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Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "wells sampled exceed" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


1

Vapor port and groundwater sampling well  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method and apparatus has been developed for combining groundwater monitoring wells with unsaturated-zone vapor sampling ports. The apparatus allows concurrent monitoring of both the unsaturated and the saturated zone from the same well at contaminated areas. The innovative well design allows for concurrent sampling of groundwater and volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in the vadose (unsaturated) zone from a single well, saving considerable time and money. The sample tubes are banded to the outer well casing during installation of the well casing.

Hubbell, Joel M. (Idaho Falls, ID); Wylie, Allan H. (Idaho Falls, ID)

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

2

IMPROVED WELL PLUGGING EQUIPMENT AND WASTE MANGEMENT TECHNIQUES EXCEED ALARA GOALS AT THE OAK RIDGE NATIONAL LABORATORY  

SciTech Connect

In 2000, Bechtel Jacobs Company LLC (BJC) contracted Tetra Tech NUS, Inc. (TtNUS) and their sub-contractor, Texas World Operations, Inc. (TWO), to plug and abandon (P&A) 111 wells located in the Melton Valley area of Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). One hundred and seven of those wells were used to monitor fluid movement and subsurface containment of the low level radioactive liquid waste/grout slurry that was injected into the Pumpkin Valley Shale Formation, underlying ORNL. Four wells were used as hydrofracture injection wells to emplace the waste in the shale formation. Although the practice of hydrofracturing was and is considered by many to pose no threat to human health or the environment, the practice was halted in 1982 after the Federal Underground Injection Control regulations were enacted by United States Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA) making it necessary to properly close the wells. The work is being performed for the United States Department of Energy Oak Ridge Operations (DOE ORO). The project team is using the philosophy of minimum waste generation and the principles of ALARA (As Low As Reasonably Achievable) as key project goals to minimize personnel and equipment exposure, waste generation, and project costs. Achievement of these goals was demonstrated by the introduction of several new pieces of custom designed well plugging and abandonment equipment that were tested and used effectively during field operations. Highlights of the work performed and the equipment used are presented.

Whiteside, R.; Pawlowicz, R.; Whitehead, L.; Arnseth, R.

2002-02-25T23:59:59.000Z

3

Well purge and sample apparatus and method  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The present invention specifically permits purging and/or sampling of a well but only removing, at most, about 25% of the fluid volume compared to conventional methods and, at a minimum, removing none of the fluid volume from the well. The invention is an isolation assembly with a packer, pump and exhaust, that is inserted into the well. The isolation assembly is designed so that only a volume of fluid between the outside diameter of the isolation assembly and the inside diameter of the well over a fluid column height from the bottom of the well to the top of the active portion (lower annulus) is removed. The packer is positioned above the active portion thereby sealing the well and preventing any mixing or contamination of inlet fluid with fluid above the packer. Ports in the wall of the isolation assembly permit purging and sampling of the lower annulus along the height of the active portion.

Schalla, Ronald (Kennewick, WA); Smith, Ronald M. (Richland, WA); Hall, Stephen H. (Kennewick, WA); Smart, John E. (Richland, WA); Gustafson, Gregg S. (Redmond, WA)

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

4

Well purge and sample apparatus and method  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The present invention specifically permits purging and/or sampling of a well but only removing, at most, about 25% of the fluid volume compared to conventional methods and, at a minimum, removing none of the fluid volume from the well. The invention is an isolation assembly with a packer, pump and exhaust, that is inserted into the well. The isolation assembly is designed so that only a volume of fluid between the outside diameter of the isolation assembly and the inside diameter of the well over a fluid column height from the bottom of the well to the top of the active portion (lower annulus) is removed. The packer is positioned above the active portion thereby sealing the well and preventing any mixing or contamination of inlet fluid with fluid above the packer. Ports in the wall of the isolation assembly permit purging and sampling of the lower annulus along the height of the active portion. 8 figs.

Schalla, R.; Smith, R.M.; Hall, S.H.; Smart, J.E.; Gustafson, G.S.

1995-10-24T23:59:59.000Z

5

Diffusion Multilayer Sampling of Ground Water in Five Wells at...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

Diffusion Multilayer Sampling of Ground Water in Five Wells at the Tuba City, Arizona, Site Diffusion Multilayer Sampling of Ground Water in Five Wells at the Tuba City, Arizona,...

6

Multi-well sample plate cover penetration system  

SciTech Connect

An apparatus for penetrating a cover over a multi-well sample plate containing at least one individual sample well includes a cutting head, a cutter extending from the cutting head, and a robot. The cutting head is connected to the robot wherein the robot moves the cutting head and cutter so that the cutter penetrates the cover over the multi-well sample plate providing access to the individual sample well. When the cutting head is moved downward the foil is pierced by the cutter that splits, opens, and folds the foil inward toward the well. The well is then open for sample aspiration but has been protected from cross contamination.

Beer, Neil Reginald (Pleasanton, CA)

2011-12-27T23:59:59.000Z

7

Well fluid isolation and sample apparatus and method  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The present invention specifically permits purging and/or sampling of a well but only removing, at most, about 25% of the fluid volume compared to conventional methods and, at a minimum, removing none of the fluid volume from the well. The invention is an isolation assembly that is inserted into the well. The isolation assembly is designed so that only a volume of fluid between the outside diameter of the isolation assembly and the inside diameter of the well over a fluid column height from the bottom of the well to the top of the active portion (lower annulus) is removed. A seal may be positioned above the active portion thereby sealing the well and preventing any mixing or contamination of inlet fluid with fluid above the packer. Purged well fluid is stored in a riser above the packer. Ports in the wall of the isolation assembly permit purging and sampling of the lower annulus along the height of the active portion.

Schalla, Ronald (Kennewick, WA); Smith, Ronald M. (Richland, WA); Hall, Stephen H. (Kennewick, WA); Smart, John E. (Richland, WA)

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

8

LANL exceeds Early Recovery Act  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

exceeds Early Recovery Act recycling goals March 8, 2010 More than 136 tons of metal saved from demolished buildings LOS ALAMOS, New Mexico, March 9, 2009-Los Alamos National...

9

Isopach map of black shale in the Sonyea Group (from well sample studies)  

SciTech Connect

A map containing information on black shale deposits in the Sonyea Group in Western New York State was produced from well sample studies. (DC)

Kamakaris, D.G.; Van Tyne, A.M.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

10

Isopach map of black shale in the West Falls Formation (from well sample studies)  

SciTech Connect

Maps of western New York State and Lake Erie were prepared containing information on black shale deposits in the West Falls Formation from well sample studies. (DC)

Kamakaris, D.G.; Van Tyne, A.M.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

11

Isopach map of black shale in the Hamilton Group (from well sample studies)  

SciTech Connect

A map of western New York State and Lake Erie was prepared containing information on black shale deposits in the Hamilton Group from well sample studies. (DC)

Kamakaris, D.G.; Van Tyne, A.M.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

12

Isopach map of black shale in the Java Formation (from well sample studies)  

SciTech Connect

A map of western New York State and Lake Erie was prepared containing information on black shale deposits in the Java Formation from well sample studies. (DC)

Kamakaris, D.G.; Van Tyne, A.M.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

13

Isopach map of black shale in the Genesee Group (from well sample studies)  

SciTech Connect

A map of western New York State was prepared containing information on black shale deposits in the Genesee Group from well samples. (DC)

Kamakaris, D.G.; Van Tyne, A.M.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

14

Water Sampling At Salt Wells Area (Coolbaugh, Et Al., 2006) | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Water Sampling At Salt Wells Area (Coolbaugh, Et Al., Water Sampling At Salt Wells Area (Coolbaugh, Et Al., 2006) Exploration Activity Details Location Salt Wells Geothermal Area Exploration Technique Water Sampling Activity Date 2005 - 2005 Usefulness useful DOE-funding Unknown Exploration Basis Geochemical water sampling, mineral distribution mapping, and shallow (30 cm) temperature probe measurements were conducted to expand on a previous field mapping study of surface geothermal features at Salt Wells, in order to evaluate the relationship between these features and structures that control geothermal fluid flow. Notes Water from six hot springs/seeps (out of some 20 seasonal discharges identified, with hot spring temperatures ranging from 39.1-81.6°C and cold seep temperatures between 5-7°C) and playa groundwaters were sampled and

15

LANL exceeds Early Recovery Act recycling goals  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

LANL exceeds Early Recovery Act recycling goals LANL exceeds Early Recovery Act recycling goals Lab demolition projects under the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act have...

16

Isopach map of black shale in the Perrysburg FM. (and equivalent section) (from well sample studies)  

SciTech Connect

A map of western New York State and Lake Erie was prepared containing information on black shale deposits in the Perrysburg FM. (and equivalent section) from well sample studies. (DC)

Kamakaris, D.G.; Van Tyne, A.M.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

17

A Mineralogical Petrographic And Geochemical Study Of Samples From Wells In  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Mineralogical Petrographic And Geochemical Study Of Samples From Wells In Mineralogical Petrographic And Geochemical Study Of Samples From Wells In The Geothermal Field Of Milos Island (Greece) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Journal Article: A Mineralogical Petrographic And Geochemical Study Of Samples From Wells In The Geothermal Field Of Milos Island (Greece) Details Activities (0) Areas (0) Regions (0) Abstract: This paper presents a study of hydrothermal alteration on Milos island, Greece. Examination of cores and cuttings from the two drill sites, obtained from a depth of about 1100 m in Milos geothermal field, showed that the hydrothermal minerals occurring in the rock include: K-feldspar, albite, chlorite, talc, diopside, epidote, muscovite, tremolite, kaolinite, montmorillonite, alunite, anhydrite, gypsum, calcite, and opaque minerals.

18

Water Sampling At Salt Wells Area (Shevenell & Garside, 2003) | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Shevenell & Garside, 2003) Shevenell & Garside, 2003) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Water Sampling At Salt Wells Area (Shevenell & Garside, 2003) Exploration Activity Details Location Salt Wells Geothermal Area Exploration Technique Water Sampling Activity Date 2002 - 2002 Usefulness not useful DOE-funding Unknown Exploration Basis The objective of the study was to expand knowledge of Nevada's geothermal resource potential by providing new geochemical data from springs in less studied geothermal areas and to refine geochemical data from springs for which only incomplete data were available. This work fills in gaps in publicly available geochemical data, thereby enabling comprehensive evaluation of Nevada's geothermal resource potential.

19

Sampling and Analysis Procedures for Gas, Condensate, Brine, and Solids: Pleasant Bayou Well Test, 1988-Present  

SciTech Connect

This section covers analyses performed on gas. Chemical analyses can only be related to well performance if the quantity of the various fluids are known. The IGT on-line data computer system measures the flowrate, the pressures, and the temperatures every 10 seconds. These values are automatically recorded over operator selected intervals both on magnetic media and on paper. This allows review of samples versus operating conditions. This paper covers analyses performed on gas, including: An approximate sampling schedule during flow tests; On-site sample handling and storage of gas samples; Addresses of laboratories that perform off site analyses; Sample shipping instructions; Data archiving; and Quality Control/Quality Assurance. It is expected that the above procedures will change as the flow test progresses, but deviations from the written procedures should be approved by C. Hayden of IGT and noted on the results of the analysis.

Hayden, Chris

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

20

Soil Sampling At Salt Wells Area (Henkle, Et Al., 2005) | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Salt Wells Area (Henkle, Et Al., 2005) Salt Wells Area (Henkle, Et Al., 2005) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Soil Sampling At Salt Wells Area (Henkle, Et Al., 2005) Exploration Activity Details Location Salt Wells Area Exploration Technique Soil Sampling Activity Date - 2005 Usefulness useful DOE-funding Unknown Exploration Basis Adsorbed mercury soil geochemical surveys and radiometric geophysical surveys were carried out in conjunction with geologic mapping to test the application of these ground-based techniques to geothermal exploration at three prospects in Nevada by Henkle Jr. et al. in 2005. Mercury soil vapor surveys were not widely used in geothermal exploration in the western US at the time, although the association of mercury vapors with geothermal

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "wells sampled exceed" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Report of testing and sampling of municipal supply well PM-4  

SciTech Connect

During drilling of regional aquifer characterization borehole R-25, located in the western part of Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) at Technical Area (TA) 16, groundwater samples were collected from perched zones of saturation and the regional aquifer that contained elevated levels of high explosive (HE) compounds. One of the nearest Los Alamos County municipal supply wells potentially located down gradient from borehole R-25 is PM-4, located on Mesita del Buey at the west end of TA-54. During the winter of 1998 and 1999 the pump in PM-4 had been removed from the well for scheduled maintenance by the Los Alamos County Public Utilities Department (PUD). Because the pump was removed from PM-4, the opportunity existed to enter the well to (1) perform tests to determine where within the regional aquifer groundwater entered the well and (2) collect groundwater samples from the producing zones for analyses to determine if HE contaminants were present in discrete zones within the regional aquifer. The report of the activities that were performed during March 1999 for the testing and sampling of municipal supply well PM-4 is provided. The report provides a description of the field activities associated with the two phases of the project, including (1) the results of the static and dynamic spinner log surveys, and (2) a description of the sampling activities and the field-measured groundwater quality parameters that were obtained during sampling activities. This report also provides the analytical results of the groundwater samples and a brief discussion of the results of the project.

Richard J. Koch; Patrick Longmire; David B. Rogers; Ken Mullen

1999-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

22

Surge Block Method for Controlling Well Clogging and Sampling Sediment during Bioremediation  

SciTech Connect

A surge block treatment method (i.e. inserting a solid rod plunger with a flat seal that closely fits the casing interior into a well and stocking it up and down) was performed for the rehabilitation of wells clogged with biomass and for the collection of time series sediment samples during in situ bioremediation tests for U(VI) immobilization at a the U.S. Department of Energy site in Oak Ridge, TN. The clogging caused by biomass growth had been controlled by using routine surge block treatment for18 times over a nearly four year test period. The treatment frequency was dependent of the dosage of electron donor injection and microbial community developed in the subsurface. Hydraulic tests showed that the apparent aquifer transmissivity at a clogged well with an inner diameter (ID) of 10.16 cm was increased by 8 13 times after the rehabilitation, indicating the effectiveness of the rehabilitation. Simultaneously with the rehabilitation, the surge block method was successfully used for collecting time series sediment samples composed of fine particles (clay and silt) from wells with ID 1.9 10.16 cm for the analysis of mineralogical and geochemical composition and microbial community during the same period. Our results demonstrated that the surge block method provided a cost-effective approach for both well rehabilitation and frequent solid sampling at the same location.

Wu, Wei-min [Stanford University] [Stanford University; Watson, David B [ORNL] [ORNL; Luo, Jian [Stanford University] [Stanford University; Carley, Jack M [ORNL] [ORNL; Mehlhorn, Tonia L [ORNL] [ORNL; Kitanidis, Peter K. [Stanford University] [Stanford University; Jardine, Philip [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK)] [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK); Criddle, Craig [Stanford University] [Stanford University

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

23

Water Sampling At Salt Wells Area (Henkle, Et Al., 2005) | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Henkle, Et Al., 2005) Henkle, Et Al., 2005) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Water Sampling At Salt Wells Area (Henkle, Et Al., 2005) Exploration Activity Details Location Salt Wells Area Exploration Technique Water Sampling Activity Date - 2005 Usefulness useful DOE-funding Unknown Exploration Basis Adsorbed mercury soil geochemical surveys and radiometric geophysical surveys were carried out in conjunction with geologic mapping to test the application of these ground-based techniques to geothermal exploration at three prospects in Nevada by Henkle Jr. et al. in 2005. Mercury soil vapor surveys were not widely used in geothermal exploration in the western US at the time, although the association of mercury vapors with geothermal

24

Hanford Groundwater Contamination Areas Shrink as EM Exceeds Cleanup Goals  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Groundwater Contamination Areas Shrink as EM Exceeds Groundwater Contamination Areas Shrink as EM Exceeds Cleanup Goals Hanford Groundwater Contamination Areas Shrink as EM Exceeds Cleanup Goals June 26, 2013 - 12:00pm Addthis The 200 West Pump and Treat System is Hanford’s largest facility for treating contaminated groundwater. The 200 West Pump and Treat System is Hanford's largest facility for treating contaminated groundwater. A graphic showing the 200 West Pump and Treat plumes and well network. A graphic showing the 200 West Pump and Treat plumes and well network. The 200 West Pump and Treat System is Hanford's largest facility for treating contaminated groundwater. A graphic showing the 200 West Pump and Treat plumes and well network. RICHLAND, Wash. - Workers supporting groundwater cleanup for EM's

25

LANL exceeds Early Recovery Act recycling goals  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

LANL exceeds Early Recovery Act recycling goals LANL exceeds Early Recovery Act recycling goals LANL exceeds Early Recovery Act recycling goals Lab demolition projects under the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act have recovered more than 136 tons of recyclable metal since work began last year. March 8, 2010 Los Alamos National Laboratory sits on top of a once-remote mesa in northern New Mexico with the Jemez mountains as a backdrop to research and innovation covering multi-disciplines from bioscience, sustainable energy sources, to plasma physics and new materials. Los Alamos National Laboratory sits on top of a once-remote mesa in northern New Mexico with the Jemez mountains as a backdrop to research and innovation covering multi-disciplines from bioscience, sustainable energy sources, to plasma physics and new materials.

26

Los Alamos exceeds waste shipping goal  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Los Alamos exceeds waste shipping goal Los Alamos exceeds waste shipping goal Los Alamos exceeds waste shipping goal Los Alamos shipped 1,074 cubic meters of transuranic (TRU) and mixed low-level waste to the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant and other approved waste disposal facilities. July 8, 2013 A shipment carrying Los Alamos transuranic waste heads down NM 502, bound for the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant in southeastern New Mexico. A shipment carrying Los Alamos transuranic waste heads down NM 502, bound for the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant in southeastern New Mexico. Contact Fred deSousa Communications Office (505) 665-3430 Email "We've made significant progress removing waste stored above ground at Area G, and we made this progress while maintaining an excellent safety record," said Jeff Mousseau, associate director of Environmental Programs

27

Los Alamos exceeds waste shipping goal  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Los Alamos exceeds waste shipping goal Los Alamos exceeds waste shipping goal Los Alamos exceeds waste shipping goal Los Alamos shipped 1,074 cubic meters of transuranic (TRU) and mixed low-level waste to the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant and other approved waste disposal facilities. July 8, 2013 A shipment carrying Los Alamos transuranic waste heads down NM 502, bound for the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant in southeastern New Mexico. A shipment carrying Los Alamos transuranic waste heads down NM 502, bound for the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant in southeastern New Mexico. Contact Fred deSousa Communications Office (505) 665-3430 Email "We've made significant progress removing waste stored above ground at Area G, and we made this progress while maintaining an excellent safety record," said Jeff Mousseau, associate director of Environmental Programs

28

E-Print Network 3.0 - artesian wells Sample Search Results  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

that have Summary: was 89 mgd (July 19, 1999) which falls well below Delaware's historic peak day of 93 mgd (July 18, 1997... environmentalecosystem damage as well. Thus,...

29

E-Print Network 3.0 - alas quantum wells Sample Search Results  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

are themselves constructed using well Source: Balaram , P. - Molecular Biophysics Unit, Indian Institute of Science, Bangalore Collection: Biology and Medicine 10 NANO EXPRESS...

30

E-Print Network 3.0 - asymmetric quantum wells Sample Search...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

transitions are well resolved... BY MULTIPLE QUANTUM NMR: n-PENTYL CYANOBIPHENYL S. SINTON and A. PINES Department of Chemistry. Lawrence... The multiple quantum NhlR spectrum...

31

E-Print Network 3.0 - abandoned wells metodologia Sample Search...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

metodologias e alguns mtodos de desenvolvimento de ontologias assim como algumas... terms and relations comprising the vocabulary of a topic area, as well as the rules for...

32

E-Print Network 3.0 - animal well-being Sample Search Results  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

RESEARCH THE UNIVERSITY OF NORTH CAROLINA AT GREENSBORO Summary: and contribute to their health, comfort and well-being; animal care activities are directed by a veterinarian......

33

Y-12 Successfully Meets and Exceeds Defense Programs Goals During...  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

News Releases Y-12 Successfully Meets and Exceeds Defense Programs ... Y-12 Successfully Meets and Exceeds Defense Programs Goals During FY 2010 applicationmsword icon NR-11-10...

34

A brightness exceeding simulated Langmuir limit  

SciTech Connect

When an excitation of the first lens determines a beam is parallel beam, a brightness that is 100 times higher than Langmuir limit is measured experimentally, where Langmuir limits are estimated using a simulated axial cathode current density which is simulated based on a measured emission current. The measured brightness is comparable to Langmuir limit, when the lens excitation is such that an image position is slightly shorter than a lens position. Previously measured values of brightness for cathode apical radii of curvature 20, 60, 120, 240, and 480 ?m were 8.7, 5.3, 3.3, 2.4, and 3.9 times higher than their corresponding Langmuir limits, respectively, in this experiment, the lens excitation was such that the lens and the image positions were 180 mm and 400 mm, respectively. From these measured brightness for three different lens excitation conditions, it is concluded that the brightness depends on the first lens excitation. For the electron gun operated in a space charge limited condition, some of the electrons emitted from the cathode are returned to the cathode without having crossed a virtual cathode. Therefore, method that assumes a Langmuir limit defining method using a Maxwellian distribution of electron velocities may need to be revised. For the condition in which the values of the exceeding the Langmuir limit are measured, the simulated trajectories of electrons that are emitted from the cathode do not cross the optical axis at the crossover, thus the law of sines may not be valid for high brightness electron beam systems.

Nakasuji, Mamoru [2-15-11, Serigaya-chou, Kounan-ku, Yokohama-shi, Kanagawa-ken (Japan)] [2-15-11, Serigaya-chou, Kounan-ku, Yokohama-shi, Kanagawa-ken (Japan)

2013-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

35

Analytical Data Report for Sediment Samples Collected From 200 BP 5 OU, C7514 (299-E28-30) L-Well  

SciTech Connect

This an analytical data report for samples received from BP-5 L Well. This report is being prepared for CHPRC.

Lindberg, Michael J.

2010-06-18T23:59:59.000Z

36

EPAct Transportation Regulatory Activities: National Grid Exceeds EPAct  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

National National Grid Exceeds EPAct Requirements Deploying Natural Gas Technology to someone by E-mail Share EPAct Transportation Regulatory Activities: National Grid Exceeds EPAct Requirements Deploying Natural Gas Technology on Facebook Tweet about EPAct Transportation Regulatory Activities: National Grid Exceeds EPAct Requirements Deploying Natural Gas Technology on Twitter Bookmark EPAct Transportation Regulatory Activities: National Grid Exceeds EPAct Requirements Deploying Natural Gas Technology on Google Bookmark EPAct Transportation Regulatory Activities: National Grid Exceeds EPAct Requirements Deploying Natural Gas Technology on Delicious Rank EPAct Transportation Regulatory Activities: National Grid Exceeds EPAct Requirements Deploying Natural Gas Technology on Digg

37

National Energy Research Scientific Computing Center NERSC Exceeds Reliability  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Scientific Scientific Computing Center NERSC Exceeds Reliability Standards With Tape-Based Active Archive Research Facility Accelerates Access to Data while Supporting Exponential Growth Founded in 1974, the National Energy Research Scientific Computing Center (NERSC) is the primary scientific com- puting facility for the Office of Science in the U.S. Department of Energy. NERSC is located at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory's Oakland Scientific Facility in Oakland, California and is mandated with providing computational resources and expertise for scientific research to about 5,000 scientists at national labora- tories and universities across the United States, as well as their international col- laborators. A division of Lawrence Berke- ley National Laboratory, NERSC supports

38

Sampling and Analysis Instruction for Installation of UPR-100-N-17 Bioremediation Wells and Performance of Bioventing Pilot Tests  

SciTech Connect

Sampling and analytical requirements for in situ bioremediation pilot study for remediation of vadose zone petroleum hydrocarbon contamination.

W. S. Thompson

2008-12-30T23:59:59.000Z

39

Mixed Waste Management Facility FSS Well Data Groundwater Monitoring Report. Fourth Quarter 1994 and 1994 summary  

SciTech Connect

During fourth quarter 1994, ten constituents exceeded final Primary Drinking Water Standards (PDWS) in groundwater samples from downgradient monitoring wells at the Mixed Waste Management Facility, the Old Burial Ground, the E-Area Vaults, the proposed Hazardous Waste/Mixed Waste Disposal Vaults, and the F-Area Sewage Sludge Application Site. No constituent exceeded final PDWS in samples from the upgradient monitoring wells. The groundwater flow directions and rates in the three hydrostratigraphic units were similar to those of previous quarters.

Chase, J.A.

1995-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

40

Kansas City Weatherization Efforts Exceed Goals | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Weatherization Efforts Exceed Goals Weatherization Efforts Exceed Goals Kansas City Weatherization Efforts Exceed Goals July 23, 2010 - 11:43am Addthis Stephen Graff Former Writer & editor for Energy Empowers, EERE Kansas City's rainy summer is good news for lawns but not so good news for homes in need of weatherization, since wet conditions slow down work. But Bob Jackson isn't worried. "We've had a significantly wet season... but we're two and half months ahead," says the manager of the city's Property Preservation Division, which oversees weatherization efforts for Kansas City and some satellite towns. Even so, Jackson far exceeded the target number of income-eligible homes to weatherize, as set forth by the Missouri's Department of Natural Resources (DNR) and the U.S. Department of Energy's Weatherization Assistance

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "wells sampled exceed" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Kansas City Weatherization Efforts Exceed Goals | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Kansas City Weatherization Efforts Exceed Goals Kansas City Weatherization Efforts Exceed Goals Kansas City Weatherization Efforts Exceed Goals July 23, 2010 - 11:43am Addthis Stephen Graff Former Writer & editor for Energy Empowers, EERE Kansas City's rainy summer is good news for lawns but not so good news for homes in need of weatherization, since wet conditions slow down work. But Bob Jackson isn't worried. "We've had a significantly wet season... but we're two and half months ahead," says the manager of the city's Property Preservation Division, which oversees weatherization efforts for Kansas City and some satellite towns. Even so, Jackson far exceeded the target number of income-eligible homes to weatherize, as set forth by the Missouri's Department of Natural Resources (DNR) and the U.S. Department of Energy's Weatherization Assistance

42

Savannah River Tritium Enterprise exceeds productivity savings goals for  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Tritium Enterprise exceeds productivity savings goals for Tritium Enterprise exceeds productivity savings goals for FY13 | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure Continuing Management Reform Countering Nuclear Terrorism About Us Our Programs Our History Who We Are Our Leadership Our Locations Budget Our Operations Media Room Congressional Testimony Fact Sheets Newsletters Press Releases Speeches Events Social Media Video Gallery Photo Gallery NNSA Archive Federal Employment Apply for Our Jobs Our Jobs Working at NNSA Blog Home > NNSA Blog > Savannah River Tritium Enterprise exceeds productivity savings ... Savannah River Tritium Enterprise exceeds productivity savings goals for FY13 Posted By Office of Public Affairs

43

Savannah River Tritium Enterprise exceeds productivity savings goals for  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Tritium Enterprise exceeds productivity savings goals for Tritium Enterprise exceeds productivity savings goals for FY13 | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure Continuing Management Reform Countering Nuclear Terrorism About Us Our Programs Our History Who We Are Our Leadership Our Locations Budget Our Operations Media Room Congressional Testimony Fact Sheets Newsletters Press Releases Speeches Events Social Media Video Gallery Photo Gallery NNSA Archive Federal Employment Apply for Our Jobs Our Jobs Working at NNSA Blog Home > NNSA Blog > Savannah River Tritium Enterprise exceeds productivity savings ... Savannah River Tritium Enterprise exceeds productivity savings goals for FY13 Posted By Office of Public Affairs

44

Los Alamos National Laboratory Transuranic Waste Program Exceeds Planned  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Los Alamos National Laboratory Transuranic Waste Program Exceeds Los Alamos National Laboratory Transuranic Waste Program Exceeds Planned Shipping Goal Los Alamos National Laboratory Transuranic Waste Program Exceeds Planned Shipping Goal May 1, 2012 - 12:00pm Addthis LOS ALAMOS, N.M. - Los Alamos National Laboratory's (LANL) Transuranic (TRU) Waste Program is looking at another record-setting month for the amount of TRU waste leaving Material Disposal Area G, headed to the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) for permanent disposal. LANL exceeded its planned removal of TRU waste from Area G in April, shipping more than 91 cubic meters of waste to WIPP - more than the Lab has ever shipped there in a single month. The Lab is headed for an even more successful May, with 99 cubic meters shipped to WIPP as of May 22. "Our shipping performance reflects the acceleration that began last

45

Hanford Groundwater Contamination Areas Shrink as EM Exceeds...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

Office at the Hanford site have exceeded a fiscal year goal to remove 3,500 pounds of carbon tetrachloride from groundwater under the center of the site. EM-funded contractor,...

46

EM Exceeds Sustainability Goal by Reducing Carbon Footprint | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

EM Exceeds Sustainability Goal by Reducing Carbon Footprint EM Exceeds Sustainability Goal by Reducing Carbon Footprint EM Exceeds Sustainability Goal by Reducing Carbon Footprint April 8, 2013 - 12:00pm Addthis Spanning 34 acres, the Savannah River Site Biomass Cogeneration Facility is the culmination of 30 months and more than 600,000 hours of labor. Spanning 34 acres, the Savannah River Site Biomass Cogeneration Facility is the culmination of 30 months and more than 600,000 hours of labor. Sources of greenhouse gas emissions. Sources of greenhouse gas emissions. Spanning 34 acres, the Savannah River Site Biomass Cogeneration Facility is the culmination of 30 months and more than 600,000 hours of labor. Sources of greenhouse gas emissions. WASHINGTON, D.C. - EM has surpassed another DOE sustainability goal, this

47

EM Exceeds Sustainability Goal by Reducing Carbon Footprint | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Exceeds Sustainability Goal by Reducing Carbon Footprint Exceeds Sustainability Goal by Reducing Carbon Footprint EM Exceeds Sustainability Goal by Reducing Carbon Footprint April 8, 2013 - 12:00pm Addthis Spanning 34 acres, the Savannah River Site Biomass Cogeneration Facility is the culmination of 30 months and more than 600,000 hours of labor. Spanning 34 acres, the Savannah River Site Biomass Cogeneration Facility is the culmination of 30 months and more than 600,000 hours of labor. Sources of greenhouse gas emissions. Sources of greenhouse gas emissions. Spanning 34 acres, the Savannah River Site Biomass Cogeneration Facility is the culmination of 30 months and more than 600,000 hours of labor. Sources of greenhouse gas emissions. WASHINGTON, D.C. - EM has surpassed another DOE sustainability goal, this

48

Whistler Modes with Wave Magnetic Fields Exceeding the Ambient Field  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Whistler-mode wave packets with fields exceeding the ambient dc magnetic field have been excited in a large, high electron-beta plasma. The waves are induced with a loop antenna with dipole moment either along or opposite to the dc field. In the latter case the excited wave packets have the topology of a spheromak but are propagating in the whistler mode along and opposite to the dc magnetic field. Field-reversed configurations with net zero helicity have also been produced. The electron magnetohydrodynamics fields are force free, have wave energy density exceeding the particle energy density, and propagate stably at subelectron thermal velocities through a nearly uniform stationary ion density background.

R. L. Stenzel; J. M. Urrutia; K. D. Strohmaier

2006-03-10T23:59:59.000Z

49

Analysis of core samples from the BPXA-DOE-USGS Mount Elbert gas hydrate stratigraphic test well: Insights into core disturbance and handling  

SciTech Connect

Collecting and preserving undamaged core samples containing gas hydrates from depth is difficult because of the pressure and temperature changes encountered upon retrieval. Hydrate-bearing core samples were collected at the BPXA-DOE-USGS Mount Elbert Gas Hydrate Stratigraphic Test Well in February 2007. Coring was performed while using a custom oil-based drilling mud, and the cores were retrieved by a wireline. The samples were characterized and subsampled at the surface under ambient winter arctic conditions. Samples thought to be hydrate bearing were preserved either by immersion in liquid nitrogen (LN), or by storage under methane pressure at ambient arctic conditions, and later depressurized and immersed in LN. Eleven core samples from hydrate-bearing zones were scanned using x-ray computed tomography to examine core structure and homogeneity. Features observed include radial fractures, spalling-type fractures, and reduced density near the periphery. These features were induced during sample collection, handling, and preservation. Isotopic analysis of the methane from hydrate in an initially LN-preserved core and a pressure-preserved core indicate that secondary hydrate formation occurred throughout the pressurized core, whereas none occurred in the LN-preserved core, however no hydrate was found near the periphery of the LN-preserved core. To replicate some aspects of the preservation methods, natural and laboratory-made saturated porous media samples were frozen in a variety of ways, with radial fractures observed in some LN-frozen sands, and needle-like ice crystals forming in slowly frozen clay-rich sediments. Suggestions for hydrate-bearing core preservation are presented.

Kneafsey, Timothy J.; Lu, Hailong; Winters, William; Boswell, Ray; Hunter, Robert; Collett, Timothy S.

2009-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

50

Examination of core samples from the Mount Elbert Gas Hydrate Stratigraphic Test Well, Alaska North Slope: Effects of retrieval and preservation  

SciTech Connect

Collecting and preserving undamaged core samples containing gas hydrates from depth is difficult because of the pressure and temperature changes encountered upon retrieval. Hydrate-bearing core samples were collected at the BPXA-DOE-USGS Mount Elbert Gas Hydrate Stratigraphic Test Well in February 2007. Coring was performed while using a custom oil-based drilling mud, and the cores were retrieved by a wireline. The samples were characterized and subsampled at the surface under ambient winter arctic conditions. Samples thought to be hydrate bearing were preserved either by immersion in liquid nitrogen (LN), or by storage under methane pressure at ambient arctic conditions, and later depressurized and immersed in LN. Eleven core samples from hydrate-bearing zones were scanned using x-ray computed tomography to examine core structure and homogeneity. Features observed include radial fractures, spalling-type fractures, and reduced density near the periphery. These features were induced during sample collection, handling, and preservation. Isotopic analysis of the methane from hydrate in an initially LN-preserved core and a pressure-preserved core indicate that secondary hydrate formation occurred throughout the pressurized core, whereas none occurred in the LN-preserved core, however no hydrate was found near the periphery of the LN-preserved core. To replicate some aspects of the preservation methods, natural and laboratory-made saturated porous media samples were frozen in a variety of ways, with radial fractures observed in some LN-frozen sands, and needle-like ice crystals forming in slowly frozen clay-rich sediments. Suggestions for hydrate-bearing core preservation are presented.

Kneafsey, T.J.; Liu, T.J. H.; Winters, W.; Boswell, R.; Hunter, R.; Collett, T.S.

2011-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

51

Analysis of FY 2005/2006 Hydrologic Testing and Sampling Results for Well ER-12-4, Nevada Test Site, Nye County, Nevada, Rev. No.: 0  

SciTech Connect

This report documents the analysis of data collected for ER-12-4 during the fiscal year (FY) 2005 Rainier Mesa/Shoshone Mountain well development and hydraulic testing program (herein referred to as the ''testing program'') and hydraulic response data from the FY 2006 Sampling Program. Well ER-12-4 was constructed and tested as a part of the Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 99, Rainier Mesa/Shoshone Mountain, Phase I drilling program during FY 2005. These activities were conducted on behalf of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office (NNSA/NSO) for the Underground Test Area (UGTA) Subproject. As shown on Figure 1-1, ER-12-4 is located in central Rainier Mesa, in Area 12 of the Nevada Test Site (NTS). Figure 1-2 shows the well location in relation to the tunnels under Rainier Mesa. The well was drilled to a total depth (TD) of 3,715 feet (ft) below ground surface (bgs) (surface elevation 6,883.7 ft above mean sea level [amsl]) in the area of several tunnels mined into Rainier Mesa that were used historically for nuclear testing (NNSA/NSO, 2006). The closest nuclear test to the well location was MIGHTY OAK (U-12t.08), conducted in the U-12t Tunnel approximately 475 ft north of the well site. The MIGHTY OAK test working point elevation was located at approximately 5,620 ft amsl. The MIGHTY OAK test had an announced yield of ''less than 20 kilotons'' (DOE/NV, 2000). The purpose of this hydrogeologic investigation well is to evaluate the deep Tertiary volcanic section below the tunnel level, which is above the regional water table, and to provide information on the section of the lower carbonate aquifer - thrust plate (LCA3), located below the Tertiary volcanic section (SNJV, 2005b). Details on the drilling and completion program are presented in the ''Completion Report for Well ER-12-4 Corrective Action Unit 99: Rainier Mesa-Shoshone Mountain'' (NNSA/NSO, 2006). Participants in ER-12-4 testing activities were: Stoller-Navarro Joint Venture (SNJV), Bechtel Nevada (BN), Desert Research Institute (DRI), Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL), and the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS). Stoller-Navarro Joint Venture served as the lead contractor responsible for providing site supervision, development and testing services, and waste management services; BN provided construction and engineering support services; DRI provided well logging services and participated in groundwater sampling and laboratory analyses; LANL and LLNL participated in groundwater sampling and laboratory analyses; and the USGS performed laboratory analyses. Analyses of data from the ER-12-4 testing program presented in this document were performed by SNJV except as noted. These same contractors participated in the FY 2006 Sampling Program.

Bill Fryer

2006-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

52

Fuel Cells Market Exceeds $1.3 Billion in Worldwide Sales | Department...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Fuel Cells Market Exceeds 1.3 Billion in Worldwide Sales Fuel Cells Market Exceeds 1.3 Billion in Worldwide Sales December 1, 2014 - 5:14pm Addthis The market for fuel cells is...

53

Analytical Data Report for Sediment Samples Collected From 200 BP 5 OU, C5860 (299-E29-545) K-Well  

SciTech Connect

This is an analytical data report for sediments received fro BP 5 K Well. This report is prepared for CHPRC

Lindberg, Michael J.

2010-06-18T23:59:59.000Z

54

Summary of micrographic analysis of selected core samples from Well ER-20-6{number_sign}1 in support of matrix diffusion testing  

SciTech Connect

ER-20-6{number_sign}1 was cored to determine fracture and lithologic properties proximal to the BULLION test cavity. Selected samples from ER-20-6{number_sign}1 were subjected to matrix and/or fracture diffusion experiments to assess solute movement in this environment. Micrographic analysis of these samples suggests that the similarity in bulk chemical composition results in very similar mineral assemblages forming along natural fractures. These samples are all part of the mafic-poor Calico Hills Formation and exhibit fracture-coating mineral assemblages dominated by mixed illite/smectite clay and illite, with local opaline silica (2,236 and 2, 812 feet), and zeolite (at 2,236 feet). Based on this small sample population, the magnitude to which secondary phases have formed on fracture surfaces bears an apparently inverse relationship to the competency of the host lithology, reflected by variations in the degree of fracturing and the development of secondary phases on fracture surfaces. In the flow breccia at 2,851 feet, thinly developed, localized coatings are developed along persistent open fracture apertures in this competent rock type. Fractures in the devitrified lava from 2,812 feet are irregular, and locally blocked by secondary mineral phases. Natural fractures on the zeolitized tuff from 2,236 feet are discontinuous and irregular and typically obstructed with secondary mineral phases. There are also a second set of clean fractures in the 2,236 foot sample which lack secondary mineral phases and are interpreted to have been induced by the BULLION test. Based on these results, it is expected that matrix diffusion will be enhanced in samples where potentially transmissive fractures exhibit the greatest degree of obstruction (2,236>2,812=2,835>2,851). It is unclear what influence the induced fractures observed at 2,236 feet may have on diffusion given the lack of knowledge on their extent. It is assumed that the bulk matrix diffusion characteristics of the sample at 2,835 feet will be equivalent to the unfractured characteristics of the sample at 2,812 feet.

