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Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "weekly heating oil" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


1

Residential heating oil price  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

heating oil price decreases The average retail price for home heating oil fell 6.3 cents from a week ago to 2.91 per gallon. That's down 1.10 from a year ago, based on the...

2

Residential heating oil price  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

heating oil price decreases The average retail price for home heating oil fell 7.5 cents from a week ago to 2.84 per gallon. That's down 1.22 from a year ago, based on the...

3

Residential heating oil price  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

heating oil price decreases The average retail price for home heating oil fell 7.6 cents from a week ago to 2.97 per gallon. That's down 1.05 from a year ago, based on the...

4

Residential heating oil price  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

heating oil price decreases The average retail price for home heating oil fell 3.6 cents from a week ago to 3.04 per gallon. That's down 99.4 cents from a year ago, based on the...

5

Residential heating oil prices decline  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

heating oil prices decline The average retail price for home heating oil is 3.48 per gallon. That's down 4.5 cents from a week ago, based on the residential heating fuel survey by...

6

Residential heating oil prices decrease  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

heating oil prices decrease The average retail price for home heating oil fell 1.7 cents from a week ago to 4.02 per gallon. That's up 1.7 cents from a year ago, based on the...

7

Residential heating oil price decreases  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

heating oil price decreases The average retail price for home heating oil fell 7.8 cents from a week ago to 3.14 per gallon. That's down 81.1 cents from a year ago, based on the...

8

Residential heating oil price decreases  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

heating oil price decreases The average retail price for home heating oil fell 10.5 cents from a week ago to 3.22 per gallon. That's down 73.6 cents from a year ago, based on the...

9

Residential heating oil price decreases  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

heating oil price decreases The average retail price for home heating oil fell 1.8 cents from a week ago to 2.82 per gallon. That's down 1.36 from a year ago, based on the...

10

Residential heating oil prices decline  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

heating oil price decreases The average retail price for home heating oil fell 2 cents from a week ago to 3.36 per gallon. That's down 52.5 cents from a year ago, based on the...

11

Residential heating oil prices increase  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

heating oil prices increase The average retail price for home heating oil rose 3.9 cents last week to 3.96 per gallon. That's down 2.6 cents from a year ago, based on the...

12

Residential heating oil price decreases  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

05, 2014 Residential heating oil price decreases The average retail price for home heating oil fell 1.9 cents from a week ago to 3.43 per gallon. That's down 39 cents from a year...

13

Residential heating oil price decreases  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

4 Residential heating oil price decreases The average retail price for home heating oil fell 1.6 cents from a week ago to 3.42 per gallon. That's down 39.5 cents from a year ago,...

14

Residential heating oil prices decrease  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

heating oil price decreases The average retail price for home heating oil fell 2.9 cents from a week ago to 3.45 per gallon. That's down 36.6 cents from a year ago, based on the...

15

Residential heating oil prices decline  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

heating oil price decreases The average retail price for home heating oil fell 3.3 cents from a week ago to 3.38 per gallon. That's down 43.9 cents from a year ago, based on the...

16

Residential heating oil prices increase  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

5, 2014 Residential heating oil prices increase The average retail price for home heating oil rose 6.5 cents from a week ago to 4.24 per gallon. That's up 14.9 cents from a year...

17

Residential heating oil price decreases  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

6, 2014 Residential heating oil price decreases The average retail price for home heating oil rose 1.6 cents from a week ago to 4.24 per gallon. That's up 8.9 cents from a year...

18

Residential heating oil prices decline  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

heating oil price decreases The average retail price for home heating oil fell 6.3 cents from a week ago to 3.08 per gallon. That's down 90.3 cents from a year ago, based on the...

19

Residential heating oil price decreases  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

heating oil price decreases The average retail price for home heating oil fell 3.8 cents from a week ago to 3.33 per gallon. That's down 59.1 cents from a year ago, based on the...

20

Residential heating oil prices increase  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

heating oil prices increase The average retail price for home heating oil rose 5.4 cents from a week ago to 4.04 per gallon. That's up 4.9 cents from a year ago, based on the...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "weekly heating oil" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Residential heating oil prices increase  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

heating oil prices increase The average retail price for home heating oil rose 2.9 cents from a week ago to 3.98 per gallon. That's up 6-tenths of a penny from a year ago, based...

22

Residential heating oil prices increase  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

3, 2014 Residential heating oil prices increase The average retail price for home heating oil rose 4.4 cents from a week ago to 4.06 per gallon. That's up 4.1 cents from a year...

23

Residential heating oil prices decrease  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

5, 2014 Residential heating oil prices decrease The average retail price for home heating oil fell 1.8 cents from a week ago to 4.00 per gallon. That's down 2-tenths of a cent...

24

Residential heating oil prices increase  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

heating oil prices increase The average retail price for home heating oil rose 12 cents from a week ago to 4.18 per gallon. That's up 13 cents from a year ago, based on the...

25

Residential Heating Oil Prices  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

This chart highlights residential heating oil prices for the current and This chart highlights residential heating oil prices for the current and past heating season. As you can see, prices have started the heating season, about 40 to 50 cents per gallon higher than last year at this time. The data presented are from EIA's State Heating Oil and Propane Program. We normally collect and publish this data twice a month, but given the low stocks and high prices, we started tracking the prices weekly. These data will also be used to determine the price trigger mechanism for the Northeast Heating Oil Reserve. The data are published at a State and regional level on our web site. The slide is to give you some perspective of what is happening in these markets, since you probably will get a number of calls from local residents about their heating fuels bills

26

U.S. Weekly Heating Oil and Propane Prices (October - March)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Area: U.S. East Coast (PADD 1) New England (PADD 1A) Connecticut Maine Massachusetts New Hampshire Rhode Island Vermont Central Atlantic (PADD 1B) Delaware District of Columbia Maryland New Jersey New York Pennsylvania Lower Atlantic (PADD 1C) North Carolina Virginia Midwest (PADD 2) Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Michigan Minnesota Missouri Nebraska North Dakota Ohio South Dakota Wisconsin Period: Weekly Monthly Area: U.S. East Coast (PADD 1) New England (PADD 1A) Connecticut Maine Massachusetts New Hampshire Rhode Island Vermont Central Atlantic (PADD 1B) Delaware District of Columbia Maryland New Jersey New York Pennsylvania Lower Atlantic (PADD 1C) North Carolina Virginia Midwest (PADD 2) Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Michigan Minnesota Missouri Nebraska North Dakota Ohio South Dakota Wisconsin Period: Weekly Monthly Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources & Notes Definitions, Sources & Notes Show Data By: Data Series Area

27

Residential heating oil prices available  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

ago, based on the U.S. Energy Information Administration's weekly residential heating fuel price survey. Heating oil prices in the New England region are at 3.48 per gallon,...

28

Northeast Home Heating Oil Reserve  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Northeast Home Heating Oil Reserve Northeast Home Heating Oil Reserve Information on the Northeast Home Heating Oil Reserve is available from the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Petroleum Reserves web site at http://www.fossil.energy.gov/programs/reserves/heatingoil/. Northeast Home Heating Oil Reserve (NEHHOR) inventories now classified as ultra-low sulfur distillate (15 parts per million) are not considered to be in the commercial sector and therefore are excluded from distillate fuel oil supply and disposition statistics in Energy Information Administration publications, such as the Weekly Petroleum Status Report, Petroleum Supply Monthly, and This Week In Petroleum. Northeast Home Heating Oil Reserve Terminal Operator Location (Thousand Barrels) Hess Corp. Groton, CT 500*

29

Residential heating oil prices virtually unchanged  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

heating oil prices virtually unchanged The average retail price for home heating oil fell 4-tenths of a penny from a week ago to 3.95 per gallon. That's down 8-tenths of a penny...

30

Residential heating oil prices virtually unchanged  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

4 Residential heating oil price decreases The average retail price for home heating oil fell 3.1 cents from a week ago to 4.20 per gallon. That's up 13.6 cents from a year ago,...

31

Residential heating oil prices virtually unchanged  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

0, 2014 Residential heating oil price decreases The average retail price for home heating oil fell 1.9 cents from a week ago to 4.23 per gallon. That's up 5.1 cents from a year...

32

Residential heating oil prices virtually unchanged  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

5, 2014 Residential heating oil price decreases The average retail price for home heating oil fell 1.6 cents from a week ago to 4.23 per gallon. That's up 14.9 cents from a year...

33

Residential heating oil prices virtually unchanged  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

9, 2014 Residential heating oil price decreases The average retail price for home heating oil fell 7.2 cents from a week ago to 4.12 per gallon. That's up 9.4 cents from a year...

34

Residential heating oil prices virtually unchanged  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

4 Residential heating oil prices virtually unchanged The average retail price for home heating oil rose 2-tenths of a cent from a week ago to 4.24 per gallon. That's up 8.2 cents...

35

Winter Residential Heating Oil Prices  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

7 7 Notes: Residential heating oil prices reflect a similar pattern to that shown in spot prices. However, like other retail petroleum prices, they tend to lag changes in wholesale prices in both directions, with the result that they don't rise as rapidly or as much, but they take longer to recede. This chart shows the residential heating oil prices collected under the State Heating Oil and Propane Program (SHOPP), which only runs during the heating season, from October through March. The spike in New York Harbor spot prices last winter carried through to residential prices throughout New England and the Central Atlantic states. Though the spike actually lasted only a few weeks, residential prices ended the heating season well above where they had started.

36

PIA - Northeast Home Heating Oil Reserve System (Heating Oil...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

Home Heating Oil Reserve System (Heating Oil) More Documents & Publications PIA - WEB Physical Security Major Application PIA - GovTrip (DOE data) PIA - WEB Unclassified...

37

Heating Oil and Propane Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Maps of states participating in Winter Fuels Survey Residential propane PADD map Residential heating oil PADD map...

38

Heating Oil and Propane Update - Energy Information Administration  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

all Petroleum Reports all Petroleum Reports Heating Oil and Propane Update Weekly heating oil and propane prices are only collected during the heating season, which extends from October through March. U.S. Heating Oil and Propane Prices Residential Heating Oil Graph. Residential Propane Graph. change from change from Heating Oil 12/16/2013 week ago year ago Propane 12/16/2013 week ago year ago Residential 3.952 values are down 0.004 values are down 0.008 Residential 2.712 values are up 0.091 values are up 0.469 Wholesale 3.074 values are down 0.063 values are not available NA Wholesale 1.637 values are up 0.113 values are not available NA Note: Price in dollars per gallon, excluding taxes. Values shown on the graph and corresponding data pages for the previous week may be revised to account for late submissions and corrections.

39

Regional Residential Heating Oil Prices  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

One of the first places where consumers are feeling the impact of One of the first places where consumers are feeling the impact of this winter's market pressures is in home heating oil prices. This chart shows prices through February 28, the most recent EIA data available. The general level of heating oil prices each year is largely a function of crude oil prices, and the price range over the course of the heating season is typically about 10 cents per gallon. Exceptions occur in unusual circumstances, such as very cold weather, large changes in crude oil prices, or supply problems. Heating oil prices for East Coast consumers started this winter at just over $1 per gallon, but rising crude oil prices drove them up nearly 21 cents through mid-January. With the continuing upward pressure from crude oil markets, magnified by a regional shortfall of heating oil

40

Heating Oil and Propane Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Holiday Release Schedule Holiday Release Schedule The Heating Oil and Propane Update is produced during the winter heating season, which extends from October through March of each year. The standard release time and day of the week will be at 1:00 p. m. (Eastern time) on Wednesdays with the following exceptions. All times are Eastern. Data for: Alternate Release Date Release Day Release Time Holiday October 14, 2013 October 17, 2013 Thursday Cancelled Columbus/EIA Closed November 11, 2013 November 14, 2013 Thursday 1:00 p.m. Veterans December 23, 2013 December 27, 2013 Friday 1:00 p.m. Christmas December 30, 2013 January 3, 2014 Friday 1:00 p.m. New Year's January 20, 2014 January 23, 2014 Thursday 1:00 p.m. Martin Luther King Jr. February 17, 2014 February 20, 2014 Thursday 1:00 p.m. President's

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "weekly heating oil" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Heating oils, 1982  

SciTech Connect

Properties of 235 heating oils marketed in the United States were submitted for study and compilation under agreement between BETC and API. The fuels were manufactured by 25 petroleum refining companies in 88 domestic refineries. The data are tabulated according to six grades of fuel and subdivided into five geographic regions in which the fuels are marketed. The five regions containing a total of 16 marketing districts are shown on a map in the report. Trend charts are included showing average properties of the six grades of fuel for the past several years. Summaries of the results of the tests by grade and by region for 1982 compared with data for 1981 are tabulated. Analyses of grade 6 foreign import oils are presented.

Shelton, E.M.

1982-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

42

Heating oils, 1980  

SciTech Connect

Properties of 247 heating oils marketed in the United States were submitted for study and compilation under agreement between the Bartlesville Energy Technology Center and the American Petroleum Institute. The fuels were manufactured by 26 petroleum refining companies in 87 domestic refineries. The data are tabulated according to six grades of fuel and subdivided into five geographic regions in which the fuels are marketed. The six grades of fuel are defined by the American Society for Testing and Materials Specification D396. The five regions containing a total of 16 marketing districts are shown on a map in the report. Trend charts are included showing average properties of the six grades of fuel for the past several years. Summaries of the results of the tests by grade and by region for 1980 compared with data for 1979 are shown in tables. Analyses of grades 2, 5(light), and 6 foreign import oils are presented.

Shelton, E.M.

1980-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

43

Heating oils, 1981  

SciTech Connect

Properties of 249 heating oils marketed in the United States were submitted for study and compilation under agreement between the Bartlesville Energy Technology Center (BETC) and the American Petroleum Institute (API). The fuels were manufactured by 28 petroleum refining companies in 92 domestic refineries. The data are tabulated according to six grades of fuel and subdivided into five geographic regions in which the fuels are marketed. The six grades of fuels are defined by the American Society for Testing and Materials (ASTM) Specification D396. The five regions containing a total of 16 marketing districts are shown on a map in the report. Trend charts are included showing average properties of the six grades of fuel for the past several years. Summaries of the results of the tests by grade and by region for 1981 compared with data for 1980 are shown in Tables 1 through 6. Analyses of grade 6 foreign import oils are presented in Table 13.

Shelton, E.M.

1981-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

44

Biomass Derivatives Competitive with Heating Oil Costs.  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Biomass Derivatives Competitive with Heating Oil Costs Transportation fuel Heat or electricity * Data are from literature, except heating oil is adjusted from 2011 winter average *...

45

Regional Residential Heating Oil Prices  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Slide 2 of 11 Notes: One of the first places where consumers are feeling the impact of this winter’s market pressures is in home heating oil prices. This chart shows prices through February 7, the most recent EIA data available. The general level of heating oil prices each year is largely a function of crude oil prices, and the price range over the course of the heating season is typically about 10 cents per gallon. Exceptions occur in unusual circumstances, such as very cold weather, large changes in crude oil prices, or supply problems. Heating oil prices for East Coast consumers started this winter at just over $1 per gallon, but rising crude oil prices drove them up nearly 21 cents per gallon through mid-January. With the continuing upward pressure from crude oil markets, magnified by a regional shortfall of

46

Consumer Winter Heating Oil Costs  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

5 5 Notes: Using the Northeast as a regional focus for heating oil, the typical oil-heated household consumes about 680 gallons of oil during the winter, assuming that weather is "normal." The previous three winters were warmer than average and generated below normal consumption rates. Last winter, consumers saw large increases over the very low heating oil prices seen during the winter of 1998-1999 but, outside of the cold period in late January/early February they saw relatively low consumption rates due to generally warm weather. Even without particularly sharp cold weather events this winter, we think consumers are likely to see higher average heating oil prices than were seen last winter. If weather is normal, our projections imply New England heating oil

47

Heating Oil and Propane Update  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

data not collected over the summer? The residential pricing data collected on heating oil and propane prices are for the Winter Heating Fuels Survey. The purpose of this survey...

48

Consumer Winter Heating Oil Costs  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

6 6 Notes: The outlook for heating oil costs this winter, due to high crude oil costs and tight heating oil supplies, breaks down to an expected increase in heating expenditures for a typical oil-heated household of more than $200 this winter, the result of an 18% increase in the average price and an 11% increase in consumption. The consumption increase is due to the colder than normal temperatures experienced so far this winter and our expectations of normal winter weather for the rest of this heating season. Last winter, Northeast heating oil (and diesel fuel) markets experienced an extremely sharp spike in prices when a severe weather situation developed in late January. It is virtually impossible to gauge the probability of a similar (or worse) price shock recurring this winter,

49

This Week In Petroleum Crude Oil Section  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Crude oil futures and estimated contract prices (dollars per barrel) Contract 1 Contract 2 Contract 3 Contract 4 Crude oil futures price contract 1 graph Crude oil futures price...

50

Heating oils, 1983  

SciTech Connect

Properties of 195 heating oils marketed in the United States were submitted for study and compilation under agreement between the Bartlesville Energy Technology Center (BETC) and the American Petroleum Institute (API). The fuels were manufactured by 25 petroleum refining companies in 83 domestic refineries. The data are tabulated according to six grades of fuel and subdivided into five geographic regions in which the fuels are marketed. The six grades of fuels are defined by the American Society for Testing and Materials (ASTM) Specification D396. The five regions containing a total of 16 marketing districts are shown on a map in the report. Trend charts are included showing average properties of the six grades of fuel for the past several years. Summaries of the results of the tests by grade and by region for 1983 are compared with data for 1982. 7 figures, 12 tables.

Shelton, E.M.

1983-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

51

Biomass Derivatives Competitive with Heating Oil Costs.  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Presentation at the May 9, 2012, Pyrolysis Oil Workship on biomass derivatives competitive with heating oil costs.

52

New York Home Heating Oil Prices  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

5 of 15 5 of 15 Notes: The severity of this spot price increase is causing dramatic changes in residential home heating oil prices, although residential price movements are usually a little slower and spread out over time compared to spot prices. Wholesale prices increased over 50 cents from January 17 to January 24, while retail increased 44 cents in New York. Diesel prices are showing a similar pattern to residential home heating oil prices, and are indicating that home heating oil prices may not have peaked yet, although spot prices are dropping. Diesel prices in New England and the Mid-Atlantic increased 30-40 cents January 24 over the prior week, and another 13-15 cents January 31. Spot prices plummeted January 31, closing at 82 cents per gallon, indicating the worst part of the crisis may be over, but it is still a

53

Residential heating oil prices decline  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

propane price increase slightly The average retail price for propane is 2.41 per gallon, up 1-tenth of a cent from last week, based on the residential heating fuel survey by the...

54

This Week In Petroleum Crude Oil Section  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Refinery Inputs Refinery Inputs Crude Oil Futures and Estimated Contract Prices (Dollars per Barrel) Crude Oil Futures Prices Petroleum Data Tables more data Most Recent Year Ago 11/29/13 12/06/13 12/13/13 12/20/13 12/27/13 01/03/14 01/10/14 01/11/13 Contract 1 92.72 97.65 96.60 99.32 100.32 93.96 92.72 93.56 Contract 2 93.01 97.90 96.93 99.26 100.39 94.14 92.95 93.99 Contract 3 93.24 97.94 96.91 98.73 99.97 94.06 92.92 94.35 Contract 4 93.32 97.66 96.55 97.91 99.18 93.75 92.68 94.66 Crude Oil Futures Price Graph. Crude Oil Stocks (Million Barrels) and Days of Supply Crude Oil Stocks Petroleum Data Tables more data Most Recent Year Ago 11/29/13 12/06/13 12/13/13 12/20/13 12/27/13 01/03/14 01/10/14 01/11/13 U.S. 385.8 375.2 372.3 367.6 360.6 357.9 350.2 360.3

55

Crude Oil, Heating Oil, and Propane Market Outlook  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Oil, Heating Oil, and Propane Market Outlook Oil, Heating Oil, and Propane Market Outlook 8/13/01 Click here to start Table of Contents Crude Oil, Heating Oil, and Propane Market Outlook Short-Term World Oil Price Forecast Price Movements Related to Supply/Demand Balance OPEC Production Likely To Remain Low U.S. Reflects World Market Crude Oil Outlook Conclusions Distillate Prices Increase With Crude Oil Distillate Stocks on the East Coast Were Very Low Entering Last Winter Distillate Demand Strong Last Winter More Supply Possible This Fall than Forecast Distillate Fuel Oil Imports Could Be Available - For A Price Distillate Supply/Demand Balance Reflected in Spreads Distillate Stocks Expected to Remain Low Winter Crude Oil and Distillate Price Outlook Heating Oil Outlook Conclusion Propane Prices Follow Crude Oil

56

Lower oil prices also cutting winter heating oil and propane...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Lower oil prices also cutting winter heating oil and propane bills Lower oil prices are not only driving down gasoline costs, but U.S. consumers will also see a bigger savings in...

57

Residential Heating Oil Weekly Heating Oil and Propane Prices (October -  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

3.815 3.822 3.888 3.917 3.956 3.952 1990-2013 3.815 3.822 3.888 3.917 3.956 3.952 1990-2013 East Coast (PADD 1) 3.817 3.825 3.891 3.920 3.960 3.956 1990-2013 New England (PADD 1A) 3.766 3.773 3.840 3.865 3.918 3.921 1990-2013 Connecticut 3.943 3.943 4.038 4.064 4.119 4.104 1990-2013 Maine 3.559 3.558 3.584 3.626 3.658 3.688 1990-2013 Massachusetts 3.813 3.822 3.896 3.897 3.963 3.971 1990-2013 New Hampshire 3.619 3.621 3.671 3.718 3.787 3.793 1990-2013 Rhode Island 3.835 3.875 3.925 3.949 4.0 3.992 1990-2013 Vermont 3.575 3.575 3.682 3.710 3.734 3.716 1990-2013 Central Atlantic (PADD 1B) 3.859 3.867 3.933 3.965 3.996 3.987 1990-2013 Delaware 3.668 3.667 3.728 3.774 3.786 3.802 1990-2013 District of Columbia 4.402 4.426 4.461 4.580 4.581 4.573 1990-2013

58

Wholesale Heating Oil Weekly Heating Oil and Propane Prices (October -  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2.990 3.042 3.150 3.152 3.137 3.074 2013-2013 2.990 3.042 3.150 3.152 3.137 3.074 2013-2013 East Coast (PADD 1) 2.977 3.044 3.151 3.159 3.168 3.107 2013-2013 New England (PADD 1A) 3.012 3.084 3.194 3.205 3.222 3.166 2013-2013 Connecticut 3.001 3.074 3.187 3.198 3.207 3.143 2013-2013 Maine 3.006 3.074 3.179 3.181 3.202 3.158 2013-2013 Massachusetts 3.018 3.092 3.200 3.215 3.229 3.161 2013-2013 New Hampshire 3.003 3.076 3.200 3.216 3.247 3.238 2013-2013 Rhode Island 2.970 3.038 3.147 3.150 3.171 3.113 2013-2013 Vermont 3.115 3.190 3.301 3.309 3.334 3.274 2013-2013 Central Atlantic (PADD 1B) 2.964 3.030 3.135 3.144 3.149 3.084 2013-2013 Delaware 2.916 3.101 3.207 3.087 3.103 3.130 2013-2013 Maryland 2.920 2.992 3.109 3.099 3.111 3.047 2013-2013

59

Residential Heating Oil Weekly Heating Oil and Propane Prices...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

3.453 3.436 3.416 3.383 3.364 3.326 1990-2014 East Coast (PADD 1) 3.454 3.436 3.415 3.383 3.363 3.326 1990-2014 New England (PADD 1A) 3.407 3.381 3.362 3.327 3.314 3.277 1990-2014...

60

Northeast Home Heating Oil Reserve - Guidelines for Release ...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Heating Oil Reserve Northeast Home Heating Oil Reserve - Guidelines for Release Northeast Home Heating Oil Reserve - Guidelines for Release The Energy Policy and Conservation...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "weekly heating oil" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Heating Oil and Propane Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

State Energy Offices State Energy Offices Q1: What price should be reported to EIA when submitting weekly data? EIA requests that you collect / report the residential credit price (keep-full prices being preferred) and that all prices exclude taxes for the Monday of each survey week, even if that Monday falls on a holiday. Prices should not include discounts for payment of cash or for payment made within a short period of time. However, if a company deals exclusively in cash, then this price should be reported and noted in the file sent to EIA. Q2: When is this data due to EIA each week? The EIA-877 "Winter Heating Fuels Telephone Survey" will begin the first Monday in October. Data should be submitted to EIA as soon as they are available but no later than noon on Tuesday of each week. Data collection

62

DOE to Purchase Heating Oil for the Northeast Home Heating Oil Reserve |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Purchase Heating Oil for the Northeast Home Heating Oil Purchase Heating Oil for the Northeast Home Heating Oil Reserve DOE to Purchase Heating Oil for the Northeast Home Heating Oil Reserve June 23, 2008 - 1:29pm Addthis WASHINGTON, DC -The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) today issued a solicitation seeking to purchase heating oil for the Northeast Home Heating Oil Reserve (NEHHOR) using $3 million in appropriated funds. The Northeast Home Heating Oil Reserve provides an important safety cushion for millions of Americans residing in the Northeast region of the country. Due to the modest volume of heating oil expected to be purchased with the available funds, no impact on market prices is expected. In 2007 a 35,000 barrel sale was conducted to raise funds necessary to award new long-term storage contracts to fill NEHHOR to its authorized

63

DOE Announces Award of a Contract to Repurchase Heating Oil for the  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

DOE Announces Award of a Contract to Repurchase Heating Oil for the DOE Announces Award of a Contract to Repurchase Heating Oil for the Northeast Home Heating Oil Reserve DOE Announces Award of a Contract to Repurchase Heating Oil for the Northeast Home Heating Oil Reserve July 23, 2008 - 2:15pm Addthis WASHINGTON, DC - The U.S. Department of Energy today announced the award of a contract to Hess Corporation for the delivery of approximately 808,625 gallons (approximately 19,250 barrels) of home heating oil for the Northeast Home Heating Oil Reserve (NEHHOR). The purchased oil is expected to be delivered to the Hess First Reserve terminal at Perth Amboy, NJ in New York Harbor later this week. The award resulted from a solicitation issued on June 23, 2008, to repurchase heating oil using $3 million in funds appropriated after the

64

PADD 1 (East Coast) Heating Oil Stocks Low  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

5 5 Notes: The East Coast (PADD 1) is the primary heating oil region, and it depends heavily on production from the Gulf Coast (PADD 3) as well. The biggest decline in U.S. stocks has taken place in the heating oil markets of PADD 1 (East Coast), which consumed 86 percent of the nation’s heating oil in 1998. It also is the region with the largest volume of heating oil stocks. PADD 1 was down over 8.4 million barrels on January 21 from the 5-year average stock level for end of January PADD 3, which supplies PADD 1, was down 4.6 million barrels from its 5-year January ending levels. During the week ending January 21, weather in New England was nearly 20% colder than normal for this time of year. This cold weather on top of low stocks was pushing prices up, with

65

Tips For Residential Heating Oil Tank Owners  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

· · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · Tips For Residential Heating Oil Tank Owners Source: DEP Fact Sheet Residential heating oil tanks are used to store fuel for furnaces or boilers to heat homes. The tanks can either be aboveground tanks, normally located in basements or utility rooms

Maroncelli, Mark

66

Retail Heating Oil and Diesel Fuel Prices  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

6 6 Notes: With the worst of the heating season (October-March) now behind us, we can be fairly confident that retail heating oil prices have seen their seasonal peak. Relatively mild weather and a softening of crude oil prices have helped ease heating oil prices. Spot heating oil prices recently reached their lowest levels in over six months. Because of relatively balmy weather in the Northeast in January and February, heating oil stock levels have stabilized. Furthermore, heating oil production has been unusually robust, running several hundred thousand barrels per day over last year's pace. Currently, EIA expects winter prices to average around $1.41, which is quite high in historical terms. The national average price in December 2000 was 44 cents per gallon above the December 1999 price. For February

67

Heat Requirements for Retorting Oil Shale  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Heat Requirements for Retorting Oil Shale ... Converting Oil Shale to Liquid Fuels: Energy Inputs and Greenhouse Gas Emissions of the Shell in Situ Conversion Process ... Converting Oil Shale to Liquid Fuels: Energy Inputs and Greenhouse Gas Emissions of the Shell in Situ Conversion Process ...

H. W. Sohns; L. E. Mitchell; R. J. Cox; W. I. Barnet; W. I. R. Murphy

1951-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

68

Heating Oil and Propane Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

SHOPP Financial Forms - for State Energy Officials SHOPP Financial Forms - for State Energy Officials The Federal forms below are required for State Energy Officials participating in the State Heating Oil and Propane Program (SHOPP) to execute their cooperative agreements with the U. S. Energy Information Administration. The Application for Federal Assistance, Form SF-424, is required to be submitted annually no later than May 15th in order for the applicant to receive funds for the upcoming season. This form consists of three parts: SF-424 - general funding information SF-424A - annual budget SF-424B - assurance pages The Federal Financial Report, Form SF-425, collects basic data on federal and recipient expenditures related to the SHOPP grant. This form should be submitted by August 1st of each year after the end of the season.

69

Electromagnetic Heating Methods for Heavy Oil Reservoirs  

SciTech Connect

The most widely used method of thermal oil recovery is by injecting steam into the reservoir. A well-designed steam injection project is very efficient in recovering oil, however its applicability is limited in many situations. Simulation studies and field experience has shown that for low injectivity reservoirs, small thickness of the oil-bearing zone, and reservoir heterogeneity limits the performance of steam injection. This paper discusses alternative methods of transferring heat to heavy oil reservoirs, based on electromagnetic energy. They present a detailed analysis of low frequency electric resistive (ohmic) heating and higher frequency electromagnetic heating (radio and microwave frequency). They show the applicability of electromagnetic heating in two example reservoirs. The first reservoir model has thin sand zones separated by impermeable shale layers, and very viscous oil. They model preheating the reservoir with low frequency current using two horizontal electrodes, before injecting steam. The second reservoir model has very low permeability and moderately viscous oil. In this case they use a high frequency microwave antenna located near the producing well as the heat source. Simulation results presented in this paper show that in some cases, electromagnetic heating may be a good alternative to steam injection or maybe used in combination with steam to improve heavy oil production. They identify the parameters which are critical in electromagnetic heating. They also discuss past field applications of electromagnetic heating including technical challenges and limitations.

Sahni, A.; Kumar, M.; Knapp, R.B.

2000-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

70

U.S. Residential Heating Oil Prices  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

5 5 Notes: One of the first places where consumers are feeling the impact of this winter’s market pressures is in home heating oil prices. This chart shows prices for the last four winters, with this year’s prices shown through January 24, the most recent EIA data available. The general level of heating oil prices each year is largely a function of crude oil prices, and the price range over the course of the heating season is typically about 10 cents per gallon. Exceptions occur in unusual circumstances, such as very cold weather, large changes in crude oil prices, or supply problems. Although heating oil prices for consumers started this winter at similar levels to those in 1997, they already rose nearly 20 cents per gallon through mid-January. With the continuing upward pressure from crude

71

Retail Heating Oil and Diesel Fuel Prices  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Because of the higher projected crude oil prices and because of Because of the higher projected crude oil prices and because of increased tightening in the Northeast heating oil market since the last Outlook, we now expect prices this winter for residential heating oil deliveries to peak at $1.52 per gallon in January. This is significantly above the monthly peak reached last winter. Because these figures are monthly averages, we expect some price movements for a few days to be above the values shown on the graph. This winter's expected peak price would be the highest on record in nominal terms, eclipsing the high set in February 2000. However, in real (constant dollar) terms, both of these prices remain well below the peak reached in March 1981, when the average residential heating oil price was $1.29 per gallon, equivalent to over $2.50 per gallon today.

72

Retail Heating Oil and Diesel Fuel Prices  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

9 9 Notes: Because of the higher projected crude oil prices and because of increased tightening in the Northeast heating oil market since the last Outlook, we now expect prices this winter for residential heating oil deliveries to peak at about $1.52 per gallon in January. This is significantly above the monthly peak reached last winter. Because these figures are monthly averages, we expect some price movements for a few days to be above the values shown on the graph. This winter's expected peak price would be the highest on record in nominal terms, eclipsing the high set in February 2000. However, in real (constant dollar) terms, both of these prices remain well below the peak reached in March 1981, when the average residential heating oil price was $1.29 per gallon, equivalent to over $2.50 per gallon today.

73

Insulated dipole antennas for heating oil shale  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Insulated dipole antennas in the HF band are potentially useful in heating shale i n s i t u to extract oil. To help evaluate the efficiency of such antennas the spatial distribution of the power absorbed per unit volume in the shale is computed.

John P. Casey; Rajeev Bansal

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

74

Retail Heating Oil and Diesel Fuel Prices  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

7 7 Notes: Because of the higher projected crude oil prices and because of increased tightening in the Northeast heating oil market since the last Outlook, we have raised expected peak prices this winter for residential heating oil deliveries to $1.55 per gallon (January) compared to $1.43 per gallon in last month's projections. This is significantly above the monthly peak reached last winter. Because these figures are monthly averages, we expect some price movements for a few days to be above the values shown on the graph. Primary distillate inventories in the United States failed to rise significantly in November despite some speculation that previous distributions into secondary and tertiary storage would back up burgeoning production and import volumes into primary storage that month. Average

75

Heat of combustion of Green River oil shale  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Heat of combustion of Green River oil shale ... AMSOs Novel Approach to In-Situ Oil Shale Recovery ... AMSOs Novel Approach to In-Situ Oil Shale Recovery ...

Michael J. Muehlbauer; Alan K. Burnham

1984-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

76

Technical Information Exchange on Pyrolysis Oil: Potential for a renewable heating oil substitution  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Two-day agenda from the workshop: Technical Information Exchange on Pyrolysis Oil: Potential for a renewable heating oil substitution fuel in New England.

77

Process for heating coal-oil slurries  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Controlling gas to slurry volume ratio to achieve a gas holdup of about 0.4 when heating a flowing coal-oil slurry and a hydrogen containing gas stream allows operation with virtually any coal to solvent ratio and permits operation with efficient heat transfer and satisfactory pressure drops. The critical minimum gas flow rate for any given coal-oil slurry will depend on numerous factors such as coal concentration, coal particle size distribution, composition of the solvent (including recycle slurries), and type of coal. Further system efficiency can be achieved by operating with multiple heating zones to provide a high heat flux when the apparent viscosity of the gas saturated slurry is highest. Operation with gas flow rates below the critical minimum results in system instability indicated by temperature excursions in the fluid and at the tube wall, by a rapid increase and then decrease in overall pressure drop with decreasing gas flow rate, and by increased temperature differences between the temperature of the bulk fluid and the tube wall. At the temperatures and pressures used in coal liquefaction preheaters the coal-oil slurry and hydrogen containing gas stream behaves essentially as a Newtonian fluid at shear rates in excess of 150 sec[sup [minus]1]. The gas to slurry volume ratio should also be controlled to assure that the flow regime does not shift from homogeneous flow to non-homogeneous flow. Stable operations have been observed with a maximum gas holdup as high as 0.72. 29 figs.

Braunlin, W.A.; Gorski, A.; Jaehnig, L.J.; Moskal, C.J.; Naylor, J.D.; Parimi, K.; Ward, J.V.

1984-01-03T23:59:59.000Z

78

Process for heating coal-oil slurries  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Controlling gas to slurry volume ratio to achieve a gas holdup of about 0.4 when heating a flowing coal-oil slurry and a hydrogen containing gas stream allows operation with virtually any coal to solvent ratio and permits operation with efficient heat transfer and satisfactory pressure drops. The critical minimum gas flow rate for any given coal-oil slurry will depend on numerous factors such as coal concentration, coal particle size distribution, composition of the solvent (including recycle slurries), and type of coal. Further system efficiency can be achieved by operating with multiple heating zones to provide a high heat flux when the apparent viscosity of the gas saturated slurry is highest. Operation with gas flow rates below the critical minimum results in system instability indicated by temperature excursions in the fluid and at the tube wall, by a rapid increase and then decrease in overall pressure drop with decreasing gas flow rate, and by increased temperature differences between the temperature of the bulk fluid and the tube wall. At the temperatures and pressures used in coal liquefaction preheaters the coal-oil slurry and hydrogen containing gas stream behaves essentially as a Newtonian fluid at shear rates in excess of 150 sec.sup. -1. The gas to slurry volume ratio should also be controlled to assure that the flow regime does not shift from homogeneous flow to non-homogeneous flow. Stable operations have been observed with a maximum gas holdup as high as 0.72.

Braunlin, Walter A. (Spring, TX); Gorski, Alan (Lovington, NM); Jaehnig, Leo J. (New Orleans, LA); Moskal, Clifford J. (Oklahoma City, OK); Naylor, Joseph D. (Houston, TX); Parimi, Krishnia (Allison Park, PA); Ward, John V. (Arvada, CO)

1984-01-03T23:59:59.000Z

79

This Week In Petroleum Printer-Friendly Version  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

February. A lengthy decline in crude oil inputs would reduce refinery production of major petroleum products such as gasoline, heating oil, and diesel fuel. Last week's data showed...

80

This Week In Petroleum Printer-Friendly Version  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

If so, a prolonged decline in crude oil inputs would reduce refinery production of major petroleum products, such as gasoline, heating oil, and diesel fuel. Last week's data...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "weekly heating oil" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

State heating oil and propane program: 1995-96 heating season. Final report  

SciTech Connect

This is a summary report of the New Hampshire Governor`s Office of Energy and Community Services (ECS) participation in the State Heating Oil and Propane Program (SHOPP) for the 1995/96 heating season. SHOPP is a cooperative effort, linking energy offices in East Coast and Midwest states, with the Department of Energy (DOE), Energy Information Administration (EIA) for the purpose of collecting retail price data for heating oil and propane. The program funded by the participating state with a matching grant from DOE. EIA provides ECS with a list of oil and propane retailers that serve customers in New Hampshire. In turn ECS conduct phone surveys twice per month from October through March to determine the average retail price for each fuel. Data collected by ECS is entered into the Petroleum Electronic Data Reporting Option (PEDRO) and transmitted via modem to EIA. The results of the state retail price surveys along with wholesale prices, supply, production and stock levels for oil, and propane are published by EIA in the Weekly Petroleum Status Report. Data is also published electronically via the internet or through the Electronic Publication System.

NONE

1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

82

Emissions characteristics of modern oil heating equipment  

SciTech Connect

Over the last 10 years there have been some very interesting developments in oil heating. These include higher static pressure burners, air atomizing nozzles, low firing rate nozzles, low heat loss combustion chambers and condensing boilers and furnaces. The current data base on the emissions characteristics of oil-fired residential heating equipment is based primarily on data taken in the 1970's. The objective of the work described in this report is to evaluate the effects of recent developments in oil-fired equipment on emissions. Detailed emissions measurements have been made on a number of currently available residential oil burners and whole systems selected to represent recent development trends. Some additional data was taken with equipment which is in the prototype stage. These units are a prevaporizing burner and a retention head burner modified with an air atomizing nozzle. Measurements include No{sub x}, smoke numbers, CO, gas phase hydrocarbon emissions and particulate mass emission rates. Emissions of smoke, CO and hydrocarbons were found to be significantly greater under cyclic operation for all burners tested. Generally, particulate emission rates were found to be 3 to 4 times greater in cyclic operation than in steady state. Air atomized burners were found to be capable of operation at much lower excess air levels than pressure atomized burners without producing significant amounts of smoke. As burner performance is improved, either through air atomization or prevaporization of the fuel, there appears to be a general trend towards producing CO at lower smoke levels as excess air is decreased. The criteria of adjusting burners for trace smoke may need to be abandoned for advanced burners and replaced with an adjustment for specific excess air levels. 17 refs., 15 figs., 6 tabs.

Krajewski, R.; Celebi, Y.; Coughlan, R.; Butcher, T.; McDonald, R.J.

1990-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

83

DOE Seeks Commercial Storage for Northeast Home Heating Oil Reserve |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

for Northeast Home Heating Oil Reserve for Northeast Home Heating Oil Reserve DOE Seeks Commercial Storage for Northeast Home Heating Oil Reserve March 14, 2011 - 1:00pm Addthis Washington, DC - The Department of Energy, through its agent, DLA Energy, has issued a solicitation for new contracts to store two million barrels of ultra low sulfur distillate for the Northeast Home Heating Oil Reserve in New York Harbor and New England. Offers are due no later than 9:00 a.m. EDT on March 29, 2011. Of the U.S. households that use heating oil to heat their homes, 69% reside in the Northeast. The Northeast Home Heating Oil Reserve was established by the Energy Policy Act of 2000 to provide an emergency buffer that can supplement commercial fuel supplies in the event of an actual or imminent severe supply disruption. The Reserve can provide supplemental supplies for

84

Question of the Week: What Kind of Heating System Do You Have...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Kind of Heating System Do You Have in Your Home? Question of the Week: What Kind of Heating System Do You Have in Your Home? November 20, 2008 - 8:39am Addthis As we note on...

85

This Week In Petroleum Summary Printer-Friendly Version  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

the Northeast, the Nation's largest heating oil market, typically peak in November, to help meet peak heating demand during the months of December, January, and February. Weekly...

86

DOE Announces Award of a Contract to Repurchase Heating Oil for...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

Award of a Contract to Repurchase Heating Oil for the Northeast Home Heating Oil Reserve DOE Announces Award of a Contract to Repurchase Heating Oil for the Northeast Home Heating...

87

Applying Bayesian Forecasting to Predict New Customers' Heating Oil Demand.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??This thesis presents a new forecasting technique that estimates energy demand by applying a Bayesian approach to forecasting. We introduce our Bayesian Heating Oil Forecaster (more)

Sakauchi, Tsuginosuke

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

88

Question of the Week: How Do You Reduce Your Water Heating Costs |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Reduce Your Water Heating Costs Reduce Your Water Heating Costs Question of the Week: How Do You Reduce Your Water Heating Costs February 19, 2009 - 1:39pm Addthis Water heating can account for a significant portion of your energy costs. Purchasing a new ENERGY STAR® water heater is just one way to save on your water heating bills. The Energy Savers Tips site lists other strategies you can use to cut your water heating costs. How do you reduce your water heating costs? E-mail your responses to the Energy Saver team at consumer.webmaster@nrel.gov. Addthis Related Articles Question of the Week: How Do You Reduce Your Water Heating Costs Energy Savers Guide: Tips on Saving Money and Energy at Home How Do You Save on Lighting Costs? Question of the Week: How Do You Reduce Your Water Heating Costs

89

DOE to Sell 35,000 Barrels of Oil from the Northeast Home Heating Oil  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

to Sell 35,000 Barrels of Oil from the Northeast Home Heating to Sell 35,000 Barrels of Oil from the Northeast Home Heating Oil Reserve DOE to Sell 35,000 Barrels of Oil from the Northeast Home Heating Oil Reserve May 24, 2007 - 4:16pm Addthis WASHINGTON, DC - The U.S. Department of Energy announced today that it will sell approximately 35,000 barrels of home heating oil from the Northeast Home Heating Oil Reserve (NEHHOR). The Reserve's current 5-year storage contracts expire on September 30, 2007 and market conditions have caused new storage costs to rise to a level that exceeds available funds. Revenue from the sale will be used to supplement funds for the award of new long-term storage contracts that will begin on October 1, 2007. The Department will work with Congress to resolve these funding issues in order

90

DOE to Sell 35,000 Barrels of Oil from the Northeast Home Heating Oil  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Sell 35,000 Barrels of Oil from the Northeast Home Heating Sell 35,000 Barrels of Oil from the Northeast Home Heating Oil Reserve DOE to Sell 35,000 Barrels of Oil from the Northeast Home Heating Oil Reserve May 24, 2007 - 4:16pm Addthis WASHINGTON, DC - The U.S. Department of Energy announced today that it will sell approximately 35,000 barrels of home heating oil from the Northeast Home Heating Oil Reserve (NEHHOR). The Reserve's current 5-year storage contracts expire on September 30, 2007 and market conditions have caused new storage costs to rise to a level that exceeds available funds. Revenue from the sale will be used to supplement funds for the award of new long-term storage contracts that will begin on October 1, 2007. The Department will work with Congress to resolve these funding issues in order to restore the inventory of the Reserve to its full authorized size.

91

Retorting Oil Shale by a Self-Heating Route  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Retorting is a frequently used method for producing shale oil from oil shale. During retorting, heat is usually supplied to the retort by heat-carrier gas of high temperature, such as 700 C, until retorting ends. In this work, a low-energy-input ...

Hongfan Guo; Siyuan Peng; Jiadong Lin; Jiang Chang; Shan Lei; Tianbo Fan; Yunyi Liu

2013-04-09T23:59:59.000Z

92

Wholesale Propane Weekly Heating Oil and Propane Prices (October - March)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1.381 1.412 1.427 1.406 1.524 1.637 2013-2013 1.381 1.412 1.427 1.406 1.524 1.637 2013-2013 East Coast (PADD 1) 1.442 1.509 1.551 1.548 1.660 1.712 2013-2013 Central Atlantic (PADD 1B) 1.493 1.530 1.584 1.587 1.702 1.751 2013-2013 New Jersey 1.575 1.583 1.596 1.624 1.672 1.672 2013-2013 New York 1.516 1.562 1.637 1.642 1.792 1.864 2013-2013 Pennsylvania 1.432 1.478 1.541 1.529 1.659 1.720 2013-2013 Lower Atlantic (PADD 1C) 1.366 1.479 1.503 1.489 1.596 1.653 2013-2013 North Carolina 1.327 1.440 1.468 1.428 1.540 1.596 2013-2013 Virginia 1.468 1.578 1.592 1.645 1.740 1.800 2013-2013 Midwest (PADD 2) 1.356 1.373 1.379 1.351 1.471 1.607 2013-2013 Illinois 1.358 1.388 1.375 1.332 1.473 1.644 2013-2013 Indiana 1.436 1.484 1.509 1.484 1.636 1.772 2013-2013

93

Residential Propane Weekly Heating Oil and Propane Prices (October...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

413 2.401 2.411 2.404 2.401 2.407 1990-2014 East Coast (PADD 1) 3.079 3.029 3.055 3.040 3.023 3.040 1990-2014 New England (PADD 1A) 3.109 3.098 3.106 3.093 3.089 3.098 1990-2014...

