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1

Wet Corn Milling Plant EPI | ENERGY STAR  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Wet Corn Milling Plant EPI Secondary menu About us Press room Contact Us Portfolio Manager Login Facility owners and managers Existing buildings Commercial new construction...

2

Wet Corn Milling Energy Guide  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

307 307 ERNEST ORLANDO LAWRENCE BERKELEY NATIONAL LABORATORY Energy Efficiency Improvement and Cost Saving Opportunities for the Corn Wet Milling Industry An ENERGY STAR Guide for Energy and Plant Managers Christina Galitsky, Ernst Worrell and Michael Ruth Environmental Energy Technologies Division Sponsored by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency July 2003 Disclaimer This document was prepared as an account of work sponsored by the United States Government. While this document is believed to contain correct information, neither the United States Government nor any agency thereof, nor The Regents of the University of California, nor any of their employees, makes any warranty, express or implied, or assumes any legal responsibility for the accuracy, completeness, or usefulness of any information, apparatus, product,

3

Energy efficiency improvement and cost saving opportunities for the Corn Wet Milling Industry: An ENERGY STAR Guide for Energy and Plant Managers  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the Net Energy Balance of Corn Ethanol. An Economic Researchoutputs of corn wet milling are corn sweeteners and ethanol.Both corn sweeteners and ethanol are made from the starch in

Galitsky, Christina; Worrell, Ernst; Ruth, Michael

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

4

Energy Efficiency Improvements and Cost Saving Opportunities in the Corn Wet Milling Industry  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Corn wet milling is the most energy intensive industry in the food and kindred products group (SIC 20). Plants typically spend approximately $15 to 25 million per year on energy, one of its largest operating costs, making energy efficiency improvement an important way to reduce costs and increase predictable earnings, especially in times of high energy-price volatility. After describing the industry's trends, structure and production and the process's energy use, we examine energy-efficiency opportunities for corn wet millers. Where available, we provide energy savings and typical payback periods for each measure based on case studies of plants that have implemented it. Given available resources and technology, there are opportunities to reduce energy consumption cost-effectively in the industry while maintaining the quality of the products produced. Further research on the economics of the measures and their applicability to different wet milling practices is needed to assess implementation of selected technologies at individual plants.

Galitsky, C.; Worrell, E.

2003-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

5

311221," Wet Corn Milling",0,0,"X",0  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

3 Relative Standard Errors for Table 11.3;" 3 Relative Standard Errors for Table 11.3;" " Unit: Percents." " "," ",,,"Renewable Energy" " "," ",,,"(excluding Wood" "NAICS"," ","Total Onsite",,"and" "Code(a)","Subsector and Industry","Generation","Cogeneration(b)","Other Biomass)(c)","Other(d)" ,,"Total United States" 311,"Food",2.8,1.1,86.8,37.8 3112," Grain and Oilseed Milling",0.7,0.7,"X",0 311221," Wet Corn Milling",0,0,"X",0 31131," Sugar Manufacturing",0,0,"X",0 3114," Fruit and Vegetable Preserving and Specialty Foods ",1.2,1.2,"X",44.1

6

Energy efficiency improvement and cost saving opportunities for the Corn Wet Milling Industry: An ENERGY STAR Guide for Energy and Plant Managers  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Alkali and Conventional Corn Wet-Milling: 100-g Procedures.for Starch Recovery from Corn. Illinois Marketing Board,the Net Energy Balance of Corn Ethanol. An Economic Research

Galitsky, Christina; Worrell, Ernst; Ruth, Michael

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

7

Cargill Corn Milling North America  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Manufacturing. Cargill Corn Milling North America. Cargill employees (Photo courtesy of Cargill Corn Milling North America). ...

2010-11-23T23:59:59.000Z

8

Energy efficiency improvement and cost saving opportunities for the Corn Wet Milling Industry: An ENERGY STAR Guide for Energy and Plant Managers  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Corn wet milling is the most energy intensive industry within the food and kindred products group (SIC 20), using 15 percent of the energy in the entire food industry. After corn, energy is the second largest operating cost for corn wet millers in the United States. A typical corn wet milling plant in the United States spends approximately $20 to $30 million per year on energy, making energy efficiency improvement an important way to reduce costs and increase predictable earnings, especially in times of high energy-price volatility. This report shows energy efficiency opportunities available for wet corn millers. It begins with descriptions of the trends, structure and production of the corn wet milling industry and the energy used in the milling and refining process. Specific primary energy savings for each energy efficiency measure based on case studies of plants and references to technical literature are provided. If available, typical payback periods are also listed. The report draws upon the experiences of corn, wheat and other starch processing plants worldwide for energy efficiency measures. The findings suggest that given available resources and technology, there are opportunities to reduce energy consumption cost-effectively in the corn wet milling industry while maintaining the quality of the products manufactured. Further research on the economics of the measures, as well as the applicability of these to different wet milling practices, is needed to assess the feasibility of implementation of selected technologies at individual plants.

Galitsky, Christina; Worrell, Ernst; Ruth, Michael

2003-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

9

Corn Milling  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... facilities include processing and storage tanks, screening and sizing equipment, grind mills, high pressure steam boilers, centrifuges, rotary ...

10

Corn Milling  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... From this analysis, Product Line Leaders target customers and markets and ... has hired experts from the feed, sugar, fermentation, biofuels, and corn ...

11

Direct application of West Coast geothermal resources in a wet-corn-milling plant. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The engineering and economic feasibility of using the geothermal resources in East Mesa, California, in a new corn processing plant is evaluated. Institutional barriers were also identified and evaluated. Several alternative plant designs which used geothermal energy were developed. A capital cost estimate and rate of return type of economic analysis were performed to evaluate each alternative. (MHR)

Not Available

1981-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

12

Direct application of west coast geothermal resources in a wet corn milling plant supplementary analyses and information dissemination. Final report, addendum  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

In an extension to the scope of the previous studies, supplementary analyses were to be performed for both plants which would assess the economics of geothermal energy if coal had been the primary fuel rather than oil and gas. The studies include: supplementary analysis for a coal fired wet corn milling plant, supplementary analysis for an East Coast frozen food plant with coal fired boilers, and information dissemination activities.

Not Available

1982-03-19T23:59:59.000Z

13

Energy efficiency improvement and cost saving opportunities for the Corn Wet Milling Industry: An ENERGY STAR Guide for Energy and Plant Managers  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1991). Energy from a Flour Mill Waste Water. Case study CA-Variable Speed Drives on a Flour Mill Extract Fan. AvailableCOD/m 3 /day. Ogilvie flour mills use an anaerobic treatment

Galitsky, Christina; Worrell, Ernst; Ruth, Michael

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

14

Effects of corn processing and dietary wet corn gluten feed on newly received and growing cattle.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Effects of corn processing with or without the inclusion of wet corn gluten feed (WCGF) on growth and performance were analyzed in two experiments. Treatments… (more)

Siverson, Anna

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

15

Energy efficiency improvement and cost saving opportunities for the Corn Wet Milling Industry: An ENERGY STAR Guide for Energy and Plant Managers  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

appear in the syrup refinery through process integration –etc. In many corn refineries, some of the dextrose solutionjet conversion of starch in refineries. Flue gas is used for

Galitsky, Christina; Worrell, Ernst; Ruth, Michael

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

16

Energy efficiency improvement and cost saving opportunities for the Corn Wet Milling Industry: An ENERGY STAR Guide for Energy and Plant Managers  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Characterization: Steam Turbines”, Energy Nexus Group,coal, in boilers using steam turbines. A few generate onlylarge-scale mills use steam turbine systems. Switching to

Galitsky, Christina; Worrell, Ernst; Ruth, Michael

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

17

Energy efficiency improvement and cost saving opportunities for the Corn Wet Milling Industry: An ENERGY STAR Guide for Energy and Plant Managers  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

2001b). Energy Efficiency Opportunity Guide in the LimeMilling Industry An ENERGY STAR Guide for Energy and PlantAn ENERGY STAR ® Guide for Energy and Plant Managers

Galitsky, Christina; Worrell, Ernst; Ruth, Michael

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

18

Enzymatic corn wet milling: engineering process and cost model  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This is an Open Access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License

Edna C Ramírez; David B Johnston; Andrew J Mcaloon; Vijay Singh; Open Access; Edna C Ramírez; David B Johnston; Andrew J Mcaloon; Vijay Singh

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

19

311221," Wet Corn Milling",0,0,0,0,0  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1.1 Relative Standard Errors for Table 11.1;" " Unit: Percents." " "," " " "," ",,,"Total ","Sales and","Net Demand" "NAICS"," ",,"Transfers ","Onsite","Transfers","for"...

20

BIOETHANOL PRODUCTION FROM WET OXIDSED CORN STOVER USING PRE-TREATED MANURE AS A NUTRIENT SOURCE  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

BIOETHANOL PRODUCTION FROM WET OXIDSED CORN STOVER USING PRE-TREATED MANURE AS A NUTRIENT SOURCE E (sugar-, and starch-containing) raw materials represent the major part of the total production cost- linked, rigid lignocellulose complex. This structure severely limits the biological conversion; therefore

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "wet corn milling" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Costs of Harvesting, Storing in a Large Pile, and Transporting Corn Stover in a Wet Form  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Corn stover is potentially an attractive biomass resource, but must be stored if used to supply a biorefinery year-round. Based on experience with successfully storing water-saturated large piles of bagasse for the pulping industry, Atchison and Hettenhaus (2003) proposed that such a system can also be applied to corn stover. Regardless of the technical feasibility of this system, in this article we estimate the cost of harvesting corn stover in a single pass with corn grain, delivering the chopped biomass to a storage pile, storing the stover in a wet form in a large pile at 75% moisture in a 211,700-dry Mg facility within a radius of 24 km from the field, and transporting the stover 64 km to a biorefinery. Field-ground corn stover can be delivered to a biorefinery by rail for $55 to $61/dry Mg. Truck transport is more expensive, $71 to $77/dry Mg. To achieve a minimum cost in the system proposed by Atchison and Hettenhaus, it is necessary to field densify stover to 74 dry kg/m3, without losing combine field efficiency, have a large storage pile to spread fixed costs of storage over enough biomass, and use rail transportation. Compared to storage in an on-farm bunker silo at $60/dry Mg, there are limited circumstances in which large pile storage has a cost advantage.

Turhollow Jr, Anthony F [ORNL; Sokhansanj, Shahabaddine [ORNL

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

22

Bulk density and compaction behavior of knife mill chopped switchgrass,wheat straw, and corn stover  

SciTech Connect

Bulk density of comminuted biomass significantly increased by vibration during handling and transportation, and by normal pressure during storage. Compaction characteristics affecting the bulk density of switchgrass, wheat straw, and corn stover chopped in a knife mill at different operating conditions and using four different classifying screens were studied. Mean loose-filled bulk densities were 67.5 18.4 kg/m3 for switchgrass, 36.1 8.6 kg/m3 for wheat straw, and 52.1 10.8 kg/m3 for corn stover. Mean tapped bulk densities were 81.8 26.2 kg/m3 for switchgrass, 42.8 11.7 kg/m3 for wheat straw, and 58.9 13.4 kg/m3 for corn stover. Percentage changes in compressibility due to variation in particle size obtained from a knife mill ranged from 64.3 to 173.6 for chopped switchgrass, 22.2 51.5 for chopped wheat straw and 42.1 117.7 for chopped corn stover within the tested consolidation pressure range of 5 120 kPa. Pressure and volume relationship of chopped biomass during compression with application of normal pressure can be characterized by the Walker model and Kawakita and Ludde model. Parameter of Walker model was correlated to the compressibility with Pearson correlation coefficient greater than 0.9. Relationship between volume reduction in chopped biomass with respect to number of tappings studied using Sone s model indicated that infinite compressibility was highest for chopped switchgrass followed by chopped wheat straw and corn stover. Degree of difficulty in packing measured using the parameters of Sone s model indicated that the chopped wheat straw particles compacted very rapidly by tapping compared to chopped switchgrass and corn stover. These results are very useful for solving obstacles in handling bulk biomass supply logistics issues for a biorefinery.

Chevanan, Nehru [University of Tennessee; Womac, A.R. [University of Tennessee; Bitra, V.S.P. [University of Tennessee; Igathinathane, C. [Mississippi State University (MSU); Yang, Y.T. [University of Tennessee; Miu, P.I [University of Tennessee; Sokhansanj, Shahabaddine [ORNL

2009-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

23

Mathematical model parameters for describing the particle size spectra of knife-milled corn stover  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Particle size distributions of Corn stover (Zea mays L.) created by a knife mill were determined using integral classifying screens with sizes from 12.7 to 50.8 mm, operating at speeds from 250 to 500 rpm, and mass input rates ranging from 1 to 9 kg min_1. Particle distributions were classified using American Society of Agricultural and Biological Engineers (ASABE) standardised sieves for forage analysis that incorporated a horizontal sieving motion. The sieves were made from machined-aluminium with their thickness proportional to the sieve opening dimensions. A wide range of analytical descriptors that could be used to mathematically represent the range of particle sizes in the distributions were examined. The correlation coefficients between geometric mean length and screen size, feed rate, and speed were 0.980, 0.612, and _0.027, respectively. Screen size and feed rate directly influenced particle size, whereas operating speed had a weak indirect relation with particle size. The Rosin Rammler equation fitted the chopped corn stover size distribution data with coefficient of determination (R2) > 0.978. This indicated that particle size distribution of corn stover was well-fit by the Rosin Rammler function. This can be attributed to the fact that Rosin Rammler expression was well suited to the skewed distribution of particle sizes. Skewed distributions occurred when significant quantities of particles, either finer or coarser, existed or were removed from region of the predominant size. The mass relative span was slightly greater than 1, which indicated that it was a borderline narrow to wide distribution of particle sizes. The uniformity coefficient was corn stover produced fine-skewed mesokurtic particles with 12.7 50.8 mm screens. Size-related parameters, namely, geometric mean length, Rosin Rammler size parameter, median length, effective length, and size guide number, were well predicted at R2 values of 0.981, 0.982, 0.979, 0.950 and 0.978, respectively as a function of knife mill screen size, feed rate, and speed. Results of this analysis of particle sizes could be applied to the selection of knife mill operating parameters to produce a particular size of corn stover chop, and could serve as a guide for the relationships among various analytic descriptors of biomass particle distributions.

Bitra, V.S.P [University of Tennessee; Womac, A.R. [University of Tennessee; Yang, Y.T. [University of Tennessee; Miu, P.I. [University of Tennessee; Igathanathane, C. [Mississippi State University (MSU)

2009-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

24

Characterization of chemical composition, milling properties and carbon dioxide diffusivity resulting from early harvest corn and corn stover.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The increasing demand of corn as food and fuel sources has increased the competition for feedstock between livestock and ethanol industries. Developing an effective corn… (more)

Huang, Haibo

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

25

Opportunities for Utility-Owned CHP at Dry-Mill Fuel Ethanol Plants  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report quantifies opportunities to co-locate natural-gas-fueled combined heat and power (CHP) facilities with corn dry-mill fuel ethanol plants in the upper Midwest. It also evaluates the opportunity to generate renewable power by fueling the CHP plants with biogas produced by anaerobic digestion of the byproducts of the corn wet-milling process.

2008-09-23T23:59:59.000Z

26

Corn  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Corn Corn Nature Bulletin No. 118 May 31, 1947 Forest Preserve District of Cook County William N. Erickson, President Roberts Mann, Supt. of Conservation CORN Corn, or maize, has never been found growing wild. Columbus found it being grown by the Carib Indians and called it " Mahiz". The Aztecs told Cortez it was a gift from their gods, but the Mayas and the Incas already had been growing corn for thousands of years. Teosinte, a coarse native Mexican grass, appears to be its closest relative and its origin was probably in Central or South America. Our first colonists planted seed obtained from the Indians and, "corn" being the English word for all grain, called this strange new plant "Indian corn". Without man' s help, corn soon would disappear. Each year the seed must be carefully selected, carefully planted, and the soil kept cultivated to remove competition from other plants. Modern scientific breeding has produced varieties remarkable for their rapid growth, uniform size and heavy yield.

27

Ethanol production from dry-mill corn starch in a fluidized-bed bioreactor  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The development of a high-rate process for the production of fuel ethanol from dry-mill corn starch using fluidized-bed bioreactor (FBR) technology is discussed. Experiments were conducted in a laboratory scale FBR using immobilized biocatalysts. Two ethanol production process designs were considered in this study. In the first design, simultaneous saccharification and fermentation was performed at 35 C using {kappa}-carageenan beads (1.5 mm to 1.5 mm in diameter) of co-immobilized glucoamylase and Zymomonas mobilis. For dextrin feed concentration of 100 g/L, the single-pass conversion ranged from 54% to 89%. Ethanol concentrations of 23 to 36 g/L were obtained at volumetric productivities of 9 to 15 g/L-h. No accumulation of glucose was observed, indicating that saccharification was the rate-limiting step. In the second design, saccharification and fermentation were carried out sequentially. In the first stage, solutions of 150 to 160 g/L dextrins were pumped through an immobilized glucoamylase packed column maintained at 55 C. Greater than 95% conversion was obtained at a residence time of 1 h, giving a product of 165 to 170 g glucose/L. In the second stage, these glucose solutions were fed to the FBR containing Z. mobilis immobilized in {kappa}-carageenan beads. At a residence time of 2 h, 94% conversion and ethanol concentration of 70 g/L was achieved, giving an overall productivity of 23 g/L-h.

Krishnan, M.S.; Nghiem, N.P.; Davison, B.H.

1998-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

28

KNIFE MILL COMMINUTION ENERGY ANALYSIS OF SWITCHGRASS, WHEAT STRAW, AND CORN STOVER AND CHARACTERIZATION OF PARTICLE SIZE DISTRIBUTIONS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Biomass preprocessing and pretreatment technologies such as size reduction and chemical preconditioning are aimed at reducing the cost of ethanol production from lignocellulosic biomass. Size reduction is an energy-intensive biomass preprocessing unit operation. In this study, switchgrass, wheat straw, and corn stover were chopped in an instrumented knife mill to evaluate size reduction energy and corresponding particle size distribution as determined with a standard forage sieve analyzer. Direct mechanical power inputs were determined using a dedicated data acquisition system for knife mill screen openings from 12.7 to 50.8 mm, rotor speeds between 250 and 500 rpm, and mass feed rates from 1 to 11 kg/min. A speed of 250 rpm gave optimum performance of the mill. Optimum feed rates for 25.4 mm screen and 250 rpm were 7.6, 5.8, and 4.5 kg/min for switchgrass, wheat straw, and corn stover, respectively. Total specific energy (MJ/Mg) was defined as the size reduction energy required to operate the knife mill plus that imparted to the biomass. Effective specific energy was defined as the energy imparted to the biomass. For these conditions, total specific energies were 27.3, 37.9, and 31.9 MJ/Mg and effective specific energies were 10.1, 15.5, and 3.2 MJ/Mg for switchgrass, wheat straw, and corn stover, respectively. These results demonstrated that biomass selection affects the size reduction energy, even for biomass with similar features. Second-order polynomial equations for the total specific energy requirement fitted well (R2 > 0.95) as a function of knife mill screen size, mass feed rate, and speed for biomass materials tested. The Rosin-Rammler equation fitted the cumulative undersize mass of switchgrass, wheat straw, and corn stover chop passed through ASABE sieves with high R2 (>0.983). Knife mill chopping of switchgrass, wheat straw, and corn stover resulted in particle size distributions classified as 'well-graded strongly fine-skewed mesokurtic', 'well-graded fine-skewed mesokurtic', and 'well-graded fine-skewed mesokurtic', respectively, for small knife mill screen sizes (12.7 to 25.4 mm) and distributions classified as 'well-graded fine-skewed mesokurtic', 'well-graded strongly fine-skewed mesokurtic', and 'well-graded fine-skewed mesokurtic', respectively, for the large screen size (50.8 mm). Total and effective specific energy values per unit size reduction of wheat straw were greater compared to those for switchgrass. Corn stover resulted in reduced total and effective specific energy per unit size reduction compared to wheat straw for the same operating conditions, but higher total specific energy per unit size reduction and lesser effective specific energy per unit size reduction compared to switchgrass. Data on minimized total specific energy with corresponding particle spectra will be useful for preparing feed material with a knife mill for subsequent grinding with finer size reduction devices.

Bitra, V.S.P. [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK); Womac, A.R. [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK); Sokhansanj, Shahabaddine [ORNL; Igathinathane, C. [North Dakota State University

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

29

Investigation and design of wet-mill equipment and process technology.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??need to dry-mill the wheat into flour, and as a result, the total cost of conversion from wheat to bread is reduced. The resulting product… (more)

Smith, Lisa Noelle.

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

30

Particle size distributions of ground corn and DDGS from dry grind processing  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

ABSTRACT. Ethanol production has increased in the past decade as a result of growth in the dry grind industry. In the dry grind process, the first step is grinding of corn. The particle size of the resulting ground corn can affect the fermentation process and the particle size of dried distillers ’ grains with solubles (DDGS), a coproduct of dry grind processing. Few data are available that characterize particle size distributions of ground corn or DDGS. The objective was to determine particle size distributions of ground corn and DDGS. Samples of ground corn and DDGS were obtained from nine dry grind plants; particle size distribution, geometric mean diameter (dgw) and geometric standard deviation (Sgw) were determined. The dgw of ground corn and of DDGS were not different among processing plants. The overall mean dgw of ground corn was not different from that of DDGS. Most of the ground corn (80 g/100 g) and DDGS (70 g/100 g) were recovered in the three largest particle size categories. The particle size distributions of ground corn were not correlated (r Corn, DDGS, Distillers dried grains with solubles, Ethanol. Corn is processed into ethanol by one of two major processes: dry grinding or wet milling. Wet milling is more complex than dry grinding because fiber and germ components are separated; this requires considerable equipment and capital. In the dry grind process,

K. D. Rausch; R. L. Belyea; M. R. Ellersieck; V. Singh; D. B. Johnston; M. E. Tumbleson

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

31

Direct mechanical energy measures of hammer mill comminution of switchgrass, wheat straw, and corn stover and analysis of their particle size distributions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Biomass particle size impacts handling, storage, conversion, and dust control systems. Size reduction mechanical energy was directly measured for switchgrass (Panicum virgatum L.), wheat straw (Triticum aestivum L.), and corn stover (Zea mays L.) in an instrumented hammer mill. Direct energy inputs were determined for hammer mill operating speeds from 2000 to 3600 rpm for 3.2 mm integral classifying screen and mass input rate of 2.5 kg/min with 90 - and 30 -hammers. Overall accuracy of specific energy measurement was calculated as 0.072 MJ/Mg. Particle size distributions created by hammer mill were determined for mill operating factors using ISO sieve sizes from 4.75 to 0.02 mm in conjunction with Ro-Tap sieve analyzer. A wide range of analytical descriptors were examined to mathematically represent the range of particle sizes in the distributions. Total specific energy (MJ/Mg) was defined as size reduction energy to operate the hammer mill plus that imparted to biomass. Effective specific energy was defined as energy imparted to biomass. Total specific energy for switchgrass, wheat straw, and corn stover grinding increased by 37, 30, and 45% from 114.4, 125.1, and 103.7 MJ/Mg, respectively, with an increase in hammer mill speed from 2000 to 3600 rpm for 90 -hammers. Corresponding total specific energy per unit size reduction was 14.9, 19.7, and 13.5 MJ/Mg mm, respectively. Effective specific energy of 90 -hammers decreased marginally for switchgrass and considerably for wheat straw and it increased for corn stover with an increase in speed from 2000 to 3600 rpm. However, effective specific energy increased with speed to a certain extent and then decreased for 30 -hammers. Rosin Rammler equation fitted the size distribution data with R2 > 0.995. Mass relative span was greater than 1, which indicated a wide distribution of particle sizes. Hammer milling of switchgrass, wheat straw, and corn stover with 3.2 mm screen resulted in well-graded fine-skewed mesokurtic particles. Uniformity coefficient was corn stover, which indicated a moderate assortment of particles. Size-related parameters, namely, geometric mean diameter, Rosin Rammler size parameter, median diameter, and effective size had strong correlation among themselves and good negative correlation with speed. Distribution-related parameters, namely, Rosin Rammler distribution parameter, mass relative span, inclusive graphic skewness, graphic kurtosis, uniformity index, uniformity coefficient, coefficient of gradation and distribution geometric standard deviation had strong correlation among themselves and a weak correlation with mill speed. Results of this extensive analysis of specific energy and particle sizes can be applied to selection of hammer mill operating factors to produce a particular size of switchgrass, wheat straw, and corn stover grind, and will serve as a guide for relations among the energy and various analytic descriptors of biomass particle distributions.

Bitra, V.S.P [University of Tennessee; Womac, A.R. [University of Tennessee; Chevanan, Nehru [University of Tennessee; Miu, P.I. [University of Tennessee; Smith, D.R. [University of Tennessee; Igathinathane, C. [Mississippi State University (MSU); Sokhansanj, Shahabaddine [ORNL

2009-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

32

Effects of Ruminally Degradable Nitrogen in Diets Containing Wet Distiller’s Grains with Solubles and Steam-flaked Corn on Feedlot Cattle Performance and Carcass Characteristics  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Wet distiller’s grains with solubles are the most common feedstuff generated by the ethanol industry, and this feedstuff has been utilized by the feedlot industry. Exploration of the effect of dietary distiller’s inclusion on the form and quantity of protein or nitrogen (N) has received little attention. Assessment of degradable N needs in diets containing wet distiller’s grains with solubles (WDGS) is needed to aid the cattle feeding industry in managing feed costs and potential environmental issues. In Exp. 1, 525 yearling steers (initial weight = 373 ±13 kg) received treatments in a 2 × 3 1 factorial. Factors included corn WDGS (15 or 30 percent of DM) and non-protein N (NPN; 0, 1.5, or 3.0 percent of DM) from urea. The control diet without corn WDGS contained 3.0 percent NPN (1.06 percent urea) and cottonseed meal. Overall gain efficiency among steers fed 15 percent corn WDGS was greatest for 1.5 percent NPN and least for 0 percent NPN (P = 0.07, quadratic), whereas gain efficiency decreased linearly (P 0.15). Dietary NPN concentration did not influence growth performance (P > 0.21). Results suggest that optimum performance for cattle fed 15 percent WDGS occurred when the diet contained between 1.5 percent and 2.25 percent NPN. However, removing all supplemental NPN was necessary to support optimum performance in diets containing 30 percent WCDG.

Ponce, Christian

2010-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

33

Microscopic Analysis of Corn Fiber Using Corn Starch- and Cellulose-Specific Molecular Probes  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Ethanol is the primary liquid transportation fuel produced from renewable feedstocks in the United States today. The majority of corn grain, the primary feedstock for ethanol production, has been historically processed in wet mills yielding products such as gluten feed, gluten meal, starch, and germ. Starch extracted from the grain is used to produce ethanol in saccharification and fermentation steps; however the extraction of starch is not 100% efficient. To better understand starch extraction during the wet milling process, we have developed fluorescent probes that can be used to visually localize starch and cellulose in samples using confocal microscopy. These probes are based on the binding specificities of two types of carbohydrate binding modules (CBMs), which are small substrate-specific protein domains derived from carbohydrate degrading enzymes. CBMs were fused, using molecular cloning techniques, to a green fluorescent protein (GFP) or to the red fluorescent protein DsRed (RFP). Using these engineered probes, we found that the binding of the starch-specific probe correlates with starch content in corn fiber samples. We also demonstrate that there is starch internally localized in the endosperm that may contribute to the high starch content in corn fiber. We also surprisingly found that the cellulose-specific probe did not bind to most corn fiber samples, but only to corn fiber that had been hydrolyzed using a thermochemical process that removes the residual starch and much of the hemicellulose. Our findings should be of interest to those working to increase the efficiency of the corn grain to ethanol process.

Porter, S. E.; Donohoe, B. S.; Beery, K. E.; Xu, Q.; Ding, S.-Y.; Vinzant, T. B.; Abbas, C. A.; Himmel, M. E.

2007-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

34

Update of distillers grains displacement ratios for corn ethanol life-cycle analysis.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Production of corn-based ethanol (either by wet milling or by dry milling) yields the following coproducts: distillers grains with solubles (DGS), corn gluten meal (CGM), corn gluten feed (CGF), and corn oil. Of these coproducts, all except corn oil can replace conventional animal feeds, such as corn, soybean meal, and urea. Displacement ratios of corn-ethanol coproducts including DGS, CGM, and CGF were last updated in 1998 at a workshop at Argonne National Laboratory on the basis of input from a group of experts on animal feeds, including Prof. Klopfenstein (University of Nebraska, Lincoln), Prof. Berger (University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign), Mr. Madson (Rapheal Katzen International Associates, Inc.), and Prof. Trenkle (Iowa State University) (Wang 1999). Table 1 presents current dry milling coproduct displacement ratios being used in the GREET model. The current effort focuses on updating displacement ratios of dry milling corn-ethanol coproducts used in the animal feed industry. Because of the increased availability and use of these coproducts as animal feeds, more information is available on how these coproducts replace conventional animal feeds. To glean this information, it is also important to understand how industry selects feed. Because of the wide variety of available feeds, animal nutritionists use commercial software (such as Brill Formulation{trademark}) for feed formulation. The software recommends feed for the animal on the basis of the nutritional characteristics, availability, and price of various animal feeds, as well as on the nutritional requirements of the animal (Corn Refiners Association 2006). Therefore, feed formulation considers both the economic and the nutritional characteristics of feed products.

Arora, S.; Wu, M.; Wang, M.; Energy Systems

2011-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

35

Greenhouse gases in the corn-to-fuel ethanol pathway.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) has applied its Greenhouse gas, Regulated Emissions and Energy in Transportation (GREET) full-fuel-cycle analysis model to examine greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions of corn-feedstock ethanol, given present and near-future production technology and practice. On the basis of updated information appropriate to corn farming and processing operations in the four principal corn- and ethanol-producing states (Illinois, Iowa, Minnesota, and Nebraska), the model was used to estimate energy requirements and GHG emissions of corn farming; the manufacture, transportation to farms, and field application of fertilizer and pesticide; transportation of harvested corn to ethanol plants; nitrous oxide emissions from cultivated cornfields; ethanol production in current average and future technology wet and dry mills; and operation of cars and light trucks using ethanol fuels. For all cases examined on the basis of mass emissions per travel mile, the corn-to-ethanol fuel cycle for Midwest-produced ethanol used in both E85 and E10 blends with gasoline outperforms conventional (current) and reformulated (future) gasoline with respect to energy use and GHG production. Also, GHG reductions (but not energy use) appear surprisingly sensitive to the value chosen for combined soil and leached N-fertilizer conversion to nitrous oxide. Co-product energy-use attribution remains the single key factor in estimating ethanol's relative benefits because this value can range from 0 to 50%, depending on the attribution method chosen.

Wang, M. Q.

