National Library of Energy BETA

Sample records for wells selected years

  1. Greater Green River basin well-site selection

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Frohne, K.H.; Boswell, R.

    1993-12-31

    Recent estimates of the natural gas resources of Cretaceous low-permeability reservoirs of the Greater Green River basin indicate that as much as 5000 trillion cubic feet (Tcf) of gas may be in place (Law and others 1989). Of this total, Law and others (1989) attributed approximately 80 percent to the Upper Cretaceous Mesaverde Group and Lewis Shale. Unfortunately, present economic conditions render the drilling of many vertical wells unprofitable. Consequently, a three-well demonstration program, jointly sponsored by the US DOE/METC and the Gas Research Institute, was designed to test the profitability of this resource using state-of-the-art directional drilling and completion techniques. DOE/METC studied the geologic and engineering characteristics of ``tight`` gas reservoirs in the eastern portion of the Greater Green River basin in order to identify specific locations that displayed the greatest potential for a successful field demonstration. This area encompasses the Rocks Springs Uplift, Wamsutter Arch, and the Washakie and Red Desert (or Great Divide) basins of southwestern Wyoming. The work was divided into three phases. Phase 1 consisted of a regional geologic reconnaissance of 14 gas-producing areas encompassing 98 separate gas fields. In Phase 2, the top four areas were analyzed in greater detail, and the area containing the most favorable conditions was selected for the identification of specific test sites. In Phase 3, target horizons were selected for each project area, and specific placement locations were selected and prioritized.

  2. Moisture Durability Assessment of Selected Well-insulated Wall Assemblies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pallin, Simon B.; Boudreaux, Philip R.; Kehrer, Manfred; Hun, Diana E.; Jackson, Roderick K.; Desjarlais, Andre Omer

    2015-12-01

    This report presents the results from studying the hygrothermal performance of two well-insulated wall assemblies, both complying with and exceeding international building codes (IECC 2015 2014, IRC 2015). The hygrothermal performance of walls is affected by a large number of influential parameters (e.g., outdoor and indoor climates, workmanship, material properties). This study was based on a probabilistic risk assessment in which a number of these influential parameters were simulated with their natural variability. The purpose of this approach was to generate simulation results based on laboratory chamber measurements that represent a variety of performances and thus better mimic realistic conditions. In total, laboratory measurements and 6,000 simulations were completed for five different US climate zones. A mold growth indicator (MGI) was used to estimate the risk of mold which potentially can cause moisture durability problems in the selected wall assemblies. Analyzing the possible impact on the indoor climate due to mold was not part of this study. The following conclusions can be reached from analyzing the simulation results. In a hot-humid climate, a higher R-value increases the importance of the airtightness because interior wall materials are at lower temperatures. In a cold climate, indoor humidity levels increase with increased airtightness. Air leakage must be considered in a hygrothermal risk assessment, since air efficiently brings moisture into buildings from either the interior or exterior environment. The sensitivity analysis of this study identifies mitigation strategies. Again, it is important to remark that MGI is an indicator of mold, not an indicator of indoor air quality and that mold is the most conservative indicator for moisture durability issues.

  3. "Table 11. Fuel Economy, Selected Survey Years (Miles Per Gallon...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Fuel Economy, Selected Survey Years (Miles Per Gallon)" ,"Survey Years" ,1983,1985,1988,1991,1994,2001 "Total",15.1,16.1,18.3,19.3,19.8,20.2 "Household Characteristics" "Census...

  4. Selection of area and specific site for drilling a horizontal well in Calhoun County, West Virginia

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Reeves, T.K.; Overbey, W.K. Jr.; Salamy, S.P.; Locke, C.D.

    1992-03-01

    This report discusses the data collection and analysis procedures used to establish criteria for geologic and engineering studies conducted by BDM to select a general area for more detailed study and a specific site for the drilling of a cooperative well with an industry partner, the Consolidated Natural Gas Development Company (CNGD). The results of detailed geologic studies are presented for two areas in Calhoun County, West Virginia, and one area along the Logan-Boone County line in West Virginia. The effects of Appalachian Basin tectonics and the Rome Trough Rift system were identified on seismic lines made available by (CNGD). These helped to identify and define the trapping mechanisms which had been effective in each area. Engineering analyses of past production histories provided data to support selection of target areas and then to select a specific site that met the project requirements for production, reservoir pressure, and risk. A final site was selected in Lee District at the southwestern margin of the Sand Ridge gas field based on the combination of a geologic trapping mechanism and reservoir pressures which were projected as 580 psi with a stress ratio of 0.53.

  5. Basic Data Report for Well Plugging and Abandonment and Reconfiguration Activities for Fiscal Year 2005

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None, None

    2006-03-13

    The FY 2005 program was initiated on March 31, 2005, and concluded on July 16, 2005. The FY 2005 program initially included 25 wells requiring workover (P&A, Magenta reconfiguration, cleaning and keeping). During the process, the U.S. Bureau of Land Management (BLM) requested transfer of two wells (H-7c and H-8c) to their ownership for future livestock watering. These wells were transferred to the BLM through execution of Form wr-03, Declaration of Owner of Underground Water Rights, between the New Mexico Office of the State Engineer (NMOSE), the BLM, and the DOE Carlsbad Field Office (CBFO). One well (H-2b2) was cleaned and retained as a Culebra monitor well for continued use. One well (H-3d) was converted to a shallow well to monitor the formational contact between the Dewey Lake Redbeds Formation and the Santa Rosa Formation in support of the DP-831 discharge permit monitoring program. Nine dual-completion wells were reconfigured as Magenta-only monitor wells, and 12 wells were plugged and abandoned permanently. This report presents the summary in the same order that the wells were worked in the field.

  6. Fiscal year 1996 well plugging and abandonment program Y-12 Plant, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1997-04-01

    This report is a synopsis of the progress of the well plugging and abandonment program at the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant, Oak Ridge, Tennessee, from August 1995 through August 1996. A total of 27 wells, piezometers, and borings were plugged and abandoned during the period of time covered in this report. All wells and borings were plugged and abandoned in accordance with the Monitoring Well Plugging and Abandonment Plan for the U.S. Department of Energy, Y-12 Plant, Oak Ridge, Tennessee (HSW, Inc. 1991).

  7. Fiscal year 1995 well plugging and abandonment program Y-12 Plant, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1995-09-01

    This report is a synopsis of the progress of the well plugging and abandonment program at the Y-12 Plant, Oak Ridge, Tennessee, from September 1994 through August 1995. A total of 67 wells, piezometers, and borings were plugged and abandoned during the period of time covered in this report. All wells and borings were plugged and abandoned if (1) its construction did not meet current standards (substandard construction); (2) it was irreparably damaged or had deteriorated beyond practical repair; (3) its location interfered with or otherwise impeded site operations, construction, or closure activities; or (4) special circumstances existed as defined on a case-by-case basis and approved by the Y-12 Plant Groundwater Protection Program (GWPP) Manager. This summary report contains: general geologic setting of the Y-12 Plant and vicinity; discussion of well plugging and abandonment methods, grouting procedures, and waste management practices (a Waste Management Plan for Drilling Activities is included in Appendix C); summaries of plugging and abandonment activities at each site; and quality assurance/quality control (QA/QC) and health and safety protocols used during the FY 1995 Plugging and Abandonment Program.

  8. DOE Selects Nine Projects to Receive Funding for Carbon Storage Intelligent Monitoring and Well Integrity and Mitigation Research

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The U.S. Department of Energy’s (DOE) National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) has selected nine projects to receive funding to research new CO2 storage technologies devoted to intelligent monitoring systems and advanced well integrity and mitigation approaches through DOE’s Carbon Storage Program.

  9. Department of Energy Selects Winner of Wind Cooperative of the Year Award |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy Winner of Wind Cooperative of the Year Award Department of Energy Selects Winner of Wind Cooperative of the Year Award January 25, 2008 - 11:29am Addthis WASHINGTON, DC-The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) announced-in partnership with the National Rural Electric Cooperative Association (NRECA)-its selection of the Alaska Village Electric Cooperative (AVEC) of Anchorage, Alaska, as the winner of the 2007 Wind Cooperative of the Year Award. This annual award, in its

  10. Table 2.10 Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption and Expenditure Indicators, Selected Years, 1979-2003

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    0 Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption and Expenditure Indicators, Selected Years, 1979-2003 Energy Source and Year Building Characteristics Energy Consumption Energy Expenditures Number of Buildings Total Square Feet Square Feet per Building Total Per Building Per Square Foot Per Employee Total Per Building Per Square Foot Per Million Btu Thousands Millions Thousands Trillion Btu Million Btu Thousand Btu Million Btu Million Dollars 1 Thousand Dollars 1 Dollars 1 Dollars 1 Major Sources 2

  11. In Situ SIMS and IR Spectroscopy of Well-Defined Surfaces Prepared by Soft Landing of Mass-Selected Ions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Johnson, Grant E.; Gunaratne, Kalupathirannehelage Don D.; Laskin, Julia

    2014-06-16

    Soft landing of mass-selected ions onto surfaces is a powerful approach for the highly-controlled preparation of materials that are inaccessible using conventional synthesis techniques. Coupling soft landing with in situ characterization using secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS) and infrared reflection absorption spectroscopy (IRRAS) enables analysis of well-defined surfaces under clean vacuum conditions. The capabilities of three soft-landing instruments constructed in our laboratory are illustrated for the representative system of surface-bound organometallics prepared by soft landing of mass-selected ruthenium tris(bipyridine) dications, [Ru(bpy)3]2+, onto carboxylic acid terminated self-assembled monolayer surfaces on gold (COOH-SAMs). In situ time-of-flight (TOF)-SIMS provides insight into the reactivity of the soft-landed ions. In addition, the kinetics of charge reduction, neutralization and desorption occurring on the COOH-SAM both during and after ion soft landing are studied using in situ Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance (FT-ICR)-SIMS measurements. In situ IRRAS experiments provide insight into how the structure of organic ligands surrounding metal centers is perturbed through immobilization of organometallic ions on COOH-SAM surfaces by soft landing. Collectively, the three instruments provide complementary information about the chemical composition, reactivity and structure of well-defined species supported on surfaces.

  12. Fiscal Year 1998 Well Installation, Plugging and Abandonment, and Redevelopment summary report Y-12 Plant, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1998-12-01

    This report summarizes the well installation, plugging and abandonment, and redevelopment activities conducted during the federal fiscal year (FY) 1998 at the Y-12 Plant, Oak Ridge, Tennessee. Five new groundwater monitoring wells were installed at the Y-12 Plant under the FY 1998 drilling program. Two of the wells are located in west Bear Creek Valley, one is in the eastern Y-12 Plant area near Lake Reality, and two are located near the Oil Landfarm Waste Management Area, which were installed by Bechtel Jacobs Company LLC (Bechtel Jacobs) as part of a site characterization activity for the Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR) Disposal Cell. Also, two existing wells were upgraded and nine temporary piezometers were installed to characterize hydrogeologic conditions at the Disposal Cell site. In addition, 40 temporary piezometers were installed in the Boneyard/Bumyard area of Bear Creek Valley by Bechtel Jacobs as part of the accelerated remedial actions conducted by the Environmental Restoration Program. Ten monitoring wells at the Y-12 Plant were decommissioned in FY 1998. Two existing monitoring wells were redeveloped during FY 1998 (of these, GW-732 was redeveloped tsvice). All well installation and development (including redevelopment) was conducted following industry-standard methods and approved procedures from the Environmental Surveillance Procedures Quality Control Program (Energy Systems 1988); the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) Groundwater Monitoring Technical Enforcement Guidance Document (EPA 1992); and the Monitoring Well Installation Plan for the Department of Energy Y-12 Plant, Oak Ridge, Tennessee (Energy Systems 1997a). Well installation and development of the non-Y-12 Plant GWPP oversight installation projects were conducted using procedures/guidance defined in the following documents: Work Plan for Support to Upper East Fork Poplar Creek East End Volatile Organic Compound Plumes Well Installation Project, Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant, Oak Ridge

  13. Geologic ages and accumulation rates of basalt-flow groups and sedimentary interbeds in selected wells at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, Idaho

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Anderson, S.R.; Liszewski, M.J.; Cecil, L.D.

    1997-01-01

    Geologic ages and accumulation rates, estimated from regressions, were used to evaluate measured ages and interpreted stratigraphic and structural relations of basalt and sediment in the unsaturated zone and the Snake River Plain aquifer at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) in eastern Idaho. Geologic ages and accumulation rates were estimated from standard linear regressions of 21 mean potassium-argon (K-Ar) ages, selected mean paleomagnetic ages, and cumulative depths of a composite stratigraphic section composed of complete intervals of basalt and sediment that were deposited in areas of past maximum subsidence. Accumulation rates also were estimated from regressions of stratigraphic intervals in three wells in and adjacent to an area of interpreted uplift at and near the Idaho Chemical Processing Plant (ICPP) and the Test Reactor Area (TRA) to allow a comparison of rates in areas of past uplift and subsidence. Estimated geologic ages range from about 200 thousand to 1.8 million years before present and are reasonable approximations for the interval of basalt and sediment above the effective base of the aquifer, based on reported uncertainties of corresponding measured ages. Estimated ages between 200 and 800 thousand years are within the range of reported uncertainties for all 15 K-Ar ages used in regressions and two out of three -argon ({sup 40}Ar/{sup 39}Ar) ages of duplicate argon samples. Two sets of estimated ages between 800 thousand and 1.8 million years are within the range of reported uncertainties for all seven K-Ar ages used in regressions, which include one shared age of about 800 thousand years. Two sets of ages were estimated for this interval because K-Ar ages make up two populations that agree with previous and revised ages of three paleomagnetic subchrons. The youngest set of ages is consistent with a K-Ar age from the effective base of the aquifer that agrees with previous ages of the Olduvai Normal-Polarity Subchron.

  14. Statement of Work for Drilling Four CERCLA Groundwater Monitoring Wells During Fiscal Year 2006, 300-FF-5 Operable Unit

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Williams, Bruce A.

    2005-10-10

    This document contains the statement of work required to drill, characterize, and construct the proposed groundwater monitoring wells at 300-FF-5 Operable Unit during FY 2006.

  15. YEAR

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    69 YEAR 2014 Males 34 Females 35 YEAR 2014 SES 5 EJEK 1 EN 05 8 EN 04 5 NN (Engineering) 27 NQ (ProfTechAdmin) 22 NU (TechAdmin Support) 1 YEAR 2014 American Indian Alaska...

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    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    42 YEAR 2014 Males 36 Females 6 PAY PLAN YEAR 2014 SES 2 EJEK 5 EN 05 7 EN 04 6 EN 03 1 NN (Engineering) 15 NQ (ProfTechAdmin) 6 YEAR 2014 American Indian Alaska Native Male...

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    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    4 YEAR 2012 Males 65 Females 29 YEAR 2012 SES 3 EJEK 5 EN 04 3 NN (Engineering) 21 NQ (ProfTechAdmin) 61 NU (TechAdmin Support) 1 YEAR 2012 American Indian Male 0 American...

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    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    4 YEAR 2011 Males 21 Females 23 YEAR 2011 SES 3 EJEK 1 EN 03 1 NN (Engineering) 3 NQ (ProfTechAdmin) 31 NU (TechAdmin Support) 5 YEAR 2011 American Indian Male 0 American...

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    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    92 YEAR 2012 Males 52 Females 40 YEAR 2012 SES 1 EJEK 7 EN 04 13 EN 03 1 NN (Engineering) 27 NQ (ProfTechAdmin) 38 NU (TechAdmin Support) 5 YEAR 2012 American Indian Male 0...

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    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    558 YEAR 2013 Males 512 Females 46 YEAR 2013 SES 2 EJEK 2 EN 04 1 NN (Engineering) 11 NQ (ProfTechAdmin) 220 NU (TechAdmin Support) 1 NV (Nuc Mat Courier) 321 YEAR 2013...

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    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    11 YEAR 2012 Males 78 Females 33 YEAR 2012 SES 2 EJEK 9 EN 05 1 EN 04 33 NN (Engineering) 32 NQ (ProfTechAdmin) 31 NU (TechAdmin Support) 3 YEAR 2012 American Indian Male 2...

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    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    300 YEAR 2011 Males 109 Females 191 YEAR 2011 SES 9 EJEK 1 NN (Engineering) 2 NQ (ProfTechAdmin) 203 NU (TechAdmin Support) 38 NF (Future Ldrs) 47 YEAR 2011 American Indian...

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    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    02 YEAR 2011 Males 48 Females 54 YEAR 2011 SES 5 EJEK 1 NN (Engineering) 13 NQ (ProfTechAdmin) 80 NU (TechAdmin Support) 3 YEAR 2011 American Indian Male 0 American Indian...

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    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    8 YEAR 2013 Males 27 Females 11 YEAR 2013 SES 1 EN 05 1 EN 04 11 NN (Engineering) 8 NQ (ProfTechAdmin) 15 NU (TechAdmin Support) 2 YEAR 2013 American Indian Alaska Native Male...

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    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    31 YEAR 2013 Males 20 Females 11 YEAR 2013 SES 2 EN 04 4 NN (Engineering) 12 NQ (ProfTechAdmin) 12 NU (TechAdmin Support) 1 YEAR 2013 American Indian Alaska Native Male (AIAN,...

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    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    16 YEAR 2012 Males 84 Females 32 YEAR 2012 SES 26 EJEK 2 EN 05 9 NN (Engineering) 39 NQ (ProfTechAdmin) 30 NU (TechAdmin Support) 10 YEAR 2012 American Indian Male 0 American...

