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Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "western states coalbed" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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1

Western States Coalbed Methane Production (Billion Cubic Feet)  

Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) " ,"ClickPipelines AboutDecemberSteamYearTexas--StateWinterYearFeet)perWestern States Coalbed Methane

2

Miscellaneous States Coalbed Methane Proved Reserves Revision...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Revision Decreases (Billion Cubic Feet) Miscellaneous States Coalbed Methane Proved Reserves Revision Decreases (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4...

3

Miscellaneous States Coalbed Methane Proved Reserves Adjustments...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Adjustments (Billion Cubic Feet) Miscellaneous States Coalbed Methane Proved Reserves Adjustments (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6...

4

Unconventional gas resources. [Eastern Gas Shales, Western Gas Sands, Coalbed Methane, Methane from Geopressured Systems  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document describes the program goals, research activities, and the role of the Federal Government in a strategic plan to reduce the uncertainties surrounding the reserve potential of the unconventional gas resources, namely, the Eastern Gas Shales, the Western Gas Sands, Coalbed Methane, and methane from Geopressured Aquifers. The intent is to provide a concise overview of the program and to identify the technical activities that must be completed in the successful achievement of the objectives.

Komar, C.A. (ed.)

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

5

State-of-the-art in coalbed methane drilling fluids  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The production of methane from wet coalbeds is often associated with the production of significant amounts of water. While producing water is necessary to desorb the methane from the coal, the damage from the drilling fluids used is difficult to assess, because the gas production follows weeks to months after the well is drilled. Commonly asked questions include the following: What are the important parameters for drilling an organic reservoir rock that is both the source and the trap for the methane? Has the drilling fluid affected the gas production? Are the cleats plugged? Does the 'filtercake' have an impact on the flow of water and gas? Are stimulation techniques compatible with the drilling fluids used? This paper describes the development of a unique drilling fluid to drill coalbed methane wells with a special emphasis on horizontal applications. The fluid design incorporates products to match the delicate surface chemistry on the coal, a matting system to provide both borehole stability and minimize fluid losses to the cleats, and a breaker method of removing the matting system once drilling is completed. This paper also discusses how coal geology impacts drilling planning, drilling practices, the choice of drilling fluid, and completion/stimulation techniques for Upper Cretaceous Mannville-type coals drilled within the Western Canadian Sedimentary Basin. A focus on horizontal coalbed methane (CBM) wells is presented. Field results from three horizontal wells are discussed, two of which were drilled with the new drilling fluid system. The wells demonstrated exceptional stability in coal for lengths to 1000 m, controlled drilling rates and ease of running slotted liners. Methods for, and results of, placing the breaker in the horizontal wells are covered in depth.

Baltoiu, L.V.; Warren, B.K.; Natras, T.A.

2008-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

6

Western States Shale Production (Billion Cubic Feet)  

Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

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7

Correlation of producing Fruitland Formation coals within the western outcrop and coalbed methane leakage on the Southern Ute Reservation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Colorado Geological Survey and Southern Ute Indian Tribe proposed to determine the cause of several gas seeps which are occurring on the western outcrop of the coalbed methane producing Fruitland Formation on the Southern Ute Indian Reservation. Correlation between outcrop coals and subsurface coals was necessary to determine seep source in the northern part of the study area. Subsurface studies include structure and net coal isopach maps, stratigraphy was cross-sections, production maps, and a production database. Detailed coal stratigraphy was correlated through production wells near the outcrop region. These maps and cross-sections were correlated to new surface outcrop maps generated by the Colorado, Geological Survey and the Southern Ute Division of Energy Resources. Methane gas seepage has been noted historically within the study area. The total investigation may help determine if gas seepage is natural, a result of coalbed methane development, or some combination of the above.

Carroll, Christopher J.; Mathews, Stephanie; Wickman, Barbara

2000-07-07T23:59:59.000Z

8

Miscellaneous States Coalbed Methane Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data CenterFranconia,(Million Barrels) Crude Oil Reserves in Nonproducing Reservoirs Year2per Thousand CubicYear Jan Feb MarThousandCoalbed

9

Eastern States Coalbed Methane Production (Billion Cubic Feet)  

Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) " ,"ClickPipelines AboutDecemberSteam Coal Import96Nebraska Nuclear ProfileReportSep-14(Million CubicCoalbed

10

Western cretaceous coal seam project formation evaluation of coalbed methane wells. Topical report, January 1988-December 1991  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Procedures are discussed for collecting and interpreting sufficient data required to estimate coalbed methane gas and water production rates. The procedures include the collection of core, drill stem test, and open hole log data during the drilling of exploration and early development wells. The significance and use of the data is illustrated.

Mavor, M.J.; Close, J.C.

1991-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

11

2014 State of Western's Assets  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In this report we document the State of Western’s Assets in terms of physical equipment, financial resources, strategic direction, and human capital, both at the organizational and regional levels. We identify the condition of our assets today and share what work we will be doing in these areas in the coming years.

none,

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

12

,"California--State Offshore Coalbed Methane Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National and Regional Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy SourcesWyoming"Coalbed Methane ProvedDry Natural Gas ExpectedWellheadCrudeCoalbed Methane

13

,"Miscellaneous States Coalbed Methane Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National and Regional Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: EnergyShale Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet)"ShaleCoalbed Methane Proved Reserves (Billion

14

,"Texas--State Offshore Coalbed Methane Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National and Regional Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: EnergyShale ProvedTexas"Brunei (Dollars per ThousandPriceDryCoalbed

15

Enhanced coalbed methane recovery  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The recovery of coalbed methane can be enhanced by injecting CO{sub 2} in the coal seam at supercritical conditions. Through an in situ adsorption/desorption process the displaced methane is produced and the adsorbed CO{sub 2} is permanently stored. This is called enhanced coalbed methane recovery (ECBM) and it is a technique under investigation as a possible approach to the geological storage of CO{sub 2} in a carbon dioxide capture and storage system. This work reviews the state of the art on fundamental and practical aspects of the technology and summarizes the results of ECBM field tests. These prove the feasibility of ECBM recovery and highlight substantial opportunities for interdisciplinary research at the interface between earth sciences and chemical engineering.

Mazzotti, M.; Pini, R.; Storti, G. [ETH, Zurich (Switzerland). Inst. of Process Engineering

2009-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

16

,"Louisiana (with State Offshore) Coalbed Methane Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National and Regional Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: EnergyShale Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet)" ,"Click worksheet name orSpainCoalbed

17

,"Lower 48 States Coalbed Methane Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National and Regional Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: EnergyShale Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet)"Shale Proved ReservesCoalbed Methane Proved

18

Western Interstate Nuclear Compact State Nuclear Policy (Multiple States)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Legislation authorizes states' entrance into the Western Interstate Nuclear Compact, which aims to undertake the cooperation of participating states in deriving the optimum benefit from nuclear and...

19

The basics of coalbed methane  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The report is an overview of coalbed methane (CBM), also known as coal seam gas. It provides an overview of what coalbed methane is and the current status of global coalbed methane exploration and production. Topics covered in the report include: An analysis of the natural gas industry, including current and future production, consumption, and reserves; A detailed description of coalbed methane, its characteristics, and future potential; An analysis of the key business factors that are driving the increased interest in coalbed methane; An analysis of the barriers that are hindering the development of coalbed methane; An overview of the technologies used for coalbed methane production and water treatment; and Profiles of key coalbed methane producing countries. 25 figs., 5 tabs., 1 app.

NONE

2006-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

20

RTG resource book for western states and provinces: Final proceedings  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Western Interstate Energy Board held a workshop and liaison activities among western states, provinces, and utilities on the formation of Regional Transmission Groups (RTGs). Purpose of the activities was to examine the policy implications for western states and provinces in the formation of RTGs in the West, the implications for western ratepayers and utilities of the RTG formation and potential impacts of RTGs on the western electricity system. The workshop contributed to fulfilling the transmission access and competition objectives of Title VII of the Energy Policy Act of 1992.

NONE

1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "western states coalbed" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Electricity markets in the western United States  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This article introduces the use of rigorous econometric tools to understand the geographic scope of the market for generation services. These tools are applied to data from the current wholesale electricity market in the western United States. The behavior of the current wholesale electricity market and the methods used to assess the expanse of the geographic market in the current wholesale electricity market can go a long way toward informing the discussion of pricing behavior and performance in a restructured electricity industry. First, the current wholesale electricity market is already effectively unregulated and suffers from the same technical complexities that face a retail electricity market. Consequently, understanding the supply and demand conditions that cause the extent of the geographic market for generation services to narrow in the current wholesale electricity market can shed light on which times the geographic expanse of the market may narrow in a restructures electricity market. Second, the techniques developed in this paper to assess the extent of the current wholesale electricity market can be applied readily to a restructured electricity market. Finally, because market conditions in the electricity industry are likely to change significantly in the next few years, as the structure of the electricity sector changes dramatically, this analysis of the geographic expanse of the market can provide a useful benchmark against which to compare post-restructuring wholesale price relationships.

Bailey, E.M.

1998-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

22

Method of coalbed methane production  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This patent describes a method for producing coalbed methane from a coal seam containing coalbed methane and penetrated by at least one injection well and at least one producing well. It comprises: injecting an inert gas through the injection well and into the coal seam. The inert gas being a gas that does not react with the coal under conditions of use and that does not significantly adsorb to the coal; and producing a gas from the production well which consists essentially of the inert gas, coalbed methane, or mixtures thereof.

Puri, R.; Stein, M.H.

1989-11-28T23:59:59.000Z

23

Western States Geothermal Company | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data CenterFranconia, Virginia:FAQ < RAPID Jump to:SeadovCooperative Jump to: navigation,Western Cooling EfficiencyWestern Springs is

24

COPYRIGHT: State of Western Australia Copyright in this document is reserved to the Crown in right of the State of Western Australia.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

COPYRIGHT: © State of Western Australia Copyright in this document is reserved to the Crown in right of the State of Western Australia. This is NOT an official version. It is reproduced with permission of the State of Western Australia, but it does not purport to be the official or authorised

25

Oregon State University Sun Grant Western Regional Center  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-term goal of this research project is to optimize the use of halophytic microalgae as a biofuels cropOregon State University Sun Grant Western Regional Center Biofuels from Salt Basin Algae and insoluble starch content has been completed for nineteen (19) strains of halophytic microalgae. Data were

Tullos, Desiree

26

Oregon State University Sun Grant Western Regional Center  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Oregon State University Sun Grant Western Regional Center Hybrid Poplar as a Regional Ethanol is to couple hybrid poplar production with end-use ethanol production. Dr. Swanson, working in collaboration with industrial partners, will analyze feedstock taken from selected hybrid poplar clones to develop ethanol yield

Tullos, Desiree

27

Oregon State University Sun Grant Western Regional Center  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

biomass into various products. This approach will diversify the value of forest biomass. Progress to DateOregon State University Sun Grant Western Regional Center A Forest Residue-Based Pyrolysis to produce much-needed biofuels, supply valuable bioproducts, utilize waste streams and create jobs in rural

Tullos, Desiree

28

2014 International and Western States In-Place Recycling Conference  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

2014 International and Western States In-Place Recycling Conference August 5­7, 2014 Denver and the road to revitalizing in-place recycling technologies. · Join this prestigious forum especially designed/research agencies to discuss the status of in-place recycling. · Experience what we know today for each form of in

29

WATERJETTING: A NEW DRILLING TECHNIQUE IN COALBED METHANE RESERVOIRS.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??WATERJETTING: A NEW DRILLING TECHNIQUE IN COALBED METHANE RESERVOIRS Applications of waterjeting to drill horizontal wells for the purpose of degassing coalbeds prior to mining… (more)

Funmilayo, Gbenga M.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

30

,"Colorado Coalbed Methane Proved Reserves, Reserves Changes...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Colorado Coalbed Methane Proved Reserves, Reserves Changes, and Production",10,"Annual",2013,"630...

31

,"Arkansas Coalbed Methane Proved Reserves, Reserves Changes...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Arkansas Coalbed Methane Proved Reserves, Reserves Changes, and Production",10,"Annual",2013,"630...

32

,"Wyoming Coalbed Methane Proved Reserves, Reserves Changes,...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Wyoming Coalbed Methane Proved Reserves, Reserves Changes, and Production",10,"Annual",2013,"630...

33

A guide to coalbed methane operations  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A guide to coalbed methane production is presented. The guide provides practical information on siting, drilling, completing, and producing coalbed methane wells. Information is presented for experienced coalbed methane producers and coalbed methane operations. The information will assist in making informed decisions about producing this resource. The information is presented in nine chapters on selecting and preparing of field site, drilling and casing the wellbore, wireline logging, completing the well, fracturing coal seams, selecting production equipment and facilities, operating wells and production equipment, treating and disposing of produced water, and testing the well.

Hollub, V.A.; Schafer, P.S.

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

34

,"Montana Coalbed Methane Proved Reserves, Reserves Changes,...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Montana Coalbed Methane Proved Reserves, Reserves Changes, and Production",10,"Annual",2013,"630...

35

,"Oklahoma Coalbed Methane Proved Reserves, Reserves Changes...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Oklahoma Coalbed Methane Proved Reserves, Reserves Changes, and Production",10,"Annual",2013,"630...

36

,"Virginia Coalbed Methane Proved Reserves, Reserves Changes...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Virginia Coalbed Methane Proved Reserves, Reserves Changes, and Production",10,"Annual",2013,"630...

37

CO2 Sequestration Enhances Coalbed Methane Production.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??Since 1980s, petroleum engineers and geologists have conducted researches on Enhanced Coalbed Methane Recovery (ECBM). During this period, many methods are introduced to enhance the… (more)

Pang, Yu

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

38

,"Pennsylvania Coalbed Methane Proved Reserves, Reserves Changes...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Pennsylvania Coalbed Methane Proved Reserves, Reserves Changes, and Production",10,"Annual",2013,"630...

39

,"Miscellaneous Coalbed Methane Proved Reserves, Reserves Changes...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Coalbed Methane Proved Reserves, Reserves Changes, and Production" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Late...

40

,"Alabama Coalbed Methane Proved Reserves, Reserves Changes,...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Alabama Coalbed Methane Proved Reserves, Reserves Changes, and Production",10,"Annual",2013,"630...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "western states coalbed" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

SEQUESTERING CARBON DIOXIDE IN COALBEDS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The authors' long-term goal is to develop accurate prediction methods for describing the adsorption behavior of gas mixtures on solid adsorbents over complete ranges of temperature, pressure, and adsorbent types. The originally-stated, major objectives of the current project are to: (1) measure the adsorption behavior of pure CO{sub 2}, methane, nitrogen, and their binary and ternary mixtures on several selected coals having different properties at temperatures and pressures applicable to the particular coals being studied, (2) generalize the adsorption results in terms of appropriate properties of the coals to facilitate estimation of adsorption behavior for coals other than those studied experimentally, (3) delineate the sensitivity of the competitive adsorption of CO{sub 2}, methane, and nitrogen to the specific characteristics of the coal on which they are adsorbed; establish the major differences (if any) in the nature of this competitive adsorption on different coals, and (4) test and/or develop theoretically-based mathematical models to represent accurately the adsorption behavior of mixtures of the type for which measurements are made. As this project developed, an important additional objective was added to the above original list. Namely, we were encouraged to interact with industry and/or governmental agencies to utilize our expertise to advance the state of the art in coalbed adsorption science and technology. As a result of this additional objective, we participated with the Department of Energy and industry in the measurement and analysis of adsorption behavior as part of two distinct investigations. These include (a) Advanced Resources International (ARI) DOE Project DE-FC26-00NT40924, ''Adsorption of Pure Methane, Nitrogen, and Carbon Dioxide and Their Mixtures on Wet Tiffany Coal'', and (b) the DOE-NETL Project, ''Round Robin: CO{sub 2} Adsorption on Selected Coals''. These activities, contributing directly to the DOE projects listed above, also provided direct synergism with the original goals of our work. Specific accomplishments of this project are summarized below in three broad categories: experimentation, model development, and coal characterization.

K.A.M. Gasem; R.L. Robinson, Jr.; J.E. Fitzgerald; Z. Pan; M. Sudibandriyo

2003-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

42

The 1991 coalbed methane symposium proceedings  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The proceedings of the 1991 coalbed methane symposium are presented. The proceedings contains 50 papers on environmental aspects of recovering methane from coal seams, reservoir characterization and testing mine safety and productivity, coalbed stimulation, geology and resource assessment, well completion and production technologies, reservoir modeling and case histories, and resources and technology.

Not Available

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

43

Coalbed methane production case histories  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The production of methane gas from coal and coal-bearing rocks is one of the prime objectives of the Department of Energy's Methane Recovery from Coalbeds Project. This report contains brief description of wells that are presently producing gas from coal or coal-bearing rocks. Data from three gob gas production areas in Illinois, an in-mine horizontal borehole degasification, and eleven vertical boreholes are presented. Production charts and electric logs of the producing zones are included for some of the wells. Additional information on dry gas production from the San Juan Basin, Colorado/New Mexico and the Greater Green River Coal Region, Colorado/Wyoming is also included.

Not Available

1981-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

44

Coalbed Methane (CBM) is natural  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:YearRound-Up fromDepartmentTieCelebrate Earth DayFuelsDepartmentPolicyClean,Coalbed Methane (CBM)

45

Utah coalbed gas exploration poised for growth  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Coalbed methane production in eastern Utah is growing despite a relaxed pace of exploratory drilling. Leasing has been active the past 2 years, but a delay in issuance of a federal environmental impact statement could retard drilling. Only 19 new wells began producing coalbed gas during 1995, but gas production increased from existing wells as dewatering progressed. The US Bureau of Land Management will allow limited exploration but no field development on federal lands until the EIS is completed, possibly as early as this month. The paper discusses production of coalbed methane in Utah.

Petzet, G.A.

1996-08-05T23:59:59.000Z

46

Energy Efficiency as a Preferred Resource: Evidence from Utility Resource Plans in the Western United States and Canada  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Western United States and Canada Authors: Nicole Hopper 1 ,Western United States and Canada, as envisioned in the mostIn the Western U.S. and Canada, organized wholesale markets

Hopper, Nichole

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

47

Research and Development Concerning Coalbed Natural Gas  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Powder River Basin in northeastern Wyoming is one of the most active areas of coalbed natural gas (CBNG) development in the western United States. This resource provides clean energy but raises environmental concerns. Primary among these is the disposal of water that is co-produced with the gas during depressurization of the coal seam. Beginning with a few producing wells in Wyoming's Powder River Basin (PRB) in 1987, CBNG well numbers in this area increased to over 13,600 in 2004, with projected growth to 20,900 producing wells in the PRB by 2010. CBNG development is continuing apace since 2004, and CBNG is now being produced or evaluated in four other Wyoming coal basins in addition to the PRB, with roughly 3500-4000 new CBNG wells permitted statewide each year since 2004. This is clearly a very valuable source of clean fuel for the nation, and for Wyoming the economic benefits are substantial. For instance, in 2003 alone the total value of Wyoming CBNG production was about $1.5 billion, with tax and royalty income of about $90 million to counties, $140 million to the state, and $27 million to the federal government. In Wyoming, cumulative CBNG water production from 1987 through December 2004 was just over 380,000 acre-feet (2.9 billion barrels), while producing almost 1.5 trillion cubic feet (tcf) of CBNG gas statewide. Annual Wyoming CBNG water production in 2003 was 74,457 acre-feet (577 million barrels). Total production of CBNG water across all Wyoming coal fields could total roughly 7 million acre-feet (55.5 billion barrels), if all of the recoverable CBNG in the projected reserves of 31.7 tcf were produced over the coming decades. Pumping water from coals to produce CBNG has been designated a beneficial water use by the Wyoming State Engineer's Office (SEO), though recently the SEO has limited this beneficial use designation by requiring a certain gas/water production ratio. In the eastern part of the PRB where CBNG water is generally of good quality, most of it is discharged to surface drainages or to soil (for irrigation). CBNG water quality generally declines when moving from the Cheyenne River drainage northwestward to the Belle Fourche, Little Powder, and Powder River drainages and in the central and western part of the PRB, most CBNG water goes to evaporation-infiltration ponds or is discharged directly to surface drainages. Concerns center on the salinity of the water, usually measured as total dissolved solids (TDS), or electrical conductivity (EC) and sodium adsorption ratio (SAR). Other management options currently in use include injection, managed irrigation (with additives to mitigate the effects of high salinity), atomization, and treatment by reverse osmosis or ion exchange. A key water quality issue is the cumulative effect of numerous CBNG water discharges on the overall water quality of basin streams. This leads to one of the most contentious issues in CBNG development in Wyoming's PRB: Montana's concern about the potential downstream effects of water quality degradation on rivers flowing north into Montana. Many of the benefits and costs associated with CBNG development have been debated, but dealing with CBNG water quantity and quality arguably has been the most difficult of all the issues. Given the importance of these issues for continued development of CBNG resources in Wyoming and elsewhere, the DOE-NETL funded project presented here focuses on CBNG co-produced water management. The research was organized around nine separate, but interrelated, technical project tasks and one administrative task (Task 1). The nine technical project tasks were pursued by separate research teams at the University of Wyoming, but all nine tasks were coordinated to the extent possible in order to maximize information gained about CBNG co-produced waters. In addition to project management in Task 1, the key research tasks included: (2) estimating groundwater recharge rates in the PRB; (3) groundwater contamination of trace elements from CBNG disposal ponds; (4) use of environmental tracers in assessing wate

William Ruckelshaus

2008-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

48

Virginia Coalbed Methane Proved Reserves Extensions (Billion...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Extensions (Billion Cubic Feet) Virginia Coalbed Methane Proved Reserves Extensions (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8...

49

Oklahoma Coalbed Methane Proved Reserves Extensions (Billion...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Extensions (Billion Cubic Feet) Oklahoma Coalbed Methane Proved Reserves Extensions (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8...

50

Pennsylvania Coalbed Methane Proved Reserves Revision Decreases...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Decreases (Billion Cubic Feet) Pennsylvania Coalbed Methane Proved Reserves Revision Decreases (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7...

51

Virginia Coalbed Methane Proved Reserves Adjustments (Billion...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Adjustments (Billion Cubic Feet) Virginia Coalbed Methane Proved Reserves Adjustments (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8...

52

Arkansas Coalbed Methane Proved Reserves Adjustments (Billion...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Adjustments (Billion Cubic Feet) Arkansas Coalbed Methane Proved Reserves Adjustments (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8...

53

Colorado Coalbed Methane Proved Reserves Revision Increases ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Increases (Billion Cubic Feet) Colorado Coalbed Methane Proved Reserves Revision Increases (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7...

54

Pennsylvania Coalbed Methane Proved Reserves Revision Increases...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Increases (Billion Cubic Feet) Pennsylvania Coalbed Methane Proved Reserves Revision Increases (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7...

55

Virginia Coalbed Methane Proved Reserves Revision Decreases ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Decreases (Billion Cubic Feet) Virginia Coalbed Methane Proved Reserves Revision Decreases (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7...

56

Colorado Coalbed Methane Proved Reserves Extensions (Billion...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Extensions (Billion Cubic Feet) Colorado Coalbed Methane Proved Reserves Extensions (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8...

57

Oklahoma Coalbed Methane Proved Reserves Revision Decreases ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Decreases (Billion Cubic Feet) Oklahoma Coalbed Methane Proved Reserves Revision Decreases (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7...

58

Montana Coalbed Methane Proved Reserves Adjustments (Billion...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Adjustments (Billion Cubic Feet) Montana Coalbed Methane Proved Reserves Adjustments (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8...

59

Wyoming Coalbed Methane Proved Reserves Acquisitions (Billion...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Acquisitions (Billion Cubic Feet) Wyoming Coalbed Methane Proved Reserves Acquisitions (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8...

60

Wyoming Coalbed Methane Proved Reserves Adjustments (Billion...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Adjustments (Billion Cubic Feet) Wyoming Coalbed Methane Proved Reserves Adjustments (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "western states coalbed" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Arkansas Coalbed Methane Proved Reserves Revision Increases ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Increases (Billion Cubic Feet) Arkansas Coalbed Methane Proved Reserves Revision Increases (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7...

62

Oklahoma Coalbed Methane Proved Reserves Revision Increases ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Increases (Billion Cubic Feet) Oklahoma Coalbed Methane Proved Reserves Revision Increases (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7...

63

Oklahoma Coalbed Methane Proved Reserves Adjustments (Billion...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Adjustments (Billion Cubic Feet) Oklahoma Coalbed Methane Proved Reserves Adjustments (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8...

64

Pennsylvania Coalbed Methane Proved Reserves Extensions (Billion...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Extensions (Billion Cubic Feet) Pennsylvania Coalbed Methane Proved Reserves Extensions (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8...

65

Colorado Coalbed Methane Proved Reserves Adjustments (Billion...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Adjustments (Billion Cubic Feet) Colorado Coalbed Methane Proved Reserves Adjustments (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8...

66

Arkansas Coalbed Methane Proved Reserves Acquisitions (Billion...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Acquisitions (Billion Cubic Feet) Arkansas Coalbed Methane Proved Reserves Acquisitions (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8...

67

Colorado Coalbed Methane Proved Reserves Acquisitions (Billion...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Acquisitions (Billion Cubic Feet) Colorado Coalbed Methane Proved Reserves Acquisitions (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8...

68

Oklahoma Coalbed Methane Proved Reserves Acquisitions (Billion...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Acquisitions (Billion Cubic Feet) Oklahoma Coalbed Methane Proved Reserves Acquisitions (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8...

69

Colorado Coalbed Methane Proved Reserves Revision Decreases ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Decreases (Billion Cubic Feet) Colorado Coalbed Methane Proved Reserves Revision Decreases (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7...

70

Arkansas Coalbed Methane Proved Reserves Revision Decreases ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Decreases (Billion Cubic Feet) Arkansas Coalbed Methane Proved Reserves Revision Decreases (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7...

71

Virginia Coalbed Methane Proved Reserves Revision Increases ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Increases (Billion Cubic Feet) Virginia Coalbed Methane Proved Reserves Revision Increases (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7...

72

Pennsylvania Coalbed Methane Proved Reserves Adjustments (Billion...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Adjustments (Billion Cubic Feet) Pennsylvania Coalbed Methane Proved Reserves Adjustments (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8...

73

Power systems simulations of the western United States region.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report documents a part of a broad assessment of energy-water-related issues in the western United States. The full analysis involved three Department of Energy national laboratories: Argonne National Laboratory, Los Alamos National Laboratory, and Sandia National Laboratories. Argonne's objective in the overall project was to develop a regional power sector expansion forecast and a detailed unit-level operational (dispatch) analysis. With these two major analysis components, Argonne estimated current and future freshwater withdrawals and consumption related to the operation of U.S. thermal-electric power plants in the Western Electricity Coordinating Council (WECC) region for the period 2005-2025. Water is withdrawn and used primarily for cooling but also for environmental control, such as sulfur scrubbers. The current scope of the analysis included three scenarios: (1) Baseline scenario as a benchmark for assessing the adequacy and cost-effectiveness of water conservation options and strategies, (2) High nuclear scenario, and (3) High renewables scenario. Baseline projections are consistent with forecasts made by the WECC and the Energy Information Administration (EIA) in its Annual Energy Outlook (AEO) (EIA 2006a). Water conservation scenarios are currently limited to two development alternatives that focus heavily on constructing new generating facilities with zero water consumption. These technologies include wind farms and nuclear power plants with dry cooling. Additional water conservation scenarios and estimates of water use associated with fuel or resource extraction and processing will be developed in follow-on analyses.

Conzelmann, G.; Koritarov, V.; Poch, L.; Thimmapuram, P.; Veselka, T.; Decision and Information Sciences

2010-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

74

EIS-0386: Designation of Energy Corridors on Federal Land in Western States  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This EIS analyzes DOE's decision to designatate corridors on Federal land in the eleven Western States for oil, gas and hydrogen pipelines and electricity transmission and distribution facilities.

75

Development of a Series of National Coalbed Methane Databases  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Development of a Series of National Coalbed Methane Databases Mohaghegh, S. D., Nunsavathu, U Growing Interest in Coalbed Methane ­ Elevated natural gas prices ­ Demand for clean energy sources DatabaseDatabase One Location Reservoir & Sorption Collection ­ 126 Coalbed Areas ­ 34 Parameters Ordered

Mohaghegh, Shahab

76

Transport of Asian ozone pollution into surface air over the western United States in spring  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Transport of Asian ozone pollution into surface air over the western United States in spring Meiyun the mechanisms involved in the transport of Asian pollution plumes into western U.S. surface air through, including the interleaving and mixing of Asian pollution and stratospheric air associated with complex

77

Geologic evaluation of critical production parameters for coalbed methane resources. Part 1. San Juan Basin. Annual report, August 1988-July 1989  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In the San Juan Basin, Fruitland Formation coal seams contain an estimated 43 to 49 Tcf of methane. With more than 500 producing coalbed methane wells and approximately 1,000 wells scheduled for drilling in 1990, the basin is one of the most active areas of coalbed methane exploration and production in the United States. Among the most important geologic factors affecting the occurrence and producibility of coalbed methane are depositional setting, structural attitude and fracturing of the coal, and regional hydraulic setting. In the second year of the study, the Bureau of Economic Geology evaluated the depositional setting and structure of Fruitland coal seams, which are both source rocks and reservoirs for coalbed methane, throughout the basin. The report summarizes the regional tectonic setting of the San Juan Basin; describes the Cretaceous stratigraphy, structure, and basin evolution; relates these factors to Fruitland coal and coalbed methane occurrence; describes studies of lineaments, fractures, and cleats; presents hydrodynamic controls on the producibility of coalbed methane from the Fruitland Formation; summarizes production from the Fruitland Formation; and evaluates geologic and hydrologic controls on coalbed methane producibility.

Ayers, W.B.; Kaiser, W.R.; Ambrose, W.A.; Swartz, T.E.; Laubach, S.E.

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

78

Biogeochemistry of Microbial Coal-Bed Methane  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Biogeochemistry of Microbial Coal-Bed Methane Dariusz Strapo´c,1, Maria Mastalerz,2 Katherine, biodegradation Abstract Microbial methane accumulations have been discovered in multiple coal- bearing basins low-maturity coals with predominantly microbial methane gas or uplifted coals containing older

Macalady, Jenn

79

Methodology The electricity generation and distribution network in the Western United States is  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Methodology The electricity generation and distribution network in the Western United States is comprised of power plants, electric utilities, electrical transformers, transmission and distribution infrastructure, etc. We conceptualize the system as a transportation network with resources (electricity

Hall, Sharon J.

80

Development of water production type curves for horizontal wells in coalbed methane reservoirs.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??Coalbed methane is an unconventional gas resource that consists of methane production from the coal seams. The key parameters for the evaluation of coalbed methane… (more)

Burka Narayana, Praveen Kumar.

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "western states coalbed" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Coalbed Methane Produced Water Screening Tool for Treatment Technology and Beneficial Use 2013 Supporting Information  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Coalbed Methane Produced Water Screening Tool for Treatment Technology and Beneficial Use 2013 1 (to sustain instream #12;Coalbed Methane Produced Water Screening Tool for Treatment Technology

82

Tool to predict the production performance of vertical wells in a coalbed methane reservoir.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??Coalbed Methane (CBM) is an unconventional gas resource that consists of methane production from coal seams. Coalbed Methane gas production is controlled be interactions of… (more)

Enoh, Michael E.

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

83

,"North Louisiana Coalbed Methane Proved Reserves, Reserves Changes...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Coalbed Methane Proved Reserves, Reserves Changes, and Production" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Late...

84

,"Ohio Coalbed Methane Proved Reserves, Reserves Changes, and...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Ohio Coalbed Methane Proved Reserves, Reserves Changes, and Production",10,"Annual",2010,"630...

85

Prediction of coalbed methane reservoir performance with type curves.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??Coalbed methane is an unconventional gas resource that consists of methane production from the coal seams. CBM reservoirs are dual-porosity systems that are characterized by… (more)

Bhavsar, Amol Bhaskar.

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

86

,"U.S. Coalbed Methane Proved Reserves Extensions (Billion Cubic...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","U.S. Coalbed Methane Proved Reserves Extensions (Billion Cubic Feet)",1,"Annual",2013 ,"Release...

87

Ohio Coalbed Methane Proved Reserves Revision Increases (Billion...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

W Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 1242014 Next Release Date: 12312015 Referring Pages: Coalbed Methane Reserves Revision Increases...

88

Ohio Coalbed Methane Proved Reserves Adjustments (Billion Cubic...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Available; W Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 1242014 Next Release Date: 12312015 Referring Pages: Coalbed Methane Reserves Adjustments...

89

The Optimization of Well Spacing in a Coalbed Methane Reservoir.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??Numerical reservoir simulation has been used to describe mechanism of methane gas desorption process, diffusion process, and fluid flow in a coalbed methane reservoir. The… (more)

Sinurat, Pahala Dominicus

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

90

,"U.S. Coalbed Methane Proved Reserves New Field Discoveries...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","U.S. Coalbed Methane Proved Reserves New Field Discoveries (Billion Cubic Feet)",1,"Annual",201...

91

,"Kansas Coalbed Methane Proved Reserves, Reserves Changes, and...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Kansas Coalbed Methane Proved Reserves, Reserves Changes, and Production",10,"Annual",2013,"630...

92

Oklahoma Coalbed Methane Proved Reserves New Reservoir Discoveries...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

New Reservoir Discoveries in Old Fields (Billion Cubic Feet) Oklahoma Coalbed Methane Proved Reserves New Reservoir Discoveries in Old Fields (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0...

93

,"NM, West Coalbed Methane Proved Reserves, Reserves Changes...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Coalbed Methane Proved Reserves, Reserves Changes, and Production" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Late...

94

,"Federal Offshore, Gulf of Mexico, Louisiana & Alabama Coalbed...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Coalbed Methane Proved Reserves, Reserves Changes, and Production" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Late...

95

,"U.S. Coalbed Methane Production (Billion Cubic Feet)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","U.S. Coalbed Methane Production (Billion Cubic Feet)",1,"Annual",2013 ,"Release Date:","124...

96

,"U.S. Coalbed Methane Proved Reserves New Reservoir Discoveries...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","U.S. Coalbed Methane Proved Reserves New Reservoir Discoveries in Old Fields (Billion Cubic...

97

,"West Virginia Coalbed Methane Proved Reserves, Reserves Changes...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","West Virginia Coalbed Methane Proved Reserves, Reserves Changes, and Production",10,"Annual",2013,"630...

98

,"New Mexico Coalbed Methane Proved Reserves, Reserves Changes...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","New Mexico Coalbed Methane Proved Reserves, Reserves Changes, and Production",10,"Annual",2013,"630...

99

,"TX, RRC District 2 Onshore Coalbed Methane Proved Reserves...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Coalbed Methane Proved Reserves, Reserves Changes, and Production" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Late...

