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1

Investigation of gas hydrate-bearing sandstone reservoirs at the "Mount Elbert" stratigraphic test well, Milne Point, Alaska  

SciTech Connect

In February 2007, the U.S. Department of Energy, BP Exploration (Alaska), Inc., and the U.S. Geological Survey conducted an extensive data collection effort at the "Mount Elbert #1" gas hydrates stratigraphic test well on the Alaska North Slope (ANS). The 22-day field program acquired significant gas hydrate-bearing reservoir data, including a full suite of open-hole well logs, over 500 feet of continuous core, and open-hole formation pressure response tests. Hole conditions, and therefore log data quality, were excellent due largely to the use of chilled oil-based drilling fluids. The logging program confirmed the existence of approximately 30 m of gashydrate saturated, fine-grained sand reservoir. Gas hydrate saturations were observed to range from 60% to 75% largely as a function of reservoir quality. Continuous wire-line coring operations (the first conducted on the ANS) achieved 85% recovery through 153 meters of section, providing more than 250 subsamples for analysis. The "Mount Elbert" data collection program culminated with open-hole tests of reservoir flow and pressure responses, as well as gas and water sample collection, using Schlumberger's Modular Formation Dynamics Tester (MDT) wireline tool. Four such tests, ranging from six to twelve hours duration, were conducted. This field program demonstrated the ability to safely and efficiently conduct a research-level openhole data acquisition program in shallow, sub-permafrost sediments. The program also demonstrated the soundness of the program's pre-drill gas hydrate characterization methods and increased confidence in gas hydrate resource assessment methodologies for the ANS.

Boswell, R.M.; Hunter, R. (ASRC Energy Services, Anchorage, AK); Collett, T. (USGS, Denver, CO); Digert, S. (BP Exploration (Alaska) Inc., Anchorage, AK); Hancock, S. (RPS Energy Canada, Calgary, Alberta, Canada); Weeks, M. (BP Exploration (Alaska) Inc., Anchorage, AK); Mt. Elbert Science Team

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

2

Regional long-term production modeling from a single well test, Mount Elbert Gas Hydrate Stratigraphic Test Well, Alaska North Slope  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Following the results from the open-hole formation pressure response test in the BPXA-DOE-USGS Mount Elbert Gas Hydrate Stratigraphic Test Well (Mount Elbert well) using Schlumberger’s Modular Dynamics Formation Tester (MDT) wireline tool, the International Methane Hydrate Reservoir Simulator Code Comparison project performed long-term reservoir simulations on three different model reservoirs. These descriptions were based on 1) the Mount Elbert gas hydrate accumulation as delineated by an extensive history-matching exercise, 2) an estimation of the hydrate accumulation near the Prudhoe Bay L-pad, and 3) a reservoir that would be down-dip of the Prudhoe Bay L-pad and therefore warmer and deeper. All of these simulations were based, in part, on the results of the MDT results from the Mount Elbert Well. The comparison group’s consensus value for the initial perme- ability of the hydrate-filled reservoir (k = 0.12 mD) and the permeability model based on the MDT history match were used as the basis for subsequent simulations on the three regional scenarios. The simulation results of the five different simulation codes, CMG STARS, HydrateResSim, MH-21 HYDRES, STOMP-HYD, and TOUGHþHYDRATE exhibit good qualitative agreement and the variability of potential methane production rates from gas hydrate reservoirs is illustrated. As expected, the pre- dicted methane production rate increased with increasing in situ reservoir temperature; however, a significant delay in the onset of rapid hydrate dissociation is observed for a cold, homogeneous reservoir and it is found to be repeatable. The inclusion of reservoir heterogeneity in the description of this cold reservoir is shown to eliminate this delayed production. Overall, simulations utilized detailed information collected across the Mount Elbert reservoir either obtained or determined from geophysical well logs, including thickness (37 ft), porosity (35%), hydrate saturation (65%), intrinsic permeability (1000 mD), pore water salinity (5 ppt), and formation temperature (3.3–3.9 ?C). This paper presents the approach and results of extrapolating regional forward production modeling from history-matching efforts on the results from a single well test.

Anderson, Brian; Kurihara, Masanori; White, Mark D.; Moridis, George J.; Wilson, Scott J.; Pooladi-Darvish, Mehran; Gaddipati, Manohar; Masuda, Yoshihiro; Collett, T. S.; Hunter, Robert B.; Narita, Hideo; Rose, Kelly K.; Boswell, Ray

2011-02-02T23:59:59.000Z

3

Examination of core samples from the Mount Elbert Gas Hydrate Stratigraphic Test Well, Alaska North Slope: Effects of retrieval and preservation  

SciTech Connect

Collecting and preserving undamaged core samples containing gas hydrates from depth is difficult because of the pressure and temperature changes encountered upon retrieval. Hydrate-bearing core samples were collected at the BPXA-DOE-USGS Mount Elbert Gas Hydrate Stratigraphic Test Well in February 2007. Coring was performed while using a custom oil-based drilling mud, and the cores were retrieved by a wireline. The samples were characterized and subsampled at the surface under ambient winter arctic conditions. Samples thought to be hydrate bearing were preserved either by immersion in liquid nitrogen (LN), or by storage under methane pressure at ambient arctic conditions, and later depressurized and immersed in LN. Eleven core samples from hydrate-bearing zones were scanned using x-ray computed tomography to examine core structure and homogeneity. Features observed include radial fractures, spalling-type fractures, and reduced density near the periphery. These features were induced during sample collection, handling, and preservation. Isotopic analysis of the methane from hydrate in an initially LN-preserved core and a pressure-preserved core indicate that secondary hydrate formation occurred throughout the pressurized core, whereas none occurred in the LN-preserved core, however no hydrate was found near the periphery of the LN-preserved core. To replicate some aspects of the preservation methods, natural and laboratory-made saturated porous media samples were frozen in a variety of ways, with radial fractures observed in some LN-frozen sands, and needle-like ice crystals forming in slowly frozen clay-rich sediments. Suggestions for hydrate-bearing core preservation are presented.

Kneafsey, T.J.; Liu, T.J. H.; Winters, W.; Boswell, R.; Hunter, R.; Collett, T.S.

2011-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

4

Analysis of core samples from the BPXA-DOE-USGS Mount Elbert gas hydrate stratigraphic test well: Insights into core disturbance and handling  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Collecting and preserving undamaged core samples containing gas hydrates from depth is difficult because of the pressure and temperature changes encountered upon retrieval. Hydrate-bearing core samples were collected at the BPXA-DOE-USGS Mount Elbert Gas Hydrate Stratigraphic Test Well in February 2007. Coring was performed while using a custom oil-based drilling mud, and the cores were retrieved by a wireline. The samples were characterized and subsampled at the surface under ambient winter arctic conditions. Samples thought to be hydrate bearing were preserved either by immersion in liquid nitrogen (LN), or by storage under methane pressure at ambient arctic conditions, and later depressurized and immersed in LN. Eleven core samples from hydrate-bearing zones were scanned using x-ray computed tomography to examine core structure and homogeneity. Features observed include radial fractures, spalling-type fractures, and reduced density near the periphery. These features were induced during sample collection, handling, and preservation. Isotopic analysis of the methane from hydrate in an initially LN-preserved core and a pressure-preserved core indicate that secondary hydrate formation occurred throughout the pressurized core, whereas none occurred in the LN-preserved core, however no hydrate was found near the periphery of the LN-preserved core. To replicate some aspects of the preservation methods, natural and laboratory-made saturated porous media samples were frozen in a variety of ways, with radial fractures observed in some LN-frozen sands, and needle-like ice crystals forming in slowly frozen clay-rich sediments. Suggestions for hydrate-bearing core preservation are presented.

Kneafsey, Timothy J.; Lu, Hailong; Winters, William; Boswell, Ray; Hunter, Robert; Collett, Timothy S.

2009-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

5

Well Testing Techniques | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Well Testing Techniques Well Testing Techniques Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Technique: Well Testing Techniques Details Activities (0) Areas (0) Regions (0) NEPA(17) Exploration Technique Information Exploration Group: Downhole Techniques Exploration Sub Group: Well Testing Techniques Parent Exploration Technique: Downhole Techniques Information Provided by Technique Lithology: Enable estimation of in-situ reservoir elastic parameters Stratigraphic/Structural: Fracture distribution, formation permeability, and ambient tectonic stresses Hydrological: provides information on permeability, location of permeable zones recharge rates, flow rates, fluid flow direction, hydrologic connections, storativity, reservoir pressures, fluid chemistry, and scaling.

6

RMOTC - Testing - Openhole Logging Well  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Openhole Logging Well RMOTC Openhole Logging Well RMOTC has drilled a vertical well that is specifically designated for openhole logging tests. It was drilled to 5,450 feet and has...

7

Thermal well-test method  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A well-test method involving injection of hot (or cold) water into a groundwater aquifer, or injecting cold water into a geothermal reservoir. By making temperature measurements at various depths in one or more observation wells, certain properties of the aquifer are determined. These properties, not obtainable from conventional well test procedures, include the permeability anisotropy, and layering in the aquifer, and in-situ thermal properties. The temperature measurements at various depths are obtained from thermistors mounted in the observation wells.

Tsang, Chin-Fu (Albany, CA); Doughty, Christine A. (Berkeley, CA)

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

8

Thermal well-test method  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A well-test method involving injection of hot (or cold) water into a groundwater aquifer, or injecting cold water into a geothermal reservoir is disclosed. By making temperature measurements at various depths in one or more observation wells, certain properties of the aquifer are determined. These properties, not obtainable from conventional well test procedures, include the permeability anisotropy, and layering in the aquifer, and in-situ thermal properties. The temperature measurements at various depths are obtained from thermistors mounted in the observation wells.

Tsang, C.F.; Doughty, C.A.

1984-02-24T23:59:59.000Z

9

INVITATIONAL WELL-TESTING SYMPOSIUM PROCEEDINGS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

3 P. A. Witherspoon Petroleum Engineering Well TestActivation Analysis in Petroleum Exploration Research",Monograph Series, Society of Petroleum Engineers of AlME,

Authors, Various

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

10

Geothermal Well Completion Tests | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Geothermal Well Completion Tests Geothermal Well Completion Tests Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Conference Paper: Geothermal Well Completion Tests Abstract This paper reviews the measurements that are typically made in a well immediately after drilling is completed - the Completion Tests. The objective of these tests is to determine the properties of the reservoir, and of the reservoir fluid near the well. A significant amount of information that will add to the characterisation of the reservoir and the well, can only be obtained in the period during and immediately after drilling activities are completed. Author Hagen Hole Conference Petroleum Engineering Summer School; Dubrovnik, Croatia; 2008/06/09 Published N/A, 2008 DOI Not Provided Check for DOI availability: http://crossref.org

11

Well test analysis in fractured media  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The behavior of fracture systems under well test conditions and methods for analyzing well test data from fractured media are investigated. Several analytical models are developed to be used for analyzing well test data from fractured media. Numerical tools that may be used to simulate fluid flow in fractured media are also presented. Three types of composite models for constant flux tests are investigated. These models are based on the assumption that a fracture system under well test conditions may be represented by two concentric regions, one representing a small number of fractures that dominates flow near the well, and the other representing average conditions farther away from the well. Type curves are presented that can be used to find the flow parameters of these two regions and the extent of the inner concentric region. Several slug test models with different geometric conditions that may be present in fractured media are also investigated. A finite element model that can simulate transient fluid flow in fracture networks is used to study the behavior of various two-dimensional fracture systems under well test conditions. A mesh generator that can be used to model mass and heat flow in a fractured-porous media is presented.

Karasaki, K.

1987-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

12

Well-test data from geothermal reservoirs  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Extensive well testing in geothermal resources has been carried out throughout the western United States and in northern Mexico since 1975. Each resource tested and each well test conducted by LBL during the eight-year period are covered in brief. The information, collected from published reports and memoranda, includes test particulars, special instrumentation, data interpretation when available, and plots of actual data. Brief geologic and hydrologic descriptions of the geothermal resources are also presented. The format is such that well test descriptions are grouped, in the order performed, into major sections according to resource, each section containing a short resource description followed by individual test details. Additional information regarding instrumentation is provided. Source documentation is provided throughout to facilitate access to further information and raw data.

Bodvarsson, M.G.; Benson, S.M.

1982-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

13

Well test analysis in fractured media  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

In this study the behavior of fracture systems under well test conditions and methods for analyzing well test data from fractured media are investigated. Several analytical models are developed to be used for analyzing well test data from fractured media. Numerical tools that may be used to simulate fluid flow in fractured media are also presented. Three types of composite models for constant flux tests are investigated. Several slug test models with different geometric conditions that may be present in fractured media are also investigated. A finite element model that can simulate transient fluid flow in fracture networks is used to study the behavior of various two-dimensional fracture systems under well test conditions. A mesh generator that can be used to model mass and heat flow in a fractured-porous media is presented. This model develops an explicit solution in the porous matrix as well as in the discrete fractures. Because the model does not require the assumptions of the conventional double porosity approach, it may be used to simulate cases where double porosity models fail.

Karasaki, K.

1986-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

14

Uncertainty analysis of well test data  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

During a well test a transient pressure response is created by a temporary change in production rate. The well response is usually monitored during a relatively short period of time, depending upon the test objectives. Reservoir properties are determined from well test data via an inverse problem approach. Uncertainty is inherent in any nonlinear inverse problem. Unfortunately, well test interpretation suffers particularly from a variety of uncertainties that, when combined, reduce the confidence that can be associated with the estimated reservoir properties. The specific factors that have been analyzed in this work are: 1. Pressure noise (random noise) 2. Pressure drift (systematic variation) 3. Rate history effects Our work is based on the analysis of the effects of random pressure noise, the drift error, and the rate history on the estimation of typical reservoir parameters for two common reservoir models: A vertical well with a constant wellbore storage and skin in a homogeneous reservoir. A vertical well with a finite conductivity vertical fracture including wellbore effects in a homogeneous reservoir. This work represents a sensitivity study of the impact of pressure and rate uncertainty on parameter estimation and the confidence intervals associated with these results. In this work we statistically analyze the calculated reservoir parameters to quantify the impact of pressure and rate uncertainty on them.

Merad, Mohamed Belgacem

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

15

Third invitational well-testing symposium: well testing in low permeability environments  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The testing of low permeability rocks is common to waste disposal, fossil energy resource development, underground excavation, and geothermal energy development. This document includes twenty-six papers and abstracts, divided into the following sessions: opening session, case histories and related phenomena, well test design in low permeability formations, analysis and interpretation of well test data, and instrumentation for well tests. Separate abstracts were prepared for 15 of the 16 papers; the remaining paper has been previously abstracted. (DLC)

Doe, T.W.; Schwarz, W.J. (eds.)

1981-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

16

Flow tests of the Willis Hulin well  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Hulin well was tested between 20,100 and 20,700 feet down in layers of brine-saturated clean sand with occasional intervening layers of shale. The characteristics of the brine and gas were determined in this interval and an initial determination of the reservoir properties were made.

Randolph, P.L.; Hayden, C.G.; Rogers, L.A.

1992-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

17

Hydrologic Tests at Characterization Well R-14  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Well R-14 is located in Ten Site Canyon and was completed at a depth of 1316 ft below ground surface (bgs) in August 2002 within unassigned pumiceous deposits located below the Puye Formation (fanglomerate). The well was constructed with two screens positioned below the regional water table. Individual static depths measured for each isolated screen after the Westbay{trademark} transducer monitoring system was installed in mid-December 2002 were nearly identical at 1177 ft bgs, suggesting only horizontal subsurface flow at this time, location, and depth. Screen 1 straddles the geologic contact between the Puye fanglomerate and unassigned pumiceous deposits. Screen 2 is located about 50 ft deeper than screen 1 and is only within the unassigned pumiceous deposits. Constant-rate, straddle-packer, injection tests were conducted at screen 2, including two short tests and one long test. The short tests were 1 minute each but at different injection rates. These short tests were used to select an appropriate injection rate for the long test. We analyzed both injection and recovery data from the long test using the Theis, Theis recovery, Theis residual-recovery, and specific capacity techniques. The Theis injection, Theis recovery, and specific capacity methods correct for partial screen penetration; however, the Theis residual-recovery method does not. The long test at screen 2 involved injection at a rate of 10.1 gallons per minute (gpm) for 68 minutes and recovery for the next 85 minutes. The Theis analysis for screen 2 gave the best fit to residual recovery data. These results suggest that the 158-ft thick deposits opposite screen 2 have a transmissivity (T) equal to or greater than 143 ft{sup 2}/day, and correspond to a horizontal hydraulic conductivity (K) of at least 0.9 ft/day. The specific capacity method yielded a T value equal to or greater than 177 ft{sup 2}/day, and a horizontal K of at least 1.1 ft/day. Results from the injection and recovery phases of the test at screen 2 were similar to those from the residual-recovery portion of the test, but were lower by a factor of about two. The response to injection was typical for a partially penetrating well screen in a very thick aquifer.

S. McLin; W. Stone

2004-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

18

Integrated Geothermal Well Testing: Test Objectives and Facilities  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A new and highly integrated geothermal well test program was designed for three geothermal operators in the US (MCR, RGI and Mapco Geothermal). This program required the design, construction and operation of new well test facilities. The main objectives of the test program and facilities are to investigate the critical potential and worst problems associated with the well and produced fluids in a period of approximately 30 days. Field and laboratory investigations are required to determine and quantify the problems of fluid production, utilization and reinjection. The facilities are designed to handle a flow rate from a geothermal well of one million pounds per hour at a wellhead temperature of approximately 268 C (515 F). The facilities will handle an entire spectrum of temperature and rate conditions up to these limits. All pertinent conditions for future fluid exploitations can be duplicated with these facilities, thus providing critical information at the very early stages of field development. The new well test facilities have been used to test high temperature, liquid-dominated geothermal wells in the Imperial Valley of California. The test facilities still have some problems which should be solvable. The accomplishments of this new and highly integrated geothermal well test program are described in this paper.

Nicholson, R. W.; Vetter, O. J.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

19

A combined perforating and well testing system  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Underbalanced perforating is widely used in well completions and is considered by many operators to be an effective method of obtaining improved well productivity. A measurement of downhole pressure before, during and after perforating can be made by installing a pressure gauge on the gun-string. By using a wireline, the added capability of real-time read-out on surface allows the entire operation to be monitored 'live.' Correct underbalance can be accurately established prior to shooting, there is an unambiguous shot indication, and a pressure transient analysis can be made during the initial flow or fill-up period. From this we can obtain an estimate of permeability, skin damage and, possibly, static reservoir pressure, which is a useful supplement to the shut-in buildup analysis which usually follows if flow reaches surface. Any subsequent conventional well-test can of course be planned without the need to retrieve or run in additional equipment since the pressure gauge is already in place.

Westaway, P.J.; El Shafie, I.; Wittman, M.J.

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

20

INVITATIONAL WELL-TESTING SYMPOSIUM PROCEEDINGS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Schlumberger Tube: For Oil-Well Logging", Nucleonics, No.W. E. : "An Investigation of Oil Well Cementing," Drill. andon Pressure Buildup in Oil Wells," Trans. , AIME (1958),213,

Authors, Various

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "wells stratigraphic tests" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

INVITATIONAL WELL-TESTING SYMPOSIUM PROCEEDINGS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

to the well bore by drilling fluid, or by turbulent flowdrilled into. Although the drilling fluid normally providesthe hole filled with drilling fluid of appropriate density

Authors, Various

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

22

INVITATIONAL WELL-TESTING SYMPOSIUM PROCEEDINGS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

wei I is being dri lied underbalanced, whether H2S is to beis occurring, the well is underbalanced and the threat of ain, the wei I may become underbalanced and the threat of a

Authors, Various

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

23

Crown Zellerbach Well No. 2, Livingston Parish, Louisiana. Volume II. Well test data. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The following well test data are included: final report of field test data, IGT compiled data, ERMI raw data, Gas Producer's Associated tentative method of testing for hydrogen sulfide in natural gas using length of stain tubes, IGT combined sample log, report on reservoir fluids, well test analysis, sampling and chemical analysis procedures, and scale and corrosion evaluation. (MHR)

Not Available

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

24

Dixie Valley Six Well Flow Test | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Six Well Flow Test Six Well Flow Test Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Journal Article: Dixie Valley Six Well Flow Test Abstract A six well flow test was conducted during 1986 at the Dixie Valley geothermal field. Flow duration lasted from 40 to 74 days with a maximum rate of 5.9 million pounds/hour. During the test, downhole pressures were monitored in eight surrounding wells. Downhole pressure and temperature surveys were run in each of the flowing wells,usually in conjunction with productivity tests. Results from the flow test and earlier interference tests indicate that six wells are capable of providing in excess of the 4.5 million pounds/hour required for a 62 mw (gross) power plant. Author William L. Desormier Published Journal Geothermal Resources Council, TRANSACTIONS, 1987

25

Site characterization and monitoring data from Area 5 Pilot Wells, Nevada Test Site, Nye County, Nevada  

SciTech Connect

The Special Projects Section (SPS) of Reynolds Electrical & Engineering Co., Inc. (REECO) is responsible for characterizing the subsurface geology and hydrology of the Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Site (RWMS) at the Nevada Test Site (NTS) for the US Department of Energy, Nevada Operations Office (DOE/NV), Environmental Restoration and Waste Management Division, Waste Operations Branch. The three Pilot Wells that comprise the Pilot Well Project are an important part of the Area 5 Site Characterization Program designed to determine the suitability of the Area 5 RWMS for disposal of low-level waste (LLW), mixed waste (MW), and transuranic waste (TRU). The primary purpose of the Pilot Well Project is two-fold: first, to characterize important water quality and hydrologic properties of the uppermost aquifer; and second, to characterize the lithologic, stratigraphic, and hydrologic conditions which influence infiltration, redistribution, and percolation, and chemical transport through the thick vadose zone in the vicinity of the Area 5 RWMS. This report describes Pilot Well drilling and coring, geophysical logging, instrumentation and stemming, laboratory testing, and in situ testing and monitoring activities.

NONE

1994-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

26

Geothermal Well Testing and Evaluation | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Geothermal Well Testing and Evaluation Geothermal Well Testing and Evaluation Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Web Site: Geothermal Well Testing and Evaluation Author Jon Ragnarsson Published Iceland Geosurvey, 2013 DOI Not Provided Check for DOI availability: http://crossref.org Online Internet link for Geothermal Well Testing and Evaluation Citation Jon Ragnarsson. Geothermal Well Testing and Evaluation [Internet]. 2013. Iceland Geosurvey. [cited 2013/10/18]. Available from: http://www.geothermal.is/geothermal-well-testing-and-evaluation Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Geothermal_Well_Testing_and_Evaluation&oldid=688939" Categories: References Geothermal References Uncited References What links here Related changes Special pages

27

Final Report - Hydraulic Conductivity with Depth for Underground Test Area (UGTA) Wells  

SciTech Connect

Hydraulic conductivity with depth has been calculated for Underground Test Area (UGTA) wells in volcanic tuff and carbonate rock. The following wells in volcanic tuff are evaluated: ER-EC-1, ER-EC-2a, ER-EC-4, ER-EC-5, ER-5-4#2, ER-EC-6, ER-EC-7, and ER-EC-8. The following wells in carbonate rock are evaluated: ER-7-1, ER-6-1, ER-6-1#2, and ER-12-3. There are a sufficient number of wells in volcanic tuff and carbonate rock to associate the conductivity values with the specific hydrogeologic characteristics such as the stratigraphic unit, hydrostratigraphic unit, hydrogeologic unit, lithologic modifier, and alteration modifier used to describe the hydrogeologic setting. Associating hydraulic conductivity with hydrogeologic characteristics allows an evaluation of the data range and the statistical distribution of values. These results are relevant to how these units are considered in conceptual models and represented in groundwater models. The wells in volcanic tuff illustrate a wide range of data values and data distributions when associated with specific hydrogeologic characteristics. Hydraulic conductivity data within a hydrogeologic characteristic can display normal distributions, lognormal distributions, semi-uniform distribution, or no identifiable distribution. There can be multiple types of distributions within a hydrogeologic characteristic such as a single stratigraphic unit. This finding has implications for assigning summary hydrogeologic characteristics to hydrostratigraphic and hydrogeologic units. The results presented herein are specific to the hydrogeologic characteristic and to the wells used to describe hydraulic conductivity. The wells in carbonate rock are associated with a fewer number of hydrogeologic characteristics. That is, UGTA wells constructed in carbonate rock have tended to be in similar hydrogeologic materials, and show a wide range in hydraulic conductivity values and data distributions. Associations of hydraulic conductivity and hydrogeologic characteristics are graphically presented even when there are only a few data. This approach benchmarks what is currently known about the association of depth-specific hydraulic conductivity and hydrogeologic characteristics.

P. Oberlander; D. McGraw; C. Russell

2007-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

28

Casing pull tests for directionally drilled environmental wells  

SciTech Connect

A series of tests to evaluate several types of environmental well casings have been conducted by Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) and it`s industrial partner, The Charles Machine Works, Inc. (CMW). A test bed was constructed at the CMW test range to model a typical shallow, horizontal, directionally drilled wellbore. Four different types of casings were pulled through this test bed. The loads required to pull the casings through the test bed and the condition of the casing material were documented during the pulling operations. An additional test was conducted to make a comparison of test bed vs actual wellbore casing pull loads. A directionally drilled well was emplaced by CMW to closely match the test bed. An instrumented casing was installed in the well and the pull loads recorded. The completed tests are reviewed and the results reported.

Staller, G.E.; Wemple, R.P. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Layne, R.R. [Charles Machine Works, Inc., Perry, OK (United States)

1994-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

29

Stratigraphic Boundaries | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Stratigraphic Boundaries Stratigraphic Boundaries Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Print PDF Stratigraphic Boundaries Dictionary.png Stratigraphic Boundaries: No definition has been provided for this term. Add a Definition Controlling Structures List of controlling structures typically associated with geothermal systems: Major Normal Fault Termination of a Major Normal Fault Stepover or Relay Ramp in Normal Fault Zones Apex or Salient of Normal Fault Fault Intersection Accommodation Zone Displacement Transfer Zone Pull-Apart in Strike-Slip Fault Zone Intrusion Margins and Associated Fractures Stratigraphic Boundaries Fissure Swarms Caldera Rim Margins Lithologically Controlled Hydrothermal circulation may occur at the contacts between different lithologies. Examples

30

Testing geopressured geothermal reservoirs in existing wells. Annual report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This contract called for the acquisition and testing of Wells of Opportunity. Wells of Opportunity are located by screening published information on oil industry activity and through personal contacts with oil operators. This process resulted in recommendation of 21 candidate wells to the DOE for the WOO program. Of the 21 wells recommended, 7 were accepted. Six of these 7 were acquired for testing. Three wells have been tested, and the fourth and fifth will be tested early in 1981. Preliminary test results are briefly described and are shown in a table. The actual testing schedule and the originally proposed schedule matched very closely. Cumulative costs through November 1980 were approximately $6.5 million and compare to an estimate of $8.5 million for the same period. A graphical comparison of actual versus estimated costs is given.

Not Available

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

31

Newly Installed Alaska North Slope Well Will Test Innovative Hydrate  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Newly Installed Alaska North Slope Well Will Test Innovative Newly Installed Alaska North Slope Well Will Test Innovative Hydrate Production Technologies Newly Installed Alaska North Slope Well Will Test Innovative Hydrate Production Technologies May 17, 2011 - 1:00pm Addthis Washington, DC - A fully instrumented well that will test innovative technologies for producing methane gas from hydrate deposits has been safely installed on the North Slope of Alaska. As a result, the "Iġnik Sikumi" (Iñupiaq for "fire in the ice") gas hydrate field trial well will be available for field experiments as early as winter 2011-12. The well, the result of a partnership between ConocoPhillips and the Office of Fossil Energy's (FE) National Energy Technology Laboratory, will test a technology that involves injecting carbon dioxide (CO2) into sandstone

32

Hydrate Test Well, Milne Pt. Alaska Thomas D. Lorenson* U.S. Geological Survey, 345 Middlefield Rd., MS/ 999  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Assessment of Hydrocarbon Gas Sources from the Mt. Elbert No. 1 Gas Assessment of Hydrocarbon Gas Sources from the Mt. Elbert No. 1 Gas Hydrate Test Well, Milne Pt. Alaska Thomas D. Lorenson* U.S. Geological Survey, 345 Middlefield Rd., MS/ 999 Menlo Park, CA, 94025, USA tlorenson@usgs.gov Timothy S. Collett U.S. Geological Survey, Denver Federal Center Box 25046, MS-939 Denver CO, 80225, USA Robert B. Hunter ASRC Energy Services, 3900 C St., Suite 702 Anchorage, Alaska, 99503 USA ABSTRACT Hydrocarbon gases were collected from well cuttings and core at the MtElbert-01 gas hydrate stratigraphic test well, drilled within the Milne Point field on the Alaska North Slope. Regionally, the Eileen gas hydrate deposits overlie the more deeply buried Prudhoe Bay, Milne Point, and Kuparuk River oil fields and are

33

Logging, Testing and Monitoring Geothermal Wells | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Logging, Testing and Monitoring Geothermal Wells Logging, Testing and Monitoring Geothermal Wells Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Conference Paper: Logging, Testing and Monitoring Geothermal Wells Abstract Wells or boreholes are essential components in both geothermal research and utilization as they enable a drastic increase in geothermal energy production beyond natural out-flow as well as providing access deep into the systems, not otherwise possible. Wells also play a vital role in all geothermal reservoir physics (also called reservoir engineering) research, which would be particularly ineffec-tive without the access into geothermal systems provided by wells. During drilling the main reservoir physics research is performed through logging of different parameters as functions

34

Transient well testing in two-phase geothermal reservoirs  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A study of well test analysis techniques in two-phase geothermal reservoirs has been conducted using a three-dimensional, two-phase, wellbore and reservoir simulation model. Well tests from Cerro Prieto and the Hawaiian Geothermal project have been history matched. Using these well tests as a base, the influence of reservoir permeability, porosity, thickness, and heat capacity, along with flow rate and fracturing were studied. Single and two-phase transient well test equations were used to analyze these tests with poor results due to rapidly changing fluid properties and inability to calculate the flowing steam saturation in the reservoir. The injection of cold water into the reservoir does give good data from which formation properties can be calculated.

Aydelotte, S.R.

1980-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

35

Prairie Canal Well No. 1, Calcasieu Parish, Louisiana. Volume II. Well test data. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The following are included in appendices: field test data, field non-edited data, raw data, tentative method of testing for hydrogen sulfide in natural gas using length of stain tubes, combined sample log, report on reservoir fluids study, well test analysis, analysis of solids samples from primary zone, chemical analysis procedures, scale and corrosion evaluation, laboratory report on scale deposits, and sand detector strip charts. (MHR)

Not Available

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

36

Evaluation of a geothermal well logging, DST and Pit test  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This paper briefly discusses logging and testing operations and certain related physical aspects in geothermal well evaluations. A good understanding of thermal and hydrological characteristics of geothermal reservoirs are essential in geothermal well evaluations. Within geothermal reservoirs, in evaluating the wells, the two most important parameters that first could be estimated, then measured or calculated, are temperature and productivity. Well logs and wireline surveys are means of measuring formation temperatures. Drill Stem Tests (DST's) or Pit Tests are means of determining formation productivity. Geochemistry and Petrology are currently accepted as two evaluation yardsticks in geothermal well evaluations. investigations of cuttings and cores during drilling operations, along with studies on formation waters could be used in a predictive nature for temperature and productivity and could yield useful information on the resource.

Tansev, Erdal O.

1978-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

37

Analysis of Transient Pressure Tests for Olkaria Exploration Wells  

SciTech Connect

Analysis of transient pressure tests for Olkaria West wells shows that both infinite acting and double porosity models can be used to analyze the well behaviour and infer reservoir properties from fall-off steps of long enough duration, in wells where no significant thermal recovery occurs. The double porosity model gives better estimates of reservoir properties than the infinite acting model, for long fall-off steps in wells intercepting fractures. Semilog methods give fairly good estimates of reservoir transmissivity for the long fall-off steps but are highly inaccurate when used independently, especially for the short fall-off steps conducted in most of the wells. Double porosity models can also be used for recovery test analyses where two phase transients are not significant. 6 refs., 11 figs., 8 tabs.

Haukwa, Charles B.

1987-01-20T23:59:59.000Z

38

Flow tests of the Gladys McCall well  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report pulls together the data from all of the geopressured-geothermal field research conducted at the Gladys McCall well. The well produced geopressured brine containing dissolved natural gas from the Lower Miocene sands at a depth of 15,150 to 16,650 feet. More than 25 million barrels of brine and 727 million standard cubic feet of natural gas were produced in a series of flow tests between December 1982 and October 1987 at various brine flow rates up to 28,000 barrels per day. Initial short-term flow tests for the Number 9 Sand found the permeability to be 67 to 85 md (millidarcies) for a brine volume of 85 to 170 million barrels. Initial short-term flow tests for the Number 8 Sand found a permeability of 113 to 132 md for a reservoir volume of 430 to 550 million barrels of brine. The long-term flow and buildup test of the Number 8 Sand found that the high-permeability reservoir connected to the wellbore (measured by the short-term flow test) was connected to a much larger, low-permeability reservoir. Numerical simulation of the flow and buildup tests required this large connected reservoir to have a volume of about 8 billion barrels (two cubic miles of reservoir rock) with effective permeabilities in the range of 0.2 to 20 md. Calcium carbonate scale formation in the well tubing and separator equipment was a problem. During the first 2 years of production, scale formation was prevented in the surface equipment by injection of an inhibitor upstream of the choke. Starting in 1985, scale formation in the production tubing was successfully prevented by injecting inhibitor pills'' directly into the reservoir. Corrosion and/or erosion of surface piping and equipment, as well as disposal well tubing, was also significant.

Randolph, P.L.; Hayden, C.G.; Rogers, L.A. (Institute of Gas Technology, Chicago, IL (United States)) [Institute of Gas Technology, Chicago, IL (United States)

1992-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

39

Well-bore effects in the analysis of two-phase geothermal well tests  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A method of designing and analyzing pressure transient well tests of two-phase (steam-water) reservoirs is given. Wellbore storage is taken into account and the duration of it is estimated. It is shown that the wellbore flow can completely dominate the downhole pressure signal such that large changes in the downhole pressure that might be expected because of changes in kinematic mobility are not seen. Changes in the flowing enthalpy from the reservoir can interact with the wellbore flow so that a temporary plateau in the downhole transient curve is measured. Application of graphical and non-graphical methods to determine reservoir parameters from drawdown tests is demonstrated.

Miller, C.W.; Benson, S.; O'Sullivan, M.J.; Pruess, K.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

40

FIELD OBSERVATIONS OF GAS-CONDENSATE WELL TESTING  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, a commercial simulator was used to perform phase- equilibrium and property calculations based on the PengFIELD OBSERVATIONS OF GAS- CONDENSATE WELL TESTING A REPORT SUBMITTED TO THE DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY-point pressure is impacted severely due to condensate banking around the wellbore. Condensate banking also

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "wells stratigraphic tests" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

G. M. Koelemay well No. 1, Jefferson County, Texas. Volume I. Completion and testing: testing geopressured geothermal reservoirs in existing wells. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The acquisition, completion, and testing of a geopressured-geothermal well are described. The following are covered: geology; petrophysics; re-entry and completion operations - test well; drilling and completion operations - disposal well; test objectives; surface testing facilities; pre-test operations; test sequence; test results and analysis; and return of wells and location to operator. (MHR)

Not Available

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

42

Marysville Test Well Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Test Well Geothermal Area Test Well Geothermal Area Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Geothermal Resource Area: Marysville Test Well Geothermal Area Contents 1 Area Overview 2 History and Infrastructure 3 Regulatory and Environmental Issues 4 Exploration History 5 Well Field Description 6 Geology of the Area 7 Geofluid Geochemistry 8 NEPA-Related Analyses (0) 9 Exploration Activities (0) 10 References Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"TERRAIN","zoom":6,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"500px","height":"300px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":46.75333333,"lon":-112.3766667,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

43

Testing geopressured geothermal reservoirs in existing wells. Final report: Saldana well No. 2, Zapata County, Texas. Volume II. Well test data  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The following are included: field test data, compiled and edited raw data, time/pressure data, tentative method of testing for hydrogen sulfide in natural gas using length of stain tubes, combined sample log, report on reservoir fluids study, well test analysis, smoothing with weighted moving averages, chemical analysis procedures, scale monitoring report, sand detector strip charts, and analyses of water and gas samples. (MHR)

Not Available

44

Drilling and Completion of the Urach III HDR Test Well  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The hot dry rock (HDR) test well, urach III, was drilled and completed in 1979. The borehole is located in Southwest Germany in the geothermal anomaly of Urach. The purpose of project Urach was to study drilling and completion problems of HDR wells and to provide a test site for a HDR research program. The Urach III borehole was drilled to a total depth of 3,334 meters (10,939 feet), penetrating 1,700 meters (5,578 feet) into the granitic basement. Extensive coring was required to provide samples for geophysical and geochemical studies. Positive displacement downhole motors were used for coring and normal drilling operations. It was found that these motors in combination with the proper bits gave better results than conventional rotary drilling. Loss of circulation was encountered not only in sedimentary rocks but also in the granite. After drilling and completion of the borehole, a number of hydraulic fracturing experiments were performed in the open hole as well as in the cased section of Urach III. A circulation loop was established by using the single-borehole concept. It is not yet clear whether new fractures have actually been generated or preexisting joints and fissures have been reactivated. Evaluation of the results of this first step is almost completed and the planning of Phase II of the Urach project is under way.

Meier, U.; Ernst, P. L.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

45

Sensitivity study on hydraulic well testing inversion using simulated annealing  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

For environmental remediation, management of nuclear waste disposal, or geothermal reservoir engineering, it is very important to evaluate the permeabilities, spacing, and sizes of the subsurface fractures which control ground water flow. Cluster variable aperture (CVA) simulated annealing has been used as an inversion technique to construct fluid flow models of fractured formations based on transient pressure data from hydraulic tests. A two-dimensional fracture network system is represented as a filled regular lattice of fracture elements. The algorithm iteratively changes an aperture of cluster of fracture elements, which are chosen randomly from a list of discrete apertures, to improve the match to observed pressure transients. The size of the clusters is held constant throughout the iterations. Sensitivity studies using simple fracture models with eight wells show that, in general, it is necessary to conduct interference tests using at least three different wells as pumping well in order to reconstruct the fracture network with a transmissivity contrast of one order of magnitude, particularly when the cluster size is not known a priori. Because hydraulic inversion is inherently non-unique, it is important to utilize additional information. The authors investigated the relationship between the scale of heterogeneity and the optimum cluster size (and its shape) to enhance the reliability and convergence of the inversion. It appears that the cluster size corresponding to about 20--40 % of the practical range of the spatial correlation is optimal. Inversion results of the Raymond test site data are also presented and the practical range of spatial correlation is evaluated to be about 5--10 m from the optimal cluster size in the inversion.

Nakao, Shinsuke; Najita, J.; Karasaki, Kenzi

1997-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

46

Category:Well Testing Techniques | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

following 6 pages are in this category, out of 6 total. E Earth Tidal Analysis F Flow Test I Injectivity Test S Static Temperature Survey Stress Test T Tracer Testing Retrieved...

47

Testing geopressured geothermal reservoirs in existing wells. Wells of Opportunity Program final contract report, 1980-1981  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The geopressured-geothermal candidates for the Wells of Opportunity program were located by the screening of published information on oil industry activity and through direct contact with the oil and gas operators. This process resulted in the recommendation to the DOE of 33 candidate wells for the program. Seven of the 33 recommended wells were accepted for testing. Of these seven wells, six were actually tested. The first well, the No. 1 Kennedy, was acquired but not tested. The seventh well, the No. 1 Godchaux, was abandoned due to mechanical problems during re-entry. The well search activities, which culminated in the acceptance by the DOE of 7 recommended wells, were substantial. A total of 90,270 well reports were reviewed, leading to 1990 wells selected for thorough geological analysis. All of the reservoirs tested in this program have been restricted by one or more faults or permeability barriers. A comprehensive discussion of test results is presented.

Not Available

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

48

NETL: Methane Hydrates - DOE/NETL Projects - Structural and Stratigraphic  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Structural and Stratigraphic Controls on Methane Hydrate Occurrence and Distribution: Gulf of Mexico, Walker Ridge 313 and Green Canyon 955 Last Reviewed 12/24/2013 Structural and Stratigraphic Controls on Methane Hydrate Occurrence and Distribution: Gulf of Mexico, Walker Ridge 313 and Green Canyon 955 Last Reviewed 12/24/2013 DE-FE0009904 Goal The goal of this project is to determine structural and stratigraphic controls on hydrate occurrence and distribution in Green Canyon (GC) 955 and Walker Ridge (WR) 313 blocks with special emphasis on hydrate-bearing sand reservoirs. Structural and stratigraphic controls on hydrate distribution are examined by jointly analyzing surface-towed, multichannel seismic (MCS) and Ocean Bottom Seismometer (OBS) data and well logs through a combination of pre-stack depth migration (PSDM), traveltime and full-waveform inversion (FWI), and rock physics modeling methods. Performers Oklahoma State University, Stillwater, OK 74078-1026

49

Newly Installed Alaska North Slope Well Will Test Innovative...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

the North Slope of Alaska. As a result, the "Inik Sikumi" (Iupiaq for "fire in the ice") gas hydrate field trial well will be available for field experiments as early as...

50

Wireless remote liquid level detector and indicator for well testing  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An acoustic system is provided for measuring the fluid level in oil, gas or water wells under pressure conditions that does not require an electrical link to the surface for level detection. A battery powered sound transmitter is integrated with a liquid sensor in the form of a conductivity probe, enclosed in a sealed housing which is lowered into a well by means of a wire line reel assembly. The sound transmitter generates an intense identifiable acoustic emission when the sensor contacts liquid in the well. The acoustic emissions propagate up the well which functions as a waveguide and are detected by an acoustic transducer. The output signal from the transducer is filtered to provide noise rejection outside of the acoustic signal spectrum. The filtered signal is used to indicate to an operator the liquid level in the well has been reached and the depth is read from a footage counter coupled with the wire line reel assembly at the instant the sound signal is received.

Fasching, George E. (Morgantown, WV); Evans, Donald M. (Point Marion, PA); Ernest, John H. (Morgantown, WV)

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

51

Hulin Geopressure-geothermal test well: First order levels  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The purpose of this survey was to level through and establish elevations for existing benchmarks along LA Highway No. 685 from Erath, Louisiana south to the well site. The leveling was performed in April 1991, and was accomplished using procedures and equipment identical to that used by the National Geodetic Survey for First Order Class I Leveling. The leveling began on benchmark NGS T-361 located in Erath, Louisiana and the published elevation of 5.271 feet was used for this survey. On this survey a new benchmark, HU-18 was set on a concrete slab in the well site to observe the subsidence of the ground surface. Also, benchmark No.8 could not be found. A two hour search was made with no results. At this leveling it was noted that an error was made. A metric D.E. was used for the well head elevation instead of feet. This error has been corrected in this report.

None

1991-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

52

Analysis of core samples from the BPXA-DOE-USGS Mount Elbert gas hydrate stratigraphic test well: Insights into core disturbance and handling  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

during the core recovery, gas and water are produced.Gas produced will displace some water, reducing the density

Kneafsey, Timothy J.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

53

Examination of core samples from the Mount Elbert Gas Hydrate Stratigraphic Test Well, Alaska North Slope: Effects of retrieval and preservation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

bit and water-based drilling fluids. At that point, a 9 5/8-oil-based chilled drilling fluid. This fluid was usedcirculate subfreezing drilling fluid to mitigate down-hole

Collett, T.J. Kneafsey, T.J., H. Liu, W. Winters, R. Boswell, R. Hunter, and T.S.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

54

Analysis of core samples from the BPXA-DOE-USGS Mount Elbert gas hydrate stratigraphic test well: Insights into core disturbance and handling  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

bit and water-based drilling fluids. At that point, a 9 5/8-oil-based chilled drilling fluid. This fluid was usedcirculate subfreezing drilling fluid to mitigate down-hole

Kneafsey, Timothy J.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

55

Testing geopressured geothermal reservoirs in existing wells: Detailed completion prognosis for geopressured-geothermal well of opportunity, prospect #2  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A geopressured-geothermal test of Martin Exploration Company's Crown Zellerbach Well No. 2 will be conducted in the Tuscaloosa Trend. The Crown Zellerbach Well No. 1 will be converted to a saltwater disposal well for disposal of produced brine. The well is located in the Satsuma Area, Livingston parish, Louisiana. Eaton proposes to test the Tuscaloosa by perforating the 7 inch casing from 16,718 feet to 16,754 feet. The reservoir pressure at an intermediate formation depth of 16,736 feet is anticipated to be 12,010 psi and the temperature is anticipated to be 297 F. Calculated water salinity is 16,000 ppm. The well is expected to produce a maximum of 16,000 barrels of water a day with a gas content of 51 SCF/bbl. Eaton will re-enter the test well, clean out to 17,000 feet, run production casing and complete the well. The disposal well will be re-entered and completed in the 9-5/8 inch casing for disposal of produced brine. Testing will be conducted similar to previous Eaton annular flow WOO tests. An optional test from 16,462 feet to 16,490 feet may be performed after the original test and will require a workover with a rig on location to perform the plugback. The surface production equipment utilized on previous tests will be utilized on this test. The equipment has worked satisfactorily and all parties involved in the testing are familiar with its operation. Weatherly Engineering will operate the test equipment. The Institute of Gas Technology (IGT) and Mr. Don Clark will handle sampling, testing and reservoir engineering evaluation, respectively. wireline work required will be awarded on basis of bid evaluation. At the conclusion of the test period, the D.O.E. owned test equipment will be removed from the test site, the test and disposal wells plugged and abandoned and the sites restored to the satisfaction of all parties.

None

1981-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

56

Identification of stratigraphic formation interfaces using wavelet and Fourier transforms  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The purpose of this study was to identify the formation interfaces from geophysical well log data using the wavelet transform, and a combination of the wavelet transform and the Fourier transform methods. In the wavelet transform method, the identification ... Keywords: Formation interface, Fourier transform, Geophysical well log, Stratigraphic interface, Wavelet transform

Shih-Yu Pan; Bieng-Zih Hsieh; Ming-Tar Lu; Zsay-Shing Lin

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

57

Successful test of new ESP technology for gassy oil wells  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Problems producing high free-gas fractions through electric-submersible-pump (ESP) systems have been well-documented. When fluid flows through an ESP, gas bubbles tend to lag behind the liquid in the lower-pressure area of the impeller and gas accumulates in that area over a period of time. When the gas forms a long continuous column, the pump no longer generates a discharge pressure and the equipment shuts down because of amperage underload. The amount of gas a pump can handle without gas locking depends on stage designs and sizes. Smaller pumps with radial stages have been known to handle 10 to 15 vol% free gas, and larger pumps with mixed-flow staging can tolerate 20 to 25 vol%. Today many ESP applications require smaller pumps to handle 30 to 50 vol% free gas and larger pumps to handle 40 to 60 vol%. Wells in Lake Maracaibo have high gas/oil ratios, and their production by use of a standard ESP configuration was not considered a feasible option. The wells are currently on gas lift, but their production is declining and gas for gas lift is expensive. If a newly developed advanced gas-handling (AGH) system can enable an ESP to handle at least 40 vol% free gas, it would be a production option for these wells.