1998-06-18T23:59:59.000Z

36

Separation of Corn Fiber and Conversion to Fuels and Chemicals Phase II: Pilot-scale Operation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The purpose of the Department of Energy (DOE)-supported corn fiber conversion project, “Separation of Corn Fiber and Conversion to Fuels and Chemicals Phase II: Pilot-scale Operation” is to develop and demonstrate an integrated, economical process for the separation of corn fiber into its principal components to produce higher value-added fuel (ethanol and biodiesel), nutraceuticals (phytosterols), chemicals (polyols), and animal feed (corn fiber molasses). This project has successfully demonstrated the corn fiber conversion process on the pilot scale, and ensured that the process will integrate well into existing ADM corn wet-mills. This process involves hydrolyzing the corn fiber to solubilize 50% of the corn fiber as oligosaccharides and soluble protein. The solubilized fiber is removed and the remaining fiber residue is solvent extracted to remove the corn fiber oil, which contains valuable phytosterols. The extracted oil is refined to separate the phytosterols and the remaining oil is converted to biodiesel. The de-oiled fiber is enzymatically hydrolyzed and remixed with the soluble oligosaccharides in a fermentation vessel where it is fermented by a recombinant yeast, which is capable of fermenting the glucose and xylose to produce ethanol. The fermentation broth is distilled to remove the ethanol. The stillage is centrifuged to separate the yeast cell mass from the soluble components. The yeast cell mass is sold as a high-protein yeast cream and the remaining sugars in the stillage can be purified to produce a feedstock for catalytic conversion of the sugars to polyols (mainly ethylene glycol and propylene glycol) if desirable. The remaining materials from the purification step and any materials remaining after catalytic conversion are concentrated and sold as a corn fiber molasses. Additional high-value products are being investigated for the use of the corn fiber as a dietary fiber sources.

Abbas, Charles; Beery, Kyle; Orth, Rick; Zacher, Alan

2007-09-28T23:59:59.000Z

37

Economics of producing fuel-grade alcohol from corn in western Ohio  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The production of significant quantities of alcohol fuel will have important effects on the use of agricultural resources, including increased food prices. The two major objectives of this research were to determine (1) the potential effects of alcohol-fuel production on agriculture, and (2) the increase in energy prices needed for alcohol-fuel production to become economic. Western Ohio (the Corn Belt part of the state) was chosen for study. A quadratic-programming model with crop, livestock, and alcohol-fuel-production activities was used for analysis. Four alcohol-fuel-production levels were analyzed: 100, 200, 300 and 400 million gallons. The 400-million-gallon level represents western Ohio's share of alcohol-fuel production for a national gasohol program. The production of alcohol results in a high protein by-product feed that can substitute for soybean meal. Efficient use of this by-product is a crucial factor affecting resource use and food prices. At low alcohol-fuel production levels, 80% of the additional cropland required for increased corn production comes from the cropland released through by-product feeding. However, as alcohol-fuel production increases, livestock's ability to use efficiently this by-product feed decreases. This in turn, reduces greatly the cropland that can be released for increased corn production. Consequently, food prices increase substantially. The quantity of land released through by-product feeding, at high alcohol-fuel-production levels, can be increased if the corn is first wet milled. Wet milling produces high-protein feeds that can be used more efficiently by livestock. For alcohol-fuel production to become economic, crude oil prices must increase by ten cents per gallon for the wet-milling process and 22 cents per gallon for the conventional distillery process (1981 $).

Ott, S.L.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

38

Energy efficiency improvement and cost saving opportunities for the Corn Wet Milling Industry: An ENERGY STAR Guide for Energy and Plant Managers  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Energy Markets and End Use, Washington, DC. Energy InformationEnergy Markets and End Use, Washington, DC. Energy Information

Galitsky, Christina; Worrell, Ernst; Ruth, Michael

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

39

Energy efficiency improvement and cost saving opportunities for the Corn Wet Milling Industry: An ENERGY STAR Guide for Energy and Plant Managers  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

regenerative thermal oxidizer (RTO) (see Section 5.7) (Svonja, 2001). Generally, this system reuses the energy

Galitsky, Christina; Worrell, Ernst; Ruth, Michael

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

40

Energy efficiency improvement and cost saving opportunities for the Corn Wet Milling Industry: An ENERGY STAR Guide for Energy and Plant Managers  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Hydrogen Sulphide Laden Biogas in a Process Integrated Afterprocessing company, uses biogas in its afterburners (Caddet,1995). The biogas is produced by their on-site wastewater

Galitsky, Christina; Worrell, Ernst; Ruth, Michael

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "wet corn milling" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Energy efficiency improvement and cost saving opportunities for the Corn Wet Milling Industry: An ENERGY STAR Guide for Energy and Plant Managers  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

flash steam. When a steam trap purges condensate from acontrol Return condensate Reduce flue gas Recover steam fromair Return condensate Correct sizing in design Recover steam

Galitsky, Christina; Worrell, Ernst; Ruth, Michael

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

42

Energy efficiency improvement and cost saving opportunities for the Corn Wet Milling Industry: An ENERGY STAR Guide for Energy and Plant Managers  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

determine energy intensity (see page 5), an indicator mustof these indicators were used, energy intensity would bea single indicator for determining energy intensity in this

Galitsky, Christina; Worrell, Ernst; Ruth, Michael

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

43

Energy efficiency improvement and cost saving opportunities for the Corn Wet Milling Industry: An ENERGY STAR Guide for Energy and Plant Managers  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

efficiency motors Lighting Controls Replace metal halide HID with high-intensity Daylighting fluorescents Replace incandescent with fluorescent or CFL

Galitsky, Christina; Worrell, Ernst; Ruth, Michael

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

44

Energy efficiency improvement and cost saving opportunities for the Corn Wet Milling Industry: An ENERGY STAR Guide for Energy and Plant Managers  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Practice Case Study 300: Energy Savings by Reducing the SizeRivers. (1997). Capturing Energy Savings with Steam Traps.et al. , 1997). Although energy savings are not available,

Galitsky, Christina; Worrell, Ernst; Ruth, Michael

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

45

Owens Corning  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Williams, and Mark Lessans of the Department of Energy's (DOE) Building Technologies Office. Owens Corning requested this meeting to cover a broad set of issues, including: 1....

46

Recovery of Recombinant and Native Proteins from Rice and Corn Seed  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Plants are potential sources of valuable recombinant and native proteins that can be purified for pharmaceutical, nutraceutical, and food applications. Transgenic rice and corn germ were evaluated for the production of novel protein products. This dissertation addresses: 1) the extraction and purification of the recombinant protein, human lysozyme (HuLZ), from transgenic rice and 2) the processing of dry-milled corn germ for the production of high protein germ and corn protein concentrate (CPC). The factors affecting the extraction and purification of HuLZ from rice were evaluated. Ionic strength and pH was used to optimize HuLZ extraction and cation exchange purification. The selected conditions, pH 4.5 with 50 mM NaCl, were a compromise between HuLZ extractability and binding capacity, resulting in 90% purity. Process simulation was used to assess the HuLZ purification efficiency and showed that the processing costs were comparable to native lysozyme purification from egg-white, the current predominant lysozyme source. Higher purity HuLZ (95%) could be achieved using pH 4.5 extraction followed by pH 6 adsorption, but the binding capacity was unexpectedly reduced by 80%. The rice impurity, phytic acid, was identified as the potential cause of the unacceptably low capacity. Enzymatic (phytase) treatment prior to adsorption improved purification, implicating phytic acid as the primary culprit. Two processing methods were proposed to reduce this interference: 1) pH 10 extraction followed by pH 4.5 precipitation and pH 6 adsorption and 2) pH 4.5 extraction and pH 6 adsorption in the presence of TRIS counter-ions. Both methods improved the binding capacity from 8.6 mg/mL to >25 mg/mL and maintained HuLZ purity. Processing of dry-milled corn germ to increase protein and oil content was evaluated using germ wet milling. In this novel method, dry-milled germ is soaked and wet processed to produce higher value protein products. Lab-scale and pilot-scale experiments identified soaking conditions that reduced germ starch content, enhanced protein and oil content, and maintained germ PDI (protein dispersibility index). Soaking at neutral pH and 25 degrees C maintained germ PDI and improved CPC yield from defatted germ flour. CPC with greater than 75% protein purity was produced using protein precipitation or membrane filtration.

Wilken, Lisa Rachelle

2009-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

47

Corn Syndrome  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Reports of "floppy " corn were numerous earlier this month. Many causes have been proposed for this problem. Herein lies one more look at this curious phenomenon. Click on image to open a larger version. he curious phenomenon referred to as "floppy corn syndrome" reared (or lowered, as it were) its ugly head in some fields in Indiana and Ohio back in early June. The term "floppy corn " simply describes a young (V5 to V8) plant that has fallen over because of the absence of an established nodal root system at the crown of the plant. Affected plants may survive if the mesocotyl remains intact long enough for subsequent nodes of roots to establish themselves in moist soil. If the mesocotyl breaks before subsequent establishment of additional nodal roots, the plant dies. The causes of the poor nodal root development have been debated for years and, indeed, likely vary from situation to situation. Click on image to open a larger version. My own experience with investigating floppy corn events over the years has primarily been associated with the detrimental effects of excessively dry surface soil at the time of initial nodal root elongation in young (V2 to V4) corn plants (Nielsen, 2001). Young roots that emerge from the crown area of the plant will die if their root tips dessicate prior to successful root establishment in moist soil. The crown of a young corn plant is typically located only 3/4 inch or so below the soil surface and so is particularly vulnerable to dry upper soil conditions. Other causes have been implicated in the development of floppy corn, including excessive

Over-extended Mesocotyls; R. L. (bob Nielsen

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

48

Owens Corning  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

OWENS CORNING OWENS CORNING GOVERNMENT AND PUBLIC AFFAIRS 900 19 TH STREET N.W. SUITE 250 WASHINGTON, DC 20006 202.639.6900 FAX: 202.639.0247 OWENS CORNING September 20, 2013 By email: expartecommunications@hq.doe.gov Daniel Cohen Assistant General Counsel for Legislation and Regulatory Law Office of General Counsel Department of Energy 1000 Independence Ave., SW Washington DC 20585-0121 RE: Ex Parte Memo Dear Mr. Cohen: On Thursday, August 29, 2013, Julian Francis, VP & Managing Director Residential Insulation, Frank O'Brien Bernini, VP & Chief Sustainability Officer, Paul Smith, VP Building Materials Group Marketing, John Libonati, VP Government and Public Affairs, and I met with David Lee, Jeremy Williams, and Mark Lessans

49

Corn Replant Decision-Making  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Crappy stands of corn (aka less than desirable) occur somewhere in Indiana every year. The recent spate of cool, rainy days does not bode well for some corn fields planted during the days immediately preceding the onset of the rainy weather. Stands of corn in river bottoms may be destroyed outright by flood waters. Poorly drained soils where ponding has occurred for four or more days are vulnerable to seedling death. Eventual drying of saturated soils often leads to severe crusting that can restrict corn emergence and result in lower than desirable plant populations. Cool, wet soils are also conducive for seedling infection by certain soil-borne diseases. Unacceptable stand establishment in some of these fields may eventually require growers to make decisions about replanting. Deciding to replant a crappy stand of corn should be based on a number of criteria, but unfortunately the major influencing factor is often the emotion associated with looking out the kitchen window at the damaged field every morning or driving by the field every afternoon taking the kids to baseball practice. Make a wise decision about the merits of replanting a damaged field of corn requires more than emotions. In fact, I would rather that emotions be taken out of the equation entirely. Toward that end, I developed a replant decision-making worksheet that assists growers and farm managers in making that important replant decision. The worksheet allows you to determine the damaged field’s current yield potential (if left untouched), its replant yield potential, and the dollar returns (if any) from replanting the field. The worksheet is included in a larger overall publication on corn replanting titled

R. L. (bob Nielsen

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

50

Zipping Wetting  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Water droplets can completely wet micro-structured superhydrophobic surfaces. The {\\it dynamics} of this rapid process is analyzed by ultra-high-speed imaging. Depending on the scales of the micro-structure, the wetting fronts propagate smoothly and circularly or -- more interestingly -- in a {\\it stepwise} manner, leading to a growing {\\it square-shaped} wetted area: entering a new row perpendicular to the direction of front propagation takes milliseconds, whereas once this has happened, the row itself fills in microseconds ({\\it ``zipping''}). Numerical simulations confirm this view and are in quantitative agreement with the experiments.

Sbragaglia, Mauro; Pirat, Christophe; Borkent, Bram M; Lammertink, Rob G H; Wessling, Matthias; Lohse, Detlef

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

51

Evan Mills  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Evan Mills Evan Mills Residential Building Systems Group Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory 1 Cyclotron Road MS 90R2000 Berkeley CA 94720 Office Location: 90-2058 (510) 486-6784...

52

8. Corn Hybrid Options for Replanting 1. Determining Vegetative Growth Stages of Corn  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Knowing the growth stage of corn is critical to understanding the management practices and potential yield impact from wet weather and/or hail damage. There are a couple methods for determining vegetative growth stages in corn. These different staging methods are used by different disciplines and often occur on different herbicide labels. Knowing the differences between these staging methods will help to reduce confusion when determining corn growth and development. These stages are determined either by the number of visible leaf collars or the number of leaves. Collars and V-Stages The collar is the part of the leaf that wraps

Hail Damage To Corn; Corn Flood Survival; Chad Lee Agronomy

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

53

Cassie Mills  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Cassie Mills is a communications associate in the Advanced Manufacturing Office in the Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy.

54

Evan Mills  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Evan Mills Evan Mills Evan Mills Residential Building Systems Group Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory 1 Cyclotron Road MS 90R2000 Berkeley CA 94720 Office Location: 90-2058 (510) 486-6784 EMills@lbl.gov Evan Mills is a Staff Scientist in the Building Technology and Urban Systems Department, and has worked in the energy efficiency field since 1982. His core commercial-buildings expertise is in energy benchmarking, commissioning, high-tech buildings, risk management, and the efficiency business case. He is a frequent speaker to academic and industry audiences on buildings energy efficiency, author of over 200 publications, and member of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change, which shared the 2007 Nobel Peace Prize. He is recipient of an R&D 100 award for commercializing

55

Andrew Mills  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Andrew D. Mills Andrew D. Mills Andrew Mills Electricity Markets and Policy Group Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory 1 Cyclotron Road MS 90R4000 Berkeley CA 94720 Office Location: 90-4126J (510) 486-4059 ADMills@lbl.gov Andrew D. Mills is a Principal Research Associate in the Electricity Markets and Policy Group at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory. Andrew conducts research and provides policy analysis on renewables and transmission, including power system operations and valuation of wind and solar. Andrew's has published his research in Energy Policy and was a contributing author to the IPCC Special Report on Renewable Energy. Previously, Andrew worked with All Cell Technologies, a battery technologystart-up company. Andrew has an M.S. in Energy and Resources from UC Berkeley and a B.S. in

56

Direct measures of mechanical energy for knife mill size reduction  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Lengthy straw/stalk of biomass may not be directly fed into grinders such as hammer mills and disc refiners. Hence, biomass needs to be preprocessed using coarse grinders like a knife mill to allow for efficient feeding in refiner mills without bridging and choking. Size reduction mechanical energy was directly measured for switchgrass (Panicum virgatum L.), wheat straw (Triticum aestivum L.), and corn stover (Zea mays L.) in an instrumented knife mill. Direct power inputs were determined for different knife mill screen openings from 12.7 to 50.8 mm, rotor speeds between 250 and 500 rpm, and mass feed rates from 1 to 11 kg/min. Overall accuracy of power measurement was calculated to be 0.003 kW. Total specific energy (kWh/Mg) was defined as size reduction energy to operate mill with biomass. Effective specific energy was defined as the energy that can be assumed to reach the biomass. The difference is parasitic or no-load energy of mill. Total specific energy for switchgrass, wheat straw, and corn stover chopping increased with knife mill speed, whereas, effective specific energy decreased marginally for switchgrass and increased for wheat straw and corn stover. Total and effective specific energy decreased with an increase in screen size for all the crops studied. Total specific energy decreased with increase in mass feed rate, but effective specific energy increased for switchgrass and wheat straw, and decreased for corn stover at increased feed rate. For knife mill screen size of 25.4 mm and optimum speed of 250 rpm, optimum feed rates were 7.6, 5.8, and 4.5 kg/min for switchgrass, wheat straw, and corn stover, respectively, and the corresponding total specific energies were 7.57, 10.53, and 8.87 kWh/Mg and effective specific energies were 1.27, 1.50, and 0.24 kWh/Mg for switchgrass, wheat straw, and corn stover, respectively. Energy utilization ratios were calculated as 16.8%, 14.3%, and 2.8% for switchgrass, wheat straw, and corn stover, respectively. These data will be useful for preparing the feed material for subsequent fine grinding operations and designing new mills.

Bitra, V.S.P. [University of Tennessee; Womac, A.R. [University of Tennessee; Igathinathane, C. [Mississippi State University (MSU); Miu, P.I [University of Tennessee; Yang, Y.T. [University of Tennessee; Smith, D.R. [University of Tennessee; Chevanan, Nehru [University of Tennessee; Sokhansanj, Shahabaddine [ORNL

2009-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

57

Cooking with Corn Syrup  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This fact sheet describes the nutritional value and safe storage of corn syrup, a commodity food. It also offers food preparation ideas.

Anding, Jenna

2001-09-10T23:59:59.000Z

58

Estimating Corn Grain Yields  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This publication explains how to estimate the grain yield of a corn crop before harvest. An interactive grain yield calculator is included. 6 pages, 3 tables, 1 figure.

Blumenthal, Jurg M.; Thompson, Wayne

2009-06-12T23:59:59.000Z

59

Improved Multivariate Calibration Models for Corn Stover Feedstock and Dilute-Acid Pretreated Corn Stover  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We have studied rapid calibration models to predict the composition of a variety of biomass feedstocks by correlating near-infrared (NIR) spectroscopic data to compositional data produced using traditional wet chemical analysis techniques. The rapid calibration models are developed using multivariate statistical analysis of the spectroscopic and wet chemical data. This work discusses the latest versions of the NIR calibration models for corn stover feedstock and dilute-acid pretreated corn stover. Measures of the calibration precision and uncertainty are presented. No statistically significant differences (p = 0.05) are seen between NIR calibration models built using different mathematical pretreatments. Finally, two common algorithms for building NIR calibration models are compared; no statistically significant differences (p = 0.05) are seen for the major constituents glucan, xylan, and lignin, but the algorithms did produce different predictions for total extractives. A single calibration model combining the corn stover feedstock and dilute-acid pretreated corn stover samples gave less satisfactory predictions than the separate models.

Wolfrum, E. J.; Sluiter, A. D.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

60

Carbon Emissions: Food Industry - Energy Information Administration  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

The wet corn milling industry emits almost a sixth of the energy-related carbon in the food industry. ...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "wet corn milling" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Volunteer corn in soybeans  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Volunteer corn is a highly visible weed in Nebraska soybean fields. Most soybean fields in the state are affected to some degree. The problem generally is worse in fields that receive tillage during the spring. We are concerned that soybean producers are not adequately considering the negative consequences of uncontrolled volunteer corn growth in soybean. Impact of volunteer corn on soybean yield Volunteer corn is an extremely competitive weed in soybean. It grows taller than soybean early in the season, and in addition to shading surrounding soybean plants, it competes for nutrient and water resources. The yield effect of volunteer corn depends on its density. South Dakota State University conducted studies in 2007 and 2008 where they established volunteer corn densities of 0 up to 17,800 plants/A in soybean (Alms et al. 2008). The corn was allowed to compete for the entire growing season and soybean yields were measured. A density of 5,000 volunteers/A reduced soybean yield approximately 20%, or a 12 bu/A yield loss in 60 bu/A soybean. With a density of 5,000 plants/A, there would be a volunteer corn

Mark Bernards; Lowell S; Bob Wright

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

62

Corn Rootworm (Diabrotica spp.) and Bt Corn: Effects on Pest Survival, Emergence and Susceptibility.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Corn rootworms (Diabrotica spp.) are one of the most destructive pests of corn in the United States. Bt corn or corn that has been genetically… (more)

Keweshan, Ryan Scott

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

63

Tools for tracking and benchmarking facility energy performance...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Juice Processing Plants EPI Pharmaceutical Manufacturing EPI Pulp Mill EPI Wet Corn Milling EPI Commercial buildings EPA's ENERGY STAR Portfolio Manager tool helps you measure...

64

Wet Stacks Design Guide  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The expense of fluegas reheat has led to increased application of less expensive wet stacks downstream of wet FGD (flue gas desulfurization) systems. Good data is necessary to properly design the wet stack system or serious problems can occur. This design guide summarizes all the latest information and provides guidance on developing detailed design specifications.

1997-01-04T23:59:59.000Z

65

Corn stalk orientation effect on mechanical cutting  

SciTech Connect

Research efforts that increase the efficiency of size reduction of biomass can lead to a significant energy saving. This paper deals with the determination of the effect of sample orientation with respect to cutting element and quantify the possible cutting energy reduction, utilising dry corn stalks as the test material (15%e20% wet basis). To evaluate the mechanical cutting characteristics of corn stalks, a Warnere Bratzler device was modified by replacing its blunt edged cutting element with one having a 30_ single bevel sharp knife edge. Cutting force-deformation characteristics obtained with a universal testing machine were analysed to evaluate the orientation effects at perpendicular (90o), inclined (45o), and parallel (0o) orientations on internodes and nodes for cutting force, energy, ultimate stress, and specific energy of corn stalks. The corn stalks cutting force-displacement characteristics were found to differ with orientation, and internode and node material difference. Overall, the peak failure force, and the total cutting energy of internodes and nodes varied significantly (P < 0.05) with stalk cross-sectional area. The specific energy values (total energy per unit cut area) of dry corn stalk internodes ranged from 11.3 to 23.5 kN m_1, and nodes from 8.6 to 14.0 kN m_1. The parallel orientation (along grain) compared to perpendicular (across grain) produced a significant reduction of the cutting stress and the specific energy to one tenth or better for internodes, and to about one-fifth for nodes.

Igathinathane, C. [Mississippi State University (MSU); Womac, A.R. [University of Tennessee; Sokhansanj, Shahabaddine [ORNL

2010-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

66

Understanding Corn Test Weight  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Corn test weight (TW) is an often discussed topic of conversation among corn growers. The topic moves to the forefront in years when corn has been stressed at some point during the grain filling period or when the growing season is ended by frost before physiological maturity is reached. In many cases, the concept of test weight is misunderstood. Test weight is volumetric measurement. An official bushel measures 1.244 cubic feet. To measure TW, we usually take the weight of some smaller unit of measure and make a conversion. The official minimum allowable TW for U.S. No. 1 yellow corn is 56 lbs. per bushel, while No. 2 corn is 54 lbs. per bushel. It's unknown how this all started hundreds of years ago, but perhaps it was easier and more fair to sell things based on volume (length x width x height), something a person could see, instead of weight. Today, of course, corn is sold by weight and often in 56-pound blocks that we, for some reason, still call a bushel. Because weight is contingent on moisture content, grain buyers base their price on a "standard " moisture of (usually) 15 or 15.5 percent. Test weight and yield... Sometimes high TW is associated with high grain yield and low TW is associated with low grain yield. In fact, there is a poor relationship between TW and yield. The same TW can exist across a

Mike Rankin

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

67

MBI Biorefinery: Corn to Biomass, Ethanol to Biochemicals and Biomaterials  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The project is a continuation of DOE-funded work (FY02 and FY03) that has focused on the development of the ammonia fiber explosion (AFEX) pretreatment technology, fermentation production of succinic acid and new processes and products to enhance dry mill profitability. The primary objective for work beginning in April 2004 and ending in November 2005 is focus on the key issues related to the: (1) design, costing and construction plan for a pilot AFEX pretreatment system, formation of a stakeholder development team to assist in the planning and design of a biorefinery pilot plant, continued evaluation of corn fractionation technologies, corn oil extraction, AFEX treatment of corn fiber/DDGs; (2) development of a process to fractionate AFEX-treated corn fiber and corn stover--cellulose and hemicellulose fractionation and sugar recovery; and (3) development of a scalable batch succinic acid production process at 500 L at or below $.42/lb, a laboratory scale fed-batch process for succinic acid production at or below $.40/lb, a recovery process for succinic acid that reduces the cost of succinic acid by $.02/lb and the development of an acid tolerant succinic acid production strain at lab scale (last objective not to be completed during this project time period).

None

2006-02-17T23:59:59.000Z

68

Milling Techniques - TMS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

February 4-8 · 1996 TMS ANNUAL MEETING · Anaheim, California. SYNTHESIS AND PROCESSING OF NANOCRYSTALLINE POWDER III: Milling Techniques ...

69

Ensiling wet distillers grains with other feeds. SDSU Extension Extra 4029  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

During the last century, livestock producers have relied heavily on highly valued crops to feed their cattle. Corn grain and silage, alfalfa hay and silage as well as other highly productive crops have been used extensively. Changes in oil prices have sparked interest into renewable energy alternatives. Ethanol production from corn has gained popularity in the Midwest resulting in increased availability of corn distillers grains. Corn distillers grains are an excellent feed for ruminants. They can usually be purchased as wet (40-70 % moisture) or dry. They supply approximately 10 % more energy than corn grain, and approximately 30 % protein, 10 % fat and 1 % phosphorus. These are highly priced nutrients and thus desirable in a feed, although they might pose a challenge when formulating diets. When distillers grains

A. D. Garcia; K. F. Kalscheur

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

70

Corn-O-Copia  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper describes an ethanol project initiated by Red Trail Energy at its plant near Richardton, ND, with the goal of producing ethanol from corn using coal for energy. Aside from the fact that it does not substantially reduce carbon emissions, the ...

W. Sweet

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

71

On environmental lifecycle assessment for policy selection  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

emissions due to us corn ethanol production: A comprehensivebiofuels such as corn ethanol can reduce GHG emissions (dea ?nal good (say, corn ethanol produced by wet-milling Iowa

Rajagopal, Deepak

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

72

Varo & Owens Corning Teaming Profile  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Engineers, Inc Owens Corning - Newark Plant 2751 Tuller Parkway 400 Case Avenue Dublin, Ohio 43017 Newark, Ohio 43055 Business: Consulting Engineer Business: Insulation Materials...

73

Robbins Corn & Bulk Services | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Robbins Corn & Bulk Services Jump to: navigation, search Name Robbins Corn & Bulk Services Place Sackets Harbor, NY Information About Partnership with NREL Partnership with NREL...

74

Fast Corn Grading System Verification and Modification.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??A fast corn grading system can replace the traditional method in unofficial corn grading locations. The initial design of the system proved that it can… (more)

Smith, Leanna Marie

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

75

Delayed Planting Considerations for Corn  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Quite a bit of Indiana’s corn crop remains to be planted, especially in southern Indiana, due to the current rainy spell that put the brakes on what had been a very rapid planting pace. As of 11 May, 42 % of Indiana’s intended corn acreage was yet to be planted (USDA-NASS,

John Obermeyer; Entomology Dept; Tony Vyn; Agronomy Dept

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

76

Spray type wet scrubber  

SciTech Connect

A spray type wet scrubber includes a plurality of spray nozzles installed in parallel banks across the path of gas stream within the scrubber body, and partition walls held upright in grating fashion to divide the path of gas stream into a plurality of passages, each of which accommodates one of the spray nozzles.

Atsukawa, M.; Tatani, A.

1978-01-10T23:59:59.000Z

77

The effects of previous-year corn hybrid and cropping system on current-year corn hybrids in second year corn.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Grain yields decrease when corn (Zea mays L.) follows corn compared to corn grown in rotation with other crops. The factors that decrease grain yield… (more)

Kent, Wade Adam

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

78

Ethanol extraction of phytosterols from corn fiber  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The present invention provides a process for extracting sterols from a high solids, thermochemically hydrolyzed corn fiber using ethanol as the extractant. The process includes obtaining a corn fiber slurry having a moisture content from about 20 weight percent to about 50 weight percent solids (high solids content), thermochemically processing the corn fiber slurry having high solids content of 20 to 50% to produce a hydrolyzed corn fiber slurry, dewatering the hydrolyzed corn fiber slurry to achieve a residual corn fiber having a moisture content from about 30 to 80 weight percent solids, washing the residual corn fiber, dewatering the washed, hydrolyzed corn fiber slurry to achieve a residual corn fiber having a moisture content from about 30 to 80 weight percent solids, and extracting the residual corn fiber with ethanol and separating at least one sterol.

Abbas, Charles (Champaign, IL); Beery, Kyle E. (Decatur, IL); Binder, Thomas P. (Decatur, IL); Rammelsberg, Anne M. (Decatur, IL)

2010-11-16T23:59:59.000Z

79

Corn Yield Prediction Using Climatology  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A method is developed to predict corn yield during the growing season using a plant process model (CERES-Maize), current weather data and climatological data. The procedure is to place the current year's daily weather (temperature and ...

Claude E. Duchon

1986-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

80

"Invisible" Archaeological Deposits at Small Milling Sites  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Deposits at Small Milling Sites ROBERT E. PARR and MARK Q.architechire, bedrock milling features, soil colorlithic scatters or bedrock milling stations), it appears

Parr, Robert E.; Sutton, Mark Q.

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "wet corn milling" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Optical wet steam monitor  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A wet steam monitor determines steam particle size by using laser doppler velocimeter (LDV) device to produce backscatter light. The backscatter light signal is processed with a spectrum analyzer to produce a visibility waveform in the frequency domain. The visibility waveform includes a primary peak and a plurality of sidebands. The bandwidth of at least the primary frequency peak is correlated to particle size by either visually comparing the bandwidth to those of known particle sizes, or by digitizing the waveform and comparing the waveforms electronically.

Maxey, Lonnie C. (Powell, TN); Simpson, Marc L. (Knoxville, TN)

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

82

Optical wet steam monitor  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A wet steam monitor determines steam particle size by using laser doppler velocimeter (LDV) device to produce backscatter light. The backscatter light signal is processed with a spectrum analyzer to produce a visibility waveform in the frequency domain. The visibility waveform includes a primary peak and a plurality of sidebands. The bandwidth of at least the primary frequency peak is correlated to particle size by either visually comparing the bandwidth to those of known particle sizes, or by digitizing the waveform and comparing the waveforms electronically. 4 figures.

Maxey, L.C.; Simpson, M.L.

1995-01-17T23:59:59.000Z

83

Effect of corn stover harvest and winter rye cover crop on corn nitrogen fertilization.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Improvement in N management to optimize corn N fertilization requirement and minimize NO33 – N loss from agricultural fields is an ongoing need for continuous corn… (more)

Pantoja, Jose L.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

84

Corn Ethanol and Wildlife: How are Policy and Market Driven Increases in Corn Plantings Affecting Habitat and Wildlife.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Since 2005, government incentives have driven massive growth in the corn ethanol industry, increasing demand for corn for ethanol by 200%. Corn prices have risen… (more)

Griffin, Elizabeth; Glaser, Aviva; Fogel, Gregory; Johnson, Kristen

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

85

Value Added Products from Hemicellulose Utilization in Dry Mill Ethanol Plants  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Iowa Corn Promotion Board is the principal contracting entity for this grant funded by the US Department of Agriculture and managed by the US Department of Energy. The Iowa Corn Promotion Board subcontracted with New Jersey Institute of Technology, KiwiChem, Pacific Northwest National Lab and Idaho National Lab to conduct research for this project. KiwiChem conducted the economic engineering assessment of a dry-mill ethanol plant. New Jersey Institute of Technology conducted work on incorporating the organic acids into polymers. Pacific Northwest National Lab conducted work in hydrolysis of hemicellulose, fermentation and chemical catalysis of sugars to value-added chemicals. Idaho National Lab engineered an organism to ferment a specific organic acid. Dyadic, an enzme company, was a collaborator which provided in-kind support for the project. The Iowa Corn Promotion Board collaborated with the Ohio Corn Marketing Board and the Minnesota Corn Merchandising Council in providing cost share for the project. The purpose of this diverse collaboration was to integrate the hydrolysis, the conversion and the polymer applications into one project and increase the likelihood of success. This project had two primary goals: (1) to hydrolyze the hemicellulose fraction of the distillers grain (DG) coproduct coming from the dry-mill ethanol plants and (2) convert the sugars derived from the hemicellulose into value-added co-products via fermentation and chemical catalysis.

