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Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "welding stress management" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


1

Develop baseline computational model for proactive welding stress  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Develop baseline computational model for proactive welding stress Develop baseline computational model for proactive welding stress management to suppress helium induced cracking during weld repair Develop baseline computational model for proactive welding stress management to suppress helium induced cracking during weld repair There are over 100 nuclear power plants operating in the U.S., which generate approximately 20% of the nation's electricity. These plants range from 15 to 40 years old. Extending the service lives of the current fleet of nuclear power plants beyond 60 years is imperative to allow for the environmentally-sustainable energy infrastructure being developed and matured. Welding repair of irradiated nuclear reactor materials (such as austenitic stainless steels) is especially challenging because of the

2

Residual Stress Tensor in a Compact Tension Weld Specimen  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Presentation Title, Residual Stress Tensor in a Compact Tension Weld Specimen ... austenitic stainless steel (Esshete 1250) compact tension weld specimen.

3

Controlling Residual Stresses by Heat Sink Welding  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Results are described of a combined finite element and pipe welding study in which the welding and heat sink parameters required to optimize fast pass heat sink welding (LPHSW) were identified and evaluated in analytic and experimental tasks. Also discussed is the application of an elastic-plastic finite element computer code model to evaluate and optimize the LPHSW process and to verify the results through residual stress measurements on LPHSW pipes.

1981-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

4

Materials Reliability Program: Validation of Welding Residual Stress Models for PWR Piping Dissimilar Metal Welds (MRP-271)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The residual stresses imparted by the welding process are a principal factor in primary water stress corrosion cracking (PWSCC) of Dissimilar Metal (DM) piping butt welds in PWRs. Analytical models are frequently used to simulate the welding process in order to predict the residual stress distribution in the weld and base material as an input to crack growth calculations. The crack growth calculations have demonstrated a high sensitivity to the welding residual stress distribution inputs. As part of the ...

2009-12-22T23:59:59.000Z

5

NRC/EPRI Welding Residual Stress Validation Program (Phase III)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The NRC/EPRI weld residual stress (WRS) program currently consists of four phases, with each phase increasing in complexity from lab size specimens to ...

6

Materials Reliability Program: Welding Residual Stress Dissimilar Metal Butt-Weld Finite Element Modeling Handbook (MRP-317)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The residual stresses imparted by the welding process are a principal factor in the process of primary water stress corrosion cracking (PWSCC) of Alloy 82/182 nickel-alloy (i.e., dissimilar metal) piping butt welds in pressurized water reactors (PWRs). Numerical methods by finite element analyses are frequently used to simulate the welding process in order to predict the residual stress distribution in the weld and base material as an input to crack growth calculations. The crack growth calculations, in ...

2011-12-22T23:59:59.000Z

7

Stress corrosion cracking of austenitic stainless steel core internal welds.  

SciTech Connect

Microstructural analyses by several advanced metallographic techniques were conducted on austenitic stainless steel mockup and core shroud welds that had cracked in boiling water reactors. Contrary to previous beliefs, heat-affected zones of the cracked Type 304L, as well as 304 SS core shroud welds and mockup shielded-metal-arc welds, were free of grain-boundary carbides, which shows that core shroud failure cannot be explained by classical intergranular stress corrosion cracking. Neither martensite nor delta-ferrite films were present on the grain boundaries. However, as a result of exposure to welding fumes, the heat-affected zones of the core shroud welds were significantly contaminated by oxygen and fluorine, which migrate to grain boundaries. Significant oxygen contamination seems to promote fluorine contamination and suppress thermal sensitization. Results of slow-strain-rate tensile tests also indicate that fluorine exacerbates the susceptibility of irradiated steels to intergranular stress corrosion cracking. These observations, combined with previous reports on the strong influence of weld flux, indicate that oxygen and fluorine contamination and fluorine-catalyzed stress corrosion play a major role in cracking of core shroud welds.

Chung, H. M.; Park, J.-H.; Ruther, W. E.; Sanecki, J. E.; Strain, R. V.; Zaluzec, N. J.

1999-04-14T23:59:59.000Z

8

Stress Corrosion Cracking Resistance of Weld Metals 182, 72, and 308L  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Intergranular stress corrosion cracking (IGSCC) has occurred in alloy 182 weld metal in operating BWRs. This study compares the propagation behavior of IGSCC for nickel-base weld metal, alloy 182, with two other weld metals: type 308L stainless steel and a high-chromium nickel-base BWR candidate, alloy 72. Results indicate that weld metal 72 is more stress corrosion crack (SCC) resistant than either weld metals 182 or type 308L.

1992-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

9

Stress corrosion cracking of type 304L stainless steel core shroud welds.  

SciTech Connect

Microstructural analyses by advanced metallographic techniques were conducted on mockup welds and a cracked BWR core shroud weld fabricated from Type 304L stainless steel. heat-affected zones of the shroud weld and mockup shielded-metal-arc welds were free of grain-boundary carbide, martensite, delta ferrite, or Cr depletion near grain boundaries. However, as a result of exposure to welding fumes, the heat-affected zones of the welds were significantly contaminated by fluorine and oxygen which migrate to grain boundaries. Significant oxygen contamination promotes fluorine contamination and suppresses classical thermal sensitization, even in Type 304 steels. Results of slow-strain-rate tensile tests indicate that fluorine exacerbates the susceptibility of irradiated steels to intergranular stress corrosion cracking. These observations, combined with previous reports on the strong influence of weld flux, indicate that oxygen and fluorine contamination and fluorine-catalyzed stress corrosion play a major role in cracking of Type 304L stainless steel core shroud welds.

Chung, H. M.; Park, J.-H.; Sanecki, J. E.; Zaluzec, N. J.; Yu, M. S.; Yang, T. T.

1999-10-26T23:59:59.000Z

10

Prediction of residual stresses in high strength carbon steel pipe weld considering solid-state phase transformation effects  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this paper, prediction of axial and hoop residual stresses produced in high strength carbon steel pipe weld was made by employing a sequentially coupled 3-D thermal, metallurgical and mechanical FE model. Solid-state phase transformation during welding ... Keywords: 3-D FE simulation, High strength carbon steel pipe weld, Solid-state phase transformation, Welding residual stresses

Chin-Hyung Lee; Kyong-Ho Chang

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

11

Insights Gained from Ultrasonic Testing of Piping Welds Subjected to the Mechanical Stress Improvement Process  

SciTech Connect

Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) is assisting the United States Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) in developing a position on the management of primary water stress corrosion cracking (PWSCC) in leak-before-break piping systems. Part of this involves determining whether inspections alone, or inspections plus mitigation, are needed. This work addresses the reliability of ultrasonic testing (UT) of cracks that have been mitigated by the mechanical stress improvement process (MSIP). The MSIP has been approved by the NRC (NUREG-0313) since 1986 and modifies residual stresses remaining after welding with compressive, or neutral, stresses near the inner diameter surface of the pipe. This compressive stress is thought to arrest existing cracks and inhibit new crack formation. To evaluate the effectiveness of the MSIP and the reliability of ultrasonic inspections, flaws were evaluated both before and after MSIP application. An initial investigation was based on data acquired from cracked areas in 325-mm-diameter piping at the Ignalina Nuclear Power Plant (INPP) in Lithuania. In a follow-on exercise, PNNL acquired and evaluated similar UT data from a dissimilar metal weld (DMW) specimen containing implanted thermal fatigue cracks. The DMW specimen is a carbon steel nozzle-to-safe end-to-stainless steel pipe section that simulates a pressurizer surge nozzle. The flaws were implanted in the nozzle-to-safe end Alloy 82/182 butter region. Results are presented on the effects of MSIP on specimen surfaces, and on UT flaw responses.

Anderson, Michael T.; Cinson, Anthony D.; Crawford, Susan L.; Diaz, Aaron A.; Moran, Traci L.

2010-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

12

Neutron diffraction measurements of residual stresses in friction stir welding: a review  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Significant amounts of residual stresses are often generated during welding and result in critical degradation of the structural integrity and performance of components. Neutron diffraction has become a well established technique for the determination of residual stresses in welds because of the unique deep penetration, three-dimensional mapping capability, and volume averaged bulk measurements characteristic of the scattering neutron beam. Friction stir welding has gained prominence in recent years. The authors reviewed a number of neutron diffraction measurements of residual stresses in friction stir welds and highlighted examples addressing how the microstructures and residual stresses are correlated with each other. An example of in situ neutron diffraction measurement result shows the evolution of the residual stresses during welding.

Woo, Wan Chuck [ORNL; Feng, Zhili [ORNL; Wang, Xun-Li [ORNL; David, Stan A [ORNL

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

13

Materials Reliability Program: Weld Residual Stress Measurement and Implications for Stress Corrosion Testing (MRP-282)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Primary water stress corrosion cracking (PWSCC) data for heat-affected zones (HAZs) in thick-walled components of both Alloy 600 and Alloy 690TT are needed to support the Materials Reliability Program (MRP) crack growth rate (CGR) disposition relationship for Alloy 600 (EPRI report 1006695, MRP-55 Revision 1). Such data are also needed to ensure that welding of Alloy 690TT does not deleteriously affect its inherent resistance to PWSCC. Various welded plates of both Alloy 600 and Alloy 690TT were produced...

2010-08-02T23:59:59.000Z

14

Effects of thermal aging on Stress Corrosion Cracking and mechanical properties of stainless steel weld metals  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Stress Corrosion Cracking (SCC) in and around primary loop piping welds in Boiling Water Reactors has been observed worldwide as plants continue to operate at temperatures and pressures near 2880C (5500F) and 6.9 MPa (1000 ...

Hixon, Jeff

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

15

Welding  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

*. Bookmark and Share. Return to RoboCrane Home. RoboCrane. Welding Application. (click on the photo to enlarge the image). ...

2011-08-10T23:59:59.000Z

16

Welding and Repair Technology Center: Overlay Handbook  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The discovery of primary water stress corrosion cracking (PWSCC) in pressurized water reactor (PWR) vessel heads and components has led to the use of corrosion-resistant high-nickel welding alloys for repair and mitigation activities. To date, more than 30 PWR units have applied weld overlays to pressurizer welds with detected indications or have applied them as a mitigation method. Although the application of weld overlays appears to be a viable solution to managing this difficult issue, the utility ind...

2012-06-29T23:59:59.000Z

17

Residual stress determination in an overlay dissimilar welded pipe by neutron diffraction  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Residual stresses were determined through the thickness of a dissimilar weld overlay pipe using neutron diffraction. The specimen has a complex joining structure consisting of a ferritic steel (SA508), austenitic steel (F316L), Ni-based consumable (Alloy 182), and overlay of Ni-base superalloy (Alloy 52M). It simulates pressurized nozzle components, which have been a critical issue under the severe crack condition of nuclear power reactors. Two neutron diffractometers with different spatial resolutions have been utilized on the identical specimen for comparison. The macroscopic 'stress-free' lattice spacing (d{sub o}) was also obtained from both using a 2-mm width comb-like coupon. The results show significant changes in residual stresses from tension (300-400 MPa) to compression (-600 MPa) through the thickness of the dissimilar weld overlay pipe specimen.

Woo, Wan Chuck [ORNL; Em, Vyacheslav [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute; Hubbard, Camden R [ORNL; Lee, Ho-Jin [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute; Park, Kwang Soo [Doosan Heavy Industries & Construction

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

18

Virtual Welded-Joint Design Integrating Advanced Materials and Processing Technologies  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The primary goal of this project is to increase the fatigue life of a welded-joint by 10 times and to reduce energy use by 25% through product performance and productivity improvements using an integrated modeling approach. The fatigue strength of a welded-joint is currently the bottleneck to design high performance and lightweight welded structures using advanced materials such as high strength steels. In order to achieve high fatigue strength in a welded-joint it is necessary to manage the weld bead shape for lower stress concentration, produce preferable residual stress distribution, and obtain the desired microstructure for improved material toughness and strength. This is a systems challenge that requires the optimization of the welding process, the welding consumable, the base material, as well as the structure design. The concept of virtual welded-joint design has been proposed and established in this project. The goal of virtual welded-joint design is to develop a thorough procedure to predict the relationship of welding process, microstructure, property, residual stress, and the ultimate weld fatigue strength by a systematic modeling approach. The systematic approach combines five sub-models: weld thermal-fluid model, weld microstructure model, weld material property model, weld residual stress model, and weld fatigue model. The systematic approach is thus based on interdisciplinary applied sciences including heat transfer, computational fluid dynamics, materials science, engineering mechanics, and material fracture mechanics. The sub-models are based on existing models with further development. The results from modeling have been validated with critical experiments. The systematic modeling approach has been used to design high fatigue resistant welds considering the combined effects of weld bead geometry, residual stress, microstructure, and material property. In particular, a special welding wire has been developed in this project to introduce compressive residual stress at weld toe for weld fatigue resistance.

Yang, Z.; Dong, P.; Liu, S.; Babu, S.; Olson, G.; DebRoy, T.

2005-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

19

The stress corrosion cracking behavior of alloys 690 and 152 WELD in a PWR environment.  

SciTech Connect

Alloys 690 and 152 are the replacement materials of choice for Alloys 600 and 182, respectively. The latter two alloys are used as structural materials in pressurized water reactors (PWRs) and have been found to undergo stress corrosion cracking (SCC). The objective of this work is to determine the crack growth rates (CGRs) in a simulated PWR water environment for the replacement alloys. The study involved Alloy 690 cold-rolled by 26% and a laboratory-prepared Alloy 152 double-J weld in the as-welded condition. The experimental approach involved pre-cracking in a primary water environment and monitoring the cyclic CGRs to determine the optimum conditions for transitioning from the fatigue transgranular to intergranular SCC fracture mode. The cyclic CGRs of cold-rolled Alloy 690 showed significant environmental enhancement, while those for Alloy 152 were minimal. Both materials exhibited SCC of 10{sup -11} m/s under constant loading at moderate stress intensity factors. The paper also presents tensile property data for Alloy 690TT and Alloy 152 weld in the temperature range 25--870 C.

Alexandreanu, B.; Chopra, O. K.; Shack, W. J. (Nuclear Engineering Division); ( EVS); ( ESE)

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

20

Materials Reliability Program: Primary Water Stress Corrosion Testing of Alloys 690 and Weld Metals -- An Update (MRP-309)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Primary water stress corrosion cracking (PWSCC) continues to cause increased costs for operation, maintenance, assessment, and repair of thick-walled, pressurized water reactor (PWR) components made of Alloy 600 and its weld metals Alloys 182 and 82. Thick-section Alloy 690 and its weld metals (Alloys 52, or 52M, and 152) are now being widely used, particularly for nozzle penetrations during replacement of RPV heads and for repairs to other components in the primary system. Three reports have already bee...

2011-12-13T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "welding stress management" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Neutron and x-ray scattering studies of the metallurgical condition and residual stresses in Weldalite welds  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Weldalite is a lithium-containing aluminum alloy which is being considered for aerospace applications because its favorable strength-to-weight ratio. Successful welding of this alloy depends on the control of the metallurgical condition and residual stresses in the heat affected zone. Neutron and x-ray scattering methods of residual stress measurement were applied to plasma arc welds made in aluminum-lithium alloy test panels as part of an evaluation of materials for use in welded structures. In the course of these studies discrepancies between x-ray and neutron results from the heat affected zone (HAZ) of the weld were found. Texture changes and recovery from the cold work, indicated in peak widths, were found in the HAZ as well. The consideration of x-ray and neutron results leads to the conclusion that there is a change in solute composition which modifies the d-spacings in the HAZ which affects the neutron diffraction determination of residual stresses. The composition changes give the appearance of significant compressive strains in the HAZ. This effect and sharp gradients in the texture give severe anomalies in the neutron measurement of residual stress. The use of combined x-ray and neutron techniques and the solution to the minimizing of the neutron diffraction anomalies are discussed.

Spooner, S. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Pardue, E.B.S. [Technology for Energy Corp., Knoxville, TN (United States)

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

22

Program on Technology Innovation: Hybrid Models of Stress Corrosion Crack Propagation for Nickel Alloy Welds in Low-Electrochemical Potential (ECP) Pressurized Water Reactor (PWR) Primary Water Environments  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

EPRI has developed hybrid models of pressurized water reactor (PWR) primary water stress corrosion cracking (PWSCC) in nickel alloy welds.  These models are able to account for differences in tensile properties of each heat, applied stress intensity factor, dissolved hydrogen, water temperature, and the increase in local strain rate caused by the moving crack. The new models show promise for reducing uncertainty in predicting PWSCC for nickel alloy welds by a statistically and practically ...

2012-10-30T23:59:59.000Z

23

Materials Reliability Program: Testing the Resistance to Stress Corrosion Cracking of Alloy 690 and its Weld Metal in Supercritical Boron/Lithium/H2 Solutions (MRP-225)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Although alloy 600 and its weld metals (Alloy 182 and Alloy 82) were originally used in PWRs due to their resistance to general corrosion in a number of aggressive environments, stress corrosion cracking in PWR primary water (PWSCC) has been observed over the last thirty years in numerous Alloy 600 components and associated welds, sometimes after relatively long incubation times. The occurrence of PWSCC has been responsible for significant downtime and replacement power costs. Component repairs and repla...

2007-11-19T23:59:59.000Z

24

Welding and Repair Technology Center: Evaluation of High-Chromium Nickel-Base Welding Alloys, Resistance to Solidification Cracking - Update  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

One of the challenges faced by nuclear power industry engineers and managers responsible for making welding and repair decisions is selection of weld metals that have adequate resistance to stress corrosion cracking (SCC) with acceptable resistance to other forms of cracking. Continued testing and evaluation of new and enhanced high-chromium nickel-base filler metals is important to understanding the influence of slight composition changes on sensitivity to known cracking mechanisms and general ...

2013-08-14T23:59:59.000Z

25

Experimental Determination of the Effect of Last Pass Heat Sink Welding on Residual Stress in a Large Stainless Steel Pipe  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report discusses the experimental determination of through-wall residual distribution at welds in a 24-inch diameter heavy wall pipe. The results of a conventional butt weld and a butt weld made using the last pass heat sink welding method are compared.

1983-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

26

Ultrasonic Welding  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Mar 7, 2013 ... Ultrasonic Welding II: Ultrasonic Welding: Metallic and Non-metallic ... Comparison of Ultrasonic Spot and Torsion Welding for Al/Ti-joints by ...

27

Materials Reliability Program: Effect of Defects in an Alloy 600/82 Weld on Stress Corrosion Cracking in Testing of Heat Affected Zo ne Specimens (MRP-254)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Primary water stress corrosion cracking (PWSCC) data for heat affected zones (HAZs) in thick-walled components of both Alloy 600 and Alloy 690TT are needed to support the Materials Reliability Program, MRP-55 crack growth rate (CGR) disposition relationship for Alloy 600 (EPRI report 1006695). Such data are also needed to ensure that welding of Alloy 690TT does not deleteriously affect its inherent resistance to PWSCC. CGR experiments to obtain data in the HAZ of Alloy 600 plates welded with Alloy 82 and...

2008-11-26T23:59:59.000Z

28

Assessment of Weld Overlays for Mitigating Primary Water Stress Corrosion Cracking at Nickel Alloy Butt Welds in Piping Systems Approved for Leak-Before-Break  

SciTech Connect

This TLR provides an assessment of weld overlays as a mitigation strategy for PWSCC, and includes an assessment of the WOL-related inspection requirements of Code Case N-770-1, as conditioned in §50.55a.

Sullivan, Edward J.; Anderson, Michael T.

2012-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

29

Argonne Transportation - Weld Monitor at DaimlerChrysler  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Evanecky, area technical manager at ITP. Throughout the automotive industry, laser welding has been rapidly overtaking traditional arc welding technology as the state of the...

30

Repair welding of fusion reactor components  

SciTech Connect

Experiments have shown that irradiated Type 316 stainless steel is susceptible to heat-affected-zone (HAZ) cracking upon cooling when welded using the gas tungsten arc (GTA) process under lateral constraint. The cracking has been hypothesized to be caused by stress-assisted helium bubble growth and rupture at grain boundaries. This study utilized an experimental welding setup which enabled different compressive stresses to be applied to the plates during welding. Autogenous GTA welds were produced in Type 316 stainless steel doped with 256 appm helium. The application of a compressive stress, 55 MPa, during welding suppressed the previously observed catastrophic cracking. Detailed examinations conducted after welding showed a dramatic change in helium bubble morphology. Grain boundary bubble growth along directions parallel to the weld was suppressed. Results suggest that stress-modified welding techniques may be used to suppress or eliminate helium-induced cracking during joining of irradiated materials.

Chin, B.A.

1993-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

31

Neutron diffraction measurements of residual stresses in welds fabricated from highly anisotropic materials  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

neutron diffraction to neutron diffraction to engineering problems T.M. Holden Northern Stress Technologies Deep River, Ontario, Canada Oak Ridge National Laboratory, 13 nd June 2011 Reference material * "Introduction to the characterization of residual stress by neutron diffraction". M.T. Hutchings, P.J. Withers, T.M. Holden and T. Lorentzen, (Taylor and Francis: Boca Raton) 2005 * "Introduction to diffraction in Materials Science and Engineering", A.D. Krawitz (John Wiley and Sons ,Inc.: New York) 2001 * "Non-destructive testing-Standard Test Method for

32

Materials Reliability Program: Primary Water Stress Corrosion Cracking of Cold-Worked Alloy 690 Control Rod Drive Mechanism Tube Mat erial and Weld Metals Alloy 52 and 152 (MRP-340)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Primary water stress corrosion cracking (PWSCC) continues to cause increased costs for operation, maintenance, assessment, and repair of thick-walled pressurized water reactor (PWR) components made of Alloy 600 and its weld metals Alloys 182 and 82. Thick-section Alloy 690 and its weld metals (Alloys 52 [(or 52M] and 152) are now being widely used, particularly for nozzle penetrations during the replacement of reactor pressure vessel (RPV) heads and for repairs to other components in the primary ...

2012-10-17T23:59:59.000Z

33

Life Management of Creep Strength Enhanced Grade 91 Steels - Atlas of Microstructures and Welds  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Understanding the way in which creep damage forms is critical to developing methods to monitor in-service condition and to mitigate the driving force for damage in future power plants. This report describes the controlled manufacture, metallographic characterization, and creep testing of welds fabricated from Grade 91 steel. It has been established that in-service components fabricated from this grade of creep strength enhanced ferritic (CSEF) steel will be prone to weldment cracking. The research ...

2013-07-02T23:59:59.000Z

34

Virtual Welded - Joint Design Integrating Advanced Materials and Processing Technology  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Virtual Welede-Joint Design, a systematic modeling approach, has been developed in this project to predict the relationship of welding process, microstructure, properties, residual stress, and the ultimate weld fatique strength. This systematic modeling approach was applied in the welding of high strength steel. A special welding wire was developed in this project to introduce compressive residual stress at weld toe. The results from both modeling and experiments demonstrated that more than 10x fatique life improvement can be acheived in high strength steel welds by the combination of compressive residual stress from the special welding wire and the desired weld bead shape from a unique welding process. The results indicate a technology breakthrough in the design of lightweight and high fatique performance welded structures using high strength steels.

Yang, Zhishang; Ludewig, Howard W.; Babu, S. Suresh

2005-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

35

Measurement and finite element analysis of temperature distribution in arc welding process  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This presentation describes both the experimental measurement and finite element analysis used to study the temperature distribution during a metal inert gas (MIG) welding process, including the cooling down period. Welding was carried out on ... Keywords: FEA, MIG welding, arc welding, cracking, finite element analysis, metal inert gas welding, residual stress, simulation, temperature distribution, weldment temperature

C. K. Lee; J. Candy; C. P. H. Tan

2004-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

36

Weld Monitor  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Monitoring of Laser Beam Welding Monitoring of Laser Beam Welding Using Infrared Weld Emissions P. G. Sanders, J. S. Keske, G. Kornecki, and K. H. Leong Technology Development Division Argonne National Laboratory Argonne, IL 60439 USA The submitted manuscript has been authorized by a contractor of the U. S. Government under contract No. W-31-109-ENG-38. Accordingly, the U. S. Government retains a non-exclusive, royalty-free license to publish or reproduce the published form of this contribution, or allow others to do so, for U. S. Government purposes. Abstract A non-obtrusive, pre-aligned, solid-state device has been developed to monitor the primary infrared emissions during laser welding. The weld monitor output is a 100-1000 mV signal that depends on the beam power and weld characteristics. The DC level of this signal is related to weld

37

Welding and Repair Technology Center: Evaluation of Magnetic Stir Welding for Improved Weldability of 52M  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Nickel-base weld metals with high chromium content, such as 52M, provide optimum resistance to stress corrosion cracking in nuclear power primary water systems. Unfortunately, these nickel-base weld metals present many challenges such as less than ideal weldability and susceptibility to hot cracking or solid-state cracking depending on welding conditions and dilution effects with dissimilar metals. Moreover, the presence of large solidification grains, typical of nickel-base weld metal, makes ...

2012-10-30T23:59:59.000Z

38

Elements of arc welding  

SciTech Connect

This paper looks at the following arc welding techniques: (1) shielded metal-arc welding; (2) submerged-arc welding; (3) gas metal-arc welding; (4) flux-cored arc welding; (5) electrogas welding; (6) gas tungsten-arc welding; and (7) plasma-arc welding.

1993-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

39

ICME for Residual Stress  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Oct 8, 2012 ... Application of ICME to Weld Process Innovations and Residual Stress ... Incorporation of Residual Stresses into Design of Ni-Base Superalloy ...

40

Repair welding of fusion reactor components. Second year technical report  

SciTech Connect

Experiments have shown that irradiated Type 316 stainless steel is susceptible to heat-affected-zone (HAZ) cracking upon cooling when welded using the gas tungsten arc (GTA) process under lateral constraint. The cracking has been hypothesized to be caused by stress-assisted helium bubble growth and rupture at grain boundaries. This study utilized an experimental welding setup which enabled different compressive stresses to be applied to the plates during welding. Autogenous GTA welds were produced in Type 316 stainless steel doped with 256 appm helium. The application of a compressive stress, 55 MPa, during welding suppressed the previously observed catastrophic cracking. Detailed examinations conducted after welding showed a dramatic change in helium bubble morphology. Grain boundary bubble growth along directions parallel to the weld was suppressed. Results suggest that stress-modified welding techniques may be used to suppress or eliminate helium-induced cracking during joining of irradiated materials.

Chin, B.A.

1993-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "welding stress management" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Short-Crack Response of Alloy 182 Weld Metal Undergoing Stress Corrosion Cracking in High-Temperature PWR Primary Water  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Mechanistic investigations of environmentally assisted cracking (EAC), to date, have focused more on propagation relative to initiation. At the same time, components spend most of their life in the initiation and "short-crack" growth regimes. Prior exploratory work conducted at General Electric Global Research Center (GE GRC) showed that stainless steels, Alloy 600, and Alloy 182 weld metal exhibit lower average growth rates when the cracks are very short or small (1050 m). In those tests, the transition...

2008-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

42

WELDING TORCH  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A welding torch into which water and inert gas are piped separately for cooling and for providing a suitable gaseous atmosphere is described. A welding electrode is clamped in the torch by a removable collet sleeve and a removable collet head. Replacement of the sleeve and head with larger or smaller sleeve and head permits a larger or smaller welding electrode to be substituted on the torch. (AEC)

Correy, T.B.

1961-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

43

WELDING STANDARDS  

SciTech Connect

Hanford Atomic Production Operation specification guides and standards for welding and brazing are presented. Details of this manual are given in TID- 4100 (Suppl.). (N.W.R.)

1963-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

44

Welding Consumables  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Oct 18, 2011 ... Emerging Materials Joining Challenges and Technology Needs: An Industry Perspective: Henry J. Cialone1; 1Edison Welding Institute

45

Roll Welding  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Table 1   Typical properties of common roll-welded clad laminates...31(a) 40(a) Typically used for commutators in electric

46

Assessment of the Mechanical Stress Improvement Process for Mitigating Primary Water Stress Corrosion Cracking in Nickel Alloy Butt Welds in Piping Systems Approved for Leak-Before-Break  

SciTech Connect

This report provides an assessment of the use of Mechanical Stress Improvement Process to reduce, or decrease, stress-driven degradation, i.e., primary water stress corrosion cracking.

Sullivan, Edmund J.; Anderson, Michael T.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

47

Welding and Repair Technology Center: Underwater Laser Welding Studies  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Repair of internal reactor components has been a continuing challenge for the nuclear industry. High radiation levels, underwater environment, and altered material weldability have made traditional repair methods more difficult to use for internal component repair. One of the key issues is to make seal-weld repairs on cracks that might exist due to stress corrosion or fatigue. Sealing of these cracks by welding might be necessary to maintain pressure boundary or flow requirements. During this research pr...

2009-12-21T23:59:59.000Z

48

WELDING METHOD  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A semi-automatic method is described for the weld joining of pipes and fittings which utilizes the inert gasshielded consumable electrode electric arc welding technique, comprising laying down the root pass at a first peripheral velocity and thereafter laying down the filler passes over the root pass necessary to complete the weld by revolving the pipes and fittings at a second peripheral velocity different from the first peripheral velocity, maintaining the welding head in a fixed position as to the specific direction of revolution, while the longitudinal axis of the welding head is disposed angularly in the direction of revolution at amounts between twenty minutas and about four degrees from the first position.

Cornell, A.A.; Dunbar, J.V.; Ruffner, J.H.

1959-09-29T23:59:59.000Z

49

A HANDBOOK PERTAINING TO MUSIC EDUCATORS' STRESS MANAGEMENT, PHYSICAL ACTIVITY, AND NUTRITION.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The purpose of this study was to write a handbook pertaining to music educators’ stress management, physical activity, and nutrition. In order to obtain information… (more)

Farmer, Sarah Michaelene

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

50

Stress Management: X-Rays Reveal Si Thin-Film Defects  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Stress Management: X-Rays Reveal Si Thin-Film Defects. ... Advanced Photon Source, and supported in part by the Department of Energy. ...

2011-04-26T23:59:59.000Z

51

Welding austenitic steel clads for fast reactor fuel pins  

SciTech Connect

ABS>From symposium on fuel and elements for fast reactors; Brussels. Belgium (2 Jul 1973). Developmental programs aimed at fabrication of stainless steelclad PuO/sub 2/ fuel pins are described. Information and data are included on welding fast reactor fuel cans, methods of reducing the incidence of weld cracking, effects of weld stresses, and fuel plug design. (JRD)

Papeleux, P.; Flipot, A.J.; Lafontaine, I.

1973-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

52

WELDING UNUSUAL METALS  

SciTech Connect

Methods of welding including electron beam welding, diffusion bonding, motor-arc welding, and combination methods are discussed. The successful welding and soldering of uranium in different shapes are discussed. (C.J.G.)

Grobecker, D.W.

1959-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

53

Introduction to Projection Welding  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

...W. Peterson, Projection Welding, Welding Fundamentals and Processes, Vol 6A, ASM Handbook, ASM International, 2011, p 423â??437...

54

Materials Reliability Program: Evaluation of Potential for Low Temperature Crack Propagation in Reactor Pressure Vessel Outlet Nozzl e Dissimilar Metal Butt Welds by Stress and Fracture Mechanics Analyses (MRP-247)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Low Temperature Crack Propagation is a form of hydrogen embrittlement that can cause, under specific environmental conditions in laboratory tests, severe degradation of the fracture resistance of nickel-base alloys X-750 and 690, and weld metals 82/182 and 52/152. While no operating plant has exhibited evidence of LTCP, the hydrogen levels and temperature conditions necessary for LTCP to occur are present during some PWR shutdowns. This report evaluates the potential for the thermal stresses generated du...

2008-12-22T23:59:59.000Z

55

Stress in accident and post-accident management at Chernobyl ?  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Abstract. The effects of the Chernobyl nuclear accident on the psychology of the affected population have been much discussed. The psychological dimension has been advanced as a factor explaining the emergence, from 1990 onwards, of a post-accident crisis in the main CIS countries affected. This article presents the conclusions of a series of European studies, which focused on the consequences of the Chernobyl accident. These studies show that the psychological and social effects associated with the post-accident situation arise from the interdependency of a number of complex factors exerting a deleterious effect on the population. We shall first attempt to characterise the stress phenomena observed among the population affected by the accident. Secondly, we will be presenting an analysis of the various factors that have contributed to the emerging psychological and social features of population reaction to the accident and in post-accident phases, while not neglecting the effects of the pre-accident situation on the target population. Thirdly, we shall devote some initial consideration to the conditions that might be conducive to better management of postaccident stress. In conclusion, we shall emphasise the need to restore confidence among the population generally. 1.

Gilles Heriard Dubreuil

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

56

Welding method combining laser welding and MIG welding  

SciTech Connect

Welding of deep penetration is obtained in a sustrate by a method which comprises first melting the joint portion of the substrates by MIG welding and then focusing a laser beam in the bottom surface of a crater formed in consequence of the MIG welding thereby effecting laser welding of the crater.

Hamasaki, M.

1985-03-26T23:59:59.000Z

57

Materials Reliability Program: Finite-Element Model Validation for Dissimilar Metal Butt-Welds (MRP-316)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Residual stresses imparted by the welding process are a principal factor in the process of primary water stress corrosion cracking (PWSCC) of Alloy 82/182 nickel-alloy dissimilar metal (DM) piping butt welds in pressurized water reactors (PWRs). Analytical models are frequently used to simulate the welding process in order to predict the residual stress distribution in the weld and base material as an input to crack growth calculations. The crack growth calculations, in turn, have demonstrated a high sen...

2011-12-20T23:59:59.000Z

58

Laser Welding of Metals [Laser Applications Laboratory] - Nuclear  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Laser Welding of Metals Laser Welding of Metals Capabilities Engineering Experimentation Reactor Safety Experimentation Aerosol Experiments System Components Laser Applications Overview Laser Oil & Gas Well Drilling Laser Heat Treatment Laser Welding of Metals On-line Monitoring Laser Beam Delivery Laser Glazing of Railroad Rails High Power Laser Beam Delivery Decontamination and Decommissioning Refractory Alloy Welding Robots Applications Other Facilities Other Capabilities Work with Argonne Contact us For Employees Site Map Help Join us on Facebook Follow us on Twitter NE on Flickr Laser Applications Laboratory Laser Welding of Metals Project description: High-speed laser welding of metals. Category: Project with industrial partner (Delphi Energy and Engine Management Systems) Bookmark and Share

59

Narrow gap laser welding  

SciTech Connect

A laser welding process including: (a) using optical ray tracing to make a model of a laser beam and the geometry of a joint to be welded; (b) adjusting variables in the model to choose variables for use in making a laser weld; and (c) laser welding the joint to be welded using the chosen variables.

Milewski, John O. (Santa Fe, NM); Sklar, Edward (Santa Fe, NM)

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

60

Narrow gap laser welding  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A laser welding process including: (a) using optical ray tracing to make a model of a laser beam and the geometry of a joint to be welded; (b) adjusting variables in the model to choose variables for use in making a laser weld; and (c) laser welding the joint to be welded using the chosen variables. 34 figs.

Milewski, J.O.; Sklar, E.

1998-06-02T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "welding stress management" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Pakistan Vt. J., 22(4): 2002 STRESS MANAGEMENT FOLLOWING VACCINATION AGAINST  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Pakistan Vêt. J., 22(4): 2002 STRESS MANAGEMENT FOLLOWING VACCINATION AGAINST COCCIDIOSISPathology, 'Department ofParasitology University ofVeterinary and Animal sciences, Lahore, Pakistan ABSTRACT The présent

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

62

ELECTRON WELDING OF METALS  

SciTech Connect

The advantages and disadvantages of the electron welding of metals are briefly reviewed. Typical apparatuses used for electron welding are described. (J.S.R)

Stohr, J.-A.

1958-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

63

VRML2 Car Welding  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

VRML2 Car Welding. by Qiming Wang. Click on the base of the robot to start spot welding the car. This file follows VRML97 conventions. ...

64

weld data handbook  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... steel structures), has collected critical data on the welding of high-alloy steels for the 2009 American Welding Society Handbook: Materials and ...

2012-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

65

Heat Stress Management Program for Power Plants: Clothing Update of EPRI NP-4453-L -- 1991 Report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Clothing ensembles that protect workers from radioactive skin contamination can potentially increase the risk for heat stress. To address this issue, most nuclear power plants calculate action times (stay times) based on the ambient temperature and humidity, work level, and the protective clothing worn. The 1991 EPRI Heat Stress Management Program for Power Plants (report NP-4453-L, Rev. 1) described common methods for evaluating heat stress and provided the necessary adjustment factors for five specific...

1998-08-25T23:59:59.000Z

66

WELDING PROCESS  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method of joining metal parts for the preparation of relatively long, thin fuel element cores of uranium or alloys thereof for nuclear reactors is described. The process includes the steps of cleaning the surfaces to be jointed, placing the sunfaces together, and providing between and in contact with them, a layer of a compound in finely divided form that is decomposable to metal by heat. The fuel element members are then heated at the contact zone and maintained under pressure during the heating to decompose the compound to metal and sinter the members and reduced metal together producing a weld. The preferred class of decomposable compounds are the metal hydrides such as uranium hydride, which release hydrogen thus providing a reducing atmosphere in the vicinity of the welding operation.

Zambrow, J.; Hausner, H.

1957-09-24T23:59:59.000Z

67

WELDING APPARATUS  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

This patent covers an arrangement for replacing air in a welding chamber with an inert gas. This operation usually is time-consuming because of the tendency of the inert gas to mix with the air being removed from the welding chamber. The chamber is open at the bottom and has at its top a cover and a porous plate a little below the cover. The inert gas is admitted to the chamber through two screened openings in the cover. On passing through the porous plate, the gas acts as a piston extending across the chamber and moving downwardly to expel the air through the lower open end of the chamber, with a minimum of mixing with the air being expelled. (AEC)

Correy, T.B.; DeWitt, D.E.; Nelson, I.V.

1963-04-23T23:59:59.000Z

68

Modeling of Heat and Mass Transfer in Fusion Welding  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In fusion welding, parts are joined together by melting and subsequent solidification. Although this principle is simple, complex transport phenomena take place during fusion welding, and they determine the final weld quality and performance. The heat and mass transfer in the weld pool directly affect the size and shape of the pool, the solidification microstructure, the formation of weld defects such as porosity and humping, and the temperature distribution in the fusion zone and heat-affected zone (HAZ). Furthermore, the temperature evolution affects the kinetics and extent of various solid-state phase transformations, which in turn determine the final weld microstructure and mechanical properties. The formation of residual stresses and distortion originates from the thermal expansion and contraction during welding heating and cooling, respectively.

Zhang, Wei [ORNL

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

69

Design and Implementation of Welding with Electromagnetic Trailing Peening Control Circuit  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In order to eliminate welding stress and improve the quality of welding.The technology of constant frequency pulse width modulation (PWM) is applied in the design of control circuit of welding with trailing peening.AT89C52 is the core of the circuit.This ...