Castro, E. M.; Kalas, P.

1998-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

58

Testing of the Pleasant Bayou Well through October 1990  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Pleasant Bayou location was inactive from 1983 until the cleanout of the production and disposal wells in 1986. The surface facilities were rehabilitated and after shakedown of the system, additional repair of wellhead valves, and injection of an inhibitor pill, continuous long-term production was started in 1988. Over two years of production subsequent to that are reviewed here, including: production data, brine sampling and analysis, hydrocarbon sampling and analysis, solids sampling and analysis, scale control and corrosion monitoring and control.

Randolph, P.L.; Hayden, C.G.; Mosca, V.L.; Anhaiser, J.L.

1992-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

59

Testing geopressured geothermal reservoirs in existing wells: Detailed completion prognosis for geopressured-geothermal well of opportunity, prospect #7  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This book is a detailed prognosis covering the acquisition, completion, drilling, testing and abandonment of the Frank A. Godchaux, III, Well No. 1 under the Wells of Opportunity Program. The well is located approximately 12 miles southeast of the city of Abbeville, Louisiana. Eaton Operating Company proposes to test a section of the Planulina sand at a depth ranging from 15,584 to 15,692 feet. The reservoir pressure is estimated to be 14,480 psi and the temperature of the formation water is expected to be 298 F. The water salinity is calculated to be 75,000 ppm. The well is expected to produce 20,000 barrels of water per day with a gas content of 44 standard cubic feet pre barrel. The well was acquired from C and K Petroleu, Inc. on March 20, 1981. C and K abandoned the well at a total depth of 16,000 feet. The well has a 7-5/8 inches liner set at 13,387 feet. Eaton proposes to set 5-1/2 inch casing at 16,000 feet and produce the well through the casing using a 2-3/8 inch tubing string for wireline protection and for pressure control. A 4,600 foot saltwater disposal well will be drilled on the site and testing will be conducted similar to previous Eaton tests. The total estimated cost to perform the work is $2,959,000. An optional test from 14,905 to 15,006 feet may be performed after the original test and will require a workover with a rig on location to perform the plugback. The surface production equipment utilized on previous Eaton WOO tests will be utilized on this test. This equipment has worked satisfactorily and all parties involved in the testing are familiar with its operation. The Institute of Gas Technology and Mr. Don Clark will handle the sampling and testing and reservoir evaluation, respectively, as on the previous Eaton tests.

Godchaux, Frank A.

1981-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

60

Testing geopressured geothermal reservoirs in existing wells. Saldana well No. 2, Zapata County, Texas. Volume I. Completion and testing. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Saldana Well No. 2, approximately 35 miles Southeast of the city of Laredo, Texas, was the sixth successful test of a geopressured-geothermal aquifer under the DOE Wells of Opportunity Program. The well was tested through the annulus between 7-inch casing and 2-3/8 inch tubing. The interval tested was from 9745 to 9820 feet. The geological section was the 1st Hinnant Sand, an upper member of the Wilcox Group. Produced water was injected into the Saldana Well No. 1, which was also acquired from Riddle Oil Company and converted to a disposal well. A Miocene salt water sand was perforated from 3005 to 3100 feet for disposal. One pressure drawdown flow test and one pressure buildup test were conducted during a 10-day period. A total of 9328 barrels of water was produced. The highest sustained flow rate was 1950 BWPD.

Not Available

1981-10-07T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "wells stratigraphic tests" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Testing geopressured geothermal reservoirs in existing wells: Pauline Kraft Well No. 1, Nueces County, Texas. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Pauline Kraft Well No. 1 was originally drilled to a depth of 13,001 feet and abandoned as a dry hole. The well was re-entered in an effort to obtain a source of GEO/sup 2/ energy for a proposed gasohol manufacturing plant. The well was tested through a 5-inch by 2-3/8 inch annulus. The geological section tested was the Frio-Anderson sand of Mid-Oligocene age. The interval tested was from 12,750 to 12,860 feet. A saltwater disposal well was drilled on the site and completed in a Micocene sand section. The disposal interval was perforated from 4710 to 4770 feet and from 4500 to 4542 feet. The test well failed to produce water at substantial rates. Initial production was 34 BWPD. A large acid stimulation treatment increased productivity to 132 BWPD, which was still far from an acceptable rate. During the acid treatment, a failure of the 5-inch production casing occurred. The poor production rates are attributed to a reservoir with very low permeability and possible formation damage. The casing failure is related to increased tensile strain resulting from cooling of the casing by acid and from the high surface injection pressure. The location of the casing failure is now known at this time, but it is not at the surface. Failure as a result of a defect in a crossover joint at 723 feet is suspected.

Not Available

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

62

G. M. Koelemay well No. 1, Jefferson County, Texas. Volume II. Well test data: testing geopressured geothermal reservoirs in existing wells. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The following are included in the appendices: field test data, combined and edited raw data, time/pressure data, sample log, reservoir fluid study, gas data, sample collection and analysis procedure, scale monitoring and water analysis, sand detector and strip charts, and Horner-type plot data. (MHR)

Not Available

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

63

Testing geopressured geothermal reservoirs in existing wells: Detailed completions prognosis for geopressured-geothermal well of opportunity, prospect #1  

SciTech Connect

This prospective well of opportunity was originally drilled and completed as a gas producer by Wrightsman Investment Company in early 1973. The original and present producing interval was from 15,216 to 15,238 feet. IMC Exploration Company, Inc. acquired the property from Wrightsman and is the present owner operator. The well is presently shut in s a non-economic producer and IMC proposed to perform plug and abandonment operations in April, 1980. This well has a good geopressured-geothermal water sand behind the 5-1/2 inch casing that has 94 feet of net sand thickness. Pursuant to DOE/NVO authorization of March 11,1980, Eaton negotiated an option agreement with IMC whereby IMC would delay their abandonment operations for a period of 90 days to permit DOE to evaluate the well for geopressure-geothermal testing. The IMC-Eaton option agreements provide that IMG will delay plugging the well until June 15, 1980. If Eaton exercises its option to acquire the well, IMC will sell the well bore, and an adjacent salt water disposal well, to Eaton for the sole consideration of Eaton assuming the obligation to plug and abandon the wells in accordance with lease and regulatory requirements. If Eaton does not exercise its option, then Eaton will pay IMC $95,000 cash and IMC will proceed with plugging and abandonment at the termination of the option period.

Kennedy, Clovis A.

1980-04-03T23:59:59.000Z

64

Testing geopressured geothermal reservoirs in existing wells. Final report P. R. Girouard Well No. 1, Lafayette Parish, Louisiana. Volume I. Completion and testing  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The P.R. Girouard No. 1 Well, located approximately 10 miles southeast of Lafayette, Louisiana, was the fourth successful test of a geopressured-geothermal aquifer under the Wells of Opportunity program. The well was tested through 3-1/2 inch tubing set on a packer at 14,570 feet without major problems. The geological section tested was the Oligocene Marginulina Texana No. 1 sand of upper Frio age. The interval tested was from 14,744 to 14,819 feet. Produced water was piped down a disposal well perforated from 2870 to 3000 feet in a Miocene saltwater sand. Four flow tests were conducted for sustained production rates of approximately 4000 BWPD to approximately 15,000 BWPD. The highest achieved, during a fifth short test, was 18,460 BWPD. The test equipment was capable of handling higher rates. The gas-to-water ratio was relatively uniform at approximately 40 SCF/bbl. The heating value of the gas is 970 Btu/SCF. The reservoir tests show that is is doubtful that this well would sustain production rates over 10,000 BWPD for any lengthy period from the sand zone in which it was completed. This limited flow capacity is due to the well's poor location in the reservoir and is not a result of any production deficiencies of the Marginulina Texana sand.

Not Available

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

65

Data Acquisition for Low-Temperature Well Tests and Long-Term...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

ACQUISITION FOR LOW-TEMPERATURE GEOTHERMAL WELL TESTS AND LONG-TERM MONITORING DATA ACQUISITION FOR LOW-TEMPERATURE GEOTHERMAL WELL TESTS AND LONG-TERM MONITORING Prepared For:...

66

Long-Term Testing of Geothermal Wells in the Coso Hot Springs KGRA | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Long-Term Testing of Geothermal Wells in the Coso Hot Springs KGRA Long-Term Testing of Geothermal Wells in the Coso Hot Springs KGRA Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Conference Proceedings: Long-Term Testing of Geothermal Wells in the Coso Hot Springs KGRA Details Activities (3) Areas (2) Regions (0) Abstract: Three wells have been drilled by the Los Angeles Department of Water and Power at the Coso Hot Springs KGRA. A long-term flow test was conducted involving one producing well (well 43-7), one injector (well 88-1), and two observation wells (well 66-6 and California Energy Co's well 71A-7). This paper presents the equipment and techniques involved and the results from the long-term test conducted between December 1985 and February 1986. Author(s): Sanyal, S.; Menzies, A.; Granados, E.; Sugine, S.;

67

Summary of well-testing activities at Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory, 1975-1983  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Well test data collected from various geothermal fields by the geothermal group at Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory are presented. The type of well tests conducted, the instrumentation used and the data collected are described. Experience gained through interpretation of the data has helped identify problems in test procedures and interpretative methods.

Bodvarsson, M.G.; Benson, S.M.

1983-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

68

Assessment of non-destructive testing of well casing,, cement and cement bond in high temperature wells  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Because of the difficulty in bringing geothermal well blowouts under control, any indication of a casing/cement problem should be expeditiously evaluated and solved. There are currently no high temperature cement bond and casing integrity logging systems for geothermal wells with maximum temperatures in excess of 500/sup 0/F. The market is currently insufficient to warrannt the private investment necessary to develop tools and cables capable of withstanding high temperatures. It is concluded that a DOE-funded development program is required to assure that diagnostic tools are available in the interim until geothermal resource development activities are of sufficient magnitude to support developmental work on high temperature casing/cement logging capabilities by industry. This program should be similar to and complement the current DOE program for development of reservoir evaluation logging capabilities for hot wells. The appendices contain annotated bibliographies on the following: high temperature logging in general, cement integrity testing, cosing integrity testing, casing and cement failures, and special and protective treatment techniques. Also included are composite listing of references in alphabetical order by senior author.

Knutson,, C.K.; Boardman, C.R.

69

Results of Electric Survey in the Area of Hawaii Geothermal Test Well HGP-A  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Electric Survey in the Area of Hawaii Geothermal Test Well HGP-A Electric Survey in the Area of Hawaii Geothermal Test Well HGP-A Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Journal Article: Results of Electric Survey in the Area of Hawaii Geothermal Test Well HGP-A Abstract N/A Authors James Kauahikaua and Douglas Klein Published Journal Geothermal Resources Council, TRANSACTIONS, 1978 DOI Not Provided Check for DOI availability: http://crossref.org Online Internet link for Results of Electric Survey in the Area of Hawaii Geothermal Test Well HGP-A Citation James Kauahikaua,Douglas Klein. 1978. Results of Electric Survey in the Area of Hawaii Geothermal Test Well HGP-A. Geothermal Resources Council, TRANSACTIONS. 2:363-366. Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Results_of_Electric_Survey_in_the_Area_of_Hawaii_Geothermal_Test_Well_HGP-A&oldid=682499

70

Long-Term Testing of Geothermal Wells in the Coso Hot Springs KGRA  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Three wells have been drilled by the Los Angeles Department of Water and Power at the Coso Hot Springs KGRA. A long-term flow test was conducted involving one producing well (well 43-7), one injector (well 88-1), and two observation wells (well 66-6 and California Energy Co’s well 71A-7). This paper presents the equipment and techniques involved and the results from the long-term test conducted between December 1985 and February 1986. 1 tab., 9 figs.

Sanyal, S.; Menzies, A.; Granados, E.; Sugine, S.; Gentner, R.

1987-01-20T23:59:59.000Z

71

Analysis of preliminary testing of Willis Hulin Well No. 1 (Draft)  

SciTech Connect

The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) has both drilled and tested four deep research wells in the Texas-Louisiana Gulf Coast region as part of its program to define the magnitude and recoverability of the geopressured-geothermal energy resource. DOE also took over nine wells from industry (before being abandoned) and tested them for short periods to determine fluid properties. The Willis Hulin Well No. 1, located about 7.5 miles south of the town of Erath, Louisiana, is the first well taken over from industry for possible long-term testing. This well penetrates the deepest known Gulf Coast geopressured-geothermal reservoir.

Riney, T.D.

1991-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

72

Private Water Well Testing in Areas Impacted by Marcellus Shale Gas Drilling  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Private Water Well Testing in Areas Impacted by Marcellus Shale Gas Drilling (Updated November 15th in the absence of shale-gas drilling, well owners are strongly encouraged to evaluate their water on a regular testing in order to more specifically document potential impacts of Marcellus Shale gas development

Manning, Sturt

73

Evaluation of testing and reservoir parameters in geothermal wells at Raft  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

testing and reservoir parameters in geothermal wells at Raft testing and reservoir parameters in geothermal wells at Raft River and Boise, Idaho Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Conference Proceedings: Evaluation of testing and reservoir parameters in geothermal wells at Raft River and Boise, Idaho Details Activities (1) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: Evaluating the Raft River and Boise, Idaho, resources by pump and injection tests require information on the geology, geochemistry, surficial and borehole geophysics, and well construction and development methods. Nonideal test conditions and a complex hydrogeologic system prevent the use of idealized mathematical models for data evaluation in a one-phase fluid system. An empirical approach is successfully used since it was observed that all valid pump and injection well pressure data for constant discharge

74

Construction of MV-6 Well Pad at the Central Nevada Test Area Completed |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Construction of MV-6 Well Pad at the Central Nevada Test Area Construction of MV-6 Well Pad at the Central Nevada Test Area Completed Construction of MV-6 Well Pad at the Central Nevada Test Area Completed October 22, 2013 - 6:10pm Addthis What does this project do? Goal 1. Protect human health and the environment A new groundwater monitoring/validation (MV) well was installed at the Central Nevada Test Area (CNTA) in September 2013. LM proposed this well to the Nevada Division of Environmental Protection (NDEP) to enhance the existing monitoring network and to expedite the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (FFACO) closure process for the CNTA Subsurface Corrective Action Unit. CNTA is located in Hot Creek Valley in Nye County, Nevada, adjacent to U.S. Highway 6, about 30 miles north of Warm Springs, Nevada. CNTA was the site of "Project Faultless," a test site where a

75

Construction of MV-6 Well Pad at the Central Nevada Test Area Completed |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Construction of MV-6 Well Pad at the Central Nevada Test Area Construction of MV-6 Well Pad at the Central Nevada Test Area Completed Construction of MV-6 Well Pad at the Central Nevada Test Area Completed October 22, 2013 - 6:10pm Addthis What does this project do? Goal 1. Protect human health and the environment A new groundwater monitoring/validation (MV) well was installed at the Central Nevada Test Area (CNTA) in September 2013. LM proposed this well to the Nevada Division of Environmental Protection (NDEP) to enhance the existing monitoring network and to expedite the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (FFACO) closure process for the CNTA Subsurface Corrective Action Unit. CNTA is located in Hot Creek Valley in Nye County, Nevada, adjacent to U.S. Highway 6, about 30 miles north of Warm Springs, Nevada. CNTA was the site of "Project Faultless," a test site where a

76

Fourth Novatek Hammer Field Test Department of Energy Well PM-2-31  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Novatek Hammer Field Test Novatek Hammer Field Test Department of Energy Well PM-2-31 Garfield County, Colorado September, 1995 Report Prepared for Mud Hammer Development Project Partners Mobil Oil Novatek Brian Tarr, MEPTEC Drilling MOBIL EXPLORATION AND PRODUCTION TECHNICAL CENTER Dallas, Texas September 1995 Fourth Novatek Hammer Field Test Department of Energy Well PM-2-31 September 1995 Contents Page EXECUTIVE SUMMARY 3 CONCLUSIONS 4 RECOMMENDATIONS5 5 Field Test Procedure and Results 6 APPENDIX 1 - Well Data 10 APPENDIX 2 - ∆P Calculations APPENDIX 3 - Novatek hammer drawings and photo.'s Fourth Novatek Hammer Field Test Department of Energy Well PM-2-31 September 1995 EXECUTIVE SUMMARY Objectives The primary objective of the fourth field test was to establish if the threshold level of power required to increase rock bit

77

Data acquisition for low-temperature geothermal well tests and long-term monitoring. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Groundwater monitoring is an essential part of the development of a low-temperature geothermal field for production and injection wells. State water resource and environmental departments are requiring both geothermal well testing and long-term monitoring as a part of the permitting process for geothermal developments. This report covers water-level measurement methods, instruments used for well testing, geochemical sampling, examples of data acquisition and regulatory mandates on groundwater monitoring.

Lienau, P.J.

1992-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

78

Data acquisition for low-temperature geothermal well tests and long-term monitoring  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Groundwater monitoring is an essential part of the development of a low-temperature geothermal field for production and injection wells. State water resource and environmental departments are requiring both geothermal well testing and long-term monitoring as a part of the permitting process for geothermal developments. This report covers water-level measurement methods, instruments used for well testing, geochemical sampling, examples of data acquisition and regulatory mandates on groundwater monitoring.

Lienau, P.J.

1992-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

79

Interpretation of pre- and post-fracturing well tests in a geothermal reservoir  

SciTech Connect

Pre- and post-fracturing well tests in TG-2 well drilled next to the Matsukawa field are interpreted for evaluating effects of a massive hydraulic fracturing treatment. The interpreted data include multiple-step rate tests, a two-step rate test, and falloff tests. Pressure behaviors of massive hydraulic fracturing are matched by a simulator of dynamic fracture option. Fracture parting pressures can be evaluated from the multiple-step rate test data. The multiple-step rates during the massive hydraulic fracturing treatment show that multiple fractures have been induced in sequence. Although the pre-fracturing falloff tests are too short, fracture propagation can be evaluated qualitatively from the falloff data. Interpretation of the falloff test immediately after the MHF suggests that extensive fractures have been created by the MHF, which is verified by simulation. The post-fracturing falloff tests show that the fractures created by the MHF have closed to a great degree.

Arihara, Norio; Fukagawa, Hiroshi; Hyodo, Masami; Abbaszadeh, Maghsood

1995-01-26T23:59:59.000Z

80

Phase 2 Reese River Geothermal Project Slim Well 56-4 Drilling And Testing  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Phase 2 Reese River Geothermal Project Slim Well 56-4 Drilling And Testing Phase 2 Reese River Geothermal Project Slim Well 56-4 Drilling And Testing Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Report: Phase 2 Reese River Geothermal Project Slim Well 56-4 Drilling And Testing Details Activities (6) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: This report covers the drilling and testing of the slim well 56-4 at the Reese River Geothermal Project in Lander County, Nevada. This well was partially funded through a GRED III Cooperative Funding Agreement # DE-FC36-04GO14344, from USDOE. Author(s): William R. Henkle, Joel Ronne Published: Geothermal Technologies Legacy Collection, 2008 Document Number: Unavailable DOI: Unavailable Source: View Original Report Compound and Elemental Analysis At Reese River Area (Henkle & Ronne, 2008)

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "wells stratigraphic tests" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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81

Gulf Coast Programmatic Environmental Assessment Geothermal Well Testing: The Frio Formation of Texas and Louisiana  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

In accordance with the requirements of 10 CFR Part 711, environmental assessments are being prepared for significant activities and individual projects of the Division of Geothermal Energy (DGE) of the Energy Research and Development Administration (ERDA). This environmental assessment of geopressure well testing addresses, on a regional basis, the expected activities, affected environments, and possible impacts in a broad sense. The specific part of the program addressed by this environmental assessment is geothermal well testing by the take-over of one or more unsuccessful oil wells before the drilling rig is removed and completion of drilling into the geopressured zone. Along the Texas and Louisiana Gulf Coast (Plate 1 and Overlay) water at high temperatures and high pressures is trapped within Gulf basin sediments. The water is confined within or below essentially impermeable shale sequences and carries most or all of the overburden pressure. Such zones are referred to as geopressured strata. These fluids and sediments are heated to abnormally high temperatures (up to 260 C) and may provide potential reservoirs for economical production of geothermal energy. The obvious need in resource development is to assess the resource. Ongoing studies to define large-sand-volume reservoirs will ultimately define optimum sites for drilling special large diameter wells to perform large volume flow production tests. In the interim, existing well tests need to be made to help define and assess the resource. The project addressed by this environmental assessment is the performance of a geothermal well test in high potential geothermal areas. Well tests involve four major actions each of which may or may not be required for each of the well tests. The four major actions are: site preparation, drilling a salt-water disposal well, actual flow testing, and abandonment of the well.

None

1977-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

82

Pumping tests of well Campbell et al. No. 2, Gila Hot Springs, Grant County, New Mexico  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Well Campbell et al. No. 2 near Gila Hot Springs in southwestern New Mexico (Section 5, Township 13 South, Range 13 West) was pumped for a five-step test and a 48-hour constant-rate test during October 1981. Measurements included depth to water in the pumping well and two observation wells, and discharge rates at the pumping well and two springs. The water level in the pumping well responded during both tests. However, water-level changes in the observation wells were too small for analytical use and discharge rates from the springs showed no change. Chemical analyses of water samples collected from two springs and the pumping well show very similar water chemistries. Estimates of hydraulic properties show transmissivity from 12,000 to 14,000 gpd/ft and a storativity of 0.05. Combining these parameters with well data gives the first-year optimum discharge rate as 50 gpm with 20 feet of drawdown. Pumping this well at 50 gpm for forty years should produce only small water-level changes in wells a few hundred feet away. It would diminish the flow of the springs, and for planning purposes the combined discharge of the springs and well should be considered constant.

Schwab, G.E.; Summers, W.K.; Colpitts, R.M. Jr.; Teuten, C.E.; Young, W.K.

1982-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

83

NETL: News Release - Frio Formation Test Well Injected With Carbon Dioxide  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

19, 2004 19, 2004 Frio Formation Test Well Injected With Carbon Dioxide Researchers Perform Small Scale, Short Term Carbon Sequestration Field Test HOUSTON, TX - In the first U.S. field test to investigate the ability of brine formations to store greenhouse gasses, researchers funded by the U.S. Department of Energy are closely monitoring 1,600 tons of carbon dioxide that were injected into a mile-deep well in Texas in October. The test is providing unique data to help investigators understand the viability of geologic sequestration as a means of reducing greenhouse gas emissions. The Frio Brine Pilot experimental site is 30 miles northeast of Houston, in the South Liberty oilfield. Researchers at the University of Texas at Austin's Bureau of Economic Geology drilled a 5,753 foot injection well earlier this year, and developed a nearby observation well to study the ability of the high-porosity Frio sandstone formation to store carbon dioxide.

84

Closed-loop flow test Miravalles Geothermal Field well log results  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Instituto Costarricense de Electricidad (ICE) conducted a closed-loop flow test in the Miravalles Geothermal Field. The closed-loop test was started in May and ran through August of 1990. The effluent from the production well PG-11 was carried by a pipeline through a monitor station to the injection well PG-2. Before starting the long-term flow test in May, cold-water injection experiments were performed in each well to determine the pressure and temperature response. A series of downhole measurements were made in each well to obtain background information. The downhole measurements were repeated in August just before terminating the flow test to evaluate the results.

Dennis, B.; Eden, G.; Lawton, R.

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

85

NETL: News Release -Alaskan North Slope Well to Sample and Test...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

February 20, 2007 Alaskan North Slope Well to Sample and Test Gas Hydrate DOE-Led Interagency R&D Effort Key Step to Unlocking Vast Energy Resource WASHINGTON, DC - Drilling is...

86

New model for well test analysis in a purely fractured medium  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

In a porous medium the flow conduits are small and a large number of conduits are connected to the well. For this reason the medium appears to behave like a continuum on the scale of the well test, and volumetric averaging and continuum approximations are justified. On the contrary, in a fractured medium, only a small number of fractures may intersect the pumping well. These particular fractures will be stressed by a large gradient under well test conditions. Consequently, the early time behavior will be dominated by these fractures. The volumetrically averaged permeability does not control flow in the vicinity of an active well. The individual fractures close to the well must be characterized in order to understand the well test behavior especially if the hydraulic parameters of these fractures are significantly different from the average values for the entire system. In the present study, a new analytical model is proposed for well test problems in fracture networks where the matrix is impermeable. The model accounts for the difference in the flow regime around the active well from that of the system as a whole. The analytical solutions are presented in a series of type curves for ranges of dimensionless parameters. The flow properties of the fracture system can be determined by curve matching.

Karasaki, K.; Long, J.C.S.; Witherspoon, P.A.

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

87

Phase 2 Reese River Geothermal Project Slim Well 56-4 Drilling and Testing  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report covers the drilling and testing of the slim well 56-4 at the Reese River Geothermal Project in Lander County, Nevada. This well was partially funded through a GRED III Cooperative Funding Agreement # DE-FC36-04GO14344, from USDOE.

Henkle, William R.; Ronne, Joel

2008-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

88

Novel Application of Single-Well Tracer Tests to Evaluate Hydraulic Stimulation Effectiveness  

SciTech Connect

This paper presents a graphical method by which one can identify the number of fractures and their permeability distribution in the near-well region from single-well tracer tests. The method is an extension of tracer analysis methods developed previously to estimate flow geometry and relies on caluclating the relative fluid velocity from F-__ plots. A number of numerical examples show that high flow zones (fractures) are readily identified from the derivatives of an F-___ curve. The method can be used in evaluating well stimulation efforts by conducting a tracer test before and after the stimulation and comparing the velocity distributions.

G. M. Shook; Gopi Nalla

2005-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

89

Injectivity Test | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Injectivity Test Injectivity Test Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Technique: Injectivity Test Details Activities (7) Areas (6) Regions (0) NEPA(1) Exploration Technique Information Exploration Group: Downhole Techniques Exploration Sub Group: Well Testing Techniques Parent Exploration Technique: Well Testing Techniques Information Provided by Technique Lithology: Stratigraphic/Structural: Hydrological: Permeability of the well Thermal: Dictionary.png Injectivity Test: A well testing technique conducted upon completion of a well. Water is pumped into the well at a constant rate until a stable pressure is reached then the pump is turned off and the rate at which pressure decreases is measured. The pressure measurements are graphed and well permeability can

90

Analysis of Well ER-6-2 Testing, Yucca Flat FY 2004 Testing Program, Nevada Test Site, Nye County, Nevada, Rev. No.: 0  

SciTech Connect

This report documents the analysis of data collected for Well ER-6-2 during fiscal year (FY) 2004 Yucca Flat well development and testing program (herein referred to as the ''testing program''). Participants in Well ER-6-2 field development and hydraulic testing activities were: Stoller-Navarro Joint Venture (SNJV), Bechtel Nevada (BN), Desert Research Institute (DRI), Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL), U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), and the University of Nevada, Las Vegas-Harry Reid Center (UNLV-HRC). The analyses of data collected from the Well ER-6-2 testing program were performed by the SNJV.

Greg Ruskauff

2005-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

91

Crown Zellerbach Well No. 2, Livingston Parish, Louisiana. Volume I. Completion and testing. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Crown Zellerbach Well No. 2, approximately 23 miles east of Baton Rouge, Louisiana, is the eighth successful test of a geopressured-geothermal aquifer under the DOE Wells of Opportunity program. The well was tested through the annulus between 7-inch casing and 2-3/8 inch tubing. Two flow tests and one reservoir pressure buildup test were conducted on the lower zone during a 13-day period. A total of 12,489 barrels of water was produced. The highest flow rate achieved was about 3887 BWPD. One flow test followed by a buildup period was conducted on the combined upper and lower zones during a 3-day period. A total of 4739 barrels of water was produced. The highest flow rate achieved was about 3000 BWPD. The gas/water ratio measured during testing was about 32.0 SCF/BBL for the lower zone. The extrapolated latoratory data indicates that the solubility of the gas is 55.7 SCF/BBL. It appears that the reservoir brine is considerably undersaturated. The methane content of the flare line gas averaged 71.0 mole percent. Crown Zellerbach Company carefully studied the commercial feasibility of using the well to produce energy for a wood-drying facility and decided against the project.

Not Available

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

92

Analysis of diagnostic testing of Gladys McCall Well No. 1  

SciTech Connect

Gladys McCall Well No. 1 was flow tested from 1983 to 1987, underwent long-term pressure buildup testing from October 1987 to October 1991, and has recently been re-entered for final diagnostic testing. The combination of a very large, poorly defined reservoir with data from only a single well has required that the testing be carried out over an unusually long time period for an understanding of the pressure maintenance mechanisms to be developed. Ongoing diagnostic testing of the well has been undertaken by DOE to help resolve questions that arose during the analysis of the test data from the eight year depletion and recovery testing. A rather complete summary of the synthesis, correlation and analysis of the earlier test data has recently been published (Riney, 1991.) and is included in this report as an Appendix. Figure 1 (an update of Figure 9 in the Appendix) includes the final pressure buildup data in the comparison with the earlier reservoir simulation model. During October 1991 the Gladys McCall well was flowed twice as part of the diagnostic testing. On October 1 flow was started to clean out the well and to perform a spinner survey to determine the fluid entry distribution across the perforated interval of Sand 8. The spinner log was run on October 2 with the well producing at a constant rate of {approx} 4800 stb/d. Total production during the October 1-2 test period was 5954 stb. The second flow was from October 10 to 14 to obtain downhole pressure transient data to determine if the transmissivity (kh product) of Sand 8 had changed during the four-year shutin period (October 1987 to October 1991). The total production during the four day constant-rate (5958 stb/d) drawdown test of October 10-14 was 23,850 stb. Eaton Operating Co. and Institute of Gas Technology are continuing with the diagnostic testing; entry and pressure measurements in two overlaying sands (2 and 4) are planned. Since neither time nor funds are sufficient to complete the Gladys McCall analysis under S-Cubed's FY 1991 Subcontract, this is a preliminary report. It is anticipated that the work will continue under a new FY1992 Subcontract to LBL.

Riney, T.D.; Garg, S.K.

1991-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

93

Effects of Barometric Fluctuations on Well Water-Level Measurements and Aquifer Test Data  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, as part of the Hanford Groundwater Monitoring Project, examines the potential for offsite migration of contamination within underlying aquifer systems. Well water-level elevation measurements from selected wells within these aquifer systems commonly form the basis for delineating groundwater-flow patterns (i.e., flow direction and hydraulic gradient). In addition, the analysis of water-level responses obtained in wells during hydrologic tests provides estimates of hydraulic properties that are important for evaluating groundwater-flow velocity and transport characteristics. Barometric pressure fluctuations, however, can have a discernible impact on well water-level measurements. These barometric effects may lead to erroneous indications of hydraulic head within the aquifer. Total hydraulic head (i.e., sum of the water-table elevation and the atmospheric pressure at the water-table surface) within the aquifer, not well water-level elevation, is the hydrologic parameter for determining groundwater-flow direction and hydraulic gradient conditions. Temporal variations in barometric pressure may also adversely affect well water-level responses obtained during hydrologic tests. If significant, adjustments or removal of these barometric effects from the test-response record may be required for quantitative hydraulic property determination. This report examines the effects of barometric fluctuations on well water-level measurements and evaluates adjustment and removal methods for determining areal aquifer head conditions and aquifer test analysis. Two examples of Hanford Site unconfined aquifer tests are examined that demonstrate barometric response analysis and illustrate the predictive/removal capabilities of various methods for well water-level and aquifer total head values. Good predictive/removal characteristics were demonstrated with best corrective results provided by multiple-regression deconvolution methods.

FA Spane, Jr.

1999-12-16T23:59:59.000Z

94

Flow Test | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Flow Test Flow Test Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Technique: Flow Test Details Activities (38) Areas (33) Regions (1) NEPA(3) Exploration Technique Information Exploration Group: Downhole Techniques Exploration Sub Group: Well Testing Techniques Parent Exploration Technique: Well Testing Techniques Information Provided by Technique Lithology: Stratigraphic/Structural: Hydrological: Flow tests provide information on permeability, recharge rates, reservoir pressures, fluid chemistry, and scaling. Thermal: Flow tests can measure temperature variations with time to estimate characteristics about the heat source. Dictionary.png Flow Test: Flow tests are typically conducted shortly after a well has been drilled to test its productivity. The well is opened and fluids are released, the

95

BP-5 Remedial Investigation Slug-Test Characterization Results for Well 699-52-55A  

SciTech Connect

Pacific Northwest National Laboratory conducted slug-test characterization at the final, completed BP-5 Remedial Investigation well 699-52-55A near the 200-East Area at the Hanford Site on April 22, 2008. The slug-test characterization was in support of the BP-5 Remedial Investigation. The portion of the unconfined aquifer tested is composed of sediments of the lower Ringold Formation and the underlying Elephant Mountain basalt flowtop. The basalt flowtop unit was included as part of the effective test-interval length for the slug-test analysis because the flowtop unit is hydraulically communicative with the unconfined aquifer. Estimates of hydraulic conductivity for the effective test-interval length represent composite values for the lower Ringold Formation and the underlying Elephant Mountain basalt flow top.

Newcomer, Darrell R.

2008-07-21T23:59:59.000Z

96

Data-collection instrumentation and interpretation for geopressured aquifer well tests  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Wells of Opportunity program funded by the Department of Energy, sought to determine the amount of natural gas and thermal energy entrained in geopressured, geothermal aquifers of the Texas and Louisiana Gulf Coast fairways. This determination was made by bringing representative wells onto production for periods long enough to ascertain such characteristics as temperature, gas/brine ratio, reservoir boundaries and permeabilities. During testing, amounts of produced gas and brine were carefully monitored through a computer controlled instrumentation station, which provided reliable and precise indications of the amounts of recoverable gas being produced from the reservoir. A data collection system was designed to be integrated into the surface test equipment to provide real-time control and data compilation during the well tests. Strip chart records provided real-time control information during the test. All pressures, both differential pressures, brine and gas temperatures, and sand detector signals were displayed, and the physical records were maintained for interpretation of well performance. The data collection system coupled with the interpretation software permitted gas/brine ratio to be determined with accuracy of five percent for values as low as 0.02 MCF/STB. In addition, graphical representation of well performance, brine flow rates, gas production, pressure histories, etc., could be made as the test progressed. Data system reliability was very high. Downtime was minimal even under relatively harsh environmental conditions for electronic equipment. This data collection system, while designed initially for geopressured aquifers, is adaptable to the automated collection of scientific and engineering information for the interpretation of well tests of other petroleum resources.

Rose, R.E.; Doherty, M.G.

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

97

Application of pressure and pressure integral functions for the analysis of well test data  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The analysis of well test data by methods which only use the pressure change can be ambiguous, and analysis using the derivative of the pressure change is often distorted by random error in the data or data noise. Although various "smoothing" techniques have been used to reduce data noise, some concern exists that smoothing procedures may alter the basic character of the data. In this work, we use pressure integral and pressure integral derivative functions to reduce the data noise. First, we perform the conventional semilog analysis on the well test data using the pressure integral functions. Then, we demonstrate the applicability of the pressure change integral and derivative of pressure change integral functions. In this manner we couple the integral functions with the pressure change and pressure change derivative functions to derive useful qualitative and quantitative information from these test data. We also analyze well test data with these methods without the use of superposition time functions such as, Horner time and Agarwal "effective time" functions. In addition, we introduce a numerical technique to generate the pressure integral functions. Thus, we integrate the pressure analysis approach with the pressure integral analysis approach and develop a consistent and applicable method for the analysis of well test data.

Samad, Zahid

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

98

Single well surfactant test to evaluate surfactant floods using multi tracer method  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Data useful for evaluating the effectiveness of or designing an enhanced recovery process said process involving mobilizing and moving hydrocarbons through a hydrocarbon bearing subterranean formation from an injection well to a production well by injecting a mobilizing fluid into the injection well, comprising (a) determining hydrocarbon saturation in a volume in the formation near a well bore penetrating formation, (b) injecting sufficient mobilizing fluid to mobilize and move hydrocarbons from a volume in the formation near the well bore, and (c) determining the hydrocarbon saturation in a volume including at least a part of the volume of (b) by an improved single well surfactant method comprising injecting 2 or more slugs of water containing the primary tracer separated by water slugs containing no primary tracer. Alternatively, the plurality of ester tracers can be injected in a single slug said tracers penetrating varying distances into the formation wherein the esters have different partition coefficients and essentially equal reaction times. The single well tracer method employed is disclosed in U.S. Pat. No. 3,623,842. This method designated the single well surfactant test (SWST) is useful for evaluating the effect of surfactant floods, polymer floods, carbon dioxide floods, micellar floods, caustic floods and the like in subterranean formations in much less time and at much reduced cost compared to conventional multiwell pilot tests.

Sheely, Clyde Q. (Ponca City, OK)

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

99

Well Test Analysis and Improved Models for Geopressured-Geothermal Systems  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

In accordance with the S-CUBED Subcontract Work Statement, S-CUBED has concentrated on the synthesis, correlation and analysis of all pertinent data from the Department of Energy (DOE) geopressured-geothermal research wells undergoing testing during the contract period. This work has included the development of reservoir simulation models for the geopressured-geothermal resource in hydrological connection with each well. Existing S-CUBED simulation techniques have been applied to develop, update and improve the models for the reservoirs tested. During the contract period, data have been available from the Gladys McCall, Pleasant Bayou and Hulin test wells. S-CUBED has also contributed to the design of the well tests and participated in DOE's planning and review meetings in support of the geopressured-geothermal program. Detailed technical Topical Reports have been prepared and issued as appropriate during the contract period as referenced in the following summary of the work performed during the final year of the S-CUBED Subcontract to UTA.

Riney, T.D.

1990-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

100

Testing and sampling procedures for geothermal-compressured wells. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Test wells to tap and sample geothermal-geopressured formations at 15,000 to 20,000 feet in the Gulf Coast area can be drilled routinely utilizing available equipment and methods. Electrical logs, surveys and fluid samplers can be used to obtain accurate and reliable information as to depths, temperatures, pressures, and fluid content of the geopressured formations before the well is completed. But it will be necessary to set casing and flow the well, at least temporarily, to secure fluid production volume and pressure data to evaluate the producibility of the geopressured resource. Electric logging and wireline survey methods are fully developed techniques for measuring the parameters needed to assess a geopressured zone before setting casing. Formation subsidence, though it may be slow to develop, can be measured during radioactivity tracer surveys. The following conclusions are drawn: existing well logging and surveying methods and equipment are generally satisfactory for testing and sampling a geothermal-geopressured resource; no significant areas of research are needed to predict, detect, and evaluate geopressured formations for their potential as geothermal resources. Static and dynamic testing procedures using existing technology are satisfactory to test, sample, and analyze a geopressured reservoir.

Boyd, W.E.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "wells stratigraphic tests" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Environmental Assessment: Geothermal Energy Geopressure Subprogram. Gulf Coast Well Testing Activity, Frio Formation, Texas and Louisiana  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This Environmental Assessment (EA) has been prepared to provide the environmental input into the Division of Geothermal Energy's decisions to expand the geothermal well testing activities to include sites in the Frio Formation of Texas and Louisiana. It is proposed that drilling rigs be leased before they are removed from sites in the formation where drilling for gas or oil exploration has been unsuccessful and that the rigs be used to complete the drilling into the geopressured zone for resource exploration. This EA addresses, on a regional basis, the expected activities, affected environment, and the possible impacts in a broad sense as they apply to the Gulf Coast well testing activity of the Geothermal Energy Geopressure Subprogram of the Department of Energy. Along the Texas and Louisiana Gulf Coast (Plate 1 and Overlay, Atlas) water at high temperatures and high pressures is trapped within Gulf basin sediments. The water is confined within or below essentially impermeable shale sequences and carries most or all of the overburden pressure. Such zones are referred to as geopressured strata. These fluids and sediments are heated to abnormally high temperatures (up to 260 C) and may provide potential reservoirs for economical production of geothermal energy. The obvious need in resource development is to assess the resource. Ongoing studies to define large-sand-volume reservoirs will ultimately define optimum sites for drilling special large diameter wells to perform large volume flow production tests. in the interim, existing well tests need to be made to help define and assess the resource.

None

1978-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

102

Phase III: well testing and analysis. Progress report for the first quarter of federal FY77  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Management activities during the period are summarized. The following aspects of the geosciences program are reviewed: magnetics; seismic studies; geoelectric studies; petrography, petrology, and geochemistry; hydrology and hydrothermal geochemistry; and physical properties of rocks; and geotoxicology. The engineering program review includes numerical modelling and well testing and reservoir engineering. (MHR)

Not Available

1977-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

103

Recently developed well test insrumentation for low-to-moderate temperature hydrothermal reservoirs  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The engineering drawings, assembly instructions, and recommended usage for several of the instruments developed for low and moderate temperature (< 150/sup 0/C) hydrothermal well testing are presented. Included are the drawings for: a downhole pressure and temperature instrument, a multi-conductor cablehead, a line driver to be used with the downhole pressure and temperature instrument, and a fluid-level detector.

Solbau, R.; Goranson, C.B.; Benson, S.M.

1981-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

104

Investigation and evaluation of geopressured-geothermal wells: Fairfax Foster Sutter No. 2 well, St. Mary Parish, Louisiana. Volume II. Well test data. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The following data tables are included: pressure buildup, pressure survey, geothermal field test, analyses of reservoir brine, recombination analysis, analyses of separator gas, analyses of scale samples, H/sub 2/S in separator gas, and analysis of reservoir data. (MHR)

Willits, M.H.; McCoy, R.L.; Dobson, R.J.; Hartsock, J.H.

1979-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

105

Evaluation of testing and reservoir parameters in geothermal wells at Raft River and Boise, Idaho  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Evaluating the Raft River and Boise, Idaho, resources by pump and injection tests require information on the geology, geochemistry, surficial and borehole geophysics, and well construction and development methods. Nonideal test conditions and a complex hydrogeologic system prevent the use of idealized mathematical models for data evaluation in a one-phase fluid system. An empirical approach is successfully used since it was observed that all valid pump and injection well pressure data for constant discharge tests plotted as linear trends on semilogarithmic plots of borehole pressure versus time since pumping or injection began. Quantification of the pressure response prior to 600 minutes is not always possible. Short-duration (< 24-hour) injection or pump tests are conducted with the drilling rig equipment, and long-duration (21-day) injection and pump tests are then conducted with the permanent pumping facilities. Replicate instrumentation for pressure, temperature, and flow rates is necessary to ensure quality data. Water quality and monitor well data are also collected.

Allman, D.W.; Goldman, D.; Niemi, W.L.

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

106

Evaluation of testing and reservoir parameters in geothermal wells at Raft River and Boise, Idaho  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Evaluating the Raft River and Boise, Idaho, resources by pump and injection tests requires information on the geology, geochemistry, surficial and borehole geophysics, and well construction and development methods. Nonideal test conditions and a complex hydrogeologic system prevent the use of idealized mathematical models for data evaluation in a one-phase fluid system. An empirical approach is successfully used since it was observed that all valid pump and injection well pressure data for constant discharge tests plotted as linear trends on semilogarithmic plots of borehole pressure versus time since pumping or injection began. Quantification of the pressure response prior to 600 minutes is not always possible. Short-duration (< 24-hour) injection or pump tests are conducted with the drilling rig equipment, and long-duration (21-day) injection and pump tests are then conducted with the permanent pumping facilities. Replicate instrumentation for pressure, temperature, and flow rates are necessary to ensure quality data. Water quality and monitor well data are also collected.

Allman, D.W.; Goldman, D.; Niemi, W.L.

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

107

Hydrologic properties of the Dixie Valley, Nevada, geothermal reservoir from well-test analyses  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Temperature, pressure, and spinner (TPS) logs have been recorded in several wells from the Dixie Valley Geothermal Reservoir in west central Nevada. A variety of well-test analyses has been performed with these data to quantify the hydrologic properties of this fault-dominated geothermal resource. Four complementary analytical techniques were employed, their individual application depending upon availability and quality of data and validity of scientific assumptions. In some instances, redundancy in methodologies was used to decouple interrelated terms. The methods were (1) step-drawdown, variable-discharge test; (2) recovery analysis; (3) damped-oscillation response; and (4) injection test. To date, TPS logs from five wells have been examined and results fall into two distinct categories. Productive, economically viable wells have permeability-thickness values on the order of 10{sup 5} millidarcy-meter (mD-m) and storativities of about 10{sup {minus}3}. Low-productivity wells, sometimes located only a few kilometers from their permeable counterparts, are artesian and display a sharp reduction in permeability-thickness to about 10 mD-m with storativities on the order of 10{sup {minus}4}. These results demonstrate that the hydrologic characteristics of this liquid-dominated geothermal system exhibit a significant spatial variability along the range-bounding normal fault that forms the predominant aquifer. A large-scale, coherent model of the Dixie Valley Geothermal Reservoir will require an understanding of the nature of this heterogeneity and the parameters that control it.

Morin, R.H. [Geological Survey, Denver, CO (United States); Hickman, S.H. [Geological Survey, Menlo Park, CA (United States); Barton, C.A. [Stanford Univ., CA (United States). Dept. of Geophysics; Shapiro, A.M. [Geological Survey, Reston, VA (United States); Benoit, W.R. [Oxbow Geothermal Corp., Reno, NV (United States); Sass, J.H. [Geological Survey, Flagstaff, AZ (United States)

1998-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

108

Test facility for well logging cables (in air at atmospheric pressure)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A system has been built to test, in air at ambient pressure, short sections of electromechanical cables which are potentially useful for geothermal well logging service. Electrical characteristics of the test cable are monitored while the cable is exposed to elevated temperature and tensioned in a manner simulating loading experienced by a typical well logging cable. Cable conductor resistance, dielectric resistance and capacitance are measured. The cable can be exposed to bending, simulating that which occurs when passing over sheaves or wound on or off a drum. Cable anchors are arranged to permit nearly 100 percent strength tensioning in the heated section. Electrical connectors are made at the unstrained ends at ambient temperature. The system can also be used to tension test cable terminations at elevated temperatures.

Not Available

1977-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

109

NETL: News Release - Newly Installed Alaska North Slope Well Will Test  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

18, 2011 18, 2011 Newly Installed Alaska North Slope Well Will Test Innovative Hydrate Production Technologies Project Goals Include Injecting and Storing CO2 While Producing Methane Gas from Hydrate Washington, D.C. - A fully instrumented well that will test innovative technologies for producing methane gas from hydrate deposits has been safely installed on the North Slope of Alaska. As a result, the "Iġnik Sikumi" (Iñupiaq for "fire in the ice") gas hydrate field trial well will be available for field experiments as early as winter 2011-12. The well, the result of a partnership between ConocoPhillips and the Office of Fossil Energy's (FE) National Energy Technology Laboratory, will test a technology that involves injecting carbon dioxide (CO2) into sandstone reservoirs containing methane hydrate. Laboratory studies indicate that the CO2 molecules will replace the methane molecules within the solid hydrate lattice, resulting in the simultaneous sequestration of CO2 in a solid hydrate structure and production of methane gas.