100

,"U.S. Coalbed Methane Proved Reserves Acquisitions (Billion...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","U.S. Coalbed Methane Proved Reserves Acquisitions (Billion Cubic Feet)",1,"Annual",2013...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "western states coalbed" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Wyoming Coalbed Methane Proved Reserves New Reservoir Discoveries...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

New Reservoir Discoveries in Old Fields (Billion Cubic Feet) Wyoming Coalbed Methane Proved Reserves New Reservoir Discoveries in Old Fields (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0...

102

,"U.S. Coalbed Methane Proved Reserves Revision Increases (Billion...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","U.S. Coalbed Methane Proved Reserves Revision Increases (Billion Cubic Feet)",1,"Annual",2013...

103

,"U.S. Coalbed Methane Proved Reserves Adjustments (Billion Cubic...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","U.S. Coalbed Methane Proved Reserves Adjustments (Billion Cubic Feet)",1,"Annual",2013...

104

,"Utah Coalbed Methane Proved Reserves, Reserves Changes, and...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Utah Coalbed Methane Proved Reserves, Reserves Changes, and Production",10,"Annual",2013,"630...

105

,"TX, RRC District 10 Coalbed Methane Proved Reserves, Reserves...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Coalbed Methane Proved Reserves, Reserves Changes, and Production" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Late...

106

,"TX, RRC District 4 Onshore Coalbed Methane Proved Reserves...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Coalbed Methane Proved Reserves, Reserves Changes, and Production" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Late...

107

,"NM, East Coalbed Methane Proved Reserves, Reserves Changes...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Coalbed Methane Proved Reserves, Reserves Changes, and Production" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Late...

108

,"TX, RRC District 3 Onshore Coalbed Methane Proved Reserves...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Coalbed Methane Proved Reserves, Reserves Changes, and Production" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Late...

109

,"Texas Coalbed Methane Proved Reserves, Reserves Changes, and...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Coalbed Methane Proved Reserves, Reserves Changes, and Production" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Late...

110

,"U.S. Coalbed Methane Proved Reserves Revision Decreases (Billion...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","U.S. Coalbed Methane Proved Reserves Revision Decreases (Billion Cubic Feet)",1,"Annual",2013...

111

Utah Coalbed Methane Proved Reserves New Reservoir Discoveries...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

New Reservoir Discoveries in Old Fields (Billion Cubic Feet) Utah Coalbed Methane Proved Reserves New Reservoir Discoveries in Old Fields (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1...

112

Development of gas production type curves for coalbed methane reservoirs.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??Coalbed methane is an unconventional gas resource that consists on methane production from the coal seams. The unique coal characteristic results in a dual-porosity system.… (more)

Garcia Arenas, Anangela.

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

113

Area balance and strain in coalbed methane reservoirs of the Black Warrior basin  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Investigation of coalbed methane reservoirs in the Black Warrior basin of Alabama has established a correspondence between productivity and structural position, but the reasons for this correspondence remain uncertain. In Cedar Cove field, for example, exceptionally productive wells are concentrated in a rollover anticline, whereas in Oak Grove field, exceptionally productive wells are aligned along a synclinal axis. This suggests that factors controlling gas production are a derivative of the structural geometry, and not the geometry by itself. Natural fractures and a low state of in-situ stress facilitate depressurization of coalbed reservoirs by dewatering, and hence, desorption and production of coalbed gas. Our hypothesis is that the abundance and openness of natural fractures in the Black Warrior basin are a direct expression of the layer-parallel strain dictated by map-scale structural geometry. Area balancing techniques can be used to quantify requisite strain, which is the homogeneous layer-parallel strain required for local area balance, and can also be used to constrain and verify structural cross sections. Application of area balancing techniques to extensional structures in the Black Warrior basin indicates that coalbed gas is produced from thin-skinned structures detached within the coal-bearing Pottsville Formation. Within reservoir intervals, requisite strain values are as high as 10 percent and increase downward toward the basal detachment. Mapping structure and production indicates that some productivity sweet spots correlate with enhanced bed curvature. Whereas requisite strain is the homogeneous strain calculated for discrete bed segments, curvature affects the distribution of strain within those segments. Recognizing this, our research is now focused on integrating area balancing techniques with curvature analysis to explain production patterns in coalbed methane reservoirs.

Pashin, J.C. [Geological Survey of Alabama, Tuscaloosa, AL (United States); Groshong, R.H., Jr. [Univ. of Alabama, Tuscaloosa, AL (United States)

1996-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

114

William L. Fisher PUBLICATIONS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of coalbed methane produced waters in the Western United States: National Academies Press, The National

Yang, Zong-Liang

115

The potential for coalbed gas exploration and production in the Greater Green River Basin, southwest Wyoming and northwest Colorado  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Coalbed gas is an important source of natural gas in the United States. In 1993, approximately 740 BCF of coalbed gas was produced in the United States, or about 4.2% of the nation`s total gas production. Nearly 96% of this coalbed gas is produced from just two basins, the San Juan (615.7 BCF; gas in place 84 TCF) and Black Warrior (105 BCF; gas in place 20 TCF), and current production represents only a fraction of the nation`s estimated 675 TCF of in-place coalbed gas. Coal beds in the Greater Green River Basin in southwest Wyoming and northwest Colorado hold almost half of the gas in place (314 TCF) and are an important source of gas for low-permeability Almond sandstones. Because total gas in place in the Greater Green River Basin is reported to exceed 3,000 TCF (Law et al., 1989), the basin may substantially increase the domestic gas resource base. Therefore, through integrated geologic and hydrologic studies, the coalbed gas potential of the basin was assessed where tectonic, structural, and depositional setting, coal distribution and rank, gas content, coal permeability, and ground-water flow are critical controls on coalbed gas producibility. Synergism between these geologic and hydrologic controls determines gas productivity. High productivity is governed by (1) thick, laterally continuous coals of high thermal maturity, (2) basinward flow of ground water through fractured and permeable coals, down the coal rank gradient toward no-flow boundaries oriented perpendicular to the regional flow direction, and (3) conventional trapping of gas along those boundaries to provide additional sources of gas beyond that sorbed on the coal surface.

Tyler, R.; Kaiser, W.R.; Scott, A.R.; Hamilton, D.S. [Univ. of Texas, Austin, TX (United States)

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

116

Regular Articles Coalbed methane produced water screening tool for treatment technology  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Regular Articles Coalbed methane produced water screening tool for treatment technology and publicly available coalbed methane produced water screening tool to two simulated case studies to determine the largest volume waste stream in the industry (GWI, 2011). For coalbed methane (CBM) (coalbed natural gas

117

Oregon State University Sun Grant Western Regional Center  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

for Use in Pacific Ethanol's Boardman, Oregon Cellulosic Ethanol Plant Russ Karow, Oregon State University OVERVIEW Pacific Ethanol, in Boardman, Oregon, is the recipient of a federal grant to establish a 1/10 th scale cellulosic ethanol pilot plant adjacent to their existing corn-based ethanol facility. This new

Tullos, Desiree

118

Oregon State University Sun Grant Western Regional Center  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and Cellulases in the Bioconversion of Lignocellulosic Feedstocks to Ethanol Christine Kelly, Oregon State to ethanol. The team will examine fungal heme peroxidases to discover new "accessory" enzymes that function of conversion of softwoods to ethanol. Progress to Date · Bioreactor runs and analyses: Dr. Kelly and her

Tullos, Desiree

119

Ohio Coalbed Methane Production (Billion Cubic Feet)  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) " ,"ClickPipelines About U.S.30 2013 Macroeconomicper Thousand Cubic Feet)3.74Decade Year-00 ' uCoalbed

120

Mountain hydrology of the western United States Roger C. Bales,1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Mountain hydrology of the western United States Roger C. Bales,1 Noah P. Molotch,2,3 Thomas H, population growth, and land use change drive the need for new hydrologic knowledge and understanding. In the mountainous West and other similar areas worldwide, three pressing hydrologic needs stand out: first

California at Santa Barbara, University of

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "western states coalbed" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Changes in winter precipitation extremes for the western United States under a warmer climate as simulated  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Changes in winter precipitation extremes for the western United States under a warmer climate find a consistent and statistically significant increase in the intensity of future extreme winter consistently show an increase in the intensity of extreme winter precipitation with the multi-model mean

Castro, Christopher L.

122

H. R. 2998: A bill to amend the Natural Gas Act to permit the development of coalbed methane gas in areas where its development has been impeded or made impossible by uncertainty and litigation over ownership rights, and for other purposes, introduced in the US House of Representatives, One Hundred Second Congress, First Session, July 23, 1991  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This bill would direct the Secretary of Energy to compile a list of affected states which are determined to be states in which disputes, uncertainty, or litigation exist or potentially exists regarding the ownership of coalbed methane; in which the development of significant deposits of coalbed methane may be impeded by such disputes; in which statutory or regulatory procedures permitting and encouraging development of coalbed methane prior to final resolution of disputes are not in place; and in which extensive development of coalbed methane does not exist. Colorado, Montana, New Mexico, Wyoming, Utah, Virginia, and Alabama are excluded from such a list since they currently have development of coalbed methane. Until the Secretary of Energy publishes a different list, the affected states are West Virginia, Pennsylvania, Kentucky, Ohio, Tennessee, Indiana, and Illinois, effective on the date of enactment of this bill.

Not Available

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

123

Assessment of municipal solid waste for energy production in the western United States  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Municipal solid waste (MSW) represents both a significant problem and an abundant resource for the production of energy. The residential, institutional, and industrial sectors of this country generate about 250 million tons of MSW each year. In this report, the authors have compiled data on the status of MSW in the 13-state western region, including economic and environmental issues. The report is designed to assist the members of the Western Regional Biomass Energy Program Ad Hoc Resource Committee in determining the potential for using MSW to produce energy in the region. 51 refs., 7 figs., 18 tabs.

Goodman, B.J.; Texeira, R.H.

1990-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

124

Wyoming Coalbed Methane Proved Reserves Revision Decreases (Billion...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Decreases (Billion Cubic Feet) Wyoming Coalbed Methane Proved Reserves Revision Decreases (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8...

125

New Mexico Coalbed Methane Proved Reserves Revision Decreases...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Decreases (Billion Cubic Feet) New Mexico Coalbed Methane Proved Reserves Revision Decreases (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7...

126

New Mexico Coalbed Methane Proved Reserves Adjustments (Billion...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Adjustments (Billion Cubic Feet) New Mexico Coalbed Methane Proved Reserves Adjustments (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8...

127

West Virginia Coalbed Methane Proved Reserves Adjustments (Billion...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Adjustments (Billion Cubic Feet) West Virginia Coalbed Methane Proved Reserves Adjustments (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7...

128

Oklahoma Coalbed Methane Proved Reserves Sales (Billion Cubic...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Sales (Billion Cubic Feet) Oklahoma Coalbed Methane Proved Reserves Sales (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 2000's 6...

129

Kansas Coalbed Methane Proved Reserves Extensions (Billion Cubic...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Extensions (Billion Cubic Feet) Kansas Coalbed Methane Proved Reserves Extensions (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9...

130

Montana Coalbed Methane Proved Reserves Revision Decreases (Billion...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Decreases (Billion Cubic Feet) Montana Coalbed Methane Proved Reserves Revision Decreases (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8...

131

New Mexico Coalbed Methane Proved Reserves New Field Discoveries...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Coalbed Methane Proved Reserves New Field Discoveries (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 2000's 0 2010's 0 0 0 0 - ...

132

Utah Coalbed Methane Proved Reserves New Field Discoveries (Billion...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Coalbed Methane Proved Reserves New Field Discoveries (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 2000's 0 2010's 0 0 0 0 - ...

133

Utah Coalbed Methane Proved Reserves Extensions (Billion Cubic...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Extensions (Billion Cubic Feet) Utah Coalbed Methane Proved Reserves Extensions (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9...

134

Louisiana--North Coalbed Methane Proved Reserves Sales (Billion...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Sales (Billion Cubic Feet) Louisiana--North Coalbed Methane Proved Reserves Sales (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9...

135

Utah Coalbed Methane Proved Reserves Revision Increases (Billion...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Increases (Billion Cubic Feet) Utah Coalbed Methane Proved Reserves Revision Increases (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8...

136

Ohio Coalbed Methane Proved Reserves Revision Decreases (Billion...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Revision Decreases (Billion Cubic Feet) Ohio Coalbed Methane Proved Reserves Revision Decreases (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7...

137

Kansas Coalbed Methane Proved Reserves Adjustments (Billion Cubic...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Adjustments (Billion Cubic Feet) Kansas Coalbed Methane Proved Reserves Adjustments (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8...

138

Wyoming Coalbed Methane Proved Reserves Extensions (Billion Cubic...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Extensions (Billion Cubic Feet) Wyoming Coalbed Methane Proved Reserves Extensions (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9...

139

Utah Coalbed Methane Proved Reserves Adjustments (Billion Cubic...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Adjustments (Billion Cubic Feet) Utah Coalbed Methane Proved Reserves Adjustments (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9...

140

Utah Coalbed Methane Proved Reserves Acquisitions (Billion Cubic...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Acquisitions (Billion Cubic Feet) Utah Coalbed Methane Proved Reserves Acquisitions (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "western states coalbed" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

New Mexico Coalbed Methane Proved Reserves Revision Increases...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Increases (Billion Cubic Feet) New Mexico Coalbed Methane Proved Reserves Revision Increases (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7...

142

Kansas Coalbed Methane Proved Reserves Revision Increases (Billion...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Increases (Billion Cubic Feet) Kansas Coalbed Methane Proved Reserves Revision Increases (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8...

143

West Virginia Coalbed Methane Proved Reserves Revision Increases...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Increases (Billion Cubic Feet) West Virginia Coalbed Methane Proved Reserves Revision Increases (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7...

144

Wyoming Coalbed Methane Proved Reserves New Field Discoveries...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Coalbed Methane Proved Reserves New Field Discoveries (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 2000's 0 2010's 0 0 0 0 - ...

145

Montana Coalbed Methane Proved Reserves Revision Increases (Billion...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Increases (Billion Cubic Feet) Montana Coalbed Methane Proved Reserves Revision Increases (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8...

146

Wyoming Coalbed Methane Proved Reserves Revision Increases (Billion...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Increases (Billion Cubic Feet) Wyoming Coalbed Methane Proved Reserves Revision Increases (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8...

147

Pennsylvania Coalbed Methane Proved Reserves Sales (Billion Cubic...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Sales (Billion Cubic Feet) Pennsylvania Coalbed Methane Proved Reserves Sales (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9...

148

Wyoming Coalbed Methane Proved Reserves Sales (Billion Cubic...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Sales (Billion Cubic Feet) Wyoming Coalbed Methane Proved Reserves Sales (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 2000's...

149

Oklahoma Coalbed Methane Proved Reserves New Field Discoveries...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Oklahoma Coalbed Methane Proved Reserves New Field Discoveries (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 2000's 0 2010's 0 0...

150

Kansas Coalbed Methane Proved Reserves Revision Decreases (Billion...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Decreases (Billion Cubic Feet) Kansas Coalbed Methane Proved Reserves Revision Decreases (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8...

151

Utah Coalbed Methane Proved Reserves Revision Decreases (Billion...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Decreases (Billion Cubic Feet) Utah Coalbed Methane Proved Reserves Revision Decreases (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8...

152

Montana Coalbed Methane Proved Reserves Extensions (Billion Cubic...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Extensions (Billion Cubic Feet) Montana Coalbed Methane Proved Reserves Extensions (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9...

153

West Virginia Coalbed Methane Proved Reserves Revision Decreases...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Decreases (Billion Cubic Feet) West Virginia Coalbed Methane Proved Reserves Revision Decreases (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7...

154

Colorado Coalbed Methane Proved Reserves Sales (Billion Cubic...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Sales (Billion Cubic Feet) Colorado Coalbed Methane Proved Reserves Sales (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 2000's 0...

155

Arkansas Coalbed Methane Proved Reserves Sales (Billion Cubic...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Sales (Billion Cubic Feet) Arkansas Coalbed Methane Proved Reserves Sales (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 2000's...

156

Utah Coalbed Methane Proved Reserves Sales (Billion Cubic Feet...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Sales (Billion Cubic Feet) Utah Coalbed Methane Proved Reserves Sales (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 2000's 0...

157

Proceedings of the international coalbed methane symposium. Volume 2  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Volume 2 contains 36 papers divided among the following sessions: Resources/development potential; Mine safety and productivity issues; Reservoir characterization, modeling, and well testing; and a Poster session whose papers discuss coal geology, well completion methods, origin of coalbed methane, rock mechanics of coal seams, geologic fractures in coal seams, and the use of coalbed methane for mitigation of greenhouse gases. All papers have been processed for inclusion on the data base.

NONE

1993-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

158

Coalbed methane resource potential of the Piceance Basin, northwestern Colorado  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

As predicted, from an evolving coalbed methane producibility model, prolific coalbed methane production is precluded in the Piceance Basin by the absence of coal bed reservoir continuity and dynamic ground-water flow. The best potential for production may lie at the transition zone from hydropressure to hydrocarbon overpressure and/or in conventional traps basinward of where outcrop and subsurface coals are in good reservoir and hydraulic communication. Geologic and hydrologic synergy among tectonic and structural setting, depositional systems and coal distribution, coal rank, gas content, permeability and hydrodynamics are the controls that determine the coalbed methane resource potential of the Piceance Basin. Within the coal-bearing Upper Cretaceous Williams Fork Formation, the prime coalbed methane target, reservoir heterogeneity and thrust faults cause coal beds along the Grand Hogback and in the subsurface to be in modest to poor reservoir and hydraulic communication, restricting meteoric ground water recharge and basinward flow. Total subsurface coalbed methane resources are still estimated to be approximately 99 Tcf (3.09 Tm{sup 3}), although coalbed methane resource estimates range between 80 (2.49 Tm{sup 3}) and 136 Tcf (4.24 Tm{sup 3}), depending on the calculation method used. To explore for high gas contents or fully gas-saturated coals and consequent high productivity in the Piceance Basin, improved geologic and completion technologies including exploration and development for migrated conventionally and hydrodynamically trapped gases, in-situ generated secondary biogenic gases, and solution gases will be required.

Tyler, R.; Scott, A.R.; Kaiser, W.R. [Univ. of Texas, Austin, TX (United States)

1996-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

159

Estimating effects of energy planning on environmental impacts in the Western United States  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

As part of their long-term planning process, utilities and government agencies are choosing power generation and conservation strategies that will effect environmental interactions for decades to come. In the US, power marketing administrations within the US Department of Energy have a strong influence over the strategies to be implemented in large multi-state regions. Pacific Northwest Laboratories (PNL) prepared environmental impact statements (EIS) for two power marketing agencies, the Western Area Power Administration (Western) and Bonneville Power Administration (Bonneville). The Western EIS assessed the effects of integrated resource planing (IRP) on the public utilities Western serves, while the Bonneville EIS assessed the effects of acquiring new energy resources in the pacific Northwest. The results were found using models that simulated utility systems. In both cases, environmental impacts were reduced when the conservation strategy in question was considered. This paper describes the results of the environmental analyses for the two agencies and compares the results with those of another simplified approach that relies on attributing emissions of new resources based on an extrapolation of existing capacity.

Baechler, M.C.; Cothran, J.N.

1994-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

160

Alaska coal geology, resources, and coalbed methane potential  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Estimated Alaska coal resources are largely in Cretaceous and Tertiary rocks distributed in three major provinces, Northern Alaska-Slope, Central Alaska-Nenana, and Southern Alaska-Cook Inlet. Cretaceous resources, predominantly bituminous coal and lignite, are in the Northern Alaska-Slope coal province. Most of the Tertiary resources, mainly lignite to subbituminous coal with minor amounts of bituminous and semianthracite coals, are in the other two provinces. The combined measured, indicated, inferred, and hypothetical coal resources in the three areas are estimated to be 5,526 billion short tons (5,012 billion metric tons), which constitutes about 87 percent of Alaska's coal and surpasses the total coal resources of the conterminous United States by 40 percent. Coal mining has been intermittent in the Central Alaskan-Nenana and Southern Alaska-Cook Inlet coal provinces, with only a small fraction of the identified coal resource having been produced from some dozen underground and strip mines. Alaskan coals have a lower sulfur content (averaging 0.3 percent) than most coals in the conterminous United States and are within or below the minimum sulfur value mandated by the 1990 Clean Air Act amendments. Another untapped potential resource is coalbed methane estimated to total 1,000 trillion cubic feet (28 trillion cubic meters).

Romeo M. Flores; Gary D. Stricker; Scott A. Kinney

2005-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "western states coalbed" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

The economics of alternative fuel reduction treatments in western United States dry forests: Financial and policy implications  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The economics of alternative fuel reduction treatments in western United States dry forests information on alternative fuel reduction methods. With support from the USDI/USDA Joint Fire Science Program We collected data at seven sites in the western US, on the costs of fuel reduction operations

Stephens, Scott L.

162

How Permeability Depends on Stress and Pore Pressure in Coalbeds: A New Model  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

- pression. However, in coalbeds, drawdown leads to desorption of methane, and this is accompanied by matrixHow Permeability Depends on Stress and Pore Pressure in Coalbeds: A New Model Ian Palmer, SPE

163

ANALYSIS OF ENHANCED COALBED METHANE RECOVERY THROUGH CARBON SEQUESTRATION IN THE CENTRAL  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ANALYSIS OF ENHANCED COALBED METHANE RECOVERY THROUGH CARBON SEQUESTRATION IN THE CENTRAL recovered. Carbon sequestration, therefore, allows the utilization of unexploited mineral resources while potential of coalbed methane production using carbon dioxide sequestration in the Central Appalachian Basin

164

WATER QUALITY CHANGES AS A RESULT OF COALBED METHANE DEVELOPMENT IN A ROCKY MOUNTAIN WATERSHED1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

WATER QUALITY CHANGES AS A RESULT OF COALBED METHANE DEVELOPMENT IN A ROCKY MOUNTAIN WATERSHED1 Xixi Wang, Assefa M. Melesse, Michael E. McClain, and Wanhong Yang2 ABSTRACT: Coalbed methane (CBM the Powder River. (KEY TERMS: coalbed methane, produced water; Montana; natural gas; pattern analysis

McClain, Michael

165

Coalbed methane potential of the Pechora Coalfield, Timan-Pechora Basin, Russia  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A comparison of the more important geologic attributes of coal beds in the coalbed methane producing regions of the United States to Permian coal beds in the Pechora Coalfield, Timan-Pechora Basin, Russia indicates a high potential for commercial coalbed methane production. Although the depositional and structural histories, as well as the age, of the coal beds in the Pechora Coalfield are different than coal beds in U.S. basins, coal quality attributes are similar. The more prospective part of the coal-bearing sequence is as thick as 1600 m and contains more than 150 coal beds that individually are as thick as 4 m. These coal beds are composed primarily of rank ranges from subbituminous to anthracite (,0.5->2.5% R[sub 0]), with the highest rank coal located near the city of Vorkuta. Published data indicates that the gas content of coals is as high as 28-35 m[sup 3]/ton, with an average value of 18 m[sup 3]/ton. About 700 MMCM of gas per year is emmitted from coal mines. Pore pressures in the coal beds are unknown, however, interbedded sandstones in some parts of the basin are overpressured. The commonly occurring problem, in mid-latitude coalbed methane well, of excessive amounts of water may be alleviated in this high-latitude coal field. We suggest that the wide-spread occurrence of permafrost in the Pechora Coalfield may form an effective barrier to down-dip water flow, thereby facilitating the dewatering state. In summary, the quality of coal beds in the Pechora Coalfield are similar to methane producing coal beds in the United States and should, therefore, be favorable for commercial rates of gas production.

Yakutseni, V.P.; Petrova, Y.E. (VNIGRI, St. Petersburg (Russian Federation)); Law, B.E.; Ulmishek, G.F. (Geological Survey, Denver, CO (United States))

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

166

Coalbed methane potential of the Pechora Coalfield, Timan-Pechora Basin, Russia  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A comparison of the more important geologic attributes of coal beds in the coalbed methane producing regions of the United States to Permian coal beds in the Pechora Coalfield, Timan-Pechora Basin, Russia indicates a high potential for commercial coalbed methane production. Although the depositional and structural histories, as well as the age, of the coal beds in the Pechora Coalfield are different than coal beds in U.S. basins, coal quality attributes are similar. The more prospective part of the coal-bearing sequence is as thick as 1600 m and contains more than 150 coal beds that individually are as thick as 4 m. These coal beds are composed primarily of rank ranges from subbituminous to anthracite (,0.5->2.5% R{sub 0}), with the highest rank coal located near the city of Vorkuta. Published data indicates that the gas content of coals is as high as 28-35 m{sup 3}/ton, with an average value of 18 m{sup 3}/ton. About 700 MMCM of gas per year is emmitted from coal mines. Pore pressures in the coal beds are unknown, however, interbedded sandstones in some parts of the basin are overpressured. The commonly occurring problem, in mid-latitude coalbed methane well, of excessive amounts of water may be alleviated in this high-latitude coal field. We suggest that the wide-spread occurrence of permafrost in the Pechora Coalfield may form an effective barrier to down-dip water flow, thereby facilitating the dewatering state. In summary, the quality of coal beds in the Pechora Coalfield are similar to methane producing coal beds in the United States and should, therefore, be favorable for commercial rates of gas production.

Yakutseni, V.P.; Petrova, Y.E. [VNIGRI, St. Petersburg (Russian Federation); Law, B.E.; Ulmishek, G.F. [Geological Survey, Denver, CO (United States)

1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

167

,"Utah Coalbed Methane Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National and Regional Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: EnergyShale ProvedTexas"BruneiReserves in NonproducingU.S. Underground Natural GasStateCoalbed

168

Mapping water availability, projected use and cost in the western United States  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

New demands for water can be satisfied through a variety of source options. In some basins surface and/or groundwater may be available through permitting with the state water management agency (termed unappropriated water), alternatively water might be purchased and transferred out of its current use to another (termed appropriated water), or non-traditional water sources can be captured and treated (e.g., wastewater). The relative availability and cost of each source are key factors in the development decision. Unfortunately, these measures are location dependent with no consistent or comparable set of data available for evaluating competing water sources. With the help of western water managers, water availability was mapped for over 1200 watersheds throughout the western US. Five water sources were individually examined, including unappropriated surface water, unappropriated groundwater, appropriated water, municipal wastewater and brackish groundwater. Also mapped was projected change in consumptive water use from 2010 to 2030. Associated costs to acquire, convey and treat the water, as necessary, for each of the five sources were estimated. These metrics were developed to support regional water planning and policy analysis with initial application to electric transmission planning in the western US.

Vincent C. Tidwell; Barbara D. Moreland; Katie M. Zemlick; Barry L. Roberts; Howard D. Passell; Daniel Jensen; Christopher Forsgren; Gerald Sehlke; Margaret A. Cook; Carey W. King

2014-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

169

Enhancement of Biogenic Coalbed Methane Production and Back Injection of Coalbed Methane Co-Produced Water  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Biogenic methane is a common constituent in deep subsurface environments such as coalbeds and oil shale beds. Coalbed methane (CBM) makes significant contributions to world natural gas industry and CBM production continues to increase. With increasing CBM production, the production of CBM co-produced water increases, which is an environmental concern. This study investigated the feasibility in re-using CBM co-produced water and other high sodic/saline water to enhance biogenic methane production from coal and other unconventional sources, such as oil shale. Microcosms were established with the selected carbon sources which included coal, oil shale, lignite, peat, and diesel-contaminated soil. Each microcosm contained either CBM coproduced water or groundwater with various enhancement and inhibitor combinations. Results indicated that the addition of nutrients and nutrients with additional carbon can enhance biogenic methane production from coal and oil shale. Methane production from oil shale was much greater than that from coal, which is possibly due to the greater amount of available Dissolved Organic Carbon (DOC) from oil shale. Inconclusive results were observed from the other sources since the incubation period was too low. WRI is continuing studies with biogenic methane production from oil shale.

Song Jin

2007-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

170

Evaluation of potential geothermal reservoirs in central and western New York state. Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Computer processes geophysical well logs from central and western New York State were analyzed to evaluate the potential of subsurface formations as a source for low-temperature geothermal water. The analysis indicated that porous sandstone sections at the top of the Ordovician Theresa Formation and at the base of the Cambrian Potsdam Formation have the required depth, porosity, and permeability to act as a source for geothermal fluids over a relatively large area in the central part of the state. The fluid potential plus an advantageous geothermal gradient and the results of the test well drilled in the city of Auburn in Cayuga County suggest that low temperature geothermal energy may be a viable alternative to other more conventional forms of energy that are not indigenous to New York State.

Not Available

1983-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

171

Mid-Century Ensemble Regional Climate Change Scenarios for the Western United States  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

To study the impacts of climate change on water resources in the western U.S., global climate simulations were produced using the National Center for Atmospheric Research/Department of Energy (NCAR/DOE) Parallel Climate Model (PCM). The Penn State/NCAR Mesoscale Model (MM5) was used to downscale the PCM control (1995-2015) and three future (2040-2060) climate simulations to yield ensemble regional climate simulations at 40 km spatial resolution for the western U.S. This paper focuses on analyses of regional simulations in the Columbia River and Sacramento-San Joaquin River Basins. Results based on the regional simulations show that by mid-century, the average regional warming of 1-2.5oC strongly affects snowpack in the western U.S. Along coastal mountains, reduction in annual snowpack is about 70%. Besides changes in mean temperature, precipitation, and snowpack, cold season extreme daily precipitation is found to increase by 5 to 15 mm/day (15-20%) along the Cascades and the Sierra. The warming results in increased rainfall over snowfall and reduced snow accumulation (or earlier snowmelt) during the cold season. In the Columbia River Basin, these changes are accompanied by more frequent rain-on-snow events. Overall, they induce higher likelihood of wintertime flooding and reduced runoff and soil moisture in the summer. Such changes could have serious impacts on water resources and agriculture in the western U.S. Changes in surface water and energy budgets in the Columbia River and Sacramento-San Joaquin basins are driven mainly by changes in surface temperature, which are statistically significant at the 0.95 confidence level. Changes in precipitation, however, are spatially incoherent and not statistically significant except for the drying trend during summer.

Leung, Lai R.; Qian, Yun; Bian, Xindi; Washington, Warren M.; Han, Jongil; Roads, John O.

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

172

Dewatering of coalbed methane wells with hydraulic gas pump  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The coalbed methane industry has become an important source of natural gas production. Proper dewatering of coalbed methane (CBM) wells is the key to efficient gas production from these reservoirs. This paper presents the Hydraulic Gas Pump as a new alternative dewatering system for CBM wells. The Hydraulic Gas Pump (HGP) concept offers several operational advantages for CBM wells. Gas interference does not affect its operation. It resists solids damage by eliminating the lift mechanism and reducing the number of moving parts. The HGP has a flexible production rate and is suitable for all production phases of CBM wells. It can also be designed as a wireline retrievable system. We conclude that the Hydraulic Gas Pump is a suitable dewatering system for coalbed methane wells.

Amani, M.; Juvkam-Wold, H.C. [Texas A& M Univ., College Station, TX (United States)

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

173

Integrated process for coalbed brine and methane disposal  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper describes a technology and project to demonstrate and commercialize a brine disposal process for converting the brine stream of a coalbed gas producing site into clean water for agricultural use and dry solids that can be recycled for industrial consumption. The process also utilizes coalbed methane (CBM) released from coal mining for the combustion process thereby substantially reducing the potential for methane emissions to the atmosphere. The technology is ideally suited for the treatment and disposal of produced brines generated from the development of coal mines and coalbed methane resources worldwide. Over the next 10 to 15 years, market potential for brine elimination equipment and services is estimated to be in the range of $1 billion.

Byam, J.W. Jr.; Tait, J.H.; Brandt, H.

1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

174

Multicomponent 3-D characterization of a coalbed methane reservoir  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Methane is produced from fractured coalbed reservoirs at Cedar Hill Field in the San Juan Basin. Fracturing and local stress are critical to production because of the absence of matrix permeability in the coals. Knowledge of the direction of open fractures, the degree of fracturing, reservoir pressure, and compartmentalization is required to understand the flow of fluids through the reservoir. A multicomponent 3-D seismic survey was acquired to aid in coalbed methane reservoir characterization. Coalbed reservoir heterogeneities, including isolated pressure cells, zones of increased fracture density, and variable fracture directions, have been interpreted through the analysis of the multicomponent data and integration with petrophysical and reservoir engineering studies. Strike-slip faults, which compartmentalize the reservoir, have been identified by structural interpretation of the 3-D P-wave seismic data. These faults form boundaries for pressure cells that have been identified by P-wave reflection amplitude anomalies.

Shuck, E.L. [Advance Geophysical Corp., Englewood, CO (United States)] [Advance Geophysical Corp., Englewood, CO (United States); Davis, T.L.; Benson, R.D. [Colorado School of Mines, Golden, CO (United States). Geophysics Dept.] [Colorado School of Mines, Golden, CO (United States). Geophysics Dept.

1996-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

175

Exploiting coalbed methane and protecting the global environment  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The global climate change caused by greenhouse gases (GHGs) emission has received wide attention from all countries in the world. Global environmental protection as a common problem has confronted the human being. As a main component of coalbed methane, methane is an important factor influencing the production safety of coal mine and threatens the lives of miners. The recent research on environment science shows that methane is a very harmful GHG. Although methane gas has very little proportion in the GHGs emission and its stayed period is also very short, it has very obvious impact on the climate change. From the estimation, methane emission in the coal-mining process is only 10% of the total emission from human`s activities. As a clean energy, Methane has mature recovery technique before, during and after the process of mining. Thus, coalbed methane is the sole GHG generated in the human`s activities and being possible to be reclaimed and utilized. Compared with the global greenhouse effect of other GHGs emission abatement, coalbed methane emission abatement can be done in very low cost with many other benefits: (1) to protect global environment; (2) to improve obviously the safety of coal mine; and (3) to obtain a new kind of clean energy. Coal is the main energy in China, and coalbed contains very rich methane. According to the exploration result in recent years, about 30000{approximately}35000 billion m{sup 2} methane is contained in the coalbed below 2000 m in depth. China has formed a good development base in the field of reclamation and utilization of coalbed methane. The author hopes that wider international technical exchange and cooperation in the field will be carried out.

