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1

Hawthorne Army Depot Geothermal Project | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Depot Geothermal Project Depot Geothermal Project Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Development Project: Hawthorne Army Depot Geothermal Project Project Location Information Coordinates 38.476944444444°, -118.65777777778° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":38.476944444444,"lon":-118.65777777778,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

2

Slim Holes At Hawthorne Area (Sabin, Et Al., 2010) | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Slim Holes At Hawthorne Area (Sabin, Et Al., 2010) Slim Holes At Hawthorne Area (Sabin, Et Al., 2010) Exploration Activity Details Location Hawthorne Area Exploration Technique Slim Holes Activity Date Usefulness useful DOE-funding Unknown Notes GPO drilled two deep, slim geophysical test holes on the western margin of the Hawthorne Army Depot in 2008/2009. These two holes, HWAD 2a and HWAD 3, were drilled on the perceived structural trend of this valley and immediately south and east, respectively, of the El Capitan well. The "El Cap" is a 1,000' well completed by an unsuccessful developer in 1980. The El Cap and several other wells in this region south of Walker Lake have long been admired and even discussed by industry and the military but no sustained exploration or development activities work have ever been

3

Hawthorns and Crabapples  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Hawthorns and Crabapples Hawthorns and Crabapples Nature Bulletin No. 153 May 1, 1948 Forest Preserve District of Cook County William N. Erickson, President Roberts Mann, Supt of Conservation HAWTHORNS AND CRABAPPLES The wild crabapple and the hawthorn are small trees; pioneers of the open woodlands, forest edges, sunny pastures, roadsides and fence rows. One of the peculiarities of the Chicago region is the manner in which the hawthorns, their seeds distributed largely by birds, will march across abandoned fields and take possession. Undisturbed by ax or fire, in twenty years there will be an almost impenetrable thicket from 10 to 20 feet in height. Crabapples and some species of hawthorns look much alike but the leaves are different and the crab has no thorns on its twigs. Its fragrant 5-petalled blossoms are pink or rose-tinged, and its fruit is a small greenish sour apple. The hawthorns have sharp thorns, white 5- petalled blossoms with a rather unpleasant fragrance, and its fruits, or "haws", are small, round, mealy-fleshed and varying In color from brilliant scarlet to dull dotted red or yellow -- according to the species.

4

Boom And Bust With The Latest 2M Temperature Surveys- Dead Horse Wells,  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Boom And Bust With The Latest 2M Temperature Surveys- Dead Horse Wells, Boom And Bust With The Latest 2M Temperature Surveys- Dead Horse Wells, Hawthorne Army Depot, Terraced Hills, And Other Areas In Nevada Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Conference Paper: Boom And Bust With The Latest 2M Temperature Surveys- Dead Horse Wells, Hawthorne Army Depot, Terraced Hills, And Other Areas In Nevada Details Activities (7) Areas (7) Regions (0) Abstract: New examples of the use of two-meter temperature (2m) surveys to quickly and inexpensively reveal blind geothermal systems were documented at Dead Horse Wells, the Hawthorne Army Depot, and Emerson Pass, all located in Nevada. In addition, more than 100 new 2m measurements at Astor Pass, Nevada resolved additional details of near-surface thermal outflow in this blind geothermal system. And at Columbus Salt Marsh, Nevada,

5

Hawthorne Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Hawthorne Geothermal Area Hawthorne Geothermal Area Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Geothermal Resource Area: Hawthorne Geothermal Area Contents 1 Area Overview 2 History and Infrastructure 3 Regulatory and Environmental Issues 4 Exploration History 5 Well Field Description 6 Geology of the Area 7 Geofluid Geochemistry 8 NEPA-Related Analyses (0) 9 Exploration Activities (9) 10 References Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"TERRAIN","zoom":6,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"500px","height":"300px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":38.53,"lon":-118.65,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

6

Hawthorne Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Hawthorne Geothermal Area Hawthorne Geothermal Area (Redirected from Hawthorne Area) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Geothermal Resource Area: Hawthorne Geothermal Area Contents 1 Area Overview 2 History and Infrastructure 3 Regulatory and Environmental Issues 4 Exploration History 5 Well Field Description 6 Geology of the Area 7 Geofluid Geochemistry 8 NEPA-Related Analyses (0) 9 Exploration Activities (9) 10 References Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"TERRAIN","zoom":6,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"500px","height":"300px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":38.53,"lon":-118.65,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

7

Elton Mayo - Gli esperimenti di Hawthorne.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??RIASSUNTO ELTON MAYO GLI ESPERIMENTI DI HAWTHORNE Elton Mayo stato il fondatore della Scuola delle Relazioni Umane e liniziatore di un nuovo modo (more)

BONANNO, SABRINA

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

8

Hawthorne Geothermal Project | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Hawthorne Geothermal Project Hawthorne Geothermal Project Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Development Project: Hawthorne Geothermal Project Project Location Information Coordinates 38.313444444444°, -118.58527777778° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":38.313444444444,"lon":-118.58527777778,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

9

Hawthorne, California: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Hawthorne, California: Energy Resources Hawthorne, California: Energy Resources (Redirected from Hawthorne, CA) Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 33.9164032°, -118.3525748° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":33.9164032,"lon":-118.3525748,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

10

Hawthorne, Nevada: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Hawthorne, NV) Hawthorne, NV) Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 38.5246441°, -118.624578° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":38.5246441,"lon":-118.624578,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

11

2-M Probe At Hawthorne Area (Kratt, Et Al., 2010) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Kratt, Et Al., 2010) Kratt, Et Al., 2010) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: 2-M Probe At Hawthorne Area (Kratt, Et Al., 2010) Exploration Activity Details Location Hawthorne Area Exploration Technique 2-M Probe Activity Date Usefulness useful DOE-funding Unknown Notes Shallow 2m surveys were first conducted at Hawthorne by Trexler et al. (1982b), who were among the earliest researchers to employ 2m surveys on a systematic basis in the Great Basin. Their work identified two shallow thermal anomalies, one of them located west of the city of Hawthorne at the base of the Wassuk Range, and the other in the "Southeast Magazine" area, south of state highway 50 and southeast of Hawthorne (anomalies A and B on Figure 3). Subsequent drilling verified the existence of shallow thermal

12

Army Guidance for UESCs  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

of 11 of 11 Randy Smidt / DAIM-ODF-E / (703) 601-1564 (DSN 329) / SmidtRF@conus.army.mil 071400AUG2008 ARMY STRONG Army Policy Guidance for Utility Energy Services Contracts presented at The Federal Utility Partnership Working Group 5 MAY 2009 by Randy Smidt Headquarters Dept of Army, Office of the Assistant Chief of Staff for Installation Management 2 of 11 Randy Smidt / DAIM-ODF-E / (703) 601-1564 (DSN 329) / SmidtRF@conus.army.mil 071400AUG2008 ARMY STRONG Overview of Army UESC Program & Draft Policy Guidance * Army UESC Program * Draft Policy Guidance o Organizations, responsibilities & relationships o Procedures o Management & Execution o Resource Requirements o Reporting Requirements o Case Studies 3 of 11 Randy Smidt / DAIM-ODF-E / (703) 601-1564 (DSN 329) / SmidtRF@conus.army.mil

13

Water Sampling At Hawthorne Area (Lazaro, Et Al., 2010) | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Hawthorne Area (Lazaro, Et Al., Hawthorne Area (Lazaro, Et Al., 2010) Exploration Activity Details Location Hawthorne Area Exploration Technique Water Sampling Activity Date Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Notes The Navy GPO has contracted the University of Nevada Reno Great Basin for Center for Geothermal Research to conduct additional field exploration at HAD. The tasks required by the Navy range from field mapping and water sampling; detailed mapping, to low angle sun photo interpretations, trenching, to 3-D seismic interpretations and modeling. References Michael Lazaro, Chris Page, Andy Tiedeman, Andrew Sabin, Steve Bjornstad, Steve Alm, David Meade, Jeff Shoffner, Kevin Mitchell, Bob Crowder, Greg Halsey (2010) United States Department Of The Navy Geothermal Exploration Leading To Shallow And Intermediate-Deep Drilling At Hawthorne

14

Thermal Gradient Holes At Hawthorne Area (Sabin, Et Al., 2010) | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Sabin, Et Al., 2010) Sabin, Et Al., 2010) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Thermal Gradient Holes At Hawthorne Area (Sabin, Et Al., 2010) Exploration Activity Details Location Hawthorne Area Exploration Technique Thermal Gradient Holes Activity Date Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Notes In lieu of Seabee TGH drilling, GPO awarded a large IDIQ TGH drilling contract in December, 2009. Over the next two years, 90 500-ft TGHs will be installed at select sites in California and Nevada. Interim data from this campaign are already available for the Chocolate Mountains and Hawthorne. Results of these programs can be found in the Chocolate Mountains and Hawthorne papers also available in this volume. References Andrew Sabin, S. Bjornstad, M. Lazaro, D. Meade, C. Page, S. Alm, A.

15

Modeling-Computer Simulations At Hawthorne Area (Lazaro, Et Al., 2010) |  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Modeling-Computer Simulations At Hawthorne Area (Lazaro, Et Al., 2010) Modeling-Computer Simulations At Hawthorne Area (Lazaro, Et Al., 2010) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Modeling-Computer Simulations At Hawthorne Area (Lazaro, Et Al., 2010) Exploration Activity Details Location Hawthorne Area Exploration Technique Modeling-Computer Simulations Activity Date Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Notes The Navy GPO has contracted the University of Nevada Reno Great Basin for Center for Geothermal Research to conduct additional field exploration at HAD. The tasks required by the Navy range from field mapping and water sampling; detailed mapping, to low angle sun photo interpretations, trenching, to 3-D seismic interpretations and modeling. References Michael Lazaro, Chris Page, Andy Tiedeman, Andrew Sabin, Steve

16

Manhattan Project: Army parade, Los Alamos  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

Army parade, Los Alamos Events > Difficult Choices, 1942 > Enter the Army, 1942 People > Military Organizations > Army Corps of Engineers Army parade, Los Alamos...

17

Aerial Photography At Hawthorne Area (Lazaro, Et Al., 2010) | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Aerial Photography At Hawthorne Area (Lazaro, Et Al., Aerial Photography At Hawthorne Area (Lazaro, Et Al., 2010) Exploration Activity Details Location Hawthorne Area Exploration Technique Aerial Photography Activity Date Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Notes The Navy GPO has contracted the University of Nevada Reno Great Basin for Center for Geothermal Research to conduct additional field exploration at HAD. The tasks required by the Navy range from field mapping and water sampling; detailed mapping, to low angle sun photo interpretations, trenching, to 3-D seismic interpretations and modeling. References Michael Lazaro, Chris Page, Andy Tiedeman, Andrew Sabin, Steve Bjornstad, Steve Alm, David Meade, Jeff Shoffner, Kevin Mitchell, Bob Crowder, Greg Halsey (2010) United States Department Of The Navy Geothermal

18

Teleseismic-Seismic Monitoring At Hawthorne Area (Lazaro, Et Al., 2010) |  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Teleseismic-Seismic Monitoring At Hawthorne Area Teleseismic-Seismic Monitoring At Hawthorne Area (Lazaro, Et Al., 2010) Exploration Activity Details Location Hawthorne Area Exploration Technique Teleseismic-Seismic Monitoring Activity Date Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Notes The Navy GPO has contracted the University of Nevada Reno Great Basin for Center for Geothermal Research to conduct additional field exploration at HAD. The tasks required by the Navy range from field mapping and water sampling; detailed mapping, to low angle sun photo interpretations, trenching, to 3-D seismic interpretations and modeling. References Michael Lazaro, Chris Page, Andy Tiedeman, Andrew Sabin, Steve Bjornstad, Steve Alm, David Meade, Jeff Shoffner, Kevin Mitchell, Bob Crowder, Greg Halsey (2010) United States Department Of The Navy Geothermal

19

Thermal Gradient Holes At Hawthorne Area (Lazaro, Et Al., 2010) | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

source source History View New Pages Recent Changes All Special Pages Semantic Search/Querying Get Involved Help Apps Datasets Community Login | Sign Up Search Page Edit History Facebook icon Twitter icon » Thermal Gradient Holes At Hawthorne Area (Lazaro, Et Al., 2010) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Thermal Gradient Holes At Hawthorne Area (Lazaro, Et Al., 2010) Exploration Activity Details Location Hawthorne Area Exploration Technique Thermal Gradient Holes Activity Date Usefulness useful DOE-funding Unknown Notes The Navy recently completed a temperature gradient hole (TGH) drilling campaign. Results suggest multiple resources may exist on HAD lands. To further define the shallow resource, the Navy will drill one or two

20

Field Mapping At Hawthorne Area (Lazaro, Et Al., 2010) | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Field Mapping At Hawthorne Area (Lazaro, Et Al., Field Mapping At Hawthorne Area (Lazaro, Et Al., 2010) Exploration Activity Details Location Hawthorne Area Exploration Technique Field Mapping Activity Date Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Notes The Navy GPO has contracted the University of Nevada Reno Great Basin for Center for Geothermal Research to conduct additional field exploration at HAD. The tasks required by the Navy range from field mapping and water sampling; detailed mapping, to low angle sun photo interpretations, trenching, to 3-D seismic interpretations and modeling. References Michael Lazaro, Chris Page, Andy Tiedeman, Andrew Sabin, Steve Bjornstad, Steve Alm, David Meade, Jeff Shoffner, Kevin Mitchell, Bob Crowder, Greg Halsey (2010) United States Department Of The Navy Geothermal

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "wells hawthorne army" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Army Energy Security Considerations  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

ARMY Energy Security ARMY Energy Security Considerations Don Juhasz, PE, CEM HQDA, OACSIM, DAIM-FDF Telephone: (703)-601-0374 E-mail: don.juhasz@hqda.army.mil FUEL CELL OPPORTUNITIES 26 April 2007 1 of 10 Don Juhasz DAIM-FDF (703) 601-0374 (DSN 329) / don.juhasz@hqda.army.mil 5 April 2007 Army Energy * * * * FOREIGN OIL 2 of 10 Don Juhasz DAIM-FDF (703) 601-0374 (DSN 329) / don.juhasz@hqda.army.mil 5 April 2007 World Energy Situation OIL & GAS LIQUIDS 38% Rise in NTV Fuel Use 35% of DoD utilities 21% of Fed government 11% of installations' budget US ARMY IS DEPENDENT ON 1 ¾ ¾ ¾ ¾ ¾ In ¾ 3 of 10 Don Juhasz DAIM-FDF (703) 601-0374 (DSN 329) / don.juhasz@hqda.army.mil 5 April 2007 Challenges To Managing The Future World population growing: 6.5 B in 2006, 2030 estimate 7.9 B

22

HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

.S. Army Reverse Engineering Handbook:MIL - HDBK -115(ME) Washington, DC, 1987 [Usse 97] Cary Ussery, Kathy

US Army Corps of Engineers

23

The Single Army Financial Enterprise  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The US Army is a complex organisation. Financial integration and full auditability have remained objectives for years. This paper presents an architecture-driven approach for achieving financial integration as the Army is implementing new business ... Keywords: ARIS, Architecture of Integrated Information Systems, US Army, USA, United States, enterprise integration, enterprise solution architecture, financial integration, financial management

Thomas R. Gulledge; Edward Tom

2008-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

24

Peaking Service Experience at Kansas City Power and Light Hawthorn Station  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

EPRI's durability surveillance (DS) program -- in place since 1991 -- is producing the first in-service performance and operating data on the newest high-efficiency gas turbines. This detailed investigation of the Siemens V84.3A installed at the Kansas City Power & Light (KCPL) Hawthorn Station is providing plant personnel and the manufacturer with valuable information for solving initial problems. Program results will help all power producers specify, operate, and maintain a new generation of high-perfo...

1999-12-14T23:59:59.000Z

25

Army Energy Security and Independence  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

ARMY ARMY ENERGY SECURITY AND INDEPENDENCE Leadership Ownership Partnership 19 NOV 2008 Don Juhasz, PE, CEM CHIEF ARMY ENERGY POLICY Army Energy Security - "The Way Ahead" 2 ARMY ENERGY SECURITY AND INDEPENDENCE Leadership Ownership Partnership Energy Costs Driven by Global Situation OIL & GAS LIQUIDS Army Utilities Energy Use * 35% of DoD consumption * 21% of Fed government use * 11% of installations' budget * Commodity Prices increasing 8 - 20% annually Consumption Climbs as new sources decrease Oil production is primarily OCONUS and decreasing Our consumption is out of balance with our Reserves New Sources Dwindling - Forcing our reliance on Unstable governments 3 ARMY ENERGY SECURITY AND INDEPENDENCE Leadership Ownership Partnership Oil Field Forecasts Peak Year Oil Expert

26

ARMY SERVICE FORCES  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

ARMY SERVICE FORCES ARMY SERVICE FORCES ' -, 1 MANHATTAN ENGINEER DISTRICT --t 4 IN "LPLI RC,' LR io EIDM CIS INTELLIGENCE AND SECURITY DIVISION CHICAGO BRANCH OFFICE i ., -,* - P. 0. Box 6770-A I ' 1 .' CHICAGO 80. ILLINOIS /lvb 15 February 1945 Subject: shipment Security Survey at &Uinckrodt Chemical Works. MEMORANDUM to the Officer in Charge. 1. The Mallinckrodt Chemical Works, St. Louis, Missouri, was contacted by the undersigned on 16 November 1944, for the purpose of -king an investigation to determine security provided shipments of interest to the Manhattan Engineer District. The investigation in- cluded shipments of vital materials originating with the Mallinckrodt Company and those received by them. Particular attention has been given to the future production and shipment schedules of these materials.

27

Army Energy Initiatives Task Force  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Presentationgiven at the Fall 2011 Federal Utility Partnership Working Group (FUPWG) meetingcovers the Army Energy Initiatives Task Force.

28

US Army Corps  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

"-,,,,~r" "-,,,,~r" c«' "'<''f'~''''''':''~~?<~~':'t:!trtl«'' .' i.~ , _ ...., , 1,_, - ~, .." * * * * , * >:'.,.~:-t ~\, ;:. ; i ....._- - - * '.1',.£.... US Army Corps of Engineers® rlllBlLllT Buffalo District * FINAL * RECORD OF DECISION FOR THE ASHLAND 1 * (INCLUDING SEAWAY AREA D) AND ASHLAND 2 SITES * TONAWANDA, NEW YORK * * April 1998 * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * I. DECLARATION FOR THE RECORD OF DECISION ( * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * DECLARATION FOR THE RECORD OF DECISION SITE NAME AND LOCATION Ashland 1 (including Seaway Area D) and Ashland 2 Sites Town of Tonawanda, New York Within this Record of Decision (ROD), any reference to Ashland 1 with respect to cleanup includes

29

Army High Performance Computing Research Center  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Army High Performance Computing Research Center Applying advanced computational science research challenges http://me.stanford.edu/research/centers/ahpcrc #12;Army High Performance Computing challenges http://me.stanford.edu/research/centers/ahpcrc #12;Army High Performance Computing Research

Prinz, Friedrich B.

30

Army Energy Security and Independence  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Presentationgiven at the Federal Utility Partnership Working Group (FUPWG) Fall 2008 meetingcovers oil field forecasts; U.S. Army's energy and water strategy for installations; renewable energy projects; net zero energy installations; and the Army's renewable energy program.

31

US Army Corps of Engineers  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Engineering and Support Center, Huntsville Engineering and Support Center, Huntsville FUPWG Oct 20-21, 2010 Margaret Simmons U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Huntsville Center (256) 895-1101 Margaret.p.simmons@usace.army.mil Disclaimer: The views expressed in this presentation are those of the author and do not represent the views of the Army or the Army Corps of Engineers. US Army Engineering and Support Center, Huntsville * DEMOLISHED BUILDINGS - Contract provides that adjustments can be made for changes in building usage and building occupancy - but doesn't contain the process to make the adjustment - Building is demolished so NO ENERGY is being consumed - however this is not due to the ESPC project - Should the contractor be given credit? Contracts allows for adjustment so yes. However, since building is gone, contractor

32

Army Energy Initiatives Task Force  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

UNCLASSIFIED UNCLASSIFIED Army Energy Initiatives Task Force Kathy Ahsing Director, Planning and Development UNCLASSIFIED 2 Perfect Storm UNCLASSIFIED 3 U.S. Army Energy Consumption, 2010 23% 77% 42% 58%  Facilities  Vehicles & Equipment (Tactical and Non-tactical) Sources: Energy Information Agency, 2010 Annual Energy Review; Agency Annual Energy Management Data Reports submitted to DOE's Federal Energy Management Program (Preliminary FY 2010) 32% 68% DoD 80% Army 21% Federal Gov 1% Federal Government United States Department of Defense U.S. = 98,079 Trillion Btu DoD = 889 Trillion Btu Fed Gov = 1,108 Trillion Btu U.S. Army = 189 Trillion Btu FY10 Highlights - $2.5+B Operational Energy Costs - $1.2 B Facility Energy Costs

33

Department of the Army Letterhead  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

ARMY ARMY US ARMY PUBLIC HEALTH COMMAND (PROVISIONAL) 5158 BLACKHAWK ROAD ABERDEEN PROVING GROUND, MD 21010-5403 MCHB-TS-EON MEMORANDUM FOR Savannah River Site, Savannah River Nuclear Solutions (Mr. C. Barry Shedrow), Building 705-3C, Aiken, SC 29808 SUBJECT: Operational Noise Consultation, 52-EN-0D55-10, Operational Noise Contours for Proposed Aviation Activity, Savannah River Site, Aiken, South Carolina, 12 April 2010. 1. We are enclosing 2 copies of the consultation. 2. Please contact us if this consultation or any of our services did not meet your needs or expectations. 3. The point of contact is Ms. Kristy Broska, Environmental Protection Specialist or Ms. Catherine Stewart, Program Manager, Operational Noise, US Army Public Health

34

Salvation Army : the next generation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Salvation Army thrift stores are retail entities in the center of neighborhoods which collect and resell used objects. Although historically dear to many, it seems that the physical condition, market visibility, and ...

Francpourmoi, Salom

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

35

Process Improvement at Army Installations  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Compliance with environmental law is becoming significantly expensive. In the past for convenience of management, compliance and pollution prevention were considered independently from production. Environmental law was introduced to optimize production methods to reduce pollution. Energy conservation opportunities (ECOs) that enhance pollution prevention have been compiled through research at many installations, including United States Army Construction Engineering Research Laboratories (USACERL). Executive Orders require the Army to reduce the use of energy and related environmental impacts by promoting renewable energy technologies. These new energy and environmental directives usually exceed the performance capabilities of DODs currently installed industrial technologies. The majority of DOD industrial activities utilize 40 year-old technologies and facilities. The objective of this project was to conduct a Level II process optimization audit on a munitions manufacturing operation at an Army base to optimize capacity, and energy and environmental performance. This paper reports the outcome and offers insights into process optimization.

Northrup, J.; Smith, E. D.; Lin, M.; Baird, J.

1997-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

36

Manhattan Project: Enter the Army, 1942  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

Army parade, Los Alamos ENTER THE ARMY Army parade, Los Alamos ENTER THE ARMY (1942) Events > Difficult Choices, 1942 More Uranium Research, 1942 More Piles and Plutonium, 1942 Enter the Army, 1942 Groves and the MED, 1942 Picking Horses, November 1942 Final Approval to Build the Bomb, December 1942 The decision to proceed with planning for the production of enriched uranium and of plutonium led directly to the involvement of the Army, specifically the Corps of Engineers. President Roosevelt had approved Army involvement on October 9, 1941, and Vannevar Bush had arranged for Army participation at S-1 meetings beginning in March 1942. The need for security suggested placing the S-1 program within one of the armed forces, and the construction expertise of the Corps of Engineers made it the logical choice to build the production facilities envisioned in the Conant report of May 23.

37

An overview of Army Mobility Energy Research and Development. Interim report Jun 79-Oct 81  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Dependence on foreign oil sources and the attendant strategic problems of securing the long lines of supplies from possible interruption raise a question of the ability of the Armed Forces to carry out its mission in the event of a national emergency. Energy is essential for the Army in maintaining readiness to assure national security in peacetime, crisis, or war. The Army Energy Plan, which is in concert with and support of national energy goals, establishes the basis for reducing energy consumption, reducing dependency on conventional hydrocarbon fuels, and tasks the Army to obtain a position of energy leadership. In this report, the Department of Army Energy goals/objectives are identified and the framework for planning Army Mobility/Energy/Research and Development is outlined. Key elements of the Army Mobility Energy R and D plan of action include an organization plan, technical assessment, technical performance plan, and a management plan. The Army Mobility Energy R and D Program has been categorized into four program areas--fuels, other fluids, engines, and other equipment. Examples of individual projects, as well as an overview of the Army's Mobility Energy Research and Development are provided with respect to meeting Army Energy goals.

Stavinoha, L.L.; Cauldwell, G.S.; Kemp, M.B.

1981-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

38

US Army Corps of Engineers  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Mine in Freestone, Leon, and Limestone Counties, Texas by Texas Westmoreland Coal Company. APPLICANT 96° 12' 36" W. The Jewett Mine began extracting lignite (coal) in 1985. The project areaUS Army Corps of Engineers Fort Worth District Public Notice Applicant: Texas Westmoreland Coal

US Army Corps of Engineers

39

Top Operations and Maintenance (O&M) Efficiency Opportunities at DoD/Army Sites - A Guide for O&M/Energy Managers and Practitioners  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report, sponsored the Army's Energy Engineering Analysis Program, provides the Operations and Maintenance (O&M) Energy manager and practitioner with useful information about the top O&M opportunities consistently found across the DoD/Army sector. The target is to help the DoD/Army sector develop a well-structured and organized O&M program.

Sullivan, Gregory P.; Dean, Jesse D.; Dixon, Douglas R.

2007-05-25T23:59:59.000Z

40

U.S. Army Corps of Engineers | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Army Corps of Engineers Jump to: navigation, search Logo: U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Name U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Place Washington, District of Columbia Website http:...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "wells hawthorne army" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Energy Design Guides for Army Barracks: Preprint  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers and NREL are developing target energy budgets and design guides to achieve 30% energy savings. This paper focuses the design guide for one type of barracks called unaccompanied enlisted personal housing.

Deru, M.; Zhivov, A.; Herron, D.

2008-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

42

Waste-to-Energy Projects at ArmyWaste to Energy Projects at Army Installations  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

13 JAN 201113 JAN 2011 US Army Corps of Engineers BUILDING STRONG® Distribution Statement A -- Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. #12;Outline Background Intro to ERDC Army natural gas and steam by Oct 2016 [EISA 2007] Electricity use for federal government from renewable

43

Energy Conservation in Army Industrial Facilities  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The United States Army Materiel Development and Readiness Command (DARCOM) is responsible for the life cycle functions for all assigned materiel systems of the United States Army and Department of Defense agencies. DARCOM installations account for approximately 19 percent of the Army's total energy consumption (approximately 44 million barrels of oil equivalent) and have reduced energy consumption approximately 26 percent below FY 75 levels. Highlights of the program include a comprehensive energy audit program, process energy studies, several different energy capital investment programs, and an aggressive energy awareness program. This paper describes the program with particular emphasis on the ongoing effort to establish relationships between key production parameters and energy consumption throughout the command. This will enable DARCOM to forecast future energy requirements and to determine the effectiveness of the conservation program in a dynamic industrial environment.

Aveta, G. A.; Sliwinski, B. J.

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

44

Army Energy and Water Reporting System Assessment  

SciTech Connect

There are many areas of desired improvement for the Army Energy and Water Reporting System. The purpose of system is to serve as a data repository for collecting information from energy managers, which is then compiled into an annual energy report. This document summarizes reported shortcomings of the system and provides several alternative approaches for improving application usability and adding functionality. The U.S. Army has been using Army Energy and Water Reporting System (AEWRS) for many years to collect and compile energy data from installations for facilitating compliance with Federal and Department of Defense energy management program reporting requirements. In this analysis, staff from Pacific Northwest National Laboratory found that substantial opportunities exist to expand AEWRS functions to better assist the Army to effectively manage energy programs. Army leadership must decide if it wants to invest in expanding AEWRS capabilities as a web-based, enterprise-wide tool for improving the Army Energy and Water Management Program or simply maintaining a bottom-up reporting tool. This report looks at both improving system functionality from an operational perspective and increasing user-friendliness, but also as a tool for potential improvements to increase program effectiveness. The authors of this report recommend focusing on making the system easier for energy managers to input accurate data as the top priority for improving AEWRS. The next major focus of improvement would be improved reporting. The AEWRS user interface is dated and not user friendly, and a new system is recommended. While there are relatively minor improvements that could be made to the existing system to make it easier to use, significant improvements will be achieved with a user-friendly interface, new architecture, and a design that permits scalability and reliability. An expanded data set would naturally have need of additional requirements gathering and a focus on integrating with other existing data sources, thus minimizing manually entered data.

Deprez, Peggy C.; Giardinelli, Michael J.; Burke, John S.; Connell, Linda M.

2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

45

NIST, Army Researchers Pave the Way for Anthrax Spore ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Researchers from the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) and the US Army Dugway (Utah) Proving Ground have developed ...

2012-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

46

US Army Corps of Engineers BUILDING STRONG  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

® Office Structure Par 005 / Office of Engineer Inspector General 01 *Supv Engineer Inspector General GS-15 02 Engineer Inspector General Rep GS-13 03 Administrative Officer GS-09 *The Engineer InspectorUS Army Corps of Engineers BUILDING STRONG® Mission Briefing The Engineer Inspector General #12

US Army Corps of Engineers

47

Testing and Performance of the Siemens V84.3A Gas Turbine in Peaking Service at Hawthorn Station of Kansas City Power & Light Compan y  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

EPRI's durability surveillance (DS) program, in place since 1991, is producing the first in-service performance and operating data on the newest high-efficiency gas turbines. This detailed investigation of the Siemens V84.3A installed at the Kansas City Power & Light (KCP&L) Hawthorn Station is providing plant personnel and the manufacturer with valuable information for solving initial problems, and will help all power producers specify, operate, and maintain a new generation of high-performance gas turb...

1998-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

48

Automation impact study of Army Training Management  

SciTech Connect

The main objectives of this impact study were to identify the potential cost savings associated with automated Army Training Management (TM), and to perform a cost-benefit analysis for an Army-wide automated TM system. A subsidiary goal was to establish baseline data for an independent evaluation of a prototype Integrated Training Management System (ITMS), to be tested in the fall of 1988. A structured analysis of TM doctrine was performed for comparison with empirical data gathered in a job analysis survey of selected units of the 9ID (MTZ) at Ft. Lewis, Washington. These observations will be extended to other units in subsequent surveys. The survey data concerning staffing levels and amount of labor expended on eight distinct TM tasks were analyzed in a cost effectiveness model. The main results of the surveys and cost effectiveness modelling are summarized. 18 figs., 47 tabs.

Sanquist, T.F.; Schuller, C.R.; McCallum, M.C.; Underwood, J.A.; Bettin, P.J.; King, J.L.; Melber, B.D.; Hostick, C.J.; Seaver, D.A.

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

49

Flagging vigilance: the post-Vietnam "Hollow Army"  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This thesis is an evaluation of the United States Army as it existed in the years following its evacuation from Southeast Asia and its transition from a predominantly conscript army to the all-volunteer concept in 1973. The post-Vietnam army's reputation has been pierced through with derision as time has passed and this study seeks to ascertain the merit of that derision. Not least among the dispersions cast against the army in question were those expressed by Army Chief of Staff Edward C. "Shy" Meyer in his 1980 White Paper. In his assessment, Meyer raised several questions regarding the post-Vietnam army's ability to meet its missions of deterrence and preparedness for war due to several maladies afflicting the force at the time. Ultimately, Meyer charged that the army was not, in fact, attaining its desired goals, coining the term "Hollow Army" in describing its status. Using Meyer's White Paper as a genesis, this study will examine several aspects of the post-Vietnam army in an effort to ascertain the validity of Meyer's assessment. The areas discussed include manpower and recruiting troubles, retention difficulties, the quality of life provided to the soldiers of the All-Volunteer Force, the caliber of soldiers serving during the period in question, and the nature of soldier behavior and conduct. In due course, this thesis will demonstrate that Meyer's negative assessment of the post-Vietnam army's status was quite accurate (if not comprehensive) and that America's guardian was, in fact, hollow.

Lee, Robert Matthew

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

50

Energy Design Guides for Army Barracks  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Energy Policy Act of 2005 requires federal facilities to be built to achieve 30% energy savings over the 2004 International Energy Code or American Society of Heating, Refrigerating and Air-Conditioning Engineers (ASHRAE) Standard 90.1-2004, as appropriate. The Engineer Research and Development Center of the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers and the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) are developing target energy budgets and design guides with a prescriptive path to achieve 30% energy savings over a baseline built to the minimum requirements of ANSI/ASHRAE/IESNA Standard 90.1-2004. This project covers eight building types in 15 U.S. climate zones. The building types include barracks, administrative buildings, a maintenance facility, a dining facility, a child development center, and an Army reserve center. All the design guides will be completed by the end of 2008. This paper focuses on the design guide for one type of barracks called unaccompanied enlisted personal housing (UEPH). The UEPH buildings are similar to apartment buildings with double occupancy units. For each building type, a baseline was established following typical Army construction and ASHRAE Standard 90.1 Appendix G modeling rules. Improvements in energy performance were achieved for the envelope using the NREL optimization platform for commercial buildings and previous ASHRAE design guides. Credit was also taken for tightening the building envelope by using proposed envelope leakage rates from ASHRAE and the Army. Two HVAC systems, including a dedicated outdoor air system, were considered. The final results achieved 29% site energy savings in two climates and greater than 30% site energy savings in all other climates. Results of this study were implemented in the Army's standard RFP process for new UEPH barracks construction in late 2007. New UEPH design/construction begun in 2008 and beyond will require the contractor to design and construct a UEPH facility that meets the target energy budget developed in this study using either a custom design or the design guide's prescriptive path developed as part of this study.

Deru, M.; Zhivov, A.; Herron, D.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

51

U.S. Army - Ft. Carson, Colorado | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Army - Ft. Carson, Colorado Army - Ft. Carson, Colorado U.S. Army - Ft. Carson, Colorado October 7, 2013 - 10:01am Addthis Photo of High-Bay Aviation Maintenance Facility at Butts Army Airfield Fort Carson U.S. Army Base is located south of Colorado Springs, Colorado. It was the first Federal facility to install a "solar wall"-a solar ventilation air preheating system. The solar wall heats Ft. Carson's new high-bay aviation maintenance facility at Butts Army Airfield by pre-warming air as much as 54°F and supplying the heated air to the building's central heating system. This collector system is especially advantageous for buildings that require large volumes of heated air. The system cost $140,000 to design, build, and install. The unglazed collector consists of 7,800 ft.² of sheet metal dotted with tiny holes. It

52

Iowa Army Ammunition Plant Former Workers, Construction Worker...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Construction Worker Screening Projects Project Name: Medical Monitoring of Former Atomic Weapons Workers at the Iowa Army Ammunition Plant (IAAP) in Burlington, Iowa...

53

Former Worker Medical Screening Program - Iowa Army Ammunition...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Former Worker Medical Screening Program (FWP) Project Name: Medical Monitoring of Former Atomic Weapons Workers at the Iowa Army Ammunition Plant (IAAP) in Burlington, Iowa...

54

US Army Requirements-Driven Remote Power and Microgrid ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... FY06 Army fuel and utility consumption: 412 M gallons of ... of $45 M 330,000 gallons of biodiesel fuel at cost ... Reduce dependence on fossil fuels ...

2012-10-12T23:59:59.000Z

55

Not going home: Army changes program for active duty Stop Loss, Stop Movement  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

WASHINGTON Active-duty Soldiers nearing the end of their service contract may not be getting out of the Army as soon as they might have expected. Army officials announced June 1 the latest Active Army

Story Karla; L. Gonzalez

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

56

DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Seneca Army Depot - NY 11  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Seneca Army Depot - NY 11 Seneca Army Depot - NY 11 FUSRAP Considered Sites Site: SENECA ARMY DEPOT (NY.11 ) Eliminated from consideration under FUSRAP Designated Name: Not Designated Alternate Name: None Location: Romulus , New York Evaluation Year: 1985 NY.11-2 NY.11-3 Site Operations: Eleven bunkers were used to store approximately 2,000 drums of pitchblende ore in the early 1940's. The bunkers were returned to munitions storage service after removal of the ore drums. NY.11-4 Site Disposition: Eliminated - Referred to The Department of the Army NY.11-2 Radioactive Materials Handled: Yes Primary Radioactive Materials Handled: Pitchblende Ore NY.11-3 Radiological Survey(s): Yes NY.11-5 Site Status: Eliminated from consideration under FUSRAP NY.11-2 Also see Documents Related to SENECA ARMY DEPOT

57

Diurnal ice storage cooling systems for Army facilities  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The US Army's experience with diurnal ice storage (DIS) cooling systems for one of its facilities is discussed in this paper. A few favorable characteristics of an Army post for the application of storage cooling systems are identified. A nominal 900 ton-hour (t-h) ice-in-tank DIS cooling system was installed at Ft. Stewart, GA, and has been in operation since March 1987 to demonstrate the applicability of DIS cooling systems to Army facilities. Information on the design, construction, operation, and performance of the Ft. Stewart DIS cooling system is presented. 7 refs., 9 figs., 3 tabs.

Sohn, C.W.; Tomlinson, J.J.

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

58

U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Sites  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

In 1997, Congress directed the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (USACE) to conduct assessment, remedial action, and site closure activities forFormerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program (FUSRAP)...