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    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    34 YEAR 2012 Males 66 Females 68 YEAR 2012 SES 6 NN (Engineering) 15 NQ (ProfTechAdmin) 110 NU (TechAdmin Support) 3 YEAR 2012 American Indian Male 1 American Indian Female 2...

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    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    86 YEAR 2012 Males 103 Females 183 YEAR 2012 SES 7 EJEK 1 NN (Engineering) 1 NQ (ProfTechAdmin) 202 NU (TechAdmin Support) 30 NF (Future Ldrs) 45 YEAR 2012 American Indian Male...

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    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    80 YEAR 2012 Males 51 Females 29 YEAR 2012 SES 1 EJEK 22 EN 04 21 NN (Engineering) 14 NQ (ProfTechAdmin) 21 NU (TechAdmin Support) 1 YEAR 2012 American Indian Male 0 American...

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    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    1 YEAR 2012 Males 30 Females 11 YEAR 2012 SES 1 EN 05 1 EN 04 11 NN (Engineering) 9 NQ (ProfTechAdmin) 17 NU (TechAdmin Support) 2 YEAR 2012 American Indian Male 0 American...

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    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    96 YEAR 2013 Males 69 Females 27 YEAR 2013 SES 1 EJEK 9 EN 04 27 NN (Engineering) 26 NQ (ProfTechAdmin) 30 NU (TechAdmin Support) 3 YEAR 2013 American Indian Alaska Native Male...

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    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    31 YEAR 2012 Males 19 Females 12 YEAR 2012 SES 2 EN 04 4 NN (Engineering) 12 NQ (ProfTechAdmin) 12 NU (TechAdmin Support) 1 YEAR 2012 American Indian Male 0 American Indian...

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    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    0 YEAR 2013 Males 48 Females 32 YEAR 2013 SES 2 EJEK 7 EN 04 11 EN 03 1 NN (Engineering) 23 NQ (ProfTechAdmin) 33 NU (TechAdmin Support) 3 YEAR 2013 American Indian Alaska...

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    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    40 YEAR 2011 Males 68 Females 72 YEAR 2011 SES 5 EJEK 1 NN (Engineering) 16 NQ (ProfTechAdmin) 115 NU (TechAdmin Support) 3 YEAR 2011 American Indian Male 1 American Indian...

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    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    00 YEAR 2012 Males 48 Females 52 YEAR 2012 SES 5 EJEK 1 NN (Engineering) 11 NQ (ProfTechAdmin) 80 NU (TechAdmin Support) 3 YEAR 2012 American Indian Male 0 American Indian...

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    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    137 YEAR 2013 Males 90 Females 47 YEAR 2013 SES 2 SL 1 EJEK 30 EN 04 30 EN 03 2 NN (Engineering) 23 NQ (ProfTechAdmin) 45 NU (TechAdmin Support) 4 YEAR 2013 American Indian...

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    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    of Employees 14 GENDER YEAR 2012 Males 9 Females 5 YEAR 2012 SES 2 EJEK 2 NN (Engineering) 4 NQ (ProfTechAdmin) 6 YEAR 2012 American Indian Male 0 American Indian Female 0...

  18. YEAR

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    3 YEAR 2012 Males 21 Females 22 YEAR 2012 SES 3 EJEK 1 EN 03 1 NN (Engineering) 3 NQ (ProfTechAdmin) 30 NU (TechAdmin Support) 5 YEAR 2012 American Indian Male 0 American...

  19. The Underground Corrosion of Selected Type 300 Stainless Steels After 34 Years

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    T. S. Yoder; M. K. Adler Flitton

    2009-03-01

    Recently, interest in long-term underground corrosion has greatly increased because of the ongoing need to dispose of nuclear waste. Additionally, the Nuclear Waste Policy Act of 1982 requires disposal of high-level nuclear waste in an underground repository. Current contaminant release and transport models use limited available short-term underground corrosion rates when considering container and waste form degradation. Consequently, the resulting models oversimplify the complex mechanisms of underground metal corrosion. The complexity of stainless steel corrosion mechanisms and the processes by which corrosion products migrate from their source are not well depicted by a corrosion rate based on general attack. The research presented here is the analysis of austenitic stainless steels after 33 years of burial. In this research, the corrosion specimens were analyzed using applicable ASTM standards as well as microscopic and X-ray examination to determine the mechanisms of underground stainless steel corrosion. As presented, the differences in the corrosion mechanisms vary with the type of stainless steel and the treatment of the samples. The uniqueness of the long sampling time allows for further understanding of the actual stainless steel corrosion mechanisms, and when applied back into predictive models, will assist in reduction of the uncertainty in parameters for predicting long-term fate and transport.

  20. YEAR

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Males 139 Females 88 YEAR 2012 SES 13 EX 1 EJEK 8 EN 05 23 EN 04 20 EN 03 2 NN (Engineering) 91 NQ (ProfTechAdmin) 62 NU (TechAdmin Support) 7 YEAR 2012 American Indian...

  1. YEAR

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    26 YEAR 2014 Males 81 Females 45 PAY PLAN YEAR 2014 SES 1 SL1 EJEK 25 EN 04 26 EN 03 2 NN (Engineering) 23 NQ (ProfTechAdmin) 44 NU (TechAdmin Support) 4 YEAR 2014 American ...

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    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    563 YEAR 2012 Males 518 Females 45 YEAR 2012 SES 1 EJEK 2 EN 04 1 EN 03 1 NN (Engineering) 12 NQ (ProfTechAdmin) 209 NU (TechAdmin Support) 2 NV (Nuc Mat Courier) 335 YEAR 2012...

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    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    7 YEAR 2012 Males 64 Females 33 YEAR 2012 SES 2 EJEK 3 EN 05 1 EN 04 30 EN 03 1 NN (Engineering) 26 NQ (ProfTechAdmin) 32 NU (TechAdmin Support) 2 YEAR 2012 American Indian...

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    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    4 YEAR 2012 Males 37 Females 7 YEAR 2012 SES 1 EJEK 6 EN 05 5 EN 04 7 EN 03 1 NN (Engineering) 17 NQ (ProfTechAdmin) 6 NU (TechAdmin Support) 1 YEAR 2012 American Indian Male 2...

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    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    7 YEAR 2011 Males 38 Females 9 YEAR 2011 SES 1 EJEK 6 EN 05 5 EN 04 7 EN 03 1 NN (Engineering) 19 NQ (ProfTechAdmin) 7 NU (TechAdmin Support) 1 YEAR 2011 American Indian Male 2...

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    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    8 YEAR 2013 Males 62 Females 26 YEAR 2013 SES 1 EJEK 3 EN 05 1 EN 04 28 EN 03 1 NN (Engineering) 25 NQ (ProfTechAdmin) 27 NU (TechAdmin Support) 2 YEAR 2013 American Indian...

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    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    6 YEAR 2012 Males 64 Females 32 YEAR 2012 SES 1 EJEK 5 EN 05 3 EN 04 23 EN 03 9 NN (Engineering) 18 NQ (ProfTechAdmin) 33 NU (TechAdmin Support) 4 YEAR 2012 American Indian...

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    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    5 YEAR 2013 Males 58 Females 27 YEAR 2013 SES 1 EJEK 4 EN 05 3 EN 04 21 EN 03 8 NN (Engineering) 16 NQ (ProfTechAdmin) 28 NU (TechAdmin Support) 4 YEAR 2013 American Indian...

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    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    78 YEAR 2012 Males 57 Females 21 YEAR 2012 SES 2 SL 1 EJEK 12 EN 04 21 EN 03 2 NN (Engineering) 12 NQ (ProfTechAdmin) 24 NU (TechAdmin Support) 4 YEAR 2012 American Indian Male...

  10. Technical and economic evaluation of selected compact drill rigs for drilling 10,000 foot geothermal production wells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Huttrer, G.W.

    1997-11-01

    This report summarizes the investigation and evaluation of several {open_quotes}compact{close_quotes} drill rigs which could be used for drilling geothermal production wells. Use of these smaller rigs would save money by reducing mobilization costs, fuel consumption, crew sizes, and environmental impact. Advantages and disadvantages of currently-manufactured rigs are identified, and desirable characteristics for the {open_quotes}ideal{close_quotes} compact rig are defined. The report includes a detailed cost estimate of a specific rig, and an evaluation of the cost/benefit ratio of using this rig. Industry contacts for further information are given.

  11. YEAR

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    2012 Males 149 Females 115 YEAR 2012 SES 17 EX 1 EJEK 7 EN 05 2 EN 04 9 EN 03 2 NN (Engineering) 56 NQ (ProfTechAdmin) 165 NU (TechAdmin Support) 4 GS 13 1 YEAR 2012 American...

  12. YEAR

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    5 YEAR 2014 Males 61 Females 24 PAY PLAN YEAR 2014 SES 1 EJ/EK 8 EN 04 22 NN (Engineering) 23 NQ (Prof/Tech/Admin) 28 NU (Tech/Admin Support) 3 YEAR 2014 American Indian Alaska Native Male (AIAN M) 2 American Indian Alaskan Native Female (AIAN F) 3 African American Male (AA M) 0 African American Female (AA F) 0 Asian American Pacific Islander Male (AAPI M) 3 Asian American Pacific Islander Female (AAPI F) 0 Hispanic Male (H M) 13 Hispanic Female (H F) 10 White Male (W M) 43 White Female (W F) 11

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    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    2 YEAR 2014 Males 57 Females 25 PAY PLAN YEAR 2014 SES 3 EJ/EK 4 EN 04 2 NN (Engineering) 20 NQ (Prof/Tech/Admin) 53 YEAR 2014 American Indian Alaska Native Male (AIAN M) 0 American Indian Alaskan Native Female (AIAN F) 0 African American Male (AA M) 9 African American Female (AA F) 9 Asian American Pacific Islander Male (AAPI M) 2 Asian American Pacific Islander Female (AAPI F) 1 Hispanic Male (H M) 3 Hispanic Female (H F) 5 White Male (W M) 43 White Female (W F) 10 DIVERSITY TOTAL WORKFORCE

  14. YEAR

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    93 YEAR 2014 Males 50 Females 43 PAY PLAN YEAR 2014 EJ/EK 3 NN (Engineering) 13 NQ (Prof/Tech/Admin) 74 NU (Tech/Admin Support) 3 YEAR 2014 American Indian Alaska Native Male (AIAN M) 0 American Indian Alaskan Native Female (AIAN F) 2 African American Male (AA M) 5 African American Female (AA F) 6 Asian American Pacific Islander Male (AAPI M) 0 Asian American Pacific Islander Female (AAPI F) 0 Hispanic Male (H M) 6 Hispanic Female (H F) 14 White Male (W M) 39 White Female (W F) 21 DIVERSITY

  15. YEAR

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    YEAR 2014 Males 11 Females 2 PAY PLAN YEAR 2014 SES 2 EJ/EK 1 EN 04 1 NN (Engineering) 5 NQ (Prof/Tech/Admin) 4 YEAR 2014 American Indian Alaska Native Male (AIAN M) 0 American Indian Alaskan Native Female (AIAN F) 0 African American Male (AA M) 0 African American Female (AA F) 0 Asian American Pacific Islander Male (AAPI M) 1 Asian American Pacific Islander Female (AAPI F) 0 Hispanic Male (H M) 0 Hispanic Female (H F) 0 White Male (W M) 10 White Female (W F) 2 DIVERSITY TOTAL WORKFORCE GENDER

  16. YEAR

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    9 YEAR 2014 Males 9 Females 10 YEAR 2014 SES 7 ED 1 EJ/EK 1 EN 05 1 NQ (Prof/Tech/Admin) 8 NU (Tech/Admin Support) 1 YEAR 2014 American Indian Alaska Native Male (AIAN M) 0 American Indian Alaskan Native Female (AIAN F) 1 African American Male (AA M) 1 African American Female (AA F) 5 Asian American Pacific Islander Male (AAPI M) 1 Asian American Pacific Islander Female (AAPI F) 0 Hispanic Male (H M) 0 Hispanic Female (H F) 3 White Male (W M) 7 White Female (W F) 1 PAY PLAN DIVERSITY TOTAL

  17. YEAR

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    5 YEAR 2014 Males 92 Females 43 YEAR 2014 SES 8 EX 1 EJ/EK 4 EN 05 9 EN 04 12 EN 03 2 NN (Engineering) 57 NQ (Prof/Tech/Admin) 42 YEAR 2014 American Indian Alaska Native Male (AIAN M) 1 American Indian Alaskan Native Female (AIAN F) 1 African American Male (AA M) 9 African American Female (AA F) 11 Asian American Pacific Islander Male (AAPI M) 4 Asian American Pacific Islander Female (AAPI F) 2 Hispanic Male (H M) 12 Hispanic Female (H F) 7 White Male (W M) 66 White Female (W F) 22 PAY PLAN

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    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    563 YEAR 2014 Males 517 Females 46 PAY PLAN YEAR 2014 SES 2 EJ/EK 2 EN 04 1 NN (Engineering) 11 NQ (Prof/Tech/Admin) 218 NU (Tech/Admin Support) 2 NV (Nuc Mat Courier) 327 YEAR 2014 American Indian Alaska Native Male (AIAN M) 14 American Indian Alaskan Native Female (AIAN F) 2 African American Male (AA M) 18 African American Female (AA F) 1 Asian American Pacific Islander Male (AAPI M) 8 Asian American Pacific Islander Female (AAPI F) 2 Hispanic Male (H M) 76 Hispanic Female (H F) 21 White Male

  19. YEAR

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    89 YEAR 2014 Males 98 Females 91 PAY PLAN YEAR 2014 SES 14 EX 1 EJ/EK 3 EN 05 1 EN 04 4 EN 03 1 NN (Engineering) 32 NQ (Prof/Tech/Admin) 130 NU (Tech/Admin Support) 2 GS 15 1 YEAR 2014 American Indian Alaska Native Male (AIAN M) 1 American Indian Alaskan Native Female (AIAN F) 0 African American Male (AA M) 5 African American Female (AA F) 14 Asian American Pacific Islander Male (AAPI M) 3 Asian American Pacific Islander Female (AAPI F) 7 Hispanic Male (H M) 7 Hispanic Female (H F) 10 White Male

  20. YEAR

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    3 YEAR 2014 Males 162 Females 81 PAY PLAN YEAR 2014 SES 26 EJ/EK 3 EN 05 7 NN (Engineering) 77 NQ (Prof/Tech/Admin) 108 NU (Tech/Admin Support) 22 YEAR 2014 American Indian Alaska Native Male (AIAN M) 0 American Indian Alaskan Native Female (AIAN F) 1 African American Male (AA M) 5 African American Female (AA F) 9 Asian American Pacific Islander Male (AAPI M) 1 Asian American Pacific Islander Female (AAPI F) 0 Hispanic Male (H M) 2 Hispanic Female (H F) 0 White Male (W M) 154 White Female (W F)

  1. YEAR

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    74 YEAR 2014 Males 96 Females 78 PAY PLAN YEAR 2014 SES 8 EJ/EK 4 EN 04 11 EN 03 1 NN (Engineering) 34 NQ (Prof/Tech/Admin) 113 NU (Tech/Admin Support) 3 YEAR 2014 American Indian Alaska Native Male (AIAN M) 2 American Indian Alaskan Native Female (AIAN F) 1 African American Male (AA M) 3 African American Female (AA F) 11 Asian American Pacific Islander Male (AAPI M) 5 Asian American Pacific Islander Female (AAPI F) 0 Hispanic Male (H M) 25 Hispanic Female (H F) 25 White Male (W M) 61 White

  2. YEAR

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    4 YEAR 2014 Males 7 Females 7 PAY PLAN YEAR 2014 SES 1 NQ (Prof/Tech/Admin) 7 GS 15 1 GS 14 2 GS 13 2 GS 10 1 YEAR 2014 American Indian Alaska Native Male (AIAN M) 0 American Indian Alaskan Native Female (AIAN F) 0 African American Male (AA M) 3 African American Female (AA F) 2 Asian American Pacific Islander Male (AAPI M) 0 Asian American Pacific Islander Female (AAPI F) 0 Hispanic Male (H M) 0 Hispanic Female (H F) 0 White Male (W M) 4 White Female (W F) 5 DIVERSITY TOTAL WORKFORCE GENDER

  3. YEAR

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    16 YEAR 2014 Males 72 Females 144 PAY PLAN YEAR 2014 SES 8 EJ/EK 1 NQ (Prof/Tech/Admin) 198 NU (Tech/Admin Support) 9 YEAR 2014 American Indian Alaska Native Male (AIAN M) 2 American Indian Alaskan Native Female (AIAN F) 2 African American Male (AA M) 10 African American Female (AA F) 38 Asian American Pacific Islander Male (AAPI M) 1 Asian American Pacific Islander Female (AAPI F) 3 Hispanic Male (H M) 15 Hispanic Female (H F) 33 White Male (W M) 44 White Female (W F) 68 DIVERSITY TOTAL

  4. YEAR

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    26 YEAR 2014 Males 81 Females 45 PAY PLAN YEAR 2014 SES 1 SL 1 EJ/EK 25 EN 04 26 EN 03 2 NN (Engineering) 23 NQ (Prof/Tech/Admin) 44 NU (Tech/Admin Support) 4 YEAR 2014 American Indian Alaska Native Male (AIAN M) 0 American Indian Alaskan Native Female (AIAN F) 1 African American Male (AA M) 3 African American Female (AA F) 7 Asian American Pacific Islander Male (AAPI M) 4 Asian American Pacific Islander Female (AAPI F) 1 Hispanic Male (H M) 6 Hispanic Female (H F) 6 White Male (W M) 68 White

