National Library of Energy BETA

Sample records for wet chemistry methods

  1. Mars Surveyor Program '01 Mars Environmental Compatibility Assessment wet chemistry lab

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kounaves, Samuel P.

    Mars Surveyor Program '01 Mars Environmental Compatibility Assessment wet chemistry lab: A sensor Department of Chemistry, Tufts University, Medford, Massachusetts, USA Michael H. Hecht, Sabrina M. Grannan] The Mars Environmental Compatibility Assessment (MECA) instrument was designed, built, and flight qualified

  2. Wet Chemistry experiments on the 2007 Phoenix Mars Scout Lander mission: Data analysis and results

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kounaves, Samuel P.

    Wet Chemistry experiments on the 2007 Phoenix Mars Scout Lander mission: Data analysis and results performed using the Wet Chemistry Laboratories on the 2007 Phoenix Mars Scout Lander. One soil sample.36(±0.3) mM, respectively. Results indicate that the leached portion of soils at the Phoenix landing site

  3. The MECA Wet Chemistry Laboratory on the 2007 Phoenix Mars Scout Lander

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kounaves, Samuel P.

    The MECA Wet Chemistry Laboratory on the 2007 Phoenix Mars Scout Lander Samuel P. Kounaves,1] To analyze and interpret the chemical record, the 2007 Phoenix Mars Lander includes four wet chemistry cells on the 2007 Phoenix Mars Scout Lander, J. Geophys. Res., 114, E00A19, doi:10.1029/2008JE003084. 1

  4. GAUSSIAN NOISE REMOVAL FOR WET CHEMISTRY DATA FROM THE PHOENIX MISSION , E. Oberlin2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ding, Wei

    GAUSSIAN NOISE REMOVAL FOR WET CHEMISTRY DATA FROM THE PHOENIX MISSION Y. Mu1 , W. Ding1 , X. Ren1 will result in misinter- pretation of the parent salt composition of the soil ana- lyzed by the Phoenix WCL. The WCL on board the phoenix lander performed the first comprehensive wet chemical analysis of the soil

  5. THE MARS ENVIRONMENTAL COMPATIBILITY ASSESSMENT (MECA) WET CHEMISTRY EXPERIMENT ON THE MARS '01 LANDER

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kounaves, Samuel P.

    THE MARS ENVIRONMENTAL COMPATIBILITY ASSESSMENT (MECA) WET CHEMISTRY EXPERIMENT ON THE MARS '01 of Chemistry, TuftsUniversity, Medford, MA, 02155 4 Mineral Processing Department, West Virginia University, Morgantown, WV, 26507 Introduction. The Mars Environmental Compatibility Assessment (MECA) is an instrument

  6. Wet/dry cooling tower and method

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Glicksman, Leon R. (Lynnfield, MA); Rohsenow, Warren R. (Waban, MA)

    1981-01-01

    A wet/dry cooling tower wherein a liquid to-be-cooled is flowed along channels of a corrugated open surface or the like, which surface is swept by cooling air. The amount of the surface covered by the liquid is kept small compared to the dry part thereof so that said dry part acts as a fin for the wet part for heat dissipation.

  7. Density-Functional Theory and Quantum Chemistry Studies on "dry" and "wet"

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alavi, Ali

    Density-Functional Theory and Quantum Chemistry Studies on "dry" and "wet" NaCl(001) vorgelegt von essential role as a food preserva- tive. However, many fundamental physical and chemical properties of Na), and defects on NaCl(001) surfaces have been examined with density-functional theory within the plane

  8. IMPROVED QUASISTEADYSTATEAPPROXIMATION METHODS FOR ATMOSPHERIC CHEMISTRY INTEGRATION #

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jay, Laurent O.

    IMPROVED QUASI­STEADY­STATE­APPROXIMATION METHODS FOR ATMOSPHERIC CHEMISTRY INTEGRATION # L. O. JAY QSSA are presented. Key words. atmospheric chemistry, sti# ordinary di#erential equations, quasi PII. S1064827595283033 1. Introduction. As our scientific understanding of atmospheric chemistry

  9. Method for wetting a boron alloy to graphite

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Storms, E.K.

    1987-08-21

    A method is provided for wetting a graphite substrate and spreading a a boron alloy over the substrate. The wetted substrate may be in the form of a needle for an effective ion emission source. The method may also be used to wet a graphite substrate for subsequent joining with another graphite substrate or other metal, or to form a protective coating over a graphite substrate. A noneutectic alloy of boron is formed with a metal selected from the group consisting of nickel (Ni), palladium (Pd), and platinum (Pt) with excess boron, i.e., and atomic percentage of boron effective to precipitate boron at a wetting temperature of less than the liquid-phase boundary temperature of the alloy. The alloy is applied to the substrate and the graphite substrate is then heated to the wetting temperature and maintained at the wetting temperature for a time effective for the alloy to wet and spread over the substrate. The excess boron is evenly dispersed in the alloy and is readily available to promote the wetting and spreading action of the alloy. 1 fig.

  10. Development of a two-body wet abrasion test method with attention...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Development of a two-body wet abrasion test method with attention to the effects of reused abradant Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Development of a two-body wet...

  11. A wet chemistry approach to sub-micron, removable flip chip interconnects.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rowen, Adam M.; Barker, Joy M.; Gillen, J. Rusty; Orendorff, Christopher J.; Arrington, Christian L.; Yelton, William Graham

    2008-08-01

    Higher performance is the main driver in the integrated circuit (IC) market, but along with added function comes the cost of increased input/output connections and larger die sizes. Space saving approaches aimed at solving these challenges includes two technologies; 3D stacking (3D-ICs) and flip chip assemblies. Emerging ICs require sub-micron scale interconnects which include vias for 3D-ICs and bump bonds for flip chips. Photolithographic techniques are commonly used to prepare templates followed by metal vapor deposition to create flip chip bump bonds. Both the lithography step and the metal properties required for bump bonding contribute to limiting this approach to a minimum bump size of -10 ?m. Here, we present a wet chemistry approach to fabricating uniform bump bonds of tunable size and height down to the nanoscale. Nanosphere lithography (NSL), a soft lithographic technique, is used to create a bump bond template or mask for nanoscale bumps. Electrochemical deposition is also used through photoresist templates to create uniform bump bonds across large area wafers or dies. This template approach affords bumps with tunable diameters from 100s of nanometers to microns (allowing for tunable interconnect pitch and via diameters) while the use of constant current electroplating gives uniform bump height over large areas (>1 cm{sup 2}).

  12. Wet-chemical systems and methods for producing black silicon substrates

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Yost, Vernon; Yuan, Hao-Chih; Page, Matthew

    2015-05-19

    A wet-chemical method of producing a black silicon substrate. The method comprising soaking single crystalline silicon wafers in a predetermined volume of a diluted inorganic compound solution. The substrate is combined with an etchant solution that forms a uniform noble metal nanoparticle induced Black Etch of the silicon wafer, resulting in a nanoparticle that is kinetically stabilized. The method comprising combining with an etchant solution having equal volumes acetonitrile/acetic acid:hydrofluoric acid:hydrogen peroxide.

  13. MULTIGRID METHOD FOR MODELING MULTIDIMENSIONAL COMBUSTION WITH DETAILED CHEMISTRY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    equations can be solved by using the existing CFD code, therefore most efforts towards modeling combustion, the development of very efficient CFD methods and reaction modeling method is equally important in combustionMULTIGRID METHOD FOR MODELING MULTI­DIMENSIONAL COMBUSTION WITH DETAILED CHEMISTRY Xiaoqing Zheng

  14. IMPROVED QUASI-STEADY-STATE-APPROXIMATION METHODS FOR ATMOSPHERIC CHEMISTRY INTEGRATION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jay, Laurent O.

    IMPROVED QUASI-STEADY-STATE-APPROXIMATION METHODS FOR ATMOSPHERIC CHEMISTRY INTEGRATION L. O. JAY are presented. Key words. atmospheric chemistry, stiff ordinary differential equations, quasi PII. S1064827595283033 1. Introduction. As our scientific understanding of atmospheric chemistry

  15. Method and apparatus for combinatorial chemistry

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Foote, Robert S. (Oak Ridge, TN)

    2012-06-05

    A method and apparatus are provided for performing light-directed reactions in spatially addressable channels within a plurality of channels. One aspect of the invention employs photoactivatable reagents in solutions disposed into spatially addressable flow streams to control the parallel synthesis of molecules immobilized within the channels. The reagents may be photoactivated within a subset of channels at the site of immobilized substrate molecules or at a light-addressable site upstream from the substrate molecules. The method and apparatus of the invention find particularly utility in the synthesis of biopolymer arrays, e.g., oligonucleotides, peptides and carbohydrates, and in the combinatorial synthesis of small molecule arrays for drug discovery.

  16. Method and apparatus for combinatorial chemistry

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Foote, Robert S.

    2007-02-20

    A method and apparatus are provided for performing light-directed reactions in spatially addressable channels within a plurality of channels. One aspect of the invention employs photoactivatable reagents in solutions disposed into spatially addressable flow streams to control the parallel synthesis of molecules immobilized within the channels. The reagents may be photoactivated within a subset of channels at the site of immobilized substrate molecules or at a light-addressable site upstream from the substrate molecules. The method and apparatus of the invention find particularly utility in the synthesis of biopolymer arrays, e.g., oligonucleotides, peptides and carbohydrates, and in the combinatorial synthesis of small molecule arrays for drug discovery.

  17. Analytical chemistry methods for metallic core components: Revision March 1985

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1985-03-01

    This standard provides analytical chemistry methods for the analysis of alloys used to fabricate core components. These alloys are 302, 308, 316, 316-Ti, and 321 stainless steels and 600 and 718 Inconels and they may include other 300-series stainless steels.

  18. Manual of analytical methods for the Industrial Hygiene Chemistry Laboratory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Greulich, K.A.; Gray, C.E. (comp.)

    1991-08-01

    This Manual is compiled from techniques used in the Industrial Hygiene Chemistry Laboratory of Sandia National Laboratories in Albuquerque, New Mexico. The procedures are similar to those used in other laboratories devoted to industrial hygiene practices. Some of the methods are standard; some, modified to suit our needs; and still others, developed at Sandia. The authors have attempted to present all methods in a simple and concise manner but in sufficient detail to make them readily usable. It is not to be inferred that these methods are universal for any type of sample, but they have been found very reliable for the types of samples mentioned.

  19. Chemistry

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Industrial Chemistry Top Journals Journal of the American Chemical Society Angewandte Chemie & Angewandte Chemie, international edition in English Chemical Communications Chemical...

  20. Test method for auger electron spectroscopy(AES) evaluation of oxide layer of wetted surfaces of passivated 316L stainless steel components

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Semiconductor Equipement and Materials International. San José, CA

    2002-01-01

    Test method for auger electron spectroscopy(AES) evaluation of oxide layer of wetted surfaces of passivated 316L stainless steel components

  1. Enhanced-wetting, boron-based liquid-metal ion source and method

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bozack, Michael J. (Opelika, AL); Swanson, Lynwood W. (Portland, OR); Bell, Anthony E. (McMinnville, OR); Clark Jr., William M. (Thousand Oaks, CA); Utlaut, Mark W. (Saugus, CA); Storms, Edmund K. (Los Alamos, NM)

    1999-01-01

    A binary, boron-based alloy as a source for field-emission-type, ion-beam generating devices, wherein boron predominates in the alloy, preferably with a presence of about 60 atomic percent. The other constituent in the alloy is selected from the group of elements consisting of nickel, palladium and platinum. Predominance of boron in these alloys, during operation, promotes combining of boron with trace impurities of carbon in the alloys to form B.sub.4 C and thus to promote wetting of an associated carbon support substrate.

  2. Enhanced-wetting, boron-based liquid-metal ion source and method

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bozack, M.J.; Swanson, L.W.; Bell, A.E.; Clark, W.M. Jr.; Utlaut, M.W.; Storms, E.K.

    1999-02-16

    A binary, boron-based alloy as a source for field-emission-type, ion-beam generating devices, wherein boron predominates in the alloy, preferably with a presence of about 60 atomic percent is disclosed. The other constituent in the alloy is selected from the group of elements consisting of nickel, palladium and platinum. Predominance of boron in these alloys, during operation, promotes combining of boron with trace impurities of carbon in the alloys to form B{sub 4}C and thus to promote wetting of an associated carbon support substrate. 1 fig.

  3. NUMERICAL ALGORITHMS IN CHEMISTRY: ALGEBRAIC METHODS. REPORT ON THE WORKSHOP

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Authors, Various

    2011-01-01

    method or is known as Jacobi's method. elements of A. Here Dcalculations. The Jacobi method can similarly be acceleratedFor the optimally extrapolated Jacobi method,with A positive

  4. 5.068 Physical Methods in Inorganic Chemistry, Spring 2005

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mueller, Peter

    Introduction to the study of physical methods to probe the electronic and geometric structure of inorganic compounds. Included are electronic photoelectron spectroscopy; vibrational and rotational spectroscopy; magnetic ...

  5. Method for predicting dry mechanical properties from wet wood and standing trees

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Meglen, Robert R.; Kelley, Stephen S.

    2003-08-12

    A method for determining the dry mechanical strength for a green wood comprising: illuminating a surface of the wood to be determined with light between 350-2,500 nm, the wood having a green moisture content; analyzing the surface using a spectrometric method, the method generating a first spectral data, and using a multivariate analysis to predict the dry mechanical strength of green wood when dry by comparing the first spectral data with a calibration model, the calibration model comprising a second spectrometric method of spectral data obtained from a reference wood having a green moisture content, the second spectral data correlated with a known mechanical strength analytical result obtained from a reference wood when dried and having a dry moisture content.

  6. Preparation of supported gold nanoparticles by a modified incipient wetness impregnation method

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    procedure of impregnation of oxide supports with chloroauric acid, which is well-known to lead to large gold Paris Cedex 05, France Running title: Modified method of impregnation of Au/oxide Figures: 8 Tables: 3 after a treatment of calcination at 300°C on any type of oxide supports (alumina, titania, silica

  7. Tensor product methods and entanglement optimization for ab initio quantum chemistry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Szilárd Szalay; Max Pfeffer; Valentin Murg; Gergely Barcza; Frank Verstraete; Reinhold Schneider; Örs Legeza

    2014-12-18

    The treatment of high-dimensional problems such as the Schr\\"odinger equation can be approached by concepts of tensor product approximation. We present general techniques that can be used for the treatment of high-dimensional optimization tasks and time-dependent equations, and connect them to concepts already used in many-body quantum physics. Based on achievements from the past decade, entanglement-based methods, -- developed from different perspectives for different purposes in distinct communities already matured to provide a variety of tools -- can be combined to attack highly challenging problems in quantum chemistry. The aim of the present paper is to give a pedagogical introduction to the theoretical background of this novel field and demonstrate the underlying benefits through numerical applications on a text book example. Among the various optimization tasks we will discuss only those which are connected to a controlled manipulation of the entanglement which is in fact the key ingredient of the methods considered in the paper. The selected topics will be covered according to a series of lectures given on the topic "New wavefunction methods and entanglement optimizations in quantum chemistry" at the Workshop on Theoretical Chemistry, 18 - 21 February 2014, Mariapfarr, Austria.

  8. amc technical briefamc technical brief Analytical Methods Committee No. 4. Jan 2001 Royal Society of Chemistry 2001

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    DeWitt, Thomas J.

    for examples in analytical chemistry. A MINITAB macro for calculating kernel density estimates is availableamc technical briefamc technical brief Analytical Methods Committee No. 4. Jan 2001 © Royal Society of Chemistry 2001 REPRESENTING DATA DISTRIBUTIONS WITH KERNEL DENSITY ESTIMATES Histograms are the usual

  9. Categorical Exclusion 4497: Lithium Wet Chemistry Project

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 OutreachProductswsicloudwsiclouddenDVA N C E D B LReportsDeterminatIon

  10. Carbon nanotube fiber spun from wetted ribbon

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Zhu, Yuntian T; Arendt, Paul; Zhang, Xiefei; Li, Qingwen; Fu, Lei; Zheng, Lianxi

    2014-04-29

    A fiber of carbon nanotubes was prepared by a wet-spinning method involving drawing carbon nanotubes away from a substantially aligned, supported array of carbon nanotubes to form a ribbon, wetting the ribbon with a liquid, and spinning a fiber from the wetted ribbon. The liquid can be a polymer solution and after forming the fiber, the polymer can be cured. The resulting fiber has a higher tensile strength and higher conductivity compared to dry-spun fibers and to wet-spun fibers prepared by other methods.

  11. Performance Optimization of Tensor Contraction Expressions for Many Body Methods in Quantum Chemistry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Krishnamoorthy, Sriram [ORNL; Bernholdt, David E [ORNL; Pitzer, R. M. [Ohio State University; Sadayappan, Ponnuswamy [ORNL

    2009-01-01

    Complex tensor contraction expressions arise in accurate electronic structure models in quantum chemistry, such as the coupled cluster method. This paper addresses two complementary aspects of performance optimization of such tensor contraction expressions. Transformations using algebraic properties of commutativity and associativity can be used to significantly decrease the number of arithmetic operations required for evaluation of these expressions. The identification of common subexpressions among a set of tensor contraction expressions can result in a reduction of the total number of operations required to evaluate the tensor contractions. The first part of the paper describes an effective algorithm for operation minimization with common subexpression identification and demonstrates its effectiveness on tensor contraction expressions for coupled cluster equations. The second part of the paper highlights the importance of data layout transformation in the optimization of tensor contraction computations on modern processors. A number of considerations, such as minimization of cache misses and utilization of multimedia vector instructions, are discussed. A library for efficient index permutation of multidimensional tensors is described, and experimental performance data is provided that demonstrates its effectiveness.

  12. Performance Optimization of Tensor Contraction Expressions for Many Body Methods in Quantum Chemistry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hartono, Albert; Lu, Qingda; henretty, thomas; Krishnamoorthy, Sriram; zhang, huaijian; Baumgartner, Gerald; Bernholdt, David E.; Nooijen, Marcel; Pitzer, Russell M.; Ramanujam, J.; Sadayappan, Ponnuswamy

    2009-11-12

    Complex tensor contraction expressions arise in accurate electronic structure models in quantum chemistry, such as the coupled cluster method. This paper addresses two complementary aspects of performance optimization of such tensor contraction expressions. Transformations using algebraic properties of commutativity and associativity can be used to significantly decrease the number of arithmetic operations required for evaluation of these expressions. The identification of common subexpressions among a set of tensor contraction expressions can result in a reduction of the total number of operations required to evaluate the tensor contractions. The first part of the paper describes an effective algorithm for operation minimization with common subexpression identification and demonstrates its effectiveness on tensor contraction expressions for coupled cluster equations. The second part of the paper highlights the importance of data layout transformation in the optimization of tensor contraction computations on modern processors. A number of considerations such as minimization of cache misses and utilization of multimedia vector instructions are discussed. A library for efficient index permutation of multi-dimensional tensors is described and experimental performance data is provided that demonstrates its effectiveness.

  13. Department of Chemistry & Biochemistry UCLA Chemistry, Biochemistry & Chemistry Material Science

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Levine, Alex J.

    Department of Chemistry & Biochemistry UCLA Chemistry, Biochemistry & Chemistry Material Science ...........................................................................................................................................4 Chemistry & Biochemistry Undergraduate Office..............................................................................................6 Majors in Chemistry & Biochemistry

  14. A method for the direct numerical simulation of hypersonic boundary-layer instability with finite-rate chemistry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Marxen, Olaf, E-mail: olaf.marxen@vki.ac.be [Center for Turbulence Research, Building 500, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305-3035 (United States) [Center for Turbulence Research, Building 500, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305-3035 (United States); Aeronautics and Aerospace Department, von Karman Institute for Fluid Dynamics, Chaussée de Waterloo, 72, 1640 Rhode-St-Genčse (Belgium); Magin, Thierry E. [Aeronautics and Aerospace Department, von Karman Institute for Fluid Dynamics, Chaussée de Waterloo, 72, 1640 Rhode-St-Genčse (Belgium)] [Aeronautics and Aerospace Department, von Karman Institute for Fluid Dynamics, Chaussée de Waterloo, 72, 1640 Rhode-St-Genčse (Belgium); Shaqfeh, Eric S.G.; Iaccarino, Gianluca [Center for Turbulence Research, Building 500, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305-3035 (United States)] [Center for Turbulence Research, Building 500, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305-3035 (United States)

    2013-12-15

    A new numerical method is presented here that allows to consider chemically reacting gases during the direct numerical simulation of a hypersonic fluid flow. The method comprises the direct coupling of a solver for the fluid mechanical model and a library providing the physio-chemical model. The numerical method for the fluid mechanical model integrates the compressible Navier–Stokes equations using an explicit time advancement scheme and high-order finite differences. This Navier–Stokes code can be applied to the investigation of laminar-turbulent transition and boundary-layer instability. The numerical method for the physio-chemical model provides thermodynamic and transport properties for different gases as well as chemical production rates, while here we exclusively consider a five species air mixture. The new method is verified for a number of test cases at Mach 10, including the one-dimensional high-temperature flow downstream of a normal shock, a hypersonic chemical reacting boundary layer in local thermodynamic equilibrium and a hypersonic reacting boundary layer with finite-rate chemistry. We are able to confirm that the diffusion flux plays an important role for a high-temperature boundary layer in local thermodynamic equilibrium. Moreover, we demonstrate that the flow for a case previously considered as a benchmark for the investigation of non-equilibrium chemistry can be regarded as frozen. Finally, the new method is applied to investigate the effect of finite-rate chemistry on boundary layer instability by considering the downstream evolution of a small-amplitude wave and comparing results with those obtained for a frozen gas as well as a gas in local thermodynamic equilibrium.

  15. Adiabatic path integral molecular dynamics methods. II. Algorithms Department of Chemistry, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 19104-6323

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cao, Jianshu

    , University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 19104-6323 G. J. Martyna Department of Chemistry

  16. Reactant ion chemistry for detection of TNT, RDX, and PETN using an ion mobility spectrometer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Klassen, S.E.; Rodacy, P.; Silva, R.

    1997-09-01

    This report describes the responses of three energetic materials (TNT, RDX, and PETN) to varying reactant ion chemistries and IMS cell temperatures. The following reactant ion chemistries were evaluated; air-dry; air-wet; methylene chloride-dry; methylene chloride-wet; methylene bromide-dry; nitrogen dioxide-wet; sulfur dioxide-wet. The temperature was varied between 160 - 220{degrees}C.

  17. Wet storage integrity update

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bailey, W.J.; Johnson, A.B. Jr.

    1983-09-01

    This report includes information from various studies performed under the Wet Storage Task of the Spent Fuel Integrity Project of the Commercial Spent Fuel Management (CSFM) Program at Pacific Northwest Laboratory. An overview of recent developments in the technology of wet storage of spent water reactor fuel is presented. Licensee Event Reports pertaining to spent fuel pools and the associated performance of spent fuel and storage components during wet storage are discussed. The current status of fuel that was examined under the CSFM Program is described. Assessments of the effect of boric acid in spent fuel pool water on the corrosion and stress corrosion cracking of stainless steel and the stress corrosion cracking of stainless steel piping containing stagnant water at spent fuel pools are discussed. A list of pertinent publications is included. 84 references, 21 figures, 11 tables.

  18. Atmospheric Chemistry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Finlayson-Pitts, B. J

    2010-01-01

    in our understanding of important chemistry and highlightedin our knowledge. In summary, the chemistry occurring in theBJ, Pitts JN, Jr (2000) Chemistry of the Upper and Lower

  19. CLUSTER CHEMISTRY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Muetterties, Earl L.

    2013-01-01

    Advanced Inorganic Chemistry, 11 Wiley Huetterties and C. M.Submitted to the Journal of Organometallic ChemistryCLUSTER CHEMISTRY Earl L. Muetterties TWO-WEEK LOAN COPY May

  20. Coal combustion by wet oxidation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bettinger, J.A.; Lamparter, R.A.; McDowell, D.C.

    1980-11-15

    The combustion of coal by wet oxidation was studied by the Center for Waste Management Programs, of Michigan Technological University. In wet oxidation a combustible material, such as coal, is reacted with oxygen in the presence of liquid water. The reaction is typically carried out in the range of 204/sup 0/C (400/sup 0/F) to 353/sup 0/C (650/sup 0/F) with sufficient pressure to maintain the water present in the liquid state, and provide the partial pressure of oxygen in the gas phase necessary to carry out the reaction. Experimental studies to explore the key reaction parameters of temperature, time, oxidant, catalyst, coal type, and mesh size were conducted by running batch tests in a one-gallon stirred autoclave. The factors exhibiting the greatest effect on the extent of reaction were temperature and residence time. The effect of temperature was studied from 204/sup 0/C (400/sup 0/F) to 260/sup 0/C (500/sup 0/F) with a residence time from 600 to 3600 seconds. From this data, the reaction activation energy of 2.7 x 10/sup 4/ calories per mole was determined for a high-volatile-A-Bituminous type coal. The reaction rate constant may be determined at any temperature from the activation energy using the Arrhenius equation. Additional data were generated on the effect of mesh size and different coal types. A sample of peat was also tested. Two catalysts were evaluated, and their effects on reaction rate presented in the report. In addition to the high temperature combustion, low temperature desulfurization is discussed. Desulfurization can improve low grade coal to be used in conventional combustion methods. It was found that 90% of the sulfur can be removed from the coal by wet oxidation with the carbon untouched. Further desulfurization studies are indicated.

  1. Nanostructure, Chemistry and Crystallography of Iron Nitride...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Nanostructure, Chemistry and Crystallography of Iron Nitride Magnetic Materials by Ultra-High-Resolution Electron Microscopy and Related Methods Nanostructure, Chemistry and...

  2. Method and apparatus for analyzing the internal chemistry and compositional variations of materials and devices

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kazmerski, L.L.

    1985-04-30

    A method and apparatus is disclosed for obtaining and mapping chemical compositional data for solid devices. It includes a SIMS mass analyzer or similar system capable of being rastered over a surface of the solid to sample the material at a pattern of selected points, as the surface is being eroded away by sputtering or a similar process. The data for each point sampled in a volume of the solid is digitally processed and indexed by element or molecule type, exact spacial location within the volume, and the concentration levels of the detected element or molecule types. This data can then be recalled and displayed for any desired planar view in the volume.

  3. Method and apparatus for analyzing the internal chemistry and compositional variations of materials and devices

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kazmerski, Lawrence L. (Lakewood, CO)

    1989-01-01

    A method and apparatus is disclosed for obtaining and mapping chemical compositional data for solid devices. It includes a SIMS mass analyzer or similar system capable of being rastered over a surface of the solid to sample the material at a pattern of selected points, as the surface is being eroded away by sputtering or a similar process. The data for each point sampled in a volume of the solid is digitally processed and indexed by element or molecule type, exact spacial location within the volume, and the concentration levels of the detected element or molecule types. This data can then be recalled and displayed for any desired planar view in the volume.

  4. Controllable underwater anisotropic oil-wetting

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yong, Jiale; Chen, Feng Yang, Qing; Farooq, Umar; Bian, Hao; Du, Guangqing; Hou, Xun

    2014-08-18

    This Letter demonstrates a simple method to achieve underwater anisotropic oil-wetting using silicon surfaces with a microgroove array produced by femtosecond laser ablation. The oil contact angles along the direction perpendicular to the grooves are consistently larger than those parallel to the microgroove arrays in water because the oil droplet is restricted by the energy barrier that exists between the non-irradiated domain and the trapped water in the laser-ablated microgrooves. This underwater anisotropic oil-wetting is able to be controlled, and the anisotropy can be tuned from 0° to ?20° by adjusting the period of the microgroove arrays.

  5. Optical wet steam monitor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Maxey, Lonnie C. (Powell, TN); Simpson, Marc L. (Knoxville, TN)

    1995-01-01

    A wet steam monitor determines steam particle size by using laser doppler velocimeter (LDV) device to produce backscatter light. The backscatter light signal is processed with a spectrum analyzer to produce a visibility waveform in the frequency domain. The visibility waveform includes a primary peak and a plurality of sidebands. The bandwidth of at least the primary frequency peak is correlated to particle size by either visually comparing the bandwidth to those of known particle sizes, or by digitizing the waveform and comparing the waveforms electronically.

  6. Optical wet steam monitor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Maxey, L.C.; Simpson, M.L.

    1995-01-17

    A wet steam monitor determines steam particle size by using laser doppler velocimeter (LDV) device to produce backscatter light. The backscatter light signal is processed with a spectrum analyzer to produce a visibility waveform in the frequency domain. The visibility waveform includes a primary peak and a plurality of sidebands. The bandwidth of at least the primary frequency peak is correlated to particle size by either visually comparing the bandwidth to those of known particle sizes, or by digitizing the waveform and comparing the waveforms electronically. 4 figures.

  7. Chemical Effect of Dry and Wet Cleaning of the Ru Protective Layer of the Extreme ultraviolet (EUV) Lithography Reflector

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Belau, Leonid

    2010-01-01

    Park, Physical Chemistry Chemical Y.B. He, et al. , JournalChemical Effect of Dry and Wet Cleaning of the Ru ProtectiveBerkeley, California 94720 Chemical Sciences Division,

  8. CSC2522 Course Project Michael Tao 6.1 Rendering Wet Sand

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Toronto, University of

    CSC2522 Course Project Michael Tao 6.1 Rendering Wet Sand 6.1.1 Goals The primary goal of this project was to implement a method for rendering sand as a wet porous medium with water flowing into it from within PBRT. The final result was a video of sand being wetted by water particles flowing through

  9. Hydrothermal Processing of Wet Wastes

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Breakout Session 3A—Conversion Technologies III: Energy from Our Waste—Will we Be Rich in Fuel or Knee Deep in Trash by 2025? Hydrothermal Processing of Wet Wastes James R. Oyler, President, Genifuel Corporation

  10. Platinum adlayered ruthenium nanoparticles, method for preparing, and uses thereof

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Tong, YuYe; Du, Bingchen

    2015-08-11

    A superior, industrially scalable one-pot ethylene glycol-based wet chemistry method to prepare platinum-adlayered ruthenium nanoparticles has been developed that offers an exquisite control of the platinum packing density of the adlayers and effectively prevents sintering of the nanoparticles during the deposition process. The wet chemistry based method for the controlled deposition of submonolayer platinum is advantageous in terms of processing and maximizing the use of platinum and can, in principle, be scaled up straightforwardly to an industrial level. The reactivity of the Pt(31)-Ru sample was about 150% higher than that of the industrial benchmark PtRu (1:1) alloy sample but with 3.5 times less platinum loading. Using the Pt(31)-Ru nanoparticles would lower the electrode material cost compared to using the industrial benchmark alloy nanoparticles for direct methanol fuel cell applications.

  11. Selenium Speciation and Management in Wet FGD Systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Searcy, K; Richardson, M; Blythe, G; Wallschlaeger, D; Chu, P; Dene, C

    2012-02-29

    This report discusses results from bench- and pilot-scale simulation tests conducted to determine the factors that impact selenium speciation and phase partitioning in wet FGD systems. The selenium chemistry in wet FGD systems is highly complex and not completely understood, thus extrapolation and scale-up of these results may be uncertain. Control of operating parameters and application of scrubber additives have successfully demonstrated the avoidance or decrease of selenite oxidation at the bench and pilot scale. Ongoing efforts to improve sample handling methods for selenium speciation measurements are also discussed. Bench-scale scrubber tests explored the impacts of oxidation air rate, trace metals, scrubber additives, and natural limestone on selenium speciation in synthetic and field-generated full-scale FGD liquors. The presence and concentration of redox-active chemical species as well as the oxidation air rate contribute to the oxidation-reduction potential (ORP) conditions in FGD scrubbers. Selenite oxidation to the undesirable selenate form increases with increasing ORP conditions, and decreases with decreasing ORP conditions. Solid-phase manganese [Mn(IV)] appeared to be the significant metal impacting the oxidation of selenite to selenate. Scrubber additives were tested for their ability to inhibit selenite oxidation. Although dibasic acid and other scrubber additives showed promise in early clear liquor (sodium based and without calcium solids) bench-scale tests, these additives did not show strong inhibition of selenite oxidation in tests with higher manganese concentrations and with slurries from full-scale wet FGD systems. In bench-tests with field liquors, addition of ferric chloride at a 250:1 iron-to-selenium mass ratio sorbed all incoming selenite to the solid phase, although addition of ferric salts had no impact on native selenate that already existed in the field slurry liquor sample. As ORP increases, selenite may oxidize to selenate more rapidly than it sorbs to ferric solids. Though it was not possible to demonstrate a decrease in selenium concentrations to levels below the project�¢����s target of 50 ���µg/L during pilot testing, some trends observed in bench-scale testing were evident at the pilot scale. Specifically, reducing oxidation air rate and ORP tends to either retain selenium as selenite in the liquor or shift selenium phase partitioning to the solid phase. Oxidation air flow rate control may be one option for managing selenium behavior in FGD scrubbers. Units that cycle load widely may find it more difficult to impact ORP conditions with oxidation air flow rate control alone. Because decreasing oxidation air rates to the reaction tank showed that all �¢����new�¢��� selenium reported to the solids, the addition of ferric chloride to the pilot scrubber could not show further improvements in selenium behavior. Ferric chloride addition did shift mercury to the slurry solids, specifically to the fine particles. Several competing pathways may govern the reporting of selenium to the slurry solids: co-precipitation with gypsum into the bulk solids and sorption or co-precipitation with iron into the fine particles. Simultaneous measurement of selenium and mercury behavior suggests a holistic management strategy is best to optimize the fate of both of these elements in FGD waters. Work conducted under this project evaluated sample handling and analytical methods for selenium speciation in FGD waters. Three analytical techniques and several preservation methods were employed. Measurements of selenium speciation over time indicated that for accurate selenium speciation, it is best to conduct measurements on unpreserved, filtered samples as soon after sampling as possible. The capital and operating costs for two selenium management strategies were considered: ferric chloride addition and oxidation air flow rate control. For ferric chloride addition, as migh

  12. Chemistry and Biochemistry University of Mississippi Gregory S. Tschumper

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tchumper, Gregory S.

