion cracking of stainless steel and the stress corrosion cracking of stainless steel piping containing stagnant water at spent fuel pools are discussed. A list of pertinent publications is included. 84 references, 21 figures, 11 tables.

  10. Optical wet steam monitor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Maxey, Lonnie C. (Powell, TN); Simpson, Marc L. (Knoxville, TN)

    1995-01-01

    A wet steam monitor determines steam particle size by using laser doppler velocimeter (LDV) device to produce backscatter light. The backscatter light signal is processed with a spectrum analyzer to produce a visibility waveform in the frequency domain. The visibility waveform includes a primary peak and a plurality of sidebands. The bandwidth of at least the primary frequency peak is correlated to particle size by either visually comparing the bandwidth to those of known particle sizes, or by digitizing the waveform and comparing the waveforms electronically.

  11. Optical wet steam monitor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Maxey, L.C.; Simpson, M.L.

    1995-01-17

    A wet steam monitor determines steam particle size by using laser doppler velocimeter (LDV) device to produce backscatter light. The backscatter light signal is processed with a spectrum analyzer to produce a visibility waveform in the frequency domain. The visibility waveform includes a primary peak and a plurality of sidebands. The bandwidth of at least the primary frequency peak is correlated to particle size by either visually comparing the bandwidth to those of known particle sizes, or by digitizing the waveform and comparing the waveforms electronically. 4 figures.

  12. Wetting, Spreading, and Adsorption on Randomly Rough Surfaces

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    S. Herminghaus

    2011-11-17

    The wetting properties of solid substrates with customary (i.e., macroscopic) random roughness are considered as a function of the microscopic contact angle of the wetting liquid and its partial pressure in the surrounding gas phase. Analytic expressions are derived which allow for any given lateral correlation function and height distribution of the roughness to calculate the wetting phase diagram, the adsorption isotherms, and to locate the percolation transition in the adsorbed liquid film. Most features turn out to depend only on a few key parameters of the roughness, which can be clearly identified. It is shown that a first order transition in the adsorbed film thickness, which we term 'Wenzel prewetting', occurs generically on typical roughness topographies, but is absent on purely Gaussian roughness. It is thereby shown that even subtle deviations from Gaussian roughness characteristics may be essential for correctly predicting even qualitative aspects of wetting.

  13. KEY PERSONNEL

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    KEY PERSONNEL 7062015 TITLE NAME President Christopher C. Gentile Vice President, Engineering Robin Stubenhofer Vice President, Integrated Supply Chain Rick Lavelock Director,...

  14. Hydrothermal Processing of Wet Wastes

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Breakout Session 3A—Conversion Technologies III: Energy from Our Waste—Will we Be Rich in Fuel or Knee Deep in Trash by 2025? Hydrothermal Processing of Wet Wastes James R. Oyler, President, Genifuel Corporation

  15. ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS ..................................................................................4 DEFINITIONS OF KEY TERMS .........................................................................6

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Escher, Christine

    ) means the chemical compound containing one atom of carbon and two atoms of oxygen. (2) "Carbon dioxide) "Global Warming Potential factor" (GWP) means the radiative forcing impact of one mass-based unit. For instance, methane (CH4) has a GWP of 23, meaning that every gram of methane will trap 23 times as much

  16. Wetting Transitions of Condensed Droplets on Superhydrophobic Surfaces with Two-Tier Roughness

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lv, Cunjing; Zhang, Xiwen; He, Feng

    2015-01-01

    Although realizing wetting transitions of droplets spontaneously on solid rough surfaces is quite challenging, it is becoming a key research topic in many practical applications which require highly efficient removal of liquid. We report wetting transitions of condensed droplets occurring spontaneously on pillared surfaces with two-tier roughness owing to excellent superhydrophobicity. The phenomenon results from further decreased Laplace pressure on the top side of the individual droplet when its size becomes comparable to the scale of the micropillars, which leads to a surprising robust spontaneous wetting transition, from valleys to tops of the pillars. A simple scaling law is derived theoretically, which demonstrates that the critical size of the droplet is determined by the space of the micropillars. For this reason, highly efficient removal of water benefits greatly from smaller micropillar space. Furthermore, three wetting transition modes exist, in which the in situ wetting behaviors are in good agree...

  17. WET LOOSE SNOW AVALANCHING IN SOUTHWESTERN MONTANA Simon August Trautman

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dyer, Bill

    WET LOOSE SNOW AVALANCHING IN SOUTHWESTERN MONTANA by Simon August Trautman A thesis submitted ..........................................................................................................1 2. WET SNOW...................................................................................................................3 Metamorphism of Wet Snow

  18. Elucidating the mysteries of wetting.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Webb, Edmund Blackburn, III (,; ); Bourdon, Christopher Jay; Grillet, Anne Mary; Sackinger, Philip A.; Grest, Gary Stephen; Emerson, John Allen; Ash, Benjamin Jesse; Heine, David R.; Brooks, Carlton, F.; Gorby, Allen D.

    2005-11-01

    Nearly every manufacturing and many technologies central to Sandia's business involve physical processes controlled by interfacial wetting. Interfacial forces, e.g. conjoining/disjoining pressure, electrostatics, and capillary condensation, are ubiquitous and can surpass and even dominate bulk inertial or viscous effects on a continuum level. Moreover, the statics and dynamics of three-phase contact lines exhibit a wide range of complex behavior, such as contact angle hysteresis due to surface roughness, surface reaction, or compositional heterogeneities. These thermodynamically and kinetically driven interactions are essential to the development of new materials and processes. A detailed understanding was developed for the factors controlling wettability in multicomponent systems from computational modeling tools, and experimental diagnostics for systems, and processes dominated by interfacial effects. Wettability probed by dynamic advancing and receding contact angle measurements, ellipsometry, and direct determination of the capillary and disjoining forces. Molecular scale experiments determined the relationships between the fundamental interactions between molecular species and with the substrate. Atomistic simulations studied the equilibrium concentration profiles near the solid and vapor interfaces and tested the basic assumptions used in the continuum approaches. These simulations provide guidance in developing constitutive equations, which more accurately take into account the effects of surface induced phase separation and concentration gradients near the three-phase contact line. The development of these accurate models for dynamic multicomponent wetting allows improvement in science based engineering of manufacturing processes previously developed through costly trial and error by varying material formulation and geometry modification.

  19. Mechanisms of dissipation in wet granular matter

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. Fingerle; S. Herminghaus

    2007-08-20

    The impact dynamics between wet surfaces, which dominates the mechanical properties of wet granular matter, is studied both experimentally and theoretically. It is shown that the hysteretic formation and rupture of liquid capillary bridges between adjacent grains accounts reasonably well for most relevant cases of wet granular matter. The various dissipation mechanisms are discussed with particular emphasis on their relevance. Variations of the rupture energy loss with the impact energy are quantified and discussed.

  20. Complete wetting of elastically responsive substrates

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    N. R. Bernardino; S. Dietrich

    2012-02-07

    We analyze theoretically complete wetting of a substrate supporting an array of parallel, vertical plates which can tilt elastically. The adsorbed liquid tilts the plates, inducing clustering, and thus modifies the substrate geometry. In turn, this change in geometry alters the wetting properties of the substrate and, consequently, the adsorption of liquid. This geometry-wetting feedback loop leads to stepped adsorption isotherms with each step corresponding to an abrupt change in the substrate geometry. We discuss how this can be used for constructing substrates with tunable wetting and adsorption properties.

  1. Carbon nanotube fiber spun from wetted ribbon

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Zhu, Yuntian T; Arendt, Paul; Zhang, Xiefei; Li, Qingwen; Fu, Lei; Zheng, Lianxi

    2014-04-29

    A fiber of carbon nanotubes was prepared by a wet-spinning method involving drawing carbon nanotubes away from a substantially aligned, supported array of carbon nanotubes to form a ribbon, wetting the ribbon with a liquid, and spinning a fiber from the wetted ribbon. The liquid can be a polymer solution and after forming the fiber, the polymer can be cured. The resulting fiber has a higher tensile strength and higher conductivity compared to dry-spun fibers and to wet-spun fibers prepared by other methods.

  2. Wetting and lubricating film instabilities in microchannels

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cubaud, Thomas

    Wetting and lubricating film instabilities in microchannels Thomas Cubaud Department of Mechanical, and silicone oils . Dynamic wetting transitions: a pearl flow thick lubricating film , b spider flow thin lubricating film , c ghost flow metastable dewetting patches . Droplet-decorated streams: d droplets

  3. Maintenance of Stormwater Wetlands and Wet Ponds

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hunt, William F.

    1 Maintenance of Stormwater Wetlands and Wet Ponds Stormwater management practices must be kept maintenance guidelines for stormwater wetlands and wet ponds, two stormwater prac- tices that are being constructed across North Carolina. OVERVIEW As its name implies, a stormwater wetland is a wetland system

  4. Much of the North Carolina Coastal Plain is wet and supports plant communities that are domi-

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Krings, Alexander

    Much of the North Carolina Coastal Plain is wet and supports plant communities that are domi- nated, the North Caro- lina State University Herbarium. 1 Department of Botany, North Carolina State University.S.A. WINTER KEYS TO COMMON, WETLAND TREES, SHRUBS, AND WOODY VINES OF THE NORTH CAROLINA COASTAL PLAIN JON M

  5. OPERATIONAL WINDOWS FOR DRY-WALL AND WETTED-WALL IFE CHAMBERS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Raffray, A. René

    subsystems was performed parametrically to uncover key physics/technology uncertainties and to iden- tify be necessary that may preclude propagation of the laser driver and require assisted pinch transport issue for wetted-wall concepts. KEYWORDS: inertial fusion, fusion technology, IFE chambers *E

  6. Challenges and Opportunities for Wet-Waste Feedstocks – Resource Assessment

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Breakout Session 2-C: Biogas and Beyond: Challenges and Opportunities for Advanced Biofuels from Wet-Waste FeedstocksChallenges and Opportunities for Wet-Waste Feedstocks – Resource...

  7. Identification of High Collision Concentration Locations Under Wet Weather Conditions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hwang, Taesung; Chung, Koohong; Ragland, David; Chan, Chin-Yao

    2008-01-01

    conducted under wet weather conditions. Observations fromLeahy, M. , and Suggett, J. Weather as a Chronic Hazard forLocations Under Wet Weather Conditions Taesung Hwang,

  8. Quantum Public-Key Encryption with Information Theoretic Security

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jiangyou Pan; Li Yang

    2012-02-20

    We propose a definition for the information theoretic security of a quantum public-key encryption scheme, and present bit-oriented and two-bit-oriented encryption schemes satisfying our security definition via the introduction of a new public-key algorithm structure. We extend the scheme to a multi-bitoriented one, and conjecture that it is also information theoretically secure, depending directly on the structure of our new algorithm.

  9. Breakdown in the Wetting Transparency of Graphene

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shih, Chih-Jen

    We develop a theory to model the van der Waals interactions between liquid and graphene, including quantifying the wetting behavior of a graphene-coated surface. Molecular dynamics simulations and contact angle measurements ...

  10. National Ignition Facility wet weather construction plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kugler, A N

    1998-01-01

    This report presents a wet weather construction plan for the National Ignition Facility (NIF) construction project. Construction of the NIF commenced in mid- 1997, and excavation of the site was completed in the fall. Preparations for placing concrete foundations began in the fall, and above normal rainfall is expected over the tinter. Heavy rainfall in late November impacted foundation construction, and a wet weather construction plan was determined to be needed. This wet weather constiction plan recommends a strategy, techniques and management practices to prepare and protect the site corn wet weather effects and allow construction work to proceed. It is intended that information in this plan be incorporated in the Stormwater Pollution Prevention Plan (SWPPP) as warranted.

  11. Wet/dry cooling tower and method

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Glicksman, Leon R. (Lynnfield, MA); Rohsenow, Warren R. (Waban, MA)

    1981-01-01

    A wet/dry cooling tower wherein a liquid to-be-cooled is flowed along channels of a corrugated open surface or the like, which surface is swept by cooling air. The amount of the surface covered by the liquid is kept small compared to the dry part thereof so that said dry part acts as a fin for the wet part for heat dissipation.

  12. Information systems definition architecture

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Calapristi, A.J.

    1996-06-20

    The Tank Waste Remediation System (TWRS) Information Systems Definition architecture evaluated information Management (IM) processes in several key organizations. The intent of the study is to identify improvements in TWRS IM processes that will enable better support to the TWRS mission, and accommodate changes in TWRS business environment. The ultimate goals of the study are to reduce IM costs, Manage the configuration of TWRS IM elements, and improve IM-related process performance.

  13. Public Key Cryptography and Key Management

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2000-02-15

    The use and management of certificate-based public key cryptography for the Department of Energy (DOE) requires the establishment of a public key infrastructure (PKI). This chapter defines the policy related to roles, requirements, and responsibilities for establishing and maintaining a DOE PKI and the documentation necessary to ensure that all certificates are managed in a manner that maintains the overall trust required to support a viable PKI. Canceled by DOE N 251.112.

  14. Wet powder seal for gas containment

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Stang, Louis G. (Sayville, NY)

    1982-01-01

    A gas seal is formed by a compact layer of an insoluble powder and liquid filling the fine interstices of that layer. The smaller the particle size of the selected powder, such as sand or talc, the finer will be the interstices or capillary spaces in the layer and the greater will be the resulting sealing capacity, i.e., the gas pressure differential which the wet powder layer can withstand. Such wet powder seal is useful in constructing underground gas reservoirs or storage cavities for nuclear wastes as well as stopping leaks in gas mains buried under ground or situated under water. The sealing capacity of the wet powder seal can be augmented by the hydrostatic head of a liquid body established over the seal.

  15. Key Milestones/Outlook

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Key Milestones/Outlook per the Department of Energy 2015 Congressional Budget Request, Environmental Management, March 2014

  16. Chaoticity of the Wet Granular Gas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. Fingerle; S. Herminghaus; V. Yu. Zaburdaev

    2007-05-22

    In this work we derive an analytic expression for the Kolmogorov-Sinai entropy of dilute wet granular matter, valid for any spatial dimension. The grains are modelled as hard spheres and the influence of the wetting liquid is described according to the Capillary Model, in which dissipation is due to the hysteretic cohesion force of capillary bridges. The Kolmogorov-Sinai entropy is expanded in a series with respect to density. We find a rapid increase of the leading term when liquid is added. This demonstrates the sensitivity of the granular dynamics to humidity, and shows that the liquid significantly increases the chaoticity of the granular gas.

  17. Controllable underwater anisotropic oil-wetting

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yong, Jiale; Chen, Feng Yang, Qing; Farooq, Umar; Bian, Hao; Du, Guangqing; Hou, Xun

    2014-08-18

    This Letter demonstrates a simple method to achieve underwater anisotropic oil-wetting using silicon surfaces with a microgroove array produced by femtosecond laser ablation. The oil contact angles along the direction perpendicular to the grooves are consistently larger than those parallel to the microgroove arrays in water because the oil droplet is restricted by the energy barrier that exists between the non-irradiated domain and the trapped water in the laser-ablated microgrooves. This underwater anisotropic oil-wetting is able to be controlled, and the anisotropy can be tuned from 0° to ?20° by adjusting the period of the microgroove arrays.

  18. Analysis of Wet Weather Related Collision Concentration Locations: Empirical Assessment of Continuous Risk Profile

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oh, Soonmi; Chung, Koohong; Ragland, David R; Chan, Ching-Yao

    2009-01-01

    Analysis of Wet Weather Related Collision ConcentrationThe CRP plot displays wet weather related collision profilefactors responsible for wet weather related collisions is

  19. Key Events Timeline

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This document lists key events beginning with the April 20 fire on the Deepwater Horizon through July 28th. Updated July 28, 2010.

  20. FUNDAMENTALS OF WETTING AND BONDING BETWEEN CERAMICS AND METALS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pask, J.A.

    2010-01-01

    WETTING AND BONDING BETWEEN CERAMICS AND METALS Jo s eph A.OF WETTING AND BONDING BETWEEN CERAMICS AND METALS Joseph A.and glass-to-metal or ceramic-to-metal seals. Both physical

  1. www.kostic.niu.edu/DRnanofluids Wet-Nanotechnology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kostic, Milivoje M.

    1 www.kostic.niu.edu/DRnanofluids Wet-Nanotechnology: nanofluids at NIU www.kostic.niu.edu/DRnanofluids Dry- vs. Wet-nanotechnology · Fluids (gases & liquids) vs. Solids in Nature and (Chemical & Bio, and processes · Synergy of dry-nanotechnology (solid-state) & wet-nanotechnology (POLY-nanofluids) #12;2 www

  2. Optical key system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hagans, Karla G. (Livermore, CA); Clough, Robert E. (Danville, CA)

    2000-01-01

    An optical key system comprises a battery-operated optical key and an isolated lock that derives both its operating power and unlock signals from the correct optical key. A light emitting diode or laser diode is included within the optical key and is connected to transmit a bit-serial password. The key user physically enters either the code-to-transmit directly, or an index to a pseudorandom number code, in the key. Such person identification numbers can be retained permanently, or ephemeral. When a send button is pressed, the key transmits a beam of light modulated with the password information. The modulated beam of light is received by a corresponding optical lock with a photovoltaic cell that produces enough power from the beam of light to operate a password-screen digital logic. In one application, an acceptable password allows a two watt power laser diode to pump ignition and timing information over a fiberoptic cable into a sealed engine compartment. The receipt of a good password allows the fuel pump, spark, and starter systems to each operate. Therefore, bypassing the lock mechanism as is now routine with automobile thieves is pointless because the engine is so thoroughly disabled.

  3. Wet Sand flows better than dry sand

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jorge E. Fiscina; Christian Wagner

    2007-11-19

    We investigated the yield stress and the apparent viscosity of sand with and without small amounts of liquid. By pushing the sand through a tube with an enforced Poiseuille like profile we minimize the effect of avalanches and shear localization. We find that the system starts to flow when a critical shear of the order of one particle diameter is exceeded. In contrast to common believe, we observe that the resistance against the flow of wet sand is much smaller than that of dry sand. For the dissipative flow we propose a non-equilibrium state equation for granular fluids.

  4. Cryptographic Key Management System

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    No, author

    2014-02-21

    This report summarizes the outcome of U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) contract DE-OE0000543, requesting the design of a Cryptographic Key Management System (CKMS) for the secure management of cryptographic keys for the energy sector infrastructure. Prime contractor Sypris Electronics, in collaboration with Oak Ridge National Laboratories (ORNL), Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI), Valicore Technologies, and Purdue University's Center for Education and Research in Information Assurance and Security (CERIAS) and Smart Meter Integration Laboratory (SMIL), has designed, developed and evaluated the CKMS solution. We provide an overview of the project in Section 3, review the core contributions of all contractors in Section 4, and discuss bene#12;ts to the DOE in Section 5. In Section 6 we describe the technical construction of the CKMS solution, and review its key contributions in Section 6.9. Section 7 describes the evaluation and demonstration of the CKMS solution in different environments. We summarize the key project objectives in Section 8, list publications resulting from the project in Section 9, and conclude with a discussion on commercialization in Section 10 and future work in Section 11.

  5. Key Reference Agilent Technologies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Anlage, Steven

    is provided "as is", and is subject to being changed, without notice, in future editions. Further with the User and should any of the contract terms conflict with these terms, the contract terms shall control enables you to define the number of points in a step sweep. When you press this key, the current value

  6. Key Research Results Achievement

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ) evaluated several common figures of merit used to compare the electrical and optical performance of TCsKey Research Results Achievement NREL research significantly contributed to inadequate existing not yet at performance levels of TCOs, demonstrate a much better combination of transmission

  7. Key Research Results Achievement

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    % energy savings in new buildings and major renovations. Researchers at the National Renewable Energy%energysavingsovercode.NREL developedthesimulationtoolsandledthe committeethatproducedtheguides. Key Result TheAdvancedEnergy to use signifi- cantly less energy--reducing operating costs and greenhouse gas emissions. This new K-12

  8. Challenges and Opportunities for Wet-Waste Feedstocks - Resource...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Documents & Publications "Wet" Waste-to-Energy in the Bioenergy Technologies Office Algae-to-Fuel: Integrating Thermochemical Conversion, Nutrient Recycling, and Wastewater...

  9. Wet Gasification of Ethanol Residue: A Preliminary Assessment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brown, Michael D.; Elliott, Douglas C.

    2008-09-22

    A preliminary technoeconomic assessment has been made of several options for the application of catalytic hydrothermal gasification (wet gasification) to ethanol processing residues.

  10. New Mexico Natural Gas Wet After Lease Separation, Reserves in...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    After Lease Separation, Reserves in Nonproducing Reservoirs (Billion Cubic Feet) New Mexico Natural Gas Wet After Lease Separation, Reserves in Nonproducing Reservoirs (Billion...

  11. ,"New Mexico Nonassociated Natural Gas Proved Reserves, Wet After...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","New Mexico Nonassociated Natural Gas Proved Reserves, Wet After Lease Separation",10,"Annual",201...

  12. Kinetics of wet sodium vapor complex plasma

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mishra, S. K., E-mail: nishfeb@rediffmail.com [Institute for Plasma Research (IPR), Gandhinagar 382428 (India); Sodha, M. S. [Centre of Energy Studies, Indian Institute of Technology Delhi (IITD), New Delhi 110016 (India)] [Centre of Energy Studies, Indian Institute of Technology Delhi (IITD), New Delhi 110016 (India)

    2014-04-15

    In this paper, we have investigated the kinetics of wet (partially condensed) Sodium vapor, which comprises of electrons, ions, neutral atoms, and Sodium droplets (i) in thermal equilibrium and (ii) when irradiated by light. The formulation includes the balance of charge over the droplets, number balance of the plasma constituents, and energy balance of the electrons. In order to evaluate the droplet charge, a phenomenon for de-charging of the droplets, viz., evaporation of positive Sodium ions from the surface has been considered in addition to electron emission and electron/ion accretion. The analysis has been utilized to evaluate the steady state parameters of such complex plasmas (i) in thermal equilibrium and (ii) when irradiated; the results have been graphically illustrated. As a significant outcome irradiated, Sodium droplets are seen to acquire large positive potential, with consequent enhancement in the electron density.

  13. BERYLLIUM MEASUREMENT IN COMMERCIALLY AVAILABLE WET WIPES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Youmans-Mcdonald, L.

    2011-02-18

    Analysis for beryllium by fluorescence is now an established method which is used in many government-run laboratories and commercial facilities. This study investigates the use of this technique using commercially available wet wipes. The fluorescence method is widely documented and has been approved as a standard test method by ASTM International and the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH). The procedure involves dissolution of samples in aqueous ammonium bifluoride solution and then adding a small aliquot to a basic hydroxybenzoquinoline sulfonate fluorescent dye (Berylliant{trademark} Inc. Detection Solution Part No. CH-2) , and measuring the fluorescence. This method is specific to beryllium. This work explores the use of three different commercial wipes spiked with beryllium, as beryllium acetate or as beryllium oxide and subsequent analysis by optical fluorescence. The effect of possible interfering metals such as Fe, Ti and Pu in the wipe medium is also examined.

  14. Method for wetting a boron alloy to graphite

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Storms, E.K.

    1987-08-21

    A method is provided for wetting a graphite substrate and spreading a a boron alloy over the substrate. The wetted substrate may be in the form of a needle for an effective ion emission source. The method may also be used to wet a graphite substrate for subsequent joining with another graphite substrate or other metal, or to form a protective coating over a graphite substrate. A noneutectic alloy of boron is formed with a metal selected from the group consisting of nickel (Ni), palladium (Pd), and platinum (Pt) with excess boron, i.e., and atomic percentage of boron effective to precipitate boron at a wetting temperature of less than the liquid-phase boundary temperature of the alloy. The alloy is applied to the substrate and the graphite substrate is then heated to the wetting temperature and maintained at the wetting temperature for a time effective for the alloy to wet and spread over the substrate. The excess boron is evenly dispersed in the alloy and is readily available to promote the wetting and spreading action of the alloy. 1 fig.

  15. Secondary imbibition in NAPL-invaded mixed-wet sediments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Patzek, Tadeusz W.

    Secondary imbibition in NAPL-invaded mixed-wet sediments Ahmed Al-Futaisia,b , Tad W. Patzekb to study the spontaneous and forced secondary imbibition of a NAPL-invaded sediment, as in the displacement-wet sediment, i.e., the receding contact angles are very small. However, depending on the surface mineralogy

  16. Wave Energy Test Site (WETS) Marine Corps Base Hawaii (MCBH)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wave Energy Test Site (WETS) Marine Corps Base Hawaii (MCBH) Alexandra DeVisser, NAVFAC-EXWC Brian June 10, 2013 #12;Wave Energy Test Site (WETS) Objective: Provide location for year-long in Cable, Sound & Sea Technology (SST) Luis A. Vega, HNEI-University of Hawaii Energy Ocean International

  17. The Web Services Vision Definition of Web Services

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cheverst, Keith

    1 The Web Services Vision Overview Definition of Web Services Key concepts Difference from traditional web model Context Service-oriented architecture Distributed computing Overview Microsoft .NET vision Web Services Difference from traditional web model Context Service-oriented architecture

  18. Key Management in Historical Context

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ;Rolling Keys Why change keys? --- cryptoperiod (intrinsic to cryptosystem) --- management issuesKey Management in Historical Context Whitfield Diffie Internet Corporation for Assigned Names to become the security or insecurity of the message. #12;Key management systems both reflect and shape

  19. Definition of Energy Efficiency

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Energy Users Energy Efficiency Page Energy Efficiency Definition Energy Efficiency: Definition Stairs) "Take the Stairs--Be More Energy Efficient" Person A interprets the sign as...

  20. Wetting and phase separation in soft adhesion

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    K. E. Jensen; R. Sarfati; R. W. Style; R. Boltyanskiy; A. Chakrabarti; M. K. Chaudhury; E. R. Dufresne

    2015-07-22

    In the classic theory of solid adhesion, surface energy drives deformation to increase contact area while bulk elasticity opposes it. Recently, solid surface stress has been shown also to play an important role in opposing deformation of soft materials. This suggests that the contact line in soft adhesion should mimic that of a liquid droplet, with a contact angle determined by surface tensions. Consistent with this hypothesis, we observe a contact angle of a soft silicone substrate on rigid silica spheres that depends on the surface functionalization but not the sphere size. However, to satisfy this wetting condition without a divergent elastic stress, the gel separates from its solvent near the contact line. This creates a four-phase contact zone with two additional contact lines hidden below the surface of the substrate. While the geometries of these contact lines are independent of the size of the sphere, the volume of the phase-separated region is not, but rather depends on the indentation volume. These results indicate that theories of adhesion of soft gels need to account for both the compressibility of the gel network and a non-zero surface stress between the gel and its solvent.

  1. ORIGINAL PAPER Wet hibernacula promote inoculative freezing and limit

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lee Jr., Richard E.

    ORIGINAL PAPER Wet hibernacula promote inoculative freezing and limit the potential Peninsula. Although overwintering larvae have the physiological potential to survive by freezing or cryopro- tective dehydration, use of the latter strategy may be con- strained by inoculative freezing within

  2. Source apportionment of wet sulfate deposition in eastern North America

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fay, James A.

    1985-01-01

    An analytical model of long distance transport of air pollutants (Fay and Rosenzweig, 1980) has been adapted for the estimation of long term (e.g. annual) wet sulfate deposition in eastern N. America. The model parameters ...

  3. The wet Nicaraguan slab Geoffrey A. Abers and Terry Plank

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hacker, Bradley R.

    University, Boston, MA, USA Bradley R. Hacker Department of Geological Sciences, University of California Seismology: Body wave propagation. Citation: Abers, G. A., T. Plank, and B. R. Hacker, The wet Nicaraguan

  4. Retention of canopy lichens after partial-cut harvesting in wet-belt interior cedarhemlock forests,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Northern British Columbia, University of

    Retention of canopy lichens after partial-cut harvesting in wet-belt interior cedar­hemlock forests-growth cedar­hemlock forests of the interior wet-belt of British Columbia are rich in abundance and diversity a zone of high precipitation, the so-called interior wet- belt, which favours the development of lush wet

  5. A nonparametric wet/dry spell model for resampling daily precipitation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tarboton, David

    A nonparametric wet/dry spell model for resampling daily precipitation Upmanu Lall Department precipitation at a site. The model considers alternating sequences of wet and dry days in a given season, wet spell length, precipitation amount, and wet spell length given prior to dry spell length

  6. Policy on Keys and Keycards Policy on Keys and Keycards

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sridhar, Srinivas

    department is responsible for the total cost of lock changes and new keys/cards to secure areas compromised has been compromised, and avoid potentially significant costs due to theft, vandalism, or excessive be given access to keys/cards that permit entry to buildings and locked spaces on the University campuses

  7. Table Definitions, Sources, and Explanatory Notes

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustments (Billion Cubic Feet)Decade Year-0 Year-1Plant Processing Definitions Key Terms Definition Extraction

  8. Table Definitions, Sources, and Explanatory Notes

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustments (Billion Cubic Feet)Decade Year-0 Year-1Plant Processing Definitions Key Terms Definition

  9. Table Definitions, Sources, and Explanatory Notes

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustments (Billion Cubic Feet)Decade Year-0 Year-1Plant Processing Definitions Key Terms DefinitionSupplemental

  10. Definitions of dwelling

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Olgyay, Victor W. (Victor Wayne)

    1986-01-01

    Home is an elusive concept. In one manner it is highly specific and individual in its definition, and in other aspects it is ubiquitous, present in our every act. In this thesis I explore several possible definitions of ...

  11. Definiteness as Maximal Informativeness

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    von Fintel, Kai

    2014-01-01

    We argue that definites are interpreted as denoting the maximally informative object that falls under the relevant predicate.

  12. Definitions Main Result

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Heubach, Silvia

    Background Definitions Main Result Special Types of Patterns Summary Avoidance of partially ordered Avoidance of partially ordered patterns in compositions #12;Background Definitions Main Result Special Types of Patterns Summary Outline 1 Background 2 Definitions 3 Main Result Preliminaries Main Result 4 Special Types

  13. Wetting on Random Roughness: the Ubiquity of Wenzel Prewetting

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stephan Herminghaus

    2012-03-23

    The wetting properties of solid substrates with macroscopic random roughness are considered as a function of the microscopic contact angle of the wetting liquid and its partial pressure in the surrounding gas phase. It is shown that Wenzel prewetting, which has been recently predicted for a rather wide class of roughness pro?les derived from Gaussian random processes by a general distortion procedure, should in fact be ubiquitous and prevail under even much milder conditions. The well-known transition occurring at Wenzel's angle is accompanied by a prewetting transition, at which a jump in the adsorbed liquid volume occurs. This should be present on most surfaces bearing homogeneous, isotropic random roughness.

  14. Electro-osmotic transport in wet processing of textiles

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Cooper, John F. (Oakland, CA)

    1998-01-01

    Electro-osmotic (or electrokinetic) transport is used to efficiently force a solution (or water) through the interior of the fibers or yarns of textile materials for wet processing of textiles. The textile material is passed between electrodes that apply an electric field across the fabric. Used alone or in parallel with conventional hydraulic washing (forced convection), electro-osmotic transport greatly reduces the amount of water used in wet processing. The amount of water required to achieve a fixed level of rinsing of tint can be reduced, for example, to 1-5 lbs water per pound of fabric from an industry benchmark of 20 lbs water/lb fabric.

  15. Electro-osmotic transport in wet processing of textiles

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Cooper, J.F.

    1998-09-22

    Electro-osmotic (or electrokinetic) transport is used to efficiently force a solution (or water) through the interior of the fibers or yarns of textile materials for wet processing of textiles. The textile material is passed between electrodes that apply an electric field across the fabric. Used alone or in parallel with conventional hydraulic washing (forced convection), electro-osmotic transport greatly reduces the amount of water used in wet processing. The amount of water required to achieve a fixed level of rinsing of tint can be reduced, for example, to 1--5 lbs water per pound of fabric from an industry benchmark of 20 lbs water/lb fabric. 5 figs.

  16. California - San Joaquin Basin Onshore Natural Gas, Wet After Lease

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustments (Billion Cubic Feet) Wyoming963 1.969 1.979Coal4 Arizona -ProductionWet AfterWet

  17. California - San Joaquin Basin Onshore Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustments (Billion Cubic Feet) Wyoming963 1.969 1.979Coal4 Arizona -ProductionWet AfterWetLease Separation,

  18. California Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation,

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustments (Billion Cubic Feet) Wyoming963 1.969 1.979Coal4 Arizona -ProductionWet AfterWetLease

  19. California Federal Offshore Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet After

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustments (Billion Cubic Feet) Wyoming963 1.969 1.979Coal4 Arizona -ProductionWet AfterWetLeaseCrude

  20. FUNDAMENTALS OF WETTING AND BONDING BETWEEN CERAMICS AND METALS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pask, J.A.

    2010-01-01

    the interface. a definite oxide layer remains, adherence onapplied glass. A discrete oxide layer, however, can affectLoss of substrate metal oxide layer at the interface results

  1. NAME GRAD'NG KEY .

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    MA 165 EXAM 3 Fall 2002 Page 1/4. NAME GRAD'NG KEY . Page 1 / 18. STUDENT ID Page 2 / 32. Page 3 /18. RECITATION INSTRUCTOR. Page 4 / 32.

  2. Diversity & Flexibility Key to Sustainability | Department of...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Diversity & Flexibility Key to Sustainability Diversity & Flexibility Key to Sustainability Plenary V: Biofuels and Sustainability: Acknowledging Challenges and Confronting...

  3. Development of a two-body wet abrasion test method with attention...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Development of a two-body wet abrasion test method with attention to the effects of reused abradant Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Development of a two-body wet...

  4. Importance of wet precipitation as a removal and transport process for atmospheric water soluble carbonyls

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Matsunaga, SN; Guenther, AB; Izawa, Y; Wiedinmyer, C; Greenberg, JP; Kawamura, K

    2007-01-01

    et al. , 2001). Wet precipitation samples contain almost alldeposition rate due to the precipitation Yield mg C m 2 h 1Importance of wet precipitation as a removal and transport

  5. STANDARD OPERATING PROCEDURE FOR TUBE "A2-WetOxBond" furnace in TRL.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Reif, Rafael

    STANDARD OPERATING PROCEDURE FOR TUBE "A2-WetOxBond" furnace in TRL. INTRODUCTION Tube "A2-Wet. Three Eurotherm temperature controllers provide a 20 inch long, flat profile in the Center Zone resistant gloves to handle those parts PROCEDURE. 1) "ENGAGE" the machine in CORAL for TRL tube "A2-WetOxBond"machine

  6. CSC2522 Course Project Michael Tao 6.1 Rendering Wet Sand

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Toronto, University of

    CSC2522 Course Project Michael Tao 6.1 Rendering Wet Sand 6.1.1 Goals The primary goal of this project was to implement a method for rendering sand as a wet porous medium with water flowing into it from within PBRT. The final result was a video of sand being wetted by water particles flowing through

  7. Key China Energy Statistics 2012

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Levine, Mark; Fridley, David; Lu, Hongyou; Fino-Chen, Cecilia

    2012-05-01

    The China Energy Group at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) was established in 1988. Over the years the Group has gained recognition as an authoritative source of China energy statistics through the publication of its China Energy Databook (CED). The Group has published seven editions to date of the CED (http://china.lbl.gov/research/chinaenergy-databook). This handbook summarizes key statistics from the CED and is expressly modeled on the International Energy Agency’s “Key World Energy Statistics” series of publications. The handbook contains timely, clearly-presented data on the supply, transformation, and consumption of all major energy sources.

  8. Key China Energy Statistics 2011

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Levine, Mark; Fridley, David; Lu, Hongyou; Fino-Chen, Cecilia

    2012-01-15

    The China Energy Group at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) was established in 1988. Over the years the Group has gained recognition as an authoritative source of China energy statistics through the publication of its China Energy Databook (CED). In 2008 the Group published the Seventh Edition of the CED (http://china.lbl.gov/research/chinaenergy-databook). This handbook summarizes key statistics from the CED and is expressly modeled on the International Energy Agency’s “Key World Energy Statistics” series of publications. The handbook contains timely, clearly-presented data on the supply, transformation, and consumption of all major energy sources.

  9. Key Issues | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on DeliciousMathematicsEnergyInterested Parties - WAPA Public CommentInverted253.16582104) Kenmore:Key2: ProjectKey

  10. Key Steps | Argonne National Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home Room NewsInformationJesse Bergkamp Graduate student Subtask 4Photo4> TheKevin MorrisKeyKey Steps

  11. Direct Use of Wet Ethanol in a Homogeneous Charge Compression Ignition (HCCI) Engine: Experimental and Numerical Results

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mack, John Hunter; Flowers, Daniel L; Aceves, Salvador M; Dibble, Robert W

    2007-01-01

    The energy balance of corn ethanol revisited, Transaction offor autoignition. The wet ethanol modeling study [REF] usedengine running on wet ethanol. Fuel mixtures studied range

  12. Wetting and free surface flow modeling for potting and encapsulation.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brooks, Carlton, F.; Brooks, Michael J.; Graham, Alan Lyman; Noble, David F. ); Notz, Patrick K.; Hopkins, Matthew Morgan; Castaneda, Jaime N.; Mahoney, Leo James; Baer, Thomas A.; Berchtold, Kathryn; Adolf, Douglas Brian; Wilkes, Edward Dean; Rao, Rekha Ranjana; Givler, Richard C.; Sun, Amy Cha-Tien; Cote, Raymond O.; Mondy, Lisa Ann; Grillet, Anne Mary; Kraynik, Andrew Michael

    2007-06-01

    As part of an effort to reduce costs and improve quality control in encapsulation and potting processes the Technology Initiative Project ''Defect Free Manufacturing and Assembly'' has completed a computational modeling study of flows representative of those seen in these processes. Flow solutions are obtained using a coupled, finite-element-based, numerical method based on the GOMA/ARIA suite of Sandia flow solvers. The evolution of the free surface is solved with an advanced level set algorithm. This approach incorporates novel methods for representing surface tension and wetting forces that affect the evolution of the free surface. In addition, two commercially available codes, ProCAST and MOLDFLOW, are also used on geometries representing encapsulation processes at the Kansas City Plant. Visual observations of the flow in several geometries are recorded in the laboratory and compared to the models. Wetting properties for the materials in these experiments are measured using a unique flowthrough goniometer.

