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Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "webb achp herb" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


1

Herbs  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Herbs Herbs Nature Bulletin 471-A November 18, 1972 Forest Preserve District of Cook County George W. Dunne, President Roland F. Eisenbeis, Supt. of Conservation HERBS An herb, to a botanist, is a plant with tender stems -- they are not permanently woodly like those of a shrub. To most people, herbs are plants with fragrant stems and leaves, or pungent seeds, used in cooking, pickling, perfumes, or medicines. Their use for such purposes, particularly the latter, is as old as the hills and in every country there is a wealth of folklore, legends and superstitions about them. The early American colonists had herb gardens. They included several kinds of plants used to flavor foods and, especially, to disguise the taste of old half-spoiled meat. They also included many medicinal plants called "simples", or "Physio Herbs", used in home remedies for all sorts of ailments.

2

The Honorable Wellington E. Webb  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

' ' , i Department of Energy Washington, DC 20585 ,, ,' ,, FEB 1 6 i& ;. .I I. ,' . ., i The Honorable Wellington E. Webb 350, City-County Building Denver, Colorado 8D202 ,' I ,..' ., .' Dear Mayors Webb: , : Secretary of Energy,Hazel O'Leary has announced anew approach to openness in the Department-of ,Energy '(DOE)',and -its communications with the public. In support of this initiative, we are pleased to forward~the enclosed information, related to the former Denver:Equipment Co..in your jurisdiction that performed, work for DOE's predecessor agencies. ..This' information' is provided for'your 1 : information,>use? and retention. DOE's Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action .Program is respons'tble for identificationof sites used by/DOE's predecessor agencies, determining.their

3

Webb, Alabama: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Webb, Alabama: Energy Resources Webb, Alabama: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 31.2604534°, -85.2732658° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":31.2604534,"lon":-85.2732658,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

4

HERB: a home exploring robotic butler  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We describe the architecture, algorithms, and experiments with HERB, an autonomous mobile manipulator that performs useful manipulation tasks in the home. We present new algorithms for searching for objects, learning to navigate in cluttered ... Keywords: Computer vision, Mobile manipulation, Navigation, Personal robotics, Robotic manipulation, Search

Siddhartha S. Srinivasa; Dave Ferguson; Casey J. Helfrich; Dmitry Berenson; Alvaro Collet; Rosen Diankov; Garratt Gallagher; Geoffrey Hollinger; James Kuffner; Michael Vande Weghe

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

5

Photo of the Week: The Webb Telescope's "Golden Spider" | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

The Webb Telescope's "Golden Spider" The Webb Telescope's "Golden Spider" Photo of the Week: The Webb Telescope's "Golden Spider" September 14, 2012 - 2:32pm Addthis The James Webb Space Telescope is a large, infrared-optimized telescope that is anticipated to launch in 2018. The spider-like sheets and tubes of wires you see here are the Optical Telescope Simulator (OSIM) for the telescope itself. OSIM will help scientists prepare the Webb telescope for flight by generating a beam of light that the telescope optics will feed into its actual flight instruments. In this photo, engineers have blanketed the OSIM with special insulating material to help control its temperature while it goes into the deep freeze testing of the Space Environment Simulator at NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center in Greenbelt, Maryland. The simulator will mimic the environment that the telescope will experience in operational orbit, more than 1 million miles from Earth. | Photo credit: Chris Gunn/NASA.

6

March 18, 2010 James Webb Space Telescope Studies of Dark Energy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

March 18, 2010 James Webb Space Telescope Studies of Dark Energy Jonathan P. Gardner (NASA. Introduction The Hubble Space Telescope (HST) has contributed significantly to studies of dark energy) was due to dark energy rather than observational or astrophysical effects such as systematic errors

Sirianni, Marco

7

Gas-Phase Diffusion in Porous Media: Comparison of Models Stephen W. Webb  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

Gas-Phase Diffusion in Porous Media: Comparison of Models Gas-Phase Diffusion in Porous Media: Comparison of Models Stephen W. Webb Sandia National Laboratories Albuquerque, New Mexico 87 185 ABSTRACT Two models are commonly used to analyze gas- phase diffusion in porous media in the presence of advection, the Advective-Dispersive Model (ADM) and the Dusty-gas Model (DGM). The ADM, which is used in TOUGH2, is based on a simple linear addition of advection calculated by Darcy's law and ordinary diffusion using Fick's law with a porosity- tortuosity-gas saturation multiplier to account for the porous medium. Another approach for gas-phase transport in porous media is the Dusty-Gas Model. This model applies the kinetic theory of gases to the gaseous components and the porous media (or "dust") to combine transport due to diffusion and

8

GRR Workshop at GRC | OpenEI Community  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

GRR Workshop at GRC GRR Workshop at GRC Home > Groups > Geothermal Regulatory Roadmap Kyoung's picture Submitted by Kyoung(155) Contributor 10 October, 2012 - 09:02 GRC GRR Panel Discussion workshop Last week, Tuesday (10/2), we held an all-day workshop at the Peppermill Hotel in Reno, NV. The workshop included presentations on the project background and history, status updates, analysis summary and future directions. The day ended with a panel discussion, with members including Lee Webb (ACHP), Herb Black (BLM), Doug Hollett (DOE), Craig Mataczynski (Gradient), Paul Thomsen (Ormat) and Bob Fujimoto (USFS). Presentations from the workshop are posted with this blog entry. Files: application/pdf icon Opening Talk - Doug Hollett application/pdf icon Comparison of Permitting Across States

9

OpenEI Community - workshop  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Workshop at GRC Workshop at GRC http://en.openei.org/community/blog/grr-workshop-grc Last week, Tuesday (10/2), we held an all-day workshop at the Peppermill Hotel in Reno, NV.  The workshop included presentations on the project background and history, status updates, analysis summary and future directions.  The day ended with a panel discussion, with members including Lee Webb (ACHP), Herb Black (BLM), Doug Hollett (DOE), Craig Mataczynski (Gradient), Paul Thomsen (Ormat) and Bob Fujimoto (USFS).  Presentations from the workshop are posted with this blog entry.

Files: 

10

workshop | OpenEI Community  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

workshop workshop Home Kyoung's picture Submitted by Kyoung(155) Contributor 10 October, 2012 - 09:02 GRR Workshop at GRC GRC GRR Panel Discussion workshop Last week, Tuesday (10/2), we held an all-day workshop at the Peppermill Hotel in Reno, NV. The workshop included presentations on the project background and history, status updates, analysis summary and future directions. The day ended with a panel discussion, with members including Lee Webb (ACHP), Herb Black (BLM), Doug Hollett (DOE), Craig Mataczynski (Gradient), Paul Thomsen (Ormat) and Bob Fujimoto (USFS). Presentations from the workshop are posted with this blog entry. Files: application/pdf icon Opening Talk - Doug Hollett application/pdf icon Comparison of Permitting Across States application/pdf icon Agency- & Industry-Identified Concerns

11

Morphological themes of informal housing in Colonias: impacts of sociocultural identity on Webb County housing form  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Informal settlements are a form of housing found in many parts of the world. Self-help housing in informal settlements has different influences that are denoted in the customs and preferences of the residents, which in turn, are reflected on the elements of house exteriors as well as its interior. Colonias in the U.S-Mexico border region are a model of informal settlements. The purpose of this study is to analyze the social and cultural influences on housing fronts in Webb County Colonias. The study focuses on investigating traditional features, vernacular forms, building rituals, and social features as they relate to the morphology of house fronts and their production. The housing model of Geddes and Bertalanffy explained by Turner (1972) was the premise of establishing the argument of this study. A mixed-method approach was used in data gathering from the following three Colonias: Los Altos, Larga Vista, and Rio Bravo. Utilized methods included image-based research through systematic random sampling of housing fronts in the Colonias, as well as a group-administered structured survey distributed during community monthly gathering for food distribution. The development of the research process and methodology incorporated the input of the local community and local leaders and volunteers assisted in its implementation. The study concluded that past and present experiences of Colonias residents have intense impacts on different aspects contributing to the themes comprising the morphology of Colonias housing fronts. A classical pattern of migration as well as maintained contact and continuous dialogue between residents and their kin were found to result in preserving the inherent native culture of the Coloniasâ?? residents and can thus be considered as core elements. This preservation of native culture was indicated by utilization of semi-private space, traditional roof forms, privacy and security elements, and building rituals. The study also identified additional secondary modified elements, represented by the lack of gates utilization as a measure of security. These core and modified elements coincide with the Geddes and Bertalanffy model and therefore it can be deduced that this model can be applied in the case of the Colonias.

Mohamed Kamal El Sayed Ibrahim, Azza

2005-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

12

Evaluation of antioxidative/antimicrobial potential of Oriental nutraceutical herb extracts in raw and cooked goat meat and beef products  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This study was conducted to determine the effects of alcohol extracts of several Oriental nutraceutical herbs on storage properties of raw and cooked ground goat meat and beef. White peony root, red peony root, sappanwood stem, rehmania root, moutan cortex root, angelica root, and rosemary leaves were dehydrated, extracted with 95% ethanol, and freed of the solvent. The sappanwood, moutan cortex, and rosemary samples contained the largest amounts of total phenolics. Extracts were added to ground goat meat, and treated meat samples were aerobically stored at 4C for 6 days, with or without cooking. Each herbal extract was also added to ground beef at 0.25% (w/w), with or without adding NaCl at 2% (w/w), and stored as raw and cooked patties. Peony (red or white) root extracts, whether added at 0.5, 1, or 2% levels, showed strong antioxidant effects in cooked goat meat, decreasing TBARS content more than 90% at day 6. The extracts were less antioxidative in raw goat meat, lowering the day-6 TBARS content less than 50%. The extracts from rehmania root, sappanwood, and moutan cortex were as antioxidative as the extracts from red and white peony roots, decreasing the TBARS content in cooked goat meat more than 88% at day 6. When red peony root extract was evaluated for antimicrobial activity in raw goat meat, it decreased APCs at day 3, but not at day 6. Extracts from white and red peony roots, sappanwood, moutan cortex, and rosemary were highly antioxidative in both raw and cooked beef patties, decreasing TBARS more than 88% by day 6. However, rehmania and angelica root extracts were less inhibitory. The antioxidant activity of the herbal extracts correlated (P 0.05) with total phenolic levels. All the extracts, other than rosemary extract, showed no antimicrobial activity in raw beef patties at either day 3 or day 6, presumably due to the relatively high microbial counts found in the initial untreated meat. Rosemary extract decreased APCs only at day 3.

Han, Jaejoon

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

13

Pulte/Del Webb | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

MI Information About Partnership with NREL Partnership with NREL Yes Partnership Type Test & Evaluation Partner Partnering Center within NREL Electricity Resources & Building...

14

Webb County, Texas: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

7.8174487°, -99.0128926° 7.8174487°, -99.0128926° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":27.8174487,"lon":-99.0128926,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

15

Webb City, Oklahoma: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

6.8069821°, -96.7086401° 6.8069821°, -96.7086401° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":36.8069821,"lon":-96.7086401,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

16

2000 TMS Annual Meeting Exhibitor: Jervis B. Webb  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Overhead power and free conveyors will transport the rodded anodes to the ... In the smelting plant, our full line of power and free conveyors and integrated...

17

The Honorable Wellington E. Webb 350 City County Building  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

these records are'being furnished to.you. .If you have any questions, please feel free to call me at 301-,427-1721 or Dr. W. Alexander Willianp,301-427-1719 of'my staff....

18

Cross-Domain Dialogue Act Tagging Nick Webb, Ting Liu, Mark Hepple, Yorick Wilks  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the source corpus. Visual inspection of these cues reveals that, as one might expect, there is a high de (DAs) (Bunt, 1994), also known as speech acts or dialogue moves (Power, 1979), rep- resent

19

Computers, Conversation, Utilization and Commoditization: the 2008 Herb Abrams Lecture  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

I want to thank Steven Seltzer and the Brigham radiology community for the opportunity to speak today. The invitation is both an honor and a responsibility. It is an honor to follow the distinguished group of previous ...

Levy, Frank

20

2 Resource Conservation District Sonya Webb 3 Diamond W Cattle Company Mike Williams Response to Comments: No. Author Comment Response  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

on the Ventura River Algae TMDL to develop a TMDL that will result in a mechanism for reducing nutrient discharges and also maintain the ability of the stakeholders in the watershed to coordinate and effectively implement the TMDLs. We feel that the TMDL that was adopted by the Los Comment noted. 1.2 Gerhardt Hubner Angeles Regional Water Board achieves that goal. We would like to express our support for the Ventura River Algae TMDL and request that the State Water Resources Control Board (SWRCB) approve the TMDL as proposed. As this is a consent decree TMDL with a deadline of March 24, 2013, we appreciate the SWRCBs rapid consideration of this TMDL. We feel it is important to get this TMDL effective as soon as possible to avoid conflicts with EPA promulgated TMDLs to address the same listings that will become effective in March 2013. Comment noted.

unknown authors

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "webb achp herb" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Microsoft PowerPoint - Herb_Presentation 6-10-09 (2).ppt  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

operational flexibility typically unavailable from conventional hydro due to water availability considerations and other project requirements Pumping energy provides...

22

HERBS 2.0, Hyperlinked EPRI Redbook Software on CD-ROM for Win 2000/XP  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This software package, for use in conjunction with EPRI AC Transmission Line Reference Book 200kV and Above, Third Edition (EPRI Product 1011974), contains 50 applets, which are small software programs or stand-alone calculation modules. These applets enable users to make specific calculations for transmission-line design parameters and include associated example and design features.

2006-01-23T23:59:59.000Z

23

Microsoft PowerPoint - Herb_Presentation 6-10-09 (2).ppt  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Southeastern Power Administration Southwestern Federal Hydropower Conference Hydropower Pump-back ProjectsPerspectives 2 System Overview Pump Storage Facilities Marketing Issues...

24

Efficiencies of adiabatic transfer in a multistate system R. M. Godun, C. L. Webb, M. K. Oberthaler, G. S. Summy, and K. Burnett  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of the efficiency of adiabatic transfer between the Zeeman substates of the cesium ground level, using the D1 F 44- erally been confined to systems where atoms are trans- ferred between two Zeeman ground states for adiabatic transfer efficiency in a multistate system, the cesium ground level F 4. A sys- tem with a higher

Summy, Gil

25

Discovery and Characterization of Transiting Super Earths Using an All-Sky Transit Survey and Follow-up by the James Webb Space Telescope  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Doppler and transit surveys are finding extrasolar planets of ever smaller mass and radius, and are now sampling the domain of super Earths (13R?). Recent results from the Doppler surveys suggest that discovery of a ...

Seager, Sara

26

High-Resolution NMR Spectroscopy of Sample Volumes from 1 nL to 10 L Michael E. Lacey,, Raju Subramanian,, Dean L. Olson,,,| Andrew G. Webb,, and  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

High-Resolution NMR Spectroscopy of Sample Volumes from 1 nL to 10 µL Michael E. Lacey,,§ Raju, 1999) Contents I. Introduction 1 II. Historical Perspective 3 III. NMR Figures of Merit 3 A. Spectral Resolution 3 B. Signal-to-Noise, Sensitivity, and Limits of Detection 3 IV. Approaches To Augment NMR Probe

Andrews, Anne M.

27

NEPA and NHPA: A Handbook for Integrating NEPA and Section 106 | Department  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

and NHPA: A Handbook for Integrating NEPA and Section 106 and NHPA: A Handbook for Integrating NEPA and Section 106 NEPA and NHPA: A Handbook for Integrating NEPA and Section 106 In this document the Council on Environmental Quality and the Advisory Council on Historic Preservation (ACHP) provide advice to Federal agencies, applicants, project sponsors, and consultants on how to take advantage of existing regulatory provisions to align the NEPA process and the National Historic Preservation Act (NHPA) Section 106 review process. Federal agencies have independent statutory obligations under NEPA and NHPA. The handbook and a joint letter from CEQ and ACHP are available for download here. G-CEQ-NEPA_NHPA_Section_106_Handbook_Mar2013.pdf CEQ_ACHP_LTR_NEPA_NHPA_Handbook_MAR2013.pdf More Documents & Publications

28

Microsoft Word - May2009.doc  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

009 Volume 4, Number 1 009 Volume 4, Number 1 IN THIS ISSUE  DOE Wins ACHP Chairman's Award  Oak Ridge Hosts Energy Communities Alliance for Meeting and Secret Cities Festival  Hanford's B Reactor Named National Historic Landmark  National Trust Awards National Preservation Award for V-Site Restoration  Want to Receive Partners in Preservation?  Public Tours at Savannah River  Remember the ACHP  Status of National Park Service Manhattan Project Study  Touring the B Reactor at Hanford  Federal Archeological Activities Questionnaire  Featured Photo: Dose Gauged from Blood- Sodium Activity DOE WINS ACHP CHAIRMAN'S AWARD On May 13, 2008, Advisory Council on Historic Preservation Chairman John L. Nau, III, presented the Chairman's Award for

29

National Historic Preservation Act | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Act Act Jump to: navigation, search Statute Name National Historic Preservation Act Year 1966 Url [[File:|160px|link=http://www.achp.gov/docs/nhpa%202008-final.pdf]] Description 16 USC 470a et seq (2006) and implementing regulations at 36 CFR 800 (2008) References Advisory Council on Historic Preservation[1] (pdf) National Historic Preservation Act[2] 16 USC 470a et seq (2006) and implementing regulations at 36 CFR 800 (2008) The goal of the National Historic Preservation Act (NHPA), which established the Advisory Council on Historic Preservation (ACHP) in 1966, is to have federal agencies act as responsible stewards of our nation's resources when their actions affect historic properties. The ACHP is the only entity with the legal responsibility to encourage federal agencies to

30

ferretti  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... soame. soc. socialist. soden. soft. solar. sold. sole. soley. solihull. solley. ... waveney. way. wealden. weapon. weather. webb. week. weekday. weekend ...

31

Kindly supported by the Research School of Asia and the Pacific (http://asiapacific.anu.edu.au/researchschool/)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

scale structures Isabella Rosso 9.30 ­ 10:30 ENERGY and ADAPTATION Chair: Bob Webb Rooftop solar energy

32

Participants_30Aug12 Page 1 Last First Affiliation Michael Los ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... of Calif. San Diego Becker Chandler NIST Metallurgy Div. ... Warren Jim NIST Metallurgy Div. Webb Edmund B. Lehigh Univ. ...

2012-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

33

Microsoft Word - April06.doc  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

6 Volume 2, Number 1 6 Volume 2, Number 1 In This Issue * DOE and ACHP Heritage Tourism Partnership * Nau Applauds DOE Executive Order Report * Want to Receive Partners in Preservation? * Atomic Testing Museum to Host Museum and Visitor Center Conference * $2 Million in FY06 Budget for Manhattan Project Preservation * Manhattan Project Web Site & Reprint * National Park Service Manhattan Project Study * 2006 DOE Cultural Resources Forum: Oak Ridge, Tennessee * Idaho to Hold Cultural Resources Stakeholder Meeting * $350,000 for Hanford Exhibits * K-25 Preservation Update DOE and ACHP Heritage Tourism Partnership On February 9, 2006, Deputy Secretary of Energy Clay Sell (right) and DOE FPO Skip Gosling met with John Nau III (bottom right), Chairman of the

34

RING ROAD SOUTH CHANCELLOR'S  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Sciences R5 Aston Webb ­ B Block R6 Aston Webb ­ Great Hall R7 Aston Webb ­ C Block R8 Physics West R9P P 24-h Security R3 RING ROAD SOUTH CHANCELLOR'S COURT CHANCELLOR'S University Centre COURT Sports PitchesSports Pitches South Car Park R21 R17 R18 R22 Main Library R19 R23 R24 R 24 R14 R15 R16 East Gate O

Heinke, Dietmar

35

Housing Reservation Form  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

NOTE: PLEASE RETURN THIS FORM BY MAY 31, 2003 to: BY MAIL: Meghan Webb, Conference Services, University of Utah,. 110 S. Ft. Douglas Blvd., Salt...

36

Slide 1  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Seed Money Chair Tim McKnight Business Planning and Process Improvement Ramie Wilkerson Independent Oversight Becky Webb, Interim Science and Technology Performance Analytics Lynn...

37

SAGA Biennial Technical Meeting and Exhibition Short Paper Magnetotelluric study in northeastern Botswana  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of the Witwatersrand, Jan Smuts Avenue, Johannesburg 2050, South Africa, WebbS@geosciences.wits.ac.za 11: ABB AB, HVDC

Jones, Alan G.

38

RING ROAD SOUTH IVERSITY ROAD WEST  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Webb ­ Earth Sciences R5 Aston Webb ­ B Block R6 Aston Webb ­ Great Hall R7 Aston Webb ­ C Block R8P P P Barber Institute ELSROAD M R.15 R.30 24h Security R.3 RING ROAD SOUTH U N IVERSITY ROAD WEST South Car Park P R21 R17 R18 R22 Main Library R19 R20R20 R23 R24R24 R25 Munrow Sport Centre R27 R26 R28

Sloman, Aaron

39

Structural Sequestration of Uranium in Bacteriogenic Manganese...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Highlightsbanner Structural Sequestration of Uranium in Bacteriogenic Manganese Oxides Samuel M. Webb (Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Laboratory), Bradley M. Tebo (Oregon Health...

40

Evaluation of Improved Pyrgeometer Calibration Method  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

A. Gotseff, T. L. Stoffel, and C. Webb National Renewable Energy Laboratory Golden, Colorado Abstract Broadband longwave (atmospheric) irradiance measurements are important for...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "webb achp herb" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Lattice-based Algorithms for Number Partitioning in the Hard Phase  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Oct 15, 2008 ... Lattice-based Algorithms for Number Partitioning in the Hard Phase. Bala Krishnamoorthy (bkrishna ***at*** math.wsu.edu) William Webb...