    1 Chemistry and Biochemistry University of Mississippi Gregory S. Tschumper 4 June 2015 http://quantum.chem.olemiss.edu Introduction to Computational Quantum Chemistry III Chemistry and Biochemistry University of Mississippi chemistry § Convergent quantum chemistry · Basis sets · Methods ŘPart II § A case

  13. Analytical Chemistry Laboratory Progress Report for FY 1994

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Green, D.W.; Boparai, A.S.; Bowers, D.L. [and others

    1994-12-01

    The purpose of this report is to summarize the activities of the Analytical Chemistry Laboratory (ACL) at Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) for Fiscal Year (FY) 1994 (October 1993 through September 1994). This annual report is the eleventh for the ACL and describes continuing effort on projects, work on new projects, and contributions of the ACL staff to various programs at ANL. The Analytical Chemistry Laboratory is a full-cost-recovery service center, with the primary mission of providing a broad range of analytical chemistry support services to the scientific and engineering programs at ANL. The ACL also has a research program in analytical chemistry, conducts instrumental and methods development, and provides analytical services for governmental, educational, and industrial organizations. The ACL handles a wide range of analytical problems. Some routine or standard analyses are done, but it is common for the Argonne programs to generate unique problems that require significant development of methods and adaption of techniques to obtain useful analytical data. The ACL has four technical groups -- Chemical Analysis, Instrumental Analysis, Organic Analysis, and Environmental Analysis -- which together include about 45 technical staff members. Talents and interests of staff members cross the group lines, as do many projects within the ACL. The Chemical Analysis Group uses wet- chemical and instrumental methods for elemental, compositional, and isotopic determinations in solid, liquid, and gaseous samples and provides specialized analytical services. Major instruments in this group include an ion chromatograph (IC), an inductively coupled plasma/atomic emission spectrometer (ICP/AES), spectrophotometers, mass spectrometers (including gas-analysis and thermal-ionization mass spectrometers), emission spectrographs, autotitrators, sulfur and carbon determinators, and a kinetic phosphorescence uranium analyzer.

  14. Sandia Energy - Chemistry of Autoignition

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Chemistry of Autoignition Home Transportation Energy Predictive Simulation of Engines Combustion Chemistry Combustion Kinetics Chemistry of Autoignition Chemistry of...

  15. Dry purification of aspirational air in coke-sorting systems with wet slaking of coke

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    T.F. Trembach; A.G. Klimenko [Giprokoks, the State Institute for the Design of Coke-Industry Enterprises, Kharkov (Ukraine)

    2009-07-15

    Coke transportation after wet slaking is accompanied by the release of dust in the production building and in the surrounding atmosphere. Wet methods are traditionally used to purify very humid air. Giprokoks has developed designs for highly efficient dry dust-removal methods in such conditions.

  16. BERYLLIUM MEASUREMENT IN COMMERCIALLY AVAILABLE WET WIPES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Youmans-Mcdonald, L.

    2011-02-18

    Analysis for beryllium by fluorescence is now an established method which is used in many government-run laboratories and commercial facilities. This study investigates the use of this technique using commercially available wet wipes. The fluorescence method is widely documented and has been approved as a standard test method by ASTM International and the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH). The procedure involves dissolution of samples in aqueous ammonium bifluoride solution and then adding a small aliquot to a basic hydroxybenzoquinoline sulfonate fluorescent dye (Berylliant{trademark} Inc. Detection Solution Part No. CH-2) , and measuring the fluorescence. This method is specific to beryllium. This work explores the use of three different commercial wipes spiked with beryllium, as beryllium acetate or as beryllium oxide and subsequent analysis by optical fluorescence. The effect of possible interfering metals such as Fe, Ti and Pu in the wipe medium is also examined.

  17. Chemistry-nuclear chemistry division. Progress report, October 1979-September 1980

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ryan, R.R. (comp.)

    1981-05-01

    This report presents the research and development programs pursued by the Chemistry-Nuclear Chemistry Division of the Los Alamos National Laboratory. Topics covered include advanced analytical methods, atmospheric chemistry and transport, biochemistry, biomedical research, element migration and fixation, inorganic chemistry, isotope separation and analysis, atomic and molecular collisions, molecular spectroscopy, muonic x rays, nuclear cosmochemistry, nuclear structure and reactions, radiochemical separations, theoretical chemistry, and unclassified weapons research.

  18. WET LOOSE SNOW AVALANCHING IN SOUTHWESTERN MONTANA Simon August Trautman

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dyer, Bill

    WET LOOSE SNOW AVALANCHING IN SOUTHWESTERN MONTANA by Simon August Trautman A thesis submitted ..........................................................................................................1 2. WET SNOW...................................................................................................................3 Metamorphism of Wet Snow

  19. FACULTY OF CHEMISTRY AND PHARMACY CHEMISTRY & PHARMACY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schubart, Christoph

    FACULTY OF CHEMISTRY AND PHARMACY Faculty of CHEMISTRY & PHARMACY People and their research #12;PD Dr. Denis Usvyat Theoretical Chemistry PD Dr. Sabine Amslinger Organic Chemistry Dr. Ferdinand Brandl Pharmaceutical Technology Dr. Robert Kretschmer Inorganic Chemistry Dr. Christoph Dorn Clinical Pharmacy Our

  20. Department of Chemistry "Supramolecular Chemistry in Polymeric

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mark, James E.

    Department of Chemistry "Supramolecular Chemistry in Polymeric Systems: From Nanoassemblies Colloquium Friday, May 15, 2009 3:00 p.m. 502 Rieveschl #12;Supramolecular Chemistry in Polymeric Systems.rowan@case.edu The utilization of supramolecular chemistry, the chemistry of the non-covalent bond, in the polymeric realm has

  1. Green Chemistry and Workers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2009-01-01

    of green chemistry and green engineering and by consideringResearch, Green Chemistry and Green Engineering Center, YaleOF GREEN CHEMISTRY AND GREEN ENGINEERING Julie Zimmerman By

  2. Green Chemistry and Workers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2009-01-01

    J. Warner. 1998. Green Chemistry: Theory and Practice. NewNew Science, Green Chemistry and Environmental Health.abstract.html 5. American Chemistry Council. 2003. Guide to

  3. DEPARTMENT OF CHEMISTRY DEPARTMENT OF CHEMISTRY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lennard, William N.

    i DEPARTMENT OF CHEMISTRY HANDBOOK 2008-2009 DEPARTMENT OF CHEMISTRY HANDBOOK 2014-2015 Revised TABLE OF CONTENTS I. WELCOME TO THE DEPARTMENT OF CHEMISTRY AND WESTERN UNIVERSITY... 1 1. MESSAGE FROM

  4. Sandia Energy - Flame Chemistry

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Flame Chemistry Home Transportation Energy Predictive Simulation of Engines Combustion Chemistry Flame Chemistry Flame ChemistryAshley Otero2015-10-28T02:43:31+00:00 Research in...

  5. Eleventh international symposium on radiopharmaceutical chemistry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1995-12-31

    This document contains abstracts of papers which were presented at the Eleventh International Symposium on Radiopharmaceutical Chemistry. Sessions included: radiopharmaceuticals for the dopaminergic system, strategies for the production and use of labelled reactive small molecules, radiopharmaceuticals for measuring metabolism, radiopharmaceuticals for the serotonin and sigma receptor systems, labelled probes for molecular biology applications, radiopharmaceuticals for receptor systems, radiopharmaceuticals utilizing coordination chemistry, radiolabelled antibodies, radiolabelling methods for small molecules, analytical techniques in radiopharmaceutical chemistry, and analytical techniques in radiopharmaceutical chemistry.

  6. Synthetic and Mechanistic Chemistry

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    isotopes for biological applications Aaron S. Anderson: Synthetic chemistry of biosensors Andrew M. Dattelbaum: Synthetic chemistry and nanoparticles Sponsors, Funding...

  7. UCLA CHEMISTRY & BIOCHEMISTRY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Levine, Alex J.

    UCLA CHEMISTRY & BIOCHEMISTRY ORIENTATION HANDBOOK 2012-2013 #12;Table of Contents Introduction .............................................................................................................................................2 Chemistry & Biochemistry Undergraduate Office ................................................................................................................................................4 Biochemistry

  8. Chemistry & Biology Brief Communication

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhao, Huimin

    Chemistry & Biology Brief Communication Cloning, IL 61801, USA 3Department of Chemistry 4Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering

  9. CHEMISTRY 1010 CHEMISTRY, HUMANITY AND ENVIRONMENT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Simons, Jack

    : Chemistry 1010 aims to promote understanding of the basic environmental ingredients, energy, atomsCHEMISTRY 1010 CHEMISTRY, HUMANITY AND ENVIRONMENT Spring 2006 Instructor: Dr. Laya Kesner, HEB - 002 H ST 205 11:50 a.m.-12:40 p.m. Teaching Assistant: Chem 1010-002 Michelle Taliaferro, michelle@chemistry

  10. CHEMISTRY, B.S. CHEMISTRY (CHEM)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hamburger, Peter

    CHEMISTRY, B.S. CHEMISTRY (CHEM) (Fall 2015-Summer 2016) IPFW Residency Requirements: ____ 32 CHEMISTRY BS COURSES & SUPPORTING COURSES (66 credits) *Note: 2.0 CHM GPA required/2.0 CHM GPA in 300+ courses *The Bachelor of Science with a major in chemistry program is appropriate for premedical

  11. AN EXPLORATION INTO BATTERY CHEMISTRY IONIC FLOW, INTERCALATION AND

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Petta, Jason

    AN EXPLORATION INTO BATTERY CHEMISTRY IONIC FLOW, INTERCALATION AND CRYSTAL LATTICES JAKE GARCIA ALLA ZAMARAYEVA ADVISOR: DAN STEINGART #12;A PROBLEM IN SOCIETY! · The energy problem · Batteries-cost and environmentally friendly battery? #12;BACKGROUND · Different Common Battery types: Galvanic "Wet" Cell Dry Cell

  12. Elucidating the mysteries of wetting.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Webb, Edmund Blackburn, III (,; ); Bourdon, Christopher Jay; Grillet, Anne Mary; Sackinger, Philip A.; Grest, Gary Stephen; Emerson, John Allen; Ash, Benjamin Jesse; Heine, David R.; Brooks, Carlton, F.; Gorby, Allen D.

    2005-11-01

    Nearly every manufacturing and many technologies central to Sandia's business involve physical processes controlled by interfacial wetting. Interfacial forces, e.g. conjoining/disjoining pressure, electrostatics, and capillary condensation, are ubiquitous and can surpass and even dominate bulk inertial or viscous effects on a continuum level. Moreover, the statics and dynamics of three-phase contact lines exhibit a wide range of complex behavior, such as contact angle hysteresis due to surface roughness, surface reaction, or compositional heterogeneities. These thermodynamically and kinetically driven interactions are essential to the development of new materials and processes. A detailed understanding was developed for the factors controlling wettability in multicomponent systems from computational modeling tools, and experimental diagnostics for systems, and processes dominated by interfacial effects. Wettability probed by dynamic advancing and receding contact angle measurements, ellipsometry, and direct determination of the capillary and disjoining forces. Molecular scale experiments determined the relationships between the fundamental interactions between molecular species and with the substrate. Atomistic simulations studied the equilibrium concentration profiles near the solid and vapor interfaces and tested the basic assumptions used in the continuum approaches. These simulations provide guidance in developing constitutive equations, which more accurately take into account the effects of surface induced phase separation and concentration gradients near the three-phase contact line. The development of these accurate models for dynamic multicomponent wetting allows improvement in science based engineering of manufacturing processes previously developed through costly trial and error by varying material formulation and geometry modification.

  13. Mechanisms of dissipation in wet granular matter

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. Fingerle; S. Herminghaus

    2007-08-20

    The impact dynamics between wet surfaces, which dominates the mechanical properties of wet granular matter, is studied both experimentally and theoretically. It is shown that the hysteretic formation and rupture of liquid capillary bridges between adjacent grains accounts reasonably well for most relevant cases of wet granular matter. The various dissipation mechanisms are discussed with particular emphasis on their relevance. Variations of the rupture energy loss with the impact energy are quantified and discussed.

  14. A fast stratospheric ozone chemistry schemeA fast stratospheric ozone chemistry scheme Michel Bourqui1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bourqui, Michel

    A fast stratospheric ozone chemistry schemeA fast stratospheric ozone chemistry scheme Michel a computationally efficient chemical scheme, the FAst STratospheric Ozone Chemistry (FASTOC) scheme, which has advantages over many existing fast methods, as it does not rely on relaxation to assumed conditions, does

  15. Complete wetting of elastically responsive substrates

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    N. R. Bernardino; S. Dietrich

    2012-02-07

    We analyze theoretically complete wetting of a substrate supporting an array of parallel, vertical plates which can tilt elastically. The adsorbed liquid tilts the plates, inducing clustering, and thus modifies the substrate geometry. In turn, this change in geometry alters the wetting properties of the substrate and, consequently, the adsorption of liquid. This geometry-wetting feedback loop leads to stepped adsorption isotherms with each step corresponding to an abrupt change in the substrate geometry. We discuss how this can be used for constructing substrates with tunable wetting and adsorption properties.

  16. Sandia Energy - High Pressure Chemistry

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    High Pressure Chemistry Home Transportation Energy Predictive Simulation of Engines Combustion Chemistry Combustion Kinetics High Pressure Chemistry High Pressure ChemistryAshley...

  17. Dynamics of Coalescence of Plugs with a Hydrophilic Wetting Layer Induced by Flow in a Microfluidic Chemistrode

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ismagilov, Rustem F.

    Dynamics of Coalescence of Plugs with a Hydrophilic Wetting Layer Induced by Flow in a Microfluidic.; Ismagilov, R. F. Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U.S.A. 2008, 105, 16843­16848) microfluidic analogue of an electrode-response processes in chemistry and biology. The chemistrode consists of open-ended V-shaped microfluidic channels

  18. Simulation of Oil Displacement from Oil-Wet Cores by Interfacial Tension Reduction and Wettability Alteration

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kalaei, Mohammad Hosein

    2010-01-29

    Waterflooding in oil-wet naturally fractured reservoirs is not successful because the ability of matrix blocks to imbibe the injected water and displace the oil into the fracture system is poor. Chemical enhanced oil recovery methods...

  19. Combustion chemistry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brown, N.J. [Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory, CA (United States)

    1993-12-01

    This research is concerned with the development and use of sensitivity analysis tools to probe the response of dependent variables to model input variables. Sensitivity analysis is important at all levels of combustion modeling. This group`s research continues to be focused on elucidating the interrelationship between features in the underlying potential energy surface (obtained from ab initio quantum chemistry calculations) and their responses in the quantum dynamics, e.g., reactive transition probabilities, cross sections, and thermal rate coefficients. The goals of this research are: (i) to provide feedback information to quantum chemists in their potential surface refinement efforts, and (ii) to gain a better understanding of how various regions in the potential influence the dynamics. These investigations are carried out with the methodology of quantum functional sensitivity analysis (QFSA).

  20. Green Chemistry and Workers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2009-01-01

    chemistry as it produces green, sustainable union jobs; •jobs and industries, green remediation, and green chemistry.jobs—including those connected to the emerging field of green chemistry—and

  1. Sandia Energy - Materials Chemistry

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Materials Chemistry Home Transportation Energy Predictive Simulation of Engines Clean FuelsPower Materials Chemistry Materials ChemistryAshley Otero2015-10-28T02:42:21+00:00...

  2. Wetting and lubricating film instabilities in microchannels

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cubaud, Thomas

    Wetting and lubricating film instabilities in microchannels Thomas Cubaud Department of Mechanical, and silicone oils . Dynamic wetting transitions: a pearl flow thick lubricating film , b spider flow thin lubricating film , c ghost flow metastable dewetting patches . Droplet-decorated streams: d droplets

  3. Maintenance of Stormwater Wetlands and Wet Ponds

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hunt, William F.

    1 Maintenance of Stormwater Wetlands and Wet Ponds Stormwater management practices must be kept maintenance guidelines for stormwater wetlands and wet ponds, two stormwater prac- tices that are being constructed across North Carolina. OVERVIEW As its name implies, a stormwater wetland is a wetland system

  4. Biology 3515/Chemistry 3515 Biological Chemistry Laboratory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Simons, Jack

    Biology 3515/Chemistry 3515 Biological Chemistry Laboratory Spring 2013 (Draft Syllabus, 23 August 2012) Course Description and Objectives: This course is intended for students who have taken Biology and function, particularly for enzymes. Prerequisites: Biology 3510 or Chemistry 3510 Instructor: David P

  5. Wetting and free surface flow modeling for potting and encapsulation.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brooks, Carlton, F.; Brooks, Michael J.; Graham, Alan Lyman; Noble, David F. ); Notz, Patrick K.; Hopkins, Matthew Morgan; Castaneda, Jaime N.; Mahoney, Leo James; Baer, Thomas A.; Berchtold, Kathryn; Adolf, Douglas Brian; Wilkes, Edward Dean; Rao, Rekha Ranjana; Givler, Richard C.; Sun, Amy Cha-Tien; Cote, Raymond O.; Mondy, Lisa Ann; Grillet, Anne Mary; Kraynik, Andrew Michael

    2007-06-01

    As part of an effort to reduce costs and improve quality control in encapsulation and potting processes the Technology Initiative Project ''Defect Free Manufacturing and Assembly'' has completed a computational modeling study of flows representative of those seen in these processes. Flow solutions are obtained using a coupled, finite-element-based, numerical method based on the GOMA/ARIA suite of Sandia flow solvers. The evolution of the free surface is solved with an advanced level set algorithm. This approach incorporates novel methods for representing surface tension and wetting forces that affect the evolution of the free surface. In addition, two commercially available codes, ProCAST and MOLDFLOW, are also used on geometries representing encapsulation processes at the Kansas City Plant. Visual observations of the flow in several geometries are recorded in the laboratory and compared to the models. Wetting properties for the materials in these experiments are measured using a unique flowthrough goniometer.

  6. Predictive modeling of reactive wetting and metal joining.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    van Swol, Frank B.

    2013-09-01

    The performance, reproducibility and reliability of metal joints are complex functions of the detailed history of physical processes involved in their creation. Prediction and control of these processes constitutes an intrinsically challenging multi-physics problem involving heating and melting a metal alloy and reactive wetting. Understanding this process requires coupling strong molecularscale chemistry at the interface with microscopic (diffusion) and macroscopic mass transport (flow) inside the liquid followed by subsequent cooling and solidification of the new metal mixture. The final joint displays compositional heterogeneity and its resulting microstructure largely determines the success or failure of the entire component. At present there exists no computational tool at Sandia that can predict the formation and success of a braze joint, as current capabilities lack the ability to capture surface/interface reactions and their effect on interface properties. This situation precludes us from implementing a proactive strategy to deal with joining problems. Here, we describe what is needed to arrive at a predictive modeling and simulation capability for multicomponent metals with complicated phase diagrams for melting and solidification, incorporating dissolutive and composition-dependent wetting.

  7. Chemistry-Nuclear Chemistry Division. Progress report, October 1980-September 1981

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ryan, R.R.

    1982-05-01

    This report describes major progress in the research and development programs pursued by the Chemistry-Nuclear Chemistry Division of the Los Alamos National Laboratory during FY 1981. Topics covered include advanced analytical methods, atmospheric chemistry and transport, biochemistry, biomedical research, medical radioisotopes research, element migration and fixation, nuclear waste isolation research, inorganic and structural chemistry, isotope separation, analysis and applications, the newly established Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Center, atomic and molecular collisions, molecular spectroscopy, nuclear cosmochemistry, nuclear structure and reactions, pion charge exchange, radiochemical separations, theoretical chemistry, and unclassified weapons research.

  8. CHEMISTRY 499 UNDERGRADUATE RESEARCH

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hamburger, Peter

    1 CHEMISTRY 499 UNDERGRADUATE RESEARCH Chemistry 499 provides a mechanism whereby undergraduate chemistry majors may participate in the research of the faculty and receive academic credit for the instructor, and one to be kept on file in the Chemistry Office (specified by the American Chemical Society

  9. Challenges and Opportunities for Wet-Waste Feedstocks – Resource Assessment

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Breakout Session 2-C: Biogas and Beyond: Challenges and Opportunities for Advanced Biofuels from Wet-Waste FeedstocksChallenges and Opportunities for Wet-Waste Feedstocks – Resource...

  10. Identification of High Collision Concentration Locations Under Wet Weather Conditions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hwang, Taesung; Chung, Koohong; Ragland, David; Chan, Chin-Yao

    2008-01-01

    conducted under wet weather conditions. Observations fromLeahy, M. , and Suggett, J. Weather as a Chronic Hazard forLocations Under Wet Weather Conditions Taesung Hwang,

  11. 128 Department of Chemistry Graduate Catalogue 201415

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ; cage compounds; coordination and organometallic chemistry; supramolecular chemistry; photocatalysis

  12. From molecular chemistry to supramolecular chemistry to superdupermolecular chemistry. Controlling covalent bond formation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Turro, Nicholas J.

    From molecular chemistry to supramolecular chemistry to superdupermolecular chemistry. Controlling covalent bond formation through non-covalent and magnetic interactions Nicholas J. Turro Chemistry. Introduction Carbon centered radicals are among the most reactive species encountered in organic chemistry

  13. Legendre Functions Quantum Chemistry: Chemistry 180-345A

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ronis, David M.

    Legendre Functions Quantum Chemistry: Chemistry 180-345A In class we showed that the the angular Fall 2003 #12;Quantum Chemistry -2- Chemistry 180-345A which is divergent at x = ±1 (i.e., at = 0 Chemistry -3- Chemistry 180-345A Hydrogen orbitals for l = 0, 1 Fall 2003 #12;Quantum Chemistry -4

  14. School of Chemistry CHEM3100: Chemistry at a Molecular Level

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rzepa, Henry S.

    School of Chemistry CHEM3100: Chemistry at a Molecular Level Tutorial Groups 2014/15 Name Programme Tutor Arif, Saboor Chemistry Armstrong, Sam W. Chemistry Beaumont, Jack P. Chemistry Dwayne Heard Bennett, Niall C. Chemistry Room 1.28a Betts, Samuel A. Chemistry D.E.Heard@leeds.ac.uk Booth, Natalie L

  15. Breakdown in the Wetting Transparency of Graphene

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shih, Chih-Jen

    We develop a theory to model the van der Waals interactions between liquid and graphene, including quantifying the wetting behavior of a graphene-coated surface. Molecular dynamics simulations and contact angle measurements ...

  16. National Ignition Facility wet weather construction plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kugler, A N

    1998-01-01

    This report presents a wet weather construction plan for the National Ignition Facility (NIF) construction project. Construction of the NIF commenced in mid- 1997, and excavation of the site was completed in the fall. Preparations for placing concrete foundations began in the fall, and above normal rainfall is expected over the tinter. Heavy rainfall in late November impacted foundation construction, and a wet weather construction plan was determined to be needed. This wet weather constiction plan recommends a strategy, techniques and management practices to prepare and protect the site corn wet weather effects and allow construction work to proceed. It is intended that information in this plan be incorporated in the Stormwater Pollution Prevention Plan (SWPPP) as warranted.

  17. Computational Chemistry | More Science | ORNL

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Computational Chemistry SHARE Computational Chemistry Computational Chemistry at ORNL uses principles of computer science and mathematics and the results of theoretical physics and...

  18. Atmospheric chemistry and global change

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Prather, MJ

    1999-01-01

    and particles. Thus Atmospheric Chemistry and Global Changethe future of atmospheric chemistry. BROWSINGS Tornadothe complexity of atmospheric chemistry well, but trips a

  19. Mercury removal in utility wet scrubber using a chelating agent

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Amrhein, Gerald T. (Louisville, OH)

    2001-01-01

    A method for capturing and reducing the mercury content of an industrial flue gas such as that produced in the combustion of a fossil fuel or solid waste adds a chelating agent, such as ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA) or other similar compounds like HEDTA, DTPA and/or NTA, to the flue gas being scrubbed in a wet scrubber used in the industrial process. The chelating agent prevents the reduction of oxidized mercury to elemental mercury, thereby increasing the mercury removal efficiency of the wet scrubber. Exemplary tests on inlet and outlet mercury concentration in an industrial flue gas were performed without and with EDTA addition. Without EDTA, mercury removal totaled 42%. With EDTA, mercury removal increased to 71%. The invention may be readily adapted to known wet scrubber systems and it specifically provides for the removal of unwanted mercury both by supplying S.sup.2- ions to convert Hg.sup.2+ ions into mercuric sulfide (HgS) and by supplying a chelating agent to sequester other ions, including but not limited to Fe.sup.2+ ions, which could otherwise induce the unwanted reduction of Hg.sup.2+ to the form, Hg.sup.0.

  20. Chemistry and Biochemistry Scholarships

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Almor, Amit

    Chemistry and Biochemistry Scholarships Complete Scholarship Name Application Deadline Date Contact to Chemistry and Biochemistry entering graduate students who have asked for consideration to serve as research senior in the Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry based on faculty recommendation for undergraduate

  1. Chemistry and Biochemistry Scholarships

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Almor, Amit

    Chemistry and Biochemistry Scholarships Complete Scholarship Name Application Deadline Date Contact Endowment Fund To provide support for undergraduate biomedical research in the Department of Chemistry/or the purchase of supplies. Yes w/recommendation s from faculty Call goes out in February to all chemistry

  2. Wet powder seal for gas containment

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Stang, Louis G. (Sayville, NY)

    1982-01-01

    A gas seal is formed by a compact layer of an insoluble powder and liquid filling the fine interstices of that layer. The smaller the particle size of the selected powder, such as sand or talc, the finer will be the interstices or capillary spaces in the layer and the greater will be the resulting sealing capacity, i.e., the gas pressure differential which the wet powder layer can withstand. Such wet powder seal is useful in constructing underground gas reservoirs or storage cavities for nuclear wastes as well as stopping leaks in gas mains buried under ground or situated under water. The sealing capacity of the wet powder seal can be augmented by the hydrostatic head of a liquid body established over the seal.

  3. Chaoticity of the Wet Granular Gas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. Fingerle; S. Herminghaus; V. Yu. Zaburdaev

    2007-05-22

    In this work we derive an analytic expression for the Kolmogorov-Sinai entropy of dilute wet granular matter, valid for any spatial dimension. The grains are modelled as hard spheres and the influence of the wetting liquid is described according to the Capillary Model, in which dissipation is due to the hysteretic cohesion force of capillary bridges. The Kolmogorov-Sinai entropy is expanded in a series with respect to density. We find a rapid increase of the leading term when liquid is added. This demonstrates the sensitivity of the granular dynamics to humidity, and shows that the liquid significantly increases the chaoticity of the granular gas.

  4. Chemflex Overview: Common Chemistry core

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gilchrist, James F.

    Advanced chemistry laboratory I CHM 335 3 Advanced chemistry laboratory II Mat 33 3 Engineering materialsChemflex Overview: Common Chemistry core CHM 40, 41 (or CHM 30, 31) 8 Introductory chemistry CHM 110,111,112,113 8 Organic chemistry CHM 332 3 Analytical chemistry CHM 201*** 2 Technical writing CHM

  5. WETTABILITY AND IMBIBITION: MICROSCOPIC DISTRIBUTION OF WETTING AND ITS CONSEQUENCES AT THE CORE AND FIELD SCALES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jill S. Buckley; Norman R. Morrow; Chris Palmer; Purnendu K. Dasgupta

    2003-02-01

    The questions of reservoir wettability have been approached in this project from three directions. First, we have studied the properties of crude oils that contribute to wetting alteration in a reservoir. A database of more than 150 different crude oil samples has been established to facilitate examination of the relationships between crude oil chemical and physical properties and their influence on reservoir wetting. In the course of this work an improved SARA analysis technique was developed and major advances were made in understanding asphaltene stability including development of a thermodynamic Asphaltene Solubility Model (ASM) and empirical methods for predicting the onset of instability. The CO-Wet database is a resource that will be used to guide wettability research in the future. The second approach is to study crude oil/brine/rock interactions on smooth surfaces. Contact angle measurements were made under controlled conditions on mica surfaces that had been exposed to many of the oils in the CO-Wet database. With this wealth of data, statistical tests can now be used to examine the relationships between crude oil properties and the tendencies of those oils to alter wetting. Traditionally, contact angles have been used as the primary wetting assessment tool on smooth surfaces. A new technique has been developed using an atomic forces microscope that adds a new dimension to the ability to characterize oil-treated surfaces. Ultimately we aim to understand wetting in porous media, the focus of the third approach taken in this project. Using oils from the CO-Wet database, experimental advances have been made in scaling the rate of imbibition, a sensitive measure of core wetting. Application of the scaling group to mixed-wet systems has been demonstrated for a range of core conditions. Investigations of imbibition in gas/liquid systems provided the motivation for theoretical advances as well. As a result of this project we have many new tools for studying wetting at microscopic and macroscopic scales and a library of well-characterized fluids for use in studies of crude oil/brine/rock interactions.

  6. CFD Combustion Modeling with Conditional Moment Closure using Tabulated Chemistry

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    A method is presented that allows for efficient conditional moment closure combustion simulations through the use of a progress variable based parameterization of the combustion chemistry.

  7. Analysis of Wet Weather Related Collision Concentration Locations: Empirical Assessment of Continuous Risk Profile

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oh, Soonmi; Chung, Koohong; Ragland, David R; Chan, Ching-Yao

    2009-01-01

    Analysis of Wet Weather Related Collision ConcentrationThe CRP plot displays wet weather related collision profilefactors responsible for wet weather related collisions is

  8. FUNDAMENTALS OF WETTING AND BONDING BETWEEN CERAMICS AND METALS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pask, J.A.

    2010-01-01

    WETTING AND BONDING BETWEEN CERAMICS AND METALS Jo s eph A.OF WETTING AND BONDING BETWEEN CERAMICS AND METALS Joseph A.and glass-to-metal or ceramic-to-metal seals. Both physical

  9. CHEMISTRY, B.S.C. CHEMISTRY OPTION (CHEC)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hamburger, Peter

    CHEMISTRY, B.S.C. CHEMISTRY OPTION (CHEC) (Fall 2015-Summer 2016) IPFW Residency Requirements of the American Chemical Society (ACS), and B.S.C. graduates are certified. ______ 1 CHM 19400 Freshman Chemistry Orientation ______ 4 CHM 11500 General Chemistry ______ 4 CHM 11600 General Chemistry ______ 4 CHM 24100 Intro

  10. B.A. DEGREE REQUIREMENTS FOR CHEMISTRY (CHEMISTRY TRACK)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Doyle, Robert

    B.A. DEGREE REQUIREMENTS FOR CHEMISTRY (CHEMISTRY TRACK) Requirements include 36 credits in chemistry core courses, 32 of which are taken in specific courses. Each student's course of study includes the following: 1.) Required Chemistry Core Courses CHE 106: General Chemistry Lecture I (3) CHE 116: General

  11. CHEMISTRY, B. S. WITH TEACHER CERTIFICATE CHEMISTRY OPTION (CHMT)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hamburger, Peter

    CHEMISTRY, B. S. WITH TEACHER CERTIFICATE CHEMISTRY OPTION (CHMT) (Fall 2015-Summer 2016) IPFW- or above in Gen Ed Chemistry BS Courses (62 credits) *Note: 3.0 CHM GPA required/2.0 CHM GPA in 300+ courses ______ 1 CHM 19400 Freshman Chemistry Orientation ______ 4 CHM 11500 General Chemistry ______ 4

  12. Virginia Tech Department of Chemistry Instructor Position / General Chemistry Program

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    entail teaching courses in analytical or physical chemistry lecture or lab as needed. Applicants should Virginia Tech Department of Chemistry Instructor Position / General Chemistry Program The Department of Chemistry is seeking an Instructor to teach classes in its General Chemistry Program to start

  13. TCD-IISc Symposium "Chemistry & Chemical Biology"

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    O'Mahony, Donal E.

    actinide chemistry, with a focus on coordination and organometallic uranium chemistry. Paula ColavitaTCD-IISc Symposium "Chemistry & Chemical Biology" Trinity College Clive Williams, Dean of Chemistry. Research areas include supramolecular organic and inorganic chemistry and medicinal chemistry

  14. DOE fundamentals handbook: Chemistry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-01-01

    This handbook was developed to assist nuclear facility operating contractors in providing operators, maintenance personnel, and the technical staff with the necessary fundamentals training to ensure a basic understanding of chemistry. This volume contains the following modules: reactor water chemistry (effects of radiation on water chemistry, chemistry parameters), principles of water treatment (purpose; treatment processes [ion exchange]; dissolved gases, suspended solids, and pH control; water purity), and hazards of chemicals and gases (corrosives [acids, alkalies], toxic compounds, compressed gases, flammable/combustible liquids).

  15. Chemistry 455 Chemical Nanotechnology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rohs, Remo

    , and superconductivity. Prerequisite: CHEM 453 Advanced Inorganic Chemistry. Required Texts: Owens & Poole, The Physics. Superconductivity (15) Statement for Students with Disabilities: Any student requesting academic accommodations

  16. www.kostic.niu.edu/DRnanofluids Wet-Nanotechnology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kostic, Milivoje M.

    1 www.kostic.niu.edu/DRnanofluids Wet-Nanotechnology: nanofluids at NIU www.kostic.niu.edu/DRnanofluids Dry- vs. Wet-nanotechnology · Fluids (gases & liquids) vs. Solids in Nature and (Chemical & Bio, and processes · Synergy of dry-nanotechnology (solid-state) & wet-nanotechnology (POLY-nanofluids) #12;2 www

  17. Teaching Assistants Department of Chemistry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Guide for Teaching Assistants Department of Chemistry The University of Chicago #12;© 2012 Department of Chemistry, The University of Chicago (2nd edition) #12;i Preface Welcome to the Chemistry to familiarize you with your teaching responsibilities for General Chemistry and Organic Chemistry and to provide

  18. Medicinal Chemistry and Enzyme Kinetics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Truhlar, Donald G

    Prof. Donald G. Truhlar, Department of Chemistry, February 2007 Recent Results ·Novel analytic functionMedicinal Chemistry and Enzyme Kinetics Elizabeth Amin and C. R. Wagner, Medicinal Chemistry Jiali Gao, Chemistry Don Truhlar, Chemistry February 2007 #12;Zn Metalloprotein Force Field Design ·Zn

  19. TU KAISERSLAUTERN DEPARTMENT OF CHEMISTRY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Berns, Karsten

    TU KAISERSLAUTERN DEPARTMENT OF CHEMISTRY - STUDY GUIDE - H Rb Sr K Ca ...Mn Fe... ONC He P S Br Kr .................................................................................................22 FOOD CHEMISTRY AND TOXICOLOGY: JUN.-Prof. Dr. M. Esselen...............................................................................24 FOOD CHEMISTRY AND TOXICOLOGY: Prof. Dr. E. Richling

  20. Adhesion and nonwetting-wetting transition in the Al -Al2O3 interface Qing Zhang, Tahir C agin, Adri van Duin, and William A. Goddard III

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Goddard III, William A.

