National Library of Energy BETA

Sample records for wet corn milling

  1. ENGINEERING AND PROCESSING A 100-g Laboratory Corn Wet-Milling Procedure

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ENGINEERING AND PROCESSING A 100-g Laboratory Corn Wet-Milling Procedure S. R. ECKHOFF,' S. K of biotechnology and genetic engineering in corn hybrid development. Identification of better wet-milling hybrids of separation of the germ or the ability Professor, Department of Agricultural Engineering, University

  2. Characterization of light gluten and light steep water from a corn wet milling plant

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Characterization of light gluten and light steep water from a corn wet milling plant K.D. Rausch. There are few data on the effect of composition of the parent process streams, light steep water (LSW) and light value of CGF and CGM. CGF and CGM are formed from two process streams, light steep water (LSW) and light

  3. SCHEDULE OF FEES Wet Milling

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lee, Tonghun

    approximately 15 kg starch. A Bauer mill is used for first and second grind and a hydrocyclone is used

  4. BIOETHANOL PRODUCTION FROM WET OXIDSED CORN STOVER USING PRE-TREATED MANURE AS A NUTRIENT SOURCE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    and oxygen addition) were also applied for pre-treatment of manure. The manure was blended with water for the production of bioethanol. This pre-treatment method, similar to other hot water pre-treatments, acts, Roskilde, Denmark ABSTRACT: In the present study ethanol was produced from wet oxidised corn stover

  5. Costs of Harvesting, Storing in a Large Pile, and Transporting Corn Stover in a Wet Form

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Turhollow Jr, Anthony F [ORNL; Sokhansanj, Shahabaddine [ORNL

    2007-01-01

    Corn stover is potentially an attractive biomass resource, but must be stored if used to supply a biorefinery year-round. Based on experience with successfully storing water-saturated large piles of bagasse for the pulping industry, Atchison and Hettenhaus (2003) proposed that such a system can also be applied to corn stover. Regardless of the technical feasibility of this system, in this article we estimate the cost of harvesting corn stover in a single pass with corn grain, delivering the chopped biomass to a storage pile, storing the stover in a wet form in a large pile at 75% moisture in a 211,700-dry Mg facility within a radius of 24 km from the field, and transporting the stover 64 km to a biorefinery. Field-ground corn stover can be delivered to a biorefinery by rail for $55 to $61/dry Mg. Truck transport is more expensive, $71 to $77/dry Mg. To achieve a minimum cost in the system proposed by Atchison and Hettenhaus, it is necessary to field densify stover to 74 dry kg/m3, without losing combine field efficiency, have a large storage pile to spread fixed costs of storage over enough biomass, and use rail transportation. Compared to storage in an on-farm bunker silo at $60/dry Mg, there are limited circumstances in which large pile storage has a cost advantage.

  6. Coproducts From Corn Processing 47 Applied Biochemistry and Biotechnology Vol. 128, 2006

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lee, Tonghun

    , distillers' dried grains with solubles (DDGS), is generated. Dry-grind plants require less equipment, 2006 Index Entries: Distillers' dried grains with solubles; dry-grind process; wet milling; dry milling and reformulated gasoline to reduce CO and other pollutants. The amount of corn used for ethanol production has

  7. Determining Fiber and Protein Degradation Rates of Corn Milling (Co)Products and Their Effects on Rumen Bacterial Populations and Lactating Dairy Cow Performance 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Williams, Whitney

    2012-07-16

    ....................................................................... 10 2.3 Chemical composition of the diets fed to lactating dairy cows predicted by the CPM-dairy model ............................................................................ 12 2.4 Comparison of the anaerobic fermentation...-fold in what is called stillage. The stillage is then further processed and refined into nutrient dense corn (co)products. These corn milling (co)products are an excellent source of CP, specifically RUP, and digestible fiber for ruminant consumption. Ideally...

  8. Energy Efficiency Improvements and Cost Saving Opportunities in the Corn Wet Milling Industry 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Galitsky, C.; Worrell, E.

    2003-01-01

    (2). Another filtering option is the rotary drum filter, in which a rotating drum with a filtering surface and an internal vacuum passes through a stream of thickened gluten. A gluten "cake" fonns on the drum and can be collected; it has a solids... and the mixture is dried to yield com gluten feed. This drying is done using various dryer designs. Commonly used is a rotary dryer consisting of a rotary drum through which the feed passes and is dried by a co-current hot air stream, usually generated...

  9. 311221," Wet Corn Milling",0,0,"X",0

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: AlternativeMonthly","10/2015"Monthly","10/2015" ,"Release7 Relative Standard Errors for RelativeIndustrialCommercialTotalAbout3

  10. 311221," Wet Corn Milling",0,0,0,0,0

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: AlternativeMonthly","10/2015"Monthly","10/2015" ,"Release7 Relative Standard Errors for

  11. Update of distillers grains displacement ratios for corn ethanol life-cycle analysis.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Arora, S.; Wu, M.; Wang, M.; Energy Systems

    2011-02-01

    Production of corn-based ethanol (either by wet milling or by dry milling) yields the following coproducts: distillers grains with solubles (DGS), corn gluten meal (CGM), corn gluten feed (CGF), and corn oil. Of these coproducts, all except corn oil can replace conventional animal feeds, such as corn, soybean meal, and urea. Displacement ratios of corn-ethanol coproducts including DGS, CGM, and CGF were last updated in 1998 at a workshop at Argonne National Laboratory on the basis of input from a group of experts on animal feeds, including Prof. Klopfenstein (University of Nebraska, Lincoln), Prof. Berger (University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign), Mr. Madson (Rapheal Katzen International Associates, Inc.), and Prof. Trenkle (Iowa State University) (Wang 1999). Table 1 presents current dry milling coproduct displacement ratios being used in the GREET model. The current effort focuses on updating displacement ratios of dry milling corn-ethanol coproducts used in the animal feed industry. Because of the increased availability and use of these coproducts as animal feeds, more information is available on how these coproducts replace conventional animal feeds. To glean this information, it is also important to understand how industry selects feed. Because of the wide variety of available feeds, animal nutritionists use commercial software (such as Brill Formulation{trademark}) for feed formulation. The software recommends feed for the animal on the basis of the nutritional characteristics, availability, and price of various animal feeds, as well as on the nutritional requirements of the animal (Corn Refiners Association 2006). Therefore, feed formulation considers both the economic and the nutritional characteristics of feed products.

  12. Corn Silage Virginia Corn &

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liskiewicz, Maciej

    Virginia Corn Silage Testing 2006 Virginia Corn & Small Grain Management #12;#12; The 2006 Virginia Corn Silage Hybrid Trials The 2006 Virginia Corn Silage Hybrid Trials Coordnated by B. Jones, H. Behl Syngenta Co.) NK Brand Po Box 959, Mnneapols, MN 55440 Poneer H-bred Int'l, Inc. Poneer 7501 Memoral

  13. Corn Hybrid Virginia Corn &

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liskiewicz, Maciej

    Virginia Corn Hybrid and Management Trials 2007 Virginia Corn & Small Grain Management #12;VIRGINIA CORN HYBRID AND MANAGEMENT TRIALS IN 2007 Coordinators of Virginia Corn Hybrid Trials in 2007 Wade Thomason, Extension Specialist, Department of Crop and Soil Environmental Sciences, Virginia Tech Harry

  14. Corn Hybrid Virginia Corn &

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liskiewicz, Maciej

    Virginia Corn Hybrid Management and Trials 2006 Virginia Corn & Small Grain Management #12;#12;Virginia Corn Hybrid and Management Trials 2006 Coordinators of Virginia Corn Hybrid Trials in 2006 Wade Thomason, Extension Specialist, Department of Crop and Soil Environmental Sciences, Virginia Tech Harry

  15. Greenhouse gases in the corn-to-fuel ethanol pathway.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang, M. Q.

    1998-06-18

    Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) has applied its Greenhouse gas, Regulated Emissions and Energy in Transportation (GREET) full-fuel-cycle analysis model to examine greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions of corn-feedstock ethanol, given present and near-future production technology and practice. On the basis of updated information appropriate to corn farming and processing operations in the four principal corn- and ethanol-producing states (Illinois, Iowa, Minnesota, and Nebraska), the model was used to estimate energy requirements and GHG emissions of corn farming; the manufacture, transportation to farms, and field application of fertilizer and pesticide; transportation of harvested corn to ethanol plants; nitrous oxide emissions from cultivated cornfields; ethanol production in current average and future technology wet and dry mills; and operation of cars and light trucks using ethanol fuels. For all cases examined on the basis of mass emissions per travel mile, the corn-to-ethanol fuel cycle for Midwest-produced ethanol used in both E85 and E10 blends with gasoline outperforms conventional (current) and reformulated (future) gasoline with respect to energy use and GHG production. Also, GHG reductions (but not energy use) appear surprisingly sensitive to the value chosen for combined soil and leached N-fertilizer conversion to nitrous oxide. Co-product energy-use attribution remains the single key factor in estimating ethanol's relative benefits because this value can range from 0 to 50%, depending on the attribution method chosen.

  16. High moisture corn stover pelleting in a flat die pellet mill fitted with a 6 mm die: physical properties and specific energy consumption

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Tumuluru, Jaya Shankar

    2015-06-15

    The quality and specific energy consumption (SEC) of the biomass pellets produced depend upon pelleting process conditions. The present study includes understanding the effect of feedstock moisture in the range of 28–38% (wet basis [w.b.]) and preheating in the range of 30–110°C at two die speeds of 40 and 60 Hz on the physical properties and SEC. A flat die pellet mill fitted with a 6 mm die was used in the present study. The physical properties of pellets such as moisture content, unit, bulk and tapped density, durability, and expansion ratio and SEC of the pelleting process are measured.more »The results indicate that the pellets produced have durability values in the range of 87–98%, and unit bulk and tapped density in the range of 670–1100, 375–575, and 420–620 kg/m³. Increasing the feedstock moisture content from 33% to 38% (w.b) decreased the unit, bulk and tapped density by about 30–40%. Increasing feedstock moisture content increased the expansion ratio and decreased the density values. A higher feedstock moisture content of 38% (w.b.) and higher preheating temperature of 110°C resulted in lower density and a higher expansion ratio, which can be attributed to flash off of moisture as the material extrudes out of the die. The SEC was in the range of 75–275 kWh/ton. Higher feedstock moisture content of 38% (w.b.) and a lower die speed of 40 Hz increased the SEC, whereas lower to medium preheating temperature (30–70°C), medium feedstock moisture content of 33% (w.b.), and a higher die speed of 60 Hz minimized the SEC to « less

  17. Direct Use of Wet Ethanol in a Homogeneous Charge Compression Ignition (HCCI) Engine: Experimental and Numerical Results

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mack, John Hunter; Flowers, Daniel L; Aceves, Salvador M; Dibble, Robert W

    2007-01-01

    The energy balance of corn ethanol revisited, Transaction offor autoignition. The wet ethanol modeling study [REF] usedengine running on wet ethanol. Fuel mixtures studied range

  18. Energy efficiency improvement and cost saving opportunities for the Corn Wet Milling Industry: An ENERGY STAR Guide for Energy and Plant Managers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Galitsky, Christina; Worrell, Ernst; Ruth, Michael

    2003-01-01

    Programme. (1997). Good Practice Guide 149: Rotary Drying inProgramme. (1998). Good Practice Guide 249: Energy Savings

  19. Energy efficiency improvement and cost saving opportunities for the Corn Wet Milling Industry: An ENERGY STAR Guide for Energy and Plant Managers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Galitsky, Christina; Worrell, Ernst; Ruth, Michael

    2003-01-01

    be efficiently separated using hydrocyclone separators. Thewith a centrifuge or hydrocyclone system. Larox has

  20. Energy efficiency improvement and cost saving opportunities for the Corn Wet Milling Industry: An ENERGY STAR Guide for Energy and Plant Managers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Galitsky, Christina; Worrell, Ernst; Ruth, Michael

    2003-01-01

    speed drives Higher efficiency motors Variable voltage controls Switched reluctance drives 1 Pumps Operations and Maintenancespeed drives Higher efficiency motors Variable voltage controls Switched reluctance drives 1 Pumps Operations and maintenance

  1. Energy efficiency improvement and cost saving opportunities for the Corn Wet Milling Industry: An ENERGY STAR Guide for Energy and Plant Managers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Galitsky, Christina; Worrell, Ernst; Ruth, Michael

    2003-01-01

    also reduced maintenance costs, increased pump bearing lifecosts of the pump. Maintenance costs compose the remainingpump system. Energy costs, and sometimes operations and maintenance costs,

  2. Energy efficiency improvement and cost saving opportunities for the Corn Wet Milling Industry: An ENERGY STAR Guide for Energy and Plant Managers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Galitsky, Christina; Worrell, Ernst; Ruth, Michael

    2003-01-01

    at Caffal, C. (1995). Energy Management in Industry. CentrePollution Prevention/Energy Management. General MotorsZetmeelindustrie (Energy Management Measures in the Starch

  3. Corn fodder 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Curtis, Geo. W. (George Washington)

    1891-01-01

    Hay ................. Red Top Hay .............. Mixed Ilay and Clover ........ Clover Hay ................. Ensilage from Southern Corn. . ..... Ensilage from Sweet Corn ....... Pasture (Tame Grasses) e, we ase as Digestible Non- Digestible I'rotcinlnitrogenous Nu...- Nutritive Ratio. ---- 3.45 Green Rye .................... I ::: Sugar Beets.. ................ trients. 48.71 12.87 7.81 I 15.4 15.5 From the above it will be seen that pure leaf fodder has a very high value for feeding-second only to clover hay...

  4. 128 CEREAL CHEMISTRY Effects of Alkali Debranning, Roller Mill Cracking and Gap Setting, and Alkali

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    . Cracking the pericarp-free corn in a roller mill is done to further reduce kernel size so that steep time fiber, and gluten are separated. This procedure gave a practical compar- able starch yield of 67 was developed for the purpose of obtaining bran-free corn that was further processed into edible corn products

  5. Corn Hybrids for Texas. 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bockholt, A. J.; Collier, J. W.

    1960-01-01

    . Land resource areas and corn test locations. Discussion of Results e areas affords an opportunity to determine if any Weather conditions were highly differences in adaptation to climatic and general corn production during the 3 soil conditions... usually has a climate for corn production and appr TABLE 6. CORN PERFORMANCE TEST, EAST BERLANDS, 1957-59 Bushels of shelled corn per acre ' Y-1 Kirby- Nacog- Mount Bowie' jr: ville doches Jyk~leasant countv A'! Texas 30 Texas 32 Texas 28 Texas...

  6. National Ignition Facility wet weather construction plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kugler, A N

    1998-01-01

    This report presents a wet weather construction plan for the National Ignition Facility (NIF) construction project. Construction of the NIF commenced in mid- 1997, and excavation of the site was completed in the fall. Preparations for placing concrete foundations began in the fall, and above normal rainfall is expected over the tinter. Heavy rainfall in late November impacted foundation construction, and a wet weather construction plan was determined to be needed. This wet weather constiction plan recommends a strategy, techniques and management practices to prepare and protect the site corn wet weather effects and allow construction work to proceed. It is intended that information in this plan be incorporated in the Stormwater Pollution Prevention Plan (SWPPP) as warranted.

  7. "Mill’s Conception of Human Rights"

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Harrar, Souad Chaherli

    2008-01-01

    his article Bentham (7) Mill reproaches two main points toof human nature. Mill reproaches Bentham for his inability

  8. Mechanical Harvesting of Corn

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sorenson, J. W. (Jerome Wallace); Smith, H. P. (Harris Pearson)

    1948-01-01

    , the field results of this study can be divided intc, three parts: (I) plant characteristics prior to harvest, (2) machine performance and (3) effect of machine on the corn ears. Review of Literature According to Shedd (7), a few corn picking machines... and yields are shown as shelled corn. Preharvest Plant Data Manufacturers of corn harvesting machinery have found tha: corn growers of the Southwest prefer a machine that snaps the ears from the stalks without removing the husks. They have nlw Figure 7...

  9. Who Pays a Price on Carbon?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Grainger, Corbett A.; Kolstad, Charles D.

    2010-01-01

    nonmetallic mineral mining Iron and steel mills Wet cornSynthetic dye and pigment manuf. Iron ore mining Other

  10. Improved Multivariate Calibration Models for Corn Stover Feedstock and Dilute-Acid Pretreated Corn Stover

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wolfrum, E. J.; Sluiter, A. D.

    2009-01-01

    We have studied rapid calibration models to predict the composition of a variety of biomass feedstocks by correlating near-infrared (NIR) spectroscopic data to compositional data produced using traditional wet chemical analysis techniques. The rapid calibration models are developed using multivariate statistical analysis of the spectroscopic and wet chemical data. This work discusses the latest versions of the NIR calibration models for corn stover feedstock and dilute-acid pretreated corn stover. Measures of the calibration precision and uncertainty are presented. No statistically significant differences (p = 0.05) are seen between NIR calibration models built using different mathematical pretreatments. Finally, two common algorithms for building NIR calibration models are compared; no statistically significant differences (p = 0.05) are seen for the major constituents glucan, xylan, and lignin, but the algorithms did produce different predictions for total extractives. A single calibration model combining the corn stover feedstock and dilute-acid pretreated corn stover samples gave less satisfactory predictions than the separate models.

  11. Development of a Wet Logistics System for Bulk Corn Stover

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:FinancingPetroleum Based| Department8,Department of Energy2 DOE Hydrogen andMEQ inWoody

  12. Corn Hybrids for Texas. 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rogers, J. S.; McAfee, T. E.

    1954-01-01

    Corn Hybrids for Terns ST LOCATIONS AREA I AREA II ARE4 Ill AREA IV 2Prdrie View 7.Tylw lZ.Lockhart 17.Waxahachie 22San Antonio 3.Cleveland 8.Mt. Pbctont I3Brsnha B.Garland 23Lamposas 4.Colbqe Sta. 9Sulphw Spp. 14Holland l9.0reenvilb 24...Stephenville ,J* 5.K'rbyvilb I0.Cbrkdb 15.Tanpk 2ODetiion 25.Wllothe TEXAS AGRICULTURAL EXPERIMENT STATION R. D. LEWIS. DIRECTOR, COLLEGE STATION, TEXAS DIGEST The Texas corn acreage planted to hybrids increased from less than 1 percent of the total acrea...

  13. Cooking with Corn Syrup 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Anding, Jenna

    2001-09-10

    1 1 /2 cups chopped nuts 1 cup packed brown sugar 3 /4 cup melted butter or margarine 1 /2 cup corn syrup 1 teaspoon vanilla How to make it 1. Wash your hands; make sure your cooking... 2 eggs 9- to 10-inch unbaked pie shell How to make it 1. Wash your hands; make sure your cooking area is clean. 2. Mix the ingredients and pour the mixture into an unbaked pie shell. 3. Bake the pie for 45...

  14. Cooking with Corn Syrup (Spanish) 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Anding, Jenna

    2001-08-08

    This fact sheet describes the nutritional value and safe storage of corn syrup, a commodity food. It also offers food preparation ideas....

  15. Wet storage integrity update

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bailey, W.J.; Johnson, A.B. Jr.

    1983-09-01

    This report includes information from various studies performed under the Wet Storage Task of the Spent Fuel Integrity Project of the Commercial Spent Fuel Management (CSFM) Program at Pacific Northwest Laboratory. An overview of recent developments in the technology of wet storage of spent water reactor fuel is presented. Licensee Event Reports pertaining to spent fuel pools and the associated performance of spent fuel and storage components during wet storage are discussed. The current status of fuel that was examined under the CSFM Program is described. Assessments of the effect of boric acid in spent fuel pool water on the corrosion and stress corrosion cracking of stainless steel and the stress corrosion cracking of stainless steel piping containing stagnant water at spent fuel pools are discussed. A list of pertinent publications is included. 84 references, 21 figures, 11 tables.

  16. Ethanol extraction of phytosterols from corn fiber

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Abbas, Charles (Champaign, IL); Beery, Kyle E. (Decatur, IL); Binder, Thomas P. (Decatur, IL); Rammelsberg, Anne M. (Decatur, IL)

    2010-11-16

    The present invention provides a process for extracting sterols from a high solids, thermochemically hydrolyzed corn fiber using ethanol as the extractant. The process includes obtaining a corn fiber slurry having a moisture content from about 20 weight percent to about 50 weight percent solids (high solids content), thermochemically processing the corn fiber slurry having high solids content of 20 to 50% to produce a hydrolyzed corn fiber slurry, dewatering the hydrolyzed corn fiber slurry to achieve a residual corn fiber having a moisture content from about 30 to 80 weight percent solids, washing the residual corn fiber, dewatering the washed, hydrolyzed corn fiber slurry to achieve a residual corn fiber having a moisture content from about 30 to 80 weight percent solids, and extracting the residual corn fiber with ethanol and separating at least one sterol.

  17. Corn Hybrids for Texas. 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rogers, J. S.; Bockholt, A. J.; Collier, J. W.

    1957-01-01

    practices which would bring their corn into tassel around June 1. This can be done by planting adapted hybrids at the dates recom- mended in Table 1. When planting is delayed, or if it is necessary to replant, hybrids with earlier maturity should... 90 ' 65.2 Coker 911 67.3 Texas 28 64.9 Texas 26 62.7 Texas 17W 73.0 Tennessee 29 67.5 Texas 9W 74.0 North Carolina 29 65.9 Georgia lOlW 70.7 Dixie 18 63.0 Asgrow lOlW 59.0 TRF 3 62.2 Coker 811 40.0 Surcropper 47.6 - - Averase yield 67...

  18. Life-cycle energy and greenhouse gas emission impacts of different corn ethanol plant types.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang, M.; Wu, M.; Huo, H.; Energy Systems

    2007-04-01

    Since the United States began a program to develop ethanol as a transportation fuel, its use has increased from 175 million gallons in 1980 to 4.9 billion gallons in 2006. Virtually all of the ethanol used for transportation has been produced from corn. During the period of fuel ethanol growth, corn farming productivity has increased dramatically, and energy use in ethanol plants has been reduced by almost by half. The majority of corn ethanol plants are powered by natural gas. However, as natural gas prices have skyrocketed over the last several years, efforts have been made to further reduce the energy used in ethanol plants or to switch from natural gas to other fuels, such as coal and wood chips. In this paper, we examine nine corn ethanol plant types--categorized according to the type of process fuels employed, use of combined heat and power, and production of wet distiller grains and solubles. We found that these ethanol plant types can have distinctly different energy and greenhouse gas emission effects on a full fuel-cycle basis. In particular, greenhouse gas emission impacts can vary significantly--from a 3% increase if coal is the process fuel to a 52% reduction if wood chips are used. Our results show that, in order to achieve energy and greenhouse gas emission benefits, researchers need to closely examine and differentiate among the types of plants used to produce corn ethanol so that corn ethanol production would move towards a more sustainable path.

  19. Optical wet steam monitor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Maxey, Lonnie C. (Powell, TN); Simpson, Marc L. (Knoxville, TN)

    1995-01-01

    A wet steam monitor determines steam particle size by using laser doppler velocimeter (LDV) device to produce backscatter light. The backscatter light signal is processed with a spectrum analyzer to produce a visibility waveform in the frequency domain. The visibility waveform includes a primary peak and a plurality of sidebands. The bandwidth of at least the primary frequency peak is correlated to particle size by either visually comparing the bandwidth to those of known particle sizes, or by digitizing the waveform and comparing the waveforms electronically.

  20. Optical wet steam monitor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Maxey, L.C.; Simpson, M.L.

    1995-01-17

    A wet steam monitor determines steam particle size by using laser doppler velocimeter (LDV) device to produce backscatter light. The backscatter light signal is processed with a spectrum analyzer to produce a visibility waveform in the frequency domain. The visibility waveform includes a primary peak and a plurality of sidebands. The bandwidth of at least the primary frequency peak is correlated to particle size by either visually comparing the bandwidth to those of known particle sizes, or by digitizing the waveform and comparing the waveforms electronically. 4 figures.

  1. Sweet Corn Cultivar Trial Dr. Richard Hassell

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stuart, Steven J.

    regulates the water transfer through the plant, reducing water loss from the leaves, making them more beetle Corn Borer Fall Armyworm Corn Earworm Mole Cricket #12;HARVESTING #12;PACKAGING Sweet Corn suckers, not all kernels straight Tassel Date: June 2 Silk Date: June 6 Harvest Date: June 20 Average

  2. Standing corn rows needed to help

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Minnesota, University of

    Standing corn rows needed to help reduce drifting snow By PAULA MOHR T HE Minnesota Department of Transportation is looking for more farmers to par- ticipate in its standing corn row program to help reduce and pays farmers to leave cornstalks up throughout the winter. Farmers are reimbursed for standing corn

  3. Specifying linepipe suitable for safe operation in sour, wet service

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Moore, E.M.; Hansen, D.A.

    1982-06-01

    This paper describes the specifications recommended by the authors for buying linepipe in grades up to X-70 for wet, sour service. The linepipe is tested to verify that it is resistant to hydrogen-induced cracking (HIC). In addition, fracture control requirements are imposed so that if a failure does occur for any reason, the crack is guaranteed to self arrest, thus minimizing the consequences of the failure. Pipe meeting the specifications described in this paper is readily available from numerous European and Japanese mills.

  4. doeid11129r1.pdf

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    have biomass supply infrastructures - such as wet and dry corn mills and pulp and paper mills - can reduce the need for new feedstock sources by more fully using all...

  5. Hydrothermal Processing of Wet Wastes

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Breakout Session 3A—Conversion Technologies III: Energy from Our Waste—Will we Be Rich in Fuel or Knee Deep in Trash by 2025? Hydrothermal Processing of Wet Wastes James R. Oyler, President, Genifuel Corporation

  6. Evaluation of End Mill Coatings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    L. J. Lazarus; R. L. Hester,

    2005-08-01

    Milling tests were run on families of High Speed Steel (HSS) end mills to determine their lives while machining 304 Stainless Steel. The end mills tested were made from M7, M42 and T15-CPM High Speed Steels. The end mills were also evaluated with no coatings as well as with Titanium Nitride (TiN) and Titanium Carbo-Nitride (TiCN) coatings to determine which combination of HSS and coating provided the highest increase in end mill life while increasing the cost of the tool the least. We found end mill made from M42 gave us the largest increase in tool life with the least increase in cost. The results of this study will be used by Cutting Tool Engineering in determining which end mill descriptions will be dropped from our tool catalog.

  7. INDEX TO VIRGINIA CORN HYBRID AND MANAGEMENT TRIALS 1998 SECTION I. VIRGINIA CORN HYBRID TRIALS IN 1998.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liskiewicz, Maciej

    INDEX TO VIRGINIA CORN HYBRID AND MANAGEMENT TRIALS 1998 SECTION I. VIRGINIA CORN HYBRID TRIALS IN 1998. Companies participating in the 1998 Corn Hybrid Trials 2 1998 Virginia Corn Hybird Plot, and 1998. 36 SECTION II. EVALUATION OF DOUBLECROP CORN UNDER IRRIGATION IN EASTERN VIRGINIA. Table 27

  8. SECTION I. VIRGINIA CORN HYBRID TRIALS IN 1997. Companies Participating in the 1997 Corn Hybrid Trials

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liskiewicz, Maciej

    1 SECTION I. VIRGINIA CORN HYBRID TRIALS IN 1997. Companies Participating in the 1997 Corn Hybrid COLUMBIA PLAINVIEW TX 79072 NORTHRUP KING CO. NORTHRUP KING PO BOX 959 MINNEAPOLIS MN 55440 PIONEER HI, INC. WILSON PO BOX 391 HARLAN IA 51537 VIRGINIA CORN HYBRID TRIALS IN 1997 Coordinated by H. Behl, E

  9. Corn Ethanol -April 2006 11 Cover Story

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Patzek, Tadeusz W.

    Corn Ethanol - April 2006 11 Cover Story orn ethanol is the fuel du jour. It's domestic. It's not oil. Ethanol's going to help promote "energy independence." Magazines trumpet it as the motor vehicle Midwest fields, waiting to rot or be processed into ethanol. Interestingly, the National Corn Growers

  10. Owens Corning | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIXsourceII JumpQuarterly Smart Grid DataInformationOpenOsmosisWesternCorning Jump to:

  11. Robotics Learning Center Milling Machine Operation Manual

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Miller, Damon A.

    Robotics Learning Center Milling Machine Operation Manual Ken Gruel, Dr. Massood Atashbar, RyanMaster.............................................................................................................. 16 6. Milling Machine Operation for the operation of the LPKF® milling machine, and then gives an overview of the physical operation of the machine

  12. WET LOOSE SNOW AVALANCHING IN SOUTHWESTERN MONTANA Simon August Trautman

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dyer, Bill

    WET LOOSE SNOW AVALANCHING IN SOUTHWESTERN MONTANA by Simon August Trautman A thesis submitted ..........................................................................................................1 2. WET SNOW...................................................................................................................3 Metamorphism of Wet Snow

  13. September 2010 FAPRI-MU US Biofuels, Corn Processing,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Noble, James S.

    September 2010 FAPRI-MU US Biofuels, Corn Processing, Distillers Grains, Fats, Switchgrass-882-4256 or the US Department of Education, Office of Civil Rights. #12;1 Overview of FAPRI-MU Biofuels, Corn listed here represent US biofuel, corn processing, distillers grains, fats, switchgrass, and corn stover

  14. Size reduction of high- and low-moisture corn stalks by linear knife grid system

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Womac, A.R. [University of Tennessee; Igathinathane, C. [Mississippi State University (MSU); Sokhansanj, Shahabaddine [ORNL; Narayan, S. [First American Scientific Co.

    2009-04-01

    High- and low-moisture corn stalks were tested using a linear knife grid size reduction device developed for first-stage size reduction. The device was used in conjunction with a universal test machine that quantified shearing stress and energy characteristics for forcing a bed of corn stalks through a grid of sharp knives. No published engineering performance data for corn stover with similar devices are available to optimize performance; however, commercial knife grid systems exist for forage size reduction. From the force displacement data, mean and maximum ultimate shear stresses, cumulative and peak mass-based cutting energies for corn stalks, and mean new surface area-based cutting energies were determined from 4 5 refill runs at two moisture contents (78.8% and 11.3% wet basis), three knife grid spacings (25.4, 50.8, and 101.6 mm), and three bed depths (50.8, 101.6, and 152.4 mm). In general, the results indicated that peak failure load, ultimate shear stress, and cutting energy values varied directly with bed depth and inversely with knife grid spacing. Mean separation analysis established that high- and low-moisture conditions and bed depths 101.6 mm did not differ significantly (P < 0.05) for ultimate stress and cutting energy values, but knife grid spacing were significantly different. Linear knife grid cutting energy requirements for both moisture conditions of corn stalks were much smaller than reported cutting energy requirements. Ultimate shear stress and cutting energy results of this research should aid the engineering design of commercial scale linear knife gird size reduction equipment for various biomass feedstocks.

  15. INDEX TO VIRGINIA CORN HYBRID AND MANAGEMENT TRIALS 1999 SECTION I. VIRGINIA CORN HYBRID TRIALS IN 1999.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liskiewicz, Maciej

    INDEX TO VIRGINIA CORN HYBRID AND MANAGEMENT TRIALS 1999 SECTION I. VIRGINIA CORN HYBRID TRIALS IN 1999. Companies participating in the 1999 Corn Hybrid Trials 2 1999 Virginia Corn Hybird Plot Information and Management Practices 3 Table 1. 1999 Relative Yield of hybrids entered in three or more

  16. MILLING OPERATIONS Milling is the process of machining flat, curved, or Milling machines are basically classified as vertical or

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gellman, Andrew J.

    of a motor driven spindle, which milling machines have self-contained electric drive motors, mountsTC 9-524 Chapter 8 MILLING OPERATIONS Milling is the process of machining flat, curved, or Milling machines are basically classified as vertical or irregular surfaces by feeding the workpiece against

  17. Logs Wood Chips Straw Corn Switchgrass

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Clean energy can come from the sun. The energy in wind can make electricity. Bioenergy comes from plants we can turn into fuel. Logs Wood Chips Straw Corn Switchgrass We can use...

  18. Factors affecting viscosity changes in corn 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McGill, Kendra Louise

    1995-01-01

    Corn meals with known differences were tested using the Rapid Visco Analyzer. Various tests included the effect of solid concentration, effect of heating rate, effect of particle size, effect of Sodium Carboxymethylcellulose ...

  19. Bioaugmentation for Electricity Generation from Corn Stover

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    -intensive or expensive process to extract sugars for bioenergy production. However, it is possible to directly generate and animal wastewaters and corn stover hydrolysates. For example, high power densities (810 to 970 mW/m2

  20. Corn Performance Trials Companies Participating in the 1994 Corn Performance Trials

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liskiewicz, Maciej

    Virginia Corn Performance Trials in 1994 #12;#12;1 Companies Participating in the 1994 Corn IN 46031 CARGILL HYBRID SEEDS CARGILL PO BOX 5645 MINNEAPOLIS MN 55440 CAVERNDALE FARMS INC. CAVERNDALE SCIENCES MYCOGEN 624 27TH ST LUBBOCK TX 79404 NORTHRUP KING CO. NORTHRUP KING 317 330TH ST STANTON MN 55018

  1. The estimated costs of corn, corn silage, soybeans, alfalfa, and pasture maintenance in this report are

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Duffy, Michael D.

    The estimated costs of corn, corn silage, soybeans, alfalfa, and pasture maintenance in this report summaries, production and costs data from the Depart- ments of Economics, Agricultural and Biosystems and other input suppliers around the state. These costs estimates are representative of average costs

  2. Coal combustion by wet oxidation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bettinger, J.A.; Lamparter, R.A.; McDowell, D.C.

    1980-11-15

    The combustion of coal by wet oxidation was studied by the Center for Waste Management Programs, of Michigan Technological University. In wet oxidation a combustible material, such as coal, is reacted with oxygen in the presence of liquid water. The reaction is typically carried out in the range of 204/sup 0/C (400/sup 0/F) to 353/sup 0/C (650/sup 0/F) with sufficient pressure to maintain the water present in the liquid state, and provide the partial pressure of oxygen in the gas phase necessary to carry out the reaction. Experimental studies to explore the key reaction parameters of temperature, time, oxidant, catalyst, coal type, and mesh size were conducted by running batch tests in a one-gallon stirred autoclave. The factors exhibiting the greatest effect on the extent of reaction were temperature and residence time. The effect of temperature was studied from 204/sup 0/C (400/sup 0/F) to 260/sup 0/C (500/sup 0/F) with a residence time from 600 to 3600 seconds. From this data, the reaction activation energy of 2.7 x 10/sup 4/ calories per mole was determined for a high-volatile-A-Bituminous type coal. The reaction rate constant may be determined at any temperature from the activation energy using the Arrhenius equation. Additional data were generated on the effect of mesh size and different coal types. A sample of peat was also tested. Two catalysts were evaluated, and their effects on reaction rate presented in the report. In addition to the high temperature combustion, low temperature desulfurization is discussed. Desulfurization can improve low grade coal to be used in conventional combustion methods. It was found that 90% of the sulfur can be removed from the coal by wet oxidation with the carbon untouched. Further desulfurization studies are indicated.

  3. Elucidating the mysteries of wetting.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Webb, Edmund Blackburn, III (,; ); Bourdon, Christopher Jay; Grillet, Anne Mary; Sackinger, Philip A.; Grest, Gary Stephen; Emerson, John Allen; Ash, Benjamin Jesse; Heine, David R.; Brooks, Carlton, F.; Gorby, Allen D.

    2005-11-01

    Nearly every manufacturing and many technologies central to Sandia's business involve physical processes controlled by interfacial wetting. Interfacial forces, e.g. conjoining/disjoining pressure, electrostatics, and capillary condensation, are ubiquitous and can surpass and even dominate bulk inertial or viscous effects on a continuum level. Moreover, the statics and dynamics of three-phase contact lines exhibit a wide range of complex behavior, such as contact angle hysteresis due to surface roughness, surface reaction, or compositional heterogeneities. These thermodynamically and kinetically driven interactions are essential to the development of new materials and processes. A detailed understanding was developed for the factors controlling wettability in multicomponent systems from computational modeling tools, and experimental diagnostics for systems, and processes dominated by interfacial effects. Wettability probed by dynamic advancing and receding contact angle measurements, ellipsometry, and direct determination of the capillary and disjoining forces. Molecular scale experiments determined the relationships between the fundamental interactions between molecular species and with the substrate. Atomistic simulations studied the equilibrium concentration profiles near the solid and vapor interfaces and tested the basic assumptions used in the continuum approaches. These simulations provide guidance in developing constitutive equations, which more accurately take into account the effects of surface induced phase separation and concentration gradients near the three-phase contact line. The development of these accurate models for dynamic multicomponent wetting allows improvement in science based engineering of manufacturing processes previously developed through costly trial and error by varying material formulation and geometry modification.

  4. Mechanisms of dissipation in wet granular matter

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. Fingerle; S. Herminghaus

    2007-08-20

    The impact dynamics between wet surfaces, which dominates the mechanical properties of wet granular matter, is studied both experimentally and theoretically. It is shown that the hysteretic formation and rupture of liquid capillary bridges between adjacent grains accounts reasonably well for most relevant cases of wet granular matter. The various dissipation mechanisms are discussed with particular emphasis on their relevance. Variations of the rupture energy loss with the impact energy are quantified and discussed.

  5. Complete wetting of elastically responsive substrates

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    N. R. Bernardino; S. Dietrich

    2012-02-07

    We analyze theoretically complete wetting of a substrate supporting an array of parallel, vertical plates which can tilt elastically. The adsorbed liquid tilts the plates, inducing clustering, and thus modifies the substrate geometry. In turn, this change in geometry alters the wetting properties of the substrate and, consequently, the adsorption of liquid. This geometry-wetting feedback loop leads to stepped adsorption isotherms with each step corresponding to an abrupt change in the substrate geometry. We discuss how this can be used for constructing substrates with tunable wetting and adsorption properties.

  6. Carbon nanotube fiber spun from wetted ribbon

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Zhu, Yuntian T; Arendt, Paul; Zhang, Xiefei; Li, Qingwen; Fu, Lei; Zheng, Lianxi

    2014-04-29

    A fiber of carbon nanotubes was prepared by a wet-spinning method involving drawing carbon nanotubes away from a substantially aligned, supported array of carbon nanotubes to form a ribbon, wetting the ribbon with a liquid, and spinning a fiber from the wetted ribbon. The liquid can be a polymer solution and after forming the fiber, the polymer can be cured. The resulting fiber has a higher tensile strength and higher conductivity compared to dry-spun fibers and to wet-spun fibers prepared by other methods.

  7. Prediction of corn tortilla textural quality using stress relaxation methods 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Guo, Zhihong

    1998-01-01

    Feasibility of the stress relaxation technique which has a strong potential for texture characterization of dough and food products, was evaluated with both corn masa and corn tortillas (These are "low-moisture tortillas" which are ready to be fried...

  8. Barley tortillas and barley flours in corn tortillas 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mitre-Dieste, Carlos Marcelo

    2001-01-01

    Barley tortillas (100%) were easily processed using corn tortilla technology. Flavor and color of barley tortillas were different from those of corn or wheat tortillas. Barley tortillas were generally darker, maybe due to ...

  9. The estimated costs of corn, corn silage, soybeans, al-falfa, and pasture maintenance in this report are based

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Duffy, Michael D.

    The estimated costs of corn, corn silage, soybeans, al- falfa, and pasture maintenance record summaries, production and costs data from the Departments of Economics, Agricultural cooperatives and other input suppliers around the state. These costs estimates are representative of average

  10. FIELD CROPS 2012 Weeds: Corn 5-53

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liskiewicz, Maciej

    in Delmarva corn production. To be successful in controlling weeds in corn, the weed control program must this record to plan your weed control program. Cultural control. Several aspects of cultural weed control should be considered in planning a corn weed control program. These include weed-free seed, cover crops

  11. Wetting and lubricating film instabilities in microchannels

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cubaud, Thomas

    Wetting and lubricating film instabilities in microchannels Thomas Cubaud Department of Mechanical, and silicone oils . Dynamic wetting transitions: a pearl flow thick lubricating film , b spider flow thin lubricating film , c ghost flow metastable dewetting patches . Droplet-decorated streams: d droplets

  12. Maintenance of Stormwater Wetlands and Wet Ponds

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hunt, William F.