110

Environmental Assessment of the Hawaii Geothermal Project Well Flow Test Program  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Hawaii Geothermal Project, a coordinated research effort of the University of Hawaii, funded by the County and State of Hawaii, and ERDA, was initiated in 1973 in an effort to identify, generate, and use geothermal energy on the Big Island of Hawaii. A number of stages are involved in developing geothermal power resources: exploration, test drilling, production testing, field development, power plant and powerline construction, and full-scale production. Phase I of the Project, which began in the summer of 1973, involved conducting exploratory surveys, developing analytical models for interpretation of geophysical results, conducting studies on energy recovery from hot brine, and examining the legal and economic implications of developing geothermal resources in the state. Phase II of the Project, initiated in the summer of 1975, centers on drilling an exploratory research well on the Island of Hawaii, but also continues operational support for the geophysical, engineering, and socioeconomic activities delineated above. The project to date is between the test drilling and production testing phase. The purpose of this assessment is to describe the activities and potential impacts associated with extensive well flow testing to be completed during Phase II.

None

1976-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

111

Calibration and performance testing of the IAEA Aquila Active Well Coincidence Counter (Unit 1)  

SciTech Connect

An Active Well Coincidence Counter (AWCC) and a portable shift register (PSR-B) produced by Aquila Technologies Group, Inc., have been tested and cross-calibrated with existing AWCCs used by the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA). This report summarizes the results of these tests and the cross-calibration of the detector. In addition, updated tables summarizing the cross-calibration of existing AWCCs and AmLi sources are also included. Using the Aquila PSR-B with existing IAEA software requires secondary software also supplied by Aquila to set up the PSR-B with the appropriate measurement parameters.

Menlove, H.O..; Siebelist, R.; Wenz, T.R.

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

112

A Microsoft Excel Program for Two-Well Tracer Test Data Analysis  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Two-well tracer tests are often conducted to investigate subsurface solute transport in the field. Analyzing breakthrough curves in the extraction and monitoring wells using numerical methods is nontrivial due to highly nonuniform flow conditions. We extended, and implemented analytical solutions for the convection-dispersion equation for an injection-extraction well-duplet in a homogeneous confined aquifer under steady state conditions. Functions were provided to calculate the concentrations in the extraction and monitoring wells at any location due to a step or pulse injection. Type curves for a step injection were compared with those calculated by numerically integrating the solution for a pulse injection. The results from the two approaches are similar when the dispersivity is small. As the dispersivity increases, the latter was found to be more accurate but requires more computing time. The code was verified by comparing the results with published type curves and applied to analyze data from the literature. It can be used as a first approximation for two-well tracer test data analysis, and to check accuracy of numerical solutions. The code and example files are publically-available.

Tang, Guoping [ORNL; Watson, David B [ORNL; Parker, Jack C. [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK); Brooks, Scott C [ORNL

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

113

A Spreadsheet Program for Two-Well Tracer Test Data Analysis  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Two-well tracer tests are often conducted to investigate subsurface solute transport in the field. Analyzing breakthrough curves in extraction and monitoring wells using numerical methods is nontrivial due to highly nonuniform flow conditions. We extended approximate analytical solutions for the advection-dispersion equation for an injection-extraction well doublet in a homogeneous confined aquifer under steady-state flow conditions for equal injection and extraction rates with no transverse dispersion and negligible ambient flow, and implemented the solutions in Microsoft Excel using Visual Basic for Application (VBA). Functions were implemented to calculate concentrations in extraction and monitoring wells at any location due to a step or pulse injection. Type curves for a step injection were compared with those calculated by numerically integrating the solution for a pulse injection. The results from the two approaches are similar when the dispersivity is small. As the dispersivity increases, the latter was found to be more accurate but requires more computing time. The code was verified by comparing the results with published-type curves and applied to analyze data from the literature. The method can be used as a first approximation for two-well tracer test design and data analysis, and to check accuracy of numerical solutions. The code and example files are publicly available.

Tang, Guoping [ORNL; Watson, David [ORNL; Parker, Jack C. [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK); Brooks, Scott C [ORNL

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

114

Testing the well-posedness of characteristic evolution of scalar waves  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Recent results have revealed a critical way in which lower order terms affect the well-posedness of the characteristic initial value problem for the scalar wave equation. The proper choice of such terms can make the Cauchy problem for scalar waves well posed even on a background spacetime with closed lightlike curves. These results provide new guidance for developing stable characteristic evolution algorithms. In this regard, we present here the finite difference version of these recent results and implement them in a stable evolution code. We describe test results which validate the code and exhibit some of the interesting features due to the lower order terms.

M. C. Babiuc; H-O. Kreiss; J. Winicour

2013-05-30T23:59:59.000Z

115

Prairie Canal Well No. 1, Calcasieu Parish, Louisiana. Volume 1. Completion and testing. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Prairie Canal Company, Inc. Well No. 1, approximately 8 miles south of the city of Lake Charles, Louisiana, was tested through the annulus between 5-1/2 inch casing and 2-3/8 inch tubing. The interval tested was from 14,782 to 14,820 feet. The geological section was the Hackberry Sand, a member of the Oligocene Frio formation. Produced water was injected into a disposal well which was perforated in several Miocene Sands from 3070 to 4600 feet. Original plans were to test a section of the Hackberry sand from 14,976 to 15,024 feet. This primary zone, however, produced a large amount of sand, shale, gravel, and rocks during early flow periods and was abandoned in favor of the secondary zone. Four pressure drawdown flow tests and three pressure buildup tests were conducted during a 12-day period. A total of 36,505 barrels of water was produced. The highest sustained flow rate was approximately 7100 BWPD. The gas-to-water ratio, measured during testing, ranged from 41 to 50 SCF/BBL. There is disagreement as to the saturation value of the reservoir brine, which may be between 43.3 and 49.7 SCF/BBL. The methane content of the flare line gas averaged 88.4 mole percent. The CO/sub 2/ content averaged 8.4 mole percent. Measured values of H/sub 2/S in the gas were between 12 and 24 ppM.

Not Available

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

116

Modeling Single Well Injection-Withdrawal (SWIW) Tests for Characterization of Complex Fracture-Matrix Systems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The ability to reliably predict flow and transport in fractured porous rock is an essential condition for performance evaluation of geologic (underground) nuclear waste repositories. In this report, a suite of programs (TRIPOLY code) for calculating and analyzing flow and transport in two-dimensional fracture-matrix systems is used to model single-well injection-withdrawal (SWIW) tracer tests. The SWIW test, a tracer test using one well, is proposed as a useful means of collecting data for site characterization, as well as estimating parameters relevant to tracer diffusion and sorption. After some specific code adaptations, we numerically generated a complex fracture-matrix system for computation of steady-state flow and tracer advection and dispersion in the fracture network, along with solute exchange processes between the fractures and the porous matrix. We then conducted simulations for a hypothetical but workable SWIW test design and completed parameter sensitivity studies on three physical parameters of the rock matrix - namely porosity, diffusion coefficient, and retardation coefficient - in order to investigate their impact on the fracture-matrix solute exchange process. Hydraulic fracturing, or hydrofracking, is also modeled in this study, in two different ways: (1) by increasing the hydraulic aperture for flow in existing fractures and (2) by adding a new set of fractures to the field. The results of all these different tests are analyzed by studying the population of matrix blocks, the tracer spatial distribution, and the breakthrough curves (BTCs) obtained, while performing mass-balance checks and being careful to avoid some numerical mistakes that could occur. This study clearly demonstrates the importance of matrix effects in the solute transport process, with the sensitivity studies illustrating the increased importance of the matrix in providing a retardation mechanism for radionuclides as matrix porosity, diffusion coefficient, or retardation coefficient increase. Interestingly, model results before and after hydrofracking are insensitive to adding more fractures, while slightly more sensitive to aperture increase, making SWIW tests a possible means of discriminating between these two potential hydrofracking effects. Finally, we investigate the possibility of inferring relevant information regarding the fracture-matrix system physical parameters from the BTCs obtained during SWIW testing.

Cotte, F.P.; Doughty, C.; Birkholzer, J.

2010-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

117

Geopressured-geothermal well report. Volume II. Well workover and production testing, February 1982-October 1985. T-F and S/DOE Gladys McCall No. 1 well, Cameron Parish, Louisiana. Appendices 8-12. Final report  

SciTech Connect

These appendices contain the following reports: (1) analysis of flow data from the Gladys McCall No. 1 well; (2) reservoir limit test data, sand zone No. 8; (3) reservoir fluid analysis for Gladys McCall well No. 1, sand 8; (4) brine and gas production history and gas sales; and (5) reservoir tests. (ACR)

Not Available

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

118

Report of testing and sampling of municipal supply well PM-4  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

During drilling of regional aquifer characterization borehole R-25, located in the western part of Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) at Technical Area (TA) 16, groundwater samples were collected from perched zones of saturation and the regional aquifer that contained elevated levels of high explosive (HE) compounds. One of the nearest Los Alamos County municipal supply wells potentially located down gradient from borehole R-25 is PM-4, located on Mesita del Buey at the west end of TA-54. During the winter of 1998 and 1999 the pump in PM-4 had been removed from the well for scheduled maintenance by the Los Alamos County Public Utilities Department (PUD). Because the pump was removed from PM-4, the opportunity existed to enter the well to (1) perform tests to determine where within the regional aquifer groundwater entered the well and (2) collect groundwater samples from the producing zones for analyses to determine if HE contaminants were present in discrete zones within the regional aquifer. The report of the activities that were performed during March 1999 for the testing and sampling of municipal supply well PM-4 is provided. The report provides a description of the field activities associated with the two phases of the project, including (1) the results of the static and dynamic spinner log surveys, and (2) a description of the sampling activities and the field-measured groundwater quality parameters that were obtained during sampling activities. This report also provides the analytical results of the groundwater samples and a brief discussion of the results of the project.

Richard J. Koch; Patrick Longmire; David B. Rogers; Ken Mullen

1999-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

119

City of North Bonneville, Washington: Geothermal Exploration Project, production test well, Phase II. Final report  

SciTech Connect

Based on discussions with the City of North Bonneville, the production test well was drilled to a depth that would also explore for ground water temperatures near 130/sup 0/F (54.4/sup 0/C). Depth projections to a 130/sup 0/F bottom hole temperature were made by assuming a constant ground water temperature rise greater than 50/sup 0/C per kilometer, and by assuming that essentially homogeneous or equivalent conductive rock units would be encountered. Minimum water production requirements were not set, although the City determined that about 800 gpm would be acceptable. Large upper casing diameters of 16 and 12 inches were installed in order to provide the future use of either a vertical turbine or submersible pump, as desired by the city. The scope of work included interpretation of well characteristics, evaluation of ground water as a geothermal resource, geologic analysis of data from drilling and testing, drilling supervision, daily drilling cost accounting, and preparation of a final report. The report includes geologic evaluation of the drilling and test data, ground water and geothermal potential.

Not Available

1982-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

120

Sampling and Analysis Procedures for Gas, Condensate, Brine, and Solids: Pleasant Bayou Well Test, 1988-Present  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This section covers analyses performed on gas. Chemical analyses can only be related to well performance if the quantity of the various fluids are known. The IGT on-line data computer system measures the flowrate, the pressures, and the temperatures every 10 seconds. These values are automatically recorded over operator selected intervals both on magnetic media and on paper. This allows review of samples versus operating conditions. This paper covers analyses performed on gas, including: An approximate sampling schedule during flow tests; On-site sample handling and storage of gas samples; Addresses of laboratories that perform off site analyses; Sample shipping instructions; Data archiving; and Quality Control/Quality Assurance. It is expected that the above procedures will change as the flow test progresses, but deviations from the written procedures should be approved by C. Hayden of IGT and noted on the results of the analysis.

Hayden, Chris

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "wells stratigraphic tests" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Godchaux Well No. 1, Vermilion Parish, Louisiana: completion and testing. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Godchaux Well No. 1 was originally drilled too a total depth of 16,000 feet in January, 1981 by C and K Petroleum, Inc. and was temporarily abandoned. The well was re-entered by Eaton on 6 August 1981 in an effort to clean out the original open hole below the 7-5/8 inch liner and test a section of the Planulina sand at a depth ranging from 15,584 to 15,692 feet. The reservoir pressure was estimated to be 14,480 psi, and the temperature of the formation water was expected to be 298/sup 0/F. The water salinity was predicted to be 70,000 ppM. The well was expected to produce up to 20,000 BWPD, was a gas content of 44 SCF per barrel. An optional test of a zone from 14,905 to 15,006 feet was also proposed in the detailed completion prognosis, which preceded the attempted test. In the process of drilling the cement plug set by the original operators, the drill string became side-tracked from the original hole. While drilling at 14,510 feet a severe loss of circulation of drilling fluid occurred through a hole in the intermediate casing. The reduction in hydrostatic head resulting from lost circulation caused the open hole to close around and stick the drill string. Efforts to repair the intermediate casing and return to normal operations were estimated to be prohibitively expensive in view of the expected poor probability of success; accordingly, the decision to plug and abandon was carried out on September 12, 1981.

Not Available

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

122

Candidate Well Selection for the Test of Degradable Biopolymer as Fracturing Fluid  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Hydraulic fracturing is a well-established technology of generating highly conductive flow path inside the rock by injecting massive amount of fracturing fluid and proppant with sufficient pressure to break the formation apart. But as the concern for environment and health effects of hydraulic fracturing becomes intense, many efforts are made to replace the conventional fracturing fluid with more environment-friendly materials. The degradable biopolymer is one of the novel materials that is injected in the form of solid pellets containing proppant, degrades in the presence of water to form a viscous gel fluid, leaving no gel residue or harmful material. This work develops a methodology and computer program to determine the best candidate wells for the field test of degradable biopolymer as fracturing fluid. The unique properties of degradable biopolymer is captured in the selection of decision criteria such as bottomhole temperature and treatment volume as well as traditional hydraulic fracturing candidate well selection criteria such as formation permeability, productivity index.

Hwang, Yun Suk

2011-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

123

Investigation and evaluation of geopressured-geothermal wells. Final report: Beulah Simon No. 2 Well, Vermilion Parish, Louisiana. Volume I. Completion and testing  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Geopressured-geothermal (Geo{sup 2}) test operations were conducted at the Beulah Simon No. 2 well site during the period from September through December 1979. The well provided the second geopressured-geothermal test to be completed under the DOE-Gruy Well of Opportunity program. The completion in a geopressured aquifer of Oligocene age at approximately 14,700 feet and the testing of hot salt water from this zone were accomplished without significant difficulty. Some problems were encountered with the wireline and wireline high-pressure lubricator associated with the running of bottomhole instruments. The objectives of the project were all accomplished, and good test data were obtained on the flow rates of gas and water. The gas content was 24 standard cubic feet per stock tank barrel of water. The disposal well accepted the full wellhead stream at temperatures as high as 255{sup 0}F (124{sup 0}C). Over the 10-day flow period the hot brine did not appear to adversely affect the clay minerals in the disposal aquifer. A conclusion from this operation is that presently available wirelines and pressure lubricators are not adaptable for use with uninhibited well fluids under flowing conditions. In addition, this test demonstrated that injection of scale inhibitor down the annulus eliminated scale buildup within the flow string and surface facilities. (MHR)

Dobson, R.J.; Hartsock, J.H.; McCoy, R.L.; Rodgers, J.A.

1980-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

124

Site Release Reports for C-Well Pipeline, UE-25 Large Rocks Test Site, and 29 GSF Test Pits  

SciTech Connect

The U.S. Department of Energy has implemented a program to reclaim lands disturbed by site characterization at Yucca Mountain. Long term goals of the program are to re-establish processes on disturbed sites that will lead to self-sustaining plant communities. The Biological Opinion for Yucca Mountain Site Characterization Studies required that the U.S. Department of Energy develop a Reclamation Standards and Monitoring Plan to evaluate the success of reclamation efforts. According to the Reclamation Standards and Monitoring Plan, reclaimed sites will be monitored periodically, remediated if necessary, and eventually compared to an appropriate reference area to determine whether reclamation goals have been achieved and the site can be released from further monitoring. Plant cover, density, and species richness (success parameters) on reclaimed sites are compared to 60 percent of the values (success criteria) for the same parameters on the reference area. Small sites (less than 0.1 ha) are evaluated for release using qualitative methods while large sites (greater than 0.1 ha) are evaluated using quantitative methods. In the summer of 2000, 31 small sites reclaimed in 1993 and 1994 were evaluated for reclamation success and potential release from further monitoring. Plant density, cover, and species richness were estimated on the C-Well Pipeline, UE-25 Large Rocks test site, and 29 ground surface facility test pits. Evidence of erosion, reproduction and natural recruitment, exotic species abundance, and animal use (key attributes) also were recorded for each site and used in success evaluations. The C-Well Pipeline and ground surface facility test pits were located in a ''Larrea tridentata - Ephedra nevadensis'' vegetation association while the UE-25 Large Rocks test site was located in an area dominated by ''Coleogyne ramosissima and Ephedra nevadensis''. Reference areas in the same vegetation associations with similar slope and aspect were chosen for comparison to the reclaimed sites. Sixty percent of the reference area means for density, cover, and species richness were compared to the estimated means for the reclaimed sites. Plant density, cover, and species richness at the C-Well Pipeline and UE-25 Large Rocks test site were greater than the success criteria and all key attributes indicated the sites were in acceptable condition. Therefore, these two sites were recommended for release from further monitoring. Of the 29 ground surface facility test pits, 26 met the criterion for density, 21 for cover, and 23 for species richness. When key attributes and conditions of the plant community near each pit were taken into account, 27 of these pits were recommended for release. Success parameters and key attributes at ground surface facility test pits 19 and 20 were inadequate for site release. Transplants of native species were added to these two sites in 2001 to improve density, cover, and species richness.

K.E. Rasmuson

2002-04-02T23:59:59.000Z

125

Inorganic geochemistry of Devonian shales in southern West Virginia: geographic and stratigraphic trends  

SciTech Connect

Samples of cuttings from twenty-one wells and a core from a single well in southern West Virginia were analyzed for major and minor elements: silicon, aluminum, iron, magnesium, calcium, sodium, titanium, phosphorus, manganese, sulfur, zinc, and strontium. Stratigraphic and geographic controls on elemental abundances were studied through canonical correlations, factor analyses, and trend surface analyses. The most abundant elements, silicon and aluminum, show gradual trends through the stratigraphic column of most wells, with silicon increasing and aluminum decreasing up-section. Other elements such as calcium, sulfur, and titanium change abruptly in abundance at certain stratigraphic boundaries. Important geographic trends run east-west: for instance, one can see an increase in sulfur and a decrease in titanium to the west; and a decrease in silicon from the east to the central part of the study area, then an increase further west. Although observed vertical trends in detrital minerals and geographic patterns in elemental abundances agree with the accepted view of a prograding delta complex during Late Devonian time, geographically-local, time restricted depositional processes influenced elemental percentages in subsets of the wells and the stratigraphic intervals studied. The black shales of lower Huron age do not represent simply a return of depositional conditions present in the earlier Rhinestreet time; nor do the gray shales of the Ohio Shale represent the same environmental conditions as the Big White Slate.

Hohn, M.E.; Neal, D.W.; Renton, J.J.

1980-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

126

Geothermal well cements: current status of R and D and downhole testing  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The status as of October 1981 of the program to develop and test geothermal well cementing materials. The program represents the most comprehensive and thorough examination of the geothermal cementing problem undertaken thus far. To date, 27 cements identified in an R and D phase of the program or supplied by industry have been evaluated in laboratory tests. Sixteen of these materials were selected for downhole investigations currently in progress in Mexico at Cerro Prieto. Data for 3 months exposures to flowing brine at 210{sup 0}C are available. Most of the cements continue to meet the strength and permeability acceptance criteria. These results should be reassuring to operators who are using such slurries. Further evaluations are planned after 6 and 12 months exposures. Contingent upon these results, tests will be initiated at 350{sup 0}C. Since many of the cements were formulated specifically for use at temperatures above 300/sup 0/C, it is expected that significant property improvements may be observed as the downhole temperature is increased.

Kukacka, L.E.

1981-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

127

Investigation and Evaluation of Geopressured-Geothermal Wells; Detailed Reentry Prognosis for Geopressure-Geothermal Testing of The Watkins-Miller No. 1 Well, Cameron Parish, Louisiana  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This Gruy Federal Type II-B prospect was drilled as the Superior Oil Company No. 1 Watkins-Miller, API designation 17-023-20501 and is located in Section 5, T15S, R5W, Cameron Parish, Louisiana. The well site is just north of lot 39 on Indian Point Island and is readily accessible from state highway Route 82 and a shell road in good condition. Superior Oil completed this well in late 1970 as a dual gas producer in sands between 11,150 and 11,250 feet but eventually abandoned the well in December, 1974. The cellar of the well is still visible on the site. This location is shown on the lower portion of USGS topographic sheet ''Grand Lake West'' in the map pocket of the Gruy Federal report ''Investigation and Evaluation of Geopressured-Geothermal Wells, Prospective Test Wells in the Texas and Louisiana Gulf Coast'', February 28, 1978.

None

1978-04-13T23:59:59.000Z

128

Pahute Mesa Well Development and Testing Analyses for Wells ER-20-8 and ER-20-4, Nevada National Security Site, Nye County, Nevada, Revision 0  

SciTech Connect

Wells ER-20-4 and ER-20-8 were drilled during fiscal year (FY) 2009 and FY 2010 (NNSA/NSO, 2011a and b). The closest underground nuclear test detonations to the area of investigation are TYBO (U-20y), BELMONT (U-20as), MOLBO (U-20ag), BENHAM (U-20c), and HOYA (U-20 be) (Figure 1-1). The TYBO, MOLBO, and BENHAM detonations had working points located below the regional water table. The BELMONT and HOYA detonation working points were located just above the water table, and the cavity for these detonations are calculated to extend below the water table (Pawloski et al., 2002). The broad purpose of Wells ER-20-4 and ER-20-8 is to determine the extent of radionuclide-contaminated groundwater, the geologic formations, groundwater geochemistry as an indicator of age and origin, and the water-bearing properties and hydraulic conditions that influence radionuclide migration. Well development and testing is performed to determine the hydraulic properties at the well and between other wells, and to obtain groundwater samples at the well that are representative of the formation at the well. The area location, wells, underground nuclear detonations, and other features are shown in Figure 1-1. Hydrostratigraphic cross sections A-A’, B-B’, C-C’, and D-D’ are shown in Figures 1-2 through 1-5, respectively.

Greg Ruskauff and Sam Marutzky

2012-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

129

Modeling Single Well Injection-Withdrawal (SWIW) Tests for Characterization of Complex Fracture-Matrix Systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

not just near the injection well. Note that because thisConcentrations at the injection well increase during thethe fractures away from the injection well is fast, solutes

Cotte, F.P.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

130

T-F and S/DOE Gladys McCall No. 1 well, Cameron Parish, Louisiana. Geopressured-geothermal well report, Volume II. Well workover and production testing, February 1982-October 1985. Final report. Appendices 1-7  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

These appendices contain the following reports: (1) investigation of coupling failure from the Gladys McCall No. 1 well; (2) failure analysis - oil well casing coupling; (3) technical remedial requirements for 5-inch production tubing string; (4) reservoir limit test data for sand zone No. 9; (5) reservoir fluid study - sand zone No. 9; (6) engineering interpretation of exploration drawdown tests; and (7) reservoir analysis. (ACR)

Not Available

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

131

Investigation and Evaluation of Geopressured-Geothermal Wells; Detailed Reentry Prognosis for Geopressure-Geothermal Testing of Alice C. Plantation No. 2 Well  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This Gruy Federal Type II-B, geopressured-geothermal (Geo) prospect was drilled as the Sun Oil Company, No. 2 Alice C. Plantation and is located in Section 2, Township 16-S, Range 10-E, St. mary Parish, Louisiana. The well site is 3,705.61 feet from U.S.C. and G.S. marker ''Foster''. The well site is located in a sugar cane field, and is accessible by approximately 2,500 feet of cane field road. The well was originally drilled to a depth of 19,000 feet and abandoned as a dry hole in December, 1963. The location is shown on the west central area of the USGS topographic sheet, 'North Bend'', Louisiana, in the Gruy Federal report, ''Investigation and Evaluation of Geopressured-Geothermal Wells, prospective Test Wells in the Texas and Louisiana Gulf Coast'', March 20, 1978.

None

1978-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

132

Investigation and evaluation of geopressured-geothermal wells. Fairfax Foster Sutter No. 2 well, St. Mary Parish, Louisiana. Volume I. Completion and testing. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Fairfax Foster Sutter No. 2 well, located in the East Franklin area of St. Mary Parish, Louisiana, is the first successful test of a geopressured-geothermal aquifer under the Well-of-Opportunity program. The section tested was the MA-6 sand of lower Miocene age which has produced large quantities of gas from the adjacent but structurally separated Garden City field. In the subject well the observed temperature was 270{sup 0}F (132{sup 0}C) and the measured gradient was 0.77 psi/ft. The gross sand thickness was 270 feet, the net sand thickness 190 feet, and the tested interval 58 net feet. The temperatures and pressures encountered approached the limits of the surface-recording bottomhole pressure gauge and particularly the single-conductor cables on which the gauges were run. The objectives of the tests were all accomplished, and data were obtained which will contribute to the overall assessment of the geopressured-geothermal resource of the Upper Gulf of Mexico basin. In general, the gas solubility (22.8 scf/bbl) was as expected for the temperature, pressure, and salinity of the brine. The produced water was more saline than expected (160,000 mg/l). The high concentrations of dissolved solids, coupled with the evolution of CO{sub 2} from these waters during production, created a scaling problem in the tubular goods and surface equipment that will have to be addressed in future tests.

Willits, M.H.; McCoy, R.L.; Dobson, R.J.; Hartsock, J.H.

1979-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

133

Middle East: stratigraphic evolution and oil habitat: discussion  

SciTech Connect

The paper, Middle East: Stratigraphic Evolution and Oil Habitat, by R.J. Murris (AAPG Bull. v. 64, p. 597-618) is discussed. Problems with the time-stratigraphic units used in the article are pointed out, along with the source rocks of the petroleum deposits, the depositional cyclicity, subsidence and sea level fluctuation, and the Middle East geosyncline. (JMT)

Ibrahim, M.W.

1981-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

134

CONVERT 15 WELLS TO BORS PUMPING UNITS AND TEST/COMPARE TO CONVENTIONAL UNITS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A new type of fluid lifting equipment called Balanced Oil Recovery System (trade named BORS Lift{trademark}) was installed on several idle oil wells to demonstrate the operating efficiency of this innovative equipment technology. The BORS Lift system is designed to bring oil to the surface without the accompanying formation water. The BORS Lift system uses an innovative strap mechanism that takes oil from the top of the downhole oilwater column and lifts it to the surface, eliminating production of the formation water. Eliminating salt water production could potentially increase oil production, reduce operational costs, benefit the environment, and cut salt water disposal costs. Although the BORS Lift units did not function as intended, lessons learned during the course of the field demonstration project resulted in improvements in the technology and redesign of subsequent generation BORS Lift units which are reported to have significantly improved their performance characteristics. BORS Lift units were installed on 15 temporarily abandoned wells which had been shut down due to low oil production, high water production, and uneconomic operating conditions. The wells had been producing with artificial lift at a high watercut from a shallow (850-900 feet), pressure depleted oil sand reservoir prior to being shut down. The electrical motor driven BORS Lift units provided a possible approach for economically returning the shallow, low-volume oil wells to production. The BORS Lift units used in this field demonstration were designed to recover up to roughly 22 barrels of fluid per day from depths ranging to 1,700 feet, ideal for many marginal stripper well operations. The BORS units were first-production-model test units, operated under oil field conditions for the first time, and were naturally expected to experience some design problems. From the onset, the operator experienced mechanical, design, and operational problems with the BORS Lift units and was unable to maintain un-interrupted production operations. The inventor provided considerable on-site technical support in an ongoing effort to correct the problems with the units and the inventor worked extensively with the operator to make design and manufacturing changes to the units to try to improve their reliability and performance. The operational problems were mostly related to the durability of the various components under oil field operating conditions such as inadequate mechanical, electrical, and electronic design for rough service, extended operation, and severe weather conditions. During the course of the demonstration project, it further appeared that the producing formation lacked sufficient reservoir energy and/or favorable oil properties to mobilize and displace oil from the formation into the well bore in order to recharge the oil column in the well. The BORS Lift units were then moved to a second lease which appeared to have more favorable WTI quality oil properties. Eight of these units were reported to have been installed and placed in operation on the second lease, however, operational difficulties continued. It was determined that the units were inadequately designed and would need to be replace by improved second generation units. Due to the lack of success with the first generation units and the extra cost to replace them with the redesigned units, the operators decided not to continue with the project and the project was terminated at that point.

Walter B. North

2003-02-04T23:59:59.000Z

135

Final report for the geothermal well site restoration and plug and abandonment of wells: DOE Pleasant Bayou test site, Brazoria County, Texas  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

For a variety of reasons, thousands of oil and gas wells have been abandoned in the Gulf Coast Region of the United States. Many of these wells penetrated geopressured zones whose resource potential for power generation was undervalued or ignored. The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Geopressured-Geothermal Research Program was chartered to improve geothermal technology to the point where electricity could be commercially produced from a substantial number of geopressured resource sites. This research program focused on relatively narrow technical issues that are unique to geopressured resources such as the ability to predict reservoir production capacity based on preliminary flow tests. Three well sites were selected for the research program. These are the Willis Hulin and Gladys McCall sites in Louisiana, and the Pleasant Bayou site in Texas. The final phase of this research project consists of plug and abandonment (P&A) of the wells and site restoration.

Rinehart, Ben N.; Seigel, Ben H.

1994-03-13T23:59:59.000Z

136

Further tests of new method for zone isolation in horizontal wells  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This research is the continuation of Phase II of a joint industry project, whose main objective is to investigate the feasibility of sealing off water and gas producing zones in a horizontal well. During Phase I of the project laboratory experiments were conducted using PVC pipes up to 2-in. diameter and 3-ft. long in order to investigate the viability of using three commercial gels for use as wellborn plugs. The encouraging results from these earlier experiments led to testing the method in a full-scale 60-ft. long by 6-in. diameter wellborn model. The results obtained were again encouraging, but we needed to confirm them by repeating the experiment with some modifications. The two main objectives of this research are: (i) to investigate the effectiveness of K-MAX as a chemical wellborn plug and PERMSEAL as a formation gel in a horizontal well, and (ii) to measure the holding pressure of K-MAX. For the first research objective, the existing 60-ft. long apparatus was modified to include heater pipes inside the 12-in. PVC oboes to allow hot water circulation to achieve a temperature of about 120 F? during curing of PERMSEAL. The results showed that K-MAX performed satisfactorily as a chemical wellborn plug, being displaced with no slumping. The PERMSEAL was displaced radially around the wellborn, penetrating and consolidating the sand and making it apparently impermeable. The holding pressure apparatus consisted of two lengths of 5 []-in. casing (5-ft. long and 10-ft. long), open at one end and closed at the other. K-MAX gel was introduced into the pipe at the open end. Upon curing, the closed end was connected to a HPLC pump to inject water against the K-MAX plug. The holding pressures obtained were low (less than 1 psi). Somewhat higher holding pressures may be expected in the field because of the actual wellborn roughness; and with surface rams being closed during injection in the field, the formation would preferentially be injected into the problem zone. Given the encouraging results to date, it is recommended to field test the new zone isolation method.

Gomez Gomez, Julian Alberto

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

137

T-F and S/DOE Gladys McCall No. 1 well, Cameron Parish, Louisiana. Geopressured-geothermal well report, Volume II. Well workover and production testing, February 1982-October 1985. Final report. Part 1  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The T-F and S/DOE Gladys McCall No. 1 well was the fourth in a series of wells in the DOE Design Wells Program that were drilled into deep, large geopressured-geothermal brine aquifers in order to provide basic data with which to determine the technological and economic viability of producing energy from these unconventional resources. This brine production well was spudded on May 27, 1981 and drilling operations were completed on November 2, 1981 after using 160 days of rig time. The well was drilled to a total depth of 16,510 feet. The target sands lie at a depth of 14,412 to 15,860 feet in the Fleming Formation of the lower Miocene. This report covers well production testing operations and necessary well workover operations during the February 1982 to October 1985 period. The primary goals of the well testing program were: (1) to determine reservoir size, shape, volume, drive mechanisms, and other reservoir parameters, (2) to determine and demonstrate the technological and economic viability of producing energy from a geopressured-geothermal brine aquifer through long-term production testing, and (3) to determine problem areas associated with such long-term production, and to develop solutions therefor.

Not Available

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

138

Stress Test | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Stress Test Stress Test Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Technique: Stress Test Details Activities (1) Areas (1) Regions (0) NEPA(0) Exploration Technique Information Exploration Group: Downhole Techniques Exploration Sub Group: Well Testing Techniques Parent Exploration Technique: Well Testing Techniques Information Provided by Technique Lithology: Stratigraphic/Structural: Fracture distribution and ambient tectonic stresses Hydrological: Fluid flow direction Thermal: Dictionary.png Stress Test: A geologic stress analysis based on images of a borehole wall and hydraulic fracturing tests to characterize fracture orientations and stress magnitudes in order to identify stress planes and zones of potential permeability. Other definitions:Wikipedia Reegle

139

Investigation and Evaluation of Geopressured-Geothermal Wells; Detailed Reentry Prognosis for Geopressure-Geothermal Testing of the Watkins-Miller No.1 Well, Cameron Parish, Louisiana  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This prospect was drilled as the Superior Oil Company No. 1 Watkins-Miller, located in Section 5, T15S, R5W, Cameron Parish, Louisiana. The well site is just north of lot 39 on Indian Point Island and is readily accessible from State Highway 82 via a shell road which is in good condition. This location is shown on the lower portion of the USGS topographic sheet ''Grand Lake West''; a portion of this sheet is included. Superior Oil completed this well in late 1970 as a dual gas producer in sands between 11,150 and 11,250 feet and abandoned it in December 1974. This well was initially selected as the first Geo reentry candidate but was deferred when the landowner refused to grant reentry and test rights. He has, however, now indicated that he would be willing to grant those rights for a fee of $50,000. In view of the need for an alternate well to replace the State Lease 4183 No. 1, Gruy Federal has thoroughly reviewed alternate wells and concluded that the Watkins-Miller No. 1 requires minimal site preparation and is the reentry well of choice.

None

1978-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

140

Geopressured geothermal fairway evaluation and test-well site location, Frio Formation, Texas Gulf Coast  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Tertiary strata of the Texas Gulf Coast comprise a number of terrigenous depositional wedges, some of which thicken abruptly at their downdip ends as a result of contemporaneous movement of growth faults and underlying salt. The Frio Formation, one of these wedges, has been studied regionally by means of a grid of correlation cross sections aided by micropaleontological control. By means of these sections, the Frio was subdivided into six map units; maps of sandstone distribution within these units delineate principal elongate sandstone trends parallel to the Gulf Coast composed of deltaic, barrier-bar, and strandplain sandstones. These broad regional studies, followed by detailed local investigations, were pursued in order to delineate prospective areas for production of geopressured geothermal energy. A prospective area must meet the following minimum requirements; reservoir volume of 3 cubic miles, minimum permeability of 20 millidarcys (md), and fluid temperatures of 300/sup 0/F. Several geothermal fairways were identified as a result of this Frio study. In summary, detailed geological, geophysical, and engineering studies conducted on the Frio Formation have delineated a geothermal test well site in the Austin Bayou Prospect which extends over an area of 60 square miles. A total of 800 to 900 feet of sandstone will occur between the depths of 13,500 and 16,500 feet. At least 30% of the sand will have core permeabilities of 20 to 60 millidarcys. Temperature at the top of the sandstone section will be 300/sup 0/F. Water, produced at a rate of 20,000 to 40,000 barrels per day, will probably have to be disposed of by injection into shallower sandstone reservoirs. More than 10 billion barrels of water are in place in these sandstone reservoirs of the Austin Bayou Prospect; there should be approximately 400 billion cubic feed of methane in solution in this water.

Bebout, D.G.; Loucks, R.G.; Gregory, A.R.

1978-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "wells stratigraphic tests" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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141

Structural geology of wells of opportunity tested during 1980 and 1981  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Six geopressured-geothermal reservoirs have been tested. These reservoirs have been isolated in one or more directions by down-to-the-coast growth-type faulting. The two main types are those bounded updip by a single sealing fault and anticlinal traps bounded both up and down dip of the structure. Additional permeability barriers were encountered during testing. These barriers were not predicted in the original geologic evaluations and show the need to seek larger reservoirs in future tests.

Peterson, K.P.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

142

Stratigraphic controls on fluid distribution: An example from Prudhoe Bay, Alaska  

SciTech Connect

Oil, gas, and water distribution in three drill sites (1 79 wells) studied in the Prudhoe Bay Field is controlled dominantly by sandstone and shale stratigraphy. Detailed reservoir description, encompassing genetic-stratigraphic correlations and three-dimensional reservoir modeling has provided a new look at the locations of remaining reserves in the upper Romeo and Tango intervals of the Ivishak Sandstone. Greater than 22 billion stock tank barrels constitute in-place oil reserves in Prudhoe Bay Field. Production in excess of nine billion barrels, in conjunction with waterflood and tertiary-recovery projects, has created a complex distribution of reservoir fluids. As oil is produced, the gas-cap expands and intersects laterally extensive shales to form gas underruns. Underruns are of great economic concern as they disrupt the NLOC and segregate oil lenses as well as causing high GOR wells. Recovering these oil lenses at low GORs requires precise analysis of in-place fluids, well placement, and completion strategy. Core descriptions and stratigraphic correlations provided the basis for facies interpretations and the deterministic division of the strata into twenty-four reservoir layers (twelve sandstone and shale units). Isochore, fluid-distribution, and NILOC maps were compiled for the reservoir horizons. Stratigraphic, structural, and fluid data integrated within a three-dimensional model resulted in an improved fluid-distribution picture and revealed numerous development opportunities including infill wells, sidetracks, and recompletions.

Burns, B.A.; Knock, D.; Tye, R.S. (ARCO Alaska, Anchorage, AK (United States))

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

143

Project Rio Blanco reentry drilling and testing of RB-E-01 well. Final report  

SciTech Connect

Reentry by the RB-E-01 hole was made through the 7-in. emplacement casing. Details of the drilling operations and test results are presented. (TFD)

1975-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

144

Tracer Testing | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Tracer Testing Tracer Testing Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Technique: Tracer Testing Details Activities (9) Areas (5) Regions (0) NEPA(0) Exploration Technique Information Exploration Group: Downhole Techniques Exploration Sub Group: Well Testing Techniques Parent Exploration Technique: Well Testing Techniques Information Provided by Technique Lithology: Stratigraphic/Structural: Fracture zones and formation permeability Hydrological: Flow rates, flow direction, hydrologic connections, storativity Thermal: Dictionary.png Tracer Testing: A method based on injecting chemical tracers into the reservoir and monitoring how long it takes and where those tracers travel. The purpose is to model subsurface hydrothermal flow characteristics.

145

Performance of Large Diameter Residential Drinking Water Wells - Biofilm Growth: Laboratory and Field Testing.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??In the first phase of this project three enhanced large diameter (> 60 cm) residential wells were constructed at a study site in Lindsay, Ontario.… (more)

Ruiz Salazar, Hector Fabio

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

146

Preplant 1,3-D treatments test well for perennial crop nurseries, but challenges remain  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

for 26-month June-budded crop if soil has been previouslyfruit and nut nursery crops in the United States. Outlooktest well for perennial crop nurseries, but challenges

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

147

Stratigraphic Record Of The Yellowstone Hotspot Track, Neogene Sixmile  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Stratigraphic Record Of The Yellowstone Hotspot Track, Neogene Sixmile Stratigraphic Record Of The Yellowstone Hotspot Track, Neogene Sixmile Creek Formation Grabens, Southwest Montana Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Journal Article: Stratigraphic Record Of The Yellowstone Hotspot Track, Neogene Sixmile Creek Formation Grabens, Southwest Montana Details Activities (1) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: The Sixmile Creek Formation fills deep grabens in southwest Montana and preserves a stratigraphic record of the evolution of the Yellowstone hotspot track from ~ 17 Ma to ~ 2 Ma. The Ruby, Beaverhead, Big Hole, Deer Lodge, Medicine Lodge-Grasshopper, Three Forks, Canyon Ferry, Jefferson, Melrose, Wise River, and Paradise grabens were active during outbreak of the hotspot. They appear to be parts of a radial system of

148

Figure 2. Stratigraphic Summary of Ages, Names and Rock Types...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2. Stratigraphic Summary of Ages, Names and Rock Types in the ANWR 1002 and Coastal Plain Area of the Alaska North Slope. Potentially Productive Reservoirs and Plays Assessed by...

149

300-Area VOC Program Slug Test Characterization Results for Selected Test/Depth Intervals Conducted During the Drilling of Well 399-3-21  

SciTech Connect

This report presents brief test descriptions and analysis results for multiple, stress-level slug tests that were performed at selected test/depth intervals within well 399-3-21 as part of the 300-Area volatile organic compound characterization program. The test intervals were characterized as the borehole was advanced to its final drill depth (45.7 m) and before its completion as a monitor-well facility. The primary objective of the slug tests was to provide information pertaining to the vertical distribution of hydraulic conductivity with depth at this location and to select the final screen-depth interval for the monitor well. This type of characterization information is important for predicting/simulating contaminant migration (i.e., numerical flow/transport modeling) and designing proper monitor-well strategies within this area.

Spane, Frank A.

2007-07-19T23:59:59.000Z

150

Well test analysis and reservoir modeling of geopressured-geothermal systems (includes topical reports on analyses for: Pleasant Bayou Well No. 2, Gladys McCall Well No.1). Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Automated inversion of pressure transient data from the Pleasant Bayou and Gladys McCall geopressured test wells has allowed the resolution of several outstanding questions concerning the two reservoirs. The added accuracy of the interpretation of the various data sets from each well provides convincing evidence that the formation response of each of the reservoirs behaved in an essentially linear fashion throughout its multi-year depletion/recovery test history. The only exception was in the immediate vicinity of the sandface; the skin factor in each of the wells varies during the course of its test history (see Appendices for detailed discussions of the variations and the likely causes of the variations for each well). (a) The six bottomhole pressure transient tests of Pleasant Bayou Well No.2 over a twelve year period (1980-1992) yield estimates for the permeability-thickness product that are in excellent agreement (kh = 3.665 D-m). Inversion of the 45-day buildup portion of the 1980 RLT yields an estimate of X{sub a} = 869 m as the distance from the well to the nearest boundary. The inversion of the data from the other five tests, of much shorter duration, yield estimates in the range X{sub a} = 427-503 m. The RLT estimate would normally be given much more credence. The failure, repair and resetting of the gauge after the first ten days of the start of the buildup test, however, may have affected the RLT data. Calculations are employed to estimate bottomhole pressures from surface recordings subsequent to removal of the bottomhole gauge following the 1992 70-hr buildup test. These estimated values were combined with the 70-hr data to form the 111-day (from September 12, 1992 through January 1, 1993) LTT buildup test data set. The LTT data were inverted to yield an estimate of X{sub a} = 452 m. Since this is in agreement with the range of estimates from the five short-term bottomhole test, we believe the range X{sub a} = 427-503 m to represent the best estimate for the distance from the well to the nearest boundary. The simulation model presented in Appendix B used L1 = 990 m (Figure 3 in Appendix B) as the distance from the test well to the nearest boundary. The simulation model could probably be improved using a smaller value for L1. The actual location of the boundary to the south of the well is not known from the available geological information. (b) The five bottomhole pressure transient tests of Gladys McCall Well No.2 over an eight-year period (1983-1991) yield estimates for the permeability-thickness product that differ significantly from each other. The differences, however, can be explained by the partial plugging of the near-well formation during an aborted attempt to inject a scale-inhibitor pill in May 1985, followed by subsequent scouring out the pill precipitates by the flowing fluid during the May 1985-August 1987 production testing. The partial plugging of the near-well formation in conjunction with a known shale stringer that prevents vertical communication in sand 8 (Figure 2 in Appendix A) would reduce the apparent value of kh to about sixty percent of the original RLT value of 13.44 D-m. Inversion of the 79-hr (1985) and 92-hr (1986) buildup tests yield kh estimates of 7.69 and 8.86 D-m, respectively. Inversions of the valid MRT (1987) and FDT (1991) pressure transient data yield estimates very near the original RLT value. The reinterpretation of the MRT data represents a correction of our earlier conclusion (in Appendix A); we now believe that the data from the first and second gauges employed during the MRT are incompatible. Data from the first (''old'') gauge during the drawdown portion of the MRT could not be adequately corrected for the observed drift in the recorded data. Only the second (''new'') gauge data are considered reliable and inversion of the buildup data it recorded yields the estimate for kh that is in agreement with estimates obtained from inversion of the RLT and FDT pressure transient data.

Riney, T.D.; Owusu, L.A.

1993-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

151

INEL/Snake River plain geothermal drilling and testing plan - INEL - 1 well  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A plan for drilling a 7500 ft exploratory hole is described. This hole would be drilled at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, so that it could be immediately used by one of the government facilties. The plan details the hole design, describes the drilling program, proposes a testing program, and estimates costs. (MHR)

Miller, L.G.; Prestwich, S.M.; Griffith, J.L.

1978-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

152

Environmental assessment of proposed geothermal well testing in the Tigre Lagoon Oil Field, Vermilion Parish, Louisiana  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

An environmental assessment is made of the proposed testing of two geopressured, geothermal aquifers in central coastal Louisiana. On the basis of an analysis of the environmental setting, subsurface characteristics, and the proposed action, potential environmental impacts are determined and evaluated together with potential conflicts with federal, state, and local programs. (LBS )

Not Available

1976-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

153

A NEW LOOK AT NONLINEAR REGRESSION IN WELL TESTING A DISSERTATION  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

transformations. We developed techniques to find robust Cartesian transform pairs that worked very well with a variety of reservoir models. The Cartesian parameter transformations we proposed provided faster inherent in the data. #12;vi In the second group, data space transformations, we analyzed the wavelet

154

The Antrim Shale: Structural and stratigraphic influences on gas production  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Antrim Shale of the Michigan basin is one of the most actively drilled gas plays in the United States. Core analysis, geologic mapping, and core to log correlations of a 9 mi{sup 2} study area in the middle of the present play have defined geologic influences on the location and productivity of Antrim reservoirs. Application of these factors in the design of exploration and development strategies could improve gas recovery from the Antrim Shale. The lower section of the Antrim Shale, containing the present producing horizons, is composed of four lithologies that subdivide the Antrim into facies and parasequences based upon their mineralogy and textural characteristics. The black shales of the producing horizons are characterized by high but variable quartz contents and an extremely fine-grained matrix of muscovite and clays. The black shales are surrounded by two types of gray shale, differentiated by amount and form of carbonates, and a green shale. The type of shale bounding the productive, organic-rich black shales may affect stimulation strategies and their effectiveness. These black shales average 10% but can be as high as 20% TOC by weight. The organic contents impart a distinctive signature to gamma ray logs that enabled isopach, lithofacies, and structural mapping of the Antrim. Correlated with available production data, the maps reveal distinct trends suggesting that well performance is influenced by both structural and stratigraphic controls.