Meijiu Lu; Yuejin Ma; Jianguo Zhao; Jianchang Li; Jianjun Hao

2009-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

70

WeldingFabr&MetalForm  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Welding, Welding, Fabrication, and Metal Forming Manufacturing Technologies The department consists of three trades: weld- ing; fabrication and assembly; and precision metal forming. These interrelated groups use similar equipment and rely on each other's skills. One stop will get you the service of three reliable trades. The team manufactures and assembles proto- type hardware and has the in-house capability of producing hardware with sizes ranging from thumbnail to rail-car. Expertise includes aircraft quality sheet metal construction, certified weld- ing, and assembly. The staff has experience managing a variety of activities: design modifi- cation assistance; in-house fabrication; and project management and can work with your engineers to transform sketches and ideas into working prototypes.

71

Laser weld jig  

SciTech Connect

A system is provided for welding a workpiece (10, FIG. 1) along a predetermined weld line (12) that may be of irregular shape, which includes the step of forming a lip (32) on the workpiece to extend parallel to the weld line, and moving the workpiece by engaging the lip between a pair of rotatable members (34, 36). Rotation of one of the members at a constant speed, causes the workpiece to move so that all points on the weld line sequentially pass a fixed point in space (17) at a constant speed, so that a laser welding beam can be directed at that fixed point to form a weld along the weld line. The workpiece can include a reuseable jig (24) forming the lip, and with the jig constructed to detachably hold parts (22, 20) to be welded at a position wherein the weld line of the parts extends parallel to the lip on the jig.

Van Blarigan, Peter (Livermore, CA); Haupt, David L. (Livermore, CA)

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

72

Electron and laser beam welding  

SciTech Connect

This book contains 22 selections. Some of the titles are: Laser welding of chandelles to the plates of the sommier employed in the nuclear power plant core; Electron beam welding of hobbing cutters; Sealing welds in electron beam welding of thick metals; Development and application of high power electron beam welding; Electron beam welding of dissimilar metals (niobium, molybdenum, porous tungsten-molybdenum); Status of electron beam welding in the United States of America; and Electron and laser beam welding in Japan.

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

73

SCC Behavior of Alloy 52M/182 Weld Overlay in a PWR Environment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

NRC/EPRI Welding Residual Stress Validation Program (Phase III) · On the Microstructure of Alloy 600 SCC Cracks Observed by TEM on PWR SG Pulled Tubes ...

74

Fusion welding process  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process for the fusion welding of nickel alloy steel members wherein a ferrite containing pellet is inserted into a cavity in one member and melted by a welding torch. The resulting weld nugget, a fusion of the nickel containing alloy from the members to be welded and the pellet, has a composition which is sufficiently low in nickel content such that ferrite phases occur within the weld nugget, resulting in improved weld properties. The steel alloys encompassed also include alloys containing carbon and manganese, considered nickel equivalents.

Thomas, Kenneth C. (Export, PA); Jones, Eric D. (Salem, PA); McBride, Marvin A. (Hempfield Township, Westmoreland County, PA)

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

75

Development of Underwater Laser Cladding and Underwater Laser Seal Welding Techniques for Reactor Components (II)  

SciTech Connect

Stress corrosion cracking (SCC) is one of the major reasons to reduce the reliability of aged reactor components. Toshiba has been developing underwater laser welding onto surface of the aged components as maintenance and repair techniques. Because most of the reactor internal components to apply this underwater laser welding technique have 3-dimensional shape, effect of welding positions and welded shapes are examined and presented in this report. (authors)

Masataka Tamura; Shohei Kawano; Wataru Kouno; Yasushi Kanazawa [Toshiba Corporation (Japan)

2006-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

76

Materials Reliability Program: Technical Basis for Preemptive Weld Overlay for Alloy 82/182 Butt Welds in Pressurized Water Reactors (MRP-169) Revision 1-A  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Weld overlays can be applied at locations that have not yet shown any cracking but are considered susceptible to primary water stress corrosion cracking (PWSCC). A planned application of the overlay can be facilitated, and potential future cracking is mitigated because of the resulting favorable post-overlay residual stresses at the weld location. Inservice inspection also is expedited because of enhanced joint inspectability provided by the weld overlay. An overlay used in this manner is termed a preemp...

2010-10-05T23:59:59.000Z

77

Materials Reliability Program: Technical Basis for Preemptive Weld Overlays for Alloy 82/182 Butt Welds in PWRs (MRP-169) Revision 1  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Weld overlays can be applied at locations that have not yet shown any cracking but are considered susceptible to primary water stress corrosion cracking (PWSCC). A planned application of the overlay can be facilitated, and potential future cracking is mitigated because of the resulting favorable post-overlay residual stresses at the weld location. Inservice inspection also is expedited because of enhanced joint inspectability provided by the weld overlay. An overlay used in this manner is termed a preemp...

2008-06-11T23:59:59.000Z

78

Vibration Fatigue of Small Bore Socket-Welded Pipe Joints  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In the course of developing the screening process for the EPRI Fatigue Management Handbook, TR-104534, several areas were identified in which the industry's understanding of socket welds was somewhat lacking and current ASME Code procedures were inadequate to accurately characterize their high-cycle fatigue resistance. The research described in this report is directed at improving the understanding of socket welds and the factors and parameters that affect a socket weld's ability to resist vibration-indu...

1997-06-27T23:59:59.000Z

79

PRESSURE WELDING--BIBLIOGRAPHY  

SciTech Connect

A bibliography containing 117 references from the years 1944 to 1961 on pressure welding is presented. (N.W.R.)

1960-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

80

Virtual Training for Welding  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A mixed reality system has been created for simulating gas metal arc welding (GMAW) welding. This simulation system is intended for use in training human welders. The system is comprised of a real welding torch attached to a force feedback device, a ...

Kenneth Fast; Timothy Gifford; Robert Yancey

2004-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "welding stress management" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Welding and Fabrication Critical Factors for New Nuclear Power Plants  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Welding and fabrication processes employed for manufacture of critical nuclear power plant components may adversely affect material performance and can potentially increase susceptibility to known degradation mechanisms. This report identifies important welding and fabrication processes for specific materials, assesses their effects on potential degradation mechanisms, and identifies process enhancements that can improve long-term asset management of new nuclear plant components.

2009-12-08T23:59:59.000Z

82

Method for welding beryllium  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method is provided for joining beryllium pieces which comprises: depositing aluminum alloy on at least one beryllium surface; contacting that beryllium surface with at least one other beryllium surface; and welding the aluminum alloy coated beryllium surfaces together. The aluminum alloy may be deposited on the beryllium using gas metal arc welding. The aluminum alloy coated beryllium surfaces may be subjected to elevated temperatures and pressures to reduce porosity before welding the pieces together. The aluminum alloy coated beryllium surfaces may be machined into a desired welding joint configuration before welding. The beryllium may be an alloy of beryllium or a beryllium compound. The aluminum alloy may comprise aluminum and silicon.

Dixon, Raymond D. (Los Alamos, NM); Smith, Frank M. (Espanola, NM); O' Leary, Richard F. (Los Alamos, NM)

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

83

Initiation of PWSCC of Weld Alloys 182  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The effect of partial periodic loading increased when the temperature decreased ... Detailed Root Cause Analysis of SG Tube ODSCC Indications within the Tube Sheets of NPP Biblis Unit A .... Radiation Damage in Fe-C-Met Model Alloys ... Stress Corrosion Cracking Behavior near the Fusion Boundary of Dissimilar Weld

84

Discontinuities Associated With Specialized Welding Processes  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

...R. Gordon, Overview of Weld Discontinuities, Welding, Brazing, and Soldering, Vol 6, ASM Handbook,

85

Underwater cladding with laser beam and plasma arc welding  

SciTech Connect

Two welding processes, plasma arc (transferred arc) (PTA) and laser beam, were investigated to apply cladding to austenitic stainless steels and Inconel 600. These processes have long been used to apply cladding layers , but the novel feature being reported here is that these cladding layers were applied underwater, with a water pressure equivalent to 24 m (80 ft). Being able to apply the cladding underwater is very important for many applications, including the construction of off-shore oil platforms and the repair of nuclear reactors. In the latter case, being able to weld underwater eliminates the need for draining the reactor and removing the fuel. Welding underwater in reactors presents numerous challenges, but the ability to weld without having to drain the reactor and remove the fuel provides a huge cost savings. Welding underwater in reactors must be done remotely, but because of the radioactive corrosion products and neutron activation of the steels, remote welding would also be required even if the reactor is drained and the fuel removed. In fact, without the shielding of the water, the remote welding required if the reactor is drained might be even more difficult than that required with underwater welds. Furthermore, as shall be shown, the underwater welds that the authors have made were of high quality and exhibit compressive rather than tensile residual stresses.

White, R.A.; Fusaro, R.; Jones, M.G.; Solomon, H.D. [General Electric Corporate Research and Development Center, Schenectady, NY (United States); Milian-Rodriguez, R.R. [GE Nuclear Energy, San Jose, CA (United States)

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

86

Laser welding of electrical interconnections  

SciTech Connect

Processes and equipment have been developed for welding thin aluminum and copper foils using a Nd : YAG laser. Laser welding provides an alternate technique with improved quality for welding these types of electrical terminations.

Bauer, F.R.

1978-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

87

CHARACTERIZATION OF FERRITIC G.M.A. WELD DEPOSITS IN 9percentNi STEEL FOR CRYOGENIC APPLICATIONS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

degree of thermal refinement The heating and cooling ratesthermal and mechanical stresses present during weld bead cooling.rapid cooling rates and more frequent thermal excursions

Mahin, Kim Walker

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

88

WELDED JACKETED URANIUM BODY  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A fuel element is presented for a neutronic reactor and is comprised of a uranium body, a non-fissionable jacket surrounding sald body, thu jacket including a portion sealed by a weld, and an inclusion in said sealed jacket at said weld of a fiux having a low neutron capture cross-section. The flux is provided by combining chlorine gas and hydrogen in the intense heat of-the arc, in a "Heliarc" welding muthod, to form dry hydrochloric acid gas.

Gurinsky, D.H.

1958-08-26T23:59:59.000Z

89

WEB RESOURCE: Gas Welding Magnesium  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Sep 20, 2007 ... This webpage offers advice on gas welding of magnesium. Launch Site SOURCE: "Gas Welding Magnesium". Weldwell Corporate Website.

90

Dual wire welding torch and method  

SciTech Connect

A welding torch includes a nozzle with a first welding wire guide configured to orient a first welding wire in a first welding wire orientation, and a second welding wire guide configured to orient a second welding wire in a second welding wire orientation that is non-coplanar and divergent with respect to the first welding wire orientation. A method of welding includes moving a welding torch with respect to a workpiece joint to be welded. During moving the welding torch, a first welding wire is fed through a first welding wire guide defining a first welding wire orientation and a second welding wire is fed through a second welding wire guide defining a second welding wire orientation that is divergent and non-coplanar with respect to the first welding wire orientation.

Diez, Fernando Martinez (Peoria, IL); Stump, Kevin S. (Sherman, IL); Ludewig, Howard W. (Groveland, IL); Kilty, Alan L. (Peoria, IL); Robinson, Matthew M. (Peoria, IL); Egland, Keith M. (Peoria, IL)

2009-04-28T23:59:59.000Z

91

Remote sensing for site-specific management of biotic and abiotic stress in cotton  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This study evaluated the applicability of remote sensing instrumentation for site- specific management of abiotic and biotic stress on cotton grown under a center pivot. Three different irrigation regimes (100%, 75%, and 50% ETc) were imposed on a cotton field to 1) monitor canopy temperatures of cotton with infrared thermometers (IRTs) in order to pinpoint areas of biotic and abiotic stress, 2) compare aerial infrared photography to IRTs mounted on center pivots to correlate areas of biotic and abiotic stress, and 3) relate yield to canopy temperatures. Pivot-mounted IRTs and IR camera were able to differentiate water stress between the irrigation regimes, however, only the IR camera was effectively able to distinguish between biotic (cotton root rot) and abiotic (drought) stress with the assistance of groundtruthing. The 50% ETc regime had significantly higher canopy temperatures, which were reflected in significantly lower lint yields when compared to the 75% and 100% ETc regimes. Deficit irrigation up to 75% ETc had no impact on yield, indicating that water savings were possible without yield depletion.

Falkenberg, Nyland Ray

2005-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

92

Welding Technologies and Applications  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Oct 20, 2011 ... Joining of Advanced and Specialty Materials (JASM XIII): Welding Technologies and Applications Sponsored by: MS&T Organization Program ...

93

Electric arc welding gun  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

This invention relates to improved apparatus for arc welding an interior joint formed by intersecting tubular members. As an example, the invention is well suited for applications where many similar small-diameter vertical lines are to be welded to a long horizontal header. The improved apparatus includes an arc welding gun having a specially designed welding head which is not only very compact but also produces welds that are essentially free from rolled-over solidified metal. The welding head consists of the upper end of the barrel and a reversely extending electrode holder, or tip, which defines an acute angle with the barrel. As used in the above-mentioned example, the gun is positioned to extend upwardly through the vertical member and the joint to be welded, with its welding head disposed within the horizontal header. Depending on the design of the welding head, the barrel then is either rotated or revolved about the axis of the vertical member to cause the electrode to track the joint.

Luttrell, Edward (Clinton, TN); Turner, Paul W. (Idaho Falls, ID)

1978-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

94

Welding - Programmaster.org  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Feb 15, 2010 ... High Brightness Nd:YAG Laser Welding of Aluminum 5754: Jyotirmoy Mazumder 1; Leslie Pipe1; Yi Liu1; David Roessler1; 1University of ...

95

Materials and Welding  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Feb 28, 2011 ... Enhancement of Intergranular Corrosion Resistance of TIG Welded and Laser- surface Melted SUS 304 for Nuclear Power Plants: Joung Soo ...

96

Laser Welding of Steel  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

welding is particularly suited to the high-production rate requirements in the automobile industry. Some automotive exhaust components use 409 stainless steel and are currently arc...

97

L3 Milestone Use Computational Model to Design and Optimize Welding Conditions to Suppress Helium  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

L3 Milestone L3 Milestone Use Computational Model to Design and Optimize Welding Conditions to Suppress Helium Cracking during Welding June 2012 Wei Zhang and Zhili Feng, ORNL Eric Willis, EPRI Background and Objectives Today, welding is widely used for repair, maintenance and upgrade of nuclear reactor components. As a critical technology to extend the service life of nuclear power plants beyond 60 years, weld technology must be further developed to meet new challenges associated with the aging of the plants, such as control and mitigation of the detrimental effects of weld residual stresses and repair of highly irradiated materials. To meet this goal, fundamental understanding of the "welding" effect is necessary for development of new and improved welding technologies.

98

Explosion metal welding  

SciTech Connect

Process parameters pertaining to welding similar and dissimilar metals using explosives are reviewed. The discussion centers on the interrelationship of physical parameters which play a part in achieving desirable metallurgical results. Present activities in explosion metal welding at LASL are presented and shown how they related to the interests of the ERDA community.

Popoff, A.A.

1976-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

99

Welding electric terminals ultrasonically  

SciTech Connect

Ultrasonic welding has been investigated for use on foil conductor terminations. Equipment and tooling have been improved; material considerations and combinations have been evaluated to determine their effects on the process; and special configurations and techniques have been studied to extend the applicability of the ultrasonic welding process.

Darner, G.S.

1976-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

100

Dc arc weld starter  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A system for starting an arc for welding uses three DC power supplies, a high voltage supply for initiating the arc, an intermediate voltage supply for sustaining the arc, and a low voltage welding supply directly connected across the gap after the high voltage supply is disconnected.

Campiotti, R.H.; Hopwood, J.E.

1989-02-17T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "welding stress management" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

DC arc weld starter  

SciTech Connect

A system for starting an arc for welding uses three DC power supplies, a high voltage supply for initiating the arc, an intermediate voltage supply for sustaining the arc, and a low voltage welding supply directly connected across the gap after the high voltage supply is disconnected.

Campiotti, Richard H. (Tracy, CA); Hopwood, James E. (Oakley, CA)

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

102

Weld Metal Metallurgical Handbook  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report is part of an ongoing series of metallurgical handbooks that are being developed for utility engineers to use in assessing metallurgical characteristics of any given alloy. This report focuses specifically on the weld metal metallurgical characteristics of carbon, low-alloy martensitic, and austenitic stainless steel welds.

2009-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

103

Method for welding beryllium  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method is provided for joining beryllium pieces which comprises: depositing aluminum alloy on at least one beryllium surface; contacting that beryllium surface with at least one other beryllium surface; and welding the aluminum alloy coated beryllium surfaces together. The aluminum alloy may be deposited on the beryllium using gas metal arc welding. The aluminum alloy coated beryllium surfaces may be subjected to elevated temperatures and pressures to reduce porosity before welding the pieces together. The aluminum alloy coated beryllium surfaces may be machined into a desired welding joint configuration before welding. The beryllium may be an alloy of beryllium or a beryllium compound. The aluminum alloy may comprise aluminum and silicon. 9 figs.

Dixon, R.D.; Smith, F.M.; O`Leary, R.F.

1997-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

104

Method for welding beryllium  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method is provided for joining beryllium pieces which comprises: depositing aluminum alloy on at least one beryllium surface; contacting that beryllium surface with at least one other beryllium surface; and welding the aluminum alloy coated beryllium surfaces together. The aluminum alloy may be deposited on the beryllium using gas metal arc welding. The aluminum alloy coated beryllium surfaces may be subjected to elevated temperatures and pressures to reduce porosity before welding the pieces together. The aluminum alloy coated beryllium surfaces may be machined into a desired welding joint configuration before welding. The beryllium may be an alloy of beryllium or a beryllium compound. The aluminum alloy may comprise aluminum and silicon. Beryllium parts made using this method can be used as structural components in aircraft, satellites and space applications.

Dixon, R.D.; Smith, F.M.; O`Leary, R.F.

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

105

Ultrasonic seam welding. Final report  

SciTech Connect

Ultrasonic seam welding has been evaluated for making continuous seam welds on aluminum and copper-foil conductors. A seam welding system has been designed and fabricated, weldable material combinations have been identified, and the process parameters for welding materials applicable to flat cable production have been established.

Darner, G.S.

1980-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

106

Welding Methods for Tailored Blanks  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

...methods both with and without filler wire by Toyota since 1986. Filler wire is used for applications that have an exposed weld in the finished product, such as body side frames. Filler wire welds are ground flush to improve surface appearance after welding. Welds that do not require a flush surface...

107

Materials Reliability Program: Technical Basis for Preemptive Weld Overlays for Alloy 82/182 Butt Welds in PWRs (MRP-169)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Dissimilar metal Alloy 82/182 bimetallic pipe-to-nozzle butt welds (DMWs) have experienced cracking in recent years due to primary water stress corrosion cracking (PWSCC). Although weld overlays have been used primarily as a repair for flawed piping, they also can be applied at locations that have not yet exhibited any cracking but are considered susceptible to PWSCC. An overlay used in this manner is termed a preemptive weld overlay (PWOL). This report provides the technical basis for PWOL overlays for ...

2005-10-25T23:59:59.000Z

108

Power Supply Design for Resistance Spot Welding  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

According to a study of Edison Welding Institute, 20% of the welding quality issues are the weld schedule or power supply related. Therefore, the study of ...

109

Qualification of Welding Alloy IN-52M for Alloy 600 and 690 Repairs: Welding Procedures and Process Development  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Occurrences of primary water stress corrosion cracking (PWSCC) in pressurized water reactor (PWR) vessel heads and components have led to the use of corrosion-resistant nickel welding alloys for repair and mitigation activities. For these welds, the most common filler materials have been IN-52 and IN-152; however, during some applications of filler metal IN-52, microfissuring, lack of fusion (LOF), and lack of bond (LOB) have been observed. To address this issue, INCO Alloys (now Special Metals Incorpora...

2002-12-17T23:59:59.000Z

110

Development of Laser Weld Repair, Cladding, and Heat Treatment Technology for Alloy 600 RPV Penetrations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

EPRI has developed innovative laser weld repair technology for Alloy 600 reactor pressure vessel (RPV) head penetrations in pressure water reactors (PWRs). The repair technology consists of an Nd:YAG laser, fiber optic delivery system, optical assembly (weld head), welding filler metal feed system, and manipulator. The laser system will be used to address the repair of axially oriented cracks, stress relief, and cladding operations.

1998-06-29T23:59:59.000Z

111

CHARACTERIZATION OF DEFECTS IN ALLOY 152, 52 AND 52M WELDS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Defect distributions have been documented by optical metallography, scanning electron microscopy and electron backscatter diffraction in alloy 152 and 52 mockups welds, alloy 52 and 52M overlay mockups and an alloy 52M inlay. Primary defects were small cracks at grain boundaries except for more extensive cracking in the dilution zone of an alloy 52 overlay on 304SS. Detailed characterizations of the dilution zone cracks were performed by analytical transmission electron microscopy identifying grain boundary titanium-nitride precipitation associated with the intergranular separations. I. INTRODUCTION Weldments continue to be a primary location of stress-corrosion cracking (SCC) in light-water reactor systems. While problems related to heat-affected-zone (HAZ) sensitization and intergranular (IG) SCC of austenitic stainless alloys in boiling-water reactors (BWRs) have been significantly reduced, SCC has now been observed in HAZs of non-sensitized materials and in dissimilar metal welds where Ni-base alloy weld metals are used. IGSCC in weld metals has been observed in both BWRs and pressurized water reactors (PWRs) with recent examples for PWR pressure vessel penetrations producing the most concern. This has led to the replacement of alloy 600/182/82 welds with higher Cr, more corrosion-resistant replacement materials (alloy 690/152/52/52M). Complicating this issue has been a known susceptibility to cracking during welding [1-7] of these weld metals. There is a critical need for an improved understanding of the weld metal metallurgy and defect formation in Ni-base alloy welds to effectively assess long-term performance. A series of macroscopic to microscopic examinations were performed on available mockup welds made with alloy 52 or alloy 152 plus selected overlay and inlay mockups. The intent was to expand our understanding of weld metal structures in simulated LWR service components with a focus on as-welded defects. Microstructural features, defect distributions, defect characteristics and weld residual strains were examined by optical metallography, scanning electron microscopy, electron backscatter diffraction and transmission electron microscopy. Industry-supplied mock-up welds were characterized including alloy 52 and 152 weldments, alloy 52M overlay and inlay welds, and an alloy 52 overlay. II. WELDMENTS II.A. Alloy 52 and 152 Weld Mockups The alloy 52 and 152 weld mockups were fabricated by MHI for the Kewaunee reactor and were obtained from the EPRI NDE Center. The mockups were U-groove welds joining two plates of 304SS as shown in Figure 1. Alloy 152 butter (heat 307380) was placed on the U-groove surface for both mockups by shielded metal arc welding (SMAW). For the alloy 152 weld mockup, the alloy 152 fill (heat 307380) was also applied using SMAW while for the alloy 52 weld mockup, the alloy 52 fill (heat NX2686JK) was applied using gas tungsten arc welding (GTAW). Welding parameters for the fill materials were substantially different with the alloy 152 SMAW having a deposition speed of 4-25 cm/min with a current of 95-145 A and the alloy 52 GTAW having a deposition speed of 4-10 cm/min with a current of 150-300 A. One prominent feature in these mockup welds is the presence of a crack starting at the 304SS butt joint at the bottom of the U-groove and extending up into the weld. It appears that the 304SS plate on either side of the butt joint acted as an anchor for the weld resulting in a stress rise across the slit that drove crack formation and extension up into the fill weld. As will be shown in the next section, the extent of the cracking around this stress riser was much greater in the MHI 52 weld mockup.

Bruemmer, Stephen M.; Toloczko, Mychailo B.; Olszta, Matthew J.; Seffens, Rob J.; Efsing, Pal G.

2009-08-27T23:59:59.000Z

112

Investigation of the effect of welding parameters on weld quality of plasma arc keyhole welding of structural steels  

SciTech Connect

In the present investigation, the individual and interactive effects of the main welding parameters on weld quality of plasma arc keyhole welding of conventional structural steel, high strength microalloyed steel and strong formable microalloyed steel have been examined using welding of butt joints with a square groove in various welding positions, and welding of joint roots with a single-V-groove and the root face in the flat position. The most important welding parameters are welding current, welding speed and welding gases, especially plasma gas flow rate. Welding parameter combinations producing the best quality welds are presented. It is shown that it is possible to achieve defect-free high-quality welds with good strength and toughness properties, but the allowable range of variation of welding parameters, especially for the highest weld quality, is narrow. An argonhydrogen mixture for the plasma gas together with argon as shielding and backing gases give the best results with respect to weld quality.

Martikainen, J.K.; Moisio, T.J.I. (Lappeenranta Univ. of Technology, Lappeenranta (Finland). Welding Technology Lab.)

1993-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

113

APPARATUS FOR ARC WELDING  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An apparatus is described in which a welding arc created between an annular electrode and a workpiece moves under the influence of an electromagnetic field about the electrode in a closed or annular path. This mode of welding is specially suited to the enclosing of nuclear-fuel slugs in a protective casing. For example, a uranium slug is placed in an aluminum can, and an aluminum closure is welded to the open end of the can along a closed or annular path conforming to the periphery of the end closure.

Lingafelter, J.W.

1960-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

114

Welding and Repair Technology Center: Overlay Handbook  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report reflects the commitment of the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) to serving its members by developing practical tools and guidance in response to specific needs of the industry.BackgroundThe discovery of primary water stress corrosion cracking (PWSCC) in pressurized water reactor (PWR) vessel heads and components has led to the use of corrosion-resistant high-nickel welding alloys for repair and mitigation activities. To date, more than 30 ...

2013-11-25T23:59:59.000Z

115

Specs add confidence in use of wet welding. [Underwater welding  

SciTech Connect

Underwater wet welding can now be utilized with the same confidence as dry welding, provided certain guidelines are followed. A new electrode is discussed that has been delivering exceptionally high quality welds by a diving firm in Houston. With the issuance of the American Welding Society's specifications (ANS/LAWS D3.6-83) much of the confusion surrounding underwater welding should be eliminated. The new specifications establish the levels of quality for underwater welding and gives everyone in the business a common language.

1984-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

116

Laser weld jig. [Patent application  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A system is provided for welding a workpiece along a predetermined weld line that may be of irregular shape, which includes the step of forming a lip on the workpiece to extend parallel to the weld line, and moving the workpiece by engaging the lip between a pair of rotatable members. Rotation of one of the members at a constant speed, causes the workpiece to move so that all points on the weld line sequentially pass a fixed point in space at a constant speed, so that a laser welding beam can be directed at that fixed point to form a weld along the weld line. The workpiece can include a reusable jig forming the lip, and with the jig constructed to detachably hold parts to be welded at a position wherein the weld line of the parts extends parallel to the lip on the jig.

Van Blarigan, P.; Haupt, D.L.

1980-12-05T23:59:59.000Z

117

Evaluation of Safe-End Weld Materials and Safe-End Replacement Experience  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Alloy 182 is susceptible to stress corrosion cracking when used to weld recirculation safe ends to pressure vessel nozzles in BWRs. This research, which found alloy 182 welds in 14 of 24 U.S. BWRs, documented the procedures and materials used for replacing damaged safe ends at five plants.

1986-02-11T23:59:59.000Z

118

Resistance Spot Welding  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

...or more sheetmetal stampings that do not require gas-tight or liquid-tight joints can be more economically joined by high-speed RSW than by mechanical methods. Containers frequently are spot welded. The attachment of

119

Resistance Seam Welding  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

...a series of overlapping spot welds, is normally gas-tight or liquid-tight. Two rotating, circular electrodes (electrode wheels), or one circular and one bar-type electrode,

120

Investigation of electromagnetic welding  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We propose several methodologies to study and optimize the electromagnetic process for Electromagnetic Forming (EMF) and Welding (EMW), thereby lowering the necessary process energy up to a factor of three and lengthening ...

Pressl, Daniel G. (Daniel Gerd)

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "welding stress management" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Friction stir welding tool  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A friction stir welding tool is described and which includes a shank portion; a shoulder portion which is releasably engageable with the shank portion; and a pin which is releasably engageable with the shoulder portion.

Tolle; Charles R. (Idaho Falls, ID), Clark; Denis E. (Idaho Falls, ID), Barnes; Timothy A. (Ammon, ID)

2008-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

122

Weld failure detection  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Method and apparatus for detecting failure in a welded connection, particrly applicable to not readily accessible welds such as those joining components within the reactor vessel of a nuclear reactor system. A preselected tag gas is sealed within a chamber which extends through selected portions of the base metal and weld deposit. In the event of a failure, such as development of a crack extending from the chamber to an outer surface, the tag gas is released. The environment about the welded area is directed to an analyzer which, in the event of presence of the tag gas, evidences the failure. A trigger gas can be included with the tag gas to actuate the analyzer.

Pennell, William E. (Unity Township, Westmoreland County, PA); Sutton, Jr., Harry G. (Mt. Lebanon, PA)

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

123

Concurrent ultrasonic weld evaluation system  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A system for concurrent, non-destructive evaluation of partially completed welds for use in conjunction with an automated welder. The system utilizes real time, automated ultrasonic inspection of a welding operation as the welds are being made by providing a transducer which follows a short distance behind the welding head. Reflected ultrasonic signals are analyzed utilizing computer based digital pattern recognition techniques to discriminate between good and flawed welds on a pass by pass basis. The system also distinguishes between types of weld flaws.

Hood, Donald W. (Idaho Falls, ID); Johnson, John A. (Idaho Falls, ID); Smartt, Herschel B. (Idaho Falls, ID)

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

124

Concurrent ultrasonic weld evaluation system  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A system for concurrent, non-destructive evaluation of partially completed welds for use in conjunction with an automated welder. The system utilizes real time, automated ultrasonic inspection of a welding operation as the welds are being made by providing a transducer which follows a short distance behind the welding head. Reflected ultrasonic signals are analyzed utilizing computer based digital pattern recognition techniques to discriminate between good and flawed welds on a pass by pass basis. The system also distinguishes between types of weld flaws.

Hood, D.W.; Johnson, J.A.; Smartt, H.B.

1985-09-04T23:59:59.000Z

125

Self-welding evaluation of reactor materials in flowing sodium  

SciTech Connect

An experimental study was made of the self-welding of various combinations of FBR materials (304 ss, Inconel 718, A286, Stellite 156, and Stellite 6) in sodium at 800 to 1100$sup 0$F for time periods up to 6 months and contact stresses of 2 to 148 ksi. Stresses required to separate the surfaces were determined. Self-welding was observed only at temperatures of 1050$sup 0$F and above, with the breakaway force being less than 5 ksi. (DLC)

Chang, J.Y.; Flagella, P.N.; Schrock, S.L.

1975-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

126

HANFORD SITE WELDING PROGRAM SUCCESSFULLY PROVIDING A SINGLE SITE FUNCTION FOR USE BY MULTIPLE CONTRACTORS  

SciTech Connect

The Department of Energy, Richland Operations (DOE-RL) recently restructured its Hanford work scope, awarding two new contracts over the past several months for a total of three contracts to manage the sites cleanup efforts. DOE-RL met with key contractor personnel prior to and during contract transition to ensure site welding activities had appropriate oversight and maintained code compliance. The transition also provided an opportunity to establish a single site-wide function that would provide welding and materials engineering services to the Hanford site contractors: CH2M HILL Plateau Remediation Company (CHPRC); Mission Support Alliance (MSA); Washington River Protection Solutions (WRPS); and Washington Closure Hanford (WCH). Over the years, multiple and separate welding programs (amongst the several contractors) existed at the Hanford site leading to inefficiencies resulting from duplication of administrative efforts, maintenance of welding procedures, welder performance certifications, etc. The new, single program eliminates these inefficiencies. The new program, co-managed by two of the sites' new contractors, the CHPRC ('owner' of the program and responsible for construction welding services) and the MSA (provides maintenance welding services), provides more than just the traditional construction and maintenance welding services. Also provided, are welding engineering, specialty welding development/qualification for the closure of radioactive materials containers and materials evaluation/failure analysis. The following describes the new Hanford site welding program.

CANNELL GR

2009-11-19T23:59:59.000Z

127

Plastic Strain and Residual Stress Distributions in an AISI 304 ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Effect of DH Concentration on Crud Deposition on Heated Zircaloy-4 in .... and Residual Stress Distributions in an AISI 304 Stainless Steel BWR Pipe Weld.

128

METHOD OF OBTAINING AN IMPROVED WELD IN INERT ARC WELDING  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method is reported for inert arc welding. An a-c welding current is applied to the workpiece and welding electrode such that the positive portion of each cycle thereof, with the electrode positive, has only sufficient energy to clean the surface of the workpiece and the negative portion of each cycle thereof, with the electrode negative, contains the energy required to weld. (AEC)

Correy, T.B.

1962-12-11T23:59:59.000Z

129

Assessment of the feasibility of developing a Hanford Site weld modeling program  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Welding on the Hanford Site is an everyday occurrence, and most of the weldments made on site are relatively straightforward. Groove geometries, fillers, and wleding techniques and parameters are normally decided by experience or handbook advice. However, there are other weldments that might employ new materials, as well as one-of-a-kind welding situations. Implementation of a verified analytical weld assessment method would allow optimization of weld metal and heat-affected zone microstructure, and of variables that affect structural deformation and residual stresses. Realistic prediction of weldment thermal and strain history will require the use of a finite element model. Microstructure and resultant properties can be predicted using complex computer-based microstructure evolution models, literature-based empirical equations, or experimentally established behaviors. This report examines the feasibility of developing analytical methods for establishing weld parameter envelopes in new, complex welded configurations.

Atteridge, D.G.; Anderson, W.E.; Klein, R.F.

1986-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

130

Certification of a weld produced by friction stir welding  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Methods, devices, and systems for providing certification of friction stir welds are disclosed. A sensor is used to collect information related to a friction stir weld. Data from the sensor is compared to threshold values provided by an extrinsic standard setting organizations using a certification engine. The certification engine subsequently produces a report on the certification status of the weld.

Obaditch, Chris; Grant, Glenn J

2013-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

131

Stress testing on silicon carbide electronic devices for prognostics and health management.  

SciTech Connect

Power conversion systems for energy storage and other distributed energy resource applications are among the drivers of the important role that power electronics plays in providing reliable electricity. Wide band gap semiconductors such as silicon carbide (SiC) and gallium nitride (GaN) will help increase the performance and efficiency of power electronic equipment while condition monitoring (CM) and prognostics and health management (PHM) will increase the operational availability of the equipment and thereby make it more cost effective. Voltage and/or temperature stress testing were performed on a number of SiC devices in order to accelerate failure modes and to identify measureable shifts in electrical characteristics which may provide early indication of those failures. Those shifts can be interpreted and modeled to provide prognostic signatures for use in CM and/or PHM. Such experiments will also lead to a deeper understanding of basic device physics and the degradation mechanisms behind failure.

Kaplar, Robert James; Brock, Reinhard C.; Marinella, Matthew; King, Michael Patrick; Smith, Mark A.; Atcitty, Stanley

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

132

Reduced Pressure Electron Beam Welding Evaluation Activities on a Ni-Cr-Mo Alloy for Nuclear Waste Packages  

SciTech Connect

The current waste package design for the proposed repository at Yucca Mountain Nevada, USA, employs gas tungsten arc welding (GTAW) in fabricating the waste packages. While GTAW is widely used in industry for many applications, it requires multiple weld passes. By comparison, single-pass welding methods inherently use lower heat input than multi-pass welding methods which results in lower levels of weld distortion and also narrower regions of residual stresses at the weld TWI Ltd. has developed a Reduced Pressure Electron Beam (RPEB) welding process which allows EB welding in a reduced pressure environment ({le} 1 mbar). As it is a single-pass welding technique, use of RPEB welding could (1) achieve a comparable or better materials performance and (2) lead to potential cost savings in the waste package manufacturing as compared to GTAW. Results will be presented on the initial evaluation of the RPEB welding on a Ni-Cr-Mo alloy (a candidate alloy for the Yucca Mountain waste packages) in the areas of (a) design and manufacturing simplifications, (b) material performance and (c) weld reliability.

Wong, F; Punshon, C; Dorsch, T; Fielding, P; Richard, D; Yang, N; Hill, M; DeWald, A; Rebak, R; Day, S; Wong, L; Torres, S; McGregor, M; Hackel, L; Chen, H-L; Rankin, J

2003-09-11T23:59:59.000Z

133

Robotic Welding and Inspection System  

SciTech Connect

This paper presents a robotic system for GTA welding of lids on cylindrical vessels. The system consists of an articulated robot arm, a rotating positioner, end effectors for welding, grinding, ultrasonic and eddy current inspection. Features include weld viewing cameras, modular software, and text-based procedural files for process and motion trajectories.

H. B. Smartt; D. P. Pace; E. D. Larsen; T. R. McJunkin; C. I. Nichol; D. E. Clark; K. L. Skinner; M. L. Clark; T. G. Kaser; C. R. Tolle

2008-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

134

TUBE-TO-TUBESHEET WELDING DEVELOPMENT PROGRAMS FOR 30 MEGAWATT PROTOTYPE SODIUM INTERMEDIATE HEAT EXCHANGER AND STEAM GENERATOR  

SciTech Connect

Special welding techniques for joining Inconel weld overlays on type 316 stainless steel tubesheets and channels are described. The program for the development of the required welding procadures are divided into three specific progranns: overlaying Inconel filler Metal 82 on type 316 stainless steel, welding type 316 stainless steel tubes to a type 316 stainless steel tubesheet, and welding Inconel-type 316 stainless steel composite tubes to Inconel weld overlaid type 316 tubesheets. Shock tests are described which attempt to assimulate the most drastic thermal transient that could occur in both units and to evaluate the effect of the resulting stresses on the Inconel overlay and the tube-totubesheet welds. (N.W.R.)

1963-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

135

Friction stir welding tool and process for welding dissimilar materials  

SciTech Connect

A friction stir welding tool and process for lap welding dissimilar materials are detailed. The invention includes a cutter scribe that penetrates and extrudes a first material of a lap weld stack to a preselected depth and further cuts a second material to provide a beneficial geometry defined by a plurality of mechanically interlocking features. The tool backfills the interlocking features generating a lap weld across the length of the interface between the dissimilar materials that enhances the shear strength of the lap weld.