59

Iowa Army Ammunition Plant Former Workers, Construction Worker Screening  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Iowa Army Ammunition Plant Former Workers, Construction Worker Iowa Army Ammunition Plant Former Workers, Construction Worker Screening Projects Iowa Army Ammunition Plant Former Workers, Construction Worker Screening Projects Project Name: Medical Monitoring of Former Atomic Weapons Workers at the Iowa Army Ammunition Plant (IAAP) in Burlington, Iowa Covered DOE Site: IAAP Worker Population Served: All Line 1/Division B Workers Principal Investigator: Laurence Fuortes, MD Toll-free Telephone: (866) 282-5818 Local Medical Clinics: University of Iowa Hospitals and Clinics 200 Hawkins Drive Iowa City, IA 52242 Henry County Health Center 407 South White Street Mt. Pleasant, IA 62641 Great River Medical Center 1221 S. Gear Avenue West Burlington, IA 52655 Website: http://cph.uiowa.edu/iowafwp/ This project is intended to screen for occupational health conditions among

60

Renewable Energy Opportunities for the Army  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Department of Defense (DoD) has a goal of obtaining 25% of its domestic electricity from renewable sources by 2025, and also must meet federal renewable energy mandates and schedules. This report describes the analyses undertaken to study the renewable resource potential at 15 Army sites, focusing on grid-connected generation of electricity. The resources analyzed at each site include solar, wind, geothermal, biomass, waste-to-energy, and ground source heat pumps (GSHPs). For each renewable generation resource, an assessment was completed to determine the level of resource availability, and the price at which that resource would be available for electricity generation. Various design alternatives and available technologies were considered in order to determine the best way to utilize each resource and maximize cost-effective electricity generation. Economic analysis used multiple funding options, including investment by an independent power producer (IPP), Energy Savings Performance Contract (ESPC), and Energy Conservation Investment Program (ECIP), and considered tax incentives, renewable energy credits, and other economic factors to reveal the most realistic costs possible. Where resource options proved to be economically viable, implementation approaches were recommended. The intention was to focus each installations efforts on realistic projects, moving them from initial assessment through the design and financing to implementation. Many Army sites enjoy very low costs of electricity, limiting the number of cost-effective renewable energy options where resources are available. Waste-to-energy was often a viable option due to the additional revenue gathered from transferred tipping fees. GSHPs were also commonly cost-effective options for replacement in inefficient buildings. Geothermal, wind, and solar resources are found to be more available in certain parts of the country over others, reducing overall potential for use. Wind is variable and often most available in remote areas far from transmission lines, greatly increasing costs. Capital costs for solar energy are high, and the resource is also variable. Table 1 shows which resources are promising for each installation studied. Not all analyses are complete at this point, so some resource potential is still unknown.

Solana, Amy E.; States, Jennifer C.; Chvala, William D.; Weimar, Mark R.; Dixon, Douglas R.

2008-08-13T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "wells hawthorne army" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Commander, Seneca Army Depot Attention: Thomas Stincic, Safety Officer  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

9 1986 9 1986 Department of Energy Washington, D .C. 20545 . Commander, Seneca Army Depot Attention: Thomas Stincic, Safety Officer Romulus, New York 14541 Dear Mr. Stincic: As you are aware, the Department of Energy is evaluating the radiological condition of sites formerly used by Department predecessors during the early years of nuclear energy development , and a portion of the Seneca Army Depot was identified as one such site. While our preliminary inves-tiga- tions did identify residual radioactive material on the site, it is our understanding that the Department of Army assumed responsibility for this residual radioactivity and has completed remedial action. We have not received a final report of this work and would appreciate receiving a copy

62

U.S. Army Fort Carson Environmental Document  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

FINDING OF SUITABILITY TO LEASE FINDING OF SUITABILITY TO LEASE 3 Phases Energy Services Land Lease Us Army Installation Management Command Headquarters, United States Army Garrison, Fort Carson 1.0 PURPOSE The purpose of this Finding of Suitability to Lease (FOSL) is to document the environmental suitability of property at Fort Carson, Colorado, for leasing and construction of a 2 Megawatt (2 MW) solar photovoltaic (PV) plant consistent with Department of Defense (DOD) and Army policy. In addition, the FOSL identifies use restrictions as specified in the attached Environmental Protection Provisions necessary to protect human health or the environment and to prevent interference with existing and planned environmental restoration activities. 2.0 PROPERTY DESCRIPTIONS The property to be leased consists of approximately 18.1518 acres of land located inside a

63

U.S. Army Fort Carson Environmental Document  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

FINDING OF SUITABILITY TO LEASE FINDING OF SUITABILITY TO LEASE 3 Phases Energy Services Land Lease Us Army Installation Management Command Headquarters, United States Army Garrison, Fort Carson 1.0 PURPOSE The purpose of this Finding of Suitability to Lease (FOSL) is to document the environmental suitability of property at Fort Carson, Colorado, for leasing and construction of a 2 Megawatt (2 MW) solar photovoltaic (PV) plant consistent with Department of Defense (DOD) and Army policy. In addition, the FOSL identifies use restrictions as specified in the attached Environmental Protection Provisions necessary to protect human health or the environment and to prevent interference with existing and planned environmental restoration activities. 2.0 PROPERTY DESCRIPTIONS The property to be leased consists of approximately 18.1518 acres of land located inside a

64

Federal Energy Management Program: U.S. Army - Ft. Carson, Colorado  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

U.S. Army - Ft. U.S. Army - Ft. Carson, Colorado to someone by E-mail Share Federal Energy Management Program: U.S. Army - Ft. Carson, Colorado on Facebook Tweet about Federal Energy Management Program: U.S. Army - Ft. Carson, Colorado on Twitter Bookmark Federal Energy Management Program: U.S. Army - Ft. Carson, Colorado on Google Bookmark Federal Energy Management Program: U.S. Army - Ft. Carson, Colorado on Delicious Rank Federal Energy Management Program: U.S. Army - Ft. Carson, Colorado on Digg Find More places to share Federal Energy Management Program: U.S. Army - Ft. Carson, Colorado on AddThis.com... Energy-Efficient Products Technology Deployment Renewable Energy Federal Requirements Renewable Resources & Technologies Project Planning & Implementation Project Assistance

65

Integrating the Army Geospatial Enterprise : synchronizing geospatial-intelligence to the dismounted soldier  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Army's Geospatial Enterprise (AGE) has an emerging identity and value proposition arising from the need to synchronize geospatial information activities across the Army in order to deliver value to military decision ...

Richards, James E., S.M. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

66

U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Delivers Cost and Schedule Validation...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Army Corps of Engineers Delivers Cost and Schedule Validation for Hanford Waste Treatment Plant U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Delivers Cost and Schedule Validation for Hanford Waste...

67

The potential of America's Army, the video game as civilian-military public sphere  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The US Army developed multiplayer online First Person Shooter video game, America's Army, was examined as the first instance of an entirely state-produced and directed enterprise leveraging video game popular culture. ...

Li, Zhan, 1979-

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

68

The Iraq War and the Post Vietnam Narrative: Culture and Change in the U.S. Army, 2005-2007.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The Iraq War was an era of crisis and change within the U.S. Army. The failure of the army to adapt to the war revealed (more)

Chastain, William

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

69

Baseline Report for the Fort Hood Army Base: Sept. 1, 2002 - Aug. 31, 2003  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This report presents electricity, natural gas and cooling baselines for the thermal plant, buildings located in the 87000 block, III Corp building and other buildings that were determined to be part of the ESPC project at Ft. Hood. A baseline analysis is also presented for the natural gas consumption for the Ft. Hood Army base. The weather-independent analysis, which utilizes 24-hour profiles that were developed using ASHRAE??s 1093-RP diversity factor procedures are presented for data obtained from portable loggers attached to Watt-hour meters in selected buildings as well as data from the Main, West and North Substations.

Haberl, J. S.; Baltazar-Cervantes, J. C.; Liu, Z.; Claridge, D. E.; Turner, W. D.

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

70

Field Evaluation of Debris Handling and Sediment Clogging of a 2.0-mm Fine-Mesh Traveling Water Screen at the Hawthorn Power Plant, Missouri River, in Kansas City, Missouri  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report presents results of an evaluation of the field performance of a fine-mesh (2.0-mm) traveling water screen (TWS) in a debris- and sediment-laden river. Fine-mesh overlay panels were installed on one intake screen at Kansas City Power and Light's Hawthorn Generating Station on the Missouri River, in Kansas City, Missouri. Its operation relative to an adjoining coarse-mesh (9.5-mm) screen was evaluated over a nearly 22-month period from December 2009 through August 2011.

2012-02-29T23:59:59.000Z

71

Boxes G-984 through G-1001 U.S. Army En ineers in Hawaii  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Papers labeled "Engineer Division, Army Ground Forces PAC HQ" [DFS 000, 061, 121, 300, 312, 319 series "Engineer Division, Army Ground Forces PAC HQ" Corres. and messages incl. Monthly Report of Operations, Army Ground Forces, Pacific," [DFS 319, 320, 322, 333 series] including Tables of Organization

US Army Corps of Engineers

72

United States Army Corp of Engineers (ERDC) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Army Corp of Engineers (ERDC) Army Corp of Engineers (ERDC) Jump to: navigation, search Hydro | Hydrodynamic Testing Facilities Name United States Army Corp of Engineers (ERDC) Address Coastal & Hydraulics Laboratory, 3909 Halls Ferry Road Place Vicksburg, Mississippi Zip 39180 Sector Hydro Phone number (601) 634-2288 Website http://chl.erdc.usace.army.mil Coordinates 32.3019199°, -90.8733522° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":32.3019199,"lon":-90.8733522,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

73

US Army Corps of Engineers Engineer Research and Development Center  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Energy Star or FEMP designated products #12;8 US Army Corps of Engineers® Engineer Research.5% or more in 2013 and beyond (DoD Internal Guidance is 25% by 2025) ­ Energy Efficient Products ­ Install · Renewable, Renewable, Renewable · Net Zero Energy ­ Energy Efficiency (Conservation) ­ Energy Production

74

Prepared for U.S. Army Corps of Engineers  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Prepared for Headquarters, U.S. Army Corps of EngineersThe contents of this report are not to be used for advertising, publication, or promotional purposes. Citation of trade names does not constitute an official endorsement or approval of the use of such commercial products.

R. Mark Bricks; Clint W. Williford; Larry W. Jones; R. Mark Bricks; Clint W. Williford; Larry W. Jones

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

75

Wellness Program WELLNESS POINTS BANK  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Wellness Program WELLNESS POINTS BANK Renew your commitment to health. Start again October 1, 2012 to your family and friends, too. Your health and well-being are also important to the University of Minnesota. As your employer, the University recognizes the value of investing in a comprehensive Wellness

Thomas, David D.

76

US Army Research Office research in progress, July 1, 1991--June 30, 1992  

SciTech Connect

The US Army Research Office, under the US Army Materiel Command (AMC), is responsible for coordinating and supporting research in the physical and engineering sciences, in materials science, geosciences, biology, and mathematics. This report describes research directly supported by the Army Research Projects Agency, and several AMC and other Army commands. A separate section is devoted to the research program at the US Army Research, Development and Standardization Group - United Kingdom. The present volume includes the research program in physics, chemistry, biological sciences, mathematics, engineering sciences, metallurgy and materials science, geosciences, electronics, and the European Research Program. It covers the 12-month period from 1 July 1991 through 30 June 1992.

Not Available

1992-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

77

Hanford wells  

SciTech Connect

The Site Characterization and Assessment Section of the Geosciences Department at Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) has compiled a list of wells located on or near the Hanford Site. Information has been updated on wells existing from the days before construction of the Hanford Works to the present. This work was funded by the US Department of Energy (DOE). The list of wells will be used by DOE contractors who need condensed, tabular information on well location, construction, and completion dates. This report does not include data on lithologic logs and ground-water contamination. Moreover, the completeness of this list is limited because of new well construction and existing well modifications, which are continually under way. Despite these limitations, this list represents the most complete description possible of data pertaining to wells on or adjacent to the Hanford Site. 7 refs., 1 fig., 2 tabs.

McGhan, V.L.

1989-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

78

Hanford wells  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Records describing wells located on or near the Hanford Site have been maintained by Pacific Northwest Laboratory and the operating contractor, Westinghouse Hanford Company. In support of the Ground-Water Surveillance Project, portions of the data contained in these records have been compiled into the following report, which is intended to be used by those needing a condensed, tabular summary of well location and basic construction information. The wells listed in this report were constructed over a period of time spanning almost 70 years. Data included in this report were retrieved from the Hanford Envirorunental Information System (HEIS) database and supplemented with information not yet entered into HEIS. While considerable effort has been made to obtain the most accurate and complete tabulations possible of the Hanford Site wells, omissions and errors may exist. This document does not include data on lithologic logs, ground-water analyses, or specific well completion details.

Chamness, M.A.; Merz, J.K.

1993-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

79

DOE invites public to mercury storage environmental impact statement...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

CO; DOE Hanford Site, Richland, WA; DOE Idaho site, Idaho Falls, ID; DOE Kansas City Plant, Kansas City, MO; DOE Savannah River Site, Aiken, SC; Hawthorne Army Depot,...

80

U.S. Army Fort Carson Photovoltaics Project Lease  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

DACA45-1-07-6037 DACA45-1-07-6037 DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY LEASE FORT CARSON MILITARY INSTALLATION EL PAS0 COUNTY, COLORADO THIS LEASE, made on behalf of the United States, between the SECRETARY OF THE ARMY, hereinafter referred to as the Secretary, and Carson Solar I, LLC., a limited liability company organized and existing under and by virtue of the laws of the State of Delaware, with its principal office at 31 897 Del Obispo, Suite 220, San Juan Capistrano, CA 92675, hereinafter referred to as the Lessee. WITNESSETH: The Secretary, by the authority of Title 10, United States Code, Section 2667, and for the consideration hereinafter set forth, hereby leases to the Lessee the property over, across, in and upon lands of the United States, identified in Exhibits "A" and "B," attached hereto and made a

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "wells hawthorne army" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Iowa Army Ammunition Plant, Former Production Workers Screening Projects |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Plant, Former Production Workers Screening Plant, Former Production Workers Screening Projects Iowa Army Ammunition Plant, Former Production Workers Screening Projects Project Name: Medical Monitoring of Former Atomic Weapons Workers at the Iowa Army Ammunition Plant (IAAP) in Burlington, Iowa Covered DOE Site: IAAP Worker Population Served: All Line 1/Division B Workers Principal Investigator: Laurence Fuortes, MD Toll-free Telephone: (866) 282-5818 Local Medical Clinics: University of Iowa Hospitals and Clinics 200 Hawkins Drive Iowa City, IA 52242 Henry County Health Center 407 South White Street Mt. Pleasant, IA 62641 Great River Medical Center 1221 S. Gear Avenue West Burlington, IA 52655 Website: http://cph.uiowa.edu/iowafwp/ This project is intended to screen for occupational health conditions among

82

Preliminary assessment report for Virginia Army National Guard Army Aviation Support Facility, Richmond International Airport, Installation 51230, Sandston, Virginia  

SciTech Connect

This report presents the results of the preliminary assessment (PA) conducted by Argonne National Laboratory at the Virginia Army National Guard (VaARNG) property in Sandston, Virginia. The Army Aviation Support Facility (AASF) is contiguous with the Richmond International Airport. Preliminary assessments of federal facilities are being conducted to compile the information necessary for completing preremedial activities and to provide a basis for establishing corrective actions in response to releases of hazardous substances. The PA is designed to characterize the site accurately and determine the need for further action by examining site activities, quantities of hazardous substances present, and potential pathways by which contamination could affect public health and the environment. The AASF, originally constructed as an active Air Force interceptor base, provides maintenance support for VaARNG aircraft. Hazardous materials used and stored at the facility include JP-4 jet fuel, diesel fuel, gasoline, liquid propane gas, heating oil, and motor oil.

Dennis, C.B.

1993-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

83

Strategy for Developing 10-Year Energy Management Plans at U.S. Army Forces Command Installations.  

SciTech Connect

In order to reach the energy reduction and sustainability goals of the Executive Order 13123, and to minimize overall energy and water costs, the U.S Army Forces Command (FORSCOM), with assistance of PNNL, has embarked on a program to develop comprehensive 10-year Energy Management Plans for each of the 11 major FORSCOM installations. These plans will identify activities and projects critical to the installation's reaching the Executive Order (E.O.) goals as well as help ensure a reliable and secure energy supply. Each FORSCOM installation will be responsible for developing a plan that is closely linked with the installation Master Plan. The Energy Management Plan will cover elements on both the demand side and the supply side, as well as energy/water security assessments and funding/financing resource requirements.

Parker, Graham B. (BATTELLE (PACIFIC NW LAB)); Gillespie, Adrian (U.S. Army Forces Command); Dixon, Douglas R. (BATTELLE (PACIFIC NW LAB)); Brown, Daryl R. (BATTELLE (PACIFIC NW LAB)); Reilly, Raymond W. (BATTELLE (PACIFIC NW LAB)); Warwick, William M. (BATTELLE (PACIFIC NW LAB))

2002-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

84

Monitoring well  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A monitoring well including a conduit defining a passageway, the conduit having a proximal and opposite, distal end; a coupler connected in fluid flowing relationship with the passageway; and a porous housing borne by the coupler and connected in fluid flowing relation thereto.

Hubbell, Joel M. (Idaho Falls, ID); Sisson, James B. (Idaho Falls, ID)

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

85

Monitoring well  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A monitoring well is described which includes: a conduit defining a passageway, the conduit having a proximal and opposite, distal end; a coupler connected in fluid flowing relationship with the passageway; and a porous housing borne by the coupler and connected in fluid flowing relation thereto. 8 figs.

Hubbell, J.M.; Sisson, J.B.

1999-06-29T23:59:59.000Z

86

An interview of Geoffrey Hawthorn  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

been announced and they were going to set their face against the traditional subjects; they were to start in 1964-5 and I thought that if I did graduate work I could then teach as I wanted to be an academic; in Spring 1962 I had read a profile of Alan... to get more money; meanwhile the load on the staff was terribly heavy; we disagreed about that; also thought that in contrast to Barnes and Goody, Tony wasn't a very liberal character; it still seems to me that Cambridge flourishes because it tolerates...

Hawthorn, Geoffrey

2009-04-23T23:59:59.000Z

87

U.S. Army Fort Knox: Using the Earth for Space Heating and Cooling (Fact Sheet)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

FEMP case study overview of the geothermal/ground source heat pump project at the U.S. Army Fort Knox Disney Barracks.

Not Available

2010-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

88

U.S. Army Fort Knox: Using the Earth for Space Heating and Cooling  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Fact sheet covers the FEMP case study overview of the geothermal/ground source heat pump project at the U.S. Army Fort Knox Disney barracks.

89

Army Equipment Modernization Strategy Versatile and Tailorable, yet Affordable and Cost Effective  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

#12;04 March 2013 For more information contact: Headquarters, Department of the Army, Office Energy 33 Annex M: Army Medicine 35 Annex N: Science and Technology 37 Annex O: References 39 Annex P in various terrains, in cold and hot weather, in energy and water constrained environments and only support

US Army Corps of Engineers

90

DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Iowa Army Ammunition Plant - IA 02  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

Army Ammunition Plant - IA 02 Army Ammunition Plant - IA 02 FUSRAP Considered Sites Iowa Army Ammunition Plant, IA Alternate Name(s): Burlington Ordnance Plant Iowa Ordnance Plant Silas Mason Company IA.02-3 Location: Located in Township 70 North, Range 3 West, Section 32, 5th Principal Meridian, Des Moines County, Burlington, Iowa IA.02-1 IA.02-5 Historical Operations: Assembled nuclear weapons, primarily high explosive components and conducted explosives testing using the high explosive components and depleted uranium. AEC and ERDA operations conducted under permit from the Department of the Army. IA.02-3 IA.02-4 Eligibility Determination: Eligible IA.02-5 Radiological Survey(s): Assessment Survey IA.02-2 Site Status: Cleanup pending by U.S. Army Corps of Engineers. IA.02-6

91

Death and Doctrine: U.S. Army Officers' Perceptions of American Casualty Aversion, 1970-1999  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

While academics and commentators have devoted considerable energy to analyzing the relationship between United States military casualties and the reaction of American public opinion, few have taken notice of the opinions and perceptions of military officers. U.S. Army officers, comprising the bulk of the American military leadership, sustained a thorough debate concerning casualties and public opinion between 1970 and 1999. That debate is apparent from a study of articles in the military's professional journals, contributions to scholarly journals, memoirs, and monographs emerging from the various service schools. Examining the material generated by officers during these decades reveals that they perceived a trend - as well as disclosing a trend in their own writing and discussions. Shaken by the experience of the Vietnam War, unsettled by the public's rejection of that war, officers struggled to prepare for future wars. In the thirty years under discussion, U.S. Army officers noticed an emphasis on technology intended to be more lethal to the enemy and to provide more protection for the American soldier. Officers observed a doctrinal trend beginning with conserving scarce manpower, escalating to minimizing casualties, and reaching the establishment of force protection as a mission equal to any in a given operation. American officers perceived that their political and military leadership had first grown wary of spending American lives and gradually came to view casualties as synonymous with defeat. Associated with this phenomenon, officers noted that in many cases - increasing as this era advanced - sustaining casualties below a given threshold marked the operation as a victory. In sum, military officers observed a trend in which America's civilian and military leadership strived to avoid sending men into conflict, attempting to mitigate through technology the risk combat posed to soldiers, and reacting to casualties as if they signified military defeat.

Johnson, Daniel I.

2010-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

92

United States Army; Fort Gordon, Georgia, Range Control Operations  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

DRAFT DRAFT Joint Standard Operating Procedures (JSOP) For Military Training at the Savannah River Site August 2011 U.S. Department of Energy, Savannah River Operations Office, Savannah River Site And U.S. Department Of The Army, Fort Gordon, Georgia DISTRIBUTION STATEMENT A. Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. 2 Chapter 1 General, 1.1 Purpose, page 8 1.2 Scope, page 8 1.3 Explanation of abbreviation and terms, page 8 1.4 Applicability, page 8 1.5 Deviations and Amendments, page 8 Chapter 2 Responsibilities 2.1 DOE-Savannah River Point of Contact (DOE-SR POC), page 10 2.2 DOE-Assistant Manager for Integration and Planning (AMIP), page 10 2.3 SRNS Interface Management Office, page 10 2.4 Directorate of Plans, Training, Mobilization, and Security (DPTMS), Page 10

93

Battling the Internet Water Army: Detection of Hidden Paid Posters  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We initiate a systematic study to help distinguish a special group of online users, called hidden paid posters, or termed "Internet water army" in China, from the legitimate ones. On the Internet, the paid posters represent a new type of online job opportunity. They get paid for posting comments and new threads or articles on different online communities and websites for some hidden purposes, e.g., to influence the opinion of other people towards certain social events or business markets. Though an interesting strategy in business marketing, paid posters may create a significant negative effect on the online communities, since the information from paid posters is usually not trustworthy. When two competitive companies hire paid posters to post fake news or negative comments about each other, normal online users may feel overwhelmed and find it difficult to put any trust in the information they acquire from the Internet. In this paper, we thoroughly investigate the behavioral pattern of online paid posters bas...

Chen, Cheng; Srinivasan, Venkatesh; Zhang, Xudong

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

94

Property:Reference material | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Reference material Reference material Jump to: navigation, search Property Name Reference material Property Type Page Description The reference material used or cited in the work, activity or concept which is the subject of the page. Pages using the property "Reference material" Showing 25 pages using this property. (previous 25) (next 25) 2 2-M Probe At Alum Area (Kratt, Et Al., 2010) + Boom And Bust With The Latest 2M Temperature Surveys- Dead Horse Wells, Hawthorne Army Depot, Terraced Hills, And Other Areas In Nevada + 2-M Probe At Astor Pass Area (Kratt, Et Al., 2010) + Boom And Bust With The Latest 2M Temperature Surveys- Dead Horse Wells, Hawthorne Army Depot, Terraced Hills, And Other Areas In Nevada + 2-M Probe At Black Warrior Area (DOE GTP) + GTP ARRA Spreadsheet +

95

U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Delivers Cost and Schedule Validation for  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Army Corps of Engineers Delivers Cost and Schedule Validation Army Corps of Engineers Delivers Cost and Schedule Validation for Hanford Waste Treatment Plant U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Delivers Cost and Schedule Validation for Hanford Waste Treatment Plant September 7, 2006 - 8:53am Addthis Corps Report Validates Cost of $12.2 billion and Construction Completion in November 2019 WASHINGTON, DC - The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) today released the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (USACE) report detailing their extensive review and validation of the project contractor, Bechtel National Inc.'s Estimate at Completion - or detailed cost and schedule - for Hanford's Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) in southeastern Washington State. To reduce uncertainty in the planning of this first-of-its kind project, Secretary Samuel W. Bodman last year requested this independent

96

Berkeley Lab Facilitates 18.6-megawatt PV facility at Army's Fort  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Berkeley Lab Facilitates 18.6-megawatt PV facility at Army's Fort Berkeley Lab Facilitates 18.6-megawatt PV facility at Army's Fort Detrick, Maryland December 2013 The Army, on Friday November 29, announced a notice of intent to award a contract to build an 18.6-megawatt solar photovoltaic (PV) facility at Fort Detrick, in Frederick, Maryland. This action will help the service meet its goal of deploying one gigawatt of renewable energy by 2025. The selected contractor is Framingham, Mass.-based Ameresco. Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (Berkeley Lab), through its Environmental Energy Technologies Division, provided essential technical services, over a span of two years, to make this project happen. Supported by the Federal Energy Management Program, Berkeley Lab renewable power expert Gerald Robinson provided the Army, Fort Detrick staff, its Energy

97

DOE, DOI and Army Corps of Engineers Sign Memorandum of Understanding on  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

DOE, DOI and Army Corps of Engineers Sign Memorandum of DOE, DOI and Army Corps of Engineers Sign Memorandum of Understanding on Hydropower DOE, DOI and Army Corps of Engineers Sign Memorandum of Understanding on Hydropower March 24, 2010 - 12:00am Addthis Washington, DC - US Department of Energy Secretary Steven Chu and US Department of Interior Secretary Ken Salazar announced today that the two agencies, along with the Army Corps of Engineers, will cooperate more closely and align priorities to support the development of environmentally sustainable hydropower. The Memorandum of Understanding represents a new approach to hydropower development - a strategy that can increase the production of clean, renewable power while avoiding or reducing environmental impacts and enhancing the viability of ecosystems. By

98

DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Granite City Army Depot - IL 0-02  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

Granite City Army Depot - IL 0-02 Granite City Army Depot - IL 0-02 FUSRAP Considered Sites Site: GRANITE CITY ARMY DEPOT ( IL.0-02 ) Eliminated from consideration under FUSRAP - Referred to DOD Designated Name: Not Designated Alternate Name: None Location: Granite City , Illinois IL.0-02-1 Evaluation Year: 1987 IL.0-02-1 Site Operations: Site was used for storage of GSA thorium residues until circa 1964. IL.0-02-1 Site Disposition: Eliminated - Referred to DOD IL.0-02-1 Radioactive Materials Handled: Yes Primary Radioactive Materials Handled: Thorium IL.0-02-1 Radiological Survey(s): None Indicated Site Status: Eliminated from consideration under FUSRAP - Referred to DOD IL.0-02-1 Also see Documents Related to GRANITE CITY ARMY DEPOT IL.0-02-1 - DOE Letter; J.Fiore to C.Schafer; Information regarding

99

DOE, DOI and Army Corps of Engineers Sign Memorandum of Understanding on  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

DOE, DOI and Army Corps of Engineers Sign Memorandum of DOE, DOI and Army Corps of Engineers Sign Memorandum of Understanding on Hydropower DOE, DOI and Army Corps of Engineers Sign Memorandum of Understanding on Hydropower March 24, 2010 - 12:00am Addthis Washington, DC - US Department of Energy Secretary Steven Chu and US Department of Interior Secretary Ken Salazar announced today that the two agencies, along with the Army Corps of Engineers, will cooperate more closely and align priorities to support the development of environmentally sustainable hydropower. The Memorandum of Understanding represents a new approach to hydropower development - a strategy that can increase the production of clean, renewable power while avoiding or reducing environmental impacts and enhancing the viability of ecosystems. By

100

The U.S. Army's Vehicle Intelligence Program (AVIP): The Future of Manned, Wheeled Tactical Vehicles  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Vehicle The U.S. Army's Vehicle Vehicle The U.S. Army's Vehicle Intelligence Program (AVIP): Intelligence Program (AVIP): The Future of Manned, Wheeled The Future of Manned, Wheeled Tactical Vehicles Tactical Vehicles H. E. (Bill) Knéé Oak Ridge National Laboratory National Transportation Research Center 2360 Cherahala Blvd. Knoxville, Tennessee 37932 USA Phone: (865) 946-1300 Fax: (865) 946-1314 E-mail: kneehe@ornl.gov David J. Gorsich U.S. Army Tank-Automotive and Armaments Command AMSTA-TR-N, Warren, Michigan 49397-5000 USA Phone: (810) 574-7413 Fax: (810) 574-6996 E-mail: GorsichD@tacom.army.mil IV2001 IEEE Intelligent Vehicles Symposium Tokyo, Japan http://www.ornl.gov/ORNLReview/v33_3_00/features.htm 1. Propulsion, Vehicle and Power Systems 2. Information and Decision Support Systems 3. Materials, Structures, and Mechanical Systems

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "wells hawthorne army" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

IOWA ARMY EPA Region 7 04/02/2012 City: Middletown  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

IOWA ARMY EPA Region 7 04/02/2012 City: Middletown AMMUNITION PLANT County: Des Moines County IOWA, and pack a variety of conventional ammunition and fusing systems for the Department of Defense. The Atomic

102

NREL: News Feature - NREL Helping the Army Be as Green as it...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

to leverage lessons learned at the pilot installations as we expand the program to 25 installations in 2014." Army Already on its Way to Net Zero Photo of two men standing in...

103

Renewable Energy Assessment Methodology for Japanese OCONUS Army Installations  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Since 2005, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) has been asked by Installation Management Command (IMCOM) to conduct strategic assessments at selected US Army installations of the potential use of renewable energy resources, including solar, wind, geothermal, biomass, waste, and ground source heat pumps (GSHPs). IMCOM has the same economic, security, and legal drivers to develop alternative, renewable energy resources overseas as it has for installations located in the US. The approach for continental US (CONUS) studies has been to use known, US-based renewable resource characterizations and information sources coupled with local, site-specific sources and interviews. However, the extent to which this sort of data might be available for outside the continental US (OCONUS) sites was unknown. An assessment at Camp Zama, Japan was completed as a trial to test the applicability of the CONUS methodology at OCONUS installations. It was found that, with some help from Camp Zama personnel in translating and locating a few Japanese sources, there was relatively little difficulty in finding sources that should provide a solid basis for conducting an assessment of comparable depth to those conducted for US installations. Project implementation will likely be more of a challenge, but the feasibility analysis will be able to use the same basic steps, with some adjusted inputs, as PNNLs established renewable resource assessment methodology.

Solana, Amy E.; Horner, Jacob A.; Russo, Bryan J.; Gorrissen, Willy J.; Kora, Angela R.; Weimar, Mark R.; Hand, James R.; Orrell, Alice C.; Williamson, Jennifer L.

2010-08-30T23:59:59.000Z

104

US Army Radiological Bioassay and Dosimetry: The RBD software package  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The RBD (Radiological Bioassay and Dosimetry) software package was developed for the U. S. Army Material Command, Arlington, Virginia, to demonstrate compliance with the radiation protection guidance 10 CFR Part 20 (ref. 1). Designed to be run interactively on an IBM-compatible personal computer, RBD consists of a data base module to manage bioassay data and a computational module that incorporates algorithms for estimating radionuclide intake from either acute or chronic exposures based on measurement of the worker`s rate of excretion of the radionuclide or the retained activity in the body. In estimating the intake,RBD uses a separate file for each radionuclide containing parametric representations of the retention and excretion functions. These files also contain dose-per-unit-intake coefficients used to compute the committed dose equivalent. For a given nuclide, if measurements exist for more than one type of assay, an auxiliary module, REPORT, estimates the intake by applying weights assigned in the nuclide file for each assay. Bioassay data and computed results (estimates of intake and committed dose equivalent) are stored in separate data bases, and the bioassay measurements used to compute a given result can be identified. The REPORT module creates a file containing committed effective dose equivalent for each individual that can be combined with the individual`s external exposure.

Eckerman, K.F.; Ward, R.C.; Maddox, L.B.

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

105

Evaluation of Statistical Methodologies Used in U. S. Army Ordnance and Explosive Work  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Oak Ridge National Laboratory was tasked by the U.S. Army Engineering and Support Center (Huntsville, AL) to evaluate the mathematical basis of existing software tools used to assist the Army with the characterization of sites potentially contaminated with unexploded ordnance (UXO). These software tools are collectively known as SiteStats/GridStats. The first purpose of the software is to guide sampling of underground anomalies to estimate a site's UXO density. The second purpose is to delineate areas of homogeneous UXO density that can be used in the formulation of response actions. It was found that SiteStats/GridStats does adequately guide the sampling so that the UXO density estimator for a sector is unbiased. However, the software's techniques for delineation of homogeneous areas perform less well than visual inspection, which is frequently used to override the software in the overall sectorization methodology. The main problems with the software lie in the criteria used to detect nonhomogeneity and those used to recommend the number of homogeneous subareas. SiteStats/GridStats is not a decision-making tool in the classical sense. Although it does provide information to decision makers, it does not require a decision based on that information. SiteStats/GridStats provides information that is supplemented by visual inspections, land-use plans, and risk estimates prior to making any decisions. Although the sector UXO density estimator is unbiased regardless of UXO density variation within a sector, its variability increases with increased sector density variation. For this reason, the current practice of visual inspection of individual sampled grid densities (as provided by Site-Stats/GridStats) is necessary to ensure approximate homogeneity, particularly at sites with medium to high UXO density. Together with Site-Stats/GridStats override capabilities, this provides a sufficient mechanism for homogeneous sectorization and thus yields representative UXO density estimates. Objections raised by various parties to the use of a numerical ''discriminator'' in SiteStats/GridStats were likely because of the fact that the concerned statistical technique is customarily applied for a different purpose and because of poor documentation. The ''discriminator'', in Site-Stats/GridStats is a ''tuning parameter'' for the sampling process, and it affects the precision of the grid density estimates through changes in required sample size. It is recommended that sector characterization in terms of a map showing contour lines of constant UXO density with an expressed uncertainty or confidence level is a better basis for remediation decisions than a sector UXO density point estimate. A number of spatial density estimation techniques could be adapted to the UXO density estimation problem.

Ostrouchov, G

2000-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

106

Remote Assessment of Army Tactictal River Crossing Sites Using LIDAR Imagery  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. Prepared for Tactical river crossings present impediments to Army units on the move because they require specialized procedures and equipment as well as more detailed planning and control than normal operations. A crossing sites suitability is highly dependant on riverbank geography. Commanders with accurate riverbank data can increase the speed of crossing operations, both by quickly and accurately determining appropriate sites and by minimizing the amount and type of equipment carried forward to effect the crossings. A previous study examined how conventional terrain analysis would be used to determine suitable crossing sites. In that study, there was a 16 % acceptable site selection rate for remotely determined crossing sites. The most common problem, which was not detectable using conventional techniques, was that bank slope was too steep for vehicles to traverse. This study looks at using a Light Distance and Ranging (LIDAR) digital elevation model (DEM) to improve acceptable site selection rate. LIDAR data were collected at the sites identified in the previous study and inspected to see if the DEM would provide the information and resolution necessary to improve crossing site identification. The DEM was compared to

Barry A. Coutermarsh July; Barry A. Coutermarsh

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

107

Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. Prepared for U.S. Army Corps of Engineers  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Washington, DC 20314-1000ABSTRACT: The primary issues affecting energy options are those of availability, affordability, sustainability, and security. Since energy resources are unevenly distributed around the world, and the impacts of energy consumption have global reach in both environmental and political terms, any meaningful review of energy-related issues must take a global perspective. This work synopsizes world and national energy issues (including energy source options, resource stocks, and future prognosis) in the context of how Army installations need to respond to changing trends. This report presents implications of actions that may be taken in response to the national and world energy situation, to help the Army to make informed choices on energy utilization that will contribute to sustaining the Armys mission. DISCLAIMER: The contents of this report are not to be used for advertising, publication, or promotional purposes. Citation of trade names does not constitute an official endorsement or approval of the use of such commercial products. All product names and trademarks cited are the property of their respective owners. The findings of this report are not to be construed as an official Department of the Army position unless so designated by other authorized documents.

Donald F. Fournier; Eileen T. Westervelt September; Eileen T. Westervelt; Donald F. Fournier

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

108

EM Employee Serves Military in Afghanistan, Manages $5.8 Billion Army Task  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Employee Serves Military in Afghanistan, Manages $5.8 Billion Employee Serves Military in Afghanistan, Manages $5.8 Billion Army Task Order EM Employee Serves Military in Afghanistan, Manages $5.8 Billion Army Task Order February 27, 2013 - 12:00pm Addthis James Hawkins James Hawkins BAGRAM AIRFIELD, Afghanistan - EM employee James Hawkins is currently serving the U.S. military in Afghanistan, where he is administering a $5.8 billion task order for the Army. A major in the U.S. Air Force Reserves, Hawkins is an administrative contracting officer for the Defense Contract Management Agency, a component of the Defense Department that directly contributes to the military readiness of the U.S. and its allies. Hawkins is an acquisition planning manager and procurement analyst in the Office of Procurement Planning in EM's Office of Acquisition and Project

109

Technical analysis of US Army Weapons Systems and related advanced technologies of military interest. Final report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report summarizes the activities and accomplishments of an US Army technology security project designed to identify and develop effective policy guidelines for militarily critical technologies in specific Army systems and in broad generic technology areas of military interest, Individual systems analyses are documented in separate Weapons Systems Technical Assessments (WSTAs) and the general generic technology areas are evaluated in the Advanced Technology Assessment Reports (ATARs), However, specific details of these assessments are not addressed here, only recommendations regarding aspects of the defined approach, methodology, and format are provided and discussed.

NONE

1991-06-14T23:59:59.000Z

110

Re: response to oil disaster; spoil islands and Army Corps Haze, Pam K, Gould, Rowan , Ashe, Dan,  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

History: Re: response to oil disaster; spoil islands and Army Corps t Haze, Pam K, Gould, Rowan:59:082010 Subject: FW: response to oil disaster; spoil islands and Army Corps at sure who to ask abou this are dredged, may be a disaster to the very same resources we want to protect from the oil. Can you please find

Fleskes, Joe

111

Major General Hans A. Van Winkle Director of Civil Works U.S. Army Corps of Engineers  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

85 85 March 31. 2000 r Major General Hans A. Van Winkle Director of Civil Works U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Department of the Army Washington. D.C. 203 14- 1000 Dear General Van Winkle: I am writing to you to notie you that the former Iowa Army Ammunition Plant is eligible for the Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program (FUSRAP). The former Atomic Energy Commission (AEC) used this site for early atomic energy development. including the production and assembly of nuclear weapons. Usage of this facility ended during the 1970s. The AEC facility was located on the Army's Iowa Army Ammunition Plant (also known as the Burlington Ordnance Plant or the Iowa Ordnance Plant) near Burlington. lowa. Known activities included the fabrication of explosives for

112

Extremely Low-Energy Design for Army Buildings: Tactical Equipment Maintenance Facility; Preprint  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper describes the integrated energy optimization process for buildings and building clusters and demonstrates this process for new construction projects and building retrofits. An explanation is given of how mission critical building loads affect possible site and source energy use reduction in Army buildings.

Langner, R.; Deru, M.; Zhivov, A.; Liesen, R.; Herron, D.