    Adhesion and nonwetting-wetting transition in the AlŐ -Al2O3 interface Qing Zhang, Tahir C¸ agin 2004 Using a reactive force field ReaxFF , we investigated the structural, energetic, and adhesion and analysis of wetting and adhesion strength of liquid Al on an -Al2O3 surface via the sessile drop method.1

  1. BIOETHANOL PRODUCTION FROM WET OXIDSED CORN STOVER USING PRE-TREATED MANURE AS A NUTRIENT SOURCE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    and oxygen addition) were also applied for pre-treatment of manure. The manure was blended with water for the production of bioethanol. This pre-treatment method, similar to other hot water pre-treatments, acts, Roskilde, Denmark ABSTRACT: In the present study ethanol was produced from wet oxidised corn stover

  2. DOE fundamentals handbook: Chemistry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-01-01

    The Chemistry Handbook was developed to assist nuclear facility operating contractors in providing operators, maintenance personnel, and the technical staff with the necessary fundamentals training to ensure a basic understanding of chemistry. The handbook includes information on the atomic structure of matter; chemical bonding; chemical equations; chemical interactions involved with corrosion processes; water chemistry control, including the principles of water treatment; the hazards of chemicals and gases, and basic gaseous diffusion processes. This information will provide personnel with a foundation for understanding the chemical properties of materials and the way these properties can impose limitations on the operation of equipment and systems.

  3. Chemistry 1010 -090 (Online) Chemistry, Humanity, and Environment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Simons, Jack

    chemistry to environmental questions such as energy sources, air quality, water quality, mineral resourcesChemistry 1010 -090 (Online) Chemistry, Humanity, and Environment 1. Course Content The Online version of Chemistry 1010 (1010-090) supports the aims of the University of Utah General Education Mission

  4. B.A. DEGREE REQUIREMENTS FOR CHEMISTRY (BIOLOGICAL CHEMISTRY TRACK)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Doyle, Robert

    B.A. DEGREE REQUIREMENTS FOR CHEMISTRY (BIOLOGICAL CHEMISTRY TRACK) Requirements include 21 credits from chemistry core courses, 6 credits from the list, (2) below, of approved biology/biochemistry core's course of study must include the following: 1.) Required Chemistry Core Courses CHE 106: General

  5. CHEMISTRY 243: Introductory Physical Chemistry II. General Information

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ronis, David M.

    CHEMISTRY 243: Introductory Physical Chemistry II. General Information Lectures: Monday & Wednesday, Inc., 2006) J.R. Barrante, Applied Mathematics for Physical Chemistry, 3rd edition (Pearson Education, Inc., 2004) Supplementary Texts 1. G. W. Castellan, Physical Chemistry 3rd edition (Benjamin Cummings

  6. CHEMISTRY, B.S. CHEMISTRY PRE-DENTAL (CHPD)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hamburger, Peter

    CHEMISTRY, B.S. CHEMISTRY PRE-DENTAL (CHPD) (Fall 2015-Summer 2016) IPFW Residency Requirements in Gen Ed CHEMISTRY BS COURSES & SUPPORTING COURSES (81 credits) *Note: 2.0 CHM GPA required/2.0 CHM GPA in 300+ courses *The Bachelor of Science with a major in chemistry program is appropriate for premedical

  7. CHEMISTRY, B. S. CHEMISTRY PRE-MEDICINE (CHPM)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hamburger, Peter

    CHEMISTRY, B. S. CHEMISTRY PRE-MEDICINE (CHPM) (Fall 2015-Summer 2016) IPFW Residency Requirements in Gen Ed CHEMISTRY BS COURSES & SUPPORTING COURSES (85 credits) *Note: 2.0 CHM GPA required/2.0 CHM GPA in 300+ courses *The Bachelor of Science with a major in chemistry program is appropriate for premedical

  8. Wet Sand flows better than dry sand

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jorge E. Fiscina; Christian Wagner

    2007-11-19

    We investigated the yield stress and the apparent viscosity of sand with and without small amounts of liquid. By pushing the sand through a tube with an enforced Poiseuille like profile we minimize the effect of avalanches and shear localization. We find that the system starts to flow when a critical shear of the order of one particle diameter is exceeded. In contrast to common believe, we observe that the resistance against the flow of wet sand is much smaller than that of dry sand. For the dissipative flow we propose a non-equilibrium state equation for granular fluids.

  9. Analytical Chemistry Applied Mathematics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Heller, Barbara

    Architecture Information Technology & Management Integrated Building Delivery Landscape Architecture ManagementAnalytical Chemistry Applied Mathematics Architectural Engineering Architecture Architecture Electricity Markets Environmental Engineering Food Process Engineering Food Safety & Technology

  10. Green Chemistry and Workers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2009-01-01

    AND GREEN CHEMISTRY IN THE CLEAN-ENERGY ECONOMY Michael P.rapid development of clean-energy technologies—of the greenof economic growth in clean-energy technologies and energy

  11. UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND Department of Chemistry & Biochemistry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thirumalai, Devarajan

    , physical chemistry and analytical chemistry. The study program in Biochemistry should have included as laboratory courses in Organic Chemistry, Biochemistry, and Analytical Chemistry. These requirements represent, Analytical) are required of all applicants; the Advanced Subject examination (Chemistry, Biochemistry

  12. Summary of Chalcogenide Glass Processing: Wet-Etching and Photolithography

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Riley, Brian J.; Sundaram, S. K.; Johnson, Bradley R.; Saraf, Laxmikant V.

    2006-12-01

    This report describes a study designed to explore the different properties of two different chalcogenide materials, As2S3 and As24S38Se38, when subjected to photolithographic wet-etching techniques. Chalcogenide glasses are made by combining chalcogen elements S, Se, and Te with Group IV and/or V elements. The etchant was selected from the literature and was composed of sodium hydroxide, isopropyl alcohol, and deionized water and the types of chalcogenide glass for study were As2S3 and As24S38Se38. The main goals here were to obtain a single variable etch rate curve of etch depth per time versus NaOH overall solution concentration in M and to see the difference in etch rate between a given etchant when used on the different chalcogenide stoichiometries. Upon completion of these two goals, future studies will begin to explore creating complex, integrated photonic devices via these methods.

  13. Atmospheric Chemistry Theodore S. Dibble

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dibble, Theodore

    SYLLABUS FOR Atmospheric Chemistry FCH 511 Fall 2014 Theodore S. Dibble Professor of Chemistry 421 in Required Text Seinfeld, J. H. and Pandis, S. N. Atmospheric Chemistry and Physics: From Air Pollution nineteenth year at ESF, and my seventeenth year teaching FCH 511 (Atmospheric Chemistry). I have done a lot

  14. CHEMISTRY 3100 FALL SEMESTER 2005

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Simons, Jack

    CHEMISTRY 3100 FALL SEMESTER 2005 TEXT: "Chemistry 3100 Notes," (Parts 1-3 and 4-8) Ernst (required) "Inorganic Chemistry," Housecroft and Sharpe (recommended) CLASS: M W F: 8:05 - 9:25 PM, ROOM 140 JTB RECOMMENDED REFERENCES: *F. Cotton and G. Wilkinson, "Advanced Inorganic Chemistry" *F. Cotton, G. Wilkinson

  15. CHEMISTRY SENIORS ANNUAL PRIZE COMPETITIONS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vertes, Akos

    (Analytical, Inorganic, Organic, and Physical) in chemistry. The Byrne Thurtell Burns Memorial PrizeCHEMISTRY SENIORS ANNUAL PRIZE COMPETITIONS Each spring the Chemistry Department sponsors a competition for two large monetary prizes to be awarded to graduating chemistry majors on Commencement weekend

  16. Wet oxidation of high-concentration reactive dyes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chen, G.; Lei, L.; Yue, P.L.

    1999-05-01

    Advanced oxidation methods were used to degrade reactive dyes at high concentrations in aqueous solutions. Wet peroxide oxidation (WPO) was found to be the best method in terms of the removal of color and total organic carbon (TOC). Reactive blue (Basilen Brilliant Blue P-3R) was chosen as a model dye for determining the suitable reaction conditions. The variables studied include reaction temperature, H{sub 2}O{sub 2} dosage, solution pH, dye concentration, and catalyst usage. The removal of TOC and color by wet oxidation is very sensitive to the reaction temperature. At 150 C, the removal of 77% TOC and 90% color was obtained in less than 30 min. The initial TOC removal rate is proportional to the H{sub 2}O{sub 2} dosage. The TOC removal is insignificant even when 50% of the stoichiometric amount of H{sub 2}O{sub 2} is used. No color change is observed until the dosage of H{sub 2}O{sub 2} is 100% of the stoichiometric amount. The color removal is closely related to TOC removal. When the pH of the solution is adjusted to 3.5, the dye degradation rate increases significantly. The rates of TOC and color removal are enhanced by using a Cu{sup 2+} catalyst. Another four reactive dyes, Procion Red PX-4B, Cibacron Yellow P-6GS, Cibacron Brown P-6R, and Procion Black PX-2R, were treated at 150 C using WPO. More than 80% TOC was removed from the solution in less than 15 min. The process can remove the colors of al these dyes except Procion Black PX-2R.

  17. Challenges and Opportunities for Wet-Waste Feedstocks - Resource...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Documents & Publications "Wet" Waste-to-Energy in the Bioenergy Technologies Office Algae-to-Fuel: Integrating Thermochemical Conversion, Nutrient Recycling, and Wastewater...

  18. Wet Gasification of Ethanol Residue: A Preliminary Assessment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brown, Michael D.; Elliott, Douglas C.

    2008-09-22

    A preliminary technoeconomic assessment has been made of several options for the application of catalytic hydrothermal gasification (wet gasification) to ethanol processing residues.

  19. New Mexico Natural Gas Wet After Lease Separation, Reserves in...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    After Lease Separation, Reserves in Nonproducing Reservoirs (Billion Cubic Feet) New Mexico Natural Gas Wet After Lease Separation, Reserves in Nonproducing Reservoirs (Billion...

  20. ,"New Mexico Nonassociated Natural Gas Proved Reserves, Wet After...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","New Mexico Nonassociated Natural Gas Proved Reserves, Wet After Lease Separation",10,"Annual",201...

  1. Tensiometer methods

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Grover, Blair K.; Hubbell, Joel M.; Sisson, James B.; Casper, William L.

    2005-12-20

    A method for collecting data regarding a matric potential of a media includes providing a tensiometer having a stainless steel tensiometer casing, the stainless steel tensiometer casing comprising a tip portion which includes a wetted porous stainless steel membrane through which a matric potential of a media is sensed; driving the tensiometer into the media using an insertion tube comprising a plurality of probe casing which are selectively coupled to form the insertion tube as the tensiometer is progressively driven deeper into the media, wherein the wetted porous stainless steel membrane is in contact with the media; and sensing the matric potential the media exerts on the wetted porous stainless steel membrane by a pressure sensor in fluid hydraulic connection with the porous stainless steel membrane. A tensiometer includes a stainless steel casing.

  2. Chemistry B.S. Fall--First Year

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gering, Jon C.

    I & Lab · PHYS 196 (or 186) Physics w Calc II LSP coursework Fall--Fourth Year · CHEM 445 Senior Chemistry II & Lab · Elective(s) and/or LSP coursework Spring--Fourth Year · CHEM 310 Modern MethodsChemistry B.S. Fall--First Year · CHEM 130 Chemical Principles I* · CHEM 145 Freshman Seminar

  3. CHEM 103-03 INTRODUCTORY CHEMISTRY LABORATORY I

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Findley, Gary L.

    CHEM 103-03 INTRODUCTORY CHEMISTRY LABORATORY I Spring 2009 2:00 - 2:50 pm, W, CNSB 144 (Prelab) 3.ulm.edu/~findley COURSE Content: A laboratory course to accompany CHEM 101. Goals/ Objectives: Mastery of selected laboratory methods that illustrate principles covered in Introductory Chemistry I (CHEM 101). REQUIREMENTS

  4. CHEM 1009-60231 GENERAL CHEMISTRY LABORATORY I

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Findley, Gary L.

    CHEM 1009-60231 GENERAL CHEMISTRY LABORATORY I Spring 2015 2:00 - 2:50 pm, M, CNSB 345 (Prelab) 3.ulm.edu/~findley COURSE Content: A laboratory course to accompany CHEM 1007. Goals/ Objectives: Mastery of selected laboratory methods that illustrate principles introduced in General Chemistry I (CHEM 1007). REQUIREMENTS

  5. Notes on the efficacy of wet versus dry screening of fly ash

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Valentim, B.; Hower, J.C.; Flores, D.; Guedes, A.

    2008-08-15

    The methodology used to obtain fly ash subsamples of different sizes is generally based on wet or dry sieving methods. However, the worth of such methods is not certain if the methodology applied is not mentioned in the analytical procedure. After performing a fly ash mechanical dry, sieving, the authors compared those results with the ones obtained by laser diffraction on the same samples and found unacceptable discrepancies. A preliminary, study of a wet sieving analysis carried out on an economizer fly ash sample showed that this method was more effective than the dry sieving. The importance of standardizing the way samples are handled, pretreated and presented to the instrument of analysis are suggested and interlaboratory reproducibility trials are needed to create a common standard methodology to obtain large amounts of fly ash size fraction subsamples.

  6. Kinetics of wet sodium vapor complex plasma

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mishra, S. K., E-mail: nishfeb@rediffmail.com [Institute for Plasma Research (IPR), Gandhinagar 382428 (India); Sodha, M. S. [Centre of Energy Studies, Indian Institute of Technology Delhi (IITD), New Delhi 110016 (India)] [Centre of Energy Studies, Indian Institute of Technology Delhi (IITD), New Delhi 110016 (India)

    2014-04-15

    In this paper, we have investigated the kinetics of wet (partially condensed) Sodium vapor, which comprises of electrons, ions, neutral atoms, and Sodium droplets (i) in thermal equilibrium and (ii) when irradiated by light. The formulation includes the balance of charge over the droplets, number balance of the plasma constituents, and energy balance of the electrons. In order to evaluate the droplet charge, a phenomenon for de-charging of the droplets, viz., evaporation of positive Sodium ions from the surface has been considered in addition to electron emission and electron/ion accretion. The analysis has been utilized to evaluate the steady state parameters of such complex plasmas (i) in thermal equilibrium and (ii) when irradiated; the results have been graphically illustrated. As a significant outcome irradiated, Sodium droplets are seen to acquire large positive potential, with consequent enhancement in the electron density.

  7. Chemistry Student Handbook College of Science

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hickman, Mark

    Chemistry Student Handbook College of Science React. Science #12;Contents 2 Welcome to the Department of Chemistry 2 Course Advice 3 What is Chemistry? 4 Career Profiles in Chemistry 5 An Undergraduate Degree in Chemistry 6 Chemistry Streams 13 Chemistry Honours Programme 14 Research

  8. Reaction chemistry of cerium

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1997-01-01

    It is truly ironic that a synthetic organic chemist likely has far greater knowledge of the reaction chemistry of cerium(IV) than an inorganic colleague. Cerium(IV) reagents have long since been employed as oxidants in effecting a wide variety of organic transformations. Conversely, prior to the late 1980s, the number of well characterized cerium(IV) complexes did not extend past a handful of known species. Though in many other areas, interest in the molecular chemistry of the 4f-elements has undergone an explosive growth over the last twenty years, the chemistry of cerium(IV) has for the most part been overlooked. This report describes reactions of cerium complexes and structure.

  9. Secondary imbibition in NAPL-invaded mixed-wet sediments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Patzek, Tadeusz W.

    Secondary imbibition in NAPL-invaded mixed-wet sediments Ahmed Al-Futaisia,b , Tad W. Patzekb to study the spontaneous and forced secondary imbibition of a NAPL-invaded sediment, as in the displacement-wet sediment, i.e., the receding contact angles are very small. However, depending on the surface mineralogy

  10. Wave Energy Test Site (WETS) Marine Corps Base Hawaii (MCBH)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wave Energy Test Site (WETS) Marine Corps Base Hawaii (MCBH) Alexandra DeVisser, NAVFAC-EXWC Brian June 10, 2013 #12;Wave Energy Test Site (WETS) Objective: Provide location for year-long in Cable, Sound & Sea Technology (SST) Luis A. Vega, HNEI-University of Hawaii Energy Ocean International

  11. Computational Chemistry Robots

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Townsend, Joseph A; Murray-Rust, Peter; Tyrrell, Simon M; Zhang, Yong

    stream_source_info ACS2005_final.ppt.txt stream_content_type text/plain stream_size 6280 Content-Encoding UTF-8 stream_name ACS2005_final.ppt.txt Content-Type text/plain; charset=UTF-8 Computational Chemistry Robots ACS Sep 2005... Computational Chemistry Robots J. A. Townsend, P. Murray-Rust, S. M. Tyrrell, Y. Zhang jat45@cam.ac.uk Can high-throughput computation provide a reliable “experimental” resource for molecular properties? Can protocols be automated? Can we believe the results...

  12. Laser ablation in analytical chemistry - A review

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Russo, Richard E.; Mao, Xianglei; Liu, Haichen; Gonzalez, Jhanis; Mao, Samuel S.

    2001-01-01

    Encyclopedia of Analytical Chemistry, John Wiley & Sons,applications in analytical chemistry. Matrix independentLaser Ablation in Analytical Chemistry - A Review Richard E.

  13. Analytical Chemistry Laboratory | Argonne National Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Chemistry Laboratory provides a broad range of analytical chemistry support services to the scientific and engineering programs. AnalyticalChemistryLaboratoryfactsheet...

  14. Lifetimes and eigenstates in atmospheric chemistry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Prather, Michael J

    1994-01-01

    Perturbation dynamics in atmospheric chemistry. J. Geophys.isotopic variations in atmospheric chemistry. Geophys. Res.M. et al. 2001 Atmospheric chemistry and greenhouse gases (

  15. Atmospheric chemistry of an Antarctic volcanic plume

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2010-01-01

    L. , et al. (2010), Atmospheric chemistry results from theI. , et al. (2006), Atmospheric chemistry of a 33 – 34 hourvolcanic eruptions on atmospheric chemistry, Chem. Geol. ,

  16. “Greening Up” Cross-Coupling Chemistry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lipshutz, Bruce H.; Abela, Alexander R.; Boškovi?, Žarko V.; Nishikata, Takashi; Duplais, Christophe; Krasovskiy, Arkady

    2010-01-01

    today. Insofar as green chemistry is concerned, however,Handbook of organopalladium chemistry for organic synthesis.Hanefeld U (2007) Green chemistry and catalysis. Wiley-VCH,

  17. CMR: Chemistry and Metallurgy Research Facility

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    CMR: Chemistry and Metallurgy Research Facility CMR: Chemistry and Metallurgy Research Facility The Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) Chemistry and Metallurgy Research (CMR)...

  18. Atmospheric chemistry of an Antarctic volcanic plume

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2010-01-01

    ET AL. : EREBUS PLUME CHEMISTRY Horrocks, L. A. , C.et al. (2010), Atmospheric chemistry results from the ANTCI2007), Reactive halogen chemistry in volca- nic plumes, J.

  19. Chemistry at the Dirac Point of Graphene

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sarkar, Santanu

    2013-01-01

    Haddon, R. C. Covalent Chemistry for Graphene Electronics.P. K. ; Yang, J. X. The Chemistry of Graphene. J. Mater.R. C. Organometallic Chemistry of Extended Periodic ?-

  20. Home / Chemistry / Chemistry (general) Angewandte Chemie International Edition

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jo, Moon-Ho

    JOURNALS Home / Chemistry / Chemistry (general) Angewandte Chemie International Edition See Also: Angewandte Chemie Copyright © 2010 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim View all previous titles

  1. SPONTANEOUS CATALYTIC WET AIR OXIDATION DURING PRE-TREATMENT OF HIGH-LEVEL RADIOACTIVE WASTE SLUDGE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Koopman, D.; Herman, C.; Pareizs, J.; Bannochie, C.; Best, D.; Bibler, N.; Fellinger, T.

    2009-10-01

    Savannah River Remediation, LLC (SRR) operates the Defense Waste Processing Facility for the U.S. Department of Energy at the Savannah River Site. This facility immobilizes high-level radioactive waste through vitrification following chemical pretreatment. Catalytic destruction of formate and oxalate ions to carbon dioxide has been observed during qualification testing of non-radioactive analog systems. Carbon dioxide production greatly exceeded hydrogen production, indicating the occurrence of a process other than the catalytic decomposition of formic acid. Statistical modeling was used to relate the new reaction chemistry to partial catalytic wet air oxidation of both formate and oxalate ions driven by the low concentrations of palladium, rhodium, and/or ruthenium in the waste. Variations in process conditions led to increases or decreases in the total oxidative destruction, as well as partially shifting the preferred species undergoing destruction from oxalate ion to formate ion.

  2. Zach Harmon Air Chemistry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Toohey, Darin W.

    in the Troposphere Summary of Problem/Impact United States dependency on foreign oil and increased energy consumptionZach Harmon 810907207 Air Chemistry Natural Gas Production Impacts on levels of ozone administration to encourage fast growth to reduce dependency of foreign oil and be energy independent. It

  3. Chemistry & Biology Brief Communication

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Herschlag, Dan

    . In each of these cases the native hydroxyl group interacts with a purine exocy- clic amine. Our resultsChemistry & Biology Brief Communication 20 -Fluoro Substituents Can Mimic Native 20 -Hydroxyls signature for tertiary interac- tions between 20 -hydroxyl groups and exocyclic amino groups within RNA

  4. Chemistry & Biology Perspective

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Williams, Loren

    Chemistry & Biology Perspective The Origin of RNA and ``My Grandfather's Axe'' Nicholas V. Hud,1 *Correspondence: hud@gatech.edu http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.chembiol.2013.03.012 The origin of RNA is one

  5. CHEMISTRY AND TOXICITY OF

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ) primary treated domestic sewage from greater Vancouver (Annacis Island Wastewater Treatment Plant); (2#12;CHEMISTRY AND TOXICITY OF THREE WASTEWATERS DOE FRAP 1993-08 Prepared for Environment Canada wastewater characterization study in April and May 1992. Three representative effluent types were sampled: (1

  6. Recovery Boiler Corrosion Chemistry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Das, Suman

    11/13/2014 1 Recovery Boiler Corrosion Chemistry Sandy Sharp and Honghi Tran Symposium on Corrosion of a recovery boiler each cause their own forms of corrosion and cracking Understanding the origin of the corrosive conditions enables us to operate a boiler so as to minimize corrosion and cracking select

  7. Chemistry and Chemical Biology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Linhardt, Robert J.

    /polymeric materials for electronics or energy storage, and polyelectrolyte membranes for fuel cell applications. http projects in emerging fields of science and technology that lie at the intersection between chemistry Biology at Rensselaer invites applications from students interested in pursuing a Ph.D. degree

  8. Chemistry 2B Laboratory Manual

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Guo, Ting

    Chemistry 2B Laboratory Manual Standard Operating Procedures Department of Chemistry University # ____________ Laboratory Information Teaching Assistant's Name _______________________ Laboratory Section Number _______________________ Laboratory Room Number _______________________ Dispensary Room Number 1060 Sciences Lab Building Location

  9. Chemistry 2A Laboratory Manual

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Guo, Ting

    Chemistry 2A Laboratory Manual Standard Operating Procedures Department of Chemistry University # ____________ Laboratory Information Teaching Assistant's Name _______________________ Laboratory Section Number _______________________ Laboratory Room Number _______________________ Dispensary Room Number 1060 Sciences Lab Building Location

  10. Chemistry 2C Laboratory Manual

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Guo, Ting

    Chemistry 2C Laboratory Manual Standard Operating Procedures Department of Chemistry University # ____________ Laboratory Information Teaching Assistant's Name _______________________ Laboratory Section Number _______________________ Laboratory Room Number _______________________ Dispensary Room Number 1060 Sciences Lab Building Location

  11. Effects of Dopant Metal Variation and Material Synthesis Method on the Material Properties of Mixed Metal Ferrites in Yttria Stabilized Zirconia for Solar Thermochemical Fuel Production

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Leonard, Jeffrey; Reyes, Nichole; Allen, Kyle M.; Randhir, Kelvin; Li, Like; AuYeung, Nick; Grunewald, Jeremy; Rhodes, Nathan; Bobek, Michael; Klausner, James F.

    2015-01-01

    Mixed metal ferrites have shown much promise in two-step solar-thermochemical fuel production. Previous work has typically focused on evaluating a particular metal ferrite produced by a particular synthesis process, which makes comparisons between studies performed by independent researchers difficult. A comparative study was undertaken to explore the effects different synthesis methods have on the performance of a particular material during redox cycling using thermogravimetry. This study revealed that materials made via wet chemistry methods and extended periods of high temperature calcination yield better redox performance. Differences in redox performance between materials made via wet chemistry methods were minimal andmore »these demonstrated much better performance than those synthesized via the solid state method. Subsequently, various metal ferrite samples (NiFe 2 O 4 , MgFe 2 O 4 , CoFe 2 O 4 , and MnFe 2 O 4 ) in yttria stabilized zirconia (8YSZ) were synthesized via coprecipitation and tested to determine the most promising metal ferrite combination. It was determined that 10?wt.% CoFe 2 O 4 in 8YSZ produced the highest and most consistent yields of O 2 and CO. By testing the effects of synthesis methods and dopants in a consistent fashion, those aspects of ferrite preparation which are most significant can be revealed. More importantly, these insights can guide future efforts in developing the next generation of thermochemical fuel production materials. « less

  12. Chemistry in Combustion Processes II Introduce and discuss some important topics and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zevenhoven, Ron

    Chemistry in Combustion Processes II Introduce and discuss some important topics and methods of today's combustion chemistry research - Burning of biomass based fuels in large scale boilers - Black to ash - "Toolbox" for combustion chemistry analysis #12;Schedule CCP2-2012 #12;CCP2 2012 part B #12

  13. Department of Chemistry Undergraduate Thesis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kounaves, Samuel P.

    Department of Chemistry Undergraduate Thesis Timeline and Requirements (Updated October, 2013) Requirement for Application to the Chemistry Thesis Program 1. Must have at least one semester or summer of Undergraduate Education to waive the Dean's List requirement. 3. To write a thesis in chemistry, the student

  14. Chemistry Department Colloquium: Spring, 2012

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sheridan, Jennifer

    Chemistry Department Colloquium: Spring, 2012 Friday, March 16; 3:30 Seminar Hall (room 1315 Chemistry) Lost in Translation: How Regulators Use Science and How Scientists Can Help Bridge Gaps Stephanie to combine her Chemistry background with a legal education to improve the use of science in environmental

  15. Marquette University Department of Chemistry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Reid, Scott A.

    Marquette University Department of Chemistry #12;Do You Want A Career that will.... Directly your ideas with others? A Marquette Chemistry degree will prepare you for advanced study or for a job right after graduation! #12;Career Possibilities for Chemistry Students Health professions Industry

  16. Chemistry & Biology Genome-Wide High-Throughput Mining

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yin, Jun

    Chemistry & Biology Article Genome-Wide High-Throughput Mining of Natural-Product Biosynthetic Gene.01.006 SUMMARY We have developed a phage-display method for high-throughput mining of bacterial gene clus- ters

  17. Wetting and phase separation in soft adhesion

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    K. E. Jensen; R. Sarfati; R. W. Style; R. Boltyanskiy; A. Chakrabarti; M. K. Chaudhury; E. R. Dufresne

    2015-07-22

    In the classic theory of solid adhesion, surface energy drives deformation to increase contact area while bulk elasticity opposes it. Recently, solid surface stress has been shown also to play an important role in opposing deformation of soft materials. This suggests that the contact line in soft adhesion should mimic that of a liquid droplet, with a contact angle determined by surface tensions. Consistent with this hypothesis, we observe a contact angle of a soft silicone substrate on rigid silica spheres that depends on the surface functionalization but not the sphere size. However, to satisfy this wetting condition without a divergent elastic stress, the gel separates from its solvent near the contact line. This creates a four-phase contact zone with two additional contact lines hidden below the surface of the substrate. While the geometries of these contact lines are independent of the size of the sphere, the volume of the phase-separated region is not, but rather depends on the indentation volume. These results indicate that theories of adhesion of soft gels need to account for both the compressibility of the gel network and a non-zero surface stress between the gel and its solvent.

  18. RADIOCHEMISTRY, AND NUCLEAR CHEMISTRY; NUCLEAR MEDICINE; HISTORICAL

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    The early days Richards, P. 38 RADIATION CHEMISTRY, RADIOCHEMISTRY, AND NUCLEAR CHEMISTRY; NUCLEAR MEDICINE; HISTORICAL ASPECTS; TECHNETIUM 99; COLLOIDS; MOLYBDENUM...

  19. Inorganic Chemistry Solutions to Semiconductor Nanocrystal Problems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Alvarado, Samuel R. [Ames Laboratory; Guo, Yijun [Ames Laboratory; Ruberu, T. Purnima A. [Ames Laboratory; Tavasoli, Elham [Ames Laboratory; Vela, Javier [Ames Laboratory

    2014-03-15

    The optoelectronic and chemical properties of semiconductor nanocrystals heavily depend on their composition, size, shape and internal structure, surface functionality, etc. Available strategies to alter these properties through traditional colloidal syntheses and ligand exchange methods place a premium on specific reaction conditions and surfactant combinations. In this invited review, we apply a molecular-level understanding of chemical precursor reactivity to reliably control the morphology, composition and intimate architecture (core/shell vs. alloyed) of semiconductor nanocrystals. We also describe our work aimed at achieving highly selective, low-temperature photochemical methods for the synthesis of semiconductor–metal and semiconductor–metal oxide photocatalytic nanocomposites. In addition, we describe our work on surface modification of semiconductor nanocrystal quantum dots using new approaches and methods that bypass ligand exchange, retaining the nanocrystal's native ligands and original optical properties, as well as on spectroscopic methods of characterization useful in determining surface ligand organization and chemistry. Using recent examples from our group and collaborators, we demonstrate how these efforts have lead to faster, wider and more systematic application of semiconductor nanocrystal-based materials to biological imaging and tracking, and to photocatalysis of unconventional substrates. We believe techniques and methods borrowed from inorganic chemistry (including coordination, organometallic and solid state chemistry) have much to offer in reaching a better understanding of the synthesis, functionalization and real-life application of such exciting materials as semiconductor nanocrystals (quantum dots, rods, tetrapods, etc.).

  20. ORIGINAL PAPER Wet hibernacula promote inoculative freezing and limit

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lee Jr., Richard E.

    ORIGINAL PAPER Wet hibernacula promote inoculative freezing and limit the potential Peninsula. Although overwintering larvae have the physiological potential to survive by freezing or cryopro- tective dehydration, use of the latter strategy may be con- strained by inoculative freezing within

  1. Source apportionment of wet sulfate deposition in eastern North America

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fay, James A.

    1985-01-01

    An analytical model of long distance transport of air pollutants (Fay and Rosenzweig, 1980) has been adapted for the estimation of long term (e.g. annual) wet sulfate deposition in eastern N. America. The model parameters ...

  2. The wet Nicaraguan slab Geoffrey A. Abers and Terry Plank

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hacker, Bradley R.

    University, Boston, MA, USA Bradley R. Hacker Department of Geological Sciences, University of California Seismology: Body wave propagation. Citation: Abers, G. A., T. Plank, and B. R. Hacker, The wet Nicaraguan

  3. Wetting, Spreading, and Adsorption on Randomly Rough Surfaces

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    S. Herminghaus

    2011-11-17

    The wetting properties of solid substrates with customary (i.e., macroscopic) random roughness are considered as a function of the microscopic contact angle of the wetting liquid and its partial pressure in the surrounding gas phase. Analytic expressions are derived which allow for any given lateral correlation function and height distribution of the roughness to calculate the wetting phase diagram, the adsorption isotherms, and to locate the percolation transition in the adsorbed liquid film. Most features turn out to depend only on a few key parameters of the roughness, which can be clearly identified. It is shown that a first order transition in the adsorbed film thickness, which we term 'Wenzel prewetting', occurs generically on typical roughness topographies, but is absent on purely Gaussian roughness. It is thereby shown that even subtle deviations from Gaussian roughness characteristics may be essential for correctly predicting even qualitative aspects of wetting.

