National Library of Energy BETA

Sample records for wells sampled exceed

  1. Vapor port and groundwater sampling well

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hubbell, J.M.; Wylie, A.H.

    1996-01-09

    A method and apparatus have been developed for combining groundwater monitoring wells with unsaturated-zone vapor sampling ports. The apparatus allows concurrent monitoring of both the unsaturated and the saturated zone from the same well at contaminated areas. The innovative well design allows for concurrent sampling of groundwater and volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in the vadose (unsaturated) zone from a single well, saving considerable time and money. The sample tubes are banded to the outer well casing during installation of the well casing. 10 figs.

  2. Vapor port and groundwater sampling well

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hubbell, Joel M. (Idaho Falls, ID); Wylie, Allan H. (Idaho Falls, ID)

    1996-01-01

    A method and apparatus has been developed for combining groundwater monitoring wells with unsaturated-zone vapor sampling ports. The apparatus allows concurrent monitoring of both the unsaturated and the saturated zone from the same well at contaminated areas. The innovative well design allows for concurrent sampling of groundwater and volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in the vadose (unsaturated) zone from a single well, saving considerable time and money. The sample tubes are banded to the outer well casing during installation of the well casing.

  3. Well purge and sample apparatus and method

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Schalla, Ronald (Kennewick, WA); Smith, Ronald M. (Richland, WA); Hall, Stephen H. (Kennewick, WA); Smart, John E. (Richland, WA); Gustafson, Gregg S. (Redmond, WA)

    1995-01-01

    The present invention specifically permits purging and/or sampling of a well but only removing, at most, about 25% of the fluid volume compared to conventional methods and, at a minimum, removing none of the fluid volume from the well. The invention is an isolation assembly with a packer, pump and exhaust, that is inserted into the well. The isolation assembly is designed so that only a volume of fluid between the outside diameter of the isolation assembly and the inside diameter of the well over a fluid column height from the bottom of the well to the top of the active portion (lower annulus) is removed. The packer is positioned above the active portion thereby sealing the well and preventing any mixing or contamination of inlet fluid with fluid above the packer. Ports in the wall of the isolation assembly permit purging and sampling of the lower annulus along the height of the active portion.

  4. Well purge and sample apparatus and method

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Schalla, R.; Smith, R.M.; Hall, S.H.; Smart, J.E.; Gustafson, G.S.

    1995-10-24

    The present invention specifically permits purging and/or sampling of a well but only removing, at most, about 25% of the fluid volume compared to conventional methods and, at a minimum, removing none of the fluid volume from the well. The invention is an isolation assembly with a packer, pump and exhaust, that is inserted into the well. The isolation assembly is designed so that only a volume of fluid between the outside diameter of the isolation assembly and the inside diameter of the well over a fluid column height from the bottom of the well to the top of the active portion (lower annulus) is removed. The packer is positioned above the active portion thereby sealing the well and preventing any mixing or contamination of inlet fluid with fluid above the packer. Ports in the wall of the isolation assembly permit purging and sampling of the lower annulus along the height of the active portion. 8 figs.

  5. Subsurface steam sampling in Geysers wells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lysne, P. [Lysne (Peter), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Koenig, B. [Unocal Geothermal and Power Operations Group, Santa Rose, CA (United States); Hirtz, P. [Thermochem, Inc., Santa Rosa, CA (United States); Normann, R.; Henfling, J. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    1997-01-01

    A new downhole sampling tool has been built for use in steam wells at The Geysers geothermal reservoir. The tool condenses specimens into an initially evacuated vessel that is opened down hole at the direction of an on-board computer. The tool makes a temperature log of the well as it is deployed, and the pressure and temperature of collected specimens are monitored for diagnostic purposes. Initial tests were encouraging, and the Department of Energy has funded an expanded effort that includes data gathering needed to develop a three-dimensional model of The Geysers geochemical environment. Collected data will be useful for understanding the origins of hydrogen chloride and non-condensable gases in the steam, as well as tracking the effect of injection on the composition of produced steam. Interested parties are invited to observe the work and to join the program.

  6. IMPROVED WELL PLUGGING EQUIPMENT AND WASTE MANGEMENT TECHNIQUES EXCEED ALARA GOALS AT THE OAK RIDGE NATIONAL LABORATORY

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Whiteside, R.; Pawlowicz, R.; Whitehead, L.; Arnseth, R.

    2002-02-25

    In 2000, Bechtel Jacobs Company LLC (BJC) contracted Tetra Tech NUS, Inc. (TtNUS) and their sub-contractor, Texas World Operations, Inc. (TWO), to plug and abandon (P&A) 111 wells located in the Melton Valley area of Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). One hundred and seven of those wells were used to monitor fluid movement and subsurface containment of the low level radioactive liquid waste/grout slurry that was injected into the Pumpkin Valley Shale Formation, underlying ORNL. Four wells were used as hydrofracture injection wells to emplace the waste in the shale formation. Although the practice of hydrofracturing was and is considered by many to pose no threat to human health or the environment, the practice was halted in 1982 after the Federal Underground Injection Control regulations were enacted by United States Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA) making it necessary to properly close the wells. The work is being performed for the United States Department of Energy Oak Ridge Operations (DOE ORO). The project team is using the philosophy of minimum waste generation and the principles of ALARA (As Low As Reasonably Achievable) as key project goals to minimize personnel and equipment exposure, waste generation, and project costs. Achievement of these goals was demonstrated by the introduction of several new pieces of custom designed well plugging and abandonment equipment that were tested and used effectively during field operations. Highlights of the work performed and the equipment used are presented.

  7. Multi-well sample plate cover penetration system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Beer, Neil Reginald (Pleasanton, CA)

    2011-12-27

    An apparatus for penetrating a cover over a multi-well sample plate containing at least one individual sample well includes a cutting head, a cutter extending from the cutting head, and a robot. The cutting head is connected to the robot wherein the robot moves the cutting head and cutter so that the cutter penetrates the cover over the multi-well sample plate providing access to the individual sample well. When the cutting head is moved downward the foil is pierced by the cutter that splits, opens, and folds the foil inward toward the well. The well is then open for sample aspiration but has been protected from cross contamination.

  8. Well fluid isolation and sample apparatus and method

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Schalla, Ronald (Kennewick, WA); Smith, Ronald M. (Richland, WA); Hall, Stephen H. (Kennewick, WA); Smart, John E. (Richland, WA)

    1995-01-01

    The present invention specifically permits purging and/or sampling of a well but only removing, at most, about 25% of the fluid volume compared to conventional methods and, at a minimum, removing none of the fluid volume from the well. The invention is an isolation assembly that is inserted into the well. The isolation assembly is designed so that only a volume of fluid between the outside diameter of the isolation assembly and the inside diameter of the well over a fluid column height from the bottom of the well to the top of the active portion (lower annulus) is removed. A seal may be positioned above the active portion thereby sealing the well and preventing any mixing or contamination of inlet fluid with fluid above the packer. Purged well fluid is stored in a riser above the packer. Ports in the wall of the isolation assembly permit purging and sampling of the lower annulus along the height of the active portion.

  9. Method and apparatus for sampling low-yield wells

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Last, George V. (Richland, WA); Lanigan, David C. (Kennewick, WA)

    2003-04-15

    An apparatus and method for collecting a sample from a low-yield well or perched aquifer includes a pump and a controller responsive to water level sensors for filling a sample reservoir. The controller activates the pump to fill the reservoir when the water level in the well reaches a high level as indicated by the sensor. The controller deactivates the pump when the water level reaches a lower level as indicated by the sensors. The pump continuously activates and deactivates the pump until the sample reservoir is filled with a desired volume, as indicated by a reservoir sensor. At the beginning of each activation cycle, the controller optionally can select to purge an initial quantity of water prior to filling the sample reservoir. The reservoir can be substantially devoid of air and the pump is a low volumetric flow rate pump. Both the pump and the reservoir can be located either inside or outside the well.

  10. Microsoft Word - Proposed Sampling UGTA Wells FY15-19.docx

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Proposed Sampling of Underground Test Area Wells 2015-2019 1 Frenchman Flat Corrective Action Unit Number of Wells* Sampling Frequency (years) Analytes Tritium Detection Method...

  11. New standard exceeds expectations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bennett, M.J. (Environmental Data Resources Inc., Southport, CT (United States))

    1993-08-01

    The new ASTM environmental due diligence standard is delivering far more than expected when it was conceived in 1990. Its use goes well beyond the relatively narrow legal liability protection that was the primary goal in its development. The real estate industry, spearheaded by the lending community, was preoccupied with environmental risk and liability. Lenders throughout the concept's evolution have been at the forefront in defining environmental due diligence. The lender liability rule is intended to protect property owners from CERCLA liability for property they own or companies they manage (for example, as a result of foreclosure). The new site assessment standard increasingly is considered a benchmark for prudent environmental due diligence in the interest of risk management, not legal liability. The focus on risk management, including collateral devaluation and corporate credit risk, are becoming dominant areas of policy focus in the lending industry. Lenders now are revising their policies to incorporate transactions beyond issues of real estate, in which a company's economic viability and ability to service debt could be impacted by an environmental problem unrelated to property transfers.

  12. Wavelength monitor based on two single-quantum-well absorbers sampling a standing wave pattern

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Miller, David A. B.

    Wavelength monitor based on two single-quantum-well absorbers sampling a standing wave pattern H. L-quantum-well absorbers that sample a standing wave created by a distributed Bragg reflector. As a wavelength monitor, our for wavelength demultiplexing.3 A class of devices based on thin absorbers in standing waves was proposed4

  13. Surge Block Method for Controlling Well Clogging and Sampling Sediment during Bioremediation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wu, Wei-min [Stanford University] [Stanford University; Watson, David B [ORNL] [ORNL; Luo, Jian [Stanford University] [Stanford University; Carley, Jack M [ORNL] [ORNL; Mehlhorn, Tonia L [ORNL] [ORNL; Kitanidis, Peter K. [Stanford University] [Stanford University; Jardine, Philip [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK)] [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK); Criddle, Craig [Stanford University] [Stanford University

    2013-01-01

    A surge block treatment method (i.e. inserting a solid rod plunger with a flat seal that closely fits the casing interior into a well and stocking it up and down) was performed for the rehabilitation of wells clogged with biomass and for the collection of time series sediment samples during in situ bioremediation tests for U(VI) immobilization at a the U.S. Department of Energy site in Oak Ridge, TN. The clogging caused by biomass growth had been controlled by using routine surge block treatment for18 times over a nearly four year test period. The treatment frequency was dependent of the dosage of electron donor injection and microbial community developed in the subsurface. Hydraulic tests showed that the apparent aquifer transmissivity at a clogged well with an inner diameter (ID) of 10.16 cm was increased by 8 13 times after the rehabilitation, indicating the effectiveness of the rehabilitation. Simultaneously with the rehabilitation, the surge block method was successfully used for collecting time series sediment samples composed of fine particles (clay and silt) from wells with ID 1.9 10.16 cm for the analysis of mineralogical and geochemical composition and microbial community during the same period. Our results demonstrated that the surge block method provided a cost-effective approach for both well rehabilitation and frequent solid sampling at the same location.

  14. Well Placement

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Well Placement Well Placement LANL maintains an extensive groundwater monitoring and surveillance program through sampling. August 1, 2013 Finished groundwater well head with solar...

  15. Los Alamos exceeds waste shipping goal

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power Administration would likeUniverseIMPACTThousand CubicResourcelogo and-EearnstakesLos Alamos exceeds waste

  16. Hanford Groundwater Contamination Areas Shrink as EM Exceeds...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Groundwater Contamination Areas Shrink as EM Exceeds Cleanup Goals Hanford Groundwater Contamination Areas Shrink as EM Exceeds Cleanup Goals June 26, 2013 - 12:00pm Addthis The...

  17. Final work plan : targeted groundwater sampling and monitoring well installation for potential site reclassification at Barnes, Kansas.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    LaFreniere, L. M.

    2006-07-11

    This ''Work Plan'' outlines the scope of work for a targeted groundwater sampling investigation and monitoring well installation at Barnes, Kansas. This activity is being conducted at the request of the Kansas Department of Health and Environment (KDHE), in accordance with the intergovernmental agreement between the KDHE and the Commodity Credit Corporation (CCC), an agency of the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA). Data resulting from the proposed work will be used to determine the hydraulic gradient near the former CCC/USDA facility, delineate the downgradient carbon tetrachloride plume, and determine additional monitoring requirements at Barnes. The overall goal is to establish criteria for monitoring leading to potential site reclassification. The proposed work will be performed on behalf of the CCC/USDA by the Environmental Science Division of Argonne National Laboratory. Argonne is a nonprofit, multidisciplinary research center operated by the University of Chicago for the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). The Farm Service Agency of the USDA has entered into an interagency agreement with DOE, under which Argonne provides technical assistance with environmental site characterization and remediation at former CCC/USDA grain storage facilities. Argonne issued a ''Master Work Plan'' (Argonne 2002) to provide general guidance for all investigations at former CCC/USDA facilities in Kansas. The ''Master Work Plan'', approved by the KDHE, contains the materials common to investigations at all locations in Kansas. This document must be consulted for the complete details of plans for this work associated with the former CCC/USDA facility at Barnes.

  18. A brightness exceeding simulated Langmuir limit

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nakasuji, Mamoru

    2013-08-15

    When an excitation of the first lens determines a beam is parallel beam, a brightness that is 100 times higher than Langmuir limit is measured experimentally, where Langmuir limits are estimated using a simulated axial cathode current density which is simulated based on a measured emission current. The measured brightness is comparable to Langmuir limit, when the lens excitation is such that an image position is slightly shorter than a lens position. Previously measured values of brightness for cathode apical radii of curvature 20, 60, 120, 240, and 480 ?m were 8.7, 5.3, 3.3, 2.4, and 3.9 times higher than their corresponding Langmuir limits, respectively, in this experiment, the lens excitation was such that the lens and the image positions were 180 mm and 400 mm, respectively. From these measured brightness for three different lens excitation conditions, it is concluded that the brightness depends on the first lens excitation. For the electron gun operated in a space charge limited condition, some of the electrons emitted from the cathode are returned to the cathode without having crossed a virtual cathode. Therefore, method that assumes a Langmuir limit defining method using a Maxwellian distribution of electron velocities may need to be revised. For the condition in which the values of the exceeding the Langmuir limit are measured, the simulated trajectories of electrons that are emitted from the cathode do not cross the optical axis at the crossover, thus the law of sines may not be valid for high brightness electron beam systems.

  19. Policy Flash 2013-41 Contracts Periods of Performance Exceeding...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    1 Contracts Periods of Performance Exceeding 5 Years Policy Flash 2013-41 Contracts Periods of Performance Exceeding 5 Years Attached is Policy Flash 2013-41 Contracts Periods of...

  20. Petrographic report on clay-rich samples from Permian Unit 4 salt, G. Friemel No. 1 well, Palo Duro Basin, Deaf Smith County, Texas: unanalyzed data

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fukui, L M

    1983-09-01

    This report presents the results of mineralogic and petrographic analyses performed on five samples of clay-rich rock from salt-bearing Permian strata sampled by drill core from G. Friemel No. 1 Well, Deaf Smith County, Texas. Five samples of clay-rich rock from depths of about 2457, 2458, 2521, 2548, and 2568 feet were analyzed to determine the amounts of soluble phase (halite) and the amounts and mineralogy of the insoluble phases. The amounts of halite found were 59, 79, 47, 40, and 4 weight percent, respectively, for the samples. The insoluble minerals are predominately clay (20 to 60 volume percent) and anhydrite (up to 17 volume percent), with minor (about 1.0%) and trace amounts of quartz, dolomite, muscovite, and gypsum. The clays include illite, chlorite, and interstratified chlorite-smectite. The results presented in this petrographic report are descriptive, uninterpreted data. 2 references, 7 tables.

  1. Sampling for Bacteria in Wells 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lesikar, Bruce J.

    2001-11-15

    that delivers softened, fil- tered or otherwise treated water; or from a hose attached to a faucet. 3. Sterilize the inside surface of the faucet by flam- ing with a propane torch (a disposable butane lighter is fine) or a homemade torch can be made by dipping a...

  2. Analysis of core samples from the BPXA-DOE-USGS Mount Elbert gas hydrate stratigraphic test well: Insights into core disturbance and handling

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kneafsey, Timothy J.; Lu, Hailong; Winters, William; Boswell, Ray; Hunter, Robert; Collett, Timothy S.

    2009-09-01

    Collecting and preserving undamaged core samples containing gas hydrates from depth is difficult because of the pressure and temperature changes encountered upon retrieval. Hydrate-bearing core samples were collected at the BPXA-DOE-USGS Mount Elbert Gas Hydrate Stratigraphic Test Well in February 2007. Coring was performed while using a custom oil-based drilling mud, and the cores were retrieved by a wireline. The samples were characterized and subsampled at the surface under ambient winter arctic conditions. Samples thought to be hydrate bearing were preserved either by immersion in liquid nitrogen (LN), or by storage under methane pressure at ambient arctic conditions, and later depressurized and immersed in LN. Eleven core samples from hydrate-bearing zones were scanned using x-ray computed tomography to examine core structure and homogeneity. Features observed include radial fractures, spalling-type fractures, and reduced density near the periphery. These features were induced during sample collection, handling, and preservation. Isotopic analysis of the methane from hydrate in an initially LN-preserved core and a pressure-preserved core indicate that secondary hydrate formation occurred throughout the pressurized core, whereas none occurred in the LN-preserved core, however no hydrate was found near the periphery of the LN-preserved core. To replicate some aspects of the preservation methods, natural and laboratory-made saturated porous media samples were frozen in a variety of ways, with radial fractures observed in some LN-frozen sands, and needle-like ice crystals forming in slowly frozen clay-rich sediments. Suggestions for hydrate-bearing core preservation are presented.

  3. Examination of core samples from the Mount Elbert Gas Hydrate Stratigraphic Test Well, Alaska North Slope: Effects of retrieval and preservation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kneafsey, T.J.; Liu, T.J. H.; Winters, W.; Boswell, R.; Hunter, R.; Collett, T.S.

    2011-06-01

    Collecting and preserving undamaged core samples containing gas hydrates from depth is difficult because of the pressure and temperature changes encountered upon retrieval. Hydrate-bearing core samples were collected at the BPXA-DOE-USGS Mount Elbert Gas Hydrate Stratigraphic Test Well in February 2007. Coring was performed while using a custom oil-based drilling mud, and the cores were retrieved by a wireline. The samples were characterized and subsampled at the surface under ambient winter arctic conditions. Samples thought to be hydrate bearing were preserved either by immersion in liquid nitrogen (LN), or by storage under methane pressure at ambient arctic conditions, and later depressurized and immersed in LN. Eleven core samples from hydrate-bearing zones were scanned using x-ray computed tomography to examine core structure and homogeneity. Features observed include radial fractures, spalling-type fractures, and reduced density near the periphery. These features were induced during sample collection, handling, and preservation. Isotopic analysis of the methane from hydrate in an initially LN-preserved core and a pressure-preserved core indicate that secondary hydrate formation occurred throughout the pressurized core, whereas none occurred in the LN-preserved core, however no hydrate was found near the periphery of the LN-preserved core. To replicate some aspects of the preservation methods, natural and laboratory-made saturated porous media samples were frozen in a variety of ways, with radial fractures observed in some LN-frozen sands, and needle-like ice crystals forming in slowly frozen clay-rich sediments. Suggestions for hydrate-bearing core preservation are presented.

  4. Hanford Groundwater Contamination Areas Shrink as EM Exceeds Cleanup Goals

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    RICHLAND, Wash. – Workers supporting groundwater cleanup for EM’s Richland Operations Office at the Hanford site have exceeded a fiscal year goal to remove 3,500 pounds of carbon tetrachloride from groundwater under the center of the site.

  5. Los Alamos exceeds waste shipping July 8, 2013

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    - 1 - Los Alamos exceeds waste shipping goal July 8, 2013 Lab breaks another record with three months remaining in fiscal year LOS ALAMOS, N.M., July 8, 2013--Los Alamos National Laboratory, which in fiscal year 2013. During the past nine months, Los Alamos shipped 1,074 cubic meters of transuranic (TRU

  6. Examination of core samples from the Mount Elbert Gas Hydrate Stratigraphic Test Well, Alaska North Slope: Effects of retrieval and preservation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Collett, T.J. Kneafsey, T.J., H. Liu, W. Winters, R. Boswell, R. Hunter, and T.S.

    2012-01-01

    dewars and placed in a Styrofoam shipping cooler partiallythe LN present in the Styrofoam cooler, the samples remained

  7. Analysis of core samples from the BPXA-DOE-USGS Mount Elbert gas hydrate stratigraphic test well: Insights into core disturbance and handling

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kneafsey, Timothy J.

    2010-01-01

    dewars and placed in a Styrofoam shipping cooler partiallythe LN present in the Styrofoam cooler, the samples remained

  8. Analysis of core samples from the BPXA-DOE-USGS Mount Elbert gas hydrate stratigraphic test well: Insights into core disturbance and handling

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kneafsey, Timothy J.

    2010-01-01

    Mount Elbert Well) during drilling and coring operationsWell in February 2007. Coring was performed while using a custom oil-based drillingWell, pressure coring was not used, thus the core was depressurized upon ascent. Drilling

  9. Examination of core samples from the Mount Elbert Gas Hydrate Stratigraphic Test Well, Alaska North Slope: Effects of retrieval and preservation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Collett, T.J. Kneafsey, T.J., H. Liu, W. Winters, R. Boswell, R. Hunter, and T.S.

    2012-01-01

    Mount Elbert Well) during drilling and coring operationsWell in February 2007. Coring was performed while using a custom oil-based drillingWell, pressure coring was not used, thus the core was depressurized upon ascent. Drilling

  10. Estimating the likelihood of weather criteria exceedance during marine operations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brabazon, P.G. [Four Elements Ltd., London (United Kingdom); Gudmestad, O.T. [Statoil, Stavanger (Norway); Hopkins, J.S.

    1996-12-31

    This paper describes an approach to estimating the probability of marine operations being exposed to unsafe weather conditions. Marine operations, both inshore and offshore, are normally sensitive to environmental conditions. For the majority of operations threshold weather criteria will be predefined. An estimate of the likelihood of the operation experiencing bad weather, taking into account the uncertainties in weather forecasting, is of great value. The method is intended to be used as part of a risk assessment of marine operations, enabling the impact of design and scheduling decisions to be assessed in a structured and systematic way. The method has two components. Firstly, the time to complete an operation is defined in the form of a probability/time distribution. This is done by analyzing the duration of the tasks within the operation and identifying possible causes of delays. The likelihood and duration of each delay is estimated. Secondly, a probability/time curve is defined for the weather conditions exceeding the predefined threshold. The curve is determined by reference to the location of the marine operation, the time of year of the operation, the initial weather conditions and the accuracy of weather forecasting. Using the two probability/time curves, the likelihood of exposure is calculated.

  11. Radionuclides, inorganic constituents, organic compounds, and bacteria in water from selected wells and springs from the southern boundary of the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory to the Hagerman Area, Idaho, 1990

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bartholomay, R.C.; Edwards, D.D. [Geological Survey, Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Campbell, L.J. [State of Idaho, Dept. of Water Resources (United States)

    1992-03-01

    The US Geological Survey and the Idaho Department of Water Resources, in response to a request from the US Department of Energy, sampled 19 sites as part of a long-term project to monitor water quality of the Snake River Plain aquifer from the southern boundary of the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory to the Hagerman area. Water samples were collected and analyzed for manmade pollutants and naturally occurring constituents. The samples were collected from seven irrigation wells, five domestic wells, two springs, one stock well, two dairy wells, one observation well, and one commercial well. Two quality assurance samples also were collected and analyzed. The water samples were analyzed for selected radionuclides, inorganic constituents, organic compounds, and bacteria. None of the radionuclides, inorganic constituents, or organic compounds exceeded the established maximum contaminant levels for drinking water. Most of the radionuclide and inorganic constituent concentrations exceeded their respective reporting levels. All samples analyzed for surfactants and dissolved organic carbon had concentrations that exceeded their reporting level. Toluene concentrations exceeded the reporting level in one water sample. Two samples contained fecal coliform bacteria counts that exceeded established maximum contaminant levels for drinking water.

  12. Sampling for Bacteria in Wells (Spanish) 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lesikar, Bruce J.

    2001-11-15

    Laboratorio del Departamento de Sanidad o llame a su oficina local del Servicio de Extensi?n. 2. Elija el grifo (llave de paso) de agua fr?a del cual va a tomar la muestra. Qu?tele el oxigenador. No tome muestras de: un grifo de agua caliente, un grifo que... repose por varios d?as. *compilado por Bruce J. Lesikar, Ingeniero Agr?cola de Extensi?n, 9/92 ...

  13. Comfort standards and variation in exceedance for mixed-mode buildings.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brager, Gail; Borgeson, Sam

    2010-01-01

    comfort exceedance: lighting power density (W/m 2 ): low ¼example, both lighting and equipment power density defaultand low lighting and equipment power density values were

  14. Bad Estimates as a Function of Exceeding the MCNP Random Number Stride

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Booth, Thomas E.

    2014-05-05

    Examples of bad MCNP estimates resulting from exceeding the MCNP random number stride are given for a simple infinite medium problem.

  15. Recovery Act Helps Y-12 Exceed Cleanup Goal at Manhattan Project...

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Helps Y-12 Exceed Cleanup Goal at Manhattan Project-Era Building | National Nuclear Security Administration Facebook Twitter Youtube Flickr RSS People Mission Managing the...

  16. Hanford wells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chamness, M.A.; Merz, J.K.

    1993-08-01

    Records describing wells located on or near the Hanford Site have been maintained by Pacific Northwest Laboratory and the operating contractor, Westinghouse Hanford Company. In support of the Ground-Water Surveillance Project, portions of the data contained in these records have been compiled into the following report, which is intended to be used by those needing a condensed, tabular summary of well location and basic construction information. The wells listed in this report were constructed over a period of time spanning almost 70 years. Data included in this report were retrieved from the Hanford Envirorunental Information System (HEIS) database and supplemented with information not yet entered into HEIS. While considerable effort has been made to obtain the most accurate and complete tabulations possible of the Hanford Site wells, omissions and errors may exist. This document does not include data on lithologic logs, ground-water analyses, or specific well completion details.

  17. Monitoring well

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hubbell, Joel M. (Idaho Falls, ID); Sisson, James B. (Idaho Falls, ID)

    1999-01-01

    A monitoring well including a conduit defining a passageway, the conduit having a proximal and opposite, distal end; a coupler connected in fluid flowing relationship with the passageway; and a porous housing borne by the coupler and connected in fluid flowing relation thereto.

  18. Monitoring well

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hubbell, J.M.; Sisson, J.B.

    1999-06-29

    A monitoring well is described which includes: a conduit defining a passageway, the conduit having a proximal and opposite, distal end; a coupler connected in fluid flowing relationship with the passageway; and a porous housing borne by the coupler and connected in fluid flowing relation thereto. 8 figs.

  19. Monitoring well

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hubbell, Joel M. (Idaho Falls, ID); Sisson, James B. (Idaho Falls, ID)

    2002-01-01

    The present invention relates to a monitoring well which includes an enclosure defining a cavity and a water reservoir enclosed within the cavity and wherein the reservoir has an inlet and an outlet. The monitoring well further includes a porous housing borne by the enclosure and which defines a fluid chamber which is oriented in fluid communication with the outlet of the reservoir, and wherein the porous housing is positioned in an earthen soil location below-grade. A geophysical monitoring device is provided and mounted in sensing relation relative to the fluid chamber of the porous housing; and a coupler is selectively moveable relative to the outlet of reservoir to couple the porous housing and water reservoir in fluid communication. An actuator is coupled in force transmitting relation relative to the coupler to selectively position the coupler in a location to allow fluid communication between the reservoir and the fluid chamber defined by the porous housing.

  20. Fuel Cells Market Exceeds $1.3 Billion in Worldwide Sales

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The market for fuel cells is growing, exceeding $1.3 billion in worldwide sales during 2013, according to the recently released "Business Case for Fuel Cells" report from the Fuel Cell Technologies Office.

  1. Developmental of a Vapor Cloud Explosion Risk Analysis Tool Using Exceedance Methodology 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alghamdi, Salem

    2012-10-19

    to buildings based on exceedance methodology. This methodology was developed in a computer program which is used to support this thesis. The proposed model considers all possible gas release scenarios through the use of the Monte Carlo simulation. The risk...

  2. Well pump

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ames, Kenneth R. (Pasco, WA); Doesburg, James M. (Chicago, IL)

    1987-01-01

    A well pump includes a piston and an inlet and/or outlet valve assembly of special structure. Each is formed of a body of organic polymer, preferably PTFE. Each includes a cavity in its upper portion and at least one passage leading from the cavity to the bottom of the block. A screen covers each cavity and a valve disk covers each screen. Flexible sealing flanges extend upwardly and downwardly from the periphery of the piston block. The outlet valve block has a sliding block and sealing fit with the piston rod.

  3. Well Placement

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power AdministrationRobust,Field-effectWorking WithTelecentricN AProjectAdministration NNSAWell Placement Well

  4. Acceleration of the Jacobi iterative method by factors exceeding 100 using scheduled relaxation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mittal, Rajat

    Acceleration of the Jacobi iterative method by factors exceeding 100 using scheduled relaxation Abstract We present a methodology that accelerates the classical Jacobi iterative method by factors of the Jacobi method. Mathematical conditions that maximize the convergence rate are derived and optimal schemes

  5. Development of high productivity medium current ion implanter 'EXCEED 3000AH Evo2'

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ikejiri, T.; Hamamoto, N.; Hisada, S.; Iwasawa, K.; Kawakami, K.; Kokuryu, K.; Miyamoto, N.; Nogami, T.; Sakamoto, T.; Sasada, Y.; Tanaka, K.; Yamamoto, Y.; Yamashita, T. [Nissin Ion Equipment Co., LTD., 575, Kuze-tonoshiro-cho, Minami-ku, Kyoto, 601-8205 (Japan)

    2011-01-07

    High productivity medium current ion implanter 'EXCEED 3000AH Evo2' is developed. In semiconductor manufacturing field, improvement of the productivity is continuously required. Especially mass production lines recently tend to use low energy beam and 2 pass implant for higher throughput. The 'Evo2' has been developed in an effort to fulfill these requirements. The 'Evo2' increases low energy beam current by 150 to 250% by applying electrostatic einzel lens called 'V-lens' installed at the exit of the Collimator magnet. This lens is also able to control the beam incident angle by adjusting the upper and lower electrode's voltages independently. Besides, mechanical scanning speed is enhanced to minimize process time of 2 pass implant, while also frequency of the fast beam scanning is enhanced to keep dose uniformity. In addition, a vacuum pumping capability at the target chamber is enhanced to reduce a vacuum waiting time during processing photo-resist wafers. This improvement achieved to reduce process time by 40% for a specific recipe. Furthermore, a modified Indirectly Heated Cathode with electron active Reflection 2 (IHC-R2) ion source which has a long life time filament has been installed. These new elements and/or functions have realized typically 25% improvement of productivity compared to standard EXCEED, and also improve a precise implantation capability.

  6. A Covalent Organic Framework that Exceeds the DOE 2015 Volumetric Target for H2 Uptake at 298 K

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yaghi, Omar M.

    A Covalent Organic Framework that Exceeds the DOE 2015 Volumetric Target for H2 Uptake at 298 K to H2 binding energies that are too weak (leading to volumetric capacity at 298 K of

  7. Decontaminating Flooded Wells 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boellstorff, Diana; Dozier, Monty; Provin, Tony; Dictson, Nikkoal; McFarland, Mark L.

    2005-09-30

    This publication explains how to decontaminate and disinfect a well, test the well water and check for well damage after a flood....

  8. BUFFERED WELL FIELD OUTLINES

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    OIL & GAS FIELD OUTLINES FROM BUFFERED WELLS The VBA Code below builds oil & gas field boundary outlines (polygons) from buffered wells (points). Input well points layer must be a...

  9. 6. B. Sole Source Purchase: Commodities, contractual and construction services exceeding $50,000, available only from a single source.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wu, Shin-Tson

    6. B. Sole Source Purchase: Commodities, contractual and construction services exceeding $50 not be cost effective to use a different consultant"; · Stating a consultant is the foremost authority: (1). Complete the sole source form at http://www.purchasing.ucf.edu/forms/index.asp. Justifications

  10. Sampling box

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Phillips, Terrance D. (617 Chestnut Ct., Aiken, SC 29803); Johnson, Craig (100 Midland Rd., Oak Ridge, TN 37831-0895)

    2000-01-01

    An air sampling box that uses a slidable filter tray and a removable filter cartridge to allow for the easy replacement of a filter which catches radioactive particles is disclosed.

  11. Exceeding the solar cell Shockley-Queisser limit via thermal up-conversion of low-energy photons

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boriskina, Svetlana V

    2013-01-01

    Maximum efficiency of ideal single-junction photovoltaic (PV) cells is limited to 33% (for one sun illumination) by intrinsic losses such as band edge thermalization, radiative recombination, and inability to absorb below-bandgap photons. This intrinsic thermodynamic limit, named after Shockley and Queisser (S-Q), can be exceeded by utilizing low-energy photons either via their electronic up-conversion or via thermophotovoltaic (TPV) conversion process. However, electronic up-conversion systems have extremely low efficiencies, and practical temperature considerations limit the operation of TPV converters to the narrow-gap PV cells. Here we develop a conceptual design of a hybrid TPV platform, which exploits thermal up-conversion of low-energy photons and is compatible with conventional silicon PV cells by using spectral and directional selectivity of the up-converter. The hybrid platform offers sunlight-to-electricity conversion efficiency exceeding that imposed by the S-Q limit on the corresponding PV cells ...

  12. Sampling apparatus

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Gordon, N.R.; King, L.L.; Jackson, P.O.; Zulich, A.W.

    1989-07-18

    A sampling apparatus is provided for sampling substances from solid surfaces. The apparatus includes first and second elongated tubular bodies which telescopically and sealingly join relative to one another. An absorbent pad is mounted to the end of a rod which is slidably received through a passageway in the end of one of the joined bodies. The rod is preferably slidably and rotatably received through the passageway, yet provides a selective fluid tight seal relative thereto. A recess is formed in the rod. When the recess and passageway are positioned to be coincident, fluid is permitted to flow through the passageway and around the rod. The pad is preferably laterally orientable relative to the rod and foldably retractable to within one of the bodies. A solvent is provided for wetting of the pad and solubilizing or suspending the material being sampled from a particular surface. 15 figs.

  13. Plugging Abandoned Water Wells 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lesikar, Bruce J.

    2002-02-28

    is abandoned without proper plugging, upward flow of salty water from the deeper aquifer may cause contamination of the shallow, fresh water aquifer. Also, any pollu- tants that occur in one zone can migrate to another zone through a well. Unplugged abandoned... wells may deplete pres- sure within an aquifer. Pressure in artesian aquifers decreases as water discharges at land surface or to less pressurized aquifers. Eventually a drop in pres- sure causes flowing wells to stop flowing and the water level...

  14. Geothermal Well Site Restoration and Plug and Abandonment of Wells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rinehart, Ben N.

    1994-08-01

    A report is presented on the final phase of an energy research program conducted by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) involving two geothermal well sites in the State of Louisiana-the Gladys McCall site and the Willis Hulin site. The research program was intended to improve geothermal technology and to determine the efficacy of producing electricity commercially from geopressured resource sites. The final phase of the program consisted of plug and abandonment (P&A) of the wells and restoration of the well sites. Restoration involved (a) initial soil and water sampling and analysis; (b) removal and disposal of well pads, concrete, utility poles, and trash; (c) plugging of monitor and freshwater wells; and (d) site leveling and general cleanup. Restoration of the McCall site required removal of naturally occurring radioactive material (NORM), which was costly and time-consuming. Exhibits are included that provide copies of work permits and authorizations, P&A reports and procedures, daily workover and current conditions report, and cost and salvage reports. Site locations, grid maps, and photographs are provided.

  15. Penrose Well Temperatures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Christopherson, Karen

    2013-03-15

    Penrose Well Temperatures Geothermal waters have been encountered in several wells near Penrose in Fremont County, Colorado. Most of the wells were drilled for oil and gas exploration and, in a few cases, production. This ESRI point shapefile utilizes data from 95 wells in and around the Penrose area provided by the Colorado Oil and Gas Conservation Commission (COGCC) database at http://cogcc.state.co.us/ . Temperature data from the database were used to calculate a temperature gradient for each well. This information was then used to estimate temperatures at various depths. Projection: UTM Zone 13 NAD27 Extent: West -105.224871 East -105.027633 North 38.486269 South 38.259507 Originators: Colorado Oil and Gas Conservation Commission (COGCC) Karen Christopherson

  16. Advance information on forthcoming market surveys and calls for tenders expected to exceed 200 000 Swiss francs and technology transfer projects

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2010-01-01

    Advance information on forthcoming market surveys and calls for tenders expected to exceed 200 000 Swiss francs and technology transfer projects

  17. Oklahoma City Flash Flood Event, 31 May -1 June 2013 Annual Exceedance Probabilities (AEPs) for Worst Case 4-hour and 6-hour Rainfall

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oklahoma City Flash Flood Event, 31 May - 1 June 2013 Annual Exceedance Probabilities (AEPs HOLDENVILLEHOLDENVILLE MIDWEST CITYMIDWEST CITY OKLAHOMA CITYOKLAHOMA CITY Hydrometeorological Design Studies Center

  18. Isobaric groundwater well

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hubbell, Joel M. (Idaho Falls, ID); Sisson, James B. (Idaho Falls, ID)

    1999-01-01

    A method of measuring a parameter in a well, under isobaric conditions, including such parameters as hydraulic gradient, pressure, water level, soil moisture content and/or aquifer properties the method as presented comprising providing a casing having first and second opposite ends, and a length between the ends, the casing supporting a transducer having a reference port; placing the casing lengthwise into the well, second end first, with the reference port vented above the water table in the well; and sealing the first end. A system is presented for measuring a parameter in a well, the system comprising a casing having first and second opposite ends, and a length between the ends and being configured to be placed lengthwise into a well second end first; a transducer, the transducer having a reference port, the reference port being vented in the well above the water table, the casing being screened across and above the water table; and a sealing member sealing the first end. In one embodiment, the transducer is a tensiometer transducer and in other described embodiments, another type transducer is used in addition to a tensiometer.

  19. Thermal indicator for wells

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Gaven, Jr., Joseph V. (Oakton, VA); Bak, Chan S. (Newbury Park, CA)

    1983-01-01

    Minute durable plate-like thermal indicators are employed for precision measuring static and dynamic temperatures of well drilling fluids. The indicators are small enough and sufficiently durable to be circulated in the well with drilling fluids during the drilling operation. The indicators include a heat resistant indicating layer, a coacting meltable solid component and a retainer body which serves to unitize each indicator and which may carry permanent indicator identifying indicia. The indicators are recovered from the drilling fluid at ground level by known techniques.

  20. Phenomenal well-being 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Campbell, Stephen Michael

    2006-08-16

    the hedonistic concept of satisfaction. An epistemic model of life-comparison (inspired by Peter RailtonÂ?s full information account of well-being) on which phenomenal lives are judged on the criterion of satisfaction is presented, followed by some objections...

  1. 100 Area Columbia River sediment sampling

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Weiss, S.G. [Westinghouse Hanford Co., Richland, WA (United States)

    1993-09-08

    Forty-four sediment samples were collected from 28 locations in the Hanford Reach of the Columbia River to assess the presence of metals and man-made radionuclides in the near shore and shoreline settings of the Hanford Site. Three locations were sampled upriver of the Hanford Site plutonium production reactors. Twenty-two locations were sampled near the reactors. Three locations were sampled downstream of the reactors near the Hanford Townsite. Sediment was collected from depths of 0 to 6 in. and between 12 to 24 in. below the surface. Samples containing concentrations of metals exceeding the 95 % upper threshold limit values (DOE-RL 1993b) are considered contaminated. Contamination by arsenic, chromium, copper, lead, and zinc was found. Man-made radionuclides occur in all samples except four collected opposite the Hanford Townsite. Man-made radionuclide concentrations were generally less than 1 pCi/g.

  2. Development Wells At Salt Wells Area (Nevada Bureau of Mines...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Development Wells At Salt Wells Area (Nevada Bureau of Mines and Geology, 2009) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Development Wells...

  3. Quantum rejection sampling

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Maris Ozols; Martin Roetteler; Jérémie Roland

    2011-12-13

    Rejection sampling is a well-known method to sample from a target distribution, given the ability to sample from a given distribution. The method has been first formalized by von Neumann (1951) and has many applications in classical computing. We define a quantum analogue of rejection sampling: given a black box producing a coherent superposition of (possibly unknown) quantum states with some amplitudes, the problem is to prepare a coherent superposition of the same states, albeit with different target amplitudes. The main result of this paper is a tight characterization of the query complexity of this quantum state generation problem. We exhibit an algorithm, which we call quantum rejection sampling, and analyze its cost using semidefinite programming. Our proof of a matching lower bound is based on the automorphism principle which allows to symmetrize any algorithm over the automorphism group of the problem. Our main technical innovation is an extension of the automorphism principle to continuous groups that arise for quantum state generation problems where the oracle encodes unknown quantum states, instead of just classical data. Furthermore, we illustrate how quantum rejection sampling may be used as a primitive in designing quantum algorithms, by providing three different applications. We first show that it was implicitly used in the quantum algorithm for linear systems of equations by Harrow, Hassidim and Lloyd. Secondly, we show that it can be used to speed up the main step in the quantum Metropolis sampling algorithm by Temme et al.. Finally, we derive a new quantum algorithm for the hidden shift problem of an arbitrary Boolean function and relate its query complexity to "water-filling" of the Fourier spectrum.

  4. Single-Well and Cross-Well Seismic At Salt Wells Area (Bureau...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Single-Well and Cross-Well Seismic At Salt Wells Area (Bureau of Land Management, 2009) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity:...

  5. Completion practices in deep sour Tuscaloosa wells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Huntoon, G.G.

    1984-01-01

    Successful development of the Tuscaloosa trend in Louisiana has required unique completion practices to produce the trend's deep sour formations. Amoco's operations in the Tuscaloosa formation are between 16,000 and 21,000 ft (4877 and 6400 m), and a range of pressure environments, high temperatures, and corrosive elements is encountered. Application of proved completion practices and equipment has resulted in several techniques that enhance the safety, longevity, and production capacity of these wells. The design of deep Tuscaloosa completions is assisted by a series of correlations developed to project bottomhole and surface shut-in tubing pressures, temperature gradients, and flow capacities for deep sour wells. This paper discusses material selection, completion practices, completion fluids, wellhead equipment, packer designs, corrosion-inhibition systems, and safety and monitoring equipment used in the Tuscaloosa trend. The design of a wellhead surface installation used to detect equipment failure, to pump kill fluids, and to circulate corrosion inhibitors is reviewed. A case study illustrates the methods used in completing a Tuscaloosa well with surface pressures exceeding 16,000 psi (110.3 MPa). Deep high-pressure sour-gas wells can be completed safely if all the elements of the environment that will affect the mechanical integrity of the wellbore are considered in the completion designs. The development of higher-strength material capable of withstanding SSC is needed if wells are completed in formations deeper than 22,000 ft (6700 m). Further research is necessary on the use of alloy steels and nonferrous metals for sour service. Effective high-temperature corrosion inhibitors for heavy zinc bromide completion fluids must be developed before these brines can be used in the Tuscaloosa. The testing of new inhibitors for use in highpressure sour-gas completions should be continued.

  6. Nevada Test Site Groundwater Well Rehabilitation Plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    David B. Hudson

    2006-12-01

    This plan describes actions to improve the utility and credibility of the Nevada Test Site (NTS) interim groundwater monitoring program. The two principal actions are: (1) well maintenance/rehabilitation activities and (2) the deployment of dedicated low-cost and reliable jack-pumps for groundwater sampling from deep monitoring wells. The scope of this proposal is to perform these actions on some number of nine selected wells (Figure 1) to evaluate whether these actions are achievable, practical, cost effective, and result in improved groundwater data quality.