  5. YEAR

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    446 YEAR 2014 Males 1626 Females 820 YEAR 2014 SES 97 EX 2 ED 1 SL 1 EJ/EK 84 EN 05 38 EN 04 162 EN 03 18 NN (Engineering) 427 NQ (Prof/Tech/Admin) 1216 NU (Tech/Admin Support) 66 NV (Nuc Mat Courier) 327 GS 15 2 GS 14 2 GS 13 2 GS 10 1 YEAR 2014 American Indian Alaska Native Male (AIAN M) 27 American Indian Alaskan Native Female (AIAN F) 24 African American Male (AA M) 90 African American Female (AA F) 141 Asian American Pacific Islander Male (AAPI M) 63 Asian American Pacific Islander Female

  6. YEAR

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    1 YEAR 2014 Males 48 Females 33 PAY PLAN YEAR 2014 SES 1 EJ/EK 8 EN 04 10 EN 03 1 NN (Engineering) 27 NQ (Prof/Tech/Admin) 29 NU (Tech/Admin Support) 5 YEAR 2014 American Indian Alaska Native Male (AIAN M) 0 American Indian Alaskan Native Female (AIAN F) 3 African American Male (AA M) 0 African American Female (AA F) 2 Asian American Pacific Islander Male (AAPI M) 2 Asian American Pacific Islander Female (AAPI F) 0 Hispanic Male (H M) 12 Hispanic Female (H F) 12 White Male (W M) 34 White Female

  7. YEAR

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    8 YEAR 2014 Males 18 Females 10 PAY PLAN YEAR 2014 SES 1 EN 05 1 EN 04 4 NN (Engineering) 12 NQ (Prof/Tech/Admin) 9 NU (Tech/Admin Support) 1 YEAR 2014 American Indian Alaska Native Male (AIAN M) 0 American Indian Alaskan Native Female (AIAN F) 1 African American Male (AA M) 4 African American Female (AA F) 4 Asian American Pacific Islander Male (AAPI M) 1 Asian American Pacific Islander Female (AAPI F) 0 Hispanic Male (H M) 0 Hispanic Female (H F) 0 White Male (W M) 13 White Female (W F) 5

  8. YEAR

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    8 YEAR 2014 Males 18 Females 20 PAY PLAN YEAR 2014 SES 3 EJ/EK 1 EN 03 1 NN (Engineering) 3 NQ (Prof/Tech/Admin) 28 NU (Tech/Admin Support) 2 YEAR 2014 American Indian Alaska Native Male (AIAN M) 0 American Indian Alaskan Native Female (AIAN F) 0 African American Male (AA M) 1 African American Female (AA F) 1 Asian American Pacific Islander Male (AAPI M) 0 Asian American Pacific Islander Female (AAPI F) 1 Hispanic Male (H M) 4 Hispanic Female (H F) 7 White Male (W M) 13 White Female (W F) 11

  9. YEAR

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    White Male (W M) 26 White Female (W F) 16 DIVERSITY TOTAL WORKFORCE GENDER Livermore Field ... YEARS OF FEDERAL SERVICE SUPERVISOR RATIO AGE Livermore Field Office As of March 22, 2014 ...

  10. YEAR

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    25 Females 10 YEAR 2014 SES 1 EN 04 11 NN (Engineering) 8 NQ (Prof/Tech/Admin) 13 NU (Tech/Admin Support) 2 YEAR 2014 American Indian Alaska Native Male (AIAN M) 0 American Indian Alaskan Native Female (AIAN F) 1 African American Male (AA M) 1 African American Female (AA F) 3 Asian American Pacific Islander Male (AAPI M) 0 Asian American Pacific Islander Female (AAPI F) 0 Hispanic Male (H M) 0 Hispanic Female (H F) 0 White Male (W M) 24 White Female (W F) 6 TOTAL WORKFORCE GENDER Kansas City

  11. YEAR

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    9 Females 24 PAY PLAN YEAR 2014 SES 1 EJ/EK 4 EN 05 3 EN 04 22 EN 03 8 NN (Engineering) 15 NQ (Prof/Tech/Admin) 27 NU (Tech/Admin Support) 3 YEAR 2014 American Indian Alaska Native Male (AIAN M) 2 American Indian Alaskan Native Female (AIAN F) 1 African American Male (AA M) 5 African American Female (AA F) 2 Asian American Pacific Islander Male (AAPI M) 21 Asian American Pacific Islander Female (AAPI F) 2 Hispanic Male (H M) 5 Hispanic Female (H F) 3 White Male (W M) 26 White Female (W F) 16

  12. YEAR

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    17 Females 18 PAY PLAN YEAR 2014 SES 1 EJ/EK 3 NQ (Prof/Tech/Admin) 30 NU (Tech/Admin Support) 1 YEAR 2014 American Indian Alaska Native Male (AIAN M) 1 American Indian Alaskan Native Female (AIAN F) 2 African American Male (AA M) 3 African American Female (AA F) 7 Asian American Pacific Islander Male (AAPI M) 1 Asian American Pacific Islander Female (AAPI F) 0 Hispanic Male (H M) 2 Hispanic Female (H F) 6 White Male (W M) 10 White Female (W F) 3 DIVERSITY TOTAL WORKFORCE GENDER Associate

  13. YEAR

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    8 Females 25 PAY PLAN YEAR 2014 SES 1 EJ/EK 3 EN 05 1 EN 04 25 EN 03 1 NN (Engineering) 25 NQ (Prof/Tech/Admin) 25 NU (Tech/Admin Support) 2 YEAR 2014 American Indian Alaska Native Male (AIAN M) 1 American Indian Alaskan Native Female (AIAN F) 1 African American Male (AA M) 3 African American Female (AA F) 3 Asian American Pacific Islander Male (AAPI M) 2 Asian American Pacific Islander Female (AAPI F) 2 Hispanic Male (H M) 6 Hispanic Female (H F) 6 White Male (W M) 46 White Female (W F) 13

  14. YEAR

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    -9.09% YEAR 2012 2013 SES 1 1 0.00% EN 05 1 1 0.00% EN 04 11 11 0.00% NN (Engineering) 8 8 0.00% NQ (ProfTechAdmin) 17 14 -17.65% NU (TechAdmin Support) 2 2...

  15. YEAR

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Females 863 YEAR 2013 SES 102 EX 3 SL 1 EJEK 89 EN 05 41 EN 04 170 EN 03 18 NN (Engineering) 448 NQ (ProfTechAdmin) 1249 NU (TechAdmin Support) 76 NV (Nuc Mat Courier) 321...

  16. YEAR

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Females 942 YEAR 2012 SES 108 EX 4 SL 1 EJEK 96 EN 05 45 EN 04 196 EN 03 20 NN (Engineering) 452 NQ (ProfTechAdmin) 1291 NU (TechAdmin Support) 106 NV (Nuc Mat Courier) 335...

  17. YEAR

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    YEAR 2012 2013 SES 2 1 -50.00% EN 05 0 1 100.00% EN 04 4 4 0.00% NN (Engineering) 13 12 -7.69% NQ (ProfTechAdmin) 13 9 -30.77% NU (TechAdmin Support) 1 1...

  18. Monitoring well

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hubbell, Joel M.; Sisson, James B.

    2002-01-01

    The present invention relates to a monitoring well which includes an enclosure defining a cavity and a water reservoir enclosed within the cavity and wherein the reservoir has an inlet and an outlet. The monitoring well further includes a porous housing borne by the enclosure and which defines a fluid chamber which is oriented in fluid communication with the outlet of the reservoir, and wherein the porous housing is positioned in an earthen soil location below-grade. A geophysical monitoring device is provided and mounted in sensing relation relative to the fluid chamber of the porous housing; and a coupler is selectively moveable relative to the outlet of reservoir to couple the porous housing and water reservoir in fluid communication. An actuator is coupled in force transmitting relation relative to the coupler to selectively position the coupler in a location to allow fluid communication between the reservoir and the fluid chamber defined by the porous housing.

  19. Table 2.6 Household End Uses: Fuel Types, Appliances, and Electronics, Selected Years, 1978-2009

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    6 Household End Uses: Fuel Types, Appliances, and Electronics, Selected Years, 1978-2009 Appliance Year Change 1978 1979 1980 1981 1982 1984 1987 1990 1993 1997 2001 2005 2009 1980 to 2009 Total Households (millions) 77 78 82 83 84 86 91 94 97 101 107 111 114 32 Percent of Households<//td> Space Heating - Main Fuel 1 Natural Gas 55 55 55 56 57 55 55 55 53 52 55 52 50 -5 Electricity 2 16 17 18 17 16 17 20 23 26 29 29 30 35 17 Liquefied Petroleum Gases 4 5 5 4 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 0 Distillate

  20. Table 2.9 Commercial Buildings Consumption by Energy Source, Selected Years, 1979-2003 (Trillion Btu)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    9 Commercial Buildings Consumption by Energy Source, Selected Years, 1979-2003 (Trillion Btu) Energy Source and Year Square Footage Category Principal Building Activity Census Region 1 All Buildings 1,001 to 10,000 10,001 to 100,000 Over 100,000 Education Food Sales Food Service Health Care Lodging Mercantile and Service Office All Other Northeast Midwest South West Major Sources 2 1979 1,255 2,202 1,508 511 [3] 336 469 278 894 861 1,616 1,217 1,826 1,395 526 4,965 1983 1,242 1,935 1,646 480 [3]

  1. Selection

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Selected U.S. energy issues: a view from the Energy Information Administration for AAAS Fellows Department of Energy May 20, 2016 by Howard Gruenspecht, Deputy Administrator * EIA collects, analyzes, and disseminates independent and impartial energy information to promote sound policymaking, efficient markets, and public understanding of energy and its interaction with the economy and the environment * By law, data, analyses, and forecasts provided by EIA are independent of approval by any other

  2. Selective area epitaxy of monolithic white-light InGaN/GaN quantum well microstripes with dual color emission

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Li, Yuejing; Tong, Yuying; Yang, Guofeng Yao, Chujun; Sun, Rui; Cai, Lesheng; Xu, Guiting; Wang, Jin; Zhang, Qing; Ye, Xuanchao; Wu, Mengting; Wen, Zhiqin

    2015-09-15

    Monolithic color synthesis is demonstrated using InGaN/GaN multiple quantum wells (QWs) grown on GaN microstripes formed by selective area epitaxy on SiO{sub 2} mask patterns. The striped microfacet structure is composed of (0001) and (11-22) planes, attributed to favorable surface polarity and surface energy. InGaN/GaN QWs on different microfacets contain spatially inhomogeneous compositions owing to the diffusion of adatoms among the facets. This unique property allows the microfacet QWs to emit blue light from the (11-22) plane and yellow light from the top (0001) plane, the mixing of which leads to the perception of white light emission.

  3. Engineering two-dimensional superconductivity and Rashba spin–orbit coupling in LaAlO3/SrTiO3 quantum wells by selective orbital occupancy

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Herranz, Gervasi; Singh, Gyanendra; Bergeal, Nicolas; Jouan, Alexis; Lesueur, Jérôme; Gázquez, Jaume; Varela, María; Scigaj, Mateusz; Dix, Nico; Sánchez, Florencio; et al

    2015-01-13

    We find the discovery of two-dimensional electron gases (2DEGs) at oxide interfaces—involving electrons in narrow d-bands—has broken new ground, enabling the access to correlated states that are unreachable in conventional semiconductors based on s- and p- electrons. There is a growing consensus that emerging properties at these novel quantum wells—such as 2D superconductivity and magnetism—are intimately connected to specific orbital symmetries in the 2DEG sub-band structure. Here we show that crystal orientation allows selective orbital occupancy, disclosing unprecedented ways to tailor the 2DEG properties. By carrying out electrostatic gating experiments in ​LaAlO3/​SrTiO3 wells of different crystal orientations, we show thatmore » the spatial extension and anisotropy of the 2D superconductivity and the Rashba spin–orbit field can be largely modulated by controlling the 2DEG sub-band filling. Such an orientational tuning expands the possibilities for electronic engineering of 2DEGs at ​LaAlO3/​SrTiO3 interfaces.« less

  4. Well Placement

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Well Placement Well Placement LANL maintains an extensive groundwater monitoring and surveillance program through sampling. August 1, 2013 Finished groundwater well head with solar...

  5. Table 2.4 Household Energy Consumption by Census Region, Selected Years, 1978-2009 (Quadrillion Btu, Except as Noted)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Household 1 Energy Consumption by Census Region, Selected Years, 1978-2009 (Quadrillion Btu, Except as Noted) Census Region 2 1978 1979 1980 1981 1982 1984 1987 1990 1993 1997 2001 2005 2009 United States Total (does not include wood) 10.56 9.74 9.32 9.29 8.58 9.04 9.13 9.22 10.01 10.25 9.86 10.55 10.18 Natural Gas 5.58 5.31 4.97 5.27 4.74 4.98 4.83 4.86 5.27 5.28 4.84 4.79 4.69 Electricity 3 2.47 2.42 2.48 2.42 2.35 2.48 2.76 3.03 3.28 3.54 3.89 4.35 4.39 Distillate Fuel Oil and Kerosene 2.19

  6. Well Placement

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Well Placement Well Placement LANL maintains an extensive groundwater monitoring and surveillance program through sampling. August 1, 2013 Finished groundwater well head with solar power Finished groundwater well head with solar power How does LANL determine where to put a monitoring well? Project teams routinely review groundwater monitoring data to verify adequate placement of wells and to plan the siting of additional wells as needed. RELATED IMAGES

  7. Development and application of a new biotechnology of the molasses in-situ method; detailed evaluation for selected wells in the Romashkino carbonate reservoir

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wagner, M.; Lungerhausen, D.; Murtada, H.; Rosenthal, G.

    1995-12-31

    On the basis of different laboratory studies, by which special strains of the type Clostridium tyrobutyricum were found, the application of molasses in-situ method for the enhanced recovery of oil in Romashkino oil field was executed. In an anaerobic, 6%-molasses medium the strains produce about 11,400 mg/l of organic acids (especially butyric acid), 3,200 mg/l ethanol, butanol, etc., and more than 350 ml/g of molasses biogas with a content of 80% C0{sub 2} and 20% H{sub 2}. The metabolics of Clostridium tyrobutyricum depress the growth of SRB, whereas methanogenic bacteria grow in an undiluted fermented molasses medium very well. In this way the dominant final fermentation process is methanogenesis. By laboratory studies with original cores under the conditions of the carbonate reservoir in Bashkir, the recovery of oil increased from 15% after waterflooding to 29% OOIP during the treatment with molasses and bacteria. We developed a new biotechnological method for a self-regulated, automatic continuous culture and constructed a special pilot plant with a high technical standard. The plant produced during the pilot on Romashkino field (September 1992 to August 1994) about 1,000 m{sup 3} of clean inoculum with a content of 3-4 billion cells per ml. This inoculum was injected in slugs together with 15,000 m{sup 3} of molasses medium, first in one, later in five wells. We will demonstrate for two example wells the complex microbiological and chemical changes in the oil, gas, and water phases, and their influences on the recover of oil.

  8. Monitoring well

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hubbell, J.M.; Sisson, J.B.

    1999-06-29

    A monitoring well is described which includes: a conduit defining a passageway, the conduit having a proximal and opposite, distal end; a coupler connected in fluid flowing relationship with the passageway; and a porous housing borne by the coupler and connected in fluid flowing relation thereto. 8 figs.

  9. Monitoring well

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hubbell, Joel M.; Sisson, James B.

    1999-01-01

    A monitoring well including a conduit defining a passageway, the conduit having a proximal and opposite, distal end; a coupler connected in fluid flowing relationship with the passageway; and a porous housing borne by the coupler and connected in fluid flowing relation thereto.

  10. Well pump

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ames, Kenneth R.; Doesburg, James M.

    1987-01-01

    A well pump includes a piston and an inlet and/or outlet valve assembly of special structure. Each is formed of a body of organic polymer, preferably PTFE. Each includes a cavity in its upper portion and at least one passage leading from the cavity to the bottom of the block. A screen covers each cavity and a valve disk covers each screen. Flexible sealing flanges extend upwardly and downwardly from the periphery of the piston block. The outlet valve block has a sliding block and sealing fit with the piston rod.

  11. Extended (5-year) Outcomes of Accelerated Partial Breast Irradiation Using MammoSite Balloon Brachytherapy: Patterns of Failure, Patient Selection, and Dosimetric Correlates for Late Toxicity

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vargo, John A.; Verma, Vivek; Kim, Hayeon; Kalash, Ronny; Heron, Dwight E.; Johnson, Ronald; Beriwal, Sushil

    2014-02-01

    Purpose: Accelerated partial breast irradiation (APBI) with balloon and catheter-based brachytherapy has gained increasing popularity in recent years and is the subject of ongoing phase III trials. Initial data suggest promising local control and cosmetic results in appropriately selected patients. Long-term data continue to evolve but are limited outside of the context of the American Society of Breast Surgeons Registry Trial. Methods and Materials: A retrospective review of 157 patients completing APBI after breast-conserving surgery and axillary staging via high-dose-rate {sup 192}Ir brachytherapy from June 2002 to December 2007 was made. APBI was delivered with a single-lumen MammoSite balloon-based applicator to a median dose of 34 Gy in 10 fractions over a 5-day period. Tumor coverage and critical organ dosimetry were retrospectively collected on the basis of computed tomography completed for conformance and symmetry. Results: At a median follow-up time of 5.5 years (range, 0-10.0 years), the 5-year and 7-year actuarial incidences of ipsilateral breast control were 98%/98%, of nodal control 99%/98%, and of distant control 99%/99%, respectively. The crude rate of ipsilateral breast recurrence was 2.5% (n=4); of nodal failure, 1.9% (n=3); and of distant failure, 0.6% (n=1). The 5-year and 7-year actuarial overall survival rates were 89%/86%, with breast cancerspecific survival of 100%/99%, respectively. Good to excellent cosmetic outcomes were achieved in 93.4% of patients. Telangiectasia developed in 27% of patients, with 1-year, 3-year, and 5-year actuarial incidence of 7%/24%/33%; skin dose >100% significantly predicted for the development of telangiectasia (50% vs 14%, P<.0001). Conclusions: Long-term single-institution outcomes suggest excellent tumor control, breast cosmesis, and minimal late toxicity. Skin toxicity is a function of skin dose, which may be ameliorated with dosimetric optimization afforded by newer multicatheter brachytherapy applicators

  12. Indiana Natural Gas Withdrawals from Oil Wells (Million Cubic...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Oil Wells (Million Cubic Feet) Indiana Natural Gas Withdrawals from Oil Wells (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 ...