  4. Solid State Chemistry Chemistry 3130 & 7130 FallB 2013 Oct 21Dec 13, 2013

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Simons, Jack

    -5784) Inorganic Chemistry Majors Organic Chemistry Majors Physical Chemistry Majors Analytical Chemistry MajorsSolid State Chemistry Chemistry 3130 & 7130 FallB 2013 Oct 21­Dec 13, 2013 Prof. Joel S. Miller information by email) Text: Solid State Chemistry, 4th Ed. L. E. Smart and E. A. Moore I. Overview of solid

  5. Reactive greenhouse gas scenarios: Systematic exploration of uncertainties and the role of atmospheric chemistry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Prather, Michael J; Holmes, Christopher D; Hsu, Juno

    2012-01-01

    et al. (2011b), The RCP greenhouse gas concentrations andResearch Council (2010), Greenhouse Gas Emissions: MethodsATMOSPHERIC CHEMISTRY AND GREENHOUSE GASES Prather, M. , and

  6. Current Analytical Chemistry, 2005, 1, 103-119 103 Porphyrin Based Affinity Interactions: Analytical Applications with Special

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Miksik, Ivan

    Current Analytical Chemistry, 2005, 1, 103-119 103 Porphyrin Based Affinity Interactions in analytical chemistry as well. Spectropho- tometric, potentiometric and voltammetric methods for the analysis: Analytical Applications with Special Reference to Open Tubular Capillary Electrochromatography Zdenek Deyl*,1

  7. Molecular dynamics of wetting layer formation and forced water invasion in angular nanopores with mixed wettability

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sedghi, Mohammad Piri, Mohammad; Goual, Lamia

    2014-11-21

    The depletion of conventional hydrocarbon reservoirs has prompted the oil and gas industry to search for unconventional resources such as shale gas/oil reservoirs. In shale rocks, considerable amounts of hydrocarbon reside in nanoscale pore spaces. As a result, understanding the multiphase flow of wetting and non-wetting phases in nanopores is important to improve oil and gas recovery from these formations. This study was designed to investigate the threshold capillary pressure of oil and water displacements in a capillary dominated regime inside nanoscale pores using nonequilibrium molecular dynamics (NEMD) simulations. The pores have the same cross-sectional area and volume but different cross-sectional shapes. Oil and water particles were represented with a coarse grained model and the NEMD simulations were conducted by assigning external pressure on an impermeable piston. Threshold capillary pressures were determined for the drainage process (water replaced by oil) in different pores. The molecular dynamics results are in close agreements with calculations using the Mayer-Stowe-Princen (MS-P) method which has been developed on the premise of energy balance in thermodynamic equilibrium. After the drainage simulations, a change in wall particles’ wettability from water-wet to oil-wet was implemented based on the final configuration of oil and water inside the pore. Waterflooding simulations were then carried out at the threshold capillary pressure. The results show that the oil layer formed between water in the corner and in the center of the pore is not stable and collapses as the simulation continues. This is in line with the predictions from the MS-P method.

  8. Retention of canopy lichens after partial-cut harvesting in wet-belt interior cedarhemlock forests,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Northern British Columbia, University of

    Retention of canopy lichens after partial-cut harvesting in wet-belt interior cedar­hemlock forests-growth cedar­hemlock forests of the interior wet-belt of British Columbia are rich in abundance and diversity a zone of high precipitation, the so-called interior wet- belt, which favours the development of lush wet

  9. A nonparametric wet/dry spell model for resampling daily precipitation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tarboton, David

    A nonparametric wet/dry spell model for resampling daily precipitation Upmanu Lall Department precipitation at a site. The model considers alternating sequences of wet and dry days in a given season, wet spell length, precipitation amount, and wet spell length given prior to dry spell length

  10. ALS Chemistry Lab

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach HomeA Better Anode Design to Improve4AJ01) (See Energy Level79AJ01)19^ U N I T E DALSALS Chemistry Lab

  11. ALS Chemistry Lab

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach HomeA Better Anode Design to Improve4AJ01) (See Energy Level79AJ01)19^ U N I T E DALSALS Chemistry

  12. Lensfree Holographic Microscopy and Wide-field Optical Imaging using Wetting Films and Nano-Lenses

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mudanyali, Onur

    2012-01-01

    Numbers and Function,” Analytical Chemistry, vol. 82, no. 9,Analysis on a Chip,” Analytical Chemistry, vol. 82, no. 11,DNA microarrays. Analytical Chemistry 77, 5041-5047 (2005).

  13. Global atmospheric chemistry: Integrating over fractional cloud cover

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Neu, Jessica L; Prather, Michael J; Penner, Joyce E

    2007-01-01

    trace gases and atmospheric chemistry, in Climate Change2007 Global atmospheric chemistry: Integrating over2007), Global atmospheric chemistry: Integrating over

  14. Fluid Dynamic Aspects of the Porous Wetted Wall Protection Scheme for Inertial Fusion Energy Reactors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shin, S.; Abdelall, F.; Juric, D.; Abdel-Khalik, S.I.; Yoda, M.; Sadowski, D. [Georgia Institute of Technology (United States)

    2003-05-15

    A numerical and experimental investigation has been conducted to analyze the fluid dynamic aspects of the porous wetted wall protection scheme for inertial fusion energy (IFE) reactor first walls. A level contour reconstruction method has been used to track the three-dimensional evolution of the liquid film surface on porous downward-facing walls with different initial film thickness, liquid injection velocity through the porous wall, surface disturbance amplitude, configuration and mode number, liquid properties, and surface inclination angle. Generalized charts for the computed droplet detachment time, detached droplet equivalent diameter, and minimum film thickness during the transient for various design parameters and coolant properties are presented.In order to validate the numerical results over a wide range of parameters, an experimental test facility has been designed and constructed to simulate the hydrodynamics of downward-facing porous wetted walls. Nondimensionalization of the model shows that water can be adequately used as a simulant to validate the numerical results. Preliminary experimental results show good agreement with model predictions. The results of this investigation should allow designers of conceptual IFE reactors to identify appropriate 'windows' for successful operation of the porous wetted wall protection concept for different coolants.

  15. FNH 301 FOOD CHEMISTRY I Principles of Food Chemistry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    FNH 301 FOOD CHEMISTRY I Principles of Food Chemistry Instructor: Dr. David Kitts Department of Food Sciences Room 243 ­ Food, Nutrition & Health Building 2205 East Mall Food, Nutrition & Health Faculty of Land and Food Systems ­ University of British Columbia Phone: 604-822-5560; Fax: 604

  16. Study Abroad in Chemistry and Biochemistry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gleeson, Joseph G.

    Study Abroad in Chemistry and Biochemistry Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry York Hall for courses that may fulfill Chemistry and/or Biochemistry & other requirements to add to your Academic Planning Form Meet with your Chemistry and/or Biochemistry & college advisors Study Abroad as a Chemistry/Biochemistry

  17. ChemLin Home Chemistry index

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McGraw, Kevin J.

    Publishing press releases Chemistry Conferences German News Companies and products Chemicals Job market ChemChemLin Home Chemistry index Chemistry A to Z News Latest news News archive New chemistry sitesLin inside © 2004 Digitalverlag GmbH ASU researchers finds novel chemistry at work to provide parrot

  18. DIVISION OF MARINE AND ATMOSPHERIC CHEMISTRY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shyu, Mei-Ling

    DIVISION OF MARINE AND ATMOSPHERIC CHEMISTRY The missions of the Division of Marine and Atmospheric Chemistry (MAC) are to carry out broadly based research on the chemistry of the atmosphere and marine and stratosphere. Atmospheric Chemistry Research activities in atmospheric chemistry and modeling are diverse

  19. Chemistry Major and Minor At A Glance

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vertes, Akos

    Chemistry Major and Minor At A Glance Major I ­ Pre-professional (Medicine, Dentistry, Business, Law, Engineering) Major II ­ ACS Certified e.g. Graduate Study or Entry Level Chemistry Employment. Major III ­ Forensic Chemistry Major IV** ­ Biochemistry Option Chemistry Minor General Chemistry I & II

  20. School of Chemistry Centre for Chemical and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Birmingham, University of

    School of Chemistry Centre for Chemical and Biochemical Analysis High quality analytical services of Chemistry Edgbaston Birmingham B15 2TT Email: chemistry4business@contacts.bham.ac.uk www to excellence in research and teaching, the School of Chemistry is one of the UK's leading chemistry departments

  1. Environmental Soil Chemistry Second Edition Environmental Soil Chemistry illustrates fundamental principles of soil

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sparks, Donald L.

    Environmental Soil Chemistry Second Edition Environmental Soil Chemistry illustrates fundamental principles of soil chemistry with respect to environmental reactions between soils and other natural contemporary training in the basics of soil chemistry and applications to real-world environmental concerns

  2. STUDENT POSITIONS IN CHEMISTRY PROGRAM Subject to budgetary approval, the Program in Chemistry anticipates hiring student

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Northern British Columbia, University of

    (TEACHING) FOR UPPER YEAR CHEMISTRY LABORATORY Organic, Biochemistry, Analytical, and Environmental MARKERS, Biochemistry, Analytical, Environmental Marker for upper chemistry courses ­ hiring based on lecturerSTUDENT POSITIONS ­ IN CHEMISTRY PROGRAM Subject to budgetary approval, the Program in Chemistry

  3. Year 3 Programme and Module BSc in Chemistry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rzepa, Henry S.

    Year 3 Programme and Module Handbook 2014-2015 BSc in Chemistry BSc in Chemistry with Analytical Chemistry BSc in Medicinal Chemistry Integrated Masters in Chemistry Integrated Masters in Chemistry with Analytical Chemistry Integrated Masters in Medicinal Chemistry BSc in Chemistry and Mathematics Integrated

  4. http://chemistry.usc.edu/ Tel: (213) 7407036 UndergraduateProgramsDepartment of Chemistry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rohs, Remo

    http://chemistry.usc.edu/ Tel: (213) 7407036 UndergraduateProgramsDepartment of Chemistry Chemistry NanoscienceChemical BiologyBiochemistryResearch Five Majors, One Vision #12;Department of Chemistry, Undergraduate Programs Information about the programs B.S. degree in Chemistry: The B.S. degree in Chemistry

  5. ATMOSPHERIC CHEMISTRY - RESPONSE TO HUMAN INFLUENCE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    LOGAN, J; PRATHER, M; WOFSY, S; MCELROY, M

    1978-01-01

    Trans. II 70, 253. ATMOSPHERIC CHEMISTRY Clyne, M. A. A. &data for modelling atmospheric chemistry. NBS Technical NoteChem. 80, 2711. ATMOSPHERIC CHEMISTRY Sanadze, G. A. 1963 On

  6. Whither Physical Organic Chemistry? Wither? Or Wider?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Perrin, Charles L

    2015-01-01

    Mechanism in Organic Chemistry, Cornell University Press,Sommer, A. Molnar, Superacid Chemistry 2 ed, John Wiley, NewYork,, . C. L. Perrin, Chemistry in Britain 1972, 8, 163-

  7. CHEMISTRY DEPARTMENT REQUEST FOR CAPSTONE RESEARCH ADVISOR

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sanyal, Suman

    CHEMISTRY DEPARTMENT REQUEST FOR CAPSTONE RESEARCH ADVISOR The capstone project should reflect student's ability to integrate chemistry knowledge gained through the coursework, to learn outside the classroom, and to demonstrate independence. An intellectual contribution within the field of chemistry

  8. CHEMICAL SENSORS School of Chemistry and Biochemistry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sherrill, David

    students. Prerequisites include an introductory course in physical or analytical chemistry, undergraduateCHEMICAL SENSORS CHEM 6282 School of Chemistry and Biochemistry Chemical sensors is an interdisciplinary topic covering area of science and engineering that lies between chemistry, physics, materials

  9. CHEM 6283 -Electroanalytical Chemistry Course Syllabus

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sherrill, David

    journals: Langmuir Analytical Chemistry J. Electrochemical Society Electrochimica Acta J. ElectroanalyticalCHEM 6283 - Electroanalytical Chemistry Course Syllabus Catalog Description: (3-0-3) Coulometry examination of theory and practice of electroanalytical chemistry. Students completing this course will be

  10. Wetting on Random Roughness: the Ubiquity of Wenzel Prewetting

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stephan Herminghaus

    2012-03-23

    The wetting properties of solid substrates with macroscopic random roughness are considered as a function of the microscopic contact angle of the wetting liquid and its partial pressure in the surrounding gas phase. It is shown that Wenzel prewetting, which has been recently predicted for a rather wide class of roughness pro?les derived from Gaussian random processes by a general distortion procedure, should in fact be ubiquitous and prevail under even much milder conditions. The well-known transition occurring at Wenzel's angle is accompanied by a prewetting transition, at which a jump in the adsorbed liquid volume occurs. This should be present on most surfaces bearing homogeneous, isotropic random roughness.

  11. Electro-osmotic transport in wet processing of textiles

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Cooper, John F. (Oakland, CA)

    1998-01-01

    Electro-osmotic (or electrokinetic) transport is used to efficiently force a solution (or water) through the interior of the fibers or yarns of textile materials for wet processing of textiles. The textile material is passed between electrodes that apply an electric field across the fabric. Used alone or in parallel with conventional hydraulic washing (forced convection), electro-osmotic transport greatly reduces the amount of water used in wet processing. The amount of water required to achieve a fixed level of rinsing of tint can be reduced, for example, to 1-5 lbs water per pound of fabric from an industry benchmark of 20 lbs water/lb fabric.

  12. Electro-osmotic transport in wet processing of textiles

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Cooper, J.F.

    1998-09-22

    Electro-osmotic (or electrokinetic) transport is used to efficiently force a solution (or water) through the interior of the fibers or yarns of textile materials for wet processing of textiles. The textile material is passed between electrodes that apply an electric field across the fabric. Used alone or in parallel with conventional hydraulic washing (forced convection), electro-osmotic transport greatly reduces the amount of water used in wet processing. The amount of water required to achieve a fixed level of rinsing of tint can be reduced, for example, to 1--5 lbs water per pound of fabric from an industry benchmark of 20 lbs water/lb fabric. 5 figs.

  13. California - San Joaquin Basin Onshore Natural Gas, Wet After Lease

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustments (Billion Cubic Feet) Wyoming963 1.969 1.979Coal4 Arizona -ProductionWet AfterWet

  14. California - San Joaquin Basin Onshore Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustments (Billion Cubic Feet) Wyoming963 1.969 1.979Coal4 Arizona -ProductionWet AfterWetLease Separation,

  15. California Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation,

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustments (Billion Cubic Feet) Wyoming963 1.969 1.979Coal4 Arizona -ProductionWet AfterWetLease

  16. California Federal Offshore Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet After

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustments (Billion Cubic Feet) Wyoming963 1.969 1.979Coal4 Arizona -ProductionWet AfterWetLeaseCrude

  17. Chemistry of Silicate Atmospheres of Evaporating Super-Recommended short title: Silicate Atmospheres of Super-Earths

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    - 1 - Chemistry of Silicate Atmospheres of Evaporating Super- Earths Recommended short title: Silicate Atmospheres of Super-Earths Laura Schaefer1,2 Bruce Fegley, Jr.1,3 1 Planetary Chemistry through currently available methods. Keywords: atmosphere, silicate, exoplanet, chemistry #12;- 4 - 1

  18. Jay, L.O.; Sandu, A.; Potra F.A.; Carmichael, G.R. Efficient Numerical Integration for Atmospheric Chemistry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jay, Laurent O.

    used method to integrate stiff ordinary differential equations arising from atmospheric chemistry (see [2], [3], [4] for examples of regional and global scale atmospheric chemistry models in use today integration algorithms for atmospheric chemistry have been obtained by carefully exploiting the particular

  19. Chemistry & Physics at Interfaces | Advanced Materials | ORNL

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Home | Science & Discovery | Advanced Materials | Research Areas | Chemistry and Physics at Interfaces SHARE Chemistry and Physics at Interfaces Chemical transformations and...

  20. Stockroom Authorization Department of Chemistry & Biochemistry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Morgan, Stephen L.

    Stockroom Authorization Department of Chemistry & Biochemistry University of South Carolina, GSRC supplies from the Dept. of Chemistry & Biochemistry Stockroom must bring with them this completed pre

  1. Chemistry & Biology Deciphering the Late Biosynthetic Steps

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhao, Huimin

    Chemistry & Biology Article Deciphering the Late Biosynthetic Steps of Antimalarial Compound FR Engineering 2Institute for Genomic Biology 3Department of Microbiology 4Department of Chemistry 5Departments

  2. Screen Electrode Materials & Cell Chemistries and Streamlining...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    & Cell Chemistries and Streamlining Optimization of Electrode Screen Electrode Materials & Cell Chemistries and Streamlining Optimization of Electrode 2010 DOE Vehicle Technologies...

  3. Interface Tensions and Perfect Wetting in the Two-Dimensional Seven-State Potts Model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    B. Grossmann; Sourendu Gupta

    1993-10-25

    We present a numerical determination of the order-disorder interface tension, \\sod, for the two-dimensional seven-state Potts model. We find $\\sod=0.0114\\pm0.0012$, in good agreement with expectations based on the conjecture of perfect wetting. We take into account systematic effects on the technique of our choice: the histogram method. Our measurements are performed on rectangular lattices, so that the histograms contain identifiable plateaus. The lattice sizes are chosen to be large compared to the physical correlation length. Capillary wave corrections are applied to our measurements on finite systems.

  4. Advanced Chemistry Basins Model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Blanco, Mario; Cathles, Lawrence; Manhardt, Paul; Meulbroek, Peter; Tang, Yongchun

    2003-02-13

    The objective of this project is to: (1) Develop a database of additional and better maturity indicators for paleo-heat flow calibration; (2) Develop maturation models capable of predicting the chemical composition of hydrocarbons produced by a specific kerogen as a function of maturity, heating rate, etc.; assemble a compositional kinetic database of representative kerogens; (3) Develop a 4 phase equation of state-flash model that can define the physical properties (viscosity, density, etc.) of the products of kerogen maturation, and phase transitions that occur along secondary migration pathways; (4) Build a conventional basin model and incorporate new maturity indicators and data bases in a user-friendly way; (5) Develop an algorithm which combines the volume change and viscosities of the compositional maturation model to predict the chemistry of the hydrocarbons that will be expelled from the kerogen to the secondary migration pathways; (6) Develop an algorithm that predicts the flow of hydrocarbons along secondary migration pathways, accounts for mixing of miscible hydrocarbon components along the pathway, and calculates the phase fractionation that will occur as the hydrocarbons move upward down the geothermal and fluid pressure gradients in the basin; and (7) Integrate the above components into a functional model implemented on a PC or low cost workstation.

  5. Organometallic chemistry of metal surfaces

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Muetterties, E.L.

    1981-06-01

    The organometallic chemistry of metal surfaces is defined as a function of surface crystallography and of surface composition for a set of cyclic hydrocarbons that include benzene, toluene, cyclohexadienes, cyclohexene, cyclohexane, cyclooctatetraene, cyclooctadienes, cyclooctadiene, cycloheptatriene and cyclobutane. 12 figures.

  6. National Nuclear Chemistry Summer School

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    he Division of Nuclear Chemistry and Technology of the American Chemical Society (ACS) is sponsoring two INTENSIVE six-week Summer Schools in Nuclear and Radiochemistry for undergraduates. Funding...

  7. Palladium chemistry in chemical biology 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yusop, Rahimi Muhammad

    2011-11-23

    A range of fluorescein derivatives were synthesised via Pd0-mediated cross-coupling chemistry of the mono triflate of fluorescein with a variety of boronic acids and the optical properties of each dye was studied. Among ...

  8. National Nuclear Chemistry Summer School

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Division of Nuclear Chemistry and Technology of the American Chemical Society (ACS) is sponsoring two INTENSIVE six-week Summer Schools in Nuclear and Radiochemistry for undergraduates. Funding is provided by the US Department of Energy.

  9. Hot atom chemistry and radiopharmaceuticals

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Krohn, Kenneth A.; Moerlein, Stephen M.; Link, Jeanne M.; Welch, Michael J.

    2012-12-19

    The chemical products made in a cyclotron target are a combined result of the chemical effects of the nuclear transformation that made the radioactive atom and the bulk radiolysis in the target. This review uses some well-known examples to understand how hot atom chemistry explains the primary products from a nuclear reaction and then how radiation chemistry is exploited to set up the optimal product for radiosynthesis. It also addresses the chemical effects of nuclear decay. There are important principles that are common to hot atom chemistry and radiopharmaceutical chemistry. Both emphasize short-lived radionuclides and manipulation of high specific activity nuclides. Furthermore, they both rely on radiochromatographic separation for identification of no-carrieradded products.

  10. UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA, SANTA CRUZ DEPARTMENT OF CHEMISTRY AND BIOCHEMISTRY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Santa Cruz, University of

    UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA, SANTA CRUZ DEPARTMENT OF CHEMISTRY AND BIOCHEMISTRY Lecturer Pool The Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry at the University of California, Santa Cruz, invites applications specialty within chemistry and biochemistry (including general chemistry, organic chemistry, inorganic

  11. Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry U.C. San Diego

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Continetti, Robert E.

    around four main areas: biochemistry, inorganic, organic, and physical/analytical chemistry. 2 four Divisions: Biochemistry, Inorganic Chemistry, Organic Chemistry, and Physical/Analytical Chemistry 1 Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry U.C. San Diego DEPARTMENTAL BYLAWS Revised Version

  12. Supramolecular chemistry and crystal engineering ASHWINI NANGIA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Giri, Ranjit K.

    Supramolecular chemistry and crystal engineering ASHWINI NANGIA School of Chemistry, University. This article traces the evolution of supramolecular chemistry and crystal engineering starting from the early of Hyderabad, Hyderabad 500 046, India. e-mail: ashwini.nangia@gmail.com Advances in supramolecular chemistry

  13. Module Catalogue Bachelor of Science Chemistry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schubart, Christoph

    Module Catalogue Bachelor of Science Chemistry University of Regensburg 13.1.2014 The Bachelor of Science Chemistry at the University of Regensburg comprises the following modules: 1. Compulsory Courses: CHE-BSc-M 1 General Chemistry CHE-BSc-M 2 Mathematics CHE-BSc-M 3 Physics CHE-BSc-M 4 Chemistry

  14. 179Department of Chemistry Undergraduate Catalogue 201415

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    the four major areas of chemistry, i.e. analytical, organic, inorganic and physical, and are strongly179Department of Chemistry Undergraduate Catalogue 2014­15 Department of Chemistry Chairperson: Karam, Pierre M. Instructors: Abi Rafi, Randa A.; Deeb, Hana H.; Sadek, Samar A. BS in Chemistry Mission

  15. Importance of wet precipitation as a removal and transport process for atmospheric water soluble carbonyls

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Matsunaga, SN; Guenther, AB; Izawa, Y; Wiedinmyer, C; Greenberg, JP; Kawamura, K

    2007-01-01

    et al. , 2001). Wet precipitation samples contain almost alldeposition rate due to the precipitation Yield mg C m 2 h 1Importance of wet precipitation as a removal and transport

  16. CHEMISTRY 2011 Academic regulations for the Bachelor's degree in Chemistry 2011

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bataillon, Thomas

    CHEMISTRY 2011 Academic regulations for the Bachelor's degree in Chemistry 2011 1. Framework) in Chemistry. Academic line and main subject areas of the degree The Bachelor's degree in Chemistry students a basic introduction to the Chemistry disciplines. In addition, the Bachelor's degree programme

  17. Air Pollution Physics and Chemistry EAS 6790 Home Work Assignment Ozone Chemistry 2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Weber, Rodney

    1 Air Pollution Physics and Chemistry EAS 6790 Fall 2010 Home Work Assignment Ozone Chemistry 2 and Chemistry EAS 6790 Fall 2006 Home Work Assignment No. 4, Ozone Chemistry Problems 11.8 and 11.9 (sub-part 1 and 2 only). Daniel Jacob, Atmospheric Chemistry #12;2 Problem 2: 2 2. Consider an air parcel ventilated

  18. STANDARD OPERATING PROCEDURE FOR TUBE "A2-WetOxBond" furnace in TRL.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Reif, Rafael

    STANDARD OPERATING PROCEDURE FOR TUBE "A2-WetOxBond" furnace in TRL. INTRODUCTION Tube "A2-Wet. Three Eurotherm temperature controllers provide a 20 inch long, flat profile in the Center Zone resistant gloves to handle those parts PROCEDURE. 1) "ENGAGE" the machine in CORAL for TRL tube "A2-WetOxBond"machine

  19. Analytical Chemistry Laboratory progress report for FY 1985

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Green, D.W.; Heinrich, R.R.; Jensen, K.J.

    1985-12-01

    The Analytical Chemistry Laboratory is a full-cost-recovery service center, with the primary mission of providing a broad range of technical support services to the scientific and engineering programs at ANL. In addition, ACL conducts a research program in analytical chemistry, works on instrumental and methods development, and provides analytical services for governmental, educational, and industrial organizations. The ACL handles a wide range of analytical problems, from routine standard analyses to unique problems that require significant development of methods and techniques. The purpose of this report is to summarize the technical and administrative activities of the Analytical Chemistry Laboratory (ACL) at Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) for Fiscal Year 1985 (October 1984 through September 1985). This is the second annual report for the ACL. 4 figs., 1 tab.

  20. From transistor to trapped-ion computers for quantum chemistry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M. -H. Yung; J. Casanova; A. Mezzacapo; J. McClean; L. Lamata; A. Aspuru-Guzik; E. Solano

    2013-07-16

    Over the last few decades, quantum chemistry has progressed through the development of computational methods based on modern digital computers. However, these methods can hardly fulfill the exponentially-growing resource requirements when applied to large quantum systems. As pointed out by Feynman, this restriction is intrinsic to all computational models based on classical physics. Recently, the rapid advancement of trapped-ion technologies has opened new possibilities for quantum control and quantum simulations. Here, we present an efficient toolkit that exploits both the internal and motional degrees of freedom of trapped ions for solving problems in quantum chemistry, including molecular electronic structure, molecular dynamics, and vibronic coupling. We focus on applications that go beyond the capacity of classical computers, but may be realizable on state-of-the-art trapped-ion systems. These results allow us to envision a new paradigm of quantum chemistry that shifts from the current transistor to a near-future trapped-ion-based technology.

  1. Preliminary Evaluation of Cesium Distribution for Wet Sieving Process Planned for Soil Decontamination in Japan - 13104

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Enokida, Y.; Tanada, Y.; Hirabayashi, D.; Sawada, K.

    2013-07-01

    For the purpose of decontaminating radioactive cesium from a huge amount of soil, which has been estimated to be 1.2x10{sup 8} m{sup 3} by excavating to a 5-cm depth from the surface of Fukushima Prefecture where a severe nuclear accident occurred at TEPCO's power generating site and has emitted a significant amount of radioactive materials, mainly radioactive cesium, a wet sieving process was selected as one of effective methods available in Japan. Some private companies have demonstrated this process for soil treatment in the Fukushima area by testing at their plants. The results were very promising, and a full-fledged application is expected to follow. In the present study, we spiked several aqueous samples containing soil collected from an industrial wet sieving plant located near our university for the recycling of construction wastes with non-radioactive cesium hydroxide. The present study provides scientific data concerning the effectiveness in volume reduction of the contaminated soil by a wet sieving process as well as the cesium distribution between the liquid phase and clay minerals for each sub-process of the full-scale one, but a simulating plant equipped with a process of coagulating sedimentation and operational safety fundamentals for the plant. Especially for the latter aspect, the study showed that clay minerals of submicron size strongly bind a high content of cesium, which was only slightly removed by coagulation with natural sedimentation (1 G) nor centrifugal sedimentation (3,700 G) and some of the cesium may be transferred to the effluent or recycled water. By applying ultracentrifugation (257,000 G), most of submicron clay minerals containing cesium was removed, and the cesium amount which might be transferred to the effluent or recycled water, could be reduced to less than 2.3 % of the original design by the addition of a cesium barrier consisting of ultracentrifugation or a hollow fiber membrane. (authors)

  2. Direct Use of Wet Ethanol in a Homogeneous Charge Compression Ignition (HCCI) Engine: Experimental and Numerical Results

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mack, John Hunter; Flowers, Daniel L; Aceves, Salvador M; Dibble, Robert W

    2007-01-01

    The energy balance of corn ethanol revisited, Transaction offor autoignition. The wet ethanol modeling study [REF] usedengine running on wet ethanol. Fuel mixtures studied range

  3. Wet-steam erosion of steam turbine disks and shafts

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Averkina, N. V.; Zheleznyak, I. V.; Kachuriner, Yu. Ya.; Nosovitskii, I. A.; Orlik, V. G.; Shishkin, V. I.

    2011-01-15

    A study of wet-steam erosion of the disks and the rotor bosses or housings of turbines in thermal and nuclear power plants shows that the rate of wear does not depend on the diagrammed degree of moisture, but is determined by moisture condensing on the surfaces of the diaphragms and steam inlet components. Renovating the diaphragm seals as an assembly with condensate removal provides a manifold reduction in the erosion.

  4. The Fernald wet records recovery project: A case history

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sterling, H.J.; Devir, B.R.; Hawley, R.A. [Fernald Environmental Restoration Management Corp., Cincinnati, OH (United States); Freesmeyer, M.T. [USDOE Ohio Field Office (United States)

    1995-06-22

    This paper discusses a project performed to recover wet records discovered in January 1995 at the Fernald Environmental Management Project (FEMP). This paper discusses the emergency and record recovery phases of the project, the technical options considered for records recovery, and special measures which were required due to radiological contamination of the records. Also, the root causes and lessons learned from the incident, and path forward for future records management operations at Fernald, are discussed.

  5. Period tripling causes rotating spirals in agitated wet granular layers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kai Huang; Ingo Rehberg

    2011-07-07

    Pattern formation of a thin layer of vertically agitated wet granular matter is investigated experimentally. Rotating spirals with three arms, which correspond to the kinks between regions with different colliding phases, are the dominating pattern. This preferred number of arms corresponds to period tripling of the agitated granular layer, unlike predominantly subharmonic Faraday crispations in dry granular matter. The chirality of the spatiotemporal pattern corresponds to the rotation direction of the spirals.

  6. Can a "state of the art" chemistry transport model simulate Amazonian tropospheric chemistry?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2011-01-01

    of tropospheric gas?phase chemistry schemes for use withinthe role of atmospheric chemistry in the global CO 2 budget,for atmospheric chemistry, Geophys. Res. Lett. , 34, L18813,

  7. Tensiometer methods and apparatus

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Grover, Blair K.; Hubbell, Joel M.; Sisson, James B.; Casper, William L.

    2004-08-10

    A method for collecting data regarding a matric potential of a media includes providing a tensiometer having a stainless steel tensiometer casing, the stainless steel tensiometer casing comprising a tip portion which includes a wetted porous stainless steel membrane through which a matric potential of a media is sensed; driving the tensiometer into the media using an insertion tube comprising a plurality of probe casing which are selectively coupled to form the insertion tube as the tensiometer is progressively driven deeper into the media, wherein the wetted porous stainless steel membrane is in contact with the media; and sensing the matric potential the media exerts on the wetted porous stainless steel membrane by a pressure sensor in fluid hydraulic connection with the porous stainless steel membrane. A tensiometer includes a stainless steel casing.

  8. Hydrologic Behavior of Two Engineered Barriers Following Extreme Wetting

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Porro, I.

    2000-09-30

    Many engineered barriers are expected to function for hundreds of years or longer. Over the course of time, it is likely that some barriers will experience infiltration to the point of breakthrough. This study compares the recovery from breakthrough of two storage- evapotranspiration type engineered barriers. Replicates of test plots comprising thick soil and capillary/biobarrier covers were wetted to breakthrough in 1997. Test plots were kept cleared of vegetation to maximize hydrologic stress during recovery. Following cessation of drainage resulting from the wetting irrigations, water storage levels in all plots were at elevated levels compared to pre-irrigation levels. As a result, infiltration of melting snow during the subsequent spring overloaded the storage capacity and produced drainage in all plots. Relatively rapid melting of accumulated snowfall produced the most significant infiltration events each year during the study. Capillary barriers yielded less total drainage than thick soil barriers. By limiting drainage, capillary barriers increased water storage in the upper portions of the test plots, which led to increased evaporation from the capillary barrier plots compared to thick soil plots. Increased evaporation in the capillary barrier plots allowed more water to infiltrate in the second season following the wetting tests without triggering drainage. All thick soil plots again yielded drainage in the second season. Within two years of intentionally induced breakthrough, evaporation alone (without transpiration) restored the capability of the capillary barrier covers to function as intended, although water storage in these covers remained at elevated levels.

  9. 'Elastic' fluctuation-induced effects in smectic wetting films

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pikina, E. S., E-mail: elena@ogri.r [Russian Academy of Sciences, Oil and Gas Research Institute (Russian Federation)

    2009-11-15

    The Li-Kardar field theory approach is generalized to wetting smectic films and the 'elastic' fluctuation-induced interaction is obtained between the external flat bounding surface and distorted IA (isotropic liquid-smectic A) interface acting as an 'internal' (bulk) boundary of the wetting smectic film under the assumption that the IA interface is essentially 'softer' than the surface smectic layer. This field theory approach allows calculating the fluctuation-induced corrections in Hamiltonians of the so-called 'correlated' liquids confined by two surfaces, in the case where one of the bounding surfaces is 'rough' and with different types of surface smectic layer anchoring. We obtain that in practice, the account of thermal displacements of the smectic layers in a wetting smectic film reduces to the addition of two contributions to the IA interface Hamiltonian. The first, so-called local contribution describes the long-range thermal 'elastic' repulsion of the fluctuating IA interface from the flat bounding surface. The second, so-called nonlocal contribution is connected with the occurrence of an 'elastic' fluctuation-induced correction to the stiffness of the IA interface. An analytic expression for this correction is obtained.

  10. Wetting kinetics of water nano-droplet containing non-surfactant nanoparticles: A molecular dynamics study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lu, Gui; Department of Mechanical Engineering and Mechanics, Drexel University, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 19104 ; Hu, Han; Sun, Ying E-mail: ysun@coe.drexel.edu; Duan, Yuanyuan E-mail: ysun@coe.drexel.edu

    2013-12-16

    In this Letter, dynamic wetting of water nano-droplets containing non-surfactant gold nanoparticles on a gold substrate is examined via molecular dynamics simulations. The results show that the addition of non-surfactant nanoparticles hinders the nano-second droplet wetting process, attributed to the increases in both surface tension of the nanofluid and friction between nanofluid and substrate. The droplet wetting kinetics decreases with increasing nanoparticle loading and water-particle interaction energy. The observed wetting suppression and the absence of nanoparticle ordering near the contact line of nano-sized droplets differ from the wetting behaviors reported from nanofluid droplets of micron size or larger.