IT Corporation, Las Vegas

1998-09-25T23:59:59.000Z

55

Recovery Act Exceeds Major Cleanup Milestone, DOE Complex Now 74 Percent  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Recovery Act Exceeds Major Cleanup Milestone, DOE Complex Now 74 Recovery Act Exceeds Major Cleanup Milestone, DOE Complex Now 74 Percent Remediated Recovery Act Exceeds Major Cleanup Milestone, DOE Complex Now 74 Percent Remediated The Office of Environmental Management's (EM) American Recovery and Reinvestment Act Program recently achieved 74 percent footprint reduction, exceeding the originally established goal of 40 percent. EM has reduced its pre-Recovery Act footprint of 931 square miles, established in 2009, by 688 square miles. Reducing its contaminated footprint to 243 square miles has proven to be a monumental task, and a challenge the EM team was ready to take on from the beginning. Recovery Act Exceeds Major Cleanup Milestone, DOE Complex Now 74 Percent Remediated More Documents & Publications 2011 ARRA Newsletters

56

Local procurements exceed planned goals in 5 out of 6 business categories  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Local procurements exceed planned goals Local procurements exceed planned goals Local procurements exceed planned goals in 5 out of 6 business categories Major subcontractor's dollars impact the economy locally, regionally and nationally. April 18, 2013 Socio Economic Goals Businesses awarded LANL subcontracts exceeding $500,000 ($1 million for construction) submit small business plans including proposed goals for various socioeconomic categories so that they are consistent with LANL's Subcontracting Plan. Contact Small Business Office (505) 667-4419 Email Major subcontractors' achievements tracked to ensure consistency with LANL's Subcontracting Plan When the Laboratory awards subcontracts to large business exceeding $500,000 ($1 million for construction), these major large business subcontractors must submit small business subcontracting plans. These plans

57

Examination of core samples from the Mount Elbert Gas Hydrate Stratigraphic Test Well, Alaska North Slope: Effects of retrieval and preservation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

future gas hydrate core handling and preservation in sand-gas-hydrate-bearing zones, in which the sediments (particularly the sands)sand deposits are primarily being investigated in the Mount Elbert well, much of the worlds natural gas hydrate

Collett, T.J. Kneafsey, T.J., H. Liu, W. Winters, R. Boswell, R. Hunter, and T.S.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

58

Analysis of core samples from the BPXA-DOE-USGS Mount Elbert gas hydrate stratigraphic test well: Insights into core disturbance and handling  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

future gas hydrate core handling and preservation in sand-gas-hydrate-bearing zones, in which the sediments (particularly the sands)sand deposits are primarily being investigated in the Mount Elbert well, much of the worlds natural gas hydrate

Kneafsey, Timothy J.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

59

Hanford wells  

SciTech Connect

Records describing wells located on or near the Hanford Site have been maintained by Pacific Northwest Laboratory and the operating contractor, Westinghouse Hanford Company. In support of the Ground-Water Surveillance Project, portions of the data contained in these records have been compiled into the following report, which is intended to be used by those needing a condensed, tabular summary of well location and basic construction information. The wells listed in this report were constructed over a period of time spanning almost 70 years. Data included in this report were retrieved from the Hanford Envirorunental Information System (HEIS) database and supplemented with information not yet entered into HEIS. While considerable effort has been made to obtain the most accurate and complete tabulations possible of the Hanford Site wells, omissions and errors may exist. This document does not include data on lithologic logs, ground-water analyses, or specific well completion details.

Chamness, M.A.; Merz, J.K.

1993-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

60

Microsoft Word - DOE Exceeds TRU Waste Cleanup Goal at LANL.doc  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

DOE Exceeds 2012 TRU Waste Cleanup Goal at DOE Exceeds 2012 TRU Waste Cleanup Goal at Los Alamos National Laboratory CARLSBAD, N.M., October 3, 2012 -The Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) Central Characterization Project (CCP) and Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) exceeded a fiscal year 2012 goal of characterizing and shipping 800 cubic meters of transuranic (TRU) waste, fulfilling a commitment to the state of New Mexico. The 800 cubic meters goal was exceeded by more than 100 cubic meters, with the vast majority of the TRU waste characterized as defense related TRU and permanently disposed at WIPP. To accomplish this achievement, the WIPP CCP increased the amount of waste that was certified, ensuring it met all the requirements for disposal at WIPP. This resulted in the ability to

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "wells sampled exceed" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Workers at Paducah Site Exceed 1.5 Million Hours Without Lost-Time Injury, Illness  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

PADUCAH, Ky. Workers with Paducah site infrastructure contractor Swift & Staley, Inc. recently exceeded 1.5 million hours without lost time away from work due to injury or illness, representing nine years of safe performance.

62

U.S. Domestic Oil Production Exceeds Imports for First Time in 18 Years |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

U.S. Domestic Oil Production Exceeds Imports for First Time in 18 U.S. Domestic Oil Production Exceeds Imports for First Time in 18 Years U.S. Domestic Oil Production Exceeds Imports for First Time in 18 Years November 15, 2013 - 3:47pm Addthis Source: Energy Information Administration Short Term Energy Outlook Allison Lantero Allison Lantero Public Affairs Specialist, Office of Public Affairs In February 1995, The Brady Bunch Movie and Billy Madison were in movie theaters, "Creep" by TLC was at the top of the Billboard charts, and the Yahoo! search engine had not yet been unveiled. It was also the last month the U.S. produced more oil than it imported. Until last month. During remarks in Cleveland yesterday, President Obama noted this historic milestone: in October, America produced more oil here at home than we imported from overseas.

63

U.S. Domestic Oil Production Exceeds Imports for First Time in 18 Years |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Domestic Oil Production Exceeds Imports for First Time in 18 Domestic Oil Production Exceeds Imports for First Time in 18 Years U.S. Domestic Oil Production Exceeds Imports for First Time in 18 Years November 15, 2013 - 3:47pm Addthis Source: Energy Information Administration Short Term Energy Outlook Allison Lantero Allison Lantero Public Affairs Specialist, Office of Public Affairs In February 1995, The Brady Bunch Movie and Billy Madison were in movie theaters, "Creep" by TLC was at the top of the Billboard charts, and the Yahoo! search engine had not yet been unveiled. It was also the last month the U.S. produced more oil than it imported. Until last month. During remarks in Cleveland yesterday, President Obama noted this historic milestone: in October, America produced more oil here at home than we imported from overseas.

64

EM Exceeds Fiscal Year 2013 Small Business Goals | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

EM Exceeds Fiscal Year 2013 Small Business Goals EM Exceeds Fiscal Year 2013 Small Business Goals EM Exceeds Fiscal Year 2013 Small Business Goals November 26, 2013 - 12:00pm Addthis Employees with Swift & Staley Inc., a Paducah site small business contractor, repair a railroad on the site. Employees with Swift & Staley Inc., a Paducah site small business contractor, repair a railroad on the site. Employees with Wastren Advantage, Inc., an Oak Ridge small business contractor, package waste for disposal at the Transuranic Waste Processing Center at Oak Ridge. Employees with Wastren Advantage, Inc., an Oak Ridge small business contractor, package waste for disposal at the Transuranic Waste Processing Center at Oak Ridge. Employees with Swift & Staley Inc., a Paducah site small business contractor, repair a railroad on the site.

65

Sampling for Bacteria in Wells (Spanish)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

C?mo Tomar Muestras de Pozos (para an?lisis bacteriol?gico) E-126S 11/01 Las muestras de agua para an?lisis bacteriol?gico siempre deben ser tomadas en envases esterilizados. El procedimiento para tomar las muestras de agua es el siguiente: 1...

Lesikar, Bruce J.

2001-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

66

Morgantown Cost of Living Exceeds National Average By Eric Bowen, Research Associate  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1 Morgantown Cost of Living Exceeds National Average By Eric Bowen, Research Associate Tess Meinert, Research Associate John Deskins, Ph.D., Director Overview The overall cost of living in Morgantown was 5. Morgantown's higher-than-average cost of living is primarily driven by housing costs. The city falls below

Mohaghegh, Shahab

67

U.S. crude oil production expected to exceed oil imports later this year  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

crude oil production expected to exceed oil imports later crude oil production expected to exceed oil imports later this year U.S. crude oil production is expected to surpass U.S. crude oil imports by the fourth quarter of this year. That would mark the first time since February 1995 that domestic crude oil output exceeds imports, according to the latest monthly energy outlook from the U.S. Energy Information Administration. The United States will still need to import crude oil to help meet domestic demand. However, total crude oil imports this year are on track to fall to their lowest level since 1997. U.S. oil production is expected to continue to rise over the next two years as imports fall. As a result, the share of total U.S. petroleum consumption met by net imports is forecast to fall to 32 percent next year, the lowest level since 1985 and nearly half the peak level of 60 percent seen in

68

Stochastic Intensity Models of Wrong Way Risk: Wrong Way CVA Need Not Exceed Independent CVA  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

motion with drift and volatility ?. We sample from the01, and an annualized volatility of 25%. The credit quality

Ghamami, Samim; Goldberg, Lisa R.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

69

Comprehensive Energy Program at Patrick Air Force Base Set to Exceed Energy Goals  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Bringing you a prosperous future where energy Bringing you a prosperous future where energy is clean, abundant, reliable, and affordable Case Study Case Study Federal Energy Management Program Federal Energy Management Program Leading by example, saving energy and taxpayer dollars in federal facilities The 45 th Space Wing at Patrick Air Force Base (PAFB) is pursuing its energy goals through a partnership with Florida Power & Light (FPL). At the request of PAFB, FPL developed a base-wide comprehensive energy program that charts a course for improving the base's energy efficiency in five phased projects and demonstrates that PAFB can exceed their federal goals for reducing energy use by 2015. The base, stretching along four miles of Florida's east coast south of Kennedy Space Center, is home to the 45

70

EM Exceeds Fiscal Year 2013 Small Business Goals | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Fiscal Year 2013 Small Business Goals Fiscal Year 2013 Small Business Goals EM Exceeds Fiscal Year 2013 Small Business Goals November 26, 2013 - 12:00pm Addthis Employees with Swift & Staley Inc., a Paducah site small business contractor, repair a railroad on the site. Employees with Swift & Staley Inc., a Paducah site small business contractor, repair a railroad on the site. Employees with Wastren Advantage, Inc., an Oak Ridge small business contractor, package waste for disposal at the Transuranic Waste Processing Center at Oak Ridge. Employees with Wastren Advantage, Inc., an Oak Ridge small business contractor, package waste for disposal at the Transuranic Waste Processing Center at Oak Ridge. Employees with Swift & Staley Inc., a Paducah site small business contractor, repair a railroad on the site.

71

Comprehensive Energy Program at Patrick Air Force Base Set to Exceed Energy Goals  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

energy energy is clean, abundant, reliable, and affordable Case Study Case Study Federal Energy Management Program Federal Energy Management Program Leading by example, saving energy and taxpayer dollars in federal facilities The 45 th Space Wing at Patrick Air Force Base (PAFB) is pursuing its energy goals through a partnership with Florida Power & Light (FPL). At the request of PAFB, FPL developed a base-wide comprehensive energy program that charts a course for improving the base's energy efficiency in five phased projects and demonstrates that PAFB can exceed their federal goals for reducing energy use by 2015. The base, stretching along four miles of Florida's east coast south of Kennedy Space Center, is home to the 45 th Space Wing and more than 35

72

Recovery Act Exceeds Major Cleanup Milestone, DOE Complex Now 74 Percent Remediated  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

November 2, 2012 November 2, 2012 WASHINGTON, D.C. - The Office of Environmental Management's (EM) American Recovery and Reinvestment Act Program recently achieved 74 percent footprint reduction, exceeding the originally established goal of 40 percent. EM has reduced its pre-Recovery Act footprint of 931 square miles, established in 2009, by 688 square miles. Reducing its contaminated footprint to 243 square miles has proven to be a monu- mental task, and a challenge the EM team was ready to take on from the beginning. In 2009, EM identified a goal of 40 percent footprint reduction by September 2011 as its High Priority Performance Goal. EM achieved that goal in April 2011, five months ahead of schedule, and continues to achieve footprint reduction, primarily at Savannah River Site and Hanford. Once

73

GLLH EM Invisible Cloak With Novel Front Branching And Without Exceed Light Speed Violation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In this paper, we propose new Global and Local (GL) electromagnetic (EM) cloaks with distinctive class material a_{\\alpha \\beta}\\log ^\\alpha (b_{\\alpha \\beta}/h) h^\\beta (GLLH Cloak) without exceed light speed violation. The refractive index of the GLLH cloak material, $n(r)$, is large than one or equal to one. Our GLLH cloak is created by GL EM modeling and GL EM cloak inversion with searching class \\it a_{\\alpha \\beta}\\log ^\\alpha (b_{\\alpha \\beta}/h) h^\\beta. The GLLH cloaks in this paper have finite speed and have no exceed light speed? physical violations and have more advantages. The GLLH EM cloaks can be practicable by using normal materials and are available for all broad frequency band. The GL EM cloak inversion and electromagnetic integral equation for cloak are presented in this paper. The novel EM wave propagation and front branching in the GLLH cloak by GL EM modeling are presented in this paper. The EM wave front propagation in GLLH cloak is behind of the front in free space. At time steps $118 dt$, in the GLLH cloak, the wave front is curved as a crescent like and propagates slower than the light in free space. At the time step $119dt$, the EM wave inside of the GLLH cloak propagates slower than light speed, moreover, its two crescent front peaks intersect at a front branching point. At the front branching point, the front is split to two fronts. The novel front branching and crescent like wave propagation are displayed in the following figure 1, figure 2 and figures 5 -20 in this paper. All copyright and patent of the GLLH EM cloaks and GL modeling and inversion methods are reserved by authors in GL Geophysical Laboratory.

Ganquan Xie; Jianhua Li; Lee Xie; Feng Xie

2010-05-21T23:59:59.000Z

74

Exploratory Well | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Exploratory Well Exploratory Well Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Technique: Exploratory Well Details Activities (8) Areas (3) Regions (0) NEPA(5) Exploration Technique Information Exploration Group: Drilling Techniques Exploration Sub Group: Exploration Drilling Parent Exploration Technique: Exploration Drilling Information Provided by Technique Lithology: Can provide core or cuttings Stratigraphic/Structural: Identify stratigraphy and structural features within a well Hydrological: -Water samples can be used for geochemical analysis -Fluid pressures can be used to estimate flow rates Thermal: -Temperatures can be measured within the hole -Information about the heat source Dictionary.png Exploratory Well: An exploratory well is drilled for the purpose of identifying the

75

U. S. S. R. turbodrilling ROP exceeds U. S. rotary rate  

SciTech Connect

It is common practice in the U.S.S.R. to evaluate drilling estimates by a mere comparison of the footage drilled on a per-rig, per-month basis because the figure integrates the techniques, technology, and management used. According to this approach, the rate of penetration (ROP) in the U.S.S.R. is 2.3-2.8 times less than that in the U.S. Based on the statistics published in the Neftanaya Promyishlennost annual, in 1988 the average rotary drilling rate in the U.S. was 4,404 m (14,440 ft)/rig/month (this figure in the U.S. annual footage drilled by all rotary rigs divided by the annual average rig count and converted from yearly to monthly figures), and in the U.S.S.R. it was 1,595 m (5,233 ft)/rig/month. This type of comparison is misleading because the drilling areas in the two countries differ greatly in geographic, geologic, and climatic characteristics. The same holds true for comparisons of average well depths. The preceeding characteristics influence drilling estimates differently. The most difficult task is to evaluate these factors as an average in each country. Our approach to the comparison takes into account only the average footage drilled for each country. In the U.S.S.R. more than 85% of the wells are drilled with turbodrills, and in the U.S. most wells (approximately 80%) are rotary drilled.

Pogarskiy, A.A.; Yasashin, A.M. (All Union Scientific and Research Inst. for Organization, Management, and Economics of Oil and Gas Industry, Moscow (SU))

1991-06-03T23:59:59.000Z

76

Decontaminating Flooded Wells  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This publication explains how to decontaminate and disinfect a well, test the well water and check for well damage after a flood....

Boellstorff, Diana; Dozier, Monty; Provin, Tony; Dictson, Nikkoal; McFarland, Mark L.

2005-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

77

September 2004 Water Sampling  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

event. Sampling Protocol Wells USGS-4 and USGS-8 were sampled using dedicated bladder pumps. Data from these wells are qualified with an "F" flag in the database indicating the...

78

Well control procedures for extended reach wells  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

been found to be critical to the success of ERD are torque and drag, drillstring design, wellbore stability, hole cleaning, casing design, directional drilling optimization, drilling dynamics and rig sizing.4 Other technologies of vital importance... are the use of rotary steerable systems (RSS) together with measurement while drilling (MWD) and logging while drilling (LWD) to geosteer the well into the geological target.5 Many of the wells drilled at Wytch Farm would not have been possible to drill...

Gjorv, Bjorn

2004-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

79

Scaling Up: Kilolumen Solid-State Lighting Exceeding 100 LPW via Remote Phosphor  

SciTech Connect

This thirty-month project was successful in attaining its ambitious objectives of demonstrating a radically novel 'remote-phosphor' LED light source that can out-perform conventional conformal coated phosphor LED sources. Numerous technical challenges were met with innovative techniques and optical configurations. This product development program for a new generation of solid-state light sources has attained unprecedented luminosity (over 1 kilo-lumen) and efficacy (based on the criterion lumens per 100mw radiant blue). LPI has successfully demonstrated its proprietary technology for optical synthesis of large uniform sources out of the light output of an array of separated LEDs. Numerous multiple blue LEDs illuminate single a phosphor patch. By separating the LEDs from the phosphor, the phosphor and LEDs operate cooler and with higher efficiency over a wide range of operating conditions (from startup to steady state). Other benefits of the system include: better source uniformity, more types of phosphor can be used (chemical interaction and high temperatures are no longer an issue), and the phosphor can be made up from a pre-manufactured sheet (thereby lowering cost and complexity of phosphor deposition). Several laboratory prototypes were built and operated at the expected high performance level. The project fully explored two types of remote phosphor system: transmissive and reflective. The first was found to be well suited for a replacement for A19 type incandescent bulbs, as it was able to replicate the beam pattern of a traditional filament bulb. The second type has the advantages that it is pre-collimate source that has an adjustable color temperature. The project was divided in two phases: Phase I explored a transmissive design and Phase II of the project developed reflective architectures. Additionally, in Phase II the design of a spherical emitting transmissive remote phosphor bulb was developed that is suitable for replacement of A19 and similar light bulbs. In Phase II several new reflective remote phosphor systems were developed and patents applied for. This research included the development of reflective systems in which the short-pass filter operated at a nominal incidence angle of 15{sup o}, a major advancement of this technology. Another goal of the project was to show that it is possible to align multiple optics to multiple LEDs (spaced apart for better thermal management) to within an accuracy in the z-direction of 10 microns or less. This goal was achieved. A further goal was to show it is possible to combine and homogenize the output from multiple LEDs without any flux loss or significant increase in etendue. This goal also was achieved. The following color-coded computer drawing of the Phase 2 reflective remote phosphor prototype gives an idea of the accuracy challenges encountered in such an assembly. The actual setup has less functional clarity due to the numerous items of auxiliary equipment involved. Not only did 10 degrees of freedoms alignment have to be supplied to the LEDs and component prisms as well, but there were also micro-titrating glue dispensers and vacuum hoses. The project also utilized a recently introduced high-index glass, available in small customized prisms. This prototype also embodies a significant advance in thin-film design, by which an unprecedented 98% single-pass efficiency was attained over a 30 degree range of incidence angle (Patents Pending). Such high efficiency is especially important since it applies to the blue light going to the phosphor and then again to the phosphor's light, so that the 'system' efficiency associated with short-pass filter was 95.5%. Other losses have to be kept equally small, towards which a new type of ultra-clear injection-moldable acrylic was discovered and used to make ultra-transparent CPC optics. Several transmissive remote phosphor prototypes were manufactured that could replace screw-in type incandescent bulbs. The CRI of the white light from these prototypes varied from 55 to 93. The system efficiency achieved was between 27 to 29.5

Waqidi Falicoff

2008-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

80

Groundwater and Wells (Nebraska)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This section describes regulations relating to groundwater protection, water wells, and water withdrawals, and requires the registration of all water wells in the state.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "wells sampled exceed" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Anomalously large spin susceptibility enhancement in n-doped CdMnTe quantum wells  

SciTech Connect

We report on time-resolved Kerr rotation (TRKR) experiments done on n-doped CdMnTe quantum wells (QWs), in the regime where strong coupling between the electron and the Mn spin-flip excitations shows up. It has been proposed previously to deduce the 2D electron gas spin susceptibility from the coupling energy between these spin excitations. Here we measure the coupling energy on a high mobility sample down to very low excitation density, and compare the results with spin-flip Raman scattering (SFRS) on the same sample. The electron spin polarizations measured by TRKR and SFRS are found in relatively good agreement. However the spin susceptibility measured by TRKR exceeds systematically the values predicted by many-body theory. This could be an indication that the two-oscillator model used to describe mixed electron-Mn spin excitations needs to be improved.

Ben Cheikh, Z. [Laboratoire Charles Coulomb, UMR 5221, Dpartement Semi-conducteurs, Matriaux et Capteurs, Universit Montpellier 2, France and Laboratoire de Physique des Matriaux: Structures et Proprits, Facult (Tunisia); Cronenberger, S.; Vladimirova, M.; Scalbert, D. [Laboratoire Charles Coulomb, UMR 5221, Departement Semi-conducteurs, Materiaux et Capteurs, Universite Montpellier 2 (France); Boujdaria, K. [Laboratoire de Physique des Matriaux: Structures et Proprits, Facult des Sciences de Bizerte, Universit de Carthage, 7021 Zarzouna (Tunisia); Baboux, F.; Perez, F. [Institut des NanoSciences de Paris, CNRS/Universit Paris 6, 4 place Jussieu, F-75005 Paris (France); Wojtowicz, T.; Karczewski, G. [Institute of Physics, Polish Academy of Sciences, 02-668 Warsaw (Poland)

2013-12-04T23:59:59.000Z

82

Plugging Abandoned Water Wells  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. It is recommended that before you begin the process of plugging an aban- doned well that you seek advice from your local groundwater conservation district, a licensed water well driller in your area, or the Water Well Drillers Program with the Texas Department... hire a licensed water well driller or pump installer to seal and plug an abandoned well. Well contractors have the equipment and an understanding of soil condi- tions to determine how a well should be properly plugged. How can you take care...

Lesikar, Bruce J.

2002-02-28T23:59:59.000Z

83

Horizontal well IPR calculations  

SciTech Connect

This paper presents the calculation of near-wellbore skin and non-Darcy flow coefficient for horizontal wells based on whether the well is drilled in an underbalanced or overbalanced condition, whether the well is completed openhole, with a slotted liner, or cased, and on the number of shots per foot and phasing for cased wells. The inclusion of mechanical skin and the non-Darcy flow coefficient in previously published horizontal well equations is presented and a comparison between these equations is given. In addition, both analytical and numerical solutions for horizontal wells with skin and non-Darcy flow are presented for comparison.

Thomas, L.K.; Todd, B.J.; Evans, C.E.; Pierson, R.G.

1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

84

Underground Wells (Oklahoma)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Class I, III, IV and V injection wells require a permit issued by the Executive Director of the Department of Environmental Quality; Class V injection wells utilized in the remediation of...

85

Economic design of wells  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...concepts and the general principles outlined...with wells of the general configuration shown...internal com- bustion engine. It is assumed that...analysis, consider a diesel- powered well of...modified to use either a general expression for performance...written in terms of diesel-powered wells...

R. F. Stoner; D. M. Milne; P. J. Lund

86

BUFFERED WELL FIELD OUTLINES  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

OIL & GAS FIELD OUTLINES FROM BUFFERED WELLS OIL & GAS FIELD OUTLINES FROM BUFFERED WELLS The VBA Code below builds oil & gas field boundary outlines (polygons) from buffered wells (points). Input well points layer must be a feature class (FC) with the following attributes: Field_name Buffer distance (can be unique for each well to represent reservoirs with different drainage radii) ...see figure below. Copy the code into a new module. Inputs: In ArcMap, data frame named "Task 1" Well FC as first layer (layer 0). Output: Polygon feature class in same GDB as the well points FC, with one polygon field record (may be multiple polygon rings) per field_name. Overlapping buffers for the same field name are dissolved and unioned (see figure below). Adds an attribute PCTFEDLAND which can be populated using the VBA

87

Well drilling apparatus  

SciTech Connect

A drill rig for drilling wells having a derrick adapted to hold and lower a conductor string and drill pipe string. A support frame is fixed to the derrick to extend over the well to be drilled, and a rotary table, for holding and rotating drill pipe strings, is movably mounted thereon. The table is displaceable between an active position in alignment with the axis of the well and an inactive position laterally spaced therefrom. A drill pipe holder is movably mounted on the frame below the rotary table for displacement between a first position laterally of the axis of the well and a second position in alignment with the axis of the well. The rotary table and said drill pipe holder are displaced in opposition to each other, so that the rotary table may be removed from alignment with the axis of the well and said drill pipe string simultaneously held without removal from said well.

Prins, K.; Prins, R.K.

1982-09-28T23:59:59.000Z

88

well | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

43 43 Varnish cache server Browse Upload data GDR 429 Throttled (bot load) Error 429 Throttled (bot load) Throttled (bot load) Guru Meditation: XID: 2142280543 Varnish cache server well Dataset Summary Description The California Division of Oil, Gas, and Geothermal Resources contains oil, gas, and geothermal data for the state of California. Source California Division of Oil, Gas, and Geothermal Resources Date Released February 01st, 2011 (3 years ago) Date Updated Unknown Keywords California data gas geothermal oil well Data application/vnd.ms-excel icon California district 1 wells (xls, 10.1 MiB) application/vnd.ms-excel icon California district 2 wells (xls, 4 MiB) application/vnd.ms-excel icon California district 3 wells (xls, 3.8 MiB) application/zip icon California district 4 wells (zip, 11.2 MiB)

89

Petroleum well costs.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??This is the first academic study of well costs and drilling times for Australia??s petroleum producing basins, both onshore and offshore. I analyse a substantial (more)

Leamon, Gregory Robert

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

90

Phenomenal well-being  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

rated against the experience of the individual?s other possible lives. Unlike well-being, PWB is guaranteed to track more robust experiential benefits that a person gets out of living a life. In this work, I discuss the concept of well-being, including...

Campbell, Stephen Michael

2006-08-16T23:59:59.000Z

91

BUFFERED WELL FIELD OUTLINES  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

drainage radii) ...see figure below. Copy the code into a new module. Inputs: In ArcMap, data frame named "Task 1" Well FC as first layer (layer 0). Output: Polygon feature class...

92

Shock Chlorination of Wells  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Shock chlorination is a method of disinfecting a water well. This publication gives complete instructions for chlorinating with bleach or with dry chlorine. It is also available in Spanish as publication L-5441S...

McFarland, Mark L.; Dozier, Monty

2003-06-11T23:59:59.000Z

93

Polymer-cement geothermal-well-completion materials. Final report  

SciTech Connect

A program to develop high-temperature polymer cements was performed. Several formulations based on organic and semi-inorganic binders were evaluated on the basis of mechanical and thermal stability, and thickening time. Two optimized systems exhibited properties exceeding those required for use in geothermal wells. Both systems were selected for continued evaluation at the National Bureau of Standards and contingent upon the results, for field testing in geothermal wells.

Zeldin, A.N.; Kukacka, L.E.

1980-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

94

Drilling, Sampling, and Well-Installation Plan for the IFC Well Field, 300 Area  

SciTech Connect

The 300 Area was selected as a location for an IFC because it offers excellent opportunities for field research on the influence of mass-transfer processes on uranium in the vadose zone and groundwater. The 300 Area was the location of nuclear fuel fabrication facilities and has more than 100 waste sites. Two of these waste sites, the North and South Process Ponds received large volumes of process waste from 1943 to 1975 and are thought to represent a significant source of the groundwater uranium plume in the 300 Area. Geophysical surveys and other characterization efforts have led to selection of the South Process Pond for the IFC.

Bjornstad, Bruce N.; Horner, Jacob A.

2008-05-05T23:59:59.000Z

95

Economic design of wells  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...year, c is the cost per lb of diesel fuel, and Co is the cost per...program was written in terms of diesel-powered wells, modifications...charac- teristics of pump-engine combinations and are again...water encountered. There is a fundamental difference between the design...

R. F. Stoner; D. M. Milne; P. J. Lund

96

September 2004 Water Sampling  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

and October 2013 and October 2013 Groundwater Sampling at the Bluewater, New Mexico, Disposal Site December 2013 LMS/BLU/S00813 This page intentionally left blank U.S. Department of Energy DVP-August and October 2013, Bluewater, New Mexico December 2013 RIN 13085537 and 13095651 Page i Contents Sampling Event Summary ...............................................................................................................1 Private Wells Sampled August 2013 and October 2013, Bluewater, NM, Disposal Site ................3 Data Assessment Summary ..............................................................................................................5 Water Sampling Field Activities Verification Checklist .............................................................7

97

Bottom-Fill Method for Stopping Leaking Oil Wells  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Hardware failure at the top of a deep underwater oil well can result in a catastrophic oil leak. The enormous pressure lifting the column of oil in that well makes it nearly impossible to stop from the top with seals or pressurization. We propose to fill the bottom of the well with dense and possibly streamlined objects that can descend through the rising oil. As they accumulate, those objects couple to the oil via viscous and drag forces and increase the oil's effective density. When its effective density exceeds that of the earth's crust, the oil will have essentially stopped flowing.

Bloomfield, Louis A

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

98

Raft River monitor well potentiometric head responses and water...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

one season cannot be sampled the next. In addition, information on well construction, completion, and production is often unreliable or not available. These data are to be...

99

Well Deepening At Lightning Dock Geothermal Area (Witcher, 2006...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Number DE-FC07-00AL66977 Notes This project deepened a well and took 4 samples from wells around the Lightning Docks KGRA and performed extensive chamical and isotope analysis...

100

Well Permits (District of Columbia)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Well permits are required for the installation of wells in private and public space. Wells are defined as any trest hole, shaft, or soil excavation created by any means including, but not limited...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "wells sampled exceed" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Single-Well and Cross-Well Seismic At Salt Wells Area (Bureau of Land  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Single-Well and Cross-Well Seismic At Salt Wells Area (Bureau of Land Single-Well and Cross-Well Seismic At Salt Wells Area (Bureau of Land Management, 2009) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Single-Well and Cross-Well Seismic At Salt Wells Area (Bureau of Land Management, 2009) Exploration Activity Details Location Salt Wells Geothermal Area Exploration Technique Single-Well And Cross-Well Seismic Activity Date 2008 - 2008 Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Exploration Basis Vulcan increased exploration efforts in the summer and fall of 2008, during which time the company drilled two temperature gradient holes (86-15 O on Pad 1 and 17-16 O on Pad 3); conducted seismic, gravity and magnetotelluric surveys; and drilled deep exploration wells at Pads 6 and 8 and binary

102

Ultra Thin Quantum Well Materials  

SciTech Connect

This project has enabled Hi-Z technology Inc. (Hi-Z) to understand how to improve the thermoelectric properties of Si/SiGe Quantum Well Thermoelectric Materials. The research that was completed under this project has enabled Hi-Z Technology, Inc. (Hi-Z) to satisfy the project goal to understand how to improve thermoelectric conversion efficiency and reduce costs by fabricating ultra thin Si/SiGe quantum well (QW) materials and measuring their properties. In addition, Hi-Z gained critical new understanding on how thin film fabrication increases the silicon substrate's electrical conductivity, which is important new knowledge to develop critical material fabrication parameters. QW materials are constructed with alternate layers of an electrical conductor, SiGe and an electrical insulator, Si. Film thicknesses were varied, ranging from 2nm to 10nm where 10 nm was the original film thickness prior to this work. The optimum performance was determined at a Si and SiGe thickness of 4nm for an electrical current and heat flow parallel to the films, which was an important conclusion of this work. Essential new information was obtained on how the Si substrate electrical conductivity increases by up to an order of magnitude upon deposition of QW films. Test measurements and calculations are accurate and include both the quantum well and the substrate. The large increase in substrate electrical conductivity means that a larger portion of the electrical current passes through the substrate. The silicon substrate's increased electrical conductivity is due to inherent impurities and thermal donors which are activated during both molecular beam epitaxy and sputtering deposition of QW materials. Hi-Z's forward looking cost estimations based on future high performance QW modules, in which the best Seebeck coefficient and electrical resistivity are taken from separate samples predict that the electricity cost produced with a QW module could be achieved at <$0.35/W. This price would open many markets for waste heat recovery applications. By installing Hi-Z's materials in applications in which electricity could be produced from waste heat sources could result in significant energy savings as well as emissions reductions. For example, if QW thermoelectric generators could be introduced commercially in 2015, and assuming they could also capture an additional 0.1%/year of the available waste heat from the aluminum, steel, and iron industries, then by 2020, their use would lead to a 2.53 trillion Btu/year reduction in energy consumption. This translates to a $12.9 million/year energy savings, and 383.6 million lb's of CO2 emissions reduction per year. Additionally, Hi-Z would expect that the use of QW TE devices in the automotive, manufacturing, and energy generation industries would reduce the USA's petroleum and fossil fuel dependence, and thus significantly reduce emissions from CO2 and other polluting gasses such as NOx, SOx, and particulate matter (PM), etc.

Dr Saeid Ghamaty

2012-08-16T23:59:59.000Z

103

Well log evaluation of natural gas hydrates  

SciTech Connect

Gas hydrates are crystalline substances composed of water and gas, in which a solid-water-lattice accommodates gas molecules in a cage-like structure. Gas hydrates are globally widespread in permafrost regions and beneath the sea in sediment of outer continental margins. While methane, propane, and other gases can be included in the clathrate structure, methane hydrates appear to be the most common in nature. The amount of methane sequestered in gas hydrates is probably enormous, but estimates are speculative and range over three orders of magnitude from about 100,000 to 270,000,000 trillion cubic feet. The amount of gas in the hydrate reservoirs of the world greedy exceeds the volume of known conventional gas reserves. Gas hydrates also represent a significant drilling and production hazard. A fundamental question linking gas hydrate resource and hazard issues is: What is the volume of gas hydrates and included gas within a given gas hydrate occurrence? Most published gas hydrate resource estimates have, of necessity, been made by broad extrapolation of only general knowledge of local geologic conditions. Gas volumes that may be attributed to gas hydrates are dependent on a number of reservoir parameters, including the areal extent ofthe gas-hydrate occurrence, reservoir thickness, hydrate number, reservoir porosity, and the degree of gas-hydrate saturation. Two of the most difficult reservoir parameters to determine are porosity and degreeof gas hydrate saturation. Well logs often serve as a source of porosity and hydrocarbon saturation data; however, well-log calculations within gas-hydrate-bearing intervals are subject to error. The primary reason for this difficulty is the lack of quantitative laboratory and field studies. The primary purpose of this paper is to review the response of well logs to the presence of gas hydrates.

Collett, T.S.

1992-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

104

Well log evaluation of natural gas hydrates  

SciTech Connect

Gas hydrates are crystalline substances composed of water and gas, in which a solid-water-lattice accommodates gas molecules in a cage-like structure. Gas hydrates are globally widespread in permafrost regions and beneath the sea in sediment of outer continental margins. While methane, propane, and other gases can be included in the clathrate structure, methane hydrates appear to be the most common in nature. The amount of methane sequestered in gas hydrates is probably enormous, but estimates are speculative and range over three orders of magnitude from about 100,000 to 270,000,000 trillion cubic feet. The amount of gas in the hydrate reservoirs of the world greedy exceeds the volume of known conventional gas reserves. Gas hydrates also represent a significant drilling and production hazard. A fundamental question linking gas hydrate resource and hazard issues is: What is the volume of gas hydrates and included gas within a given gas hydrate occurrence Most published gas hydrate resource estimates have, of necessity, been made by broad extrapolation of only general knowledge of local geologic conditions. Gas volumes that may be attributed to gas hydrates are dependent on a number of reservoir parameters, including the areal extent ofthe gas-hydrate occurrence, reservoir thickness, hydrate number, reservoir porosity, and the degree of gas-hydrate saturation. Two of the most difficult reservoir parameters to determine are porosity and degreeof gas hydrate saturation. Well logs often serve as a source of porosity and hydrocarbon saturation data; however, well-log calculations within gas-hydrate-bearing intervals are subject to error. The primary reason for this difficulty is the lack of quantitative laboratory and field studies. The primary purpose of this paper is to review the response of well logs to the presence of gas hydrates.

Collett, T.S.

1992-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

105

Well-pump alignment system  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An improved well-pump for geothermal wells, an alignment system for a well-pump, and to a method for aligning a rotor and stator within a well-pump are disclosed, wherein the well-pump has a whistle assembly formed at a bottom portion thereof, such that variations in the frequency of the whistle, indicating misalignment, may be monitored during pumping. 6 figs.

Drumheller, D.S.

1998-10-20T23:59:59.000Z

106

Health And Wellness Department Of Health And Wellness  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Health And Wellness Department Of Health And Wellness Lutchmie Narine, Chair, 315-443-9630 426 The Department of Health and Wellness offers a 123-credit Bachelor of Science degree (B.S.) in public health. Our graduates are prepared to work in community health education and health promotion in public health agencies

McConnell, Terry

107

Prairie Canal Well No. 1, Calcasieu Parish, Louisiana. Volume II. Well test data. Final report  

SciTech Connect

The following are included in appendices: field test data, field non-edited data, raw data, tentative method of testing for hydrogen sulfide in natural gas using length of stain tubes, combined sample log, report on reservoir fluids study, well test analysis, analysis of solids samples from primary zone, chemical analysis procedures, scale and corrosion evaluation, laboratory report on scale deposits, and sand detector strip charts. (MHR)

Not Available

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

108

Well Monitoring Systems for EGS  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Well Monitoring Systems for EGS presentation at the April 2013 peer review meeting held in Denver, Colorado.

109

Anthrax Sampling  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Anthrax Anthrax Sampling and Decontamination: Technology Trade-Offs Phillip N. Price, Kristina Hamachi, Jennifer McWilliams, and Michael D. Sohn Environmental Energy Technologies Division Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory Berkeley CA 94720 September 12, 2008 This work was supported by the Office of Science, Office of High Energy Physics, Homeland Security under the U.S. Department of Energy under Contract No. DE-AC02-05CH1123. Contents 1 Executive Summary 3 1.1 How much sampling is needed to decide if a building is safe? . . . . . . . 3 1.1.1 Sampling Nomogram . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 1.2 How many characterization samples should be taken? . . . . . . . . . . . 7 1.3 What decontamination method should be used? . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7 1.4 Post-decontamination sampling . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8 1.5 What are rules of thumb for cost and effort? . . . . . . . . . . . .

110

Production Wells | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Production Wells Production Wells (Redirected from Development Wells) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Technique: Production Wells Details Activities (13) Areas (13) Regions (0) NEPA(7) Exploration Technique Information Exploration Group: Drilling Techniques Exploration Sub Group: Development Drilling Parent Exploration Technique: Development Drilling Information Provided by Technique Lithology: Drill cuttings are analyzed to determine lithology and mineralogy Stratigraphic/Structural: Fractures, faults, and geologic formations that the well passes through are identified and mapped. Hydrological: Identify aquifers, reservoir boundaries, flow rates, fluid pressure, and chemistry Thermal: Direct temperature measurements from within the reservoir

111

Production Wells | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Production Wells Production Wells Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Technique: Production Wells Details Activities (13) Areas (13) Regions (0) NEPA(7) Exploration Technique Information Exploration Group: Drilling Techniques Exploration Sub Group: Development Drilling Parent Exploration Technique: Development Drilling Information Provided by Technique Lithology: Drill cuttings are analyzed to determine lithology and mineralogy Stratigraphic/Structural: Fractures, faults, and geologic formations that the well passes through are identified and mapped. Hydrological: Identify aquifers, reservoir boundaries, flow rates, fluid pressure, and chemistry Thermal: Direct temperature measurements from within the reservoir Dictionary.png Production Wells:

112

Wellness Program | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Program Program Wellness Program Workers spend 200 hours per month at work, and keeping a healthy work-life balance is essential. The Headquarters Wellness Program provides support and assistance to DOE employees through a variety of programs and resources geared toward enhancing their mental and physical well-being. Wellness programs include: Accommodations, the Child Development Centers, the Employee Assistance Program (EAP), the Forrestal (FOHO) and Germantown (GOHO) Fitness Centers, the Occupational Health Clinics and the DOE WorkLife4You Program. Programs Disability Services Child Development Centers Headquarters Employee Assistance Program (EAP) Headquarters Occupational Health Clinics Headquarters Accommodation Program DOE Worklife4You Program Health Foreign Travel Health & Wellness Tips

113

Well Deepening | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Well Deepening Well Deepening Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Technique: Well Deepening Details Activities (5) Areas (3) Regions (0) NEPA(0) Exploration Technique Information Exploration Group: Drilling Techniques Exploration Sub Group: Development Drilling Parent Exploration Technique: Development Drilling Information Provided by Technique Lithology: Drill cuttings are analyzed to determine lithology and mineralogy Stratigraphic/Structural: Fractures, faults, and geologic formations that the well passes through are identified and mapped. Hydrological: Identify aquifers, reservoir boundaries, flow rates, fluid pressure, and chemistry Thermal: Direct temperature measurements from within the reservoir Dictionary.png Well Deepening:

114

Observation Wells | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Observation Wells Observation Wells Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Technique: Observation Wells Details Activities (7) Areas (7) Regions (0) NEPA(15) Exploration Technique Information Exploration Group: Drilling Techniques Exploration Sub Group: Development Drilling Parent Exploration Technique: Development Drilling Information Provided by Technique Lithology: Stratigraphic/Structural: Hydrological: Total dissolved solids, fluid pressure, flow rates, and flow direction Thermal: Monitors temperature of circulating fluids Dictionary.png Observation Wells: An observation well is used to monitor important hydrologic parameters in a geothermal system that can indicate performance, longevity, and transient processes. Other definitions:Wikipedia Reegle

115

well records | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

well records well records Dataset Summary Description The Alabama State Oil and Gas Board publishes well record permits to the public as they are approved. This dataset is comprised of 50 recent well record permits from 2/9/11 - 3/18/11. The dataset lists the well name, county, operator, field, and date approved, among other fields. State's make oil and gas data publicly available for a range of topics. Source Geological Survey of Alabama Date Released February 09th, 2011 (3 years ago) Date Updated March 18th, 2011 (3 years ago) Keywords Alabama board gas oil state well records Data application/vnd.ms-excel icon Well records 2/9/11 - 3/18/11 (xls, 28.7 KiB) Quality Metrics Level of Review Some Review Comment Temporal and Spatial Coverage Frequency Time Period License License Open Data Commons Attribution License

116

Apparatus for operating a gas and oil producing well  

SciTech Connect

Apparatus is disclosed for automatically operating a gas and oil producing well of the plunger lift type, including a comparator for comparing casing and tubing pressures, a device for opening the gas delivery valve when the difference between casing and tubing pressure is less than a selected minimum value, a device for closing the gas discharge valve when casing pressure falls below a selected casing bleed value, an arrival sensor switch for initially closing the fluid discharge valve when the plunger reaches the upper end of the tubing, and a device for reopening the fluid discharge valve at the end of a given downtime period in the event that the level of oil in the tubing produces a pressure difference greater than the given minimum differential value, and the casing pressure is greater than lift pressure. The gas discharge valve is closed if the pressure difference exceeds a selected maximum value, or if the casing pressure falls below a selected casing bleed value. The fluid discharge valve is closed if tubing pressure exceeds a maximum safe value. In the event that the plunger does not reach the upper end of the tubing during a selected uptime period, a lockout indication is presented on a visual display device, and the well is held shut-in until the well differential is forced down to the maximum differential setting of the device. When this occurs, the device will automatically unlock and normal cycling will resume.