  13. Architecture BA (Hons) Key details

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Painter, Kevin

    Architecture BA (Hons) Key details Duration: 4 years (honours degree) Delivery type: Day Intake in the subject of Architecture, including a portfolio of Design, Technical and Theoretical courses covering all aspects of Architectural Theory and Practice. The course has been designed with reference to the RIBA

  14. INFORMATION: THE KEY TO SUSTAINABILITY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bateman, Ian J.

    of construction and demolition wastes and the introduction of demolition plans. Examples of information sources in the UK, Europe and the US are provided. Key words: waste management, construction, demolition, secondary sector so are concerned with re-use and recycling construction and demolition waste (C & D). However many

  15. Wet-steam erosion of steam turbine disks and shafts

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Averkina, N. V.; Zheleznyak, I. V.; Kachuriner, Yu. Ya.; Nosovitskii, I. A.; Orlik, V. G.; Shishkin, V. I.

    2011-01-15

    A study of wet-steam erosion of the disks and the rotor bosses or housings of turbines in thermal and nuclear power plants shows that the rate of wear does not depend on the diagrammed degree of moisture, but is determined by moisture condensing on the surfaces of the diaphragms and steam inlet components. Renovating the diaphragm seals as an assembly with condensate removal provides a manifold reduction in the erosion.

  16. The Fernald wet records recovery project: A case history

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sterling, H.J.; Devir, B.R.; Hawley, R.A. [Fernald Environmental Restoration Management Corp., Cincinnati, OH (United States); Freesmeyer, M.T. [USDOE Ohio Field Office (United States)

    1995-06-22

    This paper discusses a project performed to recover wet records discovered in January 1995 at the Fernald Environmental Management Project (FEMP). This paper discusses the emergency and record recovery phases of the project, the technical options considered for records recovery, and special measures which were required due to radiological contamination of the records. Also, the root causes and lessons learned from the incident, and path forward for future records management operations at Fernald, are discussed.

  17. Period tripling causes rotating spirals in agitated wet granular layers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kai Huang; Ingo Rehberg

    2011-07-07

    Pattern formation of a thin layer of vertically agitated wet granular matter is investigated experimentally. Rotating spirals with three arms, which correspond to the kinks between regions with different colliding phases, are the dominating pattern. This preferred number of arms corresponds to period tripling of the agitated granular layer, unlike predominantly subharmonic Faraday crispations in dry granular matter. The chirality of the spatiotemporal pattern corresponds to the rotation direction of the spirals.

  18. Food Allergies DEFINITIONS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Maxwell, Bruce D.

    Food Allergies DEFINITIONS: Definition of a Food Allergy: Immune system response to a food that the body mistakenly thinks is harmful. Upon deciding a particular food is harmful, the immune system creates a defense immune system response (antibodies) to fight it. Food allergy symptoms develop when

  19. Hydrologic Behavior of Two Engineered Barriers Following Extreme Wetting

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Porro, I.

    2000-09-30

    Many engineered barriers are expected to function for hundreds of years or longer. Over the course of time, it is likely that some barriers will experience infiltration to the point of breakthrough. This study compares the recovery from breakthrough of two storage- evapotranspiration type engineered barriers. Replicates of test plots comprising thick soil and capillary/biobarrier covers were wetted to breakthrough in 1997. Test plots were kept cleared of vegetation to maximize hydrologic stress during recovery. Following cessation of drainage resulting from the wetting irrigations, water storage levels in all plots were at elevated levels compared to pre-irrigation levels. As a result, infiltration of melting snow during the subsequent spring overloaded the storage capacity and produced drainage in all plots. Relatively rapid melting of accumulated snowfall produced the most significant infiltration events each year during the study. Capillary barriers yielded less total drainage than thick soil barriers. By limiting drainage, capillary barriers increased water storage in the upper portions of the test plots, which led to increased evaporation from the capillary barrier plots compared to thick soil plots. Increased evaporation in the capillary barrier plots allowed more water to infiltrate in the second season following the wetting tests without triggering drainage. All thick soil plots again yielded drainage in the second season. Within two years of intentionally induced breakthrough, evaporation alone (without transpiration) restored the capability of the capillary barrier covers to function as intended, although water storage in these covers remained at elevated levels.

  20. 'Elastic' fluctuation-induced effects in smectic wetting films

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pikina, E. S., E-mail: elena@ogri.r [Russian Academy of Sciences, Oil and Gas Research Institute (Russian Federation)

    2009-11-15

    The Li-Kardar field theory approach is generalized to wetting smectic films and the 'elastic' fluctuation-induced interaction is obtained between the external flat bounding surface and distorted IA (isotropic liquid-smectic A) interface acting as an 'internal' (bulk) boundary of the wetting smectic film under the assumption that the IA interface is essentially 'softer' than the surface smectic layer. This field theory approach allows calculating the fluctuation-induced corrections in Hamiltonians of the so-called 'correlated' liquids confined by two surfaces, in the case where one of the bounding surfaces is 'rough' and with different types of surface smectic layer anchoring. We obtain that in practice, the account of thermal displacements of the smectic layers in a wetting smectic film reduces to the addition of two contributions to the IA interface Hamiltonian. The first, so-called local contribution describes the long-range thermal 'elastic' repulsion of the fluctuating IA interface from the flat bounding surface. The second, so-called nonlocal contribution is connected with the occurrence of an 'elastic' fluctuation-induced correction to the stiffness of the IA interface. An analytic expression for this correction is obtained.

  1. Mercury removal in utility wet scrubber using a chelating agent

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Amrhein, Gerald T. (Louisville, OH)

    2001-01-01

    A method for capturing and reducing the mercury content of an industrial flue gas such as that produced in the combustion of a fossil fuel or solid waste adds a chelating agent, such as ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA) or other similar compounds like HEDTA, DTPA and/or NTA, to the flue gas being scrubbed in a wet scrubber used in the industrial process. The chelating agent prevents the reduction of oxidized mercury to elemental mercury, thereby increasing the mercury removal efficiency of the wet scrubber. Exemplary tests on inlet and outlet mercury concentration in an industrial flue gas were performed without and with EDTA addition. Without EDTA, mercury removal totaled 42%. With EDTA, mercury removal increased to 71%. The invention may be readily adapted to known wet scrubber systems and it specifically provides for the removal of unwanted mercury both by supplying S.sup.2- ions to convert Hg.sup.2+ ions into mercuric sulfide (HgS) and by supplying a chelating agent to sequester other ions, including but not limited to Fe.sup.2+ ions, which could otherwise induce the unwanted reduction of Hg.sup.2+ to the form, Hg.sup.0.

  2. Controlling RPV embrittlement through wet annealing in support of life attainment and life extension decisions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Krasikov, E. A.

    2012-07-01

    As a main barrier against radioactivity outlet reactor pressure vessel (RPV) is a key component in terms of Nuclear Power Plant (NPP) safety. Therefore present-day demands in RPV reliability enhance have to be met by all possible actions for RPV in-service embrittlement mitigation. Annealing treatment is known to be the effective measure to restore the RPV metal properties deteriorated by neutron irradiation. Low temperature 'wet' annealing at a maximum coolant temperature which can be obtained using the reactor core or primary circuit pumps, although it cannot be expected to produce complete recovery, is more attractive from the practical point of view especially in cases when the removal of the internals is impossible. As a rule there is no recovery effect up to annealing and irradiation temperature difference of 70 deg. C. It is known, however, that along with radiation embrittlement neutron irradiation may mitigate the radiation damage in metals. Therefore we have tried to test the possibility to use the effect of radiation-induced ductilization in 'wet' annealing technology by means of nuclear heat utilization as heat and neutron irradiation sources at once. In support of the above-mentioned conception the 3-year duration reactor experiment on 15Cr3NiMoV type steel with preliminary irradiation at operating Pressurized Water Reactor (PWR) at 270 deg. C and following extra irradiation (87 h at 330 deg. C) at IR-8 test reactor was fulfilled. In fact, embrittlement was partly suppressed up to value equivalent to 1,5 fold neutron fluence decrease. The degree of recovery in case of radiation enhanced annealing is equal to 27% whereas furnace annealing results in zero effect under existing conditions. Mechanism of the radiation-induced damage mitigation is proposed. It is hoped that 'wet' annealing technology will help provide a better management of the RPV degradation as a factor affecting the lifetime of nuclear power plants which, together with associated management methods, will help facilitate safe and economic long-term operation of PWRs. (authors)

  3. Few-key Text Entry Revisited: Mnemonic Gestures on Four Keys

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wobbrock, Jacob O.

    of Roman letters for high learnability. We compare this new 4-key method to predominant 3-key and 5-key present a new 4-key method that relies on mnemonic gestures reminiscent of Roman letters. Our method-key methods rely on two keys to move a selector left and right and a third key to select a letter. Although

  4. Wetting kinetics of water nano-droplet containing non-surfactant nanoparticles: A molecular dynamics study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lu, Gui; Department of Mechanical Engineering and Mechanics, Drexel University, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 19104 ; Hu, Han; Sun, Ying E-mail: ysun@coe.drexel.edu; Duan, Yuanyuan E-mail: ysun@coe.drexel.edu

    2013-12-16

    In this Letter, dynamic wetting of water nano-droplets containing non-surfactant gold nanoparticles on a gold substrate is examined via molecular dynamics simulations. The results show that the addition of non-surfactant nanoparticles hinders the nano-second droplet wetting process, attributed to the increases in both surface tension of the nanofluid and friction between nanofluid and substrate. The droplet wetting kinetics decreases with increasing nanoparticle loading and water-particle interaction energy. The observed wetting suppression and the absence of nanoparticle ordering near the contact line of nano-sized droplets differ from the wetting behaviors reported from nanofluid droplets of micron size or larger.

  5. Coal combustion by wet oxidation. Wet oxidation of coal for energy production: test plan and partial results. Interim report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bettinger, J.A.

    1980-07-10

    A test plan has been developed which will provide the data necessary to carry out design and economic studies of a steam generating facility, employing the wet oxidation of coal as a heat source. It is obvious, from the literature search and preliminary testing, that the higher the reaction temperature, the more complete the combustion of coal. However, operation at elevated temperatures and pressures present difficult design problems, and the necessary equipment is costly. Operation under these conditions can only be justified by the higher economic value of high pressure and temperature steam. With a reduction in temperature from 550/sup 0/F (228/sup 0/C) to 450/sup 0/F (232/sup 0/C), the operating pressure is reduced by more than half, thus holding down the overall cost of the system. For this reason, our plan is to study both the enhancement of low temperature wet oxidation of coal, and the higher operating regions. The coal selected for the first portion of this test is an Eastern Appalachian high-volatile-A Bituminous type, from the Upper Clarion seam in Pennsylvania. This coal was selected as being a typical high sulfur, eastern coal. The wet oxidation of coal to produce low pressure steam is a process suited for a high sulfur, low grade, coal. It is not intended that wet oxidation be used in all applications with all types of coals, as it does not appear to be competitive, economically, with conventional combustion, therefore the testing will focus on using high sulfur, low grade coals. In the later portion of testing all the available coals will be tested. In addition, a sample of Minnesota peat will be tested to determine if it also can be used in the process.

  6. Drought-induced defoliation and long periods of near-zero gas exchange play a key role in accentuating metabolic decline of

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mencuccini, Maurizio

    for their reduced photosynthetic area. We measured sap flow, needle water potentials and whole-tree hydraulic) doi: 10.1111/nph.12278 Key words: canopy defoliation, hydraulic limits, nonstructural carbohydrates, implying that potentially higher gas exchange (per unit of leaf area) during wet periods may not compensate

  7. Identify key design elements of desired function

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nawroth, Janna C.

    DESIGN Identify key design elements of desired function Identify functionally equivalent implementation of key design elements (e.g. structure, physiology, kinematics etc.) Quantify functional and standardize fabrication for repeatability . Test phase: Quantify implementation of key design elements

  8. Key Activities | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on DeliciousMathematicsEnergyInterested Parties - WAPA Public CommentInverted253.16582104) Kenmore:Key

  9. Brain Receptor Structures Key to Future Therapeutics

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Brain Receptor Structures Key to Future Therapeutics Brain Receptor Structures Key to Future Therapeutics Print Wednesday, 28 January 2015 00:00 With an aging population in...

  10. Key Opportunities and Challenges for Program Sustainability ...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Key Opportunities and Challenges for Program Sustainability Key Opportunities and Challenges for Program Sustainability Better Buildings Neighborhood Program, Peer Exchange Call:...

  11. Definitions Derived from Neutrosophics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Florentin Smarandache

    2003-01-28

    Thirty-three new definitions are presented, derived from neutrosophic set, neutrosophic probability, neutrosophic statistics, and neutrosophic logic. Each one is independent, short, with references and cross references like in a dictionary style.

  12. Genomic definition of species

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Crkvenjakov, R.; Drmanac, R.

    1991-07-01

    The subject of this paper is the definition of species based on the assumption that genome is the fundamental level for the origin and maintenance of biological diversity. For this view to be logically consistent it is necessary to assume the existence and operation of the new law which we call genome law. For this reason the genome law is included in the explanation of species phenomenon presented here even if its precise formulation and elaboration are left for the future. The intellectual underpinnings of this definition can be traced to Goldschmidt. We wish to explore some philosophical aspects of the definition of species in terms of the genome. The point of proposing the definition on these grounds is that any real advance in evolutionary theory has to be correct in both its philosophy and its science.

  13. Bianchi Type-I Universe with Wet Dark Fluid

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    T. Singh; R. Chaubey

    2010-07-08

    The Bianchi type-I universe filled with dark energy from a wet dark fluid has been considered. A new equation of state for the dark energy component of the universe has been used. It is modeled on the equation of state $p=\\gamma (\\rho -\\rho_\\star)$ which can describe a liquid, for example water. The exact solutions to the corresponding field equations are obtained in quadrature form. The solution for constant deceleration parameter have been studied in detail for power-law and exponential forms both. The cases $\\gamma =1$ and $\\gamma =0$ have been also analysed.

  14. Specifying linepipe suitable for safe operation in sour, wet service

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Moore, E.M.; Hansen, D.A.

    1982-06-01

    This paper describes the specifications recommended by the authors for buying linepipe in grades up to X-70 for wet, sour service. The linepipe is tested to verify that it is resistant to hydrogen-induced cracking (HIC). In addition, fracture control requirements are imposed so that if a failure does occur for any reason, the crack is guaranteed to self arrest, thus minimizing the consequences of the failure. Pipe meeting the specifications described in this paper is readily available from numerous European and Japanese mills.

  15. Arrest stress of uniformly sheared wet granular matter

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    S. H. Ebrahimnazhad Rahbari; M. Brinkmann; J. Vollmer

    2015-06-21

    We conduct extensive independent numerical experiments considering frictionless disks without internal degrees of freedom (rotation etc.) in two dimensions. We report here that for a large range of the packing fractions below random-close packing, all components of the stress tensor of wet granular materials remain finite in the limit of zero shear rate. This is direct evidence for a fluid-to-solid arrest transition. The offset value of the shear stress characterizes plastic deformation of the arrested state {which corresponds to {\\em dynamic yield stress} of the system}. {Based on an analytical line of argument, we propose that the mean number of capillary bridges per particle, $\

  16. California - Los Angeles Basin Onshore Natural Gas, Wet After Lease

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustments (Billion Cubic Feet) Wyoming963 1.969 1.979Coal4 Arizona -ProductionWet After LeaseReservesSeparation

  17. California - Los Angeles Basin Onshore Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustments (Billion Cubic Feet) Wyoming963 1.969 1.979Coal4 Arizona -ProductionWet After

  18. California Federal Offshore Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Proved

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustments (Billion Cubic Feet) Wyoming963 1.969 1.979Coal4 Arizona -ProductionWetReserves (Billion Cubic

  19. California Federal Offshore Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustments (Billion Cubic Feet) Wyoming963 1.969 1.979Coal4 Arizona -ProductionWetReserves (Billion

  20. Colorado Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Proved Reserves (Billion

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustments (Billion Cubic Feet) Wyoming963 1.969 1.979Coal4Cubic Feet)Cubic Feet) Gas, Wet After Lease

  1. Colorado Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustments (Billion Cubic Feet) Wyoming963 1.969 1.979Coal4Cubic Feet)Cubic Feet) Gas, Wet After

  2. Oklahoma Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Proved Reserves (Billion

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustments (Billion Cubic Feet)Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3+ LeaseWellhead%TexasCubic Feet) Gas, Wet

  3. Wyoming Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Proved Reserves (Billion

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustments (Billion Cubic Feet)Decade Year-0ProvedDecade Year-0Cubic Feet) Gas, Wet After Lease Separation

  4. Wyoming Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustments (Billion Cubic Feet)Decade Year-0ProvedDecade Year-0Cubic Feet) Gas, Wet After Lease

  5. MHK Technologies/WET EnGen | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIXsource HistoryScenarios Towards 2050Enermar <OMIS DTocardo <CrossWEPTOS WEC <WET

  6. Key Activities | Department of Energy

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power Administration would likeUniverseIMPACTThousand Cubic Feet) SoldDepartment ofKenThousandtheKevlar andKey

  7. Key Terms | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE: Alternative Fuelsof EnergyApril 2014 | International NuclearKaren AtkinsonAbout the FuelKey

  8. MULTIVARIATE PUBLIC KEY CRYPTOSYSTEMS FROM DIOPHANTINE EQUATIONS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gao, Shuhong

    MULTIVARIATE PUBLIC KEY CRYPTOSYSTEMS FROM DIOPHANTINE EQUATIONS SHUHONG GAO AND RAYMOND HEINDL for multivariate public key cryptosystems, which combines ideas from both triangular and oil-vinegar schemes. We the framework. 1. Introduction 1.1. Multivariate Public Key Cryptography. Public key cryptography plays

  9. Quantum Key Distribution with Qubit Pairs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mohd Asad Siddiqui; Tabish Qureshi

    2014-07-17

    We propose a new Quantum Key Distribution method in which Alice sends pairs of qubits to Bob, each in one of four possible states. Bob uses one qubit to generate a secure key and the other to generate an auxiliary key. For each pair he randomly decides which qubit to use for which key. The auxiliary key has to be added to Bob's secure key in order to match Alice's secure key. This scheme provides an additional layer of security over the standard BB84 protocol.

  10. Predictive modeling of reactive wetting and metal joining.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    van Swol, Frank B.

    2013-09-01

    The performance, reproducibility and reliability of metal joints are complex functions of the detailed history of physical processes involved in their creation. Prediction and control of these processes constitutes an intrinsically challenging multi-physics problem involving heating and melting a metal alloy and reactive wetting. Understanding this process requires coupling strong molecularscale chemistry at the interface with microscopic (diffusion) and macroscopic mass transport (flow) inside the liquid followed by subsequent cooling and solidification of the new metal mixture. The final joint displays compositional heterogeneity and its resulting microstructure largely determines the success or failure of the entire component. At present there exists no computational tool at Sandia that can predict the formation and success of a braze joint, as current capabilities lack the ability to capture surface/interface reactions and their effect on interface properties. This situation precludes us from implementing a proactive strategy to deal with joining problems. Here, we describe what is needed to arrive at a predictive modeling and simulation capability for multicomponent metals with complicated phase diagrams for melting and solidification, incorporating dissolutive and composition-dependent wetting.

  11. Table Definitions, Sources, and Explanatory Notes

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustments (Billion Cubic Feet)Decade Year-0 Year-1Plant Processing Definitions Key TermsNumber of Producing

  12. Table Definitions, Sources, and Explanatory Notes

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustments (Billion Cubic Feet)Decade Year-0 Year-1Plant Processing Definitions Key TermsNumber of

  13. Table Definitions, Sources, and Explanatory Notes

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustments (Billion Cubic Feet)Decade Year-0 Year-1Plant Processing Definitions Key TermsNumber ofNatural Gas A

  14. Table Definitions, Sources, and Explanatory Notes

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustments (Billion Cubic Feet)Decade Year-0 Year-1Plant Processing Definitions Key TermsNumber ofNatural Gas

  15. Table Definitions, Sources, and Explanatory Notes

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustments (Billion Cubic Feet)Decade Year-0 Year-1Plant Processing Definitions Key TermsNumber ofNatural

  16. Table Definitions, Sources, and Explanatory Notes

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustments (Billion Cubic Feet)Decade Year-0 Year-1Plant Processing Definitions Key TermsNumber

  17. Table Definitions, Sources, and Explanatory Notes

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustments (Billion Cubic Feet) Wyoming963 1.969 1.979 1.988 1.996DeutscheReceipts ofInputsArea Definitions Key

  18. Table Definitions, Sources, and Explanatory Notes

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustments (Billion Cubic Feet) Wyoming963 1.969 1.979 1.988 1.996DeutscheReceiptsCrude Stream Definitions Key

  19. Experimental and theoretical investigation of the interfacial phenomenon associated with wetting of trisiloxane surfactant solutions 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Radulovic, Jovana

    2010-01-01

    Surface active agents have been successfully employed in numerous industrial, agricultural and biomedical applications for decades. Trisiloxane surfactants in particular have proved to be exceptionally effective as wetting ...

  20. Specifying linepipe suitable for safe operation in sour wet service

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Moore, E.M. Jr.; Hansen, D.A.

    1981-01-01

    The specifications recommended for buying linepipe for wet, sour service are described. A two-fold approach is used. First the linepipe is tested to verify that it is resistant to hydrogen induced cracking (HIC). Second, fracture mechanics requirements are imposed so that if hydrogen induced cracking does occur due to steel-making or operation upsets, a line rupture is guaranteed to self-arrest, thus minimizing the consequences of the failure. Correlations of HIC susceptibility test results with actual service performance are presented. The HIC test acceptance criteria used by the authors are discussed. The fracture mechanics considerations include drop weight tear testing to establish ductile failures and Charpy impact testing to assure self-arrest of an unstable crack, as well as maximum crack initiation energy. The paper concludes with a brief discussion of the commercial availability of linepipe produced to the specifications discussed below.

  1. Summary of Chalcogenide Glass Processing: Wet-Etching and Photolithography

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Riley, Brian J.; Sundaram, S. K.; Johnson, Bradley R.; Saraf, Laxmikant V.

    2006-12-01

    This report describes a study designed to explore the different properties of two different chalcogenide materials, As2S3 and As24S38Se38, when subjected to photolithographic wet-etching techniques. Chalcogenide glasses are made by combining chalcogen elements S, Se, and Te with Group IV and/or V elements. The etchant was selected from the literature and was composed of sodium hydroxide, isopropyl alcohol, and deionized water and the types of chalcogenide glass for study were As2S3 and As24S38Se38. The main goals here were to obtain a single variable etch rate curve of etch depth per time versus NaOH overall solution concentration in M and to see the difference in etch rate between a given etchant when used on the different chalcogenide stoichiometries. Upon completion of these two goals, future studies will begin to explore creating complex, integrated photonic devices via these methods.

  2. $1/f$ noise on the brink of wet granular melting

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kai Huang

    2015-07-23

    The collective behavior of a two-dimensional wet granular cluster under horizontal swirling motions is investigated experimentally. Depending on the balance between the energy injection and dissipation, the cluster evolves into various nonequilibrium stationary states with strong internal structure fluctuations with time. Quantitative characterizations of the fluctuations with the bond orientational order parameter $q_{\\rm 6}$ reveal power spectra of the form $f^{\\alpha}$ with the exponent $\\alpha$ closely related to the stationary states of the system. In particular, $1/f$ type of noise with $\\alpha\\approx-1$ emerges as melting starts from the free surface of the cluster, suggesting the possibility of using $1/f$ noise as an indicator for phase transitions in systems driven far from thermodynamic equilibrium.

  3. Giant osmotic pressure in the forced wetting of hydrophobic nanopores

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Millán Michelin-Jamois; Cyril Picard; Gérard Vigier; Elisabeth Charlaix

    2015-07-02

    The forced intrusion of water in hydrophobic nanoporous pulverulent material is of interest for quick storage of energy. With nanometric pores the energy storage capacity is controlled by interfacial phenomena. With subnanometric pores, we demonstrate that a breakdown occurs with the emergence of molecular exclusion as a leading contribution. This bulk exclusion effect leads to an osmotic contribution to the pressure that can reach levels never previously sustained. We illustrate on various electrolytes and different microporous materials, that a simple osmotic pressure law accounts quantitatively for the enhancement of the intrusion and extrusion pressures governing the forced wetting and spontaneous drying of the nanopores. Using electrolyte solutions, energy storage and power capacities can be widely enhanced.

  4. Patterned functional arrays by selective de-wetting

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    FAN,HONGYOU; DOSHI,DHAVAL; LU,YUNFENG; BRINKER,C. JEFFREY

    2000-05-11

    Using a micro-Contact Printing ({mu}-CP) technique, substrates are prepared with patterns of hydrophilic, hydroxyl-terminated SAMS and hydrophobic methyl-terminated SAMS. Beginning with a homogeneous solution of silica, surfactant, ethanol, water, and functional silane, preferential ethanol evaporation during dip-coating, causes water enrichment and selective de-wetting of the hydrophobic SAMS. Correspondingly, film deposition occurs exclusively on the patterned hydrophilic SAMS. In addition, by co-condensation of tetrafunctional silanes (Si(OR){sub 4}) with tri-functional organosilanes ((RO){sub 3}Si(CH{sub 2}){sub 3}NH{sub 2}), the authors have selectively derived the silica framework with functional amine NH{sub 2} groups. A pH sensitive, micro-fluidic system was formed by further conjugation reactions with pH sensitive dye molecules.

  5. Nanoscale capillary wetting studied with dissipative particle dynamic

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    C. Cupelli; B. Henrich; M. Moseler; M. Santer

    2006-02-19

    We demonstrate that Multi-Body Dissipative Particle Dynamics (MDPD) can be used as an efficient computational tool for the investigation of nanoscale capillary impregnation of confined geometries. As an essential prerequisite, a novel model for a solid-liquid interface in the framework of MDPD is introduced, with tunable wetting behaviour and thermal roughening to reduce artificial density- and temperature oscillations. Within this model, the impregnation dynamics of a water-like fluid into a nanoscale slit pore has been studied. Despite the coarse graining implied with the model fluid, a sufficient amount of non-equilibrium averaging can be achieved allowing for the extraction of useful information even from transient simulations, such as the dynamic apparent contact angle. Although it is found to determine the capillary driving completely, it cannot be intepreted as a simple function of the capillary number.

  6. Wet oxidation of high-concentration reactive dyes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chen, G.; Lei, L.; Yue, P.L.

    1999-05-01

    Advanced oxidation methods were used to degrade reactive dyes at high concentrations in aqueous solutions. Wet peroxide oxidation (WPO) was found to be the best method in terms of the removal of color and total organic carbon (TOC). Reactive blue (Basilen Brilliant Blue P-3R) was chosen as a model dye for determining the suitable reaction conditions. The variables studied include reaction temperature, H{sub 2}O{sub 2} dosage, solution pH, dye concentration, and catalyst usage. The removal of TOC and color by wet oxidation is very sensitive to the reaction temperature. At 150 C, the removal of 77% TOC and 90% color was obtained in less than 30 min. The initial TOC removal rate is proportional to the H{sub 2}O{sub 2} dosage. The TOC removal is insignificant even when 50% of the stoichiometric amount of H{sub 2}O{sub 2} is used. No color change is observed until the dosage of H{sub 2}O{sub 2} is 100% of the stoichiometric amount. The color removal is closely related to TOC removal. When the pH of the solution is adjusted to 3.5, the dye degradation rate increases significantly. The rates of TOC and color removal are enhanced by using a Cu{sup 2+} catalyst. Another four reactive dyes, Procion Red PX-4B, Cibacron Yellow P-6GS, Cibacron Brown P-6R, and Procion Black PX-2R, were treated at 150 C using WPO. More than 80% TOC was removed from the solution in less than 15 min. The process can remove the colors of al these dyes except Procion Black PX-2R.

  7. Hash-based Multivariate Public Key Cryptosystems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    International Association for Cryptologic Research (IACR)

    Hash-based Multivariate Public Key Cryptosystems WANG Hou-Zhen and ZHANG Huan-Guo The Key for the traditional multivariate public key cryp- tosystems. For example, the signature scheme SFLASH was broken. at ASIACRYPTO'09. Most multivariate schemes known so far are insecure, except maybe the sigature schemes UOV

  8. ENGINEERING AND PROCESSING A 100-g Laboratory Corn Wet-Milling Procedure

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ENGINEERING AND PROCESSING A 100-g Laboratory Corn Wet-Milling Procedure S. R. ECKHOFF,' S. K of biotechnology and genetic engineering in corn hybrid development. Identification of better wet-milling hybrids of separation of the germ or the ability Professor, Department of Agricultural Engineering, University

  9. Dry purification of aspirational air in coke-sorting systems with wet slaking of coke

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    T.F. Trembach; A.G. Klimenko [Giprokoks, the State Institute for the Design of Coke-Industry Enterprises, Kharkov (Ukraine)

    2009-07-15

    Coke transportation after wet slaking is accompanied by the release of dust in the production building and in the surrounding atmosphere. Wet methods are traditionally used to purify very humid air. Giprokoks has developed designs for highly efficient dry dust-removal methods in such conditions.

  10. A presentation of the U.S. Navy's Wave Energy Test Site (WETS)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Frandsen, Jannette B.

    A presentation of the U.S. Navy's Wave Energy Test Site (WETS) Patrick Cross Senior Project Specialist Hawaii Natural Energy Institute School of Ocean and Earth Science and Technology University of Hawaii Abstract The U.S. Navy's Wave Energy Test Site (WETS) in Hawaii is now fully operational

  11. Wet Chemistry experiments on the 2007 Phoenix Mars Scout Lander mission: Data analysis and results

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kounaves, Samuel P.

    Wet Chemistry experiments on the 2007 Phoenix Mars Scout Lander mission: Data analysis and results performed using the Wet Chemistry Laboratories on the 2007 Phoenix Mars Scout Lander. One soil sample.36(±0.3) mM, respectively. Results indicate that the leached portion of soils at the Phoenix landing site

  12. GAUSSIAN NOISE REMOVAL FOR WET CHEMISTRY DATA FROM THE PHOENIX MISSION , E. Oberlin2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ding, Wei

    GAUSSIAN NOISE REMOVAL FOR WET CHEMISTRY DATA FROM THE PHOENIX MISSION Y. Mu1 , W. Ding1 , X. Ren1 will result in misinter- pretation of the parent salt composition of the soil ana- lyzed by the Phoenix WCL. The WCL on board the phoenix lander performed the first comprehensive wet chemical analysis of the soil

  13. The MECA Wet Chemistry Laboratory on the 2007 Phoenix Mars Scout Lander

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kounaves, Samuel P.

    The MECA Wet Chemistry Laboratory on the 2007 Phoenix Mars Scout Lander Samuel P. Kounaves,1] To analyze and interpret the chemical record, the 2007 Phoenix Mars Lander includes four wet chemistry cells on the 2007 Phoenix Mars Scout Lander, J. Geophys. Res., 114, E00A19, doi:10.1029/2008JE003084. 1

  14. A wetting and drying scheme for POM Lie-Yauw Oey *

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    that contain hydraulic jumps, including a laboratory dam-break problem. Ó 2004 Published by Elsevier Ltd.e. hydraulic jumps and/or bores) can develop. A WAD scheme is proposed and applied to the Princeton Ocean Model. Keywords: Wetting and drying; Dam-break; Flood and ebb; Princeton ocean model 1. Introduction Wetting

  15. Cost Sharing Basics Definitions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Finley Jr., Russell L.

    Cost Sharing Basics Definitions Some funding agencies require the grantee institution the project costs. Cost sharing is defined as project costs not borne by the sponsor. Cost sharing funds may resources or facilities. If the award is federal, only acceptable non-federal costs qualify as cost sharing

  16. InclusiveVT Definitions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Crawford, T. Daniel

    competent students, faculty, and staff. InclusiveVT is Virginia Tech's new approach to revitalize inclusionInclusiveVT Definitions Vision Virginia Tech will have students and employees who thrive and contribute in a diverse and global world. Virginia Tech will become the premiere institution for culturally

  17. 3 Library Regulations Definitions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mottram, Nigel

    3 Library Regulations Definitions In Regulation 3: 'Library' means the University Library as defined in Regulation 3.1; 'Library staff' means the staff of the University Library; 'Librarian' means the University Librarian and Head of Information Resources Directorate or nominee; `Library Committee' means

  18. Wet-spinnability and crosslinked fibre properties of two collagen polypeptides with varied molecular weight

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tronci, Giuseppe; Arafat, M Tarik; Yin, Jie; Wood, David J; Russell, Stephen J

    2015-01-01

    The formation of naturally-derived materials with wet stable fibrous architectures is paramount in order to mimic the features of tissues at the molecular and microscopic scale. Here, we investigated the formation of wet-spun fibres based on collagen-derived polypeptides with comparable chemical composition and varied molecular weight. Gelatin and hydrolysed fish collagen (HFC) were selected as widely-available linear amino-acidic chains of high and low molecular weight, respectively, and functionalised in the wet-spun fibre state in order to preserve the material geometry in physiological conditions. Wet-spun fibre diameter and morphology were dramatically affected depending on the polypeptide molecular weight, wet-spinning solvent (i.e. 2,2,2-Trifluoroethanol and dimethyl sulfoxide) and coagulating medium (i.e. acetone and ethanol), resulting in either bulky or porous internal geometry. Dry-state tensile moduli were significantly enhanced in gelatin and HFC samples following covalent crosslinking with activ...

  19. Gmail keyboard shortcut quick reference guide http://www.comp.nus.edu.sg/~kanmy/gmailKeys.doc

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kan, Min-Yen

    >, a Change to Reply All Change a reply to a reply all. Also works with "r", "f" to change to a forward window. Writing and Sending Gmail Key Definition Action c Compose Compose a new email. r Reply Reply to an email. a Reply All Reply to all recipients of an email. f Forward Forward the current email.

  20. Selenium Speciation and Management in Wet FGD Systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Searcy, K; Richardson, M; Blythe, G; Wallschlaeger, D; Chu, P; Dene, C

    2012-02-29

    This report discusses results from bench- and pilot-scale simulation tests conducted to determine the factors that impact selenium speciation and phase partitioning in wet FGD systems. The selenium chemistry in wet FGD systems is highly complex and not completely understood, thus extrapolation and scale-up of these results may be uncertain. Control of operating parameters and application of scrubber additives have successfully demonstrated the avoidance or decrease of selenite oxidation at the bench and pilot scale. Ongoing efforts to improve sample handling methods for selenium speciation measurements are also discussed. Bench-scale scrubber tests explored the impacts of oxidation air rate, trace metals, scrubber additives, and natural limestone on selenium speciation in synthetic and field-generated full-scale FGD liquors. The presence and concentration of redox-active chemical species as well as the oxidation air rate contribute to the oxidation-reduction potential (ORP) conditions in FGD scrubbers. Selenite oxidation to the undesirable selenate form increases with increasing ORP conditions, and decreases with decreasing ORP conditions. Solid-phase manganese [Mn(IV)] appeared to be the significant metal impacting the oxidation of selenite to selenate. Scrubber additives were tested for their ability to inhibit selenite oxidation. Although dibasic acid and other scrubber additives showed promise in early clear liquor (sodium based and without calcium solids) bench-scale tests, these additives did not show strong inhibition of selenite oxidation in tests with higher manganese concentrations and with slurries from full-scale wet FGD systems. In bench-tests with field liquors, addition of ferric chloride at a 250:1 iron-to-selenium mass ratio sorbed all incoming selenite to the solid phase, although addition of ferric salts had no impact on native selenate that already existed in the field slurry liquor sample. As ORP increases, selenite may oxidize to selenate more rapidly than it sorbs to ferric solids. Though it was not possible to demonstrate a decrease in selenium concentrations to levels below the project�¢����s target of 50 ���µg/L during pilot testing, some trends observed in bench-scale testing were evident at the pilot scale. Specifically, reducing oxidation air rate and ORP tends to either retain selenium as selenite in the liquor or shift selenium phase partitioning to the solid phase. Oxidation air flow rate control may be one option for managing selenium behavior in FGD scrubbers. Units that cycle load widely may find it more difficult to impact ORP conditions with oxidation air flow rate control alone. Because decreasing oxidation air rates to the reaction tank showed that all �¢����new�¢��� selenium reported to the solids, the addition of ferric chloride to the pilot scrubber could not show further improvements in selenium behavior. Ferric chloride addition did shift mercury to the slurry solids, specifically to the fine particles. Several competing pathways may govern the reporting of selenium to the slurry solids: co-precipitation with gypsum into the bulk solids and sorption or co-precipitation with iron into the fine particles. Simultaneous measurement of selenium and mercury behavior suggests a holistic management strategy is best to optimize the fate of both of these elements in FGD waters. Work conducted under this project evaluated sample handling and analytical methods for selenium speciation in FGD waters. Three analytical techniques and several preservation methods were employed. Measurements of selenium speciation over time indicated that for accurate selenium speciation, it is best to conduct measurements on unpreserved, filtered samples as soon after sampling as possible. The capital and operating costs for two selenium management strategies were considered: ferric chloride addition and oxidation air flow rate control. For ferric chloride addition, as migh

  1. Wet-sand impulse loading of metallic plates and corrugated core sandwich panels J.J. Rimoli a

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wadley, Haydn

    Wet-sand impulse loading of metallic plates and corrugated core sandwich panels J.J. Rimoli a , B the mechanical response of edge-clamped sandwich panels subject to the impact of explosively driven wet sand of wet sand placed at different standoff distances. Monolithic plates of the same alloy and mass per unit

  2. Development studies for a novel wet oxidation process. Phase 2

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1994-07-01

    DETOX{sup SM} is a catalyzed wet oxidation process which destroys organic materials in an acidic water solution of iron at 373 to 473 K. The solution can be used repeatedly to destroy great amounts of organic materials. Since the process is conducted in a contained vessel, air emissions from the process can be well controlled. The solution is also capable of dissolving and concentrating many heavy and radioactive metals for eventual stabilization and disposal. The Phase 2 effort for this project is site selection and engineering design for a DETOX demonstration unit. Site selection was made using a set of site selection criteria and evaluation factors. A survey of mixed wastes at DOE sites was conducted using the Interim Mixed Waste Inventory Report. Sites with likely suitable waste types were identified. Potential demonstration sites were ranked based on waste types, interest, regulatory needs, scheduling, ability to provide support, and available facilities. Engineering design for the demonstration unit is in progress and is being performed by Jacobs Applied Technology. The engineering design proceeded through preliminary process flow diagrams (PFDs), calculation of mass and energy balances for representative waste types, process and instrumentation diagrams (P and IDs), preparation of component specifications, and a firm cost estimate for fabrication of the demonstration unit.

