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1

Natural Gas Prices: Well Above Recent Averages  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

5 5 Notes: The recent surge in spot prices at the Henry Hub are well above a typical range for 1998-1999 (in this context, defined as the average, +/- 2 standard deviations). Past price surges have been of short duration. The possibility of a downward price adjustment before the end of next winter is a source of considerable risk for storage operators who acquire gas at recent elevated prices. Storage levels in the Lower 48 States were 7.5 percent below the 5-year average (1995-1999) by mid-August (August 11), although the differential is only 6.4 percent in the East, which depends most heavily on storage to meet peak demand. Low storage levels are attributable, at least in part, to poor price incentives: high current prices combined with only small price

2

average air temperature | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

average air temperature average air temperature Dataset Summary Description (Abstract): Air Temperature at 10 m Above The Surface Of The Earth (deg C)NASA Surface meteorology and Solar Energy (SSE) Release 6.0 Data Set (Nov 2007)22-year Monthly & Annual Average (July 1983 - June 2005)Parameter: Air Temperature at 10 m Above The Surface Of The Earth (deg C)Internet: http://eosweb.larc.nasa.gov/sse/Note 1: SSE Methodology & Accuracy sections onlineNote 2: Lat/Lon values indicate the lower left corner of a 1x1 degree region. Negative values are south and west; Source U.S. National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA), Surface meteorology and Solar Energy (SSE) Date Released March 31st, 2009 (5 years ago) Date Updated April 01st, 2009 (5 years ago) Keywords average air temperature

3

Average Depth of Crude Oil and Natural Gas Wells  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Depth of Crude Oil and Natural Gas Wells Depth of Crude Oil and Natural Gas Wells (Feet per Well) Period: Annual Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources & Notes Definitions, Sources & Notes 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 View History Exploratory and Development Wells 5,426 5,547 5,508 5,613 6,064 5,964 1949-2008 Crude Oil 4,783 4,829 4,836 4,846 5,111 5,094 1949-2008 Natural Gas 5,616 5,757 5,777 5,961 6,522 6,500 1949-2008 Dry Holes 5,744 5,848 5,405 5,382 5,578 5,540 1949-2008 Exploratory Wells 6,744 6,579 6,272 6,187 6,247 6,322 1949-2008 Crude Oil 6,950 8,136 8,011 7,448 7,537 7,778 1949-2008 Natural Gas 6,589 5,948 5,732 5,770 5,901 5,899 1949-2008 Dry Holes 6,809 6,924 6,437 6,340 6,307 6,232 1949-2008

4

U.S. Average Depth of Natural Gas Developmental Wells Drilled...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

Developmental Wells Drilled (Feet per Well) U.S. Average Depth of Natural Gas Developmental Wells Drilled (Feet per Well) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6...

5

U.S. Average Depth of Natural Gas Exploratory Wells Drilled ...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

Wells Drilled (Feet per Well) U.S. Average Depth of Natural Gas Exploratory Wells Drilled (Feet per Well) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8...

6

Downhole Temperature Prediction for Drilling Geothermal Wells  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Unusually high temperatures are encountered during drilling of a geothermal well. These temperatures affect every aspect of drilling, from drilling fluid properties to cement formulations. Clearly, good estimates of downhole temperatures during drilling would be helpful in preparing geothermal well completion designs, well drilling plans, drilling fluid requirements, and cement formulations. The thermal simulations in this report were conducted using GEOTEMP, a computer code developed under Sandia National Laboratories contract and available through Sandia. Input variables such as drilling fluid inlet temperatures and circulation rates, rates of penetration, and shut-in intervals were obtained from the Imperial Valley East Mesa Field and the Los Alamos Hot Dry Rock Project. The results of several thermal simulations are presented, with discussion of their impact on drilling fluids, cements, casing design, and drilling practices.

Mitchell, R. F.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

7

An improved weighted average reactor temperature estimation for simulation of adiabatic industrial hydrotreaters  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A study on the improvement of the representative operating temperature from the temperature profile of an industrial adiabatic reactor is presented. This temperature is used to simulate the reactor performance by small scale laboratory isothermal reactors. An improved methodology for the estimation of a Weighted Average Bed Temperature (WABT) was elaborated to simulate an industrial multi-bed HDS reactor. The improved WABT, so called Weighted Average Reactor Temperature (WART), was compared with the most usually used WABT in a wide range of operational conditions as well as of kinetic parameters. In case of a multi-bed industrial hydrotreater, where quench zones are located between the beds and the H2 flow rate, which enters each bed, is different, the optimal gas to oil ratio was estimated for the laboratory-scale reactor.

G.D. Stefanidis; G.D. Bellos; N.G. Papayannakos

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

8

Determining average bed temperature of nonisothermal fixed-bed hydrotreater  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Employing three catalysts in three parallel pilot-scale fixed-bed reactors, hydrotreating experiments were performed in both isothermal and ascending temperature modes to investigate kinetics and to determine a representative bed temperature. Assuming 1.5th-order for hydrodesulfurization (HDS) and 1st-order for both hydrodenitrogenation (HDN) and mild hydrocracking (MHC), kinetic parameters were obtained from the isothermal mode operation. With the activation energies from isothermal operations, equivalent isothermal temperatures (EITs) in the ascending mode operations were established for specific HDS, HDN and MHC. Employing 19 thermocouple readouts in the catalyst beds and applying an Arrhenius-type rate equation containing the same activation energy, the representative bed temperature was determined. The temperature so determined is called kinetic EIT. The kinetic EIT was found to be the best to represent the nonisothermal bed temperature. The kinetic EIT has been applied to monitoring the catalyst activity in commercial hydrotreating units.

Sok Yui; John Adjaye

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

9

E-Print Network 3.0 - area average temperature Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

and Fisheries Sciences Collection: Environmental Sciences and Ecology 24 The Greenhouse Effect Temperature Equilibrium Summary: - it is neither heating nor cooling on average....

10

Estimation of static formation temperatures in geothermal wells | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Estimation of static formation temperatures in geothermal wells Estimation of static formation temperatures in geothermal wells Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Journal Article: Estimation of static formation temperatures in geothermal wells Abstract Stabilized formation temperatures were estimated at different depths in 40 wells from the Los Humeros geothermal field, Mexico, using the Horner and the spherical radial flow (SRF) methods. The results showed that the Horner method underestimates formation temperatures, while the SRF method gives temperatures that are closer to the true formation temperatures. This was supported by numerical simulation of a combined circulation and shut-in period in several wells, and results for well H-26 are presented. Numerical reproduction of logged temperature is more feasible if an initial

11

Temperature behavior in the build section of multilateral wells  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. The model predicts the temperature profiles in the build sections connecting the laterals to one another or to a main wellbore, thus accounting for the changing well angle relative to the temperature profile in the earth. In addition, energy balance...

Romero Lugo, Analis Alejandra

2005-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

12

Temperature Data From Wells in Long Valley Caldera, California...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Caldera, California Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Report: Temperature Data From Wells in Long Valley Caldera, California Abstract No abstract...

13

Cementing temperatures for deep-well production liners  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Temperature of cement is an important factor in properly cementing deep well production liners, yet current methods of determining cement temperatures do not account for all variables. In this paper a computer model predicts temperatures of cement while pumping and while waiting on cement, compares computed and measured temperatures, defines the importance of certain cementing variables on temperatures, and provides an explanation of difficulties encountered while cementing liner tops.

Wooley, G.R.; Galate, J.W.; Giussani, A.P.

1984-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

14

Identification of an average temperature and a dynamical pressure in a multitemperature mixture of fluids  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Identification of an average temperature and a dynamical pressure in a multitemperature mixture pressure even if the fluids have a zero bulk viscosity. The nonequilib- rium dynamical pressure can

Boyer, Edmond

15

Determination of capillary displacement pressure and representative average capillary pressure vs. depth in shally sandstones from well logs  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This research presents a method whereby the capillary displacement pressure Pcd and the representative average capillary pressure in shaly sandstone reservoirs exhibits continuous information vs. depth from well logs. By the aid of special core analysis, correlation functions were obtained that relate the capillary characteristics of the reservoir rock to its lithologic development. Since the lithologic influence factor is a well log-derived parameter the correlations then were used to determine by means of well logs the capillary displacement and average capillary pressures for borehole sections where special core analysis is not available. This technique has been developed and applied to the shaly sandstone reservoir of the Sarir oil field in Libya.

Barlai, Z.; Berruin, N.A.; Mawla, R.A.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

16

Lithologic Descriptions and Temperature Profiles of Five Wells...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

and Temperature Profiles of Five Wells in the Southwestern Valles Caldera Region, New Mexico Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Report: Lithologic...

17

Old Wright Well Greenhouse Low Temperature Geothermal Facility | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Wright Well Greenhouse Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Wright Well Greenhouse Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Old Wright Well Greenhouse Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Facility Old Wright Well Sector Geothermal energy Type Greenhouse Location Mount Princeton, Colorado Coordinates 38.749167°, -106.2425° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[]}

18

Pagosa Springs Private Wells Space Heating Low Temperature Geothermal  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Private Wells Space Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Private Wells Space Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Pagosa Springs Private Wells Space Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Facility Pagosa Springs Private Wells Sector Geothermal energy Type Space Heating Location Pagosa Springs, Colorado Coordinates 37.26945°, -107.0097617° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[]}

19

Countryman Well Greenhouse Low Temperature Geothermal Facility | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Countryman Well Greenhouse Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Countryman Well Greenhouse Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Countryman Well Greenhouse Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Facility Countryman Well Sector Geothermal energy Type Greenhouse Location Lander, Wyoming Coordinates 42.833014°, -108.7306725° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[]}

20

Jackson Well Springs Space Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Facility |  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Well Springs Space Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Well Springs Space Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Jackson Well Springs Space Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Facility Jackson Well Springs Sector Geothermal energy Type Space Heating Location Ashland, Oregon Coordinates 42.1853257°, -122.6980457° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[]}

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "wells average temperature" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Pressure and temperature drawdown well testing: similarities and differences  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Temperature and pressure are the most frequently observed physical parameters in boreholes. The same differential diffusivity equation describes the transient flow of incompressible fluid in porous media and heat conduction in solids. The similarities and differences in the techniques of pressure and temperature well testing are discussed. It is shown that the mathematical model of pressure well tests based on the presentation of the borehole as an infinitely long linear source with a constant fluid flow rate in an infinite-acting homogeneous reservoir cannot be used in temperature well testing. A new technique has been developed for the determination of the formation thermal conductivity, initial temperature, skin factor and contact thermal resistance. It is assumed that the volumetric heat capacity of formations is known and the instantaneous heater's wall temperature and time data are available for a cylindrical probe with a constant heat flow rate placed in a borehole. A semi-analytical equation is used to approximate the dimensionless wall temperature of the heater. A simulated example is presented to demonstrate the data processing procedure.

L V Eppelbaum; I M Kutasov

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

22

Buckhorn Mineral Wells Pool & Spa Low Temperature Geothermal Facility |  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Buckhorn Mineral Wells Pool & Spa Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Buckhorn Mineral Wells Pool & Spa Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Facility Buckhorn Mineral Wells Sector Geothermal energy Type Pool and Spa Location Mesa, Arizona Coordinates 33.4222685°, -111.8226402° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[]}

23

Theoretical modeling of spatial- and temperature-dependent exciton energy in coupled quantum wells  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Motivated by a recent experiment of spatial and temperature-dependent average exciton energy distribution in coupled quantum wells [S. Yang et al., Phys. Rev. B 75, 033311 (2007)], we investigate the nature of the interactions in indirect excitons. Based on the uncertainty principle, along with a temperature and energy-dependent distribution which includes both population and recombination effects, we show that the interplay between an attractive two-body interaction and a repulsive three-body interaction can lead to a natural and good account for the nonmonotonic temperature dependence of the average exciton energy. Moreover, exciton energy maxima are shown to locate at the brightest regions, in agreement with the recent experiments. Our results provide an alternative way for understanding the underlying physics of the exciton dynamics in coupled quantum wells.

C. S. Liu; H. G. Luo; W. C. Wu

2009-09-17T23:59:59.000Z

24

Buckhorn Mineral Wells Space Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Facility |  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Space Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Space Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Facility Buckhorn Mineral Wells Sector Geothermal energy Type Space Heating Location Mesa, Arizona Coordinates 33.4222685°, -111.8226402° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[]}

25

Climate: monthly and annual average air temperature at 10 m GIS data at  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

air temperature at 10 m GIS data at air temperature at 10 m GIS data at one-degree resolution of the World from NASA/SSE Dataset Summary Description (Abstract): Air Temperature at 10 m Above The Surface Of The Earth (deg C)NASA Surface meteorology and Solar Energy (SSE) Release 6.0 Data Set (Nov 2007)22-year Monthly & Annual Average (July 1983 - June 2005)Parameter: Air Temperature at 10 m Above The Surface Of The Earth (deg C)Internet: http://eosweb.larc.nasa.gov/sse/Note 1: SSE Methodology & Accuracy sections onlineNote 2: Lat/Lon values indicate the lower left corner of a 1x1 degree region. Negative values are south and west; positive values are north and east. Boundaries of the -90/-180 region are -90 to -89 (south) and -180 to -179 (west). The last region, 89/180, is bounded by 89 to 90 (north) and 179 to 180 (east). The mid-point of

26

Climate: monthly and annual average Earth skin temperature GIS data at  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Earth skin temperature GIS data at Earth skin temperature GIS data at one-degree resolution of the World from NASA/SSE Dataset Summary Description (Abstract): Earth Skin Temperature (° C)NASA Surface meteorology and Solar Energy (SSE) Release 6.0 Data Set (Nov 2007)22-year Monthly & Annual Average (July 1983 - June 2005)Parameter: Earth Skin Temperature (deg C)Internet: http://eosweb.larc.nasa.gov/sse/Note 1: SSE Methodology & Accuracy sections onlineNote 2: Lat/Lon values indicate the lower left corner of a 1x1 degree region. Negative values are south and west; positive values are north and east. Boundaries of the -90/-180 region are -90 to -89 (south) and -180 to -179 (west). The last region, 89/180, is bounded by 89 to 90 (north) and 179 to 180 (east). The mid-point of the region is +0.5 added to the the Lat/Lon value. These data are

27

High-Temperature Circuit Boards for use in Geothermal Well Monitoring...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

the very high temperatures (on the order of 350C) in EGS wells. Therefore, Composite Technology Development, Calumet, A-Power, and Sandia National Laboratory are...

28

Single-well Low Temperature CO2- based Engineered Geothemal System  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Single-well Low Temperature CO2- based Engineered Geothemal Systempresentation at the April 2013 peer review meeting held in Denver, Colorado.

29

Boom And Bust With The Latest 2M Temperature Surveys- Dead Horse Wells,  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Boom And Bust With The Latest 2M Temperature Surveys- Dead Horse Wells, Boom And Bust With The Latest 2M Temperature Surveys- Dead Horse Wells, Hawthorne Army Depot, Terraced Hills, And Other Areas In Nevada Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Conference Paper: Boom And Bust With The Latest 2M Temperature Surveys- Dead Horse Wells, Hawthorne Army Depot, Terraced Hills, And Other Areas In Nevada Details Activities (7) Areas (7) Regions (0) Abstract: New examples of the use of two-meter temperature (2m) surveys to quickly and inexpensively reveal blind geothermal systems were documented at Dead Horse Wells, the Hawthorne Army Depot, and Emerson Pass, all located in Nevada. In addition, more than 100 new 2m measurements at Astor Pass, Nevada resolved additional details of near-surface thermal outflow in this blind geothermal system. And at Columbus Salt Marsh, Nevada,

30

Temperature dependent band offsets in PbSe/PbEuSe quantum well heterostructures  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The band offsets of PbSe/Pb{sub 1-x}Eu{sub x}Se multi-quantum wells grown by molecular beam epitaxy are determined as a function of temperature and europium content using temperature-modulated differential transmission spectroscopy. The confined quantum well states in the valence and conduction bands are analyzed using a k{center_dot}p model with envelope function approximation. From the fit of the experimental data, the normalized conduction band offset is determined as 0.45{+-}0.15 of the band gap difference, independently of Eu content up to 14% and temperature from 20 to 300 K.

Simma, M.; Bauer, G.; Springholz, G. [Institut fuer Halbleiter und Festkoerperphysik, Johannes Kepler Universitaet, A-4040 Linz (Austria)

2012-10-22T23:59:59.000Z

31

Utilizing Distributed Temperature Sensors in Predicting Flow Rates in Multilateral Wells  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and pressure data to determine the flow rate in real time out of a multilateral well. Temperature and pressure changes are harder to predict in horizontal laterals compared with vertical wells because of the lack of variation in elevation and geothermal...

Al Mulla, Jassim Mohammed A.

2012-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

32

Large-scale well aligned carbon nitride nanotube films: Low temperature growth and electron field emission  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Large-scale well aligned carbon nitride nanotube films: Low temperature growth and electron field emission Dingyong Zhong, Shuang Liu, Guangyu Zhang, and E. G. Wanga) State Key Laboratory for Surface Received 2 January 2001; accepted for publication 13 March 2001 Large-scale well aligned carbon nitride

Zhang, Guangyu

33

Data acquisition for low-temperature geothermal well tests and long-term monitoring  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Groundwater monitoring is an essential part of the development of a low-temperature geothermal field for production and injection wells. State water resource and environmental departments are requiring both geothermal well testing and long-term monitoring as a part of the permitting process for geothermal developments. This report covers water-level measurement methods, instruments used for well testing, geochemical sampling, examples of data acquisition and regulatory mandates on groundwater monitoring.

Lienau, P.J.

1992-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

34

Data acquisition for low-temperature geothermal well tests and long-term monitoring. Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Groundwater monitoring is an essential part of the development of a low-temperature geothermal field for production and injection wells. State water resource and environmental departments are requiring both geothermal well testing and long-term monitoring as a part of the permitting process for geothermal developments. This report covers water-level measurement methods, instruments used for well testing, geochemical sampling, examples of data acquisition and regulatory mandates on groundwater monitoring.

Lienau, P.J.

1992-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

35

Method for estimation of the average local working temperatures and the residual resource of metal coatings of gas-turbine blades  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A new method is proposed for estimation of the average local operating temperatures and the residual service life (resource) of protective MCrAlY metal coatings of gas-turbine blades after a certain time of opera...

P. G. Krukovskii; K. A. Tadlya

2007-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

36

Determining circulating fluid temperature in drilling, workover, and well-control operations  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Estimation of fluid temperature in both flow conduits (drillpipe or tubing and the annulus) is required to ascertain the fluid density and viscosity and, in turn, to calculate the pressure drop or the maximum allowable pumping rate for a number of operations. These operations include drilling, workover, and well control. The fluid temperature estimation becomes critical for high-temperature or geothermal reservoirs where significant heat exchange occurs or when fluid properties are temperature sensitive, such as for a non-Newtonian fluid. In this work, the authors present an analytical model for the flowing fluid temperature in the drillpipe/tubing and in the annulus as a function of well depth and circulation time. The model is based on an energy balance between the formation and the fluid in the drillpipe.tubing and annulus. Steady-state heat transfer is assumed in the wellbore while transient heat transfer takes place in the formation. solutions are obtained for two possible scenarios: (1) the fluid flows down the annulus and up the drillpipe/tubing, and (2) the fluid flows down the tubing and up the annulus. The analytic model developed is cast in a set of simple algebraic equations for rapid implementation. The authors also show that the maximum temperature occurs not at the well bottom, but at some distance higher from the bottom for flow up the annulus.

Kabir, C.S. [Chevron Overseas Petroleum Technology Co. (Kuwait); Hasan, A.R.; Ameen, M.M. [Univ. of North Dakota, Grand Forks, ND (United States); Kouba, G.E.

1996-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

37

High-Temperature Circuit Boards for use in Geothermal Well Monitoring  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Temperature Circuit Boards for use in Geothermal Well Monitoring Temperature Circuit Boards for use in Geothermal Well Monitoring Applications Geothermal Project Jump to: navigation, search Last modified on July 22, 2011. Project Title High-Temperature Circuit Boards for use in Geothermal Well Monitoring Applications Project Type / Topic 1 Recovery Act: Enhanced Geothermal Systems Component Research and Development/Analysis Project Type / Topic 2 High-Temperature Downhole Tools Project Description Geothermal energy offers an abundant, renewable source of power that could be used to ensure the long-term energy independence of our nation. Currently, geothermal power in the United States is produced from relatively shallow wells that also contain naturally occurring water sources. These current geothermal power plants with near-ideal conditions for geothermal power production exist primarily in the western U.S. In order to expand the use of geothermal energy, new technologies are needed that will enable the utilization of the hot, dry rock located at depths up to 10 km. The introduction of water into these deep wells to create geothermal reservoirs is referred to as Enhanced Geothermal System (EGS).

38

What Global Warming Looks Like The July 2010 global map of surface temperature anomalies (Figure 1), relative to the average  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

), relative to the average July in the 1951-1980 period of climatology, provides a useful picture of current climate. It was more than 5°C (about 10°F) warmer than climatology in the eastern European region substantial areas cooler than climatology, including a region in central Asia and the southern part of South

39

High Temperature, High Pressure Devices for Zonal Isolation in Geothermal Wells  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

DOE Geothermal Peer Review 2010 - Presentation. Project objectives: Design, demonstrate, and qualify high-temperature high pressure zonal isolation devices compatible with the high temperature downhole Enhanced Geothermal Systems (EGS) environment.

40

High-Temperature Circuit Boards for Use in Geothermal Well Monitoring Applications  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Project objective: Develop and demonstrate high-temperature; multilayer electronic circuits capable of sustained operation at 300? C.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "wells average temperature" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

High-Temperature Circuit Boards for Use in Geothermal Well Monitoring...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Composite Technology Development, Inc. High-Temperature Tools and Sensors, Downhole Pumps and Drilling May 19, 2010 This presentation does not contain any proprietary...

42

Seasonal Average Temperature - Hanford Site  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Station Real Time Met Data from Around the Site Current HMS Observations Daily HMS Extremes in Met Data Met and Climate Data Summary Products Historical Weather Charts Contacts...

43

Temperature histories in geothermal wells: survey of rock thermomechanical properties and drilling, production, and injection case studies  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Thermal and mechanical properties for geothermal formations are tabulated for a range of temperatures and stress conditions. Data was obtained from the technical literature and direct contacts with industry. Thermal properties include heat capacity, conductivity, and diffusivity. Undisturbed geothermal profiles are also presented. Mechanical properties include Youngs modulus and Poisson ratio. GEOTEMP thermal simulations of drilling, production and injection are reported for two geothermal regions, the hot dry rock area near Los Alamos and the East Mesa field in the Imperial Valley. Actual drilling, production, and injection histories are simulated. Results are documented in the form of printed GEOTEMP output and plots of temperatures versus depth, radius, and time. Discussion and interpretation of the results are presented for drilling and well completion design to determine: wellbore temperatures during drilling as a function of depth; bit temperatures over the drilling history; cement temperatures from setting to the end of drilling; and casing and formation temperatures during drilling, production, and injection.

Goodman, M.A.

1981-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

44

A robust and well shielded thermal conductivity device for low temperature measurements  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We present a compact mechanically robust thermal conductivity measurement apparatus for measurements at low temperatures (<1 K) and high magnetic fields on small high-purity single crystal samples. A high-conductivity copper box is used to enclose the sample and all the components. The box provides protection for the thermometers, heater, and most importantly the sample increasing the portability of the mount. In addition to physical protection, the copper box is also effective at shielding radio frequency electromagnetic interference and thermal radiation, which is essential for low temperature measurements. A printed circuit board in conjunction with a braided ribbon cable is used to organize the delicate wiring and provide mechanical robustness.

Toews, W. H.; Hill, R. W. [GWPI and Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Waterloo, Waterloo, Ontario N2L 3G1 (Canada)] [GWPI and Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Waterloo, Waterloo, Ontario N2L 3G1 (Canada)

2014-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

45

Low temperature barriers with heat interceptor wells for in situ processes  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A system for reducing heat load applied to a frozen barrier by a heated formation is described. The system includes heat interceptor wells positioned between the heated formation and the frozen barrier. Fluid is positioned in the heat interceptor wells. Heat transfers from the formation to the fluid to reduce the heat load applied to the frozen barrier.

McKinzie, II, Billy John (Houston, TX)

2008-10-14T23:59:59.000Z

46

Detecting and modeling cement failure in high pressure/ high temperature wells using finite-element method  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. In the event that high-pressure and high-temperature (HPHT) conditions are encountered, we must attempt to achieve permeability in the set cement to prevent gas migration and to prevent any other fluid passing through to collapse the entire structure. Therefore...

Shahri, Mehdi Abbaszadeh

2006-04-12T23:59:59.000Z

47

Optimization of power generation from a set of low-temperature abandoned gas wells, using organic Rankine cycle  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This research article deals with the employment of organic Rankine cycle (ORC) to generate electricity from a set of low-temperature abandoned gas wells in Iran. At first a thermodynamic analysis was performed to select an appropriate power cycle; consequently organic Rankine cycle was chosen. Then a comprehensive investigation was carried out to find a typical low-temperature abandoned gas reservoir so an abandoned gas reservoir in the central part of Iran was considered. The next step was selecting the working fluid; in this regard a vast range of common organic fluids were studied and R125 was chosen. Finally the gas well and the power plant were simulated and then a parametric optimization of the ORC plant was performed in order to achieve optimum power generation and also to compute generated power at different operational parameters of gas wells and power cycle.

Mahyar Ebrahimi; Seyed Ebrahim Moussavi Torshizi

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

48

The thermal regime in the resurgent dome of Long Valley Caldera, California: Inferences from precision temperature logs in deep wells  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Long Valley Caldera in eastern California formed 0.76Ma ago in a cataclysmic eruption that resulted in the deposition of 600km3 of Bishop Tuff. The total current heat flow from the caldera floor is estimated to be ~290MW, and a geothermal power plant in Casa Diablo on the flanks of the resurgent dome (RD) generates ~40MWe. The RD in the center of the caldera was uplifted by ~80cm between 1980 and 1999 and was explained by most models as a response to magma intrusion into the shallow crust. This unrest has led to extensive research on geothermal resources and volcanic hazards in the caldera. Here we present results from precise, high-resolution, temperaturedepth profiles in five deep boreholes (3271,158m) on the RD to assess its thermal state, and more specifically 1) to provide bounds on the advective heat transport as a guide for future geothermal exploration, 2) to provide constraints on the occurrence of magma at shallow crustal depths, and 3) to provide a baseline for future transient thermal phenomena in response to large earthquakes, volcanic activity, or geothermal production. The temperature profiles display substantial non-linearity within each profile and variability between the different profiles. All profiles display significant temperature reversals with depth and temperature gradients Valley boreholes are at the approximate same elevation as the high-temperature unit in borehole M-1 in Casa Diablo indicating lateral or sub-lateral hydrothermal flow through the resurgent dome. Small differences in temperature between measurements in consecutive years in three of the wells suggest slow cooling of the shallow hydrothermal flow system. By matching theoretical curves to segments of the measured temperature profiles, we calculate horizontal groundwater velocities in the hydrothermal flow unit under the RD that range from 1.9 to 2.8m/yr, which corresponds to a maximum power flowing through the RD of 34MW. The relatively low temperatures and large isothermal segments at the bottom of the temperature profiles are inconsistent with the presence of magma at shallow crustal levels.

Shaul Hurwitz; Christopher D. Farrar; Colin F. Williams

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

49

Wellbore and soil thermal simulation for geothermal wells: development of computer model and acquisition of field temperature data. Part I report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A downhole thermal simulator has been developed to improve understanding of the high downhole temperatures that affect many design factors in geothermal wells. This development is documented and field temperature data presented for flowing and shut-in conditions.

Wooley, G.R.

1980-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

50

Room temperature continuous wave InGaAsN quantum well vertical cavity lasers emitting at 1.3 um  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Selectively oxidized vertical cavity lasers emitting at 1294 nm using InGaAsN quantum wells are reported for the first time which operate continuous wave at and above room temperature. The lasers employ two n-type Al{sub 0.94}Ga{sub 0.06}As/GaAs distributed Bragg reflectors each with a selectively oxidized current aperture adjacent to the optical cavity, and the top output mirror contains a tunnel junction to inject holes into the active region. Continuous wave single mode lasing is observed up to 55 C. These lasers exhibit the longest wavelength reported to date for vertical cavity surface emitting lasers grown on GaAs substrates.

CHOQUETTE,KENT D.; KLEM,JOHN F.; FISCHER,ARTHUR J.; SPAHN,OLGA B.; ALLERMAN,ANDREW A.; FRITZ,IAN J.; KURTZ,STEVEN R.; BREILAND,WILLIAM G.; SIEG,ROBERT M.; GEIB,KENT M.; SCOTT,J.W.; NAONE,R.L.

2000-06-05T23:59:59.000Z

51

Average Residential Price  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Data Series: Average Residential Price Residential Price - Local Distribution Companies Residential Price - Marketers Residential % Sold by Local Distribution Companies Average...

52

Averaging Hypotheses in Newtonian Cosmology  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Average properties of general inhomogeneous cosmological models are discussed in the Newtonian framework. It is shown under which circumstances the average flow reduces to a member of the standard Friedmann--Lema\\^\\i tre cosmologies. Possible choices of global boundary conditions of inhomogeneous cosmologies as well as consequences for the interpretation of cosmological parameters are put into perspective.

T. Buchert

1995-12-20T23:59:59.000Z

53

Investigation of interface intermixing and roughening in low-temperature-grown AlAs/GaAs multiple quantum wells  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Investigation of interface intermixing and roughening in low-temperature-grown AlAs/GaAs multiple to the standard-temperature-grown MQW. However, significant interface roughening and intermixing occurs- neal ambients14 have effects on interface roughening or in- termixing. In all cases, enhanced diffusion

Woodall, Jerry M.

54

Influence of sintering temperature on the characteristics of shale brick containing oil well-derived drilling waste  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The influence of sintering temperature on the physico-mechanical characteristics (such as water absorption, apparent porosity, bulk density, weight loss on ignition, firing shrinkage, and compressive strength), l...

Xiang-Guo Li; Yang Lv; Bao-Guo Ma

2011-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

55

Unimodular Gravity and Averaging  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The question of the averaging of inhomogeneous spacetimes in cosmology is important for the correct interpretation of cosmological data. In this paper we suggest a conceptually simpler approach to averaging in cosmology based on the averaging of scalars within unimodular gravity. As an illustration, we consider the example of an exact spherically symmetric dust model, and show that within this approach averaging introduces correlations (corrections) to the effective dynamical evolution equation in the form of a spatial curvature term.

A. Coley; J. Brannlund; J. Latta

2011-02-16T23:59:59.000Z

56

HFAG Charm Mixing Averages  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Recently the first evidence for charm mixing has been reported by several experiments. To provide averages of these mixing results and other charm results, a new subgroup of the Heavy Flavor Averaging Group has been formed. We here report on the method and results of averaging the charm mixing results.

B. Aa. Petersen

2007-12-10T23:59:59.000Z

57

User's manual for GEOTEMP, a computer code for predicting downhole wellbore and soil temperatures in geothermal wells. Appendix to Part I report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

GEOTEMP is a computer code that calculates downhole temperatures in and surrounding a well. Temperatures are computed as a function of time in a flowing stream, in the wellbore, and in the soil. Flowing options available in the model include the following: injection/production, forward/reverse circulation, and drilling. This manual describes how to input data to the code and what results are printed out, provides six examples of both input and output, and supplies a listing of the code. The user's manual is an appendix to the Part I report Development of Computer Code and Acquisition of Field Temperature Data.

Wooley, G.R.

1980-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

58

Structural characterization of SiGe/Si single wells grown by disilane and solid-Ge molecular beam epitaxy with varied disilane cracking temperature  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Structural properties of SiGe/Si single wells are studied by double-crystal X-ray diffraction. Four SiGe/Si single wells have been grown on Si (001) at 750C by disilane and solid-Ge molecular beam epitaxy with varied disilane cracking temperature. Using dynamic theory, together with kinematic theory and the specific growth procedure adopted, structural parameters in the multilayer structure are determined precisely. The results are compared with those obtained from PL and XTEM as well as AES measurements. It is found that disilane adsorption is dependent on cracking temperature as well as Ge incorporation. Disilane adsorption is increased by cracking disilane while it decreased with Ge incorporation

J.P. Liu; M.Y. Kong; D.D. Huang; J.P. Li; D.Z. Sun

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

59

Temperature changes with time in the slotted interval of a deep, shut-in geothermal well near thermal equilibrium: East Mesa Well 31-1, Imperial County, California, 1977-1982  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Five precision temperature logs were obtained over a five year period (1977-1982) beginning three years after drilling and one year after last significant testing in East Mesa well 31-1 (32/sup 0/48.6'N, 115/sup 0/15.7'W). A sensitivity of measurement of 0.001/sup 0/C was maintained to the bottom of the well (165/sup 0/C, 180 bars). Useable precision was limited by convective motions within the hole (0.01-0.3/sup 0/C depending on ambient geothermal gradient), fluid leakage through the lubricator at the well head (4 bars) and, occasionally, by electrical or electronic noise. Comparison of these continuous logs indicates a general warming in and just above the slotted interval (1647-1877 m) which is attributed to flow into the lower levels of the slotted interval and up the casing and out into permeable zones at higher levels. Some flow continued upward through an uncemented interval of the annulus between casing and hole and out into the formation where it is blocked by cement ( about 1594 m). Some points of entrance or egress of fluid are marked by small, sharp temperature anomalies which have persisted over the 5-year period. Apparently, the uncemented part of the annulus has partly filled in, and flow into the bottom of slotted interval has increased (1978-1982). Both of these changes may have been induced by the nearby ( about 30 km) Imperial Valley earthquake of 10/15/79, or by the production or testing of nearby wells.

Diment, W.H.; Urban, T.C.

1982-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

60

2D and 3D Dense-Fluid Shear Flows via Nonequilibrium Molecular Dynamics. Comparison of Time-and-Space-Averaged Tensor Temperature and Normal Stresses from Doll's, Sllod, and Boundary-Driven Shear Algorithms  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Homogeneous shear flows (with constant strainrate du/dy) are generated with the Doll's and Sllod algorithms and compared to corresponding inhomogeneous boundary-driven flows. We use one-, two-, and three-dimensional smooth-particle weight functions for computing instantaneous spatial averages. The nonlinear stress differences are small, but significant, in both two and three space dimensions. In homogeneous systems the sign and magnitude of the shearplane stress difference, P(xx) - P(yy), depend on both the thermostat type and the chosen shearflow algorithm. The Doll's and Sllod algorithms predict opposite signs for this stress difference, with the Sllod approach definitely wrong, but somewhat closer to the (boundary-driven) truth. Neither of the homogeneous shear algorithms predicts the correct ordering of the kinetic temperatures, T(xx) > T(zz) > T(yy).

Wm. G. Hoover; Carol G. Hoover; Janka Petravic

2008-05-10T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "wells average temperature" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
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61

average | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

average average Dataset Summary Description This dataset is part of a larger internal dataset at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) that explores various characteristics of large solar electric (both PV and CSP) facilities around the United States. This dataset focuses on the land use characteristics for solar facilities that are either under construction or currently in operation. Source Land-Use Requirements for Solar Power Plants in the United States Date Released June 25th, 2013 (7 months ago) Date Updated Unknown Keywords acres area average concentrating solar power csp Density electric hectares km2 land land requirements land use land-use mean photovoltaic photovoltaics PV solar statistics Data application/vnd.openxmlformats-officedocument.spreadsheetml.sheet icon Master Solar Land Use Spreadsheet (xlsx, 1.5 MiB)

62

High Peak-to-Valley Current Ratio GaAs/InGaAs/InAs Double Stepped Quantum Well Resonant Interband Tunneling Diodes at Room Temperature  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A high ratio of the peak current density to the valley current density of current-voltage characteristic is accomplished for the double stepped quantum well resonant interband tunneling diode (DSQW RITD). Results for good quantum confinement effect and long drift layer with deep quantum well GaAs/In0.59Ga0.41As/InAs DSQW RITD that has a lower valley current density of about 0.98 A/cm2 and a higher peak-to-valley current ratio (PVCR) reached 622 at room temperature than conventionally designed double quantum well resonant interband tunneling diodes (DQW RITDs) are presented. This PVCR value is also the highest value than those of the other resonant tunneling diodes.