2012-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

113

Subject: FW: O U 052226Z ARMY WEST NILE VIRUS (WNV) CONTROL PROGRAM Importance: High  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

RUERSWA. ZNR UUUUU ZYW ZOC ZEO T ALL US ARMY REPS AND ACTIVITIES O 052226Z AUG 02 FM DA WASHINGTON DC//DAMO-AOC-CAT// TO RUEADWD/DA WASHINGTON DC//DAMO-AOC-CAT// ALARACT INFO RUEADWD/DA WASHINGTON DC TROOP AND FAMILY LIVING QUARTERS. CHECK WINDOWS AND DOOR SCREENS TO MAKE SURE THEY ARE INTACT. ENFORCE

US Army Corps of Engineers

114

Decontaminating Flooded Wells  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This publication explains how to decontaminate and disinfect a well, test the well water and check for well damage after a flood.

Boellstorff, Diana; Dozier, Monty; Provin, Tony; Dictson, Nikkoal; McFarland, Mark L.

2005-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

115

Wellness Planning Session Report  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Wellness Planning Session Report September 12, 2008 #12;Wellness Planning Session Report Printed.............................................................................1 Explored what wellness program should look like at NMSU .......................2 Considered for the Wellness committee..................................2 Identified the next meeting date and meeting agenda

Castillo, Steven P.

116

Investigating Army systems and Systems of Systems for value robustness  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This thesis proposes a value robustness approach to architect defense systems and Systems of Systems (SoS). A value robust system or SoS has the ability to provide continued value to stakeholders by performing well to meet ...

Koo, Kevin C. K. (Kevin Cheng Keong)

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

117

The AEF way of war: the American army and combat in the First World War  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Many scholars of the First World War have examined the European armies in new ways that have shown not only how those armies actually fought along the Western Front, but how they changed their ideas and methods over time, and why they fought the way they did. This dissertation does the same for the American Expeditionary Forces (AEF). It examines how four AEF divisions (the 1st, 2nd, 26th, and 77th) planned and conducted their battles, what they learned about modern combat in those battles, and how they adapted their doctrine, tactics, and other operational methods during the war. Although this dissertation describes AEF training and operations, its focus is on ideas and methods, and the changes in both during the war. It shows that when the United States joined the war in 1917, the U.S. Army was doctrinally unprepared for the industrial combat of the Western Front. It demonstrates that General John J. Pershing and other AEF leaders accepted this inadequate prewar doctrine, with only minor modification, as the official doctrine of the AEF. Many early American attacks suffered from these unrealistic ideas, which retained too much faith in the infantry rifleman on a battlefield dominated by artillery, machine guns, and barbed wire. However, this dissertation also shows that AEF divisions adjusted their doctrine, tactics, and other operational methods, as they fought. Experienced divisions prepared more comprehensive attack plans, employed more flexible infantry formations, and maximized firepower to seize limited objectives. Although some of these adaptations were accepted by senior officers at AEF General Headquarters (GHQ), the American First Army, and the various corps, the lessons seem to have been learned first, and best, by officers and men within the combat divisions. Often the extent of these changes reduced the operational relevance of senior officers at GHQ, including Pershing, many of whom failed to make the same doctrinal adjustments. In short, this study exposes the battle of ideas waged within the AEF, between those who adhered to the traditional, human-centered ideas of the prewar army and those who increasingly appreciated the modern, industrial ideas then prevalent in the European armies.

Grotelueschen, Mark Ethan

2003-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

118

BUFFERED WELL FIELD OUTLINES  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

OIL & GAS FIELD OUTLINES FROM BUFFERED WELLS The VBA Code below builds oil & gas field boundary outlines (polygons) from buffered wells (points). Input well points layer must be a...

119

Groundwater and Wells (Nebraska)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This section describes regulations relating to groundwater protection, water wells, and water withdrawals, and requires the registration of all water wells in the state.

120

Hawthorne, Nevada: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

°, -118.624578° °, -118.624578° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":38.5246441,"lon":-118.624578,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "wells hawthorne army" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Hawthorne, California: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

4032°, -118.3525748° 4032°, -118.3525748° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":33.9164032,"lon":-118.3525748,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

122

The Disarmament School: US Policy for the Disarmament and Demobilization of the Germany Army, November-December 1944  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

World War II was waged on an unprecedented scale, and the peace which followed was equally unprecedented. The Allies did more than simply call for an armistice; they made their goal the complete destruction of the German Wehrmacht and the German Military Tradition. This demilitarization of Germany was the chief goal of victory and means of ensuring lasting peace in Europe. In November and December of 1944, the US Army hosted the Disarmament School, a series of lectures by experts in the field of demilitarization planning. Based in London, these lectures familiarized US staff officers with the history of planning for the disarmament, demobilization, and final disposal of the Wehrmacht, as well as the current state of those plans. By accessing the transcripts of these lectures as well as original documents and memoranda of US post-hostilities planning staffs, I demonstrate that these groups at the SHAEF and USGCC levels were caught between the need for post-war security and the call for unconditional surrender as they planned for the control and disposal of the doomed German military machine. Though much would change between the time of the Disarmament School and the final defeat of Nazi Germany, the lectures of the Disarmament School nonetheless provide a valuable insight into the assumptions upon which Allied planning rested during a crucial stage of the war in Europe.

Wilkerson, Joseph Jr

2009-08-11T23:59:59.000Z

123

Extremely Low-Energy Design for Army Buildings: Tactical Equipment Maintenance Facility: Preprint  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Extremely Low-Energy Design Extremely Low-Energy Design for Army Buildings: Tactical Equipment Maintenance Facility Preprint Rois Langner and Michael Deru National Renewable Energy Laboratory Alexander Zhivov, Richard Liesen, and Dale Herron U.S. Army Engineer Research and Development Center Presented at the 2012 ASHRAE Winter Conference Chicago, Illinois January 21-25, 2012 Conference Paper NREL/CP-5500-53810 March 2012 NOTICE The submitted manuscript has been offered by an employee of the Alliance for Sustainable Energy, LLC (Alliance), a contractor of the US Government under Contract No. DE-AC36-08GO28308. Accordingly, the US Government and Alliance retain a nonexclusive royalty-free license to publish or reproduce the published form of this contribution, or allow others to do so, for US Government purposes.

124

Making the Connection: Beneficial Collaboration Between Army Installations and Energy Utility Companies  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

"Making the Connection: "Making the Connection: Beneficial Collaboration Between Army Installations and Energy Utility Companies" Beth Lachman RAND Corporation Federal Utility Partnership Working Group (FUPWG) Fall 2011, Philadelphia, PA October 26, 2011 Contact Information: Beth Lachman, Phone: 703-413-1100, ext. 5279, E-mail: BETHL@RAND.ORG Motivation for RAND Study * Energy Independence and Security Act of 2007, Energy Policy Act of 2005, and Executive Order 13423 require military installations to - Reduce energy use 30% by 2015 - Increase renewable energy use 7.5% or more by 2013 * Army installations spend significant amounts on energy utilities - Over $1.2 billion spent in 2010 - Energy prices are rising * Collaboration with utility companies, such as with Utility Energy Service Contracts (UESCs), offers

125

Secretary Chu Visits Advanced Battery Plant in Michigan, Announces New Army  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Advanced Battery Plant in Michigan, Announces Advanced Battery Plant in Michigan, Announces New Army Partnership Secretary Chu Visits Advanced Battery Plant in Michigan, Announces New Army Partnership July 18, 2011 - 1:09pm Addthis Secretary Chu speaks at the A123 Systems lithium-ion battery manufacturing plant in Romulus, Michigan, while employees look on. | Photo Courtesy of Damien LaVera, Energy Department Secretary Chu speaks at the A123 Systems lithium-ion battery manufacturing plant in Romulus, Michigan, while employees look on. | Photo Courtesy of Damien LaVera, Energy Department Lindsey Geisler Lindsey Geisler Public Affairs Specialist, Office of Public Affairs What are the key facts? Thirty new manufacturing plants across the country for electric vehicle batteries and components - including A123 in Michigan - were

126

Well Flix Program Details  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Well Flix's in the Well-U library. These DVD's have been made available so employees may learn about a variety of fitness for a one-week basis at no cost. Contact Well U at well-u-info@rochester.edu for DVD rental. Click the link

Portman, Douglas

127

Energy survey of Army Laundry Facilities, Fort Jackson, South Carolina; executive summary  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this study is to evaluate the technical and economic feasibility of energy conservation opportunities at the Fort Jackson Laundry Facility. This study was conducted under Contract Number DACA21-85-C-0587 entitled `Energy Survey of Army Laundry Facilities, Fort Bragg, North Carolina and Fort Jackson, South Carolina.` The Fort Jackson portion of this study was initiated on March 26, 1986 by letter from Jerry T. Hines, Lieutenant Colonel, Corps of Engineers.

1985-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

128

Facility Energy Decision System (FEDS) Assessment Report for US Army Garrison, Japan - Honshu Installations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report documents an assessment was performed by a team of engineers from Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) under contract to the Installation Management Command (IMCOM) Pacific Region Office (PARO). The effort used the Facility Energy Decision System (FEDS) model to determine how energy is consumed at five U.S. Army Garrison-Japan (USAG-J) installations in the Honshu area, identify the most cost-effective energy retrofit measures, and calculate the potential energy and cost savings.

Kora, Angela R.; Brown, Daryl R.; Dixon, Douglas R.

2010-03-09T23:59:59.000Z

129

File:Federal Hydropower - U..S. Army Corps of Engineers.pdf | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

U..S. Army Corps of Engineers.pdf U..S. Army Corps of Engineers.pdf Jump to: navigation, search File File history File usage Metadata File:Federal Hydropower - U..S. Army Corps of Engineers.pdf Size of this preview: 463 × 599 pixels. Other resolution: 464 × 600 pixels. Go to page 1 2 Go! next page → next page → Full resolution ‎(1,275 × 1,650 pixels, file size: 925 KB, MIME type: application/pdf, 2 pages) File history Click on a date/time to view the file as it appeared at that time. Date/Time Thumbnail Dimensions User Comment current 15:37, 22 May 2013 Thumbnail for version as of 15:37, 22 May 2013 1,275 × 1,650, 2 pages (925 KB) Graham7781 (Talk | contribs) You cannot overwrite this file. Edit this file using an external application (See the setup instructions for more information)

130

Underground Wells (Oklahoma)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Class I, III, IV and V injection wells require a permit issued by the Executive Director of the Department of Environmental Quality; Class V injection wells utilized in the remediation of...

131

Well-centered meshing.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??A well-centered simplex is a simplex whose circumcenter lies in its interior, and a well-centered mesh is a simplicial mesh in which every simplex is (more)

Vanderzee, Evan B.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

132

Geothermal well stimulation treatments  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The behavior of proppants in geothermal environments and two field experiments in well stimulation are discussed. (MHR)

Hanold, R.J.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

133

Wellness, Health & Counseling Services  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Wellness, Health & Counseling Services Dr. Marcelle Holmes Assistant Vice Chancellor CARE Career Student Health Center #12;The mission of the Wellness, Health & Counseling Services cluster is to support · Dedicated to promoting principles of wellness, prevention and healthy life-style choices for students

Stanford, Kyle

134

Nonlethal weapons as force options for the Army  

SciTech Connect

This paper suggests that future challenges to US national security will be very different from those previously experienced. In a number of foreseeable circumstances, conventional military force will be inappropriate. The National Command Authority, and other appropriate levels of command, need expanded options available to meet threats for which the application of massive lethal force is counterproductive or inadvisable. It is proposed that nonlethal concepts be developed that provide additional options for military leaders and politicians. Included in this initiative should be exploration of policy, strategy, doctrine, and training issues as well as the development of selected technologies and weapons. In addition, civilian law enforcement agencies have similar requirements for less-than-lethal systems. This may be an excellent example for a joint technology development venture.

Alexander, J.B.

1994-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

135

BUFFERED WELL FIELD OUTLINES  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

OIL & GAS FIELD OUTLINES FROM BUFFERED WELLS OIL & GAS FIELD OUTLINES FROM BUFFERED WELLS The VBA Code below builds oil & gas field boundary outlines (polygons) from buffered wells (points). Input well points layer must be a feature class (FC) with the following attributes: Field_name Buffer distance (can be unique for each well to represent reservoirs with different drainage radii) ...see figure below. Copy the code into a new module. Inputs: In ArcMap, data frame named "Task 1" Well FC as first layer (layer 0). Output: Polygon feature class in same GDB as the well points FC, with one polygon field record (may be multiple polygon rings) per field_name. Overlapping buffers for the same field name are dissolved and unioned (see figure below). Adds an attribute PCTFEDLAND which can be populated using the VBA

136

U.S. Army Energy and Environmental Requirements and Goals: Opportunities for Fuel Cells and Hydrogen - Facility Locations and Hydrogen Storage/Delivery Logistics  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

US Army Corps US Army Corps of Engineers ® Engineer Research and Development Center U.S. Army Energy and Environmental Requirements and Goals: Opportunities for Fuel Cells and Hydrogen Facility Locations and Hydrogen Storage/Delivery Logistics Nicholas M. Josefik 217-373-4436 N-josefik@cecer.army.mil www.dodfuelcell.com Franklin H. Holcomb Project Leader, Fuel Cell Team 27 OCT 08 Distributed Generation H 2 Generation & Storage Material Handling H2 Vehicles 2 US Army Corps of Engineers ® Engineer Research and Development Center Presentation Outline * DoD Energy Use * Federal Facilities Goals and Requirements * Federal Vehicles and Fuel Goals * Opportunities & Conclusions 3 US Army Corps of Engineers ® Engineer Research and Development Center Where Does the Energy Go? * Tactical and Combat Vehicles (Jets,

137

well | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

43 43 Varnish cache server Browse Upload data GDR 429 Throttled (bot load) Error 429 Throttled (bot load) Throttled (bot load) Guru Meditation: XID: 2142280543 Varnish cache server well Dataset Summary Description The California Division of Oil, Gas, and Geothermal Resources contains oil, gas, and geothermal data for the state of California. Source California Division of Oil, Gas, and Geothermal Resources Date Released February 01st, 2011 (3 years ago) Date Updated Unknown Keywords California data gas geothermal oil well Data application/vnd.ms-excel icon California district 1 wells (xls, 10.1 MiB) application/vnd.ms-excel icon California district 2 wells (xls, 4 MiB) application/vnd.ms-excel icon California district 3 wells (xls, 3.8 MiB) application/zip icon California district 4 wells (zip, 11.2 MiB)

138

Geothermal Well Technology Program  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The high cost of drilling and completing geothermal wells is an impediment to the development of geothermal energy resources. Technological deficiencies in rotary drilling techniques are evidenced when drilling geothermal wells. The Division of Geothermal Energy (DGE) of the U.S. Department of Energy has initiated a program aimed at developing new drilling and completion techniques for geothermal wells. The goals of this program are to reduce well costs by 25% by 1982 and by 50% by 1986. An overview of the program is presented. Program justification which relates well cost to busbar energy cost and to DGE power-on-line goals is presented. Technological deficiencies encountered when current rotary drilling techniques are used for geothermal wells are discussed. A program for correcting these deficiencies is described.

Varnado, S.G.

1978-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

139

Petroleum well costs.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??This is the first academic study of well costs and drilling times for Australia?s petroleum producing basins, both onshore and offshore. I analyse a substantial (more)

Leamon, Gregory Robert

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

140

Geothermal well stimulation  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

All available data on proppants and fluids were examined to determine areas in technology that need development for 300 to 500/sup 0/F (150/sup 0/ to 265/sup 0/C) hydrothermal wells. While fluid properties have been examined well into the 450/sup 0/F range, proppants have not been previously tested at elevated temperatures except in a few instances. The latest test data at geothermal temperatures is presented and some possible proppants and fluid systems that can be used are shown. Also discussed are alternative stimulation techniques for geothermal wells.

Sinclair, A.R.; Pittard, F.J.; Hanold, R.J.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "wells hawthorne army" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

HOMELAND SECURITY A Selected Bibliography U.S. ARMY WAR COLLEGE LIBRARY  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This bibliography includes topics that reflect some of homeland security's many challenges: borders and immigration, cybersecurity, organization, policy, response capabilities, and resourcing. With certain exceptions, the materials in this bibliography are dated from 2006 to the present. For older materials, please see Homeland Security, compiled by Jeanette Moyer, May 2006. All items are available through the USAWC Library. For your convenience, we have added U.S. Army War College Library call numbers, Internet addresses, or database links at the end of each entry. Web sites were accessed March 2011. This bibliography and others compiled by our research librarians are available online through the Librarys home page at

Greta H. Andrusyszyn

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

142

Shock Chlorination of Wells  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Shock chlorination is a method of disinfecting a water well. This publication gives complete instructions for chlorinating with bleach or with dry chlorine. It is also available in Spanish as publication L-5441S

McFarland, Mark L.; Dozier, Monty

2003-06-11T23:59:59.000Z

143

Isobaric groundwater well  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method of measuring a parameter in a well, under isobaric conditions, including such parameters as hydraulic gradient, pressure, water level, soil moisture content and/or aquifer properties the method as presented comprising providing a casing having first and second opposite ends, and a length between the ends, the casing supporting a transducer having a reference port; placing the casing lengthwise into the well, second end first, with the reference port vented above the water table in the well; and sealing the first end. A system is presented for measuring a parameter in a well, the system comprising a casing having first and second opposite ends, and a length between the ends and being configured to be placed lengthwise into a well second end first; a transducer, the transducer having a reference port, the reference port being vented in the well above the water table, the casing being screened across and above the water table; and a sealing member sealing the first end. In one embodiment, the transducer is a tensiometer transducer and in other described embodiments, another type transducer is used in addition to a tensiometer.

Hubbell, Joel M. (Idaho Falls, ID); Sisson, James B. (Idaho Falls, ID)

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

144

Major General Hans A. Van Winkle Director of Civil Works U.S. Army Corps of Engineers  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

' ' h)3,la-3 -II :. *f$oF PJ f/ --' . - - -% c l * 0 - 2 0 A *i j.. %.+-&# Department of Energy Washington, DC 20585 Nay 19, 2000 Major General Hans A. Van Winkle Director of Civil Works U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Department of the Army Washington, D.C. 20314-1000 Dear General Van Winkle: .. This letter is in follow up to a phone conversation between Department of Energy (DOE) and Army Corps of Engineers (USACE) staff concerning the potential eligibility of the former Guterl Specialty Steel site' (formerly, Simonds Saw and Steel site) in Lockport, New York, for inclusion in the Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program (FUSRAP). The site is currently under the custody of a bankruptcy trustee. The former Manhattan Engineer District (MED) and the former Atomic Energy

145

Mr. Witliam Augustine CECW-B U.S. Army Corps of Engineers 20 Massachusetts Ave., N.W~  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

:!lJY ' :!lJY ' 6 I!499 Mr. Witliam Augustine CECW-B U.S. Army Corps of Engineers 20 Massachusetts Ave., N.W~ Washington, D.C 20314-1000 Re: Former Harshaw Chemical Company Site Dear Mr. Augustine: As requested, this note is in follow-up to several phone conversations between Department of Energy (DOE) and Army Corps of Engineers staff and counsel concerning why DOE did not previously include the Former Harshaw Chemical Company site in Cleveland, Ohio in the Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program (FUSRJG' ), when DOE was responsible for FUSRAP. As indicated in my June 3 letter to you, DOE has performed historical research regarding the site and has concluded, pursuant to the March 1999 MOU between DOE and the Army Corps of Engineers, that this site was used for activities which supported the Nation'

146

Geothermal Well Stimulation  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The stimulation of geothermal wells presents some new and challenging problems. Formation temperatures in the 300-600 F range can be expected. The behavior of stimulation fluids, frac proppants, and equipment at these temperatures in a hostile brine environment must be carefully evaluated before performance expectations can be determined. In order to avoid possible damage to the producing horizon of the formation, high temperature chemical compatibility between the in situ materials and the stimulation materials must be verified. Perhaps most significant of all, in geothermal wells the required techniques must be capable of bringing about the production of very large amounts of fluid. This necessity for high flow rates represents a significant departure from conventional petroleum well stimulation and demands the creation of very high near-wellbore permeability and/or fractures with very high flow conductivity.

Campbell, D. A.; Morris, C. W.; Sinclair, A. R.; Hanold, R. J.; Vetter, O. J.

1981-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

147

Thermal indicator for wells  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Minute durable plate-like thermal indicators are employed for precision measuring static and dynamic temperatures of well drilling fluids. The indicators are small enough and sufficiently durable to be circulated in the well with drilling fluids during the drilling operation. The indicators include a heat resistant indicating layer, a coacting meltable solid component and a retainer body which serves to unitize each indicator and which may carry permanent indicator identifying indicia. The indicators are recovered from the drilling fluid at ground level by known techniques.

Gaven, Jr., Joseph V. (Oakton, VA); Bak, Chan S. (Newbury Park, CA)

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

148

Materiel availability modeling and analysis for a complex army weapon system.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Materiel availability (A{sub m}) is a new US Department of Defense Key Performance Parameter (KPP) implemented through a mandatory Sustainment Metric consisting of an Availability KPP and two supporting Key System Attributes (KSAs), materiel reliability and ownership cost. Sandia National Laboratories (Sandia), in conjunction with several US Army organizations, developed the analytical foundation, assumptions, and brigade-level modeling approach to support lifecycle, fleet-wide A{sub m} modeling and analysis of a complex Army weapon system. Like operational availability (A{sub o}), A{sub m} is dependent on reliability, but A{sub m} is also affected by other factors that do not impact A{sub o}. The largest influences on A{sub m} are technology insertion and reset downtimes. A{sub m} is a different metric from A{sub o}. Whereas A{sub o} is an operational measure, A{sub m} is more of a programmatic measure that spans a much larger timeframe, additional sources of downtime, and additional sources of unscheduled maintenance.

Gunther, David W. (US Army); Anderson, Dennis James; Martin, Jeffrey A. (US Army); Hoffman, Matthew J.

2010-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

149

U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Buffalo District Office 1776 Niagara Street, Buffalo, New York, 14207  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

Army Corps of Engineers Army Corps of Engineers Buffalo District Office 1776 Niagara Street, Buffalo, New York, 14207 Explanation of Significant Differences for the Rattlesnake Creek Portion of the Ashland Sites Tonawanda, New York September 20, 2004 Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program Explanation of Significant Differences for the Rattlesnake Creek Portion of the Ashland Sites Table of Contents I. INTRODUCTION 1 II. SITE mSTORY, CONTAMINATION AND SELECTED REMEDy 2 A. Site History 2 B. Original Remedy 3 III. BASIS FOR TmS DOCUMENT.................................*...................*..........*................*.**** 3 A. Summary of Additional Information 3 B. References 4 IV. DESCRIPTION OF SIGNIFICANT DIFFERENCES 4 V. SUPPORT AGENCY COMMENTS 5 VI. STATUTORY DETERMINATIONS 5

150

The Operational Mesogamma-Scale Analysis and Forecast System of the U.S. Army Test and Evaluation Command. Part III: Forecasting with Secondary-Applications Models  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Output from the Army Test and Evaluation Commands Four-Dimensional Weather Systems mesoscale model is used to drive secondary-applications models to produce forecasts of quantities of importance for daily decision making at U.S. Army test ...

Robert D. Sharman; Yubao Liu; Rong-Shyang Sheu; Thomas T. Warner; Daran L. Rife; James F. Bowers; Charles A. Clough; Edward E. Ellison

2008-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

151

Cementing horizontal wells  

SciTech Connect

Since the introduction of horizontal drilling, most completions have been open hole. Open-hole or slotted-liner completions may be satisfactory in straight, thick formations, if stimulation is not required. But if the wellbore wanders out of the reservoir, whether due to loss of directional control or spotty knowledge of formation dimensions, casing becomes a necessity. In addition, a wellbore that stays in the formation but comes uncomfortably close to the water-oil contact or gas cap requires casing to prevent coning. Further, if stimulation is anticipated, or may become a necessity, it is essential that the hole be cased and cemented. Otherwise, there is no control of the stimulation treatment. Even if the horizontal wellbore itself does not require casing, intermediate casing in the high-angle hole is needed. This is especially critical in open-hole completions below a gas cap, for example. The keys to effective horizontal cementing are fundamentally the same as for cementing vertical wells: proper centralization of casing in the bore-hole to ensure efficient mud removal and well-designed cement slurries.

Baret, F.; Griffin, T.J.

1989-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

152

Assessment of a 200-kW Fuel Cell at the U.S. Army Natick Research Center  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The utility industry is showing renewed interest in distributed generation, with a particular interest in fuel cells. This on-going project will provide long-term data on performance and operating characteristics of an ONSI 200-kW phosphoric acid fuel cell at the U.S. Army RD&E Center in Natick, Massachusetts.

1997-10-04T23:59:59.000Z

153

Mechanical well jar  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This patent describes a mechanical well jar having inner and outer tubular members movable longitudinally relative to each other a limited distance. Means for connecting one of the members to a pipe string extends above the jar. Means connect the other member to the pipe string below the jar. Annular shoulders on the members engage to limit the relative longitudinal movement of the members. The improvement comprises: laterally spaced, arcuate cam plates each attached to the inner surface of the outer member by threaded members that extend through the wall of the outer member and that can be removed from outside the outer member to allow the cam plates to be removed and repaired or replaced.

Burton, C.A.

1987-05-19T23:59:59.000Z

154

APPENDIX A DISTRIBUTION LIST Federal Government Agencies Army Corps of Engineers, Sacramento District Headquarter Office  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

DISTRIBUTION LIST Federal Government Agencies Army Corps of Engineers, Sacramento District Headquarter Office Engineering/Design Branch, Regulatory Branch, Planning Branch 1325 J Street, Room 1350 Sacramento, California 95814 Phone: (916) 557-5250 Fax: (916) 557-5306 Department of the Interior San Francisco Regional Office - AS, AZ, CA, CNMI, GU, HI, NV Ms. Patricia Sanderson Port Regional Environmental Officer Department of the Interior 333 Bush Street San Francisco, CA 94104 Phone: 415-296-3350 Email: patricia_port@ios.doi.gov Website: http://www.doi.gov/pmb/oepc/san-francisco.cfm EPA Region 9 - AS, AZ, CA, GU, HI, MP, NV Mr. Scott Sysum Department of Energy Reviewer Environmental Review Office Environmental Protection Agency

155

Notices ACTION: Notice of Intent. SUMMARY: The U.S. Army Corps of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

5 Federal Register 5 Federal Register / Vol. 76, No. 189 / Thursday, September 29, 2011 / Notices ACTION: Notice of Intent. SUMMARY: The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, Charleston District intends to prepare a Draft Environmental Impact Statement (DEIS) to assess the potential social, economic and environmental effects of the proposed construction and operation of a gold mine in order to extract and process gold from the Haile ore body in wetlands and streams associated with Haile Gold Mine Creek, by Haile Gold Mine, Inc. (Haile) in the vicinity of Kershaw, in Lancaster County, South Carolina. The DEIS will assess potential effects of a range of alternatives. DATES: General Public Scoping Meeting: One Public Scoping meeting is planned for Thursday October 27, 2011 beginning at 5 p.m. EDT at the Andrew

156

Wellness Peer Program Volunteer Job Description Wellness Peer Programs  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Wellness Peer Program Volunteer Job Description Wellness Peer Programs: Leave The Pack Behind & Wellness Centre, UTSC Mental Wellness ­ mental health awareness program focusing on mental health, coping on healthy relationships, sexually transmitted infections and birth control Health & Wellness Centre

Kronzucker, Herbert J.

157

Oil well jar  

SciTech Connect

A jar for use in imparting jarring blows to an object lodged in the bore of a well. The jar includes a mandrel member and outer telescopically related tubular member, the mandrel member and said tubular member being telescopically movable between an extended and a collapsed position of the jar. One of the members is connected to a drill string while the other of the members is connected to the object to be jarred. Telescopically overlapping portions of the members provide an annular chamber for confining an operating fluid. A sleeve and a cylinder extend into the chamber and into an essentially fluid tight fit with each other for a selected portion of the telescopic travel between the extended and collapsed positions. An operating fluid bypass is provided in the first one of the members, the bypass being in fluid communication with the operating fluid above and below the sleeve, the bypass including a channel. An orifice is disposed in the channel. A filter, distinct from said orifice, is provided by controlling the clearences between the sleeve and the first one of the members.

Sutliff, W. N.

1985-06-25T23:59:59.000Z

158

Development Wells At Salt Wells Area (Nevada Bureau of Mines...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Development Wells At Salt Wells Area (Nevada Bureau of Mines and Geology, 2009) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Development Wells...

159

Oil-Well Fire Fighting  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Oil Well Fire Fighting. NIST fire Research NIST Fire Research 2 Oil Well Fire Fighting RoboCrane Model Oil Well Fire Fighting Working Model.

2011-08-25T23:59:59.000Z

160

American Recovery and Reinvestment Act, Federal Energy Management Program, Technical Assistance Project 228 - US Army Installation Management Command - Pacific Region, Honolulu, Hawaii  

SciTech Connect

This report documents the activities of a resource efficiency manager that served the US Army Installation Management Command - Pacific Region during the period November 23, 2009 and August 31, 2010.

Arends, J.; Sandusky, William F.

2010-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "wells hawthorne army" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Time Accurate Unsteady Simulation of the Stall Inception Process in the Compression System of a US Army Helicopter Gas Turbine Engine  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The operational envelope of gas turbine engines such as those employed in the Army Blackhawk helicopter is constrained by the stability limit of the compression system. Technologies developed to improve the stable operating range of gas turbine compressors ...

Michael D. Hathaway; Greg Herrick; Jenping Chen; Robert Webster

2004-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

162

A new glide path: re-architecting the Flight School XXI Enterprise at the U.S. Army Aviation Center of Excellence  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This thesis utilizes eight Enterprise Architecture views to analyze the U.S. Army Aviation Center of Excellence's Flight School XXI Enterprise and provides recommendations to improve the effectiveness and efficiency of ...

Enos, James R. (James Robert)

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

163

Wellness counseling appointments: To schedule an appointment with a wellness  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Wellness counseling appointments: To schedule an appointment with a wellness counselor you may call, email, or simply stop by the Center for Student Wellness to leave a note for a wellness counselor-304-5564 (p) 212-304-5560 (p) 212-544-1967 (f) Email: studentwellness@columbia.edu Wellness information

Grishok, Alla

164

Technical Assessment for the CPC FD-7x-1500 Wind Turbine located at Tooele Army Base, Tooele Utah  

SciTech Connect

The CPC FD-7x-1500 Wind Turbine was installed with funding from the Energy Conservation Investment Program (ECIP). Since its installation, the turbine has been plagued with multiple operational upsets causing unacceptable down time. In an effort to reduce down time, the Army Corps of Engineers requested the Idaho National Laboratory conduct an assessment of the turbine to determine its viability as an operational turbine.

Robert J. Turk; Kurt S. Myers; Jason W. Bush

2012-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

165

Water Management Planning: A Case Study at Blue Grass Army Depot  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Executive Order 13123, Greening the Government Through Efficient Energy Management, mandates an aggressive policy for reducing potable water consumption at federal facilities. Implementation guidance from the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) set a requirement for each federal agency to reduce potable water usage by implementing life cycle, cost-effective water efficiency programs that include a water management plan, and not less than four Federal Energy Management Program (FEMP) Best Management Practices (BMPs). The objective of this plan is to gain full compliance with Executive Order 13123 and associated DOE implementation guidance on behalf of Blue Grass Army Depot (BGAD), Richmond, Kentucky. In accordance with this plan, BGAD must: Incorporate the plan as a component of the Installation energy conservation plan Investigate the water savings potential and life-cycle cost effectiveness of the Operations and Maintenance (O&M) and retrofit/replacement options associated with the ten FEMP BMPs Put into practice all applicable O&M options Identify retrofit/replacement options appropriate for implementation (based upon calculation of the simple payback periods) Establish a schedule for implementation of applicable and cost-effective retrofit/replacement options.

Solana, Amy E.; McMordie-Stoughton, Katherine L.

2006-04-03T23:59:59.000Z

166

Pollution prevention opportunity assessments of US Army Corps of Engineers Civil Works Facilities  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This project summary describes three Pollution Prevention Opportunity Assessments conducted at US Army Corps of Engineers Civil Works facilities under the Waste Reduction Evaluations at Federal Sites (WREAFS) Program. The purposes of the WREAFS Program are to identify new technologies and techniques for reducing wastes from industrial processes at Federal sites, and to enhance the implementation of pollution prevention through technology transfer. New techniques and technologies for reducing waste generation are identified through pollution prevention opportunity assessments (PPOA) and may be further evaluated through joint research, development, and demonstration projects. The assessments were conducted using the procedures outlined in EPA`s Facility Pollution Prevention Guide. The assessments had two major phases. The first phase quantified waste generation and management practices. The second phase identified and evaluated the feasibility of opportunities and techniques to eliminate, reduce, or recycle wastes. The facilities studied in the PPOAs were: a navigation lock and dam; a warehouse and a maintenance and repair facility; a hydroelectric power plant; and a flood control dam and reservoir with associated public recreation areas. Other Federal agencies, such as the Bureau of Reclamation and the Tennessee Valley Authority have similar functions and facilities, as do states and the private sector. Thus, the results of the PPOAs described in the three full reports have applicability to a broad audience.

NONE

1995-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

167

Point-to-Point Verification of Monitored Sensors at Reynolds Army Clinic and Hospital Final Report  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A point-to-point verification of the heating, ventilating, and air conditioning (HVAC) system of the Reynolds Army Community Hospital (RACH) in Fort Sill, Oklahoma was done by the Energy Systems Laboratory (ESL) of Texas A&M University. Work began on January 12, 2004 and was completed on July 2, 2004. The facility consists of a clinic section having 212,000 sq.ft and a hospital section with 300,100 sq.ft. Both sections are contained in one building for a total of 512,000 sq.ft. The clinic section of the facility is occupied from 0700 hours 1700 hours while the hospital side operates 24/7. Verification of the facility began shortly after the completion of a $2 million upgrade of the Energy Management Control System (EMCS) by Johnson Controls from their existing 8540 pneumatic system to a direct digital control (DDC) Metasys version 12.0 system. Only the points read by the control system and used for control sequencing were verified. In the following sections of this report detailed information will be provided for the type of equipment used for the point-to-point verification and calibration, calibration tolerances for the devices requiring calibration, areas that require attention prior to calibration, and calibration procedures. The remaining sections will focus on the central plant, clinic, and hospital areas. Each section will contain individual field data for each component tested and calibrated.

Martinez, J.; Linenschmidt, S.; Turner, D.

2004-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

168

Well-pump alignment system  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An improved well-pump for geothermal wells, an alignment system for a well-pump, and to a method for aligning a rotor and stator within a well-pump, wherein the well-pump has a whistle assembly formed at a bottom portion thereof, such that variations in the frequency of the whistle, indicating misalignment, may be monitored during pumping.

Drumheller, Douglas S. (Cedar Crest, NM)

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

169

Wellness Offerings September 17, 2009  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Wellness Offerings September 17, 2009 Vendor Health Risk Assessment Online Content and Decision (Wellness Partners: American Specialty Health) !" !" !" !" !" !" !" !" Blue Shield of CA !" !" !" !" !" !" !" !" CIGNA (Wellness and DM Partner: Healthways) !" !" !" ! HealthNet !" !" !" ! Kaiser

Kay, Mark A.

170

RMOTC - Testing - Openhole Logging Well  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Openhole Logging Well RMOTC Openhole Logging Well RMOTC has drilled a vertical well that is specifically designated for openhole logging tests. It was drilled to 5,450 feet and has...

171

Well Permits (District of Columbia)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Well permits are required for the installation of wells in private and public space. Wells are defined as any trest hole, shaft, or soil excavation created by any means including, but not limited...

172

Productivity index of multilateral wells.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??In the history of petroleum science there are a vast variety of productivity solutions for different well types, well configurations and flow regimes. The main (more)

Nunsavathu, Upender Naik.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

173

Connecticut Wells | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Connecticut Wells Jump to: navigation, search Name Connecticut Wells Place Bethlehem, Connecticut Zip 6751 Sector Geothermal energy Product A Connecticut-based geothermal heat pump...

174

Wellness Program | Department of Energy  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Program Wellness Program Workers spend 200 hours per month at work, and keeping a healthy work-life balance is essential. The Headquarters Wellness Program provides support and...

175

Single-Well and Cross-Well Seismic At Salt Wells Area (Bureau of Land  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Single-Well and Cross-Well Seismic At Salt Wells Area (Bureau of Land Single-Well and Cross-Well Seismic At Salt Wells Area (Bureau of Land Management, 2009) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Single-Well and Cross-Well Seismic At Salt Wells Area (Bureau of Land Management, 2009) Exploration Activity Details Location Salt Wells Geothermal Area Exploration Technique Single-Well And Cross-Well Seismic Activity Date 2008 - 2008 Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Exploration Basis Vulcan increased exploration efforts in the summer and fall of 2008, during which time the company drilled two temperature gradient holes (86-15 O on Pad 1 and 17-16 O on Pad 3); conducted seismic, gravity and magnetotelluric surveys; and drilled deep exploration wells at Pads 6 and 8 and binary

176

Environmental Impact Research Program and Defense Natural Resources Program: Section 7. 5. 7, US Army Corps of Engineers Wildlife Resources Management manual. Final report. [ELAEAGNUS UMBELLATA  

SciTech Connect

A plant materials report on autumn olive (Elaeagnus umbellata) is provided as Section 7.5.7 of the US Army Corps of Engineers Wildlife Resources management Manual. The report was prepared as a guide to assist project/installation natural resources personnel with the selection, establishment, and management of appropriate plant materials for wildlife and habitat development programs. Major topics covered are description, distribution, habitat requirements, wildlife and land management value, establishment, maintenance, and cautions and limitations. Autumn olive is a hardy shrub or small tree introduced into the United States from Asia. It is widely used in the East in habitat improvement projects designed to attract wildlife, provide barriers, beautify existing landscapes, and reclaim disturbed sites. Autumn olive is tolerant of a wide range of soils and climatic conditions. Plants grow best on well-drained soils that are deep, sandy, loamy, or moderately fine-textured. Establishment of autumn olive is often recommended for borders, hedgerows, windbreaks, and disturbed sites. Planting stock of autumn olive is readily available, and some commercial nurseries produce propagules in quantity. Four cultivars (Cardinal, Ellagood, Elsberry, and Redwing) have been developed and are adapted to geographically specific regions. This report provides information on management objectives, site selection and preparation, propagule selection, planting methods, and maintenance requirements for autumn olive throughout its area of potential use. Management cautions and limitations are discussed, and guidelines are provided on the appropriate use of autumn olive in wildlife and habitat management programs.

Dittberner, P.L.; Dietz, D.R.; Wasser, C.H.; Martin, C.O.; Mitchell, W.A.