  3. Brain Receptor Structures Key to Future Therapeutics

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Brain Receptor Structures Key to Future Therapeutics Print With an aging population in America, it is more important than ever to discover ways to treat or prevent diseases...

  4. Wind Vision: Analysis Highlights and Key Results

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Highlights and Key Results Eric Lantz (NREL) Ryan Wiser (LBNL) July 15, 2015 2 | Wind and Water Power Technologies Office eere.energy.gov Presentation Overview Wind...

  5. Monroe County Extension Services Key West Office

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hill, Jeffrey E.

    potable water is pumped to the Keys from the mainland through a 130-mile long transmission line irrigation and fertilizer, and are more

  6. Unifying classical and quantum key distillation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Matthias Christandl; Artur Ekert; Michal Horodecki; Pawel Horodecki; Jonathan Oppenheim; Renato Renner

    2007-02-28

    Assume that two distant parties, Alice and Bob, as well as an adversary, Eve, have access to (quantum) systems prepared jointly according to a tripartite state. In addition, Alice and Bob can use local operations and authenticated public classical communication. Their goal is to establish a key which is unknown to Eve. We initiate the study of this scenario as a unification of two standard scenarios: (i) key distillation (agreement) from classical correlations and (ii) key distillation from pure tripartite quantum states. Firstly, we obtain generalisations of fundamental results related to scenarios (i) and (ii), including upper bounds on the key rate. Moreover, based on an embedding of classical distributions into quantum states, we are able to find new connections between protocols and quantities in the standard scenarios (i) and (ii). Secondly, we study specific properties of key distillation protocols. In particular, we show that every protocol that makes use of pre-shared key can be transformed into an equally efficient protocol which needs no pre-shared key. This result is of practical significance as it applies to quantum key distribution (QKD) protocols, but it also implies that the key rate cannot be locked with information on Eve's side. Finally, we exhibit an arbitrarily large separation between the key rate in the standard setting where Eve is equipped with quantum memory and the key rate in a setting where Eve is only given classical memory. This shows that assumptions on the nature of Eve's memory are important in order to determine the correct security threshold in QKD.

  7. On multivariate signatureonly public key cryptosystems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    International Association for Cryptologic Research (IACR)

    On multivariate signature­only public key cryptosystems Nicolas T. Courtois 1,2 courtois we argument that the problem has many natural solutions within the framework of the multivariate cryptography. First of all it seems that virtually any non­injective multivariate public key is inherently

  8. Deniable Internet Key Exchange Andrew C. Yao

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    International Association for Cryptologic Research (IACR)

    Deniable Internet Key Exchange Andrew C. Yao Frances F. Yao Yunlei Zhao§ Bin Zhu¶ Abstract In this work, we develop a family of protocols for deniable Internet Key-Exchange (IKE) with the following of privacy protection (especially for E-commerce over Internet), this work is naturally of practical interest

  9. Reduction of Water Use in Wet FGD Systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    David Rencher

    2008-06-30

    Cooperative Agreement DE-FC26-06NT42726 was established in January 2006, and is current through Amendment 2, April 2006. The current reporting period, April 1, 2008 through June 30, 2008, is the eighth progress-reporting period for the project. However, this report will be the final report (instead of a quarterly report) because this project is being terminated. Efforts to bring this project to a close over the past several months focused on internal project discussions, and subsequent communications with NETL, regarding the inherent difficulty with completing this project as originally scoped, and the option of performing an engineering study to accomplish some of the chief project objectives. However, NETL decided that the engineering study did indeed constitute a significant scope deviation from the original concepts, and that pursuit of this option was not recommended. These discussions are summarized in the Results and Discussion, and the Conclusion sections. The objective of this project by a team lead by URS Group was to demonstrate the use of regenerative heat exchange to reduce flue gas temperature and minimize evaporative water consumption in wet flue gas desulphurization (FGD) systems on coal-fired boilers. Furthermore, the project intended to demonstrate that regenerative heat exchange to cool flue gas upstream of the electrostatic precipitator (ESP) and reheat flue gas downstream of the FGD system would result in the following benefits to air pollution control (APC) systems on coal-fired power plants: (1) Improve ESP performance due to reduced gas volume and improved ash resistivity characteristics, (2) Control SO3 emissions through condensation on the fly ash, and (3) Avoid the need to install wet stacks or to provide flue gas reheat. Finally, operation at cooler flue gas temperatures offered the potential benefit of increasing mercury (Hg) removal across the ESP and FGD systems. This project planned to conduct pilot-scale tests of regenerative heat exchange to determine the reduction in FGD water consumption that can be achieved and assess the resulting impact on APC systems. An analysis of the improvement in the performance of the APC systems and the resulting reduction in capital and operating costs were going to be conducted. The tests were intended to determine the impact of operation of cooling flue gas temperatures on FGD water consumption, ESP particulate removal, SO{sub 3} removal, and Hg removal, and to assess the potential negative impact of excessive corrosion rates in the regenerative heat exchanger. Testing was going to be conducted on Columbian coal (with properties similar to low-sulfur Eastern bituminous coal) and SO{sub 3} will be spiked onto the flue gas to simulate operation with higher SO{sub 3} concentrations resulting from firing a higher sulfur coal, or operating with a selective catalytic reduction (SCR) unit. The project was also going to include associate planning, laboratory analytical support, reporting, and management activities. The URS project team finalized a conceptual alternative approach to demonstrate, via an engineering study, the use of regenerative heat exchange to reduce flue gas temperature and minimize evaporative water consumption. This idea was presented in summary format to NETL for consideration. NETL determined that this alternative approach deviated from the original project objectives, and that it would be in the best interest of all parties involved to cancel the project.

  10. Assessment of an Industrial Wet Oxidation System for Burning Waste and Low-Grade Fuels 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bettinger, J.; Koppel, P.; Margulies, A.

    1988-01-01

    of subcritical and supercritical wet oxidation technologies to chemical, food processing, pharmaceutical, wood-pulping, and coal-washing wastes. Each application is evaluated for technical and economic feasibility as well as its national applicability...

  11. Mars Surveyor Program '01 Mars Environmental Compatibility Assessment wet chemistry lab

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kounaves, Samuel P.

    Mars Surveyor Program '01 Mars Environmental Compatibility Assessment wet chemistry lab: A sensor Department of Chemistry, Tufts University, Medford, Massachusetts, USA Michael H. Hecht, Sabrina M. Grannan] The Mars Environmental Compatibility Assessment (MECA) instrument was designed, built, and flight qualified

  12. Exploring plastron stability and fluid friction reduction on robust micro-textured non-wetting surfaces

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Srinivasan, Siddarth, Ph. D. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

    2015-01-01

    Non-wetting surfaces are characterized by the presence of stable pockets of vapor trapped within the asperities of the surface morphology. The utility of these surfaces in reducing skin friction in viscous laminar and ...

  13. Wetting hysteresis and droplet roll off behavior on superhydrophobic surfaces by Katherine Marie Smyth.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Smyth, Katherine Marie

    2010-01-01

    Various states of hydrophobic wetting and hysteresis are observed when water droplets are deposited on micro-post surfaces of different post densities. Hysteresis is commonly defined as the difference between the advancing ...

  14. Assessing Evapotranspiration Estimates from the Global Soil Wetness Project Phase 2 (GSWP-2) Simulations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gao, Xiang

    We assess the simulations of global-scale evapotranspiration from the Global Soil Wetness Project Phase 2 (GSWP-2) within a global water-budget framework. The scatter in the GSWP-2 global evapotranspiration estimates from ...

  15. Wetting and phase-change phenomena on micro/nanostructures for enhanced heat transfer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Xiao, Rong, Ph. D. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

    2013-01-01

    Micro/nanostructures have been extensively studied to amplify the intrinsic wettability of materials to create superhydrophilic or superhydrophobic surfaces. Such extreme wetting properties can influence the heat transfer ...

  16. Simulation of Oil Displacement from Oil-Wet Cores by Interfacial Tension Reduction and Wettability Alteration

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kalaei, Mohammad Hosein

    2010-01-29

    Waterflooding in oil-wet naturally fractured reservoirs is not successful because the ability of matrix blocks to imbibe the injected water and displace the oil into the fracture system is poor. Chemical enhanced oil recovery methods...

  17. MHK Projects/US Navy Wave Energy Technology WET Program at Marine...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    MHK ProjectsUS Navy Wave Energy Technology WET Program at Marine Corps Base Hawaii MCBH < MHK Projects Jump to: navigation, search << Return to the MHK database homepage Loading...

  18. NISTIR 7298 Glossary of Key Information

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    . For planning and transition purposes, Federal agencies may wish to closely follow the development of these new, technical, and physical standards and guidelines for the cost-effective security and privacy of other than. Since draft documents are not stable, we do not refer to terms/definitions in them. Each entry

  19. WETTABILITY AND IMBIBITION: MICROSCOPIC DISTRIBUTION OF WETTING AND ITS CONSEQUENCES AT THE CORE AND FIELD SCALES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jill S. Buckley; Norman R. Morrow; Chris Palmer; Purnendu K. Dasgupta

    2003-02-01

    The questions of reservoir wettability have been approached in this project from three directions. First, we have studied the properties of crude oils that contribute to wetting alteration in a reservoir. A database of more than 150 different crude oil samples has been established to facilitate examination of the relationships between crude oil chemical and physical properties and their influence on reservoir wetting. In the course of this work an improved SARA analysis technique was developed and major advances were made in understanding asphaltene stability including development of a thermodynamic Asphaltene Solubility Model (ASM) and empirical methods for predicting the onset of instability. The CO-Wet database is a resource that will be used to guide wettability research in the future. The second approach is to study crude oil/brine/rock interactions on smooth surfaces. Contact angle measurements were made under controlled conditions on mica surfaces that had been exposed to many of the oils in the CO-Wet database. With this wealth of data, statistical tests can now be used to examine the relationships between crude oil properties and the tendencies of those oils to alter wetting. Traditionally, contact angles have been used as the primary wetting assessment tool on smooth surfaces. A new technique has been developed using an atomic forces microscope that adds a new dimension to the ability to characterize oil-treated surfaces. Ultimately we aim to understand wetting in porous media, the focus of the third approach taken in this project. Using oils from the CO-Wet database, experimental advances have been made in scaling the rate of imbibition, a sensitive measure of core wetting. Application of the scaling group to mixed-wet systems has been demonstrated for a range of core conditions. Investigations of imbibition in gas/liquid systems provided the motivation for theoretical advances as well. As a result of this project we have many new tools for studying wetting at microscopic and macroscopic scales and a library of well-characterized fluids for use in studies of crude oil/brine/rock interactions.

  20. Heat Transfer Characteristics of the Wet Thermal Insulator with Multi-layer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jong-Won Kim; Goon-Cherl Park; Tae-Wan Kim; Doo-Jeong Lee

    2006-07-01

    SMART developed in KAERI is an integral type nuclear cogeneration reactor. SMART uses a nitrogen-filled gas pressurizer so that the steam partial pressure should be minimized and the pressurizer should be under low temperature condition. To sustain the low temperature condition, the wet thermal insulator and pressurizer cooler are installed in the pressurizer. Since the performance of wet thermal insulator is an important parameter to determine the size of the pressurizer cooler, it is important to evaluate the insulation performance of the wet thermal insulator. The wet thermal insulators with 20 layers are installed in SMART. In the design of SMART, the empirical correlation by Adamovich was used to estimate the thermal resistance of the wet thermal insulator. However, the experimental condition and results are not clear so that this correlation should be verified. To analyze the heat transfer characteristics of the multi-layer wet thermal insulator, natural convective heat transport through horizontal and vertical water-filled layers is investigated. Experiments and numerical analyses have been performed to evaluate the heat transfer rates through multi-layer and verify Adamovich correlation. In addition, a new multi-layer correlation was obtained. (authors)

  1. Captured key electrical safety lockout system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Darimont, Daniel E. (Aurora, IL)

    1995-01-01

    A safety lockout apparatus for an electrical circuit includes an electrical switch, a key, a lock and a blocking mechanism. The electrical switch is movable between an ON position at which the electrical circuit is energized and an OFF position at which the electrical circuit is deactivated. The lock is adapted to receive the key and is rotatable among a plurality of positions by the key. The key is only insertable and removable when the lock is at a preselected position. The lock is maintained in the preselected position when the key is removed from the lock. The blocking mechanism physically maintains the switch in its OFF position when the key is removed from the lock. The blocking mechanism preferably includes a member driven by the lock between a first position at which the electrical switch is movable between its ON and OFF positions and a second position at which the member physically maintains the electrical switch in its OFF position. Advantageously, the driven member's second position corresponds to the preselected position at which the key can be removed from and inserted into the lock.

  2. Captured key electrical safety lockout system

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Darimont, D.E.

    1995-10-31

    A safety lockout apparatus for an electrical circuit includes an electrical switch, a key, a lock and a blocking mechanism. The electrical switch is movable between an ON position at which the electrical circuit is energized and an OFF position at which the electrical circuit is deactivated. The lock is adapted to receive the key and is rotatable among a plurality of positions by the key. The key is only insertable and removable when the lock is at a preselected position. The lock is maintained in the preselected position when the key is removed from the lock. The blocking mechanism physically maintains the switch in its OFF position when the key is removed from the lock. The blocking mechanism preferably includes a member driven by the lock between a first position at which the electrical switch is movable between its ON and OFF positions and a second position at which the member physically maintains the electrical switch in its OFF position. Advantageously, the driven member`s second position corresponds to the preselected position at which the key can be removed from and inserted into the lock. 7 figs.

  3. Key Renewable Energy Opportunities for Oklahoma Tribes

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on DeliciousMathematicsEnergyInterested Parties - WAPA Public CommentInverted253.16582104) Kenmore:Key2: ProjectKeyKEY

  4. Definitions 4-H members will

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    principles to achieve variety in design. The criteria for good design are found in the principlesDefinitions Objectives 4-H members will: · Learn definitions of terms used in designing. DESIGN TERMS Before we go into the individual fundamentals of construction for all design, it would help

  5. BACK TO BASICS: YOUR KEYS TO SAFE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kirschner, Denise

    BACK TO BASICS: YOUR KEYS TO SAFE DRIVING FINE-TUNE THE FUNDAMENTALS DRIVE SAFELY WORK WEEK: FRIDAY an occasional refresher. In fact, most company fleet safety programs emphasize basic skills and defensive

  6. Civil Engineering BEng (Hons) Key details

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Painter, Kevin

    Civil Engineering BEng (Hons) Key details Duration: Full-time: 4 years (BEng Hons) Delivery type engineering disciplines of Structures, Geotechnics, Water Engineering and Transportation Engineering civil or structural engineers. After graduation, students are equipped to work for consultants

  7. Extracting secret keys from integrated circuits

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lim, Daihyun, 1976-

    2004-01-01

    Modern cryptographic protocols are based on the premise that only authorized participants can obtain secret keys and access to information systems. However, various kinds of tampering methods have been devised to extract ...

  8. Energy Intensity Indicators: Terminology and Definitions

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    The Energy Intensity Indicators website uses the following terms with their associated definitions. The terms related to various definitions of energy are discussed first.

  9. Smarandache Special Definite Algebraic Structures

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    W. B. Vasantha Kandasamy

    2009-02-20

    In this book, we introduce the notion of Smarandache special definite algebraic structures. We can also call them equivalently as Smarandache definite special algebraic structures. These new structures are defined as those strong algebraic structures which have in them a proper subset which is a weak algebraic structure. For instance, the existence of a semigroup in a group or a semifield in a field or a semiring in a ring. It is interesting to note that these concepts cannot be defined when the algebraic structure has finite cardinality i.e., when the algebraic structure has finite number of elements in it. This book has four chapters. Chapter one is introductory in nature. In chapter two, the notion of Smarandache special definite groups and Smarandache special definite fields are introduced and several interesting properties are derived. The notion of Smarandache definite special rings, vector spaces and linear algebras are introduced and analyzed in chapter three. The final chapter suggests over 200 problems.

  10. On the capillary stress tensor in wet granular materials

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Luc Scholtès; Pierre-Yves Hicher; François Nicot; Bruno Chareyre; Félix Darve

    2011-05-05

    This paper presents a micromechanical study of unsaturated granular media in the pendular regime, based upon numerical experiments using the discrete element method, compared to a microstructural elastoplastic model. Water effects are taken into account by adding capillary menisci at contacts and their consequences in terms of force and water volume are studied. Simulations of triaxial compression tests are used to investigate both macro and micro-effects of a partial saturation. The results provided by the two methods appear to be in good agreement, reproducing the major trends of a partially saturated granular assembly, such as the increase in the shear strength and the hardening with suction. Moreover, a capillary stress tensor is exhibited from capillary forces by using homogenisation techniques. Both macroscopic and microscopic considerations emphasize an induced anisotropy of the capillary stress tensor in relation with the pore fluid distribution inside the material. In so far as the tensorial nature of this fluid fabric implies shear effects on the solid phase associated with suction, a comparison has been made with the standard equivalent pore pressure assumption. It is shown that water effects induce microstrural phenomena that cannot be considered at the macro level, particularly when dealing with material history. Thus, the study points out that unsaturated soil stress definitions should include, besides the macroscopic stresses such as the total stress, the microscopic interparticle stresses such as the ones resulting from capillary forces, in order to interpret more precisely the implications of the pore fluid on the mechanical behaviour of granular materials.

  11. Sociocultural definitions of risk

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rayner, S.

    1990-10-01

    Public constituencies frequently are criticized by technical experts as being irrational in response to low-probability risks. This presentation argued that most people are concerned with a variety of risk attributes other than probability and that is rather irrational to exclude these from the definition and analysis of technological risk. Risk communication, which is at the heart of the right-to-know concept, is described as the creation of shared meaning rather than the mere transmission of information. A case study of utilities, public utility commissions, and public interest groups illustrates how the diversity of institutional cultures in modern society leads to problems for the creation of shared meanings in establishing trust, distributing liability, and obtaining consent to risk. This holistic approach to risk analysis is most appropriate under conditions of high uncertainty and/or decision stakes. 1 fig., 5 tabs.

  12. Wet-spinnability and crosslinked fibre properties of two collagen polypeptides with varied molecular weight

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Giuseppe Tronci; Ramya Sri Kanuparti; M. Tarik Arafat; Jie Yin; David J. Wood; Stephen J. Russell

    2015-07-26

    The formation of naturally-derived materials with wet stable fibrous architectures is paramount in order to mimic the features of tissues at the molecular and microscopic scale. Here, we investigated the formation of wet-spun fibres based on collagen-derived polypeptides with comparable chemical composition and varied molecular weight. Gelatin and hydrolysed fish collagen (HFC) were selected as widely-available linear amino-acidic chains of high and low molecular weight, respectively, and functionalised in the wet-spun fibre state in order to preserve the material geometry in physiological conditions. Wet-spun fibre diameter and morphology were dramatically affected depending on the polypeptide molecular weight, wet-spinning solvent (i.e. 2,2,2-Trifluoroethanol and dimethyl sulfoxide) and coagulating medium (i.e. acetone and ethanol), resulting in either bulky or porous internal geometry. Dry-state tensile moduli were significantly enhanced in gelatin and HFC samples following covalent crosslinking with activated 1,3 phenylenediacetic acid (Ph) (E: 726 +/- 43 - 844 +/- 85 MPa), compared to samples crosslinked via intramolecular carbodiimide-mediated condensation reaction (E: 588 +/- 38 MPa). Resulting fibres displayed a dry diameter in the range of 238 +/- 18 - 355 +/- 28 micron and proved to be mechanically-stable (E: 230 kPa) following equilibration with PBS, whilst a nearly-complete degradation was observed after 5-day incubation in physiological conditions.

  13. Microbial Enhanced Oil Recovery in Fractional-Wet Systems: A Pore-Scale Investigation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Armstrong, Ryan T.; Wildenschild, Dorthe

    2012-10-24

    Microbial enhanced oil recovery (MEOR) is a technology that could potentially increase the tertiary recovery of oil from mature oil formations. However, the efficacy of this technology in fractional-wet systems is unknown, and the mechanisms involved in oil mobilization therefore need further investigation. Our MEOR strategy consists of the injection of ex situ produced metabolic byproducts produced by Bacillus mojavensis JF-2 (which lower interfacial tension (IFT) via biosurfactant production) into fractional-wet cores containing residual oil. Two different MEOR flooding solutions were tested; one solution contained both microbes and metabolic byproducts while the other contained only the metabolic byproducts. The columns were imaged with X-ray computed microtomography (CMT) after water flooding, and after MEOR, which allowed for the evaluation of the pore-scale processes taking place during MEOR. Results indicate that the larger residual oil blobs and residual oil held under relatively low capillary pressures were the main fractions recovered during MEOR. Residual oil saturation, interfacial curvatures, and oil blob sizes were measured from the CMT images and used to develop a conceptual model for MEOR in fractional-wet systems. Overall, results indicate that MEOR was effective at recovering oil from fractional-wet systems with reported additional oil recovered (AOR) values between 44 and 80%; the highest AOR values were observed in the most oil-wet system.

  14. Comparative Reactivity Study of Forsterite and Antigorite in Wet Supercritical CO2 by In Situ Infrared Spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thompson, Christopher J.; Loring, John S.; Rosso, Kevin M.; Wang, Zheming

    2013-10-01

    The carbonation reactions of forsterite (Mg2SiO4) and antigorite [Mg3Si2O5(OH)4], representatives of olivine and serpentine minerals, in dry and wet supercritical carbon dioxide (scCO2) at conditions relevant to geologic carbon sequestration (35 °C and 100 bar) were studied by in-situ Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) spectroscopy. Our results confirm that water plays a critical role in the reactions between metal silicate minerals and scCO2. For neat scCO2, no reaction was observed in 24 hr for either mineral. When water was added to the scCO2, a thin water film formed on the minerals’ surfaces, and the reaction rates and extents increased as the water saturation level was raised from 54% to 116% (excess water). For the first time, the presence of bicarbonate, a key reaction intermediate for metal silicate reactions with scCO2, was observed in a heterogeneous system where mineral solids, an adsorbed water film, and bulk scCO2 co-exist. In excess-water experiments, approximately 4% of forsterite and less than 2% of antigorite transformed into hydrated Mg-carbonates. A precipitate similar to nesquehonite (MgCO3•3H2O) was observed for forsterite within 6 hr of reaction time, but no such precipitate was formed from antigorite until after water was removed from the scCO2 following a 24-hr reaction period. The reduced reactivity and carbonate-precipitation behavior of antigorite was attributed to slower, incongruent dissolution of the mineral and lower concentrations of Mg2+ and HCO3- in the water film. The in situ measurements employed in this work make it possible to quantify metal carbonate precipitates and key reaction intermediates such as bicarbonate for the investigation of carbonation reaction mechanisms relevant to geologic carbon sequestration.

  15. An investigation into the predictive performance of pavement marking retroreflectivity measured under various conditions of continuous wetting 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pike, Adam Matthew

    2007-04-25

    This thesis research investigated the predictive performance of pavement marking retroreflectivity measured under various conditions of continuous wetting. The researcher compared nighttime detection distance of pavement ...

  16. Air Entrainment in Dynamic Wetting: Knudsen Effects and the Influence of Ambient Air Pressure

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sprittles, James E

    2015-01-01

    Recent experiments on coating flows and liquid drop impact both demonstrate that wetting failures caused by air entrainment can be suppressed by reducing the ambient gas pressure. Here, it is shown that non-equilibrium effects in the gas can account for this behaviour, with ambient pressure reductions increasing the gas' mean free path and hence the Knudsen number $Kn$. These effects first manifest themselves through Maxwell slip at the gas' boundaries so that for sufficiently small $Kn$ they can be incorporated into a continuum model for dynamic wetting flows. The resulting mathematical model contains flow structures on the nano-, micro- and milli-metre scales and is implemented into a computational platform developed specifically for such multiscale phenomena. The coating flow geometry is used to show that for a fixed gas-liquid-solid system (a) the increased Maxwell slip at reduced pressures can substantially delay air entrainment, i.e. increase the `maximum speed of wetting', (b) unbounded maximum speeds ...

  17. Review of sour service definitions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McIntyre, D.R.; Boah, J.K. [Saudi Aramco, Dhahran (Saudi Arabia)

    1996-08-01

    Case histories and laboratory test data are presented to compare the predictive utility of NACE MR0175 with three alternatives. With some exceptions, the MR0175 definition is useful and conservative for most cases. The definition based on water phase pH and hydrogen sulfide (H{sub 2}S) partial pressure, proposed in European Federation of Corrosion (EFC) pub. 16, is not recommended since it does not predict sulfide stress cracking (SSC) in refining environments and presents higher risk of SSC of sweet service materials in certain Arabian Gulf production environments. A modified definition of sour service is proposed, which uses the MR0175 definition except in cases of very low water phase pH. 47 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

  18. ,"Utah Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet)"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home PageMonthly","10/2015"4,"Ames City of",6,1,"Omaha Public PowerOECD/IEA -Annual",2014Proved Reserves, WetGas, Wet After Lease Separation Proved Reserves

  19. ,"Virginia Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet)"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home PageMonthly","10/2015"4,"Ames City of",6,1,"Omaha Public PowerOECD/IEA -Annual",2014Proved Reserves, WetGas, Wet AfterLNG

  20. BACK TO BASICS: YOUR KEYS TO SAFE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kirschner, Denise

    BACK TO BASICS: YOUR KEYS TO SAFE DRIVING BUCKLE UP! Seat belts should never have time off DRIVE the back seat to the front seat.4 ·The back is the best place for pets. According to AAA, similar. Never place the shoulder portion under your arm or behind your back! ·Drivers should sit with at least

  1. Mechanical Engineering BEng / BEng (Hons) Key details

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Painter, Kevin

    Mechanical engineers play key roles in all industrial sectors, from aerospace and oil and gas, through food for Mechanical Engineering graduates in many sectors, including power production, oil and petrochemicals, manufacturing, power plant, medical engineering and many others l Whatever your final career path, developing

  2. Fashion Marketing & Retailing BA (Hons) Key details

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Painter, Kevin

    Fashion Marketing & Retailing BA (Hons) Key details Duration: Full-time: 3 years (BA) / 4 years (BA Hons) Delivery type: Day Intake date: September Fees: 54000 AED per year Overview Our Fashion Marketing and Retailing programme confidently prepares students for a career within the marketing and retailing industry

  3. Key Management Challenges in Smart Grid

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sheldon, Frederick T; Duren, Mike

    2012-01-01

    Agenda Awarded in February 2011 Team of industry and research organizations Project Objectives Address difficult issues Complexity Diversity of systems Scale Longevity of solution Participate in standards efforts and working groups Develop innovative key management solutions Modeling and simulation ORNL Cyber Security Econometric Enterprise System Demonstrate effectiveness of solution Demonstrate scalability

  4. Organisational Change -Key Steps LocalCollege/

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Botea, Adi

    Resources Division START Version 1.0 X:\\Employment Strategies\\Workplace Change & Innovation\\Change Management Frameworks\\Change Management - Key Steps 021111.vsd FINISH NOTES: * For information on formal vs informal change refer to the managing change clause in the ANU Enterprise Agreement and the managing change policy

  5. Chemical Engineering BEng (Hons) Key details

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Painter, Kevin

    Chemical Engineering BEng (Hons) Key details Duration: Full-time: 3 years (BEng) / 4 years (BEng Hons) Delivery type: Day Intake date: September Fees: 58000 AED per year Overview Chemical engineering successful and thriving types of business in the world. Chemical engineers play a vital role in achieving

  6. Management strategies for endangered Florida Key deer 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Peterson, Markus Nils

    2004-09-30

    species. These data were used to address my study objectives. I found the most commonly cited FSR (2.67:1, male:female) for Florida Key deer to be inaccurate. A male biased FSR of 1.45:1 was more probable. Modified drop and drive nets were appropriate...

  7. Psychology with Management BSc (Hons) Key details

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Painter, Kevin

    Psychology with Management BSc (Hons) Key details Duration: Full-time: 4 years Delivery type: Day% Psychology with 25% Business and Management modules. Psychology modules cover a range of core approaches to psychology as well as research design and analysis and applied specialist topics. The curriculum is based

  8. Roadmap for selected key measurements of LHCb

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    The LHCb Collaboration; B. Adeva; M. Adinolfi; A. Affolder; Z. Ajaltouni; J. Albrecht; F. Alessio; M. Alexander; P. Alvarez Cartelle; A. A. Alves Jr; S. Amato; Y. Amhis; J. Amoraal; J. Anderson; O. Aquines Gutierrez; L. Arrabito; M. Artuso; E. Aslanides; G. Auriemma; S. Bachmann; Y. Bagaturia; D. S. Bailey; V. Balagura; W. Baldini; MdC. Barandela Pazos; R. J. Barlow; S. Barsuk; A. Bates; C. Bauer; Th. Bauer; A. Bay; I. Bediaga; K. Belous; I. Belyaev; M. Benayoun; G. Bencivenni; R. Bernet; M. -O. Bettler; A. Bizzeti; T. Blake; F. Blanc; C. Blanks; J. Blouw; S. Blusk; A. Bobrov; V. Bocci; A. Bondar; N. Bondar; W. Bonivento; S. Borghi; A. Borgia; E. Bos; T. J. V. Bowcock; C. Bozzi; J. Bressieux; S. Brisbane; M. Britsch; N. H. Brook; H. Brown; A. Büchler-Germann; J. Buytaert; J. -P. Cachemiche; S. Cadeddu; J. M. Caicedo Carvajal; O. Callot; M. Calvi; M. Calvo Gomez; A. Camboni; W. Cameron; P. Campana; A. Carbone; G. Carboni; A. Cardini; L. Carson; K. Carvalho Akiba; G. Casse; M. Cattaneo; M. Charles; Ph. Charpentier; A. Chlopik; P. Ciambrone; X. Cid Vidal; P. J. Clark; P. E. L. Clarke; M. Clemencic; H. V. Cliff; J. Closier; C. Coca; V. Coco; J. Cogan; P. Collins; F. Constantin; G. Conti; A. Contu; G. Corti; G. A. Cowan; B. D'Almagne; C. D'Ambrosio; D. G. d'Enterria; W. Da Silva; P. David; I. De Bonis; S. De Capua; M. De Cian; F. De Lorenzi; J. M. De Miranda; L. De Paula; P. De Simone; H. De Vries; D. Decamp; H. Degaudenzi; M. Deissenroth; L. Del Buono; C. Deplano; O. Deschamps; F. Dettori; J. Dickens; H. Dijkstra; M. Dima; S. Donleavy; A. C. dos Reis; A. Dovbnya; T. Du Pree; P. -Y. Duval; L. Dwyer; R. Dzhelyadin; C. Eames; S. Easo; U. Egede; V. Egorychev; F. Eisele; S. Eisenhardt; L. Eklund; D. Esperante Pereira; L. Estève; S. Eydelman; E. Fanchini; C. Färber; G. Fardell; C. Farinelli; S. Farry; V. Fave; V. Fernandez Albor; M. Ferro-Luzzi; S. Filippov; C. Fitzpatrick; F. Fontanelli; R. Forty; M. Frank; C. Frei; M. Frosini; J. L. Fungueirino Pazos; S. Furcas; A. Gallas Torreira; D. Galli; M. Gandelman; Y. Gao; J-C. Garnier; L. Garrido; C. Gaspar; N. Gauvin; M. Gersabeck; T. Gershon; Ph. Ghez; V. Gibson; Yu. Gilitsky; V. V. Gligorov; C. Göbel; D. Golubkov; A. Golutvin; A. Gomes; M. Grabalosa Gándara; R. Graciani Diaz; L. A. Granado Cardoso; E. Graugés; G. Graziani; A. Grecu; G. Guerrer; E. Gushchin; Yu. Guz; Z. Guzik; T. Gys; F. Hachon; G. Haefeli; S. C. Haines; T. Hampson; S. Hansmann-Menzemer; R. Harji; N. Harnew; P. F. Harrison; J. He; K. Hennessy; P. Henrard; J. A. Hernando Morata; A. Hicheur; E. Hicks; W. Hofmann; K. Holubyev; P. Hopchev; W. Hulsbergen; P. Hunt; T. Huse; R. S. Huston; D. Hutchcroft; V. Iakovenko; C. Iglesias Escudero; J. Imong; R. Jacobsson; M. Jahjah Hussein; E. Jans; F. Jansen; P. Jaton; B. Jean-Marie; M. John; C. R. Jones; B. Jost; F. Kapusta; T. M. Karbach; J. Keaveney; U. Kerzel; T. Ketel; A. Keune; S. Khalil; B. Khanji; Y. M. Kim; M. Knecht; J. Knopf; S. Koblitz; A. Konoplyannikov; P. Koppenburg; I. Korolko; A. Kozlinskiy; M. Krasowski; L. Kravchuk; P. Krokovny; K. Kruzelecki; M. Kucharczyk; I. Kudryashov; T. Kvaratskheliya; D. Lacarrere; A. Lai; R. W. Lambert; G. Lanfranchi; C. Langenbruch; T. Latham; R. Le Gac; R. Lefevre; A. Leflat; J. Lefrançois; O. Leroy; K. Lessnoff; L. Li; Y. Y. Li; J. Libby; M. Lieng; R. Lindner; S. Lindsey; C. Linn; B. Liu; G. Liu; J. H. Lopes; E. Lopez Asamar; J. Luisier; F. Machefert; I. Machikhiliyan; F. Maciuc; O. Maev; J. Magnin; A. Maier; R. M. D. Mamunur; G. Manca; G. Mancinelli; N. Mangiafave; U. Marconi; F. Marin; J. Marks; G. Martellotti; A. Martens; L. Martin; D. Martinez Santos; Z. Mathe; C. Matteuzzi; V. Matveev; A. Mazurov; G. McGregor; B. Mcharek; C. Mclean; R. McNulty; M. Merk; J. Merkel; M. Merkin; R. Messi; F. C. D. Metlica; J. Michalowski; S. Miglioranzi; M. -N. Minard; S. Monteil; D. Moran; J. V. Morris; R. Mountain; I. Mous; F. Muheim; R. Muresan; F. Murtas; B. Muryn; M. Musy; J. Mylroie-Smith; P. Naik; T. Nakada; R. Nandakumar; J. Nardulli; Z. Natkaniec; M. Nedos; M. Needham; N. Neufeld; L. Nicolas; S. Nies; V. Niess; N. Nikitin; A. Noor; A. Oblakowska-Mucha; V. Obraztsov; S. Oggero; O. Okhrimenko; R. Oldeman; M. Orlandea; A. Ostankov; J. Palacios; M. Palutan; J. Panman; A. Papadelis; A. Papanestis; M. Pappagallo; C. Parkes; G. Passaleva; G. D. Patel; M. Patel; S. K. Paterson; G. N. Patrick; E. Pauna; C. Pauna; C. Pavel; A. Pazos Alvarez; A. Pellegrino; G. Penso; M. Pepe Altarelli; S. Perazzini; D. L. Perego; A. Pérez-Calero Yzquierdo; E. Perez Trigo; P. Perret; G. Pessina; A. Petrella; A. Petrolini; B. Pietrzyk; D. Pinci; S. Playfer; M. Plo Casasus; G. Polok; A. Poluektov; E. Polycarpo; D. Popov; B. Popovici; S. Poss; C. Potterat; A. Powell; S. Pozzi; V. Pugatch; A. Puig Navarro; W. Qian; J. H. Rademacker; B. Rakotomiaramanana; I. Raniuk; G. Raven; S. Redford; W. Reece

    2010-11-23

    Six of the key physics measurements that will be made by the LHCb experiment, concerning CP asymmetries and rare B decays, are discussed in detail. The "road map" towards the precision measurements is presented, including the use of control channels and other techniques to understand the performance of the detector with the first data from the LHC.

  9. Business Management BA / MA (Hons) Key details

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Painter, Kevin

    Business Management BA / MA (Hons) Key details Duration: Full-time: 3 years (BA) / 4 years (MSc Management degree programme follows a number of guiding principles that mirror the values of managers of leading organisations and reflect current business management thinking. In the first two years of all

  10. Vermont's Changing Forests Key Findings on the

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Keeton, William S.