Hovanski, Yuri; Grant, Glenn J; Jana, Saumyadeep; Mattlin, Karl F

2013-05-07T23:59:59.000Z

136

Examination of the 1970 National Bureau of Standards Underground Corrosion Test Welded Stainless STeel Coupons from Site D  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A 1970 study initiated by the National Bureau of Standards (NBS), now known as the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST), buried over 6000 corrosion coupons or specimens of stainless steel Types 201, 202, 301, 304, 316, 409, 410, 430, and 434. The coupons were configured as sheet metal plates, coated plates, cross-welded plates, U-bend samples, sandwiched materials, and welded tubes. All coupons were of various heat-treatments and cold worked conditions and were buried at six distinctive soil-type sites throughout the United States. The NBS scientists dug five sets of two trenches at each of the six sites. In each pair of trenches, they buried duplicate sets of stainless steel coupons. The NBS study was designed to retrieve coupons after one year, two years, four years, eight years, and x years in the soil. During the first eight years of the study, four of five planned removals were completed. After the fourth retrieval, the NBS study was abandoned, and the fifth and final set of specimens remained undisturbed for over 33 years. In 2003, an interdisciplinary research team of industrial, university, and national laboratory investigators were funded under the United States Department of Energy’s Environmental Management Science Program (EMSP; Project Number 86803) to extract part of the remaining set of coupons at one of the test sites, characterize the stainless steel underground corrosion rates, and examine the fate and transport of metal ions into the soil. Extraction of one trench at one of the test sites occurred in April 2004. This report details only the characterization of corrosion found on the 14 welded coupons–two cross welded plates, six U-bends, and six welded tubes–that were retrieved from Site D, located near Wildwood, NJ. The welded coupons included Type 301, 304, 316, and 409 stainless steels. After 33 years in the soil, corrosion on the coupons varied according to alloy. This report discusses the stress corrosion cracking and crevice corrosion cracking of the U-bend coupons; the minimal corrosion found on the cross-bead plates; and the general, pitting, and crevice corrosion found on the welded tubes. In general, the austenitic Type 301, 304 and 316 samples showed little if any corrosion after 33+-years in the soil, whereas the ferritic alloys-Type 409 and 434– showed a spectrum of corrosion.

L. R. Zirker; M. K. Adler Flitton; T. S. Yoder; T. L. Trowbridge

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

137

Automatic welding comes of age. [Offshore  

SciTech Connect

Automatic pipe welding systems today fall into three main categories: gas metal arc welding, gas-tungsten arc welding, and flash-butt welding. The first automatic welding devices used offshore were the CRC and H.C. Price systems. Both use gas metal arc welding with a consumable steel filler wire. The recently developed McDermott flash-butt welding system is described. (DLC)

Turner, D.L. Jr.

1981-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

138

Study of inertia welding: the sensitivity of weld configuration and strength to variations in welding parameters  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An experiment is described which is designed to demonstrate the forgiveness of inertia welding, that is, the relative insensitivity of weld strength to variations in energy (rotational speed of parts) and axial force. Although easily observed variations in the welding parameters produced easily observed changes in weldment configuration and changes in dimension (upset), only extremes in parameters produced changes in weld strength. Consequently, process monitoring and product inspection would be sufficient for quality assurance in a production environment.

Mote, M.W.

1981-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

139

The science and practice of welding. 8th ed. Vol. 2: The practice of welding  

SciTech Connect

This book includes sections on underwater welding and cutting, cold pressure welding, the application of mixed gases to various welding processes, and robot welding. The author uses photographs, tables, figures, and illustrations to explain the text and provides examination questions.

Davies, A.C.

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

140

Weld penetration and defect control  

SciTech Connect

Highly engineered designs increasingly require the use of improved materials and sophisticated manufacturing techniques. To obtain optimal performance from these engineered products, improved weld properties and joint reliability are a necessarily. This requirement for improved weld performance and reliability has led to the development of high-performance welding systems in which pre-programmed parameters are specified before any welding takes place. These automated systems however lack the ability to compensate for perturbations which arise during the welding process. Hence the need for systems which monitor and control the in-process status of the welding process. This report discusses work carried out on weld penetration indicators and the feasibility of using these indicators for on-line penetration control.

Chin, B.A.

1992-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "welding stress management" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

73rd American Welding Society annual meeting  

SciTech Connect

The volume includes the abstracts of papers presented at the 73rd American Welding Society Annual Meeting. Detailed summaries are given for 118 technical sessions papers discussing computer and control applications in welding, stainless steel, nickel and nickel alloys, weld metal microstructure, shipbuilding, consumables, structural welding, investigations in arc welding and cutting, arc welding processes, weldability testing, piping and tubing, high energy beam welding processes, welding metallurgy of structural steels, new applications, weld metal behavior, NDT certification, aluminum welding, submerged arc welding, modeling studies, resistance welding, friction welding, and safety and health. The 23rd International AWS Brazing and Soldering Conference was also held during this meeting. The topics presented in 24 papers included recent developments in soldering technology, brazing of stainless steel, brazing of ceramics and nickel material, filler metal developments for torch brazing, and developments in diffusion and induction brazing.

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

142

Method and apparatus for assessing weld quality  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Apparatus for determining a quality of a weld produced by a welding device according to the present invention includes a sensor operatively associated with the welding device. The sensor is responsive to at least one welding process parameter during a welding process and produces a welding process parameter signal that relates to the at least one welding process parameter. A computer connected to the sensor is responsive to the welding process parameter signal produced by the sensor. A user interface operatively associated with the computer allows a user to select a desired welding process. The computer processes the welding process parameter signal produced by the sensor in accordance with one of a constant voltage algorithm, a short duration weld algorithm or a pulsed current analysis module depending on the desired welding process selected by the user. The computer produces output data indicative of the quality of the weld.

Smartt, Herschel B. (Idaho Falls, ID); Kenney, Kevin L. (Idaho Falls, ID); Johnson, John A. (Idaho Falls, ID); Carlson, Nancy M. (Idaho Falls, ID); Clark, Denis E. (Idaho Falls, ID); Taylor, Paul L. (Boise, ID); Reutzel, Edward W. (State College, PA)

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

143

Method for welding chromium molybdenum steels  

SciTech Connect

Chromium-molybdenum steels exhibit a weakening after welding in an area adjacent to the weld. This invention is an improved method for welding to eliminate the weakness by subjecting normalized steel to a partial temper prior to welding and subsequently fully tempering the welded article for optimum strength and ductility.

Sikka, Vinod K. (Clinton, TN)

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

144

Method for welding chromium molybdenum steels  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Chromium-molybdenum steels exhibit a weakening after welding in an area adjacent to the weld. This invention is an improved method for welding to eliminate the weakness by subjecting normalized steel to a partial temper prior to welding and subsequently fully tempering the welded article for optimum strength and ductility.

Sikka, V.K.

1985-11-06T23:59:59.000Z

145

Bobbin-Tool Friction-Stir Welding of Thick-Walled Aluminum Alloy Pressure Vessels  

SciTech Connect

It was desired to assemble thick-walled Al alloy 2219 pressure vessels by bobbin-tool friction-stir welding. To develop the welding-process, mechanical-property, and fitness-for-service information to support this effort, extensive friction-stir welding-parameter studies were conducted on 2.5 cm. and 3.8 cm. thick 2219 Al alloy plate. Starting conditions of the plate were the fully-heat-treated (-T62) and in the annealed (-O) conditions. The former condition was chosen with the intent of using the welds in either the 'as welded' condition or after a simple low-temperature aging treatment. Since preliminary stress-analyses showed that stresses in and near the welds would probably exceed the yield-strength of both 'as welded' and welded and aged weld-joints, a post-weld solution-treatment, quenching, and aging treatment was also examined. Once a suitable set of welding and post-weld heat-treatment parameters was established, the project divided into two parts. The first part concentrated on developing the necessary process information to be able to make defect-free friction-stir welds in 3.8 cm. thick Al alloy 2219 in the form of circumferential welds that would join two hemispherical forgings with a 102 cm. inside diameter. This necessitated going to a bobbin-tool welding-technique to simplify the tooling needed to react the large forces generated in friction-stir welding. The bobbin-tool technique was demonstrated on both flat-plates and plates that were bent to the curvature of the actual vessel. An additional issue was termination of the weld, i.e. closing out the hole left at the end of the weld by withdrawal of the friction-stir welding tool. This was accomplished by friction-plug welding a slightly-oversized Al alloy 2219 plug into the termination-hole, followed by machining the plug flush with both the inside and outside surfaces of the vessel. The second part of the project involved demonstrating that the welds were fit for the intended service. This involved determining the room-temperature tensile and elastic-plastic fracture-toughness properties of the bobbin-tool friction-stir welds after a post-weld solution-treatment, quenching, and aging heat-treatment. These mechanical properties were used to conduct fracture-mechanics analyses to determine critical flaw sizes. Phased-array and conventional ultrasonic non-destructive examination was used to demonstrate that no flaws that match or exceed the calculated critical flaw-sizes exist in or near the friction-stir welds.

Dalder, E C; Pastrnak, J W; Engel, J; Forrest, R S; Kokko, E; Ternan, K M; Waldron, D

2007-06-06T23:59:59.000Z

146

Welding – Friction Stir  

Friction welding that uses a contact rotating tool creates frictional heating of an adjacent work piece. The process employs a mixer where the two pieces touch, an area called the plastic zone, to avoid the undesirable joining (e.g. alloying) of the ...

147

RESIDUAL STRESSES IN 3013 CONTAINERS  

SciTech Connect

The DOE Complex is packaging plutonium-bearing materials for storage and eventual disposition or disposal. The materials are handled according to the DOE-STD-3013 which outlines general requirements for stabilization, packaging and long-term storage. The storage vessels for the plutonium-bearing materials are termed 3013 containers. Stress corrosion cracking has been identified as a potential container degradation mode and this work determined that the residual stresses in the containers are sufficient to support such cracking. Sections of the 3013 outer, inner, and convenience containers, in both the as-fabricated condition and the closure welded condition, were evaluated per ASTM standard G-36. The standard requires exposure to a boiling magnesium chloride solution, which is an aggressive testing solution. Tests in a less aggressive 40% calcium chloride solution were also conducted. These tests were used to reveal the relative stress corrosion cracking susceptibility of the as fabricated 3013 containers. Significant cracking was observed in all containers in areas near welds and transitions in the container diameter. Stress corrosion cracks developed in both the lid and the body of gas tungsten arc welded and laser closure welded containers. The development of stress corrosion cracks in the as-fabricated and in the closure welded container samples demonstrates that the residual stresses in the 3013 containers are sufficient to support stress corrosion cracking if the environmental conditions inside the containers do not preclude the cracking process.

Mickalonis, J.; Dunn, K.

2009-11-10T23:59:59.000Z

148

Welding and Repair Technology Center: Development of Improved Weld Heat Input and Dilution Equations for Consumable Welding Processes  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Predicting heat input into the substrate and weld dilution for consumable welding processes is a challenge due to the number of variables associated with these processes. Proper heat input and power ratio controls are critical to control weld dilution, particularly in dissimilar metal welds where low weld dilution is necessary to prevent solidification cracking or for cladding where weld dilution is minimized to maintain corrosion resistance of the clad material. This report discusses the ...

2013-11-27T23:59:59.000Z

149

Topical Report: Application of the Excavate and Weld Repair Process for Repair and Mitigation of Alloy 182 and 82 in PWRs  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Weld overlay is a mature technology for the repair of PWR nozzle dissimilar metal butt welds that are susceptible to primary water stress corrosion cracking (PWSCC). While weld-overlay technology continues to serve the industry well, a viable alternative is desirable for large-bore nozzle welds (>24 inches outside diameter) to minimize the time required to perform the repair and to serve in cases in which significant physical interferences near the Alloy 82/182 dissimilar metal weld would make it difficu...

2010-12-20T23:59:59.000Z

150

WELDABILITY AND WELDING TECHNOLOGY OF MAGNESIUM ALLOYS  

SciTech Connect

The peculiarities of welding of Mg alloys, protection of Mg during the welding, reduction of the metal weld seam, difficulties during welding, general characteristic of the weldability of alloys of various systems (Mg-Mn, Mg-AlZn, Mg- Zn- Zr, Mn- Zr-rare earth metals), the tendency of the alloys for crack formation during welding, mechanical properties and structure of weld joints, the effect of some technological factors on the strength of the weld joint of deformable alloys, fluxes and coatings for welding, the welding technology for deformable Mg alloys, and casts in removal of defects (protective gases used and sources of current supply, preparation of the details for the welding, selection of the addition material and welding conditions, technique and technology of welding parts and casts, control, and correction of defects) are discussed. (Referativnyy zhurnal, Metallurgiya, No. 6, 1962)

Shpagin. B.V.

1961-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

151

Borehole stability in densely welded tuffs  

SciTech Connect

The stability of boreholes, or more generally of underground openings (i.e. including shafts, ramps, drifts, tunnels, etc.) at locations where seals or plugs are to be placed is an important consideration in seal design for a repository (Juhlin and Sandstedt, 1989). Borehole instability or borehole breakouts induced by stress redistribution could negate the effectiveness of seals or plugs. Breakout fractures along the wall of repository excavations or exploratory holes could provide a preferential flowpath for groundwater or gaseous radionuclides to bypass the plugs. After plug installation, swelling pressures exerted by a plug could induce radial cracks or could open or widen preexisting cracks in the rock at the bottom of the breakouts where the tangential compressive stresses have been released by the breakout process. The purpose of the work reported here is to determine experimentally the stability of a circular hole in a welded tuff sample subjected to various external boundary loads. Triaxial and biaxial borehole stability tests have been performed on densely welded Apache Leap tuff samples and Topopah Spring tuff samples. The nominal diameter of the test hole is 13.3 or 14.4 mm for triaxial testing, and 25.4 mm for biaxial testing. The borehole axis is parallel to one of the principal stress axes. The boreholes are drilled through the samples prior to applying external boundary loads. The boundary loads are progressively increased until breakouts occur or until the maximum load capacity of the loading system has been reached. 74 refs.

Fuenkajorn, K.; Daemen, J.J.K. [Arizona Univ., Tucson, AZ (United States). Dept. of Mining and Geological Engineering

1992-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

152

INERT GAS SHIELD FOR WELDING  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

S>An inert gas shield is presented for arc-welding materials such as zirconium that tend to oxidize rapidly in air. The device comprises a rectangular metal box into which the welding electrode is introduced through a rubber diaphragm to provide flexibility. The front of the box is provided with a wlndow having a small hole through which flller metal is introduced. The box is supplied with an inert gas to exclude the atmosphere, and with cooling water to promote the solidification of the weld while in tbe inert atmosphere. A separate water-cooled copper backing bar is provided underneath the joint to be welded to contain the melt-through at the root of the joint, shielding the root of the joint with its own supply of inert gas and cooling the deposited weld metal. This device facilitates the welding of large workpieces of zirconium frequently encountered in reactor construction.

Jones, S.O.; Daly, F.V.

1958-10-14T23:59:59.000Z

153

Welding tritium aged stainless steel  

SciTech Connect

Stainless steels exposed to tritium become unweldable by conventional methods due to He buildup within the metal matrix. With longer service lives expected for new weapon systems, and service life extensions of older systems, methods for welding/repair on tritium-exposed material will become important. Results are reported that indicate that both solid-state resistance welding and low-heat gas metal arc overlay welding are promising methods for repair or modification of tritium-aged stainless steel.

Kanne, W.R. Jr.

1993-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

154

Friction Stir Welding: High Temperature Materials I  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Mar 5, 2013 ... Friction Stir Welding of Pipeline Steels: Murray Mahoney1; Samuel .... Over 135 feet of weld length was achieved with a single W-based tool ...

155

Lienert named American Welding Society Fellow  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Calendar Video Newsroom News Stories November Lienert Named American Welding Society Fellow Lienert named American Welding Society Fellow Lienert was inducted...

156

Edison Welding Institute | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Page Edit with form History Share this page on Facebook icon Twitter icon Edison Welding Institute Jump to: navigation, search Name Edison Welding Institute Address 1250...

157

friction stir welding iv table of contents  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Friction Stir Welding—After a Decade of Development [pp. 3-18] William Arbegast . Friction Stir Welding of an Aluminum Coal Hopper Railcar [pp. 19-28

158

WEB RESOURCE: Magnesium Welding - Information Sources for ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Sep 20, 2007 ... This web-based, magnesium welding resource is a compilation of: ... SOURCE: “ Magnesium Welding – Information Sources for Magnesium ...

159

Development of Tatsumaki Friction Stir Welding  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The main advantage of this process is the application of a wide range of weld thicknesses and high speed welding by controlling the motor power consumption .

160

Welding and PWHT of P91 Steel  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

There are various sources for base materials, welding consumables and fabrication or components. The art is such that few welding problems are encountered.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "welding stress management" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Lienert named American Welding Society Fellow  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

- 1 - Lienert named American Welding Society Fellow November 29, 2012 Thomas J. Lienert of the Lab's Metallurgy group was inducted into the American Welding Society's 2012 Class of...

162

Friction Stir Welding and Processing VI  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Aug 2, 2010 ... Friction Stir Welding and Processing of Advanced Materials for Coal and Nuclear Power Applications · Friction Stir Welding of 25 mm Thick Al ...

163

Electrospark Welding of Nanostructured Materials  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Abstract Scope, Nanomaterials possess a microstructural length scale in at least ... and Microstructure of Tandem Submerged Arc Welded X80 Pipeline Steel.

164

Friction Stir Welding and Processing  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Mar 4, 2013 ... Material flow is a key phenomenon to obtain sound joints by friction stir welding ( FSW). In this study, the material flow during FSW was ...

165

Failure Origins in Arc Welds  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

...tungsten inclusions, oxide inclusions Lack of fusion (LOF) and lack of penetration (LOP) Geometric discontinuities, such as poor weld contours, undercut,

166

Laser welding of aluminum alloys  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Recent interest in reducing the weight of automobiles to increase fuel mileage has focused attention on the use of aluminum and associated joining technologies. Laser beam welding is one of the more promising methods for high speed welding of aluminum. Consequently, substantial effort has been expended in attempting to develop a robust laser beam welding process. Early results have not been very consistent in the process requirements but more definitive data has been produced recently. This paper reviews the process parameters needed to obtain consistent laser welds on 5,000 series aluminum alloys and discusses the research necessary to make laser processing of aluminum a reality for automotive applications.

Leong, K.H.; Sabo, K.R.; Sanders, P.G. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States). Technology Development Div.; Spawr, W.J.

1997-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

167

Alloy 740 Weld Strength Optimization  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Symposium, Properties, Processing, and Performance of Steels and Ni-Based Alloys for Advanced Steam Conditions. Presentation Title, Alloy 740 Weld ...

168

Microstructure and Strength Characteristics of Alloy 617 Welds  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Three types of high-temperature joints were created from alloy 617 base metal: fusion welds, braze joints, and diffusion bonds. The microstructures of all joint types and tensile properties of fusion welds and braze joints were characterized. Sound fusion welds were created by the GTAW process with alloy 617 filler wire. Cross-weld tensile strengths were equal to the parent metal at temperatures of 25, 800, and 1000°C; ductilities of the joints were only slightly lower than that of the parent metal. Failure occurred in the weld fusion zone at room temperature and in the parent metal at elevated temperatures. Incomplete wetting occurred in joints produced by vacuum brazing using AWS BNi-1 braze alloy, believed to be due to tenacious Al and Ti oxide formation. Incompletely bonded butt joints showed relatively poor tensile properties. A second set of braze joints has been created with faying surfaces electroplated with pure Ni prior to brazing; characterization of these joints is in progress. Conditions resulting in good diffusion bonds characterized by grain growth across the bondline and no porosity were determined: vacuum bonding at 1150°C for 3 hours with an initial uniaxial stress of 20 MPa (constant ram displacement). A 15 µm thick pure Ni interlayer was needed to achieve grain growth across the bondline. Tensile testing of diffusion bonds is in progress

T.C. Totemeier; H. Tian; D.E. Clark; J.A. Simpson

2005-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

169

Use of an integrated design tool for weld quality enhancement  

SciTech Connect

It has been shown previously that the use of a mathematical model to predict the inherent fluid flow, heat transfer, free surface profiles and other associated phenomena during welding leads to a better understanding and, therefore, control of the welding process. Unfortunately many of the models available today are primarily research codes and, therefore, do not serve as design tools for the production welding engineer. In the current investigation, WELDER -- a three dimensional, transient mathematical model, has been integrated with a framework based on the Rational Product & Process Design (R{center_dot}P{sup 2}{center_dot}D{sub sm}){sup +} methodology to create a true design tool aimed towards use by engineers. This highly interactive and graphic tool simulates the welding process from the start to finish, and provides the user with capabilities to view the progression of welding and the associated heating and cooling of the base plate. In addition, analysis modules analyze the temperature profiles to predict residual stresses and evolving microstructures.

Cheng, C.; Paul, A.J. [Concurrent Technologies Corp., Johnstown, PA (United States); Zacharia, T. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)

1993-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

170

Burst Test Qualification Analysis of DWPF Canister-Plug Weld  

SciTech Connect

The DWPF canister closure system uses resistance welding for sealing the canister nozzle and plug to ensure leak tightness. The welding group at SRTC is using the burst test to qualify this seal weld in lieu of the shear test in ASME B&PV Code, Section IX, paragraph QW-196. The burst test is considered simpler and more appropriate than the shear test for this application. Although the geometry, loading and boundary conditions are quite different in the two tests, structural analyses show similarity in the failure mode of the shear test in paragraph QW-196 and the burst test on the DWPF canister nozzle Non-linear structural analyses are performed using finite element techniques to study the failure mode of the two tests. Actual test geometry and realistic stress strain data for the 304L stainless steel and the weld material are used in the analyses. The finite element models are loaded until failure strains are reached. The failure modes in both tests are shear at the failure points. Based on these observations, it is concluded that the use of a burst test in lieu of the shear test for qualifying the canister-plug weld is acceptable. The burst test analysis for the canister-plug also yields the burst pressures which compare favorably with the actual pressure found during burst tests. Thus, the analysis also provides an estimate of the safety margins in the design of these vessels.

Gupta, N.K.; Gong, Chung

1995-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

171

Developing PWR Aging-Management Strategies for Reactor Vessel ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

AREVA Fuel Condition Index for a Pressurized Water Reactor .... Stress Corrosion Cracking Behavior near the Fusion Boundary of Dissimilar Weld Joint with ...

172

Narrow groove welding gas diffuser assembly and welding torch  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A diffuser assembly is provided for narrow groove welding using an automatic gas tungsten arc welding torch. The diffuser assembly includes manifold adapted for adjustable mounting on the welding torch which is received in a central opening in the manifold. Laterally extending manifold sections communicate with a shield gas inlet such that shield gas supplied to the inlet passes to gas passages of the manifold sections. First and second tapered diffusers are respectively connected to the manifold sections in fluid communication with the gas passages thereof. The diffusers extend downwardly along the torch electrode on opposite sides thereof so as to release shield gas along the length of the electrode and at the distal tip of the electrode. The diffusers are of a transverse width which is on the order of the thickness of the electrode so that the diffusers can, in use, be inserted into a narrow welding groove before and after the electrode in the direction of the weld operation.

Rooney, Stephen J.

2000-02-04T23:59:59.000Z

173

Narrow groove welding gas diffuser assembly and welding torch  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A diffuser assembly is provided for narrow groove welding using an automatic gas tungsten arc welding torch. The diffuser assembly includes a manifold adapted for adjustable mounting on the welding torch which is received in a central opening in the manifold. Laterally extending manifold sections communicate with a shield gas inlet such that shield gas supplied to the inlet passes to gas passages of the manifold sections. First and second tapered diffusers are respectively connected to the manifold sections in fluid communication with the gas passages thereof. The diffusers extend downwardly along the torch electrode on opposite sides thereof so as to release shield gas along the length of the electrode and at the distal tip of the electrode. The diffusers are of a transverse width which is on the order of the thickness of the electrode so that the diffusers can, in use, be inserted into a narrow welding groove before and after the electrode in the direction of the weld operation.

Rooney, Stephen J. (East Berne, NY)

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

174

Displaced electrode process for welding  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method is described for the butt-welding of a relatively heavy mass to a relatively small mass such as a thin-wall tube. In butt-welding heat is normally applied at the joint between the two pieces which are butt-welded together. The application of heat at the joint results in overheating the tube which causes thinning of the tube walls and porosity in the tube material. This is eliminated by displacing the welding electrode away from the seam toward the heavier mass so that heat is applied to the heavy mass and not at the butt seam. Examples of the parameters used in welding fuel rods are given. The cladding and end plugs were made of Zircalloy. The electrode used was of 2 percent thoriated tungsten. (auth)

Heichel, L.J.

1975-08-26T23:59:59.000Z

175

Simulation and validation of repair welding and heat treatment of an alloy 718 plate  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper describes simulation of repair welding and heat treatment together with measurements for validation. The possibility to replace global heat treatment with local using induction heating is evaluated with respect to obtained residual stresses. ... Keywords: Dislocation density based plasticity model, Finite element simulation, Heat treatment, Induction heating, Residual stress measurement

M. Fisk; A. LundbäCk

2012-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

176

Ultrasonic Welding for Lightweight Components - Programmaster.org  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

welding. This concerns progress of hard- and software for ultrasonic welding ... as topics to the mechanical properties (monotonic, cyclic) of ultrasonically welded

177

Method for controlling gas metal arc welding  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The heat input and mass input in a Gas Metal Arc welding process are controlled by a method that comprises calculating appropriate values for weld speed, filler wire feed rate and an expected value for the welding current by algorithmic function means, applying such values for weld speed and filler wire feed rate to the welding process, measuring the welding current, comparing the measured current to the calculated current, using said comparison to calculate corrections for the weld speed and filler wire feed rate, and applying corrections. 3 figs., 1 tab.

Smartt, H.B.; Einerson, C.J.; Watkins, A.D.

1987-08-10T23:59:59.000Z

178

Method for controlling gas metal arc welding  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The heat input and mass input in a Gas Metal Arc welding process are controlled by a method that comprises calculating appropriate values for weld speed, filler wire feed rate and an expected value for the welding current by algorithmic function means, applying such values for weld speed and filler wire feed rate to the welding process, measuring the welding current, comparing the measured current to the calculated current, using said comparison to calculate corrections for the weld speed and filler wire feed rate, and applying corrections.

Smartt, Herschel B. (Idaho Falls, ID); Einerson, Carolyn J. (Idaho Falls, ID); Watkins, Arthur D. (Idaho Falls, ID)

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

179

Towards the Prediction of Weld Metal Properties  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

assumed to be negligible compared to other contri- 2 Transfer of melted coating to weld pool Metal droplet covered with molten slag Parent metal Figure 1.1: Schematic diagram of the MMA welding process. (After B. Lundqvist (1977), "Sandvik Welding Handbook... ., SVENSSON, L.-E., and GRETOFT, B. (1986), "'Weld- ing and Performance of Pipe Welds", [Proc. Conj.], Welding Institute, Abington, U.K., paper 17. BHADESHIA, H. K. D. H., SVENSSON, L.-E., and GRETOFT, B. (1987), "Weld- ing Metallurgy of Structural Steels...

Sugden, Alastair Allen Brockbank

1989-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

180

Effects of weld metal profile on the fatigue life of integrally reinforced weld-on fittings  

SciTech Connect

The cyclic fatigue life of fabricated tee intersections, including integrally reinforced weld-on fittings, has been a topic of discussion in the recent past. The discussion has centered around questions concerning the accuracy of the ASME B31.3 Code equations in calculating the stress intensification factors, (SIFs), for these types of intersection geometries. The SIF of an intersection is an indicator of the fatigue life of the intersection when it is subjected to bending moments caused by thermal, flow, or mechanically induced cyclical displacements. Schneider, Rodabaugh, and Woods concur that inaccuracies in the Code SIF equations do exist and that these equations should be revised. This report presents new Markl type SIF data on the B.W.Pipet (BWP), an integrally reinforced weld-on branch fitting, manufactured by WFI International, Inc., in Houston, Texas. The scope of this research project was to determine the influence of the installation weld metal profile of the Pipet to the run pipe on the SIF. The SIF data were then compared to calculated SIF values using equations from the American Society of Mechanical engineers (ASME) B31.1, ASME B31.3, and ASME Section 3, Subsection NC, for the purpose of determining which Code equation may be the most appropriate for calculating the SIF for these particular fittings.

Woods, G.E. (M.W. Kellogg Co., Houston, TX (United States)); Rodabaugh, E.C. (Rodabaugh (E.C.), Dublin, OH (United States))

1994-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "welding stress management" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Control of Gas Tungsten Arc welding pool shape by trace element addition to the weld pool  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An improved process for Gas Tungsten Arc welding maximizes the depth/width ratio of the weld pool by adding a sufficient amount of a surface active element to insure inward fluid flow, resulting in deep, narrow welds. The process is especially useful to eliminate variable weld penetration and shape in GTA welding of steels and stainless steels, particularly by using a sulfur-doped weld wire in a cold wire feed technique.

Heiple, C.R.; Burgardt, P.

1984-03-13T23:59:59.000Z

182

Crack growth rates of nickel alloy welds in a PWR environment.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In light water reactors (LWRs), vessel internal components made of nickel-base alloys are susceptible to environmentally assisted cracking. A better understanding of the causes and mechanisms of this cracking may permit less conservative estimates of damage accumulation and requirements on inspection intervals. A program is being conducted at Argonne National Laboratory to evaluate the resistance of Ni alloys and their welds to environmentally assisted cracking in simulated LWR coolant environments. This report presents crack growth rate (CGR) results for Alloy 182 shielded-metal-arc weld metal in a simulated pressurized water reactor (PWR) environment at 320 C. Crack growth tests were conducted on 1-T compact tension specimens with different weld orientations from both double-J and deep-groove welds. The results indicate little or no environmental enhancement of fatigue CGRs of Alloy 182 weld metal in the PWR environment. The CGRs of Alloy 182 in the PWR environment are a factor of {approx}5 higher than those of Alloy 600 in air under the same loading conditions. The stress corrosion cracking for the Alloy 182 weld is close to the average behavior of Alloy 600 in the PWR environment. The weld orientation was found to have a profound effect on the magnitude of crack growth: cracking was found to propagate faster along the dendrites than across them. The existing CGR data for Ni-alloy weld metals have been compiled and evaluated to establish the effects of key material, loading, and environmental parameters on CGRs in PWR environments. The results from the present study are compared with the existing CGR data for Ni-alloy welds to determine the relative susceptibility of the specific Ni-alloy weld to environmentally enhanced cracking.

Alexandreanu, B.; Chopra, O. K.; Shack, W. J.; Energy Technology

2006-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

183

HRSG Repair Welding Technologies to Address FAC in Tube Bends  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Tube failures that occur in heat recovery steam generators (HRSGs) are often caused by thermal stress or thermal shock associated with cyclic plant operation or by flow-accelerated corrosion. Many premature failures occur along the length of finned tubes or at attachment locations where tubes are joined to the upper or lower header. Because of current tube repair practices and limited access for welding, reoccurring failures are common.

2008-03-20T23:59:59.000Z

184

Repair Welding Technologies For Heat Recovery Steam Generators  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Tube failures that occur in heat recovery steam generators (HRSGs) are often caused by thermal stress or thermal shock associated with cyclic plant operation or by flow-accelerated corrosion. Many premature failures occur along the length of finned tubes or at attachment locations where tubes are joined to the upper or lower header. Because of current tube repair practices and limited access for welding, reoccurring failures are common.

2005-12-21T23:59:59.000Z

185

Robotic Welding, Intelligence and Automation, 1st edition  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Thisresearch reportbrings together presenttrends in advanced welding robots, robotic welding, artificial intelligent and automatic welding. It includes important technical subjects on welding robots such as intelligent technologies and systems, and design ...

Tzyh-Jong Tarn; Tzyh-Jong Tarn; Shan-Ben Chen; Changjiu Zhou

2007-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

186

SIGMA PLUG WELDING OF SPUN-OVER FUEL CANS  

SciTech Connect

Efforts made to employ the sigma welding process for plug welding Closures in spun-over fuel cans were unsuccessful. No combination of welding conditions was found which would produce satisfactory, leak-tight, plug welds in aluminum. (auth)

Winsor, F.J.

1952-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

187

Laser welding and post weld treatment of modified 9Cr-1MoVNb steel.  

SciTech Connect

Laser welding and post weld laser treatment of modified 9Cr-1MoVNb steels (Grade P91) were performed in this preliminary study to investigate the feasibility of using laser welding process as a potential alternative to arc welding methods for solving the Type IV cracking problem in P91 steel welds. The mechanical and metallurgical testing of the pulsed Nd:YAG laser-welded samples shows the following conclusions: (1) both bead-on-plate and circumferential butt welds made by a pulsed Nd:YAG laser show good welds that are free of microcracks and porosity. The narrow heat affected zone has a homogeneous grain structure without conventional soft hardness zone where the Type IV cracking occurs in conventional arc welds. (2) The laser weld tests also show that the same laser welder has the potential to be used as a multi-function tool for weld surface remelting, glazing or post weld tempering to reduce the weld surface defects and to increase the cracking resistance and toughness of the welds. (3) The Vicker hardness of laser welds in the weld and heat affected zone was 420-500 HV with peak hardness in the HAZ compared to 240 HV of base metal. Post weld laser treatment was able to slightly reduce the peak hardness and smooth the hardness profile, but failed to bring the hardness down to below 300 HV due to insufficient time at temperature and too fast cooling rate after the time. Though optimal hardness of weld made by laser is to be determined for best weld strength, methods to achieve the post weld laser treatment temperature, time at the temperature and slow cooling rate need to be developed. (4) Mechanical testing of the laser weld and post weld laser treated samples need to be performed to evaluate the effects of laser post treatments such as surface remelting, glazing, re-hardening, or tempering on the strength of the welds.

Xu, Z. (Nuclear Engineering Division)

2012-04-03T23:59:59.000Z

188

Welding and Repair Technology Center: Nuclear Weld Overlay Training  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A major goal for nuclear utilities is to reduce overall operations and maintenance costs. The Nuclear Weld Overlay Training provided in this report supports this goal by informing member utilities that are preparing for a weld overlay campaign. This technical report reflects EPRI’s commitment to serving its members by developing practical tools and guidance in response to specific needs of the industry.ObjectivesThis document is intended to be used by ...

2013-11-27T23:59:59.000Z

189

Method for enhanced control of welding processes  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Method and system for producing high quality welds in welding processes, in general, and gas tungsten arc (GTA) welding, in particular by controlling weld penetration. Light emitted from a weld pool is collected from the backside of a workpiece by optical means during welding and transmitted to a digital video camera for further processing, after the emitted light is first passed through a short wavelength pass filter to remove infrared radiation. By filtering out the infrared component of the light emitted from the backside weld pool image, the present invention provides for the accurate determination of the weld pool boundary. Data from the digital camera is fed to an imaging board which focuses on a 100.times.100 pixel portion of the image. The board performs a thresholding operation and provides this information to a digital signal processor to compute the backside weld pool dimensions and area. This information is used by a control system, in a dynamic feedback mode, to automatically adjust appropriate parameters of a welding system, such as the welding current, to control weld penetration and thus, create a uniform weld bead and high quality weld.

Sheaffer, Donald A. (Livermore, CA); Renzi, Ronald F. (Tracy, CA); Tung, David M. (Livermore, CA); Schroder, Kevin (Pleasanton, CA)

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

190

Welding industry. Potential for energy conservation  

SciTech Connect

An estimate is presented of the annual primary energy consumption by welding processes in the US, as 3.2 to 8.8 x 10/sup 16/J (3.0 to 8.4 x 10/sup 13/ Btu), and energy conservation opportunities are discussed. The estimate has been confined to the primary energy required to actually produce coalescence. Indirect energy consumption - such as that for joint preparation, preheat, postweld heat treatment, fume removal, or other operations required by welding - has been discussed but not included in the total. The heat content of fuels used in most US power plants is termed primary energy, and it is the amount of primary energy required for welding that is estimated in this work. Welding processes have been categorized as follows: those for which energy consumption may be related to use of consumable materials, those for which it may be related to quantity of manufactured product, those for which it may be related to the number of welding machines, and those for which only limited data are available. Methodologies have been developed to estimate the energy consumption for the first three categories. The major consumers of welding energy are oxyfuel gas welding, arc welding, and resistance welding. It is significant that arc welding accounts for over 90% of electrode and filler wire consumption, yet oxyfuel gas welding accounts for about 47% of energy consumption. Arc welding consumes about 39%, and resistance welding less than 15% of the total welding energy.

Smartt, H.B.; Hood, D.W.; Jensen, W.P.

1980-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

191

Welding arc gap ionization device  

SciTech Connect

An alpha emitting isotope is positioned near the tip of a TIG welding electrode so that the alpha radiation can provide an ionized path between the electrode and the workpiece.

Schweikhardt, George M. (Richland, WA)

1976-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

192

Nevermind: creating an entertaining biofeedback-enhanced game experience to train users in stress management  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Nevermind is a PC-based biofeedback-enhanced adventure horror game developed in Unity that challenges the player to go outside of his psychological comfort zone. Its use of biofeedback technology isolates the problem of fear and stress, making it a concrete, ...

Erin Reynolds

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

193

Experiments on automatic seam detection for a MIG welding robot  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

To make robotic welding more flexible, vision systems are used to detect the weld seam and plan a path for the robot to follow. In this paper an image processing technique is introduced that can automatically detect the weld seam in a "butt-weld" configuration. ... Keywords: arc welding robot, stereo vision, weld seam detection

Mitchell Dinham; Gu Fang; Jia Ju Zou

2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

194

Pipe weld crown removal device  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

This invention is comprised of a device that provides for grinding down the crown of a pipe weld joining aligned pipe sections so that the weld is substantially flush with the pipe sections joined by the weld. The device includes a cage assembly comprising a pair of spaced cage rings adapted to be mounted for rotation on the respective pipe sections on opposite sides of the weld, a plurality of grinding wheels, supported by the cage assembly for grinding down the crown of the weld, and a plurality of support shafts, each extending longitudinally along the joined pipe sections, parallel thereto, for individually mounting respective grinding wheels. Each end of the support shafts is mounted for rotation in a bearing assembly housed within a radially directed opening in a corresponding one of the cage rings so as to provide radial movement of the associated shaft, and thus of the associated grinding wheel, towards and away from the weld. A first drive sprocket provides rotation of the cage assembly around the pipe sections while a second drive unit, driven by a common motor, provides rotation of the grinding wheels.

Sword, C.K.; Sette, P.J.