1992-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

177

WELLNESS LIFESTYLE AGREEMENT COMMITMENT FORM  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

WELLNESS LIFESTYLE AGREEMENT COMMITMENT FORM The Wellness Lifestyle Program is located in Reynolds will actively participate in the wellness program to make Reynolds Hall a healthy and supportive place or more consequences: conduct referral; administrative removal from the Wellness Program and

Weston, Ken

178

Well-pump alignment system  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An improved well-pump for geothermal wells, an alignment system for a well-pump, and to a method for aligning a rotor and stator within a well-pump are disclosed, wherein the well-pump has a whistle assembly formed at a bottom portion thereof, such that variations in the frequency of the whistle, indicating misalignment, may be monitored during pumping. 6 figs.

Drumheller, D.S.

1998-10-20T23:59:59.000Z

179

Raft River well stimulation experiments: geothermal reservoir well stimulation program  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Geothermal Reservoir Well Stimulation Program (GRWSP) performed two field experiments at the Raft River KGRA in 1979. Wells RRGP-4 and RRGP-5 were selected for the hydraulic fracture stimulation treatments. The well selection process, fracture treatment design, field execution, stimulation results, and pre- and post-job evaluations are presented.

Not Available

1980-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

180

Energy efficiency campaign for residential housing at the Fort Lewis army installation  

SciTech Connect

In FY1999, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory conducted an energy efficiency campaign for residential housing at the Fort Lewis Army Installation near Tacoma, Washington. Preliminary weather-corrected calculations show energy savings of 10{percent} from FY98 for energy use in family housing. This exceeded the project's goal of 3{percent}. The work was funded by the U.S. DOEs Federal Energy Management Program (FEMP), Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy. The project adapted FEMP's national ``You Have the Power Campaign'' at the local level, tailoring it to the military culture. The applied research project was designed to demonstrate the feasibility of tailored, research-based strategies to promote energy conservation in military family housing. In contrast to many energy efficiency efforts, the campaign focused entirely on actions residents could take in their own homes, as opposed to technology or housing upgrades. Behavioral change was targeted because residents do not pay their own utility bills; thus other motivations must drive personal energy conservation. This campaign augments ongoing energy savings from housing upgrades carried out by Fort Lewis. The campaign ran from September 1998 through August 1999. The campaign strategy was developed based on findings from previous research and on input from residents and officials at Fort Lewis. Energy use, corrected to account for weather differences, was compared with the previous year's use. Survey responses from 377 of Fort Lewis residents of occupied housing showed that the campaign was moderately effective in promoting behavior change. Of those who were aware of the campaign, almost all said they were now doing one or more energy-efficient things that they had not done before. Most people were motivated by the desire to do the right thing and to set a good example for their children. They were less motivated by other factors.

AH McMakin; RE Lundgren; EL Malone

2000-02-23T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "wells hawthorne army" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Examination of Process Implementation of Evidence-based Design Initiatives on United States Army Medical Construction  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The objective of this research is to review the degree of United States Army compliance in the implementation of evidence-based design practices within the Military Health System construction cycle. This research looks at the impact of the 2007 Assistant Secretary of Defense for Health Affairs memorandum directing the use of evidence-based design within the Military Healthcare System construction process. The memorandum impacted the military medical construction process that includes over 6.2 billion dollars in government programmed military medical construction covering 9.2 million beneficiaries. An analysis of federal construction documents, interviews, and an online survey was conducted with 85 government and civilian healthcare facility planners to measure general evidence-based design knowledge, direct knowledge of medical construction policy requirements, and the level to which the Military Health System Evidence-based Design Principles matrix has been implemented within four selected military medical construction projects. Results of the review of construction publications show minimal evidence of evidence-based design incorporation with key federal regulatory documents. The results of an online survey conducted during the research had a 65.8% response rate (39 government personnel, 17 civilian personnel). The survey showed that basic knowledge of evidence-based design was present, but revealed severe deficiencies in specific knowledge and application of construction policies. Review of selected medical facilities demonstrated non-standardized incorporation of evidence-based design features. This research concludes that evidence-based design has achieved minimal integration into the Military Health System general knowledge base and project execution. Achieving compliance with the 2007 directive memorandum requires that significant efforts be made in personnel training and reconciliation with federal military medical construction documents.

Marsh, Glenn Edward

2010-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

182

Exploratory Well | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Exploratory Well Exploratory Well Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Technique: Exploratory Well Details Activities (8) Areas (3) Regions (0) NEPA(5) Exploration Technique Information Exploration Group: Drilling Techniques Exploration Sub Group: Exploration Drilling Parent Exploration Technique: Exploration Drilling Information Provided by Technique Lithology: Can provide core or cuttings Stratigraphic/Structural: Identify stratigraphy and structural features within a well Hydrological: -Water samples can be used for geochemical analysis -Fluid pressures can be used to estimate flow rates Thermal: -Temperatures can be measured within the hole -Information about the heat source Dictionary.png Exploratory Well: An exploratory well is drilled for the purpose of identifying the

183

Optimization of fractured well performance of horizontal gas wells  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In low-permeability gas reservoirs, horizontal wells have been used to increase the reservoir contact area, and hydraulic fracturing has been further extending the contact between wellbores and reservoirs. This thesis presents an approach to evaluate horizontal well performance for fractured or unfractured gas wells and a sensitivity study of gas well performance in a low permeability formation. A newly developed Distributed Volumetric Sources (DVS) method was used to calculate dimensionless productivity index for a defined source in a box-shaped domain. The unique features of the DVS method are that it can be applied to transient flow and pseudo-steady state flow with a smooth transition between the boundary conditions. In this study, I conducted well performance studies by applying the DVS method to typical tight sandstone gas wells in the US basins. The objective is to determine the best practice to produce horizontal gas wells. For fractured wells, well performance of a single fracture and multiple fractures are compared, and the effect of the number of fractures on productivity of the well is presented based on the well productivity. The results from this study show that every basin has a unique ideal set of fracture number and fracture length. Permeability plays an important role on dictating the location and the dimension of the fractures. This study indicated that in order to achieve optimum production, the lower the permeability of the formation, the higher the number of fractures.

Magalhaes, Fellipe Vieira

2007-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

184

Assessment of Injection Well Construction and Operation for Water Injection Wells and Salt Water Disposal Wells  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Assessment of Injection Well Construction and Operation for Water Injection Wells and Salt Water Disposal Wells in the Nine Township Area ­ 2009 September 2009 Prepared by Delaware Basin Drilling from EPA to DOE dated 7/16/2009) 1 Solution Mining Practices 1 Recent Well Failures 2 The Mechanism

185

Thermal well-test method  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A well-test method involving injection of hot (or cold) water into a groundwater aquifer, or injecting cold water into a geothermal reservoir. By making temperature measurements at various depths in one or more observation wells, certain properties of the aquifer are determined. These properties, not obtainable from conventional well test procedures, include the permeability anisotropy, and layering in the aquifer, and in-situ thermal properties. The temperature measurements at various depths are obtained from thermistors mounted in the observation wells.

Tsang, Chin-Fu (Albany, CA); Doughty, Christine A. (Berkeley, CA)

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

186

Indiana Memorial Union Wells Library  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Franklin Hall Bryan Hall Law Indiana Memorial Union Jordan Hall Morrison Hall Wells Library Loop (0.5 miles) IMU to Greenhouse (0.3 miles) Business to Law School (0.75 miles) Wells Library to Morrison Hall (0.5 miles) Wells Library to Muisc Library (0.4 miles) #12;

Indiana University

187

Well Deepening | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Well Deepening Well Deepening Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Technique: Well Deepening Details Activities (5) Areas (3) Regions (0) NEPA(0) Exploration Technique Information Exploration Group: Drilling Techniques Exploration Sub Group: Development Drilling Parent Exploration Technique: Development Drilling Information Provided by Technique Lithology: Drill cuttings are analyzed to determine lithology and mineralogy Stratigraphic/Structural: Fractures, faults, and geologic formations that the well passes through are identified and mapped. Hydrological: Identify aquifers, reservoir boundaries, flow rates, fluid pressure, and chemistry Thermal: Direct temperature measurements from within the reservoir Dictionary.png Well Deepening:

188

Observation Wells | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Observation Wells Observation Wells Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Technique: Observation Wells Details Activities (7) Areas (7) Regions (0) NEPA(15) Exploration Technique Information Exploration Group: Drilling Techniques Exploration Sub Group: Development Drilling Parent Exploration Technique: Development Drilling Information Provided by Technique Lithology: Stratigraphic/Structural: Hydrological: Total dissolved solids, fluid pressure, flow rates, and flow direction Thermal: Monitors temperature of circulating fluids Dictionary.png Observation Wells: An observation well is used to monitor important hydrologic parameters in a geothermal system that can indicate performance, longevity, and transient processes. Other definitions:Wikipedia Reegle

189

Production Wells | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Production Wells Production Wells (Redirected from Development Wells) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Technique: Production Wells Details Activities (13) Areas (13) Regions (0) NEPA(7) Exploration Technique Information Exploration Group: Drilling Techniques Exploration Sub Group: Development Drilling Parent Exploration Technique: Development Drilling Information Provided by Technique Lithology: Drill cuttings are analyzed to determine lithology and mineralogy Stratigraphic/Structural: Fractures, faults, and geologic formations that the well passes through are identified and mapped. Hydrological: Identify aquifers, reservoir boundaries, flow rates, fluid pressure, and chemistry Thermal: Direct temperature measurements from within the reservoir

190

Production Wells | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Production Wells Production Wells Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Technique: Production Wells Details Activities (13) Areas (13) Regions (0) NEPA(7) Exploration Technique Information Exploration Group: Drilling Techniques Exploration Sub Group: Development Drilling Parent Exploration Technique: Development Drilling Information Provided by Technique Lithology: Drill cuttings are analyzed to determine lithology and mineralogy Stratigraphic/Structural: Fractures, faults, and geologic formations that the well passes through are identified and mapped. Hydrological: Identify aquifers, reservoir boundaries, flow rates, fluid pressure, and chemistry Thermal: Direct temperature measurements from within the reservoir Dictionary.png Production Wells:

191

Wellness Program | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Program Program Wellness Program Workers spend 200 hours per month at work, and keeping a healthy work-life balance is essential. The Headquarters Wellness Program provides support and assistance to DOE employees through a variety of programs and resources geared toward enhancing their mental and physical well-being. Wellness programs include: Accommodations, the Child Development Centers, the Employee Assistance Program (EAP), the Forrestal (FOHO) and Germantown (GOHO) Fitness Centers, the Occupational Health Clinics and the DOE WorkLife4You Program. Programs Disability Services Child Development Centers Headquarters Employee Assistance Program (EAP) Headquarters Occupational Health Clinics Headquarters Accommodation Program DOE Worklife4You Program Health Foreign Travel Health & Wellness Tips

192

Tubular well tool receiving conduit  

SciTech Connect

In combination, a well packer and a tubular well tool receiving conduit are described which consists of: a well packer having an expandable and retractable anchoring teeth and an expandable and retractable seal spaced from the anchoring teeth, a tubular well conduit including, a first plurality of circularly extending grooves on the inside of the conduit for coacting with the anchoring teeth for supporting the well tool in the conduit, a second plurality of circularly extending grooves on the inside of the conduit and positioned for coacting with the expandable seal for providing multiple seal points with the seal.

Durst, D.G.; Morris, A.J.

1986-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

193

well records | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

well records well records Dataset Summary Description The Alabama State Oil and Gas Board publishes well record permits to the public as they are approved. This dataset is comprised of 50 recent well record permits from 2/9/11 - 3/18/11. The dataset lists the well name, county, operator, field, and date approved, among other fields. State's make oil and gas data publicly available for a range of topics. Source Geological Survey of Alabama Date Released February 09th, 2011 (3 years ago) Date Updated March 18th, 2011 (3 years ago) Keywords Alabama board gas oil state well records Data application/vnd.ms-excel icon Well records 2/9/11 - 3/18/11 (xls, 28.7 KiB) Quality Metrics Level of Review Some Review Comment Temporal and Spatial Coverage Frequency Time Period License License Open Data Commons Attribution License

194

Superfund Record of Decision (EPA Region 7): Cornhusker Army Ammunition Plant, Operable Unit 2, Hall County, NE, September 30, 1998  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This Record of Decision (ROD) document presents the selected remedial action for the six areas of concern (AOCs) located at the Cornhusker Army Ammunition Plant (CHAAP) in Grand Island, Nebraska designated as OU2. The remedial action is chosen in accordance with the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act of 1980 (CERLCA), as amended by the Superfund Amendments and Reauthorization Act (SARA) of 1986, and with the National Oil and Hazardous Substances Pollution Contingency Plan (NCP). The information supporting the decisions contained in the remedy is contained in the administrative record.

NONE

1999-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

195

Water Well Data Elements Well Header Tab Page  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Water producing from Lithologic formation from which water is produced. at depth Top of water producing formation (ft) to Base of water producing formation (ft) Static water level Static water level below casingWater Well Data Elements Well Header Tab Page: This list contains location and identification

Frank, Thomas D.

196

Session: Long Valley Exploratory Well  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This session at the Geothermal Energy Program Review X: Geothermal Energy and the Utility Market consisted of four presentations: ''Long Valley Exploratory Well - Summary'' by George P. Tennyson, Jr.; ''The Long Valley Well - Phase II Operations'' by John T. Finger; ''Geologic results from the Long Valley Exploratory Well'' by John C. Eichelberger; and ''A Model for Large-Scale Thermal Convection in the Long Valley Geothermal Region'' by Charles E. Hickox.

Tennyson, George P. Jr.; Finger, John T.; Eichelberger, John C.; Hickox, Charles E.

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

197

Thermal well-test method  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A well-test method involving injection of hot (or cold) water into a groundwater aquifer, or injecting cold water into a geothermal reservoir is disclosed. By making temperature measurements at various depths in one or more observation wells, certain properties of the aquifer are determined. These properties, not obtainable from conventional well test procedures, include the permeability anisotropy, and layering in the aquifer, and in-situ thermal properties. The temperature measurements at various depths are obtained from thermistors mounted in the observation wells.

Tsang, C.F.; Doughty, C.A.

1984-02-24T23:59:59.000Z

198

OpenEI - well records  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

http:en.openei.orgdatasetstaxonomyterm4320 en Alabama State Oil and Gas Board: Oil Well Records (2911 - 31811) http:en.openei.orgdatasetsnode469

The Alabama...

199

DOE Solar Decathlon: Wells Fargo  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

greenhouse gas emissions and building sustainably, Wells Fargo serves one in three households in the United States and has been widely recognized for sustainability leadership in...

200

Fundamentals of horizontal well completions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Oil and gas wells are drilled horizontally for a variety of reasons, chiefly to improve production without drilling multiple vertical wells and to prevent water or gas coning. Benefits of horizontal drilling are well documented. This article addresses the fundamentals of completing a horizontal well, discussing completion by (1) open hole, (2) casing packers, (3) slotted or perforated liner, and (4) cemented casing/liner. Completion methods 1 through 3 are generally known as ''drain hole'' completions, and method 4 is commonly called the ''case hole'' or ''stimulated'' completion.

Austin, C.; Zimmerman, C.; Sullaway, B.; Sabins, F.

1988-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "wells hawthorne army" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Well drilling apparatus and method  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Well drilling rates may be increased by impelling projectiles to fracture rock formations and drilling with rock drill bits through the projectile fractured rock.

Alvis, Robert L. (Albuquerque, NM); Newsom, Melvin M. (Albuquerque, NM)

1977-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

202

What's new in well control  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Drillers know that the most important tools used in well control are preparation and knowledge. That fact is reinforced by government agency requirements for certification of responsible people on the rig, particularly in sensitive public areas like offshore waters. And existing problems like shallow gas blowouts and kick control in conventional wells have been complicated by industry's move to horizontal wells and underbalanced drilling. The International Association of Drilling Contractors (IADC) in the US and Europe is devoting a major effort to well control technology. It sponsored a comprehensive conference in Houston in November 1993, plus a well control trainer's Roundtable meeting in Houston in March. The IADC Well Control Conference for Europe is scheduled for June 8--10, 1994, in Stavanger, Norway, with an important 22-paper program. In this article, World Oil has selected several presentations from the two US IADC conferences noted above. These selections are noted by the authors as being of wide and current interest to the industry, they include: (1) horizontal well considerations, (2) a proposed new well killing method, (3) underbalanced drilling, (4) a new onsite simulator, and (5) IADC's school accreditation program. Summaries shown here cover only major topics. Original papers should be consulted for important details.

Snyder, R.E.

1994-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

203

Well descriptions for geothermal drilling  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Generic well models have been constructed for eight major geothermal resource areas. The models define representative times and costs associated with the individual operations that can be expected during drilling and completion of geothermal wells. They were made for and have been used to evaluate the impacts of potential new technologies. Their nature, their construction, and their validation are discussed.

Carson, C.C.; Livesay, B.J.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

204

Method for drilling directional wells  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A method is described of locating a substantially horizontal bed of interest in a formation and maintaining a drill string therein during the drilling operation, said drill string including a measurement-while-drilling (MWD) electromagnetic propagation resistivity sensor, comprising the steps of: drilling a substantially vertical offset well in a formation having at least one selected substantially horizontal bed therein; measuring resistivity in the formation at the offset well to provide a first resistivity log as a function of depth; modeling the substantially horizontal bed to provide a modeled resistivity log indicative of the resistivity taken along the substantially horizontal bed, said modeling being based on said first resistivity log; drilling a directional well in said formation near said offset well, a portion of said directional well being disposed in said substantially horizontal bed; measuring resistivity in said directional well using the MWD electromagnetic propagation resistivity sensor to provide a second log of resistivity taken substantially horizontally; comparing said second log to said modeled log to determine the location of said directional well; and adjusting the directional drilling operation so as to maintain said drill string within said substantially horizontal bed during the drilling of said directional well in response to said comparing step.

Wu, Jianwu; Wisler, M.M.

1993-07-27T23:59:59.000Z

205

Square wells, quantum wells and ultra-thin metallic films  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The eigenvalue equations for the energy of bound states of a particle in a square well are solved, and the exact solutions are obtained, as power series. Accurate analytical approximate solutions are also given. The application of these results in the physics of quantum wells are discussed,especially for ultra-thin metallic films, but also in the case of resonant cavities, heterojunction lasers, revivals and super-revivals.

Victor Barsan

2013-07-09T23:59:59.000Z

206

Geothermal-well design handbook  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A simplified process is presented for estimating the performance of geothermal wells which are produced by natural, flashing flows. The well diameter and depth, and reservoir conditions must be known; then it is possible to determine the total pressure drop in a flowing well, and therefore to find the fluid pressure, temperature, and steam quality at the wellhead. By applying the handbook process to several input data sets, the user can compile sufficient information to determine the interdependence of input and output parameters. (MHR)

Not Available

1982-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

207

Geothermal Well Site Restoration and Plug and Abandonment of Wells  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A report is presented on the final phase of an energy research program conducted by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) involving two geothermal well sites in the State of Louisiana-the Gladys McCall site and the Willis Hulin site. The research program was intended to improve geothermal technology and to determine the efficacy of producing electricity commercially from geopressured resource sites. The final phase of the program consisted of plug and abandonment (P&A) of the wells and restoration of the well sites. Restoration involved (a) initial soil and water sampling and analysis; (b) removal and disposal of well pads, concrete, utility poles, and trash; (c) plugging of monitor and freshwater wells; and (d) site leveling and general cleanup. Restoration of the McCall site required removal of naturally occurring radioactive material (NORM), which was costly and time-consuming. Exhibits are included that provide copies of work permits and authorizations, P&A reports and procedures, daily workover and current conditions report, and cost and salvage reports. Site locations, grid maps, and photographs are provided.

Rinehart, Ben N.

1994-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

208

Well servicing rig market report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This article profiles the well servicing industry, focusing on the problems facing the industry under currently depressed market conditions. The problems of rising operating costs, oil price uncertainty, and aging equipment are addressed specifically.

Killalea, M

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

209

ADVANCED CEMENTS FOR GEOTHERMAL WELLS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Using the conventional well cements consisting of the calcium silicate hydrates (CaO-SiO{sub 2}-H{sub 2}O system) and calcium aluminum silicate hydrates (CaO-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}-SiO{sub 2}-H{sub 2}O system) for the integrity of geothermal wells, the serious concern confronting the cementing industries was their poor performance in mechanically supporting the metallic well casing pipes and in mitigating the pipe's corrosion in very harsh geothermal reservoirs. These difficulties are particularly acute in two geological regions: One is the deep hot downhole area ({approx} 1700 m depth at temperatures of {approx} 320 C) that contains hyper saline water with high concentrations of CO{sub 2} (> 40,000 ppm) in conjunction with {approx} 100 ppm H{sub 2}S at a mild acid of pH {approx} 5.0; the other is the upper well region between the well's surface and {approx} 1000 m depth at temperatures up to 200 C. The specific environment of the latter region is characterized by highly concentrated H{sub 2}SO{sub 4} (pH strength of cements, lowering the mechanical support of casing pipes, but also increased the extent of permeability of the brine through the cement layer, promoting the rate of the pipe's corrosion. Severely carbonated and acid eroded cements often impaired the integrity of a well in less than one year; in the worst cases, casings have collapsed within three months, leading to the need for costly and time-consuming repairs or redrilling operations. These were the reasons why the geothermal well drilling and cementing industries were concerned about using conventional well cements, and further their deterioration was a major impediment in expediting the development of geothermal energy resources.

SUGAMA,T.

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

210

Geothermal energy well casing seal  

SciTech Connect

A geothermal energy transfer and utilization system makes use of thermal energy stored in hot solute-bearing well water to generate super-heated steam from an injected flow of clean water. The super-heated steam is then used for operating a turbine-driven pump at the well bottom for pumping the hot solute-bearing water at high pressure and in liquid state to the earth's surface, where it is used by transfer of its heat to a closed-loop steam generator-turbine-alternator combination for the beneficial generation of electrical or other power. Residual concentrated solute-bearing water is pumped back into the earth. The clean cooled water regenerated at the surface-located system is returned to the deep well pumping system also for lubrication of a fluid bearing arrangement supporting the turbine-driven pump system. The deep well pump system is supported within the well casing pipe from the earth's surface by the turbine exhaust steam conduit. In view of differential expansion effects on the relative lengths of the casing pipe and the exhaust steam conduit, a novel flexible seal is provided between the suspended turbine-pump system and the well pipe casing. 9 claims, 2 drawing figures.

Matthews, H.B.

1976-07-06T23:59:59.000Z

211

Quantum well multijunction photovoltaic cell  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A monolithic, quantum well, multilayer photovoltaic cell comprises a p-n junction comprising a p-region on one side and an n-region on the other side, each of which regions comprises a series of at least three semiconductor layers, all p-type in the p-region and all n-type in the n-region; each of said series of layers comprising alternating barrier and quantum well layers, each barrier layer comprising a semiconductor material having a first bandgap and each quantum well layer comprising a semiconductor material having a second bandgap when in bulk thickness which is narrower than said first bandgap, the barrier layers sandwiching each quantum well layer and each quantum well layer being sufficiently thin that the width of its bandgap is between said first and second bandgaps, such that radiation incident on said cell and above an energy determined by the bandgap of the quantum well layers will be absorbed and will produce an electrical potential across said junction.

Chaffin, R.J.; Osbourn, G.C.

1983-07-08T23:59:59.000Z

212

Quantum well multijunction photovoltaic cell  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A monolithic, quantum well, multilayer photovoltaic cell comprises a p-n junction comprising a p-region on one side and an n-region on the other side, each of which regions comprises a series of at least three semiconductor layers, all p-type in the p-region and all n-type in the n-region; each of said series of layers comprising alternating barrier and quantum well layers, each barrier layer comprising a semiconductor material having a first bandgap and each quantum well layer comprising a semiconductor material having a second bandgap when in bulk thickness which is narrower than said first bandgap, the barrier layers sandwiching each quantum well layer and each quantum well layer being sufficiently thin that the width of its bandgap is between said first and second bandgaps, such that radiation incident on said cell and above an energy determined by the bandgap of the quantum well layers will be absorbed and will produce an electrical potential across said junction.

Chaffin, Roger J. (Albuquerque, NM); Osbourn, Gordon C. (Albuquerque, NM)

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

213

Preliminary assessment report for Fort Jacob F. Wolters, Installation 48555, Mineral Wells, Texas. Installation Restoration Program  

SciTech Connect

This report presents the results of the preliminary assessment (PA) conducted by Argonne National Laboratory at the Texas Army National Guard (TXARNG) property near Mineral Wells, Texas. Preliminary assessments of federal facilities are being conducted to compile the information necessary for completing preremedial activities and to provide a basis for establishing corrective actions in response to releases of hazardous substances. The principal objective of the PA is to characterize the site accurately and determine the need for further action by examining site activities, quantities of hazardous substances present, and potential pathways by which contamination could affect public health and the environment. This PA satisfies, for the Fort Wolters property, the requirement of the Department of Defense Installation Restoration Program.

Dennis, C.B.

1993-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

214

Well record | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Well record Well record Dataset Summary Description This dataset contains oil and gas drilling and permit records for February 2011. State oil and gas boards and commissions make oil and gas data and information open to the public. To view the full range of data contained at the Alaska Oil and Gas Conservation Commission, visit http://doa.alaska.gov/ogc/ Source Alaska Oil and Gas Conservation Commission Date Released February 28th, 2011 (3 years ago) Date Updated Unknown Keywords Alaska Commission gas oil Well record Data application/vnd.ms-excel icon http://doa.alaska.gov/ogc/drilling/dindex.html (xls, 34.3 KiB) Quality Metrics Level of Review Some Review Comment Temporal and Spatial Coverage Frequency Monthly Time Period License License Open Data Commons Public Domain Dedication and Licence (PDDL)

215

Single-Well and Cross-Well Seismic At Salt Wells Area (Bureau...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

temperature gradient holes (86-15 O on Pad 1 and 17-16 O on Pad 3); conducted seismic, gravity and magnetotelluric surveys; and drilled deep exploration wells at Pads 6 and 8 and...

216

ADVANCED CEMENTS FOR GEOTHERMAL WELLS  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Using the conventional well cements consisting of the calcium silicate hydrates (CaO-SiO{sub 2}-H{sub 2}O system) and calcium aluminum silicate hydrates (CaO-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}-SiO{sub 2}-H{sub 2}O system) for the integrity of geothermal wells, the serious concern confronting the cementing industries was their poor performance in mechanically supporting the metallic well casing pipes and in mitigating the pipe's corrosion in very harsh geothermal reservoirs. These difficulties are particularly acute in two geological regions: One is the deep hot downhole area ({approx} 1700 m depth at temperatures of {approx} 320 C) that contains hyper saline water with high concentrations of CO{sub 2} (> 40,000 ppm) in conjunction with {approx} 100 ppm H{sub 2}S at a mild acid of pH {approx} 5.0; the other is the upper well region between the well's surface and {approx} 1000 m depth at temperatures up to 200 C. The specific environment of the latter region is characterized by highly concentrated H{sub 2}SO{sub 4} (pH < 1.5) brine containing at least 5000 ppm CO{sub 2}. When these conventional cements are emplaced in these harsh environments, their major shortcoming is their susceptibility to reactions with hot CO{sub 2} and H{sub 2}SO4, thereby causing their deterioration brought about by CO{sub 2}-catalyzed carbonation and acid-initiated erosion. Such degradation not only reduced rapidly the strength of cements, lowering the mechanical support of casing pipes, but also increased the extent of permeability of the brine through the cement layer, promoting the rate of the pipe's corrosion. Severely carbonated and acid eroded cements often impaired the integrity of a well in less than one year; in the worst cases, casings have collapsed within three months, leading to the need for costly and time-consuming repairs or redrilling operations. These were the reasons why the geothermal well drilling and cementing industries were concerned about using conventional well cements, and further their deterioration was a major impediment in expediting the development of geothermal energy resources.

SUGAMA,T.

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

217

This publication may be used by the US Army, US Navy, and US Air Force during training, exercises, and contingency operations.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and completion in North Atlantic Treaty Organization (NATO) countries. ACKNOWLEDGMENTS Acknowledgment is gratefully made to the organizations listed below for permitting the use of copyrighted material is HQ, TRADOC. Submit changes for improving this publication on Department of the Army (DA) Form 2028

US Army Corps of Engineers

218

Process for cementing geothermal wells  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A pumpable slurry of coal-filled furfuryl alcohol, furfural, and/or a low molecular weight mono- or copolymer thereof containing, preferably, a catalytic amount of a soluble acid catalyst is used to cement a casing in a geothermal well.

Eilers, Louis H. (Inola, OK)

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

219

Hawthorne, New York: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

1073183°, -73.7959666° 1073183°, -73.7959666° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":41.1073183,"lon":-73.7959666,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

220

Comparison of DOE and Army Advisory Boards: Application of a Conceptual Framework for Evaluating Public Participation in Environmental Risk Decision Making  

SciTech Connect

This article is part of a growing body of literature evaluating public participation approaches and implementation efforts. It compares the characteristics and performance of citizen advisory boards established by the U.S. Department of Energy's Environmental Restoration and Waste Management Program (DOE/EM) and by the U.S. Department of Defense's Army (DoD/Army) as a major part of the public participation programs that were undertaken to help the agencies plan and implement the cleanup of their contaminated installations. We first present the elements of the Acceptability Diamond, an evaluative framework developed by the authors through extensive fieldwork on public-federal agency interactions that identify five objectives of agency/public interactions and public participation programs, and link them to existing literature. We then use the Acceptability Diamond as a basis for comparing the performance of the DOE/EM and DoD/Army advisory boards. In the early 1990s, both DOE and DoD participated in the Federal Facilities Environmental Restoration Dialogue Committee (known as the FFER Dialogue Committee) and were influenced by the Committee's recommendations on public participation. However, the Site Specific Advisory Boards (SSABs) subsequently established by DOE/EM and the Restoration Advisory Boards (RABs) subsequently established by DoD and the Army were governed by significantly different policies and management. We describe some of these key differences and compare the performance of the SSABs and RABs. The article draws on a series of research studies conducted by the authors on the DOE/EM public participation program from its inception in the early 1990s through its transition to accelerated cleanup in 2002 and also on a recently completed study of seven Army RABs.

Branch, Kristi M.; Bradbury, Judith A.

2006-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "wells hawthorne army" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

DOE Geothermal well stimulation program  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

An effective stimulation treatment requires the interaction of four separate items: frac fluids, proppants, equipment, and planned and properly engineered schedules. While there are good fluid systems and proppants, only judicious combinations and a well thought out schedule which uses all of these materials and available equipment to best advantage is an optimum stimulation treatment. Generally, high flow rates and convective cooling can be used either with conventional (planar) fracturing or with a dendritic fracturing technique. Many of todays fluid systems have been tested to above 400/sup 0/F. Some fluids have survived quite well. Current tests on proppants have shown temperature sensitivities in sand; however, there are resin coated materials and sintered bauxite which are not temperature sensitive. (MHR)

Hanold, R.J.; Campbell, D.A.; Sinclair, A.R.

1980-10-20T23:59:59.000Z

222

Improved geothermal well logging tools  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A geothermal well logging tool has been designed to operate at 275/sup 0/C and 7000 psi. The logging tool will initially consist of a manometer, a gradiomanometer and a thermometer; the electrical and mechanical design is such that a flowmeter and a caliper can be added as a later development. A unique feature of the logging tool is that it contains no downhole active electronics. The manometer is a standard high temperature pressure gauge. The gradiomanometer consists of a differential pressure gauge which is coupled to ports separated vertically by 2 ft. The differential pressure gauge is a new development; it is designed to measure a differential pressure up to 2 psi at a line pressure of 10,000 psi. The thermometer is a platinum resistance thermometer previously developed for oil well logging. The pressure gauges are both strain gauge types which allows all three gauges are both strain gauge types which allows all three gauges to be connected in series and driven from a constant current supply. This arrangement makes it possible to use a standard seven-conductor cable with no downhole switching. The joints in the sonde are electron beam welded, thus eliminating any sealed joints in the sonde wall. The logging tool will be tested first in an autoclave and in a geothermal well later in the program.

Kratz, H.R.

1977-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

223

Dual valve well pump installation  

SciTech Connect

A reciprocating electric motor-pump assembly for lifting well fluid on downstroke of the motor pump assembly, the pump including a barrel below the motor having dual combined inlet and outlet valve means at the lower end thereof, the pump piston moving in the barrel having annular grooves therearound to prevent differential pressure sticking, the electric cable supplying the electric motor being tubular to vent the pump and prevent vacuum or gas lock, there being a packer about the valve barrel separating the outlet valve means thereabove from the inlet valve means therebelow and a packer above the motor about a production tubing including an upper standing valve.

Holm, D. R.

1985-10-22T23:59:59.000Z

224

Submarine oil well production apparatus  

SciTech Connect

A submergible apparatus for producing an oil or gas well beneath the surface of a body of water consists of an oil and gas separator having a pair of elongated horizontal ballast tanks attached thereto and means for selectively filling the ballast tanks with water or air. A pair of movable buoyancy vessels is attached to the separator and means for selectively moving the buoyancy vessels to alternate positions with respect to the separator are provided so that the apparatus has maximum stability while being towed on the surface of the body of water or submerged therein. (16 claims)

McMinn, R.E.; Tournoux, P.M.; Milnes, D.S.

1973-08-28T23:59:59.000Z

225

Number of Producing Gas Wells  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Producing Gas Wells Producing Gas Wells Period: Annual Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources & Notes Definitions, Sources & Notes Area 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 View History U.S. 452,945 476,652 493,100 487,627 514,637 482,822 1989-2012 Alabama 6,591 6,860 6,913 7,026 7,063 6,327 1989-2012 Alaska 239 261 261 269 277 185 1989-2012 Arizona 7 6 6 5 5 5 1989-2012 Arkansas 4,773 5,592 6,314 7,397 8,388 8,538 1989-2012 California 1,540 1,645 1,643 1,580 1,308 1,423 1989-2012 Colorado 22,949 25,716 27,021 28,813 30,101 32,000 1989-2012 Gulf of Mexico 2,552 1,527 1,984 1,852 1,559 1,474 1998-2012 Illinois 43 45 51 50 40 40 1989-2012 Indiana 2,350 525 563 620 914 819 1989-2012 Kansas

226

Well simulation using Refrigerant 114  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A simple method for the investigation of thermodynamic (substance) similarity in the two-phase domain is introduced based on the assumptions of a simplified model fluid. According to this method, the investigation of the conditions for thermodynamic similarity between substances in the two-phase region reveals the important role the latent heat of evaporation (h/sub fg/) plays in the definition of the property scales. These greatly influence the dynamic and geometric similarity of the process under investigation. The introduction of the thermodynamic similarity property scales into the energy conservation equations for a certain process (e.g., flow up a geothermal well) brings forth a thermodynamic length scale and kinetic energy scale. Refrigerant 114 has been examined for similarity with water substance according to this method and found to be adequate for geothermal well simulation in the laboratory. Low pressures and temperatures and a substantial reduction of mass flow rates and geometric scales are a few of the advantages of using R114 for such experiments.

Nikitopoulos, D.E.; Dickinson, D.A.; DiPippo, R.; Maeder, P.F.

1984-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

227

Ultra Thin Quantum Well Materials  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This project has enabled Hi-Z technology Inc. (Hi-Z) to understand how to improve the thermoelectric properties of Si/SiGe Quantum Well Thermoelectric Materials. The research that was completed under this project has enabled Hi-Z Technology, Inc. (Hi-Z) to satisfy the project goal to understand how to improve thermoelectric conversion efficiency and reduce costs by fabricating ultra thin Si/SiGe quantum well (QW) materials and measuring their properties. In addition, Hi-Z gained critical new understanding on how thin film fabrication increases the silicon substrate's electrical conductivity, which is important new knowledge to develop critical material fabrication parameters. QW materials are constructed with alternate layers of an electrical conductor, SiGe and an electrical insulator, Si. Film thicknesses were varied, ranging from 2nm to 10nm where 10 nm was the original film thickness prior to this work. The optimum performance was determined at a Si and SiGe thickness of 4nm for an electrical current and heat flow parallel to the films, which was an important conclusion of this work. Essential new information was obtained on how the Si substrate electrical conductivity increases by up to an order of magnitude upon deposition of QW films. Test measurements and calculations are accurate and include both the quantum well and the substrate. The large increase in substrate electrical conductivity means that a larger portion of the electrical current passes through the substrate. The silicon substrate's increased electrical conductivity is due to inherent impurities and thermal donors which are activated during both molecular beam epitaxy and sputtering deposition of QW materials. Hi-Z's forward looking cost estimations based on future high performance QW modules, in which the best Seebeck coefficient and electrical resistivity are taken from separate samples predict that the electricity cost produced with a QW module could be achieved at price would open many markets for waste heat recovery applications. By installing Hi-Z's materials in applications in which electricity could be produced from waste heat sources could result in significant energy savings as well as emissions reductions. For example, if QW thermoelectric generators could be introduced commercially in 2015, and assuming they could also capture an additional 0.1%/year of the available waste heat from the aluminum, steel, and iron industries, then by 2020, their use would lead to a 2.53 trillion Btu/year reduction in energy consumption. This translates to a $12.9 million/year energy savings, and 383.6 million lb's of CO2 emissions reduction per year. Additionally, Hi-Z would expect that the use of QW TE devices in the automotive, manufacturing, and energy generation industries would reduce the USA's petroleum and fossil fuel dependence, and thus significantly reduce emissions from CO2 and other polluting gasses such as NOx, SOx, and particulate matter (PM), etc.

Dr Saeid Ghamaty

2012-08-16T23:59:59.000Z

228

Ultra Thin Quantum Well Materials  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This project has enabled Hi-Z technology Inc. (Hi-Z) to understand how to improve the thermoelectric properties of Si/SiGe Quantum Well Thermoelectric Materials. The research that was completed under this project has enabled Hi-Z Technology, Inc. (Hi-Z) to satisfy the project goal to understand how to improve thermoelectric conversion efficiency and reduce costs by fabricating ultra thin Si/SiGe quantum well (QW) materials and measuring their properties. In addition, Hi-Z gained critical new understanding on how thin film fabrication increases the silicon substrate's electrical conductivity, which is important new knowledge to develop critical material fabrication parameters. QW materials are constructed with alternate layers of an electrical conductor, SiGe and an electrical insulator, Si. Film thicknesses were varied, ranging from 2nm to 10nm where 10 nm was the original film thickness prior to this work. The optimum performance was determined at a Si and SiGe thickness of 4nm for an electrical current and heat flow parallel to the films, which was an important conclusion of this work. Essential new information was obtained on how the Si substrate electrical conductivity increases by up to an order of magnitude upon deposition of QW films. Test measurements and calculations are accurate and include both the quantum well and the substrate. The large increase in substrate electrical conductivity means that a larger portion of the electrical current passes through the substrate. The silicon substrate's increased electrical conductivity is due to inherent impurities and thermal donors which are activated during both molecular beam epitaxy and sputtering deposition of QW materials. Hi-Z's forward looking cost estimations based on future high performance QW modules, in which the best Seebeck coefficient and electrical resistivity are taken from separate samples predict that the electricity cost produced with a QW module could be achieved at <$0.35/W. This price would open many markets for waste heat recovery applications. By installing Hi-Z's materials in applications in which electricity could be produced from waste heat sources could result in significant energy savings as well as emissions reductions. For example, if QW thermoelectric generators could be introduced commercially in 2015, and assuming they could also capture an additional 0.1%/year of the available waste heat from the aluminum, steel, and iron industries, then by 2020, their use would lead to a 2.53 trillion Btu/year reduction in energy consumption. This translates to a $12.9 million/year energy savings, and 383.6 million lb's of CO2 emissions reduction per year. Additionally, Hi-Z would expect that the use of QW TE devices in the automotive, manufacturing, and energy generation industries would reduce the USA's petroleum and fossil fuel dependence, and thus significantly reduce emissions from CO2 and other polluting gasses such as NOx, SOx, and particulate matter (PM), etc.