Yuheng, Gao

1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

176

Expansion and Enhacement of the Wyoming Coalbed Methane Clearinghouse Website to the Wyoming Energy Resources Information Clearinghouse.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Energy development is expanding across the United States, particularly in western states like Wyoming. Federal and state land management agencies, local governments, industry and non-governmental organizations have realized the need to access spatially-referenced data and other non-spatial information to determine the geographical extent and cumulative impacts of expanding energy development. The Wyoming Energy Resources Information Clearinghouse (WERIC) is a web-based portal which centralizes access to news, data, maps, reports and other information related to the development, management and conservation of Wyomingâ??s diverse energy resources. WERIC was established in 2006 by the University of Wyomingâ??s Ruckelshaus Institute of Environment and Natural Resources (ENR) and the Wyoming Geographic Information Science Center (WyGISC) with funding from the US Department of Energy (DOE) and the US Bureau of Land Management (BLM). The WERIC web portal originated in concept from a more specifically focused website, the Coalbed Methane (CBM) Clearinghouse. The CBM Clearinghouse effort focused only on coalbed methane production within the Powder River Basin of northeast Wyoming. The CBM Clearinghouse demonstrated a need to expand the effort statewide with a comprehensive energy focus, including fossil fuels and renewable and alternative energy resources produced and/or developed in Wyoming. WERIC serves spatial data to the greater Wyoming geospatial community through the Wyoming GeoLibrary, the WyGISC Data Server and the Wyoming Energy Map. These applications are critical components that support the Wyoming Energy Resources Information Clearinghouse (WERIC). The Wyoming GeoLibrary is a tool for searching and browsing a central repository for metadata. It provides the ability to publish and maintain metadata and geospatial data in a distributed environment. The WyGISC Data Server is an internet mapping application that provides traditional GIS mapping and analysis functionality via the web. It is linked into various state and federal agency spatial data servers allowing users to visualize multiple themes, such as well locations and core sage grouse areas, in one domain. Additionally, this application gives users the ability to download any of the data being displayed within the web map. The Wyoming Energy Map is the newest mapping application developed directly from this effort. With over a 100 different layers accessible via this mapping application, it is the most comprehensive Wyoming energy mapping application available. This application also provides the public with the ability to create cultural and wildlife reports based on any location throughout Wyoming and at multiple scales. The WERIC website also allows users to access links to federal, state, and local natural resource agency websites and map servers; research documents about energy; and educational information, including information on upcoming energy-relate conferences. The WERIC website has seen significant use by energy industry consultants, land management agencies, state and local decision-makers, non-governmental organizations and the public. Continued service to these sectors is desirable but some challenges remain in keeping the WERIC site viable. The most pressing issue is finding the human and financial resources to keep the site continually updated. Initially, the concept included offering users the ability to maintain the site themselves; however, this has proven not to be a viable option since very few people contributed. Without user contributions, the web page relied on already committed university staff to publish and link to the appropriate documents and web-pages. An option that is currently being explored to address this issue is development of a partnership with the University of Wyoming, School of Energy Resources (SER). As part of their outreach program, SER may be able to contribute funding for a full-time position dedicated to maintenance of WERIC.

Hulme, Diana; Hamerlinck, Jeffrey; Bergman, Harold; Oakleaf, Jim

2010-03-26T23:59:59.000Z

177

The Optimization of Well Spacing in a Coalbed Methane Reservoir  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

reserve estimation for a coalbed methane reservoir. Other numerical reservoir simulation studies were presented by David, H. and Law, S.18, Hower, T.L.19, and Jalal, J. and Shahab, D.M.20. They showed the application of a compositional simulator...

Sinurat, Pahala Dominicus

2012-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

178

Exploration strategies based on a coalbed methane producibility model  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Knowing geologic and hydrologic characteristics of a basin does not necessarily lead to a determination of its coalbed methane producibility because it is the synergy among key hydrogeologic controls that governs producibility. Detailed studies performed in the San Juan, Piceance, and Sand Wash Basins determined that the key hydrogeologic factors affecting producibility include depositional setting and coal distribution, tectonic and structural setting, coal rank and gas generation, hydrodynamics, permeability, and gas content. The conceptual model based on these factors provides a rationale for exploration and development strategies for unexplored areas or in basins having established or limited production. Exceptionally high productivity requires good permeability; thick, laterally continuous high-rank and high-gas-content coals; dynamic flow of ground water through those coals; generation of secondary biogenic gases; and migration and conventional trapping of thermogenic and biogenic gases. Higher coalbed methane producibility commonly occurs in areas of upward flow associated with permeability barriers (no-flow boundaries). Fluid migration across a large gathering area orthogonal to permeability barriers and/or in situ generation of secondary biogenic gases concentrate the coal gas, resulting in higher gas contents. Low coalbed methane production is typically associated with very low permeability systems; the absence of conventional or hydrodynamic traps; and thin, low-rank coals below the threshold of thermogenic gas generation. Production from relatively low-gas-content coals in highly permeable recharge areas may result in excessive water and limited coalbed methane production. Thus, high permeability can be as detrimental to coalbed methane producibility as is low permeability.

Scott, A.R.; Kaiser, W.R.; Hamilton, D.S.; Tyler, R.; Finley, R.J. [Univ. of Texas, Austin, TX (United States)

1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

179

Exploration strategies based on a coalbed methane producibility model  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Knowing geologic and hydrologic characteristics of a basin does not necessarily lead to a determination of its coalbed methane producibility because it is the synergy among key hydrogeologic controls that governs producibility. Detailed studies performed in the San Juan, Piceance, and Sand Wash Basins determined that the key hydrogeologic factors affecting producibility include depositional setting and coal distribution, tectonic and structural setting, coal rank and gas generation, hydrodynamics, permeability, and gas content. The conceptual model based on these factors provides a rationale for exploration and development strategies for unexplored areas or in basins having established or limited production. Exceptionally high productivity requires good permeability; thick, laterally continuous high-rank and high-gas-content coals; dynamic flow of ground water through those coals; generation of secondary biogenic gases; and migration and conventional trapping of thermogenic and biogenic gases. Higher coalbed methane producibility commonly occurs in areas of upward flow associated with permeability barriers (no-flow boundaries). Fluid migration across a large gathering area orthogonal to permeability barriers and/or in situ generation of secondary biogenic gases concentrate the coal gas, resulting in higher gas contents. Low coalbed methane production is typically associated with very low permeability systems; the absence of conventional or hydrodynamic traps; and thin, low-rank coals below the threshold of thermogenic gas generation. Production from relatively low-gas-content coals in highly permeable recharge areas may result in excessive water and limited coalbed methane production. Thus, high permeability can be as detrimental to coalbed methane producibility as is low permeability.

Scott, A.R.; Kaiser, W.R.; Hamilton, D.S.; Tyler, R.; Finley, R.J. (Univ. of Texas, Austin, TX (United States))

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

180

Climate adaptation wedges: a case study of premium wine in the western United States  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Design and implementation of effective climate change adaptation activities requires quantitative assessment of the impacts that are likely to occur without adaptation, as well as the fraction of impact that can be avoided through each activity. Here we present a quantitative framework inspired by the greenhouse gas stabilization wedges of Pacala and Socolow. In our proposed framework, the damage avoided by each adaptation activity creates an 'adaptation wedge' relative to the loss that would occur without that adaptation activity. We use premium winegrape suitability in the western United States as an illustrative case study, focusing on the near-term period that covers the years 2000 39. We find that the projected warming over this period results in the loss of suitable winegrape area throughout much of California, including most counties in the high-value North Coast and Central Coast regions. However, in quantifying adaptation wedges for individual high-value counties, we find that a large adaptation wedge can be captured by increasing the severe heat tolerance, including elimination of the 50% loss projected by the end of the 2030 9 period in the North Coast region, and reduction of the projected loss in the Central Coast region from 30% to less than 15%. Increased severe heat tolerance can capture an even larger adaptation wedge in the Pacific Northwest, including conversion of a projected loss of more than 30% in the Columbia Valley region of Washington to a projected gain of more than 150%. We also find that warming projected over the near-term decades has the potential to alter the quality of winegrapes produced in the western US, and we discuss potential actions that could create adaptation wedges given these potential changes in quality. While the present effort represents an initial exploration of one aspect of one industry, the climate adaptation wedge framework could be used to quantitatively evaluate the opportunities and limits of climate adaptation within and across a broad range of natural and human systems.

Diffenbaugh, Noah [Stanford University; White, Michael A [Utah State University (USU); Jones, Gregory V [Southern Oregon University, Ashland, OR; Ashfaq, Moetasim [ORNL

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "western states coalbed" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Structure and Origins of Trends in Hydrological Measures over the western United States  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This study examines, at 1/8 degree spatial resolution, the geographic structure of observed trends in key hydrologically relevant variables across the western United States (U.S.) over the period 1950-1999, and investigates whether these trends are statistically significantly different from trends associated with natural climate variations. A number of variables were analyzed, including late winter and spring temperature, winter-total snowy days as a fraction of winter-total wet days, 1st April Snow Water Equivalent (SWE) as a fraction of October through March precipitation total (P{sub ONDJFM}), and seasonal (January-February-March; JFM) accumulated runoff as a fraction of water year accumulated runoff. The observed changes were compared to natural internal climate variability simulated by an 850-year control run of the CCSM3-FV climate model, statistically downscaled to a 1/8 degree grid using the method of Constructed Analogues. Both observed and downscaled temperature and precipitation data were then used to drive the Variable Infiltration Capacity (VIC) hydrological model to obtain the hydrological variables analyzed in this study. Large trends (magnitudes found less than 5% of the time in the long control run) are common in the observations, and occupy substantial part of the area (37-42%) over the mountainous western U.S. These trends are strongly related to the large scale warming that appears over 89% of the domain. The strongest changes in the hydrologic variables, unlikely to be associated with natural variability alone, have occurred at medium elevations (750 m to 2500 m for JFM runoff fractions and 500 m-3000 m for SWE/PONDJFM) where warming has pushed temperatures from slightly below to slightly above freezing. Further analysis using the data on selected catchments across the simulation domain indicated that hydroclimatic variables must have changed significantly (at 95% confidence level) over at least 45% of the total catchment area to achieve a detectable trend in measures accumulated to the catchment scale.

Das, T; Hidalgo, H G; Dettinger, M D; Cayan, D R; Pierce, D W; Bonfils, C; Barnett, T P; Bala, G; Mirin, A

2008-08-22T23:59:59.000Z

182

Parametric and predictive analysis of horizontal well configurations for coalbed methane reservoirs in Appalachian Basin.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??It has been a well-established fact that the Appalachian Basin represents a high potential region for the Coalbed Methane (CBM) production. The thin coal beds… (more)

Maricic, Nikola.

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

183

Development of gas production type curves for horizontal wells in coalbed methane reservoirs.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??Coalbed methane is an unconventional gas resource that consists of methane production from coal seams .The unique difference between CBM and conventional gas reservoirs is… (more)

Nfonsam, Allen Ekahnzok.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

184

,"U.S. Coalbed Methane Proved Reserves Sales (Billion Cubic Feet...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","U.S. Coalbed Methane Proved Reserves Sales (Billion Cubic Feet)",1,"Annual",2013 ,"Release...

185

Impact of relative permeability on type curves for coalbed methane reservoirs.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??Coalbed methane (CBM) is considered an unconventional gas resource produced from coal seams usually with low permeability at shallow depths. Analyzing the production performance in… (more)

Lakshminarayanan, Sunil.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

186

Sensitivity analysis of modeling parameters that affect the dual peaking behaviour in coalbed methane reservoirs.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??Coalbed methane reservoir (CBM) performance is controlled by a complex set of reservoir, geologic, completion and operational parameters and the inter-relationships between those parameters. Therefore… (more)

Okeke, Amarachukwu Ngozi

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

187

Improving Simulations of Fine Dust Surface Concentrations over the Western United States by Optimizing the Particle Size Distribution  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

To improve estimates of remote contributions of dust to fine particulate matter (PM2.5) in the western United States, new dust particle size distributions (PSDs) based upon scale-invariant fragmentation theory (Kok_PSD) with constraints from in situ measurements (IMP_PSD) are implemented in a chemical transport model (GEOS-Chem). Compared to initial simulations, this leads to reductions in the mass of emitted dust particles with radii <1.8 mm by 40%-60%. Consequently, the root-mean-square error in simulated fine dust concentrations compared to springtime surface observations in the western United States is reduced by 67%-81%. The ratio of simulated fine to coarse PM mass is also improved, which is not achievable by reductions in total dust emissions. The IMP_PSD best represents the PSD of dust transported from remote sources and reduces modeled PM2.5 concentrations up to 5 mg/m3 over the western United States, which is important when considering sources contributing to nonattainment of air quality standards. Citation: Zhang, L., J. F. Kok, D. K. Henze, Q. Li, and C. Zhao (2013), Improving simulations of fine dust surface concentrations over the western United States by optimizing the particle size distribution, Geophys. Res. Lett., 40, 3270-3275, doi:10.1002/grl.50591.

Zhang, Li; Kok, Jasper F.; Henze, Daven; Li, Qinbin; Zhao, Chun

2013-06-28T23:59:59.000Z

188

Longest-Serving Active Paper Mill in the Western United States...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

MMBtu and 379,000 annually after receiving a DOE energy assessment and implementing steam system improvement recommendations. Longest-Serving Active Paper Mill in the Western...

189

Central-northern Appalachian coalbed methane flow grows  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Over the past decade in the US, coalbed methane (CBM) has become an increasingly important source of unconventional natural gas. The most significant CBM production occurs in the San Juan basin of Colorado and new Mexico and the Black Warrior basin of Alabama, which collective in 1995 accounted for about 94% of US CBM production. The paper discusses early CBM production, recent production, gas composition, undiscovered potential, and new exploration areas.

Lyons, P.C. [Geological Survey, Reston, VA (United States)

1997-07-07T23:59:59.000Z

190

Coalbed methane exploration in the Lorraine Basin, France  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

DuPont Conoco Hydrocarbures has been involved in a Coalbed Methane (CBM) project in France since 1991. Coalbed methane exploration differs noticeably in several aspects from conventional oil and gas exploration. This paper is divided in three parts and discusses some geological, reservoir and drilling considerations relevant to the exploration and appraisal of a coalbed methane prospect. The first part presents geological issues such as data collection and evaluation of its associated value, building expertise to create a geological and geophysical model integrating the work of a multidisciplinary team, and assessing uncertainties of the data interpretation. A short review of the basin activity, geological and tectonic setting, and environment aspects is presented in order to illustrate some CBM exploration issues. The second part describes a comprehensive coalbed methane reservoir data acquisition program incorporating coal sample optical and chemical analyses, gas sample chromatography, canister desorption, fracture density of coal cores, and measurement of in-situ coal permeability and bounding-strata stress. Field practical concerns are then discussed such as on-site and off-site canister desorption, gas sample collection, rapid estimation of gas content, ash content, total bed moisture, and finally well testing alternatives for permeability and rock stress determination. The third part reviews drilling issues such as drilling and coring options for core hole size and casing size, rig site equipment requirements for continuous coring operations, including mud treatment equipment, core handling material and core work stations, alliance of national and foreign drilling contractors to optimize equipment and experience, and finally overview of coring procedures to identify best practices for pending operations. The paper is derived from Conoco`s experience in CBM exploration in the Lorraine Basin, North East of France.

Michaud, B. [DuPont Conoco Hydrocarbures, Paris (France); Briens, F.; Girdler, D.

1995-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

191

Kansas Coalbed Methane Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data CenterFranconia,(Million Barrels) Crude Oil Reserves in Nonproducing Reservoirs Year in Review WYear Jan Feb Mar Apr May5Coalbed

192

Pennsylvania Coalbed Methane Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data CenterFranconia,(Million Barrels) Crude Oil Reserves in Nonproducing ReservoirsYear-MonthCoalbed Methane Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic

193

Comparison of Capacity Value Methods for Photovoltaics in the Western United States  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report compares different capacity value estimation techniques applied to solar photovoltaics (PV). It compares more robust data and computationally intense reliability-based capacity valuation techniques to simpler approximation techniques at 14 different locations in the western United States. The capacity values at these locations are computed while holding the underlying power system characteristics fixed. This allows the effect of differences in solar availability patterns on the capacity value of PV to be directly ascertained, without differences in the power system confounding the results. Finally, it examines the effects of different PV configurations, including varying the orientation of a fixed-axis system and installing single- and double-axis tracking systems, on the capacity value. The capacity value estimations are done over an eight-year running from 1998 to 2005, and both long-term average capacity values and interannual capacity value differences (due to interannual differences in solar resource availability) are estimated. Overall, under the assumptions used in the analysis, we find that some approximation techniques can yield similar results to reliability-based methods such as effective load carrying capability.

Madaeni, S. H.; Sioshansi, R.; Denholm, P.

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

194

Managing Carbon Regulatory Risk in Utility Resource Planning:Current Practices in the Western United States  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Concerns about global climate change have substantially increased the likelihood that future policy will seek to minimize carbon dioxide emissions. Assuch, even today, electric utilities are making resource planning and investment decisions that consider the possible implications of these future carbon regulations. In this article, we examine the manner in which utilities assess the financial risks associated with future carbon regulations within their long-term resource plans. We base our analysis on a review of the most recent resource plans filed by fifteen electric utilities in the Western United States. Virtually all of these utilities made some effort to quantitatively evaluate the potential cost of future carbon regulations when analyzing alternate supply- and demand-side resource options for meeting customer load. Even without Federal climate regulation in the U.S., the prospect of that regulation is already having an impact on utility decision-making and resource choices. That said, the methods and assumptions used by utilities to analyze carbon regulatory risk, and the impact of that analysis on their choice of a particular resource strategy, vary considerably, revealing a number of opportunities for analytic improvement. Though our review focuses on a subset of U.S. electric utilities, this work holds implications for all electric utilities and energy policymakers who are seeking to minimize the compliance costs associated with future carbon regulations

Barbose, Galen; Wiser, Ryan; Phadke, Amol; Goldman, Charles

2008-05-16T23:59:59.000Z

195

Managing Carbon Regulatory Risk in Utility Resource Planning: Current Practices in the Western United States  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Concerns about global climate change have substantially increased the likelihood that future policy will seek to minimize carbon dioxide emissions. As such, even today, electric utilities are making resource planning and investment decisions that consider the possible implications of these future carbon regulations. In this article, we examine the manner in which utilities assess the financial risks associated with future carbon regulations within their long-term resource plans. We base our analysis on a review of the most recent resource plans filed by fifteen electric utilities in the Western United States. Virtually all of these utilities made some effort to quantitatively evaluate the potential cost of future carbon regulations when analyzing alternate supply- and demand-side resource options for meeting customer load. Even without Federal climate regulation in the U.S., the prospect of that regulation is already having an impact on utility decision-making and resource choices. That said, the methods and assumptions used by utilities to analyze carbon regulatory risk, and the impact of that analysis on their choice of a particular resource strategy, vary considerably, revealing a number of opportunities for analytic improvement. Though our review focuses on a subset of U.S. electric utilities, this work holds implications for all electric utilities and energy policymakers who are seeking to minimize the compliance costs associated with future carbon regulations.

Barbose, Galen; Wiser, Ryan; Phadke, Amol; Goldman, Charles

2008-07-11T23:59:59.000Z

196

Coalbed methane production enhancement by underground coal gasification  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The sub-surface of the Netherlands is generally underlain by coal-bearing Carboniferous strata at greater depths (at many places over 1,500 m). These coal seams are generally thinner than 3 meter, occur in groups (5--15) within several hundred meters and are often fairly continuous over many square kilometers. In many cases they have endured complex burial history, influencing their methane saturation. In certain particular geological settings, a high, maximum coalbed methane saturation, may be expected. Carboniferous/Permian coals in the Tianjin-region (China) show many similarities concerning geological settings, rank and composition. Economical coalbed methane production at greater depths is often obstructed by the (very) low permeabilities of the coal seams as with increasing depth the deformation of the coal reduces both its macro-porosity (the cleat system) and microporosity. Experiments in abandoned underground mines, as well as after underground coal gasification tests indicate ways to improve the prospects for coalbed methane production in originally tight coal reservoirs. High permeability areas can be created by the application of underground coal gasification of one of the coal seams of a multi-seam cycle with some 200 meter of coal bearing strata. The gasification of one of the coal seams transforms that seam over a certain area into a highly permeable bed, consisting of coal residues, ash and (thermally altered) roof rubble. Additionally, roof collapse and subsidence will destabilize the overburden. In conjunction this will permit a better coalbed methane production from the remaining surrounding parts of the coal seams. Moreover, the effects of subsidence will influence the stress patterns around the gasified seam and this improves the permeability over certain distances in the coal seams above and below. In this paper the effects of the combined underground coal gasification and coalbed methane production technique are regarded for a single injection well. Known geotechnical aspects are combined with results from laboratory experiments on compaction of thermally treated rubble. An axi-symmetric numerical model is used to determine the effects induced by the gasified coal seam. The calculation includes the rubble formation, rubble compaction and induced stress effects in the overlying strata. Subsequently the stress effects are related to changes in coal permeability, based on experimental results of McKee et al.

Hettema, M.H.H.; Wolf, K.H.A.A.; Neumann, B.V.

1997-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

197

Integrating High Penetrations of Solar in the Western United States: Results of the Western Wind and Solar Integration Study Phase 2 (Poster)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This poster presents a summary of the results of the Western Wind and Solar Integration Study Phase 2.

Bird, L.; Lew, D.

2013-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

198

Coalbed methane producibility from the Mannville coals in Alberta, Canada: A comparison of two areas  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Coalbed methane producibility from the Mannville coals in Alberta, Canada: A comparison of two wells drilled at Corbett Creek. Keywords: Coalbed methane; Mannville coals; Alberta; Petrology 71 TCF of methane, the Belly River Formation coals 147 TCF, and the Ardley Formation coals about 57

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

199

Appalachian basin coal-bed methane: Elephant or flea  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Historically, interest in the Appalachian basin coal-bed methane resource extends at least over the last 50 years. The Northern and Central Appalachian basins are estimated to contain 61 tcf and 5 tcf of coal-bed methane gas, respectively. Development of this resource has not kept pace with that of other basins, such as the Black Warrior basin of Alabama of the San Juan basin of northern New Mexico and Colorado. Without the benefit of modern completion, stimulation, and production technology, some older Appalachian basin coal-bed methane wells were reported to have produced in excess of 150 used here to characterize some past projects and their results. This work is not intended to comprise a comprehensive survey of all Appalachian basin projects, but rather to provide background information from which to proceed for those who may be interested in doing so. Several constraints to the development of this resource have been identified, including conflicting legal rights of ownership of the gas produced from the coal seams when coal and conventional oil and gas rights are controlled by separate parties. In addition, large leaseholds have been difficult to acquire and finding costs have been high. However, the threshold of minimum economic production may be relatively low when compared with other areas, because low-pressures pipelines are available and gas prices are among the highest in the nation. Interest in the commercial development of the resource seems to be on the increase with several projects currently active and more reported to be planned for the near future.

Hunt, A.M. (Dames and Moore, Cincinnati, OH (United States))

1991-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

200

Federal Offshore California Coalbed Methane Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data CenterFranconia,(Million Barrels) Crude Oil Reserves in Nonproducing Reservoirs U.S.WyomingExpansion and Change on theFeet) Coalbed

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "western states coalbed" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Florida Coalbed Methane Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data CenterFranconia,(Million Barrels) Crude Oil Reserves in Nonproducing Reservoirs U.S.WyomingExpansion 5 Figure 2.StocksProvedCoalbed

202

New Mexico Coalbed Methane Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data CenterFranconia,(Million Barrels) Crude Oil Reserves in Nonproducing ReservoirsYear-Month Week 1 Week 2-302YearBarrels)Coalbed

203

Ohio Coalbed Methane Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data CenterFranconia,(Million Barrels) Crude Oil Reserves in Nonproducing ReservoirsYear-Month WeekReservesYear Jan Feb0 ' u o ! ) eCoalbed

204

Injection into coal seams for simultaneous CO{sub 2} mitigation and enhanced recovery of coalbed methane. Topical report, March 1995--March 1996  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The overall objective of this task is to test the technical viability of injecting CO{sub 2} into the Fruitland Coal to displace methane from the coal and to mitigate CO{sub 2} emissions that are a consequence of primary coalbed methane production from surrounding wells in the area. To evaluate this technical viability, a field test was conducted and the test is being interpreted using data measured in WRI`s laboratory, as well as using Amoco`s state-of-the-art coalbed methane simulator. Also, a second pilot of the process is being evaluated using the simulator. Ultimately, the technology developed will be applied to a Wyoming coal.

Carlson, F.M.; Mones, C.G.; Johnson, L.A.; Barbour, F.A.; Fahy, L.J.

1997-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

205

Long-Term Regional Climate Simulations Driven by Two Global Reanalyses and a GCM for the Western United States  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

To take advantage of recent development in the NCAR/Penn State Mesoscale Model (MM5), an effort has been organized to develop and evaluate an MM5-based community regional climate model. Several modifications such as the implementation of the PNNL subgrid parameterization of orographic precipitation, representation of cloud-radiation interaction, and additional output capabilities have been made to the recently released MM5 Version 3.4. To evaluate the model, several long-term simulations have been performed over the western U.S. These simulations were driven by the NCEP/NCAR and ECMWF reanalyses respectively for 20 and 13 years beginning at 1980. The western U.S. is marked by diverse topographic features and varied climate conditions such as the maritime climate in the coastal area and the semi-arid climate in the southwest. We will present results based on two domain configurations: a nested domain with a fine domain covering the western U.S. at 40 km resolution, and a single domain at 60 km resolution with the subgrid orographic precipitation scheme applied in the western U.S. Analyses are being performed to evaluate the simulations of the averaged climate and interannual variability and examine the model sensitivity to different boundary conditions. Our analyses focus on the relationships between large-scale circulation and regional climate features, surface energy and water budgets, orographic precipitation, and hydrologic conditions within selected river basins. Regional simulations are also being performed using large-scale conditions simulated by the NCAR/DOE Parallel Climate Model (PCM). The regional model was used to downscale the ensemble PCM climate change scenarios for periods of 10-20 years in the current and future climate. Results will be analyzed to study the impacts of greenhouse warming on regional water resources in the western U.S.

Leung, Lai R.; Bian, Xindi; Qian, Yun

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

206

Multiple transition zone seismic discontinuities and low velocity layers below western United States  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

With P-to-S converted waves recorded at seismic stations of the U.S. Transportable Array, we image the fine structure of upper mantle and transition zone (TZ) beneath the western U.S. We map the topographies of seismic ...

Tauzin, B.

207

Sub-Barrier Fusion Cross-Sections of Neutron-Rich Light Nuclei Indiana University, GANIL, Western Michigan Univ., Michigan State Univ.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Sub-Barrier Fusion Cross-Sections of Neutron-Rich Light Nuclei Indiana University, GANIL, Western Michigan Univ., Michigan State Univ. Theory support: Vanderbilt Univ.(Oberacker & Umar); Indiana Univ. (C

de Souza, Romualdo T.

208

L-FVM for Unsteady Seepage Flow in Low Permeability Coalbed  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The significant feature of coalbed in China is the low permeability. A new unsteady seepage flow model isdeveloped for the low permeability coalbed by considering the startup pressure gradient and methane desorption effect.Since the complexity of the problem, a new method which we call it ''L-FVM'' is developed, based on comparing the normal numerical calculation methods and comprehension research on FVM. The results show that L-FVM has the same precission but higher calculating velocity than normal FVM. This result is very important for monitoring the area pressure drawdown in coalbed methane engineering

Liu, Y. W.; Su, Z. L. [Key Laboratory of Environment Mechanics, Institute of Mechanics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100190 (China); Niu, C. C.; Cai, Q.; Li, H. S. [Beijing Technology and Business University, Beijing 100048 (China); Zhao, P. H.; Zhou, X. H.; Lu, Q. [Coalbed Methane Ltd. Company, Petrochina, Beijing 100028 (China)

2011-09-28T23:59:59.000Z

209

,"Federal Offshore--Texas Coalbed Methane Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National and Regional Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy SourcesWyoming"Coalbed Methane ProvedDry NaturalCoalbed MethaneMarketedCoalbed Methane

210

,"Florida Coalbed Methane Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National and Regional Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy SourcesWyoming"Coalbed Methane ProvedDry NaturalCoalbedPlant Liquids,Coalbed Methane

211

Other States Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Coalbed Wells (Million  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2007 10,998 9,933 10,998 10,643 10,998through 1996)Decade Year-0 Year-1Cubic Feet) YearOtherCubic

212

Texas State Offshore Coalbed Methane Proved Reserves, Reserves Changes, and  

Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) " ,"ClickPipelinesProved ReservesFeet)per Thousand Cubic4,630.2perSep-14Base22,667 28,167

213

LA, State Offshore Coalbed Methane Proved Reserves, Reserves Changes, and  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) " ,"ClickPipelines About U.S.30Natural Gas Glossary529 6330 0 14343 342 328 370 396After LeaseProduction

214

Lower 48 States Coalbed Methane Proved Reserves, Reserves Changes, and  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) " ,"ClickPipelines About U.S.30Natural Gas Glossary529 6330 0 14343 342 3289886,084Dry

215

Texas (with State Offshore) Coalbed Methane Production (Billion Cubic Feet)  

Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) " ,"ClickPipelines AboutDecemberSteamYear Jan FebThousandProcessed (Million Cubic Feet)WellheadProduction

216

Texas (with State Offshore) Coalbed Methane Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic  

Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) " ,"ClickPipelines AboutDecemberSteamYear Jan FebThousandProcessed (Million Cubic

217

Texas--State Offshore Coalbed Methane Production (Billion Cubic Feet)  

Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) " ,"ClickPipelines AboutDecemberSteamYear JanSeparation,(Million(Million(Million Barrels)

218

California (with State off) Coalbed Methane Production (Billion Cubic Feet)  

Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) " ,"ClickPipelines AboutDecemberSteam Coal Import CostsLiquidsYearReservesm 3 (D CDProduction

219

California (with State off) Coalbed Methane Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic  

Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) " ,"ClickPipelines AboutDecemberSteam Coal Import CostsLiquidsYearReservesm 3 (D CDProductionFeet)

220

California--State Offshore Coalbed Methane Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic  

Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) " ,"ClickPipelines AboutDecemberSteam Coal Import96 4.87 1967-2010 Imports 2.83

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "western states coalbed" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Louisiana (with State Offshore) Coalbed Methane Proved Reserves (Billion  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data CenterFranconia,(Million Barrels) Crude Oil Reserves in Nonproducing Reservoirs Year in Review1,213 136,422Year Jan FebYear JanCubic

222

Louisiana--State Offshore Coalbed Methane Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data CenterFranconia,(Million Barrels) Crude Oil Reserves in Nonproducing Reservoirs Year inBarrels) Crude OilShale Proved

223

Lower 48 States Coalbed Methane Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data CenterFranconia,(Million Barrels) Crude Oil Reserves in Nonproducing Reservoirs Year inBarrels) CrudeMarketedSeparation,

224

Mississippi (with State off) Coalbed Methane Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data CenterFranconia,(Million Barrels) Crude Oil Reserves in Nonproducing Reservoirs Year2per Thousand CubicYearFuture Production

225

Other States Natural Gas Coalbed Methane, Reserves Based Production  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) " ,"ClickPipelines About U.S.30 2013 Macroeconomicper ThousandResidentialElements)

226

Mississippi (with State off) Coalbed Methane Production (Billion Cubic  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) " ,"ClickPipelines About U.S.30 2013 Macroeconomic team: Kay6 Kentucky -Proved ReservesFutureFeet)

227

Louisiana--State Offshore Coalbed Methane Production (Billion Cubic Feet)  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) " ,"ClickPipelines About U.S. NaturalA.MissouriElements)Based Production (MillionProved

228

Lower 48 States Coalbed Methane Production (Billion Cubic Feet)  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) " ,"ClickPipelines About U.S. NaturalA.MissouriElements)BasedFeet) ProvedProduction (Billion Cubic

229

Louisiana (with State Offshore) Coalbed Methane Production (Billion Cubic  

Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) " ,"ClickPipelines AboutDecemberSteam CoalReserves (MillionYear JanDecadeYearFeet) Year Jan FebFeet)

230

CA, State Offshore Coalbed Methane Proved Reserves, Reserves Changes, and  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) " ,"ClickPipelines About U.S.30Natural Gas Glossary529 633 622 566 8021 1 2and Production 2011

231

Utah Coalbed Methane Production (Billion Cubic Feet)  

Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) " ,"ClickPipelines AboutDecemberSteamYearTexas--StateWinterYear Jan MonthlyProduction (Billion Cubic Feet)

232

Virginia Coalbed Methane Production (Billion Cubic Feet)  

Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) " ,"ClickPipelines AboutDecemberSteamYearTexas--StateWinterYear JanWellhead

233

Sensitivity analysis of modeling parameters that affect the dual peaking behaviour in coalbed methane reservoirs  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of the various modeling parameters on its reservoir performance. A dual porosity coalbed methane simulator is used to model primary production from a single well coal seam, for a variety of coal properties for this work. Varying different coal properties...

Okeke, Amarachukwu Ngozi

2006-10-30T23:59:59.000Z

234

New Mexico--West Coalbed Methane Proved Reserves New Field Discoveries...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Coalbed Methane Proved Reserves New Field Discoveries (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 2000's 0 2010's 0 0 0 0 - ...

235

Adsorption Modeling of Coalbed Gases and the Effects of Water on Their Adsorption Behavior.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??The simplified local-density/Peng-Robinson (SLD-PR) adsorption model was utilized to investigate the adsorption behavior of coalbed gases on coals of varying rank. The model parameters were… (more)

Mohammad, Sayeed Ahmed

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

236

Mosquito larval habitat mapping using remote sensing and GIS: Implications of coalbed methane development and West Nile virus  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Potential larval habitats of the mosquito Culex tarsalis (Coquillett), implicated as a primary vector of West Nile virus in Wyoming, were identified using integrated remote sensing and geographic information system (GIS) analyses. The study area is in the Powder River Basin of north central Wyoming, an area that has been undergoing a significant increase in coalbed methane gas extractions since the late 1990s. Large volumes of water are discharged, impounded, and released during the extraction of methane gas, creating aquatic habitats that have the potential to support immature mosquito development. Landsat TM and ETM + data were initially classified into spectrally distinct water and vegetation classes, which were in turn used to identify suitable larval habitat sites. This initial habitat classification was refined using knowledge-based GIS techniques requiring spatial data layers for topography, streams, and soils to reduce the potential for overestimation of habitat. Accuracy assessment was carried out using field data and high-resolution aerial photography commensurate with one of the Landsat images. The classifier can identify likely habitat for ponds larger than 0.8 ha (2 acres) with generally satisfactory results (72.1%) with a lower detection limit of approximate to 0.4 ha (1 acre). Results show a 75% increase in potential larval habitats from 1999 to 2004 in the study area, primarily because of the large increase in small coalbed methane water discharge ponds. These results may facilitate mosquito abatement programs in the Powder River Basin with the potential for application throughout the state and region.

Zou, L.; Miller, S.N.; Schmidtmann, E.T. [University of Wyoming, Laramie, WY (United States). Dept. of Renewable Resources

2006-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

237

,"Kansas Coalbed Methane Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National and Regional Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy SourcesWyoming"CoalbedOhio"Associated-Dissolved NaturalPriceLNGNetCoalbed Methane

238

Sub-Hourly Impacts of High Solar Penetrations in the Western United States: Preprint  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper presents results of analysis on the sub-hourly impacts of high solar penetrations from the Western Wind and Solar Integration Study Phase 2. Extreme event analysis showed that most large ramps were due to sunrise and sunset events, which have a significant predictability component. Variability in general was much higher in the high-solar versus high-wind scenario. Reserve methodologies that had already been developed for wind were therefore modified to take into account the predictability component of solar variability.