Rodney Williamson, ICPB; John Magnuson, PNNL; David Reed, INL; Marco Baez, Dyadic; Marion Bradford, ICPB

2007-03-30T23:59:59.000Z

86

Life-cycle energy and greenhouse gas emission impacts of different corn ethanol plant types.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Since the United States began a program to develop ethanol as a transportation fuel, its use has increased from 175 million gallons in 1980 to 4.9 billion gallons in 2006. Virtually all of the ethanol used for transportation has been produced from corn. During the period of fuel ethanol growth, corn farming productivity has increased dramatically, and energy use in ethanol plants has been reduced by almost by half. The majority of corn ethanol plants are powered by natural gas. However, as natural gas prices have skyrocketed over the last several years, efforts have been made to further reduce the energy used in ethanol plants or to switch from natural gas to other fuels, such as coal and wood chips. In this paper, we examine nine corn ethanol plant types--categorized according to the type of process fuels employed, use of combined heat and power, and production of wet distiller grains and solubles. We found that these ethanol plant types can have distinctly different energy and greenhouse gas emission effects on a full fuel-cycle basis. In particular, greenhouse gas emission impacts can vary significantly--from a 3% increase if coal is the process fuel to a 52% reduction if wood chips are used. Our results show that, in order to achieve energy and greenhouse gas emission benefits, researchers need to closely examine and differentiate among the types of plants used to produce corn ethanol so that corn ethanol production would move towards a more sustainable path.

Wang, M.; Wu, M.; Huo, H.; Energy Systems

2007-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

87

Corn Fields Shutting Down  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Fields of corn around Indiana, especially early-planted ones, are in the process of shutting down for the season. While only 3 % of the state’s crop was estimated to be mature (i.e., kernel black layer) as of the week ending 31 Aug, 41 % of the crop was estimated to be at dent stage or beyond (Indiana Ag Stats Service, 2 Sep 2003). The onset of maturity is naturally accompanied by an eventual senescence of the entire solar harvesting “machinery”, but some fields appear to be shutting down prematurely and deserve to be monitored for potential stalk health issues prior to harvest (Nielsen, 2003). The short-term forecast for cool evening temperatures in the mid-50’s or lower throughout much of the state the remainder of this week will further accelerate premature senescence of these stressed fields. Plant stresses contributing to the premature “shutdown ” of some fields include: Root systems compromised by saturated soil conditions caused by early and midseason “monsoon ” events. Drier than normal conditions throughout much of August, accompanied by stressful low to mid-90 F temperatures in the latter part of the month.

R. L. (bob Nielsen

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

88

W(A)93-013 STATEMENT OF CONSIDERATIONS  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

microorganisms immobilization, the use of immobilized enzymes involved in the corn wet milling processes, and immobilized cells in bioreactors for organic waste degradation....

89

ENERGY STAR Certified Buildings & Plants : ENERGY STAR  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Processing (13) Petroleum Refinery (9) Pharmaceutical Manufacturing (8) Wet Corn Milling (7) * Total does not include data centers Select Label Year 2013 2012 2011 2010 2009...

90

Barley tortillas and barley flours in corn tortillas  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Barley tortillas (100%) were easily processed using corn tortilla technology. Flavor and color of barley tortillas were different from those of corn or wheat tortillas. Barley tortillas were generally darker, maybe due to ash and phenolic compounds present in the dietary fiber of the flours. All barley tortillas had a unique mild bittersweet-astringent taste. Flavor and color were rated acceptable by an informal sensory panel. The effects of amylose and ?-glucan contents of barley flours on the quality attributes of doughs and tortillas were studied using objective and subjective tests. Barley was milled to obtain increased ?-glucan at the same amylose level. Changes in tortilla attributes were evaluated at 2 h and after storage for up to 28 d at 4°C. Stored tortillas were evaluated after equilibration to 22°C and reheating. As amylose decreased in the flour, fresh tortillas were softer and more extensible. However, upon storage all tortillas became brittle and hard. Increased ?-glucan content increased water absorption of the flours and moisture content of tortillas. Increased moisture gave softer and more extensible barley tortillas. Reheated and fresh tortillas had similar extensibilities. Reheated tortillas had less moisture and required more force to rupture. Barley flours were also substituted at 10 to 25% in corn tortillas. As barley flours increased in the formulation, tortilla extensibility improved. Color was not affected, dietary fiber was increased and a slight off-flavor was observed. Barley tortillas and corn tortillas containing barley flour may be an acceptable way to increase dietary fiber consumption at a competitive cost.

Mitre-Dieste, Carlos Marcelo

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

91

Yang-Mills redux  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

It is noted that a given pairing of the phase factor and gauge transformation to retain gauge symmetry is not unique. In their seminal paper, when Yang and Mills (YM) discuss the phase factor- gauge transformation relationship, they cite Pauli’s review paper. It is interesting that although Pauli in that paper presents the electromagnetic field strength in terms of a commutator, for whatever reason YM did not extrapolate the commutator’s use to obtain the Yang-Mills field strength – they obtained it by trial and error. Presented is a derivation of this field strength using the commutator approach detailing how certain terms cancel each other. Finally, the Yang-Mills field transformation is derived in a slightly different way than is traditionally done. 1

Samuel L. Marateck

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

92

Wet-limestone scrubbing fundamentals  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The article examines important concepts of wet-limestone scrubbing. It also addresses the topic of by-product disposal. 3 refs., 1 fig.

Buecker, B.

2006-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

93

Al Corn Clean Fuel | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

to: navigation, search Name Al-Corn Clean Fuel Place Claremont, North Dakota Product Al-Corn is an ethanol plant located in Claremont, North Dakota, which is owned by local...

94

RAFFINATE CHARACTERIZATION PION RIDGE MILL  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

were: I. The Uranium Fuel Cycle Facilities 2. Underground Uranium Mines 3. Inactive Uranium Mill Tailings 4. Licensed Uranium Mill Tailings 5. High-Level Waste Disposal Facilities 6. Department of Energy-2 ...........................................1.2.2 Uranium Mills 1-2 ...............................1.2.3 Uranium Conversion Facilities 1

95

Evaluation of End Mill Coatings  

SciTech Connect

Milling tests were run on families of High Speed Steel (HSS) end mills to determine their lives while machining 304 Stainless Steel. The end mills tested were made from M7, M42 and T15-CPM High Speed Steels. The end mills were also evaluated with no coatings as well as with Titanium Nitride (TiN) and Titanium Carbo-Nitride (TiCN) coatings to determine which combination of HSS and coating provided the highest increase in end mill life while increasing the cost of the tool the least. We found end mill made from M42 gave us the largest increase in tool life with the least increase in cost. The results of this study will be used by Cutting Tool Engineering in determining which end mill descriptions will be dropped from our tool catalog.

L. J. Lazarus; R. L. Hester,

2005-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

96

Techno-economic analysis of using corn stover to supply heat and power to a corn ethanol plant - Part 1: Cost of feedstock supply logistics  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Supply of corn stover to produce heat and power for a typical 170 dam3 dry mill ethanol plant is proposed. The corn ethanol plant requires 5.6 MW of electricity and 52.3 MW of process heat, which creates the annual stover demand of as much as 140 Gg. The corn stover supply system consists of collection, preprocessing, transportation and on-site fuel storage and preparation to produce heat and power for the ethanol plant. Economics of the entire supply system was conducted using the Integrated Biomass Supply Analysis and Logistics (IBSAL) simulation model. Corn stover was delivered in three formats (square bales, dry chops and pellets) to the combined heat and power plant. Delivered cost of biomass ready to be burned was calculated at 73 $ Mg-1 for bales, 86 $ Mg-1 for pellets and 84 $ Mg-1 for field chopped biomass. Among the three formats of stover supply systems, delivered cost of pelleted biomass was the highest due to high pelleting cost. Bulk transport of biomass in the form of chops and pellets can provide a promising future biomass supply logistic system in the US, if the costs of pelleting and transport are minimized.

Sokhansanj, Shahabaddine [ORNL; Mani, Sudhagar [University of Georgia; Togore, Sam [U.S. Department of Energy; Turhollow Jr, Anthony F [ORNL

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

97

Tall Corn Ethanol LLC | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Tall Corn Ethanol LLC Tall Corn Ethanol LLC Jump to: navigation, search Name Tall Corn Ethanol LLC Place Coon Rapids, Iowa Zip 50058 Product Farmer owned bioethanol production company which owns a 40m gallon (151.4m litre) bioethanol plant in Coon Rapids, Iowa. References Tall Corn Ethanol LLC[1] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Tall Corn Ethanol LLC is a company located in Coon Rapids, Iowa . References ↑ "Tall Corn Ethanol LLC" Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Tall_Corn_Ethanol_LLC&oldid=352015" Categories: Clean Energy Organizations Companies Organizations Stubs What links here Related changes Special pages Printable version Permanent link

98

Size reduction of high- and low-moisture corn stalks by linear knife grid system  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

High- and low-moisture corn stalks were tested using a linear knife grid size reduction device developed for first-stage size reduction. The device was used in conjunction with a universal test machine that quantified shearing stress and energy characteristics for forcing a bed of corn stalks through a grid of sharp knives. No published engineering performance data for corn stover with similar devices are available to optimize performance; however, commercial knife grid systems exist for forage size reduction. From the force displacement data, mean and maximum ultimate shear stresses, cumulative and peak mass-based cutting energies for corn stalks, and mean new surface area-based cutting energies were determined from 4 5 refill runs at two moisture contents (78.8% and 11.3% wet basis), three knife grid spacings (25.4, 50.8, and 101.6 mm), and three bed depths (50.8, 101.6, and 152.4 mm). In general, the results indicated that peak failure load, ultimate shear stress, and cutting energy values varied directly with bed depth and inversely with knife grid spacing. Mean separation analysis established that high- and low-moisture conditions and bed depths 101.6 mm did not differ significantly (P corn stalks were much smaller than reported cutting energy requirements. Ultimate shear stress and cutting energy results of this research should aid the engineering design of commercial scale linear knife gird size reduction equipment for various biomass feedstocks.

Womac, A.R. [University of Tennessee; Igathinathane, C. [Mississippi State University (MSU); Sokhansanj, Shahabaddine [ORNL; Narayan, S. [First American Scientific Co.

2009-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

99

Vijay Singh  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Urbana-Champaign. His research is on development of novel fractionation technologies for corn dry grind ethanol and corn wet milling processes. Dr. Singh has authored more than 90...

100

Process Development: From Concept to Commercialization of Enzymatic...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Process Development: From Concept to Commercialization of Enzymatic Corn Wet Milling Process Speaker(s): Vijay Singh Date: September 20, 2006 - 12:00pm Location: 90-4133 Corn is...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "wet corn milling" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Revised Wet Stack Design Guide  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

For the past 14 years, the design of wet stacks around the world has been guided by the original EPRI Wet Stacks Design Guide (1996). Since that time, the number of wet stack installations has grown considerably, and a wealth of practical real-world operating and maintenance experience has been obtained. The laws of physics have not changed, and most of the information presented in 1996 is just as valid today as it was when originally published. What has changed is the power-generation ...

2012-12-12T23:59:59.000Z

102

Survey of Wet Electrostatic Precipitators  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Wet electrostatic precipitators (ESPs) have found application since they were first installed for sulfuric acid collection on a smelter and patented by Dr. Frederick Cottrell in 1907–1908. Power generation applications typically use dry ESPs for collection of coal fly ash in nonsaturated flue gas streams. This report summarizes the physical installations, specifications, operating environments, and operational experience of wet ESPs currently operating in the United States on power generation ...

2012-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

103

tritrophic interactions among larval western corn rootworm, Bt corn and entomopathogens.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The western corn rootworm Diabrotica virgifera virgifera LeConte (Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae) is a major soil-borne pest of corn Zea mays L. in both the United States… (more)

Rudeen, Melissa Lynn

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

104

Approximation Algorithm for Multiple-Tool Milling  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Milling is the mechanical process of removing material from a piece of stock through the use of a rapidly spinning circular milling tool in order to form some desired geometric shape. An important problem in computer-aided design and manufacturing is the automated generation of efficient milling plans for computerized numerically controlled (CNC) milling machines. Among the most common milling problems is simple 2-dimensional pocket milling: cut a given 2-dimensional region down to some constant depth using a given set of milling tools. Most of the research in this area has focused on generating such milling plans assuming that the machine has a tool of a single size. Since modern CNC milling machines typically have access to a number of milling tools of various sizes and the ability to change tools automatically, this raises the important optimization problem of generating efficient milling plans that take advantage of this capability to reduce the total milling time. We consider the ...

Sunil Arya; Siu-Wing Cheng; David M. Mount

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

105

Fly ash as a liming material for corn production  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Fly ash produced as a by-product of subbituminous coal combustion can potentially serve as an alternative liming material without negatively affecting corn (Zea mays L.) production in areas where use of conventional liming materials can be uneconomical due to transportation costs. A study was conducted to determine if fly ash produced from the Nebraska Public Power District Gerald Gentleman Power Station located in Sutherland, NE could be used as an alternative liming material. Combinations of dry fly ash (DFA), wet fly ash (WFA), beet lime (by-product of sugar beet (Beta vulgaris L.) processing) (BL), and agricultural lime (AGL) were applied at rates ranging from 0.43 to 1.62 times the recommended lime rate to plots on four acidic soils (Anselmo fine sandy loam, Hord fine sandy loam, Holdrege sandy loam, and Valentine fine sand). Soil samples were collected to a depth of 0.2 m from plots and analyzed for pH before lime applications and twice periodically after lime application. The Hord and Valentine soils were analyzed for exchangeable Ca, Mg, K, Na,and Al for determination of percent Al saturation on selected treatments and sampling dates. Corn grain yields were determined annually. It is concluded that the fly ash utilized in this study and applied at rates in this study, increases soil pH comparable to agricultural lime and is an appropriate alternative liming material.

Tarkalson, D.D.; Hergert, G.W.; Stevens, W.B.; McCallister, D.L.; Kackman, S.D. [University of Nebraska, North Platte, NE (US)

2005-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

106

2009 Final Corn and Soybean Yield Forecasts  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The purpose of this brief is to update our previous evaluation of yield potential for corn and soybeans in Illinois, Indiana, and

Scott Irwin; Darrel Good; Mike Tannura

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

107

Nitrogen management of corn with sensor technology.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Corn (Zea mays) is an important cereal crop in Kansas primarily used as livestock feed for cattle in the feedlots, and there has been increased… (more)

Tucker, Andrew Neil

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

108

Oil recovery from condensed corn distillers solubles.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Condensed corn distillers solubles (CCDS) contains more oil than dried distillers grains with solubles (DDGS), 20 vs. 12% (dry weight basis). Therefore, significant amount of… (more)

Majoni, Sandra

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

109

Colony Mills Limited | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Mills Limited Jump to: navigation, search Name Colony Mills Limited Place Lahore, Pakistan Sector Solar Product Yarn manufacturer, plans to set up solar thermal plant....

110

Gourmet and Health-Promoting Specialty OilsChapter 15 Corn Kernel Oil and Corn Fiber Oil  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Gourmet and Health-Promoting Specialty Oils Chapter 15 Corn Kernel Oil and Corn Fiber Oil Health Nutrition Biochemistry eChapters Health - Nutrition - Biochemistry Press Downloadable pdf of Chapter 15 Corn Kerne

111

Animal Performance and Diet Quality While Grazing Corn Residue.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Grazing cattle on corn residue as a winter feed source has become an integral part of many Nebraska producers’ management plans. Utilizing corn residues extends… (more)

Gigax, Jennifer A

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

112

Optical Imaging and Computer Vision Technology for Corn Quality Measurement.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The official U.S. standards for corn have been available for almost one hundred years. Corn grading system has been gradually updated over the years. In… (more)

Fang, Jian

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

113

Varo & Owens Corning - Newark Teaming Profile | ENERGY STAR  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

implements phased-in lighting system upgrade at Owens Corning plant in Newark, Ohio, saving 270,000 annually in electricity and maintenance. Varo & Owens Corning - Newark...

114

Essays on ethanol-driven corn demand and crop choice.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Two essays are focused on crop choice and the growth of corn production in the Corn Belt and surrounding areas. The first essay develops a… (more)

[No author

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

115

Data Mining Soil Characteristics Affecting Corn Yield  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Ten soil characteristic variables and corn yield were measured in a field located in southeastern Boone County, Iowa. Measurements were made on a grid of 215 locations throughout the field. We use graphical and simple numerical methods to obtain an understanding of the relationship between the soil characteristics and corn yield.

William F. Christensen; Di Cook

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

116

MEXICAN CORN: Genetic Variability and Trade Liberalisation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

It is now a well established fact that corn (Zea mays) originated in Mexico and that a great part of the evolution that may be observed in terms of this plant’s genetic variability took place in this country. 2 As the plant’s history unfolded, early forms of these races were taken by people into a wide variety of environments and ecological niches from which many distinct varieties developed in the relative isolation of these separated regions. Thus, Mexico also became a center of genetic diversity for corn, and its stock of germplasm has contributed in a decisive manner to global production of corn. Even the dented varieties of the U.S. Corn Belt are close descendants of the first Mexican landraces. The germplasm resources that are deposited in Mexico’s corn varieties, as well as in the wild relatives of this crop, are of prime importance for the world’s food production system of the next century. 3 Corn germplasm of Mexican origin has played a critical role in improvements for corn cultivated in tropical regions in relation to yield increments, plague resistance, short growth cycle, drought resistance and increases of protein content of grain. It has also been instrumental in increasing yields in the case of corn produced in temperate regions at high latitudes. Mexican 1

Alejandro Nadal; El Colegio De México; Alejandro Nadal; El Colegio De México

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

117

Field evaluation of the availability for corn and soybean of phosphorus recovered as struvite from corn fiber processing for bioenergy.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??FIELD EVALUATION OF THE AVAILABILITY FOR CORN AND SOYBEAN OF PHOSPHORUS RECOVERED AS STRUVITE FROM CORN FIBER PROCESSING FOR BIOENERGY A paper to be submitted… (more)

Thompson, Louis Bernard

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

118

Effects of a Corn Root Defense Substance on Western Corn Rootworm Diabrotica virgifera virgifera LeConte Larvae.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The objectives of this research were to evaluate the effects of hydroxamic acids, a group of corn root defense substances on western corn rootworm (Diabrotica… (more)

Zhao, Zixiao

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

119

Heartland Corn Products | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Corn Products Corn Products Jump to: navigation, search Name Heartland Corn Products Place Winthrop, Minnesota Zip 55396 Product Heartland Corn Products is farmer-owned cooperative that produces corn-derived ethanol. Coordinates 48.47373°, -120.177559° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":48.47373,"lon":-120.177559,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

120

Rockwell Automation - Owens Corning Teaming Profile  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Rockwell Automation Owens Corning Rockwell Automation Owens Corning 1201 S. Second Street 247 York Road Milwaukee, WI 53204 Guelph, Ontario N1E 3G4 Business: Industrial Automation Business: Textile / Fiber Nigel Hitchings Frank Peel Marketing Manager Electrical Support Specialist Phone: 508-357-8404 Phone: 519-823-7208 Email: nehitchings@ra.rockwell.com Email: frank.peel@owenscorning.com Owens Corning partners with Rockwell Automation to retrofit fans with VFDs, saving $67,000 annually Project Scope Owens Corning and Rockwell Automation installed Variable Frequency Drives (VFDs) on one 125HP cooling fan and three 40HP recirculation fans at the Owens Corning Guelph Glass Plant. The VFDs were integrated with the existing Rockwell Automation programmable automation controller to collect

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "wet corn milling" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Corn/coal fuel characterization study  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Laboratory analyses and tests were conducted to determine the suitability of shelled corn as a potential supplemental fuel for pulverized coal fired utility boilers. The analyses and tests used were those routinely used for the characterization of coal. The data indicated very high volatility and very low ash. Corn by itself would not be a suitable fuel for conventional boilers, primarily because of the severe fouling and slagging potential of corn ash. Blends of corn and coal minimized the fouling and slagging problems. The blend samples contained 10% corn by BTU or 14% by weight. Approximately 1.05 pounds of this blend would provide the heat equivalent of one pound of coal. The additional fuel input would place an additional load on fuel handling and preparation equipment, but the decrease in ash quantity would reduce the load on ash handling and particulate-type flue gas clean-up equipment. (JSR)

Cioffi, P. L.

1978-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

122

Alloy by Double Mechanical Milling  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The results show that the morphology of double mechanical milling powder is regular and the TiAl phase and Ti3Al phase were observed in the powders.

123

VOC Control in Kraft Mills  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The formation of volatile organic compounds (VOCs), such as methanol, in kraft mills has been an environmental concern. Methanol is soluble in water and can increase the biochemical oxygen demand. Furthermore, it can also be released into atmosphere at the process temperatures of kraft mill-streams. The Cluster Rule of the EPA now requires the control of the release of methanol in pulp and paper mills. This research program was conducted to develop a computer simulation tool for mills to predict VOC air emissions. To achieve the objective of the research program, much effort was made in the development of analytical techniques for the analysis of VOC and determination of vapor liquid partitioning coefficient of VOCs in kraft mill-streams using headspace gas chromatography. With the developed analytical tool, methanol formation in alkaline pulping was studied in laboratory to provide benchmark data of the amount of methanol formation in pulping in kraft mills and for the validation of VOC formation and vapor-liquid equilibrium submodels. Several millwide air and liquid samplings were conducted using the analytical tools developed to validate the simulation tool. The VOC predictive simulation model was developed based on the basic chemical engineering concepts, i.e., reaction kinetics, vapor liquid equilibrium, combined with computerized mass and energy balances. Four kraft mill case studies (a continuous digester, two brownstock washing lines, and a pre-evaporator system) are presented and compared with mill measurements. These case studies provide valuable, technical information for issues related to MACT I and MACT II compliance, such as condensate collection and Clean-Condensate-Alternatives (CCA).

Zhu, J.Y.; Chai, X.-S.; Edwards, L.L.; Gu, Y.; Teja, A.S.; Kirkman, A.G.; Pfromm, P.H.; Rezac, M.E.

2001-09-26T23:59:59.000Z

124

September 2010 FAPRI-MU US Biofuels, Corn Processing,  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

September 2010 FAPRI-MU US Biofuels, Corn Processing, Distillers Grains, Fats, Switchgrass-882-4256 or the US Department of Education, Office of Civil Rights. #12;1 Overview of FAPRI-MU Biofuels, Corn listed here represent US biofuel, corn processing, distillers grains, fats, switchgrass, and corn stover

Noble, James S.

125

Yang-Mills algebra.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Some unexpected properties of the cubic algebra generated by the covariant derivatives of a generic Yang-Mills connection over the (s+1)-dimensional pseudo Euclidean space are pointed out. This algebra is Gorenstein and Koszul of global dimension 3 but except for s=1 (i.e. in the 2-dimensional case) where it is the universal enveloping algebra of the Heisenberg Lie algebra and is a cubic Artin-Schelter regular algebra, it fails to be regular in that it has exponential growth. We give an explicit formula for the Poincare series of this algebra A and for the dimension in degree n of the graded Lie algebra of which A is the universal enveloping algebra. In the 4-dimensional (i.e. s=3) Euclidean case, a quotient of this algebra is the quadratic algebra generated by the covariant derivatives of a generic (anti) self-dual connection. This latter algebra is Koszul of global dimension 2 but is not Gorenstein and has exponential growth. It is the universal enveloping algebra of the graded Lie-algebra which is the semi-direct product of the free Lie algebra with three generators of degree one by a derivation of degree one.

Alain Connes; Michel Dubois-Violette.

126

Corn Plus | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Plus Plus Jump to: navigation, search Name Corn Plus Place Winnebago, Minnesota Product Farmer Coop which owns an Ethanol plant in Winnebago Mn. Coordinates 42.236095°, -96.472339° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":42.236095,"lon":-96.472339,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

127

Fuel-Cycle Fossil Energy Use and Greenhouse Gas Emissions of Corn Ethanol.” Paper presented at the 8 th Bio-Energy Conference  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This study has been undertaken at the request of the Illinois Department of Commerce and Community Affairs (DCCA) on the twin premises that (1) data and information essential to an informed choice about the corn-to-ethanol cycle are in need of updating, thanks to scientific and technological advances in both corn farming and ethanol production; and (2) generalized national estimates of energy intensities and greenhouse gas (GHG) production are of less relevance than estimates based specifically on activities and practices in the principal domestic corn production and milling region-- the upper Midwest. Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) contracted with DCCA to apply the ANL Greenhouse gas, Regulated Emissions and Energy in Transportation (GREET) full-fuel-cycle analysis model with updated information appropriate to corn operations in America’s heartland in an effort to examine the role of corn-feedstock ethanol with respect to GHG emissions given present and near future production technology and practice. Information about these technologies and practices has been obtained from a panel of outside experts consisting of representatives of the U.S. Department of Agriculture, midwestern universities with expertise in corn production and soil emissions, and acknowledged authorities in the field of ethanol plant

Michael Wang; Christopher Saricks

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

128

Efficient Tool Paths and Part Orientation for Face Milling  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Avoiding Tool Exit in Planar Milling by Adjusting Width oftime. The most common face milling tool paths employed areand Part Orientation for Face Milling A. Rangarajan 1 , D.

Rangarajan, Arvind; Dornfeld, David

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

129

Milling Stone Cultures in Northern California: Berryessa I  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Weight 313 g. Edge angle MILLING STONE CULTURES IN NORTHERNSite and the Early Milling Stone Cultures of SouthernMilling Stone Cultures in Northern California: Berryessa I

True, D. L; Baumhoff, M. A; Hellen, J. E

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

130

Feasible Offset Region Based Tool Path Planning for Face Milling  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Path Planning for Face Milling, Masters Report, UniversityPath Planning for Face Milling Prabhu Ramachandran Sponsoredburr formation while face milling powertrain components in

Ramachandran, Prabhu; Dornfeld, David A

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

131

Review of Geometric Solutions for Milling Burr Prediction and Minimization  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

height and thickness in face milling operation. Trans. ASME,Burr prediction system for face milling operation. Mastersminimi- zation in face milling: a geometric approach. Trans,

Tripathi, Shantanu; Dornfeld, David

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

132

Comments of Mille Lacs Energy Cooperative | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Mille Lacs Energy Cooperative Comments of Mille Lacs Energy Cooperative Comments of Mille Lacs Energy Cooperative on Implementing the National Broadband Plan by Studying the...

133

In-Process Separation of Mill Scale From Oil at Steel Hot Rolling Mills  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

It is of vital importance to find cost-effective technologies of reducing oil concentration in mill scale in order to recycle the mill scale without causing detrimental ...

134

Quad County Corn Processors | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Quad County Corn Processors Quad County Corn Processors Jump to: navigation, search Name Quad County Corn Processors Place Galva, Iowa Zip 51020 Product Farmer owned corn processing facility management company. Coordinates 38.38422°, -97.537539° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":38.38422,"lon":-97.537539,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

135

On-farm Assessment of Nitrogen Fertilizer application to corn on Nitrous Oxide Emissions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

in soils cropped to corn with varying N fertilization. Can.as affected by tillage, corn-soybean-alfalfa rotations, andsoil nitrogen mineralization for corn production in eastern

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

136

Economic Restructuring and Rural Subsistence in Mexico: Corn and the Crisis of the 1980s  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Centro Tepoztláh Seminar on Corn and the Economic Crisis in1990a). Mobilization ot Corn Pjot! uCorn in Southern Veracruz,* 1970-

Hewitt de Alcántara, editor, Cynthia

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

137

Succinic Acid as a Byproduct in a Corn-based Ethanol Biorefinery  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

MBI endeavored to develop a process for succinic acid production suitable for integration into a corn-based ethanol biorefinery. The project investigated the fermentative production of succinic acid using byproducts of corn mill operations. The fermentation process was attuned to include raw starch, endosperm, as the sugar source. A clean-not-sterile process was established to treat the endosperm and release the monomeric sugars. We developed the fermentation process to utilize a byproduct of corn ethanol fermentations, thin stillage, as the source of complex nitrogen and vitamin components needed to support succinic acid production in A. succinogenes. Further supplementations were eliminated without lowering titers and yields and a productivity above 0.6 g l-1 hr-1was achieved. Strain development was accomplished through generation of a recombinant strain that increased yields of succinic acid production. Isolation of additional strains with improved features was also pursued and frozen stocks were prepared from enriched, characterized cultures. Two recovery processes were evaluated at pilot scale and data obtained was incorporated into our economic analyses.

MBI International

2007-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

138

Gas fluidized-bed stirred media mill  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A gas fluidized-bed stirred media mill is provided for comminuting solid ticles. The mill includes a housing enclosing a porous fluidizing gas diffuser plate, a baffled rotor and stator, a hollow drive shaft with lateral vents, and baffled gas exhaust exit ports. In operation, fluidizing gas is forced through the mill, fluidizing the raw material and milling media. The rotating rotor, stator and milling media comminute the raw material to be ground. Small entrained particles may be carried from the mill by the gas through the exit ports when the particles reach a very fine size.

Sadler, III, Leon Y. (Tuscaloosa, AL)

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

139

YIELD BENEFIT OF CORN EVENT MON 863  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

copies of this document for non-commercial purposes by any means, provide that this Data from field experiments are used to estimate the yield benefit of corn hybrids containing event MON 863 relative to nontransgenic corn hybrids without corn rootworm control and with a soil insecticide for corn rootworm control. Over typical ranges for corn rootworm population pressure, event MON 863 provides a yield benefit of 9-28% relative to no control and of 1.5-4.5 % relative to control with a soil insecticide. For a reasonable range of prices and yields, the value of the event MON 863 yield benefit is $25-$75/ac relative to no control and $4-$12/ac relative to control with a soil insecticide, depending on corn rootworm pressure. Because of the low correlation between yield loss and the root rating difference, a common empirical finding when estimating yield loss with root ratings, the 95% confidence intervals around these averages are quite wide. Though on average, event MON 863 has substantial value, the wide confidence intervals imply that farmers will see a wide variety of actual performance levels in their fields. This uncertainty in the

Paul D. Mitchell; Paul D. Mitchell

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

140

MILLING OPERATIONS Milling is the process of machining flat, curved, or Milling machines are basically classified as vertical or  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

-speed steel, stellite, and cemented carbide cutters reamer shank. In this case, one or two side milling have

Gellman, Andrew J.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "wet corn milling" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Ivaco Rolling Mills LP, Chemistry Laboratory  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Ivaco Rolling Mills LP, Chemistry Laboratory. NVLAP Lab Code: 200143-0. Address and Contact Information: Highway 17 ...

2013-09-06T23:59:59.000Z

142

URANIUM MILL TAILINGS RADON FLUX CALCULATIONS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

URANIUM MILL TAILINGS RADON FLUX CALCULATIONS PIÃ?ON RIDGE PROJECT MONTROSE COUNTY, COLORADO (EFRC) proposes to license, construct, and operate a conventional acid leach uranium and vanadium mill storage pad, and access roads. The mill is designed to process ore containing uranium and vanadium

143

,"California Federal Offshore Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","California Federal Offshore Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved...

144

Climate Forecasts for Corn Producer Decision-Making  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Corn is the most widely grown crop in the Americas, with annual production in the US of approximately 332 million metric tons. Improved climate forecasts, together with climate-related decision-tools for corn producers based on these improved ...