94

Warm Winters Held Heating Oil Demand Down While Diesel Grew  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

8 8 Notes: To understand the inventory situation, we must look the balance between demand and supply that drives inventories up or down. First consider demand. Most of the remaining charts deal with total distillate demand. Total distillate demand includes both diesel and heating oil. These are similar products physically, and prior to the low sulfur requirements for on-road diesel fuel, were used interchangeably. But even today, low sulfur diesel can be used in the heating oil market, but low sulfur requirements keep heating oil from being used in the on-road transportation sector. The seasonal increases and decreases in stocks stem from the seasonal demand in heating oil shown as the bottom red line. Heating oil demand increases by more than 50 percent from its low point to its high

95

Northeast Home Heating Oil Reserve - Online Bidding System | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Services » Petroleum Reserves » Heating Oil Reserve » Northeast Services » Petroleum Reserves » Heating Oil Reserve » Northeast Home Heating Oil Reserve - Online Bidding System Northeast Home Heating Oil Reserve - Online Bidding System The U.S. Department of Energy has developed an on-line bidding system - an anonymous auction program - for the sale of product from the one million barrel Northeast Home Heating Oil Reserve. We invite prospective bidders and other interested parties to try out this system and give us your views. You must register to use the system to practice or to participate in an actual emergency sale. Registration assures that you will receive e-mail alerts of sales or other pertinent news. You will also have the opportunity to establish a user ID and password to submit bids. If you establish a user ID, you will receive a temporary password by

96

Bio-Heating Oil Tax Credit (Personal) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Bio-Heating Oil Tax Credit (Personal) Bio-Heating Oil Tax Credit (Personal) Bio-Heating Oil Tax Credit (Personal) < Back Eligibility Commercial Residential Savings Category Biofuels Alternative Fuel Vehicles Bioenergy Maximum Rebate $500 per year Program Info Start Date 01/01/2008 State Maryland Program Type Personal Tax Credit Rebate Amount $0.03/gallon of biodiesel Provider Revenue Administration Division Maryland allows individuals and corporations to take an income tax credit of $0.03/gallon for purchases of biodiesel used for space heating or water heating. The maximum credit is $500 per year. It may not be refunded or carried over to subsequent years. In order to qualify for the tax credit, the heating oil must be at least 5% biodiesel sourced from U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) approved feedstocks or be accepted

97

Bio-Heating Oil Tax Credit (Corporate) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Bio-Heating Oil Tax Credit (Corporate) Bio-Heating Oil Tax Credit (Corporate) Bio-Heating Oil Tax Credit (Corporate) < Back Eligibility Commercial Industrial Savings Category Biofuels Alternative Fuel Vehicles Bioenergy Maximum Rebate $500 per year Program Info Start Date 01/01/2008 State Maryland Program Type Corporate Tax Credit Rebate Amount $0.03/gallon Provider Revenue Administration Division Maryland allows individuals and corporations to take an income tax credit of $0.03/gallon for purchases of biodiesel used for space heating or water heating. The maximum credit is $500 per year. It may not be refunded or carried over to subsequent years. In order to qualify for the tax credit, the heating oil must be at least 5% biodiesel sourced from U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) approved feedstocks or be accepted

98

Conductivity heating a subterranean oil shale to create permeability and subsequently produce oil  

SciTech Connect

This patent describes an improvement in a process in which oil is produced from a subterranean oil shale deposit by extending at least one each of heat-injecting and fluid-producing wells into the deposit, establishing a heat-conductive fluid-impermeable barrier between the interior of each heat-injecting well and the adjacent deposit, and then heating the interior of each heat-injecting well at a temperature sufficient to conductively heat oil shale kerogen and cause pyrolysis products to form fractures within the oil shale deposit through which the pyrolysis products are displaced into at least one production well. The improvement is for enhancing the uniformity of the heat fronts moving through the oil shale deposit. Also described is a process for exploiting a target oil shale interval, by progressively expanding a heated treatment zone band from about a geometric center of the target oil shale interval outward, such that the formation or extension of vertical fractures from the heated treatment zone band to the periphery of the target oil shale interval is minimized.

Van Meurs, P.; DeRouffignac, E.P.; Vinegar, H.J.; Lucid, M.F.

1989-12-12T23:59:59.000Z

99

Potential of vegetable oils as a domestic heating fuel  

SciTech Connect

The dependence on imported oil for domestic heating has led to the examination of other potential fuel substitutes. One potential fuel is some form of vegetable oil, which could be a yearly-renewable fuel. In Western Canada, canola has become a major oilseed crop; in Eastern Canada, sunflowers increasingly are becoming a source for a similar oil; for this reason, the Canadian Combustion Research Laboratory (CCRL) has chosen these oils for experimentation. Trials have been conducted in a conventional warm air oil furnace, fitted with a flame retention head burner. Performance has been measured with pure vegetable oils as well as a series of blends with conventional No. 2 oil. The effects of increased fuel pressure and fuel preheating are established. Emissions of carbon monoxide, nitrogen oxides, unburned hydrocarbons and particulates are given for both steady state and cyclic operation. Canola oil cannot be fired in cyclic operation above 50:50 blends with No. 2 oil. At any level above a 10% blend, canola is difficult to burn, even with significant increased pressure and temperature. Sunflower oil is much easier to burn and can be fired as a pure fuel, but with high emissions of incomplete combustion products. An optimum blend of 50:50 sunflower in No. 2 oil yields emissions and performance similar to No. 2 oil. This blend offers potential as a means of reducing demand of imported crude oil for domestic heating systems.

Hayden, A.C.S.; Begin, E.; Palmer, C.E.

1982-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

100

This Week In Petroleum Printer-Friendly Version  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

to mid-March averaging 3.28 per gallon for heating oil and 2.46 per gallon for propane, and this weeks average heating oil price above 3.85, prices for the winter as a...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "weekly heating oil" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

The stimulation of heavy oil reservoirs with electrical resistance heating  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

-307. Stuckey, W. D. : "A Study of the Pyrolysis of Oil Shale By Microwave Heating, " MS Thesis, University of Colorado, Boulder (1977). Bridges, J. E. , Taflove, A. , and Snow, R. H. : eNet Energy Recoveries for the In-Situ Dielectric Heating of Oil Shales..., w Proc. 1978 Oil Shale Symposium, Colorado School of Mines, Golden, Apr. 12-14. Solomon, B. : "Shale Oil Via Microwaves: Illinois Institute Says Yes, e Energy Daily (May 1978) 2-4; Energy Abstr. Policy Anal. (Nov. 1978) 831. Snowi R H i et. el...

Baylor, Blake Allen

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

102

Tips: Natural Gas and Oil Heating Systems | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Natural Gas and Oil Heating Systems Natural Gas and Oil Heating Systems Tips: Natural Gas and Oil Heating Systems May 30, 2012 - 5:41pm Addthis Install a new energy-efficient furnace to save money over the long term. Install a new energy-efficient furnace to save money over the long term. If you plan to buy a new heating system, ask your local utility or state energy office about the latest technologies on the market. For example, many newer models have designs for burners and heat exchangers that are more efficient during operation and cut heat loss when the equipment is off. Consider a sealed-combustion furnace -- they are safer and more efficient. Long-Term Savings Tip Install a new energy-efficient furnace to save money over the long term. Look for the ENERGY STAR® and EnergyGuide labels to compare efficiency and

103

DOE Awards Storage Contracts for Northeast Home Heating Oil Reserve |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Awards Storage Contracts for Northeast Home Heating Oil Reserve Awards Storage Contracts for Northeast Home Heating Oil Reserve DOE Awards Storage Contracts for Northeast Home Heating Oil Reserve August 18, 2011 - 1:00pm Addthis Washington, DC - The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) today announced that new contracts have been awarded for commercial storage of 650,000 barrels of ultra low sulfur distillate (ULSD) for the Northeast Home Heating Oil Reserve (NEHHOR). Awards were made to two companies for storage in New England--Hess Corporation in Groton, CT for 400,000 barrels, and Global Companies LLC in Revere, MA for 250,000 barrels. The procurement was conducted by the Defense Logistics Agency (DLA Energy), acting as the agent for DOE. Acquisition of storage services for an additional 350,000 barrels is planned to complete the establishment of a

104

Additional Storage Contracts Awarded for Northeast Home Heating Oil Reserve  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Additional Storage Contracts Awarded for Northeast Home Heating Oil Additional Storage Contracts Awarded for Northeast Home Heating Oil Reserve Additional Storage Contracts Awarded for Northeast Home Heating Oil Reserve September 30, 2011 - 1:00pm Addthis Washington, DC - The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) has completed the acquisition of commercial storage services for the one million barrel Northeast Home Heating Oil Reserve (NEHHOR). Two awards totaling 350,000 barrels have been made to companies that had earlier received storage contracts totaling 650,000 barrels. Hess Corporation in Groton, CT has been awarded a second contract for 100,000 barrels, increasing its storage obligation to 500,000 barrels. Global Companies LLC in Revere, MA was awarded a second contract for 250,000 barrels, increasing its obligation to 500,000 barrels.

105

Additional Storage Contracts Awarded for Northeast Home Heating Oil Reserve  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Additional Storage Contracts Awarded for Northeast Home Heating Oil Additional Storage Contracts Awarded for Northeast Home Heating Oil Reserve Additional Storage Contracts Awarded for Northeast Home Heating Oil Reserve September 30, 2011 - 1:00pm Addthis Washington, DC - The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) has completed the acquisition of commercial storage services for the one million barrel Northeast Home Heating Oil Reserve (NEHHOR). Two awards totaling 350,000 barrels have been made to companies that had earlier received storage contracts totaling 650,000 barrels. Hess Corporation in Groton, CT has been awarded a second contract for 100,000 barrels, increasing its storage obligation to 500,000 barrels. Global Companies LLC in Revere, MA was awarded a second contract for 250,000 barrels, increasing its obligation to 500,000 barrels.

106

Heat of combustion of retorted and burnt Colorado oil shale  

SciTech Connect

Heats of combustion were measured for 12 samples of retorted and 21 samples of burnt Colorado oil shale originating from raw shales with grades that ranged from 13 to 255 cm/sup 3/ of shale oil/kg of oil shale. For the retorted shales, the authors resolve the heat of combustion into exothermic contributions from combustion of carbon residue and iron sulfides and endothermic contributions from carbonate decomposition and glass formation. Eight samples reported in the literature were included in this analysis. Variations in the first three constituents account for over 99% of the variation in the heats of combustion. For the burnt shales, account must also be taken of the partial conversion of iron sulfides to sulfates. Equations are developed for calculating the heat of combustion of retorted and burnt oil shale with a standard error of about 60 J/g. 13 refs.

Burnham, A.K.; Crawford, P.C.; Carley, J.F.

1982-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

107

Heat of combustion of retorted and burnt Colorado oil shale  

SciTech Connect

Heats of combustion were measured for 12 samples of retorted and 21 samples of burnt Colorado oil shale originating from raw shales with grades that ranged from 13 to 255 cm/sup 3/ of shale oil/kg of oil shale. For the retorted shales, the heat of combustion was resolved into exothermic contributions from combustion of carbon residue and iron sulfides and endothermic contributions from carbonate decomposition and glass formation. Eight samples reported in the literature were included in this analysis. Variations in the first three constituents account for over 99% of the variation in the heats of combustion. For the burnt shales, account must also be taken of the partial conversion of iron sulfides to sulfates. Equations are developed for calculating the heat of combustion of retorted and burnt oil shale with a standard error of about 60 J/g.

Burnham, A.K.; Carley, J.F.; Crawford, P.C.

1982-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

108

Northeast Home Heating Oil Reserve- Guidelines for Release  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The Energy Policy and Conservation Act, as amended, sets conditions for the release of the Northeast Home Heating Oil Reserve. The Secretary of Energy has the authority to sell, exchange, or...

109

Oil production response to in situ electrical resistance heating  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

OIL PRODUCTION RESPONSE TO I? SITU ELECTRICAL RESISTANCE HEATING A Thesis by FRED WILLIAM MCDOUGAL Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE May... 1987 Major Subject: Petroleum Engineering OIL PRODUCTION RESPONSE TO IN SITV ELECTRICAL RESISTANCE HEATING A Thesis by FRED WILLIAM MCDOUGAL Approved to style and content by: R. A. Wattenbar (Chair of Commi ee) L. D. Piper (Member) D. D. Van...

McDougal, Fred William

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

110

State of Maine residential heating oil survey 2001-02 season summary [SHOPP  

SciTech Connect

This, as the title implies, is a summary report of the price trends for heating oil, propane and kerosene heating fuels for the heating season.

Elder, Betsy

2002-05-22T23:59:59.000Z

111

Design of Crude Oil Pre-Heat Trains  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Design of Crude Oil Pre-heat Trains G.T.Po]Jey B.L.Yeap D.I.Wilson M.H.Panjeh Shahi Pinchtechnology.com Dept of Chern. Engng. Dept. of Chern. Engng. University of Cambridge University of Tehran Pre-heat trains differ from most other heat... recovery networks in a number of important ways. Combination offactors gives rise to the need for a design procedure specific to pre heat trains. Outlining these factors, we first observe that one cold stream (the incoming crude) dominates the heat...

Polley, G. T.; Yeap, B. L.; Wilson, D. I.; Panjeh Shahi, M. H.

112

Heating Oil Reserve | Department of Energy  

Energy Savers (EERE)

Energy Support Center issued a solicitation to companies willing to provide the storage tanks, heating stocks, or a combination. Contracts were awarded and, by October 13, 2000,...

113

State Heating Oil & Propane Program. Final report 1997/98 heating season  

SciTech Connect

The following is a summary report of the New Hampshire Governor`s Office of Energy and Community Services (ECS) participation in the State Heating Oil and Propane Program (SHOPP) for the 1997/98 heating season. SHOPP is a cooperative effort, linking energy offices in East Coast and Midwest states, with the Department of Energy (DOE), Energy Information Administration (EIA) for the purpose of collecting retail price data for heating oil and propane. The program is funded by the participating state with a matching grant from DOE. SHOPP was initiated in response to congressional inquires into supply difficulties and price spikes of heating oil and propane associated with the winter of 1989/90. This is important to New Hampshire because heating oil controls over 55% of the residential heating market statewide. Propane controls 10% of the heating market statewide and is widely used for water heating and cooking in areas of the state where natural gas is not available. Lower installation cost, convenience, lower operating costs compared to electricity, and its perception as a clean heating fuel have all worked to increase the popularity of propane in New Hampshire and should continue to do so in the future. Any disruption in supply of these heating fuels to New Hampshire could cause prices to skyrocket and leave many residents in the cold.

Hunton, G.

1998-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

114

Increasing Oil Productivity Through Electromagnetic Induction Heat Generation of Salt Water as a Stimulant for Heavy Oil Recovery  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Brine is usually exist in the oil reservoir. Varying salinity brine are used as stimulants for heavy oil recovery processes using electromagnetic induction heating. The heated heavy oil is floating on top of the brine since it becomes less viscous and lighter. As the temperature increased more heavy oil is produced/recovered. An increasing salinity of brine will result in more recovery of heavy oil.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

115

NATCOR -Xpress case study Margaret Oil produces three products: gasoline, jet fuel, and heating oil. The average  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

NATCOR - Xpress case study Margaret Oil produces three products: gasoline, jet fuel, and heating oil. The average octane levels must be at least 8.5 for gasoline, 7 for jet fuel, and 4.5 for heating to produce gasoline or jet fuel. Distilled oil can be used to produce all three products. The octane level

Hall, Julian

116

This Week In Petroleum Distillate Section  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Residential heating oil prices (dollars per gallon) Average Regional Residential heating oil prices graph Regional residential heating oil prices graph Residential heating oil...

117

This Week In Petroleum Printer-Friendly Version  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

continuing into mid-March 2006, prices for wholesale and residential heating oil and propane will be included in This Week In Petroleum as well as in the Weekly Petroleum Status...

118

This Week In Petroleum Printer-Friendly Version  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

continuing into mid-March 2009, prices for wholesale and residential heating oil and propane will be included in This Week In Petroleum, as well as in the Weekly Petroleum Status...

119

State of Maine residential heating oil survey: 1995--1996 season summary  

SciTech Connect

In Maine the cash price is surveyed, as opposed to lthe retail or charge price, as it has been identified as the price most often paid by Maine consumers. As one can see from the chart in this report, the 1995-1996 cash prices for No. 2 heating oil can be characterized as having an upward trend and much more fluctuation than last years` relatively flat line. The 1995-96 heating season started at the closing price of the previous season and for the first few weeks prices were lower than most of the 1994-95 trendline. When the weather became cooler, however, prices were on a steady incline until well into the winter. Prices leveled off for most of the rest of the season with a dramatic surge on the last week of the survey. The average statewide cash price for No. 2 heating oil this year was .861 1 cents, approximately ten cents higher than the average for 1994-1995 which was .7661 cents per gallon. It has been the observation of the SPO that during most of the 1995-1996 season, Maine`s prices showed a direct correspondence with New England rack or wholesale prices. It appeared that they never fluctuated more than 3-4 cents from each other.

Elder, B.

1996-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

120

DOE Accepts Bids for Northeast Home Heating Oil Stocks | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Accepts Bids for Northeast Home Heating Oil Stocks Accepts Bids for Northeast Home Heating Oil Stocks DOE Accepts Bids for Northeast Home Heating Oil Stocks February 3, 2011 - 12:00pm Addthis Washington, DC - The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) today has awarded contracts to three companies who successfully bid for the purchase of 984,253 barrels of heating oil from the Northeast Home Heating Oil Reserve. Awardee Amount Morgan Stanley 500,000 barrels Shell Trading U.S. Company 250,000 barrels George E. Warren Corporation 234,253 barrels Today's sale was the first held as part of the Department's initiative to convert the current 1,984,253-barrel heating oil reserve to cleaner burning ultra low sulfur distillate. Contracts for the heating oil will be executed upon final payment to DOE; final payment is required no later than

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "weekly heating oil" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Dynamics of heating oil market prices in Europe  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This paper concerns the German and French heating oil market and attempts to establish long- and short-term relationships between German and French monthly heating oil prices in dollars, the Rotterdam spot price for the same product and the DM/US$ and FF/US$ exchange rates during the period from January 1987 to December 1997. To model the market over the period under consideration, incorporating the Gulf War, we have used conventional unit root tests and sequential tests allowing structural changes. Long-term relationships, with shifts in regime detected by cointegration tests taking structural breaks into consideration, are estimated. The short-term dynamics defined by a vector error correction (VEC) mechanism is derived in a classic manner when in presence of a cointegrated VAR system. The econometric results obtained are commented on from an economic point of view. Weak exogeneity tests are performed and the conditional VEC model is deduced, enabling measurement of the instantaneous impact of variations in weakly exogenous exchange rates on variations in heating oil prices in Germany and France. Lastly, a study is made of the asymmetric reaction of domestic prices to positive and negative variations in exchange rates and the Rotterdam spot quotation.

J.P. Indjehagopian; F. Lantz; V. Simon

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

122

Strengthening the applicability of self-heating retorting process to oil shale via co-retorting  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Recently a facile low-energy-input retorting route but without marked loss in the shale-oil yield is developed, which is achieved by a self-heating effect, that is, spontaneously increasing retorting temperature in the absence of external heat provision (Guo et al., 2013, 2014). In this work, the applicability of self-heating retorting (SHR) process to three Chinese oil shales from different places (i.e., Longkou, Huadian and Fushun) is studied. Of these three oil shales, Fushun oil shale is associated with coal and was previously abandoned during coal mining due to its not high kerogen or oil content. The results show that its hard for Fushun oil shale to obtain satisfying self-heating effect, while Longkou or Huadian oil shale with higher kerogen or oil content shows satisfactory SHR. However, by adding suitable amounts of Longkou or Huadian oil shale into Fushun oil shale, a satisfying self-heating effect can be obtained as well. Thus, the relatively low-grade Fushun oil shale can also be well utilized to produce shale oil via this facile SHR route. Moreover, to utilize Fushun oil shale with a greener SHR process, the process can be performed by co-retorting Fushun oil shale with pine needles, a kind of renewable biomass. This finding also provides a new starting point for exploring plentiful biomass resources to utilize low-grade oil shale to produce oil in the future work.

Hongfan Guo; Yindong Yang; Kuikui Wang; Yansong Pei; Qicheng Wu; Yunyi Liu

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

123

NATCOR -Xpress case study (advanced) Margaret Oil produces three products: gasoline, jet fuel, and heating oil. The average  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

NATCOR - Xpress case study (advanced) Margaret Oil produces three products: gasoline, jet fuel, and heating oil. The average octane levels must be at least 8.5 for gasoline, 7 for jet fuel, and 4. Distilled naphtha can be used only to produce gasoline or jet fuel. Distilled oil can be used to produce

Hall, Julian

124

Emerging Heat Exchanger Technologies for the Mitigation of Fouling in Crude Oil Pre-Heat Trains  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Over the last three years ESDU have been working with engineers from oil companies and the companies that serve them in order to produce a guide describing the current state of knowledge on fouling in pre-heat trains and ways in which it can...

Polley, G. T.; Pugh, S. J.; King, D. C.

125

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

September 25, 2003 (next release 2:00 p.m. on October 2) September 25, 2003 (next release 2:00 p.m. on October 2) Spot prices fluctuated mildly during the week (Wednesday to Wednesday, September 17-24), with the majority of changes in either direction limited to a nickel or less. For the week, prices generally were lower than last Wednesday. At the Henry Hub, the spot price declined 2 cents on the week, ending trading yesterday (September 24) at $4.59 per MMBtu. The NYMEX futures contract for October delivery ended the week down by $0.054 per MMBtu from the previous Wednesday (September 17), settling at $4.588 per MMBtu, as a significant one-day decline of 17 cents on Thursday (September 18) was not offset by four straight trading sessions with small increases. EIA reported that working gas inventories were 2,688 Bcf as of Friday, September 19, which is 3.3 percent below the 5-year (1998-2002) average. In oil markets, yesterday's announcement by the OPEC oil cartel of a production quota cut of 900,000 barrels per day sent crude oil and heating oil futures contract prices up sharply. The spot price for West Texas Intermediate crude oil accrued its entire increase for the week in yesterday's trading, as it gained $1.19 to $28.19 per barrel, or about $4.86 per MMBtu.

126

Application of Carbon Nanocatalysts in Upgrading Heavy Crude Oil Assisted with Microwave Heating  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Application of Carbon Nanocatalysts in Upgrading Heavy Crude Oil Assisted with Microwave Heating, Stanford, California 94305, United States *S Supporting Information ABSTRACT: Heavy crude oil can that by using carbon nano- catalysts, heavy crude oil can be efficiently upgraded to lighter oil at a relatively

Cui, Yi

127

Evaluation of Engineered Geothermal Systems as a Heat Source for Oil Sands Production in Northern Alberta  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The project costs presented in the following section are intended ... give a basic understanding of the economics of geothermal heat as an energy source for oil sands extraction. Long et...2005) reported that oil...

V. Pathak; T. Babadagli; J. A. Majorowicz; M. J. Unsworth

2014-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

128

DOE Will Convert Northeast Home Heating Oil Reserve to Ultra Low Sulfur  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Will Convert Northeast Home Heating Oil Reserve to Ultra Low Will Convert Northeast Home Heating Oil Reserve to Ultra Low Sulfur Distillate DOE Will Convert Northeast Home Heating Oil Reserve to Ultra Low Sulfur Distillate February 1, 2011 - 12:00pm Addthis Washington, DC - The current inventory of the Northeast Home Heating Oil Reserve will be converted to cleaner burning ultra low sulfur distillate to comply with new, more stringent fuel standards by some Northeastern states, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) said today. The State of New York and other Northeastern states are implementing more stringent fuel standards that require replacement of high sulfur (2,000 parts per million) heating oil to ultra low sulfur fuel (15 parts per million). As a result, DOE will sell the current inventory of the Northeast Home Heating Oil Reserve, a total of approximately 2 million barrels, and

129

DOE Completes Sale of Northeast Home Heating Oil Stocks | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Completes Sale of Northeast Home Heating Oil Stocks Completes Sale of Northeast Home Heating Oil Stocks DOE Completes Sale of Northeast Home Heating Oil Stocks February 10, 2011 - 12:00pm Addthis Washington, DC - The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) today has awarded contracts to four companies who successfully bid for the purchase of 1,000,000 barrels of heating oil from the Northeast Home Heating Oil Reserve storage sites in Groton and New Haven, CT. Hess Groton Terminal, Groton, CT Shell Trading U.S. Company 150,000 barrels Sprague Energy Corp. 100,000 barrels Magellan New Haven Terminal, New Haven, CT Hess Corporation 300,000 barrels Morgan Stanley 450,000 barrels Today's sale was the second held as part of the Department's initiative to convert the 1,984,253 barrel heating oil reserve to cleaner burning

130

State heating oil and propane program. Final report, 1990--1991  

SciTech Connect

The following is a report of New Hampshire`s participation in the State Heating Oil and Propane Program (SHOPS) for the 1990--91 heating season. The program is a joint effort between participating states and the Department of Energy (DOE), Energy Information Administration (EYE) to collect retail price data for heating oil and propane through phone surveys of 25 oil and 20 propane retailers in New Hampshire. SHOPS is funded through matching grants from DOE and the participating state. (VC)

Not Available

1991-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

131

Technical Information Exchange on Pyrolysis Oil: Potential for a Renewab;e Heating Oil Substation Fuel in New England  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This report summarizes the results of an information exchange sponsored by the DOE/EERE Bioenergy Technologies Office in Manchester, New Hampshire, on May 9-10, 2012. The participand identifies top challenges regarding feedstocks and production, logistics and compatibility, and operational issues, then prioritized next steps for expanding use of pyrolysis oil as a replacement for home heating oil in the Northeast

132

THE WEEK'S PRICE CHANGES  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

THE WEEK'S PRICE CHANGES ... Socony Vacuum Oil Co. effected a second reduction in its prices for No. 2 fuel oil and ... ...

1950-02-27T23:59:59.000Z

133

Microwave heating for adsorbents regeneration and oil sands coke activation.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Microwave heating has unique advantages compared to convection-radiation heating methods including fast heating rate and selective heating of objects. This thesis studied two applications of (more)

Chen, Heng

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

134

Recovery of stranded heavy oil by electromagnetic heating.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??High oil-viscosity is a major concern for the recovery of oil from heavy-oil reservoirs. Introducing energy to the formation has proven to be an effective (more)

Carrizales, Maylin Alejandra

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

135

Advanced oil burner for residential heating -- development report  

SciTech Connect

The development of advanced oil burner concepts has long been a part of Brookhaven National Laboratory`s (BNL) oil heat research program. Generally, goals of this work include: increased system efficiency, reduced emissions of soot and NO{sub x}, and the practical extension of the firing rate range of current burners to lower input rates. The report describes the results of a project at BNL aimed at the development of air atomized burners. Two concepts are discussed. The first is an air atomizer which uses air supplied at pressures ranging from 10 to 20 psi and requiring the integration of an air compressor in the system. The second, more novel, approach involves the use of a low-pressure air atomizing nozzle which requires only 8-14 inches of water air pressure for fuel atomization. This second approach requires the use of a fan in the burner instead of a compressor although the fan pressure is higher than with conventional, pressure atomized retention head burners. In testing the first concept, high pressure air atomization, a conventional retention head burner was modified to accept the new nozzle. In addition, the burner head was modified to reduce the flow area to maintain roughly 1 inch of water pressure drop across the head at a firing rate of 0.25 gallons of oil per hour. The burner ignited easily and could be operated at low excess air levels without smoke. The major disadvantage of this burner approach is the need for the air compressor as part of the system. In evaluating options, a vane-type compressor was selected although the use of a compressor of this type will lead to increased burner maintenance requirements.

Butcher, T.A.

1995-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

136

DOE Will Convert Northeast Home Heating Oil Reserve to Ultra Low Sulfur  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

DOE Will Convert Northeast Home Heating Oil Reserve to Ultra Low DOE Will Convert Northeast Home Heating Oil Reserve to Ultra Low Sulfur Distillate DOE Will Convert Northeast Home Heating Oil Reserve to Ultra Low Sulfur Distillate February 1, 2011 - 12:00pm Addthis Washington, DC - The current inventory of the Northeast Home Heating Oil Reserve will be converted to cleaner burning ultra low sulfur distillate to comply with new, more stringent fuel standards by some Northeastern states, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) said today. The State of New York and other Northeastern states are implementing more stringent fuel standards that require replacement of high sulfur (2,000 parts per million) heating oil to ultra low sulfur fuel (15 parts per million). As a result, DOE will sell the current inventory of the Northeast

137

Final report of the Rhode Island State Energy Office on residential no. 2 heating oil and propane prices [SHOPP  

SciTech Connect

Summary report on residential No.2 heating oil and propane prepared under grant. Summarizes the monitoring and analysis of heating oil and propane prices from October 2000 through March 2001.

McClanahan, Janice

2001-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

138

This Week In Petroleum Printer-Friendly Version  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

gallon, which was a decrease of 101.1 cents per gallon from this same time last year. Wholesale heating oil prices showed a two week drop of 21.6 cents per gallon, 13.1 cents per...

139

This Week In Petroleum Printer-Friendly Version  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

heating oil demand. Moreover, prior to this winter, the longest period for a diesel fuel price premium was 38 weeks, occurring from August 19, 1996 through May 5, 1997, which...

140

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

9, 2007 (next release 2:00 p.m. on August 16, 2007) 9, 2007 (next release 2:00 p.m. on August 16, 2007) The sweltering heat that engulfed most of the Lower 48 States for much of the report week led to natural gas spot price increases at most locations this week (Wednesday-Wednesday, August 1-8). The Henry Hub spot price increased 7 cents per MMBtu this week, or about 1 percent to $6.26. There were, however, some price decreases on the week, as well. For example, trading locations west of the Rocky Mountains decreased on the week between 7 and 14 cents per MMBtu. The price of the NYMEX futures contract for September delivery also decreased by 13 cents since last Wednesday (August 1) to settle yesterday at $6.220 per MMBtu. Natural gas in storage as of Friday, August 3, was 2,882 Bcf, which is 16.4 percent above the 5-year average. After reaching the all-time high of $78.20 per barrel on July 31, the crude oil price decreased almost 8 percent. On the week, the spot price for West Texas Intermediate (WTI) crude oil ended yesterday's trading session at $72.23 per barrel ($12.45 per MMBtu) after decreasing $4.26 per barrel (73 cents per MMBtu), or 5.6 percent.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "weekly heating oil" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

The role of interruptible natural gas customers in New England heating oil markets: A preliminary examination of events in January-February 2000  

SciTech Connect

This report provides an analysis of data collected from gas service providers and end-use customers in the six New England States and offers a preliminary assessment of the impact of interruptible gas customers on the distillate fuel oil market this past winter. Based on information collected and analyzed as of October 2000, the main findings areas follows: (1) For interruptible gas customers with distillate fuel oil as a backup fuel, their volume of interruptions was equivalent to about 1 to 2 percent of the total sales of distillate fuel oil in New England during January-February 2000. For the two peak weeks of gas supply interruptions, however, the equivalent volume of distillate fuel oil amounted to an estimated 3 to 6 percent of total sales in New England. There were no interruptions of the natural gas service during the 2-month period. (2) Purchases of distillate fuel oil by interruptible gas customers may have contributed somewhat to the spike in the price of distillate fuel oil in January-February 2000, especially during the peak weeks of gas interruptions. Nevertheless, other factors--a sudden drop in temperatures, low regional stocks of distillate fuels, and weather-related supply problems during a period of high customer demand--appear to have played a significant role in this price spike, as they have in previous spikes. (3) While this preliminary analysis suggests that interruptible natural gas service does not threaten the stability of the home heating oil market, several steps might be taken-without undermining the benefits of interruptible service--to reduce the potential adverse impacts of gas supply interruptions in times of market stress. Regardless of the magnitude of the impact of distillate fuel oil purchases by interruptible gas customers on Northeast heating oil markets, the threat of future heating oil price spikes and supply problems still remains. To help counter the threat, President Clinton in July 2000 directed Secretary Richardson to establish a heating oil component of the Strategic Petroleum Reserve in the Northeast, and 2 million barrels of heating oil are now stored in the reserve. Other possible policy options are outlined.

None

2000-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

142

Comparison of Heating Methods for In-Situ Oil Shale Extraction  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Oil shales are lamellar, non-porous, impermeable hydrocarbon bearing rocks that contain organic matter called kerogen which, when heated at pyrolysis temperature of approximately 600-800 ?, thermo-chemically decomposes to liberate hydrocarbons...

Hazra, Kaushik Gaurav

2014-04-29T23:59:59.000Z

143

DOE Seeks Commercial Storage to Complete Fill of Northeast Home Heating Oil  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

to Complete Fill of Northeast Home to Complete Fill of Northeast Home Heating Oil Reserve DOE Seeks Commercial Storage to Complete Fill of Northeast Home Heating Oil Reserve August 26, 2011 - 1:00pm Addthis Washington, DC - The Department of Energy (DOE), through its agent DLA Energy, has issued a solicitation seeking commercial storage contracts for the remaining 350,000 barrels of ultra low sulfur distillate needed to complete the fill of the Northeast Home Heating Oil Reserve. Offers are due no later than 9:00 a.m., August 31, 2011. Earlier this year, DOE sold its entire inventory of heating oil stocks with plans to replace it with cleaner burning ultra low sulfur distillate. New storage contracts were awarded in August 2011 for 650,000 barrels, and awards from this solicitation will complete the fill of the one million

144

Electromagnetic Induction Heat Generation of Nano?ferrofluid and Other Stimulants for Heavy Oil Recovery  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Nano?ferrofluid and graphite?fluid are proposed to be used as stimulants for heavy oil recovery processes using electromagnetic induction. The heat generation in the stimulants will be used for reducing the viscosity of heavy oil. The temperature increase of the stimulants are observed with the presence of electromagnetic induction. These increments are better compared to those of the varying concentration of salt water (brine) usually exist in the oil reservoir.

A. A. Pramana; D. Abdassah; S. Rachmat; A. Mikrajuddin

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

145

Heat and mass transport in non-isothermal partially saturated oil-wax Antonio Fasano1  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Mario Primicerio1 Abstract Deposition of wax at the wall of pipelines during the flow of mineral oilsHeat and mass transport in non-isothermal partially saturated oil-wax solutions Antonio Fasano1 of the main mechanisms at the origin of wax deposition, i.e. diffusion in non-isothermal solutions. We

Primicerio, Mario

146

Plant Oil Fuels Combined Heat and Power (CHP)  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Combined heat and power (CHP) or cogeneration is the simultaneous generation of both useable heat and power in a single process by a heat and power supply station or an engine. The mechanical energy is usuall...

Dr. Klaus Thuneke

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

147

Plant Oil Fuels Combined Heat and Power (CHP)  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Combined heat and power (CHP) or cogeneration is the simultaneous generation of both useable heat and power in a single process by a heat and power supply station or an engine. The mechanical energy is usuall...

Dr. Klaus Thuneke

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

148

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

13, to Wednesday, February 20) 13, to Wednesday, February 20) Released: February 21, 2008 Next release: February 28, 2008 Natural gas spot and futures prices increased this report week (February 13-20), as frigid temperatures returned to regions of the country that rely on the fuel for space heating. During the report week, the Henry Hub spot price increased $0.73 per million Btu (MMBtu) to $9.08. At the New York Mercantile Exchange (NYMEX), prices for futures contracts also registered significant increases. The futures contract for March delivery rose about 58 cents per MMBtu on the week to $8.965. As of Friday, February 15, working gas in storage was 1,770 Bcf, which is 5.8 percent above the 5-year (2003-2007) average. The spot price for West Texas Intermediate (WTI) crude oil increased $7.58 per barrel, trading yesterday at $100.86 per barrel or $17.39 per MMBtu.

149

Retail Diesel Fuel Oil Prices  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Along with heating oil prices, the distillate supply squeeze has Along with heating oil prices, the distillate supply squeeze has severely impacted diesel fuel prices, especially in the Northeast. Diesel fuel is bascially the same product as home heating oil. The primary difference is that diesel has a lower sulfur content. When heating oil is in short supply, low sulfur diesel fuel can be diverted to heating oil supply. Thus, diesel fuel prices rise with heating heating oil prices. Retail diesel fuel prices nationally, along with those of most other petroleum prices, increased steadily through most of 1999. But prices in the Northeast jumped dramatically in the third week of January. Diesel fuel prices in New England rose nearly 68 cents per gallon, or 47 percent, between January 17 and February 7. While EIA does not have

150

This Week In Petroleum  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Release Schedule Release Schedule Sign Up for Email Updates Summary Printer-Friendly Version RSS icon Complete History XLS Analysis Text History RSS feed Summary Crude Oil Gasoline Distillate Propane This Week In Petroleum Charts Scroll over labels below to see different charts. Retail Prices (Dollars per Gallon) Retail Price Graphs. Retail Prices Change From Last 01/13/14 Week Year Gasoline 3.327 values are down -0.005 values are up 0.024 Diesel Fuel 3.886 values are down -0.024 values are down -0.008 Heating Oil 4.002 values are down -0.018 values are down -0.002 Propane 2.861 values are up 0.032 values are up 0.593 Futures Prices (Dollars per Gallon*) Futures Price Graphs. Futures Prices Change From Last 01/10/14 Week Year Crude Oil 92.72 values are down -1.24 values are down -0.84

151

No. 2 heating oil/propane program 1994--1995. Final report  

SciTech Connect

During the 1994--95 heating season, the Massachusetts Division of Energy Resources (DOER) participated in a joint data collection program between several state energy offices and the federal Department of Energy`s (DOE) Energy Information Administration (EIA). The purpose of the program was to collect and monitor retail and wholesale heating oil and propane prices and inventories from October 1994 through March 1995. This program augmented the existing Massachusetts data collection system and served several important functions. The information helped the federal and state governments respond to consumer, congressional and media inquiries regarding No. 2 oil and propane. The information also provided policy decision-makers with timely, accurate and consistent data to monitor current heating oil and propane markets and develop appropriate state responses when necessary. In addition, the communication network between states and the DOE was strengthened through this program. This final report begins with an overview of the unique events that had an impact on the petroleum markets prior to and during the reporting period. Next, the report summarizes the results from residential heating oil and propane price surveys conducted by DOER over the 1994--95 heating season. The report also incorporates the wholesale heating oil and propane prices and inventories collected by EIA and distributed to the states. Finally, the report outlines DOER`s use of the data.

McBrien, J.

1995-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

152

Impacts of the Weatherization Assistance Program in fuel-oil heated houses  

SciTech Connect

The U.S. DOE Weatherization Assistance Program (WAP) Division requested Oak Ridge National Laboratory to help design and conduct an up-to-date assessment of the Program. The evaluation includes five separate studies; the fuel oil study is the subject of this paper. The primary goal of the fuel-oil study was to provide a region-wide estimate of the space-heating fuel oil saved by the Program in the Northeast during the 1991 and 1992 program years. Other goals include assessing the cost effectiveness of the Program within the fuel-oil submarket, and identifying factors which caused fuel-oil savings to vary. This paper reports only the highlights from the fuel-oil study`s final report.

Levins, W.P.; Ternes, M.P.

1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

153

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

11, 2002 11, 2002 On Friday, spot gas traded at the Henry Hub for $2.20 per MMBtu, marking no change from the price on the previous Friday. Last week spot prices at the Henry Hub traded within a tight range of $2.14-$2.20 per MMBtu. Temperatures in much of the country returned to above normal in the second half of the week and the National Weather Service's (NWS) latest 6-to 10-day forecast called for this pattern to continue through the weekend and all of this week. (See Temperature Map) (See Deviation Map) This dominant pattern of above normal temperatures has resulted in heating degree days thus far this winter that are 16 percent lower than normal. At the NYMEX, the settlement price for the March contract ended the week up almost 5 cents at $2.191 per MMBtu. Natural gas stocks remained well above last year's level as estimated net withdrawals were 82 Bcf during the last week of January. The spot price for West Texas Intermediate (WTI) crude oil moved down 15 cents last week and ended Friday trading at $20.25 per barrel or $3.49 per MMBtu.

154

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

16 2003 (next release 2:00 p.m. on October 23) 16 2003 (next release 2:00 p.m. on October 23) Moderate temperatures for much of the week (Wednesday-Wednesday, October 8-15) failed to offset upward pressure on spot prices from higher crude oil prices and the prospect of higher demand with the approaching heating season. The result at the Henry Hub was a net gain on the week of 9 cents per MMBtu to $4.93. Despite losing value in the past three trading days, the NYMEX futures contract for November delivery at the Henry Hub was higher on the week by about 28 cents per MMBtu to $5.431. Natural gas in storage as of Friday, October 10, increased to 2,944 Bcf, which is 0.3 percent below the 5-year average. The spot price for West Texas Intermediate (WTI) crude oil rose $2.14 per barrel on the week to yesterday's (October 15) closing price of $31.74 per barrel, or $5.47 per MMBtu.

155

This Week In Petroleum Printer-Friendly Version  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

motor gasoline, distillate fuel oil, kerosene-type jet fuel, residual fuel oil, and propane, and there is no weekly inventory data for "other oils." Therefore, both weekly...

156

Winter fuels report, week ending November 30, 1990. [Contains Glossary  

SciTech Connect

The Winter Fuels Report is intended to provide concise, timely information to the industry, the press, policymakers, consumers, analysts, and state and local governments on the following topics: distillate fuel oil net production, imports and stocks for all PADD's and product supplied on a US level; propane net production, imports and stocks for Petroleum Administration for Defense Districts (PADD) I, II, and III; natural gas supply and disposition and underground storage for the United States and consumption for all PADD's; residential and wholesale pricing data for propane and heating oil for those states participating in the joint Energy Information Administration (EIA)/State Heating Oil and Propane Program; crude oil and petroleum price comparisons for the United States and selected cites; and US total heating degree-days by city. This report will be published weekly by the EIA starting the first week in October 1990 and will continue until the first week in April 1991. 27 figs., 12 tabs.

Not Available

1990-12-06T23:59:59.000Z

157

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

12 2002 (next release 2:00 p.m. on December 19) 12 2002 (next release 2:00 p.m. on December 19) Spot prices generally moved higher for the week (Wednesday, December 4 to Wednesday, December 11) with exceptions at several Northeast locations, while futures prices experienced robust gains, particularly for contracts for delivery through the end of the heating season. Unusually cold temperatures accompanied the heating season's first significant and widespread snow storm late last week, and temperatures plunged again ahead of the ice storm of Tuesday and Wednesday. At the Henry Hub, the average spot price gained 41 cents for the week, ending trading yesterday (Wednesday, December 11) at $4.64 per MMBtu. Since last Wednesday, the NYMEX futures contract for delivery in January 2003 gained $0.411 per MMBtu, settling yesterday at $4.709. Natural gas in storage as of Friday, December 6, decreased to 2,794 Bcf, which is 2.9 percent below the 5-year average. The price of West Texas Intermediate crude oil gained 69 cents per barrel for the week, ending trading yesterday at $27.49 per barrel, or $4.74 per MMBtu.

158

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

7, 2007 (next release 2:00 p.m. on May 24, 2007) 7, 2007 (next release 2:00 p.m. on May 24, 2007) Natural gas spot and futures prices increased slightly this week (Wednesday-Wednesday, May 9-16), despite the usual lull in demand during this shoulder period between the winter heating and summer cooling seasons. The upward price trend likely resulted from a variety of factors, including rising prices for competing petroleum products (as evidenced by an increase in the underlying crude oil price). Additionally, concerns over current and future supplies do not appear to have eased. The official start of the hurricane season is imminent, and the first named tropical storm appeared this week. However, imports of liquefied natural gas (LNG) have increased markedly in the past few months. On the week, the Henry Hub spot price increased 16 cents per MMBtu, or 2 percent, to $7.62. At the New York Mercantile Exchange (NYMEX), the contract for June delivery increased 17.0 cents per MMBtu on the week to a daily settlement of $7.890 yesterday (May 16). EIA's Weekly Natural Gas Storage Report today reported natural gas storage supplies of 1,842 Bcf as of Friday, May 11, reflecting an implied net injection of 95 Bcf. This level of working gas in underground storage is 20.6 percent above the 5-year average inventory for this time of year. The spot price for West Texas Intermediate (WTI) crude oil increased $1.03 per barrel on the week to $62.57 per barrel, or $10.79 per MMBtu.

159

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

10, 2007 (next release 2:00 p.m. on May 17, 2007) 10, 2007 (next release 2:00 p.m. on May 17, 2007) Springtime temperatures in most regions of the country this week and lack of any significant cooling or heating load through much of the Lower 48 States led to an easing of natural gas spot prices since Wednesday, May 2. Furthermore, the formation of the first tropical storm of the 2007 Atlantic Hurricane Season 3 weeks prior to the beginning of the traditional hurricane season appeared to have no impact on the spot markets in the Lower 48 States. On the week (Wednesday-Wednesday, May 2-9), the Henry Hub spot price declined 18 cents per MMBtu, or 2.4 percent, to $7.46. In contrast to spot market activity, trading of futures contracts at the New York Mercantile Exchange (NYMEX) this week resulted in gains for all contracts with the exception of the near-month contract, possibly reflecting an expected tightness in supply over the summer months. While the NYMEX contract for June delivery decreased 1 cent per MMBtu on the week to a daily settlement of $7.720 yesterday (May 9), contracts through the end of the injection season all increased, albeit only by an average of 0.3 percent. Net injections reported in today's release of EIA's Weekly Natural Gas Storage Report brought natural gas storage supplies to 1,747 Bcf as of Friday, May 4, which is 20.5 percent above the 5-year average inventory for the report week. The spot price for West Texas Intermediate (WTI) crude oil decreased $2.24 per barrel on the week to $61.54 per barrel, or $10.61 per MMBtu.