  7. Well-pump alignment system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Drumheller, Douglas S. (Cedar Crest, NM)

    1998-01-01

    An improved well-pump for geothermal wells, an alignment system for a well-pump, and to a method for aligning a rotor and stator within a well-pump, wherein the well-pump has a whistle assembly formed at a bottom portion thereof, such that variations in the frequency of the whistle, indicating misalignment, may be monitored during pumping.

  8. JOURNAL OF NATURAL RESOURCES & LIFE SCIENCES EDUCATION VOLUME 38 2009 87 exceeds the harvesting rate, forest carbon uptake during

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Grogan, Paul

    , and lifestyle/ social dimensions. For example, is an energy-efficient hybrid car (with regenerative braking the harvesting rate, forest carbon uptake during growth of new trees in the harvested forest or woodlot offsets, Increasing energy costs as well as concerns about climate change associated with fossil fuel use have

  9. Ultra Thin Quantum Well Materials

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dr Saeid Ghamaty

    2012-08-16

    This project has enabled Hi-Z technology Inc. (Hi-Z) to understand how to improve the thermoelectric properties of Si/SiGe Quantum Well Thermoelectric Materials. The research that was completed under this project has enabled Hi-Z Technology, Inc. (Hi-Z) to satisfy the project goal to understand how to improve thermoelectric conversion efficiency and reduce costs by fabricating ultra thin Si/SiGe quantum well (QW) materials and measuring their properties. In addition, Hi-Z gained critical new understanding on how thin film fabrication increases the silicon substrate's electrical conductivity, which is important new knowledge to develop critical material fabrication parameters. QW materials are constructed with alternate layers of an electrical conductor, SiGe and an electrical insulator, Si. Film thicknesses were varied, ranging from 2nm to 10nm where 10 nm was the original film thickness prior to this work. The optimum performance was determined at a Si and SiGe thickness of 4nm for an electrical current and heat flow parallel to the films, which was an important conclusion of this work. Essential new information was obtained on how the Si substrate electrical conductivity increases by up to an order of magnitude upon deposition of QW films. Test measurements and calculations are accurate and include both the quantum well and the substrate. The large increase in substrate electrical conductivity means that a larger portion of the electrical current passes through the substrate. The silicon substrate's increased electrical conductivity is due to inherent impurities and thermal donors which are activated during both molecular beam epitaxy and sputtering deposition of QW materials. Hi-Z's forward looking cost estimations based on future high performance QW modules, in which the best Seebeck coefficient and electrical resistivity are taken from separate samples predict that the electricity cost produced with a QW module could be achieved at <$0.35/W. This price would open many markets for waste heat recovery applications. By installing Hi-Z's materials in applications in which electricity could be produced from waste heat sources could result in significant energy savings as well as emissions reductions. For example, if QW thermoelectric generators could be introduced commercially in 2015, and assuming they could also capture an additional 0.1%/year of the available waste heat from the aluminum, steel, and iron industries, then by 2020, their use would lead to a 2.53 trillion Btu/year reduction in energy consumption. This translates to a $12.9 million/year energy savings, and 383.6 million lb's of CO2 emissions reduction per year. Additionally, Hi-Z would expect that the use of QW TE devices in the automotive, manufacturing, and energy generation industries would reduce the USA's petroleum and fossil fuel dependence, and thus significantly reduce emissions from CO2 and other polluting gasses such as NOx, SOx, and particulate matter (PM), etc.

  10. Well-pump alignment system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Drumheller, D.S.

    1998-10-20

    An improved well-pump for geothermal wells, an alignment system for a well-pump, and to a method for aligning a rotor and stator within a well-pump are disclosed, wherein the well-pump has a whistle assembly formed at a bottom portion thereof, such that variations in the frequency of the whistle, indicating misalignment, may be monitored during pumping. 6 figs.

  11. DESIGN OF HYDRAULIC CONTROLS AND STRUCTURES 16.1. A spillway on a flood control dam is designed to pass a flood with an exceedance

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bowen, James D.

    CHAPTER 16 DESIGN OF HYDRAULIC CONTROLS AND STRUCTURES 16.1. A spillway on a flood control dam of failure will be no greater than 5% in a time period of 50 years. What will be the exceedance probability is such that the longest watercourse length is 300 ft, the average slope is 3%, and the Manning n value of the ground cover

  12. Apparatus for sectioning demountable semiconductor samples

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Sopori, Bhushan L. (Scottsdale, AZ); Wolf, Abraham (Sun City West, AZ)

    1984-01-01

    Apparatus for use during polishing and sectioning operations of a ribbon sample is described. The sample holder includes a cylinder having an axially extending sample cavity terminated in a first funnel-shaped opening and a second slot-like opening. A spring-loaded pressure plunger is located adjacent the second opening of the sample cavity for frictional engagement of the sample prior to introduction of a molding medium in the sample cavity. A heat softenable molding medium is inserted in the funnel-shaped opening, to surround the sample. After polishing, the heater is energized to allow draining of the molding medium from the sample cavity. During manual polishing, the second end of the sample holder is inserted in a support ring which provides mechanical support as well as alignment of the sample holder during polishing. A gauge block for measuring the protrusion of a sample beyond the second wall of the holder is also disclosed.

  13. Health And Wellness Department Of Health And Wellness

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McConnell, Terry

    Health And Wellness Department Of Health And Wellness Lutchmie Narine, Chair, 315-443-9630 426 The Department of Health and Wellness offers a 123-credit Bachelor of Science degree (B.S.) in public health. Our graduates are prepared to work in community health education and health promotion in public health agencies

  14. Argonne Premium Coal Sample Bank The Argonne Premium Coal (APC) Sample Bank can supply

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Maranas, Costas

    Argonne Premium Coal Sample Bank Background Overview T The Argonne Premium Coal (APC) Sample Bank can supply researchers with highly uniform, well-protected coal samples unexposed to oxygen. Researchers investigating coal structure, properties, and behavior can benefit greatly from these samples

  15. Horizontal well replaces hydraulic fracturing in North Sea gas well

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Reynolds, D.A.; Seymour, K.P. )

    1991-11-25

    This paper reports on excessive water production from hydraulically fractured wells in a poor quality reservoir in the North SEa which prompted the drilling of a horizontal well. Gas production from the horizontal well reached six times that of the offset vertical wells, and no water production occurred. This horizontal well proved commercial the western section of the Anglia field. Horizontal drilling in the North SEa is as an effective technology to enhance hydrocarbon recovery from reservoirs that previously had proven uncommercial with other standard techniques. It is viable for the development of marginal reservoirs, particularly where conditions preclude stimulation from hydraulic fracturing.

  16. Thermal well-test method

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Tsang, Chin-Fu (Albany, CA); Doughty, Christine A. (Berkeley, CA)

    1985-01-01

    A well-test method involving injection of hot (or cold) water into a groundwater aquifer, or injecting cold water into a geothermal reservoir. By making temperature measurements at various depths in one or more observation wells, certain properties of the aquifer are determined. These properties, not obtainable from conventional well test procedures, include the permeability anisotropy, and layering in the aquifer, and in-situ thermal properties. The temperature measurements at various depths are obtained from thermistors mounted in the observation wells.

  17. Environmental surveillance master sampling schedule

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bisping, L.E.

    1995-02-01

    Environmental surveillance of the Hanford Site and surrounding areas is conducted by the Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) for the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). This document contains the planned 1994 schedules for routine collection of samples for the Surface Environmental Surveillance Project (SESP), Drinking Water Project, and Ground-Water Surveillance Project. Samples are routinely collected for the SESP and analyzed to determine the quality of air, surface water, soil, sediment, wildlife, vegetation, foodstuffs, and farm products at Hanford Site and surrounding communities. The responsibility for monitoring onsite drinking water falls outside the scope of the SESP. PNL conducts the drinking water monitoring project concurrent with the SESP to promote efficiency and consistency, utilize expertise developed over the years, and reduce costs associated with management, procedure development, data management, quality control, and reporting. The ground-water sampling schedule identifies ground-water sampling .events used by PNL for environmental surveillance of the Hanford Site. Sampling is indicated as annual, semi-annual, quarterly, or monthly in the sampling schedule. Some samples are collected and analyzed as part of ground-water monitoring and characterization programs at Hanford (e.g. Resources Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA), Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA), or Operational). The number of samples planned by other programs are identified in the sampling schedule by a number in the analysis column and a project designation in the Cosample column. Well sampling events may be merged to avoid redundancy in cases where sampling is planned by both-environmental surveillance and another program.

  18. Apparatus for sectioning demountable semiconductor samples

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Sopori, B.L.; Wolf, A.

    1984-01-01

    Apparatus for use during polishing and sectioning operations of a ribbon sample is described. The sample holder includes a cylinder having an axially extending sample cavity terminated in a first funnel-shaped opening and a second slot-like opening. A spring-loaded pressure plunger is located adjacent the second opening of the sample cavity for frictional engagement of the sample cavity. A heat softenable molding medium is inserted in the funnel-shaped opening, to surround the sample. After polishing, the heater is energized to allow draining of the molding medium from the sample cavity. During manual polishing, the second end of the sample holder is inserted in a support ring which provides mechanical support as well as alignment of the sample holder during polishing. A gauge block for measuring the protrusion of a sample beyond the second wall of the holder is also disclosed.

  19. Apparatus for operating a gas and oil producing well

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wynn, S. R.

    1985-07-02

    Apparatus is disclosed for automatically operating a gas and oil producing well of the plunger lift type, including a comparator for comparing casing and tubing pressures, a device for opening the gas delivery valve when the difference between casing and tubing pressure is less than a selected minimum value, a device for closing the gas discharge valve when casing pressure falls below a selected casing bleed value, an arrival sensor switch for initially closing the fluid discharge valve when the plunger reaches the upper end of the tubing, and a device for reopening the fluid discharge valve at the end of a given downtime period in the event that the level of oil in the tubing produces a pressure difference greater than the given minimum differential value, and the casing pressure is greater than lift pressure. The gas discharge valve is closed if the pressure difference exceeds a selected maximum value, or if the casing pressure falls below a selected casing bleed value. The fluid discharge valve is closed if tubing pressure exceeds a maximum safe value. In the event that the plunger does not reach the upper end of the tubing during a selected uptime period, a lockout indication is presented on a visual display device, and the well is held shut-in until the well differential is forced down to the maximum differential setting of the device. When this occurs, the device will automatically unlock and normal cycling will resume.

  20. Well having inhibited microbial growth

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Lee, Brady D.; Dooley, Kirk J.

    2006-08-15

    The invention includes methods of inhibiting microbial growth in a well. A packing material containing a mixture of a first material and an antimicrobial agent is provided to at least partially fill a well bore. One or more access tubes are provided in an annular space around a casing within the well bore. The access tubes have a first terminal opening located at or above a ground surface and have a length that extends from the first terminal opening at least part of the depth of the well bore. The access tubes have a second terminal opening located within the well bore. An antimicrobial material is supplied into the well bore through the first terminal opening of the access tubes. The invention also includes well constructs.

  1. Generic effluent monitoring system certification for salt well portable exhauster

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Glissmeyer, J.A.; Maughan, A.D.

    1997-09-01

    Tests were conducted to verify that the Generic Effluent Monitoring System (GEMS), as it is applied to the Salt Well Portable Exhauster, meets all applicable regulatory performance criteria for air sampling systems at nuclear facilities. These performance criteria address both the suitability of the air sampling probe location and the transport of the sample to the collection devices. The criteria covering air sampling probe location ensure that the contaminants in the stack are well mixed with the airflow at the probe location such that the extracted sample represents the whole. The sample transport criteria ensure that the sampled contaminants are quantitatively delivered to the collection device. The specific performance criteria are described in detail in the report. The tests demonstrated that the GEMS/Salt Well Exhauster system meets all applicable performance criteria. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory conducted the testing using a mockup of the Salt Well Portable Exhauster stack at the Numatec Hanford Company`s 305 Building. The stack/sampling system configuration tested was designed to provide airborne effluent control for the Salt Well pumping operation at some U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) radioactive waste storage tanks at the Hanford Site, Washington. The portable design of the exhauster allows it to be used in other applications and over a range of exhaust air flowrates (approximately 200 - 1100 cubic feet per minute). The unit includes a stack section containing the sampling probe and another stack section containing the airflow, temperature and humidity sensors. The GEMS design features a probe with a single shrouded sampling nozzle, a sample delivery line, and sample collection system. The collection system includes a filter holder to collect the sample of record and an in-line detector head and filter for monitoring beta radiation-emitting particles.

  2. DESIGN OF THE TRANSCONDUCTANCE AMPLIFIER FOR FREQUENCY DOMAIN SAMPLING RECEIVER 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, XI

    2010-01-16

    voltages at the source terminals of the NMOS transistors, as well as ones at gate terminals, are pretty high. The bulks of the NMOS transistors are always connected to VSS, so Vgb of those NMOS transistors might exceed the breakdown voltage. The solution...

  3. Assessment of Injection Well Construction and Operation for Water Injection Wells and Salt Water Disposal Wells

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    such as drilling mud and work- over fluids. These are all shallow wells using injected fresh water to dissolve salt Disposal Wells in the Nine Township Area ­ 2009 September 2009 Prepared by Delaware Basin Drilling into a brine solution. In order to develop a solution mine, either a new well is drilled for brine extraction

  4. Static downhole characteristics of well CGEH-1 at Coso Hot Springs...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    are in the upper-cased portion of the well. Downhole chemical sampling suggests that the borehole still contains remnants of drilling materials. The well has never been...

  5. Session: Long Valley Exploratory Well

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tennyson, George P. Jr.; Finger, John T.; Eichelberger, John C.; Hickox, Charles E.

    1992-01-01

    This session at the Geothermal Energy Program Review X: Geothermal Energy and the Utility Market consisted of four presentations: ''Long Valley Exploratory Well - Summary'' by George P. Tennyson, Jr.; ''The Long Valley Well - Phase II Operations'' by John T. Finger; ''Geologic results from the Long Valley Exploratory Well'' by John C. Eichelberger; and ''A Model for Large-Scale Thermal Convection in the Long Valley Geothermal Region'' by Charles E. Hickox.

  6. Thermal well-test method

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Tsang, C.F.; Doughty, C.A.

    1984-02-24

    A well-test method involving injection of hot (or cold) water into a groundwater aquifer, or injecting cold water into a geothermal reservoir is disclosed. By making temperature measurements at various depths in one or more observation wells, certain properties of the aquifer are determined. These properties, not obtainable from conventional well test procedures, include the permeability anisotropy, and layering in the aquifer, and in-situ thermal properties. The temperature measurements at various depths are obtained from thermistors mounted in the observation wells.

  7. Well Monitoring System for EGS

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    EGS well monitoring tools offer a unique set of solutions which will lower costs and increase confidence in future geothermal projects.

  8. Optimization of fractured well performance of horizontal gas wells 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Magalhaes, Fellipe Vieira

    2009-06-02

    In low-permeability gas reservoirs, horizontal wells have been used to increase the reservoir contact area, and hydraulic fracturing has been further extending the contact between wellbores and reservoirs. This thesis presents an approach...

  9. Defining And Characterizing Sample Representativeness For DWPF Melter Feed Samples

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shine, E. P.; Poirier, M. R.

    2013-10-29

    Representative sampling is important throughout the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) process, and the demonstrated success of the DWPF process to achieve glass product quality over the past two decades is a direct result of the quality of information obtained from the process. The objective of this report was to present sampling methods that the Savannah River Site (SRS) used to qualify waste being dispositioned at the DWPF. The goal was to emphasize the methodology, not a list of outcomes from those studies. This methodology includes proven methods for taking representative samples, the use of controlled analytical methods, and data interpretation and reporting that considers the uncertainty of all error sources. Numerous sampling studies were conducted during the development of the DWPF process and still continue to be performed in order to evaluate options for process improvement. Study designs were based on use of statistical tools applicable to the determination of uncertainties associated with the data needs. Successful designs are apt to be repeated, so this report chose only to include prototypic case studies that typify the characteristics of frequently used designs. Case studies have been presented for studying in-tank homogeneity, evaluating the suitability of sampler systems, determining factors that affect mixing and sampling, comparing the final waste glass product chemical composition and durability to that of the glass pour stream sample and other samples from process vessels, and assessing the uniformity of the chemical composition in the waste glass product. Many of these studies efficiently addressed more than one of these areas of concern associated with demonstrating sample representativeness and provide examples of statistical tools in use for DWPF. The time when many of these designs were implemented was in an age when the sampling ideas of Pierre Gy were not as widespread as they are today. Nonetheless, the engineers and statisticians used carefully thought out designs that systematically and economically provided plans for data collection from the DWPF process. Key shared features of the sampling designs used at DWPF and the Gy sampling methodology were the specification of a standard for sample representativeness, an investigation that produced data from the process to study the sampling function, and a decision framework used to assess whether the specification was met based on the data. Without going into detail with regard to the seven errors identified by Pierre Gy, as excellent summaries are readily available such as Pitard [1989] and Smith [2001], SRS engineers understood, for example, that samplers can be biased (Gy?s extraction error), and developed plans to mitigate those biases. Experiments that compared installed samplers with more representative samples obtained directly from the tank may not have resulted in systematically partitioning sampling errors into the now well-known error categories of Gy, but did provide overall information on the suitability of sampling systems. Most of the designs in this report are related to the DWPF vessels, not the large SRS Tank Farm tanks. Samples from the DWPF Slurry Mix Evaporator (SME), which contains the feed to the DWPF melter, are characterized using standardized analytical methods with known uncertainty. The analytical error is combined with the established error from sampling and processing in DWPF to determine the melter feed composition. This composition is used with the known uncertainty of the models in the Product Composition Control System (PCCS) to ensure that the wasteform that is produced is comfortably within the acceptable processing and product performance region. Having the advantage of many years of processing that meets the waste glass product acceptance criteria, the DWPF process has provided a considerable amount of data about itself in addition to the data from many special studies. Demonstrating representative sampling directly from the large Tank Farm tanks is a difficult, if not unsolvable enterprise due to li

  10. SITE CHARACTERIZATION AND MONITORING DATA FROM THE AREA 5 PILOT WELLS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    BECHTEL NEVADA; U.S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY, NATIONAL NUCLEAR SECURITY ADMINISTRATION NEVADA SITE OFFICE

    2005-09-01

    Three exploratory boreholes were drilled and completed to the uppermost alluvial aquifer in Area 5 of the Nevada Test Site, Nye County, Nevada, in 1992. The boreholes and associated investigations were part of the Area 5 Site Characterization Program developed to meet data needs associated with regulatory requirements applicable to the disposal of low-level, mixed, and high-specific-activity waste at this site. This series of boreholes was specifically designed to characterize the hydrogeology of the thick vadose zone and to help define the water quality and hydraulic properties of the uppermost aquifer. Wells UE5PW-1, UE5PW-2, and UE5PW-3 are located in a triangular array near the southeast, northeast, and northwest corners, respectively, of the approximately 2.6-square-kilometer Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Site to give reasonable spatial coverage for sampling and characterization, and to help define the nearly horizontal water table. Two of the wells, UE5PW-1 and UE5PW-2, penetrated only unconsolidated alluvial materials. The third well, located closer to the margin of the basin, penetrated both alluvium and underlying ash-flow and bedded tuff units. The watertable was encountered at the elevation of approximately 734 meters. The results of laboratory testing of core and drill cuttings samples indicate that the mineralogical, material, and hydrologic properties of the alluvium are very similar within and between boreholes. Additional tests on the same core and drill cuttings samples indicate that hydrologic conditions within the alluvium are also similar between pilot wells. Both core and drill cuttings samples are dry (less than 10 percent water content by weight) throughout the entire unsaturated section of alluvium, and water content increases slightly with depth in each borehole. Water potential measurements on core samples show a large positive potential gradient (water tends to move upward, rather than downward) to a depth of approximately 30.5 meters in each borehole, and a nearly zero potential gradient throughout the remaining portion of the vadose zone. These hydrologic condition data and hydrologic property data indicate that little net downward liquid flow is occurring (if any) through the thick vadose zone. Conversely, gas flow by diffusion, and possibly by advection, may be an important transport mechanism. Environmental tracer measurements made on water extracted from geologic samples suggest that water vapor in the upper portion of the vadose zone is moving upward in response to evaporative demand of the present arid climate. Preliminary water quality data indicate that the key hazardous and radioactive constituents do not exceed appropriate standards. Monitoring instruments and equipment were installed in each pilot well for making in-situ measurements of key hydrologic and pneumatic parameters and to monitor change in these parameters over time.

  11. Method for polymer synthesis in a reaction well

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Brennan, Thomas M. (San Francisco, CA)

    1998-01-01

    A method of synthesis for building a polymer chain, oligonucleotides in particular, by sequentially adding monomer units to at least one solid support for growing and immobilizing a polymer chain thereon in a liquid reagent solution. The method includes the step of: A) depositing a liquid reagent in a reaction well (26) in contact with at least one solid support and at least one monomer unit of the polymer chain affixed to the solid support. The well (26) includes at least one orifice (74) extending into the well (26), and is of a size and dimension to form a capillary liquid seal to retain the reagent solution in the well (26) to enable polymer chain growth on the solid support. The method further includes the step of B) expelling the reagent solution from the well (26), while retaining the polymer chain therein. This is accomplished by applying a first gas pressure to the reaction well such that a pressure differential between the first gas pressure and a second gas pressure exerted on an exit (80) of the orifice (74) exceeds a predetermined amount sufficient to overcome the capillary liquid seal and expel the reagent solution from the well (26) through the orifice exit (80).

  12. Method for polymer synthesis in a reaction well

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Brennan, T.M.

    1998-09-29

    A method of synthesis is described for building a polymer chain, oligonucleotides in particular, by sequentially adding monomer units to at least one solid support for growing and immobilizing a polymer chain thereon in a liquid reagent solution. The method includes the step of: (A) depositing a liquid reagent in a reaction well in contact with at least one solid support and at least one monomer unit of the polymer chain affixed to the solid support. The well includes at least one orifice extending into the well, and is of a size and dimension to form a capillary liquid seal to retain the reagent solution in the well to enable polymer chain growth on the solid support. The method further includes the step of (B) expelling the reagent solution from the well, while retaining the polymer chain therein. This is accomplished by applying a first gas pressure to the reaction well such that a pressure differential between the first gas pressure and a second gas pressure exerted on an exit of the orifice exceeds a predetermined amount sufficient to overcome the capillary liquid seal and expel the reagent solution from the well through the orifice exit. 9 figs.

  13. Testing of the Pleasant Bayou Well through October 1990

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Randolph, P.L.; Hayden, C.G.; Mosca, V.L.; Anhaiser, J.L.

    1992-08-01

    Pleasant Bayou location was inactive from 1983 until the cleanout of the production and disposal wells in 1986. The surface facilities were rehabilitated and after shakedown of the system, additional repair of wellhead valves, and injection of an inhibitor pill, continuous long-term production was started in 1988. Over two years of production subsequent to that are reviewed here, including: production data, brine sampling and analysis, hydrocarbon sampling and analysis, solids sampling and analysis, scale control and corrosion monitoring and control.

  14. Rain sampling device

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Nelson, D.A.; Tomich, S.D.; Glover, D.W.; Allen, E.V.; Hales, J.M.; Dana, M.T.

    1991-05-14

    The present invention constitutes a rain sampling device adapted for independent operation at locations remote from the user which allows rainfall to be sampled in accordance with any schedule desired by the user. The rain sampling device includes a mechanism for directing wet precipitation into a chamber, a chamber for temporarily holding the precipitation during the process of collection, a valve mechanism for controllably releasing samples of the precipitation from the chamber, a means for distributing the samples released from the holding chamber into vessels adapted for permanently retaining these samples, and an electrical mechanism for regulating the operation of the device. 11 figures.

  15. Rain sampling device

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Nelson, Danny A. (Richland, WA); Tomich, Stanley D. (Richland, WA); Glover, Donald W. (Prosser, WA); Allen, Errol V. (Benton City, WA); Hales, Jeremy M. (Kennewick, WA); Dana, Marshall T. (Richland, WA)

    1991-01-01

    The present invention constitutes a rain sampling device adapted for independent operation at locations remote from the user which allows rainfall to be sampled in accordance with any schedule desired by the user. The rain sampling device includes a mechanism for directing wet precipitation into a chamber, a chamber for temporarily holding the precipitation during the process of collection, a valve mechanism for controllably releasing samples of said precipitation from said chamber, a means for distributing the samples released from the holding chamber into vessels adapted for permanently retaining these samples, and an electrical mechanism for regulating the operation of the device.

  16. Exceeding Energy Consumption Design Expectations 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Castleton, H. F.; Beck, S. B. M.; Hathwat, E. A.; Murphy, E.

    2013-01-01

    Operational building performance often fails to meet that predicted at the design stage by as much as two to three times. Many reasons for this difference have been identified and widely reported, however, the problem still continues to occur. A...

  17. Quantum well multijunction photovoltaic cell

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Chaffin, Roger J. (Albuquerque, NM); Osbourn, Gordon C. (Albuquerque, NM)

    1987-01-01

    A monolithic, quantum well, multilayer photovoltaic cell comprises a p-n junction comprising a p-region on one side and an n-region on the other side, each of which regions comprises a series of at least three semiconductor layers, all p-type in the p-region and all n-type in the n-region; each of said series of layers comprising alternating barrier and quantum well layers, each barrier layer comprising a semiconductor material having a first bandgap and each quantum well layer comprising a semiconductor material having a second bandgap when in bulk thickness which is narrower than said first bandgap, the barrier layers sandwiching each quantum well layer and each quantum well layer being sufficiently thin that the width of its bandgap is between said first and second bandgaps, such that radiation incident on said cell and above an energy determined by the bandgap of the quantum well layers will be absorbed and will produce an electrical potential across said junction.

  18. Quantum well multijunction photovoltaic cell

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Chaffin, R.J.; Osbourn, G.C.

    1983-07-08

    A monolithic, quantum well, multilayer photovoltaic cell comprises a p-n junction comprising a p-region on one side and an n-region on the other side, each of which regions comprises a series of at least three semiconductor layers, all p-type in the p-region and all n-type in the n-region; each of said series of layers comprising alternating barrier and quantum well layers, each barrier layer comprising a semiconductor material having a first bandgap and each quantum well layer comprising a semiconductor material having a second bandgap when in bulk thickness which is narrower than said first bandgap, the barrier layers sandwiching each quantum well layer and each quantum well layer being sufficiently thin that the width of its bandgap is between said first and second bandgaps, such that radiation incident on said cell and above an energy determined by the bandgap of the quantum well layers will be absorbed and will produce an electrical potential across said junction.

  19. Site-Wide Integrated Water Monitoring - Defining and Implementing Sampling Objectives to Support Site Closure - 13060

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wilborn, Bill; Knapp, Kathryn [U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office (United States)] [U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office (United States); Farnham, Irene; Marutzky, Sam [Navarro-Intera (United States)] [Navarro-Intera (United States)

    2013-07-01

    The Underground Test Area (UGTA) activity is responsible for assessing and evaluating the effects of the underground nuclear weapons tests on groundwater at the Nevada National Security Site (NNSS), formerly the Nevada Test Site (NTS), and implementing a corrective action closure strategy. The UGTA strategy is based on a combination of characterization, modeling studies, monitoring, and institutional controls (i.e., monitored natural attenuation). The closure strategy verifies through appropriate monitoring activities that contaminants of concern do not exceed the SDWA at the regulatory boundary and that adequate institutional controls are established and administered to ensure protection of the public. Other programs conducted at the NNSS supporting the environmental mission include the Routine Radiological Environmental Monitoring Program (RREMP), Waste Management, and the Infrastructure Program. Given the current programmatic and operational demands for various water-monitoring activities at the same locations, and the ever-increasing resource challenges, cooperative and collaborative approaches to conducting the work are necessary. For this reason, an integrated sampling plan is being developed by the UGTA activity to define sampling and analysis objectives, reduce duplication, eliminate unnecessary activities, and minimize costs. The sampling plan will ensure the right data sets are developed to support closure and efficient transition to long-term monitoring. The plan will include an integrated reporting mechanism for communicating results and integrating process improvements within the UGTA activity as well as between other U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Programs. (authors)

  20. Site-Wide Integrated Water Monitoring -- Defining and Implementing Sampling Objectives to Support Site Closure

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wilborn, Bill [NNSA/NFO, Nevada Site Office (United States); Farnham, Irene [Navarro-Interra LLC, Las Vegas (United States); Marutzky, Sam [Navarro-Interra LLC, Las Vegas (United States); Knapp, Kathryn [NNSA/NFO, Nevada Site Office (United States)

    2013-02-24

    The Underground Test Area (UGTA) activity is responsible for assessing and evaluating the effects of the underground nuclear weapons tests on groundwater at the Nevada National Security Site (NNSS), formerly the Nevada Test Site (NTS), and implementing a corrective action closure strategy. The UGTA strategy is based on a combination of characterization, modeling studies, monitoring, and institutional controls (i.e., monitored natural attenuation). The closure strategy verifies through appropriate monitoring activities that contaminants of concern do not exceed the SDWA at the regulatory boundary and that adequate institutional controls are established and administered to ensure protection of the public. Other programs conducted at the NNSS supporting the environmental mission include the Routine Radiological Environmental Monitoring Program (RREMP), Waste Management, and the Infrastructure Program. Given the current programmatic and operational demands for various water-monitoring activities at the same locations, and the ever-increasing resource challenges, cooperative and collaborative approaches to conducting the work are necessary. For this reason, an integrated sampling plan is being developed by the UGTA activity to define sampling and analysis objectives, reduce duplication, eliminate unnecessary activities, and minimize costs. The sampling plan will ensure the right data sets are developed to support closure and efficient transition to long-term monitoring. The plan will include an integrated reporting mechanism for communicating results and integrating process improvements within the UGTA activity as well as between other U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Programs.

  1. Well-Tech Award 2008 Well-Tech Award 2007

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chiao, Jung-Chih

    ://www.well-tech.it/_nuovo%20sito_/anteprima%202009/anteprima_2009_acce.html #12;ACCESSIBILITY Protesi di nuova generazione che farlo diventare il più naturale possibile, cercando un perfetto equilibrio tra protesi e corpo. Able - B Protesi di nuova generazione che punta ad ottimizzare comfort, propriocezione, andatura, postura, estetica

  2. Well completion and servicing fluid

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Grimsley, R.L.

    1990-09-25

    This patent describes a well completion servicing fluid for controlling formation pressure during completion or servicing of a well. It comprises: an aqueous solution of calcium chloride, a solid weighing agent suspended in the solution and being selected from the group consisting of zinc, zinc oxide, and mixtures thereof; and a viscosifier dissolved in the solution in an amount effective to suspend the weighing agent. The fluid has a density of greater than 15 pounds per gallon and being substantially free of bromide ions and being substantially free of solid material which is not soluble in hydrochloric acid.

  3. Process for cementing geothermal wells

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Eilers, Louis H. (Inola, OK)

    1985-01-01

    A pumpable slurry of coal-filled furfuryl alcohol, furfural, and/or a low molecular weight mono- or copolymer thereof containing, preferably, a catalytic amount of a soluble acid catalyst is used to cement a casing in a geothermal well.

  4. Sample Proficiency Test exercise

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Alcaraz, A; Gregg, H; Koester, C

    2006-02-05

    The current format of the OPCW proficiency tests has multiple sets of 2 samples sent to an analysis laboratory. In each sample set, one is identified as a sample, the other as a blank. This method of conducting proficiency tests differs from how an OPCW designated laboratory would receive authentic samples (a set of three containers, each not identified, consisting of the authentic sample, a control sample, and a blank sample). This exercise was designed to test the reporting if the proficiency tests were to be conducted. As such, this is not an official OPCW proficiency test, and the attached report is one method by which LLNL might report their analyses under a more realistic testing scheme. Therefore, the title on the report ''Report of the Umpteenth Official OPCW Proficiency Test'' is meaningless, and provides a bit of whimsy for the analyses and readers of the report.

  5. Sample Environments at Sector 30

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Designs Two standard sample holder designs are below. Copper sample holder from ARS. ARS sample holde diagram picture Aluminum sample holder - custom design Al design Al pic...

  6. Health Education & Wellness - HPMC Occupational Health Services

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Wellness Health Education & Wellness Health Education & Wellness Downloads & Patient Materials Health & Productivity Health Calculators & Logs Health Coaching Health Fairs and...

  7. Tank 241-S-111 08/1999 Compatibility Grab Samples and Analytical Results for the Final Report [SEC 1 and SEC 2

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    STEEN, F.H.

    1999-12-01

    This document is the format IV, final report for the tank 241-S-111 (S-111) grab samples taken in August 1999 to address waste compatibility concerns. Chemical, radiochemical, and physical analyses on the tank S-111 samples were performed as directed in Compatibility Grab Sampling and Analysis Plan for Fiscal Year 1999 (Sasaki 1999a,b). Any deviations from the instructions provided in the tank sampling and analysis plan (TSAP) were discussed in this narrative. The notification limit for {sup 137}Cs was exceeded on two samples. Results are discussed in Section 5.3.2. No other notification limits were exceeded.

  8. A new well surveying tool 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Haghighi, Manuchehr Mehdizabeh

    1966-01-01

    13 13 11 12 15 l2 48 51 51 51 49 49 49 51 50 49 Undetermined values. 'ARABLE II COMPARISON OF MEASURED ANGLES @ID ANGLES INDICATE' EY SURVEYING DEVICE ACTUAL VALUES EERIE(;QVENTAL VALUES Rnn No. 1 Run No. 2 Depth: Direction of...A NEW WELL SURVEYING TOOL A Thesis By MANUCHEHR MEHDIZABEH HAGHIGHI Submitted to the Graduate College of the Texas ANM University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE Major Subject: PETROLEUM...

  9. Well Deepening | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION JEnvironmental Jump to:EA EISTJThinWarsaw, Poland:EnergyWe Energy Wind FarmWege WindWeldWell

  10. Wellness Services | The Ames Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power AdministrationRobust,Field-effectWorking WithTelecentricN AProjectAdministration NNSAWellWellness Services

  11. Tank 241-AP-103 08/1999 Compatibility Grab Samples and Analytical Results for the Final Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    BELL, K.E.

    1999-12-09

    This document is the format IV, final report for the tank 241-AP-103 (AP-103) grab samples taken in August 1999 to address waste compatibility concerns. Chemical, radiochemical, and physical analyses on the tank AP-103 samples were performed as directed in ''Compatibility Grub Sampling and Analysis Plan for Fiscal Year 1999'' (Sasaki 1999a). Any deviations from the instructions provided in the tank sampling and analysis plan (TSAP) were discussed in this narrative. No notification limits were exceeded.

  12. Sampling system and method

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Decker, David L.; Lyles, Brad F.; Purcell, Richard G.; Hershey, Ronald Lee

    2013-04-16

    The present disclosure provides an apparatus and method for coupling conduit segments together. A first pump obtains a sample and transmits it through a first conduit to a reservoir accessible by a second pump. The second pump further conducts the sample from the reservoir through a second conduit.

  13. IDENTIFICATION Your Sample Box

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liskiewicz, Maciej

    to Virginia Tech Soil Testing Lab, 145 Smyth Hall (MC 0465), 185 Ag Quad Ln, Blacksburg VA 24061, in sturdy, K, Ca, Mg, Zn, Mn, Cu, Fe, B, and soluble salts) NoCharge $16.00 Organic Matter $4.00 $6.00 Fax with soil sample and form; make check or money order payable to "Treasurer, Virginia Tech." COST PER SAMPLE

  14. Free Standing Soil Sample

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stuart, Steven J.

    Free Standing Soil Sample Kiosks Clemson University Cooperative Extension Service Reportto of Richland County, Jackie Kopack Jordan has partnered with local garden centers to provide free standing soil sample collections sites. The free standing kiosks are located at three local garden centers. Woodley

  15. In-well vapor stripping drilling and characterization work plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Koegler, K.J.

    1994-03-13

    This work plan provides the information necessary for drilling, sampling, and hydrologic testing of wells to be completed in support of a demonstration of the in-well vapor stripping system. The in-well vapor stripping system is a remediation technology designed to preferentially extract volatile organic compounds (VOCs) from contaminated groundwater by converting them to a vapor phase. Air-lift pumping is used to lift and aerate groundwater within the well. The volatiles escaping the aerated water are drawn off by a slight vacuum and treated at the surface while the water is allowed to infiltrate the vadose zone back to the watertable.

  16. AndWellness: An Open Mobile System for Activity and Experience Sampling

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2011-01-01

    interaction with mobile devices and services. ACM, New York,position tracking for mobile devices. In Proceedings of theo? for continuous mobile device location. In Proceedings of

  17. Soil Sampling At Salt Wells Area (Henkle, Et Al., 2005) | Open Energy

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page| Open Energy Information Serbia-Enhancing Capacity forSilicium deEnergy Information North Brawley

  18. Water Sampling At Salt Wells Area (Coolbaugh, Et Al., 2006) | Open Energy

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION JEnvironmental Jump to:EA EISTJThinWarsaw, Poland: EnergyPageEnergyDellechaie,Open

  19. Water Sampling At Salt Wells Area (Henkle, Et Al., 2005) | Open Energy

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION JEnvironmental Jump to:EA EISTJThinWarsaw, Poland: EnergyPageEnergyDellechaie,OpenInformation

  20. Water Sampling At Salt Wells Area (Shevenell & Garside, 2003) | Open Energy

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION JEnvironmental Jump to:EA EISTJThinWarsaw, Poland:

  1. A Mineralogical Petrographic And Geochemical Study Of Samples From Wells In

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION JEnvironmental Jump to:EAand Dalton JumpProgram | OpenEnergyEvaluation | OpenLow CarbonCalderaThe

  2. Diffusion Multilayer Sampling of Ground Water in Five Wells at the Tuba

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:FinancingPetroleum Based| Department8,Department of Energy2 DOE|Energy,

  3. Water Sample Concentrator

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Idaho National Laboratory

    2010-01-08

    Automated portable device that concentrates and packages a sample of suspected contaminated water for safe, efficient transport to a qualified analytical laboratory. This technology will help safeguard against pathogen contamination or chemical and biolog

  4. Liquid scintillator sampling calorimetry 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dudgeon, R. Greg

    1994-01-01

    This research was supported by the Department of Energy to investigate a new sampling calorimeter technology for the high intensity regions of the Superconducting Supercollider. The technology involved using liquid scintillator filled glass tubes...

  5. Sample Changes and Issues

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    EIA-914 Survey and HPDI. Figure 2 shows how this could change apparent production. The blue line shows the reported sample production as it would normally be reported under the...

  6. Dissolution actuated sample container

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Nance, Thomas A.; McCoy, Frank T.

    2013-03-26

    A sample collection vial and process of using a vial is provided. The sample collection vial has an opening secured by a dissolvable plug. When dissolved, liquids may enter into the interior of the collection vial passing along one or more edges of a dissolvable blocking member. As the blocking member is dissolved, a spring actuated closure is directed towards the opening of the vial which, when engaged, secures the vial contents against loss or contamination.

  7. SAMPLING AND ANALYSIS PROTOCOLS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jannik, T; P Fledderman, P

    2007-02-09

    Radiological sampling and analyses are performed to collect data for a variety of specific reasons covering a wide range of projects. These activities include: Effluent monitoring; Environmental surveillance; Emergency response; Routine ambient monitoring; Background assessments; Nuclear license termination; Remediation; Deactivation and decommissioning (D&D); and Waste management. In this chapter, effluent monitoring and environmental surveillance programs at nuclear operating facilities and radiological sampling and analysis plans for remediation and D&D activities will be discussed.

  8. Liquid sampling system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Larson, L.L.

    1984-09-17

    A conduit extends from a reservoir through a sampling station and back to the reservoir in a closed loop. A jet ejector in the conduit establishes suction for withdrawing liquid from the reservoir. The conduit has a self-healing septum therein upstream of the jet ejector for receiving one end of a double-ended cannula, the other end of which is received in a serum bottle for sample collection. Gas is introduced into the conduit at a gas bleed between the sample collection bottle and the reservoir. The jet ejector evacuates gas from the conduit and the bottle and aspirates a column of liquid from the reservoir at a high rate. When the withdrawn liquid reaches the jet ejector the rate of flow therethrough reduces substantially and the gas bleed increases the pressure in the conduit for driving liquid into the sample bottle, the gas bleed forming a column of gas behind the withdrawn liquid column and interrupting the withdrawal of liquid from the reservoir. In the case of hazardous and toxic liquids, the sample bottle and the jet ejector may be isolated from the reservoir and may be further isolated from a control station containing remote manipulation means for the sample bottle and control valves for the jet ejector and gas bleed. 5 figs.

  9. Liquid sampling system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Larson, Loren L. (Idaho Falls, ID)

    1987-01-01

    A conduit extends from a reservoir through a sampling station and back to the reservoir in a closed loop. A jet ejector in the conduit establishes suction for withdrawing liquid from the reservoir. The conduit has a self-healing septum therein upstream of the jet ejector for receiving one end of a double-ended cannula, the other end of which is received in a serum bottle for sample collection. Gas is introduced into the conduit at a gas bleed between the sample collection bottle and the reservoir. The jet ejector evacuates gas from the conduit and the bottle and aspirates a column of liquid from the reservoir at a high rate. When the withdrawn liquid reaches the jet ejector the rate of flow therethrough reduces substantially and the gas bleed increases the pressure in the conduit for driving liquid into the sample bottle, the gas bleed forming a column of gas behind the withdrawn liquid column and interrupting the withdrawal of liquid from the reservoir. In the case of hazardous and toxic liquids, the sample bottle and the jet ejector may be isolated from the reservoir and may be further isolated from a control station containing remote manipulation means for the sample bottle and control valves for the jet ejector and gas bleed.

  10. INVITATIONAL WELL-TESTING SYMPOSIUM PROCEEDINGS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Authors, Various

    2011-01-01

    to obser- vation well, L; vertical hydraulic conductivity ofGas Wells Stimulated by Massive Hydraulic Fracturing," SPEproduc- tion well, L; hori zontal hydraulic conductivi ty,

  11. SAMPLING THEORY IN SIGNAL AND IMAGE PROCESSING c 2011 SAMPLING PUBLISHING

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bidegaray, Brigitte

    SAMPLING THEORY IN SIGNAL AND IMAGE PROCESSING c 2011 SAMPLING PUBLISHING Vol. 10, No. 1-2, 2011 and weight. In order to reach such a goal, the signal processing theory and the associated system architectures have to be rethought. This paper is a first step towards well suited signal processing techniques

  12. Fluid sampling system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Houck, Edward D. (Idaho Falls, ID)

    1994-01-01

    An fluid sampling system allows sampling of radioactive liquid without spillage. A feed tank is connected to a liquid transfer jet powered by a pumping chamber pressurized by compressed air. The liquid is pumped upwardly into a sampling jet of a venturi design having a lumen with an inlet, an outlet, a constricted middle portion, and a port located above the constricted middle portion. The liquid is passed under pressure through the constricted portion causing its velocity to increase and its pressure to decreased, thereby preventing liquid from escaping. A septum sealing the port can be pierced by a two pointed hollow needle leading into a sample bottle also sealed by a pierceable septum affixed to one end. The bottle is evacuated by flow through the sample jet, cyclic variation in the sampler jet pressure periodically leaves the evacuated bottle with lower pressure than that of the port, thus causing solution to pass into the bottle. The remaining solution in the system is returned to the feed tank via a holding tank.

  13. Fluid sampling system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Houck, E.D.

    1994-10-11

    An fluid sampling system allows sampling of radioactive liquid without spillage. A feed tank is connected to a liquid transfer jet powered by a pumping chamber pressurized by compressed air. The liquid is pumped upwardly into a sampling jet of a venturi design having a lumen with an inlet, an outlet, a constricted middle portion, and a port located above the constricted middle portion. The liquid is passed under pressure through the constricted portion causing its velocity to increase and its pressure to be decreased, thereby preventing liquid from escaping. A septum sealing the port can be pierced by a two pointed hollow needle leading into a sample bottle also sealed by a pierceable septum affixed to one end. The bottle is evacuated by flow through the sample jet, cyclic variation in the sampler jet pressure periodically leaves the evacuated bottle with lower pressure than that of the port, thus causing solution to pass into the bottle. The remaining solution in the system is returned to the feed tank via a holding tank. 4 figs.