42

Tungsten-Rhenium Super Alloy Development for Ultra High ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Presentation Title, Tungsten-Rhenium Super Alloy Development for Ultra High Temperature Space Fission and Fusion Reactors. Author(s), Jonathan Webb,...

43

SSRL School 2007 on Hard X-ray Scattering: Techniques in MES  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

In-situ scattering, S. Webb Amorphous materials, T. Hufnagel Tuesday Afternoon, SurfaceThin Film Techniques Epitaxial thin film scattering, A. Vailionis Polycrystalline thin...

44

Wild, willful, and wicked: African American childhood and the nineteenth-century literary imagination.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??This dissertation examines nineteenth-century depictions of African American children in Harriet Beecher Stowe's Uncle Tom's Cabin (1852), Frank J. Webb's The Garies and Their Friends (more)

Brewington, Paulette F.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

45

An alpine lacustrine record of early Holocene North American ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

temperatures in the Gulf of California and the eastern tropical Pacific, as well as land surface temperatures, .... and northern Mexico (Webb and Betancourt 1992;.

46

Autonomous Alignment Process for Laser Fusion Systems (AAPLF ...  

Autonomous Alignment Process for Laser Fusion Systems (AAPLF) Team Members Front Row (left to right): Roger Lowe-Webb, Robert Carey, Ben Horowitz, Mark Bowers,

47

Cation Effects on the Layer Structure of Biogenic Mn-Oxides  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Radiation Lightsource (SSRL). Wet sample slurries were placed in an aluminum sample cell with Lexan windows-bs (Samuel Webb, SSRL). Two Mn-oxide references, triclinic birnessite (TcBir) and -MnO2 were synthesized and Environmental and Quality (ISEQ) Graduate Fellowship. M.Z. also thanks Dr. Samuel Webb at SSRL for his help

Sparks, Donald L.

48

Memorandum of Understanding on early coordination of federal authorizations  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

on early coordination of federal on early coordination of federal authorizations and related environmental reviews required in order to site electric transmission facilities: August 2006 Memorandum of Understanding on early coordination of federal authorizations and related environmental reviews required in order to site electric transmission facilities: August 2006 With the signing of this Memorandum of Understanding (MOU), the Department of Energy (DOE), the Department of Agriculture (USDA), the Department of Defense (DOD), the Department of the Interior POI), the Department of Commerce (DOC), the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC), the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), the Council on Environmental Quality (CEQ), and the Advisory Council on Historic Preservation (ACHP)

49

MEMORANDUM OF UNDERSTANDING  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

MEMORANDUM OF UNDERSTANDING MEMORANDUM OF UNDERSTANDING AMONG THE U.S. DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE, DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE, DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE, DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY, ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY, THE COUNCIL ON ENVIRONMENTAL QUALITY, THE FEDERAL ENERGY REGULATORY COMMISSION, THE ADVISORY COUNCIL ON HISTORIC PRESERVATION, AND DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR, REGARDING COORDINATION IN FEDERAL AGENCY REVIEW OF ELECTRIC TRANSMISSION FACILITIES ON FEDERAL LAND I. PURPOSE The Department of Agriculture (USDA), Department of Commerce (DOC), Department of Defense (DoD), Department of Energy (DOE), Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), Council on Environmental Quality (CEQ), Advisory Council on Historic Preservation (ACHP), Department of the Interior (DOI), and the Federal Energy

50

Draft Supplemental Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement on Stockpile Stewardship and Management for a Modern Pit Facility  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Modern Pit Facility Draft Environmental Impact Statement Modern Pit Facility Draft Environmental Impact Statement xii ACRONYMS AND ABBREVIATIONS AC/MC Analytical Chemistry and Materials Characterization ACHP Advisory Council on Historic Preservation ALARA as low as reasonably achievable ALOHA Aerial Location of Hazardous Atmospheres AQCR Air Quality Control Region ARF airborne release fraction Bison-m Biota Information System of New Mexico BLM Bureau of Land Management BLS Bureau of Labor Statistics BNM Bandelier National Monument CAA Clean Air Act CAIRS Computerized Accident/Incident Reporting System CD-0 critical decision on mission need CEQ Council on Environmental Quality CFR Code of Federal Regulations CGTO Consolidated Group of Tribes and Organizations

51

RING ROAD SOUTH IVERSITY ROAD WEST  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

­ Earth Sciences R5 Aston Webb ­ B Block R6 Aston Webb ­ Great Hall R7 Aston Webb ­ C Block R8 PhysicsP P P Barber Institute ELSROAD M R.15 R.30 24h Security R.3 RING ROAD SOUTH U N IVERSITY ROAD WEST South Car Park P R21 R17 R18 R22 Main Library R19 R2020 R23 R2424 R25 Munrow Sport Centre R27 R26 R28 R

Yao, Xin

52

Matrix SAYLR1  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Set Information. Set SAYLOR. Source: Richard Kendall, Don Peaceman, Herb Stone, and Bill Watts, Exxon. Discipline: Oil reservoir modeling. ...

2004-09-22T23:59:59.000Z

53

Matrix SAYLR3  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Set Information. Set SAYLOR. Source: Richard Kendall, Don Peaceman, Herb Stone, and Bill Watts, Exxon. Discipline: Oil reservoir modeling. ...

2004-09-22T23:59:59.000Z

54

Market Incentives to Improve Cybersecurity  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Page 1. Market Incentives to Improve Cybersecurity Herb Lin ... threaten critical societal functions. Regulation that imposes best practices on system ...

2011-07-20T23:59:59.000Z

55

APPLIED AND ENVIRONMENTAL MICROBIOLOGY, Aug. 2011, p. 51705177 Vol. 77, No. 15 0099-2240/11/$12.00 doi:10.1128/AEM.00583-11  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

availability. Nature Geoscencei 2(12):867­871. 10. Chappell PD, Moffett JW, Hynes AM, Webb EA (2012) Molecular in the marine unicellular cyanobacterium Crocosphaera. Limnology and Oceanography 53(6):2472­2484. 21. Law CS

Elimelech, Menachem

56

Rapid energy savings in London's households to mitigate an energy crisis  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of London had its natural gas supply cut due to a technicalhad interruptible natural gas supply contracts (Webb 2009,within hours. Natural gas as supply had been interrupted to

Julien, Aurore; Barrett, Mark; Croxford, Ben

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

57

NETL F 451.1-1/1 Categorical Exclusion (CX) Designation Form  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Lomas, Webb County, Tx Colonias for Microgrids (TX) OE 14.09 Purpose of this project is to fully develop prototype renewable based micro-grid power systems for communities...

58

NETL F 451.1-1/1 Categorical Exclusion (CX) Designation Form  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Nov. 1,2009 - Oct. 31, 2011 Ranchitos Los Arcos, Webb County, Texas Colonias for Microgrids (TX) OE 14.09 Purpose of this project is to fully develop prototype renewable based...

59

NETL F 451.1-1/1 Categorical Exclusion (CX) Designation Form  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Nopalitos, Webb County, Tx Colonias for Microgrids (TX) OE 14.09 Purpose of this project is to fully develop prototype renewable based micro-grid power systems for communities...

60

Comparison of some optimisation techniques for numerical schemes discretising equations with advection terms  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We have considered the measures of errors devised by Tam and Webb (1993), Bogey and Bailly (2002) and by Berland et al. (2007) to construct low dispersion, low dissipation and high order numerical schemes in computational aeroacoustics. We modify their ...

Appanah Rao Appadu

2012-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "webb achp herb" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Identication of a Coordinate Regulator of Interleukins 4, 13 ...  

P. M. Webb, D. E. Crocker, S. B. Blackwell, D. P. Costa, B. J. Le Boeuf, J. Exp. Biol. 201, 2349 (1998). 27. S. H. Ridgway, B. L. Scronce, J. Kanwisher, Science

62

ARM Science Meeting  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

(to be published).Stephens, G. L., A. Slingo, and M. Webb. 1993. On measuring the greenhouse effect of the earth. High Spectral Resolution Infrared Remote Sensing for Earth's...

63

Appendix B - Chemical and Radiological Inventories for the CEMRC...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

the CEMRC, New Mexico State University (Webb 2002). Table B-1. Onsite CEMRC Chemical Inventory Chemical Name Amount Units SARA Limit Acetic Acid, Glacial 5,400 mL NA a Acetone 38...

64

The nature of marbled Terra Sigillata slips: a combined ?XRF and?XRD investigation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

4867696 S. Webb A. Mehta SSRL, SLAC, University Stanford,microprobe sample at 2.3 SSRL (USA) beam line with a detailRadiation LightsourceSSRL (Stan- ford, USA). This line is a

Leon, Y.; Sciau, P.; Goudeau, P.; Tamura, N.; Webb, S.; Mehta, A.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

65

SSRL RDB ID No. : SLAC System ID No.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

www-conf.slac.stanford.edu/smbxas-ss/2010 The goal of the SSRL SMB XAS Summer School 2010 are SSRL Staff Scientists Ritimukta Sarangi and Samuel Webb. The School will be held at SSRL

Wechsler, Risa H.

66

Kinetics of Fe(II)-catalyzed transformation of 6-line ferrihydrite under anaerobic flow conditions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Radiation Lightsource (SSRL). A wavelength of 0.7293 (Both beamlines at ALS and SSRL are equipped with areaEETD of LBNL and Sam Webb at SSRL for their help on TEM and

Yang, L.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

67

Celebrating Excellence in Humanities 2012 Celebrating Excellence in Humanities 2012 Celebrating Excellence in Humanities 2012  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

-1950" Brian Catlos History University of Texas at Arlington 47th Annual Walter Prescott Webb Essay Competition. Guerrero Literature/Creative Writing Humanities Undergraduate Research Award "I Once Was Lost: The (Found

California at Santa Cruz, University of

68

"Measures Meet for Every Sort" : the social dynamics of late-Elizabethan genre  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Limited, 1970), 16v- 20r, esp. 19r. Erasmus, De Copia, 18. ?Studies 21 (1991): 1-26, esp. 1. William Webbe, A DiscourseCT: Archon, 1975), 44-70, esp. 60-61. Wilson, Arte of

Bialo, Caralyn Alyssa

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

69

NETL F 451.1/1-1, Categorical Exclusion Designation Form  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Texas A&M University IRNR SCNGO FY13-1636 months Gary Covatch Webb County, TX Technology Integration Program - Field Trial - Site Three Data collection through observation of...

70

PDF Document (387k)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

) ) " ) " ) " ) " ) ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! Houston Webb Duval Frio Kerr Edwards Uvalde Bee Bexar Zavala Kinney Dimmit La Salle Kimble Medina Matagorda Travis Lee Sutton Nueces Real Maverick DeWitt Kleberg Lavaca Calhoun Hays Goliad Atascosa Wharton

71

Studying galaxy formation through Lyman alpha in emission and absorption  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, Facebook, Mitchell and Webb, Lucky Star Chinese Restaurant, Rob Brydon, CUARLFC, and everything else that made my time in Cambridge wonderful. And finally to God, for a wonderful Universe . . .when I run, I feel His pleasure Eric Liddell. Luke Andrew... , Facebook, Mitchell and Webb, Lucky Star Chinese Restaurant, Rob Brydon, CUARLFC, and everything else that made my time in Cambridge wonderful. And finally to God, for a wonderful Universe . . .when I run, I feel His pleasure Eric Liddell. Luke Andrew...

Barnes, Luke Andrew

2010-01-12T23:59:59.000Z

72

CEQ Releases Two Handbooks on Improving Efficiency of Federal Environmental  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

CEQ Releases Two Handbooks on Improving Efficiency of Federal CEQ Releases Two Handbooks on Improving Efficiency of Federal Environmental Reviews CEQ Releases Two Handbooks on Improving Efficiency of Federal Environmental Reviews March 5, 2013 - 4:43pm Addthis The Council on Environmental Quality (CEQ) today released two new handbooks that encourage more efficient environmental reviews under the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA). The first handbook, created by CEQ and the Advisory Council on Historic Preservation (ACHP), provides advice to Federal agencies, applicants, project sponsors, and consultants on how to take advantage of existing regulatory provisions to align the NEPA process and the National Historic Preservation Act (NHPA) Section 106 review process. The handbook explains how to align NEPA and NHPA Section 106 processes for maximum efficiency and

73

Page not found | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

21 - 18530 of 31,917 results. 21 - 18530 of 31,917 results. Download NEPA and NHPA: A Handbook for Integrating NEPA and Section 106 In this document the Council on Environmental Quality and the Advisory Council on Historic Preservation (ACHP) provide advice to Federal agencies, applicants, project sponsors, and consultants on... http://energy.gov/nepa/downloads/nepa-and-nhpa-handbook-integrating-nepa-and-section-106 Download EIS-0250-S1: Draft Supplemental Environmental Impact Statement Geologic Repository for the Disposal of Spent Nuclear Fuel and High-Level Radioactive Waste at Yucca Mountain, Nye County, Nevada http://energy.gov/nepa/downloads/eis-0250-s1-draft-supplemental-environmental-impact-statement Download Simkar: Proposed Penalty (2012-SE-5408) DOE alleged in a Notice of Proposed Civil Penalty that Simkar Corporation

74

Page not found | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

61 - 22870 of 28,905 results. 61 - 22870 of 28,905 results. Download CLAIMS FOR PATENT AND COPYRIGHT INFRINGEMENT Subpart B-Requirements and Procedures http://energy.gov/gc/downloads/claims-patent-and-copyright-infringement Download Re: Office of Weatherization and Intergovernmental Programs (OWIP) In recent conversations between our agencies, the Department of Energy (DOE) requested the assistance of the Advisory Council on Historic Preservation (ACHP) in developing a tool that the... http://energy.gov/gc/downloads/re-office-weatherization-and-intergovernmental-programs-owip Download WC_1990_004_PRINCETON_UNIVERSITY_CLASS_WAIVER_of_the_Governm.pdf http://energy.gov/gc/downloads/wc1990004princetonuniversityclasswaiverofthegovernmpdf Download WC_1990_009_UNIVERSITIES_RESCH_ASSOC_CLASS_WAIVER_of_the_Gov.pdf

75

Page not found | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

81 - 5690 of 26,764 results. 81 - 5690 of 26,764 results. Download EA-1388: Final Environmental Assessment Ground Water Compliance at the Shiprock Uranium Mill Tailings Site http://energy.gov/nepa/downloads/ea-1388-final-environmental-assessment Download Microsoft Word- rDE-FOA-0000080.rtf http://energy.gov/downloads/microsoft-word-rde-foa-0000080rtf Download NEPA and NHPA: A Handbook for Integrating NEPA and Section 106 In this document the Council on Environmental Quality and the Advisory Council on Historic Preservation (ACHP) provide advice to Federal agencies, applicants, project sponsors, and consultants on... http://energy.gov/nepa/downloads/nepa-and-nhpa-handbook-integrating-nepa-and-section-106 Download Electricity Advisory Committee Meeting Presentations June 2012- Tuesday, June 12, 2012

76

All General Counsel Reports | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

February 5, 2010 February 5, 2010 Re: Office of Weatherization and Intergovernmental Programs (OWIP) In recent conversations between our agencies, the Department of Energy (DOE) requested the assistance of the Advisory Council on Historic Preservation (ACHP) in developing a tool that the Department of Energy could share with the States administering the Energy Efficiency and Conservation Block Grant (EECBG), State Energy Plan (SEP), and the Weatherization Assistance (WAP) Programs. February 5, 2010 PROTOTYPE PROGRAMMATIC AGREEMENT BETWEEN THE UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY, THE [INSERT STATE NAME] ENERGY OFFICE AND THE [INSERT STATE NAME] STATE HISTORIC PRESERVATION OFFICE REGARDING EECBG, SEP AND WAP UNDERTAKINGS February 5, 2010 Prototype programmatic agreement for the Energy Efficiency and Conservation

77

Advisory Council on Historic Preservation | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

on Historic Preservation on Historic Preservation Jump to: navigation, search Logo: Advisory Council on Historic Preservation Name Advisory Council on Historic Preservation Address 1100 Pennsylvania Avenue NW, Suite 803 Place Washington, District of Columbia Zip 200004 Website http://www.achp.gov/index.html Coordinates 38.893686°, -77.0276442° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":38.893686,"lon":-77.0276442,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

78

CEQ Releases Two Handbooks on Improving Efficiency of Federal Environmental  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

CEQ Releases Two Handbooks on Improving Efficiency of Federal CEQ Releases Two Handbooks on Improving Efficiency of Federal Environmental Reviews CEQ Releases Two Handbooks on Improving Efficiency of Federal Environmental Reviews March 5, 2013 - 4:43pm Addthis The Council on Environmental Quality (CEQ) today released two new handbooks that encourage more efficient environmental reviews under the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA). The first handbook, created by CEQ and the Advisory Council on Historic Preservation (ACHP), provides advice to Federal agencies, applicants, project sponsors, and consultants on how to take advantage of existing regulatory provisions to align the NEPA process and the National Historic Preservation Act (NHPA) Section 106 review process. The handbook explains how to align NEPA and NHPA Section 106 processes for maximum efficiency and

79

LESSONS LEARNED LEARNED LESSONS N E P A  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Second Quarter fy 2013 Second Quarter fy 2013 June 3, 2013; Issue no. 75 NEPA Lessons Learned June 2013 1 (continued on page 4) Coordination and Substitution: Effective Options for Integrating NEPA and NHPA Section 106 The Council on Environmental Quality (CEQ) and the Advisory Council on Historic Preservation (ACHP) jointly issued a handbook in early March aimed at improving the integration of the Section 106 consultation process under the National Historic Preservation Act (NHPA) and NEPA review. NEPA and NHPA: A Handbook for Integrating NEPA and Section 106 anticipates that benefits will include maximizing staff resources, avoiding duplication of effort, facilitating coordinated public participation, and making better informed decisions. The handbook describes the options of "coordination"

80

Microsoft Word - Letter to Chu.doc  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

John L. Nau, III John L. Nau, III Chairman Susan S. Barnes Vice Chairman John M. Fowler Executive Director Preserving America's Heritage February 5, 2010 The Honorable Dr. Steven Chu Secretary of the Department of Energy U.S. Department of Energy 1000 Independence Avenue, SW Washington, DC 20585 Re: Office of Weatherization and Intergovernmental Programs (OWIP) Dear Secretary Chu: In recent conversations between our agencies, the Department of Energy (DOE) requested the assistance of the Advisory Council on Historic Preservation (ACHP) in developing a tool that the Department of Energy could share with the States administering the Energy Efficiency and Conservation Block Grant (EECBG), State Energy Plan (SEP), and the Weatherization Assistance (WAP) Programs. Since DOE

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "webb achp herb" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Lessons Learned Quarterly Report, June 2013 | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

June 2013 June 2013 Lessons Learned Quarterly Report, June 2013 Lessons Learned Quarterly Report, June 2013 In this issue, we highlight recent guidance by the Council on Environmental Quality and Advisory Council on Historic Preservation to promote better integration of NEPA and Section 106 reviews and on the Federal Highway Administration's Every Day Counts initiative to better integrate planning and NEPA. Articles in this issue include: Integrating NEPA and NHPA Section 106 ACHP Extension of Programmatic Agreements Sutley Testifies on Importance of NEPA Every Day Counts at FHWA Guide for Public-Private Projects Earth Day at DOE GAO: Consider Climate Change Risks NAEP 2012 NEPA Report NAEP 2014 Conference Announcement NAEP Environmental Awards CEQ IT Working Group NEPA-CEQA Handbook in Preparation

82

Re: Office of Weatherization and Intergovernmental Programs (OWIP) |  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Office of Weatherization and Intergovernmental Programs (OWIP) Office of Weatherization and Intergovernmental Programs (OWIP) Re: Office of Weatherization and Intergovernmental Programs (OWIP) In recent conversations between our agencies, the Department of Energy (DOE) requested the assistance of the Advisory Council on Historic Preservation (ACHP) in developing a tool that the Department of Energy could share with the States administering the Energy Efficiency and Conservation Block Grant (EECBG), State Energy Plan (SEP), and the Weatherization Assistance (WAP) Programs. Since DOE must comply with the requirements of Section 106 of the National Historic Preservation Act as a condition of obligating Federal funds, including American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009 monies, we explored options that would expedite

83

Microsoft Word - 80965924.doc  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

LIST OF ACRONYMS - 1 LIST OF ACRONYMS - 1 LIST OF ACRONYMS Acronym Definition 2000 HCM 2000 Highway Capacity Manual 2D two-dimensional 3D three-dimensional AASHTO American Association of State Highway and Transportation Officials ACAA American Coal Ash Association ACHP Advisory Council on Historic Preservation ADT Average Daily Traffic AEGL Airborne exposure guideline level AGR acid gas removal AMSL above mean sea level ANOI Advance Notice of Intent APE area of potential effects AQCR Air Quality Control Region AQRV air quality related values ASU air separation unit BAFO Best and Final Offer BEG Bureau of Economic Geology BLM Bureau of Land Management BMP best management practice Btu British thermal unit CAA Clean Air Act CAMR Clean Air Mercury Rule CCN Certificate of Convenience and Necessity

84

Microsoft Word - Final CSERD Ch 7.doc  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

7-1 7-1 7.0 GLOSSARY AND ACRONYMS ACRONYM OR TERM DEFINITION µg/m 3 microgram per cubic meter µg/mL microgram per milliliter 132 Xe Xenon 132 1-hour average ozone concentrations the EPA air quality standard for ozone is 0.12 part per million for a 1-hour average 20 Ne Neon 20 36 Ar Argon 36 84 Kr Krypton 84 8-hour average ozone concentrations the EPA air quality standard for ozone, designed to protect public health with an adequate margin of safety, is 0.085 parts per million (ppm), averaged over 8 hours ac acres ACHP Advisory Council on Historic Preservation AEP American Electric Power afforestation the conversion of bare or cultivated land into forest AGR acid gas removal AHPA Archeological and Historic Preservation Act AIH American Institute of Hydrology

85

(Lepidium sativum L.) Seed Oil  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

AOCS 2009. Abstract Garden cress (Lepidium sativum L.) is an edible, underutilised herb, grown mainly for its seeds in India. Physicochemical properties...