Wynn, S. R.

1985-07-02T23:59:59.000Z

117

Exceeding Energy Consumption Design Expectations  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

optimisation and thin client. An appraisal of these is also given, along with the performance of the photovoltaic panels and rainwater harvesting in place from the outset....

Castleton, H. F.; Beck, S. B. M.; Hathwat, E. A.; Murphy, E.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

118

College's shared savings exceed expectations  

SciTech Connect

A shared-savings contract at a Massachusetts community college with all-electric facilities may reduce electricity consumption as much as 50% instead of the estimated 39%. Maintenance and repair of existing timeclocks, relays, and pneumatic controls for building equipment and a lighting retrofit in the swimming pool area are equipment and a lighting retrofit in the swimming pool area are responsible for the savings. The college was one of four state-owned institutions to participate in a pilot shared-savings program, under which the college will receive 20% of the savings until the Hospital Efficiency Corp. recovers 123% of its costs. At that point, the college will receive all the savings.

Springer, N.

1985-12-02T23:59:59.000Z

119

Well Monitoring System for EGS  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

EGS well monitoring tools offer a unique set of solutions which will lower costs and increase confidence in future geothermal projects.

120

Thermal well-test method  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A well-test method involving injection of hot (or cold) water into a groundwater aquifer, or injecting cold water into a geothermal reservoir is disclosed. By making temperature measurements at various depths in one or more observation wells, certain properties of the aquifer are determined. These properties, not obtainable from conventional well test procedures, include the permeability anisotropy, and layering in the aquifer, and in-situ thermal properties. The temperature measurements at various depths are obtained from thermistors mounted in the observation wells.

Tsang, C.F.; Doughty, C.A.

1984-02-24T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "wells sampled exceed" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Natural Gas Wells Near Project Rulison  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

for for Natural Gas Wells Near Project Rulison Second Quarter 2013 U.S. Department of Energy Office of Legacy Management Grand Junction, Colorado Date Sampled: April 3, 2013 Background: Project Rulison was the second underground nuclear test under the Plowshare Program to stimulate natural-gas recovery from deep, low-permeability formations. On September 10, 1969, a 40-kiloton-yield nuclear device was detonated 8,426 feet (1.6 miles) below the ground surface in the Williams Fork Formation, at what is now the Rulison, Colorado, Site. Following the detonation, a series of production tests were conducted. Afterward, the site was shut down and then remediated, and the emplacement well (R-E) and the reentry well (R-Ex) were plugged. Purpose: As part of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Legacy Management (LM) mission

122

Generic effluent monitoring system certification for salt well portable exhauster  

SciTech Connect

Tests were conducted to verify that the Generic Effluent Monitoring System (GEMS), as it is applied to the Salt Well Portable Exhauster, meets all applicable regulatory performance criteria for air sampling systems at nuclear facilities. These performance criteria address both the suitability of the air sampling probe location and the transport of the sample to the collection devices. The criteria covering air sampling probe location ensure that the contaminants in the stack are well mixed with the airflow at the probe location such that the extracted sample represents the whole. The sample transport criteria ensure that the sampled contaminants are quantitatively delivered to the collection device. The specific performance criteria are described in detail in the report. The tests demonstrated that the GEMS/Salt Well Exhauster system meets all applicable performance criteria. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory conducted the testing using a mockup of the Salt Well Portable Exhauster stack at the Numatec Hanford Company`s 305 Building. The stack/sampling system configuration tested was designed to provide airborne effluent control for the Salt Well pumping operation at some U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) radioactive waste storage tanks at the Hanford Site, Washington. The portable design of the exhauster allows it to be used in other applications and over a range of exhaust air flowrates (approximately 200 - 1100 cubic feet per minute). The unit includes a stack section containing the sampling probe and another stack section containing the airflow, temperature and humidity sensors. The GEMS design features a probe with a single shrouded sampling nozzle, a sample delivery line, and sample collection system. The collection system includes a filter holder to collect the sample of record and an in-line detector head and filter for monitoring beta radiation-emitting particles.

Glissmeyer, J.A.; Maughan, A.D.

1997-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

123

100 Area Columbia River sediment sampling  

SciTech Connect

Forty-four sediment samples were collected from 28 locations in the Hanford Reach of the Columbia River to assess the presence of metals and man-made radionuclides in the near shore and shoreline settings of the Hanford Site. Three locations were sampled upriver of the Hanford Site plutonium production reactors. Twenty-two locations were sampled near the reactors. Three locations were sampled downstream of the reactors near the Hanford Townsite. Sediment was collected from depths of 0 to 6 in. and between 12 to 24 in. below the surface. Samples containing concentrations of metals exceeding the 95 % upper threshold limit values (DOE-RL 1993b) are considered contaminated. Contamination by arsenic, chromium, copper, lead, and zinc was found. Man-made radionuclides occur in all samples except four collected opposite the Hanford Townsite. Man-made radionuclide concentrations were generally less than 1 pCi/g.

Weiss, S.G. [Westinghouse Hanford Co., Richland, WA (United States)

1993-09-08T23:59:59.000Z

124

Sampling apparatus  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A sampling apparatus is provided for sampling substances from solid surfaces. The apparatus includes first and second elongated tubular bodies which telescopically and sealingly join relative to one another. An absorbent pad is mounted to the end of a rod which is slidably received through a passageway in the end of one of the joined bodies. The rod is preferably slidably and rotatably received through the passageway, yet provides a selective fluid tight seal relative thereto. A recess is formed in the rod. When the recess and passageway are positioned to be coincident, fluid is permitted to flow through the passageway and around the rod. The pad is preferably laterally orientable relative to the rod and foldably retractable to within one of the bodies. A solvent is provided for wetting of the pad and solubilizing or suspending the material being sampled from a particular surface. 15 figs.

Gordon, N.R.; King, L.L.; Jackson, P.O.; Zulich, A.W.

1989-07-18T23:59:59.000Z

125

Sampling apparatus  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A sampling apparatus is provided for sampling substances from solid surfaces. The apparatus includes first and second elongated tubular bodies which telescopically and sealingly join relative to one another. An absorbent pad is mounted to the end of a rod which is slidably received through a passageway in the end of one of the joined bodies. The rod is preferably slidably and rotatably received through the passageway, yet provides a selective fluid tight seal relative thereto. A recess is formed in the rod. When the recess and passageway are positioned to be coincident, fluid is permitted to flow through the passageway and around the rod. The pad is preferably laterally orientable relative to the rod and foldably retractable to within one of the bodies. A solvent is provided for wetting of the pad and solubilizing or suspending the material being sampled from a particular surface.

Gordon, Norman R. (Kennewick, WA); King, Lloyd L. (Benton, WA); Jackson, Peter O. (Richland, WA); Zulich, Alan W. (Bel Air, MD)

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

126

1982 geothermal well drilling summary  

SciTech Connect

This summary lists all geothermal wells spudded in 1982, which were drilled to a depth of at least 2,000 feet. Tables 1 and 2 list the drilling information by area, operator, and well type. For a tabulation of all 1982 geothermal drilling activity, including holes less than 2,000 feet deep, readers are referred to the February 11, 1983, issue of Petroleum Information's ''National Geothermal Service.'' The number of geothermal wells drilled in 1982 to 2,000 feet or more decreased to 76 wells from 99 ''deep'' wells in 1981. Accordingly, the total 1982 footage drilled was 559,110 feet of hole, as compared to 676,127 feet in 1981. Most of the ''deep'' wells (49) completed were drilled for development purposes, mainly in The Geysers area of California. Ten field extension wells were drilled, of which nine were successful. Only six wildcat wells were drilled compared to 13 in 1980 and 20 in 1981, showing a slackening of exploration compared to earlier years. Geothermal drilling activity specifically for direct use projects also decreased from 1981 to 1982, probably because of the drastic reduction in government funding and the decrease in the price of oil. Geothermal power generation in 1982 was highlighted by (a) an increase of 110 Mw geothermal power produced at The Geysers (to a total of 1,019 Mw) by addition of Unit 17, and (b) by the start-up of the Salton Sea 10 Mw single flash power plant in the Imperial Valley, which brought the total geothermal electricity generation in this area to 31 Mw.

Parmentier, P.P.

1983-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

127

Quantum well multijunction photovoltaic cell  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A monolithic, quantum well, multilayer photovoltaic cell comprises a p-n junction comprising a p-region on one side and an n-region on the other side, each of which regions comprises a series of at least three semiconductor layers, all p-type in the p-region and all n-type in the n-region; each of said series of layers comprising alternating barrier and quantum well layers, each barrier layer comprising a semiconductor material having a first bandgap and each quantum well layer comprising a semiconductor material having a second bandgap when in bulk thickness which is narrower than said first bandgap, the barrier layers sandwiching each quantum well layer and each quantum well layer being sufficiently thin that the width of its bandgap is between said first and second bandgaps, such that radiation incident on said cell and above an energy determined by the bandgap of the quantum well layers will be absorbed and will produce an electrical potential across said junction.

Chaffin, Roger J. (Albuquerque, NM); Osbourn, Gordon C. (Albuquerque, NM)

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

128

Pressure analysis for horizontal wells  

SciTech Connect

This paper presents horizontal-well test design and interpretation methods. Analytical solutions are developed that can be handled easily by a desktop computer to carry out design as well as interpretation with semilog and log-log analysis. These analytical solutions point out the distinctive behavior of horizontal wells: (1) at early time, there is a circular radial flow in a vertical plane perpendicular to the well, and (2) at late time, there is a horizontal pseudoradial flow. Each type of flow is associated with a semilog straight line to which semilog analysis has to be adapted. The horizontal pseudoradial flow takes into account a pseudoskin depending on system geometry, which is a priori defined and estimated. Practical time criteria are proposed to determine the beginning and the end of each type of flow and to provide a guide to semilog analysis and well test design. The authors study the behavior of uniform-flux or infinite-conductivity horizontal wells, with wellbore storage and skin. The homogeneous reservoir is infinite or limited by impermeable or constant-pressure boundaries. A method is also outlined to transform all our solutions for homogeneous reservoirs into corresponding solutions for double-porosity reservoirs.

Davlau, F.; Mouronval, G.; Bourdarot, G.; Curutchet, P.

1988-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

129

Method for polymer synthesis in a reaction well  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method of synthesis is described for building a polymer chain, oligonucleotides in particular, by sequentially adding monomer units to at least one solid support for growing and immobilizing a polymer chain thereon in a liquid reagent solution. The method includes the step of: (A) depositing a liquid reagent in a reaction well in contact with at least one solid support and at least one monomer unit of the polymer chain affixed to the solid support. The well includes at least one orifice extending into the well, and is of a size and dimension to form a capillary liquid seal to retain the reagent solution in the well to enable polymer chain growth on the solid support. The method further includes the step of (B) expelling the reagent solution from the well, while retaining the polymer chain therein. This is accomplished by applying a first gas pressure to the reaction well such that a pressure differential between the first gas pressure and a second gas pressure exerted on an exit of the orifice exceeds a predetermined amount sufficient to overcome the capillary liquid seal and expel the reagent solution from the well through the orifice exit. 9 figs.

Brennan, T.M.

1998-09-29T23:59:59.000Z

130

Optimization of fractured well performance of horizontal gas wells  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

................................................24 3.4 Ideal Number of Transverse Fractures..........................................26 3.5 Constant Volume Transverse Fractures ........................................32 3.6... of a longitudinal fracture..............................................10 2.5 Example of horizontal well with longitudinal fracture performance .............11 2.6 DVS representation of transverse fractures...

Magalhaes, Fellipe Vieira

2009-06-02T23:59:59.000Z

131

Testing of the Pleasant Bayou Well through October 1990  

SciTech Connect

Pleasant Bayou location was inactive from 1983 until the cleanout of the production and disposal wells in 1986. The surface facilities were rehabilitated and after shakedown of the system, additional repair of wellhead valves, and injection of an inhibitor pill, continuous long-term production was started in 1988. Over two years of production subsequent to that are reviewed here, including: production data, brine sampling and analysis, hydrocarbon sampling and analysis, solids sampling and analysis, scale control and corrosion monitoring and control.

Randolph, P.L.; Hayden, C.G.; Mosca, V.L.; Anhaiser, J.L.

1992-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

132

Well record | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Well record Well record Dataset Summary Description This dataset contains oil and gas drilling and permit records for February 2011. State oil and gas boards and commissions make oil and gas data and information open to the public. To view the full range of data contained at the Alaska Oil and Gas Conservation Commission, visit http://doa.alaska.gov/ogc/ Source Alaska Oil and Gas Conservation Commission Date Released February 28th, 2011 (3 years ago) Date Updated Unknown Keywords Alaska Commission gas oil Well record Data application/vnd.ms-excel icon http://doa.alaska.gov/ogc/drilling/dindex.html (xls, 34.3 KiB) Quality Metrics Level of Review Some Review Comment Temporal and Spatial Coverage Frequency Monthly Time Period License License Open Data Commons Public Domain Dedication and Licence (PDDL)

133

Rapid Analysis of 2,4-D in Soil Samples by Modified Soxhlet Apparatus Using HPLC with UV Detection  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......generally low and do not exceed the regulatory agencies guidelines. | National...generally low and do not exceed the regulatory agencies guidelines. Introduction...the best results. A recent review of derivatization methods and...including objectives, sampling plans, preparation of containers......

Sanjay M. Kashyap; Girish H. Pandya; Vivek K. Kondawar; Sanjay S. Gabhane

2005-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

134

A new well surveying tool  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

directional well was to tip the entire rig, then block up one side of the rotary table so as to incline the uppermost joint of the drill pipe. The accuracy obtained by this method left much to be desired. The technique of controlled directional drilling... by Surveying Device for S and 19 , N and 41 . 21 3. Comparison of Measured Angles and Angles Indicated by Surveying Device for NE snd 9 , W and 45 . . . . . . . ~ 22 ABSTRNl T Ever since the advent of rotary drilling the petroleum industry has been...

Haghighi, Manuchehr Mehdizabeh

1966-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

135

Health Education & Wellness - HPMC Occupational Health Services  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Wellness Health Education & Wellness Health Education & Wellness Downloads & Patient Materials Health & Productivity Health Calculators & Logs Health Coaching Health Fairs and...

136

Category:Production Wells | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Production Wells page? For detailed information on Production Wells, click here. Category:Production Wells Add.png Add a new Production Wells Technique Pages in category...

137

Number of Producing Gas Wells  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Producing Gas Wells Producing Gas Wells Period: Annual Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources & Notes Definitions, Sources & Notes Area 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 View History U.S. 452,945 476,652 493,100 487,627 514,637 482,822 1989-2012 Alabama 6,591 6,860 6,913 7,026 7,063 6,327 1989-2012 Alaska 239 261 261 269 277 185 1989-2012 Arizona 7 6 6 5 5 5 1989-2012 Arkansas 4,773 5,592 6,314 7,397 8,388 8,538 1989-2012 California 1,540 1,645 1,643 1,580 1,308 1,423 1989-2012 Colorado 22,949 25,716 27,021 28,813 30,101 32,000 1989-2012 Gulf of Mexico 2,552 1,527 1,984 1,852 1,559 1,474 1998-2012 Illinois 43 45 51 50 40 40 1989-2012 Indiana 2,350 525 563 620 914 819 1989-2012 Kansas

138

System for stabbing well casing  

SciTech Connect

Apparatus for stabbing well casing to join casing sections to each other, includes a rotary table assembly for supporting a casing section in a well bore, a derrick over the rotary table assembly, a crown block at the top of the derrick, a first piston and cylinder subassembly pivotally mounted on one side of the derrick over the rotary table assembly and below the crown block for pivotation about a horizontal axis, a second piston and cylinder subassembly pivotally mounted on a second side of the derrick for pivotation about a horizontal axis. The second piston and cylinder subassembly is located over the rotary table assembly and below the crown block and extends substantially normal to the direction of extension of the first piston and cylinder subassembly. The cooperating casing clamping elements are carried on the piston rods of the first and second piston and cylinder subassemblies, and counter balancing subassemblies are connected to the first and second piston and cylinder subassemblies for pivoting the first and second piston and cylinder subassemblies to a vertically extending inoperative position.

McArthur, J.R.

1984-04-03T23:59:59.000Z

139

Visualizing motion in potential wells  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The concept of potential-energy diagrams is of fundamental importance in the study of quantum physics. Yet students are rarely exposed to this powerful alternative description in introductory classes and thus have difficulty comprehending its significance when they encounter it in beginning-level quantum courses. We describe a learning unit that incorporates a sequence of computer-interfaced experiments using dynamics or air-track systems. This unit is designed to make the learning of potential-energy diagrams less abstract. Students begin by constructing the harmonic or square-well potential diagrams using either the velocity data and assuming conservation of energy or the force-displacement graph for the elasticinteraction of an object constrained by springs or bouncing off springy blocks. Then they investigate the motion of a rider magnetinteracting with a configuration of field magnets and plot directly the potential-energy diagrams using a magnetic field sensor. The ease of measurement allows exploring the motion in a large variety of potential shapes in a short duration class.

Pratibha Jolly; Dean Zollman; N. Sanjay Rebello; Albena Dimitrova

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

140

Nonmonotone line search methods with variable sample size  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The nonmonotone line search framework is embedded with a variable sample size ... the line search combines well with the variable sample size scheme as.

2014-02-17T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "wells sampled exceed" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Downhole Fluid Sampling | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Downhole Fluid Sampling Downhole Fluid Sampling Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Technique: Downhole Fluid Sampling Details Activities (0) Areas (0) Regions (0) NEPA(0) Exploration Technique Information Exploration Group: Downhole Techniques Exploration Sub Group: Well Testing Techniques Parent Exploration Technique: Well Testing Techniques Information Provided by Technique Lithology: Stratigraphic/Structural: Hydrological: Water composition and source of fluids. Gas composition and source of fluids. Thermal: Water temperature. Distinguish magmatic/mantle heat inputs. Can be used to estimate reservoir fluid temperatures. Dictionary.png Downhole Fluid Sampling: Downhole fluid sampling is done to characterize the chemical, thermal, or hydrological properties of a surface or subsurface aqueous system. Downhole

142

Spatially indirect excitons in coupled quantum wells  

SciTech Connect

Microscopic quantum phenomena such as interference or phase coherence between different quantum states are rarely manifest in macroscopic systems due to a lack of significant correlation between different states. An exciton system is one candidate for observation of possible quantum collective effects. In the dilute limit, excitons in semiconductors behave as bosons and are expected to undergo Bose-Einstein condensation (BEC) at a temperature several orders of magnitude higher than for atomic BEC because of their light mass. Furthermore, well-developed modern semiconductor technologies offer flexible manipulations of an exciton system. Realization of BEC in solid-state systems can thus provide new opportunities for macroscopic quantum coherence research. In semiconductor coupled quantum wells (CQW) under across-well static electric field, excitons exist as separately confined electron-hole pairs. These spatially indirect excitons exhibit a radiative recombination time much longer than their thermal relaxation time a unique feature in direct band gap semiconductor based structures. Their mutual repulsive dipole interaction further stabilizes the exciton system at low temperature and screens in-plane disorder more effectively. All these features make indirect excitons in CQW a promising system to search for quantum collective effects. Properties of indirect excitons in CQW have been analyzed and investigated extensively. The experimental results based on time-integrated or time-resolved spatially-resolved photoluminescence (PL) spectroscopy and imaging are reported in two categories. (i) Generic indirect exciton systems: general properties of indirect excitons such as the dependence of exciton energy and lifetime on electric fields and densities were examined. (ii) Quasi-two-dimensional confined exciton systems: highly statistically degenerate exciton systems containing more than tens of thousands of excitons within areas as small as (10 micrometer){sup 2} were observed. The spatial and energy distributions of optically active excitons were used as thermodynamic quantities to construct a phase diagram of the exciton system, demonstrating the existence of distinct phases. Optical and electrical properties of the CQW sample were examined thoroughly to provide deeper understanding of the formation mechanisms of these cold exciton systems. These insights offer new strategies for producing cold exciton systems, which may lead to opportunities for the realization of BEC in solid-state systems.

Lai, Chih-Wei Eddy

2004-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

143

Health and Wellness Guide for Students Introduction  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

dimensions of health and wellness. The 7 dimensions are: Physical Wellness � Taking care of your body Wellness � Taking care of what's around you 2Health andWellness Guide for Students #12;Physical Wellness � Communicate with your partner if you have questions or concerns � Meet with a Health Care Provider on campus

144

Site-Wide Integrated Water Monitoring - Defining and Implementing Sampling Objectives to Support Site Closure - 13060  

SciTech Connect

The Underground Test Area (UGTA) activity is responsible for assessing and evaluating the effects of the underground nuclear weapons tests on groundwater at the Nevada National Security Site (NNSS), formerly the Nevada Test Site (NTS), and implementing a corrective action closure strategy. The UGTA strategy is based on a combination of characterization, modeling studies, monitoring, and institutional controls (i.e., monitored natural attenuation). The closure strategy verifies through appropriate monitoring activities that contaminants of concern do not exceed the SDWA at the regulatory boundary and that adequate institutional controls are established and administered to ensure protection of the public. Other programs conducted at the NNSS supporting the environmental mission include the Routine Radiological Environmental Monitoring Program (RREMP), Waste Management, and the Infrastructure Program. Given the current programmatic and operational demands for various water-monitoring activities at the same locations, and the ever-increasing resource challenges, cooperative and collaborative approaches to conducting the work are necessary. For this reason, an integrated sampling plan is being developed by the UGTA activity to define sampling and analysis objectives, reduce duplication, eliminate unnecessary activities, and minimize costs. The sampling plan will ensure the right data sets are developed to support closure and efficient transition to long-term monitoring. The plan will include an integrated reporting mechanism for communicating results and integrating process improvements within the UGTA activity as well as between other U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Programs. (authors)

Wilborn, Bill; Knapp, Kathryn [U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office (United States)] [U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office (United States); Farnham, Irene; Marutzky, Sam [Navarro-Intera (United States)] [Navarro-Intera (United States)

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

145

Site-Wide Integrated Water Monitoring -- Defining and Implementing Sampling Objectives to Support Site Closure  

SciTech Connect

The Underground Test Area (UGTA) activity is responsible for assessing and evaluating the effects of the underground nuclear weapons tests on groundwater at the Nevada National Security Site (NNSS), formerly the Nevada Test Site (NTS), and implementing a corrective action closure strategy. The UGTA strategy is based on a combination of characterization, modeling studies, monitoring, and institutional controls (i.e., monitored natural attenuation). The closure strategy verifies through appropriate monitoring activities that contaminants of concern do not exceed the SDWA at the regulatory boundary and that adequate institutional controls are established and administered to ensure protection of the public. Other programs conducted at the NNSS supporting the environmental mission include the Routine Radiological Environmental Monitoring Program (RREMP), Waste Management, and the Infrastructure Program. Given the current programmatic and operational demands for various water-monitoring activities at the same locations, and the ever-increasing resource challenges, cooperative and collaborative approaches to conducting the work are necessary. For this reason, an integrated sampling plan is being developed by the UGTA activity to define sampling and analysis objectives, reduce duplication, eliminate unnecessary activities, and minimize costs. The sampling plan will ensure the right data sets are developed to support closure and efficient transition to long-term monitoring. The plan will include an integrated reporting mechanism for communicating results and integrating process improvements within the UGTA activity as well as between other U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Programs.

Wilborn, Bill [NNSA/NFO, Nevada Site Office (United States); Farnham, Irene [Navarro-Interra LLC, Las Vegas (United States); Marutzky, Sam [Navarro-Interra LLC, Las Vegas (United States); Knapp, Kathryn [NNSA/NFO, Nevada Site Office (United States)

2013-02-24T23:59:59.000Z

146

Borehole data package for the 100-K area ground water wells, CY 1994  

SciTech Connect

Borehole, hydrogeologic and geophysical logs, drilling, as-built diagrams, sampling, and well construction information and data for RCRA compliant groundwater monitoring wells installed in CY 1994 at the 100-K Basins.

Williams, B.A.

1994-12-27T23:59:59.000Z

147

Completion Report for Well Cluster ER-6-1  

SciTech Connect

Well Cluster ER-6-1 was constructed for the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office in support of the Nevada Environmental Restoration Division at the Nevada Test Site, Nye County, Nevada. This work was initiated as part of the Groundwater Characterization Project, now known as the Underground Test Area Project. The well cluster is located in southeastern Yucca Flat. Detailed lithologic descriptions with stratigraphic assignments for Well Cluster ER-6-1 are included in this report. These are based on composite drill cuttings collected every 3 meters and conventional core samples taken below 639 meters, supplemented by geophysical log data. Detailed petrographic, chemical, and mineralogical studies of rock samples were conducted on 11 samples to resolve complex interrelationships between several of the Tertiary tuff units. Additionally, paleontological analyses by the U.S. Geological Survey confirmed the stratigraphic assignments below 539 meters within the Paleozoic sedimentary section. All three wells in the Well ER-6-1 cluster were drilled within the Quaternary and Tertiary alluvium section, the Tertiary volcanic section, and into the Paleozoic sedimentary section.

Bechtel Nevada

2004-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

148

Completion Report for Well ER-2-1  

SciTech Connect

Well ER-2-1 was drilled for the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office (formerly Nevada Operations Office), in support of the Nevada Environmental Restoration Project at the Nevada Test Site, Nye County, Nevada. This well was drilled in February and March of 2003, as part of a hydrogeologic investigation program for the Yucca Flat/Climax Mine Corrective Action Unit in the northeastern portion of the Nevada Test Site. Well ER-2-1 was drilled as part of the Yucca Flat Corrective Action Unit Phase I drilling initiative. The well is located in north central Yucca Flat within Area 2 of the Nevada Test Site, and provided information regarding the radiological and physical environment near underground nuclear tests conducted in a saturated volcanic aquifer setting. Detailed lithologic descriptions with stratigraphic assignments are included in this report. These are based on composite drill cuttings collected every 3 meters and 83 sidewall samples taken at various depths between 113.7 and 754.4 meters, supplemented by geophysical log data. Detailed petrographic, chemical, and mineralogical studies of rock samples were conducted on 27 samples of drill cuttings. The well was collared in tuffaceous alluvium, and penetrated Tertiary-age tuffs of the Timber Mountain and Paintbrush Groups, Calico Hills and Wahmonie Formations, Crater Flat Group, Grouse Canyon Formation, before reaching total depth in the Tunnel Bed Formation.

Bechtel Nevada

2004-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

149

Microsoft Word - RUL_1Q2011_Gas_Samp_Results_7Wells  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

31 March 2011 31 March 2011 Purpose: The purpose of this sample collection is to monitor for radionuclides from Project Rulison. The bottom-hole locations (BHLs) of the seven gas wells sampled are between 0.75 and 0.90 mile from the Project Rulison detonation point. All wells sampled are producing gas from the Williams Fork Formation. Background: Project Rulison was the second test under the Plowshare Program to stimulate natural-gas recovery from tight sandstone formations. On 10 September 1969, a 40-kiloton-yield nuclear device was detonated 8,426 feet (1.6 miles) below the ground surface in the Williams Fork Formation. Samples Collected: * 7 gas samples from 7 wells * 7 produced water samples from 6 wells and 1 drip tank; one well was dry Findings:

150

INVITATIONAL WELL-TESTING SYMPOSIUM PROCEEDINGS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Oil, Gas, . . 81 and Geothermal Well Tests (abstract) W.has been testing geothermal wells for about three years, andof Oil, Gas, and Geothermal Well Tests W. E. Brigham

Authors, Various

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

151

E-Print Network 3.0 - andalusian population sample Sample Search...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

worldwide population, pro- viding a well-established structure for Y... - tance to the Middle East. Unfortunately, samples from the appropriate ... Source: Cavalli-Sforza, Luigi...

152

Capping of Water Wells for Future Use  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

in determining the condition of your well, contact: S your local groundwater conservation dis- trict http://www.tceq.state.tx.us/permitting/ water_supply/groundwater/districts.html S a licensed water well driller in your area S the Water Well Drillers Program... are the steps in capping a well? The landowner, a licensed well driller or a licensed pump installer may cap a well. There are several steps involved. The well casing should extend above the ground surface to limit the risk of water entering the well...

Lesikar, Bruce J.; Mechell, Justin

2007-09-04T23:59:59.000Z

153

Functionalized Graphene Nanoroads for Quantum Well Device. |...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Nanoroads for Quantum Well Device. Functionalized Graphene Nanoroads for Quantum Well Device. Abstract: Using density functional theory, a series of calculations of structural and...

154

Observation Wells (Ozkocak, 1985) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Observation Wells Activity Date Usefulness useful DOE-funding Unknown Notes Reinjection test wells can be used to obtain quite precise measurements of reservoir permeability....

155

EPA - UIC Well Classifications | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Well Classifications Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Web Site: EPA - UIC Well Classifications Author Environmental Protection Agency Published...

156

Sample holder for X-ray diffractometry  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A sample holder for use with X-ray diffractometers with the capability to rotate the sample, as well as to adjust the position of the sample in the x, y, and z directions. Adjustment in the x direction is accomplished through loosening set screws, moving a platform, and retightening the set screws. Motion translators are used for adjustment in the y and z directions. An electric motor rotates the sample, and receives power from the diffractometer.

Hesch, Victor L. (Los Alamos, NM)

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

157

Helicopter magnetic survey conducted to locate wells  

SciTech Connect

A helicopter magnetic survey was conducted in August 2007 over 15.6 sq mi at the Naval Petroleum Reserve No. 3s (NPR-3) Teapot Dome Field near Casper, Wyoming. The surveys purpose was to accurately locate wells drilled there during more than 90 years of continuous oilfield operation. The survey was conducted at low altitude and with closely spaced flight lines to improve the detection of wells with weak magnetic response and to increase the resolution of closely spaced wells. The survey was in preparation for a planned CO2 flood for EOR, which requires a complete well inventory with accurate locations for all existing wells. The magnetic survey was intended to locate wells missing from the well database and to provide accurate locations for all wells. The ability of the helicopter magnetic survey to accurately locate wells was accomplished by comparing airborne well picks with well locations from an intense ground search of a small test area.

Veloski, G.A.; Hammack, R.W.; Stamp, V. (Rocky Mountain Oilfield Testing Center); Hall, R. (Rocky Mountain Oilfield Testing Center); Colina, K. (Rocky Mountain Oilfield Testing Center)

2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

158

Dispersion modeling of selected \\{PAHs\\} in urban air: A new approach combining dispersion model with GIS and passive air sampling  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract This study introduces a new combined air concentration measurement and modeling approach that we propose can be useful in medium and long term air quality assessment. A dispersion study was carried out for four high molecular weight polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in an urban area with industrial, traffic and domestic heating sources. A geographic information system (GIS) was used both for processing of input data as well as visualization of the modeling results. The outcomes of the dispersion model were compared to the results of passive air sampling (PAS). Despite discrepancies between measured and modeled concentrations, an approach combining the two techniques is promising for future air quality assessment. Differences between measured and modeled concentrations, in particular when measured values exceed the modeled concentrations, are indicative of undocumented, sporadic pollutant sources. Thus, these differences can also be useful for assessing and refining emission inventories.

Ond?ej S?ka; Lisa Melymuk; Pavel ?upr; Alice Dvorsk; Jana Klnov

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

159

Completion Report for Well ER-8-1  

SciTech Connect

Well ER-8-1 was drilled for the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office in support of the Nevada Environmental Restoration Project at the Nevada Test Site, Nye County, Nevada. This well was drilled in October and November of 2002 as part of a Hydrogeologic investigation program for the Yucca Flat/Climax Mine Corrective Action Unit in the northeastern portion of the Nevada Test Site. Well ER-8-1 is located at the north end of Yucca Flat approximately 580 meters south-southeast of the surface exposure of the Climax granitic intrusive. Detailed lithologic descriptions with stratigraphic assignments are included in this report. These are based on composite drill cuttings samples collected every 3 meters, and 21 sidewall samples taken at various depths between 351.1 and 573.0 meters, supplemented by incomplete geophysical log data. Detailed petrographic, geochemical, and mineralogical studies of rock samples were conducted on 22 samples of drill cuttings. Drilling began in tuffaceous alluvium, and the borehole penetrated Tertiary age bedded tuffs of the Volcanics of Oak Spring Butte and carbonate sediments of Paleozoic age, which were encountered at a depth of 334 meters. The borehole unexpectedly penetrated granite at the depth of 538.9 meters in which drilling was stopped. Contact metamorphic rocks and intrusive dikes associated with the Cretaceous-age granitic intrusive and at least one significant fault zone were encountered.

Bechtel Nevada

2004-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

160

Thank you for joining: 360WELLNESS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

shortly. If you are experiencing technical difficulties with Adobe Connect, please call 1 March 22, 2012 12 pm ­ 1pm ET #12;360° WELLNESS: Achieving Wellness At Work And At Home Workshop & Self-Assessment © Joe Rosenlicht, Certified Coach 3 #12;8 Wellness Areas Wellness Nutrition Brain Power Fitness Sleep

Vertes, Akos

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "wells sampled exceed" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Track 4: Employee Health and Wellness  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

ISM Workshop Presentations Knoxville Convention Center, Knoxville, TN August 2009 Track 4: Employee Health and Wellness

162

Definition: Artesian Well | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Well Well Jump to: navigation, search Dictionary.png Artesian Well An artesian well is a water well that doesn't require a pump to bring water to the surface; this occurs when there is enough pressure in the aquifer. The pressure causes hydrostatic equilibrium and if the pressure is high enough the water may even reach the ground surface in which case the well is called a flowing artesian well.[1] View on Wikipedia Wikipedia Definition See Great Artesian Basin for the water source in Australia. An artesian aquifer is a confined aquifer containing groundwater under positive pressure. This causes the water level in a well to rise to a point where hydrostatic equilibrium has been reached. This type of well is called an artesian well. Water may even reach the ground surface if the natural

163

AUTOMATING GROUNDWATER SAMPLING AT HANFORD  

SciTech Connect

Until this past October, Fluor Hanford managed Hanford's integrated groundwater program for the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). With the new contract awards at the Site, however, the CH2M HILL Plateau Remediation Company (CHPRC) has assumed responsibility for the groundwater-monitoring programs at the 586-square-mile reservation in southeastern Washington State. These programs are regulated by the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) and the Comprehensive Environmental Response Compensation and Liability Act (CERCLA). The purpose of monitoring is to track existing groundwater contamination from past practices, as well as other potential contamination that might originate from RCRA treatment, storage, and disposal (TSD) facilities. An integral part of the groundwater-monitoring program involves taking samples of the groundwater and measuring the water levels in wells scattered across the site. More than 1,200 wells are sampled each year. Historically, field personnel or 'samplers' have been issued pre-printed forms that have information about the well(s) for a particular sampling evolution. This information is taken from the Hanford Well Information System (HWIS) and the Hanford Environmental Information System (HEIS)--official electronic databases. The samplers used these hardcopy forms to document the groundwater samples and well water-levels. After recording the entries in the field, the samplers turned the forms in at the end of the day and the collected information was posted onto a spreadsheet that was then printed and included in a log book. The log book was then used to make manual entries of the new information into the software application(s) for the HEIS and HWIS databases. This is a pilot project for automating this tedious process by providing an electronic tool for automating water-level measurements and groundwater field-sampling activities. The automation will eliminate the manual forms and associated data entry, improve the accuracy of the information recorded, and enhance the efficiency and sampling capacity of field personnel. The goal of the effort is to eliminate 100 percent of the manual input to the database(s) and replace the management of paperwork by the field and clerical personnel with an almost entirely electronic process. These activities will include the following: scheduling the activities of the field teams, electronically recording water-level measurements, electronically logging and filing Groundwater Sampling Reports (GSR), and transferring field forms into the site-wide Integrated Document Management System (IDMS).

CONNELL CW; HILDEBRAND RD; CONLEY SF; CUNNINGHAM DE

2009-01-16T23:59:59.000Z

164

New well control companies stress planning, engineering  

SciTech Connect

The technology for capping a blowing well has not changed during the last 50 years. Still, operators are finding new ways of using well control companies' expertise to help avoid potentially disastrous situations. This trend is especially critical given the current environmentally sensitive and cost-cutting times facing the oil industry. While regulatory agencies world-wide continue to hinder well control efforts during an offshore event, well control companies are focusing on technologies to make their job easier. Some of the most exciting are the hydraulic jet cutter, which gained fame in Kuwait, and electromagnetic ranging for drilling more accurate relief wells. With the number of subsea wells increasing, subsea intervention is a major target for future innovations. Well control companies are experiencing a change in their role to the offshore oil industry. Well control professionals discuss this expanded responsibility as well as other aspects of offshore blowouts including regulatory hindrances, subsea intervention and future technologies.

Bell, S.; Wright, R.

1994-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

165

Tank 241-AP-103 08/1999 Compatibility Grab Samples and Analytical Results for the Final Report  

SciTech Connect

This document is the format IV, final report for the tank 241-AP-103 (AP-103) grab samples taken in August 1999 to address waste compatibility concerns. Chemical, radiochemical, and physical analyses on the tank AP-103 samples were performed as directed in ''Compatibility Grub Sampling and Analysis Plan for Fiscal Year 1999'' (Sasaki 1999a). Any deviations from the instructions provided in the tank sampling and analysis plan (TSAP) were discussed in this narrative. No notification limits were exceeded.

BELL, K.E.

1999-12-09T23:59:59.000Z

166

Well Log Techniques | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Well Log Techniques Well Log Techniques Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Technique: Well Log Techniques Details Activities (4) Areas (4) Regions (1) NEPA(0) Exploration Technique Information Exploration Group: Downhole Techniques Exploration Sub Group: Well Log Techniques Parent Exploration Technique: Downhole Techniques Information Provided by Technique Lithology: depth and thickness of formations; lithology and porosity can be inferred Stratigraphic/Structural: reservoir thickness, reservoir geometry, borehole geometry Hydrological: permeability and fluid composition can be inferred Thermal: direct temperature measurements; thermal conductivity and heat capacity Dictionary.png Well Log Techniques: Well logging is the measurement of formation properties versus depth in a

167

Geothermal/Well Field | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

source source History View New Pages Recent Changes All Special Pages Semantic Search/Querying Get Involved Help Apps Datasets Community Login | Sign Up Search Page Edit History Facebook icon Twitter icon » Geothermal/Well Field < Geothermal(Redirected from Well Field) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Land Use Leasing Exploration Well Field Power Plant Transmission Environment Water Use Print PDF Geothermal Well Fields and Reservoirs General Techniques Tree Techniques Table Regulatory Roadmap NEPA (45) Geothermal energy plant at The Geysers near Santa Rosa in Northern California, the world's largest electricity-generating hydrothermal geothermal development. Copyright © 1995 Warren Gretz Geothermal Well Fields discussion Groups of Well Field Techniques

168

E-Print Network 3.0 - average magnetic well Sample Search Results  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

... Source: Ecole Polytechnique, Centre de mathmatiques Collection: Mathematics 90 TEST RESULTS OF HTS COILS AND AN R&D MAGNET FOR RIA* , M. Anerella, M. Harrison, J....