1991-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

195

ADVANCED INTEGRATION OF MULTI-SCALE MECHANICS AND WELDING PROCESS SIMULATION IN WELD INTEGRITY ASSESSMENT  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The potential to save trillions of BTU’s in energy usage and billions of dollars in cost on an annual basis based on use of higher strength steel in major oil and gas transmission pipeline construction is a compelling opportunity recognized by both the US Department of Energy (DOE). The use of high-strength steels (X100) is expected to result in energy savings across the spectrum, from manufacturing the pipe to transportation and fabrication, including welding of line pipe. Elementary examples of energy savings include more the 25 trillion BTUs saved annually based on lower energy costs to produce the thinner-walled high-strength steel pipe, with the potential for the US part of the Alaskan pipeline alone saving more than 7 trillion BTU in production and much more in transportation and assembling. Annual production, maintenance and installation of just US domestic transmission pipeline is likely to save 5 to 10 times this amount based on current planned and anticipated expansions of oil and gas lines in North America. Among the most important conclusions from these studies were: • While computational weld models to predict residual stress and distortions are well-established and accurate, related microstructure models need improvement. • Fracture Initiation Transition Temperature (FITT) Master Curve properly predicts surface-cracked pipe brittle-to-ductile initiation temperature. It has value in developing Codes and Standards to better correlate full-scale behavior from either CTOD or Charpy test results with the proper temperature shifts from the FITT master curve method. • For stress-based flaw evaluation criteria, the new circumferentially cracked pipe limit-load solution in the 2007 API 1104 Appendix A approach is overly conservative by a factor of 4/?, which has additional implications. . • For strain-based design of girth weld defects, the hoop stress effect is the most significant parameter impacting CTOD-driving force and can increase the crack-driving force by a factor of 2 depending on strain-hardening, pressure level as a % of SMYS, and flaw size. • From years of experience in circumferential fracture analyses and experimentation, there has not been sufficient integration of work performed for other industries into analogous problems facing the oil and gas pipeline markets. Some very basic concepts and problems solved previously in these fields could have circumvented inconsistencies seen in the stress-based and strain-based analysis efforts. For example, in nuclear utility piping work, more detailed elastic-plastic fracture analyses were always validated in their ability to predict loads and displacements (stresses and strains). The eventual implementation of these methodologies will result in acceleration of the industry adoption of higher-strength line-pipe steels.

Wilkowski, Gery M.; Rudland, David L.; Shim, Do-Jun; Brust, Frederick W.; Babu, Sundarsanam

2008-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

196

Comparison of the physics of Gas Tungsten Arc Welding (GTAW), Electron Beam Welding (EBW), and Laser Beam Welding (LBW)  

SciTech Connect

The physics governing the applicability and limitations of gas tungsten arc (GTA), electron beam (EB), and laser beam (LB) welding are compared. An appendix on the selection of laser welding systems is included.

Nunes, A.C. Jr.

1985-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

197

Upgraded HFIR Fuel Element Welding System  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The welding of aluminum-clad fuel plates into aluminum alloy 6061 side plate tubing is a unique design feature of the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) fuel assemblies as 101 full-penetration circumferential gas metal arc welds (GMAW) are required in the fabrication of each assembly. In a HFIR fuel assembly, 540 aluminum-clad fuel plates are assembled into two nested annular fuel elements 610 mm (24-inches) long. The welding process for the HFIR fuel elements was developed in the early 1960 s and about 450 HFIR fuel assemblies have been successfully welded using the GMAW process qualified in the 1960 s. In recent years because of the degradation of the electronic and mechanical components in the old HFIR welding system, reportable defects in plate attachment or adapter welds have been present in almost all completed fuel assemblies. In October 2008, a contract was awarded to AMET, Inc., of Rexburg, Idaho, to replace the old welding equipment with standard commercially available welding components to the maximum extent possible while maintaining the qualified HFIR welding process. The upgraded HFIR welding system represents a major improvement in the welding system used in welding HFIR fuel elements for the previous 40 years. In this upgrade, the new inner GMAW torch is a significant advancement over the original inner GMAW torch previously used. The innovative breakthrough in the new inner welding torch design is the way the direction of the cast in the 0.762 mm (0.030-inch) diameter aluminum weld wire is changed so that the weld wire emerging from the contact tip is straight in the plane perpendicular to the welding direction without creating any significant drag resistance in the feeding of the weld wire.

Sease, John D [ORNL

2010-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

198

Steam Generator Management Program: Assessment of Channel Head Susceptibility to Primary Water Stress Corrosion Cracking  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

There have been several documented cases of primary water stress corrosion cracking (PWSCC) indications in the divider plate assembly in Westinghouse model steam generators in operation outside the United States. These indications were observed in plants that operated with proper primary water chemistry. The function of the divider plate in most steam generators is to separate the cold and hot legs of the channel head as the primary water enters the steam generator so that the primary coolant flows up in...

2012-06-19T23:59:59.000Z

199

Diode laser welding of aluminum to steel  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Laser welding of dissimilar materials was carried out by using a high power diode laser to join aluminum to steel in a butt-joint configuration. During testing, the laser scan rate was changed as well as the laser power: at low values of fluence (i.e. the ratio between laser power and scan rate), poor joining was observed; instead at high values of fluence, an excess in the material melting affected the joint integrity. Between these limiting values, a good aesthetics was obtained; further investigations were carried out by means of tensile tests and SEM analyses. Unfortunately, a brittle behavior was observed for all the joints and a maximum rupture stress about 40 MPa was measured. Apart from the formation of intermeltallic phases, poor mechanical performances also depended on the chosen joining configuration, particularly because of the thickness reduction of the seam in comparison with the base material.

Santo, Loredana; Quadrini, Fabrizio; Trovalusci, Federica [University of Rome Tor Vergata, Department of Mechanical Engineering, Via del Politecnico 1, 00133 Rome (Italy)

2011-05-04T23:59:59.000Z

200

LASER Welding Survey for Power Generation Industry  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

EPRI has developed technology for laser weld repair of steam generator tubes in light water reactors. This technology has promise for other specialized welding and heat treatment applications in the power generation industry.

1998-04-23T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "welding stress management" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

ELEMENTS OF JOINT DESIGN FOR WELDING  

SciTech Connect

The design of joints which are to be fusion welded by any of the arc or gas processes is discussed. The designs are applicable to either manual or machine welding. (A.C.)

Koopman, K.H.

1958-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

202

Welding of Al- and Mg-alloys  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Oct 9, 2012 ... Joining of Advanced and Specialty Materials (JASM XIV): Welding of Al- and ... Do and Don't for Arc Welding of Aluminum: Israel Stol1; 1Alcoa

203

Resistance Welding: Fundamentals and Applications - TMS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Apr 5, 2006 ... If you are seeking welding basics, then this is the book for you. It covers the fundamentals of resistance spot welding (RSW) and applies them in ...

204

Advances in welding science and technology  

SciTech Connect

Over the years, welding has been more of an art than a science, but in the last few decades major advances have taken place in welding science and technology. With the development of new methodologies at the crossroads of basic and applied sciences, enormous opportunities and potential exist to develop a science-based design of composition, structure, and properties of welds with intelligent control and automation of the welding processes. In the last several decades, welding has evolved as an interdisciplinary activity requiring synthesis of knowledge from various disciplines and incorporating the most advanced tools of various basic applied sciences. A series of international conferences and other publications have covered the issues, current trends and directions in welding science and technology. In the last few decades, major progress has been made in (i) understanding physical processes in welding, (ii) characterization of microstructure and properties, and (iii) intelligent control and automation of welding. This paper describes some of these developments.

David, S.A.; Babu, S.S.; Vitek, J.M.

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

205

M-25, BUTT WELDS IN PROCESS PIPING  

SciTech Connect

Metal-arc and inert-gas shielded tungsten-arc processes were compared for circumferential butt welding of austenitic stainless steel process pipe. Inert-gas tungsten-arc welding was superior to other techniques. (C.J.G.)

Litman, A.P.

1958-07-10T23:59:59.000Z

206

Survey of welding processes for field fabrication of 2 1/4 Cr-1 Mo steel pressure vessels. [128 references  

SciTech Connect

Any evaluation of fabrication methods for massive pressure vessels must consider several welding processes with potential for heavy-section applications. These include submerged-arc and shielded metal-arc, narrow-joint modifications of inert-gas metal-arc and inert-gas tungsten-arc processes, electroslag, and electron beam. The advantage and disadvantages of each are discussed. Electroslag welding can be dropped from consideration for joining of 2 1/4 Cr-1 Mo steel because welds made with this method do not provide the required mechanical properties in the welded and stress relieved condition. The extension of electron-beam welding to sections as thick as 4 or 8 inches (100 or 200 mm) is too recent a development to permit full evaluation. The manual shielded metal-arc and submerged-arc welding processes have both been employed, often together, for field fabrication of large vessels. They have the historical advantage of successful application but present other disadvantages that make them otherwise less attractive. The manual shielded metal-arc process can be used for all-position welding. It is however, a slow and expensive technique for joining heavy sections, requires large amounts of skilled labor that is in critically short supply, and introduces a high incidence of weld repairs. Automatic submerged-arc welding has been employed in many critical applications and for welding in the flat position is free of most of the criticism that can be leveled at the shielded metal-arc process. Specialized techniques have been developed for horizontal and vertical position welding but, used in this manner, the applications are limited and the cost advantage of the process is lost.

Grotke, G.E.

1980-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

207

Friction Stir Welding of Pipeline Steels  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

About this Abstract. Meeting, 2013 TMS Annual Meeting & Exhibition. Symposium , Friction Stir Welding and Processing VII. Presentation Title, Friction Stir ...

208

Pre-resistance-welding resistance check  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A preweld resistance check for resistance welding machines uses an open circuited measurement to determine the welding machine resistance, a closed circuit measurement to determine the parallel resistance of a workpiece set and the machine, and a calculation to determine the resistance of the workpiece set. Any variation in workpiece set or machine resistance is an indication that the weld may be different from a control weld.

Destefan, Dennis E. (Broomfield, CO); Stompro, David A. (Idaho Falls, ID)

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

209

Pre-resistance-welding resistance check  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A preweld resistance check for resistance welding machines uses an open circuited measurement to determine the welding machine resistance, a closed circuit measurement to determine the parallel resistance of a workpiece set and the machine, and a calculation to determine the resistance of the workpiece set. Any variation in workpiece set or machine resistance is an indication that the weld may be different from a control weld.

Destefan, D.E.; Stompro, D.A.

1989-06-08T23:59:59.000Z

210

Welding representation for training under VR environments  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this paper, we present a virtual training system which realistically represents the situation of real welding. First of all, we built a database about welding outputs such as the shape of bead which is the deposit outcome resulting from inputs of ... Keywords: simulation, training, virtual reality, visualization, welding

Dongsik Jo; Yongwan Kim; Ungyeon Yang; Jinsung Choi; Ki-Hong Kim; Gun A. Lee; Yeong-Do Park; Young Whan Park

2011-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

211

NEW DEVELOPMENTS IN THE WELDING INDUSTRY  

SciTech Connect

A brief review is given of some of the developments and problems in the welding industry. These developments and problems are discussed in terms of new and improved welding processes, welding processes for new materials, improved design principles, and the technical education and training programs in this field. (N.W.R.)

Burt, R.G.

1961-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

212

Mechanized welding in a glove box  

SciTech Connect

An orbital-tungsten-arc welding gun was installed in a helium glove box to automatically weld final end closures to capsules that were to contain an atmosphere of required composition and quality. A fixture, tooling, and procedures were developed to automatically position the tungsten electrode repetitively with respect to the end of the tube to be welded closed. (auth)

Pugacz, M.A.; Walker, D.E.

1975-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

213

Applications of explosion-welded transition joints  

SciTech Connect

Explosion welding is presented as an alternate process of joining dissimilar metals. The process is compared with brazing, the most appropriate process for comparison, and the bond zone obtained through explosion welding is characterized. Several applications are described where transition joints were made from explosion-bonded dissimilar-metal combinations for subsequent assembly through fusion welding.

Popoff, A.A.; Casey, H.

1977-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

214

Interstitial embrittlement in vanadium laser welds  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Efficiencies of interstitial absorption during pulsed ND:YAG laser welding of vanadium were compared for nitrogen, oxygen, hydrogen, and water vapor. Influence of interstitial levels on the embrittlement of vanadium laser welds was also measured. For 1000 ppM contaminant levels in the weld atmosphere, weld hydrogen content increased 9 ppM, nitrogen content increased 190 ppM, and oxygen content increased from 500 ppM relative to baseplate levels. Welds in ultrahigh-purity argon atmospheres contained 3 ppM hydrogen, 40 ppM nitrogen, and 250 ppM oxygen. Longitudinal all-weld tensile specimens and notched-plate specimens were used to measure weld metal tensile properties at {minus}55C. All of the laser weld notch-strength ratios exceeded unity and weld metal tensile strengths all exceeded the baseplate values. For 1000 ppM atmosphere contaminant levels, the only significant decrease in ductility, as measured by reduction-in-area at fracture was for the weld atmosphere containing oxygen. Weld atmospheres containing 1% nitrogen also reduced the weld ductility, and resulted in the onset of cleavage fracture.

Strum, M.J.; Wagner, L.M.

1992-02-24T23:59:59.000Z

215

Interstitial embrittlement in vanadium laser welds  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Efficiencies of interstitial absorption during pulsed ND:YAG laser welding of vanadium were compared for nitrogen, oxygen, hydrogen, and water vapor. Influence of interstitial levels on the embrittlement of vanadium laser welds was also measured. For 1000 ppM contaminant levels in the weld atmosphere, weld hydrogen content increased 9 ppM, nitrogen content increased 190 ppM, and oxygen content increased from 500 ppM relative to baseplate levels. Welds in ultrahigh-purity argon atmospheres contained 3 ppM hydrogen, 40 ppM nitrogen, and 250 ppM oxygen. Longitudinal all-weld tensile specimens and notched-plate specimens were used to measure weld metal tensile properties at [minus]55C. All of the laser weld notch-strength ratios exceeded unity and weld metal tensile strengths all exceeded the baseplate values. For 1000 ppM atmosphere contaminant levels, the only significant decrease in ductility, as measured by reduction-in-area at fracture was for the weld atmosphere containing oxygen. Weld atmospheres containing 1% nitrogen also reduced the weld ductility, and resulted in the onset of cleavage fracture.

Strum, M.J.; Wagner, L.M.

1992-02-24T23:59:59.000Z

216

Superconducting coil and method of stress management in a superconducting coil  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A superconducting coil (12) having a plurality of superconducting layers (18) is provided. Each superconducting layer (18) may have at least one superconducting element (20) which produces an operational load. An outer support structure (24) may be disposed outwardly from the plurality of layers (18). A load transfer system (22) may be coupled between at least one of the superconducting elements (20) and the outer support structure (24). The load transfer system (22) may include a support matrix structure (30) operable to transfer the operational load from the superconducting element (20) directly to the outer support structure (24). A shear release layer (40) may be disposed, in part, between the superconducting element (20) and the support matrix structure (30) for relieving a shear stress between the superconducting element (20) and the support matrix structure (30). A compliant layer (42) may also be disposed, in part, between the superconducting element (20) and the support matrix structure (30) for relieving a compressive stress on the superconducting element (20).

McIntyre, Peter M. (College Station, TX); Shen, Weijun (Oak Ridge, TN); Diaczenko, Nick (College Station, TX); Gross, Dan A. (College Station, TX)

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

217

Welding and Repair Technology Center: Measures to Minimize 52M Hot Cracking on Stainless Steel Base Materials  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Operating experience in the nuclear power industry has shown that dissimilar metal weld joints with Inconel 82/182 (ERNiCr-3/ENiCrFe-3) weld metal in the primary loop of pressurized water reactor (PWR) plants are susceptible to primary water stress corrosion cracking (PWSCC). Alloy 690 is a 30 wt% chromium nickel-base metal with excellent resistance to PWSCC. Alloy 52M (ERNiCr-7A) is weld filler metal that closely matches the composition of Alloy 690 and ...

2012-12-12T23:59:59.000Z

218

Percussive arc welding apparatus  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A percussive arc welding apparatus includes a generally cylindrical actuator body having front and rear end portions and defining an internal recess. The front end of the body includes an opening. A solenoid assembly is provided in the rear end portion in the internal recess of the body, and an actuator shaft assembly is provided in the front end portion in the internal recess of the actuator body. The actuator shaft assembly includes a generally cylindrical actuator block having first and second end portions, and an actuator shaft having a front end extending through the opening in the actuator body, and the rear end connected to the first end portion of the actuator block. The second end portion of the actuator block is in operational engagement with the solenoid shaft by a non-rigid connection to reduce the adverse rebound effects of the actuator shaft. A generally transversely extending pin is rigidly secured to the rear end of the shaft. One end of the pin is received in a slot in the nose housing sleeve to prevent rotation of the actuator shaft during operation of the apparatus.

Hollar, Jr., Donald L. (Overland Park, KS)

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

219

Welding and Repair Technology Center: Gas Metal Arc Welding Lessons  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Modern gas metal arc welding (GMAW) systems no longer operate with a symmetric, fixed pulse. The new systems have closed-loop feedback and are waveform-controlled systems that vary the arc characteristics hundreds of times per second to stabilize the arc. The main advantage of these systems is the ease of operation when manual applications are required or out-of-position welding is applied. The systems allow flexibility in the stand-off distance (contact tip to work distance) while maintaining an ...

2013-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

220

Manual Plasma Welding (PTAW) Evaluation with Powder Hardfacing Alloys  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Repair practices for hardfacing alloys using gas tungsten arc welding (GTAW) and shielded metal arc welding (SMAW) have been evaluated in the past on hardfacing applied with various automated welding processes. Accessibility often limits the use of these welding processes in manual repair applications. Recent developments in plasma transfer arc welding (PTAW) powder welding systems have prompted evaluations of manual repair practices for hardfacing materials. The PTAW powder welding process feeds the fil...

2001-12-18T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "welding stress management" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Intraluminal tissue welding for anastomosis  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method and device are provided for performing intraluminal tissue welding for anastomosis of a hollow organ. A retractable catheter assembly is delivered through the hollow organ and consists of a catheter connected to an optical fiber, an inflatable balloon, and a biocompatible patch mounted on the balloon. The disconnected ends of the hollow organ are brought together on the catheter assembly, and upon inflation of the balloon, the free ends are held together on the balloon to form a continuous channel while the patch is deployed against the inner wall of the hollow organ. The ends are joined or "welded" using laser radiation transmitted through the optical fiber to the patch. A thin layer of a light-absorbing dye on the patch can provide a target for welding. The patch may also contain a bonding agent to strengthen the bond. The laser radiation delivered has a pulse profile to minimize tissue damage.

Glinsky, Michael (Livermore, CA); London, Richard (Orinda, CA); Zimmerman, George (Lafayette, CA); Jacques, Steven (Portland, OR)

1998-10-27T23:59:59.000Z

222

Improvement of reliability of welding by in-process sensing and control: development of smart welding machines for girth welding of pipes. First progress report  

SciTech Connect

Progress is reported in a research program to improve the reliability of welding by developing smart welding machine which will be equipped with sensors, artificial intelligence, and actuators for reducing welding errors by one or two orders of magnitude. (FS)

Converti, J.; Dror, Y.; Hardt, D.E.; Masubuchi, K.; Paynter, H.M.; Unkel, W.C.

1979-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

223

WELDING THIN-WALLED URANIUM CYLINDERS  

SciTech Connect

One of Its Monograph Series, The Industrial Atom.'' The development of a satisfactory process for the fusion welding of thin-walled uranium cylinders is discussed. Optimum results were obtained using the inert-gas shielded-arc method without the use of filler metal. The ductility of the welded joints, however, was lower than that of cast metal. Surface conditions and and the purity of the inert gas used affected the weld soundness. Straight polarity direct current was used for welding to achieve maximum penetration and to provide are stability. Welding must be done in the flat position. (auth)

Brundige, E.L.; Taub, J.M.; Hanks, G.S.; Doll, D.T.

1957-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

224

Advances in welding science - a perspective  

SciTech Connect

The ultimate goal of welding technology is to improve the joint integrity and increase productivity. Over the years, welding has been more of an art than a science, but in the last few decades major advances have taken place in welding science and technology. With the development of new methodologies at the crossroads of basic and applied sciences, enormous opportunities and potential exist to develop a science-based tailoring of composition, structure, and properties of welds with intelligent control and automation of the welding processes.

David, S.A.; Vitek, J.M. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Babu, S.S.; DebRoy, T. [Pennsylvania State Univ., University Park, PA (United States)

1995-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

225

Optical penetration sensor for pulsed laser welding  

SciTech Connect

An apparatus and method for determining the penetration of the weld pool created from pulsed laser welding and more particularly to an apparatus and method of utilizing an optical technique to monitor the weld vaporization plume velocity to determine the depth of penetration. A light source directs a beam through a vaporization plume above a weld pool, wherein the plume changes the intensity of the beam, allowing determination of the velocity of the plume. From the velocity of the plume, the depth of the weld is determined.

Essien, Marcelino (Albuquerque, NM); Keicher, David M. (Albuquerque, NM); Schlienger, M. Eric (Albuquerque, NM); Jellison, James L. (Albuquerque, NM)

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

226

Laser Welding and Post Weld Treatment of Modified 9Cr-1MoVNb Steel [Laser  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Laser Welding of Metals > Laser Welding of Metals > Laser Welding and Post Weld Treatment of Modified 9Cr-1MoVNb Steel Capabilities Engineering Experimentation Reactor Safety Experimentation Aerosol Experiments System Components Laser Applications Overview Laser Oil & Gas Well Drilling Laser Heat Treatment Laser Welding of Metals On-line Monitoring Laser Beam Delivery Laser Glazing of Railroad Rails High Power Laser Beam Delivery Decontamination and Decommissioning Refractory Alloy Welding Robots Applications Other Facilities Other Capabilities Work with Argonne Contact us For Employees Site Map Help Join us on Facebook Follow us on Twitter NE on Flickr Laser Applications Laboratory Laser Welding of Metals Laser Welding and Post Weld Treatment of Modified 9Cr-1MoVNb Steel Zhiyue Xu Nuclear Engineering Division of Argonne National Laboratory

227

Shimmed electron beam welding process  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A modified electron beam welding process effects welding of joints between superalloy materials by inserting a weldable shim in the joint and heating the superalloy materials with an electron beam. The process insures a full penetration of joints with a consistent percentage of filler material and thereby improves fatigue life of the joint by three to four times as compared with the prior art. The process also allows variable shim thickness and joint fit-up gaps to provide increased flexibility for manufacturing when joining complex airfoil structures and the like.

Feng, Ganjiang (Clifton Park, NY); Nowak, Daniel Anthony (Alplaus, NY); Murphy, John Thomas (Niskayuna, NY)

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

228

Refractory Alloy Welding [Laser Applications Laboratory] - Nuclear  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Refractory Alloy Welding Refractory Alloy Welding Capabilities Engineering Experimentation Reactor Safety Experimentation Aerosol Experiments System Components Laser Applications Overview Laser Oil & Gas Well Drilling Laser Heat Treatment Laser Welding of Metals On-line Monitoring Laser Beam Delivery Laser Glazing of Railroad Rails High Power Laser Beam Delivery Decontamination and Decommissioning Refractory Alloy Welding Robots Applications Other Facilities Other Capabilities Work with Argonne Contact us For Employees Site Map Help Join us on Facebook Follow us on Twitter NE on Flickr Laser Applications Laboratory Refractory Alloy Welding Project description: Welding of refractory metals such as vanadium alloys. Category: internal R&D project Bookmark and Share Butt weld of two 4 mm thick V-4Cr-4Ti plates made by a pulsed Nd:YAG laser

229

Resistance upset welding for vessel fabrication  

SciTech Connect

Solid-state resistance upset welding has been successfully applied to fabrication of small vessels. The process has advantages compared with the fusion welding processes currently used to join the two halves of such vessels. These advantages result from the improved metallurgical properties of the weld zone and the simplicity of the welding process. Spherical and cylindrical shapes have been fabricated using the upset welding process. Nondestructive and destructive tests have shown excellent weld strength. Storage tests have demonstrated long term compatibility of the welds for cylindrical parts made from 304L stainless steel that have been in storage for eight years. Spherical vessels and reinforced desip vessels made from forged 21-6-9 stainless steel have been prepared for storage.

Kanne, W.R. Jr.

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

230

Resistance upset welding for vessel fabrication  

SciTech Connect

Solid-state resistance upset welding has been successfully applied to fabrication of small vessels. The process has advantages compared with the fusion welding processes currently used to join the two halves of such vessels. These advantages result from the improved metallurgical properties of the weld zone and the simplicity of the welding process. Spherical and cylindrical shapes have been fabricated using the upset welding process. Nondestructive and destructive tests have shown excellent weld strength. Storage tests have demonstrated long term compatibility of the welds for cylindrical parts made from 304L stainless steel that have been in storage for eight years. Spherical vessels and reinforced desip vessels made from forged 21-6-9 stainless steel have been prepared for storage.

Kanne, W.R. Jr.

1992-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

231

APPARATUS AND METHOD FOR ARC WELDING  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An apparatus and method are given for forming a welding arc which is rotated by a magnetic field very rapidly about an annular electrode so that a weld is produced simultaneously over all points of an annular or closed path. This invention inhibits outgassing from the jacket of a fuel slug which is being welded by adjusting the pressure throughout the welding cycle to establish a balance between the gas pressure within the jacket and that of the atmosphere surrounding the jacket. Furthermore, an improved control of the magnetic field producing rotation of the welding arc is disclosed whereby this rotation is prevented from splashing about the metal being welded as the welding arc makes it molten.

Noland, R.A.; Stone, C.C.

1960-05-10T23:59:59.000Z

232

Bond strength of cementitious borehole plugs in welded tuff  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Axial loads on plugs or seals in an underground repository due to gas, water pressures and temperature changes induced subsequent to waste and plug emplacement lead to shear stresses at the plug/rock contact. Therefore, the bond between the plug and rock is a critical element for the design and effectiveness of plugs in boreholes, shafts or tunnels. This study includes a systematic investigation of the bond strength of cementitious borehole plugs in welded tuff. Analytical and numerical analysis of borehole plug-rock stress transfer mechanics is performed. The interface strength and deformation are studied as a function of Young`s modulus ratio of plug and rock, plug length and rock cylinder outside-to-inside radius ratio. The tensile stresses in and near an axially loaded plug are analyzed. The frictional interface strength of an axially loaded borehole plug, the effect of axial stress and lateral external stress, and thermal effects are also analyzed. Implications for plug design are discussed. The main conclusion is a strong recommendation to design friction plugs in shafts, drifts, tunnels or boreholes with a minimum length to diameter ratio of four. Such a geometrical design will reduce tensile stresses in the plug and in the host rock to a level which should minimize the risk of long-term deterioration caused by excessive tensile stresses. Push-out tests have been used to determine the bond strength by applying an axial load to cement plugs emplaced in boreholes in welded tuff cylinders. A total of 130 push-out tests have been performed as a function of borehole size, plug length, temperature, and degree of saturation of the host tuff. The use of four different borehole radii enables evaluation of size effects. 119 refs., 42 figs., 20 tabs.

Akgun, H.; Daemen, J.J.K. [Arizona Univ., Tucson, AZ (USA). Dept. of Mining and Geological Engineering

1991-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

233

Brief summary of reactor core component welding for the Fast Flux Test Facility (FFTF)  

SciTech Connect

Included are descriptions of welding methods and joint design, welding equipment, and qualification tests. (DG)

Brown, W.F.

1974-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

234

PARALLEL OPERATION OF WELDING GENERATORS  

SciTech Connect

Eight 900-amp, 36-kw direct current welding generators driven by eight 60-hp induction motors were operated in parallel to supply up to 7200 amp to resistance loads for heat transfer studies. A description and circuit designs of this installation, which provides safety interlocks and permits sectionalized operation for separate leads, are given. (auth)

Butler, B.H.

1960-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

235

Automated welding of nuclear piping systems  

SciTech Connect

Automated welding, or more broadly, automatic and mechanized welding processes, has found a role in nuclear power plant fabrication. This role has expanded from a rare or isolated application to relatively frequent usage in the last five years. More importantly, it is envisioned that use of automated welding will be increasing at an accelerated rate as broader exposure to this technology is achieved. Among the various pipe welding processes, the only one which has been developed for mechanized and automated nuclear piping welding is the gas tungsten arc welding (GTAW) process. This development has occurred in the past 10 to 15 years through the steady improvement and commmercialization of orbiting welding heads. Improvements in GTAW power supplies, control systems, etc., have aided this commercialization but the main element and pacing item has been the welding head itself. In order to review the status of mechanized and automated nuclear pipe welding, the topics of basic process equipment, joint design, fit-up requirements, welding parameters, and producibility will be addressed. In addition, anticipated future developments in automated systems will be discussed.

Hood, D.W.

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

236

The science and practice of welding. Volume 2: The practice of welding, 10th edition  

SciTech Connect

The book is comprised of 8 chapters that treat the various welding practices, and 11 appendices. Chapter 1 is a good introduction to basic welding (shielded metal arc), and US readers will be able to use this section as a rough guide to British and EN terms. The next three chapters cover MIG, TIG, and resistance welding, while Chapter 5 is titled ''Additional Processes of Welding.'' In that chapter, submerged arc welding is given the most extensive treatment. Chapter 6 and 7 deal with oxyacetylene welding and cutting processes, respectively, and Chapter 8 contains a wonderful introductory treatise on the welding of plastics. Among the 11 appendices, some appear to be little more than advertising. In general, this book is not a college level text for a welding engineer. At best it is a good occasional reference manual for shop owners so that they can appear knowledgeable to the engineers in the employ.

Davies, A.C.

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

237

Use Computational Model to Design and Optimize Welding Conditions to Suppress Helium Cracking during Welding  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Today, welding is widely used for repair, maintenance and upgrade of nuclear reactor components. As a critical technology to extend the service life of nuclear power plants beyond 60 years, weld...

238

HIGH-VACUUM ELECTRON-BEAM FUSION WELDING  

SciTech Connect

A newly developed welding process is described for welding in a high vacuum without introducing contaminating material into the system as a part of the welding operation. (J.E.D.)

Wyman, W.L.

1958-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

239

An overview of the welding of Ni{sub 3}Al and Fe{sub 3}Al alloys  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Weldability (degree to which defect formation is resisted when an alloy is welded) is an issue in fabrication of Ni{sub 3}Al and Fe{sub 3}Al. Work to define and improve welding of Ni{sub 3}Al and Fe{sub 3}Al alloys is reviewed and progress illustrated by examples of current activities. The cast Ni{sub 3}Al alloys currently under development, IC221M and IC396M, have low resistance to solidification cracking and hence difficult to weld. Modifications to the composition of both base alloys and weld deposits,however, increase their resistance to cracking. Crack-free, full-penetration welds were made in centrifugally cast tubes of IC221M. Tensile and stress- rupture properties of the weldments compare favorably with base metal properties. Weldability issues have limited the use of Fe{sub 3}Al alloys to weld overlay applications. Filler metal compositions suitable for weld overlay cladding were developed, and the preheat and postweld heat treatment needed to avoid cracking, were determined experimentally.

Santella, M.L.

1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

240

ELECTRON BEAM WELDING OF NUCLEAR FUEL CLADDING COMPONENTS  

SciTech Connect

The rapid technological development of the nuclear and space industries has placed a great demand on metal joining processes. One of the most promising processes is electron beam welding. Welding with the electron beam ofiers high integrity in addition to the ability to fabricate unusual configurations. Advanced nuclear fuels require both reliability and unusual designs for satisfactory operation under extreme conditions of temperature and stress. To investigate the problems and techniques involved in fabricating large, advanced nuclear fuel components from Zircaloy-2 material, several cladding pieces were designed and built using the electron beam process. These designs included five basic joint types for assembling the cladding. Destructive and nondestructive examinations were employed including corrosion testing and extensive metallographic examination. Weldment size, fit-up'' of the parts to be joined, fixturing and work carriage mechanisms, as they pertain to electron beam welding, are also discussed. The electron beam process has been demonstrated as a very satisfactory method for fabricating unusual fuel cladding. Fuel cladding components with lengths up to 8 ft have been fabricated for in-reactor irradiation. (auth)

Klein, R.F.

1963-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "welding stress management" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Inspection of Nickel Alloy Welds: Results from Five Year International Program  

SciTech Connect

The U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission established and coordinated the international Program for the Inspection of Nickel alloy Components (PINC). The goal of PINC was to evaluate the capabilities of various nondestructive examination (NDE) techniques to detect and characterize primary water stress corrosion cracking (PWSCC) in dissimilar metal welds. Round-robin results showed that a combination of conventional and phased-array ultrasound provide the highest performance for flaw detection and depth sizing in dissimilar metal piping welds. The effective detection of flaws in bottom-mounted instrumentation penetrations by eddy current and ultrasound shows that it may be possible to reliably inspect these components in the field.

Prokofiev, Iouri; Cumblidge, Stephen E.; Doctor, Steven R.

2011-06-23T23:59:59.000Z

242

Guideline for Underwater Welding to Achieve Acceptable Ferrite Number (FN) for Stainless Steel  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The ferrite number (FN) of stainless steel weld metal is critical in maintaining resistance to IGSCC (Intergranular Stress Corrosion Cracking) in a BWR environment. In addition the carbon level of the stainless steel weld metal directly affects the level of ferrite necessary to assure IGSCC resistance. NUREG-0313 and Code Case N-503-1 recommends a maximum carbon content not to exceed 0.035 wt. percent and a minimum FN of 7.5. The regulations also require that the first layer FN meets the minimum requirem...

1997-12-17T23:59:59.000Z

243

Exploiting welding in production technology. International conference held at London, 22--24 April, 1975. Volume 1. Papers  

SciTech Connect

Twenty-eight papers are included, grouped into sessions dealing with arc welding, inspection, weld preparation, positional welding, measurement and removal of welding fume, electron-beam welding, vacuum brazing, arc plasma process, and resistance and microfriction welding. (DLC)

1975-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

244

Laser welding of automotive aluminum alloys to achieve defect-free, structurally sound and reliable welds  

SciTech Connect

The objective of this program was to seek improved process control and weldment reliability during laser welding of automotive aluminum alloys while retaining the high speed and accuracy of the laser beam welding process. The effects of various welding variables on the loss of alloying elements and the formation of porosity and other geometric weld defects such as underfill and overfill were studied both experimentally and theoretically.

DebRoy, T.

2000-11-17T23:59:59.000Z

245

Unique applications of personal computers in the welding environment  

SciTech Connect

The personal computer was found to be useful in supporting a variety of welding applications: 3-D representation of crack propagation using CADD software, storage and retrieval of photographic data using an image capture board, automated positioning of the welding electrode for GTA welding, interactive computer based voice communication for welding operations, surface temperature measurements of welded structures, and inventory control of weld material through use of bar codes.

Glickstein, S.S.

1990-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

246

GTAW Flux-Cored Wires for Open Root SS Welding  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Gas tungsten arc welding (GTAW) procedures for stainless steel open root welding applications typically require purging or shielding with an inert gas (i.e. argon), during the root and subsequent hot passes, to assist with wetting and to prevent atmospheric contamination of the exposed surface. Lack of adequate purging, or welding without a purge, typically results in weld defects both on the surface and within the weld deposit, such as porosity and poor bead profile. Poor root weld profile such as lack-...

2004-06-11T23:59:59.000Z

247

Method and device for frictional welding  

SciTech Connect

A method for friction welding that produces a seal having essentially no gas porosity, comprises two rotationally symmetric, generally cylindrical members, spaced apart and coaxially aligned, that are rotated with respect to each other and brought together under high pressure. One member is preferably a generally cylindrical cannister that stores uranium within its hollow walls. The other member is preferably a generally cylindrical, hollow weld ring. An annular channel formed in the weld ring functions as an internal flash trap and is uniquely designed so that substantially all of the welding flash generated from the friction welding is directed into the channel's recessed bottom. Also, the channel design limits distortion of the two members during the friction welding process, further contributing to the complete seal that is obtained.

Peacock, Harold B. (867 N. Belair Rd., Evans, GA 30809)

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

248

Method and device for frictional welding  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method is described for friction welding that produces a seal having essentially no gas porosity, comprises two rotationally symmetric, generally cylindrical members, spaced apart and coaxially aligned, that are rotated with respect to each other and brought together under high pressure. One member is preferably a generally cylindrical canister that stores uranium within its hollow walls. The other member is preferably a generally cylindrical, hollow weld ring. An annular channel formed in the weld ring functions as an internal flash trap and is uniquely designed so that substantially all of the welding flash generated from the friction welding is directed into the channel's recessed bottom. Also, the channel design limits distortion of the two members during the friction welding process, further contributing to the complete seal that is obtained. 5 figs.

Peacock, H.B.

1992-10-13T23:59:59.000Z

249

Infrared sensing techniques for adaptive robotic welding  

SciTech Connect

The objective of this research is to investigate the feasibility of using infrared sensors to monitor the welding process. Data were gathered using an infrared camera which was trained on the molten metal pool during the welding operation. Several types of process perturbations which result in weld defects were then intentionally induced and the resulting thermal images monitored. Gas tungsten arc using ac and dc currents and gas metal arc welding processes were investigated using steel, aluminum and stainless steel plate materials. The thermal images obtained in the three materials and different welding processes revealed nearly identical patterns for the same induced process perturbation. Based upon these results, infrared thermography is a method which may be very applicable to automation of the welding process.

Lin, T.T.; Groom, K.; Madsen, N.H.; Chin, B.A.

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

250

Passively damped vibration welding system and method  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A vibration welding system includes a controller, welding horn, an anvil, and a passive damping mechanism (PDM). The controller generates an input signal having a calibrated frequency. The horn vibrates in a desirable first direction at the calibrated frequency in response to the input signal to form a weld in a work piece. The PDM is positioned with respect to the system, and substantially damps or attenuates vibration in an undesirable second direction. A method includes connecting the PDM having calibrated properties and a natural frequency to an anvil of an ultrasonic welding system. Then, an input signal is generated using a weld controller. The method includes vibrating a welding horn in a desirable direction in response to the input signal, and passively damping vibration in an undesirable direction using the PDM.

Tan, Chin-An; Kang, Bongsu; Cai, Wayne W.; Wu, Tao

2013-04-02T23:59:59.000Z

251

Method and device for frictional welding  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method for friction welding that produces a seal having essentially no gas porosity, comprises two rotationally symmetric, generally cylindrical members, spaced apart and coaxially aligned, that are rotated with respect to each other and brought together under high pressure. One member is preferably a generally cylindrical cannister that stores uranium within its hollow walls. The other member is preferably a generally cylindrical, hollow weld ring. An annular channel formed in the weld ring functions as an internal flash trap and is uniquely designed so that substantially all of the welding flash generated from the friction welding is directed into the channel`s recessed bottom. Also, the channel design limits distortion of the two members during the friction welding, process, further contributing to the complete seal that is obtained.

Peacock, H.B.

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

252

Automated Fuel Element Closure Welding System  

SciTech Connect

The Automated Fuel Element Closure Welding System is a robotic device that will load and weld top end plugs onto nuclear fuel elements in a highly radioactive and inert gas environment. The system was developed at Argonne National Laboratory-West as part of the Fuel Cycle Demonstration. The welding system performs four main functions, it (1) injects a small amount of a xenon/krypton gas mixture into specific fuel elements, and (2) loads tiny end plugs into the tops of fuel element jackets, and (3) welds the end plugs to the element jackets, and (4) performs a dimensional inspection of the pre- and post-welded fuel elements. The system components are modular to facilitate remote replacement of failed parts. The entire system can be operated remotely in manual, semi-automatic, or fully automatic modes using a computer control system. The welding system is currently undergoing software testing and functional checkout.