    1 Vermont's Changing Forests Key Findings on the Health of Forested Ecosystems from the Vermont Members Anne Archie, USDA Forest Service Douglas Lantagne, University of Vermont Ed O'Leary, Vermont, USDA Farm Service Agency Charles Scott, USDA Forest Service Steven Sinclair, Vermont Agency of Natural

  11. Automotive Engineering BEng (Hons) Key details

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Painter, Kevin

    Automotive Engineering BEng (Hons) Key details Duration: Full-time: 3 years (BEng) / 4 years (BEng programme, but allows students in the later years to specialise in subjects relating to automotive technology. Automotive engineering continues to be a major employer of professional engineers, owing

  12. CAREER RESOURCES Canadian Key Business Directory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thompson, Michael

    CAREER RESOURCES BOOKS Canadian Key Business Directory - Includes the largest companies in Canada companies - Search by name, geography, SIC code and more! - Online version available through library: http://www.jobsetc.gc.ca/eng/ - Training, career and worker information - Career Exploration resources

  13. NCLC November 1999 Cem Kaner Page 1 UCITA: Key Consumer IssuesUCITA: Key Consumer Issues

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    NCLC November 1999 Cem Kaner Page 1 UCITA: Key Consumer IssuesUCITA: Key Consumer Issues Cem Kaner, J.D., Ph.D., ASQ-CQE November 1999 Contact Information: kaner@kaner.com www.kaner.com (testing November 1999 Cem Kaner Page 2 UCITA? Huh?UCITA? Huh? · Uniform Computer Information Transactions Act

  14. Chemical and Petroleum Engineering Key and Lab Space Agreement

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chemical and Petroleum Engineering Key and Lab Space Agreement Key Holder Information Last Name and Petroleum Engineering remain the property of the Department. I agree to pay a deposit for the keys

  15. Chemical Processing in High-Pressure Aqueous Environments. 7. Process Development for Catalytic Gasification of Wet Biomass

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gasification of Wet Biomass Feedstocks Douglas C. Elliott,* Gary G. Neuenschwander, Todd R. Hart, R. Scott catalyst, gasification of wet biomass can be accomplished with high levels of carbon conversion to gas of the organic structure of biomass to gases has been achieved in the presence of a ruthenium metal catalyst

  16. DELETERIOUS EXPANSION OF CEMENT PASTE SUBJECTED TO WET-DRY CYCLES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ·I CEMENT PASTE SUBJECTED TO WET-DRY CYCLES John A. Wells*, Emmanuel K with five cements produced in different regions of Canada. Test specimens with nominal diameters of 25 mm program show that cement paste specimens exhibit significant differences in the magnitude of expansion

  17. BIOETHANOL PRODUCTION FROM WET OXIDSED CORN STOVER USING PRE-TREATED MANURE AS A NUTRIENT SOURCE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    and oxygen addition) were also applied for pre-treatment of manure. The manure was blended with water for the production of bioethanol. This pre-treatment method, similar to other hot water pre-treatments, acts, Roskilde, Denmark ABSTRACT: In the present study ethanol was produced from wet oxidised corn stover

  18. THE MARS ENVIRONMENTAL COMPATIBILITY ASSESSMENT (MECA) WET CHEMISTRY EXPERIMENT ON THE MARS '01 LANDER

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kounaves, Samuel P.

    THE MARS ENVIRONMENTAL COMPATIBILITY ASSESSMENT (MECA) WET CHEMISTRY EXPERIMENT ON THE MARS '01 of Chemistry, TuftsUniversity, Medford, MA, 02155 4 Mineral Processing Department, West Virginia University, Morgantown, WV, 26507 Introduction. The Mars Environmental Compatibility Assessment (MECA) is an instrument

  19. Stable or unstable wetting fronts in water repellent soils effect of antecedent soil moisture content

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Walter, M.Todd

    contents during the experiment, which caused the soil to be wettable instead of water repellent. The waterStable or unstable wetting fronts in water repellent soils ± effect of antecedent soil moisture content Coen J. Ritsemaa,* , John L. Nieberb , Louis W. Dekkera , T.S. Steenhuisc a DLO Winand Staring

  20. Performance evaluation of half-wetted hydrodynamic bearings with DLC coated surfaces.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Eryilmaz, O.; Erdemir, A.; Energy Systems

    2008-01-01

    In conventional liquid lubrication it is assumed that surfaces are fully wetted and no slip occurs between the fluid and the solid boundary. Under the 'no slip' condition the maximum shear gradient occurs at the fluid-surface interface. When one or both surfaces are non-wetted by the fluid, boundary slip can occur due to weak bonding between the fluid and the solid surface, which reduces shear stresses in the fluid adjacent to the non-wetted surface. A thrust bearing tribometer was used to compare the performance of 'no slip' hydrodynamic thrust bearings with bearings surfaces that were made to slip at the interface between the surface and fluid. Hydrophobic surfaces on both runner and bearing were achieved with the deposition of hydrogenated diamond like carbon (H-DLC) films, produced by plasma-enhanced CVD on titanium alloy surfaces. Hydrophilic surfaces were created through the surface modification of DLC. A mixtures of water and glycerol was used as the lubricant. The tests were conducted using different constant bearing gaps. The normal load and the torque or traction force between the rotating runner and hydrodynamic thrust bearing were measured with load cells. The experimental results confirmed that load support is still possible when surfaces are partially-wetted or nonwetted.

  1. Energy dynamics and modeled evapotranspiration from a wet tropical forest in Costa Rica

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Energy dynamics and modeled evapotranspiration from a wet tropical forest in Costa Rica H). #12;1. Introduction The energy balance of tropical forests is complex due to feedback mechanisms among.W. Loeschera, *, H.L. Gholza,b , J.M. Jacobsc , S.F. Oberbauerd,e a School of Forest Resources and Conservation

  2. Rheology of weakly wetted granular materials - a comparison of experimental and numerical data

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ruediger Schwarze; Anton Gladkyy; Fabian Uhlig; Stefan Luding

    2014-09-12

    Shear cell simulations and experiments of weakly wetted particles (a few volume percent liquid binders) are compared, with the goal to understand their flow rheology. Application examples are cores for metal casting by core shooting made of sand and liquid binding materials. The experiments are carried out with a Couette-like rotating viscometer. The weakly wetted granular materials are made of quartz sand and small amounts of Newtonian liquids. For comparison, experiments on dry sand are also performed with a modified configuration of the viscometer. The numerical model involves spherical, monodisperse particles with contact forces and a simple liquid bridge model for individual capillary bridges between two particles. Different liquid content and properties lead to different flow rheology when measuring the shear stress-strain relations. In the experiments of the weakly wetted granular material, the apparent shear viscosity $\\eta_g$ scales inversely proportional to the inertial number $I$, for all shear rates. On the contrary, in the dry case, an intermediate scaling regime inversely quadratic in $I$ is observed for moderate shear rates. In the simulations, both scaling regimes are found for dry and wet granular material as well.

  3. Density-Functional Theory and Quantum Chemistry Studies on "dry" and "wet"

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alavi, Ali

    Density-Functional Theory and Quantum Chemistry Studies on "dry" and "wet" NaCl(001) vorgelegt von essential role as a food preserva- tive. However, many fundamental physical and chemical properties of Na), and defects on NaCl(001) surfaces have been examined with density-functional theory within the plane

  4. Observations of Precipitation Size and Fall Speed Characteristics within Coexisting Rain and Wet Snow

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yuter, Sandra

    Snow SANDRA E. YUTER Department of Marine, Earth, and Atmospheric Sciences, North Carolina State are compared among samples obtained in mixed precipitation (rain and wet snow) and rain in the Oregon Cascade Mountains and in dry snow in the Rocky Mountains of Colorado. Coexisting rain and snow particles

  5. The influence of surface energy on the wetting behaviour of the spore adhesive

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chaudhury, Manoj K.

    The influence of surface energy on the wetting behaviour of the spore adhesive of the marine alga, from bacteria, through lower plants (algae) to invertebrate animals, use sticky materials. This adhesion process takes place within minutes, under water, to a wide range of substrates, over a wide range

  6. A Monte Carlo simulation study on the wetting behavior of water on graphite surface

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Xiongce Zhao

    2012-09-20

    This paper is an expanded edition of the rapid communication published several years ago by the author (Phys. Rev. B, v76, 041402(R), 2007) on the simulation of wetting transition of water on graphite, aiming to provide more details on the methodology, parameters, and results of the study which might be of interest to certain readers. We calculate adsorption isotherms of water on graphite using grand canonical Monte Carlo simulations combined with multiple histogram reweighting, based on the empirical potentials of SPC/E for water, the 10-4-3 van der Waals model, and a recently developed induction and multipolar potential for water and graphite. Our results show that wetting transition of water on graphite occurs at 475-480 K, and the prewetting critical temperature lies in the range of 505-510 K. The calculated wetting transition temperature agrees quantitatively with a previously predicted value using a simple model. The observation of the coexistence of stable and metastable states at temperatures between the wetting transition temperature and prewetting critical temperature indicates that the transition is first order.

  7. Characterization of light gluten and light steep water from a corn wet milling plant

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Characterization of light gluten and light steep water from a corn wet milling plant K.D. Rausch. There are few data on the effect of composition of the parent process streams, light steep water (LSW) and light value of CGF and CGM. CGF and CGM are formed from two process streams, light steep water (LSW) and light

  8. Surface Water Quality Pollutant Removal Efficacy of Three Wet Detention Ponds

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mallin, Michael

    Surface Water Quality Pollutant Removal Efficacy of Three Wet Detention Ponds Michael A. Mallin the natureand outflowing water nutrient concentrations. There were substantial suburban runoff inputs entering-circuited pollutant removal contact time. The golf course pond geometry of the system. showed significant increases

  9. Effect of Transport and Reaction on the Shape Evolutionof Cavities during Wet Chemical Etching

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Economou, Demetre J.

    Effect of Transport and Reaction on the Shape Evolutionof Cavities during Wet Chemical Etching Chee Burm Shin and Demetre J. Economou* Department of Chemical Engineering, University of Houston, Houston, Texas 77204-4792 ABSTRACT The effect of fluid flow, transport, and reaction on the shape evolution

  10. Wet and Dry Adhesion Properties of Self-Selective Nanowire Connectors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Javey, Ali

    Wet and Dry Adhesion Properties of Self-Selective Nanowire Connectors By Hyunhyub Ko, Zhenxing,for example, the amazing adhesion abilities of gecko feet,[3­8] the self- cleaning superhydrophobic surface that enable efficient binding with self-similar surfaces but weak adhesion towards other surfaces

  11. Does canopy wetness matter? Evapotranspiration from a subtropical montane cloud forest in Taiwan

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Jiquan

    Does canopy wetness matter? Evapotranspiration from a subtropical montane cloud forest in Taiwan Resources and Environmental Studies, National Dong-Hwa University, Hualien, Taiwan 2 Department intensive field campaign at the Chi-Lan Mountain cloud forest site in Taiwan. Eddy covariance and sap flow

  12. Efficacy of lactic acid as a pathogen intervention for dry- and wet-aged beef subprimals. 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Steger, Jessica

    2012-04-18

    USDA Select carcasses (n=6) were selected, and paired boneless (n=12) strip loins were cut in half (n=24) and were assigned randomly to be dry-aged (unpackaged) or wet-aged in a vacuum package bag. Strip loin sections were inoculated with a...

  13. Wet weather led to higher stumpage prices for hardwood (especially pulpwood) in East

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wet weather led to higher stumpage prices for hardwood (especially pulpwood) in East Texas during March/April 2012. Pine saw- log and pulpwood prices remained flat to slightly lower. Higher diesel costs put downward pressure on stumpage prices. Pine sawlog prices averaged $22.11 per ton, 6 percent lower

  14. Extremely wet and cold weather in East Texas drove up stumpage prices in the first

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Extremely wet and cold weather in East Texas drove up stumpage prices in the first period of 2010 also have played a role. Lumber prices have seen constant increase since the last quar- ter of 2009. A reporter commented that the pulpwood market felt upward pricing pres- sure from the Biomass Crop Assistance

  15. IDENTIFYING DIFFERENCES IN WET AND DRY ROAD CRASHES USING DATA MINING Emerson D a

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liang, Huizhi "Elly"

    ]. These criteria aim to develop roads that sustain set maximum traffic volumes at certain traffic speeds with low1 IDENTIFYING DIFFERENCES IN WET AND DRY ROAD CRASHES USING DATA MINING Emerson D a , Nayak R, Queensland University of Technology, Brisbane, Queensland, Australia. b. Road Asset Management Branch

  16. Production and Pressure Decline Curves for Wet Gas Sands With Closed Outer Boundaries

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mohaghegh, Shahab

    . SPE SPE 23442 Production and Pressure Decline Curves for Wet Gas Sands With Closed Outer, Richardson, TX 7S0834S36 U.5A. Telex, 730989 SPEDAL. ABSTRACT A family of pressure and production decline as gas reservoirs which produce substan- tial amounts of water together with ~as. Production of water

  17. Wet Granulation in a Twin-Screw Extruder: Implications of Screw Design

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thompson, Michael

    of pharmaceuticals. The performance of this machinery is integrally tied to its screw design yet little fundamentalWet Granulation in a Twin-Screw Extruder: Implications of Screw Design M.R. THOMPSON, J. SUN MMRI granulation in twin-screw extrusion machinery is an attractive tech- nology for the continuous processing

  18. STABILITY OF INTERFACES AND STOCHASTIC DYNAMICS IN THE REGIME OF PARTIAL WETTING.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    STABILITY OF INTERFACES AND STOCHASTIC DYNAMICS IN THE REGIME OF PARTIAL WETTING. T. BODINEAU AND D representation of the interface between the two pure phases of the Ising model. This improves the L 1 description of the interface (thickness, uctuation, detailed structure ...) as well as an understanding of the relaxation

  19. Identification of Key Barriers in Workforce Development

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2008-03-31

    This report documents the identification of key barriers in the development of an adequate national security workforce as part of the National Security Preparedness Project, being performed under a Department of Energy/National Nuclear Security Administration grant. Many barriers exist that prevent the development of an adequate number of propertly trained national security personnel. Some barriers can be eliminated in a short-term manner, whereas others will involve a long-term strategy that takes into account public policy.

  20. Key Physical Mechanisms in Nanostructured Solar Cells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dr Stephan Bremner

    2010-07-21

    The objective of the project was to study both theoretically and experimentally the excitation, recombination and transport properties required for nanostructured solar cells to deliver energy conversion efficiencies well in excess of conventional limits. These objectives were met by concentrating on three key areas, namely, investigation of physical mechanisms present in nanostructured solar cells, characterization of loss mechanisms in nanostructured solar cells and determining the properties required of nanostructured solar cells in order to achieve high efficiency and the design implications.

  1. Rapid Compression Machine ? A Key Experimental Device to Effectively...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Compression Machine A Key Experimental Device to Effectively Collaborate with Basic Energy Sciences Rapid Compression Machine A Key Experimental Device to Effectively...

  2. Cooling Towers: Understanding Key Components of Cooling Towers...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Cooling Towers: Understanding Key Components of Cooling Towers and How to Improve Water Efficiency Cooling Towers: Understanding Key Components of Cooling Towers and How to Improve...

  3. Single, Key Gene Discovery Could Streamline Production of Biofuels...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Single, Key Gene Discovery Could Streamline Production of Biofuels Single, Key Gene Discovery Could Streamline Production of Biofuels August 11, 2011 - 3:51pm Addthis WASHINGTON,...

  4. Building America Expert Meeting: Key Innovations for Adding Energy...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Expert Meeting: Key Innovations for Adding Energy Efficiency to Maintenance Projects Building America Expert Meeting: Key Innovations for Adding Energy Efficiency to Maintenance...

  5. Thailand-Key Results and Policy Recommendations for Future Bioenergy...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Thailand-Key Results and Policy Recommendations for Future Bioenergy Development Jump to: navigation, search Name Thailand-Key Results and Policy Recommendations for Future...

  6. Technology Key to Harnessing Natural Gas Potential | Department...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Technology Key to Harnessing Natural Gas Potential Technology Key to Harnessing Natural Gas Potential July 18, 2012 - 3:52pm Addthis Deputy Secretary Daniel Poneman tours Proinlosa...

  7. Key Energy-Saving Projects for Smaller Facilities | Department...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Key Energy-Saving Projects for Smaller Facilities Key Energy-Saving Projects for Smaller Facilities This presentation discusses how smaller industrial facilities can save energy...

  8. Manufacturing Energy and Carbon Footprint Definitions and Assumptions...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Definitions and Assumptions, October 2012 Manufacturing Energy and Carbon Footprint Definitions and Assumptions, October 2012 footprintsassumptionsdefinitions2012.pdf More...

  9. Analysing ZigBee Key Establishment Protocols

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yüksel, Ender

    2012-01-01

    In this report, we present our approach for protocol analysis together with a real example where we find an important flow in a contemporary wireless sensor network security protocol. We start by modelling protocols using a specific process algebraic formalism called LySa process calculus. We then apply an analysis based on a special program analysis technique called control flow analysis. We apply this technique to the ZigBee-2007 End-to-End Application Key Establishment Protocol and with the help of the analysis discover an unknown flaw. Finally we suggest a fix for the protocol, and verify that the fix works by using the same technique.

  10. Another key Y-12 General Foreman remembered

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 OutreachProductswsicloudwsiclouddenDVA N C E D B L O O D S TAPropaneandAn319Another key Y-12 General Foreman

  11. Keyes, California: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QAsource History View NewTexas: Energy ResourcesOrder atHills,NewKeithDelaware:DLRKettering,KeyTex Energy LLCKeyes,

  12. NERSC.COE.key.actions-4.pptx

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power Administration wouldMass map shines light on77 PAGEMissionStressMoveMuncriefB ONERSCNERSC8 CoE Key Actions

  13. Composite keys? | OpenEI Community

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTIONRobertsdale, Alabama (Utility Company)| Open EnergyColoradoBiomassPlusComposite keys? Home >

  14. Fermilab | Science | Particle Physics | Key Discoveries

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefieldSulfateSciTechtail.Theory ofDid you not find whatGasEnergyfeature photo featureParticleDark matterKey

  15. Key Agency Targets Summary _FY 2012_.doc

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power Administration would likeUniverseIMPACTThousand Cubic Feet) SoldDepartment ofKenThousandtheKevlar andKey5 B

  16. Key Actions for Optimizing for KNL

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home Room NewsInformationJesse Bergkamp Graduate student Subtask 4Photo4> TheKevin Morris Title:AnaKey

  17. Bioenergy Key Publications | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE: Alternative FuelsofProgram:Y-12Power, IncBio Centers Announcement at theproduceƈ GOAL:Key

  18. Fair Encryption of RSA Keys Guillaume Poupard and Jacques Stern

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stern, Jacques

    based on verifiable encryption of secret keys using double decker exponentiation which makes the proofs

  19. Session-Key Generation using Human Passwords Only Oded Goldreich

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    International Association for Cryptologic Research (IACR)

    Session-Key Generation using Human Passwords Only Oded Goldreich Department of Computer Science present session-key generation protocols in a model where the legitimate parties share only a human assumptions. Keywords: Session-key generation (authenticated key-exchange), mutual authentication proto- cols

  20. SessionKey Generation using Human Passwords Only # Oded Goldreich +

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    International Association for Cryptologic Research (IACR)

    Session­Key Generation using Human Passwords Only # Oded Goldreich + Department of Computer Science present session­key generation protocols in a model where the legitimate parties share only a human setup assumptions. Keywords: Session­key generation (authenticated key­exchange), mutual authentication

  1. The impacts of urbanization on endangered florida key deer 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Harveson, Patricia Moody

    2006-04-12

    of peninsular Florida. Key deer range is restricted to the Lower Florida Keys with approximately 60% residing on Big Pine Key and 15% residing on No Name Key which have undergone rapid human population growth and development over the past 30 years. Urban...

  2. TABLE OF CONTENTS: Building Executive Definition.......................................................................3

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Capogna, Luca

    #12;TABLE OF CONTENTS: Building Executive Definition.......................................................................3 Building Executives Areas of Responsibilities ...................................................................................5 Building Safety and Security Issues

  3. Definition of GPRA08 benefits metrics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None, None

    2009-01-18

    Background information for the FY 2007 GPRA methodology review on the definitions of GPRA08 benefits metrics.

  4. Pilot Testing of Mercury Oxidation Catalysts for Upstream of Wet FGD Systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gary Blythe; Conor Braman; Katherine Dombrowski; Tom Machalek

    2010-12-31

    This document is the final technical report for Cooperative Agreement DE-FC26-04NT41992, 'Pilot Testing of Mercury Oxidation Catalysts for Upstream of Wet FGD Systems,' which was conducted over the time-period January 1, 2004 through December 31, 2010. The objective of this project has been to demonstrate at pilot scale the use of solid catalysts and/or fixed-structure mercury sorbents to promote the removal of total mercury and oxidation of elemental mercury in flue gas from coal combustion, followed by wet flue gas desulfurization (FGD) to remove the oxidized mercury at high efficiency. The project was co-funded by the U.S. DOE National Energy Technology Laboratory (DOE-NETL), EPRI, Great River Energy (GRE), TXU Energy (now called Luminant), Southern Company, Salt River Project (SRP) and Duke Energy. URS Group was the prime contractor. The mercury control process under development uses fixed-structure sorbents and/or catalysts to promote the removal of total mercury and/or oxidation of elemental mercury in the flue gas from coal-fired power plants that have wet lime or limestone FGD systems. Oxidized mercury not adsorbed is removed in the wet FGD absorbers and leaves with the byproducts from the FGD system. The project has tested candidate materials at pilot scale and in a commercial form, to provide engineering data for future full-scale designs. Pilot-scale catalytic oxidation tests have been completed for periods of approximately 14 to19 months at three sites, with an additional round of pilot-scale fixed-structure sorbent tests being conducted at one of those sites. Additionally, pilot-scale wet FGD tests have been conducted downstream of mercury oxidation catalysts at a total of four sites. The sites include the two of three sites from this project and two sites where catalytic oxidation pilot testing was conducted as part of a previous DOE-NETL project. Pilot-scale wet FGD tests were also conducted at a fifth site, but with no catalyst or fixed-structure mercury sorbent upstream. This final report presents and discusses detailed results from all of these efforts, and makes a number of conclusions about what was learned through these efforts.

  5. Field Testing of a Wet FGD Additive for Enhanced Mercury Control - Pilot-Scale Test Results

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gary M. Blythe

    2006-03-01

    This Topical Report summarizes progress on Cooperative Agreement DE-FC26-04NT42309, ''Field Testing of a Wet FGD Additive.'' The objective of the project is to demonstrate the use of a flue gas desulfurization (FGD) additive, Degussa Corporation's TMT-15, to prevent the reemissions of elemental mercury (Hg{sup 0}) in flue gas exiting wet FGD systems on coal-fired boilers. Furthermore, the project intends to demonstrate that the additive can be used to precipitate most of the mercury (Hg) removed in the wet FGD system as a fine TMT salt that can be separated from the FGD liquor and bulk solid byproducts for separate disposal. The project will conduct pilot and full-scale tests of the TMT-15 additive in wet FGD absorbers. The tests are intended to determine required additive dosage requirements to prevent Hg{sup 0} reemissions and to separate mercury from the normal FGD byproducts for three coal types: Texas lignite/Power River Basin (PRB) coal blend, high-sulfur Eastern bituminous coal, and low-sulfur Eastern bituminous coal. The project team consists of URS Group, Inc., EPRI, TXU Generation Company LP, Southern Company, and Degussa Corporation. TXU Generation has provided the Texas lignite/PRB co-fired test site for pilot FGD tests, Monticello Steam Electric Station Unit 3. Southern Company is providing the low-sulfur Eastern bituminous coal host site for wet scrubbing tests, as well as the pilot and full-scale jet bubbling reactor (JBR) FGD systems to be tested. A third utility, to be named later, will provide the high-sulfur Eastern bituminous coal full-scale FGD test site. Degussa Corporation is providing the TMT-15 additive and technical support to the test program. The project is being conducted in six tasks. Of the six project tasks, Task 1 involves project planning and Task 6 involves management and reporting. The other four tasks involve field testing on FGD systems, either at pilot or full scale. The four tasks include: Task 2 - Pilot Additive Testing in Texas Lignite Flue Gas; Task 3 - Full-scale FGD Additive Testing in High Sulfur Eastern Bituminous Flue Gas; Task 4 - Pilot Wet Scrubber Additive Tests at Yates; and Task 5 - Full-scale Additive Tests at Plant Yates. This topical report presents the results from the Task 2 and Task 4 pilot-scale additive tests. The Task 3 and Task 5 full-scale additive tests will be conducted later in calendar year 2006.

  6. SQL Data Definition Database Systems Lecture 5

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alechina, Natasha

    SQL Data Definition Database Systems Lecture 5 Natasha Alechina #12;SQL Data Definition In This Lecture · SQL · The SQL language · SQL, the relational model, and E/R diagrams · CREATE TABLE · Columns.6. #12;SQL Data Definition SQL · Originally `Sequel' - Structured English query Language, part of an IBM

  7. SQL Data Definition Database Systems Lecture 5

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alechina, Natasha

    1 SQL Data Definition Database Systems Lecture 5 Natasha Alechina SQL Data Definition In This Lecture · SQL · The SQL language · SQL, the relational model, and E/R diagrams · CREATE TABLE · Columns.6. SQL Data Definition SQL · Originally `Sequel' - Structured English query Language, part of an IBM

  8. Rules-GASB 51 Definitions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    . Capitalization ceases when the software project is substantially complete after all testing is completed. #12The New Software Accounting Rules-GASB 51 #12;Definitions Software Package: Software purchased or licensed with the software code already written and developed . The useful life must be over 1 year

  9. Wetting of Sodium on ??-Al2O3/YSZ Composites for Low Temperature Planar Sodium-Metal Halide Batteries

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Reed, David M.; Coffey, Greg W.; Mast, Eric S.; Canfield, Nathan L.; Mansurov, Jirgal; Lu, Xiaochuan; Sprenkle, Vincent L.

    2013-04-01

    Wetting of Na on B”-Al2O3/YSZ composites was investigated using the sessile drop technique. The effects of moisture and surface preparation were studied at low temperatures. Electrical conductivity of Na/B”-Al2O3-YSZ/Na cells was also investigated at low temperatures and correlated to the wetting behavior. The use of planar B”-Al2O3 substrates at low temperature with low cost polymeric seals is realized due to improved wetting at low temperature and conductivity values consistent with the literature.

  10. Audit of wet gas processing at Chevron's McKittrick Plant, Naval Petroleum Reserve No. 1, Elk Hills, California

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1987-04-10

    The purpose of the audit was to determine if: (1) volumes of wet gas delivered to the McKittrick plant were properly calculated and reported; (2) processing fees paid to Chevron conformed to contract provisions; (3) wet gas processing at Chevron's facility was economical; and (4) controls over natural gas liquid sales were adequate. Our review showed that there were weaknesses in internal controls, practices and procedures regarding the Department's management of the wet gas which is processed by Chevron under contract to the Reserve. The findings, recommendations and management comments are synopsized in the Executive Summary.

  11. ,"Virginia Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet)"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home PageMonthly","10/2015"4,"Ames City of",6,1,"Omaha Public PowerOECD/IEA -Annual",2014Proved Reserves, WetGas, Wet AfterLNGNonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After

  12. Percolation lithography: Tuning and freezing disorder in 3D photonic crystals using partial wetting and drying

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Burgess, Ian B; Kay, Theresa M; Shneidman, Anna V; Cranshaw, Derek J; Loncar, Marko; Aizenberg, Joanna

    2015-01-01

    Although complex, hierarchical nanoscale geometries with tailored degrees of disorder are commonly found in biological systems, few simple self-assembly routes to fabricating synthetic analogues have been identified. We present two techniques that exploit basic capillary phenomena to finely control disorder in porous 3D photonic crystals, leading to complex and hierarchical geometries. In the first, we exposed the structures to mixtures of ethanol and water that partially wet their pores, where small adjustments to the ethanol content controlled the degree of partial wetting. In the second, we infiltrated the structures with thin films of volatile alkanes and observed a sequence of partial infiltration patterns as the liquid evaporated. In both cases, macroscopic symmetry breaking was driven by subtle sub-wavelength variations in the pore geometry that directed site-selective infiltration of liquids. The resulting patterns, well described by percolation theory, had significant effects on the photonic structur...

  13. Wet to dry crossover and a flow vortex-lattice in active nematics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Amin Doostmohammadi; Michael Adamer; Sumesh P. Thampi; Julia M. Yeomans

    2015-05-15

    Active systems, from bacterial suspensions to vibrated granular matter, are continuously driven out of equilibrium by local injection of energy from their constituent elements. The energy input leads to exotic behaviour such as collective motion, pattern formation, topological defects and active turbulence, but theories that link the different manifestations of activity across systems and length scales are lacking. Here we unify two different classes of active matter by using friction as a control parameter to interpolate between wet active systems, whose behaviour is dominated by hydrodynamics, and dry active matter where any flow is screened. At the wet-dry crossover, we find a novel lattice of flow vortices interleaved with an ordered network of topological defects which arises from the competition between friction and viscous dissipation. Our results contribute to understanding the physics of matter operating out-of-equilibrium, with its potential in the design of active micro- and nano-machines.

  14. Recovery of Uranium from Wet Phosphoric Acid by Solvent Extraction Processes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Beltrami, Denis; Cote, Gérard; Mokhtari, Hamid; Courtaud, Bruno; Moyer, Bruce A; Chagnes, Alexandre

    2014-01-01

    Between 1951 and 1991, about 17 processes were developed to recover uranium from wet phosphoric acid (WPA), but the viability of these processes was subject to the variation of the uranium price market. Nowadays, uranium from WPA appears to be attractive due to the increase of the global uranium demand resulting from the emergence of developing countries. The increasing demand provides impetus for a new look at the applicable technology with a view to improvements as well as altogether new approaches. This paper gives an overview on extraction processes developed in the past to recover uranium from wet phosphoric acid (WPA) as well as the physicochemistry involved in these processes. Recent advances concerning the development of new extraction systems are also reported and discussed.

  15. Notes on the efficacy of wet versus dry screening of fly ash

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Valentim, B.; Hower, J.C.; Flores, D.; Guedes, A.

    2008-08-15

    The methodology used to obtain fly ash subsamples of different sizes is generally based on wet or dry sieving methods. However, the worth of such methods is not certain if the methodology applied is not mentioned in the analytical procedure. After performing a fly ash mechanical dry, sieving, the authors compared those results with the ones obtained by laser diffraction on the same samples and found unacceptable discrepancies. A preliminary, study of a wet sieving analysis carried out on an economizer fly ash sample showed that this method was more effective than the dry sieving. The importance of standardizing the way samples are handled, pretreated and presented to the instrument of analysis are suggested and interlaboratory reproducibility trials are needed to create a common standard methodology to obtain large amounts of fly ash size fraction subsamples.

  16. MULTI-POLLUTANT CONTROL USING MEMBRANE-BASED UP-FLOW WET ELECTROSTATIC PRECIPITATION

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    James Reynolds

    2003-01-01

    This is the first quarterly report of the ''Multi-Pollutant Control Using Membrane--Based Upflow Wet Electrostatic Precipitation'' project funded by the US Department of Energy's National Energy Technology Laboratory under DOE Award No. DE-FC26-02NT41592 to Croll-Reynolds Clean Air Technologies (CRCAT). In this 18 month project, CRCAT and its team members will conduct detailed emission tests of metallic and new membrane collection material within a wet electrostatic precipitator (WESP) at First Energy's Penn Power's Bruce Mansfield (BMP) plant in Shippingport, Pa. Test results performed on the existing metallic WESP during November of 2002 showed consistent results with previous test results. Average collection efficiency of 89% on SO{sub 3} mist was achieved. Additionally, removal efficiencies of 62% were achieved at very high velocity, greater than 15 ft./sec.

  17. Dynamic Imaging of Au-nanoparticles via Scanning Electron Microscopy in a Graphene Wet Cell

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wayne Yang; Yuning Zhang; Michael Hilke; Walter Reisner

    2015-06-10

    High resolution nanoscale imaging in liquid environments is crucial for studying molecular interactions in biological and chemical systems. In particular, electron microscopy is the gold-standard tool for nanoscale imaging, but its high-vacuum requirements make application to in-liquid samples extremely challenging. Here we present a new graphene based wet cell device where high resolution SEM (scanning electron microscope) and Energy Dispersive X-rays (EDX) analysis can be performed directly inside a liquid environment. Graphene is an ideal membrane material as its high transparancy, conductivity and mechanical strength can support the high vacuum and grounding requirements of a SEM while enabling maximal resolution and signal. In particular, we obtain high resolution (graphene wet cell and EDX analysis of nanoparticle composition in the liquid enviornment. Our obtained resolution surpasses current conventional silicon nitride devices imaged in both SEM and TEM under much higher electron doses.

  18. Theory of wetting-induced fluid entrainment by advancing contact lines on dry surfaces

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rodrigo Ledesma-Aguilar; Aurora Hernández-Machado; Ignacio Pagonabarraga

    2013-06-11

    We report on the onset of fluid entrainment when a contact line is forced to advance over a dry solid of arbitrary wettability. We show that entrainment occurs at a critical advancing speed beyond which the balance between capillary, viscous and contact line forces sustaining the shape of the interface is no longer satisfied. Wetting couples to the hydrodynamics by setting both the morphology of the interface at small scales and the viscous friction of the front. We find that the critical deformation that the interface can sustain is controlled by the friction at the contact line and the viscosity contrast between the displacing and displaced fluids, leading to a rich variety of wetting-entrainment regimes. We discuss the potential use of our theory to measure contact-line forces using atomic force microscopy, and to study entrainment under microfluidic conditions exploiting colloid-polymer fluids of ultra-low surface tension.

  19. Wet-chemical systems and methods for producing black silicon substrates

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Yost, Vernon; Yuan, Hao-Chih; Page, Matthew

    2015-05-19

    A wet-chemical method of producing a black silicon substrate. The method comprising soaking single crystalline silicon wafers in a predetermined volume of a diluted inorganic compound solution. The substrate is combined with an etchant solution that forms a uniform noble metal nanoparticle induced Black Etch of the silicon wafer, resulting in a nanoparticle that is kinetically stabilized. The method comprising combining with an etchant solution having equal volumes acetonitrile/acetic acid:hydrofluoric acid:hydrogen peroxide.

  20. Soil water content dependent wetting front characteristics in sands T.W.J. Bautersa

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Walter, M.Todd

    Soil water content dependent wetting front characteristics in sands T.W.J. Bautersa , D.A. Di 94305, USA Received 2 April 1999; accepted 13 August 1999 Abstract The initial soil water content into a 20/30 sand with initial volumetric water contents of 0, 0.005, 0.01, 0.015, 0.02, 0.03, 0.04 and 0

  1. Molecular dynamics of wetting layer formation and forced water invasion in angular nanopores with mixed wettability

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sedghi, Mohammad Piri, Mohammad; Goual, Lamia

    2014-11-21

    The depletion of conventional hydrocarbon reservoirs has prompted the oil and gas industry to search for unconventional resources such as shale gas/oil reservoirs. In shale rocks, considerable amounts of hydrocarbon reside in nanoscale pore spaces. As a result, understanding the multiphase flow of wetting and non-wetting phases in nanopores is important to improve oil and gas recovery from these formations. This study was designed to investigate the threshold capillary pressure of oil and water displacements in a capillary dominated regime inside nanoscale pores using nonequilibrium molecular dynamics (NEMD) simulations. The pores have the same cross-sectional area and volume but different cross-sectional shapes. Oil and water particles were represented with a coarse grained model and the NEMD simulations were conducted by assigning external pressure on an impermeable piston. Threshold capillary pressures were determined for the drainage process (water replaced by oil) in different pores. The molecular dynamics results are in close agreements with calculations using the Mayer-Stowe-Princen (MS-P) method which has been developed on the premise of energy balance in thermodynamic equilibrium. After the drainage simulations, a change in wall particles’ wettability from water-wet to oil-wet was implemented based on the final configuration of oil and water inside the pore. Waterflooding simulations were then carried out at the threshold capillary pressure. The results show that the oil layer formed between water in the corner and in the center of the pore is not stable and collapses as the simulation continues. This is in line with the predictions from the MS-P method.

  2. Heat Transfer Performance of a Dry and Wet / Dry Advanced Cooling Tower Condenser 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fricke, H. D.; Webster, D. J.; McIlroy, K.; Bartz, J. A.

    1981-01-01

    PERFORMANCE OF A DRY AND WET/DRY ADVANCED COOLING TOWER CONDENSER Hans D. Fricke, David J. Webster, Kenneth McIlroy Union carbide Corporation - Linde Division, Tonawanda, New York John A. Bartz Electric Power Research Institute, Palo Alto, california... cooling in creases siting flexibility, particularly for locations in arid Western coal fields. However, dry cooling requires considerable capital investment for the cooling towers. Hence, the development of effitient (low cost) heat transfer surfaces...

  3. On atomic structure of Ge huts growing on the Ge/Si(001) wetting layer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Arapkina, Larisa V.; Yuryev, Vladimir A. [A. M. Prokhorov General Physics Institute of the Russian Academy of Sciences, 38 Vavilov Street, Moscow, 119991 (Russian Federation)] [A. M. Prokhorov General Physics Institute of the Russian Academy of Sciences, 38 Vavilov Street, Moscow, 119991 (Russian Federation)

    2013-09-14

    Structural models of growing Ge hut clusters—pyramids and wedges—are proposed on the basis of data of recent STM investigations of nucleation and growth of Ge huts on the Si(001) surface in the process of molecular beam epitaxy. It is shown that extension of a hut base along <110> directions goes non-uniformly during the cluster growth regardless of its shape. Growing pyramids, starting from the second monolayer, pass through cyclic formation of slightly asymmetrical and symmetrical clusters, with symmetrical ones appearing after addition of every fourth monolayer. We suppose that pyramids of symmetrical configurations composed by 2, 6, 10, etc., monolayers over the wetting layer are more stable than asymmetrical ones. This might explain less stability of pyramids in comparison with wedges in dense arrays forming at low temperatures of Ge deposition. Possible nucleation processes of pyramids and wedges on wetting layer patches from identical embryos composed by 8 dimers through formation of 1 monolayer high 16-dimer nuclei different only in their symmetry is discussed. Schematics of these processes are presented. It is concluded from precise STM measurements that top layers of wetting layer patches are relaxed when huts nucleate on them.