Manger, K.C.; Oliver, S.J.P. (ICF Resources Incorporated, Fairfax, VA (United States)); Scheper, R.J. (Gas Research Inst., Chicago, IL (United States))

1991-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

155

Field Test Report: Preliminary Aquifer Test Characterization Results for Well 299-W15-225: Supporting Phase I of the 200-ZP-1 Groundwater Operable Unit Remedial Design  

SciTech Connect

This report examines the hydrologic test results for both local vertical profile characterization and large-scale hydrologic tests associated with a new extraction well (well 299-W15-225) that was constructed during FY2009 for inclusion within the future 200-West Area Groundwater Treatment System that is scheduled to go on-line at the end of FY2011. To facilitate the analysis of the large-scale hydrologic test performed at newly constructed extraction well 299-W15-225 (C7017; also referred to as EW-1 in some planning documents), the existing 200-ZP-1 interim pump-and-treat system was completely shut-down ~1 month before the performance of the large-scale hydrologic test. Specifically, this report 1) applies recently developed methods for removing barometric pressure fluctuations from well water-level measurements to enhance the detection of hydrologic test and pump-and-treat system effects at selected monitor wells, 2) analyzes the barometric-corrected well water-level responses for a preliminary determination of large-scale hydraulic properties, and 3) provides an assessment of the vertical distribution of hydraulic conductivity in the vicinity of newly constructed extraction well 299-W15-225. The hydrologic characterization approach presented in this report is expected to have universal application for meeting the characterization needs at other remedial action sites located within unconfined and confined aquifer systems.

Spane, Frank A.; Newcomer, Darrell R.

2009-09-23T23:59:59.000Z

156

Geopressured-Geothermal Drilling and Testing Plan, Volume II, Testing Plan; Dow Chemical Co. - Dept. of Energy Dow-DOE Sweezy No. 1 Well, Vermilion Parish, Louisiana  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Dow/D.O.E. L. R. Sweezy No. 1 geopressured geothermal production well was completed in August of 1981. The well was perforated and gravel packed in approximately 50 feet of sand from 13,344 feet to 13,395 feet. Permeabilities of 6 to 914 millidarcies were measured with porosity of 25 to 36%. Static surface pressure after well clean-up was 5000 psi. At 1000 B/D flow rate the drawdown was 50 psi. The water produced in clean-up contained 100,000 ppm TDS. This report details the plan for testing this well with the goal of obtaining sufficient data to define the total production curve of the small, 939 acre, reservoir. A production time of six to nine months is anticipated. The salt water disposal well is expected to be completed and surface equipment installed such that production testing will begin by April 1, 1982. The program should be finished and reports written by February 28, 1983. The brine will be produced from the No.1 well, passed through a separator where the gas is removed, then reinjected into the No.2 (SWD) well under separator pressure. Flow rates of up to 25,000 B/D are expected. The tests are divided into a two-week short-term test and six to nine-month long-term tests with periodic downhole measurement of drawdown and buildup rates. Data obtained in the testing will be relayed by phoneline computer hookup to Otis Engineering in Dallas, Texas, where the reservoir calculations and modeling will be done. At the point where sufficient data has been obtained to reach the objectives of the program, production will be ended, the wells plugged and abandoned, and a final report will be issued.

None

1982-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

157

Flow tests of the Willis Hulin well. Appendix C, Willis Hulin Site: Final report, October 1985--October 1990  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Hulin well was tested between 20,100 and 20,700 feet down in layers of brine-saturated clean sand with occasional intervening layers of shale. The characteristics of the brine and gas were determined in this interval and an initial determination of the reservoir properties were made.

Randolph, P.L.; Hayden, C.G.; Rogers, L.A.

1992-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

158

A critical evaluation of the deviation time method to calculate discontinuity radias from well tests in composite reservoirs  

SciTech Connect

Reservoirs with a fluid bank, or a burning front, reservoirs with a reduced or an increased permeability region around the wellbore, and geothermal reservoirs are often modeled as composite reservoirs. Reservoirs with a fluid bank include reservoirs undergoing waterflood, chemical flood, polymer flood, CO/sub 2/ flood, and steam injection. Eight well tests reported in the literature exhibiting composite reservoir behavior have been analyzed using the deviation time method. The dimensionless deviation times obtained from pressure and pressure derivative responses for a well in a composite reservoir are used for analyzing the well tests. Analysis shows the estimate of discontinuity radius to be sensitive to both the real and the dimensionless deviation times used. The estimate discontinuity radius from the deviation time method may represent a lower bound for discontinuity radius, if the swept region is not cylindrical. Also, obtaining an accurate deviation time for small mobility contrasts may be difficult.

Ambastha, A.K.; Ramey, H.J., Jr. (Stanford Univ., CA (USA))

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

159

Analysis of FY 2005/2006 Hydrologic Testing and Sampling Results for Well ER-12-4, Nevada Test Site, Nye County, Nevada, Rev. No.: 0  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report documents the analysis of data collected for ER-12-4 during the fiscal year (FY) 2005 Rainier Mesa/Shoshone Mountain well development and hydraulic testing program (herein referred to as the ''testing program'') and hydraulic response data from the FY 2006 Sampling Program. Well ER-12-4 was constructed and tested as a part of the Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 99, Rainier Mesa/Shoshone Mountain, Phase I drilling program during FY 2005. These activities were conducted on behalf of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office (NNSA/NSO) for the Underground Test Area (UGTA) Subproject. As shown on Figure 1-1, ER-12-4 is located in central Rainier Mesa, in Area 12 of the Nevada Test Site (NTS). Figure 1-2 shows the well location in relation to the tunnels under Rainier Mesa. The well was drilled to a total depth (TD) of 3,715 feet (ft) below ground surface (bgs) (surface elevation 6,883.7 ft above mean sea level [amsl]) in the area of several tunnels mined into Rainier Mesa that were used historically for nuclear testing (NNSA/NSO, 2006). The closest nuclear test to the well location was MIGHTY OAK (U-12t.08), conducted in the U-12t Tunnel approximately 475 ft north of the well site. The MIGHTY OAK test working point elevation was located at approximately 5,620 ft amsl. The MIGHTY OAK test had an announced yield of ''less than 20 kilotons'' (DOE/NV, 2000). The purpose of this hydrogeologic investigation well is to evaluate the deep Tertiary volcanic section below the tunnel level, which is above the regional water table, and to provide information on the section of the lower carbonate aquifer - thrust plate (LCA3), located below the Tertiary volcanic section (SNJV, 2005b). Details on the drilling and completion program are presented in the ''Completion Report for Well ER-12-4 Corrective Action Unit 99: Rainier Mesa-Shoshone Mountain'' (NNSA/NSO, 2006). Participants in ER-12-4 testing activities were: Stoller-Navarro Joint Venture (SNJV), Bechtel Nevada (BN), Desert Research Institute (DRI), Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL), and the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS). Stoller-Navarro Joint Venture served as the lead contractor responsible for providing site supervision, development and testing services, and waste management services; BN provided construction and engineering support services; DRI provided well logging services and participated in groundwater sampling and laboratory analyses; LANL and LLNL participated in groundwater sampling and laboratory analyses; and the USGS performed laboratory analyses. Analyses of data from the ER-12-4 testing program presented in this document were performed by SNJV except as noted. These same contractors participated in the FY 2006 Sampling Program.

Bill Fryer

2006-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

160

Pahute Mesa Well Development and Testing Analyses for Wells ER-20-7, ER-20-8 #2, and ER-EC-11, Revision 1  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report analyzes the following data collected from ER-20-7, ER-20-8 No.2, and ER-EC-11 during WDT operations: (1) Chemical indicators of well development (Section 2.0); (2) Static hydraulic head (Section 3.0); (3) Radiochemistry and geochemistry (Section 4.0); (4) Drawdown observed at locations distal to the pumping well (Section 5.0); and (5) Drilling water production, flow logs, and temperature logs (Section 6.0). The new data are further considered with respect to existing data as to how they enhance or change interpretations of groundwater flow and transport, and an interim small-scale conceptual model is also developed and compared to Phase I concepts. The purpose of well development is to remove drilling fluids and drilling-associated fines from the formation adjacent to a well so samples reflecting ambient groundwater water quality can be collected, and to restore hydraulic properties near the well bore. Drilling fluids can contaminate environmental samples from the well, resulting in nonrepresentative measurements. Both drilling fluids and preexisting fines in the formation adjacent to the well can impede the flow of water from the formation to the well, creating artifacts in hydraulic response data measured in the well.

Greg Ruskauff

2011-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

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161

Hydrologic Tests at Characterization Wells R-9i, R-13, R-19, R-22, and R-31, Revision 1  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Hydrologic information is essential for environmental efforts at Los Alamos National Laboratory. Testing at new characterization wells being drilled to the regional aquifer (''R wells'') to improve the conceptual hydrogeologic model of the Pajarito Plateau is providing such information. Field tests were conducted on various zones of saturation penetrated by the R wells to collect data needed for determining hydraulic properties. This document provides details of the design and execution of testing as well as an analysis of data for five new wells: R-9i, R-13, R-19, R-22, and R-31. One well (R-13) was evaluated by a pumping test and the rest (R-9i, R-19, R-22, and R-31) were evaluated by injection tests. Characterization well R-9i is located in Los Alamos Canyon approximately 0.3 mi west of the Route 4/Route 502 intersection. It was completed at a depth of 322 ft below ground surface (bgs) in March 2000. This well was constructed with two screens positioned below the regional water table. Both screens were tested. Screen 1 is completed at about 189-200 ft bgs in fractured basalt, and screen 2 is completed at about 270-280 ft bgs in massive basalt. Specific capacity analysis of the screen 1 data suggests that the fractured basalt has a transmissivity (T) of 589 ft{sup 2}/day and corresponds to a hydraulic conductivity (K) of 7.1 ft/day based on a saturated thickness of 83 ft. The injection test data from the massive basalt near screen 2 were analyzed by the Bouwer-Rice slug test methodology and suggest that K is 0.11 ft/day, corresponding to a T of about 2.8 ft{sup 2}/day based on a saturated thickness of 25 ft. Characterization well R-13 is located in Mortandad Canyon just west of the eastern Laboratory boundary. It was completed at a depth of 1029 ft bgs in February 2002. This well was constructed with one 60-ft long screen positioned about 125 ft below the regional water table. This screen is completed at about 958-1019 ft bgs and straddles the geologic contact between the Puye fanglomerate and unassigned pumiceous units. The specific capacity analysis of a 12 minute pumping test indicates that the Puye fanglomerates near the R-13 screen have a T of 5269 ft{sup 2}/day and correspond to a hydraulic conductivity (K) of 17.6 ft/day based on a saturated thickness of 300 ft. Characterization well R-19 is located east of firing site IJ in Technical Area (TA) 36 on the mesa between Three-mile and Potrillo Canyons. It was completed at a depth of 1885 ft bgs in April 2000. This well was constructed with two screens positioned above the regional water table and five screens positioned below the regional water table. Only the bottom two screens were tested. Screen 6 is completed at about 1727-1734 ft bgs in Puye fanglomerate, and screen 7 is completed at about 1832-1849 ft bgs in Puye fanglomerate. Specific capacity analysis of the screen 6 data suggests that T is about 6923 ft{sup 2}/day and corresponds to a K of 18.6 ft/day based on a saturated thickness of 373 ft. Specific capacity analysis of the screen 7 data suggests that T is about 8179 ft{sup 2}/day and corresponds to a K of 22.0 ft/day based on a saturated thickness of 373 ft. Characterization well R-22 is located on Mesita del Buey between Canada del Buey and Pajarito Canyons immediately east of Material Disposal Area (MDA) G in TA-54. It was completed at a depth of 1489 ft bgs in October 2000. This well was constructed with five screens positioned at or below the regional water table; however, only screens 2-5 were tested. Screen 1 is completed at the regional water table at about 872-914 ft bgs in Cerros del Rio basalt. Screen 2 is completed at about 947-989 ft bgs in Cerros del Rio basalt. Screen 3 is completed at about 1272-1279 ft bgs in Puye fanglomerate. Screen 4 is completed at about 1378-1452 ft bgs in older basalt. Screen 5 is completed at about 1447-1452 ft bgs in older fanglomerate. Bouwer-Rice analyses of the injection-test recovery data suggest K values of 0.04, 0.32, 0.54, and 0.27 ft/day for screens 2, 3, 4, and 5, respectively. These values correspond to

S.G.McLin; W.J. Stone

2004-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

162

Flow tests of the Willis Hulin Well. Volume III. Final report for the period October 1985--October 1990  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The initial flow test of the Hulin well was done to obtain brine and gas samples and to get a first measure of the reservoir properties. The 20,602 to 20,690-foot interval was perforated and tested in two short-term draw-down and buildup tests. This zone had an initial pressure of 17,308 psia and temperature of 339 F. The total dissolved solids of 207,000 mg/L (mostly sodium chloride) is higher than for previously tested Gulf Coast geopressured-geothermal wells. The gas content in the brine of 31 to 32 SCF/STB indicates that the brine is at or near saturation with natural gas. The permeability, as deduced from the draw-down and buildup tests, is 13 md for the lower 80-foot-thick sand member. The duration of the tests was too short to determine the lateral extent of the reservoir; but declining measured values for static bottomhole pressure prior to each flow test suggests a relatively small reservoir. When the uppermost interval in the zone of interest (20,220 to 20,260 feet) was perforated such that flow from this zone would commingle with flow from the lower zone, little to no free gas was observed. It had been speculated before the test that there might be free gas in this upper zone. These speculations were generally deduced from logs after assuming the formation contained brine that had a salinity between 70,000 and 100,000 mg/L. The actual salinity was more than twice that number. it is now apparent that the amount of free gas, if any, is too small to make a significant contribution to production in a short-term test. This does not preclude the possibility of mobilization of gas by higher drawdown or coning down from an offsetting gas cap in one or more of the sand members. However, there was no evidence that this was occurring in this test. No measurements of the reservoir parameters, such as permeability, were made for the shallowest interval tested. But substantially lower drawdown for the commingled zones suggests either higher permeability or lower skin for the shallower perforated interval. Hydrate formation in the upper part of the wellbore was a problem. To circumvent this problem, about 10 barrels of diesel were pumped into the top of the well after each flow to displace the brine down to a level in the well where the temperature was too high for hydrates to form. Calculations of saturation index indicated that calcium carbonate scale would also form in the well if the pressure was drawn down too far. Thus all the flow tests were performed at low flow rates to preclude formation of scale in the wellbore. Scale inhibitor was injected into the surface flow lines to control possible scale formation in the surface equipment. Corrosion inhibitor was also injected, and coupon monitoring indicated a corrosion rate of less than 5 mils per year.

Randolph, P.L.; Hayden, C.G.; Rogers, L.A.

1992-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

163

Completion Report for Well Cluster ER-6-1  

SciTech Connect

Well Cluster ER-6-1 was constructed for the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office in support of the Nevada Environmental Restoration Division at the Nevada Test Site, Nye County, Nevada. This work was initiated as part of the Groundwater Characterization Project, now known as the Underground Test Area Project. The well cluster is located in southeastern Yucca Flat. Detailed lithologic descriptions with stratigraphic assignments for Well Cluster ER-6-1 are included in this report. These are based on composite drill cuttings collected every 3 meters and conventional core samples taken below 639 meters, supplemented by geophysical log data. Detailed petrographic, chemical, and mineralogical studies of rock samples were conducted on 11 samples to resolve complex interrelationships between several of the Tertiary tuff units. Additionally, paleontological analyses by the U.S. Geological Survey confirmed the stratigraphic assignments below 539 meters within the Paleozoic sedimentary section. All three wells in the Well ER-6-1 cluster were drilled within the Quaternary and Tertiary alluvium section, the Tertiary volcanic section, and into the Paleozoic sedimentary section.

Bechtel Nevada

2004-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

164

An Environmental Assessment of Proposed Geothermal Well Testing in the Tigre Lagoon Oil Field, Vermilion Parish, Louisiana  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report is an environmental assessment of the proposed testing of two geopressured, geothermal aquifers in central coastal Louisiana. On the basis of an analysis of the environmental setting, subsurface characteristics, and the proposed action, potential environmental impacts are determined and evaluated together with potential conflicts with federal, state, and local programs. Oil and gas wells in coastal Louisiana have penetrated a potentially productive geothermal zone of abnormally high-pressured aquifers that also yield large volumes of natural gas. To evaluate the extent to which the geothermal-geopressured water can be used as an alternative energy source and to what extent withdrawal of geopressured water can enhance gas production, it is necessary that flow rates, composition and temperature of fluids and gases, recharge characteristics, pressures, compressibilities, and other hydrodynamic and boundary conditions of the reservoir be determined by means of production tests. Tests are further necessary to evaluate and seek solutions to technological problems.

None

1976-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

165

Environmental baseline monitoring in the area of general crude oil-Department of Energy Pleasant Bayou Number 2: a geopressured geothermal test well, 1980. Annual report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A description of baseline air and water quality of the test well site, a summary of microseismic activity before and during 1980, and a description of the monitoring of a liquid tiltmeter at the test well site are included.

Gustavson, T.C.; Howard, R.C.; McGookey, D.

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

166

Investigation and Evaluation of Geopressured-Geothermal Wells; Detailed Reentry Prognosis for Geopressure-Geothermal Testing of Gladys McCall No. 1 Well  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This Gruy Federal Type III-A geopressured-geothermal (Geo) prospect was drilled as the Getty Oil Company and Buttes Gas and Oil Company, No.1 Gladys McCall. It is located in Section 27, Township 15S, Range 5W, Cameron Parish, Louisiana. The well is accessible by way of the original canal levee road, approximately 2 1/2 miles south of Louisiana State Route 82; one bridge must be replaced and a board road must be laid on the levee. Buttes completed this well in january, 1970, as a shut-in gas well through perforations from 11,924 to 11,928 feet. it was plugged and abandoned in April, 1970, without having produced. The location is shown on the north central area of the USGS topographic sheet ''Hog Bayou''. A portion of this sheet is included, which shows this well location as well as the State Lease 4183 Nos. 1 and 2 wells on the adjacent Rockefeller Wildlife Refuge and Game Preserve.

None

1978-06-16T23:59:59.000Z

167

Investigation and Evaluation of Geopressured-Geothermal Wells; Detailed Reentry Prognosis for Geopressure-Geothermal Testing of Dr. M.O. Miller No. 1 Well  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This Gruy Federal Type I-A prospect was drilled as the Union Oil Company of California, Dr. M.O. Miller No. 1 and is located in Section 34, T15S, R5W, Cameron Parish, Louisiana. The land belongs to the heirs of Dr. Miller and is unleased. The well site is approximately 350 feet southwest of the northwest corner of Section 34 and approximately 4,000 feet south-southeast of Prospect L-3, Buttes Gas and Oil Co. et al., Gladys McCall No. 1. The former well site is accessible by approximately 2.8 miles of canal levee on which a board road would have to be constructed. In addition, there are two wooden bridges in fair condition to be crossed which will require minor repairs. The well was drilled to a total depth of 18,158 feet and plugged and abandoned as a dry hole mid 1965.

None

1978-04-21T23:59:59.000Z

168

Ratio of produced gas to produced water from DOE's EDNA Delcambre No. 1 geopressured-geothermal aquifer gas well test  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A paper presented by the Institute of Gas Technology (IGT) at the Third Geopressured-Geothermal Energy Conference hypothesized that the high ratio of produced gas to produced water from the No. 1 sand in the Edna Delcambre No. 1 well was due to free gas trapped in pores by imbibition over geological time. This hypothesis was examined in relation to preliminary test data which reported only average gas to water ratios over the roughly 2-day steps in flow rate. Subsequent public release of detailed test data revealed substantial departures from the previously reported computer simulation results. Also, data now in the public domain reveal the existence of a gas cap on the aquifier tested. This paper describes IGT's efforts to match the observed gas/water production with computer simulation. Two models for the occurrence and production of gas in excess of that dissolved in the brine have been used. One model considers the gas to be dispersed in pores by imbibition, and the other model considers the gas as a nearby free gas cap above the aquifier. The studies revealed that the dispersed gas model characteristically gave the wrong shape to plots of gas production on the gas/water ratio plots such that no reasonable match to the flow data could be achieved. The free gas cap model gave a characteristically better shape to the production plots and could provide an approximate fit to the data of the edge of the free gas cap is only about 400 feet from the well.Because the geological structure maps indicate the free gas cap to be several thousand feet away and the computer simulation results match the distance to the nearby Delcambre Nos. 4 and 4A wells, it appears that the source of the excess free gas in the test of the No. 1 sand may be from these nearby wells. The gas source is probably a separate gas zone and is brought into contact with the No. 1 sand via a conduit around the No. 4 well.

Rogers, L.A.; Randolph, P.L.

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

169

Vertical Flowmeter Test | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Vertical Flowmeter Test Vertical Flowmeter Test Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Technique: Vertical Flowmeter Test Details Activities (0) Areas (0) Regions (0) NEPA(0) Exploration Technique Information Exploration Group: Downhole Techniques Exploration Sub Group: Well Testing Techniques Parent Exploration Technique: Well Testing Techniques Information Provided by Technique Lithology: Stratigraphic/Structural: Hydrological: Define permeable zones within a well Thermal: Dictionary.png Vertical Flowmeter Test: A well testing technique done upon completion of a well to identify locations of permeable zones within the well and to quantify the relative permeability of each zone. Other definitions:Wikipedia Reegle Introduction A vertical flowmeter test is also known as a spinner test and is preformed

170

Thermal single-well injection-withdrawal tracer tests for determining fracture-matrix heat transfer area  

SciTech Connect

Single-well injection-withdrawal (SWIW) tracer tests involve injection of traced fluid and subsequent tracer recovery from the same well, usually with some quiescent time between the injection and withdrawal periods. SWIW are insensitive to variations in advective processes that arise from formation heterogeneities, because upon withdrawal, fluid parcels tend to retrace the paths taken during injection. However, SWIW are sensitive to diffusive processes, such as diffusive exchange of conservative or reactive solutes between fractures and rock matrix. This paper focuses on SWIW tests in which temperature itself is used as a tracer. Numerical simulations demonstrate the sensitivity of temperature returns to fracture-matrix interaction. We consider thermal SWIW response to the two primary reservoir improvements targeted with stimulation, (1) making additional fractures accessible to injected fluids, and (2) increasing the aperture and permeability of pre-existing fractures. It is found that temperature returns in SWIW tests are insensitive to (2), while providing a strong signal of more rapid temperature recovery during the withdrawal phase for (1).

Pruess, K.; Doughty, C.

2010-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

171

Exploratory Well | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Exploratory Well Exploratory Well Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Technique: Exploratory Well Details Activities (8) Areas (3) Regions (0) NEPA(5) Exploration Technique Information Exploration Group: Drilling Techniques Exploration Sub Group: Exploration Drilling Parent Exploration Technique: Exploration Drilling Information Provided by Technique Lithology: Can provide core or cuttings Stratigraphic/Structural: Identify stratigraphy and structural features within a well Hydrological: -Water samples can be used for geochemical analysis -Fluid pressures can be used to estimate flow rates Thermal: -Temperatures can be measured within the hole -Information about the heat source Dictionary.png Exploratory Well: An exploratory well is drilled for the purpose of identifying the

172

Corrective Action Investigation Plan for Corrective Action Unit 145: Wells and Storage Holes, Nevada Test Site, Nevada, Rev. No.: 0  

SciTech Connect

This Corrective Action Investigation Plan (CAIP) contains project-specific information for conducting site investigation activities at Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 145: Wells and Storage Holes. Information presented in this CAIP includes facility descriptions, environmental sample collection objectives, and criteria for the selection and evaluation of environmental samples. Corrective Action Unit 145 is located in Area 3 of the Nevada Test Site, which is 65 miles northwest of Las Vegas, Nevada. Corrective Action Unit 145 is comprised of the six Corrective Action Sites (CASs) listed below: (1) 03-20-01, Core Storage Holes; (2) 03-20-02, Decon Pad and Sump; (3) 03-20-04, Injection Wells; (4) 03-20-08, Injection Well; (5) 03-25-01, Oil Spills; and (6) 03-99-13, Drain and Injection Well. These sites are being investigated because existing information on the nature and extent of potential contamination is insufficient to evaluate and recommend corrective action alternatives. Additional information will be obtained by conducting a corrective action investigation (CAI) prior to evaluating corrective action alternatives and selecting the appropriate corrective action for each CAS. The results of the field investigation will support a defensible evaluation of viable corrective action alternatives that will be presented in the Corrective Action Decision Document. One conceptual site model with three release scenario components was developed for the six CASs to address all releases associated with the site. The sites will be investigated based on data quality objectives (DQOs) developed on June 24, 2004, by representatives of the Nevada Division of Environmental Protection; U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office; Stoller-Navarro Joint Venture; and Bechtel Nevada. The DQOs process was used to identify and define the type, amount, and quality of data needed to develop and evaluate appropriate corrective actions for CAU 145.

David A. Strand

2004-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

173

Well Deepening | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Well Deepening Well Deepening Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Technique: Well Deepening Details Activities (5) Areas (3) Regions (0) NEPA(0) Exploration Technique Information Exploration Group: Drilling Techniques Exploration Sub Group: Development Drilling Parent Exploration Technique: Development Drilling Information Provided by Technique Lithology: Drill cuttings are analyzed to determine lithology and mineralogy Stratigraphic/Structural: Fractures, faults, and geologic formations that the well passes through are identified and mapped. Hydrological: Identify aquifers, reservoir boundaries, flow rates, fluid pressure, and chemistry Thermal: Direct temperature measurements from within the reservoir Dictionary.png Well Deepening:

174

Observation Wells | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Observation Wells Observation Wells Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Technique: Observation Wells Details Activities (7) Areas (7) Regions (0) NEPA(15) Exploration Technique Information Exploration Group: Drilling Techniques Exploration Sub Group: Development Drilling Parent Exploration Technique: Development Drilling Information Provided by Technique Lithology: Stratigraphic/Structural: Hydrological: Total dissolved solids, fluid pressure, flow rates, and flow direction Thermal: Monitors temperature of circulating fluids Dictionary.png Observation Wells: An observation well is used to monitor important hydrologic parameters in a geothermal system that can indicate performance, longevity, and transient processes. Other definitions:Wikipedia Reegle

175

Production Wells | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Production Wells Production Wells (Redirected from Development Wells) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Technique: Production Wells Details Activities (13) Areas (13) Regions (0) NEPA(7) Exploration Technique Information Exploration Group: Drilling Techniques Exploration Sub Group: Development Drilling Parent Exploration Technique: Development Drilling Information Provided by Technique Lithology: Drill cuttings are analyzed to determine lithology and mineralogy Stratigraphic/Structural: Fractures, faults, and geologic formations that the well passes through are identified and mapped. Hydrological: Identify aquifers, reservoir boundaries, flow rates, fluid pressure, and chemistry Thermal: Direct temperature measurements from within the reservoir

176

Production Wells | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Production Wells Production Wells Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Technique: Production Wells Details Activities (13) Areas (13) Regions (0) NEPA(7) Exploration Technique Information Exploration Group: Drilling Techniques Exploration Sub Group: Development Drilling Parent Exploration Technique: Development Drilling Information Provided by Technique Lithology: Drill cuttings are analyzed to determine lithology and mineralogy Stratigraphic/Structural: Fractures, faults, and geologic formations that the well passes through are identified and mapped. Hydrological: Identify aquifers, reservoir boundaries, flow rates, fluid pressure, and chemistry Thermal: Direct temperature measurements from within the reservoir Dictionary.png Production Wells:

177

Hawaii geothermal project. Phase III. Well testing and analysis. Quarterly progress report, January 1-March 31, 1977  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Management and geosciences program activities are reviewed briefly. The primary emphasis in geosciences is on continued data analysis and synthesis. The engineering program continued with numerical modelling activities. The HGP-A wellhead assembly has been modified to reduce the noise level, and a new wellhead platform has been built which meets OSHA standards. HGP-A has been flash discharged from January 26 to February 11, 1977 and data obtained for throttled flow conditions by inserting orifices of varied sizes in the discharge line. A second pressure buildup test was run after the well was shut-in. Pressure and temperature profiles have been obtained during discharge and quiescent periods. Reservoir analyses have been made using pressure buildup and drawdown data.

Shupe, J.W.; Helsley, C.E.; Yuen, P.C.

1977-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

178

Analysis of Hydraulic Responses from the ER-6-1 Multiple-Well Aquifer Test, Yucca Flat FY 2004 Testing Program, Nevada Test Site, Nye County, Nevada, Rev. No.: 0  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report documents the interpretation and analysis of the hydraulic data collected for the Fiscal Year (FY) 2004 Multiple-Well Aquifer Test-Tracer Test (MWAT-TT) conducted at the ER-6-1 Well Cluster in Yucca Flat Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 97, on the Nevada Test Site (NTS). The MWAT-TT was performed to investigate CAU-scale groundwater flow and transport processes related to the transport of radionuclides from sources on the NTS through the Lower Carbonate Aquifer (LCA) Hydrostratigraphic Unit (HSU). The ER-6-1 MWAT-TT was planned and executed by contractor participants for the Underground Test Area (UGTA) Project of the Environmental Restoration (ER) program of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office (NNSA/NSO). Participants included Stoller-Navarro Joint Venture (SNJV), the Environmental Engineering Services Contractor; Bechtel Nevada (BN); the Desert Research Institute (DRI); Los Alamos National Laboratory; and the University of Nevada, Las Vegas-Harry Reid Center. The SNJV team consists of the S.M. Stoller Corporation, Navarro Research and Engineering, Battelle Memorial Institute, INTERA Inc., and Weston Solutions, Inc. The MWAT-TT was implemented according to the ''Underground Test Area Project, ER-6-1 Multi-Well Aquifer Test - Tracer Test Plan'' (SNJV, 2004a) issued in April 2004. The objective of the aquifer test was to determine flow processes and local hydraulic properties for the LCA through long-term constant-rate pumping at the well cluster. This objective was to be achieved in conjunction with detailed sampling of the composite tracer breakthrough at the pumping well, as well as with depth-specific sampling and logging at multiple wells, to provide information for the depth-discrete analysis of formation hydraulic properties, particularly with regard to fracture properties.

Greg Ruskauff

2005-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

179

Interpretation of Flow Logs from Nevada Test Site Boreholes to Estimate Hydraulic conductivity Using Numerical Simulations Constrained by Single-Well Aquifer Tests  

SciTech Connect

Hydraulic conductivities of volcanic and carbonate lithologic units at the Nevada Test Site were estimated from flow logs and aquifer-test data. Borehole flow and drawdown were integrated and interpreted using a radial, axisymmetric flow model, AnalyzeHOLE. This integrated approach is used because complex well completions and heterogeneous aquifers and confining units produce vertical flow in the annular space and aquifers adjacent to the wellbore. AnalyzeHOLE simulates vertical flow, in addition to horizontal flow, which accounts for converging flow toward screen ends and diverging flow toward transmissive intervals. Simulated aquifers and confining units uniformly are subdivided by depth into intervals in which the hydraulic conductivity is estimated with the Parameter ESTimation (PEST) software. Between 50 and 150 hydraulic-conductivity parameters were estimated by minimizing weighted differences between simulated and measured flow and drawdown. Transmissivity estimates from single-well or multiple-well aquifer tests were used to constrain estimates of hydraulic conductivity. The distribution of hydraulic conductivity within each lithology had a minimum variance because estimates were constrained with Tikhonov regularization. AnalyzeHOLE simulated hydraulic-conductivity estimates for lithologic units across screened and cased intervals are as much as 100 times less than those estimated using proportional flow-log analyses applied across screened intervals only. Smaller estimates of hydraulic conductivity for individual lithologic units are simulated because sections of the unit behind cased intervals of the wellbore are not assumed to be impermeable, and therefore, can contribute flow to the wellbore. Simulated hydraulic-conductivity estimates vary by more than three orders of magnitude across a lithologic unit, indicating a high degree of heterogeneity in volcanic and carbonate-rock units. The higher water transmitting potential of carbonate-rock units relative to volcanic-rock units is exemplified by the large difference in their estimated maximum hydraulic conductivity; 4,000 and 400 feet per day, respectively. Simulated minimum estimates of hydraulic conductivity are inexact and represent the lower detection limit of the method. Minimum thicknesses of lithologic intervals also were defined for comparing AnalyzeHOLE results to hydraulic properties in regional ground-water flow models.

Garcia, C. Amanda; Halford, Keith J.; Laczniak, Randell J.

2010-02-12T23:59:59.000Z

180

Gulf Coast geopressured-geothermal program summary report compilation. Volume 2-A: Resource description, program history, wells tested, university and company based research, site restoration  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The US Department of Energy established a geopressured-geothermal energy program in the mid 1970`s as one response to America`s need to develop alternate energy resources in view of the increasing dependence on imported fossil fuel energy. This program continued for 17 years and approximately two hundred million dollars were expended for various types of research and well testing to thoroughly investigate this alternative energy source. This volume describes the following studies: Geopressured-geothermal resource description; Resource origin and sediment type; Gulf Coast resource extent; Resource estimates; Project history; Authorizing legislation; Program objectives; Perceived constraints; Program activities and structure; Well testing; Program management; Program cost summary; Funding history; Resource characterization; Wells of opportunity; Edna Delcambre No. 1 well; Edna Delcambre well recompletion; Fairfax Foster Sutter No. 2 well; Beulah Simon No. 2 well; P.E. Girouard No. 1 well; Prairie Canal No. 1 well; Crown Zellerbach No. 2 well; Alice C. Plantation No. 2 well; Tenneco Fee N No. 1 well; Pauline Kraft No. 1 well; Saldana well No. 2; G.M. Koelemay well No. 1; Willis Hulin No. 1 well; Investigations of other wells of opportunity; Clovis A. Kennedy No. 1 well; Watkins-Miller No. 1 well; Lucien J. Richard et al No. 1 well; and the C and K-Frank A. Godchaux, III, well No. 1.

John, C.J.; Maciasz, G.; Harder, B.J.

1998-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "wells stratigraphic tests" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Corrective Action Plan for Corrective Action Unit 335: Area 6 Injection Well and Drain Pit Nevada Test Site, Nevada  

SciTech Connect

This Corrective Action Plan (CAP) has been prepared for Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 335, Area 6 Injection Well and Drain Pit, in accordance with the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (FFACO) (1996). This CAP provides the methodology for implementing the approved corrective action alternative as listed in the Corrective Action Decision Document (CADD). However, there is one modification to the selected alternative. Due to the large area that would require fencing, it is proposed that instead of fencing, an appropriate number of warning signs attached to tee posts be used to delineate the use restriction area. CAU 335 is located in Area 6 of the Nevada Test Site (NTS) which is approximately 105 kilometers (km) (65 miles [mi]) northwest of Las Vegas, Nevada. CAU 335 is located in the Area 6 Well 3 Yard approximately 39 km (24 mi) north of Mercury, on the Mercury Highway and several hundred feet (ft) west along Road 6-06. CAU 335 consists of the following three Corrective Action Sites (CASs): CAS 06-20-01, Drums, Oil Waste, Spill; CAS 06-20-02, 20-inch Cased Hole; CAS 06-23-03, Drain Pit. The site history for CAU 335 is provided in the Corrective Action Investigation Plan (DOE/NV, 2000). Briefly, CAS 06-20-01, was used for storing material that was pumped out of CAS 06-20-02 and placed into four 208-liter (L) (55-gall [gal]) drums. The drums were taken to the NTS Area 5 Hazardous Waste Accumulation Site in 1991. CAS 06-20-01 will be closed with no further action required. Any spills associated with CAS 06-20-01 are addressed and considered part of CAS 06-20-02. CAS 06-20-02 was used for disposal of used motor oil, wastewater, and debris for an undetermined amount of time. In 1991, the casing was emptied of its contents, excavated, and backfilled. CAS 06-23-03 was used as a depository for effluent waste from truck-washing activities from 1960-1991.

K. B. Campbell

2002-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

182

Figure 2. Stratigraphic Summary of Ages, Names and Rock Types in ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Figure 2. Stratigraphic Summary of Ages, Names and Rock Types in the ANWR 1002 and Coastal Plain Area of the Alaska North Slope. Potentially Productive ...

183

Environmental baseline monitoring in the area of general crude oil - Department of Energy Pleasant Bayou Number 2: a geopressured geothermal test well, 1979. Annual report, Volume I  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A program to monitor baseline air and water quality, subsidence, microseismic activity, and noise in the vicinity of Brazoria County geopressured geothermal test wells, Pleasant Bayou No. 1 and No. 2, has been underway since March 1978. The initial report on environmental baseline monitoring at the test well contained descriptions of baseline air and water quality, a noise survey, an inventory of microseismic activity, and a discussion of the installation of a liquid tilt meter (Gustavson, 1979). The following report continues the description of baseline air and water quality of the test well site, includes an inventory of microseismic activity during 1979 with interpretations of the origin of the events, and discusses the installation and monitoring of a liquid tilt meter at the test well site. In addition, a brief description of flooding at the test site is presented.

Gustavson, T.C.; Howard, R.C.; McGookey, D.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

184

Thermal single-well injection-withdrawal tracer tests for determining fracture-matrix heat transfer area  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Testing for Estimating Heat Transfer Area in FracturedFRACTURE-MATRIX HEAT TRANSFER AREA Karsten Pruess andimprove the flow and heat transfer characteristics of the

Pruess, K.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

185

Transformational leadership and group affective well-being and job satisfaction: a group-level test of two potential moderators.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??This study examines the relationship between supervisors’ transformational leadership behaviors and their work groups’ subsequent affective well-being and job satisfaction under specific moderating conditions (collective… (more)

Bruning, Patrick

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

186

Forward stratigraphic modeling of the Permian of the Delaware Basin  

SciTech Connect

Permian platform-to-basin strata of the Delaware Basin In west Texas and New Mexico represent one of the world's most complete, best studied, and most hydrocarbon productive records of this geologic period in the world. This superb marriage of a refined stratigraphic framework and active exploration provided impetus to develop a forward stratigraphic model of this section to better predict the distribution of reservoir and seal relationships. The approximately 30 m.y. interval modeled is composed of 2 km of platform strata and 3 km of basinal strata divided into 8 composite sequences (average 3 m.y. duration) and 45 high-frequency sequences (400 ky m.y. duration). A 130 km dip section through the basin margin Guadalupe/Deleware Mountain outcrop is inversely modeled to derive local tectonic subsidence and a sea level curve for the Permian. In this process, the highest and lowest shoreline positions of each sequence are interpreted based on facies description which are assumed to approximate the highest and lowest relative sea level. A eustatic sea level curve is calculated by restoring these shoreline positions and removing local tectonic subsidence using a polynomial fit to the derived relative sea level curve. The quantitatively constrained curve for the Permian contains 2nd, 3rd, and 4th order 180m. This quantitatively constrained accommodation history (calculated eustatic curve and subsidence history) are input into the PHIL forward modeling program. Model variables of sediment supply are depositional system are adjusted to match known outcrop relations. The resulting model is potentially capable of predicting stratigraphy elsewhere in the basin using only subsidence history data from the inverse model.

Qiucheng, Ye; Kerans, C.; Bowman, S. (Univ. of Texas, Austin, TX (United States)) (and others)

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

187

Drilling, completion, stimulation, and testing of BDM/CNGD Well 3997, Lee District, Calhoun County, West Virginia  

SciTech Connect

This report discusses the detailed field operations in drilling, casing, completing, and stimulating the Hunter Bennett No. 3997 well located in Lee District, Calhoun County West Virginia. The project was designed and managed by BDM in cooperation with CNG Development Company. The well was spudded on November 9, 1990, and drilling was completed on December 14, 1990. The well was drilled on an average asmuth of 312 degrees with a total horizontal displacement of 2459 feet. The well was turned to a 90 degree inclination from the vertical over a measured course length of 1216 feet. Approximately 1381 feet of the well had an inclination higher than 86 degrees, while 2179 feet had an inclination greater than 62 degrees. The well was partitioned into five zones for stimulation purposes. Each zone is a little more than 300 feet long. The well was stimulated with nitrogen gas in zones one and two. Early production results are encouraging. The BDM/CNGD horizontal well averaged 147 mcfd of gas over the first week of production and, in week five, began to produce oil at a rate of about 2 bbl/day.

Overbey, W.K. Jr.; Carden, R.S.; Salamy, S.P.; Locke, C.D.; Johnson, H.R.

1992-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

188

Drilling, completion, stimulation, and testing of BDM/CNGD Well 3997, Lee District, Calhoun County, West Virginia. Final report  

SciTech Connect

This report discusses the detailed field operations in drilling, casing, completing, and stimulating the Hunter Bennett No. 3997 well located in Lee District, Calhoun County West Virginia. The project was designed and managed by BDM in cooperation with CNG Development Company. The well was spudded on November 9, 1990, and drilling was completed on December 14, 1990. The well was drilled on an average asmuth of 312 degrees with a total horizontal displacement of 2459 feet. The well was turned to a 90 degree inclination from the vertical over a measured course length of 1216 feet. Approximately 1381 feet of the well had an inclination higher than 86 degrees, while 2179 feet had an inclination greater than 62 degrees. The well was partitioned into five zones for stimulation purposes. Each zone is a little more than 300 feet long. The well was stimulated with nitrogen gas in zones one and two. Early production results are encouraging. The BDM/CNGD horizontal well averaged 147 mcfd of gas over the first week of production and, in week five, began to produce oil at a rate of about 2 bbl/day.

Overbey, W.K. Jr.; Carden, R.S.; Salamy, S.P.; Locke, C.D.; Johnson, H.R.

1992-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

189

Geothermal well site restoration and plug and abandonment of wells, DOE Gladys McCall test site, Cameron Parish, Louisiana and DOE Willis Hulin test site, Vermillion Parish, Louisiana  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A report is presented on the final phase of an energy research program conducted by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) involving two geothermal well sites in the State of Louisiana--the Gladys McCall site and the Willis Hulin site. The research program was intended to improve geothermal technology and to determine the efficacy of producing electricity commercially from geopressured resource sites. The final phase of the program consisted of plug and abandonment (P&A) of the wells and restoration of the well sites. Restoration involved (a) initial soil and water sampling and analysis; (b) removal and disposal of well pads, concrete, utility poles, and trash; (c) plugging of monitor and freshwater wells; and (d) site leveling and general cleanup. Restoration of the McCall site required removal of naturally occurring radioactive material (NORM), which was costly and time-consuming. Exhibits are included that provide copies of work permits and authorizations, P&A reports, and cost and salvage reports. Site locations, grid maps, and photographs are provided.

Rinehart, Ben N.

1994-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

190

Sweet lake geopressured-geothermal project, Magma Gulf-Technadril/DOE Amoco Fee. Annual report, December 1, 1979-February 27, 1981. Volume I. Drilling and completion test well and disposal well  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Sweet lake site is located approximately 15 miles southeast of Lake Charles in Cameron Parish, Louisiana. A geological study showed that the major structure in this area is a graben. The dip of the beds is northwesterly into the basin. A well drilled into the deep basin would find the target sand below 18,000', at high pressures and temperatures. However, since there is no well control in the basin, the specific site was chosen on the 15,000' contour of the target sand in the eastern, more narrow part of the garben. Those key control wells are present within one mile of the test well. The information acquired by drilling the test well confirmed the earlier geologic study. The target sand was reached at 15,065', had a porosity of over 20% and a permeability to water of 300 md. The original reservoir pressure was 12,060 psi and the bottom hole temperature 299{sup 0}F. There are approximately 250 net feet of sand available for the perforation. The disposal well was drilled to a total depth of 7440'.

Rodgers, R.W. (ed.)

1982-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

191

Mining subsidence prediction based on 3D stratigraphic model and visualization  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

3D phenomenon involved in mining subsidence was Classified, summarized and aggregated, established the hierarchical structure that describing the geologic phenomena and engineering phenomena of stratum structure. Proposed a 3D stratigraphic model that ... Keywords: 3D stratigraphic model, 3D visualization, DEMs-TEN model, mining subsidence prediction

Ruisheng Jia; Yanjun Peng; Hongmei Sun

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

192

Modeling of stratigraphic architectural patterns in extensional settings-towards a conceptual model  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Our earlier studies on active continental extensional basins revealed that high-frequency changes in sea/lake-level, spatially heterogeneous subsidence/uplift and multiple sources of sediment supply with varying rates and directions are the main factors ... Keywords: differential subsidence, extensional basins, multiple sediment supply, stratigraphic architecture, stratigraphic simulations

Istvan Csato; Christopher G. St. C. Kendall

2002-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

193

Slug Test Characterization Results for Multi-Test/Depth Intervals Conducted During the Drilling of CERCLA Operable Unit OU ZP-1 Wells 299-W11-43, 299-W15-50, and 299-W18-16  

SciTech Connect

The following report presents test descriptions and analysis results for multiple, stress level slug tests that were performed at selected test/depth intervals within three Operable Unit (OU) ZP-1 wells: 299-W11-43 (C4694/Well H), 299-W15-50 (C4302/Well E), and 299-W18-16 (C4303/Well D). These wells are located within south-central region of the Hanford Site 200-West Area (Figure 1.1). The test intervals were characterized as the individual boreholes were advanced to their final drill depths. The primary objective of the hydrologic tests was to provide information pertaining to the areal variability and vertical distribution of hydraulic conductivity with depth at these locations within the OU ZP-1 area. This type of characterization information is important for predicting/simulating contaminant migration (i.e., numerical flow/transport modeling) and designing proper monitor well strategies for OU and Waste Management Area locations.

Spane, Frank A.; Newcomer, Darrell R.

2010-06-21T23:59:59.000Z

194

Decontaminating Flooded Wells  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This publication explains how to decontaminate and disinfect a well, test the well water and check for well damage after a flood.

Boellstorff, Diana; Dozier, Monty; Provin, Tony; Dictson, Nikkoal; McFarland, Mark L.

2005-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

195

Completion report for Well Cluster ER-20-5  

SciTech Connect

The Well Cluster ER-20-5 drilling and completion project was conducted for the US Department of Energy, Nevada Operations Office (DOE/NV), in support of the Nevada Environmental Restoration Project at the Nevada Test Site (NTS) in Nye County, Nevada. Its primary tasks include collecting geological, geophysical, hydrological, and water chemistry data from new and existing wells to define groundwater quality in addition to pathways and rates of groundwater migration. A program of drilling wells near the sites of selected underground nuclear tests (near-field drilling) was implemented to obtain site-specific data about the nature and extent of migration of radionuclides that might have been produced by an underground nuclear explosion. Well Cluster ER-20-5 is the first near-field drilling project initiated at the NTS. This document presents construction data and summarizes the scientific data gathered during the drilling and well-installation phases for all three holes drilled at Well Cluster ER-20-5. Some of this information is preliminary and unprocessed, but was released so that drilling, geotechnical, well design, and completion data could be rapidly disseminated. Additional information about water levels, aquifer testing, and groundwater sampling will be reported after any of this work is performed. Any additional geologic and/or geophysical investigations conducted for this project is described in one or more analysis and interpretation reports. The lithologic and stratigraphic logs, however, are provided in final form.

NONE

1997-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

196

Microseismic monitoring of Chocolate Bayou, Texas: the Pleasant Bayou No. 2 geopressured/geothermal energy test well program  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Brazoria seismic network, instrumentation, design, and specifications are described. The data analysis procedures are presented. Seismicity is described in relation to the Pleasant Bayou production history. Seismicity originating near the chemical plant east of the geopressured/geothermal well is discussed. (MHR)

Mauk, F.J.; Kimball, B.; Davis, R.A.