160

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

22, 2007 (next release 2:00 p.m. on March 1, 2007) 22, 2007 (next release 2:00 p.m. on March 1, 2007) As the weather has made the transition from extreme cold to much more moderate conditions this week, natural gas spot prices have declined in much of the country. For the week (Wednesday to Wednesday, February 14-21), the Henry Hub spot price declined $1.40 per MMBtu to $7.51 as prices for next-day delivery responded to reduced demand for space-heating. However, the bitter and widespread cold of the first 2 weeks of February likely contributed to revised expectations of future storage levels, leading to increased futures prices this week. At the New York Mercantile Exchange (NYMEX), the price for the futures contract for March delivery at the Henry Hub increased 41 cents per MMBtu or about 5.6 percent. Generally, futures prices for delivery months through next summer increased by more than 4 percent. Working gas in storage as of Friday, February 16, was 1,865 Bcf, which is 10.8 percent above the 5-year (2002-2006) average. The spot price for West Texas Intermediate (WTI) crude oil increased $1.40 per barrel on the week to $59.40, or $10.24 per MMBtu.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "weekly heating oil" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

16 (next release 2:00 p.m. on February 23, 2006) 16 (next release 2:00 p.m. on February 23, 2006) Winter-like conditions in much of the East this past weekend transitioned to above-normal temperatures, contributing to a further decline in natural gas spot prices this week (Wednesday, February 8 - Wednesday, February 15). On the week the Henry Hub spot price declined 57 cents per MMBtu to $7.31. At the New York Mercantile Exchange (NYMEX), prices for futures contracts also registered significant declines. The futures contract for March delivery, which is the last contract for the current heating season, declined 66.9 cents per MMBtu on the week to $7.066. Relatively high levels of natural gas in working storage and falling prices for competing fuels likely contributed to falling natural gas prices this week. Working gas in storage as of Friday, February 10, was 2,266 Bcf, which is 43.9 percent above the 5-year (2001-2005) average. The spot price for West Texas Intermediate (WTI) crude oil decreased $4.90 per barrel on the week to $57.61, or $9.93 per MMBtu.

162

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

22, 2005 (next release 2:00 p.m. on January 5, 2006) 22, 2005 (next release 2:00 p.m. on January 5, 2006) Spot prices have decreased at virtually all market locations in the Lower 48 States this week as moderating temperatures relative to the prior week reduced space-heating demand and prices for competing petroleum products eased. For the week (Wednesday-Wednesday, December 14-21), the Henry Hub price decreased $1.25 per MMBtu to $13.55. At the New York Mercantile Exchange (NYMEX), the price of the futures contract for January delivery settled yesterday (December 21) at $14.271 per MMBtu, which was about 41 cents per MMBtu, or 2.8 percent, lower on the week. The Energy Information Administration (EIA) reported that working gas in storage was 2,804 Bcf as of Friday, December 16, which reflects an implied net decrease of 162 Bcf. The spot price for West Texas Intermediate (WTI) crude oil decreased $2.30 per barrel, or about 3.8 percent, on the week to settle yesterday at $58.56 per barrel, or $10.10 per MMBtu.

163

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Monday, January 07, 2002 Monday, January 07, 2002 The spot price at the Henry Hub finished the trading week on January 4 at $2.36 per MMBtu, roughly 30 cents or over 11 percent less than on the previous Friday. On the NYMEX, the settlement price of the futures contract for February delivery at the Henry Hub settled at $2.275 per MMBtu, down nearly 50 cents from the previous Friday. Market prices were affected early in the week by colder temperatures in most of the eastern two-thirds of the United States. (See Temperature Map) (See Deviation Map) Although again smaller than historical averages and market expectations, withdrawals from storage at 124 Bcf were the largest reported so far during the current heating season. The spot price for West Texas Intermediate (WTI) crude oil increased by over 1 percent, climbing to $21.47 per barrel or $3.70 per MMBtu.

164

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

2, 2007 (next release 2:00 p.m. on August 9, 2007) 2, 2007 (next release 2:00 p.m. on August 9, 2007) Natural gas spot prices increased this week (Wednesday-Wednesday, July 25-August 1) as tropical storm activity increased and weather-related demand returned along with normal summertime heat in large market areas in the East. On the week, the Henry Hub spot price increased 62 cents per MMBtu, or 11.1 percent, to $6.19. At the New York Mercantile Exchange (NYMEX), the futures contract for August delivery expired last Friday (July 27) at $6.11 per MMBtu. Although the price of the expiring contract in the last couple days of trading rose slightly, the expiration price was still the second lowest of the year (the January 2007 contract expired at $5.838). Taking over as the near-month contract, the September 2007 contract increased in price by $0.29 per MMBtu on the week to $6.352. EIA's Weekly Natural Gas Storage Report today reported natural gas storage supplies of 2,840 Bcf as of Friday, July 27. This level of working gas in underground storage exceeds the maximum level of the previous 5 years. The spot price for West Texas Intermediate (WTI) crude oil increased $0.75 per barrel on the week to $76.49 per barrel. On a Btu basis, the crude oil price is now more than double the price of natural gas at $13.19 per MMBtu.

165

Impacts of the Weatherization Assistance Program in fuel-oil heated houses  

SciTech Connect

In 1990, the US Department of Energy (DOE) initiated a national evaluation of its lowincome Weatherization Assistance Program. This report, which is one of five parts of that evaluation, evaluates the energy savings and cost-effectiveness of the Program as it had been applied to single-family houses heated primarily by fuel-oil. The study was based upon a representative sample (41 local weatherization agencies, 222 weatherized and 115 control houses) from the nine northeastern states during 1991 and 1992 program years. Dwelling-specific and agency-level data on measures installed, costs, and service delivery procedures were collected from the sampled agencies. Space-heating fuel-oil consumption, indoor temperature, and outdoor temperature were monitored at each house. Dwelling characteristics, air-leakage measurements, space-heating system steady-state efficiency measurements, safety inspections, and occupant questionnaires were also collected or performed at each monitored house. We estimate that the Program weatherized a total of 23,400 single-family fuel-oil heated houses in the nine northeastern states during program years 1991 and 1992. Annual fuel-oil savings were calculated using regression techniques to normalize the savings to standard weather conditions. For the northeast region, annual net fuel-oil savings averaged 160 gallons per house, or 17.7% of pre-weatherization consumption. Although indoor temperatures changed in individual houses following weatherization, there was no average change and no significant difference as compared to the control houses; thus, there was no overall indoor temperature takeback effect influencing fuel-oil savings. The weatherization work was performed cost effectively in these houses from the Program perspective, which included both installation costs and overhead and management costs but did not include non-energy benefits (such as employment and environmental).

Levins, W.P.; Ternes, M.P.

1994-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

166

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

31 (next release 2:00 p.m. on April 7) 31 (next release 2:00 p.m. on April 7) With the traditional heating season coming to a close, temperatures moderated this week and spot price changes were relatively small at most trading locations. For the week (Wednesday-Wednesday, March 23-30), the spot price at the Henry Hub increased 6 cents per MMBtu, or less than 1 percent to $7.17. In contrast to the mixed price patterns on the spot markets, the prices of futures contracts at the New York Mercantile Exchange (NYMEX) for delivery through next heating season all rose on the week. After rising 32.4 cents per MMBtu on Tuesday, March 29, the day of expiration, the April NYMEX contract's monthly settlement price was $7.323. The futures contract for May delivery at the Henry Hub yesterday (Wednesday, March 30) settled at $7.460 per MMBtu, which is 20.5 cents more than last Wednesday's price. Natural gas in storage decreased to 1,239 Bcf as of March 25, which is 19.9 percent above the 5-year average. The spot price for West Texas Intermediate (WTI) crude oil fell $4.53 per barrel or about 9 percent since last Wednesday to $53.96 per barrel or $9.30 per MMBtu.

167

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

9 (next release 2:00 p.m. on January 26, 2006) 9 (next release 2:00 p.m. on January 26, 2006) Changes in natural gas spot prices were mixed this week (Wednesday-Wednesday, January 11-18), as colder weather boosted demand for space-heating in the eastern half of the country and moderate temperatures in part led to continued price declines in the West. For the week, the price at the Henry Hub increased 30 cents, or about 3.5 percent, to $8.85 per MMBtu, as colder weather returned to the East. At the New York Mercantile Exchange (NYMEX), the price of the futures contract for February delivery dropped 47 cents per MMBtu yesterday (January 18) to $8.694, a 6-month low for the February 2006 contract, on expectations of moderate temperatures for the rest of the heating season. The near-month contract decreased roughly 54 cents since last Wednesday (January 11), and is now also trading at a 5-month low for a near-month contract. Natural gas in storage was 2,575 Bcf as of January 13, which is 16.3 percent above the 5-year average. The spot price for West Texas Intermediate (WTI) crude oil increased $1.85 per barrel, or nearly 3 percent, on the week to $65.76 per barrel or $11.34 per MMBtu.

168

Heat of combustion of Green River oil shale  

SciTech Connect

The authors derive simple equations for estimating the heat of combustion of raw shale by thermochemical estimates and by linear regression of experimental data. They find that the heat can be estimated well by an exothermic term that accounts for the combustion of organic matter and a constant that accounts for pyrite combustion, carbonate decomposition, and glass formation. The net contribution of reactions included in the constant is endothermic for the standard state products of bomb calorimetry. As a sample application, the authors perform an energy balance on a modified Fischer assay of average Green River shale by using one of our formulas for raw shale along with previously derived formulas for pyrolysis products.

Muehlbauer, M.J.; Burnham, A.K.

1984-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

169

Weekly Petroleum Status Report  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

v v U.S. crude oil refinery inputs averaged 16.0 million barrels per day during the week ending December 13, 2013, 200 thousand barrels per day lower than the previous week's average. Refineries operated at 91.5% of their operable capacity last week. Gasoline production increased last week, averaging 9.3 million barrels per day. Distillate fuel production decreased last week, averaging 5.0 million barrels per day.

170

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

1 (next release 2:00 p.m. on October 28) 1 (next release 2:00 p.m. on October 28) Increased natural gas demand owing to falling temperatures this week (Wednesday-Wednesday, October 13-20) combined with higher petroleum prices to lift spot and futures gas prices dramatically. The result at the Henry Hub was a net gain on the week of $1.86 per MMBtu, or 35 percent, to $7.25. After gaining value in the past three trading days, the NYMEX futures contract for November delivery at the Henry Hub ended the week at $7.623 per MMBtu, a net increase of 77.2 cents. Natural gas in storage continues to build at a rate that could result in the highest inventories in years by the start of the traditional heating season (November 1). As of Friday, October 15, inventories were 3,223 Bcf, which is 7.4 percent above the 5-year average. The spot price for West Texas Intermediate (WTI) crude oil rose $1.07 per barrel on the week to yesterday's (October 20) closing price of $54.93 per barrel, or $9.47 per MMBtu.

171

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

0, 2001 0, 2001 Prices in both spot and futures markets rose last week. For the week, spot prices at the Henry Hub increased by 25 cents from the previous Friday to $3.23 per MMBtu-an increase of 8 percent. The settlement price of the NYMEX futures contract for September delivery gained 37-plus cents on Wednesday in response to the AGA storage report, then declined to settle at $3.303 on Friday-still up $0.263 from the previous Friday's ending price. Pressure for sustained high prices was limited as temperatures across most of the nation moderated significantly from the heat wave conditions experienced for much of the preceding week. (See Temperature Map) (See Deviation from Normal Temperatures Map) The spot price for West Texas Intermediate crude oil oscillated in a fairly narrow range between $26.70 and $27.85 per barrel, and for the week was down $1.40 at $26.70 per barrel, or about $4.60 per MMBtu.

172

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

2, 2007 (next release 2:00 p.m. on March 29, 2007) 2, 2007 (next release 2:00 p.m. on March 29, 2007) As the bitter cold has evolved to more moderate temperatures, natural gas spot prices have eased through most of the country. During the report week (Wednesday-Wednesday, March 14-21), the Henry Hub spot price declined 4 cents per MMBtu to $6.82. At the New York Mercantile Exchange (NYMEX), prices for futures contracts were slightly higher, as increases Tuesday and yesterday (March 20 and 21) more than offset decreases that occurred in the 3 previous trading days. The futures contract for April delivery, which is the first contract following the current heating season, increased 7.7 cents per MMBtu on the week to $7.160. Relatively high levels of natural gas in working storage and decreasing prices for competing fuels likely contributed to falling natural gas spot prices this week. Working gas in storage as of Friday, March 16, was 1,533 Bcf, which is 18.5 percent above the 5-year (2002-2006) average. The spot price for West Texas Intermediate (WTI) crude oil decreased $1.17 per barrel on the week to $56.98, or $9.82 per MMBtu.

173

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

2 (next release 2:00 p.m. on December 9) 2 (next release 2:00 p.m. on December 9) Although temperatures remain generally moderate, December's arrival has brought some of the coldest temperatures of the current winter and a reminder of the prospect of higher demand as the nation continues into the heating season. This contributed to widespread price increases in spot markets across the Lower 48 States during this week (Wednesday-Wednesday, November 24 to December 1). At the Henry Hub, the spot gas price gained $1.82 per MMBtu on the week to trade at $6.77 yesterday (December 1). In contrast, at the New York Mercantile Exchange (NYMEX), futures prices dropped dramatically. The price of the futures contract for January delivery traded lower on the week by about $1.23 per MMBtu, closing yesterday at $7.413. Natural gas in storage as of Friday, November 26, decreased to 3,299 Bcf, which is 11.2 percent above the 5-year average. The spot price for West Texas Intermediate (WTI) crude oil dropped $3.58 per barrel on the week to trade yesterday at $45.56, or $7.86 per MMBtu.

174

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

25, 2007 (next release 2:00 p.m. on February 1, 2007) 25, 2007 (next release 2:00 p.m. on February 1, 2007) Natural gas spot prices across the country surged this week (Wednesday-Wednesday, January 17-24) as a blast of Arctic cold covered the Lower 48 States, reaching as far south as Texas. Prices in some gas-consuming markets in the Northeast were the highest in the country at more than $10 per MMBtu by the end of the week. But price effects from the increased heating demand registered in production areas as well. On the week (Wednesday to Wednesday), the spot price at the Henry Hub increased by $0.89 per MMBtu to an average of $7.46 yesterday (Wednesday, January 24). At the New York Mercantile Exchange (NYMEX), the price of the futures contract for February delivery ended trading on Wednesday at $7.421 per MMBtu, which was $1.187 higher than last Wednesday's price. As of January 19, natural gas in storage was 2,757 Bcf, or 20.7 percent above the 5-year average for this week. Crude oil prices climbed $1.94 per barrel since last Wednesday to an average of $54.24, or $9.35 per MMBtu.

175

Heating with energy saving alternatives to prevent biodeterioration of marine fuel oil  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This study examined how alternative handling practices, including heat shock, can facilitate the prevention of biodeterioration of fuel oil onboard ships. At temperatures exceeding 50C, no microbes were observed after incubation for 2days. Under 30C incubation, the total number of viable aerobic bacteria, Escherichia coli and Pseudomonas maltophilia, decreased gradually during the incubation period. Conversely, most fungi were destroyed after incubation for 5days. Fungi generally had a better tolerance in marine fuel than E. coli after heat shock treatment. After incubation starting at ?45C, followed by different heat shock patterns, the total number of viable fungi and E. coli increased steadily during the 10-h incubation period. In contrast to fungi, heat shock effectively controlled E. coli growth. Heat shock treatment can control the growth of certain types of microbes at temperatures of up to 10C lower than commonly used.

J. Hua

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

176

Pyrolysis Using Microwave Heating: A Sustainable Process for Recycling Used Car Engine Oil  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Pyrolysis Using Microwave Heating: A Sustainable Process for Recycling Used Car Engine Oil ... A reaction temperature of 600 C provided the greatest yield of commercially valuable products: the recovered liquid oils were composed of light paraffins and aromatic hydrocarbons that could be used as industrial feedstock; the remaining incondensable gases comprised light hydrocarbons that could potentially be used as a fuel source to power the process. ... The pyrolysis products leave the reactor and pass through a system of three water-cooled Liebig condensers [5, 6, 7], which collect condensed hydrocarbons in main and secondary collection flasks [8, 9]. ...

Su Shiung Lam; Alan D. Russell; Howard A. Chase

2010-06-18T23:59:59.000Z

177

Research on viscosity-reduction technology by electric heating and blending light oil in ultra-deep heavy oil wells  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In the Tahe oilfield in China, heavy oil is commonly lifted using the light oil blending technology. However, due to the lack of light oil, the production of heavy oil has been seriously limited. Thus, a new c...

Mo Zhu; Haiquan Zhong; Yingchuan Li

2014-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

178

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

likely can be attributed to hot temperatures and rising crude oil prices. As the heat wave subsided somewhat on Wednesday, June 11, prices eased at virtually all market...

179

Cold Fluorescent Light as Major Inducer of Lipid Oxidation in Soybean Oil Stored at Household Conditions for Eight Weeks  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Soybean oil stored in the dark for 56 days showed an increase of the peroxide value by 124 0.62% (p = 0.006), whereas exposure of the oil to light in a cycle of 12 h light alternating with 12 h darkness for 56 days led to a rise of the peroxide value by 1473 1.79% (p ? 0.001). ... Photosensitized oxidation and autoxidation of vegetable oils lead to the formation of a broad range of oxidation products. ... To investigate the influence of cold fluorescent light, bulbs were chosen that emit electromagnetic irradiation in the cold fluorescent range thereby mimicking the storage condition in a typical household. ...

Marc Pignitter; Klaus Stolze; Stephanie Gartner; Bettina Dumhart; Christiane Stoll; Georg Steiger; Klaus Kraemer; Veronika Somoza

2014-02-18T23:59:59.000Z

180

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

16, 2002 (next release 2:00 p.m. on May 23) 16, 2002 (next release 2:00 p.m. on May 23) Natural gas spot prices at many trading locations this week surged close to their highest levels for the month, but then eased yesterday (May 15) as cooler weather relieved a heat wave in the South and a recent run-up in the price of crude oil abated. On Tuesday, the NYMEX closing price of $3.855 per MMBtu for the futures contract with June delivery was the highest price for a near-month contract since June 2001. But by the end of trading the next day, prices had subsided along with a drop in crude oil prices. After reaching a high of $29.17 per barrel on Tuesday, the spot price for West Texas Intermediate (WTI) crude oil dropped Wednesday to an average of $28.17 per barrel, or $4.86 per MMBtu. This was an increase of 3 percent since last Wednesday.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "weekly heating oil" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

State of Missouri 1991--1992 Energy Information Administration State Heating Oil and Propane Program (SHOPP)  

SciTech Connect

The objective of the Missouri State Heating Oil and Propane Program was to develop a joint state-level company-specific data collective effort. The State of Missouri provided to the US Department of Energy's Energy Information Administration company specific price and volume information on residential No. 2 heating oil and propane on a semimonthly basis. The energy companies participating under the program were selected at random by the US Department of Energy and provided to the Missouri Department of Natural Resources' Division of Energy prior to the implementation of the program. The specific data collection responsibilities for the Missouri Department of Natural Resources' Division of Energy included: (1) Collection of semimonthly residential heating oil and propane prices, collected on the first and third Monday from August 1991 through August 1992; and, (2) Collection of annual sales volume data for residential propane for the period September 1, 1990 through August 31. 1991. This data was required for the first report only. These data were provided on a company identifiable level to the extent permitted by State law. Information was transmitted to the US Department of Energy's Energy Information Administration through the Petroleum Electronic Data Reporting Option (PEDRO).

Not Available

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

182

Application of bio-oils from lignocellulosic biomass to transportation, heat and power generationA review  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract This review will be concentrated on the application of bio-oil produced from the cellulosic biomass among the various liquid biofuels to transport fuels, heat and power generation as substitute. Main application of bio-oil and biocrude from two main thermochemical processes, i.e., pyrolysis and liquefaction include boiler for heat and electricity production, diesel engine or gas turbine for power generation, and diesel engine for transportation fuel. Fast pyrolysis is the most popular process for converting cellulosic biomass to high yield of bio-oil with relatively low cost. For the application of bio-oils to transportation, heat and power generation, physical upgrading methods such as emulsions (bio-oil/diesel or bio-oil/biodiesel ) and blends of bio-oil/oxygenated fuel (ethanol, diglyme) were mainly used and tested. The studies on the spray characteristics of emulsions and blends in diesel engine condition are not available in the literature. In most studies on the combustion and emission characteristics of emulsions and blends, CO emission was increased in most fuels and engines tested and HC was increased or comparable to diesel operation. However, \\{NOx\\} and soot emissions were decreased in most case of experiments. In the pressure-swirl nozzle for gas turbine application, preheating and blending techniques were employed to reduce the SMD of spray. In case of blend for the application of heat and power generation, E20 blend was mainly selected in most studies. Most studies related to bio-oil combustion in burners, diesel engines and gas turbines demonstrated the higher HC, CO and soot emissions than the original design fuel. Although the properties of bio-oil/methanol blend were widely investigated, there are no studies available about the application of bio-oil/methanol blend to transportation, heat and power generation in the literature. In addition, more research is required for the combustion of upgraded bio-oils for transportation application.

Soo-Young No

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

183

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

16 (next release 2:00 p.m. on June 23) 16 (next release 2:00 p.m. on June 23) Summer-like heat across much of the country and shut-ins in the Gulf of Mexico owing to the first tropical storm of this year's hurricane season continued to put upward pressure on natural gas prices this week (June 8 - June 15). The Henry Hub spot price increased 17 cents per MMBtu or 2.4 percent on the week to $7.39 in trading yesterday (June 15). The NYMEX futures contract for July delivery at the Henry Hub gained 44 cents since last Wednesday, closing yesterday at $7.441 per MMBtu. Natural gas in storage as of Friday, June 10, totaled an estimated 1,963 Bcf, which is 17.6 percent above the 5-year average. The spot price for West Texas Intermediate (WTI) crude oil increased $3.02 per barrel, or about 6 percent, on the week to $55.53 per barrel, or $9.57 per MMBtu.

184

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

25, 2007 (next release 2:00 p.m. on November 1, 2007) 25, 2007 (next release 2:00 p.m. on November 1, 2007) Natural gas spot and futures prices generally decreased this report week (Wednesday to Wednesday, October 17-24), as moderate weather prevailed across much of the Lower 48 States. Although tropical storms entering the Gulf of Mexico production region-evidenced by a system currently moving through the Caribbean-could still disrupt supplies, the passing of at least the most active part of the hurricane season may help explain the price declines. On the week the Henry Hub spot price decreased $1.01 per MMBtu to $6.10. At the New York Mercantile Exchange (NYMEX), prices for futures contracts also registered significant decreases. The futures contract for November delivery declined about 49 cents per MMBtu on the week to $6.972. Working gas in storage is well above the 5-year average for this time year, indicating a healthy supply picture ahead of the winter heating season. As of Friday, October 19, working gas in storage was 3,443 Bcf, which is 7.2 percent above the 5-year (2002-2006) average. The spot price for West Texas Intermediate (WTI) crude oil increased $1.11 per barrel, ending trading yesterday at $88.30, or $15.22 per MMBtu.

185

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

9, 2007 (next release 2:00 p.m. on April 26, 2007) 9, 2007 (next release 2:00 p.m. on April 26, 2007) With winter-like conditions finally moving toward the moderate temperatures (and less heating demand) of spring, natural gas spot prices have eased across most of the country. During the report week (Wednesday-Wednesday, April 11-18), the Henry Hub spot price declined 42 cents per MMBtu to $7.54. At the New York Mercantile Exchange (NYMEX), prices for futures contracts also were lower. The futures contract for May delivery decreased 35.8 cents per MMBtu on the week to $7.497. Working gas in storage as of Friday, April 13, was 1,546 Bcf, which is 22.1 percent above the 5-year (2002-2006) average. The spot price for West Texas Intermediate (WTI) crude oil increased $1.16 per barrel on the week to $63.14, or $10.89 per MMBtu.

186

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

16 (next release 2:00 p.m. on November 30, 2006) 16 (next release 2:00 p.m. on November 30, 2006) Changes in natural gas spot prices were modest at most trading locations in the Lower 48 States this week (Wednesday-Wednesday, November 8-15), as current demand for space-heating remained relatively low amid continuing concerns over long-term supplies. For the week, the price at the Henry Hub increased $0.08 per MMBtu, or about 1 percent, to $7.45. At the New York Mercantile Exchange (NYMEX), the price of the futures contract for December delivery at the Henry Hub moved about 30 cents per MMBtu, or 3.4 percent, higher on the week to settle yesterday (Wednesday, November 15) at $8.12. Natural gas in storage was 3,450 Bcf as of Friday, November 10, which is 7.4 percent higher than the 5-year average. The spot price for West Texas Intermediate (WTI) crude oil decreased $1.14 per barrel or about 2 percent, since last Wednesday (November 8) to trade yesterday at $58.79 per barrel or $10.14 per MMBtu.

187

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

February 6, 2003 (next release 2:00 p.m. on February 13) February 6, 2003 (next release 2:00 p.m. on February 13) Natural gas spot prices climbed between $0.55 and $0.95 per MMBtu at most production-area trading locations since Wednesday, January 29. Strong space-heating demand in the Midcontinent and parts of New England supported prices well over $6 throughout much of the country, but price gains were particularly large at Rockies trading locations. On the week (Wednesday-Wednesday), the Henry Hub spot price jumped $0.62 to an average of $6.24 per MMBtu. The NYMEX futures contract for March delivery gained just under 2 cents per MMBtu on the week to settle at $5.644 on Wednesday, February 5. Natural gas in storage as of Friday, January 31, decreased to 1,521 Bcf, which is 15.9 percent below the 5-year (1998-2002) average. The spot price for West Texas Intermediate (WTI) crude oil rose $0.37 per barrel on the week to yesterday's closing price of $33.91 per barrel, or $5.29 per MMBtu.

188

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

0, 2003 (next release 2:00 p.m. on March 27) 0, 2003 (next release 2:00 p.m. on March 27) Natural gas spot prices declined at nearly all trading locations for a third consecutive week (March 12-19) as temperatures became more spring-like and space-heating demand slackened. For the week (Wednesday-Wednesday), prices at the Henry Hub decreased $0.58 per MMBtu, or 10 percent, to $5.20. The price of the NYMEX futures contract for April delivery at the Henry Hub fell to its lowest point since becoming the near-month contract, decreasing for the week about $0.59 per MMBtu to settle yesterday (Wednesday, March 19) at $5.278. Natural gas in storage decreased to a record low of 636 Bcf as of Friday, March 14, which is more than 50 percent below the 5-year average. The spot price for West Texas Intermediate (WTI) crude oil decreased $7.86 per barrel or about 21 percent since last Wednesday to trade yesterday at $30.01 per barrel or $5.17 per MMBtu.

189

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

14, 2007 (next release 2:00 p.m. on June 21, 2007) 14, 2007 (next release 2:00 p.m. on June 21, 2007) Natural gas spot and futures prices decreased this week (Wednesday-Wednesday, June 6-13) as weather-related demand was limited amid close-to-normal temperatures for this time of year. Easing prices also likely resulted in part from reduced supply uncertainty in response to the amount of natural gas in underground storage (mostly for use during the winter heating season but also available for periods of hot weather in the summer). Supplies from international sources have grown considerably this spring, as imports of liquefied natural gas (LNG) have increased markedly even as natural gas supplies from Canada (transported by pipeline) likely have decreased. On the week, the Henry Hub spot price decreased 23 cents per MMBtu, or 2.9 percent, to $7.60. At the New York Mercantile Exchange (NYMEX), the contract for July delivery decreased 47.2 cents per MMBtu on the week to a daily settlement of $7.608 yesterday (June 13). EIA's Weekly Natural Gas Storage Report today reported natural gas storage supplies of 2,255 Bcf as of Friday, June 8, reflecting an implied net injection of 92 Bcf. This level of working gas in underground storage is 19.3 percent above the 5-year average inventory for this time of year. The spot price for West Texas Intermediate (WTI) crude oil increased $0.20 per barrel on the week to $66.17 per barrel, or $11.41 per MMBtu.

190

Dynamic optimization of heated oil pipeline operation using PSODE algorithm  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Crude oil, with relatively high viscosity, freezing-point and content of wax, is usually transported by heated oil pipelines (HOP) containing many pumping and heating stations. There are many different selections of operation parameters or values of pumps and heating furnaces, but all these different selections can satisfy output task and safety requirements. The power and fuel cost of pumping and heating account for 13% of the total energy consumption. For the energy saving purpose, it is necessary to optimize the HOP operations. In this paper a dynamic model of HOP was proposed and used to calculate the soil temperature field outside HOP, and then both the spatial and temporal distributions of pressure and temperature of field inside HOP. Using this calculation method and its results, an optimization model is established aiming at minimizing energy cost of running HOP, with outlet temperatures of each heating station, onoff states of each pump, and their head matrix of delivery as the optimization variables. Then a mixed algorithm combining differential evolution algorithm with particle swarm optimization algorithm is used to solve this model. The optimization results are applied to RizhaoYizheng digital long distance HOP (375km). Research shows that: verified by real time data acquired by the SCADA, the relative error of the dynamic models result is 4.042%, much less than that of the steady-state models result (22.67%). The optimized operation scheme can save 17.59% of energy cost for oil transportation task of 2640m3/h. Energy saving effect is remarkable.

Ming Zhou; Yu Zhang; Shijiu Jin

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

191

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

17, 2003 (next release 2:00 p.m. on July 24) 17, 2003 (next release 2:00 p.m. on July 24) Spot and futures prices fell significantly during the week (Wednesday-Wednesday, July 9-16), as working gas inventories continued to grow strongly, intense summer heat was limited almost exclusively to the mountainous regions of the West, and Hurricane Claudette's immediate effect on prices was minimal. In trading at the Henry Hub, spot prices fell 56 cents from the previous Wednesday (July 9), to an even $5 per MMBtu. On the NYMEX, the settlement price of the futures contract for August delivery dipped below $5 per MMBtu, as it closed yesterday (July 16) at $4.934 per MMBtu-the first sub-$5 settlement for a near-month contract in nearly 4 months. EIA reported that working gas inventories were 1,866 Bcf as of Friday, July 11, which is 13.9 percent below the previous 5-year (1998-2002) average. The spot price for West Texas Intermediate (WTI) crude oil traded in a narrow range between $31.04 and $31.60 per barrel for the week. It ended trading yesterday with a decline of 40 cents per barrel to $31.20, or about $5.38 per MMBtu, as oil markets also reacted to Hurricane Claudette's limited impact on infrastructure and production. For the week, WTI showed a modest gain of $0.33 per barrel ($0.03 per MMBtu).

192

Weekly Petroleum Status Report  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

6 6 Appendix C Northeast Home Heating Oil Reserve Information on the Northeast Home Heating Oil Reserve is available from the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Petroleum Reserves web site at http://www.fossil.energy.gov/programs/reserves/heatingoil/. Northeast Home Heating Oil Reserve (NEHHOR) inventories now classified as ultra-low sulfur distillate (15 parts per million) are not considered to be in the commercial sector and therefore are excluded from distillate fuel oil supply and disposition statistics in Energy

193

This Week In Petroleum Printer-Friendly Version  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Petroleum Status Report. Residential Heating Fuel Prices: Heating Oil Decreases While Propane Rises Residential heating oil prices decreased for the period ending October 10,...

194

SOLAR HEATING OF TANK BOTTOMS Application of Solar Heating to Asphaltic and Parrafinic Oils Reducing Fuel Costs and Greenhouse Gases Due to Use of Natural Gas and Propane  

SciTech Connect

The sale of crude oil requires that the crude meet product specifications for BS&W, temperature, pour point and API gravity. The physical characteristics of the crude such as pour point and viscosity effect the efficient loading, transport, and unloading of the crude oil. In many cases, the crude oil has either a very high paraffin content or asphalt content which will require either hot oiling or the addition of diluents to the crude oil to reduce the viscosity and the pour point of the oil allowing the crude oil to be readily loaded on to the transport. Marginal wells are significantly impacted by the cost of preheating the oil to an appropriate temperature to allow for ease of transport. Highly paraffinic and asphaltic oils exist throughout the D-J basin and generally require pretreatment during cold months prior to sales. The current study addresses the use of solar energy to heat tank bottoms and improves the overall efficiency and operational reliability of stripper wells.

Eugene A. Fritzler

2005-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

195

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

9, 2002 9, 2002 Since Wednesday May 1, spot prices were down at most locations with some exceptions, despite large increases across the board on Wednesday, May 8, owing primarily to rising crude oil prices. For the week, prices at the Henry Hub declined a little over 1 percent, falling 5 cents to $3.74 per MMBtu. (See Temperature Map) (See Deviation Map)Temperatures helped to drive demand for natural gas as overnight lows in the 20's in some parts of the country contributed to heating demand, and mid-day highs in the 90's in other parts of the country increased cooling demand. Prices in Florida surged past $7, owing to a combination of high temperatures and gas transportation difficulties, which constrained supply. The spot price for West Texas Intermediate (WTI) crude oil climbed $1.18 per barrel or over 4 percent since last Wednesday, trading at $27.76 per barrel or $4.79 per MMBtu.

196

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

24 (next release 2:00 p.m. on March 31) 24 (next release 2:00 p.m. on March 31) Both spot and futures prices were relatively unchanged for the week (Wednesday to Wednesday, March 16-23). Colder-than-normal temperatures were offset by high volumes of working gas in storage remaining with only 8 days left in the traditional heating season. The Henry Hub spot price increased 3 cents per MMBtu since last Wednesday, trading yesterday (Wednesday, March 23) for $7.11. On the NYMEX, the settlement price for the futures contract for April delivery at the Henry Hub fell $0.054 per MMBtu from last Wednesday's level to $7.138 per MMBtu at yesterday's close of trading. Working gas in underground storage was 1,290 Bcf as of Friday, March 18, which is 21.9 percent above the previous 5-year (2000-2004) average. The spot price for West Texas Intermediate (WTI) crude oil decreased $7.07 per barrel, or about 12 percent, on the week to $49.43 per barrel or $8.52 per MMBtu.

197

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

2, 2004 (next release 2:00 p.m. on January 29) 2, 2004 (next release 2:00 p.m. on January 29) Natural gas spot prices increased 10 to 60 cents per MMBtu at nearly all major trading locations in the Lower 48 States as space-heating demand remained strong amid very cold temperatures in critical gas-consuming markets. However, elevated prices of $40 per MMBtu and more in the Northeast eased closer to historical norms over the course of the week following at least a temporary reprieve from the extreme cold in the region. For the week (Wednesday-Wednesday), prices at the Henry Hub increased $0.53 per MMBtu, or 9 percent, to $6.27. The price of the NYMEX futures contract for February delivery at the Henry Hub fell approximately 24 cents per MMBtu to settle yesterday (Wednesday, January 21) at $6.150. Natural gas in storage was 2,258 Bcf as of Friday, January 16, which is 9.3 percent above the 5-year average. The spot price for West Texas Intermediate (WTI) crude oil increased $0.91 per barrel or about 2.6 percent since last Wednesday to trade yesterday at $35.53 per barrel or $6.13 per MMBtu.

198

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

24, 2002 (next release 2:00 p.m. on October 31) 24, 2002 (next release 2:00 p.m. on October 31) A second early season cold front caused heating demand that increased prices at key market centers in the Northeast and West Coast up to 42 cents per MMBtu since October 16. The higher aggregate demand lifted natural gas spot prices 10 to 25 cents at most production-area trading locations. For the week (Wednesday-Wednesday), the average Henry Hub price climbed $0.14 per MMBtu to $4.24. At the NYMEX, the futures contract for November delivery at the Henry Hub increased a more moderate $0.033 per MMBtu to a $4.260 settlement yesterday (October 23). Natural gas in storage increased to 3,161 Bcf for the week ending October 18, which exceeds the 5-year average by 7.4 percent. The spot price for West Texas Intermediate (WTI) crude oil dropped $1.09 per barrel to $28.19, or $4.86 per MMBtu.

199

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

16, 2003 (next release 2:00 p.m. on January 23) 16, 2003 (next release 2:00 p.m. on January 23) Natural gas spot prices have climbed 10 to 30 cents per MMBtu at most trading locations since Wednesday, January 8. Strong space-heating demand in Northeast and Midwest population centers boosted prices throughout much of the country, but particularly where several interstate pipelines notified shippers of restrictions on their systems. On the week (Wednesday-Wednesday), the Henry Hub spot price climbed 15 cents to an average of $5.22 per MMBtu, while the New York citygate price registered a much steeper increase of $1.20 to an average of $7.46. The NYMEX futures contract for February delivery gained just under 27 cents per MMBtu to a close of $5.43 on Wednesday, January 15. Natural gas in storage as of Friday, January 10, decreased to 2,195 Bcf, which is 0.8 percent below the 5-year (1998-2002) average. The spot price for West Texas Intermediate (WTI) crude oil traded near two-year highs, rising $2.57 per barrel on the week to yesterday's closing price of $33.23 per barrel, or $5.29 per MMBtu.

200

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

1, 2002 (next release 2:00 p.m. on August 8) 1, 2002 (next release 2:00 p.m. on August 8) Since Wednesday, July 24, natural gas spot prices have registered gains between 5 and 20 cents at most trading locations in the Lower 48 States. A heat wave rolling through most of the East supported production area prices during the week and prompted a surge in Northeast prices to highs for the season. For the week (Wednesday-Wednesday), the Henry Hub spot price gained $0.13 per MMBtu to an average price of $3.04 yesterday (July 31). The price of the NYMEX futures contract for September delivery at the Henry Hub settled at $2.954 per MMBtu yesterday, 8.6 cents less than last Wednesday's price. Natural gas in storage increased to 2,546 Bcf as of July 26, which exceeds the 5-year average by 16.9 percent. The spot price for West Texas Intermediate (WTI) crude oil rose $0.24 cents per barrel since last Wednesday, trading at $27.02 per barrel or $4.66 per MMBtu.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "weekly heating oil" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

7 (next release 2:00 p.m. on November 3) 7 (next release 2:00 p.m. on November 3) Natural gas spot prices increased sharply this week (Wednesday-Wednesday, October 19-26), as a large volume of production continued to be shut in from the recent major hurricanes and cool temperatures added space-heating demand in many regions of the country. For the week, the price at the Henry Hub increased $1.15 per MMBtu, or about 8.5 percent, to $14.67. At the New York Mercantile Exchange (NYMEX), the price of the futures contract for November delivery at the Henry Hub moved about 49 cents per MMBtu higher to settle yesterday (Wednesday, October 26) at $14.04. A steady pace of injections into underground storage has continued despite offshore production shut-ins of almost 5.6 billion cubic feet (Bcf) a day, indicating substantial demand loss in the wake of the hurricanes and amid the high-price environment. The volume of natural gas in storage was 3,139 Bcf as of Friday, October 21, which is 2.8 percent higher than the 5-year average. The spot price for West Texas Intermediate (WTI) crude oil decreased $1.26 per barrel or about 2 percent since last Wednesday to trade yesterday at $60.85, or $10.49 per MMBtu.

202

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

31, 2002 (next release 2:00 p.m. on November 7) 31, 2002 (next release 2:00 p.m. on November 7) Spot and futures prices fluctuated over the past week (Wednesday, October 23 to Wednesday, October 30), with cash prices moving up from 6 to 35 cents per MMBtu at most market locations in response to rising demand from colder-than-normal temperatures, while futures prices for contracts for delivery through the impending heating season drifted lower. At the Henry Hub, the average spot price rose 9 cents from the previous Wednesday (October 23) to $4.33 per MMBtu in yesterday's (October 30) trading. The expired near-month contract for November delivery ended trading on Tuesday, October 29 at $4.126 per MMBtu, recording a net gain of $0.085 since beginning as the prompt month contract on September 27. The new near-month contract, for December delivery, began with a gain of just under 13 cents, to settle at $4.389 per MMBtu. Natural gas in storage as of Friday, October 25 increased to 3,172 Bcf, which exceeds the 5-year average by 6.3 percent. In contrast to natural gas spot prices, crude oil prices continued to soften. After dropping over $1 per barrel the previous week, the average spot price for West Texas Intermediate (WTI) crude oil fell another $1.36 per barrel to end trading on Wednesday, October 30 at $26.85, or $4.63 per MMBtu.

203

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

What Consumers Should Know What Consumers Should Know An Assessment of Prices of Natural Gas Futures Contracts As A Predictor of Realized Spot Prices at the Henry Hub Overview of U.S. Legislation and Regulations Affecting Offshore Natural Gas and Oil Activity Changes in U.S. Natural Gas Transportation Infrastructure in 2004 Major Legislative and Regulatory Actions (1935 - 2004) U.S. Natural Gas Imports and Exports: Issues and Trends 2003 U.S. LNG Markets and Uses: June 2004 Natural Gas Restructuring Previous Issues of Natural Gas Weekly Update Natural Gas Homepage EIA's Natural Gas Division Survey Form Comments Overview: Thursday, December 1, 2005 (next release 2:00 p.m. on December 8) Colder-than-normal temperatures contributed to widespread price increases in natural gas spot markets since Wednesday, November 23 as heating demand increased. For the week (Wednesday to Wednesday), the spot price at the Henry Hub gained 59 cents per MMBtu, or about 5 percent, to trade at $11.73 per MMBtu yesterday (November 30). Similarly, at the NYMEX, the price for the futures contract for January delivery at the Henry Hub gained 54 cents since last Wednesday to close yesterday at $12.587 per MMBtu. Natural gas in storage as of Friday, November 25, decreased to 3,225 Bcf, which is 6.3 percent above the 5 year average. The spot price for West Texas Intermediate (WTI) crude oil dropped $1.02 per barrel, or about 2 percent, since last Wednesday to trade yesterday at $57.33 per barrel or $9.88 per MMBtu.

204

Causality and volatility spillovers among petroleum prices of WTI, gasoline and heating oil in different locations  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This paper examines the time series properties of daily spot and futures prices for three petroleum types traded at five commodity centers within and outside the United States. Examining five combinations of the spot and futures prices by petroleum type and trading center, the cointegration tests of each of these five groups suggest that spot and futures contracts offer little room for long-run commodity portfolio diversification. In the West Texas Intermediate (WTI) crude-oil group, the VEC model indicates that the New York Mercantile Exchange (NYMEX) 1-month futures price has the upper hand in terms of directional causality and volatility spillovers. In the NYMEX gasoline system, there are bi-directional causality relationships among all the gasoline spot and futures prices, but the spot price produces the greatest spillover. In the NYMEX heating oil system, information transmission and predictability among the spot, 1- and 3-month futures are found to be particularly strong and significant. In the international gasoline spot market, contrary to the world crude-oil market, there is no apparent world gasoline spot leader for the gasoline spot prices.

Shawkat Hammoudeh; Huimin Li; Bang Jeon

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

205

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

2, 2003 (next release 2:00 p.m. on June 19) 2, 2003 (next release 2:00 p.m. on June 19) Moderate temperatures across the country except in the Southwest contributed to natural gas spot prices easing 25 to 50 cents per MMBtu since Wednesday, June 4. On the week (Wednesday, June 4-Wednesday, June 11), the Henry Hub spot price dropped 35 cents per MMBtu to $6.06. The NYMEX futures contract for July delivery at the Henry Hub fell about 16 cents per MMBtu to $6.213. Natural gas in storage as of Friday, June 6, increased to 1,324 Bcf, which is 25.2 percent below the 5-year average. The spot price for West Texas Intermediate (WTI) crude oil rose $2.36 per barrel on the week to yesterday's (June 11) closing price of $32.17 per barrel, or $5.55 per MMBtu. Prices: Natural gas spot prices at many market locations in the Lower 48 States have declined for three consecutive trading days from Friday peaks as key market areas in the Midwest and the Eastern seaboard have experienced unseasonably cool weather. Although prices remain elevated, the slackened demand for natural gas for electric generation has contributed to prices generally softening across the board. For the week, the spot price at the Henry Hub dropped about 6 percent to $6.06 per MMBtu, while other pricing points on the Gulf Coast showed slightly greater declines and fell below the $6-mark. The overall easing of prices may reflect also the slightly improving storage picture as injections in 7 of the past 8 weeks have exceeded the 5-year average with a record net addition reported last Thursday. Although the storage refill season started slowly, injections have increased considerably, with at least one major interstate pipeline serving the Northeast, Tennessee Gas Pipeline, announcing restrictions to shippers due to injection nominations exceeding capacity. The spot price at Tennessee Gas Pipeline's Zone 6, which serves major citygates in New York and other Northeastern states, this week fell 47 cents per MMBtu to $6.30. In contrast to the East, prices in the West moved higher early in the week, as maintenance on El Paso Natural Gas in the San Juan Basin restricted deliveries from the region and a heat wave sparked buying at pricing locations in California and New Mexico. The spot price at the Southern California border surged 61 cents per MMBtu on Monday to $5.78, but has since dropped to $5.51, which is a net decline of 51 cents since Wednesday, June 4.

206

Analysis of transient temperature distribution in oil shale due to heat source propagating in retort  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The initial?boundary?value problem for the transient temperature fields in oil shale which is heated by a propagating combustionflame in an i n s i t u retort chimney is formulated and solved analytically. The heat source of the flame is represented by a Gaussian distribution which models the average statistical variations in radial and axial flame extensions and is assumed to build up to maximum strength in accordance with a temporal relaxation process. The transient temperature fields in the oil shale surrounding the retort are calculated and discussed with respect to their spatial variations and dependence on the flamerelaxation time. The theoretical temperature distributions are shown to be consistent with those observed experimentally. The high?temperature core extends less than a retort radius into the surrounding shale bed. This result has implications for (i) the i n s i t u retort design and (ii) the environmental impact of i n s i t u retorts. It appears that the spacing between neighboring retorts can be reduced and that the thermal effects of retorts on the environment are less severe than previously anticipated.