Chih-Chin Yang; Kuang-Chih Huang; Yan-Kuin Su

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

63

Average Commercial Price  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Citygate Price Residential Price Commercial Price Industrial Price Electric Power Price Gross Withdrawals Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells Gross Withdrawals From Oil Wells Gross Withdrawals From Shale Gas Wells Gross Withdrawals From Coalbed Wells Repressuring Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed Vented and Flared Marketed Production NGPL Production, Gaseous Equivalent Dry Production Imports By Pipeline LNG Imports Exports Exports By Pipeline LNG Exports Underground Storage Capacity Gas in Underground Storage Base Gas in Underground Storage Working Gas in Underground Storage Underground Storage Injections Underground Storage Withdrawals Underground Storage Net Withdrawals Total Consumption Lease and Plant Fuel Consumption Pipeline & Distribution Use Delivered to Consumers Residential Commercial Industrial Vehicle Fuel Electric Power Period: Monthly Annual

64

Average Commercial Price  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Citygate Price Residential Price Commercial Price Industrial Price Electric Power Price Gross Withdrawals Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells Gross Withdrawals From Oil Wells Gross Withdrawals From Shale Gas Wells Gross Withdrawals From Coalbed Wells Repressuring Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed Vented and Flared Marketed Production NGPL Production, Gaseous Equivalent Dry Production Imports By Pipeline LNG Imports Exports Exports By Pipeline LNG Exports Underground Storage Capacity Gas in Underground Storage Base Gas in Underground Storage Working Gas in Underground Storage Underground Storage Injections Underground Storage Withdrawals Underground Storage Net Withdrawals Total Consumption Lease and Plant Fuel Consumption Pipeline & Distribution Use Delivered to Consumers Residential Commercial Industrial Vehicle Fuel Electric Power Period: Monthly Annual

65

Average Residential Price  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Citygate Price Residential Price Commercial Price Industrial Price Electric Power Price Gross Withdrawals Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells Gross Withdrawals From Oil Wells Gross Withdrawals From Shale Gas Wells Gross Withdrawals From Coalbed Wells Repressuring Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed Vented and Flared Marketed Production NGPL Production, Gaseous Equivalent Dry Production Imports By Pipeline LNG Imports Exports Exports By Pipeline LNG Exports Underground Storage Capacity Gas in Underground Storage Base Gas in Underground Storage Working Gas in Underground Storage Underground Storage Injections Underground Storage Withdrawals Underground Storage Net Withdrawals Total Consumption Lease and Plant Fuel Consumption Pipeline & Distribution Use Delivered to Consumers Residential Commercial Industrial Vehicle Fuel Electric Power Period: Monthly Annual

66

Average Residential Price  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Citygate Price Residential Price Commercial Price Industrial Price Electric Power Price Gross Withdrawals Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells Gross Withdrawals From Oil Wells Gross Withdrawals From Shale Gas Wells Gross Withdrawals From Coalbed Wells Repressuring Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed Vented and Flared Marketed Production NGPL Production, Gaseous Equivalent Dry Production Imports By Pipeline LNG Imports Exports Exports By Pipeline LNG Exports Underground Storage Capacity Gas in Underground Storage Base Gas in Underground Storage Working Gas in Underground Storage Underground Storage Injections Underground Storage Withdrawals Underground Storage Net Withdrawals Total Consumption Lease and Plant Fuel Consumption Pipeline & Distribution Use Delivered to Consumers Residential Commercial Industrial Vehicle Fuel Electric Power Period: Monthly Annual

67

DOE Average Results  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

DOE DOE Average Results FY 12 DOE Target FY 12 Customer Perspective: Customer Satisfaction: -Timeliness 92 88 -Quality 94 92 Effective Service Partnership: -Extent of Customer Satisfaction with the responsiveness, etc. 90 92 Internal Business Perspective: Acquisition Excellence: -Extent to which internal quality control systems are effective 90 88 Most Effective Use of Contracting Approaches to Maximize Efficiency and Cost Effectiveness: Use of Competition: -% of total $'s obligated on competitive acquisitions >$3000 (Agency Level Only) 94 85 -% of acquisition actions competed for actions > $3000 (Agency Level Only) 65 68 Performance Based Acquisition: - % PBA actions relative to total eligible new acquisition actions (applicable to new actions > $25K) 82

68

Average Residential Price  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Pipeline and Distribution Use Price Citygate Price Residential Price Commercial Price Industrial Price Vehicle Fuel Price Electric Power Price Proved Reserves as of 12/31 Reserves Adjustments Reserves Revision Increases Reserves Revision Decreases Reserves Sales Reserves Acquisitions Reserves Extensions Reserves New Field Discoveries New Reservoir Discoveries in Old Fields Estimated Production Number of Producing Gas Wells Gross Withdrawals Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells Gross Withdrawals From Oil Wells Gross Withdrawals From Shale Gas Wells Gross Withdrawals From Coalbed Wells Repressuring Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed Vented and Flared Marketed Production Natural Gas Processed NGPL Production, Gaseous Equivalent Dry Production Imports By Pipeline LNG Imports Exports Exports By Pipeline LNG Exports Underground Storage Capacity Underground Storage Injections Underground Storage Withdrawals Underground Storage Net Withdrawals LNG Storage Additions LNG Storage Withdrawals LNG Storage Net Withdrawals Total Consumption Lease and Plant Fuel Consumption Lease Fuel Plant Fuel Pipeline & Distribution Use Delivered to Consumers Residential Commercial Industrial Vehicle Fuel Electric Power Period: Monthly Annual

69

Average Residential Price  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Pipeline and Distribution Use Price Citygate Price Residential Price Commercial Price Industrial Price Vehicle Fuel Price Electric Power Price Proved Reserves as of 12/31 Reserves Adjustments Reserves Revision Increases Reserves Revision Decreases Reserves Sales Reserves Acquisitions Reserves Extensions Reserves New Field Discoveries New Reservoir Discoveries in Old Fields Estimated Production Number of Producing Gas Wells Gross Withdrawals Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells Gross Withdrawals From Oil Wells Gross Withdrawals From Shale Gas Wells Gross Withdrawals From Coalbed Wells Repressuring Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed Vented and Flared Marketed Production Natural Gas Processed NGPL Production, Gaseous Equivalent Dry Production Imports By Pipeline LNG Imports Exports Exports By Pipeline LNG Exports Underground Storage Capacity Underground Storage Injections Underground Storage Withdrawals Underground Storage Net Withdrawals LNG Storage Additions LNG Storage Withdrawals LNG Storage Net Withdrawals Total Consumption Lease and Plant Fuel Consumption Lease Fuel Plant Fuel Pipeline & Distribution Use Delivered to Consumers Residential Commercial Industrial Vehicle Fuel Electric Power Period: Monthly Annual

70

Average Commercial Price  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Pipeline and Distribution Use Price Citygate Price Residential Price Commercial Price Industrial Price Vehicle Fuel Price Electric Power Price Proved Reserves as of 12/31 Reserves Adjustments Reserves Revision Increases Reserves Revision Decreases Reserves Sales Reserves Acquisitions Reserves Extensions Reserves New Field Discoveries New Reservoir Discoveries in Old Fields Estimated Production Number of Producing Gas Wells Gross Withdrawals Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells Gross Withdrawals From Oil Wells Gross Withdrawals From Shale Gas Wells Gross Withdrawals From Coalbed Wells Repressuring Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed Vented and Flared Marketed Production Natural Gas Processed NGPL Production, Gaseous Equivalent Dry Production Imports By Pipeline LNG Imports Exports Exports By Pipeline LNG Exports Underground Storage Capacity Underground Storage Injections Underground Storage Withdrawals Underground Storage Net Withdrawals LNG Storage Additions LNG Storage Withdrawals LNG Storage Net Withdrawals Total Consumption Lease and Plant Fuel Consumption Lease Fuel Plant Fuel Pipeline & Distribution Use Delivered to Consumers Residential Commercial Industrial Vehicle Fuel Electric Power Period: Monthly Annual

71

Americans' Average Radiation Exposure  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We live with radiation every day. We receive radiation exposures from cosmic rays, from outer space, from radon gas, and from other naturally radioactive elements in the earth. This is called natural background radiation. It includes the radiation we get from plants, animals, and from our own bodies. We also are exposed to man-made sources of radiation, including medical and dental treatments, television sets and emission from coal-fired power plants. Generally, radiation exposures from man-made sources are only a fraction of those received from natural sources. One exception is high exposures used by doctors to treat cancer patients. Each year in the United States, the average dose to people from natural and man-made radiation sources is about 360 millirem. A millirem is an extremely tiny amount of energy absorbed by tissues in the body.

NA

2000-08-11T23:59:59.000Z

72

Viscosity-average molecular weight  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

n .... An averaged molecular weight for high polymers that relates most closely to measurements of dilute-solution viscosities ...

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

73

Field application of an interpretation method of downhole temperature and pressure data for detecting water entry in horizontal/highly inclined gas wells  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

condition change, wellbore structure change, geothermal environment change, or simple just noise of measurement. To separate flow condition change from the other causes of temperature change, we require a comprehensive understanding of flow dynamics. 5.... The interpretation model for downhole temperature and pressure data is a coupled thermal wellbore/reservoir flow model. The model is built on fundamental flow and energy conservation equations for both the reservoir and wellbore. These equations are: Mass balance...

Achinivu, Ochi I.

2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

74

Hanford wells  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Records describing wells located on or near the Hanford Site have been maintained by Pacific Northwest Laboratory and the operating contractor, Westinghouse Hanford Company. In support of the Ground-Water Surveillance Project, portions of the data contained in these records have been compiled into the following report, which is intended to be used by those needing a condensed, tabular summary of well location and basic construction information. The wells listed in this report were constructed over a period of time spanning almost 70 years. Data included in this report were retrieved from the Hanford Envirorunental Information System (HEIS) database and supplemented with information not yet entered into HEIS. While considerable effort has been made to obtain the most accurate and complete tabulations possible of the Hanford Site wells, omissions and errors may exist. This document does not include data on lithologic logs, ground-water analyses, or specific well completion details.

Chamness, M.A.; Merz, J.K.

1993-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

75

Polyelectrolyte Complex Nanoparticles for Protection and Delayed Release of Enzymes in Alkaline pH and at Elevated Temperature during Hydraulic Fracturing of Oil Wells  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Polyethylenimine-dextran sulfate polyelectrolyte complexes (PEC) were used to entrap two enzymes used to degrade polymer gels following hydraulic fracturing of oil wells in order to obtain delayed release and to protect the enzyme from harsh...

Barati Ghahfarokhi, Reza; Johnson, Stephen J.; McCool, Stan; Green, Don W.; Willhite, G. Paul; Liang, Jenn-Tai

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

76

Class H Oil Well Cement Hydration at Elevated Temperatures in the Presence of Retarding Agents: An In Situ High-Energy X-ray Diffraction Study  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In situ powder X-ray diffraction was used to examine the hydration of API Class H cement slurries, with a water-to-cement ratio of 0.394, at 66, 93, 121, and 177 C under autogenous pressure in the presence of varying amounts of the additives tartaric acid, modified lignosulfonate, and AMPS (2-acrylamido-2-methylpropanesulfonic acid) copolymer. All of these retarding agents inhibited the hydration of crystalline C{sub 3}S (Ca{sub 3}SiO{sub 5}), but other modes of action were also apparent. The formation of ettringite was suppressed when tartaric acid was used by itself or in combination with other additives. Changes in the hydration of C{sub 3}S vs time could not be correlated in a simple way with the observed pumping times for the cement slurries. The largest changes in pumping time as a function of temperature occurred in a temperature interval where ettringite/monosulfate decomposes and crystalline hydrogarnet starts to be formed.

Jupe, Andrew C.; Wilkinson, Angus P.; Luke, Karen; Funkhouser, Gary P. (Halliburton); (GIT)

2008-07-08T23:59:59.000Z

77

Core Measure Average KTR Results  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Measure Measure Average KTR Results FY 12 Target FY 12 DOE M&O CONTRACTOR (KTR) BSC RESULTS FY 2012 Customer Perspective and level of communication provided by the procurement office 95 92 Internal Business Perspective: Assessment (%) of the degree to which the purchasing system is in compliance with stakeholder requirements 97 Local Goals % Delivery on-time (includes JIT, excludes Purchase Cards) 88 84 % of total dollars obligated, on actions > $150K , that were awarded using effective competition 73 Local Goals Rapid Purchasing Techniques: -% of transactions placed by users 77 Local Goals -% of transactions placed through electronic commerce 62 Local Goals Average Cycle Time: -Average cycle time for <= $150K 8 6 to 9 days

78

West Texas Intermediate Spot Average ............................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Crude Oil (dollars per barrel) Crude Oil (dollars per barrel) West Texas Intermediate Spot Average ............................ 102.88 93.42 92.24 87.96 94.34 94.10 105.84 96.30 95.67 95.33 95.67 93.33 94.12 97.64 95.00 Brent Spot Average ........................................................... 118.49 108.42 109.61 110.09 112.49 102.58 110.27 108.29 106.33 105.00 103.00 102.00 111.65 108.41 104.08 Imported Average .............................................................. 108.14 101.18 97.18 97.64 98.71 97.39 103.07 100.03 99.64 99.33 99.69 97.35 101.09 99.85 99.04 Refiner Average Acquisition Cost ...................................... 107.61 101.44 97.38 97.27 101.14 99.45 105.24 100.44 100.15 99.82 100.18 97.83 100.83 101.61 99.50 Liquid Fuels (cents per gallon) Refiner Prices for Resale Gasoline .........................................................................

79

HIGH AVERAGE POWER OPTICAL FEL AMPLIFIERS.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Historically, the first demonstration of the optical FEL was in an amplifier configuration at Stanford University [l]. There were other notable instances of amplifying a seed laser, such as the LLNL PALADIN amplifier [2] and the BNL ATF High-Gain Harmonic Generation FEL [3]. However, for the most part FELs are operated as oscillators or self amplified spontaneous emission devices. Yet, in wavelength regimes where a conventional laser seed can be used, the FEL can be used as an amplifier. One promising application is for very high average power generation, for instance FEL's with average power of 100 kW or more. The high electron beam power, high brightness and high efficiency that can be achieved with photoinjectors and superconducting Energy Recovery Linacs (ERL) combine well with the high-gain FEL amplifier to produce unprecedented average power FELs. This combination has a number of advantages. In particular, we show that for a given FEL power, an FEL amplifier can introduce lower energy spread in the beam as compared to a traditional oscillator. This properly gives the ERL based FEL amplifier a great wall-plug to optical power efficiency advantage. The optics for an amplifier is simple and compact. In addition to the general features of the high average power FEL amplifier, we will look at a 100 kW class FEL amplifier is being designed to operate on the 0.5 ampere Energy Recovery Linac which is under construction at Brookhaven National Laboratory's Collider-Accelerator Department.

BEN-ZVI, ILAN, DAYRAN, D.; LITVINENKO, V.

2005-08-21T23:59:59.000Z

80

Variable Average Absolute Percent Differences  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Variable Variable Average Absolute Percent Differences Percent of Projections Over- Estimated Gross Domestic Product Real Gross Domestic Product (Average Cumulative Growth)* (Table 2) 1.0 42.6 Petroleum Imported Refiner Acquisition Cost of Crude Oil (Constant $) (Table 3a) 35.2 18.6 Imported Refiner Acquisition Cost of Crude Oil (Nominal $) (Table 3b) 34.7 19.7 Total Petroleum Consumption (Table 4) 6.2 66.5 Crude Oil Production (Table 5) 6.0 59.6 Petroleum Net Imports (Table 6) 13.3 67.0 Natural Gas Natural Gas Wellhead Prices (Constant $) (Table 7a) 30.7 26.1 Natural Gas Wellhead Prices (Nominal $) (Table 7b) 30.0 27.1 Total Natural Gas Consumption (Table 8) 7.8 70.2 Natural Gas Production (Table 9) 7.1 66.0 Natural Gas Net Imports (Table 10) 29.3 69.7 Coal Coal Prices to Electric Generating Plants (Constant $)** (Table 11a)

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "wells average temperature" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Year Average Transportation Cost of Coal  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

delivered costs of coal, by year and primary transport mode Year Average Transportation Cost of Coal (Dollars per Ton) Average Delivered Cost of Coal (Dollars per Ton)...

82

Langmuir probe measurements in a time-fluctuating-highly ionized non-equilibrium cutting arc: Analysis of the electron retarding part of the time-averaged current-voltage characteristic of the probe  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This work describes the application of Langmuir probe diagnostics to the measurement of the electron temperature in a time-fluctuating-highly ionized, non-equilibrium cutting arc. The electron retarding part of the time-averaged current-voltage characteristic of the probe was analysed, assuming that the standard exponential expression describing the electron current to the probe in collision-free plasmas can be applied under the investigated conditions. A procedure is described which allows the determination of the errors introduced in time-averaged probe data due to small-amplitude plasma fluctuations. It was found that the experimental points can be gathered into two well defined groups allowing defining two quite different averaged electron temperature values. In the low-current region the averaged characteristic was not significantly disturbed by the fluctuations and can reliably be used to obtain the actual value of the averaged electron temperature. In particular, an averaged electron temperature of 0.98 0.07 eV (= 11400 800 K) was found for the central core of the arc (30 A) at 3.5 mm downstream from the nozzle exit. This average included not only a time-average over the time fluctuations but also a spatial-average along the probe collecting length. The fitting of the high-current region of the characteristic using such electron temperature value together with the corrections given by the fluctuation analysis showed a relevant departure of local thermal equilibrium in the arc core.

Prevosto, L.; Mancinelli, B. [Grupo de Descargas Elctricas, Departamento Ing. Electromecnica, Facultad Regional Venado Tuerto (UTN), Laprida 651, Venado Tuerto (2600) Santa Fe (Argentina)] [Grupo de Descargas Elctricas, Departamento Ing. Electromecnica, Facultad Regional Venado Tuerto (UTN), Laprida 651, Venado Tuerto (2600) Santa Fe (Argentina); Kelly, H. [Grupo de Descargas Elctricas, Departamento Ing. Electromecnica, Facultad Regional Venado Tuerto (UTN), Laprida 651, Venado Tuerto (2600) Santa Fe (Argentina) [Grupo de Descargas Elctricas, Departamento Ing. Electromecnica, Facultad Regional Venado Tuerto (UTN), Laprida 651, Venado Tuerto (2600) Santa Fe (Argentina); Instituto de Fsica del Plasma (CONICET), Departamento de Fsica, Facultad de Ciencias Exactas y Naturales (UBA) Ciudad Universitaria Pab. I, 1428 Buenos Aires (Argentina)

2013-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

83

Study on the flow production characteristics of deep geothermal wells  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This paper describes a study on the potential flow production characteristics of three non-producing, deep (average depth 4000 m) geothermal wells in the Cerro Prieto geothermal field. The expected production characteristics of these wells were computed in order to determine whether their inability to sustain flow was due to: (1) heat loss effects in the well; (2) the influence of casing diameters; (3) transient temperature effects during the first days of well discharge, and/or (4) the effects of secondary low-enthalpy inflows. For the study, the conservation equations of mass, momentum and energy for two-phase homogeneous flow were solved for the wellbore, since homogeneous flow provides the simplest technique for analyzing two-phase flows when the flow patterns are not well established. The formation temperature distribution was computed assuming radial transient heat conduction. The numerical model was validated by comparison with analytical solutions and with measured pressure and temperature profiles of well H-17 from the Los Humeros geothermal field, Mexico. It was found that the wells should have sustained production. The early heat losses were so large that the flow needed to be induced, and flow will be sustained only after a few days of induced discharge. For well M-202, the analysis suggests that the inflow of secondary colder fluids was responsible for stopping the flow in this well.

Alfonso Garcia-Gutierrez; Gilberto Espinosa-Paredes; Isa??as Hernandez-Ramirez

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

84

Single-Well and Cross-Well Seismic At Salt Wells Area (Bureau of Land  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Single-Well and Cross-Well Seismic At Salt Wells Area (Bureau of Land Single-Well and Cross-Well Seismic At Salt Wells Area (Bureau of Land Management, 2009) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Single-Well and Cross-Well Seismic At Salt Wells Area (Bureau of Land Management, 2009) Exploration Activity Details Location Salt Wells Geothermal Area Exploration Technique Single-Well And Cross-Well Seismic Activity Date 2008 - 2008 Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Exploration Basis Vulcan increased exploration efforts in the summer and fall of 2008, during which time the company drilled two temperature gradient holes (86-15 O on Pad 1 and 17-16 O on Pad 3); conducted seismic, gravity and magnetotelluric surveys; and drilled deep exploration wells at Pads 6 and 8 and binary

85

annual average heating degree days | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

average heating degree days average heating degree days Dataset Summary Description (Abstract): Heating Degree Days below 18° C (degree days)The monthly accumulation of degrees when the daily mean temperature is below 18° C.NASA Surface meteorology and Solar Energy (SSE) Release 6.0 Data Set (Nov 2007)22-year Monthly Average & Annual Sum (July 1983 - June 2005)Parameter: Heating Degree Days Below 18 degrees C (degree days)Internet: http://eosweb.larc.nasa.gov/sse/ Source U.S. National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA), Surface meteorology and Solar Energy (SSE) Date Released March 31st, 2009 (5 years ago) Date Updated April 01st, 2009 (5 years ago) Keywords annual average heating degree days climate GIS NASA SWERA UNEP Data application/zip icon Download Shapefile (zip, 2.7 MiB)

86

Thermal well-test method  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A well-test method involving injection of hot (or cold) water into a groundwater aquifer, or injecting cold water into a geothermal reservoir is disclosed. By making temperature measurements at various depths in one or more observation wells, certain properties of the aquifer are determined. These properties, not obtainable from conventional well test procedures, include the permeability anisotropy, and layering in the aquifer, and in-situ thermal properties. The temperature measurements at various depths are obtained from thermistors mounted in the observation wells.

Tsang, C.F.; Doughty, C.A.

1984-02-24T23:59:59.000Z

87

Exploratory Well | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Exploratory Well Exploratory Well Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Technique: Exploratory Well Details Activities (8) Areas (3) Regions (0) NEPA(5) Exploration Technique Information Exploration Group: Drilling Techniques Exploration Sub Group: Exploration Drilling Parent Exploration Technique: Exploration Drilling Information Provided by Technique Lithology: Can provide core or cuttings Stratigraphic/Structural: Identify stratigraphy and structural features within a well Hydrological: -Water samples can be used for geochemical analysis -Fluid pressures can be used to estimate flow rates Thermal: -Temperatures can be measured within the hole -Information about the heat source Dictionary.png Exploratory Well: An exploratory well is drilled for the purpose of identifying the

88

An investigation of nonlinear xenon oscillation by method of averaging  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A nonlinear analysis of xenon-temperature controlled nuclear reactor dynamics is presented. The set of equations in question belongs to a general class of rate equations with quadratic nonlinearities. Boundedness of the solutions is examined. The mean value of periodic solutions for the flux is shown to be always less than the equilibrium value. The Bogoliubov's method of averaging as extended by Case is applied to obtain approximate solutions. The mechanism of the existence of relaxation oscillations in the linear stability region is analyzed. Computer calculations are performed and found in good agreement with the approximate solutions obtained by means of the method of averaging.

Yoshiro Asahi; A.Ziya Akcasu

1973-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

89

E-Print Network 3.0 - average magnetic well Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

... Source: Ecole Polytechnique, Centre de mathmatiques Collection: Mathematics 90 TEST RESULTS OF HTS COILS AND AN R&D MAGNET FOR RIA* , M. Anerella, M. Harrison, J....

90

Averaging Spacetime: Where do we go from here?  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The construction of an averaged theory of gravity based on Einstein's General Relativity is very difficult due to the non-linear nature of the gravitational field equations. This problem is further exacerbated by the difficulty in defining a mathematically precise covariant averaging procedure for tensor fields over differentiable manifolds. Together, these two ideas have been called the averaging problem for General Relativity. In the first part of the talk, an attempt to review some the various approaches to this problem will be given, highlighting strengths, weaknesses, and commonalities between them. In the second part of the talk, an argument will be made, that if one wishes to develop a well-defined averaging procedure, one may choose to parallel transport along geodesics with respect to the Levi-Cevita connection or, use the Weitzenb\\"ock connection and ensure the transportation is independent of path. The talk concludes with some open questions to generate further discussion.

R. J. van den Hoogen

2010-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

91

Production Wells | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Production Wells Production Wells (Redirected from Development Wells) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Technique: Production Wells Details Activities (13) Areas (13) Regions (0) NEPA(7) Exploration Technique Information Exploration Group: Drilling Techniques Exploration Sub Group: Development Drilling Parent Exploration Technique: Development Drilling Information Provided by Technique Lithology: Drill cuttings are analyzed to determine lithology and mineralogy Stratigraphic/Structural: Fractures, faults, and geologic formations that the well passes through are identified and mapped. Hydrological: Identify aquifers, reservoir boundaries, flow rates, fluid pressure, and chemistry Thermal: Direct temperature measurements from within the reservoir

92

Production Wells | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Production Wells Production Wells Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Technique: Production Wells Details Activities (13) Areas (13) Regions (0) NEPA(7) Exploration Technique Information Exploration Group: Drilling Techniques Exploration Sub Group: Development Drilling Parent Exploration Technique: Development Drilling Information Provided by Technique Lithology: Drill cuttings are analyzed to determine lithology and mineralogy Stratigraphic/Structural: Fractures, faults, and geologic formations that the well passes through are identified and mapped. Hydrological: Identify aquifers, reservoir boundaries, flow rates, fluid pressure, and chemistry Thermal: Direct temperature measurements from within the reservoir Dictionary.png Production Wells:

93

Well Deepening | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Well Deepening Well Deepening Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Technique: Well Deepening Details Activities (5) Areas (3) Regions (0) NEPA(0) Exploration Technique Information Exploration Group: Drilling Techniques Exploration Sub Group: Development Drilling Parent Exploration Technique: Development Drilling Information Provided by Technique Lithology: Drill cuttings are analyzed to determine lithology and mineralogy Stratigraphic/Structural: Fractures, faults, and geologic formations that the well passes through are identified and mapped. Hydrological: Identify aquifers, reservoir boundaries, flow rates, fluid pressure, and chemistry Thermal: Direct temperature measurements from within the reservoir Dictionary.png Well Deepening:

94

Observation Wells | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Observation Wells Observation Wells Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Technique: Observation Wells Details Activities (7) Areas (7) Regions (0) NEPA(15) Exploration Technique Information Exploration Group: Drilling Techniques Exploration Sub Group: Development Drilling Parent Exploration Technique: Development Drilling Information Provided by Technique Lithology: Stratigraphic/Structural: Hydrological: Total dissolved solids, fluid pressure, flow rates, and flow direction Thermal: Monitors temperature of circulating fluids Dictionary.png Observation Wells: An observation well is used to monitor important hydrologic parameters in a geothermal system that can indicate performance, longevity, and transient processes. Other definitions:Wikipedia Reegle

95

Uncertainty Quantification and Calibration in Well Construction Cost Estimates  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

or to individual cost components. Application of the methodology to estimation of well construction costs for horizontal wells in a shale gas play resulted in well cost estimates that were well calibrated probabilistically. Overall, average estimated...

Valdes Machado, Alejandro

2013-08-05T23:59:59.000Z

96

Property:SalinityAverage | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

SalinityAverage SalinityAverage Jump to: navigation, search Property Name SalinityAverage Property Type Number Description Mean average of the low and high end measurements of the salinity [ppm] of the fluid. This is a property of type Page. Subproperties This property has the following 1 subproperty: C Coso Geothermal Area Pages using the property "SalinityAverage" Showing 19 pages using this property. A Amedee Geothermal Area + 975 + B Beowawe Hot Springs Geothermal Area + 700 + Blue Mountain Geothermal Area + 4300 + Brady Hot Springs Geothermal Area + 3500 + C Chena Geothermal Area + 325 + D Desert Peak Geothermal Area + 6700 + Dixie Valley Geothermal Area + 2295 + E East Mesa Geothermal Area + 3750 + G Geysers Geothermal Area + 217 + K Kilauea East Rift Geothermal Area + 18750 +

97

Regional averaging and scaling in relativistic cosmology  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Averaged inhomogeneous cosmologies lie at the forefront of interest, since cosmological parameters like the rate of expansion or the mass density are to be considered as volume-averaged quantities and only these can be compared with observations. For this reason the relevant parameters are intrinsically scale-dependent and one wishes to control this dependence without restricting the cosmological model by unphysical assumptions. In the latter respect we contrast our way to approach the averaging problem in relativistic cosmology with shortcomings of averaged Newtonian models. Explicitly, we investigate the scale-dependence of Eulerian volume averages of scalar functions on Riemannian three-manifolds. We propose a complementary view of a Lagrangian smoothing of (tensorial) variables as opposed to their Eulerian averaging on spatial domains. This program is realized with the help of a global Ricci deformation flow for the metric. We explain rigorously the origin of the Ricci flow which, on heuristic grounds, has already been suggested as a possible candidate for smoothing the initial data set for cosmological spacetimes. The smoothing of geometry implies a renormalization of averaged spatial variables. We discuss the results in terms of effective cosmological parameters that would be assigned to the smoothed cosmological spacetime.

Thomas Buchert; Mauro Carfora

2002-10-11T23:59:59.000Z

98

High average power scaleable thin-disk laser  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Using a thin disk laser gain element with an undoped cap layer enables the scaling of lasers to extremely high average output power values. Ordinarily, the power scaling of such thin disk lasers is limited by the deleterious effects of amplified spontaneous emission. By using an undoped cap layer diffusion bonded to the thin disk, the onset of amplified spontaneous emission does not occur as readily as if no cap layer is used, and much larger transverse thin disks can be effectively used as laser gain elements. This invention can be used as a high average power laser for material processing applications as well as for weapon and air defense applications.

Beach, Raymond J. (Livermore, CA); Honea, Eric C. (Sunol, CA); Bibeau, Camille (Dublin, CA); Payne, Stephen A. (Castro Valley, CA); Powell, Howard (Livermore, CA); Krupke, William F. (Pleasanton, CA); Sutton, Steven B. (Manteca, CA)

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

99

Average Data for Each Choke Setting (before 24-May 2010 06:00), 6-hour average (  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Average Data for Each Choke Setting (before 24-May 2010 06:00), 6-hour average (after 24-May 2010 06:00):" Average Data for Each Choke Setting (before 24-May 2010 06:00), 6-hour average (after 24-May 2010 06:00):" ,,"Choke","Average","Average","Fluid","Methanol","Water","Oil","Gas","Hyd. Eq.","Gas" ,"Choke","Setting","Upstream","Upstream","Recovery","Recovery","Recovery","Recovery","Recovery","Recovery","Recovery" "Date and Time","Setting","Duration","Pressure","Temp.","Rate","Rate","Rate","Rate","Rate","Rate","Portion" "dd-mmm-yy","(64ths)","(hours)","(psia)","(degF)","(bfpd)","(bfpd)","(bwpd)","(bopd)","(mmcfpd)","(boepd)","(%)"

100

STEO January 2013 - average gasoline prices  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

gasoline prices are expected to decline over the next two years. The average pump price for regular unleaded gasoline was 3.63 a gallon during 2012. That is expected to fall...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "wells average temperature" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Decontaminating Flooded Wells  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This publication explains how to decontaminate and disinfect a well, test the well water and check for well damage after a flood....

Boellstorff, Diana; Dozier, Monty; Provin, Tony; Dictson, Nikkoal; McFarland, Mark L.

2005-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

102

2-M Probe At Dead Horse Wells Area (Kratt, Et Al., 2010) | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Dead Horse Wells Area (Kratt, Et Al., 2010) Dead Horse Wells Area (Kratt, Et Al., 2010) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: 2-M Probe At Dead Horse Wells Area (Kratt, Et Al., 2010) Exploration Activity Details Location Dead Horse Wells Area Exploration Technique 2-M Probe Activity Date Usefulness useful DOE-funding Unknown Notes Background temperatures between 14.7°C and 17.7°C were encountered in the playa and are likely influenced by near-surface groundwater, as evidenced by abundant greasewood. In comparison, what we interpret as background, or near-background temperatures in the alluvial fan environment averaged about 20°C. The2-meter anomaly is characterized by temperatures up to 37°C (99°F) measured over a distance of more than 1.5 km. Lower, yet still

103

Well control procedures for extended reach wells  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

been found to be critical to the success of ERD are torque and drag, drillstring design, wellbore stability, hole cleaning, casing design, directional drilling optimization, drilling dynamics and rig sizing.4 Other technologies of vital importance... are the use of rotary steerable systems (RSS) together with measurement while drilling (MWD) and logging while drilling (LWD) to geosteer the well into the geological target.5 Many of the wells drilled at Wytch Farm would not have been possible to drill...

Gjorv, Bjorn

2004-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

104

Polarized electron beams at milliampere average current  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This contribution describes some of the challenges associated with developing a polarized electron source capable of uninterrupted days-long operation at milliAmpere average beam current with polarization greater than 80%. Challenges will be presented in the context of assessing the required level of extrapolation beyond the performance of today's CEBAF polarized source operating at ~ 200 uA average current. Estimates of performance at higher current will be based on hours-long demonstrations at 1 and 4 mA. Particular attention will be paid to beam-related lifetime-limiting mechanisms, and strategies to construct a photogun that operate reliably at bias voltage > 350kV.

Poelker, Matthew [JLAB

2013-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

105

Laser Fusion Energy The High Average Power  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Laser Fusion Energy and The High Average Power Program John Sethian Naval Research Laboratory Dec for Inertial Fusion Energy with lasers, direct drive targets and solid wall chambers Lasers DPPSL (LLNL) Kr posters Snead Payne #12;Laser(s) Goals 1. Develop technologies that can meet the fusion energy

106

Ordered Weighted Average Based Fuzzy Rough Sets  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Ordered Weighted Average Based Fuzzy Rough Sets Chris Cornelis 1 , Nele Verbiest1 , and Richard rough set model, which is based on a similar rationale, our proposal has the ad- vantage a feature selection application confirm the potential of the OWA-based model. Keywords: fuzzy rough sets

Gent, Universiteit

107

Groundwater and Wells (Nebraska)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This section describes regulations relating to groundwater protection, water wells, and water withdrawals, and requires the registration of all water wells in the state.

108

Plugging Abandoned Water Wells  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. It is recommended that before you begin the process of plugging an aban- doned well that you seek advice from your local groundwater conservation district, a licensed water well driller in your area, or the Water Well Drillers Program with the Texas Department... hire a licensed water well driller or pump installer to seal and plug an abandoned well. Well contractors have the equipment and an understanding of soil condi- tions to determine how a well should be properly plugged. How can you take care...

Lesikar, Bruce J.

2002-02-28T23:59:59.000Z

109

Sources Of Average Individual Radiation Exposure  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Of Average Individual Radiation Exposure Of Average Individual Radiation Exposure Natural background Medical Consumer products Industrial, security, educational and research Occupational 0.311 rem 0.300 rem 0.013 rem 0.0003 rem 0.0005 rem Savannah River Nuclear Solutions, LLC, provides radiological protection services and oversight at the Savannah River Site (SRS). These services include radiation dose measurements for persons who enter areas where they may be exposed to radiation or radioactive material. The results are periodically reported to monitored individuals. The results listed are based on a radiation dose system developed by the International Commission on Radiation Protection. The system uses the terms "effective dose," "equivalent dose" and units of rem. You may be more familiar with the term "millirem" (mrem), which is 1/1000 of a rem.

110

Fat turnover in obese slower than average  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

9-04 9-04 For immediate release: 09/23/2011 | NR-11-09-04 Fat turnover in obese slower than average Anne M Stark, LLNL, (925) 422-9799, stark8@llnl.gov Printer-friendly This scanning electron micrograph image shows part of a lobule of adipose tissue (body fat). Adipose tissue is specialized connective tissue that functions as the major storage site for fat. Photo courtesy of David Gregory & Debbie Marshall/Wellcome Images LIVERMORE, Calif. -- It may be more difficult for obese people to lose fat because the "turnover" rate is much slower for those overweight than average weight individuals. New research in the Sept. 25 online edition of the journal Nature shows that the turnover (storage and loss rate) of fat in the human body is about 1 1/2 years compared to fat cells, which turnover about every 10 years,

111

Indirect CP violation results and HFAG averages  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The current status of the search for indirect CP violation in the neutral D meson system at the B-factories and at LHCb is reported. The indirect CP asymmetry search is performed by the measurement of the proper-time asymmetry ($A_{\\Gamma}$) in decays of $D^0-\\bar{D^0}$ mesons to CP eigenstates, $K^-K^+$ and $\\pi^- \\pi^+$, and by $y_{CP}$, the ratio between the effective lifetime measured in decay to a CP eigenstate and that to the mixed eigenstate $K \\pi$. All results are consistent with the no CP violation hypothesis. The latest world averages for mixing and CP asymmetry in the charm sector evaluated by the Heavy Flavour Averaging Group are presented. The no mixing hypothesis is excluded at more than 12 standard deviations. The search for direct and indirect CP violation in the charm sector is consistent with no CP violation at 2.0% confident level.

Silvia Borghi

2013-12-17T23:59:59.000Z

112

Polarized electron beams at milliampere average current  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This contribution describes some of the challenges associated with developing a polarized electron source capable of uninterrupted days-long operation at milliAmpere average beam current with polarization greater than 80%. Challenges will be presented in the context of assessing the required level of extrapolation beyond the performance of todays CEBAF polarized source operating at ? 200 uA average current. Estimates of performance at higher current will be based on hours-long demonstrations at 1 and 4 mA. Particular attention will be paid to beam-related lifetime-limiting mechanisms, and strategies to construct a photogun that operate reliably at bias voltage > 350kV.

Poelker, M. [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility, Newport News, Virginia 23606 (United States)

2013-11-07T23:59:59.000Z

113

Horizontal well IPR calculations  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper presents the calculation of near-wellbore skin and non-Darcy flow coefficient for horizontal wells based on whether the well is drilled in an underbalanced or overbalanced condition, whether the well is completed openhole, with a slotted liner, or cased, and on the number of shots per foot and phasing for cased wells. The inclusion of mechanical skin and the non-Darcy flow coefficient in previously published horizontal well equations is presented and a comparison between these equations is given. In addition, both analytical and numerical solutions for horizontal wells with skin and non-Darcy flow are presented for comparison.

Thomas, L.K.; Todd, B.J.; Evans, C.E.; Pierson, R.G.

1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

114

Underground Wells (Oklahoma)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Class I, III, IV and V injection wells require a permit issued by the Executive Director of the Department of Environmental Quality; Class V injection wells utilized in the remediation of...

115

Economic design of wells  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...concepts and the general principles outlined...with wells of the general configuration shown...internal com- bustion engine. It is assumed that...analysis, consider a diesel- powered well of...modified to use either a general expression for performance...written in terms of diesel-powered wells...

R. F. Stoner; D. M. Milne; P. J. Lund

116

Average resonance capture study of Te124  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

An average resonance capture study of Te124 was carried out by bombarding samples of Te123 with 2- and 24-keV neutron beams. The complete set of 0+, 1+, 2+ states disclosed by the experiment is consistent with the data of Robinson, Hamilton, and Snelling, demonstrating that there are no undetected states of these spins (especially 0+ states) below about 2500 keV. In particular, proposed 0+ levels at 1156 and 1290 keV are ruled out. This impacts various attempted interpretations in terms of intruder states, U(5), and O(6) symmetries.

R. F. Casten; J.-Y. Zhang; B.-C. Liao

1991-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

117

BUFFERED WELL FIELD OUTLINES  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

OIL & GAS FIELD OUTLINES FROM BUFFERED WELLS OIL & GAS FIELD OUTLINES FROM BUFFERED WELLS The VBA Code below builds oil & gas field boundary outlines (polygons) from buffered wells (points). Input well points layer must be a feature class (FC) with the following attributes: Field_name Buffer distance (can be unique for each well to represent reservoirs with different drainage radii) ...see figure below. Copy the code into a new module. Inputs: In ArcMap, data frame named "Task 1" Well FC as first layer (layer 0). Output: Polygon feature class in same GDB as the well points FC, with one polygon field record (may be multiple polygon rings) per field_name. Overlapping buffers for the same field name are dissolved and unioned (see figure below). Adds an attribute PCTFEDLAND which can be populated using the VBA

118

Well drilling apparatus  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A drill rig for drilling wells having a derrick adapted to hold and lower a conductor string and drill pipe string. A support frame is fixed to the derrick to extend over the well to be drilled, and a rotary table, for holding and rotating drill pipe strings, is movably mounted thereon. The table is displaceable between an active position in alignment with the axis of the well and an inactive position laterally spaced therefrom. A drill pipe holder is movably mounted on the frame below the rotary table for displacement between a first position laterally of the axis of the well and a second position in alignment with the axis of the well. The rotary table and said drill pipe holder are displaced in opposition to each other, so that the rotary table may be removed from alignment with the axis of the well and said drill pipe string simultaneously held without removal from said well.

Prins, K.; Prins, R.K.