Eugene S. Takle; Christopher J. Anderson; Jeffrey Andresen; James Angel; Roger W. Elmore; Benjamin M. Gramig; Patrick Guinan; Steven Hilberg; Doug Kluck; Raymond Massey; Dev Niyogi; Jeanne M. Schneider; Martha D. Shulski; Dennis Todey; Melissa Widhalm

145

Effectiveness Analysis of Corn Combine Based on DEA Method  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper used DEA method to analyze the production efficiency of corn combine??pointed out how to find the waste of resources??then put forward the way to optimize resource utilization. Keywords: DEA, Corn combine, Efficiency, Evaluation

Xinjie Liu; Baoling Yang

2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

146

Pro Corn LLC | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Pro Corn LLC Pro Corn LLC Jump to: navigation, search Name Pro-Corn LLC Place Preston, Minnesota Zip 55965 Product Minnesotan farmer owned bioethanol production company. Coordinates 47.526531°, -121.936019° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":47.526531,"lon":-121.936019,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

147

Corn Belt Power Coop | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Corn Belt Power Coop Corn Belt Power Coop Place Iowa Utility Id 4363 Utility Location Yes Ownership C NERC Location MRO NERC MRO Yes ISO Other Yes Operates Generating Plant Yes Activity Generation Yes Activity Transmission Yes Activity Buying Transmission Yes Activity Wholesale Marketing Yes Alt Fuel Vehicle Yes Alt Fuel Vehicle2 Yes References EIA Form EIA-861 Final Data File for 2010 - File1_a[1] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Utility Rate Schedules Grid-background.png No rate schedules available. Average Rates No Rates Available References ↑ "EIA Form EIA-861 Final Data File for 2010 - File1_a" Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Corn_Belt_Power_Coop&oldid=41053

148

Innovative Methods for Corn Stover Collecting, Handling, Storing and Transporting  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Investigation of innovative methods for collecting, handling, storing, and transporting corn stover for potential use for production of cellulosic ethanol.

Atchison, J. E.; Hettenhaus, J. R.

2003-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

149

Corn Stover Impacts on Near-Surface Soil Properties of No-Till Corn In Ohio  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Corn stover is a primary biofuel feedstock and its expanded use could help reduce reliance on fossil fuels and net CO2 emissions. Excessive stover removal may, however, negatively impact near-surface soil properties within a short period after removal. We assessed changes in soil crust strength, bulk density, and water content over a 1-yr period following a systematic removal or addition of stover from three no-till soils under corn in Ohio.

Blanco-Canqui, H; Lal, Rattan; Post, W M.; Izaurralde, R Cesar C.; Owens, L B.

2006-01-06T23:59:59.000Z

150

Effect of cyclone assisted milling on legume flour characteristics and functionality in selected food products.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Legumes (cowpea and soybean) were milled using a cyclone-assisted attrition mill to produce fine legume flour. Milling variations consisted of alterations in mill design and… (more)

Jarrard, Mark, Jr.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

151

EAR ROT IN THE 2006 CORN CROP  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Several incidences of ear rot have been noticed across Illinois and Iowa this year. In most cases, these fields were grown to corn the previous year. It is not surprising that ear rots are developing this year, given the late summer rains and high amount of stalk rots. Growers should be alerted to

unknown authors

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

152

Online SAG Mill Pluse Measurement and Optimization  

SciTech Connect

The grinding efficiency of semi autogenous milling or ball milling depends on the tumbling motion of the total charge within the mill. Utilization of this tumbling motion for efficient breakage of particles depends on the conditions inside the mill. However, any kind of monitoring device to measure the conditions inside the mill shell during operation is virtually impossible due to the severe environment presented by the tumbling charge. An instrumented grinding ball, which is capable of surviving a few hours and transmitting the impacts it experiences, is proposed here. The spectrum of impacts collected over 100 revolutions of the mills presents the signature of the grinding environment inside mill. This signature could be effectively used to optimize the milling performance by investigating this signature's relation to mill product size, mill throughput, make-up ball size, mill speed, liner profile and ball addition rates. At the same time, it can also be used to design balls and liner systems that can survive longer in the mill. The technological advances made in electronics and communication makes this leap in instrumentation certainly viable. Hence, the instrumented grinding ball offers the ability to qualitatively observe and optimize the milling environment. An instrumented load cell package that can measure the force of impacts inside the grinding chamber of a mill is developed here. The signal from the instrumented load cell package is interpreted in terms of a histogram termed as an impact spectrum which is a plot of the number of impacts at a specific energy level against the energy. It reflects on the average force regime of the mill. The instrumented load cell package was calibrated against the ultra fast load cell which has been unanimously accepted as a standard to measure single breakage events. The load cell package was successfully used to produce impact spectra in an 8.5 inch lab scale mill. The mill speed and the ball size were varied to study their effect on the impact spectra. A good correlation was found between the process variables and the impact spectra. The load cell package was then used in a 16 inch pilot scale mill. The mill speed, ball size, and mill filling were varied here and a consistent trend between these variables and impact spectra was observed. With a better understanding developed from the initial tests, the design of the load cell package was significantly changed to eliminate noise. With the new design, the impact spectra were re-determined in the 16 inch pilot mill varying the process variables - ball size, mill speed, and mill filling. Finally, it is successfully shown that a change in the operating variables of a mill can be seen in the impact spectra and that this concept can be successfully developed to monitor the grinding operation of industrial mills. To adapt it to industrial level it is mandatory to make the load cell package wireless. A design of a wireless circuit that is capable of transferring data at the required speed of 1000 kbps was also developed and tested at Cortez Gold Mines (CGM), Nevada.

Raj Rajamani; Jose Delgadillo; Vishal Duriseti

2007-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

153

Asbestos/NESHAP adequately wet guidance  

SciTech Connect

The Asbestos NESHAP requires facility owners and/or operators involved in demolition and renovation activities to control emissions of particulate asbestos to the outside air because no safe concentration of airborne asbestos has ever been established. The primary method used to control asbestos emissions is to adequately wet the Asbestos Containing Material (ACM) with a wetting agent prior to, during and after demolition/renovation activities. The purpose of the document is to provide guidance to asbestos inspectors and the regulated community on how to determine if friable ACM is adequately wet as required by the Asbestos NESHAP.

Shafer, R.; Throwe, S.; Salgado, O.; Garlow, C.; Hoerath, E.

1990-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

154

Uranium mill monitoring for natural fission reactors  

SciTech Connect

Isotopic monitoring of the product stream from operating uranium mills is proposed for discovering other possible natural fission reactors; aspects of their occurrence and discovery are considered. Uranium mill operating characteristics are formulated in terms of the total uranium capacity, the uranium throughput, and the dilution half-time of the mill. The requirements for detection of milled reactor-zone uranium are expressed in terms of the dilution half-time and the sampling frequency. Detection of different amounts of reactor ore with varying degrees of /sup 235/U depletion is considered.

Apt, K.E.

1977-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

155

The Bowersock Mills and Power Company 1874  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Hydroelectric Energy The Bowersock Mills and Power Co., Lawrence, KS Hydroelectric Energy Potential for U.S. BMPC Plant At Forefront of Development Curve "In our estimates...

156

Breakdown in the Wetting Transparency of Graphene  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We develop a theory to model the van der Waals interactions between liquid and graphene, including quantifying the wetting behavior of a graphene-coated surface. Molecular dynamics simulations and contact angle measurements ...

Shih, Chih-Jen

157

Wetting of a Chemically Heterogeneous Surface  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Theories for inhomogeneous fluids have focused in recent years on wetting, capillary conden- sation, and solvation forces for model systems where the surface(s) is(are) smooth homogeneous parallel plates, cylinders, or spherical drops. Unfortunately natural systems are more likely to be hetaogeneous both in surt%ce shape and surface chemistry. In this paper we discuss the conse- quences of chemical heterogeneity on wetting. Specifically, a 2-dimensional implementation of a nonlocal density functional theory is solved for a striped surface model. Both the strength and range of the heterogeneity are varied. Contact angles are calculated, and phase transitions (both the wetting transition and a local layering transition) are located. The wetting properties of the surface ase shown to be strongly dependent on the nature of the surface heterogeneity. In addition highly ordered nanoscopic phases are found, and the operational limits for formation of ordered or crystalline phases of nanoscopic extent are discussed.

Frink, L.J.D.; Salinger, A.G.

1998-11-20T23:59:59.000Z

158

Reducing the atmospheric impact of wet slaking  

SciTech Connect

Means of reducing the atmospheric emissions due to the wet slaking of coke are considered. One option, investigated here, is to remove residual active silt and organic compounds from the biologically purified wastewater sent for slaking, by coagulation and flocculation.

B.D. Zubitskii; G.V. Ushakov; B.G. Tryasunov; A.G.Ushakov [Kuznetsk Basin State Technical University, Kemerovo (Russian Federation)

2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

159

Utah Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Utah Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic...

160

Utah Natural Gas Wet After Lease Separation, Reserves in Nonproducing...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Wet After Lease Separation, Reserves in Nonproducing Reservoirs (Billion Cubic Feet) Utah Natural Gas Wet After Lease Separation, Reserves in Nonproducing Reservoirs (Billion Cubic...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "wet corn milling" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Texas State Offshore Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet After...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Texas State Offshore Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved...

162

Texas State Offshore Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Texas State Offshore Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves...

163

Table 3. Wet natural gas production and resources (trillion cubic ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

2013 EIA/ARI unproved wet shale gas technically recoverable resources (TRR) 2012 USGS conventional unproved wet natural gas TRR, including reserve

164

Colorado Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Proved Reserves...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Colorado Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1...

165

Texas - RRC District 10 Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Texas - RRC District 10 Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves...

166

Texas - RRC District 5 Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Texas - RRC District 5 Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved...

167

Texas - RRC District 8 Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Texas - RRC District 8 Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved...

168

Texas - RRC District 8A Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Texas - RRC District 8A Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves...

169

Texas - RRC District 9 Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Texas - RRC District 9 Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved...

170

Texas - RRC District 6 Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Texas - RRC District 6 Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved...

171

New Mexico - East Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Proved...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) New Mexico - East Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade...

172

Gulf of Mexico Federal Offshore - Texas Natural Gas, Wet After...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Gulf of Mexico Federal Offshore - Texas Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Proved Reserves...

173

Texas - RRC District 3 Onshore Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Texas - RRC District 3 Onshore Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved...

174

Texas - RRC District 1 Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Texas - RRC District 1 Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade...

175

Texas - RRC District 6 Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Texas - RRC District 6 Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade...

176

Effect of pelleting on the recalcitrance and bioconversion of dilute-acid pretreated corn stover  

SciTech Connect

Background: Knowledge regarding the performance of densified biomass in biochemical processes is limited. The effects of densification on biochemical conversion are explored here. Methods: Pelleted corn stover samples were generated from bales that were milled to 6.35 mm. Low-solids acid pretreatment and simultaneous saccharification and fermentation were performed to evaluate pretreatment efficacy and ethanol yields achieved for pelleted and ground stover (6.35 mm and 2 mm) samples. Both pelleted and 6.35-mm ground stover were evaluated using a ZipperClave® reactor under high-solids, process-relevant conditions for multiple pretreatment severities (Ro), followed by enzymatic hydrolysis of the washed, pretreated solids. Results: Monomeric xylose yields were significantly higher for pellets (approximately 60%) than for ground formats (approximately 38%). Pellets achieved approximately 84% of theoretical ethanol yield (TEY); ground stover formats had similar profiles, reaching approximately 68% TEY. Pelleting corn stover was not detrimental to pretreatment efficacy for both low- and high-solids conditions, and even enhanced ethanol yields.

Allison E Ray; Amber Hoover; Gary Gresham

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

177

Modification of Corn Starch Ethanol Refinery to Efficiently Accept Various High-Impact Cellulosic Feedstocks  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The goal of the Corn-to-Cellulosic Migration (CCM) pilot facility was to demonstrate the implementation of advanced technologies and methods for conversion of non-food, cellulosic feedstocks into ethanol, assess the economics of the facility and evaluate potential environmental benefits for biomass to fuels conversion. The CCM project was comprised of design, build, and operate phases for the CCM pilot facility as well as research & development, and modeling components. The CCM pilot facility was designed to process 1 tonne per day of non-food biomass and biologically convert that biomass to ethanol at a rate of 70 gallons per tonne. The plant demonstrated throughputs in excess of 1 tonne per day for an extended run of 1400 hours. Although target yields were not fully achieved, the continuous operation validated the design and operability of the plant. These designs will permit the design of larger scale operations at existing corn milling operations or for greenfield plants. EdeniQ, a partner in the project and the owner of the pilot plant, continues to operate and evaluate other feedstocks.

Derr, Dan

2013-12-30T23:59:59.000Z

178

Wet/dry cooling tower and method  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A wet/dry cooling tower wherein a liquid to-be-cooled is flowed along channels of a corrugated open surface or the like, which surface is swept by cooling air. The amount of the surface covered by the liquid is kept small compared to the dry part thereof so that said dry part acts as a fin for the wet part for heat dissipation.

Glicksman, Leon R. (Lynnfield, MA); Rohsenow, Warren R. (Waban, MA)

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

179

PH Awareness presentation quad city jan 2004  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Arvind Thekdi - Arvind Thekdi - E3M, Inc. Corn refining Industry Web Cast 030805 Introduction to Energy Savings in Process Heating for the Corn Refining Industry Web-Cast Presentation By Arvind C. Thekdi, Ph.D. President E3M, Inc. March 8, 2005 2 Arvind Thekdi - E3M, Inc. Corn refining Industry Web Cast 030805 Energy Cost in Corn Refining Industries Operations * Corn processing is very energy intensive * Energy costs are the largest operating cost for the wet corn milling industry, next only to the cost of corn. * Corn wet milling uses 15% of all energy used by the food and kindred products sector of U.S. manufacturing * For a typical plant processing 100,000 bushels per day, energy cost is approximately 25 to 35 million dollars per year. * This represents $0.75 to $1.50 cost per bushel of corn

180

A Milling-Implement Quarry at Elephant Mountain, California  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

pp. 191-221 (1995). A Milling-Implement Quarry at Elephantwere shaped into aboriginal milling stones and pestles andin the Mojave River region. The milling-implement quarry at

Schneider, Joan S; Lerch, Michael K; Smith, Gerald A

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "wet corn milling" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Two Milling Stone Inventories from Northern San Diego County, California  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

2, pp. 233-261 (1982). Two Milling Stone Inventories from5. Manos from Rincon 301. MILLING STONE INVENTORIES FROM SANd-e) from Rincon 301. MILLING STONE INVENTORIES FROM SAN

True, D. L; Beemer, Eleanor

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

182

Virtual cutter path display for dental milling machine  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper presents the prototype of a mixed reality system using the computer controlled dental milling machine, which is called MRD Mill. First, overview of the core dental milling machine developed in this study is ...

Ito, Teruaki

183

Corn Plus Wind Farm | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Plus Wind Farm Plus Wind Farm Jump to: navigation, search Name Corn Plus Wind Farm Facility Corn Plus Sector Wind energy Facility Type Commercial Scale Wind Facility Status In Service Owner John Deere Wind Developer John Deere Wind Energy Purchaser N/a Location MN Coordinates 43.760635°, -94.149617° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":43.760635,"lon":-94.149617,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

184

Corn Belt Energy Corporation | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Corn Belt Energy Corporation Corn Belt Energy Corporation Place Illinois Utility Id 4362 Utility Location Yes Ownership C NERC Location RFC NERC RFC Yes ISO MISO Yes Activity Transmission Yes Activity Distribution Yes Activity Bundled Services Yes References EIA Form EIA-861 Final Data File for 2010 - File1_a[1] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Utility Rate Schedules Grid-background.png INDUSTRIAL SUBSTATION RATE ("ISR") Industrial RATE 1 RESIDENTIAL & FARM SERVICE Residential RATE 10 ELECTRIC HEAT FOR RESIDENTIAL & FARM SERVICE Residential RATE 11 RESIDENTIAL & FARM SERVICE - INTERRUPTIBLE Residential RATE 12 RESIDENTIAL ELECTRICALLY HEATED APARTMENTS Residential

185

Direct Use of Wet Ethanol in a Homogeneous Charge Compression Ignition (HCCI) Engine: Experimental and Numerical Results  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The energy balance of corn ethanol revisited, Transaction ofnet energy balanceof corn ethanol, USDA Economic Researchall stages of ethanol production from corn, as a percent of

Mack, John Hunter; Flowers, Daniel L; Aceves, Salvador M; Dibble, Robert W

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

186

Clean Air Act Requirements: Uranium Mill Tailings  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

EPA'S Clean Air Act Requirements: Uranium Mill Tailings Radon Emissions Rulemaking Reid J. Rosnick Presentation to Environmental Protection Agency Uranium Contamination Radiation Protection Division (6608J requirements for operating uranium mill tailings (Subpart W) Status update on Subpart W activities Outreach

187

Take Notes from Corn Hybrid Plots  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Corn harvest is slow to get going this year, with only 5 % of the state’s crop reported harvested as of 24 Sep (USDA-NASS, 25 Sep 2006). The causes of the slow start to harvest are slower than normal maturation of the grain (Fig 1), cool temperatures (slower grain drying), and muddy field conditions due to the continuing pattern of frequent rains. The slow pace of corn harvest coupled with the poor stalk quality in some fields (Nielsen, 2006) reminds us how spoiled we were with generally good harvest conditions of the past two seasons. But, that is not the point of this article. Fig. 1. Percent of Indiana’s corn crop that is rated “mature and safe from frost”, as of 24 Sep 2006. Data source: USDA-NASS. If rainy weather and soggy field conditions are keeping you from your own harvest, spend some of your down time to walk or re-walk neighborhood on-farm hybrid plots before they are harvested. Many of these trials are still “signed ” so that you can identify © 2006, Purdue UnivRL (Bob) Nielsen Page 2 9/27/2006 the seed company and their hybrid numbers. Record notes on hybrid characteristics such as ear height, ear size, completeness of kernel set, husk coverage, standability, and

R. L. (bob Nielsen

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

188

Project 310  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

carbohydrate generated from agricultural enterprises in the U.S., such as corn wet-milling. This project is studying the production of a suite of specialty chemicals by...

189

Development of a Performance-based Industrial Energy Efficiency...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

is useful if you would like background information on how EPA's ENERGY STAR Wet Corn Milling Plant EPI was developed. The report presents the individual equations used to develop...

190

NanoFab Tool: 4Wave Ion Milling System  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... 4Wave Ion Milling System. CORAL Name: Ion Mill. Location: Building 215 (NanoFab Clean Room Bay A106). Description: ...

2010-10-13T23:59:59.000Z

191

Tamil Nadu Spinning Mills Association TASMA | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

search Name Tamil Nadu Spinning Mills Association (TASMA) Place Dindigul, Tamil Nadu, India Zip 624003 Sector Wind energy Product Association of spinning mill owners; promoting...

192

STATEMENT OF CONSIDERATION REQUEST BY DOW CORNING CORPORATION (DOW CORNING) FOR AN ADVANCED  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

CONSIDERATION CONSIDERATION REQUEST BY DOW CORNING CORPORATION (DOW CORNING) FOR AN ADVANCED WAIVER OF DOMESTIC AND FOREIGN INVENTION RIGHTS UNDER COOPERATIVE AGREEMENT NO. DE-FC22-96PC96050-W(A)-96-026, CH-0915 The Petitioner, Dow Corning, was awarded this cooperative agreement in response to an unsolicited proposal for the engineering scale development of a process for the conversion of natural gas to methyl chloride. The Petitioner was selected based on its past experience in identifying an oxyhydrochlorination catalyst and separation process for this conversion. The initial phase of this work was performed under DOE Contract No. DE-AC22- 91PC91030. The Contracting Officer has found that the provisions of the 1992 Energy Policy Act P.L. 102-486 apply to this cooperative agreement and that the cost sharing requirement of

193

Maximizing the enzymic saccharification of corn stover  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Lignocellulosic biomass (e.g. agricultural residues, wood, municipal solid waste, tree and yard t gs, sewage sludge, and waste paper) comprises three major components: cellulose, hemicellulose and lignin. It can contain as much as 75% polysaccharide; thus, biomass has considerable potential as a fermentation feedstock. Corn stover represents an especially important resource because it is the single largest source of agricultural residue in the United States. The best method to obtain fermentable sugars from biomass is by enzymic saccharification. Before biomass can be effectively saccharified, some pretreatment is required. Calcium hydroxide (Eme) is an effective pretreatment agent for corn stover and is less expensive and easier to recover than other alternatives. The reconunended process conditions for treating corn stover are 4 h at 120 'C using 0. 075 g Ca(OH)2/g dry biomass and 5 g H20/g dry biomass. The maximum sugar yield bv enzymic hydrolysis (25 FPU ceflulase/g dry biomass, 50 'C, 7 days) of pretreated corn stover is 88.0% of the glucose and 88.1% of the total sugars. The recommended enzyme loading is IO FPU ceUulase/g dry biomass. Tween 20 and Tween 80 are effective at improving the enzymic saccharification of corn stover. The recommended loading of Tween is 0. 15 g Tween/g dry biomass; the loading, rather than the concentration, is the critical parameter. Adding Tween to the hydrolytic medium increases the maximum sugar yield to I 00% and 94.8% of the glucose and 97.4% and 93.3 % of the total sugars for Tween 20 and Tween 80, respectively. Tween also reduces the recommended enzyme loading to 3 FPU ceflulase/g dry biomass. The action of Tween is three-fold: (1) Time profiles show that enzymes remain active at higher temperatures in the presence of Tween. (2) Kinetic analyses show that, although the theoretical maximum hydrolysis rate is unchanged by Tween, the adsorption and coverage parameters, a and c, in the HCH-1 model are reduced which results in higher effective hydrolysis rates. (3) The maximum enzymic digestion, which is independent of enzyme effects, is higher with Tween. Thus, the action of Tween is a combination of surfactant, enzyme effector, and fignoceflulose matrix disrupter.

Kaar, William Edward

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

194

California - Coastal Region Onshore Natural Gas, Wet After Lease ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

California - Coastal Region Onshore Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Reserves Sales (Billion Cubic Feet)

195

Membrane-based wet electrostatic precipitation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Emissions of fine particulate matter, PM2.5, in both primary and secondary form, are difficult to capture in typical dry electrostatic precipitators (ESPs). Wet (or waterbased) ESPs are well suited for collection of acid aerosols and fine particulates because of greater corona power and virtually no re-entrainment. However, field disruptions because of spraying (misting) of water, formation of dry spots (channeling), and collector surface corrosion limit the applicability of current wet ESPs in the control of secondary PM2.5. Researchers at Ohio University have patented novel membrane collection surfaces to address these problems. Water-based cleaning in membrane collectors made of corrosion-resistant fibers is facilitated by capillary action between the fibers, maintaining an even distribution of water. This paper presents collection efficiency results of lab-scale and pilot-scale testing at First Energy's Bruce Mansfield Plant for the membrane-based wet ESP. The data indicate that a membrane wet ESP was more effective at collecting fine particulates, acid aerosols, and oxidized mercury than the metal-plate wet ESP, even with {approximately}15% less collecting area. 15 refs., 7 figs., 6 tabs.

David J. Bayless; Liming Shi; Gregory Kremer; Ben J. Stuart; James Reynolds; John Caine [Ohio University, Athens, OH (US). Ohio Coal Research Center

2005-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

196

Prenova & Owens Corning Teaming Presentation- Using Service and...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Presentation- Using Service and Product Providers to Leverage Your Energy Efforts: PrenovaOwens Corning Energy Process Optimization Secondary menu About us Press room Contact Us...

197

Modernizing the handling of ear corn. Final technical report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The goal of the project was to modernize the handling of ear corn. The corn was picked with a three row JD 300 picker pulled by a tractor. Pulled behind the picker was a side dump wagon with a capacity of 150 bushels of ear corn. When the dump wagon was full, a grain truck was driven along side of the wagon and the dump wagon, controlled by the tractor driver, was emptied into the truck. After two dumps of the wagon, the truck was driven to the storage area. The storage area consisted of ten (ten) 2000 bushel corn cribs set in a semi circle so that the elevator that filled the cribs could be moved from one crib to the next without changing the fill point. At the storage area, the truck full of corn was dumped into the platform feeder. By using a platform feeder to feed the elevator, all ten (10) cribs could be filled without moving it. After the harvest was complete, the corn remains in the cribs until needed for feed or until the corn is sold. During the time that the corn remains in the cribs, the turbine ventilator draws air through the corn and dries it.

Kleptz, C.F.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

198

Prediction of corn tortilla textural quality using stress relaxation methods.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Feasibility of the stress relaxation technique which has a strong potential for texture characterization of dough and food products, was evaluated with both corn masa… (more)

Guo, Zhihong

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

199

Corn fiber hulls as a food additive or animal feed  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The present invention provides a novel animal feed or food additive that may be made from thermochemically hydrolyzed, solvent-extracted corn fiber hulls. The animal feed or food additive may be made, for instance, by thermochemically treating corn fiber hulls to hydrolyze and solubilize the hemicellulose and starch present in the corn fiber hulls to oligosaccharides. The residue may be extracted with a solvent to separate the oil from the corn fiber, leaving a solid residue that may be prepared, for instance by aggolmerating, and sold as a food additive or an animal feed.

Abbas, Charles (Champaign, IL); Beery, Kyle E. (Decatur, IN); Cecava, Michael J. (Decatur, IN); Doane, Perry H. (Decatur, IN)

2010-12-21T23:59:59.000Z

200

Properties of Carbonized Corn Straw as Thermal Insulating ... - TMS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

May 1, 2007 ... Properties of Carbonized Corn Straw as Thermal Insulating Agent of Liquid Metal by Nan Wang, Min Chen, Yang Wang, Weiwei Leng, Yulong ...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "wet corn milling" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Corn and Palmer amaranth interactions in dryland and irrigated environments.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Palmer amaranth is a competitive weed and has caused variable corn yield losses in diverse environments of Kansas. The objectives of this study were to… (more)

Rule, Dwain Michael

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

202

Alternative 2010 Corn Production Scenarios and Policy Implications  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The quantity of U.S. corn used for domestic ethanol production has grown rapidly in recent years, driven by mandated production levels of renewable biofuels, tax

Scott Irwin; Darrel Good

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

203

Biochemical Production of Ethanol from Corn Stover: 2008 State...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

10-46214 August 2009 Biochemical Production of Ethanol from Corn Stover: 2008 State of Technology Model D. Humbird and A. Aden National Renewable Energy Laboratory 1617 Cole...

204

Corn Belt Energy Corporation- Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Program  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Corn Belt Energy Corporation (CBEC), in association with the Wabash Valley Power Association, provides its customers with the "Power Moves" energy efficiency rebate program. Through this program,...

205

Microsoft PowerPoint - Prenova_OwensCorning_Teaming_Presentation...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

solution to Owens Corning's North American facilities for: *Energy Supply Management *Energy Price Risk Management *Energy Process Optimization *Bill Payment and Data...

206

DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Sylvania Corning Nuclear...  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

Nuclear Corp Inc Sylvania Laboratories - NY 07 FUSRAP Considered Sites Site: SYLVANIA CORNING NUCLEAR CORP., INC., SYLVANIA LABORATORIES (NY.07) Eliminated from consideration under...

207

STATEMENT OF CONSIDERATIONS REQUEST BY CORNING INCORPORATED FOR...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

is to develop effective, economical technology to enable the removal of mercury from syngas created when coal is gasified. Under the subcontract, Corning will conduct research...

208

Yield, quality components and nitrogen levels of silage corn fertilized with urea and zeolite  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and N fertilization affect corn silage yield and quality. Jand the nitrogen status of corn. J Prod Agric. 1991;4:525-and nitrogen effects on corn silage. Agron. J. ___, Kalonge

Bernardi, Alberto C. de Campos; Souza, Gilberto Batista de; Polidoro, José Carlos; Paiva, Paulo Renato Perdigão; Monte, Marisa Bezerra de Melo

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

209

The Market Effect of a Food Scare: The Case of Genetically Modified StarLink Corn  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

outweigh the direct effect on corn prices. In retrospect,76. Gadsby, M.C. “StarLink Corn Containment Program” AventisStarLink: Impacts on the U.S. Corn Market and World Trade. ”

Carter, Colin A.; Smith, Aaron

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

210

Yield and nitrogen levels of silage corn fertilized with urea and zeolite  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

an increase in DM production of corn. Urea has been the mosturea-N is used to fertilized corn, especially on acid soils.levels of nitrogen of silage corn fertilized with urea and

Bernardi, Alberto C. de Campos; Souza, Gilberto Batista de; Polidoro, José Carlos; Paiva, Paulo Renato Perdigão; Monte, Marisa Bezerra de Melo

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

211

Wet powder seal for gas containment  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A gas seal is formed by a compact layer of an insoluble powder and liquid filling the fine interstices of that layer. The smaller the particle size of the selected powder, such as sand or talc, the finer will be the interstices or capillary spaces in the layer and the greater will be the resulting sealing capacity, i.e., the gas pressure differential which the wet powder layer can withstand. Such wet powder seal is useful in constructing underground gas reservoirs or storage cavities for nuclear wastes as well as stopping leaks in gas mains buried under ground or situated under water. The sealing capacity of the wet powder seal can be augmented by the hydrostatic head of a liquid body established over the seal.

Stang, L.G.

1979-08-29T23:59:59.000Z

212

Wet powder seal for gas containment  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A gas seal is formed by a compact layer of an insoluble powder and liquid filling the fine interstices of that layer. The smaller the particle size of the selected powder, such as sand or talc, the finer will be the interstices or capillary spaces in the layer and the greater will be the resulting sealing capacity, i.e., the gas pressure differential which the wet powder layer can withstand. Such wet powder seal is useful in constructing underground gas reservoirs or storage cavities for nuclear wastes as well as stopping leaks in gas mains buried under ground or situated under water. The sealing capacity of the wet powder seal can be augmented by the hydrostatic head of a liquid body established over the seal.

Stang, Louis G. (Sayville, NY)

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

213

Corn production with perennial ground covers: evaluation of cover species and their effects on corn growth and development.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The use of perennial ground covers (PGC) in corn production may offer a long term and ecological solution to soil conservation issues while allowing the… (more)

Flynn, Ernest Scott

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

214

Enhanced Mercury Removal by Wet FGD Systems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report provides results from testing conducted in 2005 as part of three EPRI co-funded projects that are aimed at enhancing the capture of mercury in flue gas from coal-fired power boilers when scrubbed by wet flue gas desulfurization (FGD) systems. The first project is co-sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy's National Energy Technology Laboratory (DOE-NETL) under Cooperative Agreement DE-FC26-01NT41185, "Pilot Testing of Mercury Oxidation Catalysts for Upstream of Wet FGD," as well as by two...

2006-03-07T23:59:59.000Z

215

Chaoticity of the Wet Granular Gas  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In this work we derive an analytic expression for the Kolmogorov-Sinai entropy of dilute wet granular matter, valid for any spatial dimension. The grains are modelled as hard spheres and the influence of the wetting liquid is described according to the Capillary Model, in which dissipation is due to the hysteretic cohesion force of capillary bridges. The Kolmogorov-Sinai entropy is expanded in a series with respect to density. We find a rapid increase of the leading term when liquid is added. This demonstrates the sensitivity of the granular dynamics to humidity, and shows that the liquid significantly increases the chaoticity of the granular gas.

A. Fingerle; S. Herminghaus; V. Yu. Zaburdaev

2007-05-22T23:59:59.000Z

216

Fate of Mercury in Wet FGD Systems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report describes the results of a bench-scale, laboratory investigation of the fate of flue gas mercury species in wet flue gas desulfurization (FGD) scrubbers that are used for sulfur dioxide (SO2) control in coal-fired power plants. Data collected in the EPA mercury Information Collection Request (ICR), and in research projects sponsored by EPRI show that most wet scrubbers used for SO2 control achieve high removals of oxidized mercury and little or no elemental mercury removal. However, some scru...