Lew, D.; Brinkman, G.; Ibanez, E.; Hummon, M.; Hodge, B. M.; Heaney, M.; King, J.

2012-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

239

Coalbed methane potential assessed in Forest City basin  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper reports that the Forest City basin is a shallow cratonic depression located in northeastern Kansas, southeastern Nebraska, southern Iowa and northern Missouri. Historically, the Forest City basin in northeastern Kansas has been a shallow oil and gas province with minor coal production. The Iowa and Missouri portion has had minor oil production and moderate coal mining. In recent years there has been little coal mining in the Forest City in Iowa and Kansas and only minor production in Missouri. Before 1940, gas was produced from coal beds and shales in the Kansas portion of the Forest City basin. The Cherokee group (Altokan and Desmoinesian age) includes section containing the largest number of actively mined coals and has the greatest available data for coalbed methane evaluation.

Tedesco, S.A. (CST Oil and Gas Corp., Denver, CO (US))

1992-02-10T23:59:59.000Z

240

Coalbed-methane pilots - timing, design, and analysis  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Four distinct sequential phases form a recommended process for coalbed-methane (CBM)-prospect assessment: initial screening reconnaissance, pilot testing, and final appraisal. Stepping through these four phases provides a program of progressively ramping work and cost, while creating a series of discrete decision points at which analysis of results and risks can be assessed. While discussing each of these phases in some degree, this paper focuses on the third, the critically important pilot-testing phase. This paper contains roughly 30 specific recommendations and the fundamental rationale behind each recommendation to help ensure that a CBM pilot will fulfill its primary objectives of (1) demonstrating whether the subject coal reservoir will desorb and produce consequential gas and (2) gathering the data critical to evaluate and risk the prospect at the next-often most critical-decision point.

Roadifer, R.D.; Moore, T.R.

2009-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "western states coalbed" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Analysis of drought impacts on electricity production in the Western and Texas interconnections of the United States.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Electricity generation relies heavily on water resources and their availability. To examine the interdependence of energy and water in the electricity context, the impacts of a severe drought to assess the risk posed by drought to electricity generation within the western and Texas interconnections has been examined. The historical drought patterns in the western United States were analyzed, and the risk posed by drought to electricity generation within the region was evaluated. The results of this effort will be used to develop scenarios for medium- and long-term transmission modeling and planning efforts by the Western Electricity Coordination Council (WECC) and the Electric Reliability Council of Texas (ERCOT). The study was performed in response to a request developed by the Western Governors Association in conjunction with the transmission modeling teams at the participating interconnections. It is part of a U.S. Department of Energy-sponsored, national laboratory-led research effort to develop tools related to the interdependency of energy and water as part of a larger interconnection-wide transmission planning project funded under the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act. This study accomplished three main objectives. It provided a thorough literature review of recent studies of drought and the potential implications for electricity generation. It analyzed historical drought patterns in the western United States and used the results to develop three design drought scenarios. Finally, it quantified the risk to electricity generation for each of eight basins for each of the three drought scenarios and considered the implications for transmission planning. Literature on drought impacts on electricity generation describes a number of examples where hydroelectric generation capacity has been limited because of drought but only a few examples of impact on thermoelectric generation. In all documented cases, shortfalls of generation were met by purchasing power from the market, albeit at higher prices. However, sufficient excess generation and transmission must be available for this strategy to work. Although power purchase was the most commonly discussed drought mitigation strategy, a total of 12 response strategies were identified in the literature, falling into four main categories: electricity supply, electricity demand response, alternative water supplies, and water demand response. Three hydrological drought scenarios were developed based on a literature review and historical data analysis. The literature review helped to identify key drought parameters and data on drought frequency and severity. Historical hydrological drought data were analyzed for the western United States to identify potential drought correlations and estimate drought parameters. The first scenario was a West-wide drought occurring in 1977; it represented a severe drought in five of the eight basins in the study area. A second drought scenario was artificially defined by selecting the conditions from the 10th-percentile drought year for each individual basin; this drought was defined in this way to allow more consistent analysis of risk to electricity generation in each basin. The final scenario was based upon the current low-flow hydro modeling scenario defined by WECC, which uses conditions from the year 2001. These scenarios were then used to quantify the risk to electricity generation in each basin. The risk calculations represent a first-order estimate of the maximum amount of electricity generation that might be lost from both hydroelectric and thermoelectric sources under a worst-case scenario. Even with the conservative methodology used, the majority of basins showed a limited amount of risk under most scenarios. The level of risk in these basins is likely to be amenable to mitigation by known strategies, combined with existing reserve generation and transmission capacity. However, the risks to the Pacific Northwest and Texas Basins require further study. The Pacific Northwest is vulnerable because of its heavy reliance on hydroelectri

Harto, C. B.; Yan, Y. E.; Demissie, Y. K.; Elcock, D.; Tidwell, V. C.; Hallett, K.; Macknick, J.; Wigmosta, M. S.; Tesfa, T. K. (Environmental Science Division); (Sandia National Laboratory); (National Renewable Energy Laboratory); (Pacific Northwest National Laboratory)

2012-02-09T23:59:59.000Z

242

A study on coalbed methane reserve of Shanxi: Hedong coalfield reserve and its utilization  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Coalbed gas, i.e. coalbed methane, is considered an unconventional gas, formed during coal accumulation and preserved in coal seams. In the past, coalbed gas was considered a major hazard factor to the safety of mining and caused countless explosive events and great losses to the enterprises and even to the country. Early in 1960s and 70s, it was recognized that coalbed gas could be utilized as an energy resource and collected through tunnels in China. In 1995, the output of tunnel gas reached 500Mm{sup 3}, however, surface pumping is still at its beginning stage, test and appraisal; so far, no commercial development is being carried out in China. Hedong coalfield, situated in the west of Shanxi province and bordered by the Yellow River in the northwest and outcrop seams in the southeast, is 540km long (N-S) and 10--40 km wide (E-W) and covers an area of 17,000 km{sup 2} across 13 counties of Xinzou, Luliang, Linfen and Yuncheng prefectures. It is the No. 2 coalfield in Shanxi province and the well-known base of excellent coking coal and power coal in China. Hedong coalfield is not only rich in coal resource, but also in coalbed methane. This paper describes the geology of the coalfield (including structure, magmatic activity, coal seams and coal grade); the regularity of coalbed methane occurrence in the Hedong coalfield; the calculation of coalbed methane resource; and the use of coalbed methane for motor fuels and chemicals production. The total resource is 1468.93Gm{sup 3}. The production of motor fuels can be realized by the following processes: (a) synthetic methanol as substitute of gasoline; (b) F-T synthesis for synthetic gasoline and diesel oil; (c) Compressed natural gas as motor fuel; and (d) Liquefied natural gas as motor fuel. The production of organic chemicals is suggested with the following technology: (a) Two-stage steam reforming to convert methane to synthetic gas various organic chemicals can be produced therefrom; (b) Partial oxidation of methane to produce synthesis gas and acetylene; (c) Coalbed methane to produce hydrogen cyanide and chloromethanes; and (d) Coalbed methane to produce acrylonitrile, acetylene, ethylene, propylene and butylenes.

Kong, X.; Fan, R.; Hu, Y.; Wang, M.; Wang, M.; Chen, Z.; Li, M.; Peng, S. [Taiyuan Ke-jin Technology Development Service (China)

1997-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

243

Benefit of Regional Energy Balancing Service on Wind Integration in the Western Interconnection of the United States  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Interest in various wide-area balancing schemes to help integrate wind have generated significant interest. As we have shown in past work, large balancing areas not only help with wind integration, but can also increase the efficiency of operations in systems without wind. Recent work on the Western Wind and Solar Integration Study (WWSIS) has found that combining balancing over the WestConnect footprint will increase the efficiency of commitment and dispatch at wind penetrations ranging from 10-20% of annual electricity demand, and will be essential for high penetrations and small balancing areas. In addition the Northwest Wind Integration Action Plan recommended balancing area cooperation as a method to help integrate the large potential wind development. In this paper we investigate the potential impact of a proposed Energy Imbalance Service on the ability of the non-market portions of Western Electricity Coordinating Councils (WECC) United States footprint to integrate wind energy. We will utilize data adapted from the WWSIS for the Western Interconnection. The analysis uses time-synchronized wind and load data to evaluate the potential for ramp requirement reduction that could be achieved with combined operation. Chronological analysis and ramp duration analysis quantify the benefit in terms of not only the ramp sizes, but the frequency of the potentially avoided ramps that must be managed by the non-wind generation fleet. Multiple approaches that can be used to achieve these benefits will also be suggested in the paper. We also suggest other approaches that can help achieve much of the benefit of full consolidation without requiring the physical consolidation of balancing areas.

Milligan, M.; Kirby, B.; King, J.; Beuning, S.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

244

Geologic and hydrologic controls critical to coalbed methane producibility and resource assessment: Williams Fork Formation, Piceance Basin, Northwest Colorado. Topical report, December 1, 1993-November 30, 1995  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The objectives of this report are: To further evaluate the interplay of geologic and hydrologic controls on coalbed methane production and resource assessment; to refine and validate our basin-scale coalbed methane producibility model; and to analyze the economics of coalbed methane exploration and development in the Piceance Basin.

Tyler, R.; Scott, A.R.; Kaiser, W.R.; Nance, H.S.; McMurry, R.G.

1996-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

245

Milk production and distribution in nine western states in the 1950s  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report provides information on milk distribution and dairy cattle feeding practices in Nevada, Utah and portions of seven other adjacent states during the 1950s. The information was gathered to support the US Department of Energy's ''Offsite Radiation Exposure Review Project (ORERP).'' This project is charged with providing radiation dose estimates for residents of Nevada, Utah, and surrounding states from nuclear weapons testing conducted at the Nevada Test Site from 1951 through 1962. The information on milk production and distribution is essential for assessment of the internal organ doses received by people as a result of ingesting radioactive fallout-contaminated foods. The information is used as input data for Colorado State University's PATHWAY computer code which estimates the ingestion of twenty radionuclides by people relative to a given level of fallout deposition.

Ward, G.M.; Whicker, F.W.

1987-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

246

Thermogenic and secondary biogenic gases, San Juan Basin, Colorado and New Mexico - Implications for coalbed gas producibility  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The objectives of this paper are to (1) describe the types and the major components of coalbed gases, (2) evaluate the variability of Fruitland coalbed gas composition across the basin, (3) assess factors affecting coalbed gas origin and composition, (4) determine the timing and extent of gas migration and entrapment, and (5) suggest application of these results to coalbed gas producibility. Data from more than 750 Fruitland coalbed gas wells were used to make gas-composition maps and to evaluate factors controlling gas origin. The gas data were divided into overpressured, underpressured, and transitional categories based on regional pressure regime. Also, [delta][sup 13]C isotopic values from 41 methane, 7 ethane and propane, 13 carbon dioxide, and 10 formation-water bicarbonate samples were evaluated to interpret gas origin. The data suggests that only 25-50% of the gas produced in the high-productivity fairway was generated in situ during coalification. 82 refs., 14 figs., 3 tabs.

Scott, A.R.; Kaiser, W.R. (Univ. of Texas, Austin, TX (United States)); Ayers, W.B. Jr. (Taurus Exploration, Inc., Birmingham, AL (United States))

1994-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

247

Coalbed methane potential of the Greater Green River, Piceance, Powder River, and Raton Basins. Topical report, January 1991-July 1991  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Coalbed methane potential of the Greater Green River, Piceance, Powder River, and Raton Basins was evaluated in the context of geologic and hydrologic characteristics identified in the San Juan Basin, the nation's leading coalbed methane producing basin. The major comparative criteria were (1) coalbed methane resources, (2) geologic and hydrologic factors that predict areas of high gas producibility and high coalbed reservoir permeability, and (3) coalbed thermal maturity. The technical criteria were expanded to include structure, depositional systems, and data base and then combined with economic criteria (production, industry activity, and pipeline availability) to evaluate the coalbed methane potential of the basins. The Greater Green River and Piceance Basins have primary potential to make a significant near-term contribution to the nation's gas supply. These basins have large gas resources, high-rank coals, high gas contents, and established coalbed methane production. The Greater Green River Basin has numerous coalbed methane targets, good coal-seam permeability, and extensive hydrologic areas favorable for production. The Powder River and Raton Basins were judged to have secondary potential. Coal beds in the Powder River Basin are thermally immature and produce large volumes of water; the Raton Basin has a poor data base and has no gas pipeline infrastructure. Low production and minimal industry activity further limit the near-term potential of the Raton Basin. However, if economic criteria are discounted and only major technical criteria are considered, the Greater Green River and Raton Basins are assigned primary potential. The Raton Basin's shallow, thermally mature coal beds of good permeability are attractive coalbed methane targets, but low coal-seam permeability limits the coalbed methane potential of the Piceance Basin.

Tyler, R.; Ambrose, W.A.; Scott, A.R.; Kaiser, W.R.

1991-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

248

Economics and Policies for Carbon Capture and Sequestration in the Western United States: A Marginal Cost Analysis of Potential Power Plant Deployment  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

capital costs. Capacity factors and the impact of carbon prices vary considerably by plant location: A Marginal Cost Analysis of Potential Power Plant Deployment by Gary Shu B.S., Electrical Engineering;Economics and Policies for Carbon Capture and Sequestration in the Western United States: A Marginal Cost

249

Energy Efficiency as a Preferred Resource: Evidence from Utility Resource Plans in the Western United States and Canada  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

WGA CDEAC) (2006). Energy Efficiency Task Force Report.on Phase 1 Issues: Energy Efficiency Shareholder Mechanism,Schlegel, J. (2006). Energy Efficiency in Western Utility

Hopper, Nichole

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

250

,"Arkansas Coalbed Methane Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National and Regional Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy SourcesWyoming"Coalbed Methane Proved ReservesPrice (Dollars perCoalbed Methane Proved

251

,"California - Los Angeles Basin Onshore Coalbed Methane Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National and Regional Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy SourcesWyoming"Coalbed Methane Proved ReservesPricePrice (DollarsPlantCrudeCoalbed Methane

252

,"California - San Joaquin Basin Onshore Coalbed Methane Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National and Regional Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy SourcesWyoming"Coalbed Methane Proved ReservesPricePriceNonassociated Natural Gas,Coalbed

253

,"Colorado Coalbed Methane Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National and Regional Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy SourcesWyoming"Coalbed Methane ProvedDry Natural GasMarketedCoalbed Methane Proved

254

,"Federal Offshore California Coalbed Methane Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National and Regional Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy SourcesWyoming"Coalbed Methane ProvedDry NaturalCoalbed Methane Proved Reserves (Billion

255

,"Kentucky Coalbed Methane Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National and Regional Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy SourcesWyoming"CoalbedOhio"Associated-DissolvedSummary"Gas, WetCoalbed Methane

256

,"Montana Coalbed Methane Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National and Regional Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: EnergyShale Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet)"ShaleCoalbed MethaneGas, WetNetWellheadCoalbed

257

,"Texas--RRC District 3 Onshore Coalbed Methane Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National and Regional Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: EnergyShale ProvedTexas"Brunei (Dollars per ThousandPriceDry NaturalCoalbed MethaneCoalbed

258

,"Texas--RRC District 4 Onshore Coalbed Methane Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National and Regional Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: EnergyShale ProvedTexas"Brunei (Dollars per ThousandPriceDry NaturalCoalbedCoalbed Methane Proved

259

,"Texas--RRC District 6 Coalbed Methane Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National and Regional Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: EnergyShale ProvedTexas"Brunei (Dollars per ThousandPriceDry NaturalCoalbedCoalbedPlant

260

Sulfur dioxide emissions from primary nonferrous smelters in the Western United States  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The greatest source of sulfur dioxide emissions in the West has been the pyrometallurgical processing of copper, lead, and zinc ores. Until the early 1970s, the emissions from most nonferrous metal smelters were released without control into the environment. However, recent Federal and State legislation has mandated the need for large reductions of emissions, a task that will require the introduction of highly efficient sulfur dioxide control technology. The particular processes at each smelter, the smelter location, the capital and operating costs including the cost of energy, the resolution of currently litigated issues, and the metal market prices will be major influences on the choice of technology and on the schedule for implementation of smelter control plans. These parameters are examined, and the problems and issues associated with them are described. The future impact of smelter sulfur dioxide emissions is discussed within the framework of the relevant economic, technologial, and legal issues.

Mangeng, C.; Mead, R.

1980-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "western states coalbed" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Methane recovery from coalbeds project. Monthly progress report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Progress made on the Methane Recovery from Coalbeds Project (MRCP) is reported in the Raton Mesa Coal Region. The Uinta and Warrior basin reports have been reviewed and will be published and delivered in early December. A cooperative core test with R and P Coal Company on a well in Indiana County, Pennsylvania, was negotiated. In a cooperative effort with the USGS Coal Branch on three wells in the Wind River Basin, desorption of coal samples showed little or no gas. Completed field testing at the Dugan Petroleum well in the San Juan Basin. Coal samples showed minimal gas. Initial desorption of coal samples suggests that at least a moderate amount of gas was obtained from the Coors well test in the Piceance Basin. Field work for the Piceance Basin Detailed Site Investigation was completed. In the Occidental Research Corporation (ORC) project, a higher capacity vacuum pump to increase CH/sub 4/ venting operations has been installed. Drilling of Oxy No. 12 experienced delays caused by mine gas-offs and was eventually terminated at 460 ft after an attempt to drill through a roll which produced a severe dog leg and severely damaged the drill pipe. ORC moved the second drill rig and equipment to a new location in the same panel as Oxy No. 12 and set the stand pipe for Oxy No. 13. Drill rig No. 1 has been moved east of the longwall mining area in anticipation of drilling cross-panel on 500 foot intervals. Waynesburg College project, Equitable Gas Company has received the contract from Waynesburg College and has applied to the Pennsylvania Public Utilities Commission for a new tariff rate. Waynesburg College has identified a contractor to make the piping connections to the gas line after Equitable establishes their meter and valve requirements.

Not Available

1980-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

262

The analysis of the factors effect on coalbed methane pool concentration and high-production -- The North China coalbed methane districts as an example  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The factors which affect coalbed methane (CBM) pool concentration and high-production based upon the exploration and research of the North China CBM districts are coal facies, coal rank and metamorphic types, structural features, the surrounding rocks and their thickness, and hydrogeological conditions. Coal facies, coal rank and their metamorphic types mainly affect the CBM forming characteristic, while the other factors effect the trap of CBM pool. The interaction of the above factors determines the petrophysics of coal reservoirs and extractability of CBM. The high-production areas where CBM pools develop well in North China CBM districts are sites which have a favorable coordination of the five factors. The poor-production areas where CBM pools are undeveloped in North China are caused by action of one or more unfavorable factors. Therefore the favorable factors coordination is the prerequisite in selecting sites for coalbed methane recovery.

Wang Shengwei; Zhang Ming; Zhuang Xiaoli

1997-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

263

Energy Efficiency as a Preferred Resource: Evidence from Utility Resource Plans in the Western United States and Canada  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This article examines the future role of energy efficiency as a resource in the Western United States and Canada, as envisioned in the most recent resource plans issued by 16 utilities, representing about 60percent of the region's load. Utility and third-party administered energy efficiency programs proposed by 15 utilities over a ten-year horizon would save almost 19,000 GWh annually, about 5.2percent of forecast load. There are clear regional trends in the aggressiveness of proposed energy savings. California's investor-owned utilities (IOUs) had the most aggressive savings targets, followed by IOUs in the Pacific Northwest, and the lowest savings were proposed by utilities in Inland West states and by two public utilities on the West coast. The adoption of multiple, aggressive policies targeting energy efficiency and climate change appear to produce sizeable energy efficiency commitments. Certain specific policies, such as mandated energy savings goals for California's IOUs and energy efficiency provisions in Nevada's Renewable Portfolio Standard had a direct impact on the level of energy savings included in the resource plans. Other policies, such as revenue decoupling and shareholder incentives, and voluntary or legislatively mandated greenhouse gas emission reduction policies, may have also impacted utilities' energy efficiency commitments, though the effects of these policies are not easily measured. Despite progress among the utilities in our sample, more aggressive energy efficiency strategies that include high-efficiency standards for additional appliances and equipment, tighter building codes for new construction and renovation, as well as more comprehensive ratepayer-funded energy efficiency programs are likely to be necessary to achieve a region-wide goal of meeting 20percent of electricity demand with efficiency in 2020.

Hopper, Nichole; Barbose, Galen; Goldman, Charles; Schlegel, Jeff

2008-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

264

A model for changes in coalbed permeability during primary and enhanced methane, recovery  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The natural fracture network of a dual-porosity coalbed reservoir is made up of two sets of orthogonal, and usually subvertically oriented, cleats. Coalbed permeability has been shown to vary exponentially with changes in the effective horizontal stress acting across the cleats through the cleat-volume compressibility, which is analogous to pore compressibility in porous rocks. A formulation for changes in the effective horizontal stress of coalbeds during primary methane recovery, which includes a Langmuir type curve shrinkage term, has been proposed previously. This paper presents a new version of the stress formulation by making a direct link between the volumetric matrix strain and the amount of gas desorbed. The resulting permeability model can be extended readily to account for adsorption-induced matrix swelling as well as matrix shrinkage during enhanced methane recovery involving the injection of an inert gas or gas mixture into the seams. The permeability model is validated against a recently published pressure-dependent permeability multiplier curve representative of the San Juan basin coalbeds at post-dewatering production stages. The extended permeability model is then applied successfully to history matching a micropilot test involving the injection of flue gas (consisting mainly of CO{sub 2} and N{sub 2}) at the Fenn Big Valley, Alberta, Canada.

Shi, J.Q.; Durucan, S. [University of London Imperial College of Science Technology & Medicine, London (United Kingdom). Dept. of Environmental Science & Technology

2005-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

265

Coal-bed methane production in eastern Kansas: Its potential and restraints  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In 1921 and again in 1988, workers demonstrated that the high volatile A and B coals of the Pennsylvanian Cherokee Group can be produced economically from vertically drilled holes, and that some of these coals have a gas content as high as 200 ft{sup 3}/ton. Detailed subsurface mapping on a county-by-county basis using geophysical logs shows the Weir coal seam to be the thickest (up to 6 ft thick) and to exist in numerous amoeba-shaped pockets covering several thousand acres. Lateral pinch-out into deltaic sands offers a conventional gas source. New attention to geophysical logging shows most coals have a negative SP response, high resistivities, and densities of 1.6 g/cm{sup 3}. Highly permeable coals cause lost circulation during drilling and thief zones during cementing, and they are the source of abundant unwanted salt water. Low-permeability coals can be recognized by their high fracture gradients, which are difficult to explain but are documented to exceed 2.2. Current successful completions use both limited-entry, small-volume nitrogen stimulations or an open hole below production casing. Subsurface coals are at normal Mid-Continent pressures and may be free of water. Initially, some wells flow naturally without pumping. Saltwater disposal is often helped by the need for water in nearby waterflood projects and the easy availability of state-approved saltwater disposal wells in Mississippi and Arbuckle carbonates. Recent attempts to recomplete coal zones in slim-hole completions are having mixed results. The major restraints to coal-bed methane production are restricted to low permeability of the coals and engineering problems, not to the availability or gas content of the coals.

Stoeckinger, B.T.

1989-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

266

Water quality changes as a result of coalbed methane development in a Rocky mountain watershed  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Coalbed methane (CBM) development raises serious environmental concerns. In response, concerted efforts have been made to collect chemistry, salinity, and sodicity data on CBM produced water. However, little information on changes of stream water quality resulting from directly and/or indirectly received CBM produced water is available in the literature. The objective of this study was to examine changes in stream water quality, particularly sodicity and salinity, due to CBM development in the Powder River watershed, which is located in the Rocky Mountain Region and traverses the states of Wyoming and Montana. To this end, a retrospective analysis of water quality trends and patterns was conducted using data collected from as early as 1946 up to and including 2002 at four U.S. Geological Survey gauging stations along the Powder River. Trend analysis was conducted using linear regression and Seasonal Kendall tests, whereas, Tukey's test for multiple comparisons was used to detect changes in the spatial pattern. The results indicated that the CBM development adversely affected the water quality in the Powder River. First, the development elevated the stream sodicity, as indicated by a significant increase trend of the sodium adsorption ratio. Second, the development tended to shrink the water quality differences among the three downstream stations but to widen the differences between these stations and the farthest upstream station. In contrast, the development had only a minor influence on stream salinity. Hence, the CBM development is likely an important factor that can be managed to lower the stream sodicity. The management may need to take into account that the effects of the CBMdevelopment were different from one location to another along the Powder River.

Wang, X.; Melesse, A.M.; McClain, M.E.; Yang, W. [Tarleton State University, Stephenville, TX (USA)

2007-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

267

Coalbed methane: A partial solution to Indonesia`s growing energy problems  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Indonesia contains the largest resources of coal in Southeast Asia. Indonesian scientists estimate that the in-place coalbed methane resource in 16 onshore basins is about 213 Tcf ({approximately}6 Tcm). This volume is approximately double Indonesia`s current reserves of natural gas. Indonesia is a rapidly industrializing nation of 186 million people, of which 111 million live in Java and 38 million in Sumatra. As industrialization progresses from the present low level, the growth in energy demand will be very rapid. Indonesia`s domestic gas demand is expected to increase form 1.6 Bcf/d (0.05 Bcm/d) in 1991 to 5.7 Bcf/d (0.2 Bcm/d) in 2021. Because the major gas resources of East Kalimantan, North Sumatra, and Natuna are so remote from the main consuming area in northwest Java and are dedicated for export by virtue of the national energy policy, the need is becoming urgent to develop new resources of natural gas, including coalbed methane, for the domestic market. Due to the high geothermal gradient, the coal deposits in the back-arc basins of Sumatra and Java are expected to be of higher than normal rank at depths favorable for coalbed methane production. The oil- and gas-productive Jatibarang sub-basin in northwest Java, with estimated in-place resources of coalbed methane in excess of 20 Tcf (0.6 Tcm), is considered to be the most prospective area in Indonesia for the near-term development of coalbed methane. This area includes Jakarta and vicinity, the most populous and most heavily industrialized part of Indonesia.

Murray, D.K. [D. Keith Murray & Associates, Lakewood, CO (United States); Gold, J.P. [Consulting Geologist, Evergreen, CO (United States)

1995-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

268

Carbon Dioxide Storage in Coal Seams with Enhanced Coalbed Methane Recovery: Geologic Evaluation, Capacity Assessment and Field Validation of the Central Appalachian Basin.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??The mitigation of greenhouse gas emissions and enhanced recovery of coalbed methane are benefits to sequestering carbon dioxide in coal seams. This is possible because… (more)

Ripepi, Nino Samuel

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

269

Demonstration projects for coalbed methane and Devonian shale gas: Final report. [None  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In 1979, the US Department of Energy provided the American Public Gas Association (APGA) with a grant to demonstrate the feasibility of bringing unconventional gas such as methane produced from coalbeds or Devonian Shale directly into publicly owned utility system distribution lines. In conjunction with this grant, a seven-year program was initiated where a total of sixteen wells were drilled for the purpose of providing this untapped resource to communities who distribute natural gas. While coalbed degasification ahead of coal mining was already a reality in several parts of the country, the APGA demonstration program was aimed at actual consumer use of the gas. Emphasis was therefore placed on degasification of coals with high methane gas content and on utilization of conventional oil field techniques. 13 figs.

Verrips, A.M.; Gustavson, J.B.

1987-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

270

Challenges in assessment, management and development of coalbed methane resources in the Powder River Basin, Wyoming  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Coalbed methane development in the Powder River Basin has accelerated rapidly since the mid-1990's. forecasts of coalbed methane (CBM) production and development made during the late 1980's and early 1990's have proven to be distinctly unreliable. Estimates of gas in place and recoverable reserves have also varied widely. This lack of reliable data creates challenges in resource assessment, management and development for public resource management agencies and the CBM operators. These challenges include a variety of complex technical, legal and resource management-related issues. The Bureau of Land Management's Wyoming Reservoir Management Group (WRMG) and US Geological Survey (USGS), with the cooperation and assistance of CBM operators and other interested parties have initiated cooperative studies to address some of these issues. This paper presents results of those studies to date and outlines the agencies' goals and accomplishments expected at the studies' conclusion.

McGarry, D.E.

2000-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

271

Organic petrography of coals from a coalbed methane test well, Ouachita Parish, Louisiana  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In March 2003, the U.S. Geological Survey, the Louisiana Geological Survey, and EnerVest Management Partners Ltd. participated in a Cooperative Research and Development Agreement (CRADA) to drill and core the Fairbanks Real Estate No. 359 (FRE No. 359) coalbed methane test well in Ouachita Parish, Louisiana. This effort was in support of ongoing U.S. Geological Survey investigations into the coal gas potential of the Gulf Coastal Plain. To determine possible relationships between coalbed gas content and coal composition, maceral modes were determined for 17 subsurface coal and carbonaceous shale samples cored and desorbed from the Paleocene-Eocene Wilcox Group. Similar determinations of maceral mode were made on cuttings collected from 5 non-cored coaly intervals in the overlying Eocene Sparta Sand. 22 refs., 11 figs., 3 tabs.

Paul C. Hackley; Peter D. Warwick [USGS, Reston, VA (United States)

2005-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

272

,"California - Coastal Region Coalbed Methane Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National and Regional Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy SourcesWyoming"Coalbed Methane Proved ReservesPricePrice (DollarsPlant Liquids,

273

,"Pennsylvania Coalbed Methane Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National and Regional Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: EnergyShale Proved Reserves (Billion CubicPriceCoalbed Methane Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic

274

,"Texas--RRC District 8 Coalbed Methane Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National and Regional Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: EnergyShale ProvedTexas"Brunei (Dollars per ThousandPriceDryCoalbed Methane

275

Geologic and hydrologic controls on coalbed methane producibility, Williams Fork Formation, Piceance Basin, Colorado  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Structural and depositional setting, coal rank, gas content, permeability, hydrodynamics, and reservoir heterogeneity control the producibility of coalbed methane in the Piceance Basin. The coal-rich Upper Cretaceous, Williams Fork Formation is genetically defined and regionally correlated to the genetic sequences in the Sand Wash Basin, to the north. Net coal is thickest in north-south oriented belts which accumulated on a coastal plain, behind west-east prograding shoreline sequences. Face cleats of Late Cretaceous age strike E-NE and W-NW in the southern and northern parts of the basin, respectively, normal to the Grand Hogback thrust front. Parallelism between face-cleat strike and present-day maximum horizontal stresses may enhance or inhibit coal permeability in the north and south, respectively. Geopressure and hydropressure are both present in the basin with regional hydrocarbon overpressure dominant in the central part of the basin and hydropressure limited to the basin margins. The most productive gas wells in the basin are associated with structural terraces, anticlines, and/or correspond to Cameo-Wheeler-Fairfield coal-sandstone development, reflecting basement detached thrust-faulting, fracture-enhanced permeability, and reservoir heterogeneity. Depositional heterogeneties and thrusts faults isolate coal reservoirs along the Grand Hogback from the subsurface by restricting meteoric recharge and basinward flow of ground water. An evolving coalbed methane producibility model predicts that in the Piceance Basin extraordinary coalbed methane production is precluded by low permeability and by the absence of dynamic ground-water flow.

Tyler, R.; Scott, A.R.; Kaiser, W.R.; Nance, H.S.; McMurry, R.G. [Univ. of Texas, Austin, TX (United States)

1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

276

Geologic and hydrologic controls on coalbed methane producibility, Williams Fork Formation, Piceance Basin, Colorado  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Structural and depositional setting, coal rank, gas content, permeability, hydrodynamics, and reservoir heterogeneity control the producibility of coalbed methane in the Piceance Basin. The coal-rich Upper Cretaceous, Williams Fork Formation is genetically defined and regionally correlated to the genetic sequences in the Sand Wash Basin, to the north. Net coal is thickest in north-south oriented belts which accumulated on a coastal plain, behind west-east prograding shoreline sequences. Face cleats of Late Cretaceous age strike E-NE and W-NW in the southern and northern parts of the basin, respectively, normal to the Grand Hogback thrust front. Parallelism between face-cleat strike and present-day maximum horizontal stresses may enhance or inhibit coal permeability in the north and south, respectively. Geopressure and hydropressure are both present in the basin with regional hydrocarbon overpressure dominant in the central part of the basin and hydropressure limited to the basin margins. The most productive gas wells in the basin are associated with structural terraces, anticlines, and/or correspond to Cameo-Wheeler-Fairfield coal-sandstone development, reflecting basement detached thrust-faulting, fracture-enhanced permeability, and reservoir heterogeneity. Depositional heterogeneties and thrusts faults isolate coal reservoirs along the Grand Hogback from the subsurface by restricting meteoric recharge and basinward flow of ground water. An evolving coalbed methane producibility model predicts that in the Piceance Basin extraordinary coalbed methane production is precluded by low permeability and by the absence of dynamic ground-water flow.

Tyler, R.; Scott, A.R.; Kaiser, W.R.; Nance, H.S.; McMurry, R.G. (Univ. of Texas, Austin, TX (United States))

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

277

Powder River Basin coalbed methane: The USGS role in investigating this ultimate clean coal by-product  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

For the past few decades, the Fort Union Formation in the Powder River Basin has supplied the Nation with comparatively clean low ash and low sulfur coal. However, within the past few years, coalbed methane from the same Fort Union coal has become an important energy by-product. The recently completed US Geological Survey coal resource assessment of the Fort Union coal beds and zones in the northern Rocky Mountains and Great Plains (Fort Union Coal Assessment Team, 1999) has added useful information to coalbed methane exploration and development in the Powder River Basin in Wyoming and Montana. Coalbed methane exploration and development in the Powder River Basin has rapidly accelerated in the past three years. During this time more than 800 wells have been drilled and recent operator forecasts projected more than 5,000 additional wells to be drilled over the next few years. Development of shallow (less than 1,000 ft. deep) Fort Union coal-bed methane is confined to Campbell and Sheridan Counties, Wyoming, and Big Horn County, Montana. The purpose of this paper is to report on the US Geological Survey's role on a cooperative coalbed methane project with the US Bureau of Land Management (BLM), Wyoming Reservoir Management Group and several gas operators. This paper will also discuss the methodology that the USGS and the BLM will be utilizing for analysis and evaluation of coalbed methane reservoirs in the Powder River Basin. The USGS and BLM need additional information of coalbed methane reservoirs to accomplish their respective resource evaluation and management missions.

Stricker, G.D.; Flores, R.M.; Ochs, A.M.; Stanton, R.W.

