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Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "wet bulk density" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


1

Controlling Defect Density in Polymer-Fullerene Bulk Heterojunction ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Controlling Defect Density in Polymer-Fullerene Bulk Heterojunction Solar Cells by Optimizing ... Engineering Carbon Nanomaterials for Energy Application.

2

Vibrated Bulk Density (VBD) of Calcined Petroleum Coke and ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Abstract Scope, Vibrated bulk density (VBD) is a quantitative measurement used in the aluminum industry to evaluate the density of calcined petroleum coke.

3

Vibrated Bulk Density (VBD) of Calcined Petroleum Coke and ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Presentation Title, Vibrated Bulk Density (VBD) of Calcined Petroleum Coke and Implications of Changes in the ASTM Method D4292. Author(s), Bill Spencer, ...

4

Vibration-Induced Conductivity Fluctuation Measurement for Soil Bulk Density Analysis  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Soil bulk density affects water storage, water and nutrient movement, and plant root activity in the soil profile. Its measurement is difficult in field conditions. Vibration-induced conductivity fluctuation was investigated to quantify soil bulk density with possible field applications in the future. The AC electrical conductivity of soil was measured using a pair of blade-like electrodes while exposing the soil to periodic vibration. The blades were positioned longitudinally and transversally to the direction of the induced vibration to enable the calculation of a normalized index. The normalized index was expected to provide data independent from the vibration strength and to reduce the effect of soil salinity and water content. The experiment was conducted on natural and salinized fine sand at two moisture conditions and four bulk densities. The blade-shaped electrodes improved electrode-soil contact compared to cylindrical electrodes, and thereby, reduced measurement noise. Simulations on a simplified resistor lattice indicate that the transversal effect increases as soil bulk density decreases. Measurement of dry sand showed a negative correlation between the normalized conductivity fluctuation and soil bulk density for both longitudinal and transversal settings. The decrease in the transversal signal was smaller than expected. The wet natural and salinized soils performed very similarly as hypothesized, but their normalized VICOF response was not significant to bulk density changes.

Andrea Sz. Kishne; Cristine L. S. Morgan; Hung-Chih Chang; Laszlo B. Kish

2007-05-03T23:59:59.000Z

5

Prediction of Graupel Density in a Bulk Microphysics Scheme  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A method to predict the bulk density of graupel ?g has been added to the two-moment Milbrandt–Yau bulk microphysics scheme. The simulation of graupel using the modified scheme is illustrated through idealized simulations of a mesoscale convective ...

Jason A. Milbrandt; Hugh Morrison

2013-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

6

Vibration-Induced Conductivity Fluctuation Measurement for Soil Bulk Density Analysis  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Soil bulk density affects water storage, water and nutrient movement, and plant root activity in the soil profile. Its measurement is difficult in field conditions. Vibration-induced conductivity fluctuation was investigated to quantify soil bulk density with possible field applications in the future. The AC electrical conductivity of soil was measured using a pair of blade-like electrodes while exposing the soil to periodic vibration. The blades were positioned longitudinally and transversally to the direction of the induced vibration to enable the calculation of a normalized index. The normalized index was expected to provide data independent from the vibration strength and to reduce the effect of soil salinity and water content. The experiment was conducted on natural and salinized fine sand at two moisture conditions and four bulk densities. The blade-shaped electrodes improved electrode-soil contact compared to cylindrical electrodes, and thereby, reduced measurement noise. Simulations on a simplified re...

Kishne, Andrea Sz; Chang, Hung-Chih; Kish, Laszlo B

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

7

Production of tectonically caused overpressures in carbonates by using resistivity and bulk density of associated shales  

SciTech Connect

In tectonically caused overpressured carbonate reservoirs associated with thick shale beds (e.g., 50 m and more), several shale properties can be used as predictive techniques: low porosities, high acoustic (sonic) velocities, high resistivities, and high bulk densities. The reason these properties are used is because the greater the degree of overcompaction (due to tectonic forces), the greater the amount of water squeezed from the shales, which, in turn, overpressures the associated reservoirs. Two case studies from the Soviet Union and Iran illustrate this occurrence. For comparison purposes, the prediction of overpressures caused by undercompaction (e.g., due to rapid sedimentation) using conventional overpressure indicators, such as resistivity, acoustic and density logs, and bulk density of shale cuttings, are reviewed and illustrated via a typical Tertiary sand/shale sequence.

Chilingarian, G.V. (Univ. of Southern California, Los Angeles (USA)); Fertl, W.H. (Western Atlas International, Inc., Houston, TX (USA))

1990-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

8

Bulk density and compaction behavior of knife mill chopped switchgrass,wheat straw, and corn stover  

SciTech Connect

Bulk density of comminuted biomass significantly increased by vibration during handling and transportation, and by normal pressure during storage. Compaction characteristics affecting the bulk density of switchgrass, wheat straw, and corn stover chopped in a knife mill at different operating conditions and using four different classifying screens were studied. Mean loose-filled bulk densities were 67.5 18.4 kg/m3 for switchgrass, 36.1 8.6 kg/m3 for wheat straw, and 52.1 10.8 kg/m3 for corn stover. Mean tapped bulk densities were 81.8 26.2 kg/m3 for switchgrass, 42.8 11.7 kg/m3 for wheat straw, and 58.9 13.4 kg/m3 for corn stover. Percentage changes in compressibility due to variation in particle size obtained from a knife mill ranged from 64.3 to 173.6 for chopped switchgrass, 22.2 51.5 for chopped wheat straw and 42.1 117.7 for chopped corn stover within the tested consolidation pressure range of 5 120 kPa. Pressure and volume relationship of chopped biomass during compression with application of normal pressure can be characterized by the Walker model and Kawakita and Ludde model. Parameter of Walker model was correlated to the compressibility with Pearson correlation coefficient greater than 0.9. Relationship between volume reduction in chopped biomass with respect to number of tappings studied using Sone s model indicated that infinite compressibility was highest for chopped switchgrass followed by chopped wheat straw and corn stover. Degree of difficulty in packing measured using the parameters of Sone s model indicated that the chopped wheat straw particles compacted very rapidly by tapping compared to chopped switchgrass and corn stover. These results are very useful for solving obstacles in handling bulk biomass supply logistics issues for a biorefinery.

Chevanan, Nehru [University of Tennessee; Womac, A.R. [University of Tennessee; Bitra, V.S.P. [University of Tennessee; Igathinathane, C. [Mississippi State University (MSU); Yang, Y.T. [University of Tennessee; Miu, P.I [University of Tennessee; Sokhansanj, Shahabaddine [ORNL

2009-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

9

Development of a Bulk GaN Growth Technique for Low Defect Density...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Enabling Next-Generation Power Electronics: Electrochemical Solution Growth (ESG) Technique for Bulk Gallium Nitride Substrates Karen Waldrip Dept. 2546, Advanced Power Sources R&D...

10

Thermodynamics with density and temperature dependent particle masses and properties of bulk strange quark matter and strangelets  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Thermodynamic formulas for investigating systems with density and/or temperature dependent particle masses are generally derived from the fundamental derivation equality of thermodynamics. Various problems in the previous treatments are discussed and modified. Properties of strange quark matter in bulk and strangelets at both zero and finite temperature are then calculated based on the new thermodynamic formulas with a new quark mass scaling, which indicates that low mass strangelets near beta equilibrium are multi-quark states with an anti-strange quark, such as the pentaquark (u^2d^2\\bar{s}) for baryon nmber 1 and the octaquark (u^4d^3\\bar{s}) for dibaryon etc.

X. J. Wen; X. H. Zhong; G. X. Peng; P. N. Shen; P. Z. Ning

2005-06-06T23:59:59.000Z

11

Effects of dry bulk density and particle size fraction on gas transport parameters in variably saturated landfill cover soil  

SciTech Connect

Highlights: > The effects of soil physical properties on gas transport parameters were investigated. > Higher values of D{sub p} and k{sub a} exhibited in the '+gravel' than the '-gravel' fraction at same soil-air content ({epsilon}). > Recent power law models for D{sub p} (WLR) and k{sub a} (RPL) were modified. > Model parameters were linearly related to easily measurable dry bulk density ({rho}{sub b}). - Abstract: Landfill sites are emerging in climate change scenarios as a significant source of greenhouse gases. The compacted final soil cover at landfill sites plays a vital role for the emission, fate and transport of landfill gases. This study investigated the effects of dry bulk density, {rho}{sub b}, and particle size fraction on the main soil-gas transport parameters - soil-gas diffusivity (D{sub p}/D{sub o}, ratio of gas diffusion coefficients in soil and free air) and air permeability (k{sub a}) - under variably-saturated moisture conditions. Soil samples were prepared by three different compaction methods (Standard and Modified Proctor compaction, and hand compaction) with resulting {rho}{sub b} values ranging from 1.40 to 2.10 g cm{sup -3}. Results showed that D{sub p} and k{sub a} values for the '+gravel' fraction (<35 mm) became larger than for the '-gravel' fraction (<2 mm) under variably-saturated conditions for a given soil-air content ({epsilon}), likely due to enhanced gas diffusion and advection through less tortuous, large-pore networks. The effect of dry bulk density on D{sub p} and k{sub a} was most pronounced for the '+gravel' fraction. Normalized ratios were introduced for all soil-gas parameters: (i) for gas diffusivity D{sub p}/D{sub f}, the ratio of measured D{sub p} to D{sub p} in total porosity (f), (ii) for air permeability k{sub a}/k{sub a,pF4.1}, the ratio of measured k{sub a} to k{sub a} at 1235 kPa matric potential (=pF 4.1), and (iii) for soil-air content, the ratio of soil-air content ({epsilon}) to total porosity (f) (air saturation). Based on the normalized parameters, predictive power-law models for D{sub p}({epsilon}/f) and k{sub a}({epsilon}/f) models were developed based on a single parameter (water blockage factor M for D{sub p} and P for k{sub a}). The water blockage factors, M and P, were found to be linearly correlated to {rho}{sub b} values, and the effects of dry bulk density on D{sub p} and k{sub a} for both '+gravel' and '-gravel' fractions were well accounted for by the new models.

Wickramarachchi, Praneeth, E-mail: praneeth1977@yahoo.co.uk [Graduate School of Science and Engineering, Saitama University, 255 Shimo-Okubo, Sakura-ku, Saitama 338-8570 (Japan); Kawamoto, Ken; Hamamoto, Shoichiro [Graduate School of Science and Engineering, Saitama University, 255 Shimo-Okubo, Sakura-ku, Saitama 338-8570 (Japan); Institute for Environmental Science and Technology, Saitama University, 255 Shimo-Okubo, Sakura-ku, Saitama 338-8570 (Japan); Nagamori, Masanao [Center for Environmental Science in Saitama, 914 Kamitanadare, Kazo, Saitama 347-0115 (Japan); Moldrup, Per [Environmental Engineering Section, Dept. of Biotechnology, Chemistry and Environmental Engineering, Aalborg University, Sohngaardsholmsvej 57, DK-9000 Aalborg (Denmark); Komatsu, Toshiko [Graduate School of Science and Engineering, Saitama University, 255 Shimo-Okubo, Sakura-ku, Saitama 338-8570 (Japan); Institute for Environmental Science and Technology, Saitama University, 255 Shimo-Okubo, Sakura-ku, Saitama 338-8570 (Japan)

2011-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

12

Zipping Wetting  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Water droplets can completely wet micro-structured superhydrophobic surfaces. The {\\it dynamics} of this rapid process is analyzed by ultra-high-speed imaging. Depending on the scales of the micro-structure, the wetting fronts propagate smoothly and circularly or -- more interestingly -- in a {\\it stepwise} manner, leading to a growing {\\it square-shaped} wetted area: entering a new row perpendicular to the direction of front propagation takes milliseconds, whereas once this has happened, the row itself fills in microseconds ({\\it ``zipping''}). Numerical simulations confirm this view and are in quantitative agreement with the experiments.

Sbragaglia, Mauro; Pirat, Christophe; Borkent, Bram M; Lammertink, Rob G H; Wessling, Matthias; Lohse, Detlef

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

13

Development of a Bulk GaN Growth Technique for Low Defect Density, Large-Area Native Substrates  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Next-Generation Power Electronics: Next-Generation Power Electronics: Electrochemical Solution Growth (ESG) Technique for Bulk Gallium Nitride Substrates Karen Waldrip Dept. 2546, Advanced Power Sources R&D Sandia National Labs, Albuquerque, NM knwaldr@sandia.gov, (505) 844-1619 Acknowledgements: Mike Soboroff, Stan Atcitty, Nancy Clark, and John Boyes David Ingersoll, Frank Delnick, and Travis Anderson 2010 DOE Peer Review, Nov. 2-4, Washington, DC Sandia is a multiprogram laboratory operated by Sandia Corporation, a Lockheed Martin Company, for the United States Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration under contract DE-AC04-94AL85000. Funded by the Energy Storage Systems Program of the U.S. Department Of Energy through Sandia National Laboratories Project Objective

14

Development of a Bulk GaN Growth Technique for Low Defect Density, Large-Area Native Substrates  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

the Electrochemical Solution the Electrochemical Solution Growth (ESG) Technique for Native GaN Substrates DOE Energy Storage & Power Electronics Research Program 30 September 2008 PI: Karen Waldrip Advanced Power Sources R&D, Dept 2546 PM: Stan Atcitty, John Boyes Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, NM, 87185 Sponsor: Gil Bindewald, DOE Power Electronics & Energy Storage Program Sandia is a multiprogram laboratory operated by Sandia Corporation, a Lockheed Martin Company, for the United States Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration under contract DE-AC04-94AL85000. Outline * Motivation * Existing GaN Growth Technique - Epitaxial Lateral Overgrowth - Methods for Growing Bulk GaN * Development of the Electrochemical Solution Growth Technique

15

DENSITY  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Table 2: Principal mineral phases found in the granite rock. Mineral phase. ... Table 4. Average density of 12 granite rocks by Archimedes and CT. ...

2007-01-08T23:59:59.000Z

16

Wet Stacks Design Guide  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The expense of fluegas reheat has led to increased application of less expensive wet stacks downstream of wet FGD (flue gas desulfurization) systems. Good data is necessary to properly design the wet stack system or serious problems can occur. This design guide summarizes all the latest information and provides guidance on developing detailed design specifications.

1997-01-04T23:59:59.000Z

17

Wetting of a Chemically Heterogeneous Surface  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Theories for inhomogeneous fluids have focused in recent years on wetting, capillary conden- sation, and solvation forces for model systems where the surface(s) is(are) smooth homogeneous parallel plates, cylinders, or spherical drops. Unfortunately natural systems are more likely to be hetaogeneous both in surt%ce shape and surface chemistry. In this paper we discuss the conse- quences of chemical heterogeneity on wetting. Specifically, a 2-dimensional implementation of a nonlocal density functional theory is solved for a striped surface model. Both the strength and range of the heterogeneity are varied. Contact angles are calculated, and phase transitions (both the wetting transition and a local layering transition) are located. The wetting properties of the surface ase shown to be strongly dependent on the nature of the surface heterogeneity. In addition highly ordered nanoscopic phases are found, and the operational limits for formation of ordered or crystalline phases of nanoscopic extent are discussed.

Frink, L.J.D.; Salinger, A.G.

1998-11-20T23:59:59.000Z

18

Bulk Metallic Glasses XI  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Jul 15, 2013 ... A Bulk Metallic Glass with Record-breaking Damage Tolerance ... Oxidation on the Surface Characteristics of Zr-based Bulk Metallic Glasses.

19

Chaoticity of the Wet Granular Gas  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In this work we derive an analytic expression for the Kolmogorov-Sinai entropy of dilute wet granular matter, valid for any spatial dimension. The grains are modelled as hard spheres and the influence of the wetting liquid is described according to the Capillary Model, in which dissipation is due to the hysteretic cohesion force of capillary bridges. The Kolmogorov-Sinai entropy is expanded in a series with respect to density. We find a rapid increase of the leading term when liquid is added. This demonstrates the sensitivity of the granular dynamics to humidity, and shows that the liquid significantly increases the chaoticity of the granular gas.

A. Fingerle; S. Herminghaus; V. Yu. Zaburdaev

2007-05-22T23:59:59.000Z

20

Spray type wet scrubber  

SciTech Connect

A spray type wet scrubber includes a plurality of spray nozzles installed in parallel banks across the path of gas stream within the scrubber body, and partition walls held upright in grating fashion to divide the path of gas stream into a plurality of passages, each of which accommodates one of the spray nozzles.

Atsukawa, M.; Tatani, A.

1978-01-10T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "wet bulk density" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Bulk Metallic Glasses X  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Jul 31, 2012 ... Aerospace and Spacecraft Applications for Bulk Metallic Glasses and Matrix Composites · Air Oxidation of a Binary Cu64.5Zr35.5 Bulk Metallic ...

22

Rotary bulk solids divider  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An apparatus for the disbursement of a bulk solid sample comprising, a gravity hopper having a top open end and a bottom discharge end, a feeder positioned beneath the gravity hopper so as to receive a bulk solid sample flowing from the bottom discharge end, and a conveyor receiving the bulk solid sample from the feeder and rotating on an axis that allows the bulk solid sample to disperse the sample to a collection station.

Maronde, Carl P. (McMurray, PA); Killmeyer, Jr., Richard P. (Pittsburgh, PA)

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

23

Comparison of etch characteristics of KOH, TMAH and EDP for bulk micromachining of silicon (110)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Bulk micromachining in Si (110) wafer is an essential process for fabricating vertical microstructures by wet chemical etching. We compared the anisotropic etching properties of potassium hydroxide (KOH), tetra-methyl ammonium hydroxide (TMAH) and ethylene ...

Shankar Dutta; Md Imran; P. Kumar; R. Pal; P. Datta; R. Chatterjee

2011-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

24

Greenhouse gas fluxes following tillage and wetting in a wheat-fallow cropping system  

SciTech Connect

Little is known about the relative contributions of episodic tillage and precipitation events to annual greenhouse gas emissions from soil. Consequently, the authors measured carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}), nitrous oxide (N{sub 2}O), and methane (CH{sub 4}) fluxes from soil in a wheat-fallow cropping system in western Nebraska using vented surface chambers, before and immediately after tillage and wetting with 5.1 cm of water, during the fallow period in 1995/1996. Replicated fallow management treatments included no-tillage, subtillage, and plow representing a wide range in degree of soil disturbance. Soil bulk density, water-filled pore space, electrical conductivity (EC{sub 1:1}), nitrate (NO{sub 3}), and pH within the top 30.5 cm soil, and soil temperature at 0 to 7.6 cm were measured to assess their correlation with variations in gas flux and tillage and wetting. Atmospheric concentrations above the soil (at {approximately} 40 cm) increased by 15% for CO{sub 2} and 9 to 31% for N{sub 2}O and 6 to 16% for CH{sub 4} within 1 min after tillage and returned to background concentrations within 2 h. Except immediately after tillage, net CH{sub 4} flux was negative, from the atmosphere into soil, and is referred to as CH{sub 4} uptake. Overall, increases (1.5--4-fold) in CO{sub 2} and N{sub 2}O losses from soil, and CH{sub 4} uptake by soil were short lived and returned to background levels within 8 to 24 h after tillage. Losses of CO{sub 2} and N{sub 2}O increased to 1.7 and 5 times background emissions, respectively, for 24 h following wetting, while CH{sub 4} uptake declined by about 60% for 3 to 14 d after wetting. Water-filled pore space in the surface soil fell below 60% within 24 h after saturation and exhibited an inverse relationship (R{sup 2} = 0.66) with CH{sub 4} uptake. A significant decline in soil NO{sub 3} and EC{sub 1:1} in the top 7.6 cm occurred following wetting. Under the experimental conditions, and the expected frequency of tillage and wetting events, failure to include these short-lived episodic gas pulses in annual flux estimations may underestimate annual CO{sub 2} and N{sub 2}O loss up to 13 and 24%, respectively, and overestimate CH{sub 4} uptake by up to 18% in this cropping system.

Kessavalou, A.; Drijber, R.A. [Univ. of Nebraska, Lincoln, NE (United States). Dept. of Agronomy; Doran, J.W. [Dept. of Agriculture, Lincoln, NE (United States)]|[Univ. of Nebraska, Lincoln, NE (United States); Mosier, A.R. [Dept. of Agriculture, Fort Collins, CO (United States)

1998-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

25

Optical wet steam monitor  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A wet steam monitor determines steam particle size by using laser doppler velocimeter (LDV) device to produce backscatter light. The backscatter light signal is processed with a spectrum analyzer to produce a visibility waveform in the frequency domain. The visibility waveform includes a primary peak and a plurality of sidebands. The bandwidth of at least the primary frequency peak is correlated to particle size by either visually comparing the bandwidth to those of known particle sizes, or by digitizing the waveform and comparing the waveforms electronically.

Maxey, Lonnie C. (Powell, TN); Simpson, Marc L. (Knoxville, TN)

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

26

Optical wet steam monitor  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A wet steam monitor determines steam particle size by using laser doppler velocimeter (LDV) device to produce backscatter light. The backscatter light signal is processed with a spectrum analyzer to produce a visibility waveform in the frequency domain. The visibility waveform includes a primary peak and a plurality of sidebands. The bandwidth of at least the primary frequency peak is correlated to particle size by either visually comparing the bandwidth to those of known particle sizes, or by digitizing the waveform and comparing the waveforms electronically. 4 figures.

Maxey, L.C.; Simpson, M.L.

1995-01-17T23:59:59.000Z

27

Wet-limestone scrubbing fundamentals  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The article examines important concepts of wet-limestone scrubbing. It also addresses the topic of by-product disposal. 3 refs., 1 fig.

Buecker, B.

2006-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

28

Hanford ETR Bulk Vitrification System - Demonstration Bulk Vitrification  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Bulk Vitrification System - Demonstration Bulk Bulk Vitrification System - Demonstration Bulk Vitrification System (DBVS) Review Report Hanford ETR Bulk Vitrification System - Demonstration Bulk Vitrification System (DBVS) Review Report Full Document and Summary Versions are available for download Hanford ETR Bulk Vitrification System - Demonstration Bulk Vitrification System (DBVS) Review Report Summary - Demonstration Bulk Vitrification System (DBVS) for Low-Actvity Waste at Hanford More Documents & Publications Independent Oversight Activity Report, Hanford Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant - November 2013 SRS Tank 48H Waste Treatment Project Technology Readiness Assessment External Technical Review for Evaluation of System Level Modeling and Simulation Tools in Support of Hanford Site Liquid Waste Process

29

Large area bulk superconductors  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A bulk superconductor having a thickness of not less than about 100 microns is carried by a polycrystalline textured substrate having misorientation angles at the surface thereof not greater than about 15.degree.; the bulk superconductor may have a thickness of not less than about 100 microns and a surface area of not less than about 50 cm.sup.2. The textured substrate may have a thickness not less than about 10 microns and misorientation angles at the surface thereof not greater than about 15.degree.. Also disclosed is a process of manufacturing the bulk superconductor and the polycrystalline biaxially textured substrate material.

Miller, Dean J. (Darien, IL); Field, Michael B. (Jersey City, NJ)

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

30

Bulk Metallic Glasses VII  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Sponsorship, The Minerals, Metals and Materials Society ... Air-Oxidation of a ( Zr55Cu30Al10Ni5)98Er2 Bulk Metallic Glass at 350-500oc · Anelastic ...

31

Revised Wet Stack Design Guide  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

For the past 14 years, the design of wet stacks around the world has been guided by the original EPRI Wet Stacks Design Guide (1996). Since that time, the number of wet stack installations has grown considerably, and a wealth of practical real-world operating and maintenance experience has been obtained. The laws of physics have not changed, and most of the information presented in 1996 is just as valid today as it was when originally published. What has changed is the power-generation ...

2012-12-12T23:59:59.000Z

32

Survey of Wet Electrostatic Precipitators  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Wet electrostatic precipitators (ESPs) have found application since they were first installed for sulfuric acid collection on a smelter and patented by Dr. Frederick Cottrell in 1907–1908. Power generation applications typically use dry ESPs for collection of coal fly ash in nonsaturated flue gas streams. This report summarizes the physical installations, specifications, operating environments, and operational experience of wet ESPs currently operating in the United States on power generation ...

2012-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

33

Modeling Bulk Atmospheric Drainage Flow in a Valley  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Most simulations of bulk valley-drainage flows depend heavily on parameterizations. The 1984 Atmospheric Studies in Complex Terrain (ASCOT) field experiment in Brush Creek Valley, Colorado, provided an unprecedented density of measurements in a ...

Ronald J. Dobosy

1989-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

34

A Bulk Microphysics Parameterization with Multiple Ice Precipitation Categories  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A single-moment bulk microphysics scheme with multiple ice precipitation categories is described. It has 2 liquid hydrometeor categories (cloud droplets and rain) and 10 ice categories that are characterized by habit, size, and density—two ice ...

Jerry M. Straka; Edward R. Mansell

2005-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

35

Bulk viscosity in nuclear and quark matter: A short review  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The history and recent progresses in the study of bulk viscosity in nuclear and quark matter are reviewed. The constraints from baryon number conservation and electric neutrality in quark matter on particle densities and fluid velocity divergences are discussed.

Hui Dong; Nan Su; Qun Wang

2007-02-07T23:59:59.000Z

36

Structural and economic analysis of capesize bulk carriers  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Structural failures of bulk carriers continue to account for the loss of many lives every year. Capes are particularly vulnerable to cracking because of their large length, their trade in high density cargos, and the high ...

Hadjiyiannis, Nicholas

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

37

Definition: Density Log | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Density Log Density Log Jump to: navigation, search Dictionary.png Density Log Density logging is a well logging tool that can provide a continuous record of a formation's bulk density along the length of a borehole. In geology, bulk density is a function of the density of the minerals forming a rock (i.e. matrix) and the fluid enclosed in the pore spaces.[1] View on Wikipedia Wikipedia Definition Density logging is a well logging tool that can provide a continuous record of a formation's bulk density along the length of a borehole. In geology, bulk density is a function of the density of the minerals forming a rock and the fluid enclosed in the pore spaces. This is one of three well logging tools that are commonly used to calculate porosity, the other two being sonic logging and neutron porosity logging

38

The effects of digital elevation model resolution on the calculation and predictions of topographic wetness indices.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

One of the largest exports in the Southeast U.S. is forest products. Interest in biofuels using forest biomass has increased recently, leading to more research into better forest management BMPs. The USDA Forest Service, along with the Oak Ridge National Laboratory, University of Georgia and Oregon State University are researching the impacts of intensive forest management for biofuels on water quality and quantity at the Savannah River Site in South Carolina. Surface runoff of saturated areas, transporting excess nutrients and contaminants, is a potential water quality issue under investigation. Detailed maps of variable source areas and soil characteristics would therefore be helpful prior to treatment. The availability of remotely sensed and computed digital elevation models (DEMs) and spatial analysis tools make it easy to calculate terrain attributes. These terrain attributes can be used in models to predict saturated areas or other attributes in the landscape. With laser altimetry, an area can be flown to produce very high resolution data, and the resulting data can be resampled into any resolution of DEM desired. Additionally, there exist many maps that are in various resolutions of DEM, such as those acquired from the U.S. Geological Survey. Problems arise when using maps derived from different resolution DEMs. For example, saturated areas can be under or overestimated depending on the resolution used. The purpose of this study was to examine the effects of DEM resolution on the calculation of topographic wetness indices used to predict variable source areas of saturation, and to find the best resolutions to produce prediction maps of soil attributes like nitrogen, carbon, bulk density and soil texture for low-relief, humid-temperate forested hillslopes. Topographic wetness indices were calculated based on the derived terrain attributes, slope and specific catchment area, from five different DEM resolutions. The DEMs were resampled from LiDAR, which is a laser altimetry remote sensing method, obtained from the USDA Forest Service at Savannah River Site. The specific DEM resolutions were chosen because they are common grid cell sizes (10m, 30m, and 50m) used in mapping for management applications and in research. The finer resolutions (2m and 5m) were chosen for the purpose of determining how finer resolutions performed compared with coarser resolutions at predicting wetness and related soil attributes. The wetness indices were compared across DEMs and with each other in terms of quantile and distribution differences, then in terms of how well they each correlated with measured soil attributes. Spatial and non-spatial analyses were performed, and predictions using regression and geostatistics were examined for efficacy relative to each DEM resolution. Trends in the raw data and analysis results were also revealed.

Drover, Damion, Ryan

2011-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

39

Dark energy from bulk matter  

SciTech Connect

We consider the possibility of getting accelerated expansion and w=-1 crossing in the context of a braneworld cosmological setup, endowed with a bulk energy-momentum tensor. For a given ansatz of the bulk content, we demonstrate that the bulk pressures dominate the dynamics at late times and can lead to accelerated expansion. We also analyze the constraints under which we can get a realistic profile for the effective equation of state and conclude that matter in the bulk has the effect of dark energy on the brane. Furthermore, we show that it is possible to simulate the behavior to a Chaplygin gas using nonexotic bulk matter.

Bogdanos, C.; Dimitriadis, A.; Tamvakis, K. [Physics Department, University of Ioannina, Ioannina GR451 10 (Greece)

2007-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

40

Effect of Varying Bulk Viscosity on Generalized Chaplygin Gas  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In this paper, viscous generalized Chaplygin gas as a model of dark energy considered. We assume non-constant bulk viscous coefficient and study dark energy density. We consider several cases of density-dependent viscosities. We find that, in the special case, the viscous generalized Chaplygin gas is corresponding to modified Chaplygin gas.

Saadat, H

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "wet bulk density" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Effect of Varying Bulk Viscosity on Generalized Chaplygin Gas  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In this paper, viscous generalized Chaplygin gas as a model of dark energy considered. We assume non-constant bulk viscous coefficient and study dark energy density. We consider several cases of density-dependent viscosities. We find that, in the special case, the viscous generalized Chaplygin gas is corresponding to modified Chaplygin gas.

H. Saadat; B. Pourhassan

2013-05-26T23:59:59.000Z

42

Creating bulk nanocrystalline metal.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Nanocrystalline and nanostructured materials offer unique microstructure-dependent properties that are superior to coarse-grained materials. These materials have been shown to have very high hardness, strength, and wear resistance. However, most current methods of producing nanostructured materials in weapons-relevant materials create powdered metal that must be consolidated into bulk form to be useful. Conventional consolidation methods are not appropriate due to the need to maintain the nanocrystalline structure. This research investigated new ways of creating nanocrystalline material, new methods of consolidating nanocrystalline material, and an analysis of these different methods of creation and consolidation to evaluate their applicability to mesoscale weapons applications where part features are often under 100 {micro}m wide and the material's microstructure must be very small to give homogeneous properties across the feature.

Fredenburg, D. Anthony (Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, GA); Saldana, Christopher J. (Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN); Gill, David D.; Hall, Aaron Christopher; Roemer, Timothy John (Ktech Corporation, Albuquerque, NM); Vogler, Tracy John; Yang, Pin

2008-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

43

,"California Federal Offshore Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","California Federal Offshore Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved...

44

Wet Corn Milling Plant EPI | ENERGY STAR  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Wet Corn Milling Plant EPI Secondary menu About us Press room Contact Us Portfolio Manager Login Facility owners and managers Existing buildings Commercial new construction...

45

Bulk Power Transmission Study  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

"Texans now have a choice. We can become more efficient and maintain our standard of living, or we can continue business as usual and watch our standard of living erode from competition from other regions. In the past, except for improving reliability, there was no need for a strong transmission system. When Texas generation was primarily gas fueled, the extensive natural gas pipeline network moved energy easily within the state. In recent years two things have changed: 1. Electric utilities have made extensive investment in lignite, coal, and nuclear plants and, 2. Improvements in gas turbine technology and the removal of institutional barriers has encouraged cogeneration at many of our energy intensive process industries. This energy diversity means that there are now significant differences in energy costs between units. The variable costs of generation of power can vary between units by a ratio of 2 or 3 to 1 and this difference will be accentuated when energy costs rise (and they will; it’s a question of when, not if). The potential for costs savings by optional dispatching of the entire interconnected system are greater than ever before as demonstrated by the PUC's Bulk Power Transmission Study. And the potential can be enhanced with added transmission system investment. Cogeneration and small power production has proven to be the most cost effective way for Texas to add additional generating capacity needed to supply an economy that is starting to rebound and to replace old, obsolete power plants. The freedom to locate these facilities at the fuel source or at the site of large thermal demand makes real economic and environmental sense. The use of renewable or waste fuels allows something that would otherwise be wasted to contribute to our economy. Fossil fuels that are displaced can be redirected to another use or consumed for future benefit. By integrating a gas turbine generator with a. process plant, the natural gas required for producing electricity can be reduced by 40% below that required for a combined cycle. The heat rejected from a gas turbine, combined cycle, or steam plant can be redirected to a process use that contributes to our economy by producing something of value to world markets. By contrast a conventional power plant is paid for by the rate payers and consumes Texas natural resources and therefore is a burden rather than an enhancement to our economy. The optimal location of facilities are possible only if there is an adequate transmission system. Utility, consumer and industry must cooperate to improve our transmission system for the benefit of all Texas. The Texas Public Utilities Commission has taken the lead in promoting efficiency by requiring transmission wheeling between qualifying facilities and electric utilities. Several cogeneration facilities have been constructed as a result. In order to encourage small power production, the rule needs to be expanded to include projects interconnected with distribution systems. Most renewable resource projects are relatively small and cannot afford the cost of a high voltage interconnect, and yet their characteristics match a baseload need. The ability to wheel power to a utility that needs base load power from a distribution level interconnection is essential to development of these smaller projects."