169

Completion Report for Well ER-EC-5  

SciTech Connect

Well ER-EC-5 was drilled for the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office in support of the Nevada Environmental Restoration Project at the Nevada Test Site, Nye County, Nevada. This well was drilled in the summer of 1999 as part of the U.S. Department of Energy's hydrogeologic investigation program in the Western Pahute Mesa - Oasis Valley region just west of the Nevada Test Site. A 44.5-centimeter surface hole was drilled and cased off to a depth of 342.6 meters below ground surface. The borehole diameter was then decreased to 31.1 centimeters for drilling to a total depth of 762.0 meters. One completion string with three isolated slotted intervals was installed in the well. A preliminary composite, static water level was measured at the depth of 309.9 meters, 40 days after installation of the completion string. Detailed lithologic descriptions with stratigraphic assignments are included in the report. These are based on composite drill cuttings collected every 3 meters, and 18 sidewall samples taken at various depths below 349.6 meters, supplemented by geophysical log data and results from detailed chemical and mineralogical analyses of rock samples. The well penetrated Tertiary-age tuffs of the Thirsty Canyon Group, caldera moat-filling sedimentary deposits, lava of the Beatty Wash Formation, and landslide breccia and tuffs of the Timber Mountain Group. The well reached total depth in welded ashflow tuff of the Ammonia Tanks Tuff after penetrating 440.1 meters of this unit, which is also the main water-producing unit in the well. The geologic interpretation of data from this well constrains the western margin of the Ammonia Tanks caldera to the west of the well location.

Bechtel Nevada

2004-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

170

Geothermal/Well Field | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Geothermal/Well Field Geothermal/Well Field < Geothermal Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Land Use Leasing Exploration Well Field Power Plant Transmission Environment Water Use Print PDF Geothermal Well Fields and Reservoirs General Techniques Tree Techniques Table Regulatory Roadmap NEPA (42) Geothermal energy plant at The Geysers near Santa Rosa in Northern California, the world's largest electricity-generating hydrothermal geothermal development. Copyright © 1995 Warren Gretz Geothermal Well Fields discussion Groups of Well Field Techniques There are many different techniques that are utilized in geothermal well field development and reservoir maintenance depending on the region's geology, economic considerations, project maturity, and other considerations such as land access and permitting requirements. Well field

171

RFI Well Integrity 06 JUL 1400  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This PowerPoint report entitled "Well Integrity During Shut - In Operations: DOE/DOI Analyses" describes risks and suggests risk management recommendations associated with shutting in the well.

172

Well Owner's Guide To Water Supply  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

's groundwater and guidelines, including national drinking water standards, to test well water to insure safe drinking water in private wells. National drinking water standards and common methods of home water .....................22 Contaminants in Water........................................23 Drinking Water Guidelines

Fay, Noah

173

Essays on Well-Being in Japan.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??This dissertation is comprised of four papers on well-being in Japan and aims to examine three important measures of well-being: perceptions of job insecurity, self-reported (more)

Kuroki, Masanori

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

174

sediment samples | EMSL  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

sediment samples sediment samples Leads No leads are available at this time. Diffusional Motion of Redox Centers in Carbonate Electrolytes . Abstract: Ferrocene (Fc) and...

175

Water and Sediment Sampling  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

analytical laboratory limit below which any level present cannot be determined) Note: Sediment sample locations are co-located with off-site surface water sample locations. Surface...

176

Method for the magnetization of well casing  

SciTech Connect

A well casing is magnetized by traversing an internal magnetizer along and within the well casing while periodically reversing the direction of the magnetic field of the magnetizer to create a plurality of magnetic flux leakage points along the well casing.

Hoehn, G.L. Jr.

1984-08-14T23:59:59.000Z

177

Calculator program aids well cost management  

SciTech Connect

A TI-59 calculator program designed to track well costs on daily and weekly bases can dramatically facilitate the task of monitoring well expenses. The program computes the day total, cumulative total, cumulative item-row totals, and day-week total. For carrying these costs throughout the drilling project, magnetic cards can store the individual and total cumulative well expenses.

Doyle, C.J.

1982-01-18T23:59:59.000Z

178

The integrity of oil and gas wells  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...Analyses of 8,000 offshore wells in the Gulf of Mexico show that 1112% of wells developed pressure in the outer...underground gas storage, and even geothermal energy (1620). We...to learn about how often wells fail, when and why they...

Robert B. Jackson

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

179

Spontaneous Potential Well Log | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Spontaneous Potential Well Log Spontaneous Potential Well Log Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Technique: Spontaneous Potential Well Log Details Activities (2) Areas (2) Regions (0) NEPA(0) Exploration Technique Information Exploration Group: Downhole Techniques Exploration Sub Group: Well Log Techniques Parent Exploration Technique: Well Log Techniques Information Provided by Technique Lithology: SP technique originally applied to locating sulfide ore-bodies. Stratigraphic/Structural: -Formation bed thickness and boundaries -Detection and tracing of faults -Permeability and porosity Hydrological: Determination of fluid flow patterns: electrochemical coupling processes due to variations in ionic concentrations, and electrokinetic coupling processes due to fluid flow in the subsurface.

180

Regulations of Wells (Florida) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Regulations of Wells (Florida) Regulations of Wells (Florida) Regulations of Wells (Florida) < Back Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Construction Fed. Government Fuel Distributor General Public/Consumer Industrial Installer/Contractor Institutional Investor-Owned Utility Local Government Low-Income Residential Multi-Family Residential Municipal/Public Utility Nonprofit Residential Retail Supplier Rural Electric Cooperative Schools State/Provincial Govt Systems Integrator Transportation Tribal Government Utility Program Info State Florida Program Type Environmental Regulations Siting and Permitting Provider Florida Department of Environmental Protection The Department of Environmental Protection regulates the construction, repair, and abandonment of wells, as well as the persons and businesses undertaking such practices. Governing boards of water management districts

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "wells sampled exceed" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Defining And Characterizing Sample Representativeness For DWPF Melter Feed Samples  

SciTech Connect

Representative sampling is important throughout the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) process, and the demonstrated success of the DWPF process to achieve glass product quality over the past two decades is a direct result of the quality of information obtained from the process. The objective of this report was to present sampling methods that the Savannah River Site (SRS) used to qualify waste being dispositioned at the DWPF. The goal was to emphasize the methodology, not a list of outcomes from those studies. This methodology includes proven methods for taking representative samples, the use of controlled analytical methods, and data interpretation and reporting that considers the uncertainty of all error sources. Numerous sampling studies were conducted during the development of the DWPF process and still continue to be performed in order to evaluate options for process improvement. Study designs were based on use of statistical tools applicable to the determination of uncertainties associated with the data needs. Successful designs are apt to be repeated, so this report chose only to include prototypic case studies that typify the characteristics of frequently used designs. Case studies have been presented for studying in-tank homogeneity, evaluating the suitability of sampler systems, determining factors that affect mixing and sampling, comparing the final waste glass product chemical composition and durability to that of the glass pour stream sample and other samples from process vessels, and assessing the uniformity of the chemical composition in the waste glass product. Many of these studies efficiently addressed more than one of these areas of concern associated with demonstrating sample representativeness and provide examples of statistical tools in use for DWPF. The time when many of these designs were implemented was in an age when the sampling ideas of Pierre Gy were not as widespread as they are today. Nonetheless, the engineers and statisticians used carefully thought out designs that systematically and economically provided plans for data collection from the DWPF process. Key shared features of the sampling designs used at DWPF and the Gy sampling methodology were the specification of a standard for sample representativeness, an investigation that produced data from the process to study the sampling function, and a decision framework used to assess whether the specification was met based on the data. Without going into detail with regard to the seven errors identified by Pierre Gy, as excellent summaries are readily available such as Pitard [1989] and Smith [2001], SRS engineers understood, for example, that samplers can be biased (Gy?s extraction error), and developed plans to mitigate those biases. Experiments that compared installed samplers with more representative samples obtained directly from the tank may not have resulted in systematically partitioning sampling errors into the now well-known error categories of Gy, but did provide overall information on the suitability of sampling systems. Most of the designs in this report are related to the DWPF vessels, not the large SRS Tank Farm tanks. Samples from the DWPF Slurry Mix Evaporator (SME), which contains the feed to the DWPF melter, are characterized using standardized analytical methods with known uncertainty. The analytical error is combined with the established error from sampling and processing in DWPF to determine the melter feed composition. This composition is used with the known uncertainty of the models in the Product Composition Control System (PCCS) to ensure that the wasteform that is produced is comfortably within the acceptable processing and product performance region. Having the advantage of many years of processing that meets the waste glass product acceptance criteria, the DWPF process has provided a considerable amount of data about itself in addition to the data from many special studies. Demonstrating representative sampling directly from the large Tank Farm tanks is a difficult, if not unsolvable enterprise due to li

Shine, E. P.; Poirier, M. R.

2013-10-29T23:59:59.000Z

182

Sampling procedure for atmospheric geothermal brines  

SciTech Connect

Thermodynamic and chemical changes can alter the characteristics of geothermal brine samples significantly. A procedure which minimizes these changes has been developed for sampling atmospheric geothermal brines. The method is fast with minimal cooling and yields representative samples which have been stabilized to preserve their integrity. The procedure provides reliable suspended solids data and both the solid and liquid samples are suitable for elemental analysis. The procedure is also a valuable tool to aid in monitoring a geothermal brine conditioning system. Data are included from a flow test at an MCR Geothermal well in the Imperial Valley area of California to illustrate the utility of the sampling procedure.

Kochelek, J.T.; Zienty, D.F.

1981-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

183

Completion report for Well Cluster ER-20-5  

SciTech Connect

The Well Cluster ER-20-5 drilling and completion project was conducted for the US Department of Energy, Nevada Operations Office (DOE/NV), in support of the Nevada Environmental Restoration Project at the Nevada Test Site (NTS) in Nye County, Nevada. Its primary tasks include collecting geological, geophysical, hydrological, and water chemistry data from new and existing wells to define groundwater quality in addition to pathways and rates of groundwater migration. A program of drilling wells near the sites of selected underground nuclear tests (near-field drilling) was implemented to obtain site-specific data about the nature and extent of migration of radionuclides that might have been produced by an underground nuclear explosion. Well Cluster ER-20-5 is the first near-field drilling project initiated at the NTS. This document presents construction data and summarizes the scientific data gathered during the drilling and well-installation phases for all three holes drilled at Well Cluster ER-20-5. Some of this information is preliminary and unprocessed, but was released so that drilling, geotechnical, well design, and completion data could be rapidly disseminated. Additional information about water levels, aquifer testing, and groundwater sampling will be reported after any of this work is performed. Any additional geologic and/or geophysical investigations conducted for this project is described in one or more analysis and interpretation reports. The lithologic and stratigraphic logs, however, are provided in final form.

NONE

1997-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

184

ESPC IDIQ Contract Sample  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Document displays a sample indefinite delivery, indefinite quantity (IDIQ) energy savings performance contract (ESPC).

185

Improved sample size determination for attributes and variables sampling  

SciTech Connect

Earlier INMM papers have addressed the attributes/variables problem and, under conservative/limiting approximations, have reported analytical solutions for the attributes and variables sample sizes. Through computer simulation of this problem, we have calculated attributes and variables sample sizes as a function of falsification, measurement uncertainties, and required detection probability without using approximations. Using realistic assumptions for uncertainty parameters of measurement, the simulation results support the conclusions: (1) previously used conservative approximations can be expensive because they lead to larger sample sizes than needed; and (2) the optimal verification strategy, as well as the falsification strategy, are highly dependent on the underlying uncertainty parameters of the measurement instruments. 1 ref., 3 figs.

Stirpe, D.; Picard, R.R.

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

186

September 2004 Water Sampling  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

Sampling at the Sampling at the Shirley Basin South, Wyoming, Disposal Site September 2013 LMS/SBS/S00613 This page intentionally left blank U.S. Department of Energy DVP-June 2013, Shirley Basin South, Wyoming September 2013 RIN 13065426 Page i Contents Sampling Event Summary ...............................................................................................................1 Shirley Basin South, Wyoming, Disposal Site Sample Location Map ............................................3 Data Assessment Summary ..............................................................................................................5 Water Sampling Field Activities Verification Checklist .............................................................7

187

Step-out Well | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Step-out Well Step-out Well Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Technique: Step-out Well Details Activities (5) Areas (5) Regions (0) NEPA(0) Exploration Technique Information Exploration Group: Drilling Techniques Exploration Sub Group: Exploration Drilling Parent Exploration Technique: Exploration Drilling Information Provided by Technique Lithology: Drill cuttings are analyzed to determine lithology and mineralogy Stratigraphic/Structural: Fractures, faults, and geologic formations that the well passes through are identified and mapped Hydrological: Identify aquifers, reservoir boundaries, flow rates, fluid pressure, and chemistry Thermal: Direct temperature measurements from within the reservoir Dictionary.png Step-out Well: A well drilled outside of the proven reservoir boundaries to investigate a

188

Geothermal Well Completion Tests | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Geothermal Well Completion Tests Geothermal Well Completion Tests Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Conference Paper: Geothermal Well Completion Tests Abstract This paper reviews the measurements that are typically made in a well immediately after drilling is completed - the Completion Tests. The objective of these tests is to determine the properties of the reservoir, and of the reservoir fluid near the well. A significant amount of information that will add to the characterisation of the reservoir and the well, can only be obtained in the period during and immediately after drilling activities are completed. Author Hagen Hole Conference Petroleum Engineering Summer School; Dubrovnik, Croatia; 2008/06/09 Published N/A, 2008 DOI Not Provided Check for DOI availability: http://crossref.org

189

MIMO Control during Oil Well Drilling  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract A drilling system consists of a rotating drill string, which is placed into the well. The drill fluid is pumped through the drill string and exits through the choke valve. An important scope of the drill fluid is to maintain a certain pressure gradient along the length of the well. Well construction is a complex job in which annular pressures must be kept inside the operational window (limited by fracture and pore pressure). Monitoring bottom hole pressure to avoid fluctuations out of operational window limits is an extremely important job, in order to guarantee safe conditions during drilling. Under a conventional oil well drilling task, the pore pressure (minimum limit) and the fracture pressure (maximum limit) define mud density range and pressure operational window. During oil well drilling, several disturbances affect bottom hole pressure; for example, as the length of the well increases, the bottom hole pressure varies for growing hydrostatic pressure levels. In addition, the pipe connection procedure, performed at equal time intervals, stopping the drill rotation and mud injection, mounting a new pipe segment, restarting the drill fluid pump and rotation, causes severe fluctuations in well fluids flow, changing well pressure. Permeability and porous reservoir pressure governs native reservoir fluid well influx, affecting flow patterns inside the well and well pressure. In this work, a non linear mathematical model (gas-liquid-solid), representing an oil well drilling system, was developed, based on mass and momentum balances. Besides, for implementing classic control (PI), alternative control schemes were analyzed using mud pump flow rate, choke opening index and weight on bit as manipulated variables in order to control annulus bottomhole pressure and rate of penetration. Classic controller tuning was performed for servo and regulatory control studies, under MIMO frameworks.

Mrcia Peixoto Vega; Marcela Galdino de Freitas; Andr Leibsohn Martins

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

190

Well Testing Techniques | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Well Testing Techniques Well Testing Techniques Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Technique: Well Testing Techniques Details Activities (0) Areas (0) Regions (0) NEPA(17) Exploration Technique Information Exploration Group: Downhole Techniques Exploration Sub Group: Well Testing Techniques Parent Exploration Technique: Downhole Techniques Information Provided by Technique Lithology: Enable estimation of in-situ reservoir elastic parameters Stratigraphic/Structural: Fracture distribution, formation permeability, and ambient tectonic stresses Hydrological: provides information on permeability, location of permeable zones recharge rates, flow rates, fluid flow direction, hydrologic connections, storativity, reservoir pressures, fluid chemistry, and scaling.

191

Stimulation Technologies for Deep Well Completions  

SciTech Connect

The Department of Energy (DOE) is sponsoring the Deep Trek Program targeted at improving the economics of drilling and completing deep gas wells. Under the DOE program, Pinnacle Technologies conducted a study to evaluate the stimulation of deep wells. The objective of the project was to review U.S. deep well drilling and stimulation activity, review rock mechanics and fracture growth in deep, high-pressure/temperature wells and evaluate stimulation technology in several key deep plays. This report documents results from this project.

Stephen Wolhart

2005-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

192

Hawaii Well Construction & Pump Installation Standards Webpage...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Webpage Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Web Site: Hawaii Well Construction & Pump Installation Standards Webpage Abstract This webpage provides...

193

Monitoring Results Natural Gas Wells Near Project Rulison  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

Natural Gas Wells Near Project Rulison Third Quarter 2013 U.S. Department of Energy Office of Legacy Management Grand Junction, Colorado Date Sampled: June 12, 2013 Background: Project Rulison was the second Plowshare Program test to stimulate natural-gas recovery from deep and low permeability formations. On September 10, 1969, a 40-kiloton-yield nuclear device was detonated 8,426 feet (1.6 miles) below the ground surface in the Williams Fork Formation at what is now the Rulison, Colorado, Site. Following the detonation, a series of production tests were conducted. Afterwards, the site was shut down, then remediated and the emplacement well (R-E) and reentry well (R-Ex) plugged. Purpose: As part of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Legacy Management (LM) mission

194

Completion Report for Well ER-18-2  

SciTech Connect

Well ER-18-2 was drilled for the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office in support of the Nevada Environmental Restoration Project at the Nevada Test Site, Nye County, Nevada. This well, located on Buckboard Mesa in the western part of the Nevada Test Site, was drilled in the spring of 1999 as part of the U.S. Department of Energy's hydrogeologic investigation well program in the Western Pahute Mesa - Oasis Valley region just west of the Test Site. A 44.5-centimeter surface hole was drilled and cased off to the depth 408.1 meters below the surface. The hole diameter was then decreased to 31.1 centimeters for drilling to a total depth of 762.0 meters. A preliminary composite, static, water level was measured at the depth of approximately 369.7 meters approximately two months after the completion string was installed. One completion string with three isolated, slotted intervals was installed in the well. Detailed lithologic descriptions with preliminary stratigraphic assignments are included in the report. These are based on composite drill cuttings collected every 3 meters and 15 sidewall samples taken at various depths below 420 meters, supplemented by geophysical log data and results of detailed chemical and mineralogical studies of rock samples. The upper part of the well penetrated Tertiary-age basalt, underlain by tuffaceous moat-filling sediments interbedded with ash-flow tuff units of the Thirsty Canyon Group and the Beatty Wash Formation. The lower half of the drill hole penetrated ash-flow tuff of the mafic-rich Ammonia Tanks Tuff. The geologic interpretation of data from Well ER-18-2 indicates that this site is located inside the structural margin of the Ammonia Tanks caldera.

Bechtel Nevada

2003-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

195

Completion Report for Well ER-12-2  

SciTech Connect

Well ER-12-2 was drilled for the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office, in support of the Nevada Environmental Restoration Project at the Nevada Test Site, Nye County, Nevada. The well was drilled from November 2002 to January 2003 as part of a hydrogeologic investigation program for the Yucca Flat Corrective Action Unit. The overall purpose of the well was to gather subsurface data to better characterize the hydrogeology in the northwestern portion of Yucca Flat. The well was drilled to total measured depth of 2,097.9 meters. The 131.1-centimeter-diameter borehole was left open (i.e., uncased) below the base of the intermediate casing at 901.6 meters. A piezometer string was installed outside the surface casing to a depth of 176.4 meters to monitor a zone of perched water. Data gathered during and shortly after hole construction include composite drill cuttings samples collected every 3 meters, sidewall core samples from 7 depths, various geophysical logs, and water level measurements. These data indicate that the well penetrated, in descending order, 137.5 meters of Quaternary and Tertiary alluvium, 48.8 meters of Tertiary volcanic rocks, 289.6 meters of Mississippian Chainman Shale, and 1,622.5 meters of Mississippian and Upper Devonian Eleana Formation consisting of shale, argillite, sandstone, quartzite, and limestone. Forty-seven days after the well was drilled the water level inside the main hole was tagged at the depth of 65.43 meters, and the water level inside the piezometer string was tagged at 127.14 meters.

Bechtel Nevada

2004-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

196

Completion Report for Well ER-EC-1  

SciTech Connect

Well ER-EC-1 was drilled for the U.S. Department of Energy, Nevada Operations Office in support of the Nevada Environmental Restoration Project at the Nevada Test Site, Nye County, Nevada. This well was drilled in the spring of 1999 as part of the U.S. Department of Energy's hydrogeologic investigation well program in the Western Pahute Mesa - Oasis Valley region just west of the Test Site. A 44.5-centimeter surface hole was drilled and cased off to the depth 675.1 meters below the surface. The hole diameter was then decreased to 31.1 centimeters for drilling to a total depth of 1,524.0 meters. A preliminary composite, static, water level was measured at the depth of approximately 566.3 meters prior to installation of the completion string. One completion string with three isolated, slotted intervals was installed in the well. Detailed lithologic descriptions with preliminary stratigraphic assignments are included in the report. These are based on composite drill cuttings collected every 3 meters and 31 sidewall samples taken at various depths below 680 meters, supplemented by geophysical log data. Detailed chemical and mineralogical studies of rock samples are in progress. The well penetrated Tertiary-age lava and tuff of the Timber Mountain Group, the Paintbrush Group, the Calico Hills Formation, the Crater Flat Group, and the Volcanics of Quartz Mountain. The preliminary geologic interpretation of data from Well ER-EC-1 indicates the presence of a structural trough or bench filled with a thick section of post-Rainier Mesa lava. These data also suggest that this site is located on a buried structural ridge that may separate the Silent Canyon and Timber Mountain caldera complexes.

Townsend, M.J.

2000-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

197

SAFETY & WELLNESS Annual Report 2012-2013  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

HEALTH, SAFETY & WELLNESS Annual Report 2012-2013 #12;HEALTH, SAFETY & WELLNESS UPDATE ON SAFETY PROGRAMS The professionals working in the Health and Safety team and Rehabilitation Services group have had a very successful year in supporting individuals to take accountability for their own safety and health

Sinnamon, Gordon J.

198

Record geothermal well drilled in hot granite  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Record geothermal well drilled in hot granite ... Researchers there have completed the second of two of the deepest and hottest geothermal wells ever drilled. ... It may become the energy source for a small electrical generating power station serving nearby communities in New Mexico. ...

1981-09-07T23:59:59.000Z

199

Salt Wells Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Salt Wells Geothermal Area Salt Wells Geothermal Area (Redirected from Salt Wells Area) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Geothermal Resource Area: Salt Wells Geothermal Area Contents 1 Area Overview 2 History and Infrastructure 3 Regulatory and Environmental Issues 4 Future Plans 5 Exploration History 6 Well Field Description 7 Research and Development Activities 8 Technical Problems and Solutions 9 Geology of the Area 9.1 Regional Setting 9.2 Stratigraphy 9.3 Structure 10 Hydrothermal System 11 Heat Source 12 Geofluid Geochemistry 13 NEPA-Related Analyses (9) 14 Exploration Activities (28) 15 References Area Overview Geothermal Area Profile Location: Nevada Exploration Region: Northwest Basin and Range Geothermal Region GEA Development Phase: Operational"Operational" is not in the list of possible values (Phase I - Resource Procurement and Identification, Phase II - Resource Exploration and Confirmation, Phase III - Permitting and Initial Development, Phase IV - Resource Production and Power Plant Construction) for this property.

200

Salt Wells Geothermal Exploratory Drilling Program EA  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Salt Wells Geothermal Exploratory Drilling Program EA Salt Wells Geothermal Exploratory Drilling Program EA (DOI-BLM-NV-C010-2009-0006-EA) Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Web Site: Salt Wells Geothermal Exploratory Drilling Program EA (DOI-BLM-NV-C010-2009-0006-EA) Abstract No abstract available. Author Bureau of Land Management Published U.S. Department of the Interior- Bureau of Land Management, Carson City Field Office, Nevada, 09/14/2009 DOI Not Provided Check for DOI availability: http://crossref.org Online Internet link for Salt Wells Geothermal Exploratory Drilling Program EA (DOI-BLM-NV-C010-2009-0006-EA) Citation Bureau of Land Management. Salt Wells Geothermal Exploratory Drilling Program EA (DOI-BLM-NV-C010-2009-0006-EA) [Internet]. 09/14/2009. Carson City, NV. U.S. Department of the Interior- Bureau of Land Management,

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "wells sampled exceed" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Geopressured-geothermal well activities in Louisiana  

SciTech Connect

Since September 1978, microseismic networks have operated continuously around US Department of Energy (DOE) geopressured-geothermal well sites to monitor any microearthquake activity in the well vicinity. Microseismic monitoring is necessary before flow testing at a well site to establish the level of local background seismicity. Once flow testing has begun, well development may affect ground elevations and/or may activate growth faults, which are characteristic of the coastal region of southern Louisiana and southeastern Texas where these geopressured-geothermal wells are located. The microseismic networks are designed to detest small-scale local earthquakes indicative of such fault activation. Even after flow testing has ceased, monitoring continues to assess any microearthquake activity delayed by the time dependence of stress migration within the earth. Current monitoring shows no microseismicity in the geopressured-geothermal prospect areas before, during, or after flow testing.

John, C.J.

1992-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

202

GRR/Section 19-WA-f - Water Well NOI for Replacement or Additional Wells |  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

GRR/Section 19-WA-f - Water Well NOI for Replacement or Additional Wells GRR/Section 19-WA-f - Water Well NOI for Replacement or Additional Wells < GRR Jump to: navigation, search GRR-logo.png GEOTHERMAL REGULATORY ROADMAP Roadmap Home Roadmap Help List of Sections Section 19-WA-f - Water Well NOI for Replacement or Additional Wells 19-WA-f - Water Well NOI for Replacement or Additional Wells.pdf Click to View Fullscreen Contact Agencies Washington State Department of Ecology Regulations & Policies Revised Code of Washington 90.44.100 Revised Code of Washington 18.104.048 Washington Administrative Code 173-160-151 Triggers None specified A developer seeking to use ground water for an activity may need to drill a new well in a different location than a previous well, drill an additional well at an existing location, or drill a replacement well at the same

203

Lowell, Massachusetts, Restaurant Exceeds Energy Savings Expectations...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

in a loan from the local lending consortium, the restaurant installed a new boiler, air conditioning and heating system, lighting fixtures, and an efficient refrigerator...

204

Lowell, Massachusetts, Restaurant Exceeds Energy Savings Expectations  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The Athenian Corner, a Greek restaurant owned by the Panagiotopoulos family, has been a familiar sight in the historic district of downtown Lowell, Massachusetts, since 1974. Energy efficiency upgrades are helping the Panagiotopoulos family reduce operating costs and make their restaurant more successful. The Athenian Corner completed a building energy assessment through BetterBuildings Lowell that projected 30% energy savings if the recommended upgrades were installed. After securing $47,500 through a BetterBuildings Lowell grant and $27,500 in a loan from the local lending consortium, the restaurant installed a new boiler, air conditioning and heating system, lighting fixtures, and an efficient refrigerator storage cabinet.

205

Production-systems analysis for fractured wells  

SciTech Connect

Production-systems analysis has been in use for many years to design completion configurations on the basis of an expected reservoir capacity. The most common equations used for the reservoir calculations are for steady-state radial flow. Most hydraulically fractured wells require the use of an unsteady-state production simulator to predict the higher flow rates associated with the stimulated well. These high flow rates may present problems with excessive pressure drops through production tubing designed for radial-flow production. Therefore, the unsteady-state nature of fractured-well production precludes the use of steady-state radial-flow inflow performance relationships (IPR's) to calculate reservoir performance. An accurate prediction of fractured-well production must be made to design the most economically efficient production configuration. It has been suggested in the literature that a normalized reference curve can be used to generate the IPR's necessary for production-systems analysis. However, this work shows that the reference curve for fractured-well response becomes time-dependent when reservoir boundaries are considered. A general approach for constructing IPR curves is presented, and the use of an unsteady-state fractured-well-production simulator coupled with the production-systems-analysis approach is described. A field case demonstrates the application of this method to fractured wells.

Hunt, J.L. (Halliburton Services (US))

1988-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

206

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

1 1 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells.................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Total................................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring ...................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared.............................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ..................... 0 0 0 0 0 Marketed Production ..........................................

207

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

9 9 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells.................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Total................................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring ...................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared.............................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ..................... 0 0 0 0 0 Marketed Production ..........................................

208

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

9 9 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells.................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Total................................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring ...................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared.............................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ..................... 0 0 0 0 0 Marketed Production ..........................................

209

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

1 1 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells.................................................. 7,279 6,446 3,785 3,474 3,525 Total................................................................... 7,279 6,446 3,785 3,474 3,525 Repressuring ...................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared.............................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation................................ 7,279 6,446 3,785 3,474 3,525 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ..................... 788 736 431

210

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

5 5 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 15,206 15,357 16,957 17,387 18,120 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 463,929 423,672 401,396 369,624 350,413 From Oil Wells.................................................. 63,222 57,773 54,736 50,403 47,784 Total................................................................... 527,151 481,445 456,132 420,027 398,197 Repressuring ...................................................... 896 818 775 714 677 Vented and Flared.............................................. 527 481 456 420 398 Wet After Lease Separation................................

211

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

7 7 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 9 8 7 9 6 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 368 305 300 443 331 From Oil Wells.................................................. 1 1 0 0 0 Total................................................................... 368 307 301 443 331 Repressuring ...................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared.............................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation................................ 368 307 301 443 331 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ..................... 0 0 0 0 0 Marketed Production ..........................................

212

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

7 7 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 98 96 106 109 111 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 869 886 904 1,187 1,229 From Oil Wells.................................................. 349 322 288 279 269 Total................................................................... 1,218 1,208 1,193 1,466 1,499 Repressuring ...................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared.............................................. 0 0 5 12 23 Wet After Lease Separation................................ 1,218 1,208 1,188 1,454 1,476 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed .....................

213

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

9 9 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 4 4 4 4 4 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells.................................................. 7 7 6 6 5 Total................................................................... 7 7 6 6 5 Repressuring ...................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared.............................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation................................ 7 7 6 6 5 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ..................... 0 0 0 0 0 Marketed Production ..........................................

214

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

3 3 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells.................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Total................................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring ...................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared.............................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ..................... 0 0 0 0 0 Marketed Production ..........................................

215

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

5 5 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells.................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Total................................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring ...................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared.............................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ..................... 0 0 0 0 0 Marketed Production ..........................................

216

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

3 3 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells.................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Total................................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring ...................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared.............................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ..................... 0 0 0 0 0 Marketed Production ..........................................

217

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

3 3 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells.................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Total................................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring ...................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared.............................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ..................... 0 0 0 0 0 Marketed Production ..........................................

218

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

3 3 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells.................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Total................................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring ...................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared.............................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ..................... 0 0 0 0 0 Marketed Production ..........................................

219

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

1 1 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells.................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Total................................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring ...................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared.............................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ..................... 0 0 0 0 0 Marketed Production ..........................................

220

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

7 7 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 380 350 400 430 280 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells.................................................. 1,150 2,000 2,050 1,803 2,100 Total................................................................... 1,150 2,000 2,050 1,803 2,100 Repressuring ...................................................... NA NA NA 0 NA Vented and Flared.............................................. NA NA NA 0 NA Wet After Lease Separation................................ 1,150 2,000 2,050 1,803 2,100 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed .....................

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "wells sampled exceed" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

5 5 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells.................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Total................................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring ...................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared.............................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ..................... 0 0 0 0 0 Marketed Production ..........................................

222

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

1 1 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 1,502 1,533 1,545 2,291 2,386 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 899 1,064 1,309 1,464 3,401 From Oil Wells.................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Total................................................................... 899 1,064 1,309 1,464 3,401 Repressuring ...................................................... NA NA NA 0 NA Vented and Flared.............................................. NA NA NA 0 NA Wet After Lease Separation................................ 899 1,064 1,309 1,464 3,401 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed .....................

223

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

9 9 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells.................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Total................................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring ...................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared.............................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ..................... 0 0 0 0 0 Marketed Production ..........................................

224

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

3 3 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells.................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Total................................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring ...................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared.............................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ..................... 0 0 0 0 0 Marketed Production ..........................................

225

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

7 7 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells.................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Total................................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring ...................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared.............................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ..................... 0 0 0 0 0 Marketed Production ..........................................

226

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

3 3 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 7 7 5 7 7 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 34 32 22 48 34 From Oil Wells.................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Total................................................................... 34 32 22 48 34 Repressuring ...................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared.............................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation................................ 34 32 22 48 34 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ..................... 0 0 0 0 0 Marketed Production ..........................................

227

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

1 1 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells.................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Total................................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring ...................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared.............................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ..................... 0 0 0 0 0 Marketed Production ..........................................

228

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

1 1 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ......................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells...................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells........................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Total......................................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring ............................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared .................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation...................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed............................ 0 0 0 0 0 Marketed Production

229

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

7 7 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells.................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Total................................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring ...................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared.............................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ..................... 0 0 0 0 0 Marketed Production ..........................................

230

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

3 3 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells.................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Total................................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring ...................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared.............................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ..................... 0 0 0 0 0 Marketed Production ..........................................

231

Method of gravel packing a subterranean well  

SciTech Connect

This patent describes a method of gravel packing a well bore penetrating a subterranean formation. It comprises blocking a first group of apertures in a liner with an immobile gel; positioning the liner within the well bore thereby defining a first annulus between the liner and the well bore; transporting a slurry comprised of gravel suspended in a fluid into the first annulus, the fluid flowing through a second group of apertures in the liner while the gravel is deposited within the first annulus to form a gravel pack; and thereafter removing substantially all of the gel from the first group of apertures.

Not Available

1991-11-05T23:59:59.000Z

232

Discussion of productivity of a horizontal well  

SciTech Connect

The authors of this paper has been using several of the analytical equations and numerical simulation to evaluate the productivity of horizontal wells that have near-wellbore damage. Through this evaluation, the author found that here are inconsistencies in the way the skin factor is introduced into the analytical equations. This discussion shows the corrections needed in various analytical equations to obtain consistency with numerical simulation. In the numerical simulation shown here, skin factor is simulated by assignment of a reduced permeability to nodes near the well. The author would appreciate any comments Babu and Odeh could make on this aspect of horizontal wells.

Gilman, J.R. (Marathon Oil Company (US))

1991-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

233

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

7 7 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 17 20 18 15 15 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 1,412 1,112 837 731 467 From Oil Wells.................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Total................................................................... 1,412 1,112 837 731 467 Repressuring ...................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared.............................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation................................ 1,412 1,112 837 731 467 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ..................... 198 3 0 0 0 Marketed Production

234

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

7 7 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells.................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Total................................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring ...................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared.............................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ..................... 0 0 0 0 0 Marketed Production ..........................................

235

Gas Sampling Considerations  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Gas sampling is carried out to measure the quality of a gas. Gas samples are sometimes acquired by in situ observation within the main gas body by using remote or visual observation for specific properties. A mor...

Alvin Lieberman

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

236

Definition: Single-Well And Cross-Well Seismic Imaging | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Definition Definition Edit with form History Facebook icon Twitter icon » Definition: Single-Well And Cross-Well Seismic Imaging (Redirected from Definition:Single-Well And Cross-Well Seismic) Jump to: navigation, search Dictionary.png Single-Well And Cross-Well Seismic Imaging Single well seismic imaging (SWSI) is the application of borehole seismic sources and receivers on the same string within a single borehole in order to acquire CMP type shot gathers. Cross well seismic places sources and receivers in adjacent wells in order to image the interwell volume.[1] Also Known As SWSI References ↑ http://library.seg.org/ Ret LikeLike UnlikeLike You like this.Sign Up to see what your friends like. rieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Definition:Single-Well_And_Cross-Well_Seismic_Imaging&oldid=690246"

237

Exploratory Well At Salt Wells Area (Bureau of Land Management, 2009) |  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Exploratory Well At Salt Wells Area (Bureau of Land Management, 2009) Exploratory Well At Salt Wells Area (Bureau of Land Management, 2009) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Exploratory Well At Salt Wells Area (Bureau of Land Management, 2009) Exploration Activity Details Location Salt Wells Geothermal Area Exploration Technique Exploratory Well Activity Date 2008 - 2008 Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Exploration Basis Vulcan increased exploration efforts in the summer and fall of 2008, during which time the company drilled two temperature gradient holes (86-15 O on Pad 1 and 17-16 O on Pad 3); conducted seismic, gravity and magnetotelluric surveys; and drilled deep exploration wells at Pads 6 and 8 and binary wells at Pads 1, 2, 4, and 7. Notes Data from these wells is proprietary, and so were unavailable for inclusion

238

GRR/Section 19-WA-e - Water Well Notice of Intent for New Well | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

GRR/Section 19-WA-e - Water Well Notice of Intent for New Well GRR/Section 19-WA-e - Water Well Notice of Intent for New Well < GRR Jump to: navigation, search GRR-logo.png GEOTHERMAL REGULATORY ROADMAP Roadmap Home Roadmap Help List of Sections Section 19-WA-e - Water Well Notice of Intent for New Well 19-WA-e - Water Well Notice of Intent for New Well.pdf Click to View Fullscreen Contact Agencies Washington State Department of Ecology Regulations & Policies Revised Code of Washington 18.104.048 Washington Administrative Code 173-160-151 Triggers None specified A developer seeking to use ground water for an activity may need to drill a new well to access the ground water. When a developer needs to drill a new well, the developer must complete the Notice of Intent (NOI) to Drill a Well form and submit the form to the Washington State Department of Ecology

239

Borehole data package for well 699-37-47A, PUREX Plant Cribs, CY 1996  

SciTech Connect

A new groundwater monitoring well (699-37-47A) was installed in 1996 as a downgradient well near the PUREX Plant Cribs Treatment, Storage, and Disposal Facility at Hanford. This document provides data from the well drilling and construction operations, as well as data from subsequent characterization of groundwater and sediment samples collected during the drilling process. The data include: well construction documentation, geologist`s borehole logs, results of laboratory analysis of groundwater samples collected during drilling and of physical tests conducted on sediment samples collected during drilling, borehole geophysics, and results of aquifer testing including slug tests and flowmeter analysis. This well (699-37-47A) was constructed in support of the Hanford Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (Tri-Party Agreement) milestone M-24-00H and interim milestone M-24-35 (Ecology et al. 1994), and was funded under Project W-152.

Lindberg, J.W.; Williams, B.A.; Spane, F.A.

1997-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

240

Completion Report for Well ER-7-1  

SciTech Connect

Well ER-7-1 was drilled for the U.S. Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office in support of the Nevada Environmental Restoration Project at the Nevada Test Site, Nye County, Nevada. This well was drilled in January and February 2003, as part of a hydrogeologic investigation program in Yucca Flat. A 47.0-centimeter surface hole was drilled and cased off to a depth of 541.0 meters below the surface. The hole diameter was then decreased to 31.8 centimeters for drilling to a total depth of 762.0 meters. Detailed lithologic descriptions with stratigraphic assignments are included in this report. These are based on composite drill cuttings collected every 3 meters, and 62 sidewall samples taken at various depths below 85.3 meters, supplemented by geophysical log data. Detailed petrographic, chemical, and mineralogical studies were conducted on 22 samples of cuttings. The well was collared in Quaternary surficial deposits and penetrated a thick section of Tertiary-age volcanic deposits before terminating in carbonate rocks of Paleozoic-age.