86

EM SSAB CHAIRS Bi-Monthly Conference Call  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

June 18, 2013 Participants Board ChairsRepresentatives Site Staff Hanford Steve Hudson, Susan Leckband Shelley Cimon, Kim Ballinger, Sharon Braswell, Michael Turner Idaho Herb...

87

Vol. 12, No. 2 Spring 1995 IN THIS ISSUE  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Assigned to Policy and Plans Organization Biography of James E. Webb Published Noordung Translations mailbox. To subscribe send a message to domo@hq.nasa.gov. Leave the subject line blank. In the text-358-0384, Fax 202-358-2866, e-mail: rlaunius@codei.hq.nasa.gov. NASA HISTORY OFFICE ASSIGNED TO POLICY AND PLANS

88

Mat. Res. Soc. Symp. Proc. Vol. 609 2000 Materials Research Society Comparison of Structural Properties and Solar Cell Performance of a-Si:H Films Prepared  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

fabrication of the nip structure, the devices were completed by evaporative deposition of indium tin oxide. Capangpangan, D. Tsu and A. Chan of ECD, R. Reedy, L. Gedvillas and J. Webb of the National Renewable Energy 13.56 and 70 MHz PECVD Methods S.J. Jones*, D.L. Williamson**, T. Liu*, X. Deng*, and M. Izu* *Energy

Deng, Xunming

89

H. Rickman (ed.), Reports on Astronomy, Vol. XXVA, 1001{2002. 2002 IAU. Printed in the United States of America.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Workshop on 'Energy Conversion and Particle Acceleration in the Solar Corona', Tegernsee, Germany, July 2 F. Webb Commission 10: Solar Activity Commission 12: Solar Radiation and Structure Commission 49: Interplanetary Plasma and Heliosphere 1. INTRODUCTION Division II consists of Commissions 10 (Solar Activity), 12

90

Berea College Honor Roll of Giving  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, `60 Jonnell Webb Elswick, `63 Constance M. Essington Patricia F. Evans William B. Evans, `50 Susan Gibson, `45 Dr. Smith H. Gibson, `45 Mr. and Mrs. Robert M. Ginn Mr. and Mrs. Edward Girvin William R Lewis Mr. and Mrs. Richard D. Lombard William M. Lowder, `62 Dr. John Y. Lu, `55 Ruth Ferrill Luthringer

Baltisberger, Jay H.

91

Numerical Lab 2007/08 AUTOMATIC CONTROL OF A  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

thermodynamic laws and fundamental heat and mass transfer relations to individual components. Many of the models..................................................................... 54 2.2.1. Analysis of Heat Transfer between Moist Air and Cold Surface by McElgin and Wiley................................................................................................................. 54 2.2.2. Analysis of Air Side Heat Transfer in Finned Tube Heat Exchangers by Webb

Hron, Jaroslav

92

List of significant publications  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and functional expression of a brain G-protein-coupled ATP receptor. Webb TE , [+6], Barnard EA. FEBS Letts. 324, 219-225 (1993). Characterization and channel coupling of the P2Y12 nucleotide receptor of brain capillary endothelial cells. Simon J...

Barnard, Eric

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

93

Nonlinear Backprojection for Tomographic Reconstruction 1 Blanca I. Andia2  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. sect. Amer. Stat. Assoc., pages 12­ 18, Washington, DC, 1985. [7] A. Webb. Statistical Pattern a Gaussian mixture model on windows of the data in the sinogram to allow inference of a limited number classi£cation of all data, will be a linear function of the sinogram data in the appropriate windows (i

94

Nonlinear Backprojection for Tomographic Reconstruction 1 Blanca I. And a 2 , Ken D. Sauer 2 and Charles A. Bouman 3  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. sect. Amer. Stat. Assoc., pages 12-- 18, Washington, DC, 1985. [7] A. Webb. Statistical Pattern impose a Gaussian mixture model on windows of the data in the sinogram to allow inference of a limited in the appropriate windows (i.e. the set of sinogram windows which have an effect on the reconstruction of such point

95

THERRP: a thermodynamic properties program  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The computer program THERPP, a program that calculates the thermodynamic properties of light hydrocarbons and mixtures of light hydrocarbons is documented. A specific pressure--temperature or pressure--enthalpy grid is input to obtain properties in the desired region. THERPP is a modification of the program HSGC. Thermodynamic properties are calculated using Starling's modification to the Benedict-Webb-Rubin equation of state.

Deeds, R.S.

1977-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

96

Dopant site selectivity in BaCe0.85M0.15O3-by extended x-ray absorption fine structure  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

- were performed on beam line 2­3 at the Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Laboratory SSRL at both liquid Energy Sciences. The SSRL Structural Molecu- lar Biology Program is supported by the Department of En, J. Mater. Chem. 4, 899 1994 . 12 S. M. Webb, http://www-ssrl.slac.stanford.edu/ swebb

97

Schrepel, Eric From: Jenkins, Kris  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

place greater emphasis on the value and priority of this resource. Sincerely, Kristy Webb Idaho Rural Council, Board Member 2158 Addison Ave. E. Twin Falls, Idaho 83301 (208) 733-1769 crw@magiclink.com Idaho Rural Council P. O. Box 118 Bliss, Idaho 83314 www.idahoruralcouncil.org #12;2 #12;

98

Columbia River System Operation Review : Final Environmental Impact Statement, Appendix D: Cultural Resources.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This study attempts to identify and analyze the impacts of the System Operating Strategy (SOS) alternatives on cultural resources. The impacts include effects on Native American traditional cultural values, properties and practices. They also include effects on archeological or historic properties meeting the criteria of the National Register of Historic Places. In addition to responding to the requirements of the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA), this analysis addresses the requirements of the National Historic Preservation Act (NHPA), the Archeological Resources Protection Act (ARPA), the Native American Graves Protection and Repatriation Act (NAGPRA), the Native American Religious Freedom Act (NARFA), and other relevant legislation. To meet their legally mandated cultural resources requirements, the SOR agencies will develop agreements and Implementation Plans with the appropriate State Historic Preservation Officers (SHPOs), Tribes, and the Advisory Council on Historic Preservation (ACHP) detailing the measures necessary to best manage the resource. The planning and implementation activities will be staged over a number of years in consultation with affected Tribes.

Columbia River System Operation Review (U.S.)

1995-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

99

ENVIRONMENTAL AND ECONOMIC EFFECTS OF SUBSIDENCE  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

2 ) , Calif. , Div. of Oil and Gas, Sacramento, California,Deformation Associated with Oil and Gas Field Operations inHerb Robb, Western Oil and Gas Association, Los Angeles:

Viets, V.F.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

100

by Katherine Arnold, Office of Public Affairs  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

the microphone and ended the speculation: Herb announced that scientists at Fermilab b Quark Turns 20, Lederman Turns 75 Celebrations and seminars honor the birth of the b quark...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "webb achp herb" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

The role of chess in artificial intelligence research  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Our eminent researchers including John McCarthy, Allen Newell, Claude Shannon, Herb Simon, Ken Thompson and Alan Turing put significant effort into computer chess research. Now that computers have reached the grandmaster level, and are beginning to vie ...

Robert Levinson; Feng-Hsiung Hsu; T. Anthony Marsland; Jonathan Schaeffer; David E. Wilkins

1991-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

102

A REVIEW ON LICORICE  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

ABSTRACT: Licorice (Glycyrrhizaglabra L) is an important herb used in almost all systems of medicine. The author tries to present in this article a comprehensive review on all aspects of Licorice.

K. Venkata; Subba Rao

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

103

Microsoft Word - AL2000-05.doc  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Παγε 1 οφ 2 Παγε 1 οφ 2 Subject: DOE Authorized Subcontract for Use by DOE Management and Operating (M&O) Contractors with New Independent States' Scientific Institutes through the Science and Technology Center in Ukraine References: DEAR 970.7103 - Contractor Purchasing System When is this Acquisition Letter (AL) Effective? This AL is effective 10 business days from the date of issuance. When Does this AL Expire? This AL remains in effect until superseded or canceled. Who is the Point of Contact? Contact Robert Webb of the Office of Procurement and Assistance Policy at (202) 586-8264, or via e-mail at Robert.Webb@hq.doe.gov Visit our website at www.pr.doe.gov for information on Acquisition Letters and other policy

104

Energy Blog | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

14, 2012 14, 2012 SLAC staff scientist Yiping Feng examines a chamber at LCLS' Front End Enclosure, where a thin crystal spectrometer is installed to measure the shot-by-shot characteristics of X-ray laser pulses. | SLAC National Accelerator Photo by Matt Beardsley Four Crazy Uses for Lasers in the National Labs The top five craziest things our researchers do with lasers in their pursuit to understand our physical world. September 14, 2012 The James Webb Space Telescope is a large, infrared-optimized telescope that is anticipated to launch in 2018. The spider-like sheets and tubes of wires you see here are the Optical Telescope Simulator (OSIM) for the telescope itself. OSIM will help scientists prepare the Webb telescope for flight by generating a beam of light that the telescope optics will feed into its actual flight instruments.

105

Microsoft Word - AL2002-03.doc  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

AL 2002-03 (3/13/2002) AL 2002-03 (3/13/2002) Subject: Public Relations Requirements References: Deputy Secretary Letter dated February 25, 2002 When is this Acquisition Letter (AL) Effective? This AL is effective 10 business days from the date of issuance. When does this AL Expire? This AL remains in effect until superseded or canceled. Who is the Point of Contact? Contact Bob Webb of the Office of Procurement and Assistance Policy at (202) 586-8264, or via e-mail at robert.webb@hq.doe.gov Visit our website at www.pr.doe.gov for information on Acquisition Letters and other policy issues. What is the Purpose of this AL? The purpose of this AL is to provide guidance regarding the processing of procurement requests for obtaining contractual services from public relations

106

More Regional Science Bowl Winners | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

More Regional Science Bowl Winners More Regional Science Bowl Winners More Regional Science Bowl Winners February 17, 2011 - 3:55pm Addthis The Virginia winners: coach Sharon Webb, Alexander Yang, Steve Qian, Alec Brenner, Owen Gray, Zeming Lin and Ollie, the Virginia Regional Science Bowl puppy | Photo Courtesy of National Science Bowl The Virginia winners: coach Sharon Webb, Alexander Yang, Steve Qian, Alec Brenner, Owen Gray, Zeming Lin and Ollie, the Virginia Regional Science Bowl puppy | Photo Courtesy of National Science Bowl Ginny Simmons Ginny Simmons Former Managing Editor for Energy.gov, Office of Public Affairs With the deadline for the White House's Race to the Top Commencement Challenge right around the corner, we thought it would be a good idea to see how the regional science bowls were coming along, too.

107

350 City County Building  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

(. (. - ,- Department of Eilqgy Washington, DC20585 ,. i x \ .The Honorable Wellington E. Webb .' '. ' 350 City County Building / Denver, Colorado 80202 ., ; Dear Mayor Webb: ., ~, Secretary of Energy' Hazel O'Leary has announced's new approach to openness in the Department of Energy,(OOE) and its communications with the public. In support of this initiative, we,are pleased to forward the'enclosed'information related to the former Uhiversity of Denver Research Institute site in your, jurisdiction that performed work for DOE's predecessor,agencies. This' i~nformation'is provided for your.informatibn, use,,and retention.. ; DOE's Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program (FUSRAP) is responsible for identification of sitesused by DOE's predecessor agencies, determining

108

Microsoft Word - AL2005-10.doc  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

0 0 Acquisition Regulation Date 07/07/05 ACQUISITION LETTER This Acquisition Letter is issued under the authority of the DOE and NNSA Procurement Executives. Subject: Implementation of HSPD-12 References: Homeland Security Presidential Directive 12 (HSPD-12) Federal Information Processing Standard Publication 201 (FIPS Pub 201) When is this Acquisition Letter (AL) Effective? This AL is effective upon issuance. When does this AL Expire? This AL remains in effect until superseded or canceled. Who is the Point of Contact? Contact Robert M. Webb of the Office of Procurement and Assistance Policy at (202)287-1338 or Robert.Webb@hq.doe.gov. Visit our website at www.pr.doe.gov for information on Acquisition Letters and other policy issues.

109

Microsoft Word - AL2006-10.doc  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

AL-2006-10 AL-2006-10 Acquisition Regulation Date 08/11/06 ACQUISITION LETTER This Acquisition Letter is issued under the authority of the DOE and NNSA Procurement Executives. Subject: CLASS DEVIATION FOR CERTAIN DEAR INTELLECTUAL PROPERTY CLAUSES References: DEAR 970.2704 Rights in Data DEAR 970.2770 Technology Transfer DEAR 970.5227-2 Rights in Data-Technology Transfer DEAR 970.5227-3 Technology Transfer Mission When is this Acquisition Letter (AL) Effective? This AL is effective upon issuance. When does this AL Expire? This AL remains in effect until superseded or canceled. Who is the Point of Contact? Contact Robert M. Webb of the Office of Procurement and Assistance Policy at (202)287-1338 or Robert.Webb@hq.doe.gov.

110

Microsoft Word - Annnual_Report_2009Rev1  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

8 February 2010 8 February 2010 To: Arsenio Reyes, PREPA Copy: BONUS File From: Chad Webb, BONUS RADCON Manager Subject: 2009 Annual Survey MMG conducted the comprehensive annual survey at the Dr. Modesto Iriarte Technological Museum (former BONUS Facility) during the dates of 31 August - 3 September 2009 with support from PREPA personnel. Due to inclement weather, completion of the survey was delayed until PREPA personnel could return to the facility and perform masslin smears on 8 December 2009. This survey was conducted in accordance with the Sampling and Analysis Plan (SAP) for the BONUS Facility prepared by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) (or DOE contractor) as amended by a 16 January 2001 Memorandum from Webb to Alvarado. The survey was also altered, as presented below in this report, in consideration of the

111

More Regional Science Bowl Winners | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

More Regional Science Bowl Winners More Regional Science Bowl Winners More Regional Science Bowl Winners February 17, 2011 - 3:55pm Addthis The Virginia winners: coach Sharon Webb, Alexander Yang, Steve Qian, Alec Brenner, Owen Gray, Zeming Lin and Ollie, the Virginia Regional Science Bowl puppy | Photo Courtesy of National Science Bowl The Virginia winners: coach Sharon Webb, Alexander Yang, Steve Qian, Alec Brenner, Owen Gray, Zeming Lin and Ollie, the Virginia Regional Science Bowl puppy | Photo Courtesy of National Science Bowl Ginny Simmons Ginny Simmons Former Managing Editor for Energy.gov, Office of Public Affairs With the deadline for the White House's Race to the Top Commencement Challenge right around the corner, we thought it would be a good idea to see how the regional science bowls were coming along, too.

112

CX-000910: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

10: Categorical Exclusion Determination 10: Categorical Exclusion Determination CX-000910: Categorical Exclusion Determination Austin Solar City Partnership - Webb Middle School Photovoltaic System CX(s) Applied: B5.1 Date: 02/25/2010 Location(s): Austin, Texas Office(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, Golden Field Office This National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) determination (GFO-07-131G) is the result of Austin Energy choosing a photovoltaic (PV) system installation site. The Original NEPA determination (GFO-07-131; CX A9) required Austin Energy to submit an additional EF1 for each selected solar installation site. Austin Energy would use Department of Energy and cost share funding for the installation of a pole mounted PV system at Austin Independent School District's Webb Middle School Campus

113

West Virginia University Solar Decathlon 2011 Menu and Recipes  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Preserving Energy with Appalachian Knowledge Preserving Energy with Appalachian Knowledge Dinner Menu Appetizers Caprese Salad Buffalo mozzarella, Roma tomato, Olive oil, Vinegar, Basil Artichoke Artichokes, Mayonnaise, Lemon, Capers, Thyme Focaccia Bread with Herb Oil Flour, Salt, Olive oil, Chopped Herbs, Pepper, Garlic, Basil, Oregano Entrée Chicken Parmesan Chicken breast, Bread Crumbs, Eggs, Olive oil, Mozzarella, Angel Hair Pasta Dessert Cannolis An Italian pastry filled with Ricotta Cheese and Chocolate Chips. ITALIAN NIGHT Appetizers Pepperoni Rolls Pepperoni, Butter, Eggs, Flour, Sugar, Salt, Mozzarella and Pepper Jack Cheese Entrée Pork Chop and Sauerkraut Sauerkraut, Pork Chops, Garlic Powder, Salt, Pepper, Canola

114

Microsoft Word - Contributors  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Information for beamline technique matrices provided Information for beamline technique matrices provided and/or compiled by: Major Technique Technique Compiled by Spectroscopy 01-01 Infrared Larry Carr, Lisa Miller, Eli Stavitski, Brookhaven National Laboratory 01-02 Photoemission Elio Vescovo, Brookhaven National Laboratory 02-01 Soft X-ray Spectroscopy Joe Dvorak, Brookhaven National Laboratory 02-02 Tender XAS Paul Northrup, Stony Brook University 03-01 EXAFS John Bargar, Stanford Linear Accelerator Center; Steve Heald, Argonne National Laboratory; Tony Lanzirotti, University of Chicago; Matt Newville, Argonne National Laboratory; Bruce Ravel, NIST, Sam Webb, Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource 04-01 Metrology Jeff Keister, Brookhaven National Laboratory

115

Microsoft Word - Mn.doc  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

5 5 Structural Determination of Marine Bacteriogenic Manganese Oxides John R. Bargar, Samuel M. Webb (Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Laboratory), and Bradley M. Tebo (Oregon Health and Science University) Bacterial oxidation of Mn(II) impacts the global geochemical cycling of carbon, nitrogen, sulfur, nutrients, and contaminants in the environment. Manganese is abundant in the biosphere (~10 14 Kg of suspended and dissolved manganese in the oceans) and is second only to iron in relative terrestrial abun- dance of transition metals. Manganese is an important nutrient in the marine water column and is fundamentally required for photosynthesis. The acquisition of manganese by organisms and the biogeochemistry of manganese in the oceans is therefore an

116

SSRL HEADLINES October 2010  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

4 October, 2010 4 October, 2010 ____________________________________________________________________________ Contents of this Issue: Science Highlight - Crystal Structure of NorM, a MATE Transmembrane Transporter Science Highlight - An Artificial Skin Sensitive Enough to be Bothered by a Fly From the Director of SSRL: Ready for the Next User Run Structural Genomics Research at SSRL Begins Exciting New Chapter LCLS/SSRL Users' Meeting Covers Recent Successes and Future Plans Sam Webb Honored with Lytle Award SSRL Student Poster Award Winners Photon Science Users and Faculty Honored A Warm Welcome to Newly Elected SSRL and LCLS UEC Members SSRL Reaches Seismic Upgrade Milestone Upcoming Beam Time Request & Proposal Deadlines ____________________________________________________________________________

117

Yeast Model Uncovers Dual Roles of Mitochondria in the Action of Artemisinin  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, Tsinghua University, Beijing, China, 2 Departments of Medicine and Pediatrics and Howard Hughes Medical, derived from the wormwood herb Artemisia annua, are the most potent antimalarial drugs currently available people, mainly children, each year. Resistance has emerged to all classes of antimalarial drugs except

Arnold, Jonathan

118

http://steps.ucdavis.edu H2Strategies to Achieve California's Low Carbon Fuel StandardStrategies to Achieve California's Low Carbon Fuel Standard  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

waste) 1,127 8,332 39% Diesel Substitutes: FAHC-Tallow, FAHC-Grease, FT- Municipal solid waste 493 4/yr) LCE MSW FT MSW LCE Forest LCE OVW FAHC Soy/Canola LCE Ag. Residue FAHC Tallow LCE Herb energy crop

California at Davis, University of

119

"GiGa": the Billion Galaxy HI Survey -- Tracing Galaxy Assembly from Reionization to the Present  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In this paper, we review the Billion Galaxy Survey that will be carried out at radio--optical wavelengths to micro--nanoJansky levels with the telescopes of the next decades. These are the Low-Frequency Array, the Square Kilometer Array and the Large Synoptic Survey Telescope as survey telescopes, and the Thirty Meter class Telescopes for high spectral resolution+AO, and the James Webb Space Telescope (JWST) for high spatial resolution near--mid IR follow-up. With these facilities, we will be addressing fundamental questions like how galaxies assemble with super-massive black-holes inside from the epoch of First Light until the present, how these objects started and finished the reionization of the universe, and how the processes of star-formation, stellar evolution, and metal enrichment of the IGM proceeded over cosmic time. We also summarize the high-resolution science that has been done thus far on high redshift galaxies with the Hubble Space Telescope (HST). Faint galaxies have steadily decreasing sizes at fainter fluxes and higher redshifts, reflecting the hierarchical formation of galaxies over cosmic time. HST has imaged this process in great structural detail to zsub-clumps. Finally, we summarize how the 6.5 meter James Webb Space Telescope (JWST) will measure first light, reionization, and galaxy assembly in the near--mid-IR.