H. E. Wilhelm; J. B. DuBow; S. H. Hong

1978-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

207

High Fuel Costs Spark Increased Use of Wood for Home Heating by Brian Handwerk for National Geographic News  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

families reducing their costly household oil or gas dependence by turning to a traditional fuel is typically delivered to homes in tanks, and is almost as expensive as heating oil. Berry manages the EIA Hampshire. Just last week, Erik said, he had a discussion with his fuel-oil supplier about how little oil

South Bohemia, University of

208

Evaluation of Gas, Oil and Wood Pellet Fueled Residential Heating System Emissions Characteristics  

SciTech Connect

This study has measured the emissions from a wide range of heating equipment burning different fuels including several liquid fuel options, utility supplied natural gas and wood pellet resources. The major effort was placed on generating a database for the mass emission rate of fine particulates (PM 2.5) for the various fuel types studied. The fine particulates or PM 2.5 (less than 2.5 microns in size) were measured using a dilution tunnel technique following the method described in US EPA CTM-039. The PM 2.5 emission results are expressed in several units for the benefit of scientists, engineers and administrators. The measurements of gaseous emissions of O{sub 2}, CO{sub 2}, CO, NO{sub x} and SO{sub 2} were made using a combustion analyzer based on electrochemical cells These measurements are presented for each of the residential heating systems tested. This analyzer also provides a steady state efficiency based on stack gas and temperature measurements and these values are included in the report. The gaseous results are within the ranges expected from prior emission studies with the enhancement of expanding these measurements to fuels not available to earlier researchers. Based on measured excess air levels and ultimate analysis of the fuel's chemical composition the gaseous emission results are as expected and fall within the range provided for emission factors contained in the US-EPA AP 42, Emission Factors Volume I, Fifth Edition. Since there were no unexpected findings in these gaseous measurements, the bulk of the report is centered on the emissions of fine particulates, or PM 2.5. The fine particulate (PM 2.5) results for the liquid fuel fired heating systems indicate a very strong linear relationship between the fine particulate emissions and the sulfur content of the liquid fuels being studied. This is illustrated by the plot contained in the first figure on the next page which clearly illustrates the linear relationship between the measured mass of fine particulate per unit of energy, expressed as milligrams per Mega-Joule (mg/MJ) versus the different sulfur contents of four different heating fuels. These were tested in a conventional cast iron boiler equipped with a flame retention head burner. The fuels included a typical ASTM No. 2 fuel oil with sulfur below 0.5 percent (1520 average ppm S), an ASTM No. 2 fuel oil with very high sulfur content (5780 ppm S), low sulfur heating oil (322 ppm S) and an ultra low sulfur diesel fuel (11 ppm S). Three additional oil-fired heating system types were also tested with normal heating fuel, low sulfur and ultralow sulfur fuel. They included an oil-fired warm air furnace of conventional design, a high efficiency condensing warm air furnace, a condensing hydronic boiler and the conventional hydronic boiler as discussed above. The linearity in the results was observed with all of the different oil-fired equipment types (as shown in the second figure on the next page). A linear regression of the data resulted in an Rsquared value of 0.99 indicating that a very good linear relationship exits. This means that as sulfur decreases the PM 2.5 emissions are reduced in a linear manner within the sulfur content range tested. At the ultra low sulfur level (15 ppm S) the amount of PM 2.5 had been reduced dramatically to an average of 0.043 mg/MJ. Three different gas-fired heating systems were tested. These included a conventional in-shot induced draft warm air furnace, an atmospheric fired hydronic boiler and a high efficiency hydronic boiler. The particulate (PM 2.5) measured ranged from 0.011 to 0.036 mg/MJ. depending on the raw material source used in their manufacture. All three stoves tested were fueled with premium (low ash) wood pellets obtained in a single batch to provide for uniformity in the test fuel. Unlike the oil and gas fired systems, the wood pellet stoves had measurable amounts of particulates sized above the 2.5-micron size that defines fine particulates (less than 2.5 microns). The fine particulate emissions rates ranged from 22 to 30 mg/ MJ with an average value

McDonald, R.

2009-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

209

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

6, 2011 at 2:00 P.M. 6, 2011 at 2:00 P.M. Next Release: Thursday, June 23, 2011 Overview Prices Storage Other Market Trends Natural Gas Transportation Update Overview (For the Week Ending Wednesday, June 15, 2011) The past week was characterized by passing of the earlier week’s heat wave. The Henry Hub price decreased 31 cents per million Btu (MMBtu) for the week (6.4 percent) to close at $4.52 per MMBtu on June 15. During the midst of the heat wave, working natural gas in storage last week rose to 2,256 billion cubic feet (Bcf) as of Friday, June 10, according to the U.S. Energy Information Administration’s (EIA) Weekly Natural Gas Storage Report (WNGSR). The implied increase for the week was 69 Bcf, leaving storage volumes positioned 275 Bcf below year-ago levels.

210

Winter fuels report: Week ending October 19, 1990  

SciTech Connect

The Winter Fuels Report is intended to provide concise, timely information to the industry, the press, policymakers, consumers, analysts, and state and local governments on the following topics: distillate fuel oil net production, imports and stocks for all PADD's and product supplied on the US level; propane net production, imports and stocks for Petroleum Administration for Defense Districts (PADD) I, II, and III; natural gas supply and disposition and underground storage for the United States and consumption for all PADD's; residential and wholesale pricing data for propane and heating oil for those states participating in the joint Energy Information Administration (EIA)/State Heating Oil and Propane Program; crude oil and petroleum price comparisons for the United States and selected cities; and US total heating degree-days by city. This report will be published weekly by the EIA starting the first week in October 1990 and will continue until the first week in April 1991. The data will also be available electronically after 5:00 pm on Thursday during the heating season through the EIA Electronic Publication System (EPUB).

Not Available

1990-10-25T23:59:59.000Z

211

This Week In Petroleum Summary Printer-Friendly Version  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

oil prices are a major determinant of heating oil prices, and demand relative to heating fuel supply impacts price levels over and above crude oil costs. This year, crude oil...

212

Combustion and performance of a diesel engine with preheated Jatropha curcas oil using waste heat from exhaust gas  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract The viscosity and density of CJO (crude Jatropha oil) were reduced by heating it using the heat from exhaust gas of a diesel engine with an appropriately designed helical coil heat exchanger. Experiments were conducted to evaluate the combustion characteristics of a DI (direct injection) diesel engine using PJO (preheated Jatropha oil). It exhibited a marginally higher cylinder gas pressure, rate of pressure rise and heat release rate as compared to HSD (high speed diesel) during the initial stages of combustion for all engine loadings. Ignition delay was shorter for PJO as compared to HSD. The results also indicated that BSFC (brake specific fuel consumption) and EGT (exhaust gas temperature) increased while BTE (brake thermal efficiency) decreased with PJO as compared to HSD for all engine loadings. The reductions in CO2 (carbon dioxide), HC (hydrocarbon) and \\{NOx\\} (nitrous oxide) emissions were observed for PJO along with increased CO (carbon monoxide) emission as compared to those of HSD.

Priyabrata Pradhan; Hifjur Raheman; Debasish Padhee

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

213

Weekly Petroleum Status Report  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

3 3 Appendix D Winter Fuels Explanatory Notes Prices The residential No. 2 heating oil and propane prices (excluding taxes) for a given State are based on the results of two independent telephone surveys of marketers and refiners, one for each of the two products. Data are collected by State Energy Offices under the Energy Information Administration (EIA) State Heating Oil and Propane Program (SHOPP). Sampling Methodology and Estimation

214

Retail Diesel Fuel Oil Prices  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Along with heating oil prices, the distillate supply squeeze has Along with heating oil prices, the distillate supply squeeze has severely impacted diesel fuel prices, especially in the Northeast. Retail diesel price data are available sooner than residential heating oil data. This graph shows that diesel prices turned the corner sometime after February 7 and are heading down. Retail diesel fuel prices nationally, along with those of most other petroleum prices, increased steadily through most of 1999. Prices jumped dramatically (by over 11 cents per gallon) in the third week of January, and rose 2 or more cents a week through February 7. The increases were much more rapid in the Northeast. From January 17 through February 7, diesel fuel prices in New England rose nearly 68 cents per gallon, or 47 percent. Prices in the Mid-Atlantic region rose about 58

215

Fluid Mechanics -1 An oil is used in a heat exchanger. The internal geometry consists of many small diameter tubes of fixed length  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Fluid Mechanics - 1 An oil is used in a heat exchanger. The internal geometry consists of many small diameter tubes of fixed length (mounted in a bundle as indicated in the sketch). The oil is pumped). Assume the steady flow of the oil through each small tube is in the laminar regime. It is proposed

Virginia Tech

216

Comparative cost evaluation of heating oil and small-scale wood chips produced from Euro-Mediterranean forests  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract This work performs a cost evaluation of small-scale produced wood chips from forests in the Euro-Mediterranean region to be used for heating purposes. The study is focused on forests located in the Argenola municipality (Catalonia, northeastern Spain). The use of such easy-to-produce biofuel is appealing since it may be used as a valid substitute of heating oil to produce thermal energy in the same area where it is produced, thus minimizing transportation requirements and reducing dependence on the rising prices of heating oil. Additionally, it allows facing environmental and social concerns related to the current lack of management in the forests under analysis, which has led to an important increase in the biomass stock and wildfires risk. As wildfires in the Euro-Mediterranean region generate important impacts, an average economic cost of wildfires has been evaluated in this paper. The economic assessment of small-scale production and consumption of wood chips as proposed in this study has shown interesting economic benefits when compared with current heating oil prices. Results indicate that it is a realistic option since production costs range from 12.2/GJ to 18.5/GJ depending on the applied forestry practices, whereas current cost of heating oil is about 23.9/GJ. A sensitivity analysis has also been conducted to assess the impact of the data with higher uncertainty on the final results. It has been shown that the key factors that determine the viability of the proposed model are heating oil price, biomass stock growth rate, transportation requirements and applied forest management practices. Results presented prove that wood chips cost is quite independent of fossil fuel prices, thus higher fossil fuel prices greatly favors the use of wood chips when produced and consumed in the same area, thus minimizing transportation requirements. In addition, higher biomass growth rates than those considered in this work may reduce the final cost of small-scale produced wood chips.

Bernat Esteban; Jordi-Roger Riba; Grau Baquero; Antoni Rius

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

217

Weekly Petroleum Status Report  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

8 8 Table D2. Wholesale Heating Oil Prices by Region and State (Dollars per Gallon, Excluding Taxes) Region/State 2013 - 2014 Heating Season Monthly October November December January February March Average 3.075 3.046 - - - - East Coast (PADD 1) 3.071 3.039 - - - - New England (PADD 1A) 3.105 3.077 - - - - Central Atlantic (PADD 1B) 3.054 3.024 - - - - Lower Atlantic (PADD 1C) 3.037 2.973 - - - - Midwest (PADD 2) 3.098 3.084 - - - - Region/State 2013 - 2014 Heating Season Weekly 9/30 10/7 10/14 10/21 10/28 11/4 11/11 11/18 11/25 12/2 12/9 12/16 Average - 3.073 3.106 3.106 3.016 3.003 2.990 3.042 3.150 3.152 3.137 3.074 East Coast (PADD 1) - 3.069 3.102 3.105 3.006 2.983 2.977 3.044 3.151 3.159 3.168 3.107 New England (PADD 1A) - 3.106 3.136 3.137 3.040 3.019 3.012 3.084 3.194 3.205 3.222 3.166 Connecticut - 3.084 3.116 3.111 3.021 2.996 3.001 3.074 3.187 3.198

218

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

for natural gas in the electric power sector soared during the week in order to meet heating needs from the current cold spell. The operator for the electric power grid in Texas...

219

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Tuesday, September 4, 2001 Tuesday, September 4, 2001 Prices in most major markets continued generally downward last week, spurred by relatively mild temperatures throughout much of the country and more than adequate supplies as indicated by reports of another strong storage refill rate for the prior week. (See Temperature Map) (See Deviation from Normal Temperatures Map) The spot market price at the Henry Hub in Louisiana ended the week down 62 cents at $2.15 per MMBtu. On the NYMEX futures market, the contract for September delivery at the Henry Hub expired on Wednesday at $2.295 per MMBtu, compared with almost $4.62 a year ago. The contract for delivery in October ended the week at $2.38. The spot price for West Texas Intermediate (WTI) crude oil ended the week down at $27.25 per barrel ($4.70 per MMBtu), a decline of $1.05 per barrel from the prior week.

220

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

1, 2009 1, 2009 Next Release: May 28, 2009 Overview Prices Storage Other Market Trends Natural Gas Transportation Update Overview (For the Week Ending Wednesday, May 20, 2009) Natural gas prices at most trading locations fell on the week because of mild weather as well as continued weakness in the economy. Declines ranged between 37 cents at the Dracut trading area in the Northeast to 90 cents at the El Paso non-Bondad area in the Rocky Mountains. The Henry Hub spot price fell by 67 cents during the week to $3.75 per million Btu (MMBtu). Moving in the opposite direction of natural gas prices, the price of the West Texas Intermediate (WTI) crude oil contract rose on the week to $61.45 per barrel, or $10.59 per MMBtu. Oil prices are now at their highest level since November 10, 2008, having more than doubled since falling to a

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "weekly heating oil" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Weekly Petroleum Status Report  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

5 5 Table 9. U.S. and PAD District Weekly Estimates (Thousand Barrels per Day Except Where Noted) Product/Region Current Week Last Week Year Ago 2 Years Ago Four-Week Averages 12/6/13 12/14/12 12/16/11 12/13/13 12/14/12 12/13/13 Crude Oil Production Domestic Production 1 ................................................................................ 8,058 8,075 6,863 5,862 8,041 6,838 Alaska ....................................................................................... 539 532 563 605 535 559 Lower 48 ................................................................................... 7,519 7,543 6,300 5,257 7,506 6,279 Refiner Inputs and Utilization Crude Oil Inputs .......................................................................................... 15,931 16,131 15,594 14,604

222

Spot Distillate & Crude Oil Prices  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

5 5 Notes: Retail distillate prices follow the spot distillate markets, and crude oil prices have been the main driver behind distillate spot price increases until recently. Crude oil rose about 36 cents per gallon from its low point in mid February 1999 to the middle of January 2000. Over this same time period, New York Harbor spot heating oil had risen about 42 cents per gallon, reflecting both the crude price rise and a return to a more usual seasonal spread over the price of crude oil. The week ending January 21, heating oil spot prices in the Northeast spiked dramatically to record levels, closing on Friday at $1.26 per gallon -- up 50 cents from the prior week. Gulf Coast prices were not spiking, but were probably pulled slightly higher as the New York Harbor market began to

223

This Week In Petroleum Printer-Friendly Version  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

any major unanticipated supply disruptions. Residential Heating Oil Prices Stable, Propane Prices Up as Winter Fuel Season Wanes Residential heating oil prices decreased almost...

224

This Week In Petroleum Printer-Friendly Version  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

after the final out in the 2006 World Series is recorded. Residential Heating Oil and Propane Prices Remain Relatively Unchanged Residential heating oil prices increased very...

225

This Week In Petroleum Printer-Friendly Version  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

of Electricity Delivery & Energy Reliability. Residential Heating Oil Price Dips While Propane Price Inches Up Residential heating oil prices decreased slightly for the period...

226

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

18, 2007 (next release 2:00 p.m. on January 25, 2007) 18, 2007 (next release 2:00 p.m. on January 25, 2007) Natural gas spot prices increased by $0.07 to $1.05 per MMBtu at nearly all trading locations in the Lower 48 States as space-heating demand remained strong amid very cold temperatures in critical gas-consuming markets. Prices at some market locations in the Northeast peaked at more than $10 per MMBtu on Tuesday and then declined significantly in Wednesday's (yesterday, January 17) trading. The average price in the Northeast remained among the highest of all regions during yesterday's trading. For the week (Wednesday-Wednesday), prices at the Henry Hub increased $0.16 per MMBtu, or 2.5 percent, to $6.57. The price of the NYMEX futures contract for February delivery at the Henry Hub fell approximately 52 cents per MMBtu to settle yesterday at $6.234. Natural gas in storage was 2,936 Bcf as of Friday, January 12, which is 20 percent above the 5-year average. The spot price for West Texas Intermediate (WTI) crude oil decreased $1.65 per barrel or about 3 percent since last Wednesday to trade yesterday at $52.30 per barrel or $9.02 per MMBtu. The price of crude oil as of yesterday was $14.06 per barrel lower than the year-ago level, and $24.75 less than the all-time high price of $77.05 per barrel reached in early August 2006.

227

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Thursday June 20, 2002 (next release 2:00 p.m. on June 27) Thursday June 20, 2002 (next release 2:00 p.m. on June 27) Natural gas spot prices registered gains of a dime or less at most major trading locations this week (Wednesday-Wednesday) as weather-driven demand combined with increasing oil prices to reverse a declining trend in prices. The upward price movement followed 6 weeks of declining prices until a low last Thursday, June 12, when prices at some trading locations along the Gulf Coast dipped just below $3.00 per MMBtu. Futures prices rose late last week after reaching similar lows. The NYMEX futures contract for July delivery settled Wednesday, June 19, at $3.314 per MMBtu, an increase of 26 cents for the week. EIA's estimate of total working gas inventories for the week ended June 14 was 2,096 Bcf with implied net injections of 81 Bcf. The spot price for West Texas Intermediate (WTI) crude oil recovered this week to trade at close to $26 per barrel on Monday, June 17. On Wednesday, the WTI crude oil price closed at $25.57 per barrel, or $4.41 per MMBtu.

228

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

December 30 (next release 2:00 p.m. on January 6) December 30 (next release 2:00 p.m. on January 6) Since Wednesday, December 22, natural gas spot prices have decreased sharply at virtually all market locations in the Lower 48 States. For the week (Wednesday-Wednesday), prices at the Henry Hub decreased 87 cents per MMBtu or about 12 percent to $6.18. Prices declined in each of the last three days of trading (December 27-29) as temperatures moderated following the coldest weather to date of the 2004-2005 heating season, which occurred during the holiday weekend. On Tuesday, December 28, the January futures contract at the New York Mercantile Exchange (NYMEX) ended its tenure as the near-month contract, settling at $6.213 per MMBtu. On its first day of trading as the near-month contract, the NYMEX futures contract for February delivery closed yesterday (Wednesday, December 29) at $6.402 per MMBtu, which was down roughly 45 cents or 6.5 percent lower than last Wednesday's price. Natural gas in storage decreased to 2,849 Bcf as of December 24, which is 14.4 percent above the 5-year average. The spot price for West Texas Intermediate (WTI) crude oil declined $0.55 per barrel or about 1.2 percent since last Wednesday, falling to $43.69 per barrel or $7.53 per MMBtu.

229

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

9, to Wednesday, April 16) 9, to Wednesday, April 16) Released: April 17, 2008 Next release: April 24, 2008 · Since Wednesday, April 9, natural gas spot prices increased at virtually all market locations in the Lower 48 States. Currently, spot prices exceed the average spot prices of the 2007-2008 heating season by about 25 percent. · At the New York Mercantile Exchange (NYMEX), the futures contract for May delivery at the Henry Hub settled yesterday (April 16) at $10.433 per million Btu (MMBtu), posting a 38-cent increase and reaching the highest price for a near-month contract since January 2006. · Natural gas in storage was 1,261 billion cubic feet (Bcf) as of April 11, which is 0.2 percent below the 5-year average (2003-2007). · The spot price for West Texas Intermediate (WTI) crude oil increased $3.91 per barrel on the week to $114.80 per barrel or $19.79 per MMBtu.

230

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

7 (next release 2:00 p.m. on April 14) 7 (next release 2:00 p.m. on April 14) Despite the close of the traditional heating season with relatively high volumes of natural gas remaining in storage and milder temperatures across much of the Lower 48 States, spot prices increased at most market locations. For the week, (Wednesday-Wednesday, March 30-April 6), the Henry Hub spot price increased by 29 cents per MMBtu, or 4 percent, to $7.46. Similarly, the NYMEX futures contract price for May delivery at the Henry Hub increased by nearly 10 cents from last Wednesday's level, settling yesterday (April 6) at $7.558 per MMBtu. As of Friday, April 1, natural gas in storage was 1,249 Bcf, or 22.2 percent higher than the 5-year average of 1,022 Bcf. The spot price for West Texas Intermediate (WTI) crude oil increased $1.92 per barrel or about 4 percent since last Wednesday, to $55.88 per barrel or $9.63 per MMBtu.

231

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Thursday, December 18 2003 (next release 2:00 p.m. on Monday, December 29) Thursday, December 18 2003 (next release 2:00 p.m. on Monday, December 29) Since Wednesday, December 10, natural gas spot prices have decreased at most market locations in the Lower 48 States. For the week (Wednesday-Wednesday), prices at the Henry Hub decreased 9 cents or about 1 percent to $6.56 per MMBtu. Prices declined in most areas as temperatures moderated following the first significant winter storms of the 2003-2004 heating season. Yesterday (Wednesday, December 17), the price of the NYMEX futures contract for January delivery at the Henry Hub settled at $6.993 per MMBtu, increasing roughly 28 cents or 4 percent since last Wednesday. Natural gas in storage decreased to 2,850 Bcf as of December 12, which is 1.4 percent above the 5-year average. The spot price for West Texas Intermediate (WTI) crude oil gained $1.44 per barrel or about 5 percent since last Wednesday, climbing to $33.36 per barrel or $6.993 per MMBtu.

232

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

15 (next release 2:00 p.m. on June 22, 2006) 15 (next release 2:00 p.m. on June 22, 2006) Natural gas spot prices increased at almost all locations this week (Wednesday - Wednesday, June 7-14) as wide ranging temperatures across the country affected some regional demand for both heating and air conditioning needs. The Henry Hub spot price rose 27 cents, or about 5 percent, to $6.09 per MMBtu. At the New York Mercantile Exchange (NYMEX), prices also increased for almost all the futures contracts listed. The NYMEX contract for July delivery rose about 62 cents, or about 10 percent, since last Wednesday to settle at $6.590 per MMBtu yesterday (June 14). Natural gas in storage as of Friday, June 9 was 2,397 Bcf, which is 37.9 percent above the 5-year average. The spot price for West Texas Intermediate (WTI) crude oil declined $1.78 per barrel, or about 3 percent, since last Wednesday, trading yesterday at $69.12 per barrel or $11.92 per MMBtu.

233

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

20, 2008 20, 2008 Next Release: December 4, 2008 Overview Prices Storage Other Market Trends Natural Gas Transportation Update Overview (For the week ending Wednesday, November 19, 2008) Wintry weather moved into major population centers in the Lower 48 States this report week, boosting demand related to space heating from the Midcontinent to the eastern half of the country. Prices increased throughout the country, with the biggest increases in the Midcontinent. During the report week, the Henry Hub spot price increased $0.11 per million Btu (MMBtu) to $6.76. At the New York Mercantile Exchange (NYMEX), futures prices also increased for the report week as the second week of the heating season began. The futures contract for December delivery increased by 34 cents per

234

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

4, 2011 at 2:00 P.M. 4, 2011 at 2:00 P.M. Next Release: Thursday, July 21, 2011 Overview Prices Storage Other Market Trends Overview (For the Week Ending Wednesday, July 13, 2011) Nearly all pricing points were up somewhat for the week on a heat wave that affected nearly half the country’s population according to national news reports. Despite the record heat, the Henry Hub price increased a modest 9 cents per million Btu (MMBtu) over the week (2.0 percent) to close at $4.43 per MMBtu on July 13. At the New York Mercantile Exchange (NYMEX), the price response was more robust (up 4.4 percent) with the August 2011 natural gas contract price gaining ground over the week, closing at $4.403 per MMBtu on Wednesday. Working natural gas in storage rose last week to 2,611 billion cubic

235

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

2, 2011 at 2:00 P.M. 2, 2011 at 2:00 P.M. Next Release: Thursday, June 9, 2011 Overview Prices Storage Other Market Trends Natural Gas Transportation Update Overview (For the Week Ending Wednesday, June 1, 2011) The past week was marked by two distinct trading markets — “before” and “after” the Memorial Day holiday. Cash markets were listless going into the holiday weekend but escalated Tuesday following an early heat wave that drifted into the East. The Henry Hub price advanced 27 cents per million Btu (MMBtu) for the week (6.2 percent) to close at $4.63 per MMBtu on June 1. Just prior to the heat wave, working natural gas in storage last week rose to 2,107 billion cubic feet (Bcf) as of Friday, May 27, according to the U.S. Energy Information Administration’s (EIA) Weekly Natural Gas

236

Michigan residential No. 2 fuel oil and propane price survey for the 1990/91 heating season. Final report  

SciTech Connect

This report summarizes the results of a survey of home heating oil and propane prices over the 1990/1991 heating season in Michigan. The survey was conducted under a cooperative agreement between the State of Michigan, Michigan Public Service Commission and the US Department of Energy (DOE), Energy Information Administration (EIA), and was funded by a grant from EIA. From October 1990 through May 1991, participating dealers/distributions were called and asked for their current residential retail prices of No. 2 home heating oil and propane. This information was then transmitted to the EIA, bi-monthly using an electronic reporting system called Petroleum Data Reporting Option (PEDRO). The survey was conducted using a sample provided by EIA of home heating oil and propane retailers which supply Michigan households. These retailers were contacted the first and third Mondays of each month. The sample was designed to account for distributors with different sales volumes, geographic distributions and sources of primary supply. It should be noted that this simple is different from the sample used in prior year surveys.

Not Available

1991-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

237

Michigan residential No. 2 fuel oil and propane price survey for the 1990/91 heating season  

SciTech Connect

This report summarizes the results of a survey of home heating oil and propane prices over the 1990/1991 heating season in Michigan. The survey was conducted under a cooperative agreement between the State of Michigan, Michigan Public Service Commission and the US Department of Energy (DOE), Energy Information Administration (EIA), and was funded by a grant from EIA. From October 1990 through May 1991, participating dealers/distributions were called and asked for their current residential retail prices of No. 2 home heating oil and propane. This information was then transmitted to the EIA, bi-monthly using an electronic reporting system called Petroleum Data Reporting Option (PEDRO). The survey was conducted using a sample provided by EIA of home heating oil and propane retailers which supply Michigan households. These retailers were contacted the first and third Mondays of each month. The sample was designed to account for distributors with different sales volumes, geographic distributions and sources of primary supply. It should be noted that this simple is different from the sample used in prior year surveys.

Not Available

1991-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

238

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

1 (next release 2:00 p.m. on May 18, 2006) 1 (next release 2:00 p.m. on May 18, 2006) Springtime temperatures in most regions of the country this week and slightly lower prices for crude oil led to an easing of natural gas spot prices in the Lower 48 States since Wednesday, May 3. On the week (Wednesday-Wednesday, May 3-10), the Henry Hub spot price dropped 6 cents per MMBtu, or less than 1.0 percent, to $6.50. In contrast to spot market activity, trading of futures contracts at the New York Mercantile Exchange (NYMEX) this week resulted in gains. The NYMEX contract for June delivery increased 29.4 cents per MMBtu on the week to a daily settlement of $6.900 yesterday (May 10). Net injections reported in today's release of EIA's Weekly Natural Gas Storage Report brought natural gas storage supplies to 1,989 Bcf as of Friday, May 5, which is 56.0 percent above the 5-year average inventory for the report week. The spot price for West Texas Intermediate (WTI) crude oil decreased $0.11 per barrel on the week to $72.15 per barrel, or $12.44 per MMBtu.

239

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

9 (next release 2:00 p.m. on August 5) 9 (next release 2:00 p.m. on August 5) Moderate temperatures across the country except in the Southwest and Gulf Coast contributed to natural gas spot prices easing 9 to 35 cents per MMBtu since Wednesday, July 21. On the week (Wednesday-Wednesday, July 21-28), the Henry Hub spot price dropped 14 cents per MMBtu to $5.77. In contrast to the decrease in spot prices, natural gas futures prices increased this week owing at least in part to higher crude oil and petroleum product prices. The NYMEX futures contract for August delivery at the Henry Hub expired at $6.048 per MMBtu on Wednesday, July 28, after increasing 11.7 cents in its last week of trading. The September contract takes over as the near-month contract at nearly a dime premium to the August contract, closing yesterday (July 28) at $6.142 per MMBtu. Natural gas in storage as of Friday, July 23, increased to 2,297 Bcf, which is 3.1 percent above the 5-year average. Crude oil prices rose this week to recent historical highs, in part owing to concerns over supply from Russia. The spot price for West Texas Intermediate (WTI) crude oil rose $2.18 per barrel on the week to yesterday's closing price of $42.81 per barrel, or $7.38 per MMBtu.

240

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

2, 2009 2, 2009 Next Release: February 19, 2009 Overview Prices Storage Other Market Trends Natural Gas Transportation Update Overview (For the Week Ending Wednesday, February 11, 2009) Natural gas prices decreased this week as space-heating demand slackened with a break from the bitter cold of prior weeks. During the report week, the Henry Hub spot price decreased by $0.33 per million Btu (MMBtu) to $4.68. At the New York Mercantile Exchange (NYMEX), futures prices decreased for the report week as the economic downturn is expected to be accompanied with a large-scale reduction in demand for all energy products, thus affecting prices for energy in forward markets. The futures contract for February 2009 delivery decreased by 6.5 cents per MMBtu on the week to

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "weekly heating oil" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Identification of R&D Needs Relating to the Mitigation of Fouling in Crude Oil Pre-Heat Trains  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Identification of R&D needs relating to tbe mitigation of fouling in crude oil pre-heat trains G.T.Polley ESDU International pic Worrell & Price [1] (at a paper presented at the Industrial Energy Technology Conference organised by Texas A... - but not always flows through the tubes). The threshold occurs because of the existence of two competing processes: one promoting fouling, the other mitigating against it. Models for the prediction of this threshold have been derived from measurements...

Polley, G. T.; Pugh, S. J.

242

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

1, 2004 (next release 2:00 p.m. on March 18) 1, 2004 (next release 2:00 p.m. on March 18) Spot price changes were mixed while futures prices edged up by a penny or two over the past week (Wednesday to Wednesday, March 3-10). Warmer-than-normal temperatures over nearly the entire nation early in the week gave way to considerably cooler temperatures in parts of the South and to colder-than-normal temperatures in the Midwest, the Middle Atlantic, and New England beginning over the weekend. At the Henry Hub, the spot price declined a penny on the week, ending trading yesterday (Wednesday, March 10) at $5.33 per MMBtu. On the NYMEX, the futures contract for April delivery settled yesterday at $5.397 per MMBtu, just 2.2 cents higher than its settlement price one week ago. EIA reported that inventories were 1,143 Bcf as of Friday, March 5, which is 8.3 percent below the 5-year average. Crude oil prices have generally been rising over the past 3 to 4 weeks as uncertainty over OPEC's production levels and continuing civil unrest in Venezuela apply upward pressure on oil prices and, to some extent, on gas prices. Nonetheless, the WTI price declined over the past 3 days, and ended the week with a net gain of 41 cents per barrel (7 cents per MMBtu), at $36.21, or $6.24 per MMBtu.

243

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

11, 2003 (next release 2:00 p.m. on September 18) 11, 2003 (next release 2:00 p.m. on September 18) Spot natural gas prices increased 5 to 15 cents in most regional markets for the week (Wednesday to Wednesday, September 3-10). The Henry Hub spot price gained 10 cents on the week, ending trading yesterday (Wednesday, September 10) at $4.78 per MMBtu. Futures prices were up as well, with the gains owing almost entirely to yesterday's large price increases. The NYMEX futures contract for October delivery moved up nearly 24 cents in yesterday's trading, and for the week gained $0.278 per MMBtu with its settlement yesterday at $4.968. The Energy Information Administration (EIA) reported that inventories were 2,486 Bcf as of Friday, September 5, which is 5.5 percent less than the 5-year (1998-2002) average. The spot price for West Texas Intermediate (WTI) crude oil fell below $29 per barrel for the first time since late June, lingering in the high-$28s for the first 3 days of the week before regaining nearly all of its decreases on Tuesday and Wednesday. WTI crude oil ended the week at $29.41 per barrel ($5.07 per MMBtu), just 2 cents per barrel below the week-ago price.

244

This Week In Petroleum Printer-Friendly Version  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Not Living Up to Expectations? Last week, after EIA released the latest weekly petroleum inventory data, crude oil and product prices fell on the NYMEX futures exchange. This...

245

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

November 18 (No issue Thanksgiving week; next release 2:00 p.m. on December 2) November 18 (No issue Thanksgiving week; next release 2:00 p.m. on December 2) Natural gas spot and futures prices fell for a third consecutive week (Wednesday to Wednesday, November 10-17), as temperatures for most of the nation continued to be moderate to seasonal. At the Henry Hub, the spot price declined 6 cents on the week, for the smallest week-on-week decrease in the nation. Spot gas traded there yesterday (Wednesday, November 17) at $6.06 per MMBtu. Price declines at the majority of market locations ranged from around a dime to nearly 60 cents per MMBtu. On the NYMEX, the price for the near-month natural gas futures contract (for December delivery) fell by almost 40 cents on the week, settling yesterday at $7.283 per MMBtu. EIA reported that working gas inventories in underground storage were 3,321 Bcf as of Friday, November 12, which is 9 percent greater than the previous 5-year average. The spot price for West Texas Intermediate (WTI) crude oil declined for a fourth consecutive week, dropping $1.85 per barrel ($0.32 per MMBtu), or nearly 4 percent, from last Wednesday's level, to trade yesterday at $46.85 per barrel ($8.08 per MMBtu).

246

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

1, 2002 1, 2002 Lingering low temperatures last week prompted spot prices at the Henry Hub to start the week up sharply gaining 19 cents to trade on Monday at $2.68 per MMBtu. Prices then declined sharply before rebounding on Thursday and Friday to end the week at $2.81 per MMBtu-32 cents higher than the previous Friday. Prices on the NYMEX futures market moved up most days to end the week up almost $0.45 per MMBtu at $2.800. Temperatures moderated in many parts of the country last week and rose to the 60s and 70s on Friday and Saturday in much of the Northeast. The latest National Weather Service (NWS) 6- to 10-day forecast calls for cool temperatures in the Midwest but for above normal temperatures to return to the Northeast. (See Temperature Map) (See Deviation Map) Net withdrawals from stocks increased to132 Bcf during the last week of February, which is more than double the level of a week earlier. Even though natural gas stocks continue to be 45 percent, or 577 Bcf, above the previous 5-year average, reports of the increase in storage withdrawals may have contributed to last week's spot and futures contract price rise. The price for West Texas Intermediate (WTI) crude oil rose above $23 per barrel on Tuesday and ended trading on Friday at its highest level since September 21, 2001--$23.87 per barrel, or $4.15 per MMBtu.

247

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Due to the observance of Veterans Day on Monday, November 12, the next Natural Gas Weekly Update, will be published on Tuesday, November 13, 2001. Due to the observance of Veterans Day on Monday, November 12, the next Natural Gas Weekly Update, will be published on Tuesday, November 13, 2001. Overview: Monday, November 5, 2001 Spot prices at the Henry Hub began the week up then trended down to end the week 10 cents below the previous Friday at $2.96 per MMBtu. This represents a reversal from the pattern of a week earlier when the Henry Hub price gained more than $0.70 per MMBtu on a Friday-to-Friday basis. Warmer-than-normal temperatures in most parts of the country last week along with forecasts calling for the moderate weather to continue into the weekend contributed to the decline in prices. .(See Temperature Map) (See Deviation Map) Estimates of weekly net additions to storage again were below normal levels for this time of year but the total working gas in storage remained above average and well above volumes at this time last year. The price of West Texas Intermediate (WTI) crude oil moved down $1.95 per barrel for the week to end trading on Friday at $20.20 or $3.48 per MMBtu.

248

Models for the Prediction of Fouling in Crude Oil Pre-Heat Trains  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Fouling has two significant effects upon pre-heat train performance. Firstly, any of layer of foulant on the heat transfer surface presents a resistance to heat transfer. This thermal resistance increases as the layer builds up, so fouling reduces...

Yeap, B. L.; Wilson, D. I.; Polley, G. T.

249

This Week In Petroleum Printer-Friendly Version  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

the price of the fuel. If heating oil markets are tight, cold weather can drive up wholesale and retail heating oil prices. Even crude oil prices could be pushed up globally if...

250

This Week In Petroleum Printer-Friendly Version  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

just days away, oil markets have shifted their focus away from gasoline and towards heating oil. The question many people want an answer to is: How high will heating oil prices...

251

This Week In Petroleum Printer-Friendly Version  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

of U.S. oil markets can be gained. Residential Heating Oil Prices Drop Further, Yet Propane Prices Inch Upward Residential heating oil prices decreased once more during the...

252

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

10, 2001 10, 2001 Price surges on Monday and Friday of last week overshadowed 3 straight days of decreases midweek, as nearly every major market location showed Friday-to-Friday gains. At the Henry Hub, the spot price gained 36 cents from the previous Friday to end the week at $2.11 per million Btu (MMBtu). On the futures market, in its first full week of trading as the near-month contract, the price of the NYMEX contract for January delivery at the Henry Hub declined $0.133 per MMBtu to settle on Friday at $2.568. The unseasonably warm temperatures that have blanketed nearly the entire country east of the Rocky Mountains continued, with specific-day high-temperature records being set at numerous locations in the Northeast, Midwest, and Midcontinent (Temperature Map)(Temperature Deviation Map). On Thursday, the spot price of West Texas Intermediate (WTI) crude oil fell nearly $1.00 per barrel, as the Organization of Petroleum Exporting Countries (OPEC) announced that it would delay an expected oil-production cut that it hopes will shore up sagging world crude oil prices. For the week (Friday-to-Friday), the WTI spot price fell $0.43 per barrel to $19.08, or $3.29 per MMBtu.

253

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

August 7, 2003 (next release 2:00 p.m. on August 14) August 7, 2003 (next release 2:00 p.m. on August 14) With little in the way of fundamental changes, spot and futures prices showed modest gains for the week (Wednesday to Wednesday, July 30-August 6). The Henry Hub spot price gained a nickel on the week, ending trading yesterday (Wednesday, August 6) at $4.71 per MMBtu. On the NYMEX, the near-month futures contract (for September delivery) settlement price increased by $0.077 to $4.745 per MMBtu. The Energy Information Administration (EIA) reported that working gas inventories were 2,106 Bcf as of Friday, August 1, which is 10 percent below the 5-year (1998-2002) average for the week. Crude oil prices showed more upward movement, as a terrorist bombing in Indonesia and continuing unsettled conditions in Iraq contributed to concerns about oil supply as the market looks toward the upcoming winter. The spot price for West Texas Intermediate (WTI) crude oil gained $1.08 per barrel, or 21 cents per MMBtu, on the week to $31.77 per barrel ($5.48 per MMBtu) in yesterday's trading.

254

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

16, to Wednesday, April 23) 16, to Wednesday, April 23) Released: April 24, 2008 Next release: May 1, 2008 · Spot prices at all market locations (outside the Rocky Mountain Region) are trading above $9 per million Btu (MMBtu), with a majority of the points registering prices in excess of $10 per MMBtu. · At the New York Mercantile Exchange (NYMEX), the futures contract for May delivery at the Henry Hub settled yesterday (April 24) at $10.781 MMBtu, continuing the trend of week-over-week increases for the fifth consecutive week. · Natural gas in storage was 1,285 billion cubic feet (Bcf) as of April 18, which is 1.9 percent below the 5-year average (2003-2007). · The spot price for West Texas Intermediate (WTI) crude oil increased $4.48 per barrel on the week to $119.28 per barrel or $20.57 per MMBtu.

255

This Week In Petroleum Printer-Friendly Version  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

1, 2010 (Next Release on July 28, 2010) Weekly Preliminary Crude Oil Imports Now Available EIA is now publishing preliminary weekly estimate of U.S. crude oil imports by country of...

256

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

May 6 (next release 2:00 p.m. on May 13) May 6 (next release 2:00 p.m. on May 13) Upward pressure on spot and futures natural gas prices continued for a second consecutive week (Wednesday-Wednesday, April 28-May 5), owing to continuing concerns over gas supplies and higher crude oil prices. A 42-cent per MMBtu price increase at the Henry Hub on Tuesday (May 4) appeared to be related to the increase in futures prices the previous day, when the near-month contract moved past the $6-mark to a close of $6.231. The Henry Hub spot price increase on Tuesday and a 2-cent increase last Friday (April 30) were more than enough to offset declines in the other three trading sessions this week, resulting in a net gain on the week of 30 cents per MMBtu. The NYMEX futures contract for June delivery at the Henry Hub was higher on the week by about 34 cents per MMBtu, closing yesterday (May 5) at $6.31. Natural gas in storage as of Friday, April 30, increased to 1,227 Bcf, which is 2.2 percent below the 5-year average. Owing to geopolitical concerns and perceived low gasoline supplies heading into the summer driving season, crude oil prices rose to almost $40 per barrel this week. The spot price for West Texas Intermediate (WTI) crude oil increased $2.46 per barrel on the week to yesterday's closing price of $39.69 per barrel, or $6.84 per MMBtu.

257

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

9, 2009 9, 2009 Next Release: March 26, 2009 Overview Prices Storage Other Market Trends Natural Gas Transportation Update Overview (For the Week Ending Wednesday, March 18, 2009) Warmer temperatures moved into major population centers this report week, signaling the imminent end of winter and the corresponding reduction in demand related to space heating. Spot prices continued to decline, with the biggest decreases west of the Mississippi River. During the report week, the Henry Hub spot price decreased $0.17 per million Btu (MMBtu) to $3.75. At the New York Mercantile Exchange (NYMEX), futures prices also decreased as temperatures climbed higher this week. The futures contract for April delivery decreased by 11 cents per MMBtu on the week to $3.68, the lowest close for a near-month contract in about 6½ years.

258

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

23, 2007 to Thursday, January 30, 2008) 23, 2007 to Thursday, January 30, 2008) Released: January 31, 2008 Next release: February 7, 2008 · Natural gas spot and futures prices increased this report week (Wednesday to Wednesday, January 23-30), as frigid temperatures in much of the country increased demand for space heating. During the report week, the Henry Hub spot price increased $0.33 per million Btu (MMBtu) to $8.17. · At the New York Mercantile Exchange (NYMEX), prices for futures contracts also registered increases. The futures contract for March delivery rose by about 46 cents per MMBtu on the week to $8.045. · As of Friday, January 25, working gas in storage was 2,262 Bcf, which is 3.9 percent above the 5-year (2003-2007) average. For the report week, EIA recorded the largest implied net withdrawal (274 Bcf) in its 14-year database of weekly storage statistics.

259

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

4, 2011 at 2:00 P.M. 4, 2011 at 2:00 P.M. Next Release: Thursday, August 11, 2011 Overview Prices Storage Other Market Trends Overview (For the Week Ending Wednesday, August 3, 2011) Nearly all pricing points were down modestly for the week following passage of the heat wave that had earlier gripped most of the country. The Henry Hub price decreased 20 cents per million Btu (MMBtu) over the week (down 4.5 percent) to close at $4.26 per MMBtu on August 3. At the New York Mercantile Exchange (NYMEX), the downward price response was somewhat more pronounced (down 5.3 percent) with the September 2011 natural gas contract losing ground over the week, closing at $4.090 per MMBtu on Wednesday. Working natural gas in storage rose last week to 2,758 billion cubic feet (Bcf) as of Friday, July 29, according to the U.S. Energy Information

260

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

1, 2004 (next release 2:00 p.m. on April 8) 1, 2004 (next release 2:00 p.m. on April 8) Natural gas spot prices surged upward in the past three days, bringing price levels significantly above those of a week ago (Wednesday, March 24) in all regional markets. At the Henry Hub, the price for spot gas increased $0.28 per MMBtu on the week (Wednesday-Wednesday, March 24-31), or about 5 percent, trading yesterday at $5.63. Taking over as the near-month futures contract on Tuesday, March 30, the NYMEX contract for May delivery moved up sharply, ending trading yesterday at its highest-ever settlement price of $5.933 per MMBtu. EIA reported that natural gas inventories were 1,014 Bcf as of Friday, March 26, which is 7.7 percent less than the preceding 5-year average for the week. Despite anticipation of yesterday's OPEC decision to curtail oil production by up to 1 million barrels per day, the spot price for West Texas Intermediate crude oil declined on four of the five trading days of the week, trading yesterday at $35.75 ($6.16 per MMBtu), down $1.31 per barrel ($0.23 per MMBtu) on the week.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "weekly heating oil" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

8 (next release 2:00 p.m. on October 5, 2006) 8 (next release 2:00 p.m. on October 5, 2006) Natural gas spot prices decreased sharply since Wednesday, September 20, at nearly all market locations. For the week (Wednesday to Wednesday), the price at the Henry Hub decreased $0.52 per MMBtu, or about 10 percent, to $4.35 per MMBtu. The NYMEX futures contract for October delivery at the Henry Hub declined about 73 cents since last Wednesday to close yesterday at $4.201 per MMBtu. Natural gas in storage as of Friday, September 22, was 3,254 Bcf, which is 12.2 percent above the 5-year average. The spot price for West Texas Intermediate (WTI) crude oil increased $2.96 per barrel, or about 5 percent, since last Wednesday to trade yesterday at $62.96 per barrel or $10.86 per MMBtu. This week's increase in the price of crude oil was the first week-on-week up-tick in the past 6 weeks.