2000-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

278

Water Management Strategies for Improved Coalbed Methane Production in the Black Warrior Basin  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The modern coalbed methane industry was born in the Black Warrior Basin of Alabama and has to date produced more than 2.6 trillion cubic feet of gas and 1.6 billion barrels of water. The coalbed gas industry in this area is dependent on instream disposal of co-produced water, which ranges from nearly potable sodium-bicarbonate water to hypersaline sodium-chloride water. This study employed diverse analytical methods to characterize water chemistry in light of the regional geologic framework and to evaluate the full range of water management options for the Black Warrior coalbed methane industry. Results reveal strong interrelationships among regional geology, water chemistry, and gas chemistry. Coalbed methane is produced from multiple coal seams in Pennsylvanian-age strata of the Pottsville Coal Interval, in which water chemistry is influenced by a structurally controlled meteoric recharge area along the southeastern margin of the basin. The most important constituents of concern in the produced water include chlorides, ammonia compounds, and organic substances. Regional mapping and statistical analysis indicate that the concentrations of most ionic compounds, metallic substances, and nonmetallic substances correlate with total dissolved solids and chlorides. Gas is effectively produced at pipeline quality, and the only significant impurity is N{sub 2}. Geochemical analysis indicates that the gas is of mixed thermogenic-biogenic origin. Stable isotopic analysis of produced gas and calcite vein fills indicates that widespread late-stage microbial methanogenesis occurred primarily along a CO{sub 2} reduction metabolic pathway. Organic compounds in the produced water appear to have helped sustain microbial communities. Ammonia and ammonium levels increase with total dissolved solids content and appear to have played a role in late-stage microbial methanogenesis and the generation of N{sub 2}. Gas production tends to decline exponentially, whereas water production tends to decline hyperbolically. Hyperbolic decline indicates that water volume is of greatest concern early in the life of a coalbed methane project. Regional mapping indicates that gas production is controlled primarily by the ability to depressurize permeable coal seams that are natively within the steep part of the adsorption isotherm. Water production is greatest within the freshwater intrusion and below thick Cretaceous cover strata and is least in areas of underpressure. Water management strategies include instream disposal, which can be applied effectively in most parts of the basin. Deep disposal may be applicable locally, particularly where high salinity limits the ability to dispose into streams. Artificial wetlands show promise for the management of saline water, especially where the reservoir yield is limited. Beneficial use options include municipal water supply, agricultural use, and industrial use. The water may be of use to an inland shrimp farming industry, which is active around the southwestern coalbed methane fields. The best opportunities for beneficial use are reuse of water by the coalbed methane industry for drilling and hydraulic fracturing. This research has further highlighted opportunities for additional research on treatment efficiency, the origin of nitrogen compounds, organic geochemistry, biogenic gas generation, flow modeling, and computer simulation. Results of this study are being disseminated through a vigorous technology transfer program that includes web resources, numerous presentations to stakeholders, and a variety of technical publications.

Pashin, Jack; McIntyre-Redden, Marcella; Mann, Steven; Merkel, David

2013-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

279

Simulation study of the effect of well spacing, effect of permeability anisotropy, and effect of Palmer and Mansoori model on coalbed methane production  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Interference for adjacent wells may be beneficial to Coalbed-Methane production. The effect is the acceleration of de-watering which should lead to earlier and higher gas rate peaks. It is inherent that permeability anisotropy exists in the coalbed...

Zulkarnain, Ismail

2006-04-12T23:59:59.000Z

280

Carbon dioxide reuse and sequestration: The state of the art today  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

R.J.H. Richardson, Deep coalbed methane in Alberta, Canada:gas recovery and enhanced coalbed methane recovery. Suitableprojects of enhanced coalbed methane production using CO 2

Benson, Sally M.; Dorchak, Thomas; Jacobs, Gary; Ekmann, James; Bishop, Jim; Grahame, Thomas

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "western states coalbed" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Geothermal energy in the western United States and Hawaii: Resources and projected electricity generation supplies. [Contains glossary and address list of geothermal project developers and owners  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Geothermal energy comes from the internal heat of the Earth, and has been continuously exploited for the production of electricity in the United States since 1960. Currently, geothermal power is one of the ready-to-use baseload electricity generating technologies that is competing in the western United States with fossil fuel, nuclear and hydroelectric generation technologies to provide utilities and their customers with a reliable and economic source of electric power. Furthermore, the development of domestic geothermal resources, as an alternative to fossil fuel combustion technologies, has a number of associated environmental benefits. This report serves two functions. First, it provides a description of geothermal technology and a progress report on the commercial status of geothermal electric power generation. Second, it addresses the question of how much electricity might be competitively produced from the geothermal resource base. 19 figs., 15 tabs.

Not Available

1991-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

282

GEOLOGIC SCREENING CRITERIA FOR SEQUESTRATION OF CO2 IN COAL: QUANTIFYING POTENTIAL OF THE BLACK WARRIOR COALBED METHANE FAIRWAY, ALABAMA  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Sequestration of CO{sub 2} in coal has potential benefits for reducing greenhouse gas emissions from the highly industrialized Carboniferous coal basins of North America and Europe and for enhancing coalbed methane recovery. Hence, enhanced coalbed methane recovery operations provide a basis for a market-based environmental solution in which the cost of sequestration is offset by the production and sale of natural gas. The Black Warrior foreland basin of west-central Alabama contains the only mature coalbed methane production fairway in eastern North America, and data from this basin provide an excellent basis for quantifying the carbon sequestration potential of coal and for identifying the geologic screening criteria required to select sites for the demonstration and commercialization of carbon sequestration technology. Coalbed methane reservoirs in the upper Pottsville Formation of the Black Warrior basin are extremely heterogeneous, and this heterogeneity must be considered to screen areas for the application of CO{sub 2} sequestration and enhanced coalbed methane recovery technology. Major screening factors include stratigraphy, geologic structure, geothermics, hydrogeology, coal quality, sorption capacity, technology, and infrastructure. Applying the screening model to the Black Warrior basin indicates that geologic structure, water chemistry, and the distribution of coal mines and reserves are the principal determinants of where CO{sub 2} can be sequestered. By comparison, coal thickness, temperature-pressure conditions, and coal quality are the key determinants of sequestration capacity and unswept coalbed methane resources. Results of this investigation indicate that the potential for CO{sub 2} sequestration and enhanced coalbed methane recovery in the Black Warrior basin is substantial and can result in significant reduction of greenhouse gas emissions while increasing natural gas reserves. Coal-fired power plants serving the Black Warrior basin in Alabama emit approximately 31 MMst (2.4 Tcf) of CO{sub 2} annually. The total sequestration capacity of the Black Warrior coalbed methane fairway at 350 psi is about 189 MMst (14.9 Tcf), which is equivalent to 6.1 years of greenhouse gas emissions from the coal-fired power plants. Applying the geologic screening model indicates that significant parts of the coalbed methane fairway are not accessible because of fault zones, coal mines, coal reserves, and formation water with TDS content less than 3,000 mg/L. Excluding these areas leaves a sequestration potential of 60 MMst (4.7 Tcf), which is equivalent to 1.9 years of emissions. Therefore, if about10 percent of the flue gas stream from nearby power plants is dedicated to enhanced coalbed methane recovery, a meaningful reduction of CO{sub 2} emissions can be realized for nearly two decades. If the fresh-water restriction were removed for the purposes of CO{sub 2} sequestration, an additional 10 MMst (0.9 Tcf) of CO{sub 2} could feasibly be sequestered. The amount of unswept coalbed methane in the fairway is estimated to be 1.49 Tcf at a pressure of 50 psi. Applying the screening model results in an accessible unswept gas resource of 0.44 Tcf. Removal of the fresh-water restriction would elevate this number to 0.57 Tcf. If a recovery factor of 80 percent can be realized, then enhanced recovery activities can result in an 18 percent expansion of coalbed methane reserves in the Black Warrior basin.

Jack C. Pashin; Richard E. Carroll; Richard H. Groshong Jr.; Dorothy E. Raymond; Marcella McIntyre; J. Wayne Payton

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

283

Subsurface definition of the Allegheny Group coalbed methane prospect interval in Southwestern Pennsylvania and new gas content results  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A preliminary reconnaissance of coalbed methane gas content data from exploratory coal cores and pre-existing data implies that the greater the depth and rank, the greater the total and cumulative gas content. The coal seams studied, ranging in age from the Pennsylvanian-Permian Dunkard Group to the Middle Pennsylvanian Allegheny Group, are from the Main Bituminous Field and two of the anthracite fields. Consequently, the Pennsylvania Geological Survey and the West Virginia Geological and Economic Survey conducted a mapping investigation to evaluate the regional geology of the coal-bearing intervals and its influence on coalbed methane potential. Phase I of this study involved the entire Pennsylvanian coal-bearing interval; Phase II focused on a stratigraphic delineation and evaluation of Allegheny coalbeds and associated sandstones. A variety of cross sections and isopach maps show several prospective coalbeds and facies relationships with channel-fill sandstones. This suggests that some of these sandstones may be traps for coalbed methane. Often overlooked in reservoir characterization is the quality of a coal seam. Coal rank, grade, and type influence the reserves and production of coalbed methane; the higher the rank, the greater adsorptive capacity of the coal. The integration of coal quality with other critical tools of exploration may increase the success rate of finding {open_quotes}sweet spots.{close_quotes} Additional Pennsylvania Geological Survey drilling occurred in Beaver, Lawrence, Somerset, and Washington counties. Gas contents were graphically displayed against depth, thickness, and time for a variety of samples from 21 coal seams; average gas composition and Btu values were determined for selected samples.

Markowski, A.K. [Pennsylvania Dept. of Conservation and Natural Resources-Bureau of Topographic and Geologic Survey, Harrisburg, PA (United States)

1996-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

284

Simulations of Present and Future Climates in the Western United States with Four Nested Regional Climate Models  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We analyze simulations of present and future climates in the western U.S. performed with four regional climate models (RCMs) nested within two global ocean-atmosphere climate models. Our primary goal is to assess the range of regional climate responses to increased greenhouse gases in available RCM simulations. The four RCMs used different geographical domains, different increased greenhouse gas scenarios for future-climate simulations, and (in some cases) different lateral boundary conditions. For simulations of the present climate, we compare RCM results to observations and to results of the GCM that provided lateral boundary conditions to the RCM. For future-climate (increased greenhouse gas) simulations, we compare RCM results to each other and to results of the driving GCMs. When results are spatially averaged over the western U.S., we find that the results of each RCM closely follow those of the driving GCM in the same region, in both present and future climates. This is true even though the study area is in some cases a small fraction of the RCM domain. Precipitation responses predicted by the RCMs are in many regions not statistically significant compared to interannual variability. Where the predicted precipitation responses are statistically significant, they are positive. The models agree that near-surface temperatures will increase, but do not agree on the spatial pattern of this increase. The four RCMs produce very different estimates of water content of snow in the present climate, and of the change in this water content in response to increased greenhouse gases.

Duffy, Phil; Arritt, R.; Coquard, J.; Gutowski, William; Han, J.; Iorio, J.; Kim, Jongil; Leung, Lai R.; Roads, J.; Zeledon, E.

2006-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

285

Coalbed methane stimulation techniques: Mechanisms and applicability. Topical report, August 1991-July 1993  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Increased pore pressure around a wellbore during injection into a coalbed reservoir can cause increased stresses, degradation in mechanical properties and plastic deformation. These near-wellbore effects can lead to elevated breakdown and treatment pressures during hydraulic fracturing and alternatively can promote cavity evolution and conductivity-connectivity alteration during dynamic openhole cavitation. Laboratory experimentation and field data interpretation are provided to support these contentions. Practical considerations for controlling excessive pressure during hydraulic fracturing are suggested as are similar considerations for maximizing cavity growth, deliverability, applicability, and formation evaluation.

Khodaverdian, M.F.

1994-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

286

Coordinated studies in support of hydraulic fracturing of coalbed methane. Final report, July 1990-May 1995  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The primary objective of this project is to provide laboratory data that is pertinent to designing hydraulic fracturing treatments for coalbed methane. Coal fluid interactions studies, fracture conductivity, fluid leak-off through cleats, rheology, and proppant transport are designed to respresent Black Warrior and San Juan treatments. A second objective is to apply the information learned in laboratory testing to actual hydraulic fracturing treatments in order to improve results. A final objective is to review methods currently used to catalog well performance following hydraulic fracturing for the purpose of placing the data in a useable database that can be accessed by users to determine the success of various treatment scenarios.

Penny, G.S.; Conway, M.W.

1996-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

287

,"Alabama Coalbed Methane Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National and Regional Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy SourcesWyoming"Coalbed Methane Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet)" ,"Click

288

,"Alaska (with Total Offshore) Coalbed Methane Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National and Regional Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy SourcesWyoming"Coalbed Methane Proved Reserves (BillionShare of Total U.S.

289

,"Louisiana--South Onshore Coalbed Methane Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National and Regional Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: EnergyShale Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet)" ,"ClickNonassociatedLiquidsCoalbed Methane

290

,"Michigan Coalbed Methane Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National and Regional Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: EnergyShale Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet)"Shale ProvedWellhead PriceCoalbed Methane Proved

291

,"New Mexico Coalbed Methane Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National and Regional Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: EnergyShale Proved Reserves (Billion CubicPrice Sold to Electric PowerCoalbed Methane Proved Reserves

292

,"New Mexico--West Coalbed Methane Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National and Regional Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: EnergyShale Proved Reserves (Billion CubicPrice Sold toResidential ConsumptionNetGas,Coalbed Methane

293

,"Ohio Coalbed Methane Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National and Regional Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: EnergyShale Proved Reserves (Billion CubicPrice SoldPriceGas, Wet After Lease SeparationShaleCoalbed

294

,"Oklahoma Coalbed Methane Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National and Regional Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: EnergyShale Proved Reserves (Billion CubicPrice SoldPriceGas, Wet AfterShale Proved ReservesCoalbed

295

U.S. Coalbed Methane Proved Reserves New Field Discoveries (Billion Cubic  

Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) " ,"ClickPipelinesProved ReservesFeet)per Thousand28 198 18 Q 10 14.0 12.2 1.1Feet) U.S. Coalbed

296

Texas--RRC District 2 Onshore Coalbed Methane Production (Billion Cubic  

Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) " ,"ClickPipelines AboutDecemberSteamYear JanSeparation, Proved1 4.70ProductionFeet) 2 Onshore Coalbed

297

Texas--RRC District 5 Coalbed Methane Production (Billion Cubic Feet)  

Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) " ,"ClickPipelines AboutDecemberSteamYear JanSeparation, Proved1Reserves (Million35 Coalbed Methane

298

Texas--RRC District 5 Coalbed Methane Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet)  

Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) " ,"ClickPipelines AboutDecemberSteamYear JanSeparation, Proved1Reserves (Million35 Coalbed MethaneProved

299

,"Texas--RRC District 1 Coalbed Methane Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National and Regional Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: EnergyShale ProvedTexas"Brunei (Dollars per ThousandPriceDry Natural GasCrudeCrude OilCoalbed

300

,"Texas--RRC District 2 Onshore Coalbed Methane Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

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Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "western states coalbed" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

,"Texas--RRC District 7B Coalbed Methane Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National and Regional Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: EnergyShale ProvedTexas"Brunei (Dollars per ThousandPriceDryCoalbed Methane Proved Reserves

302

,"Virginia Coalbed Methane Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National and Regional Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: EnergyShale ProvedTexas"BruneiReserves in NonproducingU.S.Summary" ,"ClickCoalbed

303

,"West Virginia Coalbed Methane Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National and Regional Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: EnergyShale ProvedTexas"BruneiReserves in NonproducingU.S.Summary"LNGShaleNetHenryCoalbed

304

Table 16. Coalbed methane proved reserves, reserves changes, and production, 2013  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data CenterFranconia, Virginia:FAQ <Information Administration (EIA) 10 MECS Survey Data9c : U.S.Welcome to the1,033 15:b.b. TotalCoalbed

305

GEOLOGIC SCREENING CRITERIA FOR SEQUESTRATION OF CO2 IN COAL: QUANTIFYING POTENTIAL OF THE BLACK WARRIOR COALBED METHANE FAIRWAY, ALABAMA  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Sequestration of CO{sub 2} in coal has potential to reduce greenhouse gas emissions from coal-fired power plants while enhancing coalbed methane recovery. Data from more than 4,000 coalbed methane wells in the Black Warrior basin of Alabama provide an opportunity to quantify the carbon sequestration potential of coal and to develop a geologic screening model for the application of carbon sequestration technology. This report summarizes stratigraphy and sedimentation, structural geology, geothermics, hydrology, coal quality, gas capacity, and production characteristics of coal in the Black Warrior coalbed methane fairway and the implications of geology for carbon sequestration and enhanced coalbed methane recovery. Coal in the Black Warrior basin is distributed among several fluvial-deltaic coal zones in the Lower Pennsylvanian Pottsville Formation. Most coal zones contain one to three coal beds that are significant targets for coalbed methane production and carbon sequestration, and net coal thickness generally increases southeastward. Pottsville strata have effectively no matrix permeability to water, so virtually all flow is through natural fractures. Faults and folds influence the abundance and openness of fractures and, hence, the performance of coalbed methane wells. Water chemistry in the Pottsville Formation ranges from fresh to saline, and zones with TDS content lower than 10,000 mg/L can be classified as USDW. An aquifer exemption facilitating enhanced recovery in USDW can be obtained where TDS content is higher than 3,000 mg/L. Carbon dioxide becomes a supercritical fluid above a temperature of 88 F and a pressure of 1,074 psi. Reservoir temperature exceeds 88 F in much of the study area. Hydrostatic pressure gradients range from normal to extremely underpressured. A large area of underpressure is developed around closely spaced longwall coal mines, and areas of natural underpressure are distributed among the coalbed methane fields. The mobility and reactivity of supercritical CO{sub 2} in coal-bearing strata is unknown, and potential exists for supercritical conditions to develop below a depth of 2,480 feet following abandonment of the coalbed methane fields. High-pressure adsorption isotherms confirm that coal sorbs approximately twice as much CO{sub 2} as CH{sub 4} and approximately four times as much CO{sub 2} as N{sub 2}. Analysis of isotherm data reveals that the sorption performance of each gas can vary by a factor of two depending on rank and ash content. Gas content data exhibit extreme vertical and lateral variability that is the product of a complex burial history involving an early phase of thermogenic gas generation and an ongoing stage of late biogenic gas generation. Production characteristics of coalbed methane wells are helpful for identifying areas that are candidates for carbon sequestration and enhanced coalbed methane recovery. Many geologic and engineering factors, including well construction, well spacing, and regional structure influence well performance. Close fault spacing limits areas where five-spot patterns may be developed for enhanced gas recovery, but large structural panels lacking normal faults are in several gas fields and can be given priority as areas to demonstrate and commercialize carbon sequestration technology in coalbed methane reservoirs.

Jack C. Pashin; Richard E. Carroll; Richard H. Groshong, Jr.; Dorothy E. Raymond; Marcella McIntyre; J. Wayne Payton

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

306

Economic Development Impacts of Wind Power: A Comparative Analysis of Impacts within the Western Governors' Association States; Preprint  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper uses NREL's newest Jobs and Economic Development Impacts (JEDI II) model to assess economic impacts from alternative power technologies, with a focus on wind energy, for a variety of states.

Tegen, S.; Milligan, M.; Goldberg, M.

2007-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

307

Effects of soot-induced snow albedo change on snowpack and hydrological cycle in western United States based on Weather Research and Forecasting chemistry and regional climate simulations  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Radiative forcing induced by soot on snow is a major anthropogenic forcing affecting the global climate. However, it is uncertain how the soot-induced snow albedo perturbation affects regional snowpack and the hydrological cycle. In this study we simulated the deposition of soot aerosol on snow and investigated the resulting impact on snowpack and the surface water budget in the western United States. A yearlong simulation was performed using the chemistry version of the Weather Research and Forecasting model (WRF-Chem) to determine an annual budget of soot deposition, followed by two regional climate simulations using WRF in meteorology-only mode, with and without the soot-induced snow albedo perturbations. The chemistry simulation shows large spatial variability in soot deposition that reflects the localized emissions and the influence of the complex terrain. The soot-induced snow albedo perturbations increase the net solar radiation flux at the surface during late winter to early spring, increase the surface air temperature, reduce snow water equivalent amount, and lead to reduced snow accumulation and less spring snowmelt. These effects are stronger over the central Rockies and southern Alberta, where soot deposition and snowpack overlap the most. The indirect forcing of soot accelerates snowmelt and alters stream flows, including a trend toward earlier melt dates in the western United States. The soot-induced albedo reduction initiates a positive feedback process whereby dirty snow absorbs more solar radiation, heating the surface and warming the air. This warming causes reduced snow depth and fraction, which further reduces the regional surface albedo for the snow covered regions. Our simulations indicate that the change of maximum snow albedo induced by soot on snow contributes to 60% of the net albedo reduction over the central Rockies. Snowpack reduction accounts for the additional 40%.

Qian, Yun; Gustafson, William I.; Leung, Lai-Yung R.; Ghan, Steven J.

2009-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

308

A parametric study on the benefits of drilling horizontal and multilateral wells in coalbed methane reservoirs  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Recent years have witnessed a renewed interest in development of coalbed methane (CBM) reservoirs. Optimizing CBM production is of interest to many operators. Drilling horizontal and multilateral wells is gaining Popularity in many different coalbed reservoirs, with varying results. This study concentrates on variations of horizontal and multilateral-well configurations and their potential benefits. In this study, horizontal and several multilateral drilling patterns for CBM reservoirs are studied. The reservoir parameters that have been studied include gas content, permeability, and desorption characteristics. Net present value (NPV) has been used as the yard stick for comparing different drilling configurations. Configurations that have been investigated are single-, dual-, tri-, and quad-lateral wells along with fishbone (also known as pinnate) wells. In these configurations, the total length of horizontal wells and the spacing between laterals (SBL) have been studied. It was determined that in the cases that have been studied in this paper (all other circumstances being equal), quadlateral wells are the optimum well configuration.

Maricic, N.; Mohaghegh, S.D.; Artun, E. [Chevron Energy Technology Co., Houston, TX (USA)

2008-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

309

Low temperature iron- and nickel-catalyzed reactions leading to coalbed gas formation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Hydrocarbon hydrogenolysis and CO{sub 2} hydrogenation in the presence of Fe/SiO{sub 2} and Ni/SiO{sub 2} catalysts were evaluated as potential mechanisms contributing to natural gas formation in coalbeds. The hydrocarbons used as reactants in hydrogenolysis included butane, octane, 1-octene, and 1-dodecene. The reactions carried out in a laboratory batch reactor produced gas that contained methane concentrations greater than 90%, which resembles the composition of natural gas. Reaction temperatures were selected to resemble natural coalbed conditions. Evidence is presented to show that iron and nickel minerals, which can be present in coals at levels of 2,000 and 10 ppm, respectively, can become active under geologic conditions. The oxides (Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} and NiO) used as precursors of the active catalysts (Fe and Ni metals) were reduced at 200 C under a hydrogen atmosphere. Moessbauer spectroscopy showed that ca. 6% of the iron oxide was converted to the metal; in the case of nickel, oxygen titration showed that the extent of reduction to the metal was ca. 29%. The resultant fractions of the active metals in coals are adequate to catalyze generation of appreciable amounts of methane over geologic time.

Medina, J.C.; Butala, S.J.; Bartholomew, C.H.; Lee, M.L.

2000-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

310

A review on recent advances in the numerical simulation for coalbed-methane-recovery process  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The recent advances in numerical simulation for primary coalbed methane (CBM) recovery and enhanced coalbed-methane recovery (ECBMR) processes are reviewed, primarily focusing on the progress that has occurred since the late 1980s. Two major issues regarding the numerical modeling will be discussed in this review: first, multicomponent gas transport in in-situ bulk coal and, second, changes of coal properties during methane (CH{sub 4}) production. For the former issues, a detailed review of more recent advances in modeling gas and water transport within a coal matrix is presented. Further, various factors influencing gas diffusion through the coal matrix will be highlighted as well, such as pore structure, concentration and pressure, and water effects. An ongoing bottleneck for evaluating total mass transport rate is developing a reasonable representation of multiscale pore space that considers coal type and rank. Moreover, few efforts have been concerned with modeling water-flow behavior in the coal matrix and its effects on CH{sub 4} production and on the exchange of carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) and CH{sub 4}. As for the second issue, theoretical coupled fluid-flow and geomechanical models have been proposed to describe the evolution of pore structure during CH{sub 4} production, instead of traditional empirical equations. However, there is currently no effective coupled model for engineering applications. Finally, perspectives on developing suitable simulation models for CBM production and for predicting CO{sub 2}-sequestration ECBMR are suggested.

Wei, X.R.; Wang, G.X.; Massarotto, P.; Golding, S.D.; Rudolph, V. [University of Queensland, Brisbane, Qld. (Australia)

2007-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

311

Potential for CO2 Sequestration and Enhanced Coalbed Methane Production, Blue Creek Field, NW Black Warrior Basin, Alabama  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Carbon dioxide (CO2) is a primary source of greenhouse gases. Injection of CO2 from power plants near coalbed reservoirs is a win-win method to reducing emissions of CO2 to the atmosphere. Limited studies have investigated CO2 sequestration...

He, Ting

2011-02-22T23:59:59.000Z

312

Investigation of feasibility of injecting power plant waste gases for enhanced coalbed methane recovery from low rank coals in Texas  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

such as power plants. CO2 emissions can be offset by sequestration of produced CO2 in natural reservoirs such as coal seams, which may initially contain methane. Production of coalbed methane can be enhanced through CO2 injection, providing an opportunity...

Saugier, Luke Duncan

2004-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

313

Geologic Sequestration of CO2 in Deep, Unmineable Coalbeds: An Integrated Researdh and Commercial-Scale Field Demonstration Project  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Coal-Seq consortium is a government-industry collaborative consortium with the objective of advancing industry's understanding of complex coalbed methane and gas shale reservoir behavior in the presence of multi-component gases via laboratory experiments, theoretical model development and field validation studies. This will allow primary recovery, enhanced recovery and CO{sub 2} sequestration operations to be commercially enhanced and/or economically deployed. The project was initially launched in 2000 as a U.S. Department of Energy sponsored investigation into CO{sub 2} sequestration in deep, unmineable coalseams. The initial project accomplished a number of important objectives, which mainly revolved around performing baseline experimental studies, documenting and analyzing existing field projects, and establishing a global network for technology exchange. The results from that Phase have been documented in a series of reports which are publicly available. An important outcome of the initial phase was that serious limitations were uncovered in our knowledge of reservoir behavior when CO{sub 2} is injected into coal. To address these limitations, the project was extended in 2005 as a government-industry collaborative consortium. Selected accomplishments from this phase have included the identification and/or development of new models for multi-component sorption and diffusion, laboratory studies of coal geomechanical and permeability behavior with CO{sub 2} injection, additional field validation studies, and continued global technology exchange. Further continuation of the consortium is currently being considered. Some of the topics that have been identified for investigation include further model development/refinement related to multicomponent equations-of-state, sorption and diffusion behavior, geomechanical and permeability studies, technical and economic feasibility studies for major international coal basins, the extension of the work to gas shale reservoirs, and continued global technology exchange.

Scott Reeves; George Koperna

2008-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

314

Utah Coalbed Methane Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet)  

Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

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315

Virginia Coalbed Methane Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet)  

Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

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316

West Virginia Coalbed Methane Production (Billion Cubic Feet)  

Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

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317

West Virginia Coalbed Methane Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet)  

Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

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318

U.S. Coalbed Methane Production (Billion Cubic Feet)  

Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

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319

U.S. Coalbed Methane Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet)  

Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) " ,"ClickPipelines AboutDecemberSteamYearTexas--State Offshore ShaleAcquisitionsWellsWellsU.S.

320

Quarterly review of methane from coal-seams technology. Volume 7, Number 3, July-September 1989  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The report contains: sources of coal well information; Powder River Basin, Wyoming; greater Green River coal region, Wyoming and Colorado; Piceance Basin, Colorado; San Juan Basin, Colorado and New Mexico; Raton Basin, Colorado and New Mexico; Black Warrior Basin, Alabama; the United States coalbed methane resource; western cretaceous coal seams project; multiple coal seams project; spalling and the development of a hydraulic fracturing strategy for coal; geologic evaluation of critical production parameters for coalbed methane resources; coalbed methane opportunities in Alberta; the coalbed methane forum; eastern coalbed methane forum.

Not Available

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "western states coalbed" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Simulation assessment of CO2 sequestration potential and enhanced methane recovery in low-rank coalbeds of the Wilcox Group, east-central Texas  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Carbon dioxide (CO2) from energy consumption is a primary source of greenhouse gases. Injection of CO2 from power plants in coalbed reservoirs is a plausible method for reducing atmospheric emissions, and it can have the additional benefit...

Hernandez Arciniegas, Gonzalo

2006-10-30T23:59:59.000Z

322

Simulation study of the effect of well spacing, effect of permeability anisotropy, and effect of Palmer and Mansoori model on coalbed methane production.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??Interference for adjacent wells may be beneficial to Coalbed-Methane production. The effect is the acceleration of de-watering which should lead to earlier and higher gas… (more)

Zulkarnain, Ismail

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

323

Gas productivity related to cleat volumes derived from focused resistivity tools in coalbed methane (CBM) fields  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Cleats are critical for coal-bed methane (CBM) production, but operators usually lack a viable method to determine productivity except for costly well tests. Wireline logs, run over the CBM deposits of the Drunkards Wash Unit located in the Uinta Basin of Utah, were used to develop a new method to relate productivity to the cleat volume. The latter is derived from a focused resistivity log and the wellbore-fluid resistivity. Induction tools are unsuitable for this method, because they are dominated by borehole effects in high resistivity coals and low resistivity mud. Moreover, they read too deep to be significantly affected by the substitution of formation fluid by borehole fluid in the cleats on which the method is based. The method was demonstrated by relating cleat volume to CBM gas productivity in 24 wells, an exercise that clearly separated good from poor producers.

Yang, Y.H.; Peeters, M.; Cloud, T.A.; Van Kirk, C.W. [Kerr McGee Rocky Mountain Corporation, Denver, CO (United States)

2006-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

324

Damage tolerance of well-completion and stimulation techniques in coalbed methane reservoirs  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Coalbed methane (CBM) reservoirs are characterized as naturally fractured, dual porosity, low permeability, and water saturated gas reservoirs. Initially, the gas, water and coal are at thermodynamic equilibrium under prevailing reservoir conditions. Dewatering is essential to promote gas production. This can be accomplished by suitable completion and stimulation techniques. This paper investigates the efficiency and performance of the openhole cavity, hydraulic fractures, frack and packs, and horizontal wells as potential completion methods which may reduce formation damage and increase the productivity in coalbed methane reservoirs. Considering the dual porosity nature of CBM reservoirs, numerical simulations have been carried out to determine the formation damage tolerance of each completion and, stimulation approach. A new comparison parameter named as the normalized productivity index is defined as the ratio of the productivity index of a stimulated well to that of a nondamaged vertical well as a function of time. Typical scenarios have been considered to evaluate the CBM properties, including reservoir heterogeneity, anisotropy, and formation damage, for their effects on this index over the production time. The results for each stimulation technique show that the value of the index declines over the time of production with a rate which depends upon the applied technique and the prevailing reservoir conditions. The results also show that horizontal wells have the best performance if drilled orthogonal to the butt cleats. Open-hole cavity completions outperform vertical fractures if the fracture conductivity is reduced by any damage process. When vertical permeability is much lower than horizontal permeability, production of vertical wells will improve while productivity of horizontal wells will decrease.

Jahediesfanjani, H.; Civan, F. [University of Oklahoma, Norman, OK (United States)

2005-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

325

Overview of GRI research at the Rock Creek Site, Black Warrior Basin. Overview of GRI research at Rock Creek: Eight years of cooperative research, coalbed methane shortcourse. Held in Abingdon, Virginia on October 23, 1992. Topical report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The presentation slides from the October 23, 1992 workshop on coalbed methane exploration and production are assembled in this volume. They illustrate the following discussions: Overview of GRI Research at Rock Creek: Eight Years of Cooperative Research, Drilling and Completing Coalbed Methane Wells: Techniques for Fragile Formations, Connecting the Wellborne to the Formation: Perforations vs. Slotting, Coalbed Methane Well Testing in the Warrior Basin, Reservoir Engineering: A Case Study at Rock Creek, Fraccing of Multiple Thin Seams: Considerations and Constraints, Implementing Coal Seam Stimulations: Requirements for Successful Treatments, Coal-Fluid Interactions, Mine-Through Observations of Coal Seam Stimulations: Reality vs. Theory, and Recompleting Coalbed Methane Wells: The Second Try at Success.

Schraufnagel, R.

1992-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

326

Secretary Moniz to Discuss Western Energy Landscape at Western...  

Energy Savers [EERE]

Discuss Western Energy Landscape at Western Governors' Association Annual Meeting Secretary Moniz to Discuss Western Energy Landscape at Western Governors' Association Annual...

327

Assessment of undiscovered carboniferous coal-bed gas resources of the Appalachian Basin and Black Warrior Basin Provinces, 2002  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Coalbed methane (CBM) occurs in coal beds of Mississippian and Pennsylvanian (Carboniferous) age in the Appalachian basin, which extends almost continuously from New York to Alabama. In general, the basin includes three structural subbasins: the Dunkard basin in Pennsylvania, Ohio, and northern West Virginia; the Pocahontas basin in southern West Virginia, eastern Kentucky, and southwestern Virginia; and the Black Warrior basin in Alabama and Mississippi. For assessment purposes, the Appalachian basin was divided into two assessment provinces: the Appalachian Basin Province from New York to Alabama, and the Black Warrior Basin Province in Alabama and Mississippi. By far, most of the coalbed methane produced in the entire Appalachian basin has come from the Black Warrior Basin Province. 8 refs., 1 fig., 1 tab.

Milici, R.C.; Hatch, J.R.

2004-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

328

Modeling Coal Matrix Shrinkage and Differential Swelling with CO2 Injection for Enhanced Coalbed Methane Recovery and Carbon Sequestration Applications  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Matrix shrinkage and swelling can cause profound changes in porosity and permeability of coalbed methane reservoirs during depletion or when under CO{sub 2} injection processes, with significant implication for primary or enhanced methane recovery. Two models that are used to describe these effects are discussed. The first was developed by Advanced Resources International (ARI) and published in 1990 by Sawyer, et al. The second model was published by Palmer and Mansoori in 1996. This paper shows that the two provide equivalent results for most applications. However, their differences in formulation cause each to have relative advantages and disadvantages under certain circumstances. Specifically, the former appears superior for undersaturated coalbed methane reservoirs while the latter would be better if a case is found where matrix swelling is strongly disproportional to gas concentration. Since its presentation in 1996, the Palmer and Mansoori model has justifiably received much critical praise. However, the model developed by ARI for the COMET reservoir simulation program has been in use since 1990, and has significant advantages in certain settings. A review of data published by Levine in 1996 reveals that carbon dioxide causes a greater degree of coal matrix swelling compared to methane, even when measured on a unit of concentration basis. This effect is described in this report as differential swelling. Differential swelling may have important consequences for enhanced coalbed methane and carbon sequestration projects. To handle the effects of differential swelling, an extension to the matrix shrinkage and swelling model used by the COMET simulator is presented and shown to replicate the data of Levine. Preliminary field results from a carbon dioxide injection project are also presented in support of the extended model. The field evidence supports that considerable changes to coal permeability occur with CO{sub 2} injection, with significant implication for the design, implementation and performance of enhanced coalbed methane recovery and CO{sub 2} sequestration projects.