  4. OVERVIEW OF CRITERIA FOR INTERIM WET & DRY STORAGE OF RESEARCH REACTOR SPENT NUCLEAR FUEL

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sindelar, R.; Vinson, D.; Iyer, N.; Fisher, D.

    2010-11-03

    Following discharge from research reactors, spent nuclear fuel may be stored 'wet' in water pools or basins, or it may be stored 'dry' in various configurations including non-sealed or sealed containers until retrieved for ultimate disposition. Interim safe storage practices are based on avoiding degradation to the fuel that would impact functions related to safety. Recommended practices including environmental controls with technical bases, are outlined for wet storage and dry storage of aluminum-clad, aluminum-based research reactor fuel. For wet storage, water quality must be maintained to minimize corrosion degradation of aluminum fuel. For dry storage, vented canister storage of aluminum fuel readily provides a safe storage configuration. For sealed dry storage, drying must be performed so as to minimize water that would cause additional corrosion and hydrogen generation. Consideration must also be given to the potential for radiolytically-generated hydrogen from the bound water in the attendant oxyhydroxides on aluminum fuel from reactor operation for dry storage systems.

  5. 3D simulations of wet foam coarsening evidence a self similar growth regime

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gilberto L. Thomas; Julio M. Belmonte; François Graner; James A. Glazier; Rita M. C. de Almeida

    2015-02-11

    In wet liquid foams, slow diffusion of gas through bubble walls changes bubble pressure, volume and wall curvature. Large bubbles grow at the expenses of smaller ones. The smaller the bubble, the faster it shrinks. As the number of bubbles in a given volume decreases in time, the average bubble size increases: i.e. the foam coarsens. During coarsening, bubbles also move relative to each other, changing bubble topology and shape, while liquid moves within the regions separating the bubbles. Analyzing the combined effects of these mechanisms requires examining a volume with enough bubbles to provide appropriate statistics throughout coarsening. Using a Cellular Potts model, we simulate these mechanisms during the evolution of three-dimensional foams with wetnesses of $\\phi=0.00$, $0.05$ and $ 0.20$. We represent the liquid phase as an ensemble of many small fluid particles, which allows us to monitor liquid flow in the region between bubbles. The simulations begin with $2 \\times 10^5$ bubbles for $\\phi = 0.00$ and $1.25 \\times 10^5$ bubbles for $\\phi = 0.05$ and $0.20$, allowing us to track the distribution functions for bubble size, topology and growth rate over two and a half decades of volume change. All simulations eventually reach a self-similar growth regime, with the distribution functions time independent and the number of bubbles decreasing with time as a power law whose exponent depends on the wetness.

  6. Fluid Dynamic Aspects of the Porous Wetted Wall Protection Scheme for Inertial Fusion Energy Reactors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shin, S.; Abdelall, F.; Juric, D.; Abdel-Khalik, S.I.; Yoda, M.; Sadowski, D. [Georgia Institute of Technology (United States)

    2003-05-15

    A numerical and experimental investigation has been conducted to analyze the fluid dynamic aspects of the porous wetted wall protection scheme for inertial fusion energy (IFE) reactor first walls. A level contour reconstruction method has been used to track the three-dimensional evolution of the liquid film surface on porous downward-facing walls with different initial film thickness, liquid injection velocity through the porous wall, surface disturbance amplitude, configuration and mode number, liquid properties, and surface inclination angle. Generalized charts for the computed droplet detachment time, detached droplet equivalent diameter, and minimum film thickness during the transient for various design parameters and coolant properties are presented.In order to validate the numerical results over a wide range of parameters, an experimental test facility has been designed and constructed to simulate the hydrodynamics of downward-facing porous wetted walls. Nondimensionalization of the model shows that water can be adequately used as a simulant to validate the numerical results. Preliminary experimental results show good agreement with model predictions. The results of this investigation should allow designers of conceptual IFE reactors to identify appropriate 'windows' for successful operation of the porous wetted wall protection concept for different coolants.

  7. 13 Lyapunov stability Definition 13.1 (Positive definite). We say that V (x, y) is positive definite, if V (x, y) 0

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Karageorgis, Paschalis

    13 Lyapunov stability Definition 13.1 (Positive definite). We say that V (x, y) is positive definite, if V (x, y) 0 at all points and if equality holds only at the origin. Definition 13.2 (Lyapunov functions). Suppose that V (x, y) is continuous and positive definite. Then we say that V is a Lyapunov

  8. Chemical Effect of Dry and Wet Cleaning of the Ru Protective Layer of the Extreme ultraviolet (EUV) Lithography Reflector

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Belau, Leonid

    2010-01-01

    Park, Physical Chemistry Chemical Y.B. He, et al. , JournalChemical Effect of Dry and Wet Cleaning of the Ru ProtectiveBerkeley, California 94720 Chemical Sciences Division,

  9. Pilot Testing of Mercury Oxidation Catalysts for Upstream of Wet FGD Systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gary M. Blythe

    2006-03-31

    This document summarizes progress on Cooperative Agreement DE-FC26-04NT41992, ''Pilot Testing of Mercury Oxidation Catalysts for Upstream of Wet FGD Systems'', during the time-period January 1 through March 31, 2006. The objective of this project is to demonstrate at pilot scale the use of solid honeycomb catalysts to promote the oxidation of elemental mercury in flue gas from coal combustion, and the use of a wet flue gas desulfurization (FGD) system downstream to remove the oxidized mercury at high efficiency. The project is being co-funded by the U.S. DOE National Energy Technology Laboratory, EPRI, Great River Energy (GRE), TXU Generation Company LP, the Southern Company, and Duke Energy. URS Group is the prime contractor. The mercury control process under development uses honeycomb catalysts to promote the oxidation of elemental mercury in the flue gas from coal-fired power plants that have wet lime or limestone FGD systems. Oxidized mercury is removed in the wet FGD absorbers and leaves with the byproducts from the FGD system. The current project is testing previously identified catalyst materials at pilot scale and in a commercial form to provide engineering data for future full-scale designs. The pilot-scale tests will continue for approximately 14 months or longer at each of two sites to provide longer-term catalyst life data. Pilot-scale wet FGD tests are being conducted periodically at each site to confirm the ability to scrub the catalytically oxidized mercury at high efficiency. This is the ninth reporting period for the subject Cooperative Agreement. During this period, project efforts primarily consisted of operating the catalyst pilot units at the TXU Generation Company LP's Monticello Steam Electric Station and at Georgia Power's Plant Yates. Two catalyst activity measurement trips were made to Plant Yates during the quarter. This Technical Progress Report presents catalyst activity results from the oxidation catalyst pilot unit at Plant Yates and discusses the status of the pilot unit at Monticello.

  10. WETTABILITY ALTERATION OF POROUS MEDIA TO GAS-WETTING FOR IMPROVING PRODUCTIVITY AND INJECTIVITY IN GAS-LIQUID FLOWS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Abbas Firoozabadi

    2003-12-01

    Wettability alteration to intermediate gas-wetting in porous media by treatment with FC-759, a fluoropolymer polymer, has been studied experimentally. Berea sandstone was used as the main rock sample in our work and its wettability before and after chemical treatment was studied at various temperatures from 25 to 93 C. We also studied recovery performance for both gas/oil and oil/water systems for Berea sandstone before and after wettability alteration by chemical treatment. Our experimental study shows that chemical treatment with FC-759 can result in: (1) wettability alteration from strong liquid-wetting to stable intermediate gas-wetting at room temperature and at elevated temperatures; (2) neutral wetting for gas, oil, and water phases in two-phase flow; (3) significant increase in oil mobility for gas/oil system; and (4) improved recovery behavior for both gas/oil and oil/water systems. This work reveals a potential for field application for improved gas-well deliverability and well injectivity by altering the rock wettability around wellbore in gas condensate reservoirs from strong liquid-wetting to intermediate gas-wetting.

  11. Electricity and Development: Global Trends and Key Challenges

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ;3. Prospects for Electricity Development Electricity Access Projected Electrification Rates by Region globalElectricity and Development: Global Trends and Key Challenges Romeo Pacudan, PhD Risoe National · Prospects for electricity development · Investment requirements · Key challenges · Final remarks #12

  12. Energy Storage: The Key to a Reliable, Clean Electricity Supply...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Energy Storage: The Key to a Reliable, Clean Electricity Supply Energy Storage: The Key to a Reliable, Clean Electricity Supply February 22, 2012 - 4:52pm Addthis Improved energy...

  13. Exploring the context : a small hotel in Key West

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    VanBeuzekom, Edrick

    1984-01-01

    This thesis develops a personal method and approach for designing in a delicate context such as the Key West Historic District. This thesis is composed of two parts. The first part presents observations of Key West, focusing ...

  14. SOW and Key Performance Parameters (KPP) Handbook Final Version...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    SOW and Key Performance Parameters (KPP) Handbook Final Version 9-30-2014 SOW and Key Performance Parameters (KPP) Handbook Final Version 9-30-2014 This handbook provides suggested...

  15. Could Solar Energy Storage be Key for Residential Solar? | Department...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Could Solar Energy Storage be Key for Residential Solar? Could Solar Energy Storage be Key for Residential Solar? October 26, 2010 - 4:52pm Addthis This is the silent power storage...

  16. Relationship between key events in Earth history

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gillman, Michael

    2015-01-01

    A model of cyclical (sinusoidal) motion of the solar system, intercepting event lines distributed at fixed intervals, explains the pattern of timings of mass extinctions, earlier glaciations, largest impact craters and the largest known extrusions of magma in the history of the Earth. The model reveals links between several sets of key events, including the end-Cretaceous and end-Ordovician extinctions with the Marinoan glaciation, and the end-Permian with the end-Serpukhovian extinctions. The model is supported by significant clusters of events and a significant reduction of impact crater size with position (sine value). The pattern of event lines is sustained to the earliest-dated impact craters (2023 and 1849 Ma) and to the origin of the solar system, close to 4567.4 Ma. The implication is that, for the entirety of its existence, the solar system has passed in a consistent manner through a predictably structured galaxy. Dark matter is a possible contender for the structure determining the event lines.

  17. Residential Energy Efficiency Financing: Key Elements of Program Design

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Presents key programmatic elements and context of financing initiatives, including contractor support, rebates, quality assurance, and more.

  18. Master Thesis Group Key Agreement for Ad Hoc Networks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    International Association for Cryptologic Research (IACR)

    Master Thesis Group Key Agreement for Ad Hoc Networks Lijun Liao Date: 06 July 2005 Supervisor: M their financial support. #12;Abstract Over the last 30 years the study of group key agreement has stimulated much present a Tree-based group key agreement Framework for Ad-hoc Networks (TFAN). TFAN is especially suitable

  19. Distributed Key Generation in the Wild Aniket Kate1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    International Association for Cryptologic Research (IACR)

    Distributed Key Generation in the Wild Aniket Kate1 Yizhou Huang2 Ian Goldberg2 1 Max Planck of Waterloo, Canada aniket@mpi-sws.org, {y226huan, iang}@uwaterloo.ca Abstract Distributed key generation (DKG communication model. computational setting. distributed key generation. uniform randomness. implementation 1

  20. A Linearization Attack on the Bluetooth Key Stream Generator

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    International Association for Cryptologic Research (IACR)

    A Linearization Attack on the Bluetooth Key Stream Generator Frederik Armknecht ? University on the key stream generator underlying the E0 yet. 1 Introduction The encryption system E 0 , which key stream generator (KSG) is used. In this paper, we propose an attack on the underlying KSG. We

  1. Leakage-Resilient Cryptography with Key Derived from Sensitive Data

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    International Association for Cryptologic Research (IACR)

    Leakage-Resilient Cryptography with Key Derived from Sensitive Data Konrad Durnoga , Tomasz Kazana subject to adversarial leakage. We propose a method to derive keys for such protocols on-the-fly from the actual keys are derived from. That is, an adversary can hardly gain any knowledge about the private data

  2. Field Testing of a Wet FGD Additive for Enhanced Mercury Control

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gary Blythe; MariJon Owens

    2007-12-31

    This document is the final report for DOE-NETL Cooperative Agreement DE-FC26-04NT42309, 'Field Testing of a Wet FGD Additive'. The objective of the project has been to demonstrate the use of two flue gas desulfurization (FGD) additives, Evonik Degussa Corporation's TMT-15 and Nalco Company's Nalco 8034, to prevent the re-emission of elemental mercury (Hg{sup 0}) in flue gas exiting wet FGD systems on coal-fired boilers. Furthermore, the project was intended to demonstrate whether such additives can be used to precipitate most of the mercury (Hg) removed in the wet FGD system as a fine salt that can be separated from the FGD liquor and bulk solid byproducts for separate disposal. The project involved pilot- and full-scale tests of the additives in wet FGD absorbers. The tests were intended to determine required additive dosages to prevent Hg{sup 0} re-emissions and to separate mercury from the normal FGD byproducts for three coal types: Texas lignite/Powder River Basin (PRB) coal blend, high-sulfur Eastern bituminous coal, and low-sulfur Eastern bituminous coal. The project team consists of URS Group, Inc., EPRI, Luminant Power (was TXU Generation Company LP), Southern Company, IPL (an AES company), Evonik Degussa Corporation and the Nalco Company. Luminant Power provided the Texas lignite/PRB co-fired test site for pilot FGD tests and project cost sharing. Southern Company provided the low-sulfur Eastern bituminous coal host site for wet scrubbing tests, the pilot- and full-scale jet bubbling reactor (JBR) FGD systems tested, and project cost sharing. IPL provided the high-sulfur Eastern bituminous coal full-scale FGD test site and cost sharing. Evonik Degussa Corporation provided the TMT-15 additive, and the Nalco Company provided the Nalco 8034 additive. Both companies also supplied technical support to the test program as in-kind cost sharing. The project was conducted in six tasks. Of the six tasks, Task 1 involved project planning and Task 6 involved management and reporting. The other four tasks involved field testing on FGD systems, either at pilot or full scale. These four tasks included: Task 2 - Pilot Additive Testing in Texas Lignite Flue Gas; Task 3 - Full-scale FGD Additive Testing in High-sulfur Eastern Bituminous Flue Gas; Task 4 - Pilot Wet Scrubber Additive Tests at Plant Yates; and Task 5 - Full-scale Additive Tests at Plant Yates. The pilot-scale tests were completed in 2005 and the full-scale test using high-sulfur coal was completed in 2006; only the TMT-15 additive was tested in these efforts. The Task 5 full-scale additive tests conducted at Southern Company's Plant Yates Unit 1 were completed in 2007, and both the TMT-15 and Nalco 8034 additives were tested.

  3. Preliminary Evaluation of Cesium Distribution for Wet Sieving Process Planned for Soil Decontamination in Japan - 13104

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Enokida, Y.; Tanada, Y.; Hirabayashi, D.; Sawada, K.

    2013-07-01

    For the purpose of decontaminating radioactive cesium from a huge amount of soil, which has been estimated to be 1.2x10{sup 8} m{sup 3} by excavating to a 5-cm depth from the surface of Fukushima Prefecture where a severe nuclear accident occurred at TEPCO's power generating site and has emitted a significant amount of radioactive materials, mainly radioactive cesium, a wet sieving process was selected as one of effective methods available in Japan. Some private companies have demonstrated this process for soil treatment in the Fukushima area by testing at their plants. The results were very promising, and a full-fledged application is expected to follow. In the present study, we spiked several aqueous samples containing soil collected from an industrial wet sieving plant located near our university for the recycling of construction wastes with non-radioactive cesium hydroxide. The present study provides scientific data concerning the effectiveness in volume reduction of the contaminated soil by a wet sieving process as well as the cesium distribution between the liquid phase and clay minerals for each sub-process of the full-scale one, but a simulating plant equipped with a process of coagulating sedimentation and operational safety fundamentals for the plant. Especially for the latter aspect, the study showed that clay minerals of submicron size strongly bind a high content of cesium, which was only slightly removed by coagulation with natural sedimentation (1 G) nor centrifugal sedimentation (3,700 G) and some of the cesium may be transferred to the effluent or recycled water. By applying ultracentrifugation (257,000 G), most of submicron clay minerals containing cesium was removed, and the cesium amount which might be transferred to the effluent or recycled water, could be reduced to less than 2.3 % of the original design by the addition of a cesium barrier consisting of ultracentrifugation or a hollow fiber membrane. (authors)

  4. PILOT TESTING OF MERCURY OXIDATION CATALYSTS FOR UPSTREAM OF WET FGD SYSTEMS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gary M. Blythe

    2003-05-01

    This document summarizes progress on Cooperative Agreement DE-FC26-01NT41185, ''Pilot Testing of Mercury Oxidation Catalysts for Upstream of Wet FGD Systems,'' during the time period January 1, 2003 through March 31, 2003. The objective of this project is to demonstrate at pilot scale the use of solid honeycomb catalysts to promote the oxidation of elemental mercury in the flue gas from coal combustion. The project is being funded by the U.S. DOE National Energy Technology Laboratory under Cooperative Agreement DE-FC26-01NT41185. EPRI, Great River Energy (GRE), and City Public Service (CPS) of San Antonio are project cofunders. URS Group is the prime contractor. The mercury control process under development uses catalyst materials applied to honeycomb substrates to promote the oxidation of elemental mercury in the flue gas from coal-fired power plants that have wet lime or limestone flue gas desulfurization (FGD) systems. Oxidized mercury is removed in the wet FGD absorbers and co-precipitates with the byproducts from the FGD system. The current project is testing previously identified, effective catalyst materials at a larger, pilot scale and in a commercial form, to provide engineering data for future full-scale designs. The pilot-scale tests will continue for up to 14 months at each of two sites to provide longer-term catalyst life data. This is the sixth full reporting period for the subject Cooperative Agreement. During this period, project efforts included continued operation of the pilot unit with three catalysts, conducting catalyst activity measurements, and procuring the fourth catalyst, all for the GRE Coal Creek pilot unit site. Laboratory efforts were also conducted to support catalyst selection for the second pilot unit site, at CPS' Spruce Plant. This technical progress report provides an update on these efforts.

  5. PILOT TESTING OF MERCURY OXIDATION CATALYSTS FOR UPSTREAM OF WET FGD SYSTEMS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gary M. Blythe

    2002-10-04

    This document summarizes progress on Cooperative Agreement DE-FC26-01NT41185, Pilot Testing of Mercury Oxidation Catalysts for Upstream of Wet FGD Systems, during the time period July 1, 2002 through September 30, 2002. The objective of this project is to demonstrate at pilot scale the use of solid honeycomb catalysts to promote the oxidation of elemental mercury in the flue gas from coal combustion. The project is being funded by the U.S. DOE National Energy Technology Laboratory under Cooperative Agreement DE-FC26-01NT41185. EPRI, Great River Energy (GRE), and City Public Service (CPS) of San Antonio are project co-funders. URS Group is the prime contractor. The mercury catalytic oxidation process under development uses catalyst materials applied to honeycomb substrates to promote the oxidation of elemental mercury in the flue gas from coal-fired power plants that have wet lime or limestone flue gas desulfurization (FGD) systems. Oxidized mercury is removed in the wet FGD absorbers and co-precipitates in a stable form with the byproducts from the FGD system. The coprecipitated mercury does not appear to adversely affect the disposal or reuse properties of the FGD byproduct. The current project will test previously identified, effective catalyst materials at a larger, pilot scale and in a commercial form, so as to provide engineering data for future full-scale designs. The pilot-scale tests will continue for up to 14 months at each of two sites to provide longer-term catalyst life data. This is the fourth full reporting period for the subject Cooperative Agreement. During this period, most of the project efforts were related to completing, installing and starting up the pilot unit, completing laboratory runs to size catalysts, and procuring catalysts for the pilot unit. This technical progress report provides an update on these efforts.

  6. PILOT TESTING OF MERCURY OXIDATION CATALYSTS FOR UPSTREAM OF WET FGD SYSTEMS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gary M. Blythe

    2003-07-01

    This document summarizes progress on Cooperative Agreement DE-FC26-01NT41185, ''Pilot Testing of Mercury Oxidation Catalysts for Upstream of Wet FGD Systems,'' during the time-period April 1, 2003 through June 30, 2003. The objective of this project is to demonstrate at pilot scale the use of solid honeycomb catalysts to promote the oxidation of elemental mercury in the flue gas from coal combustion. The project is being funded by the U.S. DOE National Energy Technology Laboratory under Cooperative Agreement DE-FC26-01NT41185. EPRI, Great River Energy (GRE), and City Public Service (CPS) of San Antonio are project cofunders. URS Group is the prime contractor. The mercury control process under development uses catalyst materials applied to honeycomb substrates to promote the oxidation of elemental mercury in the flue gas from coal-fired power plants that have wet lime or limestone flue gas desulfurization (FGD) systems. Oxidized mercury is removed in the wet FGD absorbers and co-precipitates with the byproducts from the FGD system. The current project is testing previously identified, effective catalyst materials at a larger, pilot scale and in a commercial form, to provide engineering data for future full-scale designs. The pilot-scale tests will continue for approximately 14 months at each of two sites to provide longer-term catalyst life data. This is the seventh full reporting period for the subject Cooperative Agreement. During this period, project efforts included continued operation of the first pilot unit, conducting catalyst activity measurements, installing sonic horns for on-line catalyst cleaning, and installing the fourth catalyst, all for the GRE Coal Creek site. CPS began installation of the second mercury oxidation catalyst pilot unit at their Spruce Plant during the quarter. Laboratory efforts were conducted to support catalyst selection for that second pilot unit. This technical progress report provides an update on these efforts.

  7. PILOT TESTING OF MERCURY OXIDATION CATALYSTS FOR UPSTREAM OF WET FGD SYSTEMS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gary M. Blythe

    2002-07-17

    This document summarizes progress on Cooperative Agreement DE-FC26-01NT41185, Pilot Testing of Mercury Oxidation Catalysts for Upstream of Wet FGD Systems, during the time period April 1, 2002 through June 30, 2002. The objective of this project is to demonstrate at pilot scale the use of solid honeycomb catalysts to promote the oxidation of elemental mercury in the flue gas from coal combustion. The project is being funded by the U.S. DOE National Energy Technology Laboratory under Cooperative Agreement DE-FC26-01NT41185. EPRI, Great River Energy (GRE), and City Public Service (CPS) of San Antonio are project co-funders. URS Group is the prime contractor. The mercury catalytic oxidation process under development uses catalyst materials applied to honeycomb substrates to promote the oxidation of elemental mercury in the flue gas from coal-fired power plants that have wet lime or limestone flue gas desulfurization (FGD) systems. Oxidized mercury is removed in the wet FGD absorbers and co-precipitates in a stable form with the byproducts from the FGD system. The co-precipitated mercury does not appear to adversely affect the disposal or reuse properties of the FGD byproduct. The current project will test previously identified, effective catalyst materials at a larger, pilot scale and in a commercial form, so as to provide engineering data for future full-scale designs. The pilot-scale tests will continue for up to 14 months at each of two sites to provide longer-term catalyst life data. This is the third full reporting period for the subject Cooperative Agreement. During this period, most of the project efforts were related to constructing the pilot unit and conducting laboratory runs to help size catalysts for the pilot unit. This technical progress report provides an update on these two efforts.

  8. PILOT TESTING OF MERCURY OXIDATION CATALYSTS FOR UPSTREAM OF WET FGD SYSTEMS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gary M. Blythe

    2003-01-21

    This document summarizes progress on Cooperative Agreement DE-FC26-01NT41185, Pilot Testing of Mercury Oxidation Catalysts for Upstream of Wet FGD Systems, during the time period October 1, 2002 through December 31, 2002. The objective of this project is to demonstrate at pilot scale the use of solid honeycomb catalysts to promote the oxidation of elemental mercury in the flue gas from coal combustion. The project is being funded by the U.S. DOE National Energy Technology Laboratory under Cooperative Agreement DE-FC26-01NT41185. EPRI, Great River Energy (GRE), and City Public Service (CPS) of San Antonio are project co-funders. URS Group is the prime contractor. The mercury catalytic oxidation process under development uses catalyst materials applied to honeycomb substrates to promote the oxidation of elemental mercury in the flue gas from coal-fired power plants that have wet lime or limestone flue gas desulfurization (FGD) systems. Oxidized mercury is removed in the wet FGD absorbers and co-precipitates with the byproducts from the FGD system. The co-precipitated mercury does not appear to adversely affect the disposal or reuse properties of the FGD byproduct. The current project testing previously identified, effective catalyst materials at a larger, pilot scale and in a commercial form, to provide engineering data for future fullscale designs. The pilot-scale tests will continue for up to 14 months at each of two sites to provide longer-term catalyst life data. This is the fifth full reporting period for the subject Cooperative Agreement. During this period, project efforts included starting up the pilot unit with three catalysts at the first site, conducting catalyst activity measurements, completing comprehensive flue gas sampling and analyses, and procuring additional catalysts for the pilot unit. This technical progress report provides an update on these efforts.

  9. Reductive stripping process for the recovery of uranium from wet-process phosphoric acid

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hurst, Fred J. (Oak Ridge, TN); Crouse, David J. (Oak Ridge, TN)

    1984-01-01

    A reductive stripping flow sheet for recovery of uranium from wet-process phosphoric acid is described. Uranium is stripped from a uranium-loaded organic phase by a redox reaction converting the uranyl to uranous ion. The uranous ion is reoxidized to the uranyl oxidation state to form an aqueous feed solution highly concentrated in uranium. Processing of this feed through a second solvent extraction cycle requires far less stripping reagent as compared to a flow sheet which does not include the reductive stripping reaction.

  10. Enhanced-wetting, boron-based liquid-metal ion source and method

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bozack, Michael J. (Opelika, AL); Swanson, Lynwood W. (Portland, OR); Bell, Anthony E. (McMinnville, OR); Clark Jr., William M. (Thousand Oaks, CA); Utlaut, Mark W. (Saugus, CA); Storms, Edmund K. (Los Alamos, NM)

    1999-01-01

    A binary, boron-based alloy as a source for field-emission-type, ion-beam generating devices, wherein boron predominates in the alloy, preferably with a presence of about 60 atomic percent. The other constituent in the alloy is selected from the group of elements consisting of nickel, palladium and platinum. Predominance of boron in these alloys, during operation, promotes combining of boron with trace impurities of carbon in the alloys to form B.sub.4 C and thus to promote wetting of an associated carbon support substrate.

  11. Enhanced-wetting, boron-based liquid-metal ion source and method

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bozack, M.J.; Swanson, L.W.; Bell, A.E.; Clark, W.M. Jr.; Utlaut, M.W.; Storms, E.K.

    1999-02-16

    A binary, boron-based alloy as a source for field-emission-type, ion-beam generating devices, wherein boron predominates in the alloy, preferably with a presence of about 60 atomic percent is disclosed. The other constituent in the alloy is selected from the group of elements consisting of nickel, palladium and platinum. Predominance of boron in these alloys, during operation, promotes combining of boron with trace impurities of carbon in the alloys to form B{sub 4}C and thus to promote wetting of an associated carbon support substrate. 1 fig.

  12. WET-NZ Multi-Mode Wave Energy Converter Advancement Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kopf, Steven

    2013-10-15

    The overall objective of the project was to verify the ocean wavelength functionality of the WET-NZ through targeted hydrodynamic testing at wave tank scale and controlled open sea deployment of a 1/2 scale (1:2) experimental device. This objective was accomplished through a series of tasks designed to achieve four specific goals: ?Wave Tank Testing to Characterize Hydrodynamic Characteristics; ? Open-Sea Testing of a New 1:2 Scale Experimental Model; ? Synthesis and Analysis to Demonstrate and Confirm TRL5/6 Status; ? Market Impact & Competitor Analysis, Business Plan and Commercialization Strategy.

  13. The effects of digital elevation model resolution on the calculation and predictions of topographic wetness indices.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Drover, Damion, Ryan

    2011-12-01

    One of the largest exports in the Southeast U.S. is forest products. Interest in biofuels using forest biomass has increased recently, leading to more research into better forest management BMPs. The USDA Forest Service, along with the Oak Ridge National Laboratory, University of Georgia and Oregon State University are researching the impacts of intensive forest management for biofuels on water quality and quantity at the Savannah River Site in South Carolina. Surface runoff of saturated areas, transporting excess nutrients and contaminants, is a potential water quality issue under investigation. Detailed maps of variable source areas and soil characteristics would therefore be helpful prior to treatment. The availability of remotely sensed and computed digital elevation models (DEMs) and spatial analysis tools make it easy to calculate terrain attributes. These terrain attributes can be used in models to predict saturated areas or other attributes in the landscape. With laser altimetry, an area can be flown to produce very high resolution data, and the resulting data can be resampled into any resolution of DEM desired. Additionally, there exist many maps that are in various resolutions of DEM, such as those acquired from the U.S. Geological Survey. Problems arise when using maps derived from different resolution DEMs. For example, saturated areas can be under or overestimated depending on the resolution used. The purpose of this study was to examine the effects of DEM resolution on the calculation of topographic wetness indices used to predict variable source areas of saturation, and to find the best resolutions to produce prediction maps of soil attributes like nitrogen, carbon, bulk density and soil texture for low-relief, humid-temperate forested hillslopes. Topographic wetness indices were calculated based on the derived terrain attributes, slope and specific catchment area, from five different DEM resolutions. The DEMs were resampled from LiDAR, which is a laser altimetry remote sensing method, obtained from the USDA Forest Service at Savannah River Site. The specific DEM resolutions were chosen because they are common grid cell sizes (10m, 30m, and 50m) used in mapping for management applications and in research. The finer resolutions (2m and 5m) were chosen for the purpose of determining how finer resolutions performed compared with coarser resolutions at predicting wetness and related soil attributes. The wetness indices were compared across DEMs and with each other in terms of quantile and distribution differences, then in terms of how well they each correlated with measured soil attributes. Spatial and non-spatial analyses were performed, and predictions using regression and geostatistics were examined for efficacy relative to each DEM resolution. Trends in the raw data and analysis results were also revealed.

  14. Regimes of Wetting Transitions on Superhydrophobic Textures Conditioned by Energy of Receding Contact Lines

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alexander L. Dubov; Ahmed Mourran; Martin Möller; Olga I. Vinogradova

    2015-06-23

    We discuss an evaporation-induced wetting transition on superhydrophobic stripes, and show that depending on the elastic energy of the deformed contact line, which determines the value of an instantaneous effective contact angle, two different scenarios occur. For relatively dilute stripes the receding angle is above 90$^\\circ$, and the sudden impalement transition happens due to an increase of a curvature of an evaporating drop. For dense stripes the slow impregnation transition commences when the effective angle reaches 90$^\\circ$ and represents the impregnation of the grooves from the triple contact line towards the drop center.

  15. Modeling of wet gas compression in twin-screw multiphase pump 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Xu, Jian

    2009-05-15

    are more insensitive to liquid slugs and large change in inlet gas density (Putra and Uphold, 1999). It is the most widely utilized multiphase pump (Scott et al., 2006). The biggest physical challenge for the multiphase pump in oil and gas industry... is no longer isothermal. The experimental data with GVF > 96% show tremendous temperature increase between the inlet and outlet of twin-screw pump (Singh, 2003). With the high demand of wet gas compression system, it is necessary to model the performance...

  16. Interface Tensions and Perfect Wetting in the Two-Dimensional Seven-State Potts Model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    B. Grossmann; Sourendu Gupta

    1993-10-25

    We present a numerical determination of the order-disorder interface tension, \\sod, for the two-dimensional seven-state Potts model. We find $\\sod=0.0114\\pm0.0012$, in good agreement with expectations based on the conjecture of perfect wetting. We take into account systematic effects on the technique of our choice: the histogram method. Our measurements are performed on rectangular lattices, so that the histograms contain identifiable plateaus. The lattice sizes are chosen to be large compared to the physical correlation length. Capillary wave corrections are applied to our measurements on finite systems.

  17. ,"Montana Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet)"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home PageMonthly","10/2015"4,"Ames City of",6,1,"Omaha Public PowerOECD/IEA - 2008 © OECD/IEA -Liquids LeaseAnnual",2014WellheadAnnual",2014Gas, Wet After

  18. ,"Pennsylvania Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet)"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home PageMonthly","10/2015"4,"Ames City of",6,1,"Omaha Public PowerOECD/IEA - 2008Wellhead Price (Dollars perSummary" ,"Click worksheet name or tabGas, Wet

  19. ,"Texas Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet)"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home PageMonthly","10/2015"4,"Ames City of",6,1,"Omaha Public PowerOECD/IEA - 2008Wellhead PriceConsumption by9"CoalbedGas, Wet After Lease Separation Proved

  20. ,"U.S. Natural Gas Proved Reserves, Wet After Lease Separation"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home PageMonthly","10/2015"4,"Ames City of",6,1,"Omaha Public PowerOECD/IEA -Annual",2014Proved Reserves, Wet After Lease Separation" ,"Click worksheet

  1. ,"U.S. Nonassociated Natural Gas Proved Reserves, Wet After Lease Separation"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home PageMonthly","10/2015"4,"Ames City of",6,1,"Omaha Public PowerOECD/IEA -Annual",2014Proved Reserves, Wet After LeaseAnnual",2014Value and

  2. ,"Alaska Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet)"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home PageMonthly","10/2015"4,"Ames City of",6,1,"Omaha Public PowerOECD/IEA - 2008 © OECD/IEA - 2008 © OECD/IEAConsumed" ,"ClickGas, Wet After Lease

  3. ,"Colorado Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet)"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home PageMonthly","10/2015"4,"Ames City of",6,1,"Omaha Public PowerOECD/IEA - 2008 © OECD/IEA - 2008LNG Storage NetConsumption by EndAnnual",2014Gas, Wet After

  4. ,"Louisiana Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet)"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home PageMonthly","10/2015"4,"Ames City of",6,1,"Omaha Public PowerOECD/IEA - 2008 © OECD/IEA - 2008LNGUndergroundDry Natural GasGas, Wet After Lease Separation

  5. Utah Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustments (Billion Cubic Feet)Decade Year-0Proved ReservesData20092009Reserves Based38 4.23Feet) Gas, Wet

  6. Workshop On Definition Extraction 2009 -Borovets, Bulgaria, pages 3339, Language Independent System for Definition Extraction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    on different corpus get worst. In the case of classification approach one of the main issue to be dealt with is the sparseness of definitions in a corpus. It is a matter of fact that the number of definition bearing sentences] used a balanced corpus where the definition-bearing sentences represent 59% of the whole corpus, while

  7. Wetting behavior of selected crude oil/brine/rock systems. Topical report, March 1, 1995--March 31, 1996

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhou, X.; Morrow, N.R.; Ma, S.

    1996-12-31

    Previous studies of crude oil/brine/rock (COBR) and related ensembles showed that wettability and its effect on oil recovery depend on numerous complex interactions. In the present work, the wettability of COBR ensembles prepared using Prudhoe Bay crude oil, a synthetic formation brine, and Berea Sandstone was varied by systematic change in initial water saturation and length of aging time at reservoir temperature (88 C). All displacement tests were run at ambient temperature. Various degrees of water wetness were achieved and quantified by a modified Amott wettability index to water, the relative pseudo work of imbibition, and a newly defined apparent advancing dynamic contact angle. Pairs of spontaneous imbibition (oil recovery by spontaneous imbibition of water) and waterflood (oil recovery vs. pore volumes of water injected) curves were measured for each of the induced wetting states. Several trends were observed. Imbibition rate, and hence water wetness, decreased with increase in aging time and with decrease in initial water saturation. Breakthrough recoveries and final oil recovery by waterflooding increased with decrease in water wetness. Correlations between water wetness and oil recovery by waterflooding and spontaneous imbibition are presented.

  8. The Role of Contact Angle Hysteresis for Fluid Transport in Wet Granular Matter

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Roman Mani; Ciro Semprebon; Dirk Kadau; Hans J. Herrmann; Martin Brinkmann; Stephan Herminghaus

    2015-08-06

    The stability of sand castles is determined by the structure of wet granulates. Experimental data about the size distribution of fluid pockets are ambiguous about their origin. We discovered that contact angle hysteresis plays a fundamental role in the equilibrium distribution of bridge volumes, and not geometrical disorder as commonly conjectured, which has substantial consequences on the mechanical properties of wet granular beds, including a history dependent rheology and lowered strength. Our findings are obtained using a novel model where the Laplace pressures, bridge volumes and contact angles are dynamical variables associated to the contact points. While accounting for contact line pinning, we track the temporal evolution of each bridge. We observe a cross-over to a power-law decay of the variance of capillary pressures at late times and a saturation of the variance of bridge volumes to a finite value connected to contact line pinning. Large scale simulations of liquid transport in the bridge network reveal that the equilibration dynamics at early times is well described by a mean field model. The spread of final bridge volumes can be directly related to the magnitude of contact angle hysteresis.

  9. Computaional Modeling of the Stability of Crevice Corrosion of Wetted SS316L

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    F. Cui; F.J. Presuel-Moreno; R.G. Kelly

    2006-04-17

    The stability of localized corrosion sites on SS 316L exposed to atmospheric conditions was studied computationally. The localized corrosion system was decoupled computationally by considering the wetted cathode and the crevice anode separately and linking them via a constant potential boundary condition at the mouth of the crevice. The potential of interest for stability was the repassivation potential. The limitations on the ability of the cathode that are inherent due to the restricted geometry were assessed in terms of the dependence on physical and electrochemical parameters. Physical parameters studied include temperature, electrolyte layer thickness, solution conductivity, and the size of the cathode, as well as the crevice gap for the anode. The current demand of the crevice was determined considering a constant crevice solution composition that simulates the critical crevice solution as described in the literature. An analysis of variance showed that the solution conductivity and the length of the cathode were the most important parameters in determining the total cathodic current capacity of the external surface. A semi-analytical equation was derived for the total current from a restricted geometry held at a constant potential at one end. The equation was able to reproduce all the model computation results both for the wetted external cathode and the crevice and give good explanation on the effects of physicochemical and kinetic parameters.