  14. Geochemistry of Background Sediment Samples at Technical Area 39, Los Alamos National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Eric V. McDonald; Katherine Campbell; Patrick A. Longmire; Steven L. Reneau

    1998-11-01

    This report presents results of chemical analyses of 24 analytes in 16 background sediment samples collected from Ancho Canyon and Indio Canyon at Technical Area (TA) 39, Los Alamos National Laboratory. Preliminary upper tolerance limits (UTLS) for sediments are calculated from this data set but, because of the small sample size, these UTLs exceed the maximum values in the data set by up to 50'ZO and will require revision as more background sediment data are obtained.

  15. Acid Fracture and Fracture Conductivity Study of Field Rock Samples 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Underwood, Jarrod

    2013-11-15

    Acid fracturing is a well stimulation strategy designed to increase the productivity of a producing well. The parameters of acid fracturing and the effects of acid interaction on specific rock samples can be studied experimentally. Acid injection...

  16. Viscous sludge sample collector

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Beitel, George A [Richland, WA

    1983-01-01

    A vertical core sample collection system for viscous sludge. A sample tube's upper end has a flange and is attached to a piston. The tube and piston are located in the upper end of a bore in a housing. The bore's lower end leads outside the housing and has an inwardly extending rim. Compressed gas, from a storage cylinder, is quickly introduced into the bore's upper end to rapidly accelerate the piston and tube down the bore. The lower end of the tube has a high sludge entering velocity to obtain a full-length sludge sample without disturbing strata detail. The tube's downward motion is stopped when its upper end flange impacts against the bore's lower end inwardly extending rim.

  17. Colloid characterization and quantification in groundwater samples

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    K. Stephen Kung

    2000-06-01

    This report describes the work conducted at Los Alamos National Laboratory for studying the groundwater colloids for the Yucca Mountain Project in conjunction with the Hydrologic Resources Management Program (HRMP) and the Underground Test Area (UGTA) Project. Colloidal particle size distributions and total particle concentration in groundwater samples are quantified and characterized. Colloid materials from cavity waters collected near underground nuclear explosion sites by HRMP field sampling personnel at the Nevada Test Site (NTS) were quantified. Selected colloid samples were further characterized by electron microscope to evaluate the colloid shapes, elemental compositions, and mineral phases. The authors have evaluated the colloid size and concentration in the natural groundwater sample that was collected from the ER-20-5 well and stored in a 50-gallon (about 200-liter) barrel for several months. This groundwater sample was studied because HRMP personnel have identified trace levels of radionuclides in the water sample. Colloid results show that even though the water sample had filtered through a series of Millipore filters, high-colloid concentrations were identified in all unfiltered and filtered samples. They had studied the samples that were diluted with distilled water and found that diluted samples contained more colloids than the undiluted ones. These results imply that colloids are probably not stable during the storage conditions. Furthermore, results demonstrate that undesired colloids have been introduced into the samples during the storage, filtration, and dilution processes. They have evaluated possible sources of colloid contamination associated with sample collection, filtrating, storage, and analyses of natural groundwaters. The effects of container types and sample storage time on colloid size distribution and total concentration were studied to evaluate colloid stability by using J13 groundwater. The data suggests that groundwater samples should be analyzed for colloid size and concentration shortly after they have been collected. A prolonged waiting period after sampling will affect the colloid size distribution as well as colloid concentration resulting from the changes of water chemical properties. The data also shows that sample containers, filter materials, and labware that are used for colloid analyses should be cleaned by specially treated low-colloid-containing water. Water used for sample dilution should be verified for total colloidal particle concentration. They then analyzed freshly collected groundwater from NTS wells ER-20-5{number_sign}1 and {number_sign}3. Results show that these groundwater samples have similar colloid concentrations and particle size distributions. For the particle size range between 50- and 200-nm, about ten trillion (1E10) colloidal particles per liter are present in these water samples. Most of these colloidal particles are less than 100 mm in size. For example, more than 98% of the colloids are smaller than 100 nm in size in the ER-20-5 {number_sign}1 sample. Furthermore, it was found that the smaller the sizes of colloid, the higher the colloid concentration present in the water. For another site at NTS, Cheshire, they had analyzed two zones of groundwater samples. For water samples collected from the lower water zone (near the underground detonation cavity about 3,700 feet of slanted depth from the surface), the colloid concentration was about 5E12 particles per liter. About 20 times less than the lower zone of total colloids was found in water samples collected from the upper aquifer (around 2,511 feet of slanted depth), although colloid size distributions from these two zones appear to be rather similar.

  18. Health and Wellness Guide for Students Introduction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Health and Wellness Guide for Students #12;Introduction What is Wellness? Wellness is an active life. Many factors can influence your health and well-being, in fact there are 7 different, interacting dimensions of health and wellness. The 7 dimensions are: Physical Wellness ­ Taking care of your body

  19. Coiled tubing workover saves horizontal well in Lake Maracaibo

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lizak, K.; Patterson, J.; Suarez, D.; Salas, J.

    1996-12-31

    A slotted liner horizontal completion became stuck while being run. Inflatable packers were to be used to isolate the productive interval from a water-bearing, unconsolidated sand in the curved section of this well. While personnel were deciding how to cement the well, the liner was left in the hole with the inflatable packers unset, and the production tubing was run. Coiled tubing was used to log the well, isolate the productive interval, and remove damage to restore well productivity. Personnel considered all possible options, and a thorough decision-making process guided the workover. Because of severe lost-circulation problems, extensive ``what if`` scenarios were made and updated daily for the engineers on location. Service company and oil company personnel worked together to guarantee the job designs were practical and did not exceed the limits of the equipment on location. Computer simulations of all operations were run to allow corrective action to be taken if unusual circumstances arose. All fluids were thoroughly laboratory tested and witnessed by oil company personnel to ensure job success. Problems on the job included lost circulation, locating the exact positions of the packers and water zone, ensuring correct cement placement, removing mud and workover fluids without damaging the squeeze, and bad weather on Lake Maracaibo. Advantages and disadvantages of all the solutions that were considered are included to assist anyone in a similar situation. Post-job oil production has stabilized at 900 BOPD with no water or sand production. Careful job planning and the versatility of coiled tubing saved this well and proved economical with an estimated payout of 33 days, assuming a price of $12 per barrel of oil.

  20. Please cite this article in press as: Birkholzer, J.T., et al., Brine flow up a well caused by pressure perturbation from geologic carbon sequestration: Static and dynamic evaluations. Int. J. Greenhouse Gas Control (2011), doi:10.1016/j.ijggc.2011.01.003

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhou, Quanlin

    2011-01-01

    . If the threshold pressure is exceeded, brine flow rates are dependent on various hydraulic (and other) prop- erties occurs outside of the well casing, e.g., in a permeable fracture zone between the well cement

  1. Analytical laboratory and mobile sampling platform

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stetzenbach, K.; Smiecinski, A.

    1996-04-30

    This is the final report for the Analytical Laboratory and Mobile Sampling Platform project. This report contains only major findings and conclusions resulting from this project. Detailed reports of all activities performed for this project were provided to the Project Office every quarter since the beginning of the project. This report contains water chemistry data for samples collected in the Nevada section of Death Valley National Park (Triangle Area Springs), Nevada Test Site springs, Pahranagat Valley springs, Nevada Test Site wells, Spring Mountain springs and Crater Flat and Amargosa Valley wells.

  2. Completion Report for Well ER-2-1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bechtel Nevada

    2004-10-01

    Well ER-2-1 was drilled for the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office (formerly Nevada Operations Office), in support of the Nevada Environmental Restoration Project at the Nevada Test Site, Nye County, Nevada. This well was drilled in February and March of 2003, as part of a hydrogeologic investigation program for the Yucca Flat/Climax Mine Corrective Action Unit in the northeastern portion of the Nevada Test Site. Well ER-2-1 was drilled as part of the Yucca Flat Corrective Action Unit Phase I drilling initiative. The well is located in north central Yucca Flat within Area 2 of the Nevada Test Site, and provided information regarding the radiological and physical environment near underground nuclear tests conducted in a saturated volcanic aquifer setting. Detailed lithologic descriptions with stratigraphic assignments are included in this report. These are based on composite drill cuttings collected every 3 meters and 83 sidewall samples taken at various depths between 113.7 and 754.4 meters, supplemented by geophysical log data. Detailed petrographic, chemical, and mineralogical studies of rock samples were conducted on 27 samples of drill cuttings. The well was collared in tuffaceous alluvium, and penetrated Tertiary-age tuffs of the Timber Mountain and Paintbrush Groups, Calico Hills and Wahmonie Formations, Crater Flat Group, Grouse Canyon Formation, before reaching total depth in the Tunnel Bed Formation.

  3. Completion Report for Well Cluster ER-5-4

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration, Nevada Site Office; Bechtel Nevada

    2005-02-01

    Well Cluster ER-5-4 was drilled for the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office, in support of the Nevada Environmental Restoration Project at the Nevada Test Site, Nye County, Nevada. The cluster consists of two wells, positioned about 30 meters apart on the same drill pad, constructed as part of a hydrogeologic investigation program for Frenchman Flat at the Nevada Test Site. Detailed lithologic descriptions with preliminary stratigraphic assignments for the well cluster are included in this report. These are based on composite drill cuttings collected every 3 meters, and 156 sidewall samples taken at various depths below 192 meters in both boreholes, supplemented by geophysical log data. Detailed petrographic, chemical, and mineralogical studies of rock samples were conducted on 122 samples. Well ER-5-4 penetrated approximately 1,120 meters of Quaternary and Tertiary alluvium before reaching total depth in Tertiary volcanic rocks at 1,137.5 meters. The deeper Well ER-5-4 No.2 penetrated 1,120.4 meters of alluvial sediments, and was terminated within Tertiary volcanic rocks at a depth of 2,133.6 meters, indicating that Paleozoic rocks are deeper than expected at this site.

  4. INVITATIONAL WELL-TESTING SYMPOSIUM PROCEEDINGS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Authors, Various

    2011-01-01

    Drilling Rate of Penetration Quality of Information Good lithology Good Fair Fair Good Good Good Good Sidewall Samples Conventional

  5. Spatially indirect excitons in coupled quantum wells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lai, Chih-Wei Eddy

    2004-03-01

    Microscopic quantum phenomena such as interference or phase coherence between different quantum states are rarely manifest in macroscopic systems due to a lack of significant correlation between different states. An exciton system is one candidate for observation of possible quantum collective effects. In the dilute limit, excitons in semiconductors behave as bosons and are expected to undergo Bose-Einstein condensation (BEC) at a temperature several orders of magnitude higher than for atomic BEC because of their light mass. Furthermore, well-developed modern semiconductor technologies offer flexible manipulations of an exciton system. Realization of BEC in solid-state systems can thus provide new opportunities for macroscopic quantum coherence research. In semiconductor coupled quantum wells (CQW) under across-well static electric field, excitons exist as separately confined electron-hole pairs. These spatially indirect excitons exhibit a radiative recombination time much longer than their thermal relaxation time a unique feature in direct band gap semiconductor based structures. Their mutual repulsive dipole interaction further stabilizes the exciton system at low temperature and screens in-plane disorder more effectively. All these features make indirect excitons in CQW a promising system to search for quantum collective effects. Properties of indirect excitons in CQW have been analyzed and investigated extensively. The experimental results based on time-integrated or time-resolved spatially-resolved photoluminescence (PL) spectroscopy and imaging are reported in two categories. (i) Generic indirect exciton systems: general properties of indirect excitons such as the dependence of exciton energy and lifetime on electric fields and densities were examined. (ii) Quasi-two-dimensional confined exciton systems: highly statistically degenerate exciton systems containing more than tens of thousands of excitons within areas as small as (10 micrometer){sup 2} were observed. The spatial and energy distributions of optically active excitons were used as thermodynamic quantities to construct a phase diagram of the exciton system, demonstrating the existence of distinct phases. Optical and electrical properties of the CQW sample were examined thoroughly to provide deeper understanding of the formation mechanisms of these cold exciton systems. These insights offer new strategies for producing cold exciton systems, which may lead to opportunities for the realization of BEC in solid-state systems.

  6. Innovative directional and position specific sampling technique. Phase 2, Final report, [July 28, 1992--February 15, 1994

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hutzel, W.J.; Hill, J.L. III; Foster, E.L.

    1994-01-01

    UTD, Incorporated has developed a unique real-time, in-situ POsition LOcation (POLO) device which will directly enhance the Department of Energy`s Environmental Restoration and Waste Management Program through improvements to finding contamination, identifying extent of contamination, remediating, and finally monitoring sites. POLO is smaller than existing technology and is unaffected by the presence of steel and other magnetic materials. The size of the device offers for the first time, the possibility to accurately determine the location of a penetrometer. It will be usable, in its present form, to map the position of a sampling device as that device is inserted into the ground. A three phase program was proposed to DOE to take the POLO System through the three levels of maturity prior to commercialization. Phase 1 included the design and testing of individual components of the device and met or exceeded success criteria. Phase 2 has included laboratory-scale tracking experiments of the integrated POLO System that have met or exceeded the success criterion as well. The success criterion is to demonstrate path tracking accuracy with a total error of less than 0.50% of the distance traveled for distances less than 70 meters. In Phase 3 we will develop and test a full-scale POLO System and conclude with a field demonstration. The goal of the Phase 3 effort is to achieve the same 0.50% accuracy or better with respect to the distance traveled for distances less than 70 meters in the field as was demonstrated in laboratory tests in the earlier phases. The final report details the design of a realistic laboratory-scale penetrometer path and describes the POLO tracking experiments that were conducted. Plans for demonstrations as well as commercialization and technology transfer with DOE field sites are described, highlighting the expected smooth transition to full-scale production.

  7. Sampling Free Energy Surfaces as Slices by Combining Umbrella Sampling and Metadynamics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kapil, Venkat; Nair, Nisanth N

    2015-01-01

    Metadynamics (MTD) is a very powerful technique to sample high--dimensional free energy landscapes, and due to its self--guiding property, the method has been successful in studying complex reactions and conformational changes.MTD sampling is based on filling the free energy basins by biasing potentials and thus for cases with flat, broad and unbound free energy wells, the computational time to sample them becomes very large.To alleviate this problem, we propose a scheme, named Well--Sliced MTD (WS--MTD), where we combine the standard Umbrella Sampling (US) technique with MTD to sample orthogonal collective variables (CVs) in a simultaneous way. Within this scheme, we construct the equilibrium distribution of CVs from biased distributions obtained from independent MTD simulations with umbrella potentials. Reweighting is carried out by a procedure that combines US reweighting and Tiwary-Parrinello metadynamics reweighting within the Weighted Histogram Analysis Method (WHAM). WS--MTD will be an ideal strategy f...

  8. Sampling Report for May-June, 2014 WIPP Samples

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    1 L L N L - X X X X - X X X X X Sampling Report for May- June, 2014 WIPP Samples UNCLASSIFIED Forensic Science Center January 8, 2015 Sampling Report for May-June, 2014 WIPP...

  9. New multilateral well architecture in heterogeneous reservoirs 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jia, Hongqiao

    2004-09-30

    Multilateral well technology has been widely used in the world oil fields. There still has technical limitation of these kinds of well structure. This thesis presents a new multilateral well architecture which is more ...

  10. INVITATIONAL WELL-TESTING SYMPOSIUM PROCEEDINGS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Authors, Various

    2011-01-01

    Prior to spudding the well Drilling rate'is a direct meansGraves, E. D. , Jr. : Well Design: Drilling and Production,Density to Aid in Drilling Wells in High Pressure Areas.

  11. SW New Mexico Oil Well Formation Tops

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shari Kelley

    2015-10-21

    Rock formation top picks from oil wells from southwestern New Mexico from scout cards and other sources. There are differing formation tops interpretations for some wells, so for those wells duplicate formation top data are presented in this file.

  12. Industry survey for horizontal wells. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wilson, D.D.; Kaback, D.S. [CDM Federal Programs Corp., Denver, CO (United States); Denhan, M.E. [Westinghouse Savannah River Co., Aiken, SC (United States); Watkins, D. [CDM Federal Programs Corp., Aiken, SC (United States)

    1993-07-01

    An international survey of horizontal environmental wells was performed during May and June of 1993. The purpose of the survey was to provide the environmental industry with an inventory of horizontal environmental wells and information pertaining to the extent of the use of horizontal environmental wells, the variety of horizontal environmental well applications, the types of geologic and hydrogeologic conditions within which horizontal environmental wells have been installed, and the companies that perform horizontal environmental well installations. Other information, such as the cost of horizontal environmental well installations and the results of tests performed on the wells, is not complete but is provided as general information with the caveat that the information should not be used to compare drilling companies. The result of the survey is a catalogue of horizontal environmental wells that are categorized by the objective or use of the wells, the vertical depth of the wells, and the drilling company contracted to install the wells.

  13. EML Surface Air Sampling Program, 1989 data

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Larsen, R.J.; Sanderson, C.G.

    1991-08-01

    Measurements of the concentrations of specific atmospheric radionuclides in air filter samples collected for the Environmental Measurements Laboratory`s Surface Air Sampling Program (SASP) during 1989 indicate that anthropogenic radionuclides, in both hemispheres, were at or below the lower limits of detection for the analytical and sampling techniques that were used to measure them. During 1989, the occasional detection of {sup 137}Cs in some air filter samples may have resulted from resuspension of previously deposited debris. The naturally occurring radioisotopes that we measure, {sup 7}Be and {sup 210}Pb, continue to be detected in most air filter samples. The 1989 annual mean concentrations of {sup 7}Be at many of the sites were lower than those previously reported during the last decade. Possible changes in the atmospheric production of {sup 7}Be, variations in atmospheric circulation and precipitation patterns, as well as modifications to our sampling procedure many all have contributed to this observed trend. Short-term variations in the concentrations of {sup 7}Be and {sup 210}Pb continued to be observed at many sites at which weekly air filter samples were analyzed. These short-term fluctuations probably resulted from variations in meteorological factors. The data from our quality control samples indicate that the reliability of the air filter measurements are acceptable for their intended application.

  14. EML Surface Air Sampling Program, 1989 data

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Larsen, R.J.; Sanderson, C.G.

    1991-08-01

    Measurements of the concentrations of specific atmospheric radionuclides in air filter samples collected for the Environmental Measurements Laboratory's Surface Air Sampling Program (SASP) during 1989 indicate that anthropogenic radionuclides, in both hemispheres, were at or below the lower limits of detection for the analytical and sampling techniques that were used to measure them. During 1989, the occasional detection of {sup 137}Cs in some air filter samples may have resulted from resuspension of previously deposited debris. The naturally occurring radioisotopes that we measure, {sup 7}Be and {sup 210}Pb, continue to be detected in most air filter samples. The 1989 annual mean concentrations of {sup 7}Be at many of the sites were lower than those previously reported during the last decade. Possible changes in the atmospheric production of {sup 7}Be, variations in atmospheric circulation and precipitation patterns, as well as modifications to our sampling procedure many all have contributed to this observed trend. Short-term variations in the concentrations of {sup 7}Be and {sup 210}Pb continued to be observed at many sites at which weekly air filter samples were analyzed. These short-term fluctuations probably resulted from variations in meteorological factors. The data from our quality control samples indicate that the reliability of the air filter measurements are acceptable for their intended application.

  15. Completion Report for Well ER-8-1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bechtel Nevada

    2004-11-01

    Well ER-8-1 was drilled for the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office in support of the Nevada Environmental Restoration Project at the Nevada Test Site, Nye County, Nevada. This well was drilled in October and November of 2002 as part of a Hydrogeologic investigation program for the Yucca Flat/Climax Mine Corrective Action Unit in the northeastern portion of the Nevada Test Site. Well ER-8-1 is located at the north end of Yucca Flat approximately 580 meters south-southeast of the surface exposure of the Climax granitic intrusive. Detailed lithologic descriptions with stratigraphic assignments are included in this report. These are based on composite drill cuttings samples collected every 3 meters, and 21 sidewall samples taken at various depths between 351.1 and 573.0 meters, supplemented by incomplete geophysical log data. Detailed petrographic, geochemical, and mineralogical studies of rock samples were conducted on 22 samples of drill cuttings. Drilling began in tuffaceous alluvium, and the borehole penetrated Tertiary age bedded tuffs of the Volcanics of Oak Spring Butte and carbonate sediments of Paleozoic age, which were encountered at a depth of 334 meters. The borehole unexpectedly penetrated granite at the depth of 538.9 meters in which drilling was stopped. Contact metamorphic rocks and intrusive dikes associated with the Cretaceous-age granitic intrusive and at least one significant fault zone were encountered.

  16. Wells Public Utilities - Commercial & Industrial Energy Efficiency...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Refrigeration Equipment Program Info Sector Name Utility Administrator Wells Public Utilities Website http:www.SaveEnergyInWells.com State Minnesota Program Type Rebate Program...

  17. Sample introducing apparatus and sample modules for mass spectrometer

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Thompson, Cyril V. (Knoxville, TN); Wise, Marcus B. (Kingston, TN)

    1993-01-01

    An apparatus for introducing gaseous samples from a wide range of environmental matrices into a mass spectrometer for analysis of the samples is described. Several sample preparing modules including a real-time air monitoring module, a soil/liquid purge module, and a thermal desorption module are individually and rapidly attachable to the sample introducing apparatus for supplying gaseous samples to the mass spectrometer. The sample-introducing apparatus uses a capillary column for conveying the gaseous samples into the mass spectrometer and is provided with an open/split interface in communication with the capillary and a sample archiving port through which at least about 90 percent of the gaseous sample in a mixture with an inert gas that was introduced into the sample introducing apparatus is separated from a minor portion of the mixture entering the capillary discharged from the sample introducing apparatus.

  18. Sample introducing apparatus and sample modules for mass spectrometer

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Thompson, C.V.; Wise, M.B.

    1993-12-21

    An apparatus for introducing gaseous samples from a wide range of environmental matrices into a mass spectrometer for analysis of the samples is described. Several sample preparing modules including a real-time air monitoring module, a soil/liquid purge module, and a thermal desorption module are individually and rapidly attachable to the sample introducing apparatus for supplying gaseous samples to the mass spectrometer. The sample-introducing apparatus uses a capillary column for conveying the gaseous samples into the mass spectrometer and is provided with an open/split interface in communication with the capillary and a sample archiving port through which at least about 90 percent of the gaseous sample in a mixture with an inert gas that was introduced into the sample introducing apparatus is separated from a minor portion of the mixture entering the capillary discharged from the sample introducing apparatus. 5 figures.

  19. Decoupled Sampling for Graphics Pipelines

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ragan-Kelley, Jonathan Millar

    We propose a generalized approach to decoupling shading from visibility sampling in graphics pipelines, which we call decoupled sampling. Decoupled sampling enables stochastic supersampling of motion and defocus blur at ...

  20. Sample Environments at Sector 30

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    sample holder designs are below. Aluminum sample holder - custom design Al design Al pic click drawing for .pdf-file Aluminum sample holder - custom design Al design Al pic...

  1. Fluid sampling apparatus and method

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Yeamans, D.R.

    1998-02-03

    Incorporation of a bellows in a sampling syringe eliminates ingress of contaminants, permits replication of amounts and compression of multiple sample injections, and enables remote sampling for off-site analysis. 3 figs.

  2. PSYC 465: Poverty and Development Sample Syllabus

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hopfinger, Joseph B.

    PSYC 465: Poverty and Development Sample Syllabus Description: Poverty is one of the most examines the impact of poverty and family economic hardship on human development. An ecological systems on the scientific study of poverty as an important developmental risk factor as well as on research on protective

  3. Soil sampling kit and a method of sampling therewith

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Thompson, Cyril V. (Knoxville, TN)

    1991-01-01

    A soil sampling device and a sample containment device for containing a soil sample is disclosed. In addition, a method for taking a soil sample using the soil sampling device and soil sample containment device to minimize the loss of any volatile organic compounds contained in the soil sample prior to analysis is disclosed. The soil sampling device comprises two close fitting, longitudinal tubular members of suitable length, the inner tube having the outward end closed. With the inner closed tube withdrawn a selected distance, the outer tube can be inserted into the ground or other similar soft material to withdraw a sample of material for examination. The inner closed end tube controls the volume of the sample taken and also serves to eject the sample. The soil sample containment device has a sealing member which is adapted to attach to an analytical apparatus which analyzes the volatile organic compounds contained in the sample. The soil sampling device in combination with the soil sample containment device allow an operator to obtain a soil sample containing volatile organic compounds and minimizing the loss of the volatile organic compounds prior to analysis of the soil sample for the volatile organic compounds.

  4. Soil sampling kit and a method of sampling therewith

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Thompson, C.V.

    1991-02-05

    A soil sampling device and a sample containment device for containing a soil sample is disclosed. In addition, a method for taking a soil sample using the soil sampling device and soil sample containment device to minimize the loss of any volatile organic compounds contained in the soil sample prior to analysis is disclosed. The soil sampling device comprises two close fitting, longitudinal tubular members of suitable length, the inner tube having the outward end closed. With the inner closed tube withdrawn a selected distance, the outer tube can be inserted into the ground or other similar soft material to withdraw a sample of material for examination. The inner closed end tube controls the volume of the sample taken and also serves to eject the sample. The soil sample containment device has a sealing member which is adapted to attach to an analytical apparatus which analyzes the volatile organic compounds contained in the sample. The soil sampling device in combination with the soil sample containment device allows an operator to obtain a soil sample containing volatile organic compounds and minimizing the loss of the volatile organic compounds prior to analysis of the soil sample for the volatile organic compounds. 11 figures.

  5. Interface effect in coupled quantum wells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hao, Ya-Fei

    2014-06-28

    This paper intends to theoretically investigate the effect of the interfaces on the Rashba spin splitting of two coupled quantum wells. The results show that the interface related Rashba spin splitting of the two coupled quantum wells is both smaller than that of a step quantum well which has the same structure with the step quantum well in the coupled quantum wells. And the influence of the cubic Dresselhaus spin-orbit interaction of the coupled quantum wells is larger than that of a step quantum well. It demonstrates that the spin relaxation time of the two coupled quantum wells will be shorter than that of a step quantum well. As for the application in the spintronic devices, a step quantum well may be better than the coupled quantum wells, which is mentioned in this paper.

  6. Helicopter magnetic survey conducted to locate wells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Veloski, G.A.; Hammack, R.W.; Stamp, V.; Hall, R.; Colina, K.

    2008-07-01

    A helicopter magnetic survey was conducted in August 2007 over 15.6 sq mi at the Naval Petroleum Reserve No. 3’s (NPR-3) Teapot Dome Field near Casper, Wyoming. The survey’s purpose was to accurately locate wells drilled there during more than 90 years of continuous oilfield operation. The survey was conducted at low altitude and with closely spaced flight lines to improve the detection of wells with weak magnetic response and to increase the resolution of closely spaced wells. The survey was in preparation for a planned CO2 flood for EOR, which requires a complete well inventory with accurate locations for all existing wells. The magnetic survey was intended to locate wells missing from the well database and to provide accurate locations for all wells. The ability of the helicopter magnetic survey to accurately locate wells was accomplished by comparing airborne well picks with well locations from an intense ground search of a small test area.

  7. NID Copper Sample Analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kouzes, Richard T.; Zhu, Zihua

    2011-09-12

    The current focal point of the nuclear physics program at PNNL is the MAJORANA DEMONSTRATOR, and the follow-on Tonne-Scale experiment, a large array of ultra-low background high-purity germanium detectors, enriched in 76Ge, designed to search for zero-neutrino double-beta decay (0???). This experiment requires the use of germanium isotopically enriched in 76Ge. The MAJORANA DEMONSTRATOR is a DOE and NSF funded project with a major science impact. The DEMONSTRATOR will utilize 76Ge from Russia, but for the Tonne-Scale experiment it is hoped that an alternate technology, possibly one under development at Nonlinear Ion Dynamics (NID), will be a viable, US-based, lower-cost source of separated material. Samples of separated material from NID require analysis to determine the isotopic distribution and impurities. DOE is funding NID through an SBIR grant for development of their separation technology for application to the Tonne-Scale experiment. The Environmental Molecular Sciences facility (EMSL), a DOE user facility at PNNL, has the required mass spectroscopy instruments for making isotopic measurements that are essential to the quality assurance for the MAJORANA DEMONSTRATOR and for the development of the future separation technology required for the Tonne-Scale experiment. A sample of isotopically separated copper was provided by NID to PNNL in January 2011 for isotopic analysis as a test of the NID technology. The results of that analysis are reported here. A second sample of isotopically separated copper was provided by NID to PNNL in August 2011 for isotopic analysis as a test of the NID technology. The results of that analysis are also reported here.

  8. Germanium-76 Sample Analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kouzes, Richard T.; Engelhard, Mark H.; Zhu, Zihua

    2011-04-01

    The MAJORANA DEMONSTRATOR is a large array of ultra-low background high-purity germanium detectors, enriched in 76Ge, designed to search for zero-neutrino double-beta decay (0???). The DEMONSTRATOR will utilize 76Ge from Russia, and the first one gram sample was received from the supplier for analysis on April 24, 2011. The Environmental Molecular Sciences facility, a DOE user facility at PNNL, was used to make the required isotopic and chemical purity measurements that are essential to the quality assurance for the MAJORANA DEMONSTRATOR. The results of this first analysis are reported here.

  9. Small sample feature selection 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sima, Chao

    2007-09-17

    that the correction factor is a function of the dimensionality. The estimated standard deviations for the bolstering kernels are thus given by: ?i = ˆd(yi) ?p,i , for i = 1,...,n. (2.8) Clearly, as the number of samples in the training data increases, the standard de..., the DeArray software of the National Human Genome Research Institute calculates a multi-faceted quality metric for each spot [25]. This quality problem is a result of imperfections in RNA preparation, hybridization to the arrays, scanning, and also...

  10. September 2004 Water Sampling

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefield Municipal Gas &SCE-SessionsSouth DakotaRobbins and700 GJO-2003-411-TACe: SUBJIHX:ontineSampling at

  11. September 2004 Water Sampling

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefield Municipal Gas &SCE-SessionsSouth DakotaRobbins and700 GJO-2003-411-TACe: SUBJIHX:ontineSampling

  12. 2003 CBECS Sample Design

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustments (Billion Cubic Feet)Decade Year-0ProvedDecade Year-0Cubic MonthlyTechnical Information > Sample

  13. September 2004 Water Sampling

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefield Municipal Gas &SCE-SessionsSouthReport for the t-) S/,,5 'a C O M1 theGroundwater Sampling at the

  14. September 2004 Water Sampling

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefield Municipal Gas &SCE-SessionsSouthReport for the t-) S/,,5 'a C O M1 theGroundwater Sampling at

  15. September 2004 Water Sampling

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefield Municipal Gas &SCE-SessionsSouthReport for the t-) S/,,5 'a C O M1 theGroundwater Sampling at4

  16. September 2004 Water Sampling

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefield Municipal Gas &SCE-SessionsSouthReport for the t-) S/,,5 'a C O M1 theGroundwater Sampling at4and

  17. September 2004 Water Sampling

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefield Municipal Gas &SCE-SessionsSouthReport for the t-) S/,,5 'a C O M1 theGroundwater Sampling

  18. September 2004 Water Sampling

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefield Municipal Gas &SCE-SessionsSouthReport for the t-) S/,,5 'a C O M1 theGroundwater Sampling Rifle,

  19. September 2004 Water Sampling

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefield Municipal Gas &SCE-SessionsSouthReport for the t-) S/,,5 'a C O M1 theGroundwater Sampling

  20. September 2004 Water Sampling

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefield Municipal Gas &SCE-SessionsSouthReport for the t-) S/,,5 'a C O M1 theGroundwater Sampling4

  1. January 2011 Groundwater Sampling at the Gnome-Coach, New Mexico, Site (Data Validation Package)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    2011-11-01

    Annual sampling was conducted January 19, 2011, to monitor groundwater for potential radionuclide contamination at the Gnome-Coach site in New Mexico. The sampling was performed as specified in the Sampling and Analysis Plan for U.S. Department of Energy Office of Legacy Management Sites (LMS/PLN/S04351, continually updated). Well LRL-7 was not sampled per instruction from the lead. A duplicate sample was collected from well USGS-1.Water levels were measured in the monitoring wells onsite.

  2. Ness horizontal-well case study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Koonsman, T.L. (Mobil Exploration Norway Inc. (Norway)); Purpich, A.J. (Mobil North Sea Ltd. (United Kingdom))

    1992-10-01

    This paper reviews the reservoir management work that led to the recommendation to drill the Ness field horizontal well. It also discusses the poor well performance seen almost immediately after production began and the reasons for that well performance revealed by a postdrill reservoir simulation. Finally, the atypical logging responses observed in the well are discussed.

  3. Track 4: Employee Health and Wellness

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    ISM Workshop Presentations Knoxville Convention Center, Knoxville, TN August 2009 Track 4: Employee Health and Wellness

  4. Electrphoretic Sample Excitation Light Assembly.

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Li, Qingbo (State College, PA); Liu, Changsheng (State College, PA)

    2002-04-02

    An automated electrophoretic system is disclosed. The system employs a capillary cartridge having a plurality of capillary tubes. The cartridge has a first array of capillary ends projecting from one side of a plate. The first array of capillary ends are spaced apart in substantially the same manner as the wells of a microtitre tray of standard size. This allows one to simultaneously perform capillary electrophoresis on samples present in each of the wells of the tray. The system includes a stacked, dual carrousel arrangement to eliminate cross-contamination resulting from reuse of the same buffer tray on consecutive executions from electrophoresis. The system also has a gel delivery module containing a gel syringe/a stepper motor or a high pressure chamber with a pump to quickly and uniformly deliver gel through the capillary tubes. The system further includes a multi-wavelength beam generator to generate a laser beam which produces a beam with a wide range of wavelengths. An off-line capillary reconditioner thoroughly cleans a capillary cartridge to enable simultaneous execution of electrophoresis with another capillary cartridge. The streamlined nature of the off-line capillary reconditioner offers the advantage of increased system throughput with a minimal increase in system cost.

  5. Tank 241-SY-102 January 2000 Compatibility Grab Samples Analytical Results for the Final Report [SEC 1 and 2

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    BELL, K.E.

    2000-05-11

    This document is the format IV, final report for the tank 241-SY-102 (SY-102) grab samples taken in January 2000 to address waste compatibility concerns. Chemical, radiochemical, and physical analyses on the tank SY-102 samples were performed as directed in Comparability Grab Sampling and Analysis Plan for Fiscal Year 2000 (Sasaki 1999). No notification limits were exceeded. Preliminary data on samples 2SY-99-5, -6, and -7 were reported in ''Format II Report on Tank 241-SY-102 Waste Compatibility Grab Samples Taken in January 2000'' (Lockrem 2000). The data presented here represent the final results.

  6. Entanglement sampling and applications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Frédéric Dupuis; Omar Fawzi; Stephanie Wehner

    2015-06-15

    A natural measure for the amount of quantum information that a physical system E holds about another system A = A_1,...,A_n is given by the min-entropy Hmin(A|E). Specifically, the min-entropy measures the amount of entanglement between E and A, and is the relevant measure when analyzing a wide variety of problems ranging from randomness extraction in quantum cryptography, decoupling used in channel coding, to physical processes such as thermalization or the thermodynamic work cost (or gain) of erasing a quantum system. As such, it is a central question to determine the behaviour of the min-entropy after some process M is applied to the system A. Here we introduce a new generic tool relating the resulting min-entropy to the original one, and apply it to several settings of interest, including sampling of subsystems and measuring in a randomly chosen basis. The sampling results lead to new upper bounds on quantum random access codes, and imply the existence of "local decouplers". The results on random measurements yield new high-order entropic uncertainty relations with which we prove the optimality of cryptographic schemes in the bounded quantum storage model.

  7. NID Copper Sample Analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kouzes, Richard T.; Zhu, Zihua

    2011-02-01

    The current focal point of the nuclear physics program at PNNL is the MAJORANA DEMONSTRATOR, and the follow-on Tonne-Scale experiment, a large array of ultra-low background high-purity germanium detectors, enriched in 76Ge, designed to search for zero-neutrino double-beta decay (0???). This experiment requires the use of germanium isotopically enriched in 76Ge. The DEMONSTRATOR will utilize 76Ge from Russia, but for the Tonne-Scale experiment it is hoped that an alternate technology under development at Nonlinear Ion Dynamics (NID) will be a viable, US-based, lower-cost source of separated material. Samples of separated material from NID require analysis to determine the isotopic distribution and impurities. The MAJORANA DEMONSTRATOR is a DOE and NSF funded project with a major science impact. DOE is funding NID through an SBIR grant for development of their separation technology for application to the Tonne-Scale experiment. The Environmental Molecular Sciences facility (EMSL), a DOE user facility at PNNL, has the required mass spectroscopy instruments for making these isotopic measurements that are essential to the quality assurance for the MAJORANA DEMONSTRATOR and for the development of the future separation technology required for the Tonne-Scale experiment. A sample of isotopically separated copper was provided by NID to PNNL for isotopic analysis as a test of the NID technology. The results of that analysis are reported here.

  8. Sample holder with optical features

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Milas, Mirko; Zhu, Yimei; Rameau, Jonathan David

    2013-07-30

    A sample holder for holding a sample to be observed for research purposes, particularly in a transmission electron microscope (TEM), generally includes an external alignment part for directing a light beam in a predetermined beam direction, a sample holder body in optical communication with the external alignment part and a sample support member disposed at a distal end of the sample holder body opposite the external alignment part for holding a sample to be analyzed. The sample holder body defines an internal conduit for the light beam and the sample support member includes a light beam positioner for directing the light beam between the sample holder body and the sample held by the sample support member.

  9. Fluid sampling tool

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Johnston, Roger G. (Los Alamos, NM); Garcia, Anthony R. E. (Espanola, NM); Martinez, Ronald K. (Santa Cruz, NM)

    2001-09-25

    The invention includes a rotatable tool for collecting fluid through the wall of a container. The tool includes a fluid collection section with a cylindrical shank having an end portion for drilling a hole in the container wall when the tool is rotated, and a threaded portion for tapping the hole in the container wall. A passageway in the shank in communication with at least one radial inlet hole in the drilling end and an opening at the end of the shank is adapted to receive fluid from the container. The tool also includes a cylindrical chamber affixed to the end of the shank opposite to the drilling portion thereof for receiving and storing fluid passing through the passageway. The tool also includes a flexible, deformable gasket that provides a fluid-tight chamber to confine kerf generated during the drilling and tapping of the hole. The invention also includes a fluid extractor section for extracting fluid samples from the fluid collecting section.

  10. Well Completion Report for Well ER-20-11, Corrective Action Units 101 and 102: Central and Western Pahute Mesa

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NSTec Environmental Management

    2013-02-27

    Well ER-20-11 was drilled for the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office in support of the Nevada Environmental Management Operations Underground Test Area (UGTA) Activity at the Nevada National Security Site (formerly Nevada Test Site), Nye County, Nevada. The well was drilled in September 2012 as part of the Central and Western Pahute Mesa Corrective Action Unit Phase II drilling program. Well ER-20-11 was constructed to further investigate the nature and extent of radionuclidecontaminated groundwater encountered in two nearby UGTA wells, to help define hydraulic and transport parameters for the contaminated Benham aquifer, and to provide data for the UGTA hydrostratigraphic framework model. The 44.5-centimeter (cm) surface hole was drilled to a depth of 520.0 meters (m) and cased with 34.0-cm casing to 511.5 m. The hole diameter was then decreased to 31.1 cm, and the borehole was drilled to a total depth of 915.6 m. The hole was completed to allow access for hydrologic testing and sampling in the target aquifer, which is a lava-flow aquifer known as the Benham aquifer. The completion casing string, set to the depth of 904.3 m, consists of a string of 6?-inch (in.) stainless-steel casing hanging from a string of 7?-in. carbon-steel casing. The stainless-steel casing has one slotted interval at 796.3 to 903.6 m. One piezometer string was installed, which consists of 2?-in. stainless-steel tubing that hangs from 2?-in. carbon-steel tubing via a crossover sub. This string was landed at 903.8 m and is slotted in the interval 795.3 to 903.1 m. Data collected during and shortly after hole construction include composite drill cuttings samples collected every 3.0 m, various geophysical logs, fluid samples (for groundwater chemistry analysis and tritium measurements), and water-level measurements. The well penetrated 915.6 m of Tertiary volcanic rock, including one saturated lava flow aquifer. Measurements on samples taken from the undeveloped well indicated elevated tritium levels within the Benham aquifer. The maximum tritium level measured with field equipment was 146,131 picocuries per liter from a sample obtained at the depth of 912.0 m. The fluid level was measured in the piezometer string at a depth of 504.5 m on September 26, 2012. All Fluid Management Plan (FMP) requirements for Well ER-20-11 were met. Analysis of monitoring samples and FMP confirmatory samples indicated that fluids generated during drilling at Well ER-20-11 met the FMP criteria for discharge to an unlined sump or designated infiltration area. Well development, hydrologic testing, and sampling will be conducted at a later date.

  11. Horizontal well applications in complex carbonate reservoirs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rahman, M.; Al-Awami, H.

    1995-10-01

    Over the past four years, Saudi Aramco has drilled over eighty horizontal wells, onshore and offshore. It has successfully applied this technology to develop new reservoirs as well as enhance recovery from its mature fields. This paper presents the reservoir engineering aspects of `horizontal` and `high angle` wells drilled in a major offshore field in Saudi Arabia. It shows how horizontal wells have (a) increased the recovery of bypassed oil, (b) improved well productivity in tight reservoirs, (c) increased production from thin oil zones underlain by water, and (d) improved peripheral injection. The paper discusses the actual performance of the horizontal wells and compares them with offset conventional wells. It presents the results of logging and testing of these wells, and highlights actual field data on (a) relationship between productivity gain and horizontal length, (b) pressure loss along the horizontal wellbore, and (c) effect of heterogeneity on coning an inflow performance.

  12. Disinfecting Water Wells by Shock Chlorination 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dozier, Monty; McFarland, Mark L.

    2005-09-30

    If your well has been flooded, it must be shock chlorinated before it can be used as a source of drinking water. This publication explains how to disinfect a well using either dry chlorine or liquid household bleach....

  13. Production Trends of Shale Gas Wells 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Khan, Waqar A.

    2010-01-14

    To obtain better well performance and improved production from shale gas reservoirs, it is important to understand the behavior of shale gas wells and to identify different flow regions in them over a period of time. It is also important...

  14. RFI Well Integrity 06 JUL 1400

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This PowerPoint report entitled "Well Integrity During Shut - In Operations: DOE/DOI Analyses" describes risks and suggests risk management recommendations associated with shutting in the well.

  15. Groundwater Monitoring Well Installation Work Plan

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Groundwater Monitoring Well Installation Work Plan CSMRI Site Prepared for: Colorado School;CSMRI Site Groundwater Monitoring Well Installation Work Plan December 6, 2006 Page ii Table of Contents

  16. The RGB Sample of Intermediate BL Lacs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    S. A. Laurent-Muehleisen; R. I. Kollgaard; E. D. Feigelson; W. Brinkmann; J. Siebert

    1999-05-12

    Combining newly identified and previously known BL Lacs from the RASS-Green Bank (RGB) catalog, we present a sample of 127 BL Lacs, the largest ever derived from a single uniform survey. A Complete sample of 33 objects brighter than O=18.0 mag is also presented. These samples are compared to other known BL Lac samples and are generally found to exhibit properties intermediate between those of the previously disparate classes of High and Low energy peaked BL Lacs (HBLs and LBLs, respectively). This result is most dramatic in the distribution of the X-ray to radio logarithmic flux ratios, where the RGB BL Lacs are shown to peak precisely where the sharp dichotomy between the two subclasses was previously seen. The alpha_ro vs alpha_ox diagram also shows the RGB sample smoothly bridges the gap between the previously distinct subclasses of LBLs and HBLs. We also find a weak, but statistically significant correlation between the composite X-ray spectral index alpha_xox and alpha_ro. This implies that the more LBL-like RGB BL Lacs have a secondary source of X-ray emission, possibly from an inverse Compton component. We also present both the X-ray and radio logN-logS distributions for which the competing HBL/LBL unification scenarios have differing predictions. The unknown effects of the triple flux limit inherent in the RGB Complete sample makes quantitative analysis uncertain, but the characteristics of the RGB sample compare well both with results obtained from previous samples and with general theoretical predictions based on a simple Monte Carlo simulation. Our analysis indicates that the unimodal distribution of BL Lac properties found in the RGB sample likely reliably reflect the underlying population, while the bimodal distribution found in earlier studies arose primarily from observational selection effects.