John, T.

1988-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

46

Prediction of Calcined Coke Bulk Density - Programmaster.org  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Due to changing green coke quality, a reliable forecast of the calcined coke VBD from small green coke samples is required. The VBD can be predicted from ...

47

Historical and Future Challenges with the Vibrated Bulk Density Test ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Better knowledge of the coke porosity allows a more accurate estimation of coke quality and pitch demand for fabricating anode of optimum performance.

48

Charm mass effects in bulk channel correlations  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The bulk viscosity of thermalized QCD matter at temperatures above a few hundred MeV could be significantly influenced by charm quarks because their contribution arises four perturbative orders before purely gluonic effects. In an attempt to clarify the challenges of a lattice study, we determine the relevant imaginary-time correlator (of massive scalar densities) up to NLO in perturbation theory, and compare with existing data. We find discrepancies much larger than in the vector channel; this may hint, apart from the importance of taking a continuum limit, to larger non-perturbative effects in the scalar channel. We also recall how a transport peak related to the scalar density spectral function encodes non-perturbative information concerning the charm quark chemical equilibration rate close to equilibrium.

Y. Burnier; M. Laine

2013-09-06T23:59:59.000Z

49

Wet Corn Milling Energy Guide  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

307 307 ERNEST ORLANDO LAWRENCE BERKELEY NATIONAL LABORATORY Energy Efficiency Improvement and Cost Saving Opportunities for the Corn Wet Milling Industry An ENERGY STAR Guide for Energy and Plant Managers Christina Galitsky, Ernst Worrell and Michael Ruth Environmental Energy Technologies Division Sponsored by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency July 2003 Disclaimer This document was prepared as an account of work sponsored by the United States Government. While this document is believed to contain correct information, neither the United States Government nor any agency thereof, nor The Regents of the University of California, nor any of their employees, makes any warranty, express or implied, or assumes any legal responsibility for the accuracy, completeness, or usefulness of any information, apparatus, product,

50

bulk power | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

bulk power bulk power Dataset Summary Description The Form EIA-411, "Coordinated Bulk Power Supply Program Report," collects information from the Nation's power system planners about the electricity supply, both capacity and energy, that is needed to serve current demand and for future growth. Source Energy Information Administration (EIA) Date Released December 03rd, 2010 (3 years ago) Date Updated December 03rd, 2010 (3 years ago) Keywords bulk power EIA Electricity Generation Data application/vnd.ms-excel icon Net Energy for Load - Historic, Actual and Projected Five-Years (xls, 26.1 KiB) application/vnd.ms-excel icon Noncoincident Peak Load - Historic, Actual and Projected Five-Years (xls, 25.6 KiB) application/vnd.ms-excel icon Noncoincident Peak Load - Historic, Actual and Projected Five-Years (xls, 0 bytes)

51

Robbins Corn & Bulk Services | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Robbins Corn & Bulk Services Jump to: navigation, search Name Robbins Corn & Bulk Services Place Sackets Harbor, NY Information About Partnership with NREL Partnership with NREL...

52

Asbestos/NESHAP adequately wet guidance  

SciTech Connect

The Asbestos NESHAP requires facility owners and/or operators involved in demolition and renovation activities to control emissions of particulate asbestos to the outside air because no safe concentration of airborne asbestos has ever been established. The primary method used to control asbestos emissions is to adequately wet the Asbestos Containing Material (ACM) with a wetting agent prior to, during and after demolition/renovation activities. The purpose of the document is to provide guidance to asbestos inspectors and the regulated community on how to determine if friable ACM is adequately wet as required by the Asbestos NESHAP.

Shafer, R.; Throwe, S.; Salgado, O.; Garlow, C.; Hoerath, E.

1990-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

53

Bulk-Brane Interaction and Holographic Dark Energy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In this paper we consider the bulk-brane interaction to obtain the equation of state for the holographic energy density in non-flat universe enclosed by the event horizon measured from the sphere of horizon named $L$. We assumes that the cold dark matter energy density on the brane is conserved, but the holographic dark energy density on the brane is not conserved due to brane-bulk energy exchange. Our calculation show, taking $\\Omega_{\\Lambda}=0.73$ for the present time, the lower bound of $w_{\\rm \\Lambda}^{eff}$ is -0.9. This implies that one can not generate phantom-like equation of state from an interacting holographic dark energy model in non-flat universe.

M R Setare

2006-09-14T23:59:59.000Z

54

Utah Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Utah Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic...

55

Utah Natural Gas Wet After Lease Separation, Reserves in Nonproducing...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Wet After Lease Separation, Reserves in Nonproducing Reservoirs (Billion Cubic Feet) Utah Natural Gas Wet After Lease Separation, Reserves in Nonproducing Reservoirs (Billion Cubic...

56

Table 3. Wet natural gas production and resources (trillion cubic ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

2013 EIA/ARI unproved wet shale gas technically recoverable resources (TRR) 2012 USGS conventional unproved wet natural gas TRR, including reserve

57

Texas State Offshore Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet After...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Texas State Offshore Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved...

58

Texas State Offshore Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Texas State Offshore Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves...

59

Texas - RRC District 10 Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Texas - RRC District 10 Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves...

60

Texas - RRC District 5 Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Texas - RRC District 5 Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "wet bulk density" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Texas - RRC District 8 Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Texas - RRC District 8 Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved...

62

Texas - RRC District 8A Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Texas - RRC District 8A Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves...

63

Texas - RRC District 9 Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Texas - RRC District 9 Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved...

64

Texas - RRC District 6 Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Texas - RRC District 6 Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved...

65

Colorado Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Proved Reserves...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Colorado Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1...

66

New Mexico - East Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Proved...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) New Mexico - East Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade...

67

Gulf of Mexico Federal Offshore - Texas Natural Gas, Wet After...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Gulf of Mexico Federal Offshore - Texas Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Proved Reserves...

68

Texas - RRC District 3 Onshore Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Texas - RRC District 3 Onshore Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved...

69

Texas - RRC District 1 Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Texas - RRC District 1 Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade...

70

Texas - RRC District 6 Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Texas - RRC District 6 Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade...

71

Breakdown in the Wetting Transparency of Graphene  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We develop a theory to model the van der Waals interactions between liquid and graphene, including quantifying the wetting behavior of a graphene-coated surface. Molecular dynamics simulations and contact angle measurements ...

Shih, Chih-Jen

72

Reducing the atmospheric impact of wet slaking  

SciTech Connect

Means of reducing the atmospheric emissions due to the wet slaking of coke are considered. One option, investigated here, is to remove residual active silt and organic compounds from the biologically purified wastewater sent for slaking, by coagulation and flocculation.

B.D. Zubitskii; G.V. Ushakov; B.G. Tryasunov; A.G.Ushakov [Kuznetsk Basin State Technical University, Kemerovo (Russian Federation)

2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

73

Wet/dry cooling tower and method  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A wet/dry cooling tower wherein a liquid to-be-cooled is flowed along channels of a corrugated open surface or the like, which surface is swept by cooling air. The amount of the surface covered by the liquid is kept small compared to the dry part thereof so that said dry part acts as a fin for the wet part for heat dissipation.

Glicksman, Leon R. (Lynnfield, MA); Rohsenow, Warren R. (Waban, MA)

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

74

Bulk Hauling Equipment for CHG  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

BULK HAULING EQUIPMENT FOR CHG BULK HAULING EQUIPMENT FOR CHG Don Baldwin Director of Product Development - Hexagon Lincoln HEXAGON LINCOLN TITAN(tm) Module System Compressed Hydrogen Gas * Capacity 250 bar - 616 kg 350 bar - 809 kg 540 bar - 1155 kg * Gross Vehicle Weight (with prime mover) 250 bar - 28 450 kg 350 bar - 30 820 kg 540 bar - 39 440 kg * Purchase Cost 250 bar - $510,000 350 bar - $633,750 540 bar - $1,100,000 Compressed Natural Gas * Capacity (250 bar at 15 C) - 7412 kg * GVW (With prime mover) - 35 250 kg * Purchase Cost (+/- 5%) - $510,000 HEXAGON LINCOLN TITAN(tm) V Magnum Trailer System Compressed Hydrogen Gas * Capacity 250 bar - 800 kg 350 bar - 1050 kg 540 bar - 1500 kg * Gross Vehicle Weight (with prime mover) 250 bar - 31 000 kg 350 bar - 34 200 kg 540 bar - 45 700 kg * Purchase Cost (+/-

75

California - Coastal Region Onshore Natural Gas, Wet After Lease ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

California - Coastal Region Onshore Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Reserves Sales (Billion Cubic Feet)

76

Markovian bulk-arrival and bulk-service queues with state-dependent control  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We study a modified Markovian bulk-arrival and bulk-service queue incorporating state-dependent control. The stopped bulk-arrival and bulk-service queue is first investigated and the relationship with our queueing model is examined and exploited. Equilibrium ... Keywords: 60J27, 60J80, Bulk-arrival and bulk-service queues, Busy period distributions, Equilibrium distribution, Hitting times, Queue length distributions, State-dependent control, Transient behaviour

Anyue Chen; Phil Pollett; Junping Li; Hanjun Zhang

2010-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

77

Membrane-based wet electrostatic precipitation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Emissions of fine particulate matter, PM2.5, in both primary and secondary form, are difficult to capture in typical dry electrostatic precipitators (ESPs). Wet (or waterbased) ESPs are well suited for collection of acid aerosols and fine particulates because of greater corona power and virtually no re-entrainment. However, field disruptions because of spraying (misting) of water, formation of dry spots (channeling), and collector surface corrosion limit the applicability of current wet ESPs in the control of secondary PM2.5. Researchers at Ohio University have patented novel membrane collection surfaces to address these problems. Water-based cleaning in membrane collectors made of corrosion-resistant fibers is facilitated by capillary action between the fibers, maintaining an even distribution of water. This paper presents collection efficiency results of lab-scale and pilot-scale testing at First Energy's Bruce Mansfield Plant for the membrane-based wet ESP. The data indicate that a membrane wet ESP was more effective at collecting fine particulates, acid aerosols, and oxidized mercury than the metal-plate wet ESP, even with {approximately}15% less collecting area. 15 refs., 7 figs., 6 tabs.

David J. Bayless; Liming Shi; Gregory Kremer; Ben J. Stuart; James Reynolds; John Caine [Ohio University, Athens, OH (US). Ohio Coal Research Center

2005-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

78

Effect of proton bombardment on InAs dots and wetting layer in laser structures  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The effect of proton bombardment on carrier lifetime and photoluminescence of InAs quantum dots was measured. Optical absorption and transmission electron microscopy show the dots retain their integrity under bombardment. A decrease in ground state photoluminescence with increasing dose is not explained by the decrease in dot carrier lifetime alone, but also by bombardment-induced non-radiative recombination in the wetting layer, which reduces the dot electron population at fixed excitation. To exploit the relative radiation immunity of quantum dots, it is necessary to maximise the dot density and capture probability per dot to minimize the effect of wetting layer recombination.

O'Driscoll, I.; Blood, P.; Smowton, P. M.; Sobiesierski, A. [School of Physics and Astronomy, Cardiff University, Queens Buildings, The Parade, Cardiff CF24 3AA (United Kingdom); Gwilliam, R. [Advanced Technology Institute, FEPS, University of Surrey, Guildford, Surrey GU2 7XH (United Kingdom)

2012-06-25T23:59:59.000Z

79

Wet powder seal for gas containment  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A gas seal is formed by a compact layer of an insoluble powder and liquid filling the fine interstices of that layer. The smaller the particle size of the selected powder, such as sand or talc, the finer will be the interstices or capillary spaces in the layer and the greater will be the resulting sealing capacity, i.e., the gas pressure differential which the wet powder layer can withstand. Such wet powder seal is useful in constructing underground gas reservoirs or storage cavities for nuclear wastes as well as stopping leaks in gas mains buried under ground or situated under water. The sealing capacity of the wet powder seal can be augmented by the hydrostatic head of a liquid body established over the seal.

Stang, L.G.

1979-08-29T23:59:59.000Z

80

Wet powder seal for gas containment  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A gas seal is formed by a compact layer of an insoluble powder and liquid filling the fine interstices of that layer. The smaller the particle size of the selected powder, such as sand or talc, the finer will be the interstices or capillary spaces in the layer and the greater will be the resulting sealing capacity, i.e., the gas pressure differential which the wet powder layer can withstand. Such wet powder seal is useful in constructing underground gas reservoirs or storage cavities for nuclear wastes as well as stopping leaks in gas mains buried under ground or situated under water. The sealing capacity of the wet powder seal can be augmented by the hydrostatic head of a liquid body established over the seal.

Stang, Louis G. (Sayville, NY)

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "wet bulk density" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Enhanced Mercury Removal by Wet FGD Systems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report provides results from testing conducted in 2005 as part of three EPRI co-funded projects that are aimed at enhancing the capture of mercury in flue gas from coal-fired power boilers when scrubbed by wet flue gas desulfurization (FGD) systems. The first project is co-sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy's National Energy Technology Laboratory (DOE-NETL) under Cooperative Agreement DE-FC26-01NT41185, "Pilot Testing of Mercury Oxidation Catalysts for Upstream of Wet FGD," as well as by two...

2006-03-07T23:59:59.000Z

82

Fate of Mercury in Wet FGD Systems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report describes the results of a bench-scale, laboratory investigation of the fate of flue gas mercury species in wet flue gas desulfurization (FGD) scrubbers that are used for sulfur dioxide (SO2) control in coal-fired power plants. Data collected in the EPA mercury Information Collection Request (ICR), and in research projects sponsored by EPRI show that most wet scrubbers used for SO2 control achieve high removals of oxidized mercury and little or no elemental mercury removal. However, some scru...

2004-03-12T23:59:59.000Z

83

Effectiveness of three bulking agents for food waste composting  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Rather than landfilling, composting the organic fraction of municipal solid wastes recycles the waste as a safe and nutrient enriched soil amendment, reduces emissions of greenhouse gases and generates less leachate. The objective of this project was to investigate the composting effectiveness of three bulking agents, namely chopped wheat (Triticum) straw, chopped mature hay consisting of 80% timothy (milium) and 20% clover (triphullum) and pine (pinus) wood shavings. These bulking agents were each mixed in duplicates at three different ratios with food waste (FW) and composted for 10 days using prototype in-vessel composters to observe their temperature and pH trends. Then, each mixture was matured in vertical barrels for 56 days to measure their mass loss and final nutrient content and to visually evaluate their level of decomposition. Chopped wheat straw (CWS) and chopped hay (CH) were the only two formulas that reached thermophilic temperatures during the 10 days of active composting when mixed with FW at a wet mass ratio of 8.9 and 8.6:1 (FW:CWS and FW:CH), respectively. After 56 days of maturation, these two formulas were well decomposed with no or very few recognizable substrate particles, and offered a final TN exceeding the original. Wood shavings (WS) produced the least decomposed compost at maturation, with wood particles still visible in the final product, and with a TN lower than the initial. Nevertheless, all bulking agents produced compost with an organic matter, TN, TP and TK content suitable for use as soil amendment.

Adhikari, Bijaya K. [Department of Bioresource Engineering, Macdonald Campus of McGill University, 21 111 Lakeshore, Ste Anne de Bellevue (Quebec), H9X 3V9 (Canada); Barrington, Suzelle [Department of Bioresource Engineering, Macdonald Campus of McGill University, 21 111 Lakeshore, Ste Anne de Bellevue (Quebec), H9X 3V9 (Canada)], E-mail: suzelle.barrington@mcgill.ca; Martinez, Jose [Cemagref, Rennes Regional Centre, 7 avenue du Cucille, CS 64427, F-35044 Rennes (France); King, Susan [Department of Bioresource Engineering, Macdonald Campus of McGill University, 21 111 Lakeshore, Ste Anne de Bellevue (Quebec), H9X 3V9 (Canada)

2009-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

84

Indian Centre for Wind Energy Technology C WET | Open Energy...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Centre for Wind Energy Technology C WET Jump to: navigation, search Name Indian Centre for Wind Energy Technology (C-WET) Place Chennai, India Zip 601 302 Sector Wind energy...

85

Texas - RRC District 5 Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Texas - RRC District 5 Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Reserves New Field Discoveries (Billion Cubic Feet)

86

Texas - RRC District 4 Onshore Natural Gas, Wet After Lease ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Texas - RRC District 4 Onshore Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation New Reservoir Discoveries in Old Fields (Billion Cubic Feet)

87

Categorical Exclusion 4497: Lithium Wet Chemistry Project  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

8/2012 07:36 8/2012 07:36 8655749041 ENVIRONMENTAL COMPL U.S. Department of Energy Categorical Exclusion Detennination Form Proposed Action Tills: Lithium W@t Chemistry Project (4597) Program or Fi~ld Oftke: Y-12 Site Office L&cationfs) (CiWLCount:r/State): Oak Ridge, Anderson County; Tennessee Proposed Action Description: PAGE 03/04 r: :;: :: !: s .a : brnl, i ~ y. : $ ~-rtl~il : t·:~::;J The proposed action is to develop a small lithium wet chemistry operation for the following purposes: (1) to capture wet chemistry operations, (2) to provide processing path for Lithium materials such as machine dust, (3) to provide lithium based materials, and (4) to produce the littlium hydroxide needed to support production. CategQrj~l Exclusion(s) Applied

88

Density Log | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Density Log Density Log Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Technique: Density Log Details Activities (6) Areas (6) Regions (0) NEPA(0) Exploration Technique Information Exploration Group: Downhole Techniques Exploration Sub Group: Well Log Techniques Parent Exploration Technique: Well Log Techniques Information Provided by Technique Lithology: provides data on the bulk density of the rock surrounding the well Stratigraphic/Structural: Stratigraphic correlation between well bores. Hydrological: Porosity of the formations loggesd can be calculated for the Density log andprovide an indication potential aquifers. Thermal: Cost Information Low-End Estimate (USD): 0.4040 centUSD 4.0e-4 kUSD 4.0e-7 MUSD 4.0e-10 TUSD / foot Median Estimate (USD): 0.6868 centUSD

89

EIA-811 MONTHLY BULK TERMINAL REPORT INSTRUCTIONS  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

EIA-811, Monthly Bulk Terminal Report Page 1 U.S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY ENERGY IN FORMATION ADMINISTRATION Washington, D.C. 20585 OMB No. 1905-0165

90

Bulk Metallic Glasses VIII - Programmaster.org  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Aug 2, 2010 ... Sponsorship, The Minerals, Metals and Materials Society .... The Oxidation Behavior of an FeCo-Based Bulk Metallic Glass at 600 - 700C.

91

Inorganic Nanocrystal Bulk Heterojunctions - Energy Innovation ...  

Schematic illustration of a nanocrystal bulk heterojunction solar cell with an active layer in which the concentration of n-type and p-type nanocrystals is graded ...

92

Mechanical Behavior of Bulk Nanocrystalline Copper Alloys ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Presentation Title, Mechanical Behavior of Bulk Nanocrystalline Copper Alloys Produced by High Energy Ball Milling. Author(s), Hamed Bahmanpour, Khaled M.

93

Wetting heterogeneity in mixed-wet porous media controls flow dissipation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Wettability is crucial for multiphase flow in porous media. However, the effect of spatial distribution of wetting domains has previously only been dealt with by averaging contact angles over several pores. By preparing tailored bead packings with the same average surface wettability, but differing in the typical spatial extension of the same-type wetting domains, we show that models based solely on averages do not capture the dynamics of two phase flow in such systems. Using X-ray tomography we measure the typical length scale xi of the wetting domains in our samples. In capillary pressure saturation (CPS) experiments we find that xi controls the width of the hysteresis loop for xi <= d, d being the bead diameter. X-Ray tomography of the samples during both water and oil invasion shows that the front morphology is smoothened at small values of xi. Both observations are consistent with an increase of dissipation for small correlation length.

Murison, Julie; Baret, Jean-Christophe; Herminghaus, Stephan; Schröter, Matthias; Brinkmann, Martin

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

94

Wetting heterogeneity in mixed-wet porous media controls flow dissipation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Wettability is crucial for multiphase flow in porous media. However, the effect of spatial distribution of wetting domains has previously only been dealt with by averaging contact angles over several pores. By preparing tailored bead packings with the same average surface wettability, but differing in the typical spatial extension of the same-type wetting domains, we show that models based solely on averages do not capture the dynamics of two phase flow in such systems. Using X-ray tomography we measure the typical length scale xi of the wetting domains in our samples. In capillary pressure saturation (CPS) experiments we find that xi controls the width of the hysteresis loop for xi <= d, d being the bead diameter. X-Ray tomography of the samples during both water and oil invasion shows that the front morphology is smoothened at small values of xi. Both observations are consistent with an increase of dissipation for small correlation length.

Julie Murison; Benoît Semin; Jean-Christophe Baret; Stephan Herminghaus; Matthias Schröter; Martin Brinkmann

2013-10-11T23:59:59.000Z

95

Bulk Higgs with 4D Gauge Interactions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We consider a model with an extra compact dimension in which the Higgs is a bulk field while all other Standard Model fields are confined on a brane. We find that four-dimensional gauge invariance can still be achieved by appropriate modification of the brane action. This changes accordingly the Higgs propagator so that, the Higgs, in all its interactions with Standard Model fields, behaves as an ordinary 4D field, although it has a bulk kinetic term and bulk self-interactions. In addition, it cannot propagate from the brane to the bulk and, thus, no charge can escape into the bulk but it remains confined on the brane. Moreover, the photon remains massless, while the dependence of the Higgs vacuum on the extra dimension induces a mixing between the graviphoton and the Z-boson. This results in a modification of the sensitive \\rho-parameter.

Alex Kehagias; Kyriakos Tamvakis

2005-07-14T23:59:59.000Z

96

Method for the wet quenching of coke  

SciTech Connect

A method and apparatus for the wet quenching of coke is disclosed wherein hot coke is sprayed from above with quenching water, the steam generated by the heat of the coke is condensed by a spray of condensation water from the top of the quenching tower, and the hot condensate-water mixture is collected at the bottom of the quenching tower and recirculated to the top of the tower where it is sprayed between quenching operations to be cooled by a counterflowing stream of air. The cooled condensate water mixture is suitable for reuse as the condensation spray water.

Blase, M.; Flockenhaus, C.; Wagener, D.

1982-03-30T23:59:59.000Z

97

Field Testing of a Wet FGD Additive for Enhanced Mercury Control - Pilot-Scale Test Results  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This Topical Report summarizes progress on Cooperative Agreement DE-FC26-04NT42309, ''Field Testing of a Wet FGD Additive.'' The objective of the project is to demonstrate the use of a flue gas desulfurization (FGD) additive, Degussa Corporation's TMT-15, to prevent the reemissions of elemental mercury (Hg{sup 0}) in flue gas exiting wet FGD systems on coal-fired boilers. Furthermore, the project intends to demonstrate that the additive can be used to precipitate most of the mercury (Hg) removed in the wet FGD system as a fine TMT salt that can be separated from the FGD liquor and bulk solid byproducts for separate disposal. The project will conduct pilot and full-scale tests of the TMT-15 additive in wet FGD absorbers. The tests are intended to determine required additive dosage requirements to prevent Hg{sup 0} reemissions and to separate mercury from the normal FGD byproducts for three coal types: Texas lignite/Power River Basin (PRB) coal blend, high-sulfur Eastern bituminous coal, and low-sulfur Eastern bituminous coal. The project team consists of URS Group, Inc., EPRI, TXU Generation Company LP, Southern Company, and Degussa Corporation. TXU Generation has provided the Texas lignite/PRB co-fired test site for pilot FGD tests, Monticello Steam Electric Station Unit 3. Southern Company is providing the low-sulfur Eastern bituminous coal host site for wet scrubbing tests, as well as the pilot and full-scale jet bubbling reactor (JBR) FGD systems to be tested. A third utility, to be named later, will provide the high-sulfur Eastern bituminous coal full-scale FGD test site. Degussa Corporation is providing the TMT-15 additive and technical support to the test program. The project is being conducted in six tasks. Of the six project tasks, Task 1 involves project planning and Task 6 involves management and reporting. The other four tasks involve field testing on FGD systems, either at pilot or full scale. The four tasks include: Task 2 - Pilot Additive Testing in Texas Lignite Flue Gas; Task 3 - Full-scale FGD Additive Testing in High Sulfur Eastern Bituminous Flue Gas; Task 4 - Pilot Wet Scrubber Additive Tests at Yates; and Task 5 - Full-scale Additive Tests at Plant Yates. This topical report presents the results from the Task 2 and Task 4 pilot-scale additive tests. The Task 3 and Task 5 full-scale additive tests will be conducted later in calendar year 2006.

Gary M. Blythe

2006-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

98

Ionizing wet scrubber for air pollution control  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Air pollution control equipment manufacturers are continually developing sophisticated systems designed to dramatically reduce plant emissions. One such system, the ionizing wet scrubber (IWS), has demonstrated outstanding air pollution control characteristics while meeting the challenge of energy efficiency. The IWS system removes fine solid and liquid particulate down to 0.05 micron at high collection efficiencies and low energy comsumption. It also simultaneously removes noxious, corrosive and odor-bearing gases from flue gas streams as well as coarse particulate matter above 1 micron in diameter. Due to its simplified design and low pressure drop, operating energy costs of the IWS are only a fraction of those for alternative air pollution control equipment. Pressure drop through a single-stage IWS is only 0.5 to 1.5 in. Water (125 to 374 pa) column and is controlled primarily by pressure drop through the wet scrubber section. Total system energy usage is approximately 2.0-2.5 bhp/1,000 actual ft/sup 3//min (0.7-0.9 kw/m/sup 3//min) for a single-stage IWS and 4.0-5.0 bhp/1,000 actual ft/sup 3//min for a two-stage installation. These energy requirements represent a significant savings as opposed to other air pollution control systems such as Venturi scrubbers.

Sheppard, S.V.

1986-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

99

The Bulk Viscosity of a Pion Gas  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We compute the bulk viscosity of a gas of pions at temperatures below the QCD crossover temperature, for the physical value of pion mass, to lowest order in chiral perturbation theory. Bulk viscosity is controlled by number-changing processes which become exponentially slow at low temperatures when the pions become exponentially dilute, leading to an exponentially large bulk viscosity zeta ~ (F_0^8/m_\\pi^5) exp(2m_\\pi/T), where F_0 = 93 MeV is the pion decay constant.

Egang Lu; Guy D. Moore

2011-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

100

Bulk viscosity of N=2* plasma  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We use gauge theory/string theory correspondence to study the bulk viscosity of strongly coupled, mass deformed SU(N_c) N=4 supersymmetric Yang-Mills plasma, also known as N=2^* gauge theory. For a wide range of masses we confirm the bulk viscosity bound proposed in arXiv:0708.3459. For a certain choice of masses, the theory undergoes a phase transition with divergent specific heat c_V ~ |1-T_c/T|^(-1/2). We show that, although bulk viscosity rapidly grows as T -> T_c, it remains finite in the vicinity of the critical point.

Alex Buchel; Chris Pagnutti

2008-12-18T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "wet bulk density" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
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101

Definition: Bulk Electric System | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Bulk Electric System Bulk Electric System Jump to: navigation, search Dictionary.png Bulk Electric System As defined by the Regional Reliability Organization, the electrical generation resources, transmission lines, interconnections with neighboring systems, and associated equipment, generally operated at voltages of 100 kV or higher. Radial transmission facilities serving only load with one transmission source are generally not included in this definition.[1] Related Terms Regional Reliability Organization, transmission lines, transmission line References ↑ Glossary of Terms Used in Reliability Standards An in LikeLike UnlikeLike You like this.Sign Up to see what your friends like. line Glossary Definition Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Definition:Bulk_Electric_System&oldid=48030

102

INVESTIGATION OF BULK POWER ERCOT (Texas)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

INVESTIGATION OF BULK POWER MARKETS ERCOT (Texas) November 1, 2000 The analyses and conclusions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-2 A. Electric Reliability Council of Texas (ERCOT) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-2 B. The 1995 Texas Electricity Restructuring Statute

Laughlin, Robert B.

103

Water Treatment For Wet Electrostatic Precipitators: Conceptual Design  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Pilot testing has shown that replacement of the last field of a small dry electrostatic precipitator (ESP) with a single wet field can significantly reduce outlet particulate emissions from coal-fired power plants. This report summarizes a pilot wet ESP performance test, cost projections from an economic study, and results from a study of the water use and chemistry issues that need to be resolved to make the wet ESP technology an attractive option for electric utilities.

1997-09-25T23:59:59.000Z

104

Self-oscillations on a partially wetted catalyst pellet in ? ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

and the vapor–gas phases on wetted and dry catalyst pellets, respectively. ... perature and flooding states of the catalyst pellet was first observed, which were ...

105

Utah Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Adjustments (Billion Cubic Feet) Utah Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Reserves Adjustments (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3...

106

Utah Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Acquisitions (Billion Cubic Feet) Utah Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Reserves Acquisitions (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3...

107

Utah Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation New Reservoir Discoveries...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

New Reservoir Discoveries in Old Fields (Billion Cubic Feet) Utah Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation New Reservoir Discoveries in Old Fields (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0...

108

Utah Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Extensions (Billion Cubic Feet) Utah Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Reserves Extensions (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3...

109

Utah Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Reserves...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Decreases (Billion Cubic Feet) Utah Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Reserves Revision Decreases (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3...

110

Utah Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Increases (Billion Cubic Feet) Utah Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Reserves Revision Increases (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2...

111

,"Utah Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Proved Reserves...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

,"Worksheet Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Utah Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic...

112

Utah Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Estimated...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Estimated Production from Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Utah Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Estimated Production from Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade...

113

Utah Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Reserves...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Increases (Billion Cubic Feet) Utah Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Reserves Revision Increases (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3...

114

Utah Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Reservoir Discoveries in Old Fields (Billion Cubic Feet) Utah Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, New Reservoir Discoveries in Old Fields (Billion Cubic...

115

Utah Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Decreases (Billion Cubic Feet) Utah Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Reserves Revision Decreases (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2...

116

,"Utah Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas Proved Reserves, Wet...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

,"Worksheet Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Utah Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas Proved Reserves, Wet After Lease Separation",10,"Annua...

117

,"Utah Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

,"Worksheet Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Utah Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic...

118

Utah Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Reserves...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Acquisitions (Billion Cubic Feet) Utah Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Reserves Acquisitions (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4...

119

Utah Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Field Discoveries (Billion Cubic Feet) Utah Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, New Field Discoveries (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2...

120

Utah Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Estimated Production from Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Utah Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Estimated Production from Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet)...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "wet bulk density" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Utah Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, New...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Reservoir Discoveries in Old Fields (Billion Cubic Feet) Utah Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, New Reservoir Discoveries in Old Fields (Billion Cubic Feet)...

122

,"Utah Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

,"Worksheet Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Utah Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion...

123

,"Utah Nonassociated Natural Gas Proved Reserves, Wet After Lease...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

,"Worksheet Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Utah Nonassociated Natural Gas Proved Reserves, Wet After Lease Separation",10,"Annual",2011...

124

Utah Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Reserves...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Adjustments (Billion Cubic Feet) Utah Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Reserves Adjustments (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4...

125

Utah Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Reserves...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Extensions (Billion Cubic Feet) Utah Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Reserves Extensions (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4...

126

,"Louisiana State Offshore Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Louisiana State Offshore Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic...

127

,"Louisiana State Offshore Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Louisiana State Offshore Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic...

128

,"U.S. Federal Offshore Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","U.S. Federal Offshore Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic...

129

,"California - Los Angeles Basin Onshore Natural Gas, Wet After...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","California - Los Angeles Basin Onshore Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Proved Reserves...

130

,"California Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","California Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion...

131

,"California State Offshore Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","California State Offshore Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Proved Reserves (Billion...

132

,"California State Offshore Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","California State Offshore Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved...

133

,"California - Coastal Region Onshore Natural Gas, Wet After...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","California - Coastal Region Onshore Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Proved Reserves...

134

,"California Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet After Lease...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","California Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves...

135

,"California - San Joaquin Basin Onshore Natural Gas, Wet After...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","California - San Joaquin Basin Onshore Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Proved Reserves...

136

,"California Federal Offshore Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","California Federal Offshore Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Proved Reserves (Billion...

137

,"California Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Proved Reserves...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","California Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic...

138

,"Ohio Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

,"Worksheet Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Ohio Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic...

139

,"Ohio Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

,"Worksheet Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Ohio Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion...

140

,"Ohio Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Proved Reserves...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

,"Worksheet Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Ohio Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "wet bulk density" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Wet Gasification of Ethanol Residue: A Preliminary Assessment  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A preliminary technoeconomic assessment has been made of several options for the application of catalytic hydrothermal gasification (wet gasification) to ethanol processing residues.

Brown, Michael D.; Elliott, Douglas C.

2008-09-22T23:59:59.000Z

142

,"North Dakota Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet)" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description"," Of...

143

,"Michigan Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet After Lease...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Michigan Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves...

144

,"Michigan Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Michigan Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic...

145

,"Michigan Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Proved Reserves...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Michigan Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic...

146

,"Ohio Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas Proved Reserves, Wet...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

,"Worksheet Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Ohio Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas Proved Reserves, Wet After Lease...

147

,"Ohio Nonassociated Natural Gas Proved Reserves, Wet After Lease...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

,"Worksheet Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Ohio Nonassociated Natural Gas Proved Reserves, Wet After Lease Separation",10,"Annual",20...

148

NETL: Control Technology - Field Testing of a Wet FGD Additive...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Enhanced Mercury Control URS Corporation will demonstrate the use of an additive in wet lime or limestone flue gas desulfurization (FGD) systems to prevent oxidized mercury that...

149

,"Estimated Production of Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Estimated Production of Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation " ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Lates...

