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1

Geothermal well stimulation  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

All available data on proppants and fluids were examined to determine areas in technology that need development for 300 to 500/sup 0/F (150/sup 0/ to 265/sup 0/C) hydrothermal wells. While fluid properties have been examined well into the 450/sup 0/F range, proppants have not been previously tested at elevated temperatures except in a few instances. The latest test data at geothermal temperatures is presented and some possible proppants and fluid systems that can be used are shown. Also discussed are alternative stimulation techniques for geothermal wells.

Sinclair, A.R.; Pittard, F.J.; Hanold, R.J.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

2

Geothermal Well Stimulation  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The stimulation of geothermal wells presents some new and challenging problems. Formation temperatures in the 300-600 F range can be expected. The behavior of stimulation fluids, frac proppants, and equipment at these temperatures in a hostile brine environment must be carefully evaluated before performance expectations can be determined. In order to avoid possible damage to the producing horizon of the formation, high temperature chemical compatibility between the in situ materials and the stimulation materials must be verified. Perhaps most significant of all, in geothermal wells the required techniques must be capable of bringing about the production of very large amounts of fluid. This necessity for high flow rates represents a significant departure from conventional petroleum well stimulation and demands the creation of very high near-wellbore permeability and/or fractures with very high flow conductivity.

Campbell, D. A.; Morris, C. W.; Sinclair, A. R.; Hanold, R. J.; Vetter, O. J.

1981-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

3

Imaging Fluid Flow in Geothermal Wells Using Distributed Thermal Perturbation Sensing  

SciTech Connect

The objective of Task 2 is to develop a numerical method for the efficient and accurate analysis of distributed thermal perturbation sensing (DTPS) data for (1) imaging flow profiles and (2) in situ determination of thermal conductivities and heat fluxes. Numerical forward and inverse modeling is employed to: (1) Examine heat and fluid flow processes near a geothermal well under heating and cooling conditions; (2) Demonstrate ability to interpret DTPS thermal profiles with acceptable estimation uncertainty using inverse modeling of synthetic temperature data; and (3) Develop template model and analysis procedure for the inversion of temperature data collected during a thermal perturbation test using fiber-optic distributed temperature sensors. This status report summarizes initial model developments and analyses.

Freifeld, B.; Finsterle, S.

2010-12-10T23:59:59.000Z

4

Geothermal well stimulation treatments  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The behavior of proppants in geothermal environments and two field experiments in well stimulation are discussed. (MHR)

Hanold, R.J.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

5

Geothermal Well Technology Program  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The high cost of drilling and completing geothermal wells is an impediment to the development of geothermal energy resources. Technological deficiencies in rotary drilling techniques are evidenced when drilling geothermal wells. The Division of Geothermal Energy (DGE) of the U.S. Department of Energy has initiated a program aimed at developing new drilling and completion techniques for geothermal wells. The goals of this program are to reduce well costs by 25% by 1982 and by 50% by 1986. An overview of the program is presented. Program justification which relates well cost to busbar energy cost and to DGE power-on-line goals is presented. Technological deficiencies encountered when current rotary drilling techniques are used for geothermal wells are discussed. A program for correcting these deficiencies is described.

Varnado, S.G.

1978-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

6

Fluid Inclusion Stratigraphy: Interpretation of New Wells in...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Fluid Inclusion Stratigraphy: Interpretation of New Wells in the Coso Geothermal Field Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Conference Proceedings: Fluid...

7

GEOTHERMAL FLUID PROPENE AND PROPANE: INDICATORS OF FLUID | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

FLUID PROPENE AND PROPANE: INDICATORS OF FLUID FLUID PROPENE AND PROPANE: INDICATORS OF FLUID Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Conference Proceedings: GEOTHERMAL FLUID PROPENE AND PROPANE: INDICATORS OF FLUID Details Activities (1) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: The use of fluid inclusion gas analysis propene/propene ratios is investigated. Ratios of these species are affected by geothermal fluid temperature and oxidations state. Our purpose is to determine if analyses of these species in fluid inclusions these species to can be used to interpret fluid type, history, or process. Analyses were performed on drill cuttings at 20ft intervals from four Coso geothermal wells. Two wells are good producers, one has cold-water entrants in the production zone, and the fourth is a non-producer. The ratios show distinct differences between

8

Geothermal well log interpretation midterm report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Reservoir types are defined according to fluid phase and temperature, lithology, geologic province, pore geometry, and salinity and fluid chemistry. Improvements are needed in lithology and porosity definition, fracture detection, and thermal evaluation for more accurate interpretation. Further efforts are directed toward improving diagnostic techniques for relating rock characteristics and log response, developing petrophysical models for geothermal systems, and developing thermal evaluation techniques. The Geothermal Well Log Interpretation study and report has concentrated only on hydrothermal geothermal reservoirs. Other geothermal reservoirs (hot dry rock, geopressured, etc.) are not considered.

Sanyal, S.K.; Wells, L.E.; Bickham, R.E.

1979-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

9

Geothermal-well design handbook  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A simplified process is presented for estimating the performance of geothermal wells which are produced by natural, flashing flows. The well diameter and depth, and reservoir conditions must be known; then it is possible to determine the total pressure drop in a flowing well, and therefore to find the fluid pressure, temperature, and steam quality at the wellhead. By applying the handbook process to several input data sets, the user can compile sufficient information to determine the interdependence of input and output parameters. (MHR)

Not Available

1982-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

10

MODELING SUBSIDENCE DUE TO GEOTHERMAL FLUID PRODUCTION  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

compaction, computers, geothermal energy, pore-waternot MODELING SUBSIDENCE DUE T GEOTHERMAL FLUID PRODUCTION Opromise f o r developing geothermal energy i n the United

Lippmann, M.J.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

11

Chemical logging of geothermal wells  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The presence of geothermal aquifers can be detected while drilling in geothermal formations by maintaining a chemical log of the ratio of the concentrations of calcium to carbonate and bicarbonate ions in the return drilling fluid. A continuous increase in the ratio of the concentrations of calcium to carbonate and bicarbonate ions is indicative of the existence of a warm or hot geothermal aquifer at some increased depth.

Allen, Charles A. (Idaho Falls, ID); McAtee, Richard E. (Idaho Falls, ID)

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

12

Geothermal well log interpretation state of the art. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

An in-depth study of the state of the art in Geothermal Well Log Interpretation has been made encompassing case histories, technical papers, computerized literature searches, and actual processing of geothermal wells from New Mexico, Idaho, and California. A classification scheme of geothermal reservoir types was defined which distinguishes fluid phase and temperature, lithology, geologic province, pore geometry, salinity, and fluid chemistry. Major deficiencies of Geothermal Well Log Interpretation are defined and discussed with recommendations of possible solutions or research for solutions. The Geothermal Well Log Interpretation study and report has concentrated primarily on Western US reservoirs. Geopressured geothermal reservoirs are not considered.

Sanyal, S.K.; Wells, L.E.; Bickham, R.E.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

13

TRACING FLUID SOURCES IN THE COSO GEOTHERMAL SYSTEM USING FLUID...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

TRACING FLUID SOURCES IN THE COSO GEOTHERMAL SYSTEM USING FLUID-INCLUSION GAS CHEMISTRY Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Conference Proceedings: TRACING...

14

Well descriptions for geothermal drilling  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Generic well models have been constructed for eight major geothermal resource areas. The models define representative times and costs associated with the individual operations that can be expected during drilling and completion of geothermal wells. They were made for and have been used to evaluate the impacts of potential new technologies. Their nature, their construction, and their validation are discussed.

Carson, C.C.; Livesay, B.J.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

15

Geothermal: Sponsored by OSTI -- Multi-Fluid Geothermal Energy...  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

Multi-Fluid Geothermal Energy Production and Storage in Stratigraphic Reservoirs Geothermal Technologies Legacy Collection HelpFAQ | Site Map | Contact Us | Admin Log On Home...

16

Tracing Geothermal Fluids  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Geothermal water must be injected back into the reservoir after it has been used for power production. Injection is critical in maximizing the power production and lifetime of the reservoir. To use injectate effectively the direction and velocity of the injected water must be known or inferred. This information can be obtained by using chemical tracers to track the subsurface flow paths of the injected fluid. Tracers are chemical compounds that are added to the water as it is injected back into the reservoir. The hot production water is monitored for the presence of this tracer using the most sensitive analytic methods that are economically feasible. The amount and concentration pattern of the tracer revealed by this monitoring can be used to evaluate how effective the injection strategy is. However, the tracers must have properties that suite the environment that they will be used in. This requires careful consideration and testing of the tracer properties. In previous and parallel investigations we have developed tracers that are suitable from tracing liquid water. In this investigation, we developed tracers that can be used for steam and mixed water/steam environments. This work will improve the efficiency of injection management in geothermal fields, lowering the cost of energy production and increasing the power output of these systems.

Michael C. Adams; Greg Nash

2004-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

17

Downhole Temperature Prediction for Drilling Geothermal Wells  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Unusually high temperatures are encountered during drilling of a geothermal well. These temperatures affect every aspect of drilling, from drilling fluid properties to cement formulations. Clearly, good estimates of downhole temperatures during drilling would be helpful in preparing geothermal well completion designs, well drilling plans, drilling fluid requirements, and cement formulations. The thermal simulations in this report were conducted using GEOTEMP, a computer code developed under Sandia National Laboratories contract and available through Sandia. Input variables such as drilling fluid inlet temperatures and circulation rates, rates of penetration, and shut-in intervals were obtained from the Imperial Valley East Mesa Field and the Los Alamos Hot Dry Rock Project. The results of several thermal simulations are presented, with discussion of their impact on drilling fluids, cements, casing design, and drilling practices.

Mitchell, R. F.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

18

Pumpernickel Valley Geothermal Project Thermal Gradient Wells  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Pumpernickel Valley geothermal project area is located near the eastern edge of the Sonoma Range and is positioned within the structurally complex Winnemucca fold and thrust belt of north-central Nevada. A series of approximately north-northeast-striking faults related to the Basin and Range tectonics are superimposed on the earlier structures within the project area, and are responsible for the final overall geometry and distribution of the pre-existing structural features on the property. Two of these faults, the Pumpernickel Valley fault and Edna Mountain fault, are range-bounding and display numerous characteristics typical of strike-slip fault systems. These characteristics, when combined with geophysical data from Shore (2005), indicate the presence of a pull-apart basin, formed within the releasing bend of the Pumpernickel Valley Edna Mountain fault system. A substantial body of evidence exists, in the form of available geothermal, geological and geophysical information, to suggest that the property and the pull-apart basin host a structurally controlled, extensive geothermal field. The most evident manifestations of the geothermal activity in the valley are two areas with hot springs, seepages, and wet ground/vegetation anomalies near the Pumpernickel Valley fault, which indicate that the fault focuses the fluid up-flow. There has not been any geothermal production from the Pumpernickel Valley area, but it was the focus of a limited exploration effort by Magma Power Company. In 1974, the company drilled one exploration/temperature gradient borehole east of the Pumpernickel Valley fault and recorded a thermal gradient of 160oC/km. The 1982 temperature data from five unrelated mineral exploration holes to the north of the Magma well indicated geothermal gradients in a range from 66 to 249oC/km for wells west of the fault, and ~283oC/km in a well next to the fault. In 2005, Nevada Geothermal Power Company drilled four geothermal gradient wells, PVTG-1, -2, -3, and -4, and all four encountered geothermal fluids. The holes provided valuable water geochemistry, supporting the geothermometry results obtained from the hot springs and Magma well. The temperature data gathered from all the wells clearly indicates the presence of a major plume of thermal water centered on the Pumpernickel Valley fault, and suggests that the main plume is controlled, at least in part, by flow from this fault system. The temperature data also defines the geothermal resource with gradients >100oC/km, which covers an area a minimum of 8 km2. Structural blocks, down dropped with respect to the Pumpernickel Valley fault, may define an immediate reservoir. The geothermal system almost certainly continues beyond the recently drilled holes and might be open to the east and south, whereas the heat source responsible for the temperatures associated with this plume has not been intersected and must be at a depth greater than 920 meters (depth of the deepest well Magma well). The geological and structural setting and other characteristics of the Pumpernickel Valley geothermal project area are markedly similar to the portions of the nearby Dixie Valley geothermal field. These similarities include, among others, the numerous, unexposed en echelon faults and large-scale pull-apart structure, which in Dixie Valley may host part of the geothermal field. The Pumpernickel Valley project area, for the majority of which Nevada Geothermal Power Company has geothermal rights, represents a geothermal site with a potential for the discovery of a relatively high temperature reservoir suitable for electric power production. Among locations not previously identified as having high geothermal potential, Pumpernickel Valley has been ranked as one of four sites with the highest potential for electrical power production in Nevada (Shevenell and Garside, 2003). Richards and Blackwell (2002) estimated the total heat loss and the preliminary production capacity for the entire Pumpernickel Valley geothermal system to be at 35MW. A more conservative estimate, for

Z. Adam Szybinski

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

19

Geothermal energy well casing seal  

SciTech Connect

A geothermal energy transfer and utilization system makes use of thermal energy stored in hot solute-bearing well water to generate super-heated steam from an injected flow of clean water. The super-heated steam is then used for operating a turbine-driven pump at the well bottom for pumping the hot solute-bearing water at high pressure and in liquid state to the earth's surface, where it is used by transfer of its heat to a closed-loop steam generator-turbine-alternator combination for the beneficial generation of electrical or other power. Residual concentrated solute-bearing water is pumped back into the earth. The clean cooled water regenerated at the surface-located system is returned to the deep well pumping system also for lubrication of a fluid bearing arrangement supporting the turbine-driven pump system. The deep well pump system is supported within the well casing pipe from the earth's surface by the turbine exhaust steam conduit. In view of differential expansion effects on the relative lengths of the casing pipe and the exhaust steam conduit, a novel flexible seal is provided between the suspended turbine-pump system and the well pipe casing. 9 claims, 2 drawing figures.

Matthews, H.B.

1976-07-06T23:59:59.000Z

20

Lost Circulation Experience in Geothermal Wells  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Lost circulation during drilling and cementing in geothermal wells is a problem common to most geothermal areas. Material and rig time costs due to lost circulation often represent one fourth or more of the total well cost. Assessment of the general drilling and completion practices commonly used for handling lost circulation have been surveyed and evaluated under a study sponsored by Sandia National Laboratories. Results of this study, including interviews with geothermal production companies and with drilling fluid service companies, are reported in the paper. Conclusions and recommendations are presented for control of lost circulation during geothermal operations. Recent improvements in lost circulation materials and techniques and potential equipment solutions to the lost circulation problem are discussed. Research needs are also identified.

Goodman, M. A.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "wells geothermal fluid" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Geothermal Well Completion Tests | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Geothermal Well Completion Tests Geothermal Well Completion Tests Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Conference Paper: Geothermal Well Completion Tests Abstract This paper reviews the measurements that are typically made in a well immediately after drilling is completed - the Completion Tests. The objective of these tests is to determine the properties of the reservoir, and of the reservoir fluid near the well. A significant amount of information that will add to the characterisation of the reservoir and the well, can only be obtained in the period during and immediately after drilling activities are completed. Author Hagen Hole Conference Petroleum Engineering Summer School; Dubrovnik, Croatia; 2008/06/09 Published N/A, 2008 DOI Not Provided Check for DOI availability: http://crossref.org

22

BOREHOLE PRECONDITIONING OF GEOTHERMAL WELLS FOR ENHANCED GEOTHERMAL SYSTEM  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

BOREHOLE PRECONDITIONING OF GEOTHERMAL WELLS FOR ENHANCED GEOTHERMAL SYSTEM BOREHOLE PRECONDITIONING OF GEOTHERMAL WELLS FOR ENHANCED GEOTHERMAL SYSTEM RESERVOIR DEVELOPMENT Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Conference Proceedings: BOREHOLE PRECONDITIONING OF GEOTHERMAL WELLS FOR ENHANCED GEOTHERMAL SYSTEM RESERVOIR DEVELOPMENT Details Activities (1) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: Thermal stimulation can be utilized to precondition a well to optimize fracturing and production during Enhanced Geothermal System (EGS) reservoir development. A finite element model was developed for the fully coupled processes consisting of: thermoporoelastic deformation, hydraulic conduction, thermal osmosis, heat conduction, pressure thermal effect, and the interconvertibility of mechanical and thermal energy. The model has

23

FLUID STRATIGRAPHY OF THE COSO GEOTHERMAL RESERVOIR | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

FLUID STRATIGRAPHY OF THE COSO GEOTHERMAL RESERVOIR FLUID STRATIGRAPHY OF THE COSO GEOTHERMAL RESERVOIR Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Conference Proceedings: FLUID STRATIGRAPHY OF THE COSO GEOTHERMAL RESERVOIR Details Activities (1) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: A fluid model for the Coso geothermal reservoir is developed from Fluid Inclusion Stratigraphy (FIS) analyses. Fluid inclusion gas chemistry in well cuttings collected at 20 ft intervals is analyzed and plotted on well log diagrams. The working hypothesis is that select gaseous species and species ratios indicate areas of groundwater and reservoir fluid flow, fluid processes and reservoir seals. Boiling and condensate zones are distinguished. Models are created using cross-sections and fence diagrams. A thick condensate and boiling zone is indicated across the western portion

24

Geothermal fracture stimulation technology. Volume III. Geothermal fracture fluids  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A detailed study of all available and experimental frac fluid systems is presented. They have been examined and tested for physical properties that are important in the stimulation of hot water geothermal wells. These fluids consist of water-based systems containing high molecular weight polymers in the uncrosslinked and crosslinked state. The results of fluid testing for many systems are summarized specifically at geothermal conditions or until breakdown occurs. Some of the standard tests are ambient viscosity, static aging, high temperature viscosity, fluid-loss testing, and falling ball viscosity at elevated temperatures and pressures. Results of these tests show that unalterable breakdown of the polymer solutions begins above 300/sup 0/F. This continues at higher temperatures with time even if stabilizers or other high temperature additives are included.

Not Available

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

25

Geothermal/Well Field | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

source source History View New Pages Recent Changes All Special Pages Semantic Search/Querying Get Involved Help Apps Datasets Community Login | Sign Up Search Page Edit History Facebook icon Twitter icon » Geothermal/Well Field < Geothermal(Redirected from Well Field) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Land Use Leasing Exploration Well Field Power Plant Transmission Environment Water Use Print PDF Geothermal Well Fields and Reservoirs General Techniques Tree Techniques Table Regulatory Roadmap NEPA (45) Geothermal energy plant at The Geysers near Santa Rosa in Northern California, the world's largest electricity-generating hydrothermal geothermal development. Copyright © 1995 Warren Gretz Geothermal Well Fields discussion Groups of Well Field Techniques

26

FLUID INCLUSION STRATIGRAPHY: NEW METHOD FOR GEOTHERMAL RESERVOIR  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

FLUID INCLUSION STRATIGRAPHY: NEW METHOD FOR GEOTHERMAL RESERVOIR FLUID INCLUSION STRATIGRAPHY: NEW METHOD FOR GEOTHERMAL RESERVOIR ASSESSMENT PRELIMINARY RESULTS Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Conference Proceedings: FLUID INCLUSION STRATIGRAPHY: NEW METHOD FOR GEOTHERMAL RESERVOIR ASSESSMENT PRELIMINARY RESULTS Details Activities (1) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: Fluid Inclusion Stratigraphy (FIS) is a new technique developed for the oil industry in order to map borehole fluids. This method is being studied for application to geothermal wells and is funded by the California Energy Commission. Fluid inclusion gas geochemistry is analyzed and plotted on well log diagrams. The working hypothesis is that select gaseous species and species ratios indicate areas of groundwater and reservoir fluid flow

27

Process for cementing geothermal wells  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A pumpable slurry of coal-filled furfuryl alcohol, furfural, and/or a low molecular weight mono- or copolymer thereof containing, preferably, a catalytic amount of a soluble acid catalyst is used to cement a casing in a geothermal well.

Eilers, Louis H. (Inola, OK)

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

28

Tracing Geothermal Fluids  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Chemical compounds have been designed under this contract that can be used to trace water that has been injected into vapor-dominated and two-phase geothermal fields. Increased knowledge of the injection flow is provided by the tracers, and this augments the power that can be produced. Details on the stability and use of these tracers are included in this report.

Michael C. Adams Greg Nash

2004-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

29

Geothermal well stimulation program: opening remarks  

SciTech Connect

The history of well stimulation and the development of the geothermal well stimulation program are reviewed briefly. (MHR)

Hanold, R.J.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

30

Surface Indicators of Geothermal Activity at Salt Wells, Nevada, USA,  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Surface Indicators of Geothermal Activity at Salt Wells, Nevada, USA, Surface Indicators of Geothermal Activity at Salt Wells, Nevada, USA, Including Warm Ground, Borate Deposits, and Siliceous Alteration Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Conference Paper: Surface Indicators of Geothermal Activity at Salt Wells, Nevada, USA, Including Warm Ground, Borate Deposits, and Siliceous Alteration Abstract Surface indicators of geothermal activity are often present above blind or concealed geothermal systems in the Great Basin, but their expressions are sometimes subtle. When mapped in detail, these indicators yield valuable information on the location, structural controls, and potential subsurface reservoir temperatures of geothermal fluids. An example is provided by the Salt Wells geothermal system in Churchill County, Nevada, USA, where

31

Isotopic Analysis- Fluid At Coso Geothermal Area (2007) | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Isotopic Analysis- Fluid At Coso Geothermal Area (2007) Isotopic Analysis- Fluid At Coso Geothermal Area (2007) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Isotopic Analysis- Fluid At Coso Geothermal Area (2007) Exploration Activity Details Location Coso Geothermal Area Exploration Technique Isotopic Analysis- Fluid Activity Date 2007 Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Exploration Basis Determine the location of the heat source Notes Fluids have been sampled from 9 wells and 2 fumaroles from the East Flank of the Coso hydrothermal system with a view to identifying, if possible, the location and characteristics of the heat source inflows into this portion of the geothermal field. Preliminary results show that there has been extensive vapor loss in the system, most probably in response to

32

ADVANCED CEMENTS FOR GEOTHERMAL WELLS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Using the conventional well cements consisting of the calcium silicate hydrates (CaO-SiO{sub 2}-H{sub 2}O system) and calcium aluminum silicate hydrates (CaO-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}-SiO{sub 2}-H{sub 2}O system) for the integrity of geothermal wells, the serious concern confronting the cementing industries was their poor performance in mechanically supporting the metallic well casing pipes and in mitigating the pipe's corrosion in very harsh geothermal reservoirs. These difficulties are particularly acute in two geological regions: One is the deep hot downhole area ({approx} 1700 m depth at temperatures of {approx} 320 C) that contains hyper saline water with high concentrations of CO{sub 2} (> 40,000 ppm) in conjunction with {approx} 100 ppm H{sub 2}S at a mild acid of pH {approx} 5.0; the other is the upper well region between the well's surface and {approx} 1000 m depth at temperatures up to 200 C. The specific environment of the latter region is characterized by highly concentrated H{sub 2}SO{sub 4} (pH strength of cements, lowering the mechanical support of casing pipes, but also increased the extent of permeability of the brine through the cement layer, promoting the rate of the pipe's corrosion. Severely carbonated and acid eroded cements often impaired the integrity of a well in less than one year; in the worst cases, casings have collapsed within three months, leading to the need for costly and time-consuming repairs or redrilling operations. These were the reasons why the geothermal well drilling and cementing industries were concerned about using conventional well cements, and further their deterioration was a major impediment in expediting the development of geothermal energy resources.

SUGAMA,T.

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

33

Geothermal/Well Field | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Geothermal/Well Field Geothermal/Well Field < Geothermal Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Land Use Leasing Exploration Well Field Power Plant Transmission Environment Water Use Print PDF Geothermal Well Fields and Reservoirs General Techniques Tree Techniques Table Regulatory Roadmap NEPA (42) Geothermal energy plant at The Geysers near Santa Rosa in Northern California, the world's largest electricity-generating hydrothermal geothermal development. Copyright © 1995 Warren Gretz Geothermal Well Fields discussion Groups of Well Field Techniques There are many different techniques that are utilized in geothermal well field development and reservoir maintenance depending on the region's geology, economic considerations, project maturity, and other considerations such as land access and permitting requirements. Well field

34

Technology for Increasing Geothermal Energy Productivity. Computer Models to Characterize the Chemical Interactions of Goethermal Fluids and Injectates with Reservoir Rocks, Wells, Surface Equiptment  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This final report describes the results of a research program we carried out over a five-year (3/1999-9/2004) period with funding from a Department of Energy geothermal FDP grant (DE-FG07-99ID13745) and from other agencies. The goal of research projects in this program were to develop modeling technologies that can increase the understanding of geothermal reservoir chemistry and chemistry-related energy production processes. The ability of computer models to handle many chemical variables and complex interactions makes them an essential tool for building a fundamental understanding of a wide variety of complex geothermal resource and production chemistry. With careful choice of methodology and parameterization, research objectives were to show that chemical models can correctly simulate behavior for the ranges of fluid compositions, formation minerals, temperature and pressure associated with present and near future geothermal systems as well as for the very high PT chemistry of deep resources that is intractable with traditional experimental methods. Our research results successfully met these objectives. We demonstrated that advances in physical chemistry theory can be used to accurately describe the thermodynamics of solid-liquid-gas systems via their free energies for wide ranges of composition (X), temperature and pressure. Eight articles on this work were published in peer-reviewed journals and in conference proceedings. Four are in preparation. Our work has been presented at many workshops and conferences. We also considerably improved our interactive web site (geotherm.ucsd.edu), which was in preliminary form prior to the grant. This site, which includes several model codes treating different XPT conditions, is an effective means to transfer our technologies and is used by the geothermal community and other researchers worldwide. Our models have wide application to many energy related and other important problems (e.g., scaling prediction in petroleum production systems, stripping towers for mineral production processes, nuclear waste storage, CO2 sequestration strategies, global warming). Although funding decreases cut short completion of several research activities, we made significant progress on these abbreviated projects.

Nancy Moller Weare

2006-07-25T23:59:59.000Z

35

Drilling and operating geothermal wells in California  

SciTech Connect

The following procedural points for geothermal well drilling and operation are presented: geothermal operators, definitions, geothermal unit, agent, notice of intention, fees, report on proposed operations, bonds, well name and number, well and property sale on transfer, well records, and other agencies. (MHR)

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

36

Fluid Stratigraphy and Permeable Zones of the Coso Geothermal Reservoir |  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Stratigraphy and Permeable Zones of the Coso Geothermal Reservoir Stratigraphy and Permeable Zones of the Coso Geothermal Reservoir Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Conference Proceedings: Fluid Stratigraphy and Permeable Zones of the Coso Geothermal Reservoir Details Activities (1) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: A fence-diagram for the Coso geothermal reservoir is developed from Fluid Inclusion Stratigraphy (FIS) analyses. Fluid inclusion gas chemistry in well cuttings collected at 20 ft intervals is analyzed and plotted on well log diagrams. The working hypothesis is that select gaseous species and species ratios indicate areas of groundwater and reservoir fluid flow, fluid processes and reservoir seals. Boiling and condensate zones are distinguished. Permeable zones are indicated by a large change in

37

Isotopic Analysis- Fluid At Coso Geothermal Area (1990) | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Analysis- Fluid At Coso Geothermal Area (1990) Analysis- Fluid At Coso Geothermal Area (1990) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Isotopic Analysis- Fluid At Coso Geothermal Area (1990) Exploration Activity Details Location Coso Geothermal Area Exploration Technique Isotopic Analysis- Fluid Activity Date 1990 Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Exploration Basis Determine the recharge of the area Notes Hydrogen and oxygen isotope data on waters of Coso thermal and nonthermal waters were studied. Hydrogen and oxygen isotopes do not uniquely define the recharge area for the Coso geothermal system but strongly suggest Sierran recharge with perhaps some local recharge. References Whelan, J. A. (1 September 1990) Water geochemistry study of Indian Wells Valley, Inyo and Kern Counties, California. Supplement.

38

ADVANCED CEMENTS FOR GEOTHERMAL WELLS  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Using the conventional well cements consisting of the calcium silicate hydrates (CaO-SiO{sub 2}-H{sub 2}O system) and calcium aluminum silicate hydrates (CaO-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}-SiO{sub 2}-H{sub 2}O system) for the integrity of geothermal wells, the serious concern confronting the cementing industries was their poor performance in mechanically supporting the metallic well casing pipes and in mitigating the pipe's corrosion in very harsh geothermal reservoirs. These difficulties are particularly acute in two geological regions: One is the deep hot downhole area ({approx} 1700 m depth at temperatures of {approx} 320 C) that contains hyper saline water with high concentrations of CO{sub 2} (> 40,000 ppm) in conjunction with {approx} 100 ppm H{sub 2}S at a mild acid of pH {approx} 5.0; the other is the upper well region between the well's surface and {approx} 1000 m depth at temperatures up to 200 C. The specific environment of the latter region is characterized by highly concentrated H{sub 2}SO{sub 4} (pH < 1.5) brine containing at least 5000 ppm CO{sub 2}. When these conventional cements are emplaced in these harsh environments, their major shortcoming is their susceptibility to reactions with hot CO{sub 2} and H{sub 2}SO4, thereby causing their deterioration brought about by CO{sub 2}-catalyzed carbonation and acid-initiated erosion. Such degradation not only reduced rapidly the strength of cements, lowering the mechanical support of casing pipes, but also increased the extent of permeability of the brine through the cement layer, promoting the rate of the pipe's corrosion. Severely carbonated and acid eroded cements often impaired the integrity of a well in less than one year; in the worst cases, casings have collapsed within three months, leading to the need for costly and time-consuming repairs or redrilling operations. These were the reasons why the geothermal well drilling and cementing industries were concerned about using conventional well cements, and further their deterioration was a major impediment in expediting the development of geothermal energy resources.

SUGAMA,T.

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

39

Thermodynamics of geothermal fluids  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A model to predict the thermodynamic properties of geothermal brines, based on a minimum amount of experimental data on a few key systems, is tested. Volumetric properties of aqueous sodium chloride, taken from the literature, are represented by a parametric equation over the range 0 to 300{sup 0}C and 1 bar to 1 kbar. Density measurements at 20 bar needed to complete the volumetric description also are presented. The pressure dependence of activity and thermal properties, derived from the volumetric equation, can be used to complete an equation of state for sodium chloride solutions. A flow calorimeter, used to obtain heat capacity data at high temperatures and pressures, is described. Heat capacity measurements, from 30 to 200{sup 0}C and 1 bar to 200 bar, are used to derive values for the activity coefficient and other thermodynamic properties of sodium sulfate solutions as a function of temperature. Literature data on the solubility of gypsum in mixed electrolyte solutions have been used to evaluate model parameters for calculating gypsum solubility in seawater and natural brines. Predictions of strontium and barium sulfate solubility in seawater also are given.

Rogers, P.S.Z.

1981-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

40

A Fluid-Inclusion Investigation Of The Tongonan Geothermal Field,  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Fluid-Inclusion Investigation Of The Tongonan Geothermal Field, Fluid-Inclusion Investigation Of The Tongonan Geothermal Field, Philippines Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Journal Article: A Fluid-Inclusion Investigation Of The Tongonan Geothermal Field, Philippines Details Activities (0) Areas (0) Regions (0) Abstract: At least 660 fluid-inclusion homogenization temperature (Th) and 44 freezing temperature (Tm) measurements, mainly on anhydrite crystals sampled to 2.5 km depth from 28 wells, record thermal and chemical changes in the Tongonan geothermal field. Interpretations of the Th (175-368°C range). Tm (-0.3 to -12.7°C range) and crushing stage observations indicate that early trapped fluids contained up to (approximate)2 mol% CO2 (now measured at <0.4 mol%). reservoir temperatures have decreased by

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "wells geothermal fluid" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Fluid Inclusion Analysis At Coso Geothermal Area (2004) | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Fluid Inclusion Analysis At Coso Geothermal Area Fluid Inclusion Analysis At Coso Geothermal Area (2004) Exploration Activity Details Location Coso Geothermal Area Exploration Technique Fluid Inclusion Analysis Activity Date 2004 Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Exploration Basis 1) To determine if analyses of fluid propene and propane species in fluid inclusions can be used to interpret fluid type, history, or process. 2) To evaluate the geology and thermal history of the East Flank, in order to better understand how the rocks will behave during hydro-fracturing. Notes 1) Analyses were performed on drill cuttings at 20ft intervals from four Coso geothermal wells. Two wells are good producers, one has cold-water entrants in the production zone, and the fourth is a non-producer. The ratios show distinct differences between producing and the non-producing

42

Geology, hydrothermal petrology, stable isotope geochemistry, and fluid inclusion geothermometry of LASL geothermal test well C/T-1 (Mesa 31-1), East Mesa, Imperial Valley, California, USA  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Borehole Mesa 31-1 (LASL C/T-1) is an 1899-m (6231-ft) deep well located in the northwestern part of the East Mesa Geothermal Field. Mesa 31-1 is the first Calibration/Test Well (C/T-1) in the Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory (LASL), Geothermal Log Interpretation Program. The purpose of this study is to provide a compilation of drillhole data, drill cuttings, well lithology, and formation petrology that will serve to support the use of well LASL C/T-1 as a calibration/test well for geothermal logging. In addition, reviews of fluid chemistry, stable isotope studies, isotopic and fluid inclusion geothermometry, and the temperature log data are presented. This study provides the basic data on the geology and hydrothermal alteration of the rocks in LASL C/T-1 as background for the interpretation of wireline logs.

Miller, K.R.; Elders, W.A.

1980-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

43

Improved geothermal well logging tools  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A geothermal well logging tool has been designed to operate at 275/sup 0/C and 7000 psi. The logging tool will initially consist of a manometer, a gradiomanometer and a thermometer; the electrical and mechanical design is such that a flowmeter and a caliper can be added as a later development. A unique feature of the logging tool is that it contains no downhole active electronics. The manometer is a standard high temperature pressure gauge. The gradiomanometer consists of a differential pressure gauge which is coupled to ports separated vertically by 2 ft. The differential pressure gauge is a new development; it is designed to measure a differential pressure up to 2 psi at a line pressure of 10,000 psi. The thermometer is a platinum resistance thermometer previously developed for oil well logging. The pressure gauges are both strain gauge types which allows all three gauges are both strain gauge types which allows all three gauges to be connected in series and driven from a constant current supply. This arrangement makes it possible to use a standard seven-conductor cable with no downhole switching. The joints in the sonde are electron beam welded, thus eliminating any sealed joints in the sonde wall. The logging tool will be tested first in an autoclave and in a geothermal well later in the program.

Kratz, H.R.

1977-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

44

DOE Geothermal well stimulation program  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

An effective stimulation treatment requires the interaction of four separate items: frac fluids, proppants, equipment, and planned and properly engineered schedules. While there are good fluid systems and proppants, only judicious combinations and a well thought out schedule which uses all of these materials and available equipment to best advantage is an optimum stimulation treatment. Generally, high flow rates and convective cooling can be used either with conventional (planar) fracturing or with a dendritic fracturing technique. Many of todays fluid systems have been tested to above 400/sup 0/F. Some fluids have survived quite well. Current tests on proppants have shown temperature sensitivities in sand; however, there are resin coated materials and sintered bauxite which are not temperature sensitive. (MHR)

Hanold, R.J.; Campbell, D.A.; Sinclair, A.R.

1980-10-20T23:59:59.000Z

45

Geothermal well log interpretation. Progress report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Progress is presented on the following tasks: review of the state-of-the-art, classification of geothermal reservoir types, data acquisition, problem definition and directions for solution, and refinement of existing interpretation techniques and development of new ones. Computerized literature searches were conducted. The classification system defines five major characteristics which will qualify a potential reservoir. A catalog lists well logs currently available for study. Rock and fluid parameters needed for reservoir studies are listed. A list of matrix characteristics for rocks and minerals is given. (MHR)

Not Available

1978-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

46

Integrated mineralogical and fluid inclusion study of the Coso geothermal  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

mineralogical and fluid inclusion study of the Coso geothermal mineralogical and fluid inclusion study of the Coso geothermal systems, California Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Conference Proceedings: Integrated mineralogical and fluid inclusion study of the Coso geothermal systems, California Details Activities (1) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: Coso is one of several high-temperature geothermal systems on the margins of the Basin and Range province that is associated with recent volcanic activity. This system, which is developed entirely in fractured granitic and metamorphic rocks, consists of a well-defined thermal plume that originates in the southern part of the field and then flows upward and laterally to the north. Fluid inclusion homogenization temperatures and salinities demonstrate that cool, low salinity ground waters were present

47

Salt Wells Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Salt Wells Geothermal Area Salt Wells Geothermal Area (Redirected from Salt Wells Area) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Geothermal Resource Area: Salt Wells Geothermal Area Contents 1 Area Overview 2 History and Infrastructure 3 Regulatory and Environmental Issues 4 Future Plans 5 Exploration History 6 Well Field Description 7 Research and Development Activities 8 Technical Problems and Solutions 9 Geology of the Area 9.1 Regional Setting 9.2 Stratigraphy 9.3 Structure 10 Hydrothermal System 11 Heat Source 12 Geofluid Geochemistry 13 NEPA-Related Analyses (9) 14 Exploration Activities (28) 15 References Area Overview Geothermal Area Profile Location: Nevada Exploration Region: Northwest Basin and Range Geothermal Region GEA Development Phase: Operational"Operational" is not in the list of possible values (Phase I - Resource Procurement and Identification, Phase II - Resource Exploration and Confirmation, Phase III - Permitting and Initial Development, Phase IV - Resource Production and Power Plant Construction) for this property.

48

Salt Wells Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Salt Wells Geothermal Area Salt Wells Geothermal Area Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Geothermal Resource Area: Salt Wells Geothermal Area Contents 1 Area Overview 2 History and Infrastructure 3 Regulatory and Environmental Issues 4 Future Plans 5 Exploration History 6 Well Field Description 7 Research and Development Activities 8 Technical Problems and Solutions 9 Geology of the Area 9.1 Regional Setting 9.2 Stratigraphy 9.3 Structure 10 Hydrothermal System 11 Heat Source 12 Geofluid Geochemistry 13 NEPA-Related Analyses (9) 14 Exploration Activities (28) 15 References Area Overview Geothermal Area Profile Location: Nevada Exploration Region: Northwest Basin and Range Geothermal Region GEA Development Phase: Operational"Operational" is not in the list of possible values (Phase I - Resource Procurement and Identification, Phase II - Resource Exploration and Confirmation, Phase III - Permitting and Initial Development, Phase IV - Resource Production and Power Plant Construction) for this property.

49

Integrated Geothermal Well Testing: Test Objectives and Facilities  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A new and highly integrated geothermal well test program was designed for three geothermal operators in the US (MCR, RGI and Mapco Geothermal). This program required the design, construction and operation of new well test facilities. The main objectives of the test program and facilities are to investigate the critical potential and worst problems associated with the well and produced fluids in a period of approximately 30 days. Field and laboratory investigations are required to determine and quantify the problems of fluid production, utilization and reinjection. The facilities are designed to handle a flow rate from a geothermal well of one million pounds per hour at a wellhead temperature of approximately 268 C (515 F). The facilities will handle an entire spectrum of temperature and rate conditions up to these limits. All pertinent conditions for future fluid exploitations can be duplicated with these facilities, thus providing critical information at the very early stages of field development. The new well test facilities have been used to test high temperature, liquid-dominated geothermal wells in the Imperial Valley of California. The test facilities still have some problems which should be solvable. The accomplishments of this new and highly integrated geothermal well test program are described in this paper.

Nicholson, R. W.; Vetter, O. J.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

50

TRACING FLUID SOURCES IN THE COSO GEOTHERMAL SYSTEM USING FLUID-INCLUSION  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

TRACING FLUID SOURCES IN THE COSO GEOTHERMAL SYSTEM USING FLUID-INCLUSION TRACING FLUID SOURCES IN THE COSO GEOTHERMAL SYSTEM USING FLUID-INCLUSION GAS CHEMISTRY Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Conference Proceedings: TRACING FLUID SOURCES IN THE COSO GEOTHERMAL SYSTEM USING FLUID-INCLUSION GAS CHEMISTRY Details Activities (1) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: Vein and alteration assemblages from eight Coso wells have been collected and their fluid-inclusion gases analyzed by quadrupole mass spectrometry. Four major types of alteration were sampled: 1) young calcite-hematite-pyrite veins; 2) wairakite or epidote veins and alteration that are spatially associated with deep reservoirs in the main field and eastern wells; 3) older sericite and pyrite wallrock alteration; and 4) stilbite-calcite veins that are common in cooler or marginal portions of

51

Completion report: Raft River Geothermal Production Well Four (RRGP-4)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The fourth Raft River well was originally drilled to 866 m (2840 ft), for use as a test injection well. This well allowed the injection of geothermal fluids into the intermediate zone--above the geothermal production zone and below the shallow groundwater aquifers. After this testing, the well was deepened and cased for use as a production well. The well's designation was changed from RRGI-4 to RRGP-4. This report describes the drilling and completion of both drilling projects. Results of well tests are also included.

Miller, L.G.; Prestwich, S.M.

1979-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

52

Direct contact, binary fluid geothermal boiler  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Energy is extracted from geothermal brines by direct contact with a working fluid such as isobutane which is immiscible with the brine in a geothermal boiler. The geothermal boiler provides a distributor arrangement which efficiently contacts geothermal brine with the isobutane in order to prevent the entrainment of geothermal brine in the isobutane vapor which is directed to a turbine. Accordingly the problem of brine carry-over through the turbine causes corrosion and scaling thereof is eliminated. Additionally the heat exchanger includes straightening vanes for preventing startup and other temporary fluctuations in the transitional zone of the boiler from causing brine carryover into the turbine. Also a screen is provided in the heat exchanger to coalesce the working fluid and to assist in defining the location of the transitional zone where the geothermal brine and the isobutane are initially mixed.

Rapier, Pascal M. (Richmond, CA)

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

53

Direct contact, binary fluid geothermal boiler  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Energy is extracted from geothermal brines by direct contact with a working fluid such as isobutane which is immiscible with the brine in a geothermal boiler. The geothermal boiler provides a distributor arrangement which efficiently contacts geothermal brine with the isobutane in order to prevent the entrainment of geothermal brine in the isobutane vapor which is directed to a turbine. Accordingly the problem of brine carryover through the turbine causing corrosion and scaling thereof is eliminated. Additionally the heat exchanger includes straightening vanes for preventing startup and other temporary fluctuations in the transitional zone of the boiler from causing brine carryover into the turbine. Also a screen is provided in the heat exchanger to coalesce the working fluid and to assist in defining the location of the transitional zone where the geothermal brine and the isobutane are initially mixed.

Rapier, P.M.

1979-12-27T23:59:59.000Z

54

Salt Wells Geothermal Exploratory Drilling Program EA  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Salt Wells Geothermal Exploratory Drilling Program EA Salt Wells Geothermal Exploratory Drilling Program EA (DOI-BLM-NV-C010-2009-0006-EA) Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Web Site: Salt Wells Geothermal Exploratory Drilling Program EA (DOI-BLM-NV-C010-2009-0006-EA) Abstract No abstract available. Author Bureau of Land Management Published U.S. Department of the Interior- Bureau of Land Management, Carson City Field Office, Nevada, 09/14/2009 DOI Not Provided Check for DOI availability: http://crossref.org Online Internet link for Salt Wells Geothermal Exploratory Drilling Program EA (DOI-BLM-NV-C010-2009-0006-EA) Citation Bureau of Land Management. Salt Wells Geothermal Exploratory Drilling Program EA (DOI-BLM-NV-C010-2009-0006-EA) [Internet]. 09/14/2009. Carson City, NV. U.S. Department of the Interior- Bureau of Land Management,

55

Maazama Well Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Maazama Well Geothermal Area Maazama Well Geothermal Area Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Geothermal Resource Area: Maazama Well Geothermal Area Contents 1 Area Overview 2 History and Infrastructure 3 Regulatory and Environmental Issues 4 Exploration History 5 Well Field Description 6 Geology of the Area 7 Geofluid Geochemistry 8 NEPA-Related Analyses (0) 9 Exploration Activities (0) 10 References Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"TERRAIN","zoom":6,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"500px","height":"300px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":42.8965,"lon":-121.9865,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

56

Willow Well Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Well Geothermal Area Well Geothermal Area Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Geothermal Resource Area: Willow Well Geothermal Area Contents 1 Area Overview 2 History and Infrastructure 3 Regulatory and Environmental Issues 4 Exploration History 5 Well Field Description 6 Geology of the Area 7 Geofluid Geochemistry 8 NEPA-Related Analyses (0) 9 Exploration Activities (0) 10 References Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"TERRAIN","zoom":6,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"500px","height":"300px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":61.6417,"lon":-150.095,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

57

Gas Analysis of Geothermal Fluid Inclusions: A New Technology For Geothermal Exploration  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

To increase our knowledge of gaseous species in geothermal systems by fluid inclusion analysis in order to facilitate the use of gas analysis in geothermal exploration. The knowledge of gained by this program can be applied to geothermal exploration, which may expand geothermal production. Knowledge of the gas contents in reservoir fluids can be applied to fluid inclusion gas analysis of drill chip cuttings in a similar fashion as used in the petroleum industry. Thus the results of this project may lower exploration costs both in the initial phase and lower drill hole completion costs. Commercial costs for fluid inclusion analysis done on at 20 feet intervals on chip samples for 10,000 ft oil wells is about $6,000, and the turn around time is a few weeks.

David I. Norman; Joseph Moore

2004-03-09T23:59:59.000Z

58

Fluid Inclusion Analysis At Coso Geothermal Area (1999) | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Fluid Inclusion Analysis At Coso Geothermal Area Fluid Inclusion Analysis At Coso Geothermal Area (1999) Exploration Activity Details Location Coso Geothermal Area Exploration Technique Fluid Inclusion Analysis Activity Date 1999 Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Exploration Basis Well and steam sample comparison Notes Vein and alteration assemblages from eight Coso wells have been collected and their fluid-inclusion gases analyzed by quadrupole mass spectrometry. Four major types of alteration were sampled: 1) young calcite-hematite-pyrite veins; 2) wairakite or epidote veins and alteration that are spatially associated with deep reservoirs in the main field and eastern wells; 3) older sericite and pyrite wallrock alteration; and 4) stilbite-calcite veins that are common in cooler or marginal portions of

59

Fluid Inclusion Analysis At Coso Geothermal Area (2004-2005) | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Fluid Inclusion Analysis At Coso Geothermal Area (2004-2005) Fluid Inclusion Analysis At Coso Geothermal Area (2004-2005) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Fluid Inclusion Analysis At Coso Geothermal Area (2004-2005) Exploration Activity Details Location Coso Geothermal Area Exploration Technique Fluid Inclusion Analysis Activity Date 2004 - 2005 Usefulness useful DOE-funding Unknown Exploration Basis Determine if fluid inclusion stratigraphy is applicable to geothermal Notes Fluid Inclusion Stratigraphy (FIS) is a new technique developed for the oil industry in order to map borehole fluids.Fluid inclusion gas geochemistry is analyzed and plotted on well log diagrams. The working hypothesis is that select gaseous species and species ratios indicate areas of groundwater and reservoir fluid flow and reservoir seals. Analyses from

60

The Influence of Reservoir Heterogeneity on Geothermal Fluid...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Alliance for Sustainable Energy, LLC. THE INFLUENCE OF RESERVOIR HETEROGENEITY ON GEOTHERMAL FLUID AND METHANE RECOVERY FROM A GEOPRESSURED GEOTHERMAL RESERVOIR Ariel Esposito...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "wells geothermal fluid" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

FLUID GEOCHEMISTRY AT THE RAFT RIVER GEOTHERMAL FIELD, IDAHO...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

FLUID GEOCHEMISTRY AT THE RAFT RIVER GEOTHERMAL FIELD, IDAHO- NEW DATA AND HYDROGEOLOGICAL IMPLICATIONS Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Conference...

62

Geothermal: Sponsored by OSTI -- High-potential Working Fluids...  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

High-potential Working Fluids for Next Generation Binary Cycle Geothermal Power Plants Geothermal Technologies Legacy Collection HelpFAQ | Site Map | Contact Us | Admin Log On...

63

Fluid Inclusion Analysis At International Geothermal Area Mexico...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

icon Twitter icon Fluid Inclusion Analysis At International Geothermal Area Mexico (Norman & Moore, 2004) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home...

64

Silica recovery and control in Hawaiian geothermal fluids  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A series of experiments was performed to investigate methods of controlling silica in waste geothermal brines produced at the HGP-A Generator Facility. Laboratory testing has shown that the rate of polymerization of silica in the geothermal fluids is highly pH dependent. At brine pH values in excess of 8.5 the suspension of silica polymers flocculated and rapidly precipitated a gelatinous silica mass. Optimum flocculation and precipitation rates were achieved at pH values in the range of 10.5 to 11.5. The addition of transition metal salts to the geothermal fluids similarly increased the rate of polymerization as well as the degree of precipitation of the silica polymer from suspension. A series of experiments performed on the recovered silica solids demonstrated that methanol extraction of the water in the gels followed by critical point drying yielded surface areas in excess of 300 M{sup 2}/g and that treatment of the dried solids with 2 N HCl removed most of the adsorbed impurities in the recovered product. A series of experiments tested the response of the waste brines to mixing with steam condensate and non-condensable gases.The results demonstrated that the addition of condensate and NCG greatly increased the stability of the silica in the geothermal brines. They also indicated that the process could reduce the potential for plugging of reinjection wells receiving waste geothermal fluids from commercial geothermal facilities in Hawaii. Conceptual designs were proposed to apply the gas re-combination approach to the disposal of geothermal waste fluids having a range of chemical compositions. Finally, these designs were applied to the geothermal fluid compositions found at Cerro Prieto, Ahuachapan, and Salton Sea.

Thomas, D.M.

1992-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

65

Silica recovery and control in Hawaiian geothermal fluids. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A series of experiments was performed to investigate methods of controlling silica in waste geothermal brines produced at the HGP-A Generator Facility. Laboratory testing has shown that the rate of polymerization of silica in the geothermal fluids is highly pH dependent. At brine pH values in excess of 8.5 the suspension of silica polymers flocculated and rapidly precipitated a gelatinous silica mass. Optimum flocculation and precipitation rates were achieved at pH values in the range of 10.5 to 11.5. The addition of transition metal salts to the geothermal fluids similarly increased the rate of polymerization as well as the degree of precipitation of the silica polymer from suspension. A series of experiments performed on the recovered silica solids demonstrated that methanol extraction of the water in the gels followed by critical point drying yielded surface areas in excess of 300 M{sup 2}/g and that treatment of the dried solids with 2 N HCl removed most of the adsorbed impurities in the recovered product. A series of experiments tested the response of the waste brines to mixing with steam condensate and non-condensable gases.The results demonstrated that the addition of condensate and NCG greatly increased the stability of the silica in the geothermal brines. They also indicated that the process could reduce the potential for plugging of reinjection wells receiving waste geothermal fluids from commercial geothermal facilities in Hawaii. Conceptual designs were proposed to apply the gas re-combination approach to the disposal of geothermal waste fluids having a range of chemical compositions. Finally, these designs were applied to the geothermal fluid compositions found at Cerro Prieto, Ahuachapan, and Salton Sea.

Thomas, D.M.

1992-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

66

Monitoring well systems in geothermal areas  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The ability to monitor the injection of spent geothermal fluids at reasonable cost might be greatly improved by use of multiple-completion techniques. Several such techniques, identified through contact with a broad range of experts from the groundwater and petroleum industries, are evaluated relative to application in the typical geologic and hydrologic conditions of the Basin and Range Province of the Western United States. Three basic monitor well designs are suggested for collection of pressure and temperature data: Single standpipe, multiple standpipe, and closed-system piezometers. A fourth design, monitor well/injection well dual completions, is determined to be inadvisable. Also, while it is recognized that water quality data is equally important, designs to allow water sampling greatly increase costs of construction, and so such designs are not included in this review. The single standpipe piezometer is recommended for use at depths less than 152 m (500 ft); several can be clustered in one area to provide information on vertical flow conditions. At depths greater than 152 m (500 ft), the multiple-completion standpipe and closed-system piezometers are likely to be more cost effective. Unique conditions at each monitor well site may necessitate consideration of the single standpipe piezometer even for deeper completions.

Lofgren, B.E.; O'Rourke, J.; Sterrett, R.; Thackston, J.; Fain, D.

1982-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

67

Salt Wells Geothermal Project | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Salt Wells Geothermal Project Salt Wells Geothermal Project Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Development Project: Salt Wells Geothermal Project Project Location Information Coordinates 39.580833333333°, -118.33444444444° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":39.580833333333,"lon":-118.33444444444,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

68

Geothermal Reservoir Well Stimulation Program: technology transfer  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A literature search on reservoir and/or well stimulation techniques suitable for application in geothermal fields is presented. The literature on stimulation techniques in oil and gas field applications was also searched and evaluated as to its relevancy to geothermal operations. The equivalent low-temperature work documented in the open literature is cited, and an attempt is made to evaluate the relevance of this information as far as high-temperature stimulation work is concerned. Clays play an important role in any stimulation work. Therefore, special emphasis has been placed on clay behavior anticipated in geothermal operations. (MHR)

Not Available

1980-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

69

Development Wells At Coso Geothermal Area (1985) | Open Energy...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Development Wells At Coso Geothermal Area (1985) Exploration Activity Details Location Coso Geothermal Area Exploration Technique Development Wells Activity Date 1985 Usefulness...

70

FLUID GEOCHEMISTRY AT THE RAFT RIVER GEOTHERMAL FIELD, IDAHO- NEW DATA AND  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

FLUID GEOCHEMISTRY AT THE RAFT RIVER GEOTHERMAL FIELD, IDAHO- NEW DATA AND FLUID GEOCHEMISTRY AT THE RAFT RIVER GEOTHERMAL FIELD, IDAHO- NEW DATA AND HYDROGEOLOGICAL IMPLICATIONS Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Conference Proceedings: FLUID GEOCHEMISTRY AT THE RAFT RIVER GEOTHERMAL FIELD, IDAHO- NEW DATA AND HYDROGEOLOGICAL IMPLICATIONS Details Activities (1) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: Following a period of exploration and development in the mid-late 1970's, there was little activity at the Raft River geothermal field for the next ~20 years. US Geothermal Inc. acquired the project in 2002, and began commercial power generation in January 2008. From mid-2004 to present, US Geothermal Inc. has collected geochemical data from geothermal and monitoring wells in the field, as well as other shallow wells in the

71

Monitor well responses at the Raft River, Idaho, Geothermal Site  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Effects of geothermal fluid production and injection on overlying ground-water aquifers have been studied at the Raft River Geothermal Site in southcentral Idaho. Data collected from 13 monitor wells indicate a complex fractured and porous media controlled ground-water flow system affected by natural recharge and discharge, irrigation withdrawal, and geothermal withdrawal and injection. The monitor wells are completed in aquifers and aquitards overlying the principal geothermal aquifers. Potentiometric heads and water quality are significantly affected by natural upward geothermal leakage via faults and matrix seepage. No significant change in water quality data has been observed, but potentiometric head changes resulted due to geothermal resource testing and utilization. Long-term hydrographs for the wells exhibit three distinct patterns, with superimposed responses due to geothermal pumping and injection. Well hydrographs typical of the Shallow aquifer exhibit effects of natural recharge and irrigation withdrawals. For selected wells, pressure declines due to injection and pressure buildup associated with pumping are observed. The latter effect is presumably due to the elastic deformation of geologic material overlying the stressed aquifers. A second distinct pattern occurs in two wells believed to be hydraulically connected to the underlying Intermediate aquifer via faults. These wells exhibit marked buildup effects due to injection as well as responses typical of the Shallow aquifer. The third pattern is demonstrated by three monitor wells near the principal production wells. This group of wells exhibits no seasonal potentiometric head fluctuations. Fluctuations which do occur are due to injection and pumpage. The three distinct hydrograph patterns are composites of the potentiometric head responses occurring in the various aquifers underlying the Raft River Site.

Skiba, P.A.; Allman, D.W.

1984-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

72

Fluid Inclusion Analysis At Coso Geothermal Area (Norman & Moore, 2004) |  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Fluid Inclusion Analysis At Coso Geothermal Area (Norman & Moore, 2004) Fluid Inclusion Analysis At Coso Geothermal Area (Norman & Moore, 2004) (Redirected from Water-Gas Samples At Coso Geothermal Area (2004)) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Fluid Inclusion Analysis At Coso Geothermal Area (Norman & Moore, 2004) Exploration Activity Details Location Coso Geothermal Area Exploration Technique Fluid Inclusion Analysis Activity Date 2004 Usefulness useful DOE-funding Unknown Exploration Basis To determine effectiveness of FIS for geothermal exploration Notes In order to test FIS for geothermal exploration, drill chips were analyzed from Coso well 83-16, which were selected at 1000 ft intervals by Joseph Moore. Sequential crushes done by our CFS (crushfast-scan) method (Norman

73

EA for Well Field Development at Patua Geothermal Area -  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

for Well Field Development at Patua Geothermal Area - for Well Field Development at Patua Geothermal Area - DOI-BLM-NV-C010-2011-00016-EA Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home NEPA Document Collection for: EA for Well Field Development at Patua Geothermal Area - DOI-BLM-NV-C010-2011-00016-EA EA at Patua Geothermal Area for Geothermal/Exploration, Geothermal/Well Field, Patua Geothermal Project Phase II General NEPA Document Info Energy Sector Geothermal energy Environmental Analysis Type EA Applicant Gradient Resources Geothermal Area Patua Geothermal Area Project Location Fernley, Nevada Project Phase Geothermal/Exploration, Geothermal/Well Field Techniques Drilling Techniques, Thermal Gradient Holes Time Frame (days) NEPA Process Time 327 Participating Agencies Lead Agency BLM Funding Agency none provided

74

Modeling subsidence due to geothermal fluid production  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Currently, liquid dominated geothermal systems hold the maximum promise for exploiting geothermal energy in the United States. The principal characteristic of such systems is that most of the heat is transferred by flowing water, which also controls subsurface fluid pressures and stress changes. The reduction in pore pressures brought about by geothermal fluid extraction is potentially capable of causing appreciable deformation of the reservoir rocks leading to displacements at the land surface. In order to foresee the pattern and magnitude of potential ground displacements in and around producing liquid dominated geothermal fields, a numerical model has been developed. Conceptually, the simulator combines conductive and convective heat transfer in a general three dimensional heterogeneous porous medium with a one-dimensional deformation of the reservoir rocks. The capabilities of the model and its potential applicability to field cases are illustrated with examples considering the effects of temperature and pressure dependent properties, material heterogeneities and previous stress history.

Lippmann, M.J.; Narasimhan, T.N.; Witherspoon, P.A.

1977-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

75

Fluid Inclusion Stratigraphy: Interpretation of New Wells in the Coso  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Stratigraphy: Interpretation of New Wells in the Coso Stratigraphy: Interpretation of New Wells in the Coso Geothermal Field Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Conference Proceedings: Fluid Inclusion Stratigraphy: Interpretation of New Wells in the Coso Geothermal Field Details Activities (1) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: This paper focuses on the interpretation of the additional wells (4 bore holes) and comparison to the previous wells. Preliminary correlation between wells is also presented. Analyses from multiple boreholes show fluid stratigraphy that correlates from well to well. The wells include large producers, small to moderate producers, problem producers, injectors, and non producers Author(s): Dilley, L.M.; Newman, D.L. ; McCulloch, J.; Wiggett, G. Published: Geothermal Resource Council Transactions 2005, 1/1/2005

76

Fluid Inclusion Analysis At Coso Geothermal Area (Norman & Moore, 2004) |  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Fluid Inclusion Analysis At Coso Geothermal Area (Norman & Moore, 2004) Fluid Inclusion Analysis At Coso Geothermal Area (Norman & Moore, 2004) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Fluid Inclusion Analysis At Coso Geothermal Area (Norman & Moore, 2004) Exploration Activity Details Location Coso Geothermal Area Exploration Technique Fluid Inclusion Analysis Activity Date 2004 Usefulness useful DOE-funding Unknown Exploration Basis To determine effectiveness of FIS for geothermal exploration Notes In order to test FIS for geothermal exploration, drill chips were analyzed from Coso well 83-16, which were selected at 1000 ft intervals by Joseph Moore. Sequential crushes done by our CFS (crushfast-scan) method (Norman 1996) show that chips have a high density of homogeneous fluid inclusions.

77

Geopressured-geothermal well activities in Louisiana  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Since September 1978, microseismic networks have operated continuously around US Department of Energy (DOE) geopressured-geothermal well sites to monitor any microearthquake activity in the well vicinity. Microseismic monitoring is necessary before flow testing at a well site to establish the level of local background seismicity. Once flow testing has begun, well development may affect ground elevations and/or may activate growth faults, which are characteristic of the coastal region of southern Louisiana and southeastern Texas where these geopressured-geothermal wells are located. The microseismic networks are designed to detest small-scale local earthquakes indicative of such fault activation. Even after flow testing has ceased, monitoring continues to assess any microearthquake activity delayed by the time dependence of stress migration within the earth. Current monitoring shows no microseismicity in the geopressured-geothermal prospect areas before, during, or after flow testing.

John, C.J.

1992-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

78

Fluid Inclusion Analysis At Coso Geothermal Area (2003) | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Coso Geothermal Area Coso Geothermal Area (2003) Exploration Activity Details Location Coso Geothermal Area Exploration Technique Fluid Inclusion Analysis Activity Date 2003 Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Exploration Basis 1) Fracture/stress analysis. 2)To determine the driver of the relationship between hydrogen and organic species. Notes 1) Fluid inclusion analyses of cuttings from well 83-16 were used to determine the temperatures of vein mineralization. 2) Measurement of organic compounds in fluid inclusions shows that there are strong relationships between H2 concentrations and alkane/alkene ratios and benzene concentrations. Inclusion analyses that indicate H2 concentrations > 0.001 mol % typically have ethane > ethylene, propane > propylene, and

79

Corrosion tests in Hawaiian geothermal fluids  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Exposure tests were conductd in binary geothermal brine on the island of Hawaii. The steam which flashes from the high pressure, high temperature water as it is brought to ambient pressure contains substantial amounts of H{sub 2}S. In the absence of oxygen this steam is only moderately aggressive but in the aerated state it is highly aggressive to carbon steels and copper alloys. The liquid after flasing is intermediately aggressive. The Hawaiian fluid is unique in chemistry and corrosion behavior; its corrosiveness is relatively mild for a geothermal fluid falling close to the Iceland-type resources. 24 refs., 7 figs., 5 tabs.

Larsen-Basse, J.; Lam, Kam-Fai

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

80

Raft River well stimulation experiments: geothermal reservoir well stimulation program  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Geothermal Reservoir Well Stimulation Program (GRWSP) performed two field experiments at the Raft River KGRA in 1979. Wells RRGP-4 and RRGP-5 were selected for the hydraulic fracture stimulation treatments. The well selection process, fracture treatment design, field execution, stimulation results, and pre- and post-job evaluations are presented.

Not Available

1980-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "wells geothermal fluid" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Geothermal Reservoir Well Stimulation Program: technology transfer  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

To assess the stimulation technology developed in the oil and gas industry as to its applicability to the problems of geothermal well stimulation, a literature search was performed through on-line computer systems. Also, field records of well stimulation programs that have worked successfully were obtained from oil and gas operators and service companies. The results of these surveys are presented. (MHR)

Not Available

1980-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

82

Geothermal Reservoir Well Stimulation Program: technology transfer  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Each of the following types of well stimulation techniques are summarized and explained: hydraulic fracturing; thermal; mechanical, jetting, and drainhole drilling; explosive and implosive; and injection methods. Current stimulation techniques, stimulation techniques for geothermal wells, areas of needed investigation, and engineering calculations for various techniques. (MHR)

Not Available

1980-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

83

Fluid Inclusion Analysis At International Geothermal Area Mexico (Norman &  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Page Page Edit History Facebook icon Twitter icon » Fluid Inclusion Analysis At International Geothermal Area Mexico (Norman & Moore, 2004) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Fluid Inclusion Analysis At International Geothermal Area Mexico (Norman & Moore, 2004) Exploration Activity Details Location International Geothermal Area Mexico Exploration Technique Fluid Inclusion Analysis Activity Date Usefulness useful DOE-funding Unknown Notes Our examination of Cerro Prieto gas analyses indicates that the geothermal system structure is changing with time. Gas data routinely measured in most geothermal fields; hence fluid-flow plots as presented here can be accomplished with little cost. Gas analytical data, therefore, are useful

84

Fluid Inclusion Analysis At Valles Caldera Geothermal Region (1990) | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Geothermal Region (1990) Geothermal Region (1990) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Fluid Inclusion Analysis At Valles Caldera Geothermal Region (1990) Exploration Activity Details Location Valles Caldera Geothermal Region Exploration Technique Fluid Inclusion Analysis Activity Date 1990 Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Notes A system for analysis of inclusion gas contents based upon quadrupole mass spectrometry has been designed, assembled and tested during the first 7 months of funding. The system is currently being tested and calibrated using inclusions with known gas contents from active geothermal systems. References Mckibben, M. A. (25 April 1990) Volatiles in hydrothermal fluids- A mass spectrometric study of fluid inclusions from active

85

Boise geothermal injection well: Final environmental assessment  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The City of Boise, Idaho, an Idaho Municipal Corporation, is proposing to construct a well with which to inject spent geothermal water from its hot water heating system back into the geothermal aquifer. Because of a cooperative agreement between the City and the US Department of Energy to design and construct the proposed well, compliance to the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) is required. Therefore, this Environmental Assessment (EA) represents the analysis of the proposed project required under NEPA. The intent of this EA is to: (1) briefly describe historical uses of the Boise Geothermal Aquifer; (2) discuss the underlying reason for the proposed action; (3) describe alternatives considered, including the No Action Alternative and the Preferred Alternative; and (4) present potential environmental impacts of the proposed action and the analysis of those impacts as they apply to the respective alternatives.

NONE

1997-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

86

Stepout-Deepening Wells At Coso Geothermal Area (1986) | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Stepout-Deepening Wells At Coso Geothermal Area (1986) Stepout-Deepening Wells At Coso Geothermal Area (1986) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Step-out Well At Coso Geothermal Area (1986) Exploration Activity Details Location Coso Geothermal Area Exploration Technique Step-out Well Activity Date 1986 Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Notes A step-out exploration/production well drilled in 1986 to a depth of 6553 ft located several miles south of the Devil's Kitchen region along the identified north-south feature produced fluids with a temperature greater than 640 F. References Austin, C.F.; Bishop, B.P.; Moore, J. (1 May 1987) Structural interpretation of Coso Geothermal field, Inyo County, California Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Stepout-Deepening_Wells_At_Coso_Geothermal_Area_(1986)&oldid=687864"

87

GEOFRAC: an explosives stimulation technique for a geothermal well  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The first known use of explosives for stimulating a geothermal well was successfully conducted in December 1981 with a process called GEOFRAC. The 260/sup 0/C well was located at the Union Oil Company's Geysers Field in northern California. For the initial test, 364 kg of a new explosive called HITEX II was placed at a depth of 2256 meters and detonated to verify techniques. The explosive was contained in an aluminum canister to separate it from the well fluids. In the second test, 5000 kg of explosive was used representing a column length of approximately 191 meters. The explosive was detonated at a depth of 1697 meters in the same well. The results of these tests show that HITEX II can be safely emplaced and successfully detonated in a hot geothermal well without causing damage to the well bore or casing.

Mumma, D.M.; McCullough, F. Jr.; Schmidt, E.W.; Pye, D.S.; Allen, W.C.; Pyle, D.; Hanold, R.J.

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

88

Evaluation of commercially available geothermal drilling fluids  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A review of geothermal drilling in the United States has revealed that serious problems are being encountered with corrosion and degradation of drilling fluids in high temperature wells. The best high temperature drilling fluids that could be formulated from commercially available materials were obtained from the five largest mud companies. These included samples of 9 and 18 lb/gal water muds and 18 lb/gal oil muds. Over 4,000 tests were conducted on these muds to evaluate their performance at high temperature. This included testing at temperatures to 550/sup 0/F and pressures to 15,000 psi. These tests revealed that most of the water muds had high viscosity, high filtration rates and poor corrosivity characteristics at temperatures above 350/sup 0/F. Although the oil muds performed better than water muds at high temperatures, some problems were encountered with viscosity at temperatures above 450/sup 0/F and with filtration at temperatures above 500/sup 0/F. Generally the corrosivity characteristics of the oil muds were much better than those of the water muds. Overall, oil muds have better temperature stability than water muds but their use is often limited because of problems with surface pollution, contamination of water zones and reservoir damage. Biodegradable oil mud systems would overcome some of these limitations.

Remont, L.J.; Rehm, W.A.; McDonald, W.J.; Maurer, W.C.

1976-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

89

Development of geothermal-well-completion systems. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Results of a three year study concerning the completion of geothermal wells, specifically cementing, are reported. The research involved some specific tasks: (1) determination of properties an adequate geothermal well cement must possess; (2) thorough evaluation of current high temperature oilwell cementing technology in a geothermal context; (3) basic research concerning the chemical and physical behavior of cements in a geothermal environment; (4) recommendation of specific cement systems suitable for use in a geothermal well.

Nelson, E.B.

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

90

Well cost estimates in various geothermal regions  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A project to estimate well costs in regions of current geothermal activity has been initiated. Costs associated with commonly encountered drilling problems will be included. Activity-based costing techniques will be employed to allow the identification of cost drivers and the evaluation of the economic effects of new technologies and operational procedures on well costs. The sensitivity of well costs to a number of parameters such as rate-of-penetration and daily operating costs will be examined. Additional sensitivity analyses and trade-off studies will evaluate the efficiency of various operational practices and preventive, as well as remedial, actions. These efforts should help provide an understanding of the consumption of resources in geothermal drilling.

Pierce, K.G.; Bomber, T.M. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Livesay, B.J. [Livesay Consultants, Encinitas, CA (United States)

1997-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

91

Fluid Inclusion Analysis At Coso Geothermal Area (1990) | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

0) 0) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Fluid Inclusion Analysis At Coso Geothermal Area (1990) Exploration Activity Details Location Coso Geothermal Area Exploration Technique Fluid Inclusion Analysis Activity Date 1990 Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Notes A system for analysis of inclusion gas contents based upon quadrupole mass spectrometry has been designed, assembled and tested during the first seven months of funding. The system is currently being tested and calibrated using inclusions with known gas contents from active geothermal systems. References Mckibben, M. A. (25 April 1990) Volatiles in hydrothermal fluids- A mass spectrometric study of fluid inclusions from active geothermal systems

92

Transient well testing in two-phase geothermal reservoirs  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A study of well test analysis techniques in two-phase geothermal reservoirs has been conducted using a three-dimensional, two-phase, wellbore and reservoir simulation model. Well tests from Cerro Prieto and the Hawaiian Geothermal project have been history matched. Using these well tests as a base, the influence of reservoir permeability, porosity, thickness, and heat capacity, along with flow rate and fracturing were studied. Single and two-phase transient well test equations were used to analyze these tests with poor results due to rapidly changing fluid properties and inability to calculate the flowing steam saturation in the reservoir. The injection of cold water into the reservoir does give good data from which formation properties can be calculated.

Aydelotte, S.R.

1980-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

93

Well-test data from geothermal reservoirs  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Extensive well testing in geothermal resources has been carried out throughout the western United States and in northern Mexico since 1975. Each resource tested and each well test conducted by LBL during the eight-year period are covered in brief. The information, collected from published reports and memoranda, includes test particulars, special instrumentation, data interpretation when available, and plots of actual data. Brief geologic and hydrologic descriptions of the geothermal resources are also presented. The format is such that well test descriptions are grouped, in the order performed, into major sections according to resource, each section containing a short resource description followed by individual test details. Additional information regarding instrumentation is provided. Source documentation is provided throughout to facilitate access to further information and raw data.

Bodvarsson, M.G.; Benson, S.M.

1982-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

94

Geothermal Well Testing and Evaluation | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Geothermal Well Testing and Evaluation Geothermal Well Testing and Evaluation Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Web Site: Geothermal Well Testing and Evaluation Author Jon Ragnarsson Published Iceland Geosurvey, 2013 DOI Not Provided Check for DOI availability: http://crossref.org Online Internet link for Geothermal Well Testing and Evaluation Citation Jon Ragnarsson. Geothermal Well Testing and Evaluation [Internet]. 2013. Iceland Geosurvey. [cited 2013/10/18]. Available from: http://www.geothermal.is/geothermal-well-testing-and-evaluation Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Geothermal_Well_Testing_and_Evaluation&oldid=688939" Categories: References Geothermal References Uncited References What links here Related changes Special pages

95

Gas Analysis Of Geothermal Fluid Inclusions- A New Technology For  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

source source History View New Pages Recent Changes All Special Pages Semantic Search/Querying Get Involved Help Apps Datasets Community Login | Sign Up Search Page Edit History Facebook icon Twitter icon » Gas Analysis Of Geothermal Fluid Inclusions- A New Technology For Geothermal Exploration Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Report: Gas Analysis Of Geothermal Fluid Inclusions- A New Technology For Geothermal Exploration Details Activities (7) Areas (6) Regions (0) Abstract: To increase our knowledge of gaseous species in geothermal systems by fluid inclusion analysis in order to facilitate the use of gas analysis in geothermal exploration. The knowledge of gained by this program can be applied to geothermal exploration, which may expand geothermal

96

IN SITU STRESS, FRACTURE, AND FLUID FLOW ANALYSIS IN WELL 38C-9:AN ENHANCED  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

FRACTURE, AND FLUID FLOW ANALYSIS IN WELL 38C-9:AN ENHANCED FRACTURE, AND FLUID FLOW ANALYSIS IN WELL 38C-9:AN ENHANCED GEOTHERMAL SYSTEM IN THE COSO GEOTHERMAL FIELD Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Conference Proceedings: IN SITU STRESS, FRACTURE, AND FLUID FLOW ANALYSIS IN WELL 38C-9:AN ENHANCED GEOTHERMAL SYSTEM IN THE COSO GEOTHERMAL FIELD Details Activities (2) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: Geoscientists from the Coso Operating Company, EGI-Utah, GeoMechanics International, and the U.S. Geological Survey are cooperating in a multi-year study to develop an Enhanced Geothermal System (EGS) in the Coso Geothermal Field. Key to the creation of an EGS is an understanding of the relationship among natural fracture distribution, fluid flow, and the ambient tectonic stresses that exist within the resource in order to design

97

Thermodynamic calculations of calcium carbonate scaling in geothermal wells, Dixie Valley geothermal field, U. S. A  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Wells in the Dixie Valley geothermal field of central Nevada intercept a fracture-dominated hydrothermal system at depths of 2.5 to 3 km. The reservoir water is a dilute sodium-bicarbonate-chloride type of solution thought to be in equilibrium with quartz, calcite, chlorite, and albite. Fluid sampling and chemical analysis of production during an early flow test gave remarkably low calcium concentrations. Thermodynamic calculations of mineral stability in the presence of the reservoir water indicate that five times the amount of calcium measured in fluid reaching the surface is actually in solution in the reservoir fluid. Approximately 80 percent of the calcium is lost as calcium carbonate scale on the well casing before the fluid reaches the surface. The results of thermodynamic calculations compare well with the scale-volume measurements of Benoit.

Reed, M.J. (Geothermal Technology Div., U.S. Dept. of Energy, Washington, DC (US))

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

98

Armored instrumentation cable for geothermal well logging  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Multiconductor armored well-logging cable is used extensively by the oil and natural gas industry to lower various instruments used to measure the geological and geophysical parameters into deep wellbores. Advanced technology in oil-well drilling makes it possible to achieve borehole depths of 9 km (30,000 ft). The higher temperatures in these deeper boreholes demand advancements in the design and manufacturing of wireline cable and in the electrical insulating and armoring materials used as integral components. If geothermal energy is proved an abundant economic resource, drilling temperatures approaching and exceeding 300/sup 0/C will become commonplace. The adaptation of teflons as electrical insulating material permitted use of armored cable in geothermal wellbores where temperatures are slightly in excess of 200/sup 0/C, and where the concentrations of corrosive minerals and gases are high. Teflon materials presently used in wireline cables, however, are not capable of continuous operation at the anticipated higher temperatures.

Dennis, B.R.; Johnson, J.; Todd, B.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

99

Geothermal wells: a forecast of drilling activity  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Numbers and problems for geothermal wells expected to be drilled in the United States between 1981 and 2000 AD are forecasted. The 3800 wells forecasted for major electric power projects (totaling 6 GWe of capacity) are categorized by type (production, etc.), and by location (The Geysers, etc.). 6000 wells are forecasted for direct heat projects (totaling 0.02 Quads per year). Equations are developed for forecasting the number of wells, and data is presented. Drilling and completion problems in The Geysers, The Imperial Valley, Roosevelt Hot Springs, the Valles Caldera, northern Nevada, Klamath Falls, Reno, Alaska, and Pagosa Springs are discussed. Likely areas for near term direct heat projects are identified.

Brown, G.L.; Mansure, A.J.; Miewald, J.N.

1981-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

100

Characteristics of geothermal wells located in the Salton Sea geothermal field, Imperial County, California  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A summary is given of the geophysical, geochemical, and geothermal characteristics of wells located in the Salton Sea Geothermal Field. Based on the geothermal characteristics of the wells, a subsurface heat profile was developed for the entire geothermal field. Maps of temperature contours for specified depths throughout the field were also drawn.

Palmer, T.D.

1975-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "wells geothermal fluid" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Exploratory Well At Raft River Geothermal Area (1977) | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

7) 7) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Exploratory Well At Raft River Geothermal Area (1977) Exploration Activity Details Location Raft River Geothermal Area Exploration Technique Exploratory Well Activity Date 1977 Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Notes Raft River Geothermal Exploratory Hole No. 4, RRGE-4 drilled. During this time Raft River geothermal exploration well sidetrack-C also completed. References Kunze, J. F.; Stoker, R. C.; Allen, C. A. (14 December 1977) Update on the Raft River Geothermal Reservoir Covington, H.R. (1 January 1978) Deep drilling data, Raft River geothermal area, Idaho-Raft River geothermal exploration well sidetrack-C Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Exploratory_Well_At_Raft_River_Geothermal_Area_(1977)&oldid=473847"

102

Fluid Inclusion Analysis At Geysers Geothermal Area (1990) | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Fluid Inclusion Analysis At Geysers Geothermal Area (1990) Fluid Inclusion Analysis At Geysers Geothermal Area (1990) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Fluid Inclusion Analysis At Geysers Geothermal Area (1990) Exploration Activity Details Location Geysers Geothermal Area Exploration Technique Fluid Inclusion Analysis Activity Date 1990 Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Notes A system for analysis of inclusion gas contents based upon quadrupole mass spectrometry has been designed, assembled and tested during the first 7 months of funding. The system is currently being tested and calibrated using inclusions with known gas contents from active geothermal systems. References Mckibben, M. A. (25 April 1990) Volatiles in hydrothermal fluids- A mass spectrometric study of fluid inclusions from active

103

SUBSIDENCE DUE TO GEOTHERMAL FLUID WITHDRAWAL  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

on the Cerro Prieto Geothermal Field, Baja California,monitoring at the Geysers Geothermal Field, California,~~W. and Faust, C. R. , 1979, Geothermal resource simulation:

Narasimhan, T.N.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

104

Ceramic vacuum tubes for geothermal well logging  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The results of investigations carried out into the availability and suitability of ceramic vacuum tubes for the development of logging tools for geothermal wells are summarized. Design data acquired in the evaluation of ceramic vacuum tubes for the development of a 500/sup 0/C instrumentation amplifier are presented. The general requirements for ceramic vacuum tubes for application to the development of high temperature well logs are discussed. Commercially available tubes are described and future contract activities that specifically relate to ceramic vacuum tubes are detailed. Supplemental data is presented in the appendix. (MHR)

Kelly, R.D.

1977-01-12T23:59:59.000Z

105

Cryptic Faulting and Multi-Scale Geothermal Fluid Connections...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Cryptic Faulting and Multi-Scale Geothermal Fluid Connections in the Dixie Valley-Central Nevada Seismic Belt Area- Implications from Mt Resistivity Surveying Jump to: navigation,...

106

Subsidence due to geothermal fluid withdrawal  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Single-phase and two-phase geothermal reservoirs are currently being exploited for power production in Italy, Mexico, New Zealand, the U.S. and elsewhere. Vertical ground displacements of upto 4.5 m and horizontal ground displacements of up t o 0.5 m have been observed at Wairakei, New Zealand that are clearly attributable to the resource exploitation. Similarly, vertical displacements of about 0.13 m have been recorded at The Geysers, California. No significant ground displacements that are attributable to large-scale fluid production have been observed at Larderello, Italy and Cerro Prieto, Mexico. Observations show that subsidence due to geothermal fluid production is characterized by such features as an offset of the subsidence bowl from the main area of production, time-lag between production and subsidence and nonlinear stress-strain relationships. Several plausible conceptual models, of varying degrees of sophistication, have been proposed to explain the observed features. At present, relatively more is known about the physical mechanisms that govern subsidence than the relevant therma mechanisms. Although attempts have been made to simulate observed geothermal subsidence, the modeling efforts have been seriously limited by a lack of relevant field data needed to sufficiently characterize the complex field system.

Narasimhan, T.N.; Goyal, K.P.

1982-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

107

Dead Horse Wells Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Dead Horse Wells Geothermal Area Dead Horse Wells Geothermal Area Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Geothermal Resource Area: Dead Horse Wells Geothermal Area Contents 1 Area Overview 2 History and Infrastructure 3 Regulatory and Environmental Issues 4 Exploration History 5 Well Field Description 6 Geology of the Area 7 Geofluid Geochemistry 8 NEPA-Related Analyses (6) 9 Exploration Activities (1) 10 References Area Overview Geothermal Area Profile Location: California Exploration Region: Walker-Lane Transition Zone Geothermal Region GEA Development Phase: 2008 USGS Resource Estimate Mean Reservoir Temp: Estimated Reservoir Volume: Mean Capacity: Click "Edit With Form" above to add content History and Infrastructure Operating Power Plants: 0 No geothermal plants listed.

108

In situ stress, fracture, and fluid flow analysis in Well 38C-9: an  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

In situ stress, fracture, and fluid flow analysis in Well 38C-9: an In situ stress, fracture, and fluid flow analysis in Well 38C-9: an enhanced geothermal system in the Coso geothermal field Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Conference Paper: In situ stress, fracture, and fluid flow analysis in Well 38C-9: an enhanced geothermal system in the Coso geothermal field Abstract Geoscientists from the Coso Operating Company, EGI-Utah, GeoMechanics International, and the U.S. Geological Survey are cooperating in a multi-year study to develop an Enhanced Geothermal System (EGS) in the Coso Geothermal Field. Key to the creation of an EGS is an understanding of the relationship among natural fracture distribution, fluid flow, and the ambient tectonic stresses that exist within the resource in order to design

109

Geothermal Well Site Restoration and Plug and Abandonment of Wells  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A report is presented on the final phase of an energy research program conducted by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) involving two geothermal well sites in the State of Louisiana-the Gladys McCall site and the Willis Hulin site. The research program was intended to improve geothermal technology and to determine the efficacy of producing electricity commercially from geopressured resource sites. The final phase of the program consisted of plug and abandonment (P&A) of the wells and restoration of the well sites. Restoration involved (a) initial soil and water sampling and analysis; (b) removal and disposal of well pads, concrete, utility poles, and trash; (c) plugging of monitor and freshwater wells; and (d) site leveling and general cleanup. Restoration of the McCall site required removal of naturally occurring radioactive material (NORM), which was costly and time-consuming. Exhibits are included that provide copies of work permits and authorizations, P&A reports and procedures, daily workover and current conditions report, and cost and salvage reports. Site locations, grid maps, and photographs are provided.

Rinehart, Ben N.

1994-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

110

Logging, Testing and Monitoring Geothermal Wells | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Logging, Testing and Monitoring Geothermal Wells Logging, Testing and Monitoring Geothermal Wells Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Conference Paper: Logging, Testing and Monitoring Geothermal Wells Abstract Wells or boreholes are essential components in both geothermal research and utilization as they enable a drastic increase in geothermal energy production beyond natural out-flow as well as providing access deep into the systems, not otherwise possible. Wells also play a vital role in all geothermal reservoir physics (also called reservoir engineering) research, which would be particularly ineffec-tive without the access into geothermal systems provided by wells. During drilling the main reservoir physics research is performed through logging of different parameters as functions

111

Exploratory Well At Raft River Geothermal Area (1950) | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

50) 50) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Exploratory Well At Raft River Geothermal Area (1950) Exploration Activity Details Location Raft River Geothermal Area Exploration Technique Exploratory Well Activity Date 1950 Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Exploration Basis Agricultural Wells Notes The geothermal resource at Raft River was discovered sometime prior to 1950 when two shallow agricultural wells, the Bridge and Crank wells, encountered boiling water. References Diek, A.; White, L.; Roegiers, J.-C.; Moore, J.; McLennan, J. D. (1 January 2012) BOREHOLE PRECONDITIONING OF GEOTHERMAL WELLS FOR ENHANCED GEOTHERMAL SYSTEM RESERVOIR DEVELOPMENT Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Exploratory_Well_At_Raft_River_Geothermal_Area_(1950)&oldid=473844

112

Characteristics of Basin and Range Geothermal Systems with Fluid  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Characteristics of Basin and Range Geothermal Systems with Fluid Characteristics of Basin and Range Geothermal Systems with Fluid Temperatures of 150°C to 200°C Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Conference Paper: Characteristics of Basin and Range Geothermal Systems with Fluid Temperatures of 150°C to 200°C Abstract Six geothermal reservoirs with fluid temperatures over 200°C and ten geothermal systems with measured fluid temperatures of 150-200°C have been discovered in the northern Basin and Range Province of the USA. A comparison of these high and moderate temperature systems shows considerable overlap in geographical distribution, geology, and physical properties. Our ability to distinguish between moderate and high temperature systems using fluid chemistry has been limited by often

113

Development Wells At Raft River Geothermal Area (2004) | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Development Wells At Raft River Geothermal Area (2004) Development Wells At Raft River Geothermal Area (2004) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Development Wells At Raft River Geothermal Area (2004) Exploration Activity Details Location Raft River Geothermal Area Exploration Technique Development Wells Activity Date 2004 Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding GRED II Notes Geothermal Resource Exploration and Definition Projects Raft River (GRED II): Re-assessment and testing of previously abandoned production wells. The objective of the U.S. Geothermal effort is to re-access the available wellbores, assess their condition, perform extensive testing of the reservoir to determine its productive capacity, and perform a resource utilization assessment. At the time of this paper, all five wells had been

114

Isotopic Analysis- Fluid At Rose Valley Geothermal Area (1990) | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Isotopic Analysis- Fluid At Rose Valley Geothermal Area (1990) Isotopic Analysis- Fluid At Rose Valley Geothermal Area (1990) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Isotopic Analysis- Fluid At Rose Valley Geothermal Area (1990) Exploration Activity Details Location Rose Valley Geothermal Area Exploration Technique Isotopic Analysis- Fluid Activity Date 1990 Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Exploration Basis Determine the recharge of the area Notes Hydrogen and oxygen isotope data on waters of Coso thermal and nonthermal waters were studied. Hydrogen and oxygen isotopes do not uniquely define the recharge area for the Coso geothermal system but strongly suggest Sierran recharge with perhaps some local recharge. References Whelan, J. A. (1 September 1990) Water geochemistry study of

115

Isotopic Analysis- Fluid At Sierra Valley Geothermal Area (1990) | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Isotopic Analysis- Fluid At Sierra Valley Geothermal Area (1990) Isotopic Analysis- Fluid At Sierra Valley Geothermal Area (1990) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Isotopic Analysis- Fluid At Sierra Valley Geothermal Area (1990) Exploration Activity Details Location Sierra Valley Geothermal Area Exploration Technique Isotopic Analysis- Fluid Activity Date 1990 Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Exploration Basis Determine the recharge of the area Notes Hydrogen and oxygen isotope data on waters of Coso thermal and nonthermal waters were studied. Hydrogen and oxygen isotopes do not uniquely define the recharge area for the Coso geothermal system but strongly suggest Sierran recharge with perhaps some local recharge. References Whelan, J. A. (1 September 1990) Water geochemistry study of

116

Isotopic Analysis- Fluid At Coso Geothermal Area (1982) | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Analysis- Fluid At Coso Geothermal Area (1982) Analysis- Fluid At Coso Geothermal Area (1982) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Isotopic Analysis- Fluid At Coso Geothermal Area (1982) Exploration Activity Details Location Coso Geothermal Area Exploration Technique Isotopic Analysis- Fluid Activity Date 1982 Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Exploration Basis Determine recharge for the system Notes Thirty-nine water samples were collected from the Coso geothermal system and vicinity and were analyzed for major chemical constituents and deltaD and delta18O. Non-thermal ground waters from the Coso Range were found to be isotopically heavier than non-thermal ground waters from the Sierra Nevada to the west. The deltaD value for the deep thermal water at Coso is

117

Isotopic Analysis- Fluid At Indian Valley Hot Springs Geothermal Area  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Isotopic Analysis- Fluid At Indian Valley Hot Springs Geothermal Area Isotopic Analysis- Fluid At Indian Valley Hot Springs Geothermal Area (1990) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Isotopic Analysis- Fluid At Indian Valley Hot Springs Geothermal Area (1990) Exploration Activity Details Location Indian Valley Hot Springs Geothermal Area Exploration Technique Isotopic Analysis- Fluid Activity Date 1990 Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Exploration Basis Determine the recharge of the area Notes Hydrogen and oxygen isotope data on waters of Coso thermal and nonthermal waters were studied. Hydrogen and oxygen isotopes do not uniquely define the recharge area for the Coso geothermal system but strongly suggest Sierran recharge with perhaps some local recharge. References

118

Isotopic Analysis Fluid At Coso Geothermal Area (1997) | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Fluid At Coso Geothermal Area (1997) Fluid At Coso Geothermal Area (1997) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Isotopic Analysis- Fluid At Coso Geothermal Area (1997) Exploration Activity Details Location Coso Geothermal Area Exploration Technique Isotopic Analysis- Fluid Activity Date 1997 Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Exploration Basis Identify the source of chlorine Notes The 36Cl/Cl values for several geothermal water samples and reservoir host rock samples have been measured. The results suggest that the thermal waters could be connate waters derived from sedimentary formations, presumably underlying and adjacent top the granitic rocks, which have recently migrated into the host rocks. Alternatively, most of the chlorine but not the water, may have recently input into the system from magmatic

119

ENEL Salt Wells Geothermal Facility | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

ENEL Salt Wells Geothermal Facility ENEL Salt Wells Geothermal Facility Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home ENEL Salt Wells Geothermal Facility General Information Name ENEL Salt Wells Geothermal Facility Facility Salt Wells Geothermal Facility Sector Geothermal energy Location Information Location Churchill, NV Coordinates 39.651603422063°, -118.49778413773° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":39.651603422063,"lon":-118.49778413773,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

120

Explosive stimulation of a geothermal well: GEOFRAC  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This paper describes the first known explosive stimulation successfully conducted in a geothermal well. Two tests were performed in a 2690-meter-(8826-ft.) deep Union Oil well at the Geysers field in Northern California in December 1981. The heat-resistant process, called GEOFRAC, uses a new unique, explosive HITEX 2, which is a nondetonable solid at room temperature. Upon melting at a temperature of 177[degrees]C (350[degrees]F), the HITEX 2 liquid becomes an explosive that can be safely heated to temperatures greater than 260[degrees]C (500[degrees]F). These unique properties of the explosive were exploited in the GEOFRAC process through the cooperative efforts of Physics International Company (PI), Rocket Research Company (RRC), Union oil Company (UO), and the university of California Los Alamos National Laboratories (LANL).

Mumma, D.M. (Physics International Co., San Leandro, CA (United States))

1982-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "wells geothermal fluid" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Enhanced Geothermal Systems (EGS) well construction technology evaluation report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Electricity production from geothermal resources is currently based on the exploitation of hydrothermal reservoirs. Hydrothermal reservoirs possess three ingredients critical to present day commercial extraction of subsurface heat: high temperature, in-situ fluid and high permeability. Relative to the total subsurface heat resource available, hydrothermal resources are geographically and quantitatively limited. A 2006 DOE sponsored study led by MIT entitled 'The Future of Geothermal Energy' estimates the thermal resource underlying the United States at depths between 3 km and 10 km to be on the order of 14 million EJ. For comparison purposes, total U.S. energy consumption in 2005 was 100 EJ. The overwhelming majority of this resource is present in geological formations which lack either in-situ fluid, permeability or both. Economical extraction of the heat in non-hydrothermal situations is termed Enhanced or Engineered Geothermal Systems (EGS). The technologies and processes required for EGS are currently in a developmental stage. Accessing the vast thermal resource between 3 km and 10 km in particular requires a significant extension of current hydrothermal practice, where wells rarely reach 3 km in depth. This report provides an assessment of well construction technology for EGS with two primary objectives: (1) Determining the ability of existing technologies to develop EGS wells. (2) Identifying critical well construction research lines and development technologies that are likely to enhance prospects for EGS viability and improve overall economics. Towards these ends, a methodology is followed in which a case study is developed to systematically and quantitatively evaluate EGS well construction technology needs. A baseline EGS well specification is first formulated. The steps, tasks and tools involved in the construction of this prospective baseline EGS well are then explicitly defined by a geothermal drilling contractor in terms of sequence, time and cost. A task and cost based analysis of the exercise is subsequently conducted to develop a deeper understanding of the key technical and economic drivers of the well construction process. Finally, future research & development recommendations are provided and ranked based on their economic and technical significance.

Capuano, Louis, Jr. (Thermasource Inc.); Huh, Michael; Swanson, Robert (Thermasource Inc.); Raymond, David Wayne; Finger, John Travis; Mansure, Arthur James; Polsky, Yarom; Knudsen, Steven Dell

2008-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

122

Exploratory Well At Raft River Geothermal Area (1975) | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

5) 5) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Exploratory Well At Raft River Geothermal Area (1975) Exploration Activity Details Location Raft River Geothermal Area Exploration Technique Exploratory Well Activity Date 1975 Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Exploration Basis First exploratory well Notes Raft River Geothermal Exploratory Hole No. 1 (RRGE-1) is drilled. References Reynolds Electrical and Engineering Co., Inc., Las Vegas, Nev. (USA) (1 October 1975) Raft River Geothermal Exploratory Hole No. 1 (RRGE-1). Completion report Kunze, J.F. (1 May 1977) Geothermal R and D project report, October 1, 1976--March 31, 1977 Oriel, S. S.; Williams, P. L.; Covington, H. R.; Keys, W. S.; Shaver, K. C. (1 January 1978) Deep drilling data Raft River geothermal

123

Development of New Geothermal Wellbore Holdup Correlations Using Flowing Well Data  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Geothermal well performances depend primarily on four factors: reservoir pressure, permeability, temperature and wellbore size. The ability to predict both the quantity of fluid that can be produced and its thermodynamic state (pressure, temperature, enthalpy, gas content, salinity, etc.) is essential for estimating the total usable energy of a geothermal resource. Numerical reservoir simulators can be utilized to calculate the thermodynamic state of the fluid in the reservoir when it enters the wellbore. To compute the fluid properties as it travels up the wellbore to the well-head given certain reservoir conditions the use of a wellbore simulator is needed. This report contains new correlations for flowing geothermal wells to accurately estimate produced fluid properties.

Sabodh K. Garg; John W. Pritchett; James H. Alexander; Joel Renner

2004-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

124

Fluid Inclusion Analysis At Coso Geothermal Area (1996) | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

) ) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Fluid Inclusion Analysis At Coso Geothermal Area (1996) Exploration Activity Details Location Coso Geothermal Area Exploration Technique Fluid Inclusion Analysis Activity Date 1996 Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Notes Fluid inclusion homogenization temperatures and salinities demonstrate that cool, low salinity ground waters were present when the thermal plume was emplaced. Dilution of the thermal waters occurred above and below the plume producing strong gradients in their compositions. Comparison of mineral and fluid inclusion based temperatures demonstrates that cooling has occurred along the margins of the thermal system but that the interior of the system

125

Pressure Profiles in Two-Phase Geothermal Wells: Comparison of Field Data and Model Calculations  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Increased confidence in the predictive power of two-phase correlations is a vital part of wellbore deliverability and deposition studies for geothermal wells. Previously, the Orkiszewski (1967) set of correlations has been recommended by many investigators to analyze geothermal wellbore performance. In this study, we use measured flowing pressure profile data from ten geothermal wells around the world, covering a wide range of flowrate, fluid enthalpy, wellhead pressure and well depth. We compare measured and calculated pressure profiles using the Orkiszewski (1967) correlations.

Ambastha, A.K.; Gudmundsson, J.S.

1986-01-21T23:59:59.000Z

126

Success of Geothermal Wells: A Global Study | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Success of Geothermal Wells: A Global Study Success of Geothermal Wells: A Global Study Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Report: Success of Geothermal Wells: A Global Study Author International Finance Corporation Organization International Finance Corporation Published International Finance Corporation World Bank Group, 2013 DOI Not Provided Check for DOI availability: http://crossref.org Online Internet link for Success of Geothermal Wells: A Global Study Citation International Finance Corporation (International Finance Corporation). 2013. Success of Geothermal Wells: A Global Study. Washington, D.C.: International Finance Corporation World Bank Group. Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Success_of_Geothermal_Wells:_A_Global_Study&oldid=687100

127

Observation Wells At Mccoy Geothermal Area (DOE GTP) | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Observation Wells At Mccoy Geothermal Area (DOE GTP) Observation Wells At Mccoy Geothermal Area (DOE GTP) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Observation Wells At Mccoy Geothermal Area (DOE GTP) Exploration Activity Details Location Mccoy Geothermal Area Exploration Technique Observation Wells Activity Date Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Notes 4 wells References (1 January 2011) GTP ARRA Spreadsheet Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Observation_Wells_At_Mccoy_Geothermal_Area_(DOE_GTP)&oldid=402599" Categories: Exploration Activities DOE Funded Activities ARRA Funded Activities What links here Related changes Special pages Printable version Permanent link Browse properties About us Disclaimers Energy blogs Linked Data Developer services

128

Completion techniques for geothermal-geopressured wells. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The following are covered: oil well completions, water well completions, sand control techniques, geopressured oil and gas wells, and geopressured water well completion. The conclusions for a geothermal-geopressured water well completion and needed research are included. (MHR)

Boyd, W.E.

1974-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

129

CNCC Craig Campus Geothermal Program: 82-well closed loop GHP well field to  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

CNCC Craig Campus Geothermal Program: 82-well closed loop GHP well field to CNCC Craig Campus Geothermal Program: 82-well closed loop GHP well field to provide geothermal energy as a common utility for a new community college campus. Geothermal Project Jump to: navigation, search Last modified on July 22, 2011. Project Title CNCC Craig Campus Geothermal Program: 82-well closed loop GHP well field to provide geothermal energy as a common utility for a new community college campus. Project Type / Topic 1 Recovery Act - Geothermal Technologies Program: Ground Source Heat Pumps Project Type / Topic 2 Topic Area 1: Technology Demonstration Projects Project Description This "geothermal central plant" concept will provide ground source loop energy as a utility to be shared by the academic and residential buildings on the soon-to-be-constructed campus.

130

Geothermal reservoir well stimulation program. First-year progress report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Geothermal Reservoir Well Stimulation Program (GRWSP) group planned and executed two field experiments at the Raft River KGRA during 1979. Well RRGP-4 was stimulated using a dendritic (Kiel) hydraulic fracture technique and Well RRGP-5 was stimulated using a conventional massive hydraulic fracture technique. Both experiments were technically successful; however, the post-stimulation productivity of the wells was disappointing. Even though the artificially induced fractures probably successfully connected with the natural fracture system, reservoir performance data suggest that productivity remained low due to the fundamentally limited flow capacity of the natural fractures in the affected region of the reservoir. Other accomplishments during the first year of the program may be summarized as follows: An assessment was made of current well stimulation technology upon which to base geothermal applications. Numerous reservoirs were evaluated as potential candidates for field experiments. A recommended list of candidates was developed which includes Raft River, East Mesa, Westmorland, Baca, Brawley, The Geysers and Roosevelt Hot Springs. Stimulation materials (fracture fluids, proppants, RA tracer chemicals, etc.) were screened for high temperature properties, and promising materials selected for further laboratory testing. Numerical models were developed to aid in predicting and evaluating stimulation experiments. (MHR)

Not Available

1980-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

131

Microfossils from Cerro Prieto geothermal wells, Baja California, Mexico  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

To aid in a paleoenvironmental and age reconstruction of the Cerro Prieto reservoir system, 59 samples of well cuttings were analyzed for microfossils. The cuttings were obtained at depths from 351 to 3495 m in 14 geothermal wells in the Cerro Prieto field, Baja California, Mexico. We found foraminifera in 6 samples, ostracodes in 19 samples, and nannoplankton as coccoliths in 24 samples. Other groups, such as molluscs, insects, fish skeletal parts, and plant material were occasionally present. Detailed interpretations are not possible at this time because of poor preservation of samples. This is primarily due to causes: dissolution by geothermal fluids that reach 350{sup 0}C, and the extensive mixing of filled Cretaceous forms (reworked from the Colorado Plateau region) with Tertiary species during drilling. Further studies of ostracodes and foraminifera from colder portions of the wells are needed. The abundant and well-preserved ostracodes indicate marine to brackish water environments that correspond, in part, to lagoonal or estuarine facies. The presence of the mid-Tertiary (15-My-old) marine foraminifera, Cassigerinela chipolensis, in wells M-11 and M-38, 350 to 500 m deep, is perplexing. These are not laboratory contaminates and, as yet, have not been found in the drilling mud. If further studies confirm their presence at Cerro Prieto, established ideas about the opening of the Gulf of California and about Pacific Coast mid-Tertiary history will need to be rewritten.

Cotton, M.L.; Vonder Haar, S.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

132

Exploratory Well At Raft River Geothermal Area (1976) | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

76) 76) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Exploratory Well At Raft River Geothermal Area (1976) Exploration Activity Details Location Raft River Geothermal Area Exploration Technique Exploratory Well Activity Date 1976 Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Exploration Basis Second and third exploratory wells drilled Notes Raft River Geothermal Exploratory Hole No. 2, RRGE-2 drilled. During this period, a third well, RRGE-3 was also drilled and well production was tested. Down-hole data was obtained from RRGE-3. References Speake, J.L. (1 August 1976) Raft River Geothermal Exploratory Hole No. 2, RRGE-2. Completion report Kunze, J.F. (1 October 1976) Geothermal R and D Project report for period April 1, 1976 to June 30, 1976

133

Isotopic Analysis-Fluid At Yellowstone Caldera Geothermal Region (1977) |  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Isotopic Analysis-Fluid At Yellowstone Caldera Geothermal Region (1977) Isotopic Analysis-Fluid At Yellowstone Caldera Geothermal Region (1977) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Isotopic Analysis-Fluid At Yellowstone Caldera Geothermal Region (1977) Exploration Activity Details Location Yellowstone Caldera Geothermal Region Exploration Technique Isotopic Analysis-Fluid Activity Date 1977 Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Exploration Basis Estimate deep reservoir temperature Notes The oxygen isotope compositions of dissolved sulfate and water from hot springs and shallow drillholes have been tested. Methods are described to calculate the effects of boiling and dilution. The geothermometer, is applied to thermal systems of Yellowstone Park, Wyoming, Long Valley, California, and Raft River, Idaho to estimate deep reservoir temperatures

134

Surface Indicators of Geothermal Activity at Salt Wells, Nevada...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Surface Indicators of Geothermal Activity at Salt Wells, Nevada, USA, Including Warm Ground, Borate Deposits, and Siliceous Alteration Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference...

135

Pagosa Springs Private Wells Space Heating Low Temperature Geothermal...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Page Edit with form History Facebook icon Twitter icon Pagosa Springs Private Wells Space Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Pagosa...

136

Deep Geothermal Well and Power Plant Project Final Environmental...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Oregon Institute of Technology (OIT) Deep Geothermal Well and Power Plant Project Final Environmental Assessment September 2008 Prepared for: U.S. Department of Energy 1617 Cole...

137

Geothermal: Sponsored by OSTI -- Chapter 6. Drilling and Well...  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

Chapter 6. Drilling and Well Construction Geothermal Technologies Legacy Collection HelpFAQ | Site Map | Contact Us | Admin Log On HomeBasic Search About Publications Advanced...

138

Fluid Inclusion Analysis At Coso Geothermal Area (2005-2006) | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

source source History View New Pages Recent Changes All Special Pages Semantic Search/Querying Get Involved Help Apps Datasets Community Login | Sign Up Search Page Edit History Facebook icon Twitter icon » Fluid Inclusion Analysis At Coso Geothermal Area (2005-2006) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Fluid Inclusion Analysis At Coso Geothermal Area (2005-2006) Exploration Activity Details Location Coso Geothermal Area Exploration Technique Fluid Inclusion Analysis Activity Date 2005 - 2006 Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Exploration Basis Include more wells from previous analysis Notes This paper focuses on the interpretation of the additional wells (4 bore holes) and comparison to the previous wells. Preliminary correlation

139

Statistical Analysis of Geothermal Wells in the United States  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This study represents the first attempt to characterize the U.S. geothermal-hydrothermal resource from well data. The report contains field test data on more than 500 geothermal wells and includes statistical analyses of key well parameters. Utilities can use the information in planning and engineering analysis.

1987-07-24T23:59:59.000Z

140

Reactive geothermal transport simulation to study the formation mechanism of impermeable barrier between acidic and neutral fluid zones in the Onikobe Geothermal Field, Japan  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

November 10-14, 1988, The Geothermal Research Society ofcaused by the mixing of different geothermal fluids, Proc.Twenty-third Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering,

Todaka, Norifumi; Akasaka, Chitoshi; Xu, Tianfu; Pruess, Karsten

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "wells geothermal fluid" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Fluid-temperature logs for selected wells in eastern Washington  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This Open-File Report consists of fluid temperature logs compiled during studies of the geohydrology and low temperature geothermal resources of eastern Washington. The fluid temperature logs are divided into two groups. Part A consists of wells which are concentrated in the Moses Lake-Ritzville-Connell area. Full geophysical log suites for many of these wells are presented in Stoffel and Widness (1983) and discussed in Widness (1983, 1984). Part B consists of wells outside of the Moses Lake-Ritzville-Connell study area.

Stoffel, K.L.; Widness, S. (comps.)

1983-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

142

Evaluation of testing and reservoir parameters in geothermal wells at Raft  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

testing and reservoir parameters in geothermal wells at Raft testing and reservoir parameters in geothermal wells at Raft River and Boise, Idaho Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Conference Proceedings: Evaluation of testing and reservoir parameters in geothermal wells at Raft River and Boise, Idaho Details Activities (1) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: Evaluating the Raft River and Boise, Idaho, resources by pump and injection tests require information on the geology, geochemistry, surficial and borehole geophysics, and well construction and development methods. Nonideal test conditions and a complex hydrogeologic system prevent the use of idealized mathematical models for data evaluation in a one-phase fluid system. An empirical approach is successfully used since it was observed that all valid pump and injection well pressure data for constant discharge

143

Representative well models for eight geothermal-resource areas  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Representative well models have been constructed for eight major geothermal-resource areas. The models define representative times and costs associated with the individual operations that can be expected during drilling and completion of geothermal wells. The models were made for and have been used to evaluate the impacts of potential new technologies. The nature, construction, and validation of the models are presented.

Carson, C.C.; Lin, Y.T.; Livesay, B.J.

1983-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

144

Electric Power Generation from Co-Produced Fluids from Oil and Gas Wells  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Co-Produced Fluids from Oil and Gas Wells Co-Produced Fluids from Oil and Gas Wells Geothermal Project Jump to: navigation, search Last modified on July 22, 2011. Project Title Electric Power Generation from Co-Produced Fluids from Oil and Gas Wells Project Type / Topic 1 Recovery Act: Geothermal Technologies Program Project Type / Topic 2 Geothermal Energy Production from Low Temperature Resources, Coproduced Fluids from Oil and Gas Wells, and Geopressured Resources Project Type / Topic 3 Coproduced Fluids for Oil and Gas Wells Project Description The geothermal organic Rankine cycle (ORC) system will be installed at an oil field operated by Encore Acquisition in western North Dakota where geothermal fluids occur in sedimentary formations at depths of 10,000 feet. The power plant will be operated and monitored for two years to develop engineering and economic models for geothermal ORC energy production. The data and knowledge acquire during the O & M phase can be used to facilitate the installation of similar geothermal ORC systems in other oil and gas settings.

145

Geothermal fluid genesis in the Great Basin  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Early theories concerning geothermal recharge in the Great Basin implied recharge was by recent precipitation. Physical, chemical, and isotopic differences between thermal and non-thermal fluids and global paleoclimatic indicators suggest that recharge occurred during the late Pleistocene. Polar region isotopic studies demonstrate that a depletion in stable light-isotopes of precipitation existed during the late Pleistocene due to the colder, wetter climate. Isotopic analysis of calcite veins and packrat midden megafossils confirm the depletion event occurred in the Great Basin. Isotopic analysis of non-thermal springs is utilized as a proxy for local recent precipitation. Contoured plots of deuterium concentrations from non-thermal and thermal water show a regional, systematic variation. Subtracting contoured plots of non-thermal water from plots of thermal water reveals that thermal waters on a regional scale are generally isotopically more depleted. Isolated areas where thermal water is more enriched than non-thermal water correspond to locations of pluvial Lakes Lahontan and Bonneville, suggesting isotopically enriched lake water contributed to fluid recharge. These anomalous waters also contain high concentrations of sodium chloride, boron, and other dissolved species suggestive of evaporative enrichment. Carbon-age date and isotopic data from Great Basin thermal waters correlate with the polar paleoclimate studies. Recharge occurred along range bounding faults. 151 refs., 62 figs., 15 tabs.

Flynn, T.; Buchanan, P.K.

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

146

Well Log Techniques At Coso Geothermal Area (1985) | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Coso Geothermal Area (1985) Coso Geothermal Area (1985) Exploration Activity Details Location Coso Geothermal Area Exploration Technique Well Log Techniques Activity Date 1985 Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Exploration Basis Impact of long term testing on the well pressure Notes The downhole pressure monitoring equipment for each well included a stainless steel pressure chamber attached to a 0.25 inch stainless steel capillary tubing. The surface end of the capillary tubing was connected to a Paroscientific quartz pressure trandsducer. References Sanyal, S.; Menzies, A.; Granados, E.; Sugine, S.; Gentner, R. (20 January 1987) Long-Term Testing of Geothermal Wells in the Coso Hot Springs KGRA Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Well_Log_Techniques_At_Coso_Geothermal_Area_(1985)&oldid=600462

147

BLM Fact Sheet- Ormat Technologies Salt Wells Geothermal Energy Project |  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

BLM Fact Sheet- Ormat Technologies Salt Wells Geothermal Energy Project BLM Fact Sheet- Ormat Technologies Salt Wells Geothermal Energy Project Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Report: BLM Fact Sheet- Ormat Technologies Salt Wells Geothermal Energy Project Abstract No abstract available. Author Bureau of Land Management Organization Bureau of Land Management, Carson City Field Office, Nevada Published U.S. Department of the Interior, 2011 DOI Not Provided Check for DOI availability: http://crossref.org Online Internet link for BLM Fact Sheet- Ormat Technologies Salt Wells Geothermal Energy Project Citation Bureau of Land Management (Bureau of Land Management, Carson City Field Office, Nevada). 2011. BLM Fact Sheet- Ormat Technologies Salt Wells Geothermal Energy Project. Carson City, Nevada: U.S. Department of the

148

Evaluation of a geothermal well logging, DST and Pit test  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This paper briefly discusses logging and testing operations and certain related physical aspects in geothermal well evaluations. A good understanding of thermal and hydrological characteristics of geothermal reservoirs are essential in geothermal well evaluations. Within geothermal reservoirs, in evaluating the wells, the two most important parameters that first could be estimated, then measured or calculated, are temperature and productivity. Well logs and wireline surveys are means of measuring formation temperatures. Drill Stem Tests (DST's) or Pit Tests are means of determining formation productivity. Geochemistry and Petrology are currently accepted as two evaluation yardsticks in geothermal well evaluations. investigations of cuttings and cores during drilling operations, along with studies on formation waters could be used in a predictive nature for temperature and productivity and could yield useful information on the resource.

Tansev, Erdal O.

1978-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

149

LLNL-CONF-636436 Multi-Fluid Geothermal Energy  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

36 Multi-Fluid Geothermal Energy Production and Storage in Stratigraphic Reservoirs T. A. Buscheck, M. Chen, Y. Hao, J. M. Bielicki, J. B. Randolph, Y. Sun, H. Choi May 13, 2013...

150

CO2-based mixtures as working fluids for geothermal turbines.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Sandia National Laboratories is investigating advanced Brayton cycles using supercritical working fluids for application to a variety of heat sources, including geothermal, solar, fossil, and nuclear power. This work is centered on the supercritical CO{sub 2} (S-CO{sub 2}) power conversion cycle, which has the potential for high efficiency in the temperature range of interest for these heat sources and is very compact-a feature likely to reduce capital costs. One promising approach is the use of CO{sub 2}-based supercritical fluid mixtures. The introduction of additives to CO{sub 2} alters the equation of state and the critical point of the resultant mixture. A series of tests was carried out using Sandia's supercritical fluid compression loop that confirmed the ability of different additives to increase or lower the critical point of CO{sub 2}. Testing also demonstrated that, above the modified critical point, these mixtures can be compressed in a turbocompressor as a single-phase homogenous mixture. Comparisons of experimental data to the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) Reference Fluid Thermodynamic and Transport Properties (REFPROP) Standard Reference Database predictions varied depending on the fluid. Although the pressure, density, and temperature (p, {rho}, T) data for all tested fluids matched fairly well to REFPROP in most regions, the critical temperature was often inaccurate. In these cases, outside literature was found to provide further insight and to qualitatively confirm the validity of experimental findings for the present investigation.

Wright, Steven Alan; Conboy, Thomas M.; Ames, David E.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

151

Isotopic Analysis- Fluid At Salt Wells Area (Shevenell & Garside, 2003) |  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Isotopic Analysis- Fluid At Salt Wells Area (Shevenell & Garside, 2003) Isotopic Analysis- Fluid At Salt Wells Area (Shevenell & Garside, 2003) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Isotopic Analysis- Fluid At Salt Wells Area (Shevenell & Garside, 2003) Exploration Activity Details Location Salt Wells Geothermal Area Exploration Technique Isotopic Analysis- Fluid Activity Date 2002 - 2002 Usefulness not useful DOE-funding Unknown Exploration Basis The objective of the study was to expand knowledge of Nevada's geothermal resource potential by providing new geochemical data from springs in less studied geothermal areas and to refine geochemical data from springs for which only incomplete data were available. This work fills in gaps in publicly available geochemical data, thereby enabling comprehensive

152

Isotopic Analysis- Fluid At Fenton Hill Hdr Geothermal Area (Goff & Janik,  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

source source History View New Pages Recent Changes All Special Pages Semantic Search/Querying Get Involved Help Apps Datasets Community Login | Sign Up Search Page Edit History Facebook icon Twitter icon » Isotopic Analysis- Fluid At Fenton Hill Hdr Geothermal Area (Goff & Janik, 2002) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Isotopic Analysis- Fluid At Fenton Hill Hdr Geothermal Area (Goff & Janik, 2002) Exploration Activity Details Location Fenton Hill Hdr Geothermal Area Exploration Technique Isotopic Analysis- Fluid Activity Date Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Notes Gas samples from HDR well References Fraser Goff, Cathy J. Janik (2002) Gas Geochemistry Of The Valles Caldera Region, New Mexico And Comparisons With Gases At Yellowstone, Long

153

Pumpernickel Valley Geothermal Project Thermal Gradient Wells | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Valley Geothermal Project Thermal Gradient Wells Valley Geothermal Project Thermal Gradient Wells Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Report: Pumpernickel Valley Geothermal Project Thermal Gradient Wells Details Activities (4) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: The Pumpernickel Valley geothermal project area is located near the eastern edge of the Sonoma Range and is positioned within the structurally complex Winnemucca fold and thrust belt of north-central Nevada. A series of approximately north-northeast-striking faults related to the Basin and Range tectonics are superimposed on the earlier structures within the project area, and are responsible for the final overall geometry and distribution of the pre-existing structural features on the property. Two of these faults, the Pumpernickel Valley fault and Edna Mountain fault,

154

Isotopic Constraints on the Chemical Evolution of Geothermal Fluids, Long Valley, CA  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Energy Sciences and Office of Geothermal Technologies underconcentrations in Long Valley geothermal waters discriminateand wells from the geothermal field and a nearby exploratory

Brown, Shaun

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

155

Analysis of thermally induced permeability enhancement in geothermal injection wells  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Reinjection of spent geothermal brine is a common means of disposing of geothermal effluents and maintaining reservoir pressures. Contrary to the predictions of two-fluid models (two-viscosity) of nonisothermal injection, an increase of injectivity, with continued injection, is often observed. Injectivity enhancement and thermally-affected pressure transients are particularly apparent in short-term injection tests at the Los Azufres Geothermal Field, Mexico. During an injection test, it is not uncommon to observe that after an initial pressure increase, the pressure decreases with time. As this typically occurs far below the pressure at which hydraulic fracturing is expected, some other mechanism for increasing the near-bore permeability must explain the observed behavior. This paper focuses on calculating the magnitude of the nearbore permeability changes observed in several nonisothermal injection tests conducted at the Los Azufres Geothermal Field.

Benson, S.M.; Daggett, J.S.; Iglesias, E.; Arellano, V.; Ortiz-Ramirez, J.

1987-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

156

Mineral Recovery from Geothermal Fluids | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Mineral Recovery from Geothermal Fluids Mineral Recovery from Geothermal Fluids Jump to: navigation, search Geothermal ARRA Funded Projects for Mineral Recovery from Geothermal Fluids Loading map... {"format":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"limit":200,"offset":0,"link":"all","sort":[""],"order":[],"headers":"show","mainlabel":"","intro":"","outro":"","searchlabel":"\u2026 further results","default":"","geoservice":"google","zoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","forceshow":true,"showtitle":true,"hidenamespace":false,"template":false,"title":"","label":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"locations":[{"text":"

157

Porosity, Permeability, And Fluid Flow In The Yellowstone Geothermal  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Porosity, Permeability, And Fluid Flow In The Yellowstone Geothermal Porosity, Permeability, And Fluid Flow In The Yellowstone Geothermal System, Wyoming Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Journal Article: Porosity, Permeability, And Fluid Flow In The Yellowstone Geothermal System, Wyoming Details Activities (1) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: Cores from two of 13 U.S. Geological Survey research holes at Yellowstone National Park (Y-5 and Y-8) were evaluated to characterize lithology, texture, alteration, and the degree and nature of fracturing and veining. Porosity and matrix permeability measurements and petrographic examination of the cores were used to evaluate the effects of lithology and hydrothermal alteration on porosity and permeability. The intervals studied in these two core holes span the conductive zone and the upper portion of

158

Estimation of static formation temperatures in geothermal wells | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Estimation of static formation temperatures in geothermal wells Estimation of static formation temperatures in geothermal wells Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Journal Article: Estimation of static formation temperatures in geothermal wells Abstract Stabilized formation temperatures were estimated at different depths in 40 wells from the Los Humeros geothermal field, Mexico, using the Horner and the spherical radial flow (SRF) methods. The results showed that the Horner method underestimates formation temperatures, while the SRF method gives temperatures that are closer to the true formation temperatures. This was supported by numerical simulation of a combined circulation and shut-in period in several wells, and results for well H-26 are presented. Numerical reproduction of logged temperature is more feasible if an initial

159

Completion report: Raft River Geothermal Production Well Five (RRGP-5)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Raft River Geothermal Production Well Five (RRGP-5) is a production well in the Raft River KGRA (Known Geothermal Resource Area). The plan for this well included three barefoot legs. Due to technical and funding problems, two legs were drilled; only one leg is a producing leg. This report describes the entire drilling operation and includes daily drilling reports, drill bit records, casing records, and descriptions of cementing, logging, coring, and containment techniques.

Miller, L.G.; Prestwich, S.M.

1979-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

160

SUBSIDENCE DUE TO GEOTHERMAL FLUID WITHDRAWAL  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

model to compute land subsidence, 11 Bull. Intl. Assn.geothermal production and subsidence history of the Wairakei5. Geertsma, J. , 1973, Land subsidence above compacting oil

Narasimhan, T.N.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "wells geothermal fluid" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Cryptic Faulting and Multi-Scale Geothermal Fluid Connections in the Dixie  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Cryptic Faulting and Multi-Scale Geothermal Fluid Connections in the Dixie Cryptic Faulting and Multi-Scale Geothermal Fluid Connections in the Dixie Valley-Central Nevada Seismic Belt Area- Implications from Mt Resistivity Surveying Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Conference Paper: Cryptic Faulting and Multi-Scale Geothermal Fluid Connections in the Dixie Valley-Central Nevada Seismic Belt Area- Implications from Mt Resistivity Surveying Abstract Extended magnetotelluric (MT) profiling results over the Dixie Valley-Central Nevada Seismic Belt area were recently completed to explore the hypothesis that fluid circulation to depths of 10 km or more is generating well temperatures in the field >280 C.This transect has revealed families of resistivity structures commonly dominated by high-angle

162

Old Wright Well Greenhouse Low Temperature Geothermal Facility | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Wright Well Greenhouse Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Wright Well Greenhouse Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Old Wright Well Greenhouse Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Facility Old Wright Well Sector Geothermal energy Type Greenhouse Location Mount Princeton, Colorado Coordinates 38.749167°, -106.2425° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[]}

163

Pagosa Springs Private Wells Space Heating Low Temperature Geothermal  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Private Wells Space Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Private Wells Space Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Pagosa Springs Private Wells Space Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Facility Pagosa Springs Private Wells Sector Geothermal energy Type Space Heating Location Pagosa Springs, Colorado Coordinates 37.26945°, -107.0097617° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[]}

164

Countryman Well Greenhouse Low Temperature Geothermal Facility | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Countryman Well Greenhouse Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Countryman Well Greenhouse Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Countryman Well Greenhouse Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Facility Countryman Well Sector Geothermal energy Type Greenhouse Location Lander, Wyoming Coordinates 42.833014°, -108.7306725° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[]}

165

Jackson Well Springs Space Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Facility |  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Well Springs Space Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Well Springs Space Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Jackson Well Springs Space Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Facility Jackson Well Springs Sector Geothermal energy Type Space Heating Location Ashland, Oregon Coordinates 42.1853257°, -122.6980457° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[]}

166

Salt Wells Geothermal Energy Projects Environmental Impact Statement | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Page Page Edit with form History Facebook icon Twitter icon » Salt Wells Geothermal Energy Projects Environmental Impact Statement Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Web Site: Salt Wells Geothermal Energy Projects Environmental Impact Statement Abstract Abstract unavailable. Author Bureau of Land Management Published U.S. Department of the Interior- Bureau of Land Management, Carson City Field Office, Nevada, 07/22/2011 DOI Not Provided Check for DOI availability: http://crossref.org Online Internet link for Salt Wells Geothermal Energy Projects Environmental Impact Statement Citation Bureau of Land Management. Salt Wells Geothermal Energy Projects Environmental Impact Statement [Internet]. 07/22/2011. Carson City, NV. U.S. Department of the Interior- Bureau of Land Management, Carson City

167

Salt Wells Geothermal Exploratory Drilling Program EA(DOI-BLM...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

09142009 DOI Not Provided Check for DOI availability: http:crossref.org Online Internet link for Salt Wells Geothermal Exploratory Drilling Program EA (DOI-BLM-NV-C010-2009-...

168

U.S. Geothermal Announces Successful Completion of First Well...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Number NA DOI Not Provided Check for DOI availability: http:crossref.org Online Internet link for U.S. Geothermal Announces Successful Completion of First Well at Neal Hot...

169

Polymer-cement geothermal-well-completion materials. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A program to develop high-temperature polymer cements was performed. Several formulations based on organic and semi-inorganic binders were evaluated on the basis of mechanical and thermal stability, and thickening time. Two optimized systems exhibited properties exceeding those required for use in geothermal wells. Both systems were selected for continued evaluation at the National Bureau of Standards and contingent upon the results, for field testing in geothermal wells.

Zeldin, A.N.; Kukacka, L.E.

1980-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

170

Siting and drilling recommendations for a geothermal exploration well, Wendel-Amedee KGRA, Lassen County, California  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

All available exploration data relevant to the GeoProducts leasehold in the Wendel-Amedee KGRA are reviewed and interpreted. On the basis of this interpretation, locations and procedures are recommended for drilling geothermal production wells capable of supplying fluid at a temperature of 250/sup 0/F or greater. The following are covered: stratigraphy and geological history, geologic structure, geochemistry, geophysics, temperature-gradient data, and fluid quality. (MHR)

McNitt, J.R.; Wilde, W.R.

1980-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

171

Geothermal component test facility  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A description is given of the East Mesa geothermal facility and the services provided. The facility provides for testing various types of geothermal energy-conversion equipment and materials under field conditions using geothermal fluids from three existing wells. (LBS)

Not Available

1976-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

172

Update and assessment of geothermal economic models, geothermal fluid flow and heat distribution models, and geothermal data bases  

SciTech Connect

Numerical simulation models and data bases that were developed for DOE as part of a number of geothermal programs have been assessed with respect to their overall stage of development and usefulness. This report combines three separate studies that focus attention upon: (1) economic models related to geothermal energy; (2) physical geothermal system models pertaining to thermal energy and the fluid medium; and (3) geothermal energy data bases. Computerized numerical models pertaining to the economics of extracting and utilizing geothermal energy have been summarized and catalogued with respect to their availability, utility and function. The 19 models that are discussed in detail were developed for use by geothermal operators, public utilities, and lending institutions who require a means to estimate the value of a given resource, total project costs, and the sensitivity of these values to specific variables. A number of the models are capable of economically assessing engineering aspects of geothermal projects. Computerized simulations of heat distribution and fluid flow have been assessed and are presented for ten models. Five of the models are identified as wellbore simulators and five are described as reservoir simulators. Each model is described in terms of its operational characteristics, input, output, and other pertinent attributes. Geothermal energy data bases are reviewed with respect to their current usefulness and availability. Summaries of eight data bases are provided in catalogue format, and an overall comparison of the elements of each data base is included.

Kenkeremath, D. (ed.)

1985-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

173

Fluid Imaging of Enhanced Geothermal Systems through Joint 3D Geophysical  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Imaging of Enhanced Geothermal Systems through Joint 3D Geophysical Imaging of Enhanced Geothermal Systems through Joint 3D Geophysical Inverse Modeling Geothermal Lab Call Project Jump to: navigation, search Last modified on July 22, 2011. Project Title Fluid Imaging of Enhanced Geothermal Systems through Joint 3D Geophysical Inverse Modeling Project Type / Topic 1 Laboratory Call for Submission of Applications for Research, Development and Analysis of Geothermal Technologies Project Type / Topic 2 Fluid Imaging Project Description EGS has been defined as enhanced reservoirs that have been created to extract economical amounts of heat from low permeability and/or porosity geothermal resources. Critical to the success of EGS is the successful manipulation of fluids in the subsurface to enhance permeability. Knowledge in the change in volume and location of fluids in the rocks and fractures (both natural and induced) will be needed to manage injection strategies such as the number and location of step out wells, in-fill wells and the ratio of injection to production wells. The key difficulty in manipulating fluids has been our inability to reliably predict their locations, movements and concentrations. We believe combining data from MEQ and electrical surveys has the potential to overcome these problems and can meet many of the above needs, economically. Induced seismicity is currently viewed as one of the essential methods for inferring the success of creating fracture permeability and fluid paths during large scale EGS injections. Fluids are obviously playing a critical role in inducing the seismicity, however, other effects such as thermal, geochemical and stress redistribution, etc. may also play a role.

174

Economic impact of using nonmetallic materials in low to intermediate temperature geothermal well construction  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Four appendices are included. The first covers applications of low-temperature geothermal energy including industrial processes, agricultural and related processes, district heating and cooling, and miscellaneous. The second discusses hydrogeologic factors affecting the design and construction of low-temperature geothermal wells: water quality, withdrawal rate, water depth, water temperature, basic well designs, and hydrogeologic provinces. In the third appendix, properties of metallic and nonmetallic materials are described, including: specific gravity, mechanical strength properties, resistance to physical and biological attack, thermal properties of nonmetallics, fluid flow characteristics, corrosion resistance, scaling resistance, weathering resistance of nonmetallics, and hydrolysis resistance of nonmetallics. Finally, special considerations in the design and construction of low-temperature geothermal wells using nonmetallics materials are covered. These include; drilling methods, joining methods, methods of casing and screen installation, well cementing, and well development. (MHR)

Not Available

1979-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

175

Requirements for downhole equipment used for geothermal-well stimulation. Geothermal-reservoir well-stimulation program  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The needs for new and improved down-hole stimulation equipment for geothermal wells are identified. The following kinds of equipment are discussed: mechanical downhole recording instruments, electric line logging tools, and downhole tools used for zone isolation.

Not Available

1982-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

176

Geothermal Reservoir Well Stimulation Program: technology transfer  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The following are included: review of available data from previous fracturing stimulation operations, stimulation process variables, fracturing fluid design, hydraulic fracture design, stimulation case histories, and selected bibliography. (MHR)

Not Available

1980-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

177

High-resolution seismic studies applied to injected geothermal fluids  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The application of high-resolution microseismicity studies to the problem of monitoring injected fluids is one component of the Geothermal Injection Monitoring Project at LLNL. The evaluation of microseismicity includes the development of field techniques, and the acquisition and processing of events during the initial development of a geothermal field. To achieve a specific detection threshold and location precision, design criteria are presented for seismic networks. An analysis of a small swarm near Mammoth Lakes, California, demonstrates these relationships and the usefulness of high-resolution seismic studies. A small network is currently monitoring the Mammoth-Pacific geothermal power plant at Casa Diablo as it begins production.

Smith, A.T.; Kasameyer, P.

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

178

MODELING SUBSIDENCE DUE TO GEOTHERMAL FLUID PRODUCTION  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

pore-water pressures , subsidence. DISCLAIMER NeiIher ( h ehere," do not MODELING SUBSIDENCE DUE T GEOTHERMAL FLUIDSecond Syhposium on Land Subsidence 1976 a t Anaheim, I n t

Lippmann, M.J.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

179

THE DEFINITION OF ENGINEERING DEVELOPMENT AND RESEARCH PROBLEMS RELATING TO THE USE OF GEOTHERMAL FLUIDS FOR ELECTRIC POWER GENERATION AND NONELECTRIC HEATING  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Williams, Assessment of Geothermal Resources of the UnitedActivity coefficients i.n geothermal solutions J. L. Haas R.REPORT CHARACTERIZATION OF GEOTHERMAL FLUIDS A. Geothermal

Apps, J.A.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

180

Fluid Inclusion Analysis At Coso Geothermal Area (2002) | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

) ) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Fluid Inclusion Analysis At Coso Geothermal Area (2002) Exploration Activity Details Location Coso Geothermal Area Exploration Technique Fluid Inclusion Analysis Activity Date 2002 Usefulness useful DOE-funding Unknown Notes Analyses were averaged and plotted verses depth (Figure 4). Fluid inclusion gas analyses done on vein minerals from drill hole 68-6 that we earlier analyzed (Adams 2000) were plotted for comparison in order to confirm that similar analyses are obtained from chips and vein minerals. This comparison is far from ideal. The drill holes are better than a kilometer apart, samples analyzed in the two bore holes are not from the same depths, and the chip analyses were performed on the new dual quadrupole system that

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "wells geothermal fluid" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Solicitation - Geothermal Drilling Development and Well Maintenance Projects  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Energy (DOE)-industry research and development (R and D) organization, sponsors near-term technology development projects for reducing geothermal drilling and well maintenance costs. Sandia National Laboratories (Albuquerque, NM) administers DOE funds for GDO cost-shared projects and provides technical support. The GDO serves a very important function in fostering geothermal development. It encourages commercialization of emerging, cost-reducing drilling technologies, while fostering a spirit of cooperation among various segments of the geothermal industry. For Sandia, the GDO also serves as a means of identifying the geothermal industry's drilling fuel/or well maintenance problems, and provides an important forum for technology transfer. Successfully completed GDO projects include: the development of a high-temperature borehole televiewer, high-temperature rotating head rubbers, a retrievable whipstock, and a high-temperature/high-pressure valve-changing tool. Ongoing GDO projects include technology for stemming lost circulation; foam cement integrity log interpretation, insulated drill pipe, percussive mud hammers for geothermal drilling, a high-temperature/ high-pressure valve changing tool assembly (adding a milling capability), deformed casing remediation, high- temperature steering tools, diagnostic instrumentation for casing in geothermal wells, and elastomeric casing protectors.

Sattler, A.R.

1999-07-07T23:59:59.000Z

182

BOREHOLE PRECONDITIONING OF GEOTHERMAL WELLS FOR ENHANCED GEOTHERMAL...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

RESERVOIR DEVELOPMENT edit Details Activities (1) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: Thermal stimulation can be utilized to precondition a well to optimize fracturing and...

183

Working Fluids and Their Effect on Geothermal Turbines Geothermal...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

working fluids leading to improved plant efficiency. Awardees (Company Institution) Oak Ridge National Laboratory Partner 1 Sandia National Laboratory Funding Opportunity...

184

Aqueous foam surfactants for geothermal drilling fluids: 1. Screening  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Aqueous foam is a promising drilling fluid for geothermal wells because it will minimize damage to the producing formation and would eliminate the erosion problems of air drilling. Successful use of aqueous foam will require a high foaming surfactant which will: (1) be chemically stable in the harsh thermal and chemical environment, and (2) form stable foams at high temperatures and pressures. The procedures developed to generate and test aqueous foams and the effects of a 260/sup 0/C temperature cycle on aqueous surfactant solutions are presented. More than fifty selected surfactants were evaluated with representatives from the amphoteric, anionic, cationic, and nonionic classes included. Most surfactants were severely degraded by this temperature cycle; however, some showed excellent retention of their properties. The most promising surfactant types were the alkyl and alkyl aryl sulfonates and the ethoxylated nonionics.

Rand, P.B.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

185

Idaho: basic data for thermal springs and wells as recorded in GEOTHERM, Part A  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

All chemical data for geothermal fluids in Idaho available as of December 1981 is maintained on GEOTHERM, computerized information system. This report presents summaries and sources of records for Idaho. 7 refs. (ACR)

Bliss, J.D.

1983-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

186

Nevada: basic data for thermal springs and wells as recorded in GEOTHERM. Part A  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

All chemical data for geothermal fluids in Nevada available as of December 1981 are maintained on GEOTHERM, a computerized information system. This report presents summaries and sources of records for Nevada. 7 refs. (ACR)

Bliss, J.D.

1983-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

187

Marble Hot Well Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Hot Well Geothermal Area Hot Well Geothermal Area Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Geothermal Resource Area: Marble Hot Well Geothermal Area Contents 1 Area Overview 2 History and Infrastructure 3 Regulatory and Environmental Issues 4 Exploration History 5 Well Field Description 6 Geology of the Area 7 Geofluid Geochemistry 8 NEPA-Related Analyses (0) 9 Exploration Activities (0) 10 References Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"TERRAIN","zoom":6,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"500px","height":"300px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":39.75633,"lon":-120.36,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

188

Marysville Test Well Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Test Well Geothermal Area Test Well Geothermal Area Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Geothermal Resource Area: Marysville Test Well Geothermal Area Contents 1 Area Overview 2 History and Infrastructure 3 Regulatory and Environmental Issues 4 Exploration History 5 Well Field Description 6 Geology of the Area 7 Geofluid Geochemistry 8 NEPA-Related Analyses (0) 9 Exploration Activities (0) 10 References Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"TERRAIN","zoom":6,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"500px","height":"300px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":46.75333333,"lon":-112.3766667,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

189

Hydrogeologic and hydrogeochemical assessment of geothermal fluids in the Pyramid Lake area, Washoe country, Nevada  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This paper evaluates the hydrogeological and hydrogeochemical characteristics of the geothermal fluids in the Pyramid Lake area using data from existing published and unpublished reports on springs, challow and deep wells in the area. Four geochemical provinces, namely, chloride, bicarbonate, suphate and nixed chloride-bicarbonate have been identified. Chloride waters are found in known geothermal areas. Two subsurface water recharge zones which reed the shallow and deep geothermal systems are proposed. These are the Virginia Mountains and their Northern extension and the Fox and Lake Ranges. Tertiary and Quaternary faulting systems in these mountains and Ranges act as heat conduits for geothermal fluids. The Needle Rocks geothermal system is postulated to be deeper than the San Emidio system. A connection between the Needle Rocks system and the Pyramid and Anaho islands warm springs is not clear from this study because of lack of chemical data from these islands. More systematic measurements of static water levels, temperatures, well lithology, water chemistry and isotopes data are recommended to enable better understanding of the geothermal systems in the area.

Ojiambo, S. Bwire

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

190

Geology of Injection Well 46A-19RD in the Coso Enhanced Geothermal...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Geology of Injection Well 46A-19RD in the Coso Enhanced Geothermal Systems Experiment Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Conference Proceedings: Geology...

191

Buckhorn Mineral Wells Pool & Spa Low Temperature Geothermal Facility |  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Buckhorn Mineral Wells Pool & Spa Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Buckhorn Mineral Wells Pool & Spa Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Facility Buckhorn Mineral Wells Sector Geothermal energy Type Pool and Spa Location Mesa, Arizona Coordinates 33.4222685°, -111.8226402° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[]}

192

BLM Approves Salt Wells Geothermal Energy Projects | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Energy Projects Energy Projects Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Web Site: BLM Approves Salt Wells Geothermal Energy Projects Abstract Abstract unavailable. Author Colleen Sievers Published U.S. Department of the Interior- Bureau of Land Management, Carson City Field Office, Nevada, 09/28/2011 DOI Not Provided Check for DOI availability: http://crossref.org Online Internet link for BLM Approves Salt Wells Geothermal Energy Projects Citation Colleen Sievers. BLM Approves Salt Wells Geothermal Energy Projects [Internet]. 09/28/2011. Carson City, NV. U.S. Department of the Interior- Bureau of Land Management, Carson City Field Office, Nevada. [updated 2011/09/28;cited 2013/08/21]. Available from: http://www.blm.gov/nv/st/en/fo/carson_city_field/blm_information/newsroom/2011/september/blm_approves_salt.html

193

Geothermal Reservoir Evaluation Considering Fluid Adsorption  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

t h e v a p r phase. I n a vapor-dominated geothermal r e s e r v o i r , t h e only "non-vapor" f l u when adsorbed water is the only "non-vapor" f l u i d present. There is a f u r t h e r consideration

Stanford University

194

Hydraulic fracture stimulation treatment of Well Baca 23. Geothermal Reservoir Well-Stimulation Program  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Well Stimulation Experiment No. 5 of the Geothermal Reservoir Well Stimulation Program (GRWSP) was performed on March 22, 1981 in Baca 23, located in Union's Redondo Creek Project Area in Sandoval County, New Mexico. The treatment selected was a large hydraulic fracture job designed specifically for, and utilizing frac materials chosen for, the high temperature geothermal environment. The well selection, fracture treatment, experiment evaluation, and summary of the job costs are presented herein.

Not Available

1981-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

195

Review of surface-equipment requirements for geothermal-well stimulation. Geothermal-reservoir well-stimulation program  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A summary of stimulation equipment available to geothermal industry is presented and some modifications from which it could benefit are discussed. Equipment requirements for hydraulic fracturing, acid fracturing, acidizing, and other chemical treatments are included. Designs for the following are reviewed: equipment for premixing and storing treatment fluids, proppant handling equipment, pump trucks, special equipment for foam fracturing, intensifier pumps, manifolding, and monitoring and control devices.

Not Available

1982-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

196

Geothermal Well Maintenance and Repair in Cerro Prieto  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

When the first well is drilled at a geothermal field, procedures for the cleaning, repair, and control of wells should be established. This aspect will be increasingly important as more wells are drilled. Equipment, tools and techniques need to be improved to achieve economic and safe results. Different systems have been developed and applied in maintenance of wells, in problems of casing incrustations, repairs, plugging, and well control. These systems should be improved, even though they have been reasonably satisfactory to date.

Aguirre, B. D.; Blanco, F. V.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

197

SUBSIDENCE DUE TO GEOTHERMAL FLUID WITHDRAWAL  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

drilling activity completely ceased. Of these, 65 bores account for about 95 percent of the total fluid

Narasimhan, T.N.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

198

Ornithological Survey of the Proposed Geothermal Well Site No. 2  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS 1983) and the State of Hawaii (DLNR 1986) have listed as endangered six forest bird species for the Island of Hawaii. Two of these birds, the O'u (Psittirostra psittacea) and the Hawaiian hawk (Buteo solitarius) may be present within the Geothermal resource sub-zone (Scott et al. 1986). Thus, their presence could impact future development within the resource area. This report presents the results of a bird survey conducted August 11 and 12, 1990 in the sub-zone in and around the proposed well site and pad for True/Mid Pacific Geothermal Well No.2.

Jeffrey, Jack

1990-08-16T23:59:59.000Z

199

S-cubed geothermal technology and experience  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Summaries of ten research projects are presented. They include: equations describing various geothermal systems, geohydrological environmental effects of geothermal power production, simulation of linear bench-scale experiments, simulation of fluid-rock interactions in a geothermal basin, geopressured geothermal reservoir simulator, user-oriented geothermal reservoir simulator, geothermal well test analyses, geothermal seismic exploration, high resolution seismic mapping of a geothermal reservoir, experimental evaluation of geothermal well logging cables, and list of publications. (MHR)

Not Available

1976-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

200

A Fluid-Inclusion Investigation Of The Tongonan Geothermal Field...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

on anhydrite crystals sampled to 2.5 km depth from 28 wells, record thermal and chemical changes in the Tongonan geothermal field. Interpretations of the Th (175-368C...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "wells geothermal fluid" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Technical and cost analysis of rock-melting systems for producing geothermal wells. [GEOWELL  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The drilling of wells makes up a large fraction of the costs of geothermal energy-extraction plants, and billions of dollars for wells will be needed before geothermal energy is nationally significant. Technical and economic systems studies are summarized regarding the application of the Subterrene concept, i.e., excavating and penetrating rocks or soils by melting, to the production of deep wells such as may be used for dry hot rock or geopressurized geothermal energy-extraction systems. Technically, it was found that Subterrene features are compatible with those of current rotary drilling practices. In fact, some special features could lead to improved well production techniques. These include the buildup of a glass lining along the borehole wall which provides structural resistance to collapse; close control of hole geometry; the existence of a barrier between the drilling fluids and the formations being penetrated; nonrotation; potentially better bit life; and faster rates of penetration in deep, hard rock. A typical optimum-cost well would be rotary-drilled in the upper regions and then rock-melted to total depth. Indicated cost savings are significant: a 30 percent or 3.9 million dollar (1975 $) reduction from rotary-drilled well costs are estimated for a 10-km depth well with a bottom hole temperature of 673 K. Even for relatively cool normal geothermal gradient conditions, the savings for the 1..pi..-km well are estimated as 23 percent of 2.1 million dollars.

Altseimer, J.H.

1976-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

202

A Review of the Geothermal Reservoir Well Stimulation Program  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Republic Geothermal, Inc., and its subcontractors have planned and executed four experimental fracture stimulation treatments under the Department of Energy-funded Geothermal Reservoir Well Stimulation Program (GRWSP). The 2-year program, begun in February 1979, is Ultimately to include six full-scale field hydraulic and chemical stimulation experiments in geothermal wells. This paper describes the overall program and the four treatments completed to date. The GRWSP is organized into two phases. Phase I consists of literature and theoretical studies, laboratory investigations, and numerical work. The main purpose of this work is to establish the technological bases for geothermal well stimulation design. Phase I1 will include the planning, execution, and evaluation of six well stimulation treatments which utilize the technology developed in Phase I. Two stimulation experiments were performed at the Raft River, Idaho, known geothermal resource area (KGRA) in late 1979. This is a naturally fractured, hard rock reservoir with a relatively low geothermal resource temperature 149 C {+-} (300 F{+-}). A conventional planar hydraulic fracture job was performed in Well RRGP-5 and a ''Kiel'' dendritic, or reverse flow, technique was utilized in Well RRGP-4. In mid-1980, two stimulation experiments were performed at the East Mesa, California, KGRA. The stimulation of Well 58-30 provided the first geothermal well fracturing experience in a moderate temperature, 177 C {+-} (350 F{+-}), reservoir with matrix-type rock properties. The two treatments consisted of a conventional hydraulic fracture of a deep, low-permeability zone and a mini-frac ''Kiel'' treatment of a shallow, high-permeability zone in the same well. The stimulation experiment results to date were evaluated using short-term production tests, conventional pressure transient analysis, interference pressure data, chemical and radioactive tracers, borehole acoustic televiewer surveys and numerical models. This combination of evaluation techniques yielded an interpretation of fracture geometry and productivity enhancement. However, the evaluation of artificially induced fractures in naturally fractured formations was found to lead to possibly non-unique solutions. In all the field experiments, artificial fractures were created and well productivity was increased. A discussion of the prestimulation and poststimulation data and their evaluation are provided for each experiment in this report.

Campbell, D. A.; Hanold, R. J.; Sinclair, A. R.; Vetter, O. J.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

203

Modeling of fluid and heat flow in fractured geothermal reservoirs  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

In most geothermal reservoirs large-scale permeability is dominated by fractures, while most of the heat and fluid reserves are stored in the rock matrix. Early-time fluid production comes mostly from the readily accessible fracture volume, while reservoir behavior at later time depends upon the ease with which fluid and heat can be transferred from the rock matrix to the fractures. Methods for modeling flow in fractured porous media must be able to deal with this matrix-fracture exchange, the so-called interporosity flow. This paper reviews recent work at Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory on numerical modeling of nonisothermal multiphase flow in fractured porous media. We also give a brief summary of simulation applications to problems in geothermal production and reinjection. 29 refs., 1 fig.

Pruess, K.

1988-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

204

Testing and sampling procedures for geothermal-compressured wells. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Test wells to tap and sample geothermal-geopressured formations at 15,000 to 20,000 feet in the Gulf Coast area can be drilled routinely utilizing available equipment and methods. Electrical logs, surveys and fluid samplers can be used to obtain accurate and reliable information as to depths, temperatures, pressures, and fluid content of the geopressured formations before the well is completed. But it will be necessary to set casing and flow the well, at least temporarily, to secure fluid production volume and pressure data to evaluate the producibility of the geopressured resource. Electric logging and wireline survey methods are fully developed techniques for measuring the parameters needed to assess a geopressured zone before setting casing. Formation subsidence, though it may be slow to develop, can be measured during radioactivity tracer surveys. The following conclusions are drawn: existing well logging and surveying methods and equipment are generally satisfactory for testing and sampling a geothermal-geopressured resource; no significant areas of research are needed to predict, detect, and evaluate geopressured formations for their potential as geothermal resources. Static and dynamic testing procedures using existing technology are satisfactory to test, sample, and analyze a geopressured reservoir.

Boyd, W.E.

205

Buckhorn Mineral Wells Space Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Facility |  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Space Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Space Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Facility Buckhorn Mineral Wells Sector Geothermal energy Type Space Heating Location Mesa, Arizona Coordinates 33.4222685°, -111.8226402° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[]}

206

Ceramic vacuum tubes for geothermal well logging  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Useful design data acquired in the evaluation of ceramic vacuum tubes for the development of a 500/sup 0/C instrumentation amplifier are presented. The general requirements for ceramic vacuum tubes are discussed for application to the development of high temperature well logs. Commercially available tubes are described and future contract activities that specifically relate to ceramic vacuum tubes are detailed. Supplemental data are presented in the appendix.

Kelly, R.D.

1977-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

207

Texas: basic data for thermal springs and wells as recorded in GEOTHERM  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This compilation identities all locations of potential source of geothermal fluids in Texas available as of December 1981. 7 refs. (ACR)

Bliss, J.D.

1983-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

208

Fluid Inclusion Analysis At Salton Sea Geothermal Area (1990) | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

90) 90) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Fluid Inclusion Analysis At Salton Sea Geothermal Area (1990) Exploration Activity Details Location Salton Sea Geothermal Area Exploration Technique Fluid Inclusion Analysis Activity Date 1990 Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Notes A system for analysis of inclusion gas contents based upon quadrupole mass spectrometry has been designed, assembled and tested during the first 7 months of funding. The system is currently being tested and calibrated using inclusions with known gas contents from active geothermal systems. References Mckibben, M. A. (25 April 1990) Volatiles in hydrothermal fluids- A mass spectrometric study of fluid inclusions from active geothermal systems

209

Gulf Coast Programmatic Environmental Assessment Geothermal Well Testing: The Frio Formation of Texas and Louisiana  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

In accordance with the requirements of 10 CFR Part 711, environmental assessments are being prepared for significant activities and individual projects of the Division of Geothermal Energy (DGE) of the Energy Research and Development Administration (ERDA). This environmental assessment of geopressure well testing addresses, on a regional basis, the expected activities, affected environments, and possible impacts in a broad sense. The specific part of the program addressed by this environmental assessment is geothermal well testing by the take-over of one or more unsuccessful oil wells before the drilling rig is removed and completion of drilling into the geopressured zone. Along the Texas and Louisiana Gulf Coast (Plate 1 and Overlay) water at high temperatures and high pressures is trapped within Gulf basin sediments. The water is confined within or below essentially impermeable shale sequences and carries most or all of the overburden pressure. Such zones are referred to as geopressured strata. These fluids and sediments are heated to abnormally high temperatures (up to 260 C) and may provide potential reservoirs for economical production of geothermal energy. The obvious need in resource development is to assess the resource. Ongoing studies to define large-sand-volume reservoirs will ultimately define optimum sites for drilling special large diameter wells to perform large volume flow production tests. In the interim, existing well tests need to be made to help define and assess the resource. The project addressed by this environmental assessment is the performance of a geothermal well test in high potential geothermal areas. Well tests involve four major actions each of which may or may not be required for each of the well tests. The four major actions are: site preparation, drilling a salt-water disposal well, actual flow testing, and abandonment of the well.

None

1977-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

210

Trace element and isotope geochemistry of geothermal fluids, East Rift Zone, Kilauea, Hawaii  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A research program has been undertaken in an effort to better characterize the composition and the precipitation characteristic of the geothermal fluids produced by the HGP-A geothermal well located on the Kilauea East Rift Zone on the Island of Hawaii. The results of these studies have shown that the chemical composition of the fluids changed over the production life of the well and that the fluids produced were the result of mixing of at least two, and possibly three, source fluids. These source fluids were recognized as: a sea water composition modified by high temperature water-rock reactions; meteoric recharge; and a hydrothermal fluid that had been equilibrated with high temperature reservoir rocks and magmatic volatiles. Although the major alkali and halide elements show clearly increasing trends with time, only a few of the trace transition metals show a similar trend. The rare earth elements, were typically found at low concentrations and appeared to be highly variable with time. Studies of the precipitation characteristics of silica showed that amorphous silica deposition rates were highly sensitive to fluid pH and that increases in fluid pH above about 8.5 could flocculate more than 80% of the suspended colloidal silica in excess of its solubility. Addition of transition metal salts were also found to enhance the recovery fractions of silica from solution. The amorphous silica precipitate was also found to strongly scavenge the alkaline earth and transition metal ions naturally present in the brines; mild acid treatments were shown to be capable of removing substantial fractions of the scavenged metals from the silica flocs yielding a moderately pure gelatinous by-product. Further work on the silica precipitation process is recommended to improve our ability to control silica scaling from high temperature geothermal fluids or to recover a marketable silica by-product from these fluids prior to reinjection.

West, H.B.; Delanoy, G.A.; Thomas, D.M. (Hawaii Univ., Honolulu, HI (United States). Hawaii Inst. of Geophysics); Gerlach, D.C. (Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States)); Chen, B.; Takahashi, P.; Thomas, D.M. (Hawaii Univ., Honolulu, HI (United States) Evans (Charles) and Associates, Redwood City, CA (United States))

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

211

Review of the geothermal reservoir well stimulation program  

SciTech Connect

The overall program and the four experimental fracture stimulation treatments completed to date are described. The GRWSP is organized into two phases. Phase I consists of studies (literature and theoretical), laboratory investigations, and numerical work. Phase II will include the planning, execution and evaluation of six well stimulation treatments which utilize the technology developed in Phase I. Two stimulation experiments were performed at the Raft River, Idaho, Known Geothermal Resource Area (KGRA) in late-1979. This is a naturally fractured, hard rock reservoir with a relatively low geothermal resource temperature (300/sup 0/F). A conventional planar hydraulic fracture job was performed in Well RRGP-5 and a Kiel dendritic (or reverse flow) technique was utilized in Well RRGP-4. In mid-1980, two stimulation experiments were performed at the East Mesa, California, KGRA. The stimulation of Well 58-30 provided the first geothermal well fracturing experience in a moderate temperature (350/sup 0/F/sup +/) reservoir with matrix type rock properties. The two treatments consisted of a conventional hydraulic fracture of a deep, low permeability zone and a minifrac Kiel treatment of a shallow, high permeability zone in the same well. The stimulation experiment results to date were evaluated using short-term production tests, conventional pressure transient analysis, interference pressure data, chemical and radioactive tracers, borehole acoustic televiewer surveys, and numerical models.

Campbell, D.A.; Hanold, R.J.; Sinclair, A.R.; Vetter, O.J.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

212

Technical support for geopressured-geothermal well activities in Louisiana  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Continuous recording microearthquake monitoring networks have been established around US Department of Energy (DOE) geopressured-geothermal design wells in southwestern Louisiana and southeastern Texas since summer 1980 to assess the effects well development may have had on subsidence and growth-fault activation. This monitoring has shown several unusual characteristics of Gulf Coast seismic activity. The observed activity is classified into two dominant types, one with identifiable body phases (type 1) and the other with only surface-wave signatures (type 2). During this reporting period no type 1 or body-wave events were reported. A total of 230 type 2 or surface-wave events were recorded. Origins of the type 2 events are still not positively understood; however, little or no evidence is available to connect them with geopressured-geothermal well activity. We continue to suspect sonic booms from military aircraft or some other human-induced source. 37 refs., 16 figs., 6 tabs.

Not Available

1991-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

213

Environmental Assessment: Geothermal Energy Geopressure Subprogram. Gulf Coast Well Testing Activity, Frio Formation, Texas and Louisiana  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This Environmental Assessment (EA) has been prepared to provide the environmental input into the Division of Geothermal Energy's decisions to expand the geothermal well testing activities to include sites in the Frio Formation of Texas and Louisiana. It is proposed that drilling rigs be leased before they are removed from sites in the formation where drilling for gas or oil exploration has been unsuccessful and that the rigs be used to complete the drilling into the geopressured zone for resource exploration. This EA addresses, on a regional basis, the expected activities, affected environment, and the possible impacts in a broad sense as they apply to the Gulf Coast well testing activity of the Geothermal Energy Geopressure Subprogram of the Department of Energy. Along the Texas and Louisiana Gulf Coast (Plate 1 and Overlay, Atlas) water at high temperatures and high pressures is trapped within Gulf basin sediments. The water is confined within or below essentially impermeable shale sequences and carries most or all of the overburden pressure. Such zones are referred to as geopressured strata. These fluids and sediments are heated to abnormally high temperatures (up to 260 C) and may provide potential reservoirs for economical production of geothermal energy. The obvious need in resource development is to assess the resource. Ongoing studies to define large-sand-volume reservoirs will ultimately define optimum sites for drilling special large diameter wells to perform large volume flow production tests. in the interim, existing well tests need to be made to help define and assess the resource.

None

1978-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

214

Isotopic Analysis- Fluid At Fenton Hill Hdr Geothermal Area (Goff, Et Al.,  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Isotopic Analysis- Fluid At Fenton Hill Hdr Geothermal Area (Goff, Et Al., Isotopic Analysis- Fluid At Fenton Hill Hdr Geothermal Area (Goff, Et Al., 1981) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Isotopic Analysis- Fluid At Fenton Hill Hdr Geothermal Area (Goff, Et Al., 1981) Exploration Activity Details Location Fenton Hill Hdr Geothermal Area Exploration Technique Isotopic Analysis- Fluid Activity Date Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown References Fraser E. Goff, Charles O. Grigsby, Pat E. Trujillo Jr, Dale Counce, Andrea Kron (1981) Geology, Water Geochemistry And Geothermal Potential Of The Jemez Springs Area, Canon De San Diego, New Mexico Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Isotopic_Analysis-_Fluid_At_Fenton_Hill_Hdr_Geothermal_Area_(Goff,_Et_Al.,_1981)&oldid=692519

215

Estimating Well Costs for Enhanced Geothermal System Applications  

SciTech Connect

The objective of the work reported was to investigate the costs of drilling and completing wells and to relate those costs to the economic viability of enhanced geothermal systems (EGS). This is part of a larger parametric study of major cost components in an EGS. The possibility of improving the economics of EGS can be determined by analyzing the major cost components of the system, which include well drilling and completion. Determining what costs in developing an EGS are most sensitive will determine the areas of research to reduce those costs. The results of the well cost analysis will help determine the cost of a well for EGS development.

K. K. Bloomfield; P. T. Laney

2005-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

216

Auburn low-temperature geothermal well. Volume 6. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Auburn well was drilled to explore for low temperature geothermal resources in central New York State. The Auburn site was selected based on: its proximity to the Cayuga County anomaly (30/sup 0/C/km), its favorable local geological conditions and the potential to provide hot water and space heating to two educational facilities. The well was drilled to a total depth of 5250 feet and into the Pre-Cambrian Basement. The well was extensively logged, flow and stress tested, hydraulically stimulated, and pump (pressure transient analysis) tested. The low-temperature geothermal potential was assessed in terms of: geological environment; hydrological conditions; reservoir characteristics; and recoverable hydrothermal reserves. The average geothermal gradient was measured to be as high as 26.7/sup 0/C/km with a bottom-hole temperature of 126/sup 0/ +- 1/sup 0/F. The proved volumetric resources were estimated to be 3.0 x 10/sup 6/ stock tank barrels (STB) with a maximum initial deliverability of approx.11,600 STB/D and a continuous deliverability of approx.3400 STB/D. The proved hydrothermal reserves were estimated to be 21.58 x 10/sup 10/ Btu based on a volumetric component (4.13 x 10/sup 10/ Btu), and a reinjection component (17.45 x 10/sup 10/ Btu). The conclusion was made that the Auburn low-temperature reservoir could be utilized to provide hot water and space heating to the Auburn School District.

Lynch, R.S.; Castor, T.P.

1983-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

217

Results of investigations at the Zunil geothermal field, Guatemala: Well logging and brine geochemistry  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The well logging team from Los Alamos and its counterpart from Central America were tasked to investigate the condition of four producing geothermal wells in the Zunil Geothermal Field. The information obtained would be used to help evaluate the Zunil geothermal reservoir in terms of possible additional drilling and future power plant design. The field activities focused on downhole measurements in four production wells (ZCQ-3, ZCQ-4, ZCQ-5, and ZCQ-6). The teams took measurements of the wells in both static (shut-in) and flowing conditions, using the high-temperature well logging tools developed at Los Alamos National Laboratory. Two well logging missions were conducted in the Zunil field. In October 1988 measurements were made in well ZCQ-3, ZCQ-5, and ZCQ-6. In December 1989 the second field operation logged ZCQ-4 and repeated logs in ZCQ-3. Both field operations included not only well logging but the collecting of numerous fluid samples from both thermal and nonthermal waters. 18 refs., 22 figs., 7 tabs.

Adams, A.; Dennis, B.; Van Eeckhout, E.; Goff, F.; Lawton, R.; Trujillo, P.E.; Counce, D.; Archuleta, J. (Los Alamos National Lab., NM (USA)); Medina, V. (Instituto Nacional de Electrificacion, Guatemala City (Guatemala). Unidad de Desarollo Geotermico)

1991-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

218

Arsenic speciation and transport associated with the release of spent geothermal fluids in Mutnovsky field (Kamchatka, Russia)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The use of geothermal fluids for the production of electricity poses a risk of contaminating surface waters when spent fluids are discharged into (near) surface environments. Arsenic (As) in particular is a common component in geothermal fluids and leads to a degradation of water quality when present in mobile and bioavailable forms. We have examined changes in arsenic speciation caused by quick transition from high temperature reducing conditions to surface conditions, retention mechanisms, and the extent of transport associated with the release of spent geothermal fluids at the Dachny geothermal fields (Mutnovsky geothermal region), Kamchatka, Russia -- a high temperature field used for electricity production. In the spent fluids, the arsenic concentration reaches 9 ppm, while in natural hot springs expressed in the vicinity of the field, the As concentration is typically below 10 ppb. The aqueous phase arsenic speciation was determined using Liquid Chromatography (LC) coupled to an Inductively Coupled Plasma Mass Spectrometer (ICP-MS). The arsenic speciation in the bottom sediments (geothermal source fluids is predominantly found as As(III), while a mixture of As(III)/As(V) is found in the water and sediment of the Falshivaia River downstream from the power plant. The extent of elevated arsenic concentrations in water is limited by adsorption to the bottom sediment and dilution, as determined using Cl{sup -} from the deep well fluids as a tracer. Analysis of the Extended X-ray Absorption Fine Structure (EXAFS) spectra shows that sediment phase arsenic is associated with both Al- and Fe-rich phases with a bi-dentate corner sharing local geometry. The geothermal waste fluids released in the surface water create a localized area of arsenic contamination. The extent of transport of dissolved As is limited to {approx}7 km downstream from the source, while As associated with bottom sediment travels {approx}3 km farther.

Ilgen, Anastasia G.; Rychagov, Sergey N.; Trainor, Thomas P. (Alaska Fairbanks); (Russ. Acad. Sci.)

2011-09-20T23:59:59.000Z

219

THE DEFINITION OF ENGINEERING DEVELOPMENT AND RESEARCH PROBLEMS RELATING TO THE USE OF GEOTHERMAL FLUIDS FOR ELECTRIC POWER GENERATION AND NONELECTRIC HEATING  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Geothermal resources for electric power generation. i. PlantOF GEOTHERMAL SYSTEMS Electric Power Generation SystemsUSE OF GEOTHERMAL FLUIDS FOR ELECTRIC POWER GENERATION AND

Apps, J.A.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

220

Enhanced geothermal systems (EGS) with CO2 as heat transmission fluid--A scheme for combining recovery of renewable energy with geologic storage of CO2  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Interactions in Enhanced Geothermal Systems (EGS) with CO 2Fluid, Proceedings, World Geothermal Congress 2010, Bali,Remain? Transactions, Geothermal Resources Council, Vol. 17,

Pruess, K.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "wells geothermal fluid" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Completion report: Raft River Geothermal Injection Well Six (RRGI-6)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Raft River Geothermal Injection Well Six (RRGI-6) is an intermediate-depth injection well designed to accept injection water in the 600 to 1000 m (2000 to 3500 ft) depth range. It has one barefoot leg, and it was drilled so that additional legs can be added later; if there are problems with intermediate-depth injection, one or more additional legs could be directionally drilled from the current well bore. Included are the reports of daily drilling records of drill bits, casings, and loggings, and descriptions of cementing, coring, and containment.

Miller, L.G.; Prestwich, S.M.

1979-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

222

Chemical stimulation treatment, The Geysers: Ottoboni State 22. Geothermal-reservoir well-stimulation program  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Experiment No. 6 of the Geothermal Reservoir Well Stimulation Program (GRWSP) was performed at The Geysers Field in Sonoma County, California. This well had low productivity (46,000 lb/hr), probably because it did not intersect the primary natural fracture system of the reservoir. Surrounding production wells are considered to be good wells with an average flow rate of about 100,000 lb/hr. The stimulation technique selected was an acid etching treatment (Halliburton Services' MY-T-ACID). A small water prepad was used to provide tubular cooling and fluid loss control. Following the water prepad were 500 to 750 bbl of high viscosity crosslinked gel fluid and 400 to 500 bbl of a hydrofluoric-hydrochloric (HF-HCl) acid solution. The frac fluids were expected to enter only a single or limited fracture zone within the open interval. Frac rates of 20 to 40 BPM and surface pressures of 3000 psig were estimated for this treatment. During the job, however, no significant surface pressure was recorded, and all fluids flowed easily into the interval. Subsequent evaluation of the well performance showed that no noticeable stimulation had been achieved even though the frac fluids were properly injected. Temperature and gamma ray surveys along with tracer studies indicated that the frac fluids entered natural fracture channels over a 650-foot zone of the open interval, which probably prevented the staged acid etching treatment from functioning as designed.

Not Available

1981-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

223

U.S. Geothermal Announces Successful Completion of First Well at Neal Hot  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

U.S. Geothermal Announces Successful Completion of First Well at Neal Hot U.S. Geothermal Announces Successful Completion of First Well at Neal Hot Springs Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Report: U.S. Geothermal Announces Successful Completion of First Well at Neal Hot Springs Abstract N/A Author U.S. Geothermal Inc. Published Publisher Not Provided, 2008 Report Number N/A DOI Not Provided Check for DOI availability: http://crossref.org Online Internet link for U.S. Geothermal Announces Successful Completion of First Well at Neal Hot Springs Citation U.S. Geothermal Inc.. 2008. U.S. Geothermal Announces Successful Completion of First Well at Neal Hot Springs. Boise Idaho: (!) . Report No.: N/A. Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=U.S._Geothermal_Announces_Successful_Completion_of_First_Well_at_Neal_Hot_Springs&oldid=682770"

224

Results of Electric Survey in the Area of Hawaii Geothermal Test Well HGP-A  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Electric Survey in the Area of Hawaii Geothermal Test Well HGP-A Electric Survey in the Area of Hawaii Geothermal Test Well HGP-A Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Journal Article: Results of Electric Survey in the Area of Hawaii Geothermal Test Well HGP-A Abstract N/A Authors James Kauahikaua and Douglas Klein Published Journal Geothermal Resources Council, TRANSACTIONS, 1978 DOI Not Provided Check for DOI availability: http://crossref.org Online Internet link for Results of Electric Survey in the Area of Hawaii Geothermal Test Well HGP-A Citation James Kauahikaua,Douglas Klein. 1978. Results of Electric Survey in the Area of Hawaii Geothermal Test Well HGP-A. Geothermal Resources Council, TRANSACTIONS. 2:363-366. Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Results_of_Electric_Survey_in_the_Area_of_Hawaii_Geothermal_Test_Well_HGP-A&oldid=682499

225

Isotopic Analysis-Fluid At Steamboat Springs Geothermal Area (1982) | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Isotopic Analysis-Fluid At Steamboat Springs Geothermal Area (1982) Isotopic Analysis-Fluid At Steamboat Springs Geothermal Area (1982) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Isotopic Analysis-Fluid At Steamboat Springs Geothermal Area (1982) Exploration Activity Details Location Steamboat Springs Geothermal Area Exploration Technique Isotopic Analysis-Fluid Activity Date 1982 Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Notes Helium isotope ratios have been measured in geothermal fluids. These ratios have been interpreted in terms of the processes which supply He in distinct isotopic ratios (i.e. magmatic He, ~10 Ra; atmospheric He, Ra; and crustal He, ~0.1 Ra) and in terms of the processes which can alter the isotopic ratio (hydrologic mixing, U-Th series alpha production and weathering

226

Stress and Fluid-Flow Interaction for the Coso Geothermal Field Derived  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Stress and Fluid-Flow Interaction for the Coso Geothermal Field Derived Stress and Fluid-Flow Interaction for the Coso Geothermal Field Derived from 3D Numerical Models Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Conference Proceedings: Stress and Fluid-Flow Interaction for the Coso Geothermal Field Derived from 3D Numerical Models Details Activities (1) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: The efficiency of geothermal energy production at the Coso Geothermal Field in eastern California is reliant on the knowledge of fluid flow directions associated with fracture networks. We use finite element analysis to establish the 3D state of stress within the tectonic setting of the Coso Range. The mean and differential stress distributions are used to infer fluid flow vectors and second order fracture likelihood and orientation. The results show that the Coso Range and adjacent areas are

227

SUBSIDENCE DUE TO GEOTHERMAL FLUID WITHDRAWAL  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

reinjection of the steam condensate back into the formationphenomena: steam withdrawal, injection of condensate andcondensate flows down by gravity to depths below adjacent producing wells, in situ steam

Narasimhan, T.N.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

228

Testing geopressured geothermal reservoirs in existing wells: Detailed completions prognosis for geopressured-geothermal well of opportunity, prospect #1  

SciTech Connect

This prospective well of opportunity was originally drilled and completed as a gas producer by Wrightsman Investment Company in early 1973. The original and present producing interval was from 15,216 to 15,238 feet. IMC Exploration Company, Inc. acquired the property from Wrightsman and is the present owner operator. The well is presently shut in s a non-economic producer and IMC proposed to perform plug and abandonment operations in April, 1980. This well has a good geopressured-geothermal water sand behind the 5-1/2 inch casing that has 94 feet of net sand thickness. Pursuant to DOE/NVO authorization of March 11,1980, Eaton negotiated an option agreement with IMC whereby IMC would delay their abandonment operations for a period of 90 days to permit DOE to evaluate the well for geopressure-geothermal testing. The IMC-Eaton option agreements provide that IMG will delay plugging the well until June 15, 1980. If Eaton exercises its option to acquire the well, IMC will sell the well bore, and an adjacent salt water disposal well, to Eaton for the sole consideration of Eaton assuming the obligation to plug and abandon the wells in accordance with lease and regulatory requirements. If Eaton does not exercise its option, then Eaton will pay IMC $95,000 cash and IMC will proceed with plugging and abandonment at the termination of the option period.

Kennedy, Clovis A.

1980-04-03T23:59:59.000Z

229

Comprehensive study of LASL Well C/T-2 Roosevelt Hot Springs KGRA, Utah, and applications to geothermal well logging  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Utah State Geothermal Well 9-1 in the Roosevelt Hot Springs KGRA, Beaver County, Utah, has been donated by Phillips Petroleum Company for calibration and testing of well-logging equipment in the hot, corrosive, geothermal environment. It is the second Calibration/Test Well (C/T-2) in the Geothermal Log Interpretation Program. A study of cuttings and well logs from Well C/T-2 was completed. This synthesis and data presentation contains most of the subsurface geologic information needed to effect the total evaluation of geophysical logs acquired in this geothermal calibration/test well, C/T-2.

Glenn, W.E.; Hulen, J.B.; Nielson, D.L.

1981-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

230

Modeling and optimization of geothermal power plants using the binary fluid cycle  

SciTech Connect

A computer simulation of a binary fluid cycle power plant for use with geothermal energy sources, and the subsequent optimization of this power plant type over a range of geothermal source conditions are described. The optimization technique employed for this analysis was based upon the principle of maximum use of geothermal energy.

Walter, R.A.

1976-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

231

U.S. Geothermal Drills Another Prolific Well at Neal Hot Springs Completes  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Geothermal Drills Another Prolific Well at Neal Hot Springs Completes Geothermal Drills Another Prolific Well at Neal Hot Springs Completes Production Wells Needed for Project Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Report: U.S. Geothermal Drills Another Prolific Well at Neal Hot Springs Completes Production Wells Needed for Project Abstract N/A Author U.S. Geothermal Inc. Published Publisher Not Provided, 2010 Report Number N/A DOI Not Provided Check for DOI availability: http://crossref.org Online Internet link for U.S. Geothermal Drills Another Prolific Well at Neal Hot Springs Completes Production Wells Needed for Project Citation U.S. Geothermal Inc.. 2010. U.S. Geothermal Drills Another Prolific Well at Neal Hot Springs Completes Production Wells Needed for Project. Boise Idaho: (!) . Report No.: N/A.

232

Fluid Inclusion Analysis At Raft River Geothermal Area (2011) | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Fluid Inclusion Analysis At Raft River Geothermal Area (2011) Fluid Inclusion Analysis At Raft River Geothermal Area (2011) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Fluid Inclusion Analysis At Raft River Geothermal Area (2011) Exploration Activity Details Location Raft River Geothermal Area Exploration Technique Fluid Inclusion Analysis Activity Date 2011 Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Notes Hydrogen isotope values of muscovite (δDMs ∼-100‰) and fluid inclusions in quartz (δDFluid ∼-85‰) indicate the presence of meteoric fluids during detachment dynamics. Recrystallized grain-shape fabrics and quartz c-axis fabric patterns reveal a large component of coaxial strain (pure shear), consistent with thinning of the detachment section. Therefore, the high thermal gradient preserved in the Raft River

233

Session 12: Land Subsidence and Microseismicity Associated with Geopressured-Geothermal Fluid Production  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Subsidence and fault-related surface displacements are the chief environmental concerns related to the long-term production of large volumes of fluids from geopressured-geothermal reservoirs. Environmental monitoring efforts at the three designed test well sites in Louisiana (Parcperdue, Sweet Lake, and Gladys McCall) have focused on leveling surveys, recording of microseismic events, and tiltmeter installation to provide baseline and fluid-production-related data useful in measuring land-surface and faulting effects of testing. Analysis of pretesting land-surface elevation surveys has revealed a complex pattern of subsidence related to sediment compaction, basin subsidence, and possibly to ground-water production and soil wetting and drying. The relative importance of each of these is not clear and the impact of geopressured-geothermal fluid production has not been determined. A three-year period of microseismic monitoring has produced reports by contractors of some 1000 suspected microseismic events; many of these require further verification. 64 events were recorded at Parcperdue, 141 at Gladys McCall, and 893 at Sweet Lake. Considering only events recorded by 5 stations or more reduces the total to 316, of which only six have the classic microseismic event characteristics. Analysis of all recorded events and their relation to fluid production and/or disposal is continuing. Tiltmeter data from Sweet Lake indicate that ground deformation correlates with fluid production and seismicity. This relationship is being studied and will be compared with data from Gladys McCall gathered during fluid production. The complexity of background subsidence and fault-related processes in the Gulf Coast area makes identification of processes directly related to geopressured-geothermal fluid production very difficult. Data from Sweet Lake suggest a correlation; hopefully, results from Gladys McCall will clarify interpretations made thus far.

Groat, C.G.

1983-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

234

Fluid Imaging of Enhanced Geothermal Systems through Joint 3D...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

strategies such as the number and location of step out wells, in-fill wells and the ratio of injection to production wells. The key difficulty in manipulating fluids has been...

235

Isotopic Analysis-Fluid At Raft River Geothermal Area (1982) | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Analysis-Fluid At Raft River Geothermal Area Analysis-Fluid At Raft River Geothermal Area (1982) Exploration Activity Details Location Raft River Geothermal Area Exploration Technique Isotopic Analysis- Fluid Activity Date 1982 Usefulness not useful DOE-funding Unknown Exploration Basis Determine which reservoir model best matches the isotope data. Notes 1) Chemical and light-stable isotope data are presented for water samples from the Raft River geothermal area and nearby. On the basis of chemical character, as defined by a trilinear plot of per cent milliequivalents, and light-stable isotope data, the waters in the geothermal area can be divided into waters that have and have not mixed with cold water. 2) Helium isotope ratios have been measured in geothermal fluids. These ratios have been interpreted in terms of the processes which supply He in distinct isotopic

236

Sampling and Interpretation of Drill Cuttings from Geothermal Wells  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Drill cuttings from geothermal and mineral exploration boreholes, by contrast with those from most petroleum wells, commonly are derived highly fractured and faulted, hydrothermally altered igneous and metamorphic rock sequences, and are likely to be severely contaminated. Characterization of a subsurface resource from cuttings thus requires not only especially careful sample collection, preparation, storage and examination, but also a thorough knowledge of drilling technology, local geology and the full range of potential borehole contaminants. Accurate identification of lithology from cuttings is critical for recognition and correlation of rock types likely to selectively host the desired commodity. However, many of the rocks encountered in geothermal and mineral exploration boreholes (such as gneisses and granitic rocks) can resemble one another closely as cuttings even though dissimilar in outcrop or core. In such cases, the actual rock type(s) in a cuttings sample generally can be determined by comparison with simulated cuttings of representative surface rocks, and with various geophysical and other well logs. Many other clues in cuttings, such as diagnostic metamorphic mineralogy, or sedimentary rounding and sorting, may help identify subsurface lithologies. Faults and fractures commonly are the dominant physical controls on geothermal and mineral resources. Faults occasionally can be recognized directly in cuttings by the presence of slickensiding, gouge, or other crushed material. More commonly, however, the ''gouge'' observed in cuttings actually is pseudo-gouge created beneath a bit during drilling. Since most faults and all fractures produce no direct evidence apparent in cuttings, they are best recognized indirectly, either by commonly associated hydrothermal alteration, or by responses on appropriate geophysical well logs. Hydrothermal alteration, useful for locating and defining a geothermal or mineral resource, is far more difficult to recognize and interpret in cuttings than in core or outcrop. Alteration textures and paragenetic relationships can be obscured or obliterated as cuttings are produced. Less resistant alteration (and rock-forming) minerals can be disaggregated during drilling and lost from cuttings during sampling or washing. Relict and contemporary alteration can be indistinguishable, and a wide variety of borehole contaminants can closely resemble natural alteration products encountered during drilling. These contaminants also can produce confusing geochemical signatures.

Hulen, Jeffrey B.; Sibbett, Bruce S.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

237

Variations in dissolved gas compositions of reservoir fluids from the Coso geothermal field  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Gas concentrations and ratios in 110 analyses of geothermal fluids from 47 wells in the Coso geothermal system illustrate the complexity of this two-phase reservoir in its natural state. Two geographically distinct regions of single-phase (liquid) reservoir are present and possess distinctive gas and liquid compositions. Relationships in soluble and insoluble gases preclude derivation of these waters from a common parent by boiling or condensation alone. These two regions may represent two limbs of fluid migration away from an area of two-phase upwelling. During migration, the upwelling fluids mix with chemically evolved waters of moderately dissimilar composition. CO{sub 2} rich fluids found in the limb in the southeastern portion of the Coso field are chemically distinct from liquids in the northern limb of the field. Steam-rich portions of the reservoir also indicate distinctive gas compositions. Steam sampled from wells in the central and southwestern Coso reservoir is unusually enriched in both H{sub 2}S and H{sub 2}. Such a large enrichment in both a soluble and insoluble gas cannot be produced by boiling of any liquid yet observed in single-phase portions of the field. In accord with an upflow-lateral mixing model for the Coso field, at least three end-member thermal fluids having distinct gas and liquid compositions appear to have interacted (through mixing, boiling and steam migration) to produce the observed natural state of the reservoir.

Williams, Alan E.; Copp, John F.

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

238

High-Temperature Circuit Boards for use in Geothermal Well Monitoring  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Temperature Circuit Boards for use in Geothermal Well Monitoring Temperature Circuit Boards for use in Geothermal Well Monitoring Applications Geothermal Project Jump to: navigation, search Last modified on July 22, 2011. Project Title High-Temperature Circuit Boards for use in Geothermal Well Monitoring Applications Project Type / Topic 1 Recovery Act: Enhanced Geothermal Systems Component Research and Development/Analysis Project Type / Topic 2 High-Temperature Downhole Tools Project Description Geothermal energy offers an abundant, renewable source of power that could be used to ensure the long-term energy independence of our nation. Currently, geothermal power in the United States is produced from relatively shallow wells that also contain naturally occurring water sources. These current geothermal power plants with near-ideal conditions for geothermal power production exist primarily in the western U.S. In order to expand the use of geothermal energy, new technologies are needed that will enable the utilization of the hot, dry rock located at depths up to 10 km. The introduction of water into these deep wells to create geothermal reservoirs is referred to as Enhanced Geothermal System (EGS).

239

Review and problem definition of water/rock reactions associated with injection of spent geothermal fluids from a geothermal plant into aquifers  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Among the technical problems faced by the burgeoning geothermal industry is the disposal of spent fluids from power plants. Except in unusual circumstances the normal practice, especially in the USA, is to pump these spent fluids into injection wells to prevent contamination of surface waters, and possibly in some cases, to reduce pressure drawdown in the producing aquifers. This report is a survey of experience in geothermal injection, emphasizing geochemical problems, and a discussion of approaches to their possible mitigation. The extraction of enthalpy from geothermal fluid in power plants may cause solutions to be strongly supersaturated in various dissolved components such as silica, carbonates, sulfates, and sulfides. Injection of such supersaturated solutions into disposal wells has the potential to cause scaling in the well bores and plugging of the aquifers, leading to loss of injectivity. Various aspects of the geochemistry of geothermal brines and their potential for mineral formation are discussed, drawing upon a literature survey. Experience of brine treatment and handling, and the economics of mineral extraction are also addressed in this report. Finally suggestions are made on future needs for possible experimental, field and theoretical studies to avoid or control mineral scaling.

Elders, W.A.

1986-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

240

Effects of non-condensible gases on fluid recovery in fractured geothermal reservoirs  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Numerical simulations are performed in order to investigate the effects of noncondensible gases (CO/sub 2/) on fluid recovery and matrix depletion in fractured geothermal reservoirs. The model used is that of a well producing at a constant bottomhole pressure from a two-phase fractured reservoir. The results obtained have received a complex fracture-matrix interaction due to the thermodynamics of H/sub 2/O-CO/sub 2/ mixtures. Although the matrix initially contributes fluids (liquid and gas) to the fractures, later on, the flow directions reverse and the fractures backflow fluids into the matrix. The amount of backflow depends primarily upon the flowing gas saturation in the fractures; the lower the flowing gas saturation in the fractures the more backflow. It is shown that the recoverable fluid reserves depend strongly on the amount of CO/sub 2/ present in the reservoir system.

Bodvarsson, G.S.; Gaulke, S.

1986-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "wells geothermal fluid" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Characterization of injection wells in a fractured reservoir using PTS logs, Steamboat Hills Geothermal Field, Nevada, USA  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Steamboat Hills Geothermal Field in northwestern Nevada, about 15 km south of Reno, is a shallow (150m to 825m) moderate temperature (155 C to 168 C) liquid-dominated geothermal reservoir situated in highly-fractured granodiorite. Three injection wells were drilled and completed in granodiorite to dispose of spent geothermal fluids from the Steamboat II and III power plants (a 30 MW air-cooled binary-type facility). Injection wells were targeted to depths below 300m to inject spent fluids below producing fractures. First, quasi-static downhole pressure-temperature-spinner (PTS) logs were obtained. Then, the three wells were injection-tested using fluids between 80 C and 106 C at rates from 70 kg/s to 200 kg/s. PTS logs were run both up and down the wells during these injection tests. These PTS surveys have delineated the subsurface fracture zones which will accept fluid. The relative injectivity of the wells was also established. Shut-in interzonal flow within the wells was identified and characterized.

Goranson, Colin; Combs, Jim

1995-01-26T23:59:59.000Z

242

Black Warrior: Sub-soil Gas and Fluid Inclusion Exploration and Slim Well  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Warrior: Sub-soil Gas and Fluid Inclusion Exploration and Slim Well Warrior: Sub-soil Gas and Fluid Inclusion Exploration and Slim Well Drilling Geothermal Project Jump to: navigation, search Last modified on July 22, 2011. Project Title Black Warrior: Sub-soil Gas and Fluid Inclusion Exploration and Slim Well Drilling Project Type / Topic 1 Recovery Act: Geothermal Technologies Program Project Type / Topic 2 Validation of Innovative Exploration Technologies Project Description The project area encompasses 6,273 acres of both private and federal lands including water and surface rights. It is reasonable to expect a capacity of about 20 MW. GeothermEx estimated a potential capacity of 40 MW. Black Warrior is a large blind geothermal prospect near the Pyramid Lake Indian Reservation that was identified by reconnaissance temperature gradient drilling in the 1980s by Philips Petroleum but was never tested through deep exploration drilling. Although the 10 square miles of high heat flow in the area reveals significant energy potential it also makes selection of an optimal exploration drilling target difficult.

243

ORGANIC SPECIES IN GEOTHERMAL WATERS IN LIGHT OF FLUID INCLUSION GAS  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

ORGANIC SPECIES IN GEOTHERMAL WATERS IN LIGHT OF FLUID INCLUSION GAS ORGANIC SPECIES IN GEOTHERMAL WATERS IN LIGHT OF FLUID INCLUSION GAS ANALYSES Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Conference Proceedings: ORGANIC SPECIES IN GEOTHERMAL WATERS IN LIGHT OF FLUID INCLUSION GAS ANALYSES Details Activities (1) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: Measurement of organic compounds in Karaha- Telaga Bodas and Coso fluid inclusions shows there are strong relationships between H2 concentrations and alkane/alkene ratios and benzene concentrations. Inclusion analyses that indicate H2 concentrations > 0.001 mol % typically have ethane > ethylene, propane > propylene, and butane > butylene. There are three end member fluid compositions: type 1 fluids in which alkane compounds predominate, type 2 fluids that have ethane and propylene and no

244

Estimation of static formation temperatures in geothermal wells by using an artificial neural network approach  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An artificial neural network (ANN) approach was used to develop a new predictive model for the calculation of static formation temperature (SFT) in geothermal wells. A three-layer ANN architecture was successfully trained using a geothermal borehole ... Keywords: Artificial intelligence, Borehole drilling, Bottom-hole temperature, Geothermal energy, Horner method, Levenberg-Marquardt algorithm, Shut-in time

A. Bassam; E. Santoyo; J. Andaverde; J. A. Hernndez; O. M. Espinoza-Ojeda

2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

245

A Compilation of Data on Fluids from Geothermal Resources in the United States  

SciTech Connect

This report is part of the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory work to compile data of characteristics of the main U.S. geothermal source areas. The purpose of this compilation is to provide information on the chemistry of geothermal fluids to scientists and engineers involved with the development of liquid dominated geothermal energy resources. The compilation is a comprehensive tabulation of available geothermal fluid data from the most important geothermal resources in the United States. [Abstracter's note: This was part of a large but short-lived effort at LBNL to collect lots of geothermal data. There may be other reports that are worth searching for to add to the Geothermal Legacy collection at OSTI. DJE-2005

Cosner, S.R.; Apps, J.A.

1978-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

246

Drilling, Completing, and Maintaining Geothermal Wells in Baca, New Mexico  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A 55-MWe power plant is planned for development in the Baca location in the Jemez Mountains of New Mexico. Union Geothermal has contracted to provide the steam for the power plant. This paper uses Baca Well No. 13 as a case history to describe the drilling methods, casing program, cementing program, and completion methods used by Union. The discussion includes aerated-water drilling and the methods of solving corrosion problems in aerated water. lost circulation control in mud drilling and its effect on the subsequent casing cementing program are discussed. The paper also includes a case history of scale removal methods used in Baca Well No. 11, including drilling the scale out with a turbo-drill and attempts at chemical inhibition.

Pye, S.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

247

Detection, diagnosis, and prognosis in geothermal well technology  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

For successful and safe operation of a geothermal well, the condition of the casing and cement must be accurately determined. Measurements on casing wall thickness, corrosion damage, holes, cracks, splits, etc., are needed to assess casing integrity. Cement bond logs are needed to detect channels or water pockets in cement behind pipe and to determine the state of the cement bond to the pipe and formation. Instrumentation for making such measurements is limited by the temperature capabilities (<175/sup 0/C) of existing logging equipment developed for the oil and gas industry. The instruments that are needed for geothermal casing and cementing inspection are reviewed; the principle deficiencies in their high temperature use are identified; and Sandia's upgrade research program on multi-arm caliper and acoustic cement bond logging tool is described. The key electronic section in a multi-arm caliper will consist of 275/sup 0/C circuits. In an acoustic cement bond logging tool, a simple circuit with possibilities of using commercially available components for high temperature operation is being developed. These new tools will be field tested for operation at a minimum temperature of 275/sup 0/C and pressure of 7000 psi for up to 1000 hours.

Veneruso, A.F.; Chang, H.T.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

248

Modeling discharge requirements for deep geothermal wells at the Cerro Prieto geothermal field, MX  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

During the mid-l980's, Comision Federal de Electricidad (CFE) drilled a number of deep wells (M-200 series) at the Cerro Prieto geothermal field, Baja California, Mexico to investigate the continuation of the geothermal reservoir to the east of the Cerro Prieto-II and III production areas. The wells encountered permeability at depths ranging from 2,800 to 4,400 m but due to the reservoir depth and the relatively cold temperatures encountered in the upper 1,000 to 2,000 m of the wells, it was not possible to discharge some of the wells. The wells at Cerro Prieto are generally discharged by injecting compressed air below the water level using 2-3/8-inch tubing installed with either a crane or workover rig. The objective of this technique is to lift sufficient water out of the well to stimulate flow from the reservoir into the wellbore. However, in the case of the M-200 series wells, the temperatures in the upper 1,000 to 2,000 m are generally below 50 C and the heat loss to the formation is therefore significant. The impact of heat loss on the stimulation process was evaluated using both a numerical model of the reservoir/wellbore system and steady-state wellbore modeling. The results from the study indicate that if a flow rate of at least 300 liters/minute can be sustained, the well can probably be successfully stimulated. This is consistent with the flow rates obtained during the successful stimulations of wells M-202 and M-203. If the flow rate is closer to 60 liters/minute, the heat loss is significant and it is unlikely that the well can be successfully discharged. These results are consistent with the unsuccessful discharge attempts in wells M-201 and M-205.

Menzies, Anthony J.; Granados, Eduardo E.; Puente, Hector Gutierrez; Pierres, Luis Ortega

1995-01-26T23:59:59.000Z

249

Gas Analysis Of Geothermal Fluid Inclusions- A New Technology...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

exploration. The knowledge of gained by this program can be applied to geothermal exploration, which may expand geothermal production. Knowledge of the gas contents in...

250

GeoSys.Chem: Estimate of reservoir fluid characteristics as first step in geochemical modeling of geothermal systems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A computer code GeoSys.Chem for the calculation of deep geothermal reservoir fluid characteristics from the measured physical-chemical parameters of separated water and condensed vapor samples obtained from drilled wells is presented. It was written ... Keywords: GeoChem, GeoSys.Chem, Geochemical modeling, Los Azufres, VB.NET

Mahendra P. Verma

2012-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

251

Geothermal well completions: an overview of existing methods in four types of developments  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Existing practices and capabilities for completing producing and injection wells for geothermal application in each of four categories of geothermal environments are discussed. Included are steam wells in hard, fractured rocks (The Geysers, California), hot water wells in sedimentary formations (Imperial Valley, California), hot, dry impermeable rocks with circulating water systems (Valles Caldera, New Mexico), and geopressured, geothermal water wells with associated hydrocarbon production on the U.S. Gulf Coast.

Snyder, R.E.

1978-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

252

Observation Wells At Fenton Hill Hdr Geothermal Area (Dash, Et Al., 1983) |  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Fenton Hill Hdr Geothermal Area (Dash, Et Al., 1983) Fenton Hill Hdr Geothermal Area (Dash, Et Al., 1983) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Observation Wells At Fenton Hill Hdr Geothermal Area (Dash, Et Al., 1983) Exploration Activity Details Location Fenton Hill Hdr Geothermal Area Exploration Technique Observation Wells Activity Date Usefulness useful DOE-funding Unknown Notes Fenton Hill HDR site. References Z. V. Dash, H. D. Murphy, R. L. Aamodt, R. G. Aguilar, D. W. Brown, D. A. Counce, H. N. Fisher, C. O. Grigsby, H. Keppler, A. W. Laughlin, R. M. Potter, J. W. Tester, P. E. Trujillo Jr, G. Zyvoloski (1983) Hot Dry Rock Geothermal Reservoir Testing- 1978 To 1980 Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Observation_Wells_At_Fenton_Hill_Hdr_Geothermal_Area_(Dash,_Et_Al.,_1983)&oldid=511330"

253

Development Wells At Fenton Hill Hdr Geothermal Area (Dash, Et Al., 1983) |  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Fenton Hill Hdr Geothermal Area (Dash, Et Al., 1983) Fenton Hill Hdr Geothermal Area (Dash, Et Al., 1983) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Development Wells At Fenton Hill Hdr Geothermal Area (Dash, Et Al., 1983) Exploration Activity Details Location Fenton Hill Hdr Geothermal Area Exploration Technique Development Wells Activity Date Usefulness useful DOE-funding Unknown Notes Fenton Hill HDR site. References Z. V. Dash, H. D. Murphy, R. L. Aamodt, R. G. Aguilar, D. W. Brown, D. A. Counce, H. N. Fisher, C. O. Grigsby, H. Keppler, A. W. Laughlin, R. M. Potter, J. W. Tester, P. E. Trujillo Jr, G. Zyvoloski (1983) Hot Dry Rock Geothermal Reservoir Testing- 1978 To 1980 Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Development_Wells_At_Fenton_Hill_Hdr_Geothermal_Area_(Dash,_Et_Al.,_1983)&oldid=511310"

254

Program in geothermal well technology directed toward achieving DOE/DGE power-on-line goals  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This document presents the material used in an oral presentation to the DOE/Division of Geothermal Energy, which was designed to illustrate the importance of well technology development in reducing geothermal well costs, and to achieve geothermal power-on-line goals. Examination of recent studies of the economics of geothermal energy leads to the conclusion that the overall sensitivity of geothermal power-on-line to well cost is in the range of one to two. Current data suggest that a vigorous R and D program in rotary drilling technology can reduce geothermal drilling costs by about 20%, but a reduction of 40 to 50% is needed to achieve DOE/DGE goals. Research in advanced drilling systems is needed to satisfy this more stringent requirement. Some critical technological deficiencies that occur when current rotary drilling techniques are used for geothermal drilling are discussed. A broadly based development program directed at correcting these deficiencies is defined.

Polito, J.; Varnado, S.G.

1978-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

255

Isotopic Analysis-Fluid At Long Valley Caldera Geothermal Area (1977) |  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Fluid At Long Valley Caldera Geothermal Area (1977) Fluid At Long Valley Caldera Geothermal Area (1977) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Isotopic Analysis-Fluid At Long Valley Caldera Geothermal Area (1977) Exploration Activity Details Location Long Valley Caldera Geothermal Area Exploration Technique Isotopic Analysis-Fluid Activity Date 1977 Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Exploration Basis Estimate deep reservoir temperature Notes The oxygen isotope compositions of dissolved sulfate and water from hot springs and shallow drillholes have been tested. Methods are described to calculate the effects of boiling and dilution. The geothermometer, is applied to thermal systems of Yellowstone Park, Wyoming, Long Valley, California, and Raft River, Idaho to estimate deep reservoir temperatures

256

Isotopic Analysis-Fluid At Raft River Geothermal Area (1977) | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Isotopic Analysis-Fluid At Raft River Geothermal Area (1977) Isotopic Analysis-Fluid At Raft River Geothermal Area (1977) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Isotopic Analysis-Fluid At Raft River Geothermal Area (1977) Exploration Activity Details Location Raft River Geothermal Area Exploration Technique Isotopic Analysis- Fluid Activity Date 1977 Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Exploration Basis Estimate deep reservoir temperature Notes The oxygen isotope compositions of dissolved sulfate and water from hot springs and shallow drillholes have been tested. Methods are described to calculate the effects of boiling and dilution. The geothermometer, is applied to thermal systems of Yellowstone Park, Wyoming, Long Valley, California, and Raft River, Idaho to estimate deep reservoir temperatures

257

Imaging Structure With Fluid Fluxes At The Bradys Geothermal Field With  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Imaging Structure With Fluid Fluxes At The Bradys Geothermal Field With Imaging Structure With Fluid Fluxes At The Bradys Geothermal Field With Satellite Interferometric Radar (Insar)- New Insights Into Reservoir Extent And Structural Controls Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Conference Paper: Imaging Structure With Fluid Fluxes At The Bradys Geothermal Field With Satellite Interferometric Radar (Insar)- New Insights Into Reservoir Extent And Structural Controls Details Activities (1) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: We present a new example of Interferometric Synthetic Aperture Radar's (InSAR) remarkable utility for defining an operating geothermal reservoir's lateral extent and hydrologically active fracture systems. InSAR reveals millimeter-level surface change due to volume change in the reservoir and overlying aquifer systems caused by fluid pressure reduction

258

Polymer grouts for plugging lost circulation in geothermal wells.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

We have concluded a laboratory study to evaluate the survival potential of polymeric materials used for lost circulation plugs in geothermal wells. We learned early in the study that these materials were susceptible to hydrolysis. Through a systematic program in which many potential chemical combinations were evaluated, polymers were developed which tolerated hydrolysis for eight weeks at 500 F. The polymers also met material, handling, cost, and emplacement criteria. This screening process identified the most promising materials. A benefit of this work is that the components of the polymers developed can be mixed at the surface and pumped downhole through a single hose. Further strength testing is required to determine precisely the maximum temperature at which extrusion through fractures or voids causes failure of the lost circulation plug.

Galbreath, D. (Green Mountain International, Waynesvile, NC); Mansure, Arthur James; Bauer, Stephen J.

2004-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

259

Research in lost circulation control for geothermal wells  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This paper reviews recent progress at Sandia National Laboratories in the area of lost circulation control for geothermal wells. The Lost Circulation Program has three major elements: (1) Detection and characterization of loss zones, (2) Development of new techniques and materials for control of loss zones, and (3) Integration of the first two items for wellsite application. Most of our work to date has been in the area of developing new techniques and materials. We report here on progress that has been made in the past two years in the development of new, pumpable cementitious muds, in situ mixing and placement of polyurethane foams, and fundamental analysis of and materials development for particulate lost circulation materials. Plans for work in the area of zone detection and characterization, including development of a transient, lost circulation hydraulics simulator and field zone characterization using an advanced wellbore televiewer, are discussed.

Ortega, A.; Loeppke, G.E.; Givler, R.C.

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

260

Exploratory Well At Coso Geothermal Area (1977-1978) | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

77-1978) 77-1978) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Exploratory Well At Coso Geothermal Area (1977-1978) Exploration Activity Details Location Coso Geothermal Area Exploration Technique Exploratory Well Activity Date 1977 - 1978 Usefulness useful DOE-funding Unknown Notes 1477-m Coso Geothermal Exploration Hole (CGEH) No. 1 well drilled .The objective of well and future well testing is to determine the well productivity and geothermal reservoir parameters. References Energy Research and Development Administration, Las Vegas, NV (USA). Nevada Operations Office (1 June 1977) Operations plan Coso geothermal exploratory hole No. 1 (CGEH-1) Department of Energy, Las Vegas, Nev.. Nevada Operations Office; Naval Weapons Center, China Lake, Calif.; California Univ., Berkeley.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "wells geothermal fluid" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Well Log Techniques At Raft River Geothermal Area (1977) | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Well Log Techniques At Raft River Geothermal Area Well Log Techniques At Raft River Geothermal Area (1977) Exploration Activity Details Location Raft River Geothermal Area Exploration Technique Well Log Techniques Activity Date 1977 Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Exploration Basis Characterize the rock using well log data. Notes Information is given on the following logs: dual-induction focused log, including resistivity, sp, and conductivity; acoustic log; compensated neutron; compensated densilog; and caliper. Lithologic breaks for a drill core to a depth of 2840 ft are illustrated. References Covington, H.R. (1 January 1978) Deep drilling data, Raft River geothermal area, Idaho Raft River geothermal exploration well No. 4 Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Well_Log_Techniques_At_Raft_River_Geothermal_Area_(1977)&oldid=6004

262

Data acquisition for low-temperature geothermal well tests and long-term monitoring. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Groundwater monitoring is an essential part of the development of a low-temperature geothermal field for production and injection wells. State water resource and environmental departments are requiring both geothermal well testing and long-term monitoring as a part of the permitting process for geothermal developments. This report covers water-level measurement methods, instruments used for well testing, geochemical sampling, examples of data acquisition and regulatory mandates on groundwater monitoring.

Lienau, P.J.

1992-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

263

Data acquisition for low-temperature geothermal well tests and long-term monitoring  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Groundwater monitoring is an essential part of the development of a low-temperature geothermal field for production and injection wells. State water resource and environmental departments are requiring both geothermal well testing and long-term monitoring as a part of the permitting process for geothermal developments. This report covers water-level measurement methods, instruments used for well testing, geochemical sampling, examples of data acquisition and regulatory mandates on groundwater monitoring.

Lienau, P.J.

1992-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

264

MIXTURES OF CO2-SF6 AS WORKING FLUIDS FOR GEOTHERMAL PLANTS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this paper, mixtures of CO2 and SF6 were evaluated as working fluids for geothermal plants based on property measurements, molecular dynamics modeling, thermodynamic cycle analysis, and materials compatibility assessment. The CO2 - SF6 was evaluated for a reservoir temperature of 160 oC. Increasing the efficiency for these low reservoir sources will increase the options available for geothermal energy utilization in more sites across the country. The properties for the mixtures were obtained either from thermodynamic property measurements and molecular dynamics simulations. Optimum compositions of the CO2 - SF6 were identified for a well reservoir temperature and a given water-cooling condition. Concerning the global warming potential, it was estimated that the equivalent CO2 emissions per 1kWh for a Rankine cycle operating with 100% SF6 would be approximately of 7.6% than those for a coal-fired power plant.

Sabau, Adrian S [ORNL; Yin, Hebi [ORNL; Gruszkiewicz, Miroslaw {Mirek} S [ORNL; McFarlane, Joanna [ORNL; Qualls, A L [ORNL; Conklin, Jim [ORNL; Pawel, Steven J [ORNL

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

265

Feasibility investigation and design study of optical well logging methods for high temperature geothermal wells  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The objective of this project was exploration of a novel approach to high temperature well logging, based on a system of optical transducers and an optical transmission line both theoretically capable of operation to at least 600/sup 0/C. The scope of the work involved the accomplishment of ten specific tasks. These had as their objective the determination of feasibility, and identification of major problem areas, in the implementation of continuous temperature logging of geothermal wells using optical techniques. The following tasks are reported: literature review and data compilation, measurement of fiber properties production fiber procurement, investigation of methods of fiber termination, cable design and fabrication, and sensor and system studies. (MHR)

Swanson, R.K.; Anderson, R.E.; Ash, J.I.; Beissner, R.E.; Smith, V.D.

1978-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

266

Sampling and analysis methods for geothermal fluids and gases  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The sampling procedures for geothermal fluids and gases include: sampling hot springs, fumaroles, etc.; sampling condensed brine and entrained gases; sampling steam-lines; low pressure separator systems; high pressure separator systems; two-phase sampling; downhole samplers; and miscellaneous methods. The recommended analytical methods compiled here cover physical properties, dissolved solids, and dissolved and entrained gases. The sequences of methods listed for each parameter are: wet chemical, gravimetric, colorimetric, electrode, atomic absorption, flame emission, x-ray fluorescence, inductively coupled plasma-atomic emission spectroscopy, ion exchange chromatography, spark source mass spectrometry, neutron activation analysis, and emission spectrometry. Material on correction of brine component concentrations for steam loss during flashing is presented. (MHR)

Watson, J.C.

1978-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

267

Geology of Injection Well 46A-19RD in the Coso Enhanced Geothermal Systems  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

of Injection Well 46A-19RD in the Coso Enhanced Geothermal Systems of Injection Well 46A-19RD in the Coso Enhanced Geothermal Systems Experiment Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Conference Proceedings: Geology of Injection Well 46A-19RD in the Coso Enhanced Geothermal Systems Experiment Details Activities (1) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: The Coso Geothermal Field is a large, high temperature system located in California on the western edge of the Basin and Range province. Well 46A-19RD, located in the southwestern portion of this field is currently the focus of a DOE-funded Enhanced Geothermal Systems (EGS) project. Petrologic and petrographic investigations of the well show that quartz diorite and granodiorite are dominant lithologies. Dikes of granophyre, containing phenocrysts of plagioclase, potassium feldspar, and

268

Phase 2 Reese River Geothermal Project Slim Well 56-4 Drilling And Testing  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Phase 2 Reese River Geothermal Project Slim Well 56-4 Drilling And Testing Phase 2 Reese River Geothermal Project Slim Well 56-4 Drilling And Testing Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Report: Phase 2 Reese River Geothermal Project Slim Well 56-4 Drilling And Testing Details Activities (6) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: This report covers the drilling and testing of the slim well 56-4 at the Reese River Geothermal Project in Lander County, Nevada. This well was partially funded through a GRED III Cooperative Funding Agreement # DE-FC36-04GO14344, from USDOE. Author(s): William R. Henkle, Joel Ronne Published: Geothermal Technologies Legacy Collection, 2008 Document Number: Unavailable DOI: Unavailable Source: View Original Report Compound and Elemental Analysis At Reese River Area (Henkle & Ronne, 2008)

269

High-Temperature Circuit Boards for use in Geothermal Well Monitoring...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

energy independence of our nation. Currently, geothermal power in the United States is produced from relatively shallow wells that also contain naturally occurring water...

270

Temperatures and interval geothermal-gradient determinations from wells in National Petroleum Reserve in Alaska  

SciTech Connect

Temperature and related records from 28 wells in the National Petroleum Reserve in Alaska (NPRA) although somewhat constrained from accuracy by data gathering methods, extrapolate to undisturbed formation temperatures at specific depths below permafrost, and lead to calculated geothermal graidents between these depths. Tabulation of the results show that extrapolated undisturbed temperatures range from a minimum of 98/sup 0/F (37/sup 0/C) at 4000 feet (1220 m) to a maximum of 420/sup 0/F (216/sup 0/C) at 20,260 feet (6177 m) and that geothermal gradients range from 0.34/sup 0/F/100' (6/sup 0/C/km) between 4470 feet to 7975 feet (Lisburne No. 1) and 3.15/sup 0/F/100' (57/sup 0/C/km) between 6830 feet to 7940 feet (Drew Point No. 1). Essential information needed for extrapolations consists of: time-sequential bottom-hole temperatures during wire-line logging of intermediate and deep intervals of the borehole; the times that circulating drilling fluids had disturbed the formations; and the subsequent times that non-circulating drilling fluids had been in contact with the formation. In several wells presumed near direct measures of rock temperatures recorded from formation fluids recovered by drill stem tests (DST) across thin (approx. 10-20 foot) intervals are made available. We believe that the results approach actual values close enough to serve as approximations of the thermal regimes in appropriate future investigations. Continuous temperature logs obtained at the start and end of final logging operations, conductivity measurements, and relatively long-term measurements of the recovery from disturbance at shallow depths in many of the wells will permit refinements of our values and provide determination of temperatures at other depths. 4 references, 6 figures, 3 tables.

Blanchard, D.C.; Tailleur, I.L.

1983-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

271

Isotopic Analysis- Fluid At Fenton Hill Hdr Geothermal Area (Goff, Et Al.,  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

source source History View New Pages Recent Changes All Special Pages Semantic Search/Querying Get Involved Help Apps Datasets Community Login | Sign Up Search Page Edit History Facebook icon Twitter icon » Isotopic Analysis- Fluid At Fenton Hill Hdr Geothermal Area (Goff, Et Al., 1981) (Redirected from Isotopic Analysis At Fenton Hill Hdr Geothermal Area (Goff, Et Al., 1981)) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Isotopic Analysis- Fluid At Fenton Hill Hdr Geothermal Area (Goff, Et Al., 1981) Exploration Activity Details Location Fenton Hill Hdr Geothermal Area Exploration Technique Isotopic Analysis- Fluid Activity Date Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown References Fraser E. Goff, Charles O. Grigsby, Pat E. Trujillo Jr, Dale Counce,

272

Fluid and heat flow in gas-rich geothermal reservoirs  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Numerical-simulation techniques are used to study the effects of noncondensible gases (CO/sub 2/) on geothermal reservoir behavior in the natural state and during exploitation. It is shown that the presence of CO/sub 2/ has large effects on the thermodynamic conditions of a reservoir in the natural state, especially on temperature distributions and phase compositions. The gas will expand two-phase zones and increase gas saturations to enable flow of CO/sub 2/ through the system. During exploitation, the early pressure drop is primarily due to degassing of the system. This process can cause a very rapid initial pressure drop, on the order of tens of bars, depending upon the initial partial pressure of CO/sub 2/. The following gas content from wells can provide information on in-place gas saturations and relative permeability curves that apply at a given geothermal resource. Site-specific studies are made for the gas-rich two-phase reservoir at the Ohaki geothermal field in New Zealand. A simple lumped-parameter model and a vertical column model are applied to the field data. The results obtained agree well with the natural thermodynamic state of the Ohaki field (pressure and temperature profiles) and a partial pressure of 15 to 25 bars is calculated in the primary reservoirs. The models also agree reasonably well with field data obtained during exploitation of the field. The treatment of thermophysical properties of H/sub 2/O-CO/sub 2/ mixtures for different phase compositions is summarized.

O'Sullivan, M.J.; Bodvarsson, G.S.; Pruess, K.; Blakeley, M.R.

1983-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

273

An Environmental Assessment of Proposed Geothermal Well Testing in the Tigre Lagoon Oil Field, Vermilion Parish, Louisiana  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report is an environmental assessment of the proposed testing of two geopressured, geothermal aquifers in central coastal Louisiana. On the basis of an analysis of the environmental setting, subsurface characteristics, and the proposed action, potential environmental impacts are determined and evaluated together with potential conflicts with federal, state, and local programs. Oil and gas wells in coastal Louisiana have penetrated a potentially productive geothermal zone of abnormally high-pressured aquifers that also yield large volumes of natural gas. To evaluate the extent to which the geothermal-geopressured water can be used as an alternative energy source and to what extent withdrawal of geopressured water can enhance gas production, it is necessary that flow rates, composition and temperature of fluids and gases, recharge characteristics, pressures, compressibilities, and other hydrodynamic and boundary conditions of the reservoir be determined by means of production tests. Tests are further necessary to evaluate and seek solutions to technological problems.

None

1976-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

274

Idaho: basic data for thermal springs and wells as recorded in GEOTHERM. Part B  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This compilation contains chemical data for geothermal fluids in Idaho available as of December, 1981. The 951 records contain data on location, sample description, analysis type, collection condition, flow rates, and the chemical and physical properties of the fluid. Stable and radioactive isotope data are occasionally available. 6 refs.

Bliss, J.D.

1983-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

275

A Deep Geothermal Exploration Well At Eastgate, Weardale, Uk- A Novel  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Geothermal Exploration Well At Eastgate, Weardale, Uk- A Novel Geothermal Exploration Well At Eastgate, Weardale, Uk- A Novel Exploration Concept For Low-Enthalpy Resources Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Journal Article: A Deep Geothermal Exploration Well At Eastgate, Weardale, Uk- A Novel Exploration Concept For Low-Enthalpy Resources Details Activities (0) Areas (0) Regions (0) Abstract: The first deep geothermal exploration borehole (995 m) to be drilled in the UK for over 20 years was completed at Eastgate (Weardale, Co. Durham) in December 2004. It penetrated 4 m of sandy till (Quaternary), 267.5 m of Lower Carboniferous strata (including the Whin Sill), and 723.5 m of the Weardale Granite (Devonian), with vein mineralization occurring to 913 m. Unlike previous geothermal investigations of UK radiothermal

276

A Resource Assessment Of Geothermal Energy Resources For Converting Deep Gas Wells In Carbonate Strata Into Geothermal Extraction Wells: A Permian Basin Evaluation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Previously conducted preliminary investigations within the deep Delaware and Val Verde sub-basins of the Permian Basin complex documented bottom hole temperatures from oil and gas wells that reach the 120-180C temperature range, and occasionally beyond. With large abundances of subsurface brine water, and known porosity and permeability, the deep carbonate strata of the region possess a good potential for future geothermal power development. This work was designed as a 3-year project to investigate a new, undeveloped geographic region for establishing geothermal energy production focused on electric power generation. Identifying optimum geologic and geographic sites for converting depleted deep gas wells and fields within a carbonate environment into geothermal energy extraction wells was part of the project goals. The importance of this work was to affect the three factors limiting the expansion of geothermal development: distribution, field size and accompanying resource availability, and cost. Historically, power production from geothermal energy has been relegated to shallow heat plumes near active volcanic or geyser activity, or in areas where volcanic rocks still retain heat from their formation. Thus geothermal development is spatially variable and site specific. Additionally, existing geothermal fields are only a few 10s of square km in size, controlled by the extent of the heat plume and the availability of water for heat movement. This plume radiates heat both vertically as well as laterally into the enclosing country rock. Heat withdrawal at too rapid a rate eventually results in a decrease in electrical power generation as the thermal energy is mined. The depletion rate of subsurface heat directly controls the lifetime of geothermal energy production. Finally, the cost of developing deep (greater than 4 km) reservoirs of geothermal energy is perceived as being too costly to justify corporate investment. Thus further development opportunities for geothermal resources have been hindered. To increase the effective regional implementation of geothermal resources as an energy source for power production requires meeting several objectives. These include: 1) Expand (oil and gas as well as geothermal) industry awareness of an untapped source of geothermal energy within deep permeable strata of sedimentary basins; 2) Identify and target specific geographic areas within sedimentary basins where deeper heat sources can be developed; 3) Increase future geothermal field size from 10 km2 to many 100s km2 or greater; and 4) Increase the productive depth range for economic geothermal energy extraction below the current 4 km limit by converting deep depleted and abandoned gas wells and fields into geothermal energy extraction wells. The first year of the proposed 3-year resource assessment covered an eight county region within the Delaware and Val Verde Basins of West Texas. This project has developed databases in Excel spreadsheet form that list over 8,000 temperature-depth recordings. These recordings come from header information listed on electric well logs recordings from various shallow to deep wells that were drilled for oil and gas exploration and production. The temperature-depth data is uncorrected and thus provides the lower temperature that is be expected to be encountered within the formation associated with the temperature-depth recording. Numerous graphs were developed from the data, all of which suggest that a log-normal solution for the thermal gradient is more descriptive of the data than a linear solution. A discussion of these plots and equations are presented within the narrative. Data was acquired that enable the determination of brine salinity versus brine density with the Permian Basin. A discussion on possible limestone and dolostone thermal conductivity parameters is presented with the purpose of assisting in determining heat flow and reservoir heat content for energy extraction. Subsurface maps of temperature either at a constant depth or within a target geothermal reservoir are discusse

Erdlac, Richard J., Jr.

2006-10-12T23:59:59.000Z

277

Fluid Temperature and Power Estimation of Geothermal Power Plants by a Simplified Numerical Model  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper presents an estimation of power generated in a given geothermal heat pipe system. Such power generation is basically controlled by the ultimate temperature of fluid flowing through the u-shape pipes and could also be affected by power consumption ... Keywords: energy, geothermal power plant, numerical model, heat conduction, optimum design

Ge Ou; Itai Einav

2010-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

278

Multielement geochemistry of three geothermal wells, Cove Fort-Sulphurdale geothermal area, Utah  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Multielement geochemical analysis of drill cuttings from three geothermal wells, Utah State 42-7, Utah State 31-33 and Forminco No. 1, in the Cove Fort-Sulphurdale KGRA, Utah, demonstrates that the distributions of different elements are the result of different chemical processes operating throughout the geologic history of the area. Statistical analysis of geochemical-data distributions confirm the presence of several distinct element associations. Of the 36 elements determined on the samples, 12 (V, Mo, Cd, Ag, Au, Sb, Bi, U, Te, Sn, B and Th) were present in concentrations at or below detection levels. Of the remaining 24 elements, only 3 (Ni, Co and Zr) are lognormally distributed. Distributions for the remaining elements are of aggregate populations which represent background, mineralization or other processes.

Christensen, O.D.

1982-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

279

THE NATURAL THERMODYNAMIC STATE OF THE FLUIDS IN THE LOS AZUFRES GEOTHERMAL RESERVOIR  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

We have devised a simple method to assess the natural thermodynamic state of two-phase reservoirs. This is usually a complex task. The method is based on inferring sandface flowing pressures and enthalpies from production output (deliverability) curves, and then extrapolating to shutin conditions in the pressure-enthalpy plane. The method was applied to data from 10 wells of the Los Azufres geothermal field. Comparison of the results with measured pressures and temperatures showed that the method is reliable. We present detailed thermodynamic properties of the unperturbed reservoir fluid in the neighborhood of the wells studied, in tabular form. Moreover, we present a match to these results with a very simple model that allows reasonable estimates of natural thermodynamic conditions as functions of height above sea level. The present results have important implications for the assessment of the fluid reserves, which are suggested to be greater than previously thought.

Iglesias, E.R.; Arellano, V.M.; Gardias, A.

1985-01-22T23:59:59.000Z

280

Isotopic Analysis- Fluid At Fenton Hill Hdr Geothermal Area (Rao, Et Al.,  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

source source History View New Pages Recent Changes All Special Pages Semantic Search/Querying Get Involved Help Apps Datasets Community Login | Sign Up Search Page Edit History Facebook icon Twitter icon » Isotopic Analysis- Fluid At Fenton Hill Hdr Geothermal Area (Rao, Et Al., 1996) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Isotopic Analysis- Fluid At Fenton Hill Hdr Geothermal Area (Rao, Et Al., 1996) Exploration Activity Details Location Fenton Hill Hdr Geothermal Area Exploration Technique Isotopic Analysis- Fluid Activity Date Usefulness useful DOE-funding Unknown References U. Fehn, R. T. D. Teng, Usha Rao, Fraser E. Goff (1996) Sources Of Chloride In Hydrothermal Fluids From The Valles Caldera, New Mexico- A 36Cl Study Retrieved from

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "wells geothermal fluid" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Chemical analysis and sampling techniques for geothermal fluids and gases at the Fenton Hill Laboratory  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A general description of methods, techniques, and apparatus used for the sampling, chemical analysis, and data reporting of geothermal gases and fluids is given. Step-by-step descriptions of the procedures are included in the appendixes.

Trujillo, P.E.; Counce, D.; Grigsby, C.O.; Goff, F.; Shevenell, L.

1987-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

282

Power Potential of Geothermal Wells Related to Reservoir Temperature  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

For equal flows of hot water wells, the electric power which can be generated increases with feed water temperature. However, high temperature wells discharge greater flows than that of lower temperature wells of similar permeability, with the result of enhanced power potential. In fact, where fluids are exploited utilizing two-stage flash, these factors combine to give a power potential which is proportional to the cube of the feed water temperature in degrees celsius. Hence a feed of 315 C would generate twice the power of that of water at 250 C for wells of good permeability and where the reservoir exists under conditions of boiling point with depth. Higher temperature water (exceeding 300 C) has, however, a commensurate higher tendency to mineral deposition in reinjection water lines and this disposes design to single-stage flash with slightly reduced power, compared with the two-stage alternative.

James, Russell

1986-01-21T23:59:59.000Z

283

Well fluid isolation and sample apparatus and method  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The present invention specifically permits purging and/or sampling of a well but only removing, at most, about 25% of the fluid volume compared to conventional methods and, at a minimum, removing none of the fluid volume from the well. The invention is an isolation assembly that is inserted into the well. The isolation assembly is designed so that only a volume of fluid between the outside diameter of the isolation assembly and the inside diameter of the well over a fluid column height from the bottom of the well to the top of the active portion (lower annulus) is removed. A seal may be positioned above the active portion thereby sealing the well and preventing any mixing or contamination of inlet fluid with fluid above the packer. Purged well fluid is stored in a riser above the packer. Ports in the wall of the isolation assembly permit purging and sampling of the lower annulus along the height of the active portion.

Schalla, Ronald (Kennewick, WA); Smith, Ronald M. (Richland, WA); Hall, Stephen H. (Kennewick, WA); Smart, John E. (Richland, WA)

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

284

BLM Fact Sheet- Vulcan Power Company Salt Wells Geothermal Energy Project |  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

BLM Fact Sheet- Vulcan Power Company Salt Wells Geothermal Energy Project BLM Fact Sheet- Vulcan Power Company Salt Wells Geothermal Energy Project Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Report: BLM Fact Sheet- Vulcan Power Company Salt Wells Geothermal Energy Project Abstract No abstract available. Author Bureau of Land Management Organization Bureau of Land Management, Carson City Field Office, Nevada Published U.S. Department of the Interior, 2011 DOI Not Provided Check for DOI availability: http://crossref.org Online Internet link for BLM Fact Sheet- Vulcan Power Company Salt Wells Geothermal Energy Project Citation Bureau of Land Management (Bureau of Land Management, Carson City Field Office, Nevada). 2011. BLM Fact Sheet- Vulcan Power Company Salt Wells Geothermal Energy Project. Carson City, Nevada: U.S. Department of the

285

GRR/Section 4-OR-c - Geothermal Prospect Well Process | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

GRR/Section 4-OR-c - Geothermal Prospect Well Process GRR/Section 4-OR-c - Geothermal Prospect Well Process < GRR Jump to: navigation, search GRR-logo.png GEOTHERMAL REGULATORY ROADMAP Roadmap Home Roadmap Help List of Sections Section 4-OR-c - Geothermal Prospect Well Process 04ORCGeothermalProspectWellProcess (1).pdf Click to View Fullscreen Contact Agencies Oregon State Department of Geology and Mineral Industries Regulations & Policies ORS 516: DOGAMI ORS 522: Geothermal Resources Triggers None specified Click "Edit With Form" above to add content 04ORCGeothermalProspectWellProcess (1).pdf Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Flowchart Narrative _ 4-OR-c.1 - Has Environmental Process Been Completed?

286

Testing geopressured geothermal reservoirs in existing wells: Detailed completion prognosis for geopressured-geothermal well of opportunity, prospect #2  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A geopressured-geothermal test of Martin Exploration Company's Crown Zellerbach Well No. 2 will be conducted in the Tuscaloosa Trend. The Crown Zellerbach Well No. 1 will be converted to a saltwater disposal well for disposal of produced brine. The well is located in the Satsuma Area, Livingston parish, Louisiana. Eaton proposes to test the Tuscaloosa by perforating the 7 inch casing from 16,718 feet to 16,754 feet. The reservoir pressure at an intermediate formation depth of 16,736 feet is anticipated to be 12,010 psi and the temperature is anticipated to be 297 F. Calculated water salinity is 16,000 ppm. The well is expected to produce a maximum of 16,000 barrels of water a day with a gas content of 51 SCF/bbl. Eaton will re-enter the test well, clean out to 17,000 feet, run production casing and complete the well. The disposal well will be re-entered and completed in the 9-5/8 inch casing for disposal of produced brine. Testing will be conducted similar to previous Eaton annular flow WOO tests. An optional test from 16,462 feet to 16,490 feet may be performed after the original test and will require a workover with a rig on location to perform the plugback. The surface production equipment utilized on previous tests will be utilized on this test. The equipment has worked satisfactorily and all parties involved in the testing are familiar with its operation. Weatherly Engineering will operate the test equipment. The Institute of Gas Technology (IGT) and Mr. Don Clark will handle sampling, testing and reservoir engineering evaluation, respectively. wireline work required will be awarded on basis of bid evaluation. At the conclusion of the test period, the D.O.E. owned test equipment will be removed from the test site, the test and disposal wells plugged and abandoned and the sites restored to the satisfaction of all parties.

None

1981-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

287

Geothermal Well Operations and Automation in a Competitive Market  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

America's increasing dependence on foreign energy sources, and the national environmental initiatives, based on the increasing awareness of the need for protection of the environment, have led to the development of the Department of Energy's (DOE) domestic US alternative energy programs. One of these programs is the current US Gulf Coast Geopressured-Geothermal Program, conducted at three sites in Louisiana and Texas. Excellent results have been obtained in reaching the objectives for this production operation and energy conversion project, which are: (1) to determine the size of geopressured-geothermal reservoirs and the drive mechanisms by long-term, high volume, flow testing; (2) prove long-term injectability of large volumes of spent brine; (3) develop modified scale inhibitor treatment procedures; (4) develop methods for reduction of erosion/corrosion; (5) develop technology for automated operation of geopressured-geothermal production system; and (6) develop technology to produce power economically from the geopressured-geothermal resources. The long-term flow test at the Gladys McCall site has shown the producing reservoir is many times it original, projected size. Flow tests are being conducted at the Pleasant Bayou site in Texas. Another reservoir, at the Hulin site in Louisiana, remains for initiation of testing, at a time to be determined. Gas sales and electrical power generation from the geopressured-geothermal resources have proven that these are reliable alternative power sources. Continuing work is being done for field automation to improve the economics of these operations.

Eaton, B.A.; Featherston, C.R.; Meahl, T.E.; Randolph, P.L.

1992-03-24T23:59:59.000Z

288

Long-Term Testing of Geothermal Wells in the Coso Hot Springs KGRA | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Long-Term Testing of Geothermal Wells in the Coso Hot Springs KGRA Long-Term Testing of Geothermal Wells in the Coso Hot Springs KGRA Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Conference Proceedings: Long-Term Testing of Geothermal Wells in the Coso Hot Springs KGRA Details Activities (3) Areas (2) Regions (0) Abstract: Three wells have been drilled by the Los Angeles Department of Water and Power at the Coso Hot Springs KGRA. A long-term flow test was conducted involving one producing well (well 43-7), one injector (well 88-1), and two observation wells (well 66-6 and California Energy Co's well 71A-7). This paper presents the equipment and techniques involved and the results from the long-term test conducted between December 1985 and February 1986. Author(s): Sanyal, S.; Menzies, A.; Granados, E.; Sugine, S.;

289

Geothermal Literature Review At Salt Wells Area (Faulds, Et Al., 2011) |  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Salt Wells Area (Faulds, Et Al., 2011) Salt Wells Area (Faulds, Et Al., 2011) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Geothermal Literature Review At Salt Wells Area (Faulds, Et Al., 2011) Exploration Activity Details Location Salt Wells Geothermal Area Exploration Technique Geothermal Literature Review Activity Date 2011 Usefulness useful regional reconnaissance DOE-funding ARRA (American Recovery and Reinvestment Act) Exploration Basis The paper reports on the first phase of a three-stage DOE-ARRA (American Recovery and Reinvestment Act)-funded study that integrates knowledge of favorable structural settings in the Great Basin region with the goal of developing a structural catalogue that can be used to refine exploration strategies for geothermal resources (particularly for blind/hidden systems)

290

Geopressured-geothermal well report. Volume I. Drilling and completion  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Gladys McCall site activities are covered through the completion of the test well and salt water disposal well. The test well was drilled to a total depth of 16,510 feet, then plugged back to 15,831 feet. Three 4'' diameter diamond cores were taken for analysis. An existing well on site, the Getty-Butts Gladys McCall No. 1, was reentered and completed to a depth of 3514 feet as a salt water disposal well. The geologic interpretation of the Gladys McCall site indicated target sands for testing at 15,080 feet through 15, 831 feet. Reservoir fluid temperature at this depth is estimated to be approximately 313/sup 0/F and pressure is estimated to be +-12,800 psi. The preliminary reservoir volume estimate is 3.6 billion barrels of brine. The design wells program includes environmental monitoring of the Gladys McCall site by Louisiana State University. Field stations are set up to monitor surface and ground water quality, subsidence, land loss and shoreline erosion, and seismicity. As of December 31, 1981 the study shows no significant impact on the environment by site operations.

Not Available

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

291

Geothermal-Reservoir Well-Stimulation Program. Program status report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Seven experimental fracture stimulation treatments completed to date and the laboratory work performed to develop the stimulation technology are described. A discussion of the pre-stimulation and post-stimulation data and their evaluation is provided for each experiment. Six of the seven stimulation experiments were at least technically successful in stimulating the wells. The two fracture treatments in East Mesa 58-30 more than doubled the producing rate of the previously marginal producer. The two fracture treatments in Raft River and the two in Baca were all successful in obtaining significant production from previously nonproductive intervals. However, these treatments failed to establish commercial production due to deficiencies in either fluid temperature or flow rate. The acid etching treatment in the well at The Geysers did not have any material effect on producing rate.

Not Available

1982-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

292

Enhanced Geothermal Systems Research and Development: Models of Subsurface Chemical Processes Affecting Fluid Flow  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

With funding from past grants from the DOE geothermal program and other agencies, we successfully developed advanced equation of state (EOS) and simulation technologies that accurately describe the chemistry of geothermal reservoirs and energy production processes via their free energies for wide XTP ranges. Using the specific interaction equations of Pitzer, we showed that our TEQUIL chemical models can correctly simulate behavior (e.g., mineral scaling and saturation ratios, gas break out, brine mixing effects, down hole temperatures and fluid chemical composition, spent brine incompatibilities) within the compositional range (Na-K-Ca-Cl-SO4-CO3-H2O-SiO2-CO2(g)) and temperature range (T < 350C) associated with many current geothermal energy production sites that produce brines with temperatures below the critical point of water. The goal of research carried out under DOE grant DE-FG36-04GO14300 (10/1/2004-12/31/2007) was to expand the compositional range of our Pitzer-based TEQUIL fluid/rock interaction models to include the important aluminum and silica interactions (T < 350C). Aluminum is the third most abundant element in the earths crust; and, as a constituent of aluminosilicate minerals, it is found in two thirds of the minerals in the earths crust. The ability to accurately characterize effects of temperature, fluid mixing and interactions between major rock-forming minerals and hydrothermal and/or injected fluids is critical to predict important chemical behaviors affecting fluid flow, such as mineral precipitation/dissolution reactions. We successfully achieved the project goal and objectives by demonstrating the ability of our modeling technology to correctly predict the complex pH dependent solution chemistry of the Al3+ cation and its hydrolysis species: Al(OH)2+, Al(OH)2+, Al(OH)30, and Al(OH)4- as well as the solubility of common aluminum hydroxide and aluminosilicate minerals in aqueous brines containing components (Na, K, Cl) commonly dominating hydrothermal fluids. In the sodium chloride system, where experimental data for model parameterization are most plentiful, the model extends to 300C. Determining the stability fields of aluminum species that control the solubility of aluminum-containing minerals as a function of temperature and composition has been a major objective of research in hydrothermal chemistry.

Moller, Nancy; Weare J. H.

2008-05-29T23:59:59.000Z

293

Utah: basic data for thermal springs and wells as recorded in GEOTHERM  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This GEOTHERM sample file contains 643 records for Utah. Records may be present which are duplicates for the same analyses. A record may contain data on location, sample description, analysis type (water, condensate, or gas), collection condition, flow rates, and the chemical and physical properties of the fluid. Stable and radioactive isotopic data are occasionally available. Some records may contain only location and temperature. This compilation should contain all the chemical data for geothermal fluids in Utah available as of December, 1981. 7 refs. (ACR)

Bliss, J.D.

1983-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

294

Isotopic Analysis-Fluid At Geysers Geothermal Area (1982) | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

82) 82) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Isotopic Analysis-Fluid At Geysers Geothermal Area (1982) Exploration Activity Details Location Geysers Geothermal Area Exploration Technique Isotopic Analysis-Fluid Activity Date 1982 Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Notes Helium isotope ratios have been measured in geothermal fluids. These ratios have been interpreted in terms of the processes which supply He in distinct isotopic ratios (i.e. magmatic He, ~10 Ra; atmospheric He, Ra; and crustal He, ~0.1 Ra) and in terms of the processes which can alter the isotopic ratio (hydrologic mixing, U-Th series alpha production and weathering release of crustal He, magma aging and tritiugenic addition of 3He). Raft

295

Preliminary investigation of scale formation and fluid chemistry at the Dixie Valley Geothermal Field, Nevada  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The chemistry of geothermal, production, and injection fluids at the Dixie Valley Geothermal Field, Nevada, was characterized to address an ongoing scaling problem and to evaluate the effects of reinjection into the reservoir. Fluids generally followed mixing-dilution trends. Recharge to the Dixie Valley system apparently originates from local sources. The low-pressure brine and injection waters were saturated with respect to amorphous silica, which correlated with the ongoing scaling problem. Local shallow ground water contains about 15% geothermal brine mixed with regional recharge. The elevated Ca, Mg, and HCO{sub 3} content of this water suggests that carbonate precipitation may occur if shallow groundwater is reinjected. Downhole reservoir fluids are close to equilibrium with the latest vein mineral assemblage of wairakite-epidote-quartz-calcite. Reinjection of spent geothermal brine is predicted to affect the region near the wellbore differently than it does the region farther away.

Bruton, C.J.; Counce, D.; Bergfeld, D.; Goff, F.; Johnson, S.D.; Moore, J.N.; Nimz, G.

1997-06-27T23:59:59.000Z

296

Geopressured geothermal fairway evaluation and test-well site location, Frio Formation, Texas Gulf Coast  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Tertiary strata of the Texas Gulf Coast comprise a number of terrigenous depositional wedges, some of which thicken abruptly at their downdip ends as a result of contemporaneous movement of growth faults and underlying salt. The Frio Formation, one of these wedges, has been studied regionally by means of a grid of correlation cross sections aided by micropaleontological control. By means of these sections, the Frio was subdivided into six map units; maps of sandstone distribution within these units delineate principal elongate sandstone trends parallel to the Gulf Coast composed of deltaic, barrier-bar, and strandplain sandstones. These broad regional studies, followed by detailed local investigations, were pursued in order to delineate prospective areas for production of geopressured geothermal energy. A prospective area must meet the following minimum requirements; reservoir volume of 3 cubic miles, minimum permeability of 20 millidarcys (md), and fluid temperatures of 300/sup 0/F. Several geothermal fairways were identified as a result of this Frio study. In summary, detailed geological, geophysical, and engineering studies conducted on the Frio Formation have delineated a geothermal test well site in the Austin Bayou Prospect which extends over an area of 60 square miles. A total of 800 to 900 feet of sandstone will occur between the depths of 13,500 and 16,500 feet. At least 30% of the sand will have core permeabilities of 20 to 60 millidarcys. Temperature at the top of the sandstone section will be 300/sup 0/F. Water, produced at a rate of 20,000 to 40,000 barrels per day, will probably have to be disposed of by injection into shallower sandstone reservoirs. More than 10 billion barrels of water are in place in these sandstone reservoirs of the Austin Bayou Prospect; there should be approximately 400 billion cubic feed of methane in solution in this water.

Bebout, D.G.; Loucks, R.G.; Gregory, A.R.

1978-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

297

Geothermal reservoir well stimulation program. Final program summary report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Eight field experiments and the associated theoretical and laboratory work performed to develop the stimulation technology are described. A discussion of the pre-stimulation and post-stimulation data and their evaluation is provided for each experiment. Overall results have shown that stimulation is viable where adequate reservoirs are penetrated by wells encountering formation damage or locally tight formation zones. Seven of the eight stimulation experiments were at least technically successful in stimulating the wells. The two fracture treatments in East Mesa 58-30 more than doubled the producing rate of the previously marginal producer. The two fracture treatments at Raft River and the two at Baca were all successful in obtaining significant production from previously nonproductive intervals. However, these treatments failed to establish commercial production due to deficiencies in either fluid temperature or reservoir transmissivity. The Beowawe chemical stimulation treatment appears to have significantly improved the well's injectivity, but production data were not obtained because of well mechanical problems. The acid etching treatment in the well at the Geysers did not have any material effect on producing rate. Evaluations of the field experiments to date have suggested improvements in treatment design and treatment interval selection which offer substantial encouragement for future stimulation work.

Not Available

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

298

U.S. Geothermal Drills Another Prolific Well at Neal Hot Springs...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

U.S. Geothermal Drills Another Prolific Well at Neal Hot Springs Completes Production Wells Needed for Project Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library...

299

Analysis Of Macroscopic Fractures In Granite In The Hdr Geothermal Well  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Macroscopic Fractures In Granite In The Hdr Geothermal Well Macroscopic Fractures In Granite In The Hdr Geothermal Well Eps-1, Soultz-Sous-Forets, France Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Journal Article: Analysis Of Macroscopic Fractures In Granite In The Hdr Geothermal Well Eps-1, Soultz-Sous-Forets, France Details Activities (0) Areas (0) Regions (0) Abstract: An exhaustive analysis of 3000 macroscopic fractures encountered in the geothermal Hot Dry Rock borehole, EPS-1, located inside the Rhine graben (Soultz-sous-Forets, France), was done on a continuous core section over a depth interval from 1420 to 2230 m: 97% of the macroscopic structures were successfully reorientated with a good degree of confidence by comparison between core and acoustic borehole imagery. Detailed structural analysis of the fracture population indicates that fractures are

300

Drilling and operating oil, gas, and geothermal wells in an H/sub 2/S environment  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The following subjects are covered: facts about hydrogen sulfides; drilling and operating oil, gas, and geothermal wells; detection devices and protective equipment; hazard levels and safety procedures; first aid; and H/sub 2/S in California oil, gas, and geothermal fields. (MHR)

Dosch, M.W.; Hodgson, S.F.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "wells geothermal fluid" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Program on Technology Innovation: Modeling of Single-Well Closed-Loop Enhanced Geothermal Systems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Conventional enhanced geothermal systems (EGSs) include one production well and one injection well to use hydrothermal resources to generate electricity. However, the high initial cost of drilling EGS wells is one of the main factors that hurt its competitiveness with other energy sources. The single-well closed-loop EGS (SWCLEGS) is a new type of geothermal power generation technology that aims to eliminate the need for natural hydrothermal resources with a relatively low drilling cost. The objective of...

2012-02-28T23:59:59.000Z

302

Compilation of cores and cuttings from U. S. Government-sponsored geothermal wells  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This compendium lists the repositories holding geothermal core and well cuttings from US government-sponsored geothermal wells. Also, a partial listing of cores and cutting from these wells is tabulated, along with referenced reports and location maps. These samples are available to the public for research investigations and studies, usually following submission of an appropriate request for use of the samples. The purpose of this compilation is to serve as a possible source of cores and cuttings that might aid in enhancing rock property studies in support of geothermal log interpretation.

Mathews, M.; Gambill, D.T.; Rowley, J.C.

1980-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

303

Estimating fracture parameters from p-wave velocity profiles about a geothermal well  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The feasibility of locating fracture zones and estimating their crack parameters was examined using an areal well shoot method centered on Utah State Geothermal Well 9-1, Beaver County, Utah. High-resolution travel time measurements were made between a borehole sensor and an array of shot stations distributed radially and azimuthally about the well. Directional velocity behavior in the vicinity of the well was investigated by comparing velocity logs derived from the travel time data. Three fracture zones were identified form the velocity data, corroborating fracture indicators seen in other geophysical logs conducted in Well 9-1. Crack densities and average crack aspect ratios for these fracture zones were estimated using a self-consistent velocity theory (O'Connell and Budiansy 1974). Probable trends of these fracture zones were established from a combination of the data from the more distant shot stations and the results of a gravity survey. The results of this study indicate that the areal well shoot is a potentially powerful tool for the reconnaisance of fracture-controlled fluid and gas reservoirs. Improvements in methodology and hardware could transform it into an operationally viable survey method.

Jenkinson, J.T.; Henyey, T.L.; Sammis, C.G.; Leary, P.C.; McRaney, J.K.

1981-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

304

Fluid-Rock Characterization and Interactions in NMR Well Logging  

SciTech Connect

The objective of this project was to characterize the fluid properties and fluid-rock interactions that are needed for formation evaluation by NMR well logging. The advances made in the understanding of NMR fluid properties are summarized in a chapter written for an AAPG book on NMR well logging. This includes live oils, viscous oils, natural gas mixtures, and the relation between relaxation time and diffusivity.

Hirasaki, George J.; Mohanty, Kishore K.

2003-02-10T23:59:59.000Z

305

Nevada: basic data for thermal springs and wells as recorded in geotherm. Part B  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This GEOTHERM sample file contains 1367 records for Nevada. The records contain data on location, sample description, analysis type, collection condition, flow rates, and the chemical and physical properties of the fluid. Stable and radioactive isotope data are occassionally available. (ACR)

Bliss, J.D.

1983-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

306

Central and eastern United States: basic data for thermal springs and wells as recorded in GEOTHERM  

SciTech Connect

The GEOTHERM sample file contains 119 records for the central and eastern United States. The records contain data on location, sample description, analysis type, collection condition, flow rates, and the chemical and physical properties of the fluid. Stable and radioisotopic data are occasionally available. 7 refs. (ACR)

Bliss, J.D.

1983-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

307

Fluid origin, gas fluxes and plumbing system in the sediment-hosted Salton Sea Geothermal System (California, USA)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Fluid origin, gas fluxes and plumbing system in the sediment-hosted Salton Sea Geothermal System Available online 12 June 2011 Keywords: Salton Sea Geothermal System hydrothermal seeps gas and water geochemistry flux measurements mantle The Salton Sea Geothermal System (California) is an easily accessible

Mazzini, Adriano

308

Geothermal Well Costs and their Sensitivities to Changes in Drilling and Completion Operations  

SciTech Connect

This paper presents a detailed analysis of the costs of drilling and completing geothermal wells. The basis for much of the analysis is a computer-simulation-based model which calculates and accrues operational costs involved in drilling and completing a well. Geothermal well costs are discussed in general, with special emphasis on variations among different geothermal areas in the United States, effects of escalation and inflation over the past few years, and comparisons of geothermal drilling costs with those for oil and gas wells. Cost differences between wells for direct use of geothermal energy and those for electric generation, are also indicated. In addition, a breakdown of total well cost into its components is presented. This provides an understanding of the relative contributions of different operations in drilling and completions. A major portion of the cost in many geothermal wells is from encountered troubles, such as lost circulation, cementing difficulties, and fishing. These trouble costs are considered through both specific examples and statistical treatment of drilling and completions problems. The sensitivities of well costs to variations in several drilling and completion parameters are presented. The mode1 makes it possible to easily vary parameters such as rates of penetration; bit lifetimes; bit rental, or rig costs; delay times; number of cement plugs; etc. are compared.

Carson, C. C.; Lin, Y.T.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

309

Lost circulation in geothermal wells: survey and evaluation of industry experience  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Lost circulation during drilling and completion of geothermal wells can be a severe problem, particularly in naturally fractured and/or vugular formations. Geothermal and petroleum operators, drilling service companies, and independent consultants were interviewed to assess the lost circulation problem in geothermal wells and to determine general practices for preventing lost circulation. This report documents the results and conclusions from the interviews and presents recommendations for needed research. In addition, a survey was also made of the lost circulation literature, of currently available lost circulation materials, and of existing lost circulation test equipment.

Goodman, M.A.

1981-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

310

High-potential Working Fluids for Next Generation Binary Cycle Geothermal Power Plants  

SciTech Connect

A thermo-economic model has been built and validated for prediction of project economics of Enhanced Geothermal Projects. The thermo-economic model calculates and iteratively optimizes the LCOE (levelized cost of electricity) for a prospective EGS (Enhanced Geothermal) site. It takes into account the local subsurface temperature gradient, the cost of drilling and reservoir creation, stimulation and power plant configuration. It calculates and optimizes the power plant configuration vs. well depth. Thus outputs from the model include optimal well depth and power plant configuration for the lowest LCOE. The main focus of this final report was to experimentally validate the thermodynamic properties that formed the basis of the thermo-economic model built in Phase 2, and thus build confidence that the predictions of the model could be used reliably for process downselection and preliminary design at a given set of geothermal (and/or waste heat) boundary conditions. The fluid and cycle downselected was based on a new proprietary fluid from a vendor in a supercritical ORC cycle at a resource condition of 200?C inlet temperature. The team devised and executed a series of experiments to prove the suitability of the new fluid in realistic ORC cycle conditions. Furthermore, the team performed a preliminary design study for a MW-scale turbo expander that would be used for a supercritical ORC cycle with this new fluid. The following summarizes the main findings in the investigative campaign that was undertaken: 1. Chemical compatibility of the new fluid with common seal/gasket/Oring materials was found to be problematic. Neoprene, Viton, and silicone materials were found to be incompatible, suffering chemical decomposition, swelling and/or compression set issues. Of the materials tested, only TEFLON was found to be compatible under actual ORC temperature and pressure conditions. 2. Thermal stability of the new fluid at 200?C and 40 bar was found to be acceptable after 399 hours of exposure?only 3% of the initial charge degraded into by products. The main degradation products being an isomer and a dimer. 3. In a comparative experiment between R245fa and the new fluid under subcritical conditions, it was found that the new fluid operated at 1 bar lower than R245fa for the same power output, which was also predicted in the Aspen HSYSY model. As a drop-in replacement fluid for R245fa, this new fluid was found to be at least as good as R245fa in terms of performance and stability. Further optimization of the subcritical cycle may lead to a significant improvement in performance for the new fluid. 4. For supercritical conditions, the experiment found a good match between the measured and model predicted state point property data and duties from the energy balance. The largest percent differences occurred with densities and evaporator duty (see Figure 78). It is therefore reasonable to conclude that the state point model was experimentally validated with a realistic ORC system. 5. The team also undertook a preliminary turbo-expander design study for a supercritical ORC cycle with the new working fluid. Variants of radial and axial turbo expander geometries went through preliminary design and rough costing. It was found that at 15MWe or higher power rating, a multi-stage axial turbine is most suitable providing the best performance and cost. However, at lower power ratings in the 5MWe range, the expander technology to be chosen depends on the application of the power block. For EGS power blocks, it is most optimal to use multi-stage axial machines. In conclusion, the predictions of the LCOE model that showed a supercritical cycle based on the new fluid to be most advantageous for geothermal power production at a resource temperature of ~ 200C have been experimentally validated. It was found that the cycle based on the new fluid is lower in LCOE and higher in net power output (for the same boundary conditions). The project, therefore has found a new optimal configuration for low temperature geothermal power production in the form of a su

Zia, Jalal [GE Global Research; Sevincer, Edip; Chen, Huijuan; Hardy, Ajilli; Wickersham, Paul; Kalra, Chiranjeev; Laursen, Anna Lis; Vandeputte, Thomas

2013-06-29T23:59:59.000Z

311

Environmental monitoring at designed geopressured-geothermal well sites, Louisiana and Texas  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This document covers the activities of monitoring environmental aspects at designated geothermal wells in Texas and Louisiana during the second quarter of 1990 by the Louisiana Geological Survey, Louisiana State University under contract with US DOE. 1 fig. (FSD)

Not Available

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

312

Drilling for geothermal resources: rules and regulations and minimum well construction standards  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The following geothermal rules and regulations are presented: authority; policy; definitions; drilling; records; blow out prevention; injection wells; abandonment; maintenance; hearings; notice procedures; hearings on refused, limited, or conditioned permit; appeals; penalties; and forms;

Not Available

1978-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

313

The Geochemistry of the HGP-A Geothermal Well: A Review and an Update  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The HGP-A geothermal well, located on the lower east rift system of Kilauea volcano, has provided steam and hot water to a 3 MWe wellhead generator facility on a continuous basis since December 1981.

Thomas, Donald M.

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

314

Simulation of fluid-rock interactions in a geothermal basin. Final report. [QUAGMR (quasi-active geothermal reservoir)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

General balance laws and constitutive relations are developed for convective hydrothermal geothermal reservoirs. A fully interacting rock-fluid system is considered; typical rock-fluid interactions involve momentum and energy transfer and the dependence of rock porosity and permeability upon the fluid and rock stresses. The mathematical model also includes multiphase (water/steam) effects. A simple analytical model is employed to study heat transfer into/or from a fluid moving in a porous medium. Numerical results show that for fluid velocities typical of geothermal systems (Reynolds number much less than 10), the fluid and the solid may be assumed to be in local thermal equilibrium. Mathematical formalism of Anderson and Jackson is utilized to derive a continuum species transport equation for flow in porous media; this method allows one to delineate, in a rigorous manner, the convective and diffusive mechanisms in the continuum representation of species transport. An existing computer program (QUAGMR) is applied to study upwelling of hot water from depth along a fault; the numerical results can be used to explain local temperature inversions occasionally observed in bore hole measurements.

Garg, S.K.; Blake, T.R.; Brownell, D.H. Jr.; Nayfeh, A.H.; Pritchett, J.W.

1975-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

315

Fully Coupled Well Models for Fluid Injection and Production  

SciTech Connect

Wells are the primary engineered component of geologic sequestration systems with deep subsurface reservoirs. Wells provide a conduit for injecting greenhouse gases and producing reservoirs fluids, such as brines, natural gas, and crude oil, depending on the target reservoir. Well trajectories, well pressures, and fluid flow rates are parameters over which well engineers and operators have control during the geologic sequestration process. Current drilling practices provided well engineers flexibility in designing well trajectories and controlling screened intervals. Injection pressures and fluids can be used to purposely fracture the reservoir formation or to purposely prevent fracturing. Numerical simulation of geologic sequestration processes involves the solution of multifluid transport equations within heterogeneous geologic media. These equations that mathematically describe the flow of fluid through the reservoir formation are nonlinear in form, requiring linearization techniques to resolve. In actual geologic settings fluid exchange between a well and reservoir is a function of local pressure gradients, fluid saturations, and formation characteristics. In numerical simulators fluid exchange between a well and reservoir can be specified using a spectrum of approaches that vary from totally ignoring the reservoir conditions to fully considering reservoir conditions and well processes. Well models are a numerical simulation approach that account for local conditions and gradients in the exchange of fluids between the well and reservoir. As with the mathematical equations that describe fluid flow in the reservoir, variation in fluid properties with temperature and pressure yield nonlinearities in the mathematical equations that describe fluid flow within the well. To numerically simulate the fluid exchange between a well and reservoir the two systems of nonlinear multifluid flow equations must be resolved. The spectrum of numerical approaches for resolving these equations varies from zero coupling to full coupling. In this paper we describe a fully coupled solution approach for well model that allows for a flexible well trajectory and screened interval within a structured hexahedral computational grid. In this scheme the nonlinear well equations have been fully integrated into the Jacobian matrix for the reservoir conservation equations, minimizing the matrix bandwidth.

White, Mark D.; Bacon, Diana H.; White, Signe K.; Zhang, Z. F.

2013-08-05T23:59:59.000Z

316

Geothermal field case studies that document the usefulness of models in predicting reservoir and well behavior  

SciTech Connect

The geothermal industry has shown significant interest in case histories that document field production histories and demonstrate the techniques which work best in the characterization and evaluation of geothermal systems. In response to this interest, LBL has devoted a significant art of its geothermal program to the compilation and analysis of data from US and foreign fields (e.g., East Mesa, The Geysers, Susanville, and Long Valley in California; Klamath Falls in Oregon; Valles Caldera, New Mexico; Cerro Prieto and Los Azufres in Mexico; Krafla and Nesjavellir in Iceland; Larderello in Italy; Olkaria in Kenya). In each of these case studies we have been able to test and validate in the field, or against field data, the methodology and instrumentation developed under the Reservoir Technology Task of the DOE Geothermal Program, and to add to the understanding of the characteristics and processes occurring in geothermal reservoirs. Case study results of the producing Cerro Prieto and Olkaria geothermal fields are discussed in this paper. These examples were chosen because they illustrate the value of conceptual and numerical models to predict changes in reservoir conditions, reservoir processes, and well performance that accompany field exploitation, as well as to reduce the costs associated with the development and exploitation of geothermal resources. 14 refs., 6 figs.

Lippmann, M.J.

1989-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

317

Geothermal Field Case Studies that Document the Usefulness of Models in Predicting Reservoir and Well Behavior  

SciTech Connect

The geothermal industry has shown significant interest in case histories that document field production histories and demonstrate the techniques which work best in the characterization and evaluation of geothermal systems. In response to this interest, LBL has devoted a significant part of its geothermal program to the compilation and analysis of data from US and foreign fields (e.g., East Mesa, The Geysers, Susanville, and Long Valley in California; Klamath Fall in Oregon; Valles Caldera, New Mexico; Cerro Prieto and Los Azufres in Mexico; Krafla and Nesjavellir in Iceland; Larderello in Italy; Olkaria in Kenya). In each of these case studies we have been able to test and validate in the field, or against field data, the methodology and instrumentation developed under the Reservoir Technology Task of the DOE Geothermal Program, and to add to the understanding of the characteristics and processes occurring in geothermal reservoirs. Case study results of the producing Cerro Prieto and Olkaria geothermal fields are discussed in this paper. These examples were chosen because they illustrate the value of conceptual and numerical models to predict changes in reservoir conditions, reservoir processes, and well performance that accompany field exploitation, as well as to reduce the costs associated with the development and exploitation of geothermal resources.

Lippmann, Marcelo J.

1989-03-21T23:59:59.000Z

318

Prospects for improvement in geothermal well technology and their expected benefits  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Performance restrictions on current geothermal drilling technology and their impact on drilling costs are reviewed, with the impact on electric power costs. Sensitivities of drilling costs to changes in drilling performance are analyzed. A programmatic goal for improving drilling performance is offered. The likely cost savings to the nation if the goal is attained are estimated though the use of a geothermal well drilling scenario for the 1978 to 1990 period, which was derived from DOE's geothermal power on-line scenario. The present worth of the expectd savings stream (benefit) is offered as a point of departure for justifying programmatic costs for improving drilling technology.

Not Available

1978-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

319

Simulation of air and mist drilling for geothermal wells  

SciTech Connect

An improved method for calculating downhole temperatures, pressures, fluid densities and velocities during air drilling has been developed. The basic equations of fluid flow for a gas with cuttings and mist are presented along with a numerical method for their solution. Several applications of this calculational method are given, showing the effect of flow rate and standpipe pressures in typical air and mist drilling situations. 8 refs.

Mitchell, R.F.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

320

Investigation and Evaluation of Geopressured-Geothermal Wells; Detailed Reentry Prognosis for Geopressure-Geothermal Testing of Alice C. Plantation No. 2 Well  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This Gruy Federal Type II-B, geopressured-geothermal (Geo) prospect was drilled as the Sun Oil Company, No. 2 Alice C. Plantation and is located in Section 2, Township 16-S, Range 10-E, St. mary Parish, Louisiana. The well site is 3,705.61 feet from U.S.C. and G.S. marker ''Foster''. The well site is located in a sugar cane field, and is accessible by approximately 2,500 feet of cane field road. The well was originally drilled to a depth of 19,000 feet and abandoned as a dry hole in December, 1963. The location is shown on the west central area of the USGS topographic sheet, 'North Bend'', Louisiana, in the Gruy Federal report, ''Investigation and Evaluation of Geopressured-Geothermal Wells, prospective Test Wells in the Texas and Louisiana Gulf Coast'', March 20, 1978.

None

1978-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "wells geothermal fluid" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Deep Production Well for Geothermal Direct-Use Heating of A Large Commercial Greenhouse, Radium Springs, Rio Grande Rift, New Mexico  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Expansion of a large commercial geothermally-heated greenhouse is underway and requires additional geothermal fluid production. This report discusses the results of a cost-shared U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and A.R. Masson, Inc. drilling project designed to construct a highly productive geothermal production well for expansion of the large commercial greenhouse at Radium Springs. The well should eliminate the potential for future thermal breakthrough from existing injection wells and the inducement of inflow from shallow cold water aquifers by geothermal production drawdown in the shallow reservoir. An 800 feet deep production well, Masson 36, was drilled on a US Bureau of Land Management (BLM) Geothermal Lease NM-3479 at Radium Springs adjacent to the A. R. Masson Radium Springs Farm commercial greenhouse 15 miles north of Las Cruces in Dona Ana County, New Mexico just west of Interstate 25 near the east bank of the Rio Grande. The area is in the Rio Grande rift, a tectonically-active region with high heat flow, and is one of the major geothermal provinces in the western United State.

James C. Witcher

2002-01-02T23:59:59.000Z

322

ORGANIC SPECIES IN GEOTHERMAL WATERS IN LIGHT OF FLUID INCLUSION...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

> 0.001 mol % typically have ethane > ethylene, propane > propylene, and butane > butylene. There are three end member fluid compositions: type 1 fluids in which...

323

FLUID INCLUSION STRATIGRAPHY: NEW METHOD FOR GEOTHERMAL RESERVOIR...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

(0) Abstract: Fluid Inclusion Stratigraphy (FIS) is a new technique developed for the oil industry in order to map borehole fluids. This method is being studied for application...

324

Lightweight CO{sub 2}-resistant cements for geothermal well completions  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Materials formed by acid-base reactions between calcium aluminate compounds and phosphate-containing solutions yield high strength, low permeability and CO{sub 2}-resistant cements when cured in hydrothermal environments. The cementing formulations are pumpable at temperatures up to 150{degrees}C. thereby making their use for well completions technically feasible. When this cementing matrix was exposed in an autoclave containing Na{sub 2}CO{sub 3},-saturated brine for 120 days. <0.4 wt% CaCO{sub 3} was produced. A conventional portland cement-based well completion material will form {approximately}10 wt% CACO, after only 7 days exposure. The addition of hollow aluminosilicate microspheres to the uncured matrix constituents yields slurries with densities as low as {approximately} 1.2 g/cc which cure to produce materials with properties meeting die criteria for well cementing. These formulations also exhibit low rates of carbonation. Laboratory characterization is nearing completion. engineering scale-up is underway, and plans for field testing in a variety of geothermal fluids are being made.

Kukacka, L.E.; Sugama, T.

1995-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

325

Niland development project geothermal loan guaranty: 49-MW (net) power plant and geothermal well field development, Imperial County, California: Environmental assessment  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The proposed federal action addressed by this environmental assessment is the authorization of disbursements under a loan guaranteed by the US Department of Energy for the Niland Geothermal Energy Program. The disbursements will partially finance the development of a geothermal well field in the Imperial Valley of California to supply a 25-MW(e) (net) power plant. Phase I of the project is the production of 25 MW(e) (net) of power; the full rate of 49 MW (net) would be achieved during Phase II. The project is located on approximately 1600 acres (648 ha) near the city of Niland in Imperial County, California. Well field development includes the initial drilling of 8 production wells for Phase I, 8 production wells for Phase II, and the possible need for as many as 16 replacement wells over the anticipated 30-year life of the facility. Activities associated with the power plant in addition to operation are excavation and construction of the facility and associated systems (such as cooling towers). Significant environmental impacts, as defined in Council on Environmental Quality regulation 40 CFR Part 1508.27, are not expected to occur as a result of this project. Minor impacts could include the following: local degradation of ambient air quality due to particulate and/or hydrogen sulfide emissions, temporarily increased ambient noise levels due to drilling and construction activities, and increased traffic. Impacts could be significant in the event of a major spill of geothermal fluid, which could contaminate groundwater and surface waters and alter or eliminate nearby habitat. Careful land use planning and engineering design, implementation of mitigation measures for pollution control, and design and implementation of an environmental monitoring program that can provide an early indication of potential problems should ensure that impacts, except for certain accidents, will be minimized.

Not Available

1984-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

326

Experimental study of electron beam induced removal of H/sub 2/S from geothermal fluids  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The treatment of geothermal steam by electron beam irradiation is a potential alternative method of H/sub 2/S removal which can be applied upstream or downstream and has no chemical requirements. The experimental work reported here examines the effectiveness of electron beam treatment of geothermal fluids. These fluids are produced by combining the constituents in a heated cell, which contains an electron beam transparent window. Irradiation of the contents and subsequent chemical analysis allows an evaluation of effectiveness. These results are used for a commercial feasibility assessment.

Helfritch, D.J.; Singhvi, R.; Evans, R.D.; Reynolds, W.E.

1983-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

327

A Special Application Coiled Tubing Applied Plug for Geothermal Well Casing Remediation  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Casing deformation in wells is a common problem in many geothermal fields. Casing remediation is necessary to keep wells in production and occasionally, to even enter the well for an approved plug and abandonment procedure. The costly alternative to casing remediation is to incur the expense of drilling a new well to maintain production or drilling a well to intersect a badly damaged well below the deformation for abandonment purposes. The U.S. Department of Energy and the Geothermal Drilling Organization sponsor research and development work at Sandia National Laboratories in an effort to reduce these remediation expenditures. Sandia, in cooperation with Halliburton Energy Services, has developed a low cost, commercially available, bridge-plug-type packer for use in geothermal well environments. This report documents the development and testing of this tool for use in casing remediation work.

Knudsen, S.D.; Sattler, A.R.; Staller, G.E.

1999-05-13T23:59:59.000Z

328

Automatic detection and diagnosis of problems in drilling geothermal wells  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Sandia National Laboratories and Tracor Applied Sciences have developed a proof-of-concept Expert System for the automatic detection and diagnosis of several important problems in geothermal drilling. The system is designed to detect loss of circulation, influx, loss of pump efficiency, and sensor problems. Data from flow sensors (including the rolling float meter), the pump stroke counter and other sensors are processed and examined for deviations from expected patterns. The deviations from expected patterns. The deviations are transformed into evidence for a Bayesian Network (a probabilistic reasoning tool), which estimates the probability of each fault. The results are displayed by a Graphical User Interface, which also allows the user to see data related to a specific fault. The prototype was tested on real data, and successfully detected and diagnosed faults.

Harmse, J.E.; Wallace, R.D.; Mansure, A.J.; Glowka, D.A.

1997-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

329

Colorado: basic data for thermal springs and wells as recorded in GEOTHERM  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

GEOTHERM sample file contains 225 records for Colorado. Three computer-generated indexes are found in appendices A, B, and C of this report. The indexes give one line summaries of each GEOTHERM record describing the chemistry of geothermal springs and wells in the sample file for Colorado. Each index is sorted by different variables to assist the user in locating geothermal records describing specific sites. Appendix A is sorted by the county name and the name of the source. Also given are latitude, longitude (both use decimal minutes), township, range, section, GEOTHERM record identifier, and temperature (/sup 0/C). Appendix B is sorted by county, township, range, and section. Also given are name of source, GEOTHERM record identifier, and temperature (/sup 0/C). Appendix C is first sorted into one-degree blocks by latitude, and longitude, and then by name of source. Adjacent one-degree blocks which are published as a 1:250,000 map are combined under the appropriate map name. Also given are GEOTHERM record identifier, and temperature (/sup 0/C). A bibliography is given in Appendix D.

Bliss, J.D.

1983-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

330

Basic data for thermal springs and wells as recorded in GEOTHERM: Arizona  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

GEOTHERM sample file contains 314 records for Arizona. Three computer-generated indexes are found in appendices A, B, and C of this report. The indexes give one line summaries of each GEOTHERM record describing the chemistry of geothermal springs and wells in the sample file for Arizona. Each index is sorted by different variables to assist the user in locating geothermal records describing specific sites. Appendix A is sorted by the county name and the name of the source. Also given are latitude, longitude (both use decimal minutes), township, range, section, GEOTHERM record identifier, and temperature (/sup 0/C). Appendix B is sorted by county, township, range, and section. Also given are name of source, GEOTHERM record identifier, and temperature (/sup 0/C). Appendix C is first sorted into one-degree blocks by latitude, and longitude, and then by name of source. Adjacent one-degree blocks which are published as a 1:250,000 map are combined under the appropriate map name. Also given are GEOTHERM record identifier, and temperature (/sup 0/C). A bibliography is given in Appendix D.

Bliss, J.D.

1983-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

331

Montana: basic data for thermal springs and wells as recorded in GEOTHERM  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

GEOTHERM sample file contains 225 records for Montana. Three computer-generated indexes are found in appendices A, B, and C of this report. The indexes give one line summaries of each GEOTHERM record describing the chemistry of geothermal springs and wells in the sample file for Montana. Each index is sorted by different variables to assist the user in locating geothermal records describing specific sites. Appendix A is sorted by the county name and the name of the source. Also given are latitude, longitude (both use decimal minutes), township, range, section, GEOTHERM record identifier, and temperature (/sup 0/C). Appendix B is sorted by county, township, range, and section. Also given are name of source, GEOTHERM record identifier, and temperature (/sup 0/C). Appendix C is first sorted into one-degree blocks by latitude, and longitude, and then by name of source. Adjacent one-degree blocks which are published as a 1:250,000 map are combined under the appropriate map name. Also given are GEOTHERM record identifier, and temperature (/sup 0/C). A bibliography is given in Appendix D.

Bliss, J.D.

1983-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

332

Basic data for thermal springs and wells as recorded in GEOTHERM: Wyoming  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

GEOTHERM sample file contains 356 records for Wyoming. Three computer-generated indexes are found in appendices A, B, and C of this report. The indexes give one line summaries of each GEOTHERM record describing the chemistry of geothermal springs and wells in the sample file for Wyoming. Each index is sorted by different variables to assist the user in locating geothermal records describing specific sites. Appendix A is sorted by the county name and the name of the source. Also given are latitude, longitude (both use decimal minutes), township, range, section, GEOTHERM record identifier, and temperature (/sup 0/C). Appendix B is sorted by county, township, range, and section. Also given are name of source, GEOTHERM record identifier, and temperature (/sup 0/C). Appendix C is first sorted into one-degree blocks by latitude, and longitude, and then by name of source. Adjacent one-degree blocks which are published as a 1:250,000 map are combined under the appropriate map name. Also given are GEOTHERM record identifier, and temperature (/sup 0/C). A bibliography is given in Appendix D.

Bliss, J.D.

1983-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

333

Basic data for thermal springs and wells as recorded in GEOTHERM: New Mexico  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

GEOTHERM sample file contains 251 records for New Mexico. Three computer-generated indexes are found in appendices A, B, and C of this report. The indexes give one line summaries of each GEOTHERM record describing the chemistry of geothermal springs and wells in the sample file for New Mexico. Each index is sorted by different variables to assist the user in locating geothermal records describing specific sites. Appendix A is sorted by the county name and the name of the source. Also given are latitude, longitude (both use decimal minutes), township, range, section, GEOTHERM record identifier, and temperature (/sup 0/C). Appendix B is sorted by county, township, range, and section. Also given are name of source, GEOTHERM record identifier, and temperature (/sup 0/C). Appendix C is first sorted into one-degree blocks by latitude, and longitude, and then by name of source. Adjacent one-degree blocks which are published as a 1:250,000 map are combined under the appropriate map name. Also given are GEOTHERM record identifier, and temperature (/sup 0/C). A bibliography is given in Appendix D.

Bliss, J.D.

1983-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

334

Geopressured-geothermal well activities in Louisiana. Annual report, 1 January 1991--31 December 1991  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Since September 1978, microseismic networks have operated continuously around US Department of Energy (DOE) geopressured-geothermal well sites to monitor any microearthquake activity in the well vicinity. Microseismic monitoring is necessary before flow testing at a well site to establish the level of local background seismicity. Once flow testing has begun, well development may affect ground elevations and/or may activate growth faults, which are characteristic of the coastal region of southern Louisiana and southeastern Texas where these geopressured-geothermal wells are located. The microseismic networks are designed to detest small-scale local earthquakes indicative of such fault activation. Even after flow testing has ceased, monitoring continues to assess any microearthquake activity delayed by the time dependence of stress migration within the earth. Current monitoring shows no microseismicity in the geopressured-geothermal prospect areas before, during, or after flow testing.

John, C.J.

1992-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

335

Geothermal binary-cycle working-fluid properties information. Annual report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The research discussed was performed prior to December 31, 1979. The report was not released until September 30, 1981, so that pressure-enthalpy diagrams for a number of potential geothermal binary cycle working fluids could be prepared in SI units. Efforts were directed principally to working fluid thermophysical property correlation and presentation of properties information. Pressure-enthalpy diagrams are presented for propane, normal butane, isobutane, normal pentane, isopentane and propylene. Generalized correlations are presented for the thermodynamic and transport properties of hydrocarbon pure and mixture working fluids. Specific correlations are presented for the thermodynamic properties of 27 fluids and for the viscosity and thermal conductivity of hydrocarbons including isobutane and isopentane.

Starling, K.E.; Kumar, K.H.; Malik, Z.I.; Batson, B.; Plumb, P.

1981-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

336

Geothermal/Leasing | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Leasing Leasing < Geothermal(Redirected from Leasing) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Land Use Leasing Exploration Well Field Power Plant Transmission Environment Water Use Geothermal Leasing General List of Geothermal Leases Regulatory Roadmap NEPA (1) The Bureau of Land Management (BLM) and the USDA Forest Service (FS) have prepared a joint Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement (PEIS) to analyze and expedite the leasing of BLM-and FS-administered lands with high potential for renewable geothermal resources in 11 Western states and Alaska. Geothermal Leasing ... Geothermal Leasing NEPA Documents Fluid Mineral Leasing within Six Areas on the Carson City District (January 2009) Geothermal Resources Leasing in Churchill, Mineral, & Nye Counties,

337

Geothermal/Leasing | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Leasing Leasing < Geothermal Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Land Use Leasing Exploration Well Field Power Plant Transmission Environment Water Use Geothermal Leasing General List of Geothermal Leases Regulatory Roadmap NEPA (1) The Bureau of Land Management (BLM) and the USDA Forest Service (FS) have prepared a joint Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement (PEIS) to analyze and expedite the leasing of BLM-and FS-administered lands with high potential for renewable geothermal resources in 11 Western states and Alaska. Geothermal Leasing ... Geothermal Leasing NEPA Documents Fluid Mineral Leasing within Six Areas on the Carson City District (January 2009) Geothermal Resources Leasing in Churchill, Mineral, & Nye Counties, Nevada (May 2008)

338

Reactive geothermal transport simulation to study the formation mechanism of impermeable barrier between acidic and neutral fluid zones in the Onikobe Geothermal Field, Japan  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Two types of fluids are encountered in the Onikobe geothermal reservoir, one is neutral and the other is acidic (pH=3). It is hypothesized that acidic fluid might be upwelling along a fault zone and that an impermeable barrier might be present between the acidic and neutral fluid zones. We carried out reactive geothermal transport simulations using TOUGHREACT (Xu and Pruess, 1998 and 2001) to test such a conceptual model. Mn-rich smectite precipitated near the mixing front and is likely to form an impermeable barrier between regions with acidic and neutral fluids.

Todaka, Norifumi; Akasaka, Chitosi; Xu, Tianfu; Pruess, Karsten

2003-04-09T23:59:59.000Z

339

Investigation and evaluation of geopressured-geothermal wells. Final report: Beulah Simon No. 2 Well, Vermilion Parish, Louisiana. Volume I. Completion and testing  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Geopressured-geothermal (Geo{sup 2}) test operations were conducted at the Beulah Simon No. 2 well site during the period from September through December 1979. The well provided the second geopressured-geothermal test to be completed under the DOE-Gruy Well of Opportunity program. The completion in a geopressured aquifer of Oligocene age at approximately 14,700 feet and the testing of hot salt water from this zone were accomplished without significant difficulty. Some problems were encountered with the wireline and wireline high-pressure lubricator associated with the running of bottomhole instruments. The objectives of the project were all accomplished, and good test data were obtained on the flow rates of gas and water. The gas content was 24 standard cubic feet per stock tank barrel of water. The disposal well accepted the full wellhead stream at temperatures as high as 255{sup 0}F (124{sup 0}C). Over the 10-day flow period the hot brine did not appear to adversely affect the clay minerals in the disposal aquifer. A conclusion from this operation is that presently available wirelines and pressure lubricators are not adaptable for use with uninhibited well fluids under flowing conditions. In addition, this test demonstrated that injection of scale inhibitor down the annulus eliminated scale buildup within the flow string and surface facilities. (MHR)

Dobson, R.J.; Hartsock, J.H.; McCoy, R.L.; Rodgers, J.A.

1980-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

340

A Resource Assessment Of Geothermal Energy Resources For Converting Deep Gas Wells In Carbonate Strata Into Geothermal Extraction Wells: A Permian Basin Evaluation  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

4) Increase the productive depth range for economic geothermal energy extraction below the current 4 km limit by converting deep depleted and abandoned gas wells and fields into geothermal energy extraction wells. The first year of the proposed 3-year resource assessment covered an eight county region within the Delaware and Val Verde Basins of West Texas. This project has developed databases in Excel spreadsheet form that list over 8,000 temperature-depth recordings. These recordings come from header information listed on electric well logs recordings from various shallow to deep wells that were drilled for oil and gas exploration and production. The temperature-depth data is uncorrected and thus provides the lower temperature that is be expected to be encountered within the formation associated with the temperature-depth recording. Numerous graphs were developed from the data, all of which suggest that a log-normal solution for the thermal gradient is more descriptive of the data than a linear solution. A discussion of these plots and equations are presented within the narrative. Data was acquired that enable the determination of brine salinity versus brine density with the Permian Basin. A discussion on possible limestone and dolostone thermal conductivity parameters is presented with the purpose of assisting in determining heat flow and reservoir heat content for energy extraction. Subsurface maps of temperature either at a constant depth or within a target geothermal reservoir are discusse

Erdlac, Richard J., Jr.

2006-10-12T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "wells geothermal fluid" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

CNCC Craig Campus Geothermal Program: 82-well closed loop GHP...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

campus. The primary component in this campus approach is the common GHP well field ground heat exchanger (GHEX). The innovative design of the shared well field will demonstrate...

342

In situ experiments of geothermal well stimulation using gas fracturing technology  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The results of an experimental study of gas fracturing technology for geothermal well stimulation demonstrated that multiple fractures could be created to link water-filled boreholes with existing fractures. The resulting fracture network and fracture interconnections were characterized by mineback as well as flow tests. Commercial oil field fracturing tools were used successfully in these experiments. Simple scaling laws for gas fracturing and a brief discussion of the application of this technique to actual geothermal well stimulation are presented. 10 refs., 42 figs., 4 tabs.

Chu, T.Y.; Warpinski, N.; Jacobson, R.D.

1988-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

343

Enhanced Geothermal Systems (EGS) with CO2 as Heat Transmission Fluid  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

with CO2 as Heat Transmission Fluid with CO2 as Heat Transmission Fluid Geothermal Lab Call Project Jump to: navigation, search Last modified on July 22, 2011. Project Title Enhanced Geothermal Systems (EGS) with CO2 as Heat Transmission Fluid Project Type / Topic 1 Laboratory Call for Submission of Applications for Research, Development and Analysis of Geothermal Technologies Project Type / Topic 2 Supercritical Carbon Dioxide / Reservoir Rock Chemical Interactions Project Description Previous and current attempts to develop EGS in the U.S., Japan, Europe and Australia have all employed water as a heat transmission fluid. Water has many properties that make it a favorable medium for heat extraction, but it also has serious drawbacks. The use of supercritical CO2 (scCO2) instead of water as heat extraction fluid was suggested by Donald Brown of Los Alamos National Laboratory as a "game changing" alternative that can avoid the problems of aqueous fluids, make heretofore inaccessible energy resources available for human use, and provide ancillary benefits by using and storing CO2.

344

Development of a Special Application Coiled Tubing Applied Plug for Geothermal Well Casing Remediation  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Casing deformation in producing geothermal wells is a common problem in many geothermal fields, mainly due to the active geologic formations where these wells are typically located. Repairs to deformed well casings are necessary to keep the wells in production and to occasionally enter a well for approved plugging and abandonment procedures. The costly alternative to casing remediation is to drill a new well to maintain production and/or drill a well to intersect the old well casing below the deformation for abandonment purposes. The U.S. Department of Energy and the Geothermal Drilling Organization sponsored research and development work at Sandia National Laboratories in an effort to reduce these casing remediation expenditures. Sandia, in cooperation with Halliburton Energy Services, developed a low cost, bridge-plug-type, packer for use in casing remediation work in geothermal well environments. This report documents the development and testing of this commercially available petal-basket packer called the Special Application Coiled Tubing Applied Plug (SACTAP).

STALLER,GEORGE E.; KNUDSEN,STEVEN D.; SATTLER,ALLAN R.

1999-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

345

BLM Approves Salt Wells Geothermal Plant in Churchill County | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Plant in Churchill County Plant in Churchill County Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Web Site: BLM Approves Salt Wells Geothermal Plant in Churchill County Abstract Abstract unavailable. Author Mark Struble Published U.S. Department of the Interior- Bureau of Land Management, Carson City Field Office, Nevada, 02/13/2005 DOI Not Provided Check for DOI availability: http://crossref.org Online Internet link for BLM Approves Salt Wells Geothermal Plant in Churchill County Citation Mark Struble. BLM Approves Salt Wells Geothermal Plant in Churchill County [Internet]. 02/13/2005. Carson City, NV. U.S. Department of the Interior- Bureau of Land Management, Carson City Field Office, Nevada. [updated 2005/02/13;cited 2013/08/21]. Available from: http://www.blm.gov/nv/st/en/info/newsroom/Carson_City_News_Archives/2005/02/blm_approves_salt.html

346

Simulation of air and mist drilling for geothermal wells  

SciTech Connect

An air drilling model has been developed that accounts for cuttings and mist. Comparison of the model results with previous work shows this model to be more conservative. The equations developed are simple enough to be used in hand calculations, but the full capability of the model is more easily obtained with a computer program. Studies with the model show that volume requirements and standpipe pressures are significantly different for mist drilling compared with air drilling. An improved method for calculating downhole temperatures, pressures, fluid densities, and velocities during air drilling has been developed. Improvements on previous methods include the following. A fully transient thermal analysis of the wellbore and formation is used to determine the flowing temperatures. The effects of flow acceleration are included explicitly in the calculation. The slip velocity between the gas and the cuttings is determined by the use of a separate momentum equation for the cuttings. The possibility of critical flow in the wellbore is tested and appropriate changes in the volume flow rate and standpipe pressure are made automatically. The standpipe and flowing pressures are predicted. The analysis is conservative. The effect of the cuttings on the wellbore flow will tend to overpredict the required volume flow rates. In this paper, the basic equations of fluid flow for a gas with cuttings and mist are presented along with a numerical method for their solution. Several applications of this calculational method are given, showing the effect of flow rate and standpipe pressure in typical air and mist drilling situations.

Mitchell, R.F.

1983-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

347

Preliminary study of discharge characteristics of slim holes compared to production wells in liquid-dominated geothermal reservoirs  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

There is current interest in using slim holes for geothermal exploration and reservoir assessment. A major question that must be addressed is whether results from flow or injection testing of slim holes can be scaled to predict large diameter production well performance. This brief report describes a preliminary examination of this question from a purely theoretical point of view. The WELBOR computer program was used to perform a series of calculations of the steady flow of fluid up geothermal boreholes of various diameters at various discharge rates. Starting with prescribed bottomhole conditions (pressure, enthalpy), the WELBOR code integrates the equations expressing conservation of mass, momentum and energy (together with fluid constitutive properties obtained from the steam tables) upwards towards the wellhead using numerical techniques. This results in computed profiles of conditions (pressure, temperature, steam volume fraction, etc.) as functions of depth within the flowing well, and also in a forecast of wellhead conditions (pressure, temperature, enthalpy, etc.). From these results, scaling rules are developed and discussed.

Pritchett, J.W. [S-Cubed, La Jolla, CA (United States)

1993-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

348

Phase 2 Reese River Geothermal Project Slim Well 56-4 Drilling and Testing  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report covers the drilling and testing of the slim well 56-4 at the Reese River Geothermal Project in Lander County, Nevada. This well was partially funded through a GRED III Cooperative Funding Agreement # DE-FC36-04GO14344, from USDOE.

Henkle, William R.; Ronne, Joel

2008-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

349

Economic impact of using nonmetallic materials in low to intermediate temperature geothermal well construction. Volume 1  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The results are presented of an exhaustive literature search and evaluation concerning the properties and economics of commercially available nonmetallic well casing and screens. These materials were studied in terms of their use in low to intermediate temperature geothermal well construction.

Not Available

1979-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

350

Subterrene rock-melting concept applied to the production of deep geothermal wells  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The drilling of wells comprises a large fraction of the costs of geothermal energy-extraction plants, and billions of dollars for wells will be needed before geothermal energy is nationally significant. Technical and cost studies were made of the application of the Subterrene concept, i.e., excavating and penetrating rocks or soils by melting, to deep wells such as may be used for dry-hot-rock or geopressure geothermal energy extraction systems. Technically, it was found that Subterrene requirements are compatible with those of current rotary drilling practices. Certain features of the rock-melting concept such as the glass lining on the borehole wall, and nonrotation, provide opportunities for the development of better well production techniques in hot wells. A typical optimum-cost well would be rotary-drilled in the upper regions and then rock-melted to total depth. Indicated cost-savings are significant: a 33 percent or 4.5 million dollars reduction from rotary drilled well costs are estimated for a 10 km depth well with bottom hole temperatures of 673 K. Even for normal geothermal gradient conditions, the savings for the 10 km depth is estimated as 23 percent or 2 million dollars.

Altseimer, J.H.

1976-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

351

Geothermal well technology and potential applications of Subterrene devices: a status review  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The past, present, and some future aspects of the geothermal energy (GTE) industry have been reviewed with special attention given to geothermal well-drilling problems. Geothermal wells can be produced with present equipment and methods, mostly derived from the oil and gas industry, but costs are relatively high. Short-term improvements are needed in drilling rigs and auxiliary surface equipment, drill bits, bit-bearing lubrication systems, tubular goods, high-temperature muds and cements, logging and downhole sampling equipment, directional control equipment applicable to geothermal conditions,and in the use of a data bank for GTE wells to help optimize drilling programs. Two types of wells are needed: (1) small-diameter wells for exploration, reinjection, and disposal purposes, and (2) larger-diameter wells for production. To develop and greatly expand the use of GTE in the future, new methods and equipment are needed to penetrate hard abrasive rocks and to provide hole stabilization and support at the very high temperatures and other extreme conditions which can be encountered in GTE wells. New Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory concepts for penetrating rocks by use of rock-melting processes (called Subterrene concepts) offer potential solutions to some difficult GTE well-production problems.

Altseimer, J.H.

1974-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

352

Three dimensional interpretations of single-well electromagnetic data for geothermal applications  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Energy, Office of Wind and Geothermal Technologies of theTwenty-Ninth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir EngineeringELECTROMAGNETIC DATA FOR GEOTHERMAL APPLICATIONS Hung-Wen

Tseng, Hung-Wen; Lee, Ki Ha

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

353

Geothermal wells: the cost benefit of fracture stimulation estimated by the GEOCOM code. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

GEOCOM, a computer code that provides life cycle cost/benefit analysis of completion technologies applied to geothermal wells, is used to study fracture stimulation techniques. it is estimated that stimulation must increase flow by roughly tons per $100,000 in order to be cost effective. Typically, hydraulic fracturing costs $100,000 to $500,000 per well, and the attempts at stimulation to date have generally not achieved the desired flow increases. The cost effectiveness of hydraulic fracturing is considered for several geothermal reservoirs.

Brown, G.L.

1983-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

354

Session 18: Geothermal Well Stimulation - Program Summary and the Beowawe Field Experiment  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Republic Geothermal, Inc. and its subcontractors have planned and executed laboratory studies and eight well stimulation field experiments under the Geothermal Reservoir Well Stimulation Program (GRWSP). The program, begun in February 1979, has concentrated on extending petroleum industry stimulation technology for use by the geothermal industry. The most recent experiment was in a naturally fractured Chevron well at Beowawe and involved an acid stimulation of a damaged interval which yielded a 2.3-fold increase in injectivity. Overall results to date have shown that stimulation is viable where adequate reservoirs are penetrated by wells encountering formation damage or locally tight formations. However, wells in marginal naturally fractured reservoirs have not been saved by the types of well stimulation jobs performed thus far. A recent discovery is that many wells can possibly be made outstanding producers by widening and propping compliant natural fractures. Confirmation of this constitutes unfinished business of the GRWSP, and offers one of the greatest potential opportunities for enhancing the economics of geothermal power production.

Verity, R.V.

1983-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

355

Investigation and evaluation of geopressured-geothermal wells  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Over the life of the project, 1143 wildcat wells were screened for possible use. Although many did not meet the program's requirement for sand development, a surprisingly large number were abandoned because of downhole mechanical problems. Only 94 of these wells were completed as commercial hydrocarbon producers. Five wells of opportunity were funded for testing. Of these, two were evaluated for their hydraulic energy, thermal energy, and recoverable methane, and three were abandoned because of mechanical problems. (MHR)

Hartsock, J.H.; Rodgers, J.A.

1980-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

356

EA for Well Field Development at Patua Geothermal Area -DOI...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

material storage. Off-pad stormwater would be directed away from the well pads. *An emergency response plan would be implemented that includes contingencies for hazardous...

357

Tailored Working Fluids for Enhanced Binary Geothermal Power...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

conversion efficiency of systems employed by: - Tailoring the subcritical andor supercritical glide of enhanced working fluids to best match thermal resources. - Identifying...

358

Characteristics of Basin and Range Geothermal Systems with Fluid...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Our ability to distinguish between moderate and high temperature systems using fluid chemistry has been limited by often inaccurate estimates based on shallow samples and by a...

359

Environmental monitoring at designed geopressured-geothermal well sites, Louisiana and Texas  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The research objectives of this report are to: implement and maintain the ongoing environmental monitoring program around DOE geopressured-geothermal test wells in Louisiana and Texas; analyze and interpret collected data for evidence of subsidence and induced microearthquakes which may be brought about by geopressured-geothermal well testing and development; continue geological-geophysical studies of the Hulin and Gladys McCall sites incorporating new seismic data; continue review of previously identified and tested geopressured-geothermal prospects in Louisiana to determine if any link exists between such reservoirs and the existence of free gas in commercial or subcommercial quantities; and initiate review of geology, co-location and properties of geopressured brines with medium and heavy oil reservoirs in Louisiana utilizing existing maps, databases, reports, and journal articles. 2 figs.

Not Available

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

360

Environmental monitoring at designed geopressured-geothermal well sites, Louisiana and Texas  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The research objectives of this report are to: implement and maintain the ongoing environmental monitoring program around DOE geopressured-geothermal test well in Louisiana and Texas; analyze and interpret collected data for evidence of subsidence and induced microearthquakes which may be brought about by geopressured-geothermal well testing and development; continue geological-geophysical studies of the Hulin and Gladys McCall sites incorporating new seismic data; continue review of previously identified and tested geopressured-geothermal prospects in Louisiana to determine if any link exists between such reservoirs and the existence of free gas in commercial or subcommercial quantities; and initiate review of geology, co-location and properties of geopressured brines with medium and heavy oil reservoirs in Louisiana utilizing existing maps, databases, reports, and journal articles.

Groat, C.; Stevenson, D.

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "wells geothermal fluid" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Testing geopressured geothermal reservoirs in existing wells. Annual report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This contract called for the acquisition and testing of Wells of Opportunity. Wells of Opportunity are located by screening published information on oil industry activity and through personal contacts with oil operators. This process resulted in recommendation of 21 candidate wells to the DOE for the WOO program. Of the 21 wells recommended, 7 were accepted. Six of these 7 were acquired for testing. Three wells have been tested, and the fourth and fifth will be tested early in 1981. Preliminary test results are briefly described and are shown in a table. The actual testing schedule and the originally proposed schedule matched very closely. Cumulative costs through November 1980 were approximately $6.5 million and compare to an estimate of $8.5 million for the same period. A graphical comparison of actual versus estimated costs is given.

Not Available

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

362

Advanced Binary Geothermal Power Plancts Working Fluid Property Determination and Heat Exchanger Design  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The performance of binary geothermal power plants can be improved through the proper choice of a working fluid, and optimization of component designs and operating conditions. This paper reviews the investigations at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) which are examining binary cycle performance improvements: for moderate temperature (350 to 400 F) resources with emphasis on how the improvements may be integrated into design of binary cycles. These investigations are examining performance improvements resulting from the supercritical vaporization of mixed hydrocarbon working fluids and achieving countercurrent integral condensation with these fluids, as well as the modification of the turbine inlet state points to achieve supersaturated turbine vapor expansions. For resources where the brine outlet temperature is restricted, the use of turbine exhaust recuperators is examined. The baseline plant used to determine improvements in plant performance (characterized by the increase in the net brine effectiveness, watt-hours per pound of brine) in these studies operates at conditions similar to the 45 MW Heber binary plant. Through the selection of the optimum working fluids and operating conditions, achieving countercurrent integral condensation, and allowing supersaturated vapor expansions in the turbine, the performance of the binary cycle (the net brine effectiveness) can be improved by 25 to 30% relative to the baseline plant. The design of these supercritical Rankine-cycle (Binary) power plants for geothermal resources requires information about the potential working fluids used in the cycle. In addition, methods to design the various components, (e.g., heat exchangers, pumps, turbines) are needed. This paper limits its view of component design methods to the heat exchangers in binary power plants. The design of pumps and, turbines for these working fluids presents no new problems to the turbine manufacturer. However, additional work is proceeding at the Heat Cycle Research Facility to explore metastable expansions within turbines. This work, when completed, should allow the designer more flexibility in the state point selection in the design of these cycles which will potentially increase the system performance. The paper explores the different systems of thermodynamic and transport properties for mixtures of hydrocarbons. Methods include a computer program EXCST developed at the National Bureau of Standards in Boulder, as well as some of the thermodynamic models available in the chemical process simulation code, ASPEN, which was originally developed by the Department of Energy. The heat exchanger design methodology and computer programs of Heat Transfer Research, Inc. (HTRI) have been used because they represent data which is used throughout the industry by A & E firms as well as most heat exchanger manufacturers. For most cases, some modification of the computer results are necessary for supercritical heater design. When condensation takes place on the inside of enhanced tubes, new methods beyond HTRI's present state are necessary. The paper will discuss both of these modifications.

Bliem, C.J.; Mines, G.L.

1989-03-21T23:59:59.000Z

363

WELCST: engineering cost model of geothermal wells. Description and user's guide  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

WELCST, a FORTRAN code for estimating the effects of R and D project results upon the future cost of geothermal wells is described. The code simulates the drilling and completion of a well at 27 specific US geothermal prospects, given assumptions about well design and casing plan, formation drillability, and selected engineering and cost characteristics of today's drilling technology. The user may change many of the assumptions about engineering and cost characteristics to allow WELCST to simulate impacts of specific R and D projects on the estimated cost of wells at the prospects. An important capability of WELCST is that it simulates rates and costs of major drilling mishaps, based on drilling incident data from the Imperial Valley and Geysers geothermal fields. WELCST is capable of estimating geothermal well costs at liquid-dominated (hydrothermal) sites, vapor-dominated sites, geopressured sites, and Hot Dry Rock sites. The model can contribute to many system-optimization studies, and could be easily adapted to estimate well costs outside of the United States.

Entingh, D.J.; Lopez, A.

1979-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

364

PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Sixth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, Stanford, California, January 31 -February 2, 2011  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Sixth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University AND PDM SYSTEMS IMPROVE DRILLING PERFORMANCE IN A CALIFORNIA GEOTHERMAL WELL Dennis Lovett, Terra system allows data transmission without a continuous fluid column. Operating the Coso geothermal field

Stanford University

365

Geothermal Reservoir Dynamics - TOUGHREACT  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Swelling in a Fractured Geothermal Reservoir, presented atTHC) Modeling Based on Geothermal Field Data, Geothermics,and Silica Scaling in Geothermal Production-Injection Wells

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

366

The Marysville, Montana, Geothermal Project: Environmental Analysis of the Deep Geothermal Research Well  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The objective of this research project is to investigate a geothermal anomaly of high heat flow discovered in 1969 in central Montana, and to determine how this natural resource might be developed as a source of useful energy. Under Phase I, the natural resource will be explored, drilled, and modeled at an estimated cost of $2,588,935 over a 3-year period. Phase II, depending upon the nature of the heat source, will be developing the resource under a cooperative effort of government and private industry. This environmental analysis is intended to cover the drilling and logging operations noted under Phase I, the only work being undertaken at this time. As can be seen from Figure 1, further tests may be run at this site in later phases of the study. But since the nature of these tests are highly dependent on the results of Phase I, it is not considered productive to speculate on their environmental impact. As is show, however, any later experiments would cover a range of underground experiments, some of which consume water and others which would produce water. Before a meaningful analysis of such work can be written, it will be necessary to analyze the results of Phase I findings.

None

1973-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

367

Testing geopressured geothermal reservoirs in existing wells. Wells of Opportunity Program final contract report, 1980-1981  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The geopressured-geothermal candidates for the Wells of Opportunity program were located by the screening of published information on oil industry activity and through direct contact with the oil and gas operators. This process resulted in the recommendation to the DOE of 33 candidate wells for the program. Seven of the 33 recommended wells were accepted for testing. Of these seven wells, six were actually tested. The first well, the No. 1 Kennedy, was acquired but not tested. The seventh well, the No. 1 Godchaux, was abandoned due to mechanical problems during re-entry. The well search activities, which culminated in the acceptance by the DOE of 7 recommended wells, were substantial. A total of 90,270 well reports were reviewed, leading to 1990 wells selected for thorough geological analysis. All of the reservoirs tested in this program have been restricted by one or more faults or permeability barriers. A comprehensive discussion of test results is presented.

Not Available

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

368

Investigation and evaluation of geopressured-geothermal wells. Summary of Gruy Federal's Well-of-Opportunity Program to January 31, 1980  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Scouting and monitoring techniques peculiar to geopressured-geothermal wells and legal problems are presented. The following are tabulated: priority wells actively monitored, industry contacts, and the summary of industry responses to well-or-opportunity solicitation. (MHR)

Not Available

1980-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

369

Hydrologic properties of the Dixie Valley, Nevada, geothermal reservoir from well-test analyses  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Temperature, pressure, and spinner (TPS) logs have been recorded in several wells from the Dixie Valley Geothermal Reservoir in west central Nevada. A variety of well-test analyses has been performed with these data to quantify the hydrologic properties of this fault-dominated geothermal resource. Four complementary analytical techniques were employed, their individual application depending upon availability and quality of data and validity of scientific assumptions. In some instances, redundancy in methodologies was used to decouple interrelated terms. The methods were (1) step-drawdown, variable-discharge test; (2) recovery analysis; (3) damped-oscillation response; and (4) injection test. To date, TPS logs from five wells have been examined and results fall into two distinct categories. Productive, economically viable wells have permeability-thickness values on the order of 10{sup 5} millidarcy-meter (mD-m) and storativities of about 10{sup {minus}3}. Low-productivity wells, sometimes located only a few kilometers from their permeable counterparts, are artesian and display a sharp reduction in permeability-thickness to about 10 mD-m with storativities on the order of 10{sup {minus}4}. These results demonstrate that the hydrologic characteristics of this liquid-dominated geothermal system exhibit a significant spatial variability along the range-bounding normal fault that forms the predominant aquifer. A large-scale, coherent model of the Dixie Valley Geothermal Reservoir will require an understanding of the nature of this heterogeneity and the parameters that control it.

Morin, R.H. [Geological Survey, Denver, CO (United States); Hickman, S.H. [Geological Survey, Menlo Park, CA (United States); Barton, C.A. [Stanford Univ., CA (United States). Dept. of Geophysics; Shapiro, A.M. [Geological Survey, Reston, VA (United States); Benoit, W.R. [Oxbow Geothermal Corp., Reno, NV (United States); Sass, J.H. [Geological Survey, Flagstaff, AZ (United States)

1998-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

370

Numerical studies of fluid-rock interactions in Enhanced Geothermal Systems (EGS) with CO2 as working fluid  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Development of Enhanced Geothermal Systems, paper presentedin the Deep Reservoir of the Mt. Amiata Geothermal Field,Italy, Transactions, Geothermal Resources Council, 31, 153-

Xu, Tianfu; Pruess, Karsten; Apps, John

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

371

Role of Fluid Pressure in the Production Behavior of Enhanced Geothermal Systems with CO2 as Working Fluid  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and Clay Swelling in a Fractured Geothermal Reservoir,Transactions, Geothermal Resources Council, Vol. 28, pp.2004b. Pruess, K. Enhanced Geothermal Systems (EGS) Using CO

Pruess, Karsten

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

372

Hulin Geopressure-geothermal test well: First order levels  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The purpose of this survey was to level through and establish elevations for existing benchmarks along LA Highway No. 685 from Erath, Louisiana south to the well site. The leveling was performed in April 1991, and was accomplished using procedures and equipment identical to that used by the National Geodetic Survey for First Order Class I Leveling. The leveling began on benchmark NGS T-361 located in Erath, Louisiana and the published elevation of 5.271 feet was used for this survey. On this survey a new benchmark, HU-18 was set on a concrete slab in the well site to observe the subsidence of the ground surface. Also, benchmark No.8 could not be found. A two hour search was made with no results. At this leveling it was noted that an error was made. A metric D.E. was used for the well head elevation instead of feet. This error has been corrected in this report.

None

1991-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

373

Investigation and evaluation of geopressured-geothermal wells. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This well was approved for reentry and test operations after consideration of a number of reentry prospects in Cameron Parish. This was a marsh location that required 2.3 miles of board road and replacement of two bridges. Road work was commenced on June 19, 1978, and site preparation was completed on October 25. The drilling rig moved on location on November 2. This rig was released on December 16. Reentry operations were completely unsuccessful because of failure to effect a tieback of the 7'' casing. The plugging and abandonment records filed with the Louisiana Department of Conservtion indicated that the top of the 7'' casing was at or near the base of the 10-3/4'' casing when the well was plugged. These records did not specify that the 7'' casing had been dynamited one or more times during the recovery operation. Numerous attempts were made to locate and condition the 7'' casing for tying back to the surface. All these were unsuccessful. The top of the 7'' casing was never clearly located, or if located was subsequently lost, and therefore it was not possible to cut and recover the damaged section in order to effect a tieback. The total cost of the attempted reentry was approximately $1,925,000. Of this amount, some $444,000 was spent on road and site preparation and disposal well. This expenditure can be salvaged in the event a decision is made to redrill the well.

Dobson, R.J.; Hartsock, J.H.; Willits, M.H.

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

374

Investigation and Evaluation of Geopressured-Geothermal Wells; Detailed Reentry Prognosis for Geopressure-Geothermal Testing of The Watkins-Miller No. 1 Well, Cameron Parish, Louisiana  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This Gruy Federal Type II-B prospect was drilled as the Superior Oil Company No. 1 Watkins-Miller, API designation 17-023-20501 and is located in Section 5, T15S, R5W, Cameron Parish, Louisiana. The well site is just north of lot 39 on Indian Point Island and is readily accessible from state highway Route 82 and a shell road in good condition. Superior Oil completed this well in late 1970 as a dual gas producer in sands between 11,150 and 11,250 feet but eventually abandoned the well in December, 1974. The cellar of the well is still visible on the site. This location is shown on the lower portion of USGS topographic sheet ''Grand Lake West'' in the map pocket of the Gruy Federal report ''Investigation and Evaluation of Geopressured-Geothermal Wells, Prospective Test Wells in the Texas and Louisiana Gulf Coast'', February 28, 1978.

None

1978-04-13T23:59:59.000Z

375

Fluid-Rock Characterization and Interactions in NMR Well Logging  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The objective of this project is to characterize the fluid properties and fluid-rock interactions that are needed for formation evaluation by NMR well logging. This is the first annual progress report submitted to the DOE. It reports on the work completed during the reporting period even if it may have started before this period. This project is a partnership between Professor George J. Hirasaki at Rice University and Professor Kishore Mohanty at University of Houston. In addition to the DOE, this project is supported by a consortium of oil companies and service companies. The fluid properties characterization has emphasized the departure of live oils from correlations based on dead oils. Also, asphaltic components can result in a difference between the T1 and T2 relaxation time distributions as well as reduce the hydrogen index. The fluid rock characterizations that are reported here are the effects of wettability and internal magnetic field gradients. A pore reconstruction method ha s been developed to recreate three-dimensional porous media from two-dimensional images that reproduce some of their key statistical properties. A Monte Carlo simulation technique has been developed to calculate the magnetization decay in fluid saturated porous media given their pore structure.

Hirasaki, George J.; Mohanty, Kishore, K.

2001-07-13T23:59:59.000Z

376

GEOTHERMAL PILOT STUDY FINAL REPORT: CREATING AN INTERNATIONAL GEOTHERMAL ENERGY COMMUNITY  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

B. Direct Application of Geothermal Energy . . . . . . . . .Reservoir Assessment: Geothermal Fluid Injection, ReservoirD. E. Appendix Small Geothermal Power Plants . . . . . . .

Bresee, J. C.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

377

Fluid-Rock Characterization and Interactions in NMR Well Logging  

SciTech Connect

The objective of this report is to characterize the fluid properties and fluid-rock interactions that are needed for formation evaluation by NMR well logging. The advances made in the understanding of NMR fluid properties are summarized in a chapter written for an AAPG book on NMR well logging. This includes live oils, viscous oils, natural gas mixtures, and the relation between relaxation time and diffusivity. Oil based drilling fluids can have an adverse effect on NMR well logging if it alters the wettability of the formation. The effect of various surfactants on wettability and surface relaxivity are evaluated for silica sand. The relation between the relaxation time and diffusivity distinguishes the response of brine, oil, and gas in a NMR well log. A new NMR pulse sequence in the presence of a field gradient and a new inversion technique enables the T{sub 2} and diffusivity distributions to be displayed as a two-dimensional map. The objectives of pore morphology and rock characterization are to identify vug connectivity by using X-ray CT scan, and to improve NMR permeability correlation. Improved estimation of permeability from NMR response is possible by using estimated tortuosity as a parameter to interpolate between two existing permeability models.

George J. Hirasaki; Kishore K. Mohanty

2005-09-05T23:59:59.000Z

378

Behavioral design to model a reactive decision of an expert in geothermal wells  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Software design based on agents represents a new perspective for computer science and more specifically, for Artificial Intelligence. It is a new theory that has innovated the analysis, design and implementation of system software. The design of agents ... Keywords: Artificial Intelligence, Autonomous action, Behavioral analysis, Cognitive models, Geothermal wells, Inverse problem, Multi-agent architecture, Reactive agents, Subjective domain, Temperature formation

Ana Lilia Laureano-Cruces; Gilberto Espinosa-Paredes

2005-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

379

Proceedings World Geothermal Congress 2010 Bali, Indonesia, 25-29 April 2010  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and is in a 250-260 °C range. Under reservoir temperature and pressure conditions the geothermal fluid plant to 15 MWe (GB1+GB2) and was put into service in 2003. The consequent increase in geothermal fluid the geothermal fluid supplied to GB1. Over this period, the well-head pressures were monitored for each well

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

380

Geothermal-well completions: a survey and technical evaluation of existing equipment and needs  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The geothermal environment and associated well completion problems are reviewed. Existing well completion equipment is surveyed and limitations are identified. A technical evaluation of selected completion equipment is presented. The technical evaluation concentrates on well cementing equipment and identifies potential failure mechanisms which limit the effectiveness of these tools. Equipment employed in sand control, perforating, and corrosion control are identified as potential subjects for future technical evaluation.

Nicholson, J.E.; Snyder, R.E.

1982-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "wells geothermal fluid" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Testing geopressured geothermal reservoirs in existing wells: Detailed completion prognosis for geopressured-geothermal well of opportunity, prospect #7  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This book is a detailed prognosis covering the acquisition, completion, drilling, testing and abandonment of the Frank A. Godchaux, III, Well No. 1 under the Wells of Opportunity Program. The well is located approximately 12 miles southeast of the city of Abbeville, Louisiana. Eaton Operating Company proposes to test a section of the Planulina sand at a depth ranging from 15,584 to 15,692 feet. The reservoir pressure is estimated to be 14,480 psi and the temperature of the formation water is expected to be 298 F. The water salinity is calculated to be 75,000 ppm. The well is expected to produce 20,000 barrels of water per day with a gas content of 44 standard cubic feet pre barrel. The well was acquired from C and K Petroleu, Inc. on March 20, 1981. C and K abandoned the well at a total depth of 16,000 feet. The well has a 7-5/8 inches liner set at 13,387 feet. Eaton proposes to set 5-1/2 inch casing at 16,000 feet and produce the well through the casing using a 2-3/8 inch tubing string for wireline protection and for pressure control. A 4,600 foot saltwater disposal well will be drilled on the site and testing will be conducted similar to previous Eaton tests. The total estimated cost to perform the work is $2,959,000. An optional test from 14,905 to 15,006 feet may be performed after the original test and will require a workover with a rig on location to perform the plugback. The surface production equipment utilized on previous Eaton WOO tests will be utilized on this test. This equipment has worked satisfactorily and all parties involved in the testing are familiar with its operation. The Institute of Gas Technology and Mr. Don Clark will handle the sampling and testing and reservoir evaluation, respectively, as on the previous Eaton tests.

Godchaux, Frank A.

1981-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

382

Review and evaluation of literature on testing of chemical additives for scale control in geothermal fluids. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A selected group of reported tests of chemical additives in actual geothermal fluids are reviewed and evaluated to summarize the status of chemical scale-control testing and identify information and testing needs. The task distinguishes between scale control in the cooling system of a flash plant and elsewhere in the utilization system due to the essentially different operating environments involved. Additives for non-cooling geothermal fluids are discussed by scale type: silica, carbonate, and sulfide.

Crane, C.H.; Kenkeremath, D.C.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

383

Be in the Salton Sea Geothermal System, California (USA): Salton Sea Scientific Drilling Project, California State 2-14 well: Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Salton Sea Geothermal System lies in the old Colorado River Delta, where sediments have been metamorphosed by hydrothermal processes. Fluids, from well Fee No. 5 and deep hole SSSDP California State 2-14, as well as rocks from the deep hole were studied for /sup 10/Be and /sup 9/Be. In the solid samples /sup 10/Be concentration ranges from 29 to 259 /times/ 10/sup 6/ atom/g and /sup 9/Be from 0.49 to 2.52 ppM. The /sup 10/Be concentration in the geothermal waters ranges from 2 /times/ 10/sup 3/ to 2.9 /times/ 10/sup 6/ atom/g and /sup 9/Be from 0.7 to 16.6 ppB. Compared to the steady-state inventory which represents the quantity of /sup 10/Be expected from rain deposition alone (/approximately/1 /times/ 10/sup 12/ atom/cm/sup 2/), the /sup 10/Be inventory in the deep core is 3 orders of magnitude higher (>1 /times/ 10/sup 15/ atom/cm/sup 2/). This indicates that most /sup 10/Be is inherited and that the sediments hosting the geothermal field down to 3250m are young, less than few million year old. /sup 10/Be and /sup 9/Be Kds decrease from surface to bottom (3333 to 48 and 727 to 393, respectively) expressing the strong leaching effect of the solid material by the geothermal waters. This process is more active at depth where pH is <5.3 and salinity high (approx. =25%). Compared to other natural systems, Salton Sea Geothermal fluids are strongly enriched in /sup 10/Be and /sup 9/Be. Finally, contamination has been observed in the fluids samples and we developed a tool that is helping in detecting which samples are contaminated.

Valette-Silver, N.J.

1988-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

384

Research and development of improved geothermal well logging techniques, tools and components (current projects, goals and status). Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

One of the key needs in the advancement of geothermal energy is availability of adequate subsurface measurements to aid the reservoir engineer in the development and operation of geothermal wells. Some current projects being sponsored by the U. S. Department of Energy's Division of Geothermal Energy pertaining to the development of improved well logging techniques, tools and components are described. An attempt is made to show how these projects contribute to improvement of geothermal logging technology in forming key elements of the overall program goals.

Lamers, M.D.

1978-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

385

Fracture Surface Area Effects on Fluid Extraction and the Electrical Resistivity of Geothermal Reservoir Rocks  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Laboratory measurements of the electrical resistivity of fractured analogue geothermal reservoir rocks were performed to investigate the resistivity contrast caused by active boiling and to determine the effects of variable fracture dimensions and surface area on water extraction. Experiments were performed at confining pressures up to 10 h4Pa (100 bars) and temperatures to 170 C. Fractured samples show a larger resistivity change at the onset of boiling than intact samples. Monitoring the resistivity of fractured samples as they equilibrate to imposed pressure and temperature conditions provides an estimate of fluid migration into and out of the matrix. Measurements presented are an important step toward using field electrical methods to quantitatively search for fractures, infer saturation, and track fluid migration in geothermal reservoirs.

Roberts, J J; Detwiler, R L; Ralph, W; Bonner, B

2002-05-09T23:59:59.000Z

386

Organometallic Polymer Coatings for Geothermal-Fluid-Sprayed Air-Cooled Condensers: Preprint  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Researchers are developing polymer-based coating systems to reduce scaling and corrosion of air-cooled condensers that use a geothermal fluid spray for heat transfer augmentation. These coating systems act as barriers to corrosion to protect aluminum fins and steel tubing; they are formulated to resist the strong attachment of scale. Field tests have been done to determine the corrosion and scaling issues related to brine spraying and a promising organometallic polymer has been evaluated in salt spray tests.

Gawlik, K.; Sugama, T.; Jung, D.

2002-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

387

Environmental Assessment of the Hawaii Geothermal Project Well Flow Test Program  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Hawaii Geothermal Project, a coordinated research effort of the University of Hawaii, funded by the County and State of Hawaii, and ERDA, was initiated in 1973 in an effort to identify, generate, and use geothermal energy on the Big Island of Hawaii. A number of stages are involved in developing geothermal power resources: exploration, test drilling, production testing, field development, power plant and powerline construction, and full-scale production. Phase I of the Project, which began in the summer of 1973, involved conducting exploratory surveys, developing analytical models for interpretation of geophysical results, conducting studies on energy recovery from hot brine, and examining the legal and economic implications of developing geothermal resources in the state. Phase II of the Project, initiated in the summer of 1975, centers on drilling an exploratory research well on the Island of Hawaii, but also continues operational support for the geophysical, engineering, and socioeconomic activities delineated above. The project to date is between the test drilling and production testing phase. The purpose of this assessment is to describe the activities and potential impacts associated with extensive well flow testing to be completed during Phase II.

None

1976-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

388

Single-Well Enhanced Geothermal System Front-End Engineering and Design: Optimization of a Renewable Geothermal System for Harvesting Heat from Hot, Dry Rock  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In 2009, GTherm and the Thayer School of Engineering at Dartmouth College, under an EPRI Polaris grant, evaluated the potential for a GTherm single-well enhanced geothermal system (SWEGS) and bottom-hole HeatNest to produce enough heat from deep geothermal wells to be an effective alternative for generating electric power. The research focused on the thermodynamic properties of the SWEGS design and the optimal geologic conditions. The results indicated that, given the right conditions, the SWEGS can extr...

2011-08-12T23:59:59.000Z

389

Impact of common completion and workover activities on the effective costs of geothermal wells  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The impacts of completion practices on production and maintenance costs are considered. To evaluate alternative completion and workover technologies, a simple model has been developed that compares total well cost to total production or injection. The model is discussed briefly and results from its application to different completion and workover strategies are emphasized. The model development project had three aspects: (1) the establishment of a data base for the cost and effectiveness of various geothermal completion and workover activities; (2) the development of a computer model to specific cases. The data collected include geothermal production characteristics; initial costs and completion practices for representatives wells; estimated costs and effectiveness of common workover equipment and operations; the frequencies of and times required to perform workovers; etc. The model facilitates comparisons of completion and workover alternatives. The results discussed include an analysis of the impact of variations in well lifetime. A comparison of mechanical descaling of geothermal wells to chemical scale inhibition indicates that for certain conditions chemical inhibition is more cost effective. Results of an analysis of injectivity decline are also presented, as are studies of original well cost, initial flow, and productivity decline for production wells. Other results involving underreaming, changing casing profiles, perforating, and hydraulic fracturing are also discussed.

Carson, C.C.; Mansure, A.J.

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

390

Use of an acoustic borehole televiewer to investigate casing corrosion in geothermal wells  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Corrosion of well and surface equipment due to the presence of hot, corrosive brines is one of the major problems facing geothermal operators. For wellbore casing, this problem is complicated by the fact that in-place inspection is difficult at best. In an attempt to improve this situation, a prototype acoustic borehole televiewer designed to operate in geothermal wells was used to study the corrosion damage to casing in three commercial wells. The results of this experiment were promising. The televiewer returns helped to define areas of major corrosion damage and to indicate the extent of the damage. This paper briefly discusses the corrosion problem, describes the acoustic borehole televiewer, and then summarizes the results of the field test of the televiewer's capability for investigating corrosion.

Carson, C.C.; Bauman, T.

1986-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

391

Advanced Horizontal Well Recirculation Systems for Geothermal Energy Recovery in Sedimentary Formations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

There is increased recognition that geothermal energy resources are more widespread than previously thought, with potential for providing a significant amount of sustainable clean energy worldwide. Recent advances in drilling, completion, and production technology from the oil and gas industry can now be applied to unlock vast new geothermal resources, with some estimates for potential electricity generation from geothermal energy now on the order of 2 million megawatts. Terralog USA, in collaboration with the University of California, Irvine (UCI), are currently investigating advanced design concepts for paired horizontal well recirculation systems, optimally configured for geothermal energy recovery in permeable sedimentary and crystalline formations of varying structure and material properties. This two-year research project, funded by the US Department of Energy, includes combined efforts for: 1) Resource characterization; 2) Small and large scale laboratory investigations; 3) Numerical simulation at both the laboratory and field scale; and 4) Engineering feasibility studies and economic evaluations. The research project is currently in its early stages. This paper summarizes our technical approach and preliminary findings related to potential resources, small-scale laboratory simulation, and supporting numerical simulation efforts.

Mike Bruno; Russell L. Detwiler; Kang Lao; Vahid Serajian; Jean Elkhoury; Julia Diessl; Nicky White

2012-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

392

Role of Fluid Pressure in the Production Behavior of EnhancedGeothermal Systems with CO2 as Working Fluid  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Numerical simulation is used to evaluate mass flow and heatextraction rates from enhanced geothermal injection-production systemsthat are operated using either CO2 or water as heat transmission fluid.For a model system patterned after the European hot dry rock experimentat Soultz, we find significantly greater heat extraction rates for CO2 ascompared to water. The strong dependence of CO2 mobility (=density/viscosity) upon temperature and pressure may lead to unusualproduction behavior, where heat extraction rates can actually increasefor a time, even as the reservoir is subject to thermaldepletion.

Pruess, Karsten

2007-04-13T23:59:59.000Z

393

Internal Technical Report, 1981 Annual Report, An Analysis of the Response of the Raft River Geothermal Site Monitor Wells  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A groundwater monitoring program has been established on the Raft River Geothermal Site since 1978. The objective of this program is to document possible impacts that may be caused by geothermal production and injection on the shallow aquifers used for culinary and irrigation purposes. This annual progress report summarizes data from 12 monitor wells during 1981. These data are compared with long-term trends and are correlated with seasonal patterns, irrigation water use and geothermal production and testing. These results provide a basis for predicting long-term impacts of sustained geothermal production and testing. To date, there has been no effect on the water quality of the shallow aquifers.

Thurow, T.L.; Large, R.M.; Allman, D.W.; Tullis, J.A.; Skiba, P.A.

1982-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

394

IN SITU STRESS, FRACTURE, AND FLUID FLOW ANALYSIS IN WELL 38C...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

thermal stimulation of an east-flank injection well, the first step in the creation of a heat exchanger at depth. Well datasets from the east flank of the Coso Geothermal Field...

395

Seismic response to fluid injection and production in two Salton Trough geothermal fields, southern California  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of the Salton Sea Geothermal Field, California.Journal of Volcanology and Geothermal Research, 12: 221-258patterns in hydrocarbon and geothermal reservoirs: Six case

Lajoie, Lia Joyce

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

396

On the production behavior of enhanced geothermal systems with CO2 as working fluid  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Twenty-Fifth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering,and clay swelling in a fractured geothermal reservoir,Transactions, Geothermal Resources Council, Vol. 28, pp.

Pruess, K.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

397

A COMPILATION OF DATA ON FLUIDS FROM GEOTHERMAL RESOURCES IN THE UNITED STATES  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

D. L. Assessment of Geothermal Resources of the UnitedReport on the International Geothermal Information Exchangeon the Development and Use of Geothermal Resources, Lawrence

Cosner, S.R.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

398

Enhanced Geothermal Systems (EGS) comparing water with CO2 as heat transmission fluids  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and Clay Swelling in a Fractured Geothermal Reservoir,Transactions, Geothermal Resources Council, Vol. 28, pp.the 5-km Deep Enhanced Geothermal Reservoir at Soultz-sous-

Pruess, Karsten

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

399

Well Test Analysis and Improved Models for Geopressured-Geothermal Systems  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

In accordance with the S-CUBED Subcontract Work Statement, S-CUBED has concentrated on the synthesis, correlation and analysis of all pertinent data from the Department of Energy (DOE) geopressured-geothermal research wells undergoing testing during the contract period. This work has included the development of reservoir simulation models for the geopressured-geothermal resource in hydrological connection with each well. Existing S-CUBED simulation techniques have been applied to develop, update and improve the models for the reservoirs tested. During the contract period, data have been available from the Gladys McCall, Pleasant Bayou and Hulin test wells. S-CUBED has also contributed to the design of the well tests and participated in DOE's planning and review meetings in support of the geopressured-geothermal program. Detailed technical Topical Reports have been prepared and issued as appropriate during the contract period as referenced in the following summary of the work performed during the final year of the S-CUBED Subcontract to UTA.

Riney, T.D.

1990-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

400

Unearthing Geothermal's Potential | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Unearthing Geothermal's Potential Unearthing Geothermal's Potential Unearthing Geothermal's Potential September 16, 2010 - 12:33pm Addthis Niketa Kumar Niketa Kumar Public Affairs Specialist, Office of Public Affairs Our latest geothermal technologies awards are for those who think outside of the box (and below the surface). Secretary of Energy Steven Chu announced $20 million towards the research and development of non-conventional geothermal energy technologies in three areas: low temperatures fluids, geothermal fluids recovered from oil and gas wells and highly pressurized geothermal fluids. As the Secretary said, these innovative projects have the potential to expand the use of geothermal energy to more areas around the country. Low temperature resources are widely available across the country and offer

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "wells geothermal fluid" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

A new void fraction correlation inferred from artificial neural networks for modeling two-phase flows in geothermal wells  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A new empirical void fraction correlation was developed using artificial neural network (ANN) techniques. The artificial networks were trained using the backpropagation algorithm and production data obtained from a worldwide database of geothermal wells. ... Keywords: Artificial intelligence, Geothermal energy, Liquid holdup, Pressure gradients, Simulation, Statistics

A. lvarez del Castillo; E. Santoyo; O. Garc a-Valladares

2012-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

402

Hydrothermal cements for use in the completion of geothermal wells. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A research program to develop an improved cement for use in high-temperature geothermal wells was carried out. The work involved in the selection and evaluation of an aluminum hydroxide-cured cement from the SwRI family of hydrothermal cements for this use are described. The physical testing program is described; the topics discussed include placement ability, compressive and bond strengths, permeability to water, compatibility to drilling muds, corrosion properties, and thermal properties.

Not Available

1979-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

403

PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Fifth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, Stanford, California, February 1-3, 2010  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and is in a 250-260 °C range. Under reservoir temperature and pressure conditions the geothermal fluid plant to 15 MWe (GB1+GB2) and was put into service in 2003. The consequent increase in geothermal fluid the geothermal fluid supplied to GB1. Over this period, the well-head pressures were monitored for each well

Stanford University

404

The feasibility of recovering medium to heavy oil using geopressured- geothermal fluids  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The feasibility, economics and environmental concerns of producing more domestic oil using thermal enhanced oil recovery (TEOR) are reviewed and the unique nature of geopressured-geothermal (GPGT) fluids for thermal recovery are outlined. Current methods of TEOR are briefly discussed and it is noted that these methods are presently under scrutiny by both federal and state air quality agencies; and moreover, they often involve costly operational and mechanical problems associated with heating water on the surface for injection into the target reservoir. The characteristics of the GPGT resources as seen through previous Department of Energy (DOE) studies from sites in Louisiana and Texas are discussed. These studies indicate sufficient quantities of GPGT fluids can be produced to sustain a TEOR project. The Alworth Field in the south Texas Mirando Trend is proposed as a TEOR pilot site. The target reservoirs for injection of the GPGT fluids are the Jackson and Yegua sandstones of the upper Eocene Epoch. The reservoirs contain an estimated 4 MMbbls of heavy oil in place (OIP) (18.6{degree}API) of which it is estimated that at least 1 MMbbls could be recovered by TEOR. The problems associated with using the GPGT fluids for TEOR include those normally associated with hot water flooding but in addition the reaction of the brine from the geopressured-geothermal reservoir with the target reservoir is uncertain. Under the elevated temperatures associated with GPGT TEOR, actual increased porosity and permeability are possible. 120 refs., 40 figs., 13 tabs.

Negus-de Wys, J.; Kimmell, C.E.; Hart, G.F.; Plum, M.M.

1991-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

405

Numerical studies of fluid-rock interactions in EnhancedGeothermal Systems (EGS) with CO2 as working fluid  

SciTech Connect

There is growing interest in the novel concept of operating Enhanced Geothermal Systems (EGS) with CO{sub 2} instead of water as heat transmission fluid. Initial studies have suggested that CO{sub 2} will achieve larger rates of heat extraction, and can offer geologic storage of carbon as an ancillary benefit. Fluid-rock interactions in EGS operated with CO{sub 2} are expected to be vastly different in zones with an aqueous phase present, as compared to the central reservoir zone with anhydrous supercritical CO{sub 2}. Our numerical simulations of chemically reactive transport show a combination of mineral dissolution and precipitation effects in the peripheral zone of the systems. These could impact reservoir growth and longevity, with important ramifications for sustaining energy recovery, for estimating CO{sub 2} loss rates, and for figuring tradeoffs between power generation and geologic storage of CO{sub 2}.

Xu, Tianfu; Pruess, Karsten; Apps, John

2008-01-17T23:59:59.000Z

406

Investigation and Evaluation of Geopressured-Geothermal Wells; Detailed Reentry Prognosis for Geopressure-Geothermal Testing of Gladys McCall No. 1 Well  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This Gruy Federal Type III-A geopressured-geothermal (Geo) prospect was drilled as the Getty Oil Company and Buttes Gas and Oil Company, No.1 Gladys McCall. It is located in Section 27, Township 15S, Range 5W, Cameron Parish, Louisiana. The well is accessible by way of the original canal levee road, approximately 2 1/2 miles south of Louisiana State Route 82; one bridge must be replaced and a board road must be laid on the levee. Buttes completed this well in january, 1970, as a shut-in gas well through perforations from 11,924 to 11,928 feet. it was plugged and abandoned in April, 1970, without having produced. The location is shown on the north central area of the USGS topographic sheet ''Hog Bayou''. A portion of this sheet is included, which shows this well location as well as the State Lease 4183 Nos. 1 and 2 wells on the adjacent Rockefeller Wildlife Refuge and Game Preserve.

None

1978-06-16T23:59:59.000Z

407

Organometallic Polymer Coatings for Geothermal-Fluid-Sprayed Air-Cooled Condensers: Preprint  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

2 * NREL/CP-550-32148 2 * NREL/CP-550-32148 Organometallic Polymer Coatings for Geothermal- Fluid-Sprayed Air-Cooled Condensers Preprint K. Gawlik National Renewable Energy Laboratory T. Sugama Brookhaven National Laboratory D. Jung Two Phase Engineering & Research, Inc. To be presented at the Geothermal Resources Council Annual Meeting Reno, Nevada September 22-25, 2002 National Renewable Energy Laboratory 1617 Cole Boulevard Golden, Colorado 80401-3393 NREL is a U.S. Department of Energy Laboratory Operated by Midwest Research Institute * Battelle * Bechtel Contract No. DE-AC36-99-GO10337 NOTICE The submitted manuscript has been offered by an employee of the Midwest Research Institute (MRI), a contractor of the US Government under Contract No. DE-AC36-99GO10337. Accordingly, the US

408

Evaluation of ammonia as a working fluid for a wet/dry-cooled binary geothermal plant  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The concepts considered in this study involve various arrangments of the binary geothermal power cycle with advanced dry cooling schemes. Brief descriptions of the binary cycle and advanced cooling schemes are included. Also included are descriptions of the base case concept and the ammonia working fluid concept. Performance and cost estimates were developed for a wet-cooled isobutane cycle plant, wet/dry cooled isobutane cycle plant, wet-cooled ammonia cycle plant, and a wet/dry cooled ammonia cycle plant. The performance and cost estimates were calculated using the GEOCOST computer code developed at PNL. Inputs for GEOCOST were calculated based on the Heber sites. The characteristics of the wet/dry cooling system were determined using the BNWGEO computer code developed at PNL. Results of the cooling system analysis are presented, followed by results of the geothermal plant analysis. Conclusions and comments also are included.

Drost, M.K.; Huber, H.D.

1982-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

409

Category:Geothermal Development Phases | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

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410

Report of the geophysical measurements in geothermal wells workshop, Airport Marina Hotel, Albuquerque, New Mexico, September 17--19, 1975  

SciTech Connect

This report presents results of a Workshop on Geophysical Measurements in Geothermal Wells, hosted in Albuquerque, September 17-19, by Sandia Laboratories and jointly sponsored by the United States Geological Survey and the Energy Research and Development Administration. During the workshop, tutorial papers dealing with the geothermal resource, geothermal logging, and high temperature technology were followed by working panel sessions. Three panels deliberated, respectively, well and reservoir parameters, log interpretation, and high temperature technology. In a final session, the reports of the panels were heard and discussed by the full workshop. A summary of the workshop conclusions and recommendations, as well as the complete panel statements, are presented. (auth)

Baker, L.E.; Baker, R.P.; Hughen, R.L.

1975-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

411

Three dimensional interpretations of single-well electromagnetic data for geothermal applications  

SciTech Connect

An efficient 3-D electromagnetic (EM) inversion algorithm has been developed for geothermal applications and tested successfully using a set of single-hole EM logging data. The data was collected at an oil field undergoing CO{sub 2} injection in southern California using a single-hole EM tool, Geo-BILT, developed by Electromagnetic Instruments, Inc (EMI). The tool is equipped with a multi-component source, and multi-component receivers at different separations. The inversion result provides a reasonable electrical conductivity image to a distance of 10 m from the well, and illustrates several zones with lateral conductivity variations that could not be resolved with traditional induction logging tools. The successful case study demonstrates potential applications of the tool and software for characterizing fracture systems in geothermal reservoirs.

Tseng, Hung-Wen; Lee, Ki Ha

2004-01-09T23:59:59.000Z

412

Literature survey on cements for remediation of deformed casing in geothermal wells  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Brookhaven National Laboratory was requested to conduct a literature survey for the best available cement to use in the proposed casing patch as part of the Geothermal Drilling Organization (GDO) project on remediation of deformed casings. A total of 50 wells have been identified with deformed production casing in Unocal`s portion of The Geysers geothermal field. A procedure to address the casing deformation and avoid abandonment of these wells has been developed as described in the Geysers Deformed Casing Remediation Proposal. The proposed remediation procedure involves isolation of the zone of interest with an inflatable packer, milling the deformed casing and cementing a 7 inch diameter liner to extend approximately 100 ft above and 100 ft below the milled zone. During the milling operation it is possible that the original cement and surrounding formation may slough away. In order to specify a suitable cement formulation for the casing patch it is first necessary to identify and understand the deformation mechanism/s operating in The Geysers field. Subsequently, the required cement mechanical properties to withstand further deformation of the repaired system must be defined. From this information it can be determined whether available cement formulations meet these requirements. In addition to The Geysers, other geothermal fields are at possible risk of casing deformation due to subsidence, seismic activity, lateral and vertical formation movement or other processes. Therefore, the proposed remediation procedure may have applications in other fields.

Allan, M.L.; Philippacopoulos, A.J.

1998-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

413

The Cost Effectiveness of Fracture Stimulation in Increasing the Flow from Geothermal Wells  

SciTech Connect

The cost effectiveness of fracture stimulation at The Geysers, the Imperial Valley, and other geothermal resource areas in the United States vas studied using GEOCOM, a computer code for analyzing the impact of completion activities on the life-cycle costs of geothermal wells. Technologies for fracturing the reservoir near the wellbore involve the creation of a pressure pulse in the wellbore by means of either hydraulic or explosive force. The cost of a single fracture stimulation job can vary from $50,000 to over $500,000, with a typical cost of around $300,000. The code shows that additional flow achieved by fracture stimulation must exceed 10,000 pounds per hour for each $100,000 invested in stimulation in order for a fracture treatment to be cost effective. In some reservoirs, this additional flow must be as great as 30,000 pounds per hour. The cost effectiveness of fracturing has not yet been demonstrated in the field. The Geothermal Well Stimulation Program achieved an overall average of about 10,000 pounds per hour for each $100,000 invested.

Brown, Gerald L.

1983-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

414

Unique aspects of drilling and completing hot-dry-rock geothermal wells  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Drilling operations at the Fenton Hill Hot Dry Rock (HDR) Geothermal Test Site have led to numerous developments needed to solve the problems caused by a very harsh downhole environment. A pair of deep wells were drilled to approximately 15,000 ft (4.6 km); formation temperatures were in excess of 600/sup 0/F (300/sup 0/C). The wells were directionally drilled, inclined at 35/sup 0/, one above the other, in a direction orthogonal to the least principal stress field. The well site is near the flank of a young silicic composite volcano in the Jemez Mountains of northern New Mexico. The completion of this pair of wells is unique in reservoir development. The lower well was planned as a cold water injector which will be cooled by the introduced water from the static geothermal gradient to about 80/sup 0/F (25/sup 0/C). The upper well will be heated during production to over 500/sup 0/F (250/sup 0/C). The well pair is designed to perform as a closed loop heat-extraction system connected by hydraulic fractures with a vertical spacing of 1200 ft between the wells. These conditions strongly constrain the drilling technique, casing design, cement formulation, and cementing operations.

Carden, R.S.; Nicholson, R.W.; Pettitt, R.A.; Rowley, J.C.

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

415

Flow in geothermal wells: Part III. Calculation model for self-flowing well  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The theoretical model described predicts the temperature, pressure, dynamic dryness fraction, and void fraction along the vertical channel of two-phase flow. The existing data from operating wells indicate good agreement with the model. (MHR)

Bilicki, Z.; Kestin, J.; Michaelides, E.E.

1981-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

416

Mixtures of SF6 CO2 as working fluids for geothermal power plants  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this paper, supercritical/transcritical thermodynamic cycles using mixtures of SF6 CO2 as working fluids were investigated for geothermal power plants. The system of equations that described the thermodynamic cycle was solved using a Newton-Raphson method. This approach allows a high computational efficiency even when thermophysical properties of the working fluid depend strongly on the temperature and pressure. The thermophysical properties of the mixtures were obtained from National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) REFPROP software and constituent cubic equations. The local heat transfer coefficients in the heat exchangers were calculated based on the local properties of the working fluid, geothermal brine, and cooling water. The heat exchanger areas required were calculated. Numerical simulation results presented for different cycle configurations were used to assess the effects of the SF6 fraction in CO2, brine temperature, and recuperator size on the cycle thermal efficiency, and size of heat exchangers for the evaporator and condenser. Optimal thermodynamic cycle efficiencies were calculated to be approximately 13 and 15% mole content of SF6 in a CO2- SF6 mixture for a Brayton cycle and a Rankine cycle, respectively.

Yin, Hebi [ORNL; Sabau, Adrian S [ORNL; Conklin, Jim [ORNL; McFarlane, Joanna [ORNL; Qualls, A L [ORNL

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

417

Improved geothermal well logging tools using no downhole electronics. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A geothermal sonde for measuring temperature and pressure using no downhole electronics was designed and tested for operation at temperatures up to 275/sup 0/C (527/sup 0/F) and pressures of at least 10,000 psi. The measurement system uses variable resistance transducers which are powered in series by an uphole constant current supply. The output signals from the transducers are measured with a digital voltmeter having very high common mode and normal mode rejection ratios. The high rejection ratios of the digital voltmeter virtually eliminate any noise or pickup introduced into the measurement system. The system was tested in a hydroclave at temperatures up to 288/sup 0/C (550/sup 0/F) and at pressure up to 8,000 psi. The sonde was also tested in the Los Alamos geothermal well at temperatures up to 186/sup 0/C (366/sup 0/F) and pressures up to 4100 psi. The main problems encountered were associated with pressure transducers and the logging cable or the cable head and connector. The results of this project indicate that this is a feasible method of making geothermal measurements without the use of downhole electronics and that with further development the technique could be extended to higher temperatures and pressures.

Kratz, H.R.; Day, E.A.; Ginn, W.G.

1979-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

418

Geothermal energy: tomorrow's alternative today. A handbook for geothermal-energy development in Delaware  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This is a general procedure guide to various technical, economic, and institutional aspects of geothermal development in Delaware. The following are covered: geothermal as an alternative, resource characteristics, geology, well mechanics and pumping systems, fluid disposal, direct heat utilization-feasibility, environmental and legal issues, permits and regulations, finance and taxation, and steps necessary for geothermal development. (MHR)

Mancus, J.; Perrone, E.

1982-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

419

Technical support for geopressured-geothermal well activities in Louisiana. Final report, 1 November 1983-31 October 1984  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report describes environmental monitoring of microseismic activity, land-surface subsidence, and surface and ground-water quality at three designed geopressured-geothermal test well sites in Louisiana. Separate abstracts have been prepared for individual sections. (ACR)

Not Available

1985-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

420

Technical support for geopressured-geothermal well activities in Louisiana. Annual report, 1 November 1982-31 October 1983  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This annual report describes environmental monitoring of microseismic activity, land-surface elevations, and surface and ground-water quality at three designed geopressured-geothermal test well sites in Louisiana.

Not Available

1984-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "wells geothermal fluid" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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421

G. M. Koelemay well No. 1, Jefferson County, Texas. Volume I. Completion and testing: testing geopressured geothermal reservoirs in existing wells. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The acquisition, completion, and testing of a geopressured-geothermal well are described. The following are covered: geology; petrophysics; re-entry and completion operations - test well; drilling and completion operations - disposal well; test objectives; surface testing facilities; pre-test operations; test sequence; test results and analysis; and return of wells and location to operator. (MHR)

Not Available

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

422

Well production casing Brady No. 5 well, Geothermal Food Processors, Inc. , Fernley, Nevada. Falure analysis report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Failure of the casing of the Brady No. 5 resulted from severe external corrosion. The well is located in a mineral flat and it is proposed that during wet periods the exterior of the casing was exposed to aerated saturated chloride and/or sulfate salt solutions. These solutions appear to have completely destroyed the surface conductor and upper string casing and associated cements. The production casing then corroded until mechanical failure occurred.

Ellis, P.F.

1979-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

423

Geopressured-geothermal drilling and testing plan. General Crude Oil--Dept. of Energy Pleasant Bayou No. 1 well, Brazoria County, Texas  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

As a result of geopressured resource assessment studies in the Gulf Coast region, the Brazoria fairway, located in Brazoria County, Texas was determined to be an optimum area for additional studies. A plan is presented for drilling, completion, and testing of one geopressured-geothermal well and two disposal wells in Brazoria County, Texas. The objectives of the well drilling and testing program are to determine the following parameters: reservoir permeability, porosity, thickness, rock material properties, depth, temperature, and pressure; reservoir fluid content, specific gravity, resistivity, viscosity, and hydrocarbons in solution; reservoir fluid production rates, pressure, temperature, production decline, and pressure decline; geopressured well and surface equipment design requirements for high-volume production and possible sand production; specific equipment design for surface operations, hydrocarbons distribution, and effluent disposal; and possibilities of reservoir compaction and/or surface subsidence. (JGB)

Not Available

1978-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

424

Feasibility investigation and design study of optical well logging methods for high temperature geothermal wells. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The results are reported of a one-year program designed to investigate the feasibility of optical techniques applied to well-logging, to extend measurement capabilities in high-temperature geothermal boreholes. The basic concept is shown schematically. It makes use of a special armored cable containing fiber optic wave guides, connected to passive, downhole optical transducers. The latter modulate an optical carrier in response to borehole parameters. The optical carrier is a beam of infrared light transmitted from an optical source at the surface over an optical fiber. The modulated beam from the transducer is then returned to the surface over a second fiber, where conventional optical communications techniques are used to detect and decode the down hole information. (MHR)

Swanson, R.K.; Anderson, R.E.; Ash, J.I.; Beissner, R.E.; Smith, V.D.

1977-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

425

Low-temperature geothermal water in Utah: A compilation of data for thermal wells and springs through 1993  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Geothermal Division of DOE initiated the Low-Temperature Geothermal Resources and Technology Transfer Program, following a special appropriation by Congress in 1991, to encourage wider use of lower-temperature geothermal resources through direct-use, geothermal heat-pump, and binary-cycle power conversion technologies. The Oregon Institute of Technology (OIT), the University of Utah Research Institute (UURI), and the Idaho Water Resources Research Institute organized the federally-funded program and enlisted the help of ten western states to carry out phase one. This first phase involves updating the inventory of thermal wells and springs with the help of the participating state agencies. The state resource teams inventory thermal wells and springs, and compile relevant information on each sources. OIT and UURI cooperatively administer the program. OIT provides overall contract management while UURI provides technical direction to the state teams. Phase one of the program focuses on replacing part of GEOTHERM by building a new database of low- and moderate-temperature geothermal systems for use on personal computers. For Utah, this involved (1) identifying sources of geothermal date, (2) designing a database structure, (3) entering the new date; (4) checking for errors, inconsistencies, and duplicate records; (5) organizing the data into reporting formats; and (6) generating a map (1:750,000 scale) of Utah showing the locations and record identification numbers of thermal wells and springs.

Blackett, R.E.

1994-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

426

Utilization of melting techniques for borehole wall stabilization. [Applied to geothermal well production systems  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A research program on the Subterrene concept based on excavation by melting has been completed. Theoretical and experimental studies were made for a broad range of applications. Most recently, a study of Subterrene deep geothermal well production systems predicted that, compared to rotary-drilled wells, significant cost savings are possible, e.g., 2 and 4 million dollars for 10-km-deep wells and geothermal gradients of 25 and 40 K/km, respectively. It was also concluded that for most wells the rate of penetration of the melting bits should be increased several times over that attained in the Subterrene tests. Subterrene melting penetration tests showed that borehole glass liners can be formed in a wide variety of materials and structural characterization tests showed that tuff glass cylinders can be many times stronger in compression than the parent material. Also, the tests showed that the rock-glass liner permeability decreases rapidly with confining pressure. New melting devices are conceivable that could line rotary-drilled boreholes with rock glass or other materials with resultant improvements in well costs. With emphasis on borehole liners, an overview of Subterrene program results, data on rock-glass