1982-09-28T23:59:59.000Z

119

Average Price of Natural Gas Production  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

. . Quantity and Average Price of Natural Gas Production in the United States, 1930-1996 (Volumes in Million Cubic Feet, Prices in Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet) Table Year Gross Withdrawals Used for Repressuring Nonhydro- carbon Gases Removed Vented and Flared Marketed Production Extraction Loss Dry Production Average Wellhead Price of Marketed Production 1930 ....................... NA NA NA NA 1,978,911 75,140 1,903,771 0.08 1931 ....................... NA NA NA NA 1,721,902 62,288 1,659,614 0.07 1932 ....................... NA NA NA NA 1,593,798 51,816 1,541,982 0.06 1933 ....................... NA NA NA NA 1,596,673 48,280 1,548,393 0.06 1934 ....................... NA NA NA NA 1,815,796 52,190 1,763,606 0.06 1935 ....................... NA NA NA NA 1,968,963 55,488 1,913,475 0.06 1936 ....................... 2,691,512 73,507 NA 392,528 2,225,477

120

Average values and dispersion (in parentheses)  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Average values and dispersion (in parentheses) Average values and dispersion (in parentheses) Base-pair Parameters --------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- Shear Stretch Stagger Buckle Propeller Opening 3DNA A 0.01(0.23) -0.18(0.10) 0.02(0.25) -0.13(7.77) -11.79(4.14) 0.57(2.80) B 0.00(0.21) -0.15(0.12) 0.09(0.19) 0.53(6.74) -11.35(5.26) 0.63(3.05) CEHS A 0.01(0.23) -0.18(0.10) 0.02(0.25) -0.13(7.75) -11.82(4.14) 0.56(2.78) B 0.00(0.21) -0.14(0.12) 0.09(0.19) 0.53(6.73) -11.37(5.27) 0.62(3.03) CompDNA A 0.01(0.23) -0.18(0.10) 0.02(0.25) -0.12(7.70) -11.81(4.14) 0.56(2.79) B 0.00(0.21) -0.15(0.12) 0.09(0.19) 0.53(6.70) -11.37(5.26) 0.62(3.03) Curves A 0.01(0.23) -0.18(0.10) 0.02(0.25) -0.13(7.85) -11.76(4.12) 0.57(2.80)

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "wells average temperature" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

well | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

43 43 Varnish cache server Browse Upload data GDR 429 Throttled (bot load) Error 429 Throttled (bot load) Throttled (bot load) Guru Meditation: XID: 2142280543 Varnish cache server well Dataset Summary Description The California Division of Oil, Gas, and Geothermal Resources contains oil, gas, and geothermal data for the state of California. Source California Division of Oil, Gas, and Geothermal Resources Date Released February 01st, 2011 (3 years ago) Date Updated Unknown Keywords California data gas geothermal oil well Data application/vnd.ms-excel icon California district 1 wells (xls, 10.1 MiB) application/vnd.ms-excel icon California district 2 wells (xls, 4 MiB) application/vnd.ms-excel icon California district 3 wells (xls, 3.8 MiB) application/zip icon California district 4 wells (zip, 11.2 MiB)

122

Petroleum well costs.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??This is the first academic study of well costs and drilling times for Australia??s petroleum producing basins, both onshore and offshore. I analyse a substantial (more)

Leamon, Gregory Robert

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

123

High Average Power, High Energy Short Pulse Fiber Laser System  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Recently continuous wave fiber laser systems with output powers in excess of 500W with good beam quality have been demonstrated [1]. High energy, ultrafast, chirped pulsed fiber laser systems have achieved record output energies of 1mJ [2]. However, these high-energy systems have not been scaled beyond a few watts of average output power. Fiber laser systems are attractive for many applications because they offer the promise of high efficiency, compact, robust systems that are turn key. Applications such as cutting, drilling and materials processing, front end systems for high energy pulsed lasers (such as petawatts) and laser based sources of high spatial coherence, high flux x-rays all require high energy short pulses and two of the three of these applications also require high average power. The challenge in creating a high energy chirped pulse fiber laser system is to find a way to scale the output energy while avoiding nonlinear effects and maintaining good beam quality in the amplifier fiber. To this end, our 3-year LDRD program sought to demonstrate a high energy, high average power fiber laser system. This work included exploring designs of large mode area optical fiber amplifiers for high energy systems as well as understanding the issues associated chirped pulse amplification in optical fiber amplifier systems.

Messerly, M J

2007-11-13T23:59:59.000Z

124

Average deployments versus missile and defender parameters  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report evaluates the average number of reentry vehicles (RVs) that could be deployed successfully as a function of missile burn time, RV deployment times, and the number of space-based interceptors (SBIs) in defensive constellations. Leakage estimates of boost-phase kinetic-energy defenses as functions of launch parameters and defensive constellation size agree with integral predictions of near-exact calculations for constellation sizing. The calculations discussed here test more detailed aspects of the interaction. They indicate that SBIs can efficiently remove about 50% of the RVs from a heavy missile attack. The next 30% can removed with two-fold less effectiveness. The next 10% could double constellation sizes. 5 refs., 7 figs.

Canavan, G.H.

1991-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

125

Phenomenal well-being  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

rated against the experience of the individual?s other possible lives. Unlike well-being, PWB is guaranteed to track more robust experiential benefits that a person gets out of living a life. In this work, I discuss the concept of well-being, including...

Campbell, Stephen Michael

2006-08-16T23:59:59.000Z

126

Fuel Economy Standards, New Vehicle Sales, and Average Fuel Efficiency  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The average fuel efficiency of new automobiles sold in the ... trend stagnated in 1981, however, and average fuel efficiency has actually fallen since 1987. Corporate Average Fuel Economy (CAFE) standardsthe maj...

Steven G. Thorpe

1997-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

127

Fact #744: September 10, 2012 Average New Light Vehicle Price...  

Energy Savers [EERE]

4: September 10, 2012 Average New Light Vehicle Price Grows Faster than Average Used Light Vehicle Price Fact 744: September 10, 2012 Average New Light Vehicle Price Grows Faster...

128

STATE OF CALIFORNIA AREA WEIGHTED AVERAGE CALCULATION WORKSHEET: RESIDENTIAL  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

be used to calculate weight-averaged U-factors or averaged SHGC values for prescriptive envelope of window (the SHGC values of skylights cannot be averaged per §151(f)4A). a. "Area" can be replaced

129

BUFFERED WELL FIELD OUTLINES  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

drainage radii) ...see figure below. Copy the code into a new module. Inputs: In ArcMap, data frame named "Task 1" Well FC as first layer (layer 0). Output: Polygon feature class...

130

Shock Chlorination of Wells  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Shock chlorination is a method of disinfecting a water well. This publication gives complete instructions for chlorinating with bleach or with dry chlorine. It is also available in Spanish as publication L-5441S...

McFarland, Mark L.; Dozier, Monty

2003-06-11T23:59:59.000Z

131

Fact #849: December 1, 2014 Midsize Hybrid Cars Averaged 51%...  

Energy Savers [EERE]

average is the production-weighted harmonic mean. 2014 data are preliminary. Fact 849 Dataset Supporting Information Average Fuel Economy of New Midsize Cars - Hybrid vs....

132

Well Log Techniques | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Well Log Techniques Well Log Techniques Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Technique: Well Log Techniques Details Activities (4) Areas (4) Regions (1) NEPA(0) Exploration Technique Information Exploration Group: Downhole Techniques Exploration Sub Group: Well Log Techniques Parent Exploration Technique: Downhole Techniques Information Provided by Technique Lithology: depth and thickness of formations; lithology and porosity can be inferred Stratigraphic/Structural: reservoir thickness, reservoir geometry, borehole geometry Hydrological: permeability and fluid composition can be inferred Thermal: direct temperature measurements; thermal conductivity and heat capacity Dictionary.png Well Log Techniques: Well logging is the measurement of formation properties versus depth in a

133

Development Wells At Salt Wells Area (Nevada Bureau of Mines and Geology,  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Salt Wells Area (Nevada Bureau of Mines and Geology, Salt Wells Area (Nevada Bureau of Mines and Geology, 2009) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Development Wells At Salt Wells Area (Nevada Bureau of Mines and Geology, 2009) Exploration Activity Details Location Salt Wells Geothermal Area Exploration Technique Development Drilling Activity Date 2005 - 2005 Usefulness useful DOE-funding Unknown Exploration Basis AMP Resources, LLC drilled one of the first operating wells, Industrial Production Well PW-2, in the spring of 2005 under geothermal project area permit #568. Notes The well was completed to a depth of 143.6 m and a peak temperature of 145°C, as indicated by static temperature surveys. Wellhead temperatures at PW-2 were 140°C at a flow rate of 157.7 liters per minute, and no

134

Mountain Home Well - Photos  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Snake River Plain (SRP), Idaho, hosts potential geothermal resources due to elevated groundwater temperatures associated with the thermal anomaly Yellowstone-Snake River hotspot. Project HOTSPOT has coordinated international institutions and organizations to understand subsurface stratigraphy and assess geothermal potential. Over 5.9km of core were drilled from three boreholes within the SRP in an attempt to acquire continuous core documenting the volcanic and sedimentary record of the hotspot: (1) Kimama, (2) Kimberly, and (3) Mountain Home. The Mountain Home drill hole is located along the western plain and documents older basalts overlain by sediment. Data submitted by project collaborator Doug Schmitt, University of Alberta

John Shervais

2012-01-11T23:59:59.000Z

135

Mountain Home Well - Photos  

DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

The Snake River Plain (SRP), Idaho, hosts potential geothermal resources due to elevated groundwater temperatures associated with the thermal anomaly Yellowstone-Snake River hotspot. Project HOTSPOT has coordinated international institutions and organizations to understand subsurface stratigraphy and assess geothermal potential. Over 5.9km of core were drilled from three boreholes within the SRP in an attempt to acquire continuous core documenting the volcanic and sedimentary record of the hotspot: (1) Kimama, (2) Kimberly, and (3) Mountain Home. The Mountain Home drill hole is located along the western plain and documents older basalts overlain by sediment. Data submitted by project collaborator Doug Schmitt, University of Alberta

Shervais, John

136

Economic design of wells  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...year, c is the cost per lb of diesel fuel, and Co is the cost per...program was written in terms of diesel-powered wells, modifications...charac- teristics of pump-engine combinations and are again...water encountered. There is a fundamental difference between the design...

R. F. Stoner; D. M. Milne; P. J. Lund

137

Kimberly Well - Photos  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Snake River Plain (SRP), Idaho, hosts potential geothermal resources due to elevated groundwater temperatures associated with the thermal anomaly Yellowstone-Snake River hotspot. Project HOTSPOT has coordinated international institutions and organizations to understand subsurface stratigraphy and assess geothermal potential. Over 5.9km of core were drilled from three boreholes within the SRP in an attempt to acquire continuous core documenting the volcanic and sedimentary record of the hotspot: (1) Kimama, (2) Kimberly, and (3) Mountain Home. The Kimberly drill hole was selected to document continuous volcanism when analysed in conjunction with the Kimama and is located near the margin of the plain. Data submitted by project collaborator Doug Schmitt, University of Alberta

John Shervais

2011-06-16T23:59:59.000Z

138

Kimama Well - Photos  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Snake River Plain (SRP), Idaho, hosts potential geothermal resources due to elevated groundwater temperatures associated with the thermal anomaly Yellowstone-Snake River hotspot. Project HOTSPOT has coordinated international institutions and organizations to understand subsurface stratigraphy and assess geothermal potential. Over 5.9km of core were drilled from three boreholes within the SRP in an attempt to acquire continuous core documenting the volcanic and sedimentary record of the hotspot: (1) Kimama, (2) Kimberly, and (3) Mountain Home. The Kimama drill site was set up to acquire a continuous record of basaltic volcanism along the central volcanic axis and to test the extent of geothermal resources beneath the Snake River aquifer. Data submitted by project collaborator Doug Schmitt, University of Alberta

John Shervais

2011-01-16T23:59:59.000Z

139

Well Log Data At Blue Mountain Geothermal Area (Fairbank & Niggemann...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

well Deep Blue No. 1. Notes Well log data was collected in Deep Blue No. 1 upon its completion. The logging was conducted by Welaco Well Analysis Corporation. Temperature,...

140

Body temperatures of modern and extinct vertebrates from 13C-18O bond abundances in bioapatite  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, such as alli- gators and crocodiles, generally have significant differences in average body temperatures

Schöne, Bernd R.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "wells average temperature" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

The Temperature Prediction in Deepwater Drilling of Vertical Well  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

.................................................................................................. 30 3.4 Geothermal Gradient ................................................................................ 30 3.5 Overall Heat Transfer Coefficient ............................................................ 30... ............................................................................................ 47 vii ? Page 5.2 Conservation Of Energy ........................................................................... 47 5.3 Steady-state Heat Transfer Model...

Feng, Ming

2012-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

142

Interpreting Horizontal Well Flow Profiles and Optimizing Well Performance by Downhole Temperature and Pressure Data  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, Rs = 0.1 0F...................... 118 Fig. 5.39 May identify high inflow sections at 2 days, Rs = 0.1 0F............................. 119 Fig. 5.40 Identify high inflow sections at initial, ? = 0.033 0F ................................... 120 Fig... sections at 5 day, ? = 0.1 0F ........................ 121 Fig. 5.44 Reservoir geometry and 2D permeability distribution used in example 2...

Li, Zhuoyi

2011-02-22T23:59:59.000Z

143

Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #328: July 12, 2004 Expected Average  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

8: July 12, 2004 8: July 12, 2004 Expected Average Annual Miles to someone by E-mail Share Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #328: July 12, 2004 Expected Average Annual Miles on Facebook Tweet about Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #328: July 12, 2004 Expected Average Annual Miles on Twitter Bookmark Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #328: July 12, 2004 Expected Average Annual Miles on Google Bookmark Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #328: July 12, 2004 Expected Average Annual Miles on Delicious Rank Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #328: July 12, 2004 Expected Average Annual Miles on Digg Find More places to share Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #328: July 12, 2004 Expected Average Annual Miles on AddThis.com... Fact #328: July 12, 2004 Expected Average Annual Miles Twenty-five percent of the respondents to a nationwide survey said that

144

Fact #614: March 15, 2010 Average Age of Household Vehicles  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The average age of household vehicles has increased from 6.6 years in 1977 to 9.2 years in 2009. Pickup trucks have the oldest average age in every year listed. Sport utility vehicles (SUVs), first...

145

Fact #615: March 22, 2010 Average Vehicle Trip Length  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

According to the latest National Household Travel Survey, the average trip length grew to over 10 miles in 2009, just slightly over the 9.9 mile average in 2001. Trips to work in 2009 increased to...

146

Fact #835: August 25, Average Historical Annual Gasoline Pump...  

Energy Savers [EERE]

5: August 25, Average Historical Annual Gasoline Pump Price, 1929-2013 Fact 835: August 25, Average Historical Annual Gasoline Pump Price, 1929-2013 When adjusted for inflation,...

147

Flow in geothermal wells: Part III. Calculation model for self-flowing well  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The theoretical model described predicts the temperature, pressure, dynamic dryness fraction, and void fraction along the vertical channel of two-phase flow. The existing data from operating wells indicate good agreement with the model. (MHR)

Bilicki, Z.; Kestin, J.; Michaelides, E.E.

1981-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

148

Exploratory Well At Salt Wells Area (Bureau of Land Management, 2009) |  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Exploratory Well At Salt Wells Area (Bureau of Land Management, 2009) Exploratory Well At Salt Wells Area (Bureau of Land Management, 2009) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Exploratory Well At Salt Wells Area (Bureau of Land Management, 2009) Exploration Activity Details Location Salt Wells Geothermal Area Exploration Technique Exploratory Well Activity Date 2008 - 2008 Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Exploration Basis Vulcan increased exploration efforts in the summer and fall of 2008, during which time the company drilled two temperature gradient holes (86-15 O on Pad 1 and 17-16 O on Pad 3); conducted seismic, gravity and magnetotelluric surveys; and drilled deep exploration wells at Pads 6 and 8 and binary wells at Pads 1, 2, 4, and 7. Notes Data from these wells is proprietary, and so were unavailable for inclusion

149

Spherical averages and applications to spherical splines and interpolation  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This article introduces a method for computing weighted averages on spheres based on least squares minimization that respects spherical distance. We prove existence and uniqueness properties of the weighted averages, and give fast iterative algorithms ... Keywords: Bzier curve, B-spline, barycentric coordinates, least squares minimization, quaternion interpolation, quaternions, spherical average, spherical interpolation, spherical mean, spline curve, spline interpolation

Samuel R. Buss; Jay P. Fillmore

2001-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

150

Geohydrology of Pahute Mesa-3 test well, Nye County, Nevada  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Pahute Mesa-3 test well is on Pahute Mesa about 3 miles west of the Nevada Test Site and 20 miles northeast of Oasis Valley near Beatty, Nevada. The well was drilled for the U.S. Department of Energy Radionuclide Migration Program to monitor conditions near the western edge of the Nevada Test Site. The well was drilled with conventional rotary methods and an air-foam drilling fluid to a depth of 3,019 feet. A 10.75-inch diameter steel casing was installed to a depth of 1,473 feet. The test well penetrates thick units of non-welded to partly welded ash-flow and air-fall tuff of Tertiary age with several thin layers of densely welded tuff, rhyolite and basalt flows, and breccia. Geophysical logs indicate that fractures are significant in the Tiva Canyon Tuff of the Paintbrush Group and this was confirmed by high flow in this unit during a borehole-flow survey. The geophysical logs also show that the effective porosity in tuffaceous units ranges from 19 to 38 percent and averages 30 percent, and the total porosity ranges from 33 to 55 percent and averages 42 percent. The measured temperature gradient of 1.00 degree Celsius per 100 feet is steep, but is similar to that of other nearby wells, one of which penetrates a buried granite intrusion. Injection tests for six intervals of the well yielded transmissivities that ranged from 3.1 x 10{sup -3} to 25 feet squared per day and hydraulic conductivities that ranged from 6 x 10{sup -5} to 0.12 foot per day. The sum of the transmissivities is 28 feet squared per day and the geometric mean of hydraulic conductivity is 1.7 x 10{sup -3} foot per day. Estimates of storage coefficient range from 2.1 x 10{sup -5} to 3.8 x 10{sup -3}, indicating that the aquifer responded to the injection tests in a confined manner. An aquifer test produced a drawdown of 78 feet during 31 hours of testing at 169 gallons per minute.

Kilroy, K.C.; Savard, C.S.

1997-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

151

Stimulation Technologies for Deep Well Completions  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Department of Energy (DOE) is sponsoring the Deep Trek Program targeted at improving the economics of drilling and completing deep gas wells. Under the DOE program, Pinnacle Technologies conducted a study to evaluate the stimulation of deep wells. The objective of the project was to review U.S. deep well drilling and stimulation activity, review rock mechanics and fracture growth in deep, high-pressure/temperature wells and evaluate stimulation technology in several key deep plays. This report documents results from this project.

Stephen Wolhart

2005-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

152

Abnormal Pressures in Deep Wells of Southwestern Louisiana  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...abnormally high porosity between depths...appreciable permeability to water...view of the porosity of shales, their average permeability should be appre-ciable...well-consolidated rocks. However...petroleum-reservoir behavior have...

Parke A. Dickey; Calcutta R. Shriram; William R. Paine

1968-05-10T23:59:59.000Z

153

Development Wells At Fenton Hill HDR Geothermal Area (Dreesen...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

into EE-2 at an average flow rate of 100 Ls and downhole pressure of 83 MPa, the fracture pattern produced again failed to connect the two wells. A third attempt to fracture...

154

Ensemble bayesian model averaging using markov chain Monte Carlo sampling  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Bayesian model averaging (BMA) has recently been proposed as a statistical method to calibrate forecast ensembles from numerical weather models. Successful implementation of BMA however, requires accurate estimates of the weights and variances of the individual competing models in the ensemble. In their seminal paper (Raftery etal. Mon Weather Rev 133: 1155-1174, 2(05)) has recommended the Expectation-Maximization (EM) algorithm for BMA model training, even though global convergence of this algorithm cannot be guaranteed. In this paper, we compare the performance of the EM algorithm and the recently developed Differential Evolution Adaptive Metropolis (DREAM) Markov Chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) algorithm for estimating the BMA weights and variances. Simulation experiments using 48-hour ensemble data of surface temperature and multi-model stream-flow forecasts show that both methods produce similar results, and that their performance is unaffected by the length of the training data set. However, MCMC simulation with DREAM is capable of efficiently handling a wide variety of BMA predictive distributions, and provides useful information about the uncertainty associated with the estimated BMA weights and variances.

Vrugt, Jasper A [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Diks, Cees G H [NON LANL; Clark, Martyn P [NON LANL

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

155

Step-out Well | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Step-out Well Step-out Well Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Technique: Step-out Well Details Activities (5) Areas (5) Regions (0) NEPA(0) Exploration Technique Information Exploration Group: Drilling Techniques Exploration Sub Group: Exploration Drilling Parent Exploration Technique: Exploration Drilling Information Provided by Technique Lithology: Drill cuttings are analyzed to determine lithology and mineralogy Stratigraphic/Structural: Fractures, faults, and geologic formations that the well passes through are identified and mapped Hydrological: Identify aquifers, reservoir boundaries, flow rates, fluid pressure, and chemistry Thermal: Direct temperature measurements from within the reservoir Dictionary.png Step-out Well: A well drilled outside of the proven reservoir boundaries to investigate a

156

Surface temperature | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Surface temperature Surface temperature Dataset Summary Description This dataset, made available by the UK Department of Energy and Climate Change (DECC), shows the difference between the yearly central England temperature for years 1772 through 2009 and the 1961 - 1990 baseline (1961 - 1990 Central England average after smoothing). It also shows the difference between average global temperature and 1961 - 1990 average after smoothing. The original source of the data is the Met Office. Source UK Department of Energy and Climate Change (DECC) Date Released March 12th, 2010 (4 years ago) Date Updated Unknown Keywords climate change Surface temperature UK weather Data application/vnd.ms-excel icon 1 Excel file: Surface Temps, 1772 - 1990 (xls, 1.3 MiB) Quality Metrics Level of Review Some Review

157

Free Energy Self-Averaging in Protein-Sized Random Heteropolymers  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Current theories of heteropolymers are inherently macrpscopic, but are applied to folding proteins which are only mesoscopic. In these theories, one computes the averaged free energy over sequences, always assuming that it is self-averaging -- a property well-established only if a system with quenched disorder is macroscopic. By enumerating the states and energies of compact 18, 27, and 36mers on a simplified lattice model with an ensemble of random sequences, we test the validity of the self-averaging approximation. We find that fluctuations in the free energy between sequences are weak, and that self-averaging is a valid approximation at the length scale of real proteins. These results validate certain sequence design methods which can exponentially speed up computational design and greatly simplify experimental realizations.

Jeffrey Chuang; Alexander Yu. Grosberg; Mehran Kardar

2001-02-05T23:59:59.000Z

158

Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #310: March 8, 2004 Average Material  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

0: March 8, 2004 0: March 8, 2004 Average Material Consumption for a Domestic Automobile to someone by E-mail Share Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #310: March 8, 2004 Average Material Consumption for a Domestic Automobile on Facebook Tweet about Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #310: March 8, 2004 Average Material Consumption for a Domestic Automobile on Twitter Bookmark Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #310: March 8, 2004 Average Material Consumption for a Domestic Automobile on Google Bookmark Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #310: March 8, 2004 Average Material Consumption for a Domestic Automobile on Delicious Rank Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #310: March 8, 2004 Average Material Consumption for a Domestic Automobile on Digg Find More places to share Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #310:

159

Average Interest Rate for Treasury Securities | Data.gov  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Average Interest Rate for Treasury Securities Average Interest Rate for Treasury Securities Consumer Data Apps Challenges Resources About Blogs Let's Talk Feedback Consumer You are here Data.gov » Communities » Consumer » Data Average Interest Rate for Treasury Securities Dataset Summary Description This dataset shows the average interest rates for U.S Treasury securities for the most recent month compared with the same month of the previous year. The data is broken down by the various marketable and non-marketable securities. The summary page for the data provides links for monthly reports from 2001 through the current year. Average Interest Rates are calculated on the total unmatured interest-bearing debt. The average interest rates for total marketable, total non-marketable and total interest-bearing debt do not include the U.S. Treasury Inflation-Protected Securities.

160

Raser Receives Third Party Analysis on Well Field | Department...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

GeothermEx reported that well 24-34 indicated 3.6 megawatts (MW) net at the well depth level Raser plans to produce, with temperatures in excess of 280 degrees F. GeothermEx's...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "wells average temperature" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Hydraulic fracture stimulation treatment of Well Baca 23. Geothermal Reservoir Well-Stimulation Program  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Well Stimulation Experiment No. 5 of the Geothermal Reservoir Well Stimulation Program (GRWSP) was performed on March 22, 1981 in Baca 23, located in Union's Redondo Creek Project Area in Sandoval County, New Mexico. The treatment selected was a large hydraulic fracture job designed specifically for, and utilizing frac materials chosen for, the high temperature geothermal environment. The well selection, fracture treatment, experiment evaluation, and summary of the job costs are presented herein.

Not Available

1981-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

162

Solar: monthly and annual average global horizontal (GHI) GIS...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Facebook icon Twitter icon Home Organizations DLR - Deutsches Zentrum fr ... Solar: monthly and annual ... Dataset Activity Stream Solar: monthly and annual average...

163

,"Selected National Average Natural Gas Prices"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Selected National Average Natural Gas Prices" Selected National Average Natural Gas Prices" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description","# Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Average Natural Gas Prices",11,"Monthly","11/2013","1/15/1973" ,"Data 2","Annual Average Natural Gas Prices",11,"Annual",2012,"6/30/1922" ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","ngm03vmall.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://www.eia.gov/oil_gas/natural_gas/data_publications/natural_gas_monthly/ngm.html"

164

Well Permits (District of Columbia)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Well permits are required for the installation of wells in private and public space. Wells are defined as any trest hole, shaft, or soil excavation created by any means including, but not limited...

165

Higher-order averaging, formal series and numerical integration II  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

systems of ordinary differential equations with d 1 non- resonant constant frequencies. Formal series frequency and four resonant fast frequencies. Keywords and sentences: Averaging, high-order averaging, quasi Schumann, 35170 Bruz, France. Email: Philippe.Chartier@inria.fr Konputazio Zientziak eta A. A. Saila

Murua, Ander

166

Solar: monthly and annual average direct normal (DNI), global horizontal  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

East Asia from NREL East Asia from NREL Dataset Summary Description (Abstract): Monthly Average Solar Resource for horizontal and tilted flat-plates, and 2-axis tracking concentrating collectors. (Purpose): Provide information on the solar resource potential for the data domain. The insolation values represent the average solar energy available to solar collectors. (Supplemental Information): These data provide monthly average and annual average daily total solar resource averaged over surface cells of approximately 40 km by 40 km in size. The solar resource value is represented as watt-hours per square meter per day for each month. The data were developed from NREL's Climatological Solar Radiation (CSR) Model. This model uses information on cloud cover, atmospheric water

167

Do Diurnal Aerosol Changes Affect Daily Average Radiative Forcing?  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Strong diurnal variability of aerosol has been observed frequently for many urban/industrial regions. How this variability may alter the direct aerosol radiative forcing (DARF), however, is largely unknown. To quantify changes in the time-averaged DARF, we perform an assessment of 29 days of high temporal resolution ground-based data collected during the Two-Column Aerosol Project (TCAP) on Cape Cod, which is downwind of metropolitan areas. We demonstrate that strong diurnal changes of aerosol loading (about 20% on average) have a negligible impact on the 24-h average DARF, when daily averaged optical properties are used to find this quantity. However, when there is a sparse temporal sampling of aerosol properties, which may preclude the calculation of daily averaged optical properties, large errors (up to 100%) in the computed DARF may occur. We describe a simple way of reducing these errors, which suggests the minimal temporal sampling needed to accurately find the forcing.

Kassianov, Evgueni I.; Barnard, James C.; Pekour, Mikhail S.; Berg, Larry K.; Michalsky, Joseph J.; Lantz, K.; Hodges, G. B.

2013-06-17T23:59:59.000Z

168

Solar: monthly and annual average direct normal (DNI), global horizontal  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Africa from NREL Africa from NREL Dataset Summary Description (Abstract): Monthly Average Solar Resource for horizontal and tilted flat-plates, and 2-axis tracking concentrating collectors. (Purpose): Provide information on the solar resource potential for the data domain. The insolation values represent the average solar energy available to solar collectors. (Supplemental Information): These data provide monthly average and annual average daily total solar resource averaged over surface cells of approximately 40 km by 40 km in size. The solar resource value is represented as watt-hours per square meter per day for each month. The data were developed from NREL's Climatological Solar Radiation (CSR) Model. This model uses information on cloud cover, atmospheric water

169

Averaged dynamics of ultra-relativisitc charged particles beams  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In this thesis, we consider the suitability of using the charged cold fluid model in the description of ultra-relativistic beams. The method that we have used is the following. Firstly, the necessary notions of kinetic theory and differential geometry of second order differential equations are explained. Then an averaging procedure is applied to a connection associated with the Lorentz force equation. The result of this averaging is an affine connection on the space-time manifold. The corresponding geodesic equation defines the averaged Lorentz force equation. We prove that for ultra-relativistic beams described by narrow distribution functions, the solutions of both equations are similar. This fact justifies the replacement of the Lorentz force equation by the simpler {\\it averaged Lorentz force equation}. After this, for each of these models we associate the corresponding kinetic model, which are based on the Vlasov equation and {\\it averaged Vlasov equation} respectively. The averaged Vlasov equation is simpler than the original Vlasov equation. This fact allows us to prove that the differential operation defining the averaged charged cold fluid equation is controlled by the {\\it diameter of the distribution function}, by powers of the {\\it energy of the beam} and by the time of evolution $t$. We show that the Vlasov equation and the averaged Vlasov equation have similar solutions, when the initial conditions are the same. Finally, as an application of the {\\it averaged Lorentz force equation} we re-derive the beam dynamics formalism used in accelerator physics from the Jacobi equation of the averaged Lorentz force equation.

Ricardo Gallego Torrom

2012-06-19T23:59:59.000Z

170

Conditional averaging on volumetric velocity fields for analysis of the pseudo-periodic organization of jet-in-crossflow vortices  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Volumetric velocimetry measurements have been performed on a round jet in crossflow (JICF). Two kind of conditional averaging process are presented : a global conditional average (GCA) and a local conditional average (LCA). Vortices crossing the JICF symmetry plane are used to quantify the jet pseudo-periodicity leading to the GCA and LCA definitions. Because they make possible to improve the velocity field resolution as well as to significantly reduce the experimental noise, these conditional averages are an interesting and efficient way to study the instantaneous swirling structures of this instantaneous flow.

Cambonie, Tristan

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

171

Well-pump alignment system  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An improved well-pump for geothermal wells, an alignment system for a well-pump, and to a method for aligning a rotor and stator within a well-pump are disclosed, wherein the well-pump has a whistle assembly formed at a bottom portion thereof, such that variations in the frequency of the whistle, indicating misalignment, may be monitored during pumping. 6 figs.

Drumheller, D.S.

1998-10-20T23:59:59.000Z

172

Measurement of average resistance in underwater breathing apparatus  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Underwater Breathing Apparatus (UBA) have long been characterized by the mechanical work done on them during simulated breathing. For 20 years, the work of breathing has been divided by tidal volume to yield what is properly considered a volume-averaged pressure. The authors assert that when volume-averaged pressure is divided by a factor proportional to ventilation, the result is a measure of flow resistance averaged over an entire breath. This point is illustrated with both theoretical and actual pressure-volume and pressure-flow curves for a MK 16 closed-circuit UBA.

Clarke, J.R. [Navy Experimental Diving Unit, Panama City, FL (United States)

1996-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

173

Time average vibration fringe analysis using Hilbert transformation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Quantitative phase information from a single interferogram can be obtained using the Hilbert transform (HT). We have applied the HT method for quantitative evaluation of Bessel fringes obtained in time average TV holography. The method requires only one fringe pattern for the extraction of vibration amplitude and reduces the complexity in quantifying the data experienced in the time average reference bias modulation method, which uses multiple fringe frames. The technique is demonstrated for the measurement of out-of-plane vibration amplitude on a small scale specimen using a time average microscopic TV holography system.

Kumar, Upputuri Paul; Mohan, Nandigana Krishna; Kothiyal, Mahendra Prasad

2010-10-20T23:59:59.000Z

174

Health And Wellness Department Of Health And Wellness  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Health And Wellness Department Of Health And Wellness Lutchmie Narine, Chair, 315-443-9630 426 The Department of Health and Wellness offers a 123-credit Bachelor of Science degree (B.S.) in public health. Our graduates are prepared to work in community health education and health promotion in public health agencies

McConnell, Terry

175

Slim wells for exploration purposes in Mexico  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

To invest in the construction of wells with definitive designs considerably increases the cost of a geothermal electric project in its analysis and definition stage. The Federal Commission for Electricity (Comision Federal de Electricidad, CFE) has concentrated on the task to design wells which casing and cementing programs would provide the minimum installation necessary to reach the structural objective, to confirm the existence of geothermal reservoirs susceptible to commercial exploitation, to check prior geological studies, to define the stratigraphic column and to obtain measurements of pressure, temperature and permeability. Problems of brittle, hydratable and permeable formations with severe circulation losses, must be considered within the design and drilling programs of the wells. This work explains the slim wells designs used in the exploration of three geothermal zones in Mexico: Las Derrumbadas and Acoculco in the State of Puebla and Los Negritos in the State of Michoacan.

Vaca Serrano, J.M.E.; Soto Alvarez, M.

1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

176

U.S. average gasoline price up slightly  

Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

average retail price for regular gasoline rose slightly to 3.65 a gallon on Monday. That's up a tenth of a penny from a week ago, based on the weekly price survey by the U.S....

177

Fact #671: April 18, 2011 Average Truck Speeds  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The Federal Highway Administration studies traffic volume and flow on major truck routes by tracking more than 500,000 trucks. The average speed of trucks on selected interstate highways is between...

178

Abstract Interpretation for Worst and Average Case Analysis  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

energy usage whilst bounding the average number of requests waiting to be served. PRISM is used phase extracts a control flow graph ­ for some classes of language this may already involve an abstract

Di Pierro, Alessandra

179

Weighted Coherence: A More Effective Measure Than Average Coherence  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In this study, we evaluated the effectiveness of the statistic, Weighted Coherence in relation to the average or mean coherence in a particular frequency band after cross- ... using cross-spectral analysis is r...

Vikram Kumar Yeragani; Arindam Barua

2003-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

180

Table 17. Recoverable Coal Reserves and Average Recovery Percentage...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Recoverable Coal Reserves and Average Recovery Percentage at Producing U.S. Mines by Mine Production Range and Mine Type, 2012 (million short tons) U.S. Energy Information...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "wells average temperature" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Energy loss rate in disordered quantum well  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We report the effect of dynamically screened deformation potential on the electron energy loss rate in disordered semiconductor quantum well. Interaction of confined electrons with bulk acoustic phonons has been considered in the deformation coupling. The study concludes that the dynamically screened deformation potential coupling plays a significant role as it substantially affects the power dependency of electron relaxation on temperature and mean free path.

Tripathi, P.; Ashraf, S. S. Z. [Centre of Excellence in Nanomaterials, Faculty of Engineering and Technology, Aligarh Muslim University, Aligarh-202002 (India); Hasan, S. T. [Physics Department, Faculty of Science, The M.S. University of Baroda, Vadodara-390002 (India); Sharma, A. C. [Physics Department, Sibli National College, Azamgarh-276128 (India)

2014-04-24T23:59:59.000Z

182

Table A44. Average Prices of Purchased Electricity and Steam  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

4. Average Prices of Purchased Electricity and Steam" 4. Average Prices of Purchased Electricity and Steam" " by Type of Supplier, Census Region, Census Division, and" " Economic Characteristics of the Establishment, 1994" " (Estimates in Dollars per Physical Units)" ," Electricity",," Steam" ," (kWh)",," (million Btu)" ,,,,,"RSE" ,"Utility","Nonutility","Utility","Nonutility","Row" "Economic Characteristics(a)","Supplier(b)","Supplier(c)","Supplier(b)","Supplier(c)","Factors"

183

Flavor Physics Data from the Heavy Flavor Averaging Group (HFAG)  

DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

The Heavy Flavor Averaging Group (HFAG) was established at the May 2002 Flavor Physics and CP Violation Conference in Philadelphia, and continues the LEP Heavy Flavor Steering Group's tradition of providing regular updates to the world averages of heavy flavor quantities. Data are provided by six subgroups that each focus on a different set of heavy flavor measurements: B lifetimes and oscillation parameters, Semi-leptonic B decays, Rare B decays, Unitarity triangle parameters, B decays to charm final states, and Charm Physics.

184

Solar: monthly and annual average direct normal (DNI), global horizontal  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

South America from NREL South America from NREL Dataset Summary Description (Abstract): Monthly Average Solar Resource for horizontal and tilted flat-plates, and 2-axis tracking concentrating collectors. (Purpose): Provide information on the solar resource potential for the data domain. The insolation values represent the average solar energy available to solar collectors. (Supplemental Information): These data provide monthly average and annual average daily total solar resource averaged over surface cells of approximately 40 km by 40 km in size. The solar resource value is represented as watt-hours per square meter per day for each month. The data were developed from NREL's Climatological Solar Radiation (CSR) Model. This model uses information on cloud cover, atmospheric water vapor and trace gases, and the amount of aerosols in the atmosphere to calculate the monthly average daily total insolation (sun and sky) falling on a horizontal surface. Existing ground measurement stations are used to validate the data where possible. The modeled values are accurate to approximately 10% of a true measured value within the grid cell due to the uncertainties associated with meteorological input to the model. The local cloud cover can vary significantly even within a single grid cell as a result of terrain effects and other microclimate influences. Furthermore, the uncertainty of the modeled estimates increase with distance from reliable measurement sources and with the complexity of the terrain.

185

Solar: monthly and annual average direct normal (DNI), global horizontal  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Central America and the Carribean from NREL Central America and the Carribean from NREL Dataset Summary Description (Abstract): Monthly Average Solar Resource for horizontal and tilted flat-plates, and 2-axis tracking concentrating collectors. (Purpose): Provide information on the solar resource potential for the data domain. The insolation values represent the average solar energy available to solar collectors. (Supplemental Information): These data provide monthly average and annual average daily total solar resource averaged over surface cells of approximately 40 km by 40 km in size. The solar resource value is represented as watt-hours per square meter per day for each month. The data were developed from NREL's Climatological Solar Radiation (CSR) Model. This model uses information on cloud cover, atmospheric water vapor and trace gases, and the amount of aerosols in the atmosphere to calculate the monthly average daily total insolation (sun and sky) falling on a horizontal surface. Existing ground measurement stations are used to validate the data where possible. The modeled values are accurate to approximately 10% of a true measured value within the grid cell due to the uncertainties associated with meteorological input to the model. The local cloud cover can vary significantly even within a single grid cell as a result of terrain effects and other microclimate influences. Furthermore, the uncertainty of the modeled estimates increase with distance from reliable measurement sources and with the complexity of the terrain.

186

U.S. Refiner Sales to End Users (Average) Prices  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Sales Type: Sales to End Users, Average Through Retail Outlets Sales for Resale, Average DTW Rack Bulk Sales Type: Sales to End Users, Average Through Retail Outlets Sales for Resale, Average DTW Rack Bulk Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources & Notes Definitions, Sources & Notes Show Data By: Formulation/ Grade Sales Type Apr-13 May-13 Jun-13 Jul-13 Aug-13 Sep-13 View History Conventional, Average 3.030 3.137 3.122 3.063 3.042 2.972 1994-2013 Conventional Regular 3.005 3.116 3.102 3.040 3.017 2.948 1994-2013 Conventional Midgrade 3.167 3.256 3.239 3.200 3.193 3.121 1994-2013 Conventional Premium 3.269 3.354 3.327 3.291 3.274 3.203 1994-2013 Oxygenated, Average - - - - - - 1994-2013 Oxygenated Regular - - - - - - 1994-2013 Oxygenated Midgrade - - - - - - 1994-2013

187

Well Monitoring Systems for EGS  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Well Monitoring Systems for EGS presentation at the April 2013 peer review meeting held in Denver, Colorado.

188

Wellness Program | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Program Program Wellness Program Workers spend 200 hours per month at work, and keeping a healthy work-life balance is essential. The Headquarters Wellness Program provides support and assistance to DOE employees through a variety of programs and resources geared toward enhancing their mental and physical well-being. Wellness programs include: Accommodations, the Child Development Centers, the Employee Assistance Program (EAP), the Forrestal (FOHO) and Germantown (GOHO) Fitness Centers, the Occupational Health Clinics and the DOE WorkLife4You Program. Programs Disability Services Child Development Centers Headquarters Employee Assistance Program (EAP) Headquarters Occupational Health Clinics Headquarters Accommodation Program DOE Worklife4You Program Health Foreign Travel Health & Wellness Tips

189

Exploratory Well At Salt Wells Area (Edmiston & Benoit, 1984) | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Edmiston & Benoit, 1984) Edmiston & Benoit, 1984) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Exploratory Well At Salt Wells Area (Edmiston & Benoit, 1984) Exploration Activity Details Location Salt Wells Geothermal Area Exploration Technique Exploratory Well Activity Date 1980 - 1980 Usefulness useful DOE-funding Unknown Exploration Basis The blind Salt Wells geothermal system was first identified when Anadarko Petroleum Corporation drilled slim hole and geothermal exploration wells at the site in 1980. Two reports detail the results of this drilling activity. This paper seeks to (1) describe several moderate-temperature (150-200°C) geothermal systems discovered and drilled during the early 1980s that had not been documented previously in the literature, (2) summarize and compare

190

Single-Well And Cross-Well Seismic Imaging | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Single-Well And Cross-Well Seismic Imaging Single-Well And Cross-Well Seismic Imaging Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Technique: Single-Well And Cross-Well Seismic Imaging Details Activities (2) Areas (2) Regions (0) NEPA(0) Exploration Technique Information Exploration Group: Downhole Techniques Exploration Sub Group: Borehole Seismic Techniques Parent Exploration Technique: Borehole Seismic Techniques Information Provided by Technique Lithology: Rock unit density influences elastic wave velocities. Stratigraphic/Structural: Structural geology- faults, folds, grabens, horst blocks, sedimentary layering, discontinuities, etc. Hydrological: Combining compressional and shear wave results can indicate the presence of fluid saturation in the formation. Thermal: High temperatures and pressure impact the compressional and shear wave velocities.