  11. The effects of digital elevation model resolution on the calculation and predictions of topographic wetness indices.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Drover, Damion, Ryan

    2011-12-01

    One of the largest exports in the Southeast U.S. is forest products. Interest in biofuels using forest biomass has increased recently, leading to more research into better forest management BMPs. The USDA Forest Service, along with the Oak Ridge National Laboratory, University of Georgia and Oregon State University are researching the impacts of intensive forest management for biofuels on water quality and quantity at the Savannah River Site in South Carolina. Surface runoff of saturated areas, transporting excess nutrients and contaminants, is a potential water quality issue under investigation. Detailed maps of variable source areas and soil characteristics would therefore be helpful prior to treatment. The availability of remotely sensed and computed digital elevation models (DEMs) and spatial analysis tools make it easy to calculate terrain attributes. These terrain attributes can be used in models to predict saturated areas or other attributes in the landscape. With laser altimetry, an area can be flown to produce very high resolution data, and the resulting data can be resampled into any resolution of DEM desired. Additionally, there exist many maps that are in various resolutions of DEM, such as those acquired from the U.S. Geological Survey. Problems arise when using maps derived from different resolution DEMs. For example, saturated areas can be under or overestimated depending on the resolution used. The purpose of this study was to examine the effects of DEM resolution on the calculation of topographic wetness indices used to predict variable source areas of saturation, and to find the best resolutions to produce prediction maps of soil attributes like nitrogen, carbon, bulk density and soil texture for low-relief, humid-temperate forested hillslopes. Topographic wetness indices were calculated based on the derived terrain attributes, slope and specific catchment area, from five different DEM resolutions. The DEMs were resampled from LiDAR, which is a laser altimetry remote sensing method, obtained from the USDA Forest Service at Savannah River Site. The specific DEM resolutions were chosen because they are common grid cell sizes (10m, 30m, and 50m) used in mapping for management applications and in research. The finer resolutions (2m and 5m) were chosen for the purpose of determining how finer resolutions performed compared with coarser resolutions at predicting wetness and related soil attributes. The wetness indices were compared across DEMs and with each other in terms of quantile and distribution differences, then in terms of how well they each correlated with measured soil attributes. Spatial and non-spatial analyses were performed, and predictions using regression and geostatistics were examined for efficacy relative to each DEM resolution. Trends in the raw data and analysis results were also revealed.

  12. Gas-grain chemistry in cold interstellar cloud cores with a microscopic Monte Carlo approach to surface chemistry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Q. Chang; H. M. Cuppen; E. Herbst

    2007-05-24

    AIM: We have recently developed a microscopic Monte Carlo approach to study surface chemistry on interstellar grains and the morphology of ice mantles. The method is designed to eliminate the problems inherent in the rate-equation formalism to surface chemistry. Here we report the first use of this method in a chemical model of cold interstellar cloud cores that includes both gas-phase and surface chemistry. The surface chemical network consists of a small number of diffusive reactions that can produce molecular oxygen, water, carbon dioxide, formaldehyde, methanol and assorted radicals. METHOD: The simulation is started by running a gas-phase model including accretion onto grains but no surface chemistry or evaporation. The starting surface consists of either flat or rough olivine. We introduce the surface chemistry of the three species H, O and CO in an iterative manner using our stochastic technique. Under the conditions of the simulation, only atomic hydrogen can evaporate to a significant extent. Although it has little effect on other gas-phase species, the evaporation of atomic hydrogen changes its gas-phase abundance, which in turn changes the flux of atomic hydrogen onto grains. The effect on the surface chemistry is treated until convergence occurs. We neglect all non-thermal desorptive processes. RESULTS: We determine the mantle abundances of assorted molecules as a function of time through 2x10^5 yr. Our method also allows determination of the abundance of each molecule in specific monolayers. The mantle results can be compared with observations of water, carbon dioxide, carbon monoxide, and methanol ices in the sources W33A and Elias 16. Other than a slight underproduction of mantle CO, our results are in very good agreement with observations.

  13. Atmospheric Chemistry and Air Pollution

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Gaffney, Jeffrey S.; Marley, Nancy A.

    2003-01-01

    Atmospheric chemistry is an important discipline for understanding air pollution and its impacts. This mini-review gives a brief history of air pollution and presents an overview of some of the basic photochemistry involved in the production of ozone and other oxidants in the atmosphere. Urban air quality issues are reviewed with a specific focus on ozone and other oxidants, primary and secondary aerosols, alternative fuels, and the potential for chlorine releases to amplify oxidant chemistry in industrial areas. Regional air pollution issues such as acid rain, long-range transport of aerosols and visibility loss, and the connections of aerosols to ozonemore »and peroxyacetyl nitrate chemistry are examined. Finally, the potential impacts of air pollutants on the global-scale radiative balances of gases and aerosols are discussed briefly.« less

  14. The effect of dry and wet deposition of condensable vapors on secondary organic aerosols concentrations over the continental US

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Knote, C.; Hodzic, A.; Jimenez, J. L.

    2015-01-06

    The effect of dry and wet deposition of semi-volatile organic compounds (SVOCs) in the gas phase on the concentrations of secondary organic aerosol (SOA) is reassessed using recently derived water solubility information. The water solubility of SVOCs was implemented as a function of their volatility distribution within the WRF-Chem regional chemistry transport model, and simulations were carried out over the continental United States for the year 2010. Results show that including dry and wet removal of gas-phase SVOCs reduces annual average surface concentrations of anthropogenic and biogenic SOA by 48 and 63% respectively over the continental US. Dry deposition ofmore »gas-phase SVOCs is found to be more effective than wet deposition in reducing SOA concentrations (?40 vs. ?8% for anthropogenics, and ?52 vs. ?11% for biogenics). Reductions for biogenic SOA are found to be higher due to the higher water solubility of biogenic SVOCs. The majority of the total mass of SVOC + SOA is actually deposited via the gas phase (61% for anthropogenics and 76% for biogenics). Results are sensitive to assumptions made in the dry deposition scheme, but gas-phase deposition of SVOCs remains crucial even under conservative estimates. Considering reactivity of gas-phase SVOCs in the dry deposition scheme was found to be negligible. Further sensitivity studies where we reduce the volatility of organic matter show that consideration of gas-phase SVOC removal still reduces average SOA concentrations by 31% on average. We consider this a lower bound for the effect of gas-phase SVOC removal on SOA concentrations. A saturation effect is observed for Henry's law constants above 108 M atm?1, suggesting an upper bound of reductions in surface level SOA concentrations by 60% through removal of gas-phase SVOCs. Other models that do not consider dry and wet removal of gas-phase SVOCs would hence overestimate SOA concentrations by roughly 50%. Assumptions about the water solubility of SVOCs made in some current modeling systems (H* = H* (CH3COOH); H* = 105 M atm?1; H* = H* (HNO3)) still lead to an overestimation of 35%/25%/10% compared to our best estimate.« less

  15. The effect of dry and wet deposition of condensable vapors on secondary organic aerosols concentrations over the continental US

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Knote, C.; Hodzic, A.; Jimenez, J. L.

    2014-05-26

    The effect of dry and wet deposition of semi-volatile organic compounds (SVOC) in the gas-phase on the concentrations of secondary organic aerosol (SOA) is reassessed using recently derived water solubility information. The water solubility of SVOCs was implemented as a function of their volatility distribution within the regional chemistry transport model WRF-Chem, and simulations were carried out over the continental United States for the year 2010. Results show that including dry and wet removal of gas-phase SVOCs reduces annual average surface concentrations of anthropogenic and biogenic SOA by 48% and 63% respectively over the continental US Dry deposition of gas-phasemore »SVOCs is found to be more effective than wet deposition in reducing SOA concentrations (?40% vs. ?8% for anthropogenics, ?52% vs. ?11% for biogenics). Reductions for biogenic SOA are found to be higher due to the higher water solubility of biogenic SVOCs. The majority of the total mass of SVOC + SOA is actually deposited via the gas-phase (61% for anthropogenics, 76% for biogenics). A number of sensitivity studies shows that this is a robust feature of the modeling system. Other models that do not consider dry and wet removal of gas-phase SVOCs would hence overestimate SOA concentrations by roughly 50%. Assumptions about the water solubility of SVOCs made in some current modeling systems (H* = 105 M atm?1; H* = H* (HNO3)) still lead to an overestimation of 25% / 10% compared to our best estimate. A saturation effect is observed for Henry's law constants above 108 M atm?1, suggesting an upper bound of reductions in surface level SOA concentrations by 60% through removal of gas-phase SVOCs. Considering reactivity of gas-phase SVOCs in the dry deposition scheme was found to be negligible. Further sensitivity studies where we reduce the volatility of organic matter show that consideration of gas-phase SVOC removal still reduces average SOA concentrations by 31% on average. We consider this a lower bound for the effect of gas-phase SVOC removal on SOA concentrations.« less

  16. CHEMISTRY 330 QUANTITATIVE ANALYSIS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nickrent, Daniel L.

    and evaluation of error, basic chemical equilibria, acid-base equilibria, solubility product constant equilibria of spectrophotometric analysis, atomic absorption spectroscopy, methods of separation, gas and liquid chromatography to develop and apply topics discussed in lecture; short quizzes may be used to assess individual learning

  17. Coal combustion by wet oxidation. Wet oxidation of coal for energy production: test plan and partial results. Interim report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bettinger, J.A.

    1980-07-10

    A test plan has been developed which will provide the data necessary to carry out design and economic studies of a steam generating facility, employing the wet oxidation of coal as a heat source. It is obvious, from the literature search and preliminary testing, that the higher the reaction temperature, the more complete the combustion of coal. However, operation at elevated temperatures and pressures present difficult design problems, and the necessary equipment is costly. Operation under these conditions can only be justified by the higher economic value of high pressure and temperature steam. With a reduction in temperature from 550/sup 0/F (228/sup 0/C) to 450/sup 0/F (232/sup 0/C), the operating pressure is reduced by more than half, thus holding down the overall cost of the system. For this reason, our plan is to study both the enhancement of low temperature wet oxidation of coal, and the higher operating regions. The coal selected for the first portion of this test is an Eastern Appalachian high-volatile-A Bituminous type, from the Upper Clarion seam in Pennsylvania. This coal was selected as being a typical high sulfur, eastern coal. The wet oxidation of coal to produce low pressure steam is a process suited for a high sulfur, low grade, coal. It is not intended that wet oxidation be used in all applications with all types of coals, as it does not appear to be competitive, economically, with conventional combustion, therefore the testing will focus on using high sulfur, low grade coals. In the later portion of testing all the available coals will be tested. In addition, a sample of Minnesota peat will be tested to determine if it also can be used in the process.

  18. Silane Modification of Glass and Silica Surfaces to Obtain Equally Oil-Wet Surfaces in Glass-Covered Silicon Micromodel Applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Grate, Jay W.; Warner, Marvin G.; Pittman, Jonathan W.; Dehoff, Karl J.; Wietsma, Thomas W.; Zhang, Changyong; Oostrom, Martinus

    2013-08-05

    The wettability of silicon and glass surfaces can be modified by silanization. However, similar treatments of glass and silica surfaces using the same silane do not necessarily yield the same wettability as determined by the oil-water contact angle. In this technical note, surface cleaning pretreatments were investigated to determine conditions that would yield oil-wet surfaces on glass with similar wettability to silica surfaces treated with the same silane, and both air-water and oil-water contact angles were determined. Air-water contact angles were less sensitive to differences between silanized silica and glass surfaces, often yielding similar values while the oil-water contact angles were quite different. Borosilicate glass surfaces cleaned with standard cleaning solution 1 (SC1) yield intermediate-wet surfaces when silanized with hexamethyldisilazane, while the same cleaning and silanization yields oil-wet surfaces on silica. However, cleaning glass in boiling concentrated nitric acid creates a surface that can be silanized to obtain oil-wet surfaces using HDMS. Moreover, this method is effective on glass with prior thermal treatment at an elevated temperature of 400oC. In this way, silica and glass can be silanized to obtain equally oil-wet surfaces using HMDS. It is demonstrated that pretreatment and silanization is feasible in silicon-silica/glass micromodels previously assembled by anodic bonding, and that the change in wettability has a significant observable effect on immiscisble fluid displacements in the pore network.

  19. Deepest Regression in Analytical Chemistry P. J. Rousseeuw,a

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Van Aelst, Stefan

    Deepest Regression in Analytical Chemistry P. J. Rousseeuw,a , S. Van Aelst,a , B. Rambalib , and J Recently the concept of regression depth has been introduced [1]. The deepest regression (DR) is a method for linear regression which is defined as the fit with the best depth relative to the data. In this paper we

  20. Jeanne A. Hardy, Ph.D. Assistant Professor of Chemistry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hardy, Jeanne

    -1994). Studied mechanism by which iron on asbestos increases DNA damage. PUBLICATIONS and PATENTS: ·Hardy, J. A Approaches to Structure Based Drug Design, publishers Royal Society of Chemistry, submitted with expected, S.K., Hardy, J. A., Lam, J., O'Brien, T. "Methods for Identifying Allosteric Sites." World Patent WO

  1. BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN CHEMISTRY EDUCATION (Suggested 4 Year Plan)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Benos, Panayiotis "Takis"

    Total Credits Per Term 19 Total Credits Per Term 18 Total Credits Per Academic Year 37 FOURTH YEAR, FIRST TERM CREDITS FOURTH YEAR, SECOND TERM CREDITS EDUC 1307 Secondary Methods* 4 EDUC 1481 StudentBACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN CHEMISTRY EDUCATION (Suggested 4 Year Plan) FIRST YEAR, FIRST TERM CREDITS

  2. CHEM 110-02 GENERAL CHEMISTRY LABORATORY II

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Findley, Gary L.

    CHEM 110-02 GENERAL CHEMISTRY LABORATORY II Spring 2008 2:00 - 2:50 pm, M, CNSB 345 (Prelab) 3.ulm.edu/~findley COURSE Content: A laboratory course to accompany CHEM 108 including qualitative analysis. Goals/ Objectives: Mastery of selected laboratory methods that illustrate principles of inorganic qualitative

  3. Rev. 3/1/10 NEW.........Minor in Chemistry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chatterjee, Avik P.

    and Mechanisms 3 FCH 551 Polymer Techniques 3 FCH 552 Polymer Science: Properties and Technology 3 Contact 3 FCH 515 Methods of Environmental Chemical Analysis 3 FCH 550 Polymer Science: Synthesis to the traditional areas of the chemical sciences and also specialized areas of modern chemistry. The minor provides

  4. Coupling of nitrous oxide and methane by global atmospheric chemistry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Prather, MJ; Hsu, J

    2010-01-01

    supported by NSF’s Atmospheric Chemistry program (grant ATM-Methane by Global Atmospheric Chemistry Michael J. Prathergas, through atmospheric chemistry that en- hances the

  5. 1997 Atmospheric Chemistry Colloquium for Emerging Senior Scientists

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Paul H. Wine

    1998-11-23

    DOE's Atmospheric Chemistry Program is providing partial funding for the Atmospheric Chemistry Colloquium for Emerging Senior Scientists (ACCESS) and FY 1997 Gordon Research Conference in Atmospheric Chemistry

  6. Sponsored by Nanotechnology Seminar Program Surface Chemistry of Gold

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fisher, Frank

    Sponsored by Nanotechnology Seminar Program Surface Chemistry of Gold Nanorods: Wrapping chemistry, biophysical chemistry and nanotechnology, with a primary goal to develop inorganic nanomaterials

  7. Role of inorganic chemistry on nuclear energy examined

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Role of inorganic chemistry on nuclear energy examined Role of inorganic chemistry on nuclear energy examined Inorganic chemistry can provide insight and improve technical issues...

  8. UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA, SANTA CRUZ DEPARTMENT OF CHEMISTRY AND BIOCHEMISTRY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Santa Cruz, University of

    UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA, SANTA CRUZ DEPARTMENT OF CHEMISTRY AND BIOCHEMISTRY Assistant Professor in Theoretical/Computational Chemistry The Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry at the University

  9. Chemistry & Biology Directed Evolution of the Nonribosomal Peptide

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhao, Huimin

    Chemistry & Biology Article Directed Evolution of the Nonribosomal Peptide Synthetase Adm University of Illinois, Urbana, IL 61801, USA 3Department of Chemistry 4The Chemistry of Life Processes

  10. COORDINATION CHEMISTRY OF METAL SURFACES AND METAL COMPLEXES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Muetterties, E.L.

    2013-01-01

    molecular coordination chemistry of CH3NC has been reported.features of this surface chemistry. ACKNOw"LEDGMENTS The1980 Catalysis~ COORDINATION CHEMISTRY OF METAL SURFACES AND

  11. Chemistry & Biology 16 Supplemental Data

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cheng, Jianjun

    Chemistry & Biology 16 Supplemental Data Inorganic Mercury Detection and Controlled Release Cheng, Gerard C. L. Wong, and Yi Lu SUPPLEMENTAL EXPERIMENTAL PROCEDURES Materials The lipids 1, in Eagle's Menimum Essential Medium, supplemented with 100 units/mL aqueous penicillin G, 100 µg

  12. Analytical Chemistry Laboratory. Progress report for FY 1996

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Green, D.W.; Boparai, A.S.; Bowers, D.L.

    1996-12-01

    The purpose of this report is to summarize the activities of the Analytical Chemistry Laboratory (ACL) at Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) for Fiscal Year (FY) 1996. This annual report is the thirteenth for the ACL. It describes effort on continuing and new projects and contributions of the ACL staff to various programs at ANL. The ACL operates in the ANL system as a full-cost-recovery service center, but has a mission that includes a complementary research and development component: The Analytical Chemistry Laboratory will provide high-quality, cost-effective chemical analysis and related technical support to solve research problems of our clients -- Argonne National Laboratory, the Department of Energy, and others -- and will conduct world-class research and development in analytical chemistry and its applications. Because of the diversity of research and development work at ANL, the ACL handles a wide range of analytical chemistry problems. Some routine or standard analyses are done, but the ACL usually works with commercial laboratories if our clients require high-volume, production-type analyses. It is common for ANL programs to generate unique problems that require significant development of methods and adaption of techniques to obtain useful analytical data. Thus, much of the support work done by the ACL is very similar to our applied analytical chemistry research.

  13. Chemistry of Cobalt-Platinum Nanocatalysts

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Chemistry of Cobalt-Platinum Nanocatalysts Chemistry of Cobalt-Platinum Nanocatalysts Print Monday, 25 February 2013 15:59 Bimetallic cobalt-platinum (CoPt) nanoparticles are...

  14. University of Connecticut Department of Chemistry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lozano-Robledo, Alvaro

    University of Connecticut Department of Chemistry NSF Research Experience for Undergraduates (REUREU@uconn.edu Fax: (860) 486-2981 Mail: REU Site Coordinator Department of Chemistry, University of Connecticut

  15. Protein-directed dynamic combinatorial chemistry 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bhat, Venugopal T.

    2011-11-23

    Dynamic combinatorial chemistry (DCC) is a novel approach to medicinal chemistry which integrates the synthesis and screening of small molecule libraries into a single step. The concept uses reversible chemical reactions to present a dynamic library...

  16. Prof. Sarah L. Keller Department of Chemistry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Keller, Sarah L.

    Bio Prof. Sarah L. Keller Department of Chemistry University of Washington, Seattle Sarah Keller of Sciences and was named a Fellow of the American Physical Society. She joined the Department of Chemistry

  17. CHEMISTRY 1200-090 SUMMER SEMESTER 2013

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Simons, Jack

    chemistry when compared to other students. Math prerequisite: College algebra or the equivalent schedule on the web. At the top of the chemistry class schedule is "textbook requirements". Click

  18. Interfacial Chemistry and Engineering Annual Report 2000

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Grate, Jay W.

    2001-08-01

    This annual report describes the research and staff accomplishments in 2000 for the EMSL Interfacial Chemistry and Engineering Directorate.

  19. Bianchi Type-I Universe with Wet Dark Fluid

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    T. Singh; R. Chaubey

    2010-07-08

    The Bianchi type-I universe filled with dark energy from a wet dark fluid has been considered. A new equation of state for the dark energy component of the universe has been used. It is modeled on the equation of state $p=\\gamma (\\rho -\\rho_\\star)$ which can describe a liquid, for example water. The exact solutions to the corresponding field equations are obtained in quadrature form. The solution for constant deceleration parameter have been studied in detail for power-law and exponential forms both. The cases $\\gamma =1$ and $\\gamma =0$ have been also analysed.

  20. Specifying linepipe suitable for safe operation in sour, wet service

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Moore, E.M.; Hansen, D.A.

    1982-06-01

    This paper describes the specifications recommended by the authors for buying linepipe in grades up to X-70 for wet, sour service. The linepipe is tested to verify that it is resistant to hydrogen-induced cracking (HIC). In addition, fracture control requirements are imposed so that if a failure does occur for any reason, the crack is guaranteed to self arrest, thus minimizing the consequences of the failure. Pipe meeting the specifications described in this paper is readily available from numerous European and Japanese mills.

  1. Arrest stress of uniformly sheared wet granular matter

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    S. H. Ebrahimnazhad Rahbari; M. Brinkmann; J. Vollmer

    2015-06-21

    We conduct extensive independent numerical experiments considering frictionless disks without internal degrees of freedom (rotation etc.) in two dimensions. We report here that for a large range of the packing fractions below random-close packing, all components of the stress tensor of wet granular materials remain finite in the limit of zero shear rate. This is direct evidence for a fluid-to-solid arrest transition. The offset value of the shear stress characterizes plastic deformation of the arrested state {which corresponds to {\\em dynamic yield stress} of the system}. {Based on an analytical line of argument, we propose that the mean number of capillary bridges per particle, $\

  2. California - Los Angeles Basin Onshore Natural Gas, Wet After Lease

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustments (Billion Cubic Feet) Wyoming963 1.969 1.979Coal4 Arizona -ProductionWet After LeaseReservesSeparation

  3. California - Los Angeles Basin Onshore Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustments (Billion Cubic Feet) Wyoming963 1.969 1.979Coal4 Arizona -ProductionWet After

  4. California Federal Offshore Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Proved

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustments (Billion Cubic Feet) Wyoming963 1.969 1.979Coal4 Arizona -ProductionWetReserves (Billion Cubic

  5. California Federal Offshore Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustments (Billion Cubic Feet) Wyoming963 1.969 1.979Coal4 Arizona -ProductionWetReserves (Billion

  6. Colorado Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Proved Reserves (Billion

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustments (Billion Cubic Feet) Wyoming963 1.969 1.979Coal4Cubic Feet)Cubic Feet) Gas, Wet After Lease

  7. Colorado Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustments (Billion Cubic Feet) Wyoming963 1.969 1.979Coal4Cubic Feet)Cubic Feet) Gas, Wet After

  8. Oklahoma Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Proved Reserves (Billion

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustments (Billion Cubic Feet)Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3+ LeaseWellhead%TexasCubic Feet) Gas, Wet

  9. Wyoming Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Proved Reserves (Billion

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustments (Billion Cubic Feet)Decade Year-0ProvedDecade Year-0Cubic Feet) Gas, Wet After Lease Separation

  10. Wyoming Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustments (Billion Cubic Feet)Decade Year-0ProvedDecade Year-0Cubic Feet) Gas, Wet After Lease

  11. MHK Technologies/WET EnGen | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIXsource HistoryScenarios Towards 2050Enermar <OMIS DTocardo <CrossWEPTOS WEC <WET

  12. BA in CHEMISTRY (692827) MAP Sheet Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Seamons, Kent E.

    BA in CHEMISTRY (692827) MAP Sheet Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry For students entering in major courses. --The Chemistry and Biochemistry Department requires the final 10 hours of required Biophysical Chemistry Chem 481M Biochemistry­Majors Chem 584 Biochemistry Lab/Proteins Or Chem 586

  13. BA in CHEMISTRY (692827) MAP Sheet Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Seamons, Kent E.

    BA in CHEMISTRY (692827) MAP Sheet Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry For students entering Chemistry and Biochemistry Department requires the final 10 hours of required chemistry credit to be taken 481M Biochemistry­Majors Chem 584 Biochemistry Lab/Proteins Or Chem 586 Biochemistry Lab/Nucleic Acids

  14. Chemistry Course Reading List * Physical Chemistry, P W Atkins, Oxford University Press (8th

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oxford, University of

    Chemistry Course Reading List * Physical Chemistry, P W Atkins, Oxford University Press (8th edn.) 2006, [7th edn. 2001] * Inorganic Chemistry, Shriver and Atkins, Oxford University Press (4th edn) 2006, (previous edn., 1999] Chemistry of the Elements, Greenwood & Earnshaw, Pergamon (2nd edn.), 1997 [1st edn

  15. Chemistry 109 (3 credit hours) Honors General Chemistry Lecture, Part I; Fall 2014

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Doyle, Robert

    Chemistry 109 (3 credit hours) Honors General Chemistry Lecture, Part I; Fall 2014 Instructor Prerequisite: None Textbook: Zumdahl and Zumdahl, Chemistry, 9th Edition, (Houghton Mifflin). Copies of the book are available at the University Bookstore. Corequisite: CHE 129 ­ Honors General Chemistry

  16. "Our graduate programs in chemistry are innovative and forward thinking." carleton.ca/chemistry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dawson, Jeff W.

    "Our graduate programs in chemistry are innovative and forward thinking." carleton.ca/chemistry GRADUATE PROGRAMS IN SHAPE YOUR FUTURE BASED ON YOUR RESEARCH INTERESTS Chemistry affects almost all aspects of our lives. Carleton's Department of Chemistry is host to innovative programs in analytical food

  17. Graduate Programs in Chemistry The Department of Chemistry at Wichita State offers courses

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    of biochemistry and analytical, inorganic, organic, and physical chemistry. Admission Requirements To enrollGraduate Programs in Chemistry The Department of Chemistry at Wichita State offers courses of study in the graduate program in chemistry, students must follow the admission procedures required by the Graduate

  18. Faculty of Science Chemistry and Physics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Introductory Physics I Arts or Social Science elective General Chemistry II Biological Diversity or ElectiveFaculty of Science Chemistry and Physics Honours Chemistry and Physics is a good choice if you want to attack problems of a chemical nature with a solid understanding of the underlying physics. www

  19. Chemistry of Atmospheric Brown Carbon Alexander Laskin,*,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nizkorodov, Sergey

    Chemistry of Atmospheric Brown Carbon Alexander Laskin,*, Julia Laskin,*, and Sergey A. Nizkorodov fraction of atmospheric aerosol and has profound effects on air quality, atmospheric chemistry, and climate of radiation through Earth's atmosphere. The cloud albedo effect, Special Issue: 2015 Chemistry in Climate

  20. Montana State University 1 Chemistry and Biochemistry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Maxwell, Bruce D.

    Montana State University 1 Chemistry and Biochemistry Note: MSU's programs of Biology. For additional options see Biological Sciences at MSU. Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry The Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry offers programs that are certified by the American Chemical Society

  1. BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN CHEMISTRY BIOCHEMISTRY OPTION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hardy, Christopher R.

    OF SCIENCE IN CHEMISTRY BIOCHEMISTRY OPTION RECOMMENDED PROGRAM (1) FIRST SEMESTER SECOND SEMESTER CHEM 111 SEMESTER EIGHTH SEMESTER CHEM 326 Biochemistry I 4.0 CHEM 327 Biochemistry II 4.0 CHEM 487 Chemistry Seminar 0.5 CHEM 328 Anal Biochemistry Lab 1.0 CHEM ____ Chemistry Elective*** 2.0 CHEM 465 Analytical

  2. The Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Texas at Arlington, University of

    The Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry 130 Chemistry & Physics Building · Box 19065 · 817 and Biochemistry offers four programs of study leading to the bachelor's degree and one leading to both in Chemistry - American Chemical Society certified, the Bachelor of Science in Biochemistry - American Chemical

  3. STRATEGIC PLAN Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rubloff, Gary W.

    1 STRATEGIC PLAN Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry University of Maryland, College Park 1. Executive Summary The Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry implements the missions of the College. These efforts encompass chemistry and biochemistry as traditionally defined, but are increasingly becoming

  4. College of Arts & Sciences Chemistry, MS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    New Mexico, University of

    College of Arts & Sciences Chemistry, MS Broad Learning Goals A. The student will develop a broad understanding of the major areas of chemistry with an understanding and awareness of the professional, ethical-rooted knowledge in their chosen sub-discipline in chemistry. C. The student will be able to report, present and

  5. THE UNIVERSITY OF CHICAGO DEPARTMENT OF CHEMISTRY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    THE UNIVERSITY OF CHICAGO DEPARTMENT OF CHEMISTRY A GUIDE TO THE DEPARTMENTAL ACADEMIC the Department of Chemistry 9 Departmental Seminar Attendance 9 Seminar Workshop 10 Tiger Talks 10 Scientific requires students who are admitted as prospective candidates for a higher degree in Chemistry (either the M

  6. Montana State University 1 Department of Chemistry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Maxwell, Bruce D.

    Montana State University 1 Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry Departmental Office: PO Box 173400, Bozeman , MT 59717 Tel: 406-994-4801 Fax: 406-994-5407 The Department of Chemistry, and mechanism. In each of these fields, the strength of MSU Chemistry and Biochemistry Department has been

  7. Maple Syrup--Production, Composition, Chemistry,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hayden, Nancy J.

    CHAPTER 4 Maple Syrup--Production, Composition, Chemistry, and Sensory Characteristics Timothy D Chemistry 111 A. Transformation during storage 115 B. Transformations during reverse osmosis Processing 121 IX. Syrup Standards 124 X. Syrup Chemistry 126 A. Density 126 B. Carbohydrates 126 C. pH 126 D

  8. Patterning Nanoscale Structures by Surface Chemistry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lu, Wei

    Patterning Nanoscale Structures by Surface Chemistry Wei Lu* and Dongchoul Kim Department combines spinodal decomposition, surface stress and surface chemistry. The simulation shows that the self-assembly process can be guided by tuning the surface chemistry of a substrate. An epilayer may evolve into various

  9. College of Arts & Sciences Chemistry, BA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    New Mexico, University of

    1/13/2009 College of Arts & Sciences Chemistry, BA Broad Learning Goals A. Students graduating from of chemistry. B. Students graduating from this program will be able to employ critical thinking and hypothesis and be familiar with the status of current research in the field of chemistry. D5. Students will be able

  10. A BRIEF HISTORY THE ANALYTICAL CHEMISTRY DIVISION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    #12;#12;A BRIEF HISTORY THE ANALYTICAL CHEMISTRY DIVISION OF OAK RIDGE NATIONAL LABORATORY 1950 hiembers of the Chemistry Division R-on: J. A. Swartout In ra: Transfer of Personnel to Analytical Analytical Chemistry Division under Dr. M. T. Kelley, effective immediately; C. L. Burros and Group L. T

  11. Chemistry (ACS) College of Science CHEM-BSCHM

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kihara, Daisuke

    (2)CHM26600 Organic Chemistry Lab (4)CHM32100 Analytical Chemistry I (4)CHM24100 Intro to Inorganic Chemistry (3)CHM37400 Physical Chemistry (2)CHM37600 Physical Chemistry Lab (4)CHM 42400 AnalyticalChemistry (ACS) College of Science CHEM-BSCHM CHMA 120 Credits 2.0 GPA in CHM courses and 2.0 GPA

  12. IN-PACKAGE CHEMISTRY ABSTRACTION

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    E. Thomas

    2005-07-14

    This report was developed in accordance with the requirements in ''Technical Work Plan for Postclosure Waste Form Modeling'' (BSC 2005 [DIRS 173246]). The purpose of the in-package chemistry model is to predict the bulk chemistry inside of a breached waste package and to provide simplified expressions of that chemistry as a function of time after breach to Total Systems Performance Assessment for the License Application (TSPA-LA). The scope of this report is to describe the development and validation of the in-package chemistry model. The in-package model is a combination of two models, a batch reactor model, which uses the EQ3/6 geochemistry-modeling tool, and a surface complexation model, which is applied to the results of the batch reactor model. The batch reactor model considers chemical interactions of water with the waste package materials, and the waste form for commercial spent nuclear fuel (CSNF) waste packages and codisposed (CDSP) waste packages containing high-level waste glass (HLWG) and DOE spent fuel. The surface complexation model includes the impact of fluid-surface interactions (i.e., surface complexation) on the resulting fluid composition. The model examines two types of water influx: (1) the condensation of water vapor diffusing into the waste package, and (2) seepage water entering the waste package as a liquid from the drift. (1) Vapor-Influx Case: The condensation of vapor onto the waste package internals is simulated as pure H{sub 2}O and enters at a rate determined by the water vapor pressure for representative temperature and relative humidity conditions. (2) Liquid-Influx Case: The water entering a waste package from the drift is simulated as typical groundwater and enters at a rate determined by the amount of seepage available to flow through openings in a breached waste package.

  13. Experimental and theoretical investigation of the interfacial phenomenon associated with wetting of trisiloxane surfactant solutions 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Radulovic, Jovana

    2010-01-01

    Surface active agents have been successfully employed in numerous industrial, agricultural and biomedical applications for decades. Trisiloxane surfactants in particular have proved to be exceptionally effective as wetting ...

  14. B.S. and ACS Approved Degrees in Chemistry Requirements for the Chemistry B.S. degree program

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McQuade, D. Tyler

    General Chemistry CHM 1045 & 1045L; 1046 & 1046L or CHM 1050, 1050L; 1051, 1051L Analytical Chemistry CHMB.S. and ACS Approved Degrees in Chemistry Requirements for the Chemistry B.S. degree program 3120 & 3120L; 4130 & 4130L Inorganic Chemistry CHM 4610, 4610L Organic Chemistry CHM 2210; 2211, 2211L

  15. Controlling RPV embrittlement through wet annealing in support of life attainment and life extension decisions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Krasikov, E. A.