Dr Saeid Ghamaty

2012-08-16T23:59:59.000Z

229

Hydraulically actuated well shifting tool  

SciTech Connect

This patent describes a hydraulically actuated shifting tool for actuating a sliding member in a well tool. It comprises: a housing having a hydraulic fluid bore therein; shifting dog means positioned on the housing for movement away and toward the housing; locking dog means positioned on the housing for movement away and toward the body; shifting dog hydraulic actuating means in fluid communication with the bore for causing engagement of the shifting dogs with the sliding member; locking dog hydraulic actuating means in communication with the bore for causing engagement of the locking dogs with the locking means; and hydraulic shifting means in communication with the bore for causing relative movement between the shifting dog means and the locking dog means for shifting the sliding sleeve.

Roth, B.A.

1992-10-20T23:59:59.000Z

230

Number of Producing Gas Wells (Summary)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells Gross Withdrawals From Oil Wells Gross Withdrawals From Shale Gas Wells Gross Withdrawals From Coalbed Wells Repressuring Nonhydrocarbon Gases...

231

Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Oil Wells  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Withdrawals from Gas Wells Gross Withdrawals from Oil Wells Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas Wells Gross Withdrawals from Coalbed Wells Repressuring Vented and Flared...

232

Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Gas Wells  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Withdrawals from Gas Wells Gross Withdrawals from Oil Wells Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas Wells Gross Withdrawals from Coalbed Wells Repressuring Vented and Flared...

233

Method for gravel packing wells  

SciTech Connect

This patent describes a method for gravel packing a well that penetrates an unconsolidated or poorly consolidated subterranean oil or gas reservoir. It comprises: providing a borehole casing through the reservoir; perforating the casing at preselected intervals therealong to form at least one set of longitudinal, perforation tunnels adjacent a substantial portion of the reservoir; locating a sand screen inside the casing and in juxtaposition with the perforation tunnels, an annulus being formed between the sand screen and the casing; positioning a conduit in juxtaposition with the sand screen extending substantially the length of the sand screen and having its upper extremity open to fluids; injecting a fluid slurry containing gravel down through the annulus and conduit whereby the fluid portion of the slurry is forced out of the annulus through the perforation tunnels into the reservoir and the gravel portion of the slurry deposited in the annulus and forced into the perforation tunnels into the formation; sizing the cross-sectional area of the conduit and the annulus so that if gravel forms a bridge in a portion of the annulus thereby blocking the flow of fluid slurry through the the annulus, fluid slurry containing gravel will continue to flow through the conduit and into the annulus around the gravel bridge; and terminating the injection of the slurry.

Jones, L.G.

1990-08-07T23:59:59.000Z

234

The Operational Mesogamma-Scale Analysis and Forecast System of the U.S. Army Test and Evaluation Command. Part II: Interrange Comparison of the Accuracy of Model Analyses and Forecasts  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This study builds upon previous efforts to document the performance of the U.S. Army Test and Evaluation Commands Four-Dimensional Weather Modeling System using conventional metrics. Winds, temperature, and specific humidity were verified for ...

Yubao Liu; Thomas T. Warner; Elford G. Astling; James F. Bowers; Christopher A. Davis; Scott F. Halvorson; Daran L. Rife; Rong-Shyang Sheu; Scott P. Swerdlin; Mei Xu

2008-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

235

American Recovery and Reinvestment Act (ARRA) FEMP Technical Assistance U.S. Army Project 276 Renewable Resource Development on Department of Defense Bases in Alaska: Challenges and Opportunities  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The potential to increase utilization of renewable energy sources among military facilities in Alaska through coordinated development and operation is the premise of this task. The US Army Pacific Command requested assistance from PNNL to help develop a more complete understanding of the context for wheeling power within Alaska, including legal and regulatory barriers that may prohibit the DOD facilities from wheeling power among various locations to optimize the development and use of renewable resources.

Warwick, William M.

2010-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

236

Superfund Record of Decision (EPA Region 9): Sacramento Army Depot, Operable Unit 4, Sacramento, CA. (Third remedial action), September 1992  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The 485-acre Sacramento Army Depot (SAAD) site is a military facility in Sacramento County, California. Land use in the area is predominantly commercial and light industrial, with wetlands in the vicinity of several oxidation lagoons. The estimated 56,398 people who live within 2 to 3 miles of the site use municipal water as their drinking water supply. From 1950 to 1972, the lagoons received mostly industrial waste water from metal plating processes and domestic wastewater. The selected remedial action for the site includes excavating and treating approximately 15,500 cubic yards of contaminated soil onsite using soil washing; dewatering and then backfilling the treated soil onsite in the excavation areas, and storing the rinsate temporarily in onsite holding tanks for recycling; treating rinsate from the treatment process using chemical precipitation, clarification/flocculation, and chemical coagulation to remove metals, prior to discharge into the sanitary sewer; dewatering the sludge containing the precipitated metals, and stabilizing this if necessary, followed by disposal in an RCRA landfill or recovery at an offsite reclamation unit. The estimated present worth cost for this remedial action is $5,020,000. There are no O M costs associated with the remedial action.

Not Available

1992-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

237

Preliminary assessment report for National Guard Training Center, Georgia Army National Guard, Fort Stewart, Georgia. Installation restoration program  

SciTech Connect

This report presents the results of the preliminary assessment (PA) conducted by Argonne National Laboratory at the Georgia Army National Guard (GAARNG) facility near Hinesville, Georgia, known as the National Guard Training Center (NGTC). Preliminary assessments of federal facilities are being conducted to compile the information necessary for completing preremedial activities and to provide a priority basis for completing corrective actions (where necessary) in response to releases of hazardous substances. The principal objective of the PA is to characterize the site accurately and determine the need for further action by examining previous site activities, types and quantities of hazardous substances utilized, and potential pathways by which contamination could affect public health and the environment. The scope of this assessment is limited to the facilities and past activities contained within the NGTC. Preliminary assessment site score sheet information is also provided for the NGTC. However, this assessment report is intended to be read in conjunction with a previous IRP assessment of Fort Stewart completed in 1992 (USATHAMA 1992) and to provide comprehensive information on the NGTC area for incorporation with information contained in that previous assessment for the entirety of Fort Stewart.

Not Available

1993-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

238

Definition: Observation Wells | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Observation Wells Jump to: navigation, search Dictionary.png Observation Wells An observation well is used to monitor important hydrologic parameters in a geothermal system that...

239

Definition: Exploratory Well | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Definition Edit with form History Facebook icon Twitter icon Definition: Exploratory Well Jump to: navigation, search Dictionary.png Exploratory Well An exploratory well is...

240

Definition: Well Deepening | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Definition Edit with form History Facebook icon Twitter icon Definition: Well Deepening Jump to: navigation, search Dictionary.png Well Deepening Reentering an existing well and...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "wells hawthorne army" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Definition: Production Wells | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Definition Edit with form History Facebook icon Twitter icon Definition: Production Wells Jump to: navigation, search Dictionary.png Production Wells A well drilled with the...

242

Geothermal well stimulation program: opening remarks  

SciTech Connect

The history of well stimulation and the development of the geothermal well stimulation program are reviewed briefly. (MHR)

Hanold, R.J.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

243

Attention Wells Fargo and Wachovia customers  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Attention Wells Fargo and Wachovia customers Are you a Wells Fargo or Wachovia mortgage customer Angeles, CA March , & : am to : pm You'll personally meet with a Wells Fargo representative who-inswelcomebutregistrationisrecommended. Wells Fargo Home Mortgage is a division of Wells Fargo Bank, N.A. Wells Fargo Bank, N.A. All rights

Southern California, University of

244

2-M Probe At Astor Pass Area (Kratt, Et Al., 2010) | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

source source History View New Pages Recent Changes All Special Pages Semantic Search/Querying Get Involved Help Apps Datasets Community Login | Sign Up Search Page Edit History Facebook icon Twitter icon » 2-M Probe At Astor Pass Area (Kratt, Et Al., 2010) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: 2-M Probe At Astor Pass Area (Kratt, Et Al., 2010) Exploration Activity Details Location Astor Pass Geothermal Area Exploration Technique 2-M Probe Activity Date Usefulness useful DOE-funding Unknown Notes More than 100 new 2m measurements at Astor Pass, Nevada resolved additional details of near-surface thermal outflow in this blind geothermal system References Christopher Kratt, Chris Sladek, Mark Coolbaugh (2010) Boom And Bust With The Latest 2M Temperature Surveys- Dead Horse Wells, Hawthorne Army

245

2-M Probe At Alum Area (Kratt, Et Al., 2010) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Alum Area (Kratt, Et Al., 2010) Alum Area (Kratt, Et Al., 2010) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: 2-M Probe At Alum Geothermal Area (Kratt, Et Al., 2010) Exploration Activity Details Location Alum Geothermal Area Exploration Technique 2-M Probe Activity Date Usefulness useful DOE-funding Unknown Notes More than 100 new 2m measurements at Astor Pass, Nevada resolved additional details of near-surface thermal outflow in this blind geothermal system References Christopher Kratt, Chris Sladek, Mark Coolbaugh (2010) Boom And Bust With The Latest 2M Temperature Surveys- Dead Horse Wells, Hawthorne Army Depot, Terraced Hills, And Other Areas In Nevada Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=2-M_Probe_At_Alum_Area_(Kratt,_Et_Al.,_2010)&oldid=402957"

246

2-M Probe At Columbus Salt Marsh Area (Kratt, Et Al., 2010) | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

2-M Probe At Columbus Salt Marsh Area (Kratt, Et Al., 2010) 2-M Probe At Columbus Salt Marsh Area (Kratt, Et Al., 2010) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: 2-M Probe At Columbus Salt Marsh Area (Kratt, Et Al., 2010) Exploration Activity Details Location Columbus Salt Marsh Area Exploration Technique 2-M Probe Activity Date Usefulness useful DOE-funding Unknown Notes At Columbus Salt Marsh, Nevada, additional 2m measurements better defined the shape of a blind, shallow thermal anomaly; also at this location deeper temperature measurements were used to develop a near-surface temperature gradient. References Christopher Kratt, Chris Sladek, Mark Coolbaugh (2010) Boom And Bust With The Latest 2M Temperature Surveys- Dead Horse Wells, Hawthorne Army Depot, Terraced Hills, And Other Areas In Nevada

247

Decision making technical support study for the US Army's Chemical Stockpile Disposal Program  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report examines the adequacy of current command and control systems designed to make timely decisions that would enable sufficient warning and protective response to an accident at the Edgewood area of Aberdeen Proving Ground (APG), Maryland, and at Pine Bluff Arsenal (PBA), Arkansas. Institutional procedures designed to facilitate rapid accident assessment, characterization, warning, notification, and response after the onset of an emergency and computer-assisted decision-making aids designed to provide salient information to on- and-off-post emergency responders are examined. The character of emergency decision making at APG and PBA, as well as potential needs for improvements to decision-making practices, procedures, and automated decision-support systems (ADSSs), are described and recommendations are offered to guide equipment acquisition and improve on- and off-post command and control relationships. We recommend that (1) a continued effort be made to integrate on- and off-post command control, and decision-making procedures to permit rapid decision making; (2) the pathways for alert and notification among on- and off-post officials be improved and that responsibilities and chain of command among off-post agencies be clarified; (3) greater attention be given to organizational and social context factors that affect the adequacy of response and the likelihood that decision-making systems will work as intended; and (4) faster improvements be made to on-post ADSSs being developed at APG and PBA, which hold considerable promise for depicting vast amounts of information. Phased development and procurement of computer-assisted decision-making tools should be undertaken to balance immediate needs against available resources and to ensure flexibility, equity among sites, and compatibility among on- and off-post systems. 112 refs., 6 tabs.

Feldman, D.L.; Dobson, J.E.

1990-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

248

INVITATIONAL WELL-TESTING SYMPOSIUM PROCEEDINGS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Schlumberger Tube: For Oil-Well Logging", Nucleonics, No.W. E. : "An Investigation of Oil Well Cementing," Drill. andon Pressure Buildup in Oil Wells," Trans. , AIME (1958),213,

Authors, Various

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

249

Well-Being, Authority, and Worth.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Theories of well-being give an account of what it is for persons to fare well or to live prudentially valuable lives. I divide the theoretical (more)

Hebert, Michel

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

250

RMOTC - Field Information - Wells and Production  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

& Production Facilities Wells Pumpjack at RMOTC Partners may test in RMOTC's large inventory of cased, uncased, vertical, high-angle, and horizontal wells. Cased and open-hole...

251

Helicopter magnetic survey conducted to locate wells  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A helicopter magnetic survey was conducted in August 2007 over 15.6 sq mi at the Naval Petroleum Reserve No. 3s (NPR-3) Teapot Dome Field near Casper, Wyoming. The surveys purpose was to accurately locate wells drilled there during more than 90 years of continuous oilfield operation. The survey was conducted at low altitude and with closely spaced flight lines to improve the detection of wells with weak magnetic response and to increase the resolution of closely spaced wells. The survey was in preparation for a planned CO2 flood for EOR, which requires a complete well inventory with accurate locations for all existing wells. The magnetic survey was intended to locate wells missing from the well database and to provide accurate locations for all wells. The ability of the helicopter magnetic survey to accurately locate wells was accomplished by comparing airborne well picks with well locations from an intense ground search of a small test area.

Veloski, G.A.; Hammack, R.W.; Stamp, V. (Rocky Mountain Oilfield Testing Center); Hall, R. (Rocky Mountain Oilfield Testing Center); Colina, K. (Rocky Mountain Oilfield Testing Center)

2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

252

Background chemistry for chemical warfare agents and decontamination processes in support of delisting waste streams at the U.S. Army Dugway Proving Ground, Utah  

SciTech Connect

The State of Utah, Department of Environmental Quality (DEQ), Division of Solid and Hazardous Waste (DSHW), has declared residues resulting from the demilitarization, treatment, cleanup, and testing of military chemical agents to be hazardous wastes. These residues have been designated as corrosive, reactive, toxic, and acute hazardous (Hazardous Waste No. F999). The RCRA regulations (40 Code of Federal Regulations [CFR] 260-280), the Utah Administrative Code (R-315), and other state hazardous waste programs list specific wastes as hazardous but allow generators to petition the regulator to {open_quotes}delist,{close_quotes} if it can be demonstrated that such wastes are not hazardous. The U.S. Army Test and Evaluation Command (TECOM) believes that certain categories of F999 residues are not hazardous and has obtained assistance from Argonne National Laboratory (Argonne) to make the delisting demonstration. The objective of this project is to delist chemical agent decontaminated residues resulting from materials testing activities and to delist a remediation residue (e.g., contaminated soil). To delist these residues, it must be demonstrated that the residues (1) do not contain hazardous quantities of the listed agents; (2) do not contain hazardous quantities of constituents listed in 40 CFR Part 261, Appendix VIII; (3) do not exhibit other characteristics that could define the residues as hazardous; and (4) do not fail a series of acute toxicity tests. The first phase will focus on a subset of the F999 wastes generated at the U.S. Army Dugway Proving Ground (DPG), where the Army tests the effects of military chemical agents and agent-decontamination procedures on numerous military items. This effort is identified as Phase I of the Delisting Program. Subsequent phases will address other DPG chemical agent decontaminated residues and remediation wastes and similar residues at other installations.

Rosenblatt, D.H.; Small, M.J.; Kimmell, T.A.; Anderson, A.W.

1996-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

253

Army Solid State Laser Program: Design, Operation, and Mission Analysis for a Heat-Capacity Laser  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Solid-state lasers have held great promise for the generation of high-average-power, high-quality output beams for a number of decades. However, the inherent difficulty of scaling the active solid-state gain media while continuing to provide efficient cooling has limited demonstrated powers to <5kW. Even at the maximum demonstrated average powers, the output is most often delivered as continuous wave (CW) or as small energy pulses at high pulse repetition frequency (PRF) and the beam divergence is typically >10X the diffraction limit. Challenges posed by optical distortions and depolarization arising from internal temperature gradients in the gain medium of a continuously cooled system are only increased for laser designs that would attempt to deliver the high average power in the form of high energy pulses (>25J) from a single coherent optical aperture. Although demonstrated phase-locking of multiple laser apertures may hold significant promise for the future scaling of solid-state laser systems,1 the continuing need for additional technical development and innovation coupled with the anticipated complexity of these systems effectively limits this approach for near-term multi-kW laser operation outside of a laboratory setting. We have developed and demonstrated a new operational mode for solid-state laser systems in which the cooling of the gain medium is separated in time from the lasing cycle. In ''heat-capacity'' operation, no cooling takes place during lasing. The gain medium is pumped very uniformly and the waste heat from the excitation process is stored in the solid-state gain medium. By depositing the heat on time scales that are short compared to thermal diffusion across the optical aperture, very high average power operation is possible while maintaining low optical distortions. After a lasing cycle, aggressive cooling can then take place in the absence of lasing, limited only by the fracture limit of the solid-state medium. This mode of operation is ideally suited for applications that require 1-30s engagements at very high average power. If necessary, multiple laser apertures can provide continuous operation. Land Combat mission analysis of a stressing air defense scenario including a dense attack of rockets, mortars, and artillery has indicated that multiple HEL weapon systems, based on the solid state, heat capacity laser concept, can provide significantly improved protection of high value battlefield assets. We will present EADSIM results for two government-supplied scenarios, one with temporally high threat density over a fairly large defended area, and one with fewer threats concentrating on a single defended asset. Implications for weapon system requirements will be presented. In order to demonstrate the operation of a high average power heat-capacity laser system, we have developed a flashlamp-pumped Nd:glass laser with output energies in the range of 500-1000J/pulse in a 10 x 10cm{sup 2} beam. With a repetition frequency of 20Hz, an average power of 13kW has been demonstrated for operational periods of up to 10s using a stable optical resonator (see enclosed figure). Using an M=1.4 unstable resonator, a beam divergence of 5X diffraction-limited has been measured with no active wavefront correction. An adaptively corrected unstable resonator that incorporates an intracavity deformable mirror controlled by feedback from an external wavefront sensor will provide <2X diffraction-limited output integrated over an entire 10s run at an average power of 10kW. A very similar laser architecture in which the Nd:glass is replaced by Nd:GGG and the flashlamps are replaced by large diode-laser arrays will enable the scaling of the output average power from the demonstrated 10kW to 100kW (500J/pulse at 200Hz). Risk reduction experiments for diode-pumped Nd:GGG, the fabrication of large Nd:GGG amplifier slabs, as well as the progress toward a sub-scale amplifier testbed pumped by diode arrays with total of 1MW peak power will also be presented.

Dane, C B; Flath, L; Rotter, M; Fochs, S; Brase, J; Bretney, K

2001-05-18T23:59:59.000Z

254

Pulsed Electric Field and High Hydrostatic Pressure: Proceedings of EPRI/Army Sponsored Workshop, Moscow, Idaho -- April 19-21, 1999  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Pulsed Electric Field and High Hydrostatic Pressure EPRI/Army Sponsored Workshop was held april 19-21, 1999 in Moscow, Idaho. The short course/workshop, the 4th in a series begun to disseminate and understand the latest advances in Pulsed Electric Field technologies was expanded this year to include High Hydrostatic Pressure. As a part of the Workshop, emphasis was placed on the importance of the newly formed IFT Nonthermal Processing Division. This report is comprised of an overview of the short cou...

1999-11-24T23:59:59.000Z

255

Capping of Water Wells for Future Use  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Water wells that are not being used, but that might be needed in the future, can be sealed with a cap that covers the top of the well casing pipe to prevent unauthorized access and contamination of the well. This publication explains how to cap a well safely and securely.

Lesikar, Bruce J.; Mechell, Justin

2007-09-04T23:59:59.000Z

256

Drilling and operating geothermal wells in California  

SciTech Connect

The following procedural points for geothermal well drilling and operation are presented: geothermal operators, definitions, geothermal unit, agent, notice of intention, fees, report on proposed operations, bonds, well name and number, well and property sale on transfer, well records, and other agencies. (MHR)

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

257

Pennsylvania 1995 Vintage Gas Well History  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Pennsylvania 1995 Vintage Gas Well History. Energy Information Administration (U.S. Dept. of Energy)

258

West Virginia 1995 Vintage Gas Well History  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

West Virginia 1995 Vintage Gas Well History. Energy Information Administration (U.S. Dept. of Energy)

259

North Dakota 1995 Vintage Gas Well History  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

North Dakota 1995 Vintage Gas Well History. Energy Information Administration (U.S. Dept. of Energy)

260

United States 1995 Vintage Oil Well History  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

United States 1995 Vintage Oil Well History. Energy Information Administration (U.S. Dept. of Energy)

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "wells hawthorne army" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

West Virginia 1995 Vintage Oil Well History  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

West Virginia 1995 Vintage Oil Well History. Energy Information Administration (U.S. Dept. of Energy)

262

North Dakota 1995 Vintage Oil Well History  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

North Dakota 1995 Vintage Oil Well History. Energy Information Administration (U.S. Dept. of Energy)

263

Definition: Artesian Well | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Well Well Jump to: navigation, search Dictionary.png Artesian Well An artesian well is a water well that doesn't require a pump to bring water to the surface; this occurs when there is enough pressure in the aquifer. The pressure causes hydrostatic equilibrium and if the pressure is high enough the water may even reach the ground surface in which case the well is called a flowing artesian well.[1] View on Wikipedia Wikipedia Definition See Great Artesian Basin for the water source in Australia. An artesian aquifer is a confined aquifer containing groundwater under positive pressure. This causes the water level in a well to rise to a point where hydrostatic equilibrium has been reached. This type of well is called an artesian well. Water may even reach the ground surface if the natural

264

Well Log Techniques | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Well Log Techniques Well Log Techniques Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Technique: Well Log Techniques Details Activities (4) Areas (4) Regions (1) NEPA(0) Exploration Technique Information Exploration Group: Downhole Techniques Exploration Sub Group: Well Log Techniques Parent Exploration Technique: Downhole Techniques Information Provided by Technique Lithology: depth and thickness of formations; lithology and porosity can be inferred Stratigraphic/Structural: reservoir thickness, reservoir geometry, borehole geometry Hydrological: permeability and fluid composition can be inferred Thermal: direct temperature measurements; thermal conductivity and heat capacity Dictionary.png Well Log Techniques: Well logging is the measurement of formation properties versus depth in a

265

Simple variational approaches to quantum wells  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We discuss two simple variational approaches to quantum wells. The trial harmonic functions analyzed in an earlier paper give reasonable results for all well depths and are particularly suitable for deep wells. On the other hand, the exponential functions proposed here are preferable for shallow wells. We compare the shallow-well expansions for both kind of functions and show that they do not exhibit the cubic term appearing in the exact series. It is also shown that the deep-well expansion for the harmonic functions agree with the first terms of perturbation theory.

Francisco M. Fernndez

2012-04-03T23:59:59.000Z

266

Vapor port and groundwater sampling well  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method and apparatus have been developed for combining groundwater monitoring wells with unsaturated-zone vapor sampling ports. The apparatus allows concurrent monitoring of both the unsaturated and the saturated zone from the same well at contaminated areas. The innovative well design allows for concurrent sampling of groundwater and volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in the vadose (unsaturated) zone from a single well, saving considerable time and money. The sample tubes are banded to the outer well casing during installation of the well casing. 10 figs.

Hubbell, J.M.; Wylie, A.H.

1996-01-09T23:59:59.000Z

267

Vapor port and groundwater sampling well  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method and apparatus has been developed for combining groundwater monitoring wells with unsaturated-zone vapor sampling ports. The apparatus allows concurrent monitoring of both the unsaturated and the saturated zone from the same well at contaminated areas. The innovative well design allows for concurrent sampling of groundwater and volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in the vadose (unsaturated) zone from a single well, saving considerable time and money. The sample tubes are banded to the outer well casing during installation of the well casing.

Hubbell, Joel M. (Idaho Falls, ID); Wylie, Allan H. (Idaho Falls, ID)

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

268

Geothermal/Well Field | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

source source History View New Pages Recent Changes All Special Pages Semantic Search/Querying Get Involved Help Apps Datasets Community Login | Sign Up Search Page Edit History Facebook icon Twitter icon » Geothermal/Well Field < Geothermal(Redirected from Well Field) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Land Use Leasing Exploration Well Field Power Plant Transmission Environment Water Use Print PDF Geothermal Well Fields and Reservoirs General Techniques Tree Techniques Table Regulatory Roadmap NEPA (45) Geothermal energy plant at The Geysers near Santa Rosa in Northern California, the world's largest electricity-generating hydrothermal geothermal development. Copyright © 1995 Warren Gretz Geothermal Well Fields discussion Groups of Well Field Techniques

269

Evaluation of the utility and energy monitoring and control system installed at the US Army, Europe, 409th Base Support Battalion, Military Community at Grafenwoehr, Germany  

SciTech Connect

Under the provisions of Interagency Agreement DOE 1938-B090-A1 between the US Department of Energy (DOE) and the US Army Europe (USAREUR), Martin Marietta Energy Systems, Inc., is providing technical assistance to USAREUR in the areas of computer science, information engineering, energy studies, and engineering and systems development. One of the initial projects authorized under this interagency agreement is the evaluation of utility and energy monitoring and control systems (UEMCSs) installed at selected US Army installations in Europe. This report is an evaluation of the overall energy-conservation effectiveness and use of the UEMCS at the 409th Base Support Battalion located in Grafenwoehr, Germany. The 409th Base Support Battalion is a large USAREUR military training facility that comprises a large training area, leased housing, the main post area, and the camp areas that include Camps Aachen, Algier, Normandy, Cheb, and Kasserine. All of these facilities are consumers of electrical and thermal energy. However, only buildings and facilities in the main post area and Camps Aachen, Algier, and Normandy are under the control of the UEMCS. The focus of this evaluation report is on these specific areas. Recommendations to further increase energy and cost savings and to improve operation of the UEMCS are proposed.

Broders, M.A.; Ruppel, F.R.

1993-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

270

Investigation of the Integration of Interstitial Building Spaces on Costs and Time of Facility Maintenance for U.S. Army Hospitals  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The U.S. Army Medical Department (AMEDD) has used the interstitial building system (IBS) as a design component for some of the hospitals in its healthcare infrastructure portfolio. Department of Defense (DoD) leadership is aware of increases in healthcare costs and understands the importance of safely reducing costs, which may be possible through design initiatives. An analysis was performed on facility maintenance metrics for ten different U.S. Army hospitals, including IBS design and conventional / non-interstitial building system (NIBS) design. Statistical analysis indicated a significant difference in cost and time data between IBS and NIBS for most of the building systems considered (HVAC, electrical, plumbing, and interior). Scheduled maintenance for the plumbing building system was not found to have a significant difference in costs; scheduled maintenance for the HVAC and plumbing building system was not found to have a significant difference in time expended. The data in this study showed that facility maintenance cost and time were generally lower for IBS than NIBS. Time spent (and associated cost) for scheduled maintenance of the electrical and plumbing building systems were slightly higher in IBS, though not significantly higher for plumbing. It may be easier to reach the plumbing and electrical building systems due to the greater accessibility afforded by IBS design. While a cost premium is estimated for integrating IBS design, the savings provided by life cycle facility maintenance is estimated to be up to three and a half times the initial cost premium.

Leveridge, Autumn Tamara

2013-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

271

Geothermal/Well Field | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Geothermal/Well Field Geothermal/Well Field < Geothermal Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Land Use Leasing Exploration Well Field Power Plant Transmission Environment Water Use Print PDF Geothermal Well Fields and Reservoirs General Techniques Tree Techniques Table Regulatory Roadmap NEPA (42) Geothermal energy plant at The Geysers near Santa Rosa in Northern California, the world's largest electricity-generating hydrothermal geothermal development. Copyright © 1995 Warren Gretz Geothermal Well Fields discussion Groups of Well Field Techniques There are many different techniques that are utilized in geothermal well field development and reservoir maintenance depending on the region's geology, economic considerations, project maturity, and other considerations such as land access and permitting requirements. Well field

272

Disinfecting Water Wells by Shock Chlorination (Spanish)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

If your well has been flooded, it must be shock chlorinated before it can be used as a source of drinking water. This publication explains how to disinfect a well using either dry chlorine or liquid household bleach.

Dozier, Monty; McFarland, Mark L.

2007-10-05T23:59:59.000Z

273

RFI Well Integrity 06 JUL 1400  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This PowerPoint report entitled "Well Integrity During Shut - In Operations: DOE/DOI Analyses" describes risks and suggests risk management recommendations associated with shutting in the well.

274

Disinfecting Water Wells by Shock Chlorination  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

If your well has been flooded, it must be shock chlorinated before it can be used as a source of drinking water. This publication explains how to disinfect a well using either dry chlorine or liquid household bleach.

Dozier, Monty; McFarland, Mark L.

2005-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

275

Well Models for Mimetic Finite Difference Methods and Improved Representation of Wells inMultiscale Methods.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??In reservoir simulation, the modeling and the representation of wells are critical factors. The standard approach for well modeling is to couple the well to (more)

Ligaarden, Ingeborg Skjelkvle

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

276

Observation Wells (Ozkocak, 1985) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

(Ozkocak, 1985) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Observation Wells (Ozkocak, 1985) Exploration Activity Details Location...

277

STIMULATION TECHNOLOGIES FOR DEEP WELL COMPLETIONS  

SciTech Connect

The Department of Energy (DOE) is sponsoring a Deep Trek Program targeted at improving the economics of drilling and completing deep gas wells. Under the DOE program, Pinnacle Technologies is conducting a project to evaluate the stimulation of deep wells. The objective of the project is to assess U.S. deep well drilling & stimulation activity, review rock mechanics & fracture growth in deep, high pressure/temperature wells and evaluate stimulation technology in several key deep plays. Phase 1 was recently completed and consisted of assessing deep gas well drilling activity (1995-2007) and an industry survey on deep gas well stimulation practices by region. Of the 29,000 oil, gas and dry holes drilled in 2002, about 300 were drilled in the deep well; 25% were dry, 50% were high temperature/high pressure completions and 25% were simply deep completions. South Texas has about 30% of these wells, Oklahoma 20%, Gulf of Mexico Shelf 15% and the Gulf Coast about 15%. The Rockies represent only 2% of deep drilling. Of the 60 operators who drill deep and HTHP wells, the top 20 drill almost 80% of the wells. Six operators drill half the U.S. deep wells. Deep drilling peaked at 425 wells in 1998 and fell to 250 in 1999. Drilling is expected to rise through 2004 after which drilling should cycle down as overall drilling declines.

Stephen Wolhart

2003-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

278

Visualizing Motion in Potential Wells* Pratibha Jolly  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1 Visualizing Motion in Potential Wells* Pratibha Jolly Department of Physics, University of Delhi well potential diagrams using either the velocity data and assuming conservation of energy or the force wells on the one hand and establishing the relationship between the operative forces and the potential

Zollman, Dean

279

Optimal Location of Vertical Wells: Decomposition Approach  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Optimal Location of Vertical Wells: Decomposition Approach M. G. Ierapetritou and C. A. Floudas®elopment plan with well locations, gi®en a reser®oir property map and a set of infrastructure constraints, represents a ®ery challenging prob- lem. The problem of selecting the optimal ®ertical well locations

280

High temperature spectral gamma well logging  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A high temperature spectral gamma tool has been designed and built for use in small-diameter geothermal exploration wells. Several engineering judgments are discussed regarding operating parameters, well model selection, and signal processing. An actual well log at elevated temperatures is given with spectral gamma reading showing repeatability.

Normann, R.A.; Henfling, J.A.

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "wells hawthorne army" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Hydrocarbons associated with brines from geopressured wells  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Efforts to determine the concentration of the cryocondensates in fluids of the various USDOE Geopressured wells a function of production volume. The wells are visited monthly as they are operating and samples are reported taken cryogenically during each visit. A gas scrubbing system continuously sample the gas streams of the wells in the intergas scrubbing system continuously sample the gas streams of the wells in the intervals between visit. Results obtained are to correlated the production of the collected compounds with reservoir and well production characteristics.

Not Available

1991-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

282

Spontaneous Potential Well Log | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Spontaneous Potential Well Log Spontaneous Potential Well Log Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Technique: Spontaneous Potential Well Log Details Activities (2) Areas (2) Regions (0) NEPA(0) Exploration Technique Information Exploration Group: Downhole Techniques Exploration Sub Group: Well Log Techniques Parent Exploration Technique: Well Log Techniques Information Provided by Technique Lithology: SP technique originally applied to locating sulfide ore-bodies. Stratigraphic/Structural: -Formation bed thickness and boundaries -Detection and tracing of faults -Permeability and porosity Hydrological: Determination of fluid flow patterns: electrochemical coupling processes due to variations in ionic concentrations, and electrokinetic coupling processes due to fluid flow in the subsurface.

283

Regulations of Wells (Florida) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Regulations of Wells (Florida) Regulations of Wells (Florida) Regulations of Wells (Florida) < Back Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Construction Fed. Government Fuel Distributor General Public/Consumer Industrial Installer/Contractor Institutional Investor-Owned Utility Local Government Low-Income Residential Multi-Family Residential Municipal/Public Utility Nonprofit Residential Retail Supplier Rural Electric Cooperative Schools State/Provincial Govt Systems Integrator Transportation Tribal Government Utility Program Info State Florida Program Type Environmental Regulations Siting and Permitting Provider Florida Department of Environmental Protection The Department of Environmental Protection regulates the construction, repair, and abandonment of wells, as well as the persons and businesses undertaking such practices. Governing boards of water management districts

284

Well-logging activities in Russia  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The report is a brief survey of the current state of well-logging service in Russia (number and types of crews, structure of well-logging jobs, types of techniques used, well-logging equipment, auxiliary downhole jobs, etc.). Types and peculiarities of well data acquisition and processing hardware and software are discussed (petrophysics included). New well-logging technologies used in Russia (new methods of electric logging data processing, electromagnetic logging, pulse neutron logging, nuclear magnetic resonance logging, acoustic tomography, logging-testing-logging technique, etc.) are surveyed. Comparison of the Tengiz field (Kazakhstan) well data obtained by Schlumberger and Neftegazgeofizika Association crews is given. Several problems and drawbacks in equipment and technology used by well-logging crews in Russia are discussed.

Savostyanov, N.A. (Neftegazgeofizika, Moscow (Russian Federation))

1993-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

285

Potential hydrologic characterization wells in Amargosa Valley  

SciTech Connect

More than 500 domestic, agricultural, and monitoring wells were identified in the Amargosa Valley. From this list, 80 wells were identified as potential hydrologic characterization wells, in support of the US Department of Energy (DOE) Underground Test Area/Remedial Investigation and Feasibility Study (UGTA/RIFS). Previous hydrogeologic studies have shown that groundwater flow in the basin is complex and that aquifers may have little lateral continuity. Wells located more than 10 km or so from the Nevada Test Site (NTS) boundary may yield data that are difficult to correlate to sources from the NTS. Also, monitoring well locations should be chosen within the guidelines of a hydrologic conceptual model and monitoring plan. Since these do not exist at this time, recompletion recommendations will be restricted to wells relatively close (approximately 20 km) to the NTS boundary. Recompletion recommendations were made for two abandoned agricultural irrigation wells near the town of Amargosa Valley (previously Lathrop Wells), for two abandoned wildcat oil wells about 10 km southwest of Amargosa Valley, and for Test Well 5 (TW-5), about 10 km east of Amargosa Valley.

Lyles, B.; Mihevc, T.

1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

286

Economic evaluation of smart well technology  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The demand of oil and gas resources is high and the forecasts show a trend for higher requirements in the future. More unconventional resource exploitation along with an increase in the total recovery in current producing fields is required. At this pivotal time the role of emerging technologies is of at most importance. Smart or intelligent well technology is one of the up and coming technologies that have been developed to assist improvements in field development outcome. In this paper a comprehensive review of this technology has been discussed. The possible reservoir environments in which smart well technology could be used and also, the possible benefits that could be realized by utilizing smart well technology has been discussed. The economic impact of smart well technology has been studied thoroughly. Five field cases were used to evaluate the economics of smart well technology in various production environments. Real field data along with best estimate of smart well technology pricings were used in this research. I have used different comparisons between smart well cases and conventional completion to illustrate the economic differences between the different completion scenarios. Based on the research, I have realized that all the smart well cases showed a better economic return than conventional completions. The offshore cases showed a good economic environment for smart well technology. Large onshore developments with smart well technology can also provide a lucrative economic return. These situations can increase the overall economic return and ultimate recovery which will assist in meeting some of the oil demand around the globe.

Al Omair, Abdullatif A.

2003-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

287

Stimulation Technologies for Deep Well Completions  

SciTech Connect

The Department of Energy (DOE) is sponsoring the Deep Trek Program targeted at improving the economics of drilling and completing deep gas wells. Under the DOE program, Pinnacle Technologies is conducting a study to evaluate the stimulation of deep wells. The objective of the project is to assess U.S. deep well drilling & stimulation activity, review rock mechanics & fracture growth in deep, high pressure/temperature wells and evaluate stimulation technology in several key deep plays. An assessment of historical deep gas well drilling activity and forecast of future trends was completed during the first six months of the project; this segment of the project was covered in Technical Project Report No. 1. The second progress report covers the next six months of the project during which efforts were primarily split between summarizing rock mechanics and fracture growth in deep reservoirs and contacting operators about case studies of deep gas well stimulation.