  17. Evaluating Radionuclide Air Emission Stack Sampling Systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ballinger, Marcel Y.

    2002-12-16

    The Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) operates a number of research and development (R&D) facilities for the U.S. Department of Energy at the Hanford Site, Washington. These facilities are subject to Clean Air Act regulations that require sampling of radionuclide air emissions from some of these facilities. A revision to an American National Standards Institute (ANSI) standard on sampling radioactive air emissions has recently been incorporated into federal and state regulations and a re-evaluation of affected facilities is being performed to determine the impact. The revised standard requires a well-mixed sampling location that must be demonstrated through tests specified in the standard. It also carries a number of maintenance requirements, including inspections and cleaning of the sampling system. Evaluations were performed in 2000 – 2002 on two PNNL facilities to determine the operational and design impacts of the new requirements. The evaluation included inspection and cleaning maintenance activities plus testing to determine if the current sampling locations meet criteria in the revised standard. Results show a wide range of complexity in inspection and cleaning activities depending on accessibility of the system, ease of removal, and potential impact on building operations (need for outages). As expected, these High Efficiency Particulate Air (HEPA)-filtered systems did not show deposition significant enough to cause concerns with blocking of the nozzle or other parts of the system. The tests for sampling system location in the revised standard also varied in complexity depending on accessibility of the sample site and use of a scale model can alleviate many issues. Previous criteria to locate sampling systems at eight duct diameters downstream and two duct diameters upstream of the nearest disturbances is no guarantee of meeting criteria in the revised standard. A computational fluid dynamics model was helpful in understanding flow and contaminant mixing in an exhaust system and may be useful to identify potential sampling locations in an exhaust system that are likely to meet criteria in the revised standard.

  18. Uninterruptible Power Supplies Designed to meet or exceed the safety standards established by UL, CSA, CE and VDE. The Alpha CFR UPS is one of the safest, most reliable and versatile Uninterruptible Power Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Berns, Hans-Gerd

    Uninterruptible Power Supplies Designed to meet or exceed the safety standards established by ULKVA available. Uninterruptible Power Supply > The CFR's microprocessor design provides efficiency, CSA, CE and VDE. The Alpha CFR UPS is one of the safest, most reliable and versatile Uninterruptible

  19. ExSample -- A Library for Sampling Sudakov-Type Distributions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Simon Platzer

    2012-03-19

    Sudakov-type distributions are at the heart of generating radiation in parton showers as well as contemporary NLO matching algorithms along the lines of the POWHEG algorithm. In this paper, the C++ library ExSample is introduced, which implements adaptive sampling of Sudakov-type distributions for splitting kernels which are in general only known numerically. Besides the evolution variable, the splitting kernels can depend on an arbitrary number of other degrees of freedom to be sampled, and any number of further parameters which are fixed on an event-by-event basis.

  20. Capping of Water Wells for Future Use 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lesikar, Bruce J.; Mechell, Justin

    2007-09-04

    Water wells that are not being used, but that might be needed in the future, can be sealed with a cap that covers the top of the well casing pipe to prevent unauthorized access and contamination of the well. This publication explains how to cap a...

  1. Rapid determination of actinides in asphalt samples

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Maxwell, Sherrod L.; Culligan, Brian K.; Hutchison, Jay B.

    2014-01-12

    A new rapid method for the determination of actinides in asphalt samples has been developed that can be used in emergency response situations or for routine analysis If a radiological dispersive device (RDD), Improvised Nuclear Device (IND) or a nuclear accident such as the accident at the Fukushima Nuclear Power Plant in March, 2011 occurs, there will be an urgent need for rapid analyses of many different environmental matrices, including asphalt materials, to support dose mitigation and environmental clean up. The new method for the determination of actinides in asphalt utilizes a rapid furnace step to destroy bitumen and organicsmore »present in the asphalt and sodium hydroxide fusion to digest the remaining sample. Sample preconcentration steps are used to collect the actinides and a new stacked TRU Resin + DGA Resin column method is employed to separate the actinide isotopes in the asphalt samples. The TRU Resin plus DGA Resin separation approach, which allows sequential separation of plutonium, uranium, americium and curium isotopes in asphalt samples, can be applied to soil samples as well.« less

  2. Rapid determination of actinides in asphalt samples

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Maxwell, Sherrod L.; Culligan, Brian K.; Hutchison, Jay B.

    2014-01-12

    A new rapid method for the determination of actinides in asphalt samples has been developed that can be used in emergency response situations or for routine analysis If a radiological dispersive device (RDD), Improvised Nuclear Device (IND) or a nuclear accident such as the accident at the Fukushima Nuclear Power Plant in March, 2011 occurs, there will be an urgent need for rapid analyses of many different environmental matrices, including asphalt materials, to support dose mitigation and environmental clean up. The new method for the determination of actinides in asphalt utilizes a rapid furnace step to destroy bitumen and organics present in the asphalt and sodium hydroxide fusion to digest the remaining sample. Sample preconcentration steps are used to collect the actinides and a new stacked TRU Resin + DGA Resin column method is employed to separate the actinide isotopes in the asphalt samples. The TRU Resin plus DGA Resin separation approach, which allows sequential separation of plutonium, uranium, americium and curium isotopes in asphalt samples, can be applied to soil samples as well.

  3. Specified assurance level sampling procedure

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Willner, O.

    1980-11-01

    In the nuclear industry design specifications for certain quality characteristics require that the final product be inspected by a sampling plan which can demonstrate product conformance to stated assurance levels. The Specified Assurance Level (SAL) Sampling Procedure has been developed to permit the direct selection of attribute sampling plans which can meet commonly used assurance levels. The SAL procedure contains sampling plans which yield the minimum sample size at stated assurance levels. The SAL procedure also provides sampling plans with acceptance numbers ranging from 0 to 10, thus, making available to the user a wide choice of plans all designed to comply with a stated assurance level.

  4. DISSOLUTION OF 3013-DE SAMPLE 10-16

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Taylor-Pashow, K.

    2011-05-24

    The HB-Line Facility has a long-term mission to dissolve and disposition legacy fissile materials. HB-Line dissolves plutonium dioxide (PuO{sub 2}) from K-Area parting support of the 3013 Destructive Examination (DE) program. The PuO{sub 2}-bearing solids originate from a variety of unit operations and processing facilities, but all of the material is assumed to be high-fired (i.e., calcined in air for a minimum of two hours at {ge} 750 C). The Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) conducted dissolution flowsheet studies on 3013 DE Sample 10-16 (can R610826), which contains weapons-grade plutonium (Pu) as the fissile material. The dissolution flowsheet study was performed for 4 hours at 108 C on unwashed material using 12 M nitric acid (HNO{sub 3}) containing 0.20 M potassium fluoride (KF). After 4 hours at 108 C, the {sup 239}Pu Equivalent concentration was 32.5 g/L (gamma, 5.0% uncertainty). The insoluble residue comprised 9.88 wt % of the initial bulk weight, and contained 5.31-5.95 wt % of the initial Pu. The residue contained Pu in the highest concentration, followed by tungsten (W). Analyses detected 2,770 mg/L chloride (Cl{sup -}) in the final dissolver solution (3.28 wt %), which is significantly lower than the amount of Cl{sup -} detected by prompt gamma (9.86 wt %) and the 3013 DE Surveillance program (14.7 wt %). A low bias in chloride measurement is anticipated due to volatilization during the experiment. Gas generation studies found approximately 60 mL of gas per gram of sample produced during the first 30 minutes of dissolution. Little to no gas was produced after the first 30 minutes. Hydrogen gas (H{sub 2}) was not detected in the sample. Based on detection limits and accounting for dilution, the generated gas contained < 0.12 vol % H{sub 2}, which is well below the 4.0 vol % flammability limit for H{sub 2} in air. Filtration of the dissolver solution occurred readily. When aluminum nitrate nonahydrate (ANN) was added to the filtered dissolver solution at a 3:1 Al:F molar ratio, and stored at room temperature for 24 hours, the solution filtered approximately 6 times slower than when filtered 30 minutes after ANN addition, requiring 6 minutes to complete compared to 55 seconds for the first filtration. It is likely that the ambient-temperature solubility for ANN was exceeded. A 4-hour dissolution time at a temperature of 108 C in 12 M HNO{sub 3}/0.2 M KF is recommended for dissolution of this material.

  5. Visual Sample Plan (VSP) - FIELDS Integration

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pulsipher, Brent A.; Wilson, John E.; Gilbert, Richard O.; Hassig, Nancy L.; Carlson, Deborah K.; Bing-Canar, John; Cooper, Brian; Roth, Chuck

    2003-04-19

    Two software packages, VSP 2.1 and FIELDS 3.5, are being used by environmental scientists to plan the number and type of samples required to meet project objectives, display those samples on maps, query a database of past sample results, produce spatial models of the data, and analyze the data in order to arrive at defensible decisions. VSP 2.0 is an interactive tool to calculate optimal sample size and optimal sample location based on user goals, risk tolerance, and variability in the environment and in lab methods. FIELDS 3.0 is a set of tools to explore the sample results in a variety of ways to make defensible decisions with quantified levels of risk and uncertainty. However, FIELDS 3.0 has a small sample design module. VSP 2.0, on the other hand, has over 20 sampling goals, allowing the user to input site-specific assumptions such as non-normality of sample results, separate variability between field and laboratory measurements, make two-sample comparisons, perform confidence interval estimation, use sequential search sampling methods, and much more. Over 1,000 copies of VSP are in use today. FIELDS is used in nine of the ten U.S. EPA regions, by state regulatory agencies, and most recently by several international countries. Both software packages have been peer-reviewed, enjoy broad usage, and have been accepted by regulatory agencies as well as site project managers as key tools to help collect data and make environmental cleanup decisions. Recently, the two software packages were integrated, allowing the user to take advantage of the many design options of VSP, and the analysis and modeling options of FIELDS. The transition between the two is simple for the user – VSP can be called from within FIELDS, automatically passing a map to VSP and automatically retrieving sample locations and design information when the user returns to FIELDS. This paper will describe the integration, give a demonstration of the integrated package, and give users download instructions and software requirements for running the integrated package.

  6. 3 - DJ : sampling as design

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Patel, Sayjel Vijay

    2015-01-01

    3D Sampling is introduced as a new spatial craft that can be applied to architectural design, akin to how sampling is applied in the field of electronic music. Through the development of 3-DJ, a prototype design software, ...

  7. Deep sub-nanosecond reversal of vortex cores confined in a spin-wave potential well

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dong, Xinwei; Wang, Zhenyu; Wang, Ruifang, E-mail: wangrf@xmu.edu.cn [Department of Physics and Institute of Theoretical Physics and Astrophysics, Xiamen University, Xiamen 361005 (China)

    2014-03-17

    A spin-wave potential well is created in a permalloy nanodisk by setting up a cylindrical cavity in the center of the sample. We then apply a single-harmonic external magnetic field perpendicular to the disk plane to switch the vortex polarity of the sample. Our micromagnetic numerical studies establish that the effective spin-wave confinement by the potential well leads to much stronger magnetization oscillation in the sample. Therefore, the vortex core can be reversed well below 200 ps and over a wide range of field frequency. Our findings present an additional efficient means for ultrafast switching of magnetic vortices.

  8. Completion Report for Well ER-12-2

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bechtel Nevada

    2004-11-01

    Well ER-12-2 was drilled for the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office, in support of the Nevada Environmental Restoration Project at the Nevada Test Site, Nye County, Nevada. The well was drilled from November 2002 to January 2003 as part of a hydrogeologic investigation program for the Yucca Flat Corrective Action Unit. The overall purpose of the well was to gather subsurface data to better characterize the hydrogeology in the northwestern portion of Yucca Flat. The well was drilled to total measured depth of 2,097.9 meters. The 131.1-centimeter-diameter borehole was left open (i.e., uncased) below the base of the intermediate casing at 901.6 meters. A piezometer string was installed outside the surface casing to a depth of 176.4 meters to monitor a zone of perched water. Data gathered during and shortly after hole construction include composite drill cuttings samples collected every 3 meters, sidewall core samples from 7 depths, various geophysical logs, and water level measurements. These data indicate that the well penetrated, in descending order, 137.5 meters of Quaternary and Tertiary alluvium, 48.8 meters of Tertiary volcanic rocks, 289.6 meters of Mississippian Chainman Shale, and 1,622.5 meters of Mississippian and Upper Devonian Eleana Formation consisting of shale, argillite, sandstone, quartzite, and limestone. Forty-seven days after the well was drilled the water level inside the main hole was tagged at the depth of 65.43 meters, and the water level inside the piezometer string was tagged at 127.14 meters.

  9. Completion Report for Well ER-EC-1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Townsend, M.J.

    2000-12-01

    Well ER-EC-1 was drilled for the U.S. Department of Energy, Nevada Operations Office in support of the Nevada Environmental Restoration Project at the Nevada Test Site, Nye County, Nevada. This well was drilled in the spring of 1999 as part of the U.S. Department of Energy's hydrogeologic investigation well program in the Western Pahute Mesa - Oasis Valley region just west of the Test Site. A 44.5-centimeter surface hole was drilled and cased off to the depth 675.1 meters below the surface. The hole diameter was then decreased to 31.1 centimeters for drilling to a total depth of 1,524.0 meters. A preliminary composite, static, water level was measured at the depth of approximately 566.3 meters prior to installation of the completion string. One completion string with three isolated, slotted intervals was installed in the well. Detailed lithologic descriptions with preliminary stratigraphic assignments are included in the report. These are based on composite drill cuttings collected every 3 meters and 31 sidewall samples taken at various depths below 680 meters, supplemented by geophysical log data. Detailed chemical and mineralogical studies of rock samples are in progress. The well penetrated Tertiary-age lava and tuff of the Timber Mountain Group, the Paintbrush Group, the Calico Hills Formation, the Crater Flat Group, and the Volcanics of Quartz Mountain. The preliminary geologic interpretation of data from Well ER-EC-1 indicates the presence of a structural trough or bench filled with a thick section of post-Rainier Mesa lava. These data also suggest that this site is located on a buried structural ridge that may separate the Silent Canyon and Timber Mountain caldera complexes.

  10. DWPF SMECT PVV SAMPLE CHARACTERIZATION AND REMEDIATION

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bannochie, C.; Crawford, C.

    2013-06-18

    On April 2, 2013, a solid sample of material collected from the Defense Waste Processing Facility’s Process Vessel Vent (PVV) jumper for the Slurry Mix Evaporator Condensate Tank (SMECT) was received at the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL). DWPF has experienced pressure spikes within the SMECT and other process vessels which have resulted in processing delays while a vacuum was re-established. Work on this sample was requested in a Technical Assistance Request (TAR). This document reports the results of chemical and physical property measurements made on the sample, as well as insights into the possible impact to the material using DWPF’s proposed remediation methods. DWPF was interested in what the facility could expect when the material was exposed to either 8M nitric acid or 90% formic acid, the two materials they have the ability to flush through the PVV line in addition to process water once the line is capped off during a facility outage.

  11. Gasbuggy, New Mexico, Hydrologic and Natural Gas Sampling and Analysis Results for 2010

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    2010-12-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Legacy Management conducted natural gas sampling for the Gasbuggy, New Mexico, site on July 6 and 7, 2010. Additionally, a water sample was obtained at one well known as the 29-6 Water Hole, several miles west of the Gasbuggy site. Natural gas sampling consists of collecting both gas samples and samples of produced water from gas production wells. Water samples from gas production wells were analyzed for gamma-emitting radionuclides, gross alpha, gross beta, and tritium. Natural gas samples were analyzed for tritium and carbon-14. The one water well sample was analyzed for gamma-emitting radionuclides and tritium. ALS Laboratory Group in Fort Collins, Colorado, analyzed water samples. Isotech Laboratories in Champaign, Illinois, analyzed natural gas samples.

  12. Gasbuggy, New Mexico, Natural Gas and Produced Water Sampling and Analysis Results for 2011

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2011-09-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Legacy Management conducted natural gas sampling for the Gasbuggy, New Mexico, site on June 7 and 8, 2011. Natural gas sampling consists of collecting both gas samples and samples of produced water from gas production wells. Water samples from gas production wells were analyzed for gamma-emitting radionuclides, gross alpha, gross beta, and tritium. Natural gas samples were analyzed for tritium and carbon-14. ALS Laboratory Group in Fort Collins, Colorado, analyzed water samples. Isotech Laboratories in Champaign, Illinois, analyzed natural gas samples.

  13. Rheology and TIC/TOC results of ORNL tank samples

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pareizs, J. M.; Hansen, E. K.

    2013-04-26

    The Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL)) was requested by Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) to perform total inorganic carbon (TIC), total organic carbon (TOC), and rheological measurements for several Oak Ridge tank samples. As received slurry samples were diluted and submitted to SRNL-Analytical for TIC and TOC analyses. Settled solids yield stress (also known as settled shear strength) of the as received settled sludge samples were determined using the vane method and these measurements were obtained 24 hours after the samples were allowed to settled undisturbed. Rheological or flow properties (Bingham Plastic viscosity and Bingham Plastic yield stress) were determined from flow curves of the homogenized or well mixed samples. Other targeted total suspended solids (TSS) concentrations samples were also analyzed for flow properties and these samples were obtained by diluting the as-received sample with de-ionized (DI) water.

  14. Cathodic protection of storage field well casings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dabkowski, J.

    1986-01-01

    Downhole logging of gas storage field wells to determine cathodic protection (CP) levels is expensive and requires removing the well from service. A technique allowing the prediction of downhole CP levels by modeling combined with limiting field measurements would provide the industry with a cost-effective means of implementing and monitoring casing protection. A computer model has been developed for a cathodically protected well casing.

  15. What Is Well Yield? Private wells are frequently drilled in rural areas to

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Danforth, Bryan Nicholas

    1 What Is Well Yield? Private wells are frequently drilled in rural areas to supply water lowering the water level in the borehole below the pump intake is called the well yield. Low-yielding wells are generally considered wells that cannot meet the peak water demand for the home or farm. This fact sheet

  16. Sampling-based algorithms for optimal motion planning

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Karaman, Sertac

    During the last decade, sampling-based path planning algorithms, such as probabilistic roadmaps (PRM) and rapidly exploring random trees (RRT), have been shown to work well in practice and possess theoretical guarantees ...

  17. ANALYTICAL RESULTS FOR MOX COLEMANITE CONCRETE SAMPLES RECEIVED ON JANUARY 15, 2013

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Reigel, M.; Best, D.

    2013-02-13

    The Mixed Oxide Fuel Fabrication Facility (MFFF) will use colemanite bearing concrete neutron absorber panels credited with attenuating neutron flux in the criticality design analyses and shielding operators from radiation. The Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) is tasked with measuring the total density, partial hydrogen density, and partial boron density of the colemanite concrete. SRNL received twelve samples of colemanite concrete for analysis on January 15, 2013. The average total density of each of the samples measured by the ASTM method C 642, the average partial hydrogen density was measured using method ASTM E 1311, and the average partial boron density of each sample was measured according to ASTM C 1301. The lower limits and measured values for the total density, hydrogen partial density, and boron partial density are presented. For all the samples tested, the total density and the hydrogen partial density met or exceeded the specified limit. All of the samples met or exceeded the boron partial density lower bound with the exception of samples G3-M11-2000-H, G3-M11-3000-M, and G5-M1-3000-H which are below the limit of 1.65E-01 g/cm3.

  18. ANALYTICAL RESULTS FOR MOX COLEMANITE CONCRETE SAMPLES RECEIVED ON JANUARY 15, 2013

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Reigel, M.

    2014-05-19

    The Mixed Oxide Fuel Fabrication Facility (MFFF) will use colemanite bearing concrete neutron absorber panels credited with attenuating neutron flux in the criticality design analyses and shielding operators from radiation. The Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) is tasked with measuring the total density, partial hydrogen density, and partial boron density of the colemanite concrete. SRNL received twelve samples of colemanite concrete for analysis on January 15, 2013. The average total density of each of the samples measured by the ASTM method C 642, the average partial hydrogen density was measured using method ASTM E 1131, and the average partial boron density of each sample was measured according to ASTM C 1301. The lower limits and measured values for the total density, hydrogen partial density, and boron partial density are presented. For all the samples tested, the total density and the hydrogen partial density met or exceeded the specified limit. All of the samples met or exceeded the boron partial density lower bound with the exception of samples G3-M11-2000-H, G3-M11-3000-M, and G5-M1-3000-H which are below the limit of 1.65E-01 g/cm{sup 3}.

  19. Gas condensate damage in hydraulically fractured wells 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Adeyeye, Adedeji Ayoola

    2004-09-30

    This project is a research into the effect of gas condensate damage in hydraulically fractured wells. It is the result of a problem encountered in producing a low permeability formation from a well in South Texas owned by the El Paso Production...

  20. Program Termination and Well Partial Orderings

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Blass, Andreas R.

    Program Termination and Well Partial Orderings Andreas Blass Yuri Gurevich Abstract The following observation may be useful in establishing program termination: if a transitive relation R is covered of the stature P of a well partial ordering P and show that |R| 1 × · · · × n and that this bound is tight

  1. Coiled tubing velocity strings keep wells unloaded

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wesson, H.R.; Shursen, J.L.

    1989-07-01

    Liquid loading is a problem in many older and even some newer gas wells, particularly in pressure depletion type reservoirs. This liquid loading results in decreased production and may even kill the well. The use of coiled tubing as a velocity string (or siphon string) has proved to be an economically viable alternative to allow continued and thus, increased cumulative production for wells experiencing liquid loading problems. Coiled tubing run inside the existing production string reduces the flow area, whether the well is produced up the tubing or up the annulus. This reduction in flow area results in an increase in flow velocity and thus, an increase in the well's ability to unload fluids.

  2. Monitoring cathodic protection of well casings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dabkowski, J.

    1980-01-01

    Because conventional downhole logging of gas storage wells to determine cathodic-protection levels is expensive and inconvenient, a program was developed (1) to predict downhole casing-to-soil potentials from wellhead measurements in the presence of interference and (2 )to model the mutual interference effects occurring between the wells and the cathodic-protection systems. In the first phase of this project, a transmission-line model that was developed to represent the well casing electrically adequately predicted the downhole potentials for both ideal and nonideal polarization conditions. By allowing the number of sections used and their parameter values as variables, the model can accommodate different environments and casing configurations. The model's representation of a well casing by a lumped-parameter electrical network will also permit interference studies between mutually coupled wells.

  3. Analytical Results For MOX Colemanite Concrete Samples Received On September 4, 2013

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Reigel, Marissa M.

    2013-09-24

    The Mixed Oxide Fuel Fabrication Facility (MFFF) will use colemanite bearing concrete neutron absorber panels credited with attenuating neutron flux in the criticality design analyses and shielding operators from radiation. The Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) is tasked with measuring the total density, partial hydrogen density, and partial boron density of the colemanite concrete. SRNL received three samples of colemanite concrete for analysis on September 4, 2013. The average total density of each of the samples measured by the ASTM method C 642, the average partial hydrogen density was measured using method ASTM E 1131, and the average partial boron density of each sample was measured according to ASTM C 1301. The lower limits and measured values for the total density, hydrogen partial density, and boron partial density are presented. For all the samples tested, the total density and the boron partial density met or exceeded the specified limit. None of the samples met the lower limit for hydrogen partial density.

  4. ANALYTICAL RESULTS FOR MOX COLEMANITE CONCRETE SAMPLES RECEIVED ON SEPTEMBER 4, 2013

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Reigel, M.

    2014-05-19

    The Mixed Oxide Fuel Fabrication Facility (MFFF) will use colemanite bearing concrete neutron absorber panels credited with attenuating neutron flux in the criticality design analyses and shielding operators from radiation. The Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) is tasked with measuring the total density, partial hydrogen density, and partial boron density of the colemanite concrete. SRNL received three samples of colemanite concrete for analysis on September 4, 2013. The average total density of each of the samples measured by the ASTM method C 642, the average partial hydrogen density was measured using method ASTM E 1131, and the average partial boron density of each sample was measured according to ASTM C 1301. The lower limits and measured values for the total density, hydrogen partial density, and boron partial density are presented. For all the samples tested, the total density and the boron partial density met or exceeded the specified limit. None of the samples met the lower limit for hydrogen partial density.

  5. Analytical Results For MOX Colemanite Concrete Samples Received On November, 2013

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Reigel, Marissa M.

    2013-12-18

    The Mixed Oxide Fuel Fabrication Facility (MFFF) will use colemanite bearing concrete neutron absorber panels credited with attenuating neutron flux in the criticality design analyses and shielding operators from radiation. The Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) is tasked with measuring the total density, partial hydrogen density, and partial boron density of the colemanite concrete. SRNL received two samples of colemanite concrete for analysis on November 21, 2013. The average total density of each of the samples measured by the ASTM method C 642, the average partial hydrogen density was measured using method ASTM E 1131, and the average partial boron density of each sample was measured according to ASTM C 1301. For all the samples tested, the total density and the boron partial density met or exceeded the specified limit. None of the samples met the lower limit for hydrogen partial density.

  6. ANALYTICAL RESULTS FOR MOX COLEMANITE CONCRETE SAMPLES RECEIVED ON NOVEMBER 21, 2013

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Reigel, M.

    2014-05-19

    The Mixed Oxide Fuel Fabrication Facility (MFFF) will use colemanite bearing concrete neutron absorber panels credited with attenuating neutron flux in the criticality design analyses and shielding operators from radiation. The Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) is tasked with measuring the total density, partial hydrogen density, and partial boron density of the colemanite concrete. SRNL received two samples of colemanite concrete for analysis on November 21, 2013. The average total density of each of the samples measured by the ASTM method C 642, the average partial hydrogen density was measured using method ASTM E 1131, and the average partial boron density of each sample was measured according to ASTM C 1301. The lower limits and measured values for the total density, hydrogen partial density, and boron partial density are presented. For all the samples tested, the total density and the boron partial density met or exceeded the specified limit. None of the samples met the lower limit for hydrogen partial density.

  7. Gasbuggy, New Mexico, Hydrologic and Natural Gas Sampling and Analysis Results for 2009

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    2009-11-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Legacy Management conducted hydrologic and natural gas sampling for the Gasbuggy, New Mexico, site on June 16, and 17, 2009. Hydrologic sampling consists of collecting water samples from water wells and surface water locations. Natural gas sampling consists of collecting both gas samples and samples of produced water from gas production wells. The water well samples were analyzed for gamma-emitting radionuclides and tritium. Surface water samples were analyzed for tritium. Water samples from gas production wells were analyzed for gamma-emitting radionuclides, gross alpha, gross beta, and tritium. Natural gas samples were analyzed for tritium and carbon-14. Water samples were analyzed by ALS Laboratory Group in Fort Collins, Colorado, and natural gas samples were analyzed by Isotech Laboratories in Champaign, Illinois. Concentrations of tritium and gamma-emitting radionuclides in water samples collected in the vicinity of the Gasbuggy site continue to demonstrate that the sample locations have not been impacted by detonation-related contaminants. Results from the sampling of natural gas from producing wells demonstrate that the gas wells nearest the Gasbuggy site are not currently impacted by detonation-related contaminants. Annual sampling of the gas production wells nearest the Gasbuggy site for gas and produced water will continue for the foreseeable future. The sampling frequency of water wells and surface water sources in the surrounding area will be reduced to once every 5 years. The next hydrologic sampling event at water wells, springs, and ponds will be in 2014.

  8. Completion report for Well Cluster ER-20-6

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1998-02-01

    The Well Cluster ER-20-6 drilling and completion project was conducted during February, March, and April of 1996 in support of the Nevada Environmental Restoration Project at the Nevada Test Site (NTS), Nye County, Nevada. This project is part of the DOE`s Underground Test Area (UGTA) subproject at the NTS. The primary UGTA tasks include collecting geological, geophysical, and hydrological data from new and existing wells to define groundwater quality as well as pathways and rates of groundwater migration at the NTS. A program of drilling wells near the sites of selected underground nuclear tests (near-field drilling) was implemented as part of the UGTA subproject to obtain site-specific data on the nature and extent of migration of radionuclides produced by an underground nuclear explosion. The ER-20-6 near-field drilling project was originally planned to be very similar to that recently conducted at Well Cluster ER-20-5, which was designed to obtain data on the existing hydrologic regime near the site of an underground nuclear explosion (IT, 1995; IT, 1996a). However, after further consideration of the goals of the near-field drilling program and the characteristics of the BULLION site, the TWG recommended that the ER-20-6 project be redesigned to accommodate a forced-gradient experiment. This proposed experiment is expected to yield more realistic estimates of transport parameters than can be deduced from sampling and testing natural groundwater flow systems.

  9. UMTRA project water sampling and analysis plan, Naturita, Colorado

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-04-01

    Surface remedial action is scheduled to begin at the Naturita UMTRA Project processing site in the spring of 1994. No water sampling was performed during 1993 at either the Naturita processing site (NAT-01) or the Dry Flats disposal site (NAT-12). Results of previous water sampling at the Naturita processing site indicate that ground water in the alluvium is contaminated as a result of uranium processing activities. Baseline ground water conditions have been established in the uppermost aquifer at the Dry Flats disposal site. Water sampling activities scheduled for April 1994 include preconstruction sampling of selected monitor wells at the processing site, surface water sampling of the San Miguel River, sampling of several springs/seeps in the vicinity of the disposal site, and sampling of two monitor wells in Coke Oven Valley. The monitor well locations provide sampling points to characterize ground water quality and flow conditions in the vicinity of the sites. The list of analytes has been updated to reflect constituents related to uranium processing activities and the parameters needed for geochemical evaluation. Water sampling will be conducted annually at minimum during the period of construction activities.

  10. Neural networks predict well inflow performance 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alrumah, Muhammad K.

    2004-09-30

    ........................................................................................................................66 vii LIST OF TABLES TABLE Page 1 Reservoir properties and descriptions. ............................................................ 11 2 Relative permeability and PVT curves selected for cases examined..............19 3 Sample... 2). ......................................................... 20 10 Relative change in productivity index with time. ...........................................21 11 PVT curves from Vogel?s paper...

  11. Pressure buildup characteristics in Austin Chalk wells 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Claycomb, Eddy

    1982-01-01

    hole pressure instruments used to collect data were of the Amerada-gauge type. The instruments were either a RPG-3 (1-1/4" dia. ) or a RPG-4 (1" dia. ). The gauges consist of three basic parts: the recording section, a clock and either a pressure... stimulation was designed and performed on the well. Five months after the fracture stimulation and continuous production, the well had flow rates in excess of 1. 7 mmscf per day and 170 bbls, of oil per day. Case II: Conductive H draulic Fracture Well...

  12. Behavior of nitrate-nitrogen movement around a pumping high-capacity well: A field example

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ayers, J.F.; Chen, X.; Gosselin, D.C. [Univ. of Nebraska, Lincoln, NE (United States). Conservation and Survey Div.

    1998-03-01

    This study examines the near-field flow regime influencing the chemical composition of water samples collected form an irrigation well during short pumping periods. Data on the radial and vertical distribution of nitrate-nitrogen (NO{sub 3}-N) and on draw-down were collected from a closely spaced multi-level monitoring well network installed around an irrigation well. Aquifer properties were determined from grain-size analyses performed on samples collected from test holes drilled around the irrigation well and from drawdown data using the method of Neuman (1974). Grain-size characteristics were determined from cumulative distribution curves and used to construct vertical hydraulic conductivity (K) profiles based on frequently used empirical formulas applied to grain-size data for the determination of aquifer properties. Resultant vertical profiles show a general increase in K with depth. Results from the analysis of drawdown curves support the general trend of K determined form the grain-size data, drawdown-based K values, however, were 1.5 to 2 times greater than those determined form the empirical methods. Results from four pump-and-sample experiments at different times during the irrigation season indicate: (1) the distribution of NO{sub 3}-N around the irrigation well is complex and variable over time and space; (2) shapes of concentration-time curves for individual sample points are governed by the initial contaminant distribution, and shapes of concentration-time curves for the pumping well are governed by variables such as well screen position and hydrogeologic properties; (3) irrigation well samples underestimate the highest, as well as the average NO{sub 3}-N concentrations within the aquifer; and (4) a sampling strategy based on the behavioral characteristics of the well as reflected in concentration-time curves can improve the interpretation of water quality data collected from high-capacity wells.

  13. Results of Remediation and Verification Sampling for the 600-270 Horseshoe Landfill

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    W. S. Thompson

    2005-12-14

    This report presents the results of the 2005 remedial action and verification soil sampling conducted at the 600-270 waste site after removal of soil containing residual concentrations of dichlorodiphenyl trichloroethane and its breakdown products dichlorodiphenyl dichloroethylene and dichlorodiphenyl dichloroethane. The remediation was performed in response to post-closure surface soil sampling performed between 1998 and 2003 that indicated the presence of residual DDT contamination exceeding the Record of Decision for the 1100 Area National Priorities List site cleanup criteria of 1 mg/kg that was established for the original 1994 cleanup activities.

  14. MARGINAL EXPENSE OIL WELL WIRELESS SURVEILLANCE MEOWS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mason M. Medizade; John R. Ridgely; Donald G. Nelson

    2004-11-01

    A marginal expense oil well wireless surveillance system to monitor system performance and production from rod-pumped wells in real time from wells operated by Vaquero Energy in the Edison Field, Main Area of Kern County in California has been successfully designed and field tested. The surveillance system includes a proprietary flow sensor, a programmable transmitting unit, a base receiver and receiving antenna, and a base station computer equipped with software to interpret the data. First, the system design is presented. Second, field data obtained from three wells is shown. Results of the study show that an effective, cost competitive, real-time wireless surveillance system can be introduced to oil fields across the United States and the world.

  15. Groundwater well with reactive filter pack

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Gilmore, T.J.; Holdren, G.R. Jr.; Kaplan, D.I.

    1998-09-08

    A method and apparatus are disclosed for the remediation of contaminated soil and ground water wherein a reactive pack material is added to the annular fill material utilized in standard well construction techniques. 3 figs.

  16. Groundwater well with reactive filter pack

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Gilmore, Tyler J. (Pasco, WA); Holdren, Jr., George R. (Kennewick, WA); Kaplan, Daniel I. (Richland, WA)

    1998-01-01

    A method and apparatus for the remediation of contaminated soil and ground water wherein a reactive pack material is added to the annular fill material utilized in standard well construction techniques.

  17. Completion of Oil Wells May 4, 2003

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rudge, John

    Completion of Oil Wells John Rudge May 4, 2003 1 Introduction After the initial drilling of an oil for given , z; i.e. ignore radial variation. Under this assumption these equations can be easily integrated

  18. Modeling techniques for simulating well behavior 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rattu, Bungen Christina

    2002-01-01

    This thesis is a catalog of modeling techniques useful in simulating well behavior in certain types of reservoirs that are often encountered in petroleum reservoirs. Emphasis has been placed on techniques that can be used with any conventional...

  19. Subsea tree cap well choke system

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bednar, J.M.

    1991-04-30

    This patent describes an apparatus useful in subsea well completions requiring a subsea choke. It comprises: a wellhead connector; a tree flow passage; a tree annulus passage; a tree cap; a choke; and a production line.

  20. Hypercrosslinked Phenolic Polymers with Well Developed Mesoporous Frameworks

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhang, Jinshui; Qiao, Zhenan; Mahurin, Shannon Mark; Jiang, Xueguang; Chai, Songhai; Lu, Hanfeng; Nelson, Kimberly M; Dai, Sheng

    2015-01-01

    A soft chemistry synthetic strategy based on a Friedel Crafts alkylation reaction is developed for the textural engineering of phenolic resin (PR) with a robust mesoporous framework to avoid serious framework shrinkage and maximize retention of organic functional moieties. By taking advantage of the structural benefits of molecular bridges, the resultant sample maintains a bimodal micro-mesoporous architecture with well-preserved organic functional groups, which is effective for carbon capture. Moreover, this soft chemistry synthetic protocol can be further extended to nanotexture other aromatic-based polymers with robust frameworks.

  1. Well-being and Philosophy of Science

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alexandrova, Anna

    2015-03-06

    determinants and risk factors at biological, psychological and social levels (Diener 2012). Well-being is no longer thought to be an idiosyncratic personal phenomenon that does not admit of population-level analysis. Connected to this, there is a growing... simple division of labor: philosophers (or scientists in their philosophical moments) do the foundational normative work by telling us what well-being is, while scientists (or philosophers in their empirical moments) investigate the network of causes...

  2. PrimeEnergy/DOE/GRI slant well

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Drimal, C.E.; Muncey, G.; Carden, R.

    1991-12-01

    This report presents final results of the Sterling Boggs 1240 slant well. Objectives of the project were (1) to test the potential for improved recovery efficiency in a fractured Devonian Shale reservoir from a directionally drilled well, (2) to perform detailed tests of reservoir properties and completion methods, and (3) to provide technology to industry which may ultimately improve the economics of drilling in the Devonian Shale and thereby stimulate development of its resources.

  3. Homeowner Soil Sample Information Form 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Provin, Tony

    2007-04-11

    THE TEXAS A&M UNIVERSITY SYSTEM Soil, Water and Forage Testing Laboratory Urban and Homeowner Soil Sample Information Form See sampling procedures and mailing instructions on the back of this form. (PLEASE DO NOT SEND CASH) SU07 E-444... (7-07) Results will be mailed to this address ONLY Address City Phone County where sampled Name Laboratory # (For Lab Use Only) State Zip Payment (DO NOT SEND CASH). Amount Paid $ SUBMITTED BY: Check Money Order Make Checks Payable to: Soil...

  4. Acceptance sampling using judgmental and randomly selected samples

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sego, Landon H.; Shulman, Stanley A.; Anderson, Kevin K.; Wilson, John E.; Pulsipher, Brent A.; Sieber, W. Karl

    2010-09-01

    We present a Bayesian model for acceptance sampling where the population consists of two groups, each with different levels of risk of containing unacceptable items. Expert opinion, or judgment, may be required to distinguish between the high and low-risk groups. Hence, high-risk items are likely to be identifed (and sampled) using expert judgment, while the remaining low-risk items are sampled randomly. We focus on the situation where all observed samples must be acceptable. Consequently, the objective of the statistical inference is to quantify the probability that a large percentage of the unsampled items in the population are also acceptable. We demonstrate that traditional (frequentist) acceptance sampling and simpler Bayesian formulations of the problem are essentially special cases of the proposed model. We explore the properties of the model in detail, and discuss the conditions necessary to ensure that required samples sizes are non-decreasing function of the population size. The method is applicable to a variety of acceptance sampling problems, and, in particular, to environmental sampling where the objective is to demonstrate the safety of reoccupying a remediated facility that has been contaminated with a lethal agent.

  5. Sample Residential Program Term Sheet

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    A sample for defining and elaborating on the specifics of a clean energy loan program. Author: U.S. Department of Energy

  6. Adaptive Sampling for Environmental Robotics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mohammad Rahimi; Richard Pon; Deborah Estrin; William J. Kaiser; Mani Srivastava; Gaurav S. Sukhatme

    2003-01-01

    186, 2003. S. Thrun, “Robotics Mapping: A survey”, Exploringtechnique to environmental robotics applications includingSampling for Environmental Robotics Mohammad Rahimi †,‡‡ ,

  7. Can we treat CO? well blowouts like routine plumbing problems? A study of the incidence, impact, and perception of loss of well control

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Porse, Sean L.; Wade, Sarah; Hovorka, Susan D.

    2014-12-31

    Risk communication literature suggests that for a number of reasons, the public may perceive a risk to be greater than indicated by its statistical probability. Public concern over risk can lead to significant and costly delays in project permitting and operations. Considering these theories, media coverage of CO?-related well blowouts in 2013 gave rise to the questions: What is the risk of CO? well blowouts associated with CCUS through CO? EOR? What is the potential public perception of those risks? What information could be used to respond to public concern? To address these questions, this study aims to: 1) provide a framework for understanding the nature of onshore well blowouts, 2) quantify the incidence of such events for three specific geographic regions of Texas, 3) relate this data to CCUS and findings from other studies, and 4) explore the potential implications for public perception of this risk associated with CCUS projects. While quantifying answers to these questions proved to be challenging, the results from this study suggest that (1) the perceived risk of CO? well blowouts may exceed the statistical risk and (2) information that could be used to address this gap could be made more readily available to the greater benefit of industry and stakeholders who support the development of CCUS as an option for addressing anthropogenic CO? emissions. The study also suggests approaches to best conduct such data inquiries.

  8. Can we treat CO? well blowouts like routine plumbing problems? A study of the incidence, impact, and perception of loss of well control

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Porse, Sean L.; Wade, Sarah; Hovorka, Susan D.

    2014-12-31

    Risk communication literature suggests that for a number of reasons, the public may perceive a risk to be greater than indicated by its statistical probability. Public concern over risk can lead to significant and costly delays in project permitting and operations. Considering these theories, media coverage of CO?-related well blowouts in 2013 gave rise to the questions: What is the risk of CO? well blowouts associated with CCUS through CO? EOR? What is the potential public perception of those risks? What information could be used to respond to public concern? To address these questions, this study aims to: 1) providemore »a framework for understanding the nature of onshore well blowouts, 2) quantify the incidence of such events for three specific geographic regions of Texas, 3) relate this data to CCUS and findings from other studies, and 4) explore the potential implications for public perception of this risk associated with CCUS projects. While quantifying answers to these questions proved to be challenging, the results from this study suggest that (1) the perceived risk of CO? well blowouts may exceed the statistical risk and (2) information that could be used to address this gap could be made more readily available to the greater benefit of industry and stakeholders who support the development of CCUS as an option for addressing anthropogenic CO? emissions. The study also suggests approaches to best conduct such data inquiries.« less

  9. Chemistry of spring and well waters on Kilauea Volcano, Hawaii, and vicinity

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Janik, C.J.; Nathenson, M.; Scholl, M.A.

    1994-12-31

    Published and new data for chemical and isotopic samples from wells and springs on Kilauea Volcano and vicinity are presented. These data are used to understand processes that determine the chemistry of dilute meteoric water, mixtures with sea water, and thermal water. Data for well and spring samples of non-thermal water indicate that mixing with sea water and dissolution of rock from weathering are the major processes that determine the composition of dissolved constituents in water. Data from coastal springs demonstrate that there is a large thermal system south of the lower east rift of Kilauea. Samples of thermal water from shallow wells in the lower east rift and vicinity have rather variable chemistry indicating that a number of processes operate in the near surface. Water sampled from the available deep wells is different in composition from the shallow thermal water, indicating that generally there is not a significant component of deep water in the shallow wells. Data for samples from available deep wells show significant gradients in chemistry and steam content of the reservoir fluid. These gradients are interpreted to indicate that the reservoir tapped by the existing wells is an evolving vapor-dominated system.

  10. Entiat 4Mile WELLs Completion Report, 2006.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Malinowksi, Richard

    2007-01-01

    The Entiat 4-mile Wells (Entiat 4-mile) project is located in the Entiat subbasin and will benefit Upper Columbia steelhead, spring Chinook and bull trout. The goal of this project is to prevent juvenile fish from being diverted into an out-of-stream irrigation system and to eliminate impacts due to the annual maintenance of an instream pushup dam. The objectives include eliminating a surface irrigation diversion and replacing it with two wells, which will provide Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) and the Bureau of Reclamation (Reclamation) with a Federal Columbia River Power System (FCRPS) BiOp metric credit of one. Wells were chosen over a new fish screen based on biological benefits and costs. Long-term biological benefits are provided by completely eliminating the surface diversion and the potential for fish entrainment in a fish screen. Construction costs for a new fish screen were estimated at $150,000, which does not include other costs associated with implementing and maintaining a fish screening project. Construction costs for a well were estimated at $20,000 each. The diversion consisted of a pushup dam that diverted water into an off-channel pond. Water was then pumped into a pressurized system for irrigation. There are 3 different irrigators who used water from this surface diversion, and each has multiple water right claims totaling approximately 5 cfs. Current use was estimated at 300 gallons per minute (approximately 0.641 cfs). Some irrigated acreage was taken out of orchard production less than 5 years ago. Therefore, approximately 6.8 acre-feet will be put into the State of Washington Trust Water Right program. No water will be set aside for conservation savings. The construction of the two irrigation wells for three landowners was completed in September 2006. The Lower Well (Tippen/Wick) will produce up to 175 gpm while the Upper Well (Griffith) will produce up to 275 gpm during the irrigation season. The eight inch diameter wells were developed to a depth of 75 feet and 85 feet, respectively, and will be pumped with Submersible Turbine pumps. The irrigation wells have been fitted with new electric boxes and Siemens flowmeters (MAG8000).