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

197

Closure Report for Corrective Action Unit 335: Area 6 Injection Well and Drain Pit, Nevada Test Site, Nevada  

SciTech Connect

This Closure Report documents the activities undertaken to close Corrective Action Unit 335: Area 6 Injection Well and Drain Pit, according to the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order. Corrective Action Unit 335 was closed in accordance with the Nevada Division of Environmental Protection-approved Corrective Action Plan for Corrective Action Unit 335.

U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office; Bechtel Nevada

2003-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

198

High-resolution sequence-stratigraphic correlation between shallow-marine and terrestrial strata: Examples from the Sunnyside Member of the Cretaceous Blackhawk Formation Book Cliffs eastern Utah  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Sunnyside Member of the Upper Cretaceous Blackhawk Formation in the Book Cliffs of eastern Utah provides an ideal opportunity to investigate high-resolution sequence-stratigraphic correlation between shallow-marine and terrestrial strata in an area of outstanding outcrop exposure. The thick, laterally extensive coal seam that caps the Sunnyside Member is critical for correlating between its shallow-marine and terrestrial components. Petrographic analysis of 281 samples obtained from 7 vertical sections spanning more than 30 km (18 mi) of depositional dip enabled us to recognize a series of transgressive-regressive coal facies trends in the seam. On this basis, we were able to identify a high-resolution record of accommodation change throughout the deposition of the coal, as well as a series of key sequence-stratigraphic surfaces. The stratigraphic relationships between the coal and the siliciclastic components of the Sunnyside Member enable us to correlate this record with that identified in the time-equivalent shallow-marine strata and to demonstrate that the coal spans the formation of two marine parasequences and two high-frequency, fourth-order sequence boundaries. This study has important implications for improving the understanding of sequence-stratigraphic expression in terrestrial strata and for correlating between marine and terrestrial records of base-level change. It may also have implications for improving the predictability of vertical and lateral variations in coal composition for mining and coalbed methane projects.

Davies, R.; Howell, J.; Boyd, R.; Flint, S.; Diessel, C. [University of Bergen, Bergen (Norway)

2006-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

199

Well Installation Report for Corrective Action Unit 443, Central Nevada Test Area, Nye County, Nevada, Rev. No.: 0  

SciTech Connect

A Corrective Action Investigation (CAI) was performed in several stages from 1999 to 2003, as set forth in the ''Corrective Action Investigation Plan for the Central Nevada Test Area Subsurface Sites, Corrective Action Unit 443'' (DOE/NV, 1999). Groundwater modeling was the primary activity of the CAI. Three phases of modeling were conducted for the Faultless underground nuclear test. The first phase involved the gathering and interpretation of geologic and hydrogeologic data, and inputting the data into a three-dimensional numerical model to depict groundwater flow. The output from the groundwater flow model was used in a transport model to simulate the migration of a radionuclide release (Pohlmann et al., 2000). The second phase of modeling (known as a Data Decision Analysis [DDA]) occurred after NDEP reviewed the first model. This phase was designed to respond to concerns regarding model uncertainty (Pohll and Mihevc, 2000). The third phase of modeling updated the original flow and transport model to incorporate the uncertainty identified in the DDA, and focused the model domain on the region of interest to the transport predictions. This third phase culminated in the calculation of contaminant boundaries for the site (Pohll et al., 2003). Corrective action alternatives were evaluated and an alternative was submitted in the ''Corrective Action Decision Document/Corrective Action Plan for Corrective Action Unit 443: Central Nevada Test Area-Subsurface'' (NNSA/NSO, 2004). Based on the results of this evaluation, the preferred alternative for CAU 443 is Proof-of-Concept and Monitoring with Institutional Controls. This alternative was judged to meet all requirements for the technical components evaluated and will control inadvertent exposure to contaminated groundwater at CAU 443.

Tim Echelard

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

200

Gulf Coast geopressured-geothermal program summary report compilation. Volume 2-B: Resource description, program history, wells tested, university and company based research, site restoration  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The US Department of Energy established a geopressured-geothermal energy program in the mid 1970`s as one response to America`s need to develop alternate energy resources in view of the increasing dependence on imported fossil fuel energy. This program continued for 17 years and approximately two hundred million dollars were expended for various types of research and well testing to thoroughly investigate this alternative energy source. This volume describes the following studies: Design well program; LaFourche Crossing; MG-T/DOE Amoco Fee No. 1 (Sweet Lake); Environmental monitoring at Sweet Lake; Air quality; Water quality; Microseismic monitoring; Subsidence; Dow/DOE L.R. Sweezy No. 1 well; Reservoir testing; Environmental monitoring at Parcperdue; Air monitoring; Water runoff; Groundwater; Microseismic events; Subsidence; Environmental consideration at site; Gladys McCall No. 1 well; Test results of Gladys McCall; Hydrocarbons in production gas and brine; Environmental monitoring at the Gladys McCall site; Pleasant Bayou No. 2 well; Pleasant Bayou hybrid power system; Environmental monitoring at Pleasant Bayou; and Plug abandonment and well site restoration of three geopressured-geothermal test sites. 197 figs., 64 tabs.

John, C.J.; Maciasz, G.; Harder, B.J.

1998-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "wells stratigraphic tests" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Geopressured-geothermal drilling and testing plan. General Crude Oil--Dept. of Energy Pleasant Bayou No. 1 well, Brazoria County, Texas  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

As a result of geopressured resource assessment studies in the Gulf Coast region, the Brazoria fairway, located in Brazoria County, Texas was determined to be an optimum area for additional studies. A plan is presented for drilling, completion, and testing of one geopressured-geothermal well and two disposal wells in Brazoria County, Texas. The objectives of the well drilling and testing program are to determine the following parameters: reservoir permeability, porosity, thickness, rock material properties, depth, temperature, and pressure; reservoir fluid content, specific gravity, resistivity, viscosity, and hydrocarbons in solution; reservoir fluid production rates, pressure, temperature, production decline, and pressure decline; geopressured well and surface equipment design requirements for high-volume production and possible sand production; specific equipment design for surface operations, hydrocarbons distribution, and effluent disposal; and possibilities of reservoir compaction and/or surface subsidence. (JGB)

Not Available

1978-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

202

Environmental Assessment: Geothermal Energy Geopressure Subprogram. Gulf Coast Well Drilling and Testing Activity (Frio, Wilcox, and Tuscaloosa Formations, Texas and Louisiana)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Department of Energy (DOE) has initiated a program to evaluate the feasibility of developing the geothermal-geopressured energy resources of the Louisiana-Texas Gulf Coast. As part of this effort, DOE is contracting for the drilling of design wells to define the nature and extent of the geopressure resource. At each of several sites, one deep well (4000-6400 m) will be drilled and flow tested. One or more shallow wells will also be drilled to dispose of geopressured brines. Each site will require about 2 ha (5 acres) of land. Construction and initial flow testing will take approximately one year. If initial flow testing is successful, a continuous one-year duration flow test will take place at a rate of up to 6400 m{sup 3} (40,000 bbl) per day. Extensive tests will be conducted on the physical and chemical composition of the fluids, on their temperature and flow rate, on fluid disposal techniques, and on the reliability and performance of equipment. Each project will require a maximum of three years to complete drilling, testing, and site restoration.

None

1981-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

203

Well Log Techniques | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Well Log Techniques Well Log Techniques Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Technique: Well Log Techniques Details Activities (4) Areas (4) Regions (1) NEPA(0) Exploration Technique Information Exploration Group: Downhole Techniques Exploration Sub Group: Well Log Techniques Parent Exploration Technique: Downhole Techniques Information Provided by Technique Lithology: depth and thickness of formations; lithology and porosity can be inferred Stratigraphic/Structural: reservoir thickness, reservoir geometry, borehole geometry Hydrological: permeability and fluid composition can be inferred Thermal: direct temperature measurements; thermal conductivity and heat capacity Dictionary.png Well Log Techniques: Well logging is the measurement of formation properties versus depth in a

204

Flow tests of the Gladys McCall well. Appendix A, Gladys McCall Site (Cameron Parish, LA): Final report, October 1985--October 1990  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report pulls together the data from all of the geopressured-geothermal field research conducted at the Gladys McCall well. The well produced geopressured brine containing dissolved natural gas from the Lower Miocene sands at a depth of 15,150 to 16,650 feet. More than 25 million barrels of brine and 727 million standard cubic feet of natural gas were produced in a series of flow tests between December 1982 and October 1987 at various brine flow rates up to 28,000 barrels per day. Initial short-term flow tests for the Number 9 Sand found the permeability to be 67 to 85 md (millidarcies) for a brine volume of 85 to 170 million barrels. Initial short-term flow tests for the Number 8 Sand found a permeability of 113 to 132 md for a reservoir volume of 430 to 550 million barrels of brine. The long-term flow and buildup test of the Number 8 Sand found that the high-permeability reservoir connected to the wellbore (measured by the short-term flow test) was connected to a much larger, low-permeability reservoir. Numerical simulation of the flow and buildup tests required this large connected reservoir to have a volume of about 8 billion barrels (two cubic miles of reservoir rock) with effective permeabilities in the range of 0.2 to 20 md. Calcium carbonate scale formation in the well tubing and separator equipment was a problem. During the first 2 years of production, scale formation was prevented in the surface equipment by injection of an inhibitor upstream of the choke. Starting in 1985, scale formation in the production tubing was successfully prevented by injecting inhibitor ``pills`` directly into the reservoir. Corrosion and/or erosion of surface piping and equipment, as well as disposal well tubing, was also significant.

Randolph, P.L.; Hayden, C.G.; Rogers, L.A. [Institute of Gas Technology, Chicago, IL (United States)

1992-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

205

Laboratory tests to evaluate and study formation damage with low-density drill-in fluids (LDDIF) for horizontal well completions in low pressure and depleted reservoirs  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The increasing number of open hole horizontal well completions in low-pressure and depleted reservoirs requires the use of non-damaging low-density drill-in fluids (LDDIF) to avoid formation damage and realize optimum well productivity. To address this need we have formulated new LDDIFS with specific density lower than 1.0 sg (8.34 ppg) specifically to drill and complete low pressure and depleted reservoirs with minimum formation damage and maximum production. These materials exhibit typical drilling fluid characteristics, allowing the well to be safely drilled (0 required well depth but also perform as completion fluids, lessening formation damage to a greater extent than fluids with greater density and higher wellbore pressures. The new LDDIF incorporates low-density hollow glass spheres (HGS) to allow near-balanced drilling in low pressure and depleted reservoirs. The LDDIF uses potassium chloride (KCI) brine as the base fluid because of its low density and inhibition of clay hydration and employs low concentrations of the HGS so that fluid rheology is not altered. We have conducted extensive laboratory testing to compare performance of the HGS LDDIF with that of conventional horizontal well DIFs. Experiments consisted of permeability regain tests on unconsolidated sands with sand control screens. Test variables included temperature, concentration of drill solids cleanup technique and HGS concentration. Test results have shown that the new fluids are up to 50% easier to remove from the wellbore formation faces and provide higher productivity than higher density fluids. Such results indicate that higher well productivity from wells with less impairment would offset any added costs of HGS additives in the fluids.

Chen, Guoqiang

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

206

HGP-A Wellhead Generator Proof-of-Feasibility Project (Well Test) at HGP-A Site Puna, Hawaii. Volume II. Technical Specifications  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The purpose of this project is to provide and secure the well test system complete and ready for use. The project comprises the construction of a chemical treatment system (including caustic and hydrogen peroxide handling systems), new condensate piping, wellhead steam piping modifications, ancillary electrical systems and equipment, instrumentation, site improvements and utilities distribution.

None

1979-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

207

Slug Test Characterization Results for Multi-Test/Depth Intervals Conducted During the Drilling of CERCLA Operable Unit OU ZP-1 Wells 299-W10-33 and 299-W11-48  

SciTech Connect

Slug-test results obtained from single and multiple, stress-level slug tests conducted during drilling and borehole advancement provide detailed hydraulic conductivity information at two Hanford Site Operable Unit (OU) ZP-1 test well locations. The individual test/depth intervals were generally sited to provide hydraulic-property information within the upper ~10 m of the unconfined aquifer (i.e., Ringold Formation, Unit 5). These characterization results complement previous and ongoing drill-and-test characterization programs at surrounding 200-West and -East Area locations (see Figure S.1).

Newcomer, Darrell R.

2007-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

208

Geothermal test-well drilling program for the Village of Jemez Springs, New Mexico. Final technical report, January 1, 1979-June 30, 1981  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The geothermal resources located during test drilling at Jemez Springs, New Mexico are described and the feasibility of utilizing this low-temperature resource for a space heating demonstration project at the Town Hall and Fire Department Building is discussed. A test well was drilled to a depth of 824 feet that penetrated water-producing zones at 80 feet with a water temperature of approximately 150 to 155/sup 0/F and at 500 feet with waters of approximately 120 to 125/sup 0/F. After a number of repairs to the Jemez Springs Well Number 1, the project was ended having completed a well capable of producing a flow of approximately 20 gpm at 150 to 155/sup 0/F. A follow-up demonstration heating project is planned.

Armenta, E.; Icerman, L.; Starkey, A.H.

1981-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

209

Spontaneous Potential Well Log | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Spontaneous Potential Well Log Spontaneous Potential Well Log Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Technique: Spontaneous Potential Well Log Details Activities (2) Areas (2) Regions (0) NEPA(0) Exploration Technique Information Exploration Group: Downhole Techniques Exploration Sub Group: Well Log Techniques Parent Exploration Technique: Well Log Techniques Information Provided by Technique Lithology: SP technique originally applied to locating sulfide ore-bodies. Stratigraphic/Structural: -Formation bed thickness and boundaries -Detection and tracing of faults -Permeability and porosity Hydrological: Determination of fluid flow patterns: electrochemical coupling processes due to variations in ionic concentrations, and electrokinetic coupling processes due to fluid flow in the subsurface.

210

Completion Report for Well Cluster ER-5-4  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Well Cluster ER-5-4 was drilled for the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office, in support of the Nevada Environmental Restoration Project at the Nevada Test Site, Nye County, Nevada. The cluster consists of two wells, positioned about 30 meters apart on the same drill pad, constructed as part of a hydrogeologic investigation program for Frenchman Flat at the Nevada Test Site. Detailed lithologic descriptions with preliminary stratigraphic assignments for the well cluster are included in this report. These are based on composite drill cuttings collected every 3 meters, and 156 sidewall samples taken at various depths below 192 meters in both boreholes, supplemented by geophysical log data. Detailed petrographic, chemical, and mineralogical studies of rock samples were conducted on 122 samples. Well ER-5-4 penetrated approximately 1,120 meters of Quaternary and Tertiary alluvium before reaching total depth in Tertiary volcanic rocks at 1,137.5 meters. The deeper Well ER-5-4 No.2 penetrated 1,120.4 meters of alluvial sediments, and was terminated within Tertiary volcanic rocks at a depth of 2,133.6 meters, indicating that Paleozoic rocks are deeper than expected at this site.

U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration, Nevada Site Office; Bechtel Nevada

2005-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

211

Use of data obtained from core tests in the design and operation of spent brine injection wells in geopressured or geothermal systems  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The effects of formation characteristics on injection well performance are reviewed. Use of data acquired from cores taken from injection horizons to predict injectivity is described. And methods for utilizing data from bench scale testing of brine and core samples to optimize injection well design are presented. Currently available methods and equipment provide data which enable the optimum design of injection wells through analysis of cores taken from injection zones. These methods also provide a means of identifying and correcting well injection problems. Methods described in this report are: bulk density measurement; porosity measurement; pore size distribution analysis; permeability measurement; formation grain size distribution analysis; core description (lithology) and composition; amount, type and distribution of clays and shales; connate water analysis; consolidatability of friable reservoir rocks; grain and pore characterization by scanning electron microscopy; grain and pore characterization by thin section analysis; permeability damage and enhancement tests; distribution of water-borne particles in porous media; and reservoir matrix acidizing effectiveness. The precise methods of obtaining this information are described, and their use in the engineering of injection wells is illustrated by examples, where applicable. (MHR)

Jorda, R.M.

1980-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

212

Preliminary test results and geology of the DOE/Superior Hulin. number sign. 1 geopressured-geothermal well, Vermillion Parish, Louisiana  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The DOE/Superior Hulin {number sign}1 well is the most recent of the current three geopressured-geothermal prospects being tested by the Department of Energy (DOE) under its geopressured-geothermal program initiated in 1975. The other prospects under evaluation are Gladys McCall {number sign}1 (Cameron Parish, LA) and Pleasant Bayou {number sign}2 (Brazoria County, TX). The main objective of this research program is to evaluate the commercial viability of energy production from high temperature (275{degrees}+F.), geopressured, natural-gas-saturated brine sandstone aquifers occur-ring in the Gulf Coast area. The DOE/Superior Hulin {number sign}1 well is located 7.5 mi (12 km) south of the town of Erath, Louisiana. It was originally drilled and later sidetracked as an exploration well by Superior Oil Company to a depth of 21,549 ft (6,568 m) and completed in 1979. The well produced 0.3 bcf gas in 19 months from the interval between 21,059 and 21,094 ft (6,419-6,429 m). Later, owing to production problems caused by tubing/casing failure, Superior abandoned production and transferred the well to DOE for testing under the geopressured-geothermal program. The well has recently been cleaned and recompleted by Eaton Operating Company, Houston, Texas, and plugged back to 20,725 ft (6,317 m). This well penetrates the deepest known Gulf Coast geopressured-geothermal reservoir and has a maximum recorded temperature of 338{degrees}F with a 560 ft (171 m) thick sandstone. Regional geologic work indicates that the Hulin sandstone represents either a submarine canyon or an unstable shelf delta type of environment. The well is presently perforated at the bottom of the sandstone from 20,610 to 20,690 ft (6282-6306 m) for preliminary short-term testing now in progress. Initial testing indicates the gas-brine ratio to be 31 SCF/STB.

John, C.J.; Stevenson, D.A.; Groat, C.G. (Louisiana Geological Survey, Baton Rouge (USA))

1990-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

213

Corrective Action Investigation Plan for Corrective Action Unit 556: Dry Wells and Surface Release Points Nevada Test Site, Nevada (Draft), Revision 0  

SciTech Connect

Corrective Action Unit  (CAU) 556, Dry Wells and Surface Release Points, is located in Areas 6 and 25 of the Nevada Test Site, 65 miles northwest of Las Vegas, Nevada. Corrective Action Unit 556 is comprised of four corrective action sites (CASs) listed below: •06-20-04, National Cementers Dry Well •06-99-09, Birdwell Test Hole •25-60-03, E-MAD Stormwater Discharge and Piping •25-64-01, Vehicle Washdown and Drainage Pit These sites are being investigated because existing information on the nature and extent of potential contamination is insufficient to evaluate and recommend corrective action alternatives. Additional information will be obtained by conducting a corrective action investigation before evaluating corrective action alternatives and selecting the appropriate corrective action for each CAS. The results of the field investigation will support a defensible evaluation of viable corrective action alternatives that will be presented in the Corrective Action Decision Document.

Grant Evenson

2007-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

214

Pumping test and fluid sampling report, Mansfield No. 1 well, Palo Duro Basin: Report of the Geologic Project Manager, Permian Basin  

SciTech Connect

This report describes pumping test and fluid sampling activities performed at the Mansfield No. 1 well in Oldham County about 10 miles north of Vega, Texas. The well site was selected by TBEG and is located along the northern margin of the Palo Duro Basin in an area of active dissolution with the Permian salt sections. The objectives of the pumping test and fluid sampling program were to collect data to determine the hydrologic characteristics (formation pressure and permeability) of deep water bearing formations, and to obtain formation fluid samples for analyses (gas and fluid chemistry) in order to evaluate fluid migration and age relationships in the Permian Basin. 4 refs., 8 figs., 2 tabs.

Not Available

1983-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

215

Geopressured-geothermal test of the EDNA Delcambre No. 1 well, Tigre Lagoon Field, Vermilion Parish, Louisiana: analysis of water an dissolved natural gas. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Edna Delcambre et al. No. 1 gas well, shut-in since June 1975, was made available for the project. Two geopressured sand-bed aquifers were tested: sand No. 3 at a depth of 12,900 feet and sand No. 1 at a depth of 12,600 feet. Each aquifer was subjected to flow tests which lasted approximately three weeks in each case. Water samples were obtained during flow testing of the two geopressured aquifers. The water contained 11.3 to 13.3% dissolved solids. Several radioactive species were measured. Radium-226 was found to be approximately 10 times more concentrated than the average amount observed in surface waters. No appreciable amount of heavy metals was detected. Recombination studies at bottom-hole conditions indicate the solubility of natural gas per barrel of water to be about 24 SCF. The methane content was 93 to 95%, and the gas had a heating value in the range of 1020 to 1070 Btu/cu.ft. During the flow tests, the gas/water ratio at the well-head was observed to be 45 to 88 SCF/Bbl water produced. (MHR)

Hankins, B.E.; Karkalits, O.C.

1978-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

216

Wellness Program WELLNESS POINTS BANK  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Wellness Program WELLNESS POINTS BANK Renew your commitment to health. Start again October 1, 2012 to your family and friends, too. Your health and well-being are also important to the University of Minnesota. As your employer, the University recognizes the value of investing in a comprehensive Wellness

Thomas, David D.

217

Hanford wells  

SciTech Connect

The Site Characterization and Assessment Section of the Geosciences Department at Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) has compiled a list of wells located on or near the Hanford Site. Information has been updated on wells existing from the days before construction of the Hanford Works to the present. This work was funded by the US Department of Energy (DOE). The list of wells will be used by DOE contractors who need condensed, tabular information on well location, construction, and completion dates. This report does not include data on lithologic logs and ground-water contamination. Moreover, the completeness of this list is limited because of new well construction and existing well modifications, which are continually under way. Despite these limitations, this list represents the most complete description possible of data pertaining to wells on or adjacent to the Hanford Site. 7 refs., 1 fig., 2 tabs.

McGhan, V.L.

1989-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

218

Hydrodynamic/kinetic reactions in liquid dominated geothermal systems: Hydroscale Test Program, Mercer 2 well site South Brawley, California (Tests No. 15--20). Final report, 27 October 1980--6 February 1981  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Aerojet Energy Conversion Company, under contract to the Los Alamos National Laboratory, US Department of Energy, has constructed and tested a mobile geothermal well-site test unit at the Mercer 2 well in South Brawley, California (Imperial Valley). The equipment controlled, monitored, and recorded all process conditions of single- and dual-flash power cycles. Single- and two-phase flashed brine effluents were flowed through piping component test sections to provide hydrodynamic/kinetic data for scale formation. The unit operated at flowrates in excess of 200 gpm and is designed to accommodate flowrates up to 300 gpm. Primary scale formations encountered were those of Pbs, Fe{sub 2} (OH){sub 3}Cl (iron hydroxychloride), iron chlorides, and non-crystalline forms Of SiO{sub 2}. The formation of iron hydroxychloride was due to the unusually high concentration of iron in the wellhead brine (5000 mg/1).

Nesewich, J.P.; Gracey, C.M. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States)

1982-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

219

Completion Report for Well ER-8-1  

SciTech Connect

Well ER-8-1 was drilled for the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office in support of the Nevada Environmental Restoration Project at the Nevada Test Site, Nye County, Nevada. This well was drilled in October and November of 2002 as part of a Hydrogeologic investigation program for the Yucca Flat/Climax Mine Corrective Action Unit in the northeastern portion of the Nevada Test Site. Well ER-8-1 is located at the north end of Yucca Flat approximately 580 meters south-southeast of the surface exposure of the Climax granitic intrusive. Detailed lithologic descriptions with stratigraphic assignments are included in this report. These are based on composite drill cuttings samples collected every 3 meters, and 21 sidewall samples taken at various depths between 351.1 and 573.0 meters, supplemented by incomplete geophysical log data. Detailed petrographic, geochemical, and mineralogical studies of rock samples were conducted on 22 samples of drill cuttings. Drilling began in tuffaceous alluvium, and the borehole penetrated Tertiary age bedded tuffs of the Volcanics of Oak Spring Butte and carbonate sediments of Paleozoic age, which were encountered at a depth of 334 meters. The borehole unexpectedly penetrated granite at the depth of 538.9 meters in which drilling was stopped. Contact metamorphic rocks and intrusive dikes associated with the Cretaceous-age granitic intrusive and at least one significant fault zone were encountered.

Bechtel Nevada

2004-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

220

Analysis of well test data---Application of probabilistic models to infer hydraulic properties of fractures. [Contains list of standardized terminology or nomenclatue used in statistical models  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Statistical and probabilistic methods for estimating the probability that a fracture is nonconductive (or equivalently, the conductive-fracture frequency) and the distribution of the transmissivities of conductive fractures from transmissivity measurements made in single-hole injection (well) tests were developed. These methods were applied to a database consisting of over 1,000 measurements made in nearly 25 km of borehole at five sites in Sweden. The depths of the measurements ranged from near the surface to over 600-m deep, and packer spacings of 20- and 25-m were used. A probabilistic model that describes the distribution of a series of transmissivity measurements was derived. When the parameters of this model were estimated using maximum likelihood estimators, the resulting estimated distributions generally fit the cumulative histograms of the transmissivity measurements very well. Further, estimates of the mean transmissivity of conductive fractures based on the maximum likelihood estimates of the model's parameters were reasonable, both in magnitude and in trend, with respect to depth. The estimates of the conductive fracture probability were generated in the range of 0.5--5.0 percent, with the higher values at shallow depths and with increasingly smaller values as depth increased. An estimation procedure based on the probabilistic model and the maximum likelihood estimators of its parameters was recommended. Some guidelines regarding the design of injection test programs were drawn from the recommended estimation procedure and the parameter estimates based on the Swedish data. 24 refs., 12 figs., 14 tabs.

Osnes, J.D. (RE/SPEC, Inc., Rapid City, SD (United States)); Winberg, A.; Andersson, J.E.; Larsson, N.A. (Sveriges Geologiska AB, Goeteborg (Sweden))

1991-09-27T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "wells stratigraphic tests" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Hanford wells  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Records describing wells located on or near the Hanford Site have been maintained by Pacific Northwest Laboratory and the operating contractor, Westinghouse Hanford Company. In support of the Ground-Water Surveillance Project, portions of the data contained in these records have been compiled into the following report, which is intended to be used by those needing a condensed, tabular summary of well location and basic construction information. The wells listed in this report were constructed over a period of time spanning almost 70 years. Data included in this report were retrieved from the Hanford Envirorunental Information System (HEIS) database and supplemented with information not yet entered into HEIS. While considerable effort has been made to obtain the most accurate and complete tabulations possible of the Hanford Site wells, omissions and errors may exist. This document does not include data on lithologic logs, ground-water analyses, or specific well completion details.

Chamness, M.A.; Merz, J.K.

1993-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

222

CLOSURE REPORT FOR CORRECTIVE ACTION UNIT165: AREA 25 AND 26 DRY WELL AND WASH DOWN AREAS, NEVADA TEST SITE, NEVADA  

SciTech Connect

This Closure Report (CR) documents the closure activities for Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 165, Area 25 and 26 Dry Well and Washdown Areas, according to the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (FFACO) of 1996. CAU 165 consists of 8 Corrective Action Sites (CASs) located in Areas 25 and 26 of the Nevada Test Site (NTS). The NTS is located approximately 105 kilometers (65 miles) northwest of Las Vegas, nevada. Site closure activities were performed according to the Nevada Division of Environmental Protection (NDEP)-approved Corrective Action Plan (CAP) for CAU 165. CAU 165 consists of the following CASs: (1) CAS 25-07-06, Train Decontamination Area; (2) CAS 25-07-07, Vehicle Washdown; (3) CAS 25-20-01, Lab Drain Dry Well; (4) CAS 25-47-01, Reservoir and French Drain; (5) CAS 25-51-02, Drywell; (6) CAS 25-59-01, Septic System; (7) CAS 26-07-01, Vehicle Washdown Station; and (8) CAS 26-59-01, Septic System. CAU 165, Area 25 and 26 Dry Well and Washdown Areas, consists of eight CASs located in Areas 25 and 26 of the NTS. The approved closure alternatives included No Further Action, Clean Closure, and Closure in Place with Administrative Controls.

BECHTEL NEVADA

2005-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

223

Completion Report for Well ER-18-2  

SciTech Connect

Well ER-18-2 was drilled for the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office in support of the Nevada Environmental Restoration Project at the Nevada Test Site, Nye County, Nevada. This well, located on Buckboard Mesa in the western part of the Nevada Test Site, was drilled in the spring of 1999 as part of the U.S. Department of Energy's hydrogeologic investigation well program in the Western Pahute Mesa - Oasis Valley region just west of the Test Site. A 44.5-centimeter surface hole was drilled and cased off to the depth 408.1 meters below the surface. The hole diameter was then decreased to 31.1 centimeters for drilling to a total depth of 762.0 meters. A preliminary composite, static, water level was measured at the depth of approximately 369.7 meters approximately two months after the completion string was installed. One completion string with three isolated, slotted intervals was installed in the well. Detailed lithologic descriptions with preliminary stratigraphic assignments are included in the report. These are based on composite drill cuttings collected every 3 meters and 15 sidewall samples taken at various depths below 420 meters, supplemented by geophysical log data and results of detailed chemical and mineralogical studies of rock samples. The upper part of the well penetrated Tertiary-age basalt, underlain by tuffaceous moat-filling sediments interbedded with ash-flow tuff units of the Thirsty Canyon Group and the Beatty Wash Formation. The lower half of the drill hole penetrated ash-flow tuff of the mafic-rich Ammonia Tanks Tuff. The geologic interpretation of data from Well ER-18-2 indicates that this site is located inside the structural margin of the Ammonia Tanks caldera.

Bechtel Nevada

2003-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

224

Corrective Action Decision Document/Closure Report for Corrective Action Unit 546: Injection Well and Surface Releases Nevada Test Site, Nevada, Revision 0  

SciTech Connect

This Corrective Action Decision Document/Closure Report has been prepared for Corrective Action Unit 546, Injection Well and Surface Releases, at the Nevada Test Site, Nevada, in accordance with the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (FFACO, 1996; as amended February 2008). Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 546 is comprised of two corrective action sites (CASs): • 06-23-02, U-6a/Russet Testing Area • 09-20-01, Injection Well The purpose of this Corrective Action Decision Document/Closure Report is to provide justification and documentation supporting the recommendation for closure of CAU 546. To achieve this, corrective action investigation (CAI) activities were performed from May 5 through May 28, 2008, as set forth in the Corrective Action Investigation Plan for Corrective Action Unit 546: Injection Well and Surface Releases, Nevada Test Site, Nevada (NNSA/NSO, 2008). The purpose of the CAI was to fulfill the following data needs as defined during the data quality objective (DQO) process: • Determine whether a contaminant of concern is present at a given CAS. • Determine whether sufficient information is available to evaluate potential corrective action alternatives at each CAS. The CAU 546 dataset from the investigation results was evaluated based on the data quality indicator parameters. This evaluation demonstrated the quality and acceptability of the dataset for use in fulfilling the DQO data needs. Because DQO data needs were met, and corrective actions have been implemented, it has been determined that no further corrective action (based on risk to human receptors) is necessary for the CAU 546 CASs. The U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office provides the following recommendations: • No further corrective actions are needed for CAU 546 CASs. • No Corrective Action Plan is required. • A Notice of Completion to the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office is requested from the Nevada Division of Environmental Protection for closure of CAU 546. • Corrective Action Unit 546 should be moved from Appendix III to Appendix IV of the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order. Analytes detected during the CAI were evaluated against final action levels established in this document. No analytes were detected at concentrations exceeding final action levels. However, contaminants of concern were presumed to be present in the subsurface soil at CAS 09-20-01. Therefore, the corrective action of close in place was selected as the preferred alternative for this CAS. Potential source material was removed from CAS 06-23-02; therefore, the corrective action of clean closure was selected as the preferred alternative at this CAS.

Alfred Wickline

2008-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

225

Corrective Action Decision Document for Corrective Action Unit 322: Areas 1 and 3 Release Sites and Injection Wells Nevada Test Site, Nevada, Rev. No. 0  

SciTech Connect

This Corrective Action Decision Document has been prepared for Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 322, Areas 1 and 3 Release Sites and Injection Wells, Nevada Test Site, Nevada, in accordance with the ''Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order'' (1996). Corrective Action Unit 322 is comprised of the following corrective action sites (CASs): (1) 01-25-01 - AST Release Site; (2) 03-25-03 - Mud Plant and AST Diesel Release; and (3) 03-20-05 - Injection Wells and BOP Shop. The purpose of this Corrective Action Decision Document is to identify and provide the rationale for the recommendation of a corrective action alternative for each CAS within CAU 322. Corrective action investigation activities were performed from April 2004 through September 2004, as set forth in the Corrective Action Investigation Plan. The purposes of the activities as defined during the data quality objectives process were: (1) Determine if contaminants of concern (COCs) are present; (2) If COCs are present, determine their nature and extent; and (3) Provide sufficient information and data to recommend appropriate corrective actions for the CASs. Analytes detected during the corrective action investigation were evaluated against appropriate preliminary action levels to identify contaminants of concern for each corrective action site. Radiological field measurements were compared to unrestricted release criteria. Assessment of the data generated from investigation activities revealed the following: (1) CAS 01-25-01 contains an AST berm contaminated with total petroleum hydrocarbons (TPH) diesel-range organics (DRO). (2) CAS 03-25-03 includes two distinct areas: Area A where no contamination remains from a potential spill associated with an AST, and Area B where TPH-DRO contamination associated with various activities at the mud plant was identified. The Area B contamination was found at various locations and depths. (3) CAS 03-25-03 Area B contains TPH-DRO contamination at various locations and depths in the area associated with the Mud Plant. (4) CAS 03-20-05 contains TPH-DRO, metals, and radiological contamination within the injection well casing soil and TPH-DRO contamination at the depth coincidental with the bottom of the injection well sump. Based on the evaluation of analytical data from the corrective action investigation, review of future and current operations in Areas 1 and 3 of the Nevada Test Site, and the detailed and comparative analysis of the potential corrective action alternatives, the following corrective actions are recommended for the Corrective Action Unit 322 CASs. Closure in Place with Administrative Controls is the preferred corrective action for the following CASs: (1) CAS 01-25-01, removal of TPH-DRO contamination would pose a significant safety hazard due to the site location. (2) CAS 03-25-03 No contamination remains at Area A (AST Berm); and thus, no further action is the preferred alternative at this part of the CAS. However at Area B, TPH-DRO contamination is varied in concentration and location and the footprint of the CAS is large, removal of contaminated ''pockets'' would be laborious and cost prohibitive. The plutonium-239 surface contamination identified at CAS 03-25-03 Area B has been removed and drummed as a best management practice. (3) CAS 03-20-05, TPH-DRO, metals, and radiological contamination are present in the injection well casing soils. Recommend corrective action includes removal of the liquid in the injection well sump (approximately 3 feet (ft) of liquid at 60 ft below ground surface), grouting the sump, and the area within the injection well casing.

Robert Boehlecke

2004-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

226

Addendum to the Closure Report for Corrective Action Unit 165: Area 25 and 26 Dry Well and Washdown Areas, Nevada Test Site, Nevada, Revision 0  

SciTech Connect

This document constitutes an addendum to the Closure Report for Corrective Action Unit 165: Area 25 and 26 Dry Well and Washdown Areas, Nevada Test Site, Nevada as described in the document Recommendations and Justifications To Remove Use Restrictions Established under the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Field Office Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order dated September 2013. The Use Restriction Removal document was approved by the Nevada Division of Environmental Protection on October 16, 2013. The approval of the UR Removal document constituted approval of each of the recommended UR removals. In conformance with the UR Removal document, this addendum consists of: This page that refers the reader to the UR Removal document for additional information The cover, title, and signature pages of the UR Removal document The NDEP approval letter The corresponding section of the UR Removal document This addendum provides the documentation justifying the cancellation of the UR for CAS 25-20-01, Lab Drain Dry Well. This UR was established as part of FFACO corrective actions and was based on the presence of tetrachloroethene contamination at concentrations greater than the action level established at the time of the initial investigation. Although total petroleum hydrocarbon diesel-range organics contamination at concentrations greater than the NDEP action level was present at the site, no hazardous constituents of TPH-DRO exceeded the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Region 9 preliminary remediation goals established at the time of the initial investigation.

Krauss, Mark J.

2013-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

227

Corrective Action Investigation Plan for Corrective Action Unit 219: Septic Systems and Injection Wells, Nevada Test Site, Nevada, Rev. No.: 0  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Corrective Action Investigation Plan for Corrective Action Unit 219, Septic Systems and Injection Wells, has been developed in accordance with the ''Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order'' (1996) that was agreed to by the State of Nevada, the U.S. Department of Energy, and the U.S. Department of Defense. The purpose of the investigation is to ensure that adequate data are collected to provide sufficient and reliable information to identify, evaluate, and select technically viable corrective actions. Corrective Action Unit 219 is located in Areas 3, 16, and 23 of the Nevada Test Site, which is 65 miles northwest of Las Vegas, Nevada. Corrective Action Unit 219 is comprised of the six Corrective Action Sites (CASs) listed below: (1) 03-11-01, Steam Pipes and Asbestos Tiles; (2) 16-04-01, Septic Tanks (3); (3) 16-04-02, Distribution Box; (4) 16-04-03, Sewer Pipes; (5) 23-20-01, DNA Motor Pool Sewage and Waste System; and (6) 23-20-02, Injection Well. These sites are being investigated because existing information on the nature and extent of potential contamination is insufficient to evaluate and recommend corrective action alternatives. Additional information will be obtained by conducting a corrective action investigation prior to evaluating corrective action alternatives and selecting the appropriate corrective action for each CAS. The results of the field investigation will support a defensible evaluation of viable corrective action alternatives that will be presented in the Corrective Action Decision Document.

David A. Strand

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

228

Monitoring well  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A monitoring well including a conduit defining a passageway, the conduit having a proximal and opposite, distal end; a coupler connected in fluid flowing relationship with the passageway; and a porous housing borne by the coupler and connected in fluid flowing relation thereto.

Hubbell, Joel M. (Idaho Falls, ID); Sisson, James B. (Idaho Falls, ID)

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

229

Monitoring well  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A monitoring well is described which includes: a conduit defining a passageway, the conduit having a proximal and opposite, distal end; a coupler connected in fluid flowing relationship with the passageway; and a porous housing borne by the coupler and connected in fluid flowing relation thereto. 8 figs.

Hubbell, J.M.; Sisson, J.B.

1999-06-29T23:59:59.000Z

230

Corrective Action Decision Document for Corrective Action Unit 145: Wells and Storage Holes, Nevada Test Site, Nevada, Rev. No.: 0, with ROTC No. 1 and Addendum  

SciTech Connect

This Corrective Action Decision Document has been prepared for Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 145, Wells and Storage Holes in Area 3 of the Nevada Test Site, Nevada, in accordance with the ''Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order'' (1996). Corrective Action Unit 145 is comprised of the following corrective action sites (CASs): (1) 03-20-01, Core Storage Holes; (2) 03-20-02, Decon Pad and Sump; (3) 03-20-04, Injection Wells; (4) 03-20-08, Injection Well; (5) 03-25-01, Oil Spills; and (6) 03-99-13, Drain and Injection Well. The purpose of this Corrective Action Decision Document is to identify and provide the rationale for the recommendation of a corrective action alternative for the six CASs within CAU 145. Corrective action investigation activities were performed from August 1, 2005, through November 8, 2005, as set forth in the CAU 145 Corrective Action Investigation Plan and Record of Technical Change No. 1. Analytes detected during the Corrective Action Investigation (CAI) were evaluated against appropriate final action levels to identify the contaminants of concern for each CAS. The results of the CAI identified contaminants of concern at one of the six CASs in CAU 145 and required the evaluation of corrective action alternatives. Assessment of the data generated from investigation activities conducted at CAU 145 revealed the following: CASs 03-20-01, 03-20-02, 03-20-04, 03-20-08, and 03-99-13 do not contain contamination; and CAS 03-25-01 has pentachlorophenol and arsenic contamination in the subsurface soils. Based on the evaluation of analytical data from the CAI, review of future and current operations at the six CASs, and the detailed and comparative analysis of the potential corrective action alternatives, the following corrective actions are recommended for CAU 145. No further action is the preferred corrective action for CASs 03-20-01, 03-20-02, 03-20-04, 03-20-08, and 03-99-13. Close in place is the preferred corrective action for CAS 03-25-01. The preferred corrective action alternatives were evaluated on technical merit focusing on performance, reliability, feasibility, safety, and cost. The alternatives were judged to meet all requirements for the technical components evaluated. The alternatives meet all applicable federal and state regulations for closure of the site and will reduce potential exposure pathways to the contaminated media to an acceptable level at CAU 145.

David Strand

2006-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

231

Completion Report for Well ER-EC-1  

SciTech Connect

Well ER-EC-1 was drilled for the U.S. Department of Energy, Nevada Operations Office in support of the Nevada Environmental Restoration Project at the Nevada Test Site, Nye County, Nevada. This well was drilled in the spring of 1999 as part of the U.S. Department of Energy's hydrogeologic investigation well program in the Western Pahute Mesa - Oasis Valley region just west of the Test Site. A 44.5-centimeter surface hole was drilled and cased off to the depth 675.1 meters below the surface. The hole diameter was then decreased to 31.1 centimeters for drilling to a total depth of 1,524.0 meters. A preliminary composite, static, water level was measured at the depth of approximately 566.3 meters prior to installation of the completion string. One completion string with three isolated, slotted intervals was installed in the well. Detailed lithologic descriptions with preliminary stratigraphic assignments are included in the report. These are based on composite drill cuttings collected every 3 meters and 31 sidewall samples taken at various depths below 680 meters, supplemented by geophysical log data. Detailed chemical and mineralogical studies of rock samples are in progress. The well penetrated Tertiary-age lava and tuff of the Timber Mountain Group, the Paintbrush Group, the Calico Hills Formation, the Crater Flat Group, and the Volcanics of Quartz Mountain. The preliminary geologic interpretation of data from Well ER-EC-1 indicates the presence of a structural trough or bench filled with a thick section of post-Rainier Mesa lava. These data also suggest that this site is located on a buried structural ridge that may separate the Silent Canyon and Timber Mountain caldera complexes.

Townsend, M.J.

2000-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

232

Completion Report for Well ER-EC-4  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Well ER-EC-4 was drilled for the US Department of Energy, Nevada Operations Office in support of the Nevada Environmental Restoration Project at the Nevada Test Site, Nye County, Nevada. This well was drilled in the summer of 1999 as part of the U.S Department of Energy's hydrogeologic investigation well program in the Western Pahute Mesa - Oasis Valley region just west of the Test Site. A 44.5-centimeter surface hole was drilled and cased off to a depth of 263.7 meters below the surface. The hole diameter was then decreased to 31.1 centimeters for drilling to a total depth of 1,062.8 meters. One completion string with three isolated slotted intervals was installed in the well. A preliminary composite, static, water level was measured at the depth of 228.3 meters, two months after installation of the completion string. Detailed lithologic descriptions with preliminary stratigraphic assignments are included in the report. These are based on composite drill cuttings collected every 3 meters, and 35 sidewall samples taken at various depths below 286.5 meters, supplemented by geophysical log data. Detailed chemical and mineralogical studies of rock samples are in progress. The well was collared in basalt and penetrated Tertiary-age lava and tuff of the Thirsty Canyon Group, the Volcanics of Fortymile Canyon, and the Timber Mountain Group. The preliminary geologic interpretation of data from this well helps pinpoint the location of the western margin of the Timber Mountain caldera complex in the southern Nevada volcanic field.

M. J. Townsend

2000-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

233

Step-out Well | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Step-out Well Step-out Well Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Technique: Step-out Well Details Activities (5) Areas (5) Regions (0) NEPA(0) Exploration Technique Information Exploration Group: Drilling Techniques Exploration Sub Group: Exploration Drilling Parent Exploration Technique: Exploration Drilling Information Provided by Technique Lithology: Drill cuttings are analyzed to determine lithology and mineralogy Stratigraphic/Structural: Fractures, faults, and geologic formations that the well passes through are identified and mapped Hydrological: Identify aquifers, reservoir boundaries, flow rates, fluid pressure, and chemistry Thermal: Direct temperature measurements from within the reservoir Dictionary.png Step-out Well: A well drilled outside of the proven reservoir boundaries to investigate a

234

Using Decline Map Anlaysis (DMA) to Test Well Completion Influence on Gas Production Decline Curves in Barnett Shale (Denton, Wise, and Tarrant Counties)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The increasing interest and focus on unconventional reservoirs is a result of the industry's direction toward exploring alternative energy sources. It is due to the fact that conventional reservoirs are being depleted at a fast pace. Shale gas reservoirs are a very favorable type of energy sources due to their low cost and long-lasting gas supply. In general, according to Ausubel (1996), natural gas serves as a transition stage to move from the current oil-based energy sources to future more stable and environment-friendly ones. By looking through production history in the U.S Historical Production Database, HPDI (2009), we learn that the Barnett Shale reservoir in Newark East Field has been producing since the early 90's and contributing a fraction of the U.S daily gas production. Zhao et al. (2007) estimated the Barnett Shale to be producing 1.97 Bcf/day of gas in 2007. It is considered the most productive unconventional gas shale reservoir in Texas. By 2004 and in terms of annual gas production volume, Pollastro (2007) considered the Barnett Shale as the second largest unconventional gas reservoir in the United States. Many studies have been conducted to understand better the production controls in Barnett Shale. However, this giant shale gas reservoir is still ambiguous. Some parts of this puzzle are still missing. It is not fully clear what makes the Barnett well produce high or low amounts of gas. Barnett operating companies are still trying to answer these questions. This study adds to the Barnett chain of studies. It tests the effects of the following on Barnett gas production in the core area (Denton, Wise, and Tarrant counties): * Barnett gross thickness, including the Forestburg formation that divides Barnett Shale. * Perforation footage. * Perforated zones of Barnett Shale. Instead of testing these parameters on each well production decline curve individually, this study uses a new technique to simplify this process. Decline Map Analysis (DMA) is introduced to measure the effects of these parameters on all production decline curves at the same time. Through this study, Barnett gross thickness and perforation footage are found not to have any definite effects on Barnett gas production. However, zone 3 (Top of Lower Barnett) and zone 1 (Bottom of Lower Barnett) are found to contribute to cumulative production. Zone 2 (Middle of Lower Barnett) and zone 4 (Upper Barnett), on the other hand, did not show any correlation or influence on production through their thicknesses.