150

Wetting Properties of Molten Silicon with Graphite Materials  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Abstract Scope, The wetting behavior of molten-silicon/refractory-materials system is important in ... Electrorefining of Metallurgical Grade Silicon in Molten Salts.

151

,"Colorado Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Proved Reserves...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Colorado Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic...

152

,"Colorado Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet After Lease...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Colorado Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves...

153

,"Colorado Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Colorado Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic...

154

Gulf of Mexico Federal Offshore Percentage of Natural Gas, Wet...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Reserves from Greater than 200 Meters Deep (Percent) Gulf of Mexico Federal Offshore Percentage of Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves from Greater than 200...

155

Gulf of Mexico Federal Offshore Percentage of Natural Gas, Wet...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

from Greater than 200 Meters Deep (Percent) Gulf of Mexico Federal Offshore Percentage of Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Production from Greater than 200 Meters...

156

Gulf of Mexico Federal Offshore Natural Gas, Wet After Lease...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Greater than 200 Meters Deep (Billion Cubic Feet) Gulf of Mexico Federal Offshore Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves from Greater than 200 Meters Deep...

157

Gulf of Mexico Federal Offshore Natural Gas, Wet After Lease...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Greater than 200 Meters Deep (Billion Cubic Feet) Gulf of Mexico Federal Offshore Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Production from Greater than 200 Meters Deep (Billion...

158

Gulf of Mexico Federal Offshore Natural Gas, Wet After Lease...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Less than 200 Meters Deep (Billion Cubic Feet) Gulf of Mexico Federal Offshore Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Production from Less than 200 Meters Deep (Billion Cubic...

159

Gulf of Mexico Federal Offshore Natural Gas, Wet After Lease...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Less than 200 Meters Deep (Billion Cubic Feet) Gulf of Mexico Federal Offshore Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves from Less than 200 Meters Deep (Billion...

160

,"Texas - RRC District 5 Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

,"Worksheet Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Texas - RRC District 5 Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Proved Reserves (Billion...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "wet bulk density" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

,"Texas - RRC District 3 Onshore Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

,"Worksheet Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Texas - RRC District 3 Onshore Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved...

162

,"Texas - RRC District 9 Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

,"Worksheet Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Texas - RRC District 9 Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Proved Reserves (Billion...

163

,"Texas - RRC District 5 Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

,"Worksheet Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Texas - RRC District 5 Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved...

164

,"Texas - RRC District 8 Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

,"Worksheet Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Texas - RRC District 8 Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved...

165

,"Texas Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

,"Worksheet Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Texas Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic...

166

,"Texas Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Proved Reserves...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

,"Worksheet Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Texas Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic...

167

,"Texas Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

,"Worksheet Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Texas Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion...

168

,"Texas - RRC District 6 Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

,"Worksheet Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Texas - RRC District 6 Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved...

169

,"Texas State Offshore Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

,"Worksheet Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Texas State Offshore Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic...

170

,"Texas - RRC District 2 Onshore Natural Gas, Wet After Lease...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

,"Worksheet Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Texas - RRC District 2 Onshore Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Proved Reserves...

171

,"Texas - RRC District 10 Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

,"Worksheet Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Texas - RRC District 10 Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Proved Reserves (Billion...

172

,"Texas - RRC District 3 Onshore Natural Gas, Wet After Lease...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

,"Worksheet Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Texas - RRC District 3 Onshore Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Proved Reserves...

173

,"Texas State Offshore Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

,"Worksheet Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Texas State Offshore Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved...

174

,"Texas - RRC District 8A Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

,"Worksheet Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Texas - RRC District 8A Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved...

175

,"Texas - RRC District 1 Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

,"Worksheet Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Texas - RRC District 1 Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Proved Reserves (Billion...

176

,"Texas - RRC District 4 Onshore Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

,"Worksheet Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Texas - RRC District 4 Onshore Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved...

177

,"Texas - RRC District 5 Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

,"Worksheet Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Texas - RRC District 5 Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved...

178

,"Texas - RRC District 10 Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

,"Worksheet Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Texas - RRC District 10 Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved...

179

,"Texas - RRC District 7B Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

,"Worksheet Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Texas - RRC District 7B Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved...

180

,"Texas - RRC District 4 Onshore Natural Gas, Wet After Lease...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

,"Worksheet Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Texas - RRC District 4 Onshore Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Proved Reserves...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "wet bulk density" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

,"Texas State Offshore Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

,"Worksheet Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Texas State Offshore Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves...

182

,"Texas - RRC District 9 Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

,"Worksheet Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Texas - RRC District 9 Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved...

183

,"Texas - RRC District 6 Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

,"Worksheet Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Texas - RRC District 6 Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Proved Reserves (Billion...

184

,"Texas - RRC District 2 Onshore Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

,"Worksheet Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Texas - RRC District 2 Onshore Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved...

185

,"Texas - RRC District 1 Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

,"Worksheet Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Texas - RRC District 1 Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved...

186

,"Texas - RRC District 7C Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

,"Worksheet Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Texas - RRC District 7C Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved...

187

,"Texas - RRC District 8 Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

,"Worksheet Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Texas - RRC District 8 Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved...

188

,"Texas - RRC District 8 Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

,"Worksheet Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Texas - RRC District 8 Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Proved Reserves (Billion...

189

,"Texas - RRC District 6 Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

,"Worksheet Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Texas - RRC District 6 Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved...

190

,"Texas - RRC District 9 Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

,"Worksheet Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Texas - RRC District 9 Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved...

191

,"Texas - RRC District 1 Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

,"Worksheet Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Texas - RRC District 1 Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved...

192

,"Texas - RRC District 10 Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

,"Worksheet Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Texas - RRC District 10 Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved...

193

BERYLLIUM MEASUREMENT IN COMMERCIALLY AVAILABLE WET WIPES  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Analysis for beryllium by fluorescence is now an established method which is used in many government-run laboratories and commercial facilities. This study investigates the use of this technique using commercially available wet wipes. The fluorescence method is widely documented and has been approved as a standard test method by ASTM International and the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH). The procedure involves dissolution of samples in aqueous ammonium bifluoride solution and then adding a small aliquot to a basic hydroxybenzoquinoline sulfonate fluorescent dye (Berylliant{trademark} Inc. Detection Solution Part No. CH-2) , and measuring the fluorescence. This method is specific to beryllium. This work explores the use of three different commercial wipes spiked with beryllium, as beryllium acetate or as beryllium oxide and subsequent analysis by optical fluorescence. The effect of possible interfering metals such as Fe, Ti and Pu in the wipe medium is also examined.

Youmans-Mcdonald, L.

2011-02-18T23:59:59.000Z

194

Mercury Emissions Control in Wet FGD Systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Babcock & Wilcox Company (B&W) and McDermott Technology, Inc. (MTI) have had a continuing program over the past decade for characterizing and optimizing mercury control in flue gas desulfurization (FGD) systems. These efforts have led to the characterization of mercury emissions control at two utility installations and full-scale demonstration (55 MW and 1300 MW) of the effect of a mercury control performance enhancement additive for wet FGD systems. This paper presents the results of the mercury emissions control testing conducted at these two sites. The performance is related to EPA Information Collection Request (ICR) data from an FGD system supplier’s perspective, highlighting the need to consider the effects of system design and operation when evaluating mercury emissions control performance.

Paul S. Nolan; Babcock Wilcox; Kevin E. Redinger; Babcock Wilcox; Gerald T. Amrhein; Gregory A. Kudlac

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

195

Effects Of Steam-Flaked Corn Density And Roughage Concentration On In Vitro Fermentation, Performance, Carcass Quality, And Acid-Base Balance Of Finishing Beef Cattle, And Particle Distribution Of Corn Steam Flaked To Varying Densities.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??In Exp. 1, 128 beef steers were used in a 2 x 2 factorial to evaluate bulk densities of steam-flaked corn (SFC; 335 or 386… (more)

Hales, Kristin E.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

196

Method for wetting a boron alloy to graphite  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method is provided for wetting a graphite substrate and spreading a a boron alloy over the substrate. The wetted substrate may be in the form of a needle for an effective ion emission source. The method may also be used to wet a graphite substrate for subsequent joining with another graphite substrate or other metal, or to form a protective coating over a graphite substrate. A noneutectic alloy of boron is formed with a metal selected from the group consisting of nickel (Ni), palladium (Pd), and platinum (Pt) with excess boron, i.e., and atomic percentage of boron effective to precipitate boron at a wetting temperature of less than the liquid-phase boundary temperature of the alloy. The alloy is applied to the substrate and the graphite substrate is then heated to the wetting temperature and maintained at the wetting temperature for a time effective for the alloy to wet and spread over the substrate. The excess boron is evenly dispersed in the alloy and is readily available to promote the wetting and spreading action of the alloy. 1 fig.

Storms, E.K.

1987-08-21T23:59:59.000Z

197

California Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) California Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1970's 1,881 1980's 1,792 1,424 1,230 1,120 1,006 1990's 911 901 799 817 808 736 610 570 453 355 2000's 754 842 796 759 767 799 780 686 621 612 2010's 503 510 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 8/1/2013 Next Release Date: 8/1/2014 Referring Pages: Nonassociated Natural Gas Proved Reserves, Wet After Lease Separation, as of Dec. 31 California Nonassociated Natural Gas Proved Reserves, Wet After

198

Texas State Offshore Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Proved  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Texas State Offshore Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1980's 1,112 1,073 739 634 564 610 1990's 461 477 350 337 230 313 293 290 350 419 2000's 400 468 436 456 321 265 305 261 220 164 2010's 131 118 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 8/1/2013 Next Release Date: 8/1/2014 Referring Pages: Natural Gas Proved Reserves, Wet After Lease Separation, as of Dec. 31 TX, State Offshore Natural Gas Reserves Summary as of Dec. 31 Natural Gas Proved Reserves, Wet After Lease Separation, as of Dec.

199

Louisiana State Offshore Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Louisiana State Offshore Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1980's 2,820 1,100 1,218 1,002 1,042 1990's 812 875 691 789 820 714 626 613 473 541 2000's 592 627 428 448 333 370 386 327 248 215 2010's 279 468 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 8/1/2013 Next Release Date: 8/1/2014 Referring Pages: Nonassociated Natural Gas Proved Reserves, Wet After Lease Separation, as of Dec. 31 LA, State Offshore Nonassociated Natural Gas Proved Reserves, Wet

200

California State Offshore Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) California State Offshore Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1970's 8 1980's 6 12 22 22 29 1990's 6 5 4 2 4 3 2 2 5 19 2000's 5 5 6 7 2 1 5 4 3 4 2010's 3 3 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 8/1/2013 Next Release Date: 8/1/2014 Referring Pages: Nonassociated Natural Gas Proved Reserves, Wet After Lease Separation, as of Dec. 31 CA, State Offshore Nonassociated Natural Gas Proved Reserves, Wet

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "wet bulk density" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Alabama Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation,  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Alabama Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1970's 13 1980's 23 25 1990's 25 23 30 46 56 44 38 30 28 27 2000's 29 26 31 32 32 29 18 20 19 29 2010's 38 48 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 8/1/2013 Next Release Date: 8/1/2014 Referring Pages: Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas Proved Reserves, Wet After Lease Separation, as of Dec. 31 Alabama Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas Proved Reserves, Wet After

202

California State Offshore Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Proved  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) California State Offshore Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1970's 234 1980's 166 256 254 243 235 1990's 194 60 63 65 63 59 49 56 44 77 2000's 91 85 91 83 87 90 90 83 57 57 2010's 66 82 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 8/1/2013 Next Release Date: 8/1/2014 Referring Pages: Natural Gas Proved Reserves, Wet After Lease Separation, as of Dec. 31 CA, State Offshore Natural Gas Reserves Summary as of Dec. 31 Natural Gas Proved Reserves, Wet After Lease Separation, as of Dec.

203

Miscellaneous States Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation,  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Miscellaneous States Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1970's 142 1980's 146 181 47 50 63 52 95 53 56 48 1990's 50 62 82 87 56 37 40 13 22 13 2000's 23 64 80 120 98 118 120 226 263 271 2010's 353 270 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 8/1/2013 Next Release Date: 8/1/2014 Referring Pages: Nonassociated Natural Gas Proved Reserves, Wet After Lease Separation, as of Dec. 31 Miscellaneous Nonassociated Natural Gas Proved Reserves, Wet After

204

Ohio Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Ohio Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1970's 432 1980's 282 165 158 396 364 395 522 477 749 686 1990's 844 805 780 763 780 699 715 594 548 777 2000's 717 631 772 823 767 714 801 926 886 799 2010's 742 684 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 8/1/2013 Next Release Date: 8/1/2014 Referring Pages: Nonassociated Natural Gas Proved Reserves, Wet After Lease Separation, as of Dec. 31 Ohio Nonassociated Natural Gas Proved Reserves, Wet After Lease

205

Florida Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Florida Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1970's 0 1980's 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1990's 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2000's 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2010's 26 4 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 8/1/2013 Next Release Date: 8/1/2014 Referring Pages: Nonassociated Natural Gas Proved Reserves, Wet After Lease Separation, as of Dec. 31 Florida Nonassociated Natural Gas Proved Reserves, Wet After Lease

206

Micro benchtop optics by bulk silicon micromachining  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Micromachining of bulk silicon utilizing the parallel etching characteristics of bulk silicon and integrating the parallel etch planes of silicon with silicon wafer bonding and impurity doping, enables the fabrication of on-chip optics with in situ aligned etched grooves for optical fibers, micro-lenses, photodiodes, and laser diodes. Other optical components that can be microfabricated and integrated include semi-transparent beam splitters, micro-optical scanners, pinholes, optical gratings, micro-optical filters, etc. Micromachining of bulk silicon utilizing the parallel etching characteristics thereof can be utilized to develop miniaturization of bio-instrumentation such as wavelength monitoring by fluorescence spectrometers, and other miniaturized optical systems such as Fabry-Perot interferometry for filtering of wavelengths, tunable cavity lasers, micro-holography modules, and wavelength splitters for optical communication systems.

Lee, Abraham P. (Walnut Creek, CA); Pocha, Michael D. (Livermore, CA); McConaghy, Charles F. (Livermore, CA); Deri, Robert J. (Pleasanton, CA)

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

207

High temperature magnetic properties of SmCo{sub 5}/{alpha}-Fe(Co) bulk nanocomposite magnets  

SciTech Connect

To find alternative high temperature magnets containing no heavy rare earths for power applications, SmCo{sub 5}/Fe bulk nanocomposite magnets with enhanced energy density and high thermal stability have been produced by using a ball-milling plus warm-compaction route. Up to 30% of the Fe soft magnetic phase has been added to the composites with grain size <20 nm distributed homogenously in the matrix of the SmCo{sub 5} hard magnetic phase. It was observed that the microstructure does not change with temperature up to 500 Degree-Sign C. It is also observed that the thermal stability of bulk nanocomposite samples is closely related to bulk density. Energy products above 11 MGOe have been obtained at 300 Degree-Sign C in fully dense bulk SmCo{sub 5}/Fe nanocomposite magnets, which is 65% higher than that of a single-phase counterpart at the same temperature.

Rong Chuanbing; Poudyal, Narayan; Liu, X. B.; Ping Liu, J. [Department of Physics, University of Texas at Arlington, Arlington, Texas 76019 (United States); Zhang Ying [Department of Physics, University of Texas at Arlington, Arlington, Texas 76019 (United States); Division of Materials Science and Engineering, Ames Laboratory, USDOE, Iowa State University, Ames, Iowa 50011 (United States); Kramer, M. J. [Division of Materials Science and Engineering, Ames Laboratory, USDOE, Iowa State University, Ames, Iowa 50011 (United States)

2012-10-08T23:59:59.000Z

208

Interface Width and Bulk Stability: requirements for the simulation of Deeply Quenched Liquid-Gas Systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Simulations of liquid-gas systems with extended interfaces are observed to fail to give accurate results for two reasons: the interface can get ``stuck'' on the lattice or a density overshoot develops around the interface. In the first case the bulk densities can take a range of values, dependent on the initial conditions. In the second case inaccurate bulk densities are found. In this communication we derive the minimum interface width required for the accurate simulation of liquid gas systems with a diffuse interface. We demonstrate this criterion for lattice Boltzmann simulations of a van der Waals gas. When combining this criterion with predictions for the bulk stability we can predict the parameter range that leads to stable and accurate simulation results. This allows us to identify parameter ranges leading to high density ratios of over 1000. This is despite the fact that lattice Boltzmann simulations of liquid-gas systems were believed to be restricted to modest density ratios of less than 20.

A. J. Wagner; C. M. Pooley

2007-06-11T23:59:59.000Z

209

Ohio Distillate Fuel Oil Stocks at Refineries, Bulk Terminals, and ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Ohio Distillate Fuel Oil Stocks at Refineries, Bulk Terminals, and Natural Gas Plants (Thousand Barrels)

210

Wisconsin Propane and Propylene Stocks at Refineries, Bulk ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Wisconsin Propane and Propylene Stocks at Refineries, Bulk Terminals, and Natural Gas Plants (Thousand Barrels)

211

Michigan Finished Motor Gasoline Stocks at Refineries, Bulk ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Michigan Finished Motor Gasoline Stocks at Refineries, Bulk Terminals, and Natural Gas Plants (Thousand Barrels)

212

Colorado Propane and Propylene Stocks at Refineries, Bulk ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Colorado Propane and Propylene Stocks at Refineries, Bulk Terminals, and Natural Gas Plants (Thousand Barrels)

213

Colorado Finished Motor Gasoline Stocks at Refineries, Bulk ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Colorado Finished Motor Gasoline Stocks at Refineries, Bulk Terminals, and Natural Gas Plants (Thousand Barrels)

214

South Dakota Distillate Fuel Oil Stocks at Refineries, Bulk ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

South Dakota Distillate Fuel Oil Stocks at Refineries, Bulk Terminals, and Natural Gas Plants (Thousand Barrels)

215

South Dakota Propane and Propylene Stocks at Refineries, Bulk ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

South Dakota Propane and Propylene Stocks at Refineries, Bulk Terminals, and Natural Gas Plants (Thousand Barrels)

216

The Quantum Energy Density: Improved E  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We establish a physically meaningful representation of a quantum energy density for use in Quantum Monte Carlo calculations. The energy density operator, dened in terms of Hamiltonian components and density operators, returns the correct Hamiltonian when integrated over a volume containing a cluster of particles. This property is demonstrated for a helium-neon \\gas," showing that atomic energies obtained from the energy density correspond to eigenvalues of isolated systems. The formation energies of defects or interfaces are typically calculated as total energy dierences. Using a model of delta-doped silicon (where dopant atoms form a thin plane) we show how interfacial energies can be calculated more eciently with the energy density, since the region of interest is small. We also demonstrate how the energy density correctly transitions to the bulk limit away from the interface where the correct energy is obtainable from a separate total energy calculation.

Krogel, Jaron [University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign; Yu, Min [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL); Kim, Jeongnim [ORNL; Ceperley, David M. [University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

217

Bulk materials storage handling and transportation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This book contains papers on bulk materials storage, handling, and transportation. Topic areas covered include: mechanical handling; pneumatic conveying; transportation; freight pipeliners; storage and discharge systems; integrated handling systems; automation; environment and sampling; feeders and flow control; structural design; large mobile machines; and grain handling.

Not Available

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

218

Bulk-edge correspondence in fractional Chern insulators  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

It has been recently realized that strong interactions in topological Bloch bands give rise to the appearance of novel states of matter. Here we study connections between these systems -- fractional Chern insulators and the fractional quantum Hall states -- via generalization of a gauge-fixed Wannier-Qi construction in the cylinder geometry. Our setup offers a number of important advantages compared to the earlier exact diagonalization studies on a torus. Most notably, it gives access to edge states and to a single-cut orbital entanglement spectrum, hence to the physics of bulk-edge correspondence. It is also readily implemented in the state-of-the-art density matrix renormalisation group method that allows for numerical simulations of significantly larger systems. We demonstrate our general approach on examples of flat-band models on ruby and kagome lattices at bosonic filling fractions $\

Zhao Liu; D. L. Kovrizhin; Emil J. Bergholtz

2013-04-04T23:59:59.000Z

219

Density-permittivity relationships for powdered and granular materials  

SciTech Connect

Relationships between the permittivities of powdered or granular solid materials and their bulk densities (density of the air-particle mixture) are discussed. Linear relationships between functions of the permittivity and bulk density are identified that are useful in determining permittivity of solids from measurements of the permittivity of pulverized samples. The usefulness of several dielectric mixture equations for calculating solid material permittivity from measured permittivity of pulverized samples is also discussed. Results of testing linear extrapolation techniques and dielectric mixture equations on pulverized coal, limestone, plastics, and granular wheat and flour are presented. Recommendations are provided for reliable estimation of solid material permittivities or changes in permittivities of powdered and granular materials as a result of changes in their bulk densities.

Nelson, S.O. [USDA ARS, Athens, GA (United States). Russell Research Center

2005-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

220

Texas - RRC District 7B Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Texas - RRC District 7B Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "wet bulk density" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Texas - RRC District 8A Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Texas - RRC District 8A Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved...

222

Texas - RRC District 7C Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Texas - RRC District 7C Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved...

223

Texas - RRC District 3 Onshore Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Texas - RRC District 3 Onshore Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet)...

224

Ultra-soft x-ray absorption spectroscopy: A bulk and surface probe of materials  

SciTech Connect

Direct comparisons between surface and bulk of diverse materials can be made by simultaneous electron yield (5 nm depth sensitivity) and fluorescence yield (200 nm) ultra soft x-ray absorption spectroscopy measurements utilizing a rapid sample interchange apparatus. For example the orientations of functional groups have been characterized at and near the surface of a series of model polymeric materials highlighting the chemical and molecular sensitivity of ultra soft x-ray absorption spectroscopy. In addition we discuss a bulk sensitive use of fluorescence yield to non destructively study a buried metal polymer interface. A second bulk sensitive example is the use of fluorescence yield oxygen K near edge x-ray spectroscopy as a method to determine the hole state density of high Tc materials.

Fischer, D.A. [National Institute of Standards and Technology, Gaithersburg, MD (United States); Mitchell, G.E.; Dekoven, B.M. [Dow Chemical Co., Midland, MI (United States); Yeh, A.T.; Gland, J.L. [Michigan Univ., Ann Arbor, MI (United States); Moodenbaugh, A.R. [Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States)

1993-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

225

Ultra-soft x-ray absorption spectroscopy: A bulk and surface probe of materials  

SciTech Connect

Direct comparisons between surface and bulk of diverse materials can be made by simultaneous electron yield (5 nm depth sensitivity) and fluorescence yield (200 nm) ultra soft x-ray absorption spectroscopy measurements utilizing a rapid sample interchange apparatus. For example the orientations of functional groups have been characterized at and near the surface of a series of model polymeric materials highlighting the chemical and molecular sensitivity of ultra soft x-ray absorption spectroscopy. In addition we discuss a bulk sensitive use of fluorescence yield to non destructively study a buried metal polymer interface. A second bulk sensitive example is the use of fluorescence yield oxygen K near edge x-ray spectroscopy as a method to determine the hole state density of high Tc materials.

Fischer, D.A. (National Institute of Standards and Technology, Gaithersburg, MD (United States)); Mitchell, G.E.; Dekoven, B.M. (Dow Chemical Co., Midland, MI (United States)); Yeh, A.T.; Gland, J.L. (Michigan Univ., Ann Arbor, MI (United States)); Moodenbaugh, A.R. (Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States))

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

226

California - Coastal Region Onshore Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) California - Coastal Region Onshore Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1970's 307 1980's 265 265 325 344 256 254 261 243 220 233 1990's 228 220 196 135 145 109 120 129 116 233 2000's 244 185 197 173 188 269 208 211 150 168 2010's 178 172 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 8/1/2013 Next Release Date: 8/1/2014 Referring Pages: Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas Proved Reserves, Wet After Lease

227

Montana Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Proved Reserves (Billion  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Montana Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1970's 837 1980's 1,308 1,336 870 921 825 884 823 801 834 889 1990's 920 848 875 684 727 792 806 769 789 851 2000's 892 907 914 1,068 1,002 998 1,069 1,067 1,014 993 2010's 959 792 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 8/1/2013 Next Release Date: 8/1/2014 Referring Pages: Natural Gas Proved Reserves, Wet After Lease Separation, as of Dec. 31 Montana Natural Gas Reserves Summary as of Dec. 31

228

Montana Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation,  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Montana Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1970's 51 1980's 122 89 81 108 77 91 98 97 101 68 1990's 86 66 61 53 55 53 51 42 52 67 2000's 70 85 94 112 130 161 195 219 197 312 2010's 302 270 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 8/1/2013 Next Release Date: 8/1/2014 Referring Pages: Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas Proved Reserves, Wet After Lease Separation, as of Dec. 31

229

Louisiana - North Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet After Lease  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Louisiana - North Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1970's 765 1980's 916 1,040 832 775 690 632 567 488 249 237 1990's 241 192 160 120 134 133 255 287 183 260 2000's 186 168 159 139 107 98 90 73 78 53 2010's 73 98 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 8/1/2013 Next Release Date: 8/1/2014 Referring Pages: Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas Proved Reserves, Wet After Lease

230

New York Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) New York Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1970's 211 1980's 208 262 226 295 387 367 457 410 351 364 1990's 354 331 329 264 240 195 229 223 217 212 2000's 320 311 315 365 324 346 361 365 360 196 2010's 271 245 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 8/1/2013 Next Release Date: 8/1/2014 Referring Pages: Nonassociated Natural Gas Proved Reserves, Wet After Lease Separation, as of Dec. 31

231

California - Los Angeles Basin Onshore Natural Gas, Wet After Lease  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) California - Los Angeles Basin Onshore Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1970's 176 1980's 207 163 104 115 163 188 149 155 158 141 1990's 110 120 103 108 108 115 112 146 154 174 2000's 204 195 218 196 184 186 161 154 81 91 2010's 92 102 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 8/1/2013 Next Release Date: 8/1/2014 Referring Pages: Natural Gas Proved Reserves, Wet After Lease Separation, as of Dec. 31 CA, Los Angeles Basin Onshore Natural Gas Reserves Summary as of

232

Montana Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Montana Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1970's 786 1980's 1,186 1,247 789 813 748 793 725 704 733 821 1990's 834 782 814 631 672 739 755 727 737 784 2000's 822 822 820 956 872 837 874 848 817 681 2010's 657 522 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 8/1/2013 Next Release Date: 8/1/2014 Referring Pages: Nonassociated Natural Gas Proved Reserves, Wet After Lease Separation, as of Dec. 31

233

Utah Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Reserves Sales ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Sales (Billion Cubic Feet) Utah Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Reserves Sales (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8...

234

Utah Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Reserves...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Sales (Billion Cubic Feet) Utah Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Reserves Sales (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6...

235

Utah Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Reserves Acquisitions...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Acquisitions (Billion Cubic Feet) Utah Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Reserves Acquisitions (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6...

236

Utah Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, New...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

New Field Discoveries (Billion Cubic Feet) Utah Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, New Field Discoveries (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3...

237

Utah Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Reserves Adjustments...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Adjustments (Billion Cubic Feet) Utah Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Reserves Adjustments (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6...

238

Utah Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Reserves Revision...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Decreases (Billion Cubic Feet) Utah Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Reserves Revision Decreases (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6...

239

Utah Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Reserves Revision...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Increases (Billion Cubic Feet) Utah Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Reserves Revision Increases (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6...

240

Utah Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Reserves Extensions...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Extensions (Billion Cubic Feet) Utah Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Reserves Extensions (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "wet bulk density" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Utah Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Reserves New Field...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

New Field Discoveries (Billion Cubic Feet) Utah Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Reserves New Field Discoveries (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3...

242

Utah Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Sales (Billion Cubic Feet) Utah Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Reserves Sales (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5...

243

Utah Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Reserves Estimated...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Estimated Production (Billion Cubic Feet) Utah Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Reserves Estimated Production (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4...

244

California Federal Offshore Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet After  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) California Federal Offshore Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1970's 249 1980's 307 1,110 1,249 1,312 1,252 1990's 1,229 995 987 976 1,077 1,195 1,151 498 437 488 2000's 500 490 459 456 412 776 756 752 702 731 2010's 722 711 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 8/1/2013 Next Release Date: 8/1/2014 Referring Pages: Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas Proved Reserves, Wet After Lease

245

Michigan Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation,  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Michigan Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1970's 733 1980's 883 758 719 824 774 689 577 569 491 432 1990's 408 437 352 328 357 326 347 281 228 227 2000's 214 159 214 269 193 153 192 179 148 77 2010's 72 77 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 8/1/2013 Next Release Date: 8/1/2014 Referring Pages: Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas Proved Reserves, Wet After Lease Separation, as of Dec. 31

246

Louisiana State Offshore Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Proved  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Louisiana State Offshore Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1980's 3,269 1,351 1,478 1,209 1,273 1990's 1,019 1,082 845 946 988 862 783 743 571 661 2000's 721 772 512 527 394 433 442 392 934 728 2010's 386 519 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 8/1/2013 Next Release Date: 8/1/2014 Referring Pages: Natural Gas Proved Reserves, Wet After Lease Separation, as of Dec. 31 LA, State Offshore Natural Gas Reserves Summary as of Dec. 31

247

Miscellaneous States Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Proved  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Miscellaneous States Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1970's 156 1980's 180 193 74 81 77 77 136 66 84 87 1990's 72 76 93 96 67 69 68 44 39 67 2000's 42 83 100 134 110 132 139 241 272 349 2010's 363 393 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 8/1/2013 Next Release Date: 8/1/2014 Referring Pages: Natural Gas Proved Reserves, Wet After Lease Separation, as of Dec. 31 Miscellaneous Natural Gas Reserves Summary as of Dec. 31

248

North Dakota Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Proved Reserves  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) North Dakota Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1970's 485 1980's 594 654 696 673 643 650 610 578 593 625 1990's 650 533 567 585 568 518 512 531 501 475 2000's 487 495 524 497 465 508 539 572 603 1,213 2010's 1,869 2,652 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 8/1/2013 Next Release Date: 8/1/2014 Referring Pages: Natural Gas Proved Reserves, Wet After Lease Separation, as of Dec. 31 North Dakota Natural Gas Reserves Summary as of Dec. 31

249

North Dakota Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) North Dakota Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1970's 284 1980's 355 401 448 416 376 319 317 302 327 312 1990's 316 290 301 311 293 255 257 274 240 225 2000's 223 225 209 181 145 165 182 155 119 143 2010's 152 141 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 8/1/2013 Next Release Date: 8/1/2014 Referring Pages: Nonassociated Natural Gas Proved Reserves, Wet After Lease Separation, as of Dec. 31

250

Miscellaneous States Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet After Lease  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Miscellaneous States Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1970's 14 1980's 34 12 27 31 14 25 41 13 28 39 1990's 22 14 11 9 11 32 28 31 17 54 2000's 19 19 20 14 12 14 19 15 9 78 2010's 10 104 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 8/1/2013 Next Release Date: 8/1/2014 Referring Pages: Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas Proved Reserves, Wet After Lease Separation, as of Dec. 31

251

Wyoming Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation,  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Wyoming Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1970's 1,038 1980's 1,374 1,228 1,060 959 867 710 691 691 616 581 1990's 573 572 624 502 611 879 824 850 794 713 2000's 652 488 561 450 362 384 347 365 223 362 2010's 334 318 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 8/1/2013 Next Release Date: 8/1/2014 Referring Pages: Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas Proved Reserves, Wet After Lease

252

Arkansas Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation,  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Arkansas Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1970's 166 1980's 194 184 174 194 189 157 150 145 157 145 1990's 67 136 133 93 85 104 89 56 38 41 2000's 39 30 38 37 40 46 44 37 12 20 2010's 29 46 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 8/1/2013 Next Release Date: 8/1/2014 Referring Pages: Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas Proved Reserves, Wet After Lease Separation, as of Dec. 31

253

Gulf of Mexico Federal Offshore Natural Gas, Wet After Lease...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

(Billion Cubic Feet) Gulf of Mexico Federal Offshore Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5...

254

Results of WetNet PIP-2 Project  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The second WetNet Precipitation Intercomparison Project (PIP-2) evaluates the performance of 20 satellite precipitation retrieval algorithms, implemented for application with Special Sensor Microwave/Imager (SSM/I) passive microwave (PMW) ...

E. A. Smith; J. E. Lamm; R. Adler; J. Alishouse; K. Aonashi; E. Barrett; P. Bauer; W. Berg; A. Chang; R. Ferraro; J. Ferriday; S. Goodman; N. Grody; C. Kidd; D. Kniveton; C. Kummerow; G. Liu; F. Marzano; A. Mugnai; W. Olson; G. Petty; A. Shibata; R. Spencer; F. Wentz; T. Wilheit; E. Zipser

1998-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

255

Spatial Coherence and Predictability of Indonesian Wet Season Rainfall  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Rainfall from 63 stations across Indonesia is examined for the period 1950–98 to determine the spatial coherence of wet season anomalies. An example of almost unrelated anomalies at two neighboring stations is presented. Principal component ...

Malcolm Haylock; John McBride

2001-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

256

Source apportionment of wet sulfate deposition in eastern North America  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

An analytical model of long distance transport of air pollutants (Fay and Rosenzweig, 1980) has been adapted for the estimation of long term (e.g. annual) wet sulfate deposition in eastern N. America. The model parameters ...

Fay, James A.

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

257

Wet cooling towers: rule-of-thumb design and simulation  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A survey of wet cooling tower literature was performed to develop a simplified method of cooling tower design and simulation for use in power plant cycle optimization. The theory of heat exchange in wet cooling towers is briefly summarized. The Merkel equation (the fundamental equation of heat transfer in wet cooling towers) is presented and discussed. The cooling tower fill constant (Ka) is defined and values derived. A rule-of-thumb method for the optimized design of cooling towers is presented. The rule-of-thumb design method provides information useful in power plant cycle optimization, including tower dimensions, water consumption rate, exit air temperature, power requirements and construction cost. In addition, a method for simulation of cooling tower performance at various operating conditions is presented. This information is also useful in power plant cycle evaluation. Using the information presented, it will be possible to incorporate wet cooling tower design and simulation into a procedure to evaluate and optimize power plant cycles.