  11. Solitons and vortices in nonlinear potential wells

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dror, Nir

    2015-01-01

    We consider self-trapping of topological modes governed by the one- and two-dimensional (1D and 2D) nonlinear-Schrodinger/Gross-Pitaevskii equation with effective single- and double-well (DW) nonlinear potentials induced by spatial modulation of the local strength of the self-defocusing nonlinearity. This setting, which may be implemented in optics and Bose-Einstein condensates, aims to extend previous studies, which dealt with single-well nonlinear potentials. In the 1D setting, we find several types of symmetric, asymmetric and antisymmetric states, focusing on scenarios of the spontaneous symmetry breaking. The single-well model is extended by including rocking motion of the well, which gives rise to Rabi oscillations between the fundamental and dipole modes. Analysis of the 2D single-well setting gives rise to stable modes in the form of ordinary dipoles, vortex-antivortex dipoles (VADs), and vortex triangles (VTs), which may be considered as produced by spontaneous breaking of the axial symmetry. The con...

  12. Hazard Sampling Dialog General Layout

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhang, Tao

    1 Hazard Sampling Dialog General Layout The dialog's purpose is to display information about the hazardous material being sampled by the UGV so either the system or the UV specialist can identify the risk level of the hazard. The dialog is associated with the hazmat reading icons (Table 1). Components

  13. Database Sampling with Functional Dependencies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Riera, Jesús Bisbal

    Database Sampling with Functional Dependencies Jes´us Bisbal, Jane Grimson Department of Computer there is a need to prototype the database which the applications will use when in operation. A prototype database can be built by sampling data from an existing database. Including relevant semantic information when

  14. 200 area TEDF sample schedule

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brown, M.J.

    1995-03-22

    This document summarizes the sampling criteria associated with the 200 Area Treatment Effluent Facility (TEDF) that are needed to comply with the requirements of the Washington State Discharge Permit No. WA ST 4502 and good engineering practices at the generator streams that feed into TEDF. In addition, this document Identifies the responsible parties for both sampling and data transference.

  15. Nevada National Security Site Integrated Groundwater Sampling Plan, Revision 0

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Marutzky, Sam; Farnham, Irene

    2014-10-01

    The purpose of the Nevada National Security Site (NNSS) Integrated Sampling Plan (referred to herein as the Plan) is to provide a comprehensive, integrated approach for collecting and analyzing groundwater samples to meet the needs and objectives of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Field Office (NNSA/NFO) Underground Test Area (UGTA) Activity. Implementation of this Plan will provide high-quality data required by the UGTA Activity for ensuring public protection in an efficient and cost-effective manner. The Plan is designed to ensure compliance with the UGTA Quality Assurance Plan (QAP). The Plan’s scope comprises sample collection and analysis requirements relevant to assessing the extent of groundwater contamination from underground nuclear testing. This Plan identifies locations to be sampled by corrective action unit (CAU) and location type, sampling frequencies, sample collection methodologies, and the constituents to be analyzed. In addition, the Plan defines data collection criteria such as well-purging requirements, detection levels, and accuracy requirements; identifies reporting and data management requirements; and provides a process to ensure coordination between NNSS groundwater sampling programs for sampling of interest to UGTA. This Plan does not address compliance with requirements for wells that supply the NNSS public water system or wells involved in a permitted activity.

  16. Sample push-out fixture

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Biernat, John L. (Scotia, NY)

    2002-11-05

    This invention generally relates to the remote removal of pelletized samples from cylindrical containment capsules. V-blocks are used to receive the samples and provide guidance to push out rods. Stainless steel liners fit into the v-channels on the v-blocks which permits them to be remotely removed and replaced or cleaned to prevent cross contamination between capsules and samples. A capsule holder securely holds the capsule while allowing manual up/down and in/out movement to align each sample hole with the v-blocks. Both end sections contain identical v-blocks; one that guides the drive out screw and rods or manual push out rods and the other to receive the samples as they are driven out of the capsule.

  17. Nonclassical Light from Semiconductor Quantum Wells

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    P. Grünwald; W. Vogel

    2014-05-06

    The fluorescence light from semiconductor quantum wells is analyzed with respect to its quantum optical properties. The light emitted by the excitons is described by bosonic excitations with a Kerr-type nonlinear interaction. To create the excitons, the incoming pump laser light is absorbed and the absorption acts as a spectral filter for the emitted light. The quantum properties of the emitted light are analyzed for the bare excitonic and the quantum-well systems. Squeezing of the quantum-well fluorescence persists for higher pump laser powers than the squeezing of the excitonic fluorescence. For strong pumping, the nonlinearity suppresses the creation of photon pairs and the photon statistics becomes sub-Poisson.

  18. Pseudo energy wells in active systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Raman Sheshka; Pierre Recho; Lev Truskinovsky

    2015-09-09

    Active stabilization in systems with zero or negative stiffness is an essential element of a wide variety of biological processes. We study a prototypical example of this phenomenon at a micro-scale and show how active rigidity, interpreted as a formation of a pseudo-well in the effective energy landscape, can be generated in an overdamped ratchet-type stochastic system. We link the transition from negative to positive rigidity with correlations in the noise and show that subtle differences in out-of-equilibrium driving may compromise the emergence of a pseudo-well.

  19. Resonator-quantum well infrared photodetectors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Choi, K. K. Sun, J.; Olver, K.; Jhabvala, M. D.; Jhabvala, C. A.; Waczynski, A.

    2013-11-11

    We applied a recent electromagnetic model to design the resonator-quantum well infrared photodetector (R-QWIP). In this design, we used an array of rings as diffractive elements to diffract normal incident light into parallel propagation and used the pixel volume as a resonator to intensify the diffracted light. With a proper pixel size, the detector resonates at certain optical wavelengths and thus yields a high quantum efficiency (QE). To test this detector concept, we fabricated a number of R-QWIPs with different quantum well materials and detector geometries. The experimental result agrees satisfactorily with the prediction, and the highest QE achieved is 71%.

  20. Pseudo energy wells in active systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sheshka, Raman; Truskinovsky, Lev

    2015-01-01

    Active stabilization in systems with zero or negative stiffness is an essential element of a wide variety of biological processes. We study a prototypical example of this phenomenon at a micro-scale and show how active rigidity, interpreted as a formation of a pseudo-well in the effective energy landscape, can be generated in an overdamped ratchet-type stochastic system. We link the transition from negative to positive rigidity with correlations in the noise and show that subtle differences in out-of-equilibrium driving may compromise the emergence of a pseudo-well.

  1. Los Alamos exceeds waste shipping goal

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    June, 18 2014 - The Laboratory's Corrective Actions Program (CAP) planted nearly 10,000 willows to help preserve the Pueblo Canyon wetland after damage from September 2013 floods...

  2. Savannah River Tritium Enterprise exceeds productivity savings...

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    of a calibration process that will maintain the Measuring and Test Equipment tools for facility operations, while reducing the overall cost of the program (validated...

  3. Lowell, Massachusetts, Restaurant Exceeds Energy Savings Expectations...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    a loan from the local lending consortium, the restaurant installed a new boiler, air conditioning and heating system, lighting fixtures, and an efficient refrigerator storage...

  4. Lowell, Massachusetts, Restaurant Exceeds Energy Savings Expectations |

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustmentsShirleyEnergyTher i nAand DOE Safetyof Energy This Revision 3 of the

  5. LANL exceeds Early Recovery Act recycling goals

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power Administration would likeUniverseIMPACTThousand CubicResource and Job Event In Espanola CommunityExcavationLANL

  6. Los Alamos exceeds waste shipping goal

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home Room NewsInformationJesse BergkampCentermillion to local Unitedto STEMLANL conductsLosLos Alamos

  7. Los Alamos exceeds waste shipping goal

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power Administration would likeUniverseIMPACTThousand CubicResourcelogo and-Eearnstakes

  8. Sampling Report for August 15, 2014 WIPP Samples

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    and pulley system was constructed to move a camera for documentation and close-up pictures. The sampling device is located at the end of the boom. (Note, this picture is from...

  9. Noble gases identify the mechanisms of fugitive gas contamination in drinking-water wells overlying the

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jackson, Robert B.

    Noble gases identify the mechanisms of fugitive gas contamination in drinking-water wells overlying 12, 2014 (received for review November 27, 2013) Horizontal drilling and hydraulic fracturing have and economic sustainability of shale-gas extraction. We analyzed 113 and 20 samples from drinking-water wells

  10. Reservoir studies of new multilateral well architecture 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sarfare, Manoj Dnyandeo

    2004-09-30

    solutions to these problems and prove to be the most likely tool to propel the industry in the next century. In this research we propose a new multilateral well architecture for more efficient and effective field drainage. We study the architecture from a...

  11. Geometrical Music Theory Rachel Wells Hall1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hall, Rachel W.

    Geometrical Music Theory Rachel Wells Hall1 Music theorists have frequently invoked geometry in modeling musical objects such as chords, rhythms, and scales; however, no unified geometric perspective has musical terms can be understood as expressing symmetries of n-dimensional space. Identifying-- "gluing

  12. Marginal Expense Oil Well Wireless Surveillance (MEOWWS)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nelson, Donald G.

    2002-03-11

    The objective of this study was to identify and field test a new, low cost, wireless oil well surveillance system. A variety of suppliers and technologies were considered. One supplier and system was chosen that was low cost, new to the oil field, and successfully field tested.

  13. Foolproof completions for high rate production wells 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tosic, Slavko

    2009-05-15

    wells, particularly those with subsea wellheads, and the alternative has been to subject the completion to increasingly high drawdown, accepting a high skin effect. A far better solution is to use a HPF completion. Of course the execution of a successful...

  14. T2WELL/ECO2N

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    002966IBMPC00 T2Well/ECO2N Version 1.0: Multiphase and Non-Isothermal Model for Coupled Wellbore-Reservoir Flow of Carbon Dioxide and Variable Salinity Water  http:..esd.lbl.gov/tough/licensing.html 

  15. Effects of fracturing fluid recovery upon well performance and ultimate recovery of hydraulically fractured gas wells 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Berthelot, Jan Marie

    1990-01-01

    EFFECTS OF FRACTURING FLUID RECOVERY UPON WELL PERFORMANCE AND ULTIMATE RECOVERY OF HYDRAULICALLY FRACTURED GAS WELLS A Thesis IAN MARIE BERTHELOT Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas AdtM University in partial fulfillment... of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE May 1990 Major Subject: Petroleum Engineering EFFECTS OF FRACTURING FLUID RECOVERY UPON WELL PERFORMANCE AND ULTIMATE RECOVERY OF HYDRAULICALLY FRACTURED GAS WELLS by JAN MARIE BERTIIELOT Appmved...

  16. Pahute Mesa Well Development and Testing Analyses for Wells ER-20-7, ER-20-8 #2, and ER-EC-11, Revision 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Greg Ruskauff

    2011-12-01

    This report analyzes the following data collected from ER-20-7, ER-20-8 No.2, and ER-EC-11 during WDT operations: (1) Chemical indicators of well development (Section 2.0); (2) Static hydraulic head (Section 3.0); (3) Radiochemistry and geochemistry (Section 4.0); (4) Drawdown observed at locations distal to the pumping well (Section 5.0); and (5) Drilling water production, flow logs, and temperature logs (Section 6.0). The new data are further considered with respect to existing data as to how they enhance or change interpretations of groundwater flow and transport, and an interim small-scale conceptual model is also developed and compared to Phase I concepts. The purpose of well development is to remove drilling fluids and drilling-associated fines from the formation adjacent to a well so samples reflecting ambient groundwater water quality can be collected, and to restore hydraulic properties near the well bore. Drilling fluids can contaminate environmental samples from the well, resulting in nonrepresentative measurements. Both drilling fluids and preexisting fines in the formation adjacent to the well can impede the flow of water from the formation to the well, creating artifacts in hydraulic response data measured in the well.

  17. Emergence of the Persistent Spin Helix in Semiconductor Quantum Wells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Koralek, Jake; Weber, Chris; Orenstein, Joe; Bernevig, Andrei; Zhang, Shoucheng; Mack, Shawn; Awschalom, David

    2011-08-24

    According to Noether's theorem, for every symmetry in nature there is a corresponding conservation law. For example, invariance with respect to spatial translation corresponds to conservation of momentum. In another well-known example, invariance with respect to rotation of the electron's spin, or SU(2) symmetry, leads to conservation of spin polarization. For electrons in a solid, this symmetry is ordinarily broken by spin-orbit (SO) coupling, allowing spin angular momentum to flow to orbital angular momentum. However, it has recently been predicted that SU(2) can be recovered in a two-dimensional electron gas (2DEG), despite the presence of SO coupling. The corresponding conserved quantities include the amplitude and phase of a helical spin density wave termed the 'persistent spin helix' (PSH). SU(2) is restored, in principle, when the strength of two dominant SO interactions, the Rashba ({alpha}) and linear Dresselhaus ({beta}{sub 1}), are equal. This symmetry is predicted to be robust against all forms of spin-independent scattering, including electron-electron interactions, but is broken by the cubic Dresselhaus term ({beta}{sub 3}) and spin-dependent scattering. When these terms are negligible, the distance over which spin information can propagate is predicted to diverge as {alpha} {yields} {beta}{sub 1}. Here we observe experimentally the emergence of the PSH in GaAs quantum wells (QW's) by independently tuning {alpha} and {beta}{sub 1}. Using transient spin-grating spectroscopy (TSG), we find a spin-lifetime enhancement of two orders of magnitude near the symmetry point. Excellent quantitative agreement with theory across a wide range of sample parameters allows us to obtain an absolute measure of all relevant SO terms, identifying {beta}{sub 3} as the main SU(2) violating term in our samples. The tunable suppression of spin-relaxation demonstrated in this work is well-suited for application to spintronics.

  18. Hawaii basic data for thermal springs and wells as recorded in geotherm

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bliss, J.D.

    1983-07-01

    GEOTHERM sample file contains 34 records for Hawaii. The high average ambient air temperature found on the Hawaiian Islands required fluid samples to have a temperature of at least 30/sup 0/C to be included. A computer-generated index is found in appendices A of this report. The index give one line summaries of each GEOTHERM record describing the chemistry of geothermal springs and wells in the sample file for Hawaii. The index is found in appendix A (p. is sorted by county and by the name of the source. Also given are well number (when appropriate), site type (spring, well, fumarole), latitude, longitude (both use decimal minutes), GEOTHERM record identifier, and temperature (/sup 0/C). In conducting a search of Appendix A, site names are quite useful for locating springs or wells for which a specific name is commonly used, but sites which do not have specific names are more difficult to locate.

  19. Well constructions with inhibited microbial growth and methods of antimicrobial treatment in wells

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Lee, Brady D.; Dooley, Kirk J.

    2004-11-02

    The invention includes methods of inhibiting microbial growth in a well. A packing material containing a mixture of a first material and an antimicrobial agent is provided to at least partially fill a well bore. One or more access tubes are provided in an annular space around a casing within the well bore. The access tubes have a first terminal opening located at or above a ground surface and have a length that extends from the first terminal opening at least part of the depth of the well bore. The access tubes have a second terminal opening located within the well bore. An antimicrobial material is supplied into the well bore through the first terminal opening of the access tubes. The invention also includes well constructs.

  20. The rehabilitation of monitoring wells clogged by calcite precipitation and drilling mud

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kroening, D.E.; Snipes, D.S.; Brame, S.E.; Hodges, R.A.; Price, V.; Temples, T.J.

    1996-08-01

    Based on aquifer performance tests, 13 out of 15 wells situated at the Mixed Waste Disposal (MWD) area located at the Savannah River site, South Carolina, exhibited high skin factors and low well efficiencies indicative of severely damaged wells. The use of damaged wells in aquifer testing can lead to inaccurate determinations of aquifer properties, and such wells are unusable in future remediation programs. Moreover, damaged wells can go dry during purging, thus compromising sample collection. Pump tests, chemical analyses, and biological investigations revealed that the poor well performance at MWD was attributable to calcite precipitation on the well screen and drilling mud in the filter pack. The calcite problem resulted from improper well installation, and the drilling mud in the filter pack was due to inadequate well development. Experimental rehabilitation procedures employed on two wells, MWD 5A and 1A, included acidification, swabbing, introduction of surfactants, and surging. Treatment of the wells substantially improved well yields, skin factors, and well efficiencies. Moreover, well rehabilitation was determined to be a reasonable alternative to drilling new wells at the MWD wellfield.

  1. Pumpernickel Valley Geothermal Project Thermal Gradient Wells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Z. Adam Szybinski

    2006-01-01

    The Pumpernickel Valley geothermal project area is located near the eastern edge of the Sonoma Range and is positioned within the structurally complex Winnemucca fold and thrust belt of north-central Nevada. A series of approximately north-northeast-striking faults related to the Basin and Range tectonics are superimposed on the earlier structures within the project area, and are responsible for the final overall geometry and distribution of the pre-existing structural features on the property. Two of these faults, the Pumpernickel Valley fault and Edna Mountain fault, are range-bounding and display numerous characteristics typical of strike-slip fault systems. These characteristics, when combined with geophysical data from Shore (2005), indicate the presence of a pull-apart basin, formed within the releasing bend of the Pumpernickel Valley – Edna Mountain fault system. A substantial body of evidence exists, in the form of available geothermal, geological and geophysical information, to suggest that the property and the pull-apart basin host a structurally controlled, extensive geothermal field. The most evident manifestations of the geothermal activity in the valley are two areas with hot springs, seepages, and wet ground/vegetation anomalies near the Pumpernickel Valley fault, which indicate that the fault focuses the fluid up-flow. There has not been any geothermal production from the Pumpernickel Valley area, but it was the focus of a limited exploration effort by Magma Power Company. In 1974, the company drilled one exploration/temperature gradient borehole east of the Pumpernickel Valley fault and recorded a thermal gradient of 160oC/km. The 1982 temperature data from five unrelated mineral exploration holes to the north of the Magma well indicated geothermal gradients in a range from 66 to 249oC/km for wells west of the fault, and ~283oC/km in a well next to the fault. In 2005, Nevada Geothermal Power Company drilled four geothermal gradient wells, PVTG-1, -2, -3, and -4, and all four encountered geothermal fluids. The holes provided valuable water geochemistry, supporting the geothermometry results obtained from the hot springs and Magma well. The temperature data gathered from all the wells clearly indicates the presence of a major plume of thermal water centered on the Pumpernickel Valley fault, and suggests that the main plume is controlled, at least in part, by flow from this fault system. The temperature data also defines the geothermal resource with gradients >100oC/km, which covers an area a minimum of 8 km2. Structural blocks, down dropped with respect to the Pumpernickel Valley fault, may define an immediate reservoir. The geothermal system almost certainly continues beyond the recently drilled holes and might be open to the east and south, whereas the heat source responsible for the temperatures associated with this plume has not been intersected and must be at a depth greater than 920 meters (depth of the deepest well – Magma well). The geological and structural setting and other characteristics of the Pumpernickel Valley geothermal project area are markedly similar to the portions of the nearby Dixie Valley geothermal field. These similarities include, among others, the numerous, unexposed en echelon faults and large-scale pull-apart structure, which in Dixie Valley may host part of the geothermal field. The Pumpernickel Valley project area, for the majority of which Nevada Geothermal Power Company has geothermal rights, represents a geothermal site with a potential for the discovery of a relatively high temperature reservoir suitable for electric power production. Among locations not previously identified as having high geothermal potential, Pumpernickel Valley has been ranked as one of four sites with the highest potential for electrical power production in Nevada (Shevenell and Garside, 2003). Richards and Blackwell (2002) estimated the total heat loss and the preliminary production capacity for the entire Pumpernickel Valley geothermal system to be at 35MW. A more conservative estimate, for

  2. GAS INJECTION/WELL STIMULATION PROJECT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    John K. Godwin

    2005-12-01

    Driver Production proposes to conduct a gas repressurization/well stimulation project on a six well, 80-acre portion of the Dutcher Sand of the East Edna Field, Okmulgee County, Oklahoma. The site has been location of previous successful flue gas injection demonstration but due to changing economic and sales conditions, finds new opportunities to use associated natural gas that is currently being vented to the atmosphere to repressurize the reservoir to produce additional oil. The established infrastructure and known geological conditions should allow quick startup and much lower operating costs than flue gas. Lessons learned from the previous project, the lessons learned form cyclical oil prices and from other operators in the area will be applied. Technology transfer of the lessons learned from both projects could be applied by other small independent operators.

  3. Depth-discrete sampling port

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Pemberton, Bradley E. (Aiken, SC); May, Christopher P. (Columbia, MD); Rossabi, Joseph (Aiken, SC); Riha, Brian D. (Augusta, GA); Nichols, Ralph L. (North Augusta, SC)

    1998-07-07

    A sampling port is provided which has threaded ends for incorporating the port into a length of subsurface pipe. The port defines an internal receptacle which is in communication with subsurface fluids through a series of fine filtering slits. The receptacle is in further communication through a bore with a fitting carrying a length of tubing there which samples are transported to the surface. Each port further defines an additional bore through which tubing, cables, or similar components of adjacent ports may pass.

  4. Vibration of Generalized Double Well Oscillators

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Grzegorz Litak; Marek Borowiec; Arkadiusz Syta

    2006-10-20

    We have applied the Melnikov criterion to examine a global homoclinic bifurcation and transition to chaos in a case of a double well dynamical system with a nonlinear fractional damping term and external excitation. The usual double well Duffing potential having a negative square term and positive quartic term has been generalized to a double well potential with a negative square term and a positive one with an arbitrary real exponent $q > 2$. We have also used a fractional damping term with an arbitrary power $p$ applied to velocity which enables one to cover a wide range of realistic damping factors: from dry friction $p \\to 0$ to turbulent resistance phenomena $p=2$. Using perturbation methods we have found a critical forcing amplitude $\\mu_c$ above which the system may behave chaotically. Our results show that the vibrating system is less stable in transition to chaos for smaller $p$ satisfying an exponential scaling low. The critical amplitude $\\mu_c$ as an exponential function of $p$. The analytical results have been illustrated by numerical simulations using standard nonlinear tools such as Poincare maps and the maximal Lyapunov exponent. As usual for chosen system parameters we have identified a chaotic motion above the critical Melnikov amplitude $\\mu_c$.

  5. Remote down-hole well telemetry

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Briles, Scott D. (Los Alamos, NM); Neagley, Daniel L. (Albuquerque, NM); Coates, Don M. (Santa Fe, NM); Freund, Samuel M. (Los Alamos, NM)

    2004-07-20

    The present invention includes an apparatus and method for telemetry communication with oil-well monitoring and recording instruments located in the vicinity of the bottom of gas or oil recovery pipes. Such instruments are currently monitored using electrical cabling that is inserted into the pipes; cabling has a short life in this environment, and requires periodic replacement with the concomitant, costly shutdown of the well. Modulated reflectance, a wireless communication method that does not require signal transmission power from the telemetry package will provide a long-lived and reliable way to monitor down-hole conditions. Normal wireless technology is not practical since batteries and capacitors have to frequently be replaced or recharged, again with the well being removed from service. RF energy generated above ground can also be received, converted and stored down-hole without the use of wires, for actuating down-hole valves, as one example. Although modulated reflectance reduces or eliminates the loss of energy at the sensor package because energy is not consumed, during the transmission process, additional stored extra energy down-hole is needed.

  6. January 2012 Groundwater Sampling at the Gnome-Coach, New Mexico, Site (Data Validation Package)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    2012-12-01

    Annual sampling was conducted January 18, 2012, to monitor groundwater for potential radionuclide contamination at the Gnome-Coach site in New Mexico. The sampling was performed as specified in the Sampling and Analysis Plan for U.S. Department of Energy Office of Legacy Management Sites (LMS/PLN/S04351, continually updated). Well LRL-7 was not sampled per instruction from the lead. A duplicate sample was collected from well USGS-1 and water levels were measured in the monitoring wells onsite.

  7. Radionuclide Concentrations in Terrestrial Vegetation and Soil Samples On and Around the Hanford Site, 1971 Through 2008

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Simmons, Mary Ann; Poston, Ted M.; Fritz, Brad G.; Bisping, Lynn E.

    2011-07-29

    Environmental monitoring is conducted on the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Hanford Site to comply with DOE Orders and federal and state regulations. Major objectives of the monitoring are to characterize contaminant levels in the environment and to determine site contributions to the contaminant inventory. This report focuses on surface soil and perennial vegetation samples collected between 1971 and 2008 as part of the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Surface Environmental Surveillance Project performed under contract to DOE. Areas sampled under this program are located on the Hanford Site but outside facility boundaries and on public lands surrounding the Hanford Site. Additional samples were collected during the past 8 years under DOE projects that evaluated parcels of land for radiological release. These data were included because the same sampling methodology and analytical laboratory were used for the projects. The spatial and temporal trends of six radionuclides collected over a 38-year period were evaluated. The radionuclides----cobalt-60, cesium-137, strontium-90, plutonium-238, plutonium-239/240, and uranium (reported either as uranium-238 or total uranium)----were selected because they persist in the environment and are still being monitored routinely and reported in Hanford Site environmental reports. All these radionuclides were associated with plutonium production and waste management of activities occurring on the site. Other sources include fallout from atmospheric testing of nuclear weapons, which ended in 1980, and the Chernobyl explosion in 1986. Uranium is also a natural component of the soil. This assessment of soil and vegetation data provides important information on the distribution of radionuclides in areas adjacent to industrial areas, established perimeter locations and buffer areas, and more offsite nearby and distant locations. The concentrations reflect a tendency for detection of some radionuclides close to where they were utilized onsite, but as one moves to unindustrialized areas on the site, surrounding buffer areas and perimeter location into the more distant sites, concentrations of these radionuclides approach background and cannot be distinguished from fallout activity. More importantly, concentrations in soil and vegetation samples did not exceed environmental benchmark concentrations, and associated exposure to human and ecological receptors were well below levels that are demonstratively hazardous to human health and the environment.

  8. Electron transport in coupled double quantum wells and wires

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Harff, N.E.; Simmons, J.A.; Lyo, S.K. [and others

    1997-04-01

    Due to inter-quantum well tunneling, coupled double quantum wells (DQWs) contain an extra degree of electronic freedom in the growth direction, giving rise to new transport phenomena not found in single electron layers. This report describes work done on coupled DQWs subject to inplane magnetic fields B{sub {parallel}}, and is based on the lead author`s doctoral thesis, successfully defended at Oregon State University on March 4, 1997. First, the conductance of closely coupled DQWs in B{sub {parallel}} is studied. B{sub {parallel}}-induced distortions in the dispersion, the density of states, and the Fermi surface are described both theoretically and experimentally, with particular attention paid to the dispersion anticrossing and resulting partial energy gap. Measurements of giant distortions in the effective mass are found to agree with theoretical calculations. Second, the Landau level spectra of coupled DQWs in tilted magnetic fields is studied. The magnetoresistance oscillations show complex beating as Landau levels from the two Fermi surface components cross the Fermi level. A third set of oscillations resulting from magnetic breakdown is observed. A semiclassical calculation of the Landau level spectra is then performed, and shown to agree exceptionally well with the data. Finally, quantum wires and quantum point contacts formed in DQW structures are investigated. Anticrossings of the one-dimensional DQW dispersion curves are predicted to have interesting transport effects in these devices. Difficulties in sample fabrication have to date prevented experimental verification. However, recently developed techniques to overcome these difficulties are described.

  9. Productivity and injectivity of horizontal wells. Quarterly report...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    99 MATHEMATICS, COMPUTERS, INFORMATION SCIENCE, MANAGEMENT, LAW, MISCELLANEOUS; OIL WELLS; DAMAGE; WELL DRILLING; WELL COMPLETION; EQUATIONS; PROGRESS REPORT This report...

  10. Use of immunomagnetic separation for the detection of Desulfovibrio vulgaris from environmental samples

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chakraborty, R.

    2012-01-01

    well water from the DOE chromium (VI) bioremediation 100Hwater samples were collected from the chromium (VI)-contaminated Hanford 100H site, an ongoing bioremediation

  11. Gasbuggy, New Mexico, Natural Gas and Produced Water Sampling Results for 2012

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2012-12-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Legacy Management conducted annual natural gas sampling for the Gasbuggy, New Mexico, Site on June 20 and 21, 2012. This long-term monitoring of natural gas includes samples of produced water from gas production wells that are located near the site. Water samples from gas production wells were analyzed for gamma-emitting radionuclides, gross alpha, gross beta, and tritium. Natural gas samples were analyzed for tritium and carbon-14. ALS Laboratory Group in Fort Collins, Colorado, analyzed water samples. Isotech Laboratories in Champaign, Illinois, analyzed natural gas samples.

  12. Increasing Well Productivity in Gas Condensate Wells in Qatar's North Field 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Miller, Nathan

    2010-07-14

    2.1.4. Method for Reduction of Non Darcy Flow Study ......... 17 2.2. PVT Analysis .......................................................................... 17 2.3. Reservoir Description... to study Non Darcy flow in both a multilateral well and a vertical well. A Non Darcy flow sensitivity test is run to see the impact Non Darcy flow has on near wellbore condensate blockage, and therefore, gas well productivity. 2.2. PVT...

  13. Hydraulic fracture stimulation treatment of Well Baca 23. Geothermal Reservoir Well-Stimulation Program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1981-06-01

    Well Stimulation Experiment No. 5 of the Geothermal Reservoir Well Stimulation Program (GRWSP) was performed on March 22, 1981 in Baca 23, located in Union's Redondo Creek Project Area in Sandoval County, New Mexico. The treatment selected was a large hydraulic fracture job designed specifically for, and utilizing frac materials chosen for, the high temperature geothermal environment. The well selection, fracture treatment, experiment evaluation, and summary of the job costs are presented herein.

  14. Wells, Vermont: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page| Open Energy Information Serbia-EnhancingEtGeorgia: Energy Resources Jump to:Search YourIndiana: EnergyWells, Vermont:

  15. Infinite potential well with a sinusoidal bottom

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. D. Alhaidari; H. Bahlouli

    2008-08-07

    We construct a tridiagonal matrix representation of the wave operator that maps the wave equation into a three-term recursion relation for the expansion coefficients of the wavefunction. Finding a solution of the recursion relation is equivalent to solving the original problem. Consequently, a larger class of solvable potentials is obtained. The usual diagonal representation constraint results in a reduction to the conventional class of solvable potentials. To exhibit the power of this approach, we give an exact solution for the infinite potential well with sinusoidal bottom.

  16. In situ bioremediation using horizontal wells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1995-04-01

    In Situ Bioremediation (ISB), which is the term used in this report for Gaseous Nutrient Injection for In Situ Bioremediation, remediates soils and ground water contaminated with volatile organic compounds (VOCs) both above and below the water table. ISB involves injection of air and nutrients (sparging and biostimulation) into the ground water and vacuum extraction to remove .VOCs from the vadose zone concomitant with biodegradation of VOCs. The innovation is in the combination of 3 emerging technologies, air stripping, horizontal wells, and bioremediation via gaseous nutrient injection with a baseline technology, soil vapor extraction, to produce a more efficient in situ remediation system.

  17. Logging of subterranean wells using coiled tubing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pilla, J.

    1991-01-15

    This patent describes an apparatus for production logging of a well utilizing artificial lift in a wellbore. It comprises: coiled tubing extending into the wellbore having wireline electrical cable passing through a central bore thereof and having a remote end within the wellbore which end is connected to gas injector means. The wireline cable passing through the gas injector means to a flexible electrically conductive support spacer having an end portion remote from the gas injector means and logging means connected to the end portion of the support spacer.

  18. Production Well Performance Enhancement using Sonication Technology

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Adewumi, Michael A; Ityokumbul, M Thaddeus; Watson, Robert W; Eltohami, Eltohami; Farias, Mario; Heckman, Glenn; Houlihan, Brendan; Karoor, Samata Prakash; Miller, Bruce G; Mohammed, Nazia; Olanrewaju, Johnson; Ozdemir, Mine; Rejepov, Dautmamed; Sadegh, Abdallah A; Quammie, Kevin E; Zaghloul, Jose; Hughes, W Jack; Montgomery, Thomas C

    2005-12-31

    The objective of this project was to develop a sonic well performance enhancement technology that focused on near wellbore formation damage. In order to successfully achieve this objective, a three-year project was defined. The entire project was broken into four tasks. The overall objective of all this was to foster a better understanding of the mechanisms involved in sonic energy interactions with fluid flow in porous media and adapt such knowledge for field applications. The fours tasks are: • Laboratory studies • Mathematical modeling • Sonic tool design and development • Field demonstration The project was designed to be completed in three years; however, due to budget cuts, support was only provided for the first year, and hence the full objective of the project could not be accomplished. This report summarizes what was accomplished with the support provided by the US Department of Energy. Experiments performed focused on determining the inception of cavitation, studying thermal dissipation under cavitation conditions, investigating sonic energy interactions with glass beads and oil, and studying the effects of sonication on crude oil properties. Our findings show that the voltage threshold for onset of cavitation is independent of transducer-hydrophone separation distance. In addition, thermal dissipation under cavitation conditions contributed to the mobilization of deposited paraffins and waxes. Our preliminary laboratory experiments suggest that waxes are mobilized when the fluid temperature approaches 40°C. Experiments were conducted that provided insights into the interactions between sonic wave and the fluid contained in the porous media. Most of these studies were carried out in a slim-tube apparatus. A numerical model was developed for simulating the effect of sonication in the nearwellbore region. The numerical model developed was validated using a number of standard testbed problems. However, actual application of the model for scale-up purposes was limited due to funding constraints. The overall plan for this task was to perlorm field trials with the sonication tooL These trials were to be performed in production and/or injection wells located in Pennsylvania, New York, and West Virginia. Four new wells were drilled in preparation for the field demonstration. Baseline production data were collected and reservoir simulator tuned to simulate these oil reservoirs. The sonication tools were designed for these wells. However, actual field testing could not be carried out because of premature termination of the project.

  19. Decline curve analysis for horizontal wells 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shih, Min-Yu

    1994-01-01

    Subject; Petroleum Engineering DECLINE CURVE ANALYSIS FOR HORIZONTAL WELLS A Thesis by MIN- YU SHIH Submitted to Texas A8tM University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degtee of MASTER OF SCIENCE Approved as to style and content... curves are given as log-log plots of MttdaLLattaad: Fetkovich Type Curve Radial Flow, Circular Reservoir Solutions 12 Transient "Stems" tTransient Flow) 8 001 160 000 x10 Depletion "Stems" (Boundary-Dominated Flow) r)04Arps Equations b 0 0...

  20. Spontaneous Potential Well Log | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page| Open Energy Information Serbia-Enhancing CapacityVectren) Jump to:Spill Prevention andWell Log Jump to: navigation,

  1. California Water Well Standards | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION JEnvironmentalBowerbank, Maine:Kansas: EnergyCalendarCalhounWebpageProjectPrograms Jump to:Well

  2. Category:Production Wells | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION JEnvironmentalBowerbank,CammackFLIR Jump to: navigation,GroundNearGeothermalpower.jpgWells Jump to:

  3. Category:Well Deepening | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION JEnvironmentalBowerbank,CammackFLIR Jump to:RAPID RoadmapInformation Utility RateWaterWell

  4. Well injection valve with retractable choke

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pringle, R.E.

    1986-07-22

    An injection valve is described for use in a well conduit consisting of: a housing having a bore, a valve closure member in the bore moving between open and closed positions, a flow tube telescopically movable in the housing for controlling the movement of the valve closure member, means for biasing the flow tube in a direction for allowing the valve closure member to move to the closed position, an expandable and contractible fluid restriction connected to the flow tube and extending into the bore for moving the flow tube to the open position in response to injection fluid, but allowing the passage of well tools through the valve, the restriction contractible in response to fluid flow, the restriction includes, segments movable into and out of the bore, and biasing means yieldably urging the segments into the bore, a no-go shoulder on the flow tube, and releasable lockout means between the flow tube and the housing for locking the flow tube and valve in the open position.

  5. Sample Results from Routine Salt Batch 7 Samples

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Peters, T.

    2015-05-13

    Strip Effluent Hold Tank (SEHT) and Decontaminated Salt Solution Hold Tank (DSSHT) samples from several of the “microbatches” of Integrated Salt Disposition Project (ISDP) Salt Batch (“Macrobatch”) 7B have been analyzed for 238Pu, 90Sr, 137Cs, Inductively Coupled Plasma Emission Spectroscopy (ICPES), and Ion Chromatography Anions (IC-A). The results from the current microbatch samples are similar to those from earlier samples from this and previous macrobatches. The Actinide Removal Process (ARP) and the Modular Caustic-Side Solvent Extraction Unit (MCU) continue to show more than adequate Pu and Sr removal, and there is a distinct positive trend in Cs removal, due to the use of the Next Generation Solvent (NGS). The Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) notes that historically, most measured Concentration Factor (CF) values during salt processing have been in the 12-14 range. However, recent processing gives CF values closer to 11. This observation does not indicate that the solvent performance is suffering, as the Decontamination Factor (DF) has still maintained consistently high values. Nevertheless, SRNL will continue to monitor for indications of process upsets. The bulk chemistry of the DSSHT and SEHT samples do not show any signs of unusual behavior.

  6. An Open Port Sampling Interface for Liquid Introduction Atmospheric Pressure Ionization Mass Spectrometry

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Van Berkel, Gary J.; Kertesz, Vilmos

    2015-08-25

    RATIONALE: A simple method to introduce unprocessed samples into a solvent for rapid characterization by liquid introduction atmospheric pressure ionization mass spectrometry has been lacking. The continuous flow, self-cleaning open port sampling interface introduced here fills this void. METHODS: The open port sampling interface used a vertically aligned, co-axial tube arrangement enabling solvent delivery to the sampling end of the device through the tubing annulus and solvent aspiration down the center tube and into the mass spectrometer ionization source via the commercial APCI emitter probe. The solvent delivery rate to the interface was set to exceed the aspiration rate creatingmore »a continuous sampling interface along with a constant, self-cleaning spillover of solvent from the top of the probe. RESULTS: Using the open port sampling interface with positive ion mode APCI and a hybrid quadrupole time of flight mass spectrometer, rapid, direct sampling and analysis possibilities are exemplified with plastics, ballpoint and felt tip ink pens, skin, and vegetable oils. These results demonstrated that the open port sampling interface could be used as a simple, versatile and self-cleaning system to rapidly introduce multiple types of unprocessed, sometimes highly concentrated and complex, samples into a solvent flow stream for subsequent ionization and analysis by mass spectrometry. The basic setup presented here could be incorporated with any self-aspirating liquid introduction ionization source (e.g., ESI, APCI, APPI, ICP, etc.) or any type of atmospheric pressure sampling ready mass spectrometer system. CONCLUSIONS: The open port sampling interface provides a means to introduce and quickly analyze unprocessed solid or liquid samples with liquid introduction atmospheric pressure ionization source without fear of sampling interface or ionization source contamination.« less

  7. MAINTENANCE OF THE COAL SAMPLE BANK AND DATABASE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1999-01-01

    This project generates and provides coal samples and accompanying analytical data for research by DOE contractors and others. The five-year contract has been completed and a six-month no-cost extension is under way; this will continue the limited distribution of samples and data to DOE, its contractors and grantees. All activities specified under the five-year contract have been completed. Eleven DECS samples were collected, processed to a variety of particle sizes, heat-sealed in foil laminate bags under argon, and placed in refrigerated storage. All were analyzed for basic chemical composition, inorganic major and trace element composition including hazardous air pollutant elements, petrographic composition and characteristics, thermoplastic behavior (if applicable), and other properties relevant to commercial utilization. Most were also analyzed by NMR, py/gc/ms, and a standardized liquefaction test; trends and relationships observed were evaluated and summarized. Twenty-two DECS samples collected under the previous contract received further processing, and most of these were subjected to organic geochemical and standardized liquefaction tests as well. Selected DECS samples were monitored annually to evaluate the effectiveness of foil laminate bags for long-term sample storage. Twenty-three PSOC samples collected under previous contracts and purged with argon before storage were also maintained and distributed, for a total of 56 samples covered by the contract. During the five years, 524 samples in 1501 containers, 2075 data printouts, and individual data items from 30327 samples were distributed. In the subject quarter, 23 samples, 16 data printouts, and individual data items from 2507 samples were distributed. All DECS samples are now available for immediate distribution at minus 6 mm (-1/4 inch), minus 0.85 mm (- 20 mesh U.S.), and minus 0.25 mm (- 60 mesh U.S.).

  8. Tank 214-AW-105, grab samples, analytical results for the finalreport

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Esch, R.A.

    1997-02-20

    This document is the final report for tank 241-AW-105 grab samples. Twenty grabs samples were collected from risers 10A and 15A on August 20 and 21, 1996, of which eight were designated for the K Basin sludge compatibility and mixing studies. This document presents the analytical results for the remaining twelve samples. Analyses were performed in accordance with the Compatibility Grab Sampling and Analysis Plan (TSAP) and the Data Quality Objectives for Tank Farms Waste Compatibility Program (DO). The results for the previous sampling of this tank were reported in WHC-SD-WM-DP-149, Rev. 0, 60-Day Waste Compatibility Safety Issue and Final Results for Tank 241-A W-105, Grab Samples 5A W-95-1, 5A W-95-2 and 5A W-95-3. Three supernate samples exceeded the TOC notification limit (30,000 microg C/g dry weight). Appropriate notifications were made. No immediate notifications were required for any other analyte. The TSAP requested analyses for polychlorinated biphenyls (PCB) for all liquids and centrifuged solid subsamples. The PCB analysis of the liquid samples has been delayed and will be presented in a revision to this document.

  9. Inertial impaction air sampling device

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Dewhurst, K.H.

    1987-12-10

    An inertial impactor to be used in an air sampling device for collection of respirable size particles in ambient air which may include a graphite furnace as the impaction substrate in a small-size, portable, direct analysis structure that gives immediate results and is totally self-contained allowing for remote and/or personal sampling. The graphite furnace collects suspended particles transported through the housing by means of the air flow system, and these particles may be analyzed for elements, quantitatively and qualitatively, by atomic absorption spectrophotometry. 3 figs.

  10. Inertial impaction air sampling device

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Dewhurst, K.H.

    1990-05-22

    An inertial impactor is designed which is to be used in an air sampling device for collection of respirable size particles in ambient air. The device may include a graphite furnace as the impaction substrate in a small-size, portable, direct analysis structure that gives immediate results and is totally self-contained allowing for remote and/or personal sampling. The graphite furnace collects suspended particles transported through the housing by means of the air flow system, and these particles may be analyzed for elements, quantitatively and qualitatively, by atomic absorption spectrophotometry. 3 figs.