Bechtel Nevada

2004-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "wells sampled exceed" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

September 2004 Water Sampling  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

Old and New Rifle, Old and New Rifle, Colorado, Processing Sites August 2013 LMS/RFN/RFO/S00613 This page intentionally left blank U.S. Department of Energy DVP-June 2013, Rifle, Colorado August 2013 RIN 13065380 Page i Contents Sampling Event Summary ...............................................................................................................1 Sample Location Map, New Rifle, Colorado, Processing Site ........................................................5 Sample Location Map, Old Rifle, Colorado, Processing Site ..........................................................6 Data Assessment Summary ..............................................................................................................7 Water Sampling Field Activities Verification Checklist .............................................................9

242

September 2004 Water Sampling  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

3 3 Groundwater and Surface Water Sampling at the Tuba City, Arizona, Disposal Site November 2013 LMS/TUB/S00813 This page intentionally left blank U.S. Department of Energy DVP-August 2013, Tuba City, Arizona November 2013 RIN 13085553 Page i Contents Sampling Event Summary ...............................................................................................................1 Tuba City, Arizona, Disposal Site, Sample Location Map ..............................................................7 Data Assessment Summary ..............................................................................................................9 Water Sampling Field Activities Verification Checklist ...........................................................11

243

September 2004 Water Sampling  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

3 3 Groundwater and Surface Water Sampling at the Slick Rock East and West, Colorado, Processing Sites November 2013 LMS/SRE/SRW/S0913 This page intentionally left blank U.S. Department of Energy DVP-September 2013, Slick Rock, Colorado November 2013 RIN 13095593 Page i Contents Sampling Event Summary ...............................................................................................................1 Slick Rock East and West, Colorado, Processing Sites, Sample Location Map .............................5 Data Assessment Summary ..............................................................................................................7 Water Sampling Field Activities Verification Checklist .............................................................9

244

Completion Report for Well ER-EC-8  

SciTech Connect

Well ER-EC-8 was drilled for the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office in support of the Nevada Environmental Restoration Project at the Nevada Test Site, Nye County, Nevada. This well was drilled in the summer of 1999 as part of the U.S. Department of Energy's hydrogeologic investigation program in the Western Pahute Mesa - Oasis Valley region just west of the Nevada Test Site. A 44.5-centimeter surface hole was drilled and cased off to a depth of 129.8 meters below the surface. The hole diameter was then decreased to 31.1 centimeters for drilling to a total depth of 609.6 meters. One completion string with three isolated slotted intervals was installed in the well. A preliminary composite, static water level was measured at the depth of 98.4 meters, 24 days after installation of the completion string. Detailed lithologic descriptions with stratigraphic assignments are included in the report. These are based on evaluation of composite drill cuttings collected every 3 meters, and 20 sidewall samples taken at various depths below 157.9 meters, supplemented by geophysical log data and results of detailed chemical and mineralogical studies of rock samples. Drilling began in Tertiary-age tuff of the Thirsty Canyon Group, and penetrated tuffs of the Beatty Wash Formation, tuff of Buttonhook Wash, and the upper portion of the Ammonia Tanks Tuff. The geologic interpretation of data from this well helps define the location of the western margin of the Timber Mountain caldera complex in the southwestern Nevada volcanic field. Geologic and hydrologic data from the well will aid in development of models to predict groundwater flow and contaminant migration within and near the Nevada Test Site.

Bechtel Nevada

2004-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

245

Salt Wells Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Salt Wells Geothermal Area Salt Wells Geothermal Area Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Geothermal Resource Area: Salt Wells Geothermal Area Contents 1 Area Overview 2 History and Infrastructure 3 Regulatory and Environmental Issues 4 Future Plans 5 Exploration History 6 Well Field Description 7 Research and Development Activities 8 Technical Problems and Solutions 9 Geology of the Area 9.1 Regional Setting 9.2 Stratigraphy 9.3 Structure 10 Hydrothermal System 11 Heat Source 12 Geofluid Geochemistry 13 NEPA-Related Analyses (9) 14 Exploration Activities (28) 15 References Area Overview Geothermal Area Profile Location: Nevada Exploration Region: Northwest Basin and Range Geothermal Region GEA Development Phase: Operational"Operational" is not in the list of possible values (Phase I - Resource Procurement and Identification, Phase II - Resource Exploration and Confirmation, Phase III - Permitting and Initial Development, Phase IV - Resource Production and Power Plant Construction) for this property.

246

Maazama Well Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Maazama Well Geothermal Area Maazama Well Geothermal Area Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Geothermal Resource Area: Maazama Well Geothermal Area Contents 1 Area Overview 2 History and Infrastructure 3 Regulatory and Environmental Issues 4 Exploration History 5 Well Field Description 6 Geology of the Area 7 Geofluid Geochemistry 8 NEPA-Related Analyses (0) 9 Exploration Activities (0) 10 References Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"TERRAIN","zoom":6,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"500px","height":"300px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":42.8965,"lon":-121.9865,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

247

Willow Well Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Well Geothermal Area Well Geothermal Area Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Geothermal Resource Area: Willow Well Geothermal Area Contents 1 Area Overview 2 History and Infrastructure 3 Regulatory and Environmental Issues 4 Exploration History 5 Well Field Description 6 Geology of the Area 7 Geofluid Geochemistry 8 NEPA-Related Analyses (0) 9 Exploration Activities (0) 10 References Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"TERRAIN","zoom":6,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"500px","height":"300px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":61.6417,"lon":-150.095,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

248

Wellness & Additional Benefits | Careers | ORNL  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Working at ORNL Working at ORNL Benefits Wellness and Other Incentives View Open Positions View Postdoctoral Positions Create A Profile Internal applicants please apply here View or update your current application or profile. External applicants Internal applicants Internet Explorer Browser preferred for ORNL applicants. Chrome is not currently supported. For more information about browser compatibility please refer to the FAQs. If you have difficulty using the online application system or need an accommodation to apply due to a disability, please email ORNLRecruiting@ornl.gov or phone 1-866-963-9545 Careers Home | ORNL | Careers | Working at ORNL | Wellness and Other Incentives SHARE Wellness & Additional Benefits Wellness Program Employees have many opportunities to maintain and improve their health

249

6981 well-provided recreation facility [n  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

recr. (Well-provisioned recreation installation and equipment);sinstalacin [f] de recreo intensivo (Equipamiento recreacional de gran variedad y de gran calidad);fquipement [m] de loisirs lourd (...

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

250

Two-phase flow in horizontal wells  

SciTech Connect

Flow in horizontal wells and two-phase flow interaction with the reservoir were investigated experimentally and theoretically. Two-phase flow behavior has been recognized as one of the most important problems in production engineering. The authors designed and constructed a new test facility suitable for acquiring data on the relationship between pressure drop and liquid holdup along the well and fluid influx from the reservoir. For the theoretical work, an initial model was proposed to describe the flow behavior in a horizontal well configuration. The model uses the inflow-performance-relationship (IPR) approach and empirical correlations or mechanistic models for wellbore hydraulics. Although good agreement was found between the model and experimental data, a new IPR apart from the extension of Darcy`s law must be investigated extensively to aid in the proper design of horizontal wells.

Ihara, Masaru [Japan National Oil Corp., Chiba (Japan); Yanai, Koji [Nippon Kokan Corp., Yokohama (Japan); Yanai, Koji

1995-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

251

Well Record or History | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

History Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Legal Document- OtherOther: Well Record or HistoryLegal Published NA Year Signed or Took Effect 2013...

252

Groundwater well with reactive filter pack  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method and apparatus for the remediation of contaminated soil and ground water wherein a reactive pack material is added to the annular fill material utilized in standard well construction techniques.

Gilmore, Tyler J. (Pasco, WA); Holdren, Jr., George R. (Kennewick, WA); Kaplan, Daniel I. (Richland, WA)

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

253

Groundwater well with reactive filter pack  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method and apparatus are disclosed for the remediation of contaminated soil and ground water wherein a reactive pack material is added to the annular fill material utilized in standard well construction techniques. 3 figs.

Gilmore, T.J.; Holdren, G.R. Jr.; Kaplan, D.I.

1998-09-08T23:59:59.000Z

254

Polariton dispersion of periodic quantum well structures  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We studied the polariton dispersion relations of a periodic quantum-well structure with a period in the vicinity of half the exciton resonance wavelength, i.e., the Bragg structure. We classified polariton mod...

A. V. Mintsev; L. V. Butov; C. Ell; S. Mosor

2002-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

255

Geological well log analysis. Third ed  

SciTech Connect

Until recently, well logs have mainly been used for correlation, structural mapping, and quantitive evaluation of hydrocarbon bearing formations. This third edition of Geologic Well Log Analysis, however, describes how well logs can be used for geological studies and mineral exploration. This is done by analyzing well logs for numerous parameters and indices of significant mineral accumulation, primarily in sediments. Contents are: SP and Eh curves as redoxomorphic logs; sedimentalogical studies by log curve shapes; exploration for stratigraphic traps; continuous dipmeter as a structural tool; continuous dipmeter as a sedimentation tool; Paleo-facies logging and mapping; hydrogeology 1--hydrodynamics of compaction; hydrogeology 2--geostatic equilibrium; and hydrogeology 3--hydrodynamics of infiltration. Appendixes cover: Computer program for calculating the dip magnitude, azimuth, and the degree and orientation of the resistivity anisotrophy; a lithology computer program for calculating the curvature of a structure; and basic log analysis package for HP-41CV programmable calculator.

Pirson, S.J.

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

256

California Water Well Standards | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Legal Document- OtherOther: California Water Well StandardsLegal Published NA Year Signed or Took Effect 2104 Legal Citation Not provided DOI Not Provided Check for DOI...

257

Slim wells for exploration purposes in Mexico  

SciTech Connect

To invest in the construction of wells with definitive designs considerably increases the cost of a geothermal electric project in its analysis and definition stage. The Federal Commission for Electricity (Comision Federal de Electricidad, CFE) has concentrated on the task to design wells which casing and cementing programs would provide the minimum installation necessary to reach the structural objective, to confirm the existence of geothermal reservoirs susceptible to commercial exploitation, to check prior geological studies, to define the stratigraphic column and to obtain measurements of pressure, temperature and permeability. Problems of brittle, hydratable and permeable formations with severe circulation losses, must be considered within the design and drilling programs of the wells. This work explains the slim wells designs used in the exploration of three geothermal zones in Mexico: Las Derrumbadas and Acoculco in the State of Puebla and Los Negritos in the State of Michoacan.

Vaca Serrano, J.M.E.; Soto Alvarez, M.

1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

258

September 2004 Water Sampling  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

Riverton, Wyoming, Riverton, Wyoming, Processing Site September 2013 LMS/RVT/S00613 This page intentionally left blank U.S. Department of Energy DVP-June 2013, Riverton, Wyoming September 2013 RIN 13065379 Page i Contents Sampling Event Summary ...............................................................................................................1 Riverton, Wyoming, Processing Site, Sample Location Map .........................................................5 Data Assessment Summary ..............................................................................................................7 Water Sampling Field Activities Verification Checklist .............................................................9 Laboratory Performance Assessment ........................................................................................11

259

Borehole summary report for five ground-water monitoring wells constructed in the 1100 Area  

SciTech Connect

This report contains the data collected during the installation and initial sampling of five ground-water monitoring wells between the 1100 Area and Richland City water supply wells. The five wells were installed to provide for early detection of contaminants and to provide data that may be used in making decisions on the management of the North Richland Well Field and recharge basins. 2 refs., 1 fig.

Bryce, R.W.; Goodwin, S.M.

1989-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

260

Ambipolar spin diffusion and D'yakonov-Perel' spin relaxation in GaAs quantum wells  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We report theoretical and experimental studies of ambipolar spin diffusion in a semiconductor. A circularly polarized laser pulse is used to excite spin-polarized carriers in a GaAs multiple quantum-well sample at 80 K. ...

Zhao, Hui; Mower, Matt; Vignale, G.

2009-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "wells sampled exceed" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Well-Plate Formats and Microfluidics Applications of Laminar Fluid Diffusion Interfaces to HTP Screening  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Microfluidic disposables are presented that are compatible with standard well plate readers and robotic filling systems. The disposables perform extractions and sample cleanup procedures using the diffusion-ba...

Bernhard H. Weigl; Christopher J. Morris

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

262

Sample Proficiency Test exercise  

SciTech Connect

The current format of the OPCW proficiency tests has multiple sets of 2 samples sent to an analysis laboratory. In each sample set, one is identified as a sample, the other as a blank. This method of conducting proficiency tests differs from how an OPCW designated laboratory would receive authentic samples (a set of three containers, each not identified, consisting of the authentic sample, a control sample, and a blank sample). This exercise was designed to test the reporting if the proficiency tests were to be conducted. As such, this is not an official OPCW proficiency test, and the attached report is one method by which LLNL might report their analyses under a more realistic testing scheme. Therefore, the title on the report ''Report of the Umpteenth Official OPCW Proficiency Test'' is meaningless, and provides a bit of whimsy for the analyses and readers of the report.

Alcaraz, A; Gregg, H; Koester, C

2006-02-05T23:59:59.000Z

263

Project management improves well control events  

SciTech Connect

During a well control operation, the efficient use of personnel and equipment, through good project management techniques, contributes to increased safety and ensures a quality project. The key to a successful blowout control project is to use all resources in the most efficient manner. Excessive use of resources leads to unnecessary expenditures and delays in bringing the project under control. The Kuwait well control project, which involved more than 700 blowouts, was accomplished in a much shorter time (8 months) than first estimated (5 years). This improvement partly resulted from the application of sound project management techniques. These projects were prime examples of the need for a formal project management approach to handling wild well projects. There are many examples of projects that were successful in controlling wells but were economic disasters. Only through the effective application of project management can complex well control projects be completed in reasonable time frames at reasonable cost. The paper describes team management, project scope, organizational structures, scheduling, tracking models, critical path method, and decision trees.

Oberlender, G.D. [Oklahoma State Univ., Stillwater, OK (United States); Abel, L.W. [Wild Well Control Inc., Spring, TX (United States)

1995-07-10T23:59:59.000Z

264

Snubdrilling a new well in Venezuela  

SciTech Connect

A new well was successfully drilled using a snubbing jack. The drill bit was rotated using a rotary table, downhole motors and combination of the two. Expected high-pressure zones prompted this use of ``snubdrilling.`` The primary objective was to drill a vertical well through underlying sands and gain information about formation pressures. This data would aid in the drilling of a relief well using a conventional drilling rig. The secondary objective was to relieve pressure by putting this new well on production. In addition to special high-pressure drilling jobs, there are other drilling applications where snubbing jacks are a feasible alternative to conventional rotary drilling rigs or coiled tubing units. Slimhole, underbalanced and flow drilling, and sidetracking of existing wells are excellent applications for snubdrilling. Advantages of snubdrilling vs. coiled tubing drilling, include ability to rotate drillstrings, use high-torque downhole motors, pump at high rates and pressures, apply significant overpull in case of stuck pipe, and run casing and liners without rigging down. Shortcomings of drilling with snubbing jacks compared to coiled tubing are the need to stop circulation while making new connections and inability to run continuous cable inside workstrings.

Aasen, J.

1995-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

265

Number of Producing Gas Wells (Summary)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Count) Count) Data Series: Wellhead Price Imports Price Price of Imports by Pipeline Price of LNG Imports Exports Price Price of Exports by Pipeline Price of LNG Exports Pipeline and Distribution Use Price Citygate Price Residential Price Commercial Price Industrial Price Vehicle Fuel Price Electric Power Price Proved Reserves as of 12/31 Reserves Adjustments Reserves Revision Increases Reserves Revision Decreases Reserves Sales Reserves Acquisitions Reserves Extensions Reserves New Field Discoveries New Reservoir Discoveries in Old Fields Estimated Production Number of Producing Gas Wells Gross Withdrawals Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells Gross Withdrawals From Oil Wells Gross Withdrawals From Shale Gas Wells Gross Withdrawals From Coalbed Wells Repressuring Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed Vented and Flared Marketed Production Natural Gas Processed NGPL Production, Gaseous Equivalent Dry Production Imports By Pipeline LNG Imports Exports Exports By Pipeline LNG Exports Underground Storage Capacity Underground Storage Injections Underground Storage Withdrawals Underground Storage Net Withdrawals LNG Storage Additions LNG Storage Withdrawals LNG Storage Net Withdrawals Total Consumption Lease and Plant Fuel Consumption Lease Fuel Plant Fuel Pipeline & Distribution Use Delivered to Consumers Residential Commercial Industrial Vehicle Fuel Electric Power Period:

266

EM's Use of Cost-Effective Passive Groundwater Sampling Grows...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

for use with wells with small sample volume requirements, the Hydrasleeve, a flexible plastic bag permeable to water and contaminants, allows remediation engineers to monitor for...

267

Definition: Single-Well And Cross-Well Seismic Imaging | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Definition Definition Edit with form History Facebook icon Twitter icon » Definition: Single-Well And Cross-Well Seismic Imaging Jump to: navigation, search Dictionary.png Single-Well And Cross-Well Seismic Imaging Single well seismic imaging (SWSI) is the application of borehole seismic sources and receivers on the same string within a single borehole in order to acquire CMP type shot gathers. Cross well seismic places sources and receivers in adjacent wells in order to image the interwell volume.[1] Also Known As SWSI References ↑ http://library.seg.org/ Ret LikeLike UnlikeLike You like this.Sign Up to see what your friends like. rieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Definition:Single-Well_And_Cross-Well_Seismic_Imaging&oldid=690246" Category:

268

Salt Wells Geothermal Project | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Salt Wells Geothermal Project Salt Wells Geothermal Project Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Development Project: Salt Wells Geothermal Project Project Location Information Coordinates 39.580833333333°, -118.33444444444° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":39.580833333333,"lon":-118.33444444444,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

269

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

5 5 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 21,507 32,672 33,279 34,334 35,612 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 1,473,792 1,466,833 1,476,204 1,487,451 1,604,709 From Oil Wells.................................................. 139,097 148,551 105,402 70,704 58,439 Total................................................................... 1,612,890 1,615,384 1,581,606 1,558,155 1,663,148 Repressuring ...................................................... NA NA NA 0 NA Vented and Flared.............................................. NA NA NA 0 NA Wet After Lease Separation................................

270

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

1 1 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 94 95 100 117 117 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 13,527 13,846 15,130 14,524 15,565 From Oil Wells.................................................. 42,262 44,141 44,848 43,362 43,274 Total................................................................... 55,789 57,987 59,978 57,886 58,839 Repressuring ...................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared.............................................. 3,290 3,166 2,791 2,070 3,704 Wet After Lease Separation................................ 52,499 54,821 57,187 55,816 55,135

271

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

1 1 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 997 1,143 979 427 437 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 109,041 131,608 142,070 156,727 171,915 From Oil Wells.................................................. 5,339 5,132 5,344 4,950 4,414 Total................................................................... 114,380 136,740 147,415 161,676 176,329 Repressuring ...................................................... 6,353 6,194 5,975 6,082 8,069 Vented and Flared.............................................. 2,477 2,961 3,267 3,501 3,493 Wet After Lease Separation................................

272

GeoWells International | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

GeoWells International GeoWells International Jump to: navigation, search Name GeoWells International Place Nairobi, Kenya Sector Geothermal energy, Solar, Wind energy Product Kenya-based geothermal driller. The company also supplies and installs wind and solar units. Coordinates -1.277298°, 36.806261° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":-1.277298,"lon":36.806261,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

273

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

9 9 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 42,475 42,000 45,000 46,203 47,117 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 264,139 191,889 190,249 187,723 197,217 From Oil Wells.................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Total................................................................... 264,139 191,889 190,249 187,723 197,217 Repressuring ...................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared.............................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation................................ 264,139 191,889 190,249 187,723 197,217 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed

274

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

3 3 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 9,907 13,978 15,608 18,154 20,244 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 1,188,657 1,467,331 1,572,728 1,652,504 1,736,136 From Oil Wells.................................................. 137,385 167,656 174,748 183,612 192,904 Total................................................................... 1,326,042 1,634,987 1,747,476 1,836,115 1,929,040 Repressuring ...................................................... 50,216 114,407 129,598 131,125 164,164 Vented and Flared.............................................. 9,945 7,462 12,356 16,685 16,848

275

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

5 5 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 71 68 69 61 61 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 648 563 531 550 531 From Oil Wells.................................................. 10,032 10,751 9,894 11,055 11,238 Total................................................................... 10,680 11,313 10,424 11,605 11,768 Repressuring ...................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared.............................................. 1,806 2,043 1,880 2,100 2,135 Wet After Lease Separation................................ 8,875 9,271 8,545 9,504 9,633 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed

276

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

9 9 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 60,577 63,704 65,779 68,572 72,237 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 5,859,358 4,897,366 4,828,188 4,947,589 5,074,067 From Oil Wells.................................................. 999,624 855,081 832,816 843,735 659,851 Total................................................................... 6,858,983 5,752,446 5,661,005 5,791,324 5,733,918 Repressuring ...................................................... 138,372 195,150 212,638 237,723 284,491 Vented and Flared.............................................. 32,010 26,823 27,379 23,781 26,947

277

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

9 9 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 15,700 16,350 17,100 16,939 20,734 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 4,260,529 1,398,981 1,282,137 1,283,513 1,293,204 From Oil Wells.................................................. 895,425 125,693 100,324 94,615 88,209 Total................................................................... 5,155,954 1,524,673 1,382,461 1,378,128 1,381,413 Repressuring ...................................................... 42,557 10,838 9,754 18,446 19,031 Vented and Flared.............................................. 20,266 11,750 10,957 9,283 5,015 Wet After Lease Separation................................

278

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

9 9 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 36,000 40,100 40,830 42,437 44,227 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 150,000 130,853 157,800 159,827 197,217 From Oil Wells.................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Total................................................................... 150,000 130,853 157,800 159,827 197,217 Repressuring ...................................................... NA NA NA 0 NA Vented and Flared.............................................. NA NA NA 0 NA Wet After Lease Separation................................ 150,000 130,853 157,800 159,827 197,217

279

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

3 3 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.................................... 4,359 4,597 4,803 5,157 5,526 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ................................................ 555,043 385,915 380,700 365,330 333,583 From Oil Wells .................................................. 6,501 6,066 5,802 5,580 5,153 Total................................................................... 561,544 391,981 386,502 370,910 338,735 Repressuring ...................................................... 13,988 12,758 10,050 4,062 1,307 Vented and Flared .............................................. 1,262 1,039 1,331 1,611 2,316 Wet After Lease Separation................................

280

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

5 5 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 3,321 4,331 4,544 4,539 4,971 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 61,974 71,985 76,053 78,175 87,292 From Oil Wells.................................................. 8,451 9,816 10,371 8,256 10,546 Total................................................................... 70,424 81,802 86,424 86,431 97,838 Repressuring ...................................................... 1 0 0 2 5 Vented and Flared.............................................. 488 404 349 403 1,071 Wet After Lease Separation................................ 69,936 81,397 86,075 86,027 96,762

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "wells sampled exceed" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

5 5 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 3,051 3,521 3,429 3,506 3,870 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 71,545 71,543 76,915 R 143,644 152,495 From Oil Wells.................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Total................................................................... 71,545 71,543 76,915 R 143,644 152,495 Repressuring ...................................................... NA NA NA 0 NA Vented and Flared.............................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation................................ 71,545 71,543 76,915 R 143,644 152,495 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed

282

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

5 5 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 33,948 35,217 35,873 37,100 38,574 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 1,484,269 1,484,856 1,432,966 1,391,916 1,397,934 From Oil Wells.................................................. 229,437 227,534 222,940 224,263 246,804 Total................................................................... 1,713,706 1,712,390 1,655,906 1,616,179 1,644,738 Repressuring ...................................................... 15,280 20,009 20,977 9,817 8,674 Vented and Flared.............................................. 3,130 3,256 2,849 2,347 3,525 Wet After Lease Separation................................

283

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

7 7 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 5,775 5,913 6,496 5,878 5,781 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 17,741 27,632 36,637 35,943 45,963 From Oil Wells.................................................. 16 155 179 194 87 Total................................................................... 17,757 27,787 36,816 36,137 46,050 Repressuring ...................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared.............................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation................................ 17,757 27,787 36,816 36,137 46,050 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed

284

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

9 9 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 4,000 4,825 6,755 7,606 3,460 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 156,333 150,972 147,734 157,039 176,221 From Oil Wells.................................................. 15,524 16,263 14,388 12,915 11,088 Total................................................................... 171,857 167,235 162,122 169,953 187,310 Repressuring ...................................................... 8 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared.............................................. 206 431 251 354 241 Wet After Lease Separation................................ 171,642 166,804

285

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

1 1 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 4,178 4,601 3,005 3,220 3,657 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 244,826 264,809 260,554 254,488 259,432 From Oil Wells.................................................. 36,290 36,612 32,509 29,871 31,153 Total................................................................... 281,117 301,422 293,063 284,359 290,586 Repressuring ...................................................... 563 575 2,150 1,785 1,337 Vented and Flared.............................................. 1,941 1,847 955 705 688 Wet After Lease Separation................................

286

Downhole Temperature Prediction for Drilling Geothermal Wells  

SciTech Connect

Unusually high temperatures are encountered during drilling of a geothermal well. These temperatures affect every aspect of drilling, from drilling fluid properties to cement formulations. Clearly, good estimates of downhole temperatures during drilling would be helpful in preparing geothermal well completion designs, well drilling plans, drilling fluid requirements, and cement formulations. The thermal simulations in this report were conducted using GEOTEMP, a computer code developed under Sandia National Laboratories contract and available through Sandia. Input variables such as drilling fluid inlet temperatures and circulation rates, rates of penetration, and shut-in intervals were obtained from the Imperial Valley East Mesa Field and the Los Alamos Hot Dry Rock Project. The results of several thermal simulations are presented, with discussion of their impact on drilling fluids, cements, casing design, and drilling practices.

Mitchell, R. F.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

287

Well-test data from geothermal reservoirs  

SciTech Connect

Extensive well testing in geothermal resources has been carried out throughout the western United States and in northern Mexico since 1975. Each resource tested and each well test conducted by LBL during the eight-year period are covered in brief. The information, collected from published reports and memoranda, includes test particulars, special instrumentation, data interpretation when available, and plots of actual data. Brief geologic and hydrologic descriptions of the geothermal resources are also presented. The format is such that well test descriptions are grouped, in the order performed, into major sections according to resource, each section containing a short resource description followed by individual test details. Additional information regarding instrumentation is provided. Source documentation is provided throughout to facilitate access to further information and raw data.

Bodvarsson, M.G.; Benson, S.M.

1982-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

288

Apparatus for stringing well pipe of casing  

SciTech Connect

An apparatus for use in running a string of threaded well pipe or casing in a vertical configuration in a deep well bore which is adapted to convert a top head drive drilling rig for use in running each length of pipe into the well bore. A drive spindle adaptor is provided which may be securely attached in a removably mounted manner to the rotary drive spindle or sub of a top head drive drilling rig. The drive spindle includes a pair of opposing, outwardly extending lugs disposed at a right angle to the axial direction of the spindle and a true centering guide means. A collar is included which is provided with frictional gripping members for removably securing the collar to one end of a length of conventional pipe and a pair of axially extending, spaced ears which cooperate upon engagement with said lugs on said spindle adaptor to transfer rotary motion of said spindle to said length of pipe.

Sexton, J.L.

1984-04-17T23:59:59.000Z

289

Apparatus for rotating and reciprocating well pipe  

SciTech Connect

This patent describes an apparatus for simultaneously rotating and reciprocating well pipe, having an upper end, and mechanically utilizing a rotary table attached to a drilling rig, comprising: a rotating pipe clamp assembly having an irregular cross-sectional mid-member and clamp members for releasably gripping the well pipe connected to the ends of the mid-member for rotation therewith; a square block for fitting to the rotary table square and having a selected grooved interior configuration; a torque transmitting means fitted into the grooves having openings therethrough having the same irregular cross-section as the mid-member cross-section; and a torque limiting means connecting the torque transmitting means and the block for limiting torque applied through the well pipe via the clamp assembly and the torque transmitting means.

Davis, K.D.

1988-04-12T23:59:59.000Z

290

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

7 7 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 7,068 7,425 7,700 8,600 8,500 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 241,776 224,560 224,112 194,121 212,276 From Oil Wells.................................................. 60,444 56,140 56,028 48,530 53,069 Total................................................................... 302,220 280,700 280,140 242,651 265,345 Repressuring ...................................................... 2,340 2,340 2,340 2,340 2,340 Vented and Flared.............................................. 3,324 3,324 3,324 3,324 3,324 Wet After Lease Separation................................

291

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

7 7 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 13,487 14,370 14,367 12,900 13,920 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 81,545 81,723 88,259 87,608 94,259 From Oil Wells.................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Total................................................................... 81,545 81,723 88,259 87,608 94,259 Repressuring ...................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared.............................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation................................ 81,545 81,723 88,259 87,608 94,259 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed

292

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

3 3 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 33,897 33,917 34,593 33,828 33,828 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 98,551 97,272 97,154 87,993 85,018 From Oil Wells.................................................. 6,574 2,835 6,004 5,647 5,458 Total................................................................... 105,125 100,107 103,158 93,641 90,476 Repressuring ...................................................... NA NA NA 0 NA Vented and Flared.............................................. NA NA NA 0 NA Wet After Lease Separation................................ 105,125 100,107 103,158

293

Systematic sampling with errors in sample locations  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......truncation points 0 and 2 and standard deviation = 0 05 (middle...distributed with density h. Standard renewal theory yields...systematic sampling: a review of Matheron's transitive...Trans. Inst. Econ. Mining 59, 147. GUAL-ARNAU...methods. J. Statist. Plan. Infer. 77, 263279......

Johanna Ziegel; Adrian Baddeley; Karl-Anton Dorph-Petersen; Eva B. Vedel Jensen

2010-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

294

Resonator-quantum well infrared photodetectors  

SciTech Connect

We applied a recent electromagnetic model to design the resonator-quantum well infrared photodetector (R-QWIP). In this design, we used an array of rings as diffractive elements to diffract normal incident light into parallel propagation and used the pixel volume as a resonator to intensify the diffracted light. With a proper pixel size, the detector resonates at certain optical wavelengths and thus yields a high quantum efficiency (QE). To test this detector concept, we fabricated a number of R-QWIPs with different quantum well materials and detector geometries. The experimental result agrees satisfactorily with the prediction, and the highest QE achieved is 71%.

Choi, K. K., E-mail: kwong.k.choi.civ@mail.mil; Sun, J.; Olver, K. [Electro-Optics and Photonics Division, U.S. Army Research Laboratory, Adelphi, Maryland 20783 (United States)] [Electro-Optics and Photonics Division, U.S. Army Research Laboratory, Adelphi, Maryland 20783 (United States); Jhabvala, M. D.; Jhabvala, C. A.; Waczynski, A. [Instrument Systems and Technology Division, NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, Maryland 20771 (United States)] [Instrument Systems and Technology Division, NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, Maryland 20771 (United States)

2013-11-11T23:59:59.000Z

295

Assessing respondent-driven sampling  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...convenience sampling through the internet versus respondent driven sampling...in Social Networks, Drug Abuse, and HIV Transmission , eds...5) MSM Tallinn, Estonia Internet convenience sampling...convenience sampling through the internet versus respondent driven sampling...

Sharad Goel; Matthew J. Salganik

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

296

Acid Fracture and Fracture Conductivity Study of Field Rock Samples  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Acid fracturing is a well stimulation strategy designed to increase the productivity of a producing well. The parameters of acid fracturing and the effects of acid interaction on specific rock samples can be studied experimentally. Acid injection...

Underwood, Jarrod

2013-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

297

Economic evaluation of smart well technology  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. At this pivotal time the role of emerging technologies is of at most importance. Smart or intelligent well technology is one of the up and coming technologies that have been developed to assist improvements in field development outcome. In this paper a...

Al Omair, Abdullatif A.

2007-09-17T23:59:59.000Z

298

ATHLETICS AND RECREATION Health, Wellness and Recreation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

ATHLETICS AND RECREATION Health, Wellness and Recreation 5 July 1.00pm ­ 4.00pm Attendees: Louise and recreation for UBC. Anticipating this `work in progress' outcome from our initial discussion, the approach and recreation as it is currently structured? 2 Closer attention to level/degree of competition vs other drivers

Handy, Todd C.

299

Well performance under solutions gas drive  

SciTech Connect

A fully implicit black-oil simulator was written to predict the drawdown and buildup responses for a single well under Solution Gas Drive. The model is capable of handling the following reservoir behaviors: Unfractured reservoir, Double-Porosity system, and Double Permeability-Double Porosity model of Bourdet. The accuracy of the model results is tested for both single-phase liquid flow and two-phase flow. The results presented here provide a basis for the empirical equations presented in the literature. New definitions of pseudopressure and dimensionless time are presented. By using these two definitions, the multiphase flow solutions correlate with the constant rate liquid flow solution for both transient and boundary-dominated flow. For pressure buildup tests, an analogue for the liquid solution is constructed from the drawdown pseudopressure, similar to the reservoir integral of J. Jones. The utility of using the producing gas-oil ration at shut in to compute pseudopressures and pseudotimes is documented. The influence of pressure level and skin factor on the Inflow Performance Relationship (IPR) of wells producing solution gas drive systems is examined. A new definition of flow efficiency that is based on the structure of the deliverability equations is proposed. This definition avoids problems that result when the presently available methods are applied to heavily stimulated wells. The need for using pseudopressures to analyze well test data for fractured reservoirs is shown. Expressions to compute sandface saturations for fractured systems are presented.

Camacho-Velazquez, R.G.

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

300

Flow tests of the Willis Hulin well  

SciTech Connect

The Hulin well was tested between 20,100 and 20,700 feet down in layers of brine-saturated clean sand with occasional intervening layers of shale. The characteristics of the brine and gas were determined in this interval and an initial determination of the reservoir properties were made.

Randolph, P.L.; Hayden, C.G.; Rogers, L.A.

1992-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "wells sampled exceed" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

The integrity of oil and gas wells  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...oil and natural gas wells passing through drinking-water aquifers (14). In PNAS, Ingraffea et al. (5) examine one of...Jackson RB ( 2014 ) The environmental costs and benefits of fracking. Annu Rev Environ Resour, in press . 12 Nicot JP Scanlon...

Robert B. Jackson

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

302

T2WELL/ECO2N  

Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

002966IBMPC00 T2Well/ECO2N Version 1.0: Multiphase and Non-Isothermal Model for Coupled Wellbore-Reservoir Flow of Carbon Dioxide and Variable Salinity Water http:..esd.lbl.gov/tough/licensing.html

303

Single-Well And Cross-Well Seismic Imaging | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Single-Well And Cross-Well Seismic Imaging Single-Well And Cross-Well Seismic Imaging (Redirected from Single-Well And Cross-Well Seismic) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Technique: Single-Well And Cross-Well Seismic Imaging Details Activities (2) Areas (2) Regions (0) NEPA(0) Exploration Technique Information Exploration Group: Downhole Techniques Exploration Sub Group: Borehole Seismic Techniques Parent Exploration Technique: Borehole Seismic Techniques Information Provided by Technique Lithology: Rock unit density influences elastic wave velocities. Stratigraphic/Structural: Structural geology- faults, folds, grabens, horst blocks, sedimentary layering, discontinuities, etc. Hydrological: Combining compressional and shear wave results can indicate the presence of fluid saturation in the formation.

304

Single-Well and Cross-Well Resistivity | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Single-Well and Cross-Well Resistivity Single-Well and Cross-Well Resistivity Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Technique: Single-Well and Cross-Well Resistivity Details Activities (14) Areas (13) Regions (0) NEPA(0) Exploration Technique Information Exploration Group: Downhole Techniques Exploration Sub Group: Well Log Techniques Parent Exploration Technique: Well Log Techniques Information Provided by Technique Lithology: Identify different lithological layers, rock composition, mineral, and clay content Stratigraphic/Structural: -Fault and fracture identification -Rock texture, porosity, and stress analysis -determine dip and structural features in vicinity of borehole -Detection of permeable pathways, fracture zones, faults Hydrological: Resistivity influenced by porosity, grain size distribution, permeability, fluid saturation, fluid type and phase state of the pore water

305

Fracturing pressures and near-well fracture geometry of arbitrarily oriented and horizontal wells  

SciTech Connect

The hydraulic fracturing of arbitrarily oriented and horizontal wells is made challenging by the far more complicated near-well fracture geometry compared to that of conventional vertical wells. This geometry is important both for hydraulic fracture propagation and the subsequent post-treatment well performance. Fracture tortuosity of arbitrarily oriented and horizontal wells is likely to cause large initiation pressures and reduction in the fracture widths. This paper presents a comprehensive study of the effects of important variables, including the principal stresses, wellbore orientation, and perforation configuration on fracture geometry. Initiation pressures, the contact between arbitrarily oriented wells and the fracture plane, and the near-well fracture geometry are determined and discussed. This study also shows that because of the near-well stress concentration the fracture width at the wellbore is always smaller than the maximum fracture width. This can have important consequences during hydraulic fracturing.

Chen, Z.; Economides, M.J.

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

306

Single-Well And Cross-Well Seismic (Majer, 2003) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Single-Well And Cross-Well Seismic (Majer, 2003) Single-Well And Cross-Well Seismic (Majer, 2003) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Single-Well And Cross-Well Seismic (Majer, 2003) Exploration Activity Details Location Unspecified Exploration Technique Single-Well And Cross-Well Seismic Activity Date Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Notes The goal of this work is to evaluate the most promising methods and approaches that may be used for improved geothermal exploration and reservoir assessment. It is not a comprehensive review of all seismic methods used to date in geothermal environments. This work was motivated by a need to assess current and developing seismic technology that if applied in geothermal cases may greatly improve the chances for locating new

307

Development Wells At Salt Wells Area (Nevada Bureau of Mines and Geology,  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Salt Wells Area (Nevada Bureau of Mines and Geology, Salt Wells Area (Nevada Bureau of Mines and Geology, 2009) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Development Wells At Salt Wells Area (Nevada Bureau of Mines and Geology, 2009) Exploration Activity Details Location Salt Wells Geothermal Area Exploration Technique Development Drilling Activity Date 2005 - 2005 Usefulness useful DOE-funding Unknown Exploration Basis AMP Resources, LLC drilled one of the first operating wells, Industrial Production Well PW-2, in the spring of 2005 under geothermal project area permit #568. Notes The well was completed to a depth of 143.6 m and a peak temperature of 145°C, as indicated by static temperature surveys. Wellhead temperatures at PW-2 were 140°C at a flow rate of 157.7 liters per minute, and no

308

Effects of fracturing fluid recovery upon well performance and ultimate recovery of hydraulically fractured gas wells  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

EFFECTS OF FRACTURING FLUID RECOVERY UPON WELL PERFORMANCE AND ULTIMATE RECOVERY OF HYDRAULICALLY FRACTURED GAS WELLS A Thesis IAN MARIE BERTHELOT Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas AdtM University in partial fulfillment... of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE May 1990 Major Subject: Petroleum Engineering EFFECTS OF FRACTURING FLUID RECOVERY UPON WELL PERFORMANCE AND ULTIMATE RECOVERY OF HYDRAULICALLY FRACTURED GAS WELLS by JAN MARIE BERTIIELOT Appmved...

Berthelot, Jan Marie

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

309

September 2004 Water Sampling  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

Green River, Utah, Disposal Site Green River, Utah, Disposal Site August 2013 LMS/GRN/S00613 This page intentionally left blank U.S. Department of Energy DVP-June 2013, Green River, Utah August 2013 RIN 13065402 Page i Contents Sampling Event Summary ...............................................................................................................1 Data Assessment Summary ..............................................................................................................7 Water Sampling Field Activities Verification Checklist .............................................................9 Laboratory Performance Assessment ........................................................................................11 Sampling Quality Control Assessment ......................................................................................18

310

Sampled data lattice filters  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

SAMPLED DATA LATTICE FILTERS A Thesis by WILLIAM TERRY THRIFT III Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE December 1979 Major Subfect...: Electrical Engineering SAMPLED DATA LATTICE FILTERS A Thesis by WILLIAM TERRY THRIFT III Approved as to style and content by: (Chair an of Committee) (Hea f Department) (Member) (Member) (Member) (Member) December 1979 ABSTRACT Sampled Data...

Thrift, William Terry

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

311

September 2004 Water Sampling  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

sample recovery not within control limits. Organic: Tentatively identified compound (TIC). P > 25% difference in detected pesticide or Aroclor concentrations between 2 columns....

312

EMSL - sediment samples  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

sediment-samples en Diffusional Motion of Redox Centers in Carbonate Electrolytes . http:www.emsl.pnl.govemslwebpublicationsdiffusional-motion-redox-centers-carbonate-electrol...

313

September 2004 Water Sampling  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

conducted in accordance with the Sampling and Analysis Plan for the U. S. Department of Energy Office of Legacy Management Sites (LMSPROS04351, continually updated). Monitoring...

314

September 2004 Water Sampling  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

4 Groundwater and Surface Water Sampling at the Gunnison, Colorado, Processing Site September 2014 LMSGUPS00414 This page intentionally left blank U.S. Department of Energy...

315

September 2004 Water Sampling  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

4 Groundwater and Surface Water Sampling at the Slick Rock, Colorado, Processing Sites December 2014 LMSSRWSRES00914 This page intentionally left blank U.S. Department of Energy...

316

Lalamilo Wells Wind Farm | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Wind Farm Wind Farm Jump to: navigation, search Name Lalamilo Wells Wind Farm Facility Lalamilo Wells Sector Wind energy Facility Type Commercial Scale Wind Facility Status In Service Owner Hawaiian Electric Light Co. Developer Lalamilo Ventures Energy Purchaser Hawaii Electric Light Co. Location Big Island HI Coordinates 19.9875°, -155.765556° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":19.9875,"lon":-155.765556,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

317

Lost Circulation Experience in Geothermal Wells  

SciTech Connect

Lost circulation during drilling and cementing in geothermal wells is a problem common to most geothermal areas. Material and rig time costs due to lost circulation often represent one fourth or more of the total well cost. Assessment of the general drilling and completion practices commonly used for handling lost circulation have been surveyed and evaluated under a study sponsored by Sandia National Laboratories. Results of this study, including interviews with geothermal production companies and with drilling fluid service companies, are reported in the paper. Conclusions and recommendations are presented for control of lost circulation during geothermal operations. Recent improvements in lost circulation materials and techniques and potential equipment solutions to the lost circulation problem are discussed. Research needs are also identified.