191

well records | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

well records well records Dataset Summary Description The Alabama State Oil and Gas Board publishes well record permits to the public as they are approved. This dataset is comprised of 50 recent well record permits from 2/9/11 - 3/18/11. The dataset lists the well name, county, operator, field, and date approved, among other fields. State's make oil and gas data publicly available for a range of topics. Source Geological Survey of Alabama Date Released February 09th, 2011 (3 years ago) Date Updated March 18th, 2011 (3 years ago) Keywords Alabama board gas oil state well records Data application/vnd.ms-excel icon Well records 2/9/11 - 3/18/11 (xls, 28.7 KiB) Quality Metrics Level of Review Some Review Comment Temporal and Spatial Coverage Frequency Time Period License License Open Data Commons Attribution License

192

Pressure &Pressure & TemperatureTemperature  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

to measure atmospheric pressure, and thermometer toprobe to measure atmospheric pressure, and thermometer toprobe to measure atmospheric pressure, and thermometer toprobe to measure atmospheric pressure, and thermometer to measure air temperature.measure air temperature.measure air temperature.measure air temperature

California at Santa Cruz, University of

193

Soda Lake Well Lithology Data and Geologic Cross-Sections  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Comprehensive catalogue of drill?hole data in spreadsheet, shapefile, and Geosoft database formats. Includes XYZ locations of well heads, year drilled, type of well, operator, total depths, well path data (deviations), lithology logs, and temperature data. Plus, 13 cross?sections in Adobe Illustrator format.

Faulds, James E.

2013-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

194

"2012 Average Monthly Bill- Residential"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Residential" Residential" "(Data from forms EIA-861- schedules 4A-D, EIA-861S and EIA-861U)" "State","Number of Customers","Average Monthly Consumption (kWh)","Average Price (cents/kWh)","Average Monthly Bill (Dollar and cents)" "New England",6203726,634.13095,15.713593,99.644755 "Connecticut",1454651,730.85302,17.343298,126.75402 "Maine",703770,530.56349,14.658797,77.774225 "Massachusetts",2699141,627.15845,14.912724,93.52641 "New Hampshire",601697,614.81776,16.070168,98.802249 "Rhode Island",435448,597.34783,14.404061,86.042344 "Vermont",309019,565.03618,17.006075,96.090478 "Middle Atlantic",15727423,700.63673,15.272654,107.00582

195

"2012 Average Monthly Bill- Industrial"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Industrial" Industrial" "(Data from forms EIA-861- schedules 4A-D, EIA-861S and EIA-861U)" "State","Number of Customers","Average Monthly Consumption (kWh)","Average Price (cents/kWh)","Average Monthly Bill (Dollar and cents)" "New England",34164,67854.037,11.83487,8030.4373 "Connecticut",4647,63947.063,12.672933,8103.9685 "Maine",2780,90741.457,7.9819499,7242.9376 "Massachusetts",21145,66710.826,12.566635,8383.3057 "New Hampshire",3444,47247.217,11.83228,5590.423 "Rhode Island",1927,39935.911,10.676724,4263.8471 "Vermont",221,536044.12,9.9796777,53495.475 "Middle Atlantic",45836,126368.14,7.4903534,9465.42 "New Jersey",12729,50817.89,10.516509,5344.2677

196

Time-average TV holography for vibration fringe analysis  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Time-average TV holography is widely used method for vibration measurement. The method generates speckle correlation time-averaged J0 fringes that can be used for full-field qualitative visualization of mode shapes at resonant frequencies of an object under harmonic excitation. In order to map the amplitudes of vibration, quantitative evaluation of the time-averaged fringe pattern is desired. A quantitative evaluation procedure based on the phase-shifting technique used in two beam interferometry has also been adopted for this application with some modification. The existing procedure requires a large number of frames to be recorded for implementation. We propose a procedure that will reduce the number of frames required for the analysis. The TV holographic system used and the experimental results obtained with it on an edge-clamped, sinusoidally excited square aluminium plate sample are discussed.

Kumar, Upputuri Paul; Kalyani, Yanam; Mohan, Nandigana Krishna; Kothiyal, Mahendra Prasad

2009-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

197

Globally Averaged Atmospheric CFC-11 Concentrations: Monthly and Annual  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Chlorofluorocarbons » Chlorofluorocarbons » Atmospheric CFC-11 Concentrations Globally Averaged Atmospheric CFC-11 Concentrations: Monthly and Annual Data for the Period 1975-1992 DOI: 10.3334/CDIAC/atg.db1010 data Data (DB1010) Investigator M. A. K. Khalil and R. A. Rasmussen Description This data set presents globally averaged atmospheric concentrations of chlorofluorocarbon 11, known also as CFC-11 or F-11 (chemical name: trichlorofluoromethane; formula: CCl3F). The monthly global average data are derived from flask air samples collected at eight sites in six locations over the period August 1980-July 1992. The sites are Barrow (Alaska), Cape Meares (Oregon), Cape Kumukahi and Mauna Loa (Hawaii), Cape Matatula (American Samoa), Cape Grim (Tasmania), Palmer Station, and the

198

Comparison of Average Transport and Dispersion Among a Gaussian, a  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Comparison of Average Transport and Dispersion Among a Gaussian, a Comparison of Average Transport and Dispersion Among a Gaussian, a Two-Dimensional, and a Three-Dimensional Model Comparison of Average Transport and Dispersion Among a Gaussian, a Two-Dimensional, and a Three-Dimensional Model The Nuclear Regulatory Commission's (NRC's) code for predicting off-site consequences, MACCS2 (Chanin, et al. 1998) (MELCOR Accident Consequence Code System, Version 2), uses a simplified model for atmospheric transport and d ispersion (ATD), that is, a straight-line Gaussian model. The MACCS2 calculations are used by the NRC for planning purposes, for cost-benefit analyses, and in level-3 probabilistic risk analyses (PRAs). The MACCS2 ATD model has been criticized as being overly simplistic, even for its purposes. The justification for its use has been

199

Well Monitoring System for EGS  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

EGS well monitoring tools offer a unique set of solutions which will lower costs and increase confidence in future geothermal projects.

200

Averaged equations for Josephson junction series arrays with LRC load  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We derive the averaged equations describing a series array of Josephson junctions shunted by a parallel inductor-resistor-capacitor load. We assume that the junctions have negligable capacitance ($\\beta = 0$), and derive averaged equations which turn out to be completely tractable: in particular the stability of both in-phase and splay states depends on a single parameter, $\\del$. We find an explicit expression for $\\delta$ in terms of the load parameters and the bias current. We recover (and refine) a common claim found in the technical literature, that the in-phase state is stable for inductive loads and unstable for capacitive loads.

Kurt Wiesenfeld; James W. Swift

1994-08-26T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "wells average temperature" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Well Log Data At Dixie Valley Geothermal Area (Barton, Et Al...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Borehole televiewer, temperature and flowmeter data was recorded in the wells. Fracture and fluid flow data from wells within and outside of the active producing reservoir...

202

Residual Fuel Oil Prices, Average - Sales to End Users  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Product/Sales Type: Residual Fuel, Average - Sales to End Users Residual Fuel, Average - Sales for Resale Sulfur Less Than or Equal to 1% - Sales to End Users Sulfur Less Than or Equal to 1% - Sales for Resale Sulfur Greater Than 1% - Sales to End Users Sulfur Greater Than 1% - Sales for Resale Period: Monthly Annual Product/Sales Type: Residual Fuel, Average - Sales to End Users Residual Fuel, Average - Sales for Resale Sulfur Less Than or Equal to 1% - Sales to End Users Sulfur Less Than or Equal to 1% - Sales for Resale Sulfur Greater Than 1% - Sales to End Users Sulfur Greater Than 1% - Sales for Resale Period: Monthly Annual Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources & Notes Definitions, Sources & Notes Show Data By: Product/Sales Type Area Apr-13 May-13 Jun-13 Jul-13 Aug-13 Sep-13 View History U.S. - - - - - - 1983-2013 East Coast (PADD 1) - - - - - - 1983-2013 New England (PADD 1A) - - - - - - 1983-2013 Connecticut - - - - - - 1983-2013 Maine - - - - - - 1983-2013 Massachusetts - - - - - - 1983-2013

203

Navy Estimated Average Hourly Load Profile by Month (in MW)  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Navy Estimated Average Hourly Load Profile by Month (in MW) MONTH HE1 HE2 HE3 HE4 HE5 HE6 HE7 HE8 HE9 HE10 HE11 HE12 HE13 HE14 HE15 HE16 HE17 HE18 HE19 HE20 HE21 HE22 HE23 HE24...

204

Disk-averaged Spectra & light-curves of Earth  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We are using computer models to explore the observational sensitivity to changes in atmospheric and surface properties, and the detectability of biosignatures, in the globally averaged spectra and light-curves of the Earth. Using AIRS (Atmospheric Infrared Sounder) data, as input for atmospheric and surface properties, we have generated spatially resolved high-resolution synthetic spectra using the SMART radiative transfer model, for a variety of conditions, from the UV to the far-IR (beyond the range of current Earth-based satellite data). We have then averaged over the visible disk for a number of different viewing geometries to quantify the sensitivity to surface types and atmospheric features as a function of viewing geometry, and spatial and spectral resolution. These results have been processed with an instrument simulator to improve our understanding of the detectable characteristics of Earth-like planets as viewed by the first generation extrasolar terrestrial planet detection and characterization missions (Terrestrial Planet Finder/Darwin and Life finder). The wavelength range of our results are modelled over are applicable to both the proposed visible coronograph and mid-infrared interferometer TPF architectures. We have validated this model against disk-averaged observations by the Mars Global Surveyor Thermal Emission Spectrometer (MGS TES). This model was also used to analyze Earth-shine data for detectability of planetary characteristics and biosignatures in disk-averaged spectra.

G. Tinetti; V. S. Meadows; D. Crisp; W. Fong; N. Kiang; E. Fishbein; T. Velusamy; E. Bosc; M. Turnbull

2005-02-11T23:59:59.000Z

205

Averaging of Temporal Memories by Rats Dale N. Swanton  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Averaging of Temporal Memories by Rats Dale N. Swanton Villanova University Cynthia M. Gooch University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine Matthew S. Matell Villanova University Rats were trained on a mixed fixed-interval schedule in which stimulus A (tone or light) indicated food availability after 10

Matell, Matthew S.

206

IE 361 Module 15 The Average Run Length Concept  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

IE 361 Module 15 The Average Run Length Concept Reading: Section 3.5 of Statistical Quality Assurance Methods for Engineers Prof. Steve Vardeman and Prof. Max Morris Iowa State University Vardeman Electric set of alarm rules to a control charting scheme? The most e¤ective means known for making

Vardeman, Stephen B.

207

1982 geothermal well drilling summary  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This summary lists all geothermal wells spudded in 1982, which were drilled to a depth of at least 2,000 feet. Tables 1 and 2 list the drilling information by area, operator, and well type. For a tabulation of all 1982 geothermal drilling activity, including holes less than 2,000 feet deep, readers are referred to the February 11, 1983, issue of Petroleum Information's ''National Geothermal Service.'' The number of geothermal wells drilled in 1982 to 2,000 feet or more decreased to 76 wells from 99 ''deep'' wells in 1981. Accordingly, the total 1982 footage drilled was 559,110 feet of hole, as compared to 676,127 feet in 1981. Most of the ''deep'' wells (49) completed were drilled for development purposes, mainly in The Geysers area of California. Ten field extension wells were drilled, of which nine were successful. Only six wildcat wells were drilled compared to 13 in 1980 and 20 in 1981, showing a slackening of exploration compared to earlier years. Geothermal drilling activity specifically for direct use projects also decreased from 1981 to 1982, probably because of the drastic reduction in government funding and the decrease in the price of oil. Geothermal power generation in 1982 was highlighted by (a) an increase of 110 Mw geothermal power produced at The Geysers (to a total of 1,019 Mw) by addition of Unit 17, and (b) by the start-up of the Salton Sea 10 Mw single flash power plant in the Imperial Valley, which brought the total geothermal electricity generation in this area to 31 Mw.

Parmentier, P.P.

1983-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

208

Quantum well multijunction photovoltaic cell  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A monolithic, quantum well, multilayer photovoltaic cell comprises a p-n junction comprising a p-region on one side and an n-region on the other side, each of which regions comprises a series of at least three semiconductor layers, all p-type in the p-region and all n-type in the n-region; each of said series of layers comprising alternating barrier and quantum well layers, each barrier layer comprising a semiconductor material having a first bandgap and each quantum well layer comprising a semiconductor material having a second bandgap when in bulk thickness which is narrower than said first bandgap, the barrier layers sandwiching each quantum well layer and each quantum well layer being sufficiently thin that the width of its bandgap is between said first and second bandgaps, such that radiation incident on said cell and above an energy determined by the bandgap of the quantum well layers will be absorbed and will produce an electrical potential across said junction.

Chaffin, Roger J. (Albuquerque, NM); Osbourn, Gordon C. (Albuquerque, NM)

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

209

Pressure analysis for horizontal wells  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper presents horizontal-well test design and interpretation methods. Analytical solutions are developed that can be handled easily by a desktop computer to carry out design as well as interpretation with semilog and log-log analysis. These analytical solutions point out the distinctive behavior of horizontal wells: (1) at early time, there is a circular radial flow in a vertical plane perpendicular to the well, and (2) at late time, there is a horizontal pseudoradial flow. Each type of flow is associated with a semilog straight line to which semilog analysis has to be adapted. The horizontal pseudoradial flow takes into account a pseudoskin depending on system geometry, which is a priori defined and estimated. Practical time criteria are proposed to determine the beginning and the end of each type of flow and to provide a guide to semilog analysis and well test design. The authors study the behavior of uniform-flux or infinite-conductivity horizontal wells, with wellbore storage and skin. The homogeneous reservoir is infinite or limited by impermeable or constant-pressure boundaries. A method is also outlined to transform all our solutions for homogeneous reservoirs into corresponding solutions for double-porosity reservoirs.

Davlau, F.; Mouronval, G.; Bourdarot, G.; Curutchet, P.

1988-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

210

Optimization of fractured well performance of horizontal gas wells  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

................................................24 3.4 Ideal Number of Transverse Fractures..........................................26 3.5 Constant Volume Transverse Fractures ........................................32 3.6... of a longitudinal fracture..............................................10 2.5 Example of horizontal well with longitudinal fracture performance .............11 2.6 DVS representation of transverse fractures...

Magalhaes, Fellipe Vieira

2009-06-02T23:59:59.000Z

211

A Multivariate Moving Average Control Chart for Photovoltaic Processes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

AbstractFor the electrical metrics that describe photovoltaic cell performance are inherently multivariate in nature, use of a univariate, or one variable, statistical process control chart can have important limitations. Development of a comprehensive process control strategy is known to be significantly beneficial to reducing process variability that ultimately drives up the manufacturing cost photovoltaic cells. The multivariate moving average or MMA chart, is applied to the electrical metrics of photovoltaic cells to illustrate the improved sensitivity on process variability this method of control charting offers. The result show the ability of the MMA chart to expand to as any variables as needed, suggests an application with multiple photovoltaic electrical metrics being used in concert to determine the processes state of control. KeywordsThe multivariate moving average control chart, Photovoltaic processes control, Multivariate system. I.

Chunchom Pongchavalit

212

Yearly-averaged daily usefulness efficiency of heliostat surfaces  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

An analytical expression for estimating the instantaneous usefulness efficiency of a heliostat surface is obtained. A systematic procedure is then introduced to calculate the usefulness efficiency even when overlapping of blocking and shadowing on a heliostat surface exist. For possible estimation of the reflected energy from a given field, the local yearly-averaged daily usefulness efficiency is calculated. This efficiency is found to depend on site latitude angle, radial distance from the tower measured in tower heights, heliostat position azimuth angle and the radial spacing between heliostats. Charts for the local yearly-averaged daily usefulness efficiency are presented for {phi} = 0, 15, 30, and 45 N. These charts can be used in calculating the reflected radiation from a given cell. Utilization of these charts is demonstrated.

Elsayed, M.M.; Habeebuallah, M.B.; Al-Rabghi, O.M. (King Abdulaziz Univ., Jeddah (Saudi Arabia))

1992-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

213

Cost analysis of oil, gas, and geothermal well drilling  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract This paper evaluates current and historical drilling and completion costs of oil and gas wells and compares them with geothermal wells costs. As a starting point, we developed a new cost index for US onshore oil and gas wells based primarily on the API Joint Association Survey 19762009 data. This index describes year-to-year variations in drilling costs and allows one to express historical drilling expenditures in current year dollars. To distinguish from other cost indices we have labeled it the Cornell Energy Institute (CEI) Index. This index has nine sub-indices for different well depth intervals and has been corrected for yearly changes in drilling activity. The CEI index shows 70% higher increase in well cost between 2003 and 2008 compared to the commonly used Producer Price Index (PPI) for drilling oil and gas wells. Cost trends for various depths were found to be significantly different and explained in terms of variations of oil and gas prices, costs, and availability of major well components and services at particular locations. Multiple methods were evaluated to infer the cost-depth correlation for geothermal wells in current year dollars. In addition to analyzing reported costs of the most recently completed geothermal wells, we investigated the results of the predictive geothermal well cost model WellCost Lite. Moreover, a cost database of 146 historical geothermal wells has been assembled. The CEI index was initially used to normalize costs of these wells to current year dollars. A comparison of normalized costs of historical wells with recently drilled ones and WellCost Lite predictions shows that cost escalation rates of geothermal wells were considerably lower compared to hydrocarbon wells and that a cost index based on hydrocarbon wells is not applicable to geothermal well drilling. Besides evaluating the average well costs, this work examined economic improvements resulting from increased drilling experience. Learning curve effects related to drilling multiple similar wells within the same field were correlated.

Maciej Z. Lukawski; Brian J. Anderson; Chad Augustine; Louis E. Capuano Jr.; Koenraad F. Beckers; Bill Livesay; Jefferson W. Tester

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

214

A holographic proof of the averaged null energy condition  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The averaged null energy conditions (ANEC) states that, along a complete null curve, the negative energy fluctuations of a quantum field must be balanced by positive energy fluctuations. We use the AdS/CFT correspondence to prove the ANEC for a class of strongly coupled conformal field theories in flat spacetime. A violation of the ANEC in the field theory would lead to acausal propagation of signals in the bulk.

William R. Kelly; Aron C. Wall

2014-11-03T23:59:59.000Z

215

Average dynamics of a finite set of coupled phase oscillators  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We study the solutions of a dynamical system describing the average activity of an infinitely large set of driven coupled excitable units. We compared their topological organization with that reconstructed from the numerical integration of finite sets. In this way, we present a strategy to establish the pertinence of approximating the dynamics of finite sets of coupled nonlinear units by the dynamics of its infinitely large surrogate.

Dima, Germn C., E-mail: gdima@df.uba.ar; Mindlin, Gabriel B. [Laboratorio de Sistemas Dinmicos, IFIBA y Departamento de Fsica, Facultad de Ciencias Exactas y Naturales, Universidad de Buenos Aires, Pabelln 1, Ciudad Universitaria, Buenos Aires (Argentina)] [Laboratorio de Sistemas Dinmicos, IFIBA y Departamento de Fsica, Facultad de Ciencias Exactas y Naturales, Universidad de Buenos Aires, Pabelln 1, Ciudad Universitaria, Buenos Aires (Argentina)

2014-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

216

Better than Average? - Green Building Certification in International Projects  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

8th International Conference for Enhanced Building Operations - ICEBO?08 Conference Center of the Federal Ministry of Economics and Technology Berlin, October 20 - 22, 2008 Dipl.-Ing. Oliver Baumann Ebert & Baumann Consulting Engineers, Inc.... An Enterprise of the Ebert-Consulting Group 1004 Pennsylvania Avenue, SE Washington, D.C. 20003, USA 00 12 02/ 6 08 - 13 34 o.baumann@eb-engineers.com Better than Average? - Green Building Certification in International Projects Green Building...

Baumann, O.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

217

RENORMALIZATION TECHNIQUES AND MEAN SQUARE AVERAGING, I. DETERMINISTIC EQUATIONS  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...U2 - 1)u' by a linear expression clu + c2u' and using a time average, we find that...equation to (4.1) is given by U" + C2U' + U = 0, rT where C2 = lim f (a2 cos2...0, (4.5) we write g(u) = clu + c2u', where C, = lim g(u)udt/ f u...

Richard Bellman; John M. Richardson

1961-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

218

Table 8. Average Price of U.S. Coal Exports  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Average Price of U.S. Coal Exports Average Price of U.S. Coal Exports (dollars per short ton) U.S. Energy Information Administration | Quarterly Coal Report, April - June 2013 Table 8. Average Price of U.S. Coal Exports (dollars per short ton) U.S. Energy Information Administration | Quarterly Coal Report, April - June 2013 Year to Date Continent and Country of Destination April - June 2013 January - March 2013 April - June 2012 2013 2012 Percent Change North America Total 78.29 77.25 102.62 77.88 105.14 -25.9 Canada* 81.61 80.70 110.67 81.30 112.16 -27.5 Dominican Republic 78.54 75.09 73.89 75.77 76.61 -1.1 Honduras - 54.58 54.43 54.58 54.43 0.3 Jamaica 480.00 54.43 - 54.72 55.42 -1.3 Mexico 73.45 75.81 94.36 74.35 100.95 -26.3 Other** 80.33 389.30 70.37 82.45 76.10 8.3 South America Total 107.72 108.02 149.99 107.88

219

Table 17. Average Price of U.S. Coke Exports  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Average Price of U.S. Coke Exports Average Price of U.S. Coke Exports (dollars per short ton) U.S. Energy Information Administration | Quarterly Coal Report, April - June 2013 Table 17. Average Price of U.S. Coke Exports (dollars per short ton) U.S. Energy Information Administration | Quarterly Coal Report, April - June 2013 Year to Date Continent and Country of Destination April - June 2013 January - March 2013 April - June 2012 2013 2012 Percent Change North America Total 240.59 241.38 218.40 240.85 225.80 6.7 Canada* 147.49 330.47 243.04 183.08 286.56 -36.1 Mexico 316.57 211.63 189.12 273.97 171.71 59.6 Other** 612.42 485.63 134.48 525.92 135.04 289.5 South America Total 140.65 156.15 322.70 148.29 250.36 -40.8 Other** 140.65 156.15 322.70 148.29 250.36 -40.8 Europe Total 259.26 255.24 - 257.06 427.83 -39.9 Other**

220

Table 22. Average Price of U.S. Coke Imports  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Average Price of U.S. Coke Imports Average Price of U.S. Coke Imports (dollars per short ton) U.S. Energy Information Administration | Quarterly Coal Report, April - June 2013 Table 22. Average Price of U.S. Coke Imports (dollars per short ton) U.S. Energy Information Administration | Quarterly Coal Report, April - June 2013 Year to Date Continent and Country of Origin April - June 2013 January - March 2013 April - June 2012 2013 2012 Percent Change North America Total 263.21 252.66 353.05 261.29 356.01 -26.6 Canada 263.51 252.66 353.05 258.82 356.01 -27.3 Panama 263.09 - - 263.09 - - South America Total 196.86 194.14 175.88 195.94 181.01 8.2 Brazil - - 157.60 - 157.60 - Colombia 196.86 194.14 322.06 195.94 246.68 -20.6 Europe Total 181.55 232.13 385.65 225.53 384.96 -41.4 Czech Republic - 475.91 - 475.91 - - Spain 360.51

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "wells average temperature" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Well record | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Well record Well record Dataset Summary Description This dataset contains oil and gas drilling and permit records for February 2011. State oil and gas boards and commissions make oil and gas data and information open to the public. To view the full range of data contained at the Alaska Oil and Gas Conservation Commission, visit http://doa.alaska.gov/ogc/ Source Alaska Oil and Gas Conservation Commission Date Released February 28th, 2011 (3 years ago) Date Updated Unknown Keywords Alaska Commission gas oil Well record Data application/vnd.ms-excel icon http://doa.alaska.gov/ogc/drilling/dindex.html (xls, 34.3 KiB) Quality Metrics Level of Review Some Review Comment Temporal and Spatial Coverage Frequency Monthly Time Period License License Open Data Commons Public Domain Dedication and Licence (PDDL)

222

Gatling gun: high average polarized current injector for eRHIC  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This idea was originally developed in 2001 for, at that time, an ERL-based (and later recirculating-ring) electron-ion collider at JLab. Naturally the same idea is applicable for any gun requiring current exceeding capability of a single cathode. ERL-based eRHIC is one of such cases. This note related to eRHIC was prepared at Duke University in February 2003. In many case photo-injectors can have a limited average current - it is especially true about polarized photo-guns. It is know that e-RHIC requires average polarized electron current well above currently demonstrated by photo-injectors - hence combining currents from multiple guns is can be useful option for eRHIC.

Litvinenko, V.N.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

223

How perforation shot density affects gas well performance  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The single gas well model is formulated using the systems analysis approach and is composed of three main modules. The first module is the modified inflow performance relationship (IPR). This IPR accounts for pressure drops through the reservoir, laminar skin and damaged, compacted zone around casing perforations. The second module is the tubing outflow performance computed via the Cullender and Smith method. The third module is the gas material balance equation for computing average well pressure with a given gas production level. By coupling this equation with the computed inflow and outflow results, future gas deliverability and economic return of a gas well can then be projected.

Cheng, A.M.C.

1988-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

224

A Dynamical Approach to Temperature  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We present a new dynamical approach for measuring the temperature of a Hamiltonian dynamical system in the micro canonical ensemble of thermodynamics. We show that under the hypothesis of ergodicity the temperature can be computed as a time-average of the functional, div(grad H/|grad H|^2), on the energy-surface. Our method not only yields an efficient computational approach for determining the temperature it also provides an intrinsic link between dynamical systems theory and the statistical mechanics of Hamiltonian systems.

Hans Henrik Rugh

1997-01-30T23:59:59.000Z

225

Generalized IPR curves for predicting well behavior. [Inflow Performance Relation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Oil well productivity calculations are required to relate surface measured oil rate to the pressure drawdown of the well in order to predict well behavior. The productivity index concept and the inflow performance relation concept can be combined to derive a workable form of a well's deliverability which covers the entire pressure range above and below the bubble point. A procedure for predicting well behavior is presented using equations to determine the relationship between shut-in bottom-hole pressure, bubble point pressure, and bottom-hole producing pressure. An example calculation is provided comparing 2 wells. The conclusion is that one set of production test data (rate and bottom-hole producing pressure) together with the shut-in bottom-hole pressure (or average reservoir pressure) and bubble point pressure are enough to construct a reliable inflow performance relation.

Patton, L.D.; Goland, M.

1980-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

226

Hilbert Space Average Method and adiabatic quantum search  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We discuss some aspects related to the so-called Hilbert space Average Method, as an alternative to describe the dynamics of open quantum systems. First we present a derivation of the method which does not make use of the algebra satisfied by the operators involved in the dynamics, and extend the method to systems subject to a Hamiltonian that changes with time. Next we examine the performance of the adiabatic quantum search algorithm with a particular model for the environment. We relate our results to the criteria discussed in the literature for the validity of the above-mentioned method for similar environments.

A. Perez

2009-01-19T23:59:59.000Z

227

W. R. Johnson An Average-Atom Model  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

W. R. Johnson An Average-Atom Model h0 - Z r + V (r) a(r) = aa(r) potential: V (r) = (r )/R d - (3) d 1 + exp[( - µ)/kT ] P 2 (r) norm: Z = R 0 4r 2 (r) dr ­ ND ­ 04/02 1 #12;W. R. Johnson Electron-Fermi contributions to continuum ­ ND ­ 04/02 2 #12;W. R. Johnson Phase shifts: Al - T=10eV 0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 electron

Johnson, Walter R.

228

Category:Well Log Techniques | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Category Category Edit History Facebook icon Twitter icon » Category:Well Log Techniques Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Geothermalpower.jpg Looking for the Well Log Techniques page? For detailed information on Well Log Techniques as exploration techniques, click here. Category:Well Log Techniques Add.png Add a new Well Log Techniques Technique Pages in category "Well Log Techniques" The following 17 pages are in this category, out of 17 total. A Acoustic Logs C Caliper Log Cement Bond Log Chemical Logging Cross-Dipole Acoustic Log D Density Log F FMI Log G Gamma Log I Image Logs M Mud Logging N Neutron Log P Pressure Temperature Log R Resistivity Log Resistivity Tomography S Single-Well and Cross-Well Resistivity Spontaneous Potential Well Log Stoneley Analysis

229

Kimberly Well - Borehole Geophysics Database  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Snake River Plain (SRP), Idaho, hosts potential geothermal resources due to elevated groundwater temperatures associated with the thermal anomaly Yellowstone-Snake River hotspot. Project HOTSPOT has coordinated international institutions and organizations to understand subsurface stratigraphy and assess geothermal potential. Over 5.9km of core were drilled from three boreholes within the SRP in an attempt to acquire continuous core documenting the volcanic and sedimentary record of the hotspot: (1) Kimama, (2) Kimberly, and (3) Mountain Home. The Kimberly drill hole was selected to document continuous volcanism when analysed in conjunction with the Kimama and is located near the margin of the plain. Data submitted by project collaborator Doug Schmitt, University of Alberta

John Shervais

2011-07-04T23:59:59.000Z

230

Kimama Well - Borehole Geophysics Database  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Snake River Plain (SRP), Idaho, hosts potential geothermal resources due to elevated groundwater temperatures associated with the thermal anomaly Yellowstone-Snake River hotspot. Project HOTSPOT has coordinated international institutions and organizations to understand subsurface stratigraphy and assess geothermal potential. Over 5.9km of core were drilled from three boreholes within the SRP in an attempt to acquire continuous core documenting the volcanic and sedimentary record of the hotspot: (1) Kimama, (2) Kimberly, and (3) Mountain Home. The Kimama drill site was set up to acquire a continuous record of basaltic volcanism along the central volcanic axis and to test the extent of geothermal resources beneath the Snake River aquifer. Data submitted by project collaborator Doug Schmitt, University of Alberta

John Shervais

2011-07-04T23:59:59.000Z

231

Oregon Low-Temperature-Resource Assessment Program. Final technical report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Numerous low-temperature hydrothermal systems are available for exploitation throughout the Cascades and eastern Oregon. All of these areas have heat flow significantly higher than crustal averages and many thermal aquifers. In northeastern Oregon, low temperature geothermal resources are controlled by regional stratigraphic aquifers of the Columbia River Basalt Group at shallow depths and possibly by faults at greater depths. In southeastern Oregon most hydrothermal systems are of higher temperature than those of northeastern Oregon and are controlled by high-angle fault zones and layered volcanic aquifers. The Cascades have very high heat flow but few large population centers. Direct use potential in the Cascades is therefore limited, except possibly in the cities of Oakridge and Ashland, where load may be great enough to stimulate development. Absence of large population centers also inhibits initial low temperature geothermal development in eastern Oregon. It may be that uses for the abundant low temperature geothermal resources of the state will have to be found which do not require large nearby population centers. One promising use is generation of electricity from freon-based biphase electrical generators. These generators will be installed on wells at Vale and Lakeview in the summer of 1982 to evaluate their potential use on geothermal waters with temperatures as low as 80/sup 0/C (176/sup 0/F).

Priest, G.R.; Black, G.L.; Woller, N.M.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

232

Table 14a. Average Electricity Prices, Projected vs. Actual  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

a. Average Electricity Prices, Projected vs. Actual a. Average Electricity Prices, Projected vs. Actual Projected Price in Constant Dollars (constant dollars, cents per kilowatt-hour in "dollar year" specific to each AEO) AEO Dollar Year 1993 1994 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 AEO 1995 1993 6.80 6.80 6.70 6.70 6.70 6.70 6.70 6.80 6.80 6.90 6.90 6.90 7.00 7.00 7.10 7.10 7.20 AEO 1996 1994 7.09 6.99 6.94 6.93 6.96 6.96 6.96 6.97 6.98 6.97 6.98 6.95 6.95 6.94 6.96 6.95 6.91 AEO 1997 1995 6.94 6.89 6.90 6.91 6.86 6.84 6.78 6.73 6.66 6.60 6.58 6.54 6.49 6.48 6.45 6.36

233

''Averaged'' statistical thermodynamics, energy equipartition and the third law  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Arguments are presented that the assumption, implicit to traditional statistical thermodynamics, that at zero temperature all erratic motions cease, should be dispensed with. Assuming instead a random ultrarelativistic unobservable motion, similar to zitterbewegung, it is demonstrated that in an ideal gas of classical particles the energy equipartition fails in a way that complies with the third law of thermodynamics.

Vesselin I. Dimitrov

1997-07-03T23:59:59.000Z

234

A new well surveying tool  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

directional well was to tip the entire rig, then block up one side of the rotary table so as to incline the uppermost joint of the drill pipe. The accuracy obtained by this method left much to be desired. The technique of controlled directional drilling... by Surveying Device for S and 19 , N and 41 . 21 3. Comparison of Measured Angles and Angles Indicated by Surveying Device for NE snd 9 , W and 45 . . . . . . . ~ 22 ABSTRNl T Ever since the advent of rotary drilling the petroleum industry has been...

Haghighi, Manuchehr Mehdizabeh

1966-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

235

Health Education & Wellness - HPMC Occupational Health Services  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Wellness Health Education & Wellness Health Education & Wellness Downloads & Patient Materials Health & Productivity Health Calculators & Logs Health Coaching Health Fairs and...

236

High-energy average charged multiplicities from nuclei in a Regge-calculus model  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Lehman and Winbow have used a Gribov Reggeon-calculus approach to derive expressions for average charge multiplicities in high-energy scattering off nuclei. They find the multiplicity to be n=bY+f(A), where b is independent of A. We show that a reasonable modification of their model yields n=b?A13Y+g(A), where b? is known. We find that this expression agrees with experimental data on dndY (where Y=lns) better than that of Lehman and Winbow, and agrees as well as the energy flux model of Gottfried.

R. T. Cutler and Dale R. Snider

1976-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

237

Category:Production Wells | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Production Wells page? For detailed information on Production Wells, click here. Category:Production Wells Add.png Add a new Production Wells Technique Pages in category...

238

Number of Producing Gas Wells  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Producing Gas Wells Producing Gas Wells Period: Annual Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources & Notes Definitions, Sources & Notes Area 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 View History U.S. 452,945 476,652 493,100 487,627 514,637 482,822 1989-2012 Alabama 6,591 6,860 6,913 7,026 7,063 6,327 1989-2012 Alaska 239 261 261 269 277 185 1989-2012 Arizona 7 6 6 5 5 5 1989-2012 Arkansas 4,773 5,592 6,314 7,397 8,388 8,538 1989-2012 California 1,540 1,645 1,643 1,580 1,308 1,423 1989-2012 Colorado 22,949 25,716 27,021 28,813 30,101 32,000 1989-2012 Gulf of Mexico 2,552 1,527 1,984 1,852 1,559 1,474 1998-2012 Illinois 43 45 51 50 40 40 1989-2012 Indiana 2,350 525 563 620 914 819 1989-2012 Kansas

239

System for stabbing well casing  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Apparatus for stabbing well casing to join casing sections to each other, includes a rotary table assembly for supporting a casing section in a well bore, a derrick over the rotary table assembly, a crown block at the top of the derrick, a first piston and cylinder subassembly pivotally mounted on one side of the derrick over the rotary table assembly and below the crown block for pivotation about a horizontal axis, a second piston and cylinder subassembly pivotally mounted on a second side of the derrick for pivotation about a horizontal axis. The second piston and cylinder subassembly is located over the rotary table assembly and below the crown block and extends substantially normal to the direction of extension of the first piston and cylinder subassembly. The cooperating casing clamping elements are carried on the piston rods of the first and second piston and cylinder subassemblies, and counter balancing subassemblies are connected to the first and second piston and cylinder subassemblies for pivoting the first and second piston and cylinder subassemblies to a vertically extending inoperative position.

McArthur, J.R.

1984-04-03T23:59:59.000Z

240

Average Shape of Transport-Limited Aggregates Benny Davidovitch,1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, however, might turn out to be unreliable as well, since it underestimates the possible effects of noise, such as advection diffusion and electrochemical conduction, which satisfy conformally invariant equations [10

Bazant, Martin Z.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "wells average temperature" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Elevated temperature crack propagation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper is a summary of two NASA contracts on high temperature fatigue crack propagation in metals. The first evaluated the ability of fairly simple nonlinear fracture parameters to correlate crack propagation. Hastelloy-X specimens were tested under isothermal and thermomechanical cycling at temperatures up to 980 degrees C (1800 degrees F). The most successful correlating parameter was the crack tip opening displacement derived from the J-integral. The second evaluated the ability of several path-independent integrals to correlate crack propagation behavior. Inconel 718 specimens were tested under isothermal, thermomechanical, temperature gradient, and creep conditions at temperatures up to 650 degrees C (1200 degrees F). The integrals formulated by Blackburn and by Kishimoto correlated the data reasonably well under all test conditions.

Orange, T.W.

1994-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

242

Ultra Thin Quantum Well Materials  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This project has enabled Hi-Z technology Inc. (Hi-Z) to understand how to improve the thermoelectric properties of Si/SiGe Quantum Well Thermoelectric Materials. The research that was completed under this project has enabled Hi-Z Technology, Inc. (Hi-Z) to satisfy the project goal to understand how to improve thermoelectric conversion efficiency and reduce costs by fabricating ultra thin Si/SiGe quantum well (QW) materials and measuring their properties. In addition, Hi-Z gained critical new understanding on how thin film fabrication increases the silicon substrate's electrical conductivity, which is important new knowledge to develop critical material fabrication parameters. QW materials are constructed with alternate layers of an electrical conductor, SiGe and an electrical insulator, Si. Film thicknesses were varied, ranging from 2nm to 10nm where 10 nm was the original film thickness prior to this work. The optimum performance was determined at a Si and SiGe thickness of 4nm for an electrical current and heat flow parallel to the films, which was an important conclusion of this work. Essential new information was obtained on how the Si substrate electrical conductivity increases by up to an order of magnitude upon deposition of QW films. Test measurements and calculations are accurate and include both the quantum well and the substrate. The large increase in substrate electrical conductivity means that a larger portion of the electrical current passes through the substrate. The silicon substrate's increased electrical conductivity is due to inherent impurities and thermal donors which are activated during both molecular beam epitaxy and sputtering deposition of QW materials. Hi-Z's forward looking cost estimations based on future high performance QW modules, in which the best Seebeck coefficient and electrical resistivity are taken from separate samples predict that the electricity cost produced with a QW module could be achieved at <$0.35/W. This price would open many markets for waste heat recovery applications. By installing Hi-Z's materials in applications in which electricity could be produced from waste heat sources could result in significant energy savings as well as emissions reductions. For example, if QW thermoelectric generators could be introduced commercially in 2015, and assuming they could also capture an additional 0.1%/year of the available waste heat from the aluminum, steel, and iron industries, then by 2020, their use would lead to a 2.53 trillion Btu/year reduction in energy consumption. This translates to a $12.9 million/year energy savings, and 383.6 million lb's of CO2 emissions reduction per year. Additionally, Hi-Z would expect that the use of QW TE devices in the automotive, manufacturing, and energy generation industries would reduce the USA's petroleum and fossil fuel dependence, and thus significantly reduce emissions from CO2 and other polluting gasses such as NOx, SOx, and particulate matter (PM), etc.