    2012-07-01

    As a main barrier against radioactivity outlet reactor pressure vessel (RPV) is a key component in terms of Nuclear Power Plant (NPP) safety. Therefore present-day demands in RPV reliability enhance have to be met by all possible actions for RPV in-service embrittlement mitigation. Annealing treatment is known to be the effective measure to restore the RPV metal properties deteriorated by neutron irradiation. Low temperature 'wet' annealing at a maximum coolant temperature which can be obtained using the reactor core or primary circuit pumps, although it cannot be expected to produce complete recovery, is more attractive from the practical point of view especially in cases when the removal of the internals is impossible. As a rule there is no recovery effect up to annealing and irradiation temperature difference of 70 deg. C. It is known, however, that along with radiation embrittlement neutron irradiation may mitigate the radiation damage in metals. Therefore we have tried to test the possibility to use the effect of radiation-induced ductilization in 'wet' annealing technology by means of nuclear heat utilization as heat and neutron irradiation sources at once. In support of the above-mentioned conception the 3-year duration reactor experiment on 15Cr3NiMoV type steel with preliminary irradiation at operating Pressurized Water Reactor (PWR) at 270 deg. C and following extra irradiation (87 h at 330 deg. C) at IR-8 test reactor was fulfilled. In fact, embrittlement was partly suppressed up to value equivalent to 1,5 fold neutron fluence decrease. The degree of recovery in case of radiation enhanced annealing is equal to 27% whereas furnace annealing results in zero effect under existing conditions. Mechanism of the radiation-induced damage mitigation is proposed. It is hoped that 'wet' annealing technology will help provide a better management of the RPV degradation as a factor affecting the lifetime of nuclear power plants which, together with associated management methods, will help facilitate safe and economic long-term operation of PWRs. (authors)

  16. In-Package Chemistry Abstraction

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    E. Thomas

    2004-11-09

    This report was developed in accordance with the requirements in ''Technical Work Plan for: Regulatory Integration Modeling and Analysis of the Waste Form and Waste Package'' (BSC 2004 [DIRS 171583]). The purpose of the in-package chemistry model is to predict the bulk chemistry inside of a breached waste package and to provide simplified expressions of that chemistry as function of time after breach to Total Systems Performance Assessment for the License Application (TSPA-LA). The scope of this report is to describe the development and validation of the in-package chemistry model. The in-package model is a combination of two models, a batch reactor model that uses the EQ3/6 geochemistry-modeling tool, and a surface complexation model that is applied to the results of the batch reactor model. The batch reactor model considers chemical interactions of water with the waste package materials and the waste form for commercial spent nuclear fuel (CSNF) waste packages and codisposed waste packages that contain both high-level waste glass (HLWG) and DOE spent fuel. The surface complexation model includes the impact of fluid-surface interactions (i.e., surface complexation) on the resulting fluid composition. The model examines two types of water influx: (1) the condensation of water vapor that diffuses into the waste package, and (2) seepage water that enters the waste package from the drift as a liquid. (1) Vapor Influx Case: The condensation of vapor onto the waste package internals is simulated as pure H2O and enters at a rate determined by the water vapor pressure for representative temperature and relative humidity conditions. (2) Water Influx Case: The water entering a waste package from the drift is simulated as typical groundwater and enters at a rate determined by the amount of seepage available to flow through openings in a breached waste package. TSPA-LA uses the vapor influx case for the nominal scenario for simulations where the waste package has been breached but the drip shield remains intact, so all of the seepage flow is diverted from the waste package. The chemistry from the vapor influx case is used to determine the stability of colloids and the solubility of radionuclides available for transport by diffusion, and to determine the degradation rates for the waste forms. TSPA-LA uses the water influx case for the seismic scenario, where the waste package has been breached and the drip shield has been damaged such that seepage flow is actually directed into the waste package. The chemistry from the water influx case that is a function of the flow rate is used to determine the stability of colloids and the solubility of radionuclides available for transport by diffusion and advection, and to determine the degradation rates for the CSNF and HLW glass. TSPA-LA does not use this model for the igneous scenario. Outputs from the in-package chemistry model implemented inside TSPA-LA include pH, ionic strength, and total carbonate concentration. These inputs to TSPA-LA will be linked to the following principle factors: dissolution rates of the CSNF and HLWG, dissolved concentrations of radionuclides, and colloid generation.

  17. Method of fabricating metal- and ceramic- matrix composites and functionalized textiles

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Maxwell, James L. (Jemez Springs, NM); Chavez, Craig A. (Los Alamos, NM); Black, Marcie R. (Lincoln, MA)

    2012-04-17

    A method of manufacturing an article comprises providing a first sheet, wetting the first sheet with a liquid precursor to provide a first wet sheet, and irradiating the first wet sheet in a pattern corresponding to a first cross section of the article such that the liquid precursor is at least partially converted to a solid in the first cross section. A second sheet is disposed adjacent to the first sheet. The method further comprises wetting the second sheet with the liquid precursor to provide a second wet sheet, and irradiating the second wet sheet in a pattern corresponding to a second cross section of the article such that the liquid precursor is at least partially converted to a solid in the second cross section. In particular the liquid precursor may be converted to a metal, ceramic, semiconductor, semimetal, or a combination of these materials.

  18. Specifying linepipe suitable for safe operation in sour wet service

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Moore, E.M. Jr.; Hansen, D.A.

    1981-01-01

    The specifications recommended for buying linepipe for wet, sour service are described. A two-fold approach is used. First the linepipe is tested to verify that it is resistant to hydrogen induced cracking (HIC). Second, fracture mechanics requirements are imposed so that if hydrogen induced cracking does occur due to steel-making or operation upsets, a line rupture is guaranteed to self-arrest, thus minimizing the consequences of the failure. Correlations of HIC susceptibility test results with actual service performance are presented. The HIC test acceptance criteria used by the authors are discussed. The fracture mechanics considerations include drop weight tear testing to establish ductile failures and Charpy impact testing to assure self-arrest of an unstable crack, as well as maximum crack initiation energy. The paper concludes with a brief discussion of the commercial availability of linepipe produced to the specifications discussed below.

  19. $1/f$ noise on the brink of wet granular melting

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kai Huang

    2015-07-23

    The collective behavior of a two-dimensional wet granular cluster under horizontal swirling motions is investigated experimentally. Depending on the balance between the energy injection and dissipation, the cluster evolves into various nonequilibrium stationary states with strong internal structure fluctuations with time. Quantitative characterizations of the fluctuations with the bond orientational order parameter $q_{\\rm 6}$ reveal power spectra of the form $f^{\\alpha}$ with the exponent $\\alpha$ closely related to the stationary states of the system. In particular, $1/f$ type of noise with $\\alpha\\approx-1$ emerges as melting starts from the free surface of the cluster, suggesting the possibility of using $1/f$ noise as an indicator for phase transitions in systems driven far from thermodynamic equilibrium.

  20. Giant osmotic pressure in the forced wetting of hydrophobic nanopores

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Millán Michelin-Jamois; Cyril Picard; Gérard Vigier; Elisabeth Charlaix

    2015-07-02

    The forced intrusion of water in hydrophobic nanoporous pulverulent material is of interest for quick storage of energy. With nanometric pores the energy storage capacity is controlled by interfacial phenomena. With subnanometric pores, we demonstrate that a breakdown occurs with the emergence of molecular exclusion as a leading contribution. This bulk exclusion effect leads to an osmotic contribution to the pressure that can reach levels never previously sustained. We illustrate on various electrolytes and different microporous materials, that a simple osmotic pressure law accounts quantitatively for the enhancement of the intrusion and extrusion pressures governing the forced wetting and spontaneous drying of the nanopores. Using electrolyte solutions, energy storage and power capacities can be widely enhanced.

  1. Patterned functional arrays by selective de-wetting

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    FAN,HONGYOU; DOSHI,DHAVAL; LU,YUNFENG; BRINKER,C. JEFFREY

    2000-05-11

    Using a micro-Contact Printing ({mu}-CP) technique, substrates are prepared with patterns of hydrophilic, hydroxyl-terminated SAMS and hydrophobic methyl-terminated SAMS. Beginning with a homogeneous solution of silica, surfactant, ethanol, water, and functional silane, preferential ethanol evaporation during dip-coating, causes water enrichment and selective de-wetting of the hydrophobic SAMS. Correspondingly, film deposition occurs exclusively on the patterned hydrophilic SAMS. In addition, by co-condensation of tetrafunctional silanes (Si(OR){sub 4}) with tri-functional organosilanes ((RO){sub 3}Si(CH{sub 2}){sub 3}NH{sub 2}), the authors have selectively derived the silica framework with functional amine NH{sub 2} groups. A pH sensitive, micro-fluidic system was formed by further conjugation reactions with pH sensitive dye molecules.

  2. Nanoscale capillary wetting studied with dissipative particle dynamic

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    C. Cupelli; B. Henrich; M. Moseler; M. Santer

    2006-02-19

    We demonstrate that Multi-Body Dissipative Particle Dynamics (MDPD) can be used as an efficient computational tool for the investigation of nanoscale capillary impregnation of confined geometries. As an essential prerequisite, a novel model for a solid-liquid interface in the framework of MDPD is introduced, with tunable wetting behaviour and thermal roughening to reduce artificial density- and temperature oscillations. Within this model, the impregnation dynamics of a water-like fluid into a nanoscale slit pore has been studied. Despite the coarse graining implied with the model fluid, a sufficient amount of non-equilibrium averaging can be achieved allowing for the extraction of useful information even from transient simulations, such as the dynamic apparent contact angle. Although it is found to determine the capillary driving completely, it cannot be intepreted as a simple function of the capillary number.

  3. Chemistry

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home Room News PublicationsAudits &BradburyMayARM-0501 Marine StratusChemCamChemicalCMS XSD-CMS

  4. Chemistry

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefieldSulfateSciTechtail.Theory of raregovAboutRecoveryplanning CareerNationalCNMSTHEmaterialsEnergy

  5. Chemistry and line emission from evolving Herbig Ae disks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    B. Jonkheid; C. P. Dullemond; M. R. Hogerheijde; E. F. van Dishoeck

    2006-11-07

    Aims: To calculate chemistry and gas temperature of evolving protoplanetary disks with decreasing mass or dust settling, and to explore the sensitivity of gas-phase tracers. Methods: The density and dust temperature profiles for a range of models of flaring and self-shadowed disks around a typical Herbig Ae star are used together with 2-dimensional ultraviolet (UV) radiative transfer to calculate the chemistry and gas temperature. In each model the line profiles and intensities for the fine structure lines of [O I], [C II] and [C I] and the pure rotational lines of CO, CN, HCN and HCO+ are determined. Results: The chemistry shows a strong correlation with disk mass. Molecules that are easily dissociated, like HCN, require high densities and large extinctions before they can become abundant. The products of photodissociation, like CN and C2H, become abundant in models with lower masses. Dust settling mainly affects the gas temperature, and thus high temperature tracers like the O and C+ fine structure lines. The carbon chemistry is found to be very sensitive to the adopted PAH abundance. The line ratios CO/13CO, CO/HCO+ and [O I] 63 um/146 um can be used to distinguish between disks where dust growth and settling takes place, and disks that undergo overall mass loss.

  6. ENGINEERING AND PROCESSING A 100-g Laboratory Corn Wet-Milling Procedure

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ENGINEERING AND PROCESSING A 100-g Laboratory Corn Wet-Milling Procedure S. R. ECKHOFF,' S. K of biotechnology and genetic engineering in corn hybrid development. Identification of better wet-milling hybrids of separation of the germ or the ability Professor, Department of Agricultural Engineering, University

  7. A presentation of the U.S. Navy's Wave Energy Test Site (WETS)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Frandsen, Jannette B.

    A presentation of the U.S. Navy's Wave Energy Test Site (WETS) Patrick Cross Senior Project Specialist Hawaii Natural Energy Institute School of Ocean and Earth Science and Technology University of Hawaii Abstract The U.S. Navy's Wave Energy Test Site (WETS) in Hawaii is now fully operational

  8. A wetting and drying scheme for POM Lie-Yauw Oey *

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    that contain hydraulic jumps, including a laboratory dam-break problem. Ó 2004 Published by Elsevier Ltd.e. hydraulic jumps and/or bores) can develop. A WAD scheme is proposed and applied to the Princeton Ocean Model. Keywords: Wetting and drying; Dam-break; Flood and ebb; Princeton ocean model 1. Introduction Wetting

  9. Novel Aryne Chemistry in Organic Synthesis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhijian Liu

    2006-12-12

    Arynes are among the most intensively studied systems in chemistry. However, many aspects of the chemistry of these reactive intermediates are not well understood yet and their use as reagents in synthetic organic chemistry has been somewhat limited, due to the harsh conditions needed to generate arynes and the often uncontrolled reactivity exhibited by these species. Recently, o-silylaryl triflates, which can generate the corresponding arynes under very mild reaction conditions, have been found very useful in organic synthesis. This thesis describes several novel and useful methodologies by employing arynes, which generate from o-silylaryl triflates, in organic synthesis. An efficient, reliable method for the N-arylation of amines, sulfonamides and carbamates, and the O-arylation of phenols and carboxylic acids is described in Chapter 1. Amines, sulfonamides, phenols, and carboxylic acids are good nucleophiles, which can react with arynes generated from a-silylaryl triflates to afford the corresponding N- and O-arylated products in very high yields. The regioselectivity of unsymmetrical arynes has also been studied. A lot of useful, functional groups can tolerate our reaction conditions. Carbazoles and dibenzofurans are important heteroaromatic compounds, which have a variety of biological activities. A variety of substituted carbazoles and dibenzofwans are readily prepared in good to excellent yields starting with the corresponding o-iodoanilines or o-iodophenols and o-silylaryl triflates by a treatment with CsF, followed by a Pd-catalyzed cyclization, which overall provides a one-pot, two-step process. By using this methodology, the carbazole alkaloid mukonine has been concisely synthesized in a very good yield. Insertion of an aryne into a {sigma}-bond between a nucleophile and an electrophile (Nu-E) should potentially be a very beneficial process from the standpoint of organic synthesis. A variety of substituted ketones and sulfoxides have been synthesized in good yields via the intermolecular C-N {sigma}-bond addition of amides and S-N {sigma}-bond addition of sulfinamides to arynes under mild reaction conditions. The indazole moiety is a frequently found subunit in drug substances with important biological activities. Indazole analogues have been readily synthesized under mild reaction conditions by the [3+2] cycloaddition of a variety of diazo compounds with o-silylaryl triflates in the presence of CsF or TBAF. Polycyclic aromatic and heteroaromatic hydrocarbons have been synthesized in high yields by two different processes involving the Pd-catalyzed annulation of arynes. Both processes appear to involve the catalytic, stepwise coupling of two very reactive substrates, an aryne and an organopalladium species, to generate excellent yields of cross-coupled products.

  10. Chemistry, Life, and Earth Sciences

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 OutreachProductswsicloudwsiclouddenDVA N C E D BGene NetworkNuclear SecurityChattanChemistry ofNan Sauer named

  11. Appendix C Analytical Chemistry Data

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefield Municipal Gas &SCE-SessionsSouthReport for the WeldonB10081278MaywoodWayne Analytical Chemistry

  12. Wet-spinnability and crosslinked fibre properties of two collagen polypeptides with varied molecular weight

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tronci, Giuseppe; Arafat, M Tarik; Yin, Jie; Wood, David J; Russell, Stephen J

    2015-01-01

    The formation of naturally-derived materials with wet stable fibrous architectures is paramount in order to mimic the features of tissues at the molecular and microscopic scale. Here, we investigated the formation of wet-spun fibres based on collagen-derived polypeptides with comparable chemical composition and varied molecular weight. Gelatin and hydrolysed fish collagen (HFC) were selected as widely-available linear amino-acidic chains of high and low molecular weight, respectively, and functionalised in the wet-spun fibre state in order to preserve the material geometry in physiological conditions. Wet-spun fibre diameter and morphology were dramatically affected depending on the polypeptide molecular weight, wet-spinning solvent (i.e. 2,2,2-Trifluoroethanol and dimethyl sulfoxide) and coagulating medium (i.e. acetone and ethanol), resulting in either bulky or porous internal geometry. Dry-state tensile moduli were significantly enhanced in gelatin and HFC samples following covalent crosslinking with activ...

  13. Wetting Transitions of Condensed Droplets on Superhydrophobic Surfaces with Two-Tier Roughness

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lv, Cunjing; Zhang, Xiwen; He, Feng

    2015-01-01

    Although realizing wetting transitions of droplets spontaneously on solid rough surfaces is quite challenging, it is becoming a key research topic in many practical applications which require highly efficient removal of liquid. We report wetting transitions of condensed droplets occurring spontaneously on pillared surfaces with two-tier roughness owing to excellent superhydrophobicity. The phenomenon results from further decreased Laplace pressure on the top side of the individual droplet when its size becomes comparable to the scale of the micropillars, which leads to a surprising robust spontaneous wetting transition, from valleys to tops of the pillars. A simple scaling law is derived theoretically, which demonstrates that the critical size of the droplet is determined by the space of the micropillars. For this reason, highly efficient removal of water benefits greatly from smaller micropillar space. Furthermore, three wetting transition modes exist, in which the in situ wetting behaviors are in good agree...

  14. Analytical Chemistry Core Capability Assessment - Preliminary Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Barr, Mary E. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Farish, Thomas J. [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2012-05-16

    The concept of 'core capability' can be nebulous one. Even at a fairly specific level, where core capability equals maintaining essential services, it is highly dependent upon the perspective of the requestor. Samples are submitted to analytical services because the requesters do not have the capability to conduct adequate analyses themselves. Some requests are for general chemical information in support of R and D, process control, or process improvement. Many analyses, however, are part of a product certification package and must comply with higher-level customer quality assurance requirements. So which services are essential to that customer - just those for product certification? Does the customer also (indirectly) need services that support process control and improvement? And what is the timeframe? Capability is often expressed in terms of the currently utilized procedures, and most programmatic customers can only plan a few years out, at best. But should core capability consider the long term where new technologies, aging facilities, and personnel replacements must be considered? These questions, and a multitude of others, explain why attempts to gain long-term consensus on the definition of core capability have consistently failed. This preliminary report will not try to define core capability for any specific program or set of programs. Instead, it will try to address the underlying concerns that drive the desire to determine core capability. Essentially, programmatic customers want to be able to call upon analytical chemistry services to provide all the assays they need, and they don't want to pay for analytical chemistry services they don't currently use (or use infrequently). This report will focus on explaining how the current analytical capabilities and methods evolved to serve a variety of needs with a focus on why some analytes have multiple analytical techniques, and what determines the infrastructure for these analyses. This information will be useful in defining a roadmap for what future capability needs to look like.

  15. Alumni & Industry Magazine Chemical Engineering & Applied Chemistry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Prodić, Aleksandar

    grease, waste animal fats, recycled veg- etable oils and agricultural seed oils into biodiesel. BioxAlumni & Industry Magazine Chemical Engineering & Applied Chemistry University of Toronto Volume 10

  16. Chemistry for Measurement and Detection Science publications

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Spectroscopy Email Josh Smith Chemistry Communications Email Los Alamos is one of two FBI "hub" laboratories for analyzing bulk special nuclear material. Marcelo Jaime, Ramzy...

  17. Energy & Sustainable Chemistry: Light Harvesting & Biocatalysis...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    & Sustainable Chemistry: Light Harvesting & Biocatalysis November 30, 1999 at http:www.rle.mit.eduexcitonicswp-contentuploads201408Olsen-efrc-video-highlight-artf.chloro..m...

  18. Better Enzymes for Biofuels and Green Chemistry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Better Enzymes for Biofuels and Green Chemistry: Solving the Cofactor Imbalance Problem Imbalances for the production of biofuels or other valuable chemicals. Though several research groups have re

  19. Introduction to Chemistry and Material Sciences Applications

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Intro Chem and MatSci Apps Introduction to Chemistry and Material Sciences Applications June 26, 2012 L ast edited: 2014-06-02 08:56:54...

  20. Chemistry Controls Material's Nanostructure | The Ames Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Chemistry Controls Material's Nanostructure Tweaking the chemicals used to form nanorods can be used to control their shape.Controlling a nanorod's shape is a key to controlling...

  1. Lithium Insertion Chemistry of Some Iron Vanadates

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Patoux, Sebastien; Richardson, Thomas J.

    2008-01-01

    in A. Nazri, G.Pistoia (Eds. ), Lithium batteries, Science &structure materials in lithium cells, for a lower limitLithium Insertion Chemistry of Some Iron Vanadates Sébastien

  2. Exhaust Phosphorous Chemistry | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Exhaust Phosphorous Chemistry and Catalyst Poisoning The Development of Rapid Aging and Poisoning Protocols for Diesel Aftertreatment Devices Ionic Liquids as...

  3. Quantum Chemistry at Finite Temperature

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liqiang Wei

    2006-05-23

    In this article, we present emerging fields of quantum chemistry at finite temperature. We discuss its recent developments on both experimental and theoretical fronts. First, we describe several experimental investigations related to the temperature effects on the structures, electronic spectra, or bond rupture forces for molecules. These include the analysis of the temperature impact on the pathway shifts for the protein unfolding by atomic force microscopy (AFM), the temperature dependence of the absorption spectra of electrons in solvents, and the temperature influence over the intermolecular forces measured by the AFM. On the theoretical side, we review advancements made by the author in the coming fields of quantum chemistry at finite temperature. Starting from the Bloch equation, we have derived the sets of hierarchy equations for the reduced density operators in both canonical and grand canonical ensembles. They provide a law according to which the reduced density operators vary in temperature for the identical and interacting many-body systems. By taking the independent particle approximation, we have solved the equations in the case of a grand canonical ensemble, and obtained an energy eigenequation for the molecular orbitals at finite temperature. The explicit expression for the temperature-dependent Fock operator is also given. They form a mathematical foundation for the examination of the molecular electronic structures and their interplay with finite temperature. Moreover, we clarify the physics concerning the temperature effects on the electronic structures or processes of the molecules, which is crucial for both theoretical understanding and computation. Finally, ....

  4. Chemistry and Metallurgy Research Facility The Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) Chemistry and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    . Capabilities Supporting National Security The CMR houses key capabilities for analytical chemistry, uraniumCMR Chemistry and Metallurgy Research Facility The Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) Chemistry and Metallurgy Research (CMR) building supports research and experimental activities for plutonium and uranium

  5. MATHEW M. MAYE, PH.D. ASSOCIATE PROFESSOR OF CHEMISTRY SYRACUSE UNIVERSITY, DEPARTMENT OF CHEMISTRY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McConnell, Terry

    (MRS-UMRI) Award (2000 & 2001). ACS Analytical Chemistry Award (SUNY-Binghamton, 2000). SUPPORT AFOSR- 1 - MATHEW M. MAYE, PH.D. ASSOCIATE PROFESSOR OF CHEMISTRY SYRACUSE UNIVERSITY, DEPARTMENT OF CHEMISTRY 1-014 CENTER FOR SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY, SYRACUSE, NEW YORK 13244-4100 (315) 443-2146, MMMAYE

  6. Faculty of Science Chemistry is the study of matter -

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    · Inorganic Chemistry · Analytical Chemistry · Materials Chemistry Expertise in all of these sub of courses--from Materials Chemistry, Nanoparticle Synthesis and Characterization, Main Group Chemistry, Free new compounds, materials and processes to serve the needs of society: Some examples include new

  7. Chemistry Education College of Science CHEM-BS-Teaching

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kihara, Daisuke

    26605 Organic Chemistry (1)CHM26600 or 26400 Organic Chemistry Lab (4)CHM32100 Analytical Chemistry I (4Chemistry Education College of Science CHEM-BS-Teaching CHED 120 Credits 2.5 GPA in content courses credits) (5)CHM12500 Introduction to Chemistry I(satisfies Science Selective for core) (5)CHM12600

  8. Friction of Water on Graphene and Hexagonal Boron Nitride from Ab Initio Methods: Very Different Slippage Despite Very Similar Interface

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alavi, Ali

    *,,,§ Thomas Young Centre, London Centre for Nanotechnology, University College London, London WC1E 6BT, United Kingdom § Department of Chemistry, University College London, London WC1H 0AJ, United Kingdom wetting properties, may have a significant impact on the transport of water at the nanoscale

  9. Page 1 | B.A. in Chemistry | Academic Plan of Study Updated May 2015 B.A. in Chemistry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Yongge

    Page 1 | B.A. in Chemistry | Academic Plan of Study Updated May 2015 B.A. in Chemistry Academic Plan of Study College of Liberal Arts & Sciences Department of Chemistry chemistry.uncc.edu PROGRAM. · Advising (For the Major): completed by your chemistry faculty advisor (please refer to your 49er Banner

  10. Page 1 | B.S. in Chemistry | Academic Plan of Study Updated May 2015 B.S. in Chemistry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Yongge

    Page 1 | B.S. in Chemistry | Academic Plan of Study Updated May 2015 B.S. in Chemistry Academic Plan of Study College of Liberal Arts & Sciences Department of Chemistry chemistry.uncc.edu PROGRAM to declare the major. · Advising (For the Major): completed by your chemistry faculty advisor (please refer

  11. 1 BA/BS with a Major in Chemistry, Concentration in Forensic Chemistry BA/BS WITH A MAJOR IN

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vertes, Akos

    Laboratory CHEM 3165 Biochemistry I CHEM 4122 Instrumental Analytical Chemistry CHEM 4134 Descriptive Instrumental Analytical Chemistry CHEM 4123 Instrumental Analytical Chemistry Laboratory CHEM 4134 (if1 BA/BS with a Major in Chemistry, Concentration in Forensic Chemistry BA/BS WITH A MAJOR

  12. B.S. and ACS Approved Degrees in Environmental Chemistry Requirements for the Environmental Chemistry B.S. degree program

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McQuade, D. Tyler

    and 1051 & 1051L Analytical Chemistry CHM 3120 & 3120L; 4130 & 4130L Organic Chemistry CHM 2210; 2211, 2211B.S. and ACS Approved Degrees in Environmental Chemistry Requirements for the Environmental Chemistry B.S. degree program General Chemistry CHM 1045 & CHM 1045L; 1046 and 1046L or CHM 1050 & 1050L

  13. University of Regensburg -Faculty of Chemistry & Pharmacy Chemistry, B.Sc. -course list for English-speaking students

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schubart, Christoph

    -BSc-M08 3 x x Praktikum Analytische Chemie Analytic Chemistry lab course 3 4 Praktikum PhysikalischeUniversity of Regensburg - Faculty of Chemistry & Pharmacy Chemistry, B.Sc. - course list Physikalische Chemie I Physical Chemistry I lab course 4 4 TechnischeChemie TechnicalChemistry lecture 3 CHE

  14. Laser selective chemistry -is it possible?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zewail, Ahmed

    Laser selective chemistry -is it possible? Ahmed H. Zewail Reprinted I'rom PHYSI('S TODAY November 1980 c IYHii An~czr~Laser selective chemistry 3-is it possible limited by statistical thermody- namic laws. With sufficientlybrief and intense laser radiation properly

  15. Academic Chemistry Inputs and Outcomes Data

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rosenbloom, Joshua L.; Ginther, Donna K.; Juhl, Ted P.; Heppert, Joseph A.

    2015-07-17

    represented in this data by summing real federally funded R&D expenditures (in prices of 2005) for chemistry and chemical engineering between 1990 and 2009 and then ranking... Chemistry or Chemical Engineering. The directory is published every 2 years, and intervening years were imputed by linear interpolation. The ACS directories are issued in odd...

  16. Carnegie Mellon University 1 Department of Chemistry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kurnikova, Maria

    power, plastics, metals, and pharmaceutical industries. Chemistry plays an increasingly important role Institute of Standards and Technology, and the Department of Energy as well as in consulting. Chemistry, technology and engineering, such as biology, physics, mathematics, chemical, biomedical or materials science

  17. Soil and Water Chemistry Distance Education Section

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ma, Lena

    ., 2nd edition Oxford University Press. 3. Soil Chemistry. Bohn, McNeal, O'Connor, and Myer. 2001 3rd, Professor, Soil and Water Science Dept Mailing address: University of Florida Everglades Research principles of soil and water chemistry. The class will cover the fundamentals principles of the properties

  18. The SPECTRa Project: A Wider Chemistry View

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Downing, Jim; Tonge, Alan

    2006-10-20

    services computational chemistry determined by interview and survey The Problem Science depends upon data Experimental chemistry data is a resource / asset … Proprietary spectra formats (NMR, IR, UV) : 5-year shelf life PDF image files (supplementary... ="-1.547700"/>

  19. Journal of Radioanalytical and Nuclear Chemistry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Buesseler, Ken

    1 23 Journal of Radioanalytical and Nuclear Chemistry An International Journal Dealing with All Aspects and Applications of Nuclear Chemistry ISSN 0236-5731 J Radioanal Nucl Chem DOI 10.1007/s10967 that devastated the Fuku- shima Dai-Ichi nuclear power plant resulted in the largest accidental release of cesium

  20. Chemistry 593: Problem Set 1 David Ronis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ronis, David M.

    Chemistry 593: Problem Set 1 © David Ronis McGill University DUE: Friday, January 23, 2015 1). What does = 1 signify? In Eq. (1.1), the first 4 terms were evaluated analytically, while in class. 4. Near a critical point, experiment shows that S(q) 1 + (q)2 , Winter, 2015 #12;Chemistry 593

  1. Wet-sand impulse loading of metallic plates and corrugated core sandwich panels J.J. Rimoli a

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wadley, Haydn

    Wet-sand impulse loading of metallic plates and corrugated core sandwich panels J.J. Rimoli a , B the mechanical response of edge-clamped sandwich panels subject to the impact of explosively driven wet sand of wet sand placed at different standoff distances. Monolithic plates of the same alloy and mass per unit

  2. Development studies for a novel wet oxidation process. Phase 2

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1994-07-01

    DETOX{sup SM} is a catalyzed wet oxidation process which destroys organic materials in an acidic water solution of iron at 373 to 473 K. The solution can be used repeatedly to destroy great amounts of organic materials. Since the process is conducted in a contained vessel, air emissions from the process can be well controlled. The solution is also capable of dissolving and concentrating many heavy and radioactive metals for eventual stabilization and disposal. The Phase 2 effort for this project is site selection and engineering design for a DETOX demonstration unit. Site selection was made using a set of site selection criteria and evaluation factors. A survey of mixed wastes at DOE sites was conducted using the Interim Mixed Waste Inventory Report. Sites with likely suitable waste types were identified. Potential demonstration sites were ranked based on waste types, interest, regulatory needs, scheduling, ability to provide support, and available facilities. Engineering design for the demonstration unit is in progress and is being performed by Jacobs Applied Technology. The engineering design proceeded through preliminary process flow diagrams (PFDs), calculation of mass and energy balances for representative waste types, process and instrumentation diagrams (P and IDs), preparation of component specifications, and a firm cost estimate for fabrication of the demonstration unit.

  3. Mass fractal characteristics of wet sonogels as determined by small-angle x-ray scattering and differential scanning calorimetry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vollet, D. R.; Donatti, D. A.; Ibanez Ruiz, A.; Gatto, F. R. [Departamento de Fisica, Unesp-Univerisdade Estadual Paulista, IGCE, P.O. Box 178 CEP 13500-970 Rio Claro, SP (Brazil)

    2006-07-01

    Low density silica sonogels were prepared from acid sonohydrolysis of tetraethoxysilane. Wet gels were studied by small-angle x-ray scattering (SAXS) and differential scanning calorimetry (DSC). The DSC tests were carried out under a heating rate of 2 deg. C/min from -120 deg. C up to 30 deg. C. Aerogels were obtained by CO{sub 2} supercritical extraction and characterized by nitrogen adsorption and SAXS. The DSC thermogram displays two distinct endothermic peaks. The first, a broad peak extending from about -80 deg. C up to practically 0 deg. C, was associated to the melting of ice nanocrystals with a crystal size distribution with 'pore' diameter ranging from 1 or 2 nm up to about 60 nm, as estimated from Thomson's equation. The second, a sharp peak with onset temperature close to 0 deg. C, was attributed to the melting of macroscopic crystals. The DSC incremental 'nanopore' volume distribution is in reasonable agreement with the incremental pore volume distribution of the aerogel as determined from nitrogen adsorption. No macroporosity was detected by nitrogen adsorption, probably because the adsorption method applies stress on the sample during measurement, leading to a underestimation of pore volume, or because often positive curvature of the solid surface is in aerogels, making the nitrogen condensation more difficult. According to the SAXS results, the solid network of the wet gels behaves as a mass fractal structure with mass fractal dimension D=2.20{+-}0.01 in a characteristic length scale below {xi}=7.9{+-}0.1 nm. The mass fractal characteristics of the wet gels have also been probed from DSC data by means of an earlier applied modeling for generation of a mass fractal from the incremental ''pore'' volume distribution curves. The results are shown to be in interesting agreement with the results from SAXS.

  4. February 15, 2006 Postdoctoral Position in Environmental Chemistry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Holmén, Britt A.

    February 15, 2006 Postdoctoral Position in Environmental Chemistry: Airborne Fine and Ultrafine research on airborne particles through a Dreyfus Foundation Environmental Chemistry Postdoctoral Fellowship and organizational skills and be motivated to apply their chemistry experience to environmental problems. Experience

  5. NATURE CHEMISTRY | www.nature.com/naturechemistry 1 SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stoltz, Brian M.

    . Stoltz* The Warren and Katharine Schlinger Laboratory for Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Division of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, California 91125 (USA and Chemical Engineering, Division of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, California Institute of Technology

  6. Spring 2015 Advising Booklet Biomedical Engineering Chemical & Physical Biology Chemistry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wolfe, Patrick J.

    Spring 2015 Advising Booklet Biomedical Engineering · Chemical & Physical Biology · Chemistry Human: · Biomedical Engineering · Chemical and Physical Biology · Chemistry · Cognitive Neuroscience and Evolutionary in concentrating in the Life Sciences are advised to take courses in Life Sciences, chemistry, and mathematics

  7. University of South Carolina Department of Chemistry & Biochemistry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Morgan, Stephen L.

    University of South Carolina Department of Chemistry & Biochemistry Chemical Hygiene Plan & Biochemistry Department of Chemistry & Biochemistry Safety Committee Faculty members: Stephen L. Morgan@email.sc.edu) Department of Chemistry & Biochemistry Safety Information web site: http

  8. The chemistry and biology of zoanthamine alkaloids and Illicium sesquiterpenes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Trzoss, Lynnie L.

    2012-01-01

    La Jolla, CA Ph.D. in Chemistry Research Advisor: Prof.data ……………… Chapter 3 The chemistry and biology of IlliciumLos Angeles, CA B.S. in Chemistry Research Advisor: Prof.