Wahlquist, D.R.

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

253

Automated Fuel Element Closure Welding System  

SciTech Connect

The Automated Fuel Element Closure Welding System is a robotic device that will load and weld top end plugs onto nuclear fuel elements in a highly radioactive and inert gas environment. The system was developed at Argonne National Laboratory-West as part of the Fuel Cycle Demonstration. The welding system performs four main functions, it (1) injects a small amount of a xenon/krypton gas mixture into specific fuel elements, and (2) loads tiny end plugs into the tops of fuel element jackets, and (3) welds the end plugs to the element jackets, and (4) performs a dimensional inspection of the pre- and post-welded fuel elements. The system components are modular to facilitate remote replacement of failed parts. The entire system can be operated remotely in manual, semi-automatic, or fully automatic modes using a computer control system. The welding system is currently undergoing software testing and functional checkout.

Wahlquist, D.R.

1993-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

254

Welding and Repair Technology Center: Repair Welding Handbook  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

During the life of a power plant, it often becomes necessary to perform weld repairs of various materials in order to continue safe operation. Much work has been completed in this area to assist utilities with choosing appropriate repair techniques based on the materials involved and the damage mechanism that makes the repair necessary. This report captures in one resource a variety of repair methods that have been proven to be effective.

2012-05-14T23:59:59.000Z

255

Transient Model for Keyhole During Laser Welding  

SciTech Connect

A novel approach to simulating the dominant dynamic processes present during concentrated energy beam welding of metals is presented. A model for transient behavior of the front keyhole wall is developed. It is assumed that keyhole propagation is dominated by evaporation recoil-driven melt expulsion from the beam interaction zone. Results from the model show keyhole instabilities consistent with experimental observations of metal welding, metal cutting and ice welding.

Bragg, W.D.; Damkroger, B.; Kempka, S.; Semak, V.V.

1999-03-05T23:59:59.000Z

256

Pages that link to "Apparent Welding Textures In Altered Pumice...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Share this page on Facebook icon Twitter icon Pages that link to "Apparent Welding Textures In Altered Pumice-Rich Rocks" Apparent Welding Textures In Altered...

257

Friction Stir Welding and Processing III TABLE OF CONTENTS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Friction Stir Welding of Dissimilar Aluminum Alloys [pp. 35] R. Cook ... Fatigue of Pre-Corroded 2024-T3 Friction Stir Welds: Experiment and Prediction [pp. 43

258

Experimental and Numerical Investigations on Laser welding of ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Through the numerical simulation, the weld penetration, the geometry of the ... A high-speed CCD camera is used to real-time monitor the laser welding process.

259

SOME EXPERIENCES IN THE WELD FABRICATION OF REFRACTORY METALS  

SciTech Connect

Discussion is given on the welding fabrication of tungsten, molybdenum, niobium, and tantalum. Properties which make the four refractory metals important are tabulatcd along with titanium which is given for comparison. Extensive evaluation was conducted using the gas, tungsten arc welding process employing both manual and machine welding. Design data were obtained exclusively from machine welded sheet materials. Flash welding, resistance spot welding and brazing, electron beam welding, and high frequency resistance welding processes were also applied to molybdenum alloys. The oxidation of molybdenum, tantalum, and niobium in flowing air at 2000 deg F is also given. (P.C.H.)

Thompson, E.G.

1961-02-10T23:59:59.000Z

260

Changes related to "Apparent Welding Textures In Altered Pumice...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

page Share this page on Facebook icon Twitter icon Changes related to "Apparent Welding Textures In Altered Pumice-Rich Rocks" Apparent Welding Textures In Altered...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "welding stress management" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Computational Weld Mechanics of Hot Crack Nucleation in Nickel ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Abstract Scope, Computational weld mechanics (CWM) is used to estimate the likelihood of hot crack nucleation in a welded joint. A hot crack nucleates when ...

262

Prediction of ? Phase Embrittlement in 316FR Stainless Steel Welds ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... fast breeder reactors was examined for 316FR stainless steel welds with different ... Analysis of the Fusion Boundary Region in Dissimilar Metal Welds at Low ...

263

SELECTED RESOURCES: Fusion Welding of Superalloys - TMS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

May 31, 2007 ... This listing provides links to resources on fusion welding of superalloys. Two formats of the information are presented for your convenience: pdf ...

264

Friction Stir Welding: High Temperature Materials II  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Mar 5, 2013 ... Enhanced Friction Stir Welding of Titanium Using Elemental Foils: Richard Fonda 1; Keith Knipling1; 1Naval Research Laboratory

265

An integrated model for optimizing weld quality  

SciTech Connect

Welding has evolved in the last few decades from almost an empirical art to an activity embodying the most advanced tools of, various basic and applied sciences. Significant progress has been made in understanding the welding process and welded materials. The improved knowledge base has been useful in automation and process control. In view of the large number of variables involved, creating an adequately large database to understand and control the welding process is expensive and time consuming, if not impractical. A recourse is to simulate welding processes through a set of mathematical equations representing the essential physical processes of welding. Results obtained from the phenomenological models depend crucially on the quality of the physical relations in the models and the trustworthiness of input data. In this paper, recent advances in the mathematical modeling of fundamental phenomena in welds are summarized. State of the art mathematical models, advances in computational techniques, emerging high performance computers, and experimental validation techniques have provided significant insight into the fundamental factors that control the development of the weldment. Current status and scientific issues in heat and fluid flow in welds, heat source metal interaction, and solidification microstructure are assessed. Future research areas of major importance for understanding the fundamental phenomena in weld behavior are identified.

Zacharia, T.; Radhakrishnan, B. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Paul, A.J.; Cheng, C. [Concurrent Technologies Corp., Johnstown, PA (United States)

1995-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

266

Welding the AT-400A Containment Vessel  

SciTech Connect

Early in 1994, the Department of Energy assigned Sandia National Laboratories the responsibility for designing and providing the welding system for the girth weld for the AT-400A containment vessel. (The AT-400A container is employed for the shipment and long-term storage of the nuclear weapon pits being returned from the nation's nuclear arsenal.) Mason Hanger Corporation's Pantex Plant was chosen to be the production facility. The project was successfully completed by providing and implementing a turnkey welding system and qualified welding procedure at the Pantex Plant. The welding system was transferred to Pantex and a pilot lot of 20 AT-400A containers with W48 pits was welded in August 1997. This document is intended to bring together the AT-400A welding system and product (girth weld) requirements and the activities conducted to meet those requirements. This document alone is not a complete compilation of the welding development activities but is meant to be a summary to be used with the applicable references.

Brandon, E.

1998-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

267

Ultrasonic Welding II - Programmaster.org  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This concerns progress of hard- and software for ultrasonic welding systems, new joints and especially their mechanical and physical properties. Apart from ...

268

Laser Welding for Nuclear Power Systems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Enhancement of Intergranular Corrosion Resistance of TIG Welded and Laser- surface Melted SUS 304 for Nuclear Power Plants · Evaluation of Nanofeature ...

269

Welding the AT-400A Containment Vessel  

SciTech Connect

Early in 1994, the Department of Energy assigned Sandia National Laboratories the responsibility for designing and providing the welding system for the girth weld for the AT-400A containment vessel. (The AT-400A container is employed for the shipment and long-term storage of the nuclear weapon pits being returned from the nation's nuclear arsenal.) Mason Hanger Corporation's Pantex Plant was chosen to be the production facility. The project was successfully completed by providing and implementing a turnkey welding system and qualified welding procedure at the Pantex Plant. The welding system was transferred to Pantex and a pilot lot of 20 AT-400A containers with W48 pits was welded in August 1997. This document is intended to bring together the AT-400A welding system and product (girth weld) requirements and the activities conducted to meet those requirements. This document alone is not a complete compilation of the welding development activities but is meant to be a summary to be used with the applicable references.

Brandon, E.

1998-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

270

Across Inertia Friction Welded Alloy 720Li  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

kinetic energy stored in the rotating flywheel is dissipated as heat through friction/ shearing at the weld interface. In this way, it is possible to join advanced ...

271

Improvement of reliability of welding by in-process sensing and control (development of smart welding machines for girth welding of pipes). Final report  

SciTech Connect

Closed-loop control of the welding variables represents a promising, cost-effective approach to improving weld quality and therefore reducing the total cost of producing welded structures. The ultimate goal is to place all significant weld variables under direct closed-loop control; this contrasts with preprogrammed machines which place the welding equipment under control. As the first step, an overall strategy has been formulated and an investigation of weld pool geometry control for gas tungsten arc process has been completed. The research activities were divided into the areas of arc phenomena, weld pool phenomena, sensing techniques and control activities.

Hardt, D.E.; Masubuchi, K.; Paynter, H.M.; Unkel, W.C.

1983-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

272

Welding shield for coupling heaters  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Systems for coupling end portions of two elongated heater portions and methods of using such systems to treat a subsurface formation are described herein. A system may include a holding system configured to hold end portions of the two elongated heater portions so that the end portions are abutted together or located near each other; a shield for enclosing the end portions, and one or more inert gas inlets configured to provide at least one inert gas to flush the system with inert gas during welding of the end portions. The shield may be configured to inhibit oxidation during welding that joins the end portions together. The shield may include a hinged door that, when closed, is configured to at least partially isolate the interior of the shield from the atmosphere. The hinged door, when open, is configured to allow access to the interior of the shield.

Menotti, James Louis (Dickinson, TX)

2010-03-09T23:59:59.000Z

273

Feasibility of underwater welding of highly irradiated in-vessel components of boiling-water reactors: A literature review  

SciTech Connect

In February 1997, the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC), Office of Nuclear Regulatory Research (RES), initiated a literature review to assess the state of underwater welding technology. In particular, the objective of this literature review was to evaluate the viability of underwater welding in-vessel components of boiling water reactor (BWR) in-vessel components, especially those components fabricated from stainless steels that are subjected to high neutron fluences. This assessment was requested because of the recent increased level of activity in the commercial nuclear industry to address generic issues concerning the reactor vessel and internals, especially those issues related to repair options. This literature review revealed a preponderance of general information about underwater welding technology, as a result of the active research in this field sponsored by the U.S. Navy and offshore oil and gas industry concerns. However, the literature search yielded only a limited amount of information about underwater welding of components in low-fluence areas of BWR in-vessel environments, and no information at all concerning underwater welding experiences in high-fluence environments. Research reported by the staff of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Savannah River Site and researchers from the DOE fusion reactor program proved more fruitful. This research documented relevant experience concerning welding of stainless steel materials in air environments exposed to high neutron fluences. It also addressed problems with welding highly irradiated materials, and primarily attributed those problems to helium-induced cracking in the material. (Helium is produced from the neutron irradiation of boron, an impurity, and nickel.) The researchers found that the amount of helium-induced cracking could be controlled, or even eliminated, by reducing the heat input into the weld and applying a compressive stress perpendicular to the weld path.

Lund, A.L.

1997-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

274

FUSION WELDING METHOD AND APPARATUS  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An apparatus for the fusion welding of metal pieces at a joint is described. The apparatus comprises a highvacuum chamber enclosing the metal pieces and a thermionic filament emitter. Sufficient power is applied to the emitter so that when the electron emission therefrom is focused on the joint it has sufficient energy to melt the metal pieces, ionize the metallic vapor abcve the molten metal, and establish an arc discharge between the joint and the emitter.

Wyman, W.L.; Steinkamp, W.I.

1961-01-17T23:59:59.000Z

275

Parametric Studies Of Weld Quality Of Tungsten Inert Gas Arc Welding Of Stainless Steel  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Effect of current and gas flow rate on quality of weld in tungsten inter gas arc welding of austenitic stainless steel has been studied in the present work through experiments and analyses. Butt welded joints have been made by using several levels of current and gas flow rate. The quality of the weld has been evaluated in terms of ultimate and breaking strengths of the welded specimens. The observed data have been interpreted, discussed and analyzed by using Grey--Taguchi methodology. Optimum parametric setting has been predicted and validated as well.

Kumar Pal, Pradip; Nandi, Goutam; Ghosh, Nabendu [Mechanical Engineering Department, Jadavpur University, Kolkata-700032 (India)

2011-01-17T23:59:59.000Z

276

Multi-mode ultrasonic welding control and optimization  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A system and method for providing multi-mode control of an ultrasonic welding system. In one embodiment, the control modes include the energy of the weld, the time of the welding process and the compression displacement of the parts being welded during the welding process. The method includes providing thresholds for each of the modes, and terminating the welding process after the threshold for each mode has been reached, the threshold for more than one mode has been reached or the threshold for one of the modes has been reached. The welding control can be either open-loop or closed-loop, where the open-loop process provides the mode thresholds and once one or more of those thresholds is reached the welding process is terminated. The closed-loop control provides feedback of the weld energy and/or the compression displacement so that the weld power and/or weld pressure can be increased or decreased accordingly.

Tang, Jason C.H.; Cai, Wayne W

2013-05-28T23:59:59.000Z

277

Neutron Diffraction Residual Strain Tensor Measurements Within The Phase IA Weld Mock-up Plate P-5  

SciTech Connect

Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) has worked with NRC and EPRI to apply neutron and X-ray diffraction methods to characterize the residual stresses in a number of dissimilar metal weld mockups and samples. The design of the Phase IA specimens aimed to enable stress measurements by several methods and computational modeling of the weld residual stresses. The partial groove in the 304L stainless steel plate was filled with weld beads of Alloy 82. A summary of the weld conditions for each plate is provided in Table 1. The plates were constrained along the long edges during and after welding by bolts with spring-loaded washers attached to the 1-inch thick Al backing plate. The purpose was to avoid stress relief due to bending of the welded stainless steel plate. The neutron diffraction method was one of the methods selected by EPRI for non-destructive through thickness strain and stress measurement. Four different plates (P-3 to P-6) were studied by neutron diffraction strain mapping, representing four different welding conditions. Through thickness neutron diffraction strain mappings at NRSF2 for the four plates and associated strain-free d-zero specimens involved measurement along seven lines across the weld and at six to seven depths. The mountings of each plate for neutron diffraction measurements were such that the diffraction vector was parallel to each of the three primary orthogonal directions of the plate: two in-plane directions, longitudinal and transverse, and the direction normal to the plate (shown in left figure within Table 1). From the three orthogonal strains for each location, the residual stresses along the three plate directions were calculated. The principal axes of the strain and stress tensors, however, need not necessarily align with the plate coordinate system. To explore this, plate P-5 was selected for examination of the possibility that the principal axes of strain are not along the sample coordinate system axes. If adequate data could be collected the goal would be to determine the strain tensor's orientation and magnitude of strain along each principle axis direction.

Hubbard, Camden R [ORNL

2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

278

SmartWeld working session for the GTS4  

SciTech Connect

Results from SmartWeld`s first working session involving in-progress designs is presented. The Welding Advisor component of SmartWeld was thoroughly exercised, evaluated all eleven welds of the selected part. The Welding Advisor is an expert system implemented with object-oriented techniques for knowledge representation. With two welding engineers in attendance, the recommendations of the Welding Advisor were thoroughly examined and critiqued for accuracy and for areas of improvement throughout the working session. The Weld Schedule Database component of SmartWeld was also exercised. It is a historical archive of proven, successful weld schedules that can be intelligently searched using the current context of SmartWeld`s problem solving state. On all eleven welds, the experts agreed that Welding Advisor recommended the most risk free options. As a result of the Advisor`s recommendation, six welds agreed completely with the experts, two welds had their joint geometry modified for production, and three welds were not modified but extra care was exercised during welding. 25 figs., 3 tabs.

Kleban, S. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Hicken, K.; Ng, R. [Sandia National Labs., Livermore, CA (United States); Fricke, B. [Allied Signal Kansas City Division, MO (United States)

1997-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

279

Neural network modeling of pulsed-laser weld pool shapes in aluminum alloy welds  

SciTech Connect

A model was developed to predict the weld pool shape in pulsed Nd:YAG laser welds of aluminum alloy 5754. The model utilized neural network analysis to relate the weld process conditions to four pool shape parameters: penetration, width, width at half-penetration, and cross-sectional area. The model development involved the identification of the input (process) variables, the desired output (shape) variables, and the optimal neural network architecture. The latter was influenced by the number of defined inputs and outputs as well as the amount of data that was available for training the network. After appropriate training, the best network was identified and was used to predict the weld shape. A routine to convert the shape parameters into predicted weld profiles was also developed. This routine was based on the actual experimental weld profiles and did not impose an artificial analytical function to describe the weld profile. The neural network model was tested on experimental welds. The model predictions were excellent. It was found that the predicted shapes were within the experimental variations that were found along the length of the welds (due to the pulsed nature of the weld power) and the reproducibility of welds made under nominally identical conditions.

Vitek, J.M.; Iskander, Y.S.; Oblow, E.M.; Babu, S.S.; David, S.A. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Fuerschbach, P.W. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Smartt, H.B.; Pace, D.P. Tolle, C.R. [Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Lab., Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

1998-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

280

STRESS CORROSION CRACKING IN TEAR DROP SPECIMENS  

SciTech Connect

Laboratory tests were conducted to investigate the stress corrosion cracking (SCC) of 304L stainless steel used to construct the containment vessels for the storage of plutonium-bearing materials. The tear drop corrosion specimens each with an autogenous weld in the center were placed in contact with moist plutonium oxide and chloride salt mixtures. Cracking was found in two of the specimens in the heat affected zone (HAZ) at the apex area. Finite element analysis was performed to simulate the specimen fabrication for determining the internal stress which caused SCC to occur. It was found that the tensile stress at the crack initiation site was about 30% lower than the highest stress which had been shifted to the shoulders of the specimen due to the specimen fabrication process. This finding appears to indicate that the SCC initiation took place in favor of the possibly weaker weld/base metal interface at a sufficiently high level of background stress. The base material, even subject to a higher tensile stress, was not cracked. The relieving of tensile stress due to SCC initiation and growth in the HAZ and the weld might have foreclosed the potential for cracking at the specimen shoulders where higher stress was found.

Lam, P; Philip Zapp, P; Jonathan Duffey, J; Kerry Dunn, K

2009-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "welding stress management" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Manual tube-to-tubesheet welding torch  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A welding torch made of a high temperature plastic which fits over a tube intermediate the ends thereof for welding the juncture between the tube and the back side of a tube plate and has a ballooned end in which an electrode, filler wire guide, fiber optic bundle, and blanketing gas duct are disposed.

Kiefer, Joseph H. (Tampa, FL); Smith, Danny J. (Tampa, FL)

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

282

Seal welded cast iron nuclear waste container  

SciTech Connect

This invention identifies methods and articles designed to circumvent metallurgical problems associated with hermetically closing an all cast iron nuclear waste package by welding. It involves welding nickel-carbon alloy inserts which are bonded to the mating plug and main body components of the package. The welding inserts might be bonded in place during casting of the package components. When the waste package closure weld is made, the most severe thermal effects of the process are restricted to the nickel-carbon insert material which is far better able to accommodate them than is cast iron. Use of nickel-carbon weld inserts should eliminate any need for pre-weld and post-weld heat treatments which are a problem to apply to nuclear waste packages. Although the waste package closure weld approach described results in a dissimilar metal combination, the relative surface area of nickel-to-iron, their electrochemical relationship, and the presence of graphite in both materials will act to prevent any galvanic corrosion problem.

Filippi, Arthur M. (Pittsburgh, PA); Sprecace, Richard P. (Murrysville, PA)

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

283

Temperbead Qualification: Joint P3 Weld Qualification  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report outlines the procedure qualification for a new temperbead weld repair. After an initial failed qualification, the EPRI Repair and Replacement Applications Center (RRAC) teamed with Calvert Cliffs Nuclear Power Plant to perform a joint procedure qualification and, in doing so, assisted the industry by enabling general use of the new weld procedure.

2002-12-29T23:59:59.000Z

284

Automated Spot Weld Inspection using Infrared Thermography  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An automated non-contact and non-destructive resistance spot weld inspection system based on infrared (IR) thermography was developed for post-weld applications. During inspection, a weld coupon was heated up by an auxiliary induction heating device from one side of the weld, while the resulting thermal waves on the other side were observed by an IR camera. The IR images were analyzed to extract a thermal signature based on normalized heating time, which was then quantitatively correlated to the spot weld nugget size. The use of normalized instead of absolute IR intensity was found to be useful in minimizing the sensitivity to the unknown surface conditions and environment interference. Application of the IR-based inspection system to different advanced high strength steels, thickness gauges and coatings were discussed.

Chen, Jian [ORNL; Zhang, Wei [ORNL; Yu, Zhenzhen [ORNL; Feng, Zhili [ORNL

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

285

What makes an electric welding arc perform its required function  

SciTech Connect

The physics of direct current and alternating current welding arcs, the heat transfer of direct current welding arcs, the characteristics of dc welding and ac welding power supplies and recommendations for the procurement and maintenance of precision power supplies are discussed. (LCL)

Correy, T.B.

1982-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

286

Adaptive feed-forward digital control of GTA welding  

SciTech Connect

Three control functions are performed - seam tracking, weld pattern selection, and pattern scaling. The controller uses a computer program specifically written for welding. Its use with a welding unit is sufficiently simple that it may be mastered by a person having conventional welding skills. 27 refs.

Scott, J.J.; Brandt, H.

1982-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

287

Numerical simulation of the electron beam welding process  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Electron beam welding is a highly efficient and precise welding method that is being increasingly used in industrial manufacturing and is of growing importance in industry. Compared to other welding processes it offers the advantage of very low heat ... Keywords: 3D conical heat source, Electron beam welding (EBW), Heat-affected zone, Numerical simulation, Thermomechanical coupling analysis

Piotr Lacki; Konrad Adamus

2011-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

288

Probability of Failure for Low Alloy Cr-Mo Seam Welded Piping in Fossil Power Plants  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Managing longitudinal seam welded piping in fossil fueled power plants is an expensive challenge necessitated by the failures of a few hot reheat and main steam lines. The traditional approach involves inspections during outages that require scaffold erection, insulation removal, surface preparation, and nondestructive evaluation NDE inspection. This report strives to provide utilities with another tool to manage high energy piping systems. It investigates normal distribution of material properties, alon...

2010-12-23T23:59:59.000Z

289

Stress relief cracking in creep resisting low alloy ferritic steels.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Problem of Stress Relief Cracking in Low Alloy Steels During the welding of a ferritic steel, the HAZ adjacent to the weld transforms to austenite, the grains close to the fusion zone attaining particularly high tempel'ature and undergoing considerable... growth. At the same time, carbides tend to dissolve, dissolution being more complete in the coarse 14 grained region because it attains a higher temperature. The HAZ is cooled rapidly by the cold parent metal and, as a result, re- precipitation...

Tait, Robert Andrew

1976-10-26T23:59:59.000Z

290

Program on Technology Innovation: Nondestructive Evaluation and Measurement of Residual Stress  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report summarizes the results of material characterization involving residual stress estimates that were performed on Alloy 600/182 welded plates using both X-ray diffraction (XRD) and neutron diffraction (ND) testing methods.

2008-08-14T23:59:59.000Z

291

Laser assisted non-consumable arc welding process development  

SciTech Connect

The employment of Laser Beam Welding (LBW) for many traditional arc welding applications is often limited by the inability of LBW to compensate for variations in the weld joint gap. This limitation is associated with fluctuations in the energy transfer efficiency along the weld joint. Since coupling of the laser beam to the workpiece is dependent on the maintenance of a stable absorption keyhole, perturbations to the weld pool can lead to decreased energy transfer and resultant weld defects. Because energy transfer in arc welding does not similarly depend on weld pool geometry, it is expected that combining these two processes together will lead to an enhanced fusion welding process that exhibits the advantages of both arc welding and LBW. Laser assisted non-consumable arc welds have been made on thin section aluminum. The welds combine the advantages of arc welding and laser welding, with enhanced penetration and fusion zone size. The use of a pulsed Nd:YAG laser with the combined process appears to be advantageous since this laser is effective in removing the aluminum oxide and thereby allowing operation with the tungsten electrode negative. The arc appears to increase the size of the weld and also to mitigate hot cracking tendencies that are common with the pulsed Nd:YAG laser.

Fuerschach, P.W.; Hooper, F.M.

1997-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

292

PDC IC WELD FAILURE EVALUATION AND RESOLUTION  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

During final preparations for start of the PDCF Inner Can (IC) qualification effort, welding was performed on an automated weld system known as the PICN. During the initial weld, using a pedigree canister and plug, a weld defect was observed. The defect resulted in a hole in the sidewall of the canister, and it was observed that the plug sidewall had not been consumed. This was a new type of failure not seen during development and production of legacy Bagless Transfer Cans (FB-Line/Hanford). Therefore, a team was assembled to determine the root cause and to determine if the process could be improved. After several brain storming sessions (MS and T, R and D Engineering, PDC Project), an evaluation matrix was established to direct this effort. The matrix identified numerous activities that could be taken and then prioritized those activities. This effort was limited by both time and resources (the number of canisters and plugs available for testing was limited). A discovery process was initiated to evaluate the Vendor's IC fabrication process relative to legacy processes. There were no significant findings, however, some information regarding forging/anneal processes could not be obtained. Evaluations were conducted to compare mechanical properties of the PDC canisters relative to the legacy canisters. Some differences were identified, but mechanical properties were determined to be consistent with legacy materials. A number of process changes were also evaluated. A heat treatment procedure was established that could reduce the magnetic characteristics to levels similar to the legacy materials. An in-situ arc annealing process was developed that resulted in improved weld characteristics for test articles. Also several tack welds configurations were addressed, it was found that increasing the number of tack welds (and changing the sequence) resulted in decreased can to plug gaps and a more stable weld for test articles. Incorporating all of the process improvements for the actual can welding process, however, did not result in an improved weld geometry. Several possibilities for the lack of positive response exist, some of which are that (1) an insufficient number of test articles were welded under prototypic conditions, (2) the process was not optimized so that significant improvements were observable over the 'noise', and (3) the in-situ arc anneal closed the gap down too much so the can was unable to exhaust pressure ahead of the weld. Several operational and mechanical improvements were identified. The weld clamps were changed to a design consistent with those used in the legacy operations. A helium puff operation was eliminated; it is believed that this operation was the cause of the original weld defect. Also, timing of plug mast movement was found to correspond with weld irregularities. The timing of the movement was changed to occur during weld head travel between tacks. In the end a three sequential tack weld process followed by a pulse weld at the same current and travel speed as was used for the legacy processes was suggested for use during the IC qualification effort. Relative to legacy welds, the PDC IC weld demonstrates greater fluctuation in the region of the weld located between tack welds. However, canister weld response (canister to canister) is consistent and with the aid of the optical mapping system (for targeting the cut position) is considered adequate. DR measurements and METs show the PDC IC welds to have sufficient ligament length to ensure adequate canister pressure/impact capacity and to ensure adequate stub function. The PDC welding process has not been optimized as a result of this effort. Differences remain between the legacy BTC welds and the PDC IC weld, but these differences are not sufficient to prevent resumption of the current PDC IC qualification effort. During the PDC IC qualification effort, a total of 17 cans will be welded and a variety of tests/inspections will be performed. The extensive data collected during that qualification effort should be of a sufficient population to determ

Korinko, P.; Howard, S.; Maxwell, D.; Fiscus, J.

2012-04-16T23:59:59.000Z

293

Modeling of fundamental phenomena in welds  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Recent advances in the mathematical modeling of fundamental phenomena in welds are summarized. State-of-the-art mathematical models, advances in computational techniques, emerging high-performance computers, and experimental validation techniques have provided significant insight into the fundamental factors that control the development of the weldment. The current status and scientific issues in the areas of heat and fluid flow in welds, heat source metal interaction, solidification microstructure, and phase transformations are assessed. Future research areas of major importance for understanding the fundamental phenomena in weld behavior are identified.

Zacharia, T.; Vitek, J.M. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Goldak, J.A. [Carleton Univ., Ottawa, Ontario (Canada); DebRoy, T.A. [Pennsylvania State Univ., University Park, PA (United States); Rappaz, M. [Ecole Polytechnique Federale de Lausanne (Switzerland); Bhadeshia, H.K.D.H. [Cambridge Univ. (United Kingdom)

1993-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

294

CO/sub 2/ welding used to attach inspection manway to NASA hydrogen pressure vessel  

SciTech Connect

Welding of inspection manway for internal survey of a gaseous hydrogen storage vessel is described. Pre-welding activities are reviewed, along with welding operations, and in-process welding control. (JRD)

Palmer, G.; Conklin, D.

1976-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

295

Fatique Resistant, Energy Efficient Welding Program, Final Technical Report  

SciTech Connect

The program scope was to affect the heat input and the resultant weld bead geometry by synchronizing robotic weave cycles with desired pulsed waveform shapes to develop process parameters relationships and optimized pulsed gas metal arc welding processes for welding fatique-critical structures of steel, high strength steel, and aluminum. Quality would be addressed by developing intelligent methods of weld measurement that accurately predict weld bead geometry from process information. This program was severely underfunded, and eventually terminated. The scope was redirected to investigate tandem narrow groove welding of steel butt joints during the one year of partial funding. A torch was designed and configured to perform a design of experiments of steel butt weld joints that validated the feasability of the process. An initial cost model estimated a 60% cost savings over conventional groove welding by eliminating the joint preparation and reducing the weld volume needed.

Egland, Keith; Ludewig, Howard

2006-05-25T23:59:59.000Z

296

double-sided arc welding of az31b magnesium alloy sheet  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Jul 20, 2012... tailor-welded blanks for forming automotive structural components. ... initial investigations suggest that visually acceptable symmetrical welds ...

297

Overview of a Welding Development Program for a Ni-Cr-Mo-Gd Alloy  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The National Spent Nuclear Fuel Program (NSNFP), located at the Idaho National Laboratory, coordinates and integrates management and disposal of U.S. Department of Energy-owned spent nuclear fuel. These management functions include using the DOE standardized canister for packaging, storage, treatment, transport, and long-term disposal in the Yucca Mountain Repository. Nuclear criticality must be prevented in the postulated event where a waste package is breached and water (neutron moderator) is introduced into the waste package. Criticality control will be implemented by using a new, weldable, corrosion-resistant, neutron-absorbing material to fabricate the welded structural inserts (fuel baskets) that will be placed in the standardized canister. The new alloy is based on the Ni-Cr-Mo alloy system with a gadolinium addition. Gadolinium was chosen as the neutron absorption alloying element because of its high thermal neutron absorption cross section. This paper describes a weld development program to qualify this new material for American Society of Mechanical Engineers (ASME) welding procedures, develop data to extend the present ASME Code Case (unwelded) for welded construction, and understand the weldability and microstructural factors inherent to this alloy.

W. L. Hurt; R. E. Mizia; D. E. Clark

2007-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

298

Metallurgical Characteristics and Field Performances of Weld ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Current talk highlights the weld overlays of a number of corrosion-resistant alloys that have been used successfully in waste-to-energy boilers, coal-fired boilers, ...

299

Friction Stir Welding and Processing II  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Jan 1, 2007 ... Friction Stir Welding and Processing II by K.V. Jata, M.W. Mahoney, R.S. Mishra, S.L. Semiatin, and T. Lienert, editors ...

300

Friction Stir Welding: Light Materials II  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Mar 6, 2013... interests to automotive industry due to fuel economy and emission regulation. .... a mixture solution of ice and water to freeze the microstructure. ... for the friction stir weld tool, have produced joints of adequate performance, ...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "welding stress management" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Friction stir welding of Kanthal APMT  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

EPRI P87, A New Filler Material for Dissimilar Metal Welds · Explosive Bonding of 316L to C18150 CuCrZr Alloy for ITER Applications · Failure Mechanisms of ...

302

Weld Simulation in X100 Pipeline Steel  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Abstract Scope, The effect of gas metal arc weld (GMAW) parameters on the coarse-grain heat-affect zone (CGHAZ) of X100 pipeline steel has been studied by ...

303

The 'world's largest' Inconel waterwall weld overlay  

SciTech Connect

An 11,000 square foot Inconel 655 weld repaired severe wastage caused by low NOx firing with coal/petcoke at the Belledune generating station in New Brunswick, Canada. 1 ref., 1 fig., 3 photos.

MacLean, K.; Fournier, E.; Gomez-Grande, J.; Scandroli, T. [New Brunswick Power Generation (United States)

2009-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

304

WELDED SEAL-RING VACUUM CLOSURES  

SciTech Connect

The development of bakeable high-vacuum flanges for the ORNL PIG Facility is reported. The general design approach for this type flange is to obtain a bakeable vacuum seal by first welding thin metal rings to a set of heavy metal flanges, and then edge-welding the rings together. This design sllows the option of O-ring sealing for nonbaked operation. A number of flange designs are discussed together with fabrication inspection, testing, and installation and maintenance information. (auth)

Michelson, C.

1959-08-21T23:59:59.000Z

305

Optimization of different welding processes using statistical and numerical approaches - A reference guide  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Welding input parameters play a very significant role in determining the quality of a weld joint. The joint quality can be defined in terms of properties such as weld-bead geometry, mechanical properties, and distortion. Generally, all welding processes ... Keywords: Ann, Optimization, Quality of weld, RSM, Taguchi, Welding

K. Y. Benyounis; A. G. Olabi

2008-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

306

Welding metallurgy of nickel alloys in gas turbine components  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Materials for gas turbine engines are required to meet a wide range of temperature and stress application requirements. These alloys exhibit a combination of creep resistance, creep rupture strength, yield and tensile strength over a wide temperature range, resistance to environmental attack (including oxidation, nitridation, sulphidation and carburization), fatigue and thermal fatigue resistance, metallurgical stability and useful thermal expansion characteristics. These properties are exhibited by a series of solid-solution-strengthened and precipitation-hardened nickel, iron and cobalt alloys. The properties needed to meet the turbine engine requirements have been achieved by specific alloy additions, by heat treatment and by thermal mechanical processing. A thorough understanding of the metallurgy and metallurgical processing of these materials is imperative in order to successfully fusion weld them. This same basic understanding is required for repair of a component with the added dimension of the potential effects of thermal cycling and environmental exposure the component will have endured in service. This article will explore the potential problems in joining and repair welding these materials.

Lingenfelter, A. C., LLNL

1997-05-21T23:59:59.000Z

307

Friction Stir Spot Welding of Advanced High Strength Steels  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Friction stir spot welding techniques were developed to successfully join several advanced high strength steels. Two distinct tool materials were evaluated to determine the effect of tool materials on the process parameters and joint properties. Welds were characterized primarily via lap shear, microhardness, and optical microscopy. Friction stir spot welds were compared to the resistance spot welds in similar strength alloys by using the AWS standard for resistance spot welding high strength steels. As further comparison, a primitive cost comparison between the two joining processes was developed, which included an evaluation of the future cost prospects of friction stir spot welding in advanced high strength steels.

Hovanski, Yuri; Grant, Glenn J.; Santella, M. L.

2009-11-13T23:59:59.000Z

308

Intelligent Control of Modular Robotic Welding Cell  

SciTech Connect

Although robotic machines are routinely used for welding, such machines do not normally incorporate intelligent capabilities. We are studying the general problem of formulating usable levels of intelligence into welding machines. From our perspective, an intelligent machine should: incorporate knowledge of the welding process, know if the process is operating correctly, know if the weld it is making is good or bad, have the ability to learn from its experience to perform welds, and be able to optimize its own performance. To this end, we are researching machine architecture, methods of knowledge representation, decision making and conflict resolution algorithms, methods of learning and optimization, human/machine interfaces, and various sensors. This paper presents work on the machine architecture and the human/machine interface specifically for a robotic, gas metal arc welding cell. Although the machine control problem is normally approached from the perspective of having a central body of control in the machine, we present a design using distributed agents. A prime goal of this work is to develop an architecture for an intelligent machine that will support a modular, plug and play standard. A secondary goal of this work is to formulate a human/machine interface that treats the human as an active agent in the modular structure.

Smartt, Herschel Bernard; Kenney, Kevin Louis; Tolle, Charles Robert

2002-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

309

Utilization of a finite element model to verify spent nuclear fuel storage rack welds  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Elastic and plastic finite element analyses were performed for the inner tie block assembly of a 25 port fuel rack designed for installation at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL) Idaho Chemical Processing Plant (ICPP). The model was specifically developed to verify the adequacy of certain welds joining components of the fuel storage rack assembly. The work scope for this task was limited to an investigation of the stress levels in the inner tie welds when the rack was subjected to seismic loads. Structural acceptance criteria used for the elastic calculations performed were as defined by the rack`s designer. Structural acceptance criteria used for the plastic calculations performed as part of this effort were as defined in Subsection NF and Appendix F of Section III of the ASME Boiler and Pressure Vessel Code. The results confirm that the welds joining the inner tie block to the surrounding rack structure meet the acceptance criteria. The analysis results verified that the inner tie block welds should be capable of transferring the expected seismic load without structural failure.

Nitzel, M.E.

1998-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

310

Welding  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

...due to required skills and labor intensity Possible high cost for capital equipment, especially for some

311

Welding of NOREM Iron-Base Hardfacing Alloy Wire Products: Procedures for Gas Tungsten Arc Welding  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

New wire products have been successfully fabricated and procedures developed for automatic gas tungsten arc welding of wear-resistant NOREM iron-base alloys. Research demonstrated that sound multi-layer welds on carbon and stainless steel substrates can be obtained without the use of preheating. These developments point to the advantages of NOREM alloys for field applications, such as valve refurbishing.

1992-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

312

Application of artificial neural network for predicting weld quality in laser transmission welding of thermoplastics  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The present work establishes a correlation between the laser transmission welding parameters and output variables though a nonlinear model, developed by applying artificial neural network (ANN). The process parameters of the model include laser power, ... Keywords: Artificial neural networks, Laser transmission welding, Regression analysis, Sensitivity analysis, Thermoplastics

Bappa Acherjee; Subrata Mondal; Bipan Tudu; Dipten Misra

2011-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

313

Fragility tests of welded attachments as compared to ASME Code Case N-318  

SciTech Connect

This paper presents the results from a series of fragility tests to assess the capacity of integral welded pipe attachments of various configurations. Both limit load and fatigue tests were performed on rectangular lugs and crosses (cruciforms) on straight pipe. The results of the limit load tests are presented as a limit moment. The results of the fatigue tests are cycles-to-failure. Markl`s equation is then used to determine stress intensification factors. The limit moments and stress intensification factors are then compared to those developed using the methodology of ASME Code Case N-318 to determine the level of conservatism in the Code Case.

Rawls, G.B. [Westinghouse Savannah River Co., Aiken, SC (United States); Wais, E.A. [Wais and Associates, Inc., Atlanta, GA (United States); Rodabaugh, E.C. [Rodabaugh (E.C.) and Associates, Hilliard, OH (United States)

1990-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

314

Fragility tests of welded attachments as compared to ASME Code Case N-318  

SciTech Connect

This paper presents the results from a series of fragility tests to assess the capacity of integral welded pipe attachments of various configurations. Both limit load and fatigue tests were performed on rectangular lugs and crosses (cruciforms) on straight pipe. The results of the limit load tests are presented as a limit moment. The results of the fatigue tests are cycles-to-failure. Markl's equation is then used to determine stress intensification factors. The limit moments and stress intensification factors are then compared to those developed using the methodology of ASME Code Case N-318 to determine the level of conservatism in the Code Case.