    1 Maintenance of Stormwater Wetlands and Wet Ponds Stormwater management practices must be kept maintenance guidelines for stormwater wetlands and wet ponds, two stormwater prac- tices that are being constructed across North Carolina. OVERVIEW As its name implies, a stormwater wetland is a wetland system

  13. UBC Social Ecological Economic Development Studies (SEEDS) Student Report Life Cycle Assessment of Bioethanol Derived from Corn and Corn Stover

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Air [kg NOx-Equiv.]. Production and processes of corn and petroleum from crude oils are also observed ­ Global Warming Air [kg CO2-Equiv.], 3) TRACI, Acidification Rain [kg mol H + Equiv.], and 4) TRACI, Smog for ethanol production (corn versus corn stover) had little effect on the life cycle emissions of E85, however

  14. URANIUM MILL TAILINGS RADON FLUX CALCULATIONS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    URANIUM MILL TAILINGS RADON FLUX CALCULATIONS PIŃON RIDGE PROJECT MONTROSE COUNTY, COLORADO (EFRC) proposes to license, construct, and operate a conventional acid leach uranium and vanadium mill storage pad, and access roads. The mill is designed to process ore containing uranium and vanadium

  15. Influence of Climate on Composition of Corn

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Harrington, H. H. (Henry Hill); Adriance, Duncan

    1891-01-01

    IN DOUGH STATE-GEEEN-IN LBS. Wisconsin. Kew Pork. Maryland. Kansas. Kentucky. Texas. Georgia. 11252 8120 16864 14364 13716 17892 16224 CURED-FODDER MAIZE. 9828 8100 7776 9984 8840 FORAGE CORN-GRAIN HARD-YIELD PER ACRE. 5184 3564 9720 1614 6588 12852...

  16. Challenges and Opportunities for Wet-Waste Feedstocks – Resource Assessment

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Breakout Session 2-C: Biogas and Beyond: Challenges and Opportunities for Advanced Biofuels from Wet-Waste FeedstocksChallenges and Opportunities for Wet-Waste Feedstocks – Resource...

  17. Identification of High Collision Concentration Locations Under Wet Weather Conditions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hwang, Taesung; Chung, Koohong; Ragland, David; Chan, Chin-Yao

    2008-01-01

    conducted under wet weather conditions. Observations fromLeahy, M. , and Suggett, J. Weather as a Chronic Hazard forLocations Under Wet Weather Conditions Taesung Hwang,

  18. Modification of Corn Starch Ethanol Refinery to Efficiently Accept Various High-Impact Cellulosic Feedstocks

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Derr, Dan

    2013-12-30

    The goal of the Corn-to-Cellulosic Migration (CCM) pilot facility was to demonstrate the implementation of advanced technologies and methods for conversion of non-food, cellulosic feedstocks into ethanol, assess the economics of the facility and evaluate potential environmental benefits for biomass to fuels conversion. The CCM project was comprised of design, build, and operate phases for the CCM pilot facility as well as research & development, and modeling components. The CCM pilot facility was designed to process 1 tonne per day of non-food biomass and biologically convert that biomass to ethanol at a rate of 70 gallons per tonne. The plant demonstrated throughputs in excess of 1 tonne per day for an extended run of 1400 hours. Although target yields were not fully achieved, the continuous operation validated the design and operability of the plant. These designs will permit the design of larger scale operations at existing corn milling operations or for greenfield plants. EdeniQ, a partner in the project and the owner of the pilot plant, continues to operate and evaluate other feedstocks.

  19. Effect of pelleting on the recalcitrance and bioconversion of dilute-acid pretreated corn stover

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Allison E Ray; Amber Hoover; Gary Gresham

    2012-07-01

    Background: Knowledge regarding the performance of densified biomass in biochemical processes is limited. The effects of densification on biochemical conversion are explored here. Methods: Pelleted corn stover samples were generated from bales that were milled to 6.35 mm. Low-solids acid pretreatment and simultaneous saccharification and fermentation were performed to evaluate pretreatment efficacy and ethanol yields achieved for pelleted and ground stover (6.35 mm and 2 mm) samples. Both pelleted and 6.35-mm ground stover were evaluated using a ZipperClave® reactor under high-solids, process-relevant conditions for multiple pretreatment severities (Ro), followed by enzymatic hydrolysis of the washed, pretreated solids. Results: Monomeric xylose yields were significantly higher for pellets (approximately 60%) than for ground formats (approximately 38%). Pellets achieved approximately 84% of theoretical ethanol yield (TEY); ground stover formats had similar profiles, reaching approximately 68% TEY. Pelleting corn stover was not detrimental to pretreatment efficacy for both low- and high-solids conditions, and even enhanced ethanol yields.

  20. Breakdown in the Wetting Transparency of Graphene

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shih, Chih-Jen

    We develop a theory to model the van der Waals interactions between liquid and graphene, including quantifying the wetting behavior of a graphene-coated surface. Molecular dynamics simulations and contact angle measurements ...

  1. Wet/dry cooling tower and method

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Glicksman, Leon R. (Lynnfield, MA); Rohsenow, Warren R. (Waban, MA)

    1981-01-01

    A wet/dry cooling tower wherein a liquid to-be-cooled is flowed along channels of a corrugated open surface or the like, which surface is swept by cooling air. The amount of the surface covered by the liquid is kept small compared to the dry part thereof so that said dry part acts as a fin for the wet part for heat dissipation.

  2. Tall Corn Ethanol LLC | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page| Open Energy Information Serbia-Enhancing CapacityVectren)ModelTalbotts Ltd Jump to: navigation, searchTall Corn

  3. Heartland Corn Products | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QAsource History View NewTexas: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent|Corn Products Jump to:

  4. PRELIMINARY SURVEY OF SYLVANIA-CORNING NUCLEAR CORPORATION METALLURGIC...

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    Corporaion Metallurgical Laboratory in Bayside, New York THE FORMER SYLVANIA-CORNING NUCLEAR CORPORATION, INC. METALLURGICAL LABORATORY Bayside, New York Site Function late...

  5. Corn fiber hulls as a food additive or animal feed

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Abbas, Charles (Champaign, IL); Beery, Kyle E. (Decatur, IN); Cecava, Michael J. (Decatur, IN); Doane, Perry H. (Decatur, IN)

    2010-12-21

    The present invention provides a novel animal feed or food additive that may be made from thermochemically hydrolyzed, solvent-extracted corn fiber hulls. The animal feed or food additive may be made, for instance, by thermochemically treating corn fiber hulls to hydrolyze and solubilize the hemicellulose and starch present in the corn fiber hulls to oligosaccharides. The residue may be extracted with a solvent to separate the oil from the corn fiber, leaving a solid residue that may be prepared, for instance by aggolmerating, and sold as a food additive or an animal feed.

  6. Biochemical Production of Ethanol from Corn Stover: 2007 State...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Process Design and Economics for Biochemical Conversion of Lignocellulosic Biomass to Ethanol: Dilute-Acid Pretreatment and Enzymatic Hydrolysis of Corn Stover Process Design and...

  7. Kumar, Jitendra; Hoffman, Forrest; Hargrove, William; Mills,...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    based Sampling Network Design for the State of Alaska Kumar, Jitendra; Hoffman, Forrest; Hargrove, William; Mills, Richard 54 Environmental Sciences Ecoregions; Representativeness;...

  8. Virtual cutter path display for dental milling machine

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ito, Teruaki

    This paper presents the prototype of a mixed reality system using the computer controlled dental milling machine, which is called MRD Mill. First, overview of the core dental milling machine developed in this study is ...

  9. Wet powder seal for gas containment

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Stang, Louis G. (Sayville, NY)

    1982-01-01

    A gas seal is formed by a compact layer of an insoluble powder and liquid filling the fine interstices of that layer. The smaller the particle size of the selected powder, such as sand or talc, the finer will be the interstices or capillary spaces in the layer and the greater will be the resulting sealing capacity, i.e., the gas pressure differential which the wet powder layer can withstand. Such wet powder seal is useful in constructing underground gas reservoirs or storage cavities for nuclear wastes as well as stopping leaks in gas mains buried under ground or situated under water. The sealing capacity of the wet powder seal can be augmented by the hydrostatic head of a liquid body established over the seal.

  10. Chaoticity of the Wet Granular Gas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. Fingerle; S. Herminghaus; V. Yu. Zaburdaev

    2007-05-22

    In this work we derive an analytic expression for the Kolmogorov-Sinai entropy of dilute wet granular matter, valid for any spatial dimension. The grains are modelled as hard spheres and the influence of the wetting liquid is described according to the Capillary Model, in which dissipation is due to the hysteretic cohesion force of capillary bridges. The Kolmogorov-Sinai entropy is expanded in a series with respect to density. We find a rapid increase of the leading term when liquid is added. This demonstrates the sensitivity of the granular dynamics to humidity, and shows that the liquid significantly increases the chaoticity of the granular gas.

  11. Controllable underwater anisotropic oil-wetting

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yong, Jiale; Chen, Feng Yang, Qing; Farooq, Umar; Bian, Hao; Du, Guangqing; Hou, Xun

    2014-08-18

    This Letter demonstrates a simple method to achieve underwater anisotropic oil-wetting using silicon surfaces with a microgroove array produced by femtosecond laser ablation. The oil contact angles along the direction perpendicular to the grooves are consistently larger than those parallel to the microgroove arrays in water because the oil droplet is restricted by the energy barrier that exists between the non-irradiated domain and the trapped water in the laser-ablated microgrooves. This underwater anisotropic oil-wetting is able to be controlled, and the anisotropy can be tuned from 0° to ?20° by adjusting the period of the microgroove arrays.

  12. Uranium mill ore dust characterization

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Knuth, R.H.; George, A.C.

    1980-11-01

    Cascade impactor and general air ore dust measurements were taken in a uranium processing mill in order to characterize the airborne activity, the degree of equilibrium, the particle size distribution and the respirable fraction for the /sup 238/U chain nuclides. The sampling locations were selected to limit the possibility of cross contamination by airborne dusts originating in different process areas of the mill. The reliability of the modified impactor and measurement techniques was ascertained by duplicate sampling. The results reveal no significant deviation from secular equilibrium in both airborne and bulk ore samples for the /sup 234/U and /sup 230/Th nuclides. In total airborne dust measurements, the /sup 226/Ra and /sup 210/Pb nuclides were found to be depleted by 20 and 25%, respectively. Bulk ore samples showed depletions of 10% for the /sup 226/Ra and /sup 210/Pb nuclides. Impactor samples show disequilibrium of /sup 226/Ra as high as +-50% for different size fractions. In these samples the /sup 226/Ra ratio was generally found to increase as particle size decreased. Activity median aerodynamic diameters of the airborne dusts ranged from 5 to 30 ..mu..m with a median diameter of 11 ..mu..m. The maximum respirable fraction for the ore dusts, based on the proposed International Commission on Radiological Protection's (ICRP) definition of pulmonary deposition, was < 15% of the total airborne concentration. Ore dust parameters calculated for impactor duplicate samples were found to be in excellent agreement.

  13. Corn Storage Protein - A Molecular Genetic Model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Messing, Joachim

    2013-05-31

    Corn is the highest yielding crop on earth and probably the most valuable agricultural product of the United States. Because it converts sun energy through photosynthesis into starch and proteins, we addressed energy savings by focusing on protein quality. People and animals require essential amino acids derived from the digestion of proteins. If proteins are relatively low in certain essential amino acids, the crop becomes nutritionally defective and has to be supplemented. Such deficiency affects meat and fish production and countries where corn is a staple. Because corn seed proteins have relatively low levels of lysine and methionine, a diet has to be supplemented with soybeans for the missing lysine and with chemically synthesized methionine. We therefore have studied genes expressed during maize seed development and their chromosomal organization. A critical technical requirement for the understanding of the molecular structure of genes and their positional information was DNA sequencing. Because of the length of sequences, DNA sequencing methods themselves were insufficient for this type of analysis. We therefore developed the so-called “DNA shotgun sequencing” strategy, where overlapping DNA fragments were sequenced in parallel and used to reconstruct large DNA molecules via overlaps. Our publications became the most frequently cited ones during the decade of 1981-1990 and former Associate Director of Science for the Office of Basic Energy Sciences Patricia M. Dehmer presented our work as one of the great successes of this program. A major component of the sequencing strategy was the development of bacterial strains and vectors, which were also used to develop the first biotechnology crops. These crops possessed new traits thanks to the expression of foreign genes in plants. To enable such expression, chimeric genes had to be constructed using our materials and methods by the industry. Because we made our materials and methods freely available to academia and industry, progress in plant research and new crop development could accelerate and benefit the public.

  14. Functionality of alkaline cooked corn bran on tortilla texture 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Guajardo Flores, Sara

    1998-01-01

    The effect of pericarp and nixtamalized corn bran (NCB) level on corn tortilla attributes was evaluated. The effect of varying pH (4, 9 and 11) on fresh and dry mesa flour (pH 5, 7 and 10) tortillas was also evaluated. Nixtamal was washed at three...

  15. Thermodynamics of the Corn-Ethanol Biofuel Cycle

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Patzek, Tadeusz W.

    Thermodynamics of the Corn-Ethanol Biofuel Cycle Tad W. Patzek Department of Civil Sustainability & Renewability 28 1 Introduction 28 2 Disclaimer 28 #12;ii Thermodynamics of corn-ethanol biofuel. . . Web Version 3 Preliminaries 29 4 Laws of Thermodynamics 29 5 Thermodynamics and Economics 31 6

  16. THE 2001 NET ENERGY BALANCE OF CORN-ETHANOL (PRELIMINARY)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Patzek, Tadeusz W.

    used on farms, such as gasoline, diesel, LP gas (LPG), natural gas, and electricity, for the production plants. The major objectives of this report are to improve the quality of data and methodology used on the latest data on corn production and corn yield, (2) improving the quality of estimates for energy used

  17. The Real Corn-Ethanol Transportation Tad W. Patzek

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Patzek, Tadeusz W.

    The Real Corn-Ethanol Transportation System Tad W. Patzek Department of Civil and Environmental of ethanol in the US is essentially equal to the unleaded gasoline prices in Europe research, mass transit systems, highway upgrades, etc. Corn and ethanol subsidies in the US channel money

  18. Biofuel derived from Microalgae Corn-based Ethanol

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Blouin-Demers, Gabriel

    · E10 vs. E85 choice · Examined of corn-based ethanol fuel systems on the following: - environmentalBiofuel derived from Microalgae Corn-based Ethanol #12;Outline · Production processes for each;Definitions Biofuel: clean fuel made from animal and plant fats and tissues (Hollebone, 2008) Ethanol

  19. Corning and University Technology Collaborations Charles S. Philip

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    is primarily a high-tech B2B company 4 Former Corning primary consumer brand. Current Corning primary consumer Display Technology · Drug Discovery Technology · New Business Development · Equity JV Companies · Cell Products · Light-duty gasoline vehicles · Light-duty and heavy-duty on-road diesel vehicles · Heavy

  20. Corn Belt Power Coop | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTIONRobertsdale, Alabama (Utility Company)| Open(Evans,Oregon:Volcano, Hawaii | OpenCorinna,CorixCorn

  1. Analysis of Wet Weather Related Collision Concentration Locations: Empirical Assessment of Continuous Risk Profile

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oh, Soonmi; Chung, Koohong; Ragland, David R; Chan, Ching-Yao

    2009-01-01

    Analysis of Wet Weather Related Collision ConcentrationThe CRP plot displays wet weather related collision profilefactors responsible for wet weather related collisions is

  2. FUNDAMENTALS OF WETTING AND BONDING BETWEEN CERAMICS AND METALS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pask, J.A.

    2010-01-01

    WETTING AND BONDING BETWEEN CERAMICS AND METALS Jo s eph A.OF WETTING AND BONDING BETWEEN CERAMICS AND METALS Joseph A.and glass-to-metal or ceramic-to-metal seals. Both physical

  3. Increasing corn for biofuel production reduces biocontrol services in agricultural landscapes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Landis, Doug

    Increasing corn for biofuel production reduces biocontrol services in agricultural landscapes-fold expansion of biofuel production (4), which will likely drive further expansion of corn area crops that compete with corn for land. Increased corn acreage for biofuel production has raised con

  4. www.kostic.niu.edu/DRnanofluids Wet-Nanotechnology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kostic, Milivoje M.

    1 www.kostic.niu.edu/DRnanofluids Wet-Nanotechnology: nanofluids at NIU www.kostic.niu.edu/DRnanofluids Dry- vs. Wet-nanotechnology · Fluids (gases & liquids) vs. Solids in Nature and (Chemical & Bio, and processes · Synergy of dry-nanotechnology (solid-state) & wet-nanotechnology (POLY-nanofluids) #12;2 www

  5. Yang-Mills theories and quadratic forms

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sudarshan Ananth; Lars Brink; Mahendra Mali

    2015-07-04

    We show that the Hamiltonian of (N=1;d=10) super Yang-Mills can be expressed as a quadratic form in a very similar manner to that of the (N=4;d=4) theory. We find a similar quadratic form structure for pure Yang-Mills theory but this feature, in the non-supersymmetric case, seems to be unique to four dimensions. We discuss some consequences of this feature.

  6. DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Sylvania Corning Nuclear...

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    to SYLVANIA CORNING NUCLEAR CORP., INC., SYLVANIA LABORATORIES NY.07-1 - Letter, Smith to Norris, Contract at (30-1)-1293- U Metal Requirements, March 5, 1953 NY.07-2 -...

  7. 2015 Soil Testing Form Corn, Forage, Pasture & Hay Instructions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    New Hampshire, University of

    __________ tons/acre gal/acre Wood ash applied? ________ Yes ________ No 2. Time until manure will be incorporated/acre Wood ash applied? ________ Yes ________ No Corn yield goals 15 to 18(90 ­ 108 BU) 18 to 22 (108 ­ 132

  8. Environmental Analysis of Milling Machine Tool Use in Various Manufacturing Environments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Diaz, Nancy; Helu, Moneer; Jayanathan, Stephen; Chen, Yifen; Horvath, Arpad; Dornfeld, David

    2010-01-01

    Environmental Analysis of Milling Machine Tool Use ina standard vertical milling machine tool. In this example,classification is milling machine tools. M I. I NTRODUCTION

  9. Energy Consumption Characterization and Reduction Strategies for Milling Machine Tool Use

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Diaz, Nancy; E. Redelsheimer; Dornfeld, David

    2011-01-01

    2010): Environmental Analysis of Milling Machine Tool Use inand Reduction Strategies for Milling Machine Tool Use Nancythe energy consumption of milling machine tools during their

  10. Characteristics of corn and sorghum for tortilla processing 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gonzalez de Palacios, Maria de Jesus

    1980-01-01

    CHARACTERISTICS OF CORN AND SORGHUM FOR TORTILLA PROCESSING A Thesis by MARIA DE JESUS GONZALEZ DE PALACIOS Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas A8M University in partial fulfillment of the requirement for the degree of MASTER... OF SCIENCE December 1980 Major Subject: Food Science and Technology CHARACTERISTICS OF CORN AND SORGHUM FOR TORTILLA PROCESSING A Thesis by MARIA DE JESUS GONZALEZ DE PALACIOS Approved as to style and content by: an o omm t em er em er ea o...

  11. The Misplaced Role of “Utilitarianism” in John Stuart Mill’s Utilitarianism 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wright, David

    2012-10-19

    ; if not by law, but the opinion of his fellow-creatures; if not by opinion, by the reproaches of his own conscience.”38 In Mill’s view, to have a right to something is to be able to exact a corresponding duty from someone; just as, to use his language, we...

  12. Hydrocarbon Liquid Production via Catalytic Hydroprocessing of Phenolic Oils Fractionated from Fast Pyrolysis of Red Oak and Corn Stover

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Elliott, Douglas C.; Wang, Huamin; Rover, Majorie; Whitmer, Lysle; Smith, Ryan; Brown, Robert C.

    2015-04-13

    Phenolic oils were produced from fast pyrolysis of two different biomass feedstocks, red oak and corn stover and evaluated in hydroprocessing tests for production of liquid hydrocarbon products. The phenolic oils were produced with a bio-oil fractionating process in combination with a simple water wash of the heavy ends from the fractionating process. Phenolic oils derived from the pyrolysis of red oak and corn stover were recovered with yields (wet biomass basis) of 28.7 wt% and 14.9 wt%, respectively, and 54.3% and 58.6% on a carbon basis. Both precious metal catalysts and sulfided base metal catalyst were evaluated for hydrotreating the phenolic oils, as an extrapolation from whole bio-oil hydrotreatment. They were effective in removing heteroatoms with carbon yields as high as 81% (unadjusted for the 90% carbon balance). There was nearly complete heteroatom removal with residual O of only 0.4% to 5%, while N and S were reduced to less than 0.05%. Use of the precious metal catalysts resulted in more saturated products less completely hydrotreated compared to the sulfided base metal catalyst, which was operated at higher temperature. The liquid product was 42-52% gasoline range molecules and about 43% diesel range molecules. Particulate matter in the phenolic oils complicated operation of the reactors, causing plugging in the fixed-beds especially for the corn stover phenolic oil. This difficulty contrasts with the catalyst bed fouling and plugging, which is typically seen with hydrotreatment of whole bio-oil. This problem was substantially alleviated by filtering the phenolic oils before hydrotreating. More thorough washing of the phenolic oils during their preparation from the heavy ends of bio-oil or on-line filtration of pyrolysis vapors to remove particulate matter before condensation of the bio-oil fractions is recommended.

  13. Hydrocarbon Liquid Production via Catalytic Hydroprocessing of Phenolic Oils Fractionated from Fast Pyrolysis of Red Oak and Corn Stover

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Elliott, Douglas C. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Wang, Huamin [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Rover, Majorie [Iowa State University, Ames, IA (United States); Whitmer, Lysle [Iowa State University, Ames, IA (United States); Smith, Ryan [Iowa State University, Ames, IA (United States); Brown, Robert C. [Iowa State University, Ames, IA (United States)

    2015-05-04

    Phenolic oils were produced from fast pyrolysis of two different biomass feedstocks, red oak and corn stover and evaluated in hydroprocessing tests for production of liquid hydrocarbon products. The phenolic oils were produced with a bio-oil fractionating process in combination with a simple water wash of the heavy ends from the fractionating process. Phenolic oils derived from the pyrolysis of red oak and corn stover were recovered with yields (wet biomass basis) of 28.7 wt% and 14.9 wt%, respectively, and 54.3% and 58.6% on a carbon basis. Both precious metal catalysts and sulfided base metal catalyst were evaluated for hydrotreating the phenolic oils, as an extrapolation from whole bio-oil hydrotreatment. They were effective in removing heteroatoms with carbon yields as high as 81% (unadjusted for the 90% carbon balance). There was nearly complete heteroatom removal with residual O of only 0.4% to 5%, while N and S were reduced to less than 0.05%. Use of the precious metal catalysts resulted in more saturated products less completely hydrotreated compared to the sulfided base metal catalyst, which was operated at higher temperature. The liquid product was 42-52% gasoline range molecules and about 43% diesel range molecules. Particulate matter in the phenolic oils complicated operation of the reactors, causing plugging in the fixed-beds especially for the corn stover phenolic oil. This difficulty contrasts with the catalyst bed fouling and plugging, which is typically seen with hydrotreatment of whole bio-oil. This problem was substantially alleviated by filtering the phenolic oils before hydrotreating. More thorough washing of the phenolic oils during their preparation from the heavy ends of bio-oil or on-line filtration of pyrolysis vapors to remove particulate matter before condensation of the bio-oil fractions is recommended.

  14. Hydrocarbon Liquid Production via Catalytic Hydroprocessing of Phenolic Oils Fractionated from Fast Pyrolysis of Red Oak and Corn Stover

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Elliott, Douglas C.; Wang, Huamin; Rover, Majorie; Whitmer, Lysle; Smith, Ryan; Brown, Robert C.

    2015-04-13

    Phenolic oils were produced from fast pyrolysis of two different biomass feedstocks, red oak and corn stover and evaluated in hydroprocessing tests for production of liquid hydrocarbon products. The phenolic oils were produced with a bio-oil fractionating process in combination with a simple water wash of the heavy ends from the fractionating process. Phenolic oils derived from the pyrolysis of red oak and corn stover were recovered with yields (wet biomass basis) of 28.7 wt% and 14.9 wt%, respectively, and 54.3% and 58.6% on a carbon basis. Both precious metal catalysts and sulfided base metal catalyst were evaluated for hydrotreatingmore »the phenolic oils, as an extrapolation from whole bio-oil hydrotreatment. They were effective in removing heteroatoms with carbon yields as high as 81% (unadjusted for the 90% carbon balance). There was nearly complete heteroatom removal with residual O of only 0.4% to 5%, while N and S were reduced to less than 0.05%. Use of the precious metal catalysts resulted in more saturated products less completely hydrotreated compared to the sulfided base metal catalyst, which was operated at higher temperature. The liquid product was 42-52% gasoline range molecules and about 43% diesel range molecules. Particulate matter in the phenolic oils complicated operation of the reactors, causing plugging in the fixed-beds especially for the corn stover phenolic oil. This difficulty contrasts with the catalyst bed fouling and plugging, which is typically seen with hydrotreatment of whole bio-oil. This problem was substantially alleviated by filtering the phenolic oils before hydrotreating. More thorough washing of the phenolic oils during their preparation from the heavy ends of bio-oil or on-line filtration of pyrolysis vapors to remove particulate matter before condensation of the bio-oil fractions is recommended.« less

  15. Bt vs. non-Bt corn (Zea mays L.) hybrids: effect on degradation of corn stover in soil 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Salvatore, Herminia T.

    2010-07-14

    A billion tons per year of genetically modified corn residues are soil incorporated having both direct and indirect effects on the belowground environment, soil carbon (C) sequestration, and nutrient cycling. If Bt genetic ...

  16. Influence of Airflow on Laboratory Storage of High Moisture Corn Stover

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lynn M. Wendt; Ian J. Bonner; Amber N. Hoover; Rachel M. Emerson; William A. Smith

    2014-04-01

    Storing high moisture biomass for bioenergy use is a reality in many areas of the country where wet harvest conditions and environmental factors prevent dry storage from being feasible. Aerobic storage of high moisture biomass leads to microbial degradation and self-heating, but oxygen limitation can aid in material preservation. To understand the influence of oxygen presence on high moisture biomass (50 %, wet basis), three airflow rates were tested on corn stover stored in laboratory reactors. Temperature, carbon dioxide production, dry matter loss, chemical composition, fungal abundance, pH, and organic acids were used to monitor the effects of airflow on storage conditions. The results of this work indicate that oxygen availability impacts both the duration of self-heating and the severity of dry matter loss. High airflow systems experienced the greatest initial rates of loss but a shortened microbially active period that limited total dry matter loss (19 %). Intermediate airflow had improved preservation in short-term storage compared to high airflow systems but accumulated the greatest dry matter loss over time (up to 27 %) as a result of an extended microbially active period. Low airflow systems displayed the best performance with the lowest rates of loss and total loss (10 %) in storage at 50 days. Total structural sugar levels of the stored material were preserved, although glucan enrichment and xylan loss were documented in the high and intermediate flow conditions. By understanding the role of oxygen availability on biomass storage performance, the requirements for high moisture storage solutions may begin to be experimentally defined.

  17. Wet Sand flows better than dry sand

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jorge E. Fiscina; Christian Wagner

    2007-11-19

    We investigated the yield stress and the apparent viscosity of sand with and without small amounts of liquid. By pushing the sand through a tube with an enforced Poiseuille like profile we minimize the effect of avalanches and shear localization. We find that the system starts to flow when a critical shear of the order of one particle diameter is exceeded. In contrast to common believe, we observe that the resistance against the flow of wet sand is much smaller than that of dry sand. For the dissipative flow we propose a non-equilibrium state equation for granular fluids.

  18. Transportation of the MOAB Uranium Mill Tailings to White Mesa Mill by Slurry Pipeline

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hochstein, R. F.; Warner, R.; Wetz, T. V.

    2003-02-26

    The Moab uranium mill tailings pile, located at the former Atlas Minerals Corporation site approximately three miles north of Moab, Utah, is now under the control of the US Department of Energy (''DOE''). The location of the tailings pile adjacent to the Colorado River, and the ongoing contamination of groundwater and seepage of pollutants into the river, have lead to the investigation, as part of the final site remediation program, of alternatives to relocate the tailings to a qualified permanent disposal site. This paper will describe the approach being taken by the team formed between International Uranium (USA) Corporation (''IUC'') and Washington Group International (''WGINT'') to develop an innovative technical proposal to relocate the Moab tailings to IUC's White Mesa Mill south of Blanding, Utah. The proposed approach for relocating the tailings involves using a slurry pipeline to transport the tailings to the White Mesa Mill. The White Mesa Mill is a fully licensed, active uranium mill site that is uniquely suited for permanent disposal of the Moab tailings. The tailings slurry would be dewatered at the White Mesa Mill, the slurry water would be recycled to the Moab site for reuse in slurry makeup, and the ''dry'' tailings would be permanently disposed of in an approved below grade cell at the mill site.

  19. Challenges and Opportunities for Wet-Waste Feedstocks - Resource...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Documents & Publications "Wet" Waste-to-Energy in the Bioenergy Technologies Office Algae-to-Fuel: Integrating Thermochemical Conversion, Nutrient Recycling, and Wastewater...

  20. Wet Gasification of Ethanol Residue: A Preliminary Assessment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brown, Michael D.; Elliott, Douglas C.

    2008-09-22

    A preliminary technoeconomic assessment has been made of several options for the application of catalytic hydrothermal gasification (wet gasification) to ethanol processing residues.

  1. New Mexico Natural Gas Wet After Lease Separation, Reserves in...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    After Lease Separation, Reserves in Nonproducing Reservoirs (Billion Cubic Feet) New Mexico Natural Gas Wet After Lease Separation, Reserves in Nonproducing Reservoirs (Billion...

  2. ,"New Mexico Nonassociated Natural Gas Proved Reserves, Wet After...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","New Mexico Nonassociated Natural Gas Proved Reserves, Wet After Lease Separation",10,"Annual",201...

  3. A NONLINEAR LEARNING CONTROL APPROACH FOR A CEMENT MILLING PROCESS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Efe, Mehmet Önder

    A NONLINEAR LEARNING CONTROL APPROACH FOR A CEMENT MILLING PROCESS 1 OGUZ H. DAGCI, 2 M. ÖNDER EFE, control of a cement milling circuit is studied with time-varying set values, time-varying plant parameters popularity since the field of nonlinear control still does not offer systematized procedures. Cement mill

  4. Grinding media oscillation: effect on torsional vibrations in tumble mills 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Toram, Kiran Kumar

    2005-11-01

    Tumble mills are hollow cylindrical shells of large diameter carrying grinding media (a combination of rock/iron ore/chemical flakes and metal balls/rods), which, upon rotation of the mill, will be ground into fine powder. These mills rotate at low...

  5. Mill Designed Bio bleaching Technologies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Institute of Paper Science Technology

    2004-01-30

    A key finding of this research program was that Laccase Mediator Systems (LMS) treatments on high-kappa kraft could be successfully accomplished providing substantial delignification (i.e., > 50%) without detrimental impact on viscosity and significantly improved yield properties. The efficiency of the LMS was evident since most of the lignin from the pulp was removed in less than one hour at 45 degrees C. Of the mediators investigated, violuric acid was the most effective vis-a-vis delignification. A comparative study between oxygen delignification and violuric acid revealed that under relatively mild conditions, a single or a double LMS{sub VA} treatment is comparable to a single or a double O stage. Of great notability was the retention of end viscosity of LMS{sub VA} treated pulps with respect to the end viscosity of oxygen treated pulps. These pulps could then be bleached to full brightness values employing conventional ECF bleaching technologies and the final pulp physical properties were equal and/or better than those bleached in a conventional ECF manner employing an aggressively O or OO stage initially. Spectral analyses of residual lignins isolated after LMS treated high-kappa kraft pulps revealed that similar to HBT, VA and NHA preferentially attack phenolic lignin moieties. In addition, a substantial decrease in aliphatic hydroxyl groups was also noted, suggesting side chain oxidation. In all cases, an increase in carboxylic acid was observed. Of notable importance was the different selectivity of NHA, VA and HBT towards lignin functional groups, despite the common N-OH moiety. C-5 condensed phenolic lignin groups were overall resistant to an LMS{sub NHA, HBT} treatments but to a lesser extent to an LMS{sub VA}. The inactiveness of these condensed lignin moieties was not observed when low-kappa kraft pulps were biobleached, suggesting that the LMS chemistry is influenced by the extent of delignification. We have also demonstrated that the current generation of laccase has a broad spectrum of operating parameters. Nonetheless, the development of future genetically engineered laccases with enhanced temperature, pH and redox potentials will dramatically improve the overall process. A second challenge for LMS bleaching technologies is the need to develop effective, catalytic mediators. From the literature we already know this is feasible since ABTS and some inorganic mediators are catalytic. Unfortunately, the mediators that exhibit catalytic properties do not exhibit significant delignification properties and this is a challenge for future research studies. Potential short-term mill application of laccase has been recently reported by Felby132 and Chandra133 as they have demonstrated that the physical properties of linerboard can be improved when exposed to laccase without a chemical mediator. In addition, xxx has shown that the addition of laccase to the whitewater of the paper machine has several benefits for the removal of colloidal materials. Finally, this research program has presented important features on the delignification chemistry of LMS{sub NHA} and LMS{sub VA} that, in the opinion of the author, are momentous contributions to the overall LMS chemistry/biochemistry knowledge base which will continue to have future benefits.

  6. Kinetics of wet sodium vapor complex plasma

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mishra, S. K., E-mail: nishfeb@rediffmail.com [Institute for Plasma Research (IPR), Gandhinagar 382428 (India); Sodha, M. S. [Centre of Energy Studies, Indian Institute of Technology Delhi (IITD), New Delhi 110016 (India)] [Centre of Energy Studies, Indian Institute of Technology Delhi (IITD), New Delhi 110016 (India)

    2014-04-15

    In this paper, we have investigated the kinetics of wet (partially condensed) Sodium vapor, which comprises of electrons, ions, neutral atoms, and Sodium droplets (i) in thermal equilibrium and (ii) when irradiated by light. The formulation includes the balance of charge over the droplets, number balance of the plasma constituents, and energy balance of the electrons. In order to evaluate the droplet charge, a phenomenon for de-charging of the droplets, viz., evaporation of positive Sodium ions from the surface has been considered in addition to electron emission and electron/ion accretion. The analysis has been utilized to evaluate the steady state parameters of such complex plasmas (i) in thermal equilibrium and (ii) when irradiated; the results have been graphically illustrated. As a significant outcome irradiated, Sodium droplets are seen to acquire large positive potential, with consequent enhancement in the electron density.

  7. BERYLLIUM MEASUREMENT IN COMMERCIALLY AVAILABLE WET WIPES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Youmans-Mcdonald, L.

    2011-02-18

    Analysis for beryllium by fluorescence is now an established method which is used in many government-run laboratories and commercial facilities. This study investigates the use of this technique using commercially available wet wipes. The fluorescence method is widely documented and has been approved as a standard test method by ASTM International and the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH). The procedure involves dissolution of samples in aqueous ammonium bifluoride solution and then adding a small aliquot to a basic hydroxybenzoquinoline sulfonate fluorescent dye (Berylliant{trademark} Inc. Detection Solution Part No. CH-2) , and measuring the fluorescence. This method is specific to beryllium. This work explores the use of three different commercial wipes spiked with beryllium, as beryllium acetate or as beryllium oxide and subsequent analysis by optical fluorescence. The effect of possible interfering metals such as Fe, Ti and Pu in the wipe medium is also examined.

  8. Loop expansion in Yang-Mills thermodynamics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ralf Hofmann

    2009-11-05

    We argue that a selfconsistent spatial coarse-graining, which involves interacting (anti)calorons of unit topological charge modulus, implies that real-time loop expansions of thermodynamical quantities in the deconfining phase of SU(2) and SU(3) Yang-Mills thermodynamics are, modulo 1PI resummations, determined by a finite number of connected bubble diagrams.

  9. Clean Air Act Requirements: Uranium Mill Tailings

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    EPA'S Clean Air Act Requirements: Uranium Mill Tailings Radon Emissions Rulemaking Reid J. Rosnick Requirements for Uranium Operations (Clean Air Act) Subpart W Requirements (continued) · Radon emission standard of 20 pCi/m2/sec -- annual reporting requirements, notification in advance of testing · The radon

  10. Biomass from Logging Residue and Mill Residue

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Biomass from Logging Residue and Mill Residue in East Texas, 2008 by Curtis L. VanderSchaaf, Forest Resource Analyst October 2009 #12;N Introduction The abundance of woody biomass from East Texas forests. This report represents the most current data on the availability of woody biomass in the form of logging

  11. South Carolina Pest Management Handbook for Field Crops -2015 CORN INSECT CONTROL

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stuart, Steven J.

    South Carolina Pest Management Handbook for Field Crops - 2015 48 CORN INSECT CONTROL Francis in each field where corn is to be planted. Major insect pests of corn in South Carolina. Insect and Bt11, vip protein Vip3A and cry protein Cry1Ab). #12;South Carolina Pest Management Handbook

  12. Understanding the Impact of Higher Corn Prices on Consumer Food Prices

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    2007-04-18

    In an effort to assess the true effects of higher corn prices, the National Corn Growers Association (NCGA) commissioned an analysis on the impact of increased corn prices on retail food prices. This paper summarizes key results of the study and offers additional analysis based on information from a variety of other sources.

  13. Method for wetting a boron alloy to graphite

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Storms, E.K.

    1987-08-21

    A method is provided for wetting a graphite substrate and spreading a a boron alloy over the substrate. The wetted substrate may be in the form of a needle for an effective ion emission source. The method may also be used to wet a graphite substrate for subsequent joining with another graphite substrate or other metal, or to form a protective coating over a graphite substrate. A noneutectic alloy of boron is formed with a metal selected from the group consisting of nickel (Ni), palladium (Pd), and platinum (Pt) with excess boron, i.e., and atomic percentage of boron effective to precipitate boron at a wetting temperature of less than the liquid-phase boundary temperature of the alloy. The alloy is applied to the substrate and the graphite substrate is then heated to the wetting temperature and maintained at the wetting temperature for a time effective for the alloy to wet and spread over the substrate. The excess boron is evenly dispersed in the alloy and is readily available to promote the wetting and spreading action of the alloy. 1 fig.

  14. Secondary imbibition in NAPL-invaded mixed-wet sediments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Patzek, Tadeusz W.

    Secondary imbibition in NAPL-invaded mixed-wet sediments Ahmed Al-Futaisia,b , Tad W. Patzekb to study the spontaneous and forced secondary imbibition of a NAPL-invaded sediment, as in the displacement-wet sediment, i.e., the receding contact angles are very small. However, depending on the surface mineralogy

  15. Wave Energy Test Site (WETS) Marine Corps Base Hawaii (MCBH)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wave Energy Test Site (WETS) Marine Corps Base Hawaii (MCBH) Alexandra DeVisser, NAVFAC-EXWC Brian June 10, 2013 #12;Wave Energy Test Site (WETS) Objective: Provide location for year-long in Cable, Sound & Sea Technology (SST) Luis A. Vega, HNEI-University of Hawaii Energy Ocean International

  16. Partnership Logging Accidents Cornelis de Hoop, LA Forest Products Lab

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , · Sonny Mills, LA Dept. of Labor · Greg Honaker, OSHA #12;OSHA -- LA Logging Council Strategic Partnership startup procedures. · Safe maintenance & repair procedures. · Safe work flow. · Minimize risk to fellers

  17. Beneficial uses of paper mill residuals for New York State`s recycled-paper mills. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1995-09-01

    This report evaluates the New York paper mill industry in terms of the productive management and treatment of solid wastes. It identifies current efforts by recycling mills to beneficially use paper mill residuals (often called sludge) and suggests additional options that should be considered by the industry in general and individual mills in particular. It also examines the regulations and economics affecting the mills and suggests actions that could improve the industry`s ability to convert wastes to value-added products. The report recommends that the mills should continue measures to reduce fiber and filler clay losses, promote the transfer of usable fiber and clay to mills able to use them, upgrade sludge dewatering capabilities, and take a more regional approach to solid waste disposal problems. State agencies are urged to support these efforts, encourage the development and commercialization of new beneficial use technologies, and reduce regulatory barriers whenever possible.

  18. Creating Advanced Biosensors with Chips and Light Robert M. Corn

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Creating Advanced Biosensors with Chips and Light Robert M. Corn Department of Chemistry University of California, Irvine Surface Bioaffinity Sensors #12;DNA-DNA Binding Surface Bioaffinity Biosensors Surface bioaffinity biosensors use a biochemical recognition event to detect the presence of a target biological

  19. SECO - Dow Corning's Wood Fueled Industrial Cogeneration Project 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Betts, W. D.

    1982-01-01

    In 1979, Dow Corning Corporation decided to build a wood fueled steam and electric cogeneration (SECO) power plant at Midland, Michigan. This decision was prompted by the high cost of oil and natural gas, an abundant supply of wood in mid Michigan...

  20. Managing Insect and Mite Pests of Texas Corn

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stewart, J.W.; Patrick, Carl; Cronholm, Gregory B.

    1982-01-01

    Cutworm ............................... 15 Grasshoppers ........................................ 16 INSECTICIDE APPLICATION METHODS ....................................... 17 PROTECTING BEES FROM INSECTICIDES .................................. 17... will seriously reduce bee populations. 10 Flea Beetles Flea beetles are very tiny, shiny black or greenish black insects that will jump when disturbed. They nge in size from a little smaller than a pinhead to ;,everal times as large. They damage corn...