Goodman, M. A.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

318

Consortium for Petroleum & Natural Gas Stripper Wells  

SciTech Connect

The Pennsylvania State University, under contract to the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL), established a national industry-driven Stripper Well Consortium (SWC) that is focused on improving the production performance of domestic petroleum and/or natural gas stripper wells. The SWC represents a partnership between U.S. petroleum and natural gas producers, trade associations, state funding agencies, academia, and the NETL. This document serves as the twelfth quarterly technical progress report for the SWC. Key activities for this reporting period included: (1) Drafting and releasing the 2007 Request for Proposals; (2) Securing a meeting facility, scheduling and drafting plans for the 2007 Spring Proposal Meeting; (3) Conducting elections and announcing representatives for the four 2007-2008 Executive Council seats; (4) 2005 Final Project Reports; (5) Personal Digital Assistant Workshops scheduled; and (6) Communications and outreach.

Joel L. Morrison; Sharon L. Elder

2007-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

319

GAS INJECTION/WELL STIMULATION PROJECT  

SciTech Connect

Driver Production proposes to conduct a gas repressurization/well stimulation project on a six well, 80-acre portion of the Dutcher Sand of the East Edna Field, Okmulgee County, Oklahoma. The site has been location of previous successful flue gas injection demonstration but due to changing economic and sales conditions, finds new opportunities to use associated natural gas that is currently being vented to the atmosphere to repressurize the reservoir to produce additional oil. The established infrastructure and known geological conditions should allow quick startup and much lower operating costs than flue gas. Lessons learned from the previous project, the lessons learned form cyclical oil prices and from other operators in the area will be applied. Technology transfer of the lessons learned from both projects could be applied by other small independent operators.

John K. Godwin

2005-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

320

Recent developments in well test analysis  

SciTech Connect

The analysis of pressure transient data in terms of model parameter values is part of the reservoir description process and must be regarded as complementary to other branches of this activity. The advantage of transient pressure data is the depth of investigation achieved by the propagating pressure disturbance. However, the problem of an interpretation`s lack of uniqueness always exists. The objective of well test analysis is to help increase the understanding of the reservoir structure so that ultimate recovery can be improved. This pressure transient analysis review summarizes the major developments that have occurred since the derivative technique was introduced in 1982. This is the first in a series that discusses recent and future developments in well test analysis.

Stewart, G. [Edinburgh Petroleum Services Ltd. (United Kingdom)]|[Heriot-Watt Univ., Edinburgh (United Kingdom)

1997-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "wells sampled exceed" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Boise geothermal injection well: Final environmental assessment  

SciTech Connect

The City of Boise, Idaho, an Idaho Municipal Corporation, is proposing to construct a well with which to inject spent geothermal water from its hot water heating system back into the geothermal aquifer. Because of a cooperative agreement between the City and the US Department of Energy to design and construct the proposed well, compliance to the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) is required. Therefore, this Environmental Assessment (EA) represents the analysis of the proposed project required under NEPA. The intent of this EA is to: (1) briefly describe historical uses of the Boise Geothermal Aquifer; (2) discuss the underlying reason for the proposed action; (3) describe alternatives considered, including the No Action Alternative and the Preferred Alternative; and (4) present potential environmental impacts of the proposed action and the analysis of those impacts as they apply to the respective alternatives.

NONE

1997-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

322

Drop pressure optimization in oil well drilling  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In this research work we are interested in minimizing losses existing when drilling an oil well. This would essentially improve the load losses by acting on the rheological parameters of the hydraulic and drilling mud. For this rheological tests were performed using a six-speed rotary viscometer (FANN 35). We used several rheological models to accurately describe the actual rheological behavior of drilling mud oil-based according to the Pearson's coefficient and to the standard deviation. To model the problem we established a system of equations that describe the essential to highlight purpose and various constraints that allow for achieving this goal. To solve the problem we developed a computer program that solves the obtained equations in Visual Basic language system. Hydraulic and rheological calculation was made for in situ application. This allowed us to estimate the distribution of losses in the well.

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

323

Tank 241-SY-102 January 2000 Compatibility Grab Samples Analytical Results for the Final Report [SEC 1 and 2  

SciTech Connect

This document is the format IV, final report for the tank 241-SY-102 (SY-102) grab samples taken in January 2000 to address waste compatibility concerns. Chemical, radiochemical, and physical analyses on the tank SY-102 samples were performed as directed in Comparability Grab Sampling and Analysis Plan for Fiscal Year 2000 (Sasaki 1999). No notification limits were exceeded. Preliminary data on samples 2SY-99-5, -6, and -7 were reported in ''Format II Report on Tank 241-SY-102 Waste Compatibility Grab Samples Taken in January 2000'' (Lockrem 2000). The data presented here represent the final results.

BELL, K.E.

2000-05-11T23:59:59.000Z

324

Sampling Out: Regulatory Avoidance and the Total Coliform Rule  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The propensity of regulated entities to avoid the detection of violations has been demonstrated in contexts such as safety regulation of U.S. nuclear power plants (1), water quality regulation of U.S. pulp-and-paper plants (2), and new source review standards for power plants under the Clean Air Act (3). ... First, state enforcement agencies may negotiate with systems to establish a routine monthly sampling plan, which can exceed the federal minimum. ... Keohane, N. O.; Mansur, E. T.; Voynov, A. Averting regulatory enforcement: evidence from new source review J. Econ. ...

Lori S. Bennear; Katrina K. Jessoe; Sheila M. Olmstead

2009-06-12T23:59:59.000Z

325

Gas well operation with liquid production  

SciTech Connect

Prediction of liquid loading in gas wells is discussed in terms of intersecting tubing or system performance curves with IPR curves and by using a more simplified critical velocity relationship. Different methods of liquid removal are discussed including such methods as intermittent lift, plunger lift, use of foam, gas lift, and rod, jet, and electric submersible pumps. Advantages, disadvantages, and techniques for design and application of the methods of liquid removal are discussed.

Lea, J.F.; Tighe, R.E.

1983-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

326

Energy loss rate in disordered quantum well  

SciTech Connect

We report the effect of dynamically screened deformation potential on the electron energy loss rate in disordered semiconductor quantum well. Interaction of confined electrons with bulk acoustic phonons has been considered in the deformation coupling. The study concludes that the dynamically screened deformation potential coupling plays a significant role as it substantially affects the power dependency of electron relaxation on temperature and mean free path.

Tripathi, P.; Ashraf, S. S. Z. [Centre of Excellence in Nanomaterials, Faculty of Engineering and Technology, Aligarh Muslim University, Aligarh-202002 (India); Hasan, S. T. [Physics Department, Faculty of Science, The M.S. University of Baroda, Vadodara-390002 (India); Sharma, A. C. [Physics Department, Sibli National College, Azamgarh-276128 (India)

2014-04-24T23:59:59.000Z

327

Program solves for gas well inflow performance  

SciTech Connect

A Windows-based program, GasIPR, can solve for the gas well inflow performance relationship (IPR). The program calculates gas producing rates at various pressures and is applicable for both turbulent and non-turbulent flow. It also has the following capabilities: computes PVT properties {gamma}{sub g}, P{sub c}, T{sub c}, heating value, Z, {mu}{sub g}, B{sub g}, and {rho}{sub g} from input gas composition data; calculates the Reynolds number (N{sub Re}) and shows the gas flow rates at the sandface at which the turbulence effect must be considered; helps the user to optimize the net perforation interval (h{sub p}) so that the turbulence effect can be minimized; and helps the user to evaluate the sensitivity of formation permeability on gas flow rate for a new play. IPR is a critical component in forecasting gas well deliverability. IPRs are used for sizing optimum tubing configurations and compressors, designing gravel packs, and solving gas well loading problems. IPR is the key reference for nodal analysis.

Engineer, R. [AERA Energy LLC, Bakersfield, CA (United States); Grillete, G. [Bechtel Petroleum Operations Inc., Tupman, CA (United States)

1997-10-20T23:59:59.000Z

328

Method of drilling and casing a well  

SciTech Connect

A well drilling rig having a rotary table for driving a drill string rotatively and having jacking mechanism for lowering casing into the well after drilling, with the jacking mechanism including fluid pressure actuated piston and cylinder means which may be left in the rig during drilling and which are positioned low enough in the rig to avoid interference with operation of the rotary table. The jacking mechanism also includes a structure which is adapted to be connected to the piston and cylinder means when the casing or other well pipe is to be lowered and which is actuable upwardly and downwardly and carries one of two pipe gripping units for progressively jacking the pipe downwardly by vertical reciprocation of that structure. The reciprocating structure may take the form of a beam extending between two pistons and actuable thereby, with a second beam being connected to cylinders within which the pistons are contained and being utilized to support the second gripping element. In one form of the invention, the rotary table when in use is supported by this second beam.

Boyadjieff, G.I.; Campbell, A.B.

1983-12-20T23:59:59.000Z

329

Vibration of Generalized Double Well Oscillators  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We have applied the Melnikov criterion to examine a global homoclinic bifurcation and transition to chaos in a case of a double well dynamical system with a nonlinear fractional damping term and external excitation. The usual double well Duffing potential having a negative square term and positive quartic term has been generalized to a double well potential with a negative square term and a positive one with an arbitrary real exponent $q > 2$. We have also used a fractional damping term with an arbitrary power $p$ applied to velocity which enables one to cover a wide range of realistic damping factors: from dry friction $p \\to 0$ to turbulent resistance phenomena $p=2$. Using perturbation methods we have found a critical forcing amplitude $\\mu_c$ above which the system may behave chaotically. Our results show that the vibrating system is less stable in transition to chaos for smaller $p$ satisfying an exponential scaling low. The critical amplitude $\\mu_c$ as an exponential function of $p$. The analytical results have been illustrated by numerical simulations using standard nonlinear tools such as Poincare maps and the maximal Lyapunov exponent. As usual for chosen system parameters we have identified a chaotic motion above the critical Melnikov amplitude $\\mu_c$.

Grzegorz Litak; Marek Borowiec; Arkadiusz Syta

2006-10-20T23:59:59.000Z

330

Remote down-hole well telemetry  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The present invention includes an apparatus and method for telemetry communication with oil-well monitoring and recording instruments located in the vicinity of the bottom of gas or oil recovery pipes. Such instruments are currently monitored using electrical cabling that is inserted into the pipes; cabling has a short life in this environment, and requires periodic replacement with the concomitant, costly shutdown of the well. Modulated reflectance, a wireless communication method that does not require signal transmission power from the telemetry package will provide a long-lived and reliable way to monitor down-hole conditions. Normal wireless technology is not practical since batteries and capacitors have to frequently be replaced or recharged, again with the well being removed from service. RF energy generated above ground can also be received, converted and stored down-hole without the use of wires, for actuating down-hole valves, as one example. Although modulated reflectance reduces or eliminates the loss of energy at the sensor package because energy is not consumed, during the transmission process, additional stored extra energy down-hole is needed.

Briles, Scott D. (Los Alamos, NM); Neagley, Daniel L. (Albuquerque, NM); Coates, Don M. (Santa Fe, NM); Freund, Samuel M. (Los Alamos, NM)

2004-07-20T23:59:59.000Z

331

Magazine system for multiple sample transport from air into UHV  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The time required to exchange specimens in a UHV system can be reduced considerably by a sample airlock. A low-cost sample exchange system is described which was originally constructed for an Auger spectrometer, but may be applied to other UHV systems as well. The essential parts are a magnetically coupled transfer rod, a magazine for the simultaneous transport of six samples, a bayonet clip to fix the samples sequentially to a carousel sample holder and a tilting mechanism in the specimen stage to bring the transferred samples into an optimum position for the further experiment. The system can be adapted to the multiple sample transport between two completely separated UHV systems.

W Pamler; W Reill; S Dorfner; K Roll

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

332

Social Well-being in Community Development: Challenges in  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

millennium commenced with world population exceeding six billion people, and, for first time in human history all economies. The high price of materialism and widening stratification negates the complacent assumption that the market will, in time, rectify everything. The end of cheap oil and the alarming reduction

Zaferatos, Nicholas C.

333

Sampling system and method  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The present disclosure provides an apparatus and method for coupling conduit segments together. A first pump obtains a sample and transmits it through a first conduit to a reservoir accessible by a second pump. The second pump further conducts the sample from the reservoir through a second conduit.

Decker, David L.; Lyles, Brad F.; Purcell, Richard G.; Hershey, Ronald Lee

2013-04-16T23:59:59.000Z

334

Microsoft Word - RUL_3Q2010_Rpt_Gas_Samp_Results_18Wells.doc  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

Monitoring Results Monitoring Results Natural Gas Wells near the Project Rulison Horizon U.S. Department of Energy Office of Legacy Management Grand Junction, Colorado Date Sampled: 13 July 2010 Purpose: The purpose of this sample collection is to monitor for radionuclides from Project Rulison. The bottom hole locations (BHLs) of the 18 gas wells sampled are within 1.1 miles of the Project Rulison detonation horizon. All wells sampled have produced or are producing gas from the Williams Fork Formation. Background: Project Rulison is the Plowshare Program code name for the detonation of a 40-kiloton-yield nuclear device on 10 September 1969. The detonation point was 8,426 feet (about 1.6 miles) below ground surface in the Williams Fork Formation. The purpose of the test

335

2003 CBECS Sample Design  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Technical Information > Sample Design Technical Information > Sample Design How the Survey Was Conducted 2003 Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Survey: Sample Design Introduction The Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Survey (CBECS) is conducted quadrennially by the Energy Information Administration (EIA) to provide basic statistical information about energy consumption and expenditures in U.S. commercial buildings and information about energy-related characteristics of these buildings. The survey is based upon a sample of commercial buildings selected according to the sample design requirements described below. A “building,” as opposed to an “establishment,” is the basic unit of analysis for the CBECS because the building is the energy-consuming unit. The 2003 CBECS was the eighth survey conducted since 1979

336

Sample Changes and Issues  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Sample and Model Issues Sample and Model Issues Summary Our comprehensive review of the EIA 914 has confirmed that discrepancies can arise between estimates for December of one year and January of the next. These are most evident for Texas estimates between December 2008 and January 2009. Reports now available from HPDI show that production for all the companies we sampled in both 2008 and 2009 rose by about 60 million cubic feet per day (MMcf/d) in January and that total production in Texas rose by a similar amount. Our estimate was a decrease of 360 MMcf/d. Why the difference? Computationally, EIA-914 estimates depend on two factors: * Reports from the companies in the survey sample * An expansion factor to estimate total production from the sample's reported

337

Pahute Mesa Well Development and Testing Analyses for Wells ER-20-7, ER-20-8 #2, and ER-EC-11, Revision 1  

SciTech Connect

This report analyzes the following data collected from ER-20-7, ER-20-8 No.2, and ER-EC-11 during WDT operations: (1) Chemical indicators of well development (Section 2.0); (2) Static hydraulic head (Section 3.0); (3) Radiochemistry and geochemistry (Section 4.0); (4) Drawdown observed at locations distal to the pumping well (Section 5.0); and (5) Drilling water production, flow logs, and temperature logs (Section 6.0). The new data are further considered with respect to existing data as to how they enhance or change interpretations of groundwater flow and transport, and an interim small-scale conceptual model is also developed and compared to Phase I concepts. The purpose of well development is to remove drilling fluids and drilling-associated fines from the formation adjacent to a well so samples reflecting ambient groundwater water quality can be collected, and to restore hydraulic properties near the well bore. Drilling fluids can contaminate environmental samples from the well, resulting in nonrepresentative measurements. Both drilling fluids and preexisting fines in the formation adjacent to the well can impede the flow of water from the formation to the well, creating artifacts in hydraulic response data measured in the well.

Greg Ruskauff

2011-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

338

Microsoft Word - RUL_1Q2009_Gas_Samp_Results_6wells_22Jan09  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

09 09 U.S. Department of Energy Office of Legacy Management Grand Junction, Colorado Date Sampled: 22 January 2009 Purpose: The purpose of this environmental sample collection is to monitor natural gas and production water from natural gas wells drilled near the Project Rulison test site. As part of the Department of Energy's (DOE's) directive to protect human health and the environment, samples are collected from producing gas wells and analyzed to ensure no Rulison related radionuclides have migrated outside the DOE institutional-control boundary. These samples were collected before the DOE Rulison Monitoring Plan was released in July 2010. The Rulison Monitoring Plan provides guidance for sample collection frequency, based on distance from the Rulison

339

Microsoft Word - RUL_4Q2010_Rpt_Gas_Samp_Results_8Wells  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

the Project Rulison Horizon the Project Rulison Horizon U.S. Department of Energy Office of Legacy Management Grand Junction, Colorado Date Sampled: 21 October 2010 Purpose: The purpose of this sample collection is to monitor for radionuclides from Project Rulison. The bottom hole locations (BHLs) of the 8 gas wells sampled are within 0.75 and 1.0 mile of the Project Rulison detonation horizon. All wells sampled have produced or are producing gas from the Williams Fork Formation. Background: Project Rulison was the second Plowshare Program to try stimulation natural gas in tight sandstone formations using a nuclear device. On 10 September 1969, a 40- nuclear device was detonated 8,426 feet (about 1.6 miles) below ground surface in the Williams Fork Formation. Samples Collected:

340

Completion Report for Well ER-EC-7  

SciTech Connect

Well ER-EC-7 was drilled for the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office in support of the Nevada Environmental Restoration Project at the Nevada Test Site, Nye County, Nevada. This well was drilled in the summer of 1999 as part of the Department of Energy's hydrogeologic investigation program in the Western Pahute Mesa - Oasis Valley region just west of the Test Site. A 44.5-centimeter surface hole was drilled and cased off to a depth of 265.8 meters below the surface. The hole diameter was then decreased to 31.1 centimeters for drilling to a total depth of 422.5 meters. The planned depth of 762 meters was not reached due to borehole stability problems. One completion string with two isolated slotted intervals was installed in the well. A preliminary composite, static, water level was measured at the depth of 227.8 meters, 20 days after installation of the completion string. Detailed lithologic descriptions with stratigraphic assignments are included in the report. These are based on composite drill cuttings, supplemented by geophysical log data, and incorporating data from detailed chemical and mineralogical studies of rock samples. Beneath a thin alluvial deposit, the well penetrated 410 meters of lava and bedded tuff of the Volcanics of Fortymile Canyon Group, deposited in the Timber Mountain caldera moat after caldera collapse. The geologic interpretation of data from this well provides information on the thickness, lithologic composition, and hydrogeologic character of moat-filling rocks in the southern portion of the Timber Mountain caldera complex in the southwestern Nevada volcanic field.

Bechtel Nevada

2004-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "wells sampled exceed" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Well blowout rates in California Oil and Gas District 4--Update and Trends  

SciTech Connect

Well blowouts are one type of event in hydrocarbon exploration and production that generates health, safety, environmental and financial risk. Well blowouts are variously defined as 'uncontrolled flow of well fluids and/or formation fluids from the wellbore' or 'uncontrolled flow of reservoir fluids into the wellbore'. Theoretically this is irrespective of flux rate and so would include low fluxes, often termed 'leakage'. In practice, such low-flux events are not considered well blowouts. Rather, the term well blowout applies to higher fluxes that rise to attention more acutely, typically in the order of seconds to days after the event commences. It is not unusual for insurance claims for well blowouts to exceed US$10 million. This does not imply that all blowouts are this costly, as it is likely claims are filed only for the most catastrophic events. Still, insuring against the risk of loss of well control is the costliest in the industry. The risk of well blowouts was recently quantified from an assembled database of 102 events occurring in California Oil and Gas District 4 during the period 1991 to 2005, inclusive. This article reviews those findings, updates them to a certain extent and compares them with other well blowout risk study results. It also provides an improved perspective on some of the findings. In short, this update finds that blowout rates have remained constant from 2005 to 2008 within the limits of resolution and that the decline in blowout rates from 1991 to 2005 was likely due to improved industry practice.

Jordan, Preston D.; Benson, Sally M.

2009-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

342

Investigation of Accelerated Casing Corrosion in Two Wells at Waste Management Area A-AX  

SciTech Connect

The sidewall core samples from well 299-E24-19, which were comprised of a mixture of bentonite and silt lens material, had an average porewater chloride concentration of 376 mg/L. The sidewall core samples collected from well 299-E25-46 had calculated porewater chloride concentrations ranging from 1,200 to more than 10,000 mg/L. Clearly, the sidewall core samples tested were capable of generating porewaters with sufficient chloride concentrations to cause corrosion of the stainless steel well casing. Furthermore, analysis of the sidewall core samples yielded a clear relationship between chloride concentration and well casing corrosion. The sidewall core samples containing the greatest amount of chloride, 3000 {micro}g/g of sediment, came from the well that experienced the longest length of casing failure (4.2 feet in well 299-E25-46). All of the sidewall core samples tested from both decommissioned wells contained more chloride than the Wyoming bentonite test material. However, since chloride was present as a trace constituent in all of the sidewall core samples (less than 0.4 weight percent), it is possible that it could have been introduced to the system as a ''contaminant'' contained in the bentonite backfill material. Therefore, it is likely that chloride leached from the bentonite material and/or chloride carried by/as a constituent of the liquid waste stream caused the advanced well casing corrosion found at wells 299-E24-19 and 299-E25-46 via crevice corrosion and stress corrosion cracking. The sample of Enviroplug{trademark} No.8 high swelling Wyoming bentonite was characterized for its potential to generate porewaters of sufficient chlorinity to lead to accelerated corrosion of type 304L stainless steel. Overall, the bentonite sample had considerably high water extractable concentrations of sodium, chloride, fluoride, sulfate, and alkalinity (measured as calcium carbonate). Interpretation of the laboratory data indicated that the Wyoming bentonite test sample was capable of generating localized vadose zone porewater with chloride concentrations in excess of 700 mg/L. However, the vadose zone at Hanford is primarily composed of coarse-grained sands with an in-situ moisture content ranging from 5-12%. Therefore, it is doubtful enough moisture will be available throughout the majority of the vadose zone to sufficiently ''wet'' the bentonite and leach chloride from the material. Consequently, Wyoming bentonite material should be suitable as an annulus filling agent in all low-moisture zones and those regions that lack the potential to accumulate perched water. This report contains all the geochemical and selected physical characterization data collected on archived vadose zone sediment recovered during the early 1990s installation of four RCRA monitoring wells: 299-E24-19, 299-E24-20, 299-E24-22, and 299-E25-46, sidewall core samples collected during the decommissioning (in 2004) of wells 299-E24-19 and 299-E25-46, splitspoon core samples collected during the installation (in 2004) of two RCRA monitoring wells: 299-E24-33 and 299-E25-95, a sample of Wyoming bentonite, as well as a perched water sample collected during the installation of well 299-E24-33. Laboratory tests were conducted to characterize the sediment and to identify water-leachable constituents. Testing consisted primarily of 1:1 sediment:water extractions, which were used to calculate the elemental concentrations of water soluble constituents in the solid and to estimate in-situ porewater chloride concentrations. Additionally, 8M nitric acid extractions and X-ray diffraction analysis of the solids were used to provide a measure of the total leachable sediment content of constituents and to search for the formation of new crystalline phases that may have formed during the corrosion process, respectively.

Brown, Christopher F.; Serne, R JEFFREY.; Schaef, Herbert T.; Williams, Bruce A.; Valenta, Michelle M.; LeGore, Virginia L.; Lindberg, Michael J.; Geiszler, Keith N.; Baum, Steven R.; Kutnyakov, Igor V.; Vickerman, Tanya S.; Clayton, Ray E.

2005-08-29T23:59:59.000Z

343

Production Well Performance Enhancement using Sonication Technology  

SciTech Connect

The objective of this project was to develop a sonic well performance enhancement technology that focused on near wellbore formation damage. In order to successfully achieve this objective, a three-year project was defined. The entire project was broken into four tasks. The overall objective of all this was to foster a better understanding of the mechanisms involved in sonic energy interactions with fluid flow in porous media and adapt such knowledge for field applications. The fours tasks are: Laboratory studies Mathematical modeling Sonic tool design and development Field demonstration The project was designed to be completed in three years; however, due to budget cuts, support was only provided for the first year, and hence the full objective of the project could not be accomplished. This report summarizes what was accomplished with the support provided by the US Department of Energy. Experiments performed focused on determining the inception of cavitation, studying thermal dissipation under cavitation conditions, investigating sonic energy interactions with glass beads and oil, and studying the effects of sonication on crude oil properties. Our findings show that the voltage threshold for onset of cavitation is independent of transducer-hydrophone separation distance. In addition, thermal dissipation under cavitation conditions contributed to the mobilization of deposited paraffins and waxes. Our preliminary laboratory experiments suggest that waxes are mobilized when the fluid temperature approaches 40C. Experiments were conducted that provided insights into the interactions between sonic wave and the fluid contained in the porous media. Most of these studies were carried out in a slim-tube apparatus. A numerical model was developed for simulating the effect of sonication in the nearwellbore region. The numerical model developed was validated using a number of standard testbed problems. However, actual application of the model for scale-up purposes was limited due to funding constraints. The overall plan for this task was to perlorm field trials with the sonication tooL These trials were to be performed in production and/or injection wells located in Pennsylvania, New York, and West Virginia. Four new wells were drilled in preparation for the field demonstration. Baseline production data were collected and reservoir simulator tuned to simulate these oil reservoirs. The sonication tools were designed for these wells. However, actual field testing could not be carried out because of premature termination of the project.

Adewumi, Michael A; Ityokumbul, M Thaddeus; Watson, Robert W; Eltohami, Eltohami; Farias, Mario; Heckman, Glenn; Houlihan, Brendan; Karoor, Samata Prakash; Miller, Bruce G; Mohammed, Nazia; Olanrewaju, Johnson; Ozdemir, Mine; Rejepov, Dautmamed; Sadegh, Abdallah A; Quammie, Kevin E; Zaghloul, Jose; Hughes, W Jack; Montgomery, Thomas C

2005-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

344

Treating paraffin deposits in producing oil wells  

SciTech Connect

Paraffin deposition has been a problem for operators in many areas since the beginning of petroleum production from wells. An extensive literature search on paraffin problems and methods of control has been carried out, and contact was made with companies which provide chemicals to aid in the treatment of paraffin problems. A discussion of the nature of paraffins and the mechanisms of this deposition is presented. The methods of prevention and treatment of paraffin problems are summarized. Suggested procedures for handling paraffin problems are provided. Suggestions for areas of further research testing are given.

Noll, L.

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

345

Apparatus for use in rejuvenating oil wells  

SciTech Connect

A sub incorporating a check valve is connected into the lower end of a well pipestring. This valve will pass hot steam injected down the pipestring to the formations to loosen up the thick crude oil. The check valve prevents back flow and thus will hold the high pressure steam. To resume production, the production pump can then be lowered through the pipestring. The pump itself is provided with an extended probe member which will unseat the check valve when the pump is in proper position so that production pumping can resume.

Warnock, C.E. Sr.

1983-07-19T23:59:59.000Z

346

CNCC Craig Campus Geothermal Program: 82-well closed loop GHP well field to  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

CNCC Craig Campus Geothermal Program: 82-well closed loop GHP well field to CNCC Craig Campus Geothermal Program: 82-well closed loop GHP well field to provide geothermal energy as a common utility for a new community college campus. Geothermal Project Jump to: navigation, search Last modified on July 22, 2011. Project Title CNCC Craig Campus Geothermal Program: 82-well closed loop GHP well field to provide geothermal energy as a common utility for a new community college campus. Project Type / Topic 1 Recovery Act - Geothermal Technologies Program: Ground Source Heat Pumps Project Type / Topic 2 Topic Area 1: Technology Demonstration Projects Project Description This "geothermal central plant" concept will provide ground source loop energy as a utility to be shared by the academic and residential buildings on the soon-to-be-constructed campus.

347

Exploratory Well At Salt Wells Area (Edmiston & Benoit, 1984) | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Edmiston & Benoit, 1984) Edmiston & Benoit, 1984) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Exploratory Well At Salt Wells Area (Edmiston & Benoit, 1984) Exploration Activity Details Location Salt Wells Geothermal Area Exploration Technique Exploratory Well Activity Date 1980 - 1980 Usefulness useful DOE-funding Unknown Exploration Basis The blind Salt Wells geothermal system was first identified when Anadarko Petroleum Corporation drilled slim hole and geothermal exploration wells at the site in 1980. Two reports detail the results of this drilling activity. This paper seeks to (1) describe several moderate-temperature (150-200°C) geothermal systems discovered and drilled during the early 1980s that had not been documented previously in the literature, (2) summarize and compare

348

Single-Well And Cross-Well Seismic Imaging | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Single-Well And Cross-Well Seismic Imaging Single-Well And Cross-Well Seismic Imaging Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Technique: Single-Well And Cross-Well Seismic Imaging Details Activities (2) Areas (2) Regions (0) NEPA(0) Exploration Technique Information Exploration Group: Downhole Techniques Exploration Sub Group: Borehole Seismic Techniques Parent Exploration Technique: Borehole Seismic Techniques Information Provided by Technique Lithology: Rock unit density influences elastic wave velocities. Stratigraphic/Structural: Structural geology- faults, folds, grabens, horst blocks, sedimentary layering, discontinuities, etc. Hydrological: Combining compressional and shear wave results can indicate the presence of fluid saturation in the formation. Thermal: High temperatures and pressure impact the compressional and shear wave velocities.

349

Hydraulic fracture stimulation treatment of Well Baca 23. Geothermal Reservoir Well-Stimulation Program  

SciTech Connect

Well Stimulation Experiment No. 5 of the Geothermal Reservoir Well Stimulation Program (GRWSP) was performed on March 22, 1981 in Baca 23, located in Union's Redondo Creek Project Area in Sandoval County, New Mexico. The treatment selected was a large hydraulic fracture job designed specifically for, and utilizing frac materials chosen for, the high temperature geothermal environment. The well selection, fracture treatment, experiment evaluation, and summary of the job costs are presented herein.

Not Available

1981-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

350

Third invitational well-testing symposium: well testing in low permeability environments  

SciTech Connect

The testing of low permeability rocks is common to waste disposal, fossil energy resource development, underground excavation, and geothermal energy development. This document includes twenty-six papers and abstracts, divided into the following sessions: opening session, case histories and related phenomena, well test design in low permeability formations, analysis and interpretation of well test data, and instrumentation for well tests. Separate abstracts were prepared for 15 of the 16 papers; the remaining paper has been previously abstracted. (DLC)

Doe, T.W.; Schwarz, W.J. (eds.)

1981-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

351

Well testing in coalbed methane (CBM) wells: An environmental remediation case history  

SciTech Connect

In 1993, methane seepage was observed near coalbed methane wells in southwestern Colorado. Well tests were conducted to identify the source of the seeps. The well tests were complicated by two-phase flow, groundwater flow, and gas readsorption. Using the test results, production from the area was simulated. The cause of the seeps was found to be depressuring in shallow coal near the surface, and a remediation plan using water injection near the seep area was formulated.

Cox, D.P.; Young, G.B.C.; Bell, M.J.

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

352

January 2011 Groundwater Sampling at the Gnome-Coach, New Mexico, Site (Data Validation Package)  

SciTech Connect

Annual sampling was conducted January 19, 2011, to monitor groundwater for potential radionuclide contamination at the Gnome-Coach site in New Mexico. The sampling was performed as specified in the Sampling and Analysis Plan for U.S. Department of Energy Office of Legacy Management Sites (LMS/PLN/S04351, continually updated). Well LRL-7 was not sampled per instruction from the lead. A duplicate sample was collected from well USGS-1.Water levels were measured in the monitoring wells onsite.

None

2011-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

353

Data acquisition for low-temperature geothermal well tests and long-term monitoring  

SciTech Connect

Groundwater monitoring is an essential part of the development of a low-temperature geothermal field for production and injection wells. State water resource and environmental departments are requiring both geothermal well testing and long-term monitoring as a part of the permitting process for geothermal developments. This report covers water-level measurement methods, instruments used for well testing, geochemical sampling, examples of data acquisition and regulatory mandates on groundwater monitoring.

Lienau, P.J.

1992-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

354

Data acquisition for low-temperature geothermal well tests and long-term monitoring. Final report  

SciTech Connect

Groundwater monitoring is an essential part of the development of a low-temperature geothermal field for production and injection wells. State water resource and environmental departments are requiring both geothermal well testing and long-term monitoring as a part of the permitting process for geothermal developments. This report covers water-level measurement methods, instruments used for well testing, geochemical sampling, examples of data acquisition and regulatory mandates on groundwater monitoring.

Lienau, P.J.

1992-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

355

Well injection valve with retractable choke  

SciTech Connect

An injection valve is described for use in a well conduit consisting of: a housing having a bore, a valve closure member in the bore moving between open and closed positions, a flow tube telescopically movable in the housing for controlling the movement of the valve closure member, means for biasing the flow tube in a direction for allowing the valve closure member to move to the closed position, an expandable and contractible fluid restriction connected to the flow tube and extending into the bore for moving the flow tube to the open position in response to injection fluid, but allowing the passage of well tools through the valve, the restriction contractible in response to fluid flow, the restriction includes, segments movable into and out of the bore, and biasing means yieldably urging the segments into the bore, a no-go shoulder on the flow tube, and releasable lockout means between the flow tube and the housing for locking the flow tube and valve in the open position.

Pringle, R.E.

1986-07-22T23:59:59.000Z

356

Productivity and Injectivity of Horizontal Wells  

SciTech Connect

A general wellbore flow model is presented to incorporate not only frictional, accelerational and gravitational pressure drops, but also the pressure drop caused by inflow. Influence of inflow or outflow on the wellbore pressure drop is analyzed. New friction factor correlations accounting for both inflow and outflow are also developed. The greatest source of uncertainty is reservoir description and how it is used in simulators. Integration of data through geostatistical techniques leads to multiple descriptions that all honor available data. The reality is never known. The only way to reduce this uncertainty is to use more data from geological studies, formation evaluation, high resolution seismic, well tests and production history to constrain stochastic images. Even with a perfect knowledge about reservoir geology, current models cannot do routine simulations at a fine enough scale. Furthermore, we normally don't know what scale is fine enough. Upscaling introduces errors and masks some of the physical phenomenon that we are trying to model. The scale at which upscaling is robust is not known and it is probably smaller in most cases than the scale actually used for predicting performance. Uncertainties in the well index can cause errors in predictions that are of the same magnitude as those caused by reservoir heterogeneities. Simplified semi-analytical models for cresting behavior and productivity predictions can be very misleading.

Khalid Aziz; Sepehr Arababi; Thomas A. Hewett

1997-04-29T23:59:59.000Z

357

Borehole Data Package for One CY 2005 CERCLA Well 699-S20-E10, 300-FF-5 Operable Unit, Hanford Site, Washington  

SciTech Connect

This report supplies the information obtained during drilling, characterization, and installation of the new groundwater monitoring well. This document also provides a compilation of hydrogeologic and well construction information obtained during drilling, well development, and sample collection/analysis activities.

Williams, Bruce A.; Bjornstad, Bruce N.; Lanigan, David C.; Keller, Jason M.; Rockhold, Mark L.

2006-03-29T23:59:59.000Z

358

Mixed Waste Management Facility Groundwater Monitoring Report, Fourth Quarter 1998 and 1998 Summary  

SciTech Connect

During fourth quarter 1998, ten constituents exceeded final Primary Drinking Water Standards (PDWS) in groundwater samples from downgradient monitoring wells at the Mixed Waste Management Facility. No constituents exceeded final PDWS in samples from the upgradient monitoring wells.

Chase, J.

1999-04-29T23:59:59.000Z

359

Hydrologic Tests at Characterization Well R-14  

SciTech Connect

Well R-14 is located in Ten Site Canyon and was completed at a depth of 1316 ft below ground surface (bgs) in August 2002 within unassigned pumiceous deposits located below the Puye Formation (fanglomerate). The well was constructed with two screens positioned below the regional water table. Individual static depths measured for each isolated screen after the Westbay{trademark} transducer monitoring system was installed in mid-December 2002 were nearly identical at 1177 ft bgs, suggesting only horizontal subsurface flow at this time, location, and depth. Screen 1 straddles the geologic contact between the Puye fanglomerate and unassigned pumiceous deposits. Screen 2 is located about 50 ft deeper than screen 1 and is only within the unassigned pumiceous deposits. Constant-rate, straddle-packer, injection tests were conducted at screen 2, including two short tests and one long test. The short tests were 1 minute each but at different injection rates. These short tests were used to select an appropriate injection rate for the long test. We analyzed both injection and recovery data from the long test using the Theis, Theis recovery, Theis residual-recovery, and specific capacity techniques. The Theis injection, Theis recovery, and specific capacity methods correct for partial screen penetration; however, the Theis residual-recovery method does not. The long test at screen 2 involved injection at a rate of 10.1 gallons per minute (gpm) for 68 minutes and recovery for the next 85 minutes. The Theis analysis for screen 2 gave the best fit to residual recovery data. These results suggest that the 158-ft thick deposits opposite screen 2 have a transmissivity (T) equal to or greater than 143 ft{sup 2}/day, and correspond to a horizontal hydraulic conductivity (K) of at least 0.9 ft/day. The specific capacity method yielded a T value equal to or greater than 177 ft{sup 2}/day, and a horizontal K of at least 1.1 ft/day. Results from the injection and recovery phases of the test at screen 2 were similar to those from the residual-recovery portion of the test, but were lower by a factor of about two. The response to injection was typical for a partially penetrating well screen in a very thick aquifer.

S. McLin; W. Stone

2004-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

360

Natural Gas Prices: Well Above Recent Averages  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

5 5 Notes: The recent surge in spot prices at the Henry Hub are well above a typical range for 1998-1999 (in this context, defined as the average, +/- 2 standard deviations). Past price surges have been of short duration. The possibility of a downward price adjustment before the end of next winter is a source of considerable risk for storage operators who acquire gas at recent elevated prices. Storage levels in the Lower 48 States were 7.5 percent below the 5-year average (1995-1999) by mid-August (August 11), although the differential is only 6.4 percent in the East, which depends most heavily on storage to meet peak demand. Low storage levels are attributable, at least in part, to poor price incentives: high current prices combined with only small price

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "wells sampled exceed" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

PSA_Well_Completion_Report.book  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

Restoration Restoration Project U.S. Department of Energy National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office Environmental Restoration Project U.S. Department of Energy National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office Nevada Environmental Restoration Project Well Completion Report for Corrective Action Unit 447, Project Shoal Area Churchill County, Nevada Revision No.: 0 September 2006 Approved for public release; further dissemination unlimited. DOE/NV--1166 Available for public sale, in paper, from: U.S. Department of Commerce National Technical Information Service 5285 Port Royal Road Springfield, VA 22161 Phone: 800.553.6847 Fax: 703.605.6900 Email: orders@ntis.gov Online ordering: http://www.ntis.gov/ordering.htm Available electronically at http://www.osti.gov/bridge

362

CNTA_Well_Installation_Report.book  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Nuclear Security Administration Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office Environmental Restoration Division Nevada Environmental Restoration Project Well Installation Report for Corrective Action Unit 443, Central Nevada Test Area Nye County, Nevada Revision No.: 0 January 2006 Approved for public release; further dissemination unlimited. DOE/NV--1102 Uncontrolled When Printed Available for public sale, in paper, from: U.S. Department of Commerce National Technical Information Service 5285 Port Royal Road Springfield, VA 22161 Phone: 800.553.6847 Fax: 703.605.6900 Email: orders@ntis.gov Online ordering: http://www.ntis.gov/ordering.htm Available electronically at http://www.osti.gov/bridge Available for a processing fee to U.S. Department of Energy and its contractors, in paper, from:

363

New multilateral well architecture in heterogeneous reservoirs  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the drilling of the main horizontal well and it is cemented together with the main horizontal section. The pressure and structural integrity of these junctions is critical requirement. This integrity does not have to be compromised by any additional... with 15 horizontal lateral model Case 1 Case 6 CMG Results Eclipse Results CMG Results K v/Kh J STBD/psi J STBD/psi J(Case6)/J(Case 1) J STBD/psi J(Case6)/J(Case1) 1 13.85 12.95 93.5% 13.06 94% 0.1 5.73 5.14 89.7% 5.37 93.7% 0.01 1.93 1...

Jia, Hongqiao

2004-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

364

Remote system for subsea wells tested  

SciTech Connect

At its experimental submarine station in the Grondin field offshore the West African state of Gabon, Societe Nationale Elf-Aquitaine has run a series of inspection, repair, and maintenance tests on two producing wells using a robot controlled from the surface. Designed for water depths beyond the range of divers, the TIM robot has a pair of manipulator arms and a rotating telescopic crane installed on a 14 by 7.6 ft carriage. Five television cameras fitted at various spots on the robot allow surface operators to direct TIM in such tasks as (1) installing a jumper pipe between a Christmas tree and the manifold, (2) connecting a jumper electric cable and hydraulic hose, (3) locally operating a safety valve, and (4) removing a guide line. During 104 hr of seabed experience, TIM outperformed divers, particularly in jobs requiring great strength.

Vielvoye, R.