R. A. Windhorst; S. H. Cohen; N. P. Hathi; R. A. Jansen; R. E. Ryan Jr

2008-06-12T23:59:59.000Z

120

The Challenges of Preserving Historic Resources During the Deactivation and Decommissioning of Highly Contaminated Historically Significant Plutonium Process Facilities  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Manhattan Project was initiated to develop nuclear weapons for use in World War II. The Hanford Engineer Works (HEW) was established in eastern Washington State as a production complex for the Manhattan Project. A major product of the HEW was plutonium. The buildings and process equipment used in the early phases of nuclear weapons development are historically significant because of the new and unique work that was performed. When environmental cleanup became Hanford's central mission in 1991, the Department of Energy (DOE) prepared for the deactivation and decommissioning of many of the old process facilities. In many cases, the process facilities were so contaminated, they faced demolition. The National Historic Preservation Act (NHPA) requires federal agencies to evaluate the historic significance of properties under their jurisdiction for eligibility for inclusion in the National Register of Historic Places before altering or demolishing them so that mitigation through documentation of the properties can occur. Specifically, federal agencies are required to evaluate their proposed actions against the effect the actions may have on districts, sites, buildings or structures that are included or eligible for inclusion in the National Register. In an agreement between the DOE's Richland Operations Office (RL), the Washington State Historic Preservation Office (SHPO) and the Advisory Council on Historic Preservation (ACHP), the agencies concurred that the Hanford Site Historic District is eligible for listing on the National Register of Historic Places and that a Site-wide Treatment Plan would streamline compliance with the NHPA while allowing RL to manage the cleanup of the Hanford Site. Currently, many of the old processing buildings at the Plutonium Finishing Plant (PFP) are undergoing deactivation and decommissioning. RL and Fluor Hanford project managers at the PFP are committed to preserving historical artifacts of the plutonium production process. They must also ensure the safety of workers and the full decontamination of buildings or artifacts if they are to be preserved. This paper discusses the real time challenges of working safely, decontaminating process equipment, preserving historical structures and artifacts and documenting their history at PFP. (authors)

Hopkins, A.; Minette, M.; Sorenson, D.; Heineman, R.; Gerber, M. [Fluor Hanford, Inc., PO Box 1000 Richland WA 99352 (United States); Charboneau, S. [US Department of Energy PO Box 550, Richland WA 99352 (United States); Bond, F. [Washington State Department of Ecology, WDOE 3100 Port of Benton Blvd., Richland WA, 99354 (United States)

2006-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "webb achp herb" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

CHALLENGES OF PRESERVING HISTORIC RESOURCES DURING THE D & D OF HIGHLY CONTAMINATED HISTORICALLY SIGNIFICANT PLUTONIUM PROCESS FACILITIES  

SciTech Connect

The Manhattan Project was initiated to develop nuclear weapons for use in World War II. The Hanford Engineer Works (HEW) was established in eastern Washington State as a production complex for the Manhattan Project. A major product of the HEW was plutonium. The buildings and process equipment used in the early phases of nuclear weapons development are historically significant because of the new and unique work that was performed. When environmental cleanup became Hanford's central mission in 1991, the Department of Energy (DOE) prepared for the deactivation and decommissioning of many of the old process facilities. In many cases, the process facilities were so contaminated, they faced demolition. The National Historic Preservation Act (NHPA) requires federal agencies to evaluate the historic significance of properties under their jurisdiction for eligibility for inclusion in the National Register of Historic Places before altering or demolishing them so that mitigation through documentation of the properties can occur. Specifically, federal agencies are required to evaluate their proposed actions against the effect the actions may have on districts, sites, buildings or structures that ere included or eligible for inclusion in the National Register. In an agreement between the DOE'S Richland Operations Office (RL), the Washington State Historic Preservation Office (SHPO) and the Advisory Council on Historic Preservation (ACHP), the agencies concurred that the Hanford Site Historic District is eligible for listing on the National Register of Historic Places and that a Sitewide Treatment Plan would streamline compliance with the NHPA while allowing RL to manage the cleanup of the Hanford Site. Currently, many of the old processing buildings at the Plutonium Finishing Plant (PFP) are undergoing deactivation and decommissioning. RL and Fluor Hanford project managers at the PFP are committed to preserving historical artifacts of the plutonium production process. They must also ensure the safety of workers and the full decontamination of buildings or artifacts if they are to be preserved. This paper discusses the real time challenges of working safely, decontaminating process equipment, preserving historical structures and artifacts and documenting their history at PFP.

HOPKINS, A.M.

2006-03-17T23:59:59.000Z

122

CHALLENGES OF PRESERVING HISTORIC RESOURCES DURING THE D & D OF HIGHLY CONTAMINATED HISTORICALLY SIGNIFICANT PLUTONIUM PROCESS FACILITIES  

SciTech Connect

The Manhattan Project was initiated to develop nuclear weapons for use in World War II. The Hanford Engineer Works (HEW) was established in eastern Washington State as a production complex for the Manhattan Project. A major product of the HEW was plutonium. The buildings and process equipment used in the early phases of nuclear weapons development are historically significant because of the new and unique work that was performed. When environmental cleanup became Hanford's central mission in 1991, the Department of Energy (DOE) prepared for the deactivation and decommissioning of many of the old process facilities. In many cases, the process facilities were so contaminated, they faced demolition. The National Historic Preservation Act (NHPA) requires federal agencies to evaluate the historic significance of properties under their jurisdiction for eligibility for inclusion in the National Register of Historic Places before altering or demolishing them so that mitigation through documentation of the properties can occur. Specifically, federal agencies are required to evaluate their proposed actions against the effect the actions may have on districts, sites, buildings or structures that ere included or eligible for inclusion in the National Register. In an agreement between the DOE'S Richland Operations Office (RL), the Washington State Historic Preservation Office (SHPO) and the Advisory Council on Historic Preservation (ACHP), the agencies concurred that the Hanford Site Historic District is eligible for listing on the National Register of Historic Places and that a Sitewide Treatment Plan would streamline compliance with the NHPA while allowing RL to manage the cleanup of the Hanford Site. Currently, many of the old processing buildings at the Plutonium Finishing Plant (PFP) are undergoing deactivation and decommissioning. RL and Fluor Hanford project managers at the PFP are committed to preserving historical artifacts of the plutonium production process. They must also ensure the safety of workers and the full decontamination of buildings or artifacts if they are to be preserved. This paper discusses the real time challenges of working safely, decontaminating process equipment, preserving historical structures and artifacts and documenting their history at PFP.

HOPKINS, A.M.

2006-03-17T23:59:59.000Z

123

Fueling the Future Force Preparing the Department of Defense for a Post-Petroleum Era  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We would like to thank our colleagues at the Center for a New American Security (CNAS) for their valuable insights and comments throughout the research and writing process. Will Rogers, Dr. Kristin Lord, and more than a dozen colleagues all provided invaluable feedback and critiques. Joseph S. Nye, Jr. National Security Intern Alexandra Stark contributed her sharp, investigative research skills and excellent writing. We are grateful for external reviews of drafts from, among others, CDR Herb

Christine Parthemore; John Nagl Acknowledgments; Cover Image; Christine Parthemore

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

124

Page not found | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

21 - 7230 of 31,917 results. 21 - 7230 of 31,917 results. Download CX-000917: Categorical Exclusion Determination Ocean Thermal Energy Converter Life Cycle Cost Analysis Date: 02/25/2010 Location(s): Virginia Office(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, Golden Field Office http://energy.gov/nepa/downloads/cx-000917-categorical-exclusion-determination Download CX-000910: Categorical Exclusion Determination Austin Solar City Partnership - Webb Middle School Photovoltaic System CX(s) Applied: B5.1 Date: 02/25/2010 Location(s): Austin, Texas Office(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, Golden Field Office http://energy.gov/nepa/downloads/cx-000910-categorical-exclusion-determination Download CX-000913: Categorical Exclusion Determination Austin Solar City Partnership - Valley View Elementary Photovoltaic System

125

Fermilab Today  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

2, 2011 2, 2011 spacer Subscribe | Contact Us | Archive | Classifieds | Guidelines | Help Search GO spacer Calendar Have a safe day! Monday, Sept. 12 PARTICLE ASTROPHYSICS SEMINARS WILL RESUME IN THE FALL 3:30 p.m. DIRECTOR'S COFFEE BREAK - 2nd Flr X-Over 4 p.m. All Experimenters' Meeting - Curia II Special Topics: First Shipment of BNL Equipment for g-2 to Fermilab; GEM Chamber Test (T-1010) at FTBF 5:30 p.m. Budker Seminar - Music Room at Users' Center Speaker: Viktoriya Zvoda, Fermilab Title: Advanced Bent Crystal Collimation Studies at the Tevatron (T-980) Tuesday, Sept. 13 3:30 p.m. DIRECTOR'S COFFEE BREAK - 2nd Flr X-Over 4 p.m. Accelerator Physics and Technology Seminar - One West Speaker: Stephen Webb, Stony Brook University Title: Free-Electron Laser Theory for Coherent Electron Cooling

126

untitled  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

George Baxley George Baxley System Electrical Control Craftsman Jonesboro, AR Special thanks to: Mike Deihl Ruben Garcia Darrell Gilliam Maryann Henry William Hiller Laura Holman Beth Nielsen Donna Short Dolly Vaughn Aleta Wallace Bruce Webb Rutha Williams Jan Woolverton U P D AT E S O U T H W E S T E R N P O W E R A D M I N I S T R A T I O N J A N U A R Y - M A R C H 2 0 0 5 Southwestern Expands E-Government Options In keeping with the President's Expanding Electronic Government (E-Government) Initiative, Southwestern not only accepts electronic fund transfer payments, but has just implemented a new process to electronically send invoices to customers through the Internet. Southwestern is also examining an online payment service that would provide another easy payment option to its customers by mid-2005. An E-Government

127

Microsoft Word - CX-Chehalis-OlympiaChehalis-MayfieldLewisCoWoodPolesFY12_WEB.doc  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

2 2 REPLY TO ATTN OF: KEPR/Olympia SUBJECT: Environmental Clearance Memorandum Lee Webb Ryan Brady Line Foreman III - TFOF-Olympia TFOK-Chehalis - Line Foreman III Proposed Action: Wood pole structure replacements on the Chehalis-Olympia No. 1 and Chehalis-Mayfield No. 1, 115-kV transmission lines PP&A Project No.: 2370 & 2373, Work Order # 298130, 298138, and 297997 Categorical Exclusion Applied (from Subpart D, 10 C.F.R. Part 1021): B1.3 Routine maintenance activities... Location: The subject transmission lines are located in Lewis and Thurston counties, Washington, in Bonneville Power Administration's (BPA) Olympia Maintenance District. The transmission line right-of-way (ROW) corridors cross public and privately-owned lands that

128

Microsoft Word - AL2005-16.doc  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

6 6 Acquisition Regulation Date 10/04/05 ACQUISITION LETTER This Acquisition Letter is issued under the authority of the DOE and NNSA Procurement Executives. Subject: Implementation of HSPD-12 References: Homeland Security Presidential Directive 12 (HSPD-12) Federal Information Processing Standard Publication 201 (FIPS Pub 201) DOE Notice 206.2 Identity Proofing Acquisition Letter 2005-10 dated July 7, 2005 When is this Acquisition Letter (AL) Effective? This AL is effective upon issuance. When does this AL Expire? This AL remains in effect until superseded or canceled. Who is the Point of Contact? Contact Robert M. Webb of the Office of Procurement and Assistance Policy at (202) 287-1338 or

129

Identification of novel ionizing radiation signaling targets in reconstituted human skin  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

of novel ionizing radiation signaling targets in reconstituted human skin of novel ionizing radiation signaling targets in reconstituted human skin Feng Yang, Katrina M. Waters, Bobbie-Jo Webb-Robertson, Lye-Meng Markillie, Rachel M. Wirgau, Shawna M. Hengel, Ljiljana Pasa-Tolic, and David L. Stenoien. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Our focus has been on identifying the early events that occur after low dose ionizing radiation exposure that precede and often regulate downstream events such as altered transcription, protein secretion and epigenetic regulation. Phosphorylation is one of the earliest detectible events that occurs following radiation exposure and plays important roles in multiple biological pathways including DNA damage repair, transcription, apoptosis, and cell cycle progression. Very robust

130

COO-3072-119 RESULTS ON THE PERFORMANCE OF A BROAD BAND FOCUSSING CHERENKOV COUNTER*  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

3072-119 3072-119 ^ RESULTS ON THE PERFORMANCE OF A BROAD BAND FOCUSSING CHERENKOV COUNTER* Sherman,"'"'' R. C. W e b b , ' ' ' " ' ' " ' " M. ^.otov-~ S C i i v ^ ^ - - ^ - ^ Cester, V. L. Fitch, A. Montag, S. Sherman, R. C. Webb, M. S. Witherell Department of Physics, Princeton University, Princeton, N. J. 085A4 Abstract The field of ring imaging (broad band differential) Cherenkov detectors-^ has become a very active area of interest in detector development at several high energy physics laboratories. Our group has previously report- ed2 on a method of Cherenkov ring imaging for a counter with large momentum and angular acceptance using stan- dard photo multipliers. Recently, we have applied this technique to the design of a set of Cherenkov counters

131

Microsoft PowerPoint - Poster-PIRs to WISG 2007.ppt  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

ARM/NREL Pyrgeometer Calibration with Traceability to the ARM/NREL Pyrgeometer Calibration with Traceability to the World Infrared Standard Group (WISG) Ibrahim Reda 1 , Tom Stoffel 1 and Craig Webb 2 1 National Renewable Energy Laboratory, Golden, Colorado 2 AEROMET, Inc., Billings, Oklahoma Abstract For global acceptance, ARM broadband irradiance measurements must be made with radiometers calibrated to internationally recognized references. The World Meteorological Organization's Commission for Instruments and Methods of Observation (CIMO) established an interim pyrgeometer calibration standard in February 2006. The World Infrared Standard Group (WISG), comprised of four pyrgeometers, was developed by the Physikalisch-Meteorologisches Observatorium Davos, World Radiation Center (PMOD/WRC). Working with PMOD/WRC, NREL has

132

Categorical Exclusion (CX) Determinations By Date | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

15, 2011 15, 2011 CX-006137: Categorical Exclusion Determination B39 Cellular Repeater Installation CX(s) Applied: B1.7 Date: 06/15/2011 Location(s): Morgantown, West Virginia Office(s): Fossil Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory June 15, 2011 CX-006136: Categorical Exclusion Determination Field Testing of Low Impact Oil Field Roads CX(s) Applied: B3.7 Date: 06/15/2011 Location(s): Webb County, Texas Office(s): Fossil Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory June 15, 2011 CX-006079: Categorical Exclusion Determination Topic 7A, Emergency Backup Power Systems CX(s) Applied: A9, B5.1 Date: 06/15/2011 Location(s): Georgia Office(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, Golden Field Office June 14, 2011 CX-006242: Categorical Exclusion Determination North Gunnison-Salida 115-Kilovolt Transmission Line Jumper Cable

133

Global Paleoclimatic Data for 6000 Yr B.P. (1985) (NDP-011)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Global Paleoclimatic Data for 6000 Yr B.P. (1985) (NDP-011) DOI: 10.3334/CDIAC/cli.ndp011 data Data PDF PDF File Investigator T. Webb, III To determine regional and global climatic variations during the past 6000 years, pollen, lake level, and marine plankton data from 797 stations were compiled to form a global data set. Radiocarbon dating and dated tephras were used to determine the ages of the specimens. The data available for the pollen data are site number, site name, latitude, longitude, elevation, and percentages of various taxa. For lake-level data, the data are site number, site name, latitude, longitude, and lake-level status. And for marine plankton, the data are site number, site name, latitude, longitude, water depth, date, dating control code, depth of sample, interpolated age

134

wilcox-99.PDF  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Traceability and Verification of Radiometer Calibrations at Traceability and Verification of Radiometer Calibrations at the Southern Great Plains Radiometer Calibration Facility S. M. Wilcox and I. Reda National Renewable Energy Laboratory Golden, Colorado D. A. Nelson and C. Webb Southern Great Plains Central Facility Introduction The Radiometer Calibration Facility at the Southern Great Plains (SGP) central facility annually calibrates more than 100 radiometers deployed for routine operations at the 22 SGP measurement sites. Among the factors that affect the reliability of these measurements are traceability of the calibration to the World Radiometric Reference (WRR) and independent verification of calibration results. A series of absolute cavity radiometer intercomparisons establishes and documents the traceability of broadband

135

SRS - Media Contacts  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

News Releases News Releases Video Releases Fact Sheets Photo Gallery Speakers Media Contacts SRS Home Media Contacts For information about the Department of Energy-Savannah River Operations contact: Office of External Affairs, 803-952-7697 Savannah River Operations Office, U.S. Dept. of Energy, P.O. Box A, Aiken, SC 29802 Website: http://sro.srs.gov Department of Energy For information about the Savannah River National Laboratory contact: Will Callicott, Manager, SRNL Executive Communications, 803-725-3786 Angeline French, 803-725-2854 Website: http://srnl.doe.gov Savannah River National Laboratory For information about Savannah River Nuclear Solutions, LLC, contact: Robert C. (Clif) Webb, Vice President, Corporate Communications, 803-952-9810 Barbara Smoak, Manager, Public Relations & Media Communications,

136

One West Third Street Tulsa, Oklahoma  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Kim Whipple Kim Whipple Secretary Springfield, Missouri Special thanks to: SWPA Marshall Boyken Kenny Broadaway Scott Carpenter Jim Hunt Danny Johnson Sean Long Tammy Moreno Beth Nielsen Carrie Quick Donna Short Dudley Steele Jon Worthington CNI/Bearskin Vicki Clarke Ruben Garcia William Hiller David Kinyon Kathy O'Neal Elaine Webb Mistie Yost Larry Jones Kennett Public Works Gerald Morris City of Piggott Shellie Scott Michael Brairton Power Marketing Liaison Office U P DAT E S O U T H W E S T E R N P O W E R A D M I N I S T R A T I O N Much of the Ozarks and Arkansas Delta was transformed into Iceland on January 27, 2009, as northern Arkansas and southern Missouri were encrusted with up to five inches of ice during a two-day storm that destroyed trees and transmission poles leaving thousands of utility customers without

137

Page not found | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

91 - 8800 of 31,917 results. 91 - 8800 of 31,917 results. Page Categorical Exclusion Determinations: B5.23 B5.23: Electric vehicle charging stationsThe installation, modification, operation, and removal of electric vehicle charging stations, using commercially available technology, within a previously... http://energy.gov/nepa/categorical-exclusion-determinations-b523 Download CX-006136: Categorical Exclusion Determination Field Testing of Low Impact Oil Field Roads CX(s) Applied: B3.7 Date: 06/15/2011 Location(s): Webb County, Texas Office(s): Fossil Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory http://energy.gov/nepa/downloads/cx-006136-categorical-exclusion-determination Download CX-006141: Categorical Exclusion Determination Revised Market Title for Renewable Energy Program CX(s) Applied: A9, A11, B5.1

138

Clouds, Aerosols and Precipitation in the Marine Boundary Layer (CAP-MBL) AMF Deployment Graciosa Island, Azores, NE Atlantic Ocean May 2009-December 2010  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

the Marine Boundary Layer (CAP-MBL) Graciosa Island, Azores, NE Atlantic Ocean May 2009-December 2010 Rob Wood, University of Washington CAP-MBL Proposal Team AMF Deployment Team Thanks to Mark Miller: AMF Site Scientist Kim Nitschke: AMF Site Manager Importance of Low-Clouds for Climate Imperative that we understand the processes controlling the formation, maintenance and dissipation of low clouds in order to improve their representation in climate models. Which clouds matter for climate sensitivity? Climate Feedbacks Model Intercomparison Project (CFMIP) 12 slab ocean models 2xCO 2 - control Correlation of global mean CRF with local values Mark Webb, Hadley Center 90 N 45 N 0 45 S 90S 0 90 E 180 90 W 0

139

TACT Committee Report  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Geomechanics Research Department Geomechanics Research Department Bauer-CAES 1 CAES Modeling Stephen J. Bauer Sandia National Laboratories sjbauer@sandia.gov Matt Kirk, Mark Grubelich, Steve Webb, Scott Broome SAND 2010-6940C Sandia National Laboratories is a multiprogram Corporation, a Lockheed Martin Company, for the United States Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration under Contract DE-AC04-94AL85000. Funded in part by the Energy Storage Systems Program of the U.S. Department Of Energy through Sandia National Laboratories Geomechanics Research Department Specific and existing problems, interests, needs 1-Potential Microbial and Chemical Impact of CAES in a Sandstone, M. Kirk 2-Assessment of Ignition/Explosion Potential in a Depleted Hydrocarbon Reservoir from Air Cycling Associated with

140

Microsoft PowerPoint - UTSRWorkshop-Oct2010-Bons.pptx  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

DESIGNING TURBINE ENDWALLS DESIGNING TURBINE ENDWALLS DESIGNING TURBINE ENDWALLS DESIGNING TURBINE ENDWALLS FOR DEPOSITION RESISTANCE WITH 1400C COMBUSTOR EXIT TEMPERATURES AND SYNGAS WATER VAPOR LEVELS Ch i S ith B tt B k P h th Sh k Chris Smith, Brett Barker, Prashanth Shankaran Josh Webb, Brian Casaday Dr. Ali Ameri, Dr. Jeffrey Bons "THE" OHIO STATE UNIVERSITY THE OHIO STATE UNIVERSITY Robert Laycock, Dr. Thomas Fletcher "THE" BRIGHAM YOUNG UNIVERSITY "THE" BRIGHAM YOUNG UNIVERSITY (3-year grant awarded Oct 2009) 1 MOTIVATION/NEED * Operational Issues -Fuel flexibility (range of feedstock heat release) y ( g ) -Diluent use (e.g. steam) -Filtration requirements * Technical Challenges - Higher firing temperature I d h t t f ( t dil t) - Increased heat transfer (steam diluent) - Potential for increased levels of airborne contaminants

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141

The Space Infrared Interferometric Telescope (SPIRIT): High-resolution imaging and spectroscopy in the far-infrared  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We report results of a recently-completed pre-Formulation Phase study of SPIRIT, a candidate NASA Origins Probe mission. SPIRIT is a spatial and spectral interferometer with an operating wavelength range 25 - 400 microns. SPIRIT will provide sub-arcsecond resolution images and spectra with resolution R = 3000 in a 1 arcmin field of view to accomplish three primary scientific objectives: (1) Learn how planetary systems form from protostellar disks, and how they acquire their inhomogeneous composition; (2) characterize the family of extrasolar planetary systems by imaging the structure in debris disks to understand how and where planets of different types form; and (3) learn how high-redshift galaxies formed and merged to form the present-day population of galaxies. Observations with SPIRIT will be complementary to those of the James Webb Space Telescope and the ground-based Atacama Large Millimeter Array. All three observatories could be operational contemporaneously.