  13. Missouri Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Oil Wells (Million...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    from Oil Wells (Million Cubic Feet) Missouri Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Oil Wells (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 ...

  14. Virginia Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells ...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Virginia Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 ...

  15. Monitoring Well Placement

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Monitoring Well Placement Monitoring Well Placement Monitoring wells are designed and placed to define groundwater flow and water quality below the surface. August 1, 2013 Topographic map showing placement of monitoring wells Topographic map showing placement of monitoring wells

  16. Well Monitoring Systems for EGS

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Our system can stay in the well and operate unmanned for days or years. This reduces cost ... - Once in place, the system can run unmanned (no logging truck) 3 | US DOE ...

  17. DESCRIPTION OF ACTIVITIES AND SELECTED RESULTS FOR THE U.S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY S CLEAN ENERGY APPLICATION CENTERS: FISCAL YEAR 2010

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schweitzer, Martin

    2011-11-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) sponsors a set of Clean Energy Application Centers that promote the development and deployment of clean energy technologies. There are eight regional centers that provide assistance for specific areas of the country plus a separate center operated by the International District Energy Association that provides technical assistance on district energy issues and applications to the regional centers. The original focus of the centers was on combined heat and power (CHP) alone but, beginning in fiscal year 2010, their scope expanded to include district energy systems and waste heat recovery. At that time, the official name of the centers changed from CHP Regional Application Centers (RACs) to Clean Energy Application Centers, and their number was expanded to include the previously-mentioned center focusing on district energy. Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) has performed two previous studies of RAC activities. The first one examined what the RACs had done each year from the initiation of the program through fiscal year (FY) 2008 and the second one examined RAC activities for the 2009 fiscal year. The most recent study, described in this report, examines what was accomplished in fiscal year 2010, the first year since the RACs expanded their focus and changed their name to Clean Energy Application Centers.

  18. Monitoring Well Placement

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Monitoring Well Placement Monitoring Well Placement Monitoring wells are designed and placed to define groundwater flow and water quality below the surface. August 1, 2013...

  19. Well Placement Decision Process

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Well Placement Decision Process Well Placement Decision Process Determining where to place a well is a multi-step process. August 1, 2013 Investigation process for determining where to place a sentinel well Investigation process for determining where

  20. Abandoning wells working group

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1997-03-01

    The primary objective of this working group is to identify major technical, regulatory, and environmental issues that are relevant to the abandonment of offshore wellbores. Once the issues have been identified, the working group also has the objective of making recommendations or providing potential solutions for consideration. Areas for process improvement will be identified and {open_quotes}best practices{close_quotes} will be discussed and compared to {open_quotes}minimum standards.{close_quotes} The working group will primarily focus on wellbore abandonment in the Gulf of Mexico. However, workshop participants are encouraged to discuss international issues which may be relevant to wellbore abandonment practices in the Gulf of Mexico. The Abandoning Wells Group has identified several major areas for discussion that have concerns related to both operators and service companies performing wellbore abandonments in the Gulf of Mexico. The following broad topics were selected for the agenda: (1) MMS minimum requirements and state regulations. (2) Co-existence of best practices, new technology, and P & A economics. (3) Liability and environmental issues relating to wellbore abandonment.

  1. Hydrogeologic investigation and establishment of a permanent multi-observational well network in Aiken, Allendale, and Barnwell Counties, South Carolina. Eight-year interim report (1986-1994). Volume 1 cluster-site description

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gellici, J.A.; Reed, R.H.; Logan, W.R.; Aadland, R.K.; Simones, G.C.

    1995-05-01

    The South Carolina Department of Natural Resources, Water Resources Division (SCWRD), in collaboration with the United States Department of Energy (USDOE) is conducting a hydrogeologic investigation of the ground-water system(s) peripheral to the Savannah River Site. The study area is located in the Southeastern Coastal Plain hydrogeologic province in Aiken, Allendale and Barnwell Counties, South Carolina. Ground-water movement, quality, and availability are being evaluated in order to better protect and manage this valuable regional resource. The investigation involves a well-cluster system comparable to the one constructed on the SRS. Cluster sites are situated outside the SRS on the basis of study objectives, proximity to the plant`s borders, land availability, and for the optimization of hydrogeologic control. One to three wells are completed into each major aquifer, and at each cluster site, at least one borehole is continuously cored and geophysically logged from land surface to at least 10 feet into unweathered bedrock. Data collected from the ongoing study include 146 paleontologic and palynologic age dates, 100 x-ray diffraction analyses of clay and bulk mineralogy, 442 sieve analyses, 6,040 feet of detailed core description, mineral composition and porosity determined from thin-section analyses, and continuous water-level data. This report is a compilation and interpretation of the {open_quotes}C-well{close_quotes} data that have been generated from the project and that will be used to model and characterize the aquifers and confining units in the region.

  2. Well completion and servicing fluid

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Grimsley, R.L.

    1990-09-25

    This patent describes a well completion servicing fluid for controlling formation pressure during completion or servicing of a well. It comprises: an aqueous solution of calcium chloride, a solid weighing agent suspended in the solution and being selected from the group consisting of zinc, zinc oxide, and mixtures thereof; and a viscosifier dissolved in the solution in an amount effective to suspend the weighing agent. The fluid has a density of greater than 15 pounds per gallon and being substantially free of bromide ions and being substantially free of solid material which is not soluble in hydrochloric acid.

  3. Fracture optimization on every well

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ely, J.W.; Tiner, R.L.

    1998-01-01

    Since hydraulic fracturing was introduced in 1947, significant advances have been made in the area of fracture diagnostics, particularly in the last 20 years. Common diagnostic procedures used today to quantify fracture geometry and fracture fluid efficiency are listed in a table. During the past several years, the most popular procedure was to conduct most or all of the diagnostics on one well in a field, and apply the results to subsequent wells. However, experience has shown that critical factors can change drastically, even in fields with minimal well spacing. Although some variations in relative rock stresses have been seen, rock properties typically remain fairly consistent within a designated area. However, the factor that changes drastically from well to well--even in spacing as small as 10 acres--is fracture fluid efficiency. As much as a 60% change in fluid efficiencies has been noted for offset wells. Because of these variations, a new procedure has been developed in which fracture treatments on individual wells can be optimized on the day of the fracture treatment. The paper describes this fracture optimization procedure.

  4. BUFFERED WELL FIELD OUTLINES

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    OIL & GAS FIELD OUTLINES FROM BUFFERED WELLS The VBA Code below builds oil & gas field boundary outlines (polygons) from buffered wells (points). Input well points layer must be a feature class (FC) with the following attributes: Field_name Buffer distance (can be unique for each well to represent reservoirs with different drainage radii) ...see figure below. Copy the code into a new module. Inputs: In ArcMap, data frame named "Task 1" Well FC as first layer (layer 0). Output:

  5. Well Log ETL tool

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    2013-08-01

    This is an executable python script which offers two different conversions for well log data: 1) Conversion from a BoreholeLASLogData.xls model to a LAS version 2.0 formatted XML file. 2) Conversion from a LAS 2.0 formatted XML file to an entry in the WellLog Content Model. Example templates for BoreholeLASLogData.xls and WellLogsTemplate.xls can be found in the package after download.

  6. Oil well standing valve

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Holland, R. A.; Brennan, J. R.; Christ, F. C.; Petrie, H. L.

    1985-05-28

    A standing valve which may be retrievably mounted in a well production tubing and will allow the maximum possible fluid flow and also allow the valve to be easily drained and retrieved through the well production tubing. The seal between the standing valve and the bottom hole assembly is located at or below the level of the seat and fluid from the top of the valve into the well is drained through the seat.

  7. Geothermal well stimulation program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hanold, R.J.

    1982-01-01

    The stimulation of geothermal production wells presents some new and challenging problems. Formation temperatures in the 275 to 550/sup 0/F range can be expected and the behavior of fracturing fluids and fracture proppants at these temperatures in a hostile brine environment must be carefully evaluated in laboratory tests. To avoid possible damage to the producing horizon of the formation, the high-temperature chemical compatibility between the in situ materials and the fracturing fluids, fluid loss additives, and proppants must be verified. In geothermal wells, the necessary stimulation techniques are required to be capable of initiating and maintaining the flow of very large amounts of fluid. This necessity for high flow rates represents a significant departure from conventional oil field stimulation. The objective of well stimulation is to initiate and maintain additional fluid production from existing wells at a lower cost than either drilling new replacement wells or multiply redrilling existing wells. The economics of well stimulation will be vastly enhanced when proven stimulation techniques can be implemented as part of the well completion (while the drilling rig is still over the hole) on all new wells exhibiting some form of flow impairment. Results from 7 stimulation tests are presented and planned tests are described.

  8. Penrose Well Temperatures

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Christopherson, Karen

    2013-03-15

    Penrose Well Temperatures Geothermal waters have been encountered in several wells near Penrose in Fremont County, Colorado. Most of the wells were drilled for oil and gas exploration and, in a few cases, production. This ESRI point shapefile utilizes data from 95 wells in and around the Penrose area provided by the Colorado Oil and Gas Conservation Commission (COGCC) database at http://cogcc.state.co.us/ . Temperature data from the database were used to calculate a temperature gradient for each well. This information was then used to estimate temperatures at various depths. Projection: UTM Zone 13 NAD27 Extent: West -105.224871 East -105.027633 North 38.486269 South 38.259507 Originators: Colorado Oil and Gas Conservation Commission (COGCC) Karen Christopherson

  9. Isobaric groundwater well

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hubbell, Joel M.; Sisson, James B.

    1999-01-01

    A method of measuring a parameter in a well, under isobaric conditions, including such parameters as hydraulic gradient, pressure, water level, soil moisture content and/or aquifer properties the method as presented comprising providing a casing having first and second opposite ends, and a length between the ends, the casing supporting a transducer having a reference port; placing the casing lengthwise into the well, second end first, with the reference port vented above the water table in the well; and sealing the first end. A system is presented for measuring a parameter in a well, the system comprising a casing having first and second opposite ends, and a length between the ends and being configured to be placed lengthwise into a well second end first; a transducer, the transducer having a reference port, the reference port being vented in the well above the water table, the casing being screened across and above the water table; and a sealing member sealing the first end. In one embodiment, the transducer is a tensiometer transducer and in other described embodiments, another type transducer is used in addition to a tensiometer.

  10. Geothermal Well Stimulation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Campbell, D. A.; Morris, C. W.; Sinclair, A. R.; Hanold, R. J.; Vetter, O. J.

    1981-03-01

    The stimulation of geothermal wells presents some new and challenging problems. Formation temperatures in the 300-600 F range can be expected. The behavior of stimulation fluids, frac proppants, and equipment at these temperatures in a hostile brine environment must be carefully evaluated before performance expectations can be determined. In order to avoid possible damage to the producing horizon of the formation, high temperature chemical compatibility between the in situ materials and the stimulation materials must be verified. Perhaps most significant of all, in geothermal wells the required techniques must be capable of bringing about the production of very large amounts of fluid. This necessity for high flow rates represents a significant departure from conventional petroleum well stimulation and demands the creation of very high near-wellbore permeability and/or fractures with very high flow conductivity.

  11. Horizontal well planning

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schuh, F.J. )

    1991-03-01

    Interest in horizontal drilling has exploded at a rate well above even the most optimistic projections. Certainly, this technique will not end with the Bakken and Austin Chalk plays. However, future reservoirs will undoubtedly require much more complicated well designs and multi-disciplined technical interaction than has been used so far. The horizontal drilling costs are too high to permit resolving of all the technical issues by trial and error. A multi-disciplinary team approach will be required in order for horizontal drilling to achieve its economic potential.

  12. Thermal indicator for wells

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Gaven, Jr., Joseph V.; Bak, Chan S.

    1983-01-01

    Minute durable plate-like thermal indicators are employed for precision measuring static and dynamic temperatures of well drilling fluids. The indicators are small enough and sufficiently durable to be circulated in the well with drilling fluids during the drilling operation. The indicators include a heat resistant indicating layer, a coacting meltable solid component and a retainer body which serves to unitize each indicator and which may carry permanent indicator identifying indicia. The indicators are recovered from the drilling fluid at ground level by known techniques.

  13. Kimberly Well - Photos

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shervais, John

    2011-06-16

    The Snake River Plain (SRP), Idaho, hosts potential geothermal resources due to elevated groundwater temperatures associated with the thermal anomaly Yellowstone-Snake River hotspot. Project HOTSPOT has coordinated international institutions and organizations to understand subsurface stratigraphy and assess geothermal potential. Over 5.9km of core were drilled from three boreholes within the SRP in an attempt to acquire continuous core documenting the volcanic and sedimentary record of the hotspot: (1) Kimama, (2) Kimberly, and (3) Mountain Home. The Kimberly drill hole was selected to document continuous volcanism when analysed in conjunction with the Kimama and is located near the margin of the plain. Data submitted by project collaborator Doug Schmitt, University of Alberta

  14. Models for geothermal wells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Michaelides, E.E.

    1980-06-01

    The problem of two-phase flow pressure loss is examined in order to give an answer to the problem of determination of the wellhead conditions. For this purpose two models have been developed, the first based on the pattern structure of the flow and the second on the mixing length theory. The void fraction correlations and the transition conditions are presented in the first model as a means of estimating the pressure loss. Heat losses, and the effect of impurities are examined in detail. An expression for the critical flow conditions is also derived. The model is used to predict the available power at the wellhead under various conditions and an answer to the problem of well pumping is given. For the second model an outline of the mixing length theory and the boundary layer coordinates is given; a density distribution in the geothermal well is assumed and the equations for the pressure loss are derived by means of the entropy production function. Finally a comparison of the two models is made and their predictive power is tested against known well data. A brief comparison with the Denver Research Institute is also made.

  15. Bit selection increases coiled tubing and slimhole success

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Feiner, R.F.

    1995-07-01

    Slimhole applications have grown within the past few years to include deepening existing wells to untapped reservoirs, drilling smaller well programs to reduce tangible costs and recompleting wells to adjacent reservoirs through directional or horizontal sidetracks. When selecting the proper bit for an interval, the ultimate goal is the same in the slimhole application as in the conventional application -- to save the operator money by reducing drilling cost per foot (CPF). Slimhole bit selection is a three-step process: (1) identify the characteristics of the formations to be drilled; (2) analyze the operational limitations of the slimhole application; and (3) select the bit type that will most economically drill the interval. Knowledge of lithology is crucial to the selection process. Accurate formation knowledge can be acquired from offset well records, mud logs, cores, electric logs, compressive rock strength analysis and any other information relevant to the drilling operation. This paper reviews the steps in selecting slimhole bits and completion equipment.

  16. Helicopter magnetic survey conducted to locate wells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Veloski, G.A.; Hammack, R.W.; Stamp, V.; Hall, R.; Colina, K.

    2008-07-01

    A helicopter magnetic survey was conducted in August 2007 over 15.6 sq mi at the Naval Petroleum Reserve No. 3s (NPR-3) Teapot Dome Field near Casper, Wyoming. The surveys purpose was to accurately locate wells drilled there during more than 90 years of continuous oilfield operation. The survey was conducted at low altitude and with closely spaced flight lines to improve the detection of wells with weak magnetic response and to increase the resolution of closely spaced wells. The survey was in preparation for a planned CO2 flood for EOR, which requires a complete well inventory with accurate locations for all existing wells. The magnetic survey was intended to locate wells missing from the well database and to provide accurate locations for all wells. The ability of the helicopter magnetic survey to accurately locate wells was accomplished by comparing airborne well picks with well locations from an intense ground search of a small test area.

  17. ADVANCED CEMENTS FOR GEOTHERMAL WELLS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    SUGAMA,T.

    2007-01-01

    Using the conventional well cements consisting of the calcium silicate hydrates (CaO-SiO{sub 2}-H{sub 2}O system) and calcium aluminum silicate hydrates (CaO-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}-SiO{sub 2}-H{sub 2}O system) for the integrity of geothermal wells, the serious concern confronting the cementing industries was their poor performance in mechanically supporting the metallic well casing pipes and in mitigating the pipe's corrosion in very harsh geothermal reservoirs. These difficulties are particularly acute in two geological regions: One is the deep hot downhole area ({approx} 1700 m depth at temperatures of {approx} 320 C) that contains hyper saline water with high concentrations of CO{sub 2} (> 40,000 ppm) in conjunction with {approx} 100 ppm H{sub 2}S at a mild acid of pH {approx} 5.0; the other is the upper well region between the well's surface and {approx} 1000 m depth at temperatures up to 200 C. The specific environment of the latter region is characterized by highly concentrated H{sub 2}SO{sub 4} (pH < 1.5) brine containing at least 5000 ppm CO{sub 2}. When these conventional cements are emplaced in these harsh environments, their major shortcoming is their susceptibility to reactions with hot CO{sub 2} and H{sub 2}SO4, thereby causing their deterioration brought about by CO{sub 2}-catalyzed carbonation and acid-initiated erosion. Such degradation not only reduced rapidly the strength of cements, lowering the mechanical support of casing pipes, but also increased the extent of permeability of the brine through the cement layer, promoting the rate of the pipe's corrosion. Severely carbonated and acid eroded cements often impaired the integrity of a well in less than one year; in the worst cases, casings have collapsed within three months, leading to the need for costly and time-consuming repairs or redrilling operations. These were the reasons why the geothermal well drilling and cementing industries were concerned about using conventional well cements, and further

  18. Author Select

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Authors Please use the pane on the left to start the selection process.