Alkassim, Ibrahim

2009-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

235

Corrective Action Decision Document for Corrective Action Unit 322: Areas 1 and 3 Release Sites and Injection Wells Nevada Test Site, Nevada, Revision 0 with ROTC 1  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This Corrective Action Decision Document has been prepared for Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 322, Areas 1 and 3 Release Sites and Injection Wells, Nevada Test Site, Nevada, in accordance with the ''Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order'' (1996). Corrective Action Unit 322 is comprised of the following corrective action sites (CASs): (1) 01-25-01 - AST Release Site; (2) 03-25-03 - Mud Plant and AST Diesel Release; and (3) 03-20-05 - Injection Wells and BOP Shop. The purpose of this Corrective Action Decision Document is to identify and provide the rationale for the recommendation of a corrective action alternative for each CAS within CAU 322. Corrective action investigation activities were performed from April 2004 through September 2004, as set forth in the Corrective Action Investigation Plan. The purposes of the activities as defined during the data quality objectives process were: (1) Determine if contaminants of concern (COCs) are present; (2) If COCs are present, determine their nature and extent; and (3) Provide sufficient information and data to recommend appropriate corrective actions for the CASs. Analytes detected during the corrective action investigation were evaluated against appropriate preliminary action levels to identify contaminants of concern for each corrective action site. Radiological field measurements were compared to unrestricted release criteria. Assessment of the data generated from investigation activities revealed the following: (1) CAS 01-25-01 contains an AST berm contaminated with total petroleum hydrocarbons (TPH) diesel-range organics (DRO). (2) CAS 03-25-03 includes two distinct areas: Area A where no contamination remains from a potential spill associated with an AST, and Area B where TPH-DRO contamination associated with various activities at the mud plant was identified. The Area B contamination was found at various locations and depths. (3) CAS 03-25-03 Area B contains TPH-DRO contamination at various locations and depths in the area associated with the Mud Plant. (4) CAS 03-20-05 contains TPH-DRO, metals, and radiological contamination within the injection well casing soil and TPH-DRO contamination at the depth coincidental with the bottom of the injection well sump. Based on the evaluation of analytical data from the corrective action investigation, review of future and current operations in Areas 1 and 3 of the Nevada Test Site, and the detailed and comparative analysis of the potential corrective action alternatives, the following corrective actions are recommended for the Corrective Action Unit 322 CASs. Closure in Place with Administrative Controls is the preferred corrective action for the following CASs: (1) CAS 01-25-01, removal of TPH-DRO contamination would pose a significant safety hazard due to the site location. (2) CAS 03-25-03 No contamination remains at Area A (AST Berm); and thus, no further action is the preferred alternative at this part of the CAS. However at Area B, TPH-DRO contamination is varied in concentration and location and the footprint of the CAS is large, removal of contaminated ''pockets'' would be laborious and cost prohibitive. The plutonium-239 surface contamination identified at CAS 03-25-03 Area B has been removed and drummed as a best management practice. (3) CAS 03-20-05, TPH-DRO, metals, and radiological contamination are present in the injection well casing soils. Recommend corrective action includes removal of the liquid in the injection well sump (approximately 3 feet (ft) of liquid at 60 ft below ground surface), grouting the sump, and the area within the injection well casing. The plutonium-239 surface contamination identified at CAS 03-20-05 has been removed and drummed as a best management practice and will be disposed of as low-level radioactive waste. It is recommended that the liquids be removed from the holding tank wells and the sumps of the two outer holding tanks within the BOP Shop, and the sumps be grouted, and the holding tanks filled in to the BOP Shop floor surface. The preferred corrective action alternatives were ev

Boehlecke, Robert

2004-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

236

Single-well tracer methods for hydrogeologic evaluation of target aquifers  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Designing an efficient well field for an aquifer thermal energy storage (ATES) project requires measuring local groundwater flow parameters as well as estimating horizontal and vertical inhomogeneity. Effective porosity determines the volume of aquifer needed to store a given volume of heated or chilled water. Ground-water flow velocity governs the migration of the thermal plume, and dispersion and heat exchange along the flow path reduces the thermal intensity of the recovered plume. Stratigraphic variations in the aquifer will affect plume dispersion, may bias the apparent rate of migration of the plume, and can prevent efficient hydraulic communication between wells. Single-well tracer methods using a conservative flow tracer such as bromide, along with pumping tests and water-level measurements, provide a rapid and cost-effective means for estimating flow parameters. A drift-and-pumpback tracer test yields effective porosity and flow velocity. Point-dilution tracer testing, using new instrumentation for downhole tracer measurement and a new method for calibrating the point-dilution test itself, yields depth-discrete hydraulic conductivity as it is affected by stratigraphy, and can be used to estimate well transmissivity. Experience in conducting both drift-and-pumpback and point-dilution tests at three different test sites has yielded important information that highlights both the power and the limitations of the single-well tracer methods. These sites are the University of Alabama Student Recreation Center (UASRC) ATES well field and the VA Medical Center (VA) ATES well field, both located in Tuscaloosa, Alabama, and the Hanford bioremediation test site north of Richland, Washington.

Hall, S.H.

1994-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

237

Completion report for Well ER-EC-6  

SciTech Connect

Well ER-EC-6 was drilled for the U.S. Department of Energy, Nevada Operations Office in support of the Nevada Environmental Restoration Project at the Nevada Test Site, Nye County, Nevada. This well was drilled in the spring of 1999 as part of the DOE's hydrogeologic investigation well program in the Western Pahute Mesa - Oasis Valley region just west of the Nevada Test Site. A 66-centimeter surface hole was drilled and cased off to the depth of 485.1 meters below the surface. The hole diameter was then decreased to 31.1 centimeters for drilling to a total depth of 1,524.0 meters. A preliminary composite, static, water level was measured at the depth of approximately 434.6 meters prior to installation of the completion string. One completion string with four isolated, slotted intervals was installed in the well. Detailed lithologic descriptions with preliminary stratigraphic assignments are included in the report. These are based on composite drill cuttings collected every 3 meters and 33 sidewall samples taken at various depths below 504.4 meters, supplemented by geophysical log data. Detailed chemical and mineralogical studies of rock samples are in progress. The well penetrated Tertiary-age lava and tuff of the Timber Mountain Group, the Paintbrush Group, the Calico Hills Formation, and the Volcanics of Quartz Mountain. Intense hydrothermal alteration was observed below the depth of 640 m. The preliminary geologic interpretation indicates that this site may be located on a buried structural ridge that separates the Silent Canyon and Timber Mountain caldera complexes.

M. J. Townsend

2000-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

238

Single-Well and Cross-Well Resistivity | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Single-Well and Cross-Well Resistivity Single-Well and Cross-Well Resistivity Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Technique: Single-Well and Cross-Well Resistivity Details Activities (14) Areas (13) Regions (0) NEPA(0) Exploration Technique Information Exploration Group: Downhole Techniques Exploration Sub Group: Well Log Techniques Parent Exploration Technique: Well Log Techniques Information Provided by Technique Lithology: Identify different lithological layers, rock composition, mineral, and clay content Stratigraphic/Structural: -Fault and fracture identification -Rock texture, porosity, and stress analysis -determine dip and structural features in vicinity of borehole -Detection of permeable pathways, fracture zones, faults Hydrological: Resistivity influenced by porosity, grain size distribution, permeability, fluid saturation, fluid type and phase state of the pore water

239

Single-Well And Cross-Well Seismic Imaging | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Single-Well And Cross-Well Seismic Imaging Single-Well And Cross-Well Seismic Imaging (Redirected from Single-Well And Cross-Well Seismic) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Technique: Single-Well And Cross-Well Seismic Imaging Details Activities (2) Areas (2) Regions (0) NEPA(0) Exploration Technique Information Exploration Group: Downhole Techniques Exploration Sub Group: Borehole Seismic Techniques Parent Exploration Technique: Borehole Seismic Techniques Information Provided by Technique Lithology: Rock unit density influences elastic wave velocities. Stratigraphic/Structural: Structural geology- faults, folds, grabens, horst blocks, sedimentary layering, discontinuities, etc. Hydrological: Combining compressional and shear wave results can indicate the presence of fluid saturation in the formation.

240

Corrective Action Decision Document/Closure Report for Corrective Action Unit 219: Septic Systems and Injection Wells, Nevada Test Site, Nevada, Rev. No.: 0  

SciTech Connect

This Corrective Action Decision Document/Closure Report has been prepared for Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 219, Septic Systems and Injection Wells, in Areas 3, 16, and 23 of the Nevada Test Site, Nevada, in accordance with the ''Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order'' (1996). Corrective Action Unit 219 is comprised of the following corrective action sites (CASs): (1) 03-11-01, Steam Pipes and Asbestos Tiles; (2) 16-04-01, Septic Tanks (3); (3) 16-04-02, Distribution Box; (4) 16-04-03, Sewer Pipes; (5) 23-20-01, DNA Motor Pool Sewage and Waste System; and (6) 23-20-02, Injection Well. The purpose of this Corrective Action Decision Document/Closure Report is to provide justification and documentation supporting the recommendation for closure of CAU 219 with no further corrective action beyond the application of a use restriction at CASs 16-04-01, 16-04-02, and 16-04-03. To achieve this, corrective action investigation (CAI) activities were performed from June 20 through October 12, 2005, as set forth in the CAU 219 Corrective Action Investigation Plan and Record of Technical Change No. 1. A best management practice was implemented at CASs 16-04-01, 16-04-02, and 16-04-03, and corrective action was performed at CAS 23-20-01 between January and April 2006. In addition, a use restriction will be applied to CASs 16-04-01, 16-04-02, and 16-04-03 to provide additional protection to Nevada Test Site personnel. The purpose of the CAI was to fulfill the following data needs as defined during the data quality objective (DQO) process: (1) Determine whether contaminants of concern (COCs) are present. (2) If COCs are present, determine their nature and extent. (3) Provide sufficient information and data to complete appropriate corrective actions. The CAU 219 dataset from the investigation results was evaluated based on the data quality indicator parameters. This evaluation demonstrated the quality and acceptability of the dataset for use in fulfilling the DQO data needs. Analytes detected during the CAI were evaluated against final action levels (FALs) established in this document. A Tier 2 evaluation was conducted, and a FAL of 185,000 micrograms per kilogram was calculated for chlordane at CASs 16-04-01, 16-04-02, and 16-04-03 based on an occasional use area exposure scenario. This evaluation of chlordane based on the Tier 2 FAL determined that no FALs were exceeded. Therefore, the DQO data needs were met, and it was determined that no corrective action (based on risk to human receptors) is necessary for the site. The following contaminants were determined to be present at concentrations exceeding their corresponding FALs: (1) The surface soil surrounding the main concrete pad at CAS 23-20-01 contained Aroclor-1254, Aroclor-1260, and chlordane above the FALs. This soil, along with the COCs, was subsequently removed at CAS 23-20-01. (2) The sludge in the concrete box of the catch basin at the large concrete pad at CAS 23-20-01 contained lead and benzo(a)pyrene above the FALs. This contamination was limited to the sludge in the concrete box of the catch basin and did not migrate to the subsurface features beneath it. The contaminated and the concrete box of the catch basin were subsequently recovered at CAS 23-20-01.

David Strand

2006-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "wells stratigraphic tests" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Sequence stratigraphic interpretation methods for low-accommodation, alluvial depositional sequences: applications to reservoir characterization of Cut Bank field, Montana  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In South Central Cut Bank Sand Unit (SCCBSU) of Cut Bank field, primary production and waterflood projects have resulted in recovery of only 29 % of the original oil in place from heterogeneous, fluvial sandstone deposits. Using highresolution sequence stratigraphy and geostatistical analysis, I developed a geologic model that may improve the ultimate recovery of oil from this field. In this study, I assessed sequence stratigraphic concepts for continental settings and extended the techniques to analyze low-accommodation alluvial systems of the Cut Bank and Sunburst members of the lower Kootenai formation (Cretaceous) in Cut Bank field. Identification and delineation of five sequences and their bounding surfaces led to a better understanding of the reservoir distribution and variability. Recognition of stacking patterns allowed for the prediction of reservoir rock quality. Within each systems tract, the best quality reservoir rocks are strongly concentrated in the lowstand systems tract. Erosional events associated with falling baselevel resulted in stacked, communicated (multistory) reservoirs. The lowermost Cut Bank sandstone has the highest reservoir quality and is a braided stream parasequence. Average net-to-gross ratio value (0.6) is greater than in other reservoir intervals. Little additional stratigraphically untapped oil is expected in the lowermost Cut Bank sandstone. Over most of the SCCBSU, the Sunburst and the upper Cut Bank strata are valley-fill complexes with interfluves that may laterally compartmentalize reservoir sands. Basal Sunburst sand (Sunburst 1, average net-to-gross ratio ~0.3) has better reservoir quality than other Sunburst or upper Cut Bank sands, but its reservoir quality is significantly less than that of lower Cut Bank sand. Geostatistical analysis provided equiprobable representations of the heterogeneity of reservoirs. Simulated reservoir geometries resulted in an improved description of reservoir distribution and connectivity, as well as occurrences of flow barriers. The models resulting from this study can be used to improve reservoir management and well placement and to predict reservoir performance in Cut Bank field. The technical approaches and tools from this study can be used to improve descriptions of other oil and gas reservoirs in similar depositional systems.

Ramazanova, Rahila

2006-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

242

Lithology and Stratigraphy of Holes Drilled in LANL-Use Areas of the Nevada Test Site  

SciTech Connect

Geologic data for ten holes drilled in areas used by Los Alamos National Laboratory at the Nevada Test Site are presented in this report. The holes include emplacement holes, instrumentation holes, and Underground Test Area wells drilled during calendar years 1991 through 1995. For each hole a stratigraphic log, a detailed lithologic log, and one or two geologic cross sections are presented, along with a supplemental data sheet containing information about the drilling operations, geology, or references. For three of the holes, graphic data summary sheets with geologic and geophysical data are provided as plates.

Lance B. Prothro; Sigmund L. Drellack, Jr.; Brian M. Allen

1999-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

243

Geopressured-geothermal drilling and testing plan: Magma Gulf/Technadril-Dept. of Energy MGT-DOE AMOCO Fee No. 1 well, Cameron Parish, Lousiana  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The following topics are covered: generalized site activities, occupational health and safety, drilling operations, production testing, environmental assessment and monitoring plan, permits, program management, reporting, and schedule. (MHR)

Not Available

1980-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

244

Geothermal well stimulation  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

All available data on proppants and fluids were examined to determine areas in technology that need development for 300 to 500/sup 0/F (150/sup 0/ to 265/sup 0/C) hydrothermal wells. While fluid properties have been examined well into the 450/sup 0/F range, proppants have not been previously tested at elevated temperatures except in a few instances. The latest test data at geothermal temperatures is presented and some possible proppants and fluid systems that can be used are shown. Also discussed are alternative stimulation techniques for geothermal wells.

Sinclair, A.R.; Pittard, F.J.; Hanold, R.J.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

245

Well-Posed Lateral Boundary Conditions for Spectral Semi-Implicit Semi-Lagrangian Schemes: Tests in a One-Dimensional Model  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The aim of this paper is to investigate the feasibility of well-posed lateral boundary conditions in a Fourier spectral semi-implicit semi-Lagrangian one-dimensional model. Two aspects are analyzed: (i) the complication of designing well-posed ...

F. Voitus; P. Termonia; P. Bénard

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

246

Single-Well And Cross-Well Seismic Imaging | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Single-Well And Cross-Well Seismic Imaging Single-Well And Cross-Well Seismic Imaging Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Technique: Single-Well And Cross-Well Seismic Imaging Details Activities (2) Areas (2) Regions (0) NEPA(0) Exploration Technique Information Exploration Group: Downhole Techniques Exploration Sub Group: Borehole Seismic Techniques Parent Exploration Technique: Borehole Seismic Techniques Information Provided by Technique Lithology: Rock unit density influences elastic wave velocities. Stratigraphic/Structural: Structural geology- faults, folds, grabens, horst blocks, sedimentary layering, discontinuities, etc. Hydrological: Combining compressional and shear wave results can indicate the presence of fluid saturation in the formation. Thermal: High temperatures and pressure impact the compressional and shear wave velocities.

247

Health-Enhancing Physical Activity and Well-Being: Is it How Often, How Long, or How Much Effort that Matters? A Test of Basic Psychological Needs Theory.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The primary objectives of the present study were 1) to examine the relationship between health-enhancing physical activity (HEPA) and well-being across the previous day and… (more)

Sylvester, Benjamin

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

248

Precision correlation of Kansas Pennsylvanian cyclothems emphasizing wire-line logs and conodonts in a sequence stratigraphic framework  

SciTech Connect

The lithologic components and genetic interpretation of classic Pennsylvanian cyclothems have clear counterparts in sequence stratigraphy. Blocky mudstones (paleosols) and associated extensive subaerial exposure surfaces bound individual cyclothems and represent type-1 sequence boundaries. The 'middle limestones' represent flooding units that may be thin or absent, depending on the relative rate of marine inundation. Most 'core shales' correspond to condensed sections accumulated during maximum flooding and are persistent from the basin to the upper shelf. Dense well-control with occasional cores provides a means to apply sequence-stratigraphic analysis to thin cyclothemic strata, which are below the resolution of conventional seismic profiles. A lithostratigraphic framework can be established by correlating the 'core shales' using their distinctive gamma-ray log signature. Rapid conodont evolution has resulted in a characteristic fauna for most of these 'core shales,' thus providing biostratigraphic confirmation of the lithostratigraphic correlations. The wide spread nature of these maximum transgressive deposits extends the utility of the conodont indicators across dissimilar biofacies and lithofacies that would otherwise be difficult to correlate. Integration of wire-line log and conodont indicators across dissimilar biofacies and lithofacies that would otherwise be difficult to correlate. Integration of wire-line log and conodont data by core and outcrop study could lay the groundwork for biostratigraphic analysis of 'core shale' cuttings obtained during drilling.

Lambert, L.L.; Heckel, P.H. (Univ. of Iowa, Iowa City (United States)); Watney, W.L.; Stevenson, G.M. (Kansas Geological Survey, Lawrence (United States)); Barrick, J.E.; Boardman, D.R. II (Texas Tech Univ., Lubbock (United States))

1991-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

249

EXPLORING FOR SUBTLE MISSION CANYON STRATIGRAPHIC TRAPS WITH ELASTIC WAVEFIELD SEISMIC TECHNOLOGY  

SciTech Connect

The 9C3D seismic data that will form the principal data base needed for this research program have been successfully acquired. The seismic field data exhibit a good signal-to-noise (S/N) ratio for all elastic-wave modes. Thus the major hurdle of acquiring optimal-quality 9-C seismic data has been cleared. The stratigraphic oil-reservoir target that will be the imaging objective of the seismic data-processing effort is described in this report to indicate the challenge that now confronts the data-processing phase of the project.

John Beecherl

2004-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

250

Aquifer Testing Recommendations for Well 299-W15-225: Supporting Phase I of the 200-ZP-1 Groundwater Operable Unit Remedial Design  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Aquifer characterization needs are currently being assessed to optimize pump-and-treat remedial strategies within the 200-ZP-1 Operable Unit (OU), specifically for the immediate area of the 241-TX-TY Tank Farm. Currently, 14 extraction wells are actively used in the Interim Record of Decision ZP-1 pump-and-treat system to remediate the existing groundwater contamination within this general area. Four of these wells (299-W15-40, 299-W15-43, 299-W15-44, and 299-W15-765) are targeted to remediate contamination within the immediate 241-TX-TY Tank Farm area. The major contaminant of concern (COC) for the 200-ZP-1 OU is carbon tetrachloride. Other COC’s include total chromium (trivalent [III] and hexavalent [VI], nitrate, trichloroethlyene, iodine-129, technetium-99, and tritium.

Spane, Frank A.; Newcomer, Darrell R.

2009-03-10T23:59:59.000Z

251

Completion Report for the Well ER-6-2 Site Corrective Action Unit 97: Yucca Flat - Climax Mine  

SciTech Connect

Well ER-6-2 and its satellite hole, Well ER-6-2 No.1, were drilled for the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office in support of the Nevada Environmental Restoration Project at the Nevada Test Site, Nye County, Nevada. Well ER-6-2 was drilled in two stages in 1993 and 1994; the satellite hole, Well ER-6-2 No.1 was drilled nearby in 1993 but was abandoned. The wells were drilled as part of a hydrogeologic investigation program for the Yucca Flat-Climax Mine Corrective Action Unit Number 97, in the northeastern portion of the Nevada Test Site. The wells are located in Yucca Flat, within Area 6 of the Nevada Test Site. The wells provided information regarding the radiological and hydrogeological environment in a potentially down-gradient position from tests conducted in northern and central Yucca Flat. Construction of Well ER-6-2 began with a 1.2-meter-diameter surface conductor hole, which was drilled and cased off to a depth of 30.8 meters below the surface. A 50.8-centimeter diameter surface hole was then rotary drilled to the depth of 578.5 meters and cased off to the depth of 530.4 meters. The hole diameter was then reduced to 27.0 centimeters, and the borehole was advanced to a temporary depth of 611.4 meters. The borehole was conventionally cored to a total depth of 1,045 meters with a diameter of 14.0 centimeters. Borehole sloughing required cementing and re-drilling of several zones. The open-hole completion accesses the lower carbonate aquifer, the CP thrust fault, and the upper clastic confining unit. A fluid level depth of 543.2 meters was most recently measured in the open borehole in September 2007. No radionuclides were encountered during drilling. The satellite hole Well ER-6-2 No.1 was drilled approximately 15.2 meters north of Well ER-6-2 on the same drill pad. This was planned to be used as an observation well during future hydrologic testing at Well ER-6-2; however, the satellite hole was abandoned at the depth of 399 meters due to stuck drill pipe, and was subsequently cemented to the surface. Detailed lithologic descriptions with stratigraphic assignments in this report are based on composite drill cuttings samples collected every 3 meters, cores taken between the depths of 619.3 and 1,042.4 meters, and geophysical log data. Stratigraphic assignments within the Paleozoic section are based on paleontological analyses. The well was collared in alluvium and at 30.8 meters penetrated Paleozoic carbonate rocks. These consisted of dolostone with minor shale and limestone of the Bonanza King Formation, and limestone with minor quartzite, sandstone, and dolostone assigned to the Guilmette Formation. The borehole reached total depth in a shale unit assigned to the Chainman Shale. The units below the Bonanza King Formation are overturned due to faulting and folding and, therefore, are stratigraphically upside-down.

NSTec Environmental Management

2008-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

252

Geology, hydrothermal petrology, stable isotope geochemistry, and fluid inclusion geothermometry of LASL geothermal test well C/T-1 (Mesa 31-1), East Mesa, Imperial Valley, California, USA  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Borehole Mesa 31-1 (LASL C/T-1) is an 1899-m (6231-ft) deep well located in the northwestern part of the East Mesa Geothermal Field. Mesa 31-1 is the first Calibration/Test Well (C/T-1) in the Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory (LASL), Geothermal Log Interpretation Program. The purpose of this study is to provide a compilation of drillhole data, drill cuttings, well lithology, and formation petrology that will serve to support the use of well LASL C/T-1 as a calibration/test well for geothermal logging. In addition, reviews of fluid chemistry, stable isotope studies, isotopic and fluid inclusion geothermometry, and the temperature log data are presented. This study provides the basic data on the geology and hydrothermal alteration of the rocks in LASL C/T-1 as background for the interpretation of wireline logs.

Miller, K.R.; Elders, W.A.

1980-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

253

Testing  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

plain Java classes where possible as well as the ability to use persistence outside of the ... container like Apache Tomcat or a full Java EE application server

254

TEST  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This is an abstract. TEST Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetur adipiscing elit. Cras lacinia dui et est venenatis lacinia. Vestibulum lacus dolor, adipiscing id mattis sit amet, ultricies sed purus. Nulla consectetur aliquet feugiat. Maecenas ips

255

Coal rank distribution within the Bluesky-Gething stratigraphic horizon of Northeast B.C  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The top of the Gething Formation is one of the more important formational picks routinely performed by the oil and gas industry during their exploratory and development drilling as this horizon is very c:ontinuous through northeastern British Columbia and much of northern Alberta. The name Bluesky is given to the rock unit which occupies this stratigraphic level, namely a sandstone-conglomerate unit of marine origin which separates the continental coal measures of the Gething Formation from thc overlying marine shales of the Moosebar Formation (see Fig. 32). The Bluesky is commonly glauconitic.and has a variable thickness (0 to 50 metres1 over relatively short distances and most likely represents shoreline deposition of the rapidly transgressing Clearwater Sea from the north. The Bluesky-Gething is an important petroleum producer in the Fort St. John area. MOOSEBAR FM

R. H. Karst; G. V. White; Gethlng Fm

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

256

Addendum to the Closure Report for Corrective Action Unit 322: Areas 1 & 3 Release Sites and Injection Wells Nevada Test Site, Nevada, Revision 0  

SciTech Connect

This document constitutes an addendum to the June 2006, Closure Report for Corrective Action Unit 322: Areas 1 & 3 Release Sites and Injection Wells as described in the document Recommendations and Justifications for Modifications for Use Restrictions Established under the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (UR Modification document) dated February 2008. The UR Modification document was approved by NDEP on February 26, 2008. The approval of the UR Modification document constituted approval of each of the recommended UR modifications. In conformance with the UR Modification document, this addendum consists of: • This cover page that refers the reader to the UR Modification document for additional information • The cover and signature pages of the UR Modification document • The NDEP approval letter • The corresponding section of the UR Modification document This addendum provides the documentation justifying the cancellation of the URs for: • CAS 01-25-01, AST Release • CAS 03-25-03, Mud Plant AST Diesel Release These URs were established as part of Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (FFACO) corrective actions and were based on the presence of contaminants at concentrations greater than the action levels established at the time of the initial investigation (FFACO, 1996; as amended August 2006). Since these URs were established, practices and procedures relating to the implementation of risk-based corrective actions (RBCA) have changed. Therefore, these URs were re-evaluated against the current RBCA criteria as defined in the Industrial Sites Project Establishment of Final Action Levels (NNSA/NSO, 2006c). This re-evaluation consisted of comparing the original data (used to define the need for the URs) to risk-based final action levels (FALs) developed using the current Industrial Sites RBCA process. The re-evaluation resulted in a recommendation to remove these URs because contamination is not present at these sites above the risk-based FALs. Requirements for inspecting and maintaining these URs will be canceled, and the postings and signage at each site will be removed. Fencing and posting may be present at these sites that are unrelated to the FFACO URs such as for radiological control purposes as required by the NV/YMP Radiological Control Manual (NNSA/NSO, 2004f). This modification will not affect or modify any non-FFACO requirements for fencing, posting, or monitoring at these sites.

Lynn Kidman

2008-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

257

Addendum to the Closure Report for Corrective Action Unit 335: Area 6 Injection Well and Drain Pit Nevada Test Site, Nevada, Revison 0  

SciTech Connect

This document constitutes an addendum to the June 2003, Closure Report for Corrective Action Unit 335: Area 6 Injection Well and Drain Pit as described in the document Recommendations and Justifications for Modifications for Use Restrictions Established under the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (UR Modification document) dated February 2008. The UR Modification document was approved by NDEP on February 26, 2008. The approval of the UR Modification document constituted approval of each of the recommended UR modifications. In conformance with the UR Modification document, this addendum consists of: • This cover page that refers the reader to the UR Modification document for additional information • The cover and signature pages of the UR Modification document • The NDEP approval letter • The corresponding section of the UR Modification document This addendum provides the documentation justifying the cancellation of the URs for: • CAS 06-20-02, 20-inch Cased Hole • CAS 06-23-03, Drain Pit These URs were established as part of Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (FFACO) corrective actions and were based on the presence of contaminants at concentrations greater than the action levels established at the time of the initial investigation (FFACO, 1996; as amended August 2006). Since these URs were established, practices and procedures relating to the implementation of risk-based corrective actions (RBCA) have changed. Therefore, these URs were re-evaluated against the current RBCA criteria as defined in the Industrial Sites Project Establishment of Final Action Levels (NNSA/NSO, 2006c). This re-evaluation consisted of comparing the original data (used to define the need for the URs) to risk-based final action levels (FALs) developed using the current Industrial Sites RBCA process. The re-evaluation resulted in a recommendation to remove these URs because contamination is not present at these sites above the risk-based FALs. Requirements for inspecting and maintaining these URs will be canceled, and the postings and signage at each site will be removed. Fencing and posting may be present at these sites that are unrelated to the FFACO URs such as for radiological control purposes as required by the NV/YMP Radiological Control Manual (NNSA/NSO, 2004f). This modification will not affect or modify any non-FFACO requirements for fencing, posting, or monitoring at these sites.

Lynn Kidman

2008-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

258

Neogene stratigraphic relationships within the Nam Con Son Basin, offshore Vietnam resulting from tectonics, eustasy, and sediment flux  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The South China Sea is a region of significant importance in terms of the records of SE Asian tectonics, including Tibetan Plateau uplift, and the onset and evolution of the East Asian monsoon. The Mekong River has been a dominant sediment source since at least late Miocene time and has headwaters on the eastern Tibetan Plateau. Understanding the Pliocene to Recent stratigraphy of the paleo-Mekong Delta and associated shelf-edge deposits aids in understanding changes in accommodation, sea level, and sediment supply. This record might then be useful in interpreting the longterm history of basin evolution in the Nam Con Son Basin. Nine sequence boundaries and associated sequences are recognized along the late Miocene to latest Pleistocene shelf in the East Nam Con Son Basin. Age constraints were assigned to key stratigraphic horizons by correlating sequence boundaries with published sea level curves. Accommodation in the study area is controlled by shelf -edge compaction, rift-related thermal subsidence, non-rift-related anomalous subsidence,Two primary sources supplied sediment to the southwestern South China Sea during Pliocene to Recent time and likely include the paleo-Mekong Delta and a fluviodeltaic system originating from the Sunda Shelf, such as the Molengraaff River. Changes in thickness, area, and location of Pliocene to Recent shelf-edge delta deposits reflect changes in accommodation and sediment supply over time, as well as progradation of the shelf edge during Pliocene to Recent time and avulsion of the shelf edge delta. Anomalous subsidence of LGM shelf edge deposits is estimated at approximately 40-50 m deeper than expected. The current depth of the LGM deltaic wedge may indicate renewed rapid tectonic subsidence during the last 18,000 yrs, possible compaction effects or a combination of these. eustatic change, and shelf edge faulting.

Wright, Christine M.

2006-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

259

Development of a New Stratigraphic Trap Exploration Using Elastic-Wave Seismic Technology  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Vecta acquired 9 square miles of 9-C seismic data in Mountrail County, North Dakota with the Mission Canyon shoreline as a primary target. Vecta contracted the Institute Francais du Petrole in order to co-develop a more rigorous multicomponent seismic interpretation product. The final interpretation was very unique in that it utilized not only the 9-C seismic data but also the new jointly developed software. A Mission Canyon anomaly was developed in 2006; however, it was of insufficient size to be a commercial target at the time. Therefore, Vecta analyzed the shear data for anisotropy within the Bakken formation and successfully reentered an abandoned producer within the project area and drilled a horizontal leg through the anomalous zones of the middle member of the Bakken formation. The well was open hole completed, swab tested, sand fraced, and swab tested some more. No shows of oil were ever seen from the Bakken formation, but the well yielded considerable amounts of formation water. The well has been abandoned as non-commercial. From the swab tests, one may conclude considerable permeability exists in the formation, thus confirming the utility of the shear wave to detect fractures within the targeted formation.

Bryan DeVault

2008-02-05T23:59:59.000Z

260

Drilling history and stratigraphic correlation of Rose Run sandstone of northeastern Ohio  

SciTech Connect

To date, 40 known tests have penetrated the Knox unconformity in Ashtabula, Lake, Trumbull, Geauga, and Portage Counties, Ohio. Prior to 1980, there were only 22 tests. Of these, only 10 penetrated and logged rocks older than the Rose Run sandstone. In the period 1980-1986, two Rose Run discoveries were drilled, one in New Lyme Township of Ashtabula County and one in Burton Township of Geauga County. Both discovery wells have been offset. Attempts have been made to correlate these two areas with older tests in northeastern Ohio and with the Rose Run sandstones of Coshocton County. In northeastern Ohio, preliminary studies indicate a Rose Run sandstone and/or dolomite interval approximately 100 ft thick. The upper 50 ft is predominantly sandstone and the lower 50 ft changes locally from sandstone to dolomite. The upper sandy member can be correlated to the A, B, and C sandstone units of Coshocton County.

Moyer, C.C.

1988-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "wells stratigraphic tests" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Second invitational well-testing symposium proceedings  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The symposium dealt with the state of the art of injection of fluids underground, and its application to geothermal systems in particular. Separate abstracts were prepared for fourteen papers and three abstracts of papers were listed by title. Three papers were previously abstracted for EDB.

Not Available

1978-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

262

INVITATIONAL WELL-TESTING SYMPOSIUM PROCEEDINGS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

C. and Fast, C. R. : Hydraulic Fracturing, Monograph Series,D. G. : "Mechanics of Hydraulic Fracturing," Trans. , AIME (Saunders, Calvin D. : "Hydraulic Fracturing: Fracture Flow

Authors, Various

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

263

INVITATIONAL WELL-TESTING SYMPOSIUM PROCEEDINGS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Sloughing shale; • Shale density; • Gas-cut mud; • Chloridesociated with thick shale sections; gas from drilled gas-result of the following -- gas in shale, the so-called high

Authors, Various

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

264

INVITATIONAL WELL-TESTING SYMPOSIUM PROCEEDINGS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Instrumentation A. F. Veneruso Sandia Laboratories Downholeof ERDA and M. M. Newsom of Sandia Laboratories for theirtechnical support from Sandia. Table 5 lists the industry

Authors, Various

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

265

INVITATIONAL WELL-TESTING SYMPOSIUM PROCEEDINGS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

35 G. B. Miller Oil and GasHydraulics of Water, Oil and Gas," Publ. Acad. ScL, col-A Guide to Practical Oil and Gas . • 54 Field Decisions (

Authors, Various

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

266

Core-based integrated sedimentologic, stratigraphic, and geochemical analysis of the oil shale bearing Green River Formation, Uinta Basin, Utah  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

DOE Award No.: DE-FE0001243 DOE Award No.: DE-FE0001243 Topical Report CORE-BASED INTEGRATED SEDIMENTOLOGIC, STRATIGRAPHIC, AND GEOCHEMICAL ANALYSIS OF THE OIL SHALE BEARING GREEN RIVER FORMATION, UINTA BASIN, UTAH Submitted by: University of Utah Institute for Clean and Secure Energy 155 South 1452 East, Room 380 Salt Lake City, UT 84112 Prepared for: United States Department of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory April 2011 Oil & Natural Gas Technology Office of Fossil Energy Core-based integrated sedimentologic, stratigraphic, and geochemical analysis of the oil shale bearing Green River Formation, Uinta Basin, Utah Topical Report Reporting Period: October 31, 2009 through March 31, 2011 Authors: Lauren P. Birgenheier, Energy and Geoscience Insitute, University of Utah

267

RMOTC - Field Information - Wells and Production  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

& Production Facilities Wells Pumpjack at RMOTC Partners may test in RMOTC's large inventory of cased, uncased, vertical, high-angle, and horizontal wells. Cased and open-hole...

268

Wellness Planning Session Report  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Wellness Planning Session Report September 12, 2008 #12;Wellness Planning Session Report Printed.............................................................................1 Explored what wellness program should look like at NMSU .......................2 Considered for the Wellness committee..................................2 Identified the next meeting date and meeting agenda

Castillo, Steven P.

269

COMPLETION REPORT FOR WELL CLUSTER ER-5-3  

SciTech Connect

Well Cluster ER-5-3 was drilled for the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office in support of the Nevada Environmental Restoration Project at the Nevada Test Site, Nye County, Nevada. This cluster of 3 wells was drilled in 2000 and 2001 as part of a hydrogeologic investigation program in Frenchman Flat. The first borehole in the cluster, Well ER-5-3, was drilled in February and March 2000. A 47.0-centimeter surface hole was drilled and cased off to the depth of 374.8 meters. The hole diameter was decreased to 31.1 centimeters for drilling to a total depth of 794.3 meters within welded ash-flow tuff. A piezometer string with 1 slotted interval was installed in the annulus of the surface casing, open to the saturated alluvium. A completion string with 2 slotted intervals was installed in the main hole, open to saturated alluvium and to the welded tuff aquifer. A second piezometer string with 1 slotted interval open to the welded-tuff aquifer was installed outside the completion string. Well ER-5-3 No.2 was drilled about 30 meters west of the first borehole in March 2000, and was recompleted in March 2001. A 66.0-centimeter hole was drilled and cased off to the depth of 613.8 meters. The hole diameter was decreased to 44.5 centimeters and the borehole was drilled and cased off to the depth of 849.0 meters. The hole diameter was decreased once more to 31.1 centimeters for drilling to a total depth of 1,732.2 meters in dolomite. A completion string open to the dolomite (lower carbonate aquifer) was installed. Well ER-5-3 No.3 was drilled approximately 30 meters north of the first 2 boreholes in February 2001. A 66.0-centimeter hole was drilled and cased off to the depth of 36.6 meters, then the main 25.1-centimeter-diameter hole was drilled to a total depth of 548.6 meters in alluvium. A slotted stainless-steel tubing string was installed in the saturated alluvium. A preliminary composite, static water level was measured at the depth of 282.6 meters, prior to development and hydrologic testing. Detailed lithologic descriptions and stratigraphic assignments are included in the report. These are based on composite drill cuttings collected every 3 meters, and 120 sidewall samples taken at various depths below 91 meters in Wells ER-5-3 and ER-5-3 No.2, supplemented by geophysical log data. The wells penetrated Quaternary/Tertiary alluvium to the depth of 622.4 meters, and an 8.5-meter-thick basalt flow was encountered within the alluvium. Tertiary tuff was penetrated to the depth of approximately 1,425.9 meters, where the top of the lower carbonate aquifer was tagged in Well ER-5-3 No.2.

BECHTEL NEVADA

2005-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

270

High resolution sequence stratigraphic and reservoir characterization studies of D-07, D-08 and E-01 sands, Block 2 Meren field, offshore Niger Delta  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Meren field, located offshore Niger Delta, is one of the most prolific oil-producing fields in the Niger Delta. The upper Miocene D-07, D-08 and E-01 oil sands comprise a series of stacked hydrocarbon reservoirs in Block 2 of Meren field. These reservoir sandstones were deposited in offshore to upper shoreface environments. Seven depositional facies were identified in the studied interval, each with distinct lithology, sedimentary structures, trace fossils, and wire-line log character. The dominant lithofacies are (1) locally calcite-cemented highly-bioturbated, fine-grained sandstones, (middle to lower shoreface facies); (2) cross-bedded, fine- to medium-grained well-sorted sandstones (upper shoreface facies); (3) horizontal to sub-horizontal laminated, very-fine- to fine-grained sandstone (delta front facies); (4) massive very-fine- to fine-grained poorly-sorted sandstone (delta front facies); (5) muddy silt- to fine-grained wavy-bedded sandstone (lower shoreface facies); (6) very-fine- to fine-grained sandy mudstone (lower shoreface facies); and (7) massive, silty shales (offshore marine facies). Lithofacies have distinct mean petrophysical properties, although there is overlap in the range of values. The highest quality reservoir deposits are cross-bedded sands that were deposited in high-energy upper shoreface environments. Calcite cements in lower shoreface facies significantly reduce porosity and permeability. Integration of core and wire-line log data allowed porosity and permeability to be empirically determined from bulk density. The derived equation indicated that bulk density values could predict 80% of the variance in core porosity and permeability values. Three parasequence sets were interpreted, including one lower progradational and two upper retrogradational parasequence sets. The progradational parasequence set consists of upward-coarsening delta front to upper shoreface facies, whereas the upward-fining retrogradational parasequence sets are composed of middle to lower shoreface deposits overlain by offshore marine shales. The limited amount of core data and the relatively small area of investigation place serious constraints on stratigraphic interpretations. Two possible sequence stratigraphic interpretations are presented. The first interpretation suggests the deposits comprise a highstand systems tract overlain by a transgressive systems tract. A lowstand systems tract is restricted to an incised valley fill at the southeastern end of the study area. The alternate interpretation suggests the deposits comprise a falling stage systems tract overlain by transgressive systems tract.

Esan, Adegbenga Oluwafemi

2002-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

271

CORE-BASED INTEGRATED SEDIMENTOLOGIC, STRATIGRAPHIC, AND GEOCHEMICAL ANALYSIS OF THE OIL SHALE BEARING GREEN RIVER FORMATION, UINTA BASIN, UTAH  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An integrated detailed sedimentologic, stratigraphic, and geochemical study of Utah's Green River Formation has found that Lake Uinta evolved in three phases (1) a freshwater rising lake phase below the Mahogany zone, (2) an anoxic deep lake phase above the base of the Mahogany zone and (3) a hypersaline lake phase within the middle and upper R-8. This long term lake evolution was driven by tectonic basin development and the balance of sediment and water fill with the neighboring basins, as postulated by models developed from the Greater Green River Basin by Carroll and Bohacs (1999). Early Eocene abrupt global-warming events may have had significant control on deposition through the amount of sediment production and deposition rates, such that lean zones below the Mahogany zone record hyperthermal events and rich zones record periods between hyperthermals. This type of climatic control on short-term and long-term lake evolution and deposition has been previously overlooked. This geologic history contains key points relevant to oil shale development and engineering design including: (1) Stratigraphic changes in oil shale quality and composition are systematic and can be related to spatial and temporal changes in the depositional environment and basin dynamics. (2) The inorganic mineral matrix of oil shale units changes significantly from clay mineral/dolomite dominated to calcite above the base of the Mahogany zone. This variation may result in significant differences in pyrolysis products and geomechanical properties relevant to development and should be incorporated into engineering experiments. (3) This study includes a region in the Uinta Basin that would be highly prospective for application of in-situ production techniques. Stratigraphic targets for in-situ recovery techniques should extend above and below the Mahogany zone and include the upper R-6 and lower R-8.

Lauren P. Birgenheier; Michael D. Vanden Berg,

2011-04-11T23:59:59.000Z

272

BUFFERED WELL FIELD OUTLINES  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

OIL & GAS FIELD OUTLINES FROM BUFFERED WELLS The VBA Code below builds oil & gas field boundary outlines (polygons) from buffered wells (points). Input well points layer must be a...

273

Design considerations for pump-and-treat remediation based on characterization of industrial injection wells: Lessons learned from the groundwater interim action at the test area north of the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory  

SciTech Connect

The Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) is a 2,305 km{sup 2} (890 mi{sup 2}) Federal Facility operated by the U.S. Department of Energy, Idaho Operations Office. The Test Area North (TAN) complex is located approximately 80 km (50 mi) northwest of Idaho Falls in the northern portion of the HSTEL and extends over an area of approximately 30 km{sup 2} (12 mi{sup 2}). The Technical Support Facility (TSF) is centrally located within TAN and consists of several experimental and support facilities for conducting research and development activities on nuclear reactor performance. Operations at TAN were initiated in the early 1950s to support the U.S. Air Force aircraft nuclear propulsion project and have continued over the years with various experimental and testing facilities. The TSF-05 Injection well was used from 1953 to 1972 to dispose of TAN liquid wastes in the fractured basalt of the Snake River Plain Aquifer. Trichloroethylene (TCE) was first identified as a groundwater contaminant in 1987 when it was found in the TAN drinking water above acceptable levels. The TAN Groundwater Interim Action at the INEL was intended to provide both interim containment and clean-up of contaminated groundwater resulting from the 40-year old injection well, TSF-05. The primary decontamination objective of the Groundwater Treatment Facility (GWTF) is to remove volatile organic compounds, primarily TCE. A pump-and-treat technology using air stripping, carbon adsorption, and resin ion exchange for strontium-90 ({sup 90}Sr) was selected in the Operable Unit 1-07A Groundwater Interim Action Record of Decision. Operations started on February 16, 1994 and activities were suspended on January 23, 1995 due to the inability to meet Remedial Action Objectives (RAOs).

Cotten, G.B.

1995-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

274

Groundwater and Wells (Nebraska)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This section describes regulations relating to groundwater protection, water wells, and water withdrawals, and requires the registration of all water wells in the state.

275

High-resolution stratigraphic and structural characterization of the fault-partitioned Hickory Sandstone aquifer system, Mason County, central Texas  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Hickory Sandstone is an important aquifer in central Texas and is partitioned by faults that impede cross-fault fluid flow. This study provides a detailed stratigraphic and structural model in the vicinity of a normal, oblique-slip fault with 60' (18.3 m) of stratigraphic throw. The model is developed using 3500' (1050 m) of continuous core and geophysical logs from eleven closely spaced boreholes. The local stratigraphy is studied in detail and environments of deposition inferred. A model of fault evolution is inferred using the observed fault structure and throw distributions. Locally, the Hickory Sandstone consists of 450' (137 m) of Cambrian-aged, quartzose and arkosic sandstone with localized mudstone and siltstone interbeds and overlies Precambrian Town Mountain Granite. Within the study area, the Hickory Sandstone is subdivided into four facies: the cross-bedded facies, the mudstone facies, the interbedded sandstone facies and the hematite facies. These facies form a stacked sequence representing an initial braided-stream fluvial environment that grades into a high energy, open marine environment that closely matches the tide-dominated, high microtidal estuarine model of Reinson (1992). Lateral correlation of strata packages in the cross-bedded facies was very difficult and complicated development of the fault model. The study fault is a linked fault system consisting of several major segments. Two segments overlap and locally hard link along both strike and dip. The major fault segments also consist of several linked subsegments. Net stratigraphic throw decreases slightly upward from a maximum of 60' (18.3 m) near the granite basement. Where the major segments overlap, the throw exhibits systematic variations consistent with displacement transfer between the neighboring segments. The linked fault system is inferred to have formed by interaction and linkage of two, early, en echelon basement faults. Ultimately these faults propagated upward and laterally into the overlying Hickory Sandstone, interacted and partially hard-linked, producing a large linkage structure that affected subsequent, neighboring hanging wall deformation. Subsidiary small faults are common but do not exhibit simple spatial relations with the large fault segments. There is only a weak correlation between a fault's shear zone thickness and stratigraphic throw for faults with 1' to 60' (0.3 to 18.3 m) of throw.

Wilson, Jason Steven

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

276

Corrective Action Investigation Plan for Corrective Action Unit 322: Areas 1 and 3 Release Sites and Injection Wells, Nevada Test Site, Nevada: Revision 0, Including Record of Technical Change No. 1  

SciTech Connect

This Corrective Action Investigation Plan contains the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office's approach to collect the data necessary to evaluate corrective action alternatives (CAAs) appropriate for the closure of Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 322, Areas 1 and 3 Release Sites and Injection Wells, Nevada Test Site, Nevada, under the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order. Corrective Action Unit 322 consists of three Corrective Action Sites (CASs): 01-25-01, AST Release (Area 1); 03-25-03, Mud Plant AST Diesel Release (Area 3); 03-20-05, Injection Wells (Area 3). Corrective Action Unit 322 is being investigated because existing information on the nature and extent of potential contamination is insufficient to evaluate and recommend corrective action alternatives. The investigation of three CASs in CAU 322 will determine if hazardous and/or radioactive constituents are present at concentrations and locations that could potentially pose a threat to human health and the environment. The results of this field investigation will support a defensible evaluation of corrective action alternatives in the corrective action decision document.