David Leisawitz; Charles Baker; Amy Barger; Dominic Benford; Andrew Blain; Rob Boyle; Richard Broderick; Jason Budinoff; John Carpenter; Richard Caverly; Phil Chen; Steve Cooley; Christine Cottingham; Julie Crooke; Dave DiPietro; Mike DiPirro; Michael Femiano; Art Ferrer; Jacqueline Fischer; Jonathan P. Gardner; Lou Hallock; Kenny Harris; Kate Hartman; Martin Harwit; Lynne Hillenbrand; Tupper Hyde; Drew Jones; Jim Kellogg; Alan Kogut; Marc Kuchner; Bill Lawson; Javier Lecha; Maria Lecha; Amy Mainzer; Jim Mannion; Anthony Martino; Paul Mason; John Mather; Gibran McDonald; Rick Mills; Lee Mundy; Stan Ollendorf; Joe Pellicciotti; Dave Quinn; Kirk Rhee; Stephen Rinehart; Tim Sauerwine; Robert Silverberg; Terry Smith; Gordon Stacey; H. Philip Stahl; Johannes Staguhn; Steve Tompkins; June Tveekrem; Sheila Wall; Mark Wilson

2007-07-05T23:59:59.000Z

142

Experimental Study of Heat Transfer and Flow Characteristics for a New Type of Air Heater  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A new type air heater was developed, and an experimental set-up was built to analyze its characteristics. Within the Reynolds number from 2000 to 15000, the integrated characteristics in air heater channels with and without holed baffles have been studied experimentally. The experimental results show that the average Nu number increases greatly but the friction factor increases only slightly with the Re number. The Webb performance evaluation criterion has been adopted for analysis purposes. It is found that the integrated characteristics of heat transfer and flow friction increase with the hole's diameter at the same hole density (which is equal to the ratio of the hole's total area to the baffle's area), and the heat transfer rate increases with the hole density at the same hole diameter. The C type baffle has the best performance at the same heat transfer surface area and fan power consumption; its heat transfer rate improves about 44 to 69 percent.

Zheng, H.; Fan, X.; Li, A.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

143

Computer program for determining the thermodynamic properties of light hydrocarbons  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This program was written to be used as a subroutine. The program determines the thermodynamics of light hydrocarbons. The following light hydrocarbons can be analyzed: butane, ethane, ethylene, heptane, hexane, isobutane, isopentane, methane, octane, pentane, propane and propylene. The subroutine can evaluate a thermodynamic state for the light hydrocarbons given any of the following pairs of state quantities: pressure and quality, pressure and enthalpy, pressure and entropy, temperature and pressure, temperature and quality and temperature and specific volume. These six pairs of knowns allow the user to analyze any thermodynamic cycle utilizing a light hydrocarbon as the working fluid. The Starling--Benedict--Webb--Rubin equation of state was used. A brief description, flowchart, listing and required equations for each subroutine are included.

Riemer, D.H.; Jacobs, H.R.; Boehm, R.F.; Cook, D.S.

1976-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

144

Computer program for determining the thermodynamic properties of light hydrocarbons  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This program was written to be used as a subroutine. The program determines the thermodynamics of light hydrocarbons. The following light hydrocarbons can be analyzed: butane, ethane, ethylene, heptane, hexane, isobutane, isopentane, methane, octane, pentane, propane and propylene. The subroutine can evaluate a thermodynamic state for the light hydrocarbons given any of the following pairs of state quantities: pressure and quality, pressure and enthalpy, pressure and entropy, temperature and pressure, temperature and quality and temperature and specific volume. These six pairs of knowns allow the user to analyze any thermodynamic cycle utilizing a light hydrocarbon as the working fluid. The Starling-Benedict-Webb-Rubin equation of state was used. This report contains a brief description, flowchart, listing and required equations for each subroutine.

Riemer, D.H.; Jacobs, H.R.; Boehm, R.F.; Cook, D.S.

1976-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

145

Is there further evidence for spatial variation of fundamental constants?  

SciTech Connect

Indications of spatial variation of the fine-structure constant, {alpha}, based on study of quasar absorption systems have recently been reported [J. K. Webb, J. A. King, M. T. Murphy, V. V. Flambaum, R. F. Carswell, and M. B. Bainbridge, arXiv:1008.3907.]. The physics that causes this {alpha}-variation should have other observable manifestations, and this motivates us to look for complementary astrophysical effects. In this paper we propose a method to test whether spatial variation of fundamental constants existed during the epoch of big bang nucleosynthesis and study existing measurements of deuterium abundance for a signal. We also examine existing quasar absorption spectra data that are sensitive to variation of the electron-to-proton mass ratio {mu} and x={alpha}{sup 2{mu}}g{sub p} for spatial variation.

Berengut, J. C.; Flambaum, V. V.; King, J. A.; Curran, S. J.; Webb, J. K. [School of Physics, University of New South Wales, Sydney 2052 (Australia)

2011-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

146

Climate Zone 2B | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

B B Jump to: navigation, search A type of climate defined in the ASHRAE 169-2006 standard consisting of Climate Zone Number 2 and Climate Zone Subtype B. Climate Zone 2B is defined as Dry with IP Units 6300 < CDD50ºF ≤ 9000 and SI Units 3500 < CDD10ºC ≤ 5000 . The following places are categorized as class 2B climate zones: Bandera County, Texas Dimmit County, Texas Edwards County, Texas Frio County, Texas Imperial County, California Kinney County, Texas La Paz County, Arizona La Salle County, Texas Maricopa County, Arizona Maverick County, Texas Medina County, Texas Pima County, Arizona Pinal County, Arizona Real County, Texas Uvalde County, Texas Val Verde County, Texas Webb County, Texas Yuma County, Arizona Zapata County, Texas Zavala County, Texas Retrieved from

147

Recent News from the National Labs | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

8, 2011 8, 2011 The Amonix 7700 CPV Solar Power Generators at the SolarTAC facility in Aurora, Colorado. | Photo credit: Dennis Schroeder, National Renewable Energy Laboratory staff photographer Geek-Up[2.18.2011]: Record-Setting Efficiency Through a partnership with NREL, California-based Amonix developed a concentrated solar power technology the size of an IMAX screen with the highest level of efficiency ever achieved for this type of operating solar system. February 17, 2011 The Virginia winners: coach Sharon Webb, Alexander Yang, Steve Qian, Alec Brenner, Owen Gray, Zeming Lin and Ollie, the Virginia Regional Science Bowl puppy | Photo Courtesy of National Science Bowl More Regional Science Bowl Winners By March 25, 2011, thousands of students will have competed in more than

148

Microsoft Word - AL2005-15.doc  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

5 5 Acquisition Regulation Date 10/05/05 ACQUISITION LETTER This Acquisition Letter is issued under the authority of the DOE and NNSA Procurement Executives. Subject: Implementation of the Price-Anderson Amendments Act of 2005 References: DEAR 970.250-70, Nuclear Hazards Indemnification Agreement. The Price-Anderson Amendments Act of 2005, §§ 601-611 of the Energy Policy Act, 2005, Pub.L. 109-58. When is this Acquisition Letter (AL) Effective? This AL is effective upon issuance. When does this AL Expire? This AL remains in effect until superseded or canceled. Who is the Point of Contact? Contact Robert M. Webb of the Office of Procurement and Assistance Policy at

149

Science Education | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

February 2, 2011 February 2, 2011 This Month's Feature on .EDU Connections: Iowa State University Iowa State University's vision is to lead the world in advancing the land-grant ideas of putting science, technology and human creativity to work. February 4, 2011 Geek-Up [2.4.2011]: Mars Hoppers and InSynC Designs for a nuclear-powered Mars hopper that could cover 9 miles every five to seven days and students and teachers submit proposals to use Brookhaven's National Synchrotron Light Source. February 17, 2011 The Virginia winners: coach Sharon Webb, Alexander Yang, Steve Qian, Alec Brenner, Owen Gray, Zeming Lin and Ollie, the Virginia Regional Science Bowl puppy | Photo Courtesy of National Science Bowl More Regional Science Bowl Winners By March 25, 2011, thousands of students will have competed in more than

150

Pueblo of Jemez Geothermal Feasibility Study Fianl Report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This project assessed the feasibility of developing geothermal energy on the Pueblo of Jemez, with particular attention to the Red Rocks area. Geologic mapping of the Red Rocks area was done at a scale of 1:6000 and geophysical surveys identified a potential drilling target at a depth of 420 feet. The most feasible business identified to use geothermal energy on the reservation was a greenhouse growing culinary and medicinal herbs. Space heating and a spa were identified as two other likely uses of geothermal energy at Jemez Pueblo. Further geophysical surveys are needed to identify the depth to the Madera Limestone, the most likely host for a major geothermal reservoir.

S.A. Kelley; N. Rogers; S. Sandberg; J. Witcher; J. Whittier

2005-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

151

Foothills Parkway Section 8B Final Environmental Report, Volume 4, Appendices E-I  

SciTech Connect

In 1994, Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) was tasked by the National Park Service (NPS) to prepare an Environmental Report (ER) for Section 8B of the Foothills Parkway in the Great Smoky Mountains National Park (GSMNP). Section 8B represents 27.7 km (14.2 miles) of a total of 115 km (72 miles) of the planned Foothills Parkway and would connect the Cosby community on the east to the incorporated town of Pittman Center to the west. The major deliverables for the project are listed. From August 1995 through October 1996, NPS, GSMNP, and ORNL staff interacted with Federal Highway Administration staff to develop a conceptual design plan for Section 8B with the intent of protecting critical, resources identified during the ER process to the extent possible. In addition, ORNL arranged for bioengineering experts to discuss techniques that might be employed on Section 8B with NPS, GSMNP, and ORNL staff during September 1996. For the purposes of this ER, there are two basic alternatives under consideration: (1) a build alternative and (2) a no-build alternative. Within the build alternative are a number of options including constructing Section 8B with no interchanges, constructing Section 8B with an interchange at SR 416 or U.S. 321, constructing Section 8B with a spur road on Webb Mountain, and considering operation of Section 8B both before and after the operation of Section 8C. The no-build alternative is considered the no-action alternative and is not to construct Section 8B. This volume of the ER consists of Appendices E through I (all ecological survey reports), which are summarized individually in the sections that follow. The following conclusions result from the completion of these surveys and the ER impact analysis: (1) Forest clearing should be limited as much as possible; (2) Disturbed areas should be replanted with native trees; (3) Drainages should be bridged rather than leveled with cut and fill; (4) For areas of steep slopes and potential erosion, bioengineering techniques should be implemented; (5) The Webb Mt. spur road is not recommended. If the spur road is built no grass shoulders should be used (to minimize forest fragmentation impacts); and (6) Transplanting of protected plants should be done when possible. Construction in wetland areas should be avoided and erosion and sedimentation mitigation measures discussed under water resources and aquatic ecology should be implemented.

Blasing, T.J.; Cada, G.F.; Carer, M.; Chin, S.M.; Dickerman, J.A.; Etnier, D.A.; Gibson, R.; Harvey, M.; Hatcher, B.; Lietzske, D.; Mann, L.K.; Mulholland, P.J.; Petrich, C.H.; Pounds, L.; Ranney, J.; Reed, R.M.; Ryan, P.F.; Schweitzer, M.; Smith, D.; Thomason, P.; Wade, M.C.

1999-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

152

Plants of the Bible  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Bible Bible Nature Bulletin No. 188-A April 16, 1965 Forest Preserve District of Cook County Seymour Simon, President Roland F. Eisenbeis, Supt. of Conservation PLANTS OF THE BIBLE When Jesus suffered on the cross, we are told in the Gospel according to St. Matthew (27:48) that at the ninth hour he thirsted and a sponge, filled with vinegar and put upon a reed, was raised to His lips. It is so related in St. Mark (15:36) but according to St. John (19:29), "they filled a sponge with vinegar, and put it upon hyssop, and put it into his mouth. " What was hyssop. The plant is mentioned frequently in the Bible. The hyssop of our herb gardens is not native to Palestine, Syria or Egypt, but there is evidence that when Solomon "spoke of trees, from the cedar tree that is in Lebanon even unto the hyssop that springeth out of the wall" (I Kings 4:23), he spoke of the herb we call marjoram. The hyssop dipped in the blood of a sacrificial lamb and used by the Israelites in Egypt to mark their doorways (Exodus 12:22), and the hyssop referred to by St. John but called a reed by St. Matthew and St. Mark, was probably sorghum, a tall cereal plant grown by the Jews for food and also used for brushes and brooms.

153

SSRL Beam Lines by Number | Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Number Number SSRL Beam Line Map | Beam Lines by Techniques | SPEAR3 Parameters BL Type Source Supported Technique(s) Energy Range Status Contacts 1-4 X-ray Bend Small angle x-ray scattering 7100-9000 eV Limited Chris Tassone Mike Toney 1-5 X-ray Bend Thin film diffraction 6000-14500 eV Limited Chad Miller 2-1 X-ray Bend Powder diffraction Thin film diffraction 4000-15800 eV Open Chad Miller Apurva Mehta 2-2 X-ray Bend White light station Instrumentation Development 1000-40000 eV Limited Bart Johnson 2-3 X-ray Bend X-ray absorption spectroscopy imaging 4500-24000 eV Open Sam Webb Ben Kocar 4-1 X-ray Wiggler X-ray Absorption Spectroscopy 6500-30000 eV Open John Bargar Matthew Latimer Ryan Davis 4-2 X-ray Wiggler Biological solution small angle x-ray scattering

154

The Number of Supernovae From Primordial Stars in the Universe  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Recent simulations of the formation of the first luminous objects in the universe predict isolated very massive stars to form in dark matter halos with virial temperatures large enough to allow significant amounts of molecular hydrogen to form. We construct a semi-analytic model based on the Press-Schechter formalism and calibrate the minimum halos mass that may form a primordial star with the results from extensive adaptive mesh refinement simulations. The model also includes star formation in objects with virial temperatures in excess of ten thousand Kelvin. The free parameters are tuned to match the optical depth measurements by the WMAP satellite. The models explicitly includes the negative feedback of the destruction of molecular hydrogen by a soft UV background which is computed self-consistently. We predict high redshift supernova rates as one of the most promising tools to test the current scenario of primordial star formation. The supernova rate from primordial stars peaks at redshifts {approx}20. Using an analytic model for the luminosities of pair-instability supernovae we predict observable magnitudes and discuss possible observational strategies. Such supernovae would release enough metals corresponding to a uniform enrichment to a few hundred thousands of solar metalicity. If some of these stars produce gamma ray bursts our rates will be directly applicable to understanding the anticipated results from the SWIFT satellite. This study highlights the great potential for the James Webb space telescope in probing cosmic structure at redshifts greater than 20.

Wise, J

2004-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

155

Infrared Transmission Spectra for Extrasolar Giant Planets  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Among the hot Jupiters that transit their parent stars known to date, the two best candidates to be observed with transmission spectroscopy in the mid-infrared (MIR) are HD189733b and HD209458b, due to their combined characteristics of planetary density, orbital parameters and parent star distance and brightness. Here we simulate transmission spectra of these two planets during their primary eclipse in the MIR, and we present sensitivity studies of the spectra to the changes of atmospheric thermal properties, molecular abundances and C/O ratios. Our model predicts that the dominant species absorbing in the MIR on hot Jupiters are water vapor and carbon monoxide, and their relative abundances are determined by the C/O ratio. Since the temperature profile plays a secondary role in the transmission spectra of hot Jupiters compared to molecular abundances, future primary eclipse observations in the MIR of those objects might give an insight on EGP atmospheric chemistry. We find here that the absorption features caused by water vapor and carbon monoxide in a cloud-free atmosphere, are deep enough to be observable by the present and future generation of space-based observatories, such as Spitzer Space Telescope and James Webb Space Telescope. We discuss our results in light of the capabilities of these telescopes.

G. Tinetti; M. C. Liang; A. Vidal-Madjar; D. Ehrenreich; A. Lecavelier des Etangs; Y. Yung

2006-11-06T23:59:59.000Z

156

One West Third Street Tulsa, Oklahoma  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Jimmy Hardin Jimmy Hardin Working Foreman Jonesboro Maintenance Unit Special thanks to: SWPA Marshall Boyken Kenny Broadaway Scott Carpenter Dallas Cooper Jerry Ferguson Janet Hagar Danny Johnson Darlene Low Jim McDonald Jerry Murr Beth Nielsen Carrie Quick Aiden Smith Steve Wall Jon Worthington WNT Ashley Butler Vicki Clarke Ruben Garcia Brad Howland William Hiller Kathy O'Neal Elaine Webb U P DAT E S O U T H W E S T E R N P O W E R A D M I N I S T R A T I O N J u l y - S e p t e m b e r 2 0 0 8 Southwestern "Zero Heroes" Stay Safe Sometimes being a "zero hero" is the best way to be. This was certainly the case for Southwestern in Fiscal Year (FY) 2008, when the agency achieved a Recordable Accident Frequency Rate (RAFR) of 0.0, which equates to not a single recordable injury for every

157

CANDELS: THE CONTRIBUTION OF THE OBSERVED GALAXY POPULATION TO COSMIC REIONIZATION  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We present measurements of the specific ultraviolet luminosity density from a sample of 483 galaxies at 6 {approx} 50%. We examine the contribution from galaxies in different luminosity ranges and find that the sub-L* galaxies we detect are stronger contributors to the ionizing photon budget than the L > L* population, unless f {sub esc} is luminosity dependent. Combining our observations with constraints on the emission rate of ionizing photons from Ly{alpha} forest observations at z = 6, we find that we can constrain f {sub esc} < 34% (2{sigma}) if the observed galaxies are the only contributors to reionization, or <13% (2{sigma}) if the luminosity function extends to a limiting magnitude of M {sub UV} = -13. These escape fractions are sufficient to sustain an ionized IGM by z = 6. Current constraints on the high-redshift galaxy population imply that the volume ionized fraction of the IGM, while consistent with unity at z {<=} 6, appears to drop at redshifts not much higher than 7, consistent with a number of complementary reionization probes. If faint galaxies dominated the ionizing photon budget at z = 6-7, future extremely deep observations with the James Webb Space Telescope will probe deep enough to directly observe them, providing an indirect constraint on the global ionizing photon escape fraction.