1981-05-04T23:59:59.000Z

365

Kuwait poised for massive well kill effort  

SciTech Connect

This paper reports that full scale efforts to extinguish Kuwait's oil well fires are to begin. The campaign to combat history's worst oil fires, originally expected to begin in mid-March, has been hamstrung by logistical problems, including delays in equipment deliveries caused by damage to Kuwait's infrastructure. Meantime, production from a key field off Kuwait--largely unaffected by the war--is expected to resume in May, but Kuwaiti oil exports will still be hindered by damaged onshore facilities. In addition, Kuwait is lining up equipment and personnel to restore production from its heavily damaged oil fields. Elsewhere in the Persian Gulf, Saudi Arabia reports progress in combating history's worst oil spills but acknowledges a continuing threat.

Not Available

1991-04-08T23:59:59.000Z

366

Drilling of wells with top drive unit  

SciTech Connect

Well drilling apparatus including a top drive drilling assembly having a motor driven stem adapted to be attached to the upper end of a drill string and drive it during a drilling operation, a torque wrench carried by the top drive assembly and movable upwardly and downwardly therewith and operable to break a threated connection between the drill string and the stem, and an elevator carried by and suspended from the top drive assembly and adapted to engage a section of drill pipe beneath the torque wrench in suspending relation. The torque wrench and elevator are preferably retained against rotation with the rotary element which drives the drill string, but may be movable vertically relative to that rotary element and relative to one another in a manner actuating the apparatus between various different operating conditions.

Boyadjieff, G.I.

1984-05-22T23:59:59.000Z

367

September 2004 Water Sampling  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

3-Sampling and Analysis Work Orders Attachment 4-Trip Reports DVP-June and September 2013, Durango, Colorado U.S. Department of Energy RIN 13055370 and 13085577 March 2014 Page...

368

September 2004 Water Sampling  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

agency thereof or its contractors or subcontractors. U.S. Department of Energy DVP-May 2013, Rulison, Colorado October 2013 RIN 13055300 Page i Contents Sampling Event Summary...

369

September 2004 Water Sampling  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

analyses were conducted as specified in the 2004 Monticello Mill Tailings Site Operable Unit III Post-Record of Decision Monitoring Plan, Draft Final and Sampling and Analysis Plan...

370

September 2004 Water Sampling  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

2014 Groundwater, Surface Water, Produced Water, and Natural Gas Sampling at the Gasbuggy, New Mexico, Site October 2014 LMSGSBS00614 Available for sale to the public from: U.S....

371

September 2004 Water Sampling  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

Site August 2014 LMSGRNS00614 This page intentionally left blank U.S. Department of Energy DVP-June 2014, Green River, Utah August 2014 RIN 14066228 Page i Contents Sampling...

372

Climatic data, sample of  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The representative sample data given below is derived from Climates of the World (Environmental Data Service, 1972). To facilitate conversion from degrees Fahrenheit, inches of precipitation, and elevation in fee...

John E. Oliver

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

373

Catching sparks from well-forged neutralinos  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In this paper we present a new search technique for electroweakinos, the superpartners of electroweak gauge and Higgs bosons, based on final states with missing transverse energy, a photon, and a dilepton pair, ?+??+?+ET. Unlike traditional electroweakino searches, which perform best when m?2,30?m?10,m??m?10>mZ, our search favors nearly degenerate spectra; degenerate electroweakinos typically have a larger branching ratio to photons, and the cut m???mZ effectively removes on shell Z boson backgrounds while retaining the signal. This feature makes our technique optimal for well-tempered scenarios, where the dark matter relic abundance is achieved with interelectroweakino splittings of ?2070??GeV. Additionally, our strategy applies to a wider range of scenarios where the lightest neutralinos are almost degenerate, but only make up a subdominant component of the dark mattera spectrum we dub well forged. Focusing on bino-Higgsino admixtures, we present optimal cuts and expected efficiencies for several benchmark scenarios. We find bino-Higgsino mixtures with m?2,30?190??GeV and m?2,30?m?10?30??GeV can be uncovered after roughly 600??fb?1 of luminosity at the 14TeV LHC. Scenarios with lighter states require less data for discovery, while scenarios with heavier states or larger mass splittings are harder to discriminate from the background and require more data. Unlike many searches for supersymmetry, electroweakino searches are one area where the high luminosity of the next LHC run, rather than the increased energy, is crucial for discovery.

Joseph Bramante; Antonio Delgado; Fatemeh Elahi; Adam Martin; Bryan Ostdiek

2014-11-11T23:59:59.000Z

374

Dissolution actuated sample container  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A sample collection vial and process of using a vial is provided. The sample collection vial has an opening secured by a dissolvable plug. When dissolved, liquids may enter into the interior of the collection vial passing along one or more edges of a dissolvable blocking member. As the blocking member is dissolved, a spring actuated closure is directed towards the opening of the vial which, when engaged, secures the vial contents against loss or contamination.

Nance, Thomas A.; McCoy, Frank T.

2013-03-26T23:59:59.000Z

375

Records of wells and chemical analyses of water from wells for the period June 13, 1984 to December 4, 1986 at the Maxey Flats radioactive waste disposal site, Kentucky  

SciTech Connect

Lithologic data are presented for 113 wells drilled at the Maxey Flats Radioactive Waste Disposal Site for the period June 13, 1984 to December 4, 1986. Water levels, tritium concentrations, and specific conductance are also presented for wells yielding sufficient water for measuring and sampling. At least one sample was collected from most wells for the determination of gross alpha and beta activity. These activities and the results for gamma emitting radionuclides (Cobalt 60 and Cesium 137) are also presented.

Lyverse, M.A.

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

376

Liquid sampling system  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A conduit extends from a reservoir through a sampling station and back to the reservoir in a closed loop. A jet ejector in the conduit establishes suction for withdrawing liquid from the reservoir. The conduit has a self-healing septum therein upstream of the jet ejector for receiving one end of a double-ended cannula, the other end of which is received in a serum bottle for sample collection. Gas is introduced into the conduit at a gas bleed between the sample collection bottle and the reservoir. The jet ejector evacuates gas from the conduit and the bottle and aspirates a column of liquid from the reservoir at a high rate. When the withdrawn liquid reaches the jet ejector the rate of flow therethrough reduces substantially and the gas bleed increases the pressure in the conduit for driving liquid into the sample bottle, the gas bleed forming a column of gas behind the withdrawn liquid column and interrupting the withdrawal of liquid from the reservoir. In the case of hazardous and toxic liquids, the sample bottle and the jet ejector may be isolated from the reservoir and may be further isolated from a control station containing remote manipulation means for the sample bottle and control valves for the jet ejector and gas bleed. 5 figs.

Larson, L.L.

1984-09-17T23:59:59.000Z

377

Liquid sampling system  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A conduit extends from a reservoir through a sampling station and back to the reservoir in a closed loop. A jet ejector in the conduit establishes suction for withdrawing liquid from the reservoir. The conduit has a self-healing septum therein upstream of the jet ejector for receiving one end of a double-ended cannula, the other end of which is received in a serum bottle for sample collection. Gas is introduced into the conduit at a gas bleed between the sample collection bottle and the reservoir. The jet ejector evacuates gas from the conduit and the bottle and aspirates a column of liquid from the reservoir at a high rate. When the withdrawn liquid reaches the jet ejector the rate of flow therethrough reduces substantially and the gas bleed increases the pressure in the conduit for driving liquid into the sample bottle, the gas bleed forming a column of gas behind the withdrawn liquid column and interrupting the withdrawal of liquid from the reservoir. In the case of hazardous and toxic liquids, the sample bottle and the jet ejector may be isolated from the reservoir and may be further isolated from a control station containing remote manipulation means for the sample bottle and control valves for the jet ejector and gas bleed.

Larson, Loren L. (Idaho Falls, ID)

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

378

Static downhole characteristics of well CGEH-1 at Coso Hot Springs, China  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

downhole characteristics of well CGEH-1 at Coso Hot Springs, China downhole characteristics of well CGEH-1 at Coso Hot Springs, China Lake, California Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Report: Static downhole characteristics of well CGEH-1 at Coso Hot Springs, China Lake, California Details Activities (5) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: A series of measurements was made in the exploratory well CGEH-1 at Coso Hot Springs. The temperature measurements provide estimates for the thermal equilibration of the well and indicate that the fractures intersecting the well have different temperatures. The hottest fractures are in the upper-cased portion of the well. Downhole chemical sampling suggests that the borehole still contains remnants of drilling materials. The well has never been extensively flowed at this time.

379

Monitoring polymer properties in production wells of Chateaurenard oilfield  

SciTech Connect

A polymer flooding test was conducted in the Chateaurenard field (France) from 1985 to 1989. The test was run on a ten-acre inverted five-spot. A total of 240,000 m{sup 3} of partially hydrolyzed polyacrylamide at a concentration of 1000 ppm was injected followed by an equal volume of solution but at a tapered concentration. A strong response in oil recovery for three of the four producers was observed. This paper reports on an original methodology that was designed for sampling and analyzing the polymer in the effluents of the producing wells. Concentrations and main characteristics of produced polyacrylamide were determined versus injected volume. No degradation of the polymer was detected. A molecular weight fractionation during polymer slug propagation into the reservoir due to adsorption/retention chromatography was observed. The low-polymer concentration of the effluents could be explained by a strong retention of the polymer in the low permeability zones of the reservoir.

Putz, A.G. (Elf Aquitaine, Avenue Larribau, Pau (FR)); Lecourtier, J. (Inst. Francais du Petrole, Avenue Bois-Preau, 92500 Rueil-Malmaison (FR))

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

380

Chemistry of spring and well waters on Kilauea Volcano, Hawaii, and  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Chemistry of spring and well waters on Kilauea Volcano, Hawaii, and Chemistry of spring and well waters on Kilauea Volcano, Hawaii, and vicinity Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Journal Article: Chemistry of spring and well waters on Kilauea Volcano, Hawaii, and vicinity Abstract Published and new data for chemical and isotopic samples from wells and springson Kilauea Volcano and vicinity are presented. These data are used to understandprocesses that determine the chemistry of dilute meteoric water, mixtures with sea water,and thermal water. Data for well and spring samples of non-thermal water indicate that mixing with sea water and dissolution of rock from weathering are the major processes that determine the composition of dissolved constituents in water. Data from coastal springs demonstrate that there is a large thermal system south of the lower

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "wells sampled exceed" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

EML Surface Air Sampling Program, 1989 data  

SciTech Connect

Measurements of the concentrations of specific atmospheric radionuclides in air filter samples collected for the Environmental Measurements Laboratory's Surface Air Sampling Program (SASP) during 1989 indicate that anthropogenic radionuclides, in both hemispheres, were at or below the lower limits of detection for the analytical and sampling techniques that were used to measure them. During 1989, the occasional detection of {sup 137}Cs in some air filter samples may have resulted from resuspension of previously deposited debris. The naturally occurring radioisotopes that we measure, {sup 7}Be and {sup 210}Pb, continue to be detected in most air filter samples. The 1989 annual mean concentrations of {sup 7}Be at many of the sites were lower than those previously reported during the last decade. Possible changes in the atmospheric production of {sup 7}Be, variations in atmospheric circulation and precipitation patterns, as well as modifications to our sampling procedure many all have contributed to this observed trend. Short-term variations in the concentrations of {sup 7}Be and {sup 210}Pb continued to be observed at many sites at which weekly air filter samples were analyzed. These short-term fluctuations probably resulted from variations in meteorological factors. The data from our quality control samples indicate that the reliability of the air filter measurements are acceptable for their intended application.

Larsen, R.J.; Sanderson, C.G.

1991-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

382

EML Surface Air Sampling Program, 1989 data  

SciTech Connect

Measurements of the concentrations of specific atmospheric radionuclides in air filter samples collected for the Environmental Measurements Laboratory`s Surface Air Sampling Program (SASP) during 1989 indicate that anthropogenic radionuclides, in both hemispheres, were at or below the lower limits of detection for the analytical and sampling techniques that were used to measure them. During 1989, the occasional detection of {sup 137}Cs in some air filter samples may have resulted from resuspension of previously deposited debris. The naturally occurring radioisotopes that we measure, {sup 7}Be and {sup 210}Pb, continue to be detected in most air filter samples. The 1989 annual mean concentrations of {sup 7}Be at many of the sites were lower than those previously reported during the last decade. Possible changes in the atmospheric production of {sup 7}Be, variations in atmospheric circulation and precipitation patterns, as well as modifications to our sampling procedure many all have contributed to this observed trend. Short-term variations in the concentrations of {sup 7}Be and {sup 210}Pb continued to be observed at many sites at which weekly air filter samples were analyzed. These short-term fluctuations probably resulted from variations in meteorological factors. The data from our quality control samples indicate that the reliability of the air filter measurements are acceptable for their intended application.

Larsen, R.J.; Sanderson, C.G.

1991-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

383

Flow in geothermal wells: Part III. Calculation model for self-flowing well  

SciTech Connect

The theoretical model described predicts the temperature, pressure, dynamic dryness fraction, and void fraction along the vertical channel of two-phase flow. The existing data from operating wells indicate good agreement with the model. (MHR)

Bilicki, Z.; Kestin, J.; Michaelides, E.E.

1981-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

384

Fluid sampling system  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An fluid sampling system allows sampling of radioactive liquid without spillage. A feed tank is connected to a liquid transfer jet powered by a pumping chamber pressurized by compressed air. The liquid is pumped upwardly into a sampling jet of a venturi design having a lumen with an inlet, an outlet, a constricted middle portion, and a port located above the constricted middle portion. The liquid is passed under pressure through the constricted portion causing its velocity to increase and its pressure to be decreased, thereby preventing liquid from escaping. A septum sealing the port can be pierced by a two pointed hollow needle leading into a sample bottle also sealed by a pierceable septum affixed to one end. The bottle is evacuated by flow through the sample jet, cyclic variation in the sampler jet pressure periodically leaves the evacuated bottle with lower pressure than that of the port, thus causing solution to pass into the bottle. The remaining solution in the system is returned to the feed tank via a holding tank. 4 figs.

Houck, E.D.

1994-10-11T23:59:59.000Z

385

Book Listing of Handbook of Sample Preparation  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This handbook covers the fundamentals, methodologies, and technologies of extraction, as well as the latest developments in the variety of strategies for sample preparation, including on-site analysis. ... The 23 chapters are organized under the following headings: Part I, Fundamental Extraction Techniques; Part II, Application Considerations; and Part III, Recent Developments. ...

2011-06-14T23:59:59.000Z

386

Viscous sludge sample collector  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A vertical core sample collection system for viscous sludge. A sample tube's upper end has a flange and is attached to a piston. The tube and piston are located in the upper end of a bore in a housing. The bore's lower end leads outside the housing and has an inwardly extending rim. Compressed gas, from a storage cylinder, is quickly introduced into the bore's upper end to rapidly accelerate the piston and tube down the bore. The lower end of the tube has a high sludge entering velocity to obtain a full-length sludge sample without disturbing strata detail. The tube's downward motion is stopped when its upper end flange impacts against the bore's lower end inwardly extending rim.

Beitel, George A [Richland, WA

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

387

Well test imaging - a new method for determination of boundaries from well test data  

SciTech Connect

A new method has been developed for analysis of well test data, which allows the direct calculation of the location of arbitrary reservoir boundaries which are detected during a well test. The method is based on elements of ray tracing and information theory, and is centered on the calculation of an instantaneous {open_quote}angle of view{close_quote} of the reservoir boundaries. In the absence of other information, the relative reservoir shape and boundary distances are retrievable in the form of a Diagnostic Image. If other reservoir information, such as 3-D seismic, is available; the full shape and orientation of arbitrary (non-straight line or circular arc) boundaries can be determined in the form of a Reservoir Image. The well test imaging method can be used to greatly enhance the information available from well tests and other geological data, and provides a method to integrate data from multiple disciplines to improve reservoir characterization. This paper covers the derivation of the analytical technique of well test imaging and shows examples of application of the technique to a number of reservoirs.

Slevinsky, B.A.

1997-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

388

Well completion report on installation of horizontal wells for in-situ remediation tests  

SciTech Connect

A project to drill and install two horizontal vapor extraction/air-injection wells at the Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, South Carolina, was performed in September and October of 1988. This study was performed to test the feasibility of horizontal drilling technologies in unconsolidated sediments and to evaluate the effectiveness of in-situ air stripping of volatile organics from the ground water and unsaturated soils. A tremendous amount of knowledge was obtained during the drilling and installation of the two test wells. Factors of importance to be considered during design of another horizontal well drilling program follow. (1) Trips in and out of the borehole should be minimized to maintain hole stability. No reaming to enlarge the hole should be attempted. (2) Drilling fluid performance should be maximized by utilizing a low solids, low weight, moderate viscosity, high lubricity fluid. Interruption of drilling fluid circulation should be minimized. (3) Well materials should possess adequate flexibility to negotiate the curve. A flexible guide should be attached to the front of the well screen to guide the screen downhole. (4) Sands containing a minor amount of clay are recommended for completion targets, as better drilling control in the laterals was obtained in these sections.

Kaback, D.S.; Looney, B.B.; Corey, J.C.; Wright, L.M.

1989-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

389

ARSENIC IN PRIVATE WELLS IN NH YEAR 1 FINAL REPORT  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

performed geospatial analysis of the well water arsenic estimates and survey results and produced the maps .................................................................................................. 7 Well water quality...................................................................................................... 7 Well water testing

Bucci, David J.

390

Well Log Data At Valles Caldera - Redondo Geothermal Area (Shevenell...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Area Exploration Technique Well Log Data Activity Date - 1988 Usefulness useful DOE-funding Unknown Exploration Basis The study reports well log data from five wells...

391

Characterization of cement from a well at Teapot Dome Oil Field: Implications for geological sequestration  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Wellbores represent the weakest link in terms of CO2 storage permanence. As a result, special attention to the numerous existing wells that perforate storage formations is needed. The pre-injection condition of the cement can influence the rate (and type) of alteration by the injected CO2 plume. The condition of the existing well cement depends on a variety of factors including wellbore/formation and wellbore/brine interactions as well as the composition and type of cement placed in the well (i.e. type of admixtures used, water/solids ratio, sulfate resistant mixes, etc.). In this paper, the details of recovering wellbore cement from an older well to determine pre-injection seal integrity are described. Petrographical and chemical analyses are presented for samples of cement that were retrieved from a 19-year-old well at Teapot Dome in Wyoming. Examination revealed that the retrieved cement had altered as a result of original slurry composition and with respect to the local downhole wellbore environment. Although samples were obtained from a single well, significant differences were observed in their alteration and condition. Sulfate attack resulted in abundant ettringite formation in a cement sample taken adjacent to the Wall Creek sandstone (3060ft), while cement taken adjacent to the Tensleep formation (5478ft) was decalcified and enriched in magnesium, owing to reaction of calcium hydroxide in the cement with the dolomitic formation.

George W. Scherer; Barbara Kutchko; Niels Thaulow; Andrew Duguid; Bryant Mook

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

392

Gasbuggy, New Mexico, Hydrologic and Natural Gas Sampling and Analysis Results for 2010  

SciTech Connect

The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Legacy Management conducted natural gas sampling for the Gasbuggy, New Mexico, site on July 6 and 7, 2010. Additionally, a water sample was obtained at one well known as the 29-6 Water Hole, several miles west of the Gasbuggy site. Natural gas sampling consists of collecting both gas samples and samples of produced water from gas production wells. Water samples from gas production wells were analyzed for gamma-emitting radionuclides, gross alpha, gross beta, and tritium. Natural gas samples were analyzed for tritium and carbon-14. The one water well sample was analyzed for gamma-emitting radionuclides and tritium. ALS Laboratory Group in Fort Collins, Colorado, analyzed water samples. Isotech Laboratories in Champaign, Illinois, analyzed natural gas samples.

None

2010-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

393

Gasbuggy, New Mexico, Natural Gas and Produced Water Sampling and Analysis Results for 2011  

SciTech Connect

The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Legacy Management conducted natural gas sampling for the Gasbuggy, New Mexico, site on June 7 and 8, 2011. Natural gas sampling consists of collecting both gas samples and samples of produced water from gas production wells. Water samples from gas production wells were analyzed for gamma-emitting radionuclides, gross alpha, gross beta, and tritium. Natural gas samples were analyzed for tritium and carbon-14. ALS Laboratory Group in Fort Collins, Colorado, analyzed water samples. Isotech Laboratories in Champaign, Illinois, analyzed natural gas samples.

None

2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

394

ANALYTICAL RESULTS FOR MOX COLEMANITE CONCRETE SAMPLES RECEIVED ON JANUARY 15, 2013  

SciTech Connect

The Mixed Oxide Fuel Fabrication Facility (MFFF) will use colemanite bearing concrete neutron absorber panels credited with attenuating neutron flux in the criticality design analyses and shielding operators from radiation. The Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) is tasked with measuring the total density, partial hydrogen density, and partial boron density of the colemanite concrete. SRNL received twelve samples of colemanite concrete for analysis on January 15, 2013. The average total density of each of the samples measured by the ASTM method C 642, the average partial hydrogen density was measured using method ASTM E 1131, and the average partial boron density of each sample was measured according to ASTM C 1301. The lower limits and measured values for the total density, hydrogen partial density, and boron partial density are presented. For all the samples tested, the total density and the hydrogen partial density met or exceeded the specified limit. All of the samples met or exceeded the boron partial density lower bound with the exception of samples G3-M11-2000-H, G3-M11-3000-M, and G5-M1-3000-H which are below the limit of 1.65E-01 g/cm{sup 3}.

Reigel, M.

2014-05-19T23:59:59.000Z

395

Development and application of a transient well index  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

transient well index and the Peaceman well index were compared to analytical solutions. A good match was observed between simulated well tests using the proposed transient well index and the corresponding analytical solutions, even on coarse grids (e...

Yildiz, Tabiat Tan

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

396

Uncertainty Quantification and Calibration in Well Construction Cost Estimates  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

or to individual cost components. Application of the methodology to estimation of well construction costs for horizontal wells in a shale gas play resulted in well cost estimates that were well calibrated probabilistically. Overall, average estimated...

Valdes Machado, Alejandro

2013-08-05T23:59:59.000Z

397

Cement fatigue and HPHT well integrity with application to life of well prediction  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In order to keep up with the worlds energy demands, oil and gas producing companies have taken the initiative to explore offshore reserves or drill deeper into previously existing wells. The consequence of this, however, has to deal with the high...

Ugwu, Ignatius Obinna

2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

398

Segmentation of complex geophysical structures with well Running title: Image segmentation with well data.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

with well data. Authors: Christian Gout�, and Carole Le Guyader. Complete affiliation: � Universit�e de 96822-2273 , USA. chris gout@cal.berkeley.edu : INSA de Rennes 20 Avenue des Buttes de Co�esmes CS 14315 35043 Rennes, France. carole.le-guyader@insa-rennes.fr Corresponding author : Christian Gout

Boyer, Edmond

399

Decoupled Sampling for Graphics Pipelines  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We propose a generalized approach to decoupling shading from visibility sampling in graphics pipelines, which we call decoupled sampling. Decoupled sampling enables stochastic supersampling of motion and defocus blur at ...

Ragan-Kelley, Jonathan Millar

400

Fluid sampling apparatus and method  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Incorporation of a bellows in a sampling syringe eliminates ingress of contaminants, permits replication of amounts and compression of multiple sample injections, and enables remote sampling for off-site analysis. 3 figs.

Yeamans, D.R.

1998-02-03T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "wells sampled exceed" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

DISSOLUTION OF 3013-DE SAMPLE 10-16  

SciTech Connect

The HB-Line Facility has a long-term mission to dissolve and disposition legacy fissile materials. HB-Line dissolves plutonium dioxide (PuO{sub 2}) from K-Area parting support of the 3013 Destructive Examination (DE) program. The PuO{sub 2}-bearing solids originate from a variety of unit operations and processing facilities, but all of the material is assumed to be high-fired (i.e., calcined in air for a minimum of two hours at {ge} 750 C). The Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) conducted dissolution flowsheet studies on 3013 DE Sample 10-16 (can R610826), which contains weapons-grade plutonium (Pu) as the fissile material. The dissolution flowsheet study was performed for 4 hours at 108 C on unwashed material using 12 M nitric acid (HNO{sub 3}) containing 0.20 M potassium fluoride (KF). After 4 hours at 108 C, the {sup 239}Pu Equivalent concentration was 32.5 g/L (gamma, 5.0% uncertainty). The insoluble residue comprised 9.88 wt % of the initial bulk weight, and contained 5.31-5.95 wt % of the initial Pu. The residue contained Pu in the highest concentration, followed by tungsten (W). Analyses detected 2,770 mg/L chloride (Cl{sup -}) in the final dissolver solution (3.28 wt %), which is significantly lower than the amount of Cl{sup -} detected by prompt gamma (9.86 wt %) and the 3013 DE Surveillance program (14.7 wt %). A low bias in chloride measurement is anticipated due to volatilization during the experiment. Gas generation studies found approximately 60 mL of gas per gram of sample produced during the first 30 minutes of dissolution. Little to no gas was produced after the first 30 minutes. Hydrogen gas (H{sub 2}) was not detected in the sample. Based on detection limits and accounting for dilution, the generated gas contained < 0.12 vol % H{sub 2}, which is well below the 4.0 vol % flammability limit for H{sub 2} in air. Filtration of the dissolver solution occurred readily. When aluminum nitrate nonahydrate (ANN) was added to the filtered dissolver solution at a 3:1 Al:F molar ratio, and stored at room temperature for 24 hours, the solution filtered approximately 6 times slower than when filtered 30 minutes after ANN addition, requiring 6 minutes to complete compared to 55 seconds for the first filtration. It is likely that the ambient-temperature solubility for ANN was exceeded. A 4-hour dissolution time at a temperature of 108 C in 12 M HNO{sub 3}/0.2 M KF is recommended for dissolution of this material.

Taylor-Pashow, K.

2011-05-24T23:59:59.000Z

402

Energy level spectroscopy of InSb quantum wells using quantum-well LED emission  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We have investigated the low-temperature optical properties of InSb quantum-well (QW) light-emitting diodes, with different barrier compositions, as a function of well width. Three devices were studied: QW1 had a 20 nm undoped InSb quantum well with a barrier composition of Al0.143In0.857Sb, QW2 had a 40 nm undoped InSb well with a barrier composition of Al0.077In0.923Sb, and QW3 had a 100 nm undoped InSb well with a barrier composition of Al0.025In0.975Sb. For QW1, the signature of two transitions (CB1-HH1 and CB1-HH2) can be seen in the measured spectrum, whereas for QW2 and QW3 the signature of a large number of transitions is present in the measured spectra. In particular transitions to HH2 can be seen, the first time this has been observed in AlInSb/InSb heterostructures. To identify the transitions that contribute to the measured spectra, the spectra have been simulated using an eight-band k.p calculation of the band structure together with a first-order time-dependent perturbation method (Fermi golden rule) calculation of spectral emittance, taking into account broadening. In general there is good agreement between the measured and simulated spectra. For QW2 we attribute the main peak in the experimental spectrum to the CB2-HH1 transition, which has the highest overall contribution to the emission spectrum of QW2 compared with all the other interband transitions. This transition normally falls into the category of forbidden transitions, and in order to understand this behavior we have investigated the momentum matrix elements, which determine the selection rules of the problem.

T. G. Tenev; A. Palyi; B. I. Mirza; G. R. Nash; M. Fearn; S. J. Smith; L. Buckle; M. T. Emeny; T. Ashley; J. H. Jefferson; C. J. Lambert

2009-02-02T23:59:59.000Z

403

Soil sampling kit and a method of sampling therewith  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A soil sampling device and a sample containment device for containing a soil sample is disclosed. In addition, a method for taking a soil sample using the soil sampling device and soil sample containment device to minimize the loss of any volatile organic compounds contained in the soil sample prior to analysis is disclosed. The soil sampling device comprises two close fitting, longitudinal tubular members of suitable length, the inner tube having the outward end closed. With the inner closed tube withdrawn a selected distance, the outer tube can be inserted into the ground or other similar soft material to withdraw a sample of material for examination. The inner closed end tube controls the volume of the sample taken and also serves to eject the sample. The soil sample containment device has a sealing member which is adapted to attach to an analytical apparatus which analyzes the volatile organic compounds contained in the sample. The soil sampling device in combination with the soil sample containment device allows an operator to obtain a soil sample containing volatile organic compounds and minimizing the loss of the volatile organic compounds prior to analysis of the soil sample for the volatile organic compounds. 11 figures.

Thompson, C.V.

1991-02-05T23:59:59.000Z

404

Geologic Results from the Long Valley Exploratory Well  

SciTech Connect

As a deep well in the center of a major Quaternary caldera, the Long Valley Exploratory Well (LVEW) provides a new perspective on the relationship between hydrothermal circulation and a large crustal magma chamber. It also provides an important test of models for the subsurface structure of active continental calderas. Results will impact geothermal exploration, assessment, and management of the Long Valley resource and should be applicable to other igneous-related geothermal systems. Our task is to use the cuttings and core from LVEW to interpret the evolution of the central caldera region, with emphasis on evidence of current hydrothermal conditions and circulation. LVEW has reached a depth of 2313 m, passing through post-caldera extrusives and the intracaldera Bishop Tuff to bottom in the Mt. Morrison roof pendant of the Sierran basement. The base of the section of Quaternary volcanic rocks related to Long Valley Caldera was encountered at 1800 m of which 1178 m is Bishop Tuff. The lithologies sampled generally support the classic view of large intercontinental calderas as piston-cylinder-like structures. In this model, the roof of the huge magma chamber, like an ill-fitting piston, broke and sank 2 km along a ring fracture system that simultaneously and explosively leaked magma as Bishop Tuff. Results from LVEW which support this model are the presence of intact basement at depth at the center of the caldera, the presence of a thick Bishop Tuff section, and textural evidence that the tuff encountered is not near-vent despite its central caldera location. An unexpected observation was the presence of rhyolite intrusions within the tuff with a cumulative apparent thickness in excess of 300 m. Chemical analyses indicate that these are high-silica, high-barium rhyolites. Preliminary {sup 40}Ar/{sup 39}Ar analyses determined an age of 626 {+-} 38 ka (this paper). These observations would indicate that the intrusions belong to the early post-collapse episode of volcanism and are contemporaneous with resurgence of the caldera floor. If they are extensive sills rather than dikes, a possibility being investigated through relogging of core from neighboring wells, they were responsible for resurgence. A {sup 40}Ar/{sup 39}Ar age of 769 {+-} 14 ka from Bishop Tuff at 820 m depth conforms with tuff ages from outside the caldera and indicates an absence of shallow hydrothermal activity (>300 C) persisting after emplacement. Work is proceeding on investigating hydrothermal alteration deeper in the well. This alteration includes sulfide+quartz fracture fillings, calcite+quartz replacement of feldspars, and disseminated pyrite in both the tuff and basement. Electron microprobe analysis of phases are being conducted to determine initial magmatic and subsequent hydrothermal conditions.

McConnell, Vicki S.; Eichelberger, John C.; Keskinen, Mary J.; Layer, Paul W.

1992-03-24T23:59:59.000Z

405

ANALYTICAL RESULTS FOR MOX COLEMANITE CONCRETE SAMPLES RECEIVED ON NOVEMBER 21, 2013  

SciTech Connect

The Mixed Oxide Fuel Fabrication Facility (MFFF) will use colemanite bearing concrete neutron absorber panels credited with attenuating neutron flux in the criticality design analyses and shielding operators from radiation. The Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) is tasked with measuring the total density, partial hydrogen density, and partial boron density of the colemanite concrete. SRNL received two samples of colemanite concrete for analysis on November 21, 2013. The average total density of each of the samples measured by the ASTM method C 642, the average partial hydrogen density was measured using method ASTM E 1131, and the average partial boron density of each sample was measured according to ASTM C 1301. The lower limits and measured values for the total density, hydrogen partial density, and boron partial density are presented. For all the samples tested, the total density and the boron partial density met or exceeded the specified limit. None of the samples met the lower limit for hydrogen partial density.

Reigel, M.

2014-05-19T23:59:59.000Z

406

ANALYTICAL RESULTS FOR MOX COLEMANITE CONCRETE SAMPLES RECEIVED ON SEPTEMBER 4, 2013  

SciTech Connect

The Mixed Oxide Fuel Fabrication Facility (MFFF) will use colemanite bearing concrete neutron absorber panels credited with attenuating neutron flux in the criticality design analyses and shielding operators from radiation. The Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) is tasked with measuring the total density, partial hydrogen density, and partial boron density of the colemanite concrete. SRNL received three samples of colemanite concrete for analysis on September 4, 2013. The average total density of each of the samples measured by the ASTM method C 642, the average partial hydrogen density was measured using method ASTM E 1131, and the average partial boron density of each sample was measured according to ASTM C 1301. The lower limits and measured values for the total density, hydrogen partial density, and boron partial density are presented. For all the samples tested, the total density and the boron partial density met or exceeded the specified limit. None of the samples met the lower limit for hydrogen partial density.

Reigel, M.

2014-05-19T23:59:59.000Z

407

Groundwater Sampling | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Groundwater Sampling Groundwater Sampling Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Technique: Groundwater Sampling Details Activities (3) Areas (2) Regions (0) NEPA(0) Exploration Technique Information Exploration Group: Field Techniques Exploration Sub Group: Field Sampling Parent Exploration Technique: Water Sampling Information Provided by Technique Lithology: Stratigraphic/Structural: Hydrological: Water composition and source of fluids. Determination of mixing ratios between different fluid end-members. Determination of fluid recharge rates and residence times. Thermal: Water temperature. Dictionary.png Groundwater Sampling: Groundwater sampling is done to characterize the chemical, thermal, or hydrological properties of subsurface aqueous systems. Groundwater sampling

408

Water Sampling | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Water Sampling Water Sampling Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Technique: Water Sampling Details Activities (51) Areas (45) Regions (5) NEPA(2) Exploration Technique Information Exploration Group: Field Techniques Exploration Sub Group: Field Sampling Parent Exploration Technique: Field Sampling Information Provided by Technique Lithology: Stratigraphic/Structural: Hydrological: Water composition and source of fluids Thermal: Water temperature Dictionary.png Water Sampling: Water sampling is done to characterize the chemical, thermal, or hydrological properties of a surface or subsurface aqueous system. Other definitions:Wikipedia Reegle Introduction Water sampling is done to characterize the geothermal system under investigation. A geothermal water typically has a unique chemical signature

409

Raft River monitor well potentiometric head responses and water quality as  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

monitor well potentiometric head responses and water quality as monitor well potentiometric head responses and water quality as related to the conceptual ground-water flow system Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Report: Raft River monitor well potentiometric head responses and water quality as related to the conceptual ground-water flow system Details Activities (1) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: Ground-water monitoring near the Raft River site was initiated in 1974 by the IDWR. This effort consisted of semiannual chemical sampling of 22 irrigation wells near the Raft River geothermal development area. This program yielded useful baseline chemical data; however, several problems were inherent. For example, access to water pumped from the wells is limited to the irrigation season (April through September). All the wells

410

Results of Remediation and Verification Sampling for the 600-270 Horseshoe Landfill  

SciTech Connect

This report presents the results of the 2005 remedial action and verification soil sampling conducted at the 600-270 waste site after removal of soil containing residual concentrations of dichlorodiphenyl trichloroethane and its breakdown products dichlorodiphenyl dichloroethylene and dichlorodiphenyl dichloroethane. The remediation was performed in response to post-closure surface soil sampling performed between 1998 and 2003 that indicated the presence of residual DDT contamination exceeding the Record of Decision for the 1100 Area National Priorities List site cleanup criteria of 1 mg/kg that was established for the original 1994 cleanup activities.

W. S. Thompson

2005-12-14T23:59:59.000Z

411

Soil Sampling At Molokai Area (Thomas, 1986) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Soil Sampling At Molokai Area (Thomas, 1986) Soil Sampling At Molokai Area (Thomas, 1986) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Soil Sampling At Molokai Area (Thomas, 1986) Exploration Activity Details Location Molokai Area Exploration Technique Soil Sampling Activity Date Usefulness useful DOE-funding Unknown Notes Due to the very small potential market on the island of Molokai for geothermal energy, only a limited effort was made to confirm a resource in the identified PGRA. An attempt was made to locate the (now abandoned) water well that was reported to have encountered warm saline fluids. The well was located but had caved in above the water table and thus no water sampling was possible. Temperature measurements in the open portion of the well were performed, but no temperatures significantly above ambient were

412

Microsoft Word - RBL_3Q2010_Rpt_Gas_Samp_Results_3Wells  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

near the Project Rio Blanco Horizon near the Project Rio Blanco Horizon U.S. Department of Energy Office of Legacy Management Grand Junction, Colorado Date Sampled: 13 September 2010 Purpose: The purpose of this sample collection is to monitor natural gas wells for radionuclides from Project Rio Blanco. The bottom-hole locations (BHLs) of the 3 gas wells sampled are within 1.4 miles of the Project Rio Blanco detonation horizon. All wells sampled have produced or are producing gas from the Mesaverde Group. Background: Project Rio Blanco is the Plowshare Program code name for the near-simultaneous detonation of a three 33-kiloton-yield nuclear devices in one emplacement well (RB-E-01) on 17 May 1973. The devices were detonated at 5,839-feet, 6,230-feet, and 6,689-feet below the ground surface. The shallowest device (at 5,839 feet) was detonated in the lower part of the Fort Union Formation, the

413

CAES 2014 Chemical Analyses of Thermal Wells and Springs in Southeastern Idaho  

SciTech Connect

This dataset contains chemical analyses for thermal wells and springs in Southeastern Idaho. Data includes all major cations, major anions, pH, collection temperature, and some trace metals, These samples were collected in 2014 by the Center for Advanced Energy Studies (CAES), and are part of a continuous effort to analyze the geothermal potential of Southeastern Idaho.

Baum, Jeffrey

2014-03-10T23:59:59.000Z

414

The Savannah River Site`s Groundwater Monitoring Program 1993 well installation, abandonment, and maintenance report  

SciTech Connect

This report is a summary of the well and environmental soil boring information compiled for the groundwater monitoring program of the Environmental Protection Department/Environmental Monitoring Section (EPD/EMS) at the Savannah River Site (SRS) during 1993. It includes discussions of environmental soil borings, surveying, well construction, abandonments, maintenance, and stabilization. EPD/EMS is responsible for monitoring constituents in the groundwater at approximately 135 waste sites in 16 areas at SRS. The majority of this monitoring is required by US Department of Energy (DOE) orders and by federal and state regulations administered by the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and the South Carolina Department of Health and Environmental Control (SCDHEC). The groundwater monitoring program includes the following activities: installation, maintenance, and abandonment of monitoring wells; environmental soil borings; development of sampling and analytical schedules; collection and analyses of groundwater samples; review of analytical and other data; maintenance of the databases containing groundwater monitoring data; quality assurance (QA) evaluations of laboratory performance; and reports of results to waste site facility custodians and to the Environmental Protection Section (EPS) of EPD. EPD/EMS is responsible for monitoring the wells but is not responsible for the facilities that are monitored. It is the responsibility of the custodian of each waste site to ensure that EPD/EMS is informed of sampling requirements and special requests for the sampling schedule, to assist in reviewing the data, and to make any decisions regarding groundwater monitoring at the waste site.

Not Available

1994-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

415

Geologic Map and GID Data for the Salt Wells Geothermal Area  

SciTech Connect

Salt WellsESRI Geodatabase (ArcGeology v1.3): - Contains all the geologic map data, including faults, contacts, folds, dikes, unit polygons, and attitudes of strata and faults. - List of stratigraphic units and stratigraphic correlation diagram. - Locations of 40Ar/39Ar samples.

Nick Hinz

2011-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

416

Doing Well by Doing Good? Green Office Buildings  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

dummy variables, one for each green building in the sample.dummy variables, one for each green building in the sample.nificantly higher for green buildings than for the most

Eichholtz, Piet; Kok, Nils; Quigley, John M.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

417

Microsoft Word - RUL_2Q2011_Gas_Samp_Results_7Wells_23June2011  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

23 June 2011 23 June 2011 Purpose: The purpose of this environmental sample collection is to monitor natural gas and production water from natural gas wells drilled near the Project Rulison test site. As part of the DOE's directive to protect human health and the environment, sample are collected and analyzed from producing gas wells to ensure no Rulison related radionuclides have migrated outside the DOE institution control boundary. Using the DOE Rulison Monitoring Plan as guidance, samples are collected on a frequency based on their respective distance from the site. The monitoring plan also specifies the type of analysis and the reporting thresholds. Background: Project Rulison was the second test under the Plowshare Program to stimulate natural-gas recovery from tight sandstone formations.