  11. Communication Engineering Systems Sampling Theorem &

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kovintavewat, Piya

    x nT nx continuous sample quantized sample binary stream x t x t 2 D 7 D 8 D ( ) 7L MIDRISE s T 3 DPCM (1-bit quantizer) 1 (unit delay) 17 1n n nv x x , 0 sgn , 0 n n n n v v v v 1n n nx v x 2 DM #12;.. DM 18 1n n nx x v nx 1 1 sgn sgn n n n i ii i x v v #12;.. 19 1 b s b R mf T #12

  12. The Ocean Sampling Day Consortium

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Kopf, Anna; Bicak, Mesude; Kottmann, Renzo; Schnetzer, Julia; Kostadinov, Ivaylo; Lehmann, Katja; Fernandez-Guerra, Antonio; Jeanthon, Christian; Rahav, Eyal; Ullrich, Matthias; et al

    2015-06-19

    In this study, Ocean Sampling Day was initiated by the EU-funded Micro B3 (Marine Microbial Biodiversity, Bioinformatics, Biotechnology) project to obtain a snapshot of the marine microbial biodiversity and function of the world’s oceans. It is a simultaneous global mega-sequencing campaign aiming to generate the largest standardized microbial data set in a single day. This will be achievable only through the coordinated efforts of an Ocean Sampling Day Consortium, supportive partnerships and networks between sites. This commentary outlines the establishment, function and aims of the Consortium and describes our vision for a sustainable study of marine microbial communities and theirmore »embedded functional traits.« less

  13. Well funneled nuclear structure landscape: renormalization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. Idini; G. Potel; F. Barranco; E. Vigezzi; R. A. Broglia

    2015-04-29

    A complete characterization of the structure of nuclei can be obtained by combining information arising from inelastic scattering, Coulomb excitation and $\\gamma-$decay, together with one- and two-particle transfer reactions. In this way it is possible to probe the single-particle and collective components of the nuclear many-body wavefunction resulting from their mutual coupling and diagonalising the low-energy Hamiltonian. We address the question of how accurately such a description can account for experimental observations. It is concluded that renormalizing empirically and on equal footing bare single-particle and collective motion in terms of self-energy (mass) and vertex corrections (screening), as well as particle-hole and pairing interactions through particle-vibration coupling allows theory to provide an overall, quantitative account of the data.

  14. Tank 241-AP-107, grab samples, 7AP-99-1, 7AP-99-3 and 7AP-99-4 analytical results for the final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    BELL, K.E.

    1999-08-12

    This document is the format IV, final report for the tank 241-AP-107 (AP-107) grab samples taken in May 1999 to address waste compatibility concerns. Chemical, radiochemical, and physical analyses on the tank AP-107 samples were performed as directed in Compatibility Grab Sampling and Analysis Plan for Fiscal year 1999. Any deviations from the instructions provided in the tank sampling and analysis plan (TSAP) were discussed in this narrative. Interim data were provided earlier to River Protection Project (RPP) personnel, however, the data presented here represent the official results. No notification limits were exceeded.

  15. The Impact of Soil Sampling Errors on Variable Rate Fertilization

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    R. L. Hoskinson; R C. Rope; L G. Blackwood; R D. Lee; R K. Fink

    2004-07-01

    Variable rate fertilization of an agricultural field is done taking into account spatial variability in the soil’s characteristics. Most often, spatial variability in the soil’s fertility is the primary characteristic used to determine the differences in fertilizers applied from one point to the next. For several years the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL) has been developing a Decision Support System for Agriculture (DSS4Ag) to determine the economically optimum recipe of various fertilizers to apply at each site in a field, based on existing soil fertility at the site, predicted yield of the crop that would result (and a predicted harvest-time market price), and the current costs and compositions of the fertilizers to be applied. Typically, soil is sampled at selected points within a field, the soil samples are analyzed in a lab, and the lab-measured soil fertility of the point samples is used for spatial interpolation, in some statistical manner, to determine the soil fertility at all other points in the field. Then a decision tool determines the fertilizers to apply at each point. Our research was conducted to measure the impact on the variable rate fertilization recipe caused by variability in the measurement of the soil’s fertility at the sampling points. The variability could be laboratory analytical errors or errors from variation in the sample collection method. The results show that for many of the fertility parameters, laboratory measurement error variance exceeds the estimated variability of the fertility measure across grid locations. These errors resulted in DSS4Ag fertilizer recipe recommended application rates that differed by up to 138 pounds of urea per acre, with half the field differing by more than 57 pounds of urea per acre. For potash the difference in application rate was up to 895 pounds per acre and over half the field differed by more than 242 pounds of potash per acre. Urea and potash differences accounted for almost 87% of the cost difference. The sum of these differences could result in a $34 per acre cost difference for the fertilization. Because of these differences, better analysis or better sampling methods may need to be done, or more samples collected, to ensure that the soil measurements are truly representative of the field’s spatial variability.

  16. AFRICAN AMERICAN PSYCHOLOGY Sample Syllabus

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hopfinger, Joseph B.

    AFRICAN AMERICAN PSYCHOLOGY PSYC 503 Sample Syllabus Course Description and Overview: This course examines the psychology of the African American experience. We begin the course with an overview of Black/African American psychology as an evolving field of study and consider the Black/African American Psychology

  17. Design of bioaerosol sampling inlets 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nene, Rohit Ravindra

    2007-09-17

    An experimental investigation involving the design, fabrication, and testing of an ambient sampling inlet and two additional Stokes-scaled inlets is presented here. Testing of each inlet was conducted at wind speeds of 2, 8, and 24 km/h (0.55, 2...

  18. Hydraulic Fracture Stimulation and Acid Treatment of Well Baca 20; Geothermal Reservoir Well Stimulation Program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    1983-07-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy-sponsored Geothermal Reservoir Well Stimulation Program was initiated in February 1979 to pursue industry interest in geothermal well stimulation work and to develop technical expertise in areas directly related to geothermal well stimulation activities. This report provides an overview of the two experiments conducted in the high-temperature reservoir in Baca, New Mexico. The report discusses resource and reservoir properties, and provides a description of the stimulation experiment, a description of the treatment evaluation, and a summary of the experiment costs. (DJE-2005)

  19. Inspecting coiled tubing for well operations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gard, M.F.; Pasternack, E.S.; Smith, L.J.

    1992-02-18

    This patent describes improvement in a coiled tubing system for insertion of a substantially continuous bendable length of metal tubing into and withdrawal from a wellbore, the system including a tubing injection unit disposed for injecting the length of tubing into the well bore and storage means for dispensing the length of tubing and receiving the length of tubing from the injection unit. The improvement includes: tubing inspection apparatus for substantially continuously inspecting the wall section of the tubing to detect cracks and structural defects which may lead to tubing failure, the apparatus comprising: a source of electromagnetic radiation mounted in proximity to the tubing between the injection unit and a wellhead into which the tubing is injected; a radiation detector unit for receiving signals from the source which have been projected through the wall of the tubing; means for receiving signals form the detector unit for monitoring the structural integrity o the wall of the tubing during one of injecting and withdrawing the tubing with respect to the wellhead; and housing means supported for rotation about a longitudinal axis of the tubing.

  20. Cement fatigue and HPHT well integrity with application to life of well prediction 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ugwu, Ignatius Obinna

    2009-05-15

    In order to keep up with the world’s energy demands, oil and gas producing companies have taken the initiative to explore offshore reserves or drill deeper into previously existing wells. The consequence of this, however, ...

  1. Expediting Groundwater Sampling at Hanford and Making It Safer - 13158

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Connell, Carl W. Jr.; Conley, S.F.; Carr, Jennifer S.; Schatz, Aaron L. [CH2M HILL Plateau Remediation Company, P.O. Box 1600, Richland, WA 99352 (United States)] [CH2M HILL Plateau Remediation Company, P.O. Box 1600, Richland, WA 99352 (United States); Brown, W.L. [Lockheed Martin Systems Information, P.O. Box 950, Richland, WA 99352 (United States)] [Lockheed Martin Systems Information, P.O. Box 950, Richland, WA 99352 (United States); Hildebrand, R. Douglas [Department of Energy - Richland Operations Office, 825 Jadwin Ave., Richland, WA 99352 (United States)] [Department of Energy - Richland Operations Office, 825 Jadwin Ave., Richland, WA 99352 (United States)

    2013-07-01

    The CH2M HILL Plateau Remediation Company (CHPRC) manages the groundwater monitoring programs at the Department of Energy's 586-square-mile Hanford site in southeastern Washington state. These programs are regulated by the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA), the Comprehensive Environmental Response Compensation and Liability Act (CERCLA), and the Atomic Energy Act (AEA). The purpose of monitoring is to track existing groundwater contamination from past practices, as well as other potential contamination that might originate from RCRA treatment, storage, and disposal (TSD) facilities. An integral part of the groundwater-monitoring program involves taking samples of the groundwater and measuring the water levels in wells scattered across the site. Each year, more than 1,500 wells are accessed for a variety of reasons. Historically, the monitoring activities have been very 'people intensive'. Field personnel or 'samplers' have been issued pre-printed forms showing information about the well(s) for a particular sampling evolution. This information is taken from two official electronic databases: the Hanford Well Information System (HWIS) and the Hanford Environmental Information System (HEIS). The samplers traditionally used these hardcopy forms to document the groundwater samples and well water-levels. After recording the entries in the field, the samplers turned the forms in at the end of the day and other personnel posted the collected information. In Automating Groundwater Sampling at Hanford (HNF-38542-FP Revision 0, Presented at Waste Management 2009 Conference, March 1 - March 5, 2009, Phoenix, AZ), we described the methods, tools, and techniques that would be used in automating the activities associated with measuring water levels. The Field Logging and Electronic Data Gathering (FLEDG) application/database that automates collecting the water-level measurement data has now been implemented at Hanford. In addition to eliminating the need to print out documents, the system saves three-to-four man days each month for the field personnel taking the measurements and the scientists and administrators managing the data and the documentation. After the information has received technical review, FLEDG automatically updates the database for water-level measurements and loads the document management system with the completed sampling report. Due to safety considerations, access to wells is conditional. A spreadsheet with appropriate data not only lists the wells that are cleared for work, but also the safety personnel who must be present before work can start. This spreadsheet is used in planning daily activities. Daily plans are structured to ensure that the wells to be sampled are cleared for work and the appropriate safety personnel have been assigned and are present before the work starts. Historically, the spreadsheets have been prepared manually, and as a result, are potentially subject to human error. However, a companion database application has been developed to work with FLEDG - making the entire sampling process more efficient and safer for personnel. The Well Access List - Electronic, WAL-E, is a database that contains much the same information that was previously manually loaded into the spread sheet. In addition, WAL-E contains a managed work-flow application that shows the access requirements and allows for appropriate reviews of the compiled well. Various CHPRC organizations, including Industrial Hygiene, RADCON, and Well Maintenance and Sample Administration are able to enter and review the wells added or deleted from the WAL-E database. The FLEDG system then accesses this database information to identify appropriate support personnel and provide safety requirements to field personnel. In addition, WAL-E offers the assurance that wells have appropriate locks and are correctly labeled and electrically grounded as required, before well activities begin. This feature is an extremely important aspect of the FLEDG/WAL-E system because it adds another safety check to the work evolution and reduces the pote

  2. Waste compatibility safety issues and final results for tank 241-T-110 push mode samples

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nuzum, J.L.

    1997-05-15

    This document is the final laboratory report for Tank 241-T-110. Push mode core segments were removed from risers 2 and 6 between January 29, 1997, and February 7, 1997. Segments were received and extruded at 222-S Laboratory. Analyses were performed in accordance with Tank 241-T-110 Push Mode Core Sampling and analysis Plan (TSAP) and Safety Screening Data Quality Objective (DQO). None of the subsamples submitted for total alpha activity (AT) or differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) analyses exceeded the notification limits stated in DQO.

  3. Rock Sampling | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onRAPID/Geothermal/Exploration/ColoradoRemsenburg-Speonk, NewMichigan: Energy Resources JumpMtSampling Jump to:

  4. Exploratory Well At North Brawley Geothermal Area (Matlick &...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Well Activity Date 1975 - 1980 Usefulness useful DOE-funding Unknown Exploration Basis Deep exploratory wells were drilled after a phase of thermal gradient wells helped narrow...

  5. ARSENIC IN PRIVATE WELLS IN NH YEAR 1 FINAL REPORT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bucci, David J.

    performed geospatial analysis of the well water arsenic estimates and survey results and produced the maps............................................................................................... 8 Well water treatment .................................................................................................. 7 Well water quality

  6. Multifunctional Corrosion-resistant Foamed Well Cement Composites...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Multifunctional Corrosion-resistant Foamed Well Cement Composites Multifunctional Corrosion-resistant Foamed Well Cement Composites Multifunctional Corrosion-resistant Foamed Well...

  7. Energetic Materials for EGS Well Stimulation (solids, liquids...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Energetic Materials for EGS Well Stimulation (solids, liquids, gases) Energetic Materials for EGS Well Stimulation (solids, liquids, gases) Energetic Materials for EGS Well...

  8. COMPLETION REPORT FOR WELL CLUSTER ER-5-3

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    BECHTEL NEVADA

    2005-12-01

    Well Cluster ER-5-3 was drilled for the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office in support of the Nevada Environmental Restoration Project at the Nevada Test Site, Nye County, Nevada. This cluster of 3 wells was drilled in 2000 and 2001 as part of a hydrogeologic investigation program in Frenchman Flat. The first borehole in the cluster, Well ER-5-3, was drilled in February and March 2000. A 47.0-centimeter surface hole was drilled and cased off to the depth of 374.8 meters. The hole diameter was decreased to 31.1 centimeters for drilling to a total depth of 794.3 meters within welded ash-flow tuff. A piezometer string with 1 slotted interval was installed in the annulus of the surface casing, open to the saturated alluvium. A completion string with 2 slotted intervals was installed in the main hole, open to saturated alluvium and to the welded tuff aquifer. A second piezometer string with 1 slotted interval open to the welded-tuff aquifer was installed outside the completion string. Well ER-5-3 No.2 was drilled about 30 meters west of the first borehole in March 2000, and was recompleted in March 2001. A 66.0-centimeter hole was drilled and cased off to the depth of 613.8 meters. The hole diameter was decreased to 44.5 centimeters and the borehole was drilled and cased off to the depth of 849.0 meters. The hole diameter was decreased once more to 31.1 centimeters for drilling to a total depth of 1,732.2 meters in dolomite. A completion string open to the dolomite (lower carbonate aquifer) was installed. Well ER-5-3 No.3 was drilled approximately 30 meters north of the first 2 boreholes in February 2001. A 66.0-centimeter hole was drilled and cased off to the depth of 36.6 meters, then the main 25.1-centimeter-diameter hole was drilled to a total depth of 548.6 meters in alluvium. A slotted stainless-steel tubing string was installed in the saturated alluvium. A preliminary composite, static water level was measured at the depth of 282.6 meters, prior to development and hydrologic testing. Detailed lithologic descriptions and stratigraphic assignments are included in the report. These are based on composite drill cuttings collected every 3 meters, and 120 sidewall samples taken at various depths below 91 meters in Wells ER-5-3 and ER-5-3 No.2, supplemented by geophysical log data. The wells penetrated Quaternary/Tertiary alluvium to the depth of 622.4 meters, and an 8.5-meter-thick basalt flow was encountered within the alluvium. Tertiary tuff was penetrated to the depth of approximately 1,425.9 meters, where the top of the lower carbonate aquifer was tagged in Well ER-5-3 No.2.

  9. June 2011 Natural Gas and Produced Water Sampling at the Gasbuggy, New Mexico, Site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2011-10-01

    Annual natural gas and produced water monitoring was conducted for gas wells adjacent to Section 36, where the Gasbuggy test was conducted, in accordance with the draft Long-Term Surveillance and Maintenance Plan for the Gasbuggy Site, Rio Arriba County, New Mexico. Sampling and analysis were conducted as specified in the Sampling and Analysis Plan for U.S. Department of Energy Office of Legacy Management Sites (LMS/PLN/S04351, continually updated). Natural gas samples were collected for tritium and carbon-14 analyses. Produced water samples were collected and analyzed for tritium, gamma-emitting radionuclides (by high-resolution gamma spectrometry), gross alpha, and gross beta. A duplicate produced water sample was collected from well 30-039-21743. Produced water samples were not collected at locations 30-039-30161 and 30-039-21744 because of the lack of water. Samples were not collected from location 30-039-29988 because the well was shut-in.

  10. Well test imaging - a new method for determination of boundaries from well test data

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Slevinsky, B.A.

    1997-08-01

    A new method has been developed for analysis of well test data, which allows the direct calculation of the location of arbitrary reservoir boundaries which are detected during a well test. The method is based on elements of ray tracing and information theory, and is centered on the calculation of an instantaneous {open_quote}angle of view{close_quote} of the reservoir boundaries. In the absence of other information, the relative reservoir shape and boundary distances are retrievable in the form of a Diagnostic Image. If other reservoir information, such as 3-D seismic, is available; the full shape and orientation of arbitrary (non-straight line or circular arc) boundaries can be determined in the form of a Reservoir Image. The well test imaging method can be used to greatly enhance the information available from well tests and other geological data, and provides a method to integrate data from multiple disciplines to improve reservoir characterization. This paper covers the derivation of the analytical technique of well test imaging and shows examples of application of the technique to a number of reservoirs.

  11. Radioactive air emissions notice of construction use of a portable exhauster on single-shell tanks during salt well pumping

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    HOMAN, N.A.

    1999-07-14

    This document serves as a notice of construction (NOC), pursuant to the requirements of Washington Administrative Code (WAC) 246-247-060, and as a request for approval to construct, pursuant to 40 Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) 61.07, portable exhausters for use on singleshell tanks (SSTs) during salt well pumping. Table 1-1 lists SSTs covered by this NOC. This GOC also addresses other activities that are performed in support of salt well pumping but do not require the application of a portable exhauster. Specifically this NOC analyzes the following three activities that have the potential for emissions. (1) Salt well pumping (i.e., the actual transferring of waste from one tank to another) under nominal tank operating conditions. Nominal tank operating conditions include existing passive breathing rates. (2) Salt well pumping (the actual transferring of waste from one tank to another) with use of a portable exhauster. (3) Use of a water lance on the waste to facilitate salt well screen and salt well jet pump installation into the waste. This activity is to be performed under nominal (existing passive breathing rates) tank operating conditions. The use of portable exhausters represents a cost savings because one portable exhauster can be moved back and forth between SSTs as schedules for salt well pumping dictate. A portable exhauster also could be used to simultaneously exhaust more than one SST during salt well pumping. The primary objective of providing active ventilation to these SSTs during salt well pumping is to reduce the risk of postulated accidents to remain within risk guidelines. It is anticipated that salt well pumping will release gases entrapped within the waste as the liquid level is lowered, because of less hydrostatic force keeping the gases in place. Hanford Site waste tanks must comply with the Tank Farms authorization basis (DESH 1997) that requires that the flammable gas concentration be less than 25 percent of the lower flammability limit (LFL). Safety analyses indicate that the LFL might be exceeded in some tanks during certain postulated accident scenarios. Also, the potential for electrical (pump motor, heat tracing) and mechanical (equipment installation) spark sources exist. Therefore, because of the presence of ignition sources and the potential for release of flammable gases, active ventilation might be required in some SSTs to reduce the ''time at risk'' while salt well pumping. For this reason, portable exhausters will be installed as a precautionary measure and used when flammable gas concentrations exceed 25 percent of the LFL during salt well pumping.

  12. Performance of a well with lateral and vertical wellbores 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Abdat, Toriq

    2002-01-01

    analysis of actual well test data is also provided. For horizontal wells, we focus on analysis pressure solution for pseudoradial flow. Limited entry slanted wells are considered in this work by comparing wells with different angles and evaluating...

  13. Application of computational fluid dynamics to aerosol sampling and concentration 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hu, Shishan

    2009-05-15

    of the well-to-jet was analyzed to find its influence on the total and side collections. Simulation is used to analyze liquid film, flow structure, particle collection, pressure drop, and heating requirements for a bioaerosol sampling cyclone. A volume...

  14. The Generalised Radon Transform: Sampling and Memory Considerations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    van Vliet, Lucas J.

    The Generalised Radon Transform: Sampling and Memory Considerations C.L. Luengo Hendriks, M. van. The generalised Radon transform is a well-known tool for detecting parameterised shapes in an image. Applying the Radon trans- form to an image results in a parameter response function (PRF). Curves in the image become

  15. Efficient Pattern Mining of Uncertain Data with Sampling

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Antwerpen, Universiteit

    Efficient Pattern Mining of Uncertain Data with Sampling Toon Calders1 , Calin Garboni2 , and Bart Goethals2 1 TU Eindhoven, The Netherlands t.calders@tue.nl 2 University of Antwerp, Belgium {calin.garboni,bart.goethals}@ua.ac.be Abstract. Mining frequent itemsets from transactional datasets is a well known problem with good

  16. A perspective on the status of coal research from shipments of samples

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vorres, K.S. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States); Kruse, C.W. [Illinois State Geological Survey, Champaign, IL (United States); Nater, K.A. [deGrote Vos, Zeeweg 37, 1753 BB St. Martenzee, NL (Netherlands); Glick, D.C.; Davis, A. [Pennsylvania State Univ., University Park, PA (United States). Coal and Organic Petrology Labs.

    1993-12-31

    Research on all aspects of coal research, at least for more small scale work, involves the use of samples at the beginning of experimental work. Most research workers for smaller scale work do not collect their own coal samples, but rather order them from a group of sample suppliers. The number of suppliers meeting the major needs in the US, as well as for the world, is not very large. An examination of the shipments of samples from each of these suppliers will give an interesting insight into the general trends in volume of work in the field. The suppliers involved in this study include the Argonne Premium Coal Sample Program, the Illinois Basin Coal Sample Program, the SBN and the several groups of samples from the Pennsylvania State University Coal Sample Bank. Each of these supplies a different number of samples in varying quantities. The quantities and variety of samples is important to the individual worker in selecting a supplier. The type of work to be done frequently affects the quantities and choice of sample, which in turn affects the choice of supplier. In general these data indicate that researchers realize the advantages of acquiring samples from centralized sample banks. These advantages include a lower cost than would be incurred from individual sampling and preparation; availability of analyzed samples; preservation of samples and the possibility of comparing results with others who have worked on the same samples.

  17. Pahute Mesa Well Development and Testing Analyses for Wells ER-20-8 and ER-20-4, Nevada National Security Site, Nye County, Nevada, Revision 0

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Greg Ruskauff and Sam Marutzky

    2012-09-01

    Wells ER-20-4 and ER-20-8 were drilled during fiscal year (FY) 2009 and FY 2010 (NNSA/NSO, 2011a and b). The closest underground nuclear test detonations to the area of investigation are TYBO (U-20y), BELMONT (U-20as), MOLBO (U-20ag), BENHAM (U-20c), and HOYA (U-20 be) (Figure 1-1). The TYBO, MOLBO, and BENHAM detonations had working points located below the regional water table. The BELMONT and HOYA detonation working points were located just above the water table, and the cavity for these detonations are calculated to extend below the water table (Pawloski et al., 2002). The broad purpose of Wells ER-20-4 and ER-20-8 is to determine the extent of radionuclide-contaminated groundwater, the geologic formations, groundwater geochemistry as an indicator of age and origin, and the water-bearing properties and hydraulic conditions that influence radionuclide migration. Well development and testing is performed to determine the hydraulic properties at the well and between other wells, and to obtain groundwater samples at the well that are representative of the formation at the well. The area location, wells, underground nuclear detonations, and other features are shown in Figure 1-1. Hydrostratigraphic cross sections A-A’, B-B’, C-C’, and D-D’ are shown in Figures 1-2 through 1-5, respectively.

  18. Segmentation of complex geophysical structures with well Running title: Image segmentation with well data.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    gap for reservoir characterization. Morevoer, it is well known that interpre- tation of faults for instance Monsen et al. [24], Randen et al. [28]). More precisely, the fault extraction from 3D data is of key importance in reservoir characterization: detailed knowledge of the fault system may provide

  19. Gas Sampling | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIX ECoopButtePowerEdistoWhiskeyFootprintGEXA Corp. (Delaware)GalvestonWindSampling Details

  20. Gasoline Vehicle Exhuast Particle Sampling Study | Department...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Vehicle Exhuast Particle Sampling Study Gasoline Vehicle Exhuast Particle Sampling Study 2003 DEER Conference Presentation: University of Minnesota 2003deerkittelson.pdf More...

  1. MAINTENANCE OF THE COAL SAMPLE BANK AND DATABASE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1998-10-01

    This project generates and provides coal samples and accompanying analytical data for research by DOE contractors and others. The five-year contract has been completed and a six-month no-cost extension is under way; this will continue the limited distribution of samples and data to DOE, its contractors and grantees. All activities specified under the five-year contract have been completed. Eleven DECS samples were collected, processed to a variety of particle sizes, heat-sealed in foil laminate bags under argon, and placed in refrigerated storage. All were analyzed for basic chemical composition, inorganic major and trace element composition including hazardous air pollutant elements, petrographic composition and characteristics, thermoplastic behavior (if applicable), and other properties relevant to commercial utilization. Most were also analyzed by NMR, py/gc/ms, and a standardized liquefaction test; trends and relationships observed were evaluated and summarized. Twenty-two DECS samples collected under the previous contract received further processing, and most of these were subjected to organic geochemical and standardized liquefaction tests as well. Selected DECS samples were monitored annually to evaluate the effectiveness of foil laminate bags for long-term sample storage. Twenty-three PSOC samples collected under previous contracts and purged with argon before storage were also maintained and distributed, for a total of 56 samples covered by the contract. During the five years, 524 samples in 1501 containers, 2075 data printouts, and individual data items from 30327 samples were distributed. In the subject quarter, 45 samples, 101 data printouts, and individual data items from 1237 samples were distributed. Splits of the last two samples from the previous contract received processing to minus 0.25 mm; all DECS samples are now available for immediate distribution at minus 6 mm (-1/4 inch), minus 0.85 mm (- 20 mesh U.S.), and minus 0.25 mm (minus 60 mesh U.S.). The final annual monitoring of foil laminate bag storage was completed, with most samples showing little or no deterioration.

  2. Water Evaporation: A Transition Path Sampling Study

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Patrick Varilly; David Chandler

    2012-12-12

    We use transition path sampling to study evaporation in the SPC/E model of liquid water. Based on thousands of evaporation trajectories, we characterize the members of the transition state ensemble (TSE), which exhibit a liquid-vapor interface with predominantly negative mean curvature at the site of evaporation. We also find that after evaporation is complete, the distributions of translational and angular momenta of the evaporated water are Maxwellian with a temperature equal to that of the liquid. To characterize the evaporation trajectories in their entirety, we find that it suffices to project them onto just two coordinates: the distance of the evaporating molecule to the instantaneous liquid-vapor interface, and the velocity of the water along the average interface normal. In this projected space, we find that the TSE is well-captured by a simple model of ballistic escape from a deep potential well, with no additional barrier to evaporation beyond the cohesive strength of the liquid. Equivalently, they are consistent with a near-unity probability for a water molecule impinging upon a liquid droplet to condense. These results agree with previous simulations and with some, but not all, recent experiments.

  3. AUTOMATING GROUNDWATER SAMPLING AT HANFORD THE NEXT STEP

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    CONNELL CW; CONLEY SF; HILDEBRAND RD; CUNNINGHAM DE; R_D_Doug_Hildebrand@rl.gov; DeVon_E_Cunningham@rl.gov

    2010-01-21

    Historically, the groundwater monitoring activities at the Department of Energy's Hanford Site in southeastern Washington State have been very "people intensive." Approximately 1500 wells are sampled each year by field personnel or "samplers." These individuals have been issued pre-printed forms showing information about the well(s) for a particular sampling evolution. This information is taken from 2 official electronic databases: the Hanford Well information System (HWIS) and the Hanford Environmental Information System (HEIS). The samplers used these hardcopy forms to document the groundwater samples and well water-levels. After recording the entries in the field, the samplers turned the forms in at the end of the day and other personnel posted the collected information onto a spreadsheet that was then printed and included in a log book. The log book was then used to make manual entries of the new information into the software application(s) for the HEIS and HWIS databases. A pilot project for automating this extremely tedious process was lauched in 2008. Initially, the automation was focused on water-level measurements. Now, the effort is being extended to automate the meta-data associated with collecting groundwater samples. The project allowed electronic forms produced in the field by samplers to be used in a work flow process where the data is transferred to the database and electronic form is filed in managed records - thus eliminating manually completed forms. Elimating the manual forms and streamlining the data entry not only improved the accuracy of the information recorded, but also enhanced the efficiency and sampling capacity of field office personnel.

  4. CAES 2014 Chemical Analyses of Thermal Wells and Springs in Southeastern Idaho

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Baum, Jeffrey

    This dataset contains chemical analyses for thermal wells and springs in Southeastern Idaho. Data includes all major cations, major anions, pH, collection temperature, and some trace metals, These samples were collected in 2014 by the Center for Advanced Energy Studies (CAES), and are part of a continuous effort to analyze the geothermal potential of Southeastern Idaho.

  5. CAES 2014 Chemical Analyses of Thermal Wells and Springs in Southeastern Idaho

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Baum, Jeffrey

    2014-03-10

    This dataset contains chemical analyses for thermal wells and springs in Southeastern Idaho. Data includes all major cations, major anions, pH, collection temperature, and some trace metals, These samples were collected in 2014 by the Center for Advanced Energy Studies (CAES), and are part of a continuous effort to analyze the geothermal potential of Southeastern Idaho.

  6. Gamma-analysis of airborne particulates sampled in Youzhno-Sakhalinsk town at March - April 2011

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    E. G. Tertyshnik; V. P. Martynenko; F. A. Andreev; G. B. Artemyev

    2012-03-22

    The experience of discovery of the radioactive products which have released into atmosphere of Sakhalin region from Fukushima Daiichi accident is presented. Sampling of airborne particulates and atmosphere fallout was carried out by means of the air ventilation set and horizontal gauze planchs, respectively. The HPGe detector was used for gamma analyses of the airborne samples. Since 23 March we confidently measured 131I in the airborne samples, after 03.04.2011 we also registered a rise of activity 137Cs and 134Cs. 132Te and 132I were discovered in ashen sample of the planch, which had exposed in Youzhno-Kurilk from 14 to 17 March. The effect of the pairs production when in the samples 208Tl presence, which emits gamma-quanta of 2615 keV, causes a rise in apparatus spectra of the peak corresponding to energy 1593 keV, which could be in error ascribed to 140La. It had been experimentally shown that the systematic reduction of 134Cs content in measuring samples due to effect of gamma - gamma coincidence did not exceed 7 % (for the detector and geometry of the measurement used).

  7. A margin based approach to determining sample sizes via tolerance bounds.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Newcomer, Justin T.; Freeland, Katherine Elizabeth

    2013-09-01

    This paper proposes a tolerance bound approach for determining sample sizes. With this new methodology we begin to think of sample size in the context of uncertainty exceeding margin. As the sample size decreases the uncertainty in the estimate of margin increases. This can be problematic when the margin is small and only a few units are available for testing. In this case there may be a true underlying positive margin to requirements but the uncertainty may be too large to conclude we have sufficient margin to those requirements with a high level of statistical confidence. Therefore, we provide a methodology for choosing a sample size large enough such that an estimated QMU uncertainty based on the tolerance bound approach will be smaller than the estimated margin (assuming there is positive margin). This ensures that the estimated tolerance bound will be within performance requirements and the tolerance ratio will be greater than one, supporting a conclusion that we have sufficient margin to the performance requirements. In addition, this paper explores the relationship between margin, uncertainty, and sample size and provides an approach and recommendations for quantifying risk when sample sizes are limited.

  8. Interpreting Horizontal Well Flow Profiles and Optimizing Well Performance by Downhole Temperature and Pressure Data 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Li, Zhuoyi

    2011-02-22

    . Because of geothermal gradient, formation temperature along the depth of the wellbore changes significantly. At such a situation, some small thermal effects, such as fluid thermal expansion and viscous dissipation heating, can be ignored compared... data. For horizontal wells, because geothermal temperature changes are relatively small, the dominating effects on the wellbore temperature changes may be thermal expansion, viscous dissipative heating, and thermal conduction. Model for temperature...

  9. Tank 241-ER-311, grab samples, ER311-98-1, ER311-98-2, ER311-98-3 analytical results for the final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    FULLER, R.K.

    1999-02-24

    This document is the final report for catch tank 241-ER-311 grab samples. Three grab samples ER311-98-1, ER311-98-2 and ER311-98-3 were taken from East riser of tank 241-ER-311 on August 4, 1998 and received by the 222-S Laboratory on August 4, 1998. Analyses were performed in accordance with the Compatibility Grab Sampling and Analysis Plan (TSAP) (Sasaki, 1998)and the Data Quality Objectives for Tank Farms Waste Compatibility Program (DQO) (Mulkey and Miller, 1997). The analytical results are presented in the data summary report (Table 1). No notification limits were exceeded.

  10. Core sampling system spare parts assessment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Walter, E.J.

    1995-04-04

    Soon, there will be 4 independent core sampling systems obtaining samples from the underground tanks. It is desirable that these systems be available for sampling during the next 2 years. This assessment was prepared to evaluate the adequacy of the spare parts identified for the core sampling system and to provide recommendations that may remediate overages or inadequacies of spare parts.

  11. Tank 12H residuals sample analysis report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Oji, L. N.; Shine, E. P.; Diprete, D. P.; Coleman, C. J.; Hay, M. S.

    2015-06-11

    The Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) was requested by Savannah River Remediation (SRR) to provide sample preparation and analysis of the Tank 12H final characterization samples to determine the residual tank inventory prior to grouting. Eleven Tank 12H floor and mound residual material samples and three cooling coil scrape samples were collected and delivered to SRNL between May and August of 2014.

  12. July 2010 Natural Gas and Produced Water Sampling at the Gasbuggy, New Mexico, Site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    2011-01-01

    Annual natural gas and produced water monitoring was conducted for gas wells adjacent to Section 36, where the Gasbuggy test was conducted, in accordance with the draft Long-Term Surveillance and Maintenance Plan for the Gasbuggy Site, Rio Arriba County, New Mexico. Sampling and analysis was conducted as specified in the Sampling and Analysis Plan for U.S. Department of Energy Office of Legacy Management Sites. (LMS/PLN/S04351, continually updated). Natural gas samples were collected for tritium and carbon-14 analysis. Produced water samples were collected and analyzed for tritium, gamma-emitting radionuclides (by high-resolution gamma spectrometry), gross alpha, and gross beta. An additional water sample was collected from well 29-6 Water Hole for analysis of tritium and gamma-emitting radionuclides. A duplicate produced water sample was collected from well 30-039-21743.

  13. Sample introduction apparatus for a flow cytometer

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Van den Engh, Ger (Seattle, WA)

    1998-01-01

    A sample introduction system for a flow cytometer allows easy change of sample containers such as test tubes and facilitates use in high pressure environments. The sample container includes a cap having a pressure supply chamber and a sample container attachment cavity. A sample container may be automatically positioned into the attachment cavity so as to sealably engage the end of the sample container as its outer surface. This positioning may be accomplished through some sample introduction mechanism. To facilitate cleaning HPLC tubing and fittings may be used in a manner which facilitates removable of the entire tubing from both the nozzle container and other sample container cap to permit its replacement to avoid contamination. The sample container support may include horizontal stops which loosely limit the movement of the sample container and thus avoid further stresses upon it.

  14. ALARA Review for Concrete Sampling and Robot Deployment at221-U

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    T. A. Edwards.

    1999-05-28

    This document is an as low as reasonably achievable (ALARA) review for performing characterization activities at 221-U Plant (U-Plant) in support of the Canyon Disposition Initiative. The scope of work includes sampling concrete and deployment of the robot into the ventilation tunnel to support characterization activities. While performing a radiological review of the work scope, it was determined that contamination levels in the work area may exceed the Level 2 ALARA review trigger levels specified in BHI-SH-02, Volume 1, Safety and Health Procedures, Procedure 1.22, Planning Radiological Work. This ALARA review provides a description of the engineering and administrative controls used to manage personnel exposure, control contamination levels, and control airborne radioactivity concentrations while conducting characterization and sampling activities at the 221-U Plant (U-Plant).

  15. Primary Cementing of a Highly Deviated Oil Well

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fournier, John J.F.

    in the construction of a well. The objective is to provide zonal isolation, i.e., a hydraulic seal between the wellPrimary Cementing of a Highly Deviated Oil Well by Mariana Carrasco-Teja B.Sc., Instituto Tecnol. The study comes from the primary cementing of highly deviated oil and gas wells. Highly deviated wells

  16. U.S. Average Depth of Crude Oil Exploratory Wells Drilled (Feet per Well)

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustments (BillionProved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet)Estimated Production fromSales (Billion CubicWells

  17. U.S. Average Depth of Natural Gas Exploratory Wells Drilled (Feet per Well)

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustments (BillionProved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet)Estimated Production fromSalesWells Drilled (Feet per

  18. DUS II SOIL GAS SAMPLING AND AIR INJECTION TEST RESULTS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Noonkester, J.; Jackson, D.; Jones, W.; Hyde, W.; Kohn, J.; Walker, R.

    2012-09-20

    Soil vapor extraction (SVE) and air injection well testing was performed at the Dynamic Underground Stripping (DUS) site located near the M-Area Settling Basin (referred to as DUS II in this report). The objective of this testing was to determine the effectiveness of continued operation of these systems. Steam injection ended on September 19, 2009 and since this time the extraction operations have utilized residual heat that is present in the subsurface. The well testing campaign began on June 5, 2012 and was completed on June 25, 2012. Thirty-two (32) SVE wells were purged for 24 hours or longer using the active soil vapor extraction (ASVE) system at the DUS II site. During each test five or more soil gas samples were collected from each well and analyzed for target volatile organic compounds (VOCs). The DUS II site is divided into four parcels (see Figure 1) and soil gas sample results show the majority of residual VOC contamination remains in Parcel 1 with lesser amounts in the other three parcels. Several VOCs, including tetrachloroethylene (PCE) and trichloroethylene (TCE), were detected. PCE was the major VOC with lesser amounts of TCE. Most soil gas concentrations of PCE ranged from 0 to 60 ppmv with one well (VEW-22A) as high as 200 ppmv. Air sparging (AS) generally involves the injection of air into the aquifer through either vertical or horizontal wells. AS is coupled with SVE systems when contaminant recovery is necessary. While traditional air sparging (AS) is not a primary component of the DUS process, following the cessation of steam injection, eight (8) of the sixty-three (63) steam injection wells were used to inject air. These wells were previously used for hydrous pyrolysis oxidation (HPO) as part of the DUS process. Air sparging is different from the HPO operations in that the air was injected at a higher rate (20 to 50 scfm) versus HPO (1 to 2 scfm). . At the DUS II site the air injection wells were tested to determine if air sparging affected VOC soil gas concentrations during ASVE. Five (5) SVE wells that were located closest to the air injection wells were used as monitoring points during the air sparging tests. The air sparging tests lasted 48 hours. Soil gas sample results indicate that sparging did not affect VOC concentrations in four of the five sparging wells, while results from one test did show an increase in soil gas concentrations.

  19. Economic viability of multiple-lateral horizontal wells 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Smith, Christopher Jason

    1995-01-01

    Horizontal wells are gaining popularity throughout the petroleum industry as a means to increase well productivity and enhance incremental economics. Horizontal wells provide greater reservoir exposure and are useful in ...

  20. UTM Well Coordinates for the Boise Hydrogeophysical Research Site (BHRS)

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    David Lim

    2014-12-19

    A series of oscillatory pumping tests were performed at the BHRS. The data collected from these wells will be used to tomographically image the shallow subsurface. This excel file only contains well coordinates for all wells at the Boise site.

  1. UTM Well Coordinates for the Boise Hydrogeophysical Research Site (BHRS)

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    David Lim

    A series of oscillatory pumping tests were performed at the BHRS. The data collected from these wells will be used to tomographically image the shallow subsurface. This excel file only contains well coordinates for all wells at the Boise site.

  2. Identifying Infill Locations and Underperformer Wells in Mature Fields using

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mohaghegh, Shahab

    field. Identify opportunities in mature fields: Sweet spots for infill drilling. Underperformer wellsIdentifying Infill Locations and Underperformer Wells in Mature Fields using Monthly Production wells rather than the entire field. #12;Introduction Objective Methodology Results Conclusion Objective

  3. Modeling performance of horizontal, undulating, and multilateral wells 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kamkom, Rungtip

    2009-05-15

    Horizontal, undulating, and multilateral wells are relatively new alternatives in field development because they can increase the productivity per well and reduce the cost of field development. Because the feasibility of these wells may not be valid...

  4. March 2010 Groundwater Sampling at the Project Shoal Site, Nevada (Data Validation Package)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2011-03-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy Office of Legacy Management conducted annual sampling at the Project Shoal Area (Shoal) in March 2010. Wells HC-4, HC-5, HC-7, HC-8, MV-1, MV-2 and MV-3 were sampled March 10-12, 2010, as specified in the Sampling and Analysis Plan for U.S. Department of Energy Office of Legacy Management Sites (LMS/PLN/S04351, continually updated). Wells HC-1, HC-2, HC-3, and HC-6 were sampled March 24, 2010, by Desert Research Institute personnel.

  5. Method and apparatus for data sampling

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Odell, Daniel M. C. (Aiken, SC)

    1994-01-01

    A method and apparatus for sampling radiation detector outputs and determining event data from the collected samples. The method uses high speed sampling of the detector output, the conversion of the samples to digital values, and the discrimination of the digital values so that digital values representing detected events are determined. The high speed sampling and digital conversion is performed by an A/D sampler that samples the detector output at a rate high enough to produce numerous digital samples for each detected event. The digital discrimination identifies those digital samples that are not representative of detected events. The sampling and discrimination also provides for temporary or permanent storage, either serially or in parallel, to a digital storage medium.

  6. Method and apparatus for data sampling

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Odell, D.M.C.

    1994-04-19

    A method and apparatus for sampling radiation detector outputs and determining event data from the collected samples is described. The method uses high speed sampling of the detector output, the conversion of the samples to digital values, and the discrimination of the digital values so that digital values representing detected events are determined. The high speed sampling and digital conversion is performed by an A/D sampler that samples the detector output at a rate high enough to produce numerous digital samples for each detected event. The digital discrimination identifies those digital samples that are not representative of detected events. The sampling and discrimination also provides for temporary or permanent storage, either serially or in parallel, to a digital storage medium. 6 figures.

  7. Fluid sampling system for a nuclear reactor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Lau, L.K.; Alper, N.I.

    1994-11-22

    A system of extracting fluid samples, either liquid or gas, from the interior of a nuclear reactor containment utilizes a jet pump. To extract the sample fluid, a nonradioactive motive fluid is forced through the inlet and discharge ports of a jet pump located outside the containment, creating a suction that draws the sample fluid from the containment through a sample conduit connected to the pump suction port. The mixture of motive fluid and sample fluid is discharged through a return conduit to the interior of the containment. The jet pump and means for removing a portion of the sample fluid from the sample conduit can be located in a shielded sample grab station located next to the containment. A non-nuclear grade active pump can be located outside the grab sampling station and the containment to pump the nonradioactive motive fluid through the jet pump. 1 fig.

  8. Fluid sampling system for a nuclear reactor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Lau, Louis K. (Monroeville, PA); Alper, Naum I. (Monroeville, PA)

    1994-01-01

    A system of extracting fluid samples, either liquid or gas, from the interior of a nuclear reactor containment utilizes a jet pump. To extract the sample fluid, a nonradioactive motive fluid is forced through the inlet and discharge ports of a jet pump located outside the containment, creating a suction that draws the sample fluid from the containment through a sample conduit connected to the pump suction port. The mixture of motive fluid and sample fluid is discharged through a return conduit to the interior of the containment. The jet pump and means for removing a portion of the sample fluid from the sample conduit can be located in a shielded sample grab station located next to the containment. A non-nuclear grade active pump can be located outside the grab sampling station and the containment to pump the nonradioactive motive fluid through the jet pump.

  9. Well Log Data At Valles Caldera - Redondo Geothermal Area (Shevenell...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Well Log Data At Valles Caldera - Redondo Geothermal Area (Shevenell, Et Al., 1988) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Well Log Data...

  10. Exploratory Well At Long Valley Caldera Geothermal Area (Smith...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Exploratory Well At Long Valley Caldera Geothermal Area (Smith & Rex, 1977) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Exploratory Well At...

  11. Well Log Data At Blue Mountain Geothermal Area (Fairbank & Niggemann...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Well Log Data At Blue Mountain Geothermal Area (Fairbank & Niggemann, 2004) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Well Log Data At Blue...