Finkelstein, Steven L.; Pawlik, Andreas H. [Department of Astronomy, University of Texas at Austin, Austin, TX 78712 (United States); Papovich, Casey [George P. and Cynthia Woods Mitchell Institute for Fundamental Physics and Astronomy, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Texas A and M University, College Station, TX 77843 (United States); Ryan, Russell E.; Ferguson, Henry C.; Koekemoer, Anton M.; Grogin, Norman A. [Space Telescope Science Institute, Baltimore, MD 21218 (United States); Dickinson, Mark [National Optical Astronomy Observatory, Tucson, AZ 85719 (United States); Finlator, Kristian [Physics Department, University of California, Santa Barbara, CA 93106 (United States); Giavalisco, Mauro [Department of Astronomy, University of Massachusetts, Amherst, MA 01003 (United States); Cooray, Asantha [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of California, Irvine, CA 92697 (United States); Dunlop, James S. [Institute for Astronomy, University of Edinburgh, Royal Observatory, Edinburgh (United Kingdom); Faber, Sandy M.; Kocevski, Dale D. [University of California Observatories/Lick Observatory, University of California, Santa Cruz, CA 95064 (United States); Newman, Jeffrey A., E-mail: stevenf@astro.as.utexas.edu [Department of Physics and Astronomy and Pitt-PACC, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA 15260 (United States)

2012-10-20T23:59:59.000Z

158

Minutes Ops mtg 090211  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

September 2, 2011 September 2, 2011 11:00 - 11:45 AM Minutes Attendees: Gang Huang, Tom McVeigh, Gregg Penn, Abdi Salehi, Tom Scarvie, Peter Seidl, Pat Thomas, Herb Toor, Csaba Toth, Weyland Wong 1. ES&H News and Lessons Learned: News: LBNL will be vacated the existing off-site warehouse and contracting with a warehouse management company that has several regional warehouses to manage our storage. Programs will be charged for storage. Program Heads will be asking PIs to review the materials they have in storage and reduce the quantity. There will be a temptation to move equipment from the warehouse to AFRD space on site. With Bldg. 52 being demolished and the 58A and 71 high bays being filled with new experiments, we don't have much storage space left. Program Safety

159

Minutes Ops mtg 080511  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

August 5, 2011 August 5, 2011 10:30 - 11:30 AM Minutes Attendees: Tom McVeigh, Gregg Penn, Abdi Salehi, Pat Thomas, Herb Toor, Csaba Toth, Weyland Wong 1. ES&H News and Lessons Learned: * Accident Statistics - A review of LBNL accident statistics for June 2011 reveals several slip/trip/fall accidents, including: i. An administrator fell while walking across a parking lot, ii. A project manager tripped while walking up a wooden stairs, iii. A custodian sprained an ankle while stepping on the edge of a manhole cover, iv. A guest tripped over a fire hose that was stretched across a driveway. v. A research associate was startled by a hawk and fell off a sidewalk, vi. A writer/editor lost footing on a tapered curb near a bus stop, vii. A laborer lost footing on slippery concrete while cleaning a catch

160

Minutes Ops mtg 120803  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

3, 2012 3, 2012 10:30 - 11:30 AM Minutes Attendees: Ned Borglin, Marshall Granados, Gregg Penn, Abdi Salehi, Peter Seidl, Pat Thomas, Herb Toor, Csaba Toth, Weyland Wong 1. ES&H News and Lessons Learned: News: * EHSS Customer Service Focus Group - Joe Dionne is organizing a focus group to discuss ways the Environmental Health, Safety, and Security Division can improve customer service. Participation will require a commitment of 1-2 hours. Please contact Peter Seidl or Pat Thomas if you are interested in participating. * Security and Emergency Services news - The annual drop/cover/hold/ evacuate earthquake drill is scheduled at 10 AM on October 18. A new version of the red-and-white Emergency Response Guide wall posters is being printed and should be available soon. The new Security and

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "webb achp herb" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Minutes Ops mtg 070111  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

1, 2011 1, 2011 10:30 - 11:30 AM Minutes Attendees: Ken Barat, Tom McVeigh, Abdi Salehi, Pat Thomas, Herb Toor, Weyland Wong 1. ES&H News and Lessons Learned: * Yale shop fatality - In April, an astronomy and physics graduate student working alone late at night inside a machine shop was killed when her hair become caught in a lathe. The shop had a staff member present during daytime hours, but not at night. Students were allowed to use the shop after completing an introductory shop course. Yale is reviewing safety policies for facilities with power equipment. * Reciprocating saw injury - On March 3, an Idaho National Laboratory employee was injured while preparing to cut a brace with a reciprocating saw (Saws-All). The employee was wearing PPE (gloves and safety

162

COE_NERSCtraining_Feb8_2011.pptx  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

practices for writing and running mix- practices for writing and running mix- mode MPI and OpenMP codes on the Cray XE6 LBNL NERSC Nicholas J Wright, Karl Fuerlinger, John Shalf LBNL Computing Research Division Hongzhang Shan, Tony Drummond, Andrew Canning PPPL Stephane Ethier Cray Inc. Nathan Wichmann, Marcus Wagner, Sarah Anderson, Ryan Olsen, Mike Aamodt 2 The Multicore era * Moore's Law continues * Traditional sources of performance improvement ending - Old Trend: double clock frequency every 18 th months - New Trend: Double # cores every 18 months * Power limits drive a number of Broader Technology Trends - Number Cores  - Memory Capacity per core flat or  - Memory Bandwidth per FLOP  - Network Bandwidth per FLOP  Figure courtesy of Kunle Olukotun, Lance Hammond, Herb Sutter, and Burton Smith

163

AFRD EH&S: Safety People  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Key AFRD Safety Personnel These are some of the people who work to ensure safety, health, and environmental protection in AFRD. If you need advice or assistance or just want to say hello, drop us a line or stop by. Divisional Safety Officials Peter Seidl, Division Deputy and Safety Advisory Committee Representative Building 47, Room 102, x7653 Pat Thomas, AFRD Safety Coordinator Building 71, Room 251B, x6098 Cindy Donk, Administrative Staff Representative Building 47, Room 112B, x5430 Frank Rosado, ergonomics advocate Building 50A, Room 5104, x7368 Selected Contacts in the EH&S Division Bob Fairchild, LBNL Laser Safety Officer Building 75, Room 109, x2278 Linnea Wahl, EH&S Division Liaison Note: Ned Borglin is backup Building 75, Room 106, x7623 Herb Toor, EH&S Industrial Hygienist

164

Minutes Ops mtg 1210005  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

November 2, 2012 November 2, 2012 10:30 - 11:30 AM Minutes Attendees: Marshall Granados, Abdi Salehi, Thomas Schenkel, Pat Thomas, Herb Toor, Csaba Toth, Theresa Triplett, Linnea Wahl 1. ES&H News and Lessons Learned: News: * AFRD Safety Week -- We are planning to have an "AFRD Safety Week" November 26-30. Programs can schedule either 1 whole day or 2 half-days to devote to safety. * Each Program is responsible for identifying electrical equipment surveyors by November 1, 2012. * Supervisor Safety Plan activity reports for FY12 are now overdue. Best Practices from AFRD, ALS & Engineering Spot Awards: AFRD Programs are encouraged to nominate people you observe contributing to our safety for spot awards through the safety spot award website at:

165

AFRD Ops Minutes 5-6-2011  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

May 6, 2011 May 6, 2011 10:30-11:30 AM Minutes Attendees: Ken Barat, Gang Huang, Tom McVeigh, Gregg Penn, Abdi Salehi, Tom Scarvie, Peter Seidl, Pat Thomas, Herb Toor, Csaba Toth 1. Lessons Learned: * Back strain - An Engineering technician matrixed to Supercon experienced back pain while lifting a spool of cable weighing approximately 30 pounds onto a truck. The accident is being investigated by Engineering Division. Supercon is considering ways to avoid the need for manual lifting and they are also re- arranging their storage to reduce the risk of strains. While the weight lifted was within LBNL standards, other factors should be considered when planning a manual lift, such as individual capabilities, locations that could require awkward postures or twisting to execute a lift, whether the load is difficult to grasp, etc.

166

Minutes Ops mtg 120706  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

6, 2012 6, 2012 10:30 - 11:30 AM Minutes Attendees: Ken Barat, Thomas Schenkel, Peter Seidl, Pat Thomas, Herb Toor, Csaba Toth, Linnea Wahl, Weyland Wong 1. ES&H News and Lessons Learned: News: * Chemical and gas cylinder clean-outs - EHS is organizing some chemical and gas cylinder clean-out efforts this summer. If you have old "orphaned" gas cylinders from a previous vendor or damaged cylinders that you have been having difficulties getting picked up, please contact Pat Thomas so they can be included in the clean-out. EHS is planning to bring in a contractor that can pick up the unwanted cylinders. * Goats have arrived - The herd of goats has been seen grazing on dry grass and brush around the Lab to reduce fire risk. When the goats are

167

K Basins Sludge Treatment Project Phase 1  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

K Basins Sludge Treatment Project Phase 1 K Basins Sludge Treatment Project Phase 1 Technology Readiness Assessment Report Herb G. Sutter Michael Poirier Art W. Etchells Gary Smith Kris Thomas Jim J. Davis Paul Macbeth November 16, 2009 Prepared by the U.S. Department of Energy Washington, D.C. K Basins Sludge Treatment Project Phase 1 Technology Readiness Assessment Report November 16, 2009 ii Herbert G. Sutter, Team Lead Date Michael Poirier, Team Member Date Arthur W. Etchells, Team Member Date Gary Smith, Team Member Date Kris Thomas, Team Member Date Jim J. Davis, Team Member Date Paul Macbeth, Team Member Date Signatures 11/09/2009 11/09/2009 11/09/2009 K Basins Sludge Treatment Project Phase 1 Technology Readiness Assessment Report November 16, 2009

168

Fermilab Today  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

2, 2003 2, 2003 Calendar Thursday, October 2 2:30 pm Theoretical Physics Seminar - Curia II Speaker: D. Kosower, Centre d'Etudes de Saclay Title: Real Emission at NNLO 3:30 pm Director's Coffee Break - 2nd Flr X-Over THERE WILL BE NO ACCELERATOR PHYSICS AND TECHNOLOGY SEMINAR TODAY Friday, October 3 3:30 pm Wine & Cheese- 2nd Flr X-Over 4:00 pm Joint Experimental Theoretical Physics Seminar - 1 West Speaker: M. Chen, Queen's University Title: New Results from SNO with Enhanced Neutral Current Sensitivity Cafeteria Thursday, October 2 Old fashioned tomato soup Sauerbratten $4.75 Herb crusted chicken breast $3.50 Shaved ham & cheese $4.75 Monte Cristo $4.75 Turkey club salad $3.75 Sushi Eurest Dining Center Weekly Menu Chez Leon Weather Weather Sunny 50º/36º Extended Forecast

169

Cost of Fuel to General Electricity  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

of Fuel to Generate Electricity of Fuel to Generate Electricity Cost of Fuel to Generate Electricity Herb Emmrich Gas Demand Forecast, Economic Analysis & Tariffs Manager SCG/SDG&E SCG/SDG&E Federal Utility Partnership Working Group (FUPWG) 2009 Fall Meeting November 18, 2009 Ontario, California The Six Main Costs to Price Electricity are:  Capital costs - the cost of capital investment (debt & equity), depreciation, Federal & State income taxes and property taxes and property taxes  Fuel costs based on fuel used to generate electricity - hydro, natural gas, coal, fuel oil, wind, solar, photovoltaic geothermal biogas photovoltaic, geothermal, biogas  Operating and maintenance costs  Transmission costs  Distribution costs  Social adder costs - GHG adder, low income adder,

170

Strengthening the Loan Program | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Strengthening the Loan Program Strengthening the Loan Program Strengthening the Loan Program February 10, 2012 - 4:08pm Addthis Damien LaVera Damien LaVera Deputy Director, Office of Public Affairs Today, the White House issued its Independent Review on the health of the Department's clean energy loan portfolio. The following is Secretary Chu's statement thanking Herb Allison for his review: "I appreciate the work Mr. Allison and his team have done to review the health of our clean energy loan portfolio. I will carefully review the thorough, thoughtful recommendations Mr. Allison has put forward and find the best way to use them to further strengthen the program. "Mr. Allison's review rated the overall risk in the loan portfolio slightly lower than the Department itself projected and far less than the

171

Strengthening the Loan Program | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

the Loan Program the Loan Program Strengthening the Loan Program February 10, 2012 - 4:08pm Addthis Damien LaVera Damien LaVera Deputy Director, Office of Public Affairs Today, the White House issued its Independent Review on the health of the Department's clean energy loan portfolio. The following is Secretary Chu's statement thanking Herb Allison for his review: "I appreciate the work Mr. Allison and his team have done to review the health of our clean energy loan portfolio. I will carefully review the thorough, thoughtful recommendations Mr. Allison has put forward and find the best way to use them to further strengthen the program. "Mr. Allison's review rated the overall risk in the loan portfolio slightly lower than the Department itself projected and far less than the

172

The Committee met in Room 1E-246 of the Forrestal Building at  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

MEETING MEETING + + + + + THURSDAY NOVEMBER 19, 1998 The Committee met in Room 1E-246 of the Forrestal Building at the Department of Energy, 1000 Independence Avenue, S.W., Washington, D.C., at 8:30 a.m., Daniel A. Relles, Chair, presiding. PRESENT: DANIEL A. RELLES Chair CAROL GOTWAY CRAWFORD Vice Chair DAVID R. BELLHOUSE CHARLES W. BISCHOFF JAY BREIDT R. SAMPRIT CHATTERJEE JAMES HAMMITT GRETA M. LJUNG POLLY A. PHIPPS SEYMOUR SUDMAN ALSO PRESENT: ERIN BOEDECKER STEPHEN CALOPEDIS LYNDA CARLSON SAM COHEN JOHN COLLIGAN CATHY DIPPO STAN FREEDMAN DWIGHT FRENCH JAY HAKES MARY HUTZLER W. CALVIN KILGORE PERRY LINDSTROM HERB MILLER RENEE MILLER BETSY O'BRIEN LARRY PETTIS ARTHUR RYPINSKI HANK SATTLETHIGHT JOHN SHERWELL BILL WEINIG C O N T E N T S PAGE Welcome 5

173

Microsoft Word - Chu Final Testimony March 13.12  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Energy and Natural Resources Energy and Natural Resources United States Senate March 13, 2012 Chairman Bingaman, Ranking Member Murkowski, and Members of the Committee, thank you for the opportunity to discuss the Department of Energy's efforts to strengthen our loan programs and to grow America's clean energy economy. The Department's loan programs have been the subject of much public attention. As part of our commitment to being a responsible steward of public dollars, the Department has welcomed and cooperated with Congress' requests to discuss our loan portfolio. We also welcomed the independent review by Herb Allison, which we are here today to discuss. Mr. Allison was tasked with: 1) analyzing the current state of the loan and guaranteed loan portfolio under two Title XVII programs -- Section 1703, Section 1705 -- and the Advanced

174

Minutes Ops mtg 100711  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

October 7, 2011 October 7, 2011 10:30 - 11:30 AM Minutes Attendees: Gregg Penn, Tom McVeigh, Abdi Salehi, Tom Scarvie, Pat Thomas, Herb Toor, Csaba Toth 1. ES&H News and Lessons Learned: News: * Israel Tadesse is the new hazardous waste generator assistant for AFRD. Israel previously worked in the EHS radiation safety group. Maram Kassis remains as the supervisor of the generator assistants. * Mark Scott is the new electrical safety subject matter expert for Berkeley Lab. Keith Gershon has retired. * Ken Barat will be away from the Lab October 6-14 and Oct. 28-Nov. 4. Shawn Roe is his backup for laser safety. * There was a Town Hall meeting on October 7 regarding the proposed "Working Alone" policy. The final policy will appear in PUB-3000

175

Minutes Ops mtg 120601  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

, 2012 , 2012 10:30 - 11:30 AM Minutes Attendees: Ned Borglin, Marshall Granados, Prabir Roy, Abdi Salehi, Tom Scarvie, Thomas Schenkel, Peter Seidl, Pat Thomas, Herb Toor, Csaba Toth, Linnea Wahl, Marty White, Mike Wisherop, Weyland Wong 1. ES&H News and Lessons Learned: News: * New EHS Liaison - Linnea Wahl is the new EHS Liaison for General Sciences, including AFRD. Ned Borglin is Linnea's back-up when she is not available. Ken Barat will continue as the Laser Safety Officer until he retires. * Pat's Vacation - Pat Thomas will be on vacation June 8-24 and does not expect to be in email contact. If you have some urgent safety issues that cannot wait until June 25, please contact Pat now to get them started. Back-up people you can contact while Pat is away are:

176

Flora of the Mayacmas Mountains. [Listing of 679 species in the Geysers Geothermal Resource area  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This flora describes the plants that occur within the Mayacmas Mountain Range of northern California. It is the result of ten years of environmental assessment by the author in the Geysers Geothermal Resource area, located in the center of the Mayacmas Range. The flora includes notes on plant communities and ecology of the area, as well as habitat and collection data for most of the 679 species covered. Altogether 74 families, 299 genera and 679 species are included in the flora. The work is divided into eight subdivisions: trees; shrubs; ferns and fern allies; aquatic plants; tules, sedges, and rushes; lilies and related plants; dicot herbs; and grasses. Within each subdivision, family, genera and species are listed alphabetically. Keys are provided at the beginning of each subdivision. A unique combination of physical, environmental and geologic factors have resulted in a rich and diverse flora in the Mayacmas. Maps have been provided indicating known locations for species of rare or limited occurrence.

Neilson, J.A.

1981-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

177

Smoking, Drinking, and Income  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A growing literature identifies a beneficial effect of moderate and even heavy drinking on wages and a negative effect of smoking on wages. An outstanding issue is whether these results obtain because of a causal effect of substance use on wages or whether the observed correlations reflect the effects of income on consumption or other endogeneity problems. This paper presents full information estimates of the structural parameters of a simultaneous model of drinking and smoking status and income using repeated cross--section data. With all else in the system held constant, both smoking and drinking behaviour still have large effects on income, and the income elasticities of smoking and drinking are shown to be larger in magnitude when controlling for endogeneity. JEL Classification: I12 Keywords: alcohol, tobacco, simultaneous equations, maximum simulated likelihood, multinomial probit, limited dependent variables 1 I thank Cam Donaldson, Herb Emery, David Feeny, Chris Ferrall, Jon ...

Mingshan Lu; James Mackinnon; Ken Mckenzie; Harry Paarsche; Seminar Participants; M. Christopher Auld; M. Christopher Auld

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

178

Distribution and conservation significance of endemic species of flowering plants in Peru  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Abstract. Using the data published in the Catalogue of the Flowering Plants and Gymnosperms of Peru, we analyzed the elevational distributions of 5323 species reported as endemics from that country as a whole, for 10 families with the highest number of endemic taxa in Peru, and the distribution patterns of these species according to life form. We calculated the density of endemism (number of endemic species divided by area 1000) and absolute number of endemic species among life forms and families, along an elevational gradient. Overall densities of endemics were 1015 times higher at mid-elevation (2000 3500 m) than in the Amazonian lowlands (0500 m). Absolute numbers of endemics peaked at 1500 3000 m for herbs, shrubs, and epiphytes, while trees, vines, and lianas showed maxima in the lowlands (0500 m); yet densities of endemics for all life forms peaked at 15003000 m. Among the 10 families with the highest number of endemics, densities of endemics peaked at mid- to high elevation (1500 4500 m), but showed much disparity in the elevational distribution of absolute numbers of endemic species. Finally, the percentage of endemic species to total species is highest for herbs, shrubs, and epiphytes. Given that less than 10 % of the land area for each of the montane zones (20004500 m) is protected compared to 13.529.9 % in the lower elevations (01000 m), we recommend that priority be given to increasing the size of protected areas at mid- to high altitude in the Andean slopes to grant further protection in zones with the highest density of endemics. We also recommend that more emphasis be given to collecting and studying non-trees, since most endemic species belong to that class.

Henk Van; Der Werff; Trisha Consiglio

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

179

Habitat Evaluation Procedures (HEP) Report Wanaket Wildlife Area, Techical Report 2005-2006.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Regional HEP Team (RHT) and Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation (CTUIR) Wildlife Program staff conducted a follow-up habitat evaluation procedures (HEP) analysis on the Wanaket Wildlife Management Area in June 2005. The 2005 HEP investigation generated 3,084.48 habitat units (HUs) for a net increase of 752.18 HUs above 1990/1995 baseline survey results. The HU to acre ratio also increased from 0.84:1.0 to 1.16:1.0. The largest increase in habitat units occurred in the shrubsteppe/grassland cover type (California quail and western meadowlark models), which increased from 1,544 HUs to 2,777 HUs (+43%), while agriculture cover type HUs were eliminated because agricultural lands (managed pasture) were converted to shrubsteppe/grassland. In addition to the agriculture cover type, major changes in habitat structure occurred in the shrubsteppe/grassland cover type due to the 2001 wildfire which removed the shrub component from well over 95% of its former range. The number of acres of all other cover types remained relatively stable; however, habitat quality improved in the riparian herb and riparian shrub cover types. The number and type of HEP species models used during the 2005 HEP analysis were identical to those used in the 1990/1995 baseline HEP surveys. The number of species models employed to evaluate the shrubsteppe/grassland, sand/gravel/mud/cobble, and riparian herb cover types, however, were fewer than reported in the McNary Dam Loss Assessment (Rassmussen and Wright 1989) for the same cover types.

Ashley, Paul

2006-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

180

Foothills Parkway Section 8B Final Environmental Report, Volume 2, Appendices A-C  

SciTech Connect

In 1994, Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) was tasked by the National Park Service (NPS) to prepare an Environmental Report (ER) for Section 8B of the Foothills Parkway in the Great Smoky Mountains National Park (GSMNP). Section 8B represents 27.7 km (14.2 miles) of a total of 115 km (72 miles) of the planned Foothills Parkway and would connect the Cosby community on the east to the incorporated town of Pittman Center to the west. The major deliverables for the project are listed. From August 1995 through October 1996, NW, GSMNP, and ORNL staff interacted with Federal Highway Administration staff to develop a conceptual design plan for Section 8B with the intent of protecting critical resources identified during the ER process to the extent possible. In addition, ORNL arranged for bioengineering experts to discuss techniques that might be employed on Section 8B with NPS, GSMNP, and ORNL staff during September 1996. For the purposes of this EN there are two basic alternatives under consideration: (1) a build alternative and (2) a no-build alternative. Within the build alternative are a number of options including constructing Section 8B with no interchanges, constricting Section 8B with an interchange at SR 416 or U.S. 321, constructing Section 8B with a spur road on Webb Mountain, and considering operation of Section 8B both before and after the operation of Section 8C. The no-build alternative is considered the no-action alternative and is not to construct Section 8B. This volume of the ER, which consists of Appendices A, B, and C, assesses the potential geologic impacts of the proposed Section 8B construction, presents the results of the Section 8B soil survey, and describes the water quality studies and analyses performed for the ER. The following summary sections provide information for geology, soils, and water quality.

Blasing, T.J.; Cada, G.F.; Carer, M.; Chin, S.M.; Dickerman, J.A.; Etnier, D.A.; Gibson, R.; Harvey, M.; Hatcher, B.; Lietzske, D.; Mann, L.K.; Mulholland, P.J.; Petrich, C.H.; Pounds, L.; Ranney, J.; Reed, R.M.; Ryan, P.F.; Schweitzer, M.; Smith, D.; Thomason, P.; Wade, M.C.