Leeper, S.A.

1981-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

258

Impact of Initial Soil Wetness on Seasonal Atmospheric Prediction  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This study investigates the importance of initial soil wetness in seasonal predictions with dynamical models. Two experiments are performed, each consisting of two ensembles of global climate model integrations initialized from early June ...

M. J. Fennessy; J. Shukla

1999-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

259

California - Los Angeles Basin Onshore Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) California - Los Angeles Basin Onshore Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1970's 1 1980's 0 1 1 1 1 3 0 0 0 0 1990's 0 0 3 0 0 0 0 3 1 0 2000's 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2010's 0 0 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 8/1/2013 Next Release Date: 8/1/2014 Referring Pages: Nonassociated Natural Gas Proved Reserves, Wet After Lease Separation, as of Dec. 31 CA, Los Angeles Basin Onshore Nonassociated Natural Gas Proved

260

California - Coastal Region Onshore Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) California - Coastal Region Onshore Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1970's 395 1980's 330 325 384 405 284 277 275 255 232 238 1990's 232 231 215 201 205 163 168 176 118 233 2000's 244 185 197 174 196 277 214 212 151 169 2010's 180 173 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 8/1/2013 Next Release Date: 8/1/2014 Referring Pages: Natural Gas Proved Reserves, Wet After Lease Separation, as of Dec. 31 CA, Coastal Region Onshore Natural Gas Reserves Summary as of Dec.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "wet bulk density" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

California Federal Offshore Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) California Federal Offshore Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1970's 73 1980's 107 227 217 258 267 1990's 240 179 149 147 110 94 115 58 52 48 2000's 76 50 56 55 47 49 55 53 3 9 2010's 3 0 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 8/1/2013 Next Release Date: 8/1/2014 Referring Pages: Nonassociated Natural Gas Proved Reserves, Wet After Lease Separation, as of Dec. 31 Federal Offshore California Nonassociated Natural Gas Proved

262

Gulf of Mexico Federal Offshore Natural Gas, Wet After Lease...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

(Billion Cubic Feet) Gulf of Mexico Federal Offshore Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Production (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5...

263

Demonstration of a Last Field Wet ESP Conversion -- Installation Summary  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report describes the conversion of the electrostatic precipitator (ESP) on Unit 3 at Mirant's (formerly Potomac Electric Power Company's) Dickerson Generating Station to hybrid, dry-wet operation. This Tailored Collaboration project was undertaken to determine, at full scale, if the conversion of a single field of a conventional dry ESP to wet operation could significantly reduce particulate emissions and provide reliable operation with an acceptable level of maintenance. Specifically, the performan...

2001-02-27T23:59:59.000Z

264

Air Toxics Control by Wet Flue Gas Desulfurization Systems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report provides an update on three tasks associated with the EPRI project, Air Toxics Control by Wet Flue Gas Desulfurization (FGD) Systems. The first task is an investigation of the factors that influence and control the oxidation-reduction potential (ORP) at which a limestone forced oxidation FGD system operates. Both a literature review and a numerical analysis of full-scale wet FGD data were conducted. Results from this task are presented and discussed in Section 2 of the ...

2012-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

265

Bulk viscosity in quasi particle models  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We discuss transport properties of dynamical fluid composed of quasi-particles whose masses depend on temperature and charge chemical potentials. Based on the relativistic kinetic theory formulated under the relaxation time approximation, we derive a general expression for the bulk viscosity in the quasi-particle medium. We show that dynamically generated particle masses imply an essential modification of the fluid compressibility. As an application of our results we consider a class of quasi-particle models with the chiral phase transition belonging to O(4) and Z(2) universality class. Based on the Ginzburg-Landau and the scaling theory we study the critical properties of the bulk viscosity zeta near the phase transition. We show that under the relaxation time approximation the zeta is not expected to show singular behavior near the O(4) and Z(2) critical point through static critical exponents.

Sasaki, C

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

266

Bulk viscosity in quasi particle models  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We discuss transport properties of dynamical fluid composed of quasi-particles whose masses depend on temperature and charge chemical potentials. Based on the relativistic kinetic theory formulated under the relaxation time approximation, we derive a general expression for the bulk viscosity in the quasi-particle medium. We show that dynamically generated particle masses imply an essential modification of the fluid compressibility. As an application of our results we consider a class of quasi-particle models with the chiral phase transition belonging to O(4) and Z(2) universality class. Based on the Ginzburg-Landau and the scaling theory we study the critical properties of the bulk viscosity zeta near the phase transition. We show that under the relaxation time approximation the zeta is not expected to show singular behavior near the O(4) and Z(2) critical point through static critical exponents.

C. Sasaki; K. Redlich

2008-06-29T23:59:59.000Z

267

Isotopically engineered semiconductors: from the bulk tonanostructures  

SciTech Connect

Research performed with semiconductors with controlled isotopic composition is evolving from the measurement of fundamental properties in the bulk to those measured in superlattices and nanostructures. This is driven in part by interests associated with the fields of 'spintronics' and quantum computing. In this topical review, which is dedicated to Prof. Abstreiter, we introduce the subject by reviewing classic and recent measurements of phonon frequencies, thermal conductivity, bandgap renormalizations, and spin coherence lifetimes in isotopically controlled bulk group IV semiconductors. Next, we review phonon properties measured in isotope heterostructures, including pioneering work made possible by superlattices grown by the group of Prof. Abstreiter. We close the review with an outlook on the exciting future possibilities offered through isotope control in 1, 2, and 3 dimensions that will be possible due to advances in nanoscience.

Ager III, Joel W.; Haller, Eugene E.

2006-04-07T23:59:59.000Z

268

Hydrogen isotope separation utilizing bulk getters  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Tritium and deuterium are separated from a gaseous mixture thereof, derived from a nuclear fusion reactor or some other source, by providing a casing with a bulk getter therein for absorbing the gaseous mixture to produce an initial loading of the getter, partially desorbing the getter to produce a desorbed mixture which is tritium-enriched, pumping the desorbed mixture into a separate container, the remaining gaseous loading in the getter being deuterium-enriched, desorbing the getter to a substantially greater extent to produce a deuterium-enriched gaseous mixture, and removing the deuterium-enriched mixture into another container. The bulk getter may comprise a zirconium-aluminum alloy, or a zirconium-vanadium-iron alloy. The partial desorption may reduce the loading by approximately fifty percent. The basic procedure may be extended to produce a multistage isotope separator, including at least one additional bulk getter into which the tritium-enriched mixture is absorbed. The second getter is then partially desorbed to produce a desorbed mixture which is further tritium-enriched. The last-mentioned mixture is then removed from the container for the second getter, which is then desorbed to a substantially greater extent to produce a desorbed mixture which is deuterium-enriched. The last-mentioned mixture is then removed so that the cycle can be continued and repeated. The method of isotope separation is also applicable to other hydrogen isotopes, in that the method can be employed for separating either deuterium or tritium from normal hydrogen.

Knize, Randall J. (Los Angeles, CA); Cecchi, Joseph L. (Lawrenceville, NJ)

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

269

Hydrogen isotope separation utilizing bulk getters  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Tritium and deuterium are separated from a gaseous mixture thereof, derived from a nuclear fusion reactor or some other source, by providing a casing with a bulk getter therein for absorbing the gaseous mixture to produce an initial loading of the getter, partially desorbing the getter to produce a desorbed mixture which is tritium-enriched, pumping the desorbed mixture into a separate container, the remaining gaseous loading in the getter being deuterium-enriched, desorbing the getter to a substantially greater extent to produce a deuterium-enriched gaseous mixture, and removing the deuterium-enriched mixture into another container. The bulk getter may comprise a zirconium-aluminum alloy, or a zirconium-vanadium-iron alloy. The partial desorption may reduce the loading by approximately fifty percent. The basic procedure may be extended to produce a multistage isotope separator, including at least one additional bulk getter into which the tritium-enriched mixture is absorbed. The second getter is then partially desorbed to produce a desorbed mixture which is further tritium-enriched. The last-mentioned mixture is then removed from the container for the second getter, which is then desorbed to a substantially greater extent to produce a desorbed mixture which is deuterium-enriched. The last-mentioned mixture is then removed so that the cycle can be continued and repeated. The method of isotope separation is also applicable to other hydrogen isotopes, in that the method can be employed for separating either deuterium or tritium from normal hydrogen.

Knize, Randall J. (Los Angeles, CA); Cecchi, Joseph L. (Lawrenceville, NJ)

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

270

Hydrogen isotope separation utilizing bulk getters  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Tritium and deuterium are separated from a gaseous mixture thereof, derived from a nuclear fusion reactor or some other source, by providing a casing with a bulk getter therein for absorbing the gaseous mixture to produce an initial loading of the getter, partially desorbing the getter to produce a desorbed mixture which is tritium-enriched, pumping the desorbed mixture into a separate container, the remaining gaseous loading in the getter being deuterium-enriched, desorbing the getter to a substantially greater extent to produce a deuterium-enriched gaseous mixture, and removing the deuterium-enriched mixture into another container. The bulk getter may comprise a zirconium-aluminum alloy, or a zirconium-vanadium-iron alloy. The partial desorption may reduce the loading by approximately fifty percent. The basic procedure may be extended to produce a multistage isotope separator, including at least one additional bulk getter into which the tritium-enriched mixture is absorbed. The second getter is then partially desorbed to produce a desorbed mixture which is further tritium-enriched. The last-mentioned mixture is then removed from the container for the second getter, which is then desorbed to a substantially greater extent to produce a desorbed mixture which is deuterium-enriched. The last-mentioned mixture is then removed so that the cycle can be continued and repeated. The method of isotope separation is also applicable to other hydrogen isotopes, in that the method can be employed for separating either deuterium or tritium from normal hydrogen. 4 figures.

Knize, R.J.; Cecchi, J.L.

1991-08-20T23:59:59.000Z

271

Silicon surface and bulk defect passivation by low temperature PECVD oxides and nitrides  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The effectiveness of PECVD passivation of surface and bulk defects in Si, as well as phosphorous diffused emitters, Is investigated and quantified. Significant hydrogen incorporation coupled with high positive charge density in the PECVD SiN layer is found to play an important role in bulk and surface passivation. It is shown that photo-assisted anneal in a forming gas ambient after PECVD depositions significantly improves the passivation of emitter and bulk defects. PECVD passivation of phosphorous doped emitters and boron doped bare Si surfaces is found to be a strong function of doping concentration. Surface recombination velocity of less than 200 cm/s for 0.2 Ohm-cm and less than 1 cm/s for high resistivity substrates ({approximately} Ohm-cm) were achieved. PECVD passivation improved bulk lifetime in the range of 30% to 70% in multicrystalline Si materials. However, the degree of the passivation was found to be highly material specific. Depending upon the passivation scheme, emitter saturation current density (J{sub oe}) can be reduced by a factor of 3 to 9. Finally, the stability of PECVD oxide/nitride passivation under prolonged UV exposure is established.

Chen, Z.; Rohatgi, A. [Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, GA (United States). Univ. Center of Excellence for Photovoltaics Research and Education; Ruby, D. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

272

Field Testing of a Wet FGD Additive for Enhanced Mercury Control  

SciTech Connect

This document is the final report for DOE-NETL Cooperative Agreement DE-FC26-04NT42309, 'Field Testing of a Wet FGD Additive'. The objective of the project has been to demonstrate the use of two flue gas desulfurization (FGD) additives, Evonik Degussa Corporation's TMT-15 and Nalco Company's Nalco 8034, to prevent the re-emission of elemental mercury (Hg{sup 0}) in flue gas exiting wet FGD systems on coal-fired boilers. Furthermore, the project was intended to demonstrate whether such additives can be used to precipitate most of the mercury (Hg) removed in the wet FGD system as a fine salt that can be separated from the FGD liquor and bulk solid byproducts for separate disposal. The project involved pilot- and full-scale tests of the additives in wet FGD absorbers. The tests were intended to determine required additive dosages to prevent Hg{sup 0} re-emissions and to separate mercury from the normal FGD byproducts for three coal types: Texas lignite/Powder River Basin (PRB) coal blend, high-sulfur Eastern bituminous coal, and low-sulfur Eastern bituminous coal. The project team consists of URS Group, Inc., EPRI, Luminant Power (was TXU Generation Company LP), Southern Company, IPL (an AES company), Evonik Degussa Corporation and the Nalco Company. Luminant Power provided the Texas lignite/PRB co-fired test site for pilot FGD tests and project cost sharing. Southern Company provided the low-sulfur Eastern bituminous coal host site for wet scrubbing tests, the pilot- and full-scale jet bubbling reactor (JBR) FGD systems tested, and project cost sharing. IPL provided the high-sulfur Eastern bituminous coal full-scale FGD test site and cost sharing. Evonik Degussa Corporation provided the TMT-15 additive, and the Nalco Company provided the Nalco 8034 additive. Both companies also supplied technical support to the test program as in-kind cost sharing. The project was conducted in six tasks. Of the six tasks, Task 1 involved project planning and Task 6 involved management and reporting. The other four tasks involved field testing on FGD systems, either at pilot or full scale. These four tasks included: Task 2 - Pilot Additive Testing in Texas Lignite Flue Gas; Task 3 - Full-scale FGD Additive Testing in High-sulfur Eastern Bituminous Flue Gas; Task 4 - Pilot Wet Scrubber Additive Tests at Plant Yates; and Task 5 - Full-scale Additive Tests at Plant Yates. The pilot-scale tests were completed in 2005 and the full-scale test using high-sulfur coal was completed in 2006; only the TMT-15 additive was tested in these efforts. The Task 5 full-scale additive tests conducted at Southern Company's Plant Yates Unit 1 were completed in 2007, and both the TMT-15 and Nalco 8034 additives were tested.

Gary Blythe; MariJon Owens

2007-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

273

Short range chemical ordering in bulk metallic glasses  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

We provide direct experimental evidence for a non-random distribution of atomic constituents in Zr-based multi-component bulk metallic glasses using positron annihilation spectroscopy. The Ti content around the open-volume regions is significantly enhanced at the expense of Cu and Ni, indicating that Cu and Ni occupy most of the volume bounded by their neighboring atoms while Ti and Zr are less closely packed and more likely to be associated with open-volume regions. Temperature-dependent measurements indicate the presence of at least two different characteristic sizes for the open volume regions. Measurements on hydrogen-charged samples show that the larger open-volume regions can be filled by hydrogen up to a critical density. Beyond this critical density, local atomic-scale open-volume damage is created in the sample to accommodate additional hydrogen. The onset of this local damage in positron annihilation data coincides with the onset of volume expansion in X-ray diffraction data.

Sterne, P A; Asoka-Kumar, P; Hartley, J H; Howell, R H; Nieh, T G; Flores, K M; Suh, D; Dauskardt, R H

2001-01-03T23:59:59.000Z

274

Field Testing of a Wet FGD Additive for Enhanced Mercury Control - Task 3 Full-scale Test Results  

SciTech Connect

This Topical Report summarizes progress on Cooperative Agreement DE-FC26-04NT42309, 'Field Testing of a Wet FGD Additive'. The objective of the project is to demonstrate the use of a flue gas desulfurization (FGD) additive, Degussa Corporation's TMT-15, to prevent the reemission of elemental mercury (Hg{sup 0}) in flue gas exiting wet FGD systems on coal-fired boilers. Furthermore, the project intends to demonstrate whether the additive can be used to precipitate most of the mercury (Hg) removed in the wet FGD system as a fine TMT salt that can be separated from the FGD liquor and bulk solid byproducts for separate disposal. The project is conducting pilot- and full-scale tests of the TMT-15 additive in wet FGD absorbers. The tests are intended to determine required additive dosages to prevent Hg{sup 0} reemissions and to separate mercury from the normal FGD byproducts for three coal types: Texas lignite/Power River Basin (PRB) coal blend, high-sulfur Eastern bituminous coal, and low-sulfur Eastern bituminous coal. The project team consists of URS Group, Inc., EPRI, TXU Generation Company LP, Southern Company, and Degussa Corporation. TXU Generation has provided the Texas lignite/PRB cofired test site for pilot FGD tests, Monticello Steam Electric Station Unit 3. Southern Company is providing the low-sulfur Eastern bituminous coal host site for wet scrubbing tests, as well as the pilot- and full-scale jet bubbling reactor (JBR) FGD systems to be tested. IPL, an AES company, provided the high-sulfur Eastern bituminous coal full-scale FGD test site and cost sharing. Degussa Corporation is providing the TMT-15 additive and technical support to the test program as cost sharing. The project is being conducted in six tasks. Of the six project tasks, Task 1 involves project planning and Task 6 involves management and reporting. The other four tasks involve field testing on FGD systems, either at pilot or full scale. The four tasks include: Task 2 - Pilot Additive Testing in Texas Lignite Flue Gas; Task 3 - Full-scale FGD Additive Testing in High-sulfur Eastern Bituminous Flue Gas; Task 4 - Pilot Wet Scrubber Additive Tests at Plant Yates; and Task 5 - Full-scale Additive Tests at Plant Yates. The pilot-scale tests were completed in 2005 and have been previously reported. This topical report presents the results from the Task 3 full-scale additive tests, conducted at IPL's Petersburg Station Unit 2. The Task 5 full-scale additive tests will be conducted later in calendar year 2007.

Gary Blythe

2007-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

275

Controlled Shear Band and Fracture in Bulk Metallic Glasses  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Aerospace and Spacecraft Applications for Bulk Metallic Glasses and Matrix Composites · Air Oxidation of a Binary Cu64.5Zr35.5 Bulk Metallic Alloy at 573 ...

276

Superconductivity in bulk ultrafine-grained metals prepared by high ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

About this Abstract. Meeting, 2014 TMS Annual Meeting & Exhibition. Symposium , Ultrafine Grained Materials VIII. Presentation Title, Superconductivity in bulk ...

277

Stresses resulting from compression of bulk cotton lint fibers  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The modulus of elasticity, Poisson's ratio and shear modulus of bulk cotton lint fibers were determined. The cotton lint was compressed in an MTS machine to a predetermined density, and the resilient forces induced by the cotton lint after being compressed were measured. Finite element analysis was used to model force on cotton bale ties, and determine the magnitude of the resilient forces on the bale ties. The nodal forces on the bale tie material were evaluated for three different bale tie materials to determine if bale tie breakage would occur. Young's modulus of bulk lint cotton was found to be 9 MPa and the Poisson's ratio was 0. 1, while 12 MPa was recorded for the shear modulus. The FEA analysis showed that round steel ties, at six ties per bale were loaded at 5.9 % of their tensile yield strength, and at 5.4 % for eight ties per bale. Plastic ties were loaded at 11.9 % of their tensile yield strength at six ties per bale, and at 10.8 % at eight ties per bale. The flat steel ties were loaded at 10.7 % of their tensile yield strength at six ties per bale, and at 9.4 % at eight ties per bale. Depth adjustment on the basis of the sample depth to the actual depth resulted in plastic ties being loaded to 84 % of their tensile yield strength at six ties per bale. Round steel ties were loaded to 62% and the flat steel ties were loaded to 66% at six ties per bale.

Chimbombi, Ezekiel Maswe

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

278

Kentucky Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation,  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Kentucky Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1970's 2 1980's 11 14 12 19 17 13 17 19 19 22 1990's 8 10 8 6 47 27 24 26 20 29 2000's 27 25 25 25 19 30 36 34 34 32 2010's 111 98 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 8/1/2013 Next Release Date: 8/1/2014 Referring Pages: Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas Proved Reserves, Wet After Lease Separation, as of Dec. 31 Kentucky Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas Proved Reserves, Wet After

279

Florida Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation,  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Florida Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1970's 108 1980's 122 99 86 64 90 81 69 62 69 57 1990's 53 45 55 59 117 110 119 112 106 100 2000's 93 96 102 92 88 87 50 110 1 7 2010's 30 2 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 8/1/2013 Next Release Date: 8/1/2014 Referring Pages: Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas Proved Reserves, Wet After Lease Separation, as of Dec. 31 Florida Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas Proved Reserves, Wet After

280

Improving the bulk data transfer experience  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Scientific computations and collaborations increasingly rely on the network to provide high-speed data transfer, dissemination of results, access to instruments, support for computational steering, etc. The Energy Sciences Network is establishing a science data network to provide user driven bandwidth allocation. In a shared network environment, some reservations may not be granted due to the lack of available bandwidth on any single path. In many cases, the available bandwidth across multiple paths would be sufficient to grant the reservation. In this paper we investigate how to utilize the available bandwidth across multiple paths in the case of bulk data transfer.

Guok, Chin; Guok, Chin; Lee, Jason R.; Berket, Karlo

2008-05-07T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "wet bulk density" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Hanford ETR Bulk Vitrification System - Demonstration Bulk Vitrification System (DBVS) Review Report  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

A Comprehensive Technical A Comprehensive Technical Review of the Demonstration Bulk Vitrification System Technical Assessment Conducted by an Independent and External Team of Experts Volume 1 September 28, 2006 Chartered by CH2M HILL Hanford Group, Inc. Richland, Washington 99352 RPP-31314 Executive Summary In May 2006, CH2M HILL Hanford Group, Inc. chartered an Expert Review Panel (ERP) to review the current status of the Demonstration Bulk Vitrification System (DBVS). It is the consensus of the ERP that bulk vitrification is a technology that requires further development and evaluation to determine its potential for meeting the Hanford waste stabilization mission. No fatal flaws (issues that would jeopardize the overall DBVS mission that cannot be mitigated) were found, given the current state of the project.

282

MHK Technologies/WET NZ | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

NZ NZ < MHK Technologies Jump to: navigation, search << Return to the MHK database homepage WET NZ.jpg Technology Profile Primary Organization Wave Energy Technology New Zealand WET NZ Technology Resource Click here Wave Technology Type Click here Point Absorber - Floating Technology Readiness Level Click here TRL 5 6 System Integration and Technology Laboratory Demonstration Technology Description The WET NZ device is planned to have a modular generation capability of up to 500 kW with onboard controls that will be able to accurately forecast incoming waves and adjust the response to changing wave patterns The device will be largely sub surface so that as much of the device as possible interacts directly with the wave energy Technology Dimensions

283

Electro-osmotic transport in wet processing of textiles  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Electro-osmotic (or electrokinetic) transport is used to efficiently force a solution (or water) through the interior of the fibers or yarns of textile materials for wet processing of textiles. The textile material is passed between electrodes that apply an electric field across the fabric. Used alone or in parallel with conventional hydraulic washing (forced convection), electro-osmotic transport greatly reduces the amount of water used in wet processing. The amount of water required to achieve a fixed level of rinsing of tint can be reduced, for example, to 1-5 lbs water per pound of fabric from an industry benchmark of 20 lbs water/lb fabric.

Cooper, John F. (Oakland, CA)

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

284

Electro-osmotic transport in wet processing of textiles  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Electro-osmotic (or electrokinetic) transport is used to efficiently force a solution (or water) through the interior of the fibers or yarns of textile materials for wet processing of textiles. The textile material is passed between electrodes that apply an electric field across the fabric. Used alone or in parallel with conventional hydraulic washing (forced convection), electro-osmotic transport greatly reduces the amount of water used in wet processing. The amount of water required to achieve a fixed level of rinsing of tint can be reduced, for example, to 1--5 lbs water per pound of fabric from an industry benchmark of 20 lbs water/lb fabric. 5 figs.

Cooper, J.F.

1998-09-22T23:59:59.000Z

285

Passivation Polymer Bulking Versus Sucrose Impregnation: A Cross-Methodological Approach to the Conservation of Leather  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Archaeological leather, especially that which comes from wet excavation sites, has long challenged conservators who wish to preserve it so that it will be long lasting, stable, and informative for cultural analysis. Both the unique structure of the artifact and the detrimental waterlogged environment must be overcome to achieve acceptable results. Many methods have been used to conserve leather with varying degrees of success. The three most common methods of conservation are drying, consolidation, and the use of chemical dressings. The purpose of this research is to compare two methods of consolidation: silicone impregnation and sucrose bulking. Silicone impregnation has been used in leather conservation with excellent results, and its effects have been compared with those of several other consolidation methods, but never to sucrose. In fact, sucrose has never been used as a conservation agent in leather, and has rather been used only in the conservation of waterlogged wood. Parallel testing of polymer bulking and sucrose impregnation confirmed the superiority of samples treated with Passivation Polymer technology in terms of retaining diagnostic characteristics. However, it also proved that sucrose impregnation may serve as a quick, cheap, and reversible method of conservation, particularly for developing conservation programs.

White, Laura Gail

2008-08-19T23:59:59.000Z

286

The Relationship between Flux Coefficient and Entrainment Ratio in Density Currents  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The authors explore the theoretical and empirical relationship between the nonlocal quantities of the entrainment ratio E, the appropriately depth- and time-averaged flux coefficient ?, and the bulk Froude number Fro in density currents. The main ...

Mathew Wells; Claudia Cenedese; C. P. Caulfield

2010-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

287

Development of a Bulk GaN Growth Technique for Low Defect Density...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Technique: Electrochemical Solution Growth (ESG) Use salt flow to deliver precursors Increase growth rate through flux of reactants (increase spin rate) Precursors can be...

288

Charge density dependent nongeminate recombination in organic bulk heterojunction solar cells  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Apparent recombination orders exceeding the value of two expected for bimolecular recombination have been reported for organic solar cells in various publications. Two prominent explanations are bimolecular losses with a carrier concentration dependent prefactor due to a trapping limited mobility, and protection of trapped charge carriers from recombination by a donor--acceptor phase separation until reemission from these deep states. In order to clarify which mechanism is dominant we performed temperature and illumination dependent charge extraction measurements under open circuit as well as short circuit conditions at poly(3-hexylthiophene-2,5-diyl):[6,6]-phenyl-C$_{61}$butyric acid methyl ester (P3HT:PC$_{61}$BM) and PTB7:PC$_{71}$BM (Poly[[4,8-bis[(2-ethylhexyl)oxy]benzo[1,2-b:4,5-b']dithiophene-2,6-diyl][3-fluoro-2-[(2-ethylhexyl)carbonyl]thieno[3,4-b]thiophenediyl

D. Rauh; C. Deibel; V. Dyakonov

2012-03-27T23:59:59.000Z

289

Wetting at the BaTiO{sub 3}/Pt interface  

SciTech Connect

Using density functional theory, we analyze the wetting conditions for Pt on the (001) surface of ferroelectric BaTiO{sub 3} (BTO). We estimate the surface energy of (100), (110), and (111) Pt to be 2.42, 2.49, and 2.00 J/m{sup 2}, respectively. We find the BTO surface energy to vary between 0.26 and 2.28 J/m{sup 2} depending on termination, polarization, and chemical environment. The interface energy between TiO{sub 2}-terminated out-of-plane polarized BTO and (100) Pt is found to be between 1.64 and 2.62 J/m{sup 2}, indicating that (100) Pt cannot wet BTO for this interface. A similar result is found for an interface with (110) Pt. Cross-sectional transmission electron microscopy of Pt films grown on BTO by molecular beam epitaxy with a low flux at high deposition temperature shows Volmer-Weber islands, consistent with first principles calculations.

Fredrickson, Kurt D.; Posadas, Agham B.; Demkov, Alexander A. [Department of Physics, The University of Texas at Austin, Austin, Texas 78712 (United States)] [Department of Physics, The University of Texas at Austin, Austin, Texas 78712 (United States); Dubourdieu, Catherine; Bruley, John [IBM T. J. Watson Research Center, Yorktown Heights, New York 10598 (United States)] [IBM T. J. Watson Research Center, Yorktown Heights, New York 10598 (United States)

2013-05-14T23:59:59.000Z

290

Interface control of bulk ferroelectric polarization  

SciTech Connect

The control of material interfaces at the atomic level has led to no- vel interfacial properties and functionalities. In particular, the study of polar discontinuities at interfaces between complex oxides lies at the frontier of modern condensed matter research. Here we em- ploy a combination of experimental measurements and theoretical calculations to demonstrate the control of a bulk property, namely ferroelectric polarization, of a heteroepitaxial bilayer by precise atomic-scale interface engineering. More specifically, the control is achieved by exploiting the interfacial valence mismatch to influence the electrostatic potential step across the interface, which manifests itself as the biased-voltage in ferroelectric hysteresis loops and determines the ferroelectric state. A broad study of diverse systems comprising different ferroelectrics and conducting perovskite un- derlayers extends the generality of this phenomenon.

Yu, P [University of California, Berkeley; Luo, Weidong [ORNL; Yi, D. [University of California, Berkeley; Zhang, J.-X. [University of California, Berkeley; Rossell, M.D. [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL); Yang, C.-H. [Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology; You, L. [University of California, Berkeley; Singh-Bhalla, G. B. [University of California, Berkeley & LBNL; Yang, S.Y [University of California, Berkeley; He, Q [University of California, Berkeley; Ramasse, Q. M. [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL); Erni, R. [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL); Martin, L. W. [University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign; Chu, Y. H. [University of California, Berkeley; Pantelides, Sokrates T [ORNL; Pennycook, Stephen J [ORNL; Ramesh, R. [University of California, Berkeley

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

291

Organic hybrid planar-nanocrystalline bulk heterojunctions  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A photosensitive optoelectronic device having an improved hybrid planar bulk heterojunction includes a plurality of photoconductive materials disposed between the anode and the cathode. The photoconductive materials include a first continuous layer of donor material and a second continuous layer of acceptor material. A first network of donor material or materials extends from the first continuous layer toward the second continuous layer, providing continuous pathways for conduction of holes to the first continuous layer. A second network of acceptor material or materials extends from the second continuous layer toward the first continuous layer, providing continuous pathways for conduction of electrons to the second continuous layer. The first network and the second network are interlaced with each other. At least one other photoconductive material is interspersed between the interlaced networks. This other photoconductive material or materials has an absorption spectra different from the donor and acceptor materials.

Forrest, Stephen R. (Ann Arbor, MI); Yang, Fan (Piscataway, NJ)

2011-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

292

Organic hybrid planar-nanocrystalline bulk heterojunctions  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A photosensitive optoelectronic device having an improved hybrid planar bulk heterojunction includes a plurality of photoconductive materials disposed between the anode and the cathode. The photoconductive materials include a first continuous layer of donor material and a second continuous layer of acceptor material. A first network of donor material or materials extends from the first continuous layer toward the second continuous layer, providing continuous pathways for conduction of holes to the first continuous layer. A second network of acceptor material or materials extends from the second continuous layer toward the first continuous layer, providing continuous pathways for conduction of electrons to the second continuous layer. The first network and the second network are interlaced with each other. At least one other photoconductive material is interspersed between the interlaced networks. This other photoconductive material or materials has an absorption spectra different from the donor and acceptor materials.

Forrest, Stephen R.; Yang, Fan

2013-04-09T23:59:59.000Z

293

DEVELOPMENT OF THE BULK TRITIUM SHIPPING PACKAGING  

SciTech Connect

A new radioactive shipping packaging for transporting bulk quantities of tritium, the Bulk Tritium Shipping Package (BTSP), has been designed for the Department of Energy (DOE) as a replacement for a package designed in the early 1970s. This paper summarizes significant design features and describes how the design satisfies the regulatory safety requirements of the Code of Federal Regulations and the International Atomic Energy Agency. The BTSP design incorporates many improvements over its predecessor by implementing improved testing, handling, and maintenance capabilities, while improving manufacturability and incorporating new engineered materials. This paper also discusses the results from testing of the BTSP to 10 CFR 71 Normal Conditions of Transport and Hypothetical Accident Condition events. The programmatic need of the Department of Energy (DOE) to ship bulk quantities of tritium has been satisfied since the late 1970s by the UC-609 shipping package. The current Certificate of Conformance for the UC-609, USA/9932/B(U) (DOE), will expire in late 2011. Since the UC-609 was not designed to meet current regulatory requirements, it will not be recertified and thereby necessitates a replacement Type B shipping package for continued DOE tritium shipments in the future. A replacement tritium packaging called the Bulk Tritium Shipping Package (BTSP) is currently being designed and tested by Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL). The BTSP consists of two primary assemblies, an outer Drum Assembly and an inner Containment Vessel Assembly (CV), both designed to mitigate damage and to protect the tritium contents from leaking during the regulatory Hypothetical Accident Condition (HAC) events and during Normal Conditions of Transport (NCT). During transport, the CV rests on a silicone pad within the Drum Liner and is covered with a thermal insulating disk within the insulated Drum Assembly. The BTSP packaging weighs approximately 500 lbs without contents and is 50-1/2 inches high by 24-1/2 inches in outside diameter. With contents the gross weight of the BTSP is 650 lbs. The BTSP is designed for the safe shipment of 150 grams of tritium in a solid or gaseous state. To comply with the federal regulations that govern Type B shipping packages, the BTSP is designed so that it will not lose tritium at a rate greater than the limits stated in 10CFR 71.51 of 10{sup -6} A2 per hour for the 'Normal Conditions of Transport' (NCT) and an A2 in 1 week under 'Hypothetical Accident Conditions' (HAC). Additionally, since the BTSP design incorporates a valve as part of the tritium containment boundary, secondary containment features are incorporated in the CV Lid to protect against gas leakage past the valve as required by 10CFR71.43(e). This secondary containment boundary is designed to provide the same level of containment as the primary containment boundary when subjected to the HAC and NCT criteria.

Blanton, P.; Eberl, K.