  10. MULTI-POLLUTANT CONTROL USING MEMBRANE--BASED UP-FLOW WET ELECTROSTATIC PRECIPITATION

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    James Reynolds

    2004-10-29

    This is the Final Report of the ''Multi-Pollutant Control Using Membrane-Based Up-flow Wet Electrostatic Precipitation'' project funded by the US Department of Energy's National Energy Technology Laboratory under DOE Award No. DE-FC26-02NT41592 to Croll-Reynolds Clean Air Technologies (CRCAT). In this 18 month project, CRCAT and its team members conducted detailed emission tests of metallic and new membrane collection material within a wet electrostatic precipitator (WESP) at First Energy's Penn Power's Bruce Mansfield (BMP) plant in Shippingport, Pa. The Membrane WESP was designed to be as similar as the metallic WESP in terms of collection area, air-flow, and electrical characteristics. Both units are two-field units. The membrane unit was installed during the 2nd and 3rd quarters of 2003. Testing of the metallic unit was performed to create a baseline since the Mansfield plant had installed selective catalytic reduction equipment for NOx control and a sodium bisulfate injection system for SO3 control during the spring of 2003. Tests results on the metallic WESP were consistent with previous testing for PM2.5, SO3 mist and mercury. Testing on the membrane WESP demonstrated no adverse impact and equivalent removal efficiencies as that of the metallic WESP. Testing on both units was performed at 8,000 acfm and 15,000 acfm. Summary results are shown.

  11. Definitions

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power Administration would like submit theCovalent Bonding Low-Cost2Department of Energy Defense-RelatedCall

  12. Full-Scale Testing of a Mercury Oxidation Catalyst Upstream of a Wet FGD System

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gary Blythe; Jennifer Paradis

    2010-06-30

    This document presents and discusses results from Cooperative Agreement DE-FC26-06NT42778, 'Full-scale Testing of a Mercury Oxidation Catalyst Upstream of a Wet FGD System,' which was conducted over the time-period July 24, 2006 through June 30, 2010. The objective of the project was to demonstrate at full scale the use of solid honeycomb catalysts to promote the oxidation of elemental mercury in pulverized-coal-fired flue gas. Oxidized mercury is removed downstream in wet flue gas desulfurization (FGD) absorbers and collected with the byproducts from the FGD system. The project was co-funded by EPRI, the Lower Colorado River Authority (LCRA), who also provided the host site, Great River Energy, Johnson Matthey, Southern Company, Salt River Project (SRP), the Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA), NRG Energy, Ontario Power and Westar. URS Group was the prime contractor and also provided cofunding. The scope of this project included installing and testing a gold-based catalyst upstream of one full-scale wet FGD absorber module (about 200-MW scale) at LCRA's Fayette Power Project (FPP) Unit 3, which fires Powder River Basin coal. Installation of the catalyst involved modifying the ductwork upstream of one of three wet FGD absorbers on Unit 3, Absorber C. The FGD system uses limestone reagent, operates with forced sulfite oxidation, and normally runs with two FGD modules in service and one spare. The full-scale catalyst test was planned for 24 months to provide catalyst life data. Over the test period, data were collected on catalyst pressure drop, elemental mercury oxidation across the catalyst module, and mercury capture by the downstream wet FGD absorber. The demonstration period began on May 6, 2008 with plans for the catalyst to remain in service until May 5, 2010. However, because of continual increases in pressure drop across the catalyst and concerns that further increases would adversely affect Unit 3 operations, LCRA decided to end the demonstration early, during a planned unit outage. On October 2, 2009, Unit 3 was taken out of service for a fall outage and the catalyst upstream of Absorber C was removed. This ended the demonstration after approximately 17 months of the planned 24 months of operation. This report discusses reasons for the pressure drop increase and potential measures to mitigate such problems in any future application of this technology. Mercury oxidation and capture measurements were made on Unit 3 four times during the 17-month demonstration. Measurements were performed across the catalyst and Absorber C and 'baseline' measurements were performed across Absorber A or B, which did not have a catalyst upstream. Results are presented in the report from all four sets of measurements during the demonstration period. These results include elemental mercury oxidation across the catalyst, mercury capture across Absorber C downstream of the catalyst, baseline mercury capture across Absorber A or B, and mercury re-emissions across both absorbers in service. Also presented in the report are estimates of the average mercury control performance of the oxidation catalyst technology over the 17-month demonstration period and the resulting mercury control costs.

  13. Fusion Simulation Program Definition. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cary, John R.

    2012-09-05

    We have completed our contributions to the Fusion Simulation Program Definition Project. Our contributions were in the overall planning with concentration in the definition of the area of Software Integration and Support. We contributed to the planning of multiple meetings, and we contributed to multiple planning documents.

  14. Entropy and Energy: Toward a Definition of Physical Sustainability

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hermanowicz, Slawomir W

    2005-01-01

    of entropy-energy definition of sustainability as well asto assess the sustainability is based on the energy. Thisand Energy: Toward a Definition of Physical Sustainability

  15. Entropy and Energy: Toward a Definition of Physical Sustainability

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hermanowicz, Slawomir W

    2005-01-01

    of entropy-energy definition of sustainability as well asand Energy: Toward a Definition of Physical Sustainabilityto assess the sustainability is based on the energy. This

  16. Updated distribution and reintroduction of the Lower Keys marsh rabbit 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Faulhaber, Craig Alan

    2005-02-17

    , for their advice and interest in the project. Kim Rohrs of the Monroe County Department of Planning and Environmental Resources provided valuable spatial and tabular data on land ownership and land-use planning in the Keys. My interns, Josh Harris, Kyle........................ 29 3.1 The number of individual Lower Keys marsh rabbits captured in 13 occupied populations on 4 keys from October 2001?August 2002. Data are arranged according to sex and age class...

  17. Test method for auger electron spectroscopy(AES) evaluation of oxide layer of wetted surfaces of passivated 316L stainless steel components

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Semiconductor Equipement and Materials International. San José, CA

    2002-01-01

    Test method for auger electron spectroscopy(AES) evaluation of oxide layer of wetted surfaces of passivated 316L stainless steel components

  18. Water dynamics clue to key residues in protein folding

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gao, Meng [State Key Laboratory for Turbulence and Complex Systems, and Department of Biomedical Engineering, and Center for Theoretical Biology, and Center for Protein Science, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China)] [State Key Laboratory for Turbulence and Complex Systems, and Department of Biomedical Engineering, and Center for Theoretical Biology, and Center for Protein Science, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China); Zhu, Huaiqiu, E-mail: hqzhu@pku.edu.cn [State Key Laboratory for Turbulence and Complex Systems, and Department of Biomedical Engineering, and Center for Theoretical Biology, and Center for Protein Science, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China)] [State Key Laboratory for Turbulence and Complex Systems, and Department of Biomedical Engineering, and Center for Theoretical Biology, and Center for Protein Science, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China); Yao, Xin-Qiu [State Key Laboratory for Turbulence and Complex Systems, and Department of Biomedical Engineering, and Center for Theoretical Biology, and Center for Protein Science, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China) [State Key Laboratory for Turbulence and Complex Systems, and Department of Biomedical Engineering, and Center for Theoretical Biology, and Center for Protein Science, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China); Department of Biophysics, Kyoto University, Sakyo Kyoto 606-8502 (Japan); She, Zhen-Su, E-mail: she@pku.edu.cn [State Key Laboratory for Turbulence and Complex Systems, and Department of Biomedical Engineering, and Center for Theoretical Biology, and Center for Protein Science, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China)] [State Key Laboratory for Turbulence and Complex Systems, and Department of Biomedical Engineering, and Center for Theoretical Biology, and Center for Protein Science, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China)

    2010-01-29

    A computational method independent of experimental protein structure information is proposed to recognize key residues in protein folding, from the study of hydration water dynamics. Based on all-atom molecular dynamics simulation, two key residues are recognized with distinct water dynamical behavior in a folding process of the Trp-cage protein. The identified key residues are shown to play an essential role in both 3D structure and hydrophobic-induced collapse. With observations on hydration water dynamics around key residues, a dynamical pathway of folding can be interpreted.

  19. Key Practical Issues in Strengthening Safety Culture, INSAG-15

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Key Pratical Issues in Strengthening Safety Culture, INSAG-15. A report by the International Nuclear Safety Advisory Gorup, International Atomic Energy Agency, Vienna, 2002.

  20. Deputy Secretary Sherwood-Randall Meets Key Government Officials...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Pritzker and Deputy Secretary Sherwood-Randall had the opportunity to engage with key Chinese government officials while in Beijing. Both met with Premier Li Keqiang and Vice...

  1. Climate Action Planning: A Review of Best Practices, Key Elements...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Climate Action Planning: A Review of Best Practices, Key Elements, and Common Climate Strategies for Signatories to the American College & University Presidents' Climate Commitment...

  2. California Energy Incentive Programs An Annual Update on Key...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Energy Issues and Financial Opportunities for Federal Sites in California California Energy Incentive Programs An Annual Update on Key Energy Issues and Financial Opportunities...

  3. Intercropped silviculture systems, a key to achieving soil fungal...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Intercropped silviculture systems, a key to achieving soil fungal community management in eucalyptus plantations Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Intercropped...

  4. Strategic Energy Management.  Keys to Behavioral and Operational Change.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kroll, Ryan M; Willems, Phil; Rubado, Dan; Belkhayat, Kathleen

    2015-01-01

    Strategic Energy Management Keys to Behavioral andof Oregon’s Strategic Energy Management (SEM) initiative.Introduction Strategic energy management (SEM) is defined

  5. MasterKey Cryptosystems AT&T Bell Labs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Blaze, Matthew

    then be converted to a stream­ cipher via one of the usual block­chaining methods). We use the public­key encryption

  6. Pantex Plant Achieves Key Safety Milestone Ahead of Schedule...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Achieves Key Safety Milestone Ahead of Schedule | National Nuclear Security Administration Facebook Twitter Youtube Flickr RSS People Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing...

  7. Dependence of waterflood remaining oil saturation on relative permeability, capillary pressure, and reservoir parameters in mixed-wet turbidite sands

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hirasaki, G.J.

    1996-05-01

    The dependence of waterflood oil recovery on relative permeability, capillary pressure, and reservoir parameters was investigated by numerical simulation. The relative permeability and capillary pressure curves were based on laboratory measurements on unconsolidated sands. The water-wet case is based on the assumption that the system is water-wet and measurements were made with refined oil. The mixed-wet case assumed that the system is mixed-wet and restored-state measurements were made with crude oil. The reservoir model was a prototype turbidite sand with a range of thickness and permeability values. The economic oil recovery was based on an economic limit water cut of 50%. The remaining oil saturation (ROS) in the swept region for the water-wet cases was close to the residual oil saturation. The ROS of the mixed-wet cases ranged from low values near the residual oil saturation to far above the residual oil saturation. It is dependent on the reservoir parameters that govern (1) the vertical film surface drainage of oil by gravity, (2) accumulation of a high oil saturation and thus a high relative permeability under the caprock, and (3) up-dip migration of the oil that accumulated under the caprock. The dependence on the reservoir parameters can be summarized by dimensionless groups. There is a dimensionless time for the vertical displacement of oil by gravity. The accumulation of a high oil saturation under the caprock is dependent on the ratio of the capillary transition zone and the sand thickness. The updip migration is dependent on a combination of the gravity number and the endpoint mobility ratio.

  8. Investigations of segregation phenomena in highly strained Mn-doped Ge wetting layers and Ge quantum dots embedded in silicon

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Prestat, E., E-mail: eric.prestat@gmail.com; Porret, C.; Favre-Nicolin, V.; Tainoff, D.; Boukhari, M.; Bayle-Guillemaud, P.; Jamet, M.; Barski, A., E-mail: andre.barski@cea.com [INAC, SP2M, CEA and Université Joseph Fourier, 17 rue des Martyrs, 38054 Grenoble (France)

    2014-03-10

    In this Letter, we investigate manganese diffusion and the formation of Mn precipitates in highly strained, few monolayer thick, Mn-doped Ge wetting layers and nanometric size Ge quantum dot heterostructures embedded in silicon. We show that in this Ge(Mn)/Si system manganese always precipitates and that the size and the position of Mn clusters (precipitates) depend on the growth temperature. At high growth temperature, manganese strongly diffuses from germanium to silicon, whereas decreasing the growth temperature reduces the manganese diffusion. In the germanium quantum dots layers, Mn precipitates are detected, not only in partially relaxed quantum dots but also in fully strained germanium wetting layers between the dots.

  9. ,"U.S. Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet)"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home PageMonthly","10/2015"4,"Ames City of",6,1,"Omaha Public PowerOECD/IEA -Annual",2014Proved Reserves, Wet After LeaseAnnual",2014Value andGas, Wet After

  10. ,"Utah Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet)"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home PageMonthly","10/2015"4,"Ames City of",6,1,"Omaha Public PowerOECD/IEA -Annual",2014Proved Reserves, WetGas, Wet After Lease Separation Proved

  11. ,"Virginia Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet)"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home PageMonthly","10/2015"4,"Ames City of",6,1,"Omaha Public PowerOECD/IEA -Annual",2014Proved Reserves, WetGas, Wet After LeaseSummary"

  12. ,"West Virginia Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet)"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home PageMonthly","10/2015"4,"Ames City of",6,1,"Omaha Public PowerOECD/IEA -Annual",2014Proved Reserves, WetGas, WetAnnual",2014Associated-Dissolved Natural

  13. PILOT TESTING OF MERCURY OXIDATION CATALYSTS FOR UPSTREAM OF WET FGD SYSTEMS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gary M. Blythe

    2003-10-01

    This document summarizes progress on Cooperative Agreement DE-FC26-01NT41185, ''Pilot Testing of Mercury Oxidation Catalysts for Upstream of Wet FGD Systems,'' during the time-period July 1, 2003 through September 30, 2003. The objective of this project is to demonstrate at pilot scale the use of solid honeycomb catalysts to promote the oxidation of elemental mercury in the flue gas from coal combustion. The project is being funded by the U.S. DOE National Energy Technology Laboratory under Cooperative Agreement DE-FC26-01NT41185. EPRI, Great River Energy (GRE), and City Public Service (CPS) of San Antonio are project cofunders. URS Group is the prime contractor. The mercury control process under development uses catalyst materials applied to honeycomb substrates to promote the oxidation of elemental mercury in the flue gas from coal-fired power plants that have wet lime or limestone flue gas desulfurization (FGD) systems. Oxidized mercury is removed in the wet FGD absorbers and co-precipitates with the byproducts from the FGD system. The current project is testing previously identified, effective catalyst materials at a larger, pilot scale and in a commercial form, to provide engineering data for future full-scale designs. The pilot-scale tests will continue for approximately 14 months at each of two sites to provide longer-term catalyst life data. This is the eighth full reporting period for the subject Cooperative Agreement. During this period, project efforts included continued operation of the first pilot unit at the GRE Coal Creek site with all four catalysts in service and sonic horns installed for on-line catalyst cleaning. During the quarter, a catalyst activity measurement trip and mercury SCEM relative accuracy tests were completed, and catalyst pressure drop was closely monitored with the sonic horns in operation. CPS completed the installation of the second mercury oxidation catalyst pilot unit at their Spruce Plant during the quarter, and the four catalysts to be tested in that unit were ordered. The pilot unit was started up with two of the four catalysts in service late in August, and initial catalyst activity results were measured in late September. The other two catalysts will not become available for testing until sometime in October. This technical progress report details these efforts at both sites.

  14. PILOT TESTING OF MERCURY OXIDATION CATALYSTS FOR UPSTREAM OF WET FGD SYSTEMS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gary M. Blythe

    2002-04-26

    This document summarizes progress on Cooperative Agreement DE-FC26-01NT41185, Pilot Testing of Mercury Oxidation Catalysts for Upstream of Wet FGD Systems, during the time period January 1, 2002 through March 31, 2002. The objective of this project is to demonstrate at pilot scale the use of solid honeycomb catalysts to promote the oxidation of elemental mercury in the flue gas from coal combustion. The project is being funded by the U.S. DOE National Energy Technology Laboratory under Cooperative Agreement DE-FC26-01NT41185. EPRI, Great River Energy (GRE) and City Public Service (CPS) of San Antonio are project co-funders. URS Group is the prime contractor. The mercury catalytic oxidation process under development uses catalyst materials applied to honeycomb substrates to promote the oxidation of elemental mercury in the flue gas from coal-fired power plants that have wet lime or limestone flue gas desulfurization (FGD) systems. Oxidized mercury is removed in the wet FGD absorbers and co-precipitates in a stable form with the byproducts from the FGD system. The co-precipitated mercury does not appear to adversely affect the disposal or reuse properties of the FGD byproduct. The current project will test previously identified, effective catalyst materials at a larger, pilot scale and in a commercial form, so as to provide engineering data for future full-scale designs. The pilot-scale tests will continue for up to 14 months at each of two sites to provide longer-term catalyst life data. This is the second full reporting period for the subject Cooperative Agreement. During this period, most of the project efforts were related to pilot unit design and conducting laboratory runs to help select candidate catalysts. This technical progress report provides an update on these two efforts. A Test Plan for the upcoming pilot-scale evaluations was also prepared and submitted to NETL for review and comment. Since this document was already submitted under separate cover, this information is not repeated here.

  15. AES Flow Interception : Key Snooping Method on Virtual Machine.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    International Association for Cryptologic Research (IACR)

    AES Flow Interception : Key Snooping Method on Virtual Machine. - Exception Handling Attack for AES for snooping AES en- cryption key on Virtual Machine Monitor (VMM), and we present coun- termeasures against. In general, the virtualization technology composes two software parts: one is vir- tual machine (VM

  16. Entity Authentication and Authenticated Key Exchange with Tree Parity Machines

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    International Association for Cryptologic Research (IACR)

    synchronization of two in­ teracting identically structured Tree Parity Machines (TPMs) has been proposed underEntity Authentication and Authenticated Key Exchange with Tree Parity Machines Markus Volkmer key exchange in the framework of Tree Parity Machines (TPMs). The interaction of TPMs has been

  17. Energy Security: A Key Requirement forSustainable Development

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1 Energy Security: A Key Requirement forSustainable Development Perspective and Action Plan Robert Card Under Secretary US Department of Energy August 30, 2002 Session One: Maintaining Energy Security WSSD Side Event Energy for Sustainable Development IEA/UNEP/Eskom #12;2 Energy Security is a Key

  18. A Distributed Public Key Caching Scheme in Large Wireless Networks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Deng, Jing

    -constrained, in terms of computational power, battery energy, and on-board memory space. For example, the prototypeA Distributed Public Key Caching Scheme in Large Wireless Networks Yuan Kong Jing Deng Stephen R in wireless networks, the public keys of the nodes need to be widely available and signed by a Certificate

  19. Improved Key Generation For Gentry's Fully Homomorphic Encryption Scheme

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    International Association for Cryptologic Research (IACR)

    Improved Key Generation For Gentry's Fully Homomorphic Encryption Scheme P. Scholl and N.P. Smart scheme was the slow key generation process. Gentry and Halevi provided a fast technique for 2-power cyclo. In particular they focused on the field generated by the polynomial F(X) = X2n + 1, but they noted

  20. Zero-one laws for connectivity in random key graphs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yagan, Osman

    with the random key predistribution scheme of Eschenauer and Gligor for wireless sensor networks. For this class which are more realistic for applications to wireless sensor networks. Keywords: Wireless sensor- dom key predistribution for wireless sensor networks (WSNs) [6], [7], [9]. For the sake

  1. Baton: Key Agility for Android without a Centralized Certificate Infrastructure

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Van Oorschot, Paul

    Baton: Key Agility for Android without a Centralized Certificate Infrastructure David Barrera,dmccarney}@ccsl.carleton.ca {clark,paulv}@scs.carleton.ca ABSTRACT Android's trust-on-first-use application signing model asso transfer signing au- thority to a new signing key. Our proposal, Baton, modifies Android's app installation

  2. Comparative Analysis of Software Libraries for Public Key Cryptography

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gaj, Krzysztof

    Comparative Analysis of Software Libraries for Public Key Cryptography Ashraf Abusharekh1 and Kris libraries implementing such operations exist both commercially and in the public domain, in this paper, we, using performance and support of public key primitive operations. The performance of all libraries

  3. k-Connectivity in Random Key Graphs with Unreliable Links

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yagan, Osman

    of Eschenauer and Gligor for securing wireless sensor network (WSN) communications. Random key graphs have real-world networks; e.g., with secure WSN application in mind, link unreliability can be attributed for securing WSN communications is the random predistribution of cryptographic keys to sensor nodes

  4. Wireless sensor networks under the random pairwise key predistribution scheme

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yagan, Osman

    Wireless sensor networks under the random pairwise key predistribution scheme: Can resiliency, College Park, MD 20742. Email: armand@isr.umd.edu Abstract--We investigate the resiliency of wireless the classical key predistribution scheme of Eschenauer and Gligor. Keywords: Wireless sensor networks, Security

  5. SPONTANEOUS CATALYTIC WET AIR OXIDATION DURING PRE-TREATMENT OF HIGH-LEVEL RADIOACTIVE WASTE SLUDGE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Koopman, D.; Herman, C.; Pareizs, J.; Bannochie, C.; Best, D.; Bibler, N.; Fellinger, T.

    2009-10-01

    Savannah River Remediation, LLC (SRR) operates the Defense Waste Processing Facility for the U.S. Department of Energy at the Savannah River Site. This facility immobilizes high-level radioactive waste through vitrification following chemical pretreatment. Catalytic destruction of formate and oxalate ions to carbon dioxide has been observed during qualification testing of non-radioactive analog systems. Carbon dioxide production greatly exceeded hydrogen production, indicating the occurrence of a process other than the catalytic decomposition of formic acid. Statistical modeling was used to relate the new reaction chemistry to partial catalytic wet air oxidation of both formate and oxalate ions driven by the low concentrations of palladium, rhodium, and/or ruthenium in the waste. Variations in process conditions led to increases or decreases in the total oxidative destruction, as well as partially shifting the preferred species undergoing destruction from oxalate ion to formate ion.

  6. Permeability of a bubble assembly: From the very dry to the wet limit

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Florence Rouyer; Olivier Pitois; Elise Lorenceau; Nicolas Louvet

    2009-10-12

    We measure the permeability of a fluidized bed of monodispersed bubbles with soap solution characteristic of mobile and non-mobile interfaces. These experimental data extend the permeability curves previously published for foam in the dry limit. In the wet limit, these data join the permeability curves of a hard sphere suspension at porosity equal to 0.4 and 0.6 in the cases of mobile and non-mobile interfaces respectively. We show that the model of permeability proposed by Kozeny and Carman and originally validated for packed beds of spheres (with porosity around 0.4) can be successfully applied with no adjustable parameters to liquid fractions from 0.001 up to 0.85 for systems made of monodisperse and deformable entities with non-mobile interfaces.

  7. Void Prediction During Liquid Composite Molding Processes: Wetting and Capillary Phenomena

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Abdelwahed, Mohamed Amine Ben; Bizet, Laurent; Bréard, Joël

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this work is to contribute in improving fibrous preforms impregnation for Liquid Composite Molding (LCM) processes. The void prediction in LCM sparks off interest within the Composite Material elaboration because it represents a significant issue to keep the expected mechanical properties of the final product. The liquid properties, the preform geometry and the flow conditions impact the void or bubble entrapped inside and outside the yarns. Nevertheless, due to the complex geometry of the reinforcement, experimental characterization of bubble formation remains delicate. Thus, our study deals with two simple model networks representing connected pores so called "Pore Doublet Model". A first is considering two capillaries converging on a node (T-junction) and a second is representing two capillaries interconnected with a supplying principle. In this paper, we emphasize on microfluidic and millifluidic approaches where wetting and capillary forces are significant during bubble formation mechanism.

  8. Void Prediction During Liquid Composite Molding Processes: Wetting and Capillary Phenomena

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mohamed Amine Ben Abdelwahed; Yanneck Wielhorski; Laurent Bizet; Joël Bréard

    2012-07-17

    The aim of this work is to contribute in improving fibrous preforms impregnation for Liquid Composite Molding (LCM) processes. The void prediction in LCM sparks off interest within the Composite Material elaboration because it represents a significant issue to keep the expected mechanical properties of the final product. The liquid properties, the preform geometry and the flow conditions impact the void or bubble entrapped inside and outside the yarns. Nevertheless, due to the complex geometry of the reinforcement, experimental characterization of bubble formation remains delicate. Thus, our study deals with two simple model networks representing connected pores so called "Pore Doublet Model". A first is considering two capillaries converging on a node (T-junction) and a second is representing two capillaries interconnected with a supplying principle. In this paper, we emphasize on microfluidic and millifluidic approaches where wetting and capillary forces are significant during bubble formation mechanism.

  9. A preliminary assessment of beryllium dust oxidation during a wet bypass accident in a fusion reactor

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brad J. Merrill; Richard L. Moore; J. Phillip Sharp

    2008-09-01

    A beryllium dust oxidation model has been developed at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) by the Fusion Safety Program (FSP) for the MELCOR safety computer code. The purpose of this model is to investigate hydrogen production from beryllium dust layers on hot surfaces inside a fusion reactor vacuum vessel (VV) during in-vessel loss-of-cooling accidents (LOCAs). This beryllium dust oxidation model accounts for the diffusion of steam into a beryllium dust layer, the oxidation of the dust particles inside this layer based on the beryllium-steam oxidation equations developed at the INL, and the effective thermal conductivity of this beryllium dust layer. This paper details this oxidation model and presents the results of the application of this model to a wet bypass accident scenario in the ITER device.

  10. Apparatus, system, and method for synchronizing a timer key

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Condit, Reston A; Daniels, Michael A; Clemens, Gregory P; Tomberlin, Eric S; Johnson, Joel A

    2014-04-22

    A timer key relating to monitoring a countdown time of a countdown routine of an electronic device is disclosed. The timer key comprises a processor configured to respond to a countdown time associated with operation of the electronic device, a display operably coupled with the processor, and a housing configured to house at least the processor. The housing has an associated structure configured to engage with the electronic device to share the countdown time between the electronic device and the timer key. The processor is configured to begin a countdown routine based at least in part on the countdown time, wherein the countdown routine is at least substantially synchronized with a countdown routine of the electronic device when the timer key is removed from the electronic device. A system and method for synchronizing countdown routines of a timer key and an electronic device are also disclosed.

  11. Practical issues in quantum-key-distribution postprocessing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fung, C.-H. Fred; Chau, H. F. [Department of Physics and Center of Theoretical and Computational Physics, University of Hong Kong, Pokfulam Road (Hong Kong); Ma Xiongfeng [Institute for Quantum Computing and Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Waterloo, 200 University Ave W., Waterloo, Ontario, Canada N2L 3G1 (Canada)

    2010-01-15

    Quantum key distribution (QKD) is a secure key generation method between two distant parties by wisely exploiting properties of quantum mechanics. In QKD, experimental measurement outcomes on quantum states are transformed by the two parties to a secret key. This transformation is composed of many logical steps (as guided by security proofs), which together will ultimately determine the length of the final secret key and its security. We detail the procedure for performing such classical postprocessing taking into account practical concerns (including the finite-size effect and authentication and encryption for classical communications). This procedure is directly applicable to realistic QKD experiments and thus serves as a recipe that specifies what postprocessing operations are needed and what the security level is for certain lengths of the keys. Our result is applicable to the BB84 protocol with a single or entangled photon source.

  12. Impacts of WRF Physics and Measurement Uncertainty on California Wintertime Model Wet Bias

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chin, H S; Caldwell, P M; Bader, D C

    2009-07-22

    The Weather and Research Forecast (WRF) model version 3.0.1 is used to explore California wintertime model wet bias. In this study, two wintertime storms are selected from each of four major types of large-scale conditions; Pineapple Express, El Nino, La Nina, and synoptic cyclones. We test the impacts of several model configurations on precipitation bias through comparison with three sets of gridded surface observations; one from the National Oceanographic and Atmospheric Administration, and two variations from the University of Washington (without and with long-term trend adjustment; UW1 and UW2, respectively). To simplify validation, California is divided into 4 regions (Coast, Central Valley, Mountains, and Southern California). Simulations are driven by North American Regional Reanalysis data to minimize large-scale forcing error. Control simulations are conducted with 12-km grid spacing (low resolution) but additional experiments are performed at 2-km (high) resolution to evaluate the robustness of microphysics and cumulus parameterizations to resolution changes. We find that the choice of validation dataset has a significant impact on the model wet bias, and the forecast skill of model precipitation depends strongly on geographic location and storm type. Simulations with right physics options agree better with UW1 observations. In 12-km resolution simulations, the Lin microphysics and the Kain-Fritsch cumulus scheme have better forecast skill in the coastal region while Goddard, Thompson, and Morrison microphysics, and the Grell-Devenyi cumulus scheme perform better in the rest of California. The effect of planetary boundary layer, soil-layer, and radiation physics on model precipitation is weaker than that of microphysics and cumulus processes for short- to medium-range low-resolution simulations. Comparison of 2-km and 12-km resolution runs suggests a need for improvement of cumulus schemes, and supports the use of microphysics schemes in coarser-grid applications.

  13. PILOT TESTING OF MERCURY OXIDATION CATALYSTS FOR UPSTREAM OF WET FGD SYSTEMS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gary M. Blythe

    2002-02-22

    The objective of this project is to demonstrate at pilot scale the use of solid honeycomb catalysts to promote the oxidation of elemental mercury in the flue gas from coal combustion. The project is being funded by the U.S. DOE National Energy Technology Laboratory under Cooperative Agreement DE-FC26-01NT41185. EPRI, Great River Energy (GRE), and City Public Service (CPS) of San Antonio are project co-funders. URS Group is the prime contractor. The mercury catalytic oxidation process under development uses catalyst materials applied to honeycomb substrates to promote the oxidation of elemental mercury in the flue gas from coal-fired power plants that have wet lime or limestone flue gas desulfurization (FGD) systems. Oxidized mercury is removed in the wet FGD absorbers and co-precipitates in a stable form with the byproducts from the FGD system. The co-precipitated mercury does not appear to adversely affect the disposal or reuse properties of the FGD byproduct. The current project will test previously identified, effective catalyst materials at a larger, pilot scale and in a commercial form, so as to provide engineering data for future full-scale designs. The pilot-scale tests will continue for up to 14 months at each of two sites to provide longer-term catalyst life data. This is the first full reporting period for the subject Cooperative Agreement. During this period, most of the project efforts were related to project initiation and planning. There is no significant technical progress to report for the current period.

  14. Manufacturing Energy and Carbon Footprint Definitions and Assumptions, October 2012

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Definitions of parameters and table of assumptions for the Manufacturing Energy and Carbon Footprint

  15. India Ink Staining 1. Place wet or dried blot in a small volume of PBSTw. Place blot on surface of liquid to allow slow and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aris, John P.

    51 India Ink Staining 1. Place wet or dried blot in a small volume of PBSTw. Place blot on surface of liquid to allow slow and even wetting. 2. Add India Ink dropwise while swirling buffer (up to 0.1% final

  16. Adhesion and nonwetting-wetting transition in the Al -Al2O3 interface Qing Zhang, Tahir C agin, Adri van Duin, and William A. Goddard III

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Goddard III, William A.

    Adhesion and nonwetting-wetting transition in the AlÕ -Al2O3 interface Qing Zhang, Tahir C¸ agin 2004 Using a reactive force field ReaxFF , we investigated the structural, energetic, and adhesion and analysis of wetting and adhesion strength of liquid Al on an -Al2O3 surface via the sessile drop method.1

  17. The 7th World Congress on Particle Technology (WCPT7) Towards hydrodynamic simulations of wet particle systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Luding, Stefan

    The 7th World Congress on Particle Technology (WCPT7) Towards hydrodynamic simulations of wet !!, !!, !! inner/ split/ outer radius of shear cell [m] ! filling height [m] (r, , z) cylindrical coordinates [m migration across the contacts, affects the shear band structure [6] and different liquid bridge models were

  18. Dynamics of Coalescence of Plugs with a Hydrophilic Wetting Layer Induced by Flow in a Microfluidic Chemistrode

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ismagilov, Rustem F.

    Dynamics of Coalescence of Plugs with a Hydrophilic Wetting Layer Induced by Flow in a Microfluidic.; Ismagilov, R. F. Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U.S.A. 2008, 105, 16843­16848) microfluidic analogue of an electrode-response processes in chemistry and biology. The chemistrode consists of open-ended V-shaped microfluidic channels

  19. Coupled electromechanical effects in wurtzite quantum dots with wetting layers in gate controlled electric fields: The multiband case

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Melnik, Roderick

    Coupled electromechanical effects in wurtzite quantum dots with wetting layers in gate controlled quantifies the electromechanical effects on the band structure of wurtzite quantum dots. c Systematic study online 25 September 2012 a b s t r a c t We quantify the influence of coupled electromechanical effects

  20. Dependence of waterflood remaining oil saturation on relative permeability, capillary pressure, and reservoir parameters in mixed wet, turbidite sands

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hirasaki, G.J.

    1995-12-31

    The dependence of waterflood oil recovery on relative permeability, capillary pressure, and reservoir parameters was investigated by numerical simulation. The relative permeability and capillary pressure curves were based on laboratory measurements on unconsolidated sands and were evaluated for water-wet and mixed wet states. The reservoir model was a prototype turbidite sand with a range of thickness and permeability values. The economic oil recovery was based on an economic limit water cut of 50%. The remaining oil saturation in the swept region for the water-wet cases was close to the residual oil saturation. The remaining oil saturation of the mixed wet cases ranged from low values near the residual oil saturation to far above the residual oil saturation. It is dependent on the reservoir parameters that govern: (1) the vertical {open_quotes}film surface drainage{close_quotes} of oil by gravity, (2) accumulation of a high oil saturation and thus a high relative permeability under the cap rock, (3) updip migration of the oil that accumulated under the cap rock. The dependence on the reservoir parameters can be summarized by dimensionless groups. There is a dimensionless time for the vertical displacement of oil by gravity. The accumulation of a high oil saturation under the cap rock is dependent on the ratio of the capillary transition zone and the sand thickness. The updip migration is dependent on a combination of the gravity number and the end point mobility ratio.

  1. Spontaneous penetration of a non-wetting drop into an exposed pore Pengtao Yue and Yuriko Renardy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Renardy, Yuriko

    in a wide range of applications such as oil recovery,1 textile technology,2 ink jet printing,3 and fuel cell technology.4 For such a complex problem, it is crucial to have a good understanding of wetting in a single

  2. Dry Versus Wet Aging of Beef: Retail Cutting Yields and Palatability Evaluations of Steaks Using Alternative Cutting Styles 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Smith, Amanda 1987-

    2012-12-05

    Boneless ribeye rolls (n = 12) and boneless top sirloin butts (n = 12) were obtained from heavy weight carcasses (mean = 407.8 kg), assigned to one of two aging treatments (dry or wet) and aged for 35 days at a commercial aging facility. Cutting...

  3. RESEARCH MISCONDUCT: POLICIES, DEFINITIONS AND PROCEDURES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oviedo, Néstor J.

    RESEARCH MISCONDUCT: POLICIES, DEFINITIONS AND PROCEDURES I. INTRODUCTION The purpose and principles for assessing allegations of research misconduct, conducting inquiries and investigations related to possible research misconduct and reporting the results to federal sponsors. This policy applies to all

  4. Department of Bioengineering Definition of Biomedical Engineering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    is a discipline that advances knowledge in engineering, biology and medicine, and improves human health throughDepartment of Bioengineering Definition of Biomedical Engineering Biomedical engineering cross-disciplinary activities that integrate the engineering sciences with the biomedical sciences

  5. When a beam a definite shaft

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    No. 719 Aug. 31 When a beam a definite shaft A Science Service Foature ? \\UY THE WIEATEZR ? -----T and heavy clouds. For the long shafts of light can be seen i n the --------..- (Tomorrow: High Barometer VS

  6. Definition of a 'Zero Net Energy' Community

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Carlisle, N.; Van Geet, O.; Pless, S.

    2009-11-01

    This document provides a definition for a net zero-energy community. A community that offsets all of its energy use from renewables available within the community's built environment.

  7. Key Facts about Argonne National Laboratory | Argonne National Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power Administration would likeUniverseIMPACTThousand Cubic Feet) SoldDepartment ofKenThousandtheKevlarKeyKeyKey

  8. Security bounds for efficient decoy-state quantum key distribution

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Marco Lucamarini; James F. Dynes; Bernd Fröhlich; Zhiliang Yuan; Andrew J. Shields

    2015-03-25

    Information-theoretical security of quantum key distribution (QKD) has been convincingly proven in recent years and remarkable experiments have shown the potential of QKD for real world applications. Due to its unique capability of combining high key rate and security in a realistic finite-size scenario, the efficient version of the BB84 QKD protocol endowed with decoy states has been subject of intensive research. Its recent experimental implementation finally demonstrated a secure key rate beyond 1 Mbps over a 50 km optical fiber. However the achieved rate holds under the restrictive assumption that the eavesdropper performs collective attacks. Here, we review the protocol and generalize its security. We exploit a map by Ahrens to rigorously upper bound the Hypergeometric distribution resulting from a general eavesdropping. Despite the extended applicability of the new protocol, its key rate is only marginally smaller than its predecessor in all cases of practical interest.

  9. OIMB GK12 CURRICULUM Name: _____KEY__________ Fun Crab Facts!

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    OIMB GK12 CURRICULUM Name: _____KEY__________ Fun Crab Facts! Eyestalk mouth antenna cheliped CURRICULUM Name: _____________________ Fun Crab Facts! Eyestalk Mouth Antenna Cheliped Carapace Walking metamorphosis motorcycle exoskeleton omnivores butterfly pea #12;OIMB GK12 CURRICULUM Masked crab Fiddler crab

  10. EnergySmart Schools National Financing Roundtable - Key Outcomes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2009-04-01

    This document presents key outcomes from the EnergySmart Schools National Financing Roundtable as a follow-up to the release of its Guide to FInancing EnergySmart Schools

  11. LANL breaks ground on key sediment control project

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    project LANL breaks ground on key sediment control project Called "grade-control" structures, the approximately 2 million features are up to eight feet high and made of rocks...