262

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

23, 2002 (next release 2:00 p.m. on May 30) 23, 2002 (next release 2:00 p.m. on May 30) Natural gas spot and futures prices trended down for the week (Wednesday to Wednesday, May 15-22). The cold front that moved into major gas-consuming areas of the Midwest and Northeast for the weekend and lingered into the first part of this week had minimal impact on prices. At the Henry Hub, the average spot price fell 24 cents for the week to $3.38 per MMBtu. On the NYMEX, the settlement price of the near-month contract (June delivery) declined for 5 straight trading sessions before recording a small increase of $0.064 per MMBtu in May 22 trading, to settle at $3.459. The spot price for West Texas Intermediate (WTI) crude oil, which had held at or above $28 per barrel since last Thursday, fell nearly $1 on Tuesday, May 21, following the American Petroleum Institute's announcement of an unexpected build in crude oil stocks of 5.5 million barrels for the week ended Friday, May 17. For the week (May 15-22), the WTI price was down $0.99, at $27.01 per barrel, or $4.66 per MMBtu.

263

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

14 (next release 2:00 p.m. on April 21) 14 (next release 2:00 p.m. on April 21) The emergence of more spring-like temperatures in most regions of the country, ample natural gas storage supplies, and lower oil prices resulted in natural gas spot prices easing 7 to 43 cents per MMBtu in the Lower 48 States since Wednesday, April 6. On the week (Wednesday-Wednesday, April 6-13), the Henry Hub spot price dropped 39 cents per MMBtu, or about 5 percent, to $7.07. At the New York Mercantile Exchange (NYMEX), the futures contract for May delivery fell 58 cents per MMBtu on the week to a daily settlement of $6.978 yesterday (April 13), the first close below $7 for a near-month contract since March 28. A second week of net injections brought natural gas storage supplies to 1,293 Bcf as of Friday, April 8, which is 26.3 percent above the 5-year average inventory for the report week. The spot price for West Texas Intermediate (WTI) crude oil decreased $5.67 per barrel on the week to $50.21 per barrel, or $8.66 per MMBtu.

264

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

2, 2002 (next release 2:00 p.m. on August 29) 2, 2002 (next release 2:00 p.m. on August 29) Natural gas prices continued their upward trend for a second consecutive week with most market locations in the Lower 48 States registering gains of up to 25 cents per MMBtu since Wednesday, August 14. Continued hot temperatures across the country and an increase in oil prices resulted in prices generally ranging between $3.15 and $3.25 per MMBtu along the Gulf Coast, representing new 8-week highs. At the NYMEX, the price for the futures contract for September delivery closed on Wednesday, August 21, at $3.274 per MMBtu, an increase of just over 36 cents, or about 12.5 percent, on the week. Working gas in storage for the week ended Friday, August 16 was 2,657 Bcf, which exceeds the average for the previous 5 years by 13.1 percent. On the week (Wednesday-Wednesday), the spot price for West Texas Intermediate (WTI) crude oil gained $2.18 to end trading yesterday at $30.37 per barrel, or $5.24 per MMBtu

265

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

6, 2001 6, 2001 After opening the week up at $3.353 per MMBtu, prices on the NYMEX futures market moved down 3 of the remaining 4 days of the week to settle at the end of the week at $2.971-more than 22 cents lower than the previous Friday. Despite unseasonably high temperatures in much of the Midwest and parts of the Southwest last week and the threat of a tropical storm in the Gulf of Mexico, (See Temperature Map) (See Deviation from Normal Temperatures Map) prices at the Henry Hub spot market moved down late in the week, falling to $3.06 per MMBtu on Friday. Net injections to storage declined for the second consecutive week but still averaged 11 Bcf per day, bringing the estimated stock level to 2,262 Bcf as of July 27 with more than 3 months remaining in the refill season. The price of West Texas Intermediate (WTI) crude oil ended the week up $0.60 per barrel from the previous Friday at $27.65 or $4.77 per MMBtu.

266

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

August 29, 2002 (next release 2:00 p.m. on September 5) August 29, 2002 (next release 2:00 p.m. on September 5) Despite sizeable drops in both spot and futures contract prices in the past two days, week-on-week (Wednesday, August 21 to Wednesday August 28) increases were recorded in both cash and futures markets. Temperatures which had begun to moderate even before Thursday, August 22, particularly in the Northeast and West regions, seemed finally to begin exerting downward pressure on prices. For the week, the spot price at the Henry Hub gained $0.11 per MMBtu to average $3.33 yesterday (Wednesday, August 28). The NYMEX futures contract for September delivery expired yesterday at the closing price of $3.288 per MMBtu, up only $0.014 from the previous Wednesday's settlement. The Energy Information Administration's (EIA) Weekly Natural Gas Storage Report showed total stocks of 2,716 Bcf for the week ended Friday, August 23, which is 13 percent above the 5-year average. The run-up in the spot price of West Texas Intermediate (WTI) crude oil that resulted in an increase of $2.18 per barrel over the previous week was almost completely offset this past week, as the WTI spot price fell $2.06 per barrel to end trading on Wednesday, August 28 at an average price of $28.31 per barrel, or $4.88 per MMBtu.

267

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

15, 2004 (next release 2:00 p.m. on April 22) 15, 2004 (next release 2:00 p.m. on April 22) An early spring chill in the Northeast kept natural gas spot prices firm this week until yesterday (April 14), when warmer temperatures resulted in sharp price declines at most trading locations for the day and moderately lower prices on the week (Wednesday-Wednesday, April 7-14). The Henry Hub spot price declined 3 cents per MMBtu on the week to $5.73. After climbing above $6.00 per MMBtu earlier in the week, the NYMEX futures contract for May delivery at the Henry Hub dropped in the last two trading sessions to yesterday's closing price of $5.744, which represents a net decline of 13 cents per MMBtu on the week. There was a second consecutive week of injections into storage with stocks as of Friday, April 9, at 1,049 Bcf, which is 5.2 percent below the 5-year average. The spot price for West Texas Intermediate (WTI) crude oil rose 34 cents per barrel on the week to yesterday's closing price of $36.62 per barrel, or $6.31 per MMBtu.

268

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

13, 2002 (next release 2:00 p.m. on June 20) 13, 2002 (next release 2:00 p.m. on June 20) Moderate price increases on Monday and Wednesday of this week could not offset declines during the other three trading days of the week (Wednesday to Wednesday, June 5-12), leaving spot prices lower at most locations for the sixth consecutive week. At the Henry Hub, the average spot price decreased by 13 cents to $3.15 per MMBtu. Six weeks ago, on Wednesday, May 1, the Henry Hub spot price stood at $3.79 per MMBtu. Futures prices also trended lower for the sixth consecutive week. The NYMEX futures contract for July delivery at the Henry Hub declined by $0.203 per MMBtu for the week, settling Wednesday, June 12 at $3.057 per MMBtu-a decrease of a little over 6 percent from the previous Wednesday. EIA's estimate of net injections into storage for the week ended June 7 is 81 Bcf, bringing total working gas inventories to 1,974 Bcf, or about 20 percent above the previous 5-year (1997-2001) average. On Thursday, June 6, the spot price for West Texas Intermediate (WTI) crude oil fell below $25 per barrel for the first time since April 16, and ended trading on Wednesday, June 12 at $24.79 per barrel, or $4.27 per MMBtu.

269

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

7, 2001 7, 2001 With the return of above-average storage refill estimates for the third week of August and relatively widespread normal temperatures, prices moved down at most major markets last week. (See Temperature Map) (See Deviation from Normal Temperatures Map) At the Henry Hub, the spot market price ended the week down 46 cents per MMBtu at $2.77. On the futures market, the near-month (September) NYMEX contract ended trading on Friday at $2.706 per MMBtu-off close to $0.60 from the previous Friday. The spot price for West Texas Intermediate (WTI) crude oil remained at or above $27.20 per barrel each day last week and ended the week at $28.30 or $4.88 per MMBtu. Prices: Spot prices at most major market locations began the week down from the previous Friday, then trended up slightly at mid-week. However, following the release of the American Gas Association (AGA) weekly storage estimate on Wednesday for the previous week, prices moved down between 25 and 35 cents per MMBtu at key regional markets. Prices fell further in the Rockies, with most trading points there down a few cents either side of a half dollar. Spot gas at the Henry Hub traded at its lowest level since July 2 when it traded for $2.93 per MMBtu. Prices at other major markets all were below $3.00 at the end of the week. Some examples of these were: Katy in East Texas at $2.78 per MMBtu, Waha in West Texas at $2.71, and Midcontinent in Oklahoma at $2.65. The lowest prices reported were found in the Rockies where prices were mostly less than $2.20 per MMBtu.

270

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

30, 2001 30, 2001 Prices rose slightly mid-week with the return of summer weather and a reported slowing of net injections to storage for the prior week. Temperatures for the week reverted close to normal in the Northeast and as much as 3 degrees above normal in the Midwest. (See Temperature Map) (See Deviation from Normal Temperatures Map) In a pattern typical for this summer, spot prices declined toward the end of the week as a cool front pervaded the eastern half of the country. However, the spot price at the Henry Hub was able to hold onto a 12-cent gain over the week to close at $3.07 per MMBtu on Friday. The August contract finished as the near-month contract on a slightly higher note on the last day of trade to close at $3.167 per MMBtu due to short-covering and a forecast for warmer weather in the upcoming week. The August contract ended less than 2 cents lower than the July contract for the lowest closure since May of last year. On the West Coast, the cancellation of high-linepack operational flow orders allowed prices to buoy upward by about $1 per MMBtu early in the week. As coastal areas remained cool though, price declines offset much of the gain. For only the third week in the last 2 months, the American Gas Association (AGA) estimated net injections to storage at less than 100 Bcf as they reported 84 Bcf for the week ended Friday, July 20. An OPEC agreement to reduce production quotas by 1 million barrels per day helped prop-up crude oil prices. As of Friday, the spot price for West Texas Intermediate was $27.05 per barrel, or $4.66 per MMBtu, $1.45 per barrel more than a week earlier.

271

This Week In Petroleum Printer-Friendly Version  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

14, 2010 (Next Release on October 20, 2010) Heating Oil Costs This Winter EIA expects households heating primarily with heating oil to spend an average of 2,124 this winter...

272

This Week In Petroleum Printer-Friendly Version  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

a dramatic cut in oil exports from Venezuela as a result of their ongoing strikes, has led to U.S. oil imports declining. U.S. crude oil imports over the last three weeks are...

273

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Friday, July 6, 2007 (next release 2:00 p.m. on July 12, 2007) Friday, July 6, 2007 (next release 2:00 p.m. on July 12, 2007) Natural gas spot prices decreased sharply this week (Wednesday-Thursday, June 27-July 5), although crude oil prices continued to trade at near-record high levels. For the week, the price at the Henry Hub decreased $0.45 per MMBtu, or about 7 percent, to $6.29. At the New York Mercantile Exchange (NYMEX), the price of the futures contract for August delivery at the Henry Hub moved 47 cents per MMBtu lower to settle yesterday (Thursday, July 5) at $6.618. Natural gas in storage was 2,521 Bcf as of Friday, June 29, which is 16.9 percent higher than the 5-year average. Crude oil prices continued to rise this week. The spot price for West Texas Intermediate (WTI) crude oil increased $2.83 per barrel or about 4 percent since last Wednesday (June 27) to trade yesterday at $71.81 per barrel or $12.38 per MMBtu.

274

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

October 1, 2001 October 1, 2001 Seasonal temperatures in the Northeast and an early-week cooling trend in Texas and parts of the Southeast translated into little temperature-driven demand in many markets for much of last week. This resulted in a steady decline for spot prices in most regions. (See Temperature Map) (See Deviation from Normal Temperatures Map) On Monday, September 26, the Henry Hub spot price fell below $2.00 per MMBtu for the first time since November 1999, and stayed below $2.00 for the entire week. It ended trading Friday at $1.84 per MMBtu, 20 cents below the previous Friday's level. Likewise, the futures contract for October delivery at the Henry Hub fell sharply on Monday, losing over 19 cents to $1.910 per MMBtu. The October contract closed out trading on Wednesday down further to $1.830 per MMBtu. Crude oil prices took their largest one-day drop since the Persian Gulf War on Monday, amid signs of impending recession and speculation that OPEC would not decrease oil production. After declining by $1.25 per barrel the previous Friday, the spot price for West Texas Intermediate (WTI) crude oil fell $4.03 last Monday, then closed last Friday at $23.45 per barrel, or $4.04 per MMBtu.

275

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

1, 2007 (next release 2:00 p.m. on February 8, 2007) 1, 2007 (next release 2:00 p.m. on February 8, 2007) Since Wednesday, January 24, natural gas spot prices have increased at most market locations in the Lower 48 States, with increases ranging between 9 and 60 cents per MMBtu or about 1.1 to 8.4 percent at most markets. On Wednesday, January 31, prices at the Henry Hub averaged $7.75 per MMBtu, reflecting an increase of 29 cents per MMBtu or about 4 percent since Wednesday, January 24. The futures contract for February delivery at the Henry Hub closed at $6.917 per MMBtu on Monday, January 29, decreasing about 50 cents per MMBtu since Wednesday, January 24. By yesterday, (January 31), the futures contract for March 2007 delivery at the Henry Hub increased about 29 cents per MMBtu or about 4 percent since Wednesday, January 24. Natural gas in storage was 2,571 Bcf as of January 26, which is about 21 percent above the 5-year average. The spot price for West Texas Intermediate (WTI) crude oil increased $3.93 per barrel, or 7.3 percent to $58.17 per barrel or $10.03 per MMBtu. This week's WTI price change was the highest week-on-week increase since the week ended November 29, 2006, when crude oil increased $5.17 per barrel or $0.89 per MMBtu. Despite this week's relatively high increase, crude oil prices remain about 14.3 percent lower than a year ago.

276

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

26, to Wednesday, April 2) 26, to Wednesday, April 2) Released: April 3, 2008 Next release: April 10, 2008 · Natural gas spot prices increased in all trading regions in the Lower 48 States this report week (Wednesday-Wednesday, March 26-April 2). During the report week, the Henry Hub spot price increased $0.34 per million Btu (MMBtu) to $9.59. Frigid temperatures continued for a portion of the week in the Northeast and for most of the week in the West, likely boosting space-heating demand. · At the New York Mercantile Exchange (NYMEX), prices for futures contracts also registered increases, albeit less than in spot markets. The futures contract for May delivery rose about 15 cents per MMBtu on the week to $9.832. · With the traditional heating season not quite over, natural gas withdrawals from underground storage continued through last week. As of Friday, March 28, working gas in storage was 1,248 billion cubic feet (Bcf), which is 0.5 percent above the 5-year (2003-2007) average.

277

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

5 to Wednesday, December 12) 5 to Wednesday, December 12) Released: December 13 Next release: December 20, 2007 · Natural gas spot and futures prices increased this report week (Wednesday to Wednesday, December 5-12), as cooler temperatures in much of the country increased demand for space heating. On the week the Henry Hub spot price increased $0.18 per million Btu (MMBtu) to $7.22. · At the New York Mercantile Exchange (NYMEX), prices for futures contracts also registered significant increases. The futures contract for January delivery rose about 22 cents per MMBtu on the week to $7.408. · Working gas in storage is well above the 5-year average for this time year, indicating a healthy supply picture as the winter heating season progress. As of Friday, December 7, working gas in storage was 3,294 Bcf, which is 8.5 percent above the 5-year (2002-2006) average.

278

Correct conditions for heat treatment of butt welded oil drilling pipes  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The application of optimum normalization conditions decreases the hardness and increases the impact strength of drilling pipes used in geological survey work by 100% and that of oil drilling pipes by 2530%, the ...

F. N. Tavadze; Z. G. Napetvaridze

1965-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

279

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

23 2003 (next release 2:00 p.m. on October 30) 23 2003 (next release 2:00 p.m. on October 30) Spot price changes were mixed for the week (Wednesday to Wednesday, October 15-22), with markets with declines outnumbering those with increases by about 2 to 1, while futures prices fell significantly. At the Henry Hub, the spot price declined a nickel for the week, ending trading yesterday at $4.88 per MMBtu. The NYMEX futures contract for November delivery dropped $0.507 per MMBtu for the week, settling yesterday at $4.924. EIA reported that inventories were 3,028 Bcf as of Friday, October 17. This is 0.8 percent greater than the previous 5-year (1998-2002) average for the week. The spot price for West Texas Intermediate (WTI) crude oil ended a string of four consecutive weeks of price increases with a decline of $1.74 per barrel for the week to $30 per barrel, or $5.17 per MMBtu.

280

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

13 2003 (next release 2:00 p.m. on November 20) 13 2003 (next release 2:00 p.m. on November 20) Spot and futures prices moved in opposite directions for the week (Wednesday to Wednesday, November 5-12), as cash prices ended the week significantly higher in many locations, while futures prices moved lower. At the Henry Hub, the spot price increased 32 cents on the week, or about 7 percent, to end trading yesterday (Wednesday, November 12) at $4.77 per MMBtu. On the NYMEX, the futures contract for December delivery ended the week down by nearly 16 cents, settling yesterday at $4.739 per MMBtu, a decrease of more than 3 percent. EIA reported that inventories were 3,187 Bcf as of Friday, November 7, which is 3.9 percent greater than the previous 5-year (1998-2002) average for the week. The spot price for West Texas Intermediate crude oil increased on 4 out of 5 trading days, gaining more than $1 per barrel for the second week in a row and topping $31 per barrel for the first time in nearly a month, as it rose $1.08 to reach $31.37 per barrel, or $5.41 per MMBtu, in yesterday's trading.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "weekly heating oil" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

13 (next release 2:00 p.m. on April 20, 2006) 13 (next release 2:00 p.m. on April 20, 2006) Springtime temperatures in most regions of the country this week led to an easing of natural gas spot and futures prices in the Lower 48 States since Wednesday, April 5. On the week (Wednesday-Wednesday, April 5-12), the Henry Hub spot price dropped 9 cents per MMBtu, or about 1.3 percent, to $6.79. At the New York Mercantile Exchange (NYMEX), the futures contract for May delivery fell 26.1 cents per MMBtu on the week to a daily settlement of $6.808 yesterday (April 12), the lowest closing price for a near-month contract in over a month (March 10). The first week of net injections this season brought natural gas storage supplies to 1,714 Bcf as of Friday, April 7, which is 63.4 percent above the 5-year average inventory for the report week. The spot price for West Texas Intermediate (WTI) crude oil increased $1.77 per barrel on the week to $68.53 per barrel, or $11.82 per MMBtu.

282

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

7, 2001 7, 2001 Last week was a week like no other, as both financial and energy markets were disrupted Tuesday morning by the attacks on the World Trade Center (WTC) and the Pentagon. The New York Mercantile Exchange (NYMEX), located within four blocks of the WTC, closed almost immediately after the first attack; spot markets throughout the country closed soon after news of the attacks reached them. Futures trading did not resume until Friday, and then only in an abbreviated session using the NYMEX ACCESS system. Regular, open-outcry trading resumed at around 11:30 AM today (Monday, September 17). Cash markets did re-open last Wednesday, and continued to operate, albeit at reduced activity levels, through the rest of the week. Temperatures in most parts of the country were seasonable early in the week, but by week's end were falling in the Northeast and the Midwest as a cold front moved down from the north. (See Temperature Map) (See Deviation from Normal Temperatures Map) At the Henry Hub, spot prices gained 6 cents from the preceding week, ending trading on Friday at $2.41 per MMBtu. In its one day of open-outcry trading, the futures contract for October delivery fell $0.108 per MMBtu to settle at $2.392. The spot price for West Texas Intermediate crude oil slipped slightly on Monday to $27.65 per barrel, or $4.77 per MMBtu.

283

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

23, 2007 (next release 2:00 p.m. on August 30, 2007) 23, 2007 (next release 2:00 p.m. on August 30, 2007) Natural gas spot and futures prices eased this report week (Wednesday to Wednesday, August 15-22), as Hurricane Dean failed to have a significant impact on U.S. production in the Gulf of Mexico and moderate temperatures limited demand. On the week, the Henry Hub spot price declined $1.46 per MMBtu, or 20 percent, to $5.84. Trading of futures contracts at the New York Mercantile Exchange (NYMEX) also resulted in large price decreases. The NYMEX contract for September delivery decreased $1.286 per MMBtu on the week to a daily settlement of $5.578 yesterday (August 22). Working gas inventories reported in today's release of EIA's Weekly Natural Gas Storage Report were 2,926 Bcf as of Friday, August 17, which is 12.8 percent above the 5-year average inventory for the report week. The spot price for West Texas Intermediate (WTI) crude oil decreased $4.06 per barrel on the week to $69.30 per barrel, or $11.95 per MMBtu.

284

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

1, 2003 (next release 2:00 p.m. on August 28) 1, 2003 (next release 2:00 p.m. on August 28) Despite rising temperatures in many regions of the country that helped push prices upward over the past 3 days, spot prices nonetheless ended trading yesterday (Wednesday, August 20) down for the most part from levels of the previous Wednesday (August 13). At the Henry Hub, the spot price fell by 14 cents per MMBtu on the week, ending trading yesterday at $5.03. Likewise on the NYMEX, the settlement price for the futures contract for September delivery ended the week down 6 cents per MMBtu from the previous week, when it finished trading yesterday at $5.119. The EIA reported that working gas in storage increased to 2,266 Bcf as of Friday, August 15, which is 7.4 percent below the 5-year (1998-2002) average for the week. West Texas Intermediate (WTI) crude oil on the spot market changed little during the week ending the week up 11 cents per barrel at $30.96, or $5.34 per MMBtu.

285

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

7, 2003 (next release 2:00 p.m. on April 24) 7, 2003 (next release 2:00 p.m. on April 24) Spot and futures prices moved up for the second week in a row. Price increases for the week (Wednesday, April 9 to Wednesday, April 16) were generally around a half dollar in both the spot and futures markets-about twice the increase in spot prices (in most markets) the previous week, and three times the increase in the near-month (May delivery) futures contract price. At the Henry Hub, the average spot price rose 51 cents on the week, to $5.62 per MMBtu, an increase of nearly 10 percent. The settlement price for the May contract increased by just over 9 percent for the week, gaining a cumulative $0.482 to settle yesterday (Wednesday, April 16) at $5.677 per MMBtu. These price increases occurred despite a gradual warming trend since last Wednesday in every region of the country except in the West. Working gas in storage was 623 Bcf as of April 11, which was 49 percent below the previous 5-year (1998-2002) average, and a new record low level over the 9 years of EIA data. The spot price for West Texas Intermediate crude oil rose for the week by 23 cents per barrel, to $29.16 per barrel ($5.03 per MMBtu) in yesterday's trading.

286

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

19, 2003 (next release 2:00 p.m. on June 26) 19, 2003 (next release 2:00 p.m. on June 26) Spot and futures prices fell for the second straight week, as generally mild temperatures continued to prevail in most major market areas and storage injections exceeded 100 Bcf for a third straight week. At the Henry Hub, the spot price fell by 52 cents per MMBtu on the week (Wednesday to Wednesday, June 11-19), or almost 9 percent, to $5.54 per MMBtu. The settlement price for the NYMEX futures contract for July delivery declined by $0.632 on the week, closing yesterday (June 18) at $5.581 per MMBtu-a decline of 10 percent. The Energy Information Administration (EIA) reported that working gas in storage was 1,438 Bcf as of Friday, June 13, which is about 22 percent below the previous 5-year (1998-2002) average for the week. The spot price for West Texas Intermediate (WTI) crude oil fell in 4 of 5 trading days, ending the week down by almost $2 per barrel, at $30.28, or $5.22 per MMBtu.

287

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

0 (next release 2:00 p.m. on April 27, 2006) 0 (next release 2:00 p.m. on April 27, 2006) High crude oil prices and increasing cooling demand in some regions contributed to natural gas spot prices climbing more than 10 percent at trading locations in the Lower 48 States since Wednesday, April 12. On the week (Wednesday-Wednesday, April 12-19), the Henry Hub spot price rose 93 cents per MMBtu to $7.72. At the New York Mercantile Exchange (NYMEX), the futures contract for May delivery rose in each trading session this week, gaining $1.384 per MMBtu to close at $8.192 per MMBtu yesterday (April 19). Net storage injections continued for the second week this refill season. Working gas in storage as of Friday, April 14, increased to 1,761 Bcf, which is 62.6 percent above the 5-year (2001-2005) average. The spot price for West Texas Intermediate (WTI) crude oil increased $3.54 per barrel on the week to $72.07, or $12.43 per MMBtu.

288

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

2, 2007 (next release 2:00 p.m. on July 19, 2007) 2, 2007 (next release 2:00 p.m. on July 19, 2007) Natural gas spot prices increased during this holiday-shortened report week (Thursday-Wednesday, July 5-11) as weather-related demand emerged in response to the hottest temperatures to date this year in the Northeast and Midwest. On the week, the Henry Hub spot price increased 36 cents per MMBtu, or 5.7 percent, to $6.65. At the New York Mercantile Exchange (NYMEX), the story was slightly different with the contract price for August delivery decreasing to $6.600 per MMBtu, which was 1.8 cents lower than last Thursday's (July 5) closing price. EIA's Weekly Natural Gas Storage Report today reported natural gas storage supplies of 2,627 Bcf as of Friday, July 7. This level of working gas in underground storage is 16.6 percent above the 5-year average inventory for this time of year. The spot price for West Texas Intermediate (WTI) crude oil increased $0.77 per barrel on the week to $72.58 per barrel. On a Btu basis, the crude oil price is now nearly double the price of natural gas at $12.51 per MMBtu. The relative difference in pricing can have a large effect on demand (mostly in the industrial sector and power plants).

289

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

7, 2011 at 2:00 P.M. 7, 2011 at 2:00 P.M. Next Release: Thursday, February 3, 2011 Overview Prices Storage Other Market Trends Natural Gas Transportation Update Overview (For the Week Ending Wednesday, January 26, 2011) Natural gas spot prices were soft at all domestic pricing points. The Henry Hub price fell 8 cents per million Btu (MMBtu) (about 1.7 percent) for the week ending January 26, to $4.40 per MMBtu. The West Texas Intermediate crude oil spot price settled at $86.15 per barrel ($14.85 per MMBtu), on Wednesday, January 26. This represents a decrease of $4.70 per barrel, or $0.81 per MMBtu, from the previous Wednesday. Working natural gas in storage fell to 2,542 billion cubic feet (Bcf) as of Friday, January 21, according to the Energy Information Administration’s (EIA) Weekly Natural Gas Storage Report (WNGSR). The

290

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

9, 2008 9, 2008 Next Release: June 5, 2008 Overview Prices Storage Other Market Trends Natural Gas Transportation Update Overview Natural gas spot price movements were mixed this report week (Wednesday–Wednesday, May 21-28), with price decreases generally occurring in markets west of the Mississippi River and price increases dominant in trading locations in the eastern parts of the country. During the report week, the Henry Hub spot price increased $0.20 per million Btu (MMBtu) to $11.60. At the New York Mercantile Exchange (NYMEX), futures prices increased for the report week, continuing a trend of rising prices that has occurred in futures markets for many commodities this spring, including futures prices for crude oil. The futures contract for June delivery, for

291

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

0, 2009 at 2:00 P.M. 0, 2009 at 2:00 P.M. Next Release: Thursday, December 17, 2009 Overview Prices Storage Other Market Trends Natural Gas Transportation Update Overview (For the Week Ending Wednesday, December 9, 2009) Natural gas spot prices increased at all trading locations in the lower 48 States since last Wednesday, December 2. The Henry Hub price rose by 60 cents, or almost 13 percent, to $5.27 per million Btu (MMBtu) on the week. At the New York Mercantile Exchange (NYMEX), the price of the January 2010 natural gas contract rose about 37 cents to $4.898 per MMBtu. The Henry Hub spot price was higher than price of the near-month contract during 3 days of the report week. The West Texas Intermediate crude oil contract fell by $5.95, or 8 percent, to $70.67 per barrel or $12.18 per MMBtu.

292

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

November 26, 2001 November 26, 2001 The spot price at the Henry Hub finished the abbreviated trading week on Wednesday, November 21 at $1.91 per MMBtu, roughly 22 cents or 13 percent over the previous Friday. On the NYMEX, the settlement price of the futures contract for December delivery at the Henry Hub settled at $2.813 per MMBtu, up roughly 18 cents over the previous Friday. Market prices were affected early in the week by the expectation of colder weather , and then on Wednesday-the end of trading for the week-by mild temperatures that prevailed throughout much of the country. (Temperature Map) (Temperature Deviation Map) The spot price for West Texas Intermediate (WTI) crude oil increased by nearly 2 percent, climbing to $18.38 per barrel or $3.17 per MMBtu.

293

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

3, 2011 at 2:00 P.M. 3, 2011 at 2:00 P.M. Next Release: Thursday, March 10, 2011 Overview Prices Storage Other Market Trends Natural Gas Transportation Update Overview (For the Week Ending Wednesday, March 2, 2011) Natural gas prices showed continued relative weakness during the report week. The spot price at the Henry Hub fell from $3.83 per million Btu (MMBtu) on February 23 to $3.79 per MMBtu on March 2. At the New York Mercantile Exchange (NYMEX), the March 2011 futures contract expired at $3.793 per MMBtu, having declined about 12 percent during its tenure as the near-month contract. Working natural gas in storage fell to 1,745 Bcf as of Friday, February 25, according to EIA’s Weekly Natural Gas Storage Report. The spot price of the West Texas Intermediate (WTI) crude oil

294

This Week In Petroleum Printer-Friendly Version  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

distillates, kerosene-jet fuel, residual fuel oil, and propane in the Weekly Petroleum Status Report (WPSR), could be tempted to read too much into the week-to-week fluctuations...

295

This Week In Petroleum Printer-Friendly Version  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

of weekly crude oil imports are preliminary and thus not published, imports from Venezuela last week seem to have returned to normal levels for the first time since the week...

296

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

2, 2010 at 2:00 P.M. 2, 2010 at 2:00 P.M. Next Release: Thursday, August 19, 2010 Overview Prices Storage Other Market Trends Natural Gas Transportation Update Overview (For the Week Ending Wednesday, August 11, 2010) Summer heat and increased demand this week were insufficient to sustain the natural gas price level, as prices at trading locations across the lower 48 States posted decreases. Overall, spot price at most locations in the lower 48 States fell between 30 and 45 cents per million Btu (MMBtu), although a number of locations posted price decreases of as much as 52 cents per MMBtu. The Henry Hub spot price ended the report week yesterday, August 11, 39 cents lower than the preceding week, at $4.38 per MMBtu. At the New York Mercantile Exchange (NYMEX), the futures contract

297

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

6, 2010 at 2:00 P.M. 6, 2010 at 2:00 P.M. Next Release: Thursday, September 23, 2010 Overview Prices Storage Other Market Trends Natural Gas Transportation Update Overview (For the Week Ending Wednesday, September 15, 2010) Natural gas spot prices increased this report week (Wednesday to Wednesday, September 8–15), likely supported by demand in the electric power sector from late-season heat and associated air-conditioning demand in much of the country. During the report week, the Henry Hub spot price increased by $0.25 per million Btu (MMBtu) to $4.06 per MMBtu. At the New York Mercantile Exchange (NYMEX), the price of the October futures contract increased in 4 out of 5 trading days for a total gain during the report week of about $0.18 per MMBtu. The price of the

298

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

2, 2010 at 2:00 P.M. 2, 2010 at 2:00 P.M. Next Release: Thursday, December 9, 2010 Overview Prices Storage Other Market Trends Natural Gas Transportation Update Overview (For the Week Ending Wednesday, December 1, 2010) Following the Thanksgiving Day holiday weekend, prices moved up significantly this week as wintry weather moved into much of the country. The most severe weather to date this season is increasing space-heating demand from nearly coast to coast and as far south as Florida. During the report week (November 24-December 1), the Henry Hub spot price increased $0.39 to $4.21 per million Btu (MMBtu). At the New York Mercantile Exchange (NYMEX), futures prices decreased during the report week in response to indications of warmer weather in the outlook and amid reports of growth in supply. The futures

299

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

4, 2010 at 2:00 P.M. 4, 2010 at 2:00 P.M. Next Release: Thursday, March 11, 2010 Overview Prices Storage Other Market Trends Natural Gas Transportation Update Overview (For the Week Ending Wednesday, March 3, 2010) Warmer weather moved into major population centers this report week, limiting demand related to space heating for much of the country. Prices declined, with the biggest decreases occurring at markets in the Rocky Mountains and the Midcontinent. During the report week, the Henry Hub spot price decreased $0.15 to $4.76 per million Btu (MMBtu). At the New York Mercantile Exchange (NYMEX), futures prices also decreased. The futures contract for April delivery decreased by $0.10 on the week to $4.76 per MMBtu. As of Friday, February 26, working gas in underground storage was

300

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

1, 2010 at 2:00 P.M. 1, 2010 at 2:00 P.M. Next Release: Thursday, January 28, 2010 Overview Prices Storage Other Market Trends Natural Gas Transportation Update Overview (For the Week Ending Wednesday, January 20, 2010) A reprieve from the extreme cold in much of the country during this report week limited space-heating demand, resulting in price declines. The biggest decreases occurred in the Northeast. During the report week (January 13-20), the Henry Hub spot price decreased $0.07 to $5.54 per million Btu (MMBtu). At the New York Mercantile Exchange (NYMEX), futures prices also decreased. The futures contract for February delivery decreased by $0.24 on the week to $5.496 per MMBtu. As of Friday, January 15, working gas in underground storage was 2,607 billion cubic feet (Bcf), which is 0.2 percent below the 5-year

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "weekly heating oil" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

7, 2011 at 2:00 P.M. 7, 2011 at 2:00 P.M. Next Release: Thursday, February 24, 2011 Overview Prices Storage Other Market Trends Natural Gas Transportation Update Overview (For the Week Ending Wednesday, February 16, 2011) A reprieve from extreme cold in much of the country this week limited space-heating demand, contributing to price declines. The biggest price decreases occurred in the Northeast. During the report week (February 9-16), the Henry Hub spot price decreased $0.29 to $3.93 per million Btu (MMBtu). At the New York Mercantile Exchange (NYMEX), futures prices also decreased. The futures contract for March delivery decreased by $0.12 on the week to $3.92 per MMBtu. As of Friday, February 11, working gas in underground storage was 1,911 billion cubic feet (Bcf), which is 6.3 percent below the 5-year

302

Heating of heavy oil by circulating hot water in closed double casing in ultra-deep wells  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In heavy oil production, the loss of energy to ambient surroundings decreases the temperature of the heavy oil flowing upwards in a vertical wellbore, which increases the oil viscosity and the oil may not flow...

Riyi Lin; Fangzheng Wang; Xinwei Wang

2012-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

303

This Week In Petroleum Printer-Friendly Version  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

fuels, including distillate fuel (used as both heating oil and diesel fuel) and propane. Following last winters mild weather, inventories of both distillate fuel oil and...

304

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

October 2, 2003 (next release 2:00 p.m. on October 9) October 2, 2003 (next release 2:00 p.m. on October 9) A cold front moved through the Midwest and parts of the Northeast this week, but it failed to bring sustained higher prices. Seasonally mild temperatures in most other areas of the country and little in the way of tropical storm activity resulted in prices easing 20 cents per MMBtu or less since Wednesday, September 24. On the week (Wednesday, September 24-Wednesday, October 1), the Henry Hub spot price dropped 12 cents per MMBtu to $4.47. The NYMEX futures contract for October delivery expired on Friday, September 26, at $4.430, while the contract for November lost about 8 cents on the week to close at $4.677 yesterday (October 1). Natural gas in storage as of Friday, September 26, increased to 2,788 Bcf, which is 1.9 percent below the 5-year average inventory for the report week. The spot price for West Texas Intermediate (WTI) crude oil rose $1.24 per barrel on the week to yesterday's (October 1) closing price of $29.43 per barrel, or $5.07 per MMBtu.

305

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

15, 2001 15, 2001 Natural gas prices generally rose last week despite mild temperatures throughout much of the country (See Temperature Map) (See Deviation Map). After beginning the week down on Monday, October 8, spot prices at the Henry Hub climbed through Thursday before dropping 10 cents on Friday, October 12, to end the week at $2.31 per million Btu, $0.19 or almost 9 percent above the previous Friday. At the NYMEX futures market, the settlement price for November delivery at the Henry Hub settled at $2.43 per million Btu, 32 cents above the previous Friday. Net additions to storage in the week ended October 5 were 1 billion cubic feet (Bcf) below the prior week, but, at 65 Bcf, remained above historical levels. The price of West Texas Intermediate (WTI) crude oil closed at $22.55 per barrel ($3.89 per million Btu), up $0.15 or less than 1 percent over the previous Friday.

306

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

8, 2003 (next release 2:00 p.m. on May 15) 8, 2003 (next release 2:00 p.m. on May 15) Spot and futures prices seesawed throughout the week (Wednesday to Wednesday, April 30-May 7) with no clear underlying trend, however prices ended trading yesterday at uniformly higher levels than one week ago. The weather's influence on gas demand was muted, as temperatures in most areas of the country were generally comfortably spring-like, except for some parts of the Southeast and Southwest, where summer-like temperatures prompted some early air conditioning load. The Henry Hub average spot price increased 23 cents from the previous Wednesday (April 30) to $5.48 per MMBtu. The daily settlement price of the NYMEX futures contract for June delivery rose $0.275 on the week, ending at $5.660 per MMBtu in yesterday's trading. The EIA reported that 821 Bcf of gas was held in storage as of Friday, May 2, which is 39.9 percent less than the 5-year average. The average spot price for West Texas Intermediate crude oil traded in a narrow range of less than $1 per barrel during the week, and ended trading yesterday with a small increase of 15 cents on the week, at $26.24 per barrel, or $4.52 per MMBtu.

307

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

13 (next release 2:00 p.m. on May 20) 13 (next release 2:00 p.m. on May 20) Natural gas prices in both the cash and futures markets continued to move up for a third straight week. For the week (Wednesday to Wednesday, May 5-12), the Henry Hub spot price matched its 30-cent increase of the prior week, trading yesterday (May 12) at $6.39 per MMBtu. On the NYMEX, the futures contract for June 2004 delivery increased by just under 10 cents on the week, settling yesterday at its record-high level of $6.405 per MMBtu. EIA reported that inventories were 1,303 Bcf as of Friday, May 7, which is 1.6 percent below the 5-year (1999-2003) average. The spot price for West Texas Intermediate crude oil also rose for a third straight week, moving up $0.61 per barrel ($0.11 per MMBtu) from last Wednesday's (May 5) price to yesterday's average of $40.30 per barrel ($6.95 per MMBtu).

308

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

2, 2004 (next release 2:00 p.m. on February 19) 2, 2004 (next release 2:00 p.m. on February 19) Although seasonally cold weather continued to dominate the country this week, the absence of January's extreme temperatures resulted in prices easing 20 to 75 cents per MMBtu since Wednesday, February 4. On the week (Wednesday, February 4-Wednesday, February 11), the Henry Hub spot price dropped 39 cents per MMBtu to $5.35. The NYMEX futures contract for March delivery also fell 39 cents on the week to close at $5.26 yesterday (February 11). Natural gas in storage as of Friday, February 6, decreased to 1,603 Bcf, which is 2.3 percent below the 5-year average inventory for the report week. The spot price for West Texas Intermediate (WTI) crude oil rose $0.87 per barrel on the week to yesterday's closing price of $33.93 per barrel, or $5.85 per MMBtu.

309

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

13, 2001 13, 2001 Spot prices for natural gas appeared to stabilize just above the $3.00 mark during the week ended August 10, 2001, as the price at the Henry Hub in Louisiana varied between $3.14 and $2.98 per million Btu. Net injections of natural gas into storage for the previous week again fell within the range of market expectations reported in the trade press and contributed to the stability of the price level. However, due to warmer-than-normal temperatures in the Northeast, Midwest, and parts of the Southwest and Southeast, prices at the Henry Hub increased early in the week before decreasing and finishing over 2 percent lower than the previous week. (See Temperature Map) (See Deviation from Normal Temperatures Map) The price of West Texas Intermediate (WTI) crude oil finished the week at $28.10 per barrel or $4.84 per million Btu, an increase of almost 2 percent above the previous Friday.

310

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Monday, November 19, 2001 Monday, November 19, 2001 Last week, the NYMEX futures contract price for December delivery at the Henry Hub continued the generally downward trend that began in late October. The contract ended last week's trading at $2.637 per MMBtu-nearly 55 cents lower than the $3.183 recorded when it began as the near-month contract on October 30. Spot prices also experienced a similar pattern and reportedly declined well over $1.00 per MMBtu at most major market locations. The spot price at the Henry Hub on Friday hit its lowest level in more than two and a half years. The continued warmer-than-normal weather in most parts of the country appears to be a major contributing factor in the almost 3-week decline in natural gas prices. (Temperature Map) (Temperature Deviation Map) Another factor is the relatively high stocks that continued to increase in the second week of November. Working gas in storage now stands at its highest level since November 1998. The spot price for West Texas Intermediate (WTI) crude oil dropped by more than $2.00 per barrel on Thursday and ended the week at $18.05, or $3.11 per MMBtu-its lowest level in over 2 years.

311

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

7, 2003 (next release 2:00 p.m. on March 6) 7, 2003 (next release 2:00 p.m. on March 6) Natural gas spot prices across the country surged to record highs this week as yet another Arctic blast of cold arrived, this time reaching as far south as Texas. Prices in the Northeast were the highest in the country at more than $20 per MMBtu for much of the week, but prices also tripled since last Wednesday to $18 and more at production-area trading locations along the Gulf Coast and in Texas. On the week (Wednesday to Wednesday), the spot price at the Henry Hub had a net change of $4.26 per MMBtu to an average of $10.36 yesterday (Wednesday, February 26). The NYMEX contract for March delivery ended its run as the near-month futures contract on Wednesday, settling at just over $9.13 per MMBtu, or $3 higher on the week. As of February 21, natural gas in storage was 1,014 Bcf, or 33.4 percent below the 5-year average for this week. Crude oil prices climbed $1.90 per barrel yesterday to an average of $37.96, or $6.54 per MMBtu, which is near a 12-year high.

312

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

15, 2002 (next release 2:00 p.m. on August 22) 15, 2002 (next release 2:00 p.m. on August 22) Spot and futures prices reversed their downward trends from the previous week, as sweltering temperatures returned to many parts of the nation early this week. At the Henry Hub, average spot prices increased 4 days in a row from last Wednesday (August 7), gaining 30 cents per MMBtu to reach $3.03 per MMBtu on Tuesday (August 13), which was repeated yesterday. This pattern was mirrored by the price of the NYMEX futures contract for September delivery at the Henry Hub, which rose a cumulative 25 cents per MMBtu for the week to settle at $2.910 per MMBtu on Wednesday, August 14. Working gas in storage for the week ended Friday, August 9 was 2,620 Bcf, which exceeds the average for the previous 5 years by just under 15 percent. The spot price for West Texas Intermediate (WTI) crude oil posted a gain of $1.61 per barrel for the week, highlighted by a near-$1 increase on Monday, August 12. WTI ended trading yesterday at $28.19 per barrel, or $4.86 per MMBtu.

313

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

15, 2007 (next release 2:00 p.m. on March 22, 2007) 15, 2007 (next release 2:00 p.m. on March 22, 2007) Spring-like temperatures in most regions of the country this week led to lower natural gas spot and futures prices in the Lower 48 States since Wednesday, March 7. On the week (Wednesday-Wednesday, March 7-14), the Henry Hub spot price decreased 66 cents per MMBtu, or about 9 percent, to $6.86. At the New York Mercantile Exchange (NYMEX), the futures contract for April delivery fell 28 cents per MMBtu on the week to a daily settlement of $7.083 yesterday (March 14). Working gas in underground storage was 1,516 Bcf as of Friday, March 9, which is 12 percent above the 5-year average inventory for the report week. The spot price for West Texas Intermediate (WTI) crude oil decreased $3.70 per barrel on the week to $58.15 per barrel, or $10.03 per MMBtu.

314

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

February 19, 2004 (next release 2:00 p.m. on February 26) February 19, 2004 (next release 2:00 p.m. on February 26) Spot and futures prices moved in different directions over the past week (Wednesday to Wednesday, February 11-18), with spot prices at most market locations falling from a nickel to around 30 cents per MMBtu, while futures prices increased by a dime or less. At the Henry Hub, the spot price eased down 2 cents on the week, to $5.33 per MMBtu. On the NYMEX, the futures contract for March delivery increased $0.096 per MMBtu for the week, ending trading yesterday (February 18) at $5.356. EIA reported that natural gas inventories declined to 1,431 Bcf as of Friday, February 13, which is 6.2 percent lower than the previous 5-year (1999-2003) average. The spot price for West Texas Intermediate crude oil rose each day of the holiday-shortened week, and ended trading yesterday with an increase for the week of $1.49 per barrel ($0.24 per MMBtu), or a little over 4 percent, to $35.42 ($6.11 per MMBtu).

315

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

15, 2007 (next release 2:00 p.m. on November 29, 2007) 15, 2007 (next release 2:00 p.m. on November 29, 2007) Natural gas spot prices decreased this week, with the changes at most market locations somewhat more modest than the price changes observed over the past couple weeks. On the week (Wednesday-Wednesday, November 7-14), the price at the Henry Hub decreased 15 cents per MMBtu or about 2 percent. Relatively abundant supplies in the West and high stock levels in storage helped to drive spot prices lower this week. At the New York Mercantile Exchange (NYMEX), the price of the futures contract for December delivery moved up about 21 cents to $7.835 per MMBtu. Natural gas in storage was 3,536 Bcf as of Friday, November 9, which is 8.4 percent higher than the 5-year average of 3,263 Bcf. The spot price for West Texas Intermediate (WTI) crude oil decreased on the week by $2.44 per barrel or about 3 percent to trade yesterday at $94.02 per barrel or $16.21 per MMBtu.

316

Technical Information Exchange on Pyrolysis Oil: Potential for...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

renewable heating oil substitution Technical Information Exchange on Pyrolysis Oil: Potential for a renewable heating oil substitution Two-day agenda from the workshop: Technical...