  1. Grain Sorghums Versus Corn for Fattening Lambs : Third Experiment. 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jones, J. M. (Joseph McKinley); Dickson, R. E.

    1923-01-01

    about fourteen per cent. cheaper than made by Lot 1 ancl the profits per lamb were 29 cents greater. Table 10. Comparison of ground threshed kafir with ground shelled corn. It will be seen that Lot 7, fattened on ground threshed kafir. made practica...

  2. Kaffir Corn and Milo Maize for Fattening Cattle. 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Marshall, F. R. (Frederick Rupert); Burns, John C.

    1907-01-01

    the remaining one hundred divided into two lots practicaIly alike in weight and quality. Those wh~ch, were to receive cotton seed with their kaffir corn were de~signatecl lot 1, and those to which meal was to 1)c fecl as lot 11. The ex- ~erimcnt clid...

  3. Effects of residues from municipal solid waste landfill on corn yield and heavy metal content

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Prabpai, S. [Suphan Buri Campus Establishment Project, Kasetsart University, 50 U Floor, Administrative Building, Paholyothin Road, Jatujak, Bangkok 10900 (Thailand)], E-mail: s.prabpai@hotmail.com; Charerntanyarak, L. [Department of Epidemiology, Faculty of Public Health, Khon Kaen University, Khon Kaen 40002 (Thailand)], E-mail: lertchai@kku.ac.th; Siri, B. [Department of Agronomy, Faculty of Agriculture, Khon Kaen University, Khon Kaen 40002 (Thailand)], E-mail: boonmee@kku.ac.th; Moore, M.R. [The University of Queensland, The National Research Center for Environmental Toxicology, 39 Kessels Road, Coopers Plans, Brisbane, Queensland 4108 (Australia)], E-mail: m.moore@uq.edu.au; Noller, Barry N. [The University of Queensland, Centre for Mined Land Rehabilitation, Brisbane, Queensland 4072 (Australia)], E-mail: b.noller@uq.edu.au

    2009-08-15

    The effects of residues from municipal solid waste landfill, Khon Kaen Municipality, Thailand, on corn (Zea mays L.) yield and heavy metal content were studied. Field experiments with randomized complete block design with five treatments (0, 20, 40, 60 and 80% v/v of residues and soil) and four replications were carried out. Corn yield and heavy metal contents in corn grain were analyzed. Corn yield increased by 50, 72, 85 and 71% at 20, 40, 60 and 80% treatments as compared to the control, respectively. All heavy metals content, except cadmium, nickel and zinc, in corn grain were not significantly different from the control. Arsenic, cadmium and zinc in corn grain were strongly positively correlated with concentrations in soil. The heavy metal content in corn grain was within regulated limits for human consumption.

  4. Wetting and phase separation in soft adhesion

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    K. E. Jensen; R. Sarfati; R. W. Style; R. Boltyanskiy; A. Chakrabarti; M. K. Chaudhury; E. R. Dufresne

    2015-07-22

    In the classic theory of solid adhesion, surface energy drives deformation to increase contact area while bulk elasticity opposes it. Recently, solid surface stress has been shown also to play an important role in opposing deformation of soft materials. This suggests that the contact line in soft adhesion should mimic that of a liquid droplet, with a contact angle determined by surface tensions. Consistent with this hypothesis, we observe a contact angle of a soft silicone substrate on rigid silica spheres that depends on the surface functionalization but not the sphere size. However, to satisfy this wetting condition without a divergent elastic stress, the gel separates from its solvent near the contact line. This creates a four-phase contact zone with two additional contact lines hidden below the surface of the substrate. While the geometries of these contact lines are independent of the size of the sphere, the volume of the phase-separated region is not, but rather depends on the indentation volume. These results indicate that theories of adhesion of soft gels need to account for both the compressibility of the gel network and a non-zero surface stress between the gel and its solvent.

  5. Mass in Quantum Yang-Mills Theory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    L. D. Faddeev

    2009-11-05

    Among seven problems, proposed for XXI century by Clay Mathematical Institute, there are two stemming from physics. One of them is called "Yang-Mills Existence and Mass Gap". The detailed statement of the problem, written by A. Jaffe and E. Witten, gives both motivation and exposition of related mathematical results, known until now. Having some experience in the matter, I decided to completement their text by my own personal comments aimed mostly to mathematical audience.

  6. Geothermal Mill Redevelopment Project in Massachusetts

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vale, A.Q.

    2009-03-17

    Anwelt Heritage Apartments, LLC redeveloped a 120-year old mill complex into a mixed-use development in a lower-income neighborhood in Fitchburg, Massachusetts. Construction included 84 residential apartments rented as affordable housing to persons aged 62 and older. The Department of Energy (“DOE”) award was used as an essential component of financing the project to include the design and installation of a 200 ton geothermal system for space heating and cooling.

  7. The Dona Maria Mining and Milling Company

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Blackmar, Frank H.

    1912-06-01

    KU ScholarWorks | The University of Kansas Pre-1923 Dissertations and Theses Collection The Dona Maria Mining and Milling Company 1912 by Frank Hollister Blackmar This work was digitized by the Scholarly Communications program staff in the KU... Libraries’ Center for Digital Scholarship. http://kuscholarworks.ku.edu A thesis submitted to the department of Mining Engineering of the University of Kansas in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of Mining Engineer. rJj, •» Jf* T3E...

  8. Advanced Oxidation Technology for Pulp Mill Effluent 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hart, J. R.

    1992-01-01

    TECHNOLOGY FOR PULP MILL EFFLUENT J. ROBERT HART, MANAGER, EPRI PULP & PAPER OFFICE, ATLANTA, GA ABSTRACT The composition of effluent from various pulping processes can exhibit a wide range of physical and chemical parameters. The dissolved solids... and had the necessary accessories to monitor gas and liquid flows, injection and sampling points, and off-gas detection. The ozone was generated with a Griffin Technics HC-l.O ozone generator. This unit is air-cooled and contains two dielectrics...

  9. ORIGINAL PAPER Wet hibernacula promote inoculative freezing and limit

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lee Jr., Richard E.

    ORIGINAL PAPER Wet hibernacula promote inoculative freezing and limit the potential Peninsula. Although overwintering larvae have the physiological potential to survive by freezing or cryopro- tective dehydration, use of the latter strategy may be con- strained by inoculative freezing within

  10. Source apportionment of wet sulfate deposition in eastern North America

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fay, James A.

    1985-01-01

    An analytical model of long distance transport of air pollutants (Fay and Rosenzweig, 1980) has been adapted for the estimation of long term (e.g. annual) wet sulfate deposition in eastern N. America. The model parameters ...

  11. The wet Nicaraguan slab Geoffrey A. Abers and Terry Plank

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hacker, Bradley R.

    University, Boston, MA, USA Bradley R. Hacker Department of Geological Sciences, University of California Seismology: Body wave propagation. Citation: Abers, G. A., T. Plank, and B. R. Hacker, The wet Nicaraguan

  12. Wetting, Spreading, and Adsorption on Randomly Rough Surfaces

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    S. Herminghaus

    2011-11-17

    The wetting properties of solid substrates with customary (i.e., macroscopic) random roughness are considered as a function of the microscopic contact angle of the wetting liquid and its partial pressure in the surrounding gas phase. Analytic expressions are derived which allow for any given lateral correlation function and height distribution of the roughness to calculate the wetting phase diagram, the adsorption isotherms, and to locate the percolation transition in the adsorbed liquid film. Most features turn out to depend only on a few key parameters of the roughness, which can be clearly identified. It is shown that a first order transition in the adsorbed film thickness, which we term 'Wenzel prewetting', occurs generically on typical roughness topographies, but is absent on purely Gaussian roughness. It is thereby shown that even subtle deviations from Gaussian roughness characteristics may be essential for correctly predicting even qualitative aspects of wetting.

  13. Exterior Differential Systems for Yang-Mills Theories

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Frank B. Estabrook

    2008-12-05

    Exterior differential systems are given, and their Cartan characters calculated, for Maxwell and SU(2)-Yang-Mills equations in dimensions from three to six.

  14. Moab Mill Tailings Removal Project Celebrates 5 Years of Success

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    MOAB, Utah – In the past 5 years, DOE has seen many successes in the Moab Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action Project.

  15. Modeling of Turn-milling Process This paper presents an analytical approach for modeling of turn-milling which is a promising

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yanikoglu, Berrin

    milling machine, obtained surface roughness data and compared it with those obtained by conventional

  16. Retention of canopy lichens after partial-cut harvesting in wet-belt interior cedarhemlock forests,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Northern British Columbia, University of

    Retention of canopy lichens after partial-cut harvesting in wet-belt interior cedar­hemlock forests-growth cedar­hemlock forests of the interior wet-belt of British Columbia are rich in abundance and diversity a zone of high precipitation, the so-called interior wet- belt, which favours the development of lush wet

  17. A nonparametric wet/dry spell model for resampling daily precipitation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tarboton, David

    A nonparametric wet/dry spell model for resampling daily precipitation Upmanu Lall Department precipitation at a site. The model considers alternating sequences of wet and dry days in a given season, wet spell length, precipitation amount, and wet spell length given prior to dry spell length

  18. Engineering assessment of inactive uranium mill tailings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1981-07-01

    The Grand Junction site has been reevaluated in order to revise the October 1977 engineering assessment of the problems resulting from the existence of radioactive uranium mill tailings at Grand Junction, Colorado. This engineering assessment has included the preparation of topographic maps, the performance of core drillings and radiometric measurements sufficient to determine areas and volumes of tailings and radiation exposures of individuals and nearby populations, the investigations of site hydrology and meteorology, and the evaluation and costing of alternative corrective actions. Radon gas released from the 1.9 million tons of tailings at the Grand Junction site constitutes the most significant environmental impact, although windblown tailings and external gamma radiation are also factors. The eight alternative actions presented herein range from millsite and off-site decontamination with the addition of 3 m of stabilization cover material (Option I), to removal of the tailings to remote disposal sites and decontamination of the tailings site (Options II through VIII). Cost estimates for the eight options range from about $10,200,000 for stabilization in-place to about $39,500,000 for disposal in the DeBeque area, at a distance of about 35 mi, using transportation by rail. If transportation to DeBeque were by truck, the cost estimated to be about $41,900,000. Three principal alternatives for the reprocessing of the Grand Junction tailings were examined: (a) heap leaching; (b) treatment at an existing mill; and (c) reprocessing at a new conventional mill constructed for tailings reprocessing. The cost of the uranium recovered would be about $200/lb by heap leach and $150/lb by conventional plant processes. The spot market price for uranium was $25/lb early in 1981. Therefore, reprocessing the tailings for uranium recovery appears not to be economically attractive.

  19. Environmental impact characterization of milling and implications for potential energy savings in industry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Diaz, Nancy; Ninomiya, Kevin; Dornfeld, David

    2012-01-01

    Reduction Strategies for Milling Machine Tool Use. Proc ofconsumed by a 3-axis milling machine tool during processing.a model developed for a milling machine tool similar to that

  20. Environmental Impact Characterization of Milling and Implications for Potential Energy Savings in Industry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Diaz, Nancy; Ninomiya, Kevin; Noble, Joanna; Dornfeld, David

    2012-01-01

    Reduction Strategies for Milling Machine Tool Use. Proc ofconsumed by a 3-axis milling machine tool during processing.a model developed for a milling machine tool similar to that

  1. Commercial Feeding Stuffs, September 1, 1936 to August 31, 1937. 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fuller, F. D. (Frederick Driggs); Sullivan, James

    1937-01-01

    of crude fiber. Corn Oil Cake consists of the corn germ from which part of the oil has been pressed and is the product obtained in the wet-milling process of 20 BULLETIN NO. 555, TEXAS AGRICULTURAL EXPERIMENT STATION manufacture of cornstarch, corn.... The average composition, digestible protein, and productive energy of many feeding stuffs analyzed are shown in a table. A table is given showing the average protein content of the cottonseed products made by each oil mill, so that the reader can see which...

  2. Grain Sorghums Versus Corn for Fattening Baby Beeves. 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jones, J. M. (John McKinley); Brewer, Roy A.; Dickson, R. E.

    1922-01-01

    Initial and Final Weights. Shrinkages and Dressing Percentages .............................................. (Table 8) 19 .............. Discussion of Finishing Beeves in Texas Feed Lots 20 .......................................... Hints to Beginners... markets at figures ranging from ten to t~enty per cent. below corn.* It was with a view of casting some additional light on the above ques- tion that the Texas Experiment Station has, during recent years, con- ducted a series of lamb-feeding tests...

  3. Mille Lacs Energy Cooperative | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QAsource History ViewMayo, Maryland: Energy ResourcesDec 2005 WindPROLLC Jump to:Utah:Millard,Ohio: EnergyMille Lacs

  4. Colony Mills Limited | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTIONRobertsdale, Alabama (Utility Company) JumpIowa:Colmar, Pennsylvania: EnergyPark,Colony Mills

  5. Gary Mills | Savannah River Ecology Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home Room NewsInformation Current HABFESOpportunities Nuclear PhysicsGEGandolfi wins EarlyMills

  6. Vertical distribution of structural components in corn stover

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Johnson, Jane M. F.; Karlen, Douglas L.; Gresham, Garold L.; Cantrell, Keri B.; Archer, David W.; Wienhold, Brian J.; Varvel, Gary E.; Laird, David A.; Baker, John; Ochsner, Tyson E.; et al

    2014-11-17

    In the United States, corn (Zea mays L.) stover has been targeted for second generation fuel production and other bio-products. Our objective was to characterize sugar and structural composition as a function of vertical distribution of corn stover (leaves and stalk) that was sampled at physiological maturity and about three weeks later from multiple USA locations. A small subset of samples was assessed for thermochemical composition. Concentrations of lignin, glucan, and xylan were about 10% greater at grain harvest than at physiological maturity, but harvestable biomass was about 25% less due to stalk breakage. Gross heating density above the earmore »averaged 16.3 ± 0.40 MJ kg?¹, but with an alkalinity measure of 0.83 g MJ?¹, slagging is likely to occur during gasification. Assuming a stover harvest height of 10 cm, the estimated ethanol yield would be >2500 L ha?¹, but it would be only 1000 L ha?¹ if stover harvest was restricted to the material from above the primary ear. Vertical composition of corn stover is relatively uniform; thus, decision on cutting height may be driven by agronomic, economic and environmental considerations.« less

  7. Vertical distribution of structural components in corn stover

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Johnson, Jane M. F.; Karlen, Douglas L.; Gresham, Garold L.; Cantrell, Keri B.; Archer, David W.; Wienhold, Brian J.; Varvel, Gary E.; Laird, David A.; Baker, John; Ochsner, Tyson E.; Novak, Jeff M.; Halvorson, Ardell D.; Arriaga, Francisco; Lightle, David T.; Hoover, Amber; Emerson, Rachel; Barbour, Nancy W.

    2014-11-17

    In the United States, corn (Zea mays L.) stover has been targeted for second generation fuel production and other bio-products. Our objective was to characterize sugar and structural composition as a function of vertical distribution of corn stover (leaves and stalk) that was sampled at physiological maturity and about three weeks later from multiple USA locations. A small subset of samples was assessed for thermochemical composition. Concentrations of lignin, glucan, and xylan were about 10% greater at grain harvest than at physiological maturity, but harvestable biomass was about 25% less due to stalk breakage. Gross heating density above the ear averaged 16.3 ± 0.40 MJ kg?¹, but with an alkalinity measure of 0.83 g MJ?¹, slagging is likely to occur during gasification. Assuming a stover harvest height of 10 cm, the estimated ethanol yield would be >2500 L ha?¹, but it would be only 1000 L ha?¹ if stover harvest was restricted to the material from above the primary ear. Vertical composition of corn stover is relatively uniform; thus, decision on cutting height may be driven by agronomic, economic and environmental considerations.

  8. Vertical distribution of structural components in corn stover

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jane M. F. Johnson; Douglas L. Karlen; Garold L. Gresham; Keri B. Cantrell; David W. Archer; Brian J. Wienhold; Gary E. Varvel; David A. Laird; John Baker; Tyson E. Ochsner; Jeff M. Novak; Ardell D. Halvorson; Francisco Arriaga; David T. Lightle; Amber Hoover; Rachel Emerson; Nancy W. Barbour

    2014-11-01

    In the United States, corn (Zea mays L.) stover has been targeted for second generation fuel production and other bio-products. Our objective was to characterize sugar and structural composition as a function of vertical distribution of corn stover (leaves and stalk) that was sampled at physiological maturity and about three weeks later from multiple USA locations. A small subset of samples was assessed for thermochemical composition. Concentrations of lignin, glucan, and xylan were about 10% greater at grain harvest than at physiological maturity, but harvestable biomass was about 25% less due to stalk breakage. Gross heating density above the ear averaged 16.3 ± 0.40 MJ kg?¹, but with an alkalinity measure of 0.83 g MJ?¹, slagging is likely to occur during gasification. Assuming a stover harvest height of 10 cm, the estimated ethanol yield would be >2500 L ha?¹, but it would be only 1000 L ha?¹ if stover harvest was restricted to the material from above the primary ear. Vertical composition of corn stover is relatively uniform; thus, decision on cutting height may be driven by agronomic, economic and environmental considerations.

  9. Condition Monitoring in End-Milling Using Wireless Sensor Networks (WSNs)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wright, Paul; Dornfeld, David; Ota, Nathan

    2008-01-01

    VF-0 20HP CNC 3-axis milling machine. The output from thecasing of the CNC milling machine, while cuts Volume 36,

  10. Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action Project surface project management plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-09-01

    This Project Management Plan describes the planning, systems, and organization that shall be used to manage the Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action Project (UMTRA). US DOE is authorized to stabilize and control surface tailings and ground water contamination at 24 inactive uranium processing sites and associated vicinity properties containing uranium mill tailings and related residual radioactive materials.

  11. Process integration studies on Kraft pulp mill biorefineries producing ethanol

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ahrendt, Wolfgang

    -of-the-art mills (Brazilian example) 460 500 540 580 620 660 700 Turbines Lignin /m3EtOH New turb/lign HEN + turb below. In the repurposed pulp mill investing in larger turbines or lignin extraction in order to make use of excess steam can improve the energy balance, but improved heat integration (reducing steam

  12. John Stuart Mill's Sanction Utilitarianism: A Philosophical and Historical Interpretation 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wright, David

    2014-04-24

    . On Mill’s account of moral obligation (which purportedly holds for moral theories generally, not just utilitarianism) there is a tight relation between an action being wrong and it being subject to punishment by an agent’s conscience. The utilitarian...

  13. Techno-economic analysis of using corn stover to supply heat and power to a corn ethanol plant - Part 2: Cost of heat and power generation systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mani, Sudhagar [University of Georgia; Sokhansanj, Shahabaddine [ORNL; Togore, Sam [U.S. Department of Energy; Turhollow Jr, Anthony F [ORNL

    2010-03-01

    This paper presents a techno-economic analysis of corn stover fired process heating (PH) and the combined heat and power (CHP) generation systems for a typical corn ethanol plant (ethanol production capacity of 170 dam3). Discounted cash flow method was used to estimate both the capital and operating costs of each system and compared with the existing natural gas fired heating system. Environmental impact assessment of using corn stover, coal and natural gas in the heat and/or power generation systems was also evaluated. Coal fired process heating (PH) system had the lowest annual operating cost due to the low fuel cost, but had the highest environmental and human toxicity impacts. The proposed combined heat and power (CHP) generation system required about 137 Gg of corn stover to generate 9.5 MW of electricity and 52.3 MW of process heat with an overall CHP efficiency of 83.3%. Stover fired CHP system would generate an annual savings of 3.6 M$ with an payback period of 6 y. Economics of the coal fired CHP system was very attractive compared to the stover fired CHP system due to lower fuel cost. But the greenhouse gas emissions per Mg of fuel for the coal fired CHP system was 32 times higher than that of stover fired CHP system. Corn stover fired heat and power generation system for a corn ethanol plant can improve the net energy balance and add environmental benefits to the corn to ethanol biorefinery.

  14. Milling Machine Policies This milling machine must be used by only qualified users. A qualified user list is posted

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chappell, William J.

    be pressed down in the "zero" position to check penetration depth. While milling In the case of an emergency contour routing, keep looking to see if the contour bit goes down. If so, shut off the machine immediately of the damaged bit and sand down any burs introduced to the milling plate to keep the face as flat as possible

  15. Wetting on Random Roughness: the Ubiquity of Wenzel Prewetting

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stephan Herminghaus

    2012-03-23

    The wetting properties of solid substrates with macroscopic random roughness are considered as a function of the microscopic contact angle of the wetting liquid and its partial pressure in the surrounding gas phase. It is shown that Wenzel prewetting, which has been recently predicted for a rather wide class of roughness pro?les derived from Gaussian random processes by a general distortion procedure, should in fact be ubiquitous and prevail under even much milder conditions. The well-known transition occurring at Wenzel's angle is accompanied by a prewetting transition, at which a jump in the adsorbed liquid volume occurs. This should be present on most surfaces bearing homogeneous, isotropic random roughness.

  16. Electro-osmotic transport in wet processing of textiles

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Cooper, John F. (Oakland, CA)

    1998-01-01

    Electro-osmotic (or electrokinetic) transport is used to efficiently force a solution (or water) through the interior of the fibers or yarns of textile materials for wet processing of textiles. The textile material is passed between electrodes that apply an electric field across the fabric. Used alone or in parallel with conventional hydraulic washing (forced convection), electro-osmotic transport greatly reduces the amount of water used in wet processing. The amount of water required to achieve a fixed level of rinsing of tint can be reduced, for example, to 1-5 lbs water per pound of fabric from an industry benchmark of 20 lbs water/lb fabric.

  17. Electro-osmotic transport in wet processing of textiles

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Cooper, J.F.

    1998-09-22

    Electro-osmotic (or electrokinetic) transport is used to efficiently force a solution (or water) through the interior of the fibers or yarns of textile materials for wet processing of textiles. The textile material is passed between electrodes that apply an electric field across the fabric. Used alone or in parallel with conventional hydraulic washing (forced convection), electro-osmotic transport greatly reduces the amount of water used in wet processing. The amount of water required to achieve a fixed level of rinsing of tint can be reduced, for example, to 1--5 lbs water per pound of fabric from an industry benchmark of 20 lbs water/lb fabric. 5 figs.

  18. California - San Joaquin Basin Onshore Natural Gas, Wet After Lease

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustments (Billion Cubic Feet) Wyoming963 1.969 1.979Coal4 Arizona -ProductionWet AfterWet

  19. California - San Joaquin Basin Onshore Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustments (Billion Cubic Feet) Wyoming963 1.969 1.979Coal4 Arizona -ProductionWet AfterWetLease Separation,

  20. California Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation,

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustments (Billion Cubic Feet) Wyoming963 1.969 1.979Coal4 Arizona -ProductionWet AfterWetLease

  1. California Federal Offshore Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet After

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustments (Billion Cubic Feet) Wyoming963 1.969 1.979Coal4 Arizona -ProductionWet AfterWetLeaseCrude

  2. GEOSPATIAL DECISION SUPPORT FOR SEED COMPANIES IN THE CORN BELT Marcus E. Tooze1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Reichenbach, Stephen E.

    agroecological regions where Golden Harvest's suite of corn hybrids were bested adapted in the western Corn Belt qualities and root zone water-holding capacities, reducing risks to drought events. A toolkit of ESRI Arc Harvest brand products, outlined a series of issues within their business model to improve acreage

  3. 16 CSA News March 2013 thanol from corn has been the primary biofuel for liq-

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    DeLucia, Evan H.

    16 CSA News March 2013 E thanol from corn has been the primary biofuel for liq- uid fuels in the United States, but perennial cellulosic biofuels are on the horizon. Intensive corn production with large of nitrogen losses on large, tile-drained fields planted with perennial biofuels in the Midwest of the United

  4. Impact of Velocity on Corn Stover Pretreatment 977 Applied Biochemistry and Biotechnology Vol. 113116, 2004

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Riverside, University of

    with velocity, especially in the early reaction stage, suggests that chemical reaction is not the only factorImpact of Velocity on Corn Stover Pretreatment 977 Applied Biochemistry and Biotechnology Vol. 113 Velocity on Hot Water Only Pretreatment of Corn Stover in a Flowthrough Reactor CHAOGANG LIU AND CHARLES E

  5. The effect of CO regulations on the cost of corn ethanol production

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kammen, Daniel M.

    The effect of CO 2 regulations on the cost of corn ethanol production This article has been) 024003 (9pp) doi:10.1088/1748-9326/3/2/024003 The effect of CO2 regulations on the cost of corn ethanol the effect of CO2 price on the effective cost of ethanol production we have developed a model that integrates

  6. Supercritical carbon dioxide pretreatment of corn stover and switchgrass for lignocellulosic ethanol production

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gu, Tingyue

    ethanol production Naveen Narayanaswamy a , Ahmed Faik b , Douglas J. Goetz a , Tingyue Gu a, a Department). Increased demand in biofuels cannot be met by the use of corn and sugarcane. In the US, corn ethanol has in and Liska, 2007). The production of lignocellulosic ethanol from biomass gener- ally involves four major

  7. ETHANOL FROM CORN: CLEAN RENEWABLE FUEL FOR THE FUTURE, OR DRAIN ON OUR RESOURCES AND POCKETS?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Patzek, Tadeusz W.

    by agricultural and chemical companies for many reasons. However, ethanol does not mix well with gasoline that one burns 1 gallon of gasoline equivalent in fossil fuels to pro- duce 1 gallon of gasoline equivalent as ethanol from corn. When this corn ethanol is burned as a gasoline additive or fuel, its use amounts

  8. Assessing Hail and Freeze Damage to Field Corn and Sorghum 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Livingston, Stephen

    1995-11-30

    New Growth. Physical damage to young corn can be experienced from a freeze or heavy frost, from blowing sand and whipping in high winds, and from hail. Sometimes it may be a combination of several events. With each of these the growing point has... sunshine and temperatures above 55?F to support photosynthesis and to grow through any extended stress period once seed stores are depleted. Frost Damage (27 to 32?F). Tissue loss from frost damage is directly proportional to how low the temperature falls...

  9. Environmental Impacts of Stover Removal in the Corn Belt

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Alicia English; Wallace E. Tyner; Juan Sesmero; Phillip Owens; David Muth

    2012-08-01

    When considering the market for biomass from corn stover resources erosion and soil quality issues are important to consider. Removal of stover can be beneficial in some areas, especially when coordinated with other conservation practices, such as vegetative barrier strips and cover crops. However, benefits are highly dependent on several factors, namely if farmers see costs and benefits associated with erosion and the tradeoffs with the removal of biomass. This paper uses results from an integrated RUSLE2/WEPS model to incorporate six different regime choices, covering management, harvest and conservation, into simple profit maximization model to show these tradeoffs.

  10. PRELIMINARY SURVEY OF SYLVANIA-CORNING NUCLEAR CORPORATION METALLURGICAL LABORATORY

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefield Municipal Gas &SCE-SessionsSouth DakotaRobbins and700 GJO-2003-411-TAC GJO-PIN~$7-KSYLVANIA-CORNING

  11. Dow Corning Europe S A | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIX E LISTStar2-0057-EA Jump to:of the National ClimateDongying ShengdongCorning Europe S A

  12. Little Sioux Corn Processors LP | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIX E LISTStar2-0057-EAInvervarLeeds, UnitedLibertyLite On TechnologyCorn Processors LP Jump

  13. Robbins Corn & Bulk Services | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION JEnvironmental Jump to:EA EIS Report UrlNM-bRenewable Energy| OpenNewRiversideRoanoke,Robbins Corn

  14. Corn LP formerly Central Iowa Renewable Energy | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTIONRobertsdale, Alabama (Utility Company)| Open(Evans,Oregon:Volcano, Hawaii | OpenCorinna,CorixCornLP

  15. Ash Reduction of Corn Stover by Mild Hydrothermal Preprocessing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    M. Toufiq Reza; Rachel Emerson; M. Helal Uddin; Garold Gresham; Charles J. Coronella

    2014-04-22

    Lignocellulosic biomass such as corn stover can contain high ash content, which may act as an inhibitor in downstream conversion processes. Most of the structural ash in biomass is located in the cross-linked structure of lignin, which is mildly reactive in basic solutions. Four organic acids (formic, oxalic, tartaric, and citric) were evaluated for effectiveness in ash reduction, with limited success. Because of sodium citrate’s chelating and basic characteristics, it is effective in ash removal. More than 75 % of structural and 85 % of whole ash was removed from the biomass by treatment with 0.1 g of sodium citrate per gram of biomass at 130 °C and 2.7 bar. FTIR, fiber analysis, and chemical analyses show that cellulose and hemicellulose were unaffected by the treatment. ICP–AES showed that all inorganics measured were reduced within the biomass feedstock, except sodium due to the addition of Na through the treatment. Sodium citrate addition to the preconversion process of corn stover is an effective way to reduced physiological ash content of the feedstock without negatively impacting carbohydrate and lignin content.

  16. Boise Inc. St. Helens Paper Mill Achieves Significant Fuel Savings...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Boise Inc. St. Helens mill produces nearly 1,000 tons of pulp and specialty paper per day, including a wide variety of light-to-heavy paper and napkin grade tissues. Boise Inc. St....

  17. A Power Control System for a Paper Mill 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Richter, G. H.; Keenon, D.

    1979-01-01

    This paper describes the Power Demand Control System installed at the Lufkin Mill of Southland Division, St. Regis Paper Company. The system is based around a microprocessor unit that automatically changes the output of the generators to maintain a...

  18. Fadal VMC 3016 Milling Machine VMC 3016 Specifications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gray, Jeffrey J.

    Fadal VMC 3016 Milling Machine VMC 3016 Specifications 3016 Specifications 3016 Standard 3016) Spindle Center to Column Ways 16" 406mm #12;Main Motor - Automatic 2 Speed Vector 15 HP*, 11.2 KW Opt. HT

  19. A hybrid type small 5-axis CNC milling machine

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Son, Seung-Kil, 1964-

    2002-01-01

    5-axis CNC milling machines are important in a number of industries ranging from aerospace to consumer-die-mold machining because they can deliver high machining accuracy with a spindle tilting capacity. Most of these ...

  20. Development of a two-body wet abrasion test method with attention...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Development of a two-body wet abrasion test method with attention to the effects of reused abradant Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Development of a two-body wet...

  1. Importance of wet precipitation as a removal and transport process for atmospheric water soluble carbonyls

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Matsunaga, SN; Guenther, AB; Izawa, Y; Wiedinmyer, C; Greenberg, JP; Kawamura, K

    2007-01-01

    et al. , 2001). Wet precipitation samples contain almost alldeposition rate due to the precipitation Yield mg C m 2 h 1Importance of wet precipitation as a removal and transport

  2. Compressed Air System Optimization Saves Energy and Improves Production at a Textile Manufacturing Mill (Peerless Division, Thomastown Mills, Inc.)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2001-06-01

    This case study is one in a series on industrial firms who are implementing energy efficient technologies and system improvements into their manufacturing processes. This case study documents the activities, savings, and lessons learned on the textile manufacturing mill project.

  3. STANDARD OPERATING PROCEDURE FOR TUBE "A2-WetOxBond" furnace in TRL.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Reif, Rafael

    STANDARD OPERATING PROCEDURE FOR TUBE "A2-WetOxBond" furnace in TRL. INTRODUCTION Tube "A2-Wet. Three Eurotherm temperature controllers provide a 20 inch long, flat profile in the Center Zone resistant gloves to handle those parts PROCEDURE. 1) "ENGAGE" the machine in CORAL for TRL tube "A2-WetOxBond"machine

  4. CSC2522 Course Project Michael Tao 6.1 Rendering Wet Sand

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Toronto, University of

    CSC2522 Course Project Michael Tao 6.1 Rendering Wet Sand 6.1.1 Goals The primary goal of this project was to implement a method for rendering sand as a wet porous medium with water flowing into it from within PBRT. The final result was a video of sand being wetted by water particles flowing through

  5. Wetting and free surface flow modeling for potting and encapsulation.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brooks, Carlton, F.; Brooks, Michael J.; Graham, Alan Lyman; Noble, David F. ); Notz, Patrick K.; Hopkins, Matthew Morgan; Castaneda, Jaime N.; Mahoney, Leo James; Baer, Thomas A.; Berchtold, Kathryn; Adolf, Douglas Brian; Wilkes, Edward Dean; Rao, Rekha Ranjana; Givler, Richard C.; Sun, Amy Cha-Tien; Cote, Raymond O.; Mondy, Lisa Ann; Grillet, Anne Mary; Kraynik, Andrew Michael

    2007-06-01

    As part of an effort to reduce costs and improve quality control in encapsulation and potting processes the Technology Initiative Project ''Defect Free Manufacturing and Assembly'' has completed a computational modeling study of flows representative of those seen in these processes. Flow solutions are obtained using a coupled, finite-element-based, numerical method based on the GOMA/ARIA suite of Sandia flow solvers. The evolution of the free surface is solved with an advanced level set algorithm. This approach incorporates novel methods for representing surface tension and wetting forces that affect the evolution of the free surface. In addition, two commercially available codes, ProCAST and MOLDFLOW, are also used on geometries representing encapsulation processes at the Kansas City Plant. Visual observations of the flow in several geometries are recorded in the laboratory and compared to the models. Wetting properties for the materials in these experiments are measured using a unique flowthrough goniometer.

  6. A Five-Year Assessment of Corn Stover Harvest in Central Iowa, USA

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Douglas L. Karlen; Stuart J. Birell; J. Richard Hess

    2011-11-01

    Sustainable feedstock harvest strategies are needed to ensure bioenergy production does not irreversibly degrade soil resources. The objective for this study was to document corn (Zea mays L.) grain and stover fraction yields, plant nutrient removal and replacement costs, feedstock quality, soil-test changes, and soil quality indicator response to four stover harvest strategies for continuous corn and a corn-soybean [Glycine max. (L.) Merr.] rotation. The treatments included collecting (1) all standing plant material above a stubble height of 10 cm (whole plant), (2) the upper-half by height (ear shank upward), (3) the lower-half by height (from the 10 cm stubble height to just below the earshank), or (4) no removal. Collectable biomass from Treatment 2 averaged 3.9 ({+-}0.8) Mg ha{sup -1} for continuous corn (2005 through 2009), and 4.8 ({+-}0.4) Mg ha{sup -1} for the rotated corn (2005, 2007, and 2009). Compared to harvesting only the grain, collecting stover increased the average N-P-K removal by 29, 3 and 34 kg ha{sup -1} for continuous corn and 42, 3, and 34 kg ha{sup -1} for rotated corn, respectively. Harvesting the lower-half of the corn plant (Treatment 3) required two passes, resulted in frequent plugging of the combine, and provided a feedstock with low quality for conversion to biofuel. Therefore, Treatment 3 was replaced by a 'cobs-only' harvest starting in 2009. Structural sugars glucan and xylan accounted for up to 60% of the chemical composition, while galactan, arabinan, and mannose constituted less than 5% of the harvest fractions collected from 2005 through 2008. Soil-test data from samples collected after the first harvest (2005) revealed low to very low plant-available P and K levels which reduced soybean yield in 2006 after harvesting the whole-plant in 2005. Average continuous corn yields were 21% lower than rotated yields with no significant differences due to stover harvest. Rotated corn yields in 2009 showed some significant differences, presumably because soil-test P was again in the low range. A soil quality analysis using the Soil Management Assessment Framework (SMAF) with six indicators showed that soils at the continuous corn and rotated sites were functioning at an average of 93 and 83% of their inherent potential, respectively. With good crop management practices, including routine soil-testing, adequate fertilization, maintenance of soil organic matter, sustained soil structure, and prevention of wind, water or tillage erosion, a portion of the corn stover being produced in central Iowa, USA can be harvested in a sustainable manner.

  7. Wet-steam erosion of steam turbine disks and shafts

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Averkina, N. V.; Zheleznyak, I. V.; Kachuriner, Yu. Ya.; Nosovitskii, I. A.; Orlik, V. G.; Shishkin, V. I.

    2011-01-15

    A study of wet-steam erosion of the disks and the rotor bosses or housings of turbines in thermal and nuclear power plants shows that the rate of wear does not depend on the diagrammed degree of moisture, but is determined by moisture condensing on the surfaces of the diaphragms and steam inlet components. Renovating the diaphragm seals as an assembly with condensate removal provides a manifold reduction in the erosion.

  8. The Fernald wet records recovery project: A case history

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sterling, H.J.; Devir, B.R.; Hawley, R.A. [Fernald Environmental Restoration Management Corp., Cincinnati, OH (United States); Freesmeyer, M.T. [USDOE Ohio Field Office (United States)

    1995-06-22

    This paper discusses a project performed to recover wet records discovered in January 1995 at the Fernald Environmental Management Project (FEMP). This paper discusses the emergency and record recovery phases of the project, the technical options considered for records recovery, and special measures which were required due to radiological contamination of the records. Also, the root causes and lessons learned from the incident, and path forward for future records management operations at Fernald, are discussed.

  9. Period tripling causes rotating spirals in agitated wet granular layers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kai Huang; Ingo Rehberg

    2011-07-07

    Pattern formation of a thin layer of vertically agitated wet granular matter is investigated experimentally. Rotating spirals with three arms, which correspond to the kinks between regions with different colliding phases, are the dominating pattern. This preferred number of arms corresponds to period tripling of the agitated granular layer, unlike predominantly subharmonic Faraday crispations in dry granular matter. The chirality of the spatiotemporal pattern corresponds to the rotation direction of the spirals.

  10. Hydrologic Behavior of Two Engineered Barriers Following Extreme Wetting

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Porro, I.

    2000-09-30

    Many engineered barriers are expected to function for hundreds of years or longer. Over the course of time, it is likely that some barriers will experience infiltration to the point of breakthrough. This study compares the recovery from breakthrough of two storage- evapotranspiration type engineered barriers. Replicates of test plots comprising thick soil and capillary/biobarrier covers were wetted to breakthrough in 1997. Test plots were kept cleared of vegetation to maximize hydrologic stress during recovery. Following cessation of drainage resulting from the wetting irrigations, water storage levels in all plots were at elevated levels compared to pre-irrigation levels. As a result, infiltration of melting snow during the subsequent spring overloaded the storage capacity and produced drainage in all plots. Relatively rapid melting of accumulated snowfall produced the most significant infiltration events each year during the study. Capillary barriers yielded less total drainage than thick soil barriers. By limiting drainage, capillary barriers increased water storage in the upper portions of the test plots, which led to increased evaporation from the capillary barrier plots compared to thick soil plots. Increased evaporation in the capillary barrier plots allowed more water to infiltrate in the second season following the wetting tests without triggering drainage. All thick soil plots again yielded drainage in the second season. Within two years of intentionally induced breakthrough, evaporation alone (without transpiration) restored the capability of the capillary barrier covers to function as intended, although water storage in these covers remained at elevated levels.

  11. 'Elastic' fluctuation-induced effects in smectic wetting films

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pikina, E. S., E-mail: elena@ogri.r [Russian Academy of Sciences, Oil and Gas Research Institute (Russian Federation)

    2009-11-15

    The Li-Kardar field theory approach is generalized to wetting smectic films and the 'elastic' fluctuation-induced interaction is obtained between the external flat bounding surface and distorted IA (isotropic liquid-smectic A) interface acting as an 'internal' (bulk) boundary of the wetting smectic film under the assumption that the IA interface is essentially 'softer' than the surface smectic layer. This field theory approach allows calculating the fluctuation-induced corrections in Hamiltonians of the so-called 'correlated' liquids confined by two surfaces, in the case where one of the bounding surfaces is 'rough' and with different types of surface smectic layer anchoring. We obtain that in practice, the account of thermal displacements of the smectic layers in a wetting smectic film reduces to the addition of two contributions to the IA interface Hamiltonian. The first, so-called local contribution describes the long-range thermal 'elastic' repulsion of the fluctuating IA interface from the flat bounding surface. The second, so-called nonlocal contribution is connected with the occurrence of an 'elastic' fluctuation-induced correction to the stiffness of the IA interface. An analytic expression for this correction is obtained.

  12. Mercury removal in utility wet scrubber using a chelating agent

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Amrhein, Gerald T. (Louisville, OH)

    2001-01-01

    A method for capturing and reducing the mercury content of an industrial flue gas such as that produced in the combustion of a fossil fuel or solid waste adds a chelating agent, such as ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA) or other similar compounds like HEDTA, DTPA and/or NTA, to the flue gas being scrubbed in a wet scrubber used in the industrial process. The chelating agent prevents the reduction of oxidized mercury to elemental mercury, thereby increasing the mercury removal efficiency of the wet scrubber. Exemplary tests on inlet and outlet mercury concentration in an industrial flue gas were performed without and with EDTA addition. Without EDTA, mercury removal totaled 42%. With EDTA, mercury removal increased to 71%. The invention may be readily adapted to known wet scrubber systems and it specifically provides for the removal of unwanted mercury both by supplying S.sup.2- ions to convert Hg.sup.2+ ions into mercuric sulfide (HgS) and by supplying a chelating agent to sequester other ions, including but not limited to Fe.sup.2+ ions, which could otherwise induce the unwanted reduction of Hg.sup.2+ to the form, Hg.sup.0.