Rawls, G.B. (Westinghouse Savannah River Co., Aiken, SC (United States)); Wais, E.A. (Wais and Associates, Inc., Atlanta, GA (United States)); Rodabaugh, E.C. (Rodabaugh (E.C.) and Associates, Hilliard, OH (United States))

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

315

A Glove Box Enclosed Gas-Tungsten Arc Welding System  

SciTech Connect

This report describes an inert atmosphere enclosed gas-tungsten arc welding system which has been assembled in support of the MC2730, MC2730A and MC 3500 Radioisotope Thermoelectric Generator (RTG) Enhanced Surveillance Program. One goal of this program is to fabricate welds with microstructures and impurity levels which are similar to production heat source welds previously produced at Los Alamos National Laboratory and the Mound Facility. These welds will subsequently be used for high temperature creep testing as part of the overall component lifetime assessment. In order to maximize the utility of the welding system, means for local control of the arc atmosphere have been incorporated and a wide range of welding environments can easily be evaluated. The gas-tungsten arc welding system used in the assembly is computer controlled, includes two-axis and rotary motion, and can be operated in either continuous or pulsed modes. The system can therefore be used for detailed research studies of welding impurity effects, development of prototype weld schedules, or to mimic a significant range of production-like welding conditions. Fixturing for fabrication of high temperature creep test samples have been designed and constructed, and weld schedules for grip-tab and test welds have been developed. The microstructure of these welds have been evaluated and are consistent with those used during RTG production.

Reevr, E, M; Robino, C.V.

1999-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

316

Apparatus for maintaining aligment of a shrinking weld joint in an electron-beam welding operation  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The invention is directed to an apparatus for automatically maintaining a shrinking weld joint in alignement with an electron beam during an electron-beam multipass-welding operation. The apparatus utilizes a bias means for continually urging a workpiece-supporting face plate away from a carriage mounted base that rotatably supports the face plate. The extent of displacement of the face plate away from the base in indicative of the shrinkage occuring in the weld joint area. This displacement is measured and is used to move the base on the carriage a distance equal to one-half the displacement for aligning the weld joint with the electron beam during each welding pass.

Trent, J.B.; Murphy, J.L.

1980-01-03T23:59:59.000Z

317

Apparatus for maintaining alignment of a shrinking weld joint in an electron-beam welding operation  

SciTech Connect

The present invention is directed to an apparatus for automatically maintaining a shrinking weld joint in alignment with an electron beam during an electron-beam multipass-welding operation. The apparatus utilizes a biasing device for continually urging a workpiece-supporting face plate away from a carriage mounted base that rotatably supports the face plate. The extent of displacement of the face plate away from the base is indicative of the shrinkage occuring in the weld joint area. This displacement is measured and is used to move the base on the carriage a distance equal to one-half the displacement for aligning the weld joint with the electron beam during each welding pass.

Trent, Jett B. (Knoxville, TN); Murphy, Jimmy L. (Oak Ridge, TN)

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

318

Evaluation of Manual Ultrasonic Examinations Applied to Detect Flaws in Primary System Dissimilar Metal Welds at North Anna Power Station  

SciTech Connect

During a recent inservice inspection (ISI) of a dissimilar metal weld (DMW) in an inlet (hot leg) steam generator nozzle at North Anna Power Station Unit 1, several axially oriented flaws went undetected by the licensee's manual ultrasonic testing (UT) technique. The flaws were subsequently detected as a result of outside diameter (OD) surface machining in preparation for a full structural weld overlay. The machining operation uncovered the existence of two through-wall flaws, based on the observance of primary water leaking from the DMW. Further ultrasonic tests were then performed, and a total of five axially oriented flaws, classified as primary water stress corrosion cracking (PWSCC), were detected in varied locations around the weld circumference.

Anderson, Michael T.; Diaz, Aaron A.; Doctor, Steven R.

2012-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

319

Steam Generator Management Program: Conditions Causing Lead Stress Corrosion Cracking of Steam Generator Tubing, Alloy 690TT  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Tube damage by intergranular attack/stress corrosion cracking (IGA/SCC) continues to result in steam generator tubing degradation, plugging of tubes, and eventual replacement of steam generators.  The present strategy for mitigating IGA/SCC is based on the assumption that crack initiation and propagation rates depend on the at-temperature pH (pHT), the electrochemical potential, and the development of crevice areas.  Accordingly, all plants have adopted the practice of ...

2013-12-18T23:59:59.000Z

320

Training Program EHS ~ 244: Resistance Spot Welding Safety Training  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

4: Resistance Spot Welding Safety Training 4: Resistance Spot Welding Safety Training Course Syllabus Subject Category: Resistance Spot Welding Course Prerequisite: None Course Length: 25 minutes Medical Approval: No Delivery Mode: Web-Based Course Goal: Participants will be introduced to resistance spot welding processes, hazards, and safe work practices. Course Objectives: By the end of this course, you will be able to: * Identify resistance spot welding processes * Identify hazards, safe work practices, and personal protective equipment associated with resistance spot welding * Recognize the purpose of resistance spot welding schedules * Locate resistance spot welding schedule Subject Matter Expert: Joe Dionne x 7586 Training Compliance: 29 CFR 1910 Subparts O & Z, 29 CFR 1926 Subparts J & Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "welding stress management" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Computer Simulation for Laser Welding of Thermoplastic Polymers  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper presents an analytical approach to thermal behaviors of laser welding of polymers. Laser polymers processing leads to various thermal, photophysical, and photochemical processes within the bulk and on the material surface. The understanding ... Keywords: polymer, thermal analysis, welding

Ching-Yen Ho; Moa-Yu Wen; Chung Ma

2010-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

322

Report of the fourth BES Welding Research Program meeting  

SciTech Connect

Developments in DOE welding R and D programs, compiled and edited by Materials Technology Division, EG and G Idaho, Inc., were distributed to DOE Basic Energy Sciences and its welding program contractors for information and comment.

1981-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

323

Residual Stress Analysis of Resistance Spot Welding, FE Modeling ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Magnetic Composite Materials · X-Ray Studies of Structural Effects Induced by Pulsed (30 Tesla), High Magnetic Fields at the Advanced Photon Source ...

324

A Coupled Approach to Weld Pool, Phase and Residual Stress ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Author(s), Mustafa Megahed, Mushtaq Khan, Juansethi Ibara-Medina, Michael Vogel, Narcisse N'Dri, Andrew Pinkerton. On-Site Speaker (Planned), Mustafa ...

325

Dissimilar Metal Weld Residual Stress Mappings by Neutron and X ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... (IHD), X-ray diffraction (XRD) and neutron diffraction (ND) methods conducted by Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). ... Planned: A CD-only volume ...

326

Technology for the Examination of Boiler Tubing Dissimilar Metal Welds  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In an effort to determine the optimum method for examination of fossil power plant dissimilar metal boiler tube welds, researchers obtained several samples removed from service, and applied various ultrasonic examination technology to these samples. The welds in these samples were made with either austenitic stainless steel weld metal or by the induction pressure method. The welds were then subjected to conventional and advanced ultrasonic examination in the laboratory. For all examination methods, there...

2011-12-07T23:59:59.000Z

327

Friction Stir Welding and Processing of Nickel Based Superalloys  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

About this Abstract. Meeting, Materials Science & Technology 2011. Symposium, Joining and Sustaining of Superalloys. Presentation Title, Friction Stir Welding ...

328

Effect of Welding Speed and Defocusing Distance on  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

About this Abstract. Meeting, Materials Science & Technology 2010. Symposium, Laser Applications in Materials Processing. Presentation Title, Effect of Welding ...

329

Repair and Replacement Applications Center Joint Welding Procedure Qualification Program  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

At the request of the EPRI Repair and Replacement Applications Center subscribers, a Joint Welding Procedure Qualification Program was developed to provide a medium whereby multiple utilities can share in the qualification of specific welding procedures. The program was developed in such a manner that it will supplement existing utility welding qualification programs. Specifically the program incorporates the more stringent attributes of each utility's internal welding program while meeting the individua...

1997-11-12T23:59:59.000Z

330

Fundamentals of Friction Stir Welding and Processing Short Course  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Meeting Home · Meeting Registration · Curriculum · About the Presenters · Housing · Sponsor · Download Flyer. Fundamentals of Friction Stir Welding and ...

331

Girth Weld Cracking at Ethanol Terminal Facilities - Programmaster ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

About this Abstract. Meeting, Materials Science & Technology 2013. Symposium, Failure Analysis and Prevention. Presentation Title, Girth Weld Cracking at ...

332

Technical Letter Report - Analysis of Ultrasonic Data on Piping Cracks at Ignalina Nuclear Power Plant Before and After Applying a Mechanical Stress Improvement Process, JCN-N6319, Task 2  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) is assisting the United States Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) in developing a position on the management of primary water stress corrosion cracking (PWSCC) in piping systems previously analyzed for leak-before-break (LBB). Part of this work involves determining whether inspections alone are sufficient or if inspections plus mitigation techniques are needed. The work described in this report addresses the reliability of ultrasonic phased-array (PA) examinations for inspection of cracks that have been subjected to the mitigation method of mechanical stress improvement process (MSIP). It is believed that stresses imparted during MSIP may make ultrasonic crack responses in piping welds more difficult to detect and accurately characterize. To explore this issue, data were acquired, both before and after applying MSIP, and analyzed from cracked areas in piping at the Ignalina Nuclear Power Plant (INPP) in Lithuania. This work was performed under NRC Project JCN-N6319, PWSCC in Leak-Before-Break Systems.

Anderson, Michael T.; Cumblidge, Stephen E.; Crawford, Susan L.

2008-02-26T23:59:59.000Z

333

Materials Reliability Program: Review of Stress Corrosion Cracking of Alloys 182 and 82 in PWR Primary Water Service (MRP-220)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Since 1999, there have been several incidences involving primary water stress corrosion cracking (PWSCC) of Alloy 182/82 butt welds in pressurized water reactor (PWR) plants in the United States and abroad. These events resulted in unplanned or extended outages with associated economic costs. This report summarizes the available information on PWSCC of Alloy 182 and 82 weld metals observed in PWR primary circuit components up to the end of 2006. Relevant data from laboratory stress corrosion testing are ...

2007-10-29T23:59:59.000Z

334

Robotic laser welding: seam sensor and laser focal frame registration  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Robotic laser welding places extreme demands on the spatial accuracy with which the robot must position the focal point of the laser with respect to the joint to be welded. The required level of accuracy is difficult to achieve in a production environment ... Keywords: Calibration, Laser welding, Robots, Seam tracking

J. P. Huissoon

2002-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

335

Apparatus for the concurrent inspection of partially completed welds  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An apparatus for the concurrent inspection of partially completed welds is described in which is utilized in combination with a moveable welder for forming a partially completed weld, and an ultrasonic generator mounted on a moveable welder in which is reciprocally moveable along a path of travel which is laterally disposed relative to the partially completed weld.

Smartt, Herschel B. (Idaho Falls, ID); Johnson, John A. (Idaho Falls, ID); Larsen, Eric D. (Idaho Falls, ID); Bitsoi, Rodney J. (Ririe, ID); Perrenoud, Ben C. (Rigby, ID); Miller, Karen S. (Idaho Falls, ID); Pace, David P. (Idaho Falls, ID)

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

336

Plasma heating effects during laser welding  

SciTech Connect

Laser welding is a relatively low heat input process used in joining precisely machined components with minimum distortion and heat affects to surrounding material. The CO/sub 2/ (10.6 ..mu..m) and Nd-YAG (1.06 ..mu..m) lasers are the primary lasers used for welding in industry today. Average powers range up to 20 kW for CO/sub 2/ and 400 W for Nd-YAG with pulse lengths of milliseconds to continuous wave. Control of the process depends on an understanding of the laser-plasma-material interaction and characterization of the laser beam being used. Inherent plasma formation above the material surface and subsequent modulation of the incident laser radiation directly affect the energy transfer to the target material. The temporal and spatial characteristics of the laser beam affect the available power density incident on the target, which is important in achieving repeatability in the process. Other factors such as surface texture, surface contaminants, surface chemistry, and welding environment affect plasma formation which determines the weld penetration. This work involves studies of the laser-plasma-material interaction process and particularly the effect of the plasma on the coupling of laser energy to a material during welding. A pulsed Nd-YAG laser was used with maximum average power of 400 W.

Lewis, G.K.; Dixon, R.D.

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

337

The Use of Weld Overlays to Extend the Useful Life of Seam Welded High Energy Piping in Fossil Power Plants  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Replacement of longitudinally welded reheat and main steam lines is very expensive and can result in extended outages. Inspection and re-inspection of such systems every few years is also expensive and time-consuming. An alternative to continued inspection or system replacement is weld overlay. This report provides the basis for weld overlay of one component, clamshell elbows. Weld overlay of other piping system components will build upon the technology developed in this program.

2001-02-28T23:59:59.000Z

338

INVESTIGATIONS ON THE WELDING OF 1-INCH N.B. 18/13/1 STAINLESS STEEL PIPE BY THE HOT PRESSURE WELDING METHOD  

SciTech Connect

An investigation was made on hot pressure welding of 1-in. stainless steel pipe. The application of welding variables and their effect on welding are discussed. (J. E. D.)

O' Grady, G.; Richardson, E.K.

1952-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

339

Actively controlled vibration welding system and method  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A vibration welding system includes a controller, welding horn, an active material element, and anvil assembly. The assembly may include an anvil body connected to a back plate and support member. The element, e.g., a piezoelectric stack or shape memory alloy, is positioned with respect to the assembly. The horn vibrates in a desirable first direction to form a weld on a work piece. The element controls any vibrations in a second direction by applying calibrated response to the anvil body in the second direction. A method for controlling undesirable vibrations in the system includes positioning the element with respect to the anvil assembly, connecting the anvil body to the support member through the back plate, vibrating the horn in a desirable first direction, and transmitting an input signal to the element to control vibration in an undesirable second direction.

Cai, Wayne W.; Kang, Bongsu; Tan, Chin-An

2013-04-02T23:59:59.000Z

340

Temperature distributions in electron beam welding cavities  

SciTech Connect

Surface temperatures in electron beam welding cavities in stainless steel 304 and aluminum 1100, 2024, and 6061 were measured with a narrow band infrared radiation pyrometer. A special device was designed for mounting the radiation-sensing probe next to the electron beam gun in the welding chamber. This mounting device included a mechanism for oscillating the probe so as to scan the cavity region both perpendicular and parallel to the welding direction. At the center of its movement the probe viewed almost directly down into the welding cavity. The effect of interreflections occurring in the welding cavity were accounted for by the use of an apparent spectral cavity emittance. Typical measured cavity temperature distributions for SS-304 ranged from 1950/sup 0/C at the mouth to a peak of 2350/sup 0/C at the cavity base and from 1300 to 1650/sup 0/C for A1-1100. First approximation predictions of the cavity surface temperatures were determined by assuming a quasi-steady-state condition. The surface temperature is then a function of the vapor pressure, which is required to balance the surface tension and the hydrostatic pressure both of which tend to collapse the cavity. Base temperatures thus predicted were about 5% and 10% higher than measured for SS-304 and A1-1100, respectively. It was determined that EB welding cavity base surface temperatures are relatively constant with varying penetration depth because they are more strongly dependent on the curvature at the base than on the penetration depth. Average peak temperatures for SS-304, A1-1100, A1-6061, and A1-2024 were measured to be approximately 2300, 1700, 1525, and 1475/sup 0/C, respectively. The peak temperatures were lower for A1-6061 and A1-2024 than for A1-1100 because they contained a significant amount of magnesium and zinc, both of which have comparatively high vapor pressures.

Shintaku, S.M.

1976-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "welding stress management" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Automated Weld Characterization Using The Thermoelectric Method  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

this paper, we examine a seldom used approach based on the thermoelectric (TE) effect for characterizing welds and their associated heat affected zone (HAZ). The thermoelectric method monitors the thermoelectric power which is sensitive to small changes in the kinetics of the conduction electrons near the Fermi surface that can be caused by changes in the local microstructure. The technique has been applied to metal sorting, quality testing, flaw detection, thickness gauging of layers, and microscopic structural analysis[1-6]. To demonstrate the effectiveness of the technique for characterizing welds, a series of tungsten-inert-gas welded Inconel-718 samples were scanned with a computer controlled TE probe. The samples were then analyzed using a scanning electron microscope and Rockwell hardness tests to characterize the weld and the associated HAZ. We then correlated the results with the TE measurements to provide quantitative information on the size of the HAZ and the degree of hardness of the material in the weld region. This provides potentially valuable information on the strength and fatigue life of the weld. We begin the paper by providing a brief review of the TE technique and then highlight some of the factors that can effect the measurements. Next, we provide an overview of the experimental procedure and discuss the results. Finally, we summarize our findings and consider areas for future research. INTRODUCTION TO THERMOELECTRICITY The thermoelectric technique is based on an effect first discovered by Seebeck in 1822. Seebeck found that when two dissimilar conductors A and B make a circuit a current will flow when the junctions of the two conductors are at different temperatures (Fig. 1). The Seebeck effect occurs because at the hot end, electrons are excited ...

J. P. Fulton; B. Wincheski; M. Namkung

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

342

Welding and Repair Technology Center: Alternative Rules for Temperbead Qualification  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Temperbead welding is common practice in the nuclear power industry for in situ repair of quenched and tempered low-alloy steels when post-weld heat treatment is impractical. The temperbead process controls the heat input so that the weld heat-affected zone in the low-alloy steel is tempered by the welding heat of subsequent layers. The tempering achieved in this way eliminates the need for post-weld heat treatment. Unfortunately, repair organizations in the nuclear power industry are ...

2012-09-28T23:59:59.000Z

343

Method and apparatus for welding precipitation hardenable materials  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method for welding together members consisting of precipitation age hardened materials includes the steps of selecting a weld filler material that has substantially the same composition as the materials being joined, and an age hardening characteristic temperature age threshold below that of the aging kinetic temperature range of the materials being joined, whereby after welding the members together, the resulting weld and heat affected zone (HAZ) are heat treated at a temperature below that of the kinetic temperature range of the materials joined, for obtaining substantially the same mechanical characteristics for the weld and HAZ, as for the parent material of the members joined.

Murray, Jr., Holt (Hopewell, NJ); Harris, Ian D. (Dublin, OH); Ratka, John O. (Cleveland Heights, OH); Spiegelberg, William D. (Parma, OH)

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

344

Method and apparatus for welding precipitation hardenable materials  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method for welding together members consisting of precipitation age hardened materials includes the steps of selecting a weld filler material that has substantially the same composition as the materials being joined, and an age hardening characteristic temperature age threshold below that of the aging kinetic temperature range of the materials being joined, whereby after welding the members together, the resulting weld and heat affected zone (HAZ) are heat treated at a temperature below that of the kinetic temperature range of the materials joined, for obtaining substantially the same mechanical characteristics for the weld and HAZ, as for the parent material of the members joined. 5 figures.

Murray, H. Jr.; Harris, I.D.; Ratka, J.O.; Spiegelberg, W.D.

1994-06-28T23:59:59.000Z

345

Phase transformations in welded supermartensitic stainless steels  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the project. ii Abstract Supermartensitic stainless steels have recently been introduced in the oil and gas industries to substitute more expensive duplex stainless steels for onshore and offshore tubing applications. Although easily joined by arc welding... T the temperature Tp and T0 peak and preheat temperatures of a weld thermal cycle Tq quenching temperature t time V? and V?? volume fraction of austenite and martensite v arc velocity wij weight attributed to the input i in a model of j hidden units y general...

Carrouge, Dominique

346

Fluor Hanford Nuclear Material Stabilization Project Welding Manual  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this section of the welding manual is to: (1) Provide a general description of the major responsibilities of the organizations involved with welding. (2) Provide general guidance concerning the application of codes related to welding. This manual contains requirements for welding for all Fluor Hanford (FH) welding operators working on the W460 Project, in the Plutonium Finishing Plant (PFP) at the U. S. Department of Energy (DOE) Hanford facilities. These procedures and any additional requirements for these joining processes can be used by all FH welding operators that are qualified. The Welding Procedure Specifications (WPS) found in this document were established from Procedure Qualification Records (PQR) qualified by FH specifically for the W460 Project. PQRs are permanent records of the initial testing and qualification program and are used to backup, and support, the WPS. The identification numbers of the supporting PQR(s) are recorded on each WPS. All PQRs are permanently stored under the supervision of the Fluor Hanford Welding Engineer (FHWE). New PQRs and WPSs will continue to be developed as necessary. The qualification of welders, welding operators and welding procedures will be performed for FH under supervision and concurrent of the FHWE. All new welding procedures to be entered in this manual or welder personnel to be added to the welder qualification database, shall be approved by the FHWE.

BERKEY, J.R.

2000-10-20T23:59:59.000Z

347

Structure/property relationships in multipass GMA welding of beryllium.  

SciTech Connect

Beryllium is an interesting metal that has a strength to weight ratio six times that of steel. Because of its unique mechanical properties, beryllium is used in aerospace applications such as satellites. In addition, beryllium is also used in x-ray windows because it is nearly transparent to x-rays. Joining of beryllium has been studied for decades (Ref.l). Typically joining processes include braze-welding (either with gas tungsten arc or gas metal arc), soldering, brazing, and electron beam welding. Cracking which resulted from electron beam welding was recently studied to provide structure/property relationships in autogenous welds (Ref. 2). Braze-welding utilizes a welding arc to melt filler, and only a small amount of base metal is melted and incorporated into the weld pool. Very little has been done to characterize the braze-weld in terms of the structure/property relationships, especially with reference to multipass welding. Thus, this investigation was undertaken to evaluate the effects of multiple passes on microstructure, weld metal composition, and resulting material properties for beryllium welded with aluminum-silicon filler metal.

Hochanadel, P. W. (Patrick W.); Hults, W. L. (William L.); Thoma, D. J. (Dan J.); Dave, V. R. (Vivek R.); Kelly, A. M. (Anna Marie); Pappin, P. A. (Pallas A.); Cola, M. J. (Mark J.); Burgardt, P. (Paul)

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

348

Intermetallic alloy welding wires and method for fabricating the same  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Welding wires for welding together intermetallic alloys of nickel aluminides, nickel-iron aluminides, iron aluminides, or titanium aluminides, and preferably including additional alloying constituents are fabricated as two-component, clad structures in which one component contains the primary alloying constituent(s) except for aluminum and the other component contains the aluminum constituent. This two-component approach for fabricating the welding wire overcomes the difficulties associated with mechanically forming welding wires from intermetallic alloys which possess high strength and limited ductilities at elevated temperatures normally employed in conventional metal working processes. The composition of the clad welding wires is readily tailored so that the welding wire composition when melted will form an alloy defined by the weld deposit which substantially corresponds to the composition of the intermetallic alloy being joined. 4 figs.

Santella, M.L.; Sikka, V.K.

1996-06-11T23:59:59.000Z

349

Friction Stir Spot Welding of DP780 Carbon Steel  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Friction stir spot welds were made in uncoated and galvannneled DP780 sheets using polycrystalline boron nitride stir tools. The tools were plunged at either a single continuous rate or in two segments consisting of a relatively high rate followed by a slower rate of shorter depth. Welding times ranged from 1-10 s. Increasing tool rotation speed from 800 to 1600 rpm increased strength values. The 2-segment welding procedures also produced higher strength joints. Average lap-shear strengths exceeding 10.3 kN were consistently obtained in 4 s on both the uncoated and the galvannealed DP780. The likelihood of diffusion and mechanical interlocking contributing to bond formation was supported by metallographic examinations. A cost analysis based on spot welding in automobile assembly showed that for friction stir spot welding to be economically competitive with resistance spot welding the cost of stir tools must approach that of resistance spot welding electrode tips.

Santella, M. L.; Hovanski, Yuri; Frederick, Alan; Grant, Glenn J.; Dahl, Michael E.

2009-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

350

Intermetallic alloy welding wires and method for fabricating the same  

SciTech Connect

Welding wires for welding together intermetallic alloys of nickel aluminides, nickel-iron aluminides, iron aluminides, or titanium aluminides, and preferably including additional alloying constituents are fabricated as two-component, clad structures in which one component contains the primary alloying constituent(s) except for aluminum and the other component contains the aluminum constituent. This two-component approach for fabricating the welding wire overcomes the difficulties associated with mechanically forming welding wires from intermetallic alloys which possess high strength and limited ductilities at elevated temperatures normally employed in conventional metal working processes. The composition of the clad welding wires is readily tailored so that the welding wire composition when melted will form an alloy defined by the weld deposit which substantially corresponds to the composition of the intermetallic alloy being joined.

Santella, Michael L. (Knoxville, TN); Sikka, Vinod K. (Oak Ridge, TN)

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

351

Welding and Weldability of Thorium-Doped Iridium Alloys  

SciTech Connect

Ir-0.3%W alloys doped with thorium are currently used as post-impact containment material for radioactive fuel in thermoelectric generators that provide stable electrical power for a variety of outer planetary space exploration missions. Welding and weldability of a series of alloys was investigated using arc and laser welding processes. Some of these alloys are prone to severe hot-cracking during welding. Weldability of these alloys was characterized using Sigmajig weldability test. Hot-cracking is influenced to a great extent by the fusion zone microstructure and composition. Thorium content and welding atmosphere were found to be very critical. The weld cracking behavior in these alloys can be controlled by modifying the fusion zone microstructure. Fusion zone microstructure was found to be controlled by welding process, process parameters, and the weld pool shape.

David, S.A.; Ohriner, E.K.; King, J.F.

2000-03-12T23:59:59.000Z

352

Method for the concurrent ultrasonic inspection of partially completed welds  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method for the concurrent ultrasonic inspection of partially completed welds is disclosed and which includes providing a pair of transducers which are individually positioned on the opposite sides of a partially completed weld to be inspected; moving the transducers along the length of and laterally inwardly and outwardly relative to the partially completed weld; pulsing the respective transducers to produce an ultrasonic signal which passes through or is reflected from the partially completed weld; receiving from the respective transducers ultrasonic signals which pass through or are reflected from the partially completed welds; and analyzing the ultrasonic signal which has passed through or is reflected from the partially completed weld to determine the presence of any weld defects.

Johnson, John A. (Idaho Falls, ID); Larsen, Eric D. (Idaho Falls, ID); Miller, Karen S. (Idaho Falls, ID); Smartt, Herschel B. (Idaho Falls, ID); McJunkin, Timothy R. (Idaho Falls, ID)

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

353

Causal Factors of Weld Porosity in Gas Tungsten Arc Welding of Powder Metallurgy Produced Titanium Alloys  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

ORNL undertook an investigation using gas tungsten arc (GTA) welding on consolidated powder metallurgy (PM) titanium (Ti) plate, to identify the causal factors behind observed porosity in fusion welding. Tramp element compounds of sodium and magnesium, residual from the metallothermic reduction of titanium chloride used to produce the titanium, were remnant in the starting powder and were identified as gas forming species. PM-titanium made from revert scrap where sodium and magnesium were absent, showed fusion weld porosity, although to a lesser degree. We show that porosity was attributable to hydrogen from adsorbed water on the surface of the powders prior to consolidation. The removal / minimization of both adsorbed water on the surface of titanium powder and the residues from the reduction process prior to consolidation of titanium powders, are critical to achieve equivalent fusion welding success similar to that seen in wrought titanium produced via the Kroll process.

Muth, Thomas R [ORNL; Yamamoto, Yukinori [ORNL; Frederick, David Alan [ORNL; Contescu, Cristian I [ORNL; Chen, Wei [ORNL; Lim, Yong Chae [ORNL; Peter, William H [ORNL; Feng, Zhili [ORNL

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

354

Welding and Repair Technology Center: Welding and Repair Technical Issues in ASME Section XI  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The EPRI Welding and Repair Technology Center (WRTC) supports and is involved in numerous ASME Code changes and new initiatives associated with welding, repair, and replacement activities in the nuclear power generation industry. Due to the complicated nature and numerous topics often associated with code and regulatory issues it can be difficult to keep abreast of the current status and progress of changes and new initiatives. This document is intended to be a single reference for WRTC members to ...

2012-12-20T23:59:59.000Z

355

Welding and Repair Technology Center: Welding and Repair Technical Issues in ASME Section XI  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) Welding and Repair Technology Center (WRTC) was involved in numerous ASME Code changes and new initiatives associated with welding, repair, and replacement activities in the nuclear power generation industry during the year 2013. Due to the complicated nature of code and regulatory issues and its variety of topics, it can be difficult to keep abreast of the current status, progress, and new initiatives. This report is intended to be a single reference for ...

2013-12-16T23:59:59.000Z

356

X-ray diffraction study of residual stress in model weldments. Final report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Residual stress in a model weldment in nickel plate was characterized using x-ray diffraction techniques. The stress was mapped in 2 mm divisions up to the boundary of the weld pool. Results were in generally good agreement with the stress levels previously predicted for this system by finite element studies at LLNL. Recommendations are made that would permit 1 mm/sup 2/ spatial resolution maps of residual stress in stainless steel weldments.

Stroud, R.D.; Shackelford, J.F.

1980-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

357

Management  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Research has indicated that, depending upon driver and passenger characteristics, passengers can have either a positive or negative influence upon driver behaviour. In conclusion to a recent study investigating the roles that passengers can play to influence, positively and negatively, driver behaviour, Regan and Mitsopoulos (2001) recommended, among other things, that the principles of Crew Resource Management (CRM) training may increase passengers ’ ability to positively influence driver behaviour and also drivers ’ ability to accept constructive feedback. The present study investigated the potential application of CRM training within young driver training in the Australian Capital Territory (ACT). This involved a literature review, an analysis of the differences between the driving and aviation domains, an analysis of the team-based activities and the knowledge, skills and attitudes required during driving to perform those activities, consultation with CRM experts from the aviation and medicine domains and the conduct of six focus groups involving young learner drivers, provisional licence drivers and course teachers. The findings indicate that CRM training as part of young driver training in the ACT is a viable concept to pursue. The application of CRM training within young driver training has potential to significantly enhance the positive and reduce the negative effects of passengers on young driver behaviour, and thus the safety of young drivers and passengers alike. The outcomes of this study formed the basis for a set of recommendations for the development of a young driver CRM training program in the ACT.

Young Drivers; Eve Mitsopoulos; Michael Regan; Janet Anderson; Paul Salmon; Jessica Edquist; Ii Report Documentation Page

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

358

Evaluation of the capacity of welded attachments to elbows as compared to the methodology of ASME Code Case N-318  

SciTech Connect

This paper presents the results of a series of tests conducted to assess the capacity of various configurations of integral welded attachments. These tests are unique in that the attachments are welded to the outer radius of pipe elbows. The lug configurations tested include both rectangular and cross (cruciform) shapes. Both limit load and fatigue tests are performed on the lug-elbow configurations. The results of the limit load tests are presented as limit moments. The results of the fatigue tests are cycles-to-failure. Markl's equation is then used, with the fatigue results, to determine stress intensification factors. The limit moments and stress intensification factors are then compared to those developed using the methodology of ASME Code Case N-318. The level of conservatism in the Code Case methodology is then compared to the test results.

Rawls, G.B. (Westinghouse Savannah River Co., Aiken, SC (United States)); Wais, E.A. (Wais and Associates, Inc., Atlanta, GA (United States)); Rodabaugh, E.C. (Rodabaugh (E.C.) and Associates, Hilliard, OH (United States))

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

359

Evaluation of the capacity of welded attachments to elbows as compared to the methodology of ASME Code Case N-318  

SciTech Connect

This paper presents the results of a series of tests conducted to assess the capacity of various configurations of integral welded attachments. These tests are unique in that the attachments are welded to the outer radius of pipe elbows. The lug configurations tested include both rectangular and cross (cruciform) shapes. Both limit load and fatigue tests are performed on the lug-elbow configurations. The results of the limit load tests are presented as limit moments. The results of the fatigue tests are cycles-to-failure. Markl`s equation is then used, with the fatigue results, to determine stress intensification factors. The limit moments and stress intensification factors are then compared to those developed using the methodology of ASME Code Case N-318. The level of conservatism in the Code Case methodology is then compared to the test results.

Rawls, G.B. [Westinghouse Savannah River Co., Aiken, SC (United States); Wais, E.A. [Wais and Associates, Inc., Atlanta, GA (United States); Rodabaugh, E.C. [Rodabaugh (E.C.) and Associates, Hilliard, OH (United States)

1992-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

360

Capacitor discharge process for welding braided cable  

SciTech Connect

A capacitor discharge process for welding a braided cable formed from a plurality of individual cable strands to a solid metallic electrically conductive member comprises the steps of: (a) preparing the electrically conductive member for welding by bevelling one of its end portions while leaving an ignition projection extending outwardly from the apex of the bevel; (b) clamping the electrically conductive member in a cathode fixture; (c) connecting the electrically conductive member clamped in the cathode fixture to a capacitor bank capable of being charged to a preselected voltage value; (d) preparing the braided cable for welding by wrapping one of its end portions with a metallic sheet to form a retaining ring operable to maintain the individual strands of the braided cable in fixed position within the retaining ring; (e) clamping the braided cable and the retaining ring as a unit in an anode fixture so that the wrapped end portion of the braided cable faces the ignition projection of the electrically conductive member; and (f) moving the cathode fixture towards the anode fixture until the ignition projection of the electrically conductive member contacts the end portion of the braided cable thereby allowing the capacitor bank to discharge through the electrically conductive member and through the braided cable and causing the electrically conductive member to be welded to the braided cable via capacitor discharge action.

Wilson, Rick D. (Corvallis, OR)

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "welding stress management" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Residual stresses and stress corrosion cracking in pipe fittings  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Residual stresses can play a key role in the SCC performance of susceptible materials in PWR primary water applications. Residual stresses are stresses stored within the metal that develop during deformation and persist in the absence of external forces or temperature gradients. Sources of residual stresses in pipe fittings include fabrication processes, installation and welding. There are a number of methods to characterize the magnitude and orientation of residual stresses. These include numerical analysis, chemical cracking tests, and measurement (e.g., X-ray diffraction, neutron diffraction, strain gage/hole drilling, strain gage/trepanning, strain gage/section and layer removal, and acoustics). This paper presents 400 C steam SCC test results demonstrating that residual stresses in as-fabricated Alloy 600 pipe fittings are sufficient to induce SCC. Residual stresses present in as-fabricated pipe fittings are characterized by chemical cracking tests (stainless steel fittings tested in boiling magnesium chloride solution) and by the sectioning and layer removal (SLR) technique.

Parrington, R.J.; Scott, J.J.; Torres, F.

1994-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

362

Role of Slip Behavior in the Irradiation Assisted Stress Corrosion ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Crack Growth Rates of Irradiated Commercial Stainless Steels in BWR and PWR ... Detailed Root Cause Analysis of SG Tube ODSCC Indications within the Tube Sheets of NPP Biblis Unit A .... Radiation Damage in Fe-C-Met Model Alloys ... Stress Corrosion Cracking Behavior near the Fusion Boundary of Dissimilar Weld

363

Penetrative Internal Oxidation from Alloy 690 Surfaces and Stress ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Crack Growth Rates of Irradiated Commercial Stainless Steels in BWR and PWR ... Detailed Root Cause Analysis of SG Tube ODSCC Indications within the Tube Sheets of NPP Biblis Unit A .... Radiation Damage in Fe-C-Met Model Alloys ... Stress Corrosion Cracking Behavior near the Fusion Boundary of Dissimilar Weld

364

FITNESS-FOR-SERVICE ASSESSMENT FOR A RADIOACTIVE WASTE TANK THAT CONTAINS STRESS CORROSION CRACKS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Radioactive wastes are confined in 49 underground storage tanks at the Savannah River Site. The tanks are examined by ultrasonic (UT) methods for thinning, pitting, and stress corrosion cracking in order to assess fitness-for-service. During an inspection in 2002, ten cracks were identified on one of the tanks. Given the location of the cracks (i.e., adjacent to welds, weld attachments, and weld repairs), fabrication details (e.g., this tank was not stress-relieved), and the service history the degradation mechanism was stress corrosion cracking. Crack instability calculations utilizing API-579 guidance were performed to show that the combination of expected future service condition hydrostatic and weld residual stresses do not drive any of the identified cracks to instability. The cracks were re-inspected in 2007 to determine if crack growth had occurred. During this re-examination, one indication that was initially reported as a 'possible perpendicular crack API-579 crack instability calculations were again performed, based on expected future service conditions and trended crack growth rates for the future tank service cycle. The analysis showed that the combined hydrostatic and weld residual stresses do not drive the identified cracks to instability. This tank expected to be decommissioned in the near future. However, if these plans are delayed, it was recommended that a third examination of selected cracks in the tank be performed in 2014.

Wiersma, B; James Elder, J; Rodney Vandekamp, R; Charles Mckeel, C

2009-04-23T23:59:59.000Z

365

Crack growth rates of irradiated austenitic stainless steel weld heat affected zone in BWR environments.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Austenitic stainless steels (SSs) are used extensively as structural alloys in the internal components of reactor pressure vessels because of their superior fracture toughness. However, exposure to high levels of neutron irradiation for extended periods can exacerbate the corrosion fatigue and stress corrosion cracking (SCC) behavior of these steels by affecting the material microchemistry, material microstructure, and water chemistry. Experimental data are presented on crack growth rates of the heat affected zone (HAZ) in Types 304L and 304 SS weld specimens before and after they were irradiated to a fluence of 5.0 x 10{sup 20} n/cm{sup 2} (E > 1 MeV) ({approx} 0.75 dpa) at {approx}288 C. Crack growth tests were conducted under cycling loading and long hold time trapezoidal loading in simulated boiling water reactor environments on Type 304L SS HAZ of the H5 weld from the Grand Gulf reactor core shroud and on Type 304 SS HAZ of a laboratory-prepared weld. The effects of material composition, irradiation, and water chemistry on growth rates are discussed.

Chopra, O. K.; Alexandreanu, B.; Gruber, E. E.; Daum, R. S.; Shack, W. J.; Energy Technology

2006-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

366

Materials Reliability Program: Effects of Dissolved Hydrogen, Temperature, and Hydrogen Peroxide on Low Temperature Crack Propagation (LTCP) Fracture Resistance of Weld Metals 182, 52, and 152 (MRP-209)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Primary Water Stress Corrosion Cracking (PWSCC) of Alloy 600 nozzles and its weld metals 182 and 82 was first experienced domestically in control rod drive mechanisms at Oconee units and in reactor vessel hot leg nozzles at V.C. Summer station. Publications by Bettis Laboratory have shown nickel-base alloys X-750 and 690 and weld metals 82 and 52 to be susceptible to a reduction in fracture resistance thought to be due to a hydrogen cracking mechanism called low temperature crack propagation (LTCP). Thes...