  19. Utah Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Utah Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 ...

  20. Well Record or History | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Record or History Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Legal Document- OtherOther: Well Record or HistoryLegal Published NA Year Signed or Took...

  1. California Water Well Standards | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Water Well StandardsLegal Published NA Year Signed or Took Effect 2104 Legal Citation Not provided DOI Not Provided Check for DOI availability: http:crossref.org Online...

  2. Third invitational well-testing symposium: well testing in low...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    session, case histories and related phenomena, well test design in low permeability formations, analysis and interpretation of well test data, and instrumentation for well tests. ...

  3. LANL selects two small businesses for water monitoring work

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    LANL selects two small businesses for water monitoring work LANL selects two small businesses for water monitoring work The two companies selected are TerranearPMC, LLC and Eberline Services, Inc. April 12, 2011 LANL monitors water at more than 200 wells and sample ports at various depths. LANL monitors water at more than 200 wells and sample ports at various depths. Contact Fred deSousa Communications Office (505) 665-3430 Email Subcontract worth up to $80 million over five years LOS ALAMOS,

  4. Ultra Thin Quantum Well Materials

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dr Saeid Ghamaty

    2012-08-16

    open many markets for waste heat recovery applications. By installing Hi-Z's materials in applications in which electricity could be produced from waste heat sources could result in significant energy savings as well as emissions reductions. For example, if QW thermoelectric generators could be introduced commercially in 2015, and assuming they could also capture an additional 0.1%/year of the available waste heat from the aluminum, steel, and iron industries, then by 2020, their use would lead to a 2.53 trillion Btu/year reduction in energy consumption. This translates to a $12.9 million/year energy savings, and 383.6 million lb's of CO2 emissions reduction per year. Additionally, Hi-Z would expect that the use of QW TE devices in the automotive, manufacturing, and energy generation industries would reduce the USA's petroleum and fossil fuel dependence, and thus significantly reduce emissions from CO2 and other polluting gasses such as NOx, SOx, and particulate matter (PM), etc.

  5. ENERGY STAR PortfolioManager Baseline Year Instructions

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Baseline Year" Time frame Select "Multiple Properties" Using filters, choose properties to include in report Check box to Select all filtered properties Select these reporting ...

  6. ENERGY STAR PortfolioManager Current Year Instructions

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Current Year" Time frame Select "Multiple Properties" Using filters, choose properties to include in report Check box to Select all filtered properties Select these reporting items ...

  7. Texas Water Code 27A General Provisions for Injection Wells ...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    WellsLegal Abstract These rules outline the requirements for construction and maintenance of injection wells in Texas. Published NA Year Signed or Took Effect 1977 Legal...

  8. Author Select

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Selection List Select "add" or "add all", which appear after author's names in the middle pane, to add to the search strategy that appears in this pane. Return to Search >>

  9. Author Select

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Author Select Last Name First Name search Type in a name, or the first few letters of a name, in one or both of appropriate search boxes above and select "Go". An attempt will be...

  10. Author Select

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Selection List Select "add" or "add all", which appear after author's names in the middle pane, to add to the search strategy that appears in this pane. Return to Search >>

  11. Single-Well and Cross-Well Seismic At Salt Wells Area (Bureau...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Seismic At Salt Wells Area (Bureau of Land Management, 2009) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Single-Well and Cross-Well Seismic...

  12. South Dakota Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Coalbed Wells (Million

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Cubic Feet) Coalbed Wells (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 2000's 0 0 0 0 2010's 0 0 0 0 0 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 8/31/2016 Next Release Date: 9/30/2016 Referring Pages: Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Coalbed Wells South Dakota Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals and Production Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from

  13. POLICY GUIDANCE MEMORANDUM #13 Reemployment Priority List Selections |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy 3 Reemployment Priority List Selections POLICY GUIDANCE MEMORANDUM #13 Reemployment Priority List Selections The Department's RPL is designed to provide priority consideration to employees who have lost their jobs through reduction in force, or who have fully recovered from a compensable injury after more than 1 year. Employees may only receive priority consideration for positions that they are well-qualified for and that are in the local commuting area from which

  14. Exploratory Well At Salt Wells Area (Bureau of Land Management...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Bureau of Land Management, 2009) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Exploratory Well At Salt Wells Area (Bureau of Land Management,...

  15. West Virginia Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) West Virginia Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 ...

  16. Well-pump alignment system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Drumheller, Douglas S.

    1998-01-01

    An improved well-pump for geothermal wells, an alignment system for a well-pump, and to a method for aligning a rotor and stator within a well-pump, wherein the well-pump has a whistle assembly formed at a bottom portion thereof, such that variations in the frequency of the whistle, indicating misalignment, may be monitored during pumping.

  17. U.S. Average Depth of Crude Oil Exploratory Wells Drilled (Feet per Well)

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Wells Drilled (Feet per Well) U.S. Average Depth of Crude Oil Exploratory Wells Drilled (Feet per Well) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1940's 4,232 1950's 4,335 4,609 4,781 4,761 4,740 4,819 4,901 5,036 4,993 5,021 1960's 5,170 5,099 5,124 4,878 5,509 5,672 5,700 5,758 5,914 6,054 1970's 6,247 5,745 5,880 6,243 5,855 5,913 6,010 5,902 6,067 6,011 1980's 5,727 5,853 5,504 5,141 5,565 5,865 6,069 6,104 6,182 6,028 1990's 6,838 6,641 6,930 6,627 6,671

  18. U.S. Average Depth of Dry Holes Developmental Wells Drilled (Feet per Well)

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Developmental Wells Drilled (Feet per Well) U.S. Average Depth of Dry Holes Developmental Wells Drilled (Feet per Well) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1940's 3,225 1950's 3,077 3,255 3,520 3,401 3,512 3,699 3,574 3,605 3,631 3,844 1960's 3,889 3,782 4,239 4,143 4,207 4,446 3,900 3,901 4,311 4,437 1970's 4,714 4,633 4,725 4,851 4,599 4,415 4,439 4,662 4,600 4,517 1980's 4,214 4,226 4,184 3,974 4,205 4,306 4,236 4,390 4,704 4,684 1990's 4,755 4,629

  19. U.S. Average Depth of Dry Holes Exploratory Wells Drilled (Feet per Well)

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Exploratory Wells Drilled (Feet per Well) U.S. Average Depth of Dry Holes Exploratory Wells Drilled (Feet per Well) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1940's 3,658 1950's 3,733 4,059 4,334 4,447 4,408 4,498 4,425 4,488 4,449 4,602 1960's 4,575 4,799 4,790 4,933 4,980 5,007 5,117 5,188 5,589 5,739 1970's 5,700 5,796 5,882 5,808 5,649 5,674 5,607 5,605 5,812 5,716 1980's 5,533 5,582 5,367 4,800 5,178 5,317 5,447 5,294 5,748 5,579 1990's 5,685 5,658 5,480

  20. U.S. Average Depth of Natural Gas Exploratory Wells Drilled (Feet per Well)

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Wells Drilled (Feet per Well) U.S. Average Depth of Natural Gas Exploratory Wells Drilled (Feet per Well) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1940's 5,682 1950's 5,466 5,497 6,071 5,654 6,059 5,964 6,301 6,898 6,657 6,613 1960's 6,298 6,457 6,728 6,370 7,547 7,295 8,321 7,478 7,697 8,092 1970's 7,695 7,649 7,400 6,596 6,456 6,748 6,777 6,625 6,662 6,630 1980's 6,604 6,772 6,921 6,395 6,502 6,787 6,777 6,698 6,683 6,606 1990's 7,100 7,122 6,907 6,482 6,564

  1. U.S. Nominal Cost per Dry Well Drilled (Thousand Dollars per Well)

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Dry Well Drilled (Thousand Dollars per Well) U.S. Nominal Cost per Dry Well Drilled (Thousand Dollars per Well) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1960's 44.0 45.2 50.8 48.2 48.5 53.1 56.9 61.5 66.2 70.2 1970's 80.9 86.8 94.9 105.8 141.7 177.2 190.3 230.2 281.7 339.6 1980's 376.5 464.0 515.4 366.5 329.2 372.3 389.2 259.1 366.4 355.4 1990's 367.5 441.2 357.6 387.7 491.5 481.2 541.0 655.6 973.2 1,115.5 2000's 1,075.4 1,620.4 1,673.4 2,065.1 1,977.3 2,392.9

  2. U.S. Nominal Cost per Natural Gas Well Drilled (Thousand Dollars per Well)

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Natural Gas Well Drilled (Thousand Dollars per Well) U.S. Nominal Cost per Natural Gas Well Drilled (Thousand Dollars per Well) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1960's 102.7 94.7 97.1 92.4 104.8 101.9 133.8 141.0 148.5 154.3 1970's 160.7 166.6 157.8 155.3 189.2 262.0 270.4 313.5 374.2 443.1 1980's 536.4 698.6 864.3 608.1 489.8 508.7 522.9 380.4 460.3 457.8 1990's 471.3 506.6 426.1 521.2 535.1 629.7 616.0 728.6 815.6 798.4 2000's 756.9 896.5 991.9

  3. Methods for obtaining well-to-well flow communication

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Harmon, R.A.; Wahl, H.A.

    1988-07-05

    A process is described for reducing uneven areal sweep of injection fluid in a well pattern having a central injection well surrounded by production wells, all of the wells being communicated by a fracture, comprising: (a) injecting fracturing fluid containing a proppant material into the central injection well and into the fracture to prop the fracture adjacent the injection well; (b) simultaneous with step (a), injecting fluid into one or more of the production wells toward which it is desired to reduce the flow of injection fluid, thereby causing a greater portion of the proppant material to be placed in the fracture adjacent the central injection well in directions away from the one or more of the production wells toward which it is desired to reduce the flow of injection fluid; and (c) thereby subsequently reducing uneven areal sweep of injection fluid injected into the central injection well at rates and pressures below those required to part the fracture.

  4. Salt Selected (FINAL)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    WHY SALT WAS SELECTED AS A DISPOSAL MEDIUM Waste Isolation Pilot Plant U.S. Department Of Energy Government officials and scientists chose the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) site through a selection process that started in the 1950s. At that time, the National Academy of Sciences conducted a nationwide search for geological formations stable enough to contain radioactive wastes for thousands of years. In 1955, after extensive study, salt deposits were recommended as a promising medium for

  5. Y YEAR

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    2 40 -4.76% YEAR 2013 2014 Males 37 35 -5.41% Females 5 5 0% YEAR 2013 2014 SES 2 2 0% EJEK 5 4 -20.00% EN 05 5 7 40.00% EN 04 6 6 0% EN 03 1 1 0% NN...

  6. Y YEAR

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    79 67 -15.19% YEAR 2013 2014 Males 44 34 -22.73% Females 35 33 -5.71% YEAR 2013 2014 SES 6 4 -33.33% EJEK 1 1 0% EN 05 9 8 -11.11% EN 04 6 5 -16.67% NN...

  7. Author Select

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Author Select Last Name First Name search Type in a name, or the first few letters of a name, in one or both of appropriate search boxes above and select "Go". An attempt will be made to match authors that most closely relate to the text you typed.

  8. Pulse Wave Well Development Demonstration

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Burdick, S.

    2001-02-23

    Conventional methods of well development at the Savannah River Site generate significant volumes of investigative derived waste (IDW) which must be treated and disposed of at a regulated Treatment, Storage, or Disposal (TSD) facility. Pulse Wave technology is a commercial method of well development utilizing bursts of high pressure gas to create strong pressure waves through the well screen zone, extending out into the formation surrounding the well. The patented process is intended to reduce well development time and the amount of IDW generated as well as to micro-fracture the formation to improve well capacity.

  9. Well-pump alignment system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Drumheller, D.S.

    1998-10-20

    An improved well-pump for geothermal wells, an alignment system for a well-pump, and to a method for aligning a rotor and stator within a well-pump are disclosed, wherein the well-pump has a whistle assembly formed at a bottom portion thereof, such that variations in the frequency of the whistle, indicating misalignment, may be monitored during pumping. 6 figs.

  10. Oregon Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Coalbed Wells (Million Cubic

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1990's 24,171 52,846 49,661 2000's 69,451 82,542 55,854 74,400 88,734 87,998 75,186 101,503 116,637 108,705 2010's 108,827 60,252 81,444 101,930 90,099 113

    09 2010 2011 2012 2013 2014 View History Gross Withdrawals 821 1,407 1,344 770 770 950 1979-2014 From Gas Wells 821 1,407 1,344 770 770 950 1979-2014 From Oil Wells 0 0 0 0 0 0 1996-2014 From Shale Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 0 2007-2014 From Coalbed Wells 0 0 0

  11. Missouri Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Coalbed Wells (Million Cubic

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1990's 7,465 16,034 19,428 2000's 30,481 32,805 29,911 21,778 24,574 31,831 32,480 41,067 43,009 29,807 2010's 40,216 37,626 50,538 37,119 34,825 40,10

    NA NA NA NA 9 9 1967-2014 From Gas Wells NA NA NA NA 8 8 1967-2014 From Oil Wells NA NA NA NA 1 * 2007-2014 From Shale Gas Wells NA NA NA NA 0 0 2007-2014 From Coalbed Wells NA NA NA NA 0 0 2007-2014 Repressuring NA NA NA NA 0 0 2007-2014 Vented and Flared

  12. Nevada Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Coalbed Wells (Million Cubic

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1990's 75,656 84,093 89,954 2000's 121,054 108,510 109,605 115,960 136,945 147,743 166,867 171,473 180,668 192,049 2010's 175,837 162,778 189,291 181,326 167,916 207,145

    4 3 4 3 3 1991-2014 From Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 3 2006-2014 From Oil Wells 4 4 3 4 3 * 1991-2014 From Shale Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 0 2007-2014 From Coalbed Wells 0 0 0 0 0 0 2006-2014 Repressuring 0 0 0 0 0 0 2006-2014 Vented and Flared 0 0 0 0

  13. Hydrogeologic Site Characterization and Well Testing

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Laboratories' Defense Waste Management Programs (DWMP) uses a combination of field systems, software and scientific expertise to perform characterization activities. Capabilities include groundwater testing and hydraulic response analysis to assess and understand subsurface conditions at a particular site or region. Hydrology as part of the Site Characterization Whether you are looking to site a petroleum production well, locate a new business, or select a site for a nuclear repository, a

  14. Horizontal well replaces hydraulic fracturing in North Sea gas well

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Reynolds, D.A.; Seymour, K.P. )

    1991-11-25

    This paper reports on excessive water production from hydraulically fractured wells in a poor quality reservoir in the North SEa which prompted the drilling of a horizontal well. Gas production from the horizontal well reached six times that of the offset vertical wells, and no water production occurred. This horizontal well proved commercial the western section of the Anglia field. Horizontal drilling in the North SEa is as an effective technology to enhance hydrocarbon recovery from reservoirs that previously had proven uncommercial with other standard techniques. It is viable for the development of marginal reservoirs, particularly where conditions preclude stimulation from hydraulic fracturing.

  15. Selection Process

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Selection Process Selection Process Fellowships will be awarded based on academic excellence, relevance of candidate's research to the laboratory mission in fundamental nuclear science and relevance to Global Security or Science of Campaign missions. Contacts Director Albert Migliori Deputy Franz Freibert 505 667-6879 Email Professional Staff Assistant Susan Ramsay 505 665 0858 Email The Seaborg internal advisory committee will judge applications based on academic excellence, relevance of the

  16. Wellness Services | The Ames Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Program Wellness Program Workers spend 200 hours per month at work, and keeping a healthy work-life balance is essential. The Headquarters Wellness Program provides support and assistance to DOE employees through a variety of programs and resources geared toward enhancing their mental and physical well-being. Wellness programs include: Accommodations, the Child Development Centers, the Employee Assistance Program (EAP), the Forrestal (FOHO) and Germantown (GOHO) Fitness Centers, the Occupational

  17. Thermal well-test method

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Tsang, Chin-Fu; Doughty, Christine A.

    1985-01-01

    A well-test method involving injection of hot (or cold) water into a groundwater aquifer, or injecting cold water into a geothermal reservoir. By making temperature measurements at various depths in one or more observation wells, certain properties of the aquifer are determined. These properties, not obtainable from conventional well test procedures, include the permeability anisotropy, and layering in the aquifer, and in-situ thermal properties. The temperature measurements at various depths are obtained from thermistors mounted in the observation wells.