None

2003-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

288

Step-out Well | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Step-out Well Step-out Well Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Technique: Step-out Well Details Activities (5) Areas (5) Regions (0) NEPA(0) Exploration Technique Information Exploration Group: Drilling Techniques Exploration Sub Group: Exploration Drilling Parent Exploration Technique: Exploration Drilling Information Provided by Technique Lithology: Drill cuttings are analyzed to determine lithology and mineralogy Stratigraphic/Structural: Fractures, faults, and geologic formations that the well passes through are identified and mapped Hydrological: Identify aquifers, reservoir boundaries, flow rates, fluid pressure, and chemistry Thermal: Direct temperature measurements from within the reservoir Dictionary.png Step-out Well: A well drilled outside of the proven reservoir boundaries to investigate a

289

Well purge and sample apparatus and method  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The present invention specifically permits purging and/or sampling of a well but only removing, at most, about 25% of the fluid volume compared to conventional methods and, at a minimum, removing none of the fluid volume from the well. The invention is an isolation assembly with a packer, pump and exhaust, that is inserted into the well. The isolation assembly is designed so that only a volume of fluid between the outside diameter of the isolation assembly and the inside diameter of the well over a fluid column height from the bottom of the well to the top of the active portion (lower annulus) is removed. The packer is positioned above the active portion thereby sealing the well and preventing any mixing or contamination of inlet fluid with fluid above the packer. Ports in the wall of the isolation assembly permit purging and sampling of the lower annulus along the height of the active portion.

Schalla, Ronald (Kennewick, WA); Smith, Ronald M. (Richland, WA); Hall, Stephen H. (Kennewick, WA); Smart, John E. (Richland, WA); Gustafson, Gregg S. (Redmond, WA)

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

290

Well purge and sample apparatus and method  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The present invention specifically permits purging and/or sampling of a well but only removing, at most, about 25% of the fluid volume compared to conventional methods and, at a minimum, removing none of the fluid volume from the well. The invention is an isolation assembly with a packer, pump and exhaust, that is inserted into the well. The isolation assembly is designed so that only a volume of fluid between the outside diameter of the isolation assembly and the inside diameter of the well over a fluid column height from the bottom of the well to the top of the active portion (lower annulus) is removed. The packer is positioned above the active portion thereby sealing the well and preventing any mixing or contamination of inlet fluid with fluid above the packer. Ports in the wall of the isolation assembly permit purging and sampling of the lower annulus along the height of the active portion. 8 figs.

Schalla, R.; Smith, R.M.; Hall, S.H.; Smart, J.E.; Gustafson, G.S.

1995-10-24T23:59:59.000Z

291

Geothermal Well Completion Tests | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Geothermal Well Completion Tests Geothermal Well Completion Tests Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Conference Paper: Geothermal Well Completion Tests Abstract This paper reviews the measurements that are typically made in a well immediately after drilling is completed - the Completion Tests. The objective of these tests is to determine the properties of the reservoir, and of the reservoir fluid near the well. A significant amount of information that will add to the characterisation of the reservoir and the well, can only be obtained in the period during and immediately after drilling activities are completed. Author Hagen Hole Conference Petroleum Engineering Summer School; Dubrovnik, Croatia; 2008/06/09 Published N/A, 2008 DOI Not Provided Check for DOI availability: http://crossref.org

292

How to avoid well kicks in weakzones  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Since 1981 there has been a significant increase in well programs that drill long hole sections between casing strings, particularly below surface casing. In many instances this practice leaves one or more weak zones. In addition to the standard well control methods, another procedure cautiously recommend is pumping the influx from the well with a slug of heavier mud ahead of the kill mud. In this article the author discusses this procedure.

Merryman, J.C. (Parker Drilling Co. (US))

1988-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

293

Stimulation Technologies for Deep Well Completions  

SciTech Connect

The Department of Energy (DOE) is sponsoring the Deep Trek Program targeted at improving the economics of drilling and completing deep gas wells. Under the DOE program, Pinnacle Technologies conducted a study to evaluate the stimulation of deep wells. The objective of the project was to review U.S. deep well drilling and stimulation activity, review rock mechanics and fracture growth in deep, high-pressure/temperature wells and evaluate stimulation technology in several key deep plays. This report documents results from this project.

Stephen Wolhart

2005-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

294

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

5 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ... 152 170 165 195 224 Production (million cubic feet)...

295

Ida B. Wells: A Voice Against Lynching.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??This study focuses on the campaign that the African American journalist Ida B. Wells fought against lynching in the United States between the 19th and (more)

MUNTEANU, DANIELA

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

296

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

9 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ... 280 300 225 240 251 Production (million cubic feet)...

297

Geothermal wells: a forecast of drilling activity  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Numbers and problems for geothermal wells expected to be drilled in the United States between 1981 and 2000 AD are forecasted. The 3800 wells forecasted for major electric power projects (totaling 6 GWe of capacity) are categorized by type (production, etc.), and by location (The Geysers, etc.). 6000 wells are forecasted for direct heat projects (totaling 0.02 Quads per year). Equations are developed for forecasting the number of wells, and data is presented. Drilling and completion problems in The Geysers, The Imperial Valley, Roosevelt Hot Springs, the Valles Caldera, northern Nevada, Klamath Falls, Reno, Alaska, and Pagosa Springs are discussed. Likely areas for near term direct heat projects are identified.

Brown, G.L.; Mansure, A.J.; Miewald, J.N.

1981-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

298

Well Testing Techniques | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Well Testing Techniques Well Testing Techniques Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Technique: Well Testing Techniques Details Activities (0) Areas (0) Regions (0) NEPA(17) Exploration Technique Information Exploration Group: Downhole Techniques Exploration Sub Group: Well Testing Techniques Parent Exploration Technique: Downhole Techniques Information Provided by Technique Lithology: Enable estimation of in-situ reservoir elastic parameters Stratigraphic/Structural: Fracture distribution, formation permeability, and ambient tectonic stresses Hydrological: provides information on permeability, location of permeable zones recharge rates, flow rates, fluid flow direction, hydrologic connections, storativity, reservoir pressures, fluid chemistry, and scaling.

299

Rigs Drilling Gas Wells Are At  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

The increasing number of resulting gas well completions have been expanding production in major producing States, such as Texas. For the year 2000, ...

300

Characterization Well R-22 Geochemistry Report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report provides analytical results for groundwater collected during four characterization-sampling rounds conducted at well R-22 from March 2001 through March 2002. Characterization well R-22 was sampled from March 6 through 13, 2001; June 19 through 26, 2001; November 30 through December 10, 2001; and February 27 through March 7, 2002. The goal of the characterization efforts was to assess the hydrochemistry and to determine whether or not contaminants are present in the regional aquifer in the vicinity of the well. A geochemical evaluation of the analytical results for the well is also presented in this report.

Patrick Longmire

2002-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "wells hawthorne army" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Gas Wells  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals and Production (Volumes in Million Cubic Feet) Data Series: ... coalbed production data are included in Gas Well totals.

302

INVITATIONAL WELL-TESTING SYMPOSIUM PROCEEDINGS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

to the well bore by drilling fluid, or by turbulent flowdrilled into. Although the drilling fluid normally providesthe hole filled with drilling fluid of appropriate density

Authors, Various

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

303

Gas well deliquification. 2nd. ed.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Chapter 1: Introduction; Chapter 2: Recognizing Symptoms of Liquid Loading in Gas Wells; Chapter 3: Critical Velocity; Chapter 4: Systems Nodal Analysis; Chapter 5: Sizing Tubing; Chapter 6: Compression; Chapter 7: Plunger Lift; Chapter 8: Use of Foam to Deliquefy Gas Wells; Chapter 9: Hydraulic Pumping; Chapter 10: Use of Beam Pumps to Deliquefy Gas Wells; Chapter 11: Gas Lift; Chapter 12: Electric Submersible Pumps; Chapter 13: Progressing Cavity Pumps; Chapter 14: Coal Bed Methane; Chapter 15: Production Automation. Chapter 14, by David Simpson, based in the San Juan Basin, addresses issues in coal bed methane, low pressure operations, gas compression, gas measurement, oil field construction, gas well deliquification and project management.

James Lea; Henry Nickens; Mike Wells [Texas Technical University, TX (United States). Petroleum Engineering Department

2008-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

304

INVITATIONAL WELL-TESTING SYMPOSIUM PROCEEDINGS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

3 P. A. Witherspoon Petroleum Engineering Well TestActivation Analysis in Petroleum Exploration Research",Monograph Series, Society of Petroleum Engineers of AlME,

Authors, Various

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

305

Natural Gas Prices: Well Above Recent Averages  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

The recent surge in spot prices at the Henry Hub are well above a typical range for 1998 ... gas prices gradually declining after the winter heating . ...

306

Geothermal Reservoir Well Stimulation Program: technology transfer  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

To assess the stimulation technology developed in the oil and gas industry as to its applicability to the problems of geothermal well stimulation, a literature search was performed through on-line computer systems. Also, field records of well stimulation programs that have worked successfully were obtained from oil and gas operators and service companies. The results of these surveys are presented. (MHR)

Not Available

1980-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

307

Geothermal Reservoir Well Stimulation Program: technology transfer  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Each of the following types of well stimulation techniques are summarized and explained: hydraulic fracturing; thermal; mechanical, jetting, and drainhole drilling; explosive and implosive; and injection methods. Current stimulation techniques, stimulation techniques for geothermal wells, areas of needed investigation, and engineering calculations for various techniques. (MHR)

Not Available

1980-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

308

Subsea well control involves special considerations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Due to the increased length of kill and choke lines, greater care must be taken in subsea operations to establish the parameters employed to kill an underbalanced well. This study provides a straightforward, step-by-step approach for round-the-clock preparedness when well control equipment is located on the seafloor.

Fulton, D.K.

1982-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

309

Subsea well control involves special considerations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Due to the increased length of kill and choke lines, greater care must be taken in subsea operations to establish the parameters employed to kill an underbalanced well. This article provides a straightforward, step-by-step approach for round-the-clock preparedness when well control equipment is located on the seafloor.

Fulton, D.K.

1982-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

310

The Operational Mesogamma-Scale Analysis and Forecast System of the U.S. Army Test and Evaluation Command. Part IV: The White Sands Missile Range Auto-Nowcast System  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

During the summer months at the U.S. Army Test and Evaluation Commands (ATEC) White Sands Missile Range (WSMR), forecasting thunderstorm activity is one of the primary duties of the range forecasters. The safety of personnel working on the range ...

Thomas R. Saxen; Cynthia K. Mueller; Thomas T. Warner; Matthias Steiner; Edward E. Ellison; Eric W. Hatfield; Terri L. Betancourt; Susan M. Dettling; Niles A. Oien

2008-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

311

What Is Well Yield? Private wells are frequently drilled in rural areas to  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1 What Is Well Yield? Private wells are frequently drilled in rural areas to supply water to individual homes or farms. The maximum rate in gallons per minute (GPM) that a well can be pumped without lowering the water level in the borehole below the pump intake is called the well yield. Low-yielding wells

Keinan, Alon

312

Salt Wells Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Salt Wells Geothermal Area Salt Wells Geothermal Area (Redirected from Salt Wells Area) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Geothermal Resource Area: Salt Wells Geothermal Area Contents 1 Area Overview 2 History and Infrastructure 3 Regulatory and Environmental Issues 4 Future Plans 5 Exploration History 6 Well Field Description 7 Research and Development Activities 8 Technical Problems and Solutions 9 Geology of the Area 9.1 Regional Setting 9.2 Stratigraphy 9.3 Structure 10 Hydrothermal System 11 Heat Source 12 Geofluid Geochemistry 13 NEPA-Related Analyses (9) 14 Exploration Activities (28) 15 References Area Overview Geothermal Area Profile Location: Nevada Exploration Region: Northwest Basin and Range Geothermal Region GEA Development Phase: Operational"Operational" is not in the list of possible values (Phase I - Resource Procurement and Identification, Phase II - Resource Exploration and Confirmation, Phase III - Permitting and Initial Development, Phase IV - Resource Production and Power Plant Construction) for this property.

313

Salt Wells Geothermal Exploratory Drilling Program EA  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Salt Wells Geothermal Exploratory Drilling Program EA Salt Wells Geothermal Exploratory Drilling Program EA (DOI-BLM-NV-C010-2009-0006-EA) Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Web Site: Salt Wells Geothermal Exploratory Drilling Program EA (DOI-BLM-NV-C010-2009-0006-EA) Abstract No abstract available. Author Bureau of Land Management Published U.S. Department of the Interior- Bureau of Land Management, Carson City Field Office, Nevada, 09/14/2009 DOI Not Provided Check for DOI availability: http://crossref.org Online Internet link for Salt Wells Geothermal Exploratory Drilling Program EA (DOI-BLM-NV-C010-2009-0006-EA) Citation Bureau of Land Management. Salt Wells Geothermal Exploratory Drilling Program EA (DOI-BLM-NV-C010-2009-0006-EA) [Internet]. 09/14/2009. Carson City, NV. U.S. Department of the Interior- Bureau of Land Management,

314

Geopressured-geothermal well activities in Louisiana  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Since September 1978, microseismic networks have operated continuously around US Department of Energy (DOE) geopressured-geothermal well sites to monitor any microearthquake activity in the well vicinity. Microseismic monitoring is necessary before flow testing at a well site to establish the level of local background seismicity. Once flow testing has begun, well development may affect ground elevations and/or may activate growth faults, which are characteristic of the coastal region of southern Louisiana and southeastern Texas where these geopressured-geothermal wells are located. The microseismic networks are designed to detest small-scale local earthquakes indicative of such fault activation. Even after flow testing has ceased, monitoring continues to assess any microearthquake activity delayed by the time dependence of stress migration within the earth. Current monitoring shows no microseismicity in the geopressured-geothermal prospect areas before, during, or after flow testing.

John, C.J.

1992-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

315

Underbalanced completions improve well safety and productivity  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Recent advances in completion technology, especially the use of and advances in coiled tubing technology, have presented the petroleum industry with methods that were previously unknown or considered too risky. Specifically, coiled tubing drilling and underbalanced drilling have both proven to be effective and acceptable methods in industry today. Several methods have been presented that will allow for the well to be completed underbalanced. By utilizing these methods, the completion process can be carried out while experiencing the same benefits offered by underbalanced drilling. the well can be completed with minimal fluid loss, which will result in reduced formation damage and improved well productivity. This new approach to the completion process provides additional opportunities both for completing new wells and for reentering existing wells.

Walker, T.; Hopmann, M. [Baker Oil Tools, Houston, TX (United States)

1995-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

316

High order well-balanced schemes  

SciTech Connect

In this paper the authors review some recent work on high-order well-balanced schemes. A characteristic feature of hyperbolic systems of balance laws is the existence of non-trivial equilibrium solutions, where the effects of convective fluxes and source terms cancel each other. Well-balanced schemes satisfy a discrete analogue of this balance and are therefore able to maintain an equilibrium state. They discuss two classes of schemes, one based on high-order accurate, non-oscillatory finite difference operators which are well-balanced for a general class of equilibria, and the other one based on well-balanced quadratures, which can - in principle - be applied to all equilibria. Applications include equilibria at rest, where the flow velocity vanishes, and also the more challenging moving flow equilibria. Numerical experiments show excellent resolution of unperturbed as well as slightly perturbed equilibria.

Noelle, Sebastian [Institut fur Physikalische Chemie der RWTH; Xing, Yulong [ORNL; Shu, Chi-wang [Brown University

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

317

Foolproof completions for high rate production wells  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Operators, especially those managing production from deepwater reservoirs, are striving to produce hydrocarbons at higher and higher rates without exposing the wells to completion failure risk. To avoid screen failures, recent studies have favored gravel pack (GP) and high rate water pack (HRWP) completions over high-permeability fracturing (HPF), known in the vernacular as a frac&pack (FP) for very high rate wells. While a properly designed GP completion may prevent sand production, it does not stop formation fines migration, and, over time, fines accumulation in the GP will lead to increasing completion skin. Although, and not always, the skin can be removed by acidizing, it is not practical to perform repeated acid treatments on deepwater wells, particularly those with subsea wellheads, and the alternative has been to subject the completion to increasingly high drawdown, accepting a high skin effect. A far better solution is to use a HPF completion. Of course the execution of a successful HPF is not a trivial exercise, and frequently, there is a steep learning curve for such a practice. This work explains the importance to HPF completions of the well trajectory through the interval to be hydraulically fractured, for production, not execution, reasons. A new model quantifies the effect of the well inclination on the connectivity between the fracture and the well via perforations. Guidelines based on the maximum target production rate, including forecasts of multiphase flow, are provided to size the HPF completion to avoid common completion failures that may result from high fluid rate and/or fines movement. Skin model will be developed for both vertical and deviated wells. Once the HPF is properly designed and executed, the operators should end up with a long term low skin good completion quality well. The well will be safely produced at the maximum flow rates, with no need for well surveillance and monitoring.

Tosic, Slavko

2007-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

318

Advanced Technologies For Stripper Gas Well Enhancement  

SciTech Connect

Stripper gas and oil well operators frequently face a dilemma regarding maximizing production from low-productivity wells. With thousands of stripper wells in the United States covering extensive acreage, it is difficult to identify easily and efficiently marginal or underperforming wells. In addition, the magnitude of reviewing vast amounts of data places a strain on an operator's work force and financial resources. Schlumberger DCS, in cooperation with the National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) and the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), has created software and developed in-house analysis methods to identify remediation potential in stripper wells relatively easily. This software is referred to as Stripper Well Analysis Remediation Methodology (SWARM). SWARM was beta-tested with data pertaining to two gas fields located in northwestern Pennsylvania and had notable results. Great Lakes Energy Partners, LLC (Great Lakes) and Belden & Blake Corporation (B&B) both operate wells in the first field studied. They provided data for 729 wells, and we estimated that 41 wells were candidates for remediation. However, for reasons unbeknownst to Schlumberger these wells were not budgeted for rework by the operators. The second field (Cooperstown) is located in Crawford, Venango, and Warren counties, Pa and has more than 2,200 wells operated by Great Lakes. This paper discusses in depth the successful results of a candidate recognition study of this area. We compared each well's historical production with that of its offsets and identified 339 underperformers before considering remediation costs, and 168 economically viable candidates based on restimulation costs of $50,000 per well. From this data, we prioritized a list based on the expected incremental recoverable gas and 10% discounted net present value (NPV). For this study, we calculated the incremental gas by subtracting the volumes forecasted after remediation from the production projected at its current configuration. Assuming that remediation efforts increased production from the 168 marginal wells to the average of their respective offsets, approximately 6.4 Bscf of gross incremental gas with a NPV approximating $4.9 million after investment, would be made available to the domestic market. Seventeen wells have successfully been restimulated to date and have already obtained significant production increases. At the time of this report, eight of these wells had enough post-rework production data available to forecast the incremental gas and verify the project's success. This incremental gas is estimated at 615 MMscf. The outcome of the other ten wells will be determined after more post-refrac production data becomes available. Plans are currently underway for future restimulations. The success of this project has shown the value of this methodology to recognize underperforming wells quickly and efficiently in fields containing hundreds or thousands of wells. This contributes considerably to corporate net income and domestic natural gas and/or oil reserves.

Ronald J. MacDonald; Charles M. Boyer; Joseph H. Frantz Jr; Paul A. Zyglowicz

2005-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

319

GRR/Section 19-WA-f - Water Well NOI for Replacement or Additional Wells |  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

GRR/Section 19-WA-f - Water Well NOI for Replacement or Additional Wells GRR/Section 19-WA-f - Water Well NOI for Replacement or Additional Wells < GRR Jump to: navigation, search GRR-logo.png GEOTHERMAL REGULATORY ROADMAP Roadmap Home Roadmap Help List of Sections Section 19-WA-f - Water Well NOI for Replacement or Additional Wells 19-WA-f - Water Well NOI for Replacement or Additional Wells.pdf Click to View Fullscreen Contact Agencies Washington State Department of Ecology Regulations & Policies Revised Code of Washington 90.44.100 Revised Code of Washington 18.104.048 Washington Administrative Code 173-160-151 Triggers None specified A developer seeking to use ground water for an activity may need to drill a new well in a different location than a previous well, drill an additional well at an existing location, or drill a replacement well at the same

320

Dry Gas-Well Capacity per New Gas-Well Completions  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Appendix C Dry Gas-Well Capacity per New Gas-Well Completion Dry gas-well gas productive capacity of about one billion cubic feet per day is added per 1,000 new gas ...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "wells hawthorne army" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Well test analysis in fractured media  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The behavior of fracture systems under well test conditions and methods for analyzing well test data from fractured media are investigated. Several analytical models are developed to be used for analyzing well test data from fractured media. Numerical tools that may be used to simulate fluid flow in fractured media are also presented. Three types of composite models for constant flux tests are investigated. These models are based on the assumption that a fracture system under well test conditions may be represented by two concentric regions, one representing a small number of fractures that dominates flow near the well, and the other representing average conditions farther away from the well. Type curves are presented that can be used to find the flow parameters of these two regions and the extent of the inner concentric region. Several slug test models with different geometric conditions that may be present in fractured media are also investigated. A finite element model that can simulate transient fluid flow in fracture networks is used to study the behavior of various two-dimensional fracture systems under well test conditions. A mesh generator that can be used to model mass and heat flow in a fractured-porous media is presented.

Karasaki, K.

1987-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

322

Production Trends of Shale Gas Wells  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

To obtain better well performance and improved production from shale gas reservoirs, it is important to understand the behavior of shale gas wells and to identify different flow regions in them over a period of time. It is also important to understand best fracture and stimulation practice to increase productivity of wells. These objectives require that accurate production analysis be performed. For accurate production analysis, it is important to analyze the production behavior of wells, and field production data should be interpreted in such a way that it will identify well parameters. This can be done by performing a detailed analysis on a number of wells over whole reservoirs. This study is an approach that will lead to identifying different flow regions in shale gas wells that include linear and bilinear flow. Important field parameters can be calculated from those observations to help improve future performance. The detailed plots of several wells in this study show some good numbers for linear and bilinear flow, and some unique observations were made. The purpose of this work is to also manage the large amount of data in such a way that they can be used with ease for future studies. A program was developed to automate the analysis and generation of different plots. The program can also be used to perform the simple calculations to calculate different parameters. The goal was to develop a friendly user interface that would facilitate reservoir analysis. Examples were shown for each flow period, i.e. linear and bilinear flow. Different plots were generated (e.g; Bob Plot (square root of time plot) and Fourth Root of Time Plot, that will help in measuring slopes and thus reservoir parameters such as fracture permeability and drainage area. Different unique cases were also observed that show a different behavior of well in one type of plot from another.

Khan, Waqar A.

2008-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

323

U.S. Army Fort Knox: Using the Earth for Space Heating and Cooling, Federal Energy Management Program (FEMP) (Fact Sheet)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Management Program Management Program (FEMP) facilitates the Federal Government's implementation of sound, cost-effective energy management and investment practices to enhance the nation's energy security and environmental stewardship. Located near Louisville, Kentucky, Fort Knox is home to the U.S. Army's Armor Center, Armor School, Recruiting Command, and numerous other facilities. The post has a daytime population of more than 30,000 people and more than 3,000 family housing units. In total, Fort Knox encompasses 11 million square feet of conditioned space across more than 109,000 acres. A military post of this size consumes a significant amount of energy. Fort Knox is acutely aware of the need for sustainability to ensure continuous operations and meet Federal energy goals and requirements.

324

U.S. Army Fort Knox: Using the Earth for Space Heating and Cooling, Federal Energy Management Program (FEMP) (Fact Sheet)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Management Program Management Program (FEMP) facilitates the Federal Government's implementation of sound, cost-effective energy management and investment practices to enhance the nation's energy security and environmental stewardship. Located near Louisville, Kentucky, Fort Knox is home to the U.S. Army's Armor Center, Armor School, Recruiting Command, and numerous other facilities. The post has a daytime population of more than 30,000 people and more than 3,000 family housing units. In total, Fort Knox encompasses 11 million square feet of conditioned space across more than 109,000 acres. A military post of this size consumes a significant amount of energy. Fort Knox is acutely aware of the need for sustainability to ensure continuous operations and meet Federal energy goals and requirements.

325

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

3 3 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells.................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Total................................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring ...................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared.............................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ..................... 0 0 0 0 0 Marketed Production ..........................................

326

Intervalley splittings of Si quantum wells  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Multi-valley effective mass theory for silicon quantum well structure is studied taking into account the external fields and the quantum interfaces. It is found that the phenomenological delta function potential, employed to explain the valley splitting caused by the quantum well interface in the previous work [Ref. 10], can be derived self-consistently from the multi-valley effective mass theory. Finite element method is used to solve the multi-valley effective equations. Theoretical predictions are in a reasonably good agreement with the recent experimental observation of valley splitting in a SiO_{2}/Si/SiO_{2} quantum well, which prove the validity of our approach.

S. -H. Park; Y. Y. Lee; Doyeol Ahn

2007-11-05T23:59:59.000Z

327

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

1 1 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells.................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Total................................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring ...................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared.............................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ..................... 0 0 0 0 0 Marketed Production ..........................................

328

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

9 9 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells.................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Total................................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring ...................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared.............................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ..................... 0 0 0 0 0 Marketed Production ..........................................

329

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

9 9 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells.................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Total................................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring ...................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared.............................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ..................... 0 0 0 0 0 Marketed Production ..........................................

330

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

1 1 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells.................................................. 7,279 6,446 3,785 3,474 3,525 Total................................................................... 7,279 6,446 3,785 3,474 3,525 Repressuring ...................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared.............................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation................................ 7,279 6,446 3,785 3,474 3,525 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ..................... 788 736 431

331

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

5 5 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 15,206 15,357 16,957 17,387 18,120 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 463,929 423,672 401,396 369,624 350,413 From Oil Wells.................................................. 63,222 57,773 54,736 50,403 47,784 Total................................................................... 527,151 481,445 456,132 420,027 398,197 Repressuring ...................................................... 896 818 775 714 677 Vented and Flared.............................................. 527 481 456 420 398 Wet After Lease Separation................................

332

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

7 7 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 9 8 7 9 6 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 368 305 300 443 331 From Oil Wells.................................................. 1 1 0 0 0 Total................................................................... 368 307 301 443 331 Repressuring ...................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared.............................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation................................ 368 307 301 443 331 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ..................... 0 0 0 0 0 Marketed Production ..........................................

333

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

7 7 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 98 96 106 109 111 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 869 886 904 1,187 1,229 From Oil Wells.................................................. 349 322 288 279 269 Total................................................................... 1,218 1,208 1,193 1,466 1,499 Repressuring ...................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared.............................................. 0 0 5 12 23 Wet After Lease Separation................................ 1,218 1,208 1,188 1,454 1,476 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed .....................

334

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

9 9 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 4 4 4 4 4 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells.................................................. 7 7 6 6 5 Total................................................................... 7 7 6 6 5 Repressuring ...................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared.............................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation................................ 7 7 6 6 5 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ..................... 0 0 0 0 0 Marketed Production ..........................................

335

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

3 3 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells.................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Total................................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring ...................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared.............................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ..................... 0 0 0 0 0 Marketed Production ..........................................

336

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

5 5 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells.................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Total................................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring ...................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared.............................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ..................... 0 0 0 0 0 Marketed Production ..........................................

337

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

3 3 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells.................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Total................................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring ...................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared.............................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ..................... 0 0 0 0 0 Marketed Production ..........................................

338

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

3 3 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells.................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Total................................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring ...................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared.............................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ..................... 0 0 0 0 0 Marketed Production ..........................................

339

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

3 3 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells.................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Total................................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring ...................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared.............................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ..................... 0 0 0 0 0 Marketed Production ..........................................

340

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

1 1 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells.................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Total................................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring ...................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared.............................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ..................... 0 0 0 0 0 Marketed Production ..........................................

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "wells hawthorne army" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

7 7 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 380 350 400 430 280 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells.................................................. 1,150 2,000 2,050 1,803 2,100 Total................................................................... 1,150 2,000 2,050 1,803 2,100 Repressuring ...................................................... NA NA NA 0 NA Vented and Flared.............................................. NA NA NA 0 NA Wet After Lease Separation................................ 1,150 2,000 2,050 1,803 2,100 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed .....................

342

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

5 5 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells.................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Total................................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring ...................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared.............................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ..................... 0 0 0 0 0 Marketed Production ..........................................

343

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

1 1 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 1,502 1,533 1,545 2,291 2,386 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 899 1,064 1,309 1,464 3,401 From Oil Wells.................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Total................................................................... 899 1,064 1,309 1,464 3,401 Repressuring ...................................................... NA NA NA 0 NA Vented and Flared.............................................. NA NA NA 0 NA Wet After Lease Separation................................ 899 1,064 1,309 1,464 3,401 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed .....................

344

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

9 9 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells.................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Total................................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring ...................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared.............................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ..................... 0 0 0 0 0 Marketed Production ..........................................

345

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

3 3 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells.................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Total................................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring ...................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared.............................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ..................... 0 0 0 0 0 Marketed Production ..........................................

346

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

7 7 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells.................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Total................................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring ...................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared.............................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ..................... 0 0 0 0 0 Marketed Production ..........................................

347

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

3 3 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 7 7 5 7 7 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 34 32 22 48 34 From Oil Wells.................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Total................................................................... 34 32 22 48 34 Repressuring ...................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared.............................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation................................ 34 32 22 48 34 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ..................... 0 0 0 0 0 Marketed Production ..........................................

348

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

1 1 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells.................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Total................................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring ...................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared.............................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ..................... 0 0 0 0 0 Marketed Production ..........................................

349

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

1 1 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ......................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells...................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells........................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Total......................................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring ............................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared .................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation...................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed............................ 0 0 0 0 0 Marketed Production

350

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

7 7 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells.................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Total................................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring ...................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared.............................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ..................... 0 0 0 0 0 Marketed Production ..........................................

351

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

7 7 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 17 20 18 15 15 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 1,412 1,112 837 731 467 From Oil Wells.................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Total................................................................... 1,412 1,112 837 731 467 Repressuring ...................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared.............................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation................................ 1,412 1,112 837 731 467 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ..................... 198 3 0 0 0 Marketed Production

352

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

7 7 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells.................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Total................................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring ...................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared.............................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ..................... 0 0 0 0 0 Marketed Production ..........................................

353

An examination of electronic file transfer between host and microcomputers for the AMPMODNET/AIMNET (Army Material Plan Modernization Network/Acquisition Information Management Network) classified network environment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report presents the results of investigation and testing conducted by Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) for the Project Manager -- Acquisition Information Management (PM-AIM), and the United States Army Materiel Command Headquarters (HQ-AMC). It concerns the establishment of file transfer capabilities on the Army Materiel Plan Modernization (AMPMOD) classified computer system. The discussion provides a general context for micro-to-mainframe connectivity and focuses specifically upon two possible solutions for file transfer capabilities. The second section of this report contains a statement of the problem to be examined, a brief description of the institutional setting of the investigation, and a concise declaration of purpose. The third section lays a conceptual foundation for micro-to-mainframe connectivity and provides a more detailed description of the AMPMOD computing environment. It gives emphasis to the generalized International Business Machines, Inc. (IBM) standard of connectivity because of the predominance of this vendor in the AMPMOD computing environment. The fourth section discusses two test cases as possible solutions for file transfer. The first solution used is the IBM 3270 Control Program telecommunications and terminal emulation software. A version of this software was available on all the IBM Tempest Personal Computer 3s. The second solution used is Distributed Office Support System host electronic mail software with Personal Services/Personal Computer microcomputer e-mail software running with IBM 3270 Workstation Program for terminal emulation. Test conditions and results are presented for both test cases. The fifth section provides a summary of findings for the two possible solutions tested for AMPMOD file transfer. The report concludes with observations on current AMPMOD understanding of file transfer and includes recommendations for future consideration by the sponsor.

Hake, K.A.

1990-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

354

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

3 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ... 22,442 22,117 23,554 18,774 16,718 Production...

355

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

2004 1 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year... 341,678 373,304 387,772 393,327 405,048 Production...

356

Soliton in a Well. Dynamics and Tunneling  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We derive the leading order radiation through tunneling of an oscillating soliton in a well. We use the hydrodynamic formulation with a rigorous control of the errors for finite times.

V. Fleurov; A. Soffer

2013-05-18T23:59:59.000Z

357

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

1 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ... 1,169 1,244 1,232 1,249 1,272 Production (million...

358

Surprising attractive potential barriers and repulsive wells  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The fundamental fact is revealed that in the old good quantum mechanics there is possible such unexpected inversion: potential barriers can drag in wave-particles and wells can push them off.

B. N. Zakhariev

2008-05-06T23:59:59.000Z

359

Salt Wells Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Salt Wells Geothermal Area Salt Wells Geothermal Area Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Geothermal Resource Area: Salt Wells Geothermal Area Contents 1 Area Overview 2 History and Infrastructure 3 Regulatory and Environmental Issues 4 Future Plans 5 Exploration History 6 Well Field Description 7 Research and Development Activities 8 Technical Problems and Solutions 9 Geology of the Area 9.1 Regional Setting 9.2 Stratigraphy 9.3 Structure 10 Hydrothermal System 11 Heat Source 12 Geofluid Geochemistry 13 NEPA-Related Analyses (9) 14 Exploration Activities (28) 15 References Area Overview Geothermal Area Profile Location: Nevada Exploration Region: Northwest Basin and Range Geothermal Region GEA Development Phase: Operational"Operational" is not in the list of possible values (Phase I - Resource Procurement and Identification, Phase II - Resource Exploration and Confirmation, Phase III - Permitting and Initial Development, Phase IV - Resource Production and Power Plant Construction) for this property.

360

Maazama Well Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Maazama Well Geothermal Area Maazama Well Geothermal Area Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Geothermal Resource Area: Maazama Well Geothermal Area Contents 1 Area Overview 2 History and Infrastructure 3 Regulatory and Environmental Issues 4 Exploration History 5 Well Field Description 6 Geology of the Area 7 Geofluid Geochemistry 8 NEPA-Related Analyses (0) 9 Exploration Activities (0) 10 References Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"TERRAIN","zoom":6,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"500px","height":"300px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":42.8965,"lon":-121.9865,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "wells hawthorne army" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Willow Well Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Well Geothermal Area Well Geothermal Area Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Geothermal Resource Area: Willow Well Geothermal Area Contents 1 Area Overview 2 History and Infrastructure 3 Regulatory and Environmental Issues 4 Exploration History 5 Well Field Description 6 Geology of the Area 7 Geofluid Geochemistry 8 NEPA-Related Analyses (0) 9 Exploration Activities (0) 10 References Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"TERRAIN","zoom":6,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"500px","height":"300px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":61.6417,"lon":-150.095,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

362

Wellness & Additional Benefits | Careers | ORNL  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Working at ORNL Working at ORNL Benefits Wellness and Other Incentives View Open Positions View Postdoctoral Positions Create A Profile Internal applicants please apply here View or update your current application or profile. External applicants Internal applicants Internet Explorer Browser preferred for ORNL applicants. Chrome is not currently supported. For more information about browser compatibility please refer to the FAQs. If you have difficulty using the online application system or need an accommodation to apply due to a disability, please email ORNLRecruiting@ornl.gov or phone 1-866-963-9545 Careers Home | ORNL | Careers | Working at ORNL | Wellness and Other Incentives SHARE Wellness & Additional Benefits Wellness Program Employees have many opportunities to maintain and improve their health

363

Economic well-being and the family  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This thesis examines the well-being of families under changing labor market conditions, changes in the legal environment and changes in public policy. The first chapter asks how women's fertility decisions are affected by ...

Perry, Cynthia D

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

364

Hydrocarbons associated with brines from geopressured wells  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The purpose of this research is to determine the concentration of the cryocondensates in fluids of the various USDOE Geopressured wells as a function of production volume, to correlate the production of these compounds with reservoir and well production characteristics, to precisely measure solubilities of cryocondensates components in water and sodium chloride solutions (brines) as a function of ionic strength and temperature and the component's distribution coefficients between these solutions and oil, to develop models of the reservoir which are consistent with the data obtained, to monitor the wells for the production of aliphatic oils and relate any such production with the data obtained, and to develop a harsh environment pH probe for use in well brines. Results are summarized.

Not Available

1991-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

365

Well cost estimates in various geothermal regions  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A project to estimate well costs in regions of current geothermal activity has been initiated. Costs associated with commonly encountered drilling problems will be included. Activity-based costing techniques will be employed to allow the identification of cost drivers and the evaluation of the economic effects of new technologies and operational procedures on well costs. The sensitivity of well costs to a number of parameters such as rate-of-penetration and daily operating costs will be examined. Additional sensitivity analyses and trade-off studies will evaluate the efficiency of various operational practices and preventive, as well as remedial, actions. These efforts should help provide an understanding of the consumption of resources in geothermal drilling.

Pierce, K.G.; Bomber, T.M. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Livesay, B.J. [Livesay Consultants, Encinitas, CA (United States)

1997-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

366

Health, Safety and Wellness 2011 Annual Report  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Health, Safety and Wellness 2011 Annual Report Occupational Health & Safety and Rehabilitation Services #12;2 | P a g e Table of Contents Year in Review...................................................................................................................12 Laboratory Safety Program

Sinnamon, Gordon J.

367

Groundwater well with reactive filter pack  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method and apparatus for the remediation of contaminated soil and ground water wherein a reactive pack material is added to the annular fill material utilized in standard well construction techniques.

Gilmore, Tyler J. (Pasco, WA); Holdren, Jr., George R. (Kennewick, WA); Kaplan, Daniel I. (Richland, WA)

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

368

INVITATIONAL WELL-TESTING SYMPOSIUM PROCEEDINGS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

wei I is being dri lied underbalanced, whether H2S is to beis occurring, the well is underbalanced and the threat of ain, the wei I may become underbalanced and the threat of a

Authors, Various

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

369

A Well-Founded Software Measurement Ontology  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Software measurement is a relatively young discipline. As a consequence, it is not well defined yet, making the terminology used diverse. In order to establish a basic conceptualization regarding this domain, in this paper we present a Software Measur ...

Monalessa Perini Barcellos; Ricardo de Almeida Falbo; Rodrigo Dal Moro

2010-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

370

MARGINAL EXPENSE OIL WELL WIRELESS SURVEILLANCE MEOWS  

SciTech Connect

A marginal expense oil well wireless surveillance system to monitor system performance and production from rod-pumped wells in real time from wells operated by Vaquero Energy in the Edison Field, Main Area of Kern County in California has been successfully designed and field tested. The surveillance system includes a proprietary flow sensor, a programmable transmitting unit, a base receiver and receiving antenna, and a base station computer equipped with software to interpret the data. First, the system design is presented. Second, field data obtained from three wells is shown. Results of the study show that an effective, cost competitive, real-time wireless surveillance system can be introduced to oil fields across the United States and the world.