2007-12-13T23:59:59.000Z

367

Effect of Pulsed Nd: YAG Laser Powers On 304 Stainless Steel Welding  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this study, optimum welding parameters are obtained for 1mm thickness type 304 stainless steel welding using the Lumonics JK760TR pulsed Nd:YAG laser. The influences of laser welding parameters such as pulse duration, focal position, frequency, laser power, welding speed, and shielding gas (N2) pressure on penetration defining welding quality are investigated. Also comparisons of overlap ratios are presented between theory and experiment for pulse duration, frequency and welding speed.

Candan, L.; Demir, A.; Akman, E. [University of Kocaeli, Laser Technologies Research and Application Center, Kocaeli (Turkey)

2007-04-23T23:59:59.000Z

368

Industry standards catch up with in-service welding  

SciTech Connect

Welding onto a pipeline after it has been put into service, a practice commonly referred to as hot tap welding, is frequently required for several reasons. Repair sleeves are installed to reinforce areas of corrosion or mechanical damage, and branch connections are made for system modifications. There are often significant economic incentives to perform this welding without removing the system from service. Operations are maintained during welding and the pipe's contents are not vented into the atmosphere. Due to technological advances in in-service welding, industry needed an update to standards and recommended practices. This year, the American Petroleum Institute (API) hopes to meet that need. The 19th edition of API Standard 1104--Welding of Pipelines and Related Facilities, includes a new appendix that pertains to in-service welding. Appendix B, In-Service Welding, is intended to eventually replace API Recommended Practice 1107--Pipeline Maintenance Welding Practices. API 1107, which was introduced in 1966 and updated in 1987 and 1991, is intended to provide recommended practices for pipeline maintenance welding. The current third edition approached its mandatory five-year review in 1996 by the API-AGA Joint Committee on Oil and Gas Pipeline Field Welding Practices, which also maintains API 1104. The committee saw 11078 needed to reflect the updates that had been made to 1104 as well as the technological advances for in-service welding. To alleviate redundancy between the two documents, and to alleviate lag time between updates, the committee approved a proposal to update and incorporate requirements of API 1107 into an appendix of API 1104. In the meantime, the third edition of API 1107 was reapproved for another five-year review cycle.

Bruce, W.A.

1999-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

369

Program on Technology Innovation: Real Time NDE for Welding  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report describes real-time nondestructive evaluation (NDE) for welding and provides an update on the NDE methods being investigated and developed for flaw detection during welding and the corresponding technical results. It also provides a summary of the future proposed work.BackgroundIt has been recognized that efficient, high-quality welding processes are essential to the economical development and safety of new advanced and operational nuclear ...

2012-12-12T23:59:59.000Z

370

Analysis of the Fusion Boundary Region in Dissimilar Metal Welds at ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

On-Site Speaker (Planned), Ivan Mendoza-Bravo. Abstract Scope, The fusion boundary region (FBR) in Dissimilar Metal Welds (DMW) is where base and weld

371

Evolution of microstructure and mechanical properties in linear friction welded waspaloy.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The Ni-base superalloy, Waspaloy, was linear friction welded (LFWed) under various processing conditions. Specifically, axial shortening, in which all linear friction welding (LFW) parameters such… (more)

Chamanfar, Ahmad

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

372

Creep-Fatigue and Thermo-Mechanical Fatigue of Friction-Welded ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Thus, this method is an attractive welding process for the joining of new generation nickel based superalloys. In addition, friction welding also provides the ability ...

373

Establishing W-Based Friction Stir Welding Tool Life for Thick ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Over 135 feet of weld length was achieved with a single W-based tool and the ultimate tensile strength throughout ... Friction Stir Welding of Pipeline Steels.

374

AUTOMATIC WELDING METHODS, IN PARTICULAR AS APPLIED TO PIPES. A Literature Survey  

SciTech Connect

Thirty-one references, most with abstracts, are presented on automatic welding. Welding methods for pipes are given particular attention. (D.L.C.)

Uhlmann, W.

1961-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

375

Microsoft Word - FEAA064O_ORNL_Welding Single Cystal_Factsheet...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Welding and Weld Repair of Single Crystal Gas Turbine Alloys (Oak Ridge National Laboratory) FACT SHEET I. PROJECT PARTICIPANTS A. Prime Participant: Oak Ridge National Laboratory...

376

Static and Fatigue Strength of Dissimilar Al/Steel Spot Welds by ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Analysis of the Fusion Boundary Region in Dissimilar Metal Welds at Low Dilution · Application of Cold Metal Transfer Process for Structural Weld Overlays and ...

377

Deployment of Forming and Welding Models to Industries through ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Presentation Title, Deployment of Forming and Welding Models to Industries through High Performance Computing. Author(s), Yuping Yang, Hyunok Kim, ...

378

Fracture of welded aluminum thin-walled structures  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A comprehensive methodology was developed in the thesis for damage prediction of welded aluminum thin-walled structures, which includes material modeling, calibration, numerical simulation and experimental verification. ...

Zheng, Li, Ph. D. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

379

Weld Solidification Behavior of INCONEL™ Alloy 740H  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Effects of Alloying Elements on Shear Deformation and Stacking Fault of FCC Ni: A First-Principles Study · Friction Stir Welding and Processing of Nickel Based ...

380

Development of Self Healing Welding Technology and Materials for ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

It was shown that healing of solidification cracks during welding occurred by ... of Weldability of Ni-Based Alloys: Experimental and Computational Approach.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "welding stress management" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Preventing Dissimilar Metal Weld Failures: Application of New ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... and properties of DMWs would be extended over the component length, reducing ... and Microstructure of Tandem Submerged Arc Welded X80 Pipeline Steel.

382

Experimental Study on Friction Welding of 6063 Aluminium Alloy ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Friction pressure, upset pressure, burn-off length is varied and rotational speed and ... and Microstructure of Tandem Submerged Arc Welded X80 Pipeline Steel.

383

Friction Stir Welding and Processing of Advanced Materials for Coal ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Presentation Title, Friction Stir Welding and Processing of Advanced Materials for Coal and Nuclear Power Applications. Author(s), Glenn J. Grant, Scott Weil, ...

384

Method of automatically welding with a non-consumable electrode  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method for maintaining a constant arc gap between the electrode and the weld puddle by controlling the addition of filler wire based on the arc voltage.

Kiefer, Joseph H. (Tampa, FL)

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

385

A dimensionless parameter model for arc welding processes  

SciTech Connect

A dimensionless parameter model previously developed for C0{sub 2} laser beam welding has been shown to be applicable to GTAW and PAW autogenous arc welding processes. The model facilitates estimates of weld size, power, and speed based on knowledge of the material`s thermal properties. The dimensionless parameters can also be used to estimate the melting efficiency, which eases development of weld schedules with lower heat input to the weldment. The mathematical relationship between the dimensionless parameters in the model has been shown to be dependent on the heat flow geometry in the weldment.

Fuerschbach, P.W.

1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

386

Friction Stir Welding between Copper and 304L Stainless Steel  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A number of FSW experiments were carried out to obtain the optimum mechanical properties by adjusting the rotational speed and welding speed in the range of ...

387

Cold Welding Discovery at the Nanoscale - Materials Technology ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Feb 25, 2010 ... The discovery of these phenomena could be useful in development of high- density electronic devices, since heat-induced welds on the ...

388

Effects of Arc Welding Process on Microstructure and Morphology of ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Presentation Title, Effects of Arc Welding Process on Microstructure and Morphology of Flake Graphite in Grey Cast Iron. Author(s), Arash Elhami Khorasani, ...

389

Application of Cold Metal Transfer Process for Structural Weld ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... heat treatment of closure welds in oil and gas, and petrochemical applications. ... for Extending Plant Lives in Power Generation, Refinery & Petrochemical, ...

390

Weld monitor and failure detector for nuclear reactor system  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Critical but inaccessible welds in a nuclear reactor system are monitored throughout the life of the reactor by providing small aperture means projecting completely through the reactor vessel wall and also through the weld or welds to be monitored. The aperture means is normally sealed from the atmosphere within the reactor. Any incipient failure or cracking of the weld will cause the environment contained within the reactor to pass into the aperture means and thence to the outer surface of the reactor vessel where its presence is readily detected.

Sutton, Jr., Harry G. (Mt. Lebanon, PA)

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

391

Enhancement of Intergranular Corrosion Resistance of TIG Welded ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... of TIG Welded and Laser-surface Melted SUS 304 for Nuclear Power Plants ... Statistics of Grain Boundary Crystallography in Surrogates for Oxide Nuclear ...

392

The Development of Microstructure in Duplex Stainless Steel Welds  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

--+ , Transformation in Stainless Steel Weld Metals 58 3.4 Duplex Stainless Steel \\Veld Metals 59 9.401 Weld microstructure 59 9.4.2 Cooling rate 61 9.409 Effects of nitrogen and carbon on weld microstructure 61 9.404 Properties of weld metal and the heat affected zone... -8Ni-0.08C-2Mn-1Si wt. %) is only around 215 MPa. The ultimate tensile strength at room temperature rises to a maximum at about 70 to 80 vol% 0 and then decreases as the alloy tends towards a fully ferritic structure [6]. A law of mixtures does...

Haddad, Naseem Issa Abdallah

1990-05-08T23:59:59.000Z

393

A study of the chemistry and mutagenicity of welding fume.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??This thesis describes physical, chemical and biological studies of fumes from six types of flux-coated welding rods, and a companion study the bacterial mutagenicity of… (more)

Tandon, Ramkishore

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

394

Development of Friction Stir Welding Technology for Coal and ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Presentation Title, Development of Friction Stir Welding Technology for Coal and ... Abstract Scope, Most ferritic/martensitic steels used in coal and nuclear plant ...

395

Process Modelling of Electron Beam Welding of Aeroengine ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

PROCESS MODELLING OF THE ELECTRON BEAM WELDING OF AEROENGINE COMPONENTS. R. C. Reed, H.J. Stone, D Dye and S.M. Roberts.

396

Improvement of Mechanical Property in Weld Metal Formed with F ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... and Welding Conditions of Monopile and Transition for Offshore Wind Plant ... Optimization of a New Polycrystalline Superalloy for Industrial Gas Turbines.

397

Ductile filler metal alloys for welding nickel aluminide alloys  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Nickel aluminum alloys are welded utilizing a nickel based alloy containing zirconium but substantially free of titanium and niobium which reduces the tendency to crack.

Santella, Michael L. (Knoxville, TN); McNabb, Jeffrey D. (Lenoir City, TN); Sikka, Vinod K. (Oak Ridge, TN)

2003-04-08T23:59:59.000Z

398

Welding Cutting and Brazing Assessment Plan Assessment plan ...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

This assessment is to verify hot work requirements associated with welding, cutting, burning, brazing, grinding and other spark- or flame-producing operations have been...

399

Microstructural Evolution During Friction Welding of Mill-annealed Ti ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... deform by slip and rotate towards orientations that are the most stable with respect to the simple ... EPRI P87, A New Filler Material for Dissimilar Metal Welds.

400

Constitution Diagram for Dissimilar Metal Welds in Alloy Steels and ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Explosive Bonding of 316L to C18150 CuCrZr Alloy for ITER Applications · Failure Mechanisms of Dissimilar Metal Welds During High Temperature Service.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "welding stress management" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

The Use of Weld Overlays to Extend the Life of Seam Welded High Energy Piping in Fossil Power Plants: Common PQR and Thinner Piping Evaluation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Replacement of longitudinally welded reheat and main steam lines is very expensive and can result in extended outages. Inspection and re-inspection of such systems every few years is also expensive and time consuming. An alternative to continued inspection or system replacement is weld overlay. Weld overlay of longitudinal seamed clamshell elbows was investigated in "The Use of Weld Overlays to Extend the Useful Life of Seam Welded High Energy Piping in Fossil Power Plants" (EPRI Report No. 1001270, Febr...

2002-02-28T23:59:59.000Z

402

Program on Technology Innovation: Weld Metals and Welding Processes for Fabrication of Advanced Light Water Reactor Pressure Vessels  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Light water reactors have traditionally been constructed using roll-formed plates for the reactor pressure vessel (RPV) shells, which were assembled via horizontal and vertical seam welds. Weld filler metals often contained significant quantities of copper, other residual elements such as vanadium, and nonmetallic elements such as phosphorous and sulfur. Low-alloy steel weld filler metals of this chemical composition contributed to the degree of neutron radiation-induced embrittlement of vessel ...

2013-06-26T23:59:59.000Z

403

Advanced Welding Methods for Irradiated Materials  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

As the existing LWR fleet ages, the weldability of the structural material used to construct the reactor pressure vessels and reactor internals could be diminished. The decrease in the weldability is caused by the formation of helium in the base material structure. This is caused by nuclear transmutation reactions of boron and nickel, within the reactor materials, and increases as neutron fluence accumulates. Helium-induced weld cracking is a complex phenomenon that is related to the concentration ...

2013-10-29T23:59:59.000Z

404

Welding and Repair Technology Center: Assessment of Friction Stir Welding for Nuclear Applications  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report describes a study that was conducted to determine the usability of friction stir welding (FSW) for the repair of nuclear power plant components. The first phase of the study has performinged in air and underwater welding on 304 SS, 308L SS, Alloy182, and Alloy 600 test plates. In addition, crack sealing tests were carried out using electric discharge machining notches in these test plates. A patch seal test was also added to the test matrix to determine if a flat plate could be ...

2012-12-12T23:59:59.000Z

405

Implementation of ASME Code, Section XI, Code Case N-770, on Alternative Examination Requirements for Class 1 Butt Welds Fabricated with Alloy 82/182  

SciTech Connect

In May 2010, the NRC issued a proposed notice of rulemaking that includes a provision to add a new section to its rules to require licensees to implement ASME Code Case N-770, ‘‘Alternative Examination Requirements and Acceptance Standards for Class 1 PWR Piping and Vessel Nozzle Butt Welds Fabricated with UNS N06082 or UNS W86182 Weld Filler Material With or Without the Application of Listed Mitigation Activities, Section XI, Division 1,’’ with 15 conditions. Code Case N-770 contains baseline and inservice inspection (ISI) requirements for unmitigated butt welds fabricated with Alloy 82/182 material and preservice and ISI requirements for mitigated butt welds. The NRC stated that application of ASME Code Case N-770 is necessary because the inspections currently required by the ASME Code, Section XI, were not written to address stress corrosion cracking Alloy 82/182 butt welds, and the safety consequences of inadequate inspections can be significant. The NRC expects to issue the final rule incorporating this code case into its regulations in the spring 2011 time frame. This paper discusses the new examination requirements, the conditions that NRC is imposing , and the major concerns with implementation of the new Code Case.

Sullivan, Edmund J.; Anderson, Michael T.

2012-09-17T23:59:59.000Z

406

Access and Delivery of Integrated Weld Process Models  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Table 1   Software tools for integrated weld modeling...http://www.aws.org/wj/2008/05/wj200805/wj0508-36.pdf Desktop SORPAS http://www.swantec.com/sorpas.htm Desktop E-WeldPredictor http://calculations.ewi.org/VJP/ Internet...

407

Selective Attack of Welds by Flow-Accelerated Corrosion  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Flow-accelerated corrosion (FAC), a degradation mechanism that attacks carbon steel material, has been a significant issue for nuclear plants for some time. Until recently, though, welds were thought to be largely immune to this mechanism. This work demonstrates that significant weld attacks have been occurring at a number of nuclear plants throughout the world.

2002-07-26T23:59:59.000Z

408

CRAD, Welding, Cutting and Brazing Assessment Plan | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Welding, Cutting and Brazing Assessment Plan Welding, Cutting and Brazing Assessment Plan CRAD, Welding, Cutting and Brazing Assessment Plan Performance Objective: This assessment is to verify hot work requirements associated with welding, cutting, burning, brazing, grinding and other spark- or flame-producing operations have been implemented. Verify that the requirements implemented are appropriate for preventing loss of life and property from fire, and personal injury from contact with or exposure to molten metals, vapors, radiant energy, injurious rays and sparks. Criteria: Establish designated area in which routine and repetitive welding, cutting, and other spark- or flame producing operations are conducted [1910.252(a)(2)(iv),1910.252(a)(2)(vi)(A), 1910.252(a)(2)(xv), General Requirements].

409

Method for laser welding a fin and a tube  

SciTech Connect

A method of laser welding a planar metal surface to a cylindrical metal surface is provided, first placing a planar metal surface into approximate contact with a cylindrical metal surface to form a juncture area to be welded, the planar metal surface and cylindrical metal surface thereby forming an acute angle of contact. A laser beam, produced, for example, by a Nd:YAG pulsed laser, is focused through the acute angle of contact at the juncture area to be welded, with the laser beam heating the juncture area to a welding temperature to cause welding to occur between the planar metal surface and the cylindrical metal surface. Both the planar metal surface and cylindrical metal surface are made from a reflective metal, including copper, copper alloys, stainless steel alloys, aluminum, and aluminum alloys.

Fuerschbach, Phillip W. (Tijeras, NM); Mahoney, A. Roderick (Albuquerque, NM); Milewski, John O (Santa Fe, NM)

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

410

Pressure Resistance Welding of High Temperature Metallic Materials  

SciTech Connect

Engineers from the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) have demonstrated an innovative method for seal or pinch welding stainless steel tubing. Sometimes a tube has fuel or contamination that must be contained, or the tube needs to be shortened or cut for handling, and the tube needs to have a guaranteed sealed weld that is both quick and easy. This technique was demonstrated in a laboratory using a resistance welding system with specially designed electrodes to ensure a tube end is seal welded or if a long tube is to be shortened, the severed ends are seal welded. The unique electrodes design is integral to achieving the sealed ends. This process could readily be adapted for robotic--remote handling or for contact handling in a glovebox or hood.

Larry Zirker; Craig Tyler

2010-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

411

METHOD OF BUTT WELDING SMALL THERMOCOUPLES 0.001 TO 0.010 INCH IN DIAMETER  

SciTech Connect

A method of butt welding thermoeouples 0.001 to 0.010 in. in diameter is described. The thermocouple wires are positioned in a micro-manipulator, and a controlled welding pulse is applied to them. This welding method provides uniform upset welds through a simple preduction technique. (auth)

Stover, C.M.

1960-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

412

Novel Optimization Methodology for Welding Process/Consumable Integration  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Advanced materials are being developed to improve the energy efficiency of many industries of future including steel, mining, and chemical, as well as, US infrastructures including bridges, pipelines and buildings. Effective deployment of these materials is highly dependent upon the development of arc welding technology. Traditional welding technology development is slow and often involves expensive and time-consuming trial and error experimentation. The reason for this is the lack of useful predictive tools that enable welding technology development to keep pace with the deployment of new materials in various industrial sectors. Literature reviews showed two kinds of modeling activities. Academic and national laboratory efforts focus on developing integrated weld process models by employing the detailed scientific methodologies. However, these models are cumbersome and not easy to use. Therefore, these scientific models have limited application in real-world industrial conditions. On the other hand, industrial users have relied on simple predictive models based on analytical and empirical equations to drive their product development. The scopes of these simple models are limited. In this research, attempts were made to bridge this gap and provide the industry with a computational tool that combines the advantages of both approaches. This research resulted in the development of predictive tools which facilitate the development of optimized welding processes and consumables. The work demonstrated that it is possible to develop hybrid integrated models for relating the weld metal composition and process parameters to the performance of welds. In addition, these tools can be deployed for industrial users through user friendly graphical interface. In principle, the welding industry users can use these modular tools to guide their welding process parameter and consumable composition selection. It is hypothesized that by expanding these tools throughout welding industry, substantial energy savings can be made. Savings are expected to be even greater in the case of new steels, which will require extensive mapping over large experimental ranges of parameters such as voltage, current, speed, heat input and pre-heat.

Quintana, Marie A; DebRoy, Tarasankar; Vitek, John; Babu, Suresh

2006-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

413

Fusion Welding of AerMet 100 Alloy  

SciTech Connect

A database of mechanical properties for weldment fusion and heat-affected zones was established for AerMet{reg_sign}100 alloy, and a study of the welding metallurgy of the alloy was conducted. The properties database was developed for a matrix of weld processes (electron beam and gas-tungsten arc) welding parameters (heat inputs) and post-weld heat treatment (PWHT) conditions. In order to insure commercial utility and acceptance, the matrix was commensurate with commercial welding technology and practice. Second, the mechanical properties were correlated with fundamental understanding of microstructure and microstructural evolution in this alloy. Finally, assessments of optimal weld process/PWHT combinations for cotildent application of the alloy in probable service conditions were made. The database of weldment mechanical properties demonstrated that a wide range of properties can be obtained in welds in this alloy. In addition, it was demonstrated that acceptable welds, some with near base metal properties, could be produced from several different initial heat treatments. This capability provides a means for defining process parameters and PWHT's to achieve appropriate properties for different applications, and provides useful flexibility in design and manufacturing. The database also indicated that an important region in welds is the softened region which develops in the heat-affected zone (HAZ) and analysis within the welding metallurgy studies indicated that the development of this region is governed by a complex interaction of precipitate overaging and austenite formation. Models and experimental data were therefore developed to describe overaging and austenite formation during thermal cycling. These models and experimental data can be applied to essentially any thermal cycle, and provide a basis for predicting the evolution of microstructure and properties during thermal processing.

ENGLEHART, DAVID A.; MICHAEL, JOSEPH R.; NOVOTNY, PAUL M.; ROBINO, CHARLES V.

1999-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

414

Initial Development in Joining of ODS Alloys Using Friction Stir Welding  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Solid-state welding of oxide-dispersion-strengthened (ODS) alloy MA956 sheets using friction stir welding (FSW) was investigated. Butt weld was successfully produced. The weld and base metals were characterized using optical microscopy, scanning electronic microscopy, transmission electronic microscopy, and energy dispersion x-ray spectrum. Microhardness mapping was also conducted over the weld region. Analyses indicate that the distribution of the strengthening oxides was preserved in the weld. Decrease in microhardness of the weld was observed but was insignificant. The preliminary results seem to confirm the envisioned feasibility of FSW application to ODS alloy joining. For application to Gen IV nuclear reactor heat exchanger, further investigation is suggested.

Ren, Weiju [ORNL; Feng, Zhili [ORNL

2007-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

415

Influence of Aluminum Content on Grain Refinement and Strength of AZ31 Magnesium GTA Weld Metal  

SciTech Connect

The goal is to characterize the effect of Al content on AZ31 weld metal, the grain size and strength, and examine role of Al on grain refinement. The approach is to systematically vary the aluminum content of AZ31 weld metal, Measure average grain size in weld metal, and Measure cross-weld tensile properties and hardness. Conclusions are that: (1) increased Al content in AZ31 weld metal results in grain refinement Reason: higher undercooling during solidification; (2) weld metal grain refinement resulted in increased strength & hardness Reason: grain boundary strengthening; and (3) weld metal strength can be raised to wrought base metal levels.

Babu, N. Kishore [Singapore Institute of Manufacturing Technology; Cross, Carl E. [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2012-06-28T23:59:59.000Z

416

S&TR | March/April 2008: Standardizing the Art of Electron-Beam Welding  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Standardizing the Art of Electron-Beam Welding. Standardizing the Art of Electron-Beam Welding. WELDED materials are an integral part of everyday life. Appliances, cars, and bridges are all made by welding materials together. But not all welds are created equal. Welding methods vary in complexity, time, and cost, depending on a product's requirements and purpose. In electron-beam (EBeam) welding, an electron beam generated in a vacuum creates a fusing heat source that can unite almost any metals. This method produces deep welds without adding excessive heat that can adversely affect the properties of the surrounding metal. In the nuclear energy and aerospace industries, electron-beam welding is preferred for manufacturing high-value welds-those in which defects cannot be tolerated. The Department of Energy's (DOE's) nuclear weapons

417

SOME SPECIAL APPLICATIONS OF WELDING IN STEAM, GAS TURBINE, AND NUCLEAR POWER PLANTS  

SciTech Connect

Six special applications of welding in steam, gasturbine, and nuclear power plants are described. Experiences are quoted of: the welding of austenittc steel gas-turbine rotors; the butt welding of heat-exchanger tubes in dissimilar metals; the welding of steam pipes for advanced steam conditions; welding in relation to feedwater heaters; the construction of expansion bellows in alloy steels; and the attachment of fins to heat-exchanger tubes. (auth)

Robertson, J.M.

1961-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

418

Welding of cast A359/SiC/10p metal matrix composites  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Welding of metal matrix composites (MMCs) is an alternative to their mechanical joining, since they are difficult to machine. Published literature in fusion welding of similar composites shows metallurgical problems. This study investigates the weldability of A359/SiC/10p aluminum SiC MMC. Statistical experiments were performed to identify the significant variables and their effects on the hardness, tensile and bending strengths, ductility, and microstructure of the weld. Finite Element Analysis (FEA) was used to predict the preheat temperature field across the weld and the weld pool temperature. Welding current, welding speed, and the preheat temperature (300-350??C) affected the weld quality significantly. It was seen that the fracture of the welded specimens was either in the base MMC or in the weld indicating a stronger interface between the weld and the base MMC. Oxides formation was controlled along the weld joint. Low heat inputs provided higher weld strengths and better weld integrity. It was found that the weld strengths were approximately 85% of the parent material strength. The weld region had higher extent of uniform mixing of base and filler metal when welded at low currents and high welding speeds. These adequate thermal conditions helped the SiC particles to stay in the central weld region. The interface reaction between the matrix and SiC particles was hindered due to controlled heat inputs and formation of harmful Al4C3 flakes was suppressed. The hardness values were found to be slightly higher in the base metal rich region. There was no significant loss in the hardness of the heat affected zone. The ductility of the weld was considerably increased to 6.0-7.0% due to the addition of Al-Si filler metal.

Kothari, Mitul Arvind

2005-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

419

Manual Plasma Welding (PTAW) Evaluation with Powder Hardfacing Alloys: Revision 1 to 1003164  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Repair practices for hardfacing alloys using gas tungsten arc welding (GTAW) and shielded metal arc welding (SMAW) have been evaluated in the past on hardfacing applied with various automated welding processes. Accessibility often limits the use of these welding processes in typical manual repair applications. Recent developments in PTAW powder welding systems by Deloro-Stellite have prompted evaluations of an alternative repair technique for hardfacing materials. This document reports on the tests and f...

2002-12-13T23:59:59.000Z

420

TUNGSTEN-ARC WELDING OF THE TANTALUM IS FOUND TO BE THE MOST VERSATILE WELDING METHOD FOR JOINING THIS MATERIAL: BUT GREATER PREPARATION IS REQUIRED TO PROVIDE GOOD PROTECTION AND QUICK CHILLING  

SciTech Connect

The mechanical and welding properties of tantalum are given and welding processes are reviewed. Various types of shielding, machine welding equipment, and closed chambers for welding in an inert gas are compared. A variety of operating conditions under which tantalum can be welded is discussed. (C.J.G.)

Haslip, L.R.; Payne, B.S.

1959-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "welding stress management" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

Numerical Investigation of Residual Stress in Thick Titanium Alloy ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Jul 22, 2010 ... thick welded components with EBW is very difficult, especially for .... Because the welded plate is symmetrical about the weld centerline, only ...

422

Friction Stir Spot Welding of DP780 Carbon Steel  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Friction stir spot welds were made in uncoated and galvannealed DP780 sheets using polycrystalline boron nitride stir tools. The tools were plunged at either a single continuous rate or in two segments consisting of a relatively high rate followed by a slower rate of shorter depth. Welding times ranged from 1 to 10 s. Increasing tool rotation speed from 800 to 1600 rev min{sup -1} increased strength values. The 2-segment welding procedures also produced higher strength joints. Average lap shear strengths exceeding 10 {center_dot} 3 kN were consistently obtained in 4 s on both the uncoated and the galvannealed DP780. The likelihood of diffusion and mechanical interlocking contributing to bond formation was supported by metallographic examinations. A cost analysis based on spot welding in automobile assembly showed that for friction stir spot welding to be economically competitive with resistance spot welding the cost of stir tools must approach that of resistance spot welding electrode tips.

Santella, Michael L [ORNL; Hovanski, Yuri [ORNL; Frederick, David Alan [ORNL; Grant, Glenn J [ORNL; Dahl, Michael E [ORNL

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

423

Stress-Based Fatigue Monitoring  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The FatiguePro software, developed by the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) and first deployed in 1989, is a fatigue monitoring program that is widely used around the world to assist with aging management of nuclear power plants. The FatiguePro stress-based fatigue (SBF) module has used a single stress term for calculating fatigue usage factors. This simplified approach was chosen not only because of computer limitations at the time, but also because the conventional stress cycle counting algorith...

2011-12-05T23:59:59.000Z

424

Environmental Assessment Expanded Ponnequin Wind Energy Project Weld County, Colorado  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The U.S.Department of Energy (DOE) has considered a proposal from the State of Colorado, Office of Energy Conservation (OEC), for funding construction of the Expanded Ponnequin Wind Project in Weld County, Colorado. OEC plans to enter into a contracting arrangement with Public Service Company of Colorado (PSCO) for the completion of these activities. PSCo, along with its subcontractors and business partners, are jointly developing the Expanded Ponnequin Wind Project. DOE completed an environmental assessment of the original proposed project in August 1997. Since then, the geographic scope and the design of the project changed, necessitating additional review of the project under the National Environmental Policy Act. The project now calls for the possible construction of up to 48 wind turbines on State and private lands. PSCo and its partners have initiated construction of the project on private land in Weld County, Colorado. A substation, access road and some wind turbines have been installed. However, to date, DOE has not provided any funding for these activities. DOE, through its Commercialization Ventures Program, has solicited applications for financial assistance from state energy offices, in a teaming arrangement with private-sector organizations, for projects that will accelerate the commercialization of emerging renewable energy technologies. The Commercialization Ventures Program was established by the Renewable Energy and Energy Efficiency Technology Competitiveness Act of 1989 (P.L. 101-218) as amended by the Energy Policy Act of 1992 (P.L. 102-486). The Program seeks to assist entry into the marketplace of newly emerging renewable energy technologies, or of innovative applications of existing technologies. In short, an emerging renewable energy technology is one which has already proven viable but which has had little or no operational experience. The Program is managed by the Department of Energy, Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy. The Federal action triggering the preparation of this EA is the need for DOE to decide whether to release the requested funding to support the construction of the Expanded Ponnequin Wind Project. The purpose of this Final Environmental Assessment (EA) is to provide DOE and the public with information on potential environmental impacts associated with the Expanded Ponnequin Wind Energy Project. This EA, and public comments received on it, were used in DOE's deliberations on whether to release funding for the expanded project under the Commercialization Ventures Program.

N /A

1999-03-02T23:59:59.000Z

425

Welding Metallurgy and Processing Issues for Joining of Power Sources  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Weldability issues with the pertinent alloys have been reviewed and preliminary results of our work on Haynes 25 have been presented. Further results on the mechanical properties and metallography on the EB welds are imminent. Hot-ductility experiments will commence within a few weeks. Aging studies on the effects of heat treatment using the Gleeble are also planned. MST-6 has extensive background in the welding metallurgy of the pertinent alloys. We also have considerable experience with the various welding processes to be used.

Lienert, Thomas J. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Reardon, Patrick T. [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2012-08-14T23:59:59.000Z

426

Inspection apparatus for evaluating a partially completed weld  

SciTech Connect

An inspection apparatus for evaluating a partially completed weld is described and which is utilized in combination with an automated movable welder which moves across a supporting surface, and wherein the inspection apparatus includes a coupling member mounted on the welder; a frame member mounted on the coupling member; an ultrasonic sensor mounted on the frame member and disposed in ultrasonic sound transmitting relation relative to the partially completed weld; and a drive assembly for adjusting the position of the ultrasonic sensor relative to the partially completed weld.

Smartt, Herschel B. (Idaho Falls, ID); Larsen, Eric D. (Idaho Falls, ID); Johnson, Jonn A. (Idaho Falls, ID)

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

427

Method for laser welding ultra-thin metal foils  

SciTech Connect

A method for simultaneously cutting and welding ultra-thin foils having a thickness of less than 0.002 inches wherein two ultra-thin films are stacked and clamped together. A pulsed laser such as of the Neodymium: YAG type is provided and the beam of the laser is directed onto the stacked films to cut a channel through the films. The laser is moved relative to the stacked foils to cut the stacked foils at successive locations and to form a plurality of connected weld beads to form a continuous weld.

Pernicka, John C. (Fort Collins, CO); Benson, David K. (Golden, CO); Tracy, C. Edwin (Golden, CO)

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

428

Welding fixture for nuclear fuel pin cladding assemblies  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A welding fixture for locating a driver sleeve about the open end of a nuclear fuel pin cladding. The welding fixture includes a holder provided with an open cavity having shoulders for properly positioning the driver sleeve, the end cap, and a soft, high temperature resistant plastic protective sleeve that surrounds a portion of the end cap stem. Ejected contaminant particles spewed forth by closure of the cladding by pulsed magnetic welding techniques are captured within a contamination trap formed in the holder for ultimate removal and disposal of contaminating particles along with the holder.

Oakley, David J. (Richland, WA); Feld, Sam H. (West Richland, WA)

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

429

Welding fixture for nuclear fuel pin cladding assemblies  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A welding fixture is described for locating a driver sleeve about the open end of a nuclear fuel pin cladding. The welding fixture includes a holder provided with an open cavity having shoulders for properly positioning the driver sleeve, the end cap, and a soft, high temperature resistant plastic protective sleeve that surrounds a portion of the end cap stem. Ejected contaminant particles spewed forth by closure of the cladding by pulsed magnetic welding techniques are captured within a contamination trap formed in the holder for ultimate removal and disposal of contaminating particles along with the holder.

Oakley, D.J.; Feld, S.H.

1984-02-22T23:59:59.000Z

430

Clad vent set cup closure-weld-zone grinding evaluation  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Clad vent set (CVS) cups were ground in the closure-weld zone to reduce the wall-thickness variation created by the cup deep-drawing process. A significantly more uniform wall thickness would be beneficial for the CVS closure-weld operation. The goal was to reduce the average within-cup wall-thickness variation (defined as the range of wall thicknesses in the closure-weld zone) approximately 50% from the Cassini production value of 42 {micro}m. This goal was shown to be achievable but, unfortunately, not with the existing blank and formed cup thicknesses.

Ulrich, G.B.; Woods, A.T. [Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant, TN (United States); Ohriner, E.K. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States). Metals and Ceramics Div.

1996-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

431

Laboratory galling tests of several commercial cobalt-free weld hardfacing alloys  

SciTech Connect

Since the mechanical properties of most wear materials are generally insufficient for structural applications, hardfacing alloys have been traditionally weld deposited to provide a wear resistance surface for a base material. An important attribute of a hardfacing alloy that is subjected to high load sliding contact is the resistance to adhesive (galling) damage. Although Co-base hardfacing alloys generally possess excellent galling wear resistance, there is interest in developing cobalt-free replacement hardfacings to reduce radiation exposure costs. A laboratory galling test has been developed for weld hardfacing deposits that is a modification of the standardized ASTM G98-91 galling test procedure. The procedure for testing a weld hardfacing deposit on a softer base metal using a button-on-block configuration is described. The contact stresses for the initiation of adhesive galling damage were measured to rank the galling resistance of several commercial Fe-base, Ni-base and Co-base hardfacing alloys. Although the galling resistance of the Fe-base alloys was generally superior to the Ni-base alloys, neither system approached the excellent galling resistance of the Co-base alloys. Microstructure examinations were used to understand the micro-mechanisms for the initiation and propagation of galling damage. A physical model for the initiation and propagation of adhesive wear is used to explain the lower galling resistance for the Ni-base hardfacings and to understand the influence of composition on the galling resistance of Ni-base alloys. The composition of some Ni base hardfacings was modified in a controlled manner to quantify the influence of specific elements on the galling resistance.

Cockeram, B.V.; Buck, R.F.; Wilson, W.L.

1997-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

432

Weld-Windsor 115-kV Transmission Line Project, Weld County, Colorado  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Western Area Power Administration is proposing to rebuild a 3.0 mile segment of the existing Flatiron-Weld 115-kV transmission line in Weld County. The line would be reconductored with new conductor on new wood pole double circuit structures. The new structures would support a double circuit transmission line configuration. The first circuit would be owned by Western and the second by Public Service Company of Colorado (PSCO). Alternatives considered included no action, constructing PSCO`s circuit on new right-of-way, and reconductoring Western`s existing line on the same structures. The proposed action was selected because it provided an opportunity to share structures with PSCO and, overall, would minimize costs and environmental impacts. The environmental assessment identifies minor effects on existing natural or human resources and minor benefits for agricultural operations.

NONE

1996-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

433

Nondestructive Evaluation: Ultrasonic Equivalency Testing of Weld Inlaid and Weld Onlaid Components  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report describes Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) investigations in which ultrasonic data were acquired using American Society of Mechanical Engineers (ASME) Boiler and Pressure Vessel Code, Section XI, Appendix VIII qualified procedures on Performance Demonstration Initiative (PDI) 600 Series nozzle mockups containing crack-like flaws. These mockups were representative of dissimilar metal weld (DMW) safe-end-to-nozzle configurations found in the U.S. pressurized water reactor (PWR) fleet. T...

2008-12-22T23:59:59.000Z

434

Optical emission spectroscopy of metal vapor dominated laser-arc hybrid welding plasma  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

During laser-arc hybrid welding, plasma properties affect the welding process and the weld quality. However, hybrid welding plasmas have not been systematically studied. Here we examine electron temperatures, species densities, and electrical conductivity for laser, arc, and laser-arc hybrid welding using optical emission spectroscopy. The effects of arc currents and heat source separation distances were examined because these parameters significantly affect weld quality. Time-average plasma electron temperatures, electron and ion densities, electrical conductivity, and arc stability decrease with increasing heat source separation distance during hybrid welding. Heat source separation distance affects these properties more significantly than the arc current within the range of currents considered. Improved arc stability and higher electrical conductivity of the hybrid welding plasma result from increased heat flux, electron temperatures, electron density, and metal vapor concentrations relative to arc or laser welding.

Ribic, B.; DebRoy, T. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, The Pennsylvania State University, University Park, Pennsylvania 16802 (United States); Burgardt, P. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545 (United States)

2011-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

435

Exploiting welding in production technology. International conference held at London, 22--24 April, 1975. Volume 2. Discussions  

SciTech Connect

This volume contains the discussions which follow the papers that appear in Volume 1 (CONF-7504106-P1). Arc welding, inspection, positional welding, fumes, electron beam, vacuum brazing, arc plasma, resistance and microfriction welding are discussed. (DLC)

1975-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

436

Development of automated welding process for field fabrication of thick walled pressure vessels. (First quarterly report, FY 1981)  

SciTech Connect

The choice of sets of root welding parameters is discussed. Thick field demonstration/qualification welds will be performed. A welding procedure handbook which will be prepared is mentioned. (DLC)

Schneider, U.A.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

437

Proceedings: Seminar on Dissimilar Welds in Fossil-Fired Boilers  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The more than 20 presentations at this international seminar identified root causes of dissimilar weld failures and suggested solutions to the problem. In addition, they documented industry in-service inspection and repair practices.