2008-09-14T23:59:59.000Z

294

Bulk Heterojunction Organic Photovoltaic Devices Using Dendrimers  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A family of prototype ..pi..-conjugated dendrimers has been synthesized and incorporated into solution-processable organic photovoltaic (OPV) devices. Bulk heterojunction devices were fabricated by blending the dendrimers with a solubilized fullerene. The best of these initial devices, which were not optimized for morphology, exhibited external quantum efficiencies of 22% at peak wavelength. It was found that 3-arm dendrimers, when sufficiently soluble, yielded higher photocurrents than their 4-arm counterparts. This was attributed to better planarity and intermolecular alignment of the 3-arm version. Device efficiency was seen to increase with increasing arm length. A reduced-band gap dendrimer was synthesized by attaching electron-withdrawing groups onto the core to yield an optical band gap of 1.82 eV.

Kopidakis, N.; Mitchell, W. J.; Bozell, J. J.; Piris, J.; Ginley, D. S.; Rumbles, G.; Shaheen S. E.

2005-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

295

Longer-term Characterization of Mercury Partitioning and Re-emissions in a Full-scale Wet Flue Gas Desulfurization System, Site 2  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This document presents and discusses results from an EPRI project focused on understanding and enhancing how mercury is captured by a wet flue gas desulfurization (FGD) system and how it partitions among the FGD liquor, fine solids, and bulk FGD solid byproduct. A second objective was to close a mercury balance around the host unit by determining what portion of the coal mercury exits the stack with the scrubbed flue gas and how much ends up in the fly ash, byproduct gypsum, and FGD wastewater. During t...

2010-12-23T23:59:59.000Z

296

Texas Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Proved Reserves (Billion  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Texas Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1980's 46,803 46,620 44,319 42,192 41,404 41,554 1990's 41,411 39,288 38,141 37,847 39,020 39,736 41,592 41,108 40,793 43,350 2000's 45,419 46,462 47,491 48,717 53,275 60,178 65,805 76,357 81,843 85,034 2010's 94,287 104,454 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 8/1/2013 Next Release Date: 8/1/2014 Referring Pages: Natural Gas Proved Reserves, Wet After Lease Separation, as of Dec. 31 Texas Natural Gas Reserves Summary as of Dec. 31

297

Mississippi Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Proved Reserves  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Mississippi Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1970's 1,511 1980's 1,776 2,042 1,803 1,603 1,496 1,364 1,304 1,223 1,146 1,108 1990's 1,129 1,061 873 800 653 667 634 583 662 681 2000's 620 663 746 748 692 758 816 958 1,035 922 2010's 858 868 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 8/1/2013 Next Release Date: 8/1/2014 Referring Pages: Natural Gas Proved Reserves, Wet After Lease Separation, as of Dec. 31 Mississippi Natural Gas Reserves Summary as of Dec. 31

298

Texas Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Texas Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1980's 35,971 35,867 34,584 32,852 32,309 32,349 1990's 32,412 30,729 29,474 29,967 31,071 31,949 33,432 33,322 33,429 35,470 2000's 38,585 40,376 41,104 42,280 46,728 53,175 58,736 68,827 74,284 76,272 2010's 84,157 90,947 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 8/1/2013 Next Release Date: 8/1/2014 Referring Pages: Nonassociated Natural Gas Proved Reserves, Wet After Lease

299

California Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation,  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) California Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1970's 2,961 1980's 3,345 2,660 2,663 2,546 2,507 1990's 2,400 2,213 2,093 1,982 1,698 1,619 1,583 1,820 1,879 2,150 2000's 2,198 1,922 1,900 1,810 2,006 2,585 2,155 2,193 1,917 2,314 2010's 2,282 2,532 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 8/1/2013 Next Release Date: 8/1/2014 Referring Pages: Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas Proved Reserves, Wet After Lease

300

Pennsylvania Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Proved Reserves  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Pennsylvania Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1970's 1,516 1980's 951 1,265 1,430 1,882 1,576 1,618 1,562 1,650 2,074 1,644 1990's 1,722 1,631 1,533 1,722 1,806 1,488 1,702 1,861 1,848 1,780 2000's 1,740 1,782 2,225 2,497 2,371 2,793 3,064 3,377 3,594 7,018 2010's 14,068 26,719 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 8/1/2013 Next Release Date: 8/1/2014 Referring Pages: Natural Gas Proved Reserves, Wet After Lease Separation, as of Dec.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "wet bulk density" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Kentucky Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Proved Reserves (Billion  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Kentucky Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1970's 504 1980's 536 561 592 600 647 806 883 940 957 1,015 1990's 1,047 1,187 1,126 1,036 1,025 1,102 1,046 1,429 1,295 1,530 2000's 1,837 1,950 1,999 1,971 1,982 2,240 2,369 2,588 2,846 2,919 2010's 2,785 2,128 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 8/1/2013 Next Release Date: 8/1/2014 Referring Pages: Natural Gas Proved Reserves, Wet After Lease Separation, as of Dec. 31 Kentucky Natural Gas Reserves Summary as of Dec. 31

302

Kentucky Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Kentucky Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1970's 502 1980's 525 547 580 581 630 793 866 921 938 993 1990's 1,039 1,177 1,118 1,030 978 1,075 1,022 1,403 1,275 1,501 2000's 1,810 1,925 1,974 1,946 1,963 2,210 2,333 2,554 2,812 2,887 2010's 2,674 2,030 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 8/1/2013 Next Release Date: 8/1/2014 Referring Pages: Nonassociated Natural Gas Proved Reserves, Wet After Lease

303

Louisiana Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Louisiana Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1980's 16,316 10,943 10,724 10,826 11,171 1990's 10,597 9,969 9,060 8,615 9,165 8,890 9,038 9,020 8,569 8,667 2000's 8,704 9,245 8,520 8,952 9,235 10,091 10,149 9,651 10,581 19,898 2010's 28,838 29,906 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 8/1/2013 Next Release Date: 8/1/2014 Referring Pages: Nonassociated Natural Gas Proved Reserves, Wet After Lease

304

GPS Meteorology: Mapping Zenith Wet Delays onto Precipitable Water  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Emerging networks of Global Positioning System (GPS) receivers can be used in the remote sensing of atmospheric water vapor. The time-varying zenith wet delay observed at each GPS receiver in a network can be transformed into an estimate of the ...

Michael Bevis; Steven Businger; Steven Chiswell; Thomas A. Herring; Richard A. Anthes; Christian Rocken; Randolph H. Ware

1994-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

305

Texas - RRC District 9 Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Texas - RRC District 9 Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1970's 633 1980's 502 796 965 845 786 753 761 717 686 617 1990's 703 674 613 636 715 730 749 785 665 1,180 2000's 1,645 2,428 3,070 3,514 4,445 4,608 6,660 7,846 9,390 11,100 2010's 12,587 9,963 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 8/1/2013 Next Release Date: 8/1/2014 Referring Pages: Nonassociated Natural Gas Proved Reserves, Wet After Lease

306

Gulf of Mexico Federal Offshore - Texas Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Gulf of Mexico Federal Offshore - Texas Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1980's 6,411 6,191 6,956 6,739 6,745 6,504 1990's 6,884 6,305 6,353 6,138 5,739 5,674 5,240 4,799 4,452 4,507 2000's 5,030 5,404 4,967 4,235 3,258 2,807 2,360 2,173 1,937 1,822 2010's 1,456 1,015 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 8/1/2013 Next Release Date: 8/1/2014 Referring Pages: Nonassociated Natural Gas Proved Reserves, Wet After Lease

307

West Virginia Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) West Virginia Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1970's 1,593 1980's 2,437 1,881 2,169 2,238 2,173 2,104 2,207 2,210 2,299 2,244 1990's 2,243 2,513 2,293 2,408 2,569 2,514 2,722 2,887 2,925 2,952 2000's 2,929 2,777 3,477 3,376 3,489 4,553 4,638 4,865 5,243 6,066 2010's 7,134 10,480 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 8/1/2013 Next Release Date: 8/1/2014 Referring Pages: Nonassociated Natural Gas Proved Reserves, Wet After Lease

308

Michigan Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Proved Reserves (Billion  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Michigan Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1970's 1,334 1980's 1,551 1,252 1,200 1,353 1,193 1,064 1,242 1,571 1,434 1,443 1990's 1,330 1,404 1,290 1,218 1,379 1,344 2,125 2,256 2,386 2,313 2000's 2,772 3,032 3,311 3,488 3,154 2,961 3,117 3,691 3,253 2,805 2010's 2,975 2,549 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 8/1/2013 Next Release Date: 8/1/2014 Referring Pages: Natural Gas Proved Reserves, Wet After Lease Separation, as of Dec.

309

California Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Proved Reserves (Billion  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) California Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1970's 4,842 1980's 5,137 4,084 3,893 3,666 3,513 1990's 3,311 3,114 2,892 2,799 2,506 2,355 2,193 2,390 2,332 2,505 2000's 2,952 2,763 2,696 2,569 2,773 3,384 2,935 2,879 2,538 2,926 2010's 2,785 3,042 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 8/1/2013 Next Release Date: 8/1/2014 Referring Pages: Natural Gas Proved Reserves, Wet After Lease Separation, as of Dec. 31 California Natural Gas Reserves Summary as of Dec. 31

310

Louisiana Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Proved Reserves (Billion  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Louisiana Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1980's 19,676 13,334 12,852 12,620 12,912 1990's 12,151 11,363 10,227 9,541 10,145 9,891 10,077 10,036 9,480 9,646 2000's 9,512 10,040 9,190 9,538 9,792 10,679 10,710 10,292 11,816 20,970 2010's 29,517 30,545 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 8/1/2013 Next Release Date: 8/1/2014 Referring Pages: Natural Gas Proved Reserves, Wet After Lease Separation, as of Dec. 31 Louisiana Natural Gas Reserves Summary as of Dec. 31

311

Michigan Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Michigan Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1970's 601 1980's 668 494 481 529 419 375 665 1,002 943 1,011 1990's 922 967 938 890 1,022 1,018 1,778 1,975 2,158 2,086 2000's 2,558 2,873 3,097 3,219 2,961 2,808 2,925 3,512 3,105 2,728 2010's 2,903 2,472 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 8/1/2013 Next Release Date: 8/1/2014 Referring Pages: Nonassociated Natural Gas Proved Reserves, Wet After Lease

312

Virginia Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Virginia Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1980's 122 175 216 235 253 248 230 217 1990's 138 225 904 1,322 1,833 1,836 1,930 1,923 1,973 2,017 2000's 1,704 1,752 1,673 1,717 1,742 2,018 2,302 2,529 2,378 3,091 2010's 3,215 2,832 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 8/1/2013 Next Release Date: 8/1/2014 Referring Pages: Nonassociated Natural Gas Proved Reserves, Wet After Lease Separation, as of Dec. 31

313

Virginia Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Proved Reserves (Billion  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Virginia Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1980's 122 175 216 235 253 248 230 217 1990's 138 225 904 1,322 1,833 1,836 1,930 2,446 1,973 2,017 2000's 1,704 1,752 1,673 1,717 1,742 2,018 2,302 2,529 2,378 3,091 2010's 3,215 2,832 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 8/1/2013 Next Release Date: 8/1/2014 Referring Pages: Natural Gas Proved Reserves, Wet After Lease Separation, as of Dec. 31 Virginia Natural Gas Reserves Summary as of Dec. 31

314

West Virginia Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Proved Reserves  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) West Virginia Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1970's 1,669 1980's 2,559 1,944 2,252 2,324 2,246 2,177 2,272 2,360 2,440 2,342 1990's 2,329 2,672 2,491 2,598 2,702 2,588 2,793 2,946 2,968 3,040 2000's 3,062 2,825 3,498 3,399 3,509 4,572 4,654 4,881 5,266 6,090 2010's 7,163 10,532 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 8/1/2013 Next Release Date: 8/1/2014 Referring Pages: Natural Gas Proved Reserves, Wet After Lease Separation, as of Dec.

315

Arkansas Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Proved Reserves (Billion  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Arkansas Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1970's 1,725 1980's 1,796 1,821 1,974 2,081 2,240 2,032 2,011 2,018 2,000 1,782 1990's 1,739 1,672 1,752 1,555 1,610 1,566 1,472 1,479 1,332 1,546 2000's 1,584 1,619 1,654 1,666 1,837 1,967 2,271 3,306 5,628 10,872 2010's 14,181 16,374 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 8/1/2013 Next Release Date: 8/1/2014 Referring Pages: Natural Gas Proved Reserves, Wet After Lease Separation, as of Dec.

316

Kansas Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Proved Reserves (Billion  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Kansas Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1970's 10,824 1980's 10,065 10,443 10,128 10,183 9,981 9,844 11,093 11,089 10,530 10,509 1990's 10,004 9,946 10,302 9,872 9,705 9,093 8,145 7,328 6,862 6,248 2000's 5,682 5,460 5,329 5,143 5,003 4,598 4,197 4,248 3,795 3,500 2010's 3,937 3,747 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 8/1/2013 Next Release Date: 8/1/2014 Referring Pages: Natural Gas Proved Reserves, Wet After Lease Separation, as of Dec.

317

Colorado Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Colorado Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1970's 2,657 1980's 2,970 2,969 3,345 3,200 2,932 2,928 3,008 2,912 3,572 4,290 1990's 4,249 5,329 5,701 5,817 5,948 6,520 7,009 6,627 7,436 8,591 2000's 9,877 11,924 13,251 14,707 13,956 15,796 16,141 20,642 22,159 22,199 2010's 23,001 23,633 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 8/1/2013 Next Release Date: 8/1/2014 Referring Pages: Nonassociated Natural Gas Proved Reserves, Wet After Lease

318

Colorado Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation,  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Colorado Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1970's 181 1980's 200 259 206 173 208 167 190 219 177 236 1990's 510 682 762 1,162 1,088 1,072 1,055 533 772 781 2000's 960 1,025 1,097 1,186 1,293 1,326 1,541 1,838 2,010 1,882 2010's 2,371 2,518 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 8/1/2013 Next Release Date: 8/1/2014 Referring Pages: Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas Proved Reserves, Wet After Lease

319

Wyoming Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Proved Reserves (Billion  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Wyoming Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1970's 7,834 1980's 9,413 9,659 10,155 10,728 11,014 11,229 10,393 10,572 10,903 11,276 1990's 10,433 10,433 11,305 11,387 11,351 12,712 13,084 14,321 14,371 14,809 2000's 17,211 19,399 21,531 22,716 23,640 24,722 24,463 30,896 32,399 36,748 2010's 36,526 36,930 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 8/1/2013 Next Release Date: 8/1/2014 Referring Pages: Natural Gas Proved Reserves, Wet After Lease Separation, as of Dec.

320

Arkansas Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Arkansas Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1970's 1,559 1980's 1,602 1,637 1,800 1,887 2,051 1,875 1,861 1,873 1,843 1,637 1990's 1,672 1,536 1,619 1,462 1,525 1,462 1,383 1,423 1,294 1,505 2000's 1,545 1,589 1,616 1,629 1,797 1,921 2,227 3,269 5,616 10,852 2010's 14,152 16,328 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 8/1/2013 Next Release Date: 8/1/2014 Referring Pages: Nonassociated Natural Gas Proved Reserves, Wet After Lease

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "wet bulk density" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Preliminary Study of California Wintertime Model Wet Bias  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model version 3.0.1 is used in both short-range (days) and long-range (years) simulations to explore the California wintertime model wet bias. California is divided into four regions (the coast, central ...

Hung-Neng S. Chin; Peter M. Caldwell; David C. Bader

2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

322

New project for Hot Wet Rock geothermal reservoir design concept  

SciTech Connect

This paper presents the outlines of a new Hot Wet Rock (HWR) geothermal project. The goal of the project is to develop a design methodology for combined artificial and natural crack geothermal reservoir systems with the objective of enhancing the thermal output of existing geothermal power plants. The proposed concept of HWR and the research tasks of the project are described.

Takahashi, Hideaki; Hashida, Toshiyuki

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

323

Wet-Bulb Temperature from Relative Humidity and Air Temperature  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An equation is presented for wet-bulb temperature as a function of air temperature and relative humidity at standard sea level pressure. It was found as an empirical fit using gene-expression programming. This equation is valid for relative ...

Roland Stull

2011-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

324

California Federal Offshore Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Proved  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) California Federal Offshore Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1970's 322 1980's 414 1,337 1,466 1,570 1,519 1990's 1,469 1,174 1,136 1,123 1,187 1,289 1,266 556 489 536 2000's 576 540 515 511 459 825 811 805 705 740 2010's 725 711 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 8/1/2013 Next Release Date: 8/1/2014 Referring Pages: Natural Gas Proved Reserves, Wet After Lease Separation, as of Dec. 31 Federal Offshore, Pacific (California) Natural Gas Reserves Summary

325

Texas - RRC District 1 Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Texas - RRC District 1 Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1970's 732 1980's 683 870 708 960 714 754 716 639 1,002 1,037 1990's 744 660 606 540 586 498 523 950 1,101 1,165 2000's 1,037 1,024 1,047 1,047 1,184 1,148 1,048 1,029 987 1,456 2010's 2,332 5,227 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 8/1/2013 Next Release Date: 8/1/2014 Referring Pages: Nonassociated Natural Gas Proved Reserves, Wet After Lease

326

Alabama Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Alabama Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1970's 680 1980's 659 658 1990's 4,159 5,437 5,840 5,166 4,842 4,886 5,062 4,983 4,615 4,338 2000's 4,241 3,931 3,891 4,313 4,127 3,977 3,945 4,016 3,360 2,919 2010's 2,686 2,522 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 8/1/2013 Next Release Date: 8/1/2014 Referring Pages: Nonassociated Natural Gas Proved Reserves, Wet After Lease Separation, as of Dec. 31

327

Alaska Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Alaska Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1970's 5,058 1980's 4,828 4,373 4,188 3,883 4,120 3,131 2,462 2,983 2,910 2,821 1990's 2,466 2,924 3,002 3,492 3,326 3,310 3,216 2,957 2,768 2,646 2000's 2,564 2,309 2,157 2,081 2,004 1,875 1,447 1,270 1,139 1,090 2010's 1,021 976 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 8/1/2013 Next Release Date: 8/1/2014 Referring Pages: Nonassociated Natural Gas Proved Reserves, Wet After Lease

328

California - San Joaquin Basin Onshore Natural Gas, Wet After Lease  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) California - San Joaquin Basin Onshore Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1970's 4,037 1980's 4,434 4,230 4,058 3,964 3,808 3,716 3,404 3,229 3,033 2,899 1990's 2,775 2,703 2,511 2,425 2,130 2,018 1,864 2,012 2,016 2,021 2000's 2,413 2,298 2,190 2,116 2,306 2,831 2,470 2,430 2,249 2,609 2010's 2,447 2,685 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 8/1/2013 Next Release Date: 8/1/2014 Referring Pages: Natural Gas Proved Reserves, Wet After Lease Separation, as of Dec.

329

Alabama Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Proved Reserves (Billion  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Alabama Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1970's 693 1980's 682 683 1990's 4,184 5,460 5,870 5,212 4,898 4,930 5,100 5,013 4,643 4,365 2000's 4,269 3,958 3,922 4,345 4,159 4,006 3,963 4,036 3,379 2,948 2010's 2,724 2,570 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 8/1/2013 Next Release Date: 8/1/2014 Referring Pages: Natural Gas Proved Reserves, Wet After Lease Separation, as of Dec. 31 Alabama Natural Gas Reserves Summary as of Dec. 31

330

Louisiana Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation,  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Louisiana Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1980's 3,360 2,391 2,128 1,794 1,741 1990's 1,554 1,394 1,167 926 980 1,001 1,039 1,016 911 979 2000's 807 796 670 586 557 588 561 641 1,235 1,072 2010's 679 639 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 8/1/2013 Next Release Date: 8/1/2014 Referring Pages: Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas Proved Reserves, Wet After Lease Separation, as of Dec. 31

331

Louisiana - South Onshore Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Proved  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Louisiana - South Onshore Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1970's 14,580 1980's 13,407 13,049 12,153 11,553 10,650 10,120 9,416 9,024 8,969 8,934 1990's 8,492 7,846 7,019 6,219 6,558 6,166 6,105 6,137 5,966 5,858 2000's 5,447 5,341 4,395 3,874 3,557 3,478 3,473 3,463 2,916 2,969 2010's 2,995 2,615 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 8/1/2013 Next Release Date: 8/1/2014 Referring Pages: Natural Gas Proved Reserves, Wet After Lease Separation, as of Dec.

332

Quasiparticle energy studies of bulk semiconductors, surfaces and nanotubes  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Effects of many-body effects on electronic excitation energies (quasiparticle band structure) of these materials are explored. GW approximation, including local field effects, for self-energy operator is used to calculate quasi-particle energies. The newly discovered carbon nanotubes are studied; structural stability and band structures are calculated. BN nanotubes are also studied, and their stability is predicted. Unexpected electronic features are predicted for both systems. Filling of carbon nanotubes with metal atoms and the doping of BN nanotubes by carbon and other impurites is also studied. The occupied surface states at H/Si(111)-(1{times}1) surface are studied; it is shown that the electronic structure requires a full quasiparticle calculation even for this simple chemisorption system. The core level shift of the Si 2p levels for atoms near the H/Si(111)-(1{times}1) surface is calculated; a simple first order perturbation theory using pseudopotential and the local density approximation gives good results for the photoemission spectra of the core electrons. The quasiparticle energies of bulk hexagonal BN and those of an isolated BN sheet are studied; this provides an understanding of the quasiparticle band structure of BN nanotubes. A nearly free electron state with a wavefunction in the interlayer or vacuum region composes the bottom of the conduction bands. A mixed-space formalism is presented for calculating the dynamical screening effects and electron self-energy operator in solids; this provides an efficient algorithm to calculate quasiparticle energies for large systems.

Blase, X.F.

1994-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

333

Synthesis and Characterization of Bulk Nano Crystalline Pb Free ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

High energy ball milling route was adopted for production of bulk nano crystalline solders from these alloy powders. The milling was carried out for a period of ...

334

Fabrication of Bulk Metallic Glass Foams via Severe Plastic ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Symposium, M. Bulk Metallic Glasses, Nanocrystalline Materials, and ... Application of Metallic Glass for High Performance Si Solar Cell: Oxidation Behavior of ...

335

Bulk Metallic Glass Composites Fabricated within the Supercooled ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In the present work, lightweight magnesium base Bulk Metallic Glass Composites ... Application of Metallic Glass for High Performance Si Solar Cell: Oxidation ...

336

Washington, D. C. 20585 EIA-815 MONTHLY BULK TERMINAL AND ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

instructions, please contact the Manager at Survey (202) 586-3536. PURPOSE . ... often blending of petroleum products and has total bulk shell

337

Innovative approaches to improve bulk heterojuction organic photovoltaic device performance.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??In this thesis we studied the electrical properties of bulk heterojunction organic photovoltaic (OPV) devices fabricated using a variety of conjugated polymers, including regioregular P3HT,… (more)

Zhang, Ye

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

338

Gulf Coast (PADD 3) Refinery Grade Butane Stocks at Bulk ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Gulf Coast (PADD 3) Refinery Grade Butane Stocks at Bulk Terminals (Thousand Barrels) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec; 2005: 935: ...

339

Modular Electromechanical Batteries for Cost-Effective Bulk ...  

The "new breed" of flywheel under development at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory is aimed specifically at the "bulk storage" of electrical energy where the ...

340

Scattering Length Density Calculator  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... For energy dependent cross sections please go to ... The neutron scattering length density is defined ... To calculate scattering length densities enter a ...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "wet bulk density" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

High-Performance All Air-Processed Polymer-Fullerene Bulk Heterojunction Solar Cells  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

High photovoltaic device performance is demonstrated in ambient-air-processed bulk heterojunction solar cells having an active blend layer of organic poly(3-hexylthiophene) (P3HT): [6,6]-phenyl-C{sub 61}-butyric acid methyl ester (PCBM), with power conversion efficiencies as high as 4.1%, which is comparable to state-of-the-art bulk heterojunction devices fabricated in air-free environments. High-resolution transmission electron microscopy is combined with detailed analysis of electronic carrier transport in order to quantitatively understand the effects of oxygen exposure and different thermal treatments on electronic conduction through the highly nanostructured active blend network. Improvement in photovoltaic device performance by suitable post-fabrication thermal processing results from the reduced oxygen charge trap density in the active blend layer and is consistent with a corresponding slight increase in thickness of an {approx}4 nm aluminum oxide hole-blocking layer present at the electron-collecting contact interface.

Black, C.T.; Nam, C.-Y.; Su, D.

2009-10-23T23:59:59.000Z

342

Texas Bulk Power Study-- An Overview  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In the 1980's, several significant changes have evolved in markets for electric power in Texas. Cogeneration, fuel market volatility, electric system reliability, generation and transmission facility construction delays, construction cost escalation, regional disparities in load growth, severe economic cycles, and a variety of legal, health and environmental issues have contributed to increasing uncertainty in the utility planning process. Through more coordination and power pooling among the state's major utilities within the Electric Reliability Council of Texas (ERCOT), a potentially higher level of bulk power transactions may reduce some uncertainty and result in cost savings to the utilities involved. However, both the transactions potential and any corresponding changes in operating costs are quite sensitive to assumptions about the price of natural gas for use as a utility boiler fuel. A large computer model which simulates the operation of the utilities under the extreme boundary conditions of zero transactions and fully coordinated economic dispatch results in a range of transactions from 5% to 14% of total system energy requirements and a range of cost savings from less than 1% to nearly 6% of the ERCOT system variable operating costs.

Moore, B.

1988-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

343

The Impact of Wet Soil and Canopy Temperatures on Daytime Boundary–Layer Growth  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The impact of very wet soil and canopy temperatures on the surface sensible heat flux, and on related daytime boundary-layer properties is evaluated. For very wet soils, two winter situations are considered, related to significant changes in soil ...

M. Segal; J. R. Garratt; G. Kallos; R. A. Pielke

1989-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

344

Comparison of Soil Wetness Indices for Inducing Functional Similarity of Hydrologic Response across Sites in Illinois  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The comparative ability of four soil wetness indices to normalize soil moisture dependence of rootzone fluxes across a range of sites in Illinois is investigated. The soil wetness indices examined are various transformations of the water stored ...

Jennifer A. Saleem; Guido D. Salvucci

2002-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

345

Reduction of Water Use in Wet FGD Systems  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Reduction of WateR use in Wet fGd Reduction of WateR use in Wet fGd systems Background Coal-fired power plants require large volumes of water for efficient operation, primarily for cooling purposes. Public concern over water use is increasing, particularly in water stressed areas of the country. Analyses conducted by the U.S. Department of Energy's National Energy Technology Laboratory predict significant increases in power plant freshwater consumption over the coming years, encouraging the development of technologies to reduce this water loss. Power plant freshwater consumption refers to the quantity of water withdrawn from a water body that is not returned to the source but is lost to evaporation, while water withdrawal refers to the total quantity of water removed from a water source.

346

Wetting and free surface flow modeling for potting and encapsulation.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

As part of an effort to reduce costs and improve quality control in encapsulation and potting processes the Technology Initiative Project ''Defect Free Manufacturing and Assembly'' has completed a computational modeling study of flows representative of those seen in these processes. Flow solutions are obtained using a coupled, finite-element-based, numerical method based on the GOMA/ARIA suite of Sandia flow solvers. The evolution of the free surface is solved with an advanced level set algorithm. This approach incorporates novel methods for representing surface tension and wetting forces that affect the evolution of the free surface. In addition, two commercially available codes, ProCAST and MOLDFLOW, are also used on geometries representing encapsulation processes at the Kansas City Plant. Visual observations of the flow in several geometries are recorded in the laboratory and compared to the models. Wetting properties for the materials in these experiments are measured using a unique flowthrough goniometer.

Brooks, Carlton, F.; Brooks, Michael J. (Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM); Graham, Alan Lyman (Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM); Noble, David F. (David Frederick) (.; )); Notz, Patrick K.; Hopkins, Matthew Morgan; Castaneda, Jaime N.; Mahoney, Leo James (Kansas City Plant, Kansas City, MO); Baer, Thomas A.; Berchtold, Kathryn (Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM); Adolf, Douglas Brian; Wilkes, Edward Dean; Rao, Rekha Ranjana; Givler, Richard C.; Sun, Amy Cha-Tien; Cote, Raymond O.; Mondy, Lisa Ann; Grillet, Anne Mary; Kraynik, Andrew Michael

2007-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

347

2009 Update on Mercury Capture by Wet Flue Gas Desulfurization  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This technical update presents results of four research and development projects focused on understanding and enhancing mercury emissions control associated with wet flue gas desulfurization (FGD) technology. The first project was directed at characterizing partitioning of elemental and oxidized mercury species in solid, liquid, and gas phases within process streams involved in an operating commercial system. The second project explored dewatering options with an objective of producing low-mercury-conten...

2009-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

348

Wet-steam erosion of steam turbine disks and shafts  

SciTech Connect

A study of wet-steam erosion of the disks and the rotor bosses or housings of turbines in thermal and nuclear power plants shows that the rate of wear does not depend on the diagrammed degree of moisture, but is determined by moisture condensing on the surfaces of the diaphragms and steam inlet components. Renovating the diaphragm seals as an assembly with condensate removal provides a manifold reduction in the erosion.

Averkina, N. V. [JSC 'NPO TsKTI' (Russian Federation); Zheleznyak, I. V. [Leningradskaya AES branch of JSC 'Kontsern Rosenergoatom' (Russian Federation); Kachuriner, Yu. Ya.; Nosovitskii, I. A.; Orlik, V. G., E-mail: orlikvg@mail.ru [JSC 'NPO TsKTI' (Russian Federation); Shishkin, V. I. [Leningradskaya AES branch of JSC 'Kontsern Rosenergoatom' (Russian Federation)

2011-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

349

Modeling Wet Snow Accretion on Power Lines: Improvements to Previous Methods Using 50 Years of Observations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Methods to model wet snow accretion on structures are developed and improved, based on unique records of wet snow icing events as well as large datasets of observed and simulated weather. Hundreds of observed wet snow icing events are logged in ...

Bjørn Egil Kringlebotn Nygaard; Hálfdán Ágústsson; Katalin Somfalvi-Tóth

2013-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

350

Modeling Wet Snow Accretion on Power Lines: Improvements to Previous Methods Using 50 Years of Observations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Methods to model wet snow accretion on structures are developed and improved, based on unique records of wet snow icing events as well as large datasets of observed and simulated weather. Hundreds of observed wet snow icing events are logged in ...

Bjørn Egil Kringlebotn Nygaard; Hálfdán Ágústsson; Katalin Somfalvi-Tóth

351

Oklahoma Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Oklahoma Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1970's 12,299 1980's 11,656 13,066 14,714 14,992 14,858 14,929 15,588 15,686 15,556 14,948 1990's 15,147 14,112 13,249 12,549 12,981 13,067 12,929 13,296 13,321 12,252 2000's 13,430 13,256 14,576 15,176 16,301 17,337 17,735 19,225 21,155 23,115 2010's 26,873 27,683 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 8/1/2013 Next Release Date: 8/1/2014

352

New Mexico - East Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation,  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

East Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) East Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) New Mexico - East Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1970's 2,634 1980's 2,266 2,377 2,331 2,214 2,117 2,001 1,750 1,901 2,030 2,131 1990's 2,290 2,073 1,948 1,860 1,791 1,648 1,612 1,694 1,694 1,880 2000's 2,526 2,571 2,632 2,205 2,477 2,569 2,605 2,633 2,737 2,658 2010's 2,612 2,475 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 8/1/2013 Next Release Date: 8/1/2014 Referring Pages:

353

New Mexico Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) New Mexico Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1970's 12,568 1980's 12,267 12,913 11,562 10,868 10,458 9,948 11,094 11,176 17,030 15,219 1990's 17,094 18,204 18,802 18,354 16,947 17,069 16,232 15,280 14,816 15,172 2000's 16,922 17,112 16,971 16,681 18,109 17,683 17,332 16,556 15,592 14,662 2010's 14,316 13,586 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 8/1/2013 Next Release Date: 8/1/2014

354

Mercury removal in utility wet scrubber using a chelating agent  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method for capturing and reducing the mercury content of an industrial flue gas such as that produced in the combustion of a fossil fuel or solid waste adds a chelating agent, such as ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA) or other similar compounds like HEDTA, DTPA and/or NTA, to the flue gas being scrubbed in a wet scrubber used in the industrial process. The chelating agent prevents the reduction of oxidized mercury to elemental mercury, thereby increasing the mercury removal efficiency of the wet scrubber. Exemplary tests on inlet and outlet mercury concentration in an industrial flue gas were performed without and with EDTA addition. Without EDTA, mercury removal totaled 42%. With EDTA, mercury removal increased to 71%. The invention may be readily adapted to known wet scrubber systems and it specifically provides for the removal of unwanted mercury both by supplying S.sup.2- ions to convert Hg.sup.2+ ions into mercuric sulfide (HgS) and by supplying a chelating agent to sequester other ions, including but not limited to Fe.sup.2+ ions, which could otherwise induce the unwanted reduction of Hg.sup.2+ to the form, Hg.sup.0.