L. J. Pekot; S. R. Reeves

2002-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

329

Coalbed gases and hydrocarbon source rock potential of upper Carboniferous coal-bearing strata in upper Silesian Coal Basin, Poland  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Upper Silesian Coal Basin (USCB) is one of the major Upper Carboniferous coal basins in the world. Its coalbed gas reserves to the depths of 1,000 m are estimated to be about 350 billion cubic meters (about 12.4 TCF). Coalbed gases in the USCB are variable in both molecular and stable isotope composition [{delta}{sup 13}C(CH{sub 4}), {delta}D(CH{sub 4}), {delta}{sup 13}C(C{sub 2}H{sub 6}), {delta}{sup 13}C(C{sub 3}H{sub 8}), {delta}{sup 13}C(CO{sub 2})]. Such variability suggests the effects of both primary reactions operating during the generation of gases and secondary processes such as mixing and migration. Coalbed gases are mostly thermogenic methane in which depth-related isotopic fractionation has resulted from migration but not from mixing with the microbial one. The stable carbon isotope composition indicates that the carbon dioxide, ethane and higher gaseous hydrocarbons were generated during the bituminous coal stage of the coalification process. The main stage of coalbed gas generation occurred during the Variscan orogeny, and generation was completed after the Leonian and Asturian phases of this orogeny. The coals and carbonaceous shales have high gas generation potential but low potential for generation and expulsion of oil compared to the known Type III source rocks elsewhere. In general, the carbonaceous shales have slightly higher potential for oil generation, but probably would not be able to exceed expulsion thresholds necessary to expel economic quantities of oil.

Kotarba, M.J.J. [Univ. of Mining and metallurgy, Cracow (Poland); Clayton, J.L.; Rice, D.D. [Geological Survey, Denver, CO (United States)

1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

330

,"Louisiana--State Offshore Coalbed Methane Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National and Regional Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: EnergyShale Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet)"Shale Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic

331

Texas--State Offshore Coalbed Methane Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet)  

Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) " ,"ClickPipelines AboutDecemberSteamYear JanSeparation,(Million(Million(Million Barrels)Proved Reserves

332

,"Texas (with State Offshore) Coalbed Methane Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National and Regional Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: EnergyShale ProvedTexas"Brunei (Dollars per ThousandPrice Sold to9"3LNGCoalbed Methane

333

Assessment of CO2 Sequestration and ECBM Potential of U.S. Coalbeds  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In October, 2000, the U.S. Department of Energy, through contractor Advanced Resources International, launched a multi-year government-industry R&D collaboration called the Coal-Seq project. The Coal-Seq project is investigating the feasibility of CO{sub 2} sequestration in deep, unmineable coalseams, by performing detailed reservoir studies of two enhanced coalbed methane recovery (ECBM) field projects in the San Juan basin. The two sites are the Allison Unit, operated by Burlington Resources, and into which CO{sub 2} is being injected, and the Tiffany Unit, operating by BP America, into which N{sub 2} is being injected (the interest in understanding the N{sub 2}-ECBM process has important implications for CO{sub 2} sequestration via flue-gas injection). The purposes of the field studies are to understand the reservoir mechanisms of CO{sub 2} and N{sub 2} injection into coalseams, demonstrate the practical effectiveness of the ECBM and sequestration processes, an engineering capability to simulate them, and to evaluate sequestration economics. In support of these efforts, laboratory and theoretical studies are also being performed to understand and model multi-component isotherm behavior, and coal permeability changes due to swelling with CO{sub 2} injection. This report describes the results of an important component of the overall project, applying the findings from the San Juan Basin to a national scale to develop a preliminary assessment of the CO{sub 2} sequestration and ECBM recovery potential of U.S. coalbeds. Importantly, this assessment improves upon previous investigations by (1) including a more comprehensive list of U.S. coal basins, (2) adopting technical rationale for setting upper-bound limits on the results, and (3) incorporating new information on CO{sub 2}/CH{sub 4} replacement ratios as a function of coal rank. Based on the results of the assessment, the following conclusions have been drawn: (1) The CO{sub 2} sequestration capacity of U.S. coalbeds is estimated to be about 90 Gt. Of this, about 38 Gt is in Alaska (even after accounting for high costs associated with this province), 14 Gt is in the Powder River basin, 10 Gt is in the San Juan basin, and 8 Gt is in the Greater Green River basin. By comparison, total CO{sub 2} emissions from power generation plants is currently about 2.2 Gt/year. (2) The ECBM recovery potential associated with this sequestration is estimated to be over 150 Tcf. Of this, 47 Tcf is in Alaska (even after accounting for high costs associated with this province), 20 Tcf is in the Powder River basin, 19 Tcf is in the Greater Green River basin, and 16 Tcf is in the San Juan basin. By comparison, total CBM recoverable resources are currently estimated to be about 170 Tcf. (3) Between 25 and 30 Gt of CO{sub 2} can be sequestered at a profit, and 80-85 Gt can be sequestered at costs of less than $5/ton. These estimates do not include any costs associated with CO{sub 2} capture and transportation, and only represent geologic sequestration. (4) Several Rocky Mountain basins, including the San Juan, Raton, Powder River and Uinta appear to hold the most favorable conditions for sequestration economics. The Gulf Coast and the Central Appalachian basin also appear to hold promise as economic sequestration targets, depending upon gas prices. (5) In general, the 'non-commercial' areas (those areas outside the main play area that are not expected to produce primary CBM commercially) appear more favorable for sequestration economics than the 'commercial' areas. This is because there is more in-place methane to recover in these settings (the 'commercial' areas having already been largely depleted of methane).

Scott R. Reeves

2003-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

334

Coolerado 5 Ton RTU Performance: Western Cooling Challenge Results (Revised)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Western Cooling Efficiency Center (WCEC) developed a set of criteria for test conditions, minimum energy, and water use performance for prototype cooling equipment and identified these conditions as indicative of western state climates.

Kozubal, E.; Slayzak, S.

2010-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

335

Coordinated studies in support of hydraulic fracturing of coalbed methane. Annual report, January 1993-April 1994  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The production of natural gas from coal typically requires stimulation in the form of hydraulic fracturing and, more recently, cavity completions. The results of hydraulic fracturing treatments have ranged from extremely successful to less than satisfactory. The purpose of this work is to characterize common and potential fracturing fluids in terms of coal-fluid interactions to identify reasons for less than satisfactory performance and to ultimately devise alternative fluids and treatment procedures to optimize production following hydraulic fracturing. The laboratory data reported herein has proven helpful in designing improved hydraulic fracturing treatments and remedial treatments in the Black Warrior Basin. Acid inhibitors, scale inhibitors, additives to improve coal relative permeability to gas, and non-damaging polymer systems for hydraulic fracturing have been screened in coal damage tests. The optimum conditions for creating field-like foams in the laboratory have been explored. Tests have been run to identify minimum polymer and surfactant concentrations for applications of foam in coal. The roll of 100 mesh sand in controlling leakoff and impairing conductivity in coal has been investigated. The leakoff and proppant transport of fluids with breaker has been investigated and recommendations have been made for breaker application to minimize damage potential in coal. A data base called COAL`S has been created in Paradox (trademark) for Windows to catalogue coalbed methane activities in the Black Warrior and San Juan Basins.

Penny, G.S.; Conway, M.W.

1994-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

336

CO2 Sequestration in Coalbed Methane Reservoirs: Experimental Studies and Computer Simulations  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

One of the approaches suggested for sequestering CO{sub 2} is by injecting it in coalbed methane (CBM) reservoirs. Despite its potential importance for CO{sub 2} sequestration, to our knowledge, CO{sub 2} injection in CBM reservoirs for the purpose of sequestration has not been widely studied. Furthermore, a key element missing in most of the existing studies is the comprehensive characterization of the CBM reservoir structure. CBM reservoirs are complex porous media, since in addition to their primary pore structure, generated during coal formation, they also contain a variety of fractures, which may potentially play a key role in CO{sub 2} sequestration, as they generally provide high permeability flow paths for both CO{sub 2} and CH{sub 4}. In this report we present an overview of our ongoing experimental and modeling efforts, which aim to investigate the injection, adsorption and sequestration of CO{sub 2} in CBM reservoirs, the enhanced CH{sub 4} production that results, as well as the main factors that affect the overall operation. We describe the various experimental techniques that we utilize, and discuss their range of application and the value of the data generated. We conclude with a brief overview of our modeling efforts aiming to close the knowledge gap and fill the need in this area.

Muhammad Sahimi; Theodore T. Tsotsis

2002-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

337

Soil chemical changes resulting from irrigation with water co-produced with coalbed natural gas  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Land application of coalbed natural gas (CBNG) co-produced water is a popular management option within northwestern Powder River Basin (PRB) of Wyoming. This study evaluated the impacts of land application of CBNG waters on soil chemical properties at five sites. Soil samples were collected from different depths (0-5, 5-15, 15-30, 30-60, 60-90, and 90-120 cm) from sites that were irrigated with CBNG water for 2 to 3 yr and control sites. Chemical properties of CBNG water used for irrigation on the study sites indicate that electrical conductivity of CBNG water (EC{sub w}) and sodium adsorption ratio of CBNG water (SAR{sub w}) values were greater than those recommended for irrigation use on the soils at the study sites. Soil chemical analyses indicated that electrical conductivity of soil saturated paste extracts (ECe) and sodium adsorption ratio of soil saturated paste extracts (SAR(e)) values for irrigated sites were significantly greater (P < 0.05) than control plots in the upper 30-cm soil depths. Mass balance calculations suggested that there has been significant buildup of Na in irrigated soils due to CBNG irrigation water as well as Na mobilization within the soil profiles. Results indicate that irrigation with CBNG water significantly impacts certain soil properties, particularly if amendments are not properly utilized. This study provides information for better understanding changes in soil properties due to land application of CBNG water.

Ganjegunte, G.K.; Vance, G.F.; King, L.A. [University of Wyoming, Laramie, WY (United States). Dept. of Renewable Resources

2005-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

338

Western Pacific Regional Summary Western Pacific  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

) of the Pacific-wide (western-central and eastern Pacific Ocean) total of Pacific bigeye tuna landings reported Fisheries Commission (WCPFC) is active in the western and central Pacific Ocean and the Inter-American Tropical Tuna Commission (IATTC) is active in the eastern Pacific Ocean. Species under the purview

339

Powder River Basin Coalbed Methane Development and Produced Water Management Study  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Coalbed methane resources throughout the entire Powder River Basin were reviewed in this analysis. The study was conducted at the township level, and as with all assessments conducted at such a broad level, readers must recognize and understand the limitations and appropriate use of the results. Raw and derived data provided in this report will not generally apply to any specific location. The coal geology in the basin is complex, which makes correlation with individual seams difficult at times. Although more than 12,000 wells have been drilled to date, large areas of the Powder River Basin remain relatively undeveloped. The lack of data obviously introduces uncertainty and increases variability. Proxies and analogs were used in the analysis out of necessity, though these were always based on sound reasoning. Future development in the basin will make new data and interpretations available, which will lead to a more complete description of the coals and their fluid flow properties, and refined estimates of natural gas and water production rates and cumulative recoveries. Throughout the course of the study, critical data assumptions and relationships regarding gas content, methane adsorption isotherms, and reservoir pressure were the topics of much discussion with reviewers. A summary of these discussion topics is provided as an appendix. Water influx was not modeled although it is acknowledged that this phenomenon may occur in some settings. As with any resource assessment, technical and economic results are the product of the assumptions and methodology used. In this study, key assumptions as well as cost and price data, and economic parameters are presented to fully inform readers. Note that many quantities shown in various tables have been subject to rounding; therefore, aggregation of basic and intermediate quantities may differ from the values shown.

Advanced Resources International

2002-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

340

Factors facilitating or limiting the use of AVO for coal-bed methane  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

There are similarities and differences in employing amplitude variation with offset (AVO) to explore for gas-sand reservoirs, as opposed to coal-bed methane (CBM) reservoirs. The main similarity is that large Poisson's ratio contrasts, resulting in AVO gradient anomalies, are expected for both kinds of reservoirs. The main difference is that cleating and fracturing raise the Poisson's ratio of a coal seam as it improves its reservoir potential for CBM, while gas always lowers the Poisson's ratio of a sandstone reservoir. The top of gas sands usually has a negative AVO gradient, leading to a class one, two, or three anomaly depending on the impedance contrast with the overlying caprock. On the other hand, the top of a CBM reservoir has a positive AVO gradient, leading to a class four anomaly. Three environmental factors may limit the usage of AVO for CBM reservoirs: the smaller contrast in Poisson's ratio between a CBM reservoir and its surrounding rock, variations in the caprock of a specific CBM reservoir, and the fact that CBM is not always free to collect at structurally high points in the reservoir. However, other factors work in favor of using AVO. The strikingly high reflection amplitude of coal improves signal/noise ratio and hence the reliability of AVO measurements. The relatively simple characteristics of AVO anomalies make them easy to interpret. Because faults are known to improve the quality of CBM reservoirs, faults accompanied by AVO anomalies would be especially convincing. A 3D-AVO example offered in this paper shows that AVO might be helpful to delineate methane-rich sweet spots within coal seams.

Peng, S.P.; Chen, H.J.; Yang, R.Z.; Gao, Y.F.; Chen, X.P. [China University of Mining & Technology, Beijing (China)

2006-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "western states coalbed" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Deep subsurface drip irrigation using coal-bed sodic water: Part I. Water and solute movement  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Water co-produced with coal-bed methane (CBM) in the semi-arid Powder River Basin of Wyoming and Montana commonly has relatively low salinity and high sodium adsorption ratios that can degrade soil permeability where used for irrigation. Nevertheless, a desire to derive beneficial use from the water and a need to dispose of large volumes of it have motivated the design of a deep subsurface drip irrigation (SDI) system capable of utilizing that water. Drip tubing is buried 92 cm deep and irrigates at a relatively constant rate year-round, while evapotranspiration by the alfalfa and grass crops grown is seasonal. We use field data from two sites and computer simulations of unsaturated flow to understand water and solute movements in the SDI fields. Combined irrigation and precipitation exceed potential evapotranspiration by 300–480 mm annually. Initially, excess water contributes to increased storage in the unsaturated zone, and then drainage causes cyclical rises in the water table beneath the fields. Native chloride and nitrate below 200 cm depth are leached by the drainage. Some CBM water moves upward from the drip tubing, drawn by drier conditions above. Chloride from CBM water accumulates there as root uptake removes the water. Year over year accumulations indicated by computer simulations illustrate that infiltration of precipitation water from the surface only partially leaches such accumulations away. Field data show that 7% and 27% of added chloride has accumulated above the drip tubing in an alfalfa and grass field, respectively, following 6 years of irrigation. Maximum chloride concentrations in the alfalfa field are around 45 cm depth but reach the surface in parts of the grass field, illustrating differences driven by crop physiology. Deep SDI offers a means of utilizing marginal quality irrigation waters and managing the accumulation of their associated solutes in the crop rooting zone.

Bern, Carleton R.; Breit, George N.; Healy, Richard W.; Zupancic, John W.; Hammack, Richard

2013-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

342

Tracing coalbed natural gas-coproduced water using stable isotopes of carbon  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Recovery of hydrocarbons commonly is associated with coproduction of water. This water may be put to beneficial use or may be reinjected into subsurface aquifers. In either case, it would be helpful to establish a fingerprint for that coproduced water so that it may be tracked following discharge on the surface or reintroduction to geologic reservoirs. This study explores the potential of using {delta}{sup 13}C of dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) of coalbed natural gas (CBNG) - coproduced water as a fingerprint of its origin and to trace its fate once it is disposed on the surface. Our initial results for water samples coproduced with CBNG from the Powder River Basin show that this water has strongly positive {delta}{sup 13}C(DIC) (12 parts per thousand to 22 parts per thousand) that is readily distinguished from the negative {delta}{sup 13}C of most surface and ground water (-8 parts per thousand to -11 parts per thousand). Furthermore, the DIC concentrations in coproduced water samples are also high (more than 100 mg C/L) compared to the 20 to 50 mg C/L in ambient surface and ground water of the region. The distinctively high {delta}{sup 13}C and DIC concentrations allow us to identify surface and ground water that have incorporated CBNG-coproduced water. Accordingly, we suggest that the {delta}{sup 13}C(DIC) and DIC concentrations of water can be used for long-term monitoring of infiltration of CBNG-coproduced water into ground water and streams. Our results also show that the {delta} {sup 13}C (DIC) of CBNG-coproduced water from two different coal zones are distinct leading to the possibility of using {delta}{sup 13}C(DIC) to distinguish water produced from different coal zones.

Sharma, S.; Frost, C.D. [University of Wyoming, Laramie, WY (United States). Dept. for Renewable Resources

2008-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

343

Optimization of coalbed-methane-reservoir exploration and development strategies through integration of simulation and economics  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The unique properties and complex characteristics of coalbed methane (CBM) reservoirs, and their consequent operating strategies, call for an integrated approach to be used to explore for and develop coal plays and prospects economically. An integrated approach involves the use of sophisticated reservoir, wellbore, and facilities modeling combined with economics and decision-making criteria. A new CBM prospecting tool (CPT) was generated by combining single-well (multilayered) reservoir simulators with a gridded reservoir model, Monte Carlo (MC) simulation, and economic modules. The multilayered reservoir model is divided into pods, representing relatively uniform reservoir properties, and a 'type well' is created for each pod. At every MC iteration, type-well forecasts are generated for the pods and are coupled with economic modules. A set of decision criteria contingent upon economic outcomes and reservoir characteristics is used to advance prospect exploration from the initial exploration well to the pilot and development stages. A novel approach has been used to determine the optimal well spacing should prospect development be contemplated. CPT model outcomes include a distribution of after-tax net present value (ATNPV), mean ATNPV (expected value), chance of economic success (Pe), distribution of type-well and pod gas and water production, reserves, peak gas volume, and capita. Example application of CPT to a hypothetical prospect is provided. An integrated approach also has been used to assist with production optimization of developed reservoirs. For example, an infill-well locating tool (ILT) has been constructed to provide a quick-look evaluation of infill locations in a developed reservoir. An application of ILT to a CBM reservoir is provided.

Clarkson, C.R.; McGovern, J.M.

2005-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

344

Competitive interstate taxation of western coal  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper analyzes the potential market power of western states in setting coal severance taxes. An attempt to determine the emphasis placed by the western states on the development of their coal resources is also made. Three market structures are analyzed. One involves a western regional cartel, setting taxes collectively. The other cases are noncooperative tax equilibria with Montana and Wyoming competing against each other. We study the effects on these equilibria of changes in each region's relative emphasis on development of coal resources vs tax revenue. The welfare impacts of these tax setting policies are also addressed. The analysis is based on an activity analysis of US coal markets. The results show that the taxes associated with the noncooperative competitive tax equilibria are close to present tax levels. Additionally, we conclude that western states currently are quite efficient extractors of economic rent from coal produced within their boundaries, in terms of welfare loss per dollar of tax revenue collected. 2 figures.

Kolstad, C.D.; Wolak, F.A. Jr.

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

345

CEMI Western Regional Summit  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Please Join Assistant Secretary of Energy Dr. David Danielson for the Clean Energy Manufacturing Initiative's Western Regional Summit. Register now for this free event.

346

Western Pacific Regional Summary Western Pacific  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-central and eastern Pacific Ocean) total of Pacific bigeye tuna landings reported in 2007. Currently (WCPFC) is active in the western and central Pacific Ocean and the Inter-American Tropical Tuna Commission (IATTC) is active in the eastern Pacific Ocean. Species under the purview of the WCPFC and IATTC

347

Western Pacific Regional Summary Western Pacific  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Pacific Ocean) total of Pacific bigeye tuna landings reported in 2007. Currently, there are no catch share in the western and central Pacific Ocean and the Inter-American Tropical Tuna Commission (IATTC) is active in the eastern Pacific Ocean. Species under the purview of the WCPFC and IATTC migrate across international

348

Controls of coal fabric on coalbed gas production and compositional shift in both field production and canister desorption tests  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The production rates of coalbed gas wells commonly vary significantly, even in the same field with similar reservoir permeability and gas content. The compositional variation in produced gas is also not everywhere predictable, although in most fields produced gas becomes progressively enriched in CO, through the production life of a reservoir, such as parts of the San Juan basin. In contrast, it is generally observed that the ratio of CO{sub 2}:CH{sub 4} declines with time during field and laboratory desorption testing of coal cores. In this study, we investigate numerically the importance of coal fabric, namely cleat spacing and aperture width, on the performance of coalbed gas wells and gas compositional shifts during production. Because of the cubic relationship between fracture permeability and fracture aperture width (and thus fracture porosity) for a given cleat permeability, the production profile of coal seams varies depending on whether the permeability is distributed among closely spaced fractures (cleat) with narrower apertures or more widely spaced fractures (cleat) with wider apertures. There is a lower fracture porosity for coal with widely spaced fractures than for coal with closely spaced fractures. Therefore, the relative permeability to gas increases more rapidly for coals with more widely spaced cleats as less dewatering from fractures is required, assuming that the fractures are initially water saturated. The enrichment of CO{sub 2} in the production gas with time occurs because of the stronger adsorption of coals for CO{sub 2} than CH{sub 4}. However, during desorption of coal cores, CO{sub 2} desorbs more rapidly than methane because desorption rate is governed more by diffusion than by sorption affinity, and CO{sub 2} has much higher effective diffusivity in microporous coals than CH{sub 4}.

Cui, X.J.; Bustin, R.M. [University of British Columbia, Vancouver, BC (Canada)

2006-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

349

Treating Coalbed Natural Gas Produced Water for Beneficial Use By MFI Zeolite Membranes  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Desalination of brines produced from oil and gas fields is an attractive option for providing potable water in arid regions. Recent field-testing of subsurface sequestration of carbon dioxide for climate management purposes provides new motivation for optimizing efficacy of oilfield brine desalination: as subsurface reservoirs become used for storing CO{sub 2}, the displaced brines must be managed somehow. However, oilfield brine desalination is not economical at this time because of high costs of synthesizing membranes and the need for sophisticated pretreatments to reduce initial high TDS and to prevent serious fouling of membranes. In addition to these barriers, oil/gas field brines typically contain high concentrations of multivalent counter cations (eg. Ca{sup 2+} and SO{sub 4}{sup 2-}) that can reduce efficacy of reverse osmosis (RO). Development of inorganic membranes with typical characteristics of high strength and stability provide a valuable option to clean produced water for beneficial uses. Zeolite membranes have a well-defined subnanometer pore structure and extreme chemical and mechanical stability, thus showing promising applicability in produced water purification. For example, the MFI-type zeolite membranes with uniform pore size of {approx}0.56 nm can separate ions from aqueous solution through a mechanism of size exclusion and electrostatic repulsion (Donnan exclusion). Such a combination allows zeolite membranes to be unique in separation of both organics and electrolytes from aqueous solutions by a reverse osmosis process, which is of great interest for difficult separations, such as oil-containing produced water purification. The objectives of the project 'Treating Coalbed Natural Gas Produced Water for Beneficial Use by MFI Zeolite Membranes' are: (1) to conduct extensive fundamental investigations and understand the mechanism of the RO process on zeolite membranes and factors determining the membrane performance, (2) to improve the membranes and optimize operating conditions to enhance water flux and ion rejection, and (3) to perform long-term RO operation on tubular membranes to study membrane stability and to collect experimental data necessary for reliable evaluations of technical and economic feasibilities. Our completed research has resulted in deep understanding of the ion and organic separation mechanism by zeolite membranes. A two-step hydrothermal crystallization process resulted in a highly efficient membrane with good reproducibility. The zeolite membranes synthesized therein has an overall surface area of {approx}0.3 m{sup 2}. Multichannel vessels were designed and machined for holding the tubular zeolite membrane for water purification. A zeolite membrane RO demonstration with zeolite membranes fabricated on commercial alpha-alumina support was established in the laboratory. Good test results were obtained for both actual produced water samples and simulated samples. An overall 96.9% ion rejection and 2.23 kg/m{sup 2}.h water flux was achieved in the demonstration. In addition, a post-synthesis modification method using Al{sup 3+}-oligomers was developed for repairing the undesirable nano-scale intercrystalline pores. Considerable enhancement in ion rejection was achieved. This new method of zeolite membrane modification is particularly useful for enhancing the efficiency of ion separation from aqueous solutions because the modification does not need high temperature operation and may be carried out online during the RO operation. A long-term separation test for actual CBM produced water has indicated that the zeolite membranes show excellent ion separation and extraordinary stability at high pressure and produced water environment.

Robert Lee; Liangxiong Li

2008-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

350

Coalbed Methane Procduced Water Treatment Using Gas Hydrate Formation at the Wellhead  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Water associated with coalbed methane (CBM) production is a significant and costly process waste stream, and economic treatment and/or disposal of this water is often the key to successful and profitable CBM development. In the past decade, advances have been made in the treatment of CBM produced water. However, produced water generally must be transported in some fashion to a centralized treatment and/or disposal facility. The cost of transporting this water, whether through the development of a water distribution system or by truck, is often greater than the cost of treatment or disposal. To address this economic issue, BC Technologies (BCT), in collaboration with Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) and International Petroleum Environmental Consortium (IPEC), proposed developing a mechanical unit that could be used to treat CBM produced water by forming gas hydrates at the wellhead. This process involves creating a gas hydrate, washing it and then disassociating hydrate into water and gas molecules. The application of this technology results in three process streams: purified water, brine, and gas. The purified water can be discharged or reused for a variety of beneficial purposes and the smaller brine can be disposed of using conventional strategies. The overall objectives of this research are to develop a new treatment method for produced water where it could be purified directly at the wellhead, to determine the effectiveness of hydrate formation for the treatment of produced water with proof of concept laboratory experiments, to design a prototype-scale injector and test it in the laboratory under realistic wellhead conditions, and to demonstrate the technology under field conditions. By treating the water on-site, producers could substantially reduce their surface handling costs and economically remove impurities to a quality that would support beneficial use. Batch bench-scale experiments of the hydrate formation process and research conducted at ORNL confirmed the feasibility of the process. However, researchers at BCT were unable to develop equipment suitable for continuous operation and demonstration of the process in the field was not attempted. The significant achievements of the research area: Bench-scale batch results using carbon dioxide indicate >40% of the feed water to the hydrate formation reactor was converted to hydrate in a single pass; The batch results also indicate >23% of the feed water to the hydrate formation reactor (>50% of the hydrate formed) was converted to purified water of a quality suitable for discharge; Continuous discharge and collection of hydrates was achieved at atmospheric pressure. Continuous hydrate formation and collection at atmospheric conditions was the most significant achievement and preliminary economics indicate that if the unit could be made operable, it is potentially economic. However, the inability to continuously separate the hydrate melt fraction left the concept not ready for field demonstration and the project was terminated after Phase Two research.

BC Technologies

2009-12-30T23:59:59.000Z

351

UC Davis Western Cooling Challenge Program Requirements  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

demonstrate the capacity to produce 500 units per year, and the equipment tested must be commercially-appropriate rooftop packaged air conditioning equipment that will reduce electrical demand and energy use in Western of such technologies in the market place. Their interest in the Challenge is motivated by state and corporate goals

California at Davis, University of

352

Final Report on Transmission Pricing in the Western Interconnection  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Under this project, the Committee on Regional Electric Power Cooperation (CREPC) of the Western Interstate Energy Board developed a ''western pricing and congestion management proposal'' in order to foster efficient wholesale power markets and efficient use and expansion of the transmission grid. Drafts of this paper provided useful information to states/provinces in the Western Interconnection as Western Regional Transmission Organization (RTO) transmission pricing proposals have continued to evolve. Throughout the project there has been a gradual, but incomplete agreement on pricing systems to be used by RTOs in the West.

Douglas C. Larson; Lawrence Nordell

2003-06-25T23:59:59.000Z

353

Shallow groundwater and soil chemistry response to 3 years of subsurface drip irrigation using coalbed-methane-produced water  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Disposal of produced waters, pumped to the surface as part of coalbed methane (CBM) development, is a significant environmental issue in the Wyoming portion of the Powder River Basin, USA. High sodium adsorption ratios (SAR) of the waters could degrade agricultural land, especially if directly applied to the soil surface. One method of disposing of CBM water, while deriving beneficial use, is subsurface drip irrigation (SDI), where acidified CBM waters are applied to alfalfa fields year-round via tubing buried 0.92 m deep. Effects of the method were studied on an alluvial terrace with a relatively shallow depth to water table (?3 m). Excess irrigation water caused the water table to rise, even temporarily reaching the depth of drip tubing. The rise corresponded to increased salinity in some monitoring wells. Three factors appeared to drive increased groundwater salinity: (1) CBM solutes, concentrated by evapotranspiration; (2) gypsum dissolution, apparently enhanced by cation exchange; and (3) dissolution of native Na–Mg–SO{sub 4} salts more soluble than gypsum. Irrigation with high SAR (?24) water has increased soil saturated paste SAR up to 15 near the drip tubing. Importantly though, little change in SAR has occurred at the surface.

Bern, C. R.; Boehlke, A. R.; Engle, M. A.; Geboy, N. J.; Schroeder, K. T.; Zupancic, J. W.

2013-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

354

The University of Western Australia Submission to the Senate Education and Employment Legislation Committee  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The University of Western Australia Submission to the Senate Education and Employment Legislation Bill (2014). The University of Western Australia (UWA) was founded more than 100 years ago as the state efforts. The University of Western Australia shares the Go8's view that the current policy and funding

Tobar, Michael

355

WESTERN MICHIGAN UNIVERSITY STUDENT CODE  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

WESTERN MICHIGAN UNIVERSITY STUDENT CODE Approved by The Western Michigan University Board Michigan University Kalamazoo, MI 49008 Effective August 2008 #12;A UNIVERSITY COMMUNITY IS... ...a for the Advancement of Teaching; Ernest L. Boyer (frwd.); Princeton, New Jersey; 1990 #12;WESTERN MICHIGAN UNIVERSITY

de Doncker, Elise

356

Accounts Receivable Western Michigan University  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Accounts Receivable Western Michigan University 1903 W. Michigan Avenue Kalamazoo, MI 49008 have read the Western Michigan University Third Party Billing Policy and agree to the terms. I am authorizing Western Michigan University to bill for the specified tuition and related fees for the term

de Doncker, Elise

357

Accounts Receivable Western Michigan University  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Accounts Receivable Western Michigan University 1903 W. Michigan Avenue Kalamazoo, MI 49008-5210 269 387-4251 Fax 269 387-4227 THIRD PARTY BILLING POLICY Western Michigan University (WMU# (269) 387-4227 Western Michigan University 1903 W. Michigan Avenue E-mail: wmu

de Doncker, Elise

358

MURDOCH UNIVERSITY PERTH, WESTERN AUSTRALIA  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

MURDOCH UNIVERSITY PERTH, WESTERN AUSTRALIA INAUGRATION CEREMONY 17TH SEPTEMBER, 1974 #12;ORDER Murdoch University, the second university to be established in Western Australia, and the eighteenth in Australia, was constituted 25 July 1973 by an Act of the Parliament of Western Australia. The initial

359

Western Wind Strategy: Addressing Critical Issues for Wind Deployment  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The goal of the Western Wind Strategy project was to help remove critical barriers to wind development in the Western Interconnection. The four stated objectives of this project were to: (1) identify the barriers, particularly barriers to the operational integration of renewables and barriers identified by load-serving entities (LSEs) that will be buying wind generation, (2) communicate the barriers to state officials, (3) create a collaborative process to address those barriers with the Western states, utilities and the renewable industry, and (4) provide a role model for other regions. The project has been on the forefront of identifying and informing state policy makers and utility regulators of critical issues related to wind energy and the integration of variable generation. The project has been a critical component in the efforts of states to push forward important reforms and innovations that will enable states to meet their renewable energy goals and lower the cost to consumers of integrating variable generation.

Douglas Larson; Thomas Carr

2012-03-30T23:59:59.000Z

360

Western Kentucky thrives  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Independents and big boys struggle to keep up with increasing demand and a lack of experienced workers in the Illinois Basin. This is the second of a two part series reviewing the coal mining industry in the Illinois Basin which also includes Indiana and Western Kentucky. It includes a classification/correction to Part 1 of the article published in the September 2005 issue (see Coal Abstracts Entry data/number Dec 2005 00204). 4 photos.

Buchsbaum, L.

2005-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "western states coalbed" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Carbon Dioxide Transport and Sorption Behavior in Confined Coal Cores for Enhanced Coalbed Methane and CO2 Sequestration  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Measurements of sorption isotherms and transport properties of CO2 in coal cores are important for designing enhanced coalbed methane/CO2 sequestration field projects. Sorption isotherms measured in the lab can provide the upper limit on the amount of CO2 that might be sorbed in these projects. Because sequestration sites will most likely be in unmineable coals, many of the coals will be deep and under considerable lithostatic and hydrostatic pressures. These lithostatic pressures may significantly reduce the sorption capacities and/or transport rates. Consequently, we have studied apparent sorption and diffusion in a coal core under confining pressure. A core from the important bituminous coal Pittsburgh #8 was kept under a constant, three-dimensional external stress; the sample was scanned by X-ray computer tomography (CT) before, then while it sorbed, CO2. Increases in sample density due to sorption were calculated from the CT images. Moreover, density distributions for small volume elements inside the core were calculated and analyzed. Qualitatively, the computerized tomography showed that gas sorption advanced at different rates in different regions of the core, and that diffusion and sorption progressed slowly. The amounts of CO2 sorbed were plotted vs. position (at fixed times) and vs. time (for various locations in the sample). The resulting sorption isotherms were compared to isotherms obtained from powdered coal from the same Pittsburgh #8 extended sample. The results showed that for this single coal at specified times, the apparent sorption isotherms were dependent on position of the volume element in the core and the distance from the CO2 source. Also, the calculated isotherms showed that less CO2 was sorbed than by a powdered (and unconfined) sample of the coal. Changes in density distributions during the experiment were also observed. After desorption, the density distribution of calculated volume elements differed from the initial distribution, suggesting hysteresis and a possible rearrangement of coal structure due to CO2 sorption.

Jikich, S.A.; McLendon, T.R.; Seshadri, K.S.; Irdi, G.A.; Smith, D.H.