U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office

2003-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

277

Corrective Action Investigation Plan for Corrective Action Unit 165: Areas 25 and 26 Dry Well and Washdown Areas, Nevada Test Site, Nevada (including Record of Technical Change Nos. 1, 2, and 3) (January 2002, Rev. 0)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This Corrective Action Investigation Plan contains the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Operations Office's approach to collect the data necessary to evaluate corrective action alternatives appropriate for the closure of Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 165 under the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order. Corrective Action Unit 165 consists of eight Corrective Action Sites (CASs): CAS 25-20-01, Lab Drain Dry Well; CAS 25-51-02, Dry Well; CAS 25-59-01, Septic System; CAS 26-59-01, Septic System; CAS 25-07-06, Train Decontamination Area; CAS 25-07-07, Vehicle Washdown; CAS 26-07-01, Vehicle Washdown Station; and CAS 25-47-01, Reservoir and French Drain. All eight CASs are located in the Nevada Test Site, Nevada. Six of these CASs are located in Area 25 facilities and two CASs are located in Area 26 facilities. The eight CASs at CAU 165 consist of dry wells, septic systems, decontamination pads, and a reservoir. The six CASs in Area 25 are associated with the Nuclear Rocket Development Station that operated from 1958 to 1973. The two CASs in Area 26 are associated with facilities constructed for Project Pluto, a series of nuclear reactor tests conducted between 1961 to 1964 to develop a nuclear-powered ramjet engine. Based on site history, the scope of this plan will be a two-phased approach to investigate the possible presence of hazardous and/or radioactive constituents at concentrations that could potentially pose a threat to human health and the environment. The Phase I analytical program for most CASs will include volatile organic compounds, semivolatile organic compounds, Resource Conservation and Recovery Act metals, total petroleum hydrocarbons, polychlorinated biphenyls, and radionuclides. If laboratory data obtained from the Phase I investigation indicates the presence of contaminants of concern, the process will continue with a Phase II investigation to define the extent of contamination. Based on the results of Phase I sampling, the analytical program for Phase II investigation may be reduced. The results of this field investigation will support a defensible evaluation of corrective action alternatives in the corrective action decision document.

U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Operations Office (NNSA/NV)

2002-01-09T23:59:59.000Z

278

Well Flix Program Details  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Well Flix's in the Well-U library. These DVD's have been made available so employees may learn about a variety of fitness for a one-week basis at no cost. Contact Well U at well-u-info@rochester.edu for DVD rental. Click the link

Portman, Douglas

279

Underground Wells (Oklahoma)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Class I, III, IV and V injection wells require a permit issued by the Executive Director of the Department of Environmental Quality; Class V injection wells utilized in the remediation of...

280

Well-centered meshing.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??A well-centered simplex is a simplex whose circumcenter lies in its interior, and a well-centered mesh is a simplicial mesh in which every simplex is… (more)

Vanderzee, Evan B.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "wells stratigraphic tests" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Geothermal well stimulation treatments  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The behavior of proppants in geothermal environments and two field experiments in well stimulation are discussed. (MHR)

Hanold, R.J.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

282

Wellness, Health & Counseling Services  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Wellness, Health & Counseling Services Dr. Marcelle Holmes Assistant Vice Chancellor CARE Career Student Health Center #12;The mission of the Wellness, Health & Counseling Services cluster is to support · Dedicated to promoting principles of wellness, prevention and healthy life-style choices for students

Stanford, Kyle

283

When we test we know which students earned higher scores than other students. Without a well constructed examination, however, we may not know what students did or did not learn, nor do we necessarily know  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

#12;Preface When we test we know which students earned higher scores than other students. Without necessarily know to what degree the test score is a reasonably accurate estimate of student achievement. If testing is to be related to learning in a meaningful way, the entire testing process needs to be carefully

Roy, Subrata

284

BUFFERED WELL FIELD OUTLINES  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

OIL & GAS FIELD OUTLINES FROM BUFFERED WELLS OIL & GAS FIELD OUTLINES FROM BUFFERED WELLS The VBA Code below builds oil & gas field boundary outlines (polygons) from buffered wells (points). Input well points layer must be a feature class (FC) with the following attributes: Field_name Buffer distance (can be unique for each well to represent reservoirs with different drainage radii) ...see figure below. Copy the code into a new module. Inputs: In ArcMap, data frame named "Task 1" Well FC as first layer (layer 0). Output: Polygon feature class in same GDB as the well points FC, with one polygon field record (may be multiple polygon rings) per field_name. Overlapping buffers for the same field name are dissolved and unioned (see figure below). Adds an attribute PCTFEDLAND which can be populated using the VBA

285

Formation Testing Techniques | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Formation Testing Techniques Formation Testing Techniques Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Technique: Formation Testing Techniques Details Activities (0) Areas (0) Regions (0) NEPA(0) Exploration Technique Information Exploration Group: Downhole Techniques Exploration Sub Group: Formation Testing Techniques Parent Exploration Technique: Downhole Techniques Information Provided by Technique Lithology: Stratigraphic/Structural: Hydrological: Thermal: Dictionary.png Formation Testing Techniques: No definition has been provided for this term. Add a Definition References No exploration activities found. Print PDF Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Formation_Testing_Techniques&oldid=601973" Categories: Downhole Techniques Exploration Techniques

286

well | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

43 43 Varnish cache server Browse Upload data GDR 429 Throttled (bot load) Error 429 Throttled (bot load) Throttled (bot load) Guru Meditation: XID: 2142280543 Varnish cache server well Dataset Summary Description The California Division of Oil, Gas, and Geothermal Resources contains oil, gas, and geothermal data for the state of California. Source California Division of Oil, Gas, and Geothermal Resources Date Released February 01st, 2011 (3 years ago) Date Updated Unknown Keywords California data gas geothermal oil well Data application/vnd.ms-excel icon California district 1 wells (xls, 10.1 MiB) application/vnd.ms-excel icon California district 2 wells (xls, 4 MiB) application/vnd.ms-excel icon California district 3 wells (xls, 3.8 MiB) application/zip icon California district 4 wells (zip, 11.2 MiB)

287

Geothermal Well Technology Program  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The high cost of drilling and completing geothermal wells is an impediment to the development of geothermal energy resources. Technological deficiencies in rotary drilling techniques are evidenced when drilling geothermal wells. The Division of Geothermal Energy (DGE) of the U.S. Department of Energy has initiated a program aimed at developing new drilling and completion techniques for geothermal wells. The goals of this program are to reduce well costs by 25% by 1982 and by 50% by 1986. An overview of the program is presented. Program justification which relates well cost to busbar energy cost and to DGE power-on-line goals is presented. Technological deficiencies encountered when current rotary drilling techniques are used for geothermal wells are discussed. A program for correcting these deficiencies is described.

Varnado, S.G.

1978-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

288

Petroleum well costs.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??This is the first academic study of well costs and drilling times for Australia?s petroleum producing basins, both onshore and offshore. I analyse a substantial… (more)

Leamon, Gregory Robert

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

289

Lithologic descriptions and temperature profiles of five wells in the southwestern Valles caldera region, New Mexico  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The subsurface stratigraphy and temperature profiles of the southern and western Valles caldera region have been well constrained with the use of data from the VC-1, AET-4, WC 23-4, PC-1 and PC-2 wells. Data from these wells indicate that thermal gradients west of the caldera margin are between 110 and 140)degrees)C/km, with a maximum gradient occurring in the bottom of PC-1 equal to 240)degrees)C/km as a result of thermal fluid flow. Gradients within the caldera reach a maximum of 350)degrees)C/km, while the maximum thermal gradient measured southwest of the caldera in the thermal outflow plume is 140)degrees)C/km. The five wells exhibit high thermal gradients (>60)deghrees)C/km) resulting from high conductive heat flow associated with the Rio Grande rift and volcanism in the Valles caldera, as well as high convective heat flow associated with circulating geothermal fluids. Gamma logs run in four of the five wells appear to be of limited use for stratigraphic correlations in the caldera region. However, stratigraphic and temperature data from the five wells provide information about the structure and thermal regime of the southern and western Valles caldera region. 29 refs., 9 figs. 2 tabs.

Shevenell, L.; Goff, F.; Miles, D.; Waibel, A.; Swanberg, C.

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

290

Shock Chlorination of Wells  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Shock chlorination is a method of disinfecting a water well. This publication gives complete instructions for chlorinating with bleach or with dry chlorine. It is also available in Spanish as publication L-5441S

McFarland, Mark L.; Dozier, Monty

2003-06-11T23:59:59.000Z

291

Isobaric groundwater well  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method of measuring a parameter in a well, under isobaric conditions, including such parameters as hydraulic gradient, pressure, water level, soil moisture content and/or aquifer properties the method as presented comprising providing a casing having first and second opposite ends, and a length between the ends, the casing supporting a transducer having a reference port; placing the casing lengthwise into the well, second end first, with the reference port vented above the water table in the well; and sealing the first end. A system is presented for measuring a parameter in a well, the system comprising a casing having first and second opposite ends, and a length between the ends and being configured to be placed lengthwise into a well second end first; a transducer, the transducer having a reference port, the reference port being vented in the well above the water table, the casing being screened across and above the water table; and a sealing member sealing the first end. In one embodiment, the transducer is a tensiometer transducer and in other described embodiments, another type transducer is used in addition to a tensiometer.

Hubbell, Joel M. (Idaho Falls, ID); Sisson, James B. (Idaho Falls, ID)

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

292

DOE Geothermal well stimulation program  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

An effective stimulation treatment requires the interaction of four separate items: frac fluids, proppants, equipment, and planned and properly engineered schedules. While there are good fluid systems and proppants, only judicious combinations and a well thought out schedule which uses all of these materials and available equipment to best advantage is an optimum stimulation treatment. Generally, high flow rates and convective cooling can be used either with conventional (planar) fracturing or with a dendritic fracturing technique. Many of todays fluid systems have been tested to above 400/sup 0/F. Some fluids have survived quite well. Current tests on proppants have shown temperature sensitivities in sand; however, there are resin coated materials and sintered bauxite which are not temperature sensitive. (MHR)

Hanold, R.J.; Campbell, D.A.; Sinclair, A.R.

1980-10-20T23:59:59.000Z

293

Geothermal Well Stimulation  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The stimulation of geothermal wells presents some new and challenging problems. Formation temperatures in the 300-600 F range can be expected. The behavior of stimulation fluids, frac proppants, and equipment at these temperatures in a hostile brine environment must be carefully evaluated before performance expectations can be determined. In order to avoid possible damage to the producing horizon of the formation, high temperature chemical compatibility between the in situ materials and the stimulation materials must be verified. Perhaps most significant of all, in geothermal wells the required techniques must be capable of bringing about the production of very large amounts of fluid. This necessity for high flow rates represents a significant departure from conventional petroleum well stimulation and demands the creation of very high near-wellbore permeability and/or fractures with very high flow conductivity.

Campbell, D. A.; Morris, C. W.; Sinclair, A. R.; Hanold, R. J.; Vetter, O. J.

1981-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

294

Thermal indicator for wells  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Minute durable plate-like thermal indicators are employed for precision measuring static and dynamic temperatures of well drilling fluids. The indicators are small enough and sufficiently durable to be circulated in the well with drilling fluids during the drilling operation. The indicators include a heat resistant indicating layer, a coacting meltable solid component and a retainer body which serves to unitize each indicator and which may carry permanent indicator identifying indicia. The indicators are recovered from the drilling fluid at ground level by known techniques.

Gaven, Jr., Joseph V. (Oakton, VA); Bak, Chan S. (Newbury Park, CA)

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

295

Hydraulic testing of Salado Formation evaporites at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant site: Second interpretive report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Pressure-pulse, constant-pressure flow, and pressure-buildup tests have been performed in bedded evaporites of the Salado Formation at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) site to evaluate the hydraulic properties controlling brine flow through the Salado. Transmissivities have been interpreted from six sequences of tests conducted on five stratigraphic intervals within 15 m of the WIPP underground excavations.

Beauheim, R.L. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Roberts, R.M.; Dale, T.F.; Fort, M.D.; Stensrud, W.A. [INTERA, Inc., Austin, TX (United States)

1993-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

296

3-D structural and seismic stratigraphic interpretation of the Guasare-Misoa Interval, VLE 196 Area, Block V, Lamar Field, Lake Maracaibo, Venezuela  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In this study, the structure, depositional system, and the seismic stratigraphy of the VLE 196 area, Block V in Lamar Field were interpreted using 3-D seismic data and well logs to characterize structural and depositional settings of the Guasare-Misoa interval. To demonstrate structural settings of the study area 3-D seismic data were interpreted. Three main seismic reflectors, which are the Late Eocene unconformity, Guasare, and La Luna formations, were picked. The most dominant structure in the area is the VLE 400 Fault which was interpreted as a left-lateral strike-slip reverse fault due to its behaviors as a reverse fault in cross sections and as a strike-slip fault in strike sections. The VLE 400 Fault subdivides the VLE 196 area into two main structural blocks, a downthrown block in the western part and the upthrown block in the eastern part of the field where the hydrocarbons were trapped. Several en echelon normal and reverse faults were located along the both sides of the area. The main importance of these faults are that they fractured the La Luna source rock and created migration pathways through the reservoir layers of the Misoa Formation. To interpret depositional system of the Guasare-Misoa interval, tops of the C4 and C5 intervals and associated C4 layers were picked based on well logs and lithofacies maps were prepared. The results of this part of the study show that the sandstones of the Misoa Formation are delta front and fluvial/distributary channel facies of delta system. The net sand thickness map of the C4 interval also exhibits southeast northwest contour patterns reflecting depositional axes in the area. Shaly units of the C4 interval interpreted as potential seals and are of variable thickness and extend. Seismic stratigraphic interpretation of the area shows that the four main seismic facies are dominant which mainly represent the recent sediments, "C" sands of the Misoa Formation, underlying Colon and Mito Juan shales, and basement respectively. Some distributary eroded channel fill structures were also observed within the Misoa Formation, but they were not continuous through the area because of the intensive faulting.

Arzuman, Sadun

2002-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

297

Cementing horizontal wells  

SciTech Connect

Since the introduction of horizontal drilling, most completions have been open hole. Open-hole or slotted-liner completions may be satisfactory in straight, thick formations, if stimulation is not required. But if the wellbore wanders out of the reservoir, whether due to loss of directional control or spotty knowledge of formation dimensions, casing becomes a necessity. In addition, a wellbore that stays in the formation but comes uncomfortably close to the water-oil contact or gas cap requires casing to prevent coning. Further, if stimulation is anticipated, or may become a necessity, it is essential that the hole be cased and cemented. Otherwise, there is no control of the stimulation treatment. Even if the horizontal wellbore itself does not require casing, intermediate casing in the high-angle hole is needed. This is especially critical in open-hole completions below a gas cap, for example. The keys to effective horizontal cementing are fundamentally the same as for cementing vertical wells: proper centralization of casing in the bore-hole to ensure efficient mud removal and well-designed cement slurries.

Baret, F.; Griffin, T.J.

1989-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

298

Mechanical well jar  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This patent describes a mechanical well jar having inner and outer tubular members movable longitudinally relative to each other a limited distance. Means for connecting one of the members to a pipe string extends above the jar. Means connect the other member to the pipe string below the jar. Annular shoulders on the members engage to limit the relative longitudinal movement of the members. The improvement comprises: laterally spaced, arcuate cam plates each attached to the inner surface of the outer member by threaded members that extend through the wall of the outer member and that can be removed from outside the outer member to allow the cam plates to be removed and repaired or replaced.

Burton, C.A.

1987-05-19T23:59:59.000Z

299

Helicopter magnetic survey conducted to locate wells  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A helicopter magnetic survey was conducted in August 2007 over 15.6 sq mi at the Naval Petroleum Reserve No. 3’s (NPR-3) Teapot Dome Field near Casper, Wyoming. The survey’s purpose was to accurately locate wells drilled there during more than 90 years of continuous oilfield operation. The survey was conducted at low altitude and with closely spaced flight lines to improve the detection of wells with weak magnetic response and to increase the resolution of closely spaced wells. The survey was in preparation for a planned CO2 flood for EOR, which requires a complete well inventory with accurate locations for all existing wells. The magnetic survey was intended to locate wells missing from the well database and to provide accurate locations for all wells. The ability of the helicopter magnetic survey to accurately locate wells was accomplished by comparing airborne well picks with well locations from an intense ground search of a small test area.

Veloski, G.A.; Hammack, R.W.; Stamp, V. (Rocky Mountain Oilfield Testing Center); Hall, R. (Rocky Mountain Oilfield Testing Center); Colina, K. (Rocky Mountain Oilfield Testing Center)

2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

300

Geopressured-geothermal well activities in Louisiana  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Since September 1978, microseismic networks have operated continuously around US Department of Energy (DOE) geopressured-geothermal well sites to monitor any microearthquake activity in the well vicinity. Microseismic monitoring is necessary before flow testing at a well site to establish the level of local background seismicity. Once flow testing has begun, well development may affect ground elevations and/or may activate growth faults, which are characteristic of the coastal region of southern Louisiana and southeastern Texas where these geopressured-geothermal wells are located. The microseismic networks are designed to detest small-scale local earthquakes indicative of such fault activation. Even after flow testing has ceased, monitoring continues to assess any microearthquake activity delayed by the time dependence of stress migration within the earth. Current monitoring shows no microseismicity in the geopressured-geothermal prospect areas before, during, or after flow testing.

John, C.J.

1992-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "wells stratigraphic tests" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Wellness Peer Program Volunteer Job Description Wellness Peer Programs  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Wellness Peer Program Volunteer Job Description Wellness Peer Programs: Leave The Pack Behind & Wellness Centre, UTSC Mental Wellness ­ mental health awareness program focusing on mental health, coping on healthy relationships, sexually transmitted infections and birth control Health & Wellness Centre

Kronzucker, Herbert J.

302

Oil well jar  

SciTech Connect

A jar for use in imparting jarring blows to an object lodged in the bore of a well. The jar includes a mandrel member and outer telescopically related tubular member, the mandrel member and said tubular member being telescopically movable between an extended and a collapsed position of the jar. One of the members is connected to a drill string while the other of the members is connected to the object to be jarred. Telescopically overlapping portions of the members provide an annular chamber for confining an operating fluid. A sleeve and a cylinder extend into the chamber and into an essentially fluid tight fit with each other for a selected portion of the telescopic travel between the extended and collapsed positions. An operating fluid bypass is provided in the first one of the members, the bypass being in fluid communication with the operating fluid above and below the sleeve, the bypass including a channel. An orifice is disposed in the channel. A filter, distinct from said orifice, is provided by controlling the clearences between the sleeve and the first one of the members.

Sutliff, W. N.

1985-06-25T23:59:59.000Z

303

Improved geothermal well logging tools  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A geothermal well logging tool has been designed to operate at 275/sup 0/C and 7000 psi. The logging tool will initially consist of a manometer, a gradiomanometer and a thermometer; the electrical and mechanical design is such that a flowmeter and a caliper can be added as a later development. A unique feature of the logging tool is that it contains no downhole active electronics. The manometer is a standard high temperature pressure gauge. The gradiomanometer consists of a differential pressure gauge which is coupled to ports separated vertically by 2 ft. The differential pressure gauge is a new development; it is designed to measure a differential pressure up to 2 psi at a line pressure of 10,000 psi. The thermometer is a platinum resistance thermometer previously developed for oil well logging. The pressure gauges are both strain gauge types which allows all three gauges are both strain gauge types which allows all three gauges to be connected in series and driven from a constant current supply. This arrangement makes it possible to use a standard seven-conductor cable with no downhole switching. The joints in the sonde are electron beam welded, thus eliminating any sealed joints in the sonde wall. The logging tool will be tested first in an autoclave and in a geothermal well later in the program.

Kratz, H.R.

1977-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

304

Environmental baseline monitoring in the area of general crude oil - Department of Energy Pleasant Bayou Number 1 - a geopressured-geothermal test well, 1978. Volume III. Appendix II. Air quality monitoring, Radian Corporation, Austin, Texas. Annual report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The air monitoring program, instrument types, and bag sampling program are described in each of five quarterly reports. The operating statistics for each of the major subsystems contained in the monitoring station are presented. National ambient air quality standards are presented for criteria pollutants and the monthly statistics for the monitoring station for the month are displayed. Daily averages, maximum daily five-minute averages retained in the data base as well as the times of occurrence, the five largest averages, and the diurnal variation of various recording times are tabulated. (MHR)

Gustavson, T.C.

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

305

Development Wells At Salt Wells Area (Nevada Bureau of Mines...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Development Wells At Salt Wells Area (Nevada Bureau of Mines and Geology, 2009) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Development Wells...

306

Sequence stratigraphic controls of hydrocarbon reservoir architecture - case study of Late Permian (Guadalupian) Queen Formation, Means Field, Andrews County, Texas.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The late Permian Queen Formation (115 m thick) is a succession of mixed clastics, carbonates and evaporites deposited in the northeastern margin of Central Basin Platform of the Permian Basin, west Texas, USA. Depositional facies, stacking patterns of cyclic facies associations and statistical correlation of rock property variations define geologic controls on reservoir rock properties. Textural, compositional, petrophysical and diagenetic variations within lithofacies exhibit systematic changes with stratigraphic position, which can be related to base level changes that were controlled by high-frequency, low-amplitude, sea level fluctuations during a greenhouse period. Ten lithofacies record variations in clastic input, shallow marine carbonate production, and evaporate precipitation in sabhkas and salinas. Four different types of lithofacies associations define: (1) transgressive deltaic deposits; (2) upward-shallowing evaporite and carbonate tidal-flat deposits; (3) transgressive beach ridge and sand flat deposits; and (4) upward-shallowing evaporite salina-sabhka deposits. Stacking patterns of lithofacies associations define sixteen depositional cycles that can be grouped into eight cycle sets. Cycle sets in turn are grouped to define two high-frequency sequences. Sequence 1 progresses from fluvial to carbonate tidal flat cycles. Sequence 2 consists of salina-dominated upward-shoaling cycles. Lateral continuity of cycles indicates restricted sedimentation on low-accommodation inner platform areas updip of prograding highstand platform-margin carbonate buildups, and a long-term trend of accommodation decrease. The Queen Formation contains two reservoir types; (1) siliciclastic reservoirs capped by evaporites and (2) layer-cake carbonate reservoirs. Of the four reservoir zones identified, R11 in lowstand fluvial-deltaic deposits has relatively little cement and the best reservoir characters.

Ryu, Changsu

2002-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

307

PrimeEnergy/DOE/GRI slant well  

SciTech Connect

This report presents final results of the Sterling Boggs 1240 slant well. Objectives of the project were (1) to test the potential for improved recovery efficiency in a fractured Devonian Shale reservoir from a directionally drilled well, (2) to perform detailed tests of reservoir properties and completion methods, and (3) to provide technology to industry which may ultimately improve the economics of drilling in the Devonian Shale and thereby stimulate development of its resources.

Drimal, C.E.; Muncey, G.; Carden, R.

1991-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

308

Oil-Well Fire Fighting  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Oil Well Fire Fighting. NIST fire Research NIST Fire Research 2 Oil Well Fire Fighting RoboCrane Model Oil Well Fire Fighting Working Model.

2011-08-25T23:59:59.000Z

309

Marginal Expense Oil Well Wireless Surveillance (MEOWWS)  

SciTech Connect

The objective of this study was to identify and field test a new, low cost, wireless oil well surveillance system. A variety of suppliers and technologies were considered. One supplier and system was chosen that was low cost, new to the oil field, and successfully field tested.

Nelson, Donald G.

2002-03-11T23:59:59.000Z

310

Potential hydrologic characterization wells in Amargosa Valley  

SciTech Connect

More than 500 domestic, agricultural, and monitoring wells were identified in the Amargosa Valley. From this list, 80 wells were identified as potential hydrologic characterization wells, in support of the US Department of Energy (DOE) Underground Test Area/Remedial Investigation and Feasibility Study (UGTA/RIFS). Previous hydrogeologic studies have shown that groundwater flow in the basin is complex and that aquifers may have little lateral continuity. Wells located more than 10 km or so from the Nevada Test Site (NTS) boundary may yield data that are difficult to correlate to sources from the NTS. Also, monitoring well locations should be chosen within the guidelines of a hydrologic conceptual model and monitoring plan. Since these do not exist at this time, recompletion recommendations will be restricted to wells relatively close (approximately 20 km) to the NTS boundary. Recompletion recommendations were made for two abandoned agricultural irrigation wells near the town of Amargosa Valley (previously Lathrop Wells), for two abandoned wildcat oil wells about 10 km southwest of Amargosa Valley, and for Test Well 5 (TW-5), about 10 km east of Amargosa Valley.

Lyles, B.; Mihevc, T.

1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

311

Wellness counseling appointments: To schedule an appointment with a wellness  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Wellness counseling appointments: To schedule an appointment with a wellness counselor you may call, email, or simply stop by the Center for Student Wellness to leave a note for a wellness counselor-304-5564 (p) 212-304-5560 (p) 212-544-1967 (f) Email: studentwellness@columbia.edu Wellness information

Grishok, Alla

312

Well-pump alignment system  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An improved well-pump for geothermal wells, an alignment system for a well-pump, and to a method for aligning a rotor and stator within a well-pump, wherein the well-pump has a whistle assembly formed at a bottom portion thereof, such that variations in the frequency of the whistle, indicating misalignment, may be monitored during pumping.

Drumheller, Douglas S. (Cedar Crest, NM)

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

313

Well-logging activities in Russia  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The report is a brief survey of the current state of well-logging service in Russia (number and types of crews, structure of well-logging jobs, types of techniques used, well-logging equipment, auxiliary downhole jobs, etc.). Types and peculiarities of well data acquisition and processing hardware and software are discussed (petrophysics included). New well-logging technologies used in Russia (new methods of electric logging data processing, electromagnetic logging, pulse neutron logging, nuclear magnetic resonance logging, acoustic tomography, logging-testing-logging technique, etc.) are surveyed. Comparison of the Tengiz field (Kazakhstan) well data obtained by Schlumberger and Neftegazgeofizika Association crews is given. Several problems and drawbacks in equipment and technology used by well-logging crews in Russia are discussed.

Savostyanov, N.A. (Neftegazgeofizika, Moscow (Russian Federation))

1993-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

314

Wellness Offerings September 17, 2009  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Wellness Offerings September 17, 2009 Vendor Health Risk Assessment Online Content and Decision (Wellness Partners: American Specialty Health) !" !" !" !" !" !" !" !" Blue Shield of CA !" !" !" !" !" !" !" !" CIGNA (Wellness and DM Partner: Healthways) !" !" !" ! HealthNet !" !" !" ! Kaiser

Kay, Mark A.

315

Well Permits (District of Columbia)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Well permits are required for the installation of wells in private and public space. Wells are defined as any trest hole, shaft, or soil excavation created by any means including, but not limited...

316

Decoupled overlapping grids for the numerical modeling of oil wells  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Accurate computation of time-dependent well bore pressure is important in well test analysis - a branch of petroleum engineering where reservoir properties are estimated by comparing measured pressure responses at an oil well to results from a mathematical ... Keywords: Numerical well test analysis, Overlapping grids, Reservoir simulation

Nneoma Ogbonna; Dugald B. Duncan

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

317

Productivity index of multilateral wells.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??In the history of petroleum science there are a vast variety of productivity solutions for different well types, well configurations and flow regimes. The main… (more)

Nunsavathu, Upender Naik.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

318

Connecticut Wells | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Connecticut Wells Jump to: navigation, search Name Connecticut Wells Place Bethlehem, Connecticut Zip 6751 Sector Geothermal energy Product A Connecticut-based geothermal heat pump...

319

Wellness Program | Department of Energy  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Program Wellness Program Workers spend 200 hours per month at work, and keeping a healthy work-life balance is essential. The Headquarters Wellness Program provides support and...

320

Single-Well and Cross-Well Seismic At Salt Wells Area (Bureau of Land  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Single-Well and Cross-Well Seismic At Salt Wells Area (Bureau of Land Single-Well and Cross-Well Seismic At Salt Wells Area (Bureau of Land Management, 2009) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Single-Well and Cross-Well Seismic At Salt Wells Area (Bureau of Land Management, 2009) Exploration Activity Details Location Salt Wells Geothermal Area Exploration Technique Single-Well And Cross-Well Seismic Activity Date 2008 - 2008 Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Exploration Basis Vulcan increased exploration efforts in the summer and fall of 2008, during which time the company drilled two temperature gradient holes (86-15 O on Pad 1 and 17-16 O on Pad 3); conducted seismic, gravity and magnetotelluric surveys; and drilled deep exploration wells at Pads 6 and 8 and binary

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While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Single Well Injection Withdrawl Tracer Tests for Proppant ...  

A large question preventing optimal natural gas production from "hydrofracked" shales is how far proppants, injected to keep shale fractures open, ...

322

WELLNESS LIFESTYLE AGREEMENT COMMITMENT FORM  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

WELLNESS LIFESTYLE AGREEMENT COMMITMENT FORM The Wellness Lifestyle Program is located in Reynolds will actively participate in the wellness program to make Reynolds Hall a healthy and supportive place or more consequences: conduct referral; administrative removal from the Wellness Program and

Weston, Ken

323

Well-pump alignment system  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An improved well-pump for geothermal wells, an alignment system for a well-pump, and to a method for aligning a rotor and stator within a well-pump are disclosed, wherein the well-pump has a whistle assembly formed at a bottom portion thereof, such that variations in the frequency of the whistle, indicating misalignment, may be monitored during pumping. 6 figs.

Drumheller, D.S.

1998-10-20T23:59:59.000Z

324

Test Automation Test Automation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Test Automation Test Automation Mohammad Mousavi Eindhoven University of Technology, The Netherlands Software Testing 2013 Mousavi: Test Automation #12;Test Automation Outline Test Automation Mousavi: Test Automation #12;Test Automation Why? Challenges of Manual Testing Test-case design: Choosing inputs

Mousavi, Mohammad

325

Ultra Thin Quantum Well Materials  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This project has enabled Hi-Z technology Inc. (Hi-Z) to understand how to improve the thermoelectric properties of Si/SiGe Quantum Well Thermoelectric Materials. The research that was completed under this project has enabled Hi-Z Technology, Inc. (Hi-Z) to satisfy the project goal to understand how to improve thermoelectric conversion efficiency and reduce costs by fabricating ultra thin Si/SiGe quantum well (QW) materials and measuring their properties. In addition, Hi-Z gained critical new understanding on how thin film fabrication increases the silicon substrate's electrical conductivity, which is important new knowledge to develop critical material fabrication parameters. QW materials are constructed with alternate layers of an electrical conductor, SiGe and an electrical insulator, Si. Film thicknesses were varied, ranging from 2nm to 10nm where 10 nm was the original film thickness prior to this work. The optimum performance was determined at a Si and SiGe thickness of 4nm for an electrical current and heat flow parallel to the films, which was an important conclusion of this work. Essential new information was obtained on how the Si substrate electrical conductivity increases by up to an order of magnitude upon deposition of QW films. Test measurements and calculations are accurate and include both the quantum well and the substrate. The large increase in substrate electrical conductivity means that a larger portion of the electrical current passes through the substrate. The silicon substrate's increased electrical conductivity is due to inherent impurities and thermal donors which are activated during both molecular beam epitaxy and sputtering deposition of QW materials. Hi-Z's forward looking cost estimations based on future high performance QW modules, in which the best Seebeck coefficient and electrical resistivity are taken from separate samples predict that the electricity cost produced with a QW module could be achieved at price would open many markets for waste heat recovery applications. By installing Hi-Z's materials in applications in which electricity could be produced from waste heat sources could result in significant energy savings as well as emissions reductions. For example, if QW thermoelectric generators could be introduced commercially in 2015, and assuming they could also capture an additional 0.1%/year of the available waste heat from the aluminum, steel, and iron industries, then by 2020, their use would lead to a 2.53 trillion Btu/year reduction in energy consumption. This translates to a $12.9 million/year energy savings, and 383.6 million lb's of CO2 emissions reduction per year. Additionally, Hi-Z would expect that the use of QW TE devices in the automotive, manufacturing, and energy generation industries would reduce the USA's petroleum and fossil fuel dependence, and thus significantly reduce emissions from CO2 and other polluting gasses such as NOx, SOx, and particulate matter (PM), etc.

Dr Saeid Ghamaty

2012-08-16T23:59:59.000Z

326

Ultra Thin Quantum Well Materials  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This project has enabled Hi-Z technology Inc. (Hi-Z) to understand how to improve the thermoelectric properties of Si/SiGe Quantum Well Thermoelectric Materials. The research that was completed under this project has enabled Hi-Z Technology, Inc. (Hi-Z) to satisfy the project goal to understand how to improve thermoelectric conversion efficiency and reduce costs by fabricating ultra thin Si/SiGe quantum well (QW) materials and measuring their properties. In addition, Hi-Z gained critical new understanding on how thin film fabrication increases the silicon substrate's electrical conductivity, which is important new knowledge to develop critical material fabrication parameters. QW materials are constructed with alternate layers of an electrical conductor, SiGe and an electrical insulator, Si. Film thicknesses were varied, ranging from 2nm to 10nm where 10 nm was the original film thickness prior to this work. The optimum performance was determined at a Si and SiGe thickness of 4nm for an electrical current and heat flow parallel to the films, which was an important conclusion of this work. Essential new information was obtained on how the Si substrate electrical conductivity increases by up to an order of magnitude upon deposition of QW films. Test measurements and calculations are accurate and include both the quantum well and the substrate. The large increase in substrate electrical conductivity means that a larger portion of the electrical current passes through the substrate. The silicon substrate's increased electrical conductivity is due to inherent impurities and thermal donors which are activated during both molecular beam epitaxy and sputtering deposition of QW materials. Hi-Z's forward looking cost estimations based on future high performance QW modules, in which the best Seebeck coefficient and electrical resistivity are taken from separate samples predict that the electricity cost produced with a QW module could be achieved at <$0.35/W. This price would open many markets for waste heat recovery applications. By installing Hi-Z's materials in applications in which electricity could be produced from waste heat sources could result in significant energy savings as well as emissions reductions. For example, if QW thermoelectric generators could be introduced commercially in 2015, and assuming they could also capture an additional 0.1%/year of the available waste heat from the aluminum, steel, and iron industries, then by 2020, their use would lead to a 2.53 trillion Btu/year reduction in energy consumption. This translates to a $12.9 million/year energy savings, and 383.6 million lb's of CO2 emissions reduction per year. Additionally, Hi-Z would expect that the use of QW TE devices in the automotive, manufacturing, and energy generation industries would reduce the USA's petroleum and fossil fuel dependence, and thus significantly reduce emissions from CO2 and other polluting gasses such as NOx, SOx, and particulate matter (PM), etc.

Dr Saeid Ghamaty

2012-08-16T23:59:59.000Z

327

Raft River well stimulation experiments: geothermal reservoir well stimulation program  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Geothermal Reservoir Well Stimulation Program (GRWSP) performed two field experiments at the Raft River KGRA in 1979. Wells RRGP-4 and RRGP-5 were selected for the hydraulic fracture stimulation treatments. The well selection process, fracture treatment design, field execution, stimulation results, and pre- and post-job evaluations are presented.

Not Available

1980-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

328

Regional well-log correlation in the New Mexico portion of the Delaware Basin  

SciTech Connect

Although well logs provide the most complete record of stratigraphy and structure in the northern Delaware Basin, regional interpretations of these logs generate problems of ambiguous lithologic signatures and on-hole anomalies. Interpretation must therefore be based on log-to-log correlation rather than on inferences from single logs. In this report, logs from 276 wells were used to make stratigraphic picks of Ochoan horizons (the Rustler, Salado, and Castile Formations) in the New Mexico portion of the Delaware Basin. Current log correlation suggests that: (1) the Castile is characterized by lateral thickening and thinning; (2) some Castile thinnings are of Permian age; (3) irregular topography in the Guadalupian Bell Canyon Formation may produce apparent structures in the overlying Ochoan units; and (4) extensive dissolution of the Salado is not apparent in the area of the Waste Isolation Pilot Project (WIPP) site. 13 refs., 37 figs.

Borns, D.J.; Shaffer, S.E.

1985-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

329

Completion report: Raft River Geothermal Production Well Four (RRGP-4)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The fourth Raft River well was originally drilled to 866 m (2840 ft), for use as a test injection well. This well allowed the injection of geothermal fluids into the intermediate zone--above the geothermal production zone and below the shallow groundwater aquifers. After this testing, the well was deepened and cased for use as a production well. The well's designation was changed from RRGI-4 to RRGP-4. This report describes the drilling and completion of both drilling projects. Results of well tests are also included.

Miller, L.G.; Prestwich, S.M.

1979-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

330

Optimization of fractured well performance of horizontal gas wells  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In low-permeability gas reservoirs, horizontal wells have been used to increase the reservoir contact area, and hydraulic fracturing has been further extending the contact between wellbores and reservoirs. This thesis presents an approach to evaluate horizontal well performance for fractured or unfractured gas wells and a sensitivity study of gas well performance in a low permeability formation. A newly developed Distributed Volumetric Sources (DVS) method was used to calculate dimensionless productivity index for a defined source in a box-shaped domain. The unique features of the DVS method are that it can be applied to transient flow and pseudo-steady state flow with a smooth transition between the boundary conditions. In this study, I conducted well performance studies by applying the DVS method to typical tight sandstone gas wells in the US basins. The objective is to determine the best practice to produce horizontal gas wells. For fractured wells, well performance of a single fracture and multiple fractures are compared, and the effect of the number of fractures on productivity of the well is presented based on the well productivity. The results from this study show that every basin has a unique ideal set of fracture number and fracture length. Permeability plays an important role on dictating the location and the dimension of the fractures. This study indicated that in order to achieve optimum production, the lower the permeability of the formation, the higher the number of fractures.

Magalhaes, Fellipe Vieira

2007-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

331

Geologic controls influencing CO2 loss from a leaking well.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Injection of CO2 into formations containing brine is proposed as a long-term sequestration solution. A significant obstacle to sequestration performance is the presence of existing wells providing a transport pathway out of the sequestration formation. To understand how heterogeneity impacts the leakage rate, we employ two dimensional models of the CO2 injection process into a sandstone aquifer with shale inclusions to examine the parameters controlling release through an existing well. This scenario is modeled as a constant-rate injection of super-critical CO2 into the existing formation where buoyancy effects, relative permeabilities, and capillary pressures are employed. Three geologic controls are considered: stratigraphic dip angle, shale inclusion size and shale fraction. In this study, we examine the impact of heterogeneity on the amount and timing of CO2 released through a leaky well. Sensitivity analysis is performed to classify how various geologic controls influence CO2 loss. A 'Design of Experiments' approach is used to identify the most important parameters and combinations of parameters to control CO2 migration while making efficient use of a limited number of computations. Results are used to construct a low-dimensional description of the transport scenario. The goal of this exploration is to develop a small set of parametric descriptors that can be generalized to similar scenarios. Results of this work will allow for estimation of the amount of CO2 that will be lost for a given scenario prior to commencing injection. Additionally, two-dimensional and three-dimensional simulations are compared to quantify the influence that surrounding geologic media has on the CO2 leakage rate.

Hopkins, Polly L.; Martinez, Mario J.; McKenna, Sean Andrew; Klise, Katherine A.

2010-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

332

Assessment of Injection Well Construction and Operation for Water Injection Wells and Salt Water Disposal Wells  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Assessment of Injection Well Construction and Operation for Water Injection Wells and Salt Water Disposal Wells in the Nine Township Area ­ 2009 September 2009 Prepared by Delaware Basin Drilling from EPA to DOE dated 7/16/2009) 1 Solution Mining Practices 1 Recent Well Failures 2 The Mechanism

333

Indiana Memorial Union Wells Library  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Franklin Hall Bryan Hall Law Indiana Memorial Union Jordan Hall Morrison Hall Wells Library Loop (0.5 miles) IMU to Greenhouse (0.3 miles) Business to Law School (0.75 miles) Wells Library to Morrison Hall (0.5 miles) Wells Library to Muisc Library (0.4 miles) #12;

Indiana University

334

Wellness Program | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Program Program Wellness Program Workers spend 200 hours per month at work, and keeping a healthy work-life balance is essential. The Headquarters Wellness Program provides support and assistance to DOE employees through a variety of programs and resources geared toward enhancing their mental and physical well-being. Wellness programs include: Accommodations, the Child Development Centers, the Employee Assistance Program (EAP), the Forrestal (FOHO) and Germantown (GOHO) Fitness Centers, the Occupational Health Clinics and the DOE WorkLife4You Program. Programs Disability Services Child Development Centers Headquarters Employee Assistance Program (EAP) Headquarters Occupational Health Clinics Headquarters Accommodation Program DOE Worklife4You Program Health Foreign Travel Health & Wellness Tips

335

Tubular well tool receiving conduit  

SciTech Connect

In combination, a well packer and a tubular well tool receiving conduit are described which consists of: a well packer having an expandable and retractable anchoring teeth and an expandable and retractable seal spaced from the anchoring teeth, a tubular well conduit including, a first plurality of circularly extending grooves on the inside of the conduit for coacting with the anchoring teeth for supporting the well tool in the conduit, a second plurality of circularly extending grooves on the inside of the conduit and positioned for coacting with the expandable seal for providing multiple seal points with the seal.

Durst, D.G.; Morris, A.J.

1986-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

336

well records | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

well records well records Dataset Summary Description The Alabama State Oil and Gas Board publishes well record permits to the public as they are approved. This dataset is comprised of 50 recent well record permits from 2/9/11 - 3/18/11. The dataset lists the well name, county, operator, field, and date approved, among other fields. State's make oil and gas data publicly available for a range of topics. Source Geological Survey of Alabama Date Released February 09th, 2011 (3 years ago) Date Updated March 18th, 2011 (3 years ago) Keywords Alabama board gas oil state well records Data application/vnd.ms-excel icon Well records 2/9/11 - 3/18/11 (xls, 28.7 KiB) Quality Metrics Level of Review Some Review Comment Temporal and Spatial Coverage Frequency Time Period License License Open Data Commons Attribution License

337

Gas Production From a Cold, Stratigraphically Bounded Hydrate Deposit at the Mount Elbert Site, North Slope, Alaska  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Mallik 2002 Gas Hydrate Production Research Well Program,Of Methane Hydrate Production Methods To Reservoirs WithNumerical Studies of Gas Production From Methane Hydrates,

Moridis, G.J.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

338

Natural Gas Wells Near Project Rulison  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

for for Natural Gas Wells Near Project Rulison Second Quarter 2013 U.S. Department of Energy Office of Legacy Management Grand Junction, Colorado Date Sampled: April 3, 2013 Background: Project Rulison was the second underground nuclear test under the Plowshare Program to stimulate natural-gas recovery from deep, low-permeability formations. On September 10, 1969, a 40-kiloton-yield nuclear device was detonated 8,426 feet (1.6 miles) below the ground surface in the Williams Fork Formation, at what is now the Rulison, Colorado, Site. Following the detonation, a series of production tests were conducted. Afterward, the site was shut down and then remediated, and the emplacement well (R-E) and the reentry well (R-Ex) were plugged. Purpose: As part of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Legacy Management (LM) mission

339

Water Well Data Elements Well Header Tab Page  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Water producing from Lithologic formation from which water is produced. at depth Top of water producing formation (ft) to Base of water producing formation (ft) Static water level Static water level below casingWater Well Data Elements Well Header Tab Page: This list contains location and identification

Frank, Thomas D.

340

Stratigraphy of the PB-1 well, Nopal I uranium deposit, Sierra Pena Blanca, Chihuahua, Mexico  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The concept of source rock and concentration mechanism:source term, and only address flow and transport of radionuclides in general terms. However, detailed stratigraphic and rock-

Dobson, P.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "wells stratigraphic tests" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Session: Long Valley Exploratory Well  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This session at the Geothermal Energy Program Review X: Geothermal Energy and the Utility Market consisted of four presentations: ''Long Valley Exploratory Well - Summary'' by George P. Tennyson, Jr.; ''The Long Valley Well - Phase II Operations'' by John T. Finger; ''Geologic results from the Long Valley Exploratory Well'' by John C. Eichelberger; and ''A Model for Large-Scale Thermal Convection in the Long Valley Geothermal Region'' by Charles E. Hickox.

Tennyson, George P. Jr.; Finger, John T.; Eichelberger, John C.; Hickox, Charles E.

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

342

OpenEI - well records  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

http:en.openei.orgdatasetstaxonomyterm4320 en Alabama State Oil and Gas Board: Oil Well Records (2911 - 31811) http:en.openei.orgdatasetsnode469

The Alabama...

343

DOE Solar Decathlon: Wells Fargo  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

greenhouse gas emissions and building sustainably, Wells Fargo serves one in three households in the United States and has been widely recognized for sustainability leadership in...

344

Fundamentals of horizontal well completions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Oil and gas wells are drilled horizontally for a variety of reasons, chiefly to improve production without drilling multiple vertical wells and to prevent water or gas coning. Benefits of horizontal drilling are well documented. This article addresses the fundamentals of completing a horizontal well, discussing completion by (1) open hole, (2) casing packers, (3) slotted or perforated liner, and (4) cemented casing/liner. Completion methods 1 through 3 are generally known as ''drain hole'' completions, and method 4 is commonly called the ''case hole'' or ''stimulated'' completion.

Austin, C.; Zimmerman, C.; Sullaway, B.; Sabins, F.

1988-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

345

Well drilling apparatus and method  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Well drilling rates may be increased by impelling projectiles to fracture rock formations and drilling with rock drill bits through the projectile fractured rock.

Alvis, Robert L. (Albuquerque, NM); Newsom, Melvin M. (Albuquerque, NM)

1977-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

346

Comprehensive study of LASL Well C/T-2 Roosevelt Hot Springs KGRA, Utah, and applications to geothermal well logging  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Utah State Geothermal Well 9-1 in the Roosevelt Hot Springs KGRA, Beaver County, Utah, has been donated by Phillips Petroleum Company for calibration and testing of well-logging equipment in the hot, corrosive, geothermal environment. It is the second Calibration/Test Well (C/T-2) in the Geothermal Log Interpretation Program. A study of cuttings and well logs from Well C/T-2 was completed. This synthesis and data presentation contains most of the subsurface geologic information needed to effect the total evaluation of geophysical logs acquired in this geothermal calibration/test well, C/T-2.

Glenn, W.E.; Hulen, J.B.; Nielson, D.L.

1981-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

347

What's new in well control  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Drillers know that the most important tools used in well control are preparation and knowledge. That fact is reinforced by government agency requirements for certification of responsible people on the rig, particularly in sensitive public areas like offshore waters. And existing problems like shallow gas blowouts and kick control in conventional wells have been complicated by industry's move to horizontal wells and underbalanced drilling. The International Association of Drilling Contractors (IADC) in the US and Europe is devoting a major effort to well control technology. It sponsored a comprehensive conference in Houston in November 1993, plus a well control trainer's Roundtable meeting in Houston in March. The IADC Well Control Conference for Europe is scheduled for June 8--10, 1994, in Stavanger, Norway, with an important 22-paper program. In this article, World Oil has selected several presentations from the two US IADC conferences noted above. These selections are noted by the authors as being of wide and current interest to the industry, they include: (1) horizontal well considerations, (2) a proposed new well killing method, (3) underbalanced drilling, (4) a new onsite simulator, and (5) IADC's school accreditation program. Summaries shown here cover only major topics. Original papers should be consulted for important details.

Snyder, R.E.

1994-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

348

Well descriptions for geothermal drilling  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Generic well models have been constructed for eight major geothermal resource areas. The models define representative times and costs associated with the individual operations that can be expected during drilling and completion of geothermal wells. They were made for and have been used to evaluate the impacts of potential new technologies. Their nature, their construction, and their validation are discussed.