  9. The Chemistry of Cold Interstellar Cloud Cores Eric Herbst

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Millar, Tom

    Chapter 1 The Chemistry of Cold Interstellar Cloud Cores Eric Herbst Department of Physics and Their Chemistry . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 1.2 Gas-Phase Chemical Processes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13 1.2.4 Organic Chemistry . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 16 1.2.5 Negative

  10. Robert E. Blankenship Departments of Biology and Chemistry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Robert E. Blankenship Departments of Biology and Chemistry Washington, Berkeley ­ Ph.D. in Chemistry, 1975 Nebraska Wesleyan University, Lincoln, Nebraska ­ B.S. in Chemistry with distinction, 1970 PROFESSIONAL EXPERIENCE: 7/06­Pres

  11. Chemistry courses as the turning point for premedical students

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Barr, Donald A.; Matsui, John; Wanat, Stanley F.; Gonzalez, Maria Elena

    2010-01-01

    009-9165-3 ORIGINAL PAPER Chemistry courses as the turningnegative experiences in chemistry courses are a major factorTo determine if chemistry courses have a similar effect at a

  12. Indoor Chemistry: Materials, Ventilation Systems, and Occupant Activities

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Morrison, G.C.

    2011-01-01

    and J. D. Wooley. Indoor chemistry: ozone volatile organicTibbetts. Ozone Reactive Chemistry on Interior Latex Paint.and the role of reactive chemistry. Indoor A ir. 16 (2006)7-

  13. Analytical Chemistry Laboratory progress report for FY 1984

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Green, D.W.; Heinrich, R.R.; Jensen, K.J.; Stetter, J.R.

    1985-03-01

    Technical and administrative activities of the Analytical Chemistry Laboratory (ACL) are reported for fiscal year 1984. The ACL is a full-cost-recovery service center, with the primary mission of providing a broad range of technical support services to the scientific and engineering programs at ANL. In addition, ACL conducts a research program in analytical chemistry, works on instrumental and methods development, and provides analytical services for governmental, educational, and industrial organizations. The ACL is administratively within the Chemical Technology Division, the principal user, but provides technical support for all of the technical divisions and programs at ANL. The ACL has three technical groups - Chemical Analysis, Instrumental Analysis, and Organic Analysis. Under technical activities 26 projects are briefly described. Under professional activities, a list is presented for publications and reports, oral presentations, awards and meetings attended. 6 figs., 2 tabs.

  14. A filtered tabulated chemistry model for LES of premixed combustion

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fiorina, B.; Auzillon, P.; Darabiha, N.; Gicquel, O.; Veynante, D. [EM2C - CNRS, Ecole Centrale Paris, 92295 Chatenay Malabry (France); Vicquelin, R. [EM2C - CNRS, Ecole Centrale Paris, 92295 Chatenay Malabry (France); GDF SUEZ, Pole CHENE, Centre de Recherche et d'Innovation Gaz et Energies Nouvelles, 93211 Saint-Denis la Plaine (France)

    2010-03-15

    A new modeling strategy called F-TACLES (Filtered Tabulated Chemistry for Large Eddy Simulation) is developed to introduce tabulated chemistry methods in Large Eddy Simulation (LES) of turbulent premixed combustion. The objective is to recover the correct laminar flame propagation speed of the filtered flame front when subgrid scale turbulence vanishes as LES should tend toward Direct Numerical Simulation (DNS). The filtered flame structure is mapped using 1-D filtered laminar premixed flames. Closure of the filtered progress variable and the energy balance equations are carefully addressed in a fully compressible formulation. The methodology is first applied to 1-D filtered laminar flames, showing the ability of the model to recover the laminar flame speed and the correct chemical structure when the flame wrinkling is completely resolved. The model is then extended to turbulent combustion regimes by including subgrid scale wrinkling effects in the flame front propagation. Finally, preliminary tests of LES in a 3-D turbulent premixed flame are performed. (author)

  15. MAY 14, 2008 Chemistry and environmental science professor receives Carroll

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Reid, Scott A.

    MAY 14, 2008 Chemistry and environmental science professor receives Carroll College faculty award WAUKESHA, WIS.-- An associate professor of chemistry and environmental science has received an annual

  16. 5.13 Organic Chemistry II, Fall 2003

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jamison, Timothy F.

    Intermediate organic chemistry. Synthesis, structure determination, mechanism, and the relationships between structure and reactivity emphasized. Special topics in organic chemistry included to illustrate the role of organic ...

  17. Plastic Bags to Batteries: A Green Chemistry Solution | Argonne...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Plastic Bags to Batteries: A Green Chemistry Solution Share Description Plastic bags are the scourge of roadsides, parking lots and landfills. But chemistry comes to the rescue At...

  18. Synthesis and Surface Chemistry of Group IV Nanocrystals (Friday...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Synthesis and Surface Chemistry of Group IV Nanocrystals (Friday, September 18) Synthesis and Surface Chemistry of Group IV Nanocrystals, Nathan Neale, Group Leader, National...

  19. THE MOLECULAR BIOLOGY INSTITUTE AND THE DEPARTMENT OF CHEMISTRY & BIOCHEMISTRY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Grether, Gregory

    THE MOLECULAR BIOLOGY INSTITUTE AND THE DEPARTMENT OF CHEMISTRY & BIOCHEMISTRY Three Nominees in Molecular Biology, Biochemistry and Chemistry at UCLA #12;

  20. Think for yourself : a writing- based chemistry curriculum

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Morgan, John Andrew

    2011-01-01

    Although the number of jobs in chemistry has risen, themy job is just to make them aware of the chemistry in their

  1. Quantum Chemistry of CO2 Interaction with Swelling Clays | netl...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Quantum Chemistry of CO2 Interaction with Swelling Clays Quantum Chemistry of CO2 Interaction with Swelling Clays Ubiquitous clay minerals can play an important role in assessing...

  2. High Level Computational Chemistry Approaches to the Prediction...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Computational Chemistry Approaches to the Prediction of Energetic Properties of Chemical Hydrogen Storage Systems High Level Computational Chemistry Approaches to the Prediction...

  3. Electrophilic Metal Alkyl Chemistry in New Ligand Environments...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Electrophilic Metal Alkyl Chemistry in New Ligand Environments Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Electrophilic Metal Alkyl Chemistry in New Ligand Environments The goals...

  4. June 26 Training: Using Chemistry and Material Sciences Applications

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    June 26 Training: Using Chemistry and Material Sciences Applications June 26 Training: Using Chemistry and Material Sciences Applications June 15, 2012 by Francesca Verdier (0...

  5. Chemistry & Biology Aryl-aldehyde Formation in Fungal Polyketides

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhao, Huimin

    Chemistry & Biology Article Aryl-aldehyde Formation in Fungal Polyketides: Discovery at Urbana-Champaign, Urbana, IL 61801, USA 2Department of Chemistry, University of Illinois at Urbana

  6. Reductant Chemistry during LNT Regeneration for a Lean Gasoline...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Chemistry during LNT Regeneration for a Lean Gasoline Engine Reductant Chemistry during LNT Regeneration for a Lean Gasoline Engine Poster presented at the 16th Directions in...

  7. Zelenay receives professorship in chemistry from president of...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Zelenay receives professorship in chemistry from president of Poland Zelenay receives professorship in chemistry from president of Poland Piotr Zelenay of Materials Synthesis and...

  8. NERSC training events: Data Transfer and Archiving; Chemistry...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    training events: Data Transfer and Archiving; Chemistry and Material Sciences Applications NERSC training events: Data Transfer and Archiving; Chemistry and Material Sciences...

  9. NERSC User Martin Karplus Wins Nobel Prize in Chemistry

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    & Publications NERSC News Center News Martin Karplus Wins Nobel Prize in Chemistry Martin Karplus Wins Nobel Prize in Chemistry October 9, 2013 | Tags: Awards,...

  10. Bridging the Gap between Fundamental Physics and Chemistry and...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Bridging the Gap between Fundamental Physics and Chemistry and Applied Models for HCCI Engines Bridging the Gap between Fundamental Physics and Chemistry and Applied Models for...

  11. Fuel Chemistry and Cetane Effects on HCCI Performance, Combustion...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Coal-Derived Liquids to Enable HCCI Technology Fuel Chemistry and Cetane Effects on HCCI Performance, Combustion, and Emissions Cetane Performance and Chemistry Comparing...

  12. Reduction of Water Use in Wet FGD Systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    David Rencher

    2008-06-30

    Cooperative Agreement DE-FC26-06NT42726 was established in January 2006, and is current through Amendment 2, April 2006. The current reporting period, April 1, 2008 through June 30, 2008, is the eighth progress-reporting period for the project. However, this report will be the final report (instead of a quarterly report) because this project is being terminated. Efforts to bring this project to a close over the past several months focused on internal project discussions, and subsequent communications with NETL, regarding the inherent difficulty with completing this project as originally scoped, and the option of performing an engineering study to accomplish some of the chief project objectives. However, NETL decided that the engineering study did indeed constitute a significant scope deviation from the original concepts, and that pursuit of this option was not recommended. These discussions are summarized in the Results and Discussion, and the Conclusion sections. The objective of this project by a team lead by URS Group was to demonstrate the use of regenerative heat exchange to reduce flue gas temperature and minimize evaporative water consumption in wet flue gas desulphurization (FGD) systems on coal-fired boilers. Furthermore, the project intended to demonstrate that regenerative heat exchange to cool flue gas upstream of the electrostatic precipitator (ESP) and reheat flue gas downstream of the FGD system would result in the following benefits to air pollution control (APC) systems on coal-fired power plants: (1) Improve ESP performance due to reduced gas volume and improved ash resistivity characteristics, (2) Control SO3 emissions through condensation on the fly ash, and (3) Avoid the need to install wet stacks or to provide flue gas reheat. Finally, operation at cooler flue gas temperatures offered the potential benefit of increasing mercury (Hg) removal across the ESP and FGD systems. This project planned to conduct pilot-scale tests of regenerative heat exchange to determine the reduction in FGD water consumption that can be achieved and assess the resulting impact on APC systems. An analysis of the improvement in the performance of the APC systems and the resulting reduction in capital and operating costs were going to be conducted. The tests were intended to determine the impact of operation of cooling flue gas temperatures on FGD water consumption, ESP particulate removal, SO{sub 3} removal, and Hg removal, and to assess the potential negative impact of excessive corrosion rates in the regenerative heat exchanger. Testing was going to be conducted on Columbian coal (with properties similar to low-sulfur Eastern bituminous coal) and SO{sub 3} will be spiked onto the flue gas to simulate operation with higher SO{sub 3} concentrations resulting from firing a higher sulfur coal, or operating with a selective catalytic reduction (SCR) unit. The project was also going to include associate planning, laboratory analytical support, reporting, and management activities. The URS project team finalized a conceptual alternative approach to demonstrate, via an engineering study, the use of regenerative heat exchange to reduce flue gas temperature and minimize evaporative water consumption. This idea was presented in summary format to NETL for consideration. NETL determined that this alternative approach deviated from the original project objectives, and that it would be in the best interest of all parties involved to cancel the project.

  13. Method for protecting chip corners in wet chemical etching of wafers

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hui, Wing C. (Campbell, CA)

    1994-01-01

    The present invention is a corner protection mask design that protects chip corners from undercutting during anisotropic etching of wafers. The corner protection masks abut the chip corner point and extend laterally from segments along one or both corner sides of the corner point, forming lateral extensions. The protection mask then extends from the lateral extensions, parallel to the direction of the corner side of the chip and parallel to scribe lines, thus conserving wafer space. Unmasked bomb regions strategically formed in the protection mask facilitate the break-up of the protection mask during etching. Corner protection masks are useful for chip patterns with deep grooves and either large or small chip mask areas. Auxiliary protection masks form nested concentric frames that etch from the center outward are useful for small chip mask patterns. The protection masks also form self-aligning chip mask areas. The present invention is advantageous for etching wafers with thin film windows, microfine and micromechanical structures, and for forming chip structures more elaborate than presently possible.

  14. Method for protecting chip corners in wet chemical etching of wafers

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hui, W.C.

    1994-02-15

    The present invention is a corner protection mask design that protects chip corners from undercutting during anisotropic etching of wafers. The corner protection masks abut the chip corner point and extend laterally from segments along one or both corner sides of the corner point, forming lateral extensions. The protection mask then extends from the lateral extensions, parallel to the direction of the corner side of the chip and parallel to scribe lines, thus conserving wafer space. Unmasked bomb regions strategically formed in the protection mask facilitate the break-up of the protection mask during etching. Corner protection masks are useful for chip patterns with deep grooves and either large or small chip mask areas. Auxiliary protection masks form nested concentric frames that etch from the center outward are useful for small chip mask patterns. The protection masks also form self-aligning chip mask areas. The present invention is advantageous for etching wafers with thin film windows, microfine and micromechanical structures, and for forming chip structures more elaborate than presently possible. 63 figures.

  15. Development of a two-body wet abrasion test method with attention to the

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefieldSulfate Reducing BacteriaConnectlaser-solidSwitchgrass and Miscanthus(Conference)Report)effects of

  16. Assessment of an Industrial Wet Oxidation System for Burning Waste and Low-Grade Fuels 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bettinger, J.; Koppel, P.; Margulies, A.

    1988-01-01

    of subcritical and supercritical wet oxidation technologies to chemical, food processing, pharmaceutical, wood-pulping, and coal-washing wastes. Each application is evaluated for technical and economic feasibility as well as its national applicability...

  17. Exploring plastron stability and fluid friction reduction on robust micro-textured non-wetting surfaces

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Srinivasan, Siddarth, Ph. D. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

    2015-01-01

    Non-wetting surfaces are characterized by the presence of stable pockets of vapor trapped within the asperities of the surface morphology. The utility of these surfaces in reducing skin friction in viscous laminar and ...

  18. Wetting hysteresis and droplet roll off behavior on superhydrophobic surfaces by Katherine Marie Smyth.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Smyth, Katherine Marie

    2010-01-01

    Various states of hydrophobic wetting and hysteresis are observed when water droplets are deposited on micro-post surfaces of different post densities. Hysteresis is commonly defined as the difference between the advancing ...

  19. Assessing Evapotranspiration Estimates from the Global Soil Wetness Project Phase 2 (GSWP-2) Simulations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gao, Xiang

    We assess the simulations of global-scale evapotranspiration from the Global Soil Wetness Project Phase 2 (GSWP-2) within a global water-budget framework. The scatter in the GSWP-2 global evapotranspiration estimates from ...

  20. Wetting and phase-change phenomena on micro/nanostructures for enhanced heat transfer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Xiao, Rong, Ph. D. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

    2013-01-01

    Micro/nanostructures have been extensively studied to amplify the intrinsic wettability of materials to create superhydrophilic or superhydrophobic surfaces. Such extreme wetting properties can influence the heat transfer ...

  1. MHK Projects/US Navy Wave Energy Technology WET Program at Marine...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    MHK ProjectsUS Navy Wave Energy Technology WET Program at Marine Corps Base Hawaii MCBH < MHK Projects Jump to: navigation, search << Return to the MHK database homepage Loading...

  2. Nanoporous carbon actuator and methods of use thereof

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Biener, Juergen (San Leandro, CA); Baumann, Theodore F. (Discovery Bay, CA); Shao, Lihua (Karlsruhe, DE); Weissmueller, Joerg (Stutensee, DE)

    2012-07-31

    An electrochemically driveable actuator according to one embodiment includes a nanoporous carbon aerogel composition capable of exhibiting charge-induced reversible strain when wetted by an electrolyte and a voltage is applied thereto. An electrochemically driven actuator according to another embodiment includes a nanoporous carbon aerogel composition wetted by an electrolyte; and a mechanism for causing charge-induced reversible strain of the composition. A method for electrochemically actuating an object according to one embodiment includes causing charge-induced reversible strain of a nanoporous carbon aerogel composition wetted with an electrolyte to actuate the object by the strain.

  3. Wet-Nanotechnology: fl id t NIUnanofluids at NIU

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kostic, Milivoje M.

    " methods and thermal- flow- catalyst- and other field- www.kostic.niu.edu/DRnanofluids methods and thermal/Extraction nanofluids· Process/Extraction nanofluids · Environmental (pollution cleaning) nanofluids · Bio

  4. Heat Transfer Characteristics of the Wet Thermal Insulator with Multi-layer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jong-Won Kim; Goon-Cherl Park; Tae-Wan Kim; Doo-Jeong Lee

    2006-07-01

    SMART developed in KAERI is an integral type nuclear cogeneration reactor. SMART uses a nitrogen-filled gas pressurizer so that the steam partial pressure should be minimized and the pressurizer should be under low temperature condition. To sustain the low temperature condition, the wet thermal insulator and pressurizer cooler are installed in the pressurizer. Since the performance of wet thermal insulator is an important parameter to determine the size of the pressurizer cooler, it is important to evaluate the insulation performance of the wet thermal insulator. The wet thermal insulators with 20 layers are installed in SMART. In the design of SMART, the empirical correlation by Adamovich was used to estimate the thermal resistance of the wet thermal insulator. However, the experimental condition and results are not clear so that this correlation should be verified. To analyze the heat transfer characteristics of the multi-layer wet thermal insulator, natural convective heat transport through horizontal and vertical water-filled layers is investigated. Experiments and numerical analyses have been performed to evaluate the heat transfer rates through multi-layer and verify Adamovich correlation. In addition, a new multi-layer correlation was obtained. (authors)

  5. Chemistry Division annual progress report for period ending January 31, 1984

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1984-05-01

    Progress is reported in the following fields: coal chemistry, aqueous chemistry at high temperatures and pressures, geochemistry, high-temperature chemistry and thermodynamics of structural materials, chemistry of transuranium elements and compounds, separations chemistry, elecrochemistry, catalysis, chemical physics, theoretical chemistry, nuclear waste chemistry, chemistry of hazardous chemicals, and thermal energy storage.

  6. Contained radiological analytical chemistry module

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Barney, David M. (Scotia, NY)

    1989-01-01

    A system which provides analytical determination of a plurality of water chemistry parameters with respect to water samples subject to radiological contamination. The system includes a water sample analyzer disposed within a containment and comprising a sampling section for providing predetermined volumes of samples for analysis; a flow control section for controlling the flow through the system; and a gas analysis section for analyzing samples provided by the sampling system. The sampling section includes a controllable multiple port valve for, in one position, metering out sample of a predetermined volume and for, in a second position, delivering the material sample for analysis. The flow control section includes a regulator valve for reducing the pressure in a portion of the system to provide a low pressure region, and measurement devices located in the low pressure region for measuring sample parameters such as pH and conductivity, at low pressure. The gas analysis section which is of independent utility provides for isolating a small water sample and extracting the dissolved gases therefrom into a small expansion volume wherein the gas pressure and thermoconductivity of the extracted gas are measured.

  7. Contained radiological analytical chemistry module

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Barney, David M. (Scotia, NY)

    1990-01-01

    A system which provides analytical determination of a plurality of water chemistry parameters with respect to water samples subject to radiological contamination. The system includes a water sample analyzer disposed within a containment and comprising a sampling section for providing predetermined volumes of samples for analysis; a flow control section for controlling the flow through the system; and a gas analysis section for analyzing samples provided by the sampling system. The sampling section includes a controllable multiple port valve for, in one position, metering out sample of a predetermined volume and for, in a second position, delivering the material sample for analysis. The flow control section includes a regulator valve for reducing the pressure in a portion of the system to provide a low pressure region, and measurement devices located in the low pressure region for measuring sample parameters such as pH and conductivity, at low pressure. The gas analysis section which is of independent utility provides for isolating a small water sample and extracting the dissolved gases therefrom into a small expansion volume wherein the gas pressure and thermoconductivity of the extracted gas are measured.

  8. ALMA observations of the kinematics and chemistry of disc formation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lindberg, Johan E; Brinch, Christian; Haugbřlle, Troels; Bergin, Edwin A; Harsono, Daniel; Persson, Magnus V; Visser, Ruud; Yamamoto, Satoshi

    2014-01-01

    Context: The R CrA cloud hosts a handful of Class 0/I low-mass young stellar objects. The chemistry and physics at scales $>500$ AU in this cloud are dominated by the irradiation from the nearby Herbig Be star R CrA. The luminous large-scale emission makes it necessary to use high-resolution spectral imaging to study the chemistry and dynamics of the inner envelopes and discs of the protostars. Aims: We aim to better understand the structure of the inner regions of these protostars and in particular the interplay between the chemistry and the presence of discs. Methods: Using Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array (ALMA) high-resolution spectral imaging interferometry observations, we study the molecular line and dust continuum emission at submillimetre wavelengths. Results: We detect dust continuum emission from four circumstellar discs around Class 0/I objects within the R CrA cloud. Towards IRS7B we detect C$^{17}$O emission showing a rotation curve consistent with a Keplerian disc with a well-define...

  9. Radiation chemistry in solvent etxraction: FY2011 research

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bruce J. Mincher; Stephen P. Mezyk; Leigh R. Martin

    2011-09-01

    This report summarizes work accomplished under the Fuel Cycle Research and Development (FCR&D) program in the area of radiation chemistry during FY 2011. The tasks assigned during FY 2011 included: (1) Continue measurements free radical reaction kinetics in the organic phase; (2) Continue development of an alpha-radiolysis program and compare alpha and gamma radiolysis for CMPO; (3) Initiate an effort to understand dose rate effects in radiation chemistry; and (4) Continued work to characterize TALSPEAK radiation chemistry, including the examination of metal complexed ligand kinetics. Progress made on each of these tasks is reported here. Briefly, the method developed to measure the kinetics of the reactions of the NO3 radical with solvent extraction ligands in organic solution during FY10 was extended here to a number of compounds to better understand the differences between radical reactions in the organic versus aqueous phases. The alpha-radiolysis program in FY11 included irradiations of CMPO solutions with 244Cm, 211At and the He ion beam, for comparison to gamma irradiations, and a comparison of the gamma irradiation results for CMPO at three different gamma dose rates. Finally, recent results for TALSPEAK radiolysis are reported, summarizing the latest in an effort to understand how metal complexation to ligands affects their reaction kinetics with free radicals.

  10. Computational Science and Engineering Certification for Chemistry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gilbert, Matthew

    Computational Science and Engineering Certification for Chemistry The Computational Science that are distinct from already- required coursework. To receive a certificate in "Computational Science a solid base in problem solving using computation as a major tool for modeling complicated problems

  11. Chemistry & Biochemistry 2013 Departmental Graduation Ceremony

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Levine, Alex J.

    Chemistry & Biochemistry 2013 Departmental Graduation Ceremony When and where will it be held and Biochemistry Commencement Ceremony. You may order ten (10) additional tickets for $12 each. You MUST RSVP

  12. Conference Registration Form Property Summer School (Chemistry)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Crawford, T. Daniel

    Conference Registration Form Property Summer School (Chemistry) June 29 - July 3, 2015 Virginia with payment by May 30, 2015 (no staples, tape, or paper clips, please) to: Conference Registrar Continuing

  13. Pollution of Natural Waters 1. Redox chemistry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schofield, Jeremy

    Pollution of Natural Waters Outline: 1. Redox chemistry 2. Redox potential in aquatic systems 3; Photosynthetic algae limited to euphotic zone where light can penetrate #15; Below euphotic zone, O 2

  14. UNIVERSITY OF OTTAWA Materials Chemistry and Physics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    of the National Research Council of Canada have outstanding materials growth of a major expansion of its research programs in Materials Chemistry and Physics, energy materials and biomaterials. There is the potential for exceptional

  15. Graduate Handbook Department of Chemistry and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McQuade, D. Tyler

    Graduate Handbook Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry 2013-2014 #12;REVISED August 2013 Page as the Graduate Student Handbook published by the Office of the Graduate School. Providing assistance to graduate

  16. Graduate Handbook Department of Chemistry and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McQuade, D. Tyler

    Graduate Handbook Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry 2014-2015 #12;REVISED July 2014 Page | 1 as the Graduate Student Handbook published by the Office of the Graduate School. Providing assistance to graduate

  17. Eugene R. Zubarev Department of Chemistry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Natelson, Douglas

    -2005 Assistant Professor of Materials Science and Engineering, Iowa State University 2000-2002 Research Associate of nanomaterials and supramolecular chemistry, molecular self-assembly, organic- inorganic hybrid structures, nanoparticle catalysts, amphiphilic polymers. Experimental: organic synthesis, polymerization, synthesis

  18. The Chemistry Clinic Knowledge exchange programme

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Strathclyde, University of

    · Analytical Chemistry · Chemical Biology · Forensic Science · Inorganic Synthesis · Organic Synthesis depending on the needs of the project. Areas of expertise include: · Materials and Nanochemistry scientific advice, or they may want their current processes and materials assessed or developed. If so

  19. Eugene R. Zubarev Department of Chemistry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Natelson, Douglas

    , amphiphilic structures. Experimental: organic synthesis, polymerization, synthesis of inorganic nanocrystals-2005 Assistant Professor of Materials Science and Engineering, Iowa State University 2000-2002 Research Associate and supramolecular chemistry, molecular self-assembly, organic-inorganic hybrid structures, nanoparticle catalysts

  20. ITP Chemicals: Technology Roadmap for Computational Chemistry

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Computational chemistry can assist in the design and optimization of new and existing processes and products. It can be used to reduce the costs of development, improve energy efficiency and environmental performance...

  1. February 11, 1987 I Inorganic Chemistry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Girolami, Gregory S.

    Volume 26 Number 3 February 11, 1987 I Inorganic Chemistry 0 Copyright 1987 by the American uranium phthalocyanine derivatives have been crystallographically (I) (a) Kasuga, K.; Tsutsui, M. Coord

  2. Approaches to High Throughput Physical Organic Chemistry 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Portal, Christophe

    2008-01-01

    Over the past ten years, the development of High Throughput (HT) synthetic chemistry techniques has allowed the rapid preparation of libraries of hundreds to thousands of compounds. These tools are now extensively used for drug and material...

  3. Graduate Profile Chemistry & PhysiCs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Graduate Profile Chemistry & PhysiCs "...I am helping to develop low-cost solar technology." Ricky to develop low-cost solar technology. The aim of my project is to achieve increased light absorption in thin

  4. Chemistry Minor Program Sheet Code: xxx-150 Student Name: __________________________________ Student ID# (last 4 digits): ____________________

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sun, Yi

    Chemistry Minor Program Sheet Code: xxx-150 Student Name {Corequisites} Grade taken Chem 10301 General Chemistry I & Lab 4 (Math 19500) [ ] _________ Chem 10401 General Chemistry II & Lab 4 (Chem 10301) [ ] _________ Chemistry Minor Requirements 26100 Organic Chemistry I 3

  5. Global long-lived chemical modes excited in a 3-D chemistry transport model: Stratospheric N 2 O, NO y , O 3 and CH 4 chemistry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hsu, Juno; Prather, Michael J

    2010-01-01

    supported by NSF Atmospheric Chemistry (ATM?0550234) and theeigenstates in atmospheric chemistry, Geophys. Res. Lett. ,1998), Time scales in atmospheric chemistry: Coupled per-

  6. Bromine and iodine chemistry in a global chemistry-climate model: description and evaluation of very short-lived oceanic sources

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2012-01-01

    ical Data for Atmospheric Chemistry: Supplement VIII,Species Evaluation for Atmospheric Chemistry, J. Phys. Chem.cal data for atmospheric chemistry: web version February

  7. Global long-lived chemical modes excited in a 3-D chemistry transport model: Stratospheric N 2 O, NO y , O 3 and CH 4 chemistry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hsu, Juno; Prather, Michael J

    2010-01-01

    supported by NSF Atmospheric Chemistry (ATM?0550234) and theeigenstates in atmospheric chemistry, Geophys. Res. Lett. ,scales in atmospheric chemistry: Coupled per- turbations to

  8. Special Topics in Organic Chemistry 8833A Pulping and Bleaching Chemistry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sherrill, David

    /Functionalization of cellulosic fibers f. Chemistry of bleaching recycled fiber: dye oxidation g. Kraft lignin recovery), Principal Journals: Carbohydrate Research, Cellulose, Carbohydrate Polymers, Can. J. Chem., Holzforschung, J

  9. Chemistry -Bachelor of Science (SCH2UG) Total Credits Required: 128 Chemistry/Biochemistry -ACS Certified

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    of the following courses 3 CH1122 University Chemistry - Studio Lab II 5 BL3300 Introduction to Genomics 3 CH1130

  10. Uncertainties and assessments of chemistry-climate models of the

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wirosoetisno, Djoko

    and assessments of chemistry-climate models of the stratosphere. Atmospheric Chemistry and Physics, 3 (1). pp. 1, 1­27, 2003 www.atmos-chem-phys.org/acp/3/1/ Atmospheric Chemistry and Physics UncertaintiesUncertainties and assessments of chemistry-climate models of the stratosphere Article Published

  11. MATERIALS SCIENCE AS A VEHICLE FOR TEACHING MAINSTREAM CHEMISTRY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sadoway, Donald Robert

    MATERIALS SCIENCE AS A VEHICLE FOR TEACHING MAINSTREAM CHEMISTRY Donald R. Sadoway Department taught one of the subjects that satisfies the freshman chemistry requirement at MIT: Introduction to Solid State Chemistry (MIT subject number 3.091). This subject teaches basic principles of chemistry

  12. UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA, SANTA CRUZ DEPARTMENT OF CHEMISTRY AND BIOCHEMISTRY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Santa Cruz, University of

    UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA, SANTA CRUZ DEPARTMENT OF CHEMISTRY AND BIOCHEMISTRY Assistant Professor in Biochemistry/Biophysical Chemistry The Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry at the University of California level in the general areas of biochemistry, biophysical chemistry, and/or structural biology. We

  13. MSU Departmental Assessment Plan Department: Chemistry and Biochemistry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dyer, Bill

    MSU Departmental Assessment Plan 2007-2009 Department: Chemistry and Biochemistry Department Head.S. in Chemistry Chemistry (Professional) Option Biochemistry Option Teaching Option #12;Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry Undergraduate Assessment Plan Assessment Contact Dr. Martin Teintze, Chair Undergraduate Program

  14. Chemistry and Biochemistry University of Mississippi Gregory S. Tschumper

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tchumper, Gregory S.

    1 Chemistry and Biochemistry University of Mississippi Gregory S. Tschumper 3 June 2015 http://quantum.chem.olemiss.edu Introduction to Computational Quantum Chemistry II Chemistry and Biochemistry University of Mississippi Outline ŘPart I § Computa,onal Science § A crash course in computa,onal quantum chemistry

  15. MAJOR TO CAREER GUIDE B.A. Chemistry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Walker, Lawrence R.

    MAJOR TO CAREER GUIDE B.A. Chemistry College of Sciences www.unlv.edu/chemistry Mission of the College of Sciences The College of Sciences offers programs in life sciences, chemistry, geoscience: 702-895-2077 Campus Location: MPE-A 130 www.unlv.edu/sciences/advising About the Chemistry Career

  16. Chemistry and Biochemistry University of Mississippi Gregory S. Tschumper

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tchumper, Gregory S.

    1 Chemistry and Biochemistry University of Mississippi Gregory S. Tschumper 2 June 2015 http://quantum.chem.olemiss.edu Introduction to Computational Quantum Chemistry I Chemistry and Biochemistry University of Mississippi Outline ŘPart I § Computa,onal Science § A crash course in computa,onal quantum chemistry

  17. MAJOR TO CAREER GUIDE B.S. Chemistry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Walker, Lawrence R.

    MAJOR TO CAREER GUIDE B.S. Chemistry College of Sciences www.unlv.edu/chemistry Mission of the College of Sciences The College of Sciences offers programs in life sciences, chemistry, geoscience: 702-895-2077 Campus Location: MPE-A 130 www.unlv.edu/sciences/advising Chemistry Career Options

  18. the Knowledge Centre for Materials CheMistry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    the Knowledge Centre for Materials CheMistry The Knowledge Centre for Materials Chemistry (KCMC) coordinates, develops and exploits cutting- edge research in materials chemistry. K CMC does this by providing chemistry from STFC's Daresbury Laboratory in Cheshire and the universities of Liverpool, Manchester

  19. Chemistry Placement Test Placement in Chem 1015, 1061/1065

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thomas, David D.

    Chemistry Placement Test Placement in Chem 1015, 1061/1065 Students who need an introductory chemistry course with lab only for their intended major should take Chem 1015 (lecture) & Chem 1017 (lab). Students who have not completed high school chemistry should take Chem 1015, regardless of their Chemistry

  20. DEPARTMENT OF CHEMISTRY College of Arts and Sciences

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Frantz, Kyle J.

    D students in the areas of Analytical, Biophysical, Biochemical, Organic, and Medicinal Chemistry. What you/Computational Chemistry · Analytical Chemistry A Bioinformatics Option is available in each of the core disciplines. A PhDEPARTMENT OF CHEMISTRY College of Arts and Sciences Director of Graduate Studies Giovanni Gadda

  1. Middle Tennessee State University Department of Chemistry Master's Program

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hong, Don

    as a prerequisite for CHEM 6230 Intermediate Analytical Chemistry. 2. achieve a satisfactory score on the Graduate Intermediate Analytical Chemistry (4 hours) CHEM 6300 Intermediate Physical Chemistry (3 hours) Exceptionally of six written comprehensive examinations in the following areas of chemistry: analytical

  2. Chemistry (ACS) College of Science CHEM-BSCHM

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kihara, Daisuke

    (2)CHM26600 Organic Chemistry Lab (4)CHM32100 Analytical Chemistry I (4)CHM24100 Intro to Inorganic Lab (4)CHM 42400 Analytical Chemistry II (1)CHM 51300 Chemical Literature (3)CHM 53300 Intro/Senior Chemistry Seminar (5)MA16100 Plane Analytical Geometry Calculus I (satisfies Quantitative Reasoning

  3. Sampling for Beryllium Surface Contamination using Wet, Dry and Alcohol Wipe Sampling

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kerr, Kent

    2004-12-17

    This research project was conducted at the National Nuclear Security Administration's Kansas City Plant, operated by Honeywell Federal Manufacturing and Technologies, in conjunction with the Safety Sciences Department of Central Missouri State University, to compare relative removal efficiencies of three wipe sampling techniques currently used at Department of Energy facilities. Efficiencies of removal of beryllium contamination from typical painted surfaces were tested by wipe sampling with dry Whatman 42 filter paper, with water-moistened (Ghost Wipe) materials, and by methanol-moistened wipes. Test plates were prepared using 100 mm X 15 mm Pyrex Petri dishes with interior surfaces spray painted with a bond coat primer. To achieve uniform deposition over the test plate surface, 10 ml aliquots of solution containing 1 beryllium and 0.1 ml of metal working fluid were transferred to the test plates and subsequently evaporated. Metal working fluid was added to simulate the slight oiliness common on surfaces in metal working shops where fugitive oil mist accumulates over time. Sixteen test plates for each wipe method (dry, water, and methanol) were processed and sampled using a modification of wiping patterns recommended by OSHA Method 125G. Laboratory and statistical analysis showed that methanol-moistened wipe sampling removed significantly more (about twice as much) beryllium/oil-film surface contamination as water-moistened wipes (p< 0.001), which removed significantly more (about twice as much) residue as dry wipes (p <0.001). Evidence for beryllium sensitization via skin exposure argues in favor of wipe sampling with wetting agents that provide enhanced residue removal efficiency.