  12. Hydrogeologic characterization of wells HTH-1, UE18r, UE6e, and HTH-3, Nevada Test Site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lyles, B.F.; McKay, W.A.; Chapman, J.B.; Tyler, S.W.

    1991-06-01

    Monitoring for the migration of contaminants in groundwater or for the proper design of nuclear test emplacement holes at the Nevada Test Site (NTS) requires proper placement and completion of monitoring wells. This is only possible if the hydrogeologic system is understood in a regional and local context, necessitating data from existing wells and boreholes. Though the NTS Groundwater Characterization Project will be drilling wells, their great expense limits the number of new wells. However, there are many existing boreholes and wells on the NTS which have not been completely evaluated hydrologically. Some of these are incorporated in the Long Term Hydrologic Monitoring Program (LTHMP) of the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), others are related to the testing programs. In all cases, additional site investigation in necessary to properly interpret the hydrogeologic data from these wells. Monitoring wells on the NTS are poorly characterized with regard to aquifers penetrated, vertical hydraulic gradients, and vertical variations in water quality. One of the goals of the well validation program was to gain a thorough understanding of the parameters needed to interpret the source and fate potential hazardous and radioactive substances that may be detected in these wells in the future. One of the most critical parameters for monitoring is the knowledge of what aquifer or geologic unit is being sampled when a water sample is collected. Pumped water samples are weighted most heavily to the water quality of the most productive (highest transmissivity) aquifer penetrated by the well.

  13. Completion Report for Well ER-12-3 Corrective Action Unit 99: Rainier Mesa - Shoshone Mountain

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office; Bechtel Nevada Corporation

    2006-05-01

    Well ER-12-3 was drilled for the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office, in support of the Nevada Environmental Restoration Project at the Nevada Test Site, Nye County, Nevada. The well was drilled in March and April 2005 as part of a hydrogeologic investigation program for the Rainier Mesa-Shoshone Mountain Corrective Action Unit. The overall purpose of the well was to gather subsurface data to better characterize the hydrogeology of central Rainier Mesa, especially in the older Tertiary volcanic rocks and Paleozoic sedimentary rocks. The main 47.0-centimeter hole was drilled to a depth of 799.2 meters and cased with 33.97-centimeter casing to 743.1 meters. The hole diameter was then decreased to 31.1 centimeters, and the well was drilled to a total depth of 1,496.0 meters. The completion string consisted of 13.97-centimeter stainless steel casing, with two slotted intervals open to the lower carbonate aquifer, suspended from 19.37-centimeter carbon steel casing. A piezometer string was installed outside the 33.97-centimeter casing to a depth of 467.1 meters to monitor a zone of perched water within the Tertiary volcanic section. Data gathered during and shortly after hole construction include composite drill cuttings samples collected every 3 meters (extra cuttings samples were collected from the Paleozoic rocks for paleontological analyses), sidewall core samples from 35 depths, various geophysical logs, and water level measurements. These data indicate that the well penetrated 674.2 meters of Tertiary volcanic rocks and 821.7 meters of Paleozoic dolomite and limestone. Forty-nine days after the well was completed, but prior to well development and testing, the water level inside the main hole was tagged at the depth of 949.1 meters, and the water level inside the piezometer string was tagged at 379.9 meters.

  14. ISOLOK VALVE ACCEPTANCE TESTING FOR DWPF SME SAMPLING PROCESS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Edwards, T.; Hera, K.; Coleman, C.; Jones, M.; Wiedenman, B.

    2011-12-05

    Evaluation of the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) Chemical Process Cell (CPC) cycle time identified several opportunities to improve the CPC processing time. Of the opportunities, a focus area related to optimizing the equipment and efficiency of the sample turnaround time for DWPF Analytical Laboratory was identified. The Mechanical Systems & Custom Equipment Development (MS&CED) Section of the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) evaluated the possibility of using an Isolok{reg_sign} sampling valve as an alternative to the Hydragard{reg_sign} valve for taking process samples. Previous viability testing was conducted with favorable results using the Isolok sampler and reported in SRNL-STI-2010-00749 (1). This task has the potential to improve operability, reduce maintenance time and decrease CPC cycle time. This report summarizes the results from acceptance testing which was requested in Task Technical Request (TTR) HLW-DWPF-TTR-2010-0036 (2) and which was conducted as outlined in Task Technical and Quality Assurance Plan (TTQAP) SRNL-RP-2011-00145 (3). The Isolok to be tested is the same model which was tested, qualified, and installed in the Sludge Receipt Adjustment Tank (SRAT) sample system. RW-0333P QA requirements apply to this task. This task was to qualify the Isolok sampler for use in the DWPF Slurry Mix Evaporator (SME) sampling process. The Hydragard, which is the current baseline sampling method, was used for comparison to the Isolok sampling data. The Isolok sampler is an air powered grab sampler used to 'pull' a sample volume from a process line. The operation of the sampler is shown in Figure 1. The image on the left shows the Isolok's spool extended into the process line and the image on the right shows the sampler retracted and then dispensing the liquid into the sampling container. To determine tank homogeneity, a Coliwasa sampler was used to grab samples at a high and low location within the mixing tank. Data from the two locations were compared to determine if the contents of the tank were well mixed. The Coliwasa sampler is a tube with a stopper at the bottom and is designed to obtain grab samples from specific locations within the drum contents. A position paper (4) was issued to address the prototypic flow loop issues and simulant selections. A statistically designed plan (5) was issued to address the total number of samples each sampler needed to pull, to provide the random order in which samples were pulled and to group samples for elemental analysis. The TTR required that the Isolok sampler perform as well as the Hydragard sampler during these tests to ensure the acceptability of the Isolok sampler for use in the DWPF sampling cells. Procedure No.L9.4-5015 was used to document the sample parameters and process steps. Completed procedures are located in R&D Engineering job folder 23269.

  15. ALARA ASSESSMENT OF SETTLER SLUDGE SAMPLING METHODS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NELSEN LA

    2009-01-30

    The purpose of this assessment is to compare underwater and above water settler sludge sampling methods to determine if the added cost for underwater sampling for the sole purpose of worker dose reductions is justified. Initial planning for sludge sampling included container, settler and knock-out-pot (KOP) sampling. Due to the significantly higher dose consequence of KOP sludge, a decision was made to sample KOP underwater to achieve worker dose reductions. Additionally, initial plans were to utilize the underwater sampling apparatus for settler sludge. Since there are no longer plans to sample KOP sludge, the decision for underwater sampling for settler sludge needs to be revisited. The present sampling plan calls for spending an estimated $2,500,000 to design and construct a new underwater sampling system (per A21 C-PL-001 RevOE). This evaluation will compare and contrast the present method of above water sampling to the underwater method that is planned by the Sludge Treatment Project (STP) and determine if settler samples can be taken using the existing sampling cart (with potentially minor modifications) while maintaining doses to workers As Low As Reasonably Achievable (ALARA) and eliminate the need for costly redesigns, testing and personnel retraining.

  16. MONITORING WELL-BEING OF CIVIL ENGINEERING PROFESSION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bruneau, Michel

    MONITORING WELL-BEING OF CIVIL ENGINEERING PROFESSION By Michel Bruneau, 1Member, ASCE ABSTRACT reported decline in the well-beingof the civilengineering profession. These deficienciesare: (1) Public-beingof the civilengineering profession, as well as the evolution of this well-being.Quan- titativeperformanceindicesare

  17. Well completion process for formations with unconsolidated sands

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Davies, David K. (Kingwood, TX); Mondragon, III, Julius J. (Redondo Beach, CA); Hara, Philip Scott (Monterey Park, CA)

    2003-04-29

    A method for consolidating sand around a well, involving injecting hot water or steam through well casing perforations in to create a cement-like area around the perforation of sufficient rigidity to prevent sand from flowing into and obstructing the well. The cement area has several wormholes that provide fluid passageways between the well and the formation, while still inhibiting sand inflow.

  18. Analysis of HEU samples from the ULBA Metallurgical Plant

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gift, E.H.

    1995-05-01

    In early March 1994, eight highly enriched uranium (HEU) samples were collected from materials stored at the Ulba Metallurgical Plant in Oskamen (Ust Kamenogorsk), Kazakhstan. While at the plant site, portions of four samples were dissolved and analyzed by mass spectrograph at the Ulba analytical laboratory by Ulba analysts. Three of these mass spectrograph solutions and the eight HEU samples were subsequently delivered to the Y-12 Plant for complete chemical and isotopic analyses. Chemical forms of the eight samples were uranium metal chips, U0{sub 2} powder, uranium/beryllium oxide powder, and uranium/beryllium alloy rods. All were declared by the Ulba plant to have a uranium assay of {approximately}90 wt % {sup 235}U. The uranium/beryllium powder and alloy samples were also declared to range from about 8 to 28 wt % uranium. The chemical and uranium isotopic analyses done at the Y-12 Plant confirm the Ulba plant declarations. All samples appear to have been enriched using some reprocessed uranium, probably from recovery of uranium from plutonium production reactors. As a result, all samples contain some {sup 236}U and {sup 232}U and have small but measurable quantities of plutonium. This plutonium could be the result of either contamination carried over from the enrichment process or cross-contamination from weapons material. It is not the result of direct reactor exposure. Neither the {sup 232}U nor the plutonium concentrations are sufficiently high to provide a significant industrial health hazard. Both are well within established or proposed acceptance criteria for storage at Y-12. The trace metal analyses showed that, with the exception of beryllium, there are no trace metals in any of these HEU samples that pose a significant health hazard.

  19. Microfluidic DNA sample preparation method and device

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Krulevitch, Peter A. (Pleasanton, CA); Miles, Robin R. (Danville, CA); Wang, Xiao-Bo (San Diego, CA); Mariella, Raymond P. (Danville, CA); Gascoyne, Peter R. C. (Bellaire, TX); Balch, Joseph W. (Livermore, CA)

    2002-01-01

    Manipulation of DNA molecules in solution has become an essential aspect of genetic analyses used for biomedical assays, the identification of hazardous bacterial agents, and in decoding the human genome. Currently, most of the steps involved in preparing a DNA sample for analysis are performed manually and are time, labor, and equipment intensive. These steps include extraction of the DNA from spores or cells, separation of the DNA from other particles and molecules in the solution (e.g. dust, smoke, cell/spore debris, and proteins), and separation of the DNA itself into strands of specific lengths. Dielectrophoresis (DEP), a phenomenon whereby polarizable particles move in response to a gradient in electric field, can be used to manipulate and separate DNA in an automated fashion, considerably reducing the time and expense involved in DNA analyses, as well as allowing for the miniaturization of DNA analysis instruments. These applications include direct transport of DNA, trapping of DNA to allow for its separation from other particles or molecules in the solution, and the separation of DNA into strands of varying lengths.

  20. Curve sampling and geometric conditional simulation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fan, Ayres C. (Ayres Chee), 1978-

    2008-01-01

    The main objective of this thesis is the development and exploitation of techniques to generate geometric samples for the purpose of image segmentation. A sampling-based approach provides a number of benefits over existing ...

  1. Principles for Sampling Airborne Radioactivity from Stacks

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Glissmeyer, John A.

    2010-10-18

    This book chapter describes the special processes involved in sampling the airborne effluents from nuclear faciities. The title of the book is Radioactive Air Sampling Methods. The abstract for this chapter was cleared as PNNL-SA-45941.

  2. Adaptive Basis Sampling for Smoothing Splines 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhang, Nan

    2015-08-03

    . However, the high computational cost of smoothing splines for large data sets has hindered their wide application. We develop a new method, named adaptive basis sampling, for efficient computation of smoothing splines in super-large samples. Generally, a...

  3. Exploratory Well At Valles Caldera - Redondo Geothermal Area...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    from detailed logging of the physical samples. Notes The intracaldera volcanic stratigraphy in the vicinity of Redondo Peak was described in detail, and allowed for...

  4. Fourier Sampling Coset States of Nonabelian Groups

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hallgren, Sean

    55 Chapter 6 Fourier Sampling Coset States of Nonabelian Groups In this chapter we analyze the HSP problem, to the HSP over the symmetric group S n . In particular, we will analyze Fourier sampling coset states when the group is nonabelian. We show that Fourier sampling a polynomial number of coset states

  5. Results of investigations at the Zunil geothermal field, Guatemala: Well logging and brine geochemistry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Adams, A.; Dennis, B.; Van Eeckhout, E.; Goff, F.; Lawton, R.; Trujillo, P.E.; Counce, D.; Archuleta, J. (Los Alamos National Lab., NM (USA)); Medina, V. (Instituto Nacional de Electrificacion, Guatemala City (Guatemala). Unidad de Desarollo Geotermico)

    1991-07-01

    The well logging team from Los Alamos and its counterpart from Central America were tasked to investigate the condition of four producing geothermal wells in the Zunil Geothermal Field. The information obtained would be used to help evaluate the Zunil geothermal reservoir in terms of possible additional drilling and future power plant design. The field activities focused on downhole measurements in four production wells (ZCQ-3, ZCQ-4, ZCQ-5, and ZCQ-6). The teams took measurements of the wells in both static (shut-in) and flowing conditions, using the high-temperature well logging tools developed at Los Alamos National Laboratory. Two well logging missions were conducted in the Zunil field. In October 1988 measurements were made in well ZCQ-3, ZCQ-5, and ZCQ-6. In December 1989 the second field operation logged ZCQ-4 and repeated logs in ZCQ-3. Both field operations included not only well logging but the collecting of numerous fluid samples from both thermal and nonthermal waters. 18 refs., 22 figs., 7 tabs.

  6. Sample Results From The Interim Salt Disposition Program Macrobatch 7 Tank 21H Qualification Samples

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Peters, T. B.; Washington, A. L. II

    2013-08-08

    Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) analyzed samples from Tank 21H in support of qualification of Macrobatch (Salt Batch) 7 for the Interim Salt Disposition Program (ISDP). An ARP and several ESS tests were also performed. This document reports characterization data on the samples of Tank 21H as well as simulated performance of ARP/MCU. No issues with the projected Salt Batch 7 strategy are identified, other than the presence of visible quantities of dark colored solids. A demonstration of the monosodium titanate (0.2 g/L) removal of strontium and actinides provided acceptable 4 hour average decontamination factors for Pu and Sr of 3.22 and 18.4, respectively. The Four ESS tests also showed acceptable behavior with distribution ratios (D(Cs)) values of 15.96, 57.1, 58.6, and 65.6 for the MCU, cold blend, hot blend, and Next Generation Solvent (NGS), respectively. The predicted value for the MCU solvent was 13.2. Currently, there are no models that would allow a prediction of extraction behavior for the other three solvents. SRNL recommends that a model for predicting extraction behavior for cesium removal for the blended solvent and NGS be developed. While no outstanding issues were noted, the presence of solids in the samples should be investigated in future work. It is possible that the solids may represent a potential reservoir of material (such as potassium) that could have an impact on MCU performance if they were to dissolve back into the feed solution. This salt batch is intended to be the first batch to be processed through MCU entirely using the new NGS-MCU solvent.

  7. SAMPLE RESULTS FROM THE INTERIM SALT DISPOSITION PROGRAM MACROBATCH 8 TANK 21H QUALIFICATION SAMPLES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Peters, T. B.; Washington, A. L.

    2015-01-13

    Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) analyzed samples from Tank 21H in support of qualification of Macrobatch (Salt Batch) 8 for the Interim Salt Disposition Program (ISDP). An Actinide Removal Process (ARP) and several Extraction-Scrub- Strip (ESS) tests were also performed. This document reports characterization data on the samples of Tank 21H as well as simulated performance of ARP and the Modular Caustic Side Solvent Extraction (CSSX) Unit (MCU). No issues with the projected Salt Batch 8 strategy are identified. A demonstration of the monosodium titanate (MST) (0.2 g/L) removal of strontium and actinides provided acceptable average decontamination factors for plutonium of 2.62 (4 hour) and 2.90 (8 hour); and average strontium decontamination factors of 21.7 (4 hour) and 21.3 (8 hour). These values are consistent with results from previous salt batch ARP tests. The two ESS tests also showed acceptable performance with extraction distribution ratios (D{sub (Cs)}) values of 52.5 and 50.4 for the Next Generation Solvent (NGS) blend (from MCU) and NGS (lab prepared), respectively. These values are consistent with results from previous salt batch ESS tests. Even though the performance is acceptable, SRNL recommends that a model for predicting extraction behavior for cesium removal for the blended solvent and NGS be developed in order to improve our predictive capabilities for the ESS tests.

  8. FNR 3410C Natural Resource Sampling FNR 3410C -NATURAL RESOURCE SAMPLING

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hill, Jeffrey E.

    of sampling. Design of cost-effective sample surveys. Sampling methodology applicable 0211 (Mechanical & Aerospace Engineering) Lab 1 Period 7-9 13:55-16:55 M BLK begins with a review of elementary statistics and continues with specific

  9. Advances in downhole sampling of high temperature solutions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bayhurst, G.K.; Janecky, D.R.

    1991-01-01

    A fluid sampler capable of sampling hot and/or deep wells has been developed at Los Alamos National Laboratory. In collaboration with Leutert Instruments, an off-the-shelf sampler design was modified to meet gas-tight and minimal chemical reactivity/contamination specifications for use in geothermal wells and deep ocean drillholes. This downhole sampler has been routinely used at temperatures up to 300{degrees}C and hole depths of greater than 5 km. We have tested this sampler in various continental wells, including Valles Caldera VC-2a and VC-2b, German KTB, Cajon Pass, and Yellowstone Y-10. Both the standard commercial and enhanced samplers have also been used to obtain samples from a range of depths in the Ocean Drilling Project's hole 504B and during recent mid-ocean ridge drilling efforts. The sampler has made it possible to collect samples at temperatures and conditions beyond the limits of other tools with the added advantage of chemical corrosion resistance.

  10. Testing geopressured geothermal reservoirs in existing wells. Wells of Opportunity Program final contract report, 1980-1981

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1982-01-01

    The geopressured-geothermal candidates for the Wells of Opportunity program were located by the screening of published information on oil industry activity and through direct contact with the oil and gas operators. This process resulted in the recommendation to the DOE of 33 candidate wells for the program. Seven of the 33 recommended wells were accepted for testing. Of these seven wells, six were actually tested. The first well, the No. 1 Kennedy, was acquired but not tested. The seventh well, the No. 1 Godchaux, was abandoned due to mechanical problems during re-entry. The well search activities, which culminated in the acceptance by the DOE of 7 recommended wells, were substantial. A total of 90,270 well reports were reviewed, leading to 1990 wells selected for thorough geological analysis. All of the reservoirs tested in this program have been restricted by one or more faults or permeability barriers. A comprehensive discussion of test results is presented.

  11. Device for temporarily closing duct-formers in well completion apparatus

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zandmer, H.M.; Zandmer, S.M.

    1981-08-25

    A duct-forming device is disclosed for use in a well completion apparatus of the kind, wherein a bore hole casing is positioned in a bore hole and duct-forming devices of alkali- and acid resistant metal-such as steel-are secured at spaced levels to the casing in alignment with holes machined in the casing wall. In accordance with the invention, a closure device is arranged within the duct-forming device which permits flow of predetermined amounts of liquid, such as acid, from the interior of the casing through the duct-forming device and into the producing formation, while gradually being moved by the liquid into a position in which such fluid flow is prevented. After the fluid flow has been stopped by the closure device and when the formation pressure exceeds the pressure within the duct-forming device and the casing, fluid from the formation then forces the closure device toward and into the casing space to permit thereafter free flow of formation fluid into the duct-forming device and the casing or of pressurized treatment liquid from the casing into the formation. The inventive arrangement permits inter alia the establishment of a sufficient and substantially uniform feeding rate of treatment liquid, such as acid, from the casing into the producing formation through all the duct-formers in preparation for subsequent acidification or other treatments, such as sand fracking.

  12. Recovering sample diversity in Rao-Blackwellized particle filters for simultaneous localization and mapping

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Anderson, Andrew D. (Andrew David)

    2006-01-01

    This thesis considers possible solutions to sample impoverishment, a well-known failure mode of the Rao-Blackwellized particle filter (RBPF) in simultaneous localization and mapping (SLAMI) situations that arises when ...

  13. Sample sizes for confidence limits for reliability.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Darby, John L.

    2010-02-01

    We recently performed an evaluation of the implications of a reduced stockpile of nuclear weapons for surveillance to support estimates of reliability. We found that one technique developed at Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) under-estimates the required sample size for systems-level testing. For a large population the discrepancy is not important, but for a small population it is important. We found that another technique used by SNL provides the correct required sample size. For systems-level testing of nuclear weapons, samples are selected without replacement, and the hypergeometric probability distribution applies. Both of the SNL techniques focus on samples without defects from sampling without replacement. We generalized the second SNL technique to cases with defects in the sample. We created a computer program in Mathematica to automate the calculation of confidence for reliability. We also evaluated sampling with replacement where the binomial probability distribution applies.

  14. Two-dimensional nonlinear finite element analysis of well damage due to reservoir compaction, well-to-well interactions, and localization on weak layers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hilbert, L.B. Jr. [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States); Fredrich, J.T. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Bruno, M.S. [Terralog Technologies USA, Inc., Arcadia, CA (United States); Deitrick, G.L.; Rouffignac, E.P. de [Shell Exploration and Production Co., Houston, TX (United States)

    1996-05-01

    In this paper the authors present the results of a coupled nonlinear finite element geomechanics model for reservoir compaction and well-to-well interactions for the high-porosity, low strength diatomite reservoirs of the Belridge field near Bakersfield, California. They show that well damage and failures can occur under the action of two distinct mechanisms: shear deformations induced by pore compaction, and subsidence, and shear deformations due to well-to-well interactions during production or water injection. They show such casting damage or failure can be localized to weak layers that slide or slip under shear due to subsidence. The magnitude of shear displacements and surface subsidence agree with field observations.

  15. Rapid Determination Of Radiostrontium In Large Soil Samples

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Maxwell, Sherrod L.; Culligan, Brian K.; Shaw, Patrick J.

    2012-05-24

    A new method for the determination of radiostrontium in large soil samples has been developed at the Savannah River Environmental Laboratory (Aiken, SC, USA) that allows rapid preconcentration and separation of strontium in large soil samples for the measurement of strontium isotopes by gas flow proportional counting. The need for rapid analyses in the event of a Radiological Dispersive Device (RDD) or Improvised Nuclear Device (IND) event is well-known. In addition, the recent accident at Fukushima Nuclear Power Plant in March, 2011 reinforces the need to have rapid analyses for radionuclides in environmental samples in the event of a nuclear accident. The method employs a novel pre-concentration step that utilizes an iron hydroxide precipitation (enhanced with calcium phosphate) followed by a final calcium fluoride precipitation to remove silicates and other matrix components. The pre-concentration steps, in combination with a rapid Sr Resin separation using vacuum box technology, allow very large soil samples to be analyzed for {sup 89,90}Sr using gas flow proportional counting with a lower method detection limit. The calcium fluoride precipitation eliminates column flow problems typically associated with large amounts of silicates in large soil samples.

  16. How ARCO drills high-angle wells offshore Indonesia

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tjondrodiputro, B.; Eddyarso, H.; Jones, K. (Atlantic Richfield Indonesia, Inc., Jakarta (Indonesia))

    1993-03-01

    Atlantic Richfield Indonesia, Inc. (ARII) drilled and completed 28 high-angle wells since early 1986 in Bima, Papa and FF fields in the Offshore North West Java Sea (ONWJ) contract area. Early wells were drilled with conventional rotary bottomhole assemblies (BHAs); introduction of a steerable tool and MWD subsequently increased efficiency and reduced drilling costs. Both lignosulfonate and dispersed pac polymer muds have been used with good success. Cost to drill a high-angle well has been only marginally more than that of a 45[degree] directional well. Elimination of open hole logging and use of preperforated liners have reduced drilling costs by 10%. Production performance for wells has been higher than for vertical or low-angle wells. High-angle wells in Bima have outperformed offset vertical wells and are classified as a success. However, horizontal wells in Papa, which has a strong bottom-water drive, have not shown any improved recovery over conventional wells. The new well in FF field is still being evaluated. In this first of a two-part report, high-angle drilling operations including well planning, BHA selection, casing and mud programs, hole cleaning and logging are described. Specific wells in the Bima area are discussed as examples.

  17. Optimized estimates of the regularity of the conditional distribution of the sample mean

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Victor Chulaevsky

    2015-04-24

    We give an improved estimate for the regularity of the conditional distribution of the empiric mean of a finite sample of IID random variables, conditional on the sample "fluctuations", extending the well-known property of Gaussian IID samples. Specifically, we replace the bounds in probability, established in our earlier works, by those in distribution, and this results in the optimal regularity exponent in the final estimate.

  18. Discrete Sampling Test Plan for the 200-BP-5 Operable Unit

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sweeney, Mark D.

    2010-02-04

    The Discrete Groundwater Sampling Project is conducted by the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) on behalf of CH2M HILL Plateau Remediation Company. The project is focused on delivering groundwater samples from proscribed horizons within select groundwater wells residing in the 200-BP-5 Operable Unit (200-BP-5 OU) on the Hanford Site. This document provides the scope, schedule, methodology, and other details of the PNNL discrete sampling effort.

  19. Tank 241-AP-106, Grab samples, 6AP-98-1, 6AP-98-2 and 6AP-98-3 Analytical results for the final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    FULLER, R.K.

    1999-02-23

    This document is the final report for tank 241-AP-106 grab samples. Three grab samples 6AP-98-1, 6AP-98-2 and 6AP-98-3 were taken from riser 1 of tank 241-AP-106 on May 28, 1998 and received by the 222-S Laboratory on May 28, 1998. Analyses were performed in accordance with the ''Compatability Grab Sampling and Analysis Plan'' (TSAP) (Sasaki, 1998) and the ''Data Quality Objectives for Tank Farms Waste Compatability Program (DQO). The analytical results are presented in the data summary report. No notification limits were exceeded. The request for sample analysis received for AP-106 indicated that the samples were polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB) suspects. The results of this analysis indicated that no PCBs were present at the Toxic Substance Control Act (TSCA) regulated limit of 50 ppm. The results and raw data for the PCB analysis are included in this document.

  20. Using Parallel MCMC Sampling to Calibrate a Computer Model of a Geothermal Reservoir

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fox, Colin

    Using Parallel MCMC Sampling to Calibrate a Computer Model of a Geothermal Reservoir by T. Cui, C. 686 ISSN 1178-360 #12;Using Parallel MCMC Sampling to Calibrate a Computer Model of a Geothermal of a geothermal field to achieve model `calibration' from measured well-test data. We explore three scenarios

  1. March 2011 Groundwater Sampling at the Project Shoal Site (Data Validation Package)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2011-07-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy Office of Legacy Management conducted annual sampling at the Project Shoal Area (Shoal) in March 2011. Wells HC-1, HC-2, HC-4, HC-5, HC-6, HC-7, MV-1, MV-2 and MV-3 were sampled as specified in the Sampling and Analysis Plan for U.S. Department of Energy Office of Legacy Management Sites (LMS/PLN/S04351, continually updated). Two extra tritium samples were collected from well HC-4, one sample (HC-4-400) was collected at about 1/3 of the purge volume (135 gallons), the second sample (HC-4-400) was collected at 2/3 of purge volume (270 gallons). These additional samples were collected prior to completing the well purging process to evaluate the effects well purging has on the analytical results. Samples were not collected from locations HC-3 and HC-8 at the direction of the S.M. Stoller Corporation site lead.

  2. Utility Sampling for Trust Metrics in PKI Dakshi Agrawal # and Charanjit Jutla #

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    International Association for Cryptologic Research (IACR)

    Utility Sampling for Trust Metrics in PKI Dakshi Agrawal # and Charanjit Jutla # IBM T. J. Watson based on ``utility sampling'', which maybe of interest for non­monetary applications as well. Keywords, or the utility of this trust, also depends on what information was authenticated. For example, if the information

  3. INSTRUMENTATION AND METHODS FOR THE EXAMINATION OF VOLATILE ORGANIC HALOCARBONS IN AQUEOUS ENVIRONMENTAL SAMPLES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    liquid media into a commercial preconcentration system connected to a gas chromatograph. The gas. Methods were developed for the detection of these analytes in ice core samples as well as natural liquid uncovered problems in sample handling and storage that confounded the analytical results. The natural liquid

  4. Preparation of Oriented, Fully Hydrated Lipid Samples for Structure Determination Using X-Ray Scattering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nagle, John F.

    "the rock and roll method," which is basically a solvent evaporation technique with controlled manual. Atomic force microscopy is used to compare samples prepared using the rock and roll method with those prepared by spin-coating, which produces well-oriented but less homogeneous lipid stacks. These samples can

  5. Salt Wells Geothermal Exploratory Drilling Program EA(DOI-BLM...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Salt Wells Geothermal Exploratory Drilling Program EA (DOI-BLM-NV-C010-2009-0006-EA) Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Web Site: Salt Wells...

  6. Spin-orbit interaction in multiple quantum wells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hao, Ya-Fei

    2015-01-07

    In this paper, we investigate how the structure of multiple quantum wells affects spin-orbit interactions. To increase the interface-related Rashba spin splitting and the strength of the interface-related Rashba spin-orbit interaction, we designed three kinds of multiple quantum wells. We demonstrate that the structure of the multiple quantum wells strongly affected the interface-related Rashba spin-orbit interaction, increasing the interface-related Rashba spin splitting to up to 26% larger in multiple quantum wells than in a stepped quantum well. We also show that the cubic Dresselhaus spin-orbit interaction similarly influenced the spin relaxation time of multiple quantum wells and that of a stepped quantum well. The increase in the interface-related Rashba spin splitting originates from the relationship between interface-related Rashba spin splitting and electron probability density. Our results suggest that multiple quantum wells can be good candidates for spintronic devices.

  7. Hot exciton transport in ZnSe quantum wells

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhao, Hui; Moehl, Sebastian; Wachter, Sven; Kalt, Heinz

    2002-02-01

    The in-plane transport of excitons in ZnSe quantum wells is investigated directly by microphotoluminescence in combination with a solid immersion lens. Due to the strong Froehlich coupling, the initial kinetic energy of the excitons is well...

  8. Pressure transient testing and productivity analysis for horizontal wells 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cheng, Yueming

    2004-11-15

    This work studied the productivity evaluation and well test analysis of horizontal wells. The major components of this work consist of a 3D coupled reservoir/wellbore model, a productivity evaluation, a deconvolution ...

  9. Exploratory Well At Long Valley Caldera Geothermal Area (Sorey...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    1983 to the east and north of Highway 395. Notes Among these wells were exploration and monitoring wells drilled near the Fish Hatchery Springs in preparation for the siting of a...

  10. Well Completion Report for Corrective Action Unit 443 Central Nevada Test Area Nye County, Nevada

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2009-12-01

    The drilling program described in this report is part of a new corrective action strategy for Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 443 at the Central Nevada Test Area (CNTA). The drilling program included drilling two boreholes, geophysical well logging, construction of two monitoring/validation (MV) wells with piezometers (MV-4 and MV-5), development of monitor wells and piezometers, recompletion of two existing wells (HTH-1 and UC-1-P-1S), removal of pumps from existing wells (MV-1, MV-2, and MV-3), redevelopment of piezometers associated with existing wells (MV-1, MV-2, and MV-3), and installation of submersible pumps. The new corrective action strategy includes initiating a new 5-year proof-of-concept monitoring period to validate the compliance boundary at CNTA (DOE 2007). The new 5-year proof-of-concept monitoring period begins upon completion of the new monitor wells and collection of samples for laboratory analysis. The new strategy is described in the Corrective Action Decision Document/Corrective Action Plan addendum (DOE 2008a) that the Nevada Division of Environmental Protection approved (NDEP 2008).

  11. Enhanced Geothermal Systems (EGS) Well Construction Technology Evaluation Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Polsky, Yarom; Capuano, Louis; Finger, John; Huh, Michael; Knudsen, Steve; Chip, A.J. Mansure; Raymond, David; Swanson, Robert

    2008-12-01

    This report provides an assessment of well construction technology for EGS with two primary objectives: 1. Determining the ability of existing technologies to develop EGS wells. 2. Identifying critical well construction research lines and development technologies that are likely to enhance prospects for EGS viability and improve overall economics.

  12. Calcite Mineral Scaling Potentials of High-Temperature Geothermal Wells

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Karlsson, Brynjar

    #12;i Calcite Mineral Scaling Potentials of High-Temperature Geothermal Wells Alvin I. Remoroza-Temperature Geothermal Wells Alvin I. Remoroza 60 ECTS thesis submitted in partial fulfillment of a Magister Scientiarum #12;iv Calcite Mineral Scaling Potentials of High-Temperature Geothermal Wells 60 ECTS thesis

  13. Horizontal well hydraulics in leaky aquifers Hongbin Zhan*, Eungyu Park

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhan, Hongbin

    Horizontal well hydraulics in leaky aquifers Hongbin Zhan*, Eungyu Park Department of Geology presents a general study of horizontal well hydraulics for three aquifer types: a leaky confined aquifer- standing of horizontal well hydraulics under various aquifer conditions. 2. Mathematical model I

  14. Expediting Groundwater Sampling at Hanford and Making It Safer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Connell, Carl W. Jr.; Carr, Jennifer S.; Hildebrand, R. Douglas; Schatz, Aaron L.; Conley, S. F.; Brown, W. L.

    2013-01-22

    The CH2M HILL Plateau Remediation Company (CHPRC) manages the groundwatermonitoring programs at the Department of Energy's 586-square-mile Hanford site in southeastern Washington state. These programs are regulated by the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA), the Comprehensive Environmental Response Compensation and Liability Act (CERCLA), and the Atomic Energy Act (AEA). The purpose of monitoring is to track existing groundwater contamination from past practices, as well as other potential contamination that might originate from RCRA treatment, storage, and disposal (TSD) facilities. An integral part of the groundwater-monitoring program involves taking samples of the groundwater and measuring the water levels in wells scattered across the site. Each year, more than 1,500 wells are accessed for a variety of reasons.

  15. Reconstruction of Intensity From Covered Samples

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Barabash, Rozaliya; Watkins, Thomas R; Meisner, Roberta Ann; Burchell, Timothy D; Rosseel, Thomas M

    2015-01-01

    The safe handling of activated samples requires containment and covering the sample to eliminate any potential for contamination. Subsequent characterization of the surface with x-rays ideally necessitates a thin film. While many films appear visually transparent, they are not necessarily x-ray transparent. Each film material has a unique beam attenuation and sometimes have amorphous peaks that can superimpose with those of the sample. To reconstruct the intensity of the underlying activated sample, the x-ray attenuation and signal due to the film needs to be removed from that of the sample. This requires the calculation of unique deconvolution parameters for the film. The development of a reconstruction procedure for a contained/covered sample is described.

  16. Oil/gas separator for installation at burning wells

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Alonso, Carol T. (Orinda, CA); Bender, Donald A. (Dublin, CA); Bowman, Barry R. (Livermore, CA); Burnham, Alan K. (Livermore, CA); Chesnut, Dwayne A. (Pleasanton, CA); Comfort, III, William J. (Livermore, CA); Guymon, Lloyd G. (Livermore, CA); Henning, Carl D. (Livermore, CA); Pedersen, Knud B. (Livermore, CA); Sefcik, Joseph A. (Tracy, CA); Smith, Joseph A. (Livermore, CA); Strauch, Mark S. (Livermore, CA)

    1993-01-01

    An oil/gas separator is disclosed that can be utilized to return the burning wells in Kuwait to production. Advantageously, a crane is used to install the separator at a safe distance from the well. The gas from the well is burned off at the site, and the oil is immediately pumped into Kuwait's oil gathering system. Diverters inside the separator prevent the oil jet coming out of the well from reaching the top vents where the gas is burned. The oil falls back down, and is pumped from an annular oil catcher at the bottom of the separator, or from the concrete cellar surrounding the well.

  17. Oil/gas separator for installation at burning wells

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Alonso, C.T.; Bender, D.A.; Bowman, B.R.; Burnham, A.K.; Chesnut, D.A.; Comfort, W.J. III; Guymon, L.G.; Henning, C.D.; Pedersen, K.B.; Sefcik, J.A.; Smith, J.A.; Strauch, M.S.

    1993-03-09

    An oil/gas separator is disclosed that can be utilized to return the burning wells in Kuwait to production. Advantageously, a crane is used to install the separator at a safe distance from the well. The gas from the well is burned off at the site, and the oil is immediately pumped into Kuwait's oil gathering system. Diverters inside the separator prevent the oil jet coming out of the well from reaching the top vents where the gas is burned. The oil falls back down, and is pumped from an annular oil catcher at the bottom of the separator, or from the concrete cellar surrounding the well.

  18. Proper Oil Sampling Intervals and Sample Collection Techniques Gasoline/Diesel/Natural Gas Engines

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Proper Oil Sampling Intervals and Sample Collection Techniques Gasoline/Diesel/Natural Gas Engines: · Oil samples can be collected during oil changes. Follow manufacturers recommendations on frequency (hours, mileage, etc) of oil changes. · Capture a sample from the draining oil while the oil is still hot

  19. Assessment of the 296-S-21 Stack Sampling Probe Location

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Glissmeyer, John A.

    2006-09-08

    Tests were performed to assess the suitability of the location of the air sampling probe on the 296-S-21 stack according to the criteria of ANSI N13.1-1999, Sampling and Monitoring Releases of Airborne Radioactive Substances from the Stacks and Ducts of Nuclear Facilities. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory conducted most tests on a 3.67:1 scale model of the stack. CH2MHill also performed some limited confirmatory tests on the actual stack. The tests assessed the capability of the air-monitoring probe to extract a sample representative of the effluent stream. The tests were conducted for the practical combinations of operating fans and addressed: (1) Angular Flow--The purpose is to determine whether the velocity vector is aligned with the sampling nozzle. The average yaw angle relative to the nozzle axis should not be more than 20. The measured values ranged from 5 to 11 degrees on the scale model and 10 to 12 degrees on the actual stack. (2) Uniform Air Velocity--The gas momentum across the stack cross section where the sample is extracted should be well mixed or uniform. The uniformity is expressed as the variability of the measurements about the mean, the coefficient of variance (COV). The lower the COV value, the more uniform the velocity. The acceptance criterion is that the COV of the air velocity must be ?20% across the center two-thirds of the area of the stack. At the location simulating the sampling probe, the measured values ranged form 4 to 11%, which are within the criterion. To confirm the validity of the scale model results, air velocity uniformity measurements were made both on the actual stack and on the scale model at the test ports 1.5 stack diameters upstream of the sampling probe. The results ranged from 6 to 8% COV on the actual stack and 10 to 13% COV on the scale model. The average difference for the eight runs was 4.8% COV, which is within the validation criterion. The fact that the scale model results were slightly higher than the actual stack suggests that the other test results on the scale model are conservative relative to the actual stack. (3) Uniform Concentration of Tracer Gases--A uniform contaminant concentration in the sampling plane enables the extraction of samples that represent the true concentration. This was first tested using a tracer gas to represent gaseous effluents. The fan is a good mixer, so injecting the tracer downstream of the fans provides worst-case results. The acceptance criteria are that (1) the COV of the measured tracer gas concentration is ?20% across the center two-thirds of the sampling plane and (2) at no point in the sampling plane does the concentration vary from the mean by >30%. The results on the scale model at the point simulating the sampling probe ranged from 0.3 to 6 %COV, and the maximum single point deviation from the mean was -10%. (4) Uniform Concentration of Tracer Particles--Uniformity in contaminant concentration at the sampling probe was further demonstrated using tracer particles large enough to exhibit inertial effects. Particles of 10-?m aerodynamic diameter were used. The acceptance criterion is that the COV of particle concentration is ?20% across the center two-thirds of the sampling plane. The scale model results ranged form 2 to 9%. Based on these tests, the location of the air sampling probe on the 296-S-21 stack meets the requirements of the ANSI/HPS N13.1-1999 standard.

  20. Hanford Sampling Quality Management Plan (HSQMP)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hyatt, J.E.

    1995-06-01

    HSQMP establishes quality requirements in response to DOE Order 5700. 6C and to 10 Code of Federal Regulations 830.120. HSQMP is designed to meet the needs of Richland Operations Office for controlling the quality of services provided by sampling operations. It is issued through the Analytical Services Program of the Waste Programs Division. This document describes the Environmental Sampling and Analysis Program activities considered to represent the best management activities necessary to achieve a sampling program with adequate control.

  1. Horizontal-well pilot waterflood tests shallow, abandoned field

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McAlpine, J.L. ); Joshi, S.D. )

    1991-08-05

    This paper reports on the suitability of using horizontal wells in a waterflood of shallow, partially depleted sands which will be tested in the Jennings field in Oklahoma. The vertical wells drilled in the Jennings field intersect several well-known formations such as Red Fork, Misner, and Bartlesville sand. Most of these formations have been produced over a number of years, and presently no wells are producing in the field. In the 1940s, 1950s, and 1960s, wells were drilled on 10-acre spacing, and the last well was plugged in 1961. The field was produced only on primary production and produced approximately 1 million bbl of oil. Because the field was not waterflooded, a large potential exists to produce from the field using secondary methods. To improve the economics for the secondary process, a combination of horizontal and vertical wells was considered.

  2. Geohydrologic data for the St. Charles County well field and public-water supply 1985-91, and projected public-water supply, 1995 and 2000, for St. Charles County, Missouri

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mugel, D.N.

    1996-10-01

    Geohydrologic data for this well field and public water supply data for St. Charles County were compiled to assist US DOE in developing the St. Charles County well field contingency plan to ensure a supply of water in the event that the well field becomes contaminated from wastes (radioactive, nitroaromatic, other) stored in the Weldon Spring quarry. The well field consists of 8 wells penetrating the entire thickness of the Missouri River alluvial aquifer and is 98-116 feet deep. Aquifer tests were conducted on 3 occasions at 3 different locations in the well field. Calculated transmissivities range from 900 to 60,200 feet squared per day; hydraulic conductivities ranged from 23 to 602 feet/day. Calculated/estimated storage coefficients ranged from 0.005 to 0.2. Tracer test showed effective porosity of 0. 21-0.32. Point dilution showed a ground-water velocity of 0.83 foot/day. From 1985-91, ave daily water supply from the well field and water treatment plant increased from 5.76 to 10.23 Mgd; this is projected to increase to 11.0 Mgd in 1995 and to 12.2 Mgd in 2000. The water department`s projections of peak daily demands from customers indicate that these demands will exceed the capacity of the treatment plant in 1995 and will exceed the capacities of the well field and plant during 2000.

  3. Sample Withdrawal Letter Ready Reference F-11

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sample Withdrawal Letter Ready Reference F-11 College of Engineering, Architecture & Technology Career Services Oklahoma State University College of College of Engineering, Architecture & Technology

  4. Sample Application Letter Ready Reference F-5

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sample Application Letter Ready Reference F-5 College of Engineering, Architecture & Technology Career Services Oklahoma State University College of College of Engineering, Architecture & Technology

  5. Sample Networking Letter Ready Reference F-6

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sample Networking Letter Ready Reference F-6 College of Engineering, Architecture & Technology Career Services Oklahoma State University College of College of Engineering, Architecture & Technology

  6. Sample Acceptance Letter Ready Reference F-10

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sample Acceptance Letter Ready Reference F-10 College of Engineering, Architecture & Technology Career Services Oklahoma State University College of College of Engineering, Architecture & Technology

  7. Hanford analytical sample projections 1996--2001

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Joyce, S.M.

    1996-06-26

    This document summarizes the biannual Hanford sample projections for fiscal years 1996 to 2001. Sample projections are based on inputs submitted to Analytical Services covering Environmental Restoration, Tank Waste Remediation Systems (TWRS), Solid Waste, Liquid Effluents, Spent Nuclear Fuels, Transition Projects, Analytical Services, Site Monitoring, and Industrial Hygiene. This information will be used by Hanford Analytical Services to assure that laboratories and resources are available and effectively utilized to meet these documented needs. Sample projections are categorized by radiation level, protocol, sample matrix and Program. Analyses requirements are also presented.

  8. Favorable Geochemistry from Springs and Wells in COlorado

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zehner, Richard E.