418

Gas Sampling | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Gas Sampling Gas Sampling Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Technique: Gas Sampling Details Activities (7) Areas (7) Regions (0) NEPA(0) Exploration Technique Information Exploration Group: Field Techniques Exploration Sub Group: Field Sampling Parent Exploration Technique: Field Sampling Information Provided by Technique Lithology: Stratigraphic/Structural: High flux can be indicative of conduits for fluid flow. Hydrological: Gas composition and source of fluids. Thermal: Anomalous flux is associated with active hydrothermal activity. Distinguish magmatic/mantle heat inputs. Can be used to estimate reservoir fluid temperatures. Dictionary.png Gas Sampling: Gas sampling is done to characterize the chemical, thermal, and hydrological properties of a surface or subsurface hydrothermal system.

419

Stack sampling apparatus  

SciTech Connect

An apparatus for obtaining samples from a structure includes a support member, at least one stabilizing member, and at least one moveable member. The stabilizing member has a first portion coupled to the support member and a second portion configured to engage with the structure to restrict relative movement between the support member and the structure. The stabilizing member is radially expandable from a first configuration where the second portion does not engage with a surface of the structure to a second configuration where the second portion engages with the surface of the structure.

Lind, Randall F; Lloyd, Peter D; Love, Lonnie J; Noakes, Mark W; Pin, Francois G; Richardson, Bradley S; Rowe, John C

2014-09-16T23:59:59.000Z

420

The Cost Effectiveness of Fracture Stimulation in Increasing the Flow from Geothermal Wells  

SciTech Connect

The cost effectiveness of fracture stimulation at The Geysers, the Imperial Valley, and other geothermal resource areas in the United States vas studied using GEOCOM, a computer code for analyzing the impact of completion activities on the life-cycle costs of geothermal wells. Technologies for fracturing the reservoir near the wellbore involve the creation of a pressure pulse in the wellbore by means of either hydraulic or explosive force. The cost of a single fracture stimulation job can vary from $50,000 to over $500,000, with a typical cost of around $300,000. The code shows that additional flow achieved by fracture stimulation must exceed 10,000 pounds per hour for each $100,000 invested in stimulation in order for a fracture treatment to be cost effective. In some reservoirs, this additional flow must be as great as 30,000 pounds per hour. The cost effectiveness of fracturing has not yet been demonstrated in the field. The Geothermal Well Stimulation Program achieved an overall average of about 10,000 pounds per hour for each $100,000 invested.

Brown, Gerald L.

1983-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "wells sampled exceed" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

CORRELATIONS BETWEEN VAPOR SATURATION, FLUID COMPOSITION, AND WELL DECLINE IN LARDERELLO  

SciTech Connect

A large body of field data from Larderello shows striking temporal correlations between decline of well flow-rate, produced gas/steam ratio, chloride concentration and produced vapor fraction. The latter is inferred from measured concentrations of non-condensible gases in samples of well fluid, using chemical phase equilibrium principles. Observed temporal changes in the vapor fractions can be interpreted in term of a ''multiple source'' model, as suggested by D'Amore and Truesdell (1979). This provides clues to the dynamics of reservoir depletion, and to the evaluation of well productivity and longevity.

D'Amore, F.; Pruess, K.

1985-01-22T23:59:59.000Z

422

Fluid sampling tool  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A fluid sampling tool is described for sampling fluid from a container. The tool has a fluid collecting portion which is drilled into the container wall, thereby affixing it to the wall. The tool may have a fluid extracting section which withdraws fluid collected by the fluid collecting section. The fluid collecting section has a fluted shank with an end configured to drill a hole into a container wall. The shank has a threaded portion for tapping the borehole. The shank is threadably engaged to a cylindrical housing having an inner axial passageway sealed at one end by a septum. A flexible member having a cylindrical portion and a bulbous portion is provided. The housing can be slid into an inner axial passageway in the cylindrical portion and sealed to the flexible member. The bulbous portion has an outer lip defining an opening. The housing is clamped into the chuck of a drill, the lip of the bulbous section is pressed against a container wall until the shank touches the wall, and the user operates the drill. Wall shavings (kerf) are confined in a chamber formed in the bulbous section as it folds when the shank advances inside the container. After sufficient advancement of the shank, an o-ring makes a seal with the container wall. 6 figs.

Garcia, A.R.; Johnston, R.G.; Martinez, R.K.

1999-05-25T23:59:59.000Z

423

ATLBS EXTENDED SOURCE SAMPLE: THE EVOLUTION IN RADIO SOURCE MORPHOLOGY WITH FLUX DENSITY  

SciTech Connect

Based on the Australia Telescope Low Brightness Survey (ATLBS) we present a sample of extended radio sources and derive morphological properties of faint radio sources. One hundred nineteen radio galaxies form the ATLBS Extended Source Sample (ATLBS-ESS) consisting of all sources exceeding 30'' in extent and integrated flux densities exceeding 1 mJy. We give structural details along with information on galaxy identifications and source classifications. The ATLBS-ESS, unlike samples with higher flux-density limits, has almost equal fractions of FR-I and FR-II radio galaxies, with a large fraction of the FR-I population exhibiting 3C31-type structures. Significant asymmetry in lobe extents appears to be a common occurrence in the ATLBS-ESS FR-I sources compared with FR-II sources. We present a sample of 22 FR-Is at z > 0.5 with good structural information. The detection of several giant radio sources, with size exceeding 0.7 Mpc, at z > 1 suggests that giant radio sources are not less common at high redshifts. The ESS also includes a sample of 28 restarted radio galaxies. The relative abundance of dying and restarting sources is indicative of a model where radio sources undergo episodic activity in which an active phase is followed by a brief dying phase that terminates with restarting of the central activity; in any massive elliptical a few such activity cycles wherein adjacent events blend may constitute the lifetime of a radio source and such bursts of blended activity cycles may be repeated over the age of the host. The ATLBS-ESS includes a 2 Mpc giant radio galaxy with the lowest surface brightness lobes known to date.

Saripalli, L.; Subrahmanyan, R.; Thorat, K.; Ekers, R. D. [Raman Research Institute, C. V. Raman Avenue, Sadashivanagar, Bangalore 560080 (India); Hunstead, R. W.; Johnston, H. M.; Sadler, E. M., E-mail: lsaripal@rri.res.in [Sydney Institute for Astronomy, School of Physics, University of Sydney, NSW 2006 (Australia)

2012-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

424

RAPID/Geothermal/Well Field/Colorado | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

the Use of Wells, "Geothermal Well" means a well that is constructed for the purpose of exploration, use of a geothermal resource, or reinjection of a geothermal fluid. A permit...

425

Property:WellFieldParasiticConsump | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Name WellFieldParasiticConsump Property Type Number Description Well-Field Parasitic Consumption (MWh). Pages using the property "WellFieldParasiticConsump" Showing 2 pages using...

426

Economic viability of multiple-lateral horizontal wells  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Horizontal wells are gaining popularity throughout the petroleum industry as a means to increase well productivity and enhance incremental economics. Horizontal wells provide greater reservoir exposure and are useful in intersecting additional pay...

Smith, Christopher Jason

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

427

Masco Home Services/WellHome | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

WellHome Jump to: navigation, search Name: Masco Home ServicesWellHome Place: Taylor, MI Website: http:www.mascohomeserviceswe References: Masco Home ServicesWellHome1...

428

Science and Technology for Sustainable Well-Being  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...to well-being and sustainability, before turning...Well-Being and Sustainability Human well-being rests on a foundation of three pillars, the preservation...to the challenge of sustainability for ocean systems and...

John P. Holdren

2008-01-25T23:59:59.000Z

429

UTM Well Coordinates for the Boise Hydrogeophysical Research Site (BHRS)  

SciTech Connect

A series of oscillatory pumping tests were performed at the BHRS. The data collected from these wells will be used to tomographically image the shallow subsurface. This excel file only contains well coordinates for all wells at the Boise site.

David Lim

2014-12-19T23:59:59.000Z

430

UTM Well Coordinates for the Boise Hydrogeophysical Research Site (BHRS)  

DOE Data Explorer (OSTI)

A series of oscillatory pumping tests were performed at the BHRS. The data collected from these wells will be used to tomographically image the shallow subsurface. This excel file only contains well coordinates for all wells at the Boise site.

David Lim

431

Well Log Data At Blue Mountain Geothermal Area (Fairbank & Niggemann...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

well Deep Blue No. 1. Notes Well log data was collected in Deep Blue No. 1 upon its completion. The logging was conducted by Welaco Well Analysis Corporation. Temperature,...

432

RAPID/Geothermal/Well Field/Utah | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

if they meet the requirements of Section 73-3-8, they will be approved by the State Engineer on a well-to-well basis or as a group of wells which comprise an operating unit and...

433

DWPF SMECT PVV SAMPLE CHARACTERIZATION AND REMEDIATION  

SciTech Connect

On April 2, 2013, a solid sample of material collected from the Defense Waste Processing Facilitys Process Vessel Vent (PVV) jumper for the Slurry Mix Evaporator Condensate Tank (SMECT) was received at the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL). DWPF has experienced pressure spikes within the SMECT and other process vessels which have resulted in processing delays while a vacuum was re-established. Work on this sample was requested in a Technical Assistance Request (TAR). This document reports the results of chemical and physical property measurements made on the sample, as well as insights into the possible impact to the material using DWPFs proposed remediation methods. DWPF was interested in what the facility could expect when the material was exposed to either 8M nitric acid or 90% formic acid, the two materials they have the ability to flush through the PVV line in addition to process water once the line is capped off during a facility outage.

Bannochie, C.; Crawford, C.

2013-06-18T23:59:59.000Z

434

Velocity Anisotropy of shales and sandstones from core sample and well log on the Norwegian Continental shelf.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Abstract Velocity anisotropy referse the directional inequality of velocity on the subsurface. Often sedimentary rocks are anisotropic and occurse at all scales from core plugs (more)

Meseret, Malaku

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

435

Central Shops Burning/Rubble Pit 631-6G Additonal Sampling and Monitor Well Installation Report  

SciTech Connect

The Central Shops Burning/Rubble Pit 631-6G was constructed in 1951 as an unlined earthen pit in surficial sediments for disposal and incineration of potentially hazardous substances, such as metals and organic solvents.

Palmer, E. [Westinghouse Savannah River Company, AIKEN, SC (United States)

1995-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

436

2-M Probe Survey At Salt Wells Area (Coolbaugh, Et Al., 2006) | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Salt Wells Area (Coolbaugh, Et Al., 2006) Salt Wells Area (Coolbaugh, Et Al., 2006) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: 2-M Probe Survey At Salt Wells Area (Coolbaugh, Et Al., 2006) Exploration Activity Details Location Salt Wells Geothermal Area Exploration Technique 2-M Probe Survey Activity Date 2005 - 2006 Usefulness useful DOE-funding Unknown Exploration Basis Geochemical water sampling, mineral distribution mapping, and shallow (30 cm) temperature probe measurements were conducted to expand on a previous field mapping study of surface geothermal features at Salt Wells, in order to evaluate the relationship between these features and structures that control geothermal fluid flow. Notes This study used a modified version of the 2 m temperature probe survey,

437

Radiometrics At Salt Wells Area (Coolbaugh, Et Al., 2006) | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Radiometrics At Salt Wells Area (Coolbaugh, Et Al., 2006) Radiometrics At Salt Wells Area (Coolbaugh, Et Al., 2006) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Radiometrics At Salt Wells Area (Coolbaugh, Et Al., 2006) Exploration Activity Details Location Salt Wells Geothermal Area Exploration Technique Radiometrics Activity Date 2005 - 2005 Usefulness useful DOE-funding Unknown Exploration Basis Geochemical water sampling, mineral distribution mapping, and shallow (30 cm) temperature probe measurements were conducted to expand on a previous field mapping study of surface geothermal features at Salt Wells, in order to evaluate the relationship between these features and structures that control geothermal fluid flow. Notes Borate minerals tincalconite and borax, sodium sulfate minerals mirabilite

438

Exploratory Well At Long Valley Caldera Geothermal Area (Sorey...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

395. Notes Among these wells were exploration and monitoring wells drilled near the Fish Hatchery Springs in preparation for the siting of a second binary geothermal power...

439

RAPID/Geothermal/Well Field/California | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

& Well Field Permit Agency: California Department of Conservation, Division of Oil, Gas, and Geothermal Resources Drilling & Well Field Permit Before drilling can commense,...

440

Hydraulics and Well Testing of Engineered Geothermal Reservoirs...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Hydraulics and Well Testing of Engineered Geothermal Reservoirs Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Journal Article: Hydraulics and Well Testing of...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "wells sampled exceed" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

Sustainability Assessment of Workforce Well-Being and Mission...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Sustainability Assessment of Workforce Well-Being and Mission Readiness Sustainability Assessment of Workforce Well-Being and Mission Readiness Presentation by Dr. Jodi Jacobsen,...

442

Development Wells At Glass Buttes Area (DOE GTP) | Open Energy...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Development Wells At Glass Buttes Area (DOE GTP) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Development Wells At Glass Buttes Area (DOE GTP)...

443

NMOSE-Proof of Completion of Well | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Citation NMOSE-Proof of Completion of Well (2014). Retrieved from "http:en.openei.orgwindex.php?titleNMOSE-ProofofCompletionofWell&oldid727378" Categories: References...

444

ELIMINATING THE WELLBORE RESPONSE IN TRANSIENT WELL TEST ANALYSIS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Steam-Water Flow in Geothermal Wells", J. Pet. Tech. , ~, p.Storage Effects in Geothermal Wells," Soc. Pet. Eng. J. ,

Miller, C.W.

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

445

Effects of sample geometry on the dynamics and configurations of vortices in mesoscopic superconductors  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of sample size and cross-sectional shape on vortex nucleation and penetration. As is well known, more vortices enter the sample as the sample size grows. It is also found that if a small indentation is made on the sample boundary, vortices can be made...

Kim, Sangbum; Burkardt, John; Gunzburger, Max; Peterson, Janet.

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

446

Definition: Stepout-Deepening Wells | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Stepout-Deepening Wells Stepout-Deepening Wells Jump to: navigation, search Dictionary.png Stepout-Deepening Wells A well drilled at a later time over remote, undeveloped portions of a partially developed continuous reservoir rock. A deepening well is reentering a well and drilling to a deeper reservoir. Often referred to as an "infield exploration well" in the oil and gas industry.[1] Also Known As delayed development well References ↑ http://www.answers.com/topic/step-out-well Ste LikeLike UnlikeLike You like this.Sign Up to see what your friends like. p-out-well: a well drilled in the expected extent of a reservoir that is being developed but at a significant distance, usually two or more drilling and spacing units, from the nearest producer in that reservoir. A step-out

447

Radionuclide Concentrations in Terrestrial Vegetation and Soil Samples On and Around the Hanford Site, 1971 Through 2008  

SciTech Connect

Environmental monitoring is conducted on the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Hanford Site to comply with DOE Orders and federal and state regulations. Major objectives of the monitoring are to characterize contaminant levels in the environment and to determine site contributions to the contaminant inventory. This report focuses on surface soil and perennial vegetation samples collected between 1971 and 2008 as part of the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Surface Environmental Surveillance Project performed under contract to DOE. Areas sampled under this program are located on the Hanford Site but outside facility boundaries and on public lands surrounding the Hanford Site. Additional samples were collected during the past 8 years under DOE projects that evaluated parcels of land for radiological release. These data were included because the same sampling methodology and analytical laboratory were used for the projects. The spatial and temporal trends of six radionuclides collected over a 38-year period were evaluated. The radionuclides----cobalt-60, cesium-137, strontium-90, plutonium-238, plutonium-239/240, and uranium (reported either as uranium-238 or total uranium)----were selected because they persist in the environment and are still being monitored routinely and reported in Hanford Site environmental reports. All these radionuclides were associated with plutonium production and waste management of activities occurring on the site. Other sources include fallout from atmospheric testing of nuclear weapons, which ended in 1980, and the Chernobyl explosion in 1986. Uranium is also a natural component of the soil. This assessment of soil and vegetation data provides important information on the distribution of radionuclides in areas adjacent to industrial areas, established perimeter locations and buffer areas, and more offsite nearby and distant locations. The concentrations reflect a tendency for detection of some radionuclides close to where they were utilized onsite, but as one moves to unindustrialized areas on the site, surrounding buffer areas and perimeter location into the more distant sites, concentrations of these radionuclides approach background and cannot be distinguished from fallout activity. More importantly, concentrations in soil and vegetation samples did not exceed environmental benchmark concentrations, and associated exposure to human and ecological receptors were well below levels that are demonstratively hazardous to human health and the environment.

Simmons, Mary Ann; Poston, Ted M.; Fritz, Brad G.; Bisping, Lynn E.

2011-07-29T23:59:59.000Z

448

Cost analysis of oil, gas, and geothermal well drilling  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract This paper evaluates current and historical drilling and completion costs of oil and gas wells and compares them with geothermal wells costs. As a starting point, we developed a new cost index for US onshore oil and gas wells based primarily on the API Joint Association Survey 19762009 data. This index describes year-to-year variations in drilling costs and allows one to express historical drilling expenditures in current year dollars. To distinguish from other cost indices we have labeled it the Cornell Energy Institute (CEI) Index. This index has nine sub-indices for different well depth intervals and has been corrected for yearly changes in drilling activity. The CEI index shows 70% higher increase in well cost between 2003 and 2008 compared to the commonly used Producer Price Index (PPI) for drilling oil and gas wells. Cost trends for various depths were found to be significantly different and explained in terms of variations of oil and gas prices, costs, and availability of major well components and services at particular locations. Multiple methods were evaluated to infer the cost-depth correlation for geothermal wells in current year dollars. In addition to analyzing reported costs of the most recently completed geothermal wells, we investigated the results of the predictive geothermal well cost model WellCost Lite. Moreover, a cost database of 146 historical geothermal wells has been assembled. The CEI index was initially used to normalize costs of these wells to current year dollars. A comparison of normalized costs of historical wells with recently drilled ones and WellCost Lite predictions shows that cost escalation rates of geothermal wells were considerably lower compared to hydrocarbon wells and that a cost index based on hydrocarbon wells is not applicable to geothermal well drilling. Besides evaluating the average well costs, this work examined economic improvements resulting from increased drilling experience. Learning curve effects related to drilling multiple similar wells within the same field were correlated.

Maciej Z. Lukawski; Brian J. Anderson; Chad Augustine; Louis E. Capuano Jr.; Koenraad F. Beckers; Bill Livesay; Jefferson W. Tester

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

449

Clay mineralogy and depositional history of the Frio Formation in two geopressured wells, Brazoria County, Texas  

SciTech Connect

Twenty-three shale samples ranging in depth from 5194 ft to 13,246 ft from Gulf Oil Corporation No. 2 Texas State Lease 53034 well and 33 shale samples ranging in depth from 2185 ft to 15,592 ft from General Crude Oil Company/Department of Energy No. 1 Pleasant Bayou well were examined by x-ray techniques to determine the mineralogy of the geopressured zone in the Brazoria Fairway. Both wells have similar weight-percent trends with depth for a portion of the mineralogy. Calcite decreases, and plagioclase, quartz and total clay increase slightly. Within the clays, illite in mixed-layer illite/smectite (I/S) increases and smectite in mixed-layer I/S decreases. Four minerals have distinctly different trends with depth for each well. In the No. 2 Texas State Lease 53034 well, potassium feldspar and mixed-layer I/S decrease, kaolinite increases, and discrete illite is constant. In the No. 1 Pleasant Bayou well, potassium feldspar and kaolinite are constant, mixed-layer I/S increases, and discrete illite decreases.

Freed, R.L.

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

450

Suppression of bulk conductivity in InAs/GaSb broken gap composite quantum wells  

SciTech Connect

The two-dimensional topological insulator state in InAs/GaSb quantum wells manifests itself by topologically protected helical edge channel transport relying on an insulating bulk. This work investigates a way of suppressing bulk conductivity by using gallium source materials of different degrees of impurity concentrations. While highest-purity gallium is accompanied by clear conduction through the sample bulk, intentional impurity incorporation leads to a bulk resistance over 1 M?, independent of applied magnetic fields. In addition, ultra high electron mobilities for GaAs/AlGaAs structures fabricated in a molecular beam epitaxy system used for the growth of Sb-based samples are reported.

Charpentier, Christophe; Flt, Stefan; Reichl, Christian; Nichele, Fabrizio; Nath Pal, Atindra; Pietsch, Patrick; Ihn, Thomas; Ensslin, Klaus; Wegscheider, Werner [Laboratory for Solid State Physics, ETH Zrich, 8093 Zrich (Switzerland)] [Laboratory for Solid State Physics, ETH Zrich, 8093 Zrich (Switzerland)

2013-09-09T23:59:59.000Z

451

Natural radioactivity in various water samples and radiation dose estimations in Bolu province, Turkey  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract The level of natural radioactivity for Bolu province of north-western Turkey was assessed in this study. There is no information about radioactivity measurement reported in water samples in the Bolu province so far. For this reason, gross ? and ? activities of 55 different water samples collected from tap, spring, mineral, river and lake waters in Bolu were determined. The mean activity concentrations were 68.11mBqL?1, 169.44mBqL?1 for gross ? and ? in tap water. For all samples the gross ? activity is always higher than the gross ? activity. All value of the gross ? were lower than the limit value of 500mBqL?1 while two spring and one mineral water samples were found to have gross ? activity concentrations of greater than 1000mBqL?1. The associated age-dependent dose from all water ingestion in Bolu was estimated. The total dose for adults had an average value exceeds the WHO recommended limit value. The risk levels from the direct ingestion of the natural radionuclides in tap and mineral water in Bolu were determinated. The mean 210Po and 228Ra risk the value of tap and mineral waters slightly exceeds what some consider on acceptable risk of 10?4 or less.

F. Korkmaz Gorur; H. Camgoz

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

452

Quantum Metropolis Sampling  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The original motivation to build a quantum computer came from Feynman who envisaged a machine capable of simulating generic quantum mechanical systems, a task that is believed to be intractable for classical computers. Such a machine would have a wide range of applications in the simulation of many-body quantum physics, including condensed matter physics, chemistry, and high energy physics. Part of Feynman's challenge was met by Lloyd who showed how to approximately decompose the time-evolution operator of interacting quantum particles into a short sequence of elementary gates, suitable for operation on a quantum computer. However, this left open the problem of how to simulate the equilibrium and static properties of quantum systems. This requires the preparation of ground and Gibbs states on a quantum computer. For classical systems, this problem is solved by the ubiquitous Metropolis algorithm, a method that basically acquired a monopoly for the simulation of interacting particles. Here, we demonstrate how to implement a quantum version of the Metropolis algorithm on a quantum computer. This algorithm permits to sample directly from the eigenstates of the Hamiltonian and thus evades the sign problem present in classical simulations. A small scale implementation of this algorithm can already be achieved with today's technology

K. Temme; T. J. Osborne; K. G. Vollbrecht; D. Poulin; F. Verstraete

2009-11-18T23:59:59.000Z

453

Doing Well By Doing Good? Green Office Buildings  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and Financial Benefits of Green Buildings , October 2003.average quality of the green buildings is somewhat higherquality of the non-green buildings in the clustered samples.

Eichholtz, Piet; Kok, Nils; Quigley, John M.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

454

Compound and Elemental Analysis At Salt Wells Area (Coolbaugh...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

by standard Induced Coupled Plasma Mass Spectroscopy (ICP-MS), using ICP emission and atomic absorption methods for cations and ICP emission for anions. The hottest sampled...

455

Tank 241-AP-107, grab samples, 7AP-99-1, 7AP-99-3 and 7AP-99-4 analytical results for the final report  

SciTech Connect

This document is the format IV, final report for the tank 241-AP-107 (AP-107) grab samples taken in May 1999 to address waste compatibility concerns. Chemical, radiochemical, and physical analyses on the tank AP-107 samples were performed as directed in Compatibility Grab Sampling and Analysis Plan for Fiscal year 1999. Any deviations from the instructions provided in the tank sampling and analysis plan (TSAP) were discussed in this narrative. Interim data were provided earlier to River Protection Project (RPP) personnel, however, the data presented here represent the official results. No notification limits were exceeded.

BELL, K.E.

1999-08-12T23:59:59.000Z

456

Nevada National Security Site Integrated Groundwater Sampling Plan, Revision 0  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of the Nevada National Security Site (NNSS) Integrated Sampling Plan (referred to herein as the Plan) is to provide a comprehensive, integrated approach for collecting and analyzing groundwater samples to meet the needs and objectives of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Field Office (NNSA/NFO) Underground Test Area (UGTA) Activity. Implementation of this Plan will provide high-quality data required by the UGTA Activity for ensuring public protection in an efficient and cost-effective manner. The Plan is designed to ensure compliance with the UGTA Quality Assurance Plan (QAP). The Plans scope comprises sample collection and analysis requirements relevant to assessing the extent of groundwater contamination from underground nuclear testing. This Plan identifies locations to be sampled by corrective action unit (CAU) and location type, sampling frequencies, sample collection methodologies, and the constituents to be analyzed. In addition, the Plan defines data collection criteria such as well-purging requirements, detection levels, and accuracy requirements; identifies reporting and data management requirements; and provides a process to ensure coordination between NNSS groundwater sampling programs for sampling of interest to UGTA. This Plan does not address compliance with requirements for wells that supply the NNSS public water system or wells involved in a permitted activity.

Marutzky, Sam; Farnham, Irene

2014-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

457

DOE Regional Partnership Begins Core Sampling for Large-Volume  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Regional Partnership Begins Core Sampling for Large-Volume Regional Partnership Begins Core Sampling for Large-Volume Sequestration Test DOE Regional Partnership Begins Core Sampling for Large-Volume Sequestration Test May 22, 2009 - 1:00pm Addthis Washington, DC - The Plains CO2 Reduction (PCOR) Partnership, one of seven members of the U.S. Department of Energy's Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnerships program, has begun collecting core samples from a new characterization well near Spectra Energy's Fort Nelson natural gas processing plant in British Columbia, Canada. Core sampling, along with a sophisticated well logging program that the partnership is conducting, is an important step in proving the viability of carbon storage in brine-saturated formations. The Fort Nelson project is on track to become one of the first

458

DOE Regional Partnership Begins Core Sampling for Large-Volume  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Regional Partnership Begins Core Sampling for Large-Volume Regional Partnership Begins Core Sampling for Large-Volume Sequestration Test DOE Regional Partnership Begins Core Sampling for Large-Volume Sequestration Test May 22, 2009 - 1:00pm Addthis Washington, DC - The Plains CO2 Reduction (PCOR) Partnership, one of seven members of the U.S. Department of Energy's Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnerships program, has begun collecting core samples from a new characterization well near Spectra Energy's Fort Nelson natural gas processing plant in British Columbia, Canada. Core sampling, along with a sophisticated well logging program that the partnership is conducting, is an important step in proving the viability of carbon storage in brine-saturated formations. The Fort Nelson project is on track to become one of the first

459

Distribution and Production of Oil and Gas Wells by State  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Distribution and Production of Oil and Gas Wells by State Distribution and Production of Oil and Gas Wells by State Distribution and Production of Oil and Gas Wells by State Release date: January 7, 2011 | Next Release Date: To be determined Distribution tables of oil and gas wells by production rate for all wells, including marginal wells, are now available for most states for the years 1995 to 2009. Graphs displaying historical behavior of well production rate are also available. To download data for all states and all years, including years prior to 1995, in an Excel spreadsheet XLS (4,000 KB). The quality and completeness of data is dependent on update lag times and the quality of individual state and commercial source databases. Undercounting of the number of wells occurs in states where data is sometimes not available at the well level but only at the lease level. States not listed below will be added later as data becomes available.

460

Salt Wells, Eight Mile Flat | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Salt Wells, Eight Mile Flat Salt Wells, Eight Mile Flat Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Web Site: Salt Wells, Eight Mile Flat Abstract Abstract unavailable. Author Nevada Bureau of Mines and Geology Published Online Nevada Encyclopedia, 2009 DOI Not Provided Check for DOI availability: http://crossref.org Online Internet link for Salt Wells, Eight Mile Flat Citation Nevada Bureau of Mines and Geology. Salt Wells, Eight Mile Flat [Internet]. 2009. Online Nevada Encyclopedia. [updated 2009/03/24;cited 2013/08/07]. Available from: http://www.onlinenevada.org/articles/salt-wells-eight-mile-flat Related Geothermal Exploration Activities Activities (1) Areas (1) Regions (0) Development Wells At Salt Wells Area (Nevada Bureau of Mines and Geology, 2009) Salt Wells Geothermal Area

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "wells sampled exceed" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


461

Category:Well Log Techniques | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Category Category Edit History Facebook icon Twitter icon » Category:Well Log Techniques Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Geothermalpower.jpg Looking for the Well Log Techniques page? For detailed information on Well Log Techniques as exploration techniques, click here. Category:Well Log Techniques Add.png Add a new Well Log Techniques Technique Pages in category "Well Log Techniques" The following 17 pages are in this category, out of 17 total. A Acoustic Logs C Caliper Log Cement Bond Log Chemical Logging Cross-Dipole Acoustic Log D Density Log F FMI Log G Gamma Log I Image Logs M Mud Logging N Neutron Log P Pressure Temperature Log R Resistivity Log Resistivity Tomography S Single-Well and Cross-Well Resistivity Spontaneous Potential Well Log Stoneley Analysis

462

Fluid Inclusion Stratigraphy: Interpretation of New Wells in the Coso  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Stratigraphy: Interpretation of New Wells in the Coso Stratigraphy: Interpretation of New Wells in the Coso Geothermal Field Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Conference Proceedings: Fluid Inclusion Stratigraphy: Interpretation of New Wells in the Coso Geothermal Field Details Activities (1) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: This paper focuses on the interpretation of the additional wells (4 bore holes) and comparison to the previous wells. Preliminary correlation between wells is also presented. Analyses from multiple boreholes show fluid stratigraphy that correlates from well to well. The wells include large producers, small to moderate producers, problem producers, injectors, and non producers Author(s): Dilley, L.M.; Newman, D.L. ; McCulloch, J.; Wiggett, G. Published: Geothermal Resource Council Transactions 2005, 1/1/2005

463

Testing geopressured geothermal reservoirs in existing wells. Wells of Opportunity Program final contract report, 1980-1981  

SciTech Connect

The geopressured-geothermal candidates for the Wells of Opportunity program were located by the screening of published information on oil industry activity and through direct contact with the oil and gas operators. This process resulted in the recommendation to the DOE of 33 candidate wells for the program. Seven of the 33 recommended wells were accepted for testing. Of these seven wells, six were actually tested. The first well, the No. 1 Kennedy, was acquired but not tested. The seventh well, the No. 1 Godchaux, was abandoned due to mechanical problems during re-entry. The well search activities, which culminated in the acceptance by the DOE of 7 recommended wells, were substantial. A total of 90,270 well reports were reviewed, leading to 1990 wells selected for thorough geological analysis. All of the reservoirs tested in this program have been restricted by one or more faults or permeability barriers. A comprehensive discussion of test results is presented.

Not Available

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

464

January 2012 Groundwater Sampling at the Gnome-Coach, New Mexico, Site (Data Validation Package)  

SciTech Connect

Annual sampling was conducted January 18, 2012, to monitor groundwater for potential radionuclide contamination at the Gnome-Coach site in New Mexico. The sampling was performed as specified in the Sampling and Analysis Plan for U.S. Department of Energy Office of Legacy Management Sites (LMS/PLN/S04351, continually updated). Well LRL-7 was not sampled per instruction from the lead. A duplicate sample was collected from well USGS-1 and water levels were measured in the monitoring wells onsite.

None

2012-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

465

Interface modeling to predict well casing damage for big hill strategic petroleum reserve.  

SciTech Connect

Oil leaks were found in well casings of Caverns 105 and 109 at the Big Hill Strategic Petroleum Reserve site. According to the field observations, two instances of casing damage occurred at the depth of the interface between the caprock and top of salt. This damage could be caused by interface movement induced by cavern volume closure due to salt creep. A three dimensional finite element model, which allows each cavern to be configured individually, was constructed to investigate shear and vertical displacements across each interface. The model contains interfaces between each lithology and a shear zone to examine the interface behavior in a realistic manner. This analysis results indicate that the casings of Caverns 105 and 109 failed by shear stress that exceeded shear strength due to the horizontal movement of the top of salt relative to the caprock, and tensile stress due to the downward movement of the top of salt from the caprock, respectively. The casings of Caverns 101, 110, 111 and 114, located at the far ends of the field, are predicted to be failed by shear stress in the near future. The casings of inmost Caverns 107 and 108 are predicted to be failed by tensile stress in the near future.

Ehgartner, Brian L.; Park, Byoung Yoon

2012-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

466

Sample Environment | ORNL Neutron Sciences  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Home › Instruments › SNS › Sample Environment Home › Instruments › SNS › Sample Environment Sample Environment The Sample Environment Group provides equipment and support for studying materials under controlled conditions (temperature, pressure, magnetic field, chemical environment, etc.). When you come to SNS to conduct an experiment, our front-line teams are there to support you. Although we currently offer a wide range of capabilities, we realize that these capabilities must continually grow. Therefore, we also have a busy research and development team, and we encourage you to partner with them to develop new equipment and techniques. The Sample Environment Equipment Database allows you to search for information about the sample environment equipment available for HFIR and SNS instruments. It will be available in the near future for SNS sample

467

Rock Sampling | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Rock Sampling Rock Sampling Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Technique: Rock Sampling Details Activities (13) Areas (13) Regions (1) NEPA(0) Exploration Technique Information Exploration Group: Field Techniques Exploration Sub Group: Field Sampling Parent Exploration Technique: Field Sampling Information Provided by Technique Lithology: Rock samples are used to define lithology. Field and lab analyses can be used to measure the chemical and isotopic constituents of rock samples. Stratigraphic/Structural: Provides information about the time and environment which formed a particular geologic unit. Microscopic rock textures can be used to estimate the history of stress and strain, and/or faulting. Hydrological: Isotope geochemistry can reveal fluid circulation of a geothermal system.

468

Soil Sampling | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Soil Sampling Soil Sampling Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Technique: Soil Sampling Details Activities (10) Areas (9) Regions (1) NEPA(0) Exploration Technique Information Exploration Group: Field Techniques Exploration Sub Group: Field Sampling Parent Exploration Technique: Field Sampling Information Provided by Technique Lithology: Stratigraphic/Structural: Can reveal relatively high permeability zones Hydrological: Thermal: Used to locate active hydrothermal systems Dictionary.png Soil Sampling: Soil sampling is a method that can be used for exploration of geothermal resources that lack obvious surface manifestations. Soils that are above or adjacent to a "hidden" hydrothermal system will have a unique chemistry that can be indicative of a hydrothermal system at depth and a zone of

469

Results of investigations at the Zunil geothermal field, Guatemala: Well logging and brine geochemistry  

SciTech Connect

The well logging team from Los Alamos and its counterpart from Central America were tasked to investigate the condition of four producing geothermal wells in the Zunil Geothermal Field. The information obtained would be used to help evaluate the Zunil geothermal reservoir in terms of possible additional drilling and future power plant design. The field activities focused on downhole measurements in four production wells (ZCQ-3, ZCQ-4, ZCQ-5, and ZCQ-6). The teams took measurements of the wells in both static (shut-in) and flowing conditions, using the high-temperature well logging tools developed at Los Alamos National Laboratory. Two well logging missions were conducted in the Zunil field. In October 1988 measurements were made in well ZCQ-3, ZCQ-5, and ZCQ-6. In December 1989 the second field operation logged ZCQ-4 and repeated logs in ZCQ-3. Both field operations included not only well logging but the collecting of numerous fluid samples from both thermal and nonthermal waters. 18 refs., 22 figs., 7 tabs.

Adams, A.; Dennis, B.; Van Eeckhout, E.; Goff, F.; Lawton, R.; Trujillo, P.E.; Counce, D.; Archuleta, J. (Los Alamos National Lab., NM (USA)); Medina, V. (Instituto Nacional de Electrificacion, Guatemala City (Guatemala). Unidad de Desarollo Geotermico)

1991-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

470

Radiometrics At Salt Wells Area (Henkle, Et Al., 2005) | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Salt Wells Area (Henkle, Et Al., 2005) Salt Wells Area (Henkle, Et Al., 2005) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Radiometrics At Salt Wells Area (Henkle, Et Al., 2005) Exploration Activity Details Location Salt Wells Area Exploration Technique Radiometrics Activity Date - 2005 Usefulness could be useful with more improvements DOE-funding Unknown Exploration Basis Adsorbed mercury soil geochemical surveys and radiometric geophysical surveys were carried out in conjunction with geologic mapping to test the application of these ground-based techniques to geothermal exploration at three prospects in Nevada by Henkle Jr. et al. in 2005. Notes Soil sampling and geophysical surveys were conducted at 26 stations along an approximately 1981-m-long line oriented perpendicular to known major

471

Geothermometry At Salt Wells Area (Coolbaugh, Et Al., 2006) | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

source source History View New Pages Recent Changes All Special Pages Semantic Search/Querying Get Involved Help Apps Datasets Community Login | Sign Up Search Page Edit History Facebook icon Twitter icon » Geothermometry At Salt Wells Area (Coolbaugh, Et Al., 2006) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Geothermometry At Salt Wells Area (Coolbaugh, Et Al., 2006) Exploration Activity Details Location Salt Wells Geothermal Area Exploration Technique Geothermometry Activity Date 2005 - 2005 Usefulness useful DOE-funding Unknown Exploration Basis Geochemical water sampling, mineral distribution mapping, and shallow (30 cm) temperature probe measurements were conducted to expand on a previous field mapping study of surface geothermal features at Salt Wells, in order

472

Field Mapping At Salt Wells Area (Coolbaugh, Et Al., 2006) | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

source source History View New Pages Recent Changes All Special Pages Semantic Search/Querying Get Involved Help Apps Datasets Community Login | Sign Up Search Page Edit History Facebook icon Twitter icon » Field Mapping At Salt Wells Area (Coolbaugh, Et Al., 2006) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Field Mapping At Salt Wells Area (Coolbaugh, Et Al., 2006) Exploration Activity Details Location Salt Wells Geothermal Area Exploration Technique Field Mapping Activity Date 2005 - 2005 Usefulness useful DOE-funding Unknown Exploration Basis Geochemical water sampling, mineral distribution mapping, and shallow (30 cm) temperature probe measurements were conducted to expand on a previous field mapping study of surface geothermal features at Salt Wells, in order

473

E-Print Network 3.0 - acromegaly remains under-recognized Sample...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

test sample with both antibodies and a wash step, remaining activity in the wells Source: Burn, Charlotte - Department of Veterinary Clinical Sciences, Roayl Verterinary College...

474

E-Print Network 3.0 - aroclors Sample Search Results  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

samples as well as the technical Aroclor mixtures, we... . In our final PCA analysis, we plotted passively the relative abundance data for commercial Aroclor Source:...

475

Gasbuggy, New Mexico, Natural Gas and Produced Water Sampling Results for 2012  

SciTech Connect

The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Legacy Management conducted annual natural gas sampling for the Gasbuggy, New Mexico, Site on June 20 and 21, 2012. This long-term monitoring of natural gas includes samples of produced water from gas production wells that are located near the site. Water samples from gas production wells were analyzed for gamma-emitting radionuclides, gross alpha, gross beta, and tritium. Natural gas samples were analyzed for tritium and carbon-14. ALS Laboratory Group in Fort Collins, Colorado, analyzed water samples. Isotech Laboratories in Champaign, Illinois, analyzed natural gas samples.

None

2012-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

476

Exciton pattern generation in GaAs/AlxGa1-xAs multiple quantum wells  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Exciton photoluminescence pattern generation is investigated in multiple quantum wells. High-contrast outer rings and localized bright spots are generated using efficient field-assisted upconversion of laser light whose photon energy lies below the energy of the luminescing quantum well transition. Time-resolved images of the bright spots reveal unexpected dynamics that are not explained by two-dimensional rate equations for generation and diffusion. This behavior can be understood as a result of three-dimensional transport in the vertically extended samples.

B. Fluegel, K. Alberi, L. Bhusal, A. Mascarenhas, D. W. Snoke, G. Karunasiri, L. N. Pfeiffer, and K. West

2011-05-16T23:59:59.000Z

477

RAPID/Geothermal/Well Field/Idaho | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Any person, owner or operator who proposes to construct a well for the production of or exploration for geothermal resources or to construct an injection well shall first apply...

478

RAPID/Geothermal/Well Field/Hawaii | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

& Well Field Permit A developer seeking to drill, modify, or modify the use of a well for exploration or development must receive a drilling or modification permit prior to...

479

Colorado Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells ...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Colorado Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5...

480

Horizontal Well Placement Optimization in Gas Reservoirs Using Genetic Algorithms  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

......................................................................................................................... 65 x LIST OF FIGURES FIGURE Page 1 Algorithm for single generation of GA.... well location......................................................... 40 11 Maximum function fitness value vs generation number for Case 1........... 41 12 Case 2 fitness value vs. well location...

Gibbs, Trevor Howard

2011-08-08T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "wells sampled exceed" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


481

California Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) California Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4...

482

Louisiana Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Louisiana Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5...

483

Michigan Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells ...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Michigan Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5...

484

Oklahoma Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Oklahoma Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5...

485

Virginia Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells ...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Virginia Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5...

486

Tennessee Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Tennessee Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Yea