  18. Wellness Program | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Program Wellness Program Workers spend 200 hours per month at work, and keeping a healthy work-life balance is essential. The Headquarters Wellness Program provides support and assistance to DOE employees through a variety of programs and resources geared toward enhancing their mental and physical well-being. Wellness programs include: Accommodations, the Child Development Centers, the Employee Assistance Program (EAP), the Forrestal (FOHO) and Germantown (GOHO) Fitness Centers, the Occupational

  19. Y YEAR

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    7 35 -5.41% ↓ YEAR 2013 2014 Males 27 25 -7.41% ↓ Females 10 10 0% / YEAR 2013 2014 SES 1 1 0% / EN 05 1 1 0% / EN 04 11 10 -9.09% ↓ NN (Engineering) 8 8 0% / NQ (Prof/Tech/Admin) 14 15 7.14% ↑ NU (Tech/Admin Support) 2 0 -100% ↓ YEAR 2013 2014 American Indian Alaska Native Male (AIAN,M) 0 0 0% / American Indian Alaskan Native Female (AIAN,F) 1 1 0% / African American Male (AA,M) 1 1 0% / African American Female (AA,F) 3 3 0% / Asian American Pacific Islander Male (AAPI,M) 0 0 0% /

  20. Y YEAR

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    5 79 -7.06% ↓ YEAR 2013 2014 Males 59 57 -3.39% ↓ Females 26 22 -15.38% ↓ YEAR 2013 2014 SES 1 0 -100% ↓ EJ/EK 4 3 -25.00% ↓ EN 05 3 2 -33.33% ↓ EN 04 22 22 0% / EN 03 8 8 0% / NN (Engineering) 16 15 -6.25% ↓ NQ (Prof/Tech/Admin) 28 26 -7.14% ↓ NU (Tech/Admin Support) 3 3 0% / YEAR 2013 2014 American Indian Alaska Native Male (AIAN,M) 2 2 0% / American Indian Alaskan Native Female (AIAN,F) 1 1 0% / African American Male (AA,M) 5 4 -20.00% ↓ African American Female (AA,F) 3 2

  1. Y YEAR

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    91 81 -10.99% ↓ YEAR 2013 2014 Males 67 56 -16.42% ↓ Females 24 25 4.17% ↑ YEAR 2013 2014 SES 1 2 100% ↑ EJ/EK 9 8 -11.11% ↓ EN 04 25 22 -12.00% ↓ NN (Engineering) 24 20 -16.67% ↓ NQ (Prof/Tech/Admin) 29 26 -10.34% ↓ NU (Tech/Admin Support) 3 3 0% / YEAR 2013 2014 American Indian Alaska Native Male (AIAN,M) 2 2 0% / American Indian Alaskan Native Female (AIAN,F) 3 3 0% / African American Male (AA,M) 0 0 0% / African American Female (AA,F) 0 0 0% / Asian American Pacific Islander

  2. Y YEAR

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    21 -4.55% ↓ YEAR 2013 2014 Males 10 8 -20.00% ↓ Females 12 13 8.33% ↑ YEAR 2013 2014 SES 10 7 -30.00% ↓ EX 0 2 100% ↑ EJ/EK 1 1 0% / EN 05 0 1 100% ↑ EN 04 0 1 100% ↑ NQ (Prof/Tech/Admin) 9 8 -11.11% ↓ NU (Tech/Admin Support) 1 1 0% / ED 00 1 0 -100% ↓ YEAR 2013 2014 American Indian Alaska Native Male (AIAN,M) 0 0 0% / American Indian Alaskan Native Female (AIAN,F) 2 1 -50.00% ↓ African American Male (AA,M) 1 1 0% / African American Female (AA,F) 5 4 -20.00% ↓ Asian

  3. Y YEAR

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    41 155 9.93% ↑ YEAR 2013 2014 Males 92 106 15.22% ↑ Females 49 49 0% / YEAR 2013 2014 SES 8 8 0% / EX 1 1 0% / EJ/EK 4 4 0% / EN 05 11 10 -9.09% ↓ EN 04 11 14 27.27% ↑ EN 03 2 5 150% ↑ NN (Engineering) 60 63 5.00% ↑ NQ (Prof/Tech/Admin) 44 50 13.64% ↑ YEAR 2013 2014 American Indian Alaska Native Male (AIAN,M) 1 1 0% / American Indian Alaskan Native Female (AIAN,F) 1 1 0% / African American Male (AA,M) 7 10 42.86% ↑ African American Female (AA,F) 13 11 -15.38% ↓ Asian American

  4. Y YEAR

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    563 560 -0.53% ↓ YEAR 2013 2014 Males 518 514 -0.77% ↓ Females 45 46 2.22% ↑ YEAR 2013 2014 SES 2 2 0% / EJ/EK 2 2 0% / EN 04 1 1 0% / NN (Engineering) 11 11 0% / NQ (Prof/Tech/Admin) 218 221 1.38% ↑ NU (Tech/Admin Support) 1 2 100% ↑ NV (Nuc Mat Courier) 328 321 -2.13% ↓ YEAR 2013 2014 American Indian Alaska Native Male (AIAN,M) 15 15 0% / American Indian Alaskan Native Female (AIAN,F) 2 2 0% / African American Male (AA,M) 19 18 -5.26% ↓ African American Female (AA,F) 1 1 0% /

  5. Y YEAR

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    97 180 -8.63% ↓ YEAR 2013 2014 Males 105 89 -15.24% ↓ Females 92 91 -1.09% ↓ YEAR 2013 2014 SES 14 13 -7.14% ↓ EX 1 1 0% / EJ/EK 3 3 0% / EN 05 1 1 0% / EN 04 4 2 -50.00% ↓ EN 03 1 1 0% / EN 00 0 3 100% ↑ NN (Engineering) 35 27 -22.86% ↓ NQ (Prof/Tech/Admin) 135 126 -6.67% ↓ NU (Tech/Admin Support) 2 2 0% / GS 15 0 1 100% ↑ GS 13 1 0 -100% ↓ YEAR 2013 2014 American Indian Alaska Native Male (AIAN,M) 2 1 -50.00% ↓ American Indian Alaskan Native Female (AIAN,F) 0 0 0% /

  6. Y YEAR

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    *Total number of Employees 122 112 -8.20% ↓ YEAR 2013 2014 Males 90 84 -6.67% ↓ Females 32 28 -12.50% ↓ YEAR 2013 2014 SES 26 24 -7.69% ↓ EJ/EK 3 3 0% / EN 05 8 9 12.50% ↑ NN (Engineering) 48 47 -2.08% ↓ NQ (Prof/Tech/Admin) 30 26 -13.33% ↓ NU (Tech/Admin Support) 7 3 -57.14% ↓ YEAR 2013 2014 American Indian Alaska Native Male (AIAN,M) 0 0 0% / American Indian Alaskan Native Female (AIAN,F) 1 1 0% / African American Male (AA,M) 3 3 0% / African American Female (AA,F) 7 6 -14.29%

  7. Y YEAR

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    4 79 -5.95% ↓ YEAR 2013 2014 Males 59 55 -6.78% ↓ Females 25 24 -4.00% ↓ YEAR 2013 2014 SES 3 3 0% / EJ/EK 4 4 0% / EN 04 2 1 -50.00% ↓ NN (Engineering) 20 20 0% / NQ (Prof/Tech/Admin) 55 51 -7.27% ↓ YEAR 2013 2014 American Indian Alaska Native Male (AIAN,M) 0 0 0% / American Indian Alaskan Native Female (AIAN,F) 0 0 0% / African American Male (AA,M) 10 10 0% / African American Female (AA,F) 9 8 -11.11% ↓ Asian American Pacific Islander Male (AAPI,M) 2 2 0% / Asian American Pacific

  8. Y YEAR

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    8 87 -1.14% ↓ YEAR 2013 2014 Males 46 46 0% / Females 42 41 -2.38% ↓ YEAR 2013 2014 SES 1 0 -100% ↓ EJ/EK 4 2 -50.00% ↓ NN (Engineering) 12 12 0% / NQ (Prof/Tech/Admin) 68 70 2.94% ↑ NU (Tech/Admin Support) 3 3 0% / YEAR 2013 2014 American Indian Alaska Native Male (AIAN,M) 0 0 0% / American Indian Alaskan Native Female (AIAN,F) 2 2 0% / African American Male (AA,M) 5 5 0% / African American Female (AA,F) 5 6 20.00% ↑ Asian American Pacific Islander Male (AAPI,M) 0 0 0% / Asian

  9. Y YEAR

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    1 14 27.27% ↑ YEAR 2013 2014 Males 9 12 33.33% ↑ Females 2 2 0% / YEAR 2013 2014 SES 2 2 0% / EJ/EK 1 1 0% / EN 04 0 1 100% ↑ EN 00 0 1 100% ↑ NN (Engineering) 5 5 0% / NQ (Prof/Tech/Admin) 3 4 33.33% ↑ YEAR 2013 2014 American Indian Alaska Native Male (AIAN,M) 0 0 0% / American Indian Alaskan Native Female (AIAN,F) 0 0 0% / African American Male (AA,M) 0 0 0% / African American Female (AA,F) 0 0 0% / Asian American Pacific Islander Male (AAPI,M) 1 1 0% / Asian American Pacific

  10. Y YEAR

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    79 164 -8.38% ↓ YEAR 2013 2014 Males 100 92 -8.00% ↓ Females 79 72 -8.86% ↓ YEAR 2013 2014 SES 8 8 0% / EJ/EK 4 3 -25.00% ↓ EN 04 11 11 0% / EN 03 1 1 0% / EN 00 0 2 100% ↑ NN (Engineering) 39 32 -17.95% ↓ NQ (Prof/Tech/Admin) 111 104 -6.31% ↓ NU (Tech/Admin Support) 5 3 -40.00% ↓ YEAR 2013 2014 American Indian Alaska Native Male (AIAN,M) 1 2 100% ↑ American Indian Alaskan Native Female (AIAN,F) 2 1 -50.00% ↓ African American Male (AA,M) 4 3 -25.00% ↓ African American

  11. Y YEAR

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    40 36 -10.00% ↓ YEAR 2013 2014 Males 18 18 0% / Females 22 18 -18.18% ↓ YEAR 2013 2014 SES 3 2 -33.33% ↓ EJ/EK 1 1 0% / EN 03 1 1 0% / NN (Engineering) 3 3 0% / NQ (Prof/Tech/Admin) 30 27 -10.00% ↓ NU (Tech/Admin Support) 2 2 0% / YEAR 2013 2014 American Indian Alaska Native Male (AIAN,M) 0 0 0% / American Indian Alaskan Native Female (AIAN,F) 0 0 0% / African American Male (AA,M) 1 1 0% / African American Female (AA,F) 1 1 0% / Asian American Pacific Islander Male (AAPI,M) 0 0 0% /

  12. Y YEAR

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    4 30 -11.76% ↓ YEAR 2013 2014 Males 16 14 -12.50% ↓ Females 18 16 -11.11% ↓ YEAR 2013 2014 SES 1 1 0% / EJ/EK 3 1 -66.67% ↓ NQ (Prof/Tech/Admin) 29 27 -6.90% ↓ NU (Tech/Admin Support) 1 1 0% / YEAR 2013 2014 American Indian Alaska Native Male (AIAN,M) 1 1 0% / American Indian Alaskan Native Female (AIAN,F) 2 2 0% / African American Male (AA,M) 3 3 0% / African American Female (AA,F) 7 6 -14.29% ↓ Asian American Pacific Islander Male (AAPI,M) 1 1 0% / Asian American Pacific Islander

  13. Y YEAR

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    9 209 -8.73% ↓ YEAR 2013 2014 Males 76 76 0% / Females 153 133 -13.07% ↓ YEAR 2013 2014 SES 9 6 -33.33% ↓ EJ/EK 1 1 0% / NQ (Prof/Tech/Admin) 208 194 -6.73% ↓ NU (Tech/Admin Support) 11 8 -27.27% ↓ YEAR 2013 2014 American Indian Alaska Native Male (AIAN,M) 2 2 0% / American Indian Alaskan Native Female (AIAN,F) 3 2 -33.33% ↓ African American Male (AA,M) 10 10 0% / African American Female (AA,F) 39 36 -7.69% ↓ Asian American Pacific Islander Male (AAPI,M) 1 1 0% / Asian American

  14. Y YEAR

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    7 80 -8.05% ↓ YEAR 2013 2014 Males 62 57 -8.06% ↓ Females 25 23 -8.00% ↓ YEAR 2013 2014 SES 1 1 0% / EJ/EK 3 3 0% / EN 05 1 1 0% / EN 04 27 24 -11.11% ↓ EN 03 1 0 -100% ↓ NN (Engineering) 26 25 -3.85% ↓ NQ (Prof/Tech/Admin) 26 24 -7.69% ↓ NU (Tech/Admin Support) 2 2 0% / YEAR 2013 2014 American Indian Alaska Native Male (AIAN,M) 1 1 0% / American Indian Alaskan Native Female (AIAN,F) 1 1 0% / African American Male (AA,M) 3 2 -33.33% ↓ African American Female (AA,F) 3 3 0% / Asian

  15. Y YEAR

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    502 2381 -4.84% ↓ YEAR 2013 2014 Males 1663 1593 -4.21% ↓ Females 839 788 -6.08% ↓ YEAR 2013 2014 SES 104 90 -13.46% ↓ EX 2 4 100% ↑ SL 1 0 -100% ↓ EJ/EK 88 73 -17.05% ↓ EN 05 40 41 2.50% ↑ EN 04 169 157 -7.10% ↓ EN 03 18 21 100% ↑ EN 00 0 6 100% ↑ NN (Engineering) 441 416 -5.67% ↓ NQ (Prof/Tech/Admin) 1239 1190 -3.95% ↓ NU (Tech/Admin Support) 66 57 -13.64% ↓ NV (Nuc Mat Courier) 328 321 -2.13% ↓ GS 15 1 2 100% ↑ GS 13 2 2 0% / GS 10 3 1 -66.67% ↓ YEAR 2013

  16. Y YEAR

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    80 83 3.75% ↑ YEAR 2013 2014 Males 48 50 4.17% ↑ Females 32 33 3.13% ↑ YEAR 2013 2014 SES 2 1 -50.00% ↓ EJ/EK 8 7 -12.50% ↓ EN 04 11 9 -18.18% ↓ EN 03 1 1 0% / NN (Engineering) 24 27 12.50% ↑ NQ (Prof/Tech/Admin) 32 33 3.13% ↑ NU (Tech/Admin Support) 2 5 150% ↑ YEAR 2013 2014 American Indian Alaska Native Male (AIAN,M) 0 0 0% / American Indian Alaskan Native Female (AIAN,F) 3 3 0% / African American Male (AA,M) 0 0 0% / African American Female (AA,F) 2 2 0% / Asian American

  17. Y YEAR

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    8 27 -3.57% ↓ YEAR 2013 2014 Males 18 17 -5.56% ↓ Females 10 10 0% / YEAR 2013 2014 SES 1 1 0% / EN 05 1 1 0% / EN 04 4 3 -25.00% ↓ NN (Engineering) 12 12 0% / NQ (Prof/Tech/Admin) 9 9 0% / NU (Tech/Admin Support) 1 1 0% / YEAR 2013 2014 American Indian Alaska Native Male (AIAN,M) 0 0 0% / American Indian Alaskan Native Female (AIAN,F) 1 1 0% / African American Male (AA,M) 4 4 0% / African American Female (AA,F) 3 4 33.33% ↑ Asian American Pacific Islander Male (AAPI,M) 1 1 0% / Asian

  18. Development Wells At Salt Wells Area (Nevada Bureau of Mines...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    (Nevada Bureau of Mines and Geology, 2009) Exploration Activity Details Location Salt Wells Geothermal Area Exploration Technique Development Drilling Activity Date 2005 - 2005...

  19. Well having inhibited microbial growth

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Lee, Brady D.; Dooley, Kirk J.

    2006-08-15

    The invention includes methods of inhibiting microbial growth in a well. A packing material containing a mixture of a first material and an antimicrobial agent is provided to at least partially fill a well bore. One or more access tubes are provided in an annular space around a casing within the well bore. The access tubes have a first terminal opening located at or above a ground surface and have a length that extends from the first terminal opening at least part of the depth of the well bore. The access tubes have a second terminal opening located within the well bore. An antimicrobial material is supplied into the well bore through the first terminal opening of the access tubes. The invention also includes well constructs.

  20. 2013 Director's New Year Address

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    has in store for the ALS. An immediate answer is - a celebration - as the ALS marks its 20th year of operation. We'll spend some time this year looking back at what we've...

  1. Connecticut Wells | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Zip: 6751 Sector: Geothermal energy Product: A Connecticut-based geothermal heat pump installer and well driller. Coordinates: 40.04446, -80.690839 Show Map Loading...

  2. Well Monitoring System for EGS

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    EGS well monitoring tools offer a unique set of solutions which will lower costs and increase confidence in future geothermal projects.

  3. Remote multiple string well completion

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kirkland, K.G.

    1981-04-21

    Method and apparatus for multiple string well completions by remote operations in underwater installations, by which the tubing strings are installed independently rather than simultaneously.

  4. Well Deepening | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    can be deepened in order to reach a location with higher flow and temperature. Use in Geothermal Exploration Sometimes wells that were initially not planned for utilization...

  5. Thermal well-test method

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Tsang, C.F.; Doughty, C.A.

    1984-02-24

    A well-test method involving injection of hot (or cold) water into a groundwater aquifer, or injecting cold water into a geothermal reservoir is disclosed. By making temperature measurements at various depths in one or more observation wells, certain properties of the aquifer are determined. These properties, not obtainable from conventional well test procedures, include the permeability anisotropy, and layering in the aquifer, and in-situ thermal properties. The temperature measurements at various depths are obtained from thermistors mounted in the observation wells.

  6. Well drilling apparatus and method

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Alvis, Robert L.; Newsom, Melvin M.

    1977-01-01

    Well drilling rates may be increased by impelling projectiles to fracture rock formations and drilling with rock drill bits through the projectile fractured rock.

  7. The year book of diagnostic radiology 1981

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Whitehouse, W.M.; Adams, D.F.; Bookstein, J.J.; Gabrielsen, T.O.; Holt, J.F.; Martel, W.; Silver, T.M.; Thornbury, J.R.