Amrhein, Gerald T. (Louisville, OH)

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

355

Louisiana - South Onshore Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Louisiana - South Onshore Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1970's 12,276 1980's 11,273 11,178 10,364 9,971 9,162 8,328 7,843 7,644 7,631 7,661 1990's 7,386 6,851 6,166 5,570 5,880 5,446 5,478 5,538 5,336 5,259 2000's 4,954 4,859 3,968 3,506 3,168 3,051 3,058 2,960 2,445 2,463 2010's 2,496 2,125 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 8/1/2013 Next Release Date: 8/1/2014 Referring Pages:

356

Texas - RRC District 5 Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

5 Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) 5 Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Texas - RRC District 5 Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1970's 1,127 1980's 1,117 1,265 1,322 1,477 1,911 2,100 2,169 2,106 1,989 1,789 1990's 1,835 1,841 1,692 1,790 1,926 1,876 2,088 1,681 1,906 2,301 2000's 3,089 4,206 4,588 5,398 6,525 9,560 12,591 17,224 20,420 22,602 2010's 24,686 28,147 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 8/1/2013 Next Release Date: 8/1/2014 Referring Pages:

357

Texas - RRC District 8 Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Texas - RRC District 8 Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1970's 8,073 1980's 7,216 6,620 6,084 6,064 5,362 5,246 5,254 4,973 4,738 4,403 1990's 4,323 4,023 3,792 3,569 3,267 3,218 3,069 2,886 2,727 2,947 2000's 3,345 3,405 3,284 3,032 3,266 3,829 3,891 4,267 4,506 3,950 2010's 3,777 3,006 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 8/1/2013 Next Release Date: 8/1/2014 Referring Pages:

358

New Mexico - West Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation,  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

- West Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) - West Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) New Mexico - West Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1970's 9,934 1980's 10,001 10,536 9,231 8,654 8,341 7,947 9,344 9,275 15,000 13,088 1990's 14,804 16,131 16,854 16,494 15,156 15,421 14,620 13,586 13,122 13,292 2000's 14,396 14,541 14,339 14,476 15,632 15,114 14,727 13,923 12,855 12,004 2010's 11,704 11,111 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 8/1/2013 Next Release Date: 8/1/2014

359

Wyoming Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Wyoming Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1970's 6,796 1980's 8,039 8,431 9,095 9,769 10,147 10,519 9,702 9,881 10,287 10,695 1990's 9,860 9,861 10,681 10,885 10,740 11,833 12,260 13,471 13,577 14,096 2000's 16,559 18,911 20,970 22,266 23,278 24,338 24,116 30,531 32,176 36,386 2010's 36,192 36,612 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 8/1/2013 Next Release Date: 8/1/2014 Referring Pages:

360

WETTING BEHAVIOR OF SELECTED CRUDE OIL/BRINE/ROCK SYSTEMS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The effect of aging and displacement temperatures, and brine and oil composition on wettability and the recovery of crude oil by spontaneous imbibition and waterflooding has been investigated. This study is based on displacement tests in Berea Sandstone using three distinctly different crude oils and three reservoir brines. Brine concentration was varied by changing the concentration of total dissolved solids of the synthetic brine in proportion to give brine of twice, one tenth, and one hundredth of the reservoir brine concentration. Aging and displacement temperatures were varied independently. For all crude oils, water-wetness and oil recovery increased with increase in displacement temperature. Tests on the effect of brine concentration showed that salinity of the connate and invading brines can have a major influence on wettability and oil recovery at reservoir temperature. Oil recovery increased over that for the reservoir brine with dilution of both the initial (connate) and invading brine or dilution of either. Removal of light components from the crude oil resulted in increased water-wetness. Addition of alkanes to the crude oil reduced the water-wetness, and increased oil recovery. Relationships between waterflood recovery and wettability are summarized.

G.Q. Tang; N.R. Morrow

1997-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "wet bulk density" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Catalytic gasification of wet biomass in supercritical water  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Wet biomass (water hyacinth, banana trees, cattails, green algae, kelp, etc.) grows rapidly and abundantly around the world. As a biomass crop, aquatic species are particularly attractive because their cultivation does not compete with land-based agricultural activities designed to produce food for consumption or export. However, wet biomass is not regarded as a promising feed for conventional thermochemical conversion processes because the cost associated with drying it is too high. This research seeks to address this problem by employing water as the gasification medium. Prior work has shown that low concentrations of glucose (a model compound for whole biomass) can be completely gasified in supercritical water at 600{degrees}C and 34.5 Wa after a 30 s reaction time. Higher concentrations of glucose (up to 22% by weight in water) resulted in incomplete conversion under these conditions. The gas contained hydrogen, carbon dioxide, carbon monoxide, methane, ethane, propane, and traces of other hydrocarbons. The carbon monoxide and hydrocarbons are easily converted to hydrogen by commercial technology available in most refineries. This prior work utilized capillary tube reactors with no catalyst. A larger reactor system was fabricated and the heterogeneous catalytic gasification of glucose and wet biomass slurry of higher concentration was studied to attain higher conversions.

Antal, M.J. Jr.; Matsumura, Yukihiko; Xu, Xiaodong [Univ. of Hawaii, Honolulu, HI (United States)] [and others

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

362

Texas - RRC District 6 Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

6 Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) 6 Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Texas - RRC District 6 Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1970's 2,710 1980's 3,622 3,653 3,749 4,279 4,087 4,274 4,324 4,151 4,506 5,201 1990's 5,345 4,856 4,987 5,170 5,131 5,425 5,690 5,616 5,691 5,562 2000's 5,901 6,016 6,161 6,572 7,564 8,999 9,205 11,468 12,207 12,806 2010's 14,958 15,524 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 8/1/2013 Next Release Date: 8/1/2014 Referring Pages:

363

Lower 48 States Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation,  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Lower 48 States Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1970's 143,852 1980's 139,421 143,515 142,984 143,469 141,226 138,464 139,070 135,256 141,211 139,798 1990's 141,941 140,584 138,883 136,953 138,213 139,369 141,136 140,382 139,015 142,098 2000's 154,113 159,612 163,863 166,512 171,547 183,197 189,329 213,851 224,873 249,406 2010's 280,880 305,010 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 8/1/2013

364

Bulk Vitrification Castable Refractory Block Protection Study  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Bulk vitrification (BV) was selected for a pilot-scale test and demonstration facility for supplemental treatment to accelerate the cleanup of low-activity waste (LAW) at the Hanford U.S. DOE Site. During engineering-scale (ES) tests, a small fraction of radioactive Tc (and Re, its nonradioactive surrogate) were transferred out of the LAW glass feed and molten LAW glass, and deposited on the surface and within the pores of the castable refractory block (CRB). Laboratory experiments were undertaken to understand the mechanisms of the transport Tc/Re into the CRB during vitrification and to evaluate various means of CRB protection against the deposition of leachable Tc/Re. The tests used Re as a chemical surrogate for Tc. The tests with the baseline CRB showed that the molten LAW penetrates into CRB pores before it converts to glass, leaving deposits of sulfates and chlorides when the nitrate components decompose. Na2O from the LAW reacts with the CRB to create a durable glass phase that may contain Tc/Re. Limited data from a single CRB sample taken from an ES experiment indicate that, while a fraction of Tc/Re is present in the CRB in a readily leachable form, most of the Tc/Re deposited in the refractory is retained in the form of a durable glass phase. In addition, the molten salts from the LAW, mainly sulfates, chlorides, and nitrates, begin to evaporate from BV feeds at temperatures below 800 C and condense on solid surfaces at temperatures below 530 C. Three approaches aimed at reducing or preventing the deposition of soluble Tc/Re within the CRB were proposed: metal lining, sealing the CRB surface with a glaze, and lining the CRB with ceramic tiles. Metal liners were deemed unsuitable because evaluations showed that they can cause unacceptable distortions of the electric field in the BV system. Sodium silicate and a low-alkali borosilicate glaze were selected for testing. The glazes slowed down molten salt condensate penetration, but did little to reduce the penetration of molten salt. Out of several refractory tile candidates, only greystone and fused-cast alumina-zirconia-silica (AZS) refractory remained intact and well bonded to the CRB after firing to 1000 C. The deformation of the refractory-tile composite was avoided by prefiring the greystone tile to 800 C. Condensed vapors did not penetrate the tiles, but Re salts condensed on their surface. Refractory corrosion tests indicated that a 0.25-inch-thick greystone tile would not corrode during a BV melt. Tiles can reduce both vapor penetration and molten salt penetration, but vapor deposition above the melt line will occur even on tiles. The Tc/Re transport scenario was outlined as follows. At temperatures below 700 C, molten ionic salt (MIS) that includes all the Tc/Re penetrates, by capillarity, from the feed into the CRB open porosity. At approximately 750 C, the MIS decomposes through the loss of NOx, leaving mainly sulfate and chloride salts. The Na2O formed in the decomposition of the nitrates reacts with insoluble grains in the feed and with the aluminosilicates in the CRB to form more viscous liquids that reduce further liquid penetration into the CRB. At 800 to 1000 C, a continuous glass phase traps the remains of the MIS in the form of inclusions in the bulk glass melt. At 1000 to 1200 C, the salt inclusions in the glass slowly dissolve but also rise to the surface. The Tc/Re salts also evaporate from the free surface of the glass melt that is rapidly renewed by convective currents. The vapors condense on cooler surfaces in the upper portion of the CRB, the box lid, and the off-gas system.

Hrma, Pavel R.; Bagaasen, Larry M.; Beck, Andrew E.; Brouns, Thomas M.; Caldwell, Dustin D.; Elliott, Michael L.; Matyas, Josef; Minister, Kevin BC; Schweiger, Michael J.; Strachan, Denis M.; Tinsley, Bronnie P.; Hollenberg, Glenn W.

2005-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

365

Stacker-reclaimer scheduling in a dry bulk terminal  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A dry bulk terminal acts as a multi-modal interface for transhipping iron ores. Stacker-reclaimers are the dedicated equipments in storage yard for iron ore handling. Both unloading and loading processes are supported by stacker-reclaimers in most cases. ... Keywords: dry bulk terminal, genetic algorithm, lower bound, stacker-reclaimer scheduling

Dayong Hu; Zhenqiang Yao

2012-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

366

An evolutionary optimization approach for bulk material blending systems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Bulk material blending systems still mostly implement static and non-reactive material blending methods like the well-known Chevron stacking. The optimization potential in the existing systems which can be made available using quality analyzing methods ... Keywords: bulk material blending, chevron stacking, multi-objective evolutionary algorithms

Michael P. Cipold; Pradyumn Kumar Shukla; Claus C. Bachmann; Kaibin Bao; Hartmut Schmeck

2012-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

367

An Empirical Analysis of Bulk Cn2 Models over Water  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This article examines some of the difficulties associated with the determination of C2n over water in a coastal region using a bulk model. The analysis shows the need to supplement bulk models with elements that do not belong to traditional Monin–...

Guy Potvin; Denis Dion; Jacques Claverie; Paul A. Frederickson; Kenneth L. Davidson; J. Luc Forand

2008-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

368

Preparation of bulk 13C-enriched graphene materials  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Arc-discharge has been widely used in the bulk production of various carbon nanomaterials, especially for structurally more robust single-walled carbon nanotubes. In this paper, the same bulk-production technique was applied to the synthesis of significantly ...

Leilei Tian; Xin Wang; Li Cao; Mohammed J. Meziani; Chang Yi Kong; Fushen Lu; Ya-Ping Sun

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

369

Silicon bulk micromachined hybrid dimensional artifact.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A mesoscale dimensional artifact based on silicon bulk micromachining fabrication has been developed and manufactured with the intention of evaluating the artifact both on a high precision coordinate measuring machine (CMM) and video-probe based measuring systems. This hybrid artifact has features that can be located by both a touch probe and a video probe system with a k=2 uncertainty of 0.4 {micro}m, more than twice as good as a glass reference artifact. We also present evidence that this uncertainty could be lowered to as little as 50 nm (k=2). While video-probe based systems are commonly used to inspect mesoscale mechanical components, a video-probe system's certified accuracy is generally much worse than its repeatability. To solve this problem, an artifact has been developed which can be calibrated using a commercially available high-accuracy tactile system and then be used to calibrate typical production vision-based measurement systems. This allows for error mapping to a higher degree of accuracy than is possible with a glass reference artifact. Details of the designed features and manufacturing process of the hybrid dimensional artifact are given and a comparison of the designed features to the measured features of the manufactured artifact is presented and discussed. Measurement results from vision and touch probe systems are compared and evaluated to determine the capability of the manufactured artifact to serve as a calibration tool for video-probe systems. An uncertainty analysis for calibration of the artifact using a CMM is presented.

Claudet, Andre A.; Tran, Hy D.; Bauer, Todd Marks; Shilling, Katherine Meghan; Oliver, Andrew David

2010-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

370

Improved Superconducting Properties in Bulk MgB2 Prepared by High Energy Milling of Mg and B Powder  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Abstract. The MgB2 bulks were prepared by high energy milling of Mg and B powder. The correlations among milling times, microstructure and superconducting properties were investigated in MgB2 bulks. Samples were characterized by x-ray diffraction (XRD), energy dispersive spectrometry (EDX) and scanning electron microscope (SEM), and the magnetization properties were examined by a Superconducting quantum interfere device (SQUID) magnetometer. It showed that the high energy milling is an effective approach to get fine crystalline (40-100nm) bulk MgB2 with good grain connectivity and high Jc performance. The critical current density reaches to 2.0 × 106A/cm2 at 15K and 0.59T, 5.7 × 105A/cm2 at 2T

Y. F. Wu; Y. F. Lu; G. Yan; J. S. Li; Y. Feng; H. P. Tang; S. K. Chen; H. L. Xu; C. S. Li; P. X. Zhang

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

371

Bulk Hydrogen Storage - Strategic Directions for Hydrogen Delivery Workshop  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Hydrogen Hydrogen Storage Strategic Directions for Hydrogen Delivery Workshop May 7-8, 2003 Crystal City, Virginia Breakout Session - Bulk Hydrogen Storage Main Themes/Caveats Bulk Storage = Anything not on the vehicle 10's of Tons -- End use point 50-100 Tons - Terminals/City Gates 1000's Tons - Between Production Facility and Terminal/City Gate Bulk storage requirements less restrictive and different from on-board storage Uncertainty about evolution of infrastructure requires multiple pathways to be considered Bulk storage is an economic solution to address supply/demand imbalance Breakout Session - Bulk Hydrogen Storage Targets/Objectives Hard to quantify - scenario & end-use dependent Storage Materials (solid state) and container require different targets

372

Carbon nanotubes grown on bulk materials and methods for fabrication  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Disclosed are structures formed as bulk support media having carbon nanotubes formed therewith. The bulk support media may comprise fibers or particles and the fibers or particles may be formed from such materials as quartz, carbon, or activated carbon. Metal catalyst species are formed adjacent the surfaces of the bulk support material, and carbon nanotubes are grown adjacent the surfaces of the metal catalyst species. Methods employ metal salt solutions that may comprise iron salts such as iron chloride, aluminum salts such as aluminum chloride, or nickel salts such as nickel chloride. Carbon nanotubes may be separated from the carbon-based bulk support media and the metal catalyst species by using concentrated acids to oxidize the carbon-based bulk support media and the metal catalyst species.

Menchhofer, Paul A. (Clinton, TN); Montgomery, Frederick C. (Oak Ridge, TN); Baker, Frederick S. (Oak Ridge, TN)

2011-11-08T23:59:59.000Z

373

A new damage testing system for detailed evaluation of damage behavior of bulk KDP and DKDP  

SciTech Connect

We describe a new damage testing approach and instrumentation that provides quantitative measurements of bulk damage performance versus fluence for several frequencies. A major advantage of this method is that it can simultaneously provide direct information on pinpoint density and size, and beam obscuration. This allows for more accurate evaluation of material performance under operational conditions. Protocols for laser conditioning to improve damage performance can also be easily and rapidly evaluated.This damage testing approach has enabled us to perform complex experiments toward probing the fundamental mechanisms of damage initiation and conditioning.

DeMange, P; Negres, R A; Carr, C W; Radousky, H B; Demos, S G

2004-11-17T23:59:59.000Z

374

Symmetry energy in nuclear density functional theory  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The nuclear symmetry energy represents a response to the neutron-proton asymmetry. In this survey we discuss various aspects of symmetry energy in the framework of nuclear density functional theory, considering both non-relativistic and relativistic self-consistent mean-field realizations side-by-side. Key observables pertaining to bulk nucleonic matter and finite nuclei are reviewed. Constraints on the symmetry energy and correlations between observables and symmetry-energy parameters, using statistical covariance analysis, are investigated. Perspectives for future work are outlined in the context of ongoing experimental efforts.

W. Nazarewicz; P. -G. Reinhard; W. Satula; D. Vretenar

2013-07-22T23:59:59.000Z

375

Symmetry energy in nuclear density functional theory  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The nuclear symmetry energy represents a response to the neutron-proton asymmetry. In this survey we discuss various aspects of symmetry energy in the framework of nuclear density functional theory, considering both non-relativistic and relativistic self-consistent mean-field realizations side-by-side. Key observables pertaining to bulk nucleonic matter and finite nuclei are reviewed. Constraints on the symmetry energy and correlations between observables and symmetry-energy parameters, using statistical covariance analysis, are investigated. Perspectives for future work are outlined in the context of ongoing experimental efforts.

Nazarewicz, W; Satula, W; Vretenar, D

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

376

The Quantum Energy Density: Improved Efficiency for Quantum Monte Carlo  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We establish a physically meaningful representation of a quantum energy density for use in Quantum Monte Carlo calculations. The energy density operator, defined in terms of Hamiltonian components and density operators, returns the correct Hamiltonian when integrated over a volume containing a cluster of particles. This property is demonstrated for a helium-neon "gas," showing that atomic energies obtained from the energy density correspond to eigenvalues of isolated systems. The formation energies of defects or interfaces are typically calculated as total energy differences. Using a model of delta-doped silicon (where dopant atoms form a thin plane) we show how interfacial energies can be calculated more efficiently with the energy density, since the region of interest is small. We also demonstrate how the energy density correctly transitions to the bulk limit away from the interface where the correct energy is obtainable from a separate total energy calculation.

Krogel, Jaron T; Kim, Jeongnim; Ceperley, David M

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

377

Exploiting imperfections: Directed assembly of surface colloids via bulk topological defects  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We exploit the long-ranged elastic fields inherent to confined nematic liquid crystals to assemble colloidal particles trapped at the liquid crystal interface into reconfigurable structures with complex symmetries and packings. Spherical colloids with homeotropic anchoring trapped at the interface between air and the nematic liquid crystal 5CB create quadrupolar distortions in the director field causing particles to repel and consequently form close-packed assemblies with a triangular habit. Here we report on complex, open structures organized via interactions with defects in the bulk. Specifically, by confining the nematic liquid crystal in an array of microposts with homeotropic anchoring conditions, we cause defect rings to form at well-defined locations in the bulk of the sample. These defects source elastic deformations that direct the assembly of the interfacially-trapped colloids into ring-like assemblies, which recapitulate the defect geometry even when the microposts are completely immersed in the nematic. When the surface density of the colloids is high, they form a ring near the defect and a hexagonal lattice far from it. Since topographically complex substrates are easily fabricated and liquid crystal defects are readily reconfigured, this work lays the foundation for a new, robust mechanism to dynamically direct assembly over large areas by controlling surface anchoring and associated bulk defect structure.

Marcello Cavallaro Jr.; Mohamed A. Gharbi; Daniel A. Beller; Simon ?opar; Zheng Shi; Tobias Baumgart; Shu Yang; Randall D. Kamien; Kathleen J. Stebe

2013-08-11T23:59:59.000Z

378

BULK FLOW OF HALOS IN {Lambda}CDM SIMULATION  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Analysis of the Pangu N-body simulation validates that the bulk flow of halos follows a Maxwellian distribution with variance that is consistent with the prediction of the linear theory of structure formation. We propose that the consistency between the observed bulk velocity and theories should be examined at the effective scale of the radius of a spherical top-hat window function yielding the same smoothed velocity variance in linear theory as the sample window function does. We compared some recently estimated bulk flows from observational samples with the prediction of the {Lambda}CDM model we used; some results deviate from expectation at a level of {approx}3{sigma}, but the discrepancy is not as severe as previously claimed. We show that bulk flow is only weakly correlated with the dipole of the internal mass distribution, that the alignment angle between the mass dipole and the bulk flow has a broad distribution peaked at {approx}30 Degree-Sign -50 Degree-Sign , and also that the bulk flow shows little dependence on the mass of the halos used in the estimation. In a simulation of box size 1 h {sup -1} Gpc, for a cell of radius 100 h {sup -1} Mpc the maximal bulk velocity is >500 km s{sup -1}; dipoles of the environmental mass outside the cell are not tightly aligned with the bulk flow, but are rather located randomly around it with separation angles {approx}20 Degree-Sign -40 Degree-Sign . In the fastest cell there is a slightly smaller number of low-mass halos; however, halos inside are clustered more strongly at scales {approx}> 20 h {sup -1} Mpc, which might be a significant feature since the correlation between bulk flow and halo clustering actually increases in significance beyond such scales.

Li Ming; Pan Jun; Feng Longlong; Kang Xi [Purple Mountain Observatory, 2 West Beijing Road, Nanjing 210008 (China); Gao Liang [National Astronomical Observatories, Chinese Academy of Sciences, 20A Datun Road, Chaoyang District, Beijing 100012 (China); Jing Yipeng; Yang Xiaohu; Lin Weipeng; Zhao Donghai; Zhang Pengjie [Key Laboratory for Research in Galaxies and Cosmology, Shanghai Astronomical Observatory, 80 Nandan Road, Shanghai 200030 (China); Chi Xuebin; Shan Guihua; Wang Long, E-mail: jpan@bao.ac.cn [Supercomputing Center, Computer Network Information Center, Chinese Academy of Sciences, 4 Zhongguancun Nansijie, Haidian District, Beijing 100190 (China)

2012-12-20T23:59:59.000Z

379

Brane-Bulk energy exchange and agegraphic dark energy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We consider the agegraphic models of dark energy in a braneworld scenario with brane-bulk energy exchange. We assume that the adiabatic equation for the dark matter is satisfied while it is violated for the agegraphic dark energy due to the energy exchange between the brane and the bulk. Our study shows that with the brane-bulk interaction, the equation of state parameter of agegraphic dark energy on the brane, $w_D$, can have a transition from normal state where $w_D >-1 $ to the phantom regime where $w_D energy always satisfies $w^{\\mathrm{eff}}_D\\geq-1$.

Ahmad Sheykhi

2009-08-09T23:59:59.000Z

380

A monochromatic x-ray imaging system for characterizing low-density foams  

SciTech Connect

In High Energy Density (HED) laser experiments, targets often require small, low-density, foam components. However, their limited size can preclude single component characterization, forcing one to rely solely on less accurate bulk measurements. We have developed a monochromatic imaging a system to characterize both the density and uniformity of single component low-mass foams. This x-ray assembly is capable of determining line-averaged density variations near the 1% level, and provides statistically identical results to those obtained at the Brookhaven's NSLS. This system has the added benefit of providing two-dimensional density data, allowing an assessment of density uniformity.

Lanier, Nicholas E. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Taccetti, Jose M. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Hamilton, Christopher E. [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2012-05-04T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "wet bulk density" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Field Testing of a Wet FGD Additive for Enhanced Mercury Control - Task 5 Full-Scale Test Results  

SciTech Connect

This Topical Report summarizes progress on Cooperative Agreement DE-FC26-04NT42309, 'Field Testing of a Wet FGD Additive'. The objective of the project is to demonstrate the use of two flue gas desulfurization (FGD) additives, Evonik Degussa Corporation's TMT-15 and Nalco Company's Nalco 8034, to prevent the re-emission of elemental mercury (Hg{sup 0}) in flue gas exiting wet FGD systems on coal-fired boilers. Furthermore, the project intends to demonstrate whether the additive can be used to precipitate most of the mercury (Hg) removed in the wet FGD system as a fine salt that can be separated from the FGD liquor and bulk solid byproducts for separate disposal. The project is conducting pilot- and full-scale tests of the additives in wet FGD absorbers. The tests are intended to determine required additive dosages to prevent Hg{sup 0} re-emissions and to separate mercury from the normal FGD byproducts for three coal types: Texas lignite/Powder River Basin (PRB) coal blend, high-sulfur Eastern bituminous coal, and low-sulfur Eastern bituminous coal. The project team consists of URS Group, Inc., EPRI, Luminant Power (was TXU Generation Company LP), Southern Company, IPL (an AES company), Evonik Degussa Corporation and the Nalco Company. Luminant Power has provided the Texas lignite/PRB co-fired test site for pilot FGD tests and cost sharing. Southern Company has provided the low-sulfur Eastern bituminous coal host site for wet scrubbing tests, as well as the pilot- and full-scale jet bubbling reactor (JBR) FGD systems tested. IPL provided the high-sulfur Eastern bituminous coal full-scale FGD test site and cost sharing. Evonik Degussa Corporation is providing the TMT-15 additive, and the Nalco Company is providing the Nalco 8034 additive. Both companies are also supplying technical support to the test program as in-kind cost sharing. The project is being conducted in six tasks. Of the six project tasks, Task 1 involves project planning and Task 6 involves management and reporting. The other four tasks involve field testing on FGD systems, either at pilot or full scale. The four tasks include: Task 2 - Pilot Additive Testing in Texas Lignite Flue Gas; Task 3 - Full-scale FGD Additive Testing in High-sulfur Eastern Bituminous Flue Gas; Task 4 - Pilot Wet Scrubber Additive Tests at Plant Yates; and Task 5 - Full-scale Additive Tests at Plant Yates. The pilot-scale tests and the full-scale test using high-sulfur coal were completed in 2005 and 2006 and have been previously reported. This topical report presents the results from the Task 5 full-scale additive tests, conducted at Southern Company's Plant Yates Unit 1. Both additives were tested there.

Gary Blythe; MariJon Owens

2007-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

382

Specs add confidence in use of wet welding. [Underwater welding  

SciTech Connect

Underwater wet welding can now be utilized with the same confidence as dry welding, provided certain guidelines are followed. A new electrode is discussed that has been delivering exceptionally high quality welds by a diving firm in Houston. With the issuance of the American Welding Society's specifications (ANS/LAWS D3.6-83) much of the confusion surrounding underwater welding should be eliminated. The new specifications establish the levels of quality for underwater welding and gives everyone in the business a common language.

1984-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

383

US PRACTICE FOR INTERIM WET STORAGE OF RRSNF  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Aluminum research reactor spent nuclear fuel is currently being stored or is anticipated to be returned to the United States and stored at Department of Energy storage facilities at the Savannah River Site and the Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center. This paper summarizes the current practices to provide for continued safe interim wet storage in the U.S. Aluminum fuel stored in poor quality water is subject to aggressive corrosion attack and therefore water chemistry control systems are essential to maintain water quality. Fuel with minor breaches are safely stored directly in the basin. Fuel pieces and heavily damaged fuel is safely stored in isolation canisters.

Vinson, D.

2010-08-05T23:59:59.000Z

384

Update of Enhanced Mercury Capture by Wet FGD  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This document describes recent progress on three mercury control technology research and development projects. One project is co-funded by EPRI and the U.S. Department of Energy's National Energy Technology Laboratory (DOE-NETL), the second is funded solely by EPRI, and the third is co-funded by EPRI, DOE-NETL, and several EPRI-member companies. All three projects are focused on understanding and/or enhancing mercury capture (co-removal) by wet flue gas desulfurization (FGD) systems. The first project, c...

2007-03-12T23:59:59.000Z

385

A Theoretical Study of the Magnetic Structure of Bulk Iron with Radiation Defects  

SciTech Connect

A fundamental understanding of the radiation damage effects in solids is of great importance in assisting the development of improved materials with ultra-high strength, toughness, and radiation resistance for nuclear energy applications. In this presentation, we show our recent theoretical investigation on the magnetic structure evolution of bulk iron in the region surrounding the radiation defects. We applied the locally self-consistent multiple scattering method (LSMS), a linear scaling ab-initio method based on density functional theory with local spin density approximation, to the study of the magnetic structure in a low energy cascade in a 10,000-atom sample for a series of time steps for the evolution of the defects. The primary damage state and the evolution of all defects in the sample were simulated using molecular dynamics with empirical, embedded-atom inter-atomic potentials. We also discuss the importance of thermal effect on the magnetic structure evolution.

Wang, Yang [Pittsburgh Supercomputing Center; Stoller, Roger E [ORNL; Rusanu, Aurelian [ORNL; Nicholson, Don M [ORNL; Eisenbach, Markus [ORNL; Stocks, George Malcolm [ORNL

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

386

ARM - Campaign Instrument - ec-convair580-bulk  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

govInstrumentsec-convair580-bulk govInstrumentsec-convair580-bulk Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send Campaign Instrument : Environment Canada Convair 580 Bulk Parameters (EC-CONVAIR580-BULK) Instrument Categories Aerosols, Cloud Properties, Airborne Observations Campaigns Indirect and Semi-Direct Aerosol Campaign (ISDAC) [ Download Data ] North Slope Alaska, 2008.04.01 - 2008.04.30 Primary Measurements Taken The following measurements are those considered scientifically relevant. Refer to the datastream (netcdf) file headers for the list of all available measurements, including those recorded for diagnostic or quality assurance purposes. Ice water content Liquid water content Hydrometeor size Cloud particle number concentration Aerosol concentration

387

Bulk Energy Storage Webinar Rescheduled for February 9, 2012 | Department  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Bulk Energy Storage Webinar Rescheduled for February 9, 2012 Bulk Energy Storage Webinar Rescheduled for February 9, 2012 Bulk Energy Storage Webinar Rescheduled for February 9, 2012 February 1, 2012 - 12:48pm Addthis The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and the Iowa Stored Energy Park (ISEP) are conducting a free, 1-hour webinar, Lessons from Iowa: The Economic, Market, and Organizational Issues in Making Bulk Energy Storage Work, on Thursday, February 9, 2012 at 1 p.m. ET. Presenters include Dr. Imre Gyuk of DOE's Office of Electricity Deliverability and Energy Reliability and Bob Schulte from ISEP. The webinar was original scheduled for January 20, 2012, but experienced technical difficulties due to the large number of participants and was rescheduled. All participants must reregister. Funded by a DOE grant and managed by Sandia National Laboratories, ISEP's

388

Design of Bulk Nanocomposites as High Efficiency Thermoelectric Materials |  

Office of Science (SC) Website

Design of Bulk Nanocomposites as High Design of Bulk Nanocomposites as High Efficiency Thermoelectric Materials Energy Frontier Research Centers (EFRCs) EFRCs Home Centers Research Science Highlights Highlight Archives News & Events Publications Contact BES Home 04.27.12 Design of Bulk Nanocomposites as High Efficiency Thermoelectric Materials Print Text Size: A A A RSS Feeds FeedbackShare Page Scientific Achievement A newly synthesized bulk thermoelectric material that contains nanocrystals with the same orientation and structure as the host material breaks thermoelectric efficiency records by blocking thermal, but not electrical, conductivity. Significance and Impact A new strategy to design inexpensive materials that more efficiently convert heat to electricity. Research Details Thermoelectric materials directly generate electrical power from heat, but

389

Bodipy-backboned polymers as electron donor in bulk heterojunction ...  

Bodipy-backboned polymers as electron donor in bulk heterojunction solar cellsw BongSoo Kim,a Biwu Ma,*b Venkat R. Donuru,c Haiying Liuc and Jean M. J. Fre´chet*ab

390

Influence of Bulk Convection on Freckle Formation in Castings  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

compartments, a hot zone and a cold zone as shown in Figure l(a) below. A baffle is used to .... that the bulk convection cell will not distort the flow at the inlet.

391

Mapping the Strain Distributions in Deformed Bulk Metallic Glasses ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Abstract Scope, Bulk metallic glasses (BMGs) represent relatively new class of ... Evolution of Internal Strain with Temperature in Depleted Uranium in the ... Structural Effects upon Macroscopic Phenomena in Strained Ordered Oxide Films.

392

Development of Bulk Metallic Glasses with High Plasticity Using the ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Air-Oxidation of a (Zr55Cu30Al10Ni5)98Er2 Bulk Metallic Glass at 350-500oc · Anelastic Deformation of a Metallic Glass · Anisotropy in Metallic Glasses.

393

Photonic integration in a commercial scaled bulk-CMOS process  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We demonstrate the first photonic chip designed for a commercial bulk CMOS process (65 nm-node) using standard process layers combined with post-processing, enabling dense photonic integration with high-performance ...

Kaertner, Franz X.

394

A Second-Order Bulk Boundary-Layer Model  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Bulk mass-flux models represent the large eddies that are primarily responsible for the turbulent fluxes in the planetary boundary layer as convective circulations, with an associated convective mass flux. In order for such models to be useful, ...

David A. Randall; Qingqiu Shao; Chin-Hoh Moeng

1992-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

395

South Dakota Gasoline Midgrade Bulk Sales (Volume) by Refiners ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

South Dakota Gasoline Midgrade Bulk Sales (Volume) by Refiners (Thousand Gallons per Day) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9;

396

2011 Update on Mercury Capture by Wet FGD  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This document describes recent progress on three EPRI-funded flue gas desulfurization (FGD) research and development projects. The three projects are focused on understanding and enhancing how mercury is captured by FGD systems; on how it partitions between the FGD liquor, fine solids, and bulk FGD solid byproduct; and/or on factors that may affect beneficial use of FGD gypsum. The first project is collecting data at bench scale to determine the reactions that control the changes oxidized mercury can und...

2011-12-21T23:59:59.000Z

397

Compositional ordering and stability in nanostructured, bulk thermoelectric alloys.  

SciTech Connect

Thermoelectric materials have many applications in the conversion of thermal energy to electrical power and in solid-state cooling. One route to improving thermoelectric energy conversion efficiency in bulk material is to embed nanoscale inclusions. This report summarize key results from a recently completed LDRD project exploring the science underpinning the formation and stability of nanostructures in bulk thermoelectric and the quantitative relationships between such structures and thermoelectric properties.