Dr Saeid Ghamaty

2012-08-16T23:59:59.000Z

243

Average System Cost Methodology : Administrator's Record of Decision.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Significant features of average system cost (ASC) methodology adopted are: retention of the jurisdictional approach where retail rate orders of regulartory agencies provide primary data for computing the ASC for utilities participating in the residential exchange; inclusion of transmission costs; exclusion of construction work in progress; use of a utility's weighted cost of debt securities; exclusion of income taxes; simplification of separation procedures for subsidized generation and transmission accounts from other accounts; clarification of ASC methodology rules; more generous review timetable for individual filings; phase-in of reformed methodology; and each exchanging utility must file under the new methodology within 20 days of implementation by the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission of the ten major participating utilities, the revised ASC will substantially only affect three. (PSB)

United States. Bonneville Power Administration.

1984-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

244

Climate: monthly and annual average relative humidity GIS data at  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

relative humidity GIS data at relative humidity GIS data at one-degree resolution of the World from NASA/SSE Dataset Summary Description (Abstract): Relative Humidity at 10 m Above The Surface Of The Earth (%)NASA Surface meteorology and Solar Energy (SSE) Release 6.0 Data Set (Nov 2007)22-year Monthly & Annual Average (July 1983 - June 2005)Parameter: Relative Humidity at 10 m Above The Surface Of The Earth (%)Internet: http://eosweb.larc.nasa.gov/sse/Note 1: SSE Methodology & Accuracy sections onlineNote 2: Lat/Lon values indicate the lower left corner of a 1x1 degree region. Negative values are south and west; positive values are north and east. Boundaries of the -90/-180 region are -90 to -89 (south) and -180 to -179 (west). The last region, 89/180, is bounded by 89 to 90 (north) and 179 to 180 (east). The mid-point of

245

Fever and Body Temperature  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Fever and Body Temperature Fever and Body Temperature Name: Ying Location: N/A Country: N/A Date: N/A Question: Hi, I have a few questions that I want to ask you: Why does your body chose to raise its temperature when you have a fever? Replies: Most bacteria and viruses that live in your body grow best at body temperature. They don't grow very well when the temperature is raised. When there are bacteria in your body they give off chemicals that signal white blood cells to come to try to eat them and also affect an area in your brain called the hypothalamus. This part of the brain controls alot of the automatic functions in your body and is also the site of your body's "thermostat". When the chemicals from the bacteria circulate through the hypothalamus it sets the body's temperature higher. This is called a fever. Your body kind of tries to "sweat out" the bacteria and kill them with a higher temperature. Some scientists question whether trying to bring down a fever is the best thing to do. If it isn't too high, some believe we should just let it work

246

TRENDS: TEMPERATURE  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Historical Isotopic Temperature Record from the Vostok Ice Core Historical Isotopic Temperature Record from the Vostok Ice Core Graphics Digital Data J.R. Petit, D. Raynaud, and C. Lorius Laboratoire de Glaciogie et Géophysique de l'Environnement, CNRS, Saint Martin d'Hères Cedex, France J. Jouzel and G. Delaygue Laboratoire des Sciences du Climat et de l'Environnement (LSCE), CEA/CNRS, L'Orme des Merisiers, CEA Saclay, 91191 Gif-sur-Yvette Cedex, France N.I. Barkov Arctic and Antarctic Research Institute, Beringa Street 38, 199397 St. Petersburg, Russia V.M. Kotlyakov Institute of Geography, Staromonetny, per 29, Moscow 109017, Russia DOI: 10.3334/CDIAC/cli.006 Period of Record 420,000 years BP-present Methods Because isotopic fractions of the heavier oxygen-18 (18O) and deuterium (D) in snowfall are temperature-dependent and a strong spatial correlation

247

Visualizing motion in potential wells  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The concept of potential-energy diagrams is of fundamental importance in the study of quantum physics. Yet students are rarely exposed to this powerful alternative description in introductory classes and thus have difficulty comprehending its significance when they encounter it in beginning-level quantum courses. We describe a learning unit that incorporates a sequence of computer-interfaced experiments using dynamics or air-track systems. This unit is designed to make the learning of potential-energy diagrams less abstract. Students begin by constructing the harmonic or square-well potential diagrams using either the velocity data and assuming conservation of energy or the force-displacement graph for the elasticinteraction of an object constrained by springs or bouncing off springy blocks. Then they investigate the motion of a rider magnetinteracting with a configuration of field magnets and plot directly the potential-energy diagrams using a magnetic field sensor. The ease of measurement allows exploring the motion in a large variety of potential shapes in a short duration class.

Pratibha Jolly; Dean Zollman; N. Sanjay Rebello; Albena Dimitrova

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

248

An Exact Thickness-Weighted Average Formulation of the Boussinesq Equations WILLIAM R. YOUNG  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

An Exact Thickness-Weighted Average Formulation of the Boussinesq Equations WILLIAM R. YOUNG application of thickness-weighted averaging to the Boussinesq equa- tions of motion results in averaged

Young, William R.

249

Table 15. Average Electricity Prices, Projected vs. Actual  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Average Electricity Prices, Projected vs. Actual Average Electricity Prices, Projected vs. Actual (nominal cents per kilowatt-hour) 1985 1986 1987 1988 1989 1990 1991 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 AEO 1982 6.38 6.96 7.63 8.23 8.83 9.49 AEO 1983 6.85 7.28 7.74 8.22 8.68 9.18 13.12 AEO 1984 6.67 7.05 7.48 7.89 8.25 8.65 11.53 AEO 1985 6.62 6.94 7.32 7.63 7.89 8.15 8.46 8.85 9.20 9.61 10.04 AEO 1986 6.67 6.88 7.05 7.18 7.35 7.52 7.65 7.87 8.31 8.83 9.41 10.01 10.61 11.33 12.02 AEO 1987 6.63 6.65 6.92 7.12 7.38 7.62 7.94 8.36 8.86 11.99 AEO 1989* 6.50 6.75 7.14 7.48 7.82 8.11 8.50 8.91 9.39 9.91 10.49 11.05 11.61 AEO 1990 6.49 6.72 8.40 10.99 14.5 AEO 1991 6.94 7.31 7.59 7.82 8.18 8.38 8.54 8.73 8.99 9.38 9.83 10.29 10.83 11.36 11.94 12.58 13.21 13.88 14.58 15.21 AEO 1992 6.97 7.16 7.32 7.56 7.78 8.04 8.29 8.57 8.93 9.38 9.82 10.26 10.73 11.25 11.83 12.37 12.96 13.58 14.23 AEO 1993

250

Geothermal well log interpretation state of the art. Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

An in-depth study of the state of the art in Geothermal Well Log Interpretation has been made encompassing case histories, technical papers, computerized literature searches, and actual processing of geothermal wells from New Mexico, Idaho, and California. A classification scheme of geothermal reservoir types was defined which distinguishes fluid phase and temperature, lithology, geologic province, pore geometry, salinity, and fluid chemistry. Major deficiencies of Geothermal Well Log Interpretation are defined and discussed with recommendations of possible solutions or research for solutions. The Geothermal Well Log Interpretation study and report has concentrated primarily on Western US reservoirs. Geopressured geothermal reservoirs are not considered.

Sanyal, S.K.; Wells, L.E.; Bickham, R.E.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

251

Spatially indirect excitons in coupled quantum wells  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Microscopic quantum phenomena such as interference or phase coherence between different quantum states are rarely manifest in macroscopic systems due to a lack of significant correlation between different states. An exciton system is one candidate for observation of possible quantum collective effects. In the dilute limit, excitons in semiconductors behave as bosons and are expected to undergo Bose-Einstein condensation (BEC) at a temperature several orders of magnitude higher than for atomic BEC because of their light mass. Furthermore, well-developed modern semiconductor technologies offer flexible manipulations of an exciton system. Realization of BEC in solid-state systems can thus provide new opportunities for macroscopic quantum coherence research. In semiconductor coupled quantum wells (CQW) under across-well static electric field, excitons exist as separately confined electron-hole pairs. These spatially indirect excitons exhibit a radiative recombination time much longer than their thermal relaxation time a unique feature in direct band gap semiconductor based structures. Their mutual repulsive dipole interaction further stabilizes the exciton system at low temperature and screens in-plane disorder more effectively. All these features make indirect excitons in CQW a promising system to search for quantum collective effects. Properties of indirect excitons in CQW have been analyzed and investigated extensively. The experimental results based on time-integrated or time-resolved spatially-resolved photoluminescence (PL) spectroscopy and imaging are reported in two categories. (i) Generic indirect exciton systems: general properties of indirect excitons such as the dependence of exciton energy and lifetime on electric fields and densities were examined. (ii) Quasi-two-dimensional confined exciton systems: highly statistically degenerate exciton systems containing more than tens of thousands of excitons within areas as small as (10 micrometer){sup 2} were observed. The spatial and energy distributions of optically active excitons were used as thermodynamic quantities to construct a phase diagram of the exciton system, demonstrating the existence of distinct phases. Optical and electrical properties of the CQW sample were examined thoroughly to provide deeper understanding of the formation mechanisms of these cold exciton systems. These insights offer new strategies for producing cold exciton systems, which may lead to opportunities for the realization of BEC in solid-state systems.

Lai, Chih-Wei Eddy

2004-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

252

Coherence Autocorrelation, and Taylor and Integral Scales: Average  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

turbine will experience, with only a time series of observations at one location in space? What classify, turbulence without doing the full analysis of physical characteristics? How well can we model these turbulent properties with a stochastic turbulence generator? Using data from an acoustic Doppler velocimeter

Fox-Kemper, Baylor

253

Magnetotellurics At Salt Wells Area (Bureau of Land Management, 2009) |  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Salt Wells Area (Bureau of Land Management, 2009) Salt Wells Area (Bureau of Land Management, 2009) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Magnetotellurics At Salt Wells Area (Bureau of Land Management, 2009) Exploration Activity Details Location Salt Wells Geothermal Area Exploration Technique Magnetotellurics Activity Date 2008 - 2008 Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Exploration Basis Vulcan increased exploration efforts in the summer and fall of 2008, during which time the company drilled two temperature gradient holes (86-15 O on Pad 1 and 17-16 O on Pad 3); conducted seismic, gravity and magnetotelluric surveys; and drilled deep exploration wells at Pads 6 and 8 and binary wells at Pads 1, 2, 4, and 7. Notes Data from these wells is proprietary, and so were unavailable for inclusion

254

Dixie Valley Six Well Flow Test | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Six Well Flow Test Six Well Flow Test Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Journal Article: Dixie Valley Six Well Flow Test Abstract A six well flow test was conducted during 1986 at the Dixie Valley geothermal field. Flow duration lasted from 40 to 74 days with a maximum rate of 5.9 million pounds/hour. During the test, downhole pressures were monitored in eight surrounding wells. Downhole pressure and temperature surveys were run in each of the flowing wells,usually in conjunction with productivity tests. Results from the flow test and earlier interference tests indicate that six wells are capable of providing in excess of the 4.5 million pounds/hour required for a 62 mw (gross) power plant. Author William L. Desormier Published Journal Geothermal Resources Council, TRANSACTIONS, 1987

255

Average summer electric power bills expected to be lowest in four years  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

summer electric power bills expected to be lowest in summer electric power bills expected to be lowest in four years The average U.S. household is expected to pay $395 for electricity this summer. That's down 2.5% from last year and the lowest residential summer power bill in four years, according to the new forecast from the U.S. Energy Information Administration. Lower electricity use to meet cooling demand this summer because of forecasted milder temperatures compared with last summer is expected to more than offset higher electricity prices. The result is lower power bills for most U.S. households during the June, July, and August period. However electricity use and prices vary by region. EIA expects residential power bills will be lower in all areas of the country... except for the West South Central region, which includes

256

E-Print Network 3.0 - averaged pulsar profiles Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

for: averaged pulsar profiles Page: << < 1 2 3 4 5 > >> 1 astroph9911319 Pulsar Astronomy ---2000 and Beyond Summary: with higher than average surface dipole magnetic fields....

257

E-Print Network 3.0 - average power ratio Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

a wind turbine Summary: of pairs of poles over the average power is also studied. Index Terms-- average wind power, battery... charging, permanent magnet synchronous machine. I....

258

E-Print Network 3.0 - annual average daily traffic Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Data Systems 2000. Annual Average Daily Truck Traffic on the California State... Lockout and Non-Lockout Weekdays Average Daily Traffic Volume (vehday) All Cars Trucks ......

259

E-Print Network 3.0 - average daily traffic Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Data Systems 2000. Annual Average Daily Truck Traffic on the California State... Lockout and Non-Lockout Weekdays Average Daily Traffic Volume (vehday) All Cars Trucks...

260

Integrated Geothermal Well Testing: Test Objectives and Facilities  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A new and highly integrated geothermal well test program was designed for three geothermal operators in the US (MCR, RGI and Mapco Geothermal). This program required the design, construction and operation of new well test facilities. The main objectives of the test program and facilities are to investigate the critical potential and worst problems associated with the well and produced fluids in a period of approximately 30 days. Field and laboratory investigations are required to determine and quantify the problems of fluid production, utilization and reinjection. The facilities are designed to handle a flow rate from a geothermal well of one million pounds per hour at a wellhead temperature of approximately 268 C (515 F). The facilities will handle an entire spectrum of temperature and rate conditions up to these limits. All pertinent conditions for future fluid exploitations can be duplicated with these facilities, thus providing critical information at the very early stages of field development. The new well test facilities have been used to test high temperature, liquid-dominated geothermal wells in the Imperial Valley of California. The test facilities still have some problems which should be solvable. The accomplishments of this new and highly integrated geothermal well test program are described in this paper.

Nicholson, R. W.; Vetter, O. J.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "wells average temperature" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Table 19. Average Price of U.S. Coal Imports  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Price of U.S. Coal Imports Price of U.S. Coal Imports (dollars per short ton) U.S. Energy Information Administration | Quarterly Coal Report, April - June 2013 Table 19. Average Price of U.S. Coal Imports (dollars per short ton) U.S. Energy Information Administration | Quarterly Coal Report, April - June 2013 Year to Date Continent and Country of Origin April - June 2013 January - March 2013 April - June 2012 2013 2012 Percent Change North America Total 147.86 138.39 191.01 144.86 197.96 -26.8 Canada 147.86 138.39 191.00 144.86 197.95 -26.8 Mexico - - 286.23 - 286.23 - South America Total 75.29 80.74 86.52 77.20 87.17 -11.4 Argentina - - 504.70 - 504.70 - Colombia 74.87 80.74 83.03 76.96 85.25 -9.7 Peru 87.09 - - 87.09 - - Venezuela 91.81 - 122.01 91.81 112.61 -18.5 Europe Total - 136.50 137.33 136.50 146.31 -6.7

262

Climate: monthly and annual average atmospheric pressure GIS data at  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

atmospheric pressure GIS data at atmospheric pressure GIS data at one-degree resolution of the World from NASA/SSE Dataset Summary Description (Abstract):Atmospheric Pressure (kPa)NASA Surface meteorology and Solar Energy (SSE) Release 6.0 Data Set (Nov 2007)22-year Monthly & Annual Average (July 1983 - June 2005)Parameter: Atmospheric Pressure (kPa)Internet: http://eosweb.larc.nasa.gov/sse/Note 1: SSE Methodology & Accuracy sections onlineNote 2: Lat/Lon values indicate the lower left corner of a 1x1 degree region. Negative values are south and west; positive values are north and east. Boundaries of the -90/-180 region are -90 to -89 (south) and -180 to -179 (west). The last region, 89/180, is bounded by 89 to 90 (north) and 179 to 180 (east). The mid-point of the region is +0.5 added to the the Lat/Lon value. These data are

263

temperatures | OpenEI Community  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

temperatures temperatures Home Graham7781's picture Submitted by Graham7781(1992) Super contributor 18 January, 2013 - 15:46 U.S. Global Change Research Program publishes "National Climate Assessment" report for United States climate change drought OpenEI sea level rise temperatures U.S. Global Climate Change program The U.S. Global Change Research Program, established under the Department of Commerce in 2010, and partnered with NOAA, released an extensive National Climate Assessment report, projecting future climate changes in the United States under different scenarios. The 1,200 page report highlights some rather grim findings about the future of climate change. Here are 5 of the more disconcerting graphics from the report: 1. U.S. Average Temperatures Syndicate content

264

Orbit averaged radial buildup code for tandem mirror geometry  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The radial Fokker-Planck (RFP) model of A. Futch was modified to treat plasma buildup in the tandem mirror plug and center cell with a self-consistent model (TOARBUC). Two major changes have been made to the original version of this code. First, the center cell is treated as having separate electron and ion confining potentials with the ion potential having the opposite sign of that in a conventional mirror. Second, a two-electron-temperature treatment derived by R. Cohen was included in the present model to allow the plug and center cell to have different T/sub e/'s as observed in the experiment. The following sections explain these changes in greater detail.

Campbell, M.; Futch, A.H.

1981-01-22T23:59:59.000Z

265

Polymer-cement geothermal-well-completion materials. Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A program to develop high-temperature polymer cements was performed. Several formulations based on organic and semi-inorganic binders were evaluated on the basis of mechanical and thermal stability, and thickening time. Two optimized systems exhibited properties exceeding those required for use in geothermal wells. Both systems were selected for continued evaluation at the National Bureau of Standards and contingent upon the results, for field testing in geothermal wells.

Zeldin, A.N.; Kukacka, L.E.

1980-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

266

Electric Power Generation from Low-Temperature Geothermal Resources...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

2 Geothermal Energy Production from Low Temperature Resources, Coproduced Fluids from Oil and Gas Wells, and Geopressured Resources Project Type Topic 3 Low Temperature...

267

Production Well Performance Enhancement using Sonication Technology  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The objective of this project was to develop a sonic well performance enhancement technology that focused on near wellbore formation damage. In order to successfully achieve this objective, a three-year project was defined. The entire project was broken into four tasks. The overall objective of all this was to foster a better understanding of the mechanisms involved in sonic energy interactions with fluid flow in porous media and adapt such knowledge for field applications. The fours tasks are: Laboratory studies Mathematical modeling Sonic tool design and development Field demonstration The project was designed to be completed in three years; however, due to budget cuts, support was only provided for the first year, and hence the full objective of the project could not be accomplished. This report summarizes what was accomplished with the support provided by the US Department of Energy. Experiments performed focused on determining the inception of cavitation, studying thermal dissipation under cavitation conditions, investigating sonic energy interactions with glass beads and oil, and studying the effects of sonication on crude oil properties. Our findings show that the voltage threshold for onset of cavitation is independent of transducer-hydrophone separation distance. In addition, thermal dissipation under cavitation conditions contributed to the mobilization of deposited paraffins and waxes. Our preliminary laboratory experiments suggest that waxes are mobilized when the fluid temperature approaches 40C. Experiments were conducted that provided insights into the interactions between sonic wave and the fluid contained in the porous media. Most of these studies were carried out in a slim-tube apparatus. A numerical model was developed for simulating the effect of sonication in the nearwellbore region. The numerical model developed was validated using a number of standard testbed problems. However, actual application of the model for scale-up purposes was limited due to funding constraints. The overall plan for this task was to perlorm field trials with the sonication tooL These trials were to be performed in production and/or injection wells located in Pennsylvania, New York, and West Virginia. Four new wells were drilled in preparation for the field demonstration. Baseline production data were collected and reservoir simulator tuned to simulate these oil reservoirs. The sonication tools were designed for these wells. However, actual field testing could not be carried out because of premature termination of the project.

Adewumi, Michael A; Ityokumbul, M Thaddeus; Watson, Robert W; Eltohami, Eltohami; Farias, Mario; Heckman, Glenn; Houlihan, Brendan; Karoor, Samata Prakash; Miller, Bruce G; Mohammed, Nazia; Olanrewaju, Johnson; Ozdemir, Mine; Rejepov, Dautmamed; Sadegh, Abdallah A; Quammie, Kevin E; Zaghloul, Jose; Hughes, W Jack; Montgomery, Thomas C

2005-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

268

Borehole stability analysis at the Coporo-1 well, Colombia  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-density window for Coporo-1 and future wells in the area. Repeated sections of the Carbonera formation, high in-situ stresses, abnormal pore pressure in some intervals, high temperature, and micro-fractured formations make drilling in this region both...

Arias, Henry

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

269

Beamline Temperatures  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Temperatures Temperatures Energy: 3.0000 GeV Current: 493.2242 mA Date: 11-Jan-2014 21:40:00 Beamline Temperatures Energy 3.0000 GeV Current 493.2 mA 11-Jan-2014 21:40:00 LN:MainTankLevel 124.4 in LN:MainTankPress 56.9 psi SPEAR-BL:B120HeFlow 15.4 l/min SPEAR-BL:B131HeFlow 22.2 l/min BL 4 BL02:LCW 0.0 ℃ BL02:M0_LCW 31.5 ℃ BL 4-1 BL04-1:BasePlate -14.0 ℃ BL04-1:Bottom1 46.0 ℃ BL04-1:Bottom2 47.0 ℃ BL04-1:Lower 32.0 ℃ BL04-1:Moly 46.0 ℃ BL04-1:ChinGuard1 31.0 ℃ BL04-1:ChinGuard2 31.0 ℃ BL04-1:FirstXtalA -167.0 ℃ BL04-1:FirstXtalB -172.0 ℃ BL04-1:Pad1 31.0 ℃ BL04-1:Pad2 31.0 ℃ BL04-1:SecondXtalA -177.0 ℃ BL04-1:SecondXtalB -175.0 ℃ BL 4-2 BL04-2:BasePlate -14.0 ℃ BL04-2:Bottom1 24.0 ℃ BL04-2:Bottom2 25.0 ℃

270

Geothermal: Sponsored by OSTI -- Temperatures and intervalgeothermal...  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

Temperatures and interval geothermal-gradient determinations from wells in National Petroleum Reserve in Alaska Geothermal Technologies Legacy Collection HelpFAQ | Site Map |...

271

Geothermal Energy Production from Low Temperature Resources,...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Geothermal Energy Production from Low Temperature Resources, Coproduced Fluids from Oil and Gas Wells, and Geopressured Resources Jump to: navigation, search Geothermal ARRA Funded...

272

Energy level spectroscopy of InSb quantum wells using quantum-well LED emission  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We have investigated the low-temperature optical properties of InSb quantum-well (QW) light-emitting diodes, with different barrier compositions, as a function of well width. Three devices were studied: QW1 had a 20 nm undoped InSb quantum well with a barrier composition of Al0.143In0.857Sb, QW2 had a 40 nm undoped InSb well with a barrier composition of Al0.077In0.923Sb, and QW3 had a 100 nm undoped InSb well with a barrier composition of Al0.025In0.975Sb. For QW1, the signature of two transitions (CB1-HH1 and CB1-HH2) can be seen in the measured spectrum, whereas for QW2 and QW3 the signature of a large number of transitions is present in the measured spectra. In particular transitions to HH2 can be seen, the first time this has been observed in AlInSb/InSb heterostructures. To identify the transitions that contribute to the measured spectra, the spectra have been simulated using an eight-band k.p calculation of the band structure together with a first-order time-dependent perturbation method (Fermi golden rule) calculation of spectral emittance, taking into account broadening. In general there is good agreement between the measured and simulated spectra. For QW2 we attribute the main peak in the experimental spectrum to the CB2-HH1 transition, which has the highest overall contribution to the emission spectrum of QW2 compared with all the other interband transitions. This transition normally falls into the category of forbidden transitions, and in order to understand this behavior we have investigated the momentum matrix elements, which determine the selection rules of the problem.

T. G. Tenev; A. Palyi; B. I. Mirza; G. R. Nash; M. Fearn; S. J. Smith; L. Buckle; M. T. Emeny; T. Ashley; J. H. Jefferson; C. J. Lambert

2009-02-02T23:59:59.000Z

273

Hottest spot temperatures in ventilated dry type transformers  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The hottest spot temperature allowance to be used for the different insulation system temperature classes is a major unknown facing IEEE Working Groups developing standards and loading guides for ventilated dry type transformers. In 1944, the hottest spot temperature allowance for ventilated dry type transformers was established as 30 C for 80 C average winding temperature rise. Since 1944, insulation temperature classes have increased to 220 C but IEEE standards continue to use a constant 30 C hottest spot temperature allowance. IEC standards use a variable hottest spot temperature allowance from 5 to 30 C. Six full size test windings were manufactured with imbedded thermocouples and 133 test runs performed to obtain temperature rise data. The test data indicated that the hottest spot temperature allowance used in IEEE standards for ventilated dry type transformers above 500 kVA is too low. This is due to the large thermal gradient from the bottom to the top of the windings caused by natural convection air flow through the cooling ducts. A constant ratio of hottest spot winding temperature rise to average winding temperature rise should be used in product standards for all insulation temperature classes. A ratio of 1.5 is suggested for ventilated dry type transformers above 500 kVA. This would increase the hottest spot temperature allowance from 30 C to 60 C and decrease the permissible average winding temperature rise from 150 C to 120 C for the 220 C insulation temperature class.

Pierce, L.W. (General Electric Co., Rome, GA (United States))

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

274

Exciton formation assisted by LO phonons in quantum wells  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Kinetics of exciton formation involving LO phonons is investigated in quantum wells. Considering the formation of an exciton from a free excited electron-hole pair due to LO-phonon emission, an expression is derived for the rate of formation of an exciton as a function of carrier densities, temperature, and wave vector K? of the center of mass of excitons in quantum wells, and the formation time of an exciton is also calculated. The theory is applied to GaAs quantum wells, in which it is found that the exciton formation dominantly occurs at K??0.

I.-K. Oh, Jai Singh, A. Thilagam, and A. S. Vengurlekar

2000-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

275

City of Wells, Minnesota (Utility Company) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Wells, Minnesota (Utility Company) Wells, Minnesota (Utility Company) Jump to: navigation, search Name City of Wells Place Minnesota Utility Id 29295 Utility Location Yes Ownership M NERC Location MRO Operates Generating Plant Yes Activity Distribution Yes References EIA Form EIA-861 Final Data File for 2010 - File1_a[1] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Utility Rate Schedules Grid-background.png Commercial Rate Commercial Commercial- Outside City Limits Commercial Large General Service- Primary Commercial Large General Service- Secondary Commercial Off-Peak Service Residential Residential Rate Residential Residential- Outside City Limits Residential Average Rates Residential: $0.1190/kWh

276

,"Housing Units1","Average Square Footage Per Housing Unit",,,"Average Square Footage Per Household Member"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1 Average Square Footage of Midwest Homes, by Housing Characteristics, 2009" 1 Average Square Footage of Midwest Homes, by Housing Characteristics, 2009" " Final" ,"Housing Units1","Average Square Footage Per Housing Unit",,,"Average Square Footage Per Household Member" "Housing Characteristics","Millions","Total2","Heated","Cooled","Total2","Heated","Cooled" "Total Midwest",25.9,2272,1898,1372,912,762,551 "Midwest Divisions and States" "East North Central",17.9,2251,1869,1281,892,741,508 "Illinois",4.8,2186,1911,1451,860,752,571 "Michigan",3.8,1954,1559,962,729,582,359 "Wisconsin",2.3,2605,2091,1258,1105,887,534

277

,"Housing Units1","Average Square Footage Per Housing Unit",,,"Average Square Footage Per Household Member"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

3 Average Square Footage of West Homes, by Housing Characteristics, 2009" 3 Average Square Footage of West Homes, by Housing Characteristics, 2009" " Final" ,"Housing Units1","Average Square Footage Per Housing Unit",,,"Average Square Footage Per Household Member" "Housing Characteristics","Millions","Total2","Heated","Cooled","Total2","Heated","Cooled" "Total West",24.8,1708,1374,800,628,506,294 "West Divisions and States" "Mountain",7.9,1928,1695,1105,723,635,415 "Mountain North",3.9,2107,1858,912,776,684,336 "Colorado",1.9,2082,1832,722,896,788,311 "Idaho, Montana, Utah, Wyoming",2,2130,1883,1093,691,610,354

278

Health and Wellness Guide for Students Introduction  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

dimensions of health and wellness. The 7 dimensions are: Physical Wellness � Taking care of your body Wellness � Taking care of what's around you 2Health andWellness Guide for Students #12;Physical Wellness � Communicate with your partner if you have questions or concerns � Meet with a Health Care Provider on campus

279

Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #615: March 22, 2010 Average Vehicle Trip  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

5: March 22, 5: March 22, 2010 Average Vehicle Trip Length to someone by E-mail Share Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #615: March 22, 2010 Average Vehicle Trip Length on Facebook Tweet about Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #615: March 22, 2010 Average Vehicle Trip Length on Twitter Bookmark Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #615: March 22, 2010 Average Vehicle Trip Length on Google Bookmark Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #615: March 22, 2010 Average Vehicle Trip Length on Delicious Rank Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #615: March 22, 2010 Average Vehicle Trip Length on Digg Find More places to share Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #615: March 22, 2010 Average Vehicle Trip Length on AddThis.com... Fact #615: March 22, 2010 Average Vehicle Trip Length According to the latest National Household Travel Survey, the average trip

280

Controlled Source Frequency-Domain Magnetics At Salt Wells Area  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Controlled Source Frequency-Domain Magnetics At Salt Wells Area Controlled Source Frequency-Domain Magnetics At Salt Wells Area (Montgomery, Et Al., 2005) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Controlled Source Frequency-Domain Magnetics At Salt Wells Area (Montgomery, Et Al., 2005) Exploration Activity Details Location Salt Wells Area Exploration Technique Controlled Source Frequency-Domain Magnetics Activity Date 2004 - 2004 Usefulness useful DOE-funding Unknown Exploration Basis AMP Resource contracted Willowstick Technologies, LLC to conduct a Controlled Source-Frequency Domain Magnetics (CS-FDM) geophysical investigation at Salt Wells in order to characterize and delineate areas showing the greatest concentrations and highest temperatures of geothermal groundwater. The investigation also sought to map blind faults beneath the

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "wells average temperature" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

INVITATIONAL WELL-TESTING SYMPOSIUM PROCEEDINGS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Oil, Gas, . . 81 and Geothermal Well Tests (abstract) W.has been testing geothermal wells for about three years, andof Oil, Gas, and Geothermal Well Tests W. E. Brigham

Authors, Various

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

282

Temperature effect in stratospheric balloon flight exposure of CR-39 plastic detector  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A CR-39 stack equipped with a passive temperature control shielding was exposed to primary cosmic radiation in a balloon flight from Trapani (Sicily) to Arenosillo (Spain) at an average altitude of 4 g cm-2 residual atmosphere for 20 h. High vertical geomagnetic cut-off ensured the relativistic nature of registered ions. Stack temperature was monitored by means of thermal probes and associated electronics and transmitted by telemetry to an earth-based station. Temperature excursions were less than 16C, which is shown to correspond to a 0.11e shift in the charge scale for relativistic iron ions. Best etching conditions were established for the VH relativistic component as well as a discrimination method for relativistic ions. Charge uncertainty was found to be 0.44e. Relative abundances for the iron group extrapolated to the top of the atmosphere are compared to those reported by other authors.

M. Ginjaume; C. Baixeras; F. Fernndez; A. Vidal-Quadras

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

283

Capping of Water Wells for Future Use  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

in determining the condition of your well, contact: S your local groundwater conservation dis- trict http://www.tceq.state.tx.us/permitting/ water_supply/groundwater/districts.html S a licensed water well driller in your area S the Water Well Drillers Program... are the steps in capping a well? The landowner, a licensed well driller or a licensed pump installer may cap a well. There are several steps involved. The well casing should extend above the ground surface to limit the risk of water entering the well...

Lesikar, Bruce J.; Mechell, Justin

2007-09-04T23:59:59.000Z

284

Functionalized Graphene Nanoroads for Quantum Well Device. |...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Nanoroads for Quantum Well Device. Functionalized Graphene Nanoroads for Quantum Well Device. Abstract: Using density functional theory, a series of calculations of structural and...

285

Observation Wells (Ozkocak, 1985) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Observation Wells Activity Date Usefulness useful DOE-funding Unknown Notes Reinjection test wells can be used to obtain quite precise measurements of reservoir permeability....

286

EPA - UIC Well Classifications | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Well Classifications Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Web Site: EPA - UIC Well Classifications Author Environmental Protection Agency Published...

287

Spin-polarized current oscillations in diluted magnetic semiconductor multiple quantum wells Manuel Bejar,1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. The transport properties of Mn-based heterostructures have been studied10 including miniband transportSpin-polarized current oscillations in diluted magnetic semiconductor multiple quantum wells Manuel. The spin polarization oscillates in both magnetic and nonmagnetic quantum wells and the time average

Sánchez, David

288

Helicopter magnetic survey conducted to locate wells  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A helicopter magnetic survey was conducted in August 2007 over 15.6 sq mi at the Naval Petroleum Reserve No. 3s (NPR-3) Teapot Dome Field near Casper, Wyoming. The surveys purpose was to accurately locate wells drilled there during more than 90 years of continuous oilfield operation. The survey was conducted at low altitude and with closely spaced flight lines to improve the detection of wells with weak magnetic response and to increase the resolution of closely spaced wells. The survey was in preparation for a planned CO2 flood for EOR, which requires a complete well inventory with accurate locations for all existing wells. The magnetic survey was intended to locate wells missing from the well database and to provide accurate locations for all wells. The ability of the helicopter magnetic survey to accurately locate wells was accomplished by comparing airborne well picks with well locations from an intense ground search of a small test area.

Veloski, G.A.; Hammack, R.W.; Stamp, V. (Rocky Mountain Oilfield Testing Center); Hall, R. (Rocky Mountain Oilfield Testing Center); Colina, K. (Rocky Mountain Oilfield Testing Center)

2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

289

High Precision Geophysics & Detailed Structural Exploration & Slim Well  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Precision Geophysics & Detailed Structural Exploration & Slim Well Precision Geophysics & Detailed Structural Exploration & Slim Well Drilling Geothermal Project Jump to: navigation, search Last modified on July 22, 2011. Project Title High Precision Geophysics & Detailed Structural Exploration & Slim Well Drilling Project Type / Topic 1 Recovery Act: Geothermal Technologies Program Project Type / Topic 2 Validation of Innovative Exploration Technologies Project Description Existing geologic data show that the basalt has been broken by complex intersecting fault zones at the hot springs. Natural state hot water flow patterns in the fracture network will be interpreted from temperature gradient wells and then tested with moderate depth core holes. Production and injection well tests of the core holes will be monitored with an innovative combination of Flowing Differential Self-Potential (FDSP) and resistivity tomography surveys. The cointerpretation of all these highly detailed geophysical methods sensitive to fracture permeability patterns and water flow during the well tests will provide unprecedented details on the structures and flow in a shallow geothermal aquifer and support effective development of the low temperature reservoir and identification of deep up flow targets.

290

Coherence Length of Cold Exciton Gases in Coupled Quantum Wells  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A Mach-Zehnder interferometer with spatial and spectral resolution was used to probe spontaneous coherence in cold exciton gases, which are implemented experimentally in the ring of indirect excitons in coupled quantum wells. A strong enhancement of the exciton coherence length is observed at temperatures below a few Kelvin. The increase of the coherence length is correlated with the macroscopic spatial ordering of excitons. The coherence length at the lowest temperature corresponds to a very narrow spread of the exciton momentum distribution, much smaller than that for a classical exciton gas.

Sen Yang, A. T. Hammack, M. M. Fogler, L. V. Butov, and A. C. Gossard

2006-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

291

An investigation of the effect of permeable and impermeable lenses on well performance  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

= 6. 000 INCHES RADIUS OF WELL. = 0 ' 095 INCHES RATH TEMPERATURE = 149 ' 9 DEGREFS F THICKNESS OF MODEL = 0 ' 345 INCHES INITIAL TEMPFRATURE = 76 ' 8 DEGREES F THICKNESS OF LENSE = 0 ~ IZ5 INCHES TIME SEC 0025 0 ' 5 1 ~ 0 TEMPERATURE fDEGREE 1... RADIUS OF WELL ~ 0 ~ 095 INCHES RATH TEMPERATURE = 149 ~ 8 DEGREES F THICKNESS OF MODEL = 0 ~ 420 INCHES INITIAL TEMPERATURE = 76 ~ 5 DEGREES F THICKNESS OF LENSE = 0 125 INCHES TIME SEC 0 ' 25 0 ' 5 I ~ 0 TEMPERATURE ( DEGREES F ) FOR RADU...

Miesch, Edward Peter

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

292

Curie temperature of multiphase nanostructures  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Curie temperature and the local spontaneous magnetization of ferromagnetic nanocomposites are investigated. The macroscopic character of the critical fluctuations responsible for the onset of ferromagnetic order means that there is only one Curie temperature, independent of the number of magnetic phases present. The Curie temperature increases with the grain size and is, in general, larger than predicted from the volume averages of the exchange constants. However, the Curie-temperature enhancement is accompanied by a relative reduction of the spontaneous magnetization. Due to the quadratic dependence of the permanent-magnet energy product on the spontaneous magnetization, this amounts to a deterioration of the magnets performance. The length scale on which an effective intergranular exchange coupling is realized (coupling length) depends on the Curie-temperature difference between the phases and on the spacial distribution of the local interatomic exchange. As a rule, it is of the order of a few interatomic distances; for much bigger grain sizes the structures mimic an interaction-free ensemble of different ferromagnetic materials. This must be compared to the magnetic-anisotropy coupling length, which is of the order of 10 nm. The difference is explained by the nonrelativistic character of the Curie-temperature problem. (c) 2000 American Institute of Physics.

Skomski, R. [Department of Physics and Astronomy and Center for Materials Research and Analysis, University of Nebraska, Lincoln, Nebraska 68588 (United States)] [Department of Physics and Astronomy and Center for Materials Research and Analysis, University of Nebraska, Lincoln, Nebraska 68588 (United States); Sellmyer, D. J. [Department of Physics and Astronomy and Center for Materials Research and Analysis, University of Nebraska, Lincoln, Nebraska 68588 (United States)] [Department of Physics and Astronomy and Center for Materials Research and Analysis, University of Nebraska, Lincoln, Nebraska 68588 (United States)

2000-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

293

Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #265: April 28, 2003 State Average Fuel  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

5: April 28, 5: April 28, 2003 State Average Fuel Prices to someone by E-mail Share Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #265: April 28, 2003 State Average Fuel Prices on Facebook Tweet about Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #265: April 28, 2003 State Average Fuel Prices on Twitter Bookmark Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #265: April 28, 2003 State Average Fuel Prices on Google Bookmark Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #265: April 28, 2003 State Average Fuel Prices on Delicious Rank Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #265: April 28, 2003 State Average Fuel Prices on Digg Find More places to share Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #265: April 28, 2003 State Average Fuel Prices on AddThis.com... Fact #265: April 28, 2003 State Average Fuel Prices The American Automobile Association tracks gasoline and diesel prices

294

Fact #715: February 20, 2012 The Average Age of Light Vehicles Continues to Rise  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The average age for cars and light trucks continues to rise as consumers hold onto their vehicles longer. Between 1995 and 2011, the average age for cars increased by 32% from 8.4 years to 11.1...