Mason M. Medizade; John R. Ridgely; Donald G. Nelson

2004-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

371

Definition: Single-Well And Cross-Well Seismic Imaging | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Definition Definition Edit with form History Facebook icon Twitter icon » Definition: Single-Well And Cross-Well Seismic Imaging (Redirected from Definition:Single-Well And Cross-Well Seismic) Jump to: navigation, search Dictionary.png Single-Well And Cross-Well Seismic Imaging Single well seismic imaging (SWSI) is the application of borehole seismic sources and receivers on the same string within a single borehole in order to acquire CMP type shot gathers. Cross well seismic places sources and receivers in adjacent wells in order to image the interwell volume.[1] Also Known As SWSI References ↑ http://library.seg.org/ Ret LikeLike UnlikeLike You like this.Sign Up to see what your friends like. rieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Definition:Single-Well_And_Cross-Well_Seismic_Imaging&oldid=690246"

372

Exploratory Well At Salt Wells Area (Bureau of Land Management, 2009) |  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Exploratory Well At Salt Wells Area (Bureau of Land Management, 2009) Exploratory Well At Salt Wells Area (Bureau of Land Management, 2009) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Exploratory Well At Salt Wells Area (Bureau of Land Management, 2009) Exploration Activity Details Location Salt Wells Geothermal Area Exploration Technique Exploratory Well Activity Date 2008 - 2008 Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Exploration Basis Vulcan increased exploration efforts in the summer and fall of 2008, during which time the company drilled two temperature gradient holes (86-15 O on Pad 1 and 17-16 O on Pad 3); conducted seismic, gravity and magnetotelluric surveys; and drilled deep exploration wells at Pads 6 and 8 and binary wells at Pads 1, 2, 4, and 7. Notes Data from these wells is proprietary, and so were unavailable for inclusion

373

GRR/Section 19-WA-e - Water Well Notice of Intent for New Well | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

GRR/Section 19-WA-e - Water Well Notice of Intent for New Well GRR/Section 19-WA-e - Water Well Notice of Intent for New Well < GRR Jump to: navigation, search GRR-logo.png GEOTHERMAL REGULATORY ROADMAP Roadmap Home Roadmap Help List of Sections Section 19-WA-e - Water Well Notice of Intent for New Well 19-WA-e - Water Well Notice of Intent for New Well.pdf Click to View Fullscreen Contact Agencies Washington State Department of Ecology Regulations & Policies Revised Code of Washington 18.104.048 Washington Administrative Code 173-160-151 Triggers None specified A developer seeking to use ground water for an activity may need to drill a new well to access the ground water. When a developer needs to drill a new well, the developer must complete the Notice of Intent (NOI) to Drill a Well form and submit the form to the Washington State Department of Ecology

374

PrimeEnergy/DOE/GRI slant well  

SciTech Connect

This report presents final results of the Sterling Boggs 1240 slant well. Objectives of the project were (1) to test the potential for improved recovery efficiency in a fractured Devonian Shale reservoir from a directionally drilled well, (2) to perform detailed tests of reservoir properties and completion methods, and (3) to provide technology to industry which may ultimately improve the economics of drilling in the Devonian Shale and thereby stimulate development of its resources.

Drimal, C.E.; Muncey, G.; Carden, R.

1991-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

375

San Bernardino National Wildlife Refuge Well 10  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), at the request of the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, evaluated the water production capacity of an artesian well in the San Bernardino National Wildlife Refuge, Arizona. Water from the well initially flows into a pond containing three federally threatened or endangered fish species, and water from this pond feeds an adjacent pond/wetland containing an endangered plant species.

Ensminger, J.T.; Easterly, C.E.; Ketelle, R.H.; Quarles, H.; Wade, M.C.

1999-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

376

Stimulation Technologies for Deep Well Completions  

SciTech Connect

The Department of Energy (DOE) is sponsoring the Deep Trek Program targeted at improving the economics of drilling and completing deep gas wells. Under the DOE program, Pinnacle Technologies is conducting a study to evaluate the stimulation of deep wells. The objective of the project is to assess U.S. deep well drilling and stimulation activity, review rock mechanics and fracture growth in deep, high-pressure/temperature wells and evaluate stimulation technology in several key deep plays. An assessment of historical deep gas well drilling activity and forecast of future trends was completed during the first six months of the project; this segment of the project was covered in Technical Progress Report No. 1. During the next six months, efforts were primarily split between summarizing rock mechanics and fracture growth in deep reservoirs and contacting operators about case studies of deep gas well stimulation as documented in Technical Progress Report No. 2. This report details work done with Anadarko and ChevronTexaco in the Table Rock Field in Wyoming.

None

2004-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

377

Uncertainty analysis of well test data  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

During a well test a transient pressure response is created by a temporary change in production rate. The well response is usually monitored during a relatively short period of time, depending upon the test objectives. Reservoir properties are determined from well test data via an inverse problem approach. Uncertainty is inherent in any nonlinear inverse problem. Unfortunately, well test interpretation suffers particularly from a variety of uncertainties that, when combined, reduce the confidence that can be associated with the estimated reservoir properties. The specific factors that have been analyzed in this work are: 1. Pressure noise (random noise) 2. Pressure drift (systematic variation) 3. Rate history effects Our work is based on the analysis of the effects of random pressure noise, the drift error, and the rate history on the estimation of typical reservoir parameters for two common reservoir models: A vertical well with a constant wellbore storage and skin in a homogeneous reservoir. A vertical well with a finite conductivity vertical fracture including wellbore effects in a homogeneous reservoir. This work represents a sensitivity study of the impact of pressure and rate uncertainty on parameter estimation and the confidence intervals associated with these results. In this work we statistically analyze the calculated reservoir parameters to quantify the impact of pressure and rate uncertainty on them.

Merad, Mohamed Belgacem

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

378

Production characteristics of some Cerro Prieto wells  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

An areal distribution of heat and mass production in the Cerro Prieto field has been presented for two different times to determine the initial state of the ..cap alpha.. and ..beta.. aquifers and the behavior of the field under production. It was found that, initially, the ..cap alpha.. and ..beta.. aquifers were hot and very hot respectively. Cold boundaries to the field were found to be located toward the west and northeast. Initially, fluid production from most wells was very high. M-53 and some wells southeast of Fault H produced very hot fluids at very high rates. Production from most wells declined over the years, possibly due to scaling in the wellbore, reduced recharge to the aquifer, high resistance to flow due to silica precipitation in the reservoir pores and/or relative permeability effects in the two-phase regions surrounding the wells. In most wells fluid enthalpies declined over the years, perhaps due to mixing with colder waters either drawn in from upper strata and/or from the cold lateral boundaries depending upon well location.

Goyal, K.P.; Halfman, S.E.; Truesdell, A.H.; Howard, J.H.

1982-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

379

Characterization Well R-7 Geochemistry Report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report provides analytical results for four groundwater-sampling rounds conducted at characterization well R-7. The goal of the characterization efforts was to assess the hydrochemistry and to determine if contaminants from Technical Area (TA)-2 and TA-21 of the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL or the Laboratory) are present in the regional aquifer in the vicinity of the well. Figure 1.0-1 shows the well's location in the narrow upper part of Los Alamos Canyon, between the inactive Omega West reactor and the mouth of DP Canyon. Well R-7 is in an excellent location to characterize the hydrology and groundwater chemistry in both perched groundwater and the regional aquifer near sites of known Laboratory effluent release, including radionuclides and inorganic chemicals (Stone et al. 2002, 72717). The Risk Reduction and Environmental Stewardship-Remediation (RRES-R) Program (formerly the Environmental Restoration [ER] Project) installed well R-7 as part of groundwater investigations to satisfy requirements of the ''Hydrogeologic Workplan'' (LANL 1998, 59599) and to support the Laboratory's ''Groundwater Protection Management Program Plan'' (LANL 1996, 70215). Well R-7 was designed primarily to provide geochemical or water quality and hydrogeologic data for the regional aquifer within the Puye Formation. This report also presents a geochemical evaluation of the analytical results for well R-7 and provides hydrogeochemical interpretations using analytical results for groundwater samples collected at the well. Discussion of other hydrogeochemical data collected within the east-central portion of the Laboratory, however, is deferred until they can be evaluated in the context of sitewide information collected from other RRES and Hydrogeologic Workplan characterization wells (R-8A, R-9, and R-9i). Once all deep groundwater investigations in the east-central portion of the Laboratory are completed, geochemical and hydrogeologic conceptual models for the Los Alamos Canyon watershed may be included in a groundwater risk analysis. These models will include an evaluation of potential contaminant transport pathways. Well R-7 was completed on March 9, 2001, with three screens (363.2 to 379.2 ft, 730.4 to 746.4 ft, and 895.5 to 937.4 ft). Screen No.2 was dry during characterization sampling. Four rounds of groundwater characterization samples, collected from a perched zone and the regional aquifer from depths of 378.0 ft (screen No.1) and 915.0 ft (screen No.3), were chemically characterized for radionuclides, metals and trace elements, major ions, high-explosive (HE) compounds, total organic carbon, dissolved organic carbon, organic compounds, and stable isotopes (H, N, and O). Although well R-7 is primarily a characterization well, its design and construction also meet the requirements of a Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA)-compliant monitoring well as described in the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) document ''RCRA Groundwater Monitoring: Draft Technical Guidance,'' November 1992, EPA 530-R-93- 001. Incorporation of this well into a Laboratory-wide groundwater-monitoring program will be considered, and more specifically evaluated (e.g., sampling frequency, analytes, etc.), when the results of the well R-7 characterization activities are comprehensively evaluated in conjunction with other groundwater investigations in the ''Hydrogeologic Workplan'' (LANL 1998, 59599).

P.Longmire; F.Goff

2002-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

380

Entiat 4Mile WELLs Completion Report, 2006.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Entiat 4-mile Wells (Entiat 4-mile) project is located in the Entiat subbasin and will benefit Upper Columbia steelhead, spring Chinook and bull trout. The goal of this project is to prevent juvenile fish from being diverted into an out-of-stream irrigation system and to eliminate impacts due to the annual maintenance of an instream pushup dam. The objectives include eliminating a surface irrigation diversion and replacing it with two wells, which will provide Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) and the Bureau of Reclamation (Reclamation) with a Federal Columbia River Power System (FCRPS) BiOp metric credit of one. Wells were chosen over a new fish screen based on biological benefits and costs. Long-term biological benefits are provided by completely eliminating the surface diversion and the potential for fish entrainment in a fish screen. Construction costs for a new fish screen were estimated at $150,000, which does not include other costs associated with implementing and maintaining a fish screening project. Construction costs for a well were estimated at $20,000 each. The diversion consisted of a pushup dam that diverted water into an off-channel pond. Water was then pumped into a pressurized system for irrigation. There are 3 different irrigators who used water from this surface diversion, and each has multiple water right claims totaling approximately 5 cfs. Current use was estimated at 300 gallons per minute (approximately 0.641 cfs). Some irrigated acreage was taken out of orchard production less than 5 years ago. Therefore, approximately 6.8 acre-feet will be put into the State of Washington Trust Water Right program. No water will be set aside for conservation savings. The construction of the two irrigation wells for three landowners was completed in September 2006. The Lower Well (Tippen/Wick) will produce up to 175 gpm while the Upper Well (Griffith) will produce up to 275 gpm during the irrigation season. The eight inch diameter wells were developed to a depth of 75 feet and 85 feet, respectively, and will be pumped with Submersible Turbine pumps. The irrigation wells have been fitted with new electric boxes and Siemens flowmeters (MAG8000).

Malinowksi, Richard

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

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381

Snubdrilling a new well in Venezuela  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A new well was successfully drilled using a snubbing jack. The drill bit was rotated using a rotary table, downhole motors and combination of the two. Expected high-pressure zones prompted this use of ``snubdrilling.`` The primary objective was to drill a vertical well through underlying sands and gain information about formation pressures. This data would aid in the drilling of a relief well using a conventional drilling rig. The secondary objective was to relieve pressure by putting this new well on production. In addition to special high-pressure drilling jobs, there are other drilling applications where snubbing jacks are a feasible alternative to conventional rotary drilling rigs or coiled tubing units. Slimhole, underbalanced and flow drilling, and sidetracking of existing wells are excellent applications for snubdrilling. Advantages of snubdrilling vs. coiled tubing drilling, include ability to rotate drillstrings, use high-torque downhole motors, pump at high rates and pressures, apply significant overpull in case of stuck pipe, and run casing and liners without rigging down. Shortcomings of drilling with snubbing jacks compared to coiled tubing are the need to stop circulation while making new connections and inability to run continuous cable inside workstrings.

Aasen, J.

1995-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

382

Enhance the well stimulation learning curve  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This article explains that well a well is stimulated to either overcome formation damage or compensate for naturally poor permeability. Regardless of the motivation, it's a complicated process that requires considerable advanced planning and organization if mishaps are to be avoided. Well stimulation should be divided into three distinctly separate states, each with its own set of requirements. Perhaps the most important and difficult of the three stages, particularly during this economically depressed period, is justification. Does the well's expected increase in productivity warrant stimulation costs. How reliable is the production increase estimate. The second state is the actual execution of the stimulation. Quality control-quality assurance programs should be intact and, again, accountability assigned. The third stage of the stimulation process is evaluation after completion. Systems should be examined for efficiency breakdowns. If so, they should be corrected to prevent future problems. It is often necessary to keep a close watch on the well's performance for a considerable length of time before the stimulation's impact can be accurately judged.

Not Available

1987-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

383

Well test analysis in fractured media  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

In this study the behavior of fracture systems under well test conditions and methods for analyzing well test data from fractured media are investigated. Several analytical models are developed to be used for analyzing well test data from fractured media. Numerical tools that may be used to simulate fluid flow in fractured media are also presented. Three types of composite models for constant flux tests are investigated. Several slug test models with different geometric conditions that may be present in fractured media are also investigated. A finite element model that can simulate transient fluid flow in fracture networks is used to study the behavior of various two-dimensional fracture systems under well test conditions. A mesh generator that can be used to model mass and heat flow in a fractured-porous media is presented. This model develops an explicit solution in the porous matrix as well as in the discrete fractures. Because the model does not require the assumptions of the conventional double porosity approach, it may be used to simulate cases where double porosity models fail.

Karasaki, K.

1986-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

384

Number of Producing Gas Wells (Summary)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Count) Count) Data Series: Wellhead Price Imports Price Price of Imports by Pipeline Price of LNG Imports Exports Price Price of Exports by Pipeline Price of LNG Exports Pipeline and Distribution Use Price Citygate Price Residential Price Commercial Price Industrial Price Vehicle Fuel Price Electric Power Price Proved Reserves as of 12/31 Reserves Adjustments Reserves Revision Increases Reserves Revision Decreases Reserves Sales Reserves Acquisitions Reserves Extensions Reserves New Field Discoveries New Reservoir Discoveries in Old Fields Estimated Production Number of Producing Gas Wells Gross Withdrawals Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells Gross Withdrawals From Oil Wells Gross Withdrawals From Shale Gas Wells Gross Withdrawals From Coalbed Wells Repressuring Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed Vented and Flared Marketed Production Natural Gas Processed NGPL Production, Gaseous Equivalent Dry Production Imports By Pipeline LNG Imports Exports Exports By Pipeline LNG Exports Underground Storage Capacity Underground Storage Injections Underground Storage Withdrawals Underground Storage Net Withdrawals LNG Storage Additions LNG Storage Withdrawals LNG Storage Net Withdrawals Total Consumption Lease and Plant Fuel Consumption Lease Fuel Plant Fuel Pipeline & Distribution Use Delivered to Consumers Residential Commercial Industrial Vehicle Fuel Electric Power Period:

385

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

7 7 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 5,775 5,913 6,496 5,878 5,781 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 17,741 27,632 36,637 35,943 45,963 From Oil Wells.................................................. 16 155 179 194 87 Total................................................................... 17,757 27,787 36,816 36,137 46,050 Repressuring ...................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared.............................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation................................ 17,757 27,787 36,816 36,137 46,050 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed

386

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

9 9 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 4,000 4,825 6,755 7,606 3,460 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 156,333 150,972 147,734 157,039 176,221 From Oil Wells.................................................. 15,524 16,263 14,388 12,915 11,088 Total................................................................... 171,857 167,235 162,122 169,953 187,310 Repressuring ...................................................... 8 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared.............................................. 206 431 251 354 241 Wet After Lease Separation................................ 171,642 166,804

387

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

1 1 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 4,178 4,601 3,005 3,220 3,657 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 244,826 264,809 260,554 254,488 259,432 From Oil Wells.................................................. 36,290 36,612 32,509 29,871 31,153 Total................................................................... 281,117 301,422 293,063 284,359 290,586 Repressuring ...................................................... 563 575 2,150 1,785 1,337 Vented and Flared.............................................. 1,941 1,847 955 705 688 Wet After Lease Separation................................

388

Salt Wells Geothermal Project | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Salt Wells Geothermal Project Salt Wells Geothermal Project Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Development Project: Salt Wells Geothermal Project Project Location Information Coordinates 39.580833333333°, -118.33444444444° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":39.580833333333,"lon":-118.33444444444,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

389

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

5 5 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 21,507 32,672 33,279 34,334 35,612 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 1,473,792 1,466,833 1,476,204 1,487,451 1,604,709 From Oil Wells.................................................. 139,097 148,551 105,402 70,704 58,439 Total................................................................... 1,612,890 1,615,384 1,581,606 1,558,155 1,663,148 Repressuring ...................................................... NA NA NA 0 NA Vented and Flared.............................................. NA NA NA 0 NA Wet After Lease Separation................................

390

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

1 1 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 94 95 100 117 117 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 13,527 13,846 15,130 14,524 15,565 From Oil Wells.................................................. 42,262 44,141 44,848 43,362 43,274 Total................................................................... 55,789 57,987 59,978 57,886 58,839 Repressuring ...................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared.............................................. 3,290 3,166 2,791 2,070 3,704 Wet After Lease Separation................................ 52,499 54,821 57,187 55,816 55,135

391

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

1 1 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 997 1,143 979 427 437 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 109,041 131,608 142,070 156,727 171,915 From Oil Wells.................................................. 5,339 5,132 5,344 4,950 4,414 Total................................................................... 114,380 136,740 147,415 161,676 176,329 Repressuring ...................................................... 6,353 6,194 5,975 6,082 8,069 Vented and Flared.............................................. 2,477 2,961 3,267 3,501 3,493 Wet After Lease Separation................................

392

GeoWells International | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

GeoWells International GeoWells International Jump to: navigation, search Name GeoWells International Place Nairobi, Kenya Sector Geothermal energy, Solar, Wind energy Product Kenya-based geothermal driller. The company also supplies and installs wind and solar units. Coordinates -1.277298°, 36.806261° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":-1.277298,"lon":36.806261,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

393

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

9 9 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 42,475 42,000 45,000 46,203 47,117 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 264,139 191,889 190,249 187,723 197,217 From Oil Wells.................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Total................................................................... 264,139 191,889 190,249 187,723 197,217 Repressuring ...................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared.............................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation................................ 264,139 191,889 190,249 187,723 197,217 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed

394

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

3 3 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 9,907 13,978 15,608 18,154 20,244 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 1,188,657 1,467,331 1,572,728 1,652,504 1,736,136 From Oil Wells.................................................. 137,385 167,656 174,748 183,612 192,904 Total................................................................... 1,326,042 1,634,987 1,747,476 1,836,115 1,929,040 Repressuring ...................................................... 50,216 114,407 129,598 131,125 164,164 Vented and Flared.............................................. 9,945 7,462 12,356 16,685 16,848

395

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

5 5 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 71 68 69 61 61 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 648 563 531 550 531 From Oil Wells.................................................. 10,032 10,751 9,894 11,055 11,238 Total................................................................... 10,680 11,313 10,424 11,605 11,768 Repressuring ...................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared.............................................. 1,806 2,043 1,880 2,100 2,135 Wet After Lease Separation................................ 8,875 9,271 8,545 9,504 9,633 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed

396

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

9 9 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 60,577 63,704 65,779 68,572 72,237 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 5,859,358 4,897,366 4,828,188 4,947,589 5,074,067 From Oil Wells.................................................. 999,624 855,081 832,816 843,735 659,851 Total................................................................... 6,858,983 5,752,446 5,661,005 5,791,324 5,733,918 Repressuring ...................................................... 138,372 195,150 212,638 237,723 284,491 Vented and Flared.............................................. 32,010 26,823 27,379 23,781 26,947

397

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

9 9 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 15,700 16,350 17,100 16,939 20,734 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 4,260,529 1,398,981 1,282,137 1,283,513 1,293,204 From Oil Wells.................................................. 895,425 125,693 100,324 94,615 88,209 Total................................................................... 5,155,954 1,524,673 1,382,461 1,378,128 1,381,413 Repressuring ...................................................... 42,557 10,838 9,754 18,446 19,031 Vented and Flared.............................................. 20,266 11,750 10,957 9,283 5,015 Wet After Lease Separation................................

398

Natural Gas Wells Near Project Rulison  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

for for Natural Gas Wells Near Project Rulison Second Quarter 2013 U.S. Department of Energy Office of Legacy Management Grand Junction, Colorado Date Sampled: April 3, 2013 Background: Project Rulison was the second underground nuclear test under the Plowshare Program to stimulate natural-gas recovery from deep, low-permeability formations. On September 10, 1969, a 40-kiloton-yield nuclear device was detonated 8,426 feet (1.6 miles) below the ground surface in the Williams Fork Formation, at what is now the Rulison, Colorado, Site. Following the detonation, a series of production tests were conducted. Afterward, the site was shut down and then remediated, and the emplacement well (R-E) and the reentry well (R-Ex) were plugged. Purpose: As part of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Legacy Management (LM) mission

399

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

9 9 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 36,000 40,100 40,830 42,437 44,227 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 150,000 130,853 157,800 159,827 197,217 From Oil Wells.................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Total................................................................... 150,000 130,853 157,800 159,827 197,217 Repressuring ...................................................... NA NA NA 0 NA Vented and Flared.............................................. NA NA NA 0 NA Wet After Lease Separation................................ 150,000 130,853 157,800 159,827 197,217

400

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

3 3 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.................................... 4,359 4,597 4,803 5,157 5,526 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ................................................ 555,043 385,915 380,700 365,330 333,583 From Oil Wells .................................................. 6,501 6,066 5,802 5,580 5,153 Total................................................................... 561,544 391,981 386,502 370,910 338,735 Repressuring ...................................................... 13,988 12,758 10,050 4,062 1,307 Vented and Flared .............................................. 1,262 1,039 1,331 1,611 2,316 Wet After Lease Separation................................

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "wells hawthorne army" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

5 5 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 3,321 4,331 4,544 4,539 4,971 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 61,974 71,985 76,053 78,175 87,292 From Oil Wells.................................................. 8,451 9,816 10,371 8,256 10,546 Total................................................................... 70,424 81,802 86,424 86,431 97,838 Repressuring ...................................................... 1 0 0 2 5 Vented and Flared.............................................. 488 404 349 403 1,071 Wet After Lease Separation................................ 69,936 81,397 86,075 86,027 96,762

402

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

5 5 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 3,051 3,521 3,429 3,506 3,870 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 71,545 71,543 76,915 R 143,644 152,495 From Oil Wells.................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Total................................................................... 71,545 71,543 76,915 R 143,644 152,495 Repressuring ...................................................... NA NA NA 0 NA Vented and Flared.............................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation................................ 71,545 71,543 76,915 R 143,644 152,495 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed

403

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

5 5 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 33,948 35,217 35,873 37,100 38,574 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 1,484,269 1,484,856 1,432,966 1,391,916 1,397,934 From Oil Wells.................................................. 229,437 227,534 222,940 224,263 246,804 Total................................................................... 1,713,706 1,712,390 1,655,906 1,616,179 1,644,738 Repressuring ...................................................... 15,280 20,009 20,977 9,817 8,674 Vented and Flared.............................................. 3,130 3,256 2,849 2,347 3,525 Wet After Lease Separation................................

404

Well-test data from geothermal reservoirs  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Extensive well testing in geothermal resources has been carried out throughout the western United States and in northern Mexico since 1975. Each resource tested and each well test conducted by LBL during the eight-year period are covered in brief. The information, collected from published reports and memoranda, includes test particulars, special instrumentation, data interpretation when available, and plots of actual data. Brief geologic and hydrologic descriptions of the geothermal resources are also presented. The format is such that well test descriptions are grouped, in the order performed, into major sections according to resource, each section containing a short resource description followed by individual test details. Additional information regarding instrumentation is provided. Source documentation is provided throughout to facilitate access to further information and raw data.

Bodvarsson, M.G.; Benson, S.M.

1982-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

405

Proper centralizers can improve horizontal well cementing  

SciTech Connect

The selection and spacing of appropriate centralizers can improve the cementation of high-angle and horizontal wells. Mud removal is one of the most important factors in obtaining a good cement job. Effective centralization assists in mud removal and helps ensure an even cement coat around the casing. Centralizers for horizontal wells have to fulfill two requirements: They should have a high restoring capability and a low moving force, and they should allow pipe rotation and reciprocation. Conventional bow-type centralizers have been used successfully in some horizontal wells. But as the horizontal section length increases, special centralizers, such as low-moving-force, bow-type centralizers and rigid centralizers, may be necessary. The paper describes the following: cementing liners, centralization, torque and drag, centralizer placement, the bow-type centralizer, the rigid centralizer, and the downhole activated centralizer.

Kinzel, H. (Weatherford Oil Tool, Langenhagen (Germany))

1993-09-20T23:59:59.000Z

406

Subsurface steam sampling in Geysers wells  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A new downhole sampling tool has been built for use in steam wells at The Geysers geothermal reservoir. The tool condenses specimens into an initially evacuated vessel that is opened down hole at the direction of an on-board computer. The tool makes a temperature log of the well as it is deployed, and the pressure and temperature of collected specimens are monitored for diagnostic purposes. Initial tests were encouraging, and the Department of Energy has funded an expanded effort that includes data gathering needed to develop a three-dimensional model of The Geysers geochemical environment. Collected data will be useful for understanding the origins of hydrogen chloride and non-condensable gases in the steam, as well as tracking the effect of injection on the composition of produced steam. Interested parties are invited to observe the work and to join the program.

Lysne, P. [Lysne (Peter), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Koenig, B. [Unocal Geothermal and Power Operations Group, Santa Rose, CA (United States); Hirtz, P. [Thermochem, Inc., Santa Rosa, CA (United States); Normann, R.; Henfling, J. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

407

Downhole Temperature Prediction for Drilling Geothermal Wells  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Unusually high temperatures are encountered during drilling of a geothermal well. These temperatures affect every aspect of drilling, from drilling fluid properties to cement formulations. Clearly, good estimates of downhole temperatures during drilling would be helpful in preparing geothermal well completion designs, well drilling plans, drilling fluid requirements, and cement formulations. The thermal simulations in this report were conducted using GEOTEMP, a computer code developed under Sandia National Laboratories contract and available through Sandia. Input variables such as drilling fluid inlet temperatures and circulation rates, rates of penetration, and shut-in intervals were obtained from the Imperial Valley East Mesa Field and the Los Alamos Hot Dry Rock Project. The results of several thermal simulations are presented, with discussion of their impact on drilling fluids, cements, casing design, and drilling practices.

Mitchell, R. F.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

408

Extreme overbalance perforating improves well performance  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The application of extreme overbalance perforating, by Oryx Energy Co., is consistently outperforming the unpredictable, tubing-conveyed, underbalance perforating method which is generally accepted as the industry standard. Successful results reported from more than 60 Oryx Energy wells, applying this technology, support this claim. Oryx began this project in 1990 to address the less-than-predictable performance of underbalanced perforating. The goal was to improve the initial completion efficiency, translating it into higher profits resulting from earlier product sales. This article presents the concept, mechanics, procedures, potential applications and results of perforating using overpressured well bores. The procedure can also be used in wells with existing perforations if an overpressured surge is used. This article highlights some of the case histories that have used these techniques.

Dees, J.M.; Handren, P.J. [Oryx Energy Co., Dallas, TX (United States)

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

409

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

7 7 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 7,068 7,425 7,700 8,600 8,500 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 241,776 224,560 224,112 194,121 212,276 From Oil Wells.................................................. 60,444 56,140 56,028 48,530 53,069 Total................................................................... 302,220 280,700 280,140 242,651 265,345 Repressuring ...................................................... 2,340 2,340 2,340 2,340 2,340 Vented and Flared.............................................. 3,324 3,324 3,324 3,324 3,324 Wet After Lease Separation................................

410

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

7 7 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 13,487 14,370 14,367 12,900 13,920 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 81,545 81,723 88,259 87,608 94,259 From Oil Wells.................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Total................................................................... 81,545 81,723 88,259 87,608 94,259 Repressuring ...................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared.............................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation................................ 81,545 81,723 88,259 87,608 94,259 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed

411

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

3 3 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 33,897 33,917 34,593 33,828 33,828 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 98,551 97,272 97,154 87,993 85,018 From Oil Wells.................................................. 6,574 2,835 6,004 5,647 5,458 Total................................................................... 105,125 100,107 103,158 93,641 90,476 Repressuring ...................................................... NA NA NA 0 NA Vented and Flared.............................................. NA NA NA 0 NA Wet After Lease Separation................................ 105,125 100,107 103,158

412

Ceramic vacuum tubes for geothermal well logging  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The results of investigations carried out into the availability and suitability of ceramic vacuum tubes for the development of logging tools for geothermal wells are summarized. Design data acquired in the evaluation of ceramic vacuum tubes for the development of a 500/sup 0/C instrumentation amplifier are presented. The general requirements for ceramic vacuum tubes for application to the development of high temperature well logs are discussed. Commercially available tubes are described and future contract activities that specifically relate to ceramic vacuum tubes are detailed. Supplemental data is presented in the appendix. (MHR)

Kelly, R.D.

1977-01-12T23:59:59.000Z

413

Definition: Single-Well And Cross-Well Seismic Imaging | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Definition Definition Edit with form History Facebook icon Twitter icon » Definition: Single-Well And Cross-Well Seismic Imaging Jump to: navigation, search Dictionary.png Single-Well And Cross-Well Seismic Imaging Single well seismic imaging (SWSI) is the application of borehole seismic sources and receivers on the same string within a single borehole in order to acquire CMP type shot gathers. Cross well seismic places sources and receivers in adjacent wells in order to image the interwell volume.[1] Also Known As SWSI References ↑ http://library.seg.org/ Ret LikeLike UnlikeLike You like this.Sign Up to see what your friends like. rieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Definition:Single-Well_And_Cross-Well_Seismic_Imaging&oldid=690246" Category:

414

High-altitude, long-endurance UAVs vs. satellites : potential benefits for U.S. Army applications  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Satellites have become a critical component of nearly every aspect of modern life. In addition to well-known civilian applications, military applications of space-based platforms include supporting mission operations through ...

Symolon, William Everette, Major

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

415

Gravel packing feasible in horizontal well completions  

SciTech Connect

Successful completion of horizontal wells in unconsolidated formations depends on proper equipment selection and installation method balanced with reservoir objectives, formation parameters, and costs. The guidelines for designing these completions are based on generalized field experience, including horizontal cases where applicable.

Zaleski, T.E. Jr.; Ashton, J.P. (Baker Sand Control, Houston, TX (US))

1990-06-11T23:59:59.000Z

416

Sand-control alternatives for horizontal wells  

SciTech Connect

This paper reports that it has been well documented that horizontal completions increase production rates, as much as two to five times those of conventional techniques, because more of the producing formation is exposed to the wellbore. Although productivity improvements are highly sensitive to reservoir parameters, it is becoming generally accepted that optimum horizontal lengths will be 2,000 to 4,000 ft. The length of these completions generally causes the velocity of the fluid at the sandface to be an order of magnitude less than that observed in conventional completions. Because drag forces contributed to sand production, horizontal wells can produce at higher sand-free flow rates than conventional completions in the same reservoir. While it is frequently argued that horizontal wells do not need sand control, the potential for sand production increases significantly as reserves deplete and rock stresses increase. This is becoming more evident today in several major North Sea oil fields with conventional completions. Also, many unconsolidated formations produce sand for the first time with the onset of water production, a typical problem in such areas as the Gulf of Mexico. Operators must decide whether to implement sand control in the original horizontal-completion program because of an immediate concern or because the potential exists for a problem to arise as the well matures.

Zaleski, T.E. Jr. (Baker Sand Control (US))

1991-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

417

Spin dynamics in (110)-oriented quantum wells  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Quantum structures of III-V semiconductors grown on (110)-oriented substrates are promising for spintronic applications because they allow us to engineer and control spin dynamics of electrons. We summarise the theoretical ideas, which are the basis ... Keywords: Quantum wells, Spin dynamics, Spintronics

R. T. Harley; O. Z. Karimov; M. Henini

2006-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

418

Flow tests of the Willis Hulin well  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Hulin well was tested between 20,100 and 20,700 feet down in layers of brine-saturated clean sand with occasional intervening layers of shale. The characteristics of the brine and gas were determined in this interval and an initial determination of the reservoir properties were made.

Randolph, P.L.; Hayden, C.G.; Rogers, L.A.

1992-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

419

Groundwater Monitoring Well Installation Work Plan  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, etc.) will be delivered to each well site in factory-sealed containers and remain in such until used) for the secondary upper pack · 3/8-inch bentonite pellets/chips seal · schedule 40 PVC blank casing · 30% solids, as determined by the Stoller geologist, the placement of a 5-feet bentonite seal (3/8-inch bentonite pellets

420

Monitoring well systems in geothermal areas  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The ability to monitor the injection of spent geothermal fluids at reasonable cost might be greatly improved by use of multiple-completion techniques. Several such techniques, identified through contact with a broad range of experts from the groundwater and petroleum industries, are evaluated relative to application in the typical geologic and hydrologic conditions of the Basin and Range Province of the Western United States. Three basic monitor well designs are suggested for collection of pressure and temperature data: Single standpipe, multiple standpipe, and closed-system piezometers. A fourth design, monitor well/injection well dual completions, is determined to be inadvisable. Also, while it is recognized that water quality data is equally important, designs to allow water sampling greatly increase costs of construction, and so such designs are not included in this review. The single standpipe piezometer is recommended for use at depths less than 152 m (500 ft); several can be clustered in one area to provide information on vertical flow conditions. At depths greater than 152 m (500 ft), the multiple-completion standpipe and closed-system piezometers are likely to be more cost effective. Unique conditions at each monitor well site may necessitate consideration of the single standpipe piezometer even for deeper completions.

Lofgren, B.E.; O'Rourke, J.; Sterrett, R.; Thackston, J.; Fain, D.

1982-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "wells hawthorne army" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

Marginal Expense Oil Well Wireless Surveillance (MEOWWS)  

SciTech Connect

The objective of this study was to identify and field test a new, low cost, wireless oil well surveillance system. A variety of suppliers and technologies were considered. One supplier and system was chosen that was low cost, new to the oil field, and successfully field tested.

Nelson, Donald G.

2002-03-11T23:59:59.000Z

422

Doublets and other allied well patterns  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Whenever a liquid is injected into an infinite reservoir containing liquid with the same flow properties, the equations of flow are well known. The pressures in such a system vary over time and distance (radius) in ways that depend on the formation and liquid flow properties. Such equations are well known--they form the basis for the voluminous well-testing literature in petroleum engineering and ground water hydrology. Suppose there are two wells--one an injector and one a producer--with identical rates. The behavior of this system can be calculated using superposition; which merely means that the results can be added independently of each other. When this is done, the remarkable result is that after a period of time there is a region that approaches steady state flow. Thereafter, the pressures and flow velocities in this region stay constant. The size of this region increases with time. This ``steady state`` characteristic can be used to solve a number of interesting and useful problems, both in heat transfer and in fluid flow. The heat transfer problems can be addressed because the equations are identical in form. A number of such problems are solved herein for doublet systems. In addition, concepts are presented to help solve other cases that flow logically from the problems solved herein. It is not necessary that only two wells be involved. It turns out that any time the total injection and production are equal, the system approaches steady state. This idea is also addressed in these notes. A number of useful multiwell cases are addressed to present the flavor of such solutions.

Brigham, W.E.

1997-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

423

Increasing Well Productivity in Gas Condensate Wells in Qatar's North Field  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Condensate blockage negatively impacts large natural gas condensate reservoirs all over the world; examples include Arun Field in Indonesia, Karachaganak Field in Kazakhstan, Cupiagua Field in Colombia,Shtokmanovskoye Field in Russian Barents Sea, and North Field in Qatar. The main focus of this thesis is to evaluate condensate blockage problems in the North Field, Qatar, and then propose solutions to increase well productivity in these gas condensate wells. The first step of the study involved gathering North Field reservoir data from previously published papers. A commercial simulator was then used to carry out numerical reservoir simulation of fluid flow in the North Field. Once an accurate model was obtained, the following three solutions to increasing productivity in the North Field are presented; namely wettability alteration, horizontal wells, and reduced Non Darcy flow. Results of this study show that wettability alteration can increase well productivity in the North Field by adding significant value to a single well. Horizontal wells can successfully increase well productivity in the North Field because they have a smaller pressure drawdown (compared to vertical wells). Horizontal wells delay condensate formation, and increase the well productivity index by reducing condensate blockage in the near wellbore region. Non Darcy flow effects were found to be negligible in multilateral wells due to a decrease in fluid velocity. Therefore, drilling multilateral wells decreases gas velocity around the wellbore, decreases Non Darcy flow effects to a negligible level, and increases well productivity in the North Field.

Miller, Nathan

2009-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

424

Single-Well and Cross-Well Resistivity | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Single-Well and Cross-Well Resistivity Single-Well and Cross-Well Resistivity Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Technique: Single-Well and Cross-Well Resistivity Details Activities (14) Areas (13) Regions (0) NEPA(0) Exploration Technique Information Exploration Group: Downhole Techniques Exploration Sub Group: Well Log Techniques Parent Exploration Technique: Well Log Techniques Information Provided by Technique Lithology: Identify different lithological layers, rock composition, mineral, and clay content Stratigraphic/Structural: -Fault and fracture identification -Rock texture, porosity, and stress analysis -determine dip and structural features in vicinity of borehole -Detection of permeable pathways, fracture zones, faults Hydrological: Resistivity influenced by porosity, grain size distribution, permeability, fluid saturation, fluid type and phase state of the pore water

425

Single-Well And Cross-Well Seismic Imaging | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Single-Well And Cross-Well Seismic Imaging Single-Well And Cross-Well Seismic Imaging (Redirected from Single-Well And Cross-Well Seismic) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Technique: Single-Well And Cross-Well Seismic Imaging Details Activities (2) Areas (2) Regions (0) NEPA(0) Exploration Technique Information Exploration Group: Downhole Techniques Exploration Sub Group: Borehole Seismic Techniques Parent Exploration Technique: Borehole Seismic Techniques Information Provided by Technique Lithology: Rock unit density influences elastic wave velocities. Stratigraphic/Structural: Structural geology- faults, folds, grabens, horst blocks, sedimentary layering, discontinuities, etc. Hydrological: Combining compressional and shear wave results can indicate the presence of fluid saturation in the formation.