Hekmaty, Michelle A.; Faleev, S.; Medlin, Douglas L.; Leonard, F.; Lensch-Falk, J.; Sharma, Peter Anand; Sugar, J. D.

2009-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

398

Bulk viscosity and the conformal anomaly in the pion gas  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We calculate the bulk viscosity of the massive pion gas within Unitarized Chiral Perturbation Theory. We obtain a low temperature peak arising from explicit conformal breaking due to the pion mass and another peak near the critical temperature, dominated by the conformal anomaly through gluon condensate terms. The correlation between bulk viscosity and conformal breaking supports a recent QCD proposal. We discuss the role of resonances, heavier states and large-$N_c$ counting.

D. Fernandez-Fraile; A. Gomez Nicola

2008-09-26T23:59:59.000Z

399

Scaling of the normal coefficient of restitution for wet impacts  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A thorough understanding of the energy dissipation in the dynamics of wet granular matter is essential for a continuum description of natural phenomena such as debris flow, and the development of various industrial applications such as the granulation process. The coefficient of restitution (COR), defined as the ratio between the relative rebound and impact velocities of a binary impact, is frequently used to characterize the amount of energy dissipation associated. We measure the COR by tracing a freely falling sphere bouncing on a wet surface with the liquid film thickness monitored optically. For fixed ratio between the film thickness and the particle size, the dependence of the COR on the impact velocity and various properties of the liquid film can be characterized with the Stokes number, defined as the ratio between the inertia of the particle and the viscosity of the liquid. Moreover, the COR for infinitely large impact velocities derived from the scaling can be analyzed by a model considering the energy dissipation from the inertia of the liquid film.

Thomas Mueller; Frank Gollwitzer; Christof Kruelle; Ingo Rehberg; Kai Huang

2013-01-23T23:59:59.000Z

400

Predictive modeling of reactive wetting and metal joining.  

SciTech Connect

The performance, reproducibility and reliability of metal joints are complex functions of the detailed history of physical processes involved in their creation. Prediction and control of these processes constitutes an intrinsically challenging multi-physics problem involving heating and melting a metal alloy and reactive wetting. Understanding this process requires coupling strong molecularscale chemistry at the interface with microscopic (diffusion) and macroscopic mass transport (flow) inside the liquid followed by subsequent cooling and solidification of the new metal mixture. The final joint displays compositional heterogeneity and its resulting microstructure largely determines the success or failure of the entire component. At present there exists no computational tool at Sandia that can predict the formation and success of a braze joint, as current capabilities lack the ability to capture surface/interface reactions and their effect on interface properties. This situation precludes us from implementing a proactive strategy to deal with joining problems. Here, we describe what is needed to arrive at a predictive modeling and simulation capability for multicomponent metals with complicated phase diagrams for melting and solidification, incorporating dissolutive and composition-dependent wetting.

van Swol, Frank B.

2013-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "wet bulk density" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

1988 Wet deposition temporal and spatial patterns in North America  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The focus of this report is on North American wet deposition temporal patterns from 1979 to 1988 and spatial patterns for 1988. It is the third in a series of reports that investigate the patterns of annual precipitation-weighted average concentration and annual deposition for nine ion species: hydrogen, sulfate, nitrate, ammonium, calcium, chloride, sodium, potassium, and magnesium. Mosaic maps, based on surface estimation using kriging, display concentration and deposition spatial patterns of pH, hydrogen, sulfate, nitrate, ammonium, and calcium ion species for 1988 annual, winter, and summer periods. Temporal pattern analyses use a subset of 35 sites over a 10-year (1979--1988) period and an expanded subset of 137 sites, with greater spatial coverage, over a 7-year (1982--1988) period. The 10-year period represents the longest period with wet deposition monitoring data available that has a sufficient number of sites with data of known quality to allow a descriptive summary of annual temporal patterns. Sen`s median trend estimate and Kendall`s seasonal tau (KST) test are calculated for each ion species concentration and deposition at each site in both subsets.

Simpson, J.C.; Olsen, A.R.; Bittner, E.A.

1992-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

402

1986 wet deposition temporal and spatial patterns in North America  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The focus of this report is on North American wet deposition temporal patterns from 1979 to 1986 and spatial patterns for 1986. The report provides statistical distribution summaries of annual precipitation-weighted average concentration and annual deposition for nine ion species: hydrogen, sulfate, nitrate, ammonium, calcium, chloride, sodium, potassium, and magnesium. The data in the report are from the Acid Depositing System (ADS) for the statistical reporting of North American deposition data. Isopleth maps, based on surface estimation using kriging, display concentration and deposition spatial patterns of pH, hydrogen, sulfate, nitrate, ammonium, and calcium ion species for 1986 annual, winter, and summer periods. The temporal pattern analyses use a subset of 30 sites over an 8-year (1979-1986) period and an expanded subset of 137 sites with greater spatial coverage over a 5-year (1982-1986) period. The 8-year period represents the longest period with wet deposition monitoring data unavailable that has a sufficient number of sites with data of known quality to allow a descriptive summary of annual temporal patterns. 19 refs., 105 figs., 29 tabs.

Olsen, A.R.

1989-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

403

1988 Wet deposition temporal and spatial patterns in North America  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The focus of this report is on North American wet deposition temporal patterns from 1979 to 1988 and spatial patterns for 1988. It is the third in a series of reports that investigate the patterns of annual precipitation-weighted average concentration and annual deposition for nine ion species: hydrogen, sulfate, nitrate, ammonium, calcium, chloride, sodium, potassium, and magnesium. Mosaic maps, based on surface estimation using kriging, display concentration and deposition spatial patterns of pH, hydrogen, sulfate, nitrate, ammonium, and calcium ion species for 1988 annual, winter, and summer periods. Temporal pattern analyses use a subset of 35 sites over a 10-year (1979--1988) period and an expanded subset of 137 sites, with greater spatial coverage, over a 7-year (1982--1988) period. The 10-year period represents the longest period with wet deposition monitoring data available that has a sufficient number of sites with data of known quality to allow a descriptive summary of annual temporal patterns. Sen's median trend estimate and Kendall's seasonal tau (KST) test are calculated for each ion species concentration and deposition at each site in both subsets.

Simpson, J.C.; Olsen, A.R.; Bittner, E.A.

1992-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

404

Finsler geometric perspective on the bulk flow in the universe  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Astronomical observations showed that there may exist a bulk flow with peculiar velocities in the universe, which contradicts with the (\\Lambda)CDM model. The bulk flow reveals that the observational universe is anisotropic at large scales. In fact, a more reliable observation on the anisotropy of spacetime comes from the CMB power spectra. The WMAP and Planck satellites both show that there is a hemispherical power asymmetry at large-angular scales. In this paper, we propose a "wind" scenario to the bulk flow (or the anisotropy of spacetime). Under the influence of the "wind", the spacetime metric could become a Finsler structure. By resolving the null geodesic equation, we obtain the modified luminosity distance, which has a dipolar form at the leading order. Thus, the "wind" describes well the bulk flow. In addition, we perform a least-(\\chi^2) fit to the data of type Ia supernovae (SNe Ia) in the Union2.1 compilation. The peculiar velocity of the bulk flow has an upper limit (v_{bulk}\\lesssim 4000 \\rm{km/s}), which is compatible with all the existing observational values.

Zhe Chang; Ming-Hua Li; Sai Wang

2013-03-07T23:59:59.000Z

405

Direct Measurements of Pore Fluid Density by Vibrating Tube Densimetry  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The densities of pore-confined fluids were measured for the first time by means of a vibrating tube method. Isotherms of total adsorption capacity were measured directly making the method complementary to the conventional gravimetric or volumetric/piezometric adsorption techniques, which yield the excess adsorption (the Gibbsian surface excess). A custom-made high-pressure, high-temperature vibrating tube densimeter (VTD) was used to measure the densities of subcritical and supercritical propane (between 35 C and 97 C) and supercritical carbon dioxide (between 32 C and 50 C) saturating hydrophobic silica aerogel (0.2 g/cm3, 90% porosity) synthesized inside Hastelloy U-tubes. Additionally, excess adsorption isotherms for supercritical CO2 and the same porous solid were measured gravimetrically using a precise magnetically-coupled microbalance. Pore fluid densities and total adsorption isotherms increased monotonically with increasing density of the bulk fluid, in contrast to excess adsorption isotherms, which reached a maximum at a subcritical density of the bulk fluid, and then decreased towards zero or negative values at supercritical densities. Compression of the confined fluid significantly beyond the density of the bulk liquid at the same temperature was observed at subcritical temperatures. The features of the isotherms of confined fluid density are interpreted to elucidate the observed behavior of excess adsorption. The maxima of excess adsorption were found to occur below the critical density of the bulk fluid at the conditions corresponding to the beginning of the plateau of total adsorption, marking the end of the transition of pore fluid to a denser, liquid-like pore phase. The results for propane and carbon dioxide showed similarity in the sense of the principle of corresponding states. No measurable effect of pore confinement on the liquid-vapor critical point was found. Quantitative agreement was obtained between excess adsorption isotherms determined from VTD total adsorption results and those measured gravimetrically at the same temperature, confirming the validity of the vibrating tube measurements. Vibrating tube densimetry was demonstrated as a novel experimental approach capable of providing the average density of pore-confined fluids.

Gruszkiewicz, Miroslaw {Mirek} S [ORNL; Rother, Gernot [ORNL; Wesolowski, David J [ORNL; Cole, David R [ORNL; Wallacher, Dirk [Helmholtz-Zentrum Berlin

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

406

A Probabilistic Bulk Model of Coupled Mixed Layer and Convection. Part I: Clear-Sky Case  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A new bulk model of the convective boundary layer, the probabilistic bulk convection model (PBCM), is presented. Unlike prior bulk approaches that have modeled the mixed-layer-top buoyancy flux as a constant fraction of the surface buoyancy flux, ...

Pierre Gentine; Alan K. Betts; Benjamin R. Lintner; Kirsten L. Findell; Chiel C. van Heerwaarden; Alexandra Tzella; Fabio D’Andrea

2013-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

407

,"U.S. Federal Offshore Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","U.S. Federal Offshore Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic...

408

,"U.S. Federal Offshore Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","U.S. Federal Offshore Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves...

409

Performance analysis of heat transfer processes from wet and dry surfaces : cooling towers and heat exchangers.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The objective of this work is to study the thermal and hydraulic performance of evaporatively cooled heat exchangers, including closed wet cooling towers, and dry… (more)

Hasan, Ala Ali

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

410

Numerical modelling of heat and mass transfer and optimisation of a natural draft wet cooling tower.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The main contribution of this work is to answer several important questions relating to natural draft wet cooling tower (NDWCT) modelling, design and optimisation. Specifically,… (more)

Williamson, Nicholas J

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

411

Performance Analysis of Heat Transfer Processes from Wet and Dry Surfaces: Cooling Towers and Heat Exchangers.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The objective of this work is to study the thermal and hydraulic performance of evaporatively cooled heat exchangers, including closed wet cooling towers, and dry… (more)

Hasan, Ala Ali

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

412

Performance evaluation of wet-cooling tower fills with computational fluid dynamics.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??ENGLISH ABSTRACT: A wet-cooling tower fill performance evaluation model developed by Reuter is derived in Cartesian coordinates for a rectangular cooling tower and compared to… (more)

Gudmundsson, Yngvi

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

413

Effects of corn processing and dietary wet corn gluten feed on newly received and growing cattle.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Effects of corn processing with or without the inclusion of wet corn gluten feed (WCGF) on growth and performance were analyzed in two experiments. Treatments… (more)

Siverson, Anna

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

414

,"U.S. Nonassociated Natural Gas Proved Reserves, Wet After Lease...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

,"Worksheet Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","U.S. Nonassociated Natural Gas Proved Reserves, Wet After Lease Separation",10,"Annual",20...

415

,"U.S. Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas Proved Reserves, Wet...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

,"Worksheet Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","U.S. Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas Proved Reserves, Wet After Lease...

416

Dynamic wetting and heat transfer behaviour of aluminium droplets impinging and solidifying on copper substrates.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The present work describes an experimental set-up built to simulate dynamic wetting and heat transfer occurring in many rapid solidification processes. Tests were performed with… (more)

Leboeuf, Sébastien

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

417

Technology Maturation Plan (TMP) Wet Air Oxidation (WAO) Technology for Tank 48H Treatment Project (TTP)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This assessment determines the technology maturity level of the candidate Tank 48H treatment technologies that are being considered for implementation at DOE's SRS - specifically Wet Air Oxidation.

418

,"Texas - RRC District 7B Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

,"Worksheet Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Texas - RRC District 7B Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved...

419

,"Texas - RRC District 8A Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

,"Worksheet Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Texas - RRC District 8A Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Proved Reserves (Billion...

420

,"Texas - RRC District 8A Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

,"Worksheet Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Texas - RRC District 8A Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "wet bulk density" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

,"Texas - RRC District 7B Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

,"Worksheet Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Texas - RRC District 7B Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Proved Reserves (Billion...

422

,"Texas - RRC District 7C Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

,"Worksheet Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Texas - RRC District 7C Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Proved Reserves (Billion...

423

,"Texas - RRC District 7C Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

,"Worksheet Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Texas - RRC District 7C Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved...

424

Solar Cells: Spin-Cast Bulk Heterojunction Solar Cells: A Dynamical...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Solar Cells: Spin-Cast Bulk Heterojunction Solar Cells: A Dynamical Investigation Solar Cells: Spin-Cast Bulk Heterojunction Solar Cells: A Dynamical Investigation Print Wednesday,...

425

MHK Technologies/WET EnGen | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

EnGen EnGen < MHK Technologies Jump to: navigation, search << Return to the MHK database homepage WET EnGen.jpg Technology Profile Primary Organization Wave Energy Technologies Inc Project(s) where this technology is utilized *MHK Projects/Sandy Cove Technology Resource Click here Wave Technology Type Click here Point Absorber Technology Readiness Level Click here TRL 5/6: System Integration and Technology Laboratory Demonstration Technology Description The EnGen point absorber, which features 'Smart Float' technology that allows the device to travel along a rigid spar at an incline of 45 degrees. The spar is moored at a single point of contact which allows the device to be fully compliant on all three axes (pitch, roll and yaw). Mooring Configuration Proprietary

426

Stokes' Cradle: Normal Three-Body Collisions between Wetted Particles  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In this work, a combination of experiments and theory is used to investigate three-body, normal collisions between solid particles with a liquid coating (i.e., "wetted" particles). Experiments are carried out using a Stokes' cradle, an apparatus inspired by the Newton's cradle desktop toy except with wetted particles. Unlike previous work on two-body systems, which may either agglomerate or rebound upon collision, four outcomes are possible in three-body systems: fully agglomerated, Newton's cradle (striker and target particle it strikes agglomerate), reverse Newton's cradle (targets agglomerate while striker separates), and fully separated. Post-collisional velocities are measured over a range of parameters. For all experiments, as the impact velocity increases, the progression of outcomes observed is fully agglomerated, reverse Newton's cradle, and fully separated. Notably, as the viscosity of the oil increases, experiments reveal a decrease in the critical Stokes number (the Stokes number that demarcates a transition from agglomeration to separation) for both sets of adjacent particles. A scaling theory is developed based on lubrication forces and particle deformation and elasticity. Unlike previous work for two-particle systems, two pieces of physics are found to be critical in the prediction of a regime map that is consistent with experiments: (i) an additional resistance upon rebound of the target particles due to the pre-existing liquid bridge between them (which has no counterpart in two-particle collisions), and (ii) the addition of a rebound criterion due to glass transition of the liquid layer at high pressure between colliding particles.

C. M. Donahue; C. M. Hrenya; R. H. Davis; K. J. Nakagawa; A. P. Zelinskaya; G. G. Joseph

2009-12-18T23:59:59.000Z

427

Density-dependent covariant energy density functionals  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Relativistic nuclear energy density functionals are applied to the description of a variety of nuclear structure phenomena at and away fromstability line. Isoscalar monopole, isovector dipole and isoscalar quadrupole giant resonances are calculated using fully self-consistent relativistic quasiparticle randomphase approximation, based on the relativistic Hartree-Bogoliubovmodel. The impact of pairing correlations on the fission barriers in heavy and superheavy nuclei is examined. The role of pion in constructing desnity functionals is also investigated.

Lalazissis, G. A. [Physics Department, Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, GR-54124 (Greece)

2012-10-20T23:59:59.000Z

428

High Accuracy Predictions of the Bulk Properties of Water | Argonne  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

High Accuracy Predictions of the Bulk Properties of Water High Accuracy Predictions of the Bulk Properties of Water High Accuracy Predictions of the Bulk Properties of Water PI Name: Mark Gordon PI Email: mark@si.msg.chem.iastate.edu Institution: Iowa State University Allocation Program: ESP Allocation Hours at ALCF: 150 Million Year: 2010 to 2013 Research Domain: Chemistry Among the ab initio methods, second-order perturbation theory (MP2) predicts highly accurate structures and relative energies for water clusters. Researchers will carry out molecular dynamics simulations of water at the MP2 level. However, full MP2 calculations of even modest-sized water clusters are far too time-consuming for dynamical simulations, even on the next-generation Blue Gene. Therefore, a key element of the current approach will be the use of MP2 in conjunction with the Fragment Molecular

429

Preparation of bulk superhard B-C-N nanocomposite compact  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Bulk, superhard, B--C--N nanocomposite compacts were prepared by ball milling a mixture of graphite and hexagonal boron nitride, encapsulating the ball-milled mixture at a pressure in a range of from about 15 GPa to about 25 GPa, and sintering the pressurized encapsulated ball-milled mixture at a temperature in a range of from about 1800-2500 K. The product bulk, superhard, nanocomposite compacts were well sintered compacts with nanocrystalline grains of at least one high-pressure phase of B--C--N surrounded by amorphous diamond-like carbon grain boundaries. The bulk compacts had a measured Vicker's hardness in a range of from about 41 GPa to about 68 GPa.

Zhao, Yusheng (Los Alamos, NM); He, Duanwei (Sichuan, CN)

2011-05-10T23:59:59.000Z

430

Phantom dark energy as an effect of bulk viscosity  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In a homogeneous and isotropic universe bulk viscosity is the unique viscous effect capable to modify the background dynamics. Effects like shear viscosity or heat conduction can only change the evolution of the perturbations. The existence of a bulk viscous pressure in a fluid, which in order to obey to the second law of thermodynamics is negative, reduces its effective pressure. We discuss in this study the degeneracy in bulk viscous cosmologies and address the possibility that phantom dark energy cosmology could be caused by the existence of non-equilibrium pressure in any cosmic component. We establish the conditions under which either matter or radiation viscous cosmologies can be mapped into the phantom dark energy scenario with constraints from multiple observational data-sets

Hermano Velten; Jiaxin Wang; Xinhe Meng

2013-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

431

Properties of Bulk Sintered Silver As a Function of Porosity  

SciTech Connect

This report summarizes a study where various properties of bulk-sintered silver were investigated over a range of porosity. This work was conducted within the National Transportation Research Center's Power Device Packaging project that is part of the DOE Vehicle Technologies Advanced Power Electronics and Electric Motors Program. Sintered silver, as an interconnect material in power electronics, inherently has porosity in its produced structure because of the way it is made. Therefore, interest existed in this study to examine if that porosity affected electrical properties, thermal properties, and mechanical properties because any dependencies could affect the intended function (e.g., thermal transfer, mechanical stress relief, etc.) or reliability of that interconnect layer and alter how its performance is modeled. Disks of bulk-sintered silver were fabricated using different starting silver pastes and different sintering conditions to promote different amounts of porosity. Test coupons were harvested out of the disks to measure electrical resistivity and electrical conductivity, thermal conductivity, coefficient of thermal expansion, elastic modulus, Poisson's ratio, and yield stress. The authors fully recognize that the microstructure of processed bulk silver coupons may indeed not be identical to the microstructure produced in thin (20-50 microns) layers of sintered silver. However, measuring these same properties with such a thin actual structure is very difficult, requires very specialized specimen preparation and unique testing instrumentation, is expensive, and has experimental shortfalls of its own, so the authors concluded that the herein measured responses using processed bulk sintered silver coupons would be sufficient to determine acceptable values of those properties. Almost all the investigated properties of bulk sintered silver changed with porosity content within a range of 3-38% porosity. Electrical resistivity, electrical conductivity, thermal conductivity, elastic modulus, Poisson's ratio, and yield stress all depended on the porosity content in bulk-sintered silver. The only investigated property that was independent of porosity in that range was coefficient of thermal expansion.

Wereszczak, Andrew A [ORNL; Vuono, Daniel J [ORNL; Wang, Hsin [ORNL; Ferber, Mattison K [ORNL; Liang, Zhenxian [ORNL

2012-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

432

Physical factors controlling the ductility of bulk metallic glasses  

SciTech Connect

In order to identify key physical factor controlling the deformation and fracture behavior of bulk metallic glasses (BMGs), we compiled and analyzed the elastic moduli and compressive ductility for BMGs. In addition, new modulus data were generated in the critical ranges in order to facilitate the analysis. We have found that the intrinsic ductility of BMGs can be correlated with the bulk-to-shear modulus ratio B/G according to Pugh's [Philos. Mag. 45, 823 (1954) ] rule. In some individual BMG systems, for example, Fe based, the relationship seems to be very clear. The physical meaning of this correlation is discussed in terms of atomic bonding and connectivity.

Liu, Y. [Central South University, China; Liu, Chain T [ORNL; Zhang, Z. [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK); Keppens, V. [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK)

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

433

Nucleation of bulk superconductivity close to critical magnetic field  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We consider the two-dimensional Ginzburg-Landau functional with constant applied magnetic field. For applied magnetic fields close to the second critical field $H_{C_2}$ and large Ginzburg-Landau parameter, we provide leading order estimates on the energy of minimizing configurations. We obtain a fine threshold value of the applied magnetic field for which bulk superconductivity contributes to the leading order of the energy. Furthermore, the energy of the bulk is related to that of the Abrikosov problem in a periodic lattice. A key ingredient of the proof is a novel $L^\\infty$-bound which is of independent interest.

S. Fournais; A. Kachmar

2009-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

434

Hybrid wet paper coding mechanism for steganography employing n-indicator and fuzzy edge detector  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Data hiding technique can facilitate security and the safe transmission of important information in the digital domain, which generally requires a high embedding payload and good stego image quality. Recently, a steganographic framework known as wet ... Keywords: Fuzzy edge detector, Indicator, Security, Steganography, Wet paper coding

Chin-Chen Chang; Jung-San Lee; T. Hoang Ngan Le

2010-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

435

Probabilistic Forecasts of the Onset of the North Australian Wet Season  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The amount and timing of early wet-season rainfall are important for the management of many agricultural industries in north Australia. With this in mind, a wet-season onset date is defined based on the accumulation of rainfall to a predefined ...

Fiona Lo; Matthew C. Wheeler; Holger Meinke; Alexis Donald

2007-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

436

Droughts and Persistent Wet Spells over the United States and Mexico  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Droughts and persistent wet spells over the United States and northwest Mexico have preferred regions of occurrence and persistence. Wet or dry conditions that persist more than 1 yr tend to occur over the interior United States west of 90°–95°W ...

Kingtse C. Mo; Jae E. Schemm

2008-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

437

Dry purification of aspirational air in coke-sorting systems with wet slaking of coke  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Coke transportation after wet slaking is accompanied by the release of dust in the production building and in the surrounding atmosphere. Wet methods are traditionally used to purify very humid air. Giprokoks has developed designs for highly efficient dry dust-removal methods in such conditions.

T.F. Trembach; A.G. Klimenko [Giprokoks, the State Institute for the Design of Coke-Industry Enterprises, Kharkov (Ukraine)

2009-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

438

PION CONDENSATION IN A FIELD THEORY CONSISTENT WITH BULK PROPERTIES OF NUCLEAR MATTER  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

theory is constrained to reproduce the known bulk properties of nuclear matter, namely its saturation energy,

Banerjee, B.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

439

Evaluation of ammonia as a working fluid for a wet/dry-cooled binary geothermal plant  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The concepts considered in this study involve various arrangments of the binary geothermal power cycle with advanced dry cooling schemes. Brief descriptions of the binary cycle and advanced cooling schemes are included. Also included are descriptions of the base case concept and the ammonia working fluid concept. Performance and cost estimates were developed for a wet-cooled isobutane cycle plant, wet/dry cooled isobutane cycle plant, wet-cooled ammonia cycle plant, and a wet/dry cooled ammonia cycle plant. The performance and cost estimates were calculated using the GEOCOST computer code developed at PNL. Inputs for GEOCOST were calculated based on the Heber sites. The characteristics of the wet/dry cooling system were determined using the BNWGEO computer code developed at PNL. Results of the cooling system analysis are presented, followed by results of the geothermal plant analysis. Conclusions and comments also are included.

Drost, M.K.; Huber, H.D.

1982-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

440

Coupling between bulk- and surface chemistry in suspensions of charged colloids  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The ionic composition and pair-correlations in fluid phases of realistically salt-free charged colloidal sphere suspensions are calculated in the primitive model. We obtain the number densities of all ionic species in suspension, including low-molecular weight microions, and spherical colloidal macroions with acidic surface groups, from a self-consistent solution of a coupled physicochemical set of nonlinear algebraic equations and liquid integral equations. Here, we study suspensions of colloidal spheres with sulfate or silanol surface groups, suspended in demineralized water that is saturated with carbon dioxide under standard atmosphere. The equilibrium densities of all ionic species are coupled via the concentration of hydronium (H3O+) ions, and the only input required for our theoretical scheme are the acidic dissociation constants pKa, and effective sphere diameters of all involved ions. Our method allows for an ab initio calculation of colloidal bare charges and effective charges, at high numerical efficiency. In suspensions with highly charged colloidal spheres, the mean ion densities depend strongly on the distance from the colloidal particles surfaces, resulting in local variations of the pH-value on the sub-micrometer length scale. On the same length scale, our theoretical scheme predicts local deviations from the bulk phase mass-action balances for ion association and dissociation.

Marco Heinen; Thomas Palberg; Hartmut Löwen

2013-10-28T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "wet bulk density" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

A Warm-Bin–Cold-Bulk Hybrid Cloud Microphysical Model  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This study describes a newly developed bin–bulk hybrid cloud microphysical model named MSSG-Bin, which has been implemented in the Multi-Scale Simulator for the Geoenvironment (MSSG). In the hybrid approach, a spectral bin scheme is used for ...

Ryo Onishi; Keiko Takahashi

2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

442

ENVIRONMENTAL BIOTECHNOLOGY Effect of bulk liquid BOD concentration on activity  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

to assess the impact of bulk liquid biological oxygen demand (BOD) concentrations on the activity oxygen demand (BOD) for denitrification, are critical for improving current wastewater treatment and Geological Sciences, University of Notre Dame, 156 Fitzpatrick Hall, Notre Dame, IN 46556, USA e

Nerenberg, Robert

443

Approximating Buy-at-Bulk k-Steiner trees  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In the buy-at-bulk $k$-Steiner tree (or rent-or-buy$k$-Steiner tree) problem we are given a graph $G(V,E)$ with a setof terminals $T\\subseteq V$ including a particular vertex $s$ calledthe root, and an integer $k\\leq |T|$. ...

Hajiaghayi, MohammadTaghi

2005-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

444

Experiences with bulk SMS for health financing in Uganda  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Short message service (SMS, aka text messaging) is a low-cost and effective means of communication for organizations attempting to maintain contact with many people. In this paper we look at the deployment and of a bulk mobile text-messaging platform ... Keywords: braided communications, bulksms, health, ictd, mobile phone, sms

Melissa Densmore

2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

445

Security-Constrained Adequacy Evaluation of Bulk Power System Reliability  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Security-Constrained Adequacy Evaluation of Bulk Power System Reliability Fang Yang, Student Member. Stefopoulos, Student Member, IEEE Abstract -- A framework of security-constrained adequacy evaluation (SCAE electric load while satisfying security constraints. It encompasses three main steps: (a) critical

446

Synthesis of bulk metallic glass foam by powder extrusion with a fugitive second phase  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Bulk metallic glass foams with 12 mm in diameter and 30 mm in length having a density of 4.62 g/cm{sup 3} (approximately 58.3% of theoretical) were fabricated by extruding a powder mixture comprised of 60 vol % Ni{sub 59}Zr{sub 20}Ti{sub 16}Si{sub 2}Sn{sub 3} metallic glass blended with 40 vol % brass followed by dissolution of the fugitive brass in an aqueous HNO{sub 3} solution. The final structure consists of continuously connected, high aspect ratio metallic glass struts surrounded by {approx}40 vol % of homogeneously distributed ellipsoid-shaped pores having nominal diameters between 10 and 50 {mu}m.

Lee, Min Ha; Sordelet, Daniel J. [Materials and Engineering Physics Program, Ames Laboratory, Iowa State University, Ames, Iowa 50011 (United States)

2006-07-10T23:59:59.000Z

447

Bulk and surface controlled diffusion of fission gas atoms  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Fission gas retention and release impact nuclear fuel performance by, e.g., causing fuel swelling leading to mechanical interaction with the clad, increasing the plenum pressure and reducing the gap thermal conductivity. All of these processes are important to understand in order to optimize operating conditions of nuclear reactors and to simulate accident scenarios. Most fission gases have low solubility in the fuel matrix, which is especially pronounced for large fission gas atoms such as Xe and Kr, and as a result there is a significant driving force for segregation of gas atoms to extended defects such as grain boundaries or dislocations and subsequently for nucleation of gas bubbles at these sinks. Several empirical or semi-empirical models have been developed for fission gas release in nuclear fuels, e.g. [1-6]. One of the most commonly used models in fuel performance codes was published by Massih and Forsberg [3,4,6]. This model is similar to the early Booth model [1] in that it applies an equivalent sphere to separate bulk UO{sub 2} from grain boundaries represented by the sphere circumference. Compared to the Booth model, it also captures trapping at grain boundaries, fission gas resolution and it describes release from the boundary by applying timedependent boundary conditions to the circumference. In this work we focus on the step where fission gas atoms diffuse from the grain interior to the grain boundaries. The original Massih-Forsberg model describes this process by applying an effective diffusivity divided into three temperature regimes. In this report we present results from density functional theory calculations (DFT) that are relevant for the high (D{sub 3}) and intermediate (D{sub 2}) temperature diffusivities of fission gases. The results are validated by making a quantitative comparison to Turnbull's [8-10] and Matzke's data [12]. For the intrinsic or high temperature regime we report activation energies for both Xe and Kr diffusion in UO{sub 2{+-}x}, which compare favorably to available experiments. This is an extension of previous work [13]. In particular, it applies improved chemistry models for the UO{sub 2{+-}x} nonstoichiometry and its impact on the fission gas activation energies. The derivation of these models follows the approach that used in our recent study of uranium vacancy diffusion in UO{sub 2} [14]. Also, based on the calculated DFT data we analyze vacancy enhanced diffusion mechanisms in the intermediate temperature regime. In addition to vacancy enhanced diffusion we investigate species transport on the (111) UO{sub 2} surface. This is motivated by the formation of small voids partially filled with fission gas atoms (bubbles) in UO{sub 2} under irradiation, for which surface diffusion could be the rate-limiting transport step. Diffusion of such bubbles constitutes an alternative mechanism for mass transport in these materials.

Andersson, Anders D. [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2012-08-09T23:59:59.000Z

448

A COMPREHENSIVE TECHNICAL REVIEW OF THE DEMONSTRATION BULK VITRIFICATION SYSTEM  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In May 2006, CH2M Hill Hanford Group, Inc. chartered an Expert Review Panel (ERP) to review the current status of the Demonstration Bulk Vitrification System (DBVS). It is the consensus of the ERP that bulk vitrification is a technology that requires further development and evaluation to determine its potential for meeting the Hanford waste stabilization mission. No fatal flaws (issues that would jeopardize the overall DBVS mission that cannot be mitigated) were found, given the current state of the project. However, a number of technical issues were found that could significantly affect the project's ability to meet its overall mission as stated in the project ''Justification of Mission Need'' document, if not satisfactorily resolved. The ERP recognizes that the project has changed from an accelerated schedule demonstration project to a formally chartered project that must be in full compliance with DOE 413.3 requirements. The perspective of the ERP presented herein, is measured against the formally chartered project as stated in the approved Justification of Mission Need document. A justification of Mission Need document was approved in July 2006 which defined the objectives for the DBVS Project. In this document, DOE concluded that bulk vitrification is a viable technology that requires additional development to determine its potential applicability to treatment of a portion of the Hanford low activity waste. The DBVS mission need statement now includes the following primary objectives: (1) process approximately 190,000 gallons of Tank S-109 waste into fifty 100 metric ton boxes of vitrified product; (2) store and dispose of these boxes at Hanford's Integrated Disposal Facility (IDF); (3) evaluate the waste form characteristics; (4) gather pilot plant operability data, and (5) develop the overall life cycle system performance of bulk vitrification and produce a comparison of the bulk vitrification process to building a second LAW Immobilization facility or other supplemental treatment alternatives as provided in M-62-08.

SCHAUS, P.S.

2006-09-29T23:59:59.000Z

449

Development of a catalytic system for gasification of wet biomass  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A gasification system is under development at Pacific Northwest Laboratory that can be used with high-moisture biomass feedstocks. The system operates at 350 C and 205 atm using a liquid water phase as the processing medium. Since a pressurized system is used, the wet biomass can be fed as a slurry to the reactor without drying. Through the development of catalysts, a useful processing system has been produced. This paper includes assessment of processing test results of different catalysts. Reactor system results including batch, bench-scale continuous, and engineering-scale processing results are presented to demonstrate the applicability of this catalytic gasification system to biomass. The system has utility both for direct conversion of biomass to fuel gas or as a wastewater cleanup system for treatment of unconverted biomass from bioconversion processes. By the use of this system high conversion of biomass to fuel gas can be achieved. Medium-Btu is the primary product. Potential exists for recovery/recycle of some of the unreacted inorganic components from the biomass in the aqueous byproduct stream.