2007-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

362

Methane/CO{sub 2} sorption modeling for coalbed methane production and CO{sub 2} sequestration  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A thorough study of the sorption behavior of coals to methane and carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) is critical for carbon sequestration in coal seams and enhanced coalbed methane recovery. This paper discusses the results of an ad/de-sorption study of methane and CO{sub 2}, in single gas environment, on a set of coal samples taken from the San Juan and Illinois Basins. The results indicate that, under similar temperature and pressure conditions, coals exhibit higher affinity to CO{sub 2} as compared to methane and that the preferential sorption ratio varies between 2:1 and 4:1. Furthermore, the experimental data were modeled using Langmuir, BET, and Dubinin-Polanyi equations. The accuracy of the models in quantifying coal-gas sorption was compared using an error analysis technique. The Dubinin-Radushkevich equation failed to model the coal-gas sorption behavior satisfactorily. For methane, Langmuir, BET, and Dubinin-Astakhov (D-A) equations all performed satisfactorily within comparable accuracy. However, for CO{sub 2}, the performance of the D-A equation was found to be significantly better than the other two. Overall, the D-A equation fitted the experimental sorption data the best, followed by the Langmuir and BET equations. Since the D-A equation is capable of deriving isotherms for any temperature using a single isotherm, thus providing added flexibility to model the temperature variation due to injection/depletion, this is the recommended model to use. 49 refs., 9 figs., 5 tabs.

Satya Harpalani; Basanta K. Prusty; Pratik Dutta [Southern Illinois University-Carbondale, Carbondale, IL (United States). Department of Mining and Mineral Resources Engineering

2006-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

363

Volumetric strain associated with methane desorption and its impact on coalbed gas production from deep coal seams  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

For deep coal seams, significant reservoir pressure drawdown is required to promote gas desorption because of the Langmuir-type isotherm that typifies coals. Hence, a large permeability decline may occur because of pressure drawdown and the resulting increase in effective stress, depending on coal properties and the stress field during production. However, the permeability decline can potentially be offset by the permeability enhancement caused by the matrix shrinkage associated with methane desorption. The predictability of varying permeability is critical for coalbed gas exploration and production-well management. We have investigated quantitatively the effects of reservoir pressure and sorption-induced volumetric strain on coal-seam permeability with constraints from the adsorption isotherm and associated volumetric strain measured on a Cretaceous Mesaverde Group coal (Piceance basin) and derived a stress-dependent permeability model. Our results suggest that the favorable coal properties that can result in less permeability reduction during earlier production and an earlier strong permeability rebound (increase in permeability caused by coal shrinkage) with methane desorption include (1) large bulk or Young's modulus; (2) large adsorption or Langmuir volume; (3) high Langmuir pressure; (4) high initial permeability and dense cleat spacing; and (5) low initial reservoir pressure and high in-situ gas content. Permeability variation with gas production is further dependent on the orientation of the coal seam, the reservoir stress field, and the cleat structure. Well completion with injection of N2 and displacement of CH{sub 4} only results in short-term enhancement of permeability and does not promote the overall gas production for the coal studied.

Cui, X.J.; Bustin, R.M. [University of British Columbia, Vancouver, BC (Canada). Dept. of Earth & Ocean Science

2005-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

364

A multicomponent, two-phase-flow model for CO{sub 2} storage and enhanced coalbed-methane recovery  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Injection of CO{sub 2} into deep unminable coal seams is an option for geological storage of CO{sub 2} and may enhance the recovery of CH{sub 4} in these systems, making coal reservoirs interesting candidates for sequestration. New analytical solutions are presented for two-phase, three- and four-component flow with volume change on mixing in adsorbing systems. We analyze the simultaneous flow of water and gas containing multiple adsorbing components. The displacement problem is solved by the method of characteristics. Mixtures of N{sub 2}, CH{sub 4}, CO{sub 2}, and H{sub 2}O are used to represent enhanced coalbed-methane (ECBM) recovery processes. The displacement behavior is demonstrated to be strongly dependent on the relative adsorption strength of the gas components. In ternary systems, two types of solutions result. When a gas rich in CO{sub 2} displaces a less strongly adsorbing gas (such as CH{sub 4}), a shock solution is obtained. As the injected gas propagates through the system, CO{sub 2} is removed from the mobile phase by adsorption, while desorbed gas propagates ahead of the CO{sub 2} front. The adsorption of CO{sub 2} reduces the flow velocity of the injected gas, delaying breakthrough and allowing for more CO{sub 2} to be sequestered per volume of CH{sub 4} produced. For injection gases rich in N{sub 2}, a decrease in partial pressure is required to displace the preferentially adsorbed CH{sub 4} and a rarefaction solution results. In quaternary displacements with injection-gas mixtures of CO{sub 2} and N{sub 2}, the relative adsorption strength of the components results in solutions that exhibit features of both the N{sub 2}-rich and CO{sub 2}-rich ternary displacements. Analytical solutions for ECBM recovery processes provide insight into the complex interplay of adsorption, phase behavior, and convection.

Seto, C.J.; Jessen, K.; Orr, F.M. [University of Southern California, Los Angeles, CA (United States)

2009-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

365

Surface Mesonets of the Western United States  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

time by the University of Utah. 3) NEVADA TEST SITE ARL also maintains a mesonet for the Depart- ment of Energy (DOE) at the Nevada test site in southern Nevada. This network also has a fairly long history. It includes some mountain stations. 4) HANFORD... DOE/BATTELLE DOE has taken meteorological observations in the Hanford, Washington, area since World War II. Their current network, which includes some tall towers, is described in Table 1. 5) LOS ALAMOS NATIONAL LABORATORY The Los Alamos National...

Tucker, Donna F.

1997-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

366

Western Area Power Administration  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear SecurityTensile Strain Switched FerromagnetismWaste and MaterialsWenjun Deng Associate ResearchWestern Area Power

367

U.S. Coalbed Methane Proved Reserves, Reserves Changes, and Production  

Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) " ,"ClickPipelines AboutDecemberSteamYearTexas--State Offshore ShaleAcquisitionsWellsWellsU.S.20,798 18,578

368

U.S. Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Coalbed Wells (Million Cubic Feet)  

Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) " ,"ClickPipelines AboutDecemberSteamYearTexas--StateWinter 2013-14 WellsDecadeCubicYear Jan FebYear

369

Matrix Shrinkage and Swelling Effects on Economics of Enhanced Coalbed Methane Production and CO2 Sequestration in Coal  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Increases in CO2 levels in the atmosphere and their contributions to global climate change have been a major concern. It has been shown that CO2 injection can enhance the methane recovery from coal. Accordingly, sequestration costs can be partially offset by the value added product. Indeed, coal seam sequestration may be profitable, particularly with the introduction of incentives for CO2 sequestration. Hence, carbon dioxide sequestration in unmineable coals is a very attractive option, not only for environmental reasons, but also for possible economic benefits. Darcy flow through cleats is an important transport mechanism in coal. Cleat compression and permeability changes due to gas sorption desorption, changes of effective stress, and matrix swelling and shrinkage introduce a high level of complexity into the feasibility of a coal sequestration project. The economic effects of carbon dioxide-induced swelling on permeabilities and injectivities has received little (if any) detailed attention. Carbon dioxide and methane have different swelling effects on coal. In this work, the Palmer-Mansoori model for coal shrinkage and permeability increases during primary methane production was re-written to also account for coal swelling caused by carbon dioxide sorption. The generalized model was added to PSU-COALCOMP, a dual porosity reservoir simulator for primary and enhanced coalbed methane production. A standard five-spot of vertical wells and representative coal properties for Appalachian coals were used.[1] Simulations and sensitivity analyses were performed with the modified simulator for nine different parameters, including coal seam and operational parameters and economic criteria. The coal properties and operating parameters that were varied included Young’s modulus, Poisson’s ratio, the cleat porosity, and the injection pressure. The economic variables included CH4 price, CO2 cost, CO2 credit, water disposal cost, and interest rate. Net present value analyses of the simulation results included profits due to methane production, and potential incentives for CO2 sequestered. This work shows that for some coal-property values, the compressibility and cleat porosity of coal may be more important than more purely economic criteria.

Gorucu, F.B.; Jikich, S.A.; Bromhal, G.S.; Sams, W.N.; Ertekin, T.; Smith, D.H.

2005-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

370

Energy and water in the Western and Texas interconnects.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Department of Energy's Office of Electricity has initiated a $60M program to assist the electric industry in interconnection-level analysis and planning. The objective of this effort is to facilitate the development or strengthening of capabilities in each of the three interconnections serving the lower 48 states of the United States, to prepare analyses of transmission requirements under a broad range of alternative futures and develop long-term interconnection-wide transmission expansion plans. The interconnections are the Western Interconnection, the Eastern Interconnection, and the Texas Interconnection. One element of this program address the support and development of an integrated energy-water Decision Support System (DSS) that will enable planners in the Western and Texas Interconnections to analyze the potential implications of water stress for transmission and resource planning (the Eastern Interconnection is not participating in this element). Specific objectives include: (1) Develop an integrated Energy-Water Decision Support System (DSS) that will enable planners in the Western and Texas Interconnections to analyze the potential implications of water stress for transmission and resource planning. (2) Pursue the formulation and development of the Energy-Water DSS through a strongly collaborative process between members of this proposal team and the Western Electricity Coordinating Council (WECC), Western Governors Association (WGA), the Electric Reliability Council of Texas (ERCOT) and their associated stakeholder teams. (3) Exercise the Energy-Water DSS to investigate water stress implications of the transmission planning scenarios put forward by WECC, WGA, and ERCOT. The goals of this project are: (1) Develop an integrated Energy-Water Decision Support System (DSS) that will enable planners to analyze the potential implications of water stress for transmission and resource planning. (2) Pursue the formulation and development of the Energy-Water DSS through a strongly collaborative process between Western Electricity Coordinating Council, Electric Reliability Council of Texas, Western Governors Association, and Western States Water Council. (3) Exercise the Energy-Water DSS to investigate water transmission planning scenarios.

Tidwell, Vincent Carroll

2010-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

371

Western Oil Shale Conversion  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the United States Government. Neither the United States Govermnent nor any agency thereof, nor any of their employees makes any warranty, express of implied, or assumes any legal liability or responsibility for the accuracy, completeness or usefulness of any information, apparatus, product, or process disclosed, or re.presents that its use weuld not infringe privately owned rights. Reference herein to any specific commercial product, process, or service by trade name, trademark, manufacturer, or otherwise, does not necessarily constitute or imply its endorsemem, recommendation, or favoring by the United States Govertunent or any agency thereof. The views and opinions of authors expressed herein do not necessarily state or reflect those of the United States Government or any agency thereof. This report has been reproduced directly ft'ore the best available copy..Available to DOE and DOE contractors from the O_ce of Scientific and

C. Y. Cha; L. J. Fahy; R. W. Grimes; C. Y. Cha; Lj. Fahy; R. W. Grimes

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

372

ABOUT THE EDITORS Jenny Gregory AM FRHS is Winthrop Professor of History at The University of Western Australia. She  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of Western Australia. She has published widely on aspects of urban history, town planning and heritage. She edited the Historical Encyclopedia of Western Australia, 2009, and her recent monograph is City of Light Chetkovich works at the State Library of Western Australia selecting archival material for inclusion

Tobar, Michael

373

Case Study - Western Electricity Coordinating Council  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

A Smart Grid Strategy for Assuring Reliability of the Western Grid The Western Electricity Coordinating Council (WECC) is the Regional Entity responsible for coordinating and...

374

Coalbed Methane Reserves Extensions  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

724 497 736 166 278 2009-2013 Federal Offshore U.S. 0 0 0 0 0 2009-2013 Pacific (California) 0 0 0 0 0 2009-2013 Gulf of Mexico (Louisiana & Alabama) 0 0 0 0 0 2009-2013 Gulf of...

375

Coalbed Methane Reserves Adjustments  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

-14 784 -15 1,327 -309 2009-2013 Federal Offshore U.S. 0 0 0 0 0 2009-2013 Pacific (California) 0 0 0 0 0 2009-2013 Gulf of Mexico (Louisiana & Alabama) 0 0 0 0 0 2009-2013 Gulf of...

376

Coalbed Methane Reserves Sales  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

08 366 1,775 200 869 2009-2013 Federal Offshore U.S. 0 0 0 0 0 2009-2013 Pacific (California) 0 0 0 0 0 2009-2013 Gulf of Mexico (Louisiana & Alabama) 0 0 0 0 0 2009-2013 Gulf of...

377

Coalbed Methane Reserves Acquisitions  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

24 226 1,710 36 42 2009-2013 Federal Offshore U.S. 0 0 0 0 0 2009-2013 Pacific (California) 0 0 0 0 0 2009-2013 Gulf of Mexico (Louisiana & Alabama) 0 0 0 0 0 2009-2013 Gulf of...

378

Coalbed Methane Production  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) " ,"Click worksheet9,1,50022,3,,,,6,1,,781Title: Telephone:shortOil andMCKEESPORTfor the 2012Methane

379

Coalbed Methane Estimated Production  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) " ,"ClickPipelines About U.S.30Natural Gas Glossary529 633 622 56623 46 47 62CarbonCubic1,966 1,914 1,886

380

Western Wind and Solar Integration Study  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Western Wind and Solar Integration Study (WWSIS) is one of the largest regional wind and solar integration studies to date. It was initiated in 2007 to examine the operational impact of up to 35% energy penetration of wind, photovoltaics (PV), and concentrating solar power (CSP) on the power system operated by the WestConnect group of utilities in Arizona, Colorado, Nevada, New Mexico, and Wyoming (see study area map). WestConnect also includes utilities in California, but these were not included because California had already completed a renewable energy integration study for the state. This study was set up to answer questions that utilities, public utilities commissions, developers, and regional planning organizations had about renewable energy use in the west: (1) Does geographic diversity of renewable energy resource help mitigate variability; (2) How do local resources compare to out-of-state resources; (3) Can balancing area cooperation help mitigate variability; (4) What is the role and value of energy storage; (5) Should reserve requirements be modified; (6) What is the benefit of forecasting; and (7) How can hydropower help with integration of renewables? The Western Wind and Solar Integration Study is sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and run by NREL with WestConnect as a partner organization. The study follows DOE's 20% Wind Energy by 2030 report, which did not find any technical barriers to reaching 20% wind energy in the continental United States by 2030. This study and its partner study, the Eastern Wind Integration and Transmission Study, performed a more in-depth operating impact analysis to see if 20% wind energy was feasible from an operational level. In DOE/NREL's analysis, the 20% wind energy target required 25% wind energy in the western interconnection; therefore, this study considered 20% and 30% wind energy to bracket the DOE analysis. Additionally, since solar is rapidly growing in the west, 5% solar was also considered in this study. The goal of the Western Wind and Solar Integration Study is to understand the costs and operating impacts due to the variability and uncertainty of wind, PV, and CSP on the grid. This is mainly an operations study, (rather than a transmission study), although different scenarios model different transmission build-outs to deliver power. Using a detailed power system production simulation model, the study identifies operational impacts and challenges of wind energy penetration up to 30% of annual electricity consumption.

Lew, D.; Piwko, R.; Jordan, G.; Miller, N.; Clark, K.; Freeman, L.; Milligan, M.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "western states coalbed" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

RECIPROCAL BORROWING Western Australian University Libraries  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, The University of Western Australia and University of Notre Dame Australia. Western Australian University to 30 items on loan at any one time from The University of Western Australia, and up to 12 items fromRECIPROCAL BORROWING Western Australian University Libraries This guide explains the reciprocal

382

Impact of High Solar Penetration in the Western Interconnection  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper presents an overview of the variable characteristics of solar power, as well as the accompanying grid dynamic performance and operational economics for a system with significant solar generation. The paper will show results of economic operational simulations of a very high solar generation future for the western half of the United States.

Lew, D.; Miller, N.; Clark, K.; Jordan, G.; Gao, Z.

2010-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

383

Commuting behavior of western U.S. residents  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Estimation and interpretation of commutes to work has been studied extensively with respect to gender, race, and income. While the literature is extensive in these areas, there has been little research on regional differences between US states and territories. Since data which reports the commute to work is in average minutes, the distance traveled is estimated using estimates of the distance between home and work county centroids. The models differ in estimation of in-county commutes. The first assumes that the commute is equal to the radius of the county and the second estimates the commute as a weighted distance based on place location. Two data sets are compared, US National Guard data and US census data. Goal of this paper is to make conclusions about the commuting behavior of western residents through the use of these estimates, and therefore to provide a estimation method for distance commutes which can be used in further research. It is concluded that the radius method of estimation may be an over estimation, in particular in the western states. Since the non-western states are generally more homogeneously populated, this overestimation is not observed. It is recommended that the place location method be used for similar research, in particular studies dealing with western states. Suggestions are made for further research and recommendations are made for the US Army National Guard in regards to recruiting.

Caviglia, J. [Tennessee Univ., Knoxville, TN (United States)]|[Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)

1996-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

384

UCDavisWesternCoolingChallenge ProgramRequirements  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

demonstrate the capacity to produce 500 units per year, and the equipment tested must be commercially rooftop packaged air conditioning equipment that will reduce electrical demand and energy use in Western of such technologies in the market place. Their interest in the Challenge is motivated by state and corporate goals

California at Davis, University of

385

Western Turbine | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data CenterFranconia, Virginia:FAQ < RAPID Jump to:SeadovCooperative Jump to: navigation,Western Cooling EfficiencyWestern Springs isTurbine

386

Tropical Ocean Climate Study (TOCS) and Japan-United States Tropical Ocean Study (JUSTOS) on the R/V KAIYO, 25 Jan to 2 March 1997, to the Tropical Western Pacific Ocean BNL component  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Japanese U.S. Tropical Ocean Study (JUSTOS) cruise on the R/V KAIYO in the Tropical Western Pacific Ocean was a collaborative effort with participants from the Japanese Marine Science and Technology Center (JAMSTEC), the National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR), and Brookhaven National Laboratory BNL. This report is a summary of the instruments, measurements, and initial analysis of the BNL portion of the cruise only. It includes a brief description of the instrument system, calibration procedures, problems and resolutions, data collection, processing and data file descriptions. This is a working document, which is meant to provide both a good description of the work and as much information as possible in one place for future analysis.

Reynolds, R.M.; Smith, S.

1997-04-11T23:59:59.000Z

387

E-Print Network 3.0 - arid western doe Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Resources Summary: , AN UPDATE April 200854 Changes in Aridity in the Western United States Hidalgo H.G.1, Dettinger M.D.2... basin. The water budget of the Lower Colorado is...

388

WESTERN UNIVERSITY DEPARTMENT OF CHEMISTRY  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

WESTERN UNIVERSITY DEPARTMENT OF CHEMISTRY The Department of Chemistry invites applications for a probationary (tenure-track) faculty position at the rank of Assistant Professor in Inorganic Chemistry, externally funded research program, and to develop and teach innovative courses in chemistry

Sinnamon, Gordon J.

389

WESTERN WATER ASSESSMENT WHITE PAPER  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

the socio-economic effects of drought. Strategic Goals Following the findings and recommendations from two (outside of agriculture) · Few "disaster" declarations · Not even a unified roster of drought eventsWESTERN WATER ASSESSMENT WHITE PAPER Tracking Socioeconomic Impacts of Drought with Rapid Analytics

Neff, Jason

390

Effects of matrix shrinkage and swelling on the economics of enhanced-coalbed-methane production and CO{sub 2} sequestration in coal  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In this work, the Palmer-Mansoori model for coal shrinkage and permeability increases during primary methane production was rewritten to also account for coal swelling caused by CO{sub 2} sorption. The generalized model was added to a compositional, dual porosity coalbed-methane reservoir simulator for primary (CBM) and ECBM production. A standard five-spot of vertical wells and representative coal properties for Appalachian coals was used. Simulations and sensitivity analyses were performed with the modified simulator for nine different parameters, including coal seam and operational parameters and economic criteria. The coal properties and operating parameters that were varied included Young's modulus, Poisson's ratio, cleat porosity, and injection pressure. The economic variables included CH{sub 4}, price, Col Cost, CO{sub 2} credit, water disposal cost, and interest rate. Net-present value (NPV) analyses of the simulation results included profits resulting from CH{sub 4}, production and potential incentives for sequestered CO{sub 2}, This work shows that for some coal seams, the combination of compressibility, cleat porosity, and shrinkage/swelling of the coal may have a significant impact on project economics.

Gorucu, F.B.; Jikich, S.A.; Bromhal, G.S.; Sams, W.N.; Ertekin, T.; Smith, D.H. [Penn State University, University Park, PA (United States)

2007-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

391

Performance Contracting and Energy Efficiency in the State Government Market  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

strategy to reduce energy use in Western states by 20% by 2020 and to meet http://epa.gov/cleanrgy/energy-programs/state-and-local/

Bharvirkar, Ranjit

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

392

The Montana University System Water Center, located at Montana State University-Bozeman, was established by a 1964 Act of Congress that created Water Resources Research Institutes at universities in 50 states and four  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

to quantify the amount ofx water contributed to surface water from coal aquifers targeted for coalbed methane that can be used for comprehensive studies. Montana Water Center Coalbed natural gas product water enters

Lawrence, Rick L.

393

Gas and You: The Political Lay of the Land  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

by Hydraulic Fracturing of Coalbed Methane Reservoirs. Main finding of this study stated: "the injection

Sibille, Etienne

394

Wilson Wong The University of Western Australia, Australia  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Wilson Wong The University of Western Australia, Australia Wei Liu The University of Western Australia, Australia Mohammed Bennamoun The University of Western Australia, Australia Ontology Learning

Hammerton, James

395

Western Wind and Solar Integration Study  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report provides a full description of the Western Wind and Solar Integration Study (WWSIS) and its findings.

GE Energy

2010-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

396

Challenges and Opportunities for Regulating Greenhouse Gas Emissions at the State, Regional and Local Level  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

house Gas Initiative (RGGI). Shortly thereafter, Westernof Northeast states for the RGGI and Western states for theperspective. .For example, the RGGI states have already ad-

Doyle, Jim

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

397

Western Michigan University Office of Admissions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Western Michigan University Office of Admissions 1903 W Michigan Ave Kalamazoo MI 49008-5211 (269 for future reference) Eligibility REquiREmEnts Western Michigan University considers current high school: Western Michigan University AccountsReceivable 1903WMichiganAve KalamazooMI49008-5210 non-u.s. citiz

de Doncker, Elise

398

Western Wind and Solar Integration Study: Hydropower Analysis  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) study of 20% Wind Energy by 2030 was conducted to consider the benefits, challenges, and costs associated with sourcing 20% of U.S. energy consumption from wind power by 2030. This study found that with proactive measures, no insurmountable barriers were identified to meet the 20% goal. Following this study, DOE and the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) conducted two more studies: the Eastern Wind Integration and Transmission Study (EWITS) covering the eastern portion of the U.S., and the Western Wind and Solar Integration Study (WWSIS) covering the western portion of the United States. The WWSIS was conducted by NREL and research partner General Electric (GE) in order to provide insight into the costs, technical or physical barriers, and operational impacts caused by the variability and uncertainty of wind, photovoltaic, and concentrated solar power when employed to serve up to 35% of the load energy in the WestConnect region (Arizona, Colorado, Nevada, New Mexico, and Wyoming). WestConnect is composed of several utility companies working collaboratively to assess stakeholder and market needs to and develop cost-effective improvements to the western wholesale electricity market. Participants include the Arizona Public Service, El Paso Electric Company, NV Energy, Public Service of New Mexico, Salt River Project, Tri-State Generation and Transmission Cooperative, Tucson Electric Power, Xcel Energy and the Western Area Power Administration.

Acker, T.; Pete, C.

2012-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

399

Oregon State University Hatfield Marine Science Center  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Renewable Energy Center..........6 Oregon Sea Grant of Biomedical Sciences.....................................23 B. Federal and State Agencies Environmental Protection Agency...................................24 PacificCoastalEcologyBranch, Western Ecology Division

400

Oregon State University Hatfield Marine Science Center  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

....................................................... 3 Northwest National Marine Renewable Energy Center..........4 Oregon Sea Grant.....................................21 B. Federal and State Agencies Environmental Protection Agency PacificCoastalEcologyBranch, Western

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "western states coalbed" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Western Solargenics | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data CenterFranconia, Virginia:FAQ < RAPID Jump to:SeadovCooperative Jump to: navigation,Western Cooling Efficiency

402

The economic feasibility of enhanced coalbed methane recovery using CO2 sequestration in the San Juan Basin  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, due to the chemical and physical properties of carbon dioxide, CO2 sequestration is a potential option for substantially enhancing coal bed methane recovery (ECBM). The San Juan Fruitland coal has the most prolific coal seams in the United States...

Agrawal, Angeni

2007-09-17T23:59:59.000Z

403

Norm G. Hall Western Australian Marine Research laboratories  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Norm G. Hall Western Australian Marine Research laboratories Perth, Western Australia 6020, Western Australia. 61 50. Australia Ian C. Potter* School of Biological and Environmental Sciences, Murdoch University. Murdoch, Western Australia. 6 J50, Australia Comparisons between generalized growth

404

Integrated Energy-Water Planning in the Western and Texas Interconnections  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

While long-term regional electricity transmission planning has traditionally focused on cost, infrastructure utilization, and reliability, issues concerning the availability of water represent an emerging issue. Thermoelectric expansion must be considered in the context of competing demands from other water use sectors balanced with fresh and non-fresh water supplies subject to climate variability. An integrated Energy-Water Decision Support System (DSS) is being developed that will enable planners in the Western and Texas Interconnections to analyze the potential implications of water availability and cost for long-range transmission planning. The project brings together electric transmission planners (Western Electricity Coordinating Council and Electric Reliability Council of Texas) with western water planners (Western Governors’ Association and the Western States Water Council). This paper lays out the basic framework for this integrated Energy-Water DSS.

Vincent Tidwell; John Gasper; Robert Goldstein; Jordan Macknick; Gerald Sehlke; Michael Webber; Mark Wigmosta

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

405

Western Area Power Administration Rocky Mountain Region (Western)  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear SecurityTensile Strain Switched FerromagnetismWaste and MaterialsWenjun Deng Associate ResearchWestern AreaRocky

406

Hydraulic fracturing and wellbore completion of coalbed methane wells in the Powder River Basin, Wyoming: Implications for water and gas production  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Excessive water production (more than 7000 bbl/month per well) from many coalbed methane (CBM) wells in the Powder River Basin of Wyoming is also associated with significant delays in the time it takes for gas production to begin. Analysis of about 550 water-enhancement activities carried out during well completion demonstrates that such activities result in hydraulic fracturing of the coal. Water-enhancement activities, consists of pumping 60 bbl of water/min into the coal seam during approximately 15 min. This is done to clean the well-bore and to enhance CBM production. Hydraulic fracturing is of concern because vertical hydraulic fracture growth could extend into adjacent formations and potentially result in excess CBM water production and inefficient depressurization of coals. Analysis of the pressure-time records of the water-enhancement tests enabled us to determine the magnitude of the least principal stress (S{sub 3}) in the coal seams of 372 wells. These data reveal that because S{sub 3} switches between the minimum horizontal stress and the overburden at different locations, both vertical and horizontal hydraulic fracture growth is inferred to occur in the basin, depending on the exact location and coal layer. Relatively low water production is observed for wells with inferred horizontal fractures, whereas all of the wells associated with excessive water production are characterized by inferred vertical hydraulic fractures. The reason wells with exceptionally high water production show delays in gas production appears to be inefficient depressurization of the coal caused by water production from the formations outside the coal. To minimize CBM water production, we recommend that in areas of known vertical fracture propagation, the injection rate during the water-enhancement tests should be reduced to prevent the propagation of induced fractures into adjacent water-bearing formations.

Colmenares, L.B.; Zoback, M.D. [Stanford University, Stanford, CA (United States). Dept. of Geophysics

2007-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

407

Western Hemisphere Oil Products Balance  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) " ,"ClickPipelines About U.S. NaturalA. Michael SchaalNovember1. Foreign salesWestern Hemisphere Oil

408

Western Massachusetts Electric- Commercial Energy Efficiency Rebates  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Western Massachusetts Electric (WMECO) helps commercial and industrial customers offset the additional costs of purchasing and installing energy efficient equipment. WMECO offers rebates for...

409

Western Area Power Administration Transmission Infrastructure...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Expected to Borrow Next WHAT IS WESTERN? * Power Marketing Administration under DOE * Wholesale electricity supplier, 57 hydropower plants, 10,479 MW capacity * 682 long-termfirm...

410

Problems of intraplate extensional tectonics, Western United...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

on the Great Basin Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Conference Proceedings: Problems of intraplate extensional tectonics, Western United...

411

at Western University Located in London, Ontario, Western University is situated directly in the  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ProjectCentre@Western: joint venture between Western and the Fraunhofer Institute of Chemical Technology in Germany · As Canada, construction, clean technologies, IT and energy storage Wind Engineering · Boundary

Denham, Graham

412

How Western Does Business: An Explanation of Western's Products and Services  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The mission of the Western Area Power Administration is to market and deliver reliable, renewable, cost-based hydroelectric power and related services. This guide provides an overview of Western’s history and how Western carries out that mission and provides electrical, transmission and ancillary services. It also discusses how we develop plans for marketing our most valuable resources—long-term firm capacity and energy.

none,

2012-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

413

Subsurface Drip Irrigation As a Methold to Beneficiallly Use Coalbed Methane Produced Water: Initial Impacts to Groundwater, Soil Water, and Surface Water  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Coalbed methane (CBM) currently accounts for >8% of US natural gas production. Compared to traditional sources, CBM co-produces large volumes of water. Of particular interest is CBM development in the Powder River Basin of Wyoming and Montana, the 2nd largest CBM production field in the US, where CBM produced waters exhibit low to moderate TDS and relatively high sodium-adsorption ratio (SAR) that could potentially impact the surface environment. Subsurface drip irrigation (SDI) is an emerging technology for beneficial use of pre-treated CBM waters (injectate) which are emitted into the root zone of an agricultural field to aid in irrigation. The method is designed to minimize environmental impacts by storing potentially detrimental salts in the vadose zone. Research objectives include tracking the transport and fate of the water and salts from the injected CBM produced waters at an SDI site on an alluvial terrace, adjacent to the Powder River, Johnson County, Wyoming. This research utilizes soil science, geochemical, and geophysical methods. Initial results from pre-SDI data collection and the first 6-months of post-SDI operation will be presented. Substantial ranges in conductivity (2732-9830 {micro}S/cm) and dominant cation chemistry (Ca-SO{sub 4} to Na-SO{sub 4}) have been identified in pre-SDI analyses of groundwater samples from the site. Ratios of average composition of local ground water to injectate demonstrate that the injectate contains lower concentrations of most constituents except for Cr, Zn, and Tl (all below national water quality standards) but exhibits a higher SAR. Composition of soil water varies markedly with depth and between sites, suggesting large impacts from local controls, including ion exchange and equilibrium with gypsum and carbonates. Changes in chemical composition and specific conductivity along surface water transects adjacent to the site are minimal, suggesting that discharge to the Powder River from groundwater underlying the SDI fields is negligible. Findings from this project provide a critical understanding of water and salt dynamics associated with SDI systems using CBM produced water. The information obtained can be used to improve SDI and other CBM produced water use/disposal technologies in order to minimize adverse impacts.

Engle, M.A.: Bern, C: Healy, R: Sams, J: Zupancic, J.: Schroeder, K.

2009-10-18T23:59:59.000Z

414

Reuse of Produced Water from CO2 Enhanced Oil Recovery, Coal-Bed Methane, and Mine Pool Water by Coal-Based Power Plants  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Power generation in the Illinois Basin is expected to increase by as much as 30% by the year 2030, and this would increase the cooling water consumption in the region by approximately 40%. This project investigated the potential use of produced water from CO{sub 2} enhanced oil recovery (CO{sub 2}-EOR) operations; coal-bed methane (CBM) recovery; and active and abandoned underground coal mines for power plant cooling in the Illinois Basin. Specific objectives of this project were: (1) to characterize the quantity, quality, and geographic distribution of produced water in the Illinois Basin; (2) to evaluate treatment options so that produced water may be used beneficially at power plants; and (3) to perform a techno-economic analysis of the treatment and transportation of produced water to thermoelectric power plants in the Illinois Basin. Current produced water availability within the basin is not large, but potential flow rates up to 257 million liters per day (68 million gallons per day (MGD)) are possible if CO{sub 2}-enhanced oil recovery and coal bed methane recovery are implemented on a large scale. Produced water samples taken during the project tend to have dissolved solids concentrations between 10 and 100 g/L, and water from coal beds tends to have lower TDS values than water from oil fields. Current pretreatment and desalination technologies including filtration, adsorption, reverse osmosis (RO), and distillation can be used to treat produced water to a high quality level, with estimated costs ranging from $2.6 to $10.5 per cubic meter ($10 to $40 per 1000 gallons). Because of the distances between produced water sources and power plants, transportation costs tend to be greater than treatment costs. An optimization algorithm was developed to determine the lowest cost pipe network connecting sources and sinks. Total water costs increased with flow rate up to 26 million liters per day (7 MGD), and the range was from $4 to $16 per cubic meter ($15 to $60 per 1000 gallons), with treatment costs accounting for 13 â?? 23% of the overall cost. Results from this project suggest that produced water is a potential large source of cooling water, but treatment and transportation costs for this water are large.

Chad Knutson; Seyed Dastgheib; Yaning Yang; Ali Ashraf; Cole Duckworth; Priscilla Sinata; Ivan Sugiyono; Mark Shannon; Charles Werth

2012-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

415

Jeans, Boots, and Starry Skies: Tales of a Gay Country-and-Western Bar and Places Nearby.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??Fourteen short stories, with five interspersed vignettes, describe the lives of gay people in the southwestern United States, centered around a fictional gay country-and-western bar… (more)

Gay, Wayne Lee

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

416

Australasian Conference on the Mechanics of Structures and Materials (ACMSM 18) Perth, Western Australia 01-03 December 2004  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, Western Australia 01-03 December 2004 Comparative study of the failure mechanisms in steel and concrete Rizkalla2 1 Monash University, VIC 3800, Australia 2 North Carolina State University, Raleigh, North

417

Case Western Reserve University Chart of Accounts  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Case Western Reserve University Chart of Accounts July 7, 2004 1 SPEEDTYPE / PROJECT PREFIXES Funds PLT Plant CIP Construction in Progress #12;Case Western Reserve University Chart of Accounts July Annual Fund Gift RES Research TRN Training SPC Special Programs/Projects OSA Other Sponsored Activities

Rollins, Andrew M.