426

Single-Well And Cross-Well Seismic (Majer, 2003) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Single-Well And Cross-Well Seismic (Majer, 2003) Single-Well And Cross-Well Seismic (Majer, 2003) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Single-Well And Cross-Well Seismic (Majer, 2003) Exploration Activity Details Location Unspecified Exploration Technique Single-Well And Cross-Well Seismic Activity Date Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Notes The goal of this work is to evaluate the most promising methods and approaches that may be used for improved geothermal exploration and reservoir assessment. It is not a comprehensive review of all seismic methods used to date in geothermal environments. This work was motivated by a need to assess current and developing seismic technology that if applied in geothermal cases may greatly improve the chances for locating new

427

Development Wells At Salt Wells Area (Nevada Bureau of Mines and Geology,  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Salt Wells Area (Nevada Bureau of Mines and Geology, Salt Wells Area (Nevada Bureau of Mines and Geology, 2009) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Development Wells At Salt Wells Area (Nevada Bureau of Mines and Geology, 2009) Exploration Activity Details Location Salt Wells Geothermal Area Exploration Technique Development Drilling Activity Date 2005 - 2005 Usefulness useful DOE-funding Unknown Exploration Basis AMP Resources, LLC drilled one of the first operating wells, Industrial Production Well PW-2, in the spring of 2005 under geothermal project area permit #568. Notes The well was completed to a depth of 143.6 m and a peak temperature of 145°C, as indicated by static temperature surveys. Wellhead temperatures at PW-2 were 140°C at a flow rate of 157.7 liters per minute, and no

428

Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Oil Wells (Summary)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Gas Wells Gross Withdrawals Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells Gross Withdrawals From Oil Wells Gross Withdrawals From Shale Gas Wells Gross Withdrawals From Coalbed Wells...

429

Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Gas Wells (Summary)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Gas Wells Gross Withdrawals Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells Gross Withdrawals From Oil Wells Gross Withdrawals From Shale Gas Wells Gross Withdrawals From Coalbed Wells...

430

New Mexico Distribution of Wells by Production Rate Bracket  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Oil Wells Gas Wells; Prod. Rate Bracket (BOE/Day) | | | | # of Oil Wells % of Oil Wells Annual Oil Prod. (Mbbl) % of Oil Prod. Oil Rate per Well ...

431

Armored instrumentation cable for geothermal well logging  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Multiconductor armored well-logging cable is used extensively by the oil and natural gas industry to lower various instruments used to measure the geological and geophysical parameters into deep wellbores. Advanced technology in oil-well drilling makes it possible to achieve borehole depths of 9 km (30,000 ft). The higher temperatures in these deeper boreholes demand advancements in the design and manufacturing of wireline cable and in the electrical insulating and armoring materials used as integral components. If geothermal energy is proved an abundant economic resource, drilling temperatures approaching and exceeding 300/sup 0/C will become commonplace. The adaptation of teflons as electrical insulating material permitted use of armored cable in geothermal wellbores where temperatures are slightly in excess of 200/sup 0/C, and where the concentrations of corrosive minerals and gases are high. Teflon materials presently used in wireline cables, however, are not capable of continuous operation at the anticipated higher temperatures.

Dennis, B.R.; Johnson, J.; Todd, B.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

432

GAS INJECTION/WELL STIMULATION PROJECT  

SciTech Connect

Driver Production proposes to conduct a gas repressurization/well stimulation project on a six well, 80-acre portion of the Dutcher Sand of the East Edna Field, Okmulgee County, Oklahoma. The site has been location of previous successful flue gas injection demonstration but due to changing economic and sales conditions, finds new opportunities to use associated natural gas that is currently being vented to the atmosphere to repressurize the reservoir to produce additional oil. The established infrastructure and known geological conditions should allow quick startup and much lower operating costs than flue gas. Lessons learned from the previous project, the lessons learned form cyclical oil prices and from other operators in the area will be applied. Technology transfer of the lessons learned from both projects could be applied by other small independent operators.

John K. Godwin

2005-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

433

Lalamilo Wells Wind Farm | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Wind Farm Wind Farm Jump to: navigation, search Name Lalamilo Wells Wind Farm Facility Lalamilo Wells Sector Wind energy Facility Type Commercial Scale Wind Facility Status In Service Owner Hawaiian Electric Light Co. Developer Lalamilo Ventures Energy Purchaser Hawaii Electric Light Co. Location Big Island HI Coordinates 19.9875°, -155.765556° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":19.9875,"lon":-155.765556,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

434

Boise geothermal injection well: Final environmental assessment  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The City of Boise, Idaho, an Idaho Municipal Corporation, is proposing to construct a well with which to inject spent geothermal water from its hot water heating system back into the geothermal aquifer. Because of a cooperative agreement between the City and the US Department of Energy to design and construct the proposed well, compliance to the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) is required. Therefore, this Environmental Assessment (EA) represents the analysis of the proposed project required under NEPA. The intent of this EA is to: (1) briefly describe historical uses of the Boise Geothermal Aquifer; (2) discuss the underlying reason for the proposed action; (3) describe alternatives considered, including the No Action Alternative and the Preferred Alternative; and (4) present potential environmental impacts of the proposed action and the analysis of those impacts as they apply to the respective alternatives.

NONE

1997-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

435

Explosive stimulation of a geothermal well: GEOFRAC  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This paper describes the first known explosive stimulation successfully conducted in a geothermal well. Two tests were performed in a 2690-meter-(8826-ft.) deep Union Oil well at the Geysers field in Northern California in December 1981. The heat-resistant process, called GEOFRAC, uses a new unique, explosive HITEX 2, which is a nondetonable solid at room temperature. Upon melting at a temperature of 177[degrees]C (350[degrees]F), the HITEX 2 liquid becomes an explosive that can be safely heated to temperatures greater than 260[degrees]C (500[degrees]F). These unique properties of the explosive were exploited in the GEOFRAC process through the cooperative efforts of Physics International Company (PI), Rocket Research Company (RRC), Union oil Company (UO), and the university of California Los Alamos National Laboratories (LANL).

Mumma, D.M. (Physics International Co., San Leandro, CA (United States))

1982-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

436

Lost Circulation Experience in Geothermal Wells  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Lost circulation during drilling and cementing in geothermal wells is a problem common to most geothermal areas. Material and rig time costs due to lost circulation often represent one fourth or more of the total well cost. Assessment of the general drilling and completion practices commonly used for handling lost circulation have been surveyed and evaluated under a study sponsored by Sandia National Laboratories. Results of this study, including interviews with geothermal production companies and with drilling fluid service companies, are reported in the paper. Conclusions and recommendations are presented for control of lost circulation during geothermal operations. Recent improvements in lost circulation materials and techniques and potential equipment solutions to the lost circulation problem are discussed. Research needs are also identified.

Goodman, M. A.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

437

Rotating preventers; Technology for better well control  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper reports that recent changes in the oil and gas industry and ongoing developments in horizontal and underbalanced drilling necessitated development of a better rotating head. A new device called the rotating blowout preventer (RBOP) was developed by Seal-Tech. It is designed to replace the conventional rotating control head on top of BOP stacks and allows drilling operations to continue even on live (underbalanced) wells. Its low wear characteristics and high working pressure (1,500 psi) allow drilling rig crews to drill safely in slightly underbalanced conditions or handle severe well control problems during the time required to actuate other BOPs in the stack. Drilling with a RBOP allows wellbores to be completely closed in tat the drill floor rather than open as with conventional BOPs.

Tangedahl, M.J.; Stone, C.R. (Signa Engineering Corp. (United States))

1992-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

438

Pressure-activated well perforating apparatus  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A well perforating technique utilizes a predetermined pressure difference developed at different points in the borehole to actuate the firing mechanism of a tubing conveyed perforating gun. A first embodiment incorporated as part of a well test string includes a packer for isolating a wellbore interval and a perforating gun connected in the string below the packer which is fired in response to development of a greater pressure in the annulus above the packer than in the isolated interval, thereby causing perforation at ''underbalanced'' conditions. A modified ''full-bore'' embodiment has an annular configuration firing mechanism as part of a tubing string and fires the perforating gun in response to development of a predetermined difference between the pressures at a point in the annulus and a point in the central bore of the tubing string.

Upchurch, J. M.

1985-12-24T23:59:59.000Z

439

Pumpernickel Valley Geothermal Project Thermal Gradient Wells  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Pumpernickel Valley geothermal project area is located near the eastern edge of the Sonoma Range and is positioned within the structurally complex Winnemucca fold and thrust belt of north-central Nevada. A series of approximately north-northeast-striking faults related to the Basin and Range tectonics are superimposed on the earlier structures within the project area, and are responsible for the final overall geometry and distribution of the pre-existing structural features on the property. Two of these faults, the Pumpernickel Valley fault and Edna Mountain fault, are range-bounding and display numerous characteristics typical of strike-slip fault systems. These characteristics, when combined with geophysical data from Shore (2005), indicate the presence of a pull-apart basin, formed within the releasing bend of the Pumpernickel Valley Edna Mountain fault system. A substantial body of evidence exists, in the form of available geothermal, geological and geophysical information, to suggest that the property and the pull-apart basin host a structurally controlled, extensive geothermal field. The most evident manifestations of the geothermal activity in the valley are two areas with hot springs, seepages, and wet ground/vegetation anomalies near the Pumpernickel Valley fault, which indicate that the fault focuses the fluid up-flow. There has not been any geothermal production from the Pumpernickel Valley area, but it was the focus of a limited exploration effort by Magma Power Company. In 1974, the company drilled one exploration/temperature gradient borehole east of the Pumpernickel Valley fault and recorded a thermal gradient of 160oC/km. The 1982 temperature data from five unrelated mineral exploration holes to the north of the Magma well indicated geothermal gradients in a range from 66 to 249oC/km for wells west of the fault, and ~283oC/km in a well next to the fault. In 2005, Nevada Geothermal Power Company drilled four geothermal gradient wells, PVTG-1, -2, -3, and -4, and all four encountered geothermal fluids. The holes provided valuable water geochemistry, supporting the geothermometry results obtained from the hot springs and Magma well. The temperature data gathered from all the wells clearly indicates the presence of a major plume of thermal water centered on the Pumpernickel Valley fault, and suggests that the main plume is controlled, at least in part, by flow from this fault system. The temperature data also defines the geothermal resource with gradients >100oC/km, which covers an area a minimum of 8 km2. Structural blocks, down dropped with respect to the Pumpernickel Valley fault, may define an immediate reservoir. The geothermal system almost certainly continues beyond the recently drilled holes and might be open to the east and south, whereas the heat source responsible for the temperatures associated with this plume has not been intersected and must be at a depth greater than 920 meters (depth of the deepest well Magma well). The geological and structural setting and other characteristics of the Pumpernickel Valley geothermal project area are markedly similar to the portions of the nearby Dixie Valley geothermal field. These similarities include, among others, the numerous, unexposed en echelon faults and large-scale pull-apart structure, which in Dixie Valley may host part of the geothermal field. The Pumpernickel Valley project area, for the majority of which Nevada Geothermal Power Company has geothermal rights, represents a geothermal site with a potential for the discovery of a relatively high temperature reservoir suitable for electric power production. Among locations not previously identified as having high geothermal potential, Pumpernickel Valley has been ranked as one of four sites with the highest potential for electrical power production in Nevada (Shevenell and Garside, 2003). Richards and Blackwell (2002) estimated the total heat loss and the preliminary production capacity for the entire Pumpernickel Valley geothermal system to be at 35MW. A more conservative estimate, for

Z. Adam Szybinski

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

440

Perforating devices for use in wells  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The perforating device for use in completing a well includes a case, an explosive charge contained in the case, and a generally bowl-shaped liner. The liner is positioned adjacent the explosive charge and has non-uniforrn thickness along its length. The liner further includes a protruding portion near its tip. In another configuration, the liner includes a hole near its tip to expose a portion of the explosive charge.

Jacoby, Jerome J. (Grass Valley, CA); Brooks, James E. (Manvel, TX); Aseltine, Clifford L. (late of Houston, TX)

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "wells hawthorne army" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

Ceramic vacuum tubes for geothermal well logging  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Useful design data acquired in the evaluation of ceramic vacuum tubes for the development of a 500/sup 0/C instrumentation amplifier are presented. The general requirements for ceramic vacuum tubes are discussed for application to the development of high temperature well logs. Commercially available tubes are described and future contract activities that specifically relate to ceramic vacuum tubes are detailed. Supplemental data are presented in the appendix.

Kelly, R.D.

1977-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

442

Gas condensate damage in hydraulically fractured wells  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This project is a research into the effect of gas condensate damage in hydraulically fractured wells. It is the result of a problem encountered in producing a low permeability formation from a well in South Texas owned by the El Paso Production Company. The well was producing from a gas condensate reservoir. Questions were raised about whether flowing bottomhole pressure below dewpoint would be appropriate. Condensate damage in the hydraulic fracture was expected to be of significant effect. In the most recent work done by Adedeji Ayoola Adeyeye, this subject was studied when the effects of reservoir depletion were minimized by introduction of an injector well with fluid composition the same as the original reservoir fluid. He also used an infinite conductivity hydraulic fracture along with a linear model as an adequate analogy. He concluded that the skin due to liquid build-up is not enough to prevent lower flowing bottomhole pressures from producing more gas. This current study investigated the condensate damage at the face of the hydraulic fracture in transient and boundary dominated periods when the effects of reservoir depletion are taken into account. As a first step, simulation of liquid flow into the fracture was performed using a 2D 1-phase simulator in order to help us to better understand the results of gas condensate simulation. Then during the research, gas condensate models with various gas compositions were simulated using a commercial simulator (CMG). The results of this research are a step forward in helping to improve the management of gas condensate reservoirs by understanding the mechanics of liquid build-up. It also provides methodology for quantifying the condensate damage that impairs linear flow of gas into the hydraulic fracture.

Reza, Rostami Ravari

2004-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

443

Gas condensate damage in hydraulically fractured wells  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This project is a research into the effect of gas condensate damage in hydraulically fractured wells. It is the result of a problem encountered in producing a low permeability formation from a well in South Texas owned by the El Paso Production Company. The well was producing a gas condensate reservoir and questions were raised about how much drop in flowing bottomhole pressure below dewpoint would be appropriate. Condensate damage in the hydraulic fracture was expected to be of significant effect. Previous attempts to answer these questions have been from the perspective of a radial model. Condensate builds up in the reservoir as the reservoir pressure drops below the dewpoint pressure. As a result, the gas moving to the wellbore becomes leaner. With respect to the study by El-Banbi and McCain, the gas production rate may stabilize, or possibly increase, after the period of initial decline. This is controlled primarily by the condensate saturation near the wellbore. This current work has a totally different approach. The effects of reservoir depletion are minimized by introduction of an injector well with fluid composition the same as the original reservoir fluid. It also assumes an infinite conductivity hydraulic fracture and uses a linear model. During the research, gas condensate simulations were performed using a commercial simulator (CMG). The results of this research are a step forward in helping to improve the management of gas condensate reservoirs by understanding the mechanics of liquid build-up. It also provides methodology for quantifying the condensate damage that impairs linear flow of gas into the hydraulic fracture.

Adeyeye, Adedeji Ayoola

2003-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

444

Functionalized Graphene Nanoroads for Quantum Well Device  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Using density functional theory, a series of calculations of structural and electronic properties of Si-substituted graphene were conducted. Through substituting C atoms by Si atoms on graphene in the present study, we found that the band gap of graphene can be continuously tuned with differently substitutional concentration. To utilize such substitution-induced band gap changes, we proposed a special design to fabricate graphene-based quantum well device.

Zhou, Yungang; Yang, Ping; Wang, Zhiguo; Xiao, Hai Yan; Zu, Xiaotao T.; Sun, Xin; Khaleel, Mohammad A.; Gao, Fei

2011-03-02T23:59:59.000Z

445

A combined perforating and well testing system  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Underbalanced perforating is widely used in well completions and is considered by many operators to be an effective method of obtaining improved well productivity. A measurement of downhole pressure before, during and after perforating can be made by installing a pressure gauge on the gun-string. By using a wireline, the added capability of real-time read-out on surface allows the entire operation to be monitored 'live.' Correct underbalance can be accurately established prior to shooting, there is an unambiguous shot indication, and a pressure transient analysis can be made during the initial flow or fill-up period. From this we can obtain an estimate of permeability, skin damage and, possibly, static reservoir pressure, which is a useful supplement to the shut-in buildup analysis which usually follows if flow reaches surface. Any subsequent conventional well-test can of course be planned without the need to retrieve or run in additional equipment since the pressure gauge is already in place.

Westaway, P.J.; El Shafie, I.; Wittman, M.J.

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

446

Remote down-hole well telemetry  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The present invention includes an apparatus and method for telemetry communication with oil-well monitoring and recording instruments located in the vicinity of the bottom of gas or oil recovery pipes. Such instruments are currently monitored using electrical cabling that is inserted into the pipes; cabling has a short life in this environment, and requires periodic replacement with the concomitant, costly shutdown of the well. Modulated reflectance, a wireless communication method that does not require signal transmission power from the telemetry package will provide a long-lived and reliable way to monitor down-hole conditions. Normal wireless technology is not practical since batteries and capacitors have to frequently be replaced or recharged, again with the well being removed from service. RF energy generated above ground can also be received, converted and stored down-hole without the use of wires, for actuating down-hole valves, as one example. Although modulated reflectance reduces or eliminates the loss of energy at the sensor package because energy is not consumed, during the transmission process, additional stored extra energy down-hole is needed.

Briles, Scott D. (Los Alamos, NM); Neagley, Daniel L. (Albuquerque, NM); Coates, Don M. (Santa Fe, NM); Freund, Samuel M. (Los Alamos, NM)

2004-07-20T23:59:59.000Z

447

Understanding Fault Characteristics And Sediment Depth For Geothermal...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

of primarily E-W directed extension along N-NNW striking normal faults. Water well drilling on the eastern slopes of the Wassuk Range, west of the city of Hawthorne, Nevada...

448

Treating paraffin deposits in producing oil wells  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Paraffin deposition has been a problem for operators in many areas since the beginning of petroleum production from wells. An extensive literature search on paraffin problems and methods of control has been carried out, and contact was made with companies which provide chemicals to aid in the treatment of paraffin problems. A discussion of the nature of paraffins and the mechanisms of this deposition is presented. The methods of prevention and treatment of paraffin problems are summarized. Suggested procedures for handling paraffin problems are provided. Suggestions for areas of further research testing are given.

Noll, L.

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

449

Geothermal well log interpretation midterm report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Reservoir types are defined according to fluid phase and temperature, lithology, geologic province, pore geometry, and salinity and fluid chemistry. Improvements are needed in lithology and porosity definition, fracture detection, and thermal evaluation for more accurate interpretation. Further efforts are directed toward improving diagnostic techniques for relating rock characteristics and log response, developing petrophysical models for geothermal systems, and developing thermal evaluation techniques. The Geothermal Well Log Interpretation study and report has concentrated only on hydrothermal geothermal reservoirs. Other geothermal reservoirs (hot dry rock, geopressured, etc.) are not considered.

Sanyal, S.K.; Wells, L.E.; Bickham, R.E.

1979-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

450

Geothermal Reservoir Well Stimulation Program: technology transfer  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A literature search on reservoir and/or well stimulation techniques suitable for application in geothermal fields is presented. The literature on stimulation techniques in oil and gas field applications was also searched and evaluated as to its relevancy to geothermal operations. The equivalent low-temperature work documented in the open literature is cited, and an attempt is made to evaluate the relevance of this information as far as high-temperature stimulation work is concerned. Clays play an important role in any stimulation work. Therefore, special emphasis has been placed on clay behavior anticipated in geothermal operations. (MHR)

Not Available

1980-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

451

Pressure on the well servicing market  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

While the well servicing and workover (ws/wo) market is extremely strong and is expected to grow even stronger in the foreseeable future, several pressures are affecting the overall market. These pressures include (1) uncertainty about crude oil prices that is forcing operators to reconsider some marginal ws/wo prospects; (2) demand for oil and gas in future periods; (3) effect of current rate of rig building; and (4) changing requirements of producers. This discussion evaluates the probable effects of possible changes in each of these areas.

Haynes, J.P.

1981-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

452

Well servicing market report: Positive signs emerge  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Domestic well servicing contractors head into 1988 with an improved outlook. But contractors will hasten to tell you this is not say they are now in a healthy industry with a strong demand for equipment and services. John Copeland, executive vice president of the Association of Oilwell Servicing Contractors (AOSC), says he sees encouragement mainly for two reasons: some producing companies have indicated a willingness to raise rig rates, and significant rig utilization gains were noted in the last quarter of 1987. For now, though, the big negatives are still haunting the industry. These are most often noted as inadequate prices for rigs and by far too many rigs chasing too few jobs.

Peacock, D.

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

453

Geothermal well log interpretation. Progress report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Progress is presented on the following tasks: review of the state-of-the-art, classification of geothermal reservoir types, data acquisition, problem definition and directions for solution, and refinement of existing interpretation techniques and development of new ones. Computerized literature searches were conducted. The classification system defines five major characteristics which will qualify a potential reservoir. A catalog lists well logs currently available for study. Rock and fluid parameters needed for reservoir studies are listed. A list of matrix characteristics for rocks and minerals is given. (MHR)

Not Available

1978-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

454

The Effect of Well Trajectory on Production Performance of Tight Gas Wells  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Horizontal wells are a very important element in oil and gas industry due to their distinguished advantages. Horizontal wells are not technically horizontal. This is because of the structural nature of reservoir formations and drilling procedures. In response to the reservoir rocks strength, the horizontal well deviates upward and downward while being drilled forming an undulating path instead of a horizontal. In this study, horizontal wells with an undulating trajectory within a gas reservoir have been studied. The aim of this research is to investigate the effect of the trajectory angle on pressure drop in horizontal wells. In addition, the contribution of water flow to pressure drop is a part of this research. Generally, water comes from different sources like an aquifer or a water flood job. In low permeability horizontal wells, hydraulic fracturing introduces water to gas wells. Water distribution is an important issue in gas wells production. In order to achieve the goal of this study, a model has been developed to simulate different situations for a horizontal well with an undulating trajectory in gas reservoirs. This study is a step forward to understand well performance in low permeability gas reservoirs.

Aldousari, Mohammad

2011-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

455

The Long Valley Well: Phase II operations  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Phase II of the Long Valley Exploratory Well was completed to a depth of 7588 feet in November 1991. The drilling comprised two sub-phases: (1) drilling 17-1/2 inch hole from the Phase I casing shoe at 2558 feet to a depth of 7130 feet, plugging back to 6826 feet, and setting 13-3/8 inch casing at 6825 feet, all during August--September 1991; and (2) returning in November to drill a 3.85-inch core hole deviated out of the previous wellbore at 6868 feet and extending to 7588 feet. Ultimate depth of the well is planned to be 20,000 feet, or at a bottomhole temperature of 500{degrees}C, whichever comes first. Total cost of this drilling phase was approximately $2.3 million, and funding was shared about equally between the California Energy Commission and the Department of Energy. Phase II scientific work will commence in July 1992 and will be supported by DOE Office of Basic Energy Sciences, DOE Geothermal Division, and other funding sources.

Finger, J.T.

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

456

The Long Valley Well - Phase II Operations  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Phase II of the Long Valley Exploratory Well was completed to a depth of 7588 feet in November 1991. The drilling comprised two sub-phases: (1) drilling 17-1/2 inch hole from the Phase I casing shoe at 2558 feet to a depth of 7130 feet, plugging back to 6826 feet, and setting 13-3/8 inch casing at 6825 feet, all during August-September 1991; and (2) returning in November to drill a 3.85-inch core hole deviated out of the previous wellbore at 6808 feet and extending to 7588 feet. Ultimate depth of the well is planned to be 20,000 feet, or at a bottomhole temperature of 500 C, whichever comes first. Total cost of this drilling phase was approximately $2.3 million, and funding was shared about equally between the California Energy Commission and the Department of Energy. Phase II scientific work will commence in July 1992 and will be supported by DOE Office of Basic Energy Sciences, DOE Geothermal Division, and other funding sources.

Finger, John T.

1992-03-24T23:59:59.000Z

457

Modeling well performance in compartmentalized gas reservoirs  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Predicting the performance of wells in compartmentalized reservoirs can be quite challenging to most conventional reservoir engineering tools. The purpose of this research is to develop a Compartmentalized Gas Depletion Model that applies not only to conventional consolidated reservoirs (with constant formation compressibility) but also to unconsolidated reservoirs (with variable formation compressibility) by including geomechanics, permeability deterioration and compartmentalization to estimate the OGIP and performance characteristics of each compartment in such reservoirs given production data. A geomechanics model was developed using available correlation in the industry to estimate variable pore volume compressibility, reservoir compaction and permeability reduction. The geomechanics calculations were combined with gas material balance equation and pseudo-steady state equation and the model was used to predict well performance. Simulated production data from a conventional gas Simulator was used for consolidated reservoir cases while synthetic data (generated by the model using known parameters) was used for unconsolidated reservoir cases. In both cases, the Compartmentalized Depletion Model was used to analyze data, and estimate the OGIP and Jg of each compartment in a compartmentalized gas reservoir and predict the subsequent reservoir performance. The analysis was done by history-matching gas rate with the model using an optimization technique. The model gave satisfactory results with both consolidated and unconsolidated reservoirs for single and multiple reservoir layers. It was demonstrated that for unconsolidated reservoirs, reduction in permeability and reservoir compaction could be very significant especially for unconsolidated gas reservoirs with large pay thickness and large depletion pressure.

Yusuf, Nurudeen

2007-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

458

CNCC Craig Campus Geothermal Program: 82-well closed loop GHP well field to  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

CNCC Craig Campus Geothermal Program: 82-well closed loop GHP well field to CNCC Craig Campus Geothermal Program: 82-well closed loop GHP well field to provide geothermal energy as a common utility for a new community college campus. Geothermal Project Jump to: navigation, search Last modified on July 22, 2011. Project Title CNCC Craig Campus Geothermal Program: 82-well closed loop GHP well field to provide geothermal energy as a common utility for a new community college campus. Project Type / Topic 1 Recovery Act - Geothermal Technologies Program: Ground Source Heat Pumps Project Type / Topic 2 Topic Area 1: Technology Demonstration Projects Project Description This "geothermal central plant" concept will provide ground source loop energy as a utility to be shared by the academic and residential buildings on the soon-to-be-constructed campus.

459

Exploratory Well At Salt Wells Area (Edmiston & Benoit, 1984) | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Edmiston & Benoit, 1984) Edmiston & Benoit, 1984) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Exploratory Well At Salt Wells Area (Edmiston & Benoit, 1984) Exploration Activity Details Location Salt Wells Geothermal Area Exploration Technique Exploratory Well Activity Date 1980 - 1980 Usefulness useful DOE-funding Unknown Exploration Basis The blind Salt Wells geothermal system was first identified when Anadarko Petroleum Corporation drilled slim hole and geothermal exploration wells at the site in 1980. Two reports detail the results of this drilling activity. This paper seeks to (1) describe several moderate-temperature (150-200°C) geothermal systems discovered and drilled during the early 1980s that had not been documented previously in the literature, (2) summarize and compare

460

Single-Well And Cross-Well Seismic Imaging | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Single-Well And Cross-Well Seismic Imaging Single-Well And Cross-Well Seismic Imaging Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Technique: Single-Well And Cross-Well Seismic Imaging Details Activities (2) Areas (2) Regions (0) NEPA(0) Exploration Technique Information Exploration Group: Downhole Techniques Exploration Sub Group: Borehole Seismic Techniques Parent Exploration Technique: Borehole Seismic Techniques Information Provided by Technique Lithology: Rock unit density influences elastic wave velocities. Stratigraphic/Structural: Structural geology- faults, folds, grabens, horst blocks, sedimentary layering, discontinuities, etc. Hydrological: Combining compressional and shear wave results can indicate the presence of fluid saturation in the formation. Thermal: High temperatures and pressure impact the compressional and shear wave velocities.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "wells hawthorne army" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


461

American Recovery and Reinvestment Act (ARRA) FEMP Technical Assistance U.S. Army Project 214 Analysis of Regulations Associated with Implementation of a Rocky Mountain Secure Smart-Grid  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This document describes technical assistance provided by PNNL to further develop a smart grid technologies concept to provide a basis for policies and plans for the US Army. The effort was to analyze the potential to utilize emerging smart grid technologies along with indigenous renewable and other resources to meet the emergency and other power needs of Department of Defense facilities in Colorado and Wyoming.

Warwick, William M.

2010-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

462

Third invitational well-testing symposium: well testing in low permeability environments  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The testing of low permeability rocks is common to waste disposal, fossil energy resource development, underground excavation, and geothermal energy development. This document includes twenty-six papers and abstracts, divided into the following sessions: opening session, case histories and related phenomena, well test design in low permeability formations, analysis and interpretation of well test data, and instrumentation for well tests. Separate abstracts were prepared for 15 of the 16 papers; the remaining paper has been previously abstracted. (DLC)

Doe, T.W.; Schwarz, W.J. (eds.)

1981-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

463

Hydraulic fracture stimulation treatment of Well Baca 23. Geothermal Reservoir Well-Stimulation Program  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Well Stimulation Experiment No. 5 of the Geothermal Reservoir Well Stimulation Program (GRWSP) was performed on March 22, 1981 in Baca 23, located in Union's Redondo Creek Project Area in Sandoval County, New Mexico. The treatment selected was a large hydraulic fracture job designed specifically for, and utilizing frac materials chosen for, the high temperature geothermal environment. The well selection, fracture treatment, experiment evaluation, and summary of the job costs are presented herein.

Not Available

1981-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

464

A study of the effects of well and fracture design in a typical Marcellus shale well.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The problem with typical Marcellus shale wells is the lack of information that has beenaccumulated and the amount of information that is commercially available to (more)

Schweitzer, Ross T.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

465

Hydrologic Tests at Characterization Well R-14  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Well R-14 is located in Ten Site Canyon and was completed at a depth of 1316 ft below ground surface (bgs) in August 2002 within unassigned pumiceous deposits located below the Puye Formation (fanglomerate). The well was constructed with two screens positioned below the regional water table. Individual static depths measured for each isolated screen after the Westbay{trademark} transducer monitoring system was installed in mid-December 2002 were nearly identical at 1177 ft bgs, suggesting only horizontal subsurface flow at this time, location, and depth. Screen 1 straddles the geologic contact between the Puye fanglomerate and unassigned pumiceous deposits. Screen 2 is located about 50 ft deeper than screen 1 and is only within the unassigned pumiceous deposits. Constant-rate, straddle-packer, injection tests were conducted at screen 2, including two short tests and one long test. The short tests were 1 minute each but at different injection rates. These short tests were used to select an appropriate injection rate for the long test. We analyzed both injection and recovery data from the long test using the Theis, Theis recovery, Theis residual-recovery, and specific capacity techniques. The Theis injection, Theis recovery, and specific capacity methods correct for partial screen penetration; however, the Theis residual-recovery method does not. The long test at screen 2 involved injection at a rate of 10.1 gallons per minute (gpm) for 68 minutes and recovery for the next 85 minutes. The Theis analysis for screen 2 gave the best fit to residual recovery data. These results suggest that the 158-ft thick deposits opposite screen 2 have a transmissivity (T) equal to or greater than 143 ft{sup 2}/day, and correspond to a horizontal hydraulic conductivity (K) of at least 0.9 ft/day. The specific capacity method yielded a T value equal to or greater than 177 ft{sup 2}/day, and a horizontal K of at least 1.1 ft/day. Results from the injection and recovery phases of the test at screen 2 were similar to those from the residual-recovery portion of the test, but were lower by a factor of about two. The response to injection was typical for a partially penetrating well screen in a very thick aquifer.

S. McLin; W. Stone

2004-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

466

PSA_Well_Completion_Report.book  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

Restoration Restoration Project U.S. Department of Energy National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office Environmental Restoration Project U.S. Department of Energy National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office Nevada Environmental Restoration Project Well Completion Report for Corrective Action Unit 447, Project Shoal Area Churchill County, Nevada Revision No.: 0 September 2006 Approved for public release; further dissemination unlimited. DOE/NV--1166 Available for public sale, in paper, from: U.S. Department of Commerce National Technical Information Service 5285 Port Royal Road Springfield, VA 22161 Phone: 800.553.6847 Fax: 703.605.6900 Email: orders@ntis.gov Online ordering: http://www.ntis.gov/ordering.htm Available electronically at http://www.osti.gov/bridge

467

CNTA_Well_Installation_Report.book  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Nuclear Security Administration Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office Environmental Restoration Division Nevada Environmental Restoration Project Well Installation Report for Corrective Action Unit 443, Central Nevada Test Area Nye County, Nevada Revision No.: 0 January 2006 Approved for public release; further dissemination unlimited. DOE/NV--1102 Uncontrolled When Printed Available for public sale, in paper, from: U.S. Department of Commerce National Technical Information Service 5285 Port Royal Road Springfield, VA 22161 Phone: 800.553.6847 Fax: 703.605.6900 Email: orders@ntis.gov Online ordering: http://www.ntis.gov/ordering.htm Available electronically at http://www.osti.gov/bridge Available for a processing fee to U.S. Department of Energy and its contractors, in paper, from:

468

Natural Gas Prices: Well Above Recent Averages  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

5 5 Notes: The recent surge in spot prices at the Henry Hub are well above a typical range for 1998-1999 (in this context, defined as the average, +/- 2 standard deviations). Past price surges have been of short duration. The possibility of a downward price adjustment before the end of next winter is a source of considerable risk for storage operators who acquire gas at recent elevated prices. Storage levels in the Lower 48 States were 7.5 percent below the 5-year average (1995-1999) by mid-August (August 11), although the differential is only 6.4 percent in the East, which depends most heavily on storage to meet peak demand. Low storage levels are attributable, at least in part, to poor price incentives: high current prices combined with only small price

469

Horizontal wells in the Java Sea  

SciTech Connect

The utilization of the Navigation Drilling System in recent drilling activity has established that: Continuous build rates as high as 6.75 degrees/100 ft are achievable (with a .74 degree DTU), making possible the tapping of near platform reserves. The system provides the flexibility necessary to drill a continuous curve or an irregular path without bottomhole assembly changes. The system provides the flexibility for sidetracks to the ''low side'' of the well bore without coming out of the hole for bottomhole assembly changes or a cement plug. Geological objectives can be reached with a high degree of accuracy. The system greatly reduces the costly learning curve associated with rotary bottomhole assemblies and substantially increases the confidence of the operator. Significant drilling cost reductions resulted from the use of the system. The cost per foot was further reduced as additional familiarity with the equipment was gained.

Barrett, S.L.; Lyon, R.

1988-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

470

Crown Zellerbach Well No. 2, Livingston Parish, Louisiana. Volume II. Well test data. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The following well test data are included: final report of field test data, IGT compiled data, ERMI raw data, Gas Producer's Associated tentative method of testing for hydrogen sulfide in natural gas using length of stain tubes, IGT combined sample log, report on reservoir fluids, well test analysis, sampling and chemical analysis procedures, and scale and corrosion evaluation. (MHR)

Not Available

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

471

Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas Wells  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Withdrawals from Gas Wells Gross Withdrawals from Oil Wells Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas Wells Gross Withdrawals from Coalbed Wells Repressuring Vented and Flared...

472

Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas Wells (Summary)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Power Price Gross Withdrawals Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells Gross Withdrawals From Oil Wells Gross Withdrawals From Shale Gas Wells Gross Withdrawals From Coalbed Wells...

473

Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Oil Wells (Summary)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Power Price Gross Withdrawals Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells Gross Withdrawals From Oil Wells Gross Withdrawals From Shale Gas Wells Gross Withdrawals From Coalbed Wells...

474

Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Coalbed Wells (Summary)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Power Price Gross Withdrawals Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells Gross Withdrawals From Oil Wells Gross Withdrawals From Shale Gas Wells Gross Withdrawals From Coalbed Wells...

475

Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Gas Wells (Summary)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Power Price Gross Withdrawals Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells Gross Withdrawals From Oil Wells Gross Withdrawals From Shale Gas Wells Gross Withdrawals From Coalbed Wells...

476

Well-developed deformation in 42Si  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Excited states in 38,40,42Si nuclei have been studied via in-beam gamma-ray spectroscopy with multi-nucleon removal reactions. Intense radioactive beams of 40S and 44S provided at the new facility of the RIKEN Radioactive Isotope Beam Factory enabled gamma-gamma coincidence measurements. A prominent gamma line observed with an energy of 742(8) keV in 42Si confirms the 2+ state reported in an earlier study. Among the gamma lines observed in coincidence with the 2+ -> 0+ transition, the most probable candidate for the transition from the yrast 4+ state was identified, leading to a 4+_1 energy of 2173(14) keV. The energy ratio of 2.93(5) between the 2+_1 and 4+_1 states indicates well-developed deformation in 42Si at N=28 and Z=14. Also for 38,40Si energy ratios with values of 2.09(5) and 2.56(5) were obtained. Together with the ratio for 42Si, the results show a rapid deformation development of Si isotopes from N=24 to N=28.

S. Takeuchi; M. Matsushita; N. Aoi; P. Doornenbal; K. Li; T. Motobayashi; H. Scheit; D. Steppenbeck; H. Wang; H. Baba; D. Bazin; L. Cceres; H. Crawford; P. Fallon; R. Gernhuser; J. Gibelin; S. Go; S. Grvy; C. Hinke; C. R. Hoffman; R. Hughes; E. Ideguchi; D. Jenkins; N. Kobayashi; Y. Kondo; R. Krcken; T. Le Bleis; J. Lee; G. Lee; A. Matta; S. Michimasa; T. Nakamura; S. Ota; M. Petri; T. Sako; H. Sakurai; S. Shimoura; K. Steiger; K. Takahashi; M. Takechi; Y. Togano; R. Winkler; K. Yoneda

2012-07-26T23:59:59.000Z

477

Controlling annular gas flow in deep wells  

SciTech Connect

This article reports on the phenomenon of annular gas channeling. It can occur during primary cementing in wells with formations containing gas. Such channeling may lead to interzonal communication down hole, or even gas migration to the surface. Formation gas is normally contained by the cement slurry's hydrostatic pressure. Annular gas channeling usually results from volumetric changes associated with: cement hydration and fluid loss, poor cement placement techniques, high cement free water, cementing gelling properties, and excessive thickening times. Initially, the cement slurry acts as a true fluid, transmitting hydrostatic pressure to the formation gas and preventing its flow into the cement matrix. However, as the cement begins to set, changing from a fluid state to a rigid state, it gradually begins to lose its ability to transmit hydrostatic pressure. This period of change is usually referred to as the ''transition period.'' Shrinkage of the cement volume compounds the problem and eventually can lead to poor binding between the cement and formation, thereby allowing gas to flow through gaps at the formation-cement interface.

Matthews, S.M.; Copeland, J.C.

1987-03-01T23:59:59.000Z