  4. RAE 2001 Chemistry Panel Overview Report General impressions. The 2001 RAE Chemistry Panel received 45 submissions; in 1996

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Abrahams, I. David

    RAE 2001 Chemistry Panel Overview Report General impressions. The 2001 RAE Chemistry Panel received in academic research and teaching in chemistry. Concentration of higher quality research is realistic and, overall, academic chemistry research in UK universities is now in a lively, buoyant and well balanced

  5. Supplementary material (ESI) for Journal of Materials Chemistry This journal is The Royal Society of Chemistry 2008

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mather, Patrick T.

    Supplementary material (ESI) for Journal of Materials Chemistry This journal is © The Royal Society of Chemistry 2008 Supporting Information Shape Memory Polymers with Built-In Threshold Temperature Sensors Jill;Supplementary material (ESI) for Journal of Materials Chemistry This journal is © The Royal Society of Chemistry

  6. Low cost manufacturing of light trapping features on multi-crystalline silicon solar cells : jet etching method and cost analysis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Berrada Sounni, Amine

    2010-01-01

    An experimental study was conducted in order to determine low cost methods to improve the light trapping ability of multi-crystalline solar cells. We focused our work on improving current wet etching methods to achieve the ...

  7. Submicron particle mass concentrations and sources in the Amazonian wet season (AMAZE-08)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2015-01-01

    Engineering and Applied Sciences & Department of Earth and Planetary Sciences, Harvard University, Cambridge, MA, USA 2 Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry &

  8. Chemistry 231 Fall 2013 Chemistry 231, Chemical Kinetics and Molecular Reaction Dynamics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Continetti, Robert E.

    Chemistry 231 Fall 2013 Chemistry 231, Chemical Kinetics and Molecular Reaction Dynamics Dept chemical kinetics, the connection between chemical kinetics and molecular reaction dynamics as well as some and Hase, Prentice Hall (1999) 4. Chemical Kinetics, K.J. Laidler, McGraw Hill (1965) 5. Gas Phase Reaction

  9. Chemistry Impacts in Gasoline HCCI

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Szybist, James P [ORNL; Bunting, Bruce G [ORNL

    2006-09-01

    The use of homogeneous charge compression ignition (HCCI) combustion in internal combustion engines is of interest because it has the potential to produce low oxides of nitrogen (NOx) and particulate matter (PM) emissions while providing diesel-like efficiency. In HCCI combustion, a premixed charge of fuel and air auto-ignites at multiple points in the cylinder near top dead center (TDC), resulting in rapid combustion with very little flame propagation. In order to prevent excessive knocking during HCCI combustion, it must take place in a dilute environment, resulting from either operating fuel lean or providing high levels of either internal or external exhaust gas recirculation (EGR). Operating the engine in a dilute environment can substantially reduce the pumping losses, thus providing the main efficiency advantage compared to spark-ignition (SI) engines. Low NOx and PM emissions have been reported by virtually all researchers for operation under HCCI conditions. The precise emissions can vary depending on how well mixed the intake charge is, the fuel used, and the phasing of the HCCI combustion event; but it is common for there to be no measurable PM emissions and NOx emissions <10 ppm. Much of the early HCCI work was done on 2-stroke engines, and in these studies the CO and hydrocarbon emissions were reported to decrease [1]. However, in modern 4-stroke engines, the CO and hydrocarbon emissions from HCCI usually represent a marked increase compared with conventional SI combustion. This literature review does not report on HCCI emissions because the trends mentioned above are well established in the literature. The main focus of this literature review is the auto-ignition performance of gasoline-type fuels. It follows that this discussion relies heavily on the extensive information available about gasoline auto-ignition from studying knock in SI engines. Section 2 discusses hydrocarbon auto-ignition, the octane number scale, the chemistry behind it, its shortcomings, and its relevance to HCCI. Section 3 discusses the effects of fuel volatility on fuel and air mixing and the consequences it has on HCCI. The effects of alcohol fuels on HCCI performance, and specifically the effects that they have on the operable speed/load range, are reviewed in Section 4. Finally, conclusions are drawn in Section 5.

  10. Wet-spinnability and crosslinked fibre properties of two collagen polypeptides with varied molecular weight

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Giuseppe Tronci; Ramya Sri Kanuparti; M. Tarik Arafat; Jie Yin; David J. Wood; Stephen J. Russell

    2015-07-26

    The formation of naturally-derived materials with wet stable fibrous architectures is paramount in order to mimic the features of tissues at the molecular and microscopic scale. Here, we investigated the formation of wet-spun fibres based on collagen-derived polypeptides with comparable chemical composition and varied molecular weight. Gelatin and hydrolysed fish collagen (HFC) were selected as widely-available linear amino-acidic chains of high and low molecular weight, respectively, and functionalised in the wet-spun fibre state in order to preserve the material geometry in physiological conditions. Wet-spun fibre diameter and morphology were dramatically affected depending on the polypeptide molecular weight, wet-spinning solvent (i.e. 2,2,2-Trifluoroethanol and dimethyl sulfoxide) and coagulating medium (i.e. acetone and ethanol), resulting in either bulky or porous internal geometry. Dry-state tensile moduli were significantly enhanced in gelatin and HFC samples following covalent crosslinking with activated 1,3 phenylenediacetic acid (Ph) (E: 726 +/- 43 - 844 +/- 85 MPa), compared to samples crosslinked via intramolecular carbodiimide-mediated condensation reaction (E: 588 +/- 38 MPa). Resulting fibres displayed a dry diameter in the range of 238 +/- 18 - 355 +/- 28 micron and proved to be mechanically-stable (E: 230 kPa) following equilibration with PBS, whilst a nearly-complete degradation was observed after 5-day incubation in physiological conditions.

  11. Microbial Enhanced Oil Recovery in Fractional-Wet Systems: A Pore-Scale Investigation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Armstrong, Ryan T.; Wildenschild, Dorthe

    2012-10-24

    Microbial enhanced oil recovery (MEOR) is a technology that could potentially increase the tertiary recovery of oil from mature oil formations. However, the efficacy of this technology in fractional-wet systems is unknown, and the mechanisms involved in oil mobilization therefore need further investigation. Our MEOR strategy consists of the injection of ex situ produced metabolic byproducts produced by Bacillus mojavensis JF-2 (which lower interfacial tension (IFT) via biosurfactant production) into fractional-wet cores containing residual oil. Two different MEOR flooding solutions were tested; one solution contained both microbes and metabolic byproducts while the other contained only the metabolic byproducts. The columns were imaged with X-ray computed microtomography (CMT) after water flooding, and after MEOR, which allowed for the evaluation of the pore-scale processes taking place during MEOR. Results indicate that the larger residual oil blobs and residual oil held under relatively low capillary pressures were the main fractions recovered during MEOR. Residual oil saturation, interfacial curvatures, and oil blob sizes were measured from the CMT images and used to develop a conceptual model for MEOR in fractional-wet systems. Overall, results indicate that MEOR was effective at recovering oil from fractional-wet systems with reported additional oil recovered (AOR) values between 44 and 80%; the highest AOR values were observed in the most oil-wet system.

  12. 5, 755794, 2005 Reduction methods

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    ACPD 5, 755­794, 2005 Reduction methods for chemical schemes S. Szopa et al. Title Page Abstract Assessment of the reduction methods used to develop chemical schemes: building of a new chemical scheme for VOC oxidation suited to three-dimensional multiscale HOx-NOx-VOC chemistry simulations S. Szopa 1

  13. An investigation into the predictive performance of pavement marking retroreflectivity measured under various conditions of continuous wetting 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pike, Adam Matthew

    2007-04-25

    This thesis research investigated the predictive performance of pavement marking retroreflectivity measured under various conditions of continuous wetting. The researcher compared nighttime detection distance of pavement ...

  14. Air Entrainment in Dynamic Wetting: Knudsen Effects and the Influence of Ambient Air Pressure

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sprittles, James E

    2015-01-01

    Recent experiments on coating flows and liquid drop impact both demonstrate that wetting failures caused by air entrainment can be suppressed by reducing the ambient gas pressure. Here, it is shown that non-equilibrium effects in the gas can account for this behaviour, with ambient pressure reductions increasing the gas' mean free path and hence the Knudsen number $Kn$. These effects first manifest themselves through Maxwell slip at the gas' boundaries so that for sufficiently small $Kn$ they can be incorporated into a continuum model for dynamic wetting flows. The resulting mathematical model contains flow structures on the nano-, micro- and milli-metre scales and is implemented into a computational platform developed specifically for such multiscale phenomena. The coating flow geometry is used to show that for a fixed gas-liquid-solid system (a) the increased Maxwell slip at reduced pressures can substantially delay air entrainment, i.e. increase the `maximum speed of wetting', (b) unbounded maximum speeds ...

  15. Interstellar water chemistry: from laboratory to observations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    van Dishoeck, Ewine F; Neufeld, David A

    2013-01-01

    Water is observed throughout the universe, from diffuse interstellar clouds to protoplanetary disks around young stars, and from comets in our own solar system and exoplanetary atmospheres to galaxies at high redshifts. This review summarizes the spectroscopy and excitation of water in interstellar space as well as the basic chemical processes that form and destroy water under interstellar conditions. Three major routes to water formation are identified: low temperature ion-molecule chemistry, high-temperature neutral-neutral chemistry and gas-ice chemistry. The rate coefficients of several important processes entering the networks are discussed in detail; several of them have been determined only in the last decade through laboratory experiments and theoretical calculations. Astronomical examples of each of the different chemical routes are presented using data from powerful new telescopes, in particular the Herschel Space Observatory. Basic chemical physics studies remain critically important to analyze ast...

  16. Advanced fuel chemistry for advanced engines.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Taatjes, Craig A.; Jusinski, Leonard E.; Zador, Judit; Fernandes, Ravi X.; Miller, James A.

    2009-09-01

    Autoignition chemistry is central to predictive modeling of many advanced engine designs that combine high efficiency and low inherent pollutant emissions. This chemistry, and especially its pressure dependence, is poorly known for fuels derived from heavy petroleum and for biofuels, both of which are becoming increasingly prominent in the nation's fuel stream. We have investigated the pressure dependence of key ignition reactions for a series of molecules representative of non-traditional and alternative fuels. These investigations combined experimental characterization of hydroxyl radical production in well-controlled photolytically initiated oxidation and a hybrid modeling strategy that linked detailed quantum chemistry and computational kinetics of critical reactions with rate-equation models of the global chemical system. Comprehensive mechanisms for autoignition generally ignore the pressure dependence of branching fractions in the important alkyl + O{sub 2} reaction systems; however we have demonstrated that pressure-dependent 'formally direct' pathways persist at in-cylinder pressures.

  17. Chemistry of Low Mass Substellar Objects

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Katharina Lodders; Bruce Fegley, Jr

    2006-01-17

    "Brown dwarfs" is the collective name for objects more massive than giant planets such as Jupiter but less massive than M dwarf stars. This review gives a brief description of the classification and chemistry of low mass dwarfs. The current spectral classification of stars includes L and T dwarfs that encompass the coolest known stars and substellar objects. The relatively low atmospheric temperatures and high total pressures in substellar dwarfs lead to molecular gas and condensate chemistry. The chemistry of elements such as C, N, O, Ti, V, Fe, Cr, and the alkali elements play a dominant role in shaping the optical and infrared spectra of the "failed" stars. Chemical diagnostics for the subclassifications are described.

  18. Method for dispersing catalyst onto particulate material

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Utz, Bruce R. (Pittsburgh, PA); Cugini, Anthony V. (Pittsburgh, PA)

    1992-01-01

    A method for dispersing finely divided catalyst precursors onto the surface of coal or other particulate material includes the steps of forming a wet paste mixture of the particulate material and a liquid solution containing a dissolved transition metal salt, for instance a solution of ferric nitrate. The wet paste mixture is in a state of incipient wetness with all of this solution adsorbed onto the surfaces of the particulate material without the presence of free moisture. On adding a precipitating agent such as ammonia, a catalyst precursor such as hydrated iron oxide is deposited on the surfaces of the coal. The catalyst is activated by converting it to the sulfide form for the hydrogenation or direct liquefaction of the coal.

  19. Flow coating apparatus and method of coating

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hanumanthu, Ramasubrahmaniam; Neyman, Patrick; MacDonald, Niles; Brophy, Brenor; Kopczynski, Kevin; Nair, Wood

    2014-03-11

    Disclosed is a flow coating apparatus, comprising a slot that can dispense a coating material in an approximately uniform manner along a distribution blade that increases uniformity by means of surface tension and transfers the uniform flow of coating material onto an inclined substrate such as for example glass, solar panels, windows or part of an electronic display. Also disclosed is a method of flow coating a substrate using the apparatus such that the substrate is positioned correctly relative to the distribution blade, a pre-wetting step is completed where both the blade and substrate are completed wetted with a pre-wet solution prior to dispensing of the coating material onto the distribution blade from the slot and hence onto the substrate. Thereafter the substrate is removed from the distribution blade and allowed to dry, thereby forming a coating.

  20. ,"Utah Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet)"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home PageMonthly","10/2015"4,"Ames City of",6,1,"Omaha Public PowerOECD/IEA -Annual",2014Proved Reserves, WetGas, Wet After Lease Separation Proved Reserves

  1. ,"Virginia Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet)"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home PageMonthly","10/2015"4,"Ames City of",6,1,"Omaha Public PowerOECD/IEA -Annual",2014Proved Reserves, WetGas, Wet AfterLNG

  2. Revised 8/12/2010 B.S. Pharmaceutical Chemistry Degree

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    by Inquiry II 1 PH2100 University Physics I-Mechanics 3 UN1002 World Cultures 4 TOTAL 17 SECOND YEAR CH2410 Calculus with Technology 4 MA2320 Elementary Linear Algebra 2 UN2001 Revisions 3 TOTAL 17 THIRD YEAR CH3510 Pharmaceutical Chemistry: Drug Design 3 MA2720 Statistical Methods 4 Free Electives 3 General Education

  3. Explicit Collision Simulation of Chemical Reactions in a Graph Based Artifical Chemistry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stadler, Peter F.

    Explicit Collision Simulation of Chemical Reactions in a Graph Based Artifical Chemistry Gil BenkË?uckel Theory method. Here we describe an extension of the model that models chemical reactions as the result, the reactions are simulated in a way that treats the formation and breakage of individual chemical bonds

  4. Explicit Collision Simulation of Chemical Reactions in a Graph Based Artifical Chemistry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stadler, Peter F.

    Explicit Collision Simulation of Chemical Reactions in a Graph Based Artifical Chemistry Gil Benk¨uckel Theory method. Here we describe an extension of the model that models chemical reactions as the result, the reactions are simulated in a way that treats the formation and breakage of individual chemical bonds

  5. Multiresolution quantum chemistry in multiwavelet bases: Analytic derivatives for HartreeFock and density functional theory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Beylkin, Gregory

    Multiresolution quantum chemistry in multiwavelet bases: Analytic derivatives for Hartree An efficient and accurate analytic gradient method is presented for Hartree­Fock and density functional differential equations. In this paper, we extend the approach to include computation of analytic derivatives

  6. brief communications nature methods | VOL.8 NO.8 | AUGUST2011 | 649

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cai, Long

    brief communications nature methods | VOL.8 NO.8 | AUGUST2011 | 649 analysis speed. It provides. The high gas permeability of PDMS allows for thechamberstobefilledwithoutreagentlossbypushingtheambient air fluorinated oil that pref- erentially wets the channel walls, displacing the remaining aqueous phase

  7. Structure, chemistry, and properties of mineral nanoparticles

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Waychunas, G.A.; Zhang, H.; Gilbert, B.

    2008-12-02

    Nanoparticle properties can depart markedly from their bulk analog materials, including large differences in chemical reactivity, molecular and electronic structure, and mechanical behavior. The greatest changes are expected at the smallest sizes, e.g. 10 nm and below, where surface effects are expected to dominate bonding, shape and energy considerations. The precise chemistry at nanoparticle interfaces can have a profound effect on structure, phase transformations, strain, and reactivity. Certain phases may exist only as nanoparticles, requiring transformations in chemistry, stoichiometry and structure with evolution to larger sizes. In general, mineralogical nanoparticles have been little studied.

  8. Chemistry of Cobalt-Platinum Nanocatalysts

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 OutreachProductswsicloudwsiclouddenDVA N C E D BGene NetworkNuclear SecurityChattan oogaMakingChemistryChemistry

  9. Simultaneous assessment of phase chemistry, phase abundance and bulk chemistry with statistical electron probe micro-analyses: Application to cement clinkers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wilson, William; Krakowiak, Konrad J.; Ulm, Franz-Josef

    2014-01-15

    According to recent developments in cement clinker engineering, the optimization of chemical substitutions in the main clinker phases offers a promising approach to improve both reactivity and grindability of clinkers. Thus, monitoring the chemistry of the phases may become part of the quality control at the cement plants, along with the usual measurements of the abundance of the mineralogical phases (quantitative X-ray diffraction) and the bulk chemistry (X-ray fluorescence). This paper presents a new method to assess these three complementary quantities with a single experiment. The method is based on electron microprobe spot analyses, performed over a grid located on a representative surface of the sample and interpreted with advanced statistical tools. This paper describes the method and the experimental program performed on industrial clinkers to establish the accuracy in comparison to conventional methods. -- Highlights: •A new method of clinker characterization •Combination of electron probe technique with cluster analysis •Simultaneous assessment of phase abundance, composition and bulk chemistry •Experimental validation performed on industrial clinkers.

  10. Studies of Atmospheric Chemistry and Reaction Mechanisms Using Optical Spectroscopy and Mass Spectrometry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liu, Yingdi

    2011-01-01

    challenges in analytical chemistry of the atmosphere. Anal.amplification. Analytical Chemistry, 1984. 56(8): p.radical measurements. Analytical Chemistry, 1996. 68(23): p.

  11. Chemistry of atmospheric aerosol particles and their resulting warm cloud-nucleation properties

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Moore, Meagan Julia Kerry

    2011-01-01

    detection efficiency, Analytical Chemistry, 76, 712-719,Portable ATOFMS, Analytical Chemistry, 69, 4083-4091, 1997.Network, ART-2A, Analytical Chemistry, 71 (4), 860-865,

  12. Observing the Chemistry of Cities: Space-based Spectroscopy of NO2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Valin, Lukas Carl

    2012-01-01

    DOAS instrument, Atmospheric Chemistry and Physics, 8, 6707-2 observations, Atmospheric Chemistry and Physics, 8, 5603-and evaluation, Atmospheric Chemistry and Physics, 11, 8543-

  13. Reactive greenhouse gas scenarios: Systematic exploration of uncertainties and the role of atmospheric chemistry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Prather, Michael J; Holmes, Christopher D; Hsu, Juno

    2012-01-01

    and time scales in atmospheric chemistry, Philos. Trans. R.PRATHER ET AL. : ATMOSPHERIC CHEMISTRY AND GREENHOUSE GASESet al. (2001), Atmospheric chemistry and greenhouse gases,

  14. Environmental Chamber Study of Atmospheric Chemistry and Secondary Organic Aerosol Formation Using Cavity Enhanced Absorption Spectroscopy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liu, Yingdi

    2011-01-01

    modelling: a review. Atmospheric Chemistry and Physics,emerging issues. Atmospheric Chemistry and Physics, 2009. 9:aqueous phase. Atmospheric Chemistry and Physics, 2009. 9:

  15. Time scales in atmospheric chemistry: Theory, GWPs for CH 4 and CO, and runaway growth

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Prather, Michael J

    1996-01-01

    Program and NSF's Atmospheric Chemistry Program for supporteigenstates in atmospheric chemistry, (2) Exponential decaytracer gases and atmospheric chemistry, in steady-state

  16. Chemistry of atmospheric aerosol particles and their resulting warm cloud-nucleation properties

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Moore, Meagan Julia Kerry

    2011-01-01

    for CCN activation, Atmospheric Chemistry and Physics, 10,and precipitation, Atmospheric Chemistry and Physics, 9,dust particles. Atmospheric Chemistry and Physics, 2009, 9,

  17. Atmospheric chemistry results from the ANTCI 2005 Antarctic plateau airborne study

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2010-01-01

    2010 for Full Article Atmospheric chemistry results from theL. , et al. (2010), Atmospheric chemistry results from the2010), Plume chemistry and atmospheric impact of emissions

  18. Time scales in atmospheric chemistry: Theory, GWPs for CH4 and CO, and runaway growth

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Prather, MJ; Prather, MJ

    1996-01-01

    Program and NSF's Atmospheric Chemistry Program for supporteigenstates in atmospheric chemistry, (2) Exponential decaytracer gases and atmospheric chemistry, in steady-state

  19. Performance Characteristics of Lithium-ion Batteries of Various Chemistries for Plug-in Hybrid Vehicles

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Burke, Andrew; Miller, Marshall

    2009-01-01

    Whether any of the lithium battery chemistries can meetgeneral the higher cost lithium battery chemistries have thecosts for various lithium battery chemistries Electrode

  20. Chemistry of atmospheric aerosol particles and their resulting warm cloud-nucleation properties

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Moore, Meagan Julia Kerry

    2011-01-01

    CCN activation, Atmospheric Chemistry and Physics, 10, 5241-precipitation, Atmospheric Chemistry and Physics, 9, 3223-particles. Atmospheric Chemistry and Physics, 2009, 9, A. P.

  1. Electrohydrodynamic atomization (EHDA) assisted wet chemical synthesis of nickel nanoparticles

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Barzegar Vishlaghi, M. [Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Tabriz, Tabriz (Iran, Islamic Republic of)] [Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Tabriz, Tabriz (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Farzalipour Tabriz, M., E-mail: meisam.fa@gmail.com [Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Tabriz, Tabriz (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Mohammad Moradi, O. [Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Tabriz, Tabriz (Iran, Islamic Republic of)] [Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Tabriz, Tabriz (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2012-07-15

    Highlights: ? Electrohydrodynamic atomization (EHDA) assisted chemical synthesis of nickel nanoparticles is reported. ? Substituting water with non-aqueous media prevents the formation of nickel hydroxide. ? Size of particles decreased from 10 to 20 nm down to 2–4 nm by using multi-jet mode. ? Synthesized nanoparticles have diffraction patterns similar to amorphous materials. -- Abstract: In this study nickel nanoparticles were prepared via chemical reduction of nickel acetate using sodium borohydride using electrohydrodynamic atomization (EHDA) technique. This technique was used to spray a finely dispersed aerosol of nickel precursor solution into the reductive bath. Obtained particles were characterized by means of X-ray diffraction (XRD), UV–Visible spectroscopy, and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Results confirmed the formation of nickel nanoparticles and showed that applying EHDA technique to chemical reduction method results in producing smaller particles with narrower size distribution in comparison with conventional reductive precipitation method.

  2. Method for removing organic liquids from aqueous solutions and mixtures

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hrubesh, Lawrence W.; Coronado, Paul R.; Dow, Jerome P.

    2004-03-23

    A method for removing organic liquids from aqueous solutions and mixtures. The method employs any porous material preferably in granular form and having small pores and a large specific surface area, that is hydrophobic so that liquid water does not readily wet its surface. In this method, organics, especially organic solvents that mix with and are more volatile than water, are separated from aqueous solution by preferentially evaporating across the liquid/solid boundary formed at the surfaces of the hydrophobic porous materials. Also, organic solvents that are immiscible with water, preferentially wet the surfaces of the hydrophobic material and are drawn within the porous materials by capillary action.

  3. PAH chemistry and IR emission from circumstellar disks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    R. Visser; V. C. Geers; C. P. Dullemond; J. -C. Augereau; K. M. Pontoppidan; E. F. van Dishoeck

    2007-01-22

    Aims. The chemistry of, and infrared (IR) emission from, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in disks around Herbig Ae/Be and T Tauri stars are investigated. The equilibrium distribution of the PAHs over all accessible charge/hydrogenation states depends on the size and shape of the PAHs and on the physical properties of the star and surrounding disk. Methods. A chemistry model is created to calculate this equilibrium distribution. Destruction of PAHs by ultraviolet (UV) photons, possibly in multi-photon absorption events, is taken into account. The chemistry model is coupled to a radiative transfer code to provide the physical parameters and to combine the PAH emission with the spectral energy distribution (SED) from the star+disk system. Results. Normally hydrogenated PAHs in Herbig Ae/Be disks account for most of the observed PAH emission, with neutral and positively ionized species contributing in roughly equal amounts. Close to the midplane, the PAHs are more strongly hydrogenated and negatively ionized, but these species do not contribute to the overall emission because of the low UV/optical flux deep inside the disk. PAHs of 50 carbon atoms are destroyed out to 100 AU in the disk's surface layer, and the resulting spatial extent of the emission does not agree well with observations. Rather, PAHs of about 100 carbon atoms or more are predicted to cause most of the observed emission. The emission is extended on a scale similar to that of the size of the disk. Furthermore, the emission from T Tauri disks is much weaker and concentrated more towards the central star than that from Herbig Ae/Be disks. Positively ionized PAHs are predicted to be largely absent in T Tauri disks because of the weaker radiation field.

  4. Chemistry 365: Force Constant Calculations David Ronis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ronis, David M.

    cost energy, and hence, there will no force in thy y or z directions (thereby resulting in 4 zero eigenChemistry 365: Force Constant Calculations © David Ronis McGill University Here is an example of a force constant matrix calculation. We will consider a diatomic molecule, where the two atoms interact

  5. Computational Science and Engineering Certification for Chemistry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gao, Grace Xingxin

    Computational Science and Engineering Certification for Chemistry The Computational Science and Engineering certificate program is designed to provide CHEM undergraduate students an opportunity to develop in science and engineering. This CSE Certificate option is not an academic major or minor, but an additional

  6. ENERGY, POWER AND ENVIRONMENT (Environmental Analytical Chemistry)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sherrill, David

    credit hours J. (Art) Janata jiri.janata@chemistry.gatech.edu; 404 894 4828 Since the dawn of history a major impact on environment. As the global population grows, so does the demand for energy. Strictly Books, 1995; ISBN 0-944838-58-8 #12;SCHEDULE&OUTLINE 8/19-21 Introduction; course overview; DOE role

  7. Spin Contamination in Inorganic Chemistry Calculations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schlegel, H. Bernhard

    R EVISED PAG E PR O O FS ia617 Spin Contamination in Inorganic Chemistry Calculations Jason L . In such cases, 0 is said to be spin contaminated owing to incorporation of higher spin state character of Iron­Sulfur ia618 Clusters). It is important to note that while spin-contaminated and broken

  8. Chemistry World Surfactants: the ubiquitous amphiphiles

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Glaser, Rainer

    /mineral 60 150 Plastic additives 60 40 Pulp and paper 100 120 #12;Pulp and paper 100 120 Explosives 10 10Chemistry World Surfactants: the ubiquitous amphiphiles The surfactant industry is a huge surfactant industry is a multi-billion pound business (Fig 1), with markets everywhere from household

  9. Environmental Analytical Chemistry (ENERGY, POWER AND ENVIRONMENT)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sherrill, David

    /or irrational emotions rather than by the sound scientific principles. Since its large-scale introduction half using sound scientific principles. Chemistry occupies central position in discussion of any production sites (movie: Hanford today) 11/2-4 Nuclear Energy production (civilian); Safe reactor designs 11

  10. Adam D. McFarland Chemistry Department

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Janssen, Michel

    Involving Sulfur Compounds@ 2001 M.S., Chemistry, Northwestern University, Evanston, IL 2004 Ph Northwestern University, Department of Materials Science. Present Design and Construction of a low temperature optical ultra-high vacuum scanning tunneling microscope. 1999-2004 Teaching Assistant Northwestern

  11. Exploring Tuning Strategies for Quantum Chemistry Computations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sosonkina, Masha

    to an efficient execution. General Atomic and Molecular Electronic Structure (GAMESS), used for ab-initio molecular quantum chemistry calculations, uses NICAN for dynamically making adaptations so as to improve calculations. These calculations include a wide range of Hartree-Fock (HF) wave function (RHF, ROHF, UHF, GVB

  12. Chemistry and Biochemistry Computer Refresh Policy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ziurys, Lucy M.

    5/9/2011 Chemistry and Biochemistry Computer Refresh Policy Staff Computers · The department and deliver the computer(s) requested. · Laptops are an option for persons whose jobs require regular off-campus work or whose jobs require mobility within the campus environment (i.e. IT staff doing network support

  13. Dilution physics modeling: Dissolution/precipitation chemistry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Onishi, Y.; Reid, H.C.; Trent, D.S.

    1995-09-01

    This report documents progress made to date on integrating dilution/precipitation chemistry and new physical models into the TEMPEST thermal-hydraulics computer code. Implementation of dissolution/precipitation chemistry models is necessary for predicting nonhomogeneous, time-dependent, physical/chemical behavior of tank wastes with and without a variety of possible engineered remediation and mitigation activities. Such behavior includes chemical reactions, gas retention, solids resuspension, solids dissolution and generation, solids settling/rising, and convective motion of physical and chemical species. Thus this model development is important from the standpoint of predicting the consequences of various engineered activities, such as mitigation by dilution, retrieval, or pretreatment, that can affect safe operations. The integration of a dissolution/precipitation chemistry module allows the various phase species concentrations to enter into the physical calculations that affect the TEMPEST hydrodynamic flow calculations. The yield strength model of non-Newtonian sludge correlates yield to a power function of solids concentration. Likewise, shear stress is concentration-dependent, and the dissolution/precipitation chemistry calculations develop the species concentration evolution that produces fluid flow resistance changes. Dilution of waste with pure water, molar concentrations of sodium hydroxide, and other chemical streams can be analyzed for the reactive species changes and hydrodynamic flow characteristics.

  14. Eng Chemistry 1 (3) Logic Design (4)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fernandez, Eduardo

    Eng Chemistry 1 (3) EGN 2095 Logic Design (4) CDA 3201C Fundamentals of Engineering (3) EGN 1002 Engineering Design 2 (3) EGN 4411C Electromagnetic Fields & Waves (4) EEL 3470 Calculus for Eng 1 (4) MAC 2281) Examples of Upper Division Math Electives: MAS 2103 Matrix Theory (only exception) MAP 4306 Engineering

  15. Safety Training Policy Virginia Tech Chemistry Department

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Crawford, T. Daniel

    Safety Training Policy Virginia Tech Chemistry Department Approved by the Executive Committee on 06 at specific training sessions or programs is mandatory. Tenure-track faculty members may choose their level research are exempt, as their safety training is incorporated into their laboratory courses. The first step

  16. Ice chemistry in starless molecular cores

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kalvans, Juris

    2015-01-01

    Starless molecular cores are natural laboratories for interstellar molecular chemistry research. The chemistry of ices in such objects was investigated with a three-phase (gas, surface, and mantle) model. We considered the center part of five starless cores, with their physical conditions derived from observations. The ice chemistry of oxygen, nitrogen, sulfur, and complex organic molecules (COMs) was analyzed. We found that an ice-depth dimension, measured, e.g., in monolayers, is essential for modeling of chemistry in interstellar ices. Particularly, the H2O:CO:CO2:N2:NH3 ice abundance ratio regulates the production and destruction of minor species. It is suggested that photodesorption during core collapse period is responsible for high abundance of interstellar H2O2 and O2H, and other species synthesized on the surface. The calculated abundances of COMs in ice were compared to observed gas-phase values. Smaller activation barriers for CO and H2CO hydrogenation may help explain the production of a number of...

  17. Lower-Dimensional Black Hole Chemistry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Antonia M. Frassino; Robert B. Mann; Jonas R. Mureika

    2015-09-18

    The connection between black hole thermodynamics and chemistry is extended to the lower-dimensional regime by considering the rotating and charged BTZ metric in the $(2+1)$-D and a $(1+1)$-D limits of Einstein gravity. The Smarr relation is naturally upheld in both BTZ cases, where those with $Q \

  18. Environmental Chemistry at Vapor/Water Interfaces

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Environmental Chemistry at Vapor/Water Interfaces: Insights from Vibrational Sum Frequency for manyyearsowingtoitscomplexityandimportanceindescribingawiderange of physical phenomena. The vapor/water interface is particularly interesting from an environmental for these systems is highlighted. A future perspective toward the application of VSFG to the study of environmental

  19. NEEDS SIZE ADJUSTMENT 2 Perfect Chemistry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chapman, Michael S.

    NEEDS SIZE ADJUSTMENT #12;2 Perfect Chemistry 8 Starr Power 10 Balancing Act 14 A Rare Thing.B.A. EDitors Dee Metaj Jill Smith DEsigN Anderson McConaughy Design Co. WritErs Todd Schwartz Jill Smith Jim and friends. Please send correspondence to: Bridges Magazine sm-alum@ohsu.edu OHSU School of Medicine 3181 SW

  20. UNIVERSITY OF LEEDS SCHOOL OF CHEMISTRY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rzepa, Henry S.

    UNIVERSITY OF LEEDS SCHOOL OF CHEMISTRY TAUGHT POSTGRADUATE ADMISSIONS POLICY 2013 ENTRY the admissions principles and policies of the University of Leeds, as outlined in the 2013 University of Leeds Taught Postgraduate Admissions Policy (downloadable from our website at http://www.leeds