    1981-01-01

    The 1981 edition of the Year Book of Diagnostic Radiology fulfills the standards of excellence established by previous volumes in this series. The abstracts were carefully chosen, are concise, and are well illustrated. The book is recommended for all practicing radiologists: for the resident it is a good source from which to select articles to be carefully studied, and as review source before board examinations; for the subspecialist it provides a means to maintain contact with all areas of diagnostic radiology; and for the general radiologist, it is a convenient and reliable guide to new developments in the specialty.

  8. Illinois Natural Gas Withdrawals from Oil Wells (Million Cubic...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Oil Wells (Million Cubic Feet) Illinois Natural Gas Withdrawals from Oil Wells (Million Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1991 1 1 1 1 1 1 2 1 1 1 1...

  9. Other States Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Gas Wells (Million...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Gas Wells (Million Cubic Feet) Other States Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Gas Wells (Million Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1991 72,328 ...

  10. Indiana Natural Gas Withdrawals from Oil Wells (Million Cubic...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Withdrawals from Oil Wells (Million Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep ... Referring Pages: Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Oil Wells Indiana Natural Gas Gross ...

  11. Missouri Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Oil Wells (Million...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Oil Wells (Million Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1991 0 ... Referring Pages: Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Oil Wells Missouri Natural Gas Gross ...

  12. Other States Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Coalbed Wells...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Coalbed Wells (Million Cubic Feet) Other States Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Coalbed Wells (Million Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2002 0 0 ...

  13. Other States Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Oil Wells (Million...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Oil Wells (Million Cubic Feet) Other States Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Oil Wells (Million Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1991 3,459 3,117 ...

  14. Kentucky Natural Gas Withdrawals from Gas Wells (Million Cubic...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Gas Wells (Million Cubic Feet) Kentucky Natural Gas Withdrawals from Gas Wells (Million Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1991 7,021 6,303 6,870 ...

  15. Missouri Natural Gas Withdrawals from Gas Wells (Million Cubic...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Withdrawals from Gas Wells (Million Cubic Feet) Missouri Natural Gas Withdrawals from Gas Wells (Million Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1991 0 0 1 ...

  16. Ohio Natural Gas Withdrawals from Gas Wells (Million Cubic Feet...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Gas Wells (Million Cubic Feet) Ohio Natural Gas Withdrawals from Gas Wells (Million Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1991 13,138 11,794 12,855 ...

  17. Montana Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Gas Wells (Million...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Gas Wells (Million Cubic Feet) Montana Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Gas Wells (Million Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1991 4,561 3,826 4,106 ...

  18. Utah Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Gas Wells (Million Cubic...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Gas Wells (Million Cubic Feet) Utah Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Gas Wells (Million Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1991 21,638 18,808 21,037 ...

  19. Louisiana Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Gas Wells (Million...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Gas Wells (Million Cubic Feet) Louisiana Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Gas Wells (Million Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1991 425,704 369,500 ...

  20. Florida Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Gas Wells (Million...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Gas Wells (Million Cubic Feet) Florida Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Gas Wells (Million Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1996 - - - - - - - - - ...

  1. Indiana Natural Gas Withdrawals from Gas Wells (Million Cubic...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Withdrawals from Gas Wells (Million Cubic Feet) Indiana Natural Gas Withdrawals from Gas Wells (Million Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1991 21 18 ...

  2. Michigan Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Gas Wells (Million...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Gas Wells (Million Cubic Feet) Michigan Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Gas Wells (Million Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1991 9,579 8,593 ...

  3. Tennessee Natural Gas Withdrawals from Gas Wells (Million Cubic...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Gas Wells (Million Cubic Feet) Tennessee Natural Gas Withdrawals from Gas Wells (Million Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1991 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 ...

  4. Virginia Natural Gas Withdrawals from Gas Wells (Million Cubic...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Withdrawals from Gas Wells (Million Cubic Feet) Virginia Natural Gas Withdrawals from Gas Wells (Million Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1991 1,849 ...

  5. Maryland Natural Gas Withdrawals from Gas Wells (Million Cubic...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Withdrawals from Gas Wells (Million Cubic Feet) Maryland Natural Gas Withdrawals from Gas Wells (Million Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1991 0 0 5 ...

  6. Oregon Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Gas Wells (Million...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    from Gas Wells (Million Cubic Feet) Oregon Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Gas Wells (Million Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1991 246 244 232 ...

  7. Mississippi Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Gas Wells (Million...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Gas Wells (Million Cubic Feet) Mississippi Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Gas Wells (Million Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1991 14,797 13,076 ...

  8. Wyoming Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Gas Wells (Million...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Gas Wells (Million Cubic Feet) Wyoming Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Gas Wells (Million Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1991 58,111 51,244 ...

  9. Colorado Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Gas Wells (Million...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Gas Wells (Million Cubic Feet) Colorado Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Gas Wells (Million Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1991 15,390 18,697 ...

  10. Nebraska Natural Gas Withdrawals from Gas Wells (Million Cubic...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Gas Wells (Million Cubic Feet) Nebraska Natural Gas Withdrawals from Gas Wells (Million Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1991 9 10 11 6 9 8 10 9 8 ...

  11. Year Modules

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Annual photovoltaic module shipments, 2004-2014 (peak kilowatts) Year Modules 2004 143,274 2005 204,996 2006 320,208 2007 494,148 2008 920,693 2009 1,188,879 2010 2,644,498 2011 3,772,075 2012 4,655,005 2013 4,984,881 2014 6,237,524 Source: U.S. Energy Information Administration, Form EIA-63B, 'Annual Photovoltaic Cell/Module Shipments Report.' Note: Includes both U.S. Shipments and Exports.

  12. Year Modules

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    dollars per peak watt) Year Modules 2004 $2.99 2005 $3.19 2006 $3.50 2007 $3.37 2008 $3.49 2009 $2.79 2010 $1.96 2011 $1.59 2012 $1.15 2013 $0.75 2014 $0.87 Table 4. Average value of photovoltaic modules, 2004-2014 Source: U.S. Energy Information Administration, Form EIA-63B, 'Annual Photovoltaic Cell/Module Shipments Report.' Note: Dollars are not adjusted for inflation.

  13. Geothermal Well Site Restoration and Plug and Abandonment of Wells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rinehart, Ben N.

    1994-08-01

    A report is presented on the final phase of an energy research program conducted by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) involving two geothermal well sites in the State of Louisiana-the Gladys McCall site and the Willis Hulin site. The research program was intended to improve geothermal technology and to determine the efficacy of producing electricity commercially from geopressured resource sites. The final phase of the program consisted of plug and abandonment (P&A) of the wells and restoration of the well sites. Restoration involved (a) initial soil and water sampling and analysis; (b) removal and disposal of well pads, concrete, utility poles, and trash; (c) plugging of monitor and freshwater wells; and (d) site leveling and general cleanup. Restoration of the McCall site required removal of naturally occurring radioactive material (NORM), which was costly and time-consuming. Exhibits are included that provide copies of work permits and authorizations, P&A reports and procedures, daily workover and current conditions report, and cost and salvage reports. Site locations, grid maps, and photographs are provided.

  14. Quantum well multijunction photovoltaic cell

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Chaffin, R.J.; Osbourn, G.C.

    1983-07-08

    A monolithic, quantum well, multilayer photovoltaic cell comprises a p-n junction comprising a p-region on one side and an n-region on the other side, each of which regions comprises a series of at least three semiconductor layers, all p-type in the p-region and all n-type in the n-region; each of said series of layers comprising alternating barrier and quantum well layers, each barrier layer comprising a semiconductor material having a first bandgap and each quantum well layer comprising a semiconductor material having a second bandgap when in bulk thickness which is narrower than said first bandgap, the barrier layers sandwiching each quantum well layer and each quantum well layer being sufficiently thin that the width of its bandgap is between said first and second bandgaps, such that radiation incident on said cell and above an energy determined by the bandgap of the quantum well layers will be absorbed and will produce an electrical potential across said junction.

  15. Quantum well multijunction photovoltaic cell

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Chaffin, Roger J.; Osbourn, Gordon C.

    1987-01-01

    A monolithic, quantum well, multilayer photovoltaic cell comprises a p-n junction comprising a p-region on one side and an n-region on the other side, each of which regions comprises a series of at least three semiconductor layers, all p-type in the p-region and all n-type in the n-region; each of said series of layers comprising alternating barrier and quantum well layers, each barrier layer comprising a semiconductor material having a first bandgap and each quantum well layer comprising a semiconductor material having a second bandgap when in bulk thickness which is narrower than said first bandgap, the barrier layers sandwiching each quantum well layer and each quantum well layer being sufficiently thin that the width of its bandgap is between said first and second bandgaps, such that radiation incident on said cell and above an energy determined by the bandgap of the quantum well layers will be absorbed and will produce an electrical potential across said junction.

  16. Pennsylvania Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Coalbed Wells (Million

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1990's 20,430 30,240 31,353 2000's 20,597 22,632 50,251 41,238 76,186 80,640 100,946 143,954 141,011 210,542 2010's 245,559 306,266 393,775 362,349 390,816 439,248

    10 2011 2012 2013 2014 2015 View History Gross Withdrawals 572,902 1,310,592 2,256,696 3,259,042 4,214,643 4,768,848 1967-2015 From Gas Wells 173,450 242,305 210,609 207,872 174,576 1967-2014 From Oil Wells 0 0 3,456 2,987 3,564 1967-2014

  17. Federal Offshore California Natural Gas Withdrawals from Gas Wells (Million

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Cubic Feet) Gas Wells (Million Cubic Feet) Federal Offshore California Natural Gas Withdrawals from Gas Wells (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1970's 0 0 0 1980's 0 0 0 3,986 18,920 31,227 27,279 23,425 17,931 12,246 1990's 15,640 16,464 13,947 10,618 11,064 7,874 5,508 4,260 3,966 2,775 2000's 7,323 3,913 3,080 1,731 850 684 2,094 2,137 1,601 1,206 2010's 1,757 1,560 14,559 14,296 13,988 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not

  18. Federal Offshore California Natural Gas Withdrawals from Oil Wells (Million

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Cubic Feet) Oil Wells (Million Cubic Feet) Federal Offshore California Natural Gas Withdrawals from Oil Wells (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1970's 5,417 5,166 5,431 1980's 5,900 12,763 17,751 20,182 27,443 33,331 31,799 31,380 31,236 38,545 1990's 34,332 35,391 41,284 41,532 42,497 46,916 61,276 69,084 71,019 75,034 2000's 68,752 67,034 64,735 56,363 53,805 53,404 38,313 43,379 43,300 40,023 2010's 39,444 35,020 12,703

  19. Maximize revenue from gas condensate wells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hall, S.R.

    1988-07-01

    A computerized oil/gas modeling program called C.O.M.P. allows operators to select the economically optimum producing equipment for a given gas-condensate well-stream. This article, the first of two, discusses use of the model to analyze performance of six different production system on the same wellstream and at the same wellhead conditions. All producing equipment options are unattended wellhead facilities designed for high volume gas-condensate wells and are not gas plants. A second article to appear in September will discuss operating experience with one of the producing systems analyzed, integrated multi-stage separation with stabilization and compression (the HERO system), which was developed by U.S. Enertek, Inc. This equipment was chosen for the wellstream analyzed because of the potential revenue increase indicated by the model.

  20. Table 4.7 Crude Oil and Natural Gas Development Wells, 1949-2010

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    ... and Table 4.6 for exploratory wells only. * Service wells, stratigraphic tests, and core tests are excluded. * For 19491959, data represent wells completed in a given year. ...

  1. Integrated Approach Towards the Application of Horizontal Wells to Improve Waterflooding Performance

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chris Liner; Dennis Kerr; Mohan Kelkar

    1998-09-30

    Integrated Approach Towards the Application of Horizontal Wells to Improve Waterflooding Performance The overall purpose of the proposed project is to improve secondary recovery performance of a marginal oil field through the use of an appropriate reservoir management plan. The selection of plan will be based on the detailed reservoir description using an integrated approach. We expect that 2 to 5% of the original oil in place will be recovered using this method. This should extend the life of the reservoir by at least 10 years. The project is divided into two stages. In Stage I of the project, we selected part of the Glenn Pool Field - Self Unit. We conducted cross borehole tomography surveys and formation micro scanner logs through a newly drilled well. By combining the state-of-the-art data with conventional core and log data, we developed a detailed reservoir description based on an integrated approach. After conducting extensive reservoir simulation studies, we evaluated alternate reservoir management strategies to improve the reservoir performance including drilling of a horizontal injection well. We observed that selective completion of many wells followed by an increase in the injection rate was the most feasible option to improve the performance of the Self Unit. This management plan is currently being implemented and the performance is being monitored. Stage II of the project will involve selection of part of the same reservoir (Berryhill Unit - Tract 7), development of reservoir description using only conventional data, simulation of flow performance using developed reservoir description, selection of an appropriate reservoir management plan, and implementation of the plan followed by monitoring of reservoir performance.

  2. Process for cementing geothermal wells

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Eilers, Louis H.

    1985-01-01

    A pumpable slurry of coal-filled furfuryl alcohol, furfural, and/or a low molecular weight mono- or copolymer thereof containing, preferably, a catalytic amount of a soluble acid catalyst is used to cement a casing in a geothermal well.

  3. Remote multiple string well completion

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kirkland, K.G.

    1981-09-15

    In a remotely installed underwater well apparatus, a tubular body, typically a multiple string tubing hanger, is landed in a position oriented rotationally with respect to a reference point on the apparatus and a seal device is then energized by the same tool employed to land and orient the tubular body.

  4. High Selectivity Oxygen Delignification

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lucian A. Lucia

    2005-11-15

    Project Objective: The objectives of this project are as follows: (1) Examine the physical and chemical characteristics of a partner mill pre- and post-oxygen delignified pulp and compare them to lab generated oxygen delignified pulps; (2) Apply the chemical selectivity enhancement system to the partner pre-oxygen delignified pulps under mill conditions (with and without any predetermined amounts of carryover) to determine how efficiently viscosity is preserved, how well selectivity is enhanced, if strength is improved, measure any yield differences and/or bleachability differences; and (3) Initiate a mill scale oxygen delignification run using the selectivity enhancement agent, collect the mill data, analyze it, and propose any future plans for implementation.

  5. Nebraska wind resource assessment first year results

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hurley, P.J.F.; Vilhauer, R.; Stooksbury, D.

    1996-12-31

    This paper presents the preliminary results from a wind resource assessment program in Nebraska sponsored by the Nebraska Power Association. During the first year the measured annual wind speed at 40 meters ranged from 6.5 - 7.5 m/s (14.6 - 16.8 mph) at eight stations across the state. The site selection process is discussed as well as an overview of the site characteristics at the monitoring locations. Results from the first year monitoring period including data recovery rate, directionality, average wind speeds, wind shear, and turbulence intensity are presented. Results from the eight sites are qualitatively compared with other midwest and west coast locations. 5 figs., 2 tabs.

  6. Jet pump for oil wells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Binks, R. H.; Christ, F. C.

    1985-03-12

    A fluid operated pump system which includes power fluid supply means comprising either the annulus between well casing and production tubing, or a secondary tubing, and a production tubing, set in a well, the production tubing having a housing at the lower end with which the power fluid supply means communicates. A pump unit, including a fluid operated jet pump, is movable downwardly through the production tubing into the housing to a fixed location and maintained at the fixed location by the forces of gravity and friction. The pump is operable in the housing by operating fluid under pressure supplied through the power fluid supply means to pump fluid from the well into the production tubing. A cavity is provided at the lower end of the pump unit between two balanced seals. The cavity communicates with the power fluid supply means and with the fluid operated jet pump. Power fluid introduced into the cavity causes no net force to be exerted on the pump unit. When pumping action takes place, produced fluids are taken from a lower pressure area below the pump unit and boosted to a higher pressure area above the pump unit by the fluid operated jet pump, resulting in a net downward force on the pump unit to cause the pump unit to be restrained against its fixed location without the need of latch means.

  7. Completion practices in deep sour Tuscaloosa wells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Huntoon, G.G.

    1984-01-01

    Successful development of the Tuscaloosa trend in Louisiana has required unique completion practices to produce the trend's deep sour formations. Amoco's operations in the Tuscaloosa formation are between 16,000 and 21,000 ft (4877 and 6400 m), and a range of pressure environments, high temperatures, and corrosive elements is encountered. Application of proved completion practices and equipment has resulted in several techniques that enhance the safety, longevity, and production capacity of these wells. The design of deep Tuscaloosa completions is assisted by a series of correlations developed to project bottomhole and surface shut-in tubing pressures, temperature gradients, and flow capacities for deep sour wells. This paper discusses material selection, completion practices, completion fluids, wellhead equipment, packer designs, corrosion-inhibition systems, and safety and monitoring equipment used in the Tuscaloosa trend. The design of a wellhead surface installation used to detect equipment failure, to pump kill fluids, and to circulate corrosion inhibitors is reviewed. A case study illustrates the methods used in completing a Tuscaloosa well with surface pressures exceeding 16,000 psi (110.3 MPa). Deep high-pressure sour-gas wells can be completed safely if all the elements of the environment that will affect the mechanical integrity of the wellbore are considered in the completion designs. The development of higher-strength material capable of withstanding SSC is needed if wells are completed in formations deeper than 22,000 ft (6700 m). Further research is necessary on the use of alloy steels and nonferrous metals for sour service. Effective high-temperature corrosion inhibitors for heavy zinc bromide completion fluids must be developed before these brines can be used in the Tuscaloosa. The testing of new inhibitors for use in highpressure sour-gas completions should be continued.