295

The U.S. average retail price for on-highway diesel fuel rose...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

The U.S. average retail price for on-highway diesel fuel rose this week The U.S. average retail price for on-highway diesel fuel rose slightly to 3.90 a gallon on Monday. That's...

296

Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #671: April 18, 2011 Average Truck Speeds  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

1: April 18, 1: April 18, 2011 Average Truck Speeds to someone by E-mail Share Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #671: April 18, 2011 Average Truck Speeds on Facebook Tweet about Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #671: April 18, 2011 Average Truck Speeds on Twitter Bookmark Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #671: April 18, 2011 Average Truck Speeds on Google Bookmark Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #671: April 18, 2011 Average Truck Speeds on Delicious Rank Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #671: April 18, 2011 Average Truck Speeds on Digg Find More places to share Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #671: April 18, 2011 Average Truck Speeds on AddThis.com... Fact #671: April 18, 2011 Average Truck Speeds The Federal Highway Administration studies traffic volume and flow on major

297

Thank you for joining: 360WELLNESS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

shortly. If you are experiencing technical difficulties with Adobe Connect, please call 1 March 22, 2012 12 pm ­ 1pm ET #12;360° WELLNESS: Achieving Wellness At Work And At Home Workshop & Self-Assessment © Joe Rosenlicht, Certified Coach 3 #12;8 Wellness Areas Wellness Nutrition Brain Power Fitness Sleep

Vertes, Akos

298

Track 4: Employee Health and Wellness  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

ISM Workshop Presentations Knoxville Convention Center, Knoxville, TN August 2009 Track 4: Employee Health and Wellness

299

Definition: Artesian Well | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Well Well Jump to: navigation, search Dictionary.png Artesian Well An artesian well is a water well that doesn't require a pump to bring water to the surface; this occurs when there is enough pressure in the aquifer. The pressure causes hydrostatic equilibrium and if the pressure is high enough the water may even reach the ground surface in which case the well is called a flowing artesian well.[1] View on Wikipedia Wikipedia Definition See Great Artesian Basin for the water source in Australia. An artesian aquifer is a confined aquifer containing groundwater under positive pressure. This causes the water level in a well to rise to a point where hydrostatic equilibrium has been reached. This type of well is called an artesian well. Water may even reach the ground surface if the natural

300

Subsurface temperatures during the last millennium: Model and observation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. The GCM ECHO-g was used to produce three millennial simulations of the Earth's climate. Two simulations temperatures in Canada, grouped into regions, as a record of past climate. The regional average SATs from ECHO-g

Beltrami, Hugo

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "wells average temperature" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Optical Properties of Plasmas Based on an Average-Atom Walter Johnson, Notre Dame University  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Optical Properties of Plasmas Based on an Average-Atom Model Walter Johnson, Notre Dame University of Plasmas Based on an Average-Atom Model Walter Johnson, Notre Dame University Claude Guet, CEA/DAM Ile de of Plasmas Based on an Average-Atom Model Walter Johnson, Notre Dame University Claude Guet, CEA/DAM Ile de

Johnson, Walter R.

302

A Structural Analysis of Vehicle Design Responses to Corporate Average Fuel Economy Policy  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

sensitive to fuel prices than to CAFE standards, with the 2007 average fuel price implying that current CAFE09-0588 A Structural Analysis of Vehicle Design Responses to Corporate Average Fuel Economy Policy, Michalek, and Hendrickson 1 ABSTRACT The U.S. Corporate Average Fuel Economy (CAFE) regulations, which aim

Michalek, Jeremy J.

303

Effective environments: Preparation of stationary states with inverse temperature ranging from positive to negative values  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In this paper, we discuss how effective environments incorporating periodic measurements can be used to prepare a two-level system (TLS) in almost arbitrary thermal states: Concretely, we study a TLS coupled to a spin environment, the magnetization of which is measured periodically. In ensemble average these measurements cause a relaxation of the TLS into a thermal (diagonal) state. By adjusting the time between the measurements and the detuning of the environmental spins, the creation of very low temperatures as well as inversion becomes possible. Our analytical results derived for large environments are numerically shown to be valid even for quite small environments, down to only a few spins.

Thomas Jahnke; Gnter Mahler

2011-07-18T23:59:59.000Z

304

Surface Indicators of Geothermal Activity at Salt Wells, Nevada, USA,  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Surface Indicators of Geothermal Activity at Salt Wells, Nevada, USA, Surface Indicators of Geothermal Activity at Salt Wells, Nevada, USA, Including Warm Ground, Borate Deposits, and Siliceous Alteration Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Conference Paper: Surface Indicators of Geothermal Activity at Salt Wells, Nevada, USA, Including Warm Ground, Borate Deposits, and Siliceous Alteration Abstract Surface indicators of geothermal activity are often present above blind or concealed geothermal systems in the Great Basin, but their expressions are sometimes subtle. When mapped in detail, these indicators yield valuable information on the location, structural controls, and potential subsurface reservoir temperatures of geothermal fluids. An example is provided by the Salt Wells geothermal system in Churchill County, Nevada, USA, where

305

Climate: monthly and annual average cooling degree days above 10° C GIS  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

cooling degree days above 10° C GIS cooling degree days above 10° C GIS data at one-degree resolution of the World from NASA/SSE Dataset Summary Description (Abstract): Cooling Degree Days above 10° C (degree days)The monthly accumulation of degrees when the daily mean temperature is above 10° C.NASA Surface meteorology and Solar Energy (SSE) Release 6.0 Data Set (Nov 2007)22-year Monthly Average & Annual Sum (July 1983 - June 2005)Parameter: Cooling Degree Days Above 10 degrees C (degree days)Internet: http://eosweb.larc.nasa.gov/sse/Note 1: SSE Methodology & Accuracy sections onlineNote 2: Lat/Lon values indicate the lower left corner of a 1x1 degree region. Negative values are south and west; positive values are north and east. Boundaries of the -90/-180 region are -90 to -89 (south) and -180 to -179 (west). The last region, 89/180,

306

Climate: monthly and annual average heating degree days below 18° C GIS  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

heating degree days below 18° C GIS heating degree days below 18° C GIS data at one-degree resolution of the World from NASA/SSE Dataset Summary Description (Abstract): Heating Degree Days below 18° C (degree days)The monthly accumulation of degrees when the daily mean temperature is below 18° C.NASA Surface meteorology and Solar Energy (SSE) Release 6.0 Data Set (Nov 2007)22-year Monthly Average & Annual Sum (July 1983 - June 2005)Parameter: Heating Degree Days Below 18 degrees C (degree days)Internet: http://eosweb.larc.nasa.gov/sse/Note 1: SSE Methodology & Accuracy sections onlineNote 2: Lat/Lon values indicate the lower left corner of a 1x1 degree region. Negative values are south and west; positive values are north and east. Boundaries of the -90/-180 region are -90 to -89 (south) and -180 to -179 (west). The last region, 89/180,

307

Wells Rural Electric Co (Utah) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Utah) Utah) Jump to: navigation, search Name Wells Rural Electric Co Place Utah Utility Id 20332 References Energy Information Administration.[1] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Utility Rate Schedules Grid-background.png No rate schedules available. Average Rates Residential: $0.0938/kWh Commercial: $0.0765/kWh Industrial: $0.0593/kWh The following table contains monthly sales and revenue data for Wells Rural Electric Co (Utah). Month RES REV (THOUSAND $) RES SALES (MWH) RES CONS COM REV (THOUSAND $) COM SALES (MWH) COM CONS IND_REV (THOUSAND $) IND SALES (MWH) IND CONS OTH REV (THOUSAND $) OTH SALES (MWH) OTH CONS TOT REV (THOUSAND $) TOT SALES (MWH) TOT CONS

308

New well control companies stress planning, engineering  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The technology for capping a blowing well has not changed during the last 50 years. Still, operators are finding new ways of using well control companies' expertise to help avoid potentially disastrous situations. This trend is especially critical given the current environmentally sensitive and cost-cutting times facing the oil industry. While regulatory agencies world-wide continue to hinder well control efforts during an offshore event, well control companies are focusing on technologies to make their job easier. Some of the most exciting are the hydraulic jet cutter, which gained fame in Kuwait, and electromagnetic ranging for drilling more accurate relief wells. With the number of subsea wells increasing, subsea intervention is a major target for future innovations. Well control companies are experiencing a change in their role to the offshore oil industry. Well control professionals discuss this expanded responsibility as well as other aspects of offshore blowouts including regulatory hindrances, subsea intervention and future technologies.

Bell, S.; Wright, R.

1994-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

309

Case histories of temperature surveys in Kuwait  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Most crude produced in Kuwait is from naturally flowing wells. Casing, tubing, and cement in these wells remain unchanged after completion. This study discusses the major application of temperature surveys in indicating fluid movement both inside and behind the production string, hence locating any holes in the casing. Some significant cases of temperature anomalies are examined qualitatively, and suggestions are made for a more quantitative interpretation of temperature profiles. 9 refs.

Gupta, B.S.

1981-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

310

Vapor port and groundwater sampling well  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method and apparatus has been developed for combining groundwater monitoring wells with unsaturated-zone vapor sampling ports. The apparatus allows concurrent monitoring of both the unsaturated and the saturated zone from the same well at contaminated areas. The innovative well design allows for concurrent sampling of groundwater and volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in the vadose (unsaturated) zone from a single well, saving considerable time and money. The sample tubes are banded to the outer well casing during installation of the well casing.

Hubbell, Joel M. (Idaho Falls, ID); Wylie, Allan H. (Idaho Falls, ID)

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

311

Geothermal/Well Field | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

source source History View New Pages Recent Changes All Special Pages Semantic Search/Querying Get Involved Help Apps Datasets Community Login | Sign Up Search Page Edit History Facebook icon Twitter icon » Geothermal/Well Field < Geothermal(Redirected from Well Field) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Land Use Leasing Exploration Well Field Power Plant Transmission Environment Water Use Print PDF Geothermal Well Fields and Reservoirs General Techniques Tree Techniques Table Regulatory Roadmap NEPA (45) Geothermal energy plant at The Geysers near Santa Rosa in Northern California, the world's largest electricity-generating hydrothermal geothermal development. Copyright © 1995 Warren Gretz Geothermal Well Fields discussion Groups of Well Field Techniques

312

High Temperatures & Electricity Demand  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

High Temperatures & Electricity Demand An Assessment of Supply Adequacy in California Trends.......................................................................................................1 HIGH TEMPERATURES AND ELECTRICITY DEMAND.....................................................................................................................7 SECTION I: HIGH TEMPERATURES AND ELECTRICITY DEMAND ..........................9 BACKGROUND

313

Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #622: May 10, 2010 Average Length of  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

2: May 10, 2010 2: May 10, 2010 Average Length of Light Vehicle Ownership to someone by E-mail Share Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #622: May 10, 2010 Average Length of Light Vehicle Ownership on Facebook Tweet about Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #622: May 10, 2010 Average Length of Light Vehicle Ownership on Twitter Bookmark Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #622: May 10, 2010 Average Length of Light Vehicle Ownership on Google Bookmark Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #622: May 10, 2010 Average Length of Light Vehicle Ownership on Delicious Rank Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #622: May 10, 2010 Average Length of Light Vehicle Ownership on Digg Find More places to share Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #622: May 10, 2010 Average Length of Light Vehicle Ownership on AddThis.com...

314

Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #520: May 26, 2008 Average Price of a New  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

0: May 26, 2008 0: May 26, 2008 Average Price of a New Car, 1970-2006 to someone by E-mail Share Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #520: May 26, 2008 Average Price of a New Car, 1970-2006 on Facebook Tweet about Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #520: May 26, 2008 Average Price of a New Car, 1970-2006 on Twitter Bookmark Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #520: May 26, 2008 Average Price of a New Car, 1970-2006 on Google Bookmark Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #520: May 26, 2008 Average Price of a New Car, 1970-2006 on Delicious Rank Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #520: May 26, 2008 Average Price of a New Car, 1970-2006 on Digg Find More places to share Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #520: May 26, 2008 Average Price of a New Car, 1970-2006 on AddThis.com... Fact #520: May 26, 2008

315

Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #219: June 3, 2002 Average Price of a New  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

9: June 3, 2002 9: June 3, 2002 Average Price of a New Car: 1970-2001 to someone by E-mail Share Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #219: June 3, 2002 Average Price of a New Car: 1970-2001 on Facebook Tweet about Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #219: June 3, 2002 Average Price of a New Car: 1970-2001 on Twitter Bookmark Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #219: June 3, 2002 Average Price of a New Car: 1970-2001 on Google Bookmark Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #219: June 3, 2002 Average Price of a New Car: 1970-2001 on Delicious Rank Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #219: June 3, 2002 Average Price of a New Car: 1970-2001 on Digg Find More places to share Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #219: June 3, 2002 Average Price of a New Car: 1970-2001 on AddThis.com... Fact #219: June 3, 2002

316

Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #312: March 22, 2004 State Average Fuel  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

2: March 22, 2: March 22, 2004 State Average Fuel Prices, 2003 vs. 2004 to someone by E-mail Share Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #312: March 22, 2004 State Average Fuel Prices, 2003 vs. 2004 on Facebook Tweet about Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #312: March 22, 2004 State Average Fuel Prices, 2003 vs. 2004 on Twitter Bookmark Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #312: March 22, 2004 State Average Fuel Prices, 2003 vs. 2004 on Google Bookmark Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #312: March 22, 2004 State Average Fuel Prices, 2003 vs. 2004 on Delicious Rank Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #312: March 22, 2004 State Average Fuel Prices, 2003 vs. 2004 on Digg Find More places to share Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #312: March 22, 2004 State Average Fuel Prices, 2003 vs. 2004 on AddThis.com...

317

Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #728: May 21, 2012 Average Trip Length is  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

8: May 21, 2012 8: May 21, 2012 Average Trip Length is Less Than Ten Miles to someone by E-mail Share Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #728: May 21, 2012 Average Trip Length is Less Than Ten Miles on Facebook Tweet about Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #728: May 21, 2012 Average Trip Length is Less Than Ten Miles on Twitter Bookmark Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #728: May 21, 2012 Average Trip Length is Less Than Ten Miles on Google Bookmark Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #728: May 21, 2012 Average Trip Length is Less Than Ten Miles on Delicious Rank Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #728: May 21, 2012 Average Trip Length is Less Than Ten Miles on Digg Find More places to share Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #728: May 21, 2012 Average Trip Length is Less Than Ten Miles on AddThis.com...

318

,"Housing Units1","Average Square Footage Per Housing Unit",,,"Average Square Footage Per Household Member"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2 Average Square Footage of South Homes, by Housing Characteristics, 2009" 2 Average Square Footage of South Homes, by Housing Characteristics, 2009" " Final" ,"Housing Units1","Average Square Footage Per Housing Unit",,,"Average Square Footage Per Household Member" "Housing Characteristics","Millions","Total2","Heated","Cooled","Total2","Heated","Cooled" "Total South",42.1,1867,1637,1549,732,642,607 "South Divisions and States" "South Atlantic",22.2,1944,1687,1596,771,668,633 "Virginia",3,2227,1977,1802,855,759,692 "Georgia",3.5,2304,1983,1906,855,736,707 "Florida",7,1668,1432,1509,690,593,625 "DC, DE, MD, WV",3.4,2218,1831,1440,864,713,561

319

,"Housing Units1","Average Square Footage Per Housing Unit",,,"Average Square Footage Per Household Member"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

4 Average Square Footage of Single-Family Homes, by Housing Characteristics, 2009" 4 Average Square Footage of Single-Family Homes, by Housing Characteristics, 2009" " Final" ,"Housing Units1","Average Square Footage Per Housing Unit",,,"Average Square Footage Per Household Member" "Housing Characteristics","Millions","Total2","Heated","Cooled","Total2","Heated","Cooled" "Total Single-Family",78.6,2422,2002,1522,880,727,553 "Census Region" "Northeast",12.7,2843,2150,1237,1009,763,439 "Midwest",19.2,2721,2249,1664,1019,842,624 "South",29.7,2232,1945,1843,828,722,684 "West",16.9,2100,1712,1009,725,591,348 "Urban and Rural3"

320

,"Housing Units1","Average Square Footage Per Housing Unit",,,"Average Square Footage Per Household Member"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

0 Average Square Footage of Northeast Homes, by Housing Characteristics, 2009" 0 Average Square Footage of Northeast Homes, by Housing Characteristics, 2009" " Final" ,"Housing Units1","Average Square Footage Per Housing Unit",,,"Average Square Footage Per Household Member" "Housing Characteristics","Millions","Total2","Heated","Cooled","Total2","Heated","Cooled" "Total Northeast",20.8,2121,1663,921,836,656,363 "Northeast Divisions and States" "New England",5.5,2232,1680,625,903,680,253 "Massachusetts",2.5,2076,1556,676,850,637,277 "CT, ME, NH, RI, VT",3,2360,1781,583,946,714,234 "Mid-Atlantic",15.3,2080,1657,1028,813,647,402

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "wells average temperature" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

,"Housing Units1","Average Square Footage Per Housing Unit",,,"Average Square Footage Per Household Member"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

5 Average Square Footage of Multi-Family Homes, by Housing Characteristics, 2009" 5 Average Square Footage of Multi-Family Homes, by Housing Characteristics, 2009" " Final" ,"Housing Units1","Average Square Footage Per Housing Unit",,,"Average Square Footage Per Household Member" "Housing Characteristics","Millions","Total2","Heated","Cooled","Total2","Heated","Cooled" "Total Multi-Family",28.1,930,807,535,453,393,261 "Census Region" "Northeast",7.6,991,897,408,471,426,194 "Midwest",5.6,957,857,518,521,466,282 "South",8.4,924,846,819,462,423,410 "West",6.5,843,606,329,374,269,146 "Urban and Rural3" "Urban",26.9,927,803,531,450,390,258

322

,"Housing Units1","Average Square Footage Per Housing Unit",,,"Average Square Footage Per Household Member"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

6 Average Square Footage of Mobile Homes, by Housing Characteristics, 2009" 6 Average Square Footage of Mobile Homes, by Housing Characteristics, 2009" " Final" ,"Housing Units1","Average Square Footage Per Housing Unit",,,"Average Square Footage Per Household Member" "Housing Characteristics","Millions","Total2","Heated","Cooled","Total2","Heated","Cooled" "Total Mobile Homes",6.9,1087,985,746,413,375,283 "Census Region" "Northeast",0.5,1030,968,711,524,492,362 "Midwest",1.1,1090,1069,595,400,392,218 "South",3.9,1128,1008,894,423,378,335 "West",1.4,995,867,466,369,322,173 "Urban and Rural3" "Urban",3.5,1002,919,684,396,364,271

323

,"Housing Units1","Average Square Footage Per Housing Unit",,,"Average Square Footage Per Household Member"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

9 Average Square Footage of U.S. Homes, by Housing Characteristics, 2009" 9 Average Square Footage of U.S. Homes, by Housing Characteristics, 2009" " Final" ,"Housing Units1","Average Square Footage Per Housing Unit",,,"Average Square Footage Per Household Member" "Housing Characteristics","Millions","Total2","Heated","Cooled","Total2","Heated","Cooled" "Total",113.6,1971,1644,1230,766,639,478 "Census Region" "Northeast",20.8,2121,1663,921,836,656,363 "Midwest",25.9,2272,1898,1372,912,762,551 "South",42.1,1867,1637,1549,732,642,607 "West",24.8,1708,1374,800,628,506,294 "Urban and Rural3" "Urban",88.1,1857,1546,1148,728,607,450

324

Geothermal/Well Field | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Geothermal/Well Field Geothermal/Well Field < Geothermal Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Land Use Leasing Exploration Well Field Power Plant Transmission Environment Water Use Print PDF Geothermal Well Fields and Reservoirs General Techniques Tree Techniques Table Regulatory Roadmap NEPA (42) Geothermal energy plant at The Geysers near Santa Rosa in Northern California, the world's largest electricity-generating hydrothermal geothermal development. Copyright © 1995 Warren Gretz Geothermal Well Fields discussion Groups of Well Field Techniques There are many different techniques that are utilized in geothermal well field development and reservoir maintenance depending on the region's geology, economic considerations, project maturity, and other considerations such as land access and permitting requirements. Well field

325

RFI Well Integrity 06 JUL 1400  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This PowerPoint report entitled "Well Integrity During Shut - In Operations: DOE/DOI Analyses" describes risks and suggests risk management recommendations associated with shutting in the well.

326

Well Owner's Guide To Water Supply  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

's groundwater and guidelines, including national drinking water standards, to test well water to insure safe drinking water in private wells. National drinking water standards and common methods of home water .....................22 Contaminants in Water........................................23 Drinking Water Guidelines

Fay, Noah

327

Essays on Well-Being in Japan.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??This dissertation is comprised of four papers on well-being in Japan and aims to examine three important measures of well-being: perceptions of job insecurity, self-reported (more)

Kuroki, Masanori

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

328

High-average-power, 100-Hz-repetition-rate, tabletop soft-x-ray lasers at sub-15-nm wavelengths  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Efficient excitation of dense plasma columns at 100-Hz repetition rate using a tailored pump pulse profile produced a tabletop soft-x-ray laser average power of 0.1 mW at = 13.9 nm and 20 W at = 11.9 nm from transitions of Ni-like Ag and Ni-like Sn, respectively. Lasing on several other transitions with wavelengths between 10.9 and 14.7 nm was also obtained using 0.9-J pump pulses of 5-ps duration from a compact diode-pumped chirped pulse amplification Yb:YAG laser. Hydrodynamic and atomic plasma simulations show that the pump pulse profile, consisting of a nanosecond ramp followed by two peaks of picosecond duration, creates a plasma with an increased density of Ni-like ions at the time of peak temperature that results in a larger gain coefficient over a temporally and spatially enlarged space leading to a threefold increase in the soft-x-ray laser output pulse energy. The high average power of these compact soft-x-ray lasers will enable applications requiring high photon flux. These results open the path to milliwatt-average-power tabletop soft-x-ray lasers.

Reagan, Brendon [Colorado State University, Fort Collins] [Colorado State University, Fort Collins; Berrill, Mark A [ORNL] [ORNL; Wernsing, Keith [Colorado State University, Fort Collins] [Colorado State University, Fort Collins; Baumgarten, Cory [Colorado State University, Fort Collins] [Colorado State University, Fort Collins; Woolston, Mark [Colorado State University, Fort Collins] [Colorado State University, Fort Collins; Rocca, Jorge [Colorado State University, Fort Collins] [Colorado State University, Fort Collins

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

329

Method for the magnetization of well casing  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A well casing is magnetized by traversing an internal magnetizer along and within the well casing while periodically reversing the direction of the magnetic field of the magnetizer to create a plurality of magnetic flux leakage points along the well casing.

Hoehn, G.L. Jr.

1984-08-14T23:59:59.000Z

330

Calculator program aids well cost management  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A TI-59 calculator program designed to track well costs on daily and weekly bases can dramatically facilitate the task of monitoring well expenses. The program computes the day total, cumulative total, cumulative item-row totals, and day-week total. For carrying these costs throughout the drilling project, magnetic cards can store the individual and total cumulative well expenses.

Doyle, C.J.

1982-01-18T23:59:59.000Z

331

The integrity of oil and gas wells  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...Analyses of 8,000 offshore wells in the Gulf of Mexico show that 1112% of wells developed pressure in the outer...underground gas storage, and even geothermal energy (1620). We...to learn about how often wells fail, when and why they...

Robert B. Jackson

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

332

Geology and Geothermal Potential North of Wells, Nevada  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The geology north of Wells, Nevada is dominated by approximately 2150 m of Tertiary lacustrine siltstones and conglomerates. The sediments are cut by a high-angle, range-bounding fault and several associated step faults. Hydrothermal alteration and silicification are associated with the high-angle faults. Two ages of Quaternary sediments locally overlie the Tertiary sediments. Lithologic and well log analyses define numerous potential aquifers in the Tertiary sediments. The shallowest of these aquifers is overlain by a tuffaceous siltstone which appears to act as an aquitard for hot water moving through the aquifers. Three possible subsurface hydrologic models can be constructed to explain the spatial relationships of the thermal water near Wells. Cost-effective steps taken to expedite geothermal development in the area might include deepening of an existing domestic well in the city of Wells to at least 180 m in order to penetrate the tuffaceous siltstone aquitard, running borehole logs for all existing wells, and conducting a shallow temperature-probe survey in the Tertiary sediments north of Wells.

Jewell, Paul W.

1982-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

333

Spontaneous Potential Well Log | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Spontaneous Potential Well Log Spontaneous Potential Well Log Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Technique: Spontaneous Potential Well Log Details Activities (2) Areas (2) Regions (0) NEPA(0) Exploration Technique Information Exploration Group: Downhole Techniques Exploration Sub Group: Well Log Techniques Parent Exploration Technique: Well Log Techniques Information Provided by Technique Lithology: SP technique originally applied to locating sulfide ore-bodies. Stratigraphic/Structural: -Formation bed thickness and boundaries -Detection and tracing of faults -Permeability and porosity Hydrological: Determination of fluid flow patterns: electrochemical coupling processes due to variations in ionic concentrations, and electrokinetic coupling processes due to fluid flow in the subsurface.

334

Regulations of Wells (Florida) | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Regulations of Wells (Florida) Regulations of Wells (Florida) Regulations of Wells (Florida) < Back Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Construction Fed. Government Fuel Distributor General Public/Consumer Industrial Installer/Contractor Institutional Investor-Owned Utility Local Government Low-Income Residential Multi-Family Residential Municipal/Public Utility Nonprofit Residential Retail Supplier Rural Electric Cooperative Schools State/Provincial Govt Systems Integrator Transportation Tribal Government Utility Program Info State Florida Program Type Environmental Regulations Siting and Permitting Provider Florida Department of Environmental Protection The Department of Environmental Protection regulates the construction, repair, and abandonment of wells, as well as the persons and businesses undertaking such practices. Governing boards of water management districts

335

Fluid chemistry and temperatures prior to exploitation at the Las Tres Vrgenes geothermal field, Mexico  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Generation of electricity at the Las Tres Vrgenes (LTV) geothermal field, Mexico, began in 2001. There are currently nine geothermal wells in the field, which has an installed electricity generating capacity of 10MWe. The chemical and temperature conditions prevailing in the field prior to its exploitation have been estimated, including their central tendency and dispersion parameters. These conditions were computed on the basis of: (i) geochemical data on waters from springs and domestic wells, and on geothermal well fluids (waters and gases); most of the sampling took place between 1995 and 1999; (ii) fluid inclusion studies; (iii) geothermometric data; and (iv) static formation temperatures computed using a modified quadratic regression Horner method. Fluid inclusion homogenization temperatures (in the 100290C range) suggest that there is a high-temperature fluid upflow zone near wells LV3 and LV4 in the southern part of the field. Computed average chemical equilibrium temperatures for the geothermal fluids are ?260C, based on the Na/K and SiO2 geothermometers, and ?265C, based on the H2/Ar, and CO2/Ar geothermometers. In general, the fluid inclusion homogenization temperatures are consistent with geothermometric data, as well as with static formation temperatures. Some of the observed differences could be related to well interference effects and different fluid production/sampling depths. The deeper geothermal waters show higher concentrations of Cl, Na, K, B, Ba, but lower concentrations of SO4, Ca, and Mg than the shallower waters. Fluid inclusion salinities are also higher in the deeper rocks. The measured Na/Cl ratios of the geothermal well waters are more or less uniform throughout the field and are very similar to that of seawater, strongly suggesting a seawater component in the fluid of the LTV system. The heat stored in the LTV geothermal system was estimated to be at least 9נ1012MJ, of which some 4נ1011MJ (equivalent to about 148MWe for 30 years of operation, assuming a conversion efficiency of ?35%) might be extracted using wells. These results indicate that the installed capacity at LTV could be safely increased from the current 10MWe.

Surendra P. Verma; Kailasa Pandarinath; Edgar Santoyo; Eduardo Gonzlez-Partida; Ignacio S. Torres-Alvarado; Enrique Tello-Hinojosa

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

336

Application of a Downhole Flowmeter to Detecting Casing Breaks in a Geothermal Well  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The downhole flowmeter logging system for high temperature geothermal wells developed at Wairakei, New Zealand, is proving to be an invaluable tool for use during workovers to repair or reinstate problem wells. This contribution describes a straightforward example of identifying breaks in plain casing near the top of a productive well.

Syms, Margot C.; Syms, Peter H.; Bixley, Paul F.

1980-12-16T23:59:59.000Z

337

Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #803: November 11, 2013 Average Number of  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

3: November 11, 3: November 11, 2013 Average Number of Transmission Gears is on the Rise to someone by E-mail Share Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #803: November 11, 2013 Average Number of Transmission Gears is on the Rise on Facebook Tweet about Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #803: November 11, 2013 Average Number of Transmission Gears is on the Rise on Twitter Bookmark Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #803: November 11, 2013 Average Number of Transmission Gears is on the Rise on Google Bookmark Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #803: November 11, 2013 Average Number of Transmission Gears is on the Rise on Delicious Rank Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #803: November 11, 2013 Average Number of Transmission Gears is on the Rise on Digg Find More places to share Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #803:

338

Solar: monthly and annual average direct normal (DNI) GIS data at 40km  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

22 22 Varnish cache server Solar: monthly and annual average direct normal (DNI) GIS data at 40km resolution for Mexico, Central America, and the Caribbean Islands from NREL Dataset Summary Description (Abstract): Monthly Average Solar Resource for 2-axis tracking concentrating collectors for Mexico, Central America, and the Caribbean Islands. (Purpose): Provide information on the solar resource potential for the data domain. The insolation values represent the average solar energy available to a concentrating collector, such as a dish collector, which tracks the sun continuously. (Supplemental Information): These data provide monthly average and annual average daily total solar resource averaged over surface cells of approximately 40 km by 40 km in size. The solar resource value is

339

Thermal extraction analysis of five Los Azufres production wells  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Thermal energy extraction from five wells supplying 5-MWe wellhead generators in three zones of the Los Azufres geothermal field has been examined from production and chemical data compiled over 14-years of operation. The data, as annual means, are useful in observing small-scale changes in reservoir performance with continuous production. The chemical components are chloride for quality control and the geothermometer elements for reservoir temperatures. The flowrate and fluid enthalpy data are used to calculate the thermal extraction rates. Integration of these data provides an estimate of the total energy extracted from the zone surrounding the well. The combined production and chemical geothermometer data are used to model the produced fluid as coming from just-penetrating wells for which the annual produced mass originates from a series of concentric hemispheric shells moving out into the reservoir. Estimates are made of the drawdown distance into the reservoir and the far-field conditions.

Kruger, Paul; Quijano, Luis

1995-01-26T23:59:59.000Z

340

Quantum Well Thermoelectrics for Converting Waste Heat to Electricity  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Fabrication development of high efficiency quantum well (QW) thermoelectric continues with the P-type and N-type Si/Si{sub 80}Ge{sub 20} films with encouraging results. These films are fabricated on Si substrates and are being developed for low as well as high temperature operation. Both isothermal and gradient life testing are underway. One couple has achieved over 4000 hours at T{sub H} of 300 C and T{sub C} of 50 C with little or no degradation. Emphasis is now shifting towards couple and module design and fabrication, especially low resistance joining between N and P legs. These modules can be used in future energy conversion systems as well as for air conditioning.

Saeid Ghamaty

2007-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "wells average temperature" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Matter seen at many scales and the geometry of averaging in relativistic cosmology  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We investigate the scale-dependence of Eulerian volume averages of scalar functions on Riemannian three-manifolds. We propose a complementary view of a Lagrangian scaling of variables as opposed to their Eulerian averaging on spatial domains. This program explains rigorously the origin of the Ricci deformation flow for the metric, a flow which, on heuristic grounds, has been already suggested as a possible candidate for averaging the initial data set for cosmological spacetimes.

Thomas Buchert; Mauro Carfora

2001-01-17T23:59:59.000Z

342

Well purge and sample apparatus and method  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The present invention specifically permits purging and/or sampling of a well but only removing, at most, about 25% of the fluid volume compared to conventional methods and, at a minimum, removing none of the fluid volume from the well. The invention is an isolation assembly with a packer, pump and exhaust, that is inserted into the well. The isolation assembly is designed so that only a volume of fluid between the outside diameter of the isolation assembly and the inside diameter of the well over a fluid column height from the bottom of the well to the top of the active portion (lower annulus) is removed. The packer is positioned above the active portion thereby sealing the well and preventing any mixing or contamination of inlet fluid with fluid above the packer. Ports in the wall of the isolation assembly permit purging and sampling of the lower annulus along the height of the active portion.

Schalla, Ronald (Kennewick, WA); Smith, Ronald M. (Richland, WA); Hall, Stephen H. (Kennewick, WA); Smart, John E. (Richland, WA); Gustafson, Gregg S. (Redmond, WA)

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

343

Well purge and sample apparatus and method  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The present invention specifically permits purging and/or sampling of a well but only removing, at most, about 25% of the fluid volume compared to conventional methods and, at a minimum, removing none of the fluid volume from the well. The invention is an isolation assembly with a packer, pump and exhaust, that is inserted into the well. The isolation assembly is designed so that only a volume of fluid between the outside diameter of the isolation assembly and the inside diameter of the well over a fluid column height from the bottom of the well to the top of the active portion (lower annulus) is removed. The packer is positioned above the active portion thereby sealing the well and preventing any mixing or contamination of inlet fluid with fluid above the packer. Ports in the wall of the isolation assembly permit purging and sampling of the lower annulus along the height of the active portion. 8 figs.

Schalla, R.; Smith, R.M.; Hall, S.H.; Smart, J.E.; Gustafson, G.S.

1995-10-24T23:59:59.000Z

344

Geothermal Well Completion Tests | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Geothermal Well Completion Tests Geothermal Well Completion Tests Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Conference Paper: Geothermal Well Completion Tests Abstract This paper reviews the measurements that are typically made in a well immediately after drilling is completed - the Completion Tests. The objective of these tests is to determine the properties of the reservoir, and of the reservoir fluid near the well. A significant amount of information that will add to the characterisation of the reservoir and the well, can only be obtained in the period during and immediately after drilling activities are completed. Author Hagen Hole Conference Petroleum Engineering Summer School; Dubrovnik, Croatia; 2008/06/09 Published N/A, 2008 DOI Not Provided Check for DOI availability: http://crossref.org

345

MIMO Control during Oil Well Drilling  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract A drilling system consists of a rotating drill string, which is placed into the well. The drill fluid is pumped through the drill string and exits through the choke valve. An important scope of the drill fluid is to maintain a certain pressure gradient along the length of the well. Well construction is a complex job in which annular pressures must be kept inside the operational window (limited by fracture and pore pressure). Monitoring bottom hole pressure to avoid fluctuations out of operational window limits is an extremely important job, in order to guarantee safe conditions during drilling. Under a conventional oil well drilling task, the pore pressure (minimum limit) and the fracture pressure (maximum limit) define mud density range and pressure operational window. During oil well drilling, several disturbances affect bottom hole pressure; for example, as the length of the well increases, the bottom hole pressure varies for growing hydrostatic pressure levels. In addition, the pipe connection procedure, performed at equal time intervals, stopping the drill rotation and mud injection, mounting a new pipe segment, restarting the drill fluid pump and rotation, causes severe fluctuations in well fluids flow, changing well pressure. Permeability and porous reservoir pressure governs native reservoir fluid well influx, affecting flow patterns inside the well and well pressure. In this work, a non linear mathematical model (gas-liquid-solid), representing an oil well drilling system, was developed, based on mass and momentum balances. Besides, for implementing classic control (PI), alternative control schemes were analyzed using mud pump flow rate, choke opening index and weight on bit as manipulated variables in order to control annulus bottomhole pressure and rate of penetration. Classic controller tuning was performed for servo and regulatory control studies, under MIMO frameworks.

Mrcia Peixoto Vega; Marcela Galdino de Freitas; Andr Leibsohn Martins

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

346

High temperature lightweight foamed cements  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Cement slurries are disclosed which are suitable for use in geothermal wells since they can withstand high temperatures and high pressures. The formulation consists of cement, silica flour, water, a retarder, a foaming agent, a foam stabilizer, and a reinforcing agent. A process for producing these cements is also disclosed. 3 figs.

Sugama, Toshifumi.

1989-10-03T23:59:59.000Z

347

Summary of wells validated during fiscal years 1991 to 1992  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Well Validation Project was initiated in fiscal year 1990, with the intended purpose to evaluate wells on the Nevada Test Site. During fiscal years 1991 and 1992, a temperature/electrical conductivity logging tool was redesigned and a thermal-pulse flowmeter logging tool was developed. Seven wells were evaluated during this time period: USGS HTH {number_sign}1, UE-18r, UE-14b, HTH {open_quotes}E{close_quotes}, USGS Test Well B Ex., UE-1q, and UE-5n. The validation techniques used at each site varied depending on the site-specific objectives. Thermal-pulse flowmeter surveys were carried out in several of the wells with limited success. The thermal-pulse flowmeter was designed for boreholes 2 to 6 inches in diameter, most wells at the Nevada Test Site are generally much larger in diameter, 10 to 24 inches. Therefore, the thermal-pulse flowmeter was outfitted with an inflatable rubber packer, which constricts borehole flow through the thermal-pulse flowmeter, increasing the resolution. The thermal-pulse flowmeter can be outfitted with various-sized packers depending on the borehole diameter to be evaluated; these packers are commercially available. The packers are inflated with borehole fluid via a small submersible pump which was designed, built, and tested as part of this study.

Lyles, B.F.

1993-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

348

Vibration measurement by the time-averaged electronic speckle pattern interferometry methods  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Three different image-processing methods based on the time-averaged technique were compared by the electronic speckle pattern interferometry (ESPI) technique for vibration measurement....

Wang, Wei-Chung; Hwang, Chi-Hung; Lin, Shu-Yu

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

349

Fact #851 December 15, 2014 The Average Number of Gears used...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

trucks. Note: Based on production. 2014 production data are preliminary. Fact 851 Dataset Supporting Information Average Number of Gears in New Cars and Light Trucks Model...

350

Atmospheric propagation simulations and Boeing's high average power free electron laser ; .  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??The development of a high average power FEL for military applications, whether shipboard or not, represents a significant advancement in technology over present weapons systems (more)

Ramos, Luis.

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

351

E-Print Network 3.0 - average formation length Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

is reported... independently by each robot by averaging the x and y positions of all the robots involved in the formation. Each... maintenance. Three performance metrics are...

352

Table N8.3. Average Prices of Purchased Electricity, Natural...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

3. Average Prices of Purchased Electricity, Natural Gas, and Steam, 1998;" " Level: National and Regional Data; " " Row: NAICS Codes;" " Column: Supplier Sources of Purchased...

353

E-Print Network 3.0 - average angular momentum Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

T 1 angular momentum given bulk plasma a single ensemble-average particle... minority ion-cyclotron heating, even though process ... Source: Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory,...

354

E-Print Network 3.0 - average-climate basis non-audited Sample...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

and species- Table 2 Average climate variables for domains currently... species or ecosystem services. Climate-dynamic domains provide an objective ... Source: Hoffman,...

355

Vibration measurement using phase-shifting time-average holographic interferometry  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Computer image processing techniques for the measurement of vibration amplitude are presented, which utilize phase-shifted time-average holographic interferograms. The calculation of...

Nakadate, Suezou

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

356

E-Print Network 3.0 - average resonance neutron Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

barns) (Figure 1) covering four average lethargy steps... Verification of Neutron Phenomenology in Lead and Transmutation by Adiabatic Resonance Crossing in Accelerator... and...

357

Well Testing Techniques | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Well Testing Techniques Well Testing Techniques Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Technique: Well Testing Techniques Details Activities (0) Areas (0) Regions (0) NEPA(17) Exploration Technique Information Exploration Group: Downhole Techniques Exploration Sub Group: Well Testing Techniques Parent Exploration Technique: Downhole Techniques Information Provided by Technique Lithology: Enable estimation of in-situ reservoir elastic parameters Stratigraphic/Structural: Fracture distribution, formation permeability, and ambient tectonic stresses Hydrological: provides information on permeability, location of permeable zones recharge rates, flow rates, fluid flow direction, hydrologic connections, storativity, reservoir pressures, fluid chemistry, and scaling.