  13. Effects of Ruminally Degradable Nitrogen in Diets Containing Wet Distiller’s Grains with Solubles and Steam-flaked Corn on Feedlot Cattle Performance and Carcass Characteristics 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ponce, Christian

    2010-10-12

    process (67% of total ethanol production). The process involves five general steps: grinding, cooking, liquefaction, saccharification, and fermentation. Endproducts of this process include ethanol, carbon dioxide, residual grain particles, and yeast... to approximately 100?C to generate 4 4 4 4 soluble dextrins and destroy any preexisting microogranims. Liquefaction of this treated mash is accomplished by holding the temperature at 85?C and adding additional alpha- amylase for at least 30 minutes...

  14. Biomechanics of Wheat/Barley Straw and Corn Stover

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Christopher T. Wright; Peter A. Pryfogle; Nathan A. Stevens; Eric D. Steffler; J. Richard Hess; Thomas H. Ulrich

    2005-03-01

    The lack of understanding of the mechanical characteristics of cellulosic feedstocks is a limiting factor in economically collecting and processing crop residues, primarily wheat and barley stems and corn stover. Several testing methods, including compression, tension, and bend have been investigated to increase our understanding of the biomechanical behavior of cellulosic feedstocks. Biomechanical data from these tests can provide required input to numerical models and help advance harvesting, handling, and processing techniques. In addition, integrating the models with the complete data set from this study can identify potential tools for manipulating the biomechanical properties of plant varieties in such a manner as to optimize their physical characteristics to produce higher value biomass and more energy efficient harvesting practices.

  15. Wetting kinetics of water nano-droplet containing non-surfactant nanoparticles: A molecular dynamics study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lu, Gui; Department of Mechanical Engineering and Mechanics, Drexel University, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 19104 ; Hu, Han; Sun, Ying E-mail: ysun@coe.drexel.edu; Duan, Yuanyuan E-mail: ysun@coe.drexel.edu

    2013-12-16

    In this Letter, dynamic wetting of water nano-droplets containing non-surfactant gold nanoparticles on a gold substrate is examined via molecular dynamics simulations. The results show that the addition of non-surfactant nanoparticles hinders the nano-second droplet wetting process, attributed to the increases in both surface tension of the nanofluid and friction between nanofluid and substrate. The droplet wetting kinetics decreases with increasing nanoparticle loading and water-particle interaction energy. The observed wetting suppression and the absence of nanoparticle ordering near the contact line of nano-sized droplets differ from the wetting behaviors reported from nanofluid droplets of micron size or larger.

  16. Effect of process variables on the density and durability of the pellets made from high moisture corn stover

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jaya Shankar Tumuluru

    2014-03-01

    A flat die pellet mill was used to understand the effect of high levels of feedstock moisture content in the range of 28–38% (w.b.), with die rotational speeds of 40–60 Hz, and preheating temperatures of 30–110 °C on the pelleting characteristics of 4.8 mm screen size ground corn stover using an 8 mm pellet die. The physical properties of the pelletised biomass studied are: (a) pellet moisture content, (b) unit, bulk and tapped density, and (c) durability. Pelletisation experiments were conducted based on central composite design. Analysis of variance (ANOVA) indicated that feedstock moisture content influenced all of the physical properties at P < 0.001. Pellet moisture content decreased with increase in preheating temperature to about 110 °C and decreasing the feedstock moisture content to about 28% (w.b.). Response surface models developed for quality attributes with respect to process variables has adequately described the process with coefficient of determination (R2) values of >0.88. The other pellet quality attributes such as unit, bulk, tapped density, were maximised at feedstock moisture content of 30–33% (w.b.), die speeds of >50 Hz and preheating temperature of >90 °C. In case of durability a medium moisture content of 33–34% (w.b.) and preheating temperatures of >70 °C and higher die speeds >50 Hz resulted in high durable pellets. It can be concluded from the present study that feedstock moisture content, followed by preheating, and die rotational speed are the interacting process variables influencing pellet moisture content, unit, bulk and tapped density and durability.

  17. Coal combustion by wet oxidation. Wet oxidation of coal for energy production: test plan and partial results. Interim report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bettinger, J.A.

    1980-07-10

    A test plan has been developed which will provide the data necessary to carry out design and economic studies of a steam generating facility, employing the wet oxidation of coal as a heat source. It is obvious, from the literature search and preliminary testing, that the higher the reaction temperature, the more complete the combustion of coal. However, operation at elevated temperatures and pressures present difficult design problems, and the necessary equipment is costly. Operation under these conditions can only be justified by the higher economic value of high pressure and temperature steam. With a reduction in temperature from 550/sup 0/F (228/sup 0/C) to 450/sup 0/F (232/sup 0/C), the operating pressure is reduced by more than half, thus holding down the overall cost of the system. For this reason, our plan is to study both the enhancement of low temperature wet oxidation of coal, and the higher operating regions. The coal selected for the first portion of this test is an Eastern Appalachian high-volatile-A Bituminous type, from the Upper Clarion seam in Pennsylvania. This coal was selected as being a typical high sulfur, eastern coal. The wet oxidation of coal to produce low pressure steam is a process suited for a high sulfur, low grade, coal. It is not intended that wet oxidation be used in all applications with all types of coals, as it does not appear to be competitive, economically, with conventional combustion, therefore the testing will focus on using high sulfur, low grade coals. In the later portion of testing all the available coals will be tested. In addition, a sample of Minnesota peat will be tested to determine if it also can be used in the process.

  18. Owens Corning and Silicon Valley Power Partner to Make Energy Savings a Reality (Brochure)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2009-03-01

    This case study describes how the Owens Corning plant in Santa Clara, California, participated in Save Energy Now energy assessments and used Silicon Valley Power utility incentives to save $252,000.

  19. Owens Corning and Silicon Valley Power Partner to Make Energy Savings a Reality

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2010-06-25

    This case study describes how the Owens Corning plant in Santa Clara, California, participated in Save Energy Now energy assessments and used Silicon Valley Power utility incentives to save $252,000.

  20. The effects of Maize Dwarf Mosaic Virus (MDMV) on different corn hybrids (Zea mays L.) 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lammoglia Villagomez, Agustin

    1994-01-01

    A study was conducted to determine the effects of Maize Dwarf Mosaic Virus (MDMV) on different agronomic and grain quality characteristics of 106 corn hybrids. A randomized split-plot design with 3 replications was used. The virus isolate obtained...

  1. Separation of Corn Fiber and Conversion to Fuels and Chemicals: Pilot-Scale Operation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    2006-04-01

    This project focuses on the development and pilot-scale testing of technologies that will enable the development of a biorefinery capable of economically deriving high-value chemicals and oils from lower value corn fiber.

  2. Economic Analysis of Atoxigenic Mitigation Methods for Aflatoxin in Corn in Central Texas 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sampson, Jessica Sue

    2014-04-09

    Atoxigenics and crop insurance are available to producers to assist in preventing economic loss from aflatoxin contamination in corn. Atoxigenics are a newer technology available to farmers, and although professional opinion ...

  3. A supply forecasting model for Zimbabwe's corn sector: a time series and structural analysis 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Makaudze, Ephias

    1993-01-01

    Board's financial resource needs. Thus, the corn supply forecasts are important information used by the government for contingency planning, decision-making, policy-formulation and implementation. As such, the need for accurate forecasts is obvious...

  4. Analyzing the performance of diamond-coated micro end mills.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Torres, C. D.; Heaney, P. J.; Sumant, A. V.; Hamilton, M. A.; Carpick, R. W.; Pfefferkorn, F. E.; Univ. of Wisconsin at Madison; Univ. of Pennsylvania

    2009-06-01

    A method is presented to improve the tool life and cutting performance of 300 {micro}m diameter tungsten carbide (WC) micro end mills by applying thin (<300 nm) fine-grained diamond (FGD) and nanocrystalline diamond (NCD) coatings using the hot-filament chemical vapor deposition (HF-CVD) process. The performance of the diamond-coated tools has been evaluated by comparing their performance in dry slot milling of 6061-T6 aluminum against uncoated WC micro end mills. Tool wear, coating integrity, and chip morphology were characterized using SEM and white light interferometry. The initial test results show a dramatic improvement in the tool integrity (i.e., corners not breaking off), a lower wear rate, no observable adhesion of aluminum to the diamond-coated tool, and a significant reduction in the cutting forces (>50%). Reduction of the cutting forces is attributed to the low friction and adhesion of the diamond coating. However, approximately 80% of the tools coated with the larger FGD coatings failed during testing due to delamination. Additional machining benefits were attained for the NCD films, which was obtained by using a higher nucleation density seeding process for diamond growth. This process allowed for thinner, smaller grained diamond coatings to be deposited on the micro end mills, and enabled continued operation of the tool even after the integrity of the diamond coating had been compromised. As opposed to the FGD-coated end mills, only 40% of the NCD-tools experienced delamination issues.

  5. Antistaling properties of amylases, wheat gluten and CMC on corn tortilla 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bueso Ucles, Francisco Javier

    2004-09-30

    ANTISTALING PROPERTIES OF AMYLASES, WHEAT GLUTEN AND CMC ON CORN TORTILLA A Dissertation by FRANCISCO JAVIER BUESO UCLES Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements... for the degree of DOCTOR OF PHILOSOPHY May 2003 Major Subject: Food Science and Technology ANTISTALING PROPERTIES OF AMYLASES, WHEAT GLUTEN AND CMC ON CORN TORTILLA A Dissertation by FRANCISCO JAVIER BUESO UCLES...

  6. Economic Impact of Harvesting Corn Stover under Time Constraint: The Case of North Dakota

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Maung, Thein A.; Gustafson, Cole R.

    2013-01-01

    This study examines the impact of stochastic harvest field time on profit maximizing potential of corn cob/stover collection in North Dakota. Three harvest options are analyzed using mathematical programming models. Our findings show that under the first corn grain only harvest option, farmers are able to complete harvesting corn grain and achieve maximum net income in a fairly short amount of time with existing combine technology. However, under the second simultaneous corn grain and cob (one-pass) harvest option, farmers generate lower net income compared to the net income of the first option. This is due to the slowdown in combinemore »harvest capacity as a consequence of harvesting corn cobs. Under the third option of separate corn grain and stover (two-pass) harvest option, time allocation is the main challenge and our evidence shows that with limited harvest field time available, farmers find it optimal to allocate most of their time harvesting grain and then proceed to harvest and bale stover if time permits at the end of harvest season. The overall findings suggest is that it would be more economically efficient to allow a firm that is specialized in collecting biomass feedstock to participate in cob/stover harvest business.« less

  7. Case Study of Optimal Byproduct Gas Distribution in Integrated Steel Mill Using Multi-Period Optimization 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Makinen, K.; Kymalainen, T.; Junttila, J.

    2012-01-01

    Energy constitutes about 20 % of the total production cost in an integrated steel mill, and therefore energy efficiency is crucial for profitability within the environmental policy context. An integrated steel mill generates high calorific value...

  8. Dust size distribution and concentrations with cottonseed oil mills 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wiederhold, Lee Roy

    1976-01-01

    -VOLUME SAMPLES FOR P. S. D OF PARTICLES & 100 um DIAMETER (MMD) ANALYSIS OF VARIANCE ON HIGH-VOLUME SAMPLES FOR P. S. D. OF PARTICLES & 100 um DIAMETER (og) MULTIPLE RANGE TEST FOR MEAN VALUES OF MMD BY AREA MULTIPLE RANGE TEST OF MMD BY MILL PARTICLE SIZE... TEST OF AREA DUST CONCENTRATIONS = 15 Pm IN DIAMETER MULTIPLE RANGE TEST OF MILL DUST CONCENTRATIONS & 15 um IN DIAMETER ANALYSIS OF VARIANCE ON PARTICLE SIZING HEAD SAMPLES OF CONCENTRATIONS FOR PARTICLES & 100 IJBI DIAMETER . . . . 47 47 54...

  9. Milling of Sand Blocks to Make Casting Moulds

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lopez de Lacalle, L. N.; Rodriguez, A.; Lamikiz, A.; Penafiel, F. J. [Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of the Basque Country, ETSII, c/Alameda de Urquijo s/n, 48013 Bilbao (Spain)

    2011-01-17

    In this paper a full procedure to make moulds in sand for direct casting of metallic parts is presented. The technology aims at unique pieces or art pieces, where only one prototype or components is required, but lead times are much reduced. The key of the procedure is to achieve enough tool life when milling with carbide tools, avoiding the risk of sand destruction or damage.The use of inverse techniques is a common input due to the industrial sectors where the direct milling is interesting. Two examples of moulds are presented, evaluating times and costs. A special study of tool wear is also presented.

  10. Non-Perturbative Yang-Mills Condensate as Dark Energy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Doną, Pietro; Zhang, Yang; Antolini, Claudia

    2015-01-01

    Models based on Yang-Mills condensate (YMC) have been advocated in the literature and claimed to be successful candidates to explain dark energy. Several instantiations of this simple idea have been considered, the most promising of which are reviewed here. Nevertheless, results previously attained heavily relied on the perturbative approach to the analysis of the effective Yang-Mills action, which is only adequate in the asymptotically-free limit, and were extended into a regime, the infrared limit, in which confinement is expected. We show that if a minimum of the effective Lagrangian in $\\theta \\!=\\! - F_{\\, \\, \\mu \

  11. Fermentation and chemical treatment of pulp and paper mill sludge

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Lee, Yoon Y; Wang, Wei; Kang, Li

    2014-12-02

    A method of chemically treating partially de-ashed pulp and/or paper mill sludge to obtain products of value comprising taking a sample of primary sludge from a Kraft paper mill process, partially de-ashing the primary sludge by physical means, and further treating the primary sludge to obtain the products of value, including further treating the resulting sludge and using the resulting sludge as a substrate to produce cellulase in an efficient manner using the resulting sludge as the only carbon source and mixtures of inorganic salts as the primary nitrogen source, and including further treating the resulting sludge and using the resulting sludge to produce ethanol.

  12. Non-Perturbative Yang-Mills Condensate as Dark Energy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pietro Doną; Antonino Marcianņ; Yang Zhang; Claudia Antolini

    2015-09-19

    Models based on Yang-Mills condensate (YMC) have been advocated in the literature and claimed to be successful candidates to explain dark energy. Several instantiations of this simple idea have been considered, the most promising of which are reviewed here. Nevertheless, results previously attained heavily relied on the perturbative approach to the analysis of the effective Yang-Mills action, which is only adequate in the asymptotically-free limit, and were extended into a regime, the infrared limit, in which confinement is expected. We show that if a minimum of the effective Lagrangian in $\\theta \\!=\\! - F_{\\, \\, \\mu \

  13. 5D Yang-Mills instantons from ABJM Monopoles

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    N. Lambert; H. Nastase; C. Papageorgakis

    2012-02-08

    In the presence of a background supergravity flux, N M2-branes will expand via the Myers effect into M5-branes wrapped on a fuzzy three-sphere. In previous work the fluctuations of the M2-branes were shown to be described by the five-dimensional Yang-Mills gauge theory associated to D4-branes. We show that the ABJM prescription for eleven-dimensional momentum in terms of magnetic flux lifts to an instanton flux of the effective five-dimensional Yang-Mills theory on the sphere, giving an M-theory interpretation for these instantons.

  14. Bianchi Type-I Universe with Wet Dark Fluid

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    T. Singh; R. Chaubey

    2010-07-08

    The Bianchi type-I universe filled with dark energy from a wet dark fluid has been considered. A new equation of state for the dark energy component of the universe has been used. It is modeled on the equation of state $p=\\gamma (\\rho -\\rho_\\star)$ which can describe a liquid, for example water. The exact solutions to the corresponding field equations are obtained in quadrature form. The solution for constant deceleration parameter have been studied in detail for power-law and exponential forms both. The cases $\\gamma =1$ and $\\gamma =0$ have been also analysed.

  15. Arrest stress of uniformly sheared wet granular matter

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    S. H. Ebrahimnazhad Rahbari; M. Brinkmann; J. Vollmer

    2015-06-21

    We conduct extensive independent numerical experiments considering frictionless disks without internal degrees of freedom (rotation etc.) in two dimensions. We report here that for a large range of the packing fractions below random-close packing, all components of the stress tensor of wet granular materials remain finite in the limit of zero shear rate. This is direct evidence for a fluid-to-solid arrest transition. The offset value of the shear stress characterizes plastic deformation of the arrested state {which corresponds to {\\em dynamic yield stress} of the system}. {Based on an analytical line of argument, we propose that the mean number of capillary bridges per particle, $\

  16. California - Los Angeles Basin Onshore Natural Gas, Wet After Lease

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustments (Billion Cubic Feet) Wyoming963 1.969 1.979Coal4 Arizona -ProductionWet After LeaseReservesSeparation

  17. California - Los Angeles Basin Onshore Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustments (Billion Cubic Feet) Wyoming963 1.969 1.979Coal4 Arizona -ProductionWet After

  18. California Federal Offshore Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Proved

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustments (Billion Cubic Feet) Wyoming963 1.969 1.979Coal4 Arizona -ProductionWetReserves (Billion Cubic

  19. California Federal Offshore Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustments (Billion Cubic Feet) Wyoming963 1.969 1.979Coal4 Arizona -ProductionWetReserves (Billion

  20. Colorado Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Proved Reserves (Billion

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustments (Billion Cubic Feet) Wyoming963 1.969 1.979Coal4Cubic Feet)Cubic Feet) Gas, Wet After Lease

  1. Colorado Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustments (Billion Cubic Feet) Wyoming963 1.969 1.979Coal4Cubic Feet)Cubic Feet) Gas, Wet After

  2. Oklahoma Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Proved Reserves (Billion

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustments (Billion Cubic Feet)Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3+ LeaseWellhead%TexasCubic Feet) Gas, Wet

  3. Wyoming Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Proved Reserves (Billion

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustments (Billion Cubic Feet)Decade Year-0ProvedDecade Year-0Cubic Feet) Gas, Wet After Lease Separation

  4. Wyoming Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustments (Billion Cubic Feet)Decade Year-0ProvedDecade Year-0Cubic Feet) Gas, Wet After Lease

  5. MHK Technologies/WET EnGen | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIXsource HistoryScenarios Towards 2050Enermar <OMIS DTocardo <CrossWEPTOS WEC <WET

  6. MULTIVARIABLE NONLINEAR MODEL REFERENCE CONTROL OF CEMENT MILLS Mehmet nder Efe1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Efe, Mehmet Önder

    MULTIVARIABLE NONLINEAR MODEL REFERENCE CONTROL OF CEMENT MILLS Mehmet Önder Efe1 and Okyay Kaynak2 reference control of a cement-milling circuit that has been studied previously. The approach presented studies focusing on cement mills have appeared. Clarke (1988) discusses the predictive control technique

  7. SUITABILITY OF SMALL FISH SPECIES FOR MONITORING THE EFFECTS OF PULP MILL EFFLUENT ON FISH

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    #12;SUITABILITY OF SMALL FISH SPECIES FOR MONITORING THE EFFECTS OF PULP MILL EFFLUENT ON FISH;SUITABILITY OF SMALL FISH SPECIES FOR MONITORING THE EFFECTS OF PULP MILL EFFLUENT ON FISH POPULATIONS of the elements of study included monitoring the effects of pulp mill effluent on resident fish populations

  8. MILLING-GRINDING-DRILLING AND SLOTTING ATTACHMENT (VERSA-M IL)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gellman, Andrew J.

    TC 9-524 Chapter 9 MILLING-GRINDING-DRILLING AND SLOTTING ATTACHMENT (VERSA-M IL) GENERAL DESCRIPTION The milling-grinding-drilling and slotting attachment is commonly referred to as a Versa-purpose machines. With the different attachments that are available with the unit, drilling, shaping, milling

  9. Predictive modeling of reactive wetting and metal joining.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    van Swol, Frank B.

    2013-09-01

    The performance, reproducibility and reliability of metal joints are complex functions of the detailed history of physical processes involved in their creation. Prediction and control of these processes constitutes an intrinsically challenging multi-physics problem involving heating and melting a metal alloy and reactive wetting. Understanding this process requires coupling strong molecularscale chemistry at the interface with microscopic (diffusion) and macroscopic mass transport (flow) inside the liquid followed by subsequent cooling and solidification of the new metal mixture. The final joint displays compositional heterogeneity and its resulting microstructure largely determines the success or failure of the entire component. At present there exists no computational tool at Sandia that can predict the formation and success of a braze joint, as current capabilities lack the ability to capture surface/interface reactions and their effect on interface properties. This situation precludes us from implementing a proactive strategy to deal with joining problems. Here, we describe what is needed to arrive at a predictive modeling and simulation capability for multicomponent metals with complicated phase diagrams for melting and solidification, incorporating dissolutive and composition-dependent wetting.

  10. Mills Memorial Library Directory http://library.mcmaster.ca

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thompson, Michael

    Mills Memorial Library Directory http://library.mcmaster.ca 2011 Lower Level Archives & Research Collections Bertrand Russell Archives Preservation 1st Floor Library Services (Circulation, Reserve, Interlibrary Loan, Research Help) Bertrand Russell Research Centre L111 Connections Centre L113 Digital Lab L

  11. Mills Memorial Library Directory http://library.mcmaster.ca

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thompson, Michael

    Mills Memorial Library Directory http://library.mcmaster.ca 2010 Lower Level Archives & Research Collections Bertrand Russell Archives Preservation 1st Floor Library Services (Circulation, Reserve, Interlibrary Loan, Research Help) Bertrand Russell Research Centre L111 Connections Centre L113 Digital Lab L

  12. The rhetoric of economic inquiry in Smith, Whately, and Mill 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gore, David Charles

    2005-08-29

    ) (Member) ____________________________ __________________________ Martin J. Medhurst James Burk (Member) (Member) ____________________________ Richard L. Street, Jr. (Head of Department...-1 THE RHETORIC OF ECONOMIC INQUIRY IN SMITH, WHATELY, AND MILL A Dissertation by DAVID CHARLES GORE Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of DOCTOR...

  13. Quantum Chaos in a Yang-Mills-Higgs System

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Luca Salasnich

    1997-06-12

    We study the energy fluctuations of a spatially homogeneous SU(2) Yang-Mills-Higgs system. In particular, we analyze the nearest-neighbour spacing distribution which shows a Wigner-Poisson transition by increasing the value of the Higgs field in the vacuum. This transition is a clear quantum signature of the classical chaos-order transition of the system.

  14. AirJava: Networking for Smart Spaces Kevin L. Mills

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    of building AirJava adapters today so researchers can begin experimenting with Smart Spaces. 1. Introduction propose a means of building AirJava adapters so researchers can begin experimenting with Smart SpacesAirJava: Networking for Smart Spaces Kevin L. Mills Information Technology Laboratory National

  15. Energy Change Institute Cockcroft Building 58, Mills Road

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    course has been provided ­ "Energy Change in a Carbon Trading World". The range of educational offeringsEnergy Change Institute Cockcroft Building 58, Mills Road Canberra ACT 0200 Australia T 02 6125 4702 (direct) T 02 6125 0633 (administrator) F 02 6125 2452 E energy.change@anu.edu.au W www.energy

  16. Einstein-Yang-Mills theory : I. Asymptotic symmetries

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Glenn Barnich; Pierre-Henry Lambert

    2013-10-10

    Asymptotic symmetries of the Einstein-Yang-Mills system with or without cosmological constant are explicitly worked out in a unified manner. In agreement with a recent conjecture, one finds a Virasoro-Kac-Moody type algebra not only in three dimensions but also in the four dimensional asymptotically flat case.

  17. Approximation Algorithms for Lawn Mowing and Milling Esther M. Arkin

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Arkin, Estie

    is constrained to stay within the region. The milling problem arises naturally in the area of automatic tool path the grass is cut. This lawn mowing problem arises in several practical applications. Motivations from to coat the entire surface of an object. · (Quality Control) Plan the movement of a sensor (camera

  18. Anomalous Transformation in Supersymmetric Yang-Mills Theory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    H. Itoyama; B. Razzaghe-Ashrafi

    1992-04-03

    An ``anomalous'' supersymmetry transformation of the gaugino axial current is given in supersymmetric Yang-Mills theory. The contact term is computed to one-loop order by a gauge-invariant point-splitting procedure. We reexamine the supercurrent anomaly in this method.

  19. Experimental and theoretical investigation of the interfacial phenomenon associated with wetting of trisiloxane surfactant solutions 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Radulovic, Jovana

    2010-01-01

    Surface active agents have been successfully employed in numerous industrial, agricultural and biomedical applications for decades. Trisiloxane surfactants in particular have proved to be exceptionally effective as wetting ...

  20. Analyzing and Comparing Biomass Feedstock Supply Systems in China: Corn Stover and Sweet Sorghum Case Studies

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Ren, Lantian; Cafferty, Kara; Roni, Mohammad; Jacobson, Jacob; Xie, Guanghui; Ovard, Leslie; Wright, Christopher

    2015-06-11

    This paper analyzes the rural Chinese biomass supply system and models supply chain operations according to U.S. concepts of logistical unit operations: harvest and collection, storage, transportation, preprocessing, and handling and queuing. In this paper, we quantify the logistics cost of corn stover and sweet sorghum in China under different scenarios. We analyze three scenarios of corn stover logistics from northeast China and three scenarios of sweet sorghum stalks logistics from Inner Mongolia in China. The case study estimates that the logistics cost of corn stover and sweet sorghum stalk to be $52.95/dry metric ton and $52.64/dry metric ton, respectively,more »for the current labor-based biomass logistics system. However, if the feedstock logistics operation is mechanized, the cost of corn stover and sweet sorghum stalk decreases to $36.01/dry metric ton and $35.76/dry metric ton, respectively. The study also includes a sensitivity analysis to identify the cost factors that cause logistics cost variation. Results of the sensitivity analysis show that labor price has the most influence on the logistics cost of corn stover and sweet sorghum stalk, with a variation of $6 to $12/dry metric ton.« less

  1. 618 IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON AUTOMATIC CONTROL, VOL. 46, NO. 4, APRIL 2001 Robust Stabilization of a Nonlinear Cement Mill Model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bastin, Georges

    of a Nonlinear Cement Mill Model F. Grognard, F. Jadot, L. Magni, G. Bastin, R. Sepulchre, and V. Wertz Abstract--Plugging is well known to be a major cause of instability in in- dustrial cement mills. A simple nonlinear model- troller can be designed in order to fully prevent the mill from plugging. Index Terms--Cement mill

  2. High-energy mechanical milling of poly(methyl methacrylate), polyisoprene and poly(ethylene-alt-propylene)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    High-energy mechanical milling of poly(methyl methacrylate), polyisoprene and poly November 1999; accepted 5 November 1999 Abstract High-energy mechanical milling has been performed on poly and subsequently narrows with increasing milling time. Solid-state mechanical milling promotes comparable decreases

  3. Raytraced image of the \\house on the hill" model. Aluminum milled version of the \\house on the hill" model.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Utah, University of

    . Numerical Control Milling Machine Toolpath Generation for Regions Bounded by Free Form Curves and Surfaces

  4. Arthropod Management Tests 2012, Vol. 37 doi: 10.4182/amt.2012.E75 TOMATO: Lycopersicon esculentum (Mill.), `Phoenix'

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ma, Lena

    esculentum (Mill.), `Phoenix' SURVIVAL OF TOMATO FRUITWORM AND SOUTHERN ARMYWORM ON TOMATO LEAVES CHEMOGATED

  5. Specifying linepipe suitable for safe operation in sour wet service

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Moore, E.M. Jr.; Hansen, D.A.

    1981-01-01

    The specifications recommended for buying linepipe for wet, sour service are described. A two-fold approach is used. First the linepipe is tested to verify that it is resistant to hydrogen induced cracking (HIC). Second, fracture mechanics requirements are imposed so that if hydrogen induced cracking does occur due to steel-making or operation upsets, a line rupture is guaranteed to self-arrest, thus minimizing the consequences of the failure. Correlations of HIC susceptibility test results with actual service performance are presented. The HIC test acceptance criteria used by the authors are discussed. The fracture mechanics considerations include drop weight tear testing to establish ductile failures and Charpy impact testing to assure self-arrest of an unstable crack, as well as maximum crack initiation energy. The paper concludes with a brief discussion of the commercial availability of linepipe produced to the specifications discussed below.

  6. Summary of Chalcogenide Glass Processing: Wet-Etching and Photolithography

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Riley, Brian J.; Sundaram, S. K.; Johnson, Bradley R.; Saraf, Laxmikant V.

    2006-12-01

    This report describes a study designed to explore the different properties of two different chalcogenide materials, As2S3 and As24S38Se38, when subjected to photolithographic wet-etching techniques. Chalcogenide glasses are made by combining chalcogen elements S, Se, and Te with Group IV and/or V elements. The etchant was selected from the literature and was composed of sodium hydroxide, isopropyl alcohol, and deionized water and the types of chalcogenide glass for study were As2S3 and As24S38Se38. The main goals here were to obtain a single variable etch rate curve of etch depth per time versus NaOH overall solution concentration in M and to see the difference in etch rate between a given etchant when used on the different chalcogenide stoichiometries. Upon completion of these two goals, future studies will begin to explore creating complex, integrated photonic devices via these methods.

  7. $1/f$ noise on the brink of wet granular melting

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kai Huang

    2015-07-23

    The collective behavior of a two-dimensional wet granular cluster under horizontal swirling motions is investigated experimentally. Depending on the balance between the energy injection and dissipation, the cluster evolves into various nonequilibrium stationary states with strong internal structure fluctuations with time. Quantitative characterizations of the fluctuations with the bond orientational order parameter $q_{\\rm 6}$ reveal power spectra of the form $f^{\\alpha}$ with the exponent $\\alpha$ closely related to the stationary states of the system. In particular, $1/f$ type of noise with $\\alpha\\approx-1$ emerges as melting starts from the free surface of the cluster, suggesting the possibility of using $1/f$ noise as an indicator for phase transitions in systems driven far from thermodynamic equilibrium.

  8. Giant osmotic pressure in the forced wetting of hydrophobic nanopores

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Millįn Michelin-Jamois; Cyril Picard; Gérard Vigier; Elisabeth Charlaix

    2015-07-02

    The forced intrusion of water in hydrophobic nanoporous pulverulent material is of interest for quick storage of energy. With nanometric pores the energy storage capacity is controlled by interfacial phenomena. With subnanometric pores, we demonstrate that a breakdown occurs with the emergence of molecular exclusion as a leading contribution. This bulk exclusion effect leads to an osmotic contribution to the pressure that can reach levels never previously sustained. We illustrate on various electrolytes and different microporous materials, that a simple osmotic pressure law accounts quantitatively for the enhancement of the intrusion and extrusion pressures governing the forced wetting and spontaneous drying of the nanopores. Using electrolyte solutions, energy storage and power capacities can be widely enhanced.

  9. Patterned functional arrays by selective de-wetting

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    FAN,HONGYOU; DOSHI,DHAVAL; LU,YUNFENG; BRINKER,C. JEFFREY

    2000-05-11

    Using a micro-Contact Printing ({mu}-CP) technique, substrates are prepared with patterns of hydrophilic, hydroxyl-terminated SAMS and hydrophobic methyl-terminated SAMS. Beginning with a homogeneous solution of silica, surfactant, ethanol, water, and functional silane, preferential ethanol evaporation during dip-coating, causes water enrichment and selective de-wetting of the hydrophobic SAMS. Correspondingly, film deposition occurs exclusively on the patterned hydrophilic SAMS. In addition, by co-condensation of tetrafunctional silanes (Si(OR){sub 4}) with tri-functional organosilanes ((RO){sub 3}Si(CH{sub 2}){sub 3}NH{sub 2}), the authors have selectively derived the silica framework with functional amine NH{sub 2} groups. A pH sensitive, micro-fluidic system was formed by further conjugation reactions with pH sensitive dye molecules.

  10. Nanoscale capillary wetting studied with dissipative particle dynamic

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    C. Cupelli; B. Henrich; M. Moseler; M. Santer

    2006-02-19

    We demonstrate that Multi-Body Dissipative Particle Dynamics (MDPD) can be used as an efficient computational tool for the investigation of nanoscale capillary impregnation of confined geometries. As an essential prerequisite, a novel model for a solid-liquid interface in the framework of MDPD is introduced, with tunable wetting behaviour and thermal roughening to reduce artificial density- and temperature oscillations. Within this model, the impregnation dynamics of a water-like fluid into a nanoscale slit pore has been studied. Despite the coarse graining implied with the model fluid, a sufficient amount of non-equilibrium averaging can be achieved allowing for the extraction of useful information even from transient simulations, such as the dynamic apparent contact angle. Although it is found to determine the capillary driving completely, it cannot be intepreted as a simple function of the capillary number.

  11. Wet oxidation of high-concentration reactive dyes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chen, G.; Lei, L.; Yue, P.L.

    1999-05-01

    Advanced oxidation methods were used to degrade reactive dyes at high concentrations in aqueous solutions. Wet peroxide oxidation (WPO) was found to be the best method in terms of the removal of color and total organic carbon (TOC). Reactive blue (Basilen Brilliant Blue P-3R) was chosen as a model dye for determining the suitable reaction conditions. The variables studied include reaction temperature, H{sub 2}O{sub 2} dosage, solution pH, dye concentration, and catalyst usage. The removal of TOC and color by wet oxidation is very sensitive to the reaction temperature. At 150 C, the removal of 77% TOC and 90% color was obtained in less than 30 min. The initial TOC removal rate is proportional to the H{sub 2}O{sub 2} dosage. The TOC removal is insignificant even when 50% of the stoichiometric amount of H{sub 2}O{sub 2} is used. No color change is observed until the dosage of H{sub 2}O{sub 2} is 100% of the stoichiometric amount. The color removal is closely related to TOC removal. When the pH of the solution is adjusted to 3.5, the dye degradation rate increases significantly. The rates of TOC and color removal are enhanced by using a Cu{sup 2+} catalyst. Another four reactive dyes, Procion Red PX-4B, Cibacron Yellow P-6GS, Cibacron Brown P-6R, and Procion Black PX-2R, were treated at 150 C using WPO. More than 80% TOC was removed from the solution in less than 15 min. The process can remove the colors of al these dyes except Procion Black PX-2R.

  12. Dry purification of aspirational air in coke-sorting systems with wet slaking of coke

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    T.F. Trembach; A.G. Klimenko [Giprokoks, the State Institute for the Design of Coke-Industry Enterprises, Kharkov (Ukraine)

    2009-07-15

    Coke transportation after wet slaking is accompanied by the release of dust in the production building and in the surrounding atmosphere. Wet methods are traditionally used to purify very humid air. Giprokoks has developed designs for highly efficient dry dust-removal methods in such conditions.

  13. A presentation of the U.S. Navy's Wave Energy Test Site (WETS)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Frandsen, Jannette B.

    A presentation of the U.S. Navy's Wave Energy Test Site (WETS) Patrick Cross Senior Project Specialist Hawaii Natural Energy Institute School of Ocean and Earth Science and Technology University of Hawaii Abstract The U.S. Navy's Wave Energy Test Site (WETS) in Hawaii is now fully operational

  14. Wet Chemistry experiments on the 2007 Phoenix Mars Scout Lander mission: Data analysis and results

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kounaves, Samuel P.

    Wet Chemistry experiments on the 2007 Phoenix Mars Scout Lander mission: Data analysis and results performed using the Wet Chemistry Laboratories on the 2007 Phoenix Mars Scout Lander. One soil sample.36(±0.3) mM, respectively. Results indicate that the leached portion of soils at the Phoenix landing site

  15. GAUSSIAN NOISE REMOVAL FOR WET CHEMISTRY DATA FROM THE PHOENIX MISSION , E. Oberlin2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ding, Wei

    GAUSSIAN NOISE REMOVAL FOR WET CHEMISTRY DATA FROM THE PHOENIX MISSION Y. Mu1 , W. Ding1 , X. Ren1 will result in misinter- pretation of the parent salt composition of the soil ana- lyzed by the Phoenix WCL. The WCL on board the phoenix lander performed the first comprehensive wet chemical analysis of the soil

  16. The MECA Wet Chemistry Laboratory on the 2007 Phoenix Mars Scout Lander

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kounaves, Samuel P.

    The MECA Wet Chemistry Laboratory on the 2007 Phoenix Mars Scout Lander Samuel P. Kounaves,1] To analyze and interpret the chemical record, the 2007 Phoenix Mars Lander includes four wet chemistry cells on the 2007 Phoenix Mars Scout Lander, J. Geophys. Res., 114, E00A19, doi:10.1029/2008JE003084. 1

  17. A wetting and drying scheme for POM Lie-Yauw Oey *

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    that contain hydraulic jumps, including a laboratory dam-break problem. Ó 2004 Published by Elsevier Ltd.e. hydraulic jumps and/or bores) can develop. A WAD scheme is proposed and applied to the Princeton Ocean Model. Keywords: Wetting and drying; Dam-break; Flood and ebb; Princeton ocean model 1. Introduction Wetting

  18. The Energy Balance of Corn Ethanol: An Update. By Hosein Shapouri, James A. Duffield, and Michael Wang. U.S. Department of Agriculture, Office of the

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Patzek, Tadeusz W.

    #12;The Energy Balance of Corn Ethanol: An Update. By Hosein Shapouri, James A. Duffield estimated the net energy value (NEV) of corn ethanol. However, variations in data and assumptions used among variation and develops a more consistent estimate. We conclude that the NEV of corn ethanol has been rising

  19. Wet-spinnability and crosslinked fibre properties of two collagen polypeptides with varied molecular weight

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tronci, Giuseppe; Arafat, M Tarik; Yin, Jie; Wood, David J; Russell, Stephen J

    2015-01-01

    The formation of naturally-derived materials with wet stable fibrous architectures is paramount in order to mimic the features of tissues at the molecular and microscopic scale. Here, we investigated the formation of wet-spun fibres based on collagen-derived polypeptides with comparable chemical composition and varied molecular weight. Gelatin and hydrolysed fish collagen (HFC) were selected as widely-available linear amino-acidic chains of high and low molecular weight, respectively, and functionalised in the wet-spun fibre state in order to preserve the material geometry in physiological conditions. Wet-spun fibre diameter and morphology were dramatically affected depending on the polypeptide molecular weight, wet-spinning solvent (i.e. 2,2,2-Trifluoroethanol and dimethyl sulfoxide) and coagulating medium (i.e. acetone and ethanol), resulting in either bulky or porous internal geometry. Dry-state tensile moduli were significantly enhanced in gelatin and HFC samples following covalent crosslinking with activ...

  20. Wetting Transitions of Condensed Droplets on Superhydrophobic Surfaces with Two-Tier Roughness

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lv, Cunjing; Zhang, Xiwen; He, Feng

    2015-01-01

    Although realizing wetting transitions of droplets spontaneously on solid rough surfaces is quite challenging, it is becoming a key research topic in many practical applications which require highly efficient removal of liquid. We report wetting transitions of condensed droplets occurring spontaneously on pillared surfaces with two-tier roughness owing to excellent superhydrophobicity. The phenomenon results from further decreased Laplace pressure on the top side of the individual droplet when its size becomes comparable to the scale of the micropillars, which leads to a surprising robust spontaneous wetting transition, from valleys to tops of the pillars. A simple scaling law is derived theoretically, which demonstrates that the critical size of the droplet is determined by the space of the micropillars. For this reason, highly efficient removal of water benefits greatly from smaller micropillar space. Furthermore, three wetting transition modes exist, in which the in situ wetting behaviors are in good agree...

  1. Owings Mills, Maryland: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIXsourceII JumpQuarterly Smart Grid DataInformationOpenOsmosisWesternCorning Jump

  2. Factors affecting the efficiency of the mechanical corn picker in Mississippi 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kimbrough, Emmett Alexander

    1953-01-01

    . piciher s C~eett, Ph pt. hee nee ste-pes en hens Pets seethes e nle harvest approximately h75 acre pex. hour, depending on ths field con ditions and field cise General dimensions and s cificaticns, The machine weighs approxi mateIy 1~509 pounds...) picker net yield& {2) picker losses, (3) loose eax' losses x and (4) shelled cox?l losses s The last operation cr factor studied before the corn pickax' was operated in the corn plots wss to search for loose ears that, msy' have been knocked off...

  3. Fuelwood procurement for an industrial power plant: a case study of Dow Corning's program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Folger, A.G.; Sworden, P.G.; Bond, C.T.