2004-03-12T23:59:59.000Z

217

Formulating N recommendations for corn in the corn belt using recent data  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Making N rate recommendations for corn has been one of the most economically important goals of publicly funded crop production and soil fertility personnel and programs over the past five decades. Changes in cropping systems, hybrids, tillage, and other management practices, along with opportunities in site-specific inputs and awareness of the need to minimize the amount of N

Emerson D. Nafziger; John E. Sawyer; Robert G. Hoeft

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

218

Alternative Controls for Helicoverpazea on Sweet Corn: Phytotoxicity and Pollination Inhibition from Direct Silk Applications.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Helicoverpa zea, Boddie (corn earworm) is an important pest of sweet corn in New England. Conventional management of this pest is achieved through repeated applications… (more)

Jackson, Tori Lee

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

219

Characterization of the Impact of Process Variables on the Densification of Corn Stover.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The bulk density of corn stover poses a major obstruction to its large scale viability as a biomass feedstock. Corn stover has a low bulk… (more)

Thoreson, Curtis Peder

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

220

Sustainable use of California biomass resources can help meet state and national bioenergy targets  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

gas emissions. Increase/reduction (%) Corn ethanol drymill NG Corn ethanol best-casedry mill NG Corn ethanol dry mill coal* Corn ethanol dry

Jenkins, Bryan M; Williams, Robert B; Gildart, Martha C; Kaffka, Stephen R.; Hartsough, Bruce; Dempster, Peter G

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "wet corn milling" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

THE 2001 NET ENERGY BALANCE OF CORN-ETHANOL (PRELIMINARY)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

used on farms, such as gasoline, diesel, LP gas (LPG), natural gas, and electricity, for the production of corn ethanol utilizing the latest survey of U.S. corn producers and the 2001 U.S. survey of ethanol in manufacturing and marketing nitrogen fertilizer, (3) improving the quality of estimates for energy used

Patzek, Tadeusz W.

222

Corn Stover for Bioethanol -- Your New Cash Crop?  

SciTech Connect

Biomass ethanol technology is still developing and important questions need to be answered about corn stover removal, but prospects are excellent for you to someday be able to harvest and sell a substantial portion of your stover for fuel production--without hurting your soil or main corn grain operation.

Brown, H.

2001-05-16T23:59:59.000Z

223

Mille Lacs Energy Cooperative | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Mille Lacs Energy Cooperative Mille Lacs Energy Cooperative (Redirected from Mille Lacs Electric Coop) Jump to: navigation, search Name Mille Lacs Energy Cooperative Place Minnesota Utility Id 12546 Utility Location Yes Ownership C NERC Location MRO NERC MRO Yes ISO MISO Yes Activity Distribution Yes References EIA Form EIA-861 Final Data File for 2010 - File1_a[1] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Utility Rate Schedules Grid-background.png Dual Fuel Space Heating Rate Electric Combination Heating Rate Freedom Heating Rate Residential General Service Residential Green Power Energy Large Power Commercial Large Power - Industrial Industrial Light - 100 watt HPS Lighting Light - 150 watt HPS Lighting

224

Yang-Mills Gravity in Biconformal Space  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We propose a new conformal supergravity model with direct relevance to string/gauge theory dualities. This biconformal supergravity theory is formulated with a Yang-Mills type action. The resulting 8-dim symplectic geometries describe 4-dim scale-invariant general relativity. We then show an extension of N = 4 SUSY Yang-Mills to a curved biconformal geometry such that the extended form of the Yang-Mills fields provides the curvatures for the biconformal space. These curvatures solve the biconformal field equations whenever the original 4-dim fields satisfy the 4-dim YM theory. This gives a 1-1 mapping between the gravity and gauge theories. We also display systematic extension of any spacetime co-tangent bundle to a biconformal space, and extension of any 4-dim Yang-Mills theory to an equivalent theory on that space. 1

Lara B. Anderson; James T. Wheeler

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

225

Yang- Mills on Quantum Heisenberg Manifolds  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In the noncommutative geometry program of Connes there are two variations of the concept of Yang-Mills action functional. We show that for the quantum Heisenberg manifolds they agree.

Partha Sarathi Chakraborty; Satyajit Guin

2013-04-29T23:59:59.000Z

226

DCnet Research Network David L. Mills  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Washington, DC Evans-gw and mudge-gw are dual-redundant EECIS department routers for 10/100-Mb campus printer server 128.4.2.21 wiley Pentium II 450MHz Windows XP Beverly Mills #12;2-Aug-04 10 DC MITBBN BELL2-Aug-04 1 DC MITBBN BELL DARPA UDEL DCnet Research Network David L. Mills University of Delaware

Mills, David L.

227

Boiler Upgrades Save Money & Energy: Cargill Krefeld  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Cargill Krefeld Cargill Krefeld Cargill is an international producer and marketer of food, agricultural, financial and industrial products and services headquartered in the United States. Cargill Krefeld is a wet corn mill that produces starches, sweeteners, and other corn derived products in Krefeld, Germany that was purchased by Cargill in 2002. As an active partner in the U.S. EPA's ENERGY STAR program, Cargill has earned ENERGY STAR certification for four of its U.S. wet corn mills and has set goals to improve energy efficiency and greenhouse gas intensity by 5% within 5 years on a global basis. Because wet corn milling is an energy intensive process with high thermal and electrical demands, the Krefeld mill was originally designed with large coal boilers linked to a counter-pressure extraction steam

228

Influences on Burr Size During Face-Milling of Aluminum Alloys and Cast Iron  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

ON BURR SIZE DURING FACE-MILLING OF ALUMINUM-SILICON ALLOYSburrs formed during face milling. Other influences are tooliron. INTRODUCTION Face milling is a common procedure during

Shefelbine, Wendy; Dornfeld, David

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

229

Energy Consumption Characterization and Reduction Strategies for Milling Machine Tool Use  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Part Orientation for Face Milling, in: Annals of the CIRP,2010): Environmental Analysis of Milling Machine Tool Use inand Reduction Strategies for Milling Machine Tool Use Nancy

Diaz, Nancy; E. Redelsheimer; Dornfeld, David

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

230

Environmental Analysis of Milling Machine Tool Use in Various Manufacturing Environments  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Environmental Analysis of Milling Machine Tool Use inHorvath, David Dornfeld Milling is a type of cutting processof a standard vertical milling machine tool. In this

Diaz, Nancy; Helu, Moneer; Jayanathan, Stephen; Chen, Yifen; Horvath, Arpad; Dornfeld, David

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

231

Jet milling from a particle perspective : predicting particle fracture based on mechanical material properties.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Milling is a very old discipline originated in milling agricultural products to flour. Despite the enormous literature on size reduction, milling is a unit operation… (more)

Vegt, Onno Martinus

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

232

Indian Centre for Wind Energy Technology C WET | Open Energy...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Centre for Wind Energy Technology C WET Jump to: navigation, search Name Indian Centre for Wind Energy Technology (C-WET) Place Chennai, India Zip 601 302 Sector Wind energy...

233

Categorical Exclusion 4497: Lithium Wet Chemistry Project  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

8/2012 07:36 8/2012 07:36 8655749041 ENVIRONMENTAL COMPL U.S. Department of Energy Categorical Exclusion Detennination Form Proposed Action Tills: Lithium W@t Chemistry Project (4597) Program or Fi~ld Oftke: Y-12 Site Office L&cationfs) (CiWLCount:r/State): Oak Ridge, Anderson County; Tennessee Proposed Action Description: PAGE 03/04 r: :;: :: !: s .a : brnl, i ~ y. : $ ~-rtl~il : t·:~::;J The proposed action is to develop a small lithium wet chemistry operation for the following purposes: (1) to capture wet chemistry operations, (2) to provide processing path for Lithium materials such as machine dust, (3) to provide lithium based materials, and (4) to produce the littlium hydroxide needed to support production. CategQrj~l Exclusion(s) Applied

234

Texas - RRC District 5 Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Texas - RRC District 5 Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Reserves New Field Discoveries (Billion Cubic Feet)

235

Texas - RRC District 4 Onshore Natural Gas, Wet After Lease ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Texas - RRC District 4 Onshore Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation New Reservoir Discoveries in Old Fields (Billion Cubic Feet)

236

Factors affecting viscosity changes in corn  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Corn meals with known differences were tested using the Rapid Visco Analyzer. Various tests included the effect of solid concentration, effect of heating rate, effect of particle size, effect of Sodium Carboxymethylcellulose (CMC) and effect of heating rate, holding temperature and CMC. Differences were found to exist between meals from different crop years which were not attributable to particle size. When tested at 13, 15 and 17% solids, new meal consistently developed viscosity earliest. Aged meal consistently developed the least amount of viscosity. At 17% solids, a distinct peak was formed by new meal. When heated at various heating rate (2, 7 and 14'C/min), the slowest heating rate developed a distinct peak. New meal consistently developed viscosity earliest. Aged meal developed the least amount of viscosity. As particle size decreased, viscosity increased. The addition of various amounts of CMC showed significant differences in viscosity at 95'C. CMC changed the order of highest viscosity and masked differences in peak time. When testing heating rate, holding time and addition of CMC, 95'C was found to develop viscosity to a greater degree than 70'C. Holding temperature did not have a significant effect and CMC masked differences between samples and produced unusual curves. Whole and decorticated corns were stored for various lengths of time at 60, 50, 22 and 6'C. Density decreased over time when stored at elevated temperatures. Hardness values increased, indicating a softer grain. However, this is more likely an indicator of brittleness. Decorticated grains developed higher viscosity. Pericarp acts as a diluent. Peak temperature increased with storage at elevated temperature. Density, hardness, peak viscosity and peak temperature were found to be the most significant indicators measured.

McGill, Kendra Louise

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

237

DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Monticello Mill Site - UT 03  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Mill Site - UT 03 Mill Site - UT 03 FUSRAP Considered Sites Site: Monticello Mill Site (UT.03) Designated Name: Alternate Name: Location: Evaluation Year: Site Operations: Site Disposition: Radioactive Materials Handled: Primary Radioactive Materials Handled: Radiological Survey(s): Site Status: Also see Monticello, Utah, Disposal and Processing Sites Documents Related to Monticello Mill Site Monticello Mill Tailings Site Operable Unit III Interim Remedial Action Progress Report July 1999-July 2000. GJO-2000-163-TAR. September 2000 U.S. Department of Energy at Grand Junction 2003 Annual Inspection Monticello, Utah November 2003 2005 Annual Inspection of the Monticello Mill Tailings (USDOE) and Monticello Radioactively Contaminated Properties Sites December 2005 Office

238

Full-Scale Testing of a Mercury Oxidation Catalyst Upstream of a Wet FGD System  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

2008 2008 contacts thomas J. Feeley III Technology Manager Environmental & Water Resources National Energy Technology Laboratory 626 Cochrans Mill Road P.O. Box 10940 Pittsburgh, PA 15236-0940 412-386-6134 thomas.feeley@netl.doe.gov charles E. Miller Project Manager National Energy Technology Laboratory 626 Cochrans Mill Road P.O. Box 10940 Pittsburgh, PA 15236-0940 412-386-5745 charles.miller@netl.doe.gov Gary Blythe Principal Investigator URS Corp. 9400 Amberglen Blvd. P.O. Box 201088 Austin, Texas 78720 512-419-5321 gary_blythe@urscorp.com Environmental and Water Resources Full-Scale TeSTing oF a Mercury oxidaTion caTalyST upSTreaM oF a WeT Fgd SySTeM Background To provide alternatives for power plant owners to comply with the Clean Air Mercury Rule promulgated by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, NETL is

239

Simulation of water flow and retention in earthen-cover materials overlying uranium mill tailings  

SciTech Connect

The water retention characteristics of a multilayer earthen cover for uranium mill tailings were simulated under arid weather conditions common to Grand Junction, Colorado. The multilayer system described in this report consists of a layer of wet clay/gravel (radon barrier), which is separated from a surface covering of fill soil by a washed rock material used as a capillary barrier. The capillary barrier is designed to prevent the upward migration of water and salt from the tailings to the soil surface and subsequent loss of water from the wet clay. The flow model, UNSATV, described in this report uses hydraulic properties of the layered materials and historical climatic data for two years (1976 and 1979) to simulate long-term hydrologic response of the multilayer system. Application of this model to simulate the processes of infiltration, evaporation and drainage is described in detail. Simulations over a trial period of one relatively wet and two dry years indicated that the clay-gravel layer remained near saturation, and hence, that the layer was an effective radon barrier. Estimates show that the clay-gravel layer would not dry out (i.e., revert to drying dominated by isothermal vapor-flow conditions) for at least 20 years, provided that the modeled dry-climate period continues.

Simmons, C.S.; Gee, G.W.

1981-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

240

Transportation of the MOAB Uranium Mill Tailings to White Mesa Mill by Slurry Pipeline  

SciTech Connect

The Moab uranium mill tailings pile, located at the former Atlas Minerals Corporation site approximately three miles north of Moab, Utah, is now under the control of the US Department of Energy (''DOE''). The location of the tailings pile adjacent to the Colorado River, and the ongoing contamination of groundwater and seepage of pollutants into the river, have lead to the investigation, as part of the final site remediation program, of alternatives to relocate the tailings to a qualified permanent disposal site. This paper will describe the approach being taken by the team formed between International Uranium (USA) Corporation (''IUC'') and Washington Group International (''WGINT'') to develop an innovative technical proposal to relocate the Moab tailings to IUC's White Mesa Mill south of Blanding, Utah. The proposed approach for relocating the tailings involves using a slurry pipeline to transport the tailings to the White Mesa Mill. The White Mesa Mill is a fully licensed, active uranium mill site that is uniquely suited for permanent disposal of the Moab tailings. The tailings slurry would be dewatered at the White Mesa Mill, the slurry water would be recycled to the Moab site for reuse in slurry makeup, and the ''dry'' tailings would be permanently disposed of in an approved below grade cell at the mill site.

Hochstein, R. F.; Warner, R.; Wetz, T. V.

2003-02-26T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "wet corn milling" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

PRELIMINARY SURVEY OF SYLVANIA-CORNING NUCLEAR CORPORATION METALLURGICAL LABORATORY  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

SYLVANIA-CORNING NUCLEAR CORPORATION SYLVANIA-CORNING NUCLEAR CORPORATION METALLURGICAL LABORATORY BAYSIDE, NEW YORK Work performed by the Health and Safety Research Division Oak Ridge National Laboratory Oak Ridge, Tennessee 37830 March 1980 OAK RIDGE NATIONAL LABORATORY operated by UNION CARBIDE CORPORATION for the DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY as part of the Formerly Utilized Sites-- Remedial Action Program SYLVANIA-CORNING NUCLEAR CORPORATION METALLURGICAL LABORATORY BAYSIDE, NEW YORK At the request of the Department of Energy (DOE), a preliminary survey was performed at the former Sylvania-Corning Nuclear Corporation in Bayside, New York (see Fig. l), on November 29, 1977, to assess the radiological status of those facilities uti 7 Commission (AEC) contract during the 1950s. _ _ ._. __

242

Corn Based Ethanol in Perspective: An Overview of the Possibilities,  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Corn Based Ethanol in Perspective: An Overview of the Possibilities, Corn Based Ethanol in Perspective: An Overview of the Possibilities, Limitations and Consequences Speaker(s): Michael Carnall Date: August 30, 2007 - 12:00pm Location: 90-3122 Seminar Host/Point of Contact: Galen Barbose The use of corn based ethanol as a supplement or replacement of motor fuel gasoline has many champions as well as detractors. In this presentation I attempt to separate hype from facts and wishful thinking from realistic forecasts. The production of corn based ethanol has physical limits based on land required to grow its primary input. It also has economic limits based on the cost of inputs relative to the cost of the fuel it replaces and the value of the environmental and other benefits its use may provide. By exploring these limits and the likely consequences of

243

Similarity Moisture Dew Profiles within a Corn Canopy  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The amount of dewfall and dewrise to a corn canopy has been estimated over 7 nights by using the Bowen ratio energy balance technique and the soil diffusivity technique, respectively.

A. F. G. Jacobs; W. A. J. van Pul; A. van Dijken

1990-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

244

Alternative 2011 Corn Production, Consumption, and Price Scenarios  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

corn crop was nearly a billion bushels smaller than early season forecasts. The shortfall reflected a below-trend average yield of 152.8 bushels, 11.9 bushels below the record average yield of 2009. In addition to a smaller than expected crop, corn consumption during the first half of the 2010-11 marketing year was larger than forecast at the start of the year, reflecting a large increase in the amount of corn used for ethanol production. The USDA projects corn use for ethanol production during the 2010-11 marketing year that started on September 1, 2010 at 4.95 billion bushels, 382 million bushels more than used last

Darrel Good; Scott Irwin

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

245

Climatology of Tropical System Rainfall on the Eastern Corn Belt  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This study examines the frequency of greater than 2.54 cm (1 in) daily rainfall totals averaged within a climate division (CD) associated with tropical systems that moved through the Eastern Corn Belt region during the growing season. These ...

Alex Haberlie; Kari Gale; David Changnon; Mike Tannura

246

Corn Belt Energy Coop- Commercial Energy Efficiency Rebate Program (Illinois)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Corn Belt Energy, through the Wabash Valley Power Association, offers business, school, and farm customers a variety of energy efficient rebates and incentives through its "Power Moves" program....

247

Drought increases price of corn, reduces profits to ethanol ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Drought conditions in Midwestern states have reduced expectations for the amount of corn that may be harvested in 2012, and contributed to a 35% rise in the price of ...

248

Pine Lake Corn Processors LLC | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Farmer owned investment and management team which developed and manages the Pine Lake ethanol plant. References Pine Lake Corn Processors LLC1 LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase...

249

Corn Based Ethanol in Perspective: An Overview of the Possibilities...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Corn Based Ethanol in Perspective: An Overview of the Possibilities, Limitations and Consequences Speaker(s): Michael Carnall Date: August 30, 2007 - 12:00pm Location: 90-3122...

250

Drought has significant effect on corn crop condition, projected ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

The corn crop in the affected region is a main feedstock for ethanol, ... out of a total supply of 14.2 billion ... Farmers took advantage of the relatively warm ...

251

Wetting heterogeneity in mixed-wet porous media controls flow dissipation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Wettability is crucial for multiphase flow in porous media. However, the effect of spatial distribution of wetting domains has previously only been dealt with by averaging contact angles over several pores. By preparing tailored bead packings with the same average surface wettability, but differing in the typical spatial extension of the same-type wetting domains, we show that models based solely on averages do not capture the dynamics of two phase flow in such systems. Using X-ray tomography we measure the typical length scale xi of the wetting domains in our samples. In capillary pressure saturation (CPS) experiments we find that xi controls the width of the hysteresis loop for xi <= d, d being the bead diameter. X-Ray tomography of the samples during both water and oil invasion shows that the front morphology is smoothened at small values of xi. Both observations are consistent with an increase of dissipation for small correlation length.

Murison, Julie; Baret, Jean-Christophe; Herminghaus, Stephan; Schröter, Matthias; Brinkmann, Martin

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

252

Wetting heterogeneity in mixed-wet porous media controls flow dissipation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Wettability is crucial for multiphase flow in porous media. However, the effect of spatial distribution of wetting domains has previously only been dealt with by averaging contact angles over several pores. By preparing tailored bead packings with the same average surface wettability, but differing in the typical spatial extension of the same-type wetting domains, we show that models based solely on averages do not capture the dynamics of two phase flow in such systems. Using X-ray tomography we measure the typical length scale xi of the wetting domains in our samples. In capillary pressure saturation (CPS) experiments we find that xi controls the width of the hysteresis loop for xi <= d, d being the bead diameter. X-Ray tomography of the samples during both water and oil invasion shows that the front morphology is smoothened at small values of xi. Both observations are consistent with an increase of dissipation for small correlation length.

Julie Murison; Benoît Semin; Jean-Christophe Baret; Stephan Herminghaus; Matthias Schröter; Martin Brinkmann

2013-10-11T23:59:59.000Z

253

Rotating Einstein-Yang-Mills Black Holes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We construct rotating hairy black holes in SU(2) Einstein-Yang-Mills theory. These stationary axially symmetric black holes are asymptotically flat. They possess non-trivial non-Abelian gauge fields outside their regular event horizon, and they carry non-Abelian electric charge. In the limit of vanishing angular momentum, they emerge from the neutral static spherically symmetric Einstein-Yang-Mills black holes, labelled by the node number of the gauge field function. With increasing angular momentum and mass, the non-Abelian electric charge of the solutions increases, but remains finite. The asymptotic expansion for these black hole solutions includes non-integer powers of the radial variable.

B. Kleihaus; J. Kunz; F. Navarro-Lerida

2002-07-10T23:59:59.000Z

254

Supplementation with xylanase and beta-xylosidase to reduce xylo-oligomer and xylan inhibition of enzymatic hydrolysis of cellulose and pretreated corn stover  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

pretreatment technologies to corn stover. Bioresourcerelationship to features of corn stover solids produced byexplosion treatment of corn stover. Appl Biochem Biotech

Qing, Qing; Wyman, Charles E

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

255

EIS-0355: Remediation of the Moab Uranium Mill Tailings, Grand...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

355: Remediation of the Moab Uranium Mill Tailings, Grand and San Juan Counties, Utah EIS-0355: Remediation of the Moab Uranium Mill Tailings, Grand and San Juan Counties, Utah...

256

Pulp and Paper Mills: Profiting for Efficient Motor System Use...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Motor System Use This profile discusses how energy efficienct motor systems can help pulp and paper mills save money. Pulp and Paper Mills: Profiting for Efficient Motor System Use...

257

Pulverizer Maintenance Guide, Volume 1: Raymond Bowl Mills  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This guide provides fossil plant personnel with current maintenance information on the Alstom Raymond Bowl mills and will assist a plant in improving the maintenance of the pulverizer mills.

2004-08-27T23:59:59.000Z

258

Biomass Burner Cogenerates Jobs and Electricity from Lumber Mill...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Burner Cogenerates Jobs and Electricity from Lumber Mill Waste Biomass Burner Cogenerates Jobs and Electricity from Lumber Mill Waste December 6, 2011 - 3:57pm Addthis Dale and...

259

Effect of Ball Milling Temperature on the Ultra Fine Grained ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The mixtures of Fe-14Cr-3W-0.4Ti powder and Y2O3 were ball milled for 40 ... The size of nanoclusters seems to be dependent on milling temperature too.

260

Corn Stover Availability for Biomass Conversion: Situation Analysis  

SciTech Connect

As biorefining conversion technologies become commercial, feedstock availability, supply system logistics, and biomass material attributes are emerging as major barriers to the availability of corn stover for biorefining. While systems do exist to supply corn stover as feedstock to biorefining facilities, stover material attributes affecting physical deconstruction, such as densification and post-harvest material stability, challenge the cost-effectiveness of present-day feedstock logistics systems. In addition, the material characteristics of corn stover create barriers with any supply system design in terms of equipment capacity/efficiency, dry matter loss, and capital use efficiency. However, this study of a large, square-bale corn stover feedstock supply system concludes that (1) where other agronomic factors are not limiting, corn stover can be accessed and supplied to a biorefinery using existing bale-based technologies, (2) technologies and new supply system designs are necessary to overcome biomass bulk density and moisture material property challenges, and (3) major opportunities to improve conventional-bale biomass feedstock supply systems include improvements in equipment efficiency and capacity and reducing biomass losses in harvesting and collection and storage. Finally, the backbone of an effective stover supply system design is the optimization of intended and minimization of unintended material property changes as the corn stover passes through the individual supply system processes from the field to the biorefinery conversion processes.

J. Richard Hess; Kevin L. Kenney; Christopher T. Wright; Robert Perlack; Anthony Turhollow

2009-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "wet corn milling" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Corn stover availability for biomass conversion: situation analysis  

SciTech Connect

As biorefining conversion technologies become commercial, feedstock availability, supply system logistics, and biomass material attributes are emerging as major barriers to the availability of corn stover for biorefining. While systems do exist to supply corn stover as feedstock to biorefining facilities, stover material attributes affecting physical deconstruction, such as densification and post-harvest material stability, challenge the cost-effectiveness of present-day feedstock logistics systems. In addition, the material characteristics of corn stover create barriers with any supply system design in terms of equipment capacity/efficiency, dry matter loss, and capital use efficiency. However, analysis of a conventional large square bale corn stover feedstock supply system concludes that (1) where other agronomic factors are not limiting, corn stover can be accessed and supplied to a biorefinery using existing bale-based technologies, (2) technologies and new supply system designs are necessary to overcome biomass bulk density and moisture material property challenges, and (3) major opportunities to improve conventional bale biomass feedstock supply systems include improvements in equipment efficiency and capacity and reducing biomass losses in harvesting, collection, and storage. Finally, the backbone of an effective stover supply system design is the optimization of intended and minimization of unintended material property changes as the corn stover passes through the individual supply system processes from the field to the biorefinery conversion processes.

Hess, J. Richard [Idaho National Laboratory (INL); Kenney, Kevin L. [Idaho National Laboratory (INL); Wright, Christopher [Idaho National Laboratory (INL); Perlack, Robert D [ORNL; Turhollow, Jr., Anthony [ORNL

2009-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

262

Method for the wet quenching of coke  

SciTech Connect

A method and apparatus for the wet quenching of coke is disclosed wherein hot coke is sprayed from above with quenching water, the steam generated by the heat of the coke is condensed by a spray of condensation water from the top of the quenching tower, and the hot condensate-water mixture is collected at the bottom of the quenching tower and recirculated to the top of the tower where it is sprayed between quenching operations to be cooled by a counterflowing stream of air. The cooled condensate water mixture is suitable for reuse as the condensation spray water.

Blase, M.; Flockenhaus, C.; Wagener, D.

1982-03-30T23:59:59.000Z

263

Gravity and Yang?Mills Fields: Geometrical Approaches  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A new geometrical framework for a tetrad?affine formulation of gravity coupled with Yang?Mills fields is proposed.

Roberto Cianci; Stefano Vignolo

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

264

Focused Ion Beam Milling (FIB) Information at NIST  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Focused Ion Beam Milling (FIB) Information at NIST. Analysis of 3D Elemental Mapping Artifacts in Biological Specimens ...

2010-10-05T23:59:59.000Z

265

Nonperturbative and analytical approach to Yang-Mills thermodynamics  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

An analytical, macroscopic approach to SU(N) Yang-Mills thermodynamics is developed, tested,and applied.

Ralf Hofmann

2004-04-29T23:59:59.000Z

266

Mill Designed Bio bleaching Technologies  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A key finding of this research program was that Laccase Mediator Systems (LMS) treatments on high-kappa kraft could be successfully accomplished providing substantial delignification (i.e., > 50%) without detrimental impact on viscosity and significantly improved yield properties. The efficiency of the LMS was evident since most of the lignin from the pulp was removed in less than one hour at 45 degrees C. Of the mediators investigated, violuric acid was the most effective vis-a-vis delignification. A comparative study between oxygen delignification and violuric acid revealed that under relatively mild conditions, a single or a double LMS{sub VA} treatment is comparable to a single or a double O stage. Of great notability was the retention of end viscosity of LMS{sub VA} treated pulps with respect to the end viscosity of oxygen treated pulps. These pulps could then be bleached to full brightness values employing conventional ECF bleaching technologies and the final pulp physical properties were equal and/or better than those bleached in a conventional ECF manner employing an aggressively O or OO stage initially. Spectral analyses of residual lignins isolated after LMS treated high-kappa kraft pulps revealed that similar to HBT, VA and NHA preferentially attack phenolic lignin moieties. In addition, a substantial decrease in aliphatic hydroxyl groups was also noted, suggesting side chain oxidation. In all cases, an increase in carboxylic acid was observed. Of notable importance was the different selectivity of NHA, VA and HBT towards lignin functional groups, despite the common N-OH moiety. C-5 condensed phenolic lignin groups were overall resistant to an LMS{sub NHA, HBT} treatments but to a lesser extent to an LMS{sub VA}. The inactiveness of these condensed lignin moieties was not observed when low-kappa kraft pulps were biobleached, suggesting that the LMS chemistry is influenced by the extent of delignification. We have also demonstrated that the current generation of laccase has a broad spectrum of operating parameters. Nonetheless, the development of future genetically engineered laccases with enhanced temperature, pH and redox potentials will dramatically improve the overall process. A second challenge for LMS bleaching technologies is the need to develop effective, catalytic mediators. From the literature we already know this is feasible since ABTS and some inorganic mediators are catalytic. Unfortunately, the mediators that exhibit catalytic properties do not exhibit significant delignification properties and this is a challenge for future research studies. Potential short-term mill application of laccase has been recently reported by Felby132 and Chandra133 as they have demonstrated that the physical properties of linerboard can be improved when exposed to laccase without a chemical mediator. In addition, xxx has shown that the addition of laccase to the whitewater of the paper machine has several benefits for the removal of colloidal materials. Finally, this research program has presented important features on the delignification chemistry of LMS{sub NHA} and LMS{sub VA} that, in the opinion of the author, are momentous contributions to the overall LMS chemistry/biochemistry knowledge base which will continue to have future benefits.

Institute of Paper Science Technology

2004-01-30T23:59:59.000Z

267

Tons of Heavy Metals in Mill Creek Sediments Heather Freeman  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

with industries. Paper, woolen, flour, and cotton mills, starch factories, slaughterhouses, distilleriesTons of Heavy Metals in Mill Creek Sediments Heather Freeman 8/30/99 Geology Department Advisors: Dr. Kees DeJong Dr. Barry Manyard Dr. David Nash #12;Tons of heavy metals in Mill Creek sediments

Maynard, J. Barry

268

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Corn-to-Ethanol Research Pilot Plant  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Corn-to-Ethanol Corn-to-Ethanol Research Pilot Plant to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Corn-to-Ethanol Research Pilot Plant on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Corn-to-Ethanol Research Pilot Plant on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Corn-to-Ethanol Research Pilot Plant on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Corn-to-Ethanol Research Pilot Plant on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Corn-to-Ethanol Research Pilot Plant on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Corn-to-Ethanol Research Pilot Plant on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type Corn-to-Ethanol Research Pilot Plant The Illinois Ethanol Research Advisory Board manages and operates the

269

Loop expansion in Yang-Mills thermodynamics  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We argue that a selfconsistent spatial coarse-graining, which involves interacting (anti)calorons of unit topological charge modulus, implies that real-time loop expansions of thermodynamical quantities in the deconfining phase of SU(2) and SU(3) Yang-Mills thermodynamics are, modulo 1PI resummations, determined by a finite number of connected bubble diagrams.