358

Hawaii Well Construction & Pump Installation Standards Webpage...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Webpage Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Web Site: Hawaii Well Construction & Pump Installation Standards Webpage Abstract This webpage provides...

359

Calculation of Auger rates in a quantum well structure and its application to InGaAsP quantum well lasers  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We discuss the possible intrinsic limitation on the temperature dependence of threshold current of long wavelength InGaAsP quantum well lasers caused by Auger recombination and intervalence band absorption. A model calculation of the various band-to-band Auger rates are presented. We find that the Auger rates increase with decreasing band gap and also with increasing temperature as in the case of bulk semiconductors. The temperature dependence and the band-gap dependence arises from the energy and momentum conservation (in the direction normal to the well) that the four particle states involved must satisfy. The estimated Auger coefficient is large enough to be important in single quantum well lasers. However, the Auger effect should be much smaller in a multiquantum well laser than for a single quantum well laser. This is because the carrier density at threshold is smaller (by a factor of 3 to 4) for multiquantum well lasers than for single quantum well lasers. The increased intervalence band absorption with increasing temperature in the active layer may not be responsible for increased threshold current of single quantum well lasers.

Dutta, N.K.

1983-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

360

Polarization versus Temperature in Pyridinium Ionic Liquids  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Electronic polarization and charge transfer effects play a crucial role in thermodynamic, structural and transport properties of room-temperature ionic liquids (RTILs). These non-additive interactions constitute a useful tool for tuning physical chemical behavior of RTILs. Polarization and charge transfer generally decay as temperature increases, although their presence should be expected over an entire condensed state temperature range. For the first time, we use three popular pyridinium-based RTILs to investigate temperature dependence of electronic polarization in RTILs. Atom-centered density matrix propagation molecular dynamics, supplemented by a weak coupling to an external bath, is used to simulate the temperature impact on system properties. We show that, quite surprisingly, non-additivity in the cation-anion interactions changes negligibly between 300 and 900 K, while the average dipole moment increases due to thermal fluctuations of geometries. Our results contribute to the fundamental understanding...

Chaban, Vitaly V

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "wells average temperature" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Temperature dependence of electron transfer in coupled quantum wells Amlan Majumdara)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Laboratory, Adelphi, Maryland 20783 J. L. Reno Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, New Mexico 87185 L that are deduced using corrugated QWIPs and find that electron transfer is efficient only when thermionic emission transport mechanisms, can change differ- ently for the two QWs within each QW pair because of dif- ferent

Rokhinson, Leonid

362

Numerical Modeling of Cased-hole Instability in High Pressure and High Temperature Wells  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

mechanism of casing/cement in the non-perforated zones. We investigate the transient thermal behavior in the casing-cement-formation system resulting from the movement of wellbore fluid using finite element method. The critical value of down-hole stresses...

Shen, Zheng 1983-

2012-11-12T23:59:59.000Z

363

The Sun-Earth Connection The Temperature of the Earth  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

AST248 The Sun-Earth Connection #12;The Temperature of the Earth The Earth is in equilibrium with the Sun - on average it is neither heating nor cooling. The equilibrium temperature is set by equating ­ the heat absorbed from the Sun with ­ the heat radiated by the Earth. Heat in = heat out #12;Heat

Walter, Frederick M.

364

SAFETY & WELLNESS Annual Report 2012-2013  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

HEALTH, SAFETY & WELLNESS Annual Report 2012-2013 #12;HEALTH, SAFETY & WELLNESS UPDATE ON SAFETY PROGRAMS The professionals working in the Health and Safety team and Rehabilitation Services group have had a very successful year in supporting individuals to take accountability for their own safety and health

Sinnamon, Gordon J.

365

Record geothermal well drilled in hot granite  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Record geothermal well drilled in hot granite ... Researchers there have completed the second of two of the deepest and hottest geothermal wells ever drilled. ... It may become the energy source for a small electrical generating power station serving nearby communities in New Mexico. ...

1981-09-07T23:59:59.000Z

366

On characterization and measurement of average solar field mirror reflectance in utility-scale concentrating solar power plants  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Due to the emerging need for the development of acceptance test codes for commercial concentrating solar power (CSP) plants, an effort is made here to develop a mirror reflectance model suitable for CSP applications as well as a general procedure to measure the average mirror reflectance of a solar field. Typically, a utility-scale solar field includes hundreds of thousands of mirror panels (if not more), and their reflectance is subject to many factors, such as weather and planned washing schedule. The newly developed mirror reflectance model can be used to characterize different types of mirror materials and can be directly used to perform optical performance evaluation of solar collectors. The newly proposed procedure for average solar field reflectance measurements includes a baseline comprehensive measurement and an individual factor measurement: the former allows a comprehensive survey of mirror reflectance across the whole solar field, and the latter can provide correcting factors for selected individual factors to further improve the accuracy of the baseline measurements. A detailed test case implementing the general procedure is applied to a state-of-the-art commercial parabolic trough plant and validates the proposed mirror reflectance model and average reflectance measurement procedure. In the test case, the plant-wide reflectance measurements at a commercial utility-scale solar plant were conducted and can shed light on relevant analysis of CSP applications. The work can also be naturally applied to other types of solar plants, such as power towers and linear Fresnel plants.

Guangdong Zhu; David Kearney; Mark Mehos

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

367

Salt Wells Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Salt Wells Geothermal Area Salt Wells Geothermal Area (Redirected from Salt Wells Area) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Geothermal Resource Area: Salt Wells Geothermal Area Contents 1 Area Overview 2 History and Infrastructure 3 Regulatory and Environmental Issues 4 Future Plans 5 Exploration History 6 Well Field Description 7 Research and Development Activities 8 Technical Problems and Solutions 9 Geology of the Area 9.1 Regional Setting 9.2 Stratigraphy 9.3 Structure 10 Hydrothermal System 11 Heat Source 12 Geofluid Geochemistry 13 NEPA-Related Analyses (9) 14 Exploration Activities (28) 15 References Area Overview Geothermal Area Profile Location: Nevada Exploration Region: Northwest Basin and Range Geothermal Region GEA Development Phase: Operational"Operational" is not in the list of possible values (Phase I - Resource Procurement and Identification, Phase II - Resource Exploration and Confirmation, Phase III - Permitting and Initial Development, Phase IV - Resource Production and Power Plant Construction) for this property.

368

Salt Wells Geothermal Exploratory Drilling Program EA  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Salt Wells Geothermal Exploratory Drilling Program EA Salt Wells Geothermal Exploratory Drilling Program EA (DOI-BLM-NV-C010-2009-0006-EA) Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Web Site: Salt Wells Geothermal Exploratory Drilling Program EA (DOI-BLM-NV-C010-2009-0006-EA) Abstract No abstract available. Author Bureau of Land Management Published U.S. Department of the Interior- Bureau of Land Management, Carson City Field Office, Nevada, 09/14/2009 DOI Not Provided Check for DOI availability: http://crossref.org Online Internet link for Salt Wells Geothermal Exploratory Drilling Program EA (DOI-BLM-NV-C010-2009-0006-EA) Citation Bureau of Land Management. Salt Wells Geothermal Exploratory Drilling Program EA (DOI-BLM-NV-C010-2009-0006-EA) [Internet]. 09/14/2009. Carson City, NV. U.S. Department of the Interior- Bureau of Land Management,

369

Geopressured-geothermal well activities in Louisiana  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Since September 1978, microseismic networks have operated continuously around US Department of Energy (DOE) geopressured-geothermal well sites to monitor any microearthquake activity in the well vicinity. Microseismic monitoring is necessary before flow testing at a well site to establish the level of local background seismicity. Once flow testing has begun, well development may affect ground elevations and/or may activate growth faults, which are characteristic of the coastal region of southern Louisiana and southeastern Texas where these geopressured-geothermal wells are located. The microseismic networks are designed to detest small-scale local earthquakes indicative of such fault activation. Even after flow testing has ceased, monitoring continues to assess any microearthquake activity delayed by the time dependence of stress migration within the earth. Current monitoring shows no microseismicity in the geopressured-geothermal prospect areas before, during, or after flow testing.

John, C.J.

1992-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

370

GRR/Section 19-WA-f - Water Well NOI for Replacement or Additional Wells |  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

GRR/Section 19-WA-f - Water Well NOI for Replacement or Additional Wells GRR/Section 19-WA-f - Water Well NOI for Replacement or Additional Wells < GRR Jump to: navigation, search GRR-logo.png GEOTHERMAL REGULATORY ROADMAP Roadmap Home Roadmap Help List of Sections Section 19-WA-f - Water Well NOI for Replacement or Additional Wells 19-WA-f - Water Well NOI for Replacement or Additional Wells.pdf Click to View Fullscreen Contact Agencies Washington State Department of Ecology Regulations & Policies Revised Code of Washington 90.44.100 Revised Code of Washington 18.104.048 Washington Administrative Code 173-160-151 Triggers None specified A developer seeking to use ground water for an activity may need to drill a new well in a different location than a previous well, drill an additional well at an existing location, or drill a replacement well at the same

371

2011 Idaho National Laboratory Water Use Report and Comprehensive Well Inventory (Revision 20)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This 2011 Idaho National Laboratory Water Use Report and Comprehensive Well Inventory (Revision 20) provides water use information (monthly annual average and total annual volume) for production and potable water wells at the Idaho National Laboratory for Calendar Year 2011. It also provides detailed information for new, modified, and abandoned (decommissioned) wells and holes. One new well was drilled and completed and one well was modified in Calendar Year 2011. A total of 14 wells and boreholes were reported as decommissioned. Detailed construction information for the new and modified wells is provided. Details are provided for the wells and boreholes that have been decommissioned, and if available, construction diagrams. Location maps are included, provided survey information was available. This report is being submitted in accordance with the Water Rights Agreement between the State of Idaho and the United States, for the United States Department of Energy (dated 1990) and the subsequent Partial Decree for Water Right 34-10901 issued June 20, 2003.

Renee Bowser

2012-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

372

"Table A49. Average Prices of Purchased Electricity, Steam, and Natural Gas"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

9. Average Prices of Purchased Electricity, Steam, and Natural Gas" 9. Average Prices of Purchased Electricity, Steam, and Natural Gas" " by Type of Supplier, Census Region, and Economic Characteristics of the" " Establishment, 1991" " (Estimates in Dollars per Physical Units)" ," Electricity",," Steam",," Natural Gas" ," (Million kWh)",," (Billion Btu)",," (1000 cu ft)" ,"-","-----------","-","-----------","-","-","-","RSE" " ","Utility","Nonutility","Utility","Nonutility","Utility","Transmission","Other","Row"

373

Reynolds-Averaged Navier-Stokes Simulation of a 2D Circulation Control Wind Tunnel Experiment  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Reynolds-Averaged Navier-Stokes Simulation of a 2D Circulation Control Wind Tunnel Experiment Brian airfoil. 2D and 3D simulation results are compared to a circulation control wind tunnel test conducted simulations are performed using a Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes (RANS) flow solver for a circulation control

Frey, Pascal

374

A spatiotemporal auto-regressive moving average model for solar radiation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1). Solar radiation, averaged over ten minute intervals, was recorded at each site for two yearsA spatiotemporal auto-regressive moving average model for solar radiation C.A. Glasbey and D, is important in many hydrological, agricultural and energy contexts. To assess solar energy potential, data

Stone, J. V.

375

Innovative reliability allocation using the maximal entropy ordered weighted averaging method  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Reliability allocation is one of the most important factors to consider when determining the reliability and competitiveness of a product. The feasibility-of-objectives (FOO) technique has become the current standard for assessing reliability designs ... Keywords: Average weighting allocation method, Feasibility-of-objectives technique, Maximal entropy ordered weighted averaging, Reliability allocation

Yung-Chia Chang; Kuie-Hu Chang; Cheng-Shih Liaw

2009-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

376

ON THE SELF-AVERAGING OF WAVE ENERGY IN RANDOM GUILLAUME BAL  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ON THE SELF-AVERAGING OF WAVE ENERGY IN RANDOM MEDIA GUILLAUME BAL Abstract. We consider the stabilization (self-averaging) and destabilization of the energy of waves propagating in random media transport equations for arbitrary statistical moments of the wave field is used to show that wave energy

Bal, Guillaume

377

The kernel average for two convex functions and its application to ...  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

May 9, 2007 ... Definition 1.1 (kernel average) Let f1,f2,g ? ?(X), ?1 + ?2 = 1 with ?1,?2 > 0 ... We call this the average of f1 and f2 with respect to the kernel g or...

2007-05-09T23:59:59.000Z

378

Morgantown Cost of Living Exceeds National Average By Eric Bowen, Research Associate  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 Morgantown Cost of Living Exceeds National Average By Eric Bowen, Research Associate Tess Meinert, Research Associate John Deskins, Ph.D., Director Overview The overall cost of living in Morgantown was 5. Morgantown's higher-than-average cost of living is primarily driven by housing costs. The city falls below

Mohaghegh, Shahab

379

A Time-AverageModel of the RF PlasmaSheath Demetre J, Economou.3  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A Time-AverageModel of the RF PlasmaSheath Demetre J, Economou.3 Department of Chemical Engineering 97077 Richard C. Alkire* Department of Chemical Engineering, University of Illinois, Urbana, Illinois 6t801 ABSTRACT A time-average model of the RF plasma sheath was developed. The ion "fluid" equations

Economou, Demetre J.

380

The U.S. average retail price for on-highway diesel fuel rose...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

The U.S. average retail price for on-highway diesel fuel rose this week The U.S. average retail price for on-highway diesel fuel rose to 3.93 a gallon on Monday. That's up 2 ...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "wells average temperature" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Lagrangian Formulation of Relativistic Particle Average Motion in a Laser Field of Arbitrary Intensity  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Lagrangian and Hamiltonian functions describing average motion of a relativistic particle under the action of intensive high-frequency electromagnetic radiation are obtained. In weak, low-frequency background fields, such a particle on average drifts with an effective, relativistically invariant mass, which depends on the intensity of the electromagnetic field.

I.Y. Dodin; N.J. Fisch; G.M. Fraiman

2003-02-06T23:59:59.000Z

382

ROBUSTNESS OF ISS SYSTEMS TO INPUTS WITH LIMITED MOVING AVERAGE, WITH APPLICATION TO SPACECRAFT  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. Cybernetics, O. S. Bragstads plass 2D, NTNU, 7491 Trondheim, NORWAY bUniv. Paris Sud 11 - L2S - EECI - Sup to a class of signals with bounded average-energy, which encompasses the typical disturbances acting on space, energy, average energy, etc.) are typ- ically available. These perturbing signals may have diverse

Boyer, Edmond

383

Initial Operation of the High Temperature Electrolysis Integrated Laboratory Scale Experiment at INL  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

An integrated laboratory scale, 15 kW high-temperature electrolysis facility has been developed at the Idaho National Laboratory under the U.S. Department of Energy Nuclear Hydrogen Initiative. Initial operation of this facility resulted in over 400 hours of operation with an average hydrogen production rate of approximately 0.9 Nm3/hr. The integrated laboratory scale facility is designed to address larger-scale issues such as thermal management (feed-stock heating, high-temperature gas handling), multiple-stack hot-zone design, multiple-stack electrical configurations, and other integral issues. This paper documents the initial operation of the ILS, with experimental details about heat-up, initial stack performance, as well as long-term operation and stack degradation.

C. M. Stoots; J. E. O'Brien; K. G. Condie; J. S. Herring; J. J. Hartvigsen

2008-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

384

Static downhole characteristics of well CGEH-1 at Coso Hot Springs, China  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

downhole characteristics of well CGEH-1 at Coso Hot Springs, China downhole characteristics of well CGEH-1 at Coso Hot Springs, China Lake, California Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Report: Static downhole characteristics of well CGEH-1 at Coso Hot Springs, China Lake, California Details Activities (5) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: A series of measurements was made in the exploratory well CGEH-1 at Coso Hot Springs. The temperature measurements provide estimates for the thermal equilibration of the well and indicate that the fractures intersecting the well have different temperatures. The hottest fractures are in the upper-cased portion of the well. Downhole chemical sampling suggests that the borehole still contains remnants of drilling materials. The well has never been extensively flowed at this time.

385

Production-systems analysis for fractured wells  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Production-systems analysis has been in use for many years to design completion configurations on the basis of an expected reservoir capacity. The most common equations used for the reservoir calculations are for steady-state radial flow. Most hydraulically fractured wells require the use of an unsteady-state production simulator to predict the higher flow rates associated with the stimulated well. These high flow rates may present problems with excessive pressure drops through production tubing designed for radial-flow production. Therefore, the unsteady-state nature of fractured-well production precludes the use of steady-state radial-flow inflow performance relationships (IPR's) to calculate reservoir performance. An accurate prediction of fractured-well production must be made to design the most economically efficient production configuration. It has been suggested in the literature that a normalized reference curve can be used to generate the IPR's necessary for production-systems analysis. However, this work shows that the reference curve for fractured-well response becomes time-dependent when reservoir boundaries are considered. A general approach for constructing IPR curves is presented, and the use of an unsteady-state fractured-well-production simulator coupled with the production-systems-analysis approach is described. A field case demonstrates the application of this method to fractured wells.

Hunt, J.L. (Halliburton Services (US))

1988-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

386

Differences between near-surface equivalent temperature and temperature trends for the Eastern United States  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

University, Ft. Collins, CO, USA b NOAA/NESDIS, Camp Springs, Maryland, USA c USGS Earth Resources attention being given to the observed increase in near-surface air temperatures during the last century-averaged T trends are that T has increased by 0.3­0.6 °C over the past century (Hansen and Lebedeff, 1987; Jones

Pielke, Roger A.

387

Retrieval of Areal-averaged Spectral Surface Albedo from Transmission Data Alone: Computationally Simple and Fast Approach  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We introduce and evaluate a simple retrieval of areal-averaged surface albedo using ground-based measurements of atmospheric transmission alone at five wavelengths (415, 500, 615, 673 and 870nm), under fully overcast conditions. Our retrieval is based on a one-line semi-analytical equation and widely accepted assumptions regarding the weak spectral dependence of cloud optical properties, such as cloud optical depth and asymmetry parameter, in the visible and near-infrared spectral range. To illustrate the performance of our retrieval, we use as input measurements of spectral atmospheric transmission from Multi-Filter Rotating Shadowband Radiometer (MFRSR). These MFRSR data are collected at two well-established continental sites in the United States supported by the U.S. Department of Energys (DOEs) Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program and National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA). The areal-averaged albedos obtained from the MFRSR are compared with collocated and coincident Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) white-sky albedo. In particular, these comparisons are made at four MFRSR wavelengths (500, 615, 673 and 870nm) and for four seasons (winter, spring, summer and fall) at the ARM site using multi-year (2008-2013) MFRSR and MODIS data. Good agreement, on average, for these wavelengths results in small values (?0.01) of the corresponding root mean square errors (RMSEs) for these two sites. The obtained RMSEs are comparable with those obtained previously for the shortwave albedos (MODIS-derived versus tower-measured) for these sites during growing seasons. We also demonstrate good agreement between tower-based daily-averaged surface albedos measured for nearby overcast and non-overcast days. Thus, our retrieval originally developed for overcast conditions likely can be extended for non-overcast days by interpolating between overcast retrievals.

Kassianov, Evgueni I.; Barnard, James C.; Flynn, Connor J.; Riihimaki, Laura D.; Michalsky, Joseph; Hodges, G. B.

2014-10-25T23:59:59.000Z

388

Solar: monthly and annual average latitude tilt GIS data at 40km resolution  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Ghana from NREL Ghana from NREL Dataset Summary Description (Abstract): Monthly Average Solar Resource for flat-plate collectors tilted at latitude for Ghana. (Purpose): Provide information on the solar resource potential for the data domain. The insolation values represent the average solar energy available to a flat plate collector, such as a photovoltaic panel, oriented horizontally. (Supplemental Information): These data provide monthly average and annual average daily total solar resource averaged over surface cells of approximately 40 km by 40 km in size. The solar resource value is represented as watt-hours per square meter per day for each month. The data were developed from NREL's Climatological Solar Radiation (CSR) Model. This model uses information on cloud cover, atmospheric water vapor and trace gases, and the amount of aerosols in the atmosphere to

389

Solar: monthly and annual average direct normal (DNI) GIS data at 40km  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Ethiopia from NREL Ethiopia from NREL Dataset Summary Description (Abstract): Monthly Average Solar Resource for 2-axis tracking concentrating collectors for Ethiopia. (Purpose): Provide information on the solar resource potential for the data domain. The insolation values represent the average solar energy available to a concentrating collector, such as a dish collector, which tracks the sun continuously. (Supplemental Information): These data provide monthly average and annual average daily total solar resource averaged over surface cells of approximately 40 km by 40 km in size. The solar resource value is represented as watt-hours per square meter per day for each month. The data were developed from NREL's Climatological Solar Radiation (CSR) Model. This model uses information on cloud cover, atmospheric water

390

Solar: monthly and annual average global horizontal (GHI) GIS data at 40km  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Nepal from NREL Nepal from NREL Dataset Summary Description (Abstract): Monthly average solar resource for horizontal flat-plate collectors for Nepal. (Purpose): Provide information on the solar resource potential for the data domain. The insolation values represent the average solar energy available to a flat plate collector, such as a photovoltaic panel, oriented horizontally. (Supplemental Information): These data provide monthly average and annual average daily total solar resource averaged over surface cells of approximately 40 km by 40 km in size. The solar resource value is represented as watt-hours per square meter per day for each month. The data were developed from NREL's Climatological Solar Radiation (CSR) Model. This model uses information on cloud cover, atmospheric water

391

Solar: monthly and annual average direct normal (DNI) GIS data at 40km  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Ghana from NREL Ghana from NREL Dataset Summary Description (Abstract): Monthly Average Solar Resource for 2-axis tracking concentrating collectors for Ghana. (Purpose): Provide information on the solar resource potential for the data domain. The insolation values represent the average solar energy available to a concentrating collector, such as a dish collector, which tracks the sun continuously. (Supplemental Information): These data provide monthly average and annual average daily total solar resource averaged over surface cells of approximately 40 km by 40 km in size. The solar resource value is represented as watt-hours per square meter per day for each month. The data were developed from NREL's Climatological Solar Radiation (CSR) Model. This model uses information on cloud cover, atmospheric water

392

Solar: monthly and annual average latitude tilt GIS data at 40km resolution  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Mexico, Central America, and the Caribbean Islands from NREL Mexico, Central America, and the Caribbean Islands from NREL Dataset Summary Description (Abstract): Monthly Average Solar Resource for flat-plate collectors tilted at latitude, for Mexico, Central America, and the Caribbean Islands. (Purpose): Provide information on the solar resource potential for the data domain. The insolation values represent the average solar energy available to a flat plate collector, such as a photovoltaic panel, oriented due south at an angle from horizontal equal to the latitude of the collector location. (Supplemental Information): These data provide monthly average and annual average daily total solar resource averaged over surface cells of approximately 40 km by 40 km in size. The solar resource value is represented as watt-hours per square meter per day for each month. The

393

Solar: monthly and annual average global horizontal (GHI) GIS data at 40km  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Ghana from NREL Ghana from NREL Dataset Summary Description (Abstract): Monthly Average Solar Resource for horizontal flat-plate collectors for Ghana. (Purpose): Provide information on the solar resource potential for the data domain. The insolation values represent the average solar energy available to a flat plate collector, such as a photovoltaic panel, oriented horizontally. (Supplemental Information): These data provide monthly average and annual average daily total solar resource averaged over surface cells of approximately 40 km by 40 km in size. The solar resource value is represented as watt-hours per square meter per day for each month. The data were developed from NREL's Climatological Solar Radiation (CSR) Model. This model uses information on cloud cover, atmospheric water

394

Solar: monthly and annual average direct normal (DNI) GIS data at 40km  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Brazil from NREL Brazil from NREL Dataset Summary Description (Abstract): Monthly Average Solar Resource for 2-axis tracking concentrating collectors for Brazil. (Purpose): Provide information on the solar resource potential for the data domain. The insolation values represent the average solar energy available to a concentrating collector, such as a dish collector, which tracks the sun continuously. (Supplemental Information): These data provide monthly average and annual average daily total solar resource averaged over surface cells of approximately 40 km by 40 km in size. The solar resource value is represented as watt-hours per square meter per day for each month. The data were developed from NREL's Climatological Solar Radiation (CSR) Model. This model uses information on cloud cover, atmospheric water

395

Solar: annual average direct normal (DNI) GIS data at 10km resolution for  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

GIS data at 10km resolution for GIS data at 10km resolution for Cuba from SUNY Dataset Summary Description (Abstract): Monthly Average Solar Resource for 2-axis tracking concentrating collectors for Cuba (Purpose): Provide information on the solar resource potential for the data domain. The insolation values represent the average solar energy available to a concentrating collector, such as a dish collector, which tracks the sun continuously. (Supplemental Information): These data provide monthly average and annual average daily total solar resource averaged over surface cells of approximately 10 km by 10 km in size. The solar resource value is represented as kilowatt-hours per square meter per day for each month. The data were developed from the State University of New York's (SUNY) GOES satellite solar model. This

396

Solar: monthly and annual average global horizontal (GHI) GIS data at 40km  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Brazil from NREL Brazil from NREL Dataset Summary Description (Abstract): Monthly average solar resource for horizontal flat-plate collectors for Brazil. (Purpose): Provide information on the solar resource potential for the data domain. The insolation values represent the average solar energy available to a flat plate collector, such as a photovoltaic panel, oriented horizontally. (Supplemental Information): These data provide monthly average and annual average daily total solar resource averaged over surface cells of approximately 40 km by 40 km in size. The solar resource value is represented as watt-hours per square meter per day for each month. The data were developed from NREL's Climatological Solar Radiation (CSR) Model. This model uses information on cloud cover, atmospheric water

397

Solar: monthly and annual average direct normal (DNI) GIS data at 40km for  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

km for km for Sri Lanka from NREL Dataset Summary Description (Abstract): Monthly Average Solar Resource for 2-axis tracking concentrating collectors for Sri Lanka (Purpose): Provide information on the solar resource potential for the data domain. The insolation values represent the average solar energy available to a concentrating collector, such as a dish collector, which tracks the sun continuously. (Supplemental Information): These data provide monthly average and annual average daily total solar resource averaged over surface cells of approximately 40 km by 40 km in size. The solar resource value is represented as watt-hours per square meter per day for each month. The data were developed from NREL's Climatological Solar Radiation (CSR) Model. This model uses information on cloud cover, atmospheric water

398

Solar: monthly and annual average direct normal (DNI) GIS data at 40km  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Kenya from NREL Kenya from NREL Dataset Summary Description (Abstract): Monthly Average Solar Resource for 2-axis tracking concentrating collectors for Kenya. (Purpose): Provide information on the solar resource potential for the data domain. The insolation values represent the average solar energy available to a concentrating collector, such as a dish collector, which tracks the sun continuously. (Supplemental Information): These data provide monthly average and annual average daily total solar resource averaged over surface cells of approximately 40 km by 40 km in size. The solar resource value is represented as watt-hours per square meter per day for each month. The data were developed from NREL's Climatological Solar Radiation (CSR) Model. This model uses information on cloud cover, atmospheric water

399

Solar: monthly and annual average direct normal (DNI) GIS data at 40km  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Nepal from NREL Nepal from NREL Dataset Summary Description (Abstract): Monthly Average Solar Resource for 2-axis tracking concentrating collectors for Nepal. (Purpose): Provide information on the solar resource potential for the data domain. The insolation values represent the average solar energy available to a concentrating collector, such as a dish collector, which tracks the sun continuously. (Supplemental Information): These data provide monthly average and annual average daily total solar resource averaged over surface cells of approximately 40 km by 40 km in size. The solar resource value is represented as watt-hours per square meter per day for each month. The data were developed from NREL's Climatological Solar Radiation (CSR) Model. This model uses information on cloud cover, atmospheric water

400

Solar: monthly and annual average global horizontal (GHI) GIS data at 40km  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Kenya from NREL Kenya from NREL Dataset Summary Description (Abstract): Monthly average solar resource for horizontal flat-plate collectors for Kenya. (Purpose): Provide information on the solar resource potential for the data domain. The insolation values represent the average solar energy available to a flat plate collector, such as a photovoltaic panel, oriented horizontally. (Supplemental Information): These data provide monthly average and annual average daily total solar resource averaged over surface cells of approximately 40 km by 40 km in size. The solar resource value is represented as watt-hours per square meter per day for each month. The data were developed from NREL's Climatological Solar Radiation (CSR) Model. This model uses information on cloud cover, atmospheric water

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "wells average temperature" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Solar: monthly and annual average global horizontal (GHI) GIS data at 40km  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Sri Lanka from NREL Sri Lanka from NREL Dataset Summary Description (Abstract): Monthly Average Solar Resource for horizontal flat-plate collectors, for Sri Lanka (Purpose): Provide information on the solar resource potential for the data domain. The insolation values represent the average solar energy available to a flat plate collector, such as a photovoltaic panel, oriented horizontally. (Supplemental Information): These data provide monthly average and annual average daily total solar resource averaged over surface cells of approximately 40 km by 40 km in size. The solar resource value is represented as watt-hours per square meter per day for each month. The data were developed from NREL's Climatological Solar Radiation (CSR) Model. This model uses information on cloud cover, atmospheric water

402

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

1 1 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells.................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Total................................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring ...................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared.............................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ..................... 0 0 0 0 0 Marketed Production ..........................................

403

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

9 9 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells.................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Total................................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring ...................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared.............................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ..................... 0 0 0 0 0 Marketed Production ..........................................

404

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

9 9 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells.................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Total................................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring ...................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared.............................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ..................... 0 0 0 0 0 Marketed Production ..........................................

405

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

1 1 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells.................................................. 7,279 6,446 3,785 3,474 3,525 Total................................................................... 7,279 6,446 3,785 3,474 3,525 Repressuring ...................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared.............................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation................................ 7,279 6,446 3,785 3,474 3,525 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ..................... 788 736 431

406

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

5 5 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 15,206 15,357 16,957 17,387 18,120 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 463,929 423,672 401,396 369,624 350,413 From Oil Wells.................................................. 63,222 57,773 54,736 50,403 47,784 Total................................................................... 527,151 481,445 456,132 420,027 398,197 Repressuring ...................................................... 896 818 775 714 677 Vented and Flared.............................................. 527 481 456 420 398 Wet After Lease Separation................................

407

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

7 7 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 9 8 7 9 6 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 368 305 300 443 331 From Oil Wells.................................................. 1 1 0 0 0 Total................................................................... 368 307 301 443 331 Repressuring ...................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared.............................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation................................ 368 307 301 443 331 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ..................... 0 0 0 0 0 Marketed Production ..........................................

408

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

7 7 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 98 96 106 109 111 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 869 886 904 1,187 1,229 From Oil Wells.................................................. 349 322 288 279 269 Total................................................................... 1,218 1,208 1,193 1,466 1,499 Repressuring ...................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared.............................................. 0 0 5 12 23 Wet After Lease Separation................................ 1,218 1,208 1,188 1,454 1,476 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed .....................

409

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

9 9 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 4 4 4 4 4 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells.................................................. 7 7 6 6 5 Total................................................................... 7 7 6 6 5 Repressuring ...................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared.............................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation................................ 7 7 6 6 5 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ..................... 0 0 0 0 0 Marketed Production ..........................................

410

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

3 3 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells.................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Total................................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring ...................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared.............................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ..................... 0 0 0 0 0 Marketed Production ..........................................

411

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

5 5 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells.................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Total................................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring ...................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared.............................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ..................... 0 0 0 0 0 Marketed Production ..........................................

412

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

3 3 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells.................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Total................................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring ...................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared.............................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ..................... 0 0 0 0 0 Marketed Production ..........................................

413

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

3 3 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells.................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Total................................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring ...................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared.............................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ..................... 0 0 0 0 0 Marketed Production ..........................................

414

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

3 3 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells.................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Total................................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring ...................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared.............................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ..................... 0 0 0 0 0 Marketed Production ..........................................

415

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

1 1 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells.................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Total................................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring ...................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared.............................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ..................... 0 0 0 0 0 Marketed Production ..........................................

416

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

7 7 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 380 350 400 430 280 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells.................................................. 1,150 2,000 2,050 1,803 2,100 Total................................................................... 1,150 2,000 2,050 1,803 2,100 Repressuring ...................................................... NA NA NA 0 NA Vented and Flared.............................................. NA NA NA 0 NA Wet After Lease Separation................................ 1,150 2,000 2,050 1,803 2,100 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed .....................

417

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

5 5 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells.................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Total................................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring ...................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared.............................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ..................... 0 0 0 0 0 Marketed Production ..........................................

418

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

1 1 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 1,502 1,533 1,545 2,291 2,386 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 899 1,064 1,309 1,464 3,401 From Oil Wells.................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Total................................................................... 899 1,064 1,309 1,464 3,401 Repressuring ...................................................... NA NA NA 0 NA Vented and Flared.............................................. NA NA NA 0 NA Wet After Lease Separation................................ 899 1,064 1,309 1,464 3,401 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed .....................

419

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

9 9 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells.................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Total................................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring ...................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared.............................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ..................... 0 0 0 0 0 Marketed Production ..........................................

420

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

3 3 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells.................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Total................................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring ...................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared.............................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ..................... 0 0 0 0 0 Marketed Production ..........................................

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "wells average temperature" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

7 7 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells.................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Total................................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring ...................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared.............................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ..................... 0 0 0 0 0 Marketed Production ..........................................

422

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

3 3 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 7 7 5 7 7 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 34 32 22 48 34 From Oil Wells.................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Total................................................................... 34 32 22 48 34 Repressuring ...................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared.............................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation................................ 34 32 22 48 34 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ..................... 0 0 0 0 0 Marketed Production ..........................................

423

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

1 1 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells.................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Total................................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring ...................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared.............................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ..................... 0 0 0 0 0 Marketed Production ..........................................

424

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

1 1 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ......................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells...................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells........................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Total......................................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring ............................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared .................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation...................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed............................ 0 0 0 0 0 Marketed Production

425

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

7 7 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells.................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Total................................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring ...................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared.............................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ..................... 0 0 0 0 0 Marketed Production ..........................................

426

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

3 3 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells.................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Total................................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring ...................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared.............................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ..................... 0 0 0 0 0 Marketed Production ..........................................

427

Method of gravel packing a subterranean well  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This patent describes a method of gravel packing a well bore penetrating a subterranean formation. It comprises blocking a first group of apertures in a liner with an immobile gel; positioning the liner within the well bore thereby defining a first annulus between the liner and the well bore; transporting a slurry comprised of gravel suspended in a fluid into the first annulus, the fluid flowing through a second group of apertures in the liner while the gravel is deposited within the first annulus to form a gravel pack; and thereafter removing substantially all of the gel from the first group of apertures.

Not Available

1991-11-05T23:59:59.000Z

428

Discussion of productivity of a horizontal well  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The authors of this paper has been using several of the analytical equations and numerical simulation to evaluate the productivity of horizontal wells that have near-wellbore damage. Through this evaluation, the author found that here are inconsistencies in the way the skin factor is introduced into the analytical equations. This discussion shows the corrections needed in various analytical equations to obtain consistency with numerical simulation. In the numerical simulation shown here, skin factor is simulated by assignment of a reduced permeability to nodes near the well. The author would appreciate any comments Babu and Odeh could make on this aspect of horizontal wells.

Gilman, J.R. (Marathon Oil Company (US))

1991-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

429

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

7 7 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 17 20 18 15 15 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 1,412 1,112 837 731 467 From Oil Wells.................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Total................................................................... 1,412 1,112 837 731 467 Repressuring ...................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared.............................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation................................ 1,412 1,112 837 731 467 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ..................... 198 3 0 0 0 Marketed Production

430

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

7 7 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells.................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Total................................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring ...................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared.............................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ..................... 0 0 0 0 0 Marketed Production ..........................................

431

Geothermal reservoir well stimulation program. First-year progress report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Geothermal Reservoir Well Stimulation Program (GRWSP) group planned and executed two field experiments at the Raft River KGRA during 1979. Well RRGP-4 was stimulated using a dendritic (Kiel) hydraulic fracture technique and Well RRGP-5 was stimulated using a conventional massive hydraulic fracture technique. Both experiments were technically successful; however, the post-stimulation productivity of the wells was disappointing. Even though the artificially induced fractures probably successfully connected with the natural fracture system, reservoir performance data suggest that productivity remained low due to the fundamentally limited flow capacity of the natural fractures in the affected region of the reservoir. Other accomplishments during the first year of the program may be summarized as follows: An assessment was made of current well stimulation technology upon which to base geothermal applications. Numerous reservoirs were evaluated as potential candidates for field experiments. A recommended list of candidates was developed which includes Raft River, East Mesa, Westmorland, Baca, Brawley, The Geysers and Roosevelt Hot Springs. Stimulation materials (fracture fluids, proppants, RA tracer chemicals, etc.) were screened for high temperature properties, and promising materials selected for further laboratory testing. Numerical models were developed to aid in predicting and evaluating stimulation experiments. (MHR)

Not Available

1980-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

432

Definition: Single-Well And Cross-Well Seismic Imaging | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Definition Definition Edit with form History Facebook icon Twitter icon » Definition: Single-Well And Cross-Well Seismic Imaging (Redirected from Definition:Single-Well And Cross-Well Seismic) Jump to: navigation, search Dictionary.png Single-Well And Cross-Well Seismic Imaging Single well seismic imaging (SWSI) is the application of borehole seismic sources and receivers on the same string within a single borehole in order to acquire CMP type shot gathers. Cross well seismic places sources and receivers in adjacent wells in order to image the interwell volume.[1] Also Known As SWSI References ↑ http://library.seg.org/ Ret LikeLike UnlikeLike You like this.Sign Up to see what your friends like. rieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Definition:Single-Well_And_Cross-Well_Seismic_Imaging&oldid=690246"

433

GRR/Section 19-WA-e - Water Well Notice of Intent for New Well | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

GRR/Section 19-WA-e - Water Well Notice of Intent for New Well GRR/Section 19-WA-e - Water Well Notice of Intent for New Well < GRR Jump to: navigation, search GRR-logo.png GEOTHERMAL REGULATORY ROADMAP Roadmap Home Roadmap Help List of Sections Section 19-WA-e - Water Well Notice of Intent for New Well 19-WA-e - Water Well Notice of Intent for New Well.pdf Click to View Fullscreen Contact Agencies Washington State Department of Ecology Regulations & Policies Revised Code of Washington 18.104.048 Washington Administrative Code 173-160-151 Triggers None specified A developer seeking to use ground water for an activity may need to drill a new well to access the ground water. When a developer needs to drill a new well, the developer must complete the Notice of Intent (NOI) to Drill a Well form and submit the form to the Washington State Department of Ecology

434

The nature of the metal-insulator transition in silicon germanide quantum wells.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??A study of the temperature dependence of the resistivity of gated SiGe quantum well structures has revealed a metal-insulator transition as a function of carrier (more)

Lam, Jennifer Eleanor.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

435

Salt Wells Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Salt Wells Geothermal Area Salt Wells Geothermal Area Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Geothermal Resource Area: Salt Wells Geothermal Area Contents 1 Area Overview 2 History and Infrastructure 3 Regulatory and Environmental Issues 4 Future Plans 5 Exploration History 6 Well Field Description 7 Research and Development Activities 8 Technical Problems and Solutions 9 Geology of the Area 9.1 Regional Setting 9.2 Stratigraphy 9.3 Structure 10 Hydrothermal System 11 Heat Source 12 Geofluid Geochemistry 13 NEPA-Related Analyses (9) 14 Exploration Activities (28) 15 References Area Overview Geothermal Area Profile Location: Nevada Exploration Region: Northwest Basin and Range Geothermal Region GEA Development Phase: Operational"Operational" is not in the list of possible values (Phase I - Resource Procurement and Identification, Phase II - Resource Exploration and Confirmation, Phase III - Permitting and Initial Development, Phase IV - Resource Production and Power Plant Construction) for this property.