1999-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "webb achp herb" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Experimental study of the air side performance of louver and wave fin-and-tube coils  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The present paper reports results from an investigation of the air side thermal performance of fin-and-tube coils with herringbone-wavy and convex-louver fins. The tube diameter of the tested coils was 12.7mm. Coils with different fin pitch and tube rows have been tested in order to determine their effect over the thermal performance. In addition, the performance of the convex-louver fins has been evaluated with respect to that of the wavy fins according to the Webb VG1 procedure. The collar diameter Reynolds number covered in the tests varied from 1000 to 6000, corresponding to face velocities of 1-6m/s. It has been found that the fin pitch affects lightly the heat transfer coefficient, its value being incremented of the order of 10% by reducing the fin pitch from 3.17mm to 1.81mm. Opposite trends have been found for the friction factor of wavy and louver fins regarding the effect of the fin pitch. The thermal performance is not affected by the number of tube rows in either of the fin configurations in coils for more than two rows. One and two row coils present non-negligible differences either with respect to the Colburn or friction factors. It has been found that area reductions in louver with respect to wavy fins can attain values of the order of 30% for Reynolds number of the order of 1000 and fin pitch of 3.17mm. (author)

Saiz Jabardo, J.M.; Salamanca, A. [Escuela Politecnica Superior, Universidad de la Coruna, Mendizabal s/n Esteiro, 15403 Ferrol, Coruna (Spain); Bastos Zoghbi Filho, J.R. [Departamento de Engenharia Mecanica, EESC, University of Sao Paulo, Av. Trabalhador Saocarlense 400 Centro, 13566-590 Sao Carlos, SP (Brazil)

2006-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

182

Spectrum and proper motion of a brown dwarf companion of the T Tauri star CoD-33 7795  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present optical and infrared spectra as well as the proper motion of an H=12 mag object 2" off the ~5 mag brighter spectroscopic binary star CoD-33 7795 (=TWA-5), a member of the TW Hya association of T Tauri stars at ~55 pc. It was suggested as companion candidate by Lowrance et al. (1999) and Webb et al. (1999), but neither a spectrum nor the proper motion of the faint object were available before. Our spectra taken with FORS2 and ISAAC at the ESO-VLT reveal that the companion candidate has spectral type M8.5 to M9. It shows strong H-alpha emission and weak Na I absorption, both indicative of a young age. The faint object is clearly detected and resolved in our optical and infrared images, with a FWHM of 0.18" in the FORS2 image. The faint object's proper motion, based on two year epoch difference, is consistent with the proper motion of CoD-33 7795 by 5 Gaussian sigma significance. From three different theoretical pre-main sequence models, we estimate the companion mass to be between ~15 and 40 M_jup, assuming the distance and age of the primary. A slight offset between the VLT and HST images with an epoch difference of two years can be interpreted as orbital motion. The probability for chance alignment of such a late-type object that close to CoD-33 7795 with the correct proper motion is below 7e-9. Hence, the faint object is physically associated with CoD-33 7795, the 4th brown dwarf companion around a normal star confirmed by both spectrum and proper motion, the first around a pre-main sequence star.

R. Neuhaeuser; E. W. Guenther; M. G. Petr; W. Brandner; N. Huelamo; J. Alves

2000-07-20T23:59:59.000Z

183

LUMINOUS SUPERNOVA-LIKE UV/OPTICAL/INFRARED TRANSIENTS ASSOCIATED WITH ULTRA-LONG GAMMA-RAY BURSTS FROM METAL-POOR BLUE SUPERGIANTS  

SciTech Connect

Metal-poor massive stars typically end their lives as blue supergiants (BSGs). Gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) from such progenitors could have an ultra-long duration of relativistic jets. For example, Population III (Pop III) GRBs at z {approx} 10-20 might be observable as X-ray-rich events with a typical duration of T{sub 90} {approx} 10{sup 4}(1 + z) s. The recent GRB111209A at z = 0.677 has an ultra-long duration of T{sub 90} {approx} 2.5 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 4} s and it has been suggested that its progenitor might have been a metal-poor BSG in the local universe. Here, we suggest that luminous UV/optical/infrared emission is associated with this new class of GRBs from metal-poor BSGs. Before the jet head breaks out of the progenitor envelope, the energy injected by the jet is stored in a hot plasma cocoon, which finally emerges and expands as a baryon-loaded fireball. We show that the photospheric emissions from the cocoon fireball could be intrinsically very bright (L{sub peak} {approx} 10{sup 42}-10{sup 44} erg s{sup -1}) in UV/optical bands ({epsilon}{sub peak} {approx} 10 eV) with a typical duration of {approx}100 days in the rest frame. Such cocoon emissions from Pop III GRBs might be detectable in infrared bands at {approx}years after Pop III GRBs at up to z {approx} 15 by upcoming facilities such as the James Webb Space Telescope. We also suggest that GRB111209A might have been rebrightening in UV/optical bands up to an AB magnitude of {approx}< 26. The cocoon emission from local metal-poor BSGs might have been observed previously as luminous supernovae without GRBs since they can be seen from the off-axis direction of the jet.

Kashiyama, Kazumi; Yajima, Hidenobu [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA 16802 (United States); Nakauchi, Daisuke; Nakamura, Takashi [Department of Physics, Kyoto University, Oiwake-cho, Kitashirakawa, Sakyo-ku, Kyoto 606-8502 (Japan); Suwa, Yudai, E-mail: kzk15@psu.edu [Yukawa Institute for Theoretical Physics, Kyoto University, Oiwake-cho, Kitashirakawa, Sakyo-ku, Kyoto 606-8502 (Japan)

2013-06-10T23:59:59.000Z

184

Preliminary Design of The Wide-Field Infrared Survey Explorer (WISE)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer (WISE), a NASA MIDEX mission, will survey the entire sky in four bands from 3.3 to 23 microns with a sensitivity 1000 times greater than the IRAS survey. The WISE survey will extend the Two Micron All Sky Survey into the thermal infrared and will provide an important catalog for the James Webb Space Telescope. Using 1024x1024 HgCdTe and Si:As arrays at 3.3, 4.7, 12 and 23 microns, WISE will find the most luminous galaxies in the universe, the closest stars to the Sun, and it will detect most of the main belt asteroids larger than 3 km. The single WISE instrument consists of a 40 cm diamond-turned aluminum afocal telescope, a two-stage solid hydrogen cryostat, a scan mirror mechanism, and reimaging optics giving 5" resolution (full-width-half-maximum). The use of dichroics and beamsplitters allows four color images of a 47'x47' field of view to be taken every 8.8 seconds, synchronized with the orbital motion to provide total sky coverage with overlap between revolutions. WISE will be placed into a Sun-synchronous polar orbit on a Delta 7320-10 launch vehicle. The WISE survey approach is simple and efficient. The three-axis-stabilized spacecraft rotates at a constant rate while the scan mirror freezes the telescope line of sight during each exposure. WISE is currently in its Preliminary Design Phase, with the mission Preliminary Design Review scheduled for July, 2005. WISE is scheduled to launch in mid 2009; the project web site can be found at www.wise.ssl.berkeley.edu.

A. K. Mainzer; P. Eisenhardt; E. L. Wright; F. Liu; W. Irace; I. Heinrichsen; R. Cutri; V. Duval

2005-08-10T23:59:59.000Z

185

LBNL Campus Map Final  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

C C A L IF O R N IA G O L D E N B E A R S ⌬⌲⌭ ⌺〈⌭ ⌺⌵ ⌮⌿ Sherman Davis A r d e n Faculty Glade P P H H H H H H P P H S P L L L L O O O O O O O O O O O O O S O S O O L L L L L Mather Redwood Grove Californian North American Meso- American Garden of Old Roses Mediterranean/ European Miocene Sequoia Forest Western Herbs Chinese Herbs Australian Asian New World Desert South American African Palms & Cycads LeRoy Ave La Loma Ave Highland Pl Bancroft Way G a y le y R d S t a d i u m R i m W a y C a n y o n R d M o s s w o o d R d C e n te nn ia l D r C e n t e n n ia l D r C y c l o t r o n R d Un ive rs ity S o u th D r Piedm on t Av e C a l v in R d G la s e r R d M c M il la n R d C h a m b e r l a i n R d A l v a r e z R d 88 65 50A 50 50B 70A 70 54 6 7 17 27 53 52 16 14 4 5 25 45 48 37 80 10 2 29 58 47 51 64 63 60 81 82 55 56 90 71 46 26 76 78 75 75A 75B 69 77 79 77A 31 72 Strawberry Entrance Grizzly Peak Entrance National Center for Electron Microscopy 66 62 73 83 85B 84 Human Genome Laboratory 85 74 Lawrence Berkeley

186

Foothills Parkway Section 8B Final Environmental Report, Volume 3, Appendix D  

SciTech Connect

In 1994, Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) was tasked by the National Park Service (NPS) to prepare an Environmental Report (ER) for Section 8B of the Foothills Parkway in the Great Smoky Mountains National Park (GSMNP). Section 8B represents 27.7 km (14.2 miles) of a total of 115 km (72 miles) of the planned Foothills Parkway and would connect the Cosby community on the east to the incorporated town of Pittman Center to the west. The major deliverables for the project are listed. From August 1995 through October 1996, NPS, GSMNP, and ORNL staff interacted with Federal Highway Administration staff to develop a conceptual design plan for Section 8B with the intent of protecting critical resources identified during the ER process to the extent possible. In addition, ORNL arranged for bioengineering experts to discuss techniques that might be employed on Section 8B with NPS, GSMNP, and ORNL staff during September 1996. For the purposes of this ER, there are two basic alternatives under consideration: (1) a build alternative and (2) a no-build alternative. Within the build alternative are a number of options including constructing Section 8B with no interchanges, constructing Section 8B with an interchange at SR416 or U.S. 321, constructing Section 8B with a spur road on Webb Mountain, and considering operation of Section 8B both before and after the operation of Section 8C. The no-build alternative is considered the no-action alternative and is not to construct Section 8B. This volume of the ER inventories the fishes and benthic macroinvertebrates inhabiting the aquatic ecosystems potentially affected by the proposed construction of Section 8B. Stream biological surveys were completed at 31 stream sites during the Fall of 1994. The sampling strategy for both invertebrates and fish was to survey the different taxa from all available habitats. For benthic invertebrates, a standardized qualitative manual collection technique was employed for all 31 stations. For fish, all streams of sufficient water were sampled using various methods of electroshocking. Two listed species were identified during the surveys: the Allegheny snaketail dragonfly (formerly a C2 federal candidate species found at six of the stream survey sites) and the tangerine darter (a Tennessee state special concern species found at two of the stream survey sites).

Blasing, T.J.; Cada, G.F.; Carer, M.; Chin, S.M.; Dickerman, J.A.; Etnier, D.A.; Gibson, R.; Harvey, M.; Hatcher, B.; Lietzske, D.; Mann, L.K.; Mulholland, P.J.; Petrich, C.H.; Pounds, L.; Ranney, J.; Reed, R.M.; Ryan, P.F.; Schweitzer, M.; Smith, D.; Thomason, P.; Wade, M.C.

1999-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

187

Foothills Parkway Section 8B Final Environmental Report, Volume 6, Appendix N  

SciTech Connect

In 1994, Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) was tasked by the National Park Service (NPS) to prepare an Environmental Report (ER) for Section 8B of the Foothills Parkway in the Great Smoky Mountains National Park (GSMNP). Section 8B represents 27.7 km (14.2 miles) of a total of 115 km (72 miles) of the planned Foothills Parkway and would connect the Cosby community on the east to the incorporated town of Pittman Center to the west. The major deliverables for the project are listed. From August 1995 through October 1996, NPS, GSMNP, and ORNL staff interacted with Federal Highway Administration staff to develop a conceptual design plan for Section 8B with the intent of protecting critical resources identified during the ER process to the extent possible. In addition, ORNL arranged for bioengineering experts to discuss techniques that might be employed on Section 8B with NPS, GSMNP, and ORNL staff during September 1996. For the purposes of this ER, there are two basic alternatives under consideration: (1) a build alternative and (2) a no-build alternative. Within the build alternative are a number of options including constructing Section 8B with no interchanges, constructing Section 8B with an interchange at SR 416 or U.S. 321, constructing Section 8B with a spur road on Webb Mountain, and considering operation of Section 8B both before and after the operation of Section 8C. The no-build alternative is considered the no-action alternative and is not to construct Section 8B. This volume of the ER documents the results of the architectural, historical, and cultural resources assessment for the entire Section 8B ROW that was completed in May 1995 to document the architectural, historical, and cultural resources located within the project area. The assessment included evaluation of the potential for cultural (i.e., rural historic) landscapes in the area of the ROW. The assessment showed that one National Register-listed property is located 0.3 mile south of the ROW, and seven properties appear to meet National Register criteria. For six of these seven sites, no audible or visual effects were predicted to result from the construction and operation of the build alternatives of Section 8B. Three areas were evaluated to determine if they could be considered rural historic landscapes: the Cosby Valley, Pittman Center, and Rocky Flats. None of these landscapes met National Register criteria for rural historic landscapes.

Blasing, T.J.; Cada, G.F.; Carer, M.; Chin, S.M.; Dickerman, J.A.; Etnier, D.A.; Gibson, R.; Harvey, M.; Hatcher, B.; Lietzske, D.; Mann, L.K.; Mulholland, P.J.; Petrich, C.H.; Pounds, L.; Ranney, J.; Reed, R.M.; Ryan, P.F.; Schweitzer, M.; Smith, D.; Thomason, P.; Wade, M.C.

1999-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

188

Housing Diversity and Consolidation in Low-Income Colonias: Patterns of House Form and Household Arrangements in Colonias of the US-Mexico Border  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Colonias are low-income settlements on the US-Mexico border characterized by poor infrastructure, minimum services, and an active housing construction with a high self-help and self-management component. Housing in colonias is very diverse showing house forms that include temporary and permanent structures, campers, trailers or manufactured houses and conventional homes. Most of this housing does not meet construction standards and codes and is considered substandard. Colonias households are also of diverse nature and composition including single households, nuclear and extended families, as well as multiple households sharing lots. This wide variety of house forms and households in colonias fits poorly within the nuclear household, single family detached housing idealized by conventional low-income housing projects, programs and policies. As a result, colonias marginally benefit from the resources available to them and continue to depend mostly on the individual efforts of their inhabitants. This research identifies the housing diversity and the process of housing consolidation in colonias of the US-Mexico border by looking at the patterns of house form and household arrangements in colonias of South Texas. Ten colonias located to the east of the city of Laredo along Highway 359 in Webb County, Texas were selected based on their characteristics, data availability and accessibility. Data collected included periodic aerial images of the colonias spanning a period of 28 years, household information from the 2000 census disaggregated at the block level for these colonias, and information from a field survey and a semi structured interview made to a random sample of 123 households between February and June 2007. The survey collected information about house form and household characteristics. The survey also incorporated descriptive accounts on how households completed their house from the initial structure built or set on the lot until the current house form. Data was compiled and analyzed using simple statistical methods looking for identifiable patterns on house form and household characteristics and changes over time. Findings showed that housing in colonias is built and consolidated following identifiable patterns of successive changes to the house form. Findings also showed that households in colonias share characteristics that change over time in similar ways. These results suggest similarities of colonias with extra-legal settlements in other developing areas. Based on these findings, the study reflects on possible considerations that could improve the impact of projects, programs and policies directed to support colonias and improve colonias housing.

Reimers-Arias, Carlos Alberto

2009-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

189

PROBING PRE-GALACTIC METAL ENRICHMENT WITH HIGH-REDSHIFT GAMMA-RAY BURSTS  

SciTech Connect

We explore high-redshift gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) as promising tools to probe pre-galactic metal enrichment. We utilize the bright afterglow of a Population III (Pop III) GRB exploding in a primordial dwarf galaxy as a luminous background source, and calculate the strength of metal absorption lines that are imprinted by the first heavy elements in the intergalactic medium (IGM). To derive the GRB absorption line diagnostics, we use an existing highly resolved simulation of the formation of a first galaxy which is characterized by the onset of atomic hydrogen cooling in a halo with virial temperature {approx}> 10{sup 4} K. We explore the unusual circumburst environment inside the systems that hosted Pop III stars, modeling the density evolution with the self-similar solution for a champagne flow. For minihalos close to the cooling threshold, the circumburst density is roughly proportional to (1 + z) with values of about a few cm{sup -3}. In more massive halos, corresponding to the first galaxies, the density may be larger, n {approx}> 100 cm{sup -3}. The resulting afterglow fluxes are weakly dependent on redshift at a fixed observed time, and may be detectable with the James Webb Space Telescope and Very Large Array in the near-IR and radio wavebands, respectively, out to redshift z {approx}> 20. We predict that the maximum of the afterglow emission shifts from near-IR to millimeter bands with peak fluxes from mJy to Jy at different observed times. The metal absorption line signature is expected to be detectable in the near future. GRBs are ideal tools for probing the metal enrichment in the early IGM, due to their high luminosities and featureless power-law spectra. The metals in the first galaxies produced by the first supernova (SN) explosions are likely to reside in low-ionization stages (C II, O I, Si II and Fe II). We show that, if the afterglow can be observed sufficiently early, analysis of the metal lines may distinguish whether the first heavy elements were produced in a pair-instability supernova or a core-collapse (Type II) SN, thus constraining the initial mass function of the first stars.

Wang, F. Y.; Dai, Z. G. [School of Astronomy and Space Science, Nanjing University, Nanjing 210093 (China); Bromm, Volker [Department of Astronomy, University of Texas at Austin, Austin, TX 78712 (United States); Greif, Thomas H. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Astrophysik, Karl-Schwarzschild-Strasse 1, D-85740 Garching bei Muenchen (Germany); Stacy, Athena [NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States); Loeb, Abraham [Astronomy Department, Harvard University, 60 Garden St., Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Cheng, K. S. [Department of Physics, University of Hong Kong, Pokfulam Road (Hong Kong)

2012-11-20T23:59:59.000Z

190

Medicinal Plants  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Medicinal Plants Medicinal Plants Nature Bulletin No. 187 April 11, 1981 Forest Preserve District of Cook County George W. Dunne, President Roland F. Eisenbeis, Supt. of Conservation MEDICINAL PLANTS In springtime, many years ago, grandma made her family drink gallons of tea made by boiling roots of the sassafras. That was supposed to thin and purify the blood. Children were sent out to gather dandelion, curly dock, wild mustard, pokeberry and other greens as soon as they appeared -- not only because they added welcome variety to the diet of bread, meat, potatoes and gravy, but because some of them were also laxatives. For a bad "cold on the lungs," she slapped a mustard plaster on the patient's back, and on his chest she put a square of red flannel soaked in goose grease. For whooping cough she used a syrup of red clover blossoms. She made cough medicine from the bloodroot plant, and a tea from the compass plant of the prairies was also used for fevers and coughs. She made a pleasant tea from the blossoms of the linden or basswood tree. For stomach aches she used tea from any of several aromatic herbs such as catnip, fennel, yarrow, peppermint, spearmint, sweetflag, wild ginger, bergamot and splice bush.

191

NEWTON, Ask a Scientist at Argonne National Labs  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Seed Numbers Seed Numbers Name: Dan Status: student Grade: n/a Location: N/A Country: USA Date: Summer 2011 Question: Why do some seed plants produce numerous seeds, while others just one? Replies: Hi Dan, When a plant produces seed, the purpose is to carry on the species - to produce more plants. The strategy employed by the plant will vary depending on the environment in which the plant has developed, but in the main there are two main strategies which I categorize in my head as "Special Care" and "Safety in Numbers". "Safety In Numbers" is how the dandelion chooses to tackle the problem. It produces huge numbers of seeds, and does very little to help those seeds other than to make sure they get away from the parent plant (That's trhe job of the parachute) Other plants which use this strategy include most herbs such as mint, borage, dill where the seeds are very small, and are produced in huge numbers.

192

The Mint Family  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Mint Family Mint Family Nature Bulletin No. 432-A November 6, 1971 Forest Preserve District of Cook County George W. Dunne, President Roland F. Eisenbeis, Supt. of Conservation THE MINT FAMILY The Mint Family, in addition to the true mints -- such as Spearmint used in flavoring chewing gum and the mint sauce traditionally served with roast lamb -- contains over 3000 species. Almost all of them are plants with square stems and opposite pairs or whorls of leaves at intervals along the stems. Most of them have a distinctive fragrant or pungent odor, due to volatile oils contained in glands or sacs in the leaves and other parts. Through the ages, the mints have been variously used by man for medicinal purposes and flavorings. Lavender, rosemary and patchouli are perfumes obtained from members of this family. The lemon-scented leaves of Bergamot, one of the true mints, furnish a fragrant oil also used in perfumes. A surprising number of the savories or kitchen herbs used in cooking are plants belonging to this aromatic tribe: sage, thyme, germander, marjoram, the basils, summer savory and hyssop.

193

Banana Trees  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Banana Trees Banana Trees Name: Adele Location: N/A Country: N/A Date: N/A Question: Why do Banana trees grow bananas?? I've been asked this question and no-one I know can provide an answer! Bananas do not have seeds in them to reproduce the tree (e.g you can grow a lemon tree from the seeds in the fruit but not a banana tree from a banana) What evolutionary justification is there for a banana tree to bear fruit? Replies: Hi Adele! you are right, one cannot seed a banana tree, still that kind of vegetal is reproduced and grows... As many other plants they have an asexual reproduction, where the new plants are identical in every respect to the parent plant.The asexual reproduction involves no union of cells or nuclei of cells, there are not mingling of genetic traits. Banana plant is a gigantic herb that grows from an under- ground stem ( rhizome),and forms a false trunk with leaves. There emerges a large flower spike, with numerous individual flowers, that bends downward to become fruits. After the plants had fruits, they die and are replaced by others that arise from the underground stem, and that process can keep on going for many years. Right?

194

Restoring a disappearing ecosystem: the Longleaf Pine Savanna.  

SciTech Connect

Longleaf pine (Pinus palustris) savannas of the southeastern United States contain some of the worlds most diverse plant communities, along with a unique complement of wildlife. Their traditionally open canopy structure and rich understory of grasses and herbs were critical to their vigor. However, a long history of land-use practices such as logging, farming, and fire exclusion have reduced this once-widespread ecosystem to only 3 percent of its original range. At six longleaf pine plantations in South Carolina, Tim Harrington with the Pacific Northwest Research Station and collaborators with the Southern Research Station used various treatments (including prescribed burns, tree thinning, and herbicide applications) to alter the forest structure and tracked how successful each one was in advancing savanna restoration over a 14-year period. They found that typical planting densities for wood production in plantations create dense understory shade that excludes many native herbaceous species important to savannas and associated wildlife. The scientists found that although tree thinning alone did not result in sustained gains, a combination of controlled burning, thinning, and herbicide treatments to reduce woody plants was an effective strategy for recovering the savanna ecosystem. The scientists also found that these efforts must be repeated periodically for enduring benefits.