    1984-08-01

    Dow Corning Corporation has developed effective procedures for meeting the fuelwood requirements of a 22.4 megawatt steam and electricity cogenerating power plant. The fuelwood procurement program of Dow Corning's Natural Resources Department involves special arrangements with private landowners, logging and hauling producers, and waste wood suppliers. The program's success is attributable to a favorable location, adequate allowance for advance planning, effective public relations, and flexible management. The program is significant because it demonstrates that industrial fuelwood requirements can be met and that improved production from nonindustrial private forests can be relied upon as a major source of fuelwood. 7 references, 7 figures.

  4. Sources of Corn for Ethanol Production in the United States: A Review and Decomposition Analysis of the Empirical Data

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Oladosu, Gbadebo A [ORNL; Kline, Keith L [ORNL; Uria Martinez, Rocio [ORNL; Eaton, Laurence M [ORNL

    2011-01-01

    The use of corn for ethanol production in the United States quintupled between 2001 and 2009, generating concerns that this could lead to the conversion of forests and grasslands around the globe, known as indirect land-use change (iLUC). Estimates of iLUC and related food versus fuel concerns rest on the assumption that the corn used for ethanol production in the United States would come primarily from displacing corn exports and land previously used for other crops. A number of modeling efforts based on these assumptions have projected significant iLUC from the increases in the use of corn for ethanol production. The current study tests the veracity of these assumptions through a systematic decomposition analysis of the empirical data from 2001 to 2009. The logarithmic mean divisia index decomposition method (Type I) was used to estimate contributions of different factors to meeting the corn demand for ethanol production. Results show that about 79% of the change in corn used for ethanol production can be attributed to changes in the distribution of domestic corn consumption among different uses. Increases in the domestic consumption share of corn supply contributed only about 5%. The remaining contributions were 19% from added corn production, and 2% from stock changes. Yield change accounted for about two-thirds of the contributions from production changes. Thus, the results of this study provide little support for large land-use changes or diversion of corn exports because of ethanol production in the United States during the past decade.

  5. Statistical mechanics of Yang-Mills classical mechanics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bannur, Vishnu M. [Department of Physics, University of Calicut, Kerala-673 635 (India)

    2005-08-01

    Statistical mechanics (SM) of Yang-Mills classical mechanics is studied by using a toy model that resembles chaotic quartic oscillators. This nonlinear system attains the thermodynamic equilibrium not by collisions, which is generally assumed in SM, but by chaotic dynamics. This is a new mechanism of thermalization that may be relevent to the quark-gluon plasma (QGP) formation in relativistic heavy-ion collisions because the interactions governing QGP involve quantum chromodynamics (QCD), which is a Yang-Mills theory [SU(3)]. The thermalization time is estimated from the Lyapunov exponent. The Lyapunov exponent is evaluated using the recently developed monodromy matrix method. We also discuss the physical meaning of thermalization and SM in this system of few degrees in terms of chromo-electric and chromomagnetic fields. One of the consequence of thermalization, such as equipartition of energy and dynamical temperature, is also numerically verified.

  6. Wind Resource Assessment Report: Mille Lacs Indian Reservation, Minnesota

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jimenez, A. C.

    2013-12-01

    The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) launched the RE-Powering America's Land initiative to encourage development of renewable energy on potentially contaminated land and mine sites. EPA collaborated with the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE's) National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) and the Mille Lacs Band of Chippewa Indians to evaluate the wind resource and examine the feasibility of a wind project at a contaminated site located on the Mille Lacs Indian Reservation in Minnesota. The wind monitoring effort involved the installation of a 60-m met tower and the collection of 18 months of wind data at multiple heights above the ground. This report focuses on the wind resource assessment, the estimated energy production of wind turbines, and an assessment of the economic feasibility of a potential wind project sited this site.

  7. Vacuum Structure of Yang-Mills Theory in Curved Spacetime

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Samuel J. Collopy

    2009-08-31

    The stability of the chromomagnetic Savvidy vacuum in QCD under the influence of positive Riemannian curvature is studied. The heat traces of the operators relevant to SO(2) gauge-invariant Yang-Mills fields and Faddeev-Popov ghosts are calculated on product spaces of S^2 and S^1 \\times S^1. It is shown that the chromomagnetic vacuum with covariantly constant chromomagnetic field is stable in a certain set of radii and field strengths.

  8. Four Dimensional Quantum Yang-Mills Theory and Mass Gap

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Simone Farinelli

    2015-07-17

    A quantization procedure for the Yang-Mills equations for the Minkowski space $\\mathbf{R}^{1,3}$ is carried out in such a way that field maps satisfying Wightman's axioms of Constructive Quantum Field Theory can be obtained. Moreover, the spectrum of the corresponding Hamilton operator is proven to be positive and bounded away from zero except for the case of the vacuum state which has vanishing energy level. The particles corresponding to all solution fields are bosons.

  9. Roger Mills County, Oklahoma: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onRAPID/Geothermal/Exploration/ColoradoRemsenburg-Speonk, NewMichigan: EnergyRocklin BiomassMountain,River,Roger Mills

  10. Pine Grove Mills, Pennsylvania: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QAsource History ViewMayo, Maryland:NPIProtectio1975) | Open EnergyPhoenicia,Creek,PilgrimGrove Mills, Pennsylvania:

  11. Deconfinement in Yang-Mills Theory through Toroidal Compactification

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Simic, Dusan; Unsal, Mithat; /Stanford U., Phys. Dept. /SLAC

    2011-08-12

    We introduce field theory techniques through which the deconfinement transition of four-dimensional Yang-Mills theory can be moved to a semi-classical domain where it becomes calculable using two-dimensional field theory. We achieve this through a double-trace deformation of toroidally compactified Yang-Mills theory on R{sup 2} x S{sub L}{sup 1} x S{sub {beta}}{sup 1}. At large N, fixed-L, and arbitrary {beta}, the thermodynamics of the deformed theory is equivalent to that of ordinary Yang-Mills theory at leading order in the large N expansion. At fixed-N, small L and a range of {beta}, the deformed theory maps to a two-dimensional theory with electric and magnetic (order and disorder) perturbations, analogs of which appear in planar spin-systems and statistical physics. We show that in this regime the deconfinement transition is driven by the competition between electric and magnetic perturbations in this two-dimensional theory. This appears to support the scenario proposed by Liao and Shuryak regarding the magnetic component of the quark-gluon plasma at RHIC.

  12. Selenium Speciation and Management in Wet FGD Systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Searcy, K; Richardson, M; Blythe, G; Wallschlaeger, D; Chu, P; Dene, C

    2012-02-29

    This report discusses results from bench- and pilot-scale simulation tests conducted to determine the factors that impact selenium speciation and phase partitioning in wet FGD systems. The selenium chemistry in wet FGD systems is highly complex and not completely understood, thus extrapolation and scale-up of these results may be uncertain. Control of operating parameters and application of scrubber additives have successfully demonstrated the avoidance or decrease of selenite oxidation at the bench and pilot scale. Ongoing efforts to improve sample handling methods for selenium speciation measurements are also discussed. Bench-scale scrubber tests explored the impacts of oxidation air rate, trace metals, scrubber additives, and natural limestone on selenium speciation in synthetic and field-generated full-scale FGD liquors. The presence and concentration of redox-active chemical species as well as the oxidation air rate contribute to the oxidation-reduction potential (ORP) conditions in FGD scrubbers. Selenite oxidation to the undesirable selenate form increases with increasing ORP conditions, and decreases with decreasing ORP conditions. Solid-phase manganese [Mn(IV)] appeared to be the significant metal impacting the oxidation of selenite to selenate. Scrubber additives were tested for their ability to inhibit selenite oxidation. Although dibasic acid and other scrubber additives showed promise in early clear liquor (sodium based and without calcium solids) bench-scale tests, these additives did not show strong inhibition of selenite oxidation in tests with higher manganese concentrations and with slurries from full-scale wet FGD systems. In bench-tests with field liquors, addition of ferric chloride at a 250:1 iron-to-selenium mass ratio sorbed all incoming selenite to the solid phase, although addition of ferric salts had no impact on native selenate that already existed in the field slurry liquor sample. As ORP increases, selenite may oxidize to selenate more rapidly than it sorbs to ferric solids. Though it was not possible to demonstrate a decrease in selenium concentrations to levels below the projectĆ?Ā¢Ć?Ā?Ć?Ā?s target of 50 Ć?Ā?Ć?Āµg/L during pilot testing, some trends observed in bench-scale testing were evident at the pilot scale. Specifically, reducing oxidation air rate and ORP tends to either retain selenium as selenite in the liquor or shift selenium phase partitioning to the solid phase. Oxidation air flow rate control may be one option for managing selenium behavior in FGD scrubbers. Units that cycle load widely may find it more difficult to impact ORP conditions with oxidation air flow rate control alone. Because decreasing oxidation air rates to the reaction tank showed that all Ć?Ā¢Ć?Ā?Ć?Ā?newĆ?Ā¢Ć?Ā?Ć?Ā¯ selenium reported to the solids, the addition of ferric chloride to the pilot scrubber could not show further improvements in selenium behavior. Ferric chloride addition did shift mercury to the slurry solids, specifically to the fine particles. Several competing pathways may govern the reporting of selenium to the slurry solids: co-precipitation with gypsum into the bulk solids and sorption or co-precipitation with iron into the fine particles. Simultaneous measurement of selenium and mercury behavior suggests a holistic management strategy is best to optimize the fate of both of these elements in FGD waters. Work conducted under this project evaluated sample handling and analytical methods for selenium speciation in FGD waters. Three analytical techniques and several preservation methods were employed. Measurements of selenium speciation over time indicated that for accurate selenium speciation, it is best to conduct measurements on unpreserved, filtered samples as soon after sampling as possible. The capital and operating costs for two selenium management strategies were considered: ferric chloride addition and oxidation air flow rate control. For ferric chloride addition, as migh

  13. Wet-sand impulse loading of metallic plates and corrugated core sandwich panels J.J. Rimoli a

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wadley, Haydn

    Wet-sand impulse loading of metallic plates and corrugated core sandwich panels J.J. Rimoli a , B the mechanical response of edge-clamped sandwich panels subject to the impact of explosively driven wet sand of wet sand placed at different standoff distances. Monolithic plates of the same alloy and mass per unit

  14. Development studies for a novel wet oxidation process. Phase 2

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1994-07-01

    DETOX{sup SM} is a catalyzed wet oxidation process which destroys organic materials in an acidic water solution of iron at 373 to 473 K. The solution can be used repeatedly to destroy great amounts of organic materials. Since the process is conducted in a contained vessel, air emissions from the process can be well controlled. The solution is also capable of dissolving and concentrating many heavy and radioactive metals for eventual stabilization and disposal. The Phase 2 effort for this project is site selection and engineering design for a DETOX demonstration unit. Site selection was made using a set of site selection criteria and evaluation factors. A survey of mixed wastes at DOE sites was conducted using the Interim Mixed Waste Inventory Report. Sites with likely suitable waste types were identified. Potential demonstration sites were ranked based on waste types, interest, regulatory needs, scheduling, ability to provide support, and available facilities. Engineering design for the demonstration unit is in progress and is being performed by Jacobs Applied Technology. The engineering design proceeded through preliminary process flow diagrams (PFDs), calculation of mass and energy balances for representative waste types, process and instrumentation diagrams (P and IDs), preparation of component specifications, and a firm cost estimate for fabrication of the demonstration unit.

  15. Tolerance and weed management systems in imidazolinone tolerant corn (Zea mays L.) 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thompson, Ann Marie

    1999-01-01

    ) Field Laboratory, near College Station TX, and at TP Farms, near Waller TX. Different imidazolinone herbicide treatments were applied to imidazolinone tolerant corn between the 2- to 3- and 6- to 8- leaf stage at 36 and 72 pa/ha to evaluate weed control...

  16. Surveys of the Logging Contractor Population 8 Southern States and Maine Cornelis F. de Hoop

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    10.0 Surveys of the Logging Contractor Population ­ 8 Southern States and Maine by Cornelis F. de. Egan Associate Professor Department of Forest Management University of Maine Orono, ME 04469-5755 W. Thus, surveys of loggers in Maine and in eight southern states were conducted to gain additional

  17. 24 Crops & Soils magazine | NovemberDecember 2013 As the last of the corn and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Isaacs, Rufus

    24 Crops & Soils magazine | November­December 2013 As the last of the corn and soybean harvest crop rotation, disease-resistant hybrid selection, optimum planting timing, and post-harvest tillage." Other claims sug- gested strobilurins improve efficient use of water and nitrogen, and improve stalk

  18. MICHIGAN'S SOIL NITRATE TEST FOR CORN MSU SOIL AND PLANT NUTRIENT LAB

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Isaacs, Rufus

    MICHIGAN'S SOIL NITRATE TEST FOR CORN MSU SOIL AND PLANT NUTRIENT LAB Michigan State University Extension Crop and Soil Sciences Department Michigan State University WHY TEST SOIL FOR NITRATES Nitrate testing of soil is an excellent and inexpensive way of evaluating the available nitrogen (N) status

  19. Agricultural Robot Turning in the Headland of Corn Fields Jinlin Xue1,a

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Agricultural Robot Turning in the Headland of Corn Fields Jinlin Xue1,a and Tony E.Grift2,b 1@illinois.edu Key words: Machine vision, Agricultural robot, Turning, Field of view Abstract. This article discusses the development of variable field of view (FOV) of camera to realize headland turning of an agricultural robot

  20. Companies Participating in the 1996 Corn Performance Trials Company Brand Address

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liskiewicz, Maciej

    CARGILL HYBRID SEEDS CARGILL PO BOX 5645 MINNEAPOLIS MN 55440 DEKALB PLANT GENETICS DEKALB 3100 SYCAMORE MYCOGEN PO BOX 68 TULIA TX 79088 NORTHRUP KING CO. NORTHRUP KING PO BOX 959 MINNEAPOLIS MN 55440 PIONEER-6000 WILSON SEEDS, INC. WILSON PO BOX 391 HARLAN IA 51537 VIRGINIA CORN PERFORMANCE TRIALS IN 1996 Coordinated

  1. Companies Participating in the 1995 Corn Performance Trials Company Brand Address

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liskiewicz, Maciej

    MINNEAPOLIS MN 55440 CAVERNDALE FARMS INC. CAVERNDALE 1921 BLUEGRASS RD DANVILLE KY 40422-9293 DEKALB PLANT MINNEAPOLIS MN 55440 PIONEER HI-BRED INT., INC. PIONEER BRAND 1000 W JEFFERSON ST TIPTON IN 46072 SOUTHERN PO BOX 391 HARLAN IA 51537 VIRGINIA CORN PERFORMANCE TRIALS IN 1995 Coordinated by H. Behl, E. R

  2. Global Indirect Effects of U.S. Corn Ethanol Production: A Review of the Evidence

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Grissino-Mayer, Henri D.

    change issues at the Center for Energy Research and Development (CERD), Nigeria from 1991-1996. HeGlobal Indirect Effects of U.S. Corn Ethanol Production: A Review of the Evidence Energy security to gasoline over the next few decades. Specifically, the Energy Independence and Security Act of 2007 (EISA

  3. Forest Fuel Reduction Survey Analysis: Forest Administrators Cornelis F. de Hoop

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Forest Fuel Reduction Survey Analysis: Forest Administrators by Cornelis F. de Hoop Amith Hanumappa to seriously investigate and execute the methods required to carry out a successful fuel reduction project operations wherein fuel reduction is a primary management objective. Literature on this wave of activity

  4. Low energy milling method, low crystallinity alloy, and negative electrode composition

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Le, Dihn B; Obrovac, Mark N; Kube, Robert Y; Landucci, James R

    2012-10-16

    A method of making nanostructured alloy particles includes milling a millbase in a pebble mill containing milling media. The millbase comprises: (i) silicon, and (ii) at least one of carbon or a transition metal, and wherein the nanostructured alloy particles are substantially free of crystalline domains greater than 50 nanometers in size. A method of making a negative electrode composition for a lithium ion battery including the nanostructured alloy particles is also disclosed.

  5. DOE to Transport Moab Mill Tailings by Rail | Department of Energy

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    and Obtains Nuclear Regulatory Commission Nod WASHINGTON, DC - The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) today reaffirmed its prior decision to relocate mill tailings predominantly...

  6. The U.S. Dry-Mill Ethanol Industry: Biobased Products and Bioenergy Initiative Success Stories

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2009-10-28

    This fact sheet provides an overview of the history of ethanol production in the United States and describes innovations in dry-mill ethanol production.

  7. Longest-Serving Active Paper Mill in the Western United States...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    opportunities in the future. Applications Steam systems are widespread in the pulp and paper industry and can account for a major part of a paper mill's energy consumption....

  8. Corn versus three sorghums grown under the same dryland conditions as feeds for growing-finishing swine 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Meadows, Doyle Gene

    1974-01-01

    , (range of 8$. 5 to 102. 4 percent) the value of corn. A wide variation existed in effic'ency due to quality of' grain and protein supplements, creating a need for m &re identification of' ration constituents, More recent trials in which high quality... The data, indicates a 5. Pjo advantage in feed efficI. ency for corn over the average of the sorghum diets ($. 15 vs. 3. 27) . The advan- tage for corn in feed ef'ficiency is less than has been reported by Peo and. Hudman (1958), 11. II@; Danielson and...

  9. Reduction of Water Use in Wet FGD Systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    David Rencher

    2008-06-30

    Cooperative Agreement DE-FC26-06NT42726 was established in January 2006, and is current through Amendment 2, April 2006. The current reporting period, April 1, 2008 through June 30, 2008, is the eighth progress-reporting period for the project. However, this report will be the final report (instead of a quarterly report) because this project is being terminated. Efforts to bring this project to a close over the past several months focused on internal project discussions, and subsequent communications with NETL, regarding the inherent difficulty with completing this project as originally scoped, and the option of performing an engineering study to accomplish some of the chief project objectives. However, NETL decided that the engineering study did indeed constitute a significant scope deviation from the original concepts, and that pursuit of this option was not recommended. These discussions are summarized in the Results and Discussion, and the Conclusion sections. The objective of this project by a team lead by URS Group was to demonstrate the use of regenerative heat exchange to reduce flue gas temperature and minimize evaporative water consumption in wet flue gas desulphurization (FGD) systems on coal-fired boilers. Furthermore, the project intended to demonstrate that regenerative heat exchange to cool flue gas upstream of the electrostatic precipitator (ESP) and reheat flue gas downstream of the FGD system would result in the following benefits to air pollution control (APC) systems on coal-fired power plants: (1) Improve ESP performance due to reduced gas volume and improved ash resistivity characteristics, (2) Control SO3 emissions through condensation on the fly ash, and (3) Avoid the need to install wet stacks or to provide flue gas reheat. Finally, operation at cooler flue gas temperatures offered the potential benefit of increasing mercury (Hg) removal across the ESP and FGD systems. This project planned to conduct pilot-scale tests of regenerative heat exchange to determine the reduction in FGD water consumption that can be achieved and assess the resulting impact on APC systems. An analysis of the improvement in the performance of the APC systems and the resulting reduction in capital and operating costs were going to be conducted. The tests were intended to determine the impact of operation of cooling flue gas temperatures on FGD water consumption, ESP particulate removal, SO{sub 3} removal, and Hg removal, and to assess the potential negative impact of excessive corrosion rates in the regenerative heat exchanger. Testing was going to be conducted on Columbian coal (with properties similar to low-sulfur Eastern bituminous coal) and SO{sub 3} will be spiked onto the flue gas to simulate operation with higher SO{sub 3} concentrations resulting from firing a higher sulfur coal, or operating with a selective catalytic reduction (SCR) unit. The project was also going to include associate planning, laboratory analytical support, reporting, and management activities. The URS project team finalized a conceptual alternative approach to demonstrate, via an engineering study, the use of regenerative heat exchange to reduce flue gas temperature and minimize evaporative water consumption. This idea was presented in summary format to NETL for consideration. NETL determined that this alternative approach deviated from the original project objectives, and that it would be in the best interest of all parties involved to cancel the project.

  10. Summary of the engineering assessment of inactive uranium mill tailings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    none,

    1981-07-01

    The Grand Junction site has been reevaluated in order to revise the october 1977 engineering assessment of the problems resulting from the existence of radioactive uranium mill tailings at Grand Junction, Colorado. This engineering assessment has included the preparation of topographic maps, the performance of core drillings and radiometric measurements sufficient to determine areas and volumes of tailings and radiation exposures of individuals and nearby populations, the investigations of site hydrology and meteorology, and the evaluation and costing of alternative corrective actions. Radon gas released from the 1.9 million tons of tailings at the Grand Junction site constitutes the most significant environmental impact, although windblown tailings and external gamma radiation are also factors. The eight alternative actions presented herein range from millsite and off-site decontamination with the addition of 3 m of stabilization cover material (Option I), to removal of the tailings to remote disposal sites and decontamination of the tailings site (Option II through VIII). Cost estimates for the eight options range from about $10,200,000 for stabilization in-place to about $39,500,000 for disposal in the DeBeque area, at a distance of about 35 mi, using transportation by rail. If transportation to DeBeque were by truck, the cost is estimated to be about $41,900,000. Three prinicpal alternatives for the reprocessing of the Grand Junction tailings were examined: (a) heap leaching; (b) treatment at an existing mill; and (c) reprocessing at a new conventional mill constructed for tailings reprocessing. The cost of the uranium recovered would be about $200/lb by heap leach and $150/lb by conventional plant processes. The spot market price for uranium was $25/lb early in 1981. Therefore, reprocessing the tailings for uranium recovery appears not to be economically attractive.

  11. Assessment of an Industrial Wet Oxidation System for Burning Waste and Low-Grade Fuels 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bettinger, J.; Koppel, P.; Margulies, A.

    1988-01-01

    of subcritical and supercritical wet oxidation technologies to chemical, food processing, pharmaceutical, wood-pulping, and coal-washing wastes. Each application is evaluated for technical and economic feasibility as well as its national applicability...

  12. Mars Surveyor Program '01 Mars Environmental Compatibility Assessment wet chemistry lab

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kounaves, Samuel P.

    Mars Surveyor Program '01 Mars Environmental Compatibility Assessment wet chemistry lab: A sensor Department of Chemistry, Tufts University, Medford, Massachusetts, USA Michael H. Hecht, Sabrina M. Grannan] The Mars Environmental Compatibility Assessment (MECA) instrument was designed, built, and flight qualified

  13. Exploring plastron stability and fluid friction reduction on robust micro-textured non-wetting surfaces

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Srinivasan, Siddarth, Ph. D. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

    2015-01-01

    Non-wetting surfaces are characterized by the presence of stable pockets of vapor trapped within the asperities of the surface morphology. The utility of these surfaces in reducing skin friction in viscous laminar and ...

  14. Wetting hysteresis and droplet roll off behavior on superhydrophobic surfaces by Katherine Marie Smyth.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Smyth, Katherine Marie

    2010-01-01

    Various states of hydrophobic wetting and hysteresis are observed when water droplets are deposited on micro-post surfaces of different post densities. Hysteresis is commonly defined as the difference between the advancing ...

  15. Assessing Evapotranspiration Estimates from the Global Soil Wetness Project Phase 2 (GSWP-2) Simulations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gao, Xiang

    We assess the simulations of global-scale evapotranspiration from the Global Soil Wetness Project Phase 2 (GSWP-2) within a global water-budget framework. The scatter in the GSWP-2 global evapotranspiration estimates from ...

  16. Wetting and phase-change phenomena on micro/nanostructures for enhanced heat transfer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Xiao, Rong, Ph. D. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

    2013-01-01

    Micro/nanostructures have been extensively studied to amplify the intrinsic wettability of materials to create superhydrophilic or superhydrophobic surfaces. Such extreme wetting properties can influence the heat transfer ...

  17. Simulation of Oil Displacement from Oil-Wet Cores by Interfacial Tension Reduction and Wettability Alteration

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kalaei, Mohammad Hosein

    2010-01-29

    Waterflooding in oil-wet naturally fractured reservoirs is not successful because the ability of matrix blocks to imbibe the injected water and displace the oil into the fracture system is poor. Chemical enhanced oil recovery methods...

  18. MHK Projects/US Navy Wave Energy Technology WET Program at Marine...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    MHK ProjectsUS Navy Wave Energy Technology WET Program at Marine Corps Base Hawaii MCBH < MHK Projects Jump to: navigation, search << Return to the MHK database homepage Loading...

  19. Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action Project environmental protection implementation plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-10-01

    The Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project Environmental Protection Implementation Plan (EPIP) has been prepared in accordance with the requirements of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Order 5400.1. The UMTRA EPIP is updated annually. This version covers the time period of 9 November 1994, through 8 November 1995. Its purpose is to provide management direction to ensure that the UMTRA Project is operated and managed in a manner that will protect, maintain, and where necessary, restore environmental quality, minimize potential threats to public health and the environment, and comply with environmental regulations and DOE policies.

  20. Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action Project. 1995 Environmental Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1996-06-01

    In accordance with U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Order 23 1. 1, Environment, Safety and Health Reporting, the DOE prepares an annual report to document the activities of the Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project environmental monitoring program. This monitoring must comply with appropriate laws, regulations, and standards, and it must identify apparent and meaningful trends in monitoring results. The results of all monitoring activities must be communicated to the public. The UMTRA Project has prepared annual environmental reports to the public since 1989.

  1. Loop formulation of supersymmetric Yang-Mills quantum mechanics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kyle Steinhauer; Urs Wenger

    2014-10-01

    We derive the fermion loop formulation of N=4 supersymmetric SU(N) Yang-Mills quantum mechanics on the lattice. The loop formulation naturally separates the contributions to the partition function into its bosonic and fermionic parts with fixed fermion number and provides a way to control potential fermion sign problems arising in numerical simulations of the theory. Furthermore, we present a reduced fermion matrix determinant which allows the projection into the canonical sectors of the theory and hence constitutes an alternative approach to simulate the theory on the lattice.

  2. The lattice and quantized Yang-Mills theory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Creutz, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Quantized Yang-Mills fields lie at the heart of our understanding of the strong nuclear force. To understand the theory at low energies, we must work in the strong coupling regime. The primary technique for this is the lattice. While basically an ultraviolet regulator, the lattice avoids the use of a perturbative expansion. I discuss the historical circumstances that drove us to this approach, which has had immense success, convincingly demonstrating quark confinement and obtaining crucial properties of the strong interactions from first principles.

  3. The lattice and quantized Yang-Mills theory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Michael Creutz

    2015-10-07

    Quantized Yang-Mills fields lie at the heart of our understanding of the strong nuclear force. To understand the theory at low energies, we must work in the strong coupling regime. The primary technique for this is the lattice. While basically an ultraviolet regulator, the lattice avoids the use of a perturbative expansion. I discuss the historical circumstances that drove us to this approach, which has had immense success, convincingly demonstrating quark confinement and obtaining crucial properties of the strong interactions from first principles.

  4. Supersymmetry Algebra in Super Yang-Mills Theories

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shuichi Yokoyama

    2015-09-18

    We compute supersymmetry algebra (superalgebra) in supersymmetric Yang-Mills theories (SYM) consisting of a vector multiplet including fermionic contribution in six dimensions. We show that the contribution of fermion is given by boundary terms. From six dimensional results we determine superalgebras of five and four dimensional SYM by dimensional reduction. In five dimensional superalgebra the Kaluza-Klein momentum and the instanton particle charge are not the same but algebraically indistinguishable. We also extend this calculation including a hyper multiplet and for maximally SYM. We derive extended supersymmetry algebras in these four dimensional SYM with the holomorphic coupling constant given in hep-th/9408099.

  5. Semiclassical solution for Yang-Mills field with given energy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Michael Kuchiev

    2009-04-28

    A new classical solution for the Yang-Mills theory in which the Euclidean energy plays a role of a parameter is discussed. The instanton and sphaleron are shown to be particular examples of this more general solution. The energy parameter for them takes on special values, which are zero and sphaleron mass for the instanton and sphaleron, respectively. The solution is employed to describe the tunneling process, which is accompanied by a variation of the topological charge. A range of temperatures, where the new solution makes this tunneling more effective than the known mechanisms based on the instanton, caloron or sphaleron is found.

  6. Fusion hierarchies for N = 4 superYang-Mills theory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. V. Belitsky

    2008-04-12

    We employ the analytic Bethe Anzats to construct eigenvalues of transfer matrices with finite-dimensional atypical representations in the auxiliary space for the putative long-range spin chain encoding anomalous dimensions of all composite single-trace gauge invariant operators of the maximally supersymmetric Yang-Mills theory. They obey an infinite fusion hierarchy which can be reduced to a finite set of integral relations for a minimal set of transfer matrices. This set is used to derive a finite systems of functional equations for eigenvalues of nested Baxter polynomials.

  7. Supersymmetry Algebra in Super Yang-Mills Theories

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yokoyama, Shuichi

    2015-01-01

    We compute supersymmetry algebra (superalgebra) in supersymmetric Yang-Mills theories (SYM) consisting of a vector multiplet including fermionic contribution in six dimensions. We show that the contribution of fermion is given by boundary terms. From six dimensional results we determine superalgebras of five and four dimensional SYM by dimensional reduction. In five dimensional superalgebra the Kaluza-Klein momentum and the instanton particle charge are not the same but algebraically indistinguishable. We also extend this calculation including a hyper multiplet and for maximally SYM. We derive extended supersymmetry algebras in those four dimensional SYM with the holomorphic coupling constant given in hep-th/9408099.

  8. Width of the Confining String in Yang-Mills Theory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gliozzi, F.; Pepe, M.; Wiese, U.-J.

    2010-06-11

    We investigate the transverse fluctuations of the confining string connecting two static quarks in (2+1)D SU(2) Yang-Mills theory using Monte Carlo calculations. The exponentially suppressed signal is extracted from the large noise by a very efficient multilevel algorithm. The resulting width of the string increases logarithmically with the distance between the static quark charges. Corrections at intermediate distances due to universal higher-order terms in the effective string action are calculated analytically. They accurately fit the numerical data.

  9. DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Loma Mill - CO 03

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefield Municipal Gas &SCE-SessionsSouth Dakota Edgemont,Manufacturing - OH 40Loma Mill - CO 03 FUSRAP

  10. DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Lowman Mill Site - ID 01

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefield Municipal Gas &SCE-SessionsSouth Dakota Edgemont,Manufacturing - OH 40Loma Mill - COIdahoLowman

  11. DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Marion Mill Site - CO 09

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefield Municipal Gas &SCE-SessionsSouth Dakota Edgemont,Manufacturing - OH 40Loma MillEngineer Depot

  12. Howrah Mills Co Ltd HMCL | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QAsource History View NewTexas: Energy Resources JumpNew Jersey:Hopkinsville,AdvancedHowell County,Howrah Mills Co

  13. Gang Mills, New York: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QAsource History View New PagesSustainable UrbanKentucky: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation,Flint1987)Gang Mills,

  14. Nahar Spinning Mills Ltd NSML | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIX ECoop Inc Jump to: navigation,MeregNIFESpinning Mills Ltd NSML Jump to: navigation,

  15. Tamil Nadu Spinning Mills Association TASMA | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIX ECoop Inc JumpHeter BatterySolarfinMarketMemberI P RuralTaigaValley E P AEnergyMills

  16. Anderson Mill, Texas: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION JEnvironmental Jump to:EAandAmminex A S Jump to: navigation,InofMill, Texas: Energy Resources Jump

  17. WETTABILITY AND IMBIBITION: MICROSCOPIC DISTRIBUTION OF WETTING AND ITS CONSEQUENCES AT THE CORE AND FIELD SCALES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jill S. Buckley; Norman R. Morrow; Chris Palmer; Purnendu K. Dasgupta

    2003-02-01

    The questions of reservoir wettability have been approached in this project from three directions. First, we have studied the properties of crude oils that contribute to wetting alteration in a reservoir. A database of more than 150 different crude oil samples has been established to facilitate examination of the relationships between crude oil chemical and physical properties and their influence on reservoir wetting. In the course of this work an improved SARA analysis technique was developed and major advances were made in understanding asphaltene stability including development of a thermodynamic Asphaltene Solubility Model (ASM) and empirical methods for predicting the onset of instability. The CO-Wet database is a resource that will be used to guide wettability research in the future. The second approach is to study crude oil/brine/rock interactions on smooth surfaces. Contact angle measurements were made under controlled conditions on mica surfaces that had been exposed to many of the oils in the CO-Wet database. With this wealth of data, statistical tests can now be used to examine the relationships between crude oil properties and the tendencies of those oils to alter wetting. Traditionally, contact angles have been used as the primary wetting assessment tool on smooth surfaces. A new technique has been developed using an atomic forces microscope that adds a new dimension to the ability to characterize oil-treated surfaces. Ultimately we aim to understand wetting in porous media, the focus of the third approach taken in this project. Using oils from the CO-Wet database, experimental advances have been made in scaling the rate of imbibition, a sensitive measure of core wetting. Application of the scaling group to mixed-wet systems has been demonstrated for a range of core conditions. Investigations of imbibition in gas/liquid systems provided the motivation for theoretical advances as well. As a result of this project we have many new tools for studying wetting at microscopic and macroscopic scales and a library of well-characterized fluids for use in studies of crude oil/brine/rock interactions.

  18. Heat Transfer Characteristics of the Wet Thermal Insulator with Multi-layer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jong-Won Kim; Goon-Cherl Park; Tae-Wan Kim; Doo-Jeong Lee

    2006-07-01

    SMART developed in KAERI is an integral type nuclear cogeneration reactor. SMART uses a nitrogen-filled gas pressurizer so that the steam partial pressure should be minimized and the pressurizer should be under low temperature condition. To sustain the low temperature condition, the wet thermal insulator and pressurizer cooler are installed in the pressurizer. Since the performance of wet thermal insulator is an important parameter to determine the size of the pressurizer cooler, it is important to evaluate the insulation performance of the wet thermal insulator. The wet thermal insulators with 20 layers are installed in SMART. In the design of SMART, the empirical correlation by Adamovich was used to estimate the thermal resistance of the wet thermal insulator. However, the experimental condition and results are not clear so that this correlation should be verified. To analyze the heat transfer characteristics of the multi-layer wet thermal insulator, natural convective heat transport through horizontal and vertical water-filled layers is investigated. Experiments and numerical analyses have been performed to evaluate the heat transfer rates through multi-layer and verify Adamovich correlation. In addition, a new multi-layer correlation was obtained. (authors)

  19. Building Technologies Program: Tax Deduction Qualified Software- Owens Corning Commercial Energy Calculator (OC-CEC) version 1.1

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Provides required documentation that Owens Corning Commercial Energy Calculator (OC-CEC) version 1.1 meets Internal Revenue Code §179D, Notice 2006-52, dated June 2, 2006, for calculating commercial building energy and power cost savings.

  20. Preparation of Micrometer-to Sub-micrometer-Sized Nanostructured Silica Particles Using High-Energy Ball Milling

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mitchell, Brian S.

    ,* and Yunfeng Lu Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering, Tulane University, New Orleans, Louisiana such as milling media (zirconia, stainless steel, or steel- centered nylon balls), milling time, and the presence

  1. Quantifying Cradle-to-Farm Gate Life-Cycle Impacts Associated with Fertilizer used for Corn, Soybean, and Stover Production

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Powers, S. E.

    2005-05-01

    Fertilizer use can cause environmental problems, particular eutrophication of water bodies from excess nitrogen or phosphorus. Increased fertilizer runoff is a concern for harvesting corn stover for ethanol production. This modeling study found that eutrophication potential for the base case already exceeds proposed water quality standards, that switching to no-till cultivation and collecting stover increased that eutrophication potential by 21%, and that switching to continuous-corn production on top of that would triple eutrophication potential.

  2. The effect of enzymes and hydrocolloids on the texture of tortillas from fresh nixtamalized masa and nixtamalized corn flour 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gutierrez de Velasco, Arturo Carlos

    2004-09-30

    THE EFFECT OF ENZYMES AND HYDROCOLLOIDS ON THE TEXTURE OF TORTILLAS FROM FRESH NIXTAMALIZED MASA AND NIXTAMALIZED CORN FLOUR A Thesis by ARTURO CARLOS GUTIERREZ DE VELASCO ALVAREZ Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A... MASA AND NIXTAMALIZED CORN FLOUR A Thesis by ARTURO CARLOS GUTIERREZ DE VELASCO ALVAREZ Submitted to Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE Approved as to style...

  3. BIOMASS AND BLACK LIQUOR GASIFIER/GAS TURBINE COGENERATION AT PULP AND PAPER MILLS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    /steamturbinetechnologies. Gasification technologies under development will allow biomass-derived fuels to be usedto fuel gasturbine gasification. The use of biomass fuels with gas turbines could transform a typical pulp mill from a netBIOMASS AND BLACK LIQUOR GASIFIER/GAS TURBINE COGENERATION AT PULP AND PAPER MILLS ERIC D. LARSON

  4. Color Removal from Pulp Mill Effluent Using Coal Ash Produced from Georgia Coal Combustion Power Plants

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hutcheon, James M.

    Color Removal from Pulp Mill Effluent Using Coal Ash Produced from Georgia Coal Combustion Power color from pulp mill effluent using coal ash. Prevent coal ash adsorbent from leaching arsenic, chromium, lead, and zinc. Define a treatment procedure using coal ash that will result in the maximum

  5. Optimizing the Utility System of a Tissue Paper Mill Using Pinch Technology 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kumana, J. D.; Sung, R. D.

    1989-01-01

    A tissue paper mill in southern California had existing utility demands of 7.1 MW for the tissue mill (13 MW for the whole site), and 55 MM Btu/hr of fuel gas for the steam boiler. Total utility costs were $12 MM per year. ...

  6. Liner evaluation for uranium mill tailings. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Buelt, J.L. (comp.)

    1983-09-01

    The Liner Evaluation for Uranium Mill Tailings Program was conducted to evaluate the need for and performance of prospective lining materials for the long-term management of inactive uranium mill tailings piles. On the basis of program results, two materials have been identified: natural foundation soil amended with 10% sodium bentonite; catalytic airblown asphalt membrane. The study showed that, for most situations, calcareous soils typical of Western US sites adequately buffer tailings leachates and prevent groundwater contamination without additional liner materials or amendments. Although mathematical modeling of disposal sites is recommended on a site-specific basis, there appears to be no reason to expect significant infiltration through the cover for most Western sites. The major water source through the tailings would be groundwater movement at sites with shallow groundwater tables. Even so column leaching studies showed that contaminant source terms were reduced to near maximum contaminant levels (MCL's) for drinking water within one or two pore volumes; thus, a limited source term for groundwater contamination exists. At sites where significant groundwater movement or infiltration is expected and the tailings leachates are alkaline, however, the sodium bentonite or asphalt membrane may be necessary.

  7. Magnetic Interactions in Ball-Milled Spinel Ferrites

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Goya, Gerardo F

    2011-01-01

    Spinel Fe3O4 nanoparticles have been produced through ball milling in methyl-alcohol (CH3OH), aiming to obtain samples with similar average particle sizes and different interparticle interactions. Three samples having Fe3O4/CH3(OH) mass ratios R of 3 %, 10 % and 50 % wt. were milled for several hours until particle size reached a steady value ( ~ 7-10 nm). A detailed study of static and dynamic magnetic properties has been undertaken by measuring magnetization, ac susceptibility and M\\"ossbauer data. As expected for small particles, the Verwey transition was not observed, but instead superparamagnetic (SPM) behavior was found with transition to a blocked state at TB ~ 10-20 K. Spin disorder of the resulting particles, independent of its concentration, was inferred from the decrease of saturation magnetization MS at low temperatures. For samples having 3% wt. of magnetic particles, dynamic ac susceptibility measurements show a thermally activated Arrhenius dependence of the blocking temperature with applied f...

  8. Fuel ethanol produced from U.S. Midwest corn : help or hindrance to the vision of Kyoto?

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang, M.; Saricks, C.; Wu, M.; Energy Systems

    1999-07-01

    In this study, we examined the role of corn-feedstock ethanol in reducing greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions, given present and near-future technology and practice for corn farming and ethanol production. We analyzed the full-fuel-cycle GHG effects of corn-based ethanol using updated information on corn operations in the upper Midwest and existing ethanol production technologies. Information was obtained from representatives of the U.S. Department of Agriculture, faculty of midwestern universities with expertise in corn production and animal feed, and acknowledged authorities in the field of ethanol plant engineering, design, and operations. Cases examined included use of E85 (85% ethanol and 15% gasoline by volume) and E10 (10% ethanol and 90% gasoline). Among key findings is that Midwest-produced ethanol outperforms conventional (current) and reformulated (future) gasoline with respect to energy use and GHG emissions (on a mass emission per travel mile basis). The superiority of the energy and GHG results is well outside the range of model noise. An important facet of this work has been conducting sensitivity analyses. These analyses let us rank the factors in the corn-to-ethanol cycle that are most important for limiting GHG generation. These rankings could help ensure that efforts to reduce that generation are targeted more effectively.

  9. Energy and greenhouse gas emission effects of corn and cellulosic ethanol with technology improvements and land use changes.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang, M.; Han, J.; Haq, Z; Tyner, .W.; Wu, M.; Elgowainy, A.