317

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

7 (next release 2:00 p.m. on July 13, 2006) 7 (next release 2:00 p.m. on July 13, 2006) Natural gas spot prices decreased sharply this week (Wednesday-Thursday, June 28 - July 6), although crude oil prices continued to trade at near record high levels. For the week, the price at the Henry Hub decreased $0.76 per MMBtu, or about 13 percent, to $5.28. At the New York Mercantile Exchange (NYMEX), the price of the futures contract for August delivery at the Henry Hub moved about 50 cents per MMBtu lower to settle yesterday (Thursday, July 6) at $5.664. Natural gas in storage was 2,615 Bcf as of Friday, June 30, which is 29.2 percent higher than the 5-year average. Crude oil continued to trade at near record-high prices. The spot price for West Texas Intermediate (WTI) crude oil increased $2.85 per barrel or about 3 percent since last Wednesday (June 28) to trade yesterday at $75.00 per barrel or $12.93 per MMBtu.

318

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Tuesday, November 13. 2001 Tuesday, November 13. 2001 For the week ended Friday, November 9, 2001, both spot and futures prices continued the generally downward trend initiated in the preceding week. The declines accelerated on Monday (November 12), as prices dropped sharply to begin the week. The unusually mild temperatures in many parts of the nation coupled with relatively high storage levels were major factors in the downward trend in prices. Daily temperatures in a number of cities in the upper Midwest and Northern Plains States reached record highs and exceeded normal levels by double-digits. (See Temperature Map) (See Deviation Map) By Friday, spot prices at the Henry Hub had declined for 9 days straight, ending the week at $2.63 per MMBtu, a drop of 33 cents from the previous Friday. On Monday of this week (November 12), the spot price at the Henry Hub fell $0.17 per MMBtu to $2.46. After its major downward shift of over 32 cents per MMBtu on Monday, November 5, the settlement price of the NYMEX futures contract for December delivery fell on 3 of the 4 ensuing trading days and ended the week at $2.925 per MMBtu, down $0.323 from the previous Friday. This Monday (November 12), the December contract shifted down further, dropping $0.192 to settle at $2.733 per MMBtu. The spot price for West Texas Intermediate crude oil (WTI) edged below $20 per barrel for one day (Tuesday, November 6), then recovered to end the week at $22.25 per barrel, or $3.84 per MMBtu, up $2.05 per barrel from Friday, November 2. Yesterday, the WTI fell by a dollar to $21.25.

319

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

11 (next release 2:00 p.m. on August 18) 11 (next release 2:00 p.m. on August 18) Natural gas spot prices exhibited increases in most locations this week (Wednesday - Wednesday, August 3 - 10) as demand responded to above average temperatures, high crude oil prices, and reduced coal deliveries, which added to demand for natural gas-fired power generation. The Henry Hub spot price increased 6 cents this week, or less than 1 percent, to $8.81 per MMBtu. The price of the NYMEX futures contract for September delivery increased 72 cents since last Wednesday (August 3) to settle yesterday at $9.071 per MMBtu. Natural gas in storage as of Friday, August 5, was 2,463 Bcf, which is 6.4 percent above the 5-year average. The spot price for West Texas Intermediate (WTI) crude oil hit a record high yesterday of $64.80 per barrel ($11.17 per MMBtu) after increasing $4.04 per barrel (70 cents per MMBtu), or about 7 percent, on the week.

320

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

1, 2007 (next release 2:00 p.m. on March 8, 2007) 1, 2007 (next release 2:00 p.m. on March 8, 2007) Natural gas spot prices decreased at almost all market locations this week in spite of continuing cold weather through most of the country and increasing crude oil prices. For the week (Wednesday to Wednesday), the spot price at the Henry Hub declined 27 cents per MMBtu, or about 4 percent, to trade at $7.24 per MMBtu yesterday (February 28). The price of the NYMEX futures contract for April delivery at the Henry Hub decreased 42 cents, or about 5 percent, this week, closing yesterday at $7.300 per MMBtu, while the March contract expired at $7.547 per MMBtu on Tuesday, February 27. Natural gas in storage as of Friday, February 23, decreased to 1,733 Bcf, which is 11.5 percent above the 5-year average. The spot price for West Texas Intermediate (WTI) crude oil gained $2.38 per barrel since last Wednesday to trade yesterday at $61.78 per barrel or $10.65 per MMBtu, which is the highest price since late December.

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321

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

August 3 (next release 2:00 p.m. on August 10, 2006) August 3 (next release 2:00 p.m. on August 10, 2006) Natural gas spot prices increased sharply this week (Wednesday-Wednesday, July 26 - August 2), as demand for power generation remained high in order to meet air-conditioning load and crude oil continued to trade near record-high prices. For the week, the price at the Henry Hub increased $1.94 per MMBtu, or about 29 percent, to $8.65. At the New York Mercantile Exchange (NYMEX), the August contract expired last Thursday, July 27, at $7.042 per MMBtu, about $1.16 more than the previous month's settlement. The price of the futures contract for September delivery at the Henry Hub moved about 83 cents per MMBtu higher on the week to settle yesterday (Wednesday, August 2) at $7.799. Natural gas in storage was 2,775 Bcf as of Friday, July 28, which is 19.2 percent higher than the 5-year average. The spot price for West Texas Intermediate (WTI) crude oil increased $2.34 per barrel or about 3 percent, since last Wednesday (July 26) to trade yesterday at $76.16 per barrel or $13.13 per MMBtu.

322

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

June 6, 2002 (next release 2:00 p.m. on June 13) June 6, 2002 (next release 2:00 p.m. on June 13) Natural gas spot prices weakened in the opening days of June as concerns lingered over high storage inventories levels and mild weather limited gas demand in the key market areas of the Midwest and Northeast. Net storage injections for the week ending May 31 were 105 Bcf, bringing the total inventory level in the country to 1,893 Bcf, according to EIA estimates. Since Wednesday, May 29, prices at most trading locations have dropped by 16 cents or less. At the NYMEX, prices for futures contracts have declined more sharply. In the first week of trading as the near-month contract, the price for a futures contract for July delivery fell to $3.260 per MMBtu by yesterday's close, a drop of $0.245 per MMBtu since the previous Wednesday. Crude oil prices provided little impetus for price advances. The spot price of West Texas Intermediate crude oil fell $0.62 per barrel for the week, trading on Wednesday, June 5 at $25.02 per barrel, or $4.31 per MMBtu.

323

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

August 4 (next release 2:00 p.m. on August 11) August 4 (next release 2:00 p.m. on August 11) Natural gas spot prices increased sharply this week (Wednesday-Wednesday, July 27 - August 3), as demand for power generation remained high in order to meet air-conditioning load and crude oil continued to trade near record-high prices. For the week, the price at the Henry Hub increased $1.25 per MMBtu, or about 17 percent, to $8.75. At the New York Mercantile Exchange (NYMEX), the price of the futures contract for September delivery at the Henry Hub moved about 76 cents per MMBtu higher to settle yesterday (Wednesday, August 3) at $8.351. Natural gas in storage was 2,420 Bcf as of Friday, July 29, which is 7.6 percent higher than the 5-year average. However, the hot temperatures throughout the Lower 48 States have slowed net injections in the past several weeks. The spot price for West Texas Intermediate (WTI) crude oil increased $1.64 per barrel or about 3 percent, since last Wednesday (July 27) to trade yesterday at $60.76 per barrel or $10.48 per MMBtu.

324

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

9 (next release 2:00 p.m. on August 26) 9 (next release 2:00 p.m. on August 26) Higher crude oil prices this week (Wednesday-Wednesday, August 11-18) failed to offset the downward pressure on natural gas prices from unseasonably cool weather and associated lower electric power demand. Natural gas spot prices decreased 17 to 44 cents per MMBtu at most trading locations in the Lower 48 States since Wednesday, August 11. On the week, the Henry Hub spot price decreased 29 cents to $5.35 per MMBtu. The NYMEX futures contract for September delivery dropped just over 23 cents per MMBtu to a close of $5.382 on Wednesday, August 18. Working gas in storage as of Friday, August 13, increased to 2,530 Bcf, which is 5.7 percent above the 5-year (1999-2003) average. The spot price for West Texas Intermediate (WTI) crude oil increased $2.64 per barrel on the week to $47.36, or $8.17 per MMBtu.

325

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

7, 2003 (next release 2:00 p.m. on April 3) 7, 2003 (next release 2:00 p.m. on April 3) At the Henry Hub, the spot price declined 29 cents per MMBtu from the previous Wednesday (March 19), as spot gas traded yesterday (Wednesday, March 26) for $4.91. Both spot and futures prices trended lower for the week (Wednesday to Wednesday, March 19-26), as mild temperatures in most of the nation accompanied the first week of spring. On the NYMEX, the settlement price for the futures contract for April delivery fell a cumulative $0.181 per MMBtu from last Wednesday's level, to $5.097 per MMBtu at yesterday's close of trading. Natural gas stocks as of Friday, March 21 stood at 643 Bcf, which is 47.4 percent less than the previous 5-year (1998-2002) average. The war in Iraq has caused significant volatility in oil prices over the past week. In yesterday's trading, the spot price for West Texas Intermediate crude oil fell $4.71 to $28.71 per barrel, or $4.95 per MMBtu. This is $1.30 per barrel ($0.22 per MMBtu) less than last Wednesday's price.

326

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

7 (next release 2:00 p.m. on June 3) 7 (next release 2:00 p.m. on June 3) High crude oil prices and increasing cooling demand contributed to natural gas spot prices climbing 20 to 55 cents per MMBtu at most trading locations in the Lower 48 States since Wednesday, May 19. On the week (Wednesday-Wednesday, May 19-26), the Henry Hub spot price rose 52 cents per MMBtu to $6.70. The NYMEX futures contract for June delivery gained 22.5 cents per MMBtu on the week to a monthly settlement price of $6.68 in its final day of trading on Wednesday, May 26. Working gas in storage as of Friday, May 21, increased to 1,477 Bcf, which is 0.1 percent below the 5-year (1999-2003) average. The spot price for West Texas Intermediate (WTI) crude oil decreased $1.01 per barrel on the week to $40.60, or $7.00 per MMBtu.

327

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Friday, January 3, 2003 (next release 2:00 p.m. on January 9) Friday, January 3, 2003 (next release 2:00 p.m. on January 9) A trend of generally declining natural gas spot prices across the country since mid-December came to an abrupt halt yesterday (Thursday, January 2) owing to new forecasts of an Arctic front expected to arrive soon in the Lower 48. During the first day of trading in the New Year, the Henry Hub spot price moved up 34 cents per MMBtu to $4.94, but was still 6 cents lower in comparison with the average last Thursday. For the week (Thursday-Thursday), the price of the NYMEX futures contract for February increased just over $0.26 per MMBtu to $5.251. Natural gas in storage decreased to 2,417 Bcf, which trails the 5-year average by 3.8 percent, for the week ending December 27. Crude oil prices have provided little reprieve from the cautious energy outlook for the rest of the winter, as they continue to hover around 2-year highs owing to political strife in Venezuela and the Iraqi situation, both of which contribute to supply concerns for U.S. markets. Although the spot price for West Texas Intermediate (WTI) crude oil declined $0.64 per barrel on the week, the spot price gained $0.76 yesterday to an average of $31.97, or $5.51 per MMBtu.

328

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

18 (next release 2:00 p.m. on May 25, 2006) 18 (next release 2:00 p.m. on May 25, 2006) Natural gas spot prices decreased this week (Wednesday - Wednesday, May 10-17) at virtually all market locations, partly because of weak weather-related demand and a decrease in the price of crude oil. The Henry Hub spot price decreased 34 cents per MMBtu, or about 5 percent, while some other market locations in Louisiana noted decreases of up to 65 cents on the week. East and South Texas trading locations, as well as locations in the Northeast, experienced slightly less dramatic decreases, averaging 31 cents per MMBtu. Yesterday (May 17), the price of the New York Mercantile Exchange (NYMEX) futures contract for June delivery at the Henry Hub settled at $6.129 per MMBtu, decreasing 77 cents or about 11 percent since last Wednesday. Natural gas in storage as of Friday, May 12, increased 91 Bcf to 2,080 Bcf, which is 53.2 percent above the 5-year average. The spot price for West Texas Intermediate (WTI) crude oil declined $3.50 per barrel, or almost 5 percent on the week (Wednesday - Wednesday), to $68.65 per barrel or about $11.84 per MMBtu.

329

Dependence of thermal diffusivity on organic content for Green River oil shalesExtension of the modified Cheng?Vachon model to the parallel heat?flow case  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In an earlier paper [J. Appl. Phys. 50 2776 (1979)] the modified Cheng?Vachon model was found to give good agreement with experimental data on the variation of thermal diffusivity with organic content for Green River oil shales. Calculations using the model were carried out for the case where heat flows in directions perpendicular to the shale stratigraphic planes. In the present paper the above model is modified to account for experimental trends in the parallel heat?flow case. The modified model provides a self?consistent explanation for the lower degree of anisotropy (relative to theory) that has been experimentally observed for the thermal diffusivity of Green River oil shales.

Y. Wang; K. Rajeshwar; J. DuBow

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

330

Natural Gas Weekly Update, Printer-Friendly Version  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

7, 2007 (next release 2:00 p.m. on May 24, 2007) 7, 2007 (next release 2:00 p.m. on May 24, 2007) Natural gas spot and futures prices increased slightly this week (Wednesday-Wednesday, May 9-16), despite the usual lull in demand during this shoulder period between the winter heating and summer cooling seasons. The upward price trend likely resulted from a variety of factors, including rising prices for competing petroleum products (as evidenced by an increase in the underlying crude oil price). Additionally, concerns over current and future supplies do not appear to have eased. The official start of the hurricane season is imminent, and the first named tropical storm appeared this week. However, imports of liquefied natural gas (LNG) have increased markedly in the past few months. On the week, the Henry Hub spot price

331

Natural Gas Weekly Update, Printer-Friendly Version  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

0, 2001 0, 2001 Prices in both spot and futures markets rose last week. For the week, spot prices at the Henry Hub increased by 25 cents from the previous Friday to $3.23 per MMBtu-an increase of 8 percent. The settlement price of the NYMEX futures contract for September delivery gained 37-plus cents on Wednesday in response to the AGA storage report, then declined to settle at $3.303 on Friday-still up $0.263 from the previous Friday's ending price. Pressure for sustained high prices was limited as temperatures across most of the nation moderated significantly from the heat wave conditions experienced for much of the preceding week. (See Temperature Map) (See Deviation from Normal Temperatures Map) The spot price for West Texas Intermediate crude oil oscillated in a fairly narrow range

332

Consideration of Fouling During the Design of Crude Oil Pre-Heat Trains  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

case study, based on network in Figure 6(a) Time Ihours R f EI, E4, E5, E6 Im 2 KW' R f E2,E3,E7,E8 Im 2 KW'\\ 0 0.0 0.0 1000 0.00155 0.00248 2000 0.0026 0.0042 3000 0.0033 0.0053 4000 0.00385 0.00616 5000 0.00425 0.0068 6000 0.0046 0... of Bound point bound Tempe rature Kerosene EI sheJi lower 20 ?C HGO E2 shell lower 30 ?C Naptha E3 shell lower 110 ?C Desalter feed E3 tube upper 135 ?C Gas oil E5 shell lower l50 ?C Residue E6 shell lower 170 ?C ._~- Gas oil PA E7 shell lower...

Polley, G. T.; Pugh, S. J.; Wilson, D. I.

333

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

26, 2007 (next release 2:00 p.m. on August 2, 2007) 26, 2007 (next release 2:00 p.m. on August 2, 2007) Since Wednesday, July 18, natural gas spot prices have decreased at all market locations in the Lower 48 States, with the exception of a few points in the Rockies. For the week (Wednesday-Wednesday), prices at the Henry Hub decreased by about 11 percent to $5.57 per MMBtu. Yesterday (July 25), the price of the NYMEX futures contract for August delivery at the Henry Hub settled at $5.925 per MMBtu in its third to last day of trading, decreasing by a net of $0.60 or about 9 percent since last Wednesday (July 18). The August 2007 contract reversed a 3-day downward price trend in the final day of the report week, increasing 6.2 cents per MMBtu on Wednesday, July 25. Natural gas in storage was 2,763 Bcf as of July 20, which is 16.1 percent above the 5-year average. The spot price for West Texas Intermediate (WTI) crude oil rose $0.71 per barrel or about 1 percent on the week to $75.74 per barrel or $13.06 per MMBtu. The crude oil price reached $75.90 per barrel on July 19, which was the highest crude oil price since August 9, 2006, when the WTI traded at $76.28 per barrel. Furthermore, it was $1.15 per barrel lower than the all-time high of $77.05 per barrel recorded on August 7, 2006.

334

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

16, 2010 at 2:00 P.M. 16, 2010 at 2:00 P.M. Next Release: Thursday, January 6, 2011 Overview Prices Storage Other Market Trends Natural Gas Transportation Update Overview (For the Week Ending Wednesday, December 15, 2010) Extremely cold weather conditions moving across the country boosted demand for space heating this report week (December 8-15). Spot prices nonetheless decreased in most markets (with the exception of several in the Northeast), likely influenced by storage for winter usage remaining near historical highs and very strong current supplies. During the report week, the Henry Hub spot price decreased $0.24 to $4.22 per million Btu (MMBtu). At the New York Mercantile Exchange (NYMEX), prices for futures contracts also decreased with expectations of ample supply levels for this

335

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

7, 2009 at 2:00 P.M. 7, 2009 at 2:00 P.M. Next Release: Thursday, January 7, 2010 Overview Prices Storage Other Market Trends Natural Gas Transportation Update Overview (For the Week Ending Wednesday, December 16, 2009) Changes in natural gas spot prices this report week (December 9-16) reflected extremely cold weather conditions moving across the country. In response to varying levels of demand for space heating, spot prices increased east of the Mississippi River but declined in the West. During the report week, the Henry Hub spot price increased $0.30 to $5.57 per million Btu (MMBtu). At the New York Mercantile Exchange (NYMEX), prices for futures contracts also rose with expectations of higher demand in response to this month’s trend of colder-than-normal temperatures. The futures contract for

336

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

0, 2009 0, 2009 Next Release: August 27, 2009 Overview Prices Storage Other Market Trends Natural Gas Transportation Update Overview (For the Week Ending Wednesday, August 19, 2009) Natural gas spot prices declined this report week (August 12-19), with the largest decreases generally occurring in the western half of the country. The Henry Hub spot price decreased by $0.34 to $3.02 per million Btu (MMBtu). At the New York Mercantile Exchange (NYMEX), futures prices decreased as supplies continued to be viewed as more than adequate to address near-term demand, including heating-related demand increases this winter. The futures contract for September delivery decreased by $0.36 on the week to $3.12 per MMBtu. Working gas in underground storage as of last Friday is estimated to

337

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

4, 2011 at 2:00 P.M. 4, 2011 at 2:00 P.M. Next Release: Thursday, March 31, 2011 Overview Prices Storage Other Market Trends Natural Gas Transportation Update Overview (For the Week Ending Wednesday, March 23, 2011) Colder weather moved into major population centers this report week, increasing demand related to space heating for much of the country. Prices moved higher at all trading locations in the lower 48 States, with the biggest increases occurring in the Northeast. During the report week, the Henry Hub spot price increased $0.33 to $4.18 per million Btu (MMBtu). At the New York Mercantile Exchange (NYMEX), futures prices also increased significantly as the weather outlook suggested higher consumption for the remaining days of March. The futures contract for April delivery

338

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

2, 2007 to Thursday, January 9, 2008) 2, 2007 to Thursday, January 9, 2008) Released: January 10, 2008 Next release: January 17, 2008 · In the eastern half of the Lower 48 States, temperatures warmed significantly this report week, resulting in a respite from elevated prices at many trading locations. In the West, however, bitter cold persisted and prices continued to move upward as space-heating demand remained strong. During the report week, the Henry Hub spot price increased $0.05 per million Btu (MMBtu) to $7.88. · At the New York Mercantile Exchange (NYMEX), prices for futures contracts after an initial decline increased through the past 4 trading days as the timing of another cold front became more certain. The futures contract for February delivery rose about 25 cents per MMBtu on the week to $8.099.

339

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

2, 2010 at 2:00 P.M. 2, 2010 at 2:00 P.M. Next Release: Thursday, April 29, 2010 Overview Prices Storage Other Market Trends Natural Gas Transportation Update Overview (For the Week Ending Wednesday, April 21, 2010) Natural gas spot prices fell during the week at locations across the country, with declines ranging from 12 to 62 cents per million Btu (MMBtu). The Henry Hub spot price fell 19 cents, or about 5 percent, averaging $3.96 per MMBtu yesterday, April 21. At the New York Mercantile Exchange (NYMEX), the value of the futures contract for May 2010 delivery at the Henry Hub fell about 6 percent, from $4.199 per MMBtu on April 14 to $3.955 per MMBtu on April 21. The West Texas Intermediate crude oil spot price fell 3 percent since last Wednesday to $82.98 per barrel, or $14.31 per MMBtu.

340

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

2, 2011 at 2:00 P.M. 2, 2011 at 2:00 P.M. Next Release: Thursday, May 19, 2011 Overview Prices Storage Other Market Trends Natural Gas Transportation Update Overview (For the Week Ending Wednesday, May 11, 2011) Natural gas prices fell across the board as oil prices dropped steeply along with most other major commodities. At the Henry Hub, the natural gas spot price fell 36 cents from $4.59 per million Btu (MMBtu) on Wednesday, May 4, to $4.23 per MMBtu on Wednesday, May 11. At the New York Mercantile Exchange, the price of the near-month natural gas contract (June 2011) dropped almost 9 percent, falling from $4.577 per MMBtu last Wednesday to $4.181 yesterday. Working natural gas in storage rose by 70 billion cubic feet (Bcf) to 1,827 Bcf, according to EIA’s Weekly Natural Gas Storage Report.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "weekly heating oil" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

5, 2008 5, 2008 Next Release: June 12, 2008 Overview Prices Storage Other Market Trends Natural Gas Transportation Update Overview Spot gas at most market locations (outside the Rocky Mountain Region) traded above $10 per million Btu (MMBtu) this report week (Wednesday-Wednesday), with many points registering prices in excess of $12 per MMBtu. At the New York Mercantile Exchange (NYMEX), the price of the futures contract for July delivery at the Henry Hub moved higher by 38 cents per MMBtu compared with its settlement price a week ago, ending yesterday (June 4) at $12.379 MMBtu. Natural gas in storage was 1,806 billion cubic feet (Bcf) as of May 30, which is 0.1 percent below the 5-year average (2003-2007). The spot price for West Texas Intermediate (WTI) crude oil decreased

342

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

January 6 (next release 2:00 p.m. on January 13) January 6 (next release 2:00 p.m. on January 13) Since Wednesday, December 29, natural gas spot prices have decreased at most market locations in the Lower 48 States. For the week (Wednesday-Wednesday), prices at the Henry Hub declined 34 cents, or about 6 percent, to $5.84 per MMBtu. Yesterday (January 5), the price of the NYMEX futures contract for February delivery at the Henry Hub settled at $5.833 per MMBtu, decreasing roughly 57 cents since last Wednesday (December 29). Natural gas in storage was 2,698 Bcf as of December 31, which is about 12 percent above the 5-year average. The spot price for West Texas Intermediate (WTI) crude oil decreased $0.28 per barrel, or less than 1 percent, on the week to $43.41 per barrel or $7.484 per MMBtu.

343

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

8, 2010 at 2:00 P.M. 8, 2010 at 2:00 P.M. Next Release: Thursday, December 2, 2010 Overview Prices Storage Other Market Trends Natural Gas Transportation Update Overview (For the Week Ending Wednesday, November 17, 2010) Natural gas spot prices fell modestly at nearly all domestic pricing points, likely because expectations for colder weather were slow in materializing and storage levels rose again. The Henry Hub price fell 23 cents (about 6 percent) for the week ending November 17, to $3.77 per million Btu (MMBtu). The West Texas Intermediate crude oil spot price settled at $80.43 per barrel ($13.87 per MMBtu), on Wednesday, November 17. This represents a decrease of $7.34 per barrel, or $1.27 per MMBtu, from the previous Wednesday. Working natural gas in storage set another new all-time record

344

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

0, 2011 at 2:00 P.M. 0, 2011 at 2:00 P.M. Next Release: Thursday, January 27, 2011 Overview Prices Storage Other Market Trends Natural Gas Transportation Update Overview (For the Week Ending Wednesday, January 19, 2011) Natural gas prices fell at most market locations across the country, as bitterly cold weather subsided. At the Henry Hub, the natural gas price fell 7 cents from $4.55 per million Btu (MMBtu) on Wednesday, January 12, to $4.48 per MMBtu on Wednesday, January 19. At the New York Mercantile Exchange (NYMEX), the price of the near-month natural gas contract (February 2011) rose slightly, from $4.531 per MMBtu on January 12 to $4.561 yesterday. The spot price of the West Texas Intermediate crude oil fell by $1 over the week, from $91.85 per barrel on January 12 ($15.84 per MMBtu) to

345

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

November 4 (next release 2:00 p.m. on November 10) November 4 (next release 2:00 p.m. on November 10) Since Wednesday, October 27, natural gas spot prices have decreased at virtually all market locations in the Lower 48 States. For the week (Wednesday-Wednesday), prices at the Henry Hub declined 86 cents, or about 11 percent, to $7.26 per MMBtu. Yesterday (November 3), the price of the NYMEX futures contract for December delivery at the Henry Hub settled at $8.752 per MMBtu, decreasing roughly 2 cents since last Wednesday (October 27). Natural gas in storage was 3,293 Bcf as of October 29, which is 7.8 percent above the 5-year average. The spot price for West Texas Intermediate (WTI) crude oil decreased $0.62 per barrel, or about 3 percent, on the week to $50.90 per barrel or $8.776 per MMBtu.

346

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Holiday Notice: Holiday Notice: Due to the federal holiday in observance of Martin Luther King Day on Monday, January 21, 2002, the next issue of the Natural Gas Weekly Update will be published on Tuesday, January 22, 2002. Overview: Monday, January 14, 2002 Natural gas prices were generally lower last week as the fundamentals of ample working gas in storage and very little temperature-driven swing demand dominated the market. With little in the way of market-changing developments, trading in both the spot and futures markets tended to occur in relatively small price ranges throughout the week. The warming trend begun late in the previous week continued nearly unabated through last week, with the heavy gas-consuming areas of the Midwest and Northeast recording many of the greatest deviations above daily normal temperatures. Philadelphia, New York City, and Buffalo, NY had at least 3 days of temperatures that were 10 or more degrees above normal; Chicago's temperature reached an unusually warm 26 degrees above normal on Wednesday. (See Temperature Map) (See Deviation Map) Spot prices at the Henry Hub moved down moderately from the previous week, ending trading on Friday at $2.31, down 5 cents from the previous Friday. On the NYMEX, the futures contract for February delivery at the Henry Hub declined by $0.071 from the previous Friday, settling on Friday, January 11 at $2.204 per MMBtu. The spot price for West Texas Intermediate crude oil also fell, dipping below $20 per barrel for the first time in the New Year, ending trading last Friday at $19.67 per barrel, or $3.39 per MMBtu, down $1.80 per barrel, or $0.31 per MMBtu, from Friday, January 4.

347

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

8 (next release 2:00 p.m. on November 4) 8 (next release 2:00 p.m. on November 4) Natural gas spot prices spiked significantly higher for the second consecutive week, while futures prices for delivery months beyond November saw smaller, yet still substantial, increases. The November contract expired yesterday (Wednesday, October 27) at nearly the identical price of last Wednesday's settlement, up $0.003 on the week (Wednesday to Wednesday, October 21-28) to end trading at $7.626 per MMBtu. Taking over as the near-month contract, the NYMEX futures contract for December delivery settled yesterday at $8.775 per MMBtu, an increase of $0.235 per MMBtu, or almost 3 percent, since last Wednesday. The price for spot gas at the Henry Hub jumped $0.87 per MMBtu on the week, an increase of 12 percent, as spot gas traded yesterday at $8.12, topping $8 for the first time since early March 2003. Working gas inventories were 3,249 Bcf as of Friday, October 22, which is 6.9 percent greater than the 5-year average. The spot price for West Texas Intermediate crude oil reached a record-high $56.37 per barrel ($9.72 per MMBtu) on Tuesday (October 26), only to drop in yesterday's trading on news that last week's crude oil stocks build was about double the market's expectations. WTI ended trading yesterday at $52.52 per barrel ($9.06 per MMBtu), down $2.41 per barrel ($0.42 per MMBtu), or over 4 percent, from last Wednesday's level.

348

This Week In Petroleum Printer-Friendly Version  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

and heating oil) or products in which oil prices impact the cost (e.g., shipping costs and petrochemicals used in plastics). But the major crude oil price-related product...

349

This Week In Petroleum Printer-Friendly Version  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

heating oil is consumed, will be a critical factor affecting crude oil prices. If cold weather persists in the Northeast, then crude oil prices are not likely to diminish much,...

350

This Week In Petroleum Printer-Friendly Version  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

inventories of both distillate fuel oil (used as both heating oil and diesel fuel) and propane stood at about average levels for this time of year. Distillate fuel oil inventories...

351

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

7 (next release 2:00 p.m. on October 14) 7 (next release 2:00 p.m. on October 14) Natural gas spot and futures prices generally moved in opposite directions for the week (Wednesday to Wednesday, September 29-October 6), as spot prices fell at most market locations, while futures prices continued to climb higher. In yesterday's (Wednesday, October 6) trading at the Henry Hub, the spot price for natural gas averaged $6.00 per MMBtu, down 23 cents per MMBtu, or close to 4 percent, from the previous Wednesday. On the New York Mercantile Exchange (NYMEX), the futures contract for November delivery gained $0.134 per MMBtu on the week, or about 2 percent, as it settled yesterday at $7.045. Settlement prices for contracts for gas delivery in December 2004 through March 2005 rose much more sharply, with increases ranging from just over 40 cents to nearly 60 cents per MMBtu. EIA reported that inventories were 3,092 Bcf as of Friday, October 1, which is 6.9 percent greater than the previous 5-year average for the week. The spot price for West Texas Intermediate crude oil rose $2.45 per barrel (42 cents per MMBtu) on the week, or about 5 percent, to yesterday's record-high price of $51.98 per barrel ($8.96 per MMBtu).

352

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Monday, December 29 (next release 2:00 p.m. on January 8) Monday, December 29 (next release 2:00 p.m. on January 8) A trend of increasing natural gas spot prices since mid-November abruptly halted late in the week before Christmas, owing to mild temperatures across the country during the first week of the holiday season. For the week (Wednesday-Wednesday, December 17-24), the Henry Hub spot price decreased $1.06 per MMBtu to $5.50, while declines in Midwest and Northeast market centers were even greater at between $1.10-$1.40. The price of the NYMEX futures contract for January delivery fell slightly more than $0.61 per MMBtu to $6.379. As of December 19, natural gas in storage had decreased to 2,699 Bcf, which is 0.1 percent below the 5-year average. Although the spot price for West Texas Intermediate (WTI) crude oil increased slightly in trading before the holiday, the spot price fell $1.33 on the week to $32.03, or $5.52 per MMBtu.

353

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

13 (next release 2:00 p.m. on July 20, 2006) 13 (next release 2:00 p.m. on July 20, 2006) Natural gas spot prices increased at most market locations in the Lower 48 States this week despite significant drops in prices at many locations early in the report week. The spot price at the Henry Hub was one of the few to decrease for the week (Wednesday - Wednesday, July 5 to 12), declining 6 cents, or about 1 percent, to $5.65 per MMBtu. The price of the NYMEX futures contract for August delivery settled at $5.782 per MMBtu yesterday (July 12), which is 2 cents, or less than 1 percent, above last Wednesday's level. As of Friday, July 7, 2006, natural gas in storage was 2,704 Bcf or 27.4 percent above the 5-year average. The spot price for West Texas Intermediate (WTI) crude oil was $74.99 per barrel or $12.93 per MMBtu yesterday. This price is 21 cents per barrel less than the price last week, a decrease of less than 1 percent.

354

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

8 (next release 2:00 p.m. on June 15, 2006) 8 (next release 2:00 p.m. on June 15, 2006) Continuing moderate temperatures across much of the Lower 48 States, particularly in the eastern half of the country, helped lower natural gas spot and futures prices during the week (Wednesday to Wednesday, May 31 - June 7). The spot price at the Henry Hub decreased by $0.15 per MMBtu, or about 2.5 percent, for the week, to $5.82 in yesterday's (Wednesday, June 7) trading. At the New York Mercantile Exchange (NYMEX), the price of the futures contract for July delivery moved lower by 41 cents per MMBtu compared with its settlement price a week ago, ending yesterday at $5.974 per MMBtu. The Energy Information Administration (EIA) reported that natural gas inventories in underground storage were an estimated 2,320 Bcf as of Friday, June 2, which is 41.3 percent greater than the previous 5-year average. The spot price for West Texas Intermediate (WTI) crude oil decreased by $0.52 per barrel, or less than 1 percent on the week, bringing the WTI spot price in yesterday's trading to $70.90 per barrel, or $12.22 per MMBtu.

355

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Monday, January 28, 2002 Monday, January 28, 2002 Natural gas prices generally declined last week as mild temperatures continued in most of the country and working gas storage stocks remain at very high levels. Spot prices at most major markets that serve the eastern two-thirds of the country ended the week down from the previous Friday with weather forecasts for the past weekend calling for daytime temperatures to be in the mid 50s to the low 60s in an area stretching from Chicago to Boston. At the Henry Hub prices moved down 9 cents on Friday to end at $2.04 per MMBtu--$0.25 below the previous Friday. The National Weather Service's (NWS) latest 6- to 10-day forecast is calling for above normal temperatures to continue through this week in most areas east of the Mississippi River. (See Temperature Map) (See Deviation Map) At the NYMEX futures market, the February contract continued to trend down as it ended the week trading at $2.037 per MMBtu-off almost $0.20 from previous Friday. The spot price for West Texas Intermediate (WTI) crude oil gained almost $1.80 per barrel reaching $19.80 on Friday or about $3.40 per MMBtu.

356

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

25, 2002 25, 2002 After moving down at mid-week, spot prices at most major market locations rebounded and climbed to levels not seen in over 6 months. At the Henry Hub prices gained $0.35 on Friday to end the week at $3.54 per MMBtu, the highest reported daily mid-point price since June 25, 2001. On the NYMEX the futures contract for April delivery ended trading on Friday at $3.326 per MMBtu. This is $0.90 per MMBtu higher or 37 percent above its settlement price when it began to trade as the near-month contract on February 27. Much of the country had cooler-than-normal temperatures last week, especially in the Northern Plains and the Northeast. (See Temperature Map) (See Deviation Map) The spot price of West Texas Intermediate (WTI) crude oil continued to climb, exceeding $25 most days last week, and ended trading on Friday at $25.56 or $4.40 per MMBtu.

357

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

March 4, 2002 March 4, 2002 Spot prices wound up slightly higher for the week (Friday to Friday) after trading within relatively narrow ranges with only regional exceptions. On the NYMEX futures market, the March contract expired on Tuesday, February 26, 2002, at $2.388 per MMBtu, ending with a gain of $0.321 per MMBtu since becoming the near-month contract on January 29. Tuesday also saw the largest increase in spot prices, as a huge Arctic air mass expanded from the Central Plains States into the Midwest and Southwest, bringing some of the coldest temperatures thus far this winter. Daily average temperatures on Tuesday through Thursday in major cities in the Central and Southwest regions ranged from 6 to 18 degrees below normal and up to 8 degrees below normal in the Midwest. Equally sharp temperature drops were seen in the Southeast by Wednesday. (See Temperature Map) (See Deviation Map) At the Henry Hub, the spot price gained a nickel on Tuesday, but for the week was up by only 9 cents, to $2.49 per MMBtu. The new near-month contract, for April delivery at the Henry Hub, ended the week at $2.359 per MMBtu. The spot price for West Texas Intermediate crude oil moved above $22 per barrel for the first time since early November, gaining $1.45 for the week and ending trading on Friday at $22.37 per barrel, or $3.86 per MMBtu.

358

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

14 (next release 2:00 p.m. on October 21) 14 (next release 2:00 p.m. on October 21) Natural gas spot prices and the near-month futures price showed a week-to-week decline as the pace of storage injections indicate adequate supplies, despite continued shut-in production in the Gulf of Mexico owing to Hurricane Ivan's impact. For the week (Wednesday-Wednesday, October 6-13), the price at the Henry Hub decreased 61 cents or about 10 percent to $5.39 per MMBtu. Prices in production areas along the Gulf Coast and Texas generally fell between 40 and 75 cents per MMBtu, while Midcontinent price declines were less than 36 cents per MMBtu. The price of the NYMEX futures contract for November delivery ended the week at $6.851, a decline of roughly 19 cents per MMBtu or slightly more than 2.8 percent since last Wednesday. Natural gas in storage increased to 3,159 Bcf as of Friday, October 8, which is about 7.2 percent above the 5-year average. The spot price for West Texas Intermediate (WTI) crude oil increased $1.88 per barrel, or 3.6 percent, since last Wednesday to trade yesterday (October 13) at $53.86 per barrel or $9.29 per MMBtu.

359

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

1 (next release 2:00 p.m. on September 8) 1 (next release 2:00 p.m. on September 8) Natural gas spot and futures prices increased sharply this week (Wednesday-Wednesday, August 24-31), as Hurricane Katrina's movement through the Gulf of Mexico region brought widespread evacuations of production facilities and an unknown amount of infrastructure damage. For the week, the spot price at the Henry Hub increased $2.70 per MMBtu to $12.70. At the New York Mercantile Exchange (NYMEX), final settlement for the September delivery contract occurred on Monday as Katrina hammered the Gulf Coast, causing a one-day increase of $1.055 per MMBtu to a final expiration price of $10.847. On the week, the price of the futures contract for October delivery at the Henry Hub moved approximately $1.45 per MMBtu higher to settle yesterday (Wednesday, August 31) at $11.472. Natural gas in storage was 2,633 Bcf as of Friday, August 26, which is 5.2 percent above the 5-year average inventory for the report week. The spot price for West Texas Intermediate (WTI) crude oil increased $1.53 per barrel or about 2 percent since last Wednesday to trade yesterday at $68.63 per barrel or $11.83 per MMBtu.

360

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

22, 2001 22, 2001 The spot price at the Henry Hub finished the week at $2.34 per MMBtu, or just 3 cents above its level the previous Friday. On the NYMEX, the futures contract for November delivery ended the week over a quarter of a dollar higher than the previous Friday, at $2.681 per MMBtu. Despite a brief 2-day cold snap, temperatures across the Lower 48 States were relatively mild. Although some unseasonably cooler temperatures were seen from the Gulf Coast into the Mid-continent, even there average temperatures for the week generally were 50 degrees or more. (See Temperature Map) (See Deviation Map) On October 12 the Coast Guard lifted the ban on liquefied natural gas (LNG) tankers' use of Boston harbor to reach Distrigas of Massachusetts' import facility, helping to alleviate concerns about winter supply in New England. The spot price for West Texas Intermediate (WTI) crude oil fell by 10 percent on Tuesday, October 16, dropping to $20.05 per barrel. By Friday, WTI had recovered two thirds of the decrease, ending the week at $21.85 per barrel, or $3.77 per MMBtu.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "weekly heating oil" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

12 (next release 2:00 p.m. on May 19) 12 (next release 2:00 p.m. on May 19) Spot and futures natural gas prices this week (Wednesday-Wednesday, May 4-11) partly recovered from the prior week's sharp decline, owing to warmer temperatures moving into parts of the South and cool temperatures in the Rockies. The Henry Hub spot price increased 14 cents per MMBtu to $6.63. The New York Mercantile Exchange (NYMEX) futures contract for June delivery at the Henry Hub was higher on the week by about 5 cents per MMBtu, closing yesterday (May 11) at $6.683. Natural gas in storage as of Friday, May 6, increased to 1,509 Bcf, which is 22.3 percent above the 5-year average. Before declining sharply yesterday, crude oil spot prices appeared to be supporting higher natural gas prices, with the West Texas Intermediate (WTI) price increasing more than $1.50 per barrel since Wednesday (May 4) to over $52. The net change in the WTI price on the week was 17 cents per MMBtu, or less than 1 percent, as the price dropped $1.37 per barrel yesterday to $50.39 per barrel, or $8.69 per MMBtu.

362

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

December 3, 2001 December 3, 2001 Spot prices at the Henry Hub remain low for this time of year, as prices declined 16 cents from Friday-to-Friday. The spot price rose $0.50 per MMBtu from Monday to Wednesday, and then fell almost 60 cents by Friday to trade for $1.77 at the end of the week. Concern about the final resolution of the surprising decline of the Enron Corporation appears to be contributing to the price variability on the spot market. On the NYMEX futures market the December contract closed on Wednesday at $2.316 per MMBtu, more than $1.00 below what it began trading for as the near-month contract in late October. The unseasonably warm temperatures that have dominated the weather in much of the country continued last week in the eastern portion of the country. (Temperature Map) (Temperature Deviation Map) In addition, the National Weather Service's (NWS) latest 6 to 10 day forecast is calling for a warm weather pattern to continue into early December. Because of the combination of warmer-than-normal temperatures and favorable prices, this year's refill season has continued into the 2nd half of November with an estimated 12 Bcf added to working gas stocks during the third week of last month. The spot price of West Texas Intermediate (WTI) crude oil moved up about $0.85 per barrel on Friday and ended the week at $19.50 or about $3.36 per MMBtu.

363

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Wednesday, January 02, 2002 Wednesday, January 02, 2002 Spot prices in the Midwest and the East moved up most days during the holiday period as cold weather blanketed much of the area. .(See Temperature Map) (See Deviation Map) (Temperature map) (Temperature Deviation Map). Prices in Chicago moved close to $3.00 per MMBtu last week, while prices in the New York City area approached $5.00 on the last day of the year. Daytime temperatures early this week in the Northeast remained in the 20s and 30s from Washington, DC to Boston. The National Weather Service is calling for the wintry temperatures to continue through the end of the week in most areas in the eastern two thirds of the country. On the NYMEX, the daily settlement price for the futures contract for February delivery has declined in recent trading as the higher-than-average storage levels continue to be the main contributor to the current strong natural gas supply situation. An estimated 2,992 Bcf remains in storage as of December 21, 2001. The spot price for West Texas Intermediate (WTI) crude oil moved down in last week's trading and ended the year at $19.96 per barrel or $3.44 per MMBtu on Monday.

364

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

13, 2007 (next release 2:00 p.m. on September 20, 2007) 13, 2007 (next release 2:00 p.m. on September 20, 2007) Natural gas spot and futures prices generally increased this report week (Wednesday to Wednesday, September 6-13), as tropical storms threatened to disrupt supplies and pipeline explosions in Mexico stirred concerns of supply security. Hurricane Humberto is still active near the Texas-Louisiana border at the time of this writing, and Tropical Depression 8 in the South Atlantic is apparently moving toward Puerto Rico and the general direction of the Gulf of Mexico (where these storms might cause energy-producing platforms to be evacuated and supplies to be shut in). However, companies have not yet announced significant shut-in production or damage from the weather. On the week the Henry Hub spot price increased 32 cents per MMBtu to $6.13. At the New York Mercantile Exchange (NYMEX), prices for futures contracts also registered significant increases. The futures contract for October delivery rose 63.3 cents per MMBtu on the week to $6.438. Working gas in storage as of Friday, September 7, was 3,069 Bcf, which is 9.3 percent above the 5-year (2002-2006) average. The spot price for West Texas Intermediate (WTI) crude oil recorded yet another record high, increasing $4.11 per barrel on the week to $79.85, or $13.77 per MMBtu.

365

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

15, 2005 (next release 2:00 p.m. on December 22) 15, 2005 (next release 2:00 p.m. on December 22) A drop in temperatures across most of the Lower 48 States helped push natural gas spot and futures prices up on the week (Wednesday to Wednesday, December 7-14). The spot price at the Henry Hub increased by $0.85 per MMBtu, or about 6 percent, for the week, to $14.80 in yesterday's (Wednesday, December 14) trading. On the New York Mercantile Exchange (NYMEX), the futures contract for January delivery added 97.9 cents to its settlement price of 1 week ago, settling yesterday at $14.679 per MMBtu. The Energy Information Administration (EIA) reported that natural gas inventories in underground storage were 2,964 Bcf as of Friday, December 9, which is 3.7 percent greater than the previous 5-year average. The spot price for West Texas Intermediate (WTI) crude oil increased by $1.65 per barrel, bringing the WTI spot price in yesterday's trading to $60.86 per barrel, or $10.49 per MMBtu, an almost 3 percent gain on the week.

366

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

9 (next release 2:00 p.m. on June 16) 9 (next release 2:00 p.m. on June 16) Higher demand for natural gas from power generators meeting air-conditioning needs likely contributed to natural gas spot prices climbing $0.38 to $1.28 per MMBtu at most trading locations since Wednesday, June 1. On the week (Wednesday-Wednesday, June 1-8), the Henry Hub spot price rose 86 cents per MMBtu to $7.22. The NYMEX futures contract for July delivery gained 21.1 cents per MMBtu on the week to a daily settlement price of $7.00 on Wednesday, June 8. Working gas in storage as of Friday, June 3, increased to 1,890 Bcf, which is 20.2 percent above the 5-year (2000-2004) average inventory for the week. The spot price for West Texas Intermediate (WTI) crude oil decreased $1.89 per barrel on the week to $52.51, or $9.05 per MMBtu.

367

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Due to the upcoming holidays, we will not produce another Natural Gas Weekly Update until January 2, 2002. Due to the upcoming holidays, we will not produce another Natural Gas Weekly Update until January 2, 2002. Overview: Monday, December 17, 2001 The spot price at the Henry Hub finished the trading week on December 14 at $2.41 per MMBtu, roughly 30 cents or 14 percent over the previous Friday. On the NYMEX, the settlement price of the futures contract for January delivery at the Henry Hub settled at $2.846 per MMBtu, up nearly 28 cents over the previous Friday. Market prices were affected early in the week by colder weather, and then by milder temperatures that prevailed after Tuesday. (Temperature Map)(Temperature Deviation Map) At 22 Bcf, withdrawals from storage were again much smaller than historical averages. The spot price for West Texas Intermediate (WTI) crude oil increased by over 1 percent, climbing to $19.31 per barrel or $3.33 per MMBtu.