  12. Turbulence may be key to "fast magnetic reconnection" mystery

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    A paper published in the journal Nature asserts to have found the key to a long-standing mystery in plasma physics and astrophysics, and it's all about turbulence....

  13. Refine the Concept of Public Key Encryption with Delegated Search

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    International Association for Cryptologic Research (IACR)

    with the public key of Bob, but unfortunately, her computer is infected by some virus which embeds a malware contents. However, in this way, Bob's computer will be under the risk of infection by the malware

  14. Worldwide Trends in Energy Use and Efficiency: Key Insights from...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Trends in Energy Use and Efficiency: Key Insights from International Energy Agency (IEA) Indicator Analysis in Support of the Group of Eight (G8) Plan of Action Jump to:...

  15. A Key Review On Exergetic Analysis And Assessment Of Renewable...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    A Key Review On Exergetic Analysis And Assessment Of Renewable Energy Resources For A Sustainable Future Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Journal...

  16. Mind Your Manners: Socially Appropriate Wireless Key Establishment for Groups

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Xu, Wenyuan

    Mind Your Manners: Socially Appropriate Wireless Key Establishment for Groups Cynthia Kuo Ahren students may want to (quietly) opt out of their friends' illicit file trading activities, but academics

  17. Practical Non-Interactive Key Distribution Based on Pairings

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    International Association for Cryptologic Research (IACR)

    , the Private Key Generator (PKG), who possesses additional privileged information in the form of a master in a non- interactive system is that the synchronous communication between Alice and Bob is replaced

  18. Efficiency in Quantum Key Distribution Protocols using entangled Gaussian states

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Carles Rodó

    2010-05-14

    Efficiency is a key issue in any real implementation of a cryptographic protocol since the physical resources are not unlimited. We will first show that Quantum Key Distribution is possible with an "Entanglement based" scheme with NPPT symmetric Gaussian states in spite of the fact that these systems cannot be distilled with Gaussian operations (they are all bound entangled). In this work we analyze the secrecy properties of Gaussian states under Gaussian operations. Although such operations are useless for quantum distillation, we prove that it is possible to distill efficiently a secret key secure against finite coherent attacks from sufficiently entangled Gaussian states with non-positive partial transposition. Moreover, all such states allow for efficient key distillation, when the eavesdropper is assumed to perform individual attacks before in an efficient way.

  19. Reflective cracking of shear keys in multi-beam bridges 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sharpe, Graeme Peter

    2009-06-02

    strength to resist cracking from vehicular loads, but uneven temperature changes and shrinkage strains cause high tensile stresses in the shear key regions and lead to reflective cracking. The analyses showed the highest stresses were often times near...

  20. Key Factors in Displacement Ventilation Systems for Better IAQ 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, X.; Chen, J.; Li, Y.; Wang, Z.

    2006-01-01

    This paper sets up a mathematical model of three-dimensional steady turbulence heat transfer in an air-conditioned room of multi-polluting heat sources. Numerical simulation helps identify key factors in displacement ventilation systems that affect...

  1. Darcy Q. Hou State Key Laboratory of Hydraulic

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tijsseling, A.S.

    Darcy Q. Hou State Key Laboratory of Hydraulic Engineering Simulation and Safety, and School to severe dam- ages. Over 50 incidents have been attributed to this mechanism and an accident was reported

  2. Cold Boot Key Recovery by Solving Polynomial Systems with Noise

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    International Association for Cryptologic Research (IACR)

    the observed set of round subkeys in memory (computed via the cipher's key schedule operation), which were, for transparent en- cryption and decryption of data. One could apply the method from [9] to obtain the computer

  3. A summary of SNCR applications to two coal-fired wet bottom boilers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Himes, R.; Hubbard, D.; West, Z.

    1996-01-01

    In response to NO{sub x} reductions mandated under Title I of the 1990 Clean Air Act Amendments (CAAA), Public Service Electric & Gas and Atlantic Electric of New Jersey evaluated Selective Non-Catalytic Reduction (SNCR) for NO{sub x} control under separate programs at Mercer Station and B.L. England Station, respectively. Mercer Station is comprised of twin 321 MW Foster Wheeler coal-fired wet bottom boilers, with natural gas capability up to 100% load. B.L. England Station has three units, two of which are cyclone boilers of 136 MW and 163 MW. These furnace designs are of particular interest in that nominally 23,000 MW of cyclone boiler capacity and 6,900 MW of wall- or turbo-fired wet bottom boiler capacity will be faced with NO{sub x} reductions to be mandated under Title IV - Phase II for Group II boilers. Both stations evaluated Nalco Fuel Tech`s SNCR system using a portable test skid, with urea as the reducing chemical. The Mercer Unit 2 demonstration was performed with a low sulfur coal (nominally 0.8%), while the B.L. England Unit 1 demonstration utilized a medium sulfur coal (nominally 2.4%), and also re-injects fly ash back into the cyclones for ultimate collection and removal as slag. To address concerns over potential Ljungstrom air heater fouling, due to reactions between ammonia and SO{sub 3} in the air heater, and fly ash salability at Mercer Station, both sites targeted no greater than 5-10 ppmv ammonia emissions at the economizer exit. At Mercer Unit 2, air heater fouling was only experienced during system start-up when the ammonia emissions at the economizer exit were estimated at levels approaching 60 ppmv. B.L. England Unit 1, however, experienced frequent fouling of the air heater. NO{sub x} reductions achieved at both sites ranged between 30%-40% from nominal baseline NO{sub x} levels of 1.1-1.6 lb/MMBtu. Each site is currently undergoing installation of commercial SNCR systems.

  4. 9. Table Definition in SQL 9-1 Part 9: Table Definition

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brass, Stefan

    9. Table Definition in SQL 9-1 Part 9: Table Definition References: · Elmasri/Navathe:Fundamentals of Database Systems, 3rd Edition, 1999. Chap. 8, "SQL -- The Relational Database Standard" · Kemper/Darwen: A Guide to the SQL Standard, Fourth Edition, Addison-Wesley, 1997. · van der Lans: SQL, Der ISO

  5. Rigorous and General Definition of Thermodynamic Entropy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gian Paolo Beretta; Enzo Zanchini

    2010-10-05

    The physical foundations of a variety of emerging technologies --- ranging from the applications of quantum entanglement in quantum information to the applications of nonequilibrium bulk and interface phenomena in microfluidics, biology, materials science, energy engineering, etc. --- require understanding thermodynamic entropy beyond the equilibrium realm of its traditional definition. This paper presents a rigorous logical scheme that provides a generalized definition of entropy free of the usual unnecessary assumptions which constrain the theory to the equilibrium domain. The scheme is based on carefully worded operative definitions for all the fundamental concepts employed, including those of system, property, state, isolated system, environment, process, separable system, system uncorrelated from its environment, and parameters of a system. The treatment considers also systems with movable internal walls and/or semipermeable walls, with chemical reactions and/or external force fields, and with small numbers of particles. The definition of reversible process is revised by introducing the new concept of scenario. The definition of entropy involves neither the concept of heat nor that of quasistatic process; it applies to both equilibrium and nonequilibrium states. The role of correlations on the domain of definition and on the additivity of energy and entropy is discussed: it is proved that energy is defined and additive for all separable systems, while entropy is defined and additive only for separable systems uncorrelated from their environment; decorrelation entropy is defined. The definitions of energy and entropy are extended rigorously to open systems. Finally, to complete the discussion, the existence of the fundamental relation for stable equilibrium states is proved, in our context, for both closed and open systems.

  6. Effect of Roughness Geometry on Wetting and Dewetting of Rough PDMS Surfaces

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Daniel, Susan

    was studied as model for print surfaces used in additive manufacturing and printed electronics. A smooth PDMS on decline for over a decade,9 printing has evolved and has become a manufacturing technology for flexible are keys to a successful implementation of ink printing in manufacturing. Arias et al.4 showed that balance

  7. Field Testing of a Wet FGD Additive for Enhanced Mercury Control - Task 3 Full-scale Test Results

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gary Blythe

    2007-05-01

    This Topical Report summarizes progress on Cooperative Agreement DE-FC26-04NT42309, 'Field Testing of a Wet FGD Additive'. The objective of the project is to demonstrate the use of a flue gas desulfurization (FGD) additive, Degussa Corporation's TMT-15, to prevent the reemission of elemental mercury (Hg{sup 0}) in flue gas exiting wet FGD systems on coal-fired boilers. Furthermore, the project intends to demonstrate whether the additive can be used to precipitate most of the mercury (Hg) removed in the wet FGD system as a fine TMT salt that can be separated from the FGD liquor and bulk solid byproducts for separate disposal. The project is conducting pilot- and full-scale tests of the TMT-15 additive in wet FGD absorbers. The tests are intended to determine required additive dosages to prevent Hg{sup 0} reemissions and to separate mercury from the normal FGD byproducts for three coal types: Texas lignite/Power River Basin (PRB) coal blend, high-sulfur Eastern bituminous coal, and low-sulfur Eastern bituminous coal. The project team consists of URS Group, Inc., EPRI, TXU Generation Company LP, Southern Company, and Degussa Corporation. TXU Generation has provided the Texas lignite/PRB cofired test site for pilot FGD tests, Monticello Steam Electric Station Unit 3. Southern Company is providing the low-sulfur Eastern bituminous coal host site for wet scrubbing tests, as well as the pilot- and full-scale jet bubbling reactor (JBR) FGD systems to be tested. IPL, an AES company, provided the high-sulfur Eastern bituminous coal full-scale FGD test site and cost sharing. Degussa Corporation is providing the TMT-15 additive and technical support to the test program as cost sharing. The project is being conducted in six tasks. Of the six project tasks, Task 1 involves project planning and Task 6 involves management and reporting. The other four tasks involve field testing on FGD systems, either at pilot or full scale. The four tasks include: Task 2 - Pilot Additive Testing in Texas Lignite Flue Gas; Task 3 - Full-scale FGD Additive Testing in High-sulfur Eastern Bituminous Flue Gas; Task 4 - Pilot Wet Scrubber Additive Tests at Plant Yates; and Task 5 - Full-scale Additive Tests at Plant Yates. The pilot-scale tests were completed in 2005 and have been previously reported. This topical report presents the results from the Task 3 full-scale additive tests, conducted at IPL's Petersburg Station Unit 2. The Task 5 full-scale additive tests will be conducted later in calendar year 2007.

  8. Critically safe volume vacuum pickup for use in wet or dry cleanup of radioactive enclosures

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Zeren, J.D.

    1993-12-28

    A physical compact vacuum pickup device of critically safe volume and geometric shape is provided for use in radioactive enclosures, such as a small glove box, to facilitate manual cleanup of either wet or dry radioactive material. The device is constructed and arranged so as to remain safe when filled to capacity with plutonium-239 oxide. Two fine mesh filter bags are supported on the exterior of a rigid fine mesh stainless steel cup. This assembly is sealed within, and spaced from, the interior walls of a stainless steel canister. An air inlet communicates with the interior of the canister. A modified conventional vacuum head is physically connected to, and associated with, the interior of the mesh cup. The volume of the canister, as defined by the space between the mesh cup and the interior walls of the canister, forms a critically safe volume and geometric shape for dry radioactive particles that are gathered within the canister. A critically safe liquid volume is maintained by operation of a suction terminating float valve, and/or by operation of redundant vacuum check/liquid drain valves and placement of the air inlet. 5 figures.

  9. Costs of Harvesting, Storing in a Large Pile, and Transporting Corn Stover in a Wet Form

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Turhollow Jr, Anthony F [ORNL; Sokhansanj, Shahabaddine [ORNL

    2007-01-01

    Corn stover is potentially an attractive biomass resource, but must be stored if used to supply a biorefinery year-round. Based on experience with successfully storing water-saturated large piles of bagasse for the pulping industry, Atchison and Hettenhaus (2003) proposed that such a system can also be applied to corn stover. Regardless of the technical feasibility of this system, in this article we estimate the cost of harvesting corn stover in a single pass with corn grain, delivering the chopped biomass to a storage pile, storing the stover in a wet form in a large pile at 75% moisture in a 211,700-dry Mg facility within a radius of 24 km from the field, and transporting the stover 64 km to a biorefinery. Field-ground corn stover can be delivered to a biorefinery by rail for $55 to $61/dry Mg. Truck transport is more expensive, $71 to $77/dry Mg. To achieve a minimum cost in the system proposed by Atchison and Hettenhaus, it is necessary to field densify stover to 74 dry kg/m3, without losing combine field efficiency, have a large storage pile to spread fixed costs of storage over enough biomass, and use rail transportation. Compared to storage in an on-farm bunker silo at $60/dry Mg, there are limited circumstances in which large pile storage has a cost advantage.

  10. A wet chemistry approach to sub-micron, removable flip chip interconnects.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rowen, Adam M.; Barker, Joy M.; Gillen, J. Rusty; Orendorff, Christopher J.; Arrington, Christian L.; Yelton, William Graham

    2008-08-01

    Higher performance is the main driver in the integrated circuit (IC) market, but along with added function comes the cost of increased input/output connections and larger die sizes. Space saving approaches aimed at solving these challenges includes two technologies; 3D stacking (3D-ICs) and flip chip assemblies. Emerging ICs require sub-micron scale interconnects which include vias for 3D-ICs and bump bonds for flip chips. Photolithographic techniques are commonly used to prepare templates followed by metal vapor deposition to create flip chip bump bonds. Both the lithography step and the metal properties required for bump bonding contribute to limiting this approach to a minimum bump size of -10 ?m. Here, we present a wet chemistry approach to fabricating uniform bump bonds of tunable size and height down to the nanoscale. Nanosphere lithography (NSL), a soft lithographic technique, is used to create a bump bond template or mask for nanoscale bumps. Electrochemical deposition is also used through photoresist templates to create uniform bump bonds across large area wafers or dies. This template approach affords bumps with tunable diameters from 100s of nanometers to microns (allowing for tunable interconnect pitch and via diameters) while the use of constant current electroplating gives uniform bump height over large areas (>1 cm{sup 2}).

  11. Water-oil drainage dynamics in oil-wet random microfluidic porous media analogs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Xu, Wei; Neeves, Keith; Yin, Xiaolong

    2012-01-01

    Displacement experiments carried out in microfluidic porous media analogs show that reduced surface tension leads to a more stable displacement, opposite to the process in Hele-Shaw cells where surface tension stabilizes the displacement of a more viscous fluid by a less viscous fluid. In addition, geometry of porous media is observed to play an important role. Three random microfluidic porous media analogs were made to study water-oil drainage dynamics, featuring a pattern of randomly connected channels with a uniform width, a pattern with Gaussian channel width distribution, and a pattern with large isolated pores. The microfluidic chips fabricated using Polydimenthylsiloxane with glass covers have the internal surface treated by Trichlorosilane to achieve a uniform oil-wet condition. The aqueous phase displaces the oil phase, with a viscosity ratio of about 1:40 and a density ratio of 1:0.85. Videos 1-3 show water flooding processes. It is observed that both channel size distribution (Video 2) and heteroge...

  12. Moving zone Marangoni drying of wet objects using naturally evaporated solvent vapor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Britten, Jerald A. (Oakley, CA)

    1997-01-01

    A surface tension gradient driven flow (a Marangoni flow) is used to remove the thin film of water remaining on the surface of an object following rinsing. The process passively introduces by natural evaporation and diffusion of minute amounts of alcohol (or other suitable material) vapor in the immediate vicinity of a continuously refreshed meniscus of deionized water or another aqueous-based, nonsurfactant rinsing agent. Used in conjunction with cleaning, developing or wet etching application, rinsing coupled with Marangoni drying provides a single-step process for 1) cleaning, developing or etching, 2) rinsing, and 3) drying objects such as flat substrates or coatings on flat substrates without necessarily using heat, forced air flow, contact wiping, centrifugation or large amounts of flammable solvents. This process is useful in one-step cleaning and drying of large flat optical substrates, one-step developing/rinsing and drying or etching/rinsing/drying of large flat patterned substrates and flat panel displays during lithographic processing, and room-temperature rinsing/drying of other large parts, sheets or continuous rolls of material.

  13. Effects of pulverized coal fly-ash addition as a wet-end filler in papermaking

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sinha, A.S.K.

    2008-09-15

    This experimental study is based on the innovative idea of using pulverized coal fly ash as a wet-end filler in papermaking. This is the first evaluation of the possible use of fly ash in the paper industry. Coal-based thermal power plants throughout the world are generating fly ash as a solid waste product. The constituents of fly ash can be used effectively in papermaking. Fly ash has a wide variation in particle size, which ranges from a few micrometers to one hundred micrometers. Fly ash acts as an inert material in acidic, neutral, and alkaline papermaking processes. Its physical properties such as bulk density (800-980 kg/m{sup 3}), porosity (45%-57%), and surface area (0.138-2.3076 m{sup 2}/g) make it suitable for use as a paper filler. Fly ash obtained from thermal power plants using pulverized coal was fractionated by a vibratory-sieve stack. The fine fraction with a particle size below 38 micrometers was used to study its effect on the important mechanical-strength and optical properties of paper. The effects of fly-ash addition on these properties were compared with those of kaolin clay. Paper opacity was found to be much higher with fly ash as a filler, whereas brightness decreased as the filler percentage increased Mechanical strength properties of the paper samples with fly ash as filler were superior to those with kaolin clay.

  14. Micro-macro transition and simplified contact models for wet granular materials

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sudeshna Roy; Abhinendra Singh; Stefan Luding; Thomas Weinhart

    2015-06-21

    Wet granular materials in a quasi-static steady state shear flow have been studied with discrete particle simulations. Macroscopic quantities, consistent with the conservation laws of continuum theory, are obtained by time averaging and spatial coarse-graining. Initial studies involve understanding the effect of liquid content and liquid properties like the surface tension on the macroscopic quantities. Two parameters of the liquid bridge contact model have been studied as the constitutive parameters that define the structure of this model (i) the rupture distance of the liquid bridge model, which is proportional to the liquid content, and (ii) the maximum adhesive force, as controlled by the surface tension of the liquid. Subsequently a correlation is developed between these micro parameters and the steady state cohesion in the limit of zero confining pressure. Furthermore, as second result, the macroscopic torque measured at the walls, which is an experimentally accessible parameter, is predicted from our simulation results as a dependence on the micro-parameters. Finally, the steady state cohesion of a realistic non-linear liquid bridge contact model scales well with the steady state cohesion for a simpler linearized irreversible contact model with the same maximum adhesive force and equal energy dissipated per contact.

  15. Aluminum doped zirconia nanopowders: Wet-chemical synthesis and structural analysis by Rietveld refinement

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Srdic, Vladimir V. Rakic, Srdan; Cvejic, Zeljka

    2008-10-02

    Alumina/zirconia nanopowders, with up to 20 mol% Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}, were prepared by wet-chemical synthesis technique, using controlled hydrolysis of alkoxides. The as-synthesized powders are amorphous, have very high specific surface area and the corresponding particle size smaller than 4 nm. Amorphous powders with 0, 10 and 20 mol% Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} crystallize at 460, 692 and 749 deg. C, respectively, as a single-phase tetragonal zirconia, without any traces of alumina phases. Rietvled refinement of X-ray diffraction data, used for the detailed structural analysis of annealed nanopowders, showed that the high-temperature zirconia phase is stabilized due to the formation of ZrO{sub 2}/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} solid solutions. High solubility of alumina in the tetragonal zirconia (up to 28.6 at% Al{sup 3+}) and stabilization of tetragonal zirconia solid solution up to high temperature (as high as 1150 deg. C) were also confirmed.

  16. Experiments on High-Speed Liquid Films Over Downward-Facing Wetting and Nonwetting Surfaces

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Anderson, J.K.; Yoda, M.; Abdel-Khalik, S.I.; Sadowski, D.L. [Georgia Institute of Technology (United States)

    2003-07-15

    The fusion event in inertial fusion energy reactors can damage the chamber first walls. The Prometheus design study used a high-speed tangentially injected thin film of molten lead to protect the upper endcap of the reactor chamber. To assure full chamber coverage, the film must remain attached. Film detachment due to gravitational effects is most likely to occur on downward-facing surfaces.Experiments were therefore conducted on turbulent water films with initial thicknessess and speeds up to 2 mm and 11 m/s, respectively, onto the downward-facing surface of a flat plate 0-45 deg. below the horizontal. Average film detachment and lateral extent along the plate were measured. Detachment length appears to be a linear function of Froude number. Results for film flows over wetting and nonwetting surfaces show that surface wettability has a major impact. The data are used to establish conservative 'design windows' for film detachment. Film flow around cylindrical obstacles, modeling protective dams around chamber penetrations, was also studied. The results suggest that cylindrical dams cannot be used to protect penetrations, and that new chamber penetration geometries that avoid flow separation are a major design issue for this type of thin liquid protection.

  17. Critically safe volume vacuum pickup for use in wet or dry cleanup of radioactive enclosures

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Zeren, Joseph D. (390 Forest Ave., Boulder, CO 80304)

    1993-12-28

    A physical compact vacuum pickup device of critically safe volume and geometric shape is provided for use in radioactive enclosures, such as a small glove box, to facilitate manual cleanup of either wet or dry radioactive material. The device is constructed and arranged so as to remain safe when filled to capacity with plutonium-239 oxide. Two fine mesh filter bags are supported on the exterior of a rigid fine mesh stainless steel cup. This assembly is sealed within, and spaced from, the interior walls of a stainless steel canister. An air inlet communicates with the interior of the canister. A modified conventional vacuum head is physically connected to, and associated with, the interior of the mesh cup. The volume of the canister, as defined by the space between the mesh cup and the interior walls of the canister, forms a critically safe volume and geometric shape for dry radioactive particles that are gathered within the canister. A critically safe liquid volume is maintained by operation of a suction terminating float valve, and/or by operation of redundant vacuum check/liquid drain valves and placement of the air inlet.

  18. Untappable key distribution system: a one-time-pad booster

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Geraldo A. Barbosa; Jeroen van de Graaf

    2015-07-08

    One-time-pad (OTP) encryption simply cannot be cracked, even by a quantum computer. The need of sharing in a secure way supplies of symmetric random keys turned the method almost obsolete as a standing-alone method for fast and large volume telecommunication. Basically, this secure sharing of keys and their renewal, once exhausted, had to be done through couriers, in a slow and costly process. This paper presents a solution for this problem providing a fast and unlimited renewal of secure keys: An untappable key distribution system is presented and detailed. This fast key distribution system utilizes two layers of confidentially protection: 1) Physical noise intrinsic to the optical channel that turn the coded signals into stealth signals and 2) Privacy amplification using a bit pool of refreshed entropy run after run, to eliminate any residual information. The resulting level of security is rigorously calculated and demonstrates that the level of information an eavesdropper could obtain is completely negligible. The random bit sequences, fast and securely distributed, can be used to encrypt text, data or voice.

  19. Comparison of "warm and wet" and "cold and icy" scenarios for early Mars in a 3D climate model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wordsworth, Robin D; Pierrehumbert, Raymond T; Forget, Francois; Head, James W

    2015-01-01

    We use a 3D general circulation model to compare the primitive Martian hydrological cycle in "warm and wet" and "cold and icy" scenarios. In the warm and wet scenario, an anomalously high solar flux or intense greenhouse warming artificially added to the climate model are required to maintain warm conditions and an ice-free northern ocean. Precipitation shows strong surface variations, with high rates around Hellas basin and west of Tharsis but low rates around Margaritifer Sinus (where the observed valley network drainage density is nonetheless high). In the cold and icy scenario, snow migration is a function of both obliquity and surface pressure, and limited episodic melting is possible through combinations of seasonal, volcanic and impact forcing. At surface pressures above those required to avoid atmospheric collapse (~0.5 bar) and moderate to high obliquity, snow is transported to the equatorial highland regions where the concentration of valley networks is highest. Snow accumulation in the Aeolis quadr...

  20. Continuous Variable Quantum Key Distribution with a Noisy Laser

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Christian S. Jacobsen; Tobias Gehring; Ulrik L. Andersen

    2015-07-06

    Existing experimental implementations of continuous-variable quantum key distribution require shot-noise limited operation, achieved with shot-noise limited lasers. However, loosening this requirement on the laser source would allow for cheaper, potentially integrated systems. Here, we implement a theoretically proposed prepare-and-measure continuous-variable protocol and experimentally demonstrate the robustness of it against preparation noise stemming for instance from technical laser noise. Provided that direct reconciliation techniques are used in the post-processing we show that for small distances large amounts of preparation noise can be tolerated in contrast to reverse reconciliation where the key rate quickly drops to zero. Our experiment thereby demonstrates that quantum key distribution with non-shot-noise limited laser diodes might be feasible.

  1. Efficiency in Quantum Key Distribution Protocols with Entangled Gaussian States

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    C. Rodó; O. Romero-Isart; K. Eckert; A. Sanpera

    2007-03-21

    Quantum key distribution (QKD) refers to specific quantum strategies which permit the secure distribution of a secret key between two parties that wish to communicate secretly. Quantum cryptography has proven unconditionally secure in ideal scenarios and has been successfully implemented using quantum states with finite (discrete) as well as infinite (continuous) degrees of freedom. Here, we analyze the efficiency of QKD protocols that use as a resource entangled gaussian states and gaussian operations only. In this framework, it has already been shown that QKD is possible (M. Navascu\\'es et al. Phys. Rev. Lett. 94, 010502 (2005)) but the issue of its efficiency has not been considered. We propose a figure of merit (the efficiency $E$) to quantify the number of classical correlated bits that can be used to distill a key from a sample of $N$ entangled states. We relate the efficiency of the protocol to the entanglement and purity of the states shared between the parties.

  2. Secret Key Generation via a Modified Quantum Secret Sharing Protocol

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Smith IV, Amos M; Evans, Philip G; Lawrie, Benjamin J; Legre, Matthieu; Lougovski, Pavel; Ray, William R; Williams, Brian P; Qi, Bing; Grice, Warren P

    2015-01-01

    We present and experimentally show a novel protocol for distributing secret information between two and only two parties in a N-party single-qubit Quantum Secret Sharing (QSS) system. We demonstrate this new algorithm with N = 3 active parties over 6km of telecom. ber. Our experimental device is based on the Clavis2 Quantum Key Distribution (QKD) system built by ID Quantique but is generalizable to any implementation. We show that any two out of the N parties can build secret keys based on partial information from each other and with collaboration from the remaining N > 2 parties. This algorithm allows for the creation of two-party secret keys were standard QSS does not and signicantly reduces the number of resources needed to implement QKD on a highly connected network such as the electrical grid.

  3. Phenomenological Model of Wetting Charged Dielectric Surfaces and its Testing with Plasma-Treated Polymer Films and Inflatable Balloons

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Edward Bormashenko; Victor Multanen; Gilad Chaniel; Roman Grynyov; Evgeny Shulzinger; Roman Pogreb; Gene Whyman

    2015-10-25

    Plasma treatment of polymer films results in their electrical charging, which in turn gives rise to an increase in their surface energy. The process results in pronounced hydrophilization of the polymer surfaces. A phenomenological theory relating the change in the apparent contact angle of charged solids to the surface density of the electrical charge is introduced. Partial wetting, inherent for polymer films, becomes possible until the threshold surface density of the electrical charge is gained. The predictions of the theory are illustrated by plasma-treated polymer films and inflatable latex balloons. Deflating the plasma treated latex balloons resulted in an essential increase in the surface charge density of the latex. This increase switched the wetting regime from partial to complete wetting. The kinetics of hydrophobic recovery follows the kinetics of the electrical charge leakage from the surfaces of the plasma treated polymers. The characteristic time of the surface charge leakage coincides with the time scale of the decay of the electret response of plasma treated polymer films.

  4. A Key to Common Caterpillar Pests of Vegetables 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sparks Jr., Alton N.; Liu, Tong-Xian

    2001-08-10

    of the head capsule. The proximity of the juncture of the adfrontal and epicranial sutures to the vertical triangle is used in separating armyworms and cutworms. Using the key The key will help you identify the most destructive and most com- mon caterpillar...; sp=spiracle Figure 3. Common arrangement of crochets on prolegs. A?complete circle B?semicircle C?two rows D?single row Figure 4. Head capsule of a caterpillar. vt=vertical triangle; epi=epicranial suture; adf=adfrontal suture 3 1 Body has numerous...

  5. Robust Shot Noise Measurement for Continuous Variable Quantum Key Distribution

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sébastien Kunz-Jacques; Paul Jouguet

    2015-01-17

    We study a practical method to measure the shot noise in real time in Continuous Variable Quantum Key Distribution (CVQKD) systems. The amount of secret key that can be extracted from the raw statistics depends strongly on this quantity since it affects in particular the computation of the excess noise (i.e. noise in excess of the shot noise) added by an eavesdropper on the quantum channel. Some powerful quantum hacking attacks relying on faking the estimated value of the shot noise to hide an intercept and resend strategy were proposed. Here, we provide experimental evidence that our method can defeat the saturation attack and the wavelength attack.

  6. Feasibility of underwater free space quantum key distribution

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Peng Shi; Shi-Cheng Zhao; Wen-Dong Li; Yong-Jian Gu

    2014-04-04

    We investigate the optical absorption and scattering properties of underwater media pertinent to our underwater free space quantum key distribution (QKD) channel model. With the vector radiative transfer theory and Monte Carlo method, we obtain the attenuation of photons, the fidelity of the scattered photons, the quantum bit error rate and the sifted key generation rate of underwater quantum communication. It can be observed from our simulations that the most secure single photon underwater free space QKD is feasible in the clearest ocean water.

  7. Key Dates | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power Administration would likeUniverseIMPACTThousand Cubic Feet) SoldDepartment ofKenThousandtheKevlarKeyKey

  8. Mercury Control for Plants Firing Texas Lignite and Equipped with ESP-wet FGD

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Katherine Dombrowski

    2009-12-31

    This report presents the results of a multi-year test program conducted as part of Cooperative Agreement DE-FC26-06NT42779, 'Mercury Control for Plants Firing Texas Lignite and Equipped with ESP-wet FGD.' The objective of this program was to determine the level of mercury removal achievable using sorbent injection for a plant firing Texas lignite fuel and equipped with an ESP and wet FGD. The project was primarily funded by the U.S. DOE National Energy Technology Laboratory. EPRI, NRG Texas, Luminant (formerly TXU), and AEP were project co-funders. URS Group was the prime contractor, and Apogee Scientific and ADA-ES were subcontractors. The host site for this program was NRG Texas Limestone Electric Generating Station (LMS) Units 1 and 2, located in Jewett, Texas. The plant fires a blend of Texas lignite and Powder River Basin (PRB) coal. Full-scale tests were conducted to evaluate the mercury removal performance of powdered sorbents injected into the flue gas upstream of the ESP (traditional configuration), upstream of the air preheater, and/or between electric fields within the ESP (Toxecon{trademark} II configuration). Phases I through III of the test program, conducted on Unit 1 in 2006-2007, consisted of three short-term parametric test phases followed by a 60-day continuous operation test. Selected mercury sorbents were injected to treat one quarter of the flue gas (e.g., approximately 225 MW equivalence) produced by Limestone Unit 1. Six sorbents and three injection configurations were evaluated and results were used to select the best combination of sorbent (Norit Americas DARCO Hg-LH at 2 lb/Macf) and injection location (upstream of the ESP) for a two-month performance evaluation. A mercury removal rate of 50-70% was targeted for the long-term test. During this continuous-injection test, mercury removal performance and variability were evaluated as the plant operated under normal conditions. Additional evaluations were made to determine any balance-of-plant impacts of the mercury control process, including those associated with ESP performance and fly ash reuse properties. Upon analysis of the project results, the project team identified several areas of interest for further study. Follow-on testing was conducted on Unit 2 in 2009 with the entire unit treated with injected sorbent so that mercury removal across the FGD could be measured and so that other low-ash impact technologies could be evaluated. Three approaches to minimizing ash impacts were tested: (1) injection of 'low ash impact' sorbents, (2) alterations to the injection configuration, and (3) injection of calcium bromide in conjunction with sorbent. These conditions were tested with the goal of identifying the conditions that result in the highest mercury removal while maintaining the sorbent injection at a rate that preserves the beneficial use of ash.

  9. Submicron particle mass concentrations and sources in the Amazonian wet season (AMAZE-08)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chen, Q.; Farmer, D. K.; Rizzo, L. V.; Pauliqueivis, T.; Kuwata, Mikinori; Karl, Thomas G.; Guenther, Alex B.; Allan, James D.; Coe, H.; Andreae, M. O.; Poeschl, U.; Jiminez, J. L.; Artaxo, Paulo; Martin, Scot T.

    2015-01-01

    Real-time mass spectra of non-refractory component of submicron aerosol particles were recorded in a tropical rainforest in the central Amazon basin during the wet season of 2008, as a part of the Amazonian Aerosol Characterization Experiment (AMAZE-08). Organic components accounted on average for more than 80% of the non-refractory submicron particle mass concentrations during the period of measurements. Ammonium was present in sufficient quantities to halfway neutralize sulfate. In this acidic, isoprene-dominated, low-NOx environment the high-resolution mass spectra as well as mass closures with ion chromatography measurements did not provide evidence for significant contributions of organosulfate species, at least at concentrations above uncertainty levels. Positive-matrix factorization of the time series of particle mass spectra identified four statistical factors to account for the variance of the signal intensities of the organic constituents: a factor HOA having a hydrocarbon-like signature and identified as regional emissions of primary organic material, a factor OOA-1 associated with fresh production of secondary organic material by a mechanism of BVOC oxidation followed by gas-to-particle conversion, a factor OOA-2 consistent with reactive uptake of isoprene oxidation products, especially epoxydiols by acidic particles, and a factor OOA-3 associated with long range transport and atmospheric aging. The OOA-1, -2, and -3 factors had progressively more oxidized signatures. Diameter-resolved mass spectral markers also suggested enhanced reactive uptake of isoprene oxidation products to the accumulation mode for the OOA-2 factor, and such size partitioning can be indicative of in-cloud process. The campaign-average factor loadings were in a ratio of 1.1:1.0 for the OOA-1 compared to the OOA-2 pathway, suggesting the comparable importance of gas-phase compared to particle-phase (including cloud waters) production pathways of secondary organic material during the study period.

  10. Sampling for Beryllium Surface Contamination using Wet, Dry and Alcohol Wipe Sampling

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kerr, Kent

    2004-12-17

    This research project was conducted at the National Nuclear Security Administration's Kansas City Plant, operated by Honeywell Federal Manufacturing and Technologies, in conjunction with the Safety Sciences Department of Central Missouri State University, to compare relative removal efficiencies of three wipe sampling techniques currently used at Department of Energy facilities. Efficiencies of removal of beryllium contamination from typical painted surfaces were tested by wipe sampling with dry Whatman 42 filter paper, with water-moistened (Ghost Wipe) materials, and by methanol-moistened wipes. Test plates were prepared using 100 mm X 15 mm Pyrex Petri dishes with interior surfaces spray painted with a bond coat primer. To achieve uniform deposition over the test plate surface, 10 ml aliquots of solution containing 1 beryllium and 0.1 ml of metal working fluid were transferred to the test plates and subsequently evaporated. Metal working fluid was added to simulate the slight oiliness common on surfaces in metal working shops where fugitive oil mist accumulates over time. Sixteen test plates for each wipe method (dry, water, and methanol) were processed and sampled using a modification of wiping patterns recommended by OSHA Method 125G. Laboratory and statistical analysis showed that methanol-moistened wipe sampling removed significantly more (about twice as much) beryllium/oil-film surface contamination as water-moistened wipes (p< 0.001), which removed significantly more (about twice as much) residue as dry wipes (p <0.001). Evidence for beryllium sensitization via skin exposure argues in favor of wipe sampling with wetting agents that provide enhanced residue removal efficiency.

  11. Low-temperature catalytic gasification of wet industrial wastes. FY 1991--1992 interim report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Elliott, D.C.; Neuenschwander, G.G.; Hart, T.R.; Phelps, M.R.; Sealock, L.J. Jr.

    1993-07-01

    A catalytic gasification system operating in a pressurized water environment has been developed and refined at Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) for over 12 years. Initial experiments were aimed at developing kinetics information for steam gasification of biomass in the presence of catalysts. The combined use of alkali and metal catalysts was reported for gasification of biomass and its components at low temperatures (350{degrees}C to 450{degrees}C). From the fundamental research evolved the concept of a pressurized, catalytic gasification system for converting wet biomass feedstocks to fuel gas. Extensive batch reactor testing and limited continuous reactor system (CRS) testing were undertaken in the development of this system under sponsorship of the US Department of Energy. A wide range of biomass feedstocks were tested, and the importance of the nickel metal catalyst was identified. Specific use of this process for treating food processing wastes was also studied. The concept application was further expanded to encompass cleanup of hazardous wastewater streams, and results were reported for batch reactor tests and continuous reactor tests. Ongoing work at PNL focuses on refining the catalyst and scaling the system to long-term industrial needs. The process is licensed as the Thermochemical Environmental Energy System (TEES{reg_sign}) to Onsite*Ofsite, Inc., of Duarte, California. This report is a follow-on to the 1989--90 interim report [Elliott et al. 1991], which reviewed the results of the studies conducted with a fixed-bed, continuous-feed, tubular reactor. The discussion here provides an overview of experiments on the wide range of potential feedstock materials conducted in a batch reactor; development of new catalyst materials; and tests performed in continuous-flow reactors at three scales. The appendices contain the history and background of the process development, as well as more detailed descriptions and results of the recent studies.