418

Western Michigan University Office of Admissions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Western Michigan University Office of Admissions 1903 W Michigan Ave Kalamazoo MI 49008-5211 (269 __________________________________________________________________________ Date __________________________________ Please return to: Western Michigan University · Office Readmission Office of Admissions 1903 W Michigan Ave Kalamazoo MI 49008-5211 Returning Students (Good Standing

de Doncker, Elise

419

2011 Annual Report [WESTERN AREA POWER ADMINISTRATION  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Western’s achievements for 2011 are reported and include: Experienced a banner water year – meaning more hydropower delivered; Changed energy scheduling— to better support intermittent renewable resources; Maintained reliability— ensuring maximum use of the grid by reducing the frequency and duration of planned and unplanned outages; Connected communities— providing customers energy products and related services at cost-based rates; Managed transmission projects.

none,

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

420

Analysis of Critical Permeabilty, Capillary Pressure and Electrical Properties for Mesaverde Tight Gas Sandstones from Western U.S. Basins  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Although prediction of future natural gas supply is complicated by uncertainty in such variables as demand, liquefied natural gas supply price and availability, coalbed methane and gas shale development rate, and pipeline availability, all U.S. Energy Information Administration gas supply estimates to date have predicted that Unconventional gas sources will be the dominant source of U.S. natural gas supply for at least the next two decades (Fig. 1.1; the period of estimation). Among the Unconventional gas supply sources, Tight Gas Sandstones (TGS) will represent 50-70% of the Unconventional gas supply in this time period (Fig. 1.2). Rocky Mountain TGS are estimated to be approximately 70% of the total TGS resource base (USEIA, 2005) and the Mesaverde Group (Mesaverde) sandstones represent the principal gas productive sandstone unit in the largest Western U.S. TGS basins including the basins that are the focus of this study (Washakie, Uinta, Piceance, northern Greater Green River, Wind River, Powder River). Industry assessment of the regional gas resource, projection of future gas supply, and exploration programs require an understanding of reservoir properties and accurate tools for formation evaluation. The goal of this study is to provide petrophysical formation evaluation tools related to relative permeability, capillary pressure, electrical properties and algorithms for wireline log analysis. Detailed and accurate moveable gas-in-place resource assessment is most critical in marginal gas plays and there is need for quantitative tools for definition of limits on gas producibility due to technology and rock physics and for defining water saturation. The results of this study address fundamental questions concerning: (1) gas storage; (2) gas flow; (3) capillary pressure; (4) electrical properties; (5) facies and upscaling issues; (6) wireline log interpretation algorithms; and (7) providing a web-accessible database of advanced rock properties. The following text briefly discusses the nature of these questions. Section I.2 briefly discusses the objective of the study with respect to the problems reviewed.

Alan Byrnes; Robert Cluff; John Webb; John Victorine; Ken Stalder; Daniel Osburn; Andrew Knoderer; Owen Metheny; Troy Hommertzheim; Joshua Byrnes; Daniel Krygowski; Stefani Whittaker

2008-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "western states coalbed" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

ASTER Thermal Anomalies in western Colorado  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Citation Information: Originator: Earth Science &Observation Center (ESOC), CIRES, University of Colorado at Boulder Publication Date: 2012 Title: ASTER Thermal Anomalies Western Edition: First Publication Information: Publication Place: Earth Science & Observation Center, Cooperative Institute for Research in Environmental Science (CIRES), University of Colorado, Boulder Publisher: Earth Science &Observation Center (ESOC), CIRES, University of Colorado at Boulder Description: This layer contains the areas identified as areas of anomalous surface temperature from ASTER satellite imagery. The temperature is calculated using the Emissivity Normalization Algorithm that separate temperature from emissivity. Areas that had temperature greater than 2?, and areas with temperature equal to 1? to 2?, were considered ASTER modeled very warm and warm surface exposures (thermal anomalies), respectively Spatial Domain: Extent: Top: 4547052.446651 m Left: 158917.090117 m Right: 4101162.228281 m Bottom: 4101162.228281 m Contact Information: Contact Organization: Earth Science &Observation Center (ESOC), CIRES, University of Colorado at Boulder Contact Person: Khalid Hussein Address: CIRES, Ekeley Building Earth Science & Observation Center (ESOC) 216 UCB City: Boulder State: CO Postal Code: 80309-0216 Country: USA Contact Telephone: 303-492-6782 Spatial Reference Information: Coordinate System: Universal Transverse Mercator (UTM) WGS’1984 Zone 13N False Easting: 500000.00000000 False Northing: 0.00000000 Central Meridian: -105.00000000 Scale Factor: 0.99960000 Latitude of Origin: 0.00000000 Linear Unit: Meter Datum: World Geodetic System ’1984 (WGS ’1984) Prime Meridian: Greenwich Angular Unit: Degree Digital Form: Format Name: Shape file

Zehner, Richard E.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

422

INTEGRATED INSAR AND GPS STUDIES OF CRUSTAL DEFORMATION IN THE WESTERN GREAT BASIN, WESTERN UNITED STATES  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

UK - Zhenhong.Li@ges.gla.ac.uk KEY WORDS: InSAR, GPS, crustal deformation, Yucca Mountain, vertical GPS networks which are limited by their station spacing. We select the Yucca Mountain, Nevada region

Tingley, Joseph V.

423

Remotely Sensed Thermal Anomalies in western Colorado  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Citation Information: Originator: Earth Science &Observation Center (ESOC), CIRES, University of Colorado at Boulder Publication Date: 2012 Title: Landsat Thermal Anomalies Western Edition: First Publication Information: Publication Place: Earth Science & Observation Center, Cooperative Institute for Research in Environmental Science (CIRES), University of Colorado, Boulder Publisher: Earth Science &Observation Center (ESOC), CIRES, University of Colorado at Boulder Description: This layer contains the areas identified as areas of anomalous surface temperature from Landsat satellite imagery in Western Colorado. Data was obtained for two different dates. The digital numbers of each Landsat scene were converted to radiance and the temperature was calculated in degrees Kelvin and then converted to degrees Celsius for each land cover type using the emissivity of that cover type. And this process was repeated for each of the land cover types (open water, barren, deciduous forest and evergreen forest, mixed forest, shrub/scrub, grassland/herbaceous, pasture hay, and cultivated crops). The temperature of each pixel within each scene was calculated using the thermal band. In order to calculate the temperature an average emissivity value was used for each land cover type within each scene. The NLCD 2001 land cover classification raster data of the zones that cover Colorado were downloaded from USGS site and used to identify the land cover types within each scene. Areas that had temperature residual greater than 2?, and areas with temperature equal to 1? to 2?, were considered Landsat modeled very warm and warm surface exposures (thermal anomalies), respectively Spatial Domain: Extent: Top: 4546381.234113 m Left: 140556.857021 m Right: 573390.000000 m Bottom: 4094583.641581 m Contact Information: Contact Organization: Earth Science &Observation Center (ESOC), CIRES, University of Colorado at Boulder Contact Person: Khalid Hussein Address: CIRES, Ekeley Building Earth Science & Observation Center (ESOC) 216 UCB City: Boulder State: CO Postal Code: 80309-0216 Country: USA Contact Telephone: 303-492-6782 Spatial Reference Information: Coordinate System: Universal Transverse Mercator (UTM) WGS’1984 Zone 13N False Easting: 500000.00000000 False Northing: 0.00000000 Central Meridian: -105.00000000 Scale Factor: 0.99960000 Latitude of Origin: 0.00000000 Linear Unit: Meter Datum: World Geodetic System ’1984 (WGS ’1984) Prime Meridian: Greenwich Angular Unit: Degree Digital Form: Format Name: Shape file

Hussein, Khalid

2012-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

424

Western Employee Presents Wind Award to Minnkota | Department...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Western Employee Presents Wind Award to Minnkota Western Employee Presents Wind Award to Minnkota April 7, 2011 - 2:47pm Addthis Randy Manion Director of Renewable Energy, Western...

425

Preliminary Notice of Violation,Western Allied Mechanical, Inc...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Western Allied Mechanical, Inc. - WEA-2009-03 Preliminary Notice of Violation,Western Allied Mechanical, Inc. - WEA-2009-03 April 7, 2009 Issued to Western Allied Mechanical, Inc....

426

Preparation for upgrading western subbituminous coal  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The objective of this project was to establish the physical and chemical characteristics of western coal and determine the best preparation technologies for upgrading this resource. Western coal was characterized as an abundant, easily mineable, clean, low-sulfur coal with low heating value, high moisture, susceptibility to spontaneous ignition, and considerable transit distances from major markets. Project support was provided by the Morgantown Energy Technology Center (METC) of the US Department of Energy (DOE). The research was conducted by the Western Research Institute, (WRI) in Laramie, Wyoming. The project scope of work required the completion of four tasks: (1) project planning, (2) literature searches and verbal contacts with consumers and producers of western coal, (3) selection of the best technologies to upgrade western coal, and (4) identification of research needed to develop the best technologies for upgrading western coals. The results of this research suggest that thermal drying is the best technology for upgrading western coals. There is a significant need for further research in areas involving physical and chemical stabilization of the dried coal product. Excessive particle-size degradation and resulting dustiness, moisture reabsorption, and high susceptibility to spontaneous combustion are key areas requiring further research. Improved testing methods for the determination of equilibrium moisture and susceptibility to spontaneous ignition under various ambient conditions are recommended.

Grimes, R.W.; Cha, C.Y.; Sheesley, D.C.

1990-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

427

Western fuels symposium. 19th international conference on lignite, brown, and subbituminous coals. Proceedings  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Topics covered at the conference include: advanced power systems; environmental issues and control technologies - multipollutants and mercury; power plant systems performance; fuel by-products utilization; fuel properties and upgrading; coalbed methane and water minimization; and carbon sequestration. A few of the papars only consist of a printout of the overheads/viewgraphs. The proceedings are also available on CD-ROM.

NONE

2004-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

428

THURSDAY: Deputy Secretary of Energy to Visit Western Area Power...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

THURSDAY: Deputy Secretary of Energy to Visit Western Area Power Administration Transmission Substation THURSDAY: Deputy Secretary of Energy to Visit Western Area Power...

429

The economics of carbon sequestration in western Oregon forests.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??This study considered regional forest policies for sequestering carbon in existing forests in western Oregon. A model of log markets in western Oregon was employed… (more)

Im, Eun Ho

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

430

Oregon State University Sun Grant Western Regional Center  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

is a newly emerging crop that has considerable potential as a biofuels feedstock in the inland Pacific resistant mutant. The team was not able to select plants with a higher level of resistance in the second generation (F2) progeny of the different crosses. They are in the progress of making F2 populations between

Tullos, Desiree

431

Oregon State University Sun Grant Western Regional Center  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

is investigating the use of coconut, kamani, and Jatropha trees as feedstocks for biodiesel production, which would of Hawaii) are producing oils from coconut, kamani, and Jatropha. The oil producing institutions have

Tullos, Desiree

432

Oregon State University Sun Grant Western Regional Center  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

for ethanol production. Progress to Date The research team has determined the sugar content of three varieties of sorghum, and has successfully fermented sorghum juice to ethanol in the laboratory. Juice preservation sorghum juice that was harvested in October 2009 was fermented to ethanol at the laboratory scale using

Tullos, Desiree

433

Oregon State University Sun Grant Western Regional Center  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and Economic Analysis of Cellulosic Ethanol from Grass Straw in the Pacific Northwest Ganti Murthy, Oregon to cellulosic ethanol. This study will provide information on using Pacific Northwest biomass in a sustainable and pretreatment processes on ethanol yields in Pacific Northwest U.S.). Contact: Ganti Murthy, Biological

Tullos, Desiree

434

New Geothermal Prospects in the Western United States Show Promise...  

Energy Savers [EERE]

new 2013 Annual U.S. Geothermal Power Production and Development Report, published by the Geothermal Energy Association this week. With an estimate of more than 500 Megawatts of...

435

Mapping Geothermal Potential In The Western United States | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home5b9fcbce19 No revision hasInformation Earth's Heat JumpIncMAKGalway Bay(HeldManhattan, Kansas: EnergyNo

436

New Geothermal Prospects in the Western United States Show Promise |  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:Year in3.pdfEnergy HealthCommentsAugustNationalMarkets with WindPrudent

437

Problems of intraplate extensional tectonics, Western United States, with  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data CenterFranconia, Virginia: Energy ResourcesLoadingPenobscot County, Maine:Plug Power IncPowderClimateMeadows, NewPrior

438

Transmission Siting in the Western United States | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data CenterFranconia, Virginia:FAQ < RAPID Jump to:Seadov Pty LtdSteen,LtdInformation Dixie Valley GeothermalTransmark Renewables Greenin

439

Oregon State University Sun Grant Western Regional Center  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

agronomic practices to incorporate camelina into PNW crop production systems and assist the fledgling the optimum planting date and to assess planting methods for camelina across the PNW; 2) to identify best Dates and Methods Two planting methods ­ direct drilling and broadcast with packing ­ and six planting

Tullos, Desiree

440

United States Department of the Interior WESTERN FISHERIES RESEARCH CENTER  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

goals of many in the natural resource community to restore habitats and the biological systems within of ecosystem-based management, multi-species approaches, and for greater emphasis on the environmental effects effects on habitat quality. Many of our contaminant discussions are estuarine-based and are presented

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "western states coalbed" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

Coalbed Methane Reserves Revision Increases  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1,563 2,589 2,071 971 3,123 2009-2013 Federal Offshore U.S. 0 0 0 0 0 2009-2013 Pacific (California) 0 0 0 0 0 2009-2013 Gulf of Mexico (Louisiana & Alabama) 0 0 0 0 0 2009-2013...

442

2005 international coalbed methane symposium  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Papers are under the following topics: well completions; diversity; geology/resource assessment; reservoirs; and carbon dioxide sequestration.

NONE

2005-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

443

Coalbed Methane New Field Discoveries  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

0 0 0 0 0 2009-2013 Federal Offshore U.S. 0 0 0 0 0 2009-2013 Pacific (California) 0 0 0 0 0 2009-2013 Gulf of Mexico (Louisiana & Alabama) 0 0 0 0 0 2009-2013 Gulf of Mexico...

444

Coalbed Methane Reserves Revision Decreases  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

,486 2,914 1,668 3,871 1,998 2009-2013 Federal Offshore U.S. 0 0 0 0 0 2009-2013 Pacific (California) 0 0 0 0 0 2009-2013 Gulf of Mexico (Louisiana & Alabama) 0 0 0 0 0 2009-2013...

445

Coalbed Methane | Department of Energy  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "of Energy Power Systems EngineeringDepartment of4CenterPointChristinaClayCoal to Liquids » Coal and

446

NREL Variability Analysis for the Western Interconnect (Presentation)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This presentation investigates the effects of several Energy Imbalance Markets implementations in the Western Interconnect.

Milligan, M.; Kirby, B.; King, J.

2011-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

447

The Siwaliks of western Nepal I. Geometry and kinematics  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The Siwaliks of western Nepal I. Geometry and kinematics J.L. Mugniera, *, P. Leturmya , G. Masclea-western Nepal, and beneath 14.6 Ma sediments in mid-western Nepal, i.e., above the base of the Siwalik Group. Unconformities have been observed in the upper Siwalik member of western Nepal both on satellite images

Husson, Laurent

448

Case Western Reserve University Names First Maltz Professor in Energy Innovation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

to be at Case Western Reserve University and at the forefront of North America's new energy economy," said's untapped potential for off-shore wind and the state's existing infrastructure in manufacturing of wind farm grid interaction; water desalination systems using renewable energy; and parallel kinematics

Rollins, Andrew M.

449

Big Science, Small Scale Western University has made significant investments in nanotechnology  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Big Science, Small Scale Western University has made significant investments in nanotechnology in materials and biomaterials. Nanotechnology is poised to revolutionize and advance many vital sectors in nanotechnology and photonics · Houses state-of-the-art instruments, with tools for SEM capabilities and focused

Denham, Graham

450

Thorium isotopes in the western Mediterranean Sea: an insight into the marine particle dynamics  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Thorium isotopes in the western Mediterranean Sea: an insight into the marine particle dynamics M rights reserved. Keywords: thorium; isotopes; sea water; particles; sedimentation; Mediterranean Sea 1 physical, chemical and biological processes and sometimes non-steady-state condi- tions [1^4]. Thorium

Coppola, Laurent

451

2012 Annual Report [WESTERN AREA POWER ADMINISTRATION  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Fiscal Year 2012 brought some tumultuous and uncertain times to Western. The utility industry and technology continued to evolve, and the demand for constant flow of power and transmission system reliability continued to increase. Western kept pace by continuing to deliver reliable, cost-based hydropower while reviewing and updating business practices that took into account how the energy industry is evolving. During this time of exponential change, Western tackled many challenges, including: Reviewing the Transmission Infrastructure Program processes and procedures; Responding to Secretary of Energy Steven Chu’s memorandum to create a modern, efficient and reliable transmission grid; Weathering record-breaking natural disasters in our service territory; Completing our role in TIP’s flagship project—the Montana Alberta Tie Ltd. transmission line; Incorporating new, far-reaching regulations and industry trends.

none,

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

452

Oregon State University Hatfield Marine Science Center  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

....................................................... 4 Northwest National Marine Renewable Energy Center..........5 Oregon Sea Grant of Biomedical Sciences.....................................22 B. Federal and State Agencies Environmental Protection Agency...................................23 PacificCoastalEcologyBranch, Western Ecology Division

453

The Outlier State: Alaska’s FY 2012 Budget  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

State: Alaska’s FY 2012 Budget themselves Alaskans United toJ. (2011) “What Recession? Alaska’s 2011 Budget,” in AnnualWestern States Budget Review, and California Journal of

McBeath, Jerry; Corbin, Tanya Buhler

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

454

Semi-annual report for the unconventional gas recovery program, period ending March 31, 1980  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Four subprograms are reported on: methane recovery from coalbeds, Eastern gas shales, Western gas sands, and methane from geopressured aquifers. (DLC)

Manilla, R.D.

1980-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

455

Case Western Reserve University Chart of Accounts  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of the following: ANN LON CIP OPR CSR OSA END PLT FHB RES INC SPC INS TRN All other SpeedTypes will populate 102330 Non-Govt Construction 102340 Non-Govt CIP Movable Equipment 102350 Govt Construction 102360 Govt CIP Movable Equip 102370 CIP - Site Preparation 102371 CIP Surveying #12;Case Western Reserve

Rollins, Andrew M.

456

Northern and Western Minnesota and NW Wisconsin  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Super Haul Corridors g)! Western Truck Route h)! Lancaster Border Crossing i)! Designated Truck Network factors. 6. Super Haul Truck Corridors Conduct an analysis of best the best routes for moving heavy Commission d)! Intermodal Improvements at Dilworth e)! Truck Size and Weight Harmonization f)! Designated

Minnesota, University of

457

Regional Summary Western Pacific Management Context  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

.5 million pounds) of the Pacific-wide (western-central and eastern Pacific Ocean) total of Pacific bigeye Ocean and the Inter-American Tropical Tuna Commission (IATTC) is active in the eastern Pacific Ocean coordinated management between countries with fishing interests in the Pacific Ocean. The annual bigeye tuna

458

Regional Summary Western Pacific Management Context  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-central and eastern Pacific Ocean) total of Pacific bigeye tuna landings reported in 2009. Currently (WCPFC) is active in the western and central Pacific Ocean and the Inter-American Tropical Tuna Commission (IATTC) is active in the eastern Pacific Ocean. Species under the purview of the WCPFC and IATTC

459

Mass Wasting in the Western Galapagos Islands  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

the Hawaiian Islands, the western Galapagos Islands appear to be characterized by small slump sheets existing along the steep shallow submarine flanks of the island and by debris flows that are flanked by rift zones and extend off the platform. This study...

Hall, Hillary

2012-10-19T23:59:59.000Z

460

Lots of wonderful Vendors! Western Art  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Fresh Market Indiantown Lots of wonderful Vendors! · Western Art · Quail Eggs & Honey · Canning, Nov. 30 Seminole Inn Buy Locally Grown Produce and Arts & Crafts Vendors may contact ( 772) 597 Indiantown Fresh Market at the Seminole Inn · 11am - 3pm VENDOR APPLICATION Last Sunday of the Month Request

Watson, Craig A.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "western states coalbed" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


461

ANNUAL REPORT WESTERN COOLING EFFICIENCY CENTER  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Sinks for Unitary Air Conditioners 10 Graywater Reuse for Evaporative Cooling 14 In-Home Energy Display COOLING EFFICIENCY CENTER WESTERN COOLING EFFICIENCY CENTER EXPLORING MANY OPTIONS FOR ENERGY EFFICIENCY and leadership in the field of energy efficiency. This document, the second Annual Report on Cooling in the West

California at Davis, University of

462

QER- Comment of Western Environmental Law Center  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

To whom it may concern, I provided the following comments at the public meeting in Santa Fe, NM on 8/11/14: My name is Thomas Singer, and I am a Senior Policy Advisor at the Western Environmental Law Center.

463

PROJECT REPORT WESTERN COOLING CHALLENGE LABORATORY  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

that reduce energy, water consumption and peak electricity demand associated with cooling in the Western-cool- er to reduce the refrigerant condensing temperature of a vapor compression system, then cycles Davis Energy Efficiency Center in 2007 through a grant from the California Clean Energy Fund

California at Davis, University of

464

First Western Forum on Energy & Water Sustainability  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

First Western Forum on Energy & Water Sustainability March 22, 2007 WATER PLAN: 2000-2050 CITY;Tucson Active Management Area Tucson Active Management Area City of Tucson Tucson Active Management Area-2000 Tucson Active Management Area #12;City of Tucson 1940 #12;City of Tucson 1945 #12;City of Tucson 1950 #12

Keller, Arturo A.

465

WWU Sustainability Academy Western Washington University  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

WWU Sustainability Academy Western Washington University Dear colleagues, We cordially extend to you this invitation to join the WWU Sustainability Academy! Following several years of discussion, a group of faculty has started the (tentatively named) "WWU Sustainability Academy." Our goal is to build

Zaferatos, Nicholas C.

466

Fracking in western Maryland Johan Schijf  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Fracking in western Maryland Johan Schijf Chesapeake Biological Laboratory University of Maryland Center for Environmental Science #12;This seminar will consist of three parts: I. What is fracking and gas #12;What is the difference between conventional gas drilling and fracking? In many places natural

Boynton, Walter R.

467

Western Wind and Solar Integration Study Phase 2: Preprint  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Western Wind and Solar Integration Study (WWSIS) investigates the impacts of high penetrations of wind and solar power into the Western Interconnection of the United States. WWSIS2 builds on the Phase 1 study but with far greater refinement in the level of data inputs and production simulation. It considers the differences between wind and solar power on systems operations. It considers mitigation options to accommodate wind and solar when full costs of wear-and-tear and full impacts of emissions rates are taken into account. It determines wear-and-tear costs and emissions impacts. New data sets were created for WWSIS2, and WWSIS1 data sets were refined to improve realism of plant output and forecasts. Four scenarios were defined for WWSIS2 that examine the differences between wind and solar and penetration level. Transmission was built out to bring resources to load. Statistical analysis was conducted to investigate wind and solar impacts at timescales ranging from seasonal down to 5 minutes.

Lew, D.; Brinkman, G.; Ibanez, E.; Hodge, B.-M.; King, J.

2012-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

468

Famennian microbial reef facies, Napier and Oscar Ranges, Canning Basin, western Australia  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Geol. Rundsch. , Western Australia: Geologic Maps of theof the Canning basin, Western Australia. West. Aust. Geol.the Canning Basin, Western Australia. In: Stromatolites (Ed.

Stephens, N P; Sumner, Dawn Y.

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

469

Late devonian carbon isotope stratigraphy and sea level fluctuations, Canning Basin, Western Australia  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

reef, Canning Basin, Western Australia. Palaeontology 43,the Canning Basin, Western Australia. In: Loucks, R.G. ,Canning Basin, Western Australia. Ph.D Thesis, University of

Stephens, N P; Sumner, Dawn Y.

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

470

arc western pacific: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Cane is then modified to investigate the evolution of the western Pacific Wang, Chunzai 54 10A.7 CLUSTER ANALYSIS OF WESTERN NORTH PACIFIC TROPICAL CYCLONE TRACKS Suzana J....

471

VEE-0040- In the Matter of Western Star Propane, Inc.  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

On February 18, 1997, Western Star Propane, Inc. (Western) filed an Application for Exception with the Office of Hearings and Appeals (OHA) of the Department of Energy (DOE). In its application,...

472

Western Partnership for Environmental Technology Education Faculty Internship Program  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

As an important element within Western Partnership for Environmental Technology Education (PETE), summer internship opportunities are made available to environmental technology instructors, primarily at the community-college level, at participating federal laboratories, test facilities, state regulatory agencies and in private industry. The Program is intended to provide instructors with the opportunity to gain practical experience and understanding within the broad area of environmental technology to enhance the development and presentation of environmental technology curricula. Internship content is intended to be flexible to provide experiences which will relate to and meet the specific needs of the intern and his/her college. The Faulty Internship Program provides business and government with the opportunity to strengthen the educational process and to expand potential candidate pools for employment.

Zehnder, N. [Sandia National Labs., Livermore, CA (United States)

1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

473

Western Michigan University -Extended University Programs How to Get Started  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Western Michigan University - Extended University Programs How to Get Started Interested in takingThe first toWestern Michigan University, Office of Admissions,1903W. Michigan Ave,Kalamazoo,MI 49008Western Michigan University,Office of Admissions,1903W.Michigan Ave, Kalamazoo,MI 49008-5211;the other

de Doncker, Elise

474

NorthWestern Energy Community Works Scholarship for Electrical Engineering  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

20131030 NorthWestern Energy Community Works Scholarship for Electrical Engineering A special Electrical Engineering, NorthWestern Energy has established a scholarship program administered by the Montana. NorthWestern Energy is an investor-owned utility and one of the largest providers of electricity

Dyer, Bill

475

NorthWestern Energy Community Works Scholarship for Electrical Engineering  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

20121204 NorthWestern Energy Community Works Scholarship for Electrical Engineering A special new Electrical Engineering, NorthWestern Energy has established a scholarship program administered by the Montana. NorthWestern Energy is an investor-owned utility and one of the largest providers of electricity

Lawrence, Rick L.

476

TERTIARY INSTITUTIONS SERVICE CENTRE (Incorporated in Western Australia)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

TERTIARY INSTITUTIONS SERVICE CENTRE (Incorporated in Western Australia) 100 Royal Street East Perth, Western Australia 6004 Telephone (08) 9318 8000 Facsimile (08) 9225 7050 http://www.tisc.edu.au/ Curtin University · Edith Cowan University · Murdoch University · The University of Western Australia

477

TERTIARY INSTITUTIONS SERVICE CENTRE (Incorporated in Western Australia)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

TERTIARY INSTITUTIONS SERVICE CENTRE (Incorporated in Western Australia) Level 1, 100 Royal Street East Perth, Western Australia 6004 Telephone (08) 9318 8000 Facsimile (08) 9225 7050 http://www.tisc.edu.au/ Curtin University · Edith Cowan University · Murdoch University · The University of Western Australia

478

Alfalfa Production Under Irrigation in Western Texas.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

TEXAS AGRICULTURAL EXPERIMENT STATION A. B. CONNER, DIRECTOR COLLEGE STATION, BRAZOS COUNTY, TEXAS BULLETIN NO. 472 DECEMBER, 1932 -- DIVISION OF AGRONOMY Alfalfa Production Under Irrigation in Western Texas - - AGRICULTURAL AND MECHANICAL..... Animal Husbandry A. L. Darnell, M. A.. Dairy Husbandry *Dean, School of Veterinary Medicine. ?As of December 1,1932. **In cooperation with U. S. Department of Agriculture. f ?On leave. $In cooperation with Texas Extension Service. Alfalfa is one...

Bayles, John J. (John Jasper)

1932-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

479

Western Cooling Efficiency Center | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data CenterFranconia, Virginia:FAQ < RAPID Jump to:SeadovCooperative Jump to: navigation,Western Cooling Efficiency Center Place: Davis, CA

480

Western Ethanol Company LLC | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data CenterFranconia, Virginia:FAQ < RAPID Jump to:SeadovCooperative Jump to: navigation,Western Cooling Efficiency Center Place:

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "western states coalbed" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


481

Western Geothermal Partners | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data CenterFranconia, Virginia:FAQ < RAPID Jump to:SeadovCooperative Jump to: navigation,Western Cooling Efficiency Center Place:Geothermal

482

Western Resource Advocates | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data CenterFranconia, Virginia:FAQ < RAPID Jump to:SeadovCooperative Jump to: navigation,Western Cooling Efficiency CenterAssociation

483

Comparisons of pyrite variability from selected western Kentucky and western Pennsylvania coals  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Pyrite (and marcasite) variation in the lower Kittanning coal of western Pennsylvania has been petrographically characterized using three parameters of size (categories rather than absolute size), morphology (framboidal, euhedral, dendritic, massive, and cleat), and microlithotype (organic) association. The purpose of this study is to evaluate what influence paleo-environments have on the nature of variation of pyrite in coal. Comparison of coals has been done using the percentages of pyrite in the microlithotypes vitrite and clarite. In the lower Kittanning coal, framboidal pyrite is generally less abundant and dendritic pyrite was not observed at all. Euhedral pyrite exhibited no clear variation between the two environments. Massive pyrite was more abundant in the set of samples from the mine with the highest average pyritic sulfur but otherwise exhibited no variation. In contrast, a larger percentage of pyrite in the western Kentucky coals examined is framboidal and dendritic. Mines examined in the Moorman syncline of western Kentucky do have a framboidal pyrite percentage comparable to the lower Kittanning samples, but the percentage of dendritic pyrite (particularly in the Western Kentucky No. 9 coal) is significantly higher for the western Kentucky coals. Bulk petrography of the coals is similar with all having greater than 80% total vitrinite. The association of the pyritic sulfur does, however, change significantly between the various coals studied and particularly between the coals of western Kentucky and among the marine lower Kittanning samples and the fresh water lower Kittanning samples. Among the pyrite in the fresh water coals, massive (perhaps epigenetic) pyrite dominates the associations.

Frankie, K.A.; Hower, J.C.

1983-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

484

report 2013 Front cover image: Greenough River Solar Farm, Western Australia.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

R heAtinG 59 WinD PoWeR 65 appendiCes 65 APPenDiX 1: toP 10 SolAR PoStCoDeS by StAte 68 APPenDiX 2 #12. From jobs and investment in regional areas to solar panels, solar hot water and high efficiencyClean energy australia report 2013 #12;Front cover image: Greenough River Solar Farm, Western

Green, Donna

485

Potential small-scale development of western oil shale  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Several studies have been undertaken in an effort to determine ways to enhance development of western oil shale under current market conditions for energy resources. This study includes a review of the commercial potential of western oil shale products and byproducts, a review of retorting processes, an economic evaluation of a small-scale commercial operation, and a description of the environmental requirements of such an operation. Shale oil used as a blend in conventional asphalt appears to have the most potential for entering today's market. Based on present prices for conventional petroleum, other products from oil shale do not appear competitive at this time or will require considerable marketing to establish a position in the marketplace. Other uses for oil shale and spent shale, such as for sulfur sorbtion, power generation, cement, aggregate, and soil stabilization, are limited economically by transportation costs. The three-state area area consisting of Colorado, Utah, and Wyoming seems reasonable for the entry of shale oil-blended asphalt into the commercial market. From a review of retorting technologies and the product characteristics from various retorting processes it was determined that the direct heating Paraho and inclined fluidized-bed processes produce a high proportion of heavy material with a high nitrogen content. The two processes are complementary in that they are each best suited to processing different size ranges of materials. An economic evaluation of a 2000-b/d shale oil facility shows that the operation is potentially viable, if the price obtained for the shale oil residue is in the top range of prices projected for this product. Environmental requirements for building and operating an oil shale processing facility are concerned with permitting, control of emissions and discharges, and monitoring. 62 refs., 6 figs., 10 tabs.

Smith, V.; Renk, R.; Nordin, J.; Chatwin, T.; Harnsberger, M.; Fahy, L.J.; Cha, C.Y.; Smith, E.; Robertson, R.

1989-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

486

Western Area Power Administration, Desert Southwest Region  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear SecurityTensile Strain Switched FerromagnetismWaste and MaterialsWenjun Deng AssociateFeb-2015Sep-2014 940.05 Western

487

Case Western University (Vestas) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Office of InspectorConcentrating SolarElectricEnergyCTBarreis aCallahanWind Farm Jump to:Case Western University

488

Case Western University | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Office of InspectorConcentrating SolarElectricEnergyCTBarreis aCallahanWind Farm Jump to:Case Western UniversityCase

489

Western Area Power Administration Transmission Infrastructure Program  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsrucLasDelivered‰PNG IHDR€ÍSolar Energy SystemsFebruary 7-8,March 8,8)Normal 27 14,2TOPICS Western

490

Western NY Energy LLC | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data CenterFranconia, Virginia:FAQ < RAPID Jump to:SeadovCooperative Jump to: navigation,Western Cooling Efficiency Center Place:GeothermalNY

491

Sandia National Laboratories: Western water management  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear Security Administration the1development Sandia, NREL Release Wave EnergyLinks Water PowerWaveDyn WEC-SimWestern

492

Oregon State University NUCLEAR ENGINEERING  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Oregon State University NUCLEAR ENGINEERING 3Year STA-21 2010-2011 School Year Nuclear Engineering & Discrimination (3): NE 451 3 Neutronic Analysis I NE 452 3 Neutronic Analysis II NE 457 2 Nuclear Reactor Lab Western Culture (3): NE 467 4 Nucl Reac Therm Hyd NE 474 4 Nucl Engineering Design I NE 475 4 Nucl

Tullos, Desiree

493

Origin State Destination State  

Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

7. Estimated truck transportation rates for coal, state to state, EIA data Origin State Destination State 2008 2009 2010 2008-2010 2009-2010 Alabama Alabama W W W W W Alabama...

494

Biofuels War: The New Scramble for Africa by Western Big Money Profiteers : EcoWorldly Explore GO Media  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Biofuels War: The New Scramble for Africa by Western Big Money Profiteers : EcoWorldly About Like this post? Subscribe to our RSS feed and stay up to date. Biofuels War: The New Scramble in Africa, Ethiopia, Europe, Ghana, Global, Tanzania, United States of America Biofuels war has broken out

495

Impact of High Solar Penetration in the Western Interconnection  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Impact of High Solar Penetration in the Western Interconnection Debra Lew National Renewable Energy Laboratory Nicholas Miller, Kara Clark, Gary Jordan, and Zhi Gao GE Energy...

496

Topic A Awardee: Western Electricity Coordinating Council | Department...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

transmission plans for the Eastern and Western Interconnections, and for ERCOT. WECC received notification from the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) on December 18, 2009...

497

Western Massachusetts Electric- Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Program  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Western Massachusetts Electric (WMECO) and Masssave, a collaboration of Massachusetts municipalities and cooperatives, provides technical assistance and financial incentives to customers who...

498

Groundwater investigation and modeling - western desert of Iraq.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??The region of interest is part from Iraqi western desert covering an area about 100,000 km˛. Several of the large wadis such as Hauran, Amij,… (more)

Al-Muqdadi, Sameh Wisam

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

499

Western-UGP Transmission and Ancillary Services Rates Customer...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

responsibility for irrigation and municipal consumption as well as dam and powerplant construction, operation and maintenance. P a g e | 3 Western annually sells and delivers...

500

2011 Annual Planning Summary for Western Area Power Administration (WAPA)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The ongoing and projected Environmental Assessments and Environmental Impact Statements for 2011 and 2012 within the Western Area Power Administration (WAPA).