  8. Testing geopressured geothermal reservoirs in existing wells. Wells of Opportunity Program final contract report, 1980-1981

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1982-01-01

    The geopressured-geothermal candidates for the Wells of Opportunity program were located by the screening of published information on oil industry activity and through direct contact with the oil and gas operators. This process resulted in the recommendation to the DOE of 33 candidate wells for the program. Seven of the 33 recommended wells were accepted for testing. Of these seven wells, six were actually tested. The first well, the No. 1 Kennedy, was acquired but not tested. The seventh well, the No. 1 Godchaux, was abandoned due to mechanical problems during re-entry. The well search activities, which culminated in the acceptance by the DOE of 7 recommended wells, were substantial. A total of 90,270 well reports were reviewed, leading to 1990 wells selected for thorough geological analysis. All of the reservoirs tested in this program have been restricted by one or more faults or permeability barriers. A comprehensive discussion of test results is presented.

  9. Bottom hole oil well pump

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hansen, J.E.; Hinds, W.E.; Oldershaw, P.V.

    1982-09-21

    A bottom hole well pump is disclosed comprising a pump housing supported by a control cable for raising and lowering the housing within tubing in a well, a linear motor within the housing causing reciprocation of a plunger extending into a pumping chamber formed by the housing with inlet and outlet check valves for controlling flow of oil or other liquid into the pumping chamber and from the pumping chamber into the tubing above the pump housing. In one embodiment, belleville-type springs are employed for storing energy as the plunger approaches its opposite limits of travel in order to initiate movement of the plunger in the opposite direction. In this embodiment, a single pumping chamber is formed above the linear motor with a single-valve block arranged above the pumping chamber and including inlet check valve means for controlling liquid flow into the pumping chamber and outlet check valve means for controlling liquid flow from the pumping chamber into the tubing interior above the pump housing. In another embodiment, pumping chambers are formed above and below the linear motor with a tubular plunger extending into both pumping chambers, in order to achieve pumping during both directions of travel of the plunger.

  10. Well cleanup and completion apparatus

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brieger, E.F.

    1984-03-13

    A well cleanup and completion apparatus and technique. A packer is located downhole in a borehole, and a tool string comprising a one-way vent assembly and a one-way circulating valve assembly is connected above a perforating gun. The tool string is used to run the gun downhole through the packer until the gun arrives at a location adjacent to the formation to be perforated. During this time, the packer assembly must be in a configuration which admits flow from the lower to the upper annulus. Cleaning fluid is circulated down the entire tool string to the one-way circulating valve assembly located immediately above the firing head of the gun, thereby displacing fluid from the lower annulus, and cleaning any debris from the gun firing head. The packer is next closed, the gun detonated, whereupon the formation is perforated and production fluid flows through the perforations, up the lower annulus, into the one-way vent assembly located below the packer, into the tubing, and to the surface of the ground. Accordingly, the apparatus enables the gun and the borehole annulus adjacent the gun to be cleaned, thereby assuring that the well is properly completed in a single trip into the wellbore.

  11. Soda Lake Well Lithology Data and Geologic Cross-Sections

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Faulds, James E.

    2013-12-31

    Comprehensive catalogue of drill‐hole data in spreadsheet, shapefile, and Geosoft database formats. Includes XYZ locations of well heads, year drilled, type of well, operator, total depths, well path data (deviations), lithology logs, and temperature data. Plus, 13 cross‐sections in Adobe Illustrator format.

  12. Number of Producing Gas Wells

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Producing Gas Wells Period: Annual Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources & Notes Definitions, Sources & Notes Area 2009 2010 2011 2012 2013 2014 View History U.S. 493,100 487,627 514,637 482,822 484,994 514,786 1989-2014 Alabama 6,913 7,026 7,063 6,327 6,165 6,118 1989-2014 Alaska 261 269 277 185 159 170 1989-2014 Arizona 6 5 5 5 5 5 1989-2014 Arkansas 6,314 7,397 8,388 8,538 9,843 10,150 1989-2014 California 1,643 1,580 1,308 1,423 1,335 1,118 1989-2014

  13. Consortium for Petroleum & Natural Gas Stripper Wells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Morrison, Joel

    2011-12-01

    The United States has more oil and gas wells than any other country. As of December 31, 2004, there were more than half a million producing oil wells in the United States. That is more than three times the combined total for the next three leaders: China, Canada, and Russia. The Stripper Well Consortium (SWC) is a partnership that includes domestic oil and gas producers, service and supply companies, trade associations, academia, the Department of Energy’s Strategic Center for Natural Gas and Oil (SCNGO) at the National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL), and the New York State Energy Research and Development Authority (NYSERDA). The Consortium was established in 2000. This report serves as a final technical report for the SWC activities conducted over the May 1, 2004 to December 1, 2011 timeframe. During this timeframe, the SWC worked with 173 members in 29 states and three international countries, to focus on the development of new technologies to benefit the U.S. stripper well industry. SWC worked with NETL to develop a nationwide request-for-proposal (RFP) process to solicit proposals from the U.S. stripper well industry to develop and/or deploy new technologies that would assist small producers in improving the production performance of their stripper well operations. SWC conducted eight rounds of funding. A total of 132 proposals were received. The proposals were compiled and distributed to an industry-driven SWC executive council and program sponsors for review. Applicants were required to make a formal technical presentation to the SWC membership, executive council, and program sponsors. After reviewing the proposals and listening to the presentations, the executive council made their funding recommendations to program sponsors. A total of 64 projects were selected for funding, of which 59 were fully completed. Penn State then worked with grant awardees to issue a subcontract for their approved work. SWC organized and hosted a total of 14 meetings

  14. Entiat 4Mile WELLs Completion Report, 2006.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Malinowksi, Richard

    2007-01-01

    The Entiat 4-mile Wells (Entiat 4-mile) project is located in the Entiat subbasin and will benefit Upper Columbia steelhead, spring Chinook and bull trout. The goal of this project is to prevent juvenile fish from being diverted into an out-of-stream irrigation system and to eliminate impacts due to the annual maintenance of an instream pushup dam. The objectives include eliminating a surface irrigation diversion and replacing it with two wells, which will provide Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) and the Bureau of Reclamation (Reclamation) with a Federal Columbia River Power System (FCRPS) BiOp metric credit of one. Wells were chosen over a new fish screen based on biological benefits and costs. Long-term biological benefits are provided by completely eliminating the surface diversion and the potential for fish entrainment in a fish screen. Construction costs for a new fish screen were estimated at $150,000, which does not include other costs associated with implementing and maintaining a fish screening project. Construction costs for a well were estimated at $20,000 each. The diversion consisted of a pushup dam that diverted water into an off-channel pond. Water was then pumped into a pressurized system for irrigation. There are 3 different irrigators who used water from this surface diversion, and each has multiple water right claims totaling approximately 5 cfs. Current use was estimated at 300 gallons per minute (approximately 0.641 cfs). Some irrigated acreage was taken out of orchard production less than 5 years ago. Therefore, approximately 6.8 acre-feet will be put into the State of Washington Trust Water Right program. No water will be set aside for conservation savings. The construction of the two irrigation wells for three landowners was completed in September 2006. The Lower Well (Tippen/Wick) will produce up to 175 gpm while the Upper Well (Griffith) will produce up to 275 gpm during the irrigation season. The eight inch diameter wells were

  15. Integrated Approach Towards the Application of Horizontal Wells to Improve Waterflooding Performance

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chris Liner; Dennis Kerr; Mohan Kelkar

    1998-06-30

    Integrated Approach Towards the Application of Horizontal Wells to Improve Waterflooding Performance scanner logs through a newly drilled well. By combining the state-of-the-art data with conventional core and log data, we developed a detailed reservoir description based on an integrated approach. After conducting extensive reservoir simulation studies, we evaluated alternate reservoir management strategies to improve the reservoir performance including drilling of a horizontal injection well. We observed that selective completion of many wells followed by an increase in the injection rate was the most feasible option to improve the performance of the Self Unit. This management plan is currently being implemented and the performance is being Stage II of the project will involve selection of part of the same reservoir (Berryhill Unit - Tract 7), development of reservoir description using only conventional data, simulation of flow performance using developed reservoir description, selection of an appropriate reservoir management plan, and implementation of the plan followed by monitoring of reservoir performance. During the summer of 1995, we started implementing the reservoir management plan in the Self Unit. Last quarter, after evaluating each individual well, we decided to install electrical submersible pumps to produce three wells. The other three wells required the use of rod pumps. Production from the field improved significantly once the pumps were installed. Over the last two years, an average daily production has been approximately 40 to 45 bbls/day. Compared to a base line production of 13 bbls/day before the implementation, this is more than a 200% increase in production. determined. We are finalizing the AFE for the overall implementation. This overall implementation will include converting well no 61 into an injector, re-perforating wells M-3A and M-4A, and drilling a deviated production well between 61 and M-3A/M-4A i n east west direction. The total

  16. South Dakota Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Coalbed Wells (Million

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1990's 1,731 2,865 2,527 2000's 3,607 4,496 1,265 2,264 1,676 3,567 3,345 4,235 2,632 918 2010's 1,600 1,589 2,465 4,911 3,189 7,083

    12,927 12,540 12,449 15,085 16,205 15,307 1967-2014 From Gas Wells 1,561 1,300 933 14,396 15,693 15,005 1967-2014 From Oil Wells 11,366 11,240 11,516 689 512 303 1967-2014 From Shale Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 0 2007-2014 From Coalbed Wells 0 0 0 0 0 0 2006-2014 Repressuring 0

  17. Tennessee Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Coalbed Wells (Million Cubic

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1990's 1,636 6,213 5,875 2000's 5,250 2,479 2,596 5,621 2,262 5,627 6,691 7,291 4,411 3,668 2010's 22,156 26,314 62,961 36,613 45,019 69,830

    5,478 5,144 4,851 5,825 5,400 5,294 1967-2014 From Gas Wells 5,478 5,144 4,851 5,825 5,400 5,294 1967-2014 From Oil Wells 0 0 0 0 0 0 1967-2014 From Shale Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 0 2007-2014 From Coalbed Wells 0 0 0 0 0 0 2006-2014 Repressuring 0 0 0 0 0 0 1967-2014 Vented

  18. West Virginia Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Coalbed Wells (Million

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1990's 569 515 499 2000's 516 2,620 1,885 2,084 1,406 2,287 3,664 3,849 1,889 1,109 2010's 1,480 2,579 2,361 2,840 6,816 13,27

    65,174 394,125 539,860 741,853 1,040,250 1,318,822 1967-2015 From Gas Wells 151,401 167,113 193,537 167,118 242,241 1967-2014 From Oil Wells 0 0 1,477 2,660 1,643 1967-2014 From Shale Gas Wells 113,773 227,012 344,847 572,076 796,366 2007-2014 From Coalbed Wells 0 0 0 0 0

  19. Wyoming Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Coalbed Wells (Million Cubic

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1990's 95 271 167 2000's 1,843 2,727 3,764 2,484 532 576 827 2,024 1,088 1,079 2010's 592 418 496 535 W 706

    ,514,657 2,375,301 2,225,622 2,047,757 1,997,666 1,908,739 1967-2015 From Gas Wells 1,787,599 1,709,218 1,762,095 1,673,667 1,671,442 1967-2014 From Oil Wells 151,871 152,589 24,544 29,134 38,974 1967-2014 From Shale Gas Wells 5,519 4,755 9,252 16,175 25,387 2007-2014 From Coalbed Wells 569,667

  20. Florida Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Coalbed Wells (Million Cubic

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1990's 338,858 323,771 365,587 2000's 364,245 374,311 521,868 535,099 585,841 630,410 741,759 772,968 797,266 913,672 2010's 981,750 1,043,786 1,138,771 1,034,288 1,047,683 1,160,140

    290 13,938 17,129 18,681 18,011 21,259 1971-2014 From Gas Wells 0 0 0 17,182 16,459 19,742 1996-2014 From Oil Wells 290 13,938 17,129 1,500 1,551 1,517 1971-2014 From Shale Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 0 2007-2014 From Coalbed Wells 0 0

  1. Indiana Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Coalbed Wells (Million Cubic

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1990's 4,661 13,678 12,515 2000's 14,513 17,777 35,104 26,672 22,946 35,376 27,213 37,871 34,312 36,576 2010's 61,242 85,298 115,328 81,013 80,411 127,365

    4,927 6,802 9,075 8,814 7,938 6,616 1967-2014 From Gas Wells 4,927 6,802 9,075 8,814 7,938 6,616 1967-2014 From Oil Wells 0 0 0 0 0 0 1967-2014 From Shale Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 0 2007-2014 From Coalbed Wells 0 0 0 0 0 0 2006-2014 Repressuring 0 0 0 0 0 0

  2. Maryland Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Coalbed Wells (Million Cubic

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1990's 15,524 21,515 22,842 2000's 28,926 17,520 22,273 10,995 12,045 20,478 21,830 23,079 19,910 18,039 2010's 30,728 21,136 49,211 24,556 20,844 39,632

    43 43 34 44 32 20 1967-2014 From Gas Wells 43 43 34 44 32 20 1967-2014 From Oil Wells 0 0 0 0 0 0 2006-2014 From Shale Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 0 2007-2014 From Coalbed Wells 0 0 0 0 0 0 2006-2014 Repressuring 0 0 0 0 0 0 2006-2014 Vented and Flared 0 0 0 0 0 0

  3. Nebraska Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Coalbed Wells (Million Cubic

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1990's 2,687 5,080 4,582 2000's 5,522 4,290 4,947 4,593 3,340 8,066 7,787 10,908 7,230 3,331 2010's 3,949 4,223 7,696 5,080 4,132 4,634

    09 2010 2011 2012 2013 2014 View History Gross Withdrawals 2,916 2,255 1,980 1,328 1,032 402 1967-2014 From Gas Wells 2,734 2,092 1,854 1,317 1,027 400 1967-2014 From Oil Wells 182 163 126 11 5 1 1967-2014 From Shale Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 0 2007-2014 From Coalbed Wells 0 0 0

  4. Category:Production Wells | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Wells Jump to: navigation, search Geothermalpower.jpg Looking for the Production Wells page? For detailed information on Production Wells, click here. Category:Production Wells...

  5. Local Energy Assurance Planning Selected Cities

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Selected Cities

  6. Production Well Performance Enhancement using Sonication Technology

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Adewumi, Michael A; Ityokumbul, M Thaddeus; Watson, Robert W; Eltohami, Eltohami; Farias, Mario; Heckman, Glenn; Houlihan, Brendan; Karoor, Samata Prakash; Miller, Bruce G; Mohammed, Nazia; Olanrewaju, Johnson; Ozdemir, Mine; Rejepov, Dautmamed; Sadegh, Abdallah A; Quammie, Kevin E; Zaghloul, Jose; Hughes, W Jack; Montgomery, Thomas C

    2005-12-31

    The objective of this project was to develop a sonic well performance enhancement technology that focused on near wellbore formation damage. In order to successfully achieve this objective, a three-year project was defined. The entire project was broken into four tasks. The overall objective of all this was to foster a better understanding of the mechanisms involved in sonic energy interactions with fluid flow in porous media and adapt such knowledge for field applications. The fours tasks are: • Laboratory studies • Mathematical modeling • Sonic tool design and development • Field demonstration The project was designed to be completed in three years; however, due to budget cuts, support was only provided for the first year, and hence the full objective of the project could not be accomplished. This report summarizes what was accomplished with the support provided by the US Department of Energy. Experiments performed focused on determining the inception of cavitation, studying thermal dissipation under cavitation conditions, investigating sonic energy interactions with glass beads and oil, and studying the effects of sonication on crude oil properties. Our findings show that the voltage threshold for onset of cavitation is independent of transducer-hydrophone separation distance. In addition, thermal dissipation under cavitation conditions contributed to the mobilization of deposited paraffins and waxes. Our preliminary laboratory experiments suggest that waxes are mobilized when the fluid temperature approaches 40°C. Experiments were conducted that provided insights into the interactions between sonic wave and the fluid contained in the porous media. Most of these studies were carried out in a slim-tube apparatus. A numerical model was developed for simulating the effect of sonication in the nearwellbore region. The numerical model developed was validated using a number of standard testbed problems. However, actual application of the model for scale

  7. Streamflow and selected precipitation data for Yucca Mountain...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    water years 1983--85 Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Streamflow and selected precipitation data for Yucca Mountain and vicinity, Nye County, Nevada, water years ...

  8. 2003 Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory Shallow Injection Well Verification and Status Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lewis, M.G.

    2003-08-21

    A detailed verification of the shallow injection well inventory for Bechtel BWXT Idaho, LLC and Argonne National Laboratory-West-operated facilities was performed in 2003. Fourteen wells, or 20%, were randomly selected for the verification. This report provides updated information on the 14 shallow injection wells that were randomly selected for the 2003 verification. Where applicable, additional information is provided for shallow injection wells that were not selected for the 2003 verification. This updated information was incorporated into the 2003 Shallow Injection Wells Inventory, Sixty-eight wells were removed from the 2003 Shallow Injection Well Inventory.

  9. 2003 Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory Shallow Injection Well Verification and Status Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mike Lewis

    2003-08-01

    A detailed verification of the shallow injection well inventory for Bechtel BWXT Idaho, LLC and Argonne National Laboratory-West-operated facilities was performed in 2003. Fourteen wells, or 20%, were randomly selected for the verification. This report provides updated information on the 14 shallow injection wells that were randomly selected for the 2003 verification. Where applicable, additional information is provided for shallow injection wells that were not selected for the 2003 verification. This updated information was incorporated into the 2003 Shallow Injection Wells Inventory. Sixty-eight wells were removed from the 2003 Shallow Injection Well Inventory.

  10. Nevada Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Gas Wells (Million Cubic Feet)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    from Gas Wells (Million Cubic Feet) Nevada Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Gas Wells (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 2000's 0 0 0 0 2010's 0 0 0 0 3 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 8/31/2016 Next Release Date: 9/30/2016 Referring Pages: Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Gas Wells Nevada Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals and