Sample records for wells fluid sampling

  1. Well fluid isolation and sample apparatus and method

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Schalla, Ronald (Kennewick, WA); Smith, Ronald M. (Richland, WA); Hall, Stephen H. (Kennewick, WA); Smart, John E. (Richland, WA)

    1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The present invention specifically permits purging and/or sampling of a well but only removing, at most, about 25% of the fluid volume compared to conventional methods and, at a minimum, removing none of the fluid volume from the well. The invention is an isolation assembly that is inserted into the well. The isolation assembly is designed so that only a volume of fluid between the outside diameter of the isolation assembly and the inside diameter of the well over a fluid column height from the bottom of the well to the top of the active portion (lower annulus) is removed. A seal may be positioned above the active portion thereby sealing the well and preventing any mixing or contamination of inlet fluid with fluid above the packer. Purged well fluid is stored in a riser above the packer. Ports in the wall of the isolation assembly permit purging and sampling of the lower annulus along the height of the active portion.

  2. Prediction of Formation-Tester Fluid-Sample Quality in Highly-Deviated Wells

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Torres-Verdín, Carlos

    a relatively short period of time. Acquir- ing clean samples is essential to ensure not only reliable, currently with Chevron Energy Technology Company, Houston, TX 77099; Email: mmalik@chevron.com ©2009 Society

  3. Fluid sampling tool

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Johnston, Roger G. (Los Alamos, NM); Garcia, Anthony R. E. (Espanola, NM); Martinez, Ronald K. (Santa Cruz, NM)

    2001-09-25T23:59:59.000Z

    The invention includes a rotatable tool for collecting fluid through the wall of a container. The tool includes a fluid collection section with a cylindrical shank having an end portion for drilling a hole in the container wall when the tool is rotated, and a threaded portion for tapping the hole in the container wall. A passageway in the shank in communication with at least one radial inlet hole in the drilling end and an opening at the end of the shank is adapted to receive fluid from the container. The tool also includes a cylindrical chamber affixed to the end of the shank opposite to the drilling portion thereof for receiving and storing fluid passing through the passageway. The tool also includes a flexible, deformable gasket that provides a fluid-tight chamber to confine kerf generated during the drilling and tapping of the hole. The invention also includes a fluid extractor section for extracting fluid samples from the fluid collecting section.

  4. Well purge and sample apparatus and method

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Schalla, R.; Smith, R.M.; Hall, S.H.; Smart, J.E.; Gustafson, G.S.

    1995-10-24T23:59:59.000Z

    The present invention specifically permits purging and/or sampling of a well but only removing, at most, about 25% of the fluid volume compared to conventional methods and, at a minimum, removing none of the fluid volume from the well. The invention is an isolation assembly with a packer, pump and exhaust, that is inserted into the well. The isolation assembly is designed so that only a volume of fluid between the outside diameter of the isolation assembly and the inside diameter of the well over a fluid column height from the bottom of the well to the top of the active portion (lower annulus) is removed. The packer is positioned above the active portion thereby sealing the well and preventing any mixing or contamination of inlet fluid with fluid above the packer. Ports in the wall of the isolation assembly permit purging and sampling of the lower annulus along the height of the active portion. 8 figs.

  5. Well purge and sample apparatus and method

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Schalla, Ronald (Kennewick, WA); Smith, Ronald M. (Richland, WA); Hall, Stephen H. (Kennewick, WA); Smart, John E. (Richland, WA); Gustafson, Gregg S. (Redmond, WA)

    1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The present invention specifically permits purging and/or sampling of a well but only removing, at most, about 25% of the fluid volume compared to conventional methods and, at a minimum, removing none of the fluid volume from the well. The invention is an isolation assembly with a packer, pump and exhaust, that is inserted into the well. The isolation assembly is designed so that only a volume of fluid between the outside diameter of the isolation assembly and the inside diameter of the well over a fluid column height from the bottom of the well to the top of the active portion (lower annulus) is removed. The packer is positioned above the active portion thereby sealing the well and preventing any mixing or contamination of inlet fluid with fluid above the packer. Ports in the wall of the isolation assembly permit purging and sampling of the lower annulus along the height of the active portion.

  6. Fluid sampling system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Houck, E.D.

    1994-10-11T23:59:59.000Z

    An fluid sampling system allows sampling of radioactive liquid without spillage. A feed tank is connected to a liquid transfer jet powered by a pumping chamber pressurized by compressed air. The liquid is pumped upwardly into a sampling jet of a venturi design having a lumen with an inlet, an outlet, a constricted middle portion, and a port located above the constricted middle portion. The liquid is passed under pressure through the constricted portion causing its velocity to increase and its pressure to be decreased, thereby preventing liquid from escaping. A septum sealing the port can be pierced by a two pointed hollow needle leading into a sample bottle also sealed by a pierceable septum affixed to one end. The bottle is evacuated by flow through the sample jet, cyclic variation in the sampler jet pressure periodically leaves the evacuated bottle with lower pressure than that of the port, thus causing solution to pass into the bottle. The remaining solution in the system is returned to the feed tank via a holding tank. 4 figs.

  7. Fluid sampling system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Houck, Edward D. (Idaho Falls, ID)

    1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An fluid sampling system allows sampling of radioactive liquid without spillage. A feed tank is connected to a liquid transfer jet powered by a pumping chamber pressurized by compressed air. The liquid is pumped upwardly into a sampling jet of a venturi design having a lumen with an inlet, an outlet, a constricted middle portion, and a port located above the constricted middle portion. The liquid is passed under pressure through the constricted portion causing its velocity to increase and its pressure to decreased, thereby preventing liquid from escaping. A septum sealing the port can be pierced by a two pointed hollow needle leading into a sample bottle also sealed by a pierceable septum affixed to one end. The bottle is evacuated by flow through the sample jet, cyclic variation in the sampler jet pressure periodically leaves the evacuated bottle with lower pressure than that of the port, thus causing solution to pass into the bottle. The remaining solution in the system is returned to the feed tank via a holding tank.

  8. Sampling for Bacteria in Wells

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lesikar, Bruce J.

    2001-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Sampling for Bacteria in Wells E-126 11/01 Water samples for bacteria tests must always be col- lected in a sterile container. The procedure for collect- ing a water sample is as follows: 1. Obtain a sterile container from a Health Department...

  9. Sampling for Bacteria in Wells 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lesikar, Bruce J.

    2001-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Sampling for Bacteria in Wells E-126 11/01 Water samples for bacteria tests must always be col- lected in a sterile container. The procedure for collect- ing a water sample is as follows: 1. Obtain a sterile container from a Health Department... immediately after collecting water sample. Refrigerate the sample and transport it to the laborato- ry (in an ice chest) as soon after collection as possible (six hours is best, but up to 30 hours). Many labs will not accept bacteria samples on Friday so check...

  10. Fluid sampling system for a nuclear reactor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Lau, Louis K. (Monroeville, PA); Alper, Naum I. (Monroeville, PA)

    1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A system of extracting fluid samples, either liquid or gas, from the interior of a nuclear reactor containment utilizes a jet pump. To extract the sample fluid, a nonradioactive motive fluid is forced through the inlet and discharge ports of a jet pump located outside the containment, creating a suction that draws the sample fluid from the containment through a sample conduit connected to the pump suction port. The mixture of motive fluid and sample fluid is discharged through a return conduit to the interior of the containment. The jet pump and means for removing a portion of the sample fluid from the sample conduit can be located in a shielded sample grab station located next to the containment. A non-nuclear grade active pump can be located outside the grab sampling station and the containment to pump the nonradioactive motive fluid through the jet pump.

  11. Fluid sampling system for a nuclear reactor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Lau, L.K.; Alper, N.I.

    1994-11-22T23:59:59.000Z

    A system of extracting fluid samples, either liquid or gas, from the interior of a nuclear reactor containment utilizes a jet pump. To extract the sample fluid, a nonradioactive motive fluid is forced through the inlet and discharge ports of a jet pump located outside the containment, creating a suction that draws the sample fluid from the containment through a sample conduit connected to the pump suction port. The mixture of motive fluid and sample fluid is discharged through a return conduit to the interior of the containment. The jet pump and means for removing a portion of the sample fluid from the sample conduit can be located in a shielded sample grab station located next to the containment. A non-nuclear grade active pump can be located outside the grab sampling station and the containment to pump the nonradioactive motive fluid through the jet pump. 1 fig.

  12. Vapor port and groundwater sampling well

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hubbell, J.M.; Wylie, A.H.

    1996-01-09T23:59:59.000Z

    A method and apparatus have been developed for combining groundwater monitoring wells with unsaturated-zone vapor sampling ports. The apparatus allows concurrent monitoring of both the unsaturated and the saturated zone from the same well at contaminated areas. The innovative well design allows for concurrent sampling of groundwater and volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in the vadose (unsaturated) zone from a single well, saving considerable time and money. The sample tubes are banded to the outer well casing during installation of the well casing. 10 figs.

  13. Vapor port and groundwater sampling well

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hubbell, Joel M. (Idaho Falls, ID); Wylie, Allan H. (Idaho Falls, ID)

    1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A method and apparatus has been developed for combining groundwater monitoring wells with unsaturated-zone vapor sampling ports. The apparatus allows concurrent monitoring of both the unsaturated and the saturated zone from the same well at contaminated areas. The innovative well design allows for concurrent sampling of groundwater and volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in the vadose (unsaturated) zone from a single well, saving considerable time and money. The sample tubes are banded to the outer well casing during installation of the well casing.

  14. Fluid sampling apparatus and method

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Yeamans, David R. (Los Alamos, NM)

    1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Incorporation of a bellows in a sampling syringe eliminates ingress of contaminants, permits replication of amounts and compression of multiple sample injections, and enables remote sampling for off-site analysis.

  15. Fluid sampling apparatus and method

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Yeamans, D.R.

    1998-02-03T23:59:59.000Z

    Incorporation of a bellows in a sampling syringe eliminates ingress of contaminants, permits replication of amounts and compression of multiple sample injections, and enables remote sampling for off-site analysis. 3 figs.

  16. Fluid Inclusion Stratigraphy: Interpretation of New Wells in...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Coso Geothermal Field Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Conference Proceedings: Fluid Inclusion Stratigraphy: Interpretation of New Wells in the...

  17. Fluid-Rock Characterization and Interactions in NMR Well Logging

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hirasaki, George J.; Mohanty, Kishore K.

    2003-02-10T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of this project was to characterize the fluid properties and fluid-rock interactions that are needed for formation evaluation by NMR well logging. The advances made in the understanding of NMR fluid properties are summarized in a chapter written for an AAPG book on NMR well logging. This includes live oils, viscous oils, natural gas mixtures, and the relation between relaxation time and diffusivity.

  18. Fully Coupled Well Models for Fluid Injection and Production

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    White, Mark D.; Bacon, Diana H.; White, Signe K.; Zhang, Z. F.

    2013-08-05T23:59:59.000Z

    Wells are the primary engineered component of geologic sequestration systems with deep subsurface reservoirs. Wells provide a conduit for injecting greenhouse gases and producing reservoirs fluids, such as brines, natural gas, and crude oil, depending on the target reservoir. Well trajectories, well pressures, and fluid flow rates are parameters over which well engineers and operators have control during the geologic sequestration process. Current drilling practices provided well engineers flexibility in designing well trajectories and controlling screened intervals. Injection pressures and fluids can be used to purposely fracture the reservoir formation or to purposely prevent fracturing. Numerical simulation of geologic sequestration processes involves the solution of multifluid transport equations within heterogeneous geologic media. These equations that mathematically describe the flow of fluid through the reservoir formation are nonlinear in form, requiring linearization techniques to resolve. In actual geologic settings fluid exchange between a well and reservoir is a function of local pressure gradients, fluid saturations, and formation characteristics. In numerical simulators fluid exchange between a well and reservoir can be specified using a spectrum of approaches that vary from totally ignoring the reservoir conditions to fully considering reservoir conditions and well processes. Well models are a numerical simulation approach that account for local conditions and gradients in the exchange of fluids between the well and reservoir. As with the mathematical equations that describe fluid flow in the reservoir, variation in fluid properties with temperature and pressure yield nonlinearities in the mathematical equations that describe fluid flow within the well. To numerically simulate the fluid exchange between a well and reservoir the two systems of nonlinear multifluid flow equations must be resolved. The spectrum of numerical approaches for resolving these equations varies from zero coupling to full coupling. In this paper we describe a fully coupled solution approach for well model that allows for a flexible well trajectory and screened interval within a structured hexahedral computational grid. In this scheme the nonlinear well equations have been fully integrated into the Jacobian matrix for the reservoir conservation equations, minimizing the matrix bandwidth.

  19. Fluid-Rock Characterization and Interactions in NMR Well Logging

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hirasaki, George J.; Mohanty, Kishore K.

    2003-02-10T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of this project was to characterize the fluid properties and fluid-rock interactions which are needed for formation evaluation by NMR well logging. NMR well logging is finding wide use in formation evaluation. The formation parameters commonly estimated were porosity, permeability, and capillary bound water. Special cases include estimation of oil viscosity, residual oil saturation, location of oil/water contact, and interpretation on whether the hydrocarbon is oil or gas.

  20. Fluid-Rock Characterization and Interactions in NMR Well Logging

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    George J. Hirasaki; Kishore K. Mohanty

    2005-09-05T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of this report is to characterize the fluid properties and fluid-rock interactions that are needed for formation evaluation by NMR well logging. The advances made in the understanding of NMR fluid properties are summarized in a chapter written for an AAPG book on NMR well logging. This includes live oils, viscous oils, natural gas mixtures, and the relation between relaxation time and diffusivity. Oil based drilling fluids can have an adverse effect on NMR well logging if it alters the wettability of the formation. The effect of various surfactants on wettability and surface relaxivity are evaluated for silica sand. The relation between the relaxation time and diffusivity distinguishes the response of brine, oil, and gas in a NMR well log. A new NMR pulse sequence in the presence of a field gradient and a new inversion technique enables the T{sub 2} and diffusivity distributions to be displayed as a two-dimensional map. The objectives of pore morphology and rock characterization are to identify vug connectivity by using X-ray CT scan, and to improve NMR permeability correlation. Improved estimation of permeability from NMR response is possible by using estimated tortuosity as a parameter to interpolate between two existing permeability models.

  1. Fluid-Rock Characterization and Interactions in NMR Well Logging

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hirasaki, George J.; Mohanty, Kishore, K.

    2001-07-13T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of this project is to characterize the fluid properties and fluid-rock interactions that are needed for formation evaluation by NMR well logging. This is the first annual progress report submitted to the DOE. It reports on the work completed during the reporting period even if it may have started before this period. This project is a partnership between Professor George J. Hirasaki at Rice University and Professor Kishore Mohanty at University of Houston. In addition to the DOE, this project is supported by a consortium of oil companies and service companies. The fluid properties characterization has emphasized the departure of live oils from correlations based on dead oils. Also, asphaltic components can result in a difference between the T1 and T2 relaxation time distributions as well as reduce the hydrogen index. The fluid rock characterizations that are reported here are the effects of wettability and internal magnetic field gradients. A pore reconstruction method ha s been developed to recreate three-dimensional porous media from two-dimensional images that reproduce some of their key statistical properties. A Monte Carlo simulation technique has been developed to calculate the magnetization decay in fluid saturated porous media given their pore structure.

  2. Multi-well sample plate cover penetration system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Beer, Neil Reginald (Pleasanton, CA)

    2011-12-27T23:59:59.000Z

    An apparatus for penetrating a cover over a multi-well sample plate containing at least one individual sample well includes a cutting head, a cutter extending from the cutting head, and a robot. The cutting head is connected to the robot wherein the robot moves the cutting head and cutter so that the cutter penetrates the cover over the multi-well sample plate providing access to the individual sample well. When the cutting head is moved downward the foil is pierced by the cutter that splits, opens, and folds the foil inward toward the well. The well is then open for sample aspiration but has been protected from cross contamination.

  3. Downhole Fluid Sampling | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand JumpConceptual Model,DOE FacilityDimondale,South, New Jersey: Energy ResourcesDow KokamDownhole Fluid

  4. Horizontal well drill-in fluid utilizing alcohol ethoxylate

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jachnik, R.P.; Green, P.

    1995-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The drilling of horizontal wells in the last 6 years has significantly improved the economics of oil and gas production from depleted reservoirs or tight sands. This paper illustrates the application of an alcohol ethoxylate into a drill-in fluid designed to minimize formation damage in low permeability sandstones while drilling horizontal sections as long as 1,617 meters (5,306 ft) at depths approaching 6,580 meters (21,600 ft) and to facilitate formation cleanup. The chemistry of alcohol ethoxylates/alkoxylates are described and the more popular names used within the industry will be discussed. Laboratory results are presented which illustrate colloidal phenomena not previously reported with these systems, the routes taken for successful application into a drill-in fluid and how complex these particular colloidal systems are from a physical chemical viewpoint, along with the inevitable learning curve required to fully optimize these systems. Generalized case histories from the UK Southern North Sea will be described, along with field observations which back up the colloidal phenomena seen in the laboratory.

  5. Method and apparatus for sampling low-yield wells

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Last, George V. (Richland, WA); Lanigan, David C. (Kennewick, WA)

    2003-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

    An apparatus and method for collecting a sample from a low-yield well or perched aquifer includes a pump and a controller responsive to water level sensors for filling a sample reservoir. The controller activates the pump to fill the reservoir when the water level in the well reaches a high level as indicated by the sensor. The controller deactivates the pump when the water level reaches a lower level as indicated by the sensors. The pump continuously activates and deactivates the pump until the sample reservoir is filled with a desired volume, as indicated by a reservoir sensor. At the beginning of each activation cycle, the controller optionally can select to purge an initial quantity of water prior to filling the sample reservoir. The reservoir can be substantially devoid of air and the pump is a low volumetric flow rate pump. Both the pump and the reservoir can be located either inside or outside the well.

  6. Fluid Inclusion Stratigraphy Interpretation of New Wells in the...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    hypothesis is that selected gaseous species and species ratios can differentiate groundwater and reservoir fluid-bearing fractures, and can indicate reservoir seals. Analyses...

  7. Fluid-Rock Characterization and Interactions in NMR Well Logging

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hirasaki, George J.; Mohanty, Kishore K.

    2001-07-13T23:59:59.000Z

    This semi-annual report briefly summarizes the progress since the 1st Annual Report issued September, 2000 and the next annual report. More detailed results will be in the annual reports. The main emphasis on fluid properties was on measurements of the relaxation time and self-diffusion coefficient of ethane and propane. Ethane is similar to methane while propane is more similar to the higher alkanes. The ratio of T1 and T2 is demonstrated to be a function of both viscosity and the NMR frequency. The diffusion-induced T2 in a uniform magnetic gradient was simulated in one dimension to seek improved understanding NMR diffusion in restricted geometry. Analytical solutions can be found for this system if the correct region of validity is used. Estimation of permeability of vuggy carbonates has been problematic because the pore body size does not correlate well with pore throat size. CT scans and CPMG NMR measurements were made on a set of vuggy carbonate rocks.

  8. Reducing or stopping the uncontrolled flow of fluid such as oil from a well

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hermes, Robert E

    2014-02-18T23:59:59.000Z

    The uncontrolled flow of fluid from an oil or gas well may be reduced or stopped by injecting a composition including 2-cyanoacrylate ester monomer into the fluid stream. Injection of the monomer results in a rapid, perhaps instantaneous, polymerization of the monomer within the flow stream of the fluid. This polymerization results in formation of a solid plug that reduces or stops the flow of additional fluid from the well.

  9. Effect of oil and gas well drilling fluids on shallow groundwater in western North Dakota

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Murphy, E.C.; Kehew, A.E.

    1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Upon completion of an oil and gas well in North Dakota, the drilling fluid is buried in the reserve pit at the site. Reclamation of the drill site is expedited by digging a series of trenches which radiate out from the reserve pit. The majority of buried drilling fluid is ultimately contained within these 5-7-metre deep trenches. These fluids are commonly salt-based, i.e., they contain a concentration of 300,000 +- 20,000 ppM NaCl. In addition, these drilling fluids also contain additives including toxic trace-metal compounds. Four reclaimed oil and gas well sites were chosen for study in western North Dakota. The ages of these sites ranged from 2 to 23 years. A total of 31 piezometers and 22 soil water samplers were installed in and around the drill sites, and quarterly groundwater samples were obtained from these instruments. The local groundwater flow conditions were also determined at these sites. Results of both the water analyses and earth resistivity surveys indicate that leachate is being generated at all of the study sites. Water obtained from the unsaturated zone beneath the buried drilling fluid at all of the four study sites exceeds some of the recommended concentration limits and maximum permissible concentration limits for trace elements and major ions (As, Cl/sup -/, Pb, Se, and NO/sub 3//sup -/). These values are greatly reduced in the unsaturated zone as the depth from the buried drilling fluid increases. This reduction is assumed to be the result of attenuation of these ions by cation exchange on Na montmorillonitic clays. Two of these study sites represent the typical geohydrologic setting for the majority of oil and gas well sites in this area. At these sites the saturated zone was not monitored. The reduction in ion concentration in the unsaturated zone suggests that there would be very little impact on the groundwater from this buried drilling fluid at these two sites. 46 references, 58 figures, 3 tables.

  10. Fully Coupled Well Models for Fluid Injection and Production...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    engineers and operators have control during the geologic sequestration process. Current drilling practices provided well engineers flexibility in designing well trajectories and...

  11. IMPORTANCE SAMPLING FOR THE SIMULATION OF STOCHASTIC PETRI NETS AND FLUID STOCHASTIC PETRI

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tuffin, Bruno

    sys­ tems. The simulation of non­fluid models, using importance sampling, has been studied in (Obal II

  12. IN SITU STRESS, FRACTURE, AND FLUID FLOW ANALYSIS IN WELL 38C...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    IN THE COSO GEOTHERMAL FIELD Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Conference Proceedings: IN SITU STRESS, FRACTURE, AND FLUID FLOW ANALYSIS IN WELL...

  13. Candidate Well Selection for the Test of Degradable Biopolymer as Fracturing Fluid

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hwang, Yun Suk

    2012-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

    Hydraulic fracturing is a well-established technology of generating highly conductive flow path inside the rock by injecting massive amount of fracturing fluid and proppant with sufficient pressure to break the formation apart. But as the concern...

  14. Fluid Inclusion Gas Analysis

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Dilley, Lorie

    Fluid inclusion gas analysis for wells in various geothermal areas. Analyses used in developing fluid inclusion stratigraphy for wells and defining fluids across the geothermal fields. Each sample has mass spectrum counts for 180 chemical species.

  15. Fluid Inclusion Gas Analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dilley, Lorie

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Fluid inclusion gas analysis for wells in various geothermal areas. Analyses used in developing fluid inclusion stratigraphy for wells and defining fluids across the geothermal fields. Each sample has mass spectrum counts for 180 chemical species.

  16. Fluid sampling and chemical modeling of geopressured brines containing methane. Final report, March 1980-February 1981

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dudak, B.; Galbraith, R.; Hansen, L.; Sverjensky, D.; Weres, O.

    1982-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The development of a flowthrough sampler capable of obtaining fluid samples from geopressured wells at temperatures up to 400/sup 0/F and pressures up to 20,000 psi is described. The sampler has been designed, fabricated from MP35N alloy, laboratory tested, and used to obtain fluid samples from a geothermal well at The Geysers, California. However, it has not yet been used in a geopressured well. The design features, test results, and operation of this device are described. Alternative sampler designs are also discussed. Another activity was to review the chemistry and geochemistry of geopressured brines and reservoirs, and to evaluate the utility of available computer codes for modeling the chemistry of geopressured brines. The thermodynamic data bases for such codes are usually the limiting factor in their application to geopressured systems, but it was concluded that existing codes can be updated with reasonable effort and can usefully explain and predict the chemical characteristics of geopressured systems, given suitable input data.

  17. Black Warrior: Sub-soil gas and fluid inclusion exploration and slim well drilling

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    DOE Geothermal Peer Review 2010 - Presentation. Project Objectives: Discover a blind, low-moderate temperature resource: Apply a combination of detailed sub-soil gas, hydrocarbon, and isotope data to define possible upflow areas; Calibrate the sub-soil chemistry with down-hole fluid inclusion stratigraphy and fluid analyses to define a follow-up exploration drilling target; Create short term jobs and long term employment through resource exploration, development and power plant operation; Extend and adapt the DOE sub-soil 2 meter probe technology to gas sampling.

  18. Application of computational fluid dynamics to aerosol sampling and concentration

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hu, Shishan

    2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    An understanding of gas-liquid two-phase interactions, aerosol particle deposition, and heat transfer is needed. Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) is becoming a powerful tool to predict aerosol behavior for related design work. In this study...

  19. AN ADAPTIVE SAMPLING APPROACH TO INCOMPRESSIBLE PARTICLE-BASED FLUID 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hong, Woo-Suck

    2010-01-16T23:59:59.000Z

    I propose a particle-based technique for simulating incompressible uid that includes adaptive re nement of particle sampling. Each particle represents a mass of uid in its local region. Particles are split into several particles for ner sampling...

  20. AN ADAPTIVE SAMPLING APPROACH TO INCOMPRESSIBLE PARTICLE-BASED FLUID

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hong, Woo-Suck

    2010-01-16T23:59:59.000Z

    I propose a particle-based technique for simulating incompressible uid that includes adaptive re nement of particle sampling. Each particle represents a mass of uid in its local region. Particles are split into several particles for ner sampling...

  1. Category:Downhole Fluid Sampling | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand JumpConceptual Model, click here. Category:Conceptual Model Add.png Add aTechniques page?asFluid

  2. 1. Introduction Obtaining valid reservoir fluid samples is

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Williams, John M.

    Newsletter of the Well Testing Unit, Dhahran SAUDI ARAMCO #12;concentrations of reactive components Phase Be- haviour Unit (HPBU) at Saudi Aramco's R&D Centre has involved: research studies on bottom hole

  3. PREDICTION OF CUTTINGS BED HEIGHT WITH COMPUTATIONAL FLUID DYNAMICS IN DRILLING HORIZONTAL AND HIGHLY DEVIATED WELLS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ullmer, Brygg

    PREDICTION OF CUTTINGS BED HEIGHT WITH COMPUTATIONAL FLUID DYNAMICS IN DRILLING HORIZONTAL parameters such as wellbore geometry, pump rate, drilling fluid rheology and density, and maximum drilling Computational Fluid Dynamics methods. Movement, concentration and accumulation of drilled cuttings in non

  4. The U-tube: A new paradigm in borehole fluid sampling

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Freifeld, B. M.

    2009-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Fluid samples from deep boreholes can provide insights into subsurface physical, chemical, and biological conditions. Recovery of intact, minimally altered aliquots of subsurface fluids is required for analysis of aqueous chemistry, isotopic composition, and dissolved gases, and for microbial community characterization. Unfortunately, for many reasons, collecting geofluids poses a number of challenges, from formation contamination by drilling to maintaining integrity during recovery from depths. Not only are there substantial engineering issues in retrieval of a representative sample, but there is often the practical reality that fluid sampling is just one of many activities planned for deep boreholes. The U-tube geochemical sampling system presents a new paradigm for deep borehole fluid sampling. Because the system is small, its ability to integrate with other measurement systems and technologies opens up numerous possibilities for multifunctional integrated wellbore completions. To date, the U-tube has been successfully deployed at four different field sites, each with a different deployment modality, at depths from 260 m to 2 km. While the U-tube has proven to be highly versatile, these installations have resulted in data that provide additional insights for improving future U-tube deployments.

  5. Imaging Fluid Flow in Geothermal Wells Using Distributed Thermal Perturbation Sensing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Freifeld, B.; Finsterle, S.

    2010-12-10T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of Task 2 is to develop a numerical method for the efficient and accurate analysis of distributed thermal perturbation sensing (DTPS) data for (1) imaging flow profiles and (2) in situ determination of thermal conductivities and heat fluxes. Numerical forward and inverse modeling is employed to: (1) Examine heat and fluid flow processes near a geothermal well under heating and cooling conditions; (2) Demonstrate ability to interpret DTPS thermal profiles with acceptable estimation uncertainty using inverse modeling of synthetic temperature data; and (3) Develop template model and analysis procedure for the inversion of temperature data collected during a thermal perturbation test using fiber-optic distributed temperature sensors. This status report summarizes initial model developments and analyses.

  6. Helium measurements of pore-fluids obtained from SAFOD drillcore

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ali, S.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    al. ) released during drilling and well samples (Source 3:mud gas analyses during drilling, a well known monitoringin the well fluid samples recovered during SAFOD drilling

  7. Surge Block Method for Controlling Well Clogging and Sampling Sediment during Bioremediation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wu, Wei-min [Stanford University] [Stanford University; Watson, David B [ORNL] [ORNL; Luo, Jian [Stanford University] [Stanford University; Carley, Jack M [ORNL] [ORNL; Mehlhorn, Tonia L [ORNL] [ORNL; Kitanidis, Peter K. [Stanford University] [Stanford University; Jardine, Philip [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK)] [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK); Criddle, Craig [Stanford University] [Stanford University

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A surge block treatment method (i.e. inserting a solid rod plunger with a flat seal that closely fits the casing interior into a well and stocking it up and down) was performed for the rehabilitation of wells clogged with biomass and for the collection of time series sediment samples during in situ bioremediation tests for U(VI) immobilization at a the U.S. Department of Energy site in Oak Ridge, TN. The clogging caused by biomass growth had been controlled by using routine surge block treatment for18 times over a nearly four year test period. The treatment frequency was dependent of the dosage of electron donor injection and microbial community developed in the subsurface. Hydraulic tests showed that the apparent aquifer transmissivity at a clogged well with an inner diameter (ID) of 10.16 cm was increased by 8 13 times after the rehabilitation, indicating the effectiveness of the rehabilitation. Simultaneously with the rehabilitation, the surge block method was successfully used for collecting time series sediment samples composed of fine particles (clay and silt) from wells with ID 1.9 10.16 cm for the analysis of mineralogical and geochemical composition and microbial community during the same period. Our results demonstrated that the surge block method provided a cost-effective approach for both well rehabilitation and frequent solid sampling at the same location.

  8. Measuring resistivity changes from within a first cased well to monitor fluids injected into oil bearing geological formations from a second cased well while passing electrical current between the two cased wells

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Vail, W.B. III.

    1993-02-16T23:59:59.000Z

    A.C. current is conducted through geological formations separating two cased wells in an oil field undergoing enhanced oil recovery operations such as water flooding operations. Methods and apparatus are disclosed to measure the current leakage conducted into a geological formation from within a first cased well that is responsive to fluids injected into formation from a second cased well during the enhanced oil production activities. The current leakage and apparent resistivity measured within the first cased well are responsive to fluids injected into formation from the second cased well provided the distance of separation between the two cased wells is less than, or on the order of, a Characteristic Length appropriate for the problem.

  9. Measuring resistivity changes from within a first cased well to monitor fluids injected into oil bearing geological formations from a second cased well while passing electrical current between the two cased wells

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Vail, III, William B. (Bothell, WA)

    1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A.C. current is conducted through geological formations separating two cased wells in an oil field undergoing enhanced oil recovery operations such as water flooding operations. Methods and apparatus are disclosed to measure the current leakage conducted into a geological formation from within a first cased well that is responsive to fluids injected into formation from a second cased well during the enhanced oil production activities. The current leakage and apparent resistivity measured within the first cased well are responsive to fluids injected into formation from the second cased well provided the distance of separation between the two cased wells is less than, or on the order of, a Characteristic Length appropriate for the problem.

  10. Final report : 2004 monitoring well installation and sampling at Centralia,Kansas.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    LaFreniere, L. M.

    2006-02-08T23:59:59.000Z

    This document reports on monitoring well installation and sampling in 2004 at the location of a grain storage facility formerly operated in Centralia, Kansas, by the Commodity Credit Corporation (CCC) of the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA). Argonne National Laboratory is conducting environmental investigations of carbon tetrachloride contamination in groundwater at this site for the CCC/USDA. With the approval of the Kansas Department of Health and Environment (KDHE), Argonne installed six monitoring wells at the former facility in July 2004 to supplement existing monitoring points (piezometers) installed during Argonne's Phase I investigation in 2002. Together, the monitoring wells and piezometers constitute a monitoring network designed to (1) confirm the lateral distribution of carbon tetrachloride in the groundwater, (2) track any migration of contaminants that might take place, and (3) monitor aquifer geochemical characteristics. To verify that the six new monitoring wells had been developed adequately, they were sampled after their installation in July 2004 for analysis for volatile organic compounds (VOCs). The monitoring wells were sampled again in August 2004, after a stabilization period of four weeks. Five of the Phase I piezometers were also sampled in August 2004. Results of analysis of the August 2004 groundwater samples for VOCs confirmed the Phase II investigation's findings (based on sampling in March and April 2003) that carbon tetrachloride contamination in groundwater is generally confined to the boundary of the former CCC/USDA facility. Little migration of contamination from the former facility has been evident. Nevertheless, the network of monitoring wells now in place may not be adequate to delineate the extent of the plume. Future expansion of the network will proceed per agreement between the CCC/USDA and the KDHE. The groundwater samples collected in August 2004 were also analyzed for attenuation parameters that are helpful in determining whether the subsurface environment is suitable for natural in situ biodegradation of carbon tetrachloride. A preliminary screening of the results with a protocol of the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency showed limited evidence for active reductive dechlorination, one of the anaerobic processes by which carbon tetrachloride is biodegraded. These results indicate that additional monitoring of the groundwater contamination at the former CCC/USDA facility at Centralia is merited. On the basis of the findings and conclusions of the Phase I and Phase II investigations, as well as the results of the 2004 well sampling, a program of twice yearly groundwater monitoring in the expanded network is recommended to collect the data necessary to (1) monitor changes in plume dynamics and (2) evaluate the suitability of monitored natural attenuation as a remedial option for the Centralia site. This monitoring program should be conducted for a minimum of two years. After completion of the two-year monitoring program, remedial action objectives and potential corrective action alternatives are to be developed to address the groundwater contamination at Centralia.

  11. Topical viscosity control for light hydrocarbon displacing fluids in petroleum recovery and in fracturing fluids for well stimulation

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Heller, John P. (Socorro, NM); Dandge, Dileep K. (Socorro, NM)

    1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Solvent-type flooding fluids comprising light hydrocarbons in the range of ethane to hexane (and mixtures thereof) are used to displace crude oil in formations having temperatures of about 20 degrees to about 150 degrees Centigrade and pressures above about 650 psi, the light hydrocarbons having dissolved therein from about 0.05% to about 3% of an organotin compound of the formula R.sub.3 SnF where each R is independently an alkyl, aryl or alkyaryl group from 3 to 12 carbon atoms. Under the pressures and temperatures described, the organotin compounds become pentacoordinated and linked through the electronegative bridges, forming polymers within the light hydrocarbon flooding media to render them highly viscous. Under ambient conditions, the viscosity control agents will not readily be produced from the formation with either crude oil or water, since they are insoluble in the former and only sparingly soluble in the latter.

  12. A Well-Balanced Scheme For Two-Fluid Flows In Variable Cross-Section ducts

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    , ) p = p(, s, ), h = h(, s, ). (21) Then in these variables the sound speed c satisfies c2 = p = h. (22 of a mixture of two compressible fluids (a gas (1) and a liquid (2), for instance) in a cross-section duct

  13. Evaluation of polymer free drill-in fluids for use in high productivity, horizontal well completions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Falla Ramirez, Jorge H

    2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    acid as clean-up fluid. 40 4. 9 Regained permeability correlation for acetic acid cleaning treatment . . . . . . . . . . 41 4. 10 Sand face after acetic acid cleaning treatment (DS = 6%, acid = 10% case). 42 FIGURE Page 4. 11 General rheology... acid cleaning treatment. . . . . 40 4. 17 Regained permeability regression statistics for acetic acid cleaning treatment. 40 4. 18 Regained permeability regression coefficients for acetic acid cleaning treatment. 41 1. INTRODUCTION During the last...

  14. Application of Multi-rate Flowing Fluid Electric ConductivityLogging Method to Well DH-2, Tono Site, Japan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Doughty, Christine; Takeuchi, Shinji; Amano, Kenji; Shimo, Michito; Tsang, Chin-Fu

    2004-10-04T23:59:59.000Z

    The flowing fluid electric conductivity (FEC) logging method, wellbore fluid is replaced with de-ionized water, following which FEC profiles in the wellbore are measured at a series of times while the well is pumped at a constant rate. Locations were fluid enters the wellbore show peaks in the FEC logs, which may be analyzed to infer inflow strengths and salinities of permeable features intersected by the wellbore. In multi-rate flowing FEC logging, the flowing FEC logging method is repeated using two or more pumping rates, which enables the transmissivities and inherent pressure heads of these features to be estimated as well. We perform multi-rate FEC logging on a deep borehole in fractured granitic rock, using three different pumping rates. Results identify 19 hydraulically conducting fractures and indicate that transmissivity, pressure head, and salinity vary significantly among them. By using three pumping rates rather than the minimum number of two, we obtain an internal consistency check on the analysis that provides a measure of the uncertainty of the results. Good comparisons against static FEC profiles and against independent chemical, geological, and hydrogeological data have further enhanced confidence in the results of the multi-rate flowing FEC logging method.

  15. Imaging Fluid Flow in Geothermal Wells Using Distributed Thermal Perturbation Sensing

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Project objective: A New Geothermal Well Imaging Tool. 1.To develop a robust and easily deployable DTPS for monitoring in geothermal wells; and 2. Develop the associated analysis methodology for flow imaging; and?when possible by wellbore conditions?to determine in situthermal conductivity and basal heat flux.

  16. Horizontal well construction/completion process in a Gulf of Mexico unconsolidated sand: development of baseline correlations for improved drill-in fluid cleanup practices

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lacewell, Jason Lawrence

    1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of well planning, completion and cleanup operations. Our objectives are to present a complete examination of the openhole horizontal well construction/completion process using a new drill-in fluid (DIF). Further, we will establish data critical...

  17. Fluid-Rock Characterization for NMR Well Logging and Special Core Analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    George Hirasaki; Kishore Mohanty

    2007-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The overall objective of this effort is to develop, build and test a high-speed drilling motor that can meet the performance guidelines of the announcement, namely: 'The motors are expected to rotate at a minimum of 10,000 rpm, have an OD no larger than 7 inches and work downhole continuously for at least 100 hours. The motor must have common oilfield thread connections capable of making up to a drill bit and bottomhole assembly. The motor must be capable of transmitting drilling fluid through the motor'. To these goals, APS would add that the motor must be economically viable, in terms of both its manufacturing and maintenance costs, and be applicable to as broad a range of markets as possible. APS has taken the approach of using a system using planetary gears to increase the speed of a conventional mud motor to 10,000 rpm. The mud flow is directed around the outside of the gear train, and a unique flow diversion system has been employed. A prototype of the motor was built and tested in APS's high-pressure flow loop. The motor operated per the model up to {approx}4200 rpm. At that point a bearing seized and the performance was severely degraded. The motor is being rebuilt and will be retested outside of this program.

  18. The effect of various mixers on the viscosity and flow properties of an oil well drilling fluid

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Spannagel, Johnny Allen

    1957-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of Texas in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE January, 1957 MaJor SubJect. Petroleum Englneerlng THE EFFECT OF VARIOUS MIXERS ON THE VISCOSITY AND FLOW PROPERTIES QF AN OIL WELL DRILLING FLUID A Thesis... on the 300 rpm Farm V-G Meter Reading 15 The Effect of Various Mixers on the 600 rpm Farm V-G Meter Reading 15 The Effect of Various Mixers on the Plastic Viscosity of a Bentonite Mud 16 Temperature Variation of the Drilling Mud Mixed in Variou...

  19. Electric Power Generation from Co-Produced Fluids from Oil and Gas Wells

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand JumpConceptual Model,DOEHazel Crest, Illinois:EdinburghEldorado IvanpahGas Wells | Open

  20. E-Print Network 3.0 - animal well-being Sample Search Results

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    RESEARCH THE UNIVERSITY OF NORTH CAROLINA AT GREENSBORO Summary: and contribute to their health, comfort and well-being; animal care activities are directed by a veterinarian......

  1. Annual Logging Symposium, May 25-28, 2008 PREDICTION OF FORMATION-TESTER FLUID-SAMPLE QUALITY IN

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Torres-Verdín, Carlos

    with formation testers are often contaminated with mud filtrate. In some cases, it may take hours or even days to achieve acceptable levels of mud-filtrate contamination, thereby rendering the fluid- sampling operation the high spatial asymmetry of the mud-filtrate invaded zone (especially for the case of point probes

  2. Laboratory tests to evaluate and study formation damage with low-density drill-in fluids (LDDIF) for horizontal well completions in low pressure and depleted reservoirs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Guoqiang

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    low concentrations of the HGS so that fluid rheology is not altered. We have conducted extensive laboratory testing to compare performance of the HGS LDDIF with that of conventional horizontal well DIFs. Experiments consisted of permeability regain...

  3. E-Print Network 3.0 - alveolar fluid clearance Sample Search...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Control of Hazardous Energy at power generating facilities. These policies... .e., lubricating oil, control fluids, hydraulic oil, etc.). c. Prevent release of hazardous or...

  4. E-Print Network 3.0 - amniotic fluid clearance Sample Search...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    of Hazardous Energy at power generating facilities. These policies... .e., lubricating oil, control fluids, hydraulic oil, etc.). c. Prevent release of hazardous or potentially...

  5. Getting the Best Out of Fluid Samples John M. Williams, SPE, Science Support Services

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Williams, John M.

    essentially involves collecting surface samples of the oil and gas from the production test separator, bottomhole samples from the wellbore, or both types of samples. For separator gas samples, the quality checks are (1) determination of opening pressure; (2) compositional analysis, including air content; and (3

  6. Monitoring well

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hubbell, Joel M. (Idaho Falls, ID); Sisson, James B. (Idaho Falls, ID)

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The present invention relates to a monitoring well which includes an enclosure defining a cavity and a water reservoir enclosed within the cavity and wherein the reservoir has an inlet and an outlet. The monitoring well further includes a porous housing borne by the enclosure and which defines a fluid chamber which is oriented in fluid communication with the outlet of the reservoir, and wherein the porous housing is positioned in an earthen soil location below-grade. A geophysical monitoring device is provided and mounted in sensing relation relative to the fluid chamber of the porous housing; and a coupler is selectively moveable relative to the outlet of reservoir to couple the porous housing and water reservoir in fluid communication. An actuator is coupled in force transmitting relation relative to the coupler to selectively position the coupler in a location to allow fluid communication between the reservoir and the fluid chamber defined by the porous housing.

  7. Monitoring well

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hubbell, Joel M. (Idaho Falls, ID); Sisson, James B. (Idaho Falls, ID)

    1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A monitoring well including a conduit defining a passageway, the conduit having a proximal and opposite, distal end; a coupler connected in fluid flowing relationship with the passageway; and a porous housing borne by the coupler and connected in fluid flowing relation thereto.

  8. Monitoring well

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hubbell, J.M.; Sisson, J.B.

    1999-06-29T23:59:59.000Z

    A monitoring well is described which includes: a conduit defining a passageway, the conduit having a proximal and opposite, distal end; a coupler connected in fluid flowing relationship with the passageway; and a porous housing borne by the coupler and connected in fluid flowing relation thereto. 8 figs.

  9. Sampling and Analysis Instruction for Installation of UPR-100-N-17 Bioremediation Wells and Performance of Bioventing Pilot Tests

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    W. S. Thompson

    2008-12-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Sampling and analytical requirements for in situ bioremediation pilot study for remediation of vadose zone petroleum hydrocarbon contamination.

  10. Evaluations of Radionuclides of Uranium, Thorium, and Radium Associated with Produced Fluids, Precipitates, and Sludges from Oil, Gas, and Oilfield Brine Injection Wells in Mississippi

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ericksen, R.L.

    1999-10-28T23:59:59.000Z

    There is an unsurpassed lack of scientific data with respect to the concentrations and isotopic compositions of uranium, thorium, and radium in the produced formation fluids (brine), precipitates, and sludges generated with the operation of oil and gas wells in Mississippi. These radioactive elements when contained in the formation fluids have been given the term NORM, which is an acronym for naturally occurring radioactive materials. When they are technologically enhanced during oil and gas production activities resulting in the formation of scale (precipitates) and sludges they are termed TENORM (technologically enhanced naturally occurring radioactive materials). As used in this document, NORM and TENORM will be considered equivalent terms and the occurrence of NORM in the oilfield will be considered the result of production operations. As a result of the lack of data no scientifically sound theses may be developed concerning the presence of these radionuclides in the fluid brine, precipitate (scale), or sludge phases. Over the period of just one year, 1997 for example, Mississippi produced over 39,372,963,584 liters (10,402,368,186 gallons or 247,675,433 barrels) of formation water associated with hydrocarbon production from 41 counties across the state.

  11. Crown Zellerbach Well No. 2, Livingston Parish, Louisiana. Volume II. Well test data. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The following well test data are included: final report of field test data, IGT compiled data, ERMI raw data, Gas Producer's Associated tentative method of testing for hydrogen sulfide in natural gas using length of stain tubes, IGT combined sample log, report on reservoir fluids, well test analysis, sampling and chemical analysis procedures, and scale and corrosion evaluation. (MHR)

  12. Elucidating the effects of adsorbent flexibility on fluid adsorption using simple models and flat-histogram sampling methods

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shen, Vincent K., E-mail: vincent.shen@nist.gov; Siderius, Daniel W. [Chemical Informatics Research Group, Chemical Sciences Division, National Institute of Standards and Technology, Gaithersburg, Maryland 20899-8380 (United States)

    2014-06-28T23:59:59.000Z

    Using flat-histogram Monte Carlo methods, we investigate the adsorptive behavior of the square-well fluid in two simple slit-pore-like models intended to capture fundamental characteristics of flexible adsorbent materials. Both models require as input thermodynamic information about the flexible adsorbent material itself. An important component of this work involves formulating the flexible pore models in the appropriate thermodynamic (statistical mechanical) ensembles, namely, the osmotic ensemble and a variant of the grand-canonical ensemble. Two-dimensional probability distributions, which are calculated using flat-histogram methods, provide the information necessary to determine adsorption thermodynamics. For example, we are able to determine precisely adsorption isotherms, (equilibrium) phase transition conditions, limits of stability, and free energies for a number of different flexible adsorbent materials, distinguishable as different inputs into the models. While the models used in this work are relatively simple from a geometric perspective, they yield non-trivial adsorptive behavior, including adsorption-desorption hysteresis solely due to material flexibility and so-called “breathing” of the adsorbent. The observed effects can in turn be tied to the inherent properties of the bare adsorbent. Some of the effects are expected on physical grounds while others arise from a subtle balance of thermodynamic and mechanical driving forces. In addition, the computational strategy presented here can be easily applied to more complex models for flexible adsorbents.

  13. Bioremediation Well Borehole Soil Sampling and Data Analysis Summary Report for the 100-N Area Bioremediation Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    D. A. Gamon

    2009-09-28T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this report is to present data and findings acquired during the drilling and construction of seven bioremediation wells in the 100-N Area in conjunction with remediation of the UPR-100-N-17 petroleum waste site.

  14. Thermal Motions of the E. Coli Glucose-Galactose Binding Protein Studied Using Well-Sampled Semi-Atomistic Simulations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cashman, Derek J; Bhatt, Divesh; Zuckerman, Daniel M

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The E. coli glucose-galactose chemosensory receptor is a 309 residue, 32 kDa protein consisting of two distinct structural domains. In this computational study, we studied the protein's thermal fluctuations, including both the large scale interdomain movements that contribute to the receptor's mechanism of action, as well as smaller scale motions, using two different computational methods. We employ extremely fast, "semi-atomistic" Library-Based Monte Carlo (LBMC) simulations, which include all backbone atoms but "implicit" side chains. Our results were compared with previous experiments and an all-atom Langevin dynamics simulation. Both LBMC and Langevin dynamics simulations were performed using both the apo and glucose-bound form of the protein, with LBMC exhibiting significantly larger fluctuations. The LBMC simulations are also in general agreement with the disulfide trapping experiments of Careaga & Falke (JMB, 1992; Biophys. J., 1992), which indicate that distant residues in the crystal structure (i...

  15. Petrographic report on clay-rich samples from Permian Unit 4 salt, G. Friemel No. 1 well, Palo Duro Basin, Deaf Smith County, Texas: unanalyzed data

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fukui, L M

    1983-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report presents the results of mineralogic and petrographic analyses performed on five samples of clay-rich rock from salt-bearing Permian strata sampled by drill core from G. Friemel No. 1 Well, Deaf Smith County, Texas. Five samples of clay-rich rock from depths of about 2457, 2458, 2521, 2548, and 2568 feet were analyzed to determine the amounts of soluble phase (halite) and the amounts and mineralogy of the insoluble phases. The amounts of halite found were 59, 79, 47, 40, and 4 weight percent, respectively, for the samples. The insoluble minerals are predominately clay (20 to 60 volume percent) and anhydrite (up to 17 volume percent), with minor (about 1.0%) and trace amounts of quartz, dolomite, muscovite, and gypsum. The clays include illite, chlorite, and interstratified chlorite-smectite. The results presented in this petrographic report are descriptive, uninterpreted data. 2 references, 7 tables.

  16. Analysis of core samples from the BPXA-DOE-USGS Mount Elbert gas hydrate stratigraphic test well: Insights into core disturbance and handling

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kneafsey, Timothy J.; Lu, Hailong; Winters, William; Boswell, Ray; Hunter, Robert; Collett, Timothy S.

    2009-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Collecting and preserving undamaged core samples containing gas hydrates from depth is difficult because of the pressure and temperature changes encountered upon retrieval. Hydrate-bearing core samples were collected at the BPXA-DOE-USGS Mount Elbert Gas Hydrate Stratigraphic Test Well in February 2007. Coring was performed while using a custom oil-based drilling mud, and the cores were retrieved by a wireline. The samples were characterized and subsampled at the surface under ambient winter arctic conditions. Samples thought to be hydrate bearing were preserved either by immersion in liquid nitrogen (LN), or by storage under methane pressure at ambient arctic conditions, and later depressurized and immersed in LN. Eleven core samples from hydrate-bearing zones were scanned using x-ray computed tomography to examine core structure and homogeneity. Features observed include radial fractures, spalling-type fractures, and reduced density near the periphery. These features were induced during sample collection, handling, and preservation. Isotopic analysis of the methane from hydrate in an initially LN-preserved core and a pressure-preserved core indicate that secondary hydrate formation occurred throughout the pressurized core, whereas none occurred in the LN-preserved core, however no hydrate was found near the periphery of the LN-preserved core. To replicate some aspects of the preservation methods, natural and laboratory-made saturated porous media samples were frozen in a variety of ways, with radial fractures observed in some LN-frozen sands, and needle-like ice crystals forming in slowly frozen clay-rich sediments. Suggestions for hydrate-bearing core preservation are presented.

  17. Examination of core samples from the Mount Elbert Gas Hydrate Stratigraphic Test Well, Alaska North Slope: Effects of retrieval and preservation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kneafsey, T.J.; Liu, T.J. H.; Winters, W.; Boswell, R.; Hunter, R.; Collett, T.S.

    2011-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Collecting and preserving undamaged core samples containing gas hydrates from depth is difficult because of the pressure and temperature changes encountered upon retrieval. Hydrate-bearing core samples were collected at the BPXA-DOE-USGS Mount Elbert Gas Hydrate Stratigraphic Test Well in February 2007. Coring was performed while using a custom oil-based drilling mud, and the cores were retrieved by a wireline. The samples were characterized and subsampled at the surface under ambient winter arctic conditions. Samples thought to be hydrate bearing were preserved either by immersion in liquid nitrogen (LN), or by storage under methane pressure at ambient arctic conditions, and later depressurized and immersed in LN. Eleven core samples from hydrate-bearing zones were scanned using x-ray computed tomography to examine core structure and homogeneity. Features observed include radial fractures, spalling-type fractures, and reduced density near the periphery. These features were induced during sample collection, handling, and preservation. Isotopic analysis of the methane from hydrate in an initially LN-preserved core and a pressure-preserved core indicate that secondary hydrate formation occurred throughout the pressurized core, whereas none occurred in the LN-preserved core, however no hydrate was found near the periphery of the LN-preserved core. To replicate some aspects of the preservation methods, natural and laboratory-made saturated porous media samples were frozen in a variety of ways, with radial fractures observed in some LN-frozen sands, and needle-like ice crystals forming in slowly frozen clay-rich sediments. Suggestions for hydrate-bearing core preservation are presented.

  18. Geology, hydrothermal petrology, stable isotope geochemistry, and fluid inclusion geothermometry of LASL geothermal test well C/T-1 (Mesa 31-1), East Mesa, Imperial Valley, California, USA

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Miller, K.R.; Elders, W.A.

    1980-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Borehole Mesa 31-1 (LASL C/T-1) is an 1899-m (6231-ft) deep well located in the northwestern part of the East Mesa Geothermal Field. Mesa 31-1 is the first Calibration/Test Well (C/T-1) in the Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory (LASL), Geothermal Log Interpretation Program. The purpose of this study is to provide a compilation of drillhole data, drill cuttings, well lithology, and formation petrology that will serve to support the use of well LASL C/T-1 as a calibration/test well for geothermal logging. In addition, reviews of fluid chemistry, stable isotope studies, isotopic and fluid inclusion geothermometry, and the temperature log data are presented. This study provides the basic data on the geology and hydrothermal alteration of the rocks in LASL C/T-1 as background for the interpretation of wireline logs.

  19. EVALUATIONS OF RADIONUCLIDES OF URANIUM, THORIUM, AND RADIUM ASSOCIATED WITH PRODUCED FLUIDS, PRECIPITATES, AND SLUDGES FROM OIL, GAS, AND OILFIELD BRINE INJECTION WELLS IN MISSISSIPPI

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Charles Swann; John Matthews; Rick Ericksen; Joel Kuszmaul

    2004-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Naturally occurring radioactive materials (NORM) are known to be produced as a byproduct of hydrocarbon production in Mississippi. The presence of NORM has resulted in financial losses to the industry and continues to be a liability as the NORM-enriched scales and scale encrusted equipment is typically stored rather than disposed of. Although the NORM problem is well known, there is little publically available data characterizing the hazard. This investigation has produced base line data to fill this informational gap. A total of 329 NORM-related samples were collected with 275 of these samples consisting of brine samples. The samples were derived from 37 oil and gas reservoirs from all major producing areas of the state. The analyses of these data indicate that two isotopes of radium ({sup 226}Ra and {sup 228}Ra) are the ultimate source of the radiation. The radium contained in these co-produced brines is low and so the radiation hazard posed by the brines is also low. Existing regulations dictate the manner in which these salt-enriched brines may be disposed of and proper implementation of the rules will also protect the environment from the brine radiation hazard. Geostatistical analyses of the brine components suggest relationships between the concentrations of {sup 226}Ra and {sup 228}Ra, between the Cl concentration and {sup 226}Ra content, and relationships exist between total dissolved solids, BaSO{sub 4} saturation and concentration of the Cl ion. Principal component analysis points to geological controls on brine chemistry, but the nature of the geologic controls could not be determined. The NORM-enriched barite (BaSO{sub 4}) scales are significantly more radioactive than the brines. Leaching studies suggest that the barite scales, which were thought to be nearly insoluble in the natural environment, can be acted on by soil microorganisms and the enclosed radium can become bioavailable. This result suggests that the landspreading means of scale disposal should be reviewed. This investigation also suggests 23 specific components of best practice which are designed to provide a guide to safe handling of NORM in the hydrocarbon industry. The components of best practice include both worker safety and suggestions to maintain waste isolation from the environment.

  20. Technology for Increasing Geothermal Energy Productivity. Computer Models to Characterize the Chemical Interactions of Goethermal Fluids and Injectates with Reservoir Rocks, Wells, Surface Equiptment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nancy Moller Weare

    2006-07-25T23:59:59.000Z

    This final report describes the results of a research program we carried out over a five-year (3/1999-9/2004) period with funding from a Department of Energy geothermal FDP grant (DE-FG07-99ID13745) and from other agencies. The goal of research projects in this program were to develop modeling technologies that can increase the understanding of geothermal reservoir chemistry and chemistry-related energy production processes. The ability of computer models to handle many chemical variables and complex interactions makes them an essential tool for building a fundamental understanding of a wide variety of complex geothermal resource and production chemistry. With careful choice of methodology and parameterization, research objectives were to show that chemical models can correctly simulate behavior for the ranges of fluid compositions, formation minerals, temperature and pressure associated with present and near future geothermal systems as well as for the very high PT chemistry of deep resources that is intractable with traditional experimental methods. Our research results successfully met these objectives. We demonstrated that advances in physical chemistry theory can be used to accurately describe the thermodynamics of solid-liquid-gas systems via their free energies for wide ranges of composition (X), temperature and pressure. Eight articles on this work were published in peer-reviewed journals and in conference proceedings. Four are in preparation. Our work has been presented at many workshops and conferences. We also considerably improved our interactive web site (geotherm.ucsd.edu), which was in preliminary form prior to the grant. This site, which includes several model codes treating different XPT conditions, is an effective means to transfer our technologies and is used by the geothermal community and other researchers worldwide. Our models have wide application to many energy related and other important problems (e.g., scaling prediction in petroleum production systems, stripping towers for mineral production processes, nuclear waste storage, CO2 sequestration strategies, global warming). Although funding decreases cut short completion of several research activities, we made significant progress on these abbreviated projects.

  1. Laboratory tests to evaluate and study formation damage with low-density drill-in fluids (LDDIF) for horizontal well completions in low pressure and depleted reservoirs 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Guoqiang

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    incorporates low-density hollow glass spheres (HGS) to allow near-balanced drilling in low pressure and depleted reservoirs. The LDDIF uses potassium chloride (KCI) brine as the base fluid because of its low density and inhibition of clay hydration and employs...

  2. Geothermal well stimulation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sinclair, A.R.; Pittard, F.J.; Hanold, R.J.

    1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    All available data on proppants and fluids were examined to determine areas in technology that need development for 300 to 500/sup 0/F (150/sup 0/ to 265/sup 0/C) hydrothermal wells. While fluid properties have been examined well into the 450/sup 0/F range, proppants have not been previously tested at elevated temperatures except in a few instances. The latest test data at geothermal temperatures is presented and some possible proppants and fluid systems that can be used are shown. Also discussed are alternative stimulation techniques for geothermal wells.

  3. Examination of core samples from the Mount Elbert Gas Hydrate Stratigraphic Test Well, Alaska North Slope: Effects of retrieval and preservation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Collett, T.J. Kneafsey, T.J., H. Liu, W. Winters, R. Boswell, R. Hunter, and T.S.

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Mount Elbert Well) during drilling and coring operationsWell in February 2007. Coring was performed while using a custom oil-based drillingWell, pressure coring was not used, thus the core was depressurized upon ascent. Drilling

  4. Analysis of core samples from the BPXA-DOE-USGS Mount Elbert gas hydrate stratigraphic test well: Insights into core disturbance and handling

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kneafsey, Timothy J.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Mount Elbert Well) during drilling and coring operationsWell in February 2007. Coring was performed while using a custom oil-based drillingWell, pressure coring was not used, thus the core was depressurized upon ascent. Drilling

  5. Thermal indicator for wells

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Gaven, Jr., Joseph V. (Oakton, VA); Bak, Chan S. (Newbury Park, CA)

    1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Minute durable plate-like thermal indicators are employed for precision measuring static and dynamic temperatures of well drilling fluids. The indicators are small enough and sufficiently durable to be circulated in the well with drilling fluids during the drilling operation. The indicators include a heat resistant indicating layer, a coacting meltable solid component and a retainer body which serves to unitize each indicator and which may carry permanent indicator identifying indicia. The indicators are recovered from the drilling fluid at ground level by known techniques.

  6. Drill pipe corrosion control using an inert drilling fluid

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Caskey, B.C.; Copass, K.S.

    1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The results of a geothermal drill pipe corrosion field test are presented. When a low-density drilling fluid was required for drilling a geothermal well because of an underpressured, fractured formation, two drilling fluids were alternately used to compare drill pipe corrosion rates. The first fluid was an air-water mist with corrosion control chemicals. The other fluid was a nitrogen-water mist without added chemicals. The test was conducted during November 1980 at the Baca Location in northern New Mexico. Data from corrosion rings, corrosion probes, fluid samples and flow line instrumentation are plotted for the ten day test period. It is shown that the inert drilling fluid, nitrogen, reduced corrosion rates by more than an order of magnitude. Test setup and procedures are also discussed. Development of an onsite inert gas generator could reduce the cost of drilling geothermal wells by extending drill pipe life and reducing corrosion control chemical costs.

  7. Fluid management plan for the Project Shoal Area Offsites Subproject

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1996-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The US Department of Energy, Nevada Operations Office (DOE/NV) has initiated the Offsites Subproject to characterize the hazards posed to human health and the environment as a result of underground nuclear testing activities at facilities other than the Nevada Test Site (NTS). A primary Subproject objective is to gather adequate data to characterize the various Subproject sites through the collection of surface and subsurface soil samples and by drilling several wells for the collection of groundwater data. The Project Shoal Area (PSA) is one of the Subproject`s Nevada sites and is subject to the requirements set forth in the Federal Facility Compliance Agreement and Consent Order (FFACO) (DOE, 1996a). In accordance with the FFACO, a Corrective Action Investigation Plan (CAIP) has been developed for work at the PSA (designated as Corrective Action Unit Number 416). This Fluid Management Plan (FMP) provides guidance for the management of fluids generated from wells constructed at the PSA. Long-term monitoring and future activities at the site, if required, will be set forth in additional documents as required by the FFACO. The ultimate method for disposition of fluids generated by site operations depends upon sample analysis and process knowledge in relation to fluid management criteria. Section 2 describes well site operations; Section 3 discusses fluid management criteria; Section 4 includes the fluid monitoring program; Section 5 presents the fluid management strategy; Section 6 provides for fluid management during routine well monitoring; and Section 7 contains reporting criteria.

  8. Examination of core samples from the Mount Elbert Gas Hydrate Stratigraphic Test Well, Alaska North Slope: Effects of retrieval and preservation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Collett, T.J. Kneafsey, T.J., H. Liu, W. Winters, R. Boswell, R. Hunter, and T.S.

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    and handling of natural gas hydrate. GSC Bulletin, 544: 263-naturally occurring gas hydrates: the structures of methanefrom the Mount Elbert Gas Hydrate Stratigraphic Test Well,

  9. Analysis of core samples from the BPXA-DOE-USGS Mount Elbert gas hydrate stratigraphic test well: Insights into core disturbance and handling

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kneafsey, Timothy J.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    and handling of natural gas hydrate. GSC Bulletin, 544: 263-naturally occurring gas hydrates: the structures of methaneDOE-USGS Mount Elbert gas hydrate stratigraphic test well:

  10. Analytical Data Report for Sediment Samples Collected From 200 BP 5 OU, C7515 (299-E24-25) M-Well

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lindberg, Michael J.

    2010-06-18T23:59:59.000Z

    This is an analytical data report for sediments received from BP 5 M Well for geochemical studies. Data will be reported to CH2M HILL Plateau Remediation Company (CHPRC).

  11. Well tool

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fox, F.K.

    1981-04-07T23:59:59.000Z

    There is disclosed a turbodrill wherein excessive wear on the axial thrust bearing supporting the shaft from the housing is detectable at the surface by means of an increase in the back pressure of the drilling fluid circulating through the turbine section.

  12. Sampling for Bacteria in Wells (Spanish)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lesikar, Bruce J.

    2001-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    C?mo Tomar Muestras de Pozos (para an?lisis bacteriol?gico) E-126S 11/01 Las muestras de agua para an?lisis bacteriol?gico siempre deben ser tomadas en envases esterilizados. El procedimiento para tomar las muestras de agua es el siguiente: 1.... Obtenga un envase esterilizado del Laboratorio del Departamento de Sanidad o llame a su oficina local del Servicio de Extensi?n. 2. Elija el grifo (llave de paso) de agua fr?a del cual va a tomar la muestra. Qu?tele el oxigenador. No tome muestras de: un...

  13. Sampling for Bacteria in Wells (Spanish) 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lesikar, Bruce J.

    2001-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    general es de entre $8.00 y $25.00. La bacteria de hierro es otro contaminante que forma lama muy obvia dentro de los tubos y los grifos. No se necesita un an?lisis de laboratorio para identificarla. Busque una lama color caf? o rojiza dentro del tanque...

  14. Use of an inert drilling fluid to control geothermal drill pipe corrosion

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Caskey, B.C.

    1981-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The results of a geothermal drill pipe corrosion field test are presented. When a low-density drilling fluid was required for drilling a geothermal well because of an underpressured, fractured formation, two drilling fluids were alternatively used to compare drill pipe corrosion rates. The first fluid was an air-water mist with corrosion control chemicals. The other fluid was a nitrogen-water mist without added chemicals. The test was conducted during November 1980 at the Baca Location in northern New Mexico, USA. Data from corrosion rings, corrosion probes, fluid samples, and flow line instrumentation are plotted for the ten day test period. It is shown that the inert drilling fluid (nitrogen) reduced corrosion rates by more than an order of magnitude. Test setup and procedures are also discussed. Development of an on-site inert gas generator could reduce the cost of drilling geothermal wells by extending drill pipe life and reducing corrosion control chemical costs.

  15. Well valve control system

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schwendemann, K.L.; McCracken, O.W.; Mondon, C.G.; Wortham, L.C.

    1987-01-13T23:59:59.000Z

    A system is described for controlling well testing through an upper and lower test string with a subsea test tree connected therebetween and latch means to release the upper test string from the subsea test tree comprising: a. first and second selectively programmable microprocessor means; b. means for storing system operating limits in each microprocessor means; c. means for changing the operating limits in response to changes in well conditions; d. means for communicating operating fluid pressure to the subsurface test tree and the latch means; e. solenoid pilot valves controlling the flow of the operating fluid pressure to the subsea test tree and the latch means; f. the first microprocessor means located at a central control console; g. the second microprocessor means located near the solenoid valves; h. means for transmitting signals between the first and second microprocessor means and validating the accuracy of the signals; and i. electronic circuits to control operation of the solenoid valves in response to validated signals.

  16. Hanford wells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chamness, M.A.; Merz, J.K.

    1993-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Records describing wells located on or near the Hanford Site have been maintained by Pacific Northwest Laboratory and the operating contractor, Westinghouse Hanford Company. In support of the Ground-Water Surveillance Project, portions of the data contained in these records have been compiled into the following report, which is intended to be used by those needing a condensed, tabular summary of well location and basic construction information. The wells listed in this report were constructed over a period of time spanning almost 70 years. Data included in this report were retrieved from the Hanford Envirorunental Information System (HEIS) database and supplemented with information not yet entered into HEIS. While considerable effort has been made to obtain the most accurate and complete tabulations possible of the Hanford Site wells, omissions and errors may exist. This document does not include data on lithologic logs, ground-water analyses, or specific well completion details.

  17. FRACTURING FLUID CHARACTERIZATION FACILITY

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Subhash Shah

    2000-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Hydraulic fracturing technology has been successfully applied for well stimulation of low and high permeability reservoirs for numerous years. Treatment optimization and improved economics have always been the key to the success and it is more so when the reservoirs under consideration are marginal. Fluids are widely used for the stimulation of wells. The Fracturing Fluid Characterization Facility (FFCF) has been established to provide the accurate prediction of the behavior of complex fracturing fluids under downhole conditions. The primary focus of the facility is to provide valuable insight into the various mechanisms that govern the flow of fracturing fluids and slurries through hydraulically created fractures. During the time between September 30, 1992, and March 31, 2000, the research efforts were devoted to the areas of fluid rheology, proppant transport, proppant flowback, dynamic fluid loss, perforation pressure losses, and frictional pressure losses. In this regard, a unique above-the-ground fracture simulator was designed and constructed at the FFCF, labeled ''The High Pressure Simulator'' (HPS). The FFCF is now available to industry for characterizing and understanding the behavior of complex fluid systems. To better reflect and encompass the broad spectrum of the petroleum industry, the FFCF now operates under a new name of ''The Well Construction Technology Center'' (WCTC). This report documents the summary of the activities performed during 1992-2000 at the FFCF.

  18. Spacer for deep wells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Klein, G. D.

    1984-10-23T23:59:59.000Z

    A spacer for use in a deep well that is to have a submersible pump situated downhole and with a string of tubing attached to the pump for delivering the pumped fluid. The pump is electrically driven, and power is supplied via an armored cable which parallels the string of tubing. Spacers are clamped to the cable and have the tubing running through an eccentrically located passage in each spacer. The outside dimensions of a spacer fit freely inside any casing in the well.

  19. Subsurface well apparatus

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rubbo, R.B.; Bangert, D.S.

    1993-07-13T23:59:59.000Z

    An apparatus is described for completing a subterranean well, comprising: a tubular conduit portion made up within a tubular conduit string of the type extending from a point near the surface of the earth to a remote point downwardly within said well and which is in contact with a fluid source within said well, said tubular conduit portion forming an imperforate wall and defining a central bore radially inward and further defining an exterior surface; an activating fluid body in communication with, and disposed at least in-part within, said central bore of tubular conduit portion; signal generating means including at least one sensor member coupled to said exterior surface of said tubular conduit portion for detecting circumferential stress in said imperforate wall defined by said tubular conduit portion and for producing an output signal corresponding thereto; a well bore tool disposed exteriorly of said tubular conduit portion, and including an actuating member for performing at least one desired completion function; and control means responsive to a predetermined output signal from said signal generating means for selectively activating said well bore tool and causing said actuating member to perform at least one desired completion function.

  20. Offline solid phase microextraction sampling system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Harvey, Chris A. (French Camp, CA)

    2008-12-16T23:59:59.000Z

    An offline solid phase microextraction (SPME) sampling apparatus for enabling SPME samples to be taken a number of times from a previously collected fluid sample (e.g. sample atmosphere) stored in a fused silica lined bottle which keeps volatile organics in the fluid sample stable for weeks at a time. The offline SPME sampling apparatus has a hollow body surrounding a sampling chamber, with multiple ports through which a portion of a previously collected fluid sample may be (a) released into the sampling chamber, (b) SPME sampled to collect analytes for subsequent GC analysis, and (c) flushed/purged using a fluidically connected vacuum source and purging fluid source to prepare the sampling chamber for additional SPME samplings of the same original fluid sample, such as may have been collected in situ from a headspace.

  1. Dimensions of Wellness Staying Well

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fernandez, Eduardo

    to protect your physical health by eating a well-balanced diet, getting plenty of physical activity-evaluation and self-assessment. Wellness involves continually learning and making changes to enhance your state) A state in which your mind is engaged in lively interaction with the world around you. Intellectual

  2. Pahute Mesa Well Development and Testing Analyses for Wells ER-20-7, ER-20-8 #2, and ER-EC-11, Revision 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Greg Ruskauff

    2011-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report analyzes the following data collected from ER-20-7, ER-20-8 No.2, and ER-EC-11 during WDT operations: (1) Chemical indicators of well development (Section 2.0); (2) Static hydraulic head (Section 3.0); (3) Radiochemistry and geochemistry (Section 4.0); (4) Drawdown observed at locations distal to the pumping well (Section 5.0); and (5) Drilling water production, flow logs, and temperature logs (Section 6.0). The new data are further considered with respect to existing data as to how they enhance or change interpretations of groundwater flow and transport, and an interim small-scale conceptual model is also developed and compared to Phase I concepts. The purpose of well development is to remove drilling fluids and drilling-associated fines from the formation adjacent to a well so samples reflecting ambient groundwater water quality can be collected, and to restore hydraulic properties near the well bore. Drilling fluids can contaminate environmental samples from the well, resulting in nonrepresentative measurements. Both drilling fluids and preexisting fines in the formation adjacent to the well can impede the flow of water from the formation to the well, creating artifacts in hydraulic response data measured in the well.

  3. Investigation of injection-induced seismicity using a coupled fluid ...

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2012-01-23T23:59:59.000Z

    injection of fluid for the extraction of geothermal heat: Journal of Geo- physical ... earthquakes: Disposal of waste fluids into a deep well has triggered earth-.

  4. Sampling device for withdrawing a representative sample from single and multi-phase flows

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Apley, Walter J. (Pasco, WA); Cliff, William C. (Richland, WA); Creer, James M. (Richland, WA)

    1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A fluid stream sampling device has been developed for the purpose of obtaining a representative sample from a single or multi-phase fluid flow. This objective is carried out by means of a probe which may be inserted into the fluid stream. Individual samples are withdrawn from the fluid flow by sampling ports with particular spacings, and the sampling parts are coupled to various analytical systems for characterization of the physical, thermal, and chemical properties of the fluid flow as a whole and also individually.

  5. Fluid juggling

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Soto, Enrique

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This fluid dynamics video is an entry for the Gallery of Fluid Motion for the 66th Annual Meeting of the Fluid Dynamics Division of the American Physical Society. We show the curious behaviour of a light ball interacting with a liquid jet. For certain conditions, a ball can be suspended into a slightly inclined liquid jet. We studied this phenomenon using a high speed camera. The visualizations show that the object can be `juggled' for a variety of flow conditions. A simple calculation showed that the ball remains at a stable position due to a Bernoulli-like effect. The phenomenon is very stable and easy to reproduce.

  6. A New Method For Robust High-Precision Time-Series Photometry From Well-Sampled Images: Application to Archival MMT/Megacam Observations of the Open Cluster M37

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chang, S -W; Hartman, J D

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We introduce new methods for robust high-precision photometry from well-sampled images of a non-crowded field with a strongly varying point-spread function. For this work, we used archival imaging data of the open cluster M37 taken by MMT 6.5m telescope. We find that the archival light curves from the original image subtraction procedure exhibit many unusual outliers, and more than 20% of data get rejected by the simple filtering algorithm adopted by early analysis. In order to achieve better photometric precisions and also to utilize all available data, the entire imaging database was re-analyzed with our time-series photometry technique (Multi-aperture Indexing Photometry) and a set of sophisticated calibration procedures. The merit of this approach is as follows: we find an optimal aperture for each star with a maximum signal-to-noise ratio, and also treat peculiar situations where photometry returns misleading information with more optimal photometric index. We also adopt photometric de-trending based on ...

  7. Downhole Fluid Sampling | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand JumpConceptual Model,DOE FacilityDimondale,South, New Jersey: Energy ResourcesDow Kokam

  8. 6. Fluid mechanics: fluid statics; fluid dynamics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zevenhoven, Ron

    Figure Pressure (a scalar!) is defined as surface force / area, for example pb = Fb / (d·w) = p @ z = z1 Picture: KJ05 Fluid volume h·d·w with density and mass m = h·d·w· z = z1 In engineering forces Fn+ Fs = 0 or - py·h·w + py·h·w = 0 py = 0 Similarly Fw+ Fe= 0 gives px = 0, There are three

  9. Fluid permeability measurement system and method

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hallman, Jr., Russell Louis (Knoxville, TN); Renner, Michael John (Oak Ridge, TN)

    2008-02-05T23:59:59.000Z

    A system for measuring the permeance of a material. The permeability of the material may also be derived. The system provides a liquid or high concentration fluid bath on one side of a material test sample, and a gas flow across the opposing side of the material test sample. The mass flow rate of permeated fluid as a fraction of the combined mass flow rate of gas and permeated fluid is used to calculate the permeance of the material. The material test sample may be a sheet, a tube, or a solid shape. Operational test conditions may be varied, including concentration of the fluid, temperature of the fluid, strain profile of the material test sample, and differential pressure across the material test sample.

  10. New Tracers Identify Hydraulic Fracturing Fluids and Accidental Releases from Oil and Gas Operations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jackson, Robert B.

    New Tracers Identify Hydraulic Fracturing Fluids and Accidental Releases from Oil and Gas produced waters sampled from conventional oil and gas wells. We posit that boron isotope geochemistry can tool is validated by examining the composition of effluent discharge from an oil and gas brine

  11. Well Completion Report for Well ER-20-11, Corrective Action Units 101 and 102: Central and Western Pahute Mesa

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NSTec Environmental Management

    2013-02-27T23:59:59.000Z

    Well ER-20-11 was drilled for the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office in support of the Nevada Environmental Management Operations Underground Test Area (UGTA) Activity at the Nevada National Security Site (formerly Nevada Test Site), Nye County, Nevada. The well was drilled in September 2012 as part of the Central and Western Pahute Mesa Corrective Action Unit Phase II drilling program. Well ER-20-11 was constructed to further investigate the nature and extent of radionuclidecontaminated groundwater encountered in two nearby UGTA wells, to help define hydraulic and transport parameters for the contaminated Benham aquifer, and to provide data for the UGTA hydrostratigraphic framework model. The 44.5-centimeter (cm) surface hole was drilled to a depth of 520.0 meters (m) and cased with 34.0-cm casing to 511.5 m. The hole diameter was then decreased to 31.1 cm, and the borehole was drilled to a total depth of 915.6 m. The hole was completed to allow access for hydrologic testing and sampling in the target aquifer, which is a lava-flow aquifer known as the Benham aquifer. The completion casing string, set to the depth of 904.3 m, consists of a string of 6?-inch (in.) stainless-steel casing hanging from a string of 7?-in. carbon-steel casing. The stainless-steel casing has one slotted interval at 796.3 to 903.6 m. One piezometer string was installed, which consists of 2?-in. stainless-steel tubing that hangs from 2?-in. carbon-steel tubing via a crossover sub. This string was landed at 903.8 m and is slotted in the interval 795.3 to 903.1 m. Data collected during and shortly after hole construction include composite drill cuttings samples collected every 3.0 m, various geophysical logs, fluid samples (for groundwater chemistry analysis and tritium measurements), and water-level measurements. The well penetrated 915.6 m of Tertiary volcanic rock, including one saturated lava flow aquifer. Measurements on samples taken from the undeveloped well indicated elevated tritium levels within the Benham aquifer. The maximum tritium level measured with field equipment was 146,131 picocuries per liter from a sample obtained at the depth of 912.0 m. The fluid level was measured in the piezometer string at a depth of 504.5 m on September 26, 2012. All Fluid Management Plan (FMP) requirements for Well ER-20-11 were met. Analysis of monitoring samples and FMP confirmatory samples indicated that fluids generated during drilling at Well ER-20-11 met the FMP criteria for discharge to an unlined sump or designated infiltration area. Well development, hydrologic testing, and sampling will be conducted at a later date.

  12. Decontaminating Flooded Wells

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boellstorff, Diana; Dozier, Monty; Provin, Tony; Dictson, Nikkoal; McFarland, Mark L.

    2005-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    ER-011 6-06 Mark L. McFarland, Associate Professor and Extension Water Resources Specialist; Diane E. Boellstorff, Program Specialist Water Quality; Tony L. Provin, Associate Professor and Extension Soil Chemist; Monty C. Dozier, Assistant... and local hospitals may also test water samples for bacteria. The cost of the test ranges from $8 to $30, depending on the lab. Well disinfection does not eliminate hydrocarbons (fuels, oils), pesticides, heavy metals or other types of nonbiological...

  13. Simulating Fluids Exhibiting Microstructure

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Title: Simulating Fluids Exhibiting Microstructure Speaker: Noel J. Walkington, ... fluids containing elastic particles, and polymer fluids, all exhibit non-trivial ...

  14. New wells architectures to access deep geothermal reservoirsand increase well productivity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    with the higher costs of well drilling and completion. Our first step in tackling theproblem,was to consider with the wellbore flow which is modelled by a 1D momentum equation describing the conservation of the fluid in the wellbore fluid coupled to the heat transfer in the reservoir.We apply this coupled wellbore and reservoir

  15. Fluid extraction

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wai, Chien M. (Moscow, ID); Laintz, Kenneth E. (Los Alamos, NM)

    1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A method of extracting metalloid and metal species from a solid or liquid material by exposing the material to a supercritical fluid solvent containing a chelating agent is described. The chelating agent forms chelates that are soluble in the supercritical fluid to allow removal of the species from the material. In preferred embodiments, the extraction solvent is supercritical carbon dioxide and the chelating agent is a fluorinated .beta.-diketone. In especially preferred embodiments the extraction solvent is supercritical carbon dioxide, and the chelating agent comprises a fluorinated .beta.-diketone and a trialkyl phosphate, or a fluorinated .beta.-diketone and a trialkylphosphine oxide. Although a trialkyl phosphate can extract lanthanides and actinides from acidic solutions, a binary mixture comprising a fluorinated .beta.-diketone and a trialkyl phosphate or a trialkylphosphine oxide tends to enhance the extraction efficiencies for actinides and lanthanides. The method provides an environmentally benign process for removing contaminants from industrial waste without using acids or biologically harmful solvents. The method is particularly useful for extracting actinides and lanthanides from acidic solutions. The chelate and supercritical fluid can be regenerated, and the contaminant species recovered, to provide an economic, efficient process.

  16. Fluid jet electric discharge source

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bender, Howard A. (Ripon, CA)

    2006-04-25T23:59:59.000Z

    A fluid jet or filament source and a pair of coaxial high voltage electrodes, in combination, comprise an electrical discharge system to produce radiation and, in particular, EUV radiation. The fluid jet source is composed of at least two serially connected reservoirs, a first reservoir into which a fluid, that can be either a liquid or a gas, can be fed at some pressure higher than atmospheric and a second reservoir maintained at a lower pressure than the first. The fluid is allowed to expand through an aperture into a high vacuum region between a pair of coaxial electrodes. This second expansion produces a narrow well-directed fluid jet whose size is dependent on the size and configuration of the apertures and the pressure used in the reservoir. At some time during the flow of the fluid filament, a high voltage pulse is applied to the electrodes to excite the fluid to form a plasma which provides the desired radiation; the wavelength of the radiation being determined by the composition of the fluid.

  17. Fluid control structures in microfluidic devices

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Mathies, Richard A. (Moraga, CA); Grover, William H. (Berkeley, CA); Skelley, Alison (Berkeley, CA); Lagally, Eric (Oakland, CA); Liu, Chung N. (Albany, CA)

    2008-11-04T23:59:59.000Z

    Methods and apparatus for implementing microfluidic analysis devices are provided. A monolithic elastomer membrane associated with an integrated pneumatic manifold allows the placement and actuation of a variety of fluid control structures, such as structures for pumping, isolating, mixing, routing, merging, splitting, preparing, and storing volumes of fluid. The fluid control structures can be used to implement a variety of sample introduction, preparation, processing, and storage techniques.

  18. Actualistic and Geochemical Modeling of Reservoir Rock, CO2 and Formation Fluid Interaction, Citronelle Oil Field, Alabama

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Weislogel, Amy

    2014-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

    This report includes description of the Citronelle field study area and the work carried out in the project to characterize the geology and composition of reservoir rock material and to collect an analyze the geochemical composition of produced fluid waters from the Citronelle field. Reservoir rock samples collected from well bore core were made into thin-sections and assessed for textural properties, including pore types and porosity distribution. Compositional framework grain modal data were collected via point-counting, and grain and cement mineralogy was assessed using SEM-EDS. Geochemistry of fluid samples is described and modeled using PHREEQC. Composition of rock and produced fluids were used as inputs for TOUGHREACT reactive transport modeling, which determined the rock-fluid system was in disequilibrium.

  19. Interpreting Horizontal Well Flow Profiles and Optimizing Well Performance by Downhole Temperature and Pressure Data

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Li, Zhuoyi

    2011-02-22T23:59:59.000Z

    be used to obtain downhole flow conditions, which is key information to control and optimize horizontal well production. However, the fluid flow in the reservoir is often multiphase and complex, which makes temperature and pressure interpretation very...

  20. Raft River monitor well potentiometric head responses and water...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    wells that are sampled one season cannot be sampled the next. In addition, information on well construction, completion, and production is often unreliable or not available. These...

  1. Characterization of past hydrothermal fluids in the Humboldt...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    studies of core samples Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Conference Paper: Characterization of past hydrothermal fluids in the Humboldt...

  2. Do Well, Be Well with Diabetes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Do Well, Be Well with Diabetes Do Well, Be Well with Diabetes Lesson Topics ·WhatisDiabetes? ·Nutrition­FirstSteptoDiabetesManagement ·OneDiabetesDiet­NoLongertheSoleOption ·ManagingYourBloodGlucose ·NutritionalLabels ·DiabetesandExercise ·ForGoodMeasureatHomeandEatingOut ·DiabetesMedicines ·Preventingand

  3. Surface sampling concentration and reaction probe

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Van Berkel, Gary J; Elnaggar, Mariam S

    2013-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

    A method of analyzing a chemical composition of a specimen is described. The method can include providing a probe comprising an outer capillary tube and an inner capillary tube disposed co-axially within the outer capillary tube, where the inner and outer capillary tubes define a solvent capillary and a sampling capillary in fluid communication with one another at a distal end of the probe; contacting a target site on a surface of a specimen with a solvent in fluid communication with the probe; maintaining a plug volume proximate a solvent-specimen interface, wherein the plug volume is in fluid communication with the probe; draining plug sampling fluid from the plug volume through the sampling capillary; and analyzing a chemical composition of the plug sampling fluid with an analytical instrument. A system for performing the method is also described.

  4. Drill-in fluids control formation damage

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Halliday, W.S. (Baker Hughes Inteq, Houston, TX (United States))

    1994-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Several factors led to development, oil company interest in, and use of payzone drilling fluids, including operator concern about maximizing well production, increasing acceptance of horizontal drilling and openhole completion popularity. This article discusses water-base drill-in'' fluid systems and applications. Payzone damage, including fine solids migration, clay swelling and solids invasion, reduces effective formation permeability, which results in lower production rates. Formation damage is often caused by invasion of normal drilling fluids that contain barite or bentonite. Drill-in systems are designed with special bridging agents to minimize invasion. Several bridging materials designed to form effective filter cake for instantaneous leak-off control can be used. Bridging materials are also designed to minimize stages and time required to clean up wells before production. Fluids with easy-to-remove bridging agents reduce completion costs. Drill-in fluid bridging particles can often be removed more thoroughly than those in standard fluids.

  5. Fluid Inclusion Stratigraphy Interpretation of New Wells in the Coso

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnualPropertyd8c-a9ae-f8521cbb8489Information Hydro IncEnergyInformationOpen EnergySystem-

  6. Fluid Inclusion Stratigraphy: Interpretation of New Wells in the Coso

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnualPropertyd8c-a9ae-f8521cbb8489Information Hydro IncEnergyInformationOpen

  7. Metaphoric optical computing of fluid dynamics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tsang, M; Tsang, Mankei; Psaltis, Demetri

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We present theoretical and numerical evidence to show that self-defocusing nonlinear optical propagation can be used to compute Euler fluid dynamics and possibly Navier-Stokes fluid dynamics. In particular, the formation of twin vortices and the K\\'arm\\'an vortex street behind an obstacle, two well-known viscous fluid phenomena, is numerically demonstrated using the nonlinear Schr\\"odinger equation.

  8. Downhole Fluid Analyzer Development

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bill Turner

    2006-11-28T23:59:59.000Z

    A novel fiber optic downhole fluid analyzer has been developed for operation in production wells. This device will allow real-time determination of the oil, gas and water fractions of fluids from different zones in a multizone or multilateral completion environment. The device uses near infrared spectroscopy and induced fluorescence measurement to unambiguously determine the oil, water and gas concentrations at all but the highest water cuts. The only downhole components of the system are the fiber optic cable and windows. All of the active components--light sources, sensors, detection electronics and software--will be located at the surface, and will be able to operate multiple downhole probes. Laboratory testing has demonstrated that the sensor can accurately determine oil, water and gas fractions with a less than 5 percent standard error. Once installed in an intelligent completion, this sensor will give the operating company timely information about the fluids arising from various zones or multilaterals in a complex completion pattern, allowing informed decisions to be made on controlling production. The research and development tasks are discussed along with a market analysis.

  9. Standardization of Thermo-Fluid Modeling in Modelica.Fluid

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Franke, Rudiger; Casella, Francesco; Sielemann, Michael; Proelss, Katrin; Otter, Martin; Wetter, Michael

    2009-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This article discusses the Modelica.Fluid library that has been included in the Modelica Standard Library 3.1. Modelica.Fluid provides interfaces and basic components for the device-oriented modeling of onedimensional thermo-fluid flow in networks containing vessels, pipes, fluid machines, valves and fittings. A unique feature of Modelica.Fluid is that the component equations and the media models as well as pressure loss and heat transfer correlations are decoupled from each other. All components are implemented such that they can be used for media from the Modelica.Media library. This means that an incompressible or compressible medium, a single or a multiple substance medium with one or more phases might be used with one and the same model as long as the modeling assumptions made hold. Furthermore, trace substances are supported. Modeling assumptions can be configured globally in an outer System object. This covers in particular the initialization, uni- or bi-directional flow, and dynamic or steady-state formulation of mass, energy, and momentum balance. All assumptions can be locally refined for every component. While Modelica.Fluid contains a reasonable set of component models, the goal of the library is not to provide a comprehensive set of models, but rather to provide interfaces and best practices for the treatment of issues such as connector design and implementation of energy, mass and momentum balances. Applications from various domains are presented.

  10. Plugging and abandonment plan for wells and coreholes at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stansfield, R.G.; Bogle, M.A.; Wood, M.A.

    1992-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Site environmental characterization and remediation require data obtained from the installation and sampling of wells and coreholes. When these wells and coreholes are no longer needed, are not producing reliable information, or are damaged and can act as conduits for contaminant migration, they should be identified and properly decommissioned. This is most important for wells of sufficient depth to create the potential for exchange of fluids between different hydrologic units. This plan presents the strategy and detailed approach for the well and corehole P A plan for most of the areas for which ORNL has responsibility. Although wells in Waste Area Grouping (WAG) 5 and WAG 10 are not specifically addressed in this plan, these wells will be incorporated into the decommissioning program in FY 1993.

  11. Fourier's Law for a Granular Fluid

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    James W. Dufty

    2007-07-07T23:59:59.000Z

    Newton' viscosity law for the momentum flux and Fourier's law for the heat flux define Navier-Stokes hydrodynamics for a simple, one component fluid. There is ample evidence that a hydrodynamic description applies as well to a mesoscopic granular fluid with the same form for Newton's viscosity law. However, theory predicts a qualitative difference for Fourier's law with an additional contribution from density gradients even at uniform temperature. The reasons for the absence of such terms for normal fluids are indicated, and a related microscopic explanation for their existence in granular fluids is presented.

  12. Effects of fracturing fluid recovery upon well performance and ultimate recovery of hydraulically fractured gas wells

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Berthelot, Jan Marie

    1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    on Clean-Up Mobile Water Phase 84 17 Effects of Hystexesis on Clean-Up immobile Water Phase 84 18 Effects of Initial Flow Conditions on Gas Production Initial Resexvor Pressure = 11, 700 psi ? Single Phase . . . 95 Table 19 21 22 23 24 25... Effects of Initial How Conditions on Gas Pmduction Initial Reservor Pressure = 7, 800 psi - Single Phase Effects of Initial Flow Conditions on Productivity With No Water Injection Initial Reservoir Pressure = 11, 700 psi ? Initial Cr = 10 Effects...

  13. Well drilling tool

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fox, F.K.

    1981-04-07T23:59:59.000Z

    There is disclosed a turbodrill having an axial thrust bearing section which is contained within a lubricant chamber arranged within an annular space between the case and shaft of the turbodrill above the turbine section, and which is defined between means sealing between the shaft and the case which, in use of the turbodrill, are above the drilling fluid circulating therethrough.

  14. Viscosity of a nucleonic fluid

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aram Z. Mekjian

    2012-03-21T23:59:59.000Z

    The viscosity of nucleonic matter is studied both classically and in a quantum mechanical description. The collisions between particles are modeled as hard sphere scattering as a baseline for comparison and as scattering from an attractive square well potential. Properties associated with the unitary limit are developed which are shown to be approximately realized for a system of neutrons. The issue of near perfect fluid behavior of neutron matter is remarked on. Using some results from hard sphere molecular dynamics studies near perfect fluid behavior is discussed further.

  15. G. M. Koelemay well No. 1, Jefferson County, Texas. Volume II. Well test data: testing geopressured geothermal reservoirs in existing wells. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The following are included in the appendices: field test data, combined and edited raw data, time/pressure data, sample log, reservoir fluid study, gas data, sample collection and analysis procedure, scale monitoring and water analysis, sand detector and strip charts, and Horner-type plot data. (MHR)

  16. Automated fluid analysis apparatus and techniques

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Szecsody, James E.

    2004-03-16T23:59:59.000Z

    An automated device that couples a pair of differently sized sample loops with a syringe pump and a source of degassed water. A fluid sample is mounted at an inlet port and delivered to the sample loops. A selected sample from the sample loops is diluted in the syringe pump with the degassed water and fed to a flow through detector for analysis. The sample inlet is also directly connected to the syringe pump to selectively perform analysis without dilution. The device is airtight and used to detect oxygen-sensitive species, such as dithionite in groundwater following a remedial injection to treat soil contamination.

  17. William Benton and Jim Turner, Cabot Specialty Fluids

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Laughlin, Robert B.

    wells is to control well pressures while drilling or completing wells. Cesium formate is the heaviest of the monovalent alkali metal salts, all of which are very soluble in water and form high density fluids with a range of beneficial properties. This makes them ideally suited for use as drilling and completion fluids

  18. Well completion process for formations with unconsolidated sands

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Davies, David K. (Kingwood, TX); Mondragon, III, Julius J. (Redondo Beach, CA); Hara, Philip Scott (Monterey Park, CA)

    2003-04-29T23:59:59.000Z

    A method for consolidating sand around a well, involving injecting hot water or steam through well casing perforations in to create a cement-like area around the perforation of sufficient rigidity to prevent sand from flowing into and obstructing the well. The cement area has several wormholes that provide fluid passageways between the well and the formation, while still inhibiting sand inflow.

  19. Variations in dissolved gas compositions of reservoir fluids from the Coso geothermal field

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Williams, Alan E.; Copp, John F.

    1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Gas concentrations and ratios in 110 analyses of geothermal fluids from 47 wells in the Coso geothermal system illustrate the complexity of this two-phase reservoir in its natural state. Two geographically distinct regions of single-phase (liquid) reservoir are present and possess distinctive gas and liquid compositions. Relationships in soluble and insoluble gases preclude derivation of these waters from a common parent by boiling or condensation alone. These two regions may represent two limbs of fluid migration away from an area of two-phase upwelling. During migration, the upwelling fluids mix with chemically evolved waters of moderately dissimilar composition. CO{sub 2} rich fluids found in the limb in the southeastern portion of the Coso field are chemically distinct from liquids in the northern limb of the field. Steam-rich portions of the reservoir also indicate distinctive gas compositions. Steam sampled from wells in the central and southwestern Coso reservoir is unusually enriched in both H{sub 2}S and H{sub 2}. Such a large enrichment in both a soluble and insoluble gas cannot be produced by boiling of any liquid yet observed in single-phase portions of the field. In accord with an upflow-lateral mixing model for the Coso field, at least three end-member thermal fluids having distinct gas and liquid compositions appear to have interacted (through mixing, boiling and steam migration) to produce the observed natural state of the reservoir.

  20. Standardization of Thermo-Fluid Modeling in Modelica.Fluid

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Franke, Rudiger

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Thermo-Fluid Systems, Modelica 2003 Conference, Linköping,H. Tummescheit: The Modelica Fluid and Media Library forThermo-Fluid Pipe Networks, Modelica 2006 Conference, Vi-

  1. BUFFERED WELL FIELD OUTLINES

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    OIL & GAS FIELD OUTLINES FROM BUFFERED WELLS The VBA Code below builds oil & gas field boundary outlines (polygons) from buffered wells (points). Input well points layer must be a...

  2. Bitumen production through a horizontal well

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Livesey, D.B.; Toma, P.

    1987-02-03T23:59:59.000Z

    This patent describes a method for thermal stimulation and production of a viscous hydrocarbon from a reservoir having a productive layer which retains the hydrocarbon until the latter is made flowable by contact with a hot stimulating medium. The method includes the steps of: forming a borehole having a substantially horizontal segment which transverses the productive layer, registering a well completion in the borehole which includes; an elongated perforate well liner, a fluid conduit extending through the liner and having a discharge end, and a well head at the liner upper end communicated with the fluid conduit, positioning a variable length flow diverter in the liner adjacent to the fluid conduit discharge end, whereby to define a quasi-barrier in the liner which is pervious to passage of the hot stimulating medium, and which divides the liner into injection and production segments respectively, heating the productive layer about the substantially horizontal segment of the elongated liner, introducing a pressurized stream of the hot stimulant through the fluid conduit and into the liner injection segment, and producing hydrocarbon emulsion which flows into the liner production segment.

  3. Well performance graph simplifies field calculations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    De Ghetto, G.

    1987-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Graphic Methods are widely employed in order to understand overall well behavior using only surface parameters. The authors propose a new graphic method, used successfully by Agip for oil and gas wells in Italy, Libya, Nigeria and Tunisia. The well performance graph helps solve many production problems, including estimation of: inflow performance relationship; causes of rate decline throughout well life; and production rate and bottomhole flowing pressure for various pressures upstream of the surface choke, and vice-versa. This method differs from others by using flow behavior through the choke for both critical and subcritical conditions. Equations describing flow through the formation, string and surface choke are also used. Results are quite reliable when these theoretical equations are calibrated with field data, either from the well concerned or from nearby wells producing the same fluid. This article describes the technique as it applies to oil wells. The methodology for gas wells is similar.

  4. Regulations of Wells (Florida)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Department of Environmental Protection regulates the construction, repair, and abandonment of wells, as well as the persons and businesses undertaking such practices. Governing boards of water...

  5. Groundwater and Wells (Nebraska)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This section describes regulations relating to groundwater protection, water wells, and water withdrawals, and requires the registration of all water wells in the state.

  6. Black Warrior: Sub-soil gas and fluid inclusion exploration and...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Black Warrior: Sub-soil gas and fluid inclusion exploration and slim well drilling Black Warrior: Sub-soil gas and fluid inclusion exploration and slim well drilling DOE Geothermal...

  7. Method for preventing bitumen backflow in injection wells when steam injection is interrupted

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Freeman, D.C.; Djabbarah, N.F.

    1990-04-24T23:59:59.000Z

    This patent describes a method for preventing viscous hydrocarbonaceous fluids from backflowing into a well upon interruption of a steamflood. It comprises: detecting a substantial reduction in steam injection pressure in at least one injection well via a pressure sensing device; and causing automatically a pressurized fluid to be injected into the injection well in response to the reduction in pressure which prevents viscous hydrocarbonaceous fluids from backflowing into the injection well.

  8. Viscous fluid dynamics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. K. Chaudhuri

    2007-03-12T23:59:59.000Z

    We briefly discuss the phenomenological theory of dissipative fluid. We also present some numerical results for hydrodynamic evolution of QGP fluid with dissipation due to shear viscosity only. Its effect on particle production is also studied.

  9. HEAT TRANSFER FLUIDS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lenert, Andrej

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The choice of heat transfer fluids has significant effects on the performance, cost, and reliability of solar thermal systems. In this chapter, we evaluate existing heat transfer fluids such as oils and molten salts based ...

  10. Standardization of Thermo-Fluid Modeling in Modelica.Fluid

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Franke, Rudiger

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Ob- ject-Oriented Modeling of Thermo-Fluid Systems, Modelicable and Compressible Thermo-Fluid Pipe Networks, ModelicaStandardization of Thermo-Fluid Modeling in Modelica.Fluid

  11. Acoustic measurement of the Deepwater Horizon Macondo well flow rate

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Camilli, Richard

    On May 31, 2010, a direct acoustic measurement method was used to quantify fluid leakage rate from the Deepwater Horizon Macondo well prior to removal of its broken riser. This method utilized an acoustic imaging sonar and ...

  12. Development Wells At Long Valley Caldera Geothermal Area (Suemnicht...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Diablo field between 1993 and 1995 prompted the construction of the Basalt Canyon Pipeline later in 2005 to support the MP-I plant with additional fluids from wells 57-22 and...

  13. Detecting low levels of radionuclides in fluids

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Patch, Keith D. (Lexington, MA); Morgan, Dean T. (Sudbury, MA)

    2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An apparatus and method for detecting low levels of one or more radionuclides in a fluid sample uses a substrate that includes an ion exchange resin or other sorbent material to collect the radionuclides. A collecting apparatus includes a collecting chamber that exposes the substrate to a measured amount of the fluid sample such that radionuclides in the fluid sample are collected by the ion exchange resin. A drying apparatus, which can include a drying chamber, then dries the substrate. A measuring apparatus measures emissions from radionuclides collected on the substrate. The substrate is positioned in a measuring chamber proximate to a detector, which provides a signal in response to emissions from the radionuclides. Other analysis methods can be used to detect non-radioactive analytes, which can be collected with other types of sorbent materials.

  14. View dependent fluid dynamics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Barran, Brian Arthur

    2006-08-16T23:59:59.000Z

    , are modified to support a nonuniform simulation grid. In addition, infinite fluid boundary conditions are introduced that allow fluid to flow freely into or out of the simulation domain to achieve the effect of large, boundary free bodies of fluid. Finally, a...

  15. Chemical Signatures of and Precursors to Fractures Using Fluid Inclusion Stratigraphy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lorie M. Dilley

    2011-03-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Enhanced Geothermal Systems (EGS) are designed to recover heat from the subsurface by mechanically creating fractures in subsurface rocks. Open or recently closed fractures would be more susceptible to enhancing the permeability of the system. Identifying dense fracture areas as well as large open fractures from small fracture systems will assist in fracture stimulation site selection. Geothermal systems are constantly generating fractures (Moore, Morrow et al. 1987), and fluids and gases passing through rocks in these systems leave small fluid and gas samples trapped in healed microfractures. These fluid inclusions are faithful records of pore fluid chemistry. Fluid inclusions trapped in minerals as the fractures heal are characteristic of the fluids that formed them, and this signature can be seen in fluid inclusion gas analysis. This report presents the results of the project to determine fracture locations by the chemical signatures from gas analysis of fluid inclusions. With this project we hope to test our assumptions that gas chemistry can distinguish if the fractures are open and bearing production fluids or represent prior active fractures and whether there are chemical signs of open fracture systems in the wall rock above the fracture. Fluid Inclusion Stratigraphy (FIS) is a method developed for the geothermal industry which applies the mass quantification of fluid inclusion gas data from drill cuttings and applying known gas ratios and compositions to determine depth profiles of fluid barriers in a modern geothermal system (Dilley, 2009; Dilley et al., 2005; Norman et al., 2005). Identifying key gas signatures associated with fractures for isolating geothermal fluid production is the latest advancement in the application of FIS to geothermal systems (Dilley and Norman, 2005; Dilley and Norman, 2007). Our hypothesis is that peaks in FIS data are related to location of fractures. Previous work (DOE Grant DE-FG36-06GO16057) has indicated differences in the chemical signature of fluid inclusions between open and closed fractures as well as differences in the chemical signature of open fractures between geothermal systems. Our hypothesis is that open fracture systems can be identified by their FIS chemical signature; that there are differences based on the mineral assemblages and geology of the system; and that there are chemical precursors in the wall rock above open, large fractures. Specific goals for this project are: (1) To build on the preliminary results which indicate that there are differences in the FIS signatures between open and closed fractures by identifying which chemical species indicate open fractures in both active geothermal systems and in hot, dry rock; (2) To evaluate the FIS signatures based on the geology of the fields; (3) To evaluate the FIS signatures based on the mineral assemblages in the fracture; and (4) To determine if there are specific chemical signatures in the wall rock above open, large fractures. This method promises to lower the cost of geothermal energy production in several ways. Knowledge of productive fractures in the boreholes will allow engineers to optimize well production. This information can aid in well testing decisions, well completion strategies, and in resource calculations. It will assist in determining the areas for future fracture enhancement. This will develop into one of the techniques in the 'tool bag' for creating and managing Enhanced Geothermal Systems.

  16. Sampling box

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Phillips, Terrance D. (617 Chestnut Ct., Aiken, SC 29803); Johnson, Craig (100 Midland Rd., Oak Ridge, TN 37831-0895)

    2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An air sampling box that uses a slidable filter tray and a removable filter cartridge to allow for the easy replacement of a filter which catches radioactive particles is disclosed.

  17. Underground Wells (Oklahoma)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Class I, III, IV and V injection wells require a permit issued by the Executive Director of the Department of Environmental Quality; Class V injection wells utilized in the remediation of...

  18. Plugging Abandoned Water Wells

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lesikar, Bruce J.

    2002-02-28T23:59:59.000Z

    This brochure explains the threat of abandoned water wells to groundwater resources and the responsibility and liability of Texas property owners. It offers information to landowners on ways to plug such wells....

  19. Horizontal well circulation tool

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1990-11-06T23:59:59.000Z

    This patent describes an apparatus for securement onto one end of a continuous length of remedial tubing introducible into a subterranean well and concentrically insertable through production tubing previously positioned within the well. The well having a deviated configuration including an entry portion communicating with a curved portion extending downwardly in the well from the entry portion, and a generally linear end portion traversable with a production formation.

  20. Physiochemical Evidence of Faulting Processes and Modeling of Fluid in Evolving Fault Systems in Southern California

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Boles, James [Professor

    2013-05-24T23:59:59.000Z

    Our study targets recent (Plio-Pleistocene) faults and young (Tertiary) petroleum fields in southern California. Faults include the Refugio Fault in the Transverse Ranges, the Ellwood Fault in the Santa Barbara Channel, and most recently the Newport- Inglewood in the Los Angeles Basin. Subsurface core and tubing scale samples, outcrop samples, well logs, reservoir properties, pore pressures, fluid compositions, and published structural-seismic sections have been used to characterize the tectonic/diagenetic history of the faults. As part of the effort to understand the diagenetic processes within these fault zones, we have studied analogous processes of rapid carbonate precipitation (scaling) in petroleum reservoir tubing and manmade tunnels. From this, we have identified geochemical signatures in carbonate that characterize rapid CO2 degassing. These data provide constraints for finite element models that predict fluid pressures, multiphase flow patterns, rates and patterns of deformation, subsurface temperatures and heat flow, and geochemistry associated with large fault systems.

  1. Methods for forming small-volume electrical contacts and material manipulations with fluid microchannels

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Jacobson, Stephen C. (Knoxville, TN); Ramsey, J. Michael (Knoxville, TN); Culbertson, Christopher T. (Oak Ridge, TN); Whitten, William B. (Lancing, TN); Foote, Robert S. (Oak Ridge, TN)

    2011-12-27T23:59:59.000Z

    A microfabricated device employing a bridging membrane and methods for electrokinetic transport of a liquid phase biological or chemical material using the same are described. The bridging membrane is deployed in or adjacent to a microchannel and permits either ionic current flow or the transport of gas species, while inhibiting the bulk flow of material. The use of bridging membranes in accordance with this invention is applicable to a variety of processes, including electrokinetically induced pressure flow in a region of a microchannel that is not influenced by an electric field, sample concentration enhancement and injection, as well as improving the analysis of materials where it is desired to eliminate electrophoretic bias. Other applications of the bridging membranes according to this invention include the separation of species from a sample material, valving of fluids in a microchannel network, mixing of different materials in a microchannel, and the pumping of fluids.

  2. Portable sample preparation and analysis system for micron and sub-micron particle characterization using light scattering and absorption spectroscopy

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Stark, Peter C. (Los Alamos, NM); Zurek, Eduardo (Barranquilla, CO); Wheat, Jeffrey V. (Fort Walton Beach, FL); Dunbar, John M. (Santa Fe, NM); Olivares, Jose A. (Los Alamos, NM); Garcia-Rubio, Luis H. (Temple Terrace, FL); Ward, Michael D. (Los Alamos, NM)

    2011-07-26T23:59:59.000Z

    There is provided a method and device for remote sampling, preparation and optical interrogation of a sample using light scattering and light absorption methods. The portable device is a filtration-based device that removes interfering background particle material from the sample matrix by segregating or filtering the chosen analyte from the sample solution or matrix while allowing the interfering background particles to be pumped out of the device. The segregated analyte is then suspended in a diluent for analysis. The device is capable of calculating an initial concentration of the analyte, as well as diluting the analyte such that reliable optical measurements can be made. Suitable analytes include cells, microorganisms, bioparticles, pathogens and diseases. Sample matrixes include biological fluids such as blood and urine, as well as environmental samples including waste water.

  3. Spinning fluids reactor

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Miller, Jan D; Hupka, Jan; Aranowski, Robert

    2012-11-20T23:59:59.000Z

    A spinning fluids reactor, includes a reactor body (24) having a circular cross-section and a fluid contactor screen (26) within the reactor body (24). The fluid contactor screen (26) having a plurality of apertures and a circular cross-section concentric with the reactor body (24) for a length thus forming an inner volume (28) bound by the fluid contactor screen (26) and an outer volume (30) bound by the reactor body (24) and the fluid contactor screen (26). A primary inlet (20) can be operatively connected to the reactor body (24) and can be configured to produce flow-through first spinning flow of a first fluid within the inner volume (28). A secondary inlet (22) can similarly be operatively connected to the reactor body (24) and can be configured to produce a second flow of a second fluid within the outer volume (30) which is optionally spinning.

  4. Fluid Dynamics Seminar Fluid Dynamics Research Centre

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Davies, Christopher

    France) 8th Nov. Future Trends in Condition Monitoring of Rotating Machines Using System Identification Simulation of the Cooling of a Simplified Brake Disc Dr. Thorsten J. Möller, (Institute for Fluid Mechanics

  5. Fluid Dynamics Seminar Fluid Dynamics Research Centre

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thomas, Peter J.

    France) 8 th Nov. Future Trends in Condition Monitoring of Rotating Machines Using System Identification Simulation of the Cooling of a Simplified Brake Disc Dr. Thorsten J. Möller, (Institute for Fluid Mechanics

  6. Plugging and abandonment plan for wells and coreholes at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee. Environmental Restoration Program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stansfield, R.G.; Bogle, M.A.; Wood, M.A.

    1992-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Site environmental characterization and remediation require data obtained from the installation and sampling of wells and coreholes. When these wells and coreholes are no longer needed, are not producing reliable information, or are damaged and can act as conduits for contaminant migration, they should be identified and properly decommissioned. This is most important for wells of sufficient depth to create the potential for exchange of fluids between different hydrologic units. This plan presents the strategy and detailed approach for the well and corehole P&A plan for most of the areas for which ORNL has responsibility. Although wells in Waste Area Grouping (WAG) 5 and WAG 10 are not specifically addressed in this plan, these wells will be incorporated into the decommissioning program in FY 1993.

  7. Annulus fluid pressure operated testing valve

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Spencer, H.A. III; Green, R.R.

    1990-12-25T23:59:59.000Z

    This patent describes a fluid pressure controlled apparatus having tubular housing means adapted to be connected to a pipe string and having an axial flow passage extending therethrough from an isolated well formation. Also described is apparatus for opening and closing a well conduit extending to an isolated production formation.

  8. Plugging Abandoned Water Wells 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lesikar, Bruce J.

    2002-02-28T23:59:59.000Z

    is one of our state?s most precious resources. Groundwater from aquifers (underground layers of porous rock or sand containing water, into which wells can be drilled) supplies over half of the water used in the state. Protecting the quality of this vital... of Licensing and Regulation (TDLR). Abandoned wells are a threat to our water supply An abandoned well is a direct channel from the surface to the aquifer below. Contaminants that enter a well are introduced directly into the aquifer with no opportunity...

  9. Geothermal well log interpretation state of the art. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sanyal, S.K.; Wells, L.E.; Bickham, R.E.

    1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An in-depth study of the state of the art in Geothermal Well Log Interpretation has been made encompassing case histories, technical papers, computerized literature searches, and actual processing of geothermal wells from New Mexico, Idaho, and California. A classification scheme of geothermal reservoir types was defined which distinguishes fluid phase and temperature, lithology, geologic province, pore geometry, salinity, and fluid chemistry. Major deficiencies of Geothermal Well Log Interpretation are defined and discussed with recommendations of possible solutions or research for solutions. The Geothermal Well Log Interpretation study and report has concentrated primarily on Western US reservoirs. Geopressured geothermal reservoirs are not considered.

  10. Penrose Well Temperatures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Christopherson, Karen

    2013-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Penrose Well Temperatures Geothermal waters have been encountered in several wells near Penrose in Fremont County, Colorado. Most of the wells were drilled for oil and gas exploration and, in a few cases, production. This ESRI point shapefile utilizes data from 95 wells in and around the Penrose area provided by the Colorado Oil and Gas Conservation Commission (COGCC) database at http://cogcc.state.co.us/ . Temperature data from the database were used to calculate a temperature gradient for each well. This information was then used to estimate temperatures at various depths. Projection: UTM Zone 13 NAD27 Extent: West -105.224871 East -105.027633 North 38.486269 South 38.259507 Originators: Colorado Oil and Gas Conservation Commission (COGCC) Karen Christopherson

  11. Disposal of drilling fluids

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bryson, W.R.

    1983-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Prior to 1974 the disposal of drilling fluids was not considered to be much of an environmental problem. In the past, disposal of drilling fluids was accomplished in various ways such as spreading on oil field lease roads to stabilize the road surface and control dust, spreading in the base of depressions of sandy land areas to increase water retention, and leaving the fluid in the reserve pit to be covered on closure of the pit. In recent years, some states have become concerned over the indescriminate dumping of drilling fluids into pits or unauthorized locations and have developed specific regulations to alleviate the perceived deterioration of environmental and groundwater quality from uncontrolled disposal practices. The disposal of drilling fluids in Kansas is discussed along with a newer method or treatment in drilling fluid disposal.

  12. Fiber optic fluid detector

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Angel, S.M.

    1987-02-27T23:59:59.000Z

    Particular gases or liquids are detected with a fiber optic element having a cladding or coating of a material which absorbs the fluid or fluids and which exhibits a change of an optical property, such as index of refraction, light transmissiveness or fluoresence emission, for example, in response to absorption of the fluid. The fluid is sensed by directing light into the fiber optic element and detecting changes in the light, such as exit angle changes for example, that result from the changed optical property of the coating material. The fluid detector may be used for such purposes as sensing toxic or explosive gases in the atmosphere, measuring ground water contamination or monitoring fluid flows in industrial processes, among other uses. 10 figs.

  13. Metalworking and machining fluids

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Erdemir, Ali (Naperville, IL); Sykora, Frank (Caledon, ON, CA); Dorbeck, Mark (Brighton, MI)

    2010-10-12T23:59:59.000Z

    Improved boron-based metal working and machining fluids. Boric acid and boron-based additives that, when mixed with certain carrier fluids, such as water, cellulose and/or cellulose derivatives, polyhydric alcohol, polyalkylene glycol, polyvinyl alcohol, starch, dextrin, in solid and/or solvated forms result in improved metalworking and machining of metallic work pieces. Fluids manufactured with boric acid or boron-based additives effectively reduce friction, prevent galling and severe wear problems on cutting and forming tools.

  14. Characterization Well R-22 Geochemistry Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Patrick Longmire

    2002-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report provides analytical results for groundwater collected during four characterization-sampling rounds conducted at well R-22 from March 2001 through March 2002. Characterization well R-22 was sampled from March 6 through 13, 2001; June 19 through 26, 2001; November 30 through December 10, 2001; and February 27 through March 7, 2002. The goal of the characterization efforts was to assess the hydrochemistry and to determine whether or not contaminants are present in the regional aquifer in the vicinity of the well. A geochemical evaluation of the analytical results for the well is also presented in this report.

  15. Adsorption Kinetics of Surfactants at Fluid-Fluid Interfaces

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Andelman, David

    Adsorption Kinetics of Surfactants at Fluid-Fluid Interfaces Haim Diamant and David Andelman School-Fluid Interfaces, Adsorption, Adsorption Kinetics, Interfacial Tension. 1 #12;Abstract We review a new theoretical approach to the kinetics of surfactant adsorption at fluid-fluid interfaces. It yields a more complete

  16. Well completion report on installation of horizontal wells for in-situ remediation tests

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kaback, D.S.; Looney, B.B.; Corey, J.C.; Wright, L.M.

    1989-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A project to drill and install two horizontal vapor extraction/air-injection wells at the Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, South Carolina, was performed in September and October of 1988. This study was performed to test the feasibility of horizontal drilling technologies in unconsolidated sediments and to evaluate the effectiveness of in-situ air stripping of volatile organics from the ground water and unsaturated soils. A tremendous amount of knowledge was obtained during the drilling and installation of the two test wells. Factors of importance to be considered during design of another horizontal well drilling program follow. (1) Trips in and out of the borehole should be minimized to maintain hole stability. No reaming to enlarge the hole should be attempted. (2) Drilling fluid performance should be maximized by utilizing a low solids, low weight, moderate viscosity, high lubricity fluid. Interruption of drilling fluid circulation should be minimized. (3) Well materials should possess adequate flexibility to negotiate the curve. A flexible guide should be attached to the front of the well screen to guide the screen downhole. (4) Sands containing a minor amount of clay are recommended for completion targets, as better drilling control in the laterals was obtained in these sections.

  17. Isobaric groundwater well

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hubbell, Joel M. (Idaho Falls, ID); Sisson, James B. (Idaho Falls, ID)

    1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A method of measuring a parameter in a well, under isobaric conditions, including such parameters as hydraulic gradient, pressure, water level, soil moisture content and/or aquifer properties the method as presented comprising providing a casing having first and second opposite ends, and a length between the ends, the casing supporting a transducer having a reference port; placing the casing lengthwise into the well, second end first, with the reference port vented above the water table in the well; and sealing the first end. A system is presented for measuring a parameter in a well, the system comprising a casing having first and second opposite ends, and a length between the ends and being configured to be placed lengthwise into a well second end first; a transducer, the transducer having a reference port, the reference port being vented in the well above the water table, the casing being screened across and above the water table; and a sealing member sealing the first end. In one embodiment, the transducer is a tensiometer transducer and in other described embodiments, another type transducer is used in addition to a tensiometer.

  18. Well injection valve with retractable choke

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pringle, R.E.

    1986-07-22T23:59:59.000Z

    An injection valve is described for use in a well conduit consisting of: a housing having a bore, a valve closure member in the bore moving between open and closed positions, a flow tube telescopically movable in the housing for controlling the movement of the valve closure member, means for biasing the flow tube in a direction for allowing the valve closure member to move to the closed position, an expandable and contractible fluid restriction connected to the flow tube and extending into the bore for moving the flow tube to the open position in response to injection fluid, but allowing the passage of well tools through the valve, the restriction contractible in response to fluid flow, the restriction includes, segments movable into and out of the bore, and biasing means yieldably urging the segments into the bore, a no-go shoulder on the flow tube, and releasable lockout means between the flow tube and the housing for locking the flow tube and valve in the open position.

  19. Fluid Dynamics in Sucker Rod Pumps

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cutler, R.P.; Mansure, A.J.

    1999-01-14T23:59:59.000Z

    Sucker rod pumps are installed in approximately 90% of all oil wells in the U.S. Although they have been widely used for decades, there are many issues regarding the fluid dynamics of the pump that have not been fully investigated. A project was conducted at Sandia National Laboratories to develop unimproved understanding of the fluid dynamics inside a sucker rod pump. A mathematical flow model was developed to predict pressures in any pump component or an entire pump under single-phase fluid and pumping conditions. Laboratory flow tests were conducted on instrumented individual pump components and on a complete pump to verify and refine the model. The mathematical model was then converted to a Visual Basic program to allow easy input of fluid, geometry and pump parameters and to generate output plots. Examples of issues affecting pump performance investigated with the model include the effects of viscosity, surface roughness, valve design details, plunger and valve pressure differentials, and pumping rate.

  20. Fluid delivery control system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hoff, Brian D.; Johnson, Kris William; Algrain, Marcelo C.; Akasam, Sivaprasad

    2006-06-06T23:59:59.000Z

    A method of controlling the delivery of fluid to an engine includes receiving a fuel flow rate signal. An electric pump is arranged to deliver fluid to the engine. The speed of the electric pump is controlled based on the fuel flow rate signal.

  1. Fluid blade disablement tool

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Jakaboski, Juan-Carlos (Albuquerque, NM); Hughs, Chance G. (Albuquerque, NM); Todd, Steven N. (Rio Rancho, NM)

    2012-01-10T23:59:59.000Z

    A fluid blade disablement (FBD) tool that forms both a focused fluid projectile that resembles a blade, which can provide precision penetration of a barrier wall, and a broad fluid projectile that functions substantially like a hammer, which can produce general disruption of structures behind the barrier wall. Embodiments of the FBD tool comprise a container capable of holding fluid, an explosive assembly which is positioned within the container and which comprises an explosive holder and explosive, and a means for detonating. The container has a concavity on the side adjacent to the exposed surface of the explosive. The position of the concavity relative to the explosive and its construction of materials with thicknesses that facilitate inversion and/or rupture of the concavity wall enable the formation of a sharp and coherent blade of fluid advancing ahead of the detonation gases.

  2. New Environmentally Friendly Dispersants for High Temperature Invert-Emulsion Drilling Fluids Weighted by Manganese Tetraoxide

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rehman, Abdul

    2012-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

    This thesis provides a detailed evaluation of different environmentally friendly dispersants in invert-emulsion drilling fluids that can be used to drill wells under difficult conditions such as HPHT. The drilling fluid is weighted by manganese...

  3. A New Analytical Method to Quantify Residual Fluid Cleanup in Hydraulic Fractures

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zarrin, Tahira

    2014-04-17T23:59:59.000Z

    hydraulic fracturing fluid has always been a major issue, and is believed to drastically undermine the performance of hydraulically fractured wells. Several attempts have been made to quantify the damage associated with residual fluid, with varying level...

  4. April 27, 2010 Well Logging I

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ito, Garrett

    wells and may be drilled to tap into water or oil/natural gas. Core samples are usually not taken4/26/2010 1 GG450 April 27, 2010 Well Logging I Today's material comes from p. 501-541 in the text book. Please read and understand all of this material! Drilling ­ Exploration and Scientific Holes

  5. Results of investigations at the Zunil geothermal field, Guatemala: Well logging and brine geochemistry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Adams, A.; Dennis, B.; Van Eeckhout, E.; Goff, F.; Lawton, R.; Trujillo, P.E.; Counce, D.; Archuleta, J. (Los Alamos National Lab., NM (USA)); Medina, V. (Instituto Nacional de Electrificacion, Guatemala City (Guatemala). Unidad de Desarollo Geotermico)

    1991-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The well logging team from Los Alamos and its counterpart from Central America were tasked to investigate the condition of four producing geothermal wells in the Zunil Geothermal Field. The information obtained would be used to help evaluate the Zunil geothermal reservoir in terms of possible additional drilling and future power plant design. The field activities focused on downhole measurements in four production wells (ZCQ-3, ZCQ-4, ZCQ-5, and ZCQ-6). The teams took measurements of the wells in both static (shut-in) and flowing conditions, using the high-temperature well logging tools developed at Los Alamos National Laboratory. Two well logging missions were conducted in the Zunil field. In October 1988 measurements were made in well ZCQ-3, ZCQ-5, and ZCQ-6. In December 1989 the second field operation logged ZCQ-4 and repeated logs in ZCQ-3. Both field operations included not only well logging but the collecting of numerous fluid samples from both thermal and nonthermal waters. 18 refs., 22 figs., 7 tabs.

  6. Shock Chlorination of Wells

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McFarland, Mark L.; Dozier, Monty

    2003-06-11T23:59:59.000Z

    method) will be necessary to ensure the safety of the water supply. Shock chlorination introduces very high levels of chlorine into a water system. During the disinfec- tion process, water from the system is not suitable for consumption and neither people... system or other continuous disinfection sys- tem. For more information about wellhead protection, see the Tex-A-Syst rural water well assessment pub- lications (B-6023 through B-6032) available from Texas Cooperative Extension. 3 This publication...

  7. Intensive Sampling Of Noble Gases In Fluids At Yellowstone- I...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    < 3 times the air value. Authors B. M. Kennedy, M. A. Lynch, J. H. Reynolds and S. P. Smith Published Journal Geochimica et Cosmochimica Acta, 1985 DOI 10.1016...

  8. Low temperature barriers with heat interceptor wells for in situ processes

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    McKinzie, II, Billy John (Houston, TX)

    2008-10-14T23:59:59.000Z

    A system for reducing heat load applied to a frozen barrier by a heated formation is described. The system includes heat interceptor wells positioned between the heated formation and the frozen barrier. Fluid is positioned in the heat interceptor wells. Heat transfers from the formation to the fluid to reduce the heat load applied to the frozen barrier.

  9. Multiphase fluid characterization system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Sinha, Dipen N.

    2014-09-02T23:59:59.000Z

    A measurement system and method for permitting multiple independent measurements of several physical parameters of multiphase fluids flowing through pipes are described. Multiple acoustic transducers are placed in acoustic communication with or attached to the outside surface of a section of existing spool (metal pipe), typically less than 3 feet in length, for noninvasive measurements. Sound speed, sound attenuation, fluid density, fluid flow, container wall resonance characteristics, and Doppler measurements for gas volume fraction may be measured simultaneously by the system. Temperature measurements are made using a temperature sensor for oil-cut correction.

  10. Supercritical fluid extraction

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wai, Chien M. (Moscow, ID); Laintz, Kenneth (Pullman, WA)

    1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A method of extracting metalloid and metal species from a solid or liquid material by exposing the material to a supercritical fluid solvent containing a chelating agent. The chelating agent forms chelates that are soluble in the supercritical fluid to allow removal of the species from the material. In preferred embodiments, the extraction solvent is supercritical carbon dioxide and the chelating agent is a fluorinated or lipophilic crown ether or fluorinated dithiocarbamate. The method provides an environmentally benign process for removing contaminants from industrial waste without using acids or biologically harmful solvents. The chelate and supercritical fluid can be regenerated, and the contaminant species recovered, to provide an economic, efficient process.

  11. PARAMETER AND SYSTEM IDENTIFICATION FOR FLUID FLOW IN UNDERGROUND RESERVOIRS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ewing, Richard E.

    associated with two seem­ ingly disparate applications: production of petroleum and the remediation of water procedures associated with injection and production wells. Equations to describe the flow of fluids in porous. Such data can include pressure and flow rates of various fluid phases obtained during production, or during

  12. WETTABILITY AND PREDICTION OF OIL RECOVERY FROM RESERVOIRS DEVELOPED WITH MODERN DRILLING AND COMPLETION FLUIDS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jill S. Buckley; Norman R. Morrow

    2004-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Contamination of crude oils by surface-active agents from drilling fluids or other oil-field chemicals is more difficult to detect and quantify than bulk contamination with, for example, base fluids from oil-based muds. Bulk contamination can be detected by gas chromatography or other common analytical techniques, but surface-active contaminants can be influential at much lower concentrations that are more difficult to detect analytically, especially in the context of a mixture as complex as a crude oil. In this report we present a baseline study of interfacial tensions of 39 well-characterized crude oil samples with aqueous phases that vary in pH and ionic composition. This extensive study will provide the basis for assessing the effects of surface-active contaminant on interfacial tension and other surface properties of crude oil/brine/rock ensembles.

  13. Basic fluid system trainer

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Semans, Joseph P. (Uniontown, PA); Johnson, Peter G. (Pittsburgh, PA); LeBoeuf, Jr., Robert F. (Clairton, PA); Kromka, Joseph A. (Idaho Falls, ID); Goron, Ronald H. (Connellsville, PA); Hay, George D. (Venetia, PA)

    1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A trainer, mounted and housed within a mobile console, is used to teach and reinforce fluid principles to students. The system trainer has two centrifugal pumps, each driven by a corresponding two-speed electric motor. The motors are controlled by motor controllers for operating the pumps to circulate the fluid stored within a supply tank through a closed system. The pumps may be connected in series or in parallel. A number of valves are also included within the system to effect different flow paths for the fluid. In addition, temperature and pressure sensing instruments are installed throughout the closed system for measuring the characteristics of the fluid, as it passes through the different valves and pumps. These measurements are indicated on a front panel mounted to the console, as a teaching aid, to allow the students to observe the characteristics of the system.

  14. Basic fluid system trainer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Semans, J.P.; Johnson, P.G.; LeBoeuf, R.F. Jr.; Kromka, J.A.; Goron, R.H.; Hay, G.D.

    1991-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

    This invention, a trainer mounted and housed within a mobile console, is used to teach and reinforce fluid principles to students. The system trainer has two centrifugal pumps, each driven by a corresponding two-speed electric motor. The motors are controlled by motor controllers for operating the pumps to circulate the fluid stored within a supply tank through a closed system. The pumps may be connected in series or in parallel. A number of valves are also included within the system to effect different flow paths for the fluid. In addition, temperature and pressure sensing instruments are installed throughout the closed system for measuring the characteristics of the fluid, as it passes through the different valves and pumps. These measurements are indicated on a front panel mounted to the console, as a teaching aid, to allow the students to observe the characteristics of the system.

  15. Circulating Fluid Bed Combustor

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fraley, L. D.; Do, L. N.; Hsiao, K. H.

    1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The circulating bed combustor represents an alternative concept of burning coal in fluid bed technology, which offers distinct advantages over both the current conventional fluidized bed combustion system and the pulverized coal boilers equipped...

  16. Phoresis in fluids

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brenner, Howard

    This paper presents a unified theory of phoretic phenomena in single-component fluids. Simple formulas are given for the phoretic velocities of small inert force-free non-Brownian particles migrating through otherwise ...

  17. Fluid pumping apparatus

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    West, Phillip B. (Idaho Falls, ID)

    2006-01-17T23:59:59.000Z

    A method and apparatus suitable for coupling seismic or other downhole sensors to a borehole wall in high temperature and pressure environments. In one embodiment, one or more metal bellows mounted to a sensor module are inflated to clamp the sensor module within the borehole and couple an associated seismic sensor to a borehole wall. Once the sensing operation is complete, the bellows are deflated and the sensor module is unclamped by deflation of the metal bellows. In a further embodiment, a magnetic drive pump in a pump module is used to supply fluid pressure for inflating the metal bellows using borehole fluid or fluid from a reservoir. The pump includes a magnetic drive motor configured with a rotor assembly to be exposed to borehole fluid pressure including a rotatable armature for driving an impeller and an associated coil under control of electronics isolated from borehole pressure.

  18. Accounting for Remaining Injected Fracturing Fluid 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhang, Yannan

    2013-12-06T23:59:59.000Z

    The technology of multi-stage fracturing of horizontal wells made the development of shale gas reservoirs become greatly successful during the past decades. A large amount of fracturing fluid, usually from 53,000 bbls to 81,400 bbls, is injected...

  19. Accounting for Remaining Injected Fracturing Fluid

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhang, Yannan

    2013-12-06T23:59:59.000Z

    The technology of multi-stage fracturing of horizontal wells made the development of shale gas reservoirs become greatly successful during the past decades. A large amount of fracturing fluid, usually from 53,000 bbls to 81,400 bbls, is injected...

  20. Thermodynamics of viscoelastic fluids: the temperature equation.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wapperom, Peter

    Thermodynamics of viscoelastic fluids: the temperature equation. Peter Wapperom Martien A. Hulsen and Hydrodynamics Rotterdamseweg 145 2628 AL Delft (The Netherlands) Abstract From the thermodynamics with internal. The well- known stress differential models that fit into the thermodynamic theory will be treated

  1. Ultrarelativistic fluid dynamics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    David W. Neilsen; Matthew W. Choptuik

    1999-04-20T23:59:59.000Z

    This is the first of two papers examining the critical collapse of spherically symmetric perfect fluids with the equation of state P = (Gamma -1)rho. Here we present the equations of motion and describe a computer code capable of simulating the extremely relativistic flows encountered in critical solutions for Gamma <= 2. The fluid equations are solved using a high-resolution shock-capturing scheme based on a linearized Riemann solver.

  2. Valve for fluid control

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Oborny, Michael C. (Albuquerque, NM); Paul, Phillip H. (Livermore, CA); Hencken, Kenneth R. (Pleasanton, CA); Frye-Mason, Gregory C. (Cedar Crest, NM); Manginell, Ronald P. (Albuquerque, NM)

    2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A valve for controlling fluid flows. This valve, which includes both an actuation device and a valve body provides: the ability to incorporate both the actuation device and valve into a unitary structure that can be placed onto a microchip, the ability to generate higher actuation pressures and thus control higher fluid pressures than conventional microvalves, and a device that draws only microwatts of power. An electrokinetic pump that converts electric potential to hydraulic force is used to operate, or actuate, the valve.

  3. CSE Master Specialization Fluid Dynamics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lang, Annika

    CSE Master Specialization Fluid Dynamics Course Semester Fluid Dynamics II HS Quantitative Flow Energie- und Verfahrenstechnik FS Biofluiddynamics FS #12;CSE in Fluid Dynamics: Very large high in Fluid Dynamics: Physiology of the inner ear MicroCT imaging Multilayer MFS for Stokes flow simulations

  4. Chemical analyses of selected thermal springs and wells in Wyoming

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Heasler, H.P.

    1984-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Basic chemical data for 27 selected thermal well and springs in Wyoming are presented. The samples were gathered from 1979 through 1982 in an effort to define geothermal resources in Wyoming. The basic data for the 27 analyzed samples generally include location, temperature, flow, date analyzed, and a description of what the sample is from. The chemical analyses for the sample are listed.

  5. Fluorescent fluid interface position sensor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Weiss, Jonathan D.

    2004-02-17T23:59:59.000Z

    A new fluid interface position sensor has been developed, which is capable of optically determining the location of an interface between an upper fluid and a lower fluid, the upper fluid having a larger refractive index than a lower fluid. The sensor functions by measurement, of fluorescence excited by an optical pump beam which is confined within a fluorescent waveguide where that waveguide is in optical contact with the lower fluid, but escapes from the fluorescent waveguide where that waveguide is in optical contact with the upper fluid.

  6. Development Wells At Salt Wells Area (Nevada Bureau of Mines...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Salt Wells Area (Nevada Bureau of Mines and Geology, 2009) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Development Wells At Salt Wells Area...

  7. Gravitational Collapse of Inhomogenous Perfect Fluid

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Seema Satin; Daniele Malafarina; Pankaj S. Joshi

    2014-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We study the complete gravitational collapse of a class of inhomogeneous perfect fluid models obtained by introducing small radial perturbations in an otherwise homogeneous matter cloud. The key feature that we assume for the perturbation profile is that of a mass profile that is separable in radial and temporal coordinates. The known models of dust and homogeneous perfect fluid collapse can be obtained from this choice of the mass profile as special cases. This choice is very general and physically well motivated and we show that this class of collapse models can lead to the formation of a naked singularity as the final state.

  8. Fluid-inclusion evidence for past temperature fluctuations in...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    of nearby dikes and their subsequent cooling. The fluid-inclusion data indicate that past temperatures in SOH-4 well were as much as 64C hotter than present temperatures...

  9. Model for Fracturing Fluid Flowback and Characterization of Flowback Mechanisms

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Song, Bo

    2014-08-28T23:59:59.000Z

    A large volume of fracturing fluid that may include slick water and various sorts of additives is injected into shale formations along with proppant to create hydraulic fractures which define a stimulated shale volume a shale gas well will actually...

  10. Flow monitoring and control system for injection wells

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Corey, John C. (212 Lakeside Dr., Aiken, SC 29803)

    1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A system for monitoring and controlling the injection rate of fluid by an injection well of an in-situ remediation system for treating a contaminated groundwater plume. The well is fitted with a gated insert, substantially coaxial with the injection well. A plurality of openings, some or all of which are equipped with fluid flow sensors and gates, are spaced along the insert. The gates and sensors are connected to a surface controller. The insert may extend throughout part of, or substantially the entire length of the injection well. Alternatively, the insert may comprise one or more movable modules which can be positioned wherever desired along the well. The gates are opened part-way at the start of treatment. The sensors monitor and display the flow rate of fluid passing through each opening on a controller. As treatment continues, the gates are opened to increase flow in regions of lesser flow, and closed to decrease flow in regions of greater flow, thereby approximately equalizing the amount of fluid reaching each part of the plume.

  11. Flow monitoring and control system for injection wells

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Corey, J.C.

    1993-02-16T23:59:59.000Z

    A system for monitoring and controlling the injection rate of fluid by an injection well of an in-situ remediation system for treating a contaminated groundwater plume. The well is fitted with a gated insert, substantially coaxial with the injection well. A plurality of openings, some or all of which are equipped with fluid flow sensors and gates, are spaced along the insert. The gates and sensors are connected to a surface controller. The insert may extend throughout part of, or substantially the entire length of the injection well. Alternatively, the insert may comprise one or more movable modules which can be positioned wherever desired along the well. The gates are opened part-way at the start of treatment. The sensors monitor and display the flow rate of fluid passing through each opening on a controller. As treatment continues, the gates are opened to increase flow in regions of lesser flow, and closed to decrease flow in regions of greater flow, thereby approximately equalizing the amount of fluid reaching each part of the plume.

  12. Method for nucleic acid isolation using supercritical fluids

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Nivens, David E. (11912 Kingsgate Rd., Knoxville, TN 37911); Applegate, Bruce M. (3700 Sutherland Ave. #Q2, Knoxville, TN 37911)

    1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A method for detecting the presence of a microorganism in an environmental sample involves contacting the sample with a supercritical fluid to isolate nucleic acid from the microorganism, then detecting the presence of a particular sequence within the isolated nucleic acid. The nucleic acid may optionally be subjected to further purification.

  13. Well Monitoring Systems for EGS

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    cost for well stimulation and improves reservoir tracking. * Well stimulation through hydro-fracturing is very expensive - Our system can be in the well before stimulation,...

  14. Fluid driven reciprocating apparatus

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Whitehead, J.C.

    1997-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An apparatus is described comprising a pair of fluid driven pump assemblies in a back-to-back configuration to yield a bi-directional pump. Each of the pump assemblies includes a piston or diaphragm which divides a chamber therein to define a power section and a pumping section. An intake-exhaust valve is connected to each of the power sections of the pump chambers, and function to direct fluid, such as compressed air, into the power section and exhaust fluid therefrom. At least one of the pistons or diaphragms is connected by a rod assembly which is constructed to define a signal valve, whereby the intake-exhaust valve of one pump assembly is controlled by the position or location of the piston or diaphragm in the other pump assembly through the operation of the rod assembly signal valve. Each of the pumping sections of the pump assemblies are provided with intake and exhaust valves to enable filling of the pumping section with fluid and discharging fluid therefrom when a desired pressure has been reached. 13 figs.

  15. Fluid driven recipricating apparatus

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Whitehead, John C. (Davis, CA)

    1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An apparatus comprising a pair of fluid driven pump assemblies in a back-to-back configuration to yield a bi-directional pump. Each of the pump assemblies includes a piston or diaphragm which divides a chamber therein to define a power section and a pumping section. An intake-exhaust valve is connected to each of the power sections of the pump chambers, and function to direct fluid, such as compressed air, into the power section and exhaust fluid therefrom. At least one of the pistons or diaphragms is connected by a rod assembly which is constructed to define a signal valve, whereby the intake-exhaust valve of one pump assembly is controlled by the position or location of the piston or diaphragm in the other pump assembly through the operation of the rod assembly signal valve. Each of the pumping sections of the pump assemblies are provided with intake and exhaust valves to enable filling of the pumping section with fluid and discharging fluid therefrom when a desired pressure has been reached.

  16. Ghabezloo S, Sulem J (2010) Temperature induced pore fluid pressurization in geomaterials Temperature induced pore fluid pressurization in geomaterials

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    important in petroleum engineering where the reservoir rock and the well cement lining undergo sudden) Temperature induced pore fluid pressurization in geomaterials 1.Introduction It is common in geomechanics

  17. Static dielectric properties of dense ionic fluids

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zarubin, Grigory

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The static dielectric properties of dense ionic fluids, e.g., room temperature ionic liquids (RTILs) and inorganic fused salts, are investigated on different length scales by means of grandcanonical Monte Carlo simulations. A generally applicable scheme is developed which allows one to approximately decompose the electric susceptibility of dense ionic fluids into the orientation and the distortion polarization contribution. It is shown that at long range the well-known plasma-like perfect screening behavior occurs, which corresponds to a diverging distortion susceptibility, whereas at short range orientation polarization dominates, which coincides with that of a dipolar fluid of attached cation-anion pairs. This observation suggests that the recently debated interpretation of RTILs as dilute electrolyte solutions might not be simply a yes-no-question but it might depend on the considered length scale.

  18. Carbon-bearing fluids at nanoscale interfaces

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cole, David [Ohio State University; Ok, Salim [Ohio State University, Columbus; Phan, A [Ohio State University, Columbus; Rother, Gernot [ORNL; Striolo, Alberto [Oklahoma University; Vlcek, Lukas [ORNL

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The behaviour of fluids at mineral surfaces or in confined geometries (pores, fractures) typically differs from their bulk behaviour in many ways due to the effects of large internal surfaces and geometrical confinement. We summarize research performed on C-O-H fluids at nanoscale interfaces in materials of interest to the earth and material sciences (e.g., silica, alumina, zeolites, clays, rocks, etc.), emphasizing those techniques that assess microstructural modification and/or dynamical behaviour such as gravimetric analysis, small-angle (SANS) neutron scattering, and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR). Molecular dynamics (MD) simulations will be described that provide atomistic characterization of interfacial and confined fluid behaviour as well as aid in the interpretation of the neutron scattering results.

  19. Hazardous fluid leak detector

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Gray, Harold E. (Las Vegas, NV); McLaurin, Felder M. (Las Vegas, NV); Ortiz, Monico (Las Vegas, NV); Huth, William A. (Las Vegas, NV)

    1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A device or system for monitoring for the presence of leaks from a hazardous fluid is disclosed which uses two electrodes immersed in deionized water. A gas is passed through an enclosed space in which a hazardous fluid is contained. Any fumes, vapors, etc. escaping from the containment of the hazardous fluid in the enclosed space are entrained in the gas passing through the enclosed space and transported to a closed vessel containing deionized water and two electrodes partially immersed in the deionized water. The electrodes are connected in series with a power source and a signal, whereby when a sufficient number of ions enter the water from the gas being bubbled through it (indicative of a leak), the water will begin to conduct, thereby allowing current to flow through the water from one electrode to the other electrode to complete the circuit and activate the signal.

  20. Method of isolating an oilfield flowline sample for analysis without shearing the sample

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brickhouse, P.E.

    1990-03-06T23:59:59.000Z

    This patent describes a method for isolating an oil field production flowline sample for analysis without shearing the sample. It comprises: placing an isolation chamber in fluid communication with a sampling port of an oilfield production flowline. The isolation chamber comprising a closed vessel, a first entry port into the vessel, and a first exit port out of the vessel controlled by a first valve. The sampling port is controlled by a valve; opening a sampling port valve while the first valve is closed to permit pressure within the isolation chamber to equalize the pressure within the first entry port and the flowline; opening the first valve to permit oilfield production to pass from the flowline through the sampling port and the first entry port into the isolation chamber and out of the first valve; closing the first valve; closing the sampling port valve; allowing the oilfield production fluid contained within the isolation chamber to separate for a period of time, and removing a sample of fluid from the isolation chamber for examination.

  1. Black Warrior: Sub-soil Gas and Fluid Inclusion Exploration and...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Warrior: Sub-soil Gas and Fluid Inclusion Exploration and Slim Well Drilling Geothermal Project Jump to: navigation, search Last modified on July 22, 2011. Project Title Black...

  2. Black Warrior: Sub-soil gas and fluid inclusion exploration and...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Black Warrior: Sub-soil gas and fluid inclusion exploration and slim well drilling John Casteel Nevada Geothermal Power Co. Validation of Innovative Exploration Technologies May...

  3. Electric Power Generation from Co-Produced Fluids from Oil and...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Project Jump to: navigation, search Last modified on July 22, 2011. Project Title Electric Power Generation from Co-Produced Fluids from Oil and Gas Wells Project Type ...

  4. Chemical Signatures of and Precursors to Fractures Using Fluid Inclusion Stratigraphy

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The purpose of this research is to develop a method to identify fracture systems in wells using fluid inclusion gas analysis of drill chips.

  5. Single-Well and Cross-Well Seismic At Salt Wells Area (Bureau...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Seismic At Salt Wells Area (Bureau of Land Management, 2009) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Single-Well and Cross-Well Seismic...

  6. Production and delivery of a fluid mixture to an annular volume of a wellbore

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hermes, Robert E. (Los Alamos, NM); Bland, Ronald Gene (Houston, TX); Foley, Ron Lee (Magnolia, TX); Bloys, James B. (Katy, TX); Gonzalez, Manuel E. (Kingwood, NM); Daniel, John M. (Germantown, TN); Robinson, Ian M. (Guisborough, GB); Carpenter, Robert B. (Tomball, TX)

    2012-01-24T23:59:59.000Z

    The methods described herein generally relate to preparing and delivering a fluid mixture to a confined volume, specifically an annular volume located between two concentrically oriented casing strings within a hydrocarbon fluid producing well. The fluid mixtures disclosed herein are useful in controlling pressure in localized volumes. The fluid mixtures comprise at least one polymerizable monomer and at least one inhibitor. The processes and methods disclosed herein allow the fluid mixture to be stored, shipped and/or injected into localized volumes, for example, an annular volume defined by concentric well casing strings.

  7. Production Well Performance Enhancement using Sonication Technology

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Adewumi, Michael A; Ityokumbul, M Thaddeus; Watson, Robert W; Eltohami, Eltohami; Farias, Mario; Heckman, Glenn; Houlihan, Brendan; Karoor, Samata Prakash; Miller, Bruce G; Mohammed, Nazia; Olanrewaju, Johnson; Ozdemir, Mine; Rejepov, Dautmamed; Sadegh, Abdallah A; Quammie, Kevin E; Zaghloul, Jose; Hughes, W Jack; Montgomery, Thomas C

    2005-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of this project was to develop a sonic well performance enhancement technology that focused on near wellbore formation damage. In order to successfully achieve this objective, a three-year project was defined. The entire project was broken into four tasks. The overall objective of all this was to foster a better understanding of the mechanisms involved in sonic energy interactions with fluid flow in porous media and adapt such knowledge for field applications. The fours tasks are: • Laboratory studies • Mathematical modeling • Sonic tool design and development • Field demonstration The project was designed to be completed in three years; however, due to budget cuts, support was only provided for the first year, and hence the full objective of the project could not be accomplished. This report summarizes what was accomplished with the support provided by the US Department of Energy. Experiments performed focused on determining the inception of cavitation, studying thermal dissipation under cavitation conditions, investigating sonic energy interactions with glass beads and oil, and studying the effects of sonication on crude oil properties. Our findings show that the voltage threshold for onset of cavitation is independent of transducer-hydrophone separation distance. In addition, thermal dissipation under cavitation conditions contributed to the mobilization of deposited paraffins and waxes. Our preliminary laboratory experiments suggest that waxes are mobilized when the fluid temperature approaches 40°C. Experiments were conducted that provided insights into the interactions between sonic wave and the fluid contained in the porous media. Most of these studies were carried out in a slim-tube apparatus. A numerical model was developed for simulating the effect of sonication in the nearwellbore region. The numerical model developed was validated using a number of standard testbed problems. However, actual application of the model for scale-up purposes was limited due to funding constraints. The overall plan for this task was to perlorm field trials with the sonication tooL These trials were to be performed in production and/or injection wells located in Pennsylvania, New York, and West Virginia. Four new wells were drilled in preparation for the field demonstration. Baseline production data were collected and reservoir simulator tuned to simulate these oil reservoirs. The sonication tools were designed for these wells. However, actual field testing could not be carried out because of premature termination of the project.

  8. Flow monitoring and control system for injection wells

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Corey, J.C.

    1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The present invention relates to a system for monitoring and controlling the rate of fluid flow from an injection well used for in-situ remediation of contaminated groundwater. The United States Government has rights in this invention pursuant to Contract No. DE-AC09-89SR18035 between the US Department of Energy and Westinghouse Savannah River Company.

  9. TRACING FLUID SOURCES IN THE COSO GEOTHERMAL SYSTEM USING FLUID...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    FLUID-INCLUSION GAS CHEMISTRY Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Conference Proceedings: TRACING FLUID SOURCES IN THE COSO GEOTHERMAL SYSTEM USING...

  10. Thermal and structural properties of ionic fluids

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hendrik Bartsch; Oliver Dannenmann; Markus Bier

    2015-05-04T23:59:59.000Z

    The electrostatic interaction in ionic fluids is well-known to give rise to a characteristic phase behavior and structure. Sometimes its long range is proposed to single out the electrostatic potential over other interactions with shorter ranges. Here the importance of the range for the phase behavior and the structure of ionic fluids is investigated by means of grandcanonical Monte Carlo simulations of the lattice restricted primitive model (LRPM). The long-ranged electrostatic interaction is compared to various types of short-ranged potentials obtained by sharp and/or smooth cut-off schemes. Sharply cut off electrostatic potentials are found to lead to a strong dependence of the phase behavior and the structure on the cut-off radius. However, when combined with a suitable additional smooth cut-off, the short-ranged LRPM is found to exhibit quantitatively the same phase behavior and structure as the conventional long-ranged LRPM. Moreover, the Stillinger-Lovett perfect screening property, which is well-known to be generated by the long-ranged electrostatic potential, is also fulfilled by short-ranged LRPMs with smooth cut-offs. By showing that the characteristic phase behavior and structure of ionic fluids can also be found in systems with short-ranged potentials, one can conclude that the decisive property of the electrostatic potential in ionic fluids is not the long range but rather the valency dependence.

  11. MEASUREMENT OF INTERFACIAL TENSION IN FLUID-FLUID SYSTEMS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Loh, Watson

    MEASUREMENT OF INTERFACIAL TENSION IN FLUID-FLUID SYSTEMS J. Drelich Ch. Fang C.L. White Michigan been used to measure interfacial tensions between immisci- ble fluid phases. A recent monograph sources of information on the in- terfacial tension measurement methods include selected chapters in Refs

  12. Binary non-additive hard sphere mixtures: Fluid demixing, asymptotic decay of correlations and free fluid interfaces

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paul Hopkins; Matthias Schmidt

    2010-07-29T23:59:59.000Z

    Using a fundamental measure density functional theory we investigate both bulk and inhomogeneous systems of the binary non-additive hard sphere model. For sufficiently large (positive) non-additivity the mixture phase separates into two fluid phases with different compositions. We calculate bulk fluid-fluid coexistence curves for a range of size ratios and non-additivity parameters and find that they compare well to simulation results from the literature. Using the Ornstein-Zernike equation, we investigate the asymptotic, r->infinity, decay of the partial pair correlation functions, g_ij(r). At low densities there occurs a structural crossover in the asymptotic decay between two different damped oscillatory modes with different wavelengths corresponding to the two intra-species hard core diameters. On approaching the fluid-fluid critical point there is Fisher-Widom crossover from exponentially damped oscillatory to monotonic asymptotic decay. Using the density functional we calculate the density profiles for the planar free fluid-fluid interface between coexisting fluid phases. We show that the type of asymptotic decay of g_ij(r) not only determines the asymptotic decay of the interface profiles, but is also relevant for intermediate and even short-ranged behaviour. We also determine the surface tension of the free fluid interface, finding that it increases with non-additivity, and that on approaching the critical point mean-field scaling holds.

  13. System and method for improving performance of a fluid sensor for an internal combustion engine

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kubinski, David (Canton, MI); Zawacki, Garry (Livonia, MI)

    2009-03-03T23:59:59.000Z

    A system and method for improving sensor performance of an on-board vehicle sensor, such as an exhaust gas sensor, while sensing a predetermined substance in a fluid flowing through a pipe include a structure for extending into the pipe and having at least one inlet for receiving fluid flowing through the pipe and at least one outlet generally opposite the at least one inlet, wherein the structure redirects substantially all fluid flowing from the at least one inlet to the sensor to provide a representative sample of the fluid to the sensor before returning the fluid through the at least one outlet.

  14. Magnetically stimulated fluid flow patterns

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Martin, Jim; Solis, Kyle

    2014-08-06T23:59:59.000Z

    Sandia National Laboratories' Jim Martin and Kyle Solis explain research on the effects of magnetic fields on fluid flows and how they stimulate vigorous flows. Fluid flow is a necessary phenomenon in everything from reactors to cooling engines in cars.

  15. Magnetically stimulated fluid flow patterns

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Martin, Jim; Solis, Kyle

    2014-03-06T23:59:59.000Z

    Sandia National Laboratories' Jim Martin and Kyle Solis explain research on the effects of magnetic fields on fluid flows and how they stimulate vigorous flows. Fluid flow is a necessary phenomenon in everything from reactors to cooling engines in cars.

  16. Well-pump alignment system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Drumheller, Douglas S. (Cedar Crest, NM)

    1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An improved well-pump for geothermal wells, an alignment system for a well-pump, and to a method for aligning a rotor and stator within a well-pump, wherein the well-pump has a whistle assembly formed at a bottom portion thereof, such that variations in the frequency of the whistle, indicating misalignment, may be monitored during pumping.

  17. Sampling diffusive transition paths

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    F. Miller III, Thomas

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Sampling di?usive transition paths Thomas F. Miller III ?the algorithm to sample the transition path ensemble for thedynamics I. INTRODUCTION Transition path sampling (TPS) is a

  18. Well Permits (District of Columbia)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Well permits are required for the installation of wells in private and public space. Wells are defined as any trest hole, shaft, or soil excavation created by any means including, but not limited...

  19. Computerized fluid movement mapping and 3-D visualization

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Al-Awami, A.A.; Poore, J.W. [Saudi Aramco, Dhahran (Saudi Arabia); Sizer, J.P.

    1995-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Most of the fieldwide fluid movement monitoring techniques under utilize available computer resources. This paper discusses an approach reservoir management engineers use to monitor fluid movement in reservoirs with a multitude of wells. This approach allows the engineer to maintain up-to-date fluid movement studies and incorporate the latest information from data acquisition programs into the day to day decision-making process. The approach uses several in-house database applications and makes extensive use of commercially available software products to generate and visualize cross-sections, maps, and 3-d models. This paper reviews the computerized procedures to create cross-sections that display the current fluid contacts overlaying the lithology. It also reviews the mapping procedures nd presents examples of water encroachment maps by layer at specific time periods. 3-D geologic modeling software greatly enhances the visualization of the reservoir. This software can also be used to interpret and model fluid movement, given the appropriate engineering constraints.

  20. Flow networks: A characterization of geophysical fluid transport

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Enrico Ser-Giacomi; Vincent Rossi; Cristobal Lopez; Emilio Hernandez-Garcia

    2015-03-05T23:59:59.000Z

    We represent transport between different regions of a fluid domain by flow networks, constructed from the discrete representation of the Perron-Frobenius or transfer operator associated to the fluid advection dynamics. The procedure is useful to analyze fluid dynamics in geophysical contexts, as illustrated by the construction of a flow network associated to the surface circulation in the Mediterranean sea. We use network-theory tools to analyze the flow network and gain insights into transport processes. In particular we quantitatively relate dispersion and mixing characteristics, classically quantified by Lyapunov exponents, to the degree of the network nodes. A family of network entropies is defined from the network adjacency matrix, and related to the statistics of stretching in the fluid, in particular to the Lyapunov exponent field. Finally we use a network community detection algorithm, Infomap, to partition the Mediterranean network into coherent regions, i.e. areas internally well mixed, but with little fluid interchange between them.

  1. Chemical logging of geothermal wells

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Allen, Charles A. (Idaho Falls, ID); McAtee, Richard E. (Idaho Falls, ID)

    1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The presence of geothermal aquifers can be detected while drilling in geothermal formations by maintaining a chemical log of the ratio of the concentrations of calcium to carbonate and bicarbonate ions in the return drilling fluid. A continuous increase in the ratio of the concentrations of calcium to carbonate and bicarbonate ions is indicative of the existence of a warm or hot geothermal aquifer at some increased depth.

  2. Ultra Thin Quantum Well Materials

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dr Saeid Ghamaty

    2012-08-16T23:59:59.000Z

    This project has enabled Hi-Z technology Inc. (Hi-Z) to understand how to improve the thermoelectric properties of Si/SiGe Quantum Well Thermoelectric Materials. The research that was completed under this project has enabled Hi-Z Technology, Inc. (Hi-Z) to satisfy the project goal to understand how to improve thermoelectric conversion efficiency and reduce costs by fabricating ultra thin Si/SiGe quantum well (QW) materials and measuring their properties. In addition, Hi-Z gained critical new understanding on how thin film fabrication increases the silicon substrate's electrical conductivity, which is important new knowledge to develop critical material fabrication parameters. QW materials are constructed with alternate layers of an electrical conductor, SiGe and an electrical insulator, Si. Film thicknesses were varied, ranging from 2nm to 10nm where 10 nm was the original film thickness prior to this work. The optimum performance was determined at a Si and SiGe thickness of 4nm for an electrical current and heat flow parallel to the films, which was an important conclusion of this work. Essential new information was obtained on how the Si substrate electrical conductivity increases by up to an order of magnitude upon deposition of QW films. Test measurements and calculations are accurate and include both the quantum well and the substrate. The large increase in substrate electrical conductivity means that a larger portion of the electrical current passes through the substrate. The silicon substrate's increased electrical conductivity is due to inherent impurities and thermal donors which are activated during both molecular beam epitaxy and sputtering deposition of QW materials. Hi-Z's forward looking cost estimations based on future high performance QW modules, in which the best Seebeck coefficient and electrical resistivity are taken from separate samples predict that the electricity cost produced with a QW module could be achieved at <$0.35/W. This price would open many markets for waste heat recovery applications. By installing Hi-Z's materials in applications in which electricity could be produced from waste heat sources could result in significant energy savings as well as emissions reductions. For example, if QW thermoelectric generators could be introduced commercially in 2015, and assuming they could also capture an additional 0.1%/year of the available waste heat from the aluminum, steel, and iron industries, then by 2020, their use would lead to a 2.53 trillion Btu/year reduction in energy consumption. This translates to a $12.9 million/year energy savings, and 383.6 million lb's of CO2 emissions reduction per year. Additionally, Hi-Z would expect that the use of QW TE devices in the automotive, manufacturing, and energy generation industries would reduce the USA's petroleum and fossil fuel dependence, and thus significantly reduce emissions from CO2 and other polluting gasses such as NOx, SOx, and particulate matter (PM), etc.

  3. Numerical Investigation of Oil -Base-Mud Contamination in Condensates: From Cleanup to Sample Quality

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Torres-Verdín, Carlos

    through pressure transient testing after the onset of invasion. Mud filtrate invasion takes place. For such fluids, contamination in the stock tank oil is just as critical as that of the bulk fluid because only fluids can take extremely long times to completely clean up during a formation test or even during a well

  4. Characterization Well R-7 Geochemistry Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    P.Longmire; F.Goff

    2002-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report provides analytical results for four groundwater-sampling rounds conducted at characterization well R-7. The goal of the characterization efforts was to assess the hydrochemistry and to determine if contaminants from Technical Area (TA)-2 and TA-21 of the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL or the Laboratory) are present in the regional aquifer in the vicinity of the well. Figure 1.0-1 shows the well's location in the narrow upper part of Los Alamos Canyon, between the inactive Omega West reactor and the mouth of DP Canyon. Well R-7 is in an excellent location to characterize the hydrology and groundwater chemistry in both perched groundwater and the regional aquifer near sites of known Laboratory effluent release, including radionuclides and inorganic chemicals (Stone et al. 2002, 72717). The Risk Reduction and Environmental Stewardship-Remediation (RRES-R) Program (formerly the Environmental Restoration [ER] Project) installed well R-7 as part of groundwater investigations to satisfy requirements of the ''Hydrogeologic Workplan'' (LANL 1998, 59599) and to support the Laboratory's ''Groundwater Protection Management Program Plan'' (LANL 1996, 70215). Well R-7 was designed primarily to provide geochemical or water quality and hydrogeologic data for the regional aquifer within the Puye Formation. This report also presents a geochemical evaluation of the analytical results for well R-7 and provides hydrogeochemical interpretations using analytical results for groundwater samples collected at the well. Discussion of other hydrogeochemical data collected within the east-central portion of the Laboratory, however, is deferred until they can be evaluated in the context of sitewide information collected from other RRES and Hydrogeologic Workplan characterization wells (R-8A, R-9, and R-9i). Once all deep groundwater investigations in the east-central portion of the Laboratory are completed, geochemical and hydrogeologic conceptual models for the Los Alamos Canyon watershed may be included in a groundwater risk analysis. These models will include an evaluation of potential contaminant transport pathways. Well R-7 was completed on March 9, 2001, with three screens (363.2 to 379.2 ft, 730.4 to 746.4 ft, and 895.5 to 937.4 ft). Screen No.2 was dry during characterization sampling. Four rounds of groundwater characterization samples, collected from a perched zone and the regional aquifer from depths of 378.0 ft (screen No.1) and 915.0 ft (screen No.3), were chemically characterized for radionuclides, metals and trace elements, major ions, high-explosive (HE) compounds, total organic carbon, dissolved organic carbon, organic compounds, and stable isotopes (H, N, and O). Although well R-7 is primarily a characterization well, its design and construction also meet the requirements of a Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA)-compliant monitoring well as described in the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) document ''RCRA Groundwater Monitoring: Draft Technical Guidance,'' November 1992, EPA 530-R-93- 001. Incorporation of this well into a Laboratory-wide groundwater-monitoring program will be considered, and more specifically evaluated (e.g., sampling frequency, analytes, etc.), when the results of the well R-7 characterization activities are comprehensively evaluated in conjunction with other groundwater investigations in the ''Hydrogeologic Workplan'' (LANL 1998, 59599).

  5. Oscillating fluid power generator

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Morris, David C

    2014-02-25T23:59:59.000Z

    A system and method for harvesting the kinetic energy of a fluid flow for power generation with a vertically oriented, aerodynamic wing structure comprising one or more airfoil elements pivotably attached to a mast. When activated by the moving fluid stream, the wing structure oscillates back and forth, generating lift first in one direction then in the opposite direction. This oscillating movement is converted to unidirectional rotational movement in order to provide motive power to an electricity generator. Unlike other oscillating devices, this device is designed to harvest the maximum aerodynamic lift forces available for a given oscillation cycle. Because the system is not subjected to the same intense forces and stresses as turbine systems, it can be constructed less expensively, reducing the cost of electricity generation. The system can be grouped in more compact clusters, be less evident in the landscape, and present reduced risk to avian species.

  6. Fluid bed material transfer method

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Pinske, Jr., Edward E. (Akron, OH)

    1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A fluidized bed apparatus comprising a pair of separated fluid bed enclosures, each enclosing a fluid bed carried on an air distributor plate supplied with fluidizing air from below the plate. At least one equalizing duct extending through sidewalls of both fluid bed enclosures and flexibly engaged therewith to communicate the fluid beds with each other. The equalizing duct being surrounded by insulation which is in turn encased by an outer duct having expansion means and being fixed between the sidewalls of the fluid bed enclosures.

  7. Recent Developments in Geothermal Drilling Fluids

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kelsey, J. R.; Rand, P. B.; Nevins, M. J.; Clements, W. R.; Hilscher, L. W.; Remont, L. J.; Matula, G. W.; Balley, D. N.

    1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In the past, standard drilling muds have been used to drill most geothermal wells. However, the harsh thermal and chemical environment and the unique geothermal formations have led to such problems as excessive thickening of the fluid, formation damage, and lost circulation. This paper describes three recent development efforts aimed at solving some of these drilling fluid problems. Each of the efforts is at a different stage of development. The Sandia aqueous foam studies are still in the laboratory phase, NL Baroid's polymeric deflocculant is soon to be field tested, and the Mudtech high-temperature mud was field tested several months ago. Low density and the capability to suspend particles at low relative velocities are two factors which make foam an attractive drilling fluid. The stability of these foams and their material properties at high temperatures are presently unknown and this lack of information has precluded their use as a geothermal drilling fluid. The aqueous foam studies being conducted at Sandia are aimed at screening available surfactants for temperature and chemical stability. Approximately 100 surfactants have been tested at temperatures of 260 and 310 C (500 and 590 F), and several of these candidates appear very promising. NL Baroid has developed a polymeric deflocculant for water-based muds which shows promise in retarding thermal degradation effects and associated gelation. Formulations containing this new polymer have shown good rheological properties up to 260 C (500 F) in laboratory testing. A high-temperature mud consisting primarily of sepiolite, bentonite, and brown coal has been developed by Mudtech, Inc. A field test of this mud was conducted in a geothermal well in the Imperial Valley of California in May 1980. The fluid exhibited good hole-cleaning characteristics and good rheological properties throughout the test.

  8. Thermal extraction analysis of five Los Azufres production wells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kruger, Paul; Quijano, Luis

    1995-01-26T23:59:59.000Z

    Thermal energy extraction from five wells supplying 5-MWe wellhead generators in three zones of the Los Azufres geothermal field has been examined from production and chemical data compiled over 14-years of operation. The data, as annual means, are useful in observing small-scale changes in reservoir performance with continuous production. The chemical components are chloride for quality control and the geothermometer elements for reservoir temperatures. The flowrate and fluid enthalpy data are used to calculate the thermal extraction rates. Integration of these data provides an estimate of the total energy extracted from the zone surrounding the well. The combined production and chemical geothermometer data are used to model the produced fluid as coming from just-penetrating wells for which the annual produced mass originates from a series of concentric hemispheric shells moving out into the reservoir. Estimates are made of the drawdown distance into the reservoir and the far-field conditions.

  9. Viscous dark fluid

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    V. Folomeev; V. Gurovich

    2007-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The unified dark energy and dark matter model within the framework of a model of a continuous medium with bulk viscosity (dark fluid) is considered. It is supposed that the bulk viscosity coefficient is an arbitrary function of the Hubble parameter. The choice of this function is carried out under the requirement to satisfy the observational data from recombination ($z\\approx 1000$) till present time.

  10. Well-pump alignment system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Drumheller, D.S.

    1998-10-20T23:59:59.000Z

    An improved well-pump for geothermal wells, an alignment system for a well-pump, and to a method for aligning a rotor and stator within a well-pump are disclosed, wherein the well-pump has a whistle assembly formed at a bottom portion thereof, such that variations in the frequency of the whistle, indicating misalignment, may be monitored during pumping. 6 figs.

  11. Apparatus for producing a thin sample band in a microchannel system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Griffiths, Stewart K. (Livermore, CA; , Nilson, Robert H. (Cardiff, CA)

    2008-05-13T23:59:59.000Z

    The present invention improves the performance of microchannel systems for chemical and biological synthesis and analysis by providing a method and apparatus for producing a thin band of a species sample. Thin sample bands improve the resolution of microchannel separation processes, as well as many other processes requiring precise control of sample size and volume. The new method comprises a series of steps in which a species sample is manipulated by controlled transport through a junction formed at the intersection of four or more channels. A sample is first inserted into the end of one of these channels in the vicinity of the junction. Next, this sample is thinned by transport across the junction one or more times. During these thinning steps, flow enters the junction through one of the channels and exists through those remaining, providing a divergent flow field that progressively stretches and thins the band with each traverse of the junction. The thickness of the resulting sample band may be smaller than the channel width. Moreover, the thickness of the band may be varied and controlled by altering the method alone, without modification to the channel or junction geometries. The invention is applicable to both electroosmotic and electrophoretic transport, to combined electrokinetic transport, and to some special cases in which bulk fluid transport is driven by pressure gradients. It is further applicable to channels that are open, filled with a gel or filled with a porous or granular material.

  12. Aero-Acoustic Analysis of Wells Turbine for Ocean Wave Energy Conversion

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Frandsen, Jannette B.

    Aero-Acoustic Analysis of Wells Turbine for Ocean Wave Energy Conversion Ralf Starzmann Fluid of harnessing the energy from ocean waves is the oscillating water column (OWC) device. The OWC converts

  13. Full Life Wind Turbine Gearbox Lubricating Fluids

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lutz, Glenn A.; Jungk, Manfred; Bryant, Jonathan J.; Lauer, Rebecca S.; Chobot, Anthony; Mayer, Tyler; Palmer, Shane; Kauffman, Robert E.

    2012-02-28T23:59:59.000Z

    Industrial gear box lubricants typically are hydrocarbon based mineral oils with considerable amounts of additives to overcome the lack of base fluid properties like wear protection, oxidation stability, load carrying capacity, low temperature solidification and drop of viscosity at higher temperatures. For today's wind turbine gearboxes, the requirements are more severe and synthetic hydrocarbon oils are used to improve on this, but all such hydrocarbon based lubricants require significant amounts of Extreme Pressure (EP) additives to meet performance requirements. Perfluoropolyether (PFPE) fluids provide load carrying capacity as an inherent property. During the course of the project with the main tasks of 'Establish a Benchmark', 'Lubricant Evaluation', 'Full Scale Gearbox Trial' and 'Economic Evaluation', the PAO Reference oil exhibited significant changes after laboratory gear testing, in service operation in the field and full scale gearbox trial. Four hydrocarbon base oils were selected for comparison in the benchmarking exercise and showed variation with respect to meeting the requirements for the laboratory micro-pitting tests, while the PFPE fluid exceeded the requirements even with the material taken after the full scale gear box trial. This is remarkable for a lubricant without EP additives. Laboratory bearing tests performed on the PFPE fluids before and after the full scale gear box trial showed the results met requirements for the industry standard. The PFPE fluid successfully completed the full scale gear box test program which included baseline and progressive staged load testing. The evaluation of gears showed no micro-pitting or objectionable wear. By the final stage, lubricant film thickness had been reduced to just 21% of its original value, this was by design and resulted in a lambda ratio of well below 1. This test design scenario of a low lambda ratio is a very undesirable lubrication condition for real world but creates the ability to test the lubricating fluids performance under the most extreme conditions. The PAO Reference oil also passed its testing without any noticeable deterioration of the gear surface. However the PAO Reference oil was replaced midway through the progressive loading, as the lubricant was burned in an attempt to raise the sump temperature to the same levels as for the PFPE. Both materials experienced a decrease of viscosity during their respective run times. The viscosity index decreased for the PAO there while there was a slight increase for the PFPE. FZG laboratory gear tests and measurements of the drive motor's current during the full scale gear box trial were made to characterize the relative efficiency between the PFPE fluid and the PAO Reference oil. In the FZG laboratory efficiency test, the PFPE fluids show much higher churning losses due to their higher viscosity and density. The analysis seems to show that the efficiency correlates better to dynamic viscosity than any other of the measured metrics such as film thickness. In load stages where the load, speed and temperature are similar, the PFPE fluid has a greater film thickness and theoretical gear protection, but requires a larger current for the drive motor than the PAO. However in load stages where the film thickness is the same, the PFPE fluid's reduced dynamic viscosity gives it a slight efficiency advantage relative to the PAO reference oil. Ultimately, many factors such as temperature, rotational speed, and fluid viscosity combine in a complex fashion to influence the results. However, the PFPE's much lower change of viscosity with respect to temperature, allows variations in designing an optimum viscosity to balance efficiency versus gear protection. Economic analysis was done using Cost of Energy calculations. The results vary from 5.3% for a 'Likely Case' to 16.8% for a 'Best Case' scenario as potential cost improvement by using PFPE as the gearbox lubricating fluid. It is important to note the largest portion of savings comes in Levelized Replacement Cost, which is dictated by the assumption on gearb

  14. Apparatus for sectioning demountable semiconductor samples

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Sopori, Bhushan L. (Scottsdale, AZ); Wolf, Abraham (Sun City West, AZ)

    1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Apparatus for use during polishing and sectioning operations of a ribbon sample is described. The sample holder includes a cylinder having an axially extending sample cavity terminated in a first funnel-shaped opening and a second slot-like opening. A spring-loaded pressure plunger is located adjacent the second opening of the sample cavity for frictional engagement of the sample prior to introduction of a molding medium in the sample cavity. A heat softenable molding medium is inserted in the funnel-shaped opening, to surround the sample. After polishing, the heater is energized to allow draining of the molding medium from the sample cavity. During manual polishing, the second end of the sample holder is inserted in a support ring which provides mechanical support as well as alignment of the sample holder during polishing. A gauge block for measuring the protrusion of a sample beyond the second wall of the holder is also disclosed.

  15. Harmonic waves in a fluid-solid waveguide

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yapura, Carlos Ludwig

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    branches for a water-loaded aluminum plate have been obtained for different fluid-to-solid layer thickness ratios. The results are checked with well-known solutions in the low &equency gong wavelength) and high frequency (short wavelength) limits... . . 45 . . . . . 47 LIST OF FIGURES Fig. 1 Schematic diagram of the fluid-solid bilayer. Fig. 2 Dispersion diagram for a &ee aluminum plate Page 19 Fig. 3 Phase velocity as a function of &equency for a &ee aluminum plate. . . . . . . . . . 20 Fig...

  16. Preliminary report on fluid inclusions from halites in the Castile and lower Salado formations of the Delaware Basin, southeastern New Mexico. [Freezing-point depression

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stein, C.L.

    1985-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A suite of samples composed primarily of halite from the upper Castile and lower Salado Formations of the Permian Basin was selected from Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) core for a reconnaissance study of fluid inclusions. Volume percent of these trapped fluids averaged 0.7% to 1%. Freezing-point depressions varied widely and appeared to be unrelated to fluid-inclusion type, to sedimentary facies, or to stratigraphic depth. However, because very low freezing points were usually associated with anhydrite, a relation may exist between freezing-point data and lithology. Dissolved sulfate values were constant through the Castile, then decreased markedly with lesser depth in the lower Salado. This trend correlates very well with observed mineralogy and is consistent with an interpretation of the occurrence of secondary polyhalite as a result of gypsum or anhydrite alteration with simultaneous consumption of dissolved sulfate from the coexisting fluids. Together with the abundance and distribution of fluid inclusions in primary or ''hopper'' crystal structures, this evidence suggests that inclusions seen in these halites did not migrate any significant geographical distance since their formation. 28 refs., 17 figs., 2 tabs.

  17. Argonne Premium Coal Sample Bank The Argonne Premium Coal (APC) Sample Bank can supply

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Maranas, Costas

    Argonne Premium Coal Sample Bank Background Overview T The Argonne Premium Coal (APC) Sample Bank can supply researchers with highly uniform, well-protected coal samples unexposed to oxygen. Researchers investigating coal structure, properties, and behavior can benefit greatly from these samples

  18. Predicted impacts of future water level decline on monitoring wells using a ground-water model of the Hanford Site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wurstner, S.K.; Freshley, M.D.

    1994-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A ground-water flow model was used to predict water level decline in selected wells in the operating areas (100, 200, 300, and 400 Areas) and the 600 Area. To predict future water levels, the unconfined aquifer system was stimulated with the two-dimensional version of a ground-water model of the Hanford Site, which is based on the Coupled Fluid, Energy, and Solute Transport (CFEST) Code in conjunction with the Geographic Information Systems (GIS) software package. The model was developed using the assumption that artificial recharge to the unconfined aquifer system from Site operations was much greater than any natural recharge from precipitation or from the basalt aquifers below. However, artificial recharge is presently decreasing and projected to decrease even more in the future. Wells currently used for monitoring at the Hanford Site are beginning to go dry or are difficult to sample, and as the water table declines over the next 5 to 10 years, a larger number of wells is expected to be impacted. The water levels predicted by the ground-water model were compared with monitoring well completion intervals to determine which wells will become dry in the future. Predictions of wells that will go dry within the next 5 years have less uncertainty than predictions for wells that will become dry within 5 to 10 years. Each prediction is an estimate based on assumed future Hanford Site operating conditions and model assumptions.

  19. Apparatus and method for rapid separation and detection of hydrocarbon fractions in a fluid stream

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Sluder, Charles S.; Storey, John M.; Lewis, Sr., Samuel A.

    2013-01-22T23:59:59.000Z

    An apparatus and method for rapid fractionation of hydrocarbon phases in a sample fluid stream are disclosed. Examples of the disclosed apparatus and method include an assembly of elements in fluid communication with one another including one or more valves and at least one sorbent chamber for removing certain classifications of hydrocarbons and detecting the remaining fractions using a detector. The respective ratios of hydrocarbons are determined by comparison with a non separated fluid stream.

  20. Breaking the Tension: Development and Investigation of a Centrifugal Tensioned Metastable Fluid Detector System

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Solom, Matthew 1985-

    2012-12-10T23:59:59.000Z

    of laser-induced cavitation in a seeded fluid, and demonstrated some of the associated limitations as well. In addition, the CFD framework developed here can be used to cross-compare experimental results with computer simulations as well...

  1. Thermal well-test method

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Tsang, Chin-Fu (Albany, CA); Doughty, Christine A. (Berkeley, CA)

    1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A well-test method involving injection of hot (or cold) water into a groundwater aquifer, or injecting cold water into a geothermal reservoir. By making temperature measurements at various depths in one or more observation wells, certain properties of the aquifer are determined. These properties, not obtainable from conventional well test procedures, include the permeability anisotropy, and layering in the aquifer, and in-situ thermal properties. The temperature measurements at various depths are obtained from thermistors mounted in the observation wells.

  2. Horizontal well turbulizer and method

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hopmann, M.E.

    1990-03-20T23:59:59.000Z

    This patent describes an apparatus for securement onto one end of a continuous length of remedial tubing introduceable into a subterranean well and concentrically insertable through production tubing previously positioned within the well. The well having a deviated configuration including an entry portion communicating with a curved portion extending downwardly in the well from the entry portion, and a generally linear end portion traversable with a production formation.

  3. LUBRICANTS AND HYDRAULIC FLUIDS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Engineer Manual Department

    Contents) Major General, USA Chief of Staff i Table of Contents Purpose ........................................................ 1-1 1-1 Applicability .................................................... 1-2 1-1 References ...................................................... 1-3 1-1 Distribution Statement ............................................. 1-4 1-1 Scope ......................................................... 1-5 1-2 Friction ........................................................ 2-1 2-1 Wear .......................................................... 2-2 2-4 Lubrication and Lubricants ......................................... 2-3 2-6 Hydrodynamic or Fluid Film Lubrication ............................... 2-4 2-6 Boundary Lubrication ............................................. 2-5 2-8 Extreme Pressure (EP) Lubrication ................................... 2-6 2-9 Elastohydrodynamic (EHD) Lubrication ................................ 2-7 2-9 Oil R

  4. Pumpernickel Valley Geothermal Project Thermal Gradient Wells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Z. Adam Szybinski

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Pumpernickel Valley geothermal project area is located near the eastern edge of the Sonoma Range and is positioned within the structurally complex Winnemucca fold and thrust belt of north-central Nevada. A series of approximately north-northeast-striking faults related to the Basin and Range tectonics are superimposed on the earlier structures within the project area, and are responsible for the final overall geometry and distribution of the pre-existing structural features on the property. Two of these faults, the Pumpernickel Valley fault and Edna Mountain fault, are range-bounding and display numerous characteristics typical of strike-slip fault systems. These characteristics, when combined with geophysical data from Shore (2005), indicate the presence of a pull-apart basin, formed within the releasing bend of the Pumpernickel Valley – Edna Mountain fault system. A substantial body of evidence exists, in the form of available geothermal, geological and geophysical information, to suggest that the property and the pull-apart basin host a structurally controlled, extensive geothermal field. The most evident manifestations of the geothermal activity in the valley are two areas with hot springs, seepages, and wet ground/vegetation anomalies near the Pumpernickel Valley fault, which indicate that the fault focuses the fluid up-flow. There has not been any geothermal production from the Pumpernickel Valley area, but it was the focus of a limited exploration effort by Magma Power Company. In 1974, the company drilled one exploration/temperature gradient borehole east of the Pumpernickel Valley fault and recorded a thermal gradient of 160oC/km. The 1982 temperature data from five unrelated mineral exploration holes to the north of the Magma well indicated geothermal gradients in a range from 66 to 249oC/km for wells west of the fault, and ~283oC/km in a well next to the fault. In 2005, Nevada Geothermal Power Company drilled four geothermal gradient wells, PVTG-1, -2, -3, and -4, and all four encountered geothermal fluids. The holes provided valuable water geochemistry, supporting the geothermometry results obtained from the hot springs and Magma well. The temperature data gathered from all the wells clearly indicates the presence of a major plume of thermal water centered on the Pumpernickel Valley fault, and suggests that the main plume is controlled, at least in part, by flow from this fault system. The temperature data also defines the geothermal resource with gradients >100oC/km, which covers an area a minimum of 8 km2. Structural blocks, down dropped with respect to the Pumpernickel Valley fault, may define an immediate reservoir. The geothermal system almost certainly continues beyond the recently drilled holes and might be open to the east and south, whereas the heat source responsible for the temperatures associated with this plume has not been intersected and must be at a depth greater than 920 meters (depth of the deepest well – Magma well). The geological and structural setting and other characteristics of the Pumpernickel Valley geothermal project area are markedly similar to the portions of the nearby Dixie Valley geothermal field. These similarities include, among others, the numerous, unexposed en echelon faults and large-scale pull-apart structure, which in Dixie Valley may host part of the geothermal field. The Pumpernickel Valley project area, for the majority of which Nevada Geothermal Power Company has geothermal rights, represents a geothermal site with a potential for the discovery of a relatively high temperature reservoir suitable for electric power production. Among locations not previously identified as having high geothermal potential, Pumpernickel Valley has been ranked as one of four sites with the highest potential for electrical power production in Nevada (Shevenell and Garside, 2003). Richards and Blackwell (2002) estimated the total heat loss and the preliminary production capacity for the entire Pumpernickel Valley geothermal system to be at 35MW. A more conservative estimate, for

  5. GEOFRAC: an explosives stimulation technique for a geothermal well

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mumma, D.M.; McCullough, F. Jr.; Schmidt, E.W.; Pye, D.S.; Allen, W.C.; Pyle, D.; Hanold, R.J.

    1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The first known use of explosives for stimulating a geothermal well was successfully conducted in December 1981 with a process called GEOFRAC. The 260/sup 0/C well was located at the Union Oil Company's Geysers Field in northern California. For the initial test, 364 kg of a new explosive called HITEX II was placed at a depth of 2256 meters and detonated to verify techniques. The explosive was contained in an aluminum canister to separate it from the well fluids. In the second test, 5000 kg of explosive was used representing a column length of approximately 191 meters. The explosive was detonated at a depth of 1697 meters in the same well. The results of these tests show that HITEX II can be safely emplaced and successfully detonated in a hot geothermal well without causing damage to the well bore or casing.

  6. Well having inhibited microbial growth

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Lee, Brady D.; Dooley, Kirk J.

    2006-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The invention includes methods of inhibiting microbial growth in a well. A packing material containing a mixture of a first material and an antimicrobial agent is provided to at least partially fill a well bore. One or more access tubes are provided in an annular space around a casing within the well bore. The access tubes have a first terminal opening located at or above a ground surface and have a length that extends from the first terminal opening at least part of the depth of the well bore. The access tubes have a second terminal opening located within the well bore. An antimicrobial material is supplied into the well bore through the first terminal opening of the access tubes. The invention also includes well constructs.

  7. Generic effluent monitoring system certification for salt well portable exhauster

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Glissmeyer, J.A.; Maughan, A.D.

    1997-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Tests were conducted to verify that the Generic Effluent Monitoring System (GEMS), as it is applied to the Salt Well Portable Exhauster, meets all applicable regulatory performance criteria for air sampling systems at nuclear facilities. These performance criteria address both the suitability of the air sampling probe location and the transport of the sample to the collection devices. The criteria covering air sampling probe location ensure that the contaminants in the stack are well mixed with the airflow at the probe location such that the extracted sample represents the whole. The sample transport criteria ensure that the sampled contaminants are quantitatively delivered to the collection device. The specific performance criteria are described in detail in the report. The tests demonstrated that the GEMS/Salt Well Exhauster system meets all applicable performance criteria. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory conducted the testing using a mockup of the Salt Well Portable Exhauster stack at the Numatec Hanford Company`s 305 Building. The stack/sampling system configuration tested was designed to provide airborne effluent control for the Salt Well pumping operation at some U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) radioactive waste storage tanks at the Hanford Site, Washington. The portable design of the exhauster allows it to be used in other applications and over a range of exhaust air flowrates (approximately 200 - 1100 cubic feet per minute). The unit includes a stack section containing the sampling probe and another stack section containing the airflow, temperature and humidity sensors. The GEMS design features a probe with a single shrouded sampling nozzle, a sample delivery line, and sample collection system. The collection system includes a filter holder to collect the sample of record and an in-line detector head and filter for monitoring beta radiation-emitting particles.

  8. Ultrasonic Fluid Quality Sensor System

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Gomm, Tyler J. (Meridian, ID); Kraft, Nancy C. (Idaho Falls, ID); Phelps, Larry D. (Pocatello, ID); Taylor, Steven C. (Idaho Falls, ID)

    2003-10-21T23:59:59.000Z

    A system for determining the composition of a multiple-component fluid and for determining linear flow comprising at least one sing-around circuit that determines the velocity of a signal in the multiple-component fluid and that is correlatable to a database for the multiple-component fluid. A system for determining flow uses two of the inventive circuits, one of which is set at an angle that is not perpendicular to the direction of flow.

  9. Ultrasonic fluid quality sensor system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Gomm, Tyler J. (Meridian, ID); Kraft, Nancy C. (Idaho Falls, ID); Phelps, Larry D. (Pocatello, ID); Taylor, Steven C. (Idaho Falls, ID)

    2002-10-08T23:59:59.000Z

    A system for determining the composition of a multiple-component fluid and for determining linear flow comprising at least one sing-around circuit that determines the velocity of a signal in the multiple-component fluid and that is correlatable to a database for the multiple-component fluid. A system for determining flow uses two of the inventive circuits, one of which is set at an angle that is not perpendicular to the direction of flow.

  10. Completion Report for Well ER-EC-14, Corrective Action Units 101 and 102: Central and Western Pahute Mesa

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    2013-03-05T23:59:59.000Z

    Well ER-EC-14 was drilled for the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office in support of the Nevada Environmental Management Operations Underground Test Area (UGTA) Activity at the Nevada National Security Site (NNSS; formerly Nevada Test Site), Nye County, Nevada. The well was drilled in September and October 2012, as part of the Central and Western Pahute Mesa Corrective Action Unit Phase II drilling program. The primary purpose of the well was to provide detailed hydrogeologic information for the Fortymile Canyon composite hydrostratigraphic unit in the Timber Mountain moat area, within the Timber Mountain caldera complex, that will help address uncertainties within the Pahute Mesa–Oasis Valley hydrostratigraphic framework model. The main 55.9-centimeter (cm) hole was drilled to a total depth of 325.5 meters (m) and cased with 40.6-cm casing to 308.1 m. The hole diameter was then decreased to 37.5 cm, and drilling continued to a total depth of 724.8 m. The completion casing string, set to the depth of 690.9 m, consists of 16.8-cm stainless-steel casing hanging from 19.4-cm carbon-steel casing. The stainless-steel casing has two slotted intervals open to the Rainier Mesa Tuff. Two piezometer strings were installed in Well ER-EC-14. Both piezometer strings, each with one slotted interval, consist of 6.0-cm carbon-steel tubing at the surface, then cross over to 7.3-cm stainless-steel tubing just above the water table. The shallow piezometer string was landed at 507.8 m, and the deep piezometer string was landed at 688.6 m. Both piezometer strings are set to monitor groundwater within moderately to densely welded Rainier Mesa Tuff. Data collected during and shortly after hole construction include composite drill cuttings samples collected every 3.0 m, various geophysical logs, water quality (including tritium and other radionuclides) measurements, and water level measurements. The well penetrated 15.2 m of alluvium and 709.6 m of Tertiary volcanic rocks. The stratigraphy and general lithology were not as expected due to the position of Well ER-EC-14 relative to the buried caldera margins of the Timber Mountain caldera complex. The well is located inside the Rainier Mesa caldera, but outside the younger Ammonia Tanks caldera. On November 5, 2012, a preliminary fluid level in the shallow piezometer string was measured at the depth of 311.8 m. This water level depth was taken before installation of the bridge plug (to be placed within the main completion casing to separate the two slotted zones). Well development, hydrologic testing, and sampling, will be conducted at a later date. No tritium above levels detectable by field methods were encountered in this hole. All Fluid Management Plan (FMP) requirements for Well ER-EC-14 were met. Analysis of monitoring samples and FMP confirmatory samples indicated that fluids generated during drilling at Well ER-EC-14 met the FMP criteria for discharge to an unlined sump or designated infiltration area. All sanitary and hydrocarbon waste generated was properly handled and disposed of.

  11. AUTOMATING GROUNDWATER SAMPLING AT HANFORD

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    CONNELL CW; HILDEBRAND RD; CONLEY SF; CUNNINGHAM DE

    2009-01-16T23:59:59.000Z

    Until this past October, Fluor Hanford managed Hanford's integrated groundwater program for the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). With the new contract awards at the Site, however, the CH2M HILL Plateau Remediation Company (CHPRC) has assumed responsibility for the groundwater-monitoring programs at the 586-square-mile reservation in southeastern Washington State. These programs are regulated by the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) and the Comprehensive Environmental Response Compensation and Liability Act (CERCLA). The purpose of monitoring is to track existing groundwater contamination from past practices, as well as other potential contamination that might originate from RCRA treatment, storage, and disposal (TSD) facilities. An integral part of the groundwater-monitoring program involves taking samples of the groundwater and measuring the water levels in wells scattered across the site. More than 1,200 wells are sampled each year. Historically, field personnel or 'samplers' have been issued pre-printed forms that have information about the well(s) for a particular sampling evolution. This information is taken from the Hanford Well Information System (HWIS) and the Hanford Environmental Information System (HEIS)--official electronic databases. The samplers used these hardcopy forms to document the groundwater samples and well water-levels. After recording the entries in the field, the samplers turned the forms in at the end of the day and the collected information was posted onto a spreadsheet that was then printed and included in a log book. The log book was then used to make manual entries of the new information into the software application(s) for the HEIS and HWIS databases. This is a pilot project for automating this tedious process by providing an electronic tool for automating water-level measurements and groundwater field-sampling activities. The automation will eliminate the manual forms and associated data entry, improve the accuracy of the information recorded, and enhance the efficiency and sampling capacity of field personnel. The goal of the effort is to eliminate 100 percent of the manual input to the database(s) and replace the management of paperwork by the field and clerical personnel with an almost entirely electronic process. These activities will include the following: scheduling the activities of the field teams, electronically recording water-level measurements, electronically logging and filing Groundwater Sampling Reports (GSR), and transferring field forms into the site-wide Integrated Document Management System (IDMS).

  12. MOLECULAR DESIGN OF COLLOIDS IN SUPERCRITICAL FLUIDS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Keith P. Johnston

    2009-04-06T23:59:59.000Z

    The environmentally benign, non-toxic, non-flammable fluids water and carbon dioxide (CO2) are the two most abundant and inexpensive solvents on earth. Emulsions of these fluids are of interest in many industrial processes, as well as CO2 sequestration and enhanced oil recovery. Until recently, formation of these emulsions required stabilization with fluorinated surfactants, which are expensive and often not environmentally friendly. In this work we overcame this severe limitation by developing a fundamental understanding of the properties of surfactants the CO2-water interface and using this knowledge to design and characterize emulsions stabilized with either hydrocarbon-based surfactants or nanoparticle stabilizers. We also discovered a new concept of electrostatic stabilization for CO2-based emulsions and colloids. Finally, we were able to translate our earlier work on the synthesis of silicon and germanium nanocrystals and nanowires from high temperatures and pressures to lower temperatures and ambient pressure to make the chemistry much more accessible.

  13. Bi-directionally draining pore fluid extraction vessel

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Prizio, Joseph (Boulder, CO); Ritt, Alexander (Lakewood, CO); Mower, Timothy E. (Wheat Ridge, CO); Rodine, Lonn (Arvada, CO)

    1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The invention is used to extract pore fluid from porous solids through a combination of mechanical compression and inert-gas injection and comprises a piston for axially compressing samples to force water out, and top and bottom drainage plates for capturing the exuded water and using inert gas to force water to exit when the limits of mechanical compression have been reached.

  14. An expert system advisor for well log quality control

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Warnken, Dean Kennedy

    1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    funda- mental tool in the evaluation of petroleum reservoirs. Wireline well logging involves undergrourR measurement of various rock and fluid properties. These meas~ts are usually recorded with a downhole sonde and ~tted to the surface through a... expert systems, has proven to be an effective com- puterized problem solving tool in many oilfield applications. Expert systems strive to mimic an ~'s reasoning process when performing a highly specialized task. Expert system problem solvirg combines...

  15. Fluid system for controlling fluid losses during hydrocarbon recovery operations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Johnson, M.H.; Smejkal, K.D.

    1993-07-20T23:59:59.000Z

    A fluid system is described for controlling fluid losses during hydrocarbon recovery operations, comprising: water; a distribution of graded calcium carbonate particle sizes; and at least one modified lignosulfonate, which is a lignosulfonate modified by polymerizing it at least to an extent effective to reduce its water solubility.

  16. The thermal maturation degree of organic matter from source rocks revealed by wells logs including examples from Murzuk Basin, Libya

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Negoita, V.; Gheorghe, A.

    1995-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The customary technique used to know the organic matter quantity per rock volume it as well as the organic matter maturation stage is based on geochemical analyses accomplished on a preselected number of samples and cuttings drawn from boreholes during the drilling period. But the same objectives can be approached without any extra cost using the continuous measurements of well logs recorded in each well from the ground surface to the total depth. During the diagenetic stage, the identification of potential source rocks out of which no hydrocarbon have been generated may be carried out using a well logging suite including Gamma Ray Spectrometry, the Compensated Neutron/Litho Density combination and a Dual Induction/Sonic Log. During the catagenetic stage the onset of oil generation brings some important changes in the organic matter structure as well as in the fluid distribution throughout the pore space of source rocks. The replacement of electric conductive water by electric non-conductive hydrocarbons, together with water and oil being expelled from source rocks represent a process of different intensities dependent of time/temperature geohistory and kerogen type. The different generation and expulsion scenarios of hydrocarbons taking place during the catagenetic and metagenetic stages of source rocks are very well revealed by Induction and Laterolog investigations. Several crossplots relating vitrinite reflectance, total organic carbon and log-derived physical parameters are illustrated and discussed. The field applications are coming from Murzuk Basin, where Rompetrol of Libya is operating.

  17. Analizing Aqueous Imbibition into Shale and the Effects of Optimizing Critical Fracturing Fluid Additives

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Qureshi, Maha

    2013-09-29T23:59:59.000Z

    of pertinent chemical additives on fluid imbibition and intercalation into shale samples. We do this with the hope that we will eventually be able to determine how natural phenomena and additives affect long term resource production from unconventional oil...

  18. Analyzing Aqueous Solution Imbibition into Shale and the Effects of Optimizing Critical Fracturing Fluid Additives

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Plamin, Sammazo Jean-bertrand

    2013-09-29T23:59:59.000Z

    of pertinent chemical additives on fluid imbibition and intercalation into shale samples. We do this with the hope that we will eventually be able to determine how natural phenomena and additives affect long term resource production from unconventional oil...

  19. Thermal well-test method

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Tsang, C.F.; Doughty, C.A.

    1984-02-24T23:59:59.000Z

    A well-test method involving injection of hot (or cold) water into a groundwater aquifer, or injecting cold water into a geothermal reservoir is disclosed. By making temperature measurements at various depths in one or more observation wells, certain properties of the aquifer are determined. These properties, not obtainable from conventional well test procedures, include the permeability anisotropy, and layering in the aquifer, and in-situ thermal properties. The temperature measurements at various depths are obtained from thermistors mounted in the observation wells.

  20. Well Monitoring System for EGS

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Peer Review Well Monitoring Systems for EGS Principal Investigator Randy Normann Perma Works LLC May 19, 2010 This presentation does not contain any proprietary confidential, or...

  1. Apparatus for operating a gas and oil producing well

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wynn, S. R.

    1985-07-02T23:59:59.000Z

    Apparatus is disclosed for automatically operating a gas and oil producing well of the plunger lift type, including a comparator for comparing casing and tubing pressures, a device for opening the gas delivery valve when the difference between casing and tubing pressure is less than a selected minimum value, a device for closing the gas discharge valve when casing pressure falls below a selected casing bleed value, an arrival sensor switch for initially closing the fluid discharge valve when the plunger reaches the upper end of the tubing, and a device for reopening the fluid discharge valve at the end of a given downtime period in the event that the level of oil in the tubing produces a pressure difference greater than the given minimum differential value, and the casing pressure is greater than lift pressure. The gas discharge valve is closed if the pressure difference exceeds a selected maximum value, or if the casing pressure falls below a selected casing bleed value. The fluid discharge valve is closed if tubing pressure exceeds a maximum safe value. In the event that the plunger does not reach the upper end of the tubing during a selected uptime period, a lockout indication is presented on a visual display device, and the well is held shut-in until the well differential is forced down to the maximum differential setting of the device. When this occurs, the device will automatically unlock and normal cycling will resume.

  2. An assessment of the mechanical stability of wells offshore Nigeria

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lowrey, J.P.; Ottesen, S.

    1995-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In 1991 lost time due to stuck pipe related drilling problems accounted for approximately 18% of total drilling time in Mobil Producing Nigeria Ultd.`s (MPN) offshore operations. The primary cause of stuck pipe was identified as mechanical wellbore instability. This paper presents an assessment of the mechanical stability of MPN`s wells offshore Nigeria. The objectives of the study were to: (1) determine the magnitude of the in-situ principal stresses and material properties of the troublesome Intra-Biafra and Qua Iboe shale sequences; (2) quantify the drilling fluid densities required to drill mechanically stable wells through these formations; (3) review and recommend well planning and operational parameters which aid in minimizing wellbore stability-related drilling problems. The well-bore stability assessment was carried out with the aid of a 3-dimensional wellbore stability model using field derived data from the study area to corroborate the results. The collection and analysis of drilling data (borehole geometry and density logs, pore pressure, leak-off tests, local geology and other relevant well records) to determine the magnitude of the in-situ principal stresses, together with compressive strength tests on formation cores are discussed. Minimum safe drilling fluid densities to promote wellbore stability as a function of well geometry and depth are presented for the most troublesome shales drilled in the study area. Implementation of the results reduced wellbore stability related problems and associated trouble time to less than 5% in 1992.

  3. Apparatus and method for maintaining multi-component sample gas constituents in vapor phase during sample extraction and cooling

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Felix, Larry Gordon; Farthing, William Earl; Irvin, James Hodges; Snyder, Todd Robert

    2010-05-11T23:59:59.000Z

    A dilution apparatus for diluting a gas sample. The apparatus includes a sample gas conduit having a sample gas inlet end and a diluted sample gas outlet end, and a sample gas flow restricting orifice disposed proximate the sample gas inlet end connected with the sample gas conduit and providing fluid communication between the exterior and the interior of the sample gas conduit. A diluted sample gas conduit is provided within the sample gas conduit having a mixing end with a mixing space inlet opening disposed proximate the sample gas inlet end, thereby forming an annular space between the sample gas conduit and the diluted sample gas conduit. The mixing end of the diluted sample gas conduit is disposed at a distance from the sample gas flow restricting orifice. A dilution gas source connected with the sample gas inlet end of the sample gas conduit is provided for introducing a dilution gas into the annular space, and a filter is provided for filtering the sample gas. The apparatus is particularly suited for diluting heated sample gases containing one or more condensable components.

  4. Geothermal fracture stimulation technology. Volume III. Geothermal fracture fluids

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A detailed study of all available and experimental frac fluid systems is presented. They have been examined and tested for physical properties that are important in the stimulation of hot water geothermal wells. These fluids consist of water-based systems containing high molecular weight polymers in the uncrosslinked and crosslinked state. The results of fluid testing for many systems are summarized specifically at geothermal conditions or until breakdown occurs. Some of the standard tests are ambient viscosity, static aging, high temperature viscosity, fluid-loss testing, and falling ball viscosity at elevated temperatures and pressures. Results of these tests show that unalterable breakdown of the polymer solutions begins above 300/sup 0/F. This continues at higher temperatures with time even if stabilizers or other high temperature additives are included.

  5. Hard Sphere Dynamics for Normal and Granular Fluids

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    James W. Dufty; Aparna Baskaran

    2005-03-08T23:59:59.000Z

    A fluid of N smooth, hard spheres is considered as a model for normal (elastic collisions) and granular (inelastic collisions) fluids. The potential energy is discontinuous for hard spheres so the pairwise forces are singular and the usual forms of Newtonian and Hamiltonian mechanics do not apply. Nevertheless, particle trajectories in the N particle phase space are well defined and the generators for these trajectories can be identified. The first part of this presentation is a review of the generators for the dynamics of observables and probability densities. The new results presented in the second part refer to applications of these generators to the Liouville dynamics for granular fluids. A set of eigenvalues and eigenfunctions of the generator for this Liouville dynamics is identified in a special "stationary representation". This provides a class of exact solutions to the Liouville equation that are closely related to hydrodynamics for granular fluids.

  6. Drilling fluids and reserve pit toxicity

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Leuterman, A.J.J.; Jones, F.V.; Chandler, J.E. (M-I Drilling Fluids Co. (US))

    1988-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Drilling fluids are now classified as exempt under the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) hazardous waste laws. Since 1986, however, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) has been studying reserve pit contents to determine whether oilfield wastes should continue under this exemption. Concerns regarding reserve pit contents and disposal practices have resulted in state and local governmental regulations that limit traditional methods of construction, closure, and disposal of reserve pit sludge and water. A great deal of attention and study has been focused on drilling fluids that eventually reside in reserve pits. In-house studies show that waste from water-based drilling fluids plays a limited role (if any) in possible hazards associated with reserve pits. Reserve pit water samples and pit sludge was analyzed and collated. Analyses show that water-soluble heavy metals (Cr, Pb, Zn and Mn) in reserve pits are generally undetectable or, if found in the total analysis, are usually bound to clays or organics too tightly to exceed the limitations as determined by the EPA toxicity leachate test. The authors' experience is that most contamination associated with reserve pits involves high salt content from produced waters and/or salt formations, lead contamination from pipe dope, or poorly designed pits, which could allow washouts into surface waters or seepage into groundwater sources. The authors' analyses show that reserve its associated with water-based drilling fluid operations should not be classified as hazardous; however, careful attention attention should be paid to reserve pit construction and closure to help avoid any adverse environmental impact.

  7. Well descriptions for geothermal drilling

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Carson, C.C.; Livesay, B.J.

    1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Generic well models have been constructed for eight major geothermal resource areas. The models define representative times and costs associated with the individual operations that can be expected during drilling and completion of geothermal wells. They were made for and have been used to evaluate the impacts of potential new technologies. Their nature, their construction, and their validation are discussed.

  8. Optimization of fractured well performance of horizontal gas wells

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Magalhaes, Fellipe Vieira

    2009-06-02T23:59:59.000Z

    In low-permeability gas reservoirs, horizontal wells have been used to increase the reservoir contact area, and hydraulic fracturing has been further extending the contact between wellbores and reservoirs. This thesis presents an approach...

  9. Spin and Madelung fluid

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    G. Salesi

    2009-06-23T23:59:59.000Z

    Starting from the Pauli current we obtain the decomposition of the non-relativistic local velocity in two parts: one parallel and the other orthogonal to the momentum. The former is recognized to be the ``classical'' part, that is the velocity of the center-of-mass, and the latter the ``quantum'' one, that is the velocity of the motion in the center-of-mass frame (namely, the internal ``spin motion'' or {\\em Zitterbewegung}). Inserting the complete expression of the velocity into the kinetic energy term of the classical non-relativistic (i.e., Newtonian) Lagrangian, we straightforwardly derive the so-called ``quantum potential'' associated to the Madelung fluid. In such a way, the quantum mechanical behaviour of particles appears to be strictly correlated to the existence of spin and Zitterbewegung.

  10. ESPC IDIQ Contract Sample

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Document displays a sample indefinite delivery, indefinite quantity (IDIQ) energy savings performance contract (ESPC).

  11. Completion Report for Well ER-20-7: Corrective Action Units 101 and 102: Central and Western Pahute Mesa

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NSTec Environmental Restoration

    2010-04-28T23:59:59.000Z

    Well ER-20-7 was drilled for the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office in support of the Nevada Environmental Restoration Project at the Nevada Test Site, Nye County, Nevada. The well was drilled in June 2009 as part of the Pahute Mesa Phase II drilling program. The primary purpose of the well was to further investigate migration of radionuclides from the nearby, up-gradient TYBO and BENHAM underground nuclear tests, which originally was discovered at Well Cluster ER-20-5. This well also provided detailed hydrogeologic information in the Tertiary volcanic section that will reduce uncertainties within the Pahute Mesa-Oasis Valley hydrostratigraphic framework model. The main 44.45-centimeter hole was drilled to a depth of 681.8 meters and cased with 33.97-centimeter casing to 671.7 meters. The hole diameter was then decreased to 31.12 centimeters, and the well was drilled to total depth of 894.9 meters. The completion string, set to the depth of 890.0 meters, consists of 14.13-centimeter stainless-steel casing hanging from 19.37-centimeter carbon-steel casing. The 14.13-centimeter stainless-steel casing has one continuous slotted interval open to the Topopah Spring aquifer. Data collected during and shortly after hole construction include composite drill cuttings samples collected every 3.0 meters, sidewall core samples from 20 depth intervals, various geophysical logs, water quality (primarily tritium) measurements, and water level measurements. The well penetrated 894.9 meters of Tertiary volcanic rock, including two saturated welded-tuff aquifers. A fluid level measurement was obtained during open-hole geophysical well logging for the upper, Tiva Canyon, aquifer at the depth of 615.7 meters on June 19, 2009. The fluid level measured in the open hole on June 27, 2009,after the total depth was reached and the upper aquifer was cased off, was also at the depth of 615.7 meters. Preliminary field measurements indicated 1.5 to 4.5 million picocuries per liter of tritium in the Tiva Canyon aquifer and 20 to 61 million picocuries per liter in the underlying Topopah Spring aquifer.

  12. Experimentally Determined Interfacial Area Between Immiscible Fluids in Porous Media

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Crandall, Dustin; Niessner, J; Hassanizadeh, S.M; Smith, Duane

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    When multiple fluids flow through a porous medium, the interaction between the fluid interfaces can be of great importance. While this is widely recognized in practical applications, numerical models often disregard interactios between discrete fluid phases due to the computational complexity. And rightly so, for this level of detail is well beyond most extended Darcy Law relationships. A new model of two-phase flow including the interfacial area has been proposed by Hassarizadeh and Gray based upon thermodynamic principles. A version of this general equation set has been implemented by Nessner and Hassarizadeh. Many of the interfacial parameters required by this equation set have never been determined from experiments. The work presented here is a description of how the interfacial area, capillary pressure, interfacial velocity and interfacial permeability from two-phase flow experiments in porous media experiments can be used to determine the required parameters. This work, while on-going, has shown the possibility of digitizing images within translucent porous media and identifying the location and behavior of interfaces under dynamic conditions. Using the described methods experimentally derived interfacial functions to be used in larger scale simulations are currently being developed. In summary, the following conclusions can be drawn: (1) by mapping a pore-throat geometry onto an image of immiscible fluid flow, the saturation of fluids and the individual interfaces between the fluids can be identified; (2) the resulting saturation profiles of the low velocity drainage flows used in this study are well described by an invasion percolation fractal scaling; (3) the interfacial area between fluids has been observed to increase in a linear fashion during the initial invasion of the non-wetting fluid; and (4) the average capillary pressure within the entire cell and representative elemental volumes were observed to plateau after a small portion of the volume was invaded.

  13. Fluid distribution effect on sonic attenuation in partially saturated limestones

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cadoret, T. [Elf Exploration Production, Pau (France). Dept. Sismique] [Elf Exploration Production, Pau (France). Dept. Sismique; Mavko, G. [Stanford Univ., CA (United States)] [Stanford Univ., CA (United States); Zinszner, B. [Inst. Francais du Petrole, Rueil Malmaison (France). Lab. de Physique des Roches] [Inst. Francais du Petrole, Rueil Malmaison (France). Lab. de Physique des Roches

    1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Extensional and torsional wave-attenuation measurements are obtained at a sonic frequency around 1 kHz on partially saturated limestones using large resonant bars, 1 m long. To study the influence of the fluid distribution, the authors use two different saturation methods: drying and depressurization. When water saturation (S{sub w}) is higher than 70%, the extensional wave attenuation is found to depend on whether the resonant bar is jacketed. This can be interpreted as the Biot-Gardner-White effect. The experimental results obtained on jacketed samples show that, during a drying experiment, extensional wave attenuation is influenced strongly by the fluid content when S{sub w} is between approximately 70% and 100%. This sensitivity to fluid saturation vanishes when saturation is obtained through depressurization. Using a computer-assisted tomographic (CT) scan, the authors found that, during depressurization, the fluid distribution is homogeneous at the millimetric scale at all saturations. In contrast, during drying, heterogeneous saturation was observed at high water-saturation levels. Thus, the authors interpret the dependence of the extensional wave attenuation upon the saturation method as principally caused by a fluid distribution effect. Torsional attenuation shows no sensitivity to fluid saturation for S{sub w} between 5% and 100%.

  14. Quick, portable toxicity testing of marine or terrigenous fluids, sediments, or chemicals with bioluminescent organism

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sabate, R.W.; Stiffey, A.V.; Dewailly, E.L. [Lumitox Gulf L.C., New Orleans, LA (United States)

    1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    A hand-held, battery-operated instrument, which measures bioluminescence inhibition of the microscopic marine dinoflagellate Pyrocystis lunula, is capable of field-testing substances for toxicity. The organism is sensitive to ppb of strong toxicants. It tolerates some solvents in concentrations necessary for testing lipophylic samples. A test consumes only micrograms of sample. This method requires no adjustments for salinity, pH, color, or turbidity. It has been used successfully to test oil-well drilling fluids, brines produced with oil, waters and sediments from streams and lakes and petroleum-plant effluents containing contaminants such as benzene. The test is non-specific; however, if the substance is known, the end-point effects a direct measurement of its concentration. One-hour toxicity screening tests in the field produce results comparable to the standard four-hour laboratory test. Keeping the sample in the dark during incubation and testing, together with shortness of the overall procedure, eliminates anomalies from light-sensitive substances. Day-to-day variation, as well as among test replicates, is less than 10%. This quick method yields results comparable with a quick test that uses Photobacterium phosphoria, and with 96-hour tests that use Mysidopsis bahia, Artemia salina, Gonyaulax polyedra, Pimephales promelas, Ceriodaphnia dubia, and Cyprinodon variegatus.

  15. Proceedings Dynamics of Fluids in Fractured Rocks. LBNL-42718, Berkeley, CA February 1999 Critical Biogeochemical Parameters Used for In Situ Bioremediation of Solvents in

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hazen, Terry

    Proceedings Dynamics of Fluids in Fractured Rocks. LBNL-42718, Berkeley, CA February 1999 169 in monitoring wells near the injection point. #12;Proceedings Dynamics of Fluids in Fractured Rocks. LBNL-42718

  16. Chemistry of spring and well waters on Kilauea Volcano, Hawaii...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    the chemistry of dilute meteoric water, mixtures with sea water,and thermal water. Data for well and spring samples of non-thermal water indicate that mixing with sea water...

  17. Sample preparation and detection device for infectious agents

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Miles, Robin R.; Wang, Amy W.; Fuller, Christopher K.; Lemoff, Asuncion V.; Bettencourt, Kerry A.; Yu, June

    2003-06-10T23:59:59.000Z

    A sample preparation and analysis device which incorporates both immunoassays and PCR assays in one compact, field-portable microchip. The device provides new capabilities in fluid and particle control which allows the building of a fluidic chip with no moving parts, thus decreasing fabrication cost and increasing the robustness of the device. The device can operate in a true continuous (not batch) mode. The device incorporates magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) pumps to move the fluid through the system, acoustic mixing and fractionation, dielectropheretic (DEP) sample concentration and purification, and on-chip optical detection capabilities.

  18. Defining And Characterizing Sample Representativeness For DWPF Melter Feed Samples

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shine, E. P.; Poirier, M. R.

    2013-10-29T23:59:59.000Z

    Representative sampling is important throughout the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) process, and the demonstrated success of the DWPF process to achieve glass product quality over the past two decades is a direct result of the quality of information obtained from the process. The objective of this report was to present sampling methods that the Savannah River Site (SRS) used to qualify waste being dispositioned at the DWPF. The goal was to emphasize the methodology, not a list of outcomes from those studies. This methodology includes proven methods for taking representative samples, the use of controlled analytical methods, and data interpretation and reporting that considers the uncertainty of all error sources. Numerous sampling studies were conducted during the development of the DWPF process and still continue to be performed in order to evaluate options for process improvement. Study designs were based on use of statistical tools applicable to the determination of uncertainties associated with the data needs. Successful designs are apt to be repeated, so this report chose only to include prototypic case studies that typify the characteristics of frequently used designs. Case studies have been presented for studying in-tank homogeneity, evaluating the suitability of sampler systems, determining factors that affect mixing and sampling, comparing the final waste glass product chemical composition and durability to that of the glass pour stream sample and other samples from process vessels, and assessing the uniformity of the chemical composition in the waste glass product. Many of these studies efficiently addressed more than one of these areas of concern associated with demonstrating sample representativeness and provide examples of statistical tools in use for DWPF. The time when many of these designs were implemented was in an age when the sampling ideas of Pierre Gy were not as widespread as they are today. Nonetheless, the engineers and statisticians used carefully thought out designs that systematically and economically provided plans for data collection from the DWPF process. Key shared features of the sampling designs used at DWPF and the Gy sampling methodology were the specification of a standard for sample representativeness, an investigation that produced data from the process to study the sampling function, and a decision framework used to assess whether the specification was met based on the data. Without going into detail with regard to the seven errors identified by Pierre Gy, as excellent summaries are readily available such as Pitard [1989] and Smith [2001], SRS engineers understood, for example, that samplers can be biased (Gy?s extraction error), and developed plans to mitigate those biases. Experiments that compared installed samplers with more representative samples obtained directly from the tank may not have resulted in systematically partitioning sampling errors into the now well-known error categories of Gy, but did provide overall information on the suitability of sampling systems. Most of the designs in this report are related to the DWPF vessels, not the large SRS Tank Farm tanks. Samples from the DWPF Slurry Mix Evaporator (SME), which contains the feed to the DWPF melter, are characterized using standardized analytical methods with known uncertainty. The analytical error is combined with the established error from sampling and processing in DWPF to determine the melter feed composition. This composition is used with the known uncertainty of the models in the Product Composition Control System (PCCS) to ensure that the wasteform that is produced is comfortably within the acceptable processing and product performance region. Having the advantage of many years of processing that meets the waste glass product acceptance criteria, the DWPF process has provided a considerable amount of data about itself in addition to the data from many special studies. Demonstrating representative sampling directly from the large Tank Farm tanks is a difficult, if not unsolvable enterprise due to li

  19. Finite element simulation of electrorheological fluids

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rhyou, Chanryeol, 1973-

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Electrorheological (ER) fluids change their flow properties dramatically when an electric field is applied. These fluids are usually composed of dispersions of polarizable particles in an insulating base fluid or composed ...

  20. Testing of the Pleasant Bayou Well through October 1990

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Randolph, P.L.; Hayden, C.G.; Mosca, V.L.; Anhaiser, J.L.

    1992-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Pleasant Bayou location was inactive from 1983 until the cleanout of the production and disposal wells in 1986. The surface facilities were rehabilitated and after shakedown of the system, additional repair of wellhead valves, and injection of an inhibitor pill, continuous long-term production was started in 1988. Over two years of production subsequent to that are reviewed here, including: production data, brine sampling and analysis, hydrocarbon sampling and analysis, solids sampling and analysis, scale control and corrosion monitoring and control.

  1. A compact high-performance low-field NMR apparatus for measurements on fluids at very high pressures and temperatures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Freedman, R.; Anand, V., E-mail: VAnand@slb.com; Ganesan, K.; Tabrizi, P.; Torres, R. [Schlumberger Technology Corp., 110 Schlumberger Drive, Sugar Land, Texas 77478 (United States)] [Schlumberger Technology Corp., 110 Schlumberger Drive, Sugar Land, Texas 77478 (United States); Grant, B. [Grant Innovation, 618 Mesquite Drive, Cedar Creek, Texas 78612 (United States)] [Grant Innovation, 618 Mesquite Drive, Cedar Creek, Texas 78612 (United States); Catina, D. [National Oilwell Varco, 10302 Mula Road, Stafford, Texas 77477 (United States)] [National Oilwell Varco, 10302 Mula Road, Stafford, Texas 77477 (United States); Ryan, D.; Borman, C.; Krueckl, C. [Schlumberger DBR Technology Center, 9450–17 Avenue NW, Edmonton, Alberta (Canada)] [Schlumberger DBR Technology Center, 9450–17 Avenue NW, Edmonton, Alberta (Canada)

    2014-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

    We discuss an innovative new high-performance apparatus for performing low-field Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) relaxation times and diffusion measurements on fluids at very high pressures and high temperatures. The apparatus sensor design and electronics specifications allow for dual deployment either in a fluid sampling well logging tool or in a laboratory. The sensor and electronics were designed to function in both environments. This paper discusses the use of the apparatus in a laboratory environment. The operating temperature and pressure limits, and the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) of the new system exceed by a very wide margin what is currently possible. This major breakthrough was made possible by a revolutionary new sensor design that breaks many of the rules of conventional high pressure NMR sensor design. A metallic sample holder capable of operating at high pressures and temperatures is provided to contain the fluid under study. The sample holder has been successfully tested for operation up to 36 Kpsi. A solenoid coil wound on a slotted titanium frame sits inside the metallic sample holder and serves as an antenna to transmit RF pulses and receive NMR signals. The metal sample holder is sandwiched between a pair of gradient coils which provide a linear field gradient for pulsed field gradient diffusion measurements. The assembly sits in the bore of a low-gradient permanent magnet. The system can operate over a wide frequency range without the need for tuning the antenna to the Larmor frequency. The SNR measured on a water sample at room temperature is more than 15 times greater than that of the commercial low-field system in our laboratory. Thus, the new system provides for data acquisition more than 200 times faster than was previously possible. Laboratory NMR measurements of relaxations times and diffusion coefficients performed at pressures up to 25 Kpsi and at temperatures up to 175?°C with crude oils enlivened with dissolved hydrocarbon gases (referred to as “live oils”) are shown. This is the first time low-field NMR measurements have been performed at such high temperatures and pressures on live crude oil samples. We discuss the details of the apparatus design, tuning, calibration, and operation. NMR data acquired at multiple temperatures and pressures on a live oil sample are discussed.

  2. Quantum well multijunction photovoltaic cell

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Chaffin, R.J.; Osbourn, G.C.

    1983-07-08T23:59:59.000Z

    A monolithic, quantum well, multilayer photovoltaic cell comprises a p-n junction comprising a p-region on one side and an n-region on the other side, each of which regions comprises a series of at least three semiconductor layers, all p-type in the p-region and all n-type in the n-region; each of said series of layers comprising alternating barrier and quantum well layers, each barrier layer comprising a semiconductor material having a first bandgap and each quantum well layer comprising a semiconductor material having a second bandgap when in bulk thickness which is narrower than said first bandgap, the barrier layers sandwiching each quantum well layer and each quantum well layer being sufficiently thin that the width of its bandgap is between said first and second bandgaps, such that radiation incident on said cell and above an energy determined by the bandgap of the quantum well layers will be absorbed and will produce an electrical potential across said junction.

  3. Rain sampling device

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Nelson, D.A.; Tomich, S.D.; Glover, D.W.; Allen, E.V.; Hales, J.M.; Dana, M.T.

    1991-05-14T23:59:59.000Z

    The present invention constitutes a rain sampling device adapted for independent operation at locations remote from the user which allows rainfall to be sampled in accordance with any schedule desired by the user. The rain sampling device includes a mechanism for directing wet precipitation into a chamber, a chamber for temporarily holding the precipitation during the process of collection, a valve mechanism for controllably releasing samples of the precipitation from the chamber, a means for distributing the samples released from the holding chamber into vessels adapted for permanently retaining these samples, and an electrical mechanism for regulating the operation of the device. 11 figures.

  4. Rain sampling device

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Nelson, Danny A. (Richland, WA); Tomich, Stanley D. (Richland, WA); Glover, Donald W. (Prosser, WA); Allen, Errol V. (Benton City, WA); Hales, Jeremy M. (Kennewick, WA); Dana, Marshall T. (Richland, WA)

    1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The present invention constitutes a rain sampling device adapted for independent operation at locations remote from the user which allows rainfall to be sampled in accordance with any schedule desired by the user. The rain sampling device includes a mechanism for directing wet precipitation into a chamber, a chamber for temporarily holding the precipitation during the process of collection, a valve mechanism for controllably releasing samples of said precipitation from said chamber, a means for distributing the samples released from the holding chamber into vessels adapted for permanently retaining these samples, and an electrical mechanism for regulating the operation of the device.

  5. Drag Law of Two Dimensional Granular Fluids

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Satoshi Takada; Hisao Hayakawa

    2015-04-19T23:59:59.000Z

    Drag force law acting on a moving circular disk in a two-dimensional granular medium is analyzed based on the discrete element method (DEM). It is remarkable that the drag force on the moving disk in moderate dense and pure two-dimensional granular medium can be well reproduced by a perfect fluid with separation from the boundary. A yield force, being independent of the moving speed of the disk, appears if a dry friction between the granular disks and the bottom plate exists. The perfect fluidity is violated in this case. The yield force and the drag force diverge at the jamming point.

  6. Variable flexure-based fluid filter

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Brown, Steve B.; Colston Jr., Billy W.; Marshall, Graham; Wolcott, Duane

    2007-03-13T23:59:59.000Z

    An apparatus and method for filtering particles from a fluid comprises a fluid inlet, a fluid outlet, a variable size passage between the fluid inlet and the fluid outlet, and means for adjusting the size of the variable size passage for filtering the particles from the fluid. An inlet fluid flow stream is introduced to a fixture with a variable size passage. The size of the variable size passage is set so that the fluid passes through the variable size passage but the particles do not pass through the variable size passage.

  7. Fluid Imaging of Enhanced Geothermal Systems

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    for Fluids & Fractures - time lapse MTCSEM for fluid imaging - joint CSEM-MTseismic imaging ??? - use MEQ focal information with EM Imaging ScientificTechnical Approach...

  8. Laser heating of aqueous samples on a micro-optical-electro-mechanical system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Beer, Neil Reginald; Kennedy, Ian

    2013-02-05T23:59:59.000Z

    A system of heating a sample on a microchip includes the steps of providing a microchannel flow channel in the microchip; positioning the sample within the microchannel flow channel, providing a laser that directs a laser beam onto the sample for heating the sample; providing the microchannel flow channel with a wall section that receives the laser beam and enables the laser beam to pass through wall section of the microchannel flow channel without being appreciably heated by the laser beam; and providing a carrier fluid in the microchannel flow channel that moves the sample in the microchannel flow channel wherein the carrier fluid is not appreciably heated by the laser beam.

  9. Laser heating of aqueous samples on a micro-optical-electro-mechanical system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Beer, Neil Reginald; Kennedy, Ian

    2013-12-17T23:59:59.000Z

    A system of heating a sample on a microchip includes the steps of providing a microchannel flow channel in the microchip; positioning the sample within the microchannel flow channel, providing a laser that directs a laser beam onto the sample for heating the sample; providing the microchannel flow channel with a wall section that receives the laser beam and enables the laser beam to pass through wall section of the microchannel flow channel without being appreciably heated by the laser beam; and providing a carrier fluid in the microchannel flow channel that moves the sample in the microchannel flow channel wherein the carrier fluid is not appreciably heated by the laser beam.

  10. Flow through in situ reactors with suction lysimeter sampling capability and methods of using

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Radtke, Corey W. (Idaho Falls, ID) [Idaho Falls, ID; Blackwelder, D. Brad (Blackfoot, ID) [Blackfoot, ID; Hubbell, Joel M. (Idaho Falls, ID) [Idaho Falls, ID

    2009-11-17T23:59:59.000Z

    An in situ reactor for use in a geological strata includes a liner defining a centrally disposed passageway and a sampling conduit received within the passageway. The sampling conduit may be used to receive a geological speciment derived from geological strata therein and a lysimeter is disposed within the sampling conduit in communication with the geological specimen. Fluid may be added to the geological specimen through the passageway defined by the liner, between an inside surface of the liner and an outside surface of the sampling conduit. A distal portion of the sampling conduit may be in fluid communication with the passageway.

  11. Well-posedness of the free-surface incompressible Euler equations with or without surface tension

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Daniel Coutand; Steve Shkoller

    2006-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    We provide a new method for treating free boundary problems in perfect fluids, and prove local-in-time well-posedness in Sobolev spaces for the free-surface incompressible 3D Euler equations with or without surface tension for arbitrary initial data, and without any irrotationality assumption on the fluid. This is a free boundary problem for the motion of an incompressible perfect liquid in vacuum, wherein the motion of the fluid interacts with the motion of the free-surface at highest-order.

  12. Detachment Energies of Spheroidal Particles from Fluid-Fluid Interfaces

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gary B. Davies; Timm Krüger; Peter V. Coveney; Jens Harting

    2014-10-28T23:59:59.000Z

    The energy required to detach a single particle from a fluid-fluid interface is an important parameter for designing certain soft materials, for example, emulsions stabilised by colloidal particles, colloidosomes designed for targeted drug delivery, and bio-sensors composed of magnetic particles adsorbed at interfaces. For a fixed particle volume, prolate and oblate spheroids attach more strongly to interfaces because they have larger particle-interface areas. Calculating the detachment energy of spheroids necessitates the difficult measurement of particle-liquid surface tensions, in contrast with spheres, where the contact angle suffices. We develop a simplified detachment energy model for spheroids which depends only on the particle aspect ratio and the height of the particle centre of mass above the fluid-fluid interface. We use lattice Boltzmann simulations to validate the model and provide quantitative evidence that the approach can be applied to simulate particle-stabilized emulsions, and highlight the experimental implications of this validation.

  13. Fluid flow monitoring device

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    McKay, M.D.; Sweeney, C.E.; Spangler, B.S. Jr.

    1993-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

    A flow meter and temperature measuring device are described comprising a tube with a body centered therein for restricting flow and a sleeve at the upper end of the tube to carry several channels formed longitudinally in the sleeve to the appropriate axial location where they penetrate the tube to allow pressure measurements and temperature measurements with thermocouples. The high pressure measurement is made using a channel penetrating the tube away from the body and the low pressure measurement is made at a location at the widest part of the body. An end plug seals the end of the device and holes at its upper end allow fluid to pass from the interior of the tube into a plenum. The channels are made by cutting grooves in the sleeve, the grooves widened at the surface of the sleeve and then a strip of sleeve material is welded to the grooves closing the channels. Preferably the sleeve is packed with powdered graphite before cutting the grooves and welding the strips. 7 figures.

  14. Fluid flow monitoring device

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    McKay, Mark D. (1426 Socastee Dr., North Augusta, SC 29841); Sweeney, Chad E. (3600 Westhampton Dr., Martinez, GA 30907-3036); Spangler, Jr., B. Samuel (2715 Margate Dr., Augusta, GA 30909)

    1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A flow meter and temperature measuring device comprising a tube with a body centered therein for restricting flow and a sleeve at the upper end of the tube to carry several channels formed longitudinally in the sleeve to the appropriate axial location where they penetrate the tube to allow pressure measurements and temperature measurements with thermocouples. The high pressure measurement is made using a channel penetrating the tube away from the body and the low pressure measurement is made at a location at the widest part of the body. An end plug seals the end of the device and holes at its upper end allow fluid to pass from the interior of the tube into a plenum. The channels are made by cutting grooves in the sleeve, the grooves widened at the surface of the sleeve and then a strip of sleeve material is welded to the grooves closing the channels. Preferably the sleeve is packed with powdered graphite before cutting the grooves and welding the strips.

  15. Computational fluid dynamic applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chang, S.-L.; Lottes, S. A.; Zhou, C. Q.

    2000-04-03T23:59:59.000Z

    The rapid advancement of computational capability including speed and memory size has prompted the wide use of computational fluid dynamics (CFD) codes to simulate complex flow systems. CFD simulations are used to study the operating problems encountered in system, to evaluate the impacts of operation/design parameters on the performance of a system, and to investigate novel design concepts. CFD codes are generally developed based on the conservation laws of mass, momentum, and energy that govern the characteristics of a flow. The governing equations are simplified and discretized for a selected computational grid system. Numerical methods are selected to simplify and calculate approximate flow properties. For turbulent, reacting, and multiphase flow systems the complex processes relating to these aspects of the flow, i.e., turbulent diffusion, combustion kinetics, interfacial drag and heat and mass transfer, etc., are described in mathematical models, based on a combination of fundamental physics and empirical data, that are incorporated into the code. CFD simulation has been applied to a large variety of practical and industrial scale flow systems.

  16. Viscous dark fluid universe

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hipolito-Ricaldi, W. S. [Universidade Federal do Espirito Santo, Departamento de Ciencias Matematicas e Naturais, CEUNES, Rodovia BR 101 Norte, km. 60, CEP 29932-540, Sao Mateus, Espirito Santo (Brazil); Velten, H. E. S.; Zimdahl, W. [Universidade Federal do Espirito Santo, Departamento de Fisica, Av. Fernando Ferrari, 514, Campus de Goiabeiras, CEP 29075-910, Vitoria, Espirito Santo (Brazil)

    2010-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

    We investigate the cosmological perturbation dynamics for a universe consisting of pressureless baryonic matter and a viscous fluid, the latter representing a unified model of the dark sector. In the homogeneous and isotropic background the total energy density of this mixture behaves as a generalized Chaplygin gas. The perturbations of this energy density are intrinsically nonadiabatic and source relative entropy perturbations. The resulting baryonic matter power spectrum is shown to be compatible with the 2dFGRS and SDSS (DR7) data. A joint statistical analysis, using also Hubble-function and supernovae Ia data, shows that, different from other studies, there exists a maximum in the probability distribution for a negative present value q{sub 0{approx_equal}}-0.53 of the deceleration parameter. Moreover, while previous descriptions on the basis of generalized Chaplygin-gas models were incompatible with the matter power-spectrum data since they required a much too large amount of pressureless matter, the unified model presented here favors a matter content that is of the order of the baryonic matter abundance suggested by big-bang nucleosynthesis.

  17. Tracing Geothermal Fluids

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Michael C. Adams; Greg Nash

    2004-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Geothermal water must be injected back into the reservoir after it has been used for power production. Injection is critical in maximizing the power production and lifetime of the reservoir. To use injectate effectively the direction and velocity of the injected water must be known or inferred. This information can be obtained by using chemical tracers to track the subsurface flow paths of the injected fluid. Tracers are chemical compounds that are added to the water as it is injected back into the reservoir. The hot production water is monitored for the presence of this tracer using the most sensitive analytic methods that are economically feasible. The amount and concentration pattern of the tracer revealed by this monitoring can be used to evaluate how effective the injection strategy is. However, the tracers must have properties that suite the environment that they will be used in. This requires careful consideration and testing of the tracer properties. In previous and parallel investigations we have developed tracers that are suitable from tracing liquid water. In this investigation, we developed tracers that can be used for steam and mixed water/steam environments. This work will improve the efficiency of injection management in geothermal fields, lowering the cost of energy production and increasing the power output of these systems.

  18. COMPUTER SCIENCE SAMPLE PROGRAM

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gering, Jon C.

    COMPUTER SCIENCE SAMPLE PROGRAM (First Math Course MATH 198) This sample program suggests one way CS 181: Foundations of Computer Science II CS 180: Foundations of Computer Science I CS 191

  19. Insertable fluid flow passage bridgepiece and method

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Jones, Daniel O. (Glenville, NV)

    2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A fluid flow passage bridgepiece for insertion into an open-face fluid flow channel of a fluid flow plate is provided. The bridgepiece provides a sealed passage from a columnar fluid flow manifold to the flow channel, thereby preventing undesirable leakage into and out of the columnar fluid flow manifold. When deployed in the various fluid flow plates that are used in a Proton Exchange Membrane (PEM) fuel cell, bridgepieces of this invention prevent mixing of reactant gases, leakage of coolant or humidification water, and occlusion of the fluid flow channel by gasket material. The invention also provides a fluid flow plate assembly including an insertable bridgepiece, a fluid flow plate adapted for use with an insertable bridgepiece, and a method of manufacturing a fluid flow plate with an insertable fluid flow passage bridgepiece.

  20. ADVANCED CEMENTS FOR GEOTHERMAL WELLS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    SUGAMA,T.

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Using the conventional well cements consisting of the calcium silicate hydrates (CaO-SiO{sub 2}-H{sub 2}O system) and calcium aluminum silicate hydrates (CaO-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}-SiO{sub 2}-H{sub 2}O system) for the integrity of geothermal wells, the serious concern confronting the cementing industries was their poor performance in mechanically supporting the metallic well casing pipes and in mitigating the pipe's corrosion in very harsh geothermal reservoirs. These difficulties are particularly acute in two geological regions: One is the deep hot downhole area ({approx} 1700 m depth at temperatures of {approx} 320 C) that contains hyper saline water with high concentrations of CO{sub 2} (> 40,000 ppm) in conjunction with {approx} 100 ppm H{sub 2}S at a mild acid of pH {approx} 5.0; the other is the upper well region between the well's surface and {approx} 1000 m depth at temperatures up to 200 C. The specific environment of the latter region is characterized by highly concentrated H{sub 2}SO{sub 4} (pH < 1.5) brine containing at least 5000 ppm CO{sub 2}. When these conventional cements are emplaced in these harsh environments, their major shortcoming is their susceptibility to reactions with hot CO{sub 2} and H{sub 2}SO4, thereby causing their deterioration brought about by CO{sub 2}-catalyzed carbonation and acid-initiated erosion. Such degradation not only reduced rapidly the strength of cements, lowering the mechanical support of casing pipes, but also increased the extent of permeability of the brine through the cement layer, promoting the rate of the pipe's corrosion. Severely carbonated and acid eroded cements often impaired the integrity of a well in less than one year; in the worst cases, casings have collapsed within three months, leading to the need for costly and time-consuming repairs or redrilling operations. These were the reasons why the geothermal well drilling and cementing industries were concerned about using conventional well cements, and further their deterioration was a major impediment in expediting the development of geothermal energy resources.

  1. CO2-based mixtures as working fluids for geothermal turbines.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wright, Steven Alan; Conboy, Thomas M.; Ames, David E.

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Sandia National Laboratories is investigating advanced Brayton cycles using supercritical working fluids for application to a variety of heat sources, including geothermal, solar, fossil, and nuclear power. This work is centered on the supercritical CO{sub 2} (S-CO{sub 2}) power conversion cycle, which has the potential for high efficiency in the temperature range of interest for these heat sources and is very compact-a feature likely to reduce capital costs. One promising approach is the use of CO{sub 2}-based supercritical fluid mixtures. The introduction of additives to CO{sub 2} alters the equation of state and the critical point of the resultant mixture. A series of tests was carried out using Sandia's supercritical fluid compression loop that confirmed the ability of different additives to increase or lower the critical point of CO{sub 2}. Testing also demonstrated that, above the modified critical point, these mixtures can be compressed in a turbocompressor as a single-phase homogenous mixture. Comparisons of experimental data to the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) Reference Fluid Thermodynamic and Transport Properties (REFPROP) Standard Reference Database predictions varied depending on the fluid. Although the pressure, density, and temperature (p, {rho}, T) data for all tested fluids matched fairly well to REFPROP in most regions, the critical temperature was often inaccurate. In these cases, outside literature was found to provide further insight and to qualitatively confirm the validity of experimental findings for the present investigation.

  2. Fluid-driven deformation of a soft granular material

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Christopher W. MacMinn; Eric R. Dufresne; John S. Wettlaufer

    2015-02-24T23:59:59.000Z

    Compressing a porous, fluid-filled material will drive the interstitial fluid out of the pore space, as when squeezing water out of a kitchen sponge. Inversely, injecting fluid into a porous material can deform the solid structure, as when fracturing a shale for natural gas recovery. These poromechanical interactions play an important role in geological and biological systems across a wide range of scales, from the propagation of magma through the Earth's mantle to the transport of fluid through living cells and tissues. The theory of poroelasticity has been largely successful in modeling poromechanical behavior in relatively simple systems, but this continuum theory is fundamentally limited by our understanding of the pore-scale interactions between the fluid and the solid, and these problems are notoriously difficult to study in a laboratory setting. Here, we present a high-resolution measurement of injection-driven poromechanical deformation in a system with granular microsctructure: We inject fluid into a dense, confined monolayer of soft particles and use particle tracking to reveal the dynamics of the multi-scale deformation field. We find that a continuum model based on poroelasticity theory captures certain macroscopic features of the deformation, but the particle-scale deformation field exhibits dramatic departures from smooth, continuum behavior. We observe particle-scale rearrangement and hysteresis, as well as petal-like mesoscale structures that are connected to material failure through spiral shear banding.

  3. In situ stress, fracture, and fluid flow analysis in Well 38C...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    geothermal field Abstract Geoscientists from the Coso Operating Company, EGI-Utah, GeoMechanics International, and the U.S. Geological Survey are cooperating in a multi-year study...

  4. Effectiveness of continuous hot-fluid stimulation of high viscosity oil wells

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oetama, Teddy

    1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Cl Ct P) 0 5 N Cl C di l tQ E (U O V O O 0 QJ + CL 0 V Ql O lJ QJ 4- 4? Tl O Cl Cfl C lJ Ct C (3 ) aanqewacIIIIa I IIo I~ onpoag 0 37 Higher injection rates result in higher production temperatures at steady-state due... thermal system with heat loss to 38 adjacent shale layers. In the formation having smaller kv/kh ratio, the injected hot oil flows farther in the horizontal direction. Consequently, the contact area between the formation and the shale layer is larger...

  5. Electric Power Generation from Coproduced Fluids from Oil and Gas Wells |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYouTube YouTube Note: Since the YouTube|6721 Federal Register / Vol.6:Energy Eighth AnnualELECTRIC MOTORS

  6. In situ stress, fracture, and fluid flow analysis in Well 38C-9: an

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to: navigation, search OpenEIHesperia,IDGWP WindSatellite InterferometricImperiumenhanced

  7. Isotopic Analysis- Fluid At Salt Wells Area (Shevenell & Garside, 2003) |

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to: navigation, searchOf Kilauea Volcano, Hawaii | OpenSuperiorEnergyOpen Energy Information

  8. IN SITU STRESS, FRACTURE, AND FLUID FLOW ANALYSIS IN WELL 38C-9:AN ENHANCED

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are8COaBulkTransmissionSitingProcess.pdfGetecGtel JumpCounty, Texas: EnergyHy9MoatEnergyElectricityUSING REMOTE

  9. Electric Power Generation from Coproduced Fluids from Oil and Gas Wells

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn't Your Destiny:RevisedAdvisory BoardNucleate Boiling Efficient CoolingInc.Electric Power

  10. Electric Power Generation from Coproduced Fluids from Oil and Gas Wells |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn't Your Destiny:RevisedAdvisory BoardNucleate Boiling Efficient CoolingInc.Electric PowerDepartment

  11. Black Warrior: Sub-soil Gas and Fluid Inclusion Exploration and Slim Well

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to:EzfeedflagBiomass ConversionsSouthby 2022 | OpenEIBixby, Oklahoma:Black Warrior

  12. Peristaltic pumping and irreversibility of a Stokesian viscoelastic fluid Joseph Teran,1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shelley, Michael

    Peristaltic pumping and irreversibility of a Stokesian viscoelastic fluid Joseph Teran,1 Lisa Fauci, USA Received 28 January 2008; accepted 1 July 2008; published online 28 July 2008 Peristaltic pumping in the esophagus, intestine, oviduct, and ureter. While peristaltic pumping of a Newtonian fluid is well understood

  13. Groundwater flow to a horizontal or slanted well in an unconfined aquifer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhan, Hongbin

    groundwater, vapor, or oil improves the effective recovery of fluids. In a case study in a thin oil reservoir with the horizontal aquifer units; (4) drilling oper- ations are feasible near the ground surfaces that are obstructed equal to that of 10 vertical wells. In the petroleum industry, horizontal wells improve oil recovery

  14. Microfluidic cartridges preloaded with nanoliter plugs of reagents: an alternative to 96-well plates for screening

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ismagilov, Rustem F.

    Microfluidic cartridges preloaded with nanoliter plugs of reagents: an alternative to 96-well equipment and techniques required to dispense nanoliter volumes of fluid. Plug-based microfluidics confines techniques that rely on microfluidic cartridges preloaded with nano- liter plugs of reagents. 96-Well plates

  15. Process for cementing geothermal wells

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Eilers, Louis H. (Inola, OK)

    1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A pumpable slurry of coal-filled furfuryl alcohol, furfural, and/or a low molecular weight mono- or copolymer thereof containing, preferably, a catalytic amount of a soluble acid catalyst is used to cement a casing in a geothermal well.

  16. Fluid Mixing from Viscous Fingering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jha, Birendra

    Mixing efficiency at low Reynolds numbers can be enhanced by exploiting hydrodynamic instabilities that induce heterogeneity and disorder in the flow. The unstable displacement of fluids with different viscosities, or ...

  17. Bio-inspired fluid locomotion

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chan, Brian, 1980-

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We have developed several novel methods of locomotion at low Reynolds number, for both Newtonian and non-Newtonian fluids: Robosnails 1 and 2, which operate on a lubrication layer, and the three-link swimmer which moves ...

  18. Rip Cosmology via Inhomogeneous Fluid

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    V. V. Obukhov; A. V. Timoshkin; E. V Savushkin

    2013-09-18T23:59:59.000Z

    The conditions for the appearance of the Little Rip, Pseudo Rip and Quasi Rip universes in the terms of the parameters in the equation of state of some dark fluid are investigated. Several examples of the Rip cosmologies are investigated.

  19. Graduate Studies Environmental Fluid Mechanics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jacobs, Laurence J.

    and bridge scour · Wastewater dispersion in coastal waters · Cohesive sediment resuspension · Flood, and modeling research; and develop new technologies and tools that benefit engineering practice in fluid · Atmospheric, surface, and subsurface models · Flood/drought forecasting and management · Decision support

  20. Viscous fluid dynamics in Au+Au collisions at RHIC

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. K. Chaudhuri

    2008-06-18T23:59:59.000Z

    We have studied the space-time evolution of minimally viscous ($\\frac{\\eta}{s}$=0.08) QGP fluid, undergoing boost-invariant longitudinal motion and arbitrary transverse expansion. Relaxation equations for the shear stress tensor components, derived from the phenomenological Israel-Stewart's theory of dissipative relativistic fluid, are solved simultaneously with the energy-momentum conservation equations. Comparison of evolution of ideal and viscous fluid, both initialized under the similar conditions, e.g. same equilibration time, energy density and velocity profile, indicate that in viscous fluid, energy density or temperature of the fluid evolve slowly than in an ideal fluid. Transverse expansion is also more in viscous evolution. We have also studied particle production in viscous dynamics. Compared to ideal dynamics, in viscous dynamics, particle yield at high $p_T$ is increased. Elliptic flow on the other hand decreases. Minimally viscous QGP fluid, initialized at entropy density $s_{ini}$=110 $fm^{-3}$ at the initial time $\\tau_i$=0.6 fm, if freeze-out at temperature $T_F$=130 MeV, explains the centrality dependence of $p_T$ spectra of identified particles. Experimental $p_T$ spectra of $\\pi^-$, $K^+$ and protons in 0-5%, 5-10%, 10-20%, 20-30%, 30-40% and 40-50% Au+Au collisions are well reproduced through out the experimental $p_T$ range. This is in contrast to ideal dynamics, where, the spectra are reproduced only up to $p_T\\approx$1.5 GeV. Minimally viscous QGP fluid, also explain the elliptic flow in mid-central (10-20%, 16-23%, 20-30%) collisions. The minimum bias elliptic flow is also explained. However, the model under-predict/over-predict the elliptic flow in very central/peripheral collisions.

  1. Long-wave models of thin film fluid dynamics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. J. Roberts

    1994-11-04T23:59:59.000Z

    Centre manifold techniques are used to derive rationally a description of the dynamics of thin films of fluid. The derived model is based on the free-surface $\\eta(x,t)$ and the vertically averaged horizontal velocity $\\avu(x,t)$. The approach appears to converge well and has significant differences from conventional depth-averaged models.

  2. Effective interactions between fluid membranes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bing-Sui Lu; Rudolf Podgornik

    2015-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A self-consistent theory is proposed for the general problem of interacting undulating fluid membranes subject to the constraint that they do not interpenetrate. The steric constraint is implemented via a representation of the Heaviside function, which enables one to transform it into a novel effective steric potential. The steric potential is found to consist of two contributions: one generated by zero mode fluctuations of the membranes, and the other by thermal bending fluctuations. For membranes of cross-sectional area $S$, we find that the bending fluctuation part scales with the inter-membrane separation $d$ as $d^{-2}$ for $d \\ll \\sqrt{S}$, but crosses over to $d^{-4}$ scaling for $d \\gg \\sqrt{S}$, whereas the zero mode part of the steric potential always scales as $d^{-2}$. For membranes interacting exclusively via the steric potential, we obtain exact nonlinear expressions for the effective interaction potential and for the rms undulation amplitude $\\sigma$, which becomes small at low temperatures $T$ and/or large bending stiffnesses $\\kappa$. Moreover, $\\sigma$ scales as $d$ for $d \\ll \\sqrt{S}$, but saturates at $\\sqrt{k_{{\\rm B}} T S/\\kappa}$ for $d \\gg \\sqrt{S}$. In addition, using variational Gaussian theory, we apply our self-consistent treatment to study inter-membrane interactions subject to three different types of potential: (i)~the Moreira-Netz potential for a pair of strongly charged membranes with an intervening solution of multivalent counterions, (ii)~an attractive square well, (iii)~the Morse potential, and (iv)~a combination of hydration and van der Waals interactions.

  3. Fluid Mechanics IB Lecturer: Dr Natalia Berloff

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    : hydroelectric power, chemical processing, jet-driven cutting tools · our fluid environment: ozone loss, climate

  4. Pitch-catch only ultrasonic fluid densitometer

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Greenwood, Margaret S. (Richland, WA); Harris, Robert V. (Pasco, WA)

    1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The present invention is an ultrasonic fluid densitometer that uses a material wedge and pitch-catch only ultrasonic transducers for transmitting and receiving ultrasonic signals internally reflected within the material wedge. Density of a fluid is determined by immersing the wedge into the fluid and measuring reflection of ultrasound at the wedge-fluid interface.

  5. Fluid&ParticulateSystems 424514/2010

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zevenhoven, Ron

    cake solids mass/m2, w 3. Ruth equation using dw = (1-)solid dx fluidL p Ku solidK )1( 1 resistance, , with cake porosity : velocity, u layer thickness, L pressure drop, p dynamic viscosity, fluid Finland februari 2014 Unit w: kg/m2 Fluid&ParticulateSystems 424514/2010 Fluid&ParticulateSystems ÅA424514

  6. QUALITATIVE REASONING ABOUT FLUIDS AND MECHANICS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Forbus, Kenneth D.

    which include both me- chanical mechanisms and fluids, such as internal combustion engines and hydraulic

  7. UCSD Literature Building Page 1 PCB Sampling Report April 2009

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Krstic, Miroslav

    upon data and information obtained during a single site visit by Aurora Industrial Hygiene (Aurora Shockley, field-level industrial hygienist. The testing was supervised by Karen Shockley, Certified Industrial Hygienist (CIH #6766). Hydraulic fluid samples from the elevator equipment and surface wipe

  8. A new well surveying tool

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Haghighi, Manuchehr Mehdizabeh

    1966-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A NEW WELL SURVEYING TOOL A Thesis By MANUCHEHR MEHDIZABEH HAGHIGHI Submitted to the Graduate College of the Texas ANM University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE Major Subject: PETROLEUM... by Surveying Device for S and 19 , N and 41 . 21 3. Comparison of Measured Angles and Angles Indicated by Surveying Device for NE snd 9 , W and 45 . . . . . . . ~ 22 ABSTRNl T Ever since the advent of rotary drilling the petroleum industry has been...

  9. Method of determining interwell oil field fluid saturation distribution

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Donaldson, Erle C. (Bartlesville, OK); Sutterfield, F. Dexter (Bartlesville, OK)

    1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A method of determining the oil and brine saturation distribution in an oil field by taking electrical current and potential measurements among a plurality of open-hole wells geometrically distributed throughout the oil field. Poisson's equation is utilized to develop fluid saturation distributions from the electrical current and potential measurement. Both signal generating equipment and chemical means are used to develop current flow among the several open-hole wells.

  10. Geothermal Reservoir Well Stimulation Program: technology transfer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1980-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The following are included: review of available data from previous fracturing stimulation operations, stimulation process variables, fracturing fluid design, hydraulic fracture design, stimulation case histories, and selected bibliography. (MHR)

  11. T-F and S/DOE Gladys McCall No. 1 well, Cameron Parish, Louisiana. Geopressured-geothermal well report, Volume II. Well workover and production testing, February 1982-October 1985. Final report. Appendices 1-7

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    These appendices contain the following reports: (1) investigation of coupling failure from the Gladys McCall No. 1 well; (2) failure analysis - oil well casing coupling; (3) technical remedial requirements for 5-inch production tubing string; (4) reservoir limit test data for sand zone No. 9; (5) reservoir fluid study - sand zone No. 9; (6) engineering interpretation of exploration drawdown tests; and (7) reservoir analysis. (ACR)

  12. Method of and apparatus for determining the similarity of a biological analyte from a model constructed from known biological fluids

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Robinson, Mark R. (Albuquerque, NM); Ward, Kenneth J. (Albuquerque, NM); Eaton, Robert P. (Albuquerque, NM); Haaland, David M. (Albuquerque, NM)

    1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The characteristics of a biological fluid sample having an analyte are determined from a model constructed from plural known biological fluid samples. The model is a function of the concentration of materials in the known fluid samples as a function of absorption of wideband infrared energy. The wideband infrared energy is coupled to the analyte containing sample so there is differential absorption of the infrared energy as a function of the wavelength of the wideband infrared energy incident on the analyte containing sample. The differential absorption causes intensity variations of the infrared energy incident on the analyte containing sample as a function of sample wavelength of the energy, and concentration of the unknown analyte is determined from the thus-derived intensity variations of the infrared energy as a function of wavelength from the model absorption versus wavelength function.

  13. Fluid&ParticulateSystems 424514/2010

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zevenhoven, Ron

    fluidr L wDdrag v½bL Lv dxbFF 331 0 . Picture: BMH99 PTG #12;Fluid&ParticulateSystems 424514/2010 Fluid/2010 Fluid&ParticulateSystems ÅA424514/2014 Basic concept wFAw A F VpVpP losscs cs loss losspumppump carlosscar wFP 212121 ,0, ppwwzz F w wFP #12;Fluid&ParticulateSystems 424514/2010 Fluid

  14. Fluid accretion onto relativistic stars and gravitational radiation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alessandro Nagar; Guillermo Diaz

    2004-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

    This article reports results from numerical simulations of the gravitational radiation emitted from nonrotating relativistic stars as a result of the axisymmetric accretion of layers of perfect fluid matter, shaped in the form of quadrupolar shells. We adopt a {\\em hybrid} procedure where we evolve numerically the polar nonspherical perturbations equations of the star coupled to a fully nonlinear hydrodynamics code that calculates the motion of the accreting matter. Self-gravity of the accreting fluid as well as radiation reaction effects are neglected.

  15. Analyzing Aqueous Solution Imbibition into Shale and the Effects of Optimizing Critical Fracturing Fluid Additives 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Plamin, Sammazo Jean-bertrand

    2013-09-29T23:59:59.000Z

    Two methods of hydraulic fracturing most widely utilized on unconventional shale gas and oil reservoirs are “gelled fracturing” and “slick-water fracturing”. Both methods utilize up to several million gallons of water-based fluid per well in a...

  16. Dynamics and microstructure of colloidal complex fluids: a lattice Boltzmann study 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kim, Eunhye

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The lattice Boltzmann (LB) method is a versatile way to model complex fluids with hydrodynamic interactions through solving the Navier-Stokes equations. It is well-known that the role of hydrodynamic interactions is ...

  17. Experimental Assessment of Water Based Drilling Fluids in High Pressure and High Temperature Conditions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ravi, Ashwin

    2012-10-19T23:59:59.000Z

    Proper selection of drilling fluids plays a major role in determining the efficient completion of any drilling operation. With the increasing number of ultra-deep offshore wells being drilled and ever stringent environmental and safety regulations...

  18. Investigation of two-fluid methods for Large Eddy Simulation of spray combustion in Gas Turbines

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Investigation of two-fluid methods for Large Eddy Simulation of spray combustion in Gas Turbines the EL method well suited for gas turbine computations, but RANS with the EE approach may also be found

  19. Well Deepening | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to:Ezfeedflag JumpID-fTri GlobalJump to: navigation,Goff, 2002) |Weedpatch,Welcome NewWell

  20. Production Wells | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere I Geothermal PwerPerkins County, Nebraska:Precourt Institute for EnergyWister|Production Wells (Redirected

  1. Observation Wells | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnual SiteofEvaluatingGroup |JilinLuOpenNorth AmericaNorthwestOakdale Electric CoopWells Jump to:

  2. Geophysical logs from water wells in the Yakima area, Washington

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Biggane, J.H.

    1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The logs include: natural gamma, gamma gamma, neutron neutron, neutron gamma, caliper, fluid temperature, fluid resistivity, wall resistivity, spontaneous potential, and flow meter.

  3. Fluid observers and tilting cosmology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. A. Coley; S. Hervik; W. C. Lim

    2006-05-24T23:59:59.000Z

    We study perfect fluid cosmological models with a constant equation of state parameter $\\gamma$ in which there are two naturally defined time-like congruences, a geometrically defined geodesic congruence and a non-geodesic fluid congruence. We establish an appropriate set of boost formulae relating the physical variables, and consequently the observed quantities, in the two frames. We study expanding spatially homogeneous tilted perfect fluid models, with an emphasis on future evolution with extreme tilt. We show that for ultra-radiative equations of state (i.e., $\\gamma>4/3$), generically the tilt becomes extreme at late times and the fluid observers will reach infinite expansion within a finite proper time and experience a singularity similar to that of the big rip. In addition, we show that for sub-radiative equations of state (i.e., $\\gamma < 4/3$), the tilt can become extreme at late times and give rise to an effective quintessential equation of state. To establish the connection with phantom cosmology and quintessence, we calculate the effective equation of state in the models under consideration and we determine the future asymptotic behaviour of the tilting models in the fluid frame variables using the boost formulae. We also discuss spatially inhomogeneous models and tilting spatially homogeneous models with a cosmological constant.

  4. IDENTIFICATION Your Sample Box

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liskiewicz, Maciej

    to Virginia Tech Soil Testing Lab, 145 Smyth Hall (MC 0465), 185 Ag Quad Ln, Blacksburg VA 24061, in sturdy, K, Ca, Mg, Zn, Mn, Cu, Fe, B, and soluble salts) NoCharge $16.00 Organic Matter $4.00 $6.00 Fax with soil sample and form; make check or money order payable to "Treasurer, Virginia Tech." COST PER SAMPLE

  5. Sampling system and method

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Decker, David L.; Lyles, Brad F.; Purcell, Richard G.; Hershey, Ronald Lee

    2013-04-16T23:59:59.000Z

    The present disclosure provides an apparatus and method for coupling conduit segments together. A first pump obtains a sample and transmits it through a first conduit to a reservoir accessible by a second pump. The second pump further conducts the sample from the reservoir through a second conduit.

  6. Rehabilitation Services Sample Occupations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ronquist, Fredrik

    /Industries Correction Agencies Drug Treatment Centers Addiction Counselor Advocacy Occupations Art Therapist BehavioralRehabilitation Services Sample Occupations Sample Work Settings Child & Day Care Centers Clinics................................ IIB 29-1000 E4 Careers in Counseling and Human Services .........IIB 21-1010 C7 Careers in Health Care

  7. Maxwell's fluid model of magnetism

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Robert Brady; Ross Anderson

    2015-02-20T23:59:59.000Z

    In 1861, Maxwell derived two of his equations of electromagnetism by modelling a magnetic line of force as a `molecular vortex' in a fluid-like medium. Later, in 1980, Berry and colleagues conducted experiments on a `phase vortex', a wave geometry in a fluid which is analogous to a magnetic line of force and also exhibits behaviour corresponding to the quantisation of magnetic flux. Here we unify these approaches by writing down a solution to the equations of motion for a compressible fluid which behaves in the same way as a magnetic line of force. We then revisit Maxwell's historical inspiration, namely Faraday's 1846 model of light as disturbances in lines of force. Using our unified model, we show that such disturbances resemble photons: they are polarised, absorbed discretely, obey Maxwell's full equations of electromagnetism to first order, and quantitatively reproduce the correlation that is observed in the Bell tests.

  8. In-well vapor stripping drilling and characterization work plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Koegler, K.J.

    1994-03-13T23:59:59.000Z

    This work plan provides the information necessary for drilling, sampling, and hydrologic testing of wells to be completed in support of a demonstration of the in-well vapor stripping system. The in-well vapor stripping system is a remediation technology designed to preferentially extract volatile organic compounds (VOCs) from contaminated groundwater by converting them to a vapor phase. Air-lift pumping is used to lift and aerate groundwater within the well. The volatiles escaping the aerated water are drawn off by a slight vacuum and treated at the surface while the water is allowed to infiltrate the vadose zone back to the watertable.

  9. Non-Newtonian fluid flow

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Osinski, Charles Anthony

    1963-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    zero and unity. The Ostwald- de Waele Equation (4), commonly known as the power law, is sometimes used to describe fluid behavior of this type. The rheological equation is (4) where the parameters "k" and "n" are constant for a particular fluid... be extended to include Reynolds numbers and the type of flow determined to be laminar and/or turbulent. It is assumed that the transition from laminar to turbulent flow occurs at a Reynolds number of 2100, the numeric distribution of Reynolds numbers...

  10. DATA QUALITY OBJECTIVES FOR SELECTING WASTE SAMPLES FOR THE BENCH STEAM REFORMER TEST

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    BANNING DL

    2010-08-03T23:59:59.000Z

    This document describes the data quality objectives to select archived samples located at the 222-S Laboratory for Fluid Bed Steam Reformer testing. The type, quantity and quality of the data required to select the samples for Fluid Bed Steam Reformer testing are discussed. In order to maximize the efficiency and minimize the time to treat Hanford tank waste in the Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant, additional treatment processes may be required. One of the potential treatment processes is the fluid bed steam reformer (FBSR). A determination of the adequacy of the FBSR process to treat Hanford tank waste is required. The initial step in determining the adequacy of the FBSR process is to select archived waste samples from the 222-S Laboratory that will be used to test the FBSR process. Analyses of the selected samples will be required to confirm the samples meet the testing criteria.

  11. DECOUPLED TIME STEPPING METHODS FOR FLUID-FLUID INTERACTION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kasman, Alex

    -fluid interaction, atmosphere-ocean, implicit-explicit method. 1. Introduction. The dynamic core in atmosphere-ocean to the coupled system using only (uncoupled) atmosphere and ocean solves, (see e.g. [4, 6, 17, 18, 19 their shared interface I by a rigid-lid coupling condition, i.e. no penetration and a slip with friction

  12. Waste classification sampling plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Landsman, S.D.

    1998-05-27T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this sampling is to explain the method used to collect and analyze data necessary to verify and/or determine the radionuclide content of the B-Cell decontamination and decommissioning waste stream so that the correct waste classification for the waste stream can be made, and to collect samples for studies of decontamination methods that could be used to remove fixed contamination present on the waste. The scope of this plan is to establish the technical basis for collecting samples and compiling quantitative data on the radioactive constituents present in waste generated during deactivation activities in B-Cell. Sampling and radioisotopic analysis will be performed on the fixed layers of contamination present on structural material and internal surfaces of process piping and tanks. In addition, dose rate measurements on existing waste material will be performed to determine the fraction of dose rate attributable to both removable and fixed contamination. Samples will also be collected to support studies of decontamination methods that are effective in removing the fixed contamination present on the waste. Sampling performed under this plan will meet criteria established in BNF-2596, Data Quality Objectives for the B-Cell Waste Stream Classification Sampling, J. M. Barnett, May 1998.

  13. Laser Oil and Gas Well Drilling Demonstration Videos

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    ANL's Laser Applications Laboratory and collaborators are examining the feasibility of adapting high-power laser technology to drilling for gas and oil. The initial phase is designed to establish a scientific basis for developing a commercial laser drilling system and determine the level of gas industry interest in pursuing future research. Using lasers to bore a hole offers an entirely new approach to mechanical drilling. The novel drilling system would transfer light energy from lasers on the surface, down a borehole by a fiber optic bundle, to a series of lenses that would direct the laser light to the rock face. Researchers believe that state-of-the-art lasers have the potential to penetrate rock many times faster than conventional boring technologies - a huge benefit in reducing the high costs of operating a drill rig. Because the laser head does not contact the rock, there is no need to stop drilling to replace a mechanical bit. Moreover, researchers believe that lasers have the ability to melt the rock in a way that creates a ceramic sheath in the wellbore, eliminating the expense of buying and setting steel well casing. A laser system could also contain a variety of downhole sensors, including visual imaging systems that could communicate with the surface through the fiber optic cabling. Earlier studies have been promising, but there is still much to learn. One of the primary objectives of the new study will be to obtain much more precise measurements of the energy requirements needed to transmit light from surface lasers down a borehole with enough power to bore through rocks as much as 20,000 feet or more below the surface. Another objective will be to determine if sending the laser light in sharp pulses, rather than as a continuous stream, could further increase the rate of rock penetration. A third aspect will be to determine if lasers can be used in the presence of drilling fluids. In most wells, thick fluids called "drilling muds" are injected into the borehole to wash out rock cuttings and keep water and other fluids from the underground formations from seeping into the well. The technical challenge will be to determine whether too much laser energy is expended to clear away the fluid where the drilling is occurring. (Copied with editing from http://www.ne.anl.gov/facilities/lal/laser_drilling.html). The demonstration videos, provided here in QuickTime format, are accompanied by patent documents and PDF reports that, together, provide an overall picture of this fascinating project.

  14. Microsoft Word - Proposed Sampling UGTA Wells FY15-19.docx

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilAElectronic Input Options Gary L. Hirsch SNL 2001a, has been classified91-Rev.

  15. Soil Sampling At Salt Wells Area (Henkle, Et Al., 2005) | Open Energy

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghuraji Agro Industries Pvt LtdShawangunk, New York:SiG26588°,Socorro County,Lester

  16. Water Sampling At Salt Wells Area (Coolbaugh, Et Al., 2006) | Open Energy

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to:Ezfeedflag JumpID-fTri GlobalJump to: navigation, searchOpen

  17. Water Sampling At Salt Wells Area (Henkle, Et Al., 2005) | Open Energy

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to:Ezfeedflag JumpID-fTri GlobalJump to: navigation, searchOpenInformation Henkle, Et Al.,

  18. Water Sampling At Salt Wells Area (Shevenell & Garside, 2003) | Open Energy

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to:Ezfeedflag JumpID-fTri GlobalJump to: navigation, searchOpenInformation Henkle, Et

  19. A Mineralogical Petrographic And Geochemical Study Of Samples From Wells In

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to:Ezfeedflag JumpID-fTriWildcat 1 WindtheEnergy Information FlashingEvaluation ||Great

  20. Diffusion Multilayer Sampling of Ground Water in Five Wells at the Tuba

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn't Your Destiny:Revised Finding of No53197E T A * SEnergyTemperatureDepartmentICMECity,

  1. Compressor bleed cooling fluid feed system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Donahoo, Eric E; Ross, Christopher W

    2014-11-25T23:59:59.000Z

    A compressor bleed cooling fluid feed system for a turbine engine for directing cooling fluids from a compressor to a turbine airfoil cooling system to supply cooling fluids to one or more airfoils of a rotor assembly is disclosed. The compressor bleed cooling fluid feed system may enable cooling fluids to be exhausted from a compressor exhaust plenum through a downstream compressor bleed collection chamber and into the turbine airfoil cooling system. As such, the suction created in the compressor exhaust plenum mitigates boundary layer growth along the inner surface while providing flow of cooling fluids to the turbine airfoils.

  2. Recent developments in geothermal drilling fluids

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kelsey, J.R.; Rand, P.B.; Nevins, M.J.; Clements, W.R.; Hilscher, L.W.; Remont, L.J.; Matula, G.W.; Bailey, D.N.

    1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Three recent development efforts are described, aimed at solving some of these drilling fluid problems. The Sandia aqueous foam studies are still in the laboratory phase; NL Baroid's polymeric deflocculant is being field tested; and the Mudtech high temperature mud was field tested several months ago. The aqueous foam studies are aimed at screening available surfactants for temperture and chemical stability. Approximately 100 surfactants have been tested at temperatures of 260/sup 0/C and 310/sup 0/C and several of these candidates appear very promising. A polymeric deflocculant was developed for water-based muds which shows promise in laboratory tests of retarding thermal degradation effects and associated gelation. Formulations containing this new polymer have shown good rheological properties up to 500/sup 0/F. A high temperature mud consisting primarily of sepiolite, bentonite, and brown coal has been developed. A field test of this mud was conducted in a geothermal well in the Imperial Valley of California in May of last year. The fluid exhibited good hole-cleaning characteristics and good rheological properties throughout the test. (MHR)

  3. Meso-scale turbulence in living fluids

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Henricus H. Wensink; Jörn Dunkel; Sebastian Heidenreich; Knut Drescher; Raymond E. Goldstein; Hartmut Löwen; Julia M. Yeomans

    2012-08-21T23:59:59.000Z

    Turbulence is ubiquitous, from oceanic currents to small-scale biological and quantum systems. Self-sustained turbulent motion in microbial suspensions presents an intriguing example of collective dynamical behavior amongst the simplest forms of life, and is important for fluid mixing and molecular transport on the microscale. The mathematical characterization of turbulence phenomena in active non-equilibrium fluids proves even more difficult than for conventional liquids or gases. It is not known which features of turbulent phases in living matter are universal or system-specific, or which generalizations of the Navier-Stokes equations are able to describe them adequately. Here, we combine experiments, particle simulations, and continuum theory to identify the statistical properties of self-sustained meso-scale turbulence in active systems. To study how dimensionality and boundary conditions affect collective bacterial dynamics, we measured energy spectra and structure functions in dense Bacillus subtilis suspensions in quasi-2D and 3D geometries. Our experimental results for the bacterial flow statistics agree well with predictions from a minimal model for self-propelled rods, suggesting that at high concentrations the collective motion of the bacteria is dominated by short-range interactions. To provide a basis for future theoretical studies, we propose a minimal continuum model for incompressible bacterial flow. A detailed numerical analysis of the 2D case shows that this theory can reproduce many of the experimentally observed features of self-sustained active turbulence.

  4. Geopressured-geothermal well report. Volume I. Drilling and completion

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Gladys McCall site activities are covered through the completion of the test well and salt water disposal well. The test well was drilled to a total depth of 16,510 feet, then plugged back to 15,831 feet. Three 4'' diameter diamond cores were taken for analysis. An existing well on site, the Getty-Butts Gladys McCall No. 1, was reentered and completed to a depth of 3514 feet as a salt water disposal well. The geologic interpretation of the Gladys McCall site indicated target sands for testing at 15,080 feet through 15, 831 feet. Reservoir fluid temperature at this depth is estimated to be approximately 313/sup 0/F and pressure is estimated to be +-12,800 psi. The preliminary reservoir volume estimate is 3.6 billion barrels of brine. The design wells program includes environmental monitoring of the Gladys McCall site by Louisiana State University. Field stations are set up to monitor surface and ground water quality, subsidence, land loss and shoreline erosion, and seismicity. As of December 31, 1981 the study shows no significant impact on the environment by site operations.

  5. Sample Changes and Issues

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    EIA-914 Survey and HPDI. Figure 2 shows how this could change apparent production. The blue line shows the reported sample production as it would normally be reported under the...

  6. Water Sample Concentrator

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Idaho National Laboratory

    2010-01-08T23:59:59.000Z

    Automated portable device that concentrates and packages a sample of suspected contaminated water for safe, efficient transport to a qualified analytical laboratory. This technology will help safeguard against pathogen contamination or chemical and biolog

  7. Dissolution actuated sample container

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Nance, Thomas A.; McCoy, Frank T.

    2013-03-26T23:59:59.000Z

    A sample collection vial and process of using a vial is provided. The sample collection vial has an opening secured by a dissolvable plug. When dissolved, liquids may enter into the interior of the collection vial passing along one or more edges of a dissolvable blocking member. As the blocking member is dissolved, a spring actuated closure is directed towards the opening of the vial which, when engaged, secures the vial contents against loss or contamination.

  8. SAMPLING AND ANALYSIS PROTOCOLS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jannik, T; P Fledderman, P

    2007-02-09T23:59:59.000Z

    Radiological sampling and analyses are performed to collect data for a variety of specific reasons covering a wide range of projects. These activities include: Effluent monitoring; Environmental surveillance; Emergency response; Routine ambient monitoring; Background assessments; Nuclear license termination; Remediation; Deactivation and decommissioning (D&D); and Waste management. In this chapter, effluent monitoring and environmental surveillance programs at nuclear operating facilities and radiological sampling and analysis plans for remediation and D&D activities will be discussed.

  9. TANK 5 SAMPLING

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vrettos, N; William Cheng, W; Thomas Nance, T

    2007-11-26T23:59:59.000Z

    Tank 5 at the Savannah River Site has been used to store high level waste and is currently undergoing waste removal processes in preparation for tank closure. Samples were taken from two locations to determine the contents in support of Documented Safety Analysis (DSA) development for chemical cleaning. These samples were obtained through the use of the Drop Core Sampler and the Snowbank Sampler developed by the Engineered Equipment & Systems (EES) group of the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL).

  10. Liquid sampling system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Larson, L.L.

    1984-09-17T23:59:59.000Z

    A conduit extends from a reservoir through a sampling station and back to the reservoir in a closed loop. A jet ejector in the conduit establishes suction for withdrawing liquid from the reservoir. The conduit has a self-healing septum therein upstream of the jet ejector for receiving one end of a double-ended cannula, the other end of which is received in a serum bottle for sample collection. Gas is introduced into the conduit at a gas bleed between the sample collection bottle and the reservoir. The jet ejector evacuates gas from the conduit and the bottle and aspirates a column of liquid from the reservoir at a high rate. When the withdrawn liquid reaches the jet ejector the rate of flow therethrough reduces substantially and the gas bleed increases the pressure in the conduit for driving liquid into the sample bottle, the gas bleed forming a column of gas behind the withdrawn liquid column and interrupting the withdrawal of liquid from the reservoir. In the case of hazardous and toxic liquids, the sample bottle and the jet ejector may be isolated from the reservoir and may be further isolated from a control station containing remote manipulation means for the sample bottle and control valves for the jet ejector and gas bleed. 5 figs.

  11. Liquid sampling system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Larson, Loren L. (Idaho Falls, ID)

    1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A conduit extends from a reservoir through a sampling station and back to the reservoir in a closed loop. A jet ejector in the conduit establishes suction for withdrawing liquid from the reservoir. The conduit has a self-healing septum therein upstream of the jet ejector for receiving one end of a double-ended cannula, the other end of which is received in a serum bottle for sample collection. Gas is introduced into the conduit at a gas bleed between the sample collection bottle and the reservoir. The jet ejector evacuates gas from the conduit and the bottle and aspirates a column of liquid from the reservoir at a high rate. When the withdrawn liquid reaches the jet ejector the rate of flow therethrough reduces substantially and the gas bleed increases the pressure in the conduit for driving liquid into the sample bottle, the gas bleed forming a column of gas behind the withdrawn liquid column and interrupting the withdrawal of liquid from the reservoir. In the case of hazardous and toxic liquids, the sample bottle and the jet ejector may be isolated from the reservoir and may be further isolated from a control station containing remote manipulation means for the sample bottle and control valves for the jet ejector and gas bleed.

  12. INVITATIONAL WELL-TESTING SYMPOSIUM PROCEEDINGS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Authors, Various

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Technology and Needs for Drilling and Well Testing. . . . .AND NEEDS FOR DRILLING AND WELL TESTING INSTRUMENTATIONand Needs for Drilling and Well Testing Instrumentation W.

  13. INVITATIONAL WELL-TESTING SYMPOSIUM PROCEEDINGS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Authors, Various

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Education Course on Well Completion and Stimulation, Feb.to provide a reasonable well completion opportunity. Duringinterpretation and well completion strategy. In addition, a

  14. Visually simulating realistic fluid motion

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Naithani, Priyanka

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    's second law of motion and Conservation of Mass, which leads to the continuity equation. Newton's second law states that the total force F, acting on an element equals mass m times the element's acceleration a. In the case of fluids we do not consider...

  15. Directed flow fluid rinse trough

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kempka, S.N.; Walters, R.N.

    1996-07-02T23:59:59.000Z

    Novel rinse troughs accomplish thorough uniform rinsing. The tanks are suitable for one or more essentially planar items having substantially the same shape. The troughs ensure that each surface is rinsed uniformly. The new troughs also require less rinse fluid to accomplish a thorough rinse than prior art troughs. 9 figs.

  16. Apparatus and method for sealing perforated well casing

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Blount, C.G.; Benham, R.A.; Brock, J.L.; Emerson, J.A.; Ferguson, K.R.; Scheve, D.F.; Schmidt, J.H.; Schuler, K.W.; Stanton, P.L.

    1997-03-25T23:59:59.000Z

    Perforations and other openings in well casings, liners and other conduits may be substantially blocked or sealed to prevent fluid flow between the casing or liner interior and an earth formation by placing a radially expansible sleeve adjacent the perforations or openings and urging the sleeve into forcible engagement with the casing or inner wall using an explosive charge. An apparatus including a radially contracted sleeve formed by a coiled plate member or a tubular member having flutes defined by external and internal folds, may be deployed into a well casing or liner through a production or injection tubing string and on the end of a flexible cable or coilable tubing. An explosive charge disposed on the apparatus and within the sleeve may be detonated to urge the sleeve into forcible engagement with the casing inner wall. 17 figs.

  17. PreparationSampleGuide:StartQuickISX Sample Preparation Guide

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    straining the sample through a 70 micron nylon mesh strainer. If sample aggregation is a problem, we suggest

  18. Geothermal: Sponsored by OSTI -- Testing and sampling procedures...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Testing and sampling procedures for geothermal-compressured wells. Final report Geothermal Technologies Legacy Collection HelpFAQ | Site Map | Contact Us HomeBasic Search About...

  19. Quantifying the stimuli of photorheological fluids

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bates, Sarah Woodring

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We develop a model to predict the dynamics of photorheological fluids and, more generally, photoresponsive fluids for monochromatic and polychromatic light sources. Derived from first principles, the model relates the ...

  20. Fluid Flow Simulation in Fractured Reservoirs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sarkar, Sudipta

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this study is to analyze fluid flow in fractured reservoirs. In most petroleum reservoirs, particularly carbonate reservoirs and some tight sands, natural fractures play a critical role in controlling fluid ...

  1. Fluid Gravity Engineering Rocket motor flow analysis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Anand, Mahesh

    Fluid Gravity Engineering Capability · Rocket motor flow analysis -Internal (performance) -External (plume / contamination) · Effect on landing site (surface alteration) -In-depth flow through porous young scientists/engineers Fluid Gravity Engineering Ltd #12;

  2. Fluid&ParticulateSystems 424514/2010

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zevenhoven, Ron

    size distribution (CSD) and quality #12;Fluid&ParticulateSystems 424514/2010 Fluid solution ­ Selective distribution of impurities between a liquid phase and a solid phase uniformity, purity

  3. Heat Transfer in Complex Fluids

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mehrdad Massoudi

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Amongst the most important constitutive relations in Mechanics, when characterizing the behavior of complex materials, one can identify the stress tensor T, the heat flux vector q (related to heat conduction) and the radiant heating (related to the radiation term in the energy equation). Of course, the expression 'complex materials' is not new. In fact, at least since the publication of the paper by Rivlin & Ericksen (1955), who discussed fluids of complexity (Truesdell & Noll, 1992), to the recently published books (Deshpande et al., 2010), the term complex fluids refers in general to fluid-like materials whose response, namely the stress tensor, is 'non-linear' in some fashion. This non-linearity can manifest itself in variety of forms such as memory effects, yield stress, creep or relaxation, normal-stress differences, etc. The emphasis in this chapter, while focusing on the constitutive modeling of complex fluids, is on granular materials (such as coal) and non-linear fluids (such as coal-slurries). One of the main areas of interest in energy related processes, such as power plants, atomization, alternative fuels, etc., is the use of slurries, specifically coal-water or coal-oil slurries, as the primary fuel. Some studies indicate that the viscosity of coal-water mixtures depends not only on the volume fraction of solids, and the mean size and the size distribution of the coal, but also on the shear rate, since the slurry behaves as shear-rate dependent fluid. There are also studies which indicate that preheating the fuel results in better performance, and as a result of such heating, the viscosity changes. Constitutive modeling of these non-linear fluids, commonly referred to as non-Newtonian fluids, has received much attention. Most of the naturally occurring and synthetic fluids are non-linear fluids, for example, polymer melts, suspensions, blood, coal-water slurries, drilling fluids, mud, etc. It should be noted that sometimes these fluids show Newtonian (linear) behavior for a given range of parameters or geometries; there are many empirical or semi-empirical constitutive equations suggested for these fluids. There have also been many non-linear constitutive relations which have been derived based on the techniques of continuum mechanics. The non-linearities oftentimes appear due to higher gradient terms or time derivatives. When thermal and or chemical effects are also important, the (coupled) momentum and energy equations can give rise to a variety of interesting problems, such as instability, for example the phenomenon of double-diffusive convection in a fluid layer. In Conclusion, we have studied the flow of a compressible (density gradient type) non-linear fluid down an inclined plane, subject to radiation boundary condition. The heat transfer is also considered where a source term, similar to the Arrhenius type reaction, is included. The non-dimensional forms of the equations are solved numerically and the competing effects of conduction, dissipation, heat generation and radiation are discussed. It is observed that the velocity increases rapidly in the region near the inclined surface and is slower in the region near the free surface. Since R{sub 7} is a measure of the heat generation due to chemical reaction, when the reaction is frozen (R{sub 7}=0.0) the temperature distributions would depend only on R{sub 1}, and R{sub 2}, representing the effects of the pressure force developed in the material due to the distribution, R{sub 3} and R{sub 4} viscous dissipation, R{sub 5} the normal stress coefficient, R{sub 6} the measure of the emissivity of the particles to the thermal conductivity, etc. When the flow is not frozen (RP{sub 7} > 0) the temperature inside the flow domain is much higher than those at the inclined and free surfaces. As a result, heat is transferred away from the flow toward both the inclined surface and the free surface with a rate that increases as R{sub 7} increases. For a given temperature, an increase in {zeta} implies that the activation energy is smaller and thus, the reaction ra

  4. Ultrasonic fluid densitometer for process control

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Greenwood, Margaret S. (Richland, WA)

    2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The present invention is an ultrasonic fluid densitometer that uses at least one pair of transducers for transmitting and receiving ultrasonic signals internally reflected within a material wedge. A temperature sensor is provided to monitor the temperature of the wedge material. Density of a fluid is determined by immersing the wedge into the fluid and measuring reflection of ultrasound at the wedge-fluid interface and comparing a transducer voltage and wedge material temperature to a tabulation as a function of density.

  5. Nitrate contents of well, raw, treated and pipe borne water in Vom, Plateau State, Nigeria

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gbodi, T.A.; Atawodi, S.E.

    1987-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Nitrate content of water available to man and animals in a rural community in Plateau State, Nigeria was determined. Water samples were obtained from artesian wells, raw untreated surface water, treated raw water, and pipe borne water. The examination of the samples was over a period of 3 mo at weekly intervals. Sixty percent of the artesian wells sampled had nitrate concentration above 5-50 ppm in June and August, while samples from other sources had less than 1 ppm. The proximity of pit latrines to some of the wells may have been responsible for high nitrate content of the well water.

  6. Contamination of shallow wells in Nigeria from surface contaminant migration

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ademoroti, C.M.A. (Univ. of Benin (Nigeria))

    1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Contaminated wells, located in six south/western and western states of Nigeria, were sampled and analyzed for pollution characteristics. Results of analysis indicated migration of contaminants into the wells from places where there was a potential source. There was a significant microbiological population in the wells placed near domestic waste sites. Also, there were excessive levels of trace heavy metals in those placed near metal dumping sites. On the other hand, the contaminants were minimal in wells that were not close to polluting sources. The studies revealed that groundwater contamination occurred primarily by dumping of wastes, wrong placement of waste disposal facilities, and improper construction of wells. The groundwater sources (wells, etc.) are used when pipe-borne water facilities are inadequate.

  7. Enhanced Geothermal Systems (EGS) well construction technology evaluation report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Capuano, Louis, Jr. (Thermasource Inc.); Huh, Michael; Swanson, Robert (Thermasource Inc.); Raymond, David Wayne; Finger, John Travis; Mansure, Arthur James; Polsky, Yarom; Knudsen, Steven Dell

    2008-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Electricity production from geothermal resources is currently based on the exploitation of hydrothermal reservoirs. Hydrothermal reservoirs possess three ingredients critical to present day commercial extraction of subsurface heat: high temperature, in-situ fluid and high permeability. Relative to the total subsurface heat resource available, hydrothermal resources are geographically and quantitatively limited. A 2006 DOE sponsored study led by MIT entitled 'The Future of Geothermal Energy' estimates the thermal resource underlying the United States at depths between 3 km and 10 km to be on the order of 14 million EJ. For comparison purposes, total U.S. energy consumption in 2005 was 100 EJ. The overwhelming majority of this resource is present in geological formations which lack either in-situ fluid, permeability or both. Economical extraction of the heat in non-hydrothermal situations is termed Enhanced or Engineered Geothermal Systems (EGS). The technologies and processes required for EGS are currently in a developmental stage. Accessing the vast thermal resource between 3 km and 10 km in particular requires a significant extension of current hydrothermal practice, where wells rarely reach 3 km in depth. This report provides an assessment of well construction technology for EGS with two primary objectives: (1) Determining the ability of existing technologies to develop EGS wells. (2) Identifying critical well construction research lines and development technologies that are likely to enhance prospects for EGS viability and improve overall economics. Towards these ends, a methodology is followed in which a case study is developed to systematically and quantitatively evaluate EGS well construction technology needs. A baseline EGS well specification is first formulated. The steps, tasks and tools involved in the construction of this prospective baseline EGS well are then explicitly defined by a geothermal drilling contractor in terms of sequence, time and cost. A task and cost based analysis of the exercise is subsequently conducted to develop a deeper understanding of the key technical and economic drivers of the well construction process. Finally, future research & development recommendations are provided and ranked based on their economic and technical significance.

  8. Fluid Construction Grammar on Real Robots

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Steels, Luc

    Chapter 10 Fluid Construction Grammar on Real Robots Luc Steels1,2, Joachim De Beule3, and Pieter and P. Wellens (2012). Fluid Construction Grammar on Real Robots. In Luc Steels and Manfred Hild (Eds game experiments reported in this book. This framework is called Fluid Construction Grammar (FCG

  9. Fluid&ParticulateSystems 424514/2010

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zevenhoven, Ron

    .zevenhoven@abo.fi 2Fluid&ParticulateSystems 424514/2010 Fluid&ParticulateSystems ÅA424514/2014 2.1 Flow tube sections / Turku Finland RoNz 3 Fluid Flow in Tube Systems loss 2 2 1 pump 2 2 1 ppwzgppwzg outoutoutoutininininloss,311 ' 3 ppzgp 2loss,322 ' 3 ppzgp 210 VVV For a fully developed turbulent flow (horizontal

  10. Harmonic Fluids Changxi Zheng Doug L. James

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Columbia University

    Harmonic Fluids Changxi Zheng Doug L. James Cornell University Abstract Fluid sounds- ing. Furthermore, while offline applications can rely on talented foley artists to "cook up" plausible for vortex-based fluid sounds [Dobashi et al. 2003] and solid bodies [O'Brien et al. 2001; James et al. 2006

  11. SEISMIC MONITORING OF CARBON DIOXIDE FLUID FLOW

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Santos, Juan

    SEISMIC MONITORING OF CARBON DIOXIDE FLUID FLOW J. E. Santos1, G. B. Savioli2, J. M. Carcione3, D´e, Argentina SEISMIC MONITORING OF CARBON DIOXIDE FLUID FLOW ­ p. #12;Introduction. I Storage of CO2). SEISMIC MONITORING OF CARBON DIOXIDE FLUID FLOW ­ p. #12;Introduction. II CO2 is separated from natural

  12. Introduction to Computational Fluid Dynamics 424512 E #1 -rz Introduction to Computational Fluid Dynamics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zevenhoven, Ron

    Introduction to Computational Fluid Dynamics 424512 E #1 - rz Introduction to Computational Fluid Dynamics (iCFD) 424512.0 E, 5 sp / 3 sw 1. Introduction; Fluid dynamics (lecture 1 of 5) Ron Zevenhoven Ã?bo to Computational Fluid Dynamics 424512 E #1 - rz april 2013 Ã?bo Akademi Univ - Thermal and Flow Engineering

  13. INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL FOR NUMERICAL METHODS IN FLUIDS Int. J. Numer. Meth. Fluids 2011; 00:123

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Buscaglia, Gustavo C.

    , magma chambers, fluid­fuel interactions, crude oil recovery, spray cans, sediment transport in riversINTERNATIONAL JOURNAL FOR NUMERICAL METHODS IN FLUIDS Int. J. Numer. Meth. Fluids 2011; 00 for the treatment of discontinuous pressures in multi­fluid flows Roberto F. Ausas1 , Gustavo C. Buscaglia1

  14. An FDTD Method for Analysis of Scattering from Rough FluidFluid Interfaces

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schneider, John B.

    results are presented for fluid­fluid cases modeling water­sediment inter­ faces. Two different roughness speeds in shallow­water sediment bottoms are relatively slow, a fluid­ fluid model is a reasonable to the interface, and a correc­ tion for the numerical dispersion inherent to the FDTD algorithm. Numeri­ cal

  15. Viscous sludge sample collector

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Beitel, George A [Richland, WA

    1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A vertical core sample collection system for viscous sludge. A sample tube's upper end has a flange and is attached to a piston. The tube and piston are located in the upper end of a bore in a housing. The bore's lower end leads outside the housing and has an inwardly extending rim. Compressed gas, from a storage cylinder, is quickly introduced into the bore's upper end to rapidly accelerate the piston and tube down the bore. The lower end of the tube has a high sludge entering velocity to obtain a full-length sludge sample without disturbing strata detail. The tube's downward motion is stopped when its upper end flange impacts against the bore's lower end inwardly extending rim.

  16. Experimental Scattershot Boson Sampling

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Marco Bentivegna; Nicolò Spagnolo; Chiara Vitelli; Fulvio Flamini; Niko Viggianiello; Ludovico Latmiral; Paolo Mataloni; Daniel J. Brod; Ernesto F. Galvão; Andrea Crespi; Roberta Ramponi; Roberto Osellame; Fabio Sciarrino

    2015-05-14T23:59:59.000Z

    Boson Sampling is a computational task strongly believed to be hard for classical computers, but efficiently solvable by orchestrated bosonic interference in a specialised quantum computer. Current experimental schemes, however, are still insufficient for a convincing demonstration of the advantage of quantum over classical computation. A new variation of this task, Scattershot Boson Sampling, leads to an exponential increase in speed of the quantum device, using a larger number of photon sources based on parametric downconversion. This is achieved by having multiple heralded single photons being sent, shot by shot, into different random input ports of the interferometer. Here we report the first Scattershot Boson Sampling experiments, where six different photon-pair sources are coupled to integrated photonic circuits. We employ recently proposed statistical tools to analyse our experimental data, providing strong evidence that our photonic quantum simulator works as expected. This approach represents an important leap toward a convincing experimental demonstration of the quantum computational supremacy.

  17. Annual Logging Symposium, June 21-24, 2009 Wireline and While-Drilling Formation-Tester Sampling with Oval, Focused,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Torres-Verdín, Carlos

    . Extending the existing wireline technology requires a new pumping system capable of removing invasion fluidsSPWLA 50th Annual Logging Symposium, June 21-24, 2009 1 Wireline and While-Drilling Formation about the potential of developing new fluid sampling methods with probe-type formation testers has

  18. DARCY'S FLOW WITH PRESCRIBED CONTACT ANGLE WELL-POSEDNESS AND LUBRICATION APPROXIMATION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    DARCY'S FLOW WITH PRESCRIBED CONTACT ANGLE ­ WELL-POSEDNESS AND LUBRICATION APPROXIMATION HANS KN on a solid sub- strate. We use a model for viscous fluids where evolution is governed by Darcy's Law converge to the solutions of a one-dimensional degenerate parabolic fourth order equation which belongs

  19. The U-tube sampling methodology and real-time analysis of geofluids

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Freifeld, Barry; Perkins, Ernie; Underschultz, James; Boreham, Chris

    2009-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The U-tube geochemical sampling methodology, an extension of the porous cup technique proposed by Wood [1973], provides minimally contaminated aliquots of multiphase fluids from deep reservoirs and allows for accurate determination of dissolved gas composition. The initial deployment of the U-tube during the Frio Brine Pilot CO{sub 2} storage experiment, Liberty County, Texas, obtained representative samples of brine and supercritical CO{sub 2} from a depth of 1.5 km. A quadrupole mass spectrometer provided real-time analysis of dissolved gas composition. Since the initial demonstration, the U-tube has been deployed for (1) sampling of fluids down gradient of the proposed Yucca Mountain High-Level Waste Repository, Armagosa Valley, Nevada (2) acquiring fluid samples beneath permafrost in Nunuvut Territory, Canada, and (3) at a CO{sub 2} storage demonstration project within a depleted gas reservoir, Otway Basin, Victoria, Australia. The addition of in-line high-pressure pH and EC sensors allows for continuous monitoring of fluid during sample collection. Difficulties have arisen during U-tube sampling, such as blockage of sample lines from naturally occurring waxes or from freezing conditions; however, workarounds such as solvent flushing or heating have been used to address these problems. The U-tube methodology has proven to be robust, and with careful consideration of the constraints and limitations, can provide high quality geochemical samples.

  20. Annual Logging Symposium, May 25-28, 2008 COMPARISON OF WIRELINE FORMATION-TESTER SAMPLING

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Torres-Verdín, Carlos

    -TESTER SAMPLING WITH FOCUSED AND CONVENTIONAL PROBES IN THE PRESENCE OF OIL-BASE MUD-FILTRATE INVASION Mayank miscibility with reservoir hydrocarbons. In the course of fluid sampling, varying concentrations of OBM to properly quantify the relative performance of focused and conventional probes for a wide range of field

  1. Selection and Evaluation of a new Pu Density Measurement Fluid

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dziewinska, Krystyna [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Peters, Michael A [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Martinez, Patrick P [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Dziewinski, Jacek J [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Pugmire, David L [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Trujillo, Stephen M [Los Alamos National Laboratory; La Verne, Jake A [UNIV OF NOTRE DAME; Rajesh, P [UNIV OF NOTRE DAME

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper summarizes efforts leading to selection of a new fluid for the determination of the density of large Pu parts. Based on an extended literature search, perfluorotributylamine (FC-43) was chosen for an experimental study. Plutonium coupon corrosion studies were performed by exposing Pu to deaerated and aerated solutions and measuring corrosion gravimetrically. Corrosion rates were determined. Samples of deaerated and aerated perfuluorotributylamine (FC-43) were also irradiated with {sup 60}Co gamma rays (96 Gy/min) to various doses. The samples were extracted with NaOH and analyzed by IC and showed the presence of F and Cl{sup -}. The G-values were established. In surface study experiments Pu coupons were exposed to deaerated and aerated solutions of FC-43 and analyzed by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). The XPS data indicate that there is no detectable surface effect caused by the new fluid. In conclusion the FC-43 was determined to be a very effective and practical fluid for Pu density measurements.

  2. Sampling for Beryllium Surface Contamination using Wet, Dry and Alcohol Wipe Sampling

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kerr, Kent

    2004-12-17T23:59:59.000Z

    This research project was conducted at the National Nuclear Security Administration's Kansas City Plant, operated by Honeywell Federal Manufacturing and Technologies, in conjunction with the Safety Sciences Department of Central Missouri State University, to compare relative removal efficiencies of three wipe sampling techniques currently used at Department of Energy facilities. Efficiencies of removal of beryllium contamination from typical painted surfaces were tested by wipe sampling with dry Whatman 42 filter paper, with water-moistened (Ghost Wipe) materials, and by methanol-moistened wipes. Test plates were prepared using 100 mm X 15 mm Pyrex Petri dishes with interior surfaces spray painted with a bond coat primer. To achieve uniform deposition over the test plate surface, 10 ml aliquots of solution containing 1 beryllium and 0.1 ml of metal working fluid were transferred to the test plates and subsequently evaporated. Metal working fluid was added to simulate the slight oiliness common on surfaces in metal working shops where fugitive oil mist accumulates over time. Sixteen test plates for each wipe method (dry, water, and methanol) were processed and sampled using a modification of wiping patterns recommended by OSHA Method 125G. Laboratory and statistical analysis showed that methanol-moistened wipe sampling removed significantly more (about twice as much) beryllium/oil-film surface contamination as water-moistened wipes (p< 0.001), which removed significantly more (about twice as much) residue as dry wipes (p <0.001). Evidence for beryllium sensitization via skin exposure argues in favor of wipe sampling with wetting agents that provide enhanced residue removal efficiency.

  3. Hydrologic studies in wells open through large intervals

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report describes and summarizes activities, data, and preliminary data interpretation from the INEL Oversight Program R D-1 project titled Hydrologic Studies In Wells Open Through Large Intervals.'' The project is designed to use a straddle-packer system to isolate, hydraulically test, and sample specific intervals of monitoring wells that are open (uncased, unscreened) over large intervals of the Snake River Plain aquifer. The objectives of the project are to determine and compare vertical variations in water quality and aquifer properties that have previously only been determined in an integrated fashion over the entire thickness of the open interval of the observation wells.

  4. Fluidics platform and method for sample preparation and analysis

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Benner, W. Henry; Dzenitis, John M.; Bennet, William J.; Baker, Brian R.

    2014-08-19T23:59:59.000Z

    Herein provided are fluidics platform and method for sample preparation and analysis. The fluidics platform is capable of analyzing DNA from blood samples using amplification assays such as polymerase-chain-reaction assays and loop-mediated-isothermal-amplification assays. The fluidics platform can also be used for other types of assays and analyzes. In some embodiments, a sample in a sealed tube can be inserted directly. The following isolation, detection, and analyzes can be performed without a user's intervention. The disclosed platform may also comprises a sample preparation system with a magnetic actuator, a heater, and an air-drying mechanism, and fluid manipulation processes for extraction, washing, elution, assay assembly, assay detection, and cleaning after reactions and between samples.

  5. Silica recovery and control in Hawaiian geothermal fluids

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thomas, D.M.

    1992-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A series of experiments was performed to investigate methods of controlling silica in waste geothermal brines produced at the HGP-A Generator Facility. Laboratory testing has shown that the rate of polymerization of silica in the geothermal fluids is highly pH dependent. At brine pH values in excess of 8.5 the suspension of silica polymers flocculated and rapidly precipitated a gelatinous silica mass. Optimum flocculation and precipitation rates were achieved at pH values in the range of 10.5 to 11.5. The addition of transition metal salts to the geothermal fluids similarly increased the rate of polymerization as well as the degree of precipitation of the silica polymer from suspension. A series of experiments performed on the recovered silica solids demonstrated that methanol extraction of the water in the gels followed by critical point drying yielded surface areas in excess of 300 M{sup 2}/g and that treatment of the dried solids with 2 N HCl removed most of the adsorbed impurities in the recovered product. A series of experiments tested the response of the waste brines to mixing with steam condensate and non-condensable gases.The results demonstrated that the addition of condensate and NCG greatly increased the stability of the silica in the geothermal brines. They also indicated that the process could reduce the potential for plugging of reinjection wells receiving waste geothermal fluids from commercial geothermal facilities in Hawaii. Conceptual designs were proposed to apply the gas re-combination approach to the disposal of geothermal waste fluids having a range of chemical compositions. Finally, these designs were applied to the geothermal fluid compositions found at Cerro Prieto, Ahuachapan, and Salton Sea.

  6. Silica recovery and control in Hawaiian geothermal fluids. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thomas, D.M.

    1992-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A series of experiments was performed to investigate methods of controlling silica in waste geothermal brines produced at the HGP-A Generator Facility. Laboratory testing has shown that the rate of polymerization of silica in the geothermal fluids is highly pH dependent. At brine pH values in excess of 8.5 the suspension of silica polymers flocculated and rapidly precipitated a gelatinous silica mass. Optimum flocculation and precipitation rates were achieved at pH values in the range of 10.5 to 11.5. The addition of transition metal salts to the geothermal fluids similarly increased the rate of polymerization as well as the degree of precipitation of the silica polymer from suspension. A series of experiments performed on the recovered silica solids demonstrated that methanol extraction of the water in the gels followed by critical point drying yielded surface areas in excess of 300 M{sup 2}/g and that treatment of the dried solids with 2 N HCl removed most of the adsorbed impurities in the recovered product. A series of experiments tested the response of the waste brines to mixing with steam condensate and non-condensable gases.The results demonstrated that the addition of condensate and NCG greatly increased the stability of the silica in the geothermal brines. They also indicated that the process could reduce the potential for plugging of reinjection wells receiving waste geothermal fluids from commercial geothermal facilities in Hawaii. Conceptual designs were proposed to apply the gas re-combination approach to the disposal of geothermal waste fluids having a range of chemical compositions. Finally, these designs were applied to the geothermal fluid compositions found at Cerro Prieto, Ahuachapan, and Salton Sea.

  7. Environmental Science: Sample Pathway

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Goldberg, Bennett

    Environmental Science: Sample Pathway Semester I Semester II Freshman Year CGS Core CGS Core GE 100 & 124) MA 115 Statistics Summer Environmental Internship Junior Year CH 171 Chem for Health Sciences CH in Environmental Sciences is 17 courses. Courses taken to satisfy CAS major requirements (required, principal, core

  8. Fluid dynamics on sieve trays

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hag, M.A.

    1982-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A study was conducted to investigate the effects of fluid properties on the hydrodynamics of sieve tray columns. The study showed that changes in liquid viscosity influenced froth height, while changes in liquid surface tension and density influenced total pressure drop across the trays. Liquid holdup was independent of these solution properties. The liquid systems used for the study were: water/glycerol for viscosity, water/ethanol for surface tension and methanol/chloroform for density.

  9. Completion Report for Well ER-2-1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bechtel Nevada

    2004-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Well ER-2-1 was drilled for the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office (formerly Nevada Operations Office), in support of the Nevada Environmental Restoration Project at the Nevada Test Site, Nye County, Nevada. This well was drilled in February and March of 2003, as part of a hydrogeologic investigation program for the Yucca Flat/Climax Mine Corrective Action Unit in the northeastern portion of the Nevada Test Site. Well ER-2-1 was drilled as part of the Yucca Flat Corrective Action Unit Phase I drilling initiative. The well is located in north central Yucca Flat within Area 2 of the Nevada Test Site, and provided information regarding the radiological and physical environment near underground nuclear tests conducted in a saturated volcanic aquifer setting. Detailed lithologic descriptions with stratigraphic assignments are included in this report. These are based on composite drill cuttings collected every 3 meters and 83 sidewall samples taken at various depths between 113.7 and 754.4 meters, supplemented by geophysical log data. Detailed petrographic, chemical, and mineralogical studies of rock samples were conducted on 27 samples of drill cuttings. The well was collared in tuffaceous alluvium, and penetrated Tertiary-age tuffs of the Timber Mountain and Paintbrush Groups, Calico Hills and Wahmonie Formations, Crater Flat Group, Grouse Canyon Formation, before reaching total depth in the Tunnel Bed Formation.

  10. Spatially indirect excitons in coupled quantum wells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lai, Chih-Wei Eddy

    2004-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Microscopic quantum phenomena such as interference or phase coherence between different quantum states are rarely manifest in macroscopic systems due to a lack of significant correlation between different states. An exciton system is one candidate for observation of possible quantum collective effects. In the dilute limit, excitons in semiconductors behave as bosons and are expected to undergo Bose-Einstein condensation (BEC) at a temperature several orders of magnitude higher than for atomic BEC because of their light mass. Furthermore, well-developed modern semiconductor technologies offer flexible manipulations of an exciton system. Realization of BEC in solid-state systems can thus provide new opportunities for macroscopic quantum coherence research. In semiconductor coupled quantum wells (CQW) under across-well static electric field, excitons exist as separately confined electron-hole pairs. These spatially indirect excitons exhibit a radiative recombination time much longer than their thermal relaxation time a unique feature in direct band gap semiconductor based structures. Their mutual repulsive dipole interaction further stabilizes the exciton system at low temperature and screens in-plane disorder more effectively. All these features make indirect excitons in CQW a promising system to search for quantum collective effects. Properties of indirect excitons in CQW have been analyzed and investigated extensively. The experimental results based on time-integrated or time-resolved spatially-resolved photoluminescence (PL) spectroscopy and imaging are reported in two categories. (i) Generic indirect exciton systems: general properties of indirect excitons such as the dependence of exciton energy and lifetime on electric fields and densities were examined. (ii) Quasi-two-dimensional confined exciton systems: highly statistically degenerate exciton systems containing more than tens of thousands of excitons within areas as small as (10 micrometer){sup 2} were observed. The spatial and energy distributions of optically active excitons were used as thermodynamic quantities to construct a phase diagram of the exciton system, demonstrating the existence of distinct phases. Optical and electrical properties of the CQW sample were examined thoroughly to provide deeper understanding of the formation mechanisms of these cold exciton systems. These insights offer new strategies for producing cold exciton systems, which may lead to opportunities for the realization of BEC in solid-state systems.

  11. Hydrostatic bearings for a turbine fluid flow metering device

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Fincke, James R. (Rigby, ID)

    1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A rotor assembly fluid metering device has been improved by development of a hydrostatic bearing fluid system which provides bearing fluid at a common pressure to rotor assembly bearing surfaces. The bearing fluid distribution system produces a uniform film of fluid between bearing surfaces and allows rapid replacement of bearing fluid between bearing surfaces, thereby minimizing bearing wear and corrosion.

  12. Hydrostatic bearings for a turbine fluid flow metering device

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Fincke, J.R.

    1982-05-04T23:59:59.000Z

    A rotor assembly fluid metering device has been improved by development of a hydrostatic bearing fluid system which provides bearing fluid at a common pressure to rotor assembly bearing surfaces. The bearing fluid distribution system produces a uniform film of fluid between bearing surfaces and allows rapid replacement of bearing fluid between bearing surfaces, thereby minimizing bearing wear and corrosion. 3 figs.

  13. Locomotion in complex fluids: Integral theorems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Eric Lauga

    2014-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The biological fluids encountered by self-propelled cells display complex microstructures and rheology. We consider here the general problem of low-Reynolds number locomotion in a complex fluid. {Building on classical work on the transport of particles in viscoelastic fluids,} we demonstrate how to mathematically derive three integral theorems relating the arbitrary motion of an isolated organism to its swimming kinematics {in a non-Newtonian fluid}. These theorems correspond to three situations of interest, namely (1) squirming motion in a linear viscoelastic fluid, (2) arbitrary surface deformation in a weakly non-Newtonian fluid, and (3) small-amplitude deformation in an arbitrarily non-Newtonian fluid. Our final results, valid for a wide-class of {swimmer geometry,} surface kinematics and constitutive models, at most require mathematical knowledge of a series of Newtonian flow problems, and will be useful to quantity the locomotion of biological and synthetic swimmers in complex environments.

  14. Synthetic drill-in fluid for gravel packing depleted sands and pressured shale

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ali, S.; Griffith, G. [Chevron USA Production Co., New Orleans, LA (United States); Jones, T.; Hinojosa, R. [Baker Hughes INTEQ, Houston, TX (United States); Smejkal, K. [Baker Oil Tools, Houston, TX (United States)

    1999-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Weighted synthetic- or oil-base drill-in fluids offer an excellent solution to the problem of reactive, pressured shale. However, some operators remain uneasy about drilling into a reservoir with an invert emulsion drill-in fluid. This apprehension is partly due to the possibility of creating emulsion blocks or changing the rock matrix wettability. Either of these conditions may reduce the crude`s mobility by restricting flow. This formation damage is avoided with water-base drill-in fluids, but the borehole stability problem remains an issue. A synthetic drill-in fluid`s ability to stabilize reactive shales is well documented. There remains a concern that once reactive shales are exposed to completion brine, the inhibition imparted by a synthetic fluid is lost. If lost, the shale particles could spall (slough) freely into the wellbore, plugging the screens and resulting in an incomplete gravel placement. Another concern is the effective displacement of the synthetic fluid to the completion brine without creating undesirable emulsions and damaging the integrity of the synthetic-fluid filter cake. The key appears to be selecting a spacer system that prevents formation of viscous emulsions at the interfaces and would not aggressively attack the wellbore filter cake. The paper describes laboratory evaluation, simulated core tests, test results, a field case history in the South Timbalier field offshore Louisiana, and lessons learned.

  15. Sampling Free Energy Surfaces as Slices by Combining Umbrella Sampling and Metadynamics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kapil, Venkat; Nair, Nisanth N

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Metadynamics (MTD) is a very powerful technique to sample high--dimensional free energy landscapes, and due to its self--guiding property, the method has been successful in studying complex reactions and conformational changes.MTD sampling is based on filling the free energy basins by biasing potentials and thus for cases with flat, broad and unbound free energy wells, the computational time to sample them becomes very large.To alleviate this problem, we propose a scheme, named Well--Sliced MTD (WS--MTD), where we combine the standard Umbrella Sampling (US) technique with MTD to sample orthogonal collective variables (CVs) in a simultaneous way. Within this scheme, we construct the equilibrium distribution of CVs from biased distributions obtained from independent MTD simulations with umbrella potentials. Reweighting is carried out by a procedure that combines US reweighting and Tiwary-Parrinello metadynamics reweighting within the Weighted Histogram Analysis Method (WHAM). WS--MTD will be an ideal strategy f...

  16. Health and Wellness Guide for Students Introduction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    dimensions of health and wellness. The 7 dimensions are: Physical Wellness ­ Taking care of your body Wellness ­ Taking care of what's around you 2Health andWellness Guide for Students #12;Physical Wellness · Communicate with your partner if you have questions or concerns · Meet with a Health Care Provider on campus

  17. On equivalence of high temperature series expansion and coupling parameter series expansion in thermodynamic perturbation theory of fluids

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sai Venkata Ramana, A., E-mail: asaivenk@barc.gov.in [Theoretical Physics Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai 400 085 (India)

    2014-04-21T23:59:59.000Z

    The coupling parameter series expansion and the high temperature series expansion in the thermodynamic perturbation theory of fluids are shown to be equivalent if the interaction potential is pairwise additive. As a consequence, for the class of fluids with the potential having a hardcore repulsion, if the hard-sphere fluid is chosen as reference system, the terms of coupling parameter series expansion for radial distribution function, direct correlation function, and Helmholtz free energy follow a scaling law with temperature. The scaling law is confirmed by application to square-well fluids.

  18. ULTimateCO2 project: Field experiment in an underground rock laboratory to study the well sealing integrity in the context of CO2 geological storage

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    located at the surface. The long term well sealing integrity is therefore essential for the fluids confinements. The well sealing integrity can be lowered by geochemical reactions occurring between well the cement matrix. Understanding the near well sealing integrity then requires studying the potential

  19. Constraining the Lattice Fluid Dark Energy from SNe Ia, BAO and OHD

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Duan, Xiaoxian; Gao, Changjun

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Sanchez and Lacombe have ever developed a lattice fluid theory based on a well-defined statistical mechanical model. Taking the lattice fluid as a candidate of dark energy, we investigate the cosmic evolution of this fluid. Using the combined observational data of Type Ia Supernova (SNe Ia), Baryon Acoustic Oscillations (BAO) and Observational Hubble Data (OHD), we find the best fit value of the parameter in the model, $A = -0.3_{-0.1}^{+0.1}$. Then the cosmological implications of the model are presented.

  20. Constraining the Lattice Fluid Dark Energy from SNe Ia, BAO and OHD

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Xiaoxian Duan; Yichao Li; Changjun Gao

    2011-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Sanchez and Lacombe have ever developed a lattice fluid theory based on a well-defined statistical mechanical model. Taking the lattice fluid as a candidate of dark energy, we investigate the cosmic evolution of this fluid. Using the combined observational data of Type Ia Supernova (SNe Ia), Baryon Acoustic Oscillations (BAO) and Observational Hubble Data (OHD), we find the best fit value of the parameter in the model, $A = -0.3_{-0.1}^{+0.1}$. Then the cosmological implications of the model are presented.