Ralf Hofmann

2006-09-05T23:59:59.000Z

270

Focused helium ion beam milling and deposition  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The use of a helium ion microscope with an integrated gas injection system for nanofabrication is explored by demonstrating the milling of fine features into single layered graphene and the controlled deposition of tungsten and platinum wires from gaseous ... Keywords: Beam-induced deposition, Focused ion beam, Gas injection system, Graphene, Helium ion microscope

S. A. Boden; Z. Moktadir; D. M. Bagnall; H. Mizuta; H. N. Rutt

2011-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

271

Ionizing wet scrubber for air pollution control  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Air pollution control equipment manufacturers are continually developing sophisticated systems designed to dramatically reduce plant emissions. One such system, the ionizing wet scrubber (IWS), has demonstrated outstanding air pollution control characteristics while meeting the challenge of energy efficiency. The IWS system removes fine solid and liquid particulate down to 0.05 micron at high collection efficiencies and low energy comsumption. It also simultaneously removes noxious, corrosive and odor-bearing gases from flue gas streams as well as coarse particulate matter above 1 micron in diameter. Due to its simplified design and low pressure drop, operating energy costs of the IWS are only a fraction of those for alternative air pollution control equipment. Pressure drop through a single-stage IWS is only 0.5 to 1.5 in. Water (125 to 374 pa) column and is controlled primarily by pressure drop through the wet scrubber section. Total system energy usage is approximately 2.0-2.5 bhp/1,000 actual ft/sup 3//min (0.7-0.9 kw/m/sup 3//min) for a single-stage IWS and 4.0-5.0 bhp/1,000 actual ft/sup 3//min for a two-stage installation. These energy requirements represent a significant savings as opposed to other air pollution control systems such as Venturi scrubbers.

Sheppard, S.V.

1986-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

272

Biological conversion of biomass to methane corn stover studies. Project report, December 1, 1977-August 1, 1978  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A series of experiments was conducted to determine the performance characteristics of the methane fermentation process using corn stover obtained from the University of Illinois farms and processed through four parallel fermenters each having a capacity of 775 liters. A continuous feed system was employed to determine the conversion efficiency. The dewatering characteristics of the effluents and the quality of the liquid and solid residues were determined. The biodegradability of corn stover is low. Data obtained at a fermentation temperature of 59 +-1/sup 0/C show that only 36 percent of the volatile solids are biodegradable. The first order rate constant for this conversion was found to be 0.25 day/sup -1/. Pretreatment with caustic (NaOH) concentration of 0.30 molar (5 g/100 g dry stover) and a temperature of 115/sup 0/C for one hour increased the biodegradable fraction to 71 percent of the volatile solids. The reactor slurries were easily dewatered by both vacuum filtration and centrifugation. Corn stover does not appear to be attractive economically at the present energy prices. At a chemical cost of $154/tonne ($140/ton), the NaOH pretreatment adds approximately $5.2/tonne to the cost of processing the stover. At a methane yield of 0.25 m/sup 3//kg of solids fed, this adds a total cost of $2/100 m/sup 3/ ($0.57/MCF) for this process alone. Addition of stover acquisition costs ($20/dry tonne of stover), total processing costs without gas cleanup ($21/tonne) and residue disposal ($3/tonne of wet cake), the cost of fuel gas would be in the neighborhood of $9.76/GJ ($10.30/10/sup 6/ Btu).This cost excludes all profit, taxes, etc. associated with private financing. Depending upon financing methods, tax incentives, etc., it may be necessary to add up to an additional $2.00/GJ to the cost of this fuel gas.

Pfeffer, J T; Quindry, G E

1979-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

273

Assessing Corn Stover Composition and Sources of Variability via NIRS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Corn stover, the above-ground, non-grain portion of the crop, is a large, currently available source of biomass that potentially could be collected as a biofuels feedstock. Biomass conversion process economics are directly affected by the overall biochemical conversion yield, which is assumed to be proportional to the carbohydrate content of the feedstock materials used in the process. Variability in the feedstock carbohydrate levels affects the maximum theoretical biofuels yield and may influence the optimum pretreatment or saccharification conditions. The aim of this study is to assess the extent to which commercial hybrid corn stover composition varies and begin to partition the variation among genetic, environmental, or annual influences. A rapid compositional analysis method using near-infrared spectroscopy/partial least squares multivariate modeling (NIR/PLS) was used to evaluate compositional variation among 508 commercial hybrid corn stover samples collected from 47 sites in eight Corn Belt states after the 2001, 2002, and 2003 harvests. The major components of the corn stover, reported as average (standard deviation) % dry weight, whole biomass basis, were glucan 31.9 (2.0), xylan 18.9 (1.3), solubles composite 17.9 (4.1), and lignin (corrected for protein) 13.3 (1.1). We observed wide variability in the major corn stover components. Much of the variation observed in the structural components (on a whole biomass basis) is due to the large variation found in the soluble components. Analysis of variance (ANOVA) showed that the harvest year had the strongest effect on corn stover compositional variation, followed by location and then variety. The NIR/PLS rapid analysis method used here is well suited to testing large numbers of samples, as tested in this study, and will support feedstock improvement and biofuels process research.

Templeton, D. W.; Sluiter, A. D.; Hayward, T. K.; Hames, B. R.; Thomas, S. R.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

274

Soil Hydraulic Properties Influenced by Corn Stover Removal from No-Till Corn in Ohio.  

SciTech Connect

Corn (Zea mays L.) stover removal for biofuel production and other uses may alter soil hydraulic properties, but site-specific information needed to determine the threshold levels of removal for the U.S. Corn Belt region is limited. We quantified impacts of systematic removal of corn stover on soil hydraulic parameters after one year of stover management under no-till (NT) systems in three soils in Ohio including Rayne silt loam (fine-loamy, mixed, mesic Typic Hapludult) at Coshocton, Hoytville clay loam (fine, illitic, mesic Mollic Epiaqualfs) at Hoytville, and Celina silt loam (fine, mixed, active, mesic Aquic Hapludalfs) at South Charleston. Interrelationships among soil properties and saturated hydraulic conductivity (Ksat) predictions were also studied. Earthworm middens, Ksat, bulk density (?b), soil-water retention (SWR), pore-size distribution, and air permeability (ka) were determined for six stover treatments including 0 (T0), 25 (T25), 50 (T50), 75 (T75), 100 (T100), and 200 (T200) % of corn stover corresponding to 0, 1.25, 2.50, 3.75, 5.00, and 10.00 Mg ha-1 of stover, respectively. Stover removal reduced the number of middens, Ksat, SWR, and ka at all sites (P<0.01). Complete stover removal reduced earthworm middens by 20-fold across sites, decreased geometric mean Ksat from 6.3 to 0.1 mm h-1 at Coshocton, 3.2 to 0.3 mm h-1 at Hoytville, and 5.8 to 0.6 mm h-1 at Charleston, and increased ?b in the 0- to 10-cm depth by about 15% relative to double stover plots. The SWR for T100 was 1.3 times higher than that for T0 at 0 to -6 kPa. The log ka for T200, T100, and T75 significantly exceeded that under T50, T25, and T0 at Coshocton and Charleston. Measured parameters were strongly correlated, and ka was a potential Ksat predictor. Stover harvesting at rates above 1.25 Mg ha-1 affects soil hydraulic properties and earthworm activity, but further monitoring is needed to ascertain the threshold levels of stover removal.Corn (Zea mays L.) stover removal for biofuel production and other uses may alter soil hydraulic properties, but site-specific information needed to determine the threshold levels of removal for the U.S. Corn Belt region is limited. We quantified impacts of systematic removal of corn stover on soil hydraulic parameters after one year of stover management under no-till (NT) systems in three soils in Ohio including Rayne silt loam (fine-loamy, mixed, mesic Typic Hapludult) at Coshocton, Hoytville clay loam (fine, illitic, mesic Mollic Epiaqualfs) at Hoytville, and Celina silt loam (fine, mixed, active, mesic Aquic Hapludalfs) at South Charleston. Interrelationships among soil properties and saturated hydraulic conductivity (Ksat) predictions were also studied. Earthworm middens, Ksat, bulk density (?b), soil-water retention (SWR), pore-size distribution, and air permeability (ka) were determined for six stover treatments including 0 (T0), 25 (T25), 50 (T50), 75 (T75), 100 (T100), and 200 (T200) % of corn stover corresponding to 0, 1.25, 2.50, 3.75, 5.00, and 10.00 Mg ha-1 of stover, respectively. Stover removal reduced the number of middens, Ksat, SWR, and ka at all sites (P<0.01). Complete stover removal reduced earthworm middens by 20-fold across sites, decreased geometric mean Ksat from 6.3 to 0.1 mm h-1 at Coshocton, 3.2 to 0.3 mm h-1 at Hoytville, and 5.8 to 0.6 mm h-1 at Charleston, and increased ?b in the 0- to 10-cm depth by about 15% relative to double stover plots. The SWR for T100 was 1.3 times higher than that for T0 at 0 to -6 kPa. The log ka for T200, T100, and T75 significantly exceeded that under T50, T25, and T0 at Coshocton and Charleston. Measured parameters were strongly correlated, and ka was a potential Ksat predictor. Stover harvesting at rates above 1.25 Mg ha-1 affects soil hydraulic properties and earthworm activity, but further monitoring is needed to ascertain the threshold levels of stover removal.

Blanco-Canqui, H.; Lal, Rattan; Post, W. M.; Izaurralde, R Cesar C.; Shipitalo, M. J.

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

275

Bt vs. non-Bt corn (Zea mays L.) hybrids: effect on degradation of corn stover in soil  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A billion tons per year of genetically modified corn residues are soil incorporated having both direct and indirect effects on the belowground environment, soil carbon (C) sequestration, and nutrient cycling. If Bt genetic modification has non-target effects on corn stover structural/non-structural carbohydrate and nitrogen (N) concentrations, then the degradation rate of Bt-corn stover may be different than that of non-Bt isolines, possibly influencing soil C storage and N mineralization. Thus, this research focused primarily on the comparison of C and N mineralization of corn stover in soil as affected by Bt-trait, plant portion, water-availability and HFC-trait; and secondarily on the existence of Bt-related variations in the chemical structure of corn residues that might affect the degradation rate of stover in soil and consequently the soil C and N dynamics. A laboratory experiment was conducted under non-limiting N conditions with stover of Bt/non-Bt isogenic pairs of two varieties, a ?high fermentable corn? (HFC) line harvested at Snook, Texas and a non-HFC corn line harvested at the irrigated field of Snook and the non-irrigated field of College Station, Texas. The stover was partitioned into three plant portions, incorporated into a Weswood soil and incubated during 223 days. Results showed that the differences observed in the degradation in soil of Bt vs. non-Bt corn stover were dependent on environmental conditions (irrigated vs. non-irrigated settings) and hybrid variety (HFC vs. non-HFC hybrid lines). The structural composition of corn plants was affected by the Bt-trait, HFC-trait, irrigation and their interactions. Variations in the biomass fractions of the initial stover of Bt and non-Bt hybrids had minimum to non-impact on soil C and N concentrations measured at the end of the 223-day incubation period. Lignin concentration was affected by a Bt-trait*variety interaction. There were no significant differences in lignin concentration between non-Bt/Bt-corn derived stovers of the non-HFC variety irrespective of irrigation regime but Bt-hybrids of the HFC variety contained more than twice as much lignin as the non-Bt isogenic plants. The effects of higher lignin concentration on C mineralization rate appeared to be offset by an increased lignin degradability inherent in HFC-trait. Overall, results indicated that the cultivation of Bt-modified maize lines is not likely to have significant effects on soil C or N dynamics compared with the cropping of non-Bt hybrids.

Salvatore, Herminia T.

2009-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

276

Comparison of corn and lupin in respect to As mobilisation, uptake and release in an arsenic contaminated floodplain soil.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

particular Fe(hydr)oxides. For corn, mobilisation of P V wasorganic anions compared to corn (Dinkelaker et al. , 1989;susceptible to As V toxicity. Corn growth is not reduced in

Vetterlein, Doris; Jahn, Reinhold; Mattusch, Jürgen

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

277

Water Treatment For Wet Electrostatic Precipitators: Conceptual Design  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Pilot testing has shown that replacement of the last field of a small dry electrostatic precipitator (ESP) with a single wet field can significantly reduce outlet particulate emissions from coal-fired power plants. This report summarizes a pilot wet ESP performance test, cost projections from an economic study, and results from a study of the water use and chemistry issues that need to be resolved to make the wet ESP technology an attractive option for electric utilities.

1997-09-25T23:59:59.000Z

278

Assessment of cover systems at the Grand Junction, Colorado, uranium mill tailings pile: 1987 field measurements  

SciTech Connect

Four Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) scientists and a technician conducted an onsite evaluation of radon gas exhalation, water content profiles, and plant and animal intrusion for a series of cover systems located on the uranium mill tailings pile at Grand Junction, Colorado. These six plots were sampled extensively down to the radon control layer (e.g., asphalt or wet clay) for soil moisture content and permeability. Radon gas emission through the surface was measured. Soil samples were collected and analyzed in the lab for particle-size distribution, particle density, bulk density, and ambient water content. Prairie dog burrows were excavated to discover the extent to which they penetrated the barriers. Plant type, density, and cover characteristics were measured.

Gee, G.W.; Campbell, M.D.; Freeman, H.D.; Cline, J.F.

1989-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

279

BERYLLIUM MEASUREMENT IN COMMERCIALLY AVAILABLE WET WIPES  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Analysis for beryllium by fluorescence is now an established method which is used in many government-run laboratories and commercial facilities. This study investigates the use of this technique using commercially available wet wipes. The fluorescence method is widely documented and has been approved as a standard test method by ASTM International and the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH). The procedure involves dissolution of samples in aqueous ammonium bifluoride solution and then adding a small aliquot to a basic hydroxybenzoquinoline sulfonate fluorescent dye (Berylliant{trademark} Inc. Detection Solution Part No. CH-2) , and measuring the fluorescence. This method is specific to beryllium. This work explores the use of three different commercial wipes spiked with beryllium, as beryllium acetate or as beryllium oxide and subsequent analysis by optical fluorescence. The effect of possible interfering metals such as Fe, Ti and Pu in the wipe medium is also examined.

Youmans-Mcdonald, L.

2011-02-18T23:59:59.000Z

280

Mercury Emissions Control in Wet FGD Systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Babcock & Wilcox Company (B&W) and McDermott Technology, Inc. (MTI) have had a continuing program over the past decade for characterizing and optimizing mercury control in flue gas desulfurization (FGD) systems. These efforts have led to the characterization of mercury emissions control at two utility installations and full-scale demonstration (55 MW and 1300 MW) of the effect of a mercury control performance enhancement additive for wet FGD systems. This paper presents the results of the mercury emissions control testing conducted at these two sites. The performance is related to EPA Information Collection Request (ICR) data from an FGD system supplier’s perspective, highlighting the need to consider the effects of system design and operation when evaluating mercury emissions control performance.

Paul S. Nolan; Babcock Wilcox; Kevin E. Redinger; Babcock Wilcox; Gerald T. Amrhein; Gregory A. Kudlac

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "wet corn milling" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Self-oscillations on a partially wetted catalyst pellet in ? ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

and the vapor–gas phases on wetted and dry catalyst pellets, respectively. ... perature and flooding states of the catalyst pellet was first observed, which were ...

282

Utah Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Adjustments (Billion Cubic Feet) Utah Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Reserves Adjustments (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3...

283

Utah Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Acquisitions (Billion Cubic Feet) Utah Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Reserves Acquisitions (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3...

284

Utah Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation New Reservoir Discoveries...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

New Reservoir Discoveries in Old Fields (Billion Cubic Feet) Utah Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation New Reservoir Discoveries in Old Fields (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0...

285

Utah Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Extensions (Billion Cubic Feet) Utah Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Reserves Extensions (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3...

286

Utah Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Reserves...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Decreases (Billion Cubic Feet) Utah Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Reserves Revision Decreases (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3...

287

Utah Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Increases (Billion Cubic Feet) Utah Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Reserves Revision Increases (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2...

288

,"Utah Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Proved Reserves...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

,"Worksheet Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Utah Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic...

289

Utah Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Estimated...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Estimated Production from Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Utah Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Estimated Production from Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade...

290

Utah Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Reserves...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Increases (Billion Cubic Feet) Utah Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Reserves Revision Increases (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3...

291

Utah Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Reservoir Discoveries in Old Fields (Billion Cubic Feet) Utah Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, New Reservoir Discoveries in Old Fields (Billion Cubic...

292

Utah Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Decreases (Billion Cubic Feet) Utah Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Reserves Revision Decreases (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2...

293

,"Utah Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas Proved Reserves, Wet...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

,"Worksheet Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Utah Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas Proved Reserves, Wet After Lease Separation",10,"Annua...

294

,"Utah Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

,"Worksheet Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Utah Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic...

295

Utah Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Reserves...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Acquisitions (Billion Cubic Feet) Utah Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Reserves Acquisitions (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4...

296

Utah Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Field Discoveries (Billion Cubic Feet) Utah Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, New Field Discoveries (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2...

297

Utah Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Estimated Production from Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Utah Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Estimated Production from Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet)...

298

Utah Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, New...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Reservoir Discoveries in Old Fields (Billion Cubic Feet) Utah Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, New Reservoir Discoveries in Old Fields (Billion Cubic Feet)...

299

,"Utah Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

,"Worksheet Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Utah Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion...

300

,"Utah Nonassociated Natural Gas Proved Reserves, Wet After Lease...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

,"Worksheet Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Utah Nonassociated Natural Gas Proved Reserves, Wet After Lease Separation",10,"Annual",2011...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "wet corn milling" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Utah Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Reserves...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Adjustments (Billion Cubic Feet) Utah Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Reserves Adjustments (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4...

302

Utah Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Reserves...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Extensions (Billion Cubic Feet) Utah Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Reserves Extensions (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4...

303

Wet Gasification of Ethanol Residue: A Preliminary Assessment  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A preliminary technoeconomic assessment has been made of several options for the application of catalytic hydrothermal gasification (wet gasification) to ethanol processing residues.

Brown, Michael D.; Elliott, Douglas C.

2008-09-22T23:59:59.000Z

304

,"Ohio Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas Proved Reserves, Wet...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

,"Worksheet Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Ohio Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas Proved Reserves, Wet After Lease...

305

,"Ohio Nonassociated Natural Gas Proved Reserves, Wet After Lease...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

,"Worksheet Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Ohio Nonassociated Natural Gas Proved Reserves, Wet After Lease Separation",10,"Annual",20...

306

NETL: Control Technology - Field Testing of a Wet FGD Additive...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Enhanced Mercury Control URS Corporation will demonstrate the use of an additive in wet lime or limestone flue gas desulfurization (FGD) systems to prevent oxidized mercury that...

307

,"Louisiana State Offshore Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Louisiana State Offshore Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic...

308

,"Louisiana State Offshore Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Louisiana State Offshore Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic...

309

,"U.S. Federal Offshore Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","U.S. Federal Offshore Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic...

310

,"California - Los Angeles Basin Onshore Natural Gas, Wet After...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","California - Los Angeles Basin Onshore Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Proved Reserves...

311

,"California Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","California Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion...

312

,"California State Offshore Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","California State Offshore Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Proved Reserves (Billion...

313

,"California State Offshore Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","California State Offshore Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved...

314

,"California - Coastal Region Onshore Natural Gas, Wet After...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","California - Coastal Region Onshore Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Proved Reserves...

315

,"California Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet After Lease...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","California Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves...

316

,"California - San Joaquin Basin Onshore Natural Gas, Wet After...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","California - San Joaquin Basin Onshore Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Proved Reserves...

317

,"California Federal Offshore Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","California Federal Offshore Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Proved Reserves (Billion...

318

,"California Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Proved Reserves...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","California Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic...

319

,"Ohio Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

,"Worksheet Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Ohio Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic...

320

,"Ohio Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

,"Worksheet Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Ohio Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "wet corn milling" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

,"Ohio Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Proved Reserves...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

,"Worksheet Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Ohio Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic...

322

,"Estimated Production of Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Estimated Production of Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation " ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Lates...

323

Wetting Properties of Molten Silicon with Graphite Materials  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Abstract Scope, The wetting behavior of molten-silicon/refractory-materials system is important in ... Electrorefining of Metallurgical Grade Silicon in Molten Salts.

324

,"Colorado Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Proved Reserves...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Colorado Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic...

325

,"Colorado Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet After Lease...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Colorado Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves...

326

,"Colorado Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Colorado Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic...

327

,"North Dakota Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet)" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description"," Of...

328

Gulf of Mexico Federal Offshore Percentage of Natural Gas, Wet...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Reserves from Greater than 200 Meters Deep (Percent) Gulf of Mexico Federal Offshore Percentage of Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves from Greater than 200...

329

Gulf of Mexico Federal Offshore Percentage of Natural Gas, Wet...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

from Greater than 200 Meters Deep (Percent) Gulf of Mexico Federal Offshore Percentage of Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Production from Greater than 200 Meters...

330

,"Michigan Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet After Lease...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Michigan Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves...

331

,"Michigan Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Michigan Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic...

332

,"Michigan Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Proved Reserves...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Michigan Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic...

333

Gulf of Mexico Federal Offshore Natural Gas, Wet After Lease...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Greater than 200 Meters Deep (Billion Cubic Feet) Gulf of Mexico Federal Offshore Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves from Greater than 200 Meters Deep...

334

Gulf of Mexico Federal Offshore Natural Gas, Wet After Lease...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Greater than 200 Meters Deep (Billion Cubic Feet) Gulf of Mexico Federal Offshore Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Production from Greater than 200 Meters Deep (Billion...

335

Gulf of Mexico Federal Offshore Natural Gas, Wet After Lease...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Less than 200 Meters Deep (Billion Cubic Feet) Gulf of Mexico Federal Offshore Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Production from Less than 200 Meters Deep (Billion Cubic...

336

Gulf of Mexico Federal Offshore Natural Gas, Wet After Lease...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Less than 200 Meters Deep (Billion Cubic Feet) Gulf of Mexico Federal Offshore Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves from Less than 200 Meters Deep (Billion...

337

,"Texas - RRC District 5 Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

,"Worksheet Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Texas - RRC District 5 Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Proved Reserves (Billion...

338

,"Texas - RRC District 3 Onshore Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

,"Worksheet Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Texas - RRC District 3 Onshore Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved...

339

,"Texas - RRC District 9 Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

,"Worksheet Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Texas - RRC District 9 Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Proved Reserves (Billion...

340

,"Texas - RRC District 5 Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

,"Worksheet Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Texas - RRC District 5 Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "wet corn milling" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

,"Texas - RRC District 8 Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

,"Worksheet Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Texas - RRC District 8 Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved...

342

,"Texas Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

,"Worksheet Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Texas Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic...

343

,"Texas Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Proved Reserves...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

,"Worksheet Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Texas Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic...

344

,"Texas Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

,"Worksheet Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Texas Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion...

345

,"Texas - RRC District 6 Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

,"Worksheet Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Texas - RRC District 6 Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved...

346

,"Texas State Offshore Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

,"Worksheet Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Texas State Offshore Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic...

347

,"Texas - RRC District 2 Onshore Natural Gas, Wet After Lease...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

,"Worksheet Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Texas - RRC District 2 Onshore Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Proved Reserves...

348

,"Texas - RRC District 10 Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

,"Worksheet Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Texas - RRC District 10 Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Proved Reserves (Billion...

349

,"Texas - RRC District 3 Onshore Natural Gas, Wet After Lease...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

,"Worksheet Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Texas - RRC District 3 Onshore Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Proved Reserves...

350

,"Texas State Offshore Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

,"Worksheet Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Texas State Offshore Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved...

351

,"Texas - RRC District 8A Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

,"Worksheet Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Texas - RRC District 8A Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved...

352

,"Texas - RRC District 1 Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

,"Worksheet Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Texas - RRC District 1 Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Proved Reserves (Billion...

353

,"Texas - RRC District 4 Onshore Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

,"Worksheet Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Texas - RRC District 4 Onshore Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved...

354

,"Texas - RRC District 5 Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

,"Worksheet Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Texas - RRC District 5 Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved...

355

,"Texas - RRC District 10 Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

,"Worksheet Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Texas - RRC District 10 Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved...

356

,"Texas - RRC District 7B Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

,"Worksheet Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Texas - RRC District 7B Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved...

357

,"Texas - RRC District 4 Onshore Natural Gas, Wet After Lease...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

,"Worksheet Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Texas - RRC District 4 Onshore Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Proved Reserves...

358

,"Texas State Offshore Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

,"Worksheet Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Texas State Offshore Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves...

359

,"Texas - RRC District 9 Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

,"Worksheet Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Texas - RRC District 9 Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved...

360

,"Texas - RRC District 6 Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

,"Worksheet Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Texas - RRC District 6 Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Proved Reserves (Billion...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "wet corn milling" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

,"Texas - RRC District 2 Onshore Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

,"Worksheet Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Texas - RRC District 2 Onshore Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved...

362

,"Texas - RRC District 1 Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

,"Worksheet Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Texas - RRC District 1 Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved...

363

,"Texas - RRC District 7C Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

,"Worksheet Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Texas - RRC District 7C Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved...

364

,"Texas - RRC District 8 Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

,"Worksheet Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Texas - RRC District 8 Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved...

365

,"Texas - RRC District 8 Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

,"Worksheet Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Texas - RRC District 8 Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Proved Reserves (Billion...

366

,"Texas - RRC District 6 Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

,"Worksheet Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Texas - RRC District 6 Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved...

367

,"Texas - RRC District 9 Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

,"Worksheet Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Texas - RRC District 9 Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved...

368

,"Texas - RRC District 1 Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

,"Worksheet Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Texas - RRC District 1 Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved...

369

,"Texas - RRC District 10 Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

,"Worksheet Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Texas - RRC District 10 Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved...

370

Supplementation with xylanase and beta-xylosidase to reduce xylo-oligomer and xylan inhibition of enzymatic hydrolysis of cellulose and pretreated corn stover  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

or first- generation corn ethanol [1]. However, the inherentof fossil fuels or corn ethanol [3]. Advances in current

Qing, Qing; Wyman, Charles E

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

371

Anaerobic Digestion of Corn Ethanol Thin Stillage for Biogas Production in Batch and By Downflow Fixed Film Reactor .  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Anaerobic digestion (AD) of corn thin stillage (CTS) offers the potential to reduce corn grain ethanol production energy consumption. This thesis focuses on results collected… (more)

Wilkinson, Andrea

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

372

Effects of corn stover as carbon supplement on an integrated anaerobic digestion and ethanol fermentation process  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An integrated anaerobic digestion (AD) and ethanol fermentation process on a mixed feedstock of dairy manure and corn stover was performed to investigate the influence of corn stover on biogas production

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

373

Ozone and UV for Grain Milling Systems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Recognizing the current concerns with food safety, First Energy Services and EPRI collaborated in a project to investigate the feasibility of using ozone as a substitute for chlorinated water to control bacteria and mold at the Harvest States Amber Milling facility in Huron, Ohio. Traditionally, chlorinated water is used to control bacteria and mold in grain processing. Since chlorine usage can be costly and because chlorine presents problems in storage and safe handling of chlorine gas, the project part...

2000-12-13T23:59:59.000Z

374

YANG-MILLS THEORY FOR BUNDLE GERBES  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Abstract. Given a bundle gerbe with connection on an oriented Riemannian manifold of dimension at least equal to 3, we formulate and study the associated Yang-Mills equations. When the Riemannian manifold is compact and oriented, we prove the existence of instanton solutions to the equations and also determine the moduli space of instantons, thus giving a complete analysis in this case. We also study duality in this context.

Varghese Mathai; David Roberts

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

375

Geothermal Mill Redevelopment Project in Massachusetts  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Anwelt Heritage Apartments, LLC redeveloped a 120-year old mill complex into a mixed-use development in a lower-income neighborhood in Fitchburg, Massachusetts. Construction included 84 residential apartments rented as affordable housing to persons aged 62 and older. The Department of Energy (“DOE”) award was used as an essential component of financing the project to include the design and installation of a 200 ton geothermal system for space heating and cooling.

Vale, A.Q.

2009-03-17T23:59:59.000Z

376

in Topological Yang-Mills Theory  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We introduce the covariant forms for the non-Abelian anomaly counterparts in topological Yang-Mills theory, which satisfies the topological descent equation modulo terms that vanish at the space of BRST fixed points. We use the covariant anomalies as a new set of observables, which can absorb both ? W and ? BRS ghost number violations of zeromodes. Then, we study some problems due to the zero-modes originated from the reducible connections.

unknown authors

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

377

Corn Belt Energy Coop - Commercial Energy Efficiency Rebate Program  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Corn Belt Energy Coop - Commercial Energy Efficiency Rebate Program Corn Belt Energy Coop - Commercial Energy Efficiency Rebate Program (Illinois) Corn Belt Energy Coop - Commercial Energy Efficiency Rebate Program (Illinois) < Back Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Industrial Savings Category Other Heating & Cooling Commercial Heating & Cooling Cooling Heat Pumps Appliances & Electronics Commercial Lighting Lighting Maximum Rebate Custom Project: $0.06 per kWh reduced or 50% of project cost, up to $50,000 Program Info State Illinois Program Type Utility Rebate Program Rebate Amount Air Cooled Unitary Packaged AC/Split Systems: $60 - $75/ton Air Source Heat Pumps: $60 - $75/ton Geothermal Heat Pumps: $60 - $75/ton Packaged Terminal Heat Pump: $50/ton Room A/C: $20 Air Economizer: $150 - $180 Night Covers: $6 Programmable Thermostat: $20 - $25

378

Electricity generation potential of Thai sugar mills  

SciTech Connect

At present, the total installed electricity generating capacity of Thailand is 7500 MW. Because this level of investment will take an unacceptable large part of total foreign borrowing, the government plans to encourage participation of the private sector in electricity generation. Among the various technology options for power production, cogeneration appears to be the most promising technology due to its very high effectiveness of fuel utilization. Therefore, in the first phase of private power generation, the Thai government is encouraging cogeneration systems. This paper discusses sugar mills, where expertise and equipment for electricity generation already exist, appear to be in a particularly advantageous position to participate in the private power generation program. At present, there are 46 sugar mills in Thailand with a total capacity of 338,000 tons of cane per day. The fiber part delivered from the milling of sugarcane, bagasse, is normally used to produce steam for the process heat and electricity generation. The investment and operating costs for each of these alternatives have been evaluated. The internal rate of return is used to indicate the benefit of each alternative.

Therdyothin, A.; Bhattacharaya, S.C.; Chirarattananon, S. (Asian Inst. of Tech., Bangkok (Thailand))

1992-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

379

Accessibility in 5-Axis Milling Environment  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Using algorithms from computer graphics, namely hidden line and surface removal, techniques have been constructed to derive the 3-axis visible or millable set of a computer model from a given orientation or simulate and verify machining toolpaths. In this paper, an approach that reduces the accessibility problem of 5-axis milling using a flat end tool into a 3-axis accessibility problem is discussed. Using this approach, global detection of possible gouging into other parts, while a 5-axis flat end mill is in use, is made feasible and collisions can be avoided. Key Words: NURBs, accessibility, 5-axis machining. 1 Introduction Several methods are in use, when freeform computer models are realized using milling machines. Possibly the most common approach utilizes a ball end tool with three degrees of freedom, namely translation in x, y, and z [1, 2, 4, 5, 6, 7]. The ball end center of the tool follows an offset [8] to the model by the tool radius while the ball end surface is tangent to...

Gershon Elber

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

380

Flowability parameters for chopped switchgrass, wheat straw and corn stover  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A direct shear cell to measure the shear strength and flow properties of chopped switchgrass, wheat straw, and corn stover was designed, fabricated, and tested. Yield loci (r2=0.99) determined at pre-consolidation pressures of 3.80 kPa and 5.02 kPa indicated that chopped biomass followed Mohr-Coulomb failure. Normal stress significantly affected the displacement required for shear failure, as well as the friction coefficient values for all three chopped biomass types. Displacement at shear failure ranged from 30 to 80 mm, and depended on pre-consolidation pressure, normal stress, and particle size. Friction coefficient was inversely related to normal stress, and was highest for chopped corn stover. Also, chopped corn stover exhibited the highest angle of internal friction, unconfined yield strength, major consolidation strength, and cohesive strength, all of which indicated increased challenges in handling chopped corn stover. The measured angle of internal friction and cohesive strength indicated that chopped biomass cannot be handled by gravity alone. The measured angle of internal friction and cohesive strength were 43 and 0.75 kPa for chopped switchgrass; 44 and 0.49 kPa for chopped wheat straw; and 48 and 0.82 kPa for chopped corn stover. Unconfined yield strength and major consolidation strength used for characterization of bulk flow materials and design of hopper dimensions were 3.4 and 10.4 kPa for chopped switchgrass; 2.3 and 9.6 kPa for chopped wheat straw and 4.2 and 11.8 kPa for chopped corn stover. These results are useful for development of efficient handling, storage, and transportation systems for biomass in biorefineries.