  12. Pilot Testing of Mercury Oxidation Catalysts for Upstream of Wet FGD Systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Richard Rhudy

    2006-06-30

    This final report presents and discusses results from a mercury control process development project entitled ''Pilot Testing of Mercury Oxidation Catalysts for Upstream of Wet FGD Systems''. The objective of this project was to demonstrate at pilot scale a mercury control technology that uses solid honeycomb catalysts to promote the oxidation of elemental mercury in the flue gas from coal combustion. Oxidized mercury is removed in downstream wet flue gas desulfurization (FGD) absorbers and leaves with the FGD byproducts. The goal of the project was to achieve 90% oxidation of elemental mercury in the flue gas and 90% overall mercury capture with the downstream wet FGD system. The project was co-funded by EPRI and the U.S. Department of Energy's National Energy Technology Laboratory (DOE NETL) under Cooperative Agreement DE-FC26-01NT41185. Great River Energy (GRE) and City Public Service (now CPS Energy) of San Antonio were also project co-funders and provided host sites. URS Group, Inc. was the prime contractor. Longer-term pilot-scale tests were conducted at two sites to provide catalyst life data. GRE provided the first site, at their Coal Creek Station (CCS), which fires North Dakota lignite, and CPS Energy provided the second site, at their Spruce Plant, which fires Powder River Basin (PRB) coal. Mercury oxidation catalyst testing began at CCS in October 2002 and continued through the end of June 2004, representing nearly 21 months of catalyst operation. An important finding was that, even though the mercury oxidation catalyst pilot unit was installed downstream of a high-efficiency ESP, fly ash buildup began to plug flue gas flow through the horizontal catalyst cells. Sonic horns were installed in each catalyst compartment and appeared to limit fly ash buildup. A palladium-based catalyst showed initial elemental mercury oxidation percentages of 95% across the catalyst, declining to 67% after 21 months in service. A carbon-based catalyst began with almost 98% elemental mercury oxidation across the catalyst, but declined to 79% oxidation after nearly 13 months in service. The other two catalysts, an SCR-type catalyst (titanium/vanadium) and an experimental fly-ash-based catalyst, were significantly less active. The palladium-based and SCR-type catalysts were effectively regenerated at the end of the long-term test by flowing heated air through the catalyst overnight. The carbon-based catalyst was not observed to regenerate, and no regeneration tests were conducted on the fourth, fly-ash-based catalyst. Preliminary process economics were developed for the palladium and carbon-based catalysts for a scrubbed, North Dakota lignite application. As described above, the pilot-scale results showed the catalysts could not sustain 90% or greater oxidation of elemental mercury in the flue gas for a period of two years. Consequently, the economics were based on performance criteria in a later DOE NETL solicitation, which required candidate mercury control technologies to achieve at least a 55% increase in mercury capture for plants that fire lignite. These economics show that if the catalysts must be replaced every two years, the catalytic oxidation process can be 30 to 40% less costly than conventional (not chemically treated) activated carbon injection if the plant currently sells their fly ash and would lose those sales with carbon injection. If the plant does not sell their fly ash, activated carbon injection was estimated to be slightly less costly. There was little difference in the estimated cost for palladium versus the carbon-based catalysts. If the palladium-based catalyst can be regenerated to double its life to four years, catalytic oxidation process economics are greatly improved. With regeneration, the catalytic oxidation process shows over a 50% reduction in mercury control cost compared to conventional activated carbon injection for a case where the plant sells its fly ash. At Spruce Plant, mercury oxidation catalyst testing began in September 2003 and continued through the end of April 2005, interrupted only by a

  13. Influence of electromechanical effects and wetting layers on band structures of AlN/GaN quantum dots and spin control

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Melnik, Roderick

    Influence of electromechanical effects and wetting layers on band structures of AlN/GaN quantum In a series of recent papers we demonstrated that coupled electromechanical effects can lead to pronounced

  14. Development of statistical wet weather model to evaluate frictional properties at the pavement-tire interface on hot mix asphalt concrete 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bedi, Harpreet

    2001-01-01

    Skid resistance on wet pavements is influenced by friction at the tire-pavement interface as well as overall hot mix asphalt (HMA) performance. It is important to control aggregate, asphalt, and mix properties to achieve desirable frictional...

  15. Dictionaries Using Variable-Length Keys and Data, with Applications *

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Blelloch, Guy E.

    (Isil- logn, 1) + Itil) and Isil is the length of bit string si. We assume a word length w > log m. We present string Isil > 1, Itil > 1 for all bit-strings si and ti. Fox' fixed-length keys the dictionary problem

  16. Key Factors for Digital Collections August 7, 2007

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    by Fondren's Digital Library Initiative We evaluate digital projects on a case by case basis. There is no oneKey Factors for Digital Collections August 7, 2007 Rice University Digital Repository Supported formula for this process and in fact welcome open discussion on potential digital projects

  17. Automation-considered Logic of Authentication and Key Distribution

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kwon, Taekyoung

    methods are focused on the automation-based model checking that relies on building a finite modelAutomation-considered Logic of Authentication and Key Distribution Taekyoung Kwon1 and Seongan Lim2 Abstract. This paper presents an automation-considered logic of au- thentication for reasoning about

  18. Offshore Wind Power Experiences, Potential and Key Issues for

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    offshore wind farms are installed in British, Swedish and Danish waters, and present-day costs in 2015, 2030 and 2050 14 3.1 Offshore wind farms under construction and in planning stage 14 3Offshore Wind Power Experiences, Potential and Key Issues for Deployment Jørgen Lemming, Poul Erik

  19. Architecture of the Secoqc Quantum Key Distribution network

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mehrdad Dianati; Romain Alleaume

    2006-10-25

    The European projet Secoqc (Secure Communication based on Quantum Cryptography) aims at developing a global network for unconditionally secure key distribution. This paper specifies the requirements and presents the principles guiding the design of this network, and relevant to its architecture and protocols.

  20. The Key Coal Producers ONLINE SUPPORTING MATERIALS to

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Patzek, Tadeusz W.

    The Key Coal Producers ONLINE SUPPORTING MATERIALS to A Global Coal Production Forecast with Multi's most important coal-producing area is North-Central China. The provinces of Inner Mongolia, Ningxia, Shaanxi and Shanxi together accounted for 83 percent of China's proven coal reserves in 2000, and Shanxi

  1. Preparing Turkey Safely Turkey provides protein along with other key

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Preparing Turkey Safely Nutrition Turkey provides protein along with other key nutrients. A serving is 3 ounces cooked poultry (about the size of a deck of cards). One serving of roasted, skinless turkey protein; iron--8% daily value Right Size Turkey Use this chart as a helpful guide: Whole bird ­ 1 pound

  2. PEM FUEL CELL TECHNOLOGY Key Research Needs and Approaches

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Developer University #12;8 FUEL CELL RESEARCH NEEDS MEA optimization should focus on new materials Pt (full1 PEM FUEL CELL TECHNOLOGY Key Research Needs and Approaches Tom Jarvi UTC Power South Windsor, CT 06074 23 January 2008 #12;2 UTC POWER MARKET FOCUS Transportation Fuel Cells On-Site Power Solutions #12

  3. GIS and Spectral Soil Laboratory Key faculty member: Sabine Grunwald

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ma, Lena

    GIS and Spectral Soil Laboratory Key faculty member: Sabine Grunwald Contact: Soil and Water information systems (GIS), geostatistical and statistical methods, space-time landscape modeling, remote laboratory. Available software include: MS Office Suite; MS SQL database; ArcGIS Suite (ESRI) including

  4. November 2012 Key Performance Indicator (KPI): Carbon Management

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Evans, Paul

    November 2012 Key Performance Indicator (KPI): Carbon Management NTU report our carbon footprint provided. The carbon emissions are calculated using Carbon Trust conversion factors, as used in NTU's EMS.64 2011/2012 18,130 4.20 The recorded changes in emissions are a result of carbon management projects

  5. Experimental quantum key distribution with proven security against realistic attacks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Salvail, Louis

    , center of the Danish National Research Foundation, Dept. of Computer Science,University of Aarhus,8000, Denmark Abstract We report on a realization of a fully automated 20 km quantum key distribution system­ cated security analysis against realistic attacks is used to optimize the system parameters in order

  6. Experimental quantum key distribution without monitoring signal disturbance

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hiroki Takesue; Toshihiko Sasaki; Kiyoshi Tamaki; Masato Koashi

    2015-05-29

    Since the invention of Bennett-Brassard 1984 (BB84) protocol, many quantum key distribution (QKD) protocols have been proposed and some protocols are operated even in field environments. One of the striking features of QKD is that QKD protocols are provably secure unlike cryptography based on computational complexity assumptions. It has been believed that, to guarantee the security of QKD, Alice and Bob have to monitor the statistics of the measurement outcomes which are used to determine the amount of the privacy amplification to generate a key. Recently a new type of QKD protocol, called round robin differential phase shift (RRDPS) protocol, was proposed, and remarkably this protocol can generate a key without monitoring any statistics of the measurement outcomes. Here we report an experimental realization of the RRDPS protocol. We used a setup in which Bob randomly chooses one from four interferometers with different pulse delays so that he could implement phase difference measurements for all possible combinations with five-pulse time-bin states. Using the setup, we successfully distributed keys over 30 km of fiber, making this the first QKD experiment that does not rely on signal disturbance monitoring.

  7. The Seven Keys to Success in Energy Management and Conservation 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Darby, D. F.

    1984-01-01

    This paper is a summary of the seven key elements of the Deere & Company Energy Management and Conservation Program. These elements have been found to be essential for the ultimate success of any company-wide energy management program. The process...

  8. FAST GENERATORS FOR THE DIFFIEHELLMAN KEY AGREEMENT PROTOCOL

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    International Association for Cryptologic Research (IACR)

    FAST GENERATORS FOR THE DIFFIE­HELLMAN KEY AGREEMENT PROTOCOL AND MALICIOUS STANDARDS BOAZ TSABAN­order cyclic group. Some generators allow faster exponentiation. We show that to a large extent, using the fast that if there is some case in which fast generators are less secure, then this could be used by a malicious authority

  9. FAST GENERATORS FOR THE DIFFIE-HELLMAN KEY AGREEMENT PROTOCOL

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    International Association for Cryptologic Research (IACR)

    FAST GENERATORS FOR THE DIFFIE-HELLMAN KEY AGREEMENT PROTOCOL AND MALICIOUS STANDARDS BOAZ TSABAN, using the fast generators is as secure as using a randomly chosen generator. On the other hand, we show that if there is some case in which fast generators are less secure, then this could be used by a malicious authority

  10. Appendix 30 Fire Effects on Key Ecological Processes in Forested

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Appendix 30 Fire Effects on Key Ecological Processes in Forested Ecosystems The following paragraphs on fire effects on forest succession are from Stickney (1982) Forest Succession ...the severity of the pre-disturbance forest herb species also demonstrated the ability to survive fire, particularly those

  11. Outline Overview Design Principles Key Points Design Principles

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Almulhem, Ahmad

    Engineering Department, KFUPM Spring 2008 Ahmad Almulhem - Network Security Engineering - 2008 1 / 12 #12-Safe Defaults Economy of Mechanism Complete Mediation Open Design Separation of Privilege Least Common Mechanism Psychological Acceptability 3 Key Points Ahmad Almulhem - Network Security Engineering - 2008 2 / 12 #12;Outline

  12. Annual Report 2004 1 Key events during 2004

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Svenningsson, Josef

    Johansson studying the separation of carbon dioxide in a reactor system for two-stage combustion. #12;1 Key for innovation systems and entrepreneurship A year of anniversaries ­ the University, the Foundation, Chalmers are among those hardest struck,but many holidaying Swedes,especially in Thailand,fall victim to the tsunami

  13. MOLECULAR ENTOMOLOGY Molecular Identification Key for Pest Species of Scirtothrips

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hoddle, Mark S.

    primers and determining the size of the products by using standard agarose gel electrophoresis, followed, Neohydatothrips, molecular identiÞcation key, exotic pests, nondestruc- tive DNA extraction The genus Scirtothrips, several species of Scirtothrips have (or have the potential to) spread from their natural habitats

  14. Introduction Adhesion complexes play key roles in many events, including

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hardin, Jeff

    Introduction Adhesion complexes play key roles in many events, including cell migration cell adhesion are remarkably similar in Caenorhabditis elegans, Drosophila and humans (Hynes and Zhao to reveal much about the basic, conserved molecular mechanisms that mediate and regulate cell adhesion

  15. Keys for growth in Japan's mature mobile market

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oto, Hiroyuki

    2005-01-01

    The objective of this thesis is to identify key factors that will produce further growth for NTT DoCoMo in Japan's mature mobile market. Since the early 1990s, the mobile phone market in Japan has grown rapidly, and ...

  16. Page 1 of 4 Creating and Submitting a Key Request

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Howitt, Ivan

    of employees. Enter search criteria in the search fields available and select the down red arrow to filter the terms. #12;Page 3 of 4 13. On the Key Request Form - Room List windowpane, select Add New. 14 use the Select Drawing button after entering the building and floor to display the floor plan

  17. news and views A key issue for hydrogen storage materi-

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Palumbi, Stephen

    news and views A key issue for hydrogen storage materi- als is that the hydrogenation and dehydro be possible to discover stable hydrogen hydrates with higher storage Hydrogen Posture Plan www.eere.energy.gov/hydrogenandfuelcells/pdfs/ hydrogen_posture_plan.pdf 7. Kuhs, W

  18. Key Directions and a Roadmap for Electrical Design for Manufacturability

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kahng, Andrew B.

    Key Directions and a Roadmap for Electrical Design for Manufacturability (Invited Talk) Andrew B by design and design-for- manufacturability (DFM) techniques. This talk addresses trends and a roadmap assumptions come true? The second part will give a roadmap for electrical DFM technologies, motivated

  19. Key Title Marine Ecology www.wiley.com

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wall, Diana

    Key Title Marine Ecology www.wiley.com Antarctic Ecosystems: An Extreme Environment in a Changing their genomes. Chapters address both Antarctic terrestrial and marine ecosystems, and the scientific and evolution Part II: Marine habitats and regions Chapter 4. The impact of regional climate change

  20. Key Facts About Hurricane Readiness Preparing for a Hurricane

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    HURRICANES Key Facts About Hurricane Readiness Preparing for a Hurricane If you are under a hurricane watch or warning, here are some basic steps to take to prepare for the storm: · Learn about your. · Identify potential home hazards and know how to secure or protect them before the hurricane strikes

  1. Two-step Glass Wet-etching for Micro-fluidic Devices A. Berthold1, P.M. Sarro1, M.J. Vellekoop2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Two-step Glass Wet-etching for Micro-fluidic Devices A. Berthold1, P.M. Sarro1, M.J. Vellekoop2--In this paper a two-step glass wet-etch- ing process is presented. This process allows the fabrication of well) in the same glass wafer. The etching solutions and the masking materials used are described for the three

  2. More SQL Data Definition Database Systems Lecture 6

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alechina, Natasha

    More SQL Data Definition Database Systems Lecture 6 Natasha Alechina #12;More SQL Data Definition In this Lecture · More SQL · DROP TABLE · ALTER TABLE · INSERT, UPDATE, and DELETE · Data dictionary · Sequences · For more information · Connolly and Begg chapters 5 and 6 #12;More SQL Data Definition Creating Tables

  3. More SQL Data Definition Database Systems Lecture 6

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alechina, Natasha

    1 More SQL Data Definition Database Systems Lecture 6 Natasha Alechina More SQL Data Definition In this Lecture · More SQL · DROP TABLE · ALTER TABLE · INSERT, UPDATE, and DELETE · Data dictionary · Sequences · For more information · Connolly and Begg chapters 5 and 6 More SQL Data Definition Creating Tables · From

  4. Michael Rupen EVLA Phase II Definition Aug 23 25, 2001.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Groppi, Christopher

    Michael Rupen EVLA Phase II Definition Meeting Aug 23 ­ 25, 2001. 1 EVLA Phase II Scientific Overview Michael P. Rupen #12;Michael Rupen EVLA Phase II Definition Meeting Aug 23 ­ 25, 2001. 2 New the resolution · Always available! #12;Michael Rupen EVLA Phase II Definition Meeting Aug 23 ­ 25, 2001. 3 NMA

  5. Notes on the CRTDH Group Key Agreement Protocol Spyros Magliveras and Wandi Wei

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Magliveras, Spyros

    , the distributed schemes help in the uniform distribution of the work-load for key management and eliminate: xkzou@cs.iupui.edu Abstract Group key management (GKM) is one of the primary is- sues for secure group Key Management (GKM), Contributory Group Key Agreement, Chinese Remainder Theorem, Diffie-Hellman Key

  6. PRE-EMPLOYMENT BACKGROUND SCREENS 2. Definitions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Emmons, Scott

    Term Definition Background Check Process of acquiring records regarding a final candidate that are used. Criminal Conviction Being found guilty, entering a guilty plea, or pleading no contest or nolo contendere is considered minor while driving under the influence is major). Disclosures of criminal convictions are subject

  7. RESEARCH INVOLVING PRISONERS DEFINITIONS AND EXAMPLES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1 RESEARCH INVOLVING PRISONERS 05/30/2008 DEFINITIONS AND EXAMPLES The DUHS IRB reviews and approves research involving prisoners in compliance with 45 CFR 46 Subpart C and other applicable regulations and laws. The provisions of Subpart C apply whenever the research targets prisoners as subjects

  8. Local Constructive Set Theory and Inductive Definitions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aczel, Peter

    Local Constructive Set Theory and Inductive Definitions Peter Aczel 1 Introduction Local Constructive Set Theory (LCST) is intended to be a local version of con- structive set theory (CST principles, is also acceptable in topos mathematics, the mathematics that can be carried out in an arbi

  9. Distribution and abundance of endangered Florida Key deer on outer islands 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Watts, Dominque Elijah

    2007-04-25

    -based survey data. All outer islands exhibited estimated abundances considerably below carrying capacities, with larger populations occurring closer to Big Pine Key. Results indicated that other islands and complexes such as Ramrod Key, Water Key...

  10. Simple rate-adaptive LDPC coding for quantum key distribution

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mo Li; Chun-Mei Zhang; Zhen-Qiang Yin; Wei Chen; Chuan Wang; Zheng-Fu Han

    2015-05-24

    Although quantum key distribution (QKD) comes from the development of quantum theory, the implementation of a practical QKD system does involve a lot of classical process, such as key reconciliation and privacy amplification, which is called post-processing. Post-processing has been a crucial element to high speed QKD systems, even the bottleneck of it because of its relatively high time consumption. Low density parity check (LDPC) is now becoming a promising approach of overcoming the bottleneck due to its good performance in processing throughput. In this article we propose and simulate an easily implemented but efficiently rate-adaptive LDPC coding approach of reconciliation, different from the previously proposed puncturing- and shortening-based approach. We also give a measure for choosing the optimal LDPC parameter for our rate-adaptive approach according to error rates.

  11. Quantum Hacking on Quantum Key Distribution using Homodyne Detection

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jing-Zheng Huang; Sébastien Kunz-Jacques; Paul Jouguet; Christian Weedbrook; Zhen-Qiang Yin; Shuang Wang; Wei Chen; Guang-Can Guo; Zheng-Fu Han

    2014-02-27

    Imperfect devices in commercial quantum key distribution systems open security loopholes that an eavesdropper may exploit. An example of one such imperfection is the wavelength dependent coupling ratio of the fiber beam splitter. Utilizing this loophole, the eavesdropper can vary the transmittances of the fiber beam splitter at the receiver's side by inserting lights with wavelengths different from what is normally used. Here, we propose a wavelength attack on a practical continuous-variable quantum key distribution system using homodyne detection. By inserting light pulses at different wavelengths, this attack allows the eavesdropper to bias the shot noise estimation even if it is done in real time. Based on experimental data, we discuss the feasibility of this attack and suggest a prevention scheme by improving the previously proposed countermeasures.

  12. No-signaling Quantum Key Distribution: Solution by Linear Programming

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Won-Young Hwang; Joonwoo Bae; Nathan Killoran

    2013-01-15

    We outline a straightforward approach for obtaining a secret key rate using only no-signaling constraints and linear programming. Assuming an individual attack, we consider all possible joint probabilities. Initially, we study only the case where Eve has binary outcomes, and we impose constraints due to the no-signaling principle and given measurement outcomes. Within the remaining space of joint probabilities, by using linear programming, we get bound on the probability of Eve correctly guessing Bob's bit. We then make use of an inequality that relates this guessing probability to the mutual information between Bob and a more general Eve, who is not binary-restricted. Putting our computed bound together with the Csisz\\'ar-K\\"orner formula, we obtain a positive key generation rate. The optimal value of this rate agrees with known results, but was calculated in a more straightforward way, offering the potential of generalization to different scenarios.

  13. Secure password-based authenticated key exchange for web services

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Liang, Fang; Meder, Samuel; Chevassut, Olivier; Siebenlist, Frank

    2004-11-22

    This paper discusses an implementation of an authenticated key-exchange method rendered on message primitives defined in the WS-Trust and WS-SecureConversation specifications. This IEEE-specified cryptographic method (AuthA) is proven-secure for password-based authentication and key exchange, while the WS-Trust and WS-Secure Conversation are emerging Web Services Security specifications that extend the WS-Security specification. A prototype of the presented protocol is integrated in the WSRF-compliant Globus Toolkit V4. Further hardening of the implementation is expected to result in a version that will be shipped with future Globus Toolkit releases. This could help to address the current unavailability of decent shared-secret-based authentication options in the Web Services and Grid world. Future work will be to integrate One-Time-Password (OTP) features in the authentication protocol.

  14. Low Timing Jitter Detector for Gigahertz Quantum Key Distribution

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    R. J. Collins; R. H. Hadfield; V. Fernandez; S. W. Nam; G. S. Buller

    2007-02-23

    A superconducting single-photon detector based on a niobium nitride nanowire is demonstrated in an optical-fibre-based quantum key distribution test bed operating at a clock rate of 3.3 GHz and a transmission wavelength of 850 nm. The low jitter of the detector leads to significant reduction in the estimated quantum bit error rate and a resultant improvement in the secrecy efficiency compared to previous estimates made by use of silicon single-photon avalanche detectors.

  15. 1. Aim of the Code of Practice 2. Key points

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Roelleke, Thomas

    family leave provisions 1August 2011 #12;1 Aim of the Code of Practice The aim is to: 1 promote good1. Aim of the Code of Practice 2. Key points 3. Maternity leave and pay 4. Ante-natal leave 5. Compassionate leave for family and other reasons 1 1 3 4 5 7 8 9 10 HR Code of Practice 14. Maternity and other

  16. Key Renewable Energy Opportunities for Oklahoma Tribes | Department of

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious RankADVANCED MANUFACTURING OFFICE INDUSTRIALU.S. DepartmentJeanKey Meeting Takeaways from 2014 Meeting

  17. Key Activities in Energy Efficiency | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on DeliciousMathematicsEnergyInterested Parties - WAPA Public CommentInverted253.16582104) Kenmore: ENERGYKevinKey

  18. Key Concepts in Project Development and Financing in Alaska

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on DeliciousMathematicsEnergyInterested Parties - WAPA Public CommentInverted253.16582104) Kenmore:Key2: Project

  19. Vehicle Technologies Office: Key Activities in Vehicles | Department of

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE: Alternative FuelsofProgram: Report1538-1950 TimelineUtility-ScaleTechnology|Energy Key

  20. Field Testing of a Wet FGD Additive for Enhanced Mercury Control - Task 5 Full-Scale Test Results

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gary Blythe; MariJon Owens

    2007-12-01

    This Topical Report summarizes progress on Cooperative Agreement DE-FC26-04NT42309, 'Field Testing of a Wet FGD Additive'. The objective of the project is to demonstrate the use of two flue gas desulfurization (FGD) additives, Evonik Degussa Corporation's TMT-15 and Nalco Company's Nalco 8034, to prevent the re-emission of elemental mercury (Hg{sup 0}) in flue gas exiting wet FGD systems on coal-fired boilers. Furthermore, the project intends to demonstrate whether the additive can be used to precipitate most of the mercury (Hg) removed in the wet FGD system as a fine salt that can be separated from the FGD liquor and bulk solid byproducts for separate disposal. The project is conducting pilot- and full-scale tests of the additives in wet FGD absorbers. The tests are intended to determine required additive dosages to prevent Hg{sup 0} re-emissions and to separate mercury from the normal FGD byproducts for three coal types: Texas lignite/Powder River Basin (PRB) coal blend, high-sulfur Eastern bituminous coal, and low-sulfur Eastern bituminous coal. The project team consists of URS Group, Inc., EPRI, Luminant Power (was TXU Generation Company LP), Southern Company, IPL (an AES company), Evonik Degussa Corporation and the Nalco Company. Luminant Power has provided the Texas lignite/PRB co-fired test site for pilot FGD tests and cost sharing. Southern Company has provided the low-sulfur Eastern bituminous coal host site for wet scrubbing tests, as well as the pilot- and full-scale jet bubbling reactor (JBR) FGD systems tested. IPL provided the high-sulfur Eastern bituminous coal full-scale FGD test site and cost sharing. Evonik Degussa Corporation is providing the TMT-15 additive, and the Nalco Company is providing the Nalco 8034 additive. Both companies are also supplying technical support to the test program as in-kind cost sharing. The project is being conducted in six tasks. Of the six project tasks, Task 1 involves project planning and Task 6 involves management and reporting. The other four tasks involve field testing on FGD systems, either at pilot or full scale. The four tasks include: Task 2 - Pilot Additive Testing in Texas Lignite Flue Gas; Task 3 - Full-scale FGD Additive Testing in High-sulfur Eastern Bituminous Flue Gas; Task 4 - Pilot Wet Scrubber Additive Tests at Plant Yates; and Task 5 - Full-scale Additive Tests at Plant Yates. The pilot-scale tests and the full-scale test using high-sulfur coal were completed in 2005 and 2006 and have been previously reported. This topical report presents the results from the Task 5 full-scale additive tests, conducted at Southern Company's Plant Yates Unit 1. Both additives were tested there.

  1. A correct security evaluation of quantum key distribution

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Osamu Hirota

    2014-09-21

    There is no doubt that quantum key distribution is an excellent result as a science. However, this paper presents a view on quantum key distribution (QKD) wherein QKD may have a difficulty to provide a sufficient security and good communication performance in real world networks. In fact, a one-time pad forwarded by QKD model with $\\bar{\\epsilon}=10^{-6}$ may be easily decrypted by key estimation. Despite that researchers know several criticisms on the theoretical incompleteness on the security evaluation, Portmann and Rennner, and others still avert from the discussion on criticism, and experimental groups tend to make exaggerated claims about their own work by making it seems that QKD is applicable to commercial communication systems. All such claims are based on a misunderstanding of the meaning of criteria of information theoretic security in cryptography. A severe situation has arisen as a result, one that will impair a healthy development of quantum information science (QIS). Thus, the author hopes that this paper will help to stimulate discussions on developing a more detailed theory.

  2. Sifting attacks in finite-size quantum key distribution

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Corsin Pfister; Patrick J. Coles; Stephanie Wehner; Norbert Lütkenhaus

    2015-09-02

    A central assumption in quantum key distribution (QKD) is that Eve has no knowledge about which rounds will be used for parameter estimation or key distillation. Here we show that this assumption is violated for iterative sifting, a commonly used sifting procedure that has been em- ployed in both theoretical and experimental finite-size QKD. We show that iterative sifting leads to two problems: (1) some rounds are more likely to be key rounds than others, (2) the public communication of past measurement choices changes this bias round by round. We analyze these two previously unnoticed problems, present eavesdropping strategies that exploit them, and find that the two problems are independent. We propose corrections to the protocol and prove that the resulting protocol, which we call the fixed round number sifting protocol, is secure and can thus replace iterative sifting in future QKD protocols. It outperforms other recently suggested protocols, increasing the efficiency by a factor of almost two. More generally, we present two formal criteria for a sifting protocol which ensure that they are secure. Our criteria may guide the design of future protocols and inspire a more rigorous QKD analysis, which has neglected sifting-related attacks so far.

  3. Mass fractal characteristics of wet sonogels as determined by small-angle x-ray scattering and differential scanning calorimetry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vollet, D. R.; Donatti, D. A.; Ibanez Ruiz, A.; Gatto, F. R. [Departamento de Fisica, Unesp-Univerisdade Estadual Paulista, IGCE, P.O. Box 178 CEP 13500-970 Rio Claro, SP (Brazil)

    2006-07-01

    Low density silica sonogels were prepared from acid sonohydrolysis of tetraethoxysilane. Wet gels were studied by small-angle x-ray scattering (SAXS) and differential scanning calorimetry (DSC). The DSC tests were carried out under a heating rate of 2 deg. C/min from -120 deg. C up to 30 deg. C. Aerogels were obtained by CO{sub 2} supercritical extraction and characterized by nitrogen adsorption and SAXS. The DSC thermogram displays two distinct endothermic peaks. The first, a broad peak extending from about -80 deg. C up to practically 0 deg. C, was associated to the melting of ice nanocrystals with a crystal size distribution with 'pore' diameter ranging from 1 or 2 nm up to about 60 nm, as estimated from Thomson's equation. The second, a sharp peak with onset temperature close to 0 deg. C, was attributed to the melting of macroscopic crystals. The DSC incremental 'nanopore' volume distribution is in reasonable agreement with the incremental pore volume distribution of the aerogel as determined from nitrogen adsorption. No macroporosity was detected by nitrogen adsorption, probably because the adsorption method applies stress on the sample during measurement, leading to a underestimation of pore volume, or because often positive curvature of the solid surface is in aerogels, making the nitrogen condensation more difficult. According to the SAXS results, the solid network of the wet gels behaves as a mass fractal structure with mass fractal dimension D=2.20{+-}0.01 in a characteristic length scale below {xi}=7.9{+-}0.1 nm. The mass fractal characteristics of the wet gels have also been probed from DSC data by means of an earlier applied modeling for generation of a mass fractal from the incremental ''pore'' volume distribution curves. The results are shown to be in interesting agreement with the results from SAXS.

  4. The effect of dry and wet deposition of condensable vapors on secondary organic aerosols concentrations over the continental US

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Knote, C.; Hodzic, A.; Jimenez, J. L.

    2015-01-06

    The effect of dry and wet deposition of semi-volatile organic compounds (SVOCs) in the gas phase on the concentrations of secondary organic aerosol (SOA) is reassessed using recently derived water solubility information. The water solubility of SVOCs was implemented as a function of their volatility distribution within the WRF-Chem regional chemistry transport model, and simulations were carried out over the continental United States for the year 2010. Results show that including dry and wet removal of gas-phase SVOCs reduces annual average surface concentrations of anthropogenic and biogenic SOA by 48 and 63% respectively over the continental US. Dry deposition ofmore »gas-phase SVOCs is found to be more effective than wet deposition in reducing SOA concentrations (?40 vs. ?8% for anthropogenics, and ?52 vs. ?11% for biogenics). Reductions for biogenic SOA are found to be higher due to the higher water solubility of biogenic SVOCs. The majority of the total mass of SVOC + SOA is actually deposited via the gas phase (61% for anthropogenics and 76% for biogenics). Results are sensitive to assumptions made in the dry deposition scheme, but gas-phase deposition of SVOCs remains crucial even under conservative estimates. Considering reactivity of gas-phase SVOCs in the dry deposition scheme was found to be negligible. Further sensitivity studies where we reduce the volatility of organic matter show that consideration of gas-phase SVOC removal still reduces average SOA concentrations by 31% on average. We consider this a lower bound for the effect of gas-phase SVOC removal on SOA concentrations. A saturation effect is observed for Henry's law constants above 108 M atm?1, suggesting an upper bound of reductions in surface level SOA concentrations by 60% through removal of gas-phase SVOCs. Other models that do not consider dry and wet removal of gas-phase SVOCs would hence overestimate SOA concentrations by roughly 50%. Assumptions about the water solubility of SVOCs made in some current modeling systems (H* = H* (CH3COOH); H* = 105 M atm?1; H* = H* (HNO3)) still lead to an overestimation of 35%/25%/10% compared to our best estimate.« less

  5. Effect of degree of synthetic lightweight aggregate pre-wetting on the freeze-thaw durability of lightweight concrete 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kanabar, C. N

    1966-01-01

    - pression testing machine in accordance with ASTA C39. Three cylinders 2. 0 l n COARSE AGGREGATE S DJ C& C' U) Z'. O K 03 u O co O w oJ 1. 6 1. 2 O. B m , r . S-21-3 d S-21-1-. l. Aggregate Pre-Soaked for 21 Days. 2. Concrete Cured... In this chapter, results obtained (Table 3-1) were analyzed for the relationships between (a) the type of coarse aggregate used, (b) the degree of aggregate pre-wetting, (c) the aggregate absorption, (d) the concrete compressive strength, and (e) the freeze...

  6. The effect of dry and wet deposition of condensable vapors on secondary organic aerosols concentrations over the continental US

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Knote, C.; Hodzic, A.; Jimenez, J. L.

    2014-05-26

    The effect of dry and wet deposition of semi-volatile organic compounds (SVOC) in the gas-phase on the concentrations of secondary organic aerosol (SOA) is reassessed using recently derived water solubility information. The water solubility of SVOCs was implemented as a function of their volatility distribution within the regional chemistry transport model WRF-Chem, and simulations were carried out over the continental United States for the year 2010. Results show that including dry and wet removal of gas-phase SVOCs reduces annual average surface concentrations of anthropogenic and biogenic SOA by 48% and 63% respectively over the continental US Dry deposition of gas-phasemore »SVOCs is found to be more effective than wet deposition in reducing SOA concentrations (?40% vs. ?8% for anthropogenics, ?52% vs. ?11% for biogenics). Reductions for biogenic SOA are found to be higher due to the higher water solubility of biogenic SVOCs. The majority of the total mass of SVOC + SOA is actually deposited via the gas-phase (61% for anthropogenics, 76% for biogenics). A number of sensitivity studies shows that this is a robust feature of the modeling system. Other models that do not consider dry and wet removal of gas-phase SVOCs would hence overestimate SOA concentrations by roughly 50%. Assumptions about the water solubility of SVOCs made in some current modeling systems (H* = 105 M atm?1; H* = H* (HNO3)) still lead to an overestimation of 25% / 10% compared to our best estimate. A saturation effect is observed for Henry's law constants above 108 M atm?1, suggesting an upper bound of reductions in surface level SOA concentrations by 60% through removal of gas-phase SVOCs. Considering reactivity of gas-phase SVOCs in the dry deposition scheme was found to be negligible. Further sensitivity studies where we reduce the volatility of organic matter show that consideration of gas-phase SVOC removal still reduces average SOA concentrations by 31% on average. We consider this a lower bound for the effect of gas-phase SVOC removal on SOA concentrations.« less

  7. ,"Lower 48 States Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet)"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home PageMonthly","10/2015"4,"Ames City of",6,1,"Omaha Public PowerOECD/IEA - 2008 © OECD/IEA - 2008LNGUndergroundDry NaturalGas, Wet After Lease Separation Proved

  8. ,"Lower 48 States Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet)"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home PageMonthly","10/2015"4,"Ames City of",6,1,"Omaha Public PowerOECD/IEA - 2008 © OECD/IEA - 2008LNGUndergroundDry NaturalGas, Wet After Lease Separation

  9. ,"Miscellaneous States Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet)"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home PageMonthly","10/2015"4,"Ames City of",6,1,"Omaha Public PowerOECD/IEA - 2008 © OECD/IEA -Liquids Lease Condensate, ProvedShaleUnderground NaturalGas, Wet After

  10. ,"Miscellaneous States Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet)"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home PageMonthly","10/2015"4,"Ames City of",6,1,"Omaha Public PowerOECD/IEA - 2008 © OECD/IEA -Liquids Lease Condensate, ProvedShaleUnderground NaturalGas, Wet

  11. ,"Montana Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet)"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home PageMonthly","10/2015"4,"Ames City of",6,1,"Omaha Public PowerOECD/IEA - 2008 © OECD/IEA -Liquids LeaseAnnual",2014WellheadAnnual",2014Gas, Wet

  12. ,"New Mexico Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet)"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home PageMonthly","10/2015"4,"Ames City of",6,1,"Omaha Public PowerOECD/IEA - 2008 ©Annual",2014 ,"Release Date:","12/31/2015"Gas, Wet After

  13. ,"New Mexico Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet)"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home PageMonthly","10/2015"4,"Ames City of",6,1,"Omaha Public PowerOECD/IEA - 2008 ©Annual",2014 ,"Release Date:","12/31/2015"Gas, Wet

  14. ,"Texas - RRC District 7B Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet)"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home PageMonthly","10/2015"4,"Ames City of",6,1,"Omaha Public PowerOECD/IEA - 2008Wellhead PriceConsumption by9"Coalbed MethaneDry NaturalNatural Gas, Wet After

  15. ,"Texas Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet)"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home PageMonthly","10/2015"4,"Ames City of",6,1,"Omaha Public PowerOECD/IEA - 2008Wellhead PriceConsumption by9"CoalbedGas, Wet After Lease Separation

  16. ,"Texas State Offshore Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet)"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home PageMonthly","10/2015"4,"Ames City of",6,1,"Omaha Public PowerOECD/IEA - 2008Wellhead PriceConsumption by9"CoalbedGas, Wet After LeaseCrude Oil +

  17. ,"Texas State Offshore Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet)"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home PageMonthly","10/2015"4,"Ames City of",6,1,"Omaha Public PowerOECD/IEA - 2008Wellhead PriceConsumption by9"CoalbedGas, Wet After LeaseCrude Oil

  18. ,"U.S. Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas Proved Reserves, Wet After Lease Separation"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home PageMonthly","10/2015"4,"Ames City of",6,1,"Omaha Public PowerOECD/IEA - 2008Wellhead PriceConsumption by9"CoalbedGas, WetPlantPlantMarketedNatural GasGas

  19. ,"U.S. Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet)"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home PageMonthly","10/2015"4,"Ames City of",6,1,"Omaha Public PowerOECD/IEA - 2008Wellhead PriceConsumption by9"CoalbedGas, WetPlantPlantMarketedNatural

  20. ,"U.S. Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet)"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home PageMonthly","10/2015"4,"Ames City of",6,1,"Omaha Public PowerOECD/IEA -Annual",2014Proved Reserves, Wet After LeaseAnnual",2014Value and MarketedGas,