  1. Zero Discharge Water Management for Horizontal Shale Gas Well Development

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Paul Ziemkiewicz; Jennifer Hause; Raymond Lovett; David Locke Harry Johnson; Doug Patchen

    2012-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Hydraulic fracturing technology (fracking), coupled with horizontal drilling, has facilitated exploitation of huge natural gas (gas) reserves in the Devonian-age Marcellus Shale Formation (Marcellus) of the Appalachian Basin. The most-efficient technique for stimulating Marcellus gas production involves hydraulic fracturing (injection of a water-based fluid and sand mixture) along a horizontal well bore to create a series of hydraulic fractures in the Marcellus. The hydraulic fractures free the shale-trapped gas, allowing it to flow to the well bore where it is conveyed to pipelines for transport and distribution. The hydraulic fracturing process has two significant effects on the local environment. First, water withdrawals from local sources compete with the water requirements of ecosystems, domestic and recreational users, and/or agricultural and industrial uses. Second, when the injection phase is over, 10 to 30% of the injected water returns to the surface. This water consists of flowback, which occurs between the completion of fracturing and gas production, and produced water, which occurs during gas production. Collectively referred to as returned frac water (RFW), it is highly saline with varying amounts of organic contamination. It can be disposed of, either by injection into an approved underground injection well, or treated to remove contaminants so that the water meets the requirements of either surface release or recycle use. Depending on the characteristics of the RFW and the availability of satisfactory disposal alternatives, disposal can impose serious costs to the operator. In any case, large quantities of water must be transported to and from well locations, contributing to wear and tear on local roadways that were not designed to handle the heavy loads and increased traffic. The search for a way to mitigate the situation and improve the overall efficiency of shale gas production suggested a treatment method that would allow RFW to be used as make-up water for successive fracs. RFW, however, contains dissolved salts, suspended sediment and oils that may interfere with fracking fluids and/or clog fractures. This would lead to impaired well productivity. The major technical constraints to recycling RFW involves: identification of its composition, determination of industry standards for make-up water, and development of techniques to treat RFW to acceptable levels. If large scale RFW recycling becomes feasible, the industry will realize lower transportation and disposal costs, environmental conflicts, and risks of interruption in well development schedules.

  2. Stirling engine performance optimization with different working fluids

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Daley, J.G.; Marr, W.W.; Heames, T.J.

    1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The design flexibility of Stirling cycle devices is evident from the wide variety of mechanical configurations that have been developed as well as the many differing applications that have been shown to be technically feasible. The choice of working fluid is one option that strongly influences engine design. Hydrogen permits the most compact engine (for a given power output and efficiency) of any gaseous working fluid investigated and has therefore been the choice in Stirling development programs directed at the automotive application where engine size is a major concern. Systems using helium or air are presently under development for applications where size is not as important a consideration. This paper describes calculated characteristics of engines optimized for four working fluids (hydrogen, helium, air and methane). A comparison is given between engines whose exterior dimensions are minimized and with lower rpm, lower pressure engine designs calculated by maximizing the dimensionless parameter known as the Beale number. Design point power and efficiency are the same in the resulting eight conceptual designs but great variation is shown in engine characteristics due both to working fluid differences and to the two different design objectives. 5 refs., 7 figs., 5 tabs.

  3. Rotational viscometer for high-pressure high-temperature fluids

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Carr, Kenneth R. (Knoxville, TN)

    1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The invention is a novel rotational viscometer which is well adapted for use with fluids at high temperatures and/or pressures. In one embodiment, the viscometer includes a substantially non-magnetic tube having a closed end and having an open end in communication with a fluid whose viscosity is to be determined. An annular drive magnet is mounted for rotation about the tube. The tube encompasses and supports a rotatable shaft assembly which carries a rotor, or bob, for insertion in the fluid. Affixed to the shaft are (a) a second magnet which is magnetically coupled to the drive magnet and (b) a third magnet. In a typical operation, the drive magnet is rotated to turn the shaft assembly while the shaft rotor is immersed in the fluid. The viscous drag on the rotor causes the shaft assembly to lag the rotation of the drive magnet by an amount which is a function of the amount of viscous drag. A first magnetic pickup generates a waveform whose phase is a function of the angular position of the drive magnet. A second magnetic pickup generates a waveform whose phase is a function of the angular position of the third magnet. An output is generated indicative of the phase difference between the two waveforms.

  4. From: Numerical Grid Generation in Computational Fluid Dynamics and Related Fields, ed. B. K. Soni, J. F. Thompson, H. Hausser and P. R.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gable, Carl W.

    From: Numerical Grid Generation in Computational Fluid Dynamics and Related Fields, ed. B. K. Soni. Press, 1996. 3-Dimensional Wells and Tunnels for Finite Element Grids 1 3-Dimensional Wells and Tunnels for Finite Element Grids Terry A. Cherry1 Carl W. Gable1 Harold Trease2 ABSTRACT Modeling fluid, vapor

  5. Oil and Gas Wells: Regulatory Provisions (Kansas)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    It shall be unlawful for any person, firm or corporation having possession or control of any natural gas well, oil well or coalbed natural gas well, whether as a contractor, owner, lessee, agent or...

  6. Industry survey for horizontal wells. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wilson, D.D.; Kaback, D.S. [CDM Federal Programs Corp., Denver, CO (United States); Denhan, M.E. [Westinghouse Savannah River Co., Aiken, SC (United States); Watkins, D. [CDM Federal Programs Corp., Aiken, SC (United States)

    1993-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An international survey of horizontal environmental wells was performed during May and June of 1993. The purpose of the survey was to provide the environmental industry with an inventory of horizontal environmental wells and information pertaining to the extent of the use of horizontal environmental wells, the variety of horizontal environmental well applications, the types of geologic and hydrogeologic conditions within which horizontal environmental wells have been installed, and the companies that perform horizontal environmental well installations. Other information, such as the cost of horizontal environmental well installations and the results of tests performed on the wells, is not complete but is provided as general information with the caveat that the information should not be used to compare drilling companies. The result of the survey is a catalogue of horizontal environmental wells that are categorized by the objective or use of the wells, the vertical depth of the wells, and the drilling company contracted to install the wells.

  7. New multilateral well architecture in heterogeneous reservoirs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jia, Hongqiao

    2004-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    . The performance of new multilateral well in heterogeneous reservoirs is studied, and that is compared with vertical well architecture also. In order to study the productivity of new multilateral wells, we use a numerical simulation method to set up heterogeneous...

  8. Acid Fracture and Fracture Conductivity Study of Field Rock Samples

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Underwood, Jarrod

    2013-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    (Black and Hower 1965). Clays consist of negatively charged aluminosilicate layers kept together by cations. The most characteristic property is their ability to adsorb water between the layers, resulting in strong repulsive forces and clay expansion... chemicals used in water fracturing such as friction reducers, fluid-loss additives, and surfactants (Black and Hower 1965). The samples used in this study had significant clay-like content. To prevent swelling, a 2% KCl solution was used throughout...

  9. Research on drilling fluids and cement slurries at Standard Oil Production Company: an internship report 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Flipse, Eugene Charles, 1956-

    2013-03-13T23:59:59.000Z

    as reasonably valuable resources. A slightly different vendor seminar was provided by International Drilling Fluids (IDF). IDF had been invited to give a presentation on a specific drilling fluid for use on a specific well. IDF employed more indirect sales... with some of the other software packages such as data base managers and spreadsheets to determine if they would meet our software needs. ADMINISTRATIVE SERVICES As mentioned previously, I was the junior member of a two person operating group...

  10. Parametric study to evaluate benefits of fracture fluid quality control and in-situ stress research

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Satayapunt, Jeeradete

    1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    to evaluate the benefits of the GRI research using a data set for an "average" well. Results of that study indicated that the money invested in fluid quality control and in-situ stress measurements will yield a positive return on the investment...PARAMETRIC STUDY TO EVALUATE BENEFITS OF FRACTURE FLUID QUALITY CONTROL AND IN-SITU STRESS RESEARCH A Thesis by JEERADETE SATAYAPUNT Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment...

  11. IMPROVED NATURAL GAS STORAGE WELL REMEDIATION

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    James C. Furness; Donald O. Johnson; Michael L. Wilkey; Lynn Furness; Keith Vanderlee; P. David Paulsen

    2001-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report summarizes the research conducted during Budget Period One on the project ''Improved Natural Gas Storage Well Remediation''. The project team consisted of Furness-Newburge, Inc., the technology developer; TechSavants, Inc., the technology validator; and Nicor Technologies, Inc., the technology user. The overall objectives for the project were: (1) To develop, fabricate and test prototype laboratory devices using sonication and underwater plasma to remove scale from natural gas storage well piping and perforations; (2) To modify the laboratory devices into units capable of being used downhole; (3) To test the capability of the downhole units to remove scale in an observation well at a natural gas storage field; (4) To modify (if necessary) and field harden the units and then test the units in two pressurized injection/withdrawal gas storage wells; and (5) To prepare the project's final report. This report covers activities addressing objectives 1-3. Prototype laboratory units were developed, fabricated, and tested. Laboratory testing of the sonication technology indicated that low-frequency sonication was more effective than high-frequency (ultrasonication) at removing scale and rust from pipe sections and tubing. Use of a finned horn instead of a smooth horn improves energy dispersal and increases the efficiency of removal. The chemical data confirmed that rust and scale were removed from the pipe. The sonication technology showed significant potential and technical maturity to warrant a field test. The underwater plasma technology showed a potential for more effective scale and rust removal than the sonication technology. Chemical data from these tests also confirmed the removal of rust and scale from pipe sections and tubing. Focusing of the underwater plasma's energy field through the design and fabrication of a parabolic shield will increase the technology's efficiency. Power delivered to the underwater plasma unit by a sparkplug repeatedly was interrupted by sparkplug failure. The lifecycle for the plugs was less than 10 hours. An electrode feed system for delivering continuous power needs to be designed and developed. As a result, further work on the underwater plasma technology was terminated. It needs development of a new sparking system and a redesign of the pulsed power supply system to enable the unit to operate within a well diameter of less than three inches. Both of these needs were beyond the scope of the project. Meanwhile, the laboratory sonication unit was waterproofed and hardened, enabling the unit to be used as a field prototype, operating at temperatures to 350 F and depths of 15,000 feet. The field prototype was extensively tested at a field service company's test facility before taking it to the field site. The field test was run in August 2001 in a Nicor Gas storage field observation well at Pontiac, Illinois. Segmented bond logs, gamma ray neutron logs, water level measurements and water chemistry samples were obtained before and after the downhole demonstration. Fifteen tests were completed in the field. Results from the water chemistry analysis showed an increase in the range of calcium from 1755-1984 mg/l before testing to 3400-4028 mg/l after testing. For magnesium, the range increased from 285-296 mg/l to 461-480 mg/l. The change in pH from a range of 3.11-3.25 to 8.23-8.45 indicated a buffering of the acidic well water, probably due to the increased calcium available for buffering. The segmented bond logs showed no damage to the cement bond in the well and the gamma ray neutron log showed no increase in the amount of hydrocarbons present in the formation where the testing took place. Thus, the gas storage bubble in the aquifer was not compromised. A review of all the field test data collected documents the fact that the application of low-frequency sonication technology definitely removes scale from well pipe. Phase One of this project took sonication technology from the concept stage through a successful ''proof-of-concept'' downhole application in a natural gas storage field

  12. Characterization of sampling cyclones

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Moore, Murray Edward

    1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Farland, who' provided an excellent opportunity for the enhancement of my engineering career. To Dr. Best for his patient snd competent assistance in this project. To Dr. Parish who gave his service to my graduate committee. To Bob DeOtte and Carlos Ortiz... in air sampling standards, several different samplers have been developed which utilize either inertial impaction or cyclonic flow fractionation techniques. For example, a 10 pm cutpoint size selective inlet was developed by McFarland, Ortiz...

  13. Multiple source/multiple target fluid transfer apparatus

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Turner, Terry D. (Idaho Falls, ID)

    1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A fluid transfer apparatus includes: a) a plurality of orifices for connection with fluid sources; b) a plurality of orifices for connection with fluid targets; c) a set of fluid source conduits and fluid target conduits associated with the orifices; d) a pump fluidically interposed between the source and target conduits to transfer fluid therebetween; e) a purge gas conduit in fluid communication with the fluid source conduits, fluid target conduits and pump to receive and pass a purge gas under pressure; f) a solvent conduit in fluid communication with the fluid source conduits, fluid target conduits and pump to receive and pass solvent, the solvent conduit including a solvent valve; g) pump control means for controlling operation of the pump; h) purge gas valve control means for controlling operation of the purge gas valve to selectively impart flow of purge gas to the fluid source conduits, fluid target conduits and pump; i) solvent valve control means for controlling operation of the solvent valve to selectively impart flow of solvent to the fluid source conduits, fluid target conduits and pump; and j) source and target valve control means for controlling operation of the fluid source conduit valves and the fluid target conduit valves to selectively impart passage of fluid between a selected one of the fluid source conduits and a selected one of the fluid target conduits through the pump and to enable passage of solvent or purge gas through selected fluid source conduits and selected fluid target conduits.

  14. Completion Report for Well ER-8-1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bechtel Nevada

    2004-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Well ER-8-1 was drilled for the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office in support of the Nevada Environmental Restoration Project at the Nevada Test Site, Nye County, Nevada. This well was drilled in October and November of 2002 as part of a Hydrogeologic investigation program for the Yucca Flat/Climax Mine Corrective Action Unit in the northeastern portion of the Nevada Test Site. Well ER-8-1 is located at the north end of Yucca Flat approximately 580 meters south-southeast of the surface exposure of the Climax granitic intrusive. Detailed lithologic descriptions with stratigraphic assignments are included in this report. These are based on composite drill cuttings samples collected every 3 meters, and 21 sidewall samples taken at various depths between 351.1 and 573.0 meters, supplemented by incomplete geophysical log data. Detailed petrographic, geochemical, and mineralogical studies of rock samples were conducted on 22 samples of drill cuttings. Drilling began in tuffaceous alluvium, and the borehole penetrated Tertiary age bedded tuffs of the Volcanics of Oak Spring Butte and carbonate sediments of Paleozoic age, which were encountered at a depth of 334 meters. The borehole unexpectedly penetrated granite at the depth of 538.9 meters in which drilling was stopped. Contact metamorphic rocks and intrusive dikes associated with the Cretaceous-age granitic intrusive and at least one significant fault zone were encountered.

  15. EML Surface Air Sampling Program, 1989 data

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Larsen, R.J.; Sanderson, C.G.

    1991-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Measurements of the concentrations of specific atmospheric radionuclides in air filter samples collected for the Environmental Measurements Laboratory`s Surface Air Sampling Program (SASP) during 1989 indicate that anthropogenic radionuclides, in both hemispheres, were at or below the lower limits of detection for the analytical and sampling techniques that were used to measure them. During 1989, the occasional detection of {sup 137}Cs in some air filter samples may have resulted from resuspension of previously deposited debris. The naturally occurring radioisotopes that we measure, {sup 7}Be and {sup 210}Pb, continue to be detected in most air filter samples. The 1989 annual mean concentrations of {sup 7}Be at many of the sites were lower than those previously reported during the last decade. Possible changes in the atmospheric production of {sup 7}Be, variations in atmospheric circulation and precipitation patterns, as well as modifications to our sampling procedure many all have contributed to this observed trend. Short-term variations in the concentrations of {sup 7}Be and {sup 210}Pb continued to be observed at many sites at which weekly air filter samples were analyzed. These short-term fluctuations probably resulted from variations in meteorological factors. The data from our quality control samples indicate that the reliability of the air filter measurements are acceptable for their intended application.

  16. EML Surface Air Sampling Program, 1989 data

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Larsen, R.J.; Sanderson, C.G.

    1991-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Measurements of the concentrations of specific atmospheric radionuclides in air filter samples collected for the Environmental Measurements Laboratory's Surface Air Sampling Program (SASP) during 1989 indicate that anthropogenic radionuclides, in both hemispheres, were at or below the lower limits of detection for the analytical and sampling techniques that were used to measure them. During 1989, the occasional detection of {sup 137}Cs in some air filter samples may have resulted from resuspension of previously deposited debris. The naturally occurring radioisotopes that we measure, {sup 7}Be and {sup 210}Pb, continue to be detected in most air filter samples. The 1989 annual mean concentrations of {sup 7}Be at many of the sites were lower than those previously reported during the last decade. Possible changes in the atmospheric production of {sup 7}Be, variations in atmospheric circulation and precipitation patterns, as well as modifications to our sampling procedure many all have contributed to this observed trend. Short-term variations in the concentrations of {sup 7}Be and {sup 210}Pb continued to be observed at many sites at which weekly air filter samples were analyzed. These short-term fluctuations probably resulted from variations in meteorological factors. The data from our quality control samples indicate that the reliability of the air filter measurements are acceptable for their intended application.

  17. Functionalized Graphene Nanoroads for Quantum Well Device. |...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Nanoroads for Quantum Well Device. Functionalized Graphene Nanoroads for Quantum Well Device. Abstract: Using density functional theory, a series of calculations of structural and...

  18. Post-Award Deliverables Sample (Second Part of Sample Deliverables...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    samplereptgrqmts.doc More Documents & Publications ESPC Sample Deliverables for Task Orders (IDIQ Attachment. J-4) Sample Statement of Work - Standard Service Offerings for...

  19. Experimental and Sampling Design for the INL-2 Sample Collection Operational Test

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Piepel, Gregory F.; Amidan, Brett G.; Matzke, Brett D.

    2009-02-16T23:59:59.000Z

    This report describes the experimental and sampling design developed to assess sampling approaches and methods for detecting contamination in a building and clearing the building for use after decontamination. An Idaho National Laboratory (INL) building will be contaminated with BG (Bacillus globigii, renamed Bacillus atrophaeus), a simulant for Bacillus anthracis (BA). The contamination, sampling, decontamination, and re-sampling will occur per the experimental and sampling design. This INL-2 Sample Collection Operational Test is being planned by the Validated Sampling Plan Working Group (VSPWG). The primary objectives are: 1) Evaluate judgmental and probabilistic sampling for characterization as well as probabilistic and combined (judgment and probabilistic) sampling approaches for clearance, 2) Conduct these evaluations for gradient contamination (from low or moderate down to absent or undetectable) for different initial concentrations of the contaminant, 3) Explore judgment composite sampling approaches to reduce sample numbers, 4) Collect baseline data to serve as an indication of the actual levels of contamination in the tests. A combined judgmental and random (CJR) approach uses Bayesian methodology to combine judgmental and probabilistic samples to make clearance statements of the form "X% confidence that at least Y% of an area does not contain detectable contamination” (X%/Y% clearance statements). The INL-2 experimental design has five test events, which 1) vary the floor of the INL building on which the contaminant will be released, 2) provide for varying the amount of contaminant released to obtain desired concentration gradients, and 3) investigate overt as well as covert release of contaminants. Desirable contaminant gradients would have moderate to low concentrations of contaminant in rooms near the release point, with concentrations down to zero in other rooms. Such gradients would provide a range of contamination levels to challenge the sampling, sample extraction, and analytical methods to be used in the INL-2 study. For each of the five test events, the specified floor of the INL building will be contaminated with BG using a point-release device located in the room specified in the experimental design. Then quality control (QC), reference material coupon (RMC), judgmental, and probabilistic samples will be collected according to the sampling plan for each test event. Judgmental samples will be selected based on professional judgment and prior information. Probabilistic samples were selected with a random aspect and in sufficient numbers to provide desired confidence for detecting contamination or clearing uncontaminated (or decontaminated) areas. Following sample collection for a given test event, the INL building will be decontaminated. For possibly contaminated areas, the numbers of probabilistic samples were chosen to provide 95% confidence of detecting contaminated areas of specified sizes. For rooms that may be uncontaminated following a contamination event, or for whole floors after decontamination, the numbers of judgmental and probabilistic samples were chosen using the CJR approach. The numbers of samples were chosen to support making X%/Y% clearance statements with X = 95% or 99% and Y = 96% or 97%. The experimental and sampling design also provides for making X%/Y% clearance statements using only probabilistic samples. For each test event, the numbers of characterization and clearance samples were selected within limits based on operational considerations while still maintaining high confidence for detection and clearance aspects. The sampling design for all five test events contains 2085 samples, with 1142 after contamination and 943 after decontamination. These numbers include QC, RMC, judgmental, and probabilistic samples. The experimental and sampling design specified in this report provides a good statistical foundation for achieving the objectives of the INL-2 study.

  20. Helicopter magnetic survey conducted to locate wells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Veloski, G.A.; Hammack, R.W.; Stamp, V. (Rocky Mountain Oilfield Testing Center); Hall, R. (Rocky Mountain Oilfield Testing Center); Colina, K. (Rocky Mountain Oilfield Testing Center)

    2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A helicopter magnetic survey was conducted in August 2007 over 15.6 sq mi at the Naval Petroleum Reserve No. 3’s (NPR-3) Teapot Dome Field near Casper, Wyoming. The survey’s purpose was to accurately locate wells drilled there during more than 90 years of continuous oilfield operation. The survey was conducted at low altitude and with closely spaced flight lines to improve the detection of wells with weak magnetic response and to increase the resolution of closely spaced wells. The survey was in preparation for a planned CO2 flood for EOR, which requires a complete well inventory with accurate locations for all existing wells. The magnetic survey was intended to locate wells missing from the well database and to provide accurate locations for all wells. The ability of the helicopter magnetic survey to accurately locate wells was accomplished by comparing airborne well picks with well locations from an intense ground search of a small test area.

  1. Decoupled Sampling for Graphics Pipelines

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ragan-Kelley, Jonathan Millar

    We propose a generalized approach to decoupling shading from visibility sampling in graphics pipelines, which we call decoupled sampling. Decoupled sampling enables stochastic supersampling of motion and defocus blur at ...

  2. Soil sampling kit and a method of sampling therewith

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Thompson, Cyril V. (Knoxville, TN)

    1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A soil sampling device and a sample containment device for containing a soil sample is disclosed. In addition, a method for taking a soil sample using the soil sampling device and soil sample containment device to minimize the loss of any volatile organic compounds contained in the soil sample prior to analysis is disclosed. The soil sampling device comprises two close fitting, longitudinal tubular members of suitable length, the inner tube having the outward end closed. With the inner closed tube withdrawn a selected distance, the outer tube can be inserted into the ground or other similar soft material to withdraw a sample of material for examination. The inner closed end tube controls the volume of the sample taken and also serves to eject the sample. The soil sample containment device has a sealing member which is adapted to attach to an analytical apparatus which analyzes the volatile organic compounds contained in the sample. The soil sampling device in combination with the soil sample containment device allow an operator to obtain a soil sample containing volatile organic compounds and minimizing the loss of the volatile organic compounds prior to analysis of the soil sample for the volatile organic compounds.

  3. Soil sampling kit and a method of sampling therewith

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Thompson, C.V.

    1991-02-05T23:59:59.000Z

    A soil sampling device and a sample containment device for containing a soil sample is disclosed. In addition, a method for taking a soil sample using the soil sampling device and soil sample containment device to minimize the loss of any volatile organic compounds contained in the soil sample prior to analysis is disclosed. The soil sampling device comprises two close fitting, longitudinal tubular members of suitable length, the inner tube having the outward end closed. With the inner closed tube withdrawn a selected distance, the outer tube can be inserted into the ground or other similar soft material to withdraw a sample of material for examination. The inner closed end tube controls the volume of the sample taken and also serves to eject the sample. The soil sample containment device has a sealing member which is adapted to attach to an analytical apparatus which analyzes the volatile organic compounds contained in the sample. The soil sampling device in combination with the soil sample containment device allows an operator to obtain a soil sample containing volatile organic compounds and minimizing the loss of the volatile organic compounds prior to analysis of the soil sample for the volatile organic compounds. 11 figures.

  4. Occurrence of Multiple Fluid Phases Across a Basin, in the Same Shale Gas Formation – Eagle Ford Shale Example

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tian, Yao

    2014-04-29T23:59:59.000Z

    production data. Well deliverability was modeled to optimize oil production rate by designing appropriate operational parameters. From NW to SE, Eagle Ford fluids evolve from oil, to gas condensate and, finally, to dry gas, reflecting greater depth...

  5. January 2011 Groundwater Sampling at the Gnome-Coach, New Mexico, Site (Data Validation Package)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    2011-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Annual sampling was conducted January 19, 2011, to monitor groundwater for potential radionuclide contamination at the Gnome-Coach site in New Mexico. The sampling was performed as specified in the Sampling and Analysis Plan for U.S. Department of Energy Office of Legacy Management Sites (LMS/PLN/S04351, continually updated). Well LRL-7 was not sampled per instruction from the lead. A duplicate sample was collected from well USGS-1.Water levels were measured in the monitoring wells onsite.

  6. Track 4: Employee Health and Wellness

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    ISM Workshop Presentations Knoxville Convention Center, Knoxville, TN August 2009 Track 4: Employee Health and Wellness

  7. Immersible solar heater for fluids

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kronberg, James W. (Aiken, SC)

    1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An immersible solar heater comprising a light-absorbing panel attached to a frame for absorbing heat energy from the light and transferring the absorbed heat energy directly to the fluid in which the heater is immersed. The heater can be used to heat a swimming pool, for example, and is held in position and at a preselected angle by a system of floats, weights and tethers so that the panel can operate efficiently. A skid can be used in one embodiment to prevent lateral movement of the heater along the bottom of the pool. Alternative embodiments include different arrangements of the weights, floats and tethers and methods for making the heater.

  8. Fluid cooled vehicle drive module

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Beihoff, Bruce C.; Radosevich, Lawrence D.; Meyer, Andreas A.; Gollhardt, Neil; Kannenberg, Daniel G.

    2005-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    An electric vehicle drive includes a support may receive one or more power electronic circuits. The support may aid in removing heat from the circuits through fluid circulating through the support. The support, in conjunction with other packaging features may form a shield from both external EM/RFI and from interference generated by operation of the power electronic circuits. Features may be provided to permit and enhance connection of the circuitry to external circuitry, such as improved terminal configurations. Modular units may be assembled that may be coupled to electronic circuitry via plug-in arrangements or through interface with a backplane or similar mounting and interconnecting structures.

  9. Fluid Imaging | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are8COaBulkTransmissionSitingProcess.pdf Jump to:ar-80m.pdfFillmoreGabbs Valley Area (DOEARRA Funded Projects for Fluid

  10. NID Copper Sample Analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kouzes, Richard T.; Zhu, Zihua

    2011-09-12T23:59:59.000Z

    The current focal point of the nuclear physics program at PNNL is the MAJORANA DEMONSTRATOR, and the follow-on Tonne-Scale experiment, a large array of ultra-low background high-purity germanium detectors, enriched in 76Ge, designed to search for zero-neutrino double-beta decay (0???). This experiment requires the use of germanium isotopically enriched in 76Ge. The MAJORANA DEMONSTRATOR is a DOE and NSF funded project with a major science impact. The DEMONSTRATOR will utilize 76Ge from Russia, but for the Tonne-Scale experiment it is hoped that an alternate technology, possibly one under development at Nonlinear Ion Dynamics (NID), will be a viable, US-based, lower-cost source of separated material. Samples of separated material from NID require analysis to determine the isotopic distribution and impurities. DOE is funding NID through an SBIR grant for development of their separation technology for application to the Tonne-Scale experiment. The Environmental Molecular Sciences facility (EMSL), a DOE user facility at PNNL, has the required mass spectroscopy instruments for making isotopic measurements that are essential to the quality assurance for the MAJORANA DEMONSTRATOR and for the development of the future separation technology required for the Tonne-Scale experiment. A sample of isotopically separated copper was provided by NID to PNNL in January 2011 for isotopic analysis as a test of the NID technology. The results of that analysis are reported here. A second sample of isotopically separated copper was provided by NID to PNNL in August 2011 for isotopic analysis as a test of the NID technology. The results of that analysis are also reported here.

  11. Germanium-76 Sample Analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kouzes, Richard T.; Engelhard, Mark H.; Zhu, Zihua

    2011-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The MAJORANA DEMONSTRATOR is a large array of ultra-low background high-purity germanium detectors, enriched in 76Ge, designed to search for zero-neutrino double-beta decay (0???). The DEMONSTRATOR will utilize 76Ge from Russia, and the first one gram sample was received from the supplier for analysis on April 24, 2011. The Environmental Molecular Sciences facility, a DOE user facility at PNNL, was used to make the required isotopic and chemical purity measurements that are essential to the quality assurance for the MAJORANA DEMONSTRATOR. The results of this first analysis are reported here.

  12. Stack sampling apparatus

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Lind, Randall F; Lloyd, Peter D; Love, Lonnie J; Noakes, Mark W; Pin, Francois G; Richardson, Bradley S; Rowe, John C

    2014-09-16T23:59:59.000Z

    An apparatus for obtaining samples from a structure includes a support member, at least one stabilizing member, and at least one moveable member. The stabilizing member has a first portion coupled to the support member and a second portion configured to engage with the structure to restrict relative movement between the support member and the structure. The stabilizing member is radially expandable from a first configuration where the second portion does not engage with a surface of the structure to a second configuration where the second portion engages with the surface of the structure.

  13. Draft Sample Collection Instrument

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn't Your Destiny:Revised Finding of No53197E T ADRAFTJanuaryDominionDowDepartmentPublic5 5Sample

  14. September 2004 Water Sampling

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilA group currentBradleyTableSelling7 AugustAFRICAN3u ;;;::Sampling at the Sherwood,

  15. September 2004 Water Sampling

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilA groupTuba City, Arizona, DisposalFourthN V O 1CentralGroundwater,Sampling at the

  16. September 2004 Water Sampling

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilA groupTuba City, Arizona, DisposalFourthN V O 1CentralGroundwater,Sampling at the4

  17. September 2004 Water Sampling

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilA groupTuba City, Arizona, DisposalFourthN V O 1CentralGroundwater,Sampling at

  18. September 2004 Water Sampling

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilA groupTuba City, Arizona, DisposalFourthN V O 1CentralGroundwater,Sampling

  19. September 2004 Water Sampling

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilA groupTuba City, Arizona, DisposalFourthN V O 1CentralGroundwater,SamplingTuba

  20. September 2004 Water Sampling

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilA groupTuba City, Arizona, DisposalFourthN V O 1CentralGroundwater,SamplingTubaand

  1. System and method for filling a plurality of isolated vehicle fluid circuits through a common fluid fill port

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sullivan, Scott C; Fansler, Douglas

    2014-10-14T23:59:59.000Z

    A vehicle having multiple isolated fluid circuits configured to be filled through a common fill port includes a first fluid circuit disposed within the vehicle, the first fluid circuit having a first fill port, a second fluid circuit disposed within the vehicle, and a conduit defining a fluid passageway between the first fluid circuit and second fluid circuit, the conduit including a valve. The valve is configured such that the first and second fluid circuits are fluidly coupled via the passageway when the valve is open, and are fluidly isolated when the valve is closed.

  2. Supercritical fluid thermodynamics for coal processing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    van Swol, F. (Illinois Univ., Urbana, IL (United States). Dept. of Chemical Engineering); Eckert, C.A. (Georgia Inst. of Tech., Atlanta, GA (United States). School of Chemical Engineering)

    1988-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The main objective of this research is to develop an equation of state that can be used to predict solubilities and tailor supercritical fluid solvents for the extraction and processing of coal. To meet this objective we have implemented a two-sided. approach. First, we expanded the database of model coal compound solubilities in higher temperature fluids, polar fluids, and fluid mixtures systems. Second, the unique solute/solute, solute/cosolvent and solute/solvent intermolecular interactions in supercritical fluid solutions were investigated using spectroscopic techniques. These results increased our understanding of the molecular phenomena that affect solubility in supercritical fluids and were significant in the development of an equation of state that accurately reflects the true molecular makeup of the solution. (VC)

  3. On the equivalence of nonadiabatic fluids

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    W. Barreto

    2010-11-17T23:59:59.000Z

    Here we show how an anisotropic fluid in the diffusion limit can be equivalent to an isotropic fluid in the streaming out limit, in spherical symmetry. For a particular equation of state this equivalence is total, from one fluid we can obtain the other and vice versa. A numerical master model is presented, based on a generic equation of state, in which only quantitative differences are displayed between both nonadiabatic fluids. From a deeper view, other difference between fluids is shown as an asymmetry that can be overcome if we consider the appropriate initial-boundary conditions. Equivalence in this context can be considered as a first order method of approximation to study dissipative fluids.

  4. Split driveshaft pump for hazardous fluids

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Evans, II, Thomas P. (Aiken, SC); Purohit, Jwalit J. (Evans, GA); Fazio, John M. (Orchard Park, NY)

    1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A pump having a split driveshaft for use in pumping hazardous fluids wherein only one driveshaft becomes contaminated by the fluid while the second remains isolated from the fluid. The pump has a first portion and a second portion. The first portion contains a pump motor, the first driveshaft, a support pedestal, and vapor barriers and seals. The second portion contains a second, self-lubricating driveshaft and an impeller. The first and second driveshafts are connected together by a releasable coupling. A shield and a slinger deployed below the coupling prevent fluid from the second portion from reaching the first portion. In operation, only the second assembly comes into contact with the fluid being pumped, so the risk of contamination of the first portion by the hazardous fluid is reduced. The first assembly can be removed for repairs or routine maintenance by decoupling the first and second driveshafts and disconnecting the motor from the casing.

  5. Hydrostatic bearings for a turbine fluid flow metering device

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Fincke, J.R.

    1980-05-02T23:59:59.000Z

    A rotor assembly fluid metering device has been improved by development of a hydrostatic bearing fluid system which provides bearing fluid at a common pressure to rotor assembly bearing surfaces. The bearing fluid distribution system produces a uniform film of fluid distribution system produces a uniform film of fluid between bearing surfaces and allows rapid replacement of bearing fluid between bearing surfaces, thereby minimizing bearing wear and corrosion.

  6. NID Copper Sample Analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kouzes, Richard T.; Zhu, Zihua

    2011-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The current focal point of the nuclear physics program at PNNL is the MAJORANA DEMONSTRATOR, and the follow-on Tonne-Scale experiment, a large array of ultra-low background high-purity germanium detectors, enriched in 76Ge, designed to search for zero-neutrino double-beta decay (0???). This experiment requires the use of germanium isotopically enriched in 76Ge. The DEMONSTRATOR will utilize 76Ge from Russia, but for the Tonne-Scale experiment it is hoped that an alternate technology under development at Nonlinear Ion Dynamics (NID) will be a viable, US-based, lower-cost source of separated material. Samples of separated material from NID require analysis to determine the isotopic distribution and impurities. The MAJORANA DEMONSTRATOR is a DOE and NSF funded project with a major science impact. DOE is funding NID through an SBIR grant for development of their separation technology for application to the Tonne-Scale experiment. The Environmental Molecular Sciences facility (EMSL), a DOE user facility at PNNL, has the required mass spectroscopy instruments for making these isotopic measurements that are essential to the quality assurance for the MAJORANA DEMONSTRATOR and for the development of the future separation technology required for the Tonne-Scale experiment. A sample of isotopically separated copper was provided by NID to PNNL for isotopic analysis as a test of the NID technology. The results of that analysis are reported here.

  7. Sample holder with optical features

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Milas, Mirko; Zhu, Yimei; Rameau, Jonathan David

    2013-07-30T23:59:59.000Z

    A sample holder for holding a sample to be observed for research purposes, particularly in a transmission electron microscope (TEM), generally includes an external alignment part for directing a light beam in a predetermined beam direction, a sample holder body in optical communication with the external alignment part and a sample support member disposed at a distal end of the sample holder body opposite the external alignment part for holding a sample to be analyzed. The sample holder body defines an internal conduit for the light beam and the sample support member includes a light beam positioner for directing the light beam between the sample holder body and the sample held by the sample support member.

  8. Lined sampling vessel including a filter to separate solids from liquids on exit

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Shurtliff, Rodney M. (Idaho Falls, ID); Klingler, Kerry M. (Idaho Falls, ID); Turner, Terry D. (Ammon, ID)

    2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A filtering apparatus has an open canister with an inlet port. A canister lid is provided which includes an outlet port for the passage of fluids from the canister. Liners are also provided which are shaped to fit the interiors of the canister and the lid, with at least the canister liner preferably being flexible. The sample to be filtered is positioned inside the canister liner, with the lid and lid liner being put in place thereafter. A filter element is located between the sample and the outlet port. Seals are formed between the canister liner and lid liner, and around the outlet port to prevent fluid leakage. A pressure differential is created between the canister and the canister liner so that the fluid in the sample is ejected from the outlet port and the canister liner collapses around the retained solids.

  9. Critical phenomena in perfect fluids

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    David W. Neilsen; Matthew W. Choptuik

    1999-04-18T23:59:59.000Z

    We investigate the gravitational collapse of a spherically symmetric, perfect fluid with equation of state P = (Gamma -1)rho. We restrict attention to the ultrarelativistic (``kinetic-energy-dominated'', ``scale-free'') limit where black hole formation is anticipated to turn on at infinitesimal black hole mass (Type II behavior). Critical solutions (those which sit at the threshold of black hole formation in parametrized families of collapse) are found by solving the system of ODEs which result from a self-similar ansatz, and by solving the full Einstein/fluid PDEs in spherical symmetry. These latter PDE solutions (``simulations'') extend the pioneering work of Evans and Coleman (Gamma = 4/3) and verify that the continuously self-similar solutions previously found by Maison and Hara et al for $1.05 Gamma_dn are nodal points rather than focal points as previously reported. We also find a critical solution for Gamma = 2, and present evidence that it is continuously self-similar and Type II. Mass-scaling exponents for all of the critical solutions are calculated by evolving near-critical initial data, with results which confirm and extend previous calculations based on linear perturbation theory. Finally, we comment on critical solutions generated with an ideal-gas equation of state.

  10. Process for retarding fluid flow

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sandford, B.B.; Zillmer, R.C.

    1989-01-10T23:59:59.000Z

    A process is described for retarding the flow of fluid in a subterranean formation, comprising: (a) introducing an effective amount of a gel-forming composition into a subterranean formation, the gel-forming composition being operable when gelled in the formation for retarding the flow of fluid therein. The gel-forming composition consists of: i. a first substance dissolved in water to form an aqueous solution, the first substance being selected from the group consisting of polyvivyl alcohols, and mixtures thereof, wherein the gel-forming composition contains an amount of the first substance of from about 0.5 to about 5 weight percent of the gel-forming composition, and ii. an effective amount of glutaraldehyde which is operable for forming a weakly acidic condition having a pH from about 5.5 to less than 7 in the gel-forming composition and also operable for promoting crosslinking of the first substance and glutaraldehyde and for forming a gel from the gel-forming composition under the weakly acidic condition within a period of time no greater than about 5 days without adding an acidic catalyst to the gel-forming composition to lower the pH of the gel-forming composition below about 5.5.

  11. SEISMIC MONITORING OF CARBON DIOXIDE FLUID FLOW

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    santos

    SEISMIC MONITORING OF. CARBON DIOXIDE FLUID FLOW. J. E. Santos. 1. , G. B. Savioli. 2. , J. M. Carcione. 3. , D. Gei. 3. 1. CONICET, IGPUBA, Fac.

  12. Solution generating theorems for perfect fluid spheres

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Petarpa Boonserm; Matt Visser; Silke Weinfurtner

    2006-09-20T23:59:59.000Z

    The first static spherically symmetric perfect fluid solution with constant density was found by Schwarzschild in 1918. Generically, perfect fluid spheres are interesting because they are first approximations to any attempt at building a realistic model for a general relativistic star. Over the past 90 years a confusing tangle of specific perfect fluid spheres has been discovered, with most of these examples seemingly independent from each other. To bring some order to this collection, we develop several new transformation theorems that map perfect fluid spheres into perfect fluid spheres. These transformation theorems sometimes lead to unexpected connections between previously known perfect fluid spheres, sometimes lead to new previously unknown perfect fluid spheres, and in general can be used to develop a systematic way of classifying the set of all perfect fluid spheres. In addition, we develop new ``solution generating'' theorems for the TOV, whereby any given solution can be ``deformed'' to a new solution. Because these TOV-based theorems work directly in terms of the pressure profile and density profile it is relatively easy to impose regularity conditions at the centre of the fluid sphere.

  13. Coupled atomistic-continuum methods for fluids

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    I will discuss the coupling scheme, its application to polymer fluids, and the major difficulties in implementations. In the second part of the talk, I will discuss the ...

  14. DISPLAYING AND INTERPRETING FLUID INCLUSION STRATIGRAPHY ANALYSES...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    ANALYSES ON MUDLOG GRAPHS Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Conference Proceedings: DISPLAYING AND INTERPRETING FLUID INCLUSION STRATIGRAPHY...

  15. Methodologies for Reservoir Characterization Using Fluid Inclusion...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Surveys Chemical Signatures of and Precursors to Fractures Using Fluid Inclusion Stratigraphy Creation of an Engineered Geothermal System through Hydraulic and Thermal Stimulation...

  16. Gas powered fluid gun with recoil mitigation

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Grubelich, Mark C; Yonas, Gerold

    2013-11-12T23:59:59.000Z

    A gas powered fluid gun for propelling a stream or slug of a fluid at high velocity toward a target. Recoil mitigation is provided that reduces or eliminates the associated recoil forces, with minimal or no backwash. By launching a quantity of water in the opposite direction, net momentum forces are reduced or eliminated. Examples of recoil mitigation devices include a cone for making a conical fluid sheet, a device forming multiple impinging streams of fluid, a cavitating venturi, one or more spinning vanes, or an annular tangential entry/exit.

  17. Spinning Fluids: A Group Theoretical Approach

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dario Capasso; Debajyoti Sarkar

    2014-04-07T23:59:59.000Z

    We extend the Lagrangian formulation of relativistic non-abelian fluids in group theory language. We propose a Mathisson-Papapetrou equation for spinning fluids in terms of the reduction limit of de Sitter group. The equation we find correctly boils down to the one for non-spinning fluids. We study the application of our results for an FRW cosmological background for fluids with no vorticity and for dusts in the vicinity of a Kerr black hole. We also explore two alternative approaches based on a group theoretical formulation of particles dynamics.

  18. Completion Report for Well ER-EC-5

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bechtel Nevada

    2004-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Well ER-EC-5 was drilled for the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office in support of the Nevada Environmental Restoration Project at the Nevada Test Site, Nye County, Nevada. This well was drilled in the summer of 1999 as part of the U.S. Department of Energy's hydrogeologic investigation program in the Western Pahute Mesa - Oasis Valley region just west of the Nevada Test Site. A 44.5-centimeter surface hole was drilled and cased off to a depth of 342.6 meters below ground surface. The borehole diameter was then decreased to 31.1 centimeters for drilling to a total depth of 762.0 meters. One completion string with three isolated slotted intervals was installed in the well. A preliminary composite, static water level was measured at the depth of 309.9 meters, 40 days after installation of the completion string. Detailed lithologic descriptions with stratigraphic assignments are included in the report. These are based on composite drill cuttings collected every 3 meters, and 18 sidewall samples taken at various depths below 349.6 meters, supplemented by geophysical log data and results from detailed chemical and mineralogical analyses of rock samples. The well penetrated Tertiary-age tuffs of the Thirsty Canyon Group, caldera moat-filling sedimentary deposits, lava of the Beatty Wash Formation, and landslide breccia and tuffs of the Timber Mountain Group. The well reached total depth in welded ashflow tuff of the Ammonia Tanks Tuff after penetrating 440.1 meters of this unit, which is also the main water-producing unit in the well. The geologic interpretation of data from this well constrains the western margin of the Ammonia Tanks caldera to the west of the well location.

  19. Influence of formation clays on the flow of aqueous fluids

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hower, W.F.

    1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Most sandstone formations contain clays that can have a significant effect on the flow of aqueous fluids. The clays most frequently detected are smectite, mixed layer, illite, kaolinite, and chlorite. All of these clays are capable of migrating and causing permeability damage when they are contacted by waters foreign to the formation. Normally, these waters alter ionic environments around the clays, which causes the clays to be dislodged from their original positions. Thus, any time clay is present in the rock, it can be assumed that permeability damage can occur. The degree of damage depends upon the concentration and types of clays present, their relative position in the rock, the severity of the ionic environmental change; and fluid velocity. Permeability damage has been minimized in oil and gas wells through the use of potassium and ammonium ions. 15 references.

  20. Crystalline phases of graphene quantum Hall polariton fluids

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Francesco M. D. Pellegrino; Vittorio Giovannetti; Allan H. MacDonald; Marco Polini

    2015-05-26T23:59:59.000Z

    There is growing experimental interest in coupling cavity photons to the cyclotron resonance excitations of electron liquids in high-mobility semiconductor quantum wells or graphene sheets. These media offer unique platforms to carry out fundamental studies of exciton-polariton condensation and cavity quantum electrodynamics in a regime in which electron-electron (e-e) interactions are expected to play a pivotal role. Focusing on graphene, we present a theoretical study of the impact of e-e interactions on a quantum Hall polariton fluid (QHPF), i.e. a fluid of magneto-excitons resonantly coupled to cavity photons. We show that e-e interactions are responsible for an instability of graphene integer QHPFs towards a crystalline phase. We demonstrate that this phase can be detected by measuring the collective excitation spectra, which soften at a characteristic wave vector of the order of the inverse magnetic length.