    2012-02-01

    Citation Information: Originator: Geothermal Development Associates, Reno Nevada Originator: United States Geological Survey (USGS) Originator: Colorado Geological Survey Publication Date: 2012 Title: Favorable Geochemistry Edition: First Publication Information: Publication Place: Reno Nevada Publisher: Geothermal Development Associates, Reno, Nevada Description: This layer contains favorable geochemistry for high-temperature geothermal systems, as interpreted by Richard "Rick" Zehner. The data is compiled from the data obtained from the USGS. The original data set combines 15,622 samples collected in the State of Colorado from several sources including 1) the original Geotherm geochemical database, 2) USGS NWIS (National Water Information System), 3) Colorado Geological Survey geothermal sample data, and 4) original samples collected by R. Zehner at various sites during the 2011 field season. These samples are also available in a separate shapefile FlintWaterSamples.shp. Data from all samples were reportedly collected using standard water sampling protocols (filtering through 0.45 micron filter, etc.) Sample information was standardized to ppm (micrograms/liter) in spreadsheet columns. Commonly-used cation and silica geothermometer temperature estimates are included. Spatial Domain: Extent: Top: 4515595.841032 m Left: 149699.513964 m Right: 757959.309388 m Bottom: 4104156.435530 m Contact Information: Contact Organization: Geothermal Development Associates, Reno, Nevada Contact Person: Richard “Rick” Zehner Address: 3740 Barron Way City: Reno State: NV Postal Code: 89511 Country: USA Contact Telephone: 775-737-7806 Spatial Reference Information: Coordinate System: Universal Transverse Mercator (UTM) WGS’1984 Zone 13N False Easting: 500000.00000000 False Northing: 0.00000000 Central Meridian: -105.00000000 Scale Factor: 0.99960000 Latitude of Origin: 0.00000000 Linear Unit: Meter Datum: World Geodetic System 1984 (WGS ’1984) Prime Meridian: Greenwich Angular Unit: Degree Digital Form: Format Name: Shape file

  9. Nitrogen Monitoring of West Hackberry 117 Cavern Wells.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bettin, Giorgia; Lord, David

    2015-02-01

    U.S. Strategic Petroleum Reserve (SPR) oil storage cavern West Hackberry 117 was tested under extended nitrogen monitoring following a successful mechanical integrity test in order to validate a newly developed hydrostatic column model to be used to differentiate between normal "tight" well behavior and small-leak behavior under nitrogen. High resolution wireline pressure and temperature data were collected during the test period and used in conjunction with the hydrostatic column model to predict the nitrogen/oil interface and the pressure along the entire fluid column from the bradenhead flange nominally at ground surface to bottom of brine pool. Results here and for other SPR caverns have shown that wells under long term nitrogen monitoring do not necessarily pressurize with a relative rate (P N2 /P brine) of 1. The theoretical relative pressure rate depends on the well configuration, pressure and the location of the nitrogen-oil interface and varies from well to well. For the case of WH117 the predicted rates were 0.73 for well A and 0.92 for well B. The measured relative pressurization rate for well B was consistent with the model prediction, while well A rate was found to be between 0.58-0.68. A number of possible reasons for the discrepancy between the model and measured rates of well A are possible. These include modeling inaccuracy, measurement inaccuracy or the possibility of the presence of a very small leak (below the latest calculated minimum detectable leak rate).

  10. Procedures for sampling radium-contaminated soils

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fleischhauer, H.L.

    1985-10-01

    Two procedures for sampling the surface layer (0 to 15 centimeters) of radium-contaminated soil are recommended for use in remedial action projects. Both procedures adhere to the philosophy that soil samples should have constant geometry and constant volume in order to ensure uniformity. In the first procedure, a ''cookie cutter'' fashioned from pipe or steel plate, is driven to the desired depth by means of a slide hammer, and the sample extracted as a core or plug. The second procedure requires use of a template to outline the sampling area, from which the sample is obtained using a trowel or spoon. Sampling to the desired depth must then be performed incrementally. Selection of one procedure over the other is governed primarily by soil conditions, the cookie cutter being effective in nongravelly soils, and the template procedure appropriate for use in both gravelly and nongravelly soils. In any event, a minimum sample volume of 1000 cubic centimeters is recommended. The step-by-step procedures are accompanied by a description of the minimum requirements for sample documentation. Transport of the soil samples from the field is then addressed in a discussion of the federal regulations for shipping radioactive materials. Interpretation of those regulations, particularly in light of their application to remedial action soil-sampling programs, is provided in the form of guidance and suggested procedures. Due to the complex nature of the regulations, however, there is no guarantee that our interpretations of them are complete or entirely accurate. Preparation of soil samples for radium-226 analysis by means of gamma-ray spectroscopy is described.

  11. Fully Coupled Well Models for Fluid Injection and Production

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    White, Mark D.; Bacon, Diana H.; White, Signe K.; Zhang, Z. F.

    2013-08-05

    Wells are the primary engineered component of geologic sequestration systems with deep subsurface reservoirs. Wells provide a conduit for injecting greenhouse gases and producing reservoirs fluids, such as brines, natural gas, and crude oil, depending on the target reservoir. Well trajectories, well pressures, and fluid flow rates are parameters over which well engineers and operators have control during the geologic sequestration process. Current drilling practices provided well engineers flexibility in designing well trajectories and controlling screened intervals. Injection pressures and fluids can be used to purposely fracture the reservoir formation or to purposely prevent fracturing. Numerical simulation of geologic sequestration processes involves the solution of multifluid transport equations within heterogeneous geologic media. These equations that mathematically describe the flow of fluid through the reservoir formation are nonlinear in form, requiring linearization techniques to resolve. In actual geologic settings fluid exchange between a well and reservoir is a function of local pressure gradients, fluid saturations, and formation characteristics. In numerical simulators fluid exchange between a well and reservoir can be specified using a spectrum of approaches that vary from totally ignoring the reservoir conditions to fully considering reservoir conditions and well processes. Well models are a numerical simulation approach that account for local conditions and gradients in the exchange of fluids between the well and reservoir. As with the mathematical equations that describe fluid flow in the reservoir, variation in fluid properties with temperature and pressure yield nonlinearities in the mathematical equations that describe fluid flow within the well. To numerically simulate the fluid exchange between a well and reservoir the two systems of nonlinear multifluid flow equations must be resolved. The spectrum of numerical approaches for resolving these equations varies from zero coupling to full coupling. In this paper we describe a fully coupled solution approach for well model that allows for a flexible well trajectory and screened interval within a structured hexahedral computational grid. In this scheme the nonlinear well equations have been fully integrated into the Jacobian matrix for the reservoir conservation equations, minimizing the matrix bandwidth.

  12. Precision Ground Water Sampling in Coastal Aquifers Using a Direct-Push, Shielded-Screen

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    -Point System by Matthew A. Charette and Matt C. Allen Abstract Conventional ground water sampling methods the installation of monitoring wells through hand auguring, jetting, and drilling, are not only expensive but also well-point systems aim to solve the problems of conventional methods. To increase the depth of penetra

  13. An inventory of wells of Oak Ridge National Laboratory 1992

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rush, R.M.; Gryder, R.K.; Baxter, F.P.

    1993-02-01

    The well inventory described in this report is a database of well information being developed for the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) Groundwater Coordinator and the ORNL Groundwater Protection Program. Data are presented on 2071 ORNL wells as maps and as tabular data. A table of well identification aliases is given to permit correlation with earlier reports. Information is incomplete for many of the wells, and a form is provided for readers to provide missing or updated data. The goal of the developers of this data base is to produce a comprehensive inventory of wells at ORNL. This data base is being maintained to provide current information for the operational management of the ORNL groundwater monitoring system and for various users of groundwater data at ORNL.

  14. Novel coiled tubing application controls large LPG storage well fire

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gebhardt, F.; Eby, D.; Barnett, D.

    1996-06-01

    Conventional well control techniques for normal oil and gas wells are widely known and have been presented on numerous occasions. However, LPG storage (or cavern) wells rarely blow out and/or catch on fire. As a result, little information has been presented on the topic of well control for these types of wells. This article chronicles a case history of a high-volume liquid propane storage well fire. Because conventional wellhead removal methods could not be applied in this case, the capping/kill plan called for use of coiled tubing in a novel manner to cut the tubing downhole and install an inflatable packer to shut off propane flow. The plan was successfully executed, saving the operator millions of dollars in LPC product loss and cost of control.

  15. Automated robotic equipment for ultrasonic inspection of pressurizer heater wells

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Nachbar, Henry D. (Ballston Lake, NY); DeRossi, Raymond S. (Amsterdam, NY); Mullins, Lawrence E. (Middle Grove, NY)

    1993-01-01

    A robotic device for remotely inspecting pressurizer heater wells is provided which has the advantages of quickly, precisely, and reliably acquiring data at reasonable cost while also reducing radiation exposure of an operator. The device comprises a prober assembly including a probe which enters a heater well, gathers data regarding the condition of the heater well and transmits a signal carrying that data; a mounting device for mounting the probe assembly at the opening of the heater well so that the probe can enter the heater well; a first motor mounted on the mounting device for providing movement of the probe assembly in an axial direction; and a second motor mounted on the mounting device for providing rotation of the probe assembly. This arrangement enables full inspection of the heater well to be carried out.

  16. GraFix: sample preparation for single-

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cai, Long

    (cryo-EM). GraFix uses a glycerol gradient centrifugation step in which the complexes are centrifuged a structurally and compositionally homogeneous sample; this in turn requires advanced tools for sample handling are dissolved during centrifugation because of the pressure acting on the molecules. Chemical fixation reagents

  17. Stochastic Sampling for Internet Traffic Measurement

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rejaie, Reza

    is to sample or aggregate information. For example, to estimate link utilization, the size of all packets Gong Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering University of Massachusetts, Amherst, MA, USA data from different sources with independent clocks and sampling rates. We present results that show

  18. Disc valve for sampling erosive process streams

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Mrochek, J.E.; Dinsmore, S.R.; Chandler, E.W.

    1984-08-16

    This is a patent for a disc-type, four-port sampling valve for service with erosive high temperature process streams. Inserts and liners of ..cap alpha..-silicon carbide respectively, in the faceplates and in the sampling cavities, limit erosion while providing lubricity for a smooth and precise operation. 1 fig.

  19. Accurate Direct Illumination Using Iterative Adaptive Sampling

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bala, Kavita

    Accurate Direct Illumination Using Iterative Adaptive Sampling Michael Donikian, Bruce Walter with many lights and complex occlusion. Images are first divided into 8 Â 8 pixel blocks and for each point to be shaded within a block, a probability density function (PDF) is constructed over the lights and sampled

  20. Sampling Techniques for Probabilistic Roadmap Planners

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Utrecht, Universiteit

    Sampling Techniques for Probabilistic Roadmap Planners Roland Geraerts Mark H. Overmars institute;Sampling Techniques for Probabilistic Roadmap Planners Roland Geraerts Mark H. Overmars Institute,markov}@cs.uu.nl. Abstract The probabilistic roadmap approach is a commonly used motion planning technique. A crucial

  1. Sampling Techniques for Probabilistic Roadmap Planners

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Utrecht, Universiteit

    Sampling Techniques for Probabilistic Roadmap Planners Roland Geraerts Mark H. Overmars institute; Sampling Techniques for Probabilistic Roadmap Planners Roland Geraerts Mark H. Overmars Institute,markov}@cs.uu.nl. Abstract The probabilistic roadmap approach is a commonly used motion planning technique. A crucial

  2. SAMPLE PROGRAM (First Math Course MATH 198)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gering, Jon C.

    MATH SAMPLE PROGRAM (First Math Course MATH 198) This sample program suggests one way to navigate equivalent patterns are possible. Fall ­ Semester 1 Spring ­ Semester 2 MATH 198: Analytic Geometry with Calculus I MATH 263: Analytic Geometry with Calculus II MATH 101: Freshman Seminar CS 170: Intro

  3. Water coning calculations for vertical and horizontal wells 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yang, Weiping

    1990-01-01

    recovery of several wells coning water. Since their type curves are specific for the data they investigated, it can not serve as a general method of coning evaluation. Addington'2 developed a set of gas coning correlations for 3-D coarse grid... for predicting (1) critical coning rate, (2) breakthrough time, and (3) WOR after breakthrough in both vertical and horizontal wells. Two hand calculation methods had been developed in this study. Either of them applies to both vertical and horizontal wells...

  4. Laboratory test plan in-well vapor stripping system

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Koegler, K.J

    1994-07-01

    This test plan describes the activities that will be conducted as a part of the laboratory testing of a full-scale mockup of the Stanford in-well vapor stripping system. These tests will be conducted to delineate design parameters for the in-well vapor stripping unit and to identify and quantify variables that are sensitive to the dynamic hydraulic effects induced by operation of the system. No radioactive materials are involved in this test. In-well vapor stripping has been used successfully as an alternative to conventional pump-and-treat technology for remediation of volatile organic compound (VOC) contaminated groundwater in Europe and more recently in the United States. In-well vapor stripping permits in situ remediation of VOC-contaminated groundwater by combining an in-well vapor stripping system with a treatment well is used to extract and discharge groundwater simultaneously, resulting in the establishment of a vertical circulation groundwater flow cell in the aquifer. Groundwater extracted from the aquifer via the lower screened interval is treated for VOCs by in-well vapor stripping within the treatment well. This stripping causes aqueous phase VOCs to partition preferentially into a vapor phase. Treated groundwater is discharged back to the aquifer via the upper screened interval of the treatment well, while the vapor phase VOCs are simultaneously removed from the well bore and contained at the surface with a vacuum extraction system. Groundwater entrained into the vertical circulation flow cell becomes sequentially cleaned of VOC contamination in an efficient manner without the need for surface treatment and handling of contaminated groundwater. An added benefit of in-well vapor stripping is the ability to perform vadose zone vapor extraction concurrently with groundwater remediation. This uses the vacuum extraction capabilities of the in-well vapor stripping configured with the upper screened interval placed into the vadose zone above the water table.

  5. Tank 30 and 37 Supernatant Sample Cross-Check and Evaporator Feed Qualification Analysis-2012

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Oji, L. N.

    2013-03-07

    This report summarizes the analytical data reported by the F/H and Savannah River National Laboratories for the 2012 cross-check analysis for high level waste supernatant liquid samples from SRS Tanks 30 and 37. The intent of this Tank 30 and 37 sample analyses was to perform cross-checks against routine F/H Laboratory analyses (corrosion and evaporator feed qualification programs) using samples collected at the same time from both tanks as well as split samples from the tanks.

  6. Atmospheric sampling glow discharge ionization source

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    McLuckey, S.A.; Glish, G.L.

    1989-07-18

    An atmospheric sampling glow discharge ionization source that can be used in combination with an analytical instrument which operates at high vacuum, such as a mass spectrometer. The atmospheric sampling glow discharge ionization source comprises a chamber with at least one pair of electrodes disposed therein, an inlet for a gaseous sample to be analyzed and an outlet communicating with an analyzer which operates at subatmospheric pressure. The ionization chamber is maintained at a pressure below atmospheric pressure, and a voltage difference is applied across the electrodes to induce a glow discharge between the electrodes, so that molecules passing through the inlet are ionized by the glow discharge and directed into the analyzer. The ionization source accepts the sample under atmospheric pressure conditions and processes it directly into the high vacuum instrument, bridging the pressure gap and drawing off unwanted atmospheric gases. The invention also includes a method for analyzing a gaseous sample using the glow discharge ionization source described above. 3 figs.

  7. Empirical comparison of network sampling techniques

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Blagus, Neli; Bahec, Marko

    2015-01-01

    In the past few years, the storage and analysis of large-scale and fast evolving networks present a great challenge. Therefore, a number of different techniques have been proposed for sampling large networks. In general, network exploration techniques approximate the original networks more accurately than random node and link selection. Yet, link selection with additional subgraph induction step outperforms most other techniques. In this paper, we apply subgraph induction also to random walk and forest-fire sampling. We analyze different real-world networks and the changes of their properties introduced by sampling. We compare several sampling techniques based on the match between the original networks and their sampled variants. The results reveal that the techniques with subgraph induction underestimate the degree and clustering distribution, while overestimate average degree and density of the original networks. Techniques without subgraph induction step exhibit exactly the opposite behavior. Hence, the pe...

  8. Microfluidic Tools for Biological Sample Preparation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Visuri, S R; Ness, K; Dzenitis, J; Benett, B; Bettencourt, K; Hamilton, J; Fisher, K; Krulevitch, P

    2002-04-10

    Researchers at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory are developing means to collect and identify fluid-based biological pathogens in the forms of proteins, viruses, and bacteria. To support detection instruments, we are developing a flexible fluidic sample preparation unit. The overall goal of this Microfluidic Module is to input a fluid sample, containing background particulates and potentially target compounds, and deliver a processed sample for detection. We are developing techniques for sample purification, mixing, and filtration that would be useful to many applications including immunologic and nucleic acid assays. Sample preparation functions are accomplished with acoustic radiation pressure, dielectrophoresis, and solid phase extraction. We are integrating these technologies into packaged systems with pumps and valves to control fluid flow and investigating small-scale detection methods.

  9. Geothermal well log interpretation state of the art. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sanyal, S.K.; Wells, L.E.; Bickham, R.E.

    1980-01-01

    An in-depth study of the state of the art in Geothermal Well Log Interpretation has been made encompassing case histories, technical papers, computerized literature searches, and actual processing of geothermal wells from New Mexico, Idaho, and California. A classification scheme of geothermal reservoir types was defined which distinguishes fluid phase and temperature, lithology, geologic province, pore geometry, salinity, and fluid chemistry. Major deficiencies of Geothermal Well Log Interpretation are defined and discussed with recommendations of possible solutions or research for solutions. The Geothermal Well Log Interpretation study and report has concentrated primarily on Western US reservoirs. Geopressured geothermal reservoirs are not considered.

  10. Estimating Well Costs for Enhanced Geothermal System Applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    K. K. Bloomfield; P. T. Laney

    2005-08-01

    The objective of the work reported was to investigate the costs of drilling and completing wells and to relate those costs to the economic viability of enhanced geothermal systems (EGS). This is part of a larger parametric study of major cost components in an EGS. The possibility of improving the economics of EGS can be determined by analyzing the major cost components of the system, which include well drilling and completion. Determining what costs in developing an EGS are most sensitive will determine the areas of research to reduce those costs. The results of the well cost analysis will help determine the cost of a well for EGS development.

  11. Water geochemistry study of Indian Wells Valley, Inyo and Kern...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Water geochemistry study of Indian Wells Valley, Inyo and Kern Counties, California. Supplement. Isotope geochemistry and Appendix H. Final report Jump to: navigation, search...

  12. Controlled Source Frequency-Domain Magnetics At Salt Wells Area...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Controlled Source Frequency-Domain Magnetics At Salt Wells Area (Montgomery, Et Al., 2005) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity:...

  13. Compound and Elemental Analysis At Salt Wells Area (Coolbaugh...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Compound and Elemental Analysis At Salt Wells Area (Coolbaugh, Et Al., 2006) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Compound and...

  14. Compound and Elemental Analysis At Salt Wells Area (Shevenell...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Compound and Elemental Analysis At Salt Wells Area (Shevenell & Garside, 2003) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Compound and...

  15. Surface Indicators of Geothermal Activity at Salt Wells, Nevada...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Surface Indicators of Geothermal Activity at Salt Wells, Nevada, USA, Including Warm Ground, Borate Deposits, and Siliceous Alteration Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference...

  16. 2013 strategic petroleum reserve big hill well integrity grading report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lord, David L.; Roberts, Barry L.; Lord, Anna C. Snider; Bettin, Giorgia; Sobolik, Steven Ronald; Park, Byoung Yoon; Rudeen, David Keith; Eldredge, Lisa; Wynn, Karen; Checkai, Dean; Perry, James Thomas

    2014-02-01

    This report summarizes the work performed in developing a framework for the prioritization of cavern access wells for remediation and monitoring at the Big Hill Strategic Petroleum Reserve site. This framework was then applied to all 28 wells at the Big Hill site with each well receiving a grade for remediation and monitoring. Numerous factors affecting well integrity were incorporated into the grading framework including casing survey results, cavern pressure history, results from geomechanical simulations, and site geologic factors. The framework was developed in a way as to be applicable to all four of the Strategic Petroleum Reserve sites.

  17. BOREHOLE PRECONDITIONING OF GEOTHERMAL WELLS FOR ENHANCED GEOTHERMAL...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    to precondition a well to optimize fracturing and production during Enhanced Geothermal System (EGS) reservoir development. A finite element model was developed for the fully...

  18. Mergers and Mass Accretion for Infalling Halos Both End Well...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Halos Both End Well Outside Cluster Virial Radii Authors: Behroozi, Peter S. ; Baltimore, Space Telescope Sci. Stanford U., Phys. Dept. SLAC KIPAC, Menlo Park ; Wechsler,...

  19. Wells Public Utilities- Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    SMMPA develops innovative products and services to help them deliver value to customers. With help from SMMPA, Wells Public Utilities provides incentives for residential and commercial customers ...

  20. Observation Wells At Fenton Hill HDR Geothermal Area (Shevenell...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    for Los Alamos National Laboratory in 1984. These wells were drilled to facilitate microseismic monitoring of ongoing MHF experiments attempting to produce a viable geothermal...

  1. Symmetry Lowering in Extreme-Electron-Density Perovskite Quantum Wells

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhang, Jack Y.; Hwang, Jinwoo; Raghavan, Santosh; Stemmer, Susanne

    2013-01-01

    in Extreme-Electron-Density Perovskite Quantum Wells Jack Y.in the ideal cubic perovskite structure. The insulatingan orthorhombic distorted perovskite (space group Pnma [17])

  2. Interface-induced magnetism in perovskite quantum wells

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jackson, Clayton A; Stemmer, Susanne

    2013-01-01

    INDUCED MAGNETISM IN PEROVSKITE . . . PHYSICAL REVIEW B 88,induced magnetism in perovskite quantum wells Clayton A.structures. A prototypical perovskite heterostructure is

  3. Method for determining formation quality factor from well log...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    determining formation quality factor from well log data and its application to seismic reservoir characterization Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Method for...

  4. ,"New Mexico Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Oil Wells (MMcf...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","New Mexico Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Oil Wells (MMcf)",1,"Annual",2014 ,"Release...

  5. ,"New Mexico Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Gas Wells (MMcf...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","New Mexico Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Gas Wells (MMcf)",1,"Annual",2014 ,"Release...

  6. Development Wells At Fenton Hill HDR Geothermal Area (Dreesen...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    required to support a commercial power plant. Initial attempts to connect the two wells by hydraulic pressure-stimulation in 1982 were unsuccessful. Efforts to produce a...

  7. Fluid Inclusion Stratigraphy Interpretation of New Wells in the...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Fluid Inclusion Stratigraphy Interpretation of New Wells in the Coso Geothermal Field Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Conference Paper: Fluid...

  8. Fluid Inclusion Stratigraphy: Interpretation of New Wells in...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Fluid Inclusion Stratigraphy: Interpretation of New Wells in the Coso Geothermal Field Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Conference Proceedings:...

  9. Lithologic Descriptions and Temperature Profiles of Five Wells...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Wells in the Southwestern Valles Caldera Region, New Mexico Abstract The subsurface stratigraphy and temperature profiles of the southern and western Valles caldera region have...

  10. Vital Elements Score Comments Introduction/Motivation: Well defined &

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ito, Garrett

    Evaluator: Vital Elements Score Comments · Introduction/Motivation: Well defined & motivated: Resounding, memorable, & address objectives Vital Elements Total Presentation Mechanics · Clarity

  11. CHARACTERIZATION OF TANK 19F SAMPLES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Oji, L.; Diprete, D.; Click, D.

    2009-12-17

    The Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) was asked by Liquid Waste Operations to characterize Tank 19F closure samples. Tank 19F slurry samples analyzed included the liquid and solid fractions derived from the slurry materials along with the floor scrape bottom Tank 19F wet solids. These samples were taken from Tank 19F in April 2009 and made available to SRNL in the same month. Because of limited amounts of solids observed in Tank 19F samples, the samples from the north quadrants of the tank were combined into one Tank 19F North Hemisphere sample and similarly the south quadrant samples were combined into one Tank 19F South Hemisphere sample. These samples were delivered to the SRNL shielded cell. The Tank 19F samples were analyzed for radiological, chemical and elemental components. Where analytical methods yielded additional contaminants other than those requested by the customer, these results were also reported. The target detection limits for isotopes analyzed were based on detection values of 1E-04 {micro}Ci/g for most radionuclides and customer desired detection values of 1E-05 {micro}Ci/g for I-129, Pa-231, Np-237, and Ra-226. While many of the target detection limits, as specified in the technical task request and task technical and quality assurance plans were met for the species characterized for Tank 19F, some were not met. In a number of cases, the relatively high levels of radioactive species of the same element or a chemically similar element precluded the ability to measure some isotopes to low levels. SRNL, in conjunction with the plant customer, reviewed all these cases and determined that the impacts were negligible.

  12. CHARACTERIZATION OF THE TANK 18F SAMPLES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Oji, L.; Click, D.; Diprete, D.

    2009-12-17

    The Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) was asked by Liquid Waste Operations to characterize Tank 18F closure samples. Tank 18F slurry samples analyzed included the liquid and solid fractions derived from the 'as-received' slurry materials along with the floor scrape bottom Tank 18F wet solids. These samples were taken from Tank 18F in March 2009 and made available to SRNL in the same month. Because of limited amounts of solids observed in Tank 18F samples, the samples from the north quadrants of the tank were combined into one North Tank 18F Hemisphere sample and similarly the south quadrant samples were combined into one South Tank 18F Hemisphere sample. These samples were delivered to the SRNL shielded cell. The Tank 18F samples were analyzed for radiological, chemical and elemental components. Where analytical methods yielded additional contaminants other than those requested by the customer, these results were also reported. The target detection limits for isotopes analyzed were 1E-04 {micro}Ci/g for most radionuclides and customer desired detection values of 1E-05 {micro}Ci/g for I-129, Pa-231, Np-237, and Ra-226. While many of the minimum detection limits, as specified in the technical task request and task technical and quality assurance plans were met for the species characterized for Tank 18F, some were not met due to spectral interferences. In a number of cases, the relatively high levels of radioactive species of the same element or a chemically similar element precluded the ability to measure some isotopes to low levels. SRNL, in conjunction with the plant customer, reviewed all these cases and determined that the impacts were negligible.

  13. Instructions for Apple Leaf Sample Collection.doc September 2013 Instructions for Apple Leaf Sample Collection Vermont

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hayden, Nancy J.

    Instructions for Apple Leaf Sample Collection.doc September 2013 Instructions for Apple Leaf Sample;Instructions for Apple Leaf Sample Collection.doc September 2013 Washing Leaf Samples 1. Wash the leaf samples

  14. ANALYSES AND COMPARISON OF BULK AND COIL SURFACE SAMPLES FROM THE DWPF SLURRY MIX EVAPORATOR

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hay, M.; Nash, C.; Stone, M.

    2012-02-17

    Sludge samples from the DWPF Slurry Mix Evaporator (SME) heating coil frame and coil surface were characterized to identify differences that might help identify heat transfer fouling materials. The SME steam coils have seen increased fouling leading to lower boil-up rates. Samples of the sludge were taken from the coil frame somewhat distant from the coil (bulk tank material) and from the coil surface (coil surface sample). The results of the analysis indicate the composition of the two SME samples are very similar with the exception that the coil surface sample shows {approx}5-10X higher mercury concentration than the bulk tank sample. Elemental analyses and x-ray diffraction results did not indicate notable differences between the two samples. The ICP-MS and Cs-137 data indicate no significant differences in the radionuclide composition of the two SME samples. Semi-volatile organic analysis revealed numerous organic molecules, these likely result from antifoaming additives. The compositions of the two SME samples also match well with the analyzed composition of the SME batch with the exception of significantly higher silicon, lithium, and boron content in the batch sample indicating the coil samples are deficient in frit relative to the SME batch composition.

  15. Slow technology for well-being Steffi Beckhaus

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Beckhaus, Steffi

    Slow technology for well-being Steffi Beckhaus IAD - Technical University of Darmstadt interactiondesign@steffi.beckhaus.de ABSTRACT Slow technology is technology that actively influences our well): Miscellaneous General Terms Slow Technology SLOW TECHNOLOGY IS... Slow technology is technology that actively

  16. Improved Efficiency of Oil Well Drilling through Case Based Reasoning

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aamodt, Agnar

    1 Improved Efficiency of Oil Well Drilling through Case Based Reasoning Paal Skalle Norwegian drilling, has been developed in cooperation with an oil company. From several reoccurring problems during oil well drilling the problem of "lost circulation", i.e. loss of circulating drilling fluid

  17. KNOWLEDGE-BASED DECISION SUPPORT IN OIL WELL DRILLING

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aamodt, Agnar

    KNOWLEDGE-BASED DECISION SUPPORT IN OIL WELL DRILLING Combining general and case-specific knowledge of Computer and Information Science. agnar.aamodt@idi.ntnu.no Abstract: Oil well drilling is a complex process for information handling, decision-making, and on-the-job learning for drilling personnel in their daily working

  18. STABILIZATION OF GAS LIFTED WELLS BASED ON STATE ESTIMATION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Foss, Bjarne A.

    oil and gas from wells with low reservoir pressure by reducing the hydrostatic pressure in the tubing.imsland bjarne.foss}@itk.ntnu.no Abstract: This paper treats stabilization of multiphase flow in a gas lifted oil well. Two different controllers are investigated, PI control using the estimated downhole pressure

  19. STABILIZATION OF GAS LIFTED WELLS Gisle Otto Eikrem

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Foss, Bjarne A.

    the system at low downhole pressures. The structure which stabilizes the system at the lowest downhole is a technology to produce from wells with low reservoir pressure by reducing the hydrostatic pressure, e-mail: (hubin mgolan)@ipt.ntnu.no Abstract: Increased production from gas lifted oil wells can

  20. Magnetoresistance oscillations in triple quantum wells under microwave irradiation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gusev, Guennady

    to the ``photovoltaic'' mechanism describing combined action of the microwave and dc fields on both temporal and angular 1011 cmÀ2 Þ and a mobility of 5 Â 105 cm2 =V s. The central well width is 230 °A and both side wells

  1. Representative well models for eight geothermal-resource areas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Carson, C.C.; Lin, Y.T.; Livesay, B.J.

    1983-02-01

    Representative well models have been constructed for eight major geothermal-resource areas. The models define representative times and costs associated with the individual operations that can be expected during drilling and completion of geothermal wells. The models were made for and have been used to evaluate the impacts of potential new technologies. The nature, construction, and validation of the models are presented.

  2. Well Productivity Enhancement of High Temperature Heterogeneous Carbonate Reservoirs 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Guanqun

    2014-05-08

    . Uneven acid distribution always results in productivity enhancement under expectation. When such a well is drilled, the temperature of the well could be too high to keep the acid reaction under control. The acid used in the treatment fluid, most commonly...

  3. Compatibility of monitor well completion methods with geologic conditions 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ten Wolde, Eric Jozef

    1996-01-01

    Proper completion of a well is essential to the protection of ground-water resources. Selecting a proper material for the annular seal should be based on the geologic conditions at the well site. Previous studies have not adequately linked annular...

  4. Coherent control of atomic spin currents in a double well

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chu, Shih-I; Ng, H. T.

    2012-02-27

    We propose a method for controlling the atomic currents of a two-component Bose-Einstein condensate in a double well by applying an external field to the atoms in one of the potential wells. We study the ground-state properties of the system...

  5. Resonant acoustic transducer system for a well drilling string

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Nardi, Anthony P. (Burlington, MA)

    1981-01-01

    For use in transmitting acoustic waves propated along a well drilling string, a piezoelectric transducer is provided operating in the relatively low loss acoustic propagation range of the well drilling string. The efficiently coupled transmitting transducer incorporates a mass-spring-piezoelectric transmitter combination permitting a resonant operation in the desired low frequency range.

  6. Resonant acoustic transducer system for a well drilling string

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kent, William H. (Westford, MA); Mitchell, Peter G. (Concord, MA)

    1981-01-01

    For use in transmitting acoustic waves propagated along a well drilling string, a piezoelectric transducer is provided operating in the relatively low loss acoustic propagation range of the well drilling string. The efficiently coupled transmitting transducer incorporates a mass-spring-piezoelectric transmitter combination permitting resonant operation in the desired low frequency range.

  7. Applications of CBR in oil well drilling "A general overview"

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aamodt, Agnar

    in drilling operations indicates that this is a potential method to reduce cost of drilling, and increase drilling of an oil well is also an expensive operation, costing typically 250,000 US$ per day per rigApplications of CBR in oil well drilling "A general overview" Samad Valipour Shokouhi1,3 , Agnar

  8. Sampling and analyses report for June 1992 semiannual postburn sampling at the RM1 UCG site, Hanna, Wyoming

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lindblom, S.R.

    1992-08-01

    The Rocky Mountain 1 (RMl) underground coal gasification (UCG) test was conducted from November 16, 1987 through February 26, 1988 (United Engineers and Constructors 1989) at a site approximately one mile south of Hanna, Wyoming. The test consisted of dual module operation to evaluate the controlled retracting injection point (CRIP) technology, the elongated linked well (ELW) technology, and the interaction of closely spaced modules operating simultaneously. The test caused two cavities to be formed in the Hanna No. 1 coal seam and associated overburden. The Hanna No. 1 coal seam is approximately 30 ft thick and lays at depths between 350 ft and 365 ft below the surface in the test area. The coal seam is overlain by sandstones, siltstones and claystones deposited by various fluvial environments. The groundwater monitoring was designed to satisfy the requirements of the Wyoming Department of Environmental Quality (WDEQ) in addition to providing research data toward the development of UCG technology that minimizes environmental impacts. The June 1992 semiannual groundwater.sampling took place from June 10 through June 13, 1992. This event occurred nearly 34 months after the second groundwater restoration at the RM1 site and was the fifteenth sampling event since UCG operations ceased. Samples were collected for analyses of a limited suite set of parameters as listed in Table 1. With a few exceptions, the groundwater is near baseline conditions. Data from the field measurements and analysis of samples are presented. Benzene concentrations in the groundwater were below analytical detection limits.

  9. Adaptive Sampling Algorithms for Probabilistic Risk Assessment of Nuclear Simulations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Diego Mandelli; Dan Maljovec; Bei Wang; Valerio Pascucci; Peer-Timo Bremer

    2013-09-01

    Nuclear simulations are often computationally expensive, time-consuming, and high-dimensional with respect to the number of input parameters. Thus exploring the space of all possible simulation outcomes is infeasible using finite computing resources. During simulation-based probabilistic risk analysis, it is important to discover the relationship between a potentially large number of input parameters and the output of a simulation using as few simulation trials as possible. This is a typical context for performing adaptive sampling where a few observations are obtained from the simulation, a surrogate model is built to represent the simulation space, and new samples are selected based on the model constructed. The surrogate model is then updated based on the simulation results of the sampled points. In this way, we attempt to gain the most information possible with a small number of carefully selected sampled points, limiting the number of expensive trials needed to understand features of the simulation space. We analyze the specific use case of identifying the limit surface, i.e., the boundaries in the simulation space between system failure and system success. In this study, we explore several techniques for adaptively sampling the parameter space in order to reconstruct the limit surface. We focus on several adaptive sampling schemes. First, we seek to learn a global model of the entire simulation space using prediction models or neighborhood graphs and extract the limit surface as an iso-surface of the global model. Second, we estimate the limit surface by sampling in the neighborhood of the current estimate based on topological segmentations obtained locally. Our techniques draw inspirations from topological structure known as the Morse-Smale complex. We highlight the advantages and disadvantages of using a global prediction model versus local topological view of the simulation space, comparing several different strategies for adaptive sampling in both contexts. One of the most interesting models we propose attempt to marry the two by obtaining a coarse global representation using prediction models, and a detailed local representation based on topology. Our methods are validated on several analytical test functions as well as a small nuclear simulation dataset modeled after a simplified Pressurized Water Reactor.

  10. Automated collection and processing of environmental samples

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Troyer, Gary L. (Richland, WA); McNeece, Susan G. (Richland, WA); Brayton, Darryl D. (Richland, WA); Panesar, Amardip K. (Kennewick, WA)

    1997-01-01

    For monitoring an environmental parameter such as the level of nuclear radiation, at distributed sites, bar coded sample collectors are deployed and their codes are read using a portable data entry unit that also records the time of deployment. The time and collector identity are cross referenced in memory in the portable unit. Similarly, when later recovering the collector for testing, the code is again read and the time of collection is stored as indexed to the sample collector, or to a further bar code, for example as provided on a container for the sample. The identity of the operator can also be encoded and stored. After deploying and/or recovering the sample collectors, the data is transmitted to a base processor. The samples are tested, preferably using a test unit coupled to the base processor, and again the time is recorded. The base processor computes the level of radiation at the site during exposure of the sample collector, using the detected radiation level of the sample, the delay between recovery and testing, the duration of exposure and the half life of the isotopes collected. In one embodiment, an identity code and a site code are optically read by an image grabber coupled to the portable data entry unit.

  11. Dewatering of coalbed methane wells with hydraulic gas pump

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Amani, M.; Juvkam-Wold, H.C.

    1995-12-31

    The coalbed methane industry has become an important source of natural gas production. Proper dewatering of coalbed methane (CBM) wells is the key to efficient gas production from these reservoirs. This paper presents the Hydraulic Gas Pump as a new alternative dewatering system for CBM wells. The Hydraulic Gas Pump (HGP) concept offers several operational advantages for CBM wells. Gas interference does not affect its operation. It resists solids damage by eliminating the lift mechanism and reducing the number of moving parts. The HGP has a flexible production rate and is suitable for all production phases of CBM wells. It can also be designed as a wireline retrievable system. We conclude that the Hydraulic Gas Pump is a suitable dewatering system for coalbed methane wells.

  12. Helicopter Surveys for Locating Wells and Leaking Oilfield Infrastructure

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hammack, R.W.; Veloski, G.A.; Hodges, G. (Fugro Airborne Surveys)

    2006-10-01

    Prior to the injection of CO2 into geological formations, either for enhanced oil recovery or for CO2 sequestration, it is necessary to locate wells that perforate the target formation and are within the radius of influence for planned injection wells. Locating and plugging wells is necessary because improperly plugged well bores provide the most rapid route for CO2 escape to the surface. This paper describes the implementation and evaluation of helicopter and ground-based well detection strategies at a 100+ year old oilfield in Wyoming where a CO2 flood is planned. This project was jointly funded by the U.S. Department of Energy’s National Energy Technology Laboratory and Fugro Airborne Surveys

  13. Gas sampling system for a mass spectrometer

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    2003-12-30

    The present invention relates generally to a gas sampling system, and specifically to a gas sampling system for transporting a hazardous process gas to a remotely located mass spectrometer. The gas sampling system includes a capillary tube having a predetermined capillary length and capillary diameter in communication with the supply of process gas and the mass spectrometer, a flexible tube surrounding and coaxial with the capillary tube intermediate the supply of process gas and the mass spectrometer, a heat transfer tube surrounding and coaxial with the capillary tube, and a heating device in communication the heat transfer tube for substantially preventing condensation of the process gas within the capillary tube.

  14. Disc valve for sampling erosive process streams

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Mrochek, J.E.; Dinsmore, S.R.; Chandler, E.W.

    1986-01-07

    A four-port disc valve is described for sampling erosive, high temperature process streams. A rotatable disc defining opposed first and second sampling cavities rotates between fired faceplates defining flow passageways positioned to be alternatively in axial alignment with the first and second cavities. Silicon carbide inserts and liners composed of [alpha] silicon carbide are provided in the faceplates and in the sampling cavities to limit erosion while providing lubricity for a smooth and precise operation when used under harsh process conditions. 1 fig.

  15. Spectroscopic diagnostics for bacteria in biologic sample

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    El-Sayed, Mostafa A. (Atlanta, GA); El-Sayed, Ivan H. (Somerville, MA)

    2002-01-01

    A method to analyze and diagnose specific bacteria in a biologic sample using spectroscopy is disclosed. The method includes obtaining the spectra of a biologic sample of a non-infected patient for use as a reference, subtracting the reference from the spectra of an infected sample, and comparing the fingerprint regions of the resulting differential spectrum with reference spectra of bacteria in saline. Using this diagnostic technique, specific bacteria can be identified sooner and without culturing, bacteria-specific antibiotics can be prescribed sooner, resulting in decreased likelihood of antibiotic resistance and an overall reduction of medical costs.

  16. Plan for Using Solar-Powered Jack Pumps to Sample Groundwater at the Nevada Test Site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    David Hudson, Charles Lohrstorfer, Bruce Hurley

    2007-05-03

    Groundwater is sampled from 39 monitoring wells on the Nevada Test Site (NTS) as part of the Routine Radiological Environmental Monitoring Program. Many of these wells were not designed or constructed for long-term groundwater monitoring. Some have extensive completion zones and others have obstructions such as pumps and tubing. The high-volume submersible pumps in some wells are unsuitable for long-term monitoring and result in large volumes of water that may have to be contained and characterized before subsequent disposition. The configuration of most wells requires sampling stagnant well water with a wireline bailer. Although bailer sampling allows for the collection of depth-discrete samples, the collected samples may not be representative of local groundwater because no well purging is done. Low-maintenance, solar-powered jack pumps will be deployed in nine of these onsite monitoring wells to improve sample quality. These pumps provide the lift capacity to produce groundwater from the deep aquifers encountered in the arid environment of the NTS. The water depths in these wells range from 700 to 2,340 ft below ground surface. The considerable labor and electrical power requirements of electric submersible pumps are eliminated once these pumps are installed. Access tubing will be installed concurrent with the installation of the pump string to provide downhole access for water-level measurements or other wireline instruments. Micro-purge techniques with low pump rates will be used to minimize purge volumes and reduce hydraulic gradients. The set depths of the pumps will be determined by the borehole characteristics and screened interval.

  17. Sample results from the interim salt disposition program macrobatch 9 tank 21H qualification samples

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Peters, T. B.

    2015-11-01

    Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) analyzed samples from Tank 21H in support of qualification of Macrobatch (Salt Batch) 9 for the Interim Salt Disposition Program (ISDP). This document reports characterization data on the samples of Tank 21H.

  18. Cosmological Implications and Physical Properties of an X-Ray Flux-Limited Sample of Galaxy Clusters

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thomas H. Reiprich

    2003-08-08

    The original abstract significantly exceeds the space available here, so here's a brief summary. The abstract is similar to the abstract of astro-ph/0111285 (ApJ, 567, 716) which describes the X-ray galaxy cluster sample HIFLUGCS, the X-ray luminosity--gravitational mass relation, the cluster mass function, and the derived cosmological constraints. Additionally, the fraction of the total gravitating mass in the universe which is contained in intracluster gas is quantified. Furthermore, physical properties of the cluster sample have been studied and analyses of relations between different cluster parameters (including the gas mass fraction, gas temperature, X-ray luminosity, gas mass, gravitational mass, beta, and core radius) are discussed. Also, results from an analysis of XMM-Newton performance verification phase data of Abell 1835 are described.

  19. AN ADAPTIVE SAMPLING APPROACH TO INCOMPRESSIBLE PARTICLE-BASED FLUID 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hong, Woo-Suck

    2010-01-16

    OF PHILOSOPHY Approved by: Co-Chairs of Committee, Donald H House John Keyser Committee Members, Frederic I. Parke Ricardo Gutierrez-Osuna Head of Department, Valerie E. Taylor May 2009 Major Subject: Computer Science iii ABSTRACT An Adaptive Sampling Approach... as well to my other advisor, Prof. John Keyser, and to my committee memebers, Prof. Frederic I. Parke and Prof. Ricardo Gutierrez-Osuna. Also, thanks to Prof. CheungHun Kim, Prof. Yoonsuck Choe and Prof. Jinxiang Chai for their encouragement. Finally I...

  20. Stress, Coping, and Psychological Well-Being: Comparison among American and Asian International Graduate Students from Taiwan, China, and South Korea

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yang, Ya-Ting Tina

    2010-07-16

    The purpose of this study was to examine the relationships of stress, coping, and psychological well-being among American graduate students and Asian international graduate students from Taiwan, China, and Korea. The sample consisted of 131 American...