Carson, C.C.; Livesay, B.J.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

349

Method for drilling directional wells  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A method is described of locating a substantially horizontal bed of interest in a formation and maintaining a drill string therein during the drilling operation, said drill string including a measurement-while-drilling (MWD) electromagnetic propagation resistivity sensor, comprising the steps of: drilling a substantially vertical offset well in a formation having at least one selected substantially horizontal bed therein; measuring resistivity in the formation at the offset well to provide a first resistivity log as a function of depth; modeling the substantially horizontal bed to provide a modeled resistivity log indicative of the resistivity taken along the substantially horizontal bed, said modeling being based on said first resistivity log; drilling a directional well in said formation near said offset well, a portion of said directional well being disposed in said substantially horizontal bed; measuring resistivity in said directional well using the MWD electromagnetic propagation resistivity sensor to provide a second log of resistivity taken substantially horizontally; comparing said second log to said modeled log to determine the location of said directional well; and adjusting the directional drilling operation so as to maintain said drill string within said substantially horizontal bed during the drilling of said directional well in response to said comparing step.

Wu, Jianwu; Wisler, M.M.

1993-07-27T23:59:59.000Z

350

Square wells, quantum wells and ultra-thin metallic films  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The eigenvalue equations for the energy of bound states of a particle in a square well are solved, and the exact solutions are obtained, as power series. Accurate analytical approximate solutions are also given. The application of these results in the physics of quantum wells are discussed,especially for ultra-thin metallic films, but also in the case of resonant cavities, heterojunction lasers, revivals and super-revivals.

Victor Barsan

2013-07-09T23:59:59.000Z

351

MARGINAL EXPENSE OIL WELL WIRELESS SURVEILLANCE MEOWS  

SciTech Connect

A marginal expense oil well wireless surveillance system to monitor system performance and production from rod-pumped wells in real time from wells operated by Vaquero Energy in the Edison Field, Main Area of Kern County in California has been successfully designed and field tested. The surveillance system includes a proprietary flow sensor, a programmable transmitting unit, a base receiver and receiving antenna, and a base station computer equipped with software to interpret the data. First, the system design is presented. Second, field data obtained from three wells is shown. Results of the study show that an effective, cost competitive, real-time wireless surveillance system can be introduced to oil fields across the United States and the world.

Mason M. Medizade; John R. Ridgely; Donald G. Nelson

2004-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

352

Gas Production From a Cold, Stratigraphically Bounded Hydrate Deposit at the Mount Elbert Site, North Slope, Alaska  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and cumulative mass of produced water (M W ); the remainingthe cumulative mass of produced water M w increases with aproduced at the well, or remaining in the deposit as free gas (V R , V P and V F , respectively); water

Moridis, G.J.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

353

Geothermal-well design handbook  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A simplified process is presented for estimating the performance of geothermal wells which are produced by natural, flashing flows. The well diameter and depth, and reservoir conditions must be known; then it is possible to determine the total pressure drop in a flowing well, and therefore to find the fluid pressure, temperature, and steam quality at the wellhead. By applying the handbook process to several input data sets, the user can compile sufficient information to determine the interdependence of input and output parameters. (MHR)

Not Available

1982-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

354

Geothermal Well Site Restoration and Plug and Abandonment of Wells  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A report is presented on the final phase of an energy research program conducted by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) involving two geothermal well sites in the State of Louisiana-the Gladys McCall site and the Willis Hulin site. The research program was intended to improve geothermal technology and to determine the efficacy of producing electricity commercially from geopressured resource sites. The final phase of the program consisted of plug and abandonment (P&A) of the wells and restoration of the well sites. Restoration involved (a) initial soil and water sampling and analysis; (b) removal and disposal of well pads, concrete, utility poles, and trash; (c) plugging of monitor and freshwater wells; and (d) site leveling and general cleanup. Restoration of the McCall site required removal of naturally occurring radioactive material (NORM), which was costly and time-consuming. Exhibits are included that provide copies of work permits and authorizations, P&A reports and procedures, daily workover and current conditions report, and cost and salvage reports. Site locations, grid maps, and photographs are provided.

Rinehart, Ben N.

1994-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

355

Well servicing rig market report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This article profiles the well servicing industry, focusing on the problems facing the industry under currently depressed market conditions. The problems of rising operating costs, oil price uncertainty, and aging equipment are addressed specifically.

Killalea, M

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

356

ADVANCED CEMENTS FOR GEOTHERMAL WELLS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Using the conventional well cements consisting of the calcium silicate hydrates (CaO-SiO{sub 2}-H{sub 2}O system) and calcium aluminum silicate hydrates (CaO-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}-SiO{sub 2}-H{sub 2}O system) for the integrity of geothermal wells, the serious concern confronting the cementing industries was their poor performance in mechanically supporting the metallic well casing pipes and in mitigating the pipe's corrosion in very harsh geothermal reservoirs. These difficulties are particularly acute in two geological regions: One is the deep hot downhole area ({approx} 1700 m depth at temperatures of {approx} 320 C) that contains hyper saline water with high concentrations of CO{sub 2} (> 40,000 ppm) in conjunction with {approx} 100 ppm H{sub 2}S at a mild acid of pH {approx} 5.0; the other is the upper well region between the well's surface and {approx} 1000 m depth at temperatures up to 200 C. The specific environment of the latter region is characterized by highly concentrated H{sub 2}SO{sub 4} (pH strength of cements, lowering the mechanical support of casing pipes, but also increased the extent of permeability of the brine through the cement layer, promoting the rate of the pipe's corrosion. Severely carbonated and acid eroded cements often impaired the integrity of a well in less than one year; in the worst cases, casings have collapsed within three months, leading to the need for costly and time-consuming repairs or redrilling operations. These were the reasons why the geothermal well drilling and cementing industries were concerned about using conventional well cements, and further their deterioration was a major impediment in expediting the development of geothermal energy resources.

SUGAMA,T.

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

357

Geothermal energy well casing seal  

SciTech Connect

A geothermal energy transfer and utilization system makes use of thermal energy stored in hot solute-bearing well water to generate super-heated steam from an injected flow of clean water. The super-heated steam is then used for operating a turbine-driven pump at the well bottom for pumping the hot solute-bearing water at high pressure and in liquid state to the earth's surface, where it is used by transfer of its heat to a closed-loop steam generator-turbine-alternator combination for the beneficial generation of electrical or other power. Residual concentrated solute-bearing water is pumped back into the earth. The clean cooled water regenerated at the surface-located system is returned to the deep well pumping system also for lubrication of a fluid bearing arrangement supporting the turbine-driven pump system. The deep well pump system is supported within the well casing pipe from the earth's surface by the turbine exhaust steam conduit. In view of differential expansion effects on the relative lengths of the casing pipe and the exhaust steam conduit, a novel flexible seal is provided between the suspended turbine-pump system and the well pipe casing. 9 claims, 2 drawing figures.

Matthews, H.B.

1976-07-06T23:59:59.000Z

358

Quantum well multijunction photovoltaic cell  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A monolithic, quantum well, multilayer photovoltaic cell comprises a p-n junction comprising a p-region on one side and an n-region on the other side, each of which regions comprises a series of at least three semiconductor layers, all p-type in the p-region and all n-type in the n-region; each of said series of layers comprising alternating barrier and quantum well layers, each barrier layer comprising a semiconductor material having a first bandgap and each quantum well layer comprising a semiconductor material having a second bandgap when in bulk thickness which is narrower than said first bandgap, the barrier layers sandwiching each quantum well layer and each quantum well layer being sufficiently thin that the width of its bandgap is between said first and second bandgaps, such that radiation incident on said cell and above an energy determined by the bandgap of the quantum well layers will be absorbed and will produce an electrical potential across said junction.

Chaffin, R.J.; Osbourn, G.C.

1983-07-08T23:59:59.000Z

359

Quantum well multijunction photovoltaic cell  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A monolithic, quantum well, multilayer photovoltaic cell comprises a p-n junction comprising a p-region on one side and an n-region on the other side, each of which regions comprises a series of at least three semiconductor layers, all p-type in the p-region and all n-type in the n-region; each of said series of layers comprising alternating barrier and quantum well layers, each barrier layer comprising a semiconductor material having a first bandgap and each quantum well layer comprising a semiconductor material having a second bandgap when in bulk thickness which is narrower than said first bandgap, the barrier layers sandwiching each quantum well layer and each quantum well layer being sufficiently thin that the width of its bandgap is between said first and second bandgaps, such that radiation incident on said cell and above an energy determined by the bandgap of the quantum well layers will be absorbed and will produce an electrical potential across said junction.

Chaffin, Roger J. (Albuquerque, NM); Osbourn, Gordon C. (Albuquerque, NM)

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

360

Well record | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Well record Well record Dataset Summary Description This dataset contains oil and gas drilling and permit records for February 2011. State oil and gas boards and commissions make oil and gas data and information open to the public. To view the full range of data contained at the Alaska Oil and Gas Conservation Commission, visit http://doa.alaska.gov/ogc/ Source Alaska Oil and Gas Conservation Commission Date Released February 28th, 2011 (3 years ago) Date Updated Unknown Keywords Alaska Commission gas oil Well record Data application/vnd.ms-excel icon http://doa.alaska.gov/ogc/drilling/dindex.html (xls, 34.3 KiB) Quality Metrics Level of Review Some Review Comment Temporal and Spatial Coverage Frequency Monthly Time Period License License Open Data Commons Public Domain Dedication and Licence (PDDL)

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "wells stratigraphic tests" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Single-Well and Cross-Well Seismic At Salt Wells Area (Bureau...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

temperature gradient holes (86-15 O on Pad 1 and 17-16 O on Pad 3); conducted seismic, gravity and magnetotelluric surveys; and drilled deep exploration wells at Pads 6 and 8 and...

362

Subsurface steam sampling in Geysers wells  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A new downhole sampling tool has been built for use in steam wells at The Geysers geothermal reservoir. The tool condenses specimens into an initially evacuated vessel that is opened down hole at the direction of an on-board computer. The tool makes a temperature log of the well as it is deployed, and the pressure and temperature of collected specimens are monitored for diagnostic purposes. Initial tests were encouraging, and the Department of Energy has funded an expanded effort that includes data gathering needed to develop a three-dimensional model of The Geysers geochemical environment. Collected data will be useful for understanding the origins of hydrogen chloride and non-condensable gases in the steam, as well as tracking the effect of injection on the composition of produced steam. Interested parties are invited to observe the work and to join the program.

Lysne, P. [Lysne (Peter), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Koenig, B. [Unocal Geothermal and Power Operations Group, Santa Rose, CA (United States); Hirtz, P. [Thermochem, Inc., Santa Rosa, CA (United States); Normann, R.; Henfling, J. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

363

ADVANCED CEMENTS FOR GEOTHERMAL WELLS  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Using the conventional well cements consisting of the calcium silicate hydrates (CaO-SiO{sub 2}-H{sub 2}O system) and calcium aluminum silicate hydrates (CaO-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}-SiO{sub 2}-H{sub 2}O system) for the integrity of geothermal wells, the serious concern confronting the cementing industries was their poor performance in mechanically supporting the metallic well casing pipes and in mitigating the pipe's corrosion in very harsh geothermal reservoirs. These difficulties are particularly acute in two geological regions: One is the deep hot downhole area ({approx} 1700 m depth at temperatures of {approx} 320 C) that contains hyper saline water with high concentrations of CO{sub 2} (> 40,000 ppm) in conjunction with {approx} 100 ppm H{sub 2}S at a mild acid of pH {approx} 5.0; the other is the upper well region between the well's surface and {approx} 1000 m depth at temperatures up to 200 C. The specific environment of the latter region is characterized by highly concentrated H{sub 2}SO{sub 4} (pH < 1.5) brine containing at least 5000 ppm CO{sub 2}. When these conventional cements are emplaced in these harsh environments, their major shortcoming is their susceptibility to reactions with hot CO{sub 2} and H{sub 2}SO4, thereby causing their deterioration brought about by CO{sub 2}-catalyzed carbonation and acid-initiated erosion. Such degradation not only reduced rapidly the strength of cements, lowering the mechanical support of casing pipes, but also increased the extent of permeability of the brine through the cement layer, promoting the rate of the pipe's corrosion. Severely carbonated and acid eroded cements often impaired the integrity of a well in less than one year; in the worst cases, casings have collapsed within three months, leading to the need for costly and time-consuming repairs or redrilling operations. These were the reasons why the geothermal well drilling and cementing industries were concerned about using conventional well cements, and further their deterioration was a major impediment in expediting the development of geothermal energy resources.

SUGAMA,T.

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

364

Process for cementing geothermal wells  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A pumpable slurry of coal-filled furfuryl alcohol, furfural, and/or a low molecular weight mono- or copolymer thereof containing, preferably, a catalytic amount of a soluble acid catalyst is used to cement a casing in a geothermal well.

Eilers, Louis H. (Inola, OK)

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

365

Advanced Technologies For Stripper Gas Well Enhancement  

SciTech Connect

Stripper gas and oil well operators frequently face a dilemma regarding maximizing production from low-productivity wells. With thousands of stripper wells in the United States covering extensive acreage, it is difficult to identify easily and efficiently marginal or underperforming wells. In addition, the magnitude of reviewing vast amounts of data places a strain on an operator's work force and financial resources. Schlumberger DCS, in cooperation with the National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) and the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), has created software and developed in-house analysis methods to identify remediation potential in stripper wells relatively easily. This software is referred to as Stripper Well Analysis Remediation Methodology (SWARM). SWARM was beta-tested with data pertaining to two gas fields located in northwestern Pennsylvania and had notable results. Great Lakes Energy Partners, LLC (Great Lakes) and Belden & Blake Corporation (B&B) both operate wells in the first field studied. They provided data for 729 wells, and we estimated that 41 wells were candidates for remediation. However, for reasons unbeknownst to Schlumberger these wells were not budgeted for rework by the operators. The second field (Cooperstown) is located in Crawford, Venango, and Warren counties, Pa and has more than 2,200 wells operated by Great Lakes. This paper discusses in depth the successful results of a candidate recognition study of this area. We compared each well's historical production with that of its offsets and identified 339 underperformers before considering remediation costs, and 168 economically viable candidates based on restimulation costs of $50,000 per well. From this data, we prioritized a list based on the expected incremental recoverable gas and 10% discounted net present value (NPV). For this study, we calculated the incremental gas by subtracting the volumes forecasted after remediation from the production projected at its current configuration. Assuming that remediation efforts increased production from the 168 marginal wells to the average of their respective offsets, approximately 6.4 Bscf of gross incremental gas with a NPV approximating $4.9 million after investment, would be made available to the domestic market. Seventeen wells have successfully been restimulated to date and have already obtained significant production increases. At the time of this report, eight of these wells had enough post-rework production data available to forecast the incremental gas and verify the project's success. This incremental gas is estimated at 615 MMscf. The outcome of the other ten wells will be determined after more post-refrac production data becomes available. Plans are currently underway for future restimulations. The success of this project has shown the value of this methodology to recognize underperforming wells quickly and efficiently in fields containing hundreds or thousands of wells. This contributes considerably to corporate net income and domestic natural gas and/or oil reserves.

Ronald J. MacDonald; Charles M. Boyer; Joseph H. Frantz Jr; Paul A. Zyglowicz

2005-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

366

Dual valve well pump installation  

SciTech Connect

A reciprocating electric motor-pump assembly for lifting well fluid on downstroke of the motor pump assembly, the pump including a barrel below the motor having dual combined inlet and outlet valve means at the lower end thereof, the pump piston moving in the barrel having annular grooves therearound to prevent differential pressure sticking, the electric cable supplying the electric motor being tubular to vent the pump and prevent vacuum or gas lock, there being a packer about the valve barrel separating the outlet valve means thereabove from the inlet valve means therebelow and a packer above the motor about a production tubing including an upper standing valve.

Holm, D. R.

1985-10-22T23:59:59.000Z

367

Submarine oil well production apparatus  

SciTech Connect

A submergible apparatus for producing an oil or gas well beneath the surface of a body of water consists of an oil and gas separator having a pair of elongated horizontal ballast tanks attached thereto and means for selectively filling the ballast tanks with water or air. A pair of movable buoyancy vessels is attached to the separator and means for selectively moving the buoyancy vessels to alternate positions with respect to the separator are provided so that the apparatus has maximum stability while being towed on the surface of the body of water or submerged therein. (16 claims)

McMinn, R.E.; Tournoux, P.M.; Milnes, D.S.

1973-08-28T23:59:59.000Z

368

Statistical Analysis of Geothermal Wells in the United States  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This study represents the first attempt to characterize the U.S. geothermal-hydrothermal resource from well data. The report contains field test data on more than 500 geothermal wells and includes statistical analyses of key well parameters. Utilities can use the information in planning and engineering analysis.

1987-07-24T23:59:59.000Z

369

Number of Producing Gas Wells  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Producing Gas Wells Producing Gas Wells Period: Annual Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources & Notes Definitions, Sources & Notes Area 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 View History U.S. 452,945 476,652 493,100 487,627 514,637 482,822 1989-2012 Alabama 6,591 6,860 6,913 7,026 7,063 6,327 1989-2012 Alaska 239 261 261 269 277 185 1989-2012 Arizona 7 6 6 5 5 5 1989-2012 Arkansas 4,773 5,592 6,314 7,397 8,388 8,538 1989-2012 California 1,540 1,645 1,643 1,580 1,308 1,423 1989-2012 Colorado 22,949 25,716 27,021 28,813 30,101 32,000 1989-2012 Gulf of Mexico 2,552 1,527 1,984 1,852 1,559 1,474 1998-2012 Illinois 43 45 51 50 40 40 1989-2012 Indiana 2,350 525 563 620 914 819 1989-2012 Kansas

370

Well simulation using Refrigerant 114  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A simple method for the investigation of thermodynamic (substance) similarity in the two-phase domain is introduced based on the assumptions of a simplified model fluid. According to this method, the investigation of the conditions for thermodynamic similarity between substances in the two-phase region reveals the important role the latent heat of evaporation (h/sub fg/) plays in the definition of the property scales. These greatly influence the dynamic and geometric similarity of the process under investigation. The introduction of the thermodynamic similarity property scales into the energy conservation equations for a certain process (e.g., flow up a geothermal well) brings forth a thermodynamic length scale and kinetic energy scale. Refrigerant 114 has been examined for similarity with water substance according to this method and found to be adequate for geothermal well simulation in the laboratory. Low pressures and temperatures and a substantial reduction of mass flow rates and geometric scales are a few of the advantages of using R114 for such experiments.

Nikitopoulos, D.E.; Dickinson, D.A.; DiPippo, R.; Maeder, P.F.

1984-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

371

Investigation and evaluation of geopressured-geothermal wells. Notes on Gruy Federal's Well-of-Opportunity program  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Obtaining test data from geopressured aquifers along the Texas and Louisiana Gulf Coast by arranging to assume operation of wells already drilled and found nonproductive of conventional oil or gas accumulations before such wells were abandoned by the operators is described. The geopressured aquifers were tested after performing whatever additional operations were required. The monitoring and screening of all wells which might qualify is described. The major activities and important milestones are summarized. (MHR)

Not Available

1979-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

372

Explosive stimulation of a geothermal well: GEOFRAC  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This paper describes the first known explosive stimulation successfully conducted in a geothermal well. Two tests were performed in a 2690-meter-(8826-ft.) deep Union Oil well at the Geysers field in Northern California in December 1981. The heat-resistant process, called GEOFRAC, uses a new unique, explosive HITEX 2, which is a nondetonable solid at room temperature. Upon melting at a temperature of 177[degrees]C (350[degrees]F), the HITEX 2 liquid becomes an explosive that can be safely heated to temperatures greater than 260[degrees]C (500[degrees]F). These unique properties of the explosive were exploited in the GEOFRAC process through the cooperative efforts of Physics International Company (PI), Rocket Research Company (RRC), Union oil Company (UO), and the university of California Los Alamos National Laboratories (LANL).

Mumma, D.M. (Physics International Co., San Leandro, CA (United States))

1982-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

373

Pressure-activated well perforating apparatus  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A well perforating technique utilizes a predetermined pressure difference developed at different points in the borehole to actuate the firing mechanism of a tubing conveyed perforating gun. A first embodiment incorporated as part of a well test string includes a packer for isolating a wellbore interval and a perforating gun connected in the string below the packer which is fired in response to development of a greater pressure in the annulus above the packer than in the isolated interval, thereby causing perforation at ''underbalanced'' conditions. A modified ''full-bore'' embodiment has an annular configuration firing mechanism as part of a tubing string and fires the perforating gun in response to development of a predetermined difference between the pressures at a point in the annulus and a point in the central bore of the tubing string.

Upchurch, J. M.

1985-12-24T23:59:59.000Z

374

Treating paraffin deposits in producing oil wells  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Paraffin deposition has been a problem for operators in many areas since the beginning of petroleum production from wells. An extensive literature search on paraffin problems and methods of control has been carried out, and contact was made with companies which provide chemicals to aid in the treatment of paraffin problems. A discussion of the nature of paraffins and the mechanisms of this deposition is presented. The methods of prevention and treatment of paraffin problems are summarized. Suggested procedures for handling paraffin problems are provided. Suggestions for areas of further research testing are given.

Noll, L.

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

375

Stratigraphic and structural framework of ellesmerian and older sequences in Sadlerochit and Shublik Mountains, Arctic National Wildlife Refuge (ANWR), northeastern Alaska  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Detailed geological mapping (1:25,000 scale) and stratigraphic reconstructions in the Sadlerochit and Shublik Mountains of northeastern Alaska, immediately south of the ANWR coastal plain, indicate a compressive structural province dominated by major thrust-ramp-related anticlinal uplifts. The Katakturuk Dolomite, a Proterozoic sequence, has been subdivided into 15 lithostratigraphic units that can be traced the entire length of both the Sadlerochit and Shublik Mountains. Overlying the Katakturuk Dolomite in these ranges in the Middle Devonian to Cambrian or older Nanook Limestone. In the Early Mississippian a major erosional event produced the pre-Mississippian unconformity upon which a Mississippian through Triassic sequence was deposited: Kayak Shale; Lisburne Group carbonates; and Sadlerochit Group clastic rocks. In the northern Sadlerochit Mountains, basal units of the Mississippian Alapah Limestone lie on the pre-Mississippian unconformity with no intervening Kayak Shale. The basal Alapah contains lithologies derived from the rock units on which it rests, indicating that the contact between the Alapah and the underlying units is depositional.

Robinson, M.S.; Decker, J.; Clough, J.G.; Dillon, J.T.

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

376

Stratigraphic and structural framework of Ellesmerian and older sequences in Sadlerochit and Shublik Mountains, Arctic National Wildlife Refuge (ANWR), northeastern Alaska  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Detailed geological mapping (1:25,000 scale) and stratigraphic reconstructions in the Sadlerochit and Shublik Mountains of northeastern Alaska, immediately south of the ANWR coastal plain, indicate a compressive structural province dominated by major thrust-ramp-related anticlinal uplifts. The Katakturuk Dolomite, a Proterozoic sequence, has been subdivided into 15 lithostratigraphic units that can be traced the entire length of both the Sadlerochit and Shublik Mountains. Overlying the Katakturuk Dolomite in these ranges is the Middle Devonian to Cambrian or older Nanook Limestone. In the Early Mississippian a major erosional event produced the pre-Mississippian unconformity upon which a Mississippian through Triassic sequence was deposited: (A) Kayak Shale; (B) Lisburne Group carbonates; and (C) Sadlerochit Group clastic rocks. In the northern Sadlerochit Mountains, basal units of the Mississippian Alapah Limestone lie on the pre-Mississippian unconformity with no intervening Kayak Shale. The basal Alapah contains lithologies derived from the rocks units on which it rests, indicating that the contact between the Alapah and the underlying units is depositional. A regional decollement, localized along the pre-Mississippian unconformity in the Kayak Shale, is not a significant detachment surface north of the Shublik Mountains because the Kayak Shale is depositionally discontinuous and thin in the Sadlerochit Mountains.

Robinson, M.S.; Decker, J.; Clough, J.G.; Dillon, J.T.; Wallace, W.K.; Crowder, K.; Watts, K. (Alaska Division of Geological and Geophysical Surveys, Fairbanks (USA))

1988-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

377

Hydraulically actuated well shifting tool  

SciTech Connect

This patent describes a hydraulically actuated shifting tool for actuating a sliding member in a well tool. It comprises: a housing having a hydraulic fluid bore therein; shifting dog means positioned on the housing for movement away and toward the housing; locking dog means positioned on the housing for movement away and toward the body; shifting dog hydraulic actuating means in fluid communication with the bore for causing engagement of the shifting dogs with the sliding member; locking dog hydraulic actuating means in communication with the bore for causing engagement of the locking dogs with the locking means; and hydraulic shifting means in communication with the bore for causing relative movement between the shifting dog means and the locking dog means for shifting the sliding sleeve.

Roth, B.A.

1992-10-20T23:59:59.000Z

378

Mining Test Cases To Improve Software Maintenance  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Requirements Testing Progress: How Well Does the Test Suitefocused on? Does it adequately test all requirements? Howa loop. • Does a test exercise a requirement exhaustively?

Ziftci, Celal

379

Number of Producing Gas Wells (Summary)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells Gross Withdrawals From Oil Wells Gross Withdrawals From Shale Gas Wells Gross Withdrawals From Coalbed Wells Repressuring Nonhydrocarbon Gases...

380

Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Oil Wells  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Withdrawals from Gas Wells Gross Withdrawals from Oil Wells Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas Wells Gross Withdrawals from Coalbed Wells Repressuring Vented and Flared...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "wells stratigraphic tests" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Gas Wells  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Withdrawals from Gas Wells Gross Withdrawals from Oil Wells Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas Wells Gross Withdrawals from Coalbed Wells Repressuring Vented and Flared...

382

Method for gravel packing wells  

SciTech Connect

This patent describes a method for gravel packing a well that penetrates an unconsolidated or poorly consolidated subterranean oil or gas reservoir. It comprises: providing a borehole casing through the reservoir; perforating the casing at preselected intervals therealong to form at least one set of longitudinal, perforation tunnels adjacent a substantial portion of the reservoir; locating a sand screen inside the casing and in juxtaposition with the perforation tunnels, an annulus being formed between the sand screen and the casing; positioning a conduit in juxtaposition with the sand screen extending substantially the length of the sand screen and having its upper extremity open to fluids; injecting a fluid slurry containing gravel down through the annulus and conduit whereby the fluid portion of the slurry is forced out of the annulus through the perforation tunnels into the reservoir and the gravel portion of the slurry deposited in the annulus and forced into the perforation tunnels into the formation; sizing the cross-sectional area of the conduit and the annulus so that if gravel forms a bridge in a portion of the annulus thereby blocking the flow of fluid slurry through the the annulus, fluid slurry containing gravel will continue to flow through the conduit and into the annulus around the gravel bridge; and terminating the injection of the slurry.

Jones, L.G.

1990-08-07T23:59:59.000Z

383

GEOFRAC: an explosives stimulation technique for a geothermal well  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The first known use of explosives for stimulating a geothermal well was successfully conducted in December 1981 with a process called GEOFRAC. The 260/sup 0/C well was located at the Union Oil Company's Geysers Field in northern California. For the initial test, 364 kg of a new explosive called HITEX II was placed at a depth of 2256 meters and detonated to verify techniques. The explosive was contained in an aluminum canister to separate it from the well fluids. In the second test, 5000 kg of explosive was used representing a column length of approximately 191 meters. The explosive was detonated at a depth of 1697 meters in the same well. The results of these tests show that HITEX II can be safely emplaced and successfully detonated in a hot geothermal well without causing damage to the well bore or casing.

Mumma, D.M.; McCullough, F. Jr.; Schmidt, E.W.; Pye, D.S.; Allen, W.C.; Pyle, D.; Hanold, R.J.

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

384

Estimation of skin factor by using pressure transient testing results of a single rate well test.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??About one-fifth of the natural gas used by Americans each winter comes from natural gas storage sites. Gas storage is the primary means for the… (more)

Gunaydin, Delal.

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

385

Results of acid treatments in hydrothermal direct heat experiment wells  

SciTech Connect

Matrix acid treatments have been employed in two low-to-moderate temperature hydrothermal wells with successful results. These two wells showed flow rate increases of 40% and 50%. The increased flow reduced the payback periods for the heating systems to nearly one-half of what they were before acidization. It is recommended that well designs in certain areas consider accommodating such acid stimulation techniques, if testing suggests they are warranted as a well completion tool.

Strawn, J.A.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

386

Doublets and other allied well patterns  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Whenever a liquid is injected into an infinite reservoir containing liquid with the same flow properties, the equations of flow are well known. The pressures in such a system vary over time and distance (radius) in ways that depend on the formation and liquid flow properties. Such equations are well known--they form the basis for the voluminous well-testing literature in petroleum engineering and ground water hydrology. Suppose there are two wells--one an injector and one a producer--with identical rates. The behavior of this system can be calculated using superposition; which merely means that the results can be added independently of each other. When this is done, the remarkable result is that after a period of time there is a region that approaches steady state flow. Thereafter, the pressures and flow velocities in this region stay constant. The size of this region increases with time. This ``steady state`` characteristic can be used to solve a number of interesting and useful problems, both in heat transfer and in fluid flow. The heat transfer problems can be addressed because the equations are identical in form. A number of such problems are solved herein for doublet systems. In addition, concepts are presented to help solve other cases that flow logically from the problems solved herein. It is not necessary that only two wells be involved. It turns out that any time the total injection and production are equal, the system approaches steady state. This idea is also addressed in these notes. A number of useful multiwell cases are addressed to present the flavor of such solutions.

Brigham, W.E.

1997-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

387

Faster mutation testing inspired by test prioritization and reduction  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Mutation testing is a well-known but costly approach for determining test adequacy. The central idea behind the approach is to generate mutants, which are small syntactic transformations of the program under test, and then to measure for a given test ... Keywords: Mutation testing, Test Prioritization, Test Reduction

Lingming Zhang, Darko Marinov, Sarfraz Khurshid

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

388

PrimeEnergy/DOE/GRI slant well. Final report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report presents final results of the Sterling Boggs 1240 slant well. Objectives of the project were (1) to test the potential for improved recovery efficiency in a fractured Devonian Shale reservoir from a directionally drilled well, (2) to perform detailed tests of reservoir properties and completion methods, and (3) to provide technology to industry which may ultimately improve the economics of drilling in the Devonian Shale and thereby stimulate development of its resources.

Drimal, C.E.; Muncey, G.; Carden, R.

1991-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

389

Brazoria County Re-Leveling Pleasant Bayou Geopressured Well Site  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The purpose is to conduct first order leveling surveys as part of an ongoing environmental monitoring program for geopressured-geothermal test wells. The scope is to Conduct First Order, Class I, leveling to monitor subsidence of previously installed and leveled bench marks, established by the National Geodetic Survey (NGS) and Vernon F. Meyer and Associates, Inc., in the area of the Pleasant Bayou geopressured test well. All leveling surveys to conform to NGS standards and specifications.

None

1984-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

390

Definition: Observation Wells | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Observation Wells Jump to: navigation, search Dictionary.png Observation Wells An observation well is used to monitor important hydrologic parameters in a geothermal system that...

391

Definition: Exploratory Well | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Definition Edit with form History Facebook icon Twitter icon Definition: Exploratory Well Jump to: navigation, search Dictionary.png Exploratory Well An exploratory well is...

392

Definition: Well Deepening | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Definition Edit with form History Facebook icon Twitter icon Definition: Well Deepening Jump to: navigation, search Dictionary.png Well Deepening Reentering an existing well and...

393

Definition: Production Wells | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Definition Edit with form History Facebook icon Twitter icon Definition: Production Wells Jump to: navigation, search Dictionary.png Production Wells A well drilled with the...

394

CNTA_Well_Installation_Report.book  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Nuclear Security Administration Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office Environmental Restoration Division Nevada Environmental Restoration Project Well Installation Report for Corrective Action Unit 443, Central Nevada Test Area Nye County, Nevada Revision No.: 0 January 2006 Approved for public release; further dissemination unlimited. DOE/NV--1102 Uncontrolled When Printed Available for public sale, in paper, from: U.S. Department of Commerce National Technical Information Service 5285 Port Royal Road Springfield, VA 22161 Phone: 800.553.6847 Fax: 703.605.6900 Email: orders@ntis.gov Online ordering: http://www.ntis.gov/ordering.htm Available electronically at http://www.osti.gov/bridge Available for a processing fee to U.S. Department of Energy and its contractors, in paper, from:

395

Definition: Flow Test | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Flow Test Jump to: navigation, search Dictionary.png Flow Test Flow tests are typically conducted shortly after a well has been drilled to test its productivity. The well is opened...

396

On the Computation of the Disjunctive Well-Founded Semantics  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A characterization of the disjunctive well-founded semantics (DWFS) is given in terms of the Gelfond–Lifschitz transformation. This characterization is used to develop a top-down method of testing DWFS membership, employing a hyperresolution-like ... Keywords: bottom-up computation, disjunctive deductive databases, disjunctive logic programs, disjunctive well-founded semantics, top-down computation

C. A. Johnson

2001-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

397

Development Wells At Raft River Geothermal Area (2004) | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Development Wells At Raft River Geothermal Area (2004) Development Wells At Raft River Geothermal Area (2004) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Development Wells At Raft River Geothermal Area (2004) Exploration Activity Details Location Raft River Geothermal Area Exploration Technique Development Wells Activity Date 2004 Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding GRED II Notes Geothermal Resource Exploration and Definition Projects Raft River (GRED II): Re-assessment and testing of previously abandoned production wells. The objective of the U.S. Geothermal effort is to re-access the available wellbores, assess their condition, perform extensive testing of the reservoir to determine its productive capacity, and perform a resource utilization assessment. At the time of this paper, all five wells had been

398

Geothermal well stimulation program: opening remarks  

SciTech Connect

The history of well stimulation and the development of the geothermal well stimulation program are reviewed briefly. (MHR)

Hanold, R.J.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

399

Petrologic-petrophysical-engineering relationships, selected wells near the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge, Alaska  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In the context of the reservoir management and resource assessment programs of the U.S. Bureau of Land Management in Alaska, selected stratigraphic horizons were studied in a number of wells adjacent to the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge (ANWR), northeast Alaska. Petrographic analyses were integrated with petrophysical and engineering data, in order to provide a substantive knowledge base from which to infer reservoir potentials elsewhere in the region, using geological and geophysical methods. Of particular interest in the latter regard is the ANWR area. Horizons of concern with regard to reservoir characteristics include Franklinian through Brookian strata. Of particular interest are clastic Ellesmerian 'Break-up/Rift Sequence' sediments such as the Lower Cretaceous Thomson sand, and deeper-water marine clastics, as exemplified by the Brookian Colville Group 'turbidites.' Also of concern are pre-Ellesmerian 'basement' rocks, some of which are hosts to hydrocarbon accumulations in the Point Thomson field. Petrologic-mineralogic characteristics have been keyed to various wireline log responses and related to available engineering data, as feasible, for the wells considered. Synthesis of this information in terms of the regional geological framework, tied in with geophysical data, will facilitate more refined, effective resource assessment and management.

Mowatt, T.C.; Gibson, C.; Seidlitz, A.; Bascle, R.; Dygas, J. (U.S. Bureau of Land Management, Anchorage, AK (United States))

1991-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

400

Mobil completes deep, tight, horizontal gas well in Germany  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A completion and fracturing program for stimulating a horizontal well in the ultra-tight Rotliegendes sand onshore Germany included casing design, completion fluid selection, overbalanced perforation, analysis of the stimulation treatment, design modification, zone and fracture isolation, well testing and acid stimulation. This paper reviews the field geology, the well design, casing design, describes the completion fluids, perforation techniques, fracture treatment, and methods for zone isolation.

Abou-Sayed, I.S.; Chambers, M.R. [Mobil E and P Technical Center, Dallas, TX (United States); Mueller, M.W. [Mobil Erdgas-Erdoel GmbH, Celle (Germany)

1996-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "wells stratigraphic tests" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Investigation and evaluation of geopressured-geothermal wells  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Over the life of the project, 1143 wildcat wells were screened for possible use. Although many did not meet the program's requirement for sand development, a surprisingly large number were abandoned because of downhole mechanical problems. Only 94 of these wells were completed as commercial hydrocarbon producers. Five wells of opportunity were funded for testing. Of these, two were evaluated for their hydraulic energy, thermal energy, and recoverable methane, and three were abandoned because of mechanical problems. (MHR)

Hartsock, J.H.; Rodgers, J.A.

1980-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

402

Attention Wells Fargo and Wachovia customers  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Attention Wells Fargo and Wachovia customers Are you a Wells Fargo or Wachovia mortgage customer Angeles, CA March , & : am to : pm You'll personally meet with a Wells Fargo representative who-inswelcomebutregistrationisrecommended. Wells Fargo Home Mortgage is a division of Wells Fargo Bank, N.A. Wells Fargo Bank, N.A. All rights

Southern California, University of

403

MULTIPLE WELL VARIABLE RATE WELL TEST ANALYSIS OF DATA FROM THE AUBURN UNIVERSITY THERMAL ENERGY STORAGE PROGRAM  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

LBL-9459. experimental Thermal energy storage in confinedAUBURN UNIVERSITY THERMAL ENERGY STORAGE PROGRM1 Christineseries of aquifer thermal energy storage field experiments.

Doughty, Christine

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

404

Well Log Techniques At Coso Geothermal Area (1985) | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Coso Geothermal Area (1985) Coso Geothermal Area (1985) Exploration Activity Details Location Coso Geothermal Area Exploration Technique Well Log Techniques Activity Date 1985 Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Exploration Basis Impact of long term testing on the well pressure Notes The downhole pressure monitoring equipment for each well included a stainless steel pressure chamber attached to a 0.25 inch stainless steel capillary tubing. The surface end of the capillary tubing was connected to a Paroscientific quartz pressure trandsducer. References Sanyal, S.; Menzies, A.; Granados, E.; Sugine, S.; Gentner, R. (20 January 1987) Long-Term Testing of Geothermal Wells in the Coso Hot Springs KGRA Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Well_Log_Techniques_At_Coso_Geothermal_Area_(1985)&oldid=600462

405

Definition: Vertical Flowmeter Test | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Edit with form History Facebook icon Twitter icon Definition: Vertical Flowmeter Test Jump to: navigation, search Dictionary.png Vertical Flowmeter Test A well testing...

406

Single well seismic imaging of a gas-filled hydrofracture  

SciTech Connect

A single well seismic survey was conducted at the Lost Hills, Ca oil field in a monitoring well as part of a CO2 injection test. The source was a piezoelectric seismic source and the sensors were a string of hydrophones hanging below the source. The survey was processed using standard CMP reflection seismology techniques. A potential reflection event was observed and interpreted as being caused by a near vertical hydrofracture. The radial distance between the survey well and the hydrofracture is estimated from Kirchoff migration using a velocity model derived from cross well seismic tomography. The hydrofracture location imaged after migration agrees with the location of an existing hydrofracture.

Daley, Thomas M.; Gritto, Roland; Majer, Ernest L.

2003-08-19T23:59:59.000Z

407

Class I Disposal Well Plugging and Abandonment Cost Estimate  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Per your request, Petrotek Engineering Corporation (Petrotek) has prepared a plugging and abandonment cost estimate for the proposed COGEMA DW No. 4 and No. 5 wells. Because the well design and completion for both wells are very similar, one cost is provided that is representative for each of the wells. The procedures included herein are based on COGEMA's permit modification application to Wyoming Department of Environmental Quality (WDEQ) UIC Permit 00-340 which applies to both wells, and WDEQ regulations and guidance. A time and materials cost estimate for plugging either of the wells follows. The cost is based on information provided by COGEMA, WDEQ requirements, our field experience, and recent quotes from applicable vendors. The costs are based on the following assumptions:> A falloff test and Radioactive Tracer log (RAT) may be required. Based on historical WDEQ requirements, (1) a falloff test would be required if more than six months has elapsed since the last falloff test, and (2) a Part II mechanical integrity test (e.g., a RAT log) would be required if more than 2 years had elapsed since the last RAT log.> Materials disposal (e.g., tubing, packer, wellhead and other debris) will be

Christensen Ranch; Disposal Wellfield; Donna Wichers

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

408

ROCKY MOUNTAIN OILFIELD TESTING CENTER PROJECT TEST RESULTS  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

is also possible. Well 83A4 at the Naval Petroleum Reserve No. 3 was selected as a test well. This well is rod pumped and had a stable production history. It produced enough...

409

Performance of a well with lateral and vertical wellbores  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This thesis presents three major topics: analysis of pressure transient behavior of horizontal wells, analysis of pressure transient behavior of slanted wells, and performance analysis of wells with lateral and vertical wellbores. Additional analysis of actual well test data is also provided. For horizontal wells, we focus on analysis pressure solution for pseudoradial flow. Limited entry slanted wells are considered in this work by comparing wells with different angles and evaluating the performance. Modeling and performance analysis of a well with lateral and vertical wellbores is the last topic. The specific tasks achieved in this work include the following: We have compared four methods for analyzing pseudoradial flow found in the literature (Odeh and Babu, Joshi, Kuchuk et al., and Lichtenberger) and verified their methods using reservoir simulation. We found that the methods by Kuchuk et al. and Joshi are the most accurate while the method by Lichtenberger has the biggest error. We have modeled and examined the performance of slanted wells with different angles. The well length is equal to formation thickness and is kept constant. It has proven that the performance of slanted wells is proportional to the increase of the well angles only up to 60°. Further increasing the well angle will not make the well performance better than a vertical well. We have modeled and analyzed performance of combination wells. We compared the performance of vertical, slanted, and combination wells. Based on that comparison, the combination well has the best performance compared to other well geometries. By having a lateral section beside the vertical section, the performance of the well changes significantly. We have performed an analysis of actual injectivity test data from a well with lateral and vertical wellbores. The proper analysis obtained by correcting the pressure changes confirmed that the semilog straight line shows infinite acting radial flow. The permeability is 62.3 md, obtained by taking a correct slope of 260 psi/cycle. As of now, the radius of investigation is 8287 ft. It needs 7.9 years of injection to reach 850 psig of wellhead pressure.

Abdat, Toriq

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

410

Well-Being, Authority, and Worth.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Theories of well-being give an account of what it is for persons to fare well or to live prudentially valuable lives. I divide the theoretical… (more)

Hebert, Michel

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

411

Visual kerogen and vitrinite reflectance analyses of the Pleasant Bayou No. 1 Well, Brazoria Co. , Texas  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Based on the visual kerogen analyses, the Pleasant Bayou No. 1 Well can be subdivided into six zones and nine sub zones. The stratigraphic section ranges from immature at 2,894 feet to marginally mature at 16,500 feet. From 2,894 to 5,360 feet the organic matter suite is primarily an amorphous spore-pollen assemblage with secondary amounts of vitrinite. Below 6,080 feet the kerogenaceous debris is generally of a vitrinite, plant tissue, spore-pollen mixture with very little amorphous debris. Loss-of-circulation material, indicating drilling problems, is particularly abundant in cutting samples from 9,740 to 10,820 feet. There is a significant jump in the thermal maturation index, T.A.I., at the T-3 seismic horizon between 11,180 and 11,600 feet. As a result of the overall thermal immaturity and due to only fairquality organic matter, one can expect noncommercial accumulations of biogenic methane and/or wet gas.

Not Available

1979-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

412

SEQUENCE STRATIGRAPHIC ANALYSIS AND FACIES ARCHITECTURE OF THE CRETACEOUS MANCOS SHALE ON AND NEAR THE JICARILLA APACHE INDIAN RESERVATION, NEW MEXICO-THEIR RELATION TO SITES OF OIL ACCUMULATION  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Oil distribution in the lower part of the Mancos Shale seems to be mainly controlled by fractures and by sandier facies that are dolomite-cemented. Structure in the area of the Jicarilla Apache Indian Reservation consists of the broad northwest- to southeast-trending Chaco slope, the deep central basin, and the monocline that forms the eastern boundary of the San Juan Basin. Superimposed on the regional structure are broad low-amplitude folds. Fractures seem best developed in the areas of these folds. Using sequence stratigraphic principals, the lower part of the Mancos Shale has been subdivided into four main regressive and transgressive components. These include facies that are the basinal time equivalents to the Gallup Sandstone, an overlying interbedded sandstone and shale sequence time equivalent to the transgressive Mulatto Tongue of the Mancos Shale, the El Vado Sandstone Member which is time equivalent to part of the Dalton Sandstone, and an unnamed interbedded sandstone and shale succession time equivalent to the regressive Dalton Sandstone and transgressive Hosta Tongue of the Mesaverde Group. Facies time equivalent to the Gallup Sandstone underlie an unconformity of regional extent. These facies are gradually truncated from south to north across the Reservation. The best potential for additional oil resources in these facies is in the southern part of the Reservation where the top sandier part of these facies is preserved. The overlying unnamed wedge of transgressive rocks produces some oil but is underexplored, except for sandstones equivalent to the Tocito Sandstone. This wedge of rocks is divided into from two to five units. The highest sand content in this wedge occurs where each of the four subdivisions above the Tocito terminates to the south and is overstepped by the next youngest unit. These terminal areas should offer the best targets for future oil exploration. The El Vado Sandstone Member overlies the transgressive wedge. It produces most of the oil (except for the Tocito Sandstone) from the lower Mancos. In the central and southern part of the Reservation, large areas, currently not productive or not tested, have the potential to contain oil in the El Vado simply based on the trend of the facies and structure. There has been little oil or gas production from the overlying regressive-transgressive wedge of rock and much of this interval is untested. Thus, large areas of the Reservation could contain hydrocarbon resources in these strata. Most of the Reservation lies within the oil generation window based on new Rock-Eval data from the Mancos Shale just south of the southern part of the Reservation. If these observations are valid then oil could have been generated locally and would only have needed to migrate short distances in to sandy reservoirs and fractures. This does not rule out long distance migration of oil from the deeper, more thermally mature part of the basin to the north. However, low porosity and permeability characterize sandier rocks in the Mancos, with the exception of Tocito-like sandstones. These factors could retard long distance oil migration through the sediment package, except through fracture or fault conduits. Thus, it is suggested that future oil and gas explorations in the Mancos treat the accumulations and reservoirs as unconventional and consider whether the source and reservoir are in closer proximity than has previously been assumed.

Jennie Ridgley

2000-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

413

Capping of Water Wells for Future Use  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Water wells that are not being used, but that might be needed in the future, can be sealed with a cap that covers the top of the well casing pipe to prevent unauthorized access and contamination of the well. This publication explains how to cap a well safely and securely.

Lesikar, Bruce J.; Mechell, Justin

2007-09-04T23:59:59.000Z

414

Drilling and operating geothermal wells in California  

SciTech Connect

The following procedural points for geothermal well drilling and operation are presented: geothermal operators, definitions, geothermal unit, agent, notice of intention, fees, report on proposed operations, bonds, well name and number, well and property sale on transfer, well records, and other agencies. (MHR)

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

415

Pennsylvania 1995 Vintage Gas Well History  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Pennsylvania 1995 Vintage Gas Well History. Energy Information Administration (U.S. Dept. of Energy)

416

West Virginia 1995 Vintage Gas Well History  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

West Virginia 1995 Vintage Gas Well History. Energy Information Administration (U.S. Dept. of Energy)

417

North Dakota 1995 Vintage Gas Well History  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

North Dakota 1995 Vintage Gas Well History. Energy Information Administration (U.S. Dept. of Energy)

418

United States 1995 Vintage Oil Well History  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

United States 1995 Vintage Oil Well History. Energy Information Administration (U.S. Dept. of Energy)

41