    2011-05-01

    Use of ethanol as a transportation fuel in the United States has grown from 76 dam{sup 3} in 1980 to over 40.1 hm{sup 3} in 2009 - and virtually all of it has been produced from corn. It has been debated whether using corn ethanol results in any energy and greenhouse gas benefits. This issue has been especially critical in the past several years, when indirect effects, such as indirect land use changes, associated with U.S. corn ethanol production are considered in evaluation. In the past three years, modeling of direct and indirect land use changes related to the production of corn ethanol has advanced significantly. Meanwhile, technology improvements in key stages of the ethanol life cycle (such as corn farming and ethanol production) have been made. With updated simulation results of direct and indirect land use changes and observed technology improvements in the past several years, we conducted a life-cycle analysis of ethanol and show that at present and in the near future, using corn ethanol reduces greenhouse gas emission by more than 20%, relative to those of petroleum gasoline. On the other hand, second-generation ethanol could achieve much higher reductions in greenhouse gas emissions. In a broader sense, sound evaluation of U.S. biofuel policies should account for both unanticipated consequences and technology potentials. We maintain that the usefulness of such evaluations is to provide insight into how to prevent unanticipated consequences and how to promote efficient technologies with policy intervention.

  10. Life-cycle assessment of corn-based butanol as a potential transportation fuel.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wu, M.; Wang, M.; Liu, J.; Huo, H.; Energy Systems

    2007-12-31

    Butanol produced from bio-sources (such as corn) could have attractive properties as a transportation fuel. Production of butanol through a fermentation process called acetone-butanol-ethanol (ABE) has been the focus of increasing research and development efforts. Advances in ABE process development in recent years have led to drastic increases in ABE productivity and yields, making butanol production worthy of evaluation for use in motor vehicles. Consequently, chemical/fuel industries have announced their intention to produce butanol from bio-based materials. The purpose of this study is to estimate the potential life-cycle energy and emission effects associated with using bio-butanol as a transportation fuel. The study employs a well-to-wheels analysis tool--the Greenhouse Gases, Regulated Emissions and Energy Use in Transportation (GREET) model developed at Argonne National Laboratory--and the Aspen Plus{reg_sign} model developed by AspenTech. The study describes the butanol production from corn, including grain processing, fermentation, gas stripping, distillation, and adsorption for products separation. The Aspen{reg_sign} results that we obtained for the corn-to-butanol production process provide the basis for GREET modeling to estimate life-cycle energy use and greenhouse gas emissions. The GREET model was expanded to simulate the bio-butanol life cycle, from agricultural chemical production to butanol use in motor vehicles. We then compared the results for bio-butanol with those of conventional gasoline. We also analyzed the bio-acetone that is coproduced with bio-butanol as an alternative to petroleum-based acetone. Our study shows that, while the use of corn-based butanol achieves energy benefits and reduces greenhouse gas emissions, the results are affected by the methods used to treat the acetone that is co-produced in butanol plants.

  11. Influence of Cropping Systems On Cotton and Corn Yields on the Gulf Coast Prairie. 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jeter, B. E.; Smith, J. C.; Whiteley, E. L.

    1962-01-01

    and better stands of cotton were obtained. The main disadvantage of this system was that two planting operations a year were re- quired. Cropping systems containing Dallisgrass and White clover are more highly recommended than all other systems tested... clover can cause bloat in cattle; (3) 2 years are needed to obtain high forage yields and (4) it is difficult to obtain a good seedbed for corn or cotton when the land goes out of forage production. Dallisgrass and White clover produced higher...

  12. Wet-spinnability and crosslinked fibre properties of two collagen polypeptides with varied molecular weight

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Giuseppe Tronci; Ramya Sri Kanuparti; M. Tarik Arafat; Jie Yin; David J. Wood; Stephen J. Russell

    2015-07-26

    The formation of naturally-derived materials with wet stable fibrous architectures is paramount in order to mimic the features of tissues at the molecular and microscopic scale. Here, we investigated the formation of wet-spun fibres based on collagen-derived polypeptides with comparable chemical composition and varied molecular weight. Gelatin and hydrolysed fish collagen (HFC) were selected as widely-available linear amino-acidic chains of high and low molecular weight, respectively, and functionalised in the wet-spun fibre state in order to preserve the material geometry in physiological conditions. Wet-spun fibre diameter and morphology were dramatically affected depending on the polypeptide molecular weight, wet-spinning solvent (i.e. 2,2,2-Trifluoroethanol and dimethyl sulfoxide) and coagulating medium (i.e. acetone and ethanol), resulting in either bulky or porous internal geometry. Dry-state tensile moduli were significantly enhanced in gelatin and HFC samples following covalent crosslinking with activated 1,3 phenylenediacetic acid (Ph) (E: 726 +/- 43 - 844 +/- 85 MPa), compared to samples crosslinked via intramolecular carbodiimide-mediated condensation reaction (E: 588 +/- 38 MPa). Resulting fibres displayed a dry diameter in the range of 238 +/- 18 - 355 +/- 28 micron and proved to be mechanically-stable (E: 230 kPa) following equilibration with PBS, whilst a nearly-complete degradation was observed after 5-day incubation in physiological conditions.

  13. Microbial Enhanced Oil Recovery in Fractional-Wet Systems: A Pore-Scale Investigation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Armstrong, Ryan T.; Wildenschild, Dorthe

    2012-10-24

    Microbial enhanced oil recovery (MEOR) is a technology that could potentially increase the tertiary recovery of oil from mature oil formations. However, the efficacy of this technology in fractional-wet systems is unknown, and the mechanisms involved in oil mobilization therefore need further investigation. Our MEOR strategy consists of the injection of ex situ produced metabolic byproducts produced by Bacillus mojavensis JF-2 (which lower interfacial tension (IFT) via biosurfactant production) into fractional-wet cores containing residual oil. Two different MEOR flooding solutions were tested; one solution contained both microbes and metabolic byproducts while the other contained only the metabolic byproducts. The columns were imaged with X-ray computed microtomography (CMT) after water flooding, and after MEOR, which allowed for the evaluation of the pore-scale processes taking place during MEOR. Results indicate that the larger residual oil blobs and residual oil held under relatively low capillary pressures were the main fractions recovered during MEOR. Residual oil saturation, interfacial curvatures, and oil blob sizes were measured from the CMT images and used to develop a conceptual model for MEOR in fractional-wet systems. Overall, results indicate that MEOR was effective at recovering oil from fractional-wet systems with reported additional oil recovered (AOR) values between 44 and 80%; the highest AOR values were observed in the most oil-wet system.

  14. Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action Project 1993 Environmental Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-10-01

    This annual report documents the Uranium Mill Tailing Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project environmental monitoring and protection program. The UMTRA Project routinely monitors radiation, radioactive residual materials, and hazardous constituents at associated former uranium tailings processing sites and disposal sites. At the end of 1993, surface remedial action was complete at 10 of the 24 designated UMTRA Project processing sites. In 1993 the UMTRA Project office revised the UMTRA Project Environmental Protection Implementation Plan, as required by the US DOE. Because the UMTRA Project sites are in different stages of remedial action, the breadth of the UMTRA environmental protection program differs from site to site. In general, sites actively undergoing surface remedial action have the most comprehensive environmental programs for sampling media. At sites where surface remedial action is complete and at sites where remedial action has not yet begun, the environmental program consists primarily of surface water and ground water monitoring to support site characterization, baseline risk assessments, or disposal site performance assessments.

  15. Recombination of H and He in Yang-Mills Gravity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Daniel Katz

    2015-06-26

    We investigate some aspects of the thermal history of the early universe according to Yang-Mills Gravity (YMG); a gauge theory of gravity set in flat spacetime. Specifically, equations for the ionization fractions of hydrogen and singly ionized helium during the recombination epoch are deduced analytically and then solved numerically. By considering several approximations we find that the presence of primordial helium and its interaction with Lyman series photons has a much stronger effect on the overall free electron density in YMG than it does in the standard, General Relativity (GR) based, model. Compared to the standard model recombination happens over a much larger range of temperatures, although there is still a very sharp temperature of last scattering around 2000 K. Since the ionization history of the universe is not directly observable we discuss how one may use it to predict the CMB power spectrum and thus test YMG. This topic will be explored in detail in an upcoming paper.

  16. Dual superconductivity and vacuum properties in Yang--Mills theories

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. D'Alessandro; M. D'Elia; L. Tagliacozzo

    2007-05-03

    We address, within the dual superconductivity model for color confinement, the question whether the Yang-Mills vacuum behaves as a superconductor of type I or type II. In order to do that we compare, for the theory with gauge group SU(2), the determination of the field penetration depth $\\lambda$ with that of the superconductor correlation length $\\xi$. The latter is obtained by measuring the temporal correlator of a disorder parameter developed by the Pisa group to detect dual superconductivity. The comparison places the vacuum close to the border between type I and type II and marginally on the type II side. We also check our results against the study of directly measurable effects such as the interaction between two parallel flux tubes, obtaining consistent indications for a weak repulsive behaviour. Future strategies to improve our investigation are discussed.

  17. Mine-to-Mill Optimization of Aggregate Production

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Greg Adel; Toni Kojovic; Darren Thornton

    2006-09-30

    Mine-to-Mill optimization is a total systems approach to the reduction of energy and cost in mining and processing. Developed at the Julius Krutschnitt Mineral Research Center in Queensland, Australia, the Mine-to-Mill approach attempts to minimize energy consumption through optimization of all steps in the size reduction process. The approach involves sampling and modeling of blasting and processing, followed by computer simulation to optimize the operation and develop alternatives. The most promising alternatives are implemented, and sampling is conducted to quantify benefits. In the current project, the primary objective was to adapt Mine-to-Mill technology to the aggregates industry. The first phase of this work was carried out at the Bealeton Quarry near Fredericksburg, Virginia. The second phase was carried out at the Pittsboro Quarry south of Chapel Hill, North Carolina. Both quarries are operated by Luck Stone Corporation of Richmond, Virginia. As a result of the work, several conclusions can be drawn from the project which should assist DOE in assessing the applicability of the Mine-to-Mill approach to the aggregates industry. 1. Implementation of MTM guidelines at Pittsboro has resulted in tangible improvements in productivity. It is clear that MTM guidelines represent an energy savings of around 5% (primary and secondary) and an overall energy savings of 1%. This 1-5% energy savings is also consistent with simulated results for Bealeton had side-by-side shots used to evaluate the technology been carried out in the same rockmass. 2. Luck Stone clearly runs their operations at a high standard. Hence the percentage improvement realized in this project may represent the lower end of what might be expected overall in the aggregates industry. 3. Variability in ore types across both Bealeton and Pittsboro suggests a 2:1 difference in hardness which contradicts the misconception that quarry rock is homogenous. Therefore, the idea of comparing side-by-side blasts is not viable and long term comparisons stand the best chance of confirming the benefits of optimized blasting. 4. There are clear limitations on how much improvement can be made in the aggregate industry due to the fixed feed size that reports to the tertiary section of a typical aggregate plant. These limitations restrict the MTM approach from exercising significant increases in blasting which would only serve to increase fines and reduce product yield. 5. The key to success at Pittsboro was the development of MTM guidelines for the modified blasting practice in consultation with the drill & blast crew. Their full buy-in was necessary to implement optimized blasting in a sustained manner. 6. The JKSimBlast and JKSimMet models have proven to be effective tools for examining blasting and processing at Bealeton and Pittsboro. These models should enable Luck Stone to transfer the MTM approach to other sites.

  18. Perturbative study of Yang-Mills theory in the infrared

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Siringo, Fabio

    2015-01-01

    Pure Yang-Mills SU(N) theory is studied in four dimensional space and Landau gauge by a double perturbative expansion based on a massive free-particle propagator. By dimensional regularization, all diverging mass terms cancel exactly in the double expansion, without the need to include mass counterterms that would spoil the symmetry of the original Lagrangian. The emerging perturbation theory is safe in the infrared and shares the same behaviour of the standard perturbation theory in the UV. At one-loop, Gluon and ghost propagators are found in excellent agreement with the data of lattice simulations and an infrared-safe running coupling is derived. A natural scale m=0.5-0.6 GeV is extracted from the data for N=3.

  19. An investigation into the predictive performance of pavement marking retroreflectivity measured under various conditions of continuous wetting 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pike, Adam Matthew

    2007-04-25

    This thesis research investigated the predictive performance of pavement marking retroreflectivity measured under various conditions of continuous wetting. The researcher compared nighttime detection distance of pavement ...

  20. Air Entrainment in Dynamic Wetting: Knudsen Effects and the Influence of Ambient Air Pressure

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sprittles, James E

    2015-01-01

    Recent experiments on coating flows and liquid drop impact both demonstrate that wetting failures caused by air entrainment can be suppressed by reducing the ambient gas pressure. Here, it is shown that non-equilibrium effects in the gas can account for this behaviour, with ambient pressure reductions increasing the gas' mean free path and hence the Knudsen number $Kn$. These effects first manifest themselves through Maxwell slip at the gas' boundaries so that for sufficiently small $Kn$ they can be incorporated into a continuum model for dynamic wetting flows. The resulting mathematical model contains flow structures on the nano-, micro- and milli-metre scales and is implemented into a computational platform developed specifically for such multiscale phenomena. The coating flow geometry is used to show that for a fixed gas-liquid-solid system (a) the increased Maxwell slip at reduced pressures can substantially delay air entrainment, i.e. increase the `maximum speed of wetting', (b) unbounded maximum speeds ...

  1. The Spectrum of Softly Broken N=1 Supersymmetric Yang-Mills Theory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    G. R. Farrar; G. Gabadadze; M. Schwetz

    1998-06-24

    We study the spectrum of the softly broken generalized Veneziano-Yankielowicz effective action for N=1 SUSY Yang-Mills theory. Two dual formulations of the effective action are given. The spurion method is used for the soft SUSY breaking. Masses of the bound states are calculated and mixing patterns are discussed. Mass splittings of pure gluonic states are consistent with predictions of conventional Yang-Mills theory. The results can be tested in lattice simulations of the SUSY Yang-Mills model.

  2. Titania Prepared by Ball Milling: Its Characterization and Application as Liquefied Petroleum Gas Sensor

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yadav, B C; Singh, Satyendra; Yadav, T P

    2012-01-01

    Present paper reports the LPG sensing of TiO2 obtained through ball milling. The milled powder was characterized by XRD, TEM and UV-visible spectroscopy. Further the ball milled powder was compressed in to pellet using hydraulic press. This pellet was investigated with the exposure of LPG. Variations in resistance with exposure of LPG to the sensing pellet were recorded. The sensitivity of the sensor was ~ 11 for 5 vol.% of LPG. Response and recovery times of the sensor were ~ 100 and 250 sec. The sensor was quite sensitive to LPG and results were found reproducible within 91%.

  3. Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action Project, Surface Project Management Plan. Revision 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-12-01

    Title I of the Uranium Mill Tailings Radiation Control Act (UMTRCA) authorizes the US Department of Energy (DOE) to undertake remedial action at 24 designated inactive uranium processing sites and associated vicinity properties (VP) containing uranium mill tailings and related residual radioactive materials. The purpose of the Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Surface Project is to minimize or eliminate radiation health hazards to the public and the environment at the 24 sites and related VPs. This document describes the management organization, system, and methods used to manage the design, construction, and other activities required to clean up the designated sites and associated VPs, in accordance with the UMTRCA.

  4. ,"Utah Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet)"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home PageMonthly","10/2015"4,"Ames City of",6,1,"Omaha Public PowerOECD/IEA -Annual",2014Proved Reserves, WetGas, Wet After Lease Separation Proved Reserves

  5. ,"Virginia Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet)"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home PageMonthly","10/2015"4,"Ames City of",6,1,"Omaha Public PowerOECD/IEA -Annual",2014Proved Reserves, WetGas, Wet AfterLNG

  6. Commercial Feeding Stuffs, September 1, 1933 to August 31, 1934. 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fuller, F. D. (Frederick Driggs); Sullivan, James

    1934-01-01

    - tein and 6 per cent of crude fat, and not more than 7 per cent of crude fiber. Corn Oil Cake consists of the corn germ from which part of the oil has been pressed and is the product obtained in the wet-milling process of manufacture of cornstarch... of crude protein. 25 Per Cent Protein Whole-Pressed Cottonseed, Prime Quality, is the product resulting from subjecting the whole, sound, mature, clean, unde- corticated cottonseed to pressure for the extraction of oil, and includes the entire...

  7. Moab Project Disposes 2 Million Tons of Uranium Mill Tailings with Recovery Act Funds

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Moab Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action Project reached its primary American Recovery and Reinvestment Act milestone ahead of schedule on Wednesday with the disposal of 2 million tons of...

  8. Occlusal Contacts of Milled Polyurethane Casts Mounted in a Proprietary and Semi-adjustable Articulator 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Allen, Sarah Parker

    2015-04-07

    relationship. This information is transferred to a milling machine that carves casts from a solid polyurethane block using a subtractive process. The completed arches can be ‘snapmounted’ in a proprietary articulator for restoration fabrication at a lab...

  9. An Experimental and Numerical Investigation of the Cutting Forces in Dry Milling Machining Process 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wadja, Bright Yves wilfried

    2014-04-29

    The aim in this thesis is the investigation of the cutting forces during a dry milling machining process. An experimental design was developed and the cutting forces were measured based on the cutting input parameters. The cutting forces’ signatures...

  10. A finite-energy solution in Yang-Mills theory and quantum fluctuations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    O. V. Pavlovsky

    2000-07-05

    A finite-energy solution of Yang-Mills theory with a nonstandard lagrangian is provided. Properties of these solution are studied and also a possible physical interpretation is given.

  11. Future applications of the Yang-Mills gradient flow in lattice QCD

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Martin Lüscher

    2013-08-26

    The Yang--Mills gradient flow has many interesting applications in lattice QCD. In this talk, some recent and possible future uses of the flow are discussed, emphasizing the underlying theoretical concepts rather than any computational aspects.

  12. Optimal handling of Highly Active Pharmaceutical Ingredients during milling and blending operations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Setty, Prashant (Prashant Neelappanavara)

    2013-01-01

    This thesis investigates best practices for Highly Active Pharmaceutical Ingredient (HAPI) milling and blending. We utilize a qualitative analysis centering on a benchmarking study and quantitative analyses using a ...

  13. EPA Review of Standards for Uranium and Thorium Milling Facilities @ 40 CFR Parts 61 and 192.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    radon** (US Nuclear Regulatory Commission: 10 CFR 20 and 10 CFR 40 Appendix A; US regulatory limits. The basic regulatory limits that operating uranium mills and ISRs must comply

  14. Design of a desktop milling machine for fabrication in an introductory machine shop class

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lorenc, Dan (Daniel P.)

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this research is to design, fabricate and test the electromechanical subsystem of a CNC milling machine kit. Unlike all other CNC kits on the market, the purpose of this kit is to teach students the principles ...

  15. Experimental Study of Built-up-edge Formation in Micro Milling 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kovvuri, Vivekananda Reddy

    2015-07-24

    applications when BUE can be eventually detached from machined surface. This work presents experimental study on conditions for BUE formation and its effects in micro milling of biocompatible 316L stainless steel. Surface finish and BUE density on a micro...

  16. Classical M-Fivebrane Dynamics and Quantum N=2 Yang-Mills

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    P. S. Howe; N. D. Lambert; P. C. West

    1997-11-05

    We obtain the complete quantum Seiberg-Witten effective action for N=2 supersymmetric SU(N) Yang-Mills theory from the classical M-fivebrane equations of motion with N threebranes moving in its worldvolume.

  17. Moab Uranium Mill Tailings Cleanup Project Steps into Spotlight at International Meeting in Vienna

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    VIENNA – The Moab Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project has kept the United States at the forefront of characterization, remediation, and end-state reuse of uranium millsites around the world.

  18. EA-1155: Ground-water Compliance Activities at the Uranium Mill Tailings Site, Spook, Wyoming

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This EA evaluates the environmental impacts for the proposal to comply with the Environmental Protection Agency's ground-water standards set forth in 40 CFR 192 at the Spook, Wyoming Uranium Mill...

  19. BRST invariant PV regularization of SUSY Yang-Mills and SUGRA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gaillard, Mary K

    2011-01-01

    Pauli-Villars regularization of Yang-Mills theories and of supergravity theories is outlined, with an emphasis on BRST invariance. Applications to phenomenology and the anomaly structure of supergravity are discussed.

  20. BRST invariant PV regularization of SUSY Yang-Mills and SUGRA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mary K. Gaillard

    2011-09-14

    Pauli-Villars regularization of Yang-Mills theories and of supergravity theories is outlined, with an emphasis on BRST invariance. Applications to phenomenology and the anomaly structure of supergravity are discussed.

  1. WMU Power Generation Study Task 2.0 Corn Cob Co-Combustion Study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2009-09-30

    Much attention has been focused on renewable energy use in large-scale utilities and very small scale distributed energy systems. However, there is little information available regarding renewable energy options for midscale municipal utilities. The Willmar Municipal Utilities Corn Cob-Coal Co-Combustion Project was initiated to investigate opportunities available for small to midscale municipal utilities to "go green". The overall goal of the Project was to understand the current t'enewable energy research and energy efficiency projects that are or have been implemented at both larger and smaller scale and determine the applicability to midscale municipal utilities. More specific objectives for Task 2.0 of this project were to determine the technical feasibility of co-combusting com cobs with coal in the existing WMU boiler, and to identify any regulatory issues that might need to be addressed if WMU were to obtain a significant portion of its heat from such co-combustion. This report addresses the issues as laid out in the study proposal. The study investigated the feasibility of and demonstrated the technical effectiveness of co-combusting corn cobs with coal in the Willmar Municipal Utilities stoker boiler steam generation power plant. The results of the WMU Co-Combustion Project will serve as a model for other midscale utilities who wish to use corn cobs to generate renewable electrical energy. As a result of the Co-Combustion Project, the WMU plans to upgrade their stoker boiler to accept whole corn cobs as well as other types of biomass, while still allowing the fuel delivery system to use 100% coal as needed. Benefits of co-combustion will include: energy security, reduced Hg and CO2 air emissions, improved ash chemistry, potential future carbon credit sales, an immediate positive effect on the local economy, and positive attention focused on the WMU and the City of Willmar. The first step in the study was to complete a feasibility analysis. The feasibility analysis anticipated only positive results from the combustion of corn cobs with coal in the WMU power plant boiler, and therefore recommended that the project proceed. The study proceeded with a review of the existing WMU Power Plant configuration; cob fuel analyses; an application for an Air Quality Permit from the Minnesota Pollution Control Agency to conduct the co-combustion test burns; identification of and a site visit to a similar facility in Iowa; an evaluation of cob grinding machines; and agreements with a corn grower, a cob harvester, and the City of Willmar to procure, harvest, and store cobs. The WMU power plant staff constructed a temporary cob feed system whereby the cobs could be injected into the #3 Boiler firebox, at rates up to 40% of the boiler total heat input. Test burns were conducted, during which air emissions were monitored and fuel and ash samples analyzed. The results of the test burns indicated that the monitored flue gas quality improved slightly during the test burns. The WMU was able to determine that modifications to the #3 Boiler fuel feed system to accept com cobs on a permanent basis would be technically feasible and would enable the WMU to generate electricity from renewable fuels on a dispatchable basis.

  2. Quark confinement due to non-Abelian magnetic monopoles in SU(3) Yang-Mills theory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kondo, Kei-Ichi; Shibata, Akihiro; Shinohara, Toru; Kato, Seikou [Department of Physics, Graduate School of Science, Chiba University, Chiba 263-8522 (Japan); Computing Research Center, High Energy Accelerator Research Organization, Tsukuba 305-0801 (Japan); Department of Physics, Graduate School of Science, Chiba University, Chiba 263-8522 (Japan); Fukui National College of Technology, Sabae 916-8507 (Japan)

    2012-10-23

    We present recent results on quark confinement: in SU(3) Yang-Mills theory, confinement of fundamental quarks is obtained due to the dual Meissner effect originated from non-Abelian magnetic monopoles defined in a gauge-invariant way, which is distinct from the well-known Abelian projection scenario. This is achieved by using a non-Abelian Stokes theorem for the Wilson loop operator and a new reformulation of the Yang-Mills theory.

  3. Structural and microstructural changes in monoclinic ZrO{sub 2} during the ball-milling with stainless steel assembly

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stefanic, G. . E-mail: stefanic@irb.hr; Music, S.; Gajovic, A.

    2006-04-13

    High-energy ball-milling of monoclinic ZrO{sub 2} was performed in air using the planetary ball mill with a stainless steel milling assembly. Structural and microstructural changes during the ball-milling were monitored using X-ray powder diffraction, Raman spectroscopy, Moessbauer spectroscopy, field emission scanning electron microscopy and energy dispersive X-ray spectrometry. The results of line broadening analysis indicated a decrease in the crystallite size and an increase in the microstrains with the ball-milling time increased up to {approx}150 min. The results of quantitative phase analysis indicated the presence of a very small amount of tetragonal ZrO{sub 2} phase in this early stage of ball-milling. The onset of m-ZrO{sub 2} {sup {yields}} t-ZrO{sub 2} transition occurred between 10 and 15 h of ball-milling, which resulted in a complete transition after 20 h of ball-milling. Further ball-milling caused a decrease of the t-ZrO{sub 2} lattice parameters followed by a probable transition into c-ZrO{sub 2}. It was concluded that the stabilization of t- and c-ZrO{sub 2} polymorphs at RT can be attributed to the incorporation of aliovalent cations (Fe{sup 2+}, Fe{sup 3+} and Cr{sup 3+}) introduced into the sample due to the wear and oxidation of the milling media.

  4. Chemical Processing in High-Pressure Aqueous Environments. 7. Process Development for Catalytic Gasification of Wet Biomass

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gasification of Wet Biomass Feedstocks Douglas C. Elliott,* Gary G. Neuenschwander, Todd R. Hart, R. Scott catalyst, gasification of wet biomass can be accomplished with high levels of carbon conversion to gas of the organic structure of biomass to gases has been achieved in the presence of a ruthenium metal catalyst

  5. The Effect of Rock Phosphate Upon the Corn Possibility of Phosphoric Acid of the Soil 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fraps, G. S. (George Stronach)

    1922-01-01

    else, or the proper phosphate. For dicalcium phosphate, 1 gram was used. For rock phosphate, 5 grams were used for pots marked R, 10 grams for pots marked 2R, 20 grams for pots marked 4H, and 25 grams for pots marked 5R. Corresponding 3mounts... of Florida soft phosphate were used for pots marked F. The phosphoric acid contained in the ma- terials used is giren in Table 1. Corn was planted first, harvester1 after about sixty days, and sorghum planted as a second crop. Thl? crops were dried...

  6. Recovery of Recombinant and Native Proteins from Rice and Corn Seed 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wilken, Lisa Rachelle

    2012-02-14

    for the production of high protein germ and corn protein concentrate (CPC). The factors affecting the extraction and purification of HuLZ from rice were evaluated. Ionic strength and pH was used to optimize HuLZ extraction and cation exchange purification.... The selected conditions, pH 4.5 with 50 mM NaCl, were a compromise between HuLZ extractability and binding capacity, resulting in 90% purity. Process simulation was used to assess the HuLZ purification efficiency and showed that the processing costs were...

  7. DELETERIOUS EXPANSION OF CEMENT PASTE SUBJECTED TO WET-DRY CYCLES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ·I CEMENT PASTE SUBJECTED TO WET-DRY CYCLES John A. Wells*, Emmanuel K with five cements produced in different regions of Canada. Test specimens with nominal diameters of 25 mm program show that cement paste specimens exhibit significant differences in the magnitude of expansion

  8. THE MARS ENVIRONMENTAL COMPATIBILITY ASSESSMENT (MECA) WET CHEMISTRY EXPERIMENT ON THE MARS '01 LANDER

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kounaves, Samuel P.

    THE MARS ENVIRONMENTAL COMPATIBILITY ASSESSMENT (MECA) WET CHEMISTRY EXPERIMENT ON THE MARS '01 of Chemistry, TuftsUniversity, Medford, MA, 02155 4 Mineral Processing Department, West Virginia University, Morgantown, WV, 26507 Introduction. The Mars Environmental Compatibility Assessment (MECA) is an instrument

  9. Stable or unstable wetting fronts in water repellent soils effect of antecedent soil moisture content

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Walter, M.Todd

    contents during the experiment, which caused the soil to be wettable instead of water repellent. The waterStable or unstable wetting fronts in water repellent soils ± effect of antecedent soil moisture content Coen J. Ritsemaa,* , John L. Nieberb , Louis W. Dekkera , T.S. Steenhuisc a DLO Winand Staring

  10. Performance evaluation of half-wetted hydrodynamic bearings with DLC coated surfaces.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Eryilmaz, O.; Erdemir, A.; Energy Systems

    2008-01-01

    In conventional liquid lubrication it is assumed that surfaces are fully wetted and no slip occurs between the fluid and the solid boundary. Under the 'no slip' condition the maximum shear gradient occurs at the fluid-surface interface. When one or both surfaces are non-wetted by the fluid, boundary slip can occur due to weak bonding between the fluid and the solid surface, which reduces shear stresses in the fluid adjacent to the non-wetted surface. A thrust bearing tribometer was used to compare the performance of 'no slip' hydrodynamic thrust bearings with bearings surfaces that were made to slip at the interface between the surface and fluid. Hydrophobic surfaces on both runner and bearing were achieved with the deposition of hydrogenated diamond like carbon (H-DLC) films, produced by plasma-enhanced CVD on titanium alloy surfaces. Hydrophilic surfaces were created through the surface modification of DLC. A mixtures of water and glycerol was used as the lubricant. The tests were conducted using different constant bearing gaps. The normal load and the torque or traction force between the rotating runner and hydrodynamic thrust bearing were measured with load cells. The experimental results confirmed that load support is still possible when surfaces are partially-wetted or nonwetted.

  11. Energy dynamics and modeled evapotranspiration from a wet tropical forest in Costa Rica

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Energy dynamics and modeled evapotranspiration from a wet tropical forest in Costa Rica H). #12;1. Introduction The energy balance of tropical forests is complex due to feedback mechanisms among.W. Loeschera, *, H.L. Gholza,b , J.M. Jacobsc , S.F. Oberbauerd,e a School of Forest Resources and Conservation

  12. Rheology of weakly wetted granular materials - a comparison of experimental and numerical data

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ruediger Schwarze; Anton Gladkyy; Fabian Uhlig; Stefan Luding

    2014-09-12

    Shear cell simulations and experiments of weakly wetted particles (a few volume percent liquid binders) are compared, with the goal to understand their flow rheology. Application examples are cores for metal casting by core shooting made of sand and liquid binding materials. The experiments are carried out with a Couette-like rotating viscometer. The weakly wetted granular materials are made of quartz sand and small amounts of Newtonian liquids. For comparison, experiments on dry sand are also performed with a modified configuration of the viscometer. The numerical model involves spherical, monodisperse particles with contact forces and a simple liquid bridge model for individual capillary bridges between two particles. Different liquid content and properties lead to different flow rheology when measuring the shear stress-strain relations. In the experiments of the weakly wetted granular material, the apparent shear viscosity $\\eta_g$ scales inversely proportional to the inertial number $I$, for all shear rates. On the contrary, in the dry case, an intermediate scaling regime inversely quadratic in $I$ is observed for moderate shear rates. In the simulations, both scaling regimes are found for dry and wet granular material as well.

  13. Density-Functional Theory and Quantum Chemistry Studies on "dry" and "wet"

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alavi, Ali

    Density-Functional Theory and Quantum Chemistry Studies on "dry" and "wet" NaCl(001) vorgelegt von essential role as a food preserva- tive. However, many fundamental physical and chemical properties of Na), and defects on NaCl(001) surfaces have been examined with density-functional theory within the plane

  14. Observations of Precipitation Size and Fall Speed Characteristics within Coexisting Rain and Wet Snow

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yuter, Sandra

    Snow SANDRA E. YUTER Department of Marine, Earth, and Atmospheric Sciences, North Carolina State are compared among samples obtained in mixed precipitation (rain and wet snow) and rain in the Oregon Cascade Mountains and in dry snow in the Rocky Mountains of Colorado. Coexisting rain and snow particles

  15. Much of the North Carolina Coastal Plain is wet and supports plant communities that are domi-

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Krings, Alexander

    Much of the North Carolina Coastal Plain is wet and supports plant communities that are domi- nated, the North Caro- lina State University Herbarium. 1 Department of Botany, North Carolina State University.S.A. WINTER KEYS TO COMMON, WETLAND TREES, SHRUBS, AND WOODY VINES OF THE NORTH CAROLINA COASTAL PLAIN JON M

  16. The influence of surface energy on the wetting behaviour of the spore adhesive

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chaudhury, Manoj K.

    The influence of surface energy on the wetting behaviour of the spore adhesive of the marine alga, from bacteria, through lower plants (algae) to invertebrate animals, use sticky materials. This adhesion process takes place within minutes, under water, to a wide range of substrates, over a wide range

  17. A Monte Carlo simulation study on the wetting behavior of water on graphite surface

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Xiongce Zhao

    2012-09-20

    This paper is an expanded edition of the rapid communication published several years ago by the author (Phys. Rev. B, v76, 041402(R), 2007) on the simulation of wetting transition of water on graphite, aiming to provide more details on the methodology, parameters, and results of the study which might be of interest to certain readers. We calculate adsorption isotherms of water on graphite using grand canonical Monte Carlo simulations combined with multiple histogram reweighting, based on the empirical potentials of SPC/E for water, the 10-4-3 van der Waals model, and a recently developed induction and multipolar potential for water and graphite. Our results show that wetting transition of water on graphite occurs at 475-480 K, and the prewetting critical temperature lies in the range of 505-510 K. The calculated wetting transition temperature agrees quantitatively with a previously predicted value using a simple model. The observation of the coexistence of stable and metastable states at temperatures between the wetting transition temperature and prewetting critical temperature indicates that the transition is first order.

  18. Surface Water Quality Pollutant Removal Efficacy of Three Wet Detention Ponds

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mallin, Michael

    Surface Water Quality Pollutant Removal Efficacy of Three Wet Detention Ponds Michael A. Mallin the natureand outflowing water nutrient concentrations. There were substantial suburban runoff inputs entering-circuited pollutant removal contact time. The golf course pond geometry of the system. showed significant increases

  19. Effect of Transport and Reaction on the Shape Evolutionof Cavities during Wet Chemical Etching

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Economou, Demetre J.

    Effect of Transport and Reaction on the Shape Evolutionof Cavities during Wet Chemical Etching Chee Burm Shin and Demetre J. Economou* Department of Chemical Engineering, University of Houston, Houston, Texas 77204-4792 ABSTRACT The effect of fluid flow, transport, and reaction on the shape evolution

  20. OPERATIONAL WINDOWS FOR DRY-WALL AND WETTED-WALL IFE CHAMBERS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Raffray, A. René

    subsystems was performed parametrically to uncover key physics/technology uncertainties and to iden- tify be necessary that may preclude propagation of the laser driver and require assisted pinch transport issue for wetted-wall concepts. KEYWORDS: inertial fusion, fusion technology, IFE chambers *E

  1. Wet and Dry Adhesion Properties of Self-Selective Nanowire Connectors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Javey, Ali

    Wet and Dry Adhesion Properties of Self-Selective Nanowire Connectors By Hyunhyub Ko, Zhenxing,for example, the amazing adhesion abilities of gecko feet,[3­8] the self- cleaning superhydrophobic surface that enable efficient binding with self-similar surfaces but weak adhesion towards other surfaces

  2. Does canopy wetness matter? Evapotranspiration from a subtropical montane cloud forest in Taiwan

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Jiquan

    Does canopy wetness matter? Evapotranspiration from a subtropical montane cloud forest in Taiwan Resources and Environmental Studies, National Dong-Hwa University, Hualien, Taiwan 2 Department intensive field campaign at the Chi-Lan Mountain cloud forest site in Taiwan. Eddy covariance and sap flow

  3. Efficacy of lactic acid as a pathogen intervention for dry- and wet-aged beef subprimals. 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Steger, Jessica

    2012-04-18

    USDA Select carcasses (n=6) were selected, and paired boneless (n=12) strip loins were cut in half (n=24) and were assigned randomly to be dry-aged (unpackaged) or wet-aged in a vacuum package bag. Strip loin sections were inoculated with a...

  4. Wet weather led to higher stumpage prices for hardwood (especially pulpwood) in East

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wet weather led to higher stumpage prices for hardwood (especially pulpwood) in East Texas during March/April 2012. Pine saw- log and pulpwood prices remained flat to slightly lower. Higher diesel costs put downward pressure on stumpage prices. Pine sawlog prices averaged $22.11 per ton, 6 percent lower

  5. Extremely wet and cold weather in East Texas drove up stumpage prices in the first

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Extremely wet and cold weather in East Texas drove up stumpage prices in the first period of 2010 also have played a role. Lumber prices have seen constant increase since the last quar- ter of 2009. A reporter commented that the pulpwood market felt upward pricing pres- sure from the Biomass Crop Assistance

  6. IDENTIFYING DIFFERENCES IN WET AND DRY ROAD CRASHES USING DATA MINING Emerson D a

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liang, Huizhi "Elly"

    ]. These criteria aim to develop roads that sustain set maximum traffic volumes at certain traffic speeds with low1 IDENTIFYING DIFFERENCES IN WET AND DRY ROAD CRASHES USING DATA MINING Emerson D a , Nayak R, Queensland University of Technology, Brisbane, Queensland, Australia. b. Road Asset Management Branch

  7. Production and Pressure Decline Curves for Wet Gas Sands With Closed Outer Boundaries

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mohaghegh, Shahab

    . SPE SPE 23442 Production and Pressure Decline Curves for Wet Gas Sands With Closed Outer, Richardson, TX 7S0834S36 U.5A. Telex, 730989 SPEDAL. ABSTRACT A family of pressure and production decline as gas reservoirs which produce substan- tial amounts of water together with ~as. Production of water

  8. Wet Granulation in a Twin-Screw Extruder: Implications of Screw Design

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thompson, Michael

    of pharmaceuticals. The performance of this machinery is integrally tied to its screw design yet little fundamentalWet Granulation in a Twin-Screw Extruder: Implications of Screw Design M.R. THOMPSON, J. SUN MMRI granulation in twin-screw extrusion machinery is an attractive tech- nology for the continuous processing

  9. STABILITY OF INTERFACES AND STOCHASTIC DYNAMICS IN THE REGIME OF PARTIAL WETTING.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    STABILITY OF INTERFACES AND STOCHASTIC DYNAMICS IN THE REGIME OF PARTIAL WETTING. T. BODINEAU AND D representation of the interface between the two pure phases of the Ising model. This improves the L 1 description of the interface (thickness, uctuation, detailed structure ...) as well as an understanding of the relaxation

  10. Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action Project 1994 environmental report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1995-08-01

    This annual report documents the Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project environmental monitoring and protection program. The UMTRA Project routinely monitors radiation, radioactive residual materials, and hazardous constituents at associated former uranium tailings processing sites and disposal sites. At the end of 1994, surface remedial action was complete at 14 of the 24 designated UMTRA Project processing sites: Canonsburg, Pennsylvania; Durango, Colorado; Grand Junction, Colorado; Green River Utah, Lakeview, Oregon; Lowman, Idaho; Mexican Hat, Utah; Riverton, Wyoming; Salt Lake City, Utah; Falls City, Texas; Shiprock, New Mexico; Spook, Wyoming, Tuba City, Arizona; and Monument Valley, Arizona. Surface remedial action was ongoing at 5 sites: Ambrosia Lake, New Mexico; Naturita, Colorado; Gunnison, Colorado; and Rifle, Colorado (2 sites). Remedial action has not begun at the 5 remaining UMTRA Project sites that are in the planning stage. Belfield and Bowman, North Dakota; Maybell, Colorado; and Slick Rock, Colorado (2 sites). The ground water compliance phase of the UMTRA Project started in 1991. Because the UMTRA Project sites are.` different stages of remedial action, the breadth of the UMTRA environmental protection program differs from site to site. In general, sites actively undergoing surface remedial action have the most comprehensive environmental programs for sampling media. At sites where surface remedial action is complete and at sites where remedial action has not yet begun, the environmental program consists primarily of surface water and ground water monitoring to support site characterization, baseline risk assessments, or disposal site performance assessments.

  11. Ozone impacts on the productivity of selected crops. [Corn, wheat, soybean and peanut crops

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Heck, W.W.; Cure, W.W.; Shriner, D.S.; Olson, R.J.; Heagle, A.S.