Chevanan, Nehru [University of Tennessee; Womac, A.R. [University of Tennessee; Bitra, V.S.P. [University of Tennessee; Yoder, D.C. [University of Tennessee; Sokhansanj, Shahabaddine [ORNL

2009-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "wet corn milling" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Cellulase Accessibility of Dilute-Acid Pretreated Corn Stover  

SciTech Connect

The conclusions of this presentation are: (1) The dilute-acid pretreatment reduces xylan content in corn stover. This reduction in xylan content appears to render the substrate less recalcitrant. Below {approx}8%, xylan content is no longer the dominant factor in biomass recalcitrance. (2) Decreasing xylan content of corn stover also created more binding sites for Cel7A, but no strong correlation with actual xylan content. (3) We found no correlation between bound Cel7A concentration and lignin content. Maybe lignin is blocking the way for Cel7A? The contribution of lignin to biomass recalcitrance requires further investigation.

Jeoh, T.; Johnson, D. K.; Adney, W. S.; Himmel, M. E.

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

382

Measurement of Porosity in Dilute Acid Pretreated Corn Stover  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The conclusions of this report are: (1) pretreated corn stover appeared to have more accessible pore volume than raw corn stover; (2) solute exclusion method--differences in the pore volume were not detectable due to the high variability of the measurements; (3) thermoporosimetry--differences in pore volume between pretreated samples were not observed despite the low variability of the measurement and a good correction was found between unfrozen water at 240K and xylan content; and (4) porosity measurements showed no correlation between ethanol yields and the volume accessible to an enzyme size probe, for this sample set.

Ishizawa, C.; Davis, M. F.; Johnson, D. K.

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

383

Method for wetting a boron alloy to graphite  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method is provided for wetting a graphite substrate and spreading a a boron alloy over the substrate. The wetted substrate may be in the form of a needle for an effective ion emission source. The method may also be used to wet a graphite substrate for subsequent joining with another graphite substrate or other metal, or to form a protective coating over a graphite substrate. A noneutectic alloy of boron is formed with a metal selected from the group consisting of nickel (Ni), palladium (Pd), and platinum (Pt) with excess boron, i.e., and atomic percentage of boron effective to precipitate boron at a wetting temperature of less than the liquid-phase boundary temperature of the alloy. The alloy is applied to the substrate and the graphite substrate is then heated to the wetting temperature and maintained at the wetting temperature for a time effective for the alloy to wet and spread over the substrate. The excess boron is evenly dispersed in the alloy and is readily available to promote the wetting and spreading action of the alloy. 1 fig.

Storms, E.K.

1987-08-21T23:59:59.000Z

384

The Study on Corn Production Prediction in Heilongjiang Province Based on Support Vector Machine  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper uses the support vector machine (SVM) algorithm to study the prediction of corn production in Heilongjiang province, forms the sample set with the 1991-2008 data in Heilongjiang province, and set up the SVM model between factors and corn production. ... Keywords: corn production, support vector machine, prediction

Zhu Jing; Fan Yadong

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

385

Alabama Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation,  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Alabama Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1970's 13 1980's 23 25 1990's 25 23 30 46 56 44 38 30 28 27 2000's 29 26 31 32 32 29 18 20 19 29 2010's 38 48 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 8/1/2013 Next Release Date: 8/1/2014 Referring Pages: Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas Proved Reserves, Wet After Lease Separation, as of Dec. 31 Alabama Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas Proved Reserves, Wet After

386

California State Offshore Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Proved  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) California State Offshore Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1970's 234 1980's 166 256 254 243 235 1990's 194 60 63 65 63 59 49 56 44 77 2000's 91 85 91 83 87 90 90 83 57 57 2010's 66 82 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 8/1/2013 Next Release Date: 8/1/2014 Referring Pages: Natural Gas Proved Reserves, Wet After Lease Separation, as of Dec. 31 CA, State Offshore Natural Gas Reserves Summary as of Dec. 31 Natural Gas Proved Reserves, Wet After Lease Separation, as of Dec.

387

Florida Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Florida Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1970's 0 1980's 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1990's 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2000's 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2010's 26 4 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 8/1/2013 Next Release Date: 8/1/2014 Referring Pages: Nonassociated Natural Gas Proved Reserves, Wet After Lease Separation, as of Dec. 31 Florida Nonassociated Natural Gas Proved Reserves, Wet After Lease

388

California Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) California Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1970's 1,881 1980's 1,792 1,424 1,230 1,120 1,006 1990's 911 901 799 817 808 736 610 570 453 355 2000's 754 842 796 759 767 799 780 686 621 612 2010's 503 510 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 8/1/2013 Next Release Date: 8/1/2014 Referring Pages: Nonassociated Natural Gas Proved Reserves, Wet After Lease Separation, as of Dec. 31 California Nonassociated Natural Gas Proved Reserves, Wet After

389

Texas State Offshore Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Proved  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Texas State Offshore Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1980's 1,112 1,073 739 634 564 610 1990's 461 477 350 337 230 313 293 290 350 419 2000's 400 468 436 456 321 265 305 261 220 164 2010's 131 118 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 8/1/2013 Next Release Date: 8/1/2014 Referring Pages: Natural Gas Proved Reserves, Wet After Lease Separation, as of Dec. 31 TX, State Offshore Natural Gas Reserves Summary as of Dec. 31 Natural Gas Proved Reserves, Wet After Lease Separation, as of Dec.

390

Louisiana State Offshore Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Louisiana State Offshore Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1980's 2,820 1,100 1,218 1,002 1,042 1990's 812 875 691 789 820 714 626 613 473 541 2000's 592 627 428 448 333 370 386 327 248 215 2010's 279 468 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 8/1/2013 Next Release Date: 8/1/2014 Referring Pages: Nonassociated Natural Gas Proved Reserves, Wet After Lease Separation, as of Dec. 31 LA, State Offshore Nonassociated Natural Gas Proved Reserves, Wet

391

California State Offshore Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) California State Offshore Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1970's 8 1980's 6 12 22 22 29 1990's 6 5 4 2 4 3 2 2 5 19 2000's 5 5 6 7 2 1 5 4 3 4 2010's 3 3 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 8/1/2013 Next Release Date: 8/1/2014 Referring Pages: Nonassociated Natural Gas Proved Reserves, Wet After Lease Separation, as of Dec. 31 CA, State Offshore Nonassociated Natural Gas Proved Reserves, Wet

392

Miscellaneous States Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation,  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Miscellaneous States Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1970's 142 1980's 146 181 47 50 63 52 95 53 56 48 1990's 50 62 82 87 56 37 40 13 22 13 2000's 23 64 80 120 98 118 120 226 263 271 2010's 353 270 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 8/1/2013 Next Release Date: 8/1/2014 Referring Pages: Nonassociated Natural Gas Proved Reserves, Wet After Lease Separation, as of Dec. 31 Miscellaneous Nonassociated Natural Gas Proved Reserves, Wet After

393

Ohio Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Ohio Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1970's 432 1980's 282 165 158 396 364 395 522 477 749 686 1990's 844 805 780 763 780 699 715 594 548 777 2000's 717 631 772 823 767 714 801 926 886 799 2010's 742 684 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 8/1/2013 Next Release Date: 8/1/2014 Referring Pages: Nonassociated Natural Gas Proved Reserves, Wet After Lease Separation, as of Dec. 31 Ohio Nonassociated Natural Gas Proved Reserves, Wet After Lease

394

DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Edgemont Mill Site - SD 01  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

Edgemont Mill Site - SD 01 Edgemont Mill Site - SD 01 FUSRAP Considered Sites Site: Edgemont Mill Site (SD.01) Designated Name: Alternate Name: Location: Evaluation Year: Site Operations: Site Disposition: Radioactive Materials Handled: Primary Radioactive Materials Handled: Radiological Survey(s): Site Status: Also see Edgemont, South Dakota, Disposal Site Documents Related to Edgemont Mill Site 2012 Annual Site Inspection and Monitoring Report for Uranium Mill Tailings Radiation Control Act Title II Disposal Sites-Edgemont, South Dakota, Disposal Site. LMS/S09415. November 2012 U.S. Department of Energy 2008 UMTRCA Title II Sites Annual Report November 2008 Edgemont, South Dakota FACT SHEET Office of Legacy Management Edgemont, South Dakota, Disposal Site This fact sheet provides information about the Uranium Mill

395

Injection Molding of Tungsten Powder Treated by Jet Mill  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Tungsten powder was firstly treated by jet mill, resulting in the improvement of ... and Welding Conditions of Monopile and Transition for Offshore Wind Plant.

396

Nanoestructured Altisin Coatings For Ball Helical Milling Application ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Abstract Scope, The current power wind generation industry uses for its power ... In this work the behavior and improvement of tool life for ball end mills with ...

397

Monticello Mill Tailings, Operable Unit III Surface and Ground...  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

Action activities included millsite dewatering and treatment, initiation of a ground water management policy to prevent use Monticello Mill Tailings Site, Operable Unit III...

398

Development and Characterization of Milled Silver Powder Addition ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In order to add the milled Ag powders to granular PP feedstock two different .... Membranes Obtained from PA6/HDPE Blends Via Precipitation by Immersion.

399

Influence of Milling Time on Microstructure and Thermoelectric ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Presentation Title, Influence of Milling Time on Microstructure and Thermoelectric Properties of p-Type Bi2Te3 Alloys. Author(s), Madavali Babu, Hyo Seob Kim, ...

400

(ns) Al-2024 Alloy Obtained via Cryogenic Milling  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Milling Al-2024 powder of big particle size (>100 microns) in cryogenic regime resulted in nanostructured powder of 46 nm grain size after 18h. Furthermore ...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "wet corn milling" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

A Computer Simulation of an Agitation Mill Abrasion Process for ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We already confirmed that a special and selective grinding such as parts abrasion from the board using agitation mill was effective for the recycling of a part of ...

402

Potential for reducing paper mill energy use and carbon dioxide...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Li Journal Applied Energy Volume 102 Date Published 022013 Keywords co2 emissions, energy audit, paper mill Abstract The pulp and paper industry is one of the most...

403

Effect of enzyme application in temper water on wheat milling.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The effect of enzyme in temper water on wheat milling performance and flour quality was studied. Five independent variables, enzyme concentration, incubation time, incubation temperature,… (more)

Yoo, Juhyun

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

404

DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Falls City Mill Site - TX...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Materials Handled: Radiological Survey(s): Site Status: Also see Falls City, Texas, Disposal Site Documents Related to Falls City Mill Site Data Validation Package for...

405

DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Lowman Mill Site - ID 01  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

Radioactive Materials Handled: Radiological Survey(s): Site Status: Also see Lowman, Idaho, Disposal Site Documents Related to Lowman Mill Site Historical documents may contain...

406

Fearmonger Alert: Freeze Injury Potential for Early-Planted Corn  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Corn planting has been proceeding at a record pace in Indiana thus far in the 2004 growing season. Reasonably warm soil temperatures throughout April have also encouraged faster emergence than usually occurs with such early-planted corn. Such early planting and emergence of corn is always at higher calendar risk of injury by frost events or lethal cold temperatures. Of these two risk factors, lethal cold temperature is the more worrisome one since a corn plant’s growing point region is relatively protected from the effects of simple frost while it remains below the soil surface. Lethal cold temperatures (28F or less) can penetrate the upper inch or two of soil, especially dry surface soils, and kill plant tissue directly, including coleoptiles and growing points. Non-lethal injury by cold temperatures may cause deformed elongation of the mesocotyl or physical damage to the coleoptile in nonemerged seedlings, resulting in the proverbial “cork-screw ” symptom and subsequent leafing out underground. Air temperatures in northern areas of Indiana dipped to the low 30’s early in the morning of 3 May, with lower-lying areas likely less than 30F. Given the risk of frost or chilling

R. L. (bob Nielsen

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

407

Greenhouse gas emissions related to ethanol produced from corn  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report confers the details of a panel meeting discussion on greenhouse gases. The topic of this discussion was ethanol. Members discussed all aspects of growing corn and producing ethanol. Then the question was raised as to whether or not this is a suitable substitute to fossil fuel usage in the reduction of greenhouse gas emissions.

Marland, G.

1994-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

408

Considerations for Planting Corn into Damaged Fields of Wheat  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Many folks are still assessing the condition of wheat fields damaged by the low temperatures of the past week. In some situations, additional damage to wheat has occurred from standing water in fields due to frequent rains this winter and spring. Some growers may decide replanting damaged wheat fields to corn is a viable economic option. Some of the key considerations for doing so are described in this article. Killing the Remaining Stand of Wheat For damaged wheat fields that will be planted to corn, complete and timely control of the existing wheat is more important than if planting to soybean. Corn is more sensitive to early-season weed competition than soybean. Living wheat plants are essentially weeds and can absorb nitrogen and make it unavailable for the corn plants during the same growing season. Use of a glyphosate-based burndown program should include the use of glyphosate at 1.5 lb ae/A + 2.4-D at 1-2 pts/A. The herbicide 2,4-D is needed to control glyphosateresistant marestail which is very prevalent in southern Indiana and help with control of emerged common lambsquarter and ragweed. Apply in a spray volume of 10 to 15 GPA

Bill Johnson; Tony Vyn; Jim Camberato; Christian Krupke; Rl (bob Nielsen; Depts Of Botany; Plant Pathology

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

409

Can Delignification Decrease Cellulose Digestibility in Acid Pretreated Corn Stover?  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

It has previously been shown that the improved digestibility of dilute acid pretreated corn stover is at least partially due to the removal of xylan and the consequent increase in accessibility of the cellulose to cellobiohydrolase enzymes. We now report on the impact that lignin removal has on the accessibility and digestibility of dilute acid pretreated corn stover. Samples of corn stover were subjected to dilute sulfuric acid pretreatment with and without simultaneous (partial) lignin removal. In addition, some samples were completely delignified after the pretreatment step using acidified sodium chlorite. The accessibility and digestibility of the samples were tested using a fluorescence-labeled cellobiohydrolase (Trichoderma reesei Cel7A) purified from a commercial cellulase preparation. Partial delignification of corn stover during dilute acid pretreatment was shown to improve cellulose digestibility by T. reesei Cel7A; however, decreasing the lignin content below 5% (g g{sup -1}) by treatment with acidified sodium chlorite resulted in a dramatic reduction in cellulose digestibility. Importantly, this effect was found to be enhanced in samples with lower xylan contents suggesting that the near complete removal of xylan and lignin may cause aggregation of the cellulose microfibrils resulting in decreased cellulase accessibility.

Ishizawa, C. I.; Jeoh, T.; Adney, W. S.; Himmel, M. E.; Johnson, D. K.; Davis, M. F.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

410

Biofuel derived from Microalgae Corn-based Ethanol  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Biofuel derived from Microalgae Corn-based Ethanol #12;Outline · Production processes for each source of biofuel · Potential for environmental impacts · Comparative results · Conclusions #12;Definitions Biofuel: clean fuel made from animal and plant fats and tissues (Hollebone, 2008) Ethanol

Blouin-Demers, Gabriel

411

Crop-Hail Damage in the Midwest Corn Belt  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Crop-hail damage in the ten Midwest corn belt states is examined during the period 1957–81. Estimates of crop losses due to hail are made from hail insurance data for each state and each significant crop in the region. The crop-hail losses are ...

Harry J. Hillaker Jr.; Paul J. Waite

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

412

The effect of flaxseed hulls on expanded corn meal products  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Brown flaxseed hulls were added to de-germed corn meal and processed into extrudates with acceptable texture and increased nutritional benefits. The addition of brown flaxseed hulls to a corn based expanded snack increases the dietary fiber, alpha omega 3 fatty acids, and antioxidants levels. The addition of flaxseed hulls to a corn based snack can increase its susceptibility to oxidative rancidity which can limit shelf life. Whole ground tannin sorghum with added brown flaxseed hulls was processed into extrudates and texture, antioxidant activity, and stability were evaluated. Brown flaxseed hulls were mixed with de-germed yellow corn meal in ratios of 0:100, 15:85, 20:80, and 25:75 (w/w) and extruded with 12 and 15% feed moistures using a twin screw extruder to produce direct expanded extrudates. Expansion of extrudates containing brown hulls decreased as the amount of hulls increased. Dried extrudates had acceptable flavor immediately after processing. Total phenols and antioxidant activity of extrudates containing 20 and 25% brown flaxseed hulls, extruded at 15% feed moisture were higher than de-germed corn meal extruded at 16% feed moisture. Brown flaxseed hulls were added at 20% to whole ground white and sumac (tannin) sorghums and processed into extrudates. Expansion increased for sorghum extrudates containing brown flaxseed hulls. The addition of brown flaxseed hulls increased antioxidant activity and total phenols of both white and sumac (tannin) extrudates. The sumac (tannin) extrudates had the longest delay in producing off odor (paintlike odor) and had the lowest p-Anisidine values compared to white (ATX631x RTX 436) sorghum and corn meal with added flaxseed hulls. Corn meal extrudates with 20% brown flaxseed hulls produce off odors more rapidly than other extrudates. This suggests that the tannins in sorghum maybe extending shelf life because of their antioxidant activity. The addition of brown flaxseed hulls can be used to increase nutritional value and antioxidant levels in a direct expanded product. Also the use of tannins sorghums in products containing flaxseed may help delay oxidation, thus preventing the occurrence of off odors. Further work needs to be done to verify results.

Barron, Marc Edward

2007-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

413

Effects of Feeding Insect-Protected Corn and Corn Residue to Cattle, and Evaluation of Distillers Grains Storage when Mixed with Crop Residue on Cattle Performance.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Research has been conducted on genetically modified corn fed to livestock since the introduction of insect resistant hybrids. While the overwhelming conclusion of these trials… (more)

Weber, Barry

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

414

Engineering assessment of inactive uranium mill tailings  

SciTech Connect

The Grand Junction site has been reevaluated in order to revise the October 1977 engineering assessment of the problems resulting from the existence of radioactive uranium mill tailings at Grand Junction, Colorado. This engineering assessment has included the preparation of topographic maps, the performance of core drillings and radiometric measurements sufficient to determine areas and volumes of tailings and radiation exposures of individuals and nearby populations, the investigations of site hydrology and meteorology, and the evaluation and costing of alternative corrective actions. Radon gas released from the 1.9 million tons of tailings at the Grand Junction site constitutes the most significant environmental impact, although windblown tailings and external gamma radiation are also factors. The eight alternative actions presented herein range from millsite and off-site decontamination with the addition of 3 m of stabilization cover material (Option I), to removal of the tailings to remote disposal sites and decontamination of the tailings site (Options II through VIII). Cost estimates for the eight options range from about $10,200,000 for stabilization in-place to about $39,500,000 for disposal in the DeBeque area, at a distance of about 35 mi, using transportation by rail. If transportation to DeBeque were by truck, the cost estimated to be about $41,900,000. Three principal alternatives for the reprocessing of the Grand Junction tailings were examined: (a) heap leaching; (b) treatment at an existing mill; and (c) reprocessing at a new conventional mill constructed for tailings reprocessing. The cost of the uranium recovered would be about $200/lb by heap leach and $150/lb by conventional plant processes. The spot market price for uranium was $25/lb early in 1981. Therefore, reprocessing the tailings for uranium recovery appears not to be economically attractive.

Not Available

1981-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

415

Applications of Yang-Mills thermodynamics  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We discuss the postulate that the U(1) gauge group describing photon propagation results from a dynamically broken SU(2) gauge theory. In the context of Yang-Mills thermodynamics such a symmetry breaking occurs via the non-trivial ground state. As a result of the interaction with the quasi particles of the theory the photon acquires an effective, temperature and momentum dependent, mass. We explain how this leads to modified black body spectra at temperatures of about 5 K. Furthermore, we discuss the properties and effects of an emergent longitudinal polarization.

Schwarz, Markus [Salierstr. 10.,76137 Karlsruhe (Germany)

2012-09-26T23:59:59.000Z

416

Fundamental and effective Yang-Mills vertices  

SciTech Connect

Calorons and plane waves within and in between them collectively give rise to a thermal ground state. The latter provides a homgeneous energy density and a negative pressure, and it induces quasiparticle masses to part of the propagating spectrum of deconfining SU(2) Yang-Mills thermodynamics (dynamical gauge-symmetry breaking). In the present talk we discuss the role of a single caloron in inducing effective local vertices, characterized by powers of h, mediating the interaction of plane waves which propagate over large distances. The constraints on momentum transfers through effective 4-vertices are revisited.

Hofmann, Ralf [ITP, Universitaet Heidelberg, Philosophenweg 16, 69120 Heidelberg (Germany)

2012-09-26T23:59:59.000Z

417

Chapter 2: uranium mines and mills  

SciTech Connect

This chapter will be included in a larger ASCE Committee Report. Uranium mining production is split between underground and open pit mines. Mills are sized to produce yellowcake concentrate from hundreds to thousands of tons of ore per day. Miner's health and safety, and environmental protection are key concerns in design. Standards are set by the US Mine Safety and Health Administration, the EPA, NRC, DOT, the states, and national standards organizations. International guidance and standards are extensive and based on mining experience in many nations.

O'Connell, W.J.

1983-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

418

Pocket Milling with Tool Engagement Detection  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper presents an algorithm for generating a tool path for cutting a pocket with islands, which includes detecting when the tool is certain to be making a minimal engagement cut. Minimal engagement is defined as the amount of engagement present in peripheral milling of a flat side face of a workpiece in a straight line with constant stepover. Feed rates and spindle speeds are reset by the algorithm when machining conditions change from a minimal engagement cut to any other type of cut or vice versa.

Thomas Kramer April; Thomas R. Kramer

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

419

Effects of residues from municipal solid waste landfill on corn yield and heavy metal content  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The effects of residues from municipal solid waste landfill, Khon Kaen Municipality, Thailand, on corn (Zea mays L.) yield and heavy metal content were studied. Field experiments with randomized complete block design with five treatments (0, 20, 40, 60 and 80% v/v of residues and soil) and four replications were carried out. Corn yield and heavy metal contents in corn grain were analyzed. Corn yield increased by 50, 72, 85 and 71% at 20, 40, 60 and 80% treatments as compared to the control, respectively. All heavy metals content, except cadmium, nickel and zinc, in corn grain were not significantly different from the control. Arsenic, cadmium and zinc in corn grain were strongly positively correlated with concentrations in soil. The heavy metal content in corn grain was within regulated limits for human consumption.

Prabpai, S. [Suphan Buri Campus Establishment Project, Kasetsart University, 50 U Floor, Administrative Building, Paholyothin Road, Jatujak, Bangkok 10900 (Thailand)], E-mail: s.prabpai@hotmail.com; Charerntanyarak, L. [Department of Epidemiology, Faculty of Public Health, Khon Kaen University, Khon Kaen 40002 (Thailand)], E-mail: lertchai@kku.ac.th; Siri, B. [Department of Agronomy, Faculty of Agriculture, Khon Kaen University, Khon Kaen 40002 (Thailand)], E-mail: boonmee@kku.ac.th; Moore, M.R. [The University of Queensland, The National Research Center for Environmental Toxicology, 39 Kessels Road, Coopers Plans, Brisbane, Queensland 4108 (Australia)], E-mail: m.moore@uq.edu.au; Noller, Barry N. [The University of Queensland, Centre for Mined Land Rehabilitation, Brisbane, Queensland 4072 (Australia)], E-mail: b.noller@uq.edu.au

2009-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

420

Geometric Approaches for Reducing Burr Formation in Planar Milling by Avoiding Tool Exits  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1999). “A summary of micro-milling studies. ” 1st Int’lT.R. (1992). “Pocket milling with tool engagement detec-Burr minimization in face milling: a geometric approach. ”

Chu, Chih-Hsing; Dornfeld, David

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "wet corn milling" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

The Milling Stone Horizon Revisited: New Perspectives from Northern and Central California  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Berryessa II. Journal THE MILLING STONE HORIZON REVISITEDI, pp. 67-93 (1999). The Milling Stone Horizon Revisited:nearly half a century, the Milling Stone Horizon has been

Fitzgerald, Richard T.; Jones, Terry L.

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

422

Back Cutting and Tool Wear Influence on Burrs in Face Milling - Analysis and Solutions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of uncoated and coated milling inserts”, Wear, 225/229, ppBurr Minimization in Face Milling: A Geometric Approach,System for Burr i n Face Milling”, Journal of Manufacturing

Rangarajan, Arvind; Dornfeld, David A

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

423

A Study of Surface Roughness in the Micro-End-Milling Process  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

adaptive control of end milling operations,” Proc. NAMRC-iv,generation in dynamic milling,” ASME J. Eng. Ind. , 113,produced with the micro- end-milling process. Alauddin, M. ,

Lee, Kiha; Dornfeld, David A

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

424

On The Face Milling Burr Formation Mechanisms and Minimization Strategies at High Tool Engagement  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

on Burr Formation in Face Milling with an Extreme PositiveBurr Formation in Face Milling”, Bulletin Japan Society ofRoughness in High Speed Face Milling”, 2001-2002 LMA Annual

Avila, Miguel C; Dornfeld, David A

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

425

The Possibilities of Women and Men: Gender and the California Milling Stone Horizon  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Richard 1991 Archaic Milling Cultures of the Southern SanGender and the California Milling Stone Horizon KELLY R.those subsumed under the Milling Stone Horizon, that are not

McGuire, Kelly R; Hildebrandt, William R

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

426

California Federal Offshore Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet After  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) California Federal Offshore Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1970's 249 1980's 307 1,110 1,249 1,312 1,252 1990's 1,229 995 987 976 1,077 1,195 1,151 498 437 488 2000's 500 490 459 456 412 776 756 752 702 731 2010's 722 711 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 8/1/2013 Next Release Date: 8/1/2014 Referring Pages: Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas Proved Reserves, Wet After Lease

427

Michigan Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation,  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Michigan Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1970's 733 1980's 883 758 719 824 774 689 577 569 491 432 1990's 408 437 352 328 357 326 347 281 228 227 2000's 214 159 214 269 193 153 192 179 148 77 2010's 72 77 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 8/1/2013 Next Release Date: 8/1/2014 Referring Pages: Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas Proved Reserves, Wet After Lease Separation, as of Dec. 31

428

Louisiana State Offshore Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Proved  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Louisiana State Offshore Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1980's 3,269 1,351 1,478 1,209 1,273 1990's 1,019 1,082 845 946 988 862 783 743 571 661 2000's 721 772 512 527 394 433 442 392 934 728 2010's 386 519 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 8/1/2013 Next Release Date: 8/1/2014 Referring Pages: Natural Gas Proved Reserves, Wet After Lease Separation, as of Dec. 31 LA, State Offshore Natural Gas Reserves Summary as of Dec. 31

429

Miscellaneous States Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Proved  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Miscellaneous States Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1970's 156 1980's 180 193 74 81 77 77 136 66 84 87 1990's 72 76 93 96 67 69 68 44 39 67 2000's 42 83 100 134 110 132 139 241 272 349 2010's 363 393 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 8/1/2013 Next Release Date: 8/1/2014 Referring Pages: Natural Gas Proved Reserves, Wet After Lease Separation, as of Dec. 31 Miscellaneous Natural Gas Reserves Summary as of Dec. 31

430

North Dakota Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Proved Reserves  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) North Dakota Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1970's 485 1980's 594 654 696 673 643 650 610 578 593 625 1990's 650 533 567 585 568 518 512 531 501 475 2000's 487 495 524 497 465 508 539 572 603 1,213 2010's 1,869 2,652 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 8/1/2013 Next Release Date: 8/1/2014 Referring Pages: Natural Gas Proved Reserves, Wet After Lease Separation, as of Dec. 31 North Dakota Natural Gas Reserves Summary as of Dec. 31

431

Wyoming Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation,  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Wyoming Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1970's 1,038 1980's 1,374 1,228 1,060 959 867 710 691 691 616 581 1990's 573 572 624 502 611 879 824 850 794 713 2000's 652 488 561 450 362 384 347 365 223 362 2010's 334 318 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 8/1/2013 Next Release Date: 8/1/2014 Referring Pages: Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas Proved Reserves, Wet After Lease

432

Arkansas Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation,  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Arkansas Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1970's 166 1980's 194 184 174 194 189 157 150 145 157 145 1990's 67 136 133 93 85 104 89 56 38 41 2000's 39 30 38 37 40 46 44 37 12 20 2010's 29 46 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 8/1/2013 Next Release Date: 8/1/2014 Referring Pages: Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas Proved Reserves, Wet After Lease Separation, as of Dec. 31

433

California - Coastal Region Onshore Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) California - Coastal Region Onshore Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1970's 307 1980's 265 265 325 344 256 254 261 243 220 233 1990's 228 220 196 135 145 109 120 129 116 233 2000's 244 185 197 173 188 269 208 211 150 168 2010's 178 172 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 8/1/2013 Next Release Date: 8/1/2014 Referring Pages: Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas Proved Reserves, Wet After Lease

434

Montana Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Proved Reserves (Billion  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Montana Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1970's 837 1980's 1,308 1,336 870 921 825 884 823 801 834 889 1990's 920 848 875 684 727 792 806 769 789 851 2000's 892 907 914 1,068 1,002 998 1,069 1,067 1,014 993 2010's 959 792 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 8/1/2013 Next Release Date: 8/1/2014 Referring Pages: Natural Gas Proved Reserves, Wet After Lease Separation, as of Dec. 31 Montana Natural Gas Reserves Summary as of Dec. 31

435

Montana Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation,  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Montana Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1970's 51 1980's 122 89 81 108 77 91 98 97 101 68 1990's 86 66 61 53 55 53 51 42 52 67 2000's 70 85 94 112 130 161 195 219 197 312 2010's 302 270 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 8/1/2013 Next Release Date: 8/1/2014 Referring Pages: Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas Proved Reserves, Wet After Lease Separation, as of Dec. 31

436

Louisiana - North Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet After Lease  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Louisiana - North Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1970's 765 1980's 916 1,040 832 775 690 632 567 488 249 237 1990's 241 192 160 120 134 133 255 287 183 260 2000's 186 168 159 139 107 98 90 73 78 53 2010's 73 98 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 8/1/2013 Next Release Date: 8/1/2014 Referring Pages: Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas Proved Reserves, Wet After Lease

437

New York Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) New York Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1970's 211 1980's 208 262 226 295 387 367 457 410 351 364 1990's 354 331 329 264 240 195 229 223 217 212 2000's 320 311 315 365 324 346 361 365 360 196 2010's 271 245 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 8/1/2013 Next Release Date: 8/1/2014 Referring Pages: Nonassociated Natural Gas Proved Reserves, Wet After Lease Separation, as of Dec. 31

438

California - Los Angeles Basin Onshore Natural Gas, Wet After Lease  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) California - Los Angeles Basin Onshore Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1970's 176 1980's 207 163 104 115 163 188 149 155 158 141 1990's 110 120 103 108 108 115 112 146 154 174 2000's 204 195 218 196 184 186 161 154 81 91 2010's 92 102 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 8/1/2013 Next Release Date: 8/1/2014 Referring Pages: Natural Gas Proved Reserves, Wet After Lease Separation, as of Dec. 31 CA, Los Angeles Basin Onshore Natural Gas Reserves Summary as of

439

Montana Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Montana Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1970's 786 1980's 1,186 1,247 789 813 748 793 725 704 733 821 1990's 834 782 814 631 672 739 755 727 737 784 2000's 822 822 820 956 872 837 874 848 817 681 2010's 657 522 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 8/1/2013 Next Release Date: 8/1/2014 Referring Pages: Nonassociated Natural Gas Proved Reserves, Wet After Lease Separation, as of Dec. 31

440

California - Los Angeles Basin Onshore Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) California - Los Angeles Basin Onshore Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1970's 1 1980's 0 1 1 1 1 3 0 0 0 0 1990's 0 0 3 0 0 0 0 3 1 0 2000's 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2010's 0 0 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 8/1/2013 Next Release Date: 8/1/2014 Referring Pages: Nonassociated Natural Gas Proved Reserves, Wet After Lease Separation, as of Dec. 31 CA, Los Angeles Basin Onshore Nonassociated Natural Gas Proved

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "wet corn milling" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

California - Coastal Region Onshore Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) California - Coastal Region Onshore Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1970's 395 1980's 330 325 384 405 284 277 275 255 232 238 1990's 232 231 215 201 205 163 168 176 118 233 2000's 244 185 197 174 196 277 214 212 151 169 2010's 180 173 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 8/1/2013 Next Release Date: 8/1/2014 Referring Pages: Natural Gas Proved Reserves, Wet After Lease Separation, as of Dec. 31 CA, Coastal Region Onshore Natural Gas Reserves Summary as of Dec.