368

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

June 24 (next release 2:00 p.m. on July 1) June 24 (next release 2:00 p.m. on July 1) Cooler-than-normal temperatures over much of the nation and relative calm in petroleum and products futures markets facilitated a downward slide in natural gas spot and futures prices on the week (Wednesday to Wednesday, June 16-23). At the Henry Hub, the spot price ended the week a dime lower than last Wednesday (June 16), trading yesterday (June 23) at $6.29 per MMBtu. The NYMEX futures contract for July delivery edged down just over 7 cents on the week, settling yesterday at $6.415 per MMBtu. EIA reported that inventories were 1,845 Bcf as of Friday, June 18, which is 0.1 percent below the previous 5-year (1999-2003) average. The spot price for West Texas Intermediate crude oil increased on 3 of 5 trading days during the week and traded yesterday at $37.56 per barrel, or $6.48 per MMBtu, up 23 cents per barrel (4 cents per MMBtu) since last Wednesday.

369

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

26 (next release 2:00 p.m. on September 2) 26 (next release 2:00 p.m. on September 2) Natural gas prices in both the spot and futures markets continued their downward slide, as unusually cool August temperatures persisted for another week in most areas of the country. At the Henry Hub, the spot price edged down 3 cents on the week (Wednesday to Wednesday, August 18-25) as spot gas traded yesterday (August 25) for $5.32 per MMBtu. On the New York Mercantile Exchange (NYMEX), the futures contract for September delivery declined over 8 cents, or just under 2 percent, settling yesterday at $5.298 per MMBtu. EIA reported that inventories were 2,614 Bcf as of Friday, August 20, which is 6.7 percent greater than the prior 5-year average. After climbing to consecutive record highs on Wednesday and Thursday of last week (August 18-19), the spot price for West Texas Intermediate (WTI) crude oil fell sharply in the ensuing 4 trading days. The WTI spot price declined $3.53 per barrel ($0.61 per MMBtu) on the week to $43.83 ($7.56), a drop of over 7 percent.

370

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Tuesday February, 19, 2002 Tuesday February, 19, 2002 Spot prices at many market locations finished the week on Friday, February 15 with sharp decreases that reversed most of the gains from earlier in the week. The price at the Henry Hub was $2.18, a decline of 2 cents per MMBtu compared with the previous Friday. On the NYMEX, the price of the futures contract for March delivery at the Henry Hub settled at $2.206 per MMBtu, roughly 2 cents greater than the previous Friday. A trend towards cooling temperatures across most of the country may have contributed to the rally in prices early in the week. (See Temperature Map) (See Deviation Map) However, expectations of warmer temperatures early this week and lighter demand over the holiday weekend along with unusually high storage levels likely reversed the price rally. The spot price for West Texas Intermediate (WTI) crude oil increased by roughly 6 percent, climbing to $21.47 per barrel or $3.70 per MMBtu.

371

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Tuesday, January 22, 2002 Tuesday, January 22, 2002 Spot prices at many market locations across the country finished the week on Friday, January 18 with sharp decreases that reversed gains from earlier in the week. Prices at the Henry Hub declined 2 cents per MMBtu compared with the previous Friday. On the NYMEX, the settlement price of the futures contract for February delivery at the Henry Hub settled at $2.236 per MMBtu, up roughly 3 cents over the previous Friday. A trend towards cooler temperatures across most of the country likely contributed to the modest rally in prices early in the week. (See Temperature Map) (See Deviation Map) However, expectations of warmer temperatures early this week and lighter demand over the holiday weekend along with a-year-over-year storage differential of over 500 Bcf from normal (as measured by the 6-year average) likely reversed the price rally. The spot price for West Texas Intermediate (WTI) crude oil decreased by over 8 percent, falling to $18.02 per barrel or $3.10 per MMBtu.

372

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

24 (next release 2:00 p.m. on August 31, 2006) 24 (next release 2:00 p.m. on August 31, 2006) Since Wednesday, August 16, natural gas spot prices increased at most market locations with the exception of a few locations in the Northeast. For the week (Wednesday-Wednesday), prices at the Henry Hub increased 17 cents to $7.19 per MMBtu. Yesterday (August 23), the price of the NYMEX futures contract for September delivery settled at $6.875 per MMBtu, increasing about 11 cents or about 2 percent since Wednesday. Natural gas in storage was 2,857 Bcf as of August 18, which is 13.5 percent above the 5-year average. The spot price for West Texas Intermediate (WTI) crude oil decreased 19 cents per barrel, or about 0.3 percent, on the week to $71.45 per barrel, or $12.32 per MMBtu. Prices: Despite the lower cooling load across much of the Lower 48 States and a diminished threat from Tropical Storm Debby, natural gas spot prices increased at most market locations on the week. The increases, however, were moderate, as they were mostly limited to less than 15 cents per MMBtu. With the exception of the southern United States, power loads have been steadily diminishing in the past couple of weeks. Gas demand for electric power generation was much lower compared with the week ending August 5, when the Edison Electric Institute (EEI) reported record-high weekly electricity demand, leading to the 12 Bcf net withdrawal for the storage week ended August 4, 2006. On a regional basis, market locations in East Texas recorded the largest increases since Wednesday, August 16, averaging 18 cents per MMBtu, followed by Louisiana (16 cents per MMBtu). Most locations along the Gulf Coast recorded increases between 3 and 18 cents, while major consuming areas in the Midwest recorded an average increase of 14 cents per MMBtu. Despite the general increases this week, a few market locations in the Northeast recorded decreases since last Wednesday, the largest one of which was the 10-cent decrease at the Dracut, MA, trading point. Even with the overall increases in recent weeks, as of August 23, 2006, spot prices at market locations in the Lower 48 States are 17 to 30 percent lower than last year's levels.

373

This Week In Petroleum Printer-Friendly Version  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

if we would write something about heating oil, as some people who use oil to heat their homes will need to decide soon whether to lock in a set price for the entire winter or pay...

374

This Week In Petroleum Printer-Friendly Version  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

inventories of distillate fuel oil (used as both heating oil and diesel fuel) and for propane to adequate levels prior to the start of the next heating season. Following last...

375

This Week In Petroleum Printer-Friendly Version  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

rising 2.9 cents to 242.1 cents per gallon. Residential Heating Oil Prices Rise While Propane Prices Drop Slightly Residential heating oil prices increased for the period ending...

376

This Week In Petroleum Printer-Friendly Version  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

price increase, 0.3 cent to hit 157.9 cents per gallon. Residential Heating Oil and Propane Prices Rise Slightly The period ending November 10, 2003 saw residential heating oil...

377

This Week In Petroleum Printer-Friendly Version  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

fell by 0.1 cent per gallon to end at 152.6 cents per gallon. Retail Heating Oil and Propane Prices Increase Slightly Residential heating oil and propane prices showed slight...

378

This Week In Petroleum Printer-Friendly Version  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

inventories of distillate fuel oil (used as both heating oil and diesel fuel) and of propane to adequate levels prior to the start of the next heating season. Following the...

379

This Week In Petroleum Printer-Friendly Version  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

winter. With the near-month futures price for heating oil already at the highest recorded level ever (unadjusted for inflation), this winters retail heating oil prices could also...

380

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

8, 2001 8, 2001 Prices ended the week up slightly from where they started as a brief heat wave in the eastern half of the country caused a rise in prices (See Temperature Map) (See Deviation from Normal Temperatures Map) that was somewhat undone by the return of moderate temperatures and the report of another hefty stock build. On a Friday-to-Friday basis, the spot price at the Henry Hub increased by $0.25 to $3.88 per MMBtu compared with an increase of $0.23 to $0.33 at other major supply points in the eastern half of the country. In the same time period, the near-month (July delivery) futures contract was up less than 6 cents to $3.979 per MMBtu as of Friday, June 15, 2001. Prices in California rose substantially last Monday after coming off high inventory flow orders (OFOs) but ended the week close to or lower than the previous week due to another round of OFOs. For the past 7 weeks, weekly storage injections neared or exceeded 100 Bcf, bringing stocks to within less than a 1 percent difference from average levels. The string of record-breaking stock builds appears attributable to moderate spring temperatures and reduced cooling demand by natural-gas-fired electricity generation.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "weekly heating oil" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

This Week In Petroleum Printer-Friendly Version  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

that heating fuel markets would be expected to see higher prices for heating oil and propane following last winters lackluster weather that was the warmest on record. While...

382

This Week In Petroleum Printer-Friendly Version  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

inventory of heating fuels, including heating oil (high-sulfur distillate fuel) and propane, plunged to near historical low levels at the end of March 2003. Preliminary March...

383

This Week In Petroleum Printer-Friendly Version  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

New England, heating oil consumption may continue well into April. Distillate Fuel & Propane Days-of-Supply Followed Different Paths During 2007-08 Heating Seson Conversely,...

384

This Week In Petroleum Printer-Friendly Version  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Retail Heating Fuels Prices Show Slight Upward Movement Residential heating oil and propane prices showed slight increases for the period ending October 28, 2002. The average...

385

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

17 (next release 2:00 p.m. on February 24) 17 (next release 2:00 p.m. on February 24) Moderate temperatures throughout most of the country this week contributed to widespread price decreases at trading locations in the Lower 48 States. However, most price declines were limited to less than 20 cents per MMBtu as higher crude oil prices appeared to support prices across the energy complex. For the week (Wednesday-Wednesday, February 9-16), the price for next-day delivery at the Henry Hub slipped 9 cents per MMBtu, or about 1 percent to $6.11. The NYMEX futures contract for March delivery at the Henry Hub yesterday (February 16) settled at $6.109 per MMBtu, which is 5.6 cents less than last Wednesday's price. Natural gas in storage decreased to 1,808 Bcf as of February 11, which is 20.9 percent above the 5-year average. The spot price for West Texas Intermediate (WTI) crude oil moved up $2.90 per barrel or about 6 percent since last Wednesday to $48.35 per barrel or $8.34 per MMBtu.

386

Weekly Petroleum Status Report  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

4 4 Table 4. Stocks of Crude Oil by PAD District, and Stocks of Petroleum Products, 1 U.S. Totals (Million Barrels) Product / Region Current Week Last Week Year Ago 2 Years Ago 12/6/13 Difference 12/14/12 Percent Change 12/16/11 Percent Change 12/13/13 Crude Oil .............................................. 1,068.3 1,071.2 -2.9 1,066.6 0.2 1,019.5 4.8 Commercial (Excluding SPR) 2 ....... 372.3 375.2 -2.9 371.6 0.2 323.6 15.1 East Coast (PADD 1) .................... 10.0 10.2 -0.2 10.5 -4.8 9.7 2.9 Midwest (PADD 2) ......................... 110.0 110.3 -0.3 111.1 -1.0 94.1 16.9 Cushing 3 ................................... 40.6 41.2 -0.6 47.0 -13.5 30.2 34.5 Gulf Coast (PADD 3) ..................... 181.4 184.4 -3.0 176.7 2.7 149.0 21.7 Rocky Mountain (PADD 4) ............ 19.7 19.8 -0.1 18.0 9.5 16.0 23.4 West Coast (PADD 5)

387

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

9 (next release 2:00 p.m. on May 26) 9 (next release 2:00 p.m. on May 26) Natural gas spot prices dropped this week (Wednesday - Wednesday, May 11-18) at all market locations partly because of weak weather demand and a decrease in the price of crude oil. The Henry Hub spot price decreased 13 cents per MMBtu, or about 2 percent, while prices in California and the Rockies experienced more dramatic decreases of more than 24 cents per MMBtu at most market locations. Yesterday (May 18), the price of the New York Mercantile Exchange (NYMEX) futures contract for June delivery at the Henry Hub settled at $6.392 per MMBtu, decreasing 29 cents, or about 4 percent, since last Wednesday. Natural gas in storage as of Friday, May 13, increased 90 Bcf to 1,599 Bcf, which is 22.2 percent above the 5-year average. The spot price for West Texas Intermediate (WTI) crude oil declined $3.40 per barrel, or almost 7 percent on the week (Wednesday - Wednesday) to $46.99 per barrel or about $8.10 per MMBtu.

388

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

September 30 (next release 2:00 p.m. on October 7) September 30 (next release 2:00 p.m. on October 7) Since Wednesday, September 22, natural gas spot prices have increased at virtually all market locations in the Lower 48 States, owing to the effects of Hurricane Ivan, climbing crude oil prices, and market expectations of an early arrival of winter. For the week (Wednesday-Wednesday), prices at the Henry Hub increased 64 cents, or about 11 percent, to $6.23 per MMBtu. Yesterday (September 29), the price of the NYMEX futures contract for November delivery at the Henry Hub settled at $6.911 per MMBtu, increasing roughly 67 cents or about 11 percent since last Wednesday (September 22). Natural gas in storage was 3,011 Bcf as of September 24, which is 7 percent above the 5-year average. The spot price for West Texas Intermediate (WTI) crude oil increased $1.12 per barrel, or about 2 percent, on the week to $49.53 per barrel or $8.54 per MMBtu.

389

Weekly Petroleum Status Report  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

8 8 Table 6. Stocks of Distillate, Kerosene-Type Jet Fuel, Residual Fuel Oil, and Propane/Propylene by PAD District (Million Barrels) Product / Region Current Week Last Week Year Ago 2 Years Ago 12/13/13 12/6/13 Difference 12/14/12 Percent Change 12/16/11 Percent Change Distillate Fuel Oil 1 ..................................... 116.0 118.1 -2.1 117.0 -0.9 139.1 -16.7 East Coast (PADD 1) .......................... 36.5 37.7 -1.2 39.2 -7.1 54.4 -33.0 New England (PADD 1A) ................ 6.1 6.6 -0.4 5.8 6.5 11.6 -46.9 Central Atlantic (PADD 1B) ............. 19.0 19.5 -0.5 23.5 -19.2 32.1 -40.9 Lower Atlantic (PADD 1C) .............. 11.3 11.6 -0.3 10.0 13.4 10.7 5.7 Midwest (PADD 2) .............................. 25.9 26.0 -0.1 25.4 1.9 28.4 -8.7 Gulf Coast (PADD 3) .......................... 36.9 37.3 -0.4 34.0 8.3 40.1

390

Weekly Petroleum Status Report  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

3 3 Table 11. Spot Prices of Crude Oil, Motor Gasoline, and Heating Oil, 2012 to Present (Crude Oil in Dollars per Barrel, Products in Dollars per Gallon) Year / Product Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2012 Crude Oil WTI - Cushing ....................... 100.27 102.20 106.16 103.32 94.66 82.30 87.90 94.13 94.51 89.49 86.53 87.86 Brent ..................................... 110.69 119.33 125.45 119.75 110.34 95.16 102.62 113.36 112.86 111.71 109.06 109.49 Motor Gasoline Conventional New York Harbor ................ 2.822 3.044 3.167 3.206 2.877 2.602 2.747 3.022 3.270 2.975 2.817 2.727 U.S. Gulf Coast ................... 2.777 2.999 3.169 3.101 2.780 2.516 2.645 2.968 3.034 2.778 2.522 2.475 RBOB Regular Los Angeles ........................ 2.920 3.302 3.383 3.250 3.234 2.626 2.819 3.129 3.162 3.135

391

Weekly Petroleum Status Report  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

6 6 Table 13. NYMEX Futures Prices of Crude Oil, Motor Gasoline, and No. 2 Heating Oil (Crude Oil in Dollars per Barrel, all others in Dollars per Gallon) Mon 12/2 Tue 12/3 Wed 12/4 Thu 12/5 Fri 12/6 Mon 12/9 Tue 12/10 Wed 12/11 Thu 12/12 Fri 12/13 Crude Oil (WTI, Cushing, Oklahoma) January-2014 .................................................................. 93.82 96.04 97.20 97.38 97.65 97.34 98.51 97.44 97.50 96.60 February-2014 ................................................................ 94.10 96.27 97.43 97.61 97.90 97.56 98.66 97.72 97.82 96.93 March-2014 .................................................................... 94.28 96.31 97.45 97.64 97.94 97.58 98.58 97.72 97.77 96.91 April-2014 ....................................................................... 94.27 96.07 97.18 97.36 97.66 97.29

392

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

The release day for the Natural Gas Weekly Market Update will shift from Monday to Thursday effective for the week of April 8-12. This is the last issue to be published on Monday. There will be no issue released on Monday, April 8. The next issue will be released on Thursday, April 11. The release day for the Natural Gas Weekly Market Update will shift from Monday to Thursday effective for the week of April 8-12. This is the last issue to be published on Monday. There will be no issue released on Monday, April 8. The next issue will be released on Thursday, April 11. Overview: Monday, April 1, 2002 Spot prices fell sharply after Tuesday, March 26, during last week's holiday-shortened trading, as unseasonably cold temperatures began to moderate around midweek in many high gas consumption areas. (See Temperature Map) (See Deviation Map) With the exception of the expiring near-month contract, futures contract prices also trended down, but the decreases were relatively modest. By Thursday's end of trading (both spot and futures markets were closed for Good Friday, March 29), the Henry Hub average spot price had declined by $0.35 per MMBtu since the previous Friday (March 22) to $3.19. The NYMEX futures contract for April delivery at the Henry Hub expired on Tuesday on an upswing, gaining almost 15 cents in 2 days to close out trading at $3.472 per MMBtu. The new near-month contract (May delivery) ended trading on Thursday at $3.283 per MMBtu, down just over 9 cents in 2 days as the near-month contract. The spot price for West Texas Intermediate (WTI) crude oil continued its steady rise, with modest gains early in the week punctuated by a 42-cent per barrel increase on Thursday. The WTI spot price at week's end was $26.21 per barrel ($4.52 per MMBtu), up $0.62 per barrel over the previous Friday. This is the highest price for WTI since the third week of September 2001.

393

Natural Gas Weekly Update, Printer-Friendly Version  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

6 2003 (next release 2:00 p.m. on October 6 2003 (next release 2:00 p.m. on October 23) Moderate temperatures for much of the week (Wednesday-Wednesday, October 8-15) failed to offset upward pressure on spot prices from higher crude oil prices and the prospect of higher demand with the approaching heating season. The result at the Henry Hub was a net gain on the week of 9 cents per MMBtu to $4.93. Despite losing value in the past three trading days, the NYMEX futures contract for November delivery at the Henry Hub was higher on the week by about 28 cents per MMBtu to $5.431. Natural gas in storage as of Friday, October 10, increased to 2,944 Bcf, which is 0.3 percent below the 5-year average. The spot price for West Texas Intermediate (WTI) crude oil rose $2.14 per barrel on the week to yesterday's (October 15) closing price of $31.74 per barrel, or $5.47 per

394

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

9 (next release 2:00 p.m. on December 16) 9 (next release 2:00 p.m. on December 16) Both natural gas spot and futures prices fell significantly over the week (Wednesday to Wednesday, December 1-8), as temperatures in most major gas-consuming areas of the nation were above normal most days, with differences reaching double digits in the past several days in many locations east of the Mississippi River. The Henry Hub spot price fell 79 cents per MMBtu, or nearly 12 percent, since last Wednesday (December 1) trading yesterday (Wednesday, December 8) at $5.98. The NYMEX futures contract for January 2005 delivery declined by a similar amount for the week (73 cents per MMBtu), settling yesterday) at $6.683 per MMBtu, or about 10 percent less than last Wednesday's settlement price ($7.413). EIA reported that inventories were 3,211 Bcf as of Friday, December 3, which is 12 percent greater than the 5-year average. The spot price for West Texas Intermediate (WTI) crude oil fell by over $3 per barrel for the second week in a row, declining in 4 of 5 trading days and ending the week down $3.60 per barrel ($0.62 per MMBtu), at yesterday's price of $41.96 ($7.23). Since reaching its record-high spot price of $56.37 per barrel on October 26, the WTI spot price has declined in 5 of the 6 ensuing weeks, with yesterday's price representing a nearly26 percent drop in value.

395

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

23, 2001 23, 2001 Another mid-summer week of relatively mild temperatures in many of the nation's major gas consuming market regions and a large estimate of net injections of working gas into storage put downward pressure on spot and futures prices. Some parts of New England saw high temperatures only in the 70s for several days last week, while highs in the 80s stretched down the mid-Atlantic region as far as northern Georgia and well into the Midwest. On the West Coast, highs rarely exceeded 80 degrees, with a number of locations reporting highs in the 60s. (See Temperature Map) (See Deviation from Normal Temperatures Map). Spot prices declined for the week in nearly all markets, with spot gas at the Henry Hub trading at $2.95 per MMBtu on Friday, down $0.21 from the previous Friday. The NYMEX futures contract for August delivery fell even more, ending the week down $0.295 per MMBtu at $2.955-the first sub-$3 settlement for a near-month contract since April 11 of last year. The spot price for West Texas Intermediate (WTI) crude oil fell four days in a row and traded on Wednesday and Thursday below $25 per barrel before recovering Friday to $25.60 per barrel, or $4.41 per MMBtu. This, too, is the first time since last April that WTI has fallen below $25 per barrel, and is the second week in a row of losses of $1 or more per barrel.

396

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

8, 2007 (next release 2:00 p.m. on November 15, 2007) 8, 2007 (next release 2:00 p.m. on November 15, 2007) Natural gas spot price movements varied this week (Wednesday-Wednesday, October 31-November 7). Prices in Lower 48 market areas in the West and the Midcontinent decreased significantly on the week. Other regions, however, most notably the high-demand areas of the Northeast and the Midwest, as well as Gulf Coast production areas, recorded price increases. The spot price at the Henry Hub gained 16 cents per MMBtu, or about 2 percent, to $7.42 per MMBtu. In contrast to the spot market, prices of futures contracts at the New York Mercantile Exchange (NYMEX) for the next 12 months uniformly decreased, with the futures contract for December delivery at the Henry Hub decreasing about 71 cents since last Wednesday to close yesterday (November 7) at $7.624 per MMBtu. Working gas stocks as of Friday, November 2, again hit a record high with 3,545 Bcf in storage, which is 8.9 percent above the 5-year average. The spot price for West Texas Intermediate (WTI) crude oil increased $2.30 per barrel, or 2.4 percent, since last Wednesday to trade yesterday at $96.46 per barrel or $16.63 per MMBtu. Yesterday's crude oil price was $37.52 per barrel higher than the year-ago level, when crude oil traded at $58.94 per barrel on November 7, 2006.

397

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

October 3, 2002 (next release 2:00 p.m. on October 10) October 3, 2002 (next release 2:00 p.m. on October 10) Spot and futures prices moved up strongly for the week (Wednesday, September 25 through Wednesday, October 2) as Tropical Storm Isidore and then Hurricane Lili caused significant production curtailments in the Gulf of Mexico and onshore Texas and Louisiana. The average spot price at the Henry Hub yesterday (Wednesday, October 2), at $4.24 per MMBtu, was 49 cents higher than a week ago. However, the amount of gas actually delivered at October 2 prices is likely to be small, as operations at the Henry Hub near Erath, LA, were essentially shut down for at least 48 hours because of Lili's impending arrival. On the NYMEX, the expiring near-month contract for October delivery ended trading on Thursday, September 26 with a sizeable gain of over 19 cents per MMBtu, closing at $3.686. Taking over as the near-month contract, the futures contract for November delivery promptly gained $0.152 per MMBtu to settle at $4.041 on Friday. Natural gas in storage reached 3,038 Bcf on September 27, which exceeds the average of the past 5 years by 10 percent. With continuing turmoil in the Middle East and uncertainty surrounding the conflict with Iraq over weapons inspections keeping oil prices high, the spot price of West Texas Intermediate (WTI) crude oil hovered above $30 per barrel throughout the week. WTI ended trading Wednesday (October 2) at an average of $30.59 per barrel, or about $5.27 per MMBtu, down a dime per barrel from the previous Wednesday.

398

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

July 1 (next release 2:00 p.m. on July 8) July 1 (next release 2:00 p.m. on July 8) Since Wednesday, June 23, natural gas spot prices have decreased at virtually all market locations in the Lower 48 States. For the week (Wednesday-Wednesday), prices at the Henry Hub decreased 24 cents or about 4 percent to $6.05 per MMBtu. Yesterday (June 30), the price of the NYMEX futures contract for August delivery at the Henry Hub settled at $6.155 per MMBtu, decreasing roughly 33 cents or about 5 percent since last Wednesday. Natural gas in storage was 1,938 Bcf as of June 25 which is 0.5 percent above the 5-year average. The spot price for West Texas Intermediate (WTI) crude oil fell 64 cents per barrel or nearly 2 percent on the week to $36.92 per barrel or $6.37 per MMBtu. Prices: Widespread moderate temperature conditions and falling crude oil prices contributed to price declines of between 10 and 49 cents per MMBtu at virtually all market locations in the Lower 48 States since last Wednesday, June 2, with declines exceeding 30 cents per MMBtu at most market locations. After prices climbed 10 to 20 cents per MMBtu at most market locations on Thursday, June 24, they then fell during the next four trading days. The steepest declines occurred principally in the Northeast, Louisiana, and Texas regions, where prices fell more than 35 cents per MMBtu since last week. Despite these widespread declines, prices remain high relative to last year's levels, exceeding last year's level by more than 8 percent. For example, prices at the Henry Hub are 70 cents or 13 percent above last year's level.

399

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

26, 2007 to Thursday, January 3, 2008) 26, 2007 to Thursday, January 3, 2008) Released: January 4, 2008 Next release: January 10, 2008 · Natural gas spot and futures prices increased this report week (Wednesday to Thursday, December 26, 2007, to January 3, 2008), as frigid temperatures in much of the country increased demand for space heating. During the report week, the Henry Hub spot price increased $0.90 per million Btu (MMBtu) to $7.84. · At the New York Mercantile Exchange (NYMEX), prices for futures contracts also registered significant increases. The futures contract for February delivery rose about 51 cents per MMBtu on the week to $7.674. · Working gas in storage is well above the 5-year average for this time year, indicating a ready supply source to meet peak demand as the winter heating season progresses. As of Friday, December 28, working gas in storage was 2,921 Bcf, which is 8.2 percent above the 5-year (2002-2006) average.

400

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

14 (next release 2:00 p.m. on December 21, 2006) 14 (next release 2:00 p.m. on December 21, 2006) Softening natural gas market conditions led to spot price decreases at most market locations in the Lower 48 States since Wednesday, December 6, with decreases ranging between $0.02 and $1.22 per MMBtu. The few price increases on the week were mostly confined to market locations west of the Rocky Mountains. On Wednesday, December 13, prices at the Henry Hub averaged $7.21 per MMBtu, decreasing $0.13 per MMBtu, or about 2 percent, since the previous Wednesday. The prices of futures contracts through December 2007 changed only slightly since December 6. The price for the January delivery contract decreased about 5 cents per MMBtu, or about 1 percent on the week (Wednesday-Wednesday), settling at $7.673 per MMBtu yesterday (December 13). Natural gas in storage was 3,238 Bcf as of December 8, which is 7.5 percent above the 5-year average. The spot price for West Texas Intermediate (WTI) crude oil decreased 86 cents per barrel, or about 1 percent on the week to $61.34 per barrel or $10.58 per MMBtu.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "weekly heating oil" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

9 (next release 2:00 p.m. on March 16, 2006) 9 (next release 2:00 p.m. on March 16, 2006) Natural gas spot price movements were mixed this week (Wednesday to Wednesday, March 1-8) as temperatures varied across the Lower 48 States. Spot prices at some market locations climbed 2 to 49 cents per MMBtu since last Wednesday, primarily in areas that experienced colder-than-normal temperatures during the week, while price declines in the East, Midwest, and Louisiana averaged 34 cents per MMBtu. The Henry Hub spot price decreased 14 cents per MMBtu, or 2 percent, to $6.48. At the New York Mercantile Exchange (NYMEX), the futures contract for April delivery at the Henry Hub fell by 9 cents per MMBtu, settling at $6.648 on Wednesday, March 8. Natural gas in storage as of Friday, March 3, decreased to 1,887 Bcf, which is 54 percent above the 5-year (2001-2005) average. The spot price for West Texas Intermediate (WTI) crude oil traded at $60.06 per barrel, decreasing $1.95, or $0.34 per MMBtu on the week.

402

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

July 7 (next release 2:00 p.m. on July 14) July 7 (next release 2:00 p.m. on July 14) Natural gas spot prices increased sharply this week (Wednesday-Wednesday, June 29-July 6), as two tropical storms have disrupted production in the Gulf of Mexico and power generation demand to meet air-conditioning load has remained strong. For the week, the price at the Henry Hub increased $0.61 per MMBtu to $7.68. At the New York Mercantile Exchange (NYMEX), the price of the futures contract for August delivery at the Henry Hub moved approximately 60 cents per MMBtu higher to settle yesterday (Wednesday, July 6) at $7.688. Natural gas in storage was 2,186 Bcf as of Friday, July 1, which is 12.4 percent above the 5-year average inventory for the report week. The spot price for West Texas Intermediate (WTI) crude oil increased $4.01 per barrel or about 7 percent since last Wednesday to trade yesterday at an all-time high of $61.24 per barrel or $10.56 per MMBtu.

403

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

9, 2003 (next release 2:00 p.m. on June 5) 9, 2003 (next release 2:00 p.m. on June 5) Spot and futures prices trended down for the second consecutive week, as cool, rainy weather continued to dominate much of the nation, with the few pockets of summer-like temperatures generating swing demand and higher prices only in limited areas. At the Henry Hub, prices declined by nearly 6 percent for the week (Wednesday to Wednesday, May 22-29), falling 36 cents to $5.71 per MMBtu. The NYMEX futures contract for June delivery declined by $0.253 per MMBtu on the week, expiring yesterday (Wednesday, May 28) at the closing price of $5.945 per MMBtu. The Energy Information Administration (EIA) reported that natural gas inventories reached 1,085 Bcf as of Friday, May 23, which is 31.9 percent below the 5-year average. The spot price for West Texas Intermediate crude oil declined by just over $1 from the previous Wednesday (May 21), falling $1.05 per barrel to $28.46, or $4.91 per MMBtu.

404

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

9 (next release 2:00 p.m. on September 16) 9 (next release 2:00 p.m. on September 16) Downward pressure on prices during August carried over to the first week of September as mostly moderate temperatures during the holiday-shortened trading week resulted in net price declines. Since Wednesday, September 1, natural gas spot prices have declined between 11 and 43 cents per MMBtu at trading locations in the Lower 48 States. For the week (Wednesday-Wednesday, September 1-8), the spot price at the Henry Hub in Louisiana fell 34 cents or roughly 7 percent to $4.69 per MMBtu. The price of the NYMEX futures contract for October delivery at the Henry Hub decreased 33.4 cents per MMBtu since last Wednesday to settle at $4.631 yesterday (September 8). Natural gas in storage increased to 2,775 Bcf, which exceeds the 5-year average by 7.1 percent. The spot price for West Texas Intermediate (WTI) crude oil moved down $1.12 per barrel or about 2.6 percent since last Wednesday, to a price of $42.77 per barrel or $7.37 per MMBtu.

405

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

16 (next release 2:00 p.m. on December 30) 16 (next release 2:00 p.m. on December 30) A drop in temperatures in the eastern half of the nation beginning this past Monday (December 13) helped push natural gas spot prices up sharply on the week (Wednesday to Wednesday, December 8-15). Futures prices rose by smaller, but still significant, amounts. The spot price at the Henry Hub increased by $1.06 per MMBtu, or nearly 18 percent, for the week, to $7.04 in yesterday's (Wednesday, December 15) trading. On the New York Mercantile Exchange (NYMEX), the futures contract for January delivery added 55.3 cents to its settlement price of one week ago, settling yesterday at $7.236 per MMBtu. The Energy Information Administration (EIA) reported that inventories were 3,150 Bcf as of Friday, December 10, which is 14.3 percent greater than the previous 5-year average. The spot price for West Texas Intermediate (WTI) crude oil surged upward by $2.45 per barrel in yesterday's trading, bringing the WTI spot price to $44.21 per barrel ($7.62 per MMBtu). The WTI spot price gained $2.25 per barrel ($0.39 per MMBtu), an increase of more than 5 percent.

406

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

4, 2003 (next release 2:00 p.m. on December 11) 4, 2003 (next release 2:00 p.m. on December 11) Colder-than-expected weather over the Thanksgiving weekend that continued into this week resulted in higher natural gas spot prices at most trading locations since Wednesday, November 26. While prices at several Northeast trading locations climbed more than $0.70 per MMBtu, prices along the Gulf Coast increased a more modest $0.50-$0.60. On the week (Wednesday, November 26-Wednesday, December 3), the Henry Hub spot price rose $0.59 per MMBtu to $5.45, closing above $5 for the first time since late August. At the NYMEX, the price of the futures contract for January delivery increased $0.83 per MMBtu, or 12 percent, to $5.756 per MMBtu. Natural gas in storage as of Friday, November 28, decreased by 59 Bcf to 3,095 Bcf, which exceeds the 5-year average by 3.9 percent. The spot price of West Texas Intermediate (WTI) crude oil dropped $0.13 per barrel in trading yesterday (Wednesday, December 3), but rose a modest $0.28 on the week, settling at $30.61 per barrel, or $5.28 per MMBtu.

407

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

2 (next release 2:00 p.m. on August 19) 2 (next release 2:00 p.m. on August 19) Natural gas spot and futures prices moved lower on the week (Wednesday to Wednesday, August 4-11), as unseasonably cool temperatures prevailed in most high gas-consuming regions of the nation. At the Henry Hub, the spot price declined 6 cents on the week, or just over 1 percent, to yesterday's (Wednesday, August 11) level of $5.64 per MMBtu. On the NYMEX, the futures contract for September delivery edged down nearly 5 cents per MMBtu, or about 1 percent, to settle yesterday at $5.614. EIA reported that inventories were 2,452 Bcf as of Friday, August 6, which is 5.0 percent greater than the average for the previous 5 years (1999-2003). The spot price for West Texas Intermediate (WTI) crude oil rose sharply in last Thursday's (August 5) trading to top $44 per barrel and stayed above that level for 4 of the 5 trading days in the week. The WTI spot price ended trading yesterday at $44.72 per barrel, or $7.71 per MMBtu, which is $1.99 per barrel, or almost 5 percent, higher than last Wednesday's (August 4) price.

408

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

2, 2003 (next release 2:00 p.m. on May 29) 2, 2003 (next release 2:00 p.m. on May 29) Natural gas spot prices at most market locations in the Lower 48 States have dipped 5 to 20 cents per MMBtu since Wednesday, May 14. Although the slight easing appeared across the board in the eastern two-thirds of the country, declines in the West were more pronounced as Rockies prices fell as much as $0.65 per MMBtu. On the week (Wednesday, May 14-Wednesday, May 21), the Henry Hub spot price dropped 10 cents per MMBtu to $6.07. The NYMEX futures contract for June delivery at the Henry Hub fell just under 12 cents per MMBtu to a close of $6.198. Natural gas in storage as of Friday, May 16, increased to 990 Bcf, which is 34.9 percent below the 5-year average. The spot price for West Texas Intermediate (WTI) crude oil traded at a 4-week high, rising $0.30 per barrel on the week to yesterday's (May 21) closing price of $29.51 per barrel, or $5.09 per MMBtu.

409

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

2 (next release 2:00 p.m. on June 9) 2 (next release 2:00 p.m. on June 9) Natural gas spot prices fell at virtually all market locations in the Lower 48 States during the holiday-shortened trading week (Wednesday to Wednesday, May 25-June 1), while futures prices increased. The spot price at the Henry Hub, however, rose by 3 cents per MMBtu on the week, or nearly 0.5 percent, to $6.36 per MMBtu. On the New York Mercantile Exchange (NYMEX), the June contract expired at $6.123 per MMBtu on May 26 after declining 19 cents in its final day of trading. The settlement price for the futures contract for July delivery at the Henry Hub increased by 42 cents on the week, settling yesterday (June 1) at $6.789 per MMBtu. EIA reported that inventories of working gas in underground storage were 1,778 Bcf as of Friday, May 27, which is 20.6 percent higher than the 5-year average. The spot price for West Texas Intermediate (WTI) crude oil gained $4.03 per barrel, or 8 percent, since last Wednesday (May 25), ending trading yesterday at $54.40 per barrel ($9.38 per MMBtu), which is the highest spot price since the April 6, 2005, price of $55.88 per barrel.

410

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

9 (next release 2:00 p.m. on October 6) 9 (next release 2:00 p.m. on October 6) Natural gas spot prices declined this week as Hurricane Rita came ashore a weaker hurricane than expected, even while causing massive evacuations of rigs and platforms in the Gulf of Mexico and inflicting damage to both offshore and onshore energy-related infrastructure. While no price quotes are available at the Henry Hub, which was shut down owing to Hurricane Rita, trading at other market locations in Louisiana saw an average decrease of $1.35 per MMBtu on the week (Wednesday-Wednesday, September 21-28). The average price among Louisiana trading locations yesterday (September 28) was $13.45 per MMBtu. At the New York Mercantile Exchange (NYMEX), the futures contract for October delivery settled at $13.907 per MMBtu in its final day of trading yesterday, increasing about $1.31 per MMBtu or more than 10 percent since the previous Wednesday. Natural gas in storage was 2,885 Bcf as of September 23, which is 2.4 percent above the 5-year average. The spot price for West Texas Intermediate (WTI) crude oil decreased $0.60 per barrel, or less than 1 percent, on the week to $66.36 per barrel, or $11.44 per MMBtu.

411

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

5 2002 (next release 2:00 p.m. on December 12) 5 2002 (next release 2:00 p.m. on December 12) Cold weather over the Thanksgiving weekend and early this week lifted natural gas spot prices in many regions of the country. While prices at several Northeast trading locations climbed more than $1 per MMBtu since Wednesday, November 27, prices along the Gulf Coast and other producing areas increased by a more modest 4 to 25 cents per MMBtu. On the week (Wednesday-Wednesday), the Henry Hub spot price rose $0.04 per MMBtu to $4.24. At the NYMEX, the price of the futures contract for January delivery climbed just under a dime to $4.298 per MMBtu. Cold weather throughout the final full week in November also resulted in the season's largest withdrawal from storage. Natural gas in storage as of Friday, November 29, decreased by 91 Bcf to 2,956 Bcf, which exceeds the 5-year average by 0.9 percent. The spot price of West Texas Intermediate (WTI) crude oil dropped $0.54 per barrel in trading yesterday (Wednesday, December 4), settling at $26.80, or $4.62 per MMBtu.,

412

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

0 (next release 2:00 p.m. on August 17, 2006) 0 (next release 2:00 p.m. on August 17, 2006) Natural gas spot prices decreased at all locations except for one this week (Wednesday - Wednesday, August 2 - 9) as moderating temperatures contributed to lower demand. The Henry Hub spot price decreased $1.06 per MMBtu this week, or more than 12 percent, to $7.59. The price of the NYMEX futures contract for September delivery also decreased, albeit only by 15 cents since last Wednesday (August 2) to settle yesterday at $7.651 per MMBtu. Natural gas in storage as of Friday, August 4, was 2,763 Bcf, which is 15.7 percent above the 5-year average. The spot price for West Texas Intermediate (WTI) crude oil ended yesterday's trading session at $76.28 per barrel ($13.15 per MMBtu) after increasing $0.12 per barrel (2 cents per MMBtu), or less than 1 percent, on the week.

413

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

9, 2003 (next release 2:00 p.m. on January 16) 9, 2003 (next release 2:00 p.m. on January 16) Spot prices overall showed strong gains since Tuesday, December 31. Futures prices were mixed, with the February and March contracts retreating slightly from their levels of Thursday, January 2 (the first day of trading in the New Year), while out-month contracts had slight gains. Temperatures were relatively warm throughout most of the nation for a third consecutive week, while at the same time a weekend snow storm in the Middle Atlantic and Northeast helped push spot prices higher at the end of last week. At the Henry Hub, the average spot price rose 47 cents for the week (prices for Wednesday, January 1, deliveries were established in trading on December 31), to end trading yesterday (Wednesday, January 8) at $5.07 per MMBtu. The NYMEX futures contract for February delivery declined 9 cents per MMBtu, settling yesterday at $5.161. Natural gas in storage as of Friday, January 3 decreased to 2,331 Bcf, which is just 2 Bcf below the 5-year (1998-2002) average. The spot price for West Texas Intermediate (WTI) crude oil, which had reached $33.26 per barrel on Friday, fell to $30.66 per barrel, or $5.29 per MMBtu yesterday.

414

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

15 (next release 2:00 p.m. on July 22) 15 (next release 2:00 p.m. on July 22) Natural gas spot and futures prices moved lower on the week (Wednesday to Wednesday, July 7-14), as generally cooler-than-normal temperatures prevailed most days in key weather-sensitive markets. At the Henry Hub, the spot price declined 37 cents, or nearly 6 percent, from last Wednesday's level, averaging $5.91 per MMBtu in yesterday's (Wednesday, July 14) trading. On the futures market, the NYMEX futures contract for August delivery declined most days, dipping below $6 in Monday trading for the first time in more than two months. Despite slight increases over the next two days, the August contract settled yesterday at $5.977 per MMBtu, down $0.393 from the previous Wednesday (July 7). EIA reported that inventories were 2,155 Bcf as of Friday, July 9, which is 2.6 percent greater than the 5-year average. Primarily on the strength of yesterday's $1.43 per barrel increase, the spot price for West Texas Intermediate crude oil exceeded $40 for the first time in more than 6 weeks, gaining $1.80 per barrel on the week to trade yesterday at $40.98, or $7.07 per MMBtu.

415

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

31 (next release 2:00 p.m. on September 7, 2006) 31 (next release 2:00 p.m. on September 7, 2006) Natural gas spot prices decreased significantly in the Lower 48 States this week as Tropical Storm Ernesto moved north along the east coast, easing the threat to Gulf of Mexico natural gas supplies. The spot price at the Henry Hub dropped 79 cents, or about 11 percent this week (Wednesday to Wednesday, August 23 to 30) to $6.40 per MMBtu. In its first day of trading as the near month contract, the price of the New York Mercantile Exchange (NYMEX) futures contract for October delivery settled at $6.29 per MMBtu yesterday (August 30), which is 72 cents, or about 10 percent, less than last Wednesday's price. As of Friday, August 25, 2006, natural gas in storage was 2,905 Bcf or 12.4 percent above the 5-year average. The spot price for West Texas Intermediate (WTI) crude oil declined $1.25 this week to $70.20 per barrel or $12.10 per MMBtu yesterday.

416

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

6, 2007 (next release 2:00 p.m. on September 13, 2007) 6, 2007 (next release 2:00 p.m. on September 13, 2007) Since Wednesday, August 29, natural gas spot prices increased at most market locations in the Lower 48 States, with a few exceptions in Florida and the Rocky Mountain region. For the week (Wednesday-Wednesday), prices at the Henry Hub rose 17 cents, or about 3 percent, to $5.81 per MMBtu. Yesterday (September 5), the price of the NYMEX futures contract for October delivery at the Henry Hub settled at $5.805 per MMBtu, increasing roughly 22 cents or about 4 percent since last Wednesday (August 29). Natural gas in storage was 3,005 Bcf as of August 30, leaving natural gas inventories at 10.4 percent above the 5-year average. The spot price for West Texas Intermediate (WTI) crude oil increased in all but one trading session during the week, rising $2.22 per barrel, or 3 percent, on the week to $75.74 per barrel or $13.06 per MMBtu.

417

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

12, 2007 (next release 2:00 p.m. on April 19, 2007) 12, 2007 (next release 2:00 p.m. on April 19, 2007) Unseasonably cold temperatures in most regions of the country led to increases of both spot and futures prices since Wednesday, April 4. On the week (Wednesday-Wednesday, April 4-11) the Henry Hub spot price increased 50 cents per MMBtu, or about 6.7 percent, to $7.96. At the New York Mercantile Exchange (NYMEX), the futures contract for May delivery increased 34 cents per MMBtu to a daily settlement of $7.855 yesterday (April 11). The first weekly report of the traditional injection season brought natural gas volumes in underground storage to 1,592 Bcf as of Friday, April 6, which is 28.4 percent above the 5-year average inventory for the report week. The spot price for the West Texas Intermediate (WTI) crude oil decreased $2.42 per barrel to $61.98 per barrel or $10.69 per MMBtu.

418

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

November 28 to Wednesday, December 5) November 28 to Wednesday, December 5) Released: December 6 Next release: December 13, 2007 · Natural gas spot prices decreased at most market locations in the Lower 48 States for the week. · The Henry Hub spot price averaged $7.04 per million Btu (MMBtu) as of December 5, declining 47 cents, or about 6 percent. · The New York Mercantile Exchange (NYMEX) futures contract for January delivery at the Henry Hub settled at $7.185 per MMBtu on Wednesday, December 5, down about $0.30 per MMBtu, or 4 percent, for the week. · The spot price for West Texas Intermediate (WTI) crude oil decreased $3.26 per barrel, or about 4 percent, on the week to $87.45 per barrel or $15.08 per MMBtu. · Natural gas in storage was 3,440 Bcf as of November 30, which is 8.6 percent above the 5-year average.

419

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

9 (next release 2:00 p.m. on February 16, 2006) 9 (next release 2:00 p.m. on February 16, 2006) Despite the slightly colder weather that dominated the country this week, natural gas spot and futures prices generally decreased for the week (February 1-8). The Henry Hub natural gas spot price fell 83 cents, or about 10 percent, while prices at most other regional markets ended the week with decreases averaging 58 cents per MMBtu. The price of the NYMEX futures contract for March delivery at the Henry Hub decreased 99 cents per MMBtu, or slightly over 11 percent, settling yesterday (February 8) at $7.735 per MMBtu. The Energy Information Administration (EIA) reported working gas in underground storage of 2,368 Bcf as of February 3, which reflects an implied net decrease of 38 Bcf. The spot price for West Texas Intermediate (WTI) crude oil decreased $4.10 per barrel, or more than 6 percent since last Wednesday (February 1), ending trading yesterday at $62.51 per barrel, or $10.78 per MMBtu.