436

Maazama Well Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Maazama Well Geothermal Area Maazama Well Geothermal Area Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Geothermal Resource Area: Maazama Well Geothermal Area Contents 1 Area Overview 2 History and Infrastructure 3 Regulatory and Environmental Issues 4 Exploration History 5 Well Field Description 6 Geology of the Area 7 Geofluid Geochemistry 8 NEPA-Related Analyses (0) 9 Exploration Activities (0) 10 References Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"TERRAIN","zoom":6,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"500px","height":"300px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":42.8965,"lon":-121.9865,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

437

Willow Well Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Well Geothermal Area Well Geothermal Area Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Geothermal Resource Area: Willow Well Geothermal Area Contents 1 Area Overview 2 History and Infrastructure 3 Regulatory and Environmental Issues 4 Exploration History 5 Well Field Description 6 Geology of the Area 7 Geofluid Geochemistry 8 NEPA-Related Analyses (0) 9 Exploration Activities (0) 10 References Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"TERRAIN","zoom":6,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"500px","height":"300px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":61.6417,"lon":-150.095,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

438

Wellness & Additional Benefits | Careers | ORNL  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Working at ORNL Working at ORNL Benefits Wellness and Other Incentives View Open Positions View Postdoctoral Positions Create A Profile Internal applicants please apply here View or update your current application or profile. External applicants Internal applicants Internet Explorer Browser preferred for ORNL applicants. Chrome is not currently supported. For more information about browser compatibility please refer to the FAQs. If you have difficulty using the online application system or need an accommodation to apply due to a disability, please email ORNLRecruiting@ornl.gov or phone 1-866-963-9545 Careers Home | ORNL | Careers | Working at ORNL | Wellness and Other Incentives SHARE Wellness & Additional Benefits Wellness Program Employees have many opportunities to maintain and improve their health

439

6981 well-provided recreation facility [n  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

recr. (Well-provisioned recreation installation and equipment);sinstalacin [f] de recreo intensivo (Equipamiento recreacional de gran variedad y de gran calidad);fquipement [m] de loisirs lourd (...

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

440

Two-phase flow in horizontal wells  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Flow in horizontal wells and two-phase flow interaction with the reservoir were investigated experimentally and theoretically. Two-phase flow behavior has been recognized as one of the most important problems in production engineering. The authors designed and constructed a new test facility suitable for acquiring data on the relationship between pressure drop and liquid holdup along the well and fluid influx from the reservoir. For the theoretical work, an initial model was proposed to describe the flow behavior in a horizontal well configuration. The model uses the inflow-performance-relationship (IPR) approach and empirical correlations or mechanistic models for wellbore hydraulics. Although good agreement was found between the model and experimental data, a new IPR apart from the extension of Darcy`s law must be investigated extensively to aid in the proper design of horizontal wells.

Ihara, Masaru [Japan National Oil Corp., Chiba (Japan); Yanai, Koji [Nippon Kokan Corp., Yokohama (Japan); Yanai, Koji

1995-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "wells average temperature" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

Well Record or History | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

History Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Legal Document- OtherOther: Well Record or HistoryLegal Published NA Year Signed or Took Effect 2013...

442

Groundwater well with reactive filter pack  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method and apparatus for the remediation of contaminated soil and ground water wherein a reactive pack material is added to the annular fill material utilized in standard well construction techniques.

Gilmore, Tyler J. (Pasco, WA); Holdren, Jr., George R. (Kennewick, WA); Kaplan, Daniel I. (Richland, WA)

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

443

Groundwater well with reactive filter pack  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method and apparatus are disclosed for the remediation of contaminated soil and ground water wherein a reactive pack material is added to the annular fill material utilized in standard well construction techniques. 3 figs.

Gilmore, T.J.; Holdren, G.R. Jr.; Kaplan, D.I.

1998-09-08T23:59:59.000Z

444

Polariton dispersion of periodic quantum well structures  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We studied the polariton dispersion relations of a periodic quantum-well structure with a period in the vicinity of half the exciton resonance wavelength, i.e., the Bragg structure. We classified polariton mod...

A. V. Mintsev; L. V. Butov; C. Ell; S. Mosor

2002-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

445

Geological well log analysis. Third ed  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Until recently, well logs have mainly been used for correlation, structural mapping, and quantitive evaluation of hydrocarbon bearing formations. This third edition of Geologic Well Log Analysis, however, describes how well logs can be used for geological studies and mineral exploration. This is done by analyzing well logs for numerous parameters and indices of significant mineral accumulation, primarily in sediments. Contents are: SP and Eh curves as redoxomorphic logs; sedimentalogical studies by log curve shapes; exploration for stratigraphic traps; continuous dipmeter as a structural tool; continuous dipmeter as a sedimentation tool; Paleo-facies logging and mapping; hydrogeology 1--hydrodynamics of compaction; hydrogeology 2--geostatic equilibrium; and hydrogeology 3--hydrodynamics of infiltration. Appendixes cover: Computer program for calculating the dip magnitude, azimuth, and the degree and orientation of the resistivity anisotrophy; a lithology computer program for calculating the curvature of a structure; and basic log analysis package for HP-41CV programmable calculator.

Pirson, S.J.

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

446

California Water Well Standards | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Legal Document- OtherOther: California Water Well StandardsLegal Published NA Year Signed or Took Effect 2104 Legal Citation Not provided DOI Not Provided Check for DOI...

447

Response of California temperature to regional anthropogenic aerosol  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Response of California temperature to regional anthropogenic aerosol Response of California temperature to regional anthropogenic aerosol changes Title Response of California temperature to regional anthropogenic aerosol changes Publication Type Journal Article Year of Publication 2008 Authors Novakov, Tihomir, Thomas W. Kirchstetter, Surabi Menon, and Jeffery Aguiar Journal Geophysical Research Letters Volume 35 Issue 19 Abstract In this paper, we compare constructed records of concentrations of black carbon (BC) - an indicator of anthropogenic aerosols - with observed surface temperature trends in California. Annual average BC concentrations in major air basins in California significantly decreased after about 1990, coincident with an observed statewide surface temperature increase. Seasonal aerosol concentration trends are consistent with observed seasonal temperature trends. These data suggest that the reduction in anthropogenic aerosol concentrations contributed to the observed surface temperature increase. Conversely, high aerosol concentrations may lower surface temperature and partially offset the temperature increase of greenhouse gases.

448

Testing of six Wells of Opportunity during 1980 and 1981  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The testing of six Wells of Opportunity in different geologic environmentsin Texas and Louisiana is summarized. The results were encouraging. Natural gas-to-brine content ranged from 33.0 to 55.0 scf/bbl. Gas production rates ranged from 93 to 600 MCFD. Sustained water production rates ranged from 1950 to 15,000 BWPD. Bottom-hole temperatures ranged from 260 to 327/sup 0/F. Reservoir pressures ranged from 6627 psia to 13,203 psia. A test near Beaumont resulted in discovery of oil and gas.

Klauzinski, R.Z.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

449

Gas condensate damage in hydraulically fractured wells  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

), md 0.15 Porosity (g102), fraction 0.1 Water Saturation (S w ), fraction 0.16 Initial Pressure (p i ), psi 3,900 Injection Pressure (p inj ), psi 3,910 Dewpoint Pressure (p d ), psi 3,500 Temperature (T), o F 200 Total Compressibility (c g... simulation ..........................13 3.4 Permeability reduction normal to fracture face .........................................14 3.5 Quarter model for 80 acre drainage area....................................................15 3.6 Fracture face...

Adeyeye, Adedeji Ayoola

2004-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

450

Solar: monthly and annual average direct normal (DNI) GIS data at 40km  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

49031 49031 Varnish cache server Solar: monthly and annual average direct normal (DNI) GIS data at 40km resolution for China from NREL Dataset Summary Description (Abstract): Monthly Average Solar Resource for 2-axis tracking concentrating collectors for China. (Purpose): Provide information on the solar resource potential for the data domain. The insolation values represent the average solar energy available to a concentrating collector, such as a dish collector, which tracks the sun continuously. (Supplemental Information): These data provide monthly average and annual average daily total solar resource averaged over surface cells of approximately 40 km by 40 km in size. The solar resource value is represented as watt-hours per square meter per day for each month. The data were developed from NREL's Climatological Solar Radiation (CSR) Model. This model uses information on cloud cover, atmospheric water vapor and trace gases, and the amount of aerosols in the atmosphere to calculate the monthly average daily total insolation (sun and sky) falling on a horizontal surface. Existing ground measurement stations are used to validate the data where possible. The modeled values are accurate to approximately 10% of a true measured value within the grid cell due to the uncertainties associated with meteorological input to

451

Geothermal-Reservoir Well-Stimulation Program. Program status report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Seven experimental fracture stimulation treatments completed to date and the laboratory work performed to develop the stimulation technology are described. A discussion of the pre-stimulation and post-stimulation data and their evaluation is provided for each experiment. Six of the seven stimulation experiments were at least technically successful in stimulating the wells. The two fracture treatments in East Mesa 58-30 more than doubled the producing rate of the previously marginal producer. The two fracture treatments in Raft River and the two in Baca were all successful in obtaining significant production from previously nonproductive intervals. However, these treatments failed to establish commercial production due to deficiencies in either fluid temperature or flow rate. The acid etching treatment in the well at The Geysers did not have any material effect on producing rate.

Not Available

1982-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

452

Ordered dissipative structures in exciton systems in semiconductor quantum wells  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A phenomenological theory of exciton condensation in conditions of inhomogeneous excitation is proposed. This theory is a classical theory of phase transitions in real space (not in momentum space), generalized for the case of particles with finite lifetimesi.e., for the case of a nonequilibrium system. We study the development of a ring of exciton luminescence at macroscopical distances from the central excitation spot in double quantum wells. At certain conditions, the ring breaks down into a periodical array of islands of a condensed phase. The transition between the fragmented and the continuous ring is considered. Assuming a defect in the structure, a possibility of a localized island of the condensed phase in a fixed position outside of the ring is shown. The temperature dependence of the effects has been considered as well.

A. A. Chernyuk and V. I. Sugakov

2006-08-02T23:59:59.000Z

453

Geothermometry At Salt Wells Area (Edmiston & Benoit, 1984) | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Geothermometry At Salt Wells Area (Edmiston & Benoit, Geothermometry At Salt Wells Area (Edmiston & Benoit, 1984) Exploration Activity Details Location Salt Wells Geothermal Area Exploration Technique Geothermometry Activity Date 1980 - 1984 Usefulness useful DOE-funding Unknown Exploration Basis The blind Salt Wells geothermal system was first identified when Anadarko Petroleum Corporation drilled slim hole and geothermal exploration wells at the site in 1980. Two reports detail the results of this drilling activity. This paper seeks to (1) describe several moderate-temperature (150-200°C) geothermal systems discovered and drilled during the early 1980's that had not been documented previously in the literature, (2) summarize and compare chemical and temperature data from known moderate- to high-temperature (>200°C) in the region, and (3) to comment on the

454

Project management improves well control events  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

During a well control operation, the efficient use of personnel and equipment, through good project management techniques, contributes to increased safety and ensures a quality project. The key to a successful blowout control project is to use all resources in the most efficient manner. Excessive use of resources leads to unnecessary expenditures and delays in bringing the project under control. The Kuwait well control project, which involved more than 700 blowouts, was accomplished in a much shorter time (8 months) than first estimated (5 years). This improvement partly resulted from the application of sound project management techniques. These projects were prime examples of the need for a formal project management approach to handling wild well projects. There are many examples of projects that were successful in controlling wells but were economic disasters. Only through the effective application of project management can complex well control projects be completed in reasonable time frames at reasonable cost. The paper describes team management, project scope, organizational structures, scheduling, tracking models, critical path method, and decision trees.

Oberlender, G.D. [Oklahoma State Univ., Stillwater, OK (United States); Abel, L.W. [Wild Well Control Inc., Spring, TX (United States)

1995-07-10T23:59:59.000Z

455

Snubdrilling a new well in Venezuela  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A new well was successfully drilled using a snubbing jack. The drill bit was rotated using a rotary table, downhole motors and combination of the two. Expected high-pressure zones prompted this use of ``snubdrilling.`` The primary objective was to drill a vertical well through underlying sands and gain information about formation pressures. This data would aid in the drilling of a relief well using a conventional drilling rig. The secondary objective was to relieve pressure by putting this new well on production. In addition to special high-pressure drilling jobs, there are other drilling applications where snubbing jacks are a feasible alternative to conventional rotary drilling rigs or coiled tubing units. Slimhole, underbalanced and flow drilling, and sidetracking of existing wells are excellent applications for snubdrilling. Advantages of snubdrilling vs. coiled tubing drilling, include ability to rotate drillstrings, use high-torque downhole motors, pump at high rates and pressures, apply significant overpull in case of stuck pipe, and run casing and liners without rigging down. Shortcomings of drilling with snubbing jacks compared to coiled tubing are the need to stop circulation while making new connections and inability to run continuous cable inside workstrings.

Aasen, J.

1995-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

456

Number of Producing Gas Wells (Summary)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Count) Count) Data Series: Wellhead Price Imports Price Price of Imports by Pipeline Price of LNG Imports Exports Price Price of Exports by Pipeline Price of LNG Exports Pipeline and Distribution Use Price Citygate Price Residential Price Commercial Price Industrial Price Vehicle Fuel Price Electric Power Price Proved Reserves as of 12/31 Reserves Adjustments Reserves Revision Increases Reserves Revision Decreases Reserves Sales Reserves Acquisitions Reserves Extensions Reserves New Field Discoveries New Reservoir Discoveries in Old Fields Estimated Production Number of Producing Gas Wells Gross Withdrawals Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells Gross Withdrawals From Oil Wells Gross Withdrawals From Shale Gas Wells Gross Withdrawals From Coalbed Wells Repressuring Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed Vented and Flared Marketed Production Natural Gas Processed NGPL Production, Gaseous Equivalent Dry Production Imports By Pipeline LNG Imports Exports Exports By Pipeline LNG Exports Underground Storage Capacity Underground Storage Injections Underground Storage Withdrawals Underground Storage Net Withdrawals LNG Storage Additions LNG Storage Withdrawals LNG Storage Net Withdrawals Total Consumption Lease and Plant Fuel Consumption Lease Fuel Plant Fuel Pipeline & Distribution Use Delivered to Consumers Residential Commercial Industrial Vehicle Fuel Electric Power Period:

457

"Table HC1.2.3 Living Space Characteristics by Average Floorspace--"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

3 Living Space Characteristics by Average Floorspace--" 3 Living Space Characteristics by Average Floorspace--" " Single-Family Housing Units and Mobile Homes, 2005" ,,"Single- Family and Mobile Homes (millions)","Average Square Feet per Housing Unit" ," Housing Units (millions)" ,,,"Single-Family Detached",,,"Single-Family Attached",,,"Mobile Homes" "Housing Unit Characteristics",,,"Total1","Heated","Cooled","Total1","Heated","Cooled","Total1","Heated","Cooled" "Total",111.1,86.6,2522,1970,1310,1812,1475,821,1055,944,554 "Total Floorspace (Square Feet)" "Fewer than 500",3.2,0.9,261,336,162,"Q","Q","Q",334,260,"Q"

458

Metallic Hydrogen: A High-Temperature Superconductor?  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Application of the BCS theory to the proposed metallic modification of hydrogen suggests that it will be a high-temperature superconductor. This prediction has interesting astrophysical consequences, as well as implications for the possible development of a superconductor for use at elevated temperatures.

N. W. Ashcroft

1968-12-23T23:59:59.000Z

459

Wireless technology collects real-time information from oil and gas wells  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Wireless technology collects real-time information from oil and gas Wireless technology collects real-time information from oil and gas wells Wireless technology collects real-time information from oil and gas wells The patented system delivers continuous electromagnetic data on the reservoir conditions, enabling economical and effective monitoring and analysis. April 3, 2012 One of several active projects, LANL and Chevron co-developed INFICOMM(tm), a wireless technology used to collect real-time temperature and pressure information from sensors in oil and gas wells, including very deep wells already producing oil and gas and drilling operations for new wells. One of several active projects, LANL and Chevron co-developed INFICOMM(tm), a wireless technology used to collect real-time temperature and pressure information from sensors in oil and gas wells, including very deep wells

460

Definition: Single-Well And Cross-Well Seismic Imaging | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Definition Definition Edit with form History Facebook icon Twitter icon » Definition: Single-Well And Cross-Well Seismic Imaging Jump to: navigation, search Dictionary.png Single-Well And Cross-Well Seismic Imaging Single well seismic imaging (SWSI) is the application of borehole seismic sources and receivers on the same string within a single borehole in order to acquire CMP type shot gathers. Cross well seismic places sources and receivers in adjacent wells in order to image the interwell volume.[1] Also Known As SWSI References ↑ http://library.seg.org/ Ret LikeLike UnlikeLike You like this.Sign Up to see what your friends like. rieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Definition:Single-Well_And_Cross-Well_Seismic_Imaging&oldid=690246" Category:

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "wells average temperature" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


461

Effects of Argon Dilution on the Translational and Rotational Temperatures of SiH in Silane and Disilane Plasmas  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The effects of argon dilution on the translational and rotational temperatures of SiH in both silane and disilane plasmas have been investigated using the imaging of radicals interacting with surfaces (IRIS) technique. The average rotational temperature ...

Jie Zhou; Jianming Zhang; Ellen R. Fisher

2005-11-02T23:59:59.000Z

462

Estimation of changes in energy consumption for heat supply due to interannual temperature variability in the south of the Ukraine  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The influence of low-frequency variability of average over the heating season air temperature on population demands in heat supply is considered. Based on monthly mean temperature values for the period from 18...

A. Kh. Degterev; L. N. Degtereva

2008-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

463

Uncertainty Quantification of Calculated Temperatures for the AGR-1 Experiment  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report documents an effort to quantify the uncertainty of the calculated temperature data for the first Advanced Gas Reactor (AGR-1) fuel irradiation experiment conducted in the INLs Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) in support of the Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) R&D program. Recognizing uncertainties inherent in physics and thermal simulations of the AGR-1 test, the results of the numerical simulations can be used in combination with the statistical analysis methods to improve qualification of measured data. Additionally, the temperature simulation data for AGR tests can be used for validation of the fuel transport and fuel performance simulation models. The crucial roles of the calculated fuel temperatures in ensuring achievement of the AGR experimental program objectives require accurate determination of the model temperature uncertainties. The report is organized into three chapters. Chapter 1 introduces the AGR Fuel Development and Qualification program and provides overviews of AGR-1 measured data, AGR-1 test configuration and test procedure, and thermal simulation. Chapters 2 describes the uncertainty quantification procedure for temperature simulation data of the AGR-1 experiment, namely, (i) identify and quantify uncertainty sources; (ii) perform sensitivity analysis for several thermal test conditions; (iii) use uncertainty propagation to quantify overall response temperature uncertainty. A set of issues associated with modeling uncertainties resulting from the expert assessments are identified. This also includes the experimental design to estimate the main effects and interactions of the important thermal model parameters. Chapter 3 presents the overall uncertainty results for the six AGR-1 capsules. This includes uncertainties for the daily volume-average and peak fuel temperatures, daily average temperatures at TC locations, and time-average volume-average and time-average peak fuel temperatures.

Binh T. Pham; Jeffrey J. Einerson; Grant L. Hawkes

2013-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

464

Salt Wells Geothermal Project | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Salt Wells Geothermal Project Salt Wells Geothermal Project Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Development Project: Salt Wells Geothermal Project Project Location Information Coordinates 39.580833333333°, -118.33444444444° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":39.580833333333,"lon":-118.33444444444,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

465

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

5 5 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 21,507 32,672 33,279 34,334 35,612 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 1,473,792 1,466,833 1,476,204 1,487,451 1,604,709 From Oil Wells.................................................. 139,097 148,551 105,402 70,704 58,439 Total................................................................... 1,612,890 1,615,384 1,581,606 1,558,155 1,663,148 Repressuring ...................................................... NA NA NA 0 NA Vented and Flared.............................................. NA NA NA 0 NA Wet After Lease Separation................................

466

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

1 1 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 94 95 100 117 117 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 13,527 13,846 15,130 14,524 15,565 From Oil Wells.................................................. 42,262 44,141 44,848 43,362 43,274 Total................................................................... 55,789 57,987 59,978 57,886 58,839 Repressuring ...................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared.............................................. 3,290 3,166 2,791 2,070 3,704 Wet After Lease Separation................................ 52,499 54,821 57,187 55,816 55,135

467

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

1 1 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 997 1,143 979 427 437 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 109,041 131,608 142,070 156,727 171,915 From Oil Wells.................................................. 5,339 5,132 5,344 4,950 4,414 Total................................................................... 114,380 136,740 147,415 161,676 176,329 Repressuring ...................................................... 6,353 6,194 5,975 6,082 8,069 Vented and Flared.............................................. 2,477 2,961 3,267 3,501 3,493 Wet After Lease Separation................................

468

GeoWells International | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

GeoWells International GeoWells International Jump to: navigation, search Name GeoWells International Place Nairobi, Kenya Sector Geothermal energy, Solar, Wind energy Product Kenya-based geothermal driller. The company also supplies and installs wind and solar units. Coordinates -1.277298°, 36.806261° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":-1.277298,"lon":36.806261,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

469

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

9 9 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 42,475 42,000 45,000 46,203 47,117 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 264,139 191,889 190,249 187,723 197,217 From Oil Wells.................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Total................................................................... 264,139 191,889 190,249 187,723 197,217 Repressuring ...................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared.............................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation................................ 264,139 191,889 190,249 187,723 197,217 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed

470

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

3 3 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 9,907 13,978 15,608 18,154 20,244 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 1,188,657 1,467,331 1,572,728 1,652,504 1,736,136 From Oil Wells.................................................. 137,385 167,656 174,748 183,612 192,904 Total................................................................... 1,326,042 1,634,987 1,747,476 1,836,115 1,929,040 Repressuring ...................................................... 50,216 114,407 129,598 131,125 164,164 Vented and Flared.............................................. 9,945 7,462 12,356 16,685 16,848

471

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

5 5 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 71 68 69 61 61 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 648 563 531 550 531 From Oil Wells.................................................. 10,032 10,751 9,894 11,055 11,238 Total................................................................... 10,680 11,313 10,424 11,605 11,768 Repressuring ...................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared.............................................. 1,806 2,043 1,880 2,100 2,135 Wet After Lease Separation................................ 8,875 9,271 8,545 9,504 9,633 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed

472

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

9 9 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 60,577 63,704 65,779 68,572 72,237 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 5,859,358 4,897,366 4,828,188 4,947,589 5,074,067 From Oil Wells.................................................. 999,624 855,081 832,816 843,735 659,851 Total................................................................... 6,858,983 5,752,446 5,661,005 5,791,324 5,733,918 Repressuring ...................................................... 138,372 195,150 212,638 237,723 284,491 Vented and Flared.............................................. 32,010 26,823 27,379 23,781 26,947

473

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

9 9 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 15,700 16,350 17,100 16,939 20,734 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 4,260,529 1,398,981 1,282,137 1,283,513 1,293,204 From Oil Wells.................................................. 895,425 125,693 100,324 94,615 88,209 Total................................................................... 5,155,954 1,524,673 1,382,461 1,378,128 1,381,413 Repressuring ...................................................... 42,557 10,838 9,754 18,446 19,031 Vented and Flared.............................................. 20,266 11,750 10,957 9,283 5,015 Wet After Lease Separation................................

474

Natural Gas Wells Near Project Rulison  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

for for Natural Gas Wells Near Project Rulison Second Quarter 2013 U.S. Department of Energy Office of Legacy Management Grand Junction, Colorado Date Sampled: April 3, 2013 Background: Project Rulison was the second underground nuclear test under the Plowshare Program to stimulate natural-gas recovery from deep, low-permeability formations. On September 10, 1969, a 40-kiloton-yield nuclear device was detonated 8,426 feet (1.6 miles) below the ground surface in the Williams Fork Formation, at what is now the Rulison, Colorado, Site. Following the detonation, a series of production tests were conducted. Afterward, the site was shut down and then remediated, and the emplacement well (R-E) and the reentry well (R-Ex) were plugged. Purpose: As part of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Legacy Management (LM) mission

475

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

9 9 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 36,000 40,100 40,830 42,437 44,227 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 150,000 130,853 157,800 159,827 197,217 From Oil Wells.................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Total................................................................... 150,000 130,853 157,800 159,827 197,217 Repressuring ...................................................... NA NA NA 0 NA Vented and Flared.............................................. NA NA NA 0 NA Wet After Lease Separation................................ 150,000 130,853 157,800 159,827 197,217

476

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

3 3 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.................................... 4,359 4,597 4,803 5,157 5,526 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ................................................ 555,043 385,915 380,700 365,330 333,583 From Oil Wells .................................................. 6,501 6,066 5,802 5,580 5,153 Total................................................................... 561,544 391,981 386,502 370,910 338,735 Repressuring ...................................................... 13,988 12,758 10,050 4,062 1,307 Vented and Flared .............................................. 1,262 1,039 1,331 1,611 2,316 Wet After Lease Separation................................

477

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

5 5 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 3,321 4,331 4,544 4,539 4,971 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 61,974 71,985 76,053 78,175 87,292 From Oil Wells.................................................. 8,451 9,816 10,371 8,256 10,546 Total................................................................... 70,424 81,802 86,424 86,431 97,838 Repressuring ...................................................... 1 0 0 2 5 Vented and Flared.............................................. 488 404 349 403 1,071 Wet After Lease Separation................................ 69,936 81,397 86,075 86,027 96,762

478

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

5 5 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 3,051 3,521 3,429 3,506 3,870 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 71,545 71,543 76,915 R 143,644 152,495 From Oil Wells.................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Total................................................................... 71,545 71,543 76,915 R 143,644 152,495 Repressuring ...................................................... NA NA NA 0 NA Vented and Flared.............................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation................................ 71,545 71,543 76,915 R 143,644 152,495 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed

479

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

5 5 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 33,948 35,217 35,873 37,100 38,574 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 1,484,269 1,484,856 1,432,966 1,391,916 1,397,934 From Oil Wells.................................................. 229,437 227,534 222,940 224,263 246,804 Total................................................................... 1,713,706 1,712,390 1,655,906 1,616,179 1,644,738 Repressuring ...................................................... 15,280 20,009 20,977 9,817 8,674 Vented and Flared.............................................. 3,130 3,256 2,849 2,347 3,525 Wet After Lease Separation................................

480

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

7 7 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 5,775 5,913 6,496 5,878 5,781 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 17,741 27,632 36,637 35,943 45,963 From Oil Wells.................................................. 16 155 179 194 87 Total................................................................... 17,757 27,787 36,816 36,137 46,050 Repressuring ...................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared.............................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation................................ 17,757 27,787 36,816 36,137 46,050 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "wells average temperature" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


481

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

9 9 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 4,000 4,825 6,755 7,606 3,460 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 156,333 150,972 147,734 157,039 176,221 From Oil Wells.................................................. 15,524 16,263 14,388 12,915 11,088 Total................................................................... 171,857 167,235 162,122 169,953 187,310 Repressuring ...................................................... 8 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared.............................................. 206 431 251 354 241 Wet After Lease Separation................................ 171,642 166,804

482

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

1 1 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 4,178 4,601 3,005 3,220 3,657 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 244,826 264,809 260,554 254,488 259,432 From Oil Wells.................................................. 36,290 36,612 32,509 29,871 31,153 Total................................................................... 281,117 301,422 293,063 284,359 290,586 Repressuring ...................................................... 563 575 2,150 1,785 1,337 Vented and Flared.............................................. 1,941 1,847 955 705 688 Wet After Lease Separation................................

483

Well-test data from geothermal reservoirs  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Extensive well testing in geothermal resources has been carried out throughout the western United States and in northern Mexico since 1975. Each resource tested and each well test conducted by LBL during the eight-year period are covered in brief. The information, collected from published reports and memoranda, includes test particulars, special instrumentation, data interpretation when available, and plots of actual data. Brief geologic and hydrologic descriptions of the geothermal resources are also presented. The format is such that well test descriptions are grouped, in the order performed, into major sections according to resource, each section containing a short resource description followed by individual test details. Additional information regarding instrumentation is provided. Source documentation is provided throughout to facilitate access to further information and raw data.

Bodvarsson, M.G.; Benson, S.M.

1982-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

484

Apparatus for stringing well pipe of casing  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

An apparatus for use in running a string of threaded well pipe or casing in a vertical configuration in a deep well bore which is adapted to convert a top head drive drilling rig for use in running each length of pipe into the well bore. A drive spindle adaptor is provided which may be securely attached in a removably mounted manner to the rotary drive spindle or sub of a top head drive drilling rig. The drive spindle includes a pair of opposing, outwardly extending lugs disposed at a right angle to the axial direction of the spindle and a true centering guide means. A collar is included which is provided with frictional gripping members for removably securing the collar to one end of a length of conventional pipe and a pair of axially extending, spaced ears which cooperate upon engagement with said lugs on said spindle adaptor to transfer rotary motion of said spindle to said length of pipe.

Sexton, J.L.

1984-04-17T23:59:59.000Z

485

Apparatus for rotating and reciprocating well pipe  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This patent describes an apparatus for simultaneously rotating and reciprocating well pipe, having an upper end, and mechanically utilizing a rotary table attached to a drilling rig, comprising: a rotating pipe clamp assembly having an irregular cross-sectional mid-member and clamp members for releasably gripping the well pipe connected to the ends of the mid-member for rotation therewith; a square block for fitting to the rotary table square and having a selected grooved interior configuration; a torque transmitting means fitted into the grooves having openings therethrough having the same irregular cross-section as the mid-member cross-section; and a torque limiting means connecting the torque transmitting means and the block for limiting torque applied through the well pipe via the clamp assembly and the torque transmitting means.

Davis, K.D.

1988-04-12T23:59:59.000Z

486

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

7 7 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 7,068 7,425 7,700 8,600 8,500 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 241,776 224,560 224,112 194,121 212,276 From Oil Wells.................................................. 60,444 56,140 56,028 48,530 53,069 Total................................................................... 302,220 280,700 280,140 242,651 265,345 Repressuring ...................................................... 2,340 2,340 2,340 2,340 2,340 Vented and Flared.............................................. 3,324 3,324 3,324 3,324 3,324 Wet After Lease Separation................................

487

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

7 7 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 13,487 14,370 14,367 12,900 13,920 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 81,545 81,723 88,259 87,608 94,259 From Oil Wells.................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Total................................................................... 81,545 81,723 88,259 87,608 94,259 Repressuring ...................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared.............................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation................................ 81,545 81,723 88,259 87,608 94,259 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed

488

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

3 3 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 33,897 33,917 34,593 33,828 33,828 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 98,551 97,272 97,154 87,993 85,018 From Oil Wells.................................................. 6,574 2,835 6,004 5,647 5,458 Total................................................................... 105,125 100,107 103,158 93,641 90,476 Repressuring ...................................................... NA NA NA 0 NA Vented and Flared.............................................. NA NA NA 0 NA Wet After Lease Separation................................ 105,125 100,107 103,158

489

earth skin temperature | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

earth skin temperature earth skin temperature Dataset Summary Description (Abstract): Earth Skin Temperature (° C)NASA Surface meteorology and Solar Energy (SSE) Release 6.0 Data Set (Nov 2007)22-year Monthly & Annual Average (July 1983 - June 2005)Parameter: Earth Skin Temperature (deg C)Internet: http://eosweb.larc.nasa.gov/sse/Note 1: SSE Methodology & Accuracy sections onlineNote 2: Lat/Lon values indicate the lower left corner of a 1x1 degree region. Negative values are south and west; positive values are north and east. Boundaries of the -90/-180 region Source U.S. National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA), Surface meteorology and Solar Energy (SSE) Date Released March 31st, 2009 (5 years ago) Date Updated April 01st, 2009 (5 years ago) Keywords climate

490

Resonator-quantum well infrared photodetectors  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We applied a recent electromagnetic model to design the resonator-quantum well infrared photodetector (R-QWIP). In this design, we used an array of rings as diffractive elements to diffract normal incident light into parallel propagation and used the pixel volume as a resonator to intensify the diffracted light. With a proper pixel size, the detector resonates at certain optical wavelengths and thus yields a high quantum efficiency (QE). To test this detector concept, we fabricated a number of R-QWIPs with different quantum well materials and detector geometries. The experimental result agrees satisfactorily with the prediction, and the highest QE achieved is 71%.

Choi, K. K., E-mail: kwong.k.choi.civ@mail.mil; Sun, J.; Olver, K. [Electro-Optics and Photonics Division, U.S. Army Research Laboratory, Adelphi, Maryland 20783 (United States)] [Electro-Optics and Photonics Division, U.S. Army Research Laboratory, Adelphi, Maryland 20783 (United States); Jhabvala, M. D.; Jhabvala, C. A.; Waczynski, A. [Instrument Systems and Technology Division, NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, Maryland 20771 (United States)] [Instrument Systems and Technology Division, NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, Maryland 20771 (United States)

2013-11-11T23:59:59.000Z

491

Temperature determination from the lattice gas model  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Determination of temperature from experimental data has become important in searches for critical phenomena in heavy ion collisions. Widely used methods are ratios of isotopes (which rely on chemical and thermal equilibrium), population ratios of excited states etc. Using the lattice gas model we propose a new observable: $n_{ch}/Z$ where $n_{ch}$ is the charge multiplicity and $Z$ is the charge of the fragmenting system. We show that the reduced multiplicity is a good measure of the average temperature of the fragmenting system.

S. Das Gupta; J. Pan; M. B. Tsang

1996-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

492

Fractal quantum well heterostructures for broadband light emitters  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We examine carrier relaxation and radiative recombination in AlGaAs based near IR and AlGaInP based visible fractal quantum well heterostructures. Through temperature dependent photoluminescence, we demonstrate that enhanced population of higher lying energy levels can be achieved by varying the thickness of the layers in the fractal heterostructurd. This distribution of carriers results in room temperature emission over a relatively broad range of wavelengths: approximately 700--855 nm for AlGaAs structures and 575--650 nm for AlGaInP structures. Spectra are compared to theoretical calculations to evaluate the non-equilibrium nature of the carrier distributions. Time resolved photoluminescence measurements demonstrate an approximately linear relationship between the radiative decay time and the layer thickness of the structure. Correspondingly, integrated luminescence measurements at room temperature reveal a factor of four increase in the light output efficiency of the structure as the fractal layer thickness is increased from 50 {angstrom} to 400 {angstrom}. The applicability of these heterostructures to broadband LEDs is discussed.

Crawford, M.H.; Gourley, P.L.; Meissner, K.E.; Sinclair, M.B.; Jones, E.D.; Chow, W.W.; Schneider, R.P. Jr.

1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

493

Hydropower Upgrades to Yield Added Generation at Average Costs Less Than 4  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Hydropower Upgrades to Yield Added Generation at Average Costs Less Hydropower Upgrades to Yield Added Generation at Average Costs Less Than 4 cents per kWh - Without New Dams Hydropower Upgrades to Yield Added Generation at Average Costs Less Than 4 cents per kWh - Without New Dams November 4, 2009 - 12:00am Addthis WASHINGTON, DC - U.S. Energy Secretary Steven Chu today announced up to $30.6 million in Recovery Act funding for the selection of seven hydropower projects that modernize hydropower infrastructure by increasing efficiency and reducing environmental impacts at existing facilities. The expanded hydro generation projects have estimated incremental costs of less than 4 cents per kWh on average. The selections announced today will deploy innovative technologies such as high-efficiency, fish-friendly turbines, improved water intakes, and

494

Derivation of 24-Hour Average SO2, Background for the Update 1 Report |  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Derivation of 24-Hour Average SO2, Background for the Update 1 Derivation of 24-Hour Average SO2, Background for the Update 1 Report Derivation of 24-Hour Average SO2, Background for the Update 1 Report Docket No. EO-05-01. As supporting documentation for "Update 1 to: A Dispersion Modeling Analysis of Downwash from Mirant's Potomac River Power Plant: Modeling Unit 1 Emissions in a Cycling Mode" this memo documents the fact that the observed 24-hour SO2 background concentrations during periods when meteorological conditions produce the highest impacts from Unit 1. Derivation of 24-Hour Average SO2, Background for the Update 1 Report More Documents & Publications Review of the ENSR Report Titled "Update 1 to: A Dispersion Modeling Analysis of Downwash from Mirant's Potomac River Power Plant"

495

Bright High Average Power Table-top Soft X-Ray Lasers  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We have demonstrated the generation of bright soft x-ray laser pulses with record-high average power from compact plasma amplifiers excited by ultrafast solid state lasers. These lasers have numerous applications in nanoscience and nanotechnology.

Rocca, Jorge [Colorado State University, Fort Collins; Reagan, Brendon [Colorado State University, Fort Collins; Wernsing, Keith [Colorado State University, Fort Collins; Luther, Brad [Colorado State University, Fort Collins; Curtis, Alden [Colorado State University, Fort Collins; Nichols,, Anthony [Colorado State University, Fort Collins; Wang, Yong [Colorado State University, Fort Collins; Alessi, David [Colorado State University, Fort Collins; Martz, Dale [Colorado State University, Fort Collins; Yin, Liang [Colorado State University, Fort Collins; Wang, Shoujun [Colorado State University, Fort Collins; Berrill, Mark A [ORNL; Furch, Federico [Colorado State University, Fort Collins; Woolston, Mark [Colorado State University, Fort Collins; Patel, Dinesh [Colorado State University, Fort Collins; Marconi, Mario [Colorado State University, Fort Collins; Menoni, Carmen [Colorado State University, Fort Collins

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

496

Optimizing detector placement for isolated intersections based on minimizing average delay and number of stops  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

indicated that the cycle length increased as the Carryover and upstream detector setback distance increased. Secondly, the inverse relationship observed between average delay and number of stops was discussed for the tested scenarios. It was determined...

Hoppers, Kevin Paul

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

497

Generalized Volume-Averaged Filtration Combustion Model and Its Application for Calculating Carbon Gasifiers  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We have developed a generalized volume-averaged model of filtration combustion of gases taking into account the spatial inhomogeneity of a porous medium and the change in porosity due to the heterogeneous chem...

K. V. Dobrego; I. A. Koznacheev

498

E-Print Network 3.0 - averaged diurnal cycle Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

OF GEOPHYSICAL RESEARCH, VOL. ???, XXXX, DOI:10.1029, Diurnal and semidiurnal internal tide energy flux at Summary: are averaged over. The observed slope of 0.25 degrees is...

499

E-Print Network 3.0 - average solar-cosmic-ray fluxes Sample...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

solar-cosmic-ray fluxes Search Powered by Explorit Topic List Advanced Search Sample search results for: average solar-cosmic-ray fluxes Page: << < 1 2 3 4 5 > >> 1 Annales...

500

E-Print Network 3.0 - average current rf Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

management estimates the channel upon a frame recep- tion. MIMO... MHz bandwidth. 6.2 Simulation Results We compare the average energy per bit of RF chain management... measure...