    1982-01-01

    The regional impacts of ozone on corn, wheat, soybean, and peanut crops are estimated by using dose-response functions to relate ambient maximum 7 h/d seasonal ozone concentrations to crop productivity data. Linear dose-response functions were developed from open-top field chamber studies. It was assumed that the limited number of cultivars and growing conditions available for the analysis were representative of major agricultural regions. Hourly ozone data were selected to represent rural concentrations and used to calculate maximum 7-h/d average values. Seasonal ozone averages for counties were extrapolated from approximately 300 monitoring sites. Results must be interpreted with knowledge of these assumptions and sources of uncertainty. Impacts are calculated for county units for the conterminous United States with maps showing patterns and tables summarizing the potential magnitude of ozone effects on selected crop yields. The assessment estimates that approximately three billion dollars of productivity could be gained if current maximum 7 hour per day ozone levels were reduced from present levels to below 25 parts per billion. Dollar values are based on 1978 crop prices, without accounting for price effects, to provide an overall estimate of the impact. Of the estimated economic impact, soybean represents 64%, corn 17%, wheat 12%, and peanuts 7%.

  12. Modeled Impacts of Cover Crops and Vegetative Barriers on Corn Stover Availability and Soil Quality

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ian J. Bonner; David J. Muth Jr.; Joshua B. Koch; Douglas L. Karlen

    2014-06-01

    Environmentally benign, economically viable, and socially acceptable agronomic strategies are needed to launch a sustainable lignocellulosic biofuel industry. Our objective was to demonstrate a landscape planning process that can ensure adequate supplies of corn (Zea mays L.) stover feedstock while protecting and improving soil quality. The Landscape Environmental Assessment Framework (LEAF) was used to develop land use strategies that were then scaled up for five U.S. Corn Belt states (Nebraska, Iowa, Illinois, Indiana, and Minnesota) to illustrate the impact that could be achieved. Our results show an annual sustainable stover supply of 194 million Mg without exceeding soil erosion T values or depleting soil organic carbon [i.e., soil conditioning index (SCI)?>?0] when no-till, winter cover crop, and vegetative barriers were incorporated into the landscape. A second, more rigorous conservation target was set to enhance soil quality while sustainably harvesting stover. By requiring erosion to be <1/2 T and the SCI-organic matter (OM) subfactor to be >?0, the annual sustainable quantity of harvestable stover dropped to148 million Mg. Examining removal rates by state and soil resource showed that soil capability class and slope generally determined the effectiveness of the three conservation practices and the resulting sustainable harvest rate. This emphasizes that sustainable biomass harvest must be based on subfield management decisions to ensure soil resources are conserved or enhanced, while providing sufficient biomass feedstock to support the economic growth of bioenergy enterprises.

  13. Performance Assessment and Recommendations for Rejuvenation of a Permeable Reactive Barrier: Cotter Corporation’s Cańon City, Colorado, Uranium Mill

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Performance Assessment and Recommendations for Rejuvenation of a Permeable Reactive Barrier: Cotter Corporation’s Canon City, Colorado, Uranium Mill (April 2005)

  14. Pilot Testing of Mercury Oxidation Catalysts for Upstream of Wet FGD Systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gary Blythe; Conor Braman; Katherine Dombrowski; Tom Machalek

    2010-12-31

    This document is the final technical report for Cooperative Agreement DE-FC26-04NT41992, 'Pilot Testing of Mercury Oxidation Catalysts for Upstream of Wet FGD Systems,' which was conducted over the time-period January 1, 2004 through December 31, 2010. The objective of this project has been to demonstrate at pilot scale the use of solid catalysts and/or fixed-structure mercury sorbents to promote the removal of total mercury and oxidation of elemental mercury in flue gas from coal combustion, followed by wet flue gas desulfurization (FGD) to remove the oxidized mercury at high efficiency. The project was co-funded by the U.S. DOE National Energy Technology Laboratory (DOE-NETL), EPRI, Great River Energy (GRE), TXU Energy (now called Luminant), Southern Company, Salt River Project (SRP) and Duke Energy. URS Group was the prime contractor. The mercury control process under development uses fixed-structure sorbents and/or catalysts to promote the removal of total mercury and/or oxidation of elemental mercury in the flue gas from coal-fired power plants that have wet lime or limestone FGD systems. Oxidized mercury not adsorbed is removed in the wet FGD absorbers and leaves with the byproducts from the FGD system. The project has tested candidate materials at pilot scale and in a commercial form, to provide engineering data for future full-scale designs. Pilot-scale catalytic oxidation tests have been completed for periods of approximately 14 to19 months at three sites, with an additional round of pilot-scale fixed-structure sorbent tests being conducted at one of those sites. Additionally, pilot-scale wet FGD tests have been conducted downstream of mercury oxidation catalysts at a total of four sites. The sites include the two of three sites from this project and two sites where catalytic oxidation pilot testing was conducted as part of a previous DOE-NETL project. Pilot-scale wet FGD tests were also conducted at a fifth site, but with no catalyst or fixed-structure mercury sorbent upstream. This final report presents and discusses detailed results from all of these efforts, and makes a number of conclusions about what was learned through these efforts.

  15. Field Testing of a Wet FGD Additive for Enhanced Mercury Control - Pilot-Scale Test Results

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gary M. Blythe

    2006-03-01

    This Topical Report summarizes progress on Cooperative Agreement DE-FC26-04NT42309, ''Field Testing of a Wet FGD Additive.'' The objective of the project is to demonstrate the use of a flue gas desulfurization (FGD) additive, Degussa Corporation's TMT-15, to prevent the reemissions of elemental mercury (Hg{sup 0}) in flue gas exiting wet FGD systems on coal-fired boilers. Furthermore, the project intends to demonstrate that the additive can be used to precipitate most of the mercury (Hg) removed in the wet FGD system as a fine TMT salt that can be separated from the FGD liquor and bulk solid byproducts for separate disposal. The project will conduct pilot and full-scale tests of the TMT-15 additive in wet FGD absorbers. The tests are intended to determine required additive dosage requirements to prevent Hg{sup 0} reemissions and to separate mercury from the normal FGD byproducts for three coal types: Texas lignite/Power River Basin (PRB) coal blend, high-sulfur Eastern bituminous coal, and low-sulfur Eastern bituminous coal. The project team consists of URS Group, Inc., EPRI, TXU Generation Company LP, Southern Company, and Degussa Corporation. TXU Generation has provided the Texas lignite/PRB co-fired test site for pilot FGD tests, Monticello Steam Electric Station Unit 3. Southern Company is providing the low-sulfur Eastern bituminous coal host site for wet scrubbing tests, as well as the pilot and full-scale jet bubbling reactor (JBR) FGD systems to be tested. A third utility, to be named later, will provide the high-sulfur Eastern bituminous coal full-scale FGD test site. Degussa Corporation is providing the TMT-15 additive and technical support to the test program. The project is being conducted in six tasks. Of the six project tasks, Task 1 involves project planning and Task 6 involves management and reporting. The other four tasks involve field testing on FGD systems, either at pilot or full scale. The four tasks include: Task 2 - Pilot Additive Testing in Texas Lignite Flue Gas; Task 3 - Full-scale FGD Additive Testing in High Sulfur Eastern Bituminous Flue Gas; Task 4 - Pilot Wet Scrubber Additive Tests at Yates; and Task 5 - Full-scale Additive Tests at Plant Yates. This topical report presents the results from the Task 2 and Task 4 pilot-scale additive tests. The Task 3 and Task 5 full-scale additive tests will be conducted later in calendar year 2006.

  16. Cost of radon-barrier systems for uranium mill tailings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Baker, E.G.; Hartley, J.N.

    1982-08-01

    This report deals specifically with the cost of three types of radon barrier systems, earthen covers, asphalt emulsion covers, and multilayer covers, which could meet standards proposed by the Environmental Protection Agency to stabilize uranium mill tailings located primarily in the western US. In addition, the report includes a sensitivity analysis of various factors which significantly effect the overall cost of the three systems. These analyses were based on a generic disposal site. Four different 3m thick earthen covers were tested and cost an average of $27/m/sup 2/. The least expensive earthen cover cost was about $21/m/sup 2/. The asphalt cover system (6 to 7 cm of asphalt topped with 0.6m of overburden) cost about $28/m/sup 2/. The four multilayer covers averaged $57/m/sup 2/, but materials handling problems encountered during the test inflated this cost above what was anticipated and significant cost reductions should be possible. The least expensive multilayer cover cost $43/m/sup 2/. Based on the results of the Grand Junction field test we estimated the cost of covering the tailings from three high priority sites, Durango, Shiprock, and Salt Lake City (Vitro). The cost of a 3m earthen cover ranged from $18 to 33/m/sup 2/ for the seven disposal sites (two or three at each location) studied. The cost of asphalt cover systems were $23 to 28/m/sup 2/ and the multilayer cover costs were between $31 to 36/m/sup 2/. The earthen cover costs are less than the Grand Junction field test cost primarily because cover material is available at or near most of the disposal sites selected. Earthen material was imported from 6 to 10 miles for the field test. Assuming more efficienct utilization of materials significantly reduced the cost of the multilayer covers.

  17. Effect of Enrichment on the Thiamine, Riboflavin and Niacin of Corn Meal and Grits as Prepared for Eating. 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Whitacre, Jessie; Pace, June K.; Thomas, Kathreen

    1952-01-01

    .9 iled 30 min. 3 100.1 No. of repli- cations Corn brc 2n Retention, yo Thiamine Thiamine hydrochloride I mononitrate Range ( Average I Range / Average lit; meal 1 premix kite meal llnn -nnl 1 premix1 llow meal along with the number...

  18. Current biofuel feedstock crops such as corn lead to large environmental losses of N through nitrate leaching and N2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    David, Mark B.

    219 Current biofuel feedstock crops such as corn lead to large environmental losses of N through biofuel crops established on a rich Mollisol soil. Reduced Nitrogen Losses after Conversion of Row Crop Agriculture to Perennial Biofuel Crops Candice M. Smith, Mark B. david,* Corey A. Mitchell, Michael d. Masters

  19. As corn-based biofuels reach their practical limits, advanced algae-based biofuels are poised to supply

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Reisslein, Martin

    SEMTE abstract As corn-based biofuels reach their practical limits, advanced algae-based biofuels of Energy, General Electric, Algenol Biofuels, and Southern Company. Currently a post-doctoral fellow working for Algenol Biofuels, Dr. Lively is expanding his expertise in gas and liquid separations

  20. Multiple Word DNA Computing on Surfaces Liman Wang, Qinghua Liu,, Robert M. Corn, Anne E. Condon,,# and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Multiple Word DNA Computing on Surfaces Liman Wang, Qinghua Liu,,§ Robert M. Corn, Anne E. Condon words" is demonstrated, with applications to DNA computing. A new DESTROY operation to selectively enzyme cleavage, has been developed for multiple-word DNA computing. DNA polymerase is used to extend DNA

  1. Electricity Production from Steam-Exploded Corn Stover Biomass Yi Zuo, Pin-Ching Maness, and Bruce E. Logan*,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    primarily of acetic and butyric acids.6 Microbial fuel cells (MFCs) represent a new method for energy (MFCs) was examined from corn stover waste biomass using samples prepared through either neutral or acid and acid hydrolysates (1000 mg-COD/L, 250 ). Power output exhibited saturation kinetics with respect

  2. Fuel-Cycle Fossil Energy Use and Greenhouse Gas Emissions of Fuel Ethanol Produced from U.S. Midwest Corn

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Patzek, Tadeusz W.

    #12;Fuel-Cycle Fossil Energy Use and Greenhouse Gas Emissions of Fuel Ethanol Produced from U the ANL Greenhouse gas, Regulated Emissions and Energy in Transportation (GREET) full-fuel-cycle analysis on a mass emission per travel mile basis, the corn-to-ethanol fuel cycle for Midwest-produced ethanol

  3. Wetting of Sodium on ??-Al2O3/YSZ Composites for Low Temperature Planar Sodium-Metal Halide Batteries

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Reed, David M.; Coffey, Greg W.; Mast, Eric S.; Canfield, Nathan L.; Mansurov, Jirgal; Lu, Xiaochuan; Sprenkle, Vincent L.

    2013-04-01

    Wetting of Na on B”-Al2O3/YSZ composites was investigated using the sessile drop technique. The effects of moisture and surface preparation were studied at low temperatures. Electrical conductivity of Na/B”-Al2O3-YSZ/Na cells was also investigated at low temperatures and correlated to the wetting behavior. The use of planar B”-Al2O3 substrates at low temperature with low cost polymeric seals is realized due to improved wetting at low temperature and conductivity values consistent with the literature.

  4. Audit of wet gas processing at Chevron's McKittrick Plant, Naval Petroleum Reserve No. 1, Elk Hills, California

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1987-04-10

    The purpose of the audit was to determine if: (1) volumes of wet gas delivered to the McKittrick plant were properly calculated and reported; (2) processing fees paid to Chevron conformed to contract provisions; (3) wet gas processing at Chevron's facility was economical; and (4) controls over natural gas liquid sales were adequate. Our review showed that there were weaknesses in internal controls, practices and procedures regarding the Department's management of the wet gas which is processed by Chevron under contract to the Reserve. The findings, recommendations and management comments are synopsized in the Executive Summary.

  5. ,"Virginia Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet)"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home PageMonthly","10/2015"4,"Ames City of",6,1,"Omaha Public PowerOECD/IEA -Annual",2014Proved Reserves, WetGas, Wet AfterLNGNonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After

  6. Owens Corning

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Residential Insulation, Frank O'Brien Bernini, VP & Chief Sustainability Officer, Paul Smith, VP Building Materials Group Marketing, John Libonati, VP Government and Public...

  7. Owens Corning

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on DeliciousMathematicsEnergyInterested PartiesBuilding energy codes have a more than 20-year historyCommissionOWENS

  8. Analysis of uranium urinalysis and in vivo measurement results from eleven participating uranium mills

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Spitz, H.B.; Simpson, J.C.; Aldridge, T.L.

    1984-05-01

    Uranium urinalysis and in vivo examination results obtained from workers at eleven uranium mills between 1978 and 1980 were evaluated. The main purpose was to determine the degree of the mills' compliance with bioassay monitoring recommendations given in the draft NRC Regulatory Guide 8.22 (USNRC 1978). The effect of anticipated changes in the draft regulatory guidance, as expressed to PNL in May 1982, was also studied. Statistical analyses of the data showed that the bioassay results did not reliably meet the limited performance criteria given in the draft regulatory guide. Furthermore, quality control measurements of uranium in urine indicated that detection limits at ..cap alpha.. = ..beta.. = 0.05 ranged from 13 ..mu..g/l to 29 ..mu..g/l, whereas the draft regulatory guidance suggests 5 ..mu..g/l as the detection limit. Recommendations for monitoring frequencies given in the draft guide were not followed consistently from mill to mill. The results of these statistical analyses indicate a need to include performance criteria for accuracy, precision, and confidence in revisions of the draft Regulatory Guide 8.22. Revised guidance should also emphasize the need for each mill to continually test the laboratory performing urinalyses by submitting quality control samples (i.e., blank and spiked urine samples as open and blind test) to insure that the performance criteria are being met. Recommendations for a bioassay audit program are also given. 25 references, 15 figures, 17 tables.

  9. Annual status report on the Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action Program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1992-12-01

    This fourteenth annual status report for the Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project Office summarizes activities of the Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action Surface (UMTRA-Surface) and Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action Groundwater (UMTRA-Groundwater) Projects undertaken during fiscal year (FY) 1992 by the US Department of Energy (DOE) and other agencies. Project goals for FY 1993 are also presented. An annual report of this type was a statutory requirement through January 1, 1986, pursuant to the Uranium Mill Tailings Radiation Control Act (UMTRCA) of 1978, Public Law (PL) 95-604. The DOE will continue to submit annual reports to DOE-Headquarters, the states, tribes, and local representatives through Project completion in order to inform the public of the yearly Project status. The purpose of the remedial action is to stabilize and control the tailings and other residual radioactive material (RRM) located on the inactive uranium processing sites in a safe and environmentally sound manner, and to minimize or eliminate potential health hazards. Commercial and residential properties near designated processing sites that are contaminated with material from the sites, herein referred to as ``vicinity properties (VP),`` are also eligible for remedial action. Included in the UMTRA Project are 24 inactive uranium processing sites and associated VPs located in 10 states, and the VPs associated with the Edgemont, South Dakota, uranium mill currently owned by the Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA) (Figure A.1, Appendix A).

  10. Percolation lithography: Tuning and freezing disorder in 3D photonic crystals using partial wetting and drying

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Burgess, Ian B; Kay, Theresa M; Shneidman, Anna V; Cranshaw, Derek J; Loncar, Marko; Aizenberg, Joanna

    2015-01-01

    Although complex, hierarchical nanoscale geometries with tailored degrees of disorder are commonly found in biological systems, few simple self-assembly routes to fabricating synthetic analogues have been identified. We present two techniques that exploit basic capillary phenomena to finely control disorder in porous 3D photonic crystals, leading to complex and hierarchical geometries. In the first, we exposed the structures to mixtures of ethanol and water that partially wet their pores, where small adjustments to the ethanol content controlled the degree of partial wetting. In the second, we infiltrated the structures with thin films of volatile alkanes and observed a sequence of partial infiltration patterns as the liquid evaporated. In both cases, macroscopic symmetry breaking was driven by subtle sub-wavelength variations in the pore geometry that directed site-selective infiltration of liquids. The resulting patterns, well described by percolation theory, had significant effects on the photonic structur...

  11. Wet to dry crossover and a flow vortex-lattice in active nematics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Amin Doostmohammadi; Michael Adamer; Sumesh P. Thampi; Julia M. Yeomans

    2015-05-15

    Active systems, from bacterial suspensions to vibrated granular matter, are continuously driven out of equilibrium by local injection of energy from their constituent elements. The energy input leads to exotic behaviour such as collective motion, pattern formation, topological defects and active turbulence, but theories that link the different manifestations of activity across systems and length scales are lacking. Here we unify two different classes of active matter by using friction as a control parameter to interpolate between wet active systems, whose behaviour is dominated by hydrodynamics, and dry active matter where any flow is screened. At the wet-dry crossover, we find a novel lattice of flow vortices interleaved with an ordered network of topological defects which arises from the competition between friction and viscous dissipation. Our results contribute to understanding the physics of matter operating out-of-equilibrium, with its potential in the design of active micro- and nano-machines.

  12. Recovery of Uranium from Wet Phosphoric Acid by Solvent Extraction Processes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Beltrami, Denis; Cote, Gérard; Mokhtari, Hamid; Courtaud, Bruno; Moyer, Bruce A; Chagnes, Alexandre

    2014-01-01

    Between 1951 and 1991, about 17 processes were developed to recover uranium from wet phosphoric acid (WPA), but the viability of these processes was subject to the variation of the uranium price market. Nowadays, uranium from WPA appears to be attractive due to the increase of the global uranium demand resulting from the emergence of developing countries. The increasing demand provides impetus for a new look at the applicable technology with a view to improvements as well as altogether new approaches. This paper gives an overview on extraction processes developed in the past to recover uranium from wet phosphoric acid (WPA) as well as the physicochemistry involved in these processes. Recent advances concerning the development of new extraction systems are also reported and discussed.

  13. Notes on the efficacy of wet versus dry screening of fly ash

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Valentim, B.; Hower, J.C.; Flores, D.; Guedes, A.

    2008-08-15

    The methodology used to obtain fly ash subsamples of different sizes is generally based on wet or dry sieving methods. However, the worth of such methods is not certain if the methodology applied is not mentioned in the analytical procedure. After performing a fly ash mechanical dry, sieving, the authors compared those results with the ones obtained by laser diffraction on the same samples and found unacceptable discrepancies. A preliminary, study of a wet sieving analysis carried out on an economizer fly ash sample showed that this method was more effective than the dry sieving. The importance of standardizing the way samples are handled, pretreated and presented to the instrument of analysis are suggested and interlaboratory reproducibility trials are needed to create a common standard methodology to obtain large amounts of fly ash size fraction subsamples.

  14. MULTI-POLLUTANT CONTROL USING MEMBRANE-BASED UP-FLOW WET ELECTROSTATIC PRECIPITATION

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    James Reynolds

    2003-01-01

    This is the first quarterly report of the ''Multi-Pollutant Control Using Membrane--Based Upflow Wet Electrostatic Precipitation'' project funded by the US Department of Energy's National Energy Technology Laboratory under DOE Award No. DE-FC26-02NT41592 to Croll-Reynolds Clean Air Technologies (CRCAT). In this 18 month project, CRCAT and its team members will conduct detailed emission tests of metallic and new membrane collection material within a wet electrostatic precipitator (WESP) at First Energy's Penn Power's Bruce Mansfield (BMP) plant in Shippingport, Pa. Test results performed on the existing metallic WESP during November of 2002 showed consistent results with previous test results. Average collection efficiency of 89% on SO{sub 3} mist was achieved. Additionally, removal efficiencies of 62% were achieved at very high velocity, greater than 15 ft./sec.

  15. Dynamic Imaging of Au-nanoparticles via Scanning Electron Microscopy in a Graphene Wet Cell

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wayne Yang; Yuning Zhang; Michael Hilke; Walter Reisner

    2015-06-10

    High resolution nanoscale imaging in liquid environments is crucial for studying molecular interactions in biological and chemical systems. In particular, electron microscopy is the gold-standard tool for nanoscale imaging, but its high-vacuum requirements make application to in-liquid samples extremely challenging. Here we present a new graphene based wet cell device where high resolution SEM (scanning electron microscope) and Energy Dispersive X-rays (EDX) analysis can be performed directly inside a liquid environment. Graphene is an ideal membrane material as its high transparancy, conductivity and mechanical strength can support the high vacuum and grounding requirements of a SEM while enabling maximal resolution and signal. In particular, we obtain high resolution (graphene wet cell and EDX analysis of nanoparticle composition in the liquid enviornment. Our obtained resolution surpasses current conventional silicon nitride devices imaged in both SEM and TEM under much higher electron doses.

  16. Theory of wetting-induced fluid entrainment by advancing contact lines on dry surfaces

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rodrigo Ledesma-Aguilar; Aurora Hernįndez-Machado; Ignacio Pagonabarraga

    2013-06-11

    We report on the onset of fluid entrainment when a contact line is forced to advance over a dry solid of arbitrary wettability. We show that entrainment occurs at a critical advancing speed beyond which the balance between capillary, viscous and contact line forces sustaining the shape of the interface is no longer satisfied. Wetting couples to the hydrodynamics by setting both the morphology of the interface at small scales and the viscous friction of the front. We find that the critical deformation that the interface can sustain is controlled by the friction at the contact line and the viscosity contrast between the displacing and displaced fluids, leading to a rich variety of wetting-entrainment regimes. We discuss the potential use of our theory to measure contact-line forces using atomic force microscopy, and to study entrainment under microfluidic conditions exploiting colloid-polymer fluids of ultra-low surface tension.

  17. Wet-chemical systems and methods for producing black silicon substrates

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Yost, Vernon; Yuan, Hao-Chih; Page, Matthew

    2015-05-19

    A wet-chemical method of producing a black silicon substrate. The method comprising soaking single crystalline silicon wafers in a predetermined volume of a diluted inorganic compound solution. The substrate is combined with an etchant solution that forms a uniform noble metal nanoparticle induced Black Etch of the silicon wafer, resulting in a nanoparticle that is kinetically stabilized. The method comprising combining with an etchant solution having equal volumes acetonitrile/acetic acid:hydrofluoric acid:hydrogen peroxide.

  18. Soil water content dependent wetting front characteristics in sands T.W.J. Bautersa

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Walter, M.Todd

    Soil water content dependent wetting front characteristics in sands T.W.J. Bautersa , D.A. Di 94305, USA Received 2 April 1999; accepted 13 August 1999 Abstract The initial soil water content into a 20/30 sand with initial volumetric water contents of 0, 0.005, 0.01, 0.015, 0.02, 0.03, 0.04 and 0

  19. Molecular dynamics of wetting layer formation and forced water invasion in angular nanopores with mixed wettability

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sedghi, Mohammad Piri, Mohammad; Goual, Lamia

    2014-11-21

    The depletion of conventional hydrocarbon reservoirs has prompted the oil and gas industry to search for unconventional resources such as shale gas/oil reservoirs. In shale rocks, considerable amounts of hydrocarbon reside in nanoscale pore spaces. As a result, understanding the multiphase flow of wetting and non-wetting phases in nanopores is important to improve oil and gas recovery from these formations. This study was designed to investigate the threshold capillary pressure of oil and water displacements in a capillary dominated regime inside nanoscale pores using nonequilibrium molecular dynamics (NEMD) simulations. The pores have the same cross-sectional area and volume but different cross-sectional shapes. Oil and water particles were represented with a coarse grained model and the NEMD simulations were conducted by assigning external pressure on an impermeable piston. Threshold capillary pressures were determined for the drainage process (water replaced by oil) in different pores. The molecular dynamics results are in close agreements with calculations using the Mayer-Stowe-Princen (MS-P) method which has been developed on the premise of energy balance in thermodynamic equilibrium. After the drainage simulations, a change in wall particles’ wettability from water-wet to oil-wet was implemented based on the final configuration of oil and water inside the pore. Waterflooding simulations were then carried out at the threshold capillary pressure. The results show that the oil layer formed between water in the corner and in the center of the pore is not stable and collapses as the simulation continues. This is in line with the predictions from the MS-P method.

  20. Heat Transfer Performance of a Dry and Wet / Dry Advanced Cooling Tower Condenser 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fricke, H. D.; Webster, D. J.; McIlroy, K.; Bartz, J. A.

    1981-01-01

    PERFORMANCE OF A DRY AND WET/DRY ADVANCED COOLING TOWER CONDENSER Hans D. Fricke, David J. Webster, Kenneth McIlroy Union carbide Corporation - Linde Division, Tonawanda, New York John A. Bartz Electric Power Research Institute, Palo Alto, california... cooling in creases siting flexibility, particularly for locations in arid Western coal fields. However, dry cooling requires considerable capital investment for the cooling towers. Hence, the development of effitient (low cost) heat transfer surfaces...

  1. On atomic structure of Ge huts growing on the Ge/Si(001) wetting layer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Arapkina, Larisa V.; Yuryev, Vladimir A. [A. M. Prokhorov General Physics Institute of the Russian Academy of Sciences, 38 Vavilov Street, Moscow, 119991 (Russian Federation)] [A. M. Prokhorov General Physics Institute of the Russian Academy of Sciences, 38 Vavilov Street, Moscow, 119991 (Russian Federation)

    2013-09-14

    Structural models of growing Ge hut clusters—pyramids and wedges—are proposed on the basis of data of recent STM investigations of nucleation and growth of Ge huts on the Si(001) surface in the process of molecular beam epitaxy. It is shown that extension of a hut base along <110> directions goes non-uniformly during the cluster growth regardless of its shape. Growing pyramids, starting from the second monolayer, pass through cyclic formation of slightly asymmetrical and symmetrical clusters, with symmetrical ones appearing after addition of every fourth monolayer. We suppose that pyramids of symmetrical configurations composed by 2, 6, 10, etc., monolayers over the wetting layer are more stable than asymmetrical ones. This might explain less stability of pyramids in comparison with wedges in dense arrays forming at low temperatures of Ge deposition. Possible nucleation processes of pyramids and wedges on wetting layer patches from identical embryos composed by 8 dimers through formation of 1 monolayer high 16-dimer nuclei different only in their symmetry is discussed. Schematics of these processes are presented. It is concluded from precise STM measurements that top layers of wetting layer patches are relaxed when huts nucleate on them.

  2. OVERVIEW OF CRITERIA FOR INTERIM WET & DRY STORAGE OF RESEARCH REACTOR SPENT NUCLEAR FUEL

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sindelar, R.; Vinson, D.; Iyer, N.; Fisher, D.

    2010-11-03

    Following discharge from research reactors, spent nuclear fuel may be stored 'wet' in water pools or basins, or it may be stored 'dry' in various configurations including non-sealed or sealed containers until retrieved for ultimate disposition. Interim safe storage practices are based on avoiding degradation to the fuel that would impact functions related to safety. Recommended practices including environmental controls with technical bases, are outlined for wet storage and dry storage of aluminum-clad, aluminum-based research reactor fuel. For wet storage, water quality must be maintained to minimize corrosion degradation of aluminum fuel. For dry storage, vented canister storage of aluminum fuel readily provides a safe storage configuration. For sealed dry storage, drying must be performed so as to minimize water that would cause additional corrosion and hydrogen generation. Consideration must also be given to the potential for radiolytically-generated hydrogen from the bound water in the attendant oxyhydroxides on aluminum fuel from reactor operation for dry storage systems.

  3. 3D simulations of wet foam coarsening evidence a self similar growth regime

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gilberto L. Thomas; Julio M. Belmonte; Franēois Graner; James A. Glazier; Rita M. C. de Almeida

    2015-02-11

    In wet liquid foams, slow diffusion of gas through bubble walls changes bubble pressure, volume and wall curvature. Large bubbles grow at the expenses of smaller ones. The smaller the bubble, the faster it shrinks. As the number of bubbles in a given volume decreases in time, the average bubble size increases: i.e. the foam coarsens. During coarsening, bubbles also move relative to each other, changing bubble topology and shape, while liquid moves within the regions separating the bubbles. Analyzing the combined effects of these mechanisms requires examining a volume with enough bubbles to provide appropriate statistics throughout coarsening. Using a Cellular Potts model, we simulate these mechanisms during the evolution of three-dimensional foams with wetnesses of $\\phi=0.00$, $0.05$ and $ 0.20$. We represent the liquid phase as an ensemble of many small fluid particles, which allows us to monitor liquid flow in the region between bubbles. The simulations begin with $2 \\times 10^5$ bubbles for $\\phi = 0.00$ and $1.25 \\times 10^5$ bubbles for $\\phi = 0.05$ and $0.20$, allowing us to track the distribution functions for bubble size, topology and growth rate over two and a half decades of volume change. All simulations eventually reach a self-similar growth regime, with the distribution functions time independent and the number of bubbles decreasing with time as a power law whose exponent depends on the wetness.

  4. Fluid Dynamic Aspects of the Porous Wetted Wall Protection Scheme for Inertial Fusion Energy Reactors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shin, S.; Abdelall, F.; Juric, D.; Abdel-Khalik, S.I.; Yoda, M.; Sadowski, D. [Georgia Institute of Technology (United States)

    2003-05-15

    A numerical and experimental investigation has been conducted to analyze the fluid dynamic aspects of the porous wetted wall protection scheme for inertial fusion energy (IFE) reactor first walls. A level contour reconstruction method has been used to track the three-dimensional evolution of the liquid film surface on porous downward-facing walls with different initial film thickness, liquid injection velocity through the porous wall, surface disturbance amplitude, configuration and mode number, liquid properties, and surface inclination angle. Generalized charts for the computed droplet detachment time, detached droplet equivalent diameter, and minimum film thickness during the transient for various design parameters and coolant properties are presented.In order to validate the numerical results over a wide range of parameters, an experimental test facility has been designed and constructed to simulate the hydrodynamics of downward-facing porous wetted walls. Nondimensionalization of the model shows that water can be adequately used as a simulant to validate the numerical results. Preliminary experimental results show good agreement with model predictions. The results of this investigation should allow designers of conceptual IFE reactors to identify appropriate 'windows' for successful operation of the porous wetted wall protection concept for different coolants.

  5. Project_Descriptions_ITP_ARRA_Awards.xls

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    include a diverse cross-section of Wisconsin's industrial sector, including pulp and paper mills, printing, corn milling, plumbing and small engine manufacturing. The project...

  6. Radiating black holes in Einstein-Yang-Mills theory and cosmic censorship

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ghosh, Sushant G.; Dadhich, Naresh

    2010-08-15

    Exact nonstatic spherically symmetric black-hole solutions of the higher dimensional Einstein-Yang-Mills equations for a null dust with Yang-Mills gauge charge are obtained by employing Wu-Yang ansatz, namely, HD-EYM Vaidya solution. It is interesting to note that gravitational contribution of Yang-Mills (YM) gauge charge for this ansatz is indeed opposite (attractive rather than repulsive) that of Maxwell charge. It turns out that the gravitational collapse of null dust with YM gauge charge admits strong curvature shell focusing naked singularities violating cosmic censorship. However, there is significant shrinkage of the initial data space for a naked singularity of the HD-Vaidya collapse due to presence of YM gauge charge. The effect of YM gauge charge on structure and location of the apparent and event horizons is also discussed.

  7. Cleanup of inactive Uranium Mill Tailings Sites in the Navajo Nation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Martin, B.

    1994-12-31

    The U.S. Congress passed the Uranium Mill Tailings Radiation Control Act (UMTRCA) in 1978 to address potential and significant radiation health hazards to the public from active and inactive mill operations. Title I to the UMTRCA identified sites to be designated for remedial action. These include four uranium mill tailings remedial action (UMTRA) sites in the Navajo Nation. These sites are located in Shiprock, New Mexico; Tuba City, Arizona; Cane Valley, Arizona; and Halchita, Utah. The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) was directed to select and execute a plan of remedial action that provides long-term stabilization and control of radioactive materials and satisfies the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency standards and other applicable laws and regulations.

  8. Radiological survey of the inactive uranium-mill tailings at Rifle, Colorado

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Haywood, F.F.; Jacobs, D.J.; Ellis, B.S.; Hubbard, H.M. Jr.; Shinpaugh, W.H.

    1980-06-01

    Results of radiological surveys of two inactive uranium-mill sites near Rifle, Colorado, in May 1976 are presented. These sites are referred to as Old Rifle and New Rifle. The calculated /sup 226/Ra inventory of the latter site is much higher than at the older mill location. Data on above-ground measurements of gamma exposure rates, surface and near-surface concentration of /sup 226/Ra in soil and sediment samples, concentration of /sup 226/Ra in water, calculated subsurface distribution of /sup 226/Ra, and particulate radionuclide concentrations in air samples are given. The data serve to define the extent of contamination in the vicinity of the mill sites and their immediate surrounding areas with tailings particles. Results of these measurements were utilized as technical input for an engineering assessment of these two sites.

  9. Scientific basis for risk assessment and management of uranium mill tailings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1986-01-01

    A National Research Council study panel, convened by the Board on Radioactive Waste Management, has examined the scientific basis for risk assessment and management of uranium mill tailings and issued this final report containing a number of recommendations. Chapter 1 provides a brief introduction to the problem. Chapter 2 examines the processes of uranium extraction and the mechanisms by which radionuclides and toxic chemicals contained in the ore can enter the environment. Chapter 3 is devoted to a review of the evidence on health risks associated with radon and its decay products. Chapter 4 provides a consideration of conventional and possible new technical alternatives for tailings management. Chapter 5 explores a number of issues of comparative risk, provides a brief history of uranium mill tailings regulation, and concludes with a discussion of choices that must be made in mill tailing risk management. 211 refs., 30 figs., 27 tabs.

  10. M5-Branes, D4-Branes and Quantum 5D super-Yang-Mills

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Neil Lambert; Constantinos Papageorgakis; Maximilian Schmidt-Sommerfeld

    2011-02-22

    We revisit the relation of the six-dimensional (2,0) M5-brane Conformal Field Theory compactified on a circle to 5D maximally supersymmetric Yang-Mills Gauge Theory. We show that in the broken phase 5D super-Yang-Mills contains a spectrum of soliton states that can be identified with the complete Kaluza-Klein modes of an M2-brane ending on the M5-branes. This provides evidence that the (2,0) theory on a circle is equivalent to 5D super-Yang-Mills with no additional UV degrees of freedom, suggesting that the latter is in fact a well-defined quantum theory and possibly finite.

  11. Chemical Effect of Dry and Wet Cleaning of the Ru Protective Layer of the Extreme ultraviolet (EUV) Lithography Reflector

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Belau, Leonid

    2010-01-01

    Park, Physical Chemistry Chemical Y.B. He, et al. , JournalChemical Effect of Dry and Wet Cleaning of the Ru ProtectiveBerkeley, California 94720 Chemical Sciences Division,

  12. String theories as the adiabatic limit of Yang-Mills theory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alexander D. Popov

    2015-07-14

    We consider Yang-Mills theory with a matrix gauge group $G$ on a direct product manifold $M=\\Sigma_2\\times H^2$, where $\\Sigma_2$ is a two-dimensional Lorentzian manifold and $H^2$ is a two-dimensional open disc with the boundary $S^1=\\partial H^2$. The Euler-Lagrange equations for the metric on $\\Sigma_2$ yield constraint equations for the Yang-Mills energy-momentum tensor. We show that in the adiabatic limit, when the metric on $H^2$ is scaled down, the Yang-Mills equations plus constraints on the energy-momentum tensor become the equations describing strings with a worldsheet $\\Sigma_2$ moving in the based loop group $\\Omega G=C^\\infty (S^1, G)/G$, where $S^1$ is the boundary of $H^2$. By choosing $G=R^{d-1, 1}$ and putting to zero all parameters in $\\Omega R^{d-1, 1}$ besides $R^{d-1, 1}$, we get a string moving in $R^{d-1, 1}$. In arXiv:1506.02175 it was described how one can obtain the Green-Schwarz superstring action from Yang-Mills theory on $\\Sigma_2\\times H^2$ while $H^2$ shrinks to a point. Here we also consider Yang-Mills theory on a three-dimensional manifold $\\Sigma_2\\times S^1$ and show that in the limit when the radius of $S^1$ tends to zero, the Yang-Mills action functional supplemented by a Wess-Zumino-type term becomes the Green-Schwarz superstring action.

  13. Pilot Testing of Mercury Oxidation Catalysts for Upstream of Wet FGD Systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gary M. Blythe

    2006-03-31

    This document summarizes progress on Cooperative Agreement DE-FC26-04NT41992, ''Pilot Testing of Mercury Oxidation Catalysts for Upstream of Wet FGD Systems'', during the time-period January 1 through March 31, 2006. The objective of this project is to demonstrate at pilot scale the use of solid honeycomb catalysts to promote the oxidation of elemental mercury in flue gas from coal combustion, and the use of a wet flue gas desulfurization (FGD) system downstream to remove the oxidized mercury at high efficiency. The project is being co-funded by the U.S. DOE National Energy Technology Laboratory, EPRI, Great River Energy (GRE), TXU Generation Company LP, the Southern Company, and Duke Energy. URS Group is the prime contractor. The mercury control process under development uses honeycomb catalysts to promote the oxidation of elemental mercury in the flue gas from coal-fired power plants that have wet lime or limestone FGD systems. Oxidized mercury is removed in the wet FGD absorbers and leaves with the byproducts from the FGD system. The current project is testing previously identified catalyst materials at pilot scale and in a commercial form to provide engineering data for future full-scale designs. The pilot-scale tests will continue for approximately 14 months or longer at each of two sites to provide longer-term catalyst life data. Pilot-scale wet FGD tests are being conducted periodically at each site to confirm the ability to scrub the catalytically oxidized mercury at high efficiency. This is the ninth reporting period for the subject Cooperative Agreement. During this period, project efforts primarily consisted of operating the catalyst pilot units at the TXU Generation Company LP's Monticello Steam Electric Station and at Georgia Power's Plant Yates. Two catalyst activity measurement trips were made to Plant Yates during the quarter. This Technical Progress Report presents catalyst activity results from the oxidation catalyst pilot unit at Plant Yates and discusses the status of the pilot unit at Monticello.

  14. Impact of Collection Equipment on Ash Variability of Baled Corn Stover Biomass for Bioenergy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    William Smith; Jeffery Einerson; Kevin Kenney; Ian J. Bonner

    2014-09-01

    Cost-effective conversion of agricultural residues for renewable energy hinges not only on the material’s quality but also the biorefinery’s ability to reliably measure quality specifications. The ash content of biomass is one such specification, influencing pretreatment and disposal costs for the conversion facility and the overall value of a delivered lot of biomass. The biomass harvest process represents a primary pathway for accumulation of soil-derived ash within baled material. In this work, the influence of five collection techniques on the total ash content and variability of ash content within baled corn stover in southwest Kansas is discussed. The equipment tested included a mower for cutting the corn stover stubble, a basket rake, wheel rake, or shred flail to gather the stover, and a mixed or uniform in-feed baler for final collection. The results showed mean ash content to range from 11.5 to 28.2 % depending on operational choice. Resulting impacts on feedstock costs for a biochemical conversion process range from $5.38 to $22.30 Mg-1 based on the loss of convertible dry matter and ash disposal costs. Collection techniques that minimized soil contact (shred flail or nonmowed stubble) were shown to prevent excessive ash contamination, whereas more aggressive techniques (mowing and use of a wheel rake) caused greater soil disturbance and entrainment within the final baled material. Material sampling and testing were shown to become more difficult as within-bale ash variability increased, creating uncertainty around feedstock quality and the associated costs of ash mitigation.

  15. 502 IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON CONTROL SYSTEMS TECHNOLOGY, VOL. 7, NO. 4, JULY 1999 Multivariable Nonlinear Predictive Control of Cement Mills

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bastin, Georges

    Nonlinear Predictive Control of Cement Mills Lalo Magni, Georges Bastin, and Vincent Wertz Abstract--A new multivariable controller for cement milling circuits is presented, which is based on a nonlinear model: a change of hardness of the raw material. Index Terms--Cement industry, multivariable control systems

  16. Pitch pine (Pinus rigida Mill.) invasion of Cape Cod pond shores alters abiotic environment and inhibits indigenous

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Orians, Colin

    Pitch pine (Pinus rigida Mill.) invasion of Cape Cod pond shores alters abiotic environment 25 April 2003 Abstract Invasion by pitch pine (Pinus rigida Mill.) on coastal plain pond shores may that had been invaded by P. rigida and those that had not on two Cape Cod ponds. Soil under living pines

  17. Plant foliar disease suppression mediated by composted forms of paper mill residuals exhibits molecular features of induced resistance

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Goodman, Robert M.