420

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

15, 2007 (next release 2:00 p.m. on February 22, 2007) 15, 2007 (next release 2:00 p.m. on February 22, 2007) Natural gas spot prices increased this week at most market locations as frigid temperatures and winter storms blanketed the United States, particularly in the Northeast region. For the week (Wednesday to Wednesday, February 7 to February 14), the spot price at the Henry Hub increased $1.02 per MMBtu, or about 13 percent, to trade at $8.91 per MMBtu yesterday (February 14). In contrast, the price of the NYMEX futures contract for March delivery at the Henry Hub decreased 6 percent this week to settle yesterday at $7.241 per MMBtu. Natural gas in storage as of Friday, February 9, was 2,088 Bcf, which is 14.7 percent above the 5-year average. The spot price for West Texas Intermediate (WTI) crude oil increased 25 cents per barrel, or less than 1 percent, since last Wednesday to trade yesterday at $58 per barrel or $10 per MMBtu.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "weekly heating oil" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

10 (next release 2:00 p.m. on March 17) 10 (next release 2:00 p.m. on March 17) Natural gas spot prices increased this week (Wednesday to Wednesday, March 2-9) as a late season cold front moved into major gas-consuming regions of the country, bringing a reminder that the end of winter is still two weeks away. Spot prices climbed 17 to 76 cents per MMBtu at trading locations in the Lower 48 States since last Wednesday. Price changes in the Northeast were at the higher end of the range, while trading in the West resulted in gains at the lower end. The Henry Hub spot price increased 38 cents per MMBtu, or 5.7 percent, to $6.99. At the New York Mercantile Exchange (NYMEX), the futures contract for April delivery gained 16.3 cents per MMBtu, settling at $6.880 on Wednesday, March 9. Natural gas in storage as of Friday, March 4, decreased to 1,474 Bcf, which is 25.7 percent above the 5-year (2000-2004) average. The spot price for West Texas Intermediate (WTI) crude oil traded at near-record highs, rising $1.75 per barrel on the week to yesterday's closing price of $54.75 per barrel, or $9.44 per MMBtu.

422

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

June 1 (next release 2:00 p.m. on June 8, 2006) June 1 (next release 2:00 p.m. on June 8, 2006) Natural gas spot prices were virtually unchanged at most market locations in the Lower 48 States during the holiday-shortened trading week (Wednesday to Wednesday, May 24-31), while futures prices increased. The spot price at the Henry Hub decreased by 4 cents per MMBtu on the week, or less than 1 percent, to $5.97 per MMBtu. On the New York Mercantile Exchange (NYMEX), the June contract expired at $5.925 per MMBtu on May 26, marking the lowest contract closing price since the October 2004 futures contract closed at $5.723 per MMBtu. The settlement price for the futures contract for July delivery at the Henry Hub increased 21 cents on the week, settling yesterday (May 31) at $6.384 per MMBtu. EIA reported that inventories of working gas in underground storage were 2,243 Bcf as of Friday, May 26, which is 45.9 percent higher than the 5-year average. The spot price for West Texas Intermediate (WTI) crude oil gained $1.95 per barrel, or about 3 percent, since last Wednesday (May 24), trading yesterday at $71.42 per barrel ($12.31 per MMBtu).

423

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

18, 2002 (next release 2:00 p.m. on July 25) 18, 2002 (next release 2:00 p.m. on July 25) Since Wednesday, July 10, natural gas spot prices have declined slightly at most trading locations in the Lower 48 States. For the week (Wednesday-Wednesday), prices at the Henry Hub fell 6 cents or 2 percent to $2.98 per MMBtu. Notable exceptions to the general market trend included a recovery in prices at Rockies trading locations and an upward surge in the spot price at the New York citygate. The price of the NYMEX futures contract for August delivery at the Henry Hub fell $0.023 per MMBtu on the week to settle at $2.841 on Wednesday (July 17). Natural gas in storage for the week ending July 12 increased to 2,422 Bcf, which exceeds the 5-year average by 17.8 percent. The spot price for West Texas Intermediate (WTI) crude oil increased $1.15 per barrel since last Wednesday, trading at $27.88 or $4.81 per MMBtu.

424

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

January 26 (next release 2:00 p.m. on February 2, 2006) January 26 (next release 2:00 p.m. on February 2, 2006) Natural gas spot prices continued to decrease this week at all market locations as unseasonably mild temperatures persist in most regions of the United States. For the week (Wednesday to Wednesday), the spot price at the Henry Hub declined 35 cents per MMBtu, or about 4 percent, to trade at $8.50 per MMBtu yesterday (January 25). The price of the NYMEX futures contract for February delivery at the Henry Hub also decreased this week. The contract closed yesterday at $8.460 per MMBtu which is 23 cents per MMBtu, or about 3 percent, less than last Wednesday's price. Natural gas in storage as of Friday, January 20, decreased to 2,494 Bcf, which is 21.7 percent above the 5-year average. The spot price for West Texas Intermediate (WTI) crude oil dropped 16 cents per barrel since last Wednesday to trade yesterday at $65.60 per barrel or $11.31 per MMBtu.

425

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

August 5 (next release 2:00 p.m. on August 12) August 5 (next release 2:00 p.m. on August 12) Since Wednesday, July 28, natural gas spot prices have decreased at most market locations in the Lower 48 States. For the week (Wednesday-Wednesday), prices at the Henry Hub declined 7 cents or about 1 percent to $5.70 per MMBtu. Yesterday (August 4), the price of the NYMEX futures contract for September delivery at the Henry Hub settled at $5.661 per MMBtu, decreasing roughly 48 cents or nearly 8 percent since last Wednesday (July 28). Natural gas in storage was 2,380 Bcf as of July 30, which is 4.3 percent above the 5-year average. The spot price for West Texas Intermediate (WTI) crude oil fell 8 cents per barrel or less than 1 percent on the week to $42.73 per barrel or $7.367 per MMBtu, despite reaching a record high of $44.13 per barrel during the week.

426

Weekly Petroleum Status Report  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Table 1. U.S. Petroleum Balance Sheet, Week Ending 12/13/2013 Petroleum Stocks (Million Barrels) Current Week Week Ago Year Ago 12/6/13 Difference Percent Change 12/14/12 Difference Percent Change 12/13/13 Crude Oil .................................................... 1,068.3 1,071.2 -2.9 -0.3 1,066.6 1.7 0.2 Commercial (Excluding SPR) 1 ............... 372.3 375.2 -2.9 -0.8 371.6 0.7 0.2 Strategic Petroleum Reserve (SPR) 2 ..... 696.0 696.0 0.0 0.0 695.0 1.0 0.1 Total Motor Gasoline .................................. 220.5 219.1 1.3 0.6 219.3 1.2 0.5 Reformulated .......................................... 0.0 0.0 0.0 2.3 0.0 0.0 25.7 Conventional ........................................... 41.4 41.5 -0.1 -0.2 55.6 -14.2 -25.5 Blending Components ............................ 179.0 177.6 1.4 0.8 163.7 15.3 9.4 Fuel Ethanol

427

Performance model and annual yield comparison of parabolic-trough solar thermal power plants with either nitrogen or synthetic oil as heat transfer fluid  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract The majority of commercial parabolic-trough plants in the world operate with synthetic oil as heat transfer fluid in the solar field. However, the synthetic oils that are available at affordable cost present some challenges such as their flammability, environmental toxicity and a temperature limitation of around 400C. As alternative, this work proposes the use of pressurized nitrogen as heat transfer fluid. In order to analyze the feasibility of this technology, a comparison between a plant with nitrogen and a conventional plant with synthetic oil has been carried out. In both cases, 50MWe parabolic-trough plants with 6h of thermal storage are used as reference. A performance model including the solar field, the thermal storage system and the power block has been developed for each plant in the TRNSYS simulation software. This paper also describes the specifications, design and sizing of the solar field and explains the basic operation strategy applied in each model. Both annual simulations have been performed considering the same location, Almera (Spain), and meteorological data. In summary, the results show that similar net annual electricity productions can be attained for parabolic-trough plants with the same collection area using either nitrogen or synthetic oil as heat transfer fluid.

Mario Biencinto; Lourdes Gonzlez; Eduardo Zarza; Luis E. Dez; Javier Muoz-Antn

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

428

This Week In Petroleum Printer-Friendly Version  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

like those in the Bakken Formation is not the same as the extraction of oil from oil shale plays. See This Week In Petroleum, March 4, 2009.) Natural Gas. Proved reserves of...

429

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

2 2006 (next release 2:00 p.m. on January 19, 2006) 2 2006 (next release 2:00 p.m. on January 19, 2006) Warmer-than-normal temperatures throughout the country led to lower natural gas spot prices at many trading locations in the Lower 48 States, while some markets exhibited modest increases since last Wednesday. For the week (Wednesday-Wednesday, January 4-11), the price for next-day delivery at the Henry Hub decreased 70 cents per MMBtu, or 7.6 percent to $8.55 per MMBtu. The NYMEX futures contract for February delivery at the Henry Hub settled yesterday (January 11) at $9.238 per MMBtu, which was 96 cents less than last Wednesday's price. Natural gas in storage decreased to 2,621 Bcf as of January 6, leaving the inventories at 11.8 percent above the 5-year average. The spot price for West Texas Intermediate (WTI) crude oil moved up $0.50 per barrel or about 1 percent since last Wednesday to $63.91 per barrel or $11.02 per MMBtu. As natural gas prices have declined while crude oil prices remain above $60 per barrel, the relative position of these prices has returned to a more typical pattern, where the price of natural gas is below that of crude oil on a Btu basis. The Henry Hub spot price was 24 percent below the WTI crude oil price from the beginning of 2005 up to the point that Hurricane Katrina made landfall in late August. For the remainder of 2005, the Henry Hub spot price exceeded the WTI price by 15 percent. However, that unusual pattern of relative prices was changing by the end of 2005, and the Henry Hub spot price has been 17 percent below the WTI price on average so far in January.

430

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

8, 2008 8, 2008 Next Release: January 8, 2009 Overview Prices Storage Other Market Trends Natural Gas Transportation Update Overview (Wednesday, December 10, to Wednesday, December 17, 2008) The coldest temperatures of the season to date covered much of the northern half of the country this report week, boosting demand related to space heating on both coasts and across the Northern Plains and Midwest population centers. Prices increased throughout the country outside the Northeast, with the biggest increases occurring for supplies from the Rocky Mountains (particularly for delivery into the Northwest). During the report week, the Henry Hub spot price increased $0.11 per million Btu (MMBtu) to $5.79. At the New York Mercantile Exchange (NYMEX), futures prices

431

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

5, 2010 at 2:00 P.M. 5, 2010 at 2:00 P.M. Next Release: Thursday, April 1, 2010 Overview Prices Storage Other Market Trends Natural Gas Transportation Update Overview (For the Week Ending Wednesday, March 24, 2010) The natural gas market is transitioning to spring, a “shoulder” season of lower demand between the relatively high-demand periods of winter and summer. As space-heating demand ebbed during the report week, prices declined across the lower 48 States. The Henry Hub spot price ended trading yesterday, March 24, at $4.02 per million Btu (MMBtu), a decrease of $0.25 compared with the previous Wednesday, March 17. At the New York Mercantile Exchange (NYMEX), futures prices continued to decline as storage inventories appeared more than adequate and domestic production remained strong. The futures contract for April

432

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

8, 2007 (next release 2:00 p.m. on October 25, 2007) 8, 2007 (next release 2:00 p.m. on October 25, 2007) Natural gas spot prices increased since Wednesday, October 10, at nearly all market locations. For the week (Wednesday to Wednesday), the price at the Henry Hub increased $0.32 per MMBtu, or about 5 percent, to $7.11 per MMBtu. The NYMEX futures contract for November delivery at the Henry Hub rose 45 cents since last Wednesday to close yesterday at $7.458 per MMBtu. Natural gas in storage as of Friday, October 12, was 3,375 Bcf, which is 6.7 percent above the 5-year average. Despite the seemingly favorable supply conditions and little weather-related natural gas demand, natural gas prices continued their upward movement of the past 6 weeks. The Henry Hub spot price exceeded the $7-per MMBtu mark in this week's trading for the first time in 2 months. One factor in the recent run-up in prices may be the relatively low imports of liquefied natural gas (LNG) to the Lower 48 States. LNG imports have averaged less than 1 Bcf per day during the first half of October, based on the sendout data published on companies' websites. LNG cargoes instead are heading to Europe and Asia, where buyers continue to purchase LNG at much higher prices than have prevailed in U.S. markets. A likely influence on natural gas prices is the spot price for West Texas Intermediate (WTI) crude oil, which reached yet another record high on Tuesday, but decreased slightly during yesterday's trading to $87.19 per barrel or $15.03 per MMBtu. On the week, however, the WTI increased $5.89 per barrel or about 7 percent.

433

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

19, 2002 (next release 2:00 p.m. on September 26) 19, 2002 (next release 2:00 p.m. on September 26) Spot and futures prices surged upward as two tropical storms in close succession made their presence felt in gas markets over the past week. At the Henry Hub, the average spot price rose 47 cents week-to-week (Wednesday, September 11 to Wednesday, September 18) to $3.79 per MMBtu, which is at its highest level since May 1. In addition to some production shut-ins from Tropical Storm Hanna's arrival in the Gulf of Mexico on Friday (September 13), spot prices were also bolstered somewhat by warmer-than-normal temperatures in most regions since last Wednesday, as well as by outages of a number of nuclear-fired electric plants for routine maintenance. On the NYMEX, the settlement price of the futures contract for October delivery rose in five consecutive trading sessions, reaching a 4-month high yesterday at $3.787 per MMBtu. Natural gas in storage increased by 69 Bcf to 2,924 Bcf, 12 percent above the 5-year average. After falling 82 cents on Thursday (September 12) to dip below $29 per barrel, the spot price of West Texas Intermediate (WTI) crude oil rebounded strongly on Friday and remained above the $29 per barrel mark for the rest of the week, ending trading yesterday at $29.57 per barrel, or $5.10 per MMBtu. This is a decline of 20 cents per barrel from the WTI spot price of last Wednesday.

434

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

8 2004 (next release 2:00 p.m. on January 15) 8 2004 (next release 2:00 p.m. on January 15) A massive cold front that began flowing into the Plains States over this past weekend and spread south and eastward sent spot prices sharply upward for the first two days of this week. Coupled with the generally smaller net increases seen during the holiday-shortened New Year's week (Monday, December 29-Friday, January 2), spot prices have gained more than $1 per MMBtu since Wednesday, December 24, at nearly every market location. At the Henry Hub, the spot price rose 27 cents per MMBtu during New Year's week, and jumped 86 cents per MMBtu since Wednesday, December 31, for a net increase of $1.13 per MMBtu since Christmas, ending trading yesterday (Wednesday, January 7) at $6.63. On the NYMEX, the contract for January delivery expired on Monday, December 29, with a final settlement price of $6.150 per MMBtu. The contract for February delivery opened as the near-month contract the following day with a settlement price of $6.600 per MMBtu, and has gained $0.278 per MMBtu since then with settlement yesterday at $6.878. EIA reported that natural gas inventories were 2,567 Bcf as of Friday, January 2, which is 8.3 percent greater than the previous 5-year (1999-2003) average for the week. Since Wednesday, December 24, West Texas Intermediate (WTI) crude oil on the spot market has traded between $32.51 and $33.71 per barrel. WTI ended trading yesterday at $33.57 per barrel, or $5.79 per MMBtu, up $1.06 per barrel ($0.18 per MMBtu) from the previous Wednesday (December 29).

435

This Week In Petroleum Printer-Friendly Version  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Timing Petroleum inventories fell sharply last week, with declines seen for both crude oil and refined products. As petroleum markets continue their current cycle (as outlined...

436

This Week In Petroleum Printer-Friendly Version  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

not accurate, it is an excellent time to contrast those releases with the key information oil markets depend on, particularly weekly data released by the American Petroleum...

437

This Week In Petroleum Summary Printer-Friendly Version  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

February. Early in 2013, increasing crude oil prices and strong seasonal crack spreads led to an increase in retail gasoline prices. However, in recent weeks, both of those...

438

This Week In Petroleum Printer-Friendly Version  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

in the Weekly Petroleum Status Report, they show a rather different picture of current inventory levels, particularly for crude oil and gasoline. For example, looking at crude...

439

This Week In Petroleum Printer-Friendly Version  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

gallon, despite refinery gasoline margins that were well below their 2007 level. Crude oil prices have varied over a substantial range this year (see This Week in Petroleum,...

440

This Week In Petroleum Summary Printer-Friendly Version  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

earlier edition of This Week in Petroleum outlined some of the key infrastructural, political, and security factors affecting the outlook for Libyan oil production. In terms of...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "weekly heating oil" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

This Week In Petroleum Summary Printer-Friendly Version  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

price and the lowest average price for any week since December 2010. Falling crude oil prices have been largely responsible for the decline in retail gasoline prices. Typical...

442

This Week In Petroleum Summary Printer-Friendly Version  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Rig Count Passes 1,000 On June 24, 2011, the Baker Hughes weekly count of rigs actively drilling for oil in the United States was 1,003, marking the first week since the company...

443

This Week In Petroleum Printer-Friendly Version  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Reserve) have now fallen nearly 16 million barrels in the last three weeks, despite crude oil stocks rising 4.3 million barrels this past week. Such a steep decline in total...

444

U.S. Weekly Supply Estimates  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Area: U.S. Lower 48 (Crude Oil Production) PADD 1 New England Central Atlantic Lower Atlantic PADD 2 Cushing, Oklahoma (Crude Oil Stocks) PADD 3 PADD 4 PADD 5 Alaska (Crude Oil Production) PADD's 4 & 5 Period: Weekly 4-Week Average Area: U.S. Lower 48 (Crude Oil Production) PADD 1 New England Central Atlantic Lower Atlantic PADD 2 Cushing, Oklahoma (Crude Oil Stocks) PADD 3 PADD 4 PADD 5 Alaska (Crude Oil Production) PADD's 4 & 5 Period: Weekly 4-Week Average Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources & Notes Definitions, Sources & Notes Show Data By: Data Series Area 11/08/13 11/15/13 11/22/13 11/29/13 12/06/13 12/13/13 View History Crude Oil Production Domestic Production 7,981 7,974 8,019 8,011 8,075 8,058 1983-2013 Refiner Inputs and Utilization Crude Oil Inputs 15,411 15,447 15,551 16,106 16,131 15,931 1982-2013 Gross Inputs 15,801 15,782 15,917 16,453 16,501 16,310 1990-2013 Operable Capacity (Calendar Day)

445

Natural Gas Weekly Update, Printer-Friendly Version  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

30, 2002 (next release 2:00 p.m. on June 6) 30, 2002 (next release 2:00 p.m. on June 6) Since Wednesday, May 22, natural gas spot prices were down at most locations, despite gains ranging between 2 and 14 cents per MMBtu on Wednesday, May 29. For the week, prices at the Henry Hub declined 9 cents to $3.29 per MMBtu, which is a decrease of almost 3 percent. Moderate temperatures and falling crude oil prices contributed to declines in demand for natural gas as neither cooling demand nor heating demand for gas seemed sufficient to avoid the price declines. The NYMEX futures contract for June delivery at the Henry Hub expired yesterday (May 29) at $3.42 per MMBtu. The spot price for West Texas Intermediate (WTI) crude oil decreased $1.37 per barrel or over 5 percent since last Wednesday, trading

446

The flow and heat transfer characteristics of multi-thermal fluid in horizontal wellbore coupled with flow in heavy oil reservoirs  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract As a new improved oil-recovery technique, multi-thermal fluid injection technology through a horizontal well has been widely used in the development process of heavy oil reservoirs. The flow and heat transfer characteristic of multi-thermal fluid in horizontal wellbore is significantly important for the productivity evaluation and parameters design of the horizontal well. Considering the specific physical properties of multi-thermal fluid, fluid absorption in perforation holes and pressure drop characteristics along the horizontal wellbore, this paper developed the flow and heat transfer model of multi-thermal fluid in perforated horizontal wellbore. In order to evaluate the heating effect of the multi-thermal fluid, a concept of effective heating length of a horizontal well is proposed. Then, a sensitivity analysis process is performed to study the influence of reservoir/fluid parameters and operating parameters on the flowing process of multi-thermal fluid in horizontal wellbore. Simultaneously, using the method of orthogonal numerical test, differential analysis and variance analysis are also conducted. Results show that the flowing process of multi-thermal fluid in horizontal wellbore includes a single-phase flowing process and a gasliquid two-phase flowing process. The influence of oil viscosity on the flow and heat transfer characteristics of multi-thermal fluid in horizontal wellbore is most significant. Thereafter, the solution of our semi-analytical model is compared against the test results of an actual horizontal well from an oilfield in China. It is shown that the model results are in good agreement with the real test results. This model could be used to calculate and predict the flow and heat transfer characteristics of multi-thermal fluid (or saturated steam) in a perforated horizontal wellbore.

Xiaohu Dong; Huiqing Liu; Zhaoxiang Zhang; Changjiu Wang

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

447

Electric resistive space heating  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The cost of heating residential buildings using electricity is compared to the cost employing gas or oil. (AIP)

David Bodansky

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

448

Natural Gas Weekly Update, Printer-Friendly Version  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

January 07, 2002 January 07, 2002 The spot price at the Henry Hub finished the trading week on January 4 at $2.36 per MMBtu, roughly 30 cents or over 11 percent less than on the previous Friday. On the NYMEX, the settlement price of the futures contract for February delivery at the Henry Hub settled at $2.275 per MMBtu, down nearly 50 cents from the previous Friday. Market prices were affected early in the week by colder temperatures in most of the eastern two-thirds of the United States. (See Temperature Map) (See Deviation Map) Although again smaller than historical averages and market expectations, withdrawals from storage at 124 Bcf were the largest reported so far during the current heating season. The spot price for West Texas Intermediate (WTI) crude oil increased by over 1 percent, climbing to

449

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

12 to Wednesday, December 19) 12 to Wednesday, December 19) Released: December 20 Next release: January 4, 2008 · Since Wednesday, December 12, natural gas spot prices decreased at virtually all markets in the Lower 48 States. Prices at the Henry Hub fell 4 cents per million Btu (MMBtu), or less than 1 percent to $7.18 per MMBtu. · At the New York Mercantile Exchange (NYMEX), the futures contract for January delivery at the Henry Hub settled yesterday (December 19) at $7.179 per MMBtu, falling 23 cents or 3 percent since Wednesday, December 12. · Natural gas in storage was 3,173 billion cubic feet (Bcf) as of December 14, which is 9 percent above the 5-year average (2002-2006). · The spot price for West Texas Intermediate (WTI) crude oil decreased $3.30 per barrel on the week (Wednesday-Wednesday) to $91.11 per barrel or $15.71 per MMBtu.

450

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

0, 2010 at 2:00 P.M. 0, 2010 at 2:00 P.M. Next Release: Thursday, May 27, 2010 Overview Prices Storage Other Market Trends Natural Gas Transportation Update Overview (For the Week Ending Wednesday, May 19, 2010) Since last Wednesday, May 12, natural gas spot prices generally rose at market locations across the lower 48 States, with only a few exceptions. The Henry Hub natural gas spot price increased about 2 percent since last Wednesday, from $4.18 per million Btu (MMBtu) to $4.28 per MMBtu. At the New York Mercantile Exchange (NYMEX), the price of the June 2010 futures contract fell about 3 percent, from $4.284 per MMBtu to $4.158 per MMBtu. The West Texas Intermediate (WTI) crude oil spot price dropped about 8 percent, from $75.65 per barrel ($13.05 per MMBtu) to $69.91 per barrel

451

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

7, 2010 at 2:00 P.M. 7, 2010 at 2:00 P.M. Next Release: Thursday, October 14, 2010 Overview Prices Storage Other Market Trends Natural Gas Transportation Update Overview (For the Week Ending Wednesday, October 6, 2010) Natural gas spot prices fell at most pricing point locations across the board in the lower 48 States as demand fell. The price at the Henry Hub fell 25 cents, or about 7 percent, since last Wednesday, September 29, from $3.81 per million Btu (MMBtu) to $3.56 per MMBtu. The West Texas Intermediate crude oil spot price settled at $83.21 per barrel, or $14.35 per MMBtu, on Wednesday, October 6. This represents an increase of $5.36 per barrel, or $0.92 per MMBtu, from the previous Wednesday. Working natural gas in storage increased to 3,499 billion cubic feet

452

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

6, to Wednesday, February 13) 6, to Wednesday, February 13) Released: February 14, 2008 Next release: February 21, 2008 · Since Wednesday, February 6, natural gas spot prices increased at virtually all markets in the Lower 48 States. Prices at the Henry Hub rose 41 cents per million Btu (MMBtu), or about 5 percent, to $8.35 per MMBtu. · At the New York Mercantile Exchange (NYMEX), the futures contract for March delivery at the Henry Hub settled yesterday (February 13) at $8.388 per MMBtu, climbing 39 cents or about 5 percent since Wednesday, February 6. · Natural gas in storage was 1,942 billion cubic feet (Bcf) as of February 8, which is 5.9 percent above the 5-year average (2003-2007). · The spot price for West Texas Intermediate (WTI) crude oil climbed $6.12 per barrel on the week to $93.28 per barrel or $16.08 per MMBtu.

453

Weekly Petroleum Status Report Schedule  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Weekly Petroleum Status Report Weekly Petroleum Status Report Release Schedule The wpsrsummary.pdf, overview.pdf, and Tables 1-14 in CSV and XLS formats, are released to the Web site after 10:30 a.m. (Eastern Time) on Wednesday. All other PDF and HTML files are released to the Web site after 1:00 p.m. (Eastern Time) on Wednesday. Appendix D is produced during the winter heating season, which extends from October through March of each year. For some weeks which include holidays, releases are delayed by one day. Holiday Release Schedule The standard release time and day of the week will be at 10:30 a.m. (Eastern time) on Wednesdays with the following exceptions. All times are Eastern. Data for the week ending Alternate Release Date Release Day Release Time Holiday October 11, 2013 October 21, 2013 Monday 10:30 a.m. Columbus/EIA Closed

454

Modeling global and local dependence in a pair of commodity forward curves with an application to the US natural gas and heating oil markets  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The goal of this paper is to present a model for the joint evolution of correlated commodity forward curves. Each forward curve is directed by two state variables, namely slope and level, and the model is meant to capture both the local and global dependence structures between slopes and levels. Our framework can be interpreted as an extension of the concept of cointegration to forward curves. The model is applied to a US database of heating oil and natural gas futures prices over the period February 2000February 2009. We find the long-run slope and level relationships between natural gas and heating oil markets, analyze the lead and lag properties between the two energy commodities, the volatilities and correlations between their daily co-movements and evaluate the robustness of these observations to the turmoil experienced by energy markets since 2003.

Steve Ohana

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

455

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

June 27, 2002 (next release 2:00 p.m. on July 5) June 27, 2002 (next release 2:00 p.m. on July 5) Since Wednesday, June 19, natural gas spot prices increased at most locations, despite declines ranging between 5 and 14 cents per MMBtu on Wednesday, June 26. For the week, prices at the Henry Hub increased 19 cents to $3.42 per MMBtu, which is an increase of almost 6 percent. High temperatures and rising crude oil prices contributed to increased cooling demand for gas, which spurred the price hikes. The NYMEX futures contract for July delivery at the Henry Hub expired yesterday (June 26) at $3.278 per MMBtu, falling over 17 cents in its final day of trading. Natural gas in storage increased to 2,184 Bcf, which exceeds the 5-year average by more 20 than percent. The spot price for West Texas Intermediate (WTI) crude oil increased $1.10 per barrel or over 4 percent since last Wednesday, trading at $26.67 per barrel or $4.60 per MMBtu.

456

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

14 (next release 2:00 p.m. on July 21) 14 (next release 2:00 p.m. on July 21) Since Wednesday, July 6, natural gas spot prices have increased at virtually all market locations in the Lower 48 States, owing at least partially to the effects of storm activity in the Gulf of Mexico. For the week (Wednesday-Wednesday), prices at the Henry Hub increased 10 cents, or about 1.3 percent, to $7.78 per MMBtu. Yesterday (July 13), the price of the NYMEX futures contract for August delivery at the Henry Hub settled at $7.900 per MMBtu, increasing roughly 21 cents or about 3 percent since last Wednesday (July 6). Natural gas in storage was 2,280 Bcf as of July 8, which is 11.7 percent above the 5-year average. The spot price for West Texas Intermediate (WTI) crude oil decreased $1.24 per barrel, or about 2 percent, since last Wednesday, after reaching an all time high of $61.24 per barrel on July 6. Crude oil traded yesterday at $60 per barrel or $10.34 per MMBtu.

457

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

June 30 (next release 2:00 p.m. on July 7) June 30 (next release 2:00 p.m. on July 7) Natural gas spot prices dropped in almost all locations this week (Wednesday - Wednesday, June 22-29) partly because of a decline in cooling demand across much of the Lower 48 States. The Henry Hub spot price decreased 33 cents, or about 4.5 percent, to $7.07 per MMBtu, while locations in the West generally saw the largest decreases ranging between 27 cents and 71 cents per MMBtu. The price of the NYMEX futures contract for July delivery expired Tuesday (June 28) at $6.976, decreasing about 47 cents per MMBtu, or 6.2 percent, since last Wednesday (June 22). Natural gas in storage as of Friday, June 24 was 2,123 Bcf, which is 14.7 percent above the 5-year average. The spot price for West Texas Intermediate (WTI) crude oil declined $1.04 per barrel, or about 2 percent, since last Wednesday, ending trading yesterday (June 29) at $57.28. The WTI crude oil spot price experienced an all-time high price of $59.78 per barrel on Monday, June 27.

458

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

23 (next release 2:00 p.m. on September 30) 23 (next release 2:00 p.m. on September 30) Since Wednesday, September 15, natural gas spot prices have increased at virtually all market locations in the Lower 48 States, owing to the effects of Hurricane Ivan. For the week (Wednesday-Wednesday), prices at the Henry Hub increased 43 cents, or about 8 percent, to $5.59 per MMBtu. Yesterday (September 22), the price of the NYMEX futures contract for October delivery at the Henry Hub settled at $5.629 per MMBtu, increasing roughly 81 cents or about 17 percent since last Wednesday (September 15). Natural gas in storage was 2,942 Bcf as of September 17, which is 7 percent above the 5-year average. The spot price for West Texas Intermediate (WTI) crude oil increased $4.58 per barrel, or about 10 percent, on the week to $48.41 per barrel or $8.347 per MMBtu.

459

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

30, 2003 (next release 2:00 p.m. on February 6) 30, 2003 (next release 2:00 p.m. on February 6) Since Wednesday, January 22, natural gas spot prices have decreased at nearly all locations in the Lower 48 States, falling up to $3.18 per MMBtu. For the week (Wednesday-Wednesday), prices at the Henry Hub decreased 6 cents or roughly 1 percent to $5.62 per MMBtu. However, prices hit $6.56 on Thursday, January 23, which is its highest level since late January 2001. The price of the NYMEX futures contract for February delivery at the Henry Hub increased roughly 1 cent per MMBtu since last Wednesday to settle at $5.660 per MMBtu yesterday (January 29) in its final day of trading. Natural gas in storage decreased to 1, 729 Bcf for the week ended Friday, January 24, which is roughly 10 percent below the 5-year average. The spot price for West Texas Intermediate (WTI) crude oil increased 84 cents per barrel or about 3 percent since last Wednesday to trade yesterday at $33.54 per barrel or $5.78 per MMBtu.

460

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

10, 2003 (next release 2:00 p.m. on April 17) 10, 2003 (next release 2:00 p.m. on April 17) Unlikely wintry weather in key market areas this week boosted aggregate demand, lifting natural gas spot prices $0.20 per MMBtu or more at most trading location in the Lower 48 States. For the week (Wednesday, April 2-Wednesday, April 9), the Henry Hub spot price increased 22 cents per MMBtu, while spot price gains in the still-frigid Northeast were generally between $0.70 and $1.00. The price of the NYMEX futures contract for May delivery at the Henry Hub rose $0.13 per MMBtu, or 2.6 percent, to settle at $5.195 yesterday (April 9). Natural gas in storage decreased to 671 Bcf as of Friday, April 4, which is about 44 percent below the 5-year average. The spot price for West Texas Intermediate (WTI) crude oil increased 38 cents per barrel or 1.3 percent since last Wednesday to trade yesterday at $28.93 per barrel or $4.99 per MMBtu.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "weekly heating oil" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


461

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

15, 2004 (next release 2:00 p.m. on January 22) 15, 2004 (next release 2:00 p.m. on January 22) Since Wednesday, January 7, natural gas spot prices have decreased at most market locations in the Lower 48 States outside of the Northeast region. For the week (Wednesday-Wednesday), prices at the Henry Hub decreased 89 cents or about 13 percent to $5.74 per MMBtu. Despite widespread declines elsewhere, prices in the Northeast region surged to more than seven times last week's levels at some market locations as extreme wintry conditions moved into the region. Yesterday (January 14), the price of the NYMEX futures contract for February delivery at the Henry Hub settled at $6.387 per MMBtu, decreasing roughly 49 cents or 7 percent since last Wednesday. Natural gas in storage was 2,414 Bcf as of January 9, which is 8.3 percent above the 5-year average. The spot price for West Texas Intermediate (WTI) crude oil gained $1.05 per barrel or about 3 percent since last Wednesday, climbing to $34.62 per barrel or $5.969 per MMBtu.

462

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

February 26, 2004 (next release 2:00 p.m. on March 4) February 26, 2004 (next release 2:00 p.m. on March 4) In contrast to last year's late February price spikes, spot and futures prices this week continued drifting lower as temperatures were seasonably cool across most of the country. Since Wednesday, February 18, natural gas spot prices have decreased between 10 and 30 cents per MMBtu at virtually all market locations in the Lower 48 States. For the week (Wednesday-Wednesday), prices at the Henry Hub fell 23 cents per MMBtu or 4 percent to $5.10. Yesterday (Wednesday, February 25), the NYMEX futures contract for March delivery at the Henry Hub expired at $5.15 per MMBtu, which was 21 cents less than last Wednesday's price and 59 cents less than its debut as the near-month contract at $5.74. Natural gas in storage decreased to 1,267 Bcf as of February 20, which is about 11.4 percent below the 5-year average. The spot price for West Texas Intermediate (WTI) crude oil moved up $1.86 per barrel or about 5 percent since last Wednesday to $37.28 per barrel or $6.43 per MMBtu.

463

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

17 (next release 2:00 p.m. on March 24) 17 (next release 2:00 p.m. on March 24) Since Wednesday, March 9, natural gas spot prices have risen at most market locations in the Lower 48 States, while declining in the Northeast region. For the week (Wednesday-Wednesday), prices at the Henry Hub increased 9 cents, or about 1 percent, to $7.08 per MMBtu. Yesterday (March 16), the price of the NYMEX futures contract for April delivery at the Henry Hub settled at $7.192 per MMBtu, increasing roughly 31 cents, or about 5 percent, since last Wednesday. Natural gas in storage was 1,379 Bcf as of March 11, which is about 24 percent above the 5-year average. The spot price for West Texas Intermediate (WTI) crude oil increased $1.76 per barrel, or about 3 percent, on the week to $56.50 per barrel or $8.741 per MMBtu.

464

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

November 30 (next release 2:00 p.m. on December 7, 2006) November 30 (next release 2:00 p.m. on December 7, 2006) Natural gas spot prices increased at nearly all market locations in the Lower 48 States since Wednesday, November 22, 2006, with some Midcontinent and Western regions showing increases of more than $2 per MMBtu. With only 3 trading days included in the report week owing to the Thanksgiving holiday, the spot price at the Henry Hub increased by 34 cents, or about 5 percent, to $7.75 per MMBtu. The price of the NYMEX futures contract for January delivery settled at $8.871 per MMBtu yesterday (November 29), which is 77 cents, or about 10 percent, more than last Wednesday, and the December 2006 contract expired Tuesday at $8.318 per MMBtu. As of Friday, November 24, 2006, natural gas in storage was 3,417 Bcf or 7.2 percent above the 5-year average. The spot price for West Texas Intermediate (WTI) crude oil rose to $62.45 per barrel or $10.77 per MMBtu yesterday. This price is $5.17 per barrel, or 9 percent, more than the price last week and is the highest price since late September.

465

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

September 05, 2002 (next release 2:00 p.m. on September 12) September 05, 2002 (next release 2:00 p.m. on September 12) Since Wednesday, August 28, natural gas spot prices have declined at most locations in the Lower 48 States, generally falling between 1 and 22 cents with steeper declines at some market locations. For the week (Wednesday-Wednesday), prices at the Henry Hub fell 21 cents or roughly 6 percent to $3.12 per MMBtu. Price drops at most locations were driven principally by moderating temperatures since late last week. The price of the NYMEX futures contract for October delivery at the Henry Hub decreased 21 cents since last Wednesday to settle at $3.193 per MMBtu yesterday. Natural gas in storage increased to 2,781 Bcf, which exceeds the 5-year average by nearly 13 percent. The spot price for West Texas Intermediate (WTI) crude oil moved down 3 cents per barrel or less than 1 percent since last Wednesday, trading at $28.28 per barrel or $4.88 per MMBtu.

466

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

14, 2003 (next release 2:00 p.m. on August 21) 14, 2003 (next release 2:00 p.m. on August 21) Natural gas spot prices climbed 25 to 55 cents across the Lower 48 States this week (Wednesday, August 6-Wednesday, August 13). Increases were highest in sun-drenched California, but also significant in the Northeast and Midwest as this summer's hottest weather to date occurred in parts of the two regions. At the Henry Hub, the spot price increased 43 cents or roughly 9 percent to $5.17 per MMBtu. The price of the NYMEX futures contract for September delivery at the Henry Hub similarly increased, gaining just over 43 cents per MMBtu since last Wednesday to settle at $5.179 per MMBtu yesterday (August 13). Natural gas in storage increased to 2,188 Bcf as of Friday, August 8, which is about 8.5 percent below the 5-year average inventory level for the report week. The spot price for West Texas Intermediate (WTI) crude oil decreased $0.92 per barrel or 2.9 percent since last Wednesday to trade yesterday at $30.85 per barrel, or $5.32 per MMBtu.

467

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

9, 2004 (next release 2:00 p.m. on February 5) 9, 2004 (next release 2:00 p.m. on February 5) Spot prices in most regional markets ended the week (Wednesday-Wednesday, January 21-28) lower, despite severe cold in the Northeast beginning Friday (January 23) and continuing through the weekend. As a result, prices in the Northeast market proved the major exception to the downward trend, as cash prices moved up sharply at most locations in the region. At the Henry Hub, the spot price was 23 cents per MMBtu lower on the week, or about 4 percent, ending with yesterday's (Wednesday, January 28) level of $6.04. At the New York Mercantile Exchange (NYMEX), the futures contract for February delivery showed a modest gain of nearly 6 cents on its final day of trading, closing out at $5.775 per MMBtu. The contract for March delivery assumes the near-month position beginning today (Thursday, January 29). The Energy Information Administration (EIA) reported that natural gas inventories were 2,063 Bcf as of Friday, January 23, which is 8.6 percent greater than the previous 5-year (1999-2003) average. West Texas Intermediate crude oil on the spot market fell $1.90 per barrel, or $0.26 per MMBtu, since last Wednesday (January 21), ending trading yesterday at $33.63 per barrel, or $5.80 per MMBtu.

468

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

22 (next release 2:00 p.m. on September 29) 22 (next release 2:00 p.m. on September 29) Since Wednesday, September 14, natural gas spot prices have increased at all market locations in the Lower 48 States, owing to the aftermath of Hurricane Katrina and the approaching Hurricane Rita. For the week (Wednesday-Wednesday), prices at the Henry Hub increased $3.45, or about 32 percent, to $14.25 per MMBtu. Yesterday (September 21), the price of the NYMEX futures contract for October delivery at the Henry Hub settled at $12.594 per MMBtu, increasing roughly $1.43 or about 13 percent since last Wednesday (September 14). Natural gas in storage was 2,832 Bcf as of September 16, which is 3.4 percent above the 5-year average. The spot price for West Texas Intermediate (WTI) crude oil increased $1.76 per barrel, or about 3 percent, on the week to $66.96 per barrel or $11.54 per MMBtu.

469

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

0, 2003 (next release 2:00 p.m. on July 17) 0, 2003 (next release 2:00 p.m. on July 17) The threat of production interruptions from a tropical storm and increased cooling demand contributed to natural gas spot prices climbing 35 to 70 cents per MMBtu at most trading locations in the Lower 48 States since Wednesday, July 2. On the week (Wednesday-Wednesday), the Henry Hub spot price climbed 51 cents to $5.56 per MMBtu, while spot prices in the Northeast were slightly higher with gains of nearly 60 cents in response to regional cooling demand. The NYMEX futures contract for August delivery gained just over 32 cents per MMBtu to a close of $5.52 on Wednesday, July 9. Working gas in storage as of Friday, July 4 increased to 1,773 Bcf, which is 15.2 percent below the 5-year (1998-2002) average. The spot price for West Texas Intermediate (WTI) crude oil rose $0.58 per barrel on the week to $30.87, or $5.32 per MMBtu.

470

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

26, 2007 (next release 2:00 p.m. on May 3, 2007) 26, 2007 (next release 2:00 p.m. on May 3, 2007) Natural gas spot prices increased slightly at most market locations outside the Northeast and the Rockies since Wednesday, April 18, 2007. For the week (Wednesday, April 18, to Wednesday, April 25), the spot price at the Henry Hub increased 5 cents, or less than 1 percent, to $7.59 per MMBtu. The price of the NYMEX futures contract for May delivery settled at $7.689 per MMBtu yesterday (April 25), which is 19 cents or about 3 percent more than last Wednesday's level. As of Friday, April 20, 2007, natural gas in storage was 1,564 Bcf, which is 17.5 percent above the 5-year average. The spot price for West Texas Intermediate (WTI) crude oil was $65.33 per barrel or $11.26 per MMBtu as of yesterday. This is $2.19 per barrel more than the price last week, an increase of about 3 percent.

471

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

7 (next release 2:00 p.m. on September 14, 2006) 7 (next release 2:00 p.m. on September 14, 2006) Since Wednesday, August 30, natural gas spot prices have decreased at most market locations in the Lower 48 States. For the week (Wednesday-Wednesday), prices at the Henry Hub declined 67 cents, or about 10 percent, to $5.73 per MMBtu. Yesterday (September 6), the price of the NYMEX futures contract for October delivery at the Henry Hub settled at $5.994 per MMBtu, decreasing roughly 30 cents or about 5 percent since last Wednesday (August 30). Natural gas in storage was 2,976 Bcf as of September 1, which is 12.1 percent above the 5-year average. The spot price for West Texas Intermediate (WTI) crude oil decreased $2.45 per barrel, or 3.5 percent, on the week to $67.75 per barrel or $11.68 per MMBtu, which is its lowest level since April 25, 2006.

472

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

9, 2007 (next release 2:00 p.m. on April 5, 2007) 9, 2007 (next release 2:00 p.m. on April 5, 2007) Natural gas spot prices increased at almost all market locations in the Lower 48 States by as much as 82 cents per MMBtu since Wednesday, March 21, 2007. For the week (Wednesday - Wednesday, March 21 to 28), the spot price at the Henry Hub increased by 65 cents, or about 10 percent, to $7.47 per MMBtu. The price of the NYMEX futures contract for April delivery settled at $7.558 per MMBtu yesterday (March 28), which is 40 cents, or about 6 percent, more than last Wednesday. As of Friday, March 23, 2007, natural gas in storage was 1,511 Bcf or 21.5 percent above the 5-year average. The spot price for West Texas Intermediate (WTI) crude oil was $64.11 per barrel or $11.05 per MMBtu yesterday. This price is $7.13 per barrel, or about 13 percent, more than the price last week and is the highest WTI spot price since September 11, 2006.

473

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

24, 2007 (next release 2:00 p.m. on May 31, 2007) 24, 2007 (next release 2:00 p.m. on May 31, 2007) Natural gas spot prices decreased or remained unchanged at almost all trading locations in the Lower 48 States since Wednesday, May 16, 2007. For the week (Wednesday - Wednesday, May 16 to May 23), the spot price at the Henry Hub decreased 9 cents, or about 1 percent, to $7.53 per MMBtu. The price of the NYMEX futures contract for June delivery settled at $7.757 per MMBtu yesterday, which is 13 cents or about 2 percent less than last Wednesday. As of Friday, May 18, 2007, natural gas in storage was 1,946 Bcf, or 20.7 percent above the 5-year average. The spot price for West Texas Intermediate (WTI) crude oil was $65.10 per barrel or $11.22 per MMBtu as of yesterday. This is $2.53 per barrel more than the price last week, an increase of about 4 percent.

474

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

June 3 (next release 2:00 p.m. on June 10) June 3 (next release 2:00 p.m. on June 10) Natural gas futures prices moved down during the holiday-shortened trading week (Wednesday to Wednesday, May 26-June 2) joined by falling spot prices in markets east of the Rocky Mountains, while cash prices in western market locations rose appreciably. The spot price at the Henry Hub declined 19 cents per MMBtu on the week, or nearly 3 percent, to $6.51. On the New York Mercantile Exchange (NYMEX), the settlement price for the futures contract for July delivery fell by $0.213 to $6.519 per MMBtu. EIA reported that inventories were 1,564 Bcf as of Friday, May 28, which is 0.5 percent less than the 5-year average. The spot price for West Texas Intermediate (WTI) crude oil was 64 cents per barrel (11 cents per MMBtu) below its level of last Wednesday (May 26), ending trading yesterday (June 2) at $39.96 ($6.89 per MMBtu), afte