1985-07-30T23:59:59.000Z

438

THE EFFECT OF LASER WELDING PROCESS PARAMETERS ON THE MECHANICAL...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

1 Journal of Nuclear Materials, vol. 283-287 (2000) 1206 THE EFFECT OF LASER WELDING PROCESS PARAMETERS ON THE MECHANICAL AND MICROSTRUCTURAL PROPERTIES OF V-4Cr-4Ti STRUCTURAL...

439

Effect of Pre-Weld Heat Treatment Environment on the ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... vacuum levels i.e. under 1 atmospheric pressure shielding with pure argon, ... Application of Microstructure Engineering to the Heat Affected Zone of Welds ... Development of High-Performance Structural Alloys for Nuclear Energy Systems.

440

Reliability of Wedge Wire Bonds Subjected to Ultrasonic Welding ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper presents the effect of the ultrasonic welding lid attachment process on the reliability and mechanical strength of 1.0 and 1.5 mil gold wedge wire ...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "welding stress management" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

Friction Stir Welding of Magnesium Alloys to Steel  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

EPRI P87, A New Filler Material for Dissimilar Metal Welds · Explosive Bonding of 316L to C18150 CuCrZr Alloy for ITER Applications · Failure Mechanisms of ...

442

Weld solidification cracking in 304 to 204L stainless steel  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A series of annulus welds were made between 304 and 304L stainless steel coaxial tubes using both pulsed laser beam welding (LBW) and pulsed gas tungsten arc welding (GTAW). In this application, a change in process from pulsed LBW to pulsed gas tungsten arc welding was proposed to limit the possibility of weld solidification cracking since weldability diagrams developed for GTAW display a greater range of compositions that are not crack susceptible relative to those developed for pulsed LBW. Contrary to the predictions of the GTAW weldability diagram, cracking was found.This result was rationalized in terms of the more rapid solidification rate of the pulsed gas tungsten arc welds. In addition, for the pulsed LBW conditions, the material compositions were predicted to be, by themselves, 'weldable' according to the pulsed LBW weldability diagram. However, the composition range along the tie line connecting the two compositions passed through the crack susceptible range. Microstructurally, the primary solidification mode (PSM) of the material processed with higher power LBW was determined to be austenite (A), while solidification mode of the materials processed with lower power LBW apparently exhibited a dual PSM of both austenite (A) and ferrite-austenite (FA) within the same weld. The materials processed by pulsed GTAW showed mostly primary austenite solidification, with some regions of either primary austenite-second phase ferrite (AF) solidification or primary ferrite-second phase austenite (FA) solidification. This work demonstrates that variations in crack susceptibility may be realized when welding different heats of 'weldable' materials together, and that slight variations in processing can also contribute to crack susceptibility.

Hochanadel, Patrick W [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Lienert, Thomas J [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Martinez, Jesse N [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Johnson, Matthew Q [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2010-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

443

Weld solidification cracking in 304 to 304L stainless steel  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A series of annulus welds were made between 304 and 304L stainless steel coaxial tubes using both pulsed laser beam welding (LBW) and pulsed gas tungsten arc welding (GTAW). In this application, a change in process from pulsed LBW to pulsed gas tungsten arc welding was proposed to limit the possibility of weld solidification cracking since weldability diagrams developed for GTAW display a greater range of compositions that are not crack susceptible relative to those developed for pulsed LBW. Contrary to the predictions of the GTAW weldability diagram, cracking was found. This result was rationalized in terms of the more rapid solidification rate of the pulsed gas tungsten arc welds. In addition, for the pulsed LBW conditions, the material compositions were predicted to be, by themselves, 'weldable' according to the pulsed LBW weldability diagram. However, the composition range along the tie line connecting the two compositions passed through the crack susceptible range. Microstructurally, the primary solidification mode (PSM) of the material processed with higher power LBW was determined to be austenite (A), while solidification mode of the materials processed with lower power LBW apparently exhibited a dual PSM of both austenite (A) and ferrite-austenite (FA) within the same weld. The materials processed by pulsed GT A W showed mostly primary austenite solidification, with some regions of either primary austenite-second phase ferrite (AF) solidification or primary ferrite-second phase austenite (FA) solidification. This work demonstrates that variations in crack susceptibility may be realized when welding different heats of 'weldable' materials together, and that slight variations in processing can also contribute to crack susceptibility.

Hochanadel, Patrick W [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Lienert, Thomas J [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Martinez, Jesse N [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Martinez, Raymond J [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Johnson, Matthew Q [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

444

Onsite Plasma Welding Technology and Equipment Development: RRAC Task 88  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Automated plasma transfer arc welding (PTAW) with powder feed capabilities is commonly used for applying hardfacing alloys for new installations and for replacement valves. With a variety of hardfacing and corrosion resistant alloys readily available in the powder form, the PTAW process is an effective and economical process for applying hardfacing materials. The process can obtain high quality deposits with a very low dilution rate and excellent material properties with a minimum number of weld layers. ...

2001-03-30T23:59:59.000Z

445

Creep Strength–Enhanced Ferritic (CSEF) Steel Welding Guide  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Implementation of advanced alloys for construction of new nuclear units or in the retrofit of existing units has demonstrated the need to treat them differently at elevated temperatures than mainstay power generation alloys such as Grades 11, 12, or 22. This report presents recommendations for welding creep strength enhanced ferritic (CSEF) steels, with emphasis on Grades 91, 92, 23, and 24 in tubing, piping, and dissimilar metal weld applications. Subjects covered in detail include guidelines for ...

2013-08-27T23:59:59.000Z

446

Role of Local Strain Gradients from Prior Cold Work on Stress ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Crack Growth Rates of Irradiated Commercial Stainless Steels in BWR and PWR ... Detailed Root Cause Analysis of SG Tube ODSCC Indications within the Tube Sheets of NPP Biblis Unit A .... Radiation Damage in Fe-C-Met Model Alloys ... Stress Corrosion Cracking Behavior near the Fusion Boundary of Dissimilar Weld

447

Behavior of Stress Corrosion Cracking for Type 316L Stainless Steel ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Crack Growth Rates of Irradiated Commercial Stainless Steels in BWR and PWR ... Detailed Root Cause Analysis of SG Tube ODSCC Indications within the Tube Sheets of NPP Biblis Unit A .... Radiation Damage in Fe-C-Met Model Alloys ... Stress Corrosion Cracking Behavior near the Fusion Boundary of Dissimilar Weld

448

Stress Indices for Straight Pipe with Trunnion Attachments  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report provides equations based on experimental and test data for determining B and C stress indices and the flexibility factor, k, for straight pipe with trunnions (or hollow circular cross-section welded attachments). The report contains explicit modifications to ASME Code Cases 391 and 392 for qualification of trunnions on pipe. It also provides flexibility equations for a more accurate evaluation of these configurations.

1998-11-10T23:59:59.000Z

449

DESIGN OF A ROBOTIC WELDING SYSTEM FOR CLOSURE OF WASTE STORAGE CANISTERS  

SciTech Connect

This work reported here was done to provide a conceptual design for a robotic welding and inspection system for the Yucca Mountain Repository waste package closure system. The welding and inspection system is intended to make the various closure welds that seal and/or structurally join the lids to the waste package vessels. The welding and inspection system will also perform surface and volumetric inspections of the various closure welds and has the means to repair closure welds, if required. The system is designed to perform these various activities remotely, without the necessity of having personnel in the closure cell.

H.B. Smartt; A.D. Watkins; D.P. Pace; R.J. Bitsoi; E.D> Larsen T.R. McJunkin; C.R. Tolle

2005-04-07T23:59:59.000Z

450

Development of fully automated and integrated (''Instamatic'') welding systems for marine applications  

SciTech Connect

A two-year research program was conducted at M.I.T. to develop fully automated and integrated welding systems. These systems package many actions involved in welding so that certain prescribed welding jobs can be performed by a person with no welding skill. They have been nicknamed ''instamatic'' welding systems, since they are similar to the easy-to-operate cameras. Following a general discussion on the development of the concept of the ''instamatic'' welding system, discussions are given on two types of systems which have been built and tested: underwater stud welding systems, and those using arc welding processes.

Masubuchi, K.; Gustin, H.L.; Schloerb, D.W.

1983-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

451

Welding and Repair Technology Center: Evaluation of Hardness Requirements for Temper Bead Welding Applications--Preliminary Review  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Qualification of welding procedures for structural members and pressure boundary components in accordance with American Society of Mechanical Engineers (ASME) codes frequently requires impact testing. Specifically, the Charpy V-notch test is often used to assess base material, heat-affected zone, and weld metal impact properties. Impact testing is specified in the ASME codes to ensure that materials will have adequate fracture toughness and behave in a ductile manner under service conditions. ...

2013-10-14T23:59:59.000Z

452

Developing and Qualifying Parameters for Closure Welding Overpacks Containing Research Reactor Spent Nuclear Fuel at Hanford  

SciTech Connect

Fluor engineers developed a Gas Tungsten Arc Welding (GTAW) technique and parameters, demonstrated requisite weld quality, and successfully closure-welded packaged spent nuclear fuel (SNF) overpacks at the Hanford Site. This paper reviews weld development and qualification activities associated with the overpack closure-welding and provides a summary of the production campaign. The primary requirement of the closure weld is to provide leak-tight confinement of the packaged material against release to the environment during interim storage (40-year design term). Required weld quality, in this case, was established through up-front development and qualification, and then verification of parameter compliance during production welding. This approach was implemented to allow for a simpler overpack design and more efficient production operations than possible with approaches using routine post-weld testing and nondestructive examination (NDE). A series of welding trials were conducted to establish the desired welding technique and parameters. Qualification of the process included statistical evaluation and American Society of Mechanical Engineers (ASME) Section IX testing. In addition, pull testing with a weighted mockup, and thermal calculation/physical testing to identify the maximum temperature the packaged contents would be subject to during welding, was performed. Thirteen overpacks were successfully packaged and placed into interim storage. The closure-welding development activities (including pull testing and thermal analysis) provided the needed confidence that the packaged SNF overpacks could be safely handled and placed into interim storage, and remain leak-tight for the duration of the storage term. (author)

Cannell, G.R.; Goldmann, L.H.; McCormack, R.L. [Hanford Site, Richland, WA (United States)

2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

453

DEVELOPING AND QUANTIFYING PARAMETERS FOR CLOSURE WELDING OVERPACKS CONTAINING RESEARCH REACTOR SPENT NUCLEAR FUEL AT HANFORD  

SciTech Connect

Fluor engineers developed a Gas Tungsten Arc Welding (GTAW) technique and parameters, demonstrated requisite weld quality and successfully closure-welded packaged spent nuclear fuel (SNF) overpacks at the Hanford Site. This paper reviews weld development and qualification activities associated with the overpack closure-welding and provides a summary of the production campaign. The primary requirement of the closure weld is to provide leaktight confinement of the packaged material against release to the environment during interim storage (40-year design term). Required weld quality, in this case, was established through up-front development and qualification, and then verification of parameter compliance during production welding. This approach was implemented to allow for a simpler overpack design and more efficient production operations than possible with approaches using routine post-weld testing and nondestructive examination (NDE). . A series of welding trials were conducted to establish the desired welding technique and parameters. Qualification of the process included statistical evaluation and American Society of Mechanical Engineers (ASME) Section IX testing. In addition, pull testing with a weighted mockup, and thermal calculation/physical testing to identify the maximum temperature the packaged contents would be subject to during welding, was performed. Thirteen overpacks were successfully packaged and placed into interim storage. The closure-welding development activities (including pull testing and thermal analysis) provided the needed confidence that the packaged SNF overpacks could be safely handled and placed into interim storage, and remain leaktight for the duration of the storage term.

CANNELL GR

2007-11-07T23:59:59.000Z

454

The hardening of Type 316L stainless steel welds with thermal aging  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Welded stainless steel piping is a component of boiling water reactors (BWRs). Reirculation and other large diameter piping are fabricated from Type 304 or 316 stainless steels. Delta ferrite is present in welds, because ...

Ayers, Lauren Juliet

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

455

FITNESS-FOR-SERVICE ASSESSMENT FOR A RADIOACTIVE WASTE TANK THAT CONTAINS STRESS CORROSION CRACKS  

SciTech Connect

Radioactive wastes are confined in 49 underground storage tanks at the Savannah River Site. The tanks are examined by ultrasonic (UT) methods for thinning, pitting, and stress corrosion cracking in order to assess fitness-for-service. During an inspection in 2002, ten cracks were identified on one of the tanks. Given the location of the cracks (i.e., adjacent to welds, weld attachments, and weld repairs), fabrication details (e.g., this tank was not stress-relieved), and the service history the degradation mechanism was stress corrosion cracking. Crack instability calculations utilizing API-579 guidance were performed to show that the combination of expected future service condition hydrostatic and weld residual stresses do not drive any of the identified cracks to instability. The cracks were re-inspected in 2007 to determine if crack growth had occurred. During this re-examination, one indication that was initially reported as a 'possible perpendicular crack <25% through wall' in 2002, was clearly shown not to be a crack. Additionally, examination of a new area immediately adjacent to other cracks along a vertical weld revealed three new cracks. It is not known when these new cracks formed as they could very well have been present in 2002 as well. Therefore, a total of twelve cracks were evaluated during the re-examination. Comparison of the crack lengths measured in 2002 and 2007 revealed that crack growth had occurred in four of the nine previously measured cracks. The crack length extension ranged from 0.25 to 1.8 inches. However, in all cases the cracks still remained within the residual stress zone (i.e., within two to three inches of the weld). The impact of the cracks that grew on the future service of Tank 15 was re-assessed. API-579 crack instability calculations were again performed, based on expected future service conditions and trended crack growth rates for the future tank service cycle. The analysis showed that the combined hydrostatic and weld residual stresses do not drive the identified cracks to instability. This tank expected to be decommissioned in the near future. However, if these plans are delayed, it was recommended that a third examination of selected cracks in the tank be performed in 2014.

Wiersma, B; James Elder, J; Rodney Vandekamp, R; Charles Mckeel, C

2009-04-23T23:59:59.000Z

456

Weld Mechanical Properties of a Ni-Base Superalloy in Various Pre ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

About this Abstract. Meeting, Materials Science & Technology 2011. Symposium, Joining and Sustaining of Superalloys. Presentation Title, Weld Mechanical ...

457

Mound bridge-wire welding, testing and corrosion seminar, Miamisburg, OH, May 7-8, 1968  

SciTech Connect

Brief summaries are presented on the following presentations: welding for low voltage operation, welding techniques at Mound, welding/joining at Sandia, Ultrasonic`s plastic assemblies of detonator components, laser welding bridge-wires, laser safety in the Biorad industrial environment, nondestructive testing at Mound, thermal cycle data and evaluation, thermal cycle nondestructive testing, corrosion of detonator electrode and bridge-wire, and corrosion studies and fabrication of bridge-wire at Sigmund Cohn.

Richards, M.A.

1968-08-07T23:59:59.000Z

458

Guidelines for Using a Single Weld Qualification Code in Nuclear Power Plant Applications  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report and the appended guideline provide the justification and direction needed to use American Society of Mechanical Engineers (ASME) Section IX welding qualifications for ASME applications and American Welding Society (AWS) structural applications.BackgroundThe use of multiple welding qualification codes has long been a problem for plants with different design codes. The most frequently followed welding qualification codes are those in ASME Section ...

2013-08-21T23:59:59.000Z

459

Microstructure Characterization of Magnetic-Pulse-Welded AA 6061-T6 by Electron Backscattered Diffraction  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The grain boundary crystallographic misorientations of magnetic-pulse-welded (MPW) aluminum alloy (AA) 6061-T6 in linear and tubular configurations were examined using the electron backscattered diffraction (EBSD) technique. A refined structure of heavily deformed grains with higher grain boundary angles was observed in linear welds. Significant spalling was observed away from the joints, in the interior of tubular welds. The results show the complex interaction of shock waves with the materials during this impact welding process.

Zhang, Yuan [Ohio State University; Babu, Suresh [Ohio State University; Zhang, P [Edison Welding Institute; Kenik, Edward A [ORNL; Daehn, Glenn [Ohio State University

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

460

Development and application of an intelligent welding robot system for shipbuilding  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Over the last few decades, there have been a large number of attempts to automate welding in the shipbuilding process. However, there are still many non-automated welding operations in the double-hulled blocks, even though it presents an extremely hazardous ... Keywords: Double-hulled block, Intelligent welding robot, Rail-runner mechanism, Shipbuilding

Donghun Lee; Namkug Ku; Tae-Wan Kim; Jongwon Kim; Kyu-Yeul Lee; Youg-Shuk Son

2011-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "welding stress management" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


461

Resistance spot welding of Ti-6A1-4V alloy  

SciTech Connect

The effects of weld power, electrode force, electrode tip radius, and elapsed time between cleaning and welding on resistance spot welds in Ti-6Al-4V alloy were evaluated. The alloy is weldable by this technique, and a wide latitude can be taken in processing variables.

Jarboe, D.M.

1980-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

462

Physical processes involved in strip electrode welding using the method of slatted splicing  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Physical processes that take place in a strip electrode during welding using the slatted splicing technique are considered. Flowing of the welding current in the electrode is shown to be the key process which determines electrode heating and melting. Technological receipts are proposed that allow obtaining high-quality welds by the method of slatted splicing.

Bushma, V. O. [Moscow State Technological University 'Stankin' (Russian Federation)

2010-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

463

Nondestructive inspection of General Purpose Heat Source (GPHS) girth welds  

SciTech Connect

The General-Purpose Heat Source (GPHS) provides power for space missions by transmitting the heat of {sup 238}Pu decay to an array of thermoelectric elements. The GPHS is fabricated using iridium capsules, TIG welded, to contain the {sup 238}PuO{sub 2} fuel pellet. GPHS capsules will be utilized in the upcoming Cassini mission to explore Saturn and its moons. The physical integrity of the girth weld is important to mission safety and performance. Since experience in the past had revealed a potential for initiation of small cracks in the girth weld overlap zone, a nondestructive inspection of the capsule weld is required. A ultrasonic method was used to inspect the welds of capsules fabricated for the Galileo mission. The instrument, transducer, and method used were state of the art at the time (early 1980s). The ultrasonic instrumentation and methods used to inspect the Cassini GPHSs was significantly upgraded from those used for the Galileo mission. GPHSs that had ultrasonic reflectors that exceeded the reject specification level were subsequently inspected with radiography to provide additional engineering data used to accept/reject the heat source. This paper describes the Galileo-era ultrasonic instrumentation and methods and the subsequent upgrades made to support testing of Cassini GPHSs. Also discussed is the data obtained from radiographic examination and correlation to ultrasonic examination results.

Reimus, M.A.H.; George, T.G.; Lynch, C. [and others

1998-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

464

FILL STEM MANUFACTURING CHANGES AND PINCH WELD QUALIFICATIONS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In March of 2007 a document was issued, see attachment I, that defined the test protocol and required welding for the Kansas City Plant to change cutting oils from the recently approved 50:50 oil to an oil with similar characteristics but with different chemistry, additives, and possibly a different vendor due to plans by the current vendor to stop preparing the oils that are used in the KCP 50:50 mix. The KCP manufactured stems with the existing 50:50 oil blend in late FY07 and SRNL welded the stems and evaluated them in agreement with the test plan. This report provides all the data from these set-up and test welds. Set-up welds were shot and low and high voltages (currents) to ensure the window limits were applicable and then additional welds were made to validate the window. The purpose of this report is to ensure that the agreed upon path forward is still applicable.

Korinko, P; David Maxwell, D

2008-02-22T23:59:59.000Z

465

Subsea pipeline gets welded branch without halting flow  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In October 1994, a 16 in. welded branch was installed without interruption to production onto Wintershall Noordzee BV`s 36-in. gas pipeline from the K13-A platform in the Dutch sector of the North Sea to Den helder, The Netherlands. The procedure is the first successfully to combine hyperbaric welding and subsea hot tapping without interruption to production. Developers of new fields can now consider exporting product without interrupting existing production and through existing infrastructure even if no convenient tie-in locations exist. Unocal evaluated export options and established that the most attractive alternative was to export gas into the Wintershall 36-in. K13-A to Den Helder pipeline. Various options for installing a branch included the following: flooding the pipeline and installing a conventional tee; stopping production and installing a welded branch followed by hot tapping; and continuing production and installing a welded branch followed by hot tapping. The chosen scheme was to retrofit a subsea side-tap assembly. This was achieved by installation of a welded branch followed by hot tapping into the 36-in. pipeline. The paper describes location determination, schedules, onshore preparation, and offshore work.

West, A.; Hutt, G. [Stolt Comex Seaway Ltd., Aberdeen (United Kingdom); Starsmore, R. [Wintershall Noordzee B.V., Den Helder (Netherlands)

1995-12-11T23:59:59.000Z

466

TEMPORARILY ALLOYING TITANIUM TO FACILITATE FRICTION STIR WELDING  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

While historically hydrogen has been considered an impurity in titanium, when used as a temporary alloying agent it promotes beneficial changes to material properties that increase the hot-workability of the metal. This technique known as thermohydrogen processing was used to temporarily alloy hydrogen with commercially pure titanium sheet as a means of facilitating the friction stir welding process. Specific alloying parameters were developed to increase the overall hydrogen content of the titanium sheet ranging from commercially pure to 30 atomic percent. Each sheet was evaluated to determine the effect of the hydrogen content on process loads and tool deformation during the plunge phase of the friction stir welding process. Two materials, H-13 tool steel and pure tungsten, were used to fabricate friction stir welding tools that were plunged into each of the thermohydrogen processed titanium sheets. Tool wear was characterized and variations in machine loads were quantified for each tool material and weld metal combination. Thermohydrogen processing was shown to beneficially lower plunge forces and stabilize machine torques at specific hydrogen concentrations. The resulting effects of hydrogen addition to titanium metal undergoing the friction stir welding process are compared with modifications in titanium properties documented in modern literature. Such comparative analysis is used to explain the variance in resulting process loads as a function of the initial hydrogen concentration of the titanium.

Hovanski, Yuri

2009-05-06T23:59:59.000Z

467

The Effect Of Neutron Irradiation On The Mechanical Properties Of Welded Zircaloy-2  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Zircaloy-2 tensile specimens, subsize impact bars and representative spigot welds were subjected to three NRX cycles in the X-5 loop. Average loop temperature was 260 deg C over the three cycles. One group of tensile specimens was heat-treated in vacuum at 900 deg C for 40 minutes, another group contained welded areas in the center of the gauge length and a third group was hydrided after welding. Notches of the impact specimens were located in the fusion zone of the weld. Spigot welds were made on autoclaved and unautoclaved simulated production assemblies. Neutron irradiation had no effect on the impact properties of welded Zircaloy-2. Welding decreased the uniform and total elongation at room temperature and at 260 deg C, and increased the 260 deg C PL, YS, and UTS. Hydriding to a nominal 100 ppm hydrogen had no effect on the unirradiated tensile properties at either test temperature. The heat treatment decreased the strength properties but did not affect the ductility. Neutron irradiation increased the YS of the welded and hydrided material by 20% and the heat treated YS by 40%. Irradiation also increased the 260 deg C strength properties of the as-welded material. The unautoclaved spigot welds had a generally higher tensile strength than the autoclaved and welded specimens. For specimens welded in either condition, the outer welds of the 19-element bundle had a lower average breaking load than the inner welds. Neutron irradiation had no effect on the tensile strength of these welds. It was also demonstrated that a cup-and-cone type of fracture could be produced in a bend test. The fractures were similar to those observed in irradiated fuel bundles which was damaged during transfer operations. (auth)

Evans, D.G.

1962-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

468

OXIDATION BEHAVIOR OF WELDED AND BASE METAL UNS N06025  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The oxidation behavior of specimens containing tungsten inert gas welds of UNS N06025 (NiCrFeAlY) was investigated in air for up to 5,000h at 900 -1000 C and 1,000h at 1100 -1200 C. In general, the microstructure was very homogeneous in the weld with smaller carbides and the Al2O3 penetrations were similar or smaller compared to those formed in the base metal. Above 1000 C, significant spallation was observed and Al and Cr depletion in the metal was observed to a similar extent in the weld and base metal. The maximum internal oxidation depth of the base metal at 900 and 1100 C was lower than several other commercial Ni-base alloys.

Pint, Bruce A [ORNL; Paul, Larry D. [Thyssen-Krupp VDM

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

469

Gas-tungsten arc welding of aluminum alloys  

SciTech Connect

A gas-tungsten arc welding method for joining together structures formed of aluminum alloy with these structures disposed contiguously to a heat-damagable substrate of a metal dissimilar to the aluminum alloy. The method of the present invention is practiced by diamond machining the fay surfaces of the aluminum alloy structures to provide a mirror finish thereon having a surface roughness in the order of about one microinch. The fay surfaces are aligned and heated sufficiently by the tungsten electrode to fuse the aluminum alloy contiguous to the fay surfaces to effect the weld joint. The heat input used to provide an oxide-free weld is significantly less than that required if the fay surfaces were prepared by using conventional chemical and mechanical practices.

Frye, Lowell D. (Kingston, TN)

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

470

Method and device for controlling plume during laser welding  

SciTech Connect

A method and apparatus for enhancing the weldment of a laser welding system is provided. The laser weld plume control device includes a cylindrical body defining an upside-down cone cavity; the upper surface of the body circumscribes the base of the cone cavity, and the vertex of the cone cavity forms an orifice concentrically located with respect to the laser beam and the plume which forms as a result of the welding operation. According to the method of the invention, gas is directed radially inward through inlets in the upper surface of the body into and through channels in the wall of the body and finally through the orifice of the body, and downward onto the surface of the weldment. The gas flow is then converted by the orifice of the device from radial flow to an axisymmetric gas jet flowing away from the weldment surface in a direction perpendicular to the surface and opposite to that of the laser.

Fuerschbach, Phillip W. (Tijeras, NM); Jellison, James L. (Albuquerque, NM); Keicher, David M. (Albuquerque, NM); Oberkampf, William L. (Albuquerque, NM)

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

471

Gas-tungsten arc welding of aluminum alloys  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The present invention is directed to a gas-tungsten arc welding method for joining together structures formed of aluminum alloy with these structures disposed contiguously to a heat-damagable substrate of a metal dissimilar to the aluminum alloy. The method of the present invention is practiced by diamond machining the fay surfaces of the aluminum alloy structures to profice a mirror finish thereon having a surface roughness in the order of about one microinch. The fay surface are aligned and heated sufficiently by the tungsten electrode to fuse the aluminum alloy continguous to the fay surfaces to effect the weld joint. The heat input used to provide an oxide-free weld is significantly less than that required if the fay surfaces were prepared by using conventional chemical and mechanical practices.

Frye, L.D.

1982-03-25T23:59:59.000Z

472

Method and device for controlling plume during laser welding  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method and apparatus for enhancing the weldment of a laser welding system is provided. The laser weld plume control device is provided as a cylindrical body defining an upside-down cone cavity, the upper surface of the body circumscribing the base of the cone cavity, the vertex of the cavity forming an orifice which converts the flow of gas, directed through inlets in the upper surface of the body through channels in the wall of the body, from radial flow to an axisymmetric gas jet perpendicular to the surface of the weldment in a direction opposite to the direction of the laser beam. The orifice of the control device is concentrically located with respect to the laser beam and the plume which forms as a result of the welding operation. 6 figs.

Fuerschbach, P.W.; Jellison, J.L.; Keicher, D.M.; Oberkampf, W.L.

1989-08-25T23:59:59.000Z

473

Eddy Current Examination of Spent Nuclear Fuel Canister Closure Welds  

SciTech Connect

The National Spent Nuclear Fuel Program (NSNFP) has developed standardized DOE SNF canisters for handling and interim storage of SNF at various DOE sites as well as SNF transport to and SNF handling and disposal at the repository. The final closure weld of the canister will be produced remotely in a hot cell after loading and must meet American Society of Mechanical Engineers (ASME) Section III, Division 3 code requirements thereby requiring volumetric and surface nondestructive evaluation to verify integrity. This paper discusses the use of eddy current testing (ET) to perform surface examination of the completed welds and repair cavities. Descriptions of integrated remote welding/inspection system and how the equipment is intended function will also be discussed.

Arthur D. Watkins; Dennis C. Kunerth; Timothy R. McJunkin

2006-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

474

Application of a Plasma Powder Welding to engine valves  

SciTech Connect

In hardfacing of automobile engine valves made of heat resisting steel such as 21-4N, conventional oxy-acetylene gase welding has been currently conducted manually by well trained operators because of using cast Stellite rods as the filler. In accordance with the strong demands of automatic welding, the authors newly developed an automatically controlled Plasma Powder Welding (PPW) system. This system is characterized by the application of a high thermal density plasma arc as heat source and by using power filler which melts more easily than bar cast rods. Moreover, this PPW system has been applied to the automotive engine valve production line and resulted in the great contribution to manpower saving.

Takeuchi, Y.; Nagata, M.

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

475

Novel concepts in weld science: Role of gradients and composite structure. Final report  

SciTech Connect

The effects of compositional and microstructural gradients on weld metal and simulated weld metal properties were evaluated in this multi-part study. The results obtained on single phase solid solution systems were used as a basis for a fundamental study of the effects of compositional gradients on crack growth, both at low temperatures, in fatigue and at high temperatures during creep. Methods to physically simulate gradients in weld metals with roll bonded laminate composites were applied to analyses of ferrite-austenite and ferrite-sigma-austenite multiphase systems. Finally, results of the physical simulation analyses were utilized to predict the effects of weld process parameters on weld metal properties.

Matlock, D.K.; Olson, D.L.

1994-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

476

Development of a Fiber Laser Welding Capability for the W76, MC4702 Firing Set  

SciTech Connect

Development work to implement a new welding system for a Firing Set is presented. The new system is significant because it represents the first use of fiber laser welding technology at the KCP. The work used Six-Sigma tools for weld characterization and to define process performance. Determinations of workable weld parameters and comparison to existing equipment were completed. Replication of existing waveforms was done utilizing an Arbitrary Pulse Generator (APG), which was used to modulate the fiber laser’s exclusive continuous wave (CW) output. Fiber laser weld process capability for a Firing Set is demonstrated.

Samayoa, Jose

2010-05-12T23:59:59.000Z

477

Corrosion Fatigue Testing of GMAW and Laser Weld Overlays  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report is an update of EPRI’s ongoing laboratory study on corrosion fatigue cracking of weld overlays, applied to waterwalls of boilers suffering high wastage. At this point the work is not complete. At least one more year of testing is needed to study the effect of all variables affecting circumferential cracking of weld overlays. Thus all conclusions based on the work completed to date should be considered preliminary. Major trends observed to date are that the corrosivity of the environment along...

2005-12-09T23:59:59.000Z

478

Apparatus and process for ultrasonic seam welding stainless steel foils  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An ultrasonic seam welding apparatus having a head which is rotated to form contact, preferably rolling contact, between a metallurgically inert coated surface of the head and an outside foil of a plurality of layered foils or work materials. The head is vibrated at an ultrasonic frequency, preferably along a longitudinal axis of the head. The head is constructed to transmit vibration through a contacting surface of the head into each of the layered foils. The contacting surface of the head is preferably coated with aluminum oxide to prevent the head from becoming welded to layered stainless steel foils.

Leigh, Richard W. (New York, NY)

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

479

Advances in stainless steel welding for elevated temperature service  

SciTech Connect

An extensive program to characterize the microstructures and determine the mechanical properties of stainless steel welds is described. The amount, size, shape, and general distribution of ferrite in the weld metal was studied. The effects of electrode coatings on creep-rupture properties were determined as were the influences of slight differences in analyzed contents of carbon, silicon, phosphorus, sulfur, and boron. Using the above information, a superior commercially produced electrode was formulated which took advantage of chemical control over boron, titanium, and phosphorus. This electrode produced deposits exhibiting superior mechanical properties and it was successfully utilized to fabricate a large nuclear reactor vessel. (auth)

Goodwin, G.M.; Cole, N.C.; King, R.T.; Slaughter, G.M.

1975-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

480

APPARATUS AND METHOD FOR WELDING END CLOSURE TO CONTAINER  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A semi-automatic apparatus is described for welding a closure to the open end of a can containing a nuclear fuel slug. An arc is struck at the center of the closure and is shifted to a region near its periphery. Then the assembly of closure, can, and fuel slug is rotated so that the peripheral region of the closure is preheated. Next the arc is shifted to the periphery itself of the closure, and the assembly is rotated so that the closure is welded to the can.

Frantz, C.E.; Correy, T.B.

1959-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "welding stress management" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


481

Welding and Repair Technology Center: Rolled Plate Repair Guide  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report is intended to enlighten and assist power plant engineers in the application of welded rolled plate repairs in both nuclear and balance-of-plant piping systems. This report introduces the engineer to post-construction standards in non-nuclear industries that use these types of repair, often on a widespread basis. Related requirements in those standards are explained in order to assist the engineer in planning and designing balance-of-plant repairs using welded rolled plates in various applica...

2011-12-23T23:59:59.000Z

482

Process, Techniques, and Successes in Welding the Dry Shielded Canister Welds of the TMI-2 Reactor Core Debris  

SciTech Connect

The Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL) is operated by Bechtel-BWXT Idaho LLC (BBWI), which recently completed a very successful $100 million Three-Mile Island-2 (TMI-2) program for the Department of Energy (DOE). This complex and challenging program used an integrated multidisciplinary team approach that loaded, welded, and transported an unprecedented 25 dry shielded canisters (DSC) in seven months, and did so ahead of schedule. The program moved over 340 canisters of TMI-2 core debris that had been in wet storage into a dry storage facility at the INEEL. The main thrust of this paper is relating the innovations, techniques, approaches, and lessons learned associated to welding of the DSC's. This paper shows the synergism of elements to meet program success and shares these lessons learned that will facilitate success with welding of dry shielded canisters in other DOE complex dry storage programs.

Zirker, Laurence R; Rankin, Richard Allen; Ferrell, Larry Joseph

2002-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

483

VP-6 electrodes for welding of cold-resistant low-alloy steels  

SciTech Connect

This article examines VP-6 electrodes based on the standard Sv-10NMA welding rod. The calcium fluoride (with increased CaF/sub 2/ content) coating of the electrodes also contains feldspar and rutile, which reduce the porosity of the weld metal, improve the technological welding properties of the electrodes, and ensure good weld formation throughout. The average surfacing coefficient of the VP-6 electrodes is 9.5 g/A X h. It is concluded that the VP-6 electrodes, intended for the welding of low-alloy 09G2S-type steels, used at temperatures down to -70/sup 0/C, make it possible to eliminate the normalizing of welded joints after welding.

Lositskii, N.T.; Berezhnitskii, S.N.; Geimur, V.V.

1984-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

484

Characterization of Defocused Electron Beams and Welds in Stainless Steel and Refractory Metals using the Enhanced Modified Faraday Cup Diagnostic  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

As the first part of a project to compare new generation, continuous wave, laser welding technology to traditional electron beam welding technology, electron beam welds were made on commercially pure vanadium refractory metal and 21-6-9 austenitic stainless steel. The electron beam welds were made while employing EB diagnostics to fully characterize the beams so that direct comparisons could be made between electron beam and laser beams and the welds that each process produces.

Elmer, J W

2009-01-23T23:59:59.000Z

485

BWRVIP-228: BWR Vessel and Internals Project, A Computational Modeling Tool for Welding Repair of Irradiated Materials  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Repair welding on highly irradiated stainless steel BWR internals can lead to cracking in the heat-affected zone (HAZ) of the weld region. EPRI and participating Boiling Water Reactor Vessel and Internals Project (BWRVIP) members have sponsored development of a computational modeling tool to assist in determining appropriate welding process conditions (heat input and process selection) to produce crack-free welds on irradiated materials. This tool integrates a finite-element-based welding temperature and...

2009-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

486

A model-based approach to intelligent control of gas metal arc welding  

SciTech Connect

This paper discusses work on a model-based intelligent process controller for gas metal arc welding. Four sensors input to a neural network, which communicates to a reference model-based adaptive controller that controls process parameters. Reference model derivation and validation are discussed. The state of an arch weld is determined by the composition of the weld and base metal and the weld's thermomechanical history. The composition of the deposited weld metal depends primarily on the amount of filler metal dilution; heat input to the weld, comprising pre-heat and process heat, is the controlling factor in the thermal cycle. Thus, control of the arc welding process should focus on rational specification and in-process control of the heat and mass input to the weld. A control model has been developed in which the governing equations are solved for the process parameters as functions of the desired heat input (in terms of heat input unit weld length) and mass input (in terms of transverse reinforcement area) to the weld. The model includes resistive and arc heating of the electrode wire, characteristics of the welding power supply, and a volumetric heat balance on the electrode material, as well as latent and superheat of the electrode material. Extension of the model to include dynamics of individual droplet transfer events, based on incorporating a nonlinear, lumped parameter droplet analysis, is discussed. A major emphasis has been placed on computational simplicity; model solutions are required at the rate of about 10 Hz during welding. Finally, a process control scheme has been developed for the gas metal arc welding process using the above nonlinear model with a proportional-integral controller with adaptive coefficients to control the weld heat input and reinforcement area independently. Performance of the resulting control method is discussed. 10 refs., 5 figs.

Smartt, H.B.; Johnson, J.A.; Einerson, C.J.; Watkins, A.D.; Carlson, N.M.

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

487

Narrow groove gas tungsten arc welding of ASTM A508 Class 4 steel for improved toughness properties  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Welding of heavy section steel has traditionally used the automatic submerged arc welding (ASAW) process because of the high deposition rates achievable. However, the properties, particularly fracture toughness, of the weld are often inferior when compared to base material. This project evaluated the use of narrow groove gas tungsten arc welding (GTAW) to improve weld material properties. The welding procedures were developed for ASTM A508 Class 4 base material using a 1% Ni filler material complying to AWS Specification A.23-90-EF3-F3-N. A narrow groove joint preparation was used in conjunction with the GTAW process so competitive fabrication rates could be achieved when compared to the ASAW process. Weld procedures were developed to refine weld substructure to achieve better mechanical properties. Two heaters of weld wire were used to examine the effects of minor filler metal chemistry differences on weld mechanical properties. Extensive metallographic evaluations showed excellent weld quality with a refined microstructure. Chemical analysis of the weld metal showed minimal weld dilution by the base metal. Mechanical testing included bend and tensile tests to ensure weld quality and strength. A Charpy impact energy curve versus temperature and fracture toughness curve versus temperature were developed for each weld wire heat. Results of fracture toughness and Charpy impact testing indicated an improved transition temperature closer to that of the base material properties.

Penik, M.A. Jr. [Rensselaer Polytechnic Inst., Troy, NY (United States)

1997-04-01T23:59:59.000Z