Elliott, D.C.; Sealock, L.J.; Phelps, M.R.; Neuenschwander, G.G.; Hart, T.R.

1993-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

450

Development studies for a novel wet oxidation process  

SciTech Connect

A catalytic wet oxidation process (DETOX), which uses an acidic iron solution to oxidize organic compounds to carbon dioxide, water, and other simple products, was investigated as a potential method for the treatment of multicomponent hazardous and mixed wastes. The organic compounds picric acid, poly(vinyl chloride), tetrachlorothiophene, pentachloropyridine, Aroclor 1260 (a polychlorinated biphenyl), and hexachlorobenzene were oxidized in 125 ml reaction vessels. The metals arsenic, barium, beryllium, cadmium, cerium (as a surrogate for plutonium), chromium, lead, mercury, neodymium (as a surrogate for uranium), nickel, and vanadium were tested in the DETOX solution. Barium, beryllium, cerium, chromium, mercury, neodymium, nickel, and vanadium were all found to be very soluble (>100 g/l) in the DETOX chloride-based solution. Arsenic, barium, cadmium, and lead solubilities were lower. Lead could be selectively precipitated from the DETOX solution. Chromium(VI) was reduced to relatively non-toxic chromium(III) by the solution. Six soils were contaminated with arsenic, barium, beryllium, chromium, lead, and neodymium oxides at approximately 0.1% by weight, and benzene, trichloroethene, mineral oil, and Aroclor 1260 at approximately 5% by weight total, and 5.g amounts treated with the DETOX solution in unstirred 125. ml reaction bombs. It is felt that soil treatment in a properly designed system is entirely possible despite incomplete oxidation of the less volatile organic materials in these unstirred tests.

Dhooge, P.M.; Hakim, L.B.

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

451

FULL-SCALE TESTING OF ENHANCED MERCURY CONTROL TECHNOLOGIES FOR WET FGD SYSTEMS  

SciTech Connect

Wet flue gas desulfurization (wet FGD) systems are currently installed on about 25% of the coal-fired utility generating capacity in the U.S., representing about 15% of the number of coal-fired units. Depending on the effect of operating parameters such as mercury content of the coal, form of mercury (elemental or oxidized) in the flue gas, scrubber spray tower configuration, liquid-to-gas ratio, and slurry chemistry, FGD systems can provide cost-effective, near-term mercury emissions control options with a proven history of commercial operation. For boilers already equipped with FGD systems, the incremental cost of any vapor phase mercury removal achieved is minimal. To be widely accepted and implemented, technical approaches that improve mercury removal performance for wet FGD systems should also have low incremental costs and have little or no impact on operation and SO{sub 2} removal performance. The ultimate goal of the Full-scale Testing of Enhanced Mercury Control for Wet FGD Systems Program was to commercialize methods for the control of mercury in coal-fired electric utility systems equipped with wet flue gas desulfurization (wet FGD). The program was funded by the U.S. Department of Energy's National Energy Technology Laboratory, the Ohio Coal Development Office within the Ohio Department of Development, and Babcock & Wilcox. Host sites and associated support were provided by Michigan South Central Power Agency (MSCPA) and Cinergy. Field-testing was completed at two commercial coal-fired utilities with wet FGD systems: (1) MSCPA's 55 MW{sub e} Endicott Station and (2) Cinergy's 1300 MW{sub e} Zimmer Station. Testing was conducted at these two locations because of the large differences in size and wet scrubber chemistry. Endicott employs a limestone, forced oxidation (LSFO) wet FGD system, whereas Zimmer uses Thiosorbic{reg_sign} Lime (magnesium enhanced lime) and ex situ oxidation. Both locations burn Ohio bituminous coal.

D.K. McDonald; G.T. Amrhein; G.A. Kudlac; D. Madden Yurchison

2003-05-07T23:59:59.000Z

452

Density | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Density Density Dataset Summary Description This dataset is part of a larger internal dataset at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) that explores various characteristics of large solar electric (both PV and CSP) facilities around the United States. This dataset focuses on the land use characteristics for solar facilities that are either under construction or currently in operation. Source Land-Use Requirements for Solar Power Plants in the United States Date Released June 25th, 2013 (5 months ago) Date Updated Unknown Keywords acres area average concentrating solar power csp Density electric hectares km2 land land requirements land use land-use mean photovoltaic photovoltaics PV solar statistics Data application/vnd.openxmlformats-officedocument.spreadsheetml.sheet icon Master Solar Land Use Spreadsheet (xlsx, 1.5 MiB)

453

Single-Nucleon Densities  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Densities Densities This web page presents single-nucleon densities calculated for a variety of nuclei in the range A=2-10 with some preliminary results for A=11,12. These are from variational Monte Carlo calculations (VMC) using the Argonne v18 two-nucleon and Urbana X three-nucleon potentials (AV18+UX). (Urbana X is intermediate between the Urbana IX and Illinois-7 models; it has the form of UIX supplemented with a two-pion S-wave piece, while the strengths of its terms are taken from the IL7 model. It does NOT have the three-pion-ring term of IL7.) These VMC wave functions are the starting trial functions for a number of recent Green's function Monte Carlo (GFMC) calculations: Brida, et al., Phys. Rev. C 84, 024319 (2011); McCutchan, et al., Phys. Rev. C 86, 024315 (2012);

454

Reduction of Water Use in Wet FGD Systems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Cooperative Agreement DE-FC26-06NT42726 was established in January 2006, and is current through Amendment 2, April 2006. The current reporting period, April 1, 2008 through June 30, 2008, is the eighth progress-reporting period for the project. However, this report will be the final report (instead of a quarterly report) because this project is being terminated. Efforts to bring this project to a close over the past several months focused on internal project discussions, and subsequent communications with NETL, regarding the inherent difficulty with completing this project as originally scoped, and the option of performing an engineering study to accomplish some of the chief project objectives. However, NETL decided that the engineering study did indeed constitute a significant scope deviation from the original concepts, and that pursuit of this option was not recommended. These discussions are summarized in the Results and Discussion, and the Conclusion sections. The objective of this project by a team lead by URS Group was to demonstrate the use of regenerative heat exchange to reduce flue gas temperature and minimize evaporative water consumption in wet flue gas desulphurization (FGD) systems on coal-fired boilers. Furthermore, the project intended to demonstrate that regenerative heat exchange to cool flue gas upstream of the electrostatic precipitator (ESP) and reheat flue gas downstream of the FGD system would result in the following benefits to air pollution control (APC) systems on coal-fired power plants: (1) Improve ESP performance due to reduced gas volume and improved ash resistivity characteristics, (2) Control SO3 emissions through condensation on the fly ash, and (3) Avoid the need to install wet stacks or to provide flue gas reheat. Finally, operation at cooler flue gas temperatures offered the potential benefit of increasing mercury (Hg) removal across the ESP and FGD systems. This project planned to conduct pilot-scale tests of regenerative heat exchange to determine the reduction in FGD water consumption that can be achieved and assess the resulting impact on APC systems. An analysis of the improvement in the performance of the APC systems and the resulting reduction in capital and operating costs were going to be conducted. The tests were intended to determine the impact of operation of cooling flue gas temperatures on FGD water consumption, ESP particulate removal, SO{sub 3} removal, and Hg removal, and to assess the potential negative impact of excessive corrosion rates in the regenerative heat exchanger. Testing was going to be conducted on Columbian coal (with properties similar to low-sulfur Eastern bituminous coal) and SO{sub 3} will be spiked onto the flue gas to simulate operation with higher SO{sub 3} concentrations resulting from firing a higher sulfur coal, or operating with a selective catalytic reduction (SCR) unit. The project was also going to include associate planning, laboratory analytical support, reporting, and management activities. The URS project team finalized a conceptual alternative approach to demonstrate, via an engineering study, the use of regenerative heat exchange to reduce flue gas temperature and minimize evaporative water consumption. This idea was presented in summary format to NETL for consideration. NETL determined that this alternative approach deviated from the original project objectives, and that it would be in the best interest of all parties involved to cancel the project.

David Rencher

2008-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

455

The Streaming Potential Generated by Flow of Wet Steam in Capillary Tubes  

SciTech Connect

For a constant pressure differential, the flow of wet steam generated electric potentials which increased with time and did not reach equilibrium values. These potentials were found to increase to values greater than 100 volts. The reason for this kind of potential build-up behavior was the presence of tiny flowing water slugs which were interspersed with electrically nonconductive steam vapor slugs. The measured electric potential for wet steam increased with pressure differential, but the relationship was not linear. The increase in potential with pressure drop was attributed both to an increase in fluid flow rate and changes in the wet steam quality.

Marsden, S.S. Jr.; Tyran, Craig K.

1986-01-21T23:59:59.000Z

456

Method of fabricating an optoelectronic device having a bulk heterojunction  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method of fabricating an optoelectronic device comprises: depositing a first layer having protrusions over a first electrode, in which the first layer comprises a first organic small molecule material; depositing a second layer on the first layer such that the second layer is in physical contact with the first layer; in which the smallest lateral dimension of the protrusions are between 1 to 5 times the exciton diffusion length of the first organic small molecule material; and depositing a second electrode over the second layer to form the optoelectronic device. A method of fabricating an organic optoelectronic device having a bulk heterojunction is also provided and comprises: depositing a first layer with protrusions over an electrode by organic vapor phase deposition; depositing a second layer on the first layer where the interface of the first and second layers forms a bulk heterojunction; and depositing another electrode over the second layer.

Shtein, Max (Ann Arbor, MI); Yang, Fan (Princeton, NJ); Forrest, Stephen R. (Princeton, NJ)

2008-10-14T23:59:59.000Z

457

Evaluation of Potential Bulk System Reliability Impacts of Distributed Resources  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In recent years, distributed energy resources (DER) penetration has increased, but projections for penetration over the next 10 years show dramatic increases. Much of this is made up of distributed solar photovoltaic (PV) power, which is estimated to expand significantly in the United States in coming years. This project describes how methods to assess bulk system reliability might need to be altered to account for increasing levels of DER, particularly PV. It also aims to produce mitigating strategies t...

2011-12-21T23:59:59.000Z

458

High Performance Bulk Data Brian Tierney and Joe Metzger, ESnet  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

High Performance Bulk Data Transfer Brian Tierney and Joe Metzger, ESnet Joint Techs, Columbus OH://mitas.csail.mit.edu/papers/ Bauer_Clark_Lehr_Broadband_Spee d_Measurements.pdf 7/12/10 ESnet Template Examples 17 Figure 11: Scatter memory in power of two sizes, so you may even need 16/1.5 = 11 times more buffer space! 7/12/10 ESnet

459

Multiple density layered insulator  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A multiple density layered insulator for use with a laser is disclosed which provides at least two different insulation materials for a laser discharge tube, where the two insulation materials have different thermoconductivities. The multiple layer insulation materials provide for improved thermoconductivity capability for improved laser operation. 4 figs.

Alger, T.W.

1994-09-06T23:59:59.000Z

460

Multiple density layered insulator  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A multiple density layered insulator for use with a laser is disclosed wh provides at least two different insulation materials for a laser discharge tube, where the two insulation materials have different thermoconductivities. The multiple layer insulation materials provide for improved thermoconductivity capability for improved laser operation.

Alger, Terry W. (Tracy, CA)

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "wet bulk density" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


461

New Mexico - West Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet After Lease  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

West Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) West Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) New Mexico - West Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1970's 151 1980's 156 150 146 180 194 181 214 213 259 178 1990's 184 156 127 107 97 119 108 106 98 92 2000's 115 99 103 89 90 98 82 87 86 82 2010's 105 143 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 8/1/2013 Next Release Date: 8/1/2014 Referring Pages: Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas Proved Reserves, Wet After Lease

462

Louisiana State Offshore Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet After Lease  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Louisiana State Offshore Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1980's 449 251 260 207 231 1990's 207 207 154 157 168 148 157 130 98 120 2000's 129 145 84 79 61 63 56 65 686 513 2010's 107 51 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 8/1/2013 Next Release Date: 8/1/2014 Referring Pages: Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas Proved Reserves, Wet After Lease Separation, as of Dec. 31 LA, State Offshore Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas Proved Reserves,

463

Utah Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Utah Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1970's 367 1980's 414 335 325 360 341 391 410 471 475 442 1990's 455 469 309 289 286 277 301 310 209 321 2000's 348 303 359 299 290 308 317 368 321 601 2010's 631 909 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 8/1/2013 Next Release Date: 8/1/2014 Referring Pages: Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas Proved Reserves, Wet After Lease Separation, as of Dec. 31

464

Kansas Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Kansas Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1970's 167 1980's 185 139 112 132 110 115 132 115 103 101 1990's 114 115 94 93 75 67 82 51 60 52 2000's 40 105 66 85 80 83 82 83 85 83 2010's 79 127 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 8/1/2013 Next Release Date: 8/1/2014 Referring Pages: Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas Proved Reserves, Wet After Lease Separation, as of Dec. 31

465

North Dakota Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation,  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) North Dakota Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1970's 201 1980's 239 253 248 257 267 331 293 276 266 313 1990's 334 243 266 274 275 263 255 257 261 250 2000's 264 270 315 316 320 343 357 417 484 1,070 2010's 1,717 2,511 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 8/1/2013 Next Release Date: 8/1/2014 Referring Pages: Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas Proved Reserves, Wet After Lease

466

Ohio Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Ohio Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1970's 1,047 1980's 1,417 800 984 1,635 1,178 938 898 594 480 589 1990's 371 376 381 343 315 355 399 391 342 402 2000's 469 340 346 304 208 184 174 101 99 97 2010's 90 74 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 8/1/2013 Next Release Date: 8/1/2014 Referring Pages: Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas Proved Reserves, Wet After Lease Separation, as of Dec. 31

467

Texas - RRC District 4 Onshore Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet After  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

4 Onshore Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) 4 Onshore Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Texas - RRC District 4 Onshore Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1970's 1,416 1980's 1,292 1,005 890 765 702 684 596 451 393 371 1990's 301 243 228 215 191 209 246 368 394 182 2000's 176 140 150 136 165 148 110 117 127 96 2010's 91 61 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 8/1/2013 Next Release Date: 8/1/2014 Referring Pages: Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas Proved Reserves, Wet After Lease

468

California State Offshore Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet After Lease  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) California State Offshore Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1970's 226 1980's 160 244 232 221 206 1990's 188 55 59 63 59 56 47 54 39 58 2000's 86 80 85 76 85 89 85 79 54 53 2010's 63 79 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 8/1/2013 Next Release Date: 8/1/2014 Referring Pages: Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas Proved Reserves, Wet After Lease Separation, as of Dec. 31

469

SiC Fiber Strengths after Oxidation in Wet and Dry Air, Steam, and ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Abstract Scope, Data for SiC fiber strengths after oxidation in wet and dry air, steam, and low pO2 are reviewed. Oxidation and scale crystallization kinetics are  ...

470

Texas - RRC District 2 Onshore Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet After  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2 Onshore Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) 2 Onshore Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Texas - RRC District 2 Onshore Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1970's 955 1980's 921 806 780 747 661 570 517 512 428 430 1990's 407 352 308 288 299 245 252 235 204 202 2000's 115 65 70 81 76 109 118 137 72 72 2010's 134 924 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 8/1/2013 Next Release Date: 8/1/2014 Referring Pages: Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas Proved Reserves, Wet After Lease

471

New York Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Proved Reserves (Billion  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) New York Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1970's 211 1980's 208 264 229 295 389 369 457 410 351 368 1990's 354 331 329 264 242 197 232 224 218 221 2000's 322 318 315 365 324 349 363 375 389 196 2010's 281 253 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 8/1/2013 Next Release Date: 8/1/2014 Referring Pages: Natural Gas Proved Reserves, Wet After Lease Separation, as of Dec. 31 New York Natural Gas Reserves Summary as of Dec. 31

472

Direct Calculation of Thermodynamic Wet-Bulb Temperature as a Function of Pressure and Elevation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A simple analytical method was developed for directly calculating the thermodynamic wet-bulb temperature from air temperature and the vapor pressure (or relative humidity) at elevations up to 4500 m above MSL was developed. This methodology was ...

Sayed-Hossein Sadeghi; Troy R. Peters; Douglas R. Cobos; Henry W. Loescher; Colin S. Campbell

2013-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

473

A History and Review of the Global Soil Wetness Project (GSWP)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Global Soil Wetness Project (GSWP) is an international land surface modeling research effort involving dataset production, validation, model comparison, and scientific investigation in the areas of land surface hydrology and climatology. GSWP ...

Paul A. Dirmeyer

2011-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

474

Large-Scale Changes of Soil Wetness Induced by an Increase in Atmospheric Carbon Dioxide  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The change in soil wetness in response to an increase of atmospheric concentration of carbon dioxide is investigated by two versions of a climate model which consists of a general circulation model of the atmosphere and a static mixed layer ...

S. Manabe; R. T. Wetherald

1987-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

475

Flight-Level Thermodynamic Instrument Wetting Errors in Hurricanes. Part I: Observations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Flight-level thermodynamic errors caused by the wetting of temperature and moisture sensors immersed within the airstream are studied using data from 666 radial legs collected in 31 hurricanes at pressure levels ranging from 850 to 500 mb. ...

Matthew D. Eastin; Peter G. Black; William M. Gray

2002-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

476

The Wet and Dry Spells across India during 1951–2007  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Characteristics of wet spells (WSs) and intervening dry spells (DSs) are extremely useful for water-related sectors. The information takes on greater significance in the wake of global climate change and climate-change scenario projections. The ...

Nityanand Singh; Ashwini Ranade

2010-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

477

Assessing Evapotranspiration Estimates from the Second Global Soil Wetness Project (GSWP-2) Simulations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This study assesses the simulations of global-scale evapotranspiration from the second Global Soil Wetness Project (GSWP-2) within a global water budget framework. The scatter in the GSWP-2 global evapotranspiration estimates from various land ...

C. Adam Schlosser; Xiang Gao

2010-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

478

The Influence of Meteorological Conditions on the Wet Deposition of Mercury in Southern Florida  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Source–receptor relationships for mercury (Hg) and other trace elements wet deposited in southeastern Florida were investigated using daily event precipitation samples collected over a 1-yr period in 1995–96. Data collected in Davie, Florida, ...

J. Timothy Dvonch; Gerald J. Keeler; Frank J. Marsik

2005-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

479

Wet Microburst Activity over the Southeastern United States: Implications for Forecasting  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The thermodynamic properties of wet-microburst-producing days, as observed during the 1986 MIST (MIcroburst and Severe Thunderstorm) field project, conducted in northern Alabama, have been examined and are shown to exhibit common characteristics. ...

Nolan T. Atkins; Roger M. Wakimoto

1991-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

480

Influence of “Realistic” Land Surface Wetness on Predictability of Seasonal Precipitation in Boreal Summer  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Outputs from two ensembles of atmospheric model simulations for 1951–98 define the influence of “realistic” land surface wetness on seasonal precipitation predictability in boreal summer. The ensembles consist of one forced with observed sea ...

Shinjiro Kanae; Yukiko Hirabayashi; Tomohito Yamada; Taikan Oki

2006-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "wet bulk density" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


481

Wetting and phase-change phenomena on micro/nanostructures for enhanced heat transfer  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Micro/nanostructures have been extensively studied to amplify the intrinsic wettability of materials to create superhydrophilic or superhydrophobic surfaces. Such extreme wetting properties can influence the heat transfer ...

Xiao, Rong, Ph. D. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

482

,"U.S. Natural Gas Proved Reserves, Wet After Lease Separation...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

,"Worksheet Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","U.S. Natural Gas Proved Reserves, Wet After Lease Separation",10,"Annual",2011,"6301979"...

483

Direct Calculation of Thermodynamic Wet Bulb Temperature as a Function of Pressure and Elevation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A simple analytical method was developed for directly calculating the thermodynamic wet bulb temperature from air temperature and the vapor pressure (or relative humidity) at any desired elevation. This methodology was based on the fact that the ...

Sayed-Hossein Sadeghi; Troy R. Peters; Douglas R. Cobos; Henry W. Loescher; Colin S. Campbell

484

Flight-Level Thermodynamic Instrument Wetting Errors in Hurricanes. Part II: Implications  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The implications of flight-level instrument wetting error removal upon the mean thermodynamic structure across the eyewall, buoyancy of rainband vertical motions, and vertical energy fluxes near the top of the inflow layer are studied. ...

Matthew D. Eastin; Peter G. Black; William M. Gray

2002-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

485

Effects of Surface Wetness on the Evolution and Vertical Transport of Submicron Particles  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Simulations have been carried out with a numerical model describing air chemistry, aerosol microphysics, and turbulent mixing, in order to study the behavior of fine sulfate particles in the atmospheric surface layer over wet surfaces. ...

I. Y. Lee; M. L. Wesely

1989-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

486

Observations of Precipitation Size and Fall Speed Characteristics within Coexisting Rain and Wet Snow  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Ground-based measurements of particle size and fall speed distributions using a Particle Size and Velocity (PARSIVEL) disdrometer are compared among samples obtained in mixed precipitation (rain and wet snow) and rain in the Oregon Cascade ...

Sandra E. Yuter; David E. Kingsmill; Louisa B. Nance; Martin Löffler-Mang

2006-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

487

Comparison, Validation, and Transferability of Eight Multiyear Global Soil Wetness Products  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The characteristics of eight global soil wetness products, three produced by land surface model calculations, three from coupled land–atmosphere model reanalyses, and two from microwave remote sensing estimates, have been examined. The goal of ...

Paul A. Dirmeyer; Zhichang Guo; Xiang Gao

2004-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

488

Texas - RRC District 1 Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet After Lease  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Texas - RRC District 1 Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1970's 209 1980's 172 180 216 175 170 260 241 205 204 251 1990's 333 401 361 191 151 248 446 68 51 67 2000's 69 43 47 48 45 57 61 72 60 67 2010's 267 900 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 8/1/2013 Next Release Date: 8/1/2014 Referring Pages: Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas Proved Reserves, Wet After Lease

489

West Virginia Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation,  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) West Virginia Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1970's 76 1980's 122 63 83 86 73 73 65 150 141 98 1990's 86 159 198 190 133 74 71 59 43 88 2000's 98 48 21 23 20 19 16 16 23 24 2010's 29 52 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 8/1/2013 Next Release Date: 8/1/2014 Referring Pages: Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas Proved Reserves, Wet After Lease Separation, as of Dec. 31

490

Texas - RRC District 7B Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

B Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) B Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Texas - RRC District 7B Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1970's 608 1980's 530 655 733 872 645 574 589 546 576 364 1990's 413 379 380 393 332 263 378 299 306 275 2000's 242 203 237 314 288 859 1,589 2,350 2,682 2,322 2010's 2,504 3,754 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 8/1/2013 Next Release Date: 8/1/2014 Referring Pages: Nonassociated Natural Gas Proved Reserves, Wet After Lease

491

WETTABILITY AND IMBIBITION: MICROSCOPIC DISTRIBUTION OF WETTING AND ITS CONSEQUENCES AT THE CORE AND FIELD SCALES  

SciTech Connect

The questions of reservoir wettability have been approached in this project from three directions. First, we have studied the properties of crude oils that contribute to wetting alteration in a reservoir. A database of more than 150 different crude oil samples has been established to facilitate examination of the relationships between crude oil chemical and physical properties and their influence on reservoir wetting. In the course of this work an improved SARA analysis technique was developed and major advances were made in understanding asphaltene stability including development of a thermodynamic Asphaltene Solubility Model (ASM) and empirical methods for predicting the onset of instability. The CO-Wet database is a resource that will be used to guide wettability research in the future. The second approach is to study crude oil/brine/rock interactions on smooth surfaces. Contact angle measurements were made under controlled conditions on mica surfaces that had been exposed to many of the oils in the CO-Wet database. With this wealth of data, statistical tests can now be used to examine the relationships between crude oil properties and the tendencies of those oils to alter wetting. Traditionally, contact angles have been used as the primary wetting assessment tool on smooth surfaces. A new technique has been developed using an atomic forces microscope that adds a new dimension to the ability to characterize oil-treated surfaces. Ultimately we aim to understand wetting in porous media, the focus of the third approach taken in this project. Using oils from the CO-Wet database, experimental advances have been made in scaling the rate of imbibition, a sensitive measure of core wetting. Application of the scaling group to mixed-wet systems has been demonstrated for a range of core conditions. Investigations of imbibition in gas/liquid systems provided the motivation for theoretical advances as well. As a result of this project we have many new tools for studying wetting at microscopic and macroscopic scales and a library of well-characterized fluids for use in studies of crude oil/brine/rock interactions.

Jill S. Buckley; Norman R. Morrow; Chris Palmer; Purnendu K. Dasgupta

2003-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

492

Evaluation of the Impact of Limestone on Gypsum Crystal Habit in Wet FGD Scrubbers  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This document summarizes the results of a laboratory program focused on determining what key limestone components are responsible for impacting wet flue gas desulfurization (FGD) byproduct gypsum properties. Tests were conducted using several commercial limestone samples for which documented full-scale limestone forced oxidation wet FGD operating experience exists. These include limestone samples known to produce FGD gypsum with both ‘good’ and ‘poor’ crystallization ...

2012-12-28T23:59:59.000Z

493

Packing microstructure and local density variations of experimental and computational pebble beds  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In pebble bed type nuclear reactors the fuel is contained in graphite pebbles, which form a randomly stacked bed with a non-uniform packing density. These variations can influence local coolant flow and power density and are a possible cause of hotspots. To analyse local density variations computational methods are needed that can generate randomly stacked pebble beds with a realistic packing structure on a pebble-to-pebble level. We first compare various properties of the local packing structure of a computed bed with those of an image made using computer aided X-ray tomography, looking at properties in the bulk of the bed and near the wall separately. Especially for the bulk of the bed, properties of the computed bed show good comparison with the scanned bed and with literature, giving confidence our method generates beds with realistic packing microstructure. Results also show the packing structure is different near the wall than in the bulk of the bed, with pebbles near the wall forming ordered layers similar to hexagonal close packing. Next, variations in the local packing density are investigated by comparing probability density functions of the packing fraction of small clusters of pebbles throughout the bed. Especially near the wall large variations in local packing fractions exists, with a higher probability for both clusters of pebbles with low (0.65) packing fraction, which could significantly affect flow rates and, together with higher power densities, could result in hotspots. (authors)

Auwerda, G. J.; Kloosterman, J. L.; Lathouwers, D.; Van Der Hagen, T. H. J. J. [Delft Univ. of Technology, Mekelweg 15, 2629 JB, Delft (Netherlands)

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

494

A study of radiation damage effects on the magnetic structure of bulk Iron  

SciTech Connect

Defects, defect interactions, and defect dynamics in solids created by fast neutrons are known to have significant impact on the performance and lifetime of structural materials. A fundamental understanding of the radiation damage effects in solids is therefore of great importance in assisting the development of improved materials - materials with ultrahigh strength, toughness, and radiation resistance. In this presentation, we show our recent theoretical investigation on the magnetic structure evolution of bulk iron in the region of the radiation defects. We applied a linear scaling ab-initio method based on density functional theory with local spin density approximation, namely the locally self-consistent multiple scattering method (LSMS), to the study of magnetic moment distributions in a cascade at the damage peak and for a series of time steps as the interstitials and vacancies recombined. Atomic positions correspond to those in a low energy cascade in a 10|000 atom sample, in which the primary damage state and the evolution of all defects produced were simulated using molecular dynamics with empirical, embedded-atom inter-atomic potentials. We will discuss how a region of affected moments expands and then recedes in response to a cascade evolution.

Wang Yang [Pittsburgh Supercomputing Center, Carnegie Mellon University, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 15213 (United States); Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee 37831 (United States); Nicholson, D. M. C.; Stocks, G. M.; Rusanu, Aurelian; Eisenbach, Markus; Stoller, R. E. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee 37831 (United States)

2011-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

495

A study of radiation damage effects on the magnetic structure of bulk Iron  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Defects, defect interactions, and defect dynamics in solids created by fast neutrons are known to have significant impact on the performance and lifetime of structural materials. A fundamental understanding of the radiation damage effects in solids is therefore of great importance in assisting the development of improved materials - materials with ultrahigh strength, toughness, and radiation resistance. In this presentation, we show our recent theoretical investigation on the magnetic structure evolution of bulk iron in the region of the radiation defects. We applied a linear scaling ab-initio method based on density functional theory with local spin density approximation, namely the locally self-consistent multiple scattering method (LSMS), to the study of magnetic moment distributions in a cascade at the damage peak and for a series of time steps as the interstitials and vacancies recombined. Atomic positions correspond to those in a low energy cascade in a 10|000 atom sample, in which the primary damage state and the evolution of all defects produced were simulated using molecular dynamics with empirical, embedded-atom inter-atomic potentials. We will discuss how a region of affected moments expands and then recedes in response to a cascade evolution. VC 2011 American Institute of Physics. [doi:10.1063/1.3553937

Wang, Yang Nmn [ORNL; Nicholson, Don M [ORNL; Stocks, George Malcolm [ORNL; Rusanu, Aurelian [ORNL; Eisenbach, Markus [ORNL; Stoller, Roger E [ORNL

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

496

A study of radiation damage effects on the magnetic structure of bulk Iron  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Defects, defect interactions, and defect dynamics in solids created by fast neutrons are known to have significant impact on the performance and lifetime of structural materials. A fundamental understanding of the radiation damage effects in solids is therefore of great importance in assisting the development of improved materials - materials with ultrahigh strength, toughness, and radiation resistance. In this presentation, we show our recent theoretical investigation on the magnetic structure evolution of bulk iron in the region of the radiation defects. We applied a linear scaling ab-initio method based on density functional theory with local spin density approximation, namely the locally self-consistent multiple scattering method (LSMS), to the study of magnetic moment distributions in a cascade at the damage peak and for a series of time steps as the interstitials and vacancies recombined. Atomic positions correspond to those in a low energy cascade in a 10|000 atom sample, in which the primary damage state and the evolution of all defects produced were simulated using molecular dynamics with empirical, embedded-atom inter-atomic potentials. We will discuss how a region of affected moments expands and then recedes in response to a cascade evolution.

Wang, Yang [Pittsburgh Supercomputing Center; Stocks, George Malcolm [ORNL; Stoller, Roger E [ORNL; Nicholson, Don M [ORNL; Rusanu, Aurelian [ORNL; Eisenbach, Markus [ORNL

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

497

The Use of Electrochemical Techniques to Characterize Wet Steam Environments  

SciTech Connect

The composition of a steam phase in equilibrium with a water phase at high temperature is remarkably affected by the varying capabilities of the water phase constituents to partition into the steam. Ionic impurities (sodium, chloride, sulfate, etc.) tend to remain in the water phase, while weakly ionic or gaseous species (oxygen) partition into the steam. Analysis of the water phase can provide misleading results concerning the steam phase composition or environment. This paper describes efforts that were made to use novel electrochemical probes and sampling techniques to directly characterize a wet steam phase environment in equilibrium with high temperature water. Probes were designed to make electrochemical measurements in the thin film of water existing on exposed surfaces in steam over a water phase. Some of these probes were referenced against a conventional high temperature electrode located in the water phase. Others used two different materials (typically tungsten and platinum) to make measurements without a true reference electrode. The novel probes were also deployed in a steam space removed from the water phase. It was necessary to construct a reservoir and an external, air-cooled condenser to automatically keep the reservoir full of condensed steam. Conventional reference and working electrodes were placed in the water phase of the reservoir and the novel probes protruded into the vapor space above it. Finally, water phase probes (both reference and working electrodes) were added to the hot condensed steam in the external condenser. Since the condensing action collapsed the volatiles back into the water phase, these electrodes proved to be extremely sensitive at detecting oxygen, which is one of the species of highest concern in high temperature power systems. Although the novel steam phase probes provided encouraging initial results, the tendency for tungsten to completely corrode away in the steam phase limited their usefulness. However, the conventional water phase electrodes, installed both in the reservoir and in the external condensing coil, provided useful data showing the adverse impact of oxygen and carbon dioxide on the REDOX potential and high temperature pH, respectively.

Bruce W. Bussert; John A. Crowley; Kenneth J. Kimball; Brian J. Lashway

2003-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

498

Beyond the Gas Phase: Towards Modeling Bulk Ionic Liquids with a Comparison of Density Functional Tight Binding (DFTB) to Density Functional Theory (DFT).  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Coal-fired power plants are a leading contributor to the increase in CO2 released into the atmosphere. Alkanolamines are considered a potential solvent to capture this… (more)

Danser, Mandelle Ann

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

499

PION CONDENSATION IN A RELATIVISTIC FIELD THEORY CONSISTENT WITH BULK PROPERTIES OF NUCLEAR MATTER  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

calculate nuclear binding energies in theories based on thetheory that accounts for the known bulk properties of nuclear matter, its saturation energytheory is constrained to reproduce the known bulk properties of nuclear matter, namely, its $aturation energy,

Banerjee, B.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

500

PION CONDENSATION IN A FIELD THEORY CONSISTENT WITH BULK PROPERTIES OF NUCLEAR MATTER  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

calculate nuclear binding energies in theories based on thetheory that accounts for the known bulk properties of nuclear matter, its saturation energytheory is constrained to reproduce the known bulk properties of nuclear matter, namely, its satruation energy,

Banerjee, B.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z