442

Utah Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Reserves Sales ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Sales (Billion Cubic Feet) Utah Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Reserves Sales (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8...

443

Utah Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Reserves...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Sales (Billion Cubic Feet) Utah Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Reserves Sales (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6...

444

Utah Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Reserves Acquisitions...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Acquisitions (Billion Cubic Feet) Utah Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Reserves Acquisitions (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6...

445

Utah Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, New...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

New Field Discoveries (Billion Cubic Feet) Utah Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, New Field Discoveries (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3...

446

Utah Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Reserves Adjustments...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Adjustments (Billion Cubic Feet) Utah Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Reserves Adjustments (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6...

447

Utah Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Reserves Revision...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Decreases (Billion Cubic Feet) Utah Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Reserves Revision Decreases (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6...

448

Utah Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Reserves Revision...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Increases (Billion Cubic Feet) Utah Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Reserves Revision Increases (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6...

449

Utah Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Reserves Extensions...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Extensions (Billion Cubic Feet) Utah Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Reserves Extensions (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7...

450

Utah Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Reserves New Field...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

New Field Discoveries (Billion Cubic Feet) Utah Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Reserves New Field Discoveries (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3...

451

Utah Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Sales (Billion Cubic Feet) Utah Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Reserves Sales (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5...

452

Utah Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Reserves Estimated...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Estimated Production (Billion Cubic Feet) Utah Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Reserves Estimated Production (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4...

453

Results of WetNet PIP-2 Project  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The second WetNet Precipitation Intercomparison Project (PIP-2) evaluates the performance of 20 satellite precipitation retrieval algorithms, implemented for application with Special Sensor Microwave/Imager (SSM/I) passive microwave (PMW) ...

E. A. Smith; J. E. Lamm; R. Adler; J. Alishouse; K. Aonashi; E. Barrett; P. Bauer; W. Berg; A. Chang; R. Ferraro; J. Ferriday; S. Goodman; N. Grody; C. Kidd; D. Kniveton; C. Kummerow; G. Liu; F. Marzano; A. Mugnai; W. Olson; G. Petty; A. Shibata; R. Spencer; F. Wentz; T. Wilheit; E. Zipser

1998-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

454

Gulf of Mexico Federal Offshore Natural Gas, Wet After Lease...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

(Billion Cubic Feet) Gulf of Mexico Federal Offshore Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5...

455

Wet cooling towers: rule-of-thumb design and simulation  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A survey of wet cooling tower literature was performed to develop a simplified method of cooling tower design and simulation for use in power plant cycle optimization. The theory of heat exchange in wet cooling towers is briefly summarized. The Merkel equation (the fundamental equation of heat transfer in wet cooling towers) is presented and discussed. The cooling tower fill constant (Ka) is defined and values derived. A rule-of-thumb method for the optimized design of cooling towers is presented. The rule-of-thumb design method provides information useful in power plant cycle optimization, including tower dimensions, water consumption rate, exit air temperature, power requirements and construction cost. In addition, a method for simulation of cooling tower performance at various operating conditions is presented. This information is also useful in power plant cycle evaluation. Using the information presented, it will be possible to incorporate wet cooling tower design and simulation into a procedure to evaluate and optimize power plant cycles.

Leeper, S.A.

1981-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

456

Source apportionment of wet sulfate deposition in eastern North America  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

An analytical model of long distance transport of air pollutants (Fay and Rosenzweig, 1980) has been adapted for the estimation of long term (e.g. annual) wet sulfate deposition in eastern N. America. The model parameters ...

Fay, James A.

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

457

Impact of Initial Soil Wetness on Seasonal Atmospheric Prediction  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This study investigates the importance of initial soil wetness in seasonal predictions with dynamical models. Two experiments are performed, each consisting of two ensembles of global climate model integrations initialized from early June ...

M. J. Fennessy; J. Shukla

1999-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

458

Spatial Coherence and Predictability of Indonesian Wet Season Rainfall  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Rainfall from 63 stations across Indonesia is examined for the period 1950–98 to determine the spatial coherence of wet season anomalies. An example of almost unrelated anomalies at two neighboring stations is presented. Principal component ...

Malcolm Haylock; John McBride

2001-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

459

North Dakota Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) North Dakota Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1970's 284 1980's 355 401 448 416 376 319 317 302 327 312 1990's 316 290 301 311 293 255 257 274 240 225 2000's 223 225 209 181 145 165 182 155 119 143 2010's 152 141 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 8/1/2013 Next Release Date: 8/1/2014 Referring Pages: Nonassociated Natural Gas Proved Reserves, Wet After Lease Separation, as of Dec. 31

460

Miscellaneous States Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet After Lease  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Miscellaneous States Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1970's 14 1980's 34 12 27 31 14 25 41 13 28 39 1990's 22 14 11 9 11 32 28 31 17 54 2000's 19 19 20 14 12 14 19 15 9 78 2010's 10 104 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 8/1/2013 Next Release Date: 8/1/2014 Referring Pages: Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas Proved Reserves, Wet After Lease Separation, as of Dec. 31

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "wet corn milling" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


461

Gulf of Mexico Federal Offshore Natural Gas, Wet After Lease...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

(Billion Cubic Feet) Gulf of Mexico Federal Offshore Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Production (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5...

462

California Federal Offshore Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) California Federal Offshore Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1970's 73 1980's 107 227 217 258 267 1990's 240 179 149 147 110 94 115 58 52 48 2000's 76 50 56 55 47 49 55 53 3 9 2010's 3 0 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 8/1/2013 Next Release Date: 8/1/2014 Referring Pages: Nonassociated Natural Gas Proved Reserves, Wet After Lease Separation, as of Dec. 31 Federal Offshore California Nonassociated Natural Gas Proved

463

Texas - RRC District 7B Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Texas - RRC District 7B Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved...

464

Texas - RRC District 8A Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Texas - RRC District 8A Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved...

465

Texas - RRC District 7C Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Texas - RRC District 7C Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved...

466

Texas - RRC District 3 Onshore Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Texas - RRC District 3 Onshore Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet)...

467

Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action Project surface project management plan  

SciTech Connect

This Project Management Plan describes the planning, systems, and organization that shall be used to manage the Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action Project (UMTRA). US DOE is authorized to stabilize and control surface tailings and ground water contamination at 24 inactive uranium processing sites and associated vicinity properties containing uranium mill tailings and related residual radioactive materials.

Not Available

1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

468

Energy Conservation in the Food Industry : Terminal Flour Mill.  

SciTech Connect

This report presents the results of an energy study that was conducted at Terminal Flour Mill in Portland, Oregon. Terminal Flour Mill is one of five food industry (SIC 20) plants that are being studied. Energy conservation measures (ECM's) are divided into two groups; operation and maintenance (O and M) measures, and equipment modification measures.

United Industries Corporation.

1985-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

469

Air Toxics Control by Wet Flue Gas Desulfurization Systems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report provides an update on three tasks associated with the EPRI project, Air Toxics Control by Wet Flue Gas Desulfurization (FGD) Systems. The first task is an investigation of the factors that influence and control the oxidation-reduction potential (ORP) at which a limestone forced oxidation FGD system operates. Both a literature review and a numerical analysis of full-scale wet FGD data were conducted. Results from this task are presented and discussed in Section 2 of the ...

2012-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

470

Demonstration of a Last Field Wet ESP Conversion -- Installation Summary  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report describes the conversion of the electrostatic precipitator (ESP) on Unit 3 at Mirant's (formerly Potomac Electric Power Company's) Dickerson Generating Station to hybrid, dry-wet operation. This Tailored Collaboration project was undertaken to determine, at full scale, if the conversion of a single field of a conventional dry ESP to wet operation could significantly reduce particulate emissions and provide reliable operation with an acceptable level of maintenance. Specifically, the performan...

2001-02-27T23:59:59.000Z

471

EA-1155: Ground-water Compliance Activities at the Uranium Mill...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

5: Ground-water Compliance Activities at the Uranium Mill Tailings Site, Spook, Wyoming EA-1155: Ground-water Compliance Activities at the Uranium Mill Tailings Site, Spook,...

472

The Vertical Ball Mill for the Grinding of Calcined Petroleum Coke to ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A new vertical ball ring mill concept has been developed based on the results of research on the grinding of calcined petroleum coke. Industrial vertical mills are ...

473

Removal of Thiosalts using Biomass Ash from Pulp and Paper Mill ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Biomass ash used in this study is collected from Corner Brook Pulp and Paper Mill, NL and Zellstoff Celgar Mill, BC and is characterized to understand the ...

474

Synthesis of Sm-Fe-N Hard Magnets by Reactive Mechanical Milling  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this study, we have performed reactive mechanical milling on Sm2Fe17 alloy under hydrogen atmosphere. After reactive mechanical milling, the Sm2Fe17 ...

475

EIS-0198: Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action Groundwater Project |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

198: Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action Groundwater Project 198: Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action Groundwater Project EIS-0198: Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action Groundwater Project SUMMARY This EIS assesses the potential programmatic impacts of conducting the Ground Water Project, provides a method for determining the site-specific ground water compliance strategies, and provides data and information that can be used to prepare site-specific environmental impacts analyses more efficiently. PUBLIC COMMENT OPPORTUNITIES None available at this time. DOCUMENTS AVAILABLE FOR DOWNLOAD April 28, 1997 EIS-0198: Record of Decision Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Ground Water Project (April 1997) December 1, 1996 EIS-0198: Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Ground Water Project

476

Moab Mill Tailings Removal Project Celebrates 5 Years of Success |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Mill Tailings Removal Project Celebrates 5 Years of Success Mill Tailings Removal Project Celebrates 5 Years of Success Moab Mill Tailings Removal Project Celebrates 5 Years of Success October 3, 2012 - 12:00pm Addthis Pictured here is the Moab uranium mill tailings pile. Tailings excavation and conditioning activities are seen in the foreground. The water spray is used to eliminate extracted contaminated groundwater. Pictured here is the Moab uranium mill tailings pile. Tailings excavation and conditioning activities are seen in the foreground. The water spray is used to eliminate extracted contaminated groundwater. Moab Federal Project Director Donald Metzler stands on a final cover layer of the disposal cell. Several other layers are visible behind him. Moab Federal Project Director Donald Metzler stands on a final cover layer

477

Moab Mill Tailings Removal Project Celebrates 5 Years of Success |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Moab Mill Tailings Removal Project Celebrates 5 Years of Success Moab Mill Tailings Removal Project Celebrates 5 Years of Success Moab Mill Tailings Removal Project Celebrates 5 Years of Success October 3, 2012 - 12:00pm Addthis Pictured here is the Moab uranium mill tailings pile. Tailings excavation and conditioning activities are seen in the foreground. The water spray is used to eliminate extracted contaminated groundwater. Pictured here is the Moab uranium mill tailings pile. Tailings excavation and conditioning activities are seen in the foreground. The water spray is used to eliminate extracted contaminated groundwater. Moab Federal Project Director Donald Metzler stands on a final cover layer of the disposal cell. Several other layers are visible behind him. Moab Federal Project Director Donald Metzler stands on a final cover layer

478

DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Uravan Mill Site - CO 02  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

Uravan Mill Site - CO 02 Uravan Mill Site - CO 02 FUSRAP Considered Sites Site: Uravan Mill Site (CO.02 ) Designated Name: Alternate Name: Location: Evaluation Year: Site Operations: Site Disposition: Radioactive Materials Handled: Primary Radioactive Materials Handled: Radiological Survey(s): Site Status: Also see Naturita, Colorado, Processing Site Documents Related to Uravan Mill Site Data Validation Package for the July and October 2008 Water Sampling at the Naturita Processing and Disposal Sites Data Validation Report for the July 2009 Groundwater and Surface Water Sampling at the Naturita, Colorado, Processing Site; LMS/NAP/S00709; October 2009 2012 Annual Site Inspection and Monitoring Report for Uranium Mill Tailings Radiation Control Act Title I Disposal Sites-Naturita, Colorado,

479

DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Sylvania Corning Plant - NY 19  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

Plant - NY 19 Plant - NY 19 FUSRAP Considered Sites Sylvania-Corning, NY Alternate Name(s): Sylvania Electric Products, Inc. Sylvania Corp. NY.19-1 NY.19-4 Location: Cantiaque Road, Hicksville, Long Island, New York NY.19-5 Historical Operations: Pilot-scale production of powdered metal uranium slugs for AEC's Hanford reactor. NY.19-4 Eligibility Determination: Eligible Radiological Survey(s): Assessment Survey NY.19-3 Site Status: Cleanup in progress by U.S. Army Corps of Engineers. USACE Website Long-term Care Requirements: To be determined upon completion. Also see Documents Related to Sylvania-Corning, NY Historical documents may contain links which are no longer valid or to outside sources. LM can not attest to the accuracy of information provided by these links. Please see the Leaving LM Website page for more details.

480

City of Corning, Iowa (Utility Company) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Corning Corning Place Iowa Utility Id 4375 Utility Location Yes Ownership M NERC Location MRO NERC MRO Yes Operates Generating Plant Yes Activity Generation Yes Activity Buying Transmission Yes Activity Distribution Yes References EIA Form EIA-861 Final Data File for 2010 - File1_a[1] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Utility Rate Schedules Grid-background.png Commercial Commercial Commercial All-Electric Commercial Residential Residential Residential All-Electric Residential Rural Commercial Commercial Rural Commercial All-Electric Commercial Rural Residential Residential Rural Residential All-Electric Residential Average Rates Residential: $0.0977/kWh Commercial: $0.0974/kWh

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481

The New Era of Corn, Soybean, and Wheat Prices  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

“Prices have changed so much for what we sell and buy that it is almost impossible to feel confident in the decisions you make.”-- Agriculture Online, July 5, 2008 Prices of corn, soybeans, and wheat started moving higher in the fall of 2006 and have remained generally high and well above average prices in the previous 30 years. These higher prices, and the volatility associated with the higher prices, have resulted in the kind of uncertainty reflected in the quote above. Are higher prices here to stay? If so, what is the expected level and variability of prices during the new era? From a producer’s standpoint, the question really is, “What is a good price for corn, soybeans and wheat? ” These questions

Darrel Good; Scott Irwin

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

482

Corn LP formerly Central Iowa Renewable Energy | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

LP formerly Central Iowa Renewable Energy LP formerly Central Iowa Renewable Energy Jump to: navigation, search Name Corn LP (formerly Central Iowa Renewable Energy) Place Goldfield, Iowa Zip 50542 Product Bioethanol producer using corn as raw material Coordinates 37.707559°, -117.233459° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":37.707559,"lon":-117.233459,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

483

STA'n:MENT OF CONSIDERAT IONS REQUEST BY CORNING J 'CORP ORA TED (CORNING) FOR AN ADV t\NCE WAIV  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

STA'n:MENT OF CONSIDERAT STA'n:MENT OF CONSIDERAT IONS REQUEST BY CORNING J 'CORP ORA TED (CORNING) FOR AN ADV t\NCE WAIV ER OF DOMESTIC AN D FOREIGN P ATENT RIGHTS UNDER DOE A WARD 0 . DE-E£000575 7 W(A) 20 12-034 CORNING has req uested a waive r of domestic and fo reign patent rights for all subj ect in vent ions arising from its partjci pation und er the above-referenced awa rd entitled " Innovative Manufactw-ing of Protected Lithium Electrodes for UltraHi gh Energy Density Batteries." The award was made under the Innovative Manufacturing Initiati ve (DE-FOA-0000560). CORNING is a sub-recipient to PolyPfus Battery Company (Poly Plus), the prime recipi ent of the award. Johnson Controls Inc . is anothar sub-recipi ent under the award. This waiver only applies to CORNING. Johnson Control

484

Current and potential U.S. Corn Stover Supplies  

SciTech Connect

Agricultural residues such as corn (Zea mays L.) stover are a potential feedstock for bioenergy and bio-based products that could reduceU.S. dependence on foreign oil. Collection of such residues must take into account concerns that residue removal could increase erosion, reduce crop productivity, and deplete soil carbon and nutrients. This article estimates where and how much corn stover can be collected sustainably in the USA using existing commercial equipment and estimates costs of that collection. Erosion constraints to collection were considered explicitly, and crop productivity and soil nutrient constraints were considered implicitly, by recognizing the value of residues for maintaining soil moisture and including the cost of fertilizer to replace nutrients removed. Possible soil carbon loss was not considered in the analysis. With an annual production of 196 million Mg of corn grain (about9.2 billion bushels), the USA produces 196 million Mg of stover. Under current rotation and tillage practices, about 30% of this stover could be collected for less than $33 per Mg, taking into consideration erosion and soil moisture concerns and nutrient replacement costs. Wind erosion is a major constraint to stover collection. Analysis suggests three regions of the country (central Illinois, northern Iowa/southern Minnesota, and along the Platte River in Nebraska) produce sufficient stover to support large biorefineries with one million Mg per year feedstock demands and that if farmers converted to universal no-till production of corn, then over 100 million Mg of stover could be collected annually without causing erosion to exceed the tolerable soil loss.

Graham, Robin Lambert [ORNL; Nelson, R [Kansas State University; Perlack, Robert D [ORNL; Sheehan, J. [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL); Wright, Lynn L [subcontractor

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

485

Mille Lacs Energy Cooperative | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Jump to: navigation, search Jump to: navigation, search Name Mille Lacs Energy Cooperative Place Minnesota Utility Id 12546 Utility Location Yes Ownership C NERC Location MRO NERC MRO Yes ISO MISO Yes Activity Distribution Yes References EIA Form EIA-861 Final Data File for 2010 - File1_a[1] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Utility Rate Schedules Grid-background.png Dual Fuel Space Heating Rate Electric Combination Heating Rate Freedom Heating Rate Residential General Service Residential Green Power Energy Large Power Commercial Large Power - Industrial Industrial Light - 100 watt HPS Lighting Light - 150 watt HPS Lighting Off-Peak Energy Rate Residential Peak Shave Water Heating Rate Residential

486

Yang-Mills Propagators and QCD  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present a strong coupling expansion that permits to develop analysis of quantum field theory in the infrared limit. Application to a quartic massless scalar field gives a massive spectrum and the propagator in this regime. We extend the approach to a pure Yang-Mills theory obtaining analogous results. The gluon propagator is compared satisfactorily with lattice results and similarly for the spectrum. Comparison with experimental low energy spectrum of QCD supports the view that $\\sigma$ resonance is indeed a glueball. The gluon propagator we obtained is finally used to formulate a low energy Lagrangian for QCD that reduces to a Nambu-Jona-Lasinio model with all the parameters fixed by those of the full theory.

Marco Frasca

2008-07-27T23:59:59.000Z

487

Radiative Corrections in Yang-Mills thermodynamics  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We provide arguments why the loop expansion of the pressure in the effective theory for the deconfining phase of SU(2) Yang-Mills thermodynamics is likely to terminate at a finite order despite the fact that the effective gauge coupling is large (e{>=}{radical}(8){pi}). Each order l of the expansion measures the lth power of the fraction of a typical residual action of the quantum fluctuation in one loop S{sub l} and h. Here S{sub l} rapidly decreases with l. This is demonstrated by a computation of irreducible 2-loop and 3-loop diagrams which correct the pressure of free quasiparticles radiatively. In fact, at the three-loop level, one diagram vanishes identically. By benchmarking with known 2-loop results we show that the Monte-Carlo method used to compute on the 3-loop level is reliable.

Kaviani, Dariush [IPPP, University of Durham, South Rd, Durham DH1 3LE (United Kingdom)

2011-09-22T23:59:59.000Z

488

Compositional Analysis of Water-Soluble Materials in Corn Stover  

SciTech Connect

Corn stover is one of the leading feedstock candidates for commodity-scale biomass-to-ethanol processing. The composition of water-soluble materials in corn stover has been determined with greater than 90% mass closure in four of five representative samples. The mass percentage of water-soluble materials in tested stover samples varied from 14 to 27% on a dry weight basis. Over 30 previously unknown constituents of aqueous extracts were identified and quantified using a variety of chromatographic techniques. Monomeric sugars (primarily glucose and fructose) were found to be the predominant water-soluble components of corn stover, accounting for 30-46% of the dry weight of extractives (4-12% of the dry weight of feedstocks). Additional constituents contributing to the mass balance for extractives included various alditols (3-7%), aliphatic acids (7-21%), inorganic ions (10-18%), oligomeric sugars (4-12%), and a distribution of oligomers tentatively identified as being derived from phenolic glycosides (10-18%).

Chen, S. F.; Mowery, R. A.; Scarlata, C. J.; Chambliss, C. K.

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

489

Kieffer Paper Mill's Recycled Fiber Mill and PSI Energy's High Efficiency Motors Plan  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The needs of electricity consumers along with the utility industry are rapidly changing. Consumers want electricity to perform more functions, improve efficiencies and help lower the cost of production, all in an environmentally responsible manner. In 1991, PSI Energy developed a comprehensive Demand-Side Management program, called Energy Matters™, aimed at improving the overall end-use efficiency of its customers. Its goal is to reduce summer peak demand 120 megawatts by the summer of 1995. Kieffer Paper Mills in Brownstown, IN had a need to address the efficiency of its new, state-of-the-art pulp processing mill that it was building. With over 4,000 horsepower of process motors going into the new plant, even a modest improvement in motor efficiency would yield significant energy savings. PSI Energy was able to help Kieffer examine the economics of high efficiency motors, and through the PSI Energy High Efficiency Motors Plan encouraged Kieffer Paper Mills to purchase energy efficient motors by helping pay part of the cost differential between high efficiency and standard efficiency models.

Myers, J. A.

1993-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

490

STATEMENT OF CONSIDERATIONS REQUEST BY OWENS CORNING SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY LLC (OWENS  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

OWENS CORNING SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY LLC (OWENS OWENS CORNING SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY LLC (OWENS CORNING) FOR AN ADVANCE WAIVER OF DOMESTIC AND FOREIGN PATENT RIGHTS UNDER DOE AWARD NO. DE-EE0005436; W(A) 2011-065 OWENS CORNING has requested a waiver of domestic and foreign patent rights of the United States of America in all subject inventions arising from its participation under the above referenced cooperative agreement entitled "Development and Productization of High-Efficiency, Low-Cost Building-Integrated Photovoltaic Shingles Using Monocrystalline Silicon Thin Film Solar Cells." OWENS CORNING is a sub-awardee under the cooperative agreement. Solexel Inc. is the prime awardee. This waiver only applies to subject inventions of OWENS CORNING. As described in the petition, the objective of the project funded by the cooperative

491

Saccharification of corn fiber using enzymes from Aureobasidium sp. strain NRRL Y-2311-1  

SciTech Connect

Crude enzyme preparations from Aureobasidium sp. strain NRRL Y-2311-1 were characterized and tested for the capacity to saccharify corn fiber. Cultures grown on xylan, corn fiber, and alkaline hydrogen peroxide (AHP)-pretreated corn fiber produced specific levels of endoxylanase, amylase, protease, cellulose, and other activities. Using equal units of endoxylanase activity, crude enzymes from AHP-pretreated corn fiber cultures were most effective in saccharification. Multiple enzyme activities were implicated in this process. Pretreatment of corn fiber with AHP nearly doubled the susceptibility of hemicellulose to enzymatic digestion. Up to 138 mg xylose, 125 mg arabinose, and 490 mg glucose were obtained per g pretreated corn fiber under conditions tested. 31 refs., 2 figs., 4 tabs.

Leathers, T.D.; Gupta, S.C. [Dept. of Agriculture, Peoria, IL (United States)

1996-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

492

Functionality of alkaline cooked corn bran on tortilla texture  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The effect of pericarp and nixtamalized corn bran (NCB) level on corn tortilla attributes was evaluated. The effect of varying pH (4, 9 and 11) on fresh and dry mesa flour (pH 5, 7 and 10) tortillas was also evaluated. Nixtamal was washed at three different levels to obtain tortillas containing about 0, 50 and 100% pericarp. Fumaric acid and lime solutions were used to produce acidic and alkaline tortillas respectively. Tortilla texture was evaluated at 0, 1 and 7 days of storage objectively using a texture analyzer and subjectively using a solvability test. As pericarp content and pH increased tortillas were softer, more flexible and extensible with a darker yellow color. Acidic tortillas were harder with a white color. Pericarp improved texture of tortillas during storage. Commercial corn bran was alkaline treated to obtain NCB with functionality similar to nixtamalized corn pericarp. Dry masa flour (DMF) (1 kg) was mixed with 0, 50 and 100 g dry basis of NCB and processed into tortillas. Tortillas containing NCB had a pH of 9, were more flexible and rollable than control tortillas. Alkaline pH tortillas puffed during baking; these tortillas were yellow with a soft, moist texture. Tortillas containing nixtamalized rice and wheat brans were soft and flexible. A sensory panel found that tortillas containing nixtamalized cereal brans had a strong alkaline flavor and aroma and a blistered surface, with a soft, moist texture. NCB tortillas had the highest overall acceptability scores. Pericarp from nixtamal and alkaline pH slowed the staling mechanisms of tortillas. Nixtamalized commercial brans significantly improved the texture of corn tortillas during storage and enhanced the color, flavor and aroma of DMF tortillas. Nixtamalized cereal brans can be used as an effective additive to extend shelf stability of tortillas and enhance the flavor of DMF products. Tortillas containing NCB could be used in products such as wraps and fried tacos where the bright color and stronger flavor could be an advantage.

Guajardo Flores, Sara

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

493

Lime pretreatment and enzymatic hydrolysis of corn stover  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Renewable energy sources, such as lignocellulosic biomass, are environmentally friendly because they emit less pollution without contributing net carbon dioxide to the atmosphere. Among lignocellulosic biomass, corn stover is a very useful feedstock to economically produce environmentally friendly biofuels. Corn stover was pretreated with an excess of calcium hydroxide (0.5 g Ca(OH)2/g raw biomass) in non-oxidative and oxidative conditions at 25, 35, 45, and 55oC. The optimal condition is 55oC for 4 weeks with aeration, determined by yields of glucan and xylan. The overall yields of glucose (g glucan hydrolyzed/100 g original glucan) and xylose (g xylan hydrolyzed/100 g original xylan) were 91.3 and 51.8 at 15 FPU/g cellulose, respectively. Furthermore, when considering the dissolved fragments of glucan and xylan in the pretreatment liquors, the overall yields of glucose and xylose were 93.2 and 79.5 at 15 FPU/g cellulose, respectively. The pretreatment liquor has no inhibitory effect on ethanol fermentation using Saccharomyces cerevisiae D5A. At the recommended condition, only 0.073 g Ca(OH)2 was consumed per g of raw corn stover. Under extensive delignification conditions, 87.5% of the initial lignin was removed. Extensive delignfication required oxidative treatment and additional lime consumption. Deacetylation quickly reached a plateau within 1 week. Delignification highly depended on temperature and the presence of oxygen. Lignin and hemicellulose were selectively removed, but cellulose was not affected by lime pretreatment in mild temperatures (25 ?? 55oC). The delignification kinetic models of corn stover were empirically determined by three simultaneous first-order reactions. The activation energies for the oxidative delignification were estimated as 50.15 and 54.21 kJ/mol in the bulk and residual phases, respectively. Crystallinity slightly increased with delignification because amorphous components (lignin, hemicellulose) were removed. However, the increased crystallinity did not negatively affect the 3-d sugar yield of enzyme hydrolysis. Oxidative lime pretreatment lowered the acetyl and lignin contents to obtain high digestibility, regardless of crystallinity. The enzymatic digestibility of lime-treated biomass was affected by the change of structural features (acetylation, lignification, and crystallization) resulting from the treatment. The non-linear models for 3-d hydrolysis yields of glucan and xylan were empirically established as a function of the residual lignin fraction for the corn stover pretreated with lime and air.

Kim, Se Hoon

2003-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

494

Florida Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation,  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Florida Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1970's 108 1980's 122 99 86 64 90 81 69 62 69 57 1990's 53 45 55 59 117 110 119 112 106 100 2000's 93 96 102 92 88 87 50 110 1 7 2010's 30 2 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 8/1/2013 Next Release Date: 8/1/2014 Referring Pages: Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas Proved Reserves, Wet After Lease Separation, as of Dec. 31 Florida Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas Proved Reserves, Wet After

495

Kentucky Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation,  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Kentucky Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1970's 2 1980's 11 14 12 19 17 13 17 19 19 22 1990's 8 10 8 6 47 27 24 26 20 29 2000's 27 25 25 25 19 30 36 34 34 32 2010's 111 98 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 8/1/2013 Next Release Date: 8/1/2014 Referring Pages: Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas Proved Reserves, Wet After Lease Separation, as of Dec. 31 Kentucky Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas Proved Reserves, Wet After

496

Dams, Mills, and Electric Power (Missouri) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Mills, and Electric Power (Missouri) Mills, and Electric Power (Missouri) Dams, Mills, and Electric Power (Missouri) < Back Eligibility Commercial Industrial Institutional Investor-Owned Utility Local Government Municipal/Public Utility Retail Supplier Rural Electric Cooperative State/Provincial Govt Tribal Government Utility Savings Category Water Buying & Making Electricity Home Weatherization Program Info State Missouri Program Type Siting and Permitting Provider Missouri Department of Natural Resources The Water Resources Center of the Missouri Department of Natural Resources is responsible for implementing regulations pertaining to dam and reservoir safety. Any person or corporation may erect a dam across any watercourse, provided that: (a) the entity is chartered to construct, operate and

497

Ecophysiology of dryland corn and grain sorghum as affected by alternative planting geometries and seeding rates.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Previous work in the High Plains with alternative planting geometries of corn and grain sorghum has shown potential benefits in dryland production. Studies conducted in… (more)

Haag, Lucas A.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

498

Measuring Improvement in the Energy Performance of the U.S. Corn...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Measuring Improvement in the Energy Performance of the U.S. Corn Refining Industry Secondary menu About us Press room Contact Us Portfolio Manager Login Facility owners and...

499

Farm-, Field-, and Plant-scale Effects on European Corn Borer Oviposition.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??New technologies and strategies in commodity agriculture result in higher yields and quality harvests. Corn, one of the most economically important crops in the United… (more)

Ellis, Katherine

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

500

Fate of the mycotoxin fumonisin B1 during alkaline cooking of cultured and whole kernel corn.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Fumonisins are Fusarium mycotoxins that are natural contaminants of corn. They are toxic to animals and consumption of contaminated foods, including tortillas, is a suspected… (more)

Burns, Tantiana Donata

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z