    Plant foliar disease suppression mediated by composted forms of paper mill residuals exhibits Arabidopsis thaliana grown in soil from field plots amended with composted forms of paper mill residuals (PMR with plants grown in soil from field plots amended with a non-composted PMR or non-amended soils. Similar

  18. Bayesian models for elevated disease risk due to exposure to uranium mine and mill waste on the Navajo Nation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Huerta, Gabriel

    ForReview Only Bayesian models for elevated disease risk due to exposure to uranium mine and mill of Pharmacy, Community Environmental Health Program Keywords: abandoned uranium mines, conditionally specified to ex- posure to uranium mine and mill waste on the Navajo Nation Glenn A. Stark University of New

  19. 4.1 THE INTERACTION OF PULP MILL DISCHARGES WITH THE FRASER RIVER AND ITS SEDIMENTS by Bommanna G. Krishnappan

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1 4.1 THE INTERACTION OF PULP MILL DISCHARGES WITH THE FRASER RIVER AND ITS SEDIMENTS 4 WITH THE FRASER RIVER AND ITS SEDIMENTS The interaction of pulp mill effluent (PME) with cohesive suspended sediments has been discov- ered to significantly affect the transport and fate of sediment in the Athabasca

  20. Extended Kalman Filter Based Neural Networks Controller For Hot Strip Rolling mill

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Moussaoui, A. K. [Electrical Engineering Laboratory of Guelma (LGEG), BP.401, University of Guelma, 24000 (Algeria); Abbassi, H. A.; Bouazza, S. [Universite Badji Mokhtar BP 12--23000-Annaba Algerie (Algeria)

    2008-06-12

    The present paper deals with the application of an Extended Kalman filter based adaptive Neural-Network control scheme to improve the performance of a hot strip rolling mill. The suggested Neural Network model was implemented using Bayesian Evidence based training algorithm. The control input was estimated iteratively by an on-line extended Kalman filter updating scheme basing on the inversion of the learned neural networks model. The performance of the controller is evaluated using an accurate model estimated from real rolling mill input/output data, and the usefulness of the suggested method is proved.

  1. Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Surface Project: Project plan. Revision 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-08-11

    The Uranium Mill Tailings Radiation Control Act of 1978 (UMTRCA) [Public Law (PL) 95-604, 42 United States Code (USC) 7901], hereinafter referred to as the ``Act,`` authorizes the US Department of Energy (DOE) to stabilize and control surface tailings and ground water contamination. To fulfill this mission, the DOE has established two projects under the Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project Office. The Ground Water Project was established in April 1991 as a major project and a separate project plan will be prepared for that portion of the mission. This project plan covers the UMTRA Surface Project, a major system acquisition (MSA).

  2. The role of fiber property testing in the operations of American cotton mills 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Burns, William Henry

    1956-01-01

    THE BOLE OF FIBER PROPERTY TESTING IN THE OPERATIONS OF AMERICAN COTTON MILLS A Dissertation By WILLIAM H. BURNSit* Submitted to the Graduate School of thjB Agricultural and Mechanical College of Texas in partial fulfillment... of the requirements for the degree DOCTOR OF PHILOSOPHY May 1956 Major Subject: Agricultural Economics L! S R A P? y A <% W CbuLtGc Or IE';A3 THE HOLE OF FIBER PROPERTY TESTING IN THE OPERATIONS OF AMERICAN COTTON MILLS A Dissertation By WILLIAM H. BURNS...

  3. Hopf Soliton Solutions from Low Energy Effective Action of SU(2) Yang-Mills Theory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    N. Sawado; N. Shiiki; S. Tanaka

    2005-11-17

    The Skyrme-Faddeev-Niemi (SFN) model which is an O(3) $\\sigma$ model in three dimensional space up to fourth-order in the first derivative is regarded as a low-energy effective theory of SU(2) Yang-Mills theory. One can show from the Wilsonian renormalization group argument that the effective action of Yang-Mills theory recovers the SFN in the infrared region. However, the theory contains another fourth-order term which destabilizes the soliton solution. In this paper we derive an extended action including second derivative terms and obtain soliton solutions numerically. A new topological lower bound formula is infered for the extended action.

  4. Hagedorn spectrum and equation of state of Yang-Mills theories

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Michele Caselle; Alessandro Nada; Marco Panero

    2015-09-23

    We present a novel lattice calculation of the equation of state of SU(2) Yang-Mills theory in the confining phase. We show that a gas of massive, non-interacting glueballs describes remarkably well the results, provided that a bosonic closed-string model is used to derive an exponentially growing Hagedorn spectrum for the heavy glueball states with no free parameters. This effective model can be applied to SU(3) Yang-Mills theory and the theoretical prediction agrees nicely with the lattice results reported by Bors\\'anyi et al. in JHEP 07 (2012) 056.

  5. Vibration mills in the manufacturing technology of slurry fuel from unbeneficiated coal sludge

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    E.G. Gorlov; A.I. Seregin; G.S. Khodakov [Institute for Fossil Fuels, Moscow (Russia)

    2008-08-15

    Coal-water slurry fuel (CWSF) is economically viable provided that its ash content does not exceed 30% and the amount water in the fuel is at most 45%. Two impoundments were revealed that have considerable reserves of waste coal useful for commercial manufacture of CWSF without the beneficiation step. One of the CWSF manufacture steps is the comminution of coal sludge to have a particle size required by the combustion conditions. Vibration mills, which are more compact and energy-intensive that drum mills, can be used in the CWSG manufacture process. The rheological characteristics of CWSF obtained from unbeneficiated waste coal were determined.

  6. WETTABILITY ALTERATION OF POROUS MEDIA TO GAS-WETTING FOR IMPROVING PRODUCTIVITY AND INJECTIVITY IN GAS-LIQUID FLOWS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Abbas Firoozabadi

    2003-12-01

    Wettability alteration to intermediate gas-wetting in porous media by treatment with FC-759, a fluoropolymer polymer, has been studied experimentally. Berea sandstone was used as the main rock sample in our work and its wettability before and after chemical treatment was studied at various temperatures from 25 to 93 C. We also studied recovery performance for both gas/oil and oil/water systems for Berea sandstone before and after wettability alteration by chemical treatment. Our experimental study shows that chemical treatment with FC-759 can result in: (1) wettability alteration from strong liquid-wetting to stable intermediate gas-wetting at room temperature and at elevated temperatures; (2) neutral wetting for gas, oil, and water phases in two-phase flow; (3) significant increase in oil mobility for gas/oil system; and (4) improved recovery behavior for both gas/oil and oil/water systems. This work reveals a potential for field application for improved gas-well deliverability and well injectivity by altering the rock wettability around wellbore in gas condensate reservoirs from strong liquid-wetting to intermediate gas-wetting.

  7. Effects of feeding stimulant and insecticide mixtures on feeding response and morality of adult male corn earworm, Helicoverpa zea (Boddie)(Lepidoptera:Noctuidae) 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Clemens, Christopher Glen

    1996-01-01

    stimulants on feeding behavior and mortality of pheromone trap captured adult male corn earworms, Helicoverpa zea (Boddie), to screen and evaluate toxicants for use in an attracticide formulation. Commercially-available formulations of acephate, boric acid...

  8. High Speed/ Low Effluent Process for Ethanol

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    M. Clark Dale

    2006-10-30

    n this project, BPI demonstrated a new ethanol fermentation technology, termed the High Speed/ Low Effluent (HS/LE) process on both lab and large pilot scale as it would apply to wet mill and/or dry mill corn ethanol production. The HS/LE process allows very rapid fermentations, with 18 to 22% sugar syrups converted to 9 to 11% ethanol ‘beers’ in 6 to 12 hours using either a ‘consecutive batch’ or ‘continuous cascade’ implementation. This represents a 5 to 8X increase in fermentation speeds over conventional 72 hour batch fermentations which are the norm in the fuel ethanol industry today. The ‘consecutive batch’ technology was demonstrated on a large pilot scale (4,800 L) in a dry mill corn ethanol plant near Cedar Rapids, IA (Xethanol Biofuels). The pilot demonstrated that 12 hour fermentations can be accomplished on an industrial scale in a non-sterile industrial environment. Other objectives met in this project included development of a Low Energy (LE) Distillation process which reduces the energy requirements for distillation from about 14,000 BTU/gal steam ($0.126/gal with natural gas @ $9.00 MCF) to as low as 0.40 KW/gal electrical requirements ($0.022/gal with electricity @ $0.055/KWH). BPI also worked on the development of processes that would allow application of the HS/LE fermentation process to dry mill ethanol plants. A High-Value Corn ethanol plant concept was developed to produce 1) corn germ/oil, 2) corn bran, 3) ethanol, 4) zein protein, and 5) nutritional protein, giving multiple higher value products from the incoming corn stream.

  9. A prismatic-core design for a milling machine component A. Srikantha Phani, S.P. Mai, N.A. Fleck, J. Woodhouse

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fleck, Norman A.

    A prismatic-core design for a milling machine component A. Srikantha Phani, S.P. Mai, N.A. Fleck, J-functional structure for potential application in future generation high speed, ultra precise milling machines dynamic stiffness for milling machine application. The sandwich core gives multi-functional capabilities

  10. Field Testing of a Wet FGD Additive for Enhanced Mercury Control

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gary Blythe; MariJon Owens

    2007-12-31

    This document is the final report for DOE-NETL Cooperative Agreement DE-FC26-04NT42309, 'Field Testing of a Wet FGD Additive'. The objective of the project has been to demonstrate the use of two flue gas desulfurization (FGD) additives, Evonik Degussa Corporation's TMT-15 and Nalco Company's Nalco 8034, to prevent the re-emission of elemental mercury (Hg{sup 0}) in flue gas exiting wet FGD systems on coal-fired boilers. Furthermore, the project was intended to demonstrate whether such additives can be used to precipitate most of the mercury (Hg) removed in the wet FGD system as a fine salt that can be separated from the FGD liquor and bulk solid byproducts for separate disposal. The project involved pilot- and full-scale tests of the additives in wet FGD absorbers. The tests were intended to determine required additive dosages to prevent Hg{sup 0} re-emissions and to separate mercury from the normal FGD byproducts for three coal types: Texas lignite/Powder River Basin (PRB) coal blend, high-sulfur Eastern bituminous coal, and low-sulfur Eastern bituminous coal. The project team consists of URS Group, Inc., EPRI, Luminant Power (was TXU Generation Company LP), Southern Company, IPL (an AES company), Evonik Degussa Corporation and the Nalco Company. Luminant Power provided the Texas lignite/PRB co-fired test site for pilot FGD tests and project cost sharing. Southern Company provided the low-sulfur Eastern bituminous coal host site for wet scrubbing tests, the pilot- and full-scale jet bubbling reactor (JBR) FGD systems tested, and project cost sharing. IPL provided the high-sulfur Eastern bituminous coal full-scale FGD test site and cost sharing. Evonik Degussa Corporation provided the TMT-15 additive, and the Nalco Company provided the Nalco 8034 additive. Both companies also supplied technical support to the test program as in-kind cost sharing. The project was conducted in six tasks. Of the six tasks, Task 1 involved project planning and Task 6 involved management and reporting. The other four tasks involved field testing on FGD systems, either at pilot or full scale. These four tasks included: Task 2 - Pilot Additive Testing in Texas Lignite Flue Gas; Task 3 - Full-scale FGD Additive Testing in High-sulfur Eastern Bituminous Flue Gas; Task 4 - Pilot Wet Scrubber Additive Tests at Plant Yates; and Task 5 - Full-scale Additive Tests at Plant Yates. The pilot-scale tests were completed in 2005 and the full-scale test using high-sulfur coal was completed in 2006; only the TMT-15 additive was tested in these efforts. The Task 5 full-scale additive tests conducted at Southern Company's Plant Yates Unit 1 were completed in 2007, and both the TMT-15 and Nalco 8034 additives were tested.

  11. Gravity as the square of Yang-Mills: implications for N=8 Supergravity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sudarshan Ananth

    2009-02-18

    The pure gravity Lagrangian can be written as the "square" of the pure Yang-Mills Lagrangian to second order in coupling constants. This paper uses this form of the gravity Lagrangian as a starting point to arrive at a compact light-cone superspace Lagrangian for N=8 Supergravity to order $\\kappa$^2.

  12. Longleaf pine (Pinus palustris Mill.) fire scars reveal new details of a frequent fire regime

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stambaugh, Michael C

    Longleaf pine (Pinus palustris Mill.) fire scars reveal new details of a frequent fire regime, University of Missouri ­ Columbia, MO 65211, USA Abstract Question: How frequent and variable were fire disturbances in longleaf pine ecosystems? Has the frequency and seasonality of fire events changed during

  13. The low-lying spectrum of N=1 supersymmetric Yang-Mills theory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bergner, Georg; Montvay, Istvan; Muenster, Gernot; Piemonte, Stefano

    2015-01-01

    The spectrum of the lightest bound states in N=1 supersymmetric Yang-Mills theory with SU(2) gauge group, calculated on the lattice, is presented. The masses have first been extrapolated towards vanishing gluino mass and then to the continuum limit. The final picture is consistent with the formation of degenerate supermultiplets.

  14. Key programmatic steps and activities for implementing the Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action Project. [UMTRA Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1985-07-01

    The Uranium Mill Tailings Radiation Control Act of 1978 (UMTRCA) was enacted based upon findings by Congress that uranium mill tailings located at active and inactive hazard to the public, and that protection of the public health, safety and welfare, and the regulations of interstate commerce, require that every reasonable effort be made to provide for the stabilization, disposal, and control in a safe and environmentally sound manner of such tailings in order to prevent or minimize radon diffusion into the environment and to prevent or minimize other environmental hazards from such tailings.'' A general understanding of the steps leading to elimination of the hazards associated with designated uranium mill tailings sites, and the parties involved in that effort, are presented in this document. A representative schedule is also presented in this document to show both program sequence and activity interdependence. Those activities that have the most potential to influence program duration, because of the significant amount of additional time that may be required, include identification and selection of a suitable site, field data collection delays due to weather, actual acquisition of the designated or alternate disposal site, construction delays due to weather, and site licensing. This document provides an understanding of the steps, the sequence, the parties involved, and a representative duration of activities leading to remedial action and cleanup at the designated inactive uranium mill tailings sites. 10 refs., 5 figs., 1 tab.

  15. Radiological survey of the inactive uranium-mill tailings at Ambrosia Lake, New Mexico

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Haywood, F.F.; Christian, D.J.; Ellis, B.S.; Hubbard, H.M. Jr.; Lorenzo, D.; Shinpaugh, W.H.

    1980-06-01

    The inactive uranium-mill tailings pile at Ambrosia Lake, New Mexico, contains approximately 1520 Ci of /sup 226/Ra in 2.4 million metric tons of tailings covering an area of 43 hectares. All of the former mill buildings were intact and, at the time of this survey, several were in use. The tailings have not been stabilized, but the crusty surface is reported to be resistant to wind erosion. The average gamma-ray exposure rate 1 m above the tailings is 720 ..mu..R/h while the average rate in the former mill area is 150 ..mu..R/h. The adjacent area, between the mill site, ponds, and tailings pile, has an average exposure rate of 230 ..mu..R/h. Gamma radiation measurements outside these areas, as well as the results of analyses of surface or near-surface sediment and soil samples, show fairly wide dispersion of contamination around the site. The subsurface distribution of /sup 226/Ra in 18 holes drilled at the site, calculated from gamma-ray monitoring data, is presented graphically and compared with measured concentrations in two holes.

  16. Programmatic Environmental Report for remedial actions at UMTRA (Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action) Project vicinity properties

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1985-03-01

    This Environmental Report (ER) examines the environmental consequences of implementing a remedial action that would remove radioactive uranium mill tailings and associated contaminated materials from 394 vicinity properties near 14 inactive uranium processing sites included in the Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project pursuant to Public Law 95--604, the Uranium Mill Tailings Radiation Control Act (UMTRCA) of 1978. Vicinity properties are those properties in the vicinity of the UMTRA Project inactive mill sites, either public or private, that are believed to be contaminated by residual radioactive material originating from one of the 14 inactive uranium processing sites, and which have been designated under Section 102(a)(1) of UMTRCA. The principal hazard associated with the contaminated properties results from the production of radon, a radioactive decay product of the radium contained in the tailings. Radon, a radioactive gas, can diffuse through the contaminated material and be released into the atmosphere where it and its radioactive decay products may be inhaled by humans. A second radiation exposure pathway results from the emission of gamma radiation from uranium decay products contained in the tailings. Gamma radiation emitted from contaminated material delivers an external exposure to the whole body. If the concentration of radon and its decay products is high enough and the exposure time long enough, or if the exposure to direct gamma radiation is long enough, cancers (i.e., excess health effects) may develop in persons living and working at the vicinity properties. 3 refs., 7 tabs.

  17. Environmental assessment of remedial action at the Slick Rock uranium mill tailings sites, Slick Rock, Colorado

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1995-01-01

    The Uranium Mill Tailings Radiation Control Act of 1978, hereafter referred to as the UMTRCA, authorized the US Department of Energy (DOE) to clean up two uranium mill tailings processing sites near Slick Rock, Colorado, in San Miguel County. The purpose of the cleanup is to reduce the potential health effects associated with the radioactive materials remaining on the processing sites and on vicinity properties (VPs) associated with the sites. The US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) promulgated standards for the UMTRCA that contained measures to control the contaminated materials and to protect the ground water from further degradation. The sites contain concrete foundations of mill buildings, tailings piles, and areas contaminated by windblown and waterborne radioactive tailings materials. The proposed action is to remediate the UC and NC sites by removing all contaminated materials within the designated site boundaries or otherwise associated with the sites, and relocating them to, and stabilizing them at, a location approximately 5 road mi (8 km) northeast of the processing sites on land administered by the US Bureau of Land Management (BLM). Remediation would be performed by the DOE`s Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project.

  18. Quantum Chaos in a Yang--Mills--Higgs System Luca Salasnich 1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Quantum Chaos in a Yang--Mills--Higgs System Luca Salasnich 1 Dipartimento di Matematica Pura ed to quantum chaos, i.e. the study of properties of quantum systems which are classically chaotic 9 theory 13) . In this paper we study quantum chaos in a field--theory schematic model. We analyze

  19. arXiv:heplat/0610123 Propagators in YangMills theory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Maas, Axel

    : 11.15.Ha 12.38.Aw Green's functions encode completely the nonĀ­perturbative properties of a quantum, Caixa Postal 369, 13560Ā­970 SĆ£o Carlos, SP, Brazil Abstract. Green's functions are gauge minimal Landau gauge. Keywords: YangĀ­Mills theory; Green's functions; Confinement; Gauge dependence PACS

  20. Designing fecal pellet surveys for snowshoe hares K.E. Hodges *, L.S. Mills

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mills, L. Scott

    Designing fecal pellet surveys for snowshoe hares K.E. Hodges *, L.S. Mills Wildlife Biology, 2003), some popular indices, like counts of fecal pellets, have been used to answer basic ecological pellets to examine long-term population dynamics at individual sites (Malloy, 2000; Krebs et al., 2001

  1. MIL-L-87177 and CLT:X-10 Lubricants Improve Electrical Connector Fretting Corrosion Behavior

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    AUKLAND,NEIL R.; HANLON,JAMES T.

    1999-10-12

    We have conducted a fretting research project using MIL-L-87177 and CLT: X-10 lubricants on Nano-miniature connectors. When they were fretted without lubricant, individual connectors first exceeded our 0.5 ohm failure criteria from 2,341 to 45,238 fretting cycles. With additional fretting, their contact resistance increased to more than 100,000 ohms. Unmodified MIL-L-87177 lubricant delayed the onset of first failure to between 430,000 and over 20,000,000 fretting cycles. MIL-L-87177 modified by addition of Teflon powder delayed first failure to beyond 5 million fretting cycles. Best results were obtained when Teflon was used and also when both the straight and modified lubricants were poured into and then out of the connector. CLT: X-10 lubricant delayed the onset of first failure to beyond 55 million cycles in one test where a failure was actually observed and to beyond 20 million cycles in another that was terminated without failure. CLT: X-10 recovered an unlubricated connector driven deeply into failure, with six failed pins recovering immediately and four more recovering during an additional 420 thousand fretting cycles. MIL-L-87177 was not able to recover a connector under similar conditions.

  2. Chatter prediction from orthogonal cutting force data and stability analysis of peripheral end milling 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Arumugam, Arunkumar

    2000-01-01

    Bridegport Discovery Torq-cut 22 vertical milling center. Nonlinear system tools are an integral part of the analysis of complex dynamic systems. State Space Reconstruction by the method of delays is used in this work to reconstruct the attractor of the tool...

  3. John Stuart Mill, Victorian Liberalism, and the Failure of Cooperative Production

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Betts, Jocelyn Paul

    2015-01-01

    by the 'Probable futurity' to give up a salary of two hundred pounds a year in order to become a cooperative employee earning one pound a week.5 The chapter has understandably been cited as an important aspect of Mill's establishing of a 'two-way relationship...

  4. Self-Adaptive Leasing for Jini Kevin Bowers Kevin Mills and Scott Rose

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mills, Kevin

    Self-Adaptive Leasing for Jini Kevin Bowers Kevin Mills and Scott Rose Renssalaer Polytechnic, and system size. Then, we consider two self-adaptive algorithms that enable a Jini system, given a fixed compare performance of these self-adaptive algorithms against each other, and against fixed lease periods

  5. Rapid and precise scanning helium ion microscope milling of solid-state nanopores for biomolecule detection

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Qin, Lu-Chang

    Rapid and precise scanning helium ion microscope milling of solid-state nanopores for biomolecule detection This article has been downloaded from IOPscience. Please scroll down to see the full text article Nanotechnology 22 (2011) 285310 (6pp) doi:10.1088/0957-4484/22/28/285310 Rapid and precise scanning helium ion

  6. LLaannggeerrhhaannss LLaabb PPrroottooccoollss Handling of Dead Fish at Yates Mill Facility

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Langerhans, Brian

    LLaannggeerrhhaannss LLaabb PPrroottooccoollss Handling of Dead Fish at Yates Mill Facility If a study fish is found dead, preserve it and return it to the lab for DRILL recording. If you are going to DCL shortly after finding the fish: 1. Put it in a plastic bag and bring it to DCL. 2. Put

  7. Density Functional Theory for Protein Transfer Free Energy Eric A. Mills and Steven S. Plotkin*

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Plotkin, Steven S.

    Density Functional Theory for Protein Transfer Free Energy Eric A. Mills and Steven S. Plotkin ABSTRACT: We cast the problem of protein transfer free energy within the formalism of density functional excluded volume, solvent-accessible surface area, and temperature dependence of the transfer free energy

  8. Preliminary Evaluation of Cesium Distribution for Wet Sieving Process Planned for Soil Decontamination in Japan - 13104

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Enokida, Y.; Tanada, Y.; Hirabayashi, D.; Sawada, K.

    2013-07-01

    For the purpose of decontaminating radioactive cesium from a huge amount of soil, which has been estimated to be 1.2x10{sup 8} m{sup 3} by excavating to a 5-cm depth from the surface of Fukushima Prefecture where a severe nuclear accident occurred at TEPCO's power generating site and has emitted a significant amount of radioactive materials, mainly radioactive cesium, a wet sieving process was selected as one of effective methods available in Japan. Some private companies have demonstrated this process for soil treatment in the Fukushima area by testing at their plants. The results were very promising, and a full-fledged application is expected to follow. In the present study, we spiked several aqueous samples containing soil collected from an industrial wet sieving plant located near our university for the recycling of construction wastes with non-radioactive cesium hydroxide. The present study provides scientific data concerning the effectiveness in volume reduction of the contaminated soil by a wet sieving process as well as the cesium distribution between the liquid phase and clay minerals for each sub-process of the full-scale one, but a simulating plant equipped with a process of coagulating sedimentation and operational safety fundamentals for the plant. Especially for the latter aspect, the study showed that clay minerals of submicron size strongly bind a high content of cesium, which was only slightly removed by coagulation with natural sedimentation (1 G) nor centrifugal sedimentation (3,700 G) and some of the cesium may be transferred to the effluent or recycled water. By applying ultracentrifugation (257,000 G), most of submicron clay minerals containing cesium was removed, and the cesium amount which might be transferred to the effluent or recycled water, could be reduced to less than 2.3 % of the original design by the addition of a cesium barrier consisting of ultracentrifugation or a hollow fiber membrane. (authors)

  9. PILOT TESTING OF MERCURY OXIDATION CATALYSTS FOR UPSTREAM OF WET FGD SYSTEMS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gary M. Blythe

    2003-05-01

    This document summarizes progress on Cooperative Agreement DE-FC26-01NT41185, ''Pilot Testing of Mercury Oxidation Catalysts for Upstream of Wet FGD Systems,'' during the time period January 1, 2003 through March 31, 2003. The objective of this project is to demonstrate at pilot scale the use of solid honeycomb catalysts to promote the oxidation of elemental mercury in the flue gas from coal combustion. The project is being funded by the U.S. DOE National Energy Technology Laboratory under Cooperative Agreement DE-FC26-01NT41185. EPRI, Great River Energy (GRE), and City Public Service (CPS) of San Antonio are project cofunders. URS Group is the prime contractor. The mercury control process under development uses catalyst materials applied to honeycomb substrates to promote the oxidation of elemental mercury in the flue gas from coal-fired power plants that have wet lime or limestone flue gas desulfurization (FGD) systems. Oxidized mercury is removed in the wet FGD absorbers and co-precipitates with the byproducts from the FGD system. The current project is testing previously identified, effective catalyst materials at a larger, pilot scale and in a commercial form, to provide engineering data for future full-scale designs. The pilot-scale tests will continue for up to 14 months at each of two sites to provide longer-term catalyst life data. This is the sixth full reporting period for the subject Cooperative Agreement. During this period, project efforts included continued operation of the pilot unit with three catalysts, conducting catalyst activity measurements, and procuring the fourth catalyst, all for the GRE Coal Creek pilot unit site. Laboratory efforts were also conducted to support catalyst selection for the second pilot unit site, at CPS' Spruce Plant. This technical progress report provides an update on these efforts.

  10. PILOT TESTING OF MERCURY OXIDATION CATALYSTS FOR UPSTREAM OF WET FGD SYSTEMS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gary M. Blythe

    2002-10-04

    This document summarizes progress on Cooperative Agreement DE-FC26-01NT41185, Pilot Testing of Mercury Oxidation Catalysts for Upstream of Wet FGD Systems, during the time period July 1, 2002 through September 30, 2002. The objective of this project is to demonstrate at pilot scale the use of solid honeycomb catalysts to promote the oxidation of elemental mercury in the flue gas from coal combustion. The project is being funded by the U.S. DOE National Energy Technology Laboratory under Cooperative Agreement DE-FC26-01NT41185. EPRI, Great River Energy (GRE), and City Public Service (CPS) of San Antonio are project co-funders. URS Group is the prime contractor. The mercury catalytic oxidation process under development uses catalyst materials applied to honeycomb substrates to promote the oxidation of elemental mercury in the flue gas from coal-fired power plants that have wet lime or limestone flue gas desulfurization (FGD) systems. Oxidized mercury is removed in the wet FGD absorbers and co-precipitates in a stable form with the byproducts from the FGD system. The coprecipitated mercury does not appear to adversely affect the disposal or reuse properties of the FGD byproduct. The current project will test previously identified, effective catalyst materials at a larger, pilot scale and in a commercial form, so as to provide engineering data for future full-scale designs. The pilot-scale tests will continue for up to 14 months at each of two sites to provide longer-term catalyst life data. This is the fourth full reporting period for the subject Cooperative Agreement. During this period, most of the project efforts were related to completing, installing and starting up the pilot unit, completing laboratory runs to size catalysts, and procuring catalysts for the pilot unit. This technical progress report provides an update on these efforts.

  11. PILOT TESTING OF MERCURY OXIDATION CATALYSTS FOR UPSTREAM OF WET FGD SYSTEMS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gary M. Blythe

    2003-07-01

    This document summarizes progress on Cooperative Agreement DE-FC26-01NT41185, ''Pilot Testing of Mercury Oxidation Catalysts for Upstream of Wet FGD Systems,'' during the time-period April 1, 2003 through June 30, 2003. The objective of this project is to demonstrate at pilot scale the use of solid honeycomb catalysts to promote the oxidation of elemental mercury in the flue gas from coal combustion. The project is being funded by the U.S. DOE National Energy Technology Laboratory under Cooperative Agreement DE-FC26-01NT41185. EPRI, Great River Energy (GRE), and City Public Service (CPS) of San Antonio are project cofunders. URS Group is the prime contractor. The mercury control process under development uses catalyst materials applied to honeycomb substrates to promote the oxidation of elemental mercury in the flue gas from coal-fired power plants that have wet lime or limestone flue gas desulfurization (FGD) systems. Oxidized mercury is removed in the wet FGD absorbers and co-precipitates with the byproducts from the FGD system. The current project is testing previously identified, effective catalyst materials at a larger, pilot scale and in a commercial form, to provide engineering data for future full-scale designs. The pilot-scale tests will continue for approximately 14 months at each of two sites to provide longer-term catalyst life data. This is the seventh full reporting period for the subject Cooperative Agreement. During this period, project efforts included continued operation of the first pilot unit, conducting catalyst activity measurements, installing sonic horns for on-line catalyst cleaning, and installing the fourth catalyst, all for the GRE Coal Creek site. CPS began installation of the second mercury oxidation catalyst pilot unit at their Spruce Plant during the quarter. Laboratory efforts were conducted to support catalyst selection for that second pilot unit. This technical progress report provides an update on these efforts.

  12. PILOT TESTING OF MERCURY OXIDATION CATALYSTS FOR UPSTREAM OF WET FGD SYSTEMS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gary M. Blythe

    2002-07-17

    This document summarizes progress on Cooperative Agreement DE-FC26-01NT41185, Pilot Testing of Mercury Oxidation Catalysts for Upstream of Wet FGD Systems, during the time period April 1, 2002 through June 30, 2002. The objective of this project is to demonstrate at pilot scale the use of solid honeycomb catalysts to promote the oxidation of elemental mercury in the flue gas from coal combustion. The project is being funded by the U.S. DOE National Energy Technology Laboratory under Cooperative Agreement DE-FC26-01NT41185. EPRI, Great River Energy (GRE), and City Public Service (CPS) of San Antonio are project co-funders. URS Group is the prime contractor. The mercury catalytic oxidation process under development uses catalyst materials applied to honeycomb substrates to promote the oxidation of elemental mercury in the flue gas from coal-fired power plants that have wet lime or limestone flue gas desulfurization (FGD) systems. Oxidized mercury is removed in the wet FGD absorbers and co-precipitates in a stable form with the byproducts from the FGD system. The co-precipitated mercury does not appear to adversely affect the disposal or reuse properties of the FGD byproduct. The current project will test previously identified, effective catalyst materials at a larger, pilot scale and in a commercial form, so as to provide engineering data for future full-scale designs. The pilot-scale tests will continue for up to 14 months at each of two sites to provide longer-term catalyst life data. This is the third full reporting period for the subject Cooperative Agreement. During this period, most of the project efforts were related to constructing the pilot unit and conducting laboratory runs to help size catalysts for the pilot unit. This technical progress report provides an update on these two efforts.

  13. PILOT TESTING OF MERCURY OXIDATION CATALYSTS FOR UPSTREAM OF WET FGD SYSTEMS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gary M. Blythe

    2003-01-21

    This document summarizes progress on Cooperative Agreement DE-FC26-01NT41185, Pilot Testing of Mercury Oxidation Catalysts for Upstream of Wet FGD Systems, during the time period October 1, 2002 through December 31, 2002. The objective of this project is to demonstrate at pilot scale the use of solid honeycomb catalysts to promote the oxidation of elemental mercury in the flue gas from coal combustion. The project is being funded by the U.S. DOE National Energy Technology Laboratory under Cooperative Agreement DE-FC26-01NT41185. EPRI, Great River Energy (GRE), and City Public Service (CPS) of San Antonio are project co-funders. URS Group is the prime contractor. The mercury catalytic oxidation process under development uses catalyst materials applied to honeycomb substrates to promote the oxidation of elemental mercury in the flue gas from coal-fired power plants that have wet lime or limestone flue gas desulfurization (FGD) systems. Oxidized mercury is removed in the wet FGD absorbers and co-precipitates with the byproducts from the FGD system. The co-precipitated mercury does not appear to adversely affect the disposal or reuse properties of the FGD byproduct. The current project testing previously identified, effective catalyst materials at a larger, pilot scale and in a commercial form, to provide engineering data for future fullscale designs. The pilot-scale tests will continue for up to 14 months at each of two sites to provide longer-term catalyst life data. This is the fifth full reporting period for the subject Cooperative Agreement. During this period, project efforts included starting up the pilot unit with three catalysts at the first site, conducting catalyst activity measurements, completing comprehensive flue gas sampling and analyses, and procuring additional catalysts for the pilot unit. This technical progress report provides an update on these efforts.

  14. Energy Efficiency Feasibility Study and Resulting Plan for the Bay Mills Indian Community

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kushman, Chris

    2014-02-03

    In 2011 the Inter-Tribal Council of Michigan, Inc. was awarded an Energy Efficiency Development and Deployment in Indian Country grant from the U.S. Department of Energy’s Tribal Energy Program. This grant aimed to study select Bay Mills Indian Community community/government buildings to determine what is required to reduce each building’s energy consumption by 30%. The Bay Mills Indian Community (BMIC) buildings with the largest expected energy use were selected for this study and included the Bay Mills Ellen Marshall Health Center building, Bay Mills Indian Community Administration Building, Bay Mills Community College main campus, Bay Mills Charter School and the Waishkey Community Center buildings. These five sites are the largest energy consuming Community buildings and comprised the study area of this project titled “Energy Efficiency Feasibility Study and Resulting Plan for the Bay Mills Indian Community”. The end objective of this study, plan and the Tribe is to reduce the energy consumption at the Community’s most energy intensive buildings that will, in turn, reduce emissions at the source of energy production, reduce energy expenditures, create long lasting energy conscious practices and positively affect the quality of the natural environment. This project’s feasibility study and resulting plan is intended to act as a guide to the Community’s first step towards planned energy management within its buildings/facilities. It aims to reduce energy consumption by 30% or greater within the subject facilities with an emphasis on energy conservation and efficiency. The energy audits and related power consumption analyses conducted for this study revealed numerous significant energy conservation and efficiency opportunities for all of the subject sites/buildings. In addition, many of the energy conservation measures require no cost and serve to help balance other measures requiring capital investment. Reoccurring deficiencies relating to heating, cooling, thermostat setting inefficiencies, powering computers, lighting, items linked to weatherization and numerous other items were encountered that can be mitigated with the energy conservation measures developed and specified during the course of this project.

  15. Reductive stripping process for the recovery of uranium from wet-process phosphoric acid

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hurst, Fred J. (Oak Ridge, TN); Crouse, David J. (Oak Ridge, TN)

    1984-01-01

    A reductive stripping flow sheet for recovery of uranium from wet-process phosphoric acid is described. Uranium is stripped from a uranium-loaded organic phase by a redox reaction converting the uranyl to uranous ion. The uranous ion is reoxidized to the uranyl oxidation state to form an aqueous feed solution highly concentrated in uranium. Processing of this feed through a second solvent extraction cycle requires far less stripping reagent as compared to a flow sheet which does not include the reductive stripping reaction.

  16. Enhanced-wetting, boron-based liquid-metal ion source and method

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bozack, Michael J. (Opelika, AL); Swanson, Lynwood W. (Portland, OR); Bell, Anthony E. (McMinnville, OR); Clark Jr., William M. (Thousand Oaks, CA); Utlaut, Mark W. (Saugus, CA); Storms, Edmund K. (Los Alamos, NM)

    1999-01-01

    A binary, boron-based alloy as a source for field-emission-type, ion-beam generating devices, wherein boron predominates in the alloy, preferably with a presence of about 60 atomic percent. The other constituent in the alloy is selected from the group of elements consisting of nickel, palladium and platinum. Predominance of boron in these alloys, during operation, promotes combining of boron with trace impurities of carbon in the alloys to form B.sub.4 C and thus to promote wetting of an associated carbon support substrate.

  17. Enhanced-wetting, boron-based liquid-metal ion source and method

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bozack, M.J.; Swanson, L.W.; Bell, A.E.; Clark, W.M. Jr.; Utlaut, M.W.; Storms, E.K.

    1999-02-16

    A binary, boron-based alloy as a source for field-emission-type, ion-beam generating devices, wherein boron predominates in the alloy, preferably with a presence of about 60 atomic percent is disclosed. The other constituent in the alloy is selected from the group of elements consisting of nickel, palladium and platinum. Predominance of boron in these alloys, during operation, promotes combining of boron with trace impurities of carbon in the alloys to form B{sub 4}C and thus to promote wetting of an associated carbon support substrate. 1 fig.

  18. WET-NZ Multi-Mode Wave Energy Converter Advancement Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kopf, Steven

    2013-10-15

    The overall objective of the project was to verify the ocean wavelength functionality of the WET-NZ through targeted hydrodynamic testing at wave tank scale and controlled open sea deployment of a 1/2 scale (1:2) experimental device. This objective was accomplished through a series of tasks designed to achieve four specific goals: ?Wave Tank Testing to Characterize Hydrodynamic Characteristics; ? Open-Sea Testing of a New 1:2 Scale Experimental Model; ? Synthesis and Analysis to Demonstrate and Confirm TRL5/6 Status; ? Market Impact & Competitor Analysis, Business Plan and Commercialization Strategy.

  19. The effects of digital elevation model resolution on the calculation and predictions of topographic wetness indices.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Drover, Damion, Ryan

    2011-12-01

    One of the largest exports in the Southeast U.S. is forest products. Interest in biofuels using forest biomass has increased recently, leading to more research into better forest management BMPs. The USDA Forest Service, along with the Oak Ridge National Laboratory, University of Georgia and Oregon State University are researching the impacts of intensive forest management for biofuels on water quality and quantity at the Savannah River Site in South Carolina. Surface runoff of saturated areas, transporting excess nutrients and contaminants, is a potential water quality issue under investigation. Detailed maps of variable source areas and soil characteristics would therefore be helpful prior to treatment. The availability of remotely sensed and computed digital elevation models (DEMs) and spatial analysis tools make it easy to calculate terrain attributes. These terrain attributes can be used in models to predict saturated areas or other attributes in the landscape. With laser altimetry, an area can be flown to produce very high resolution data, and the resulting data can be resampled into any resolution of DEM desired. Additionally, there exist many maps that are in various resolutions of DEM, such as those acquired from the U.S. Geological Survey. Problems arise when using maps derived from different resolution DEMs. For example, saturated areas can be under or overestimated depending on the resolution used. The purpose of this study was to examine the effects of DEM resolution on the calculation of topographic wetness indices used to predict variable source areas of saturation, and to find the best resolutions to produce prediction maps of soil attributes like nitrogen, carbon, bulk density and soil texture for low-relief, humid-temperate forested hillslopes. Topographic wetness indices were calculated based on the derived terrain attributes, slope and specific catchment area, from five different DEM resolutions. The DEMs were resampled from LiDAR, which is a laser altimetry remote sensing method, obtained from the USDA Forest Service at Savannah River Site. The specific DEM resolutions were chosen because they are common grid cell sizes (10m, 30m, and 50m) used in mapping for management applications and in research. The finer resolutions (2m and 5m) were chosen for the purpose of determining how finer resolutions performed compared with coarser resolutions at predicting wetness and related soil attributes. The wetness indices were compared across DEMs and with each other in terms of quantile and distribution differences, then in terms of how well they each correlated with measured soil attributes. Spatial and non-spatial analyses were performed, and predictions using regression and geostatistics were examined for efficacy relative to each DEM resolution. Trends in the raw data and analysis results were also revealed.

  20. Regimes of Wetting Transitions on Superhydrophobic Textures Conditioned by Energy of Receding Contact Lines

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alexander L. Dubov; Ahmed Mourran; Martin Möller; Olga I. Vinogradova

    2015-06-23

    We discuss an evaporation-induced wetting transition on superhydrophobic stripes, and show that depending on the elastic energy of the deformed contact line, which determines the value of an instantaneous effective contact angle, two different scenarios occur. For relatively dilute stripes the receding angle is above 90$^\\circ$, and the sudden impalement transition happens due to an increase of a curvature of an evaporating drop. For dense stripes the slow impregnation transition commences when the effective angle reaches 90$^\\circ$ and represents the impregnation of the grooves from the triple contact line towards the drop center.