Harrington, Timothy B. [USFS; Miller, Karl V. [University of Georgia; Park, Noreen

2013-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

195

Pipeline corridors through wetlands - impacts on plant communities: Bayou Grand Cane, De Soto Parish, Louisiana. Topical report, August 1991--July 1993  

SciTech Connect

The goal of the Gas Research Institute Wetland Corridors Program is to document impacts of existing pipeline on the wetlands they traverse. To accomplish this goal, 12 existing wetland crossings were surveyed. These sites varied in elapsed time since pipeline construction, wetland type, pipeline installation techniques, and night of-way (ROW) management practices. This report presents the results of a survey conducted over the period of August 12-13, 1991, at the Bayou Grand Cane crossing in De Soto Parish, Louisiana, where a pipeline constructed three years prior to the survey crosses the bayou through mature bottomland hardwoods. The sit was not seeded or fertilized after construction activities. At the time of sampling, a dense herb stratum (composed of mostly native species) covered the 20-m-wide ROW, except within drainage channels. As a result of the creation of the ROW, new habitat was created, plant diversity increased, and forest habitat became fragmented. The ROW must be maintained at an early stage of succession to allow access to the pipeline however, impacts to the wetland were minimized by decreasing the width of the ROW to 20 m and recreating the drainage channels across the ROW. The canopy trees on the ROW`s edge shaded part of the ROW, which helped to minimize the effects of the ROW.

Shem, L.M.; Zimmerman, R.E.; Hayes, D. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States); Van Dyke, G.D. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States)]|[Trinity Christian College, Palos Heights, IL (United States)

1994-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

196

Puerariae radix isoflavones and their metabolites inhibit growth and induce apoptosis in breast cancer cells  

SciTech Connect

Puerariae radix (PR) is a popular natural herb and a traditional food in Asia, which has antithrombotic and anti-allergic properties and stimulates estrogenic activity. In the present study, we investigated the effects of the PR isoflavones puerarin, daidzein, and genistein on the growth of breast cancer cells. Our data revealed that after treatment with PR isoflavones, a dose-dependent inhibition of cell growth occurred in HS578T, MDA-MB-231, and MCF-7 cell lines. Results from cell cycle distribution and apoptosis assays revealed that PR isoflavones induced cell apoptosis through a caspase-3-dependent pathway and mediated cell cycle arrest in the G2/M phase. Furthermore, we observed that the serum metabolites of PR (daidzein sulfates/glucuronides) inhibited proliferation of the breast cancer cells at a 50% cell growth inhibition (GI{sub 50}) concentration of 2.35 {mu}M. These results indicate that the daidzein constituent of PR can be metabolized to daidzein sulfates or daidzein glucuronides that exhibit anticancer activities. The protein expression levels of the active forms of caspase-9 and Bax in breast cancer cells were significantly increased by treatment with PR metabolites. These metabolites also increased the protein expression levels of p53 and p21. We therefore suggest that PR may act as a chemopreventive and/or chemotherapeutic agent against breast cancer by reducing cell viability and inducing apoptosis.

Lin, Y.-J. [Department of Medical Genetics and Medical Research, China Medical University Hospital, No. 2 Yuh-Der Road, Taichung, Taiwan (China); Department of Biotechnology, Asia University, Taichung, Taiwan (China); Graduate Institute of Chinese Medical Science, China Medical University, Taichung, Taiwan (China); Hou, Y.C. [School of Pharmacy, China Medical University, Taichung, Taiwan (China); Lin, C.-H.; Hsu, Y.-A. [Department of Life Science, National Tsing Hua University, HsinChu, Taiwan (China); Sheu, Jim J.C. [Graduate Institute of Chinese Medical Science, China Medical University, Taichung, Taiwan (China); Lai, C.-H. [Department of Microbiology, School of Medicine, China Medical University, Taichung, Taiwan (China); Chen, B.-H. [Faculty of Biotechnology, Kaohsiung Medical University, Kaohsiung, Taiwan (China); Lee Chao, Pei-Dawn [School of Pharmacy, China Medical University, Taichung, Taiwan (China); Wan Lei [Department of Medical Genetics and Medical Research, China Medical University Hospital, No. 2 Yuh-Der Road, Taichung, Taiwan (China); Department of Biotechnology, Asia University, Taichung, Taiwan (China); Graduate Institute of Chinese Medical Science, China Medical University, Taichung, Taiwan (China)], E-mail: leiwan@mail.cmuh.org.tw; Tsai, F.-J. [Department of Medical Genetics and Medical Research, China Medical University Hospital, No. 2 Yuh-Der Road, Taichung, Taiwan (China); Department of Biotechnology, Asia University, Taichung, Taiwan (China); Graduate Institute of Chinese Medical Science, China Medical University, Taichung, Taiwan (China)], E-mail: d0704@mail.cmuh.org.tw

2009-01-23T23:59:59.000Z

197

Apples and Other Fruits of the Rose Family  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Apples and Other Fruits of the Rose Family Apples and Other Fruits of the Rose Family Nature Bulletin No. 277-A October 7, 1967 Forest Preserve District of Cook County Richard B. Ogilvie, President Roland F. Eisenbeis, Supt. of Conservation APPLES AND OTHER FRUITS OF THE ROSE FAMILY Bread, meat and potatoes, with vegetables and green salads, may satisfy the inner man and keep us healthy but much of the fun of eating is provided by the rose family. The rose, itself, is the flower of chivalry and love but its relative, the apple, king of the fruits, has been cultivated since prehistoric times. The members of the Rose Family give us more pleasure than we get from any other group of plants. Apples, quinces, pears, peaches, plums, apricots, cherries, blackberries, raspberries and strawberries -- whether wild or cultivated -- are all relatives of the roses. Their fruits, raw or cooked, give us desserts, pleasant drinks, and many a between-meal delicacy. Typically, they have showy flowers with five equal petals arranged around a central cup bearing one or more fruit-forming pistils and a large number of pollen-bearing stamens. Their leaves are placed alternately on the twigs or stalks -- some of them simple leaves; some of them compound leaves divided into three, five or more leaflets like the rose itself. Some are trees, some are shrubs, and some are vining herbs.

198

Dual mechanisms of NF-kappaB inhibition in carnosol-treated endothelial cells  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The increased adhesion of monocytes to injured endothelial layers is a critical early event in atherogenesis. Under inflammatory conditions, there is increased expression of specific cell adhesion molecules on activated vascular endothelial cells, which increases monocyte adhesion. In our current study, we demonstrate a putative mechanism for the anti-inflammatory effects of carnosol, a diterpene derived from the herb rosemary. Our results show that both carnosol and rosemary essential oils inhibit the adhesion of TNFalpha-induced monocytes to endothelial cells and suppress the expression of ICAM-1 at the transcriptional level. Moreover, carnosol was found to exert its inhibitory effects by blocking the degradation of the inhibitory protein IkappaBalpha in short term pretreatments but not in 12 h pretreatments. Our data show that carnosol reduces IKK-beta phosphorylation in pretreatments of less than 3 h. In TNFalpha-treated ECs, NF-kappaB nuclear translocation and transcriptional activity was abolished by up to 12 h of carnosol pretreatment and this was blocked by Nrf-2 siRNA. The long-term inhibitory effects of carnosol thus appear to be mediated through its induction of Nrf-2-related genes. The inhibition of ICAM-1 expression and p65 translocation is reversed by HO-1 siRNA. Carnosol also upregulates the Nrf-2-related glutathione synthase gene and thereby increases the GSH levels after 9 h of exposure. Treating ECs with a GSH synthesis inhibitor, BSO, blocks the inhibitory effects of carnosol. In addition, carnosol increases p65 glutathionylation. Hence, our present findings indicate that carnosol suppresses TNFalpha-induced singling pathways through the inhibition of IKK-beta activity or the upregulation of HO-1 expression. The resulting GSH levels are dependent, however, on the length of the carnosol pretreatment period.

Lian, K.-C.; Chuang, J.-J.; Hsieh, C.-W. [Department of Microbiology and Immunology, National Chiayi University, Chiayi, Taiwan (China); Wung, B.-S., E-mail: bswung@mail.ncyu.edu.t [Department of Microbiology and Immunology, National Chiayi University, Chiayi, Taiwan (China); Huang, G.-D.; Jian, T.-Y. [Department of Microbiology and Immunology, National Chiayi University, Chiayi, Taiwan (China); Sun, Y.-W. [Department of Biotechnology, Seed Improvement and Propagation Station, Taichung, Taiwan (China)

2010-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

199

Quantifying biological integrity of California sage scrub communities using plant life-form cover.  

SciTech Connect

The California sage scrub (CSS) community type in California's Mediterranean-type ecosystems supports a large number of rare, threatened, and endangered species, and is critically degraded and endangered. Monitoring ecological variables that provide information about community integrity is vital to conserving these biologically diverse communities. Fractional cover of true shrub, subshrub, herbaceous vegetation, and bare ground should fill information gaps between generalized vegetation type maps and detailed field-based plot measurements of species composition and provide an effective means for quantifying CSS community integrity. Remote sensing is the only tool available for estimating spatially comprehensive fractional cover over large extent, and fractional cover of plant life-form types is one of the measures of vegetation state that is most amenable to remote sensing. The use of remote sensing does not eliminate the need for either field surveying or vegetation type mapping; rather it will likely require a combination of approaches to reliably estimate life-form cover and to provide comprehensive information for communities. According to our review and synthesis, life-form fractional cover has strong potential for providing ecologically meaningful intermediate-scale information, which is unattainable from vegetation type maps and species-level field measurements. Thus, we strongly recommend incorporating fractional cover of true shrub, subshrub, herb, and bare ground in CSS community monitoring methods. Estimating life-form cover at a 25 m x 25 m spatial scale using remote sensing would be an appropriate approach for initial implementation. Investigation of remote sensing techniques and an appropriate spatial scale; collaboration of resource managers, biologists, and remote sensing specialists, and refinement of protocols are essential for integrating life-form fractional cover mapping into strategies for sustainable long-term CSS community management.

Hamada, Y.; Stow, D. A.; Franklin, J. (Environmental Science Division); (San Diego State University, Department of Geography); (Arizona State University, School of Geographical Sciences and Urban Planning)

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

200

Mechanical Properties of Gels; Stress from Confined Fluids  

SciTech Connect

Abstract for Grant DE-FG02-97ER45642 Period: 1997-2002 Mechanical Properties of Gels 2002-2008 Stress from Confined Fluids Principal investigator: Prof. George W. Scherer Dept. Civil & Env. Eng./PRISM Eng. Quad. E-319 Princeton, NJ 08544 USA Recipient organization: Trustees of Princeton University 4 New South Princeton, NJ 08544 USA Abstract: The initial stage of this project, entitled Mechanical Properties of Gels, was dedicated to characterizing and explaining the properties of inorganic gels. Such materials, made by sol-gel processing, are of interest for fabrication of films, fibers, optical devices, advanced insulation and other uses. However, their poor mechanical properties are an impediment in some applications, so understanding the origin of these properties could lead to enhanced performance. Novel experimental methods were developed and applied to measure the stiffness and permeability of gels and aerogels. Numerical simulations were developed to reproduce the growth process of the gels, resulting in structures whose mechanical properties matched the measurements. The models showed that the gels are formed by the growth of relatively robust clusters of molecules that are joined by tenuous links whose compliance compromises the stiffness of the structure. Therefore, synthetic methods that enhance the links could significantly increase the rigidity of such gels. The next stage of the project focused on Stress from Confined Fluids. The first problem of interest was the enhanced thermal expansion coefficient of water that we measured in the nanometric pores of cement paste. This could have a deleterious effect on the resistance of concrete to rapid heating in fires, because the excessive thermal expansion of water in the pores of the concrete could lead to spalling and collapse. A series of experiments demonstrated that the expansion of water increases as the pore size decreases. To explain this behavior, we undertook a collaboration with Prof. Stephen Garofalini (Rutgers), who has developed the best simulations of water ever reported by use of molecular dynamics. Simulated heating of water in small pores provided quantitative agreement with experiments, and showed that the origin of the high expansion is the altered structure of water in the first two molecular layers adjacent to the pore wall. The final focus of the project was to understand the damage done by crystals growing in small pores. For example, the primary cause of damage to ancient monuments in the Mediterranean Basin is growth of salt crystals in the pores of the stone. Salt may enter stone as a result of capillary rise of groundwater, by leaching of mortar joints, deposition of marine spray, or reactions with atmospheric pollutants (such as oxides of nitrogen or sulfur). As the water evaporates, the salt solution becomes supersaturated and crystals precipitate. Stress results, because the salt usually repels the minerals in the pore walls. Our goal was to identify the factors contributing to the repulsion, so that we could develop a chemical treatment to reduce the repulsion and hence the stress. (We have recently demonstrated an effective treatment as part of a separately funded study.) In collaboration with Prof. Garofalini, molecular dynamics simulations have been done that correctly reproduce the structure of water around dissolved ions of sodium and chloride. We simulated the interaction between crystals of sodium chloride and quartz, and found that this particular system exhibits attractive forces, in agreement with experiment. The origin of the attraction is the orientation of dipolar water molecules near the surfaces of the crystals. Similar calculations now must be done in systems, such as potassium chloride and quartz, where the interaction is repulsive. This grant supported the education of two doctoral students, Hang-Shing Ma (Ph.D., 2002) and Melanie Webb (Ph.D. expected 2010), three post-doctoral researchers, Joachim Gross, Gudrun Reichenauer, and Shuangyan (Sonia) Xu, and five undergraduates (for senior theses or independent projects

George W. Scherer

2009-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "webb achp herb" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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201

Adsorption of Pure Methane, Nitrogen, and Carbon Dioxide and Their Mixtures on San Juan Basin Coal  

SciTech Connect

The major objectives of this project were to (a) measure the adsorption behavior of pure methane, nitrogen, CO{sub 2} and their binary and ternary mixtures on wet Tiffany coal at 130 F and pressures to 2000 psia; (b) correlate the equilibrium adsorption isotherm data using the extended Langmuir model, the Langmuir model, the loading ratio correlation and the Zhou-Gasem-Robinson equation of state; and (c) establish sorption-time estimates for the pure components. Specific accomplishments are summarized below regarding the complementary tasks involving experimental work and data correlation. Representative coal samples from BP Amoco Tiffany Injection Wells No.1 and No.10 were prepared, as requested. The equilibrium moisture content and particle size distribution of each coal sample were determined. Compositional coal analyses for both samples were performed by Huffman Laboratories, Inc. Pure gas adsorption for methane on wet Tiffany coal samples from Injection Wells No.1 and No.10 was measured separately at 130 F (327.6 K) and pressures to 2000 psia (13.7 MPa). The average expected uncertainty in these data is about 3% (9 SCF/ton). Our measurements indicate that the adsorption isotherms of the two coal samples exhibit similar Langmuir-type behavior. For the samples from the two wells, a maximum variation of about 5% in the amount adsorbed is observed at 2000 psia. Gas adsorption isotherms were measured for pure methane, nitrogen and CO{sub 2} on a wet, mixed Tiffany coal sample. The coal sample was an equal-mass mixture of coals from Well No.1 and Well No.10. The adsorption measurements were conducted at 130 F at pressures to 2000 psia. The adsorption isotherms have average expected experimental uncertainties of 3% (9 SCF/ton), 6% (8 SCF/ton), and 7% (62 SCF/ton) for methane, nitrogen, and CO{sub 2}, respectively. Adsorption isotherms were measured for methane/nitrogen, methane/CO{sub 2} and nitrogen/CO{sub 2} binary mixtures on wet, mixed Tiffany coal at 130 F and pressures to 2000 psia. These measurements were conducted for a single molar feed composition for each mixture. The expected uncertainties in the amount adsorbed for these binary mixtures vary with pressure and composition. In general, average uncertainties are about 5% (19 SCF/ton) for the total adsorption; however, the expected uncertainties in the amount of individual-component adsorption are significantly higher for the less-adsorbed gas at lower molar feed concentrations (e.g., nitrogen in the 20/80 nitrogen/CO{sub 2} system). Adsorption isotherms were measured for a single methane/nitrogen/CO{sub 2} ternary mixture on wet, mixed Tiffany coal at 130 F and pressures to 2000 psia. The nominal molar feed composition was 10/40/50. The average expected uncertainty for the total adsorption and CO{sub 2} adsorption is about 5% (16 SCF/ton). However, the low adsorption of nitrogen and methane in this ternary yield average experimental uncertainties of 14% (9 SCF/ton) and 27% (9 SCF/ton), respectively. Limited binary and ternary gas-phase compressibility factor measurements at 130 F and pressures to 2000 psia involving methane, nitrogen, and CO{sub 2} were conducted to facilitate reduction of our ternary adsorption data. These newly acquired data (and available data from the literature) were used to improve the Benedict-Webb-Rubin (BWR) equation-of-state (EOS) compressibility factor predictions, which are used in material balance calculations for the adsorption measurements. In general, the optimized BWR EOS represents the experimental compressibility factor data within 0.5% AAD. The Langmuir/loading ratio correlation (LRC) and the Zhou-Gasem-Robinson (ZGR) two-dimensional EOS were used to analyze the newly acquired adsorption data. Model parameters were obtained for the systems studied. The LRC and ZGR EOS were used to correlate the adsorption data for methane, nitrogen, and CO{sub 2} and their mixtures on wet Tiffany coal. The model parameters were determined by minimizing the sum of squares of weighted errors in the calculated amounts of gas adsorbed. The results

K. A. M. Gasem; R. L. Robinson; S. R. Reeves

2002-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

202

Manhattan Project: Final Bomb Design, Los Alamos: Laboratory, 1944-1945  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

The first 0.11 seconds of the nuclear age, Trinity, July 16, 1945. FINAL BOMB DESIGN The first 0.11 seconds of the nuclear age, Trinity, July 16, 1945. FINAL BOMB DESIGN (Los Alamos: Laboratory, 1944-1945) Events > Bringing It All Together, 1942-1945 Establishing Los Alamos, 1942-1943 Early Bomb Design, 1943-1944 Basic Research at Los Alamos, 1943-1944 Implosion Becomes a Necessity, 1944 Oak Ridge and Hanford Come Through, 1944-1945 Final Bomb Design, 1944-1945 Atomic Rivals and the ALSOS Mission, 1938-1945 Espionage and the Manhattan Project, 1940-1945 American troops approaching the beach, D-Day, June 6, 1944. Late in 1944, Los Alamos began to shift from research to development and bomb production. Increased production at Oak Ridge and Hanford seemed to promise that enough plutonium and enriched uranium would be available for at least one bomb using each. Germany no longer was the intended primary target. The war in Europe (left) appeared to be entering its final phase, and evidence uncovered by the ALSOS mission in November 1944 indicated that the German atomic program had not gone beyond the research phase. Already by summer 1944, Groves and his advisers had turned their sights toward Japan. The atomic bomb would justify the years of effort, including both the vast expenditures and the judgment of everyone responsible, by bringing the war in the Pacific to a fiery end. J. Robert Oppenheimer Ongoing problems continued to complicate the efforts of Robert Oppenheimer (right) to finalize bomb design. Foremost among these were continuing personnel shortages, particularly of physicists, and supply difficulties. The procurement system, designed to protect the secrecy of the Los Alamos project, led to frustrating delays and, when Herb Lehr, SED, holding the Gadget's core, July 1945. combined with persistent late war shortages, proved a constant headache. The lack of contact between the remote laboratory and its supply sources exacerbated the problem, as did the relative lack of experience the academic scientists had with logistical matters. Leslie Groves and James Conant were determined not to let mundane problems compromise the bomb effort, and in fall 1944 they made several changes to prevent this possibility. Conant shipped as many scientists as could be spared from the Met Lab and Oak Ridge to Los Alamos, hired every civilian machinist he could lay his hands on, and arranged for Army enlisted men to supplement the work force (these GIs were known as SEDS ("Special Engineering Detachment"). Hartley Rowe, an experienced industrial engineer, provided help in easing the transition from research to production. Los Alamos also arranged for a rocket research team at the California Institute of Technology to aid in procurement, test fuses, and contribute to component development. These changes kept Los Alamos on track as design work reached its final stages.

203

Operational restoration of the Pen Branch bottomland hardwood and swamp wetlands - the research setting  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Savannah River Swamp is a 3020 Ha forested wetland on the floodplain of the Savannah River and is located on the Department of Energy's Savannah River Site (SRS) near Aiken, SC. Historically the swamp consisted of approximately 50 percent bald cypress-water tupelo stands, 40 percent mixed bottomland hardwood stands, and 10 percent shrub, marsh, and open water. Creek corridors were typical of Southeastern bottomland hardwood forests. The hydrology was controlled by flooding of the Savannah River and by flow from four creeks that drain into the swamp prior to flow into the Savannah River. Upstream dams have caused some alteration of the water levels and timing of flooding within the floodplain. Major impacts to the swamp hydrology occurred with the completion of the production reactors and one coal-fired powerhouse at the SRS in the early 1950's. Water was pumped from the Savannah River, through secondary heat exchangers of the reactors, and discharged into three of the tributary streams that flow into the swamp. Flow in one of the tributaries, Pen Branch, was typically 0.3 m3 s-1 (10-20) cfs prior to reactor pumping and 11.0 m3 s-1 (400 cfs) during pumping. This continued from 1954 to 1988 at various levels. The sustained increases in water volume resulted in overflow of the original stream banks and the creation of additional floodplains. Accompanying this was considerable erosion of the original stream corridor and deposition of a deep silt layer on the newly formed delta. Heated water was discharged directly into Pen Branch and water temperature in the stream often exceeded 65 degrees C. The nearly continuous flooding of the swamp, the thermal load of the water, and the heavy silting resulted in complete mortality of the original vegetation in large areas of the floodplain. In the years since pumping was reduced, early succession has begun in some affected areas. Most of this has been herbs, grasses, and shrubs. Areas that have seedlings are generally willow thickets that support a lower diversity of wildlife. No volunteer seedlings of heavy-seeded hardwoods or cypress have been found in the corridor areas. Research was conducted to determine methods to reintroduce tree species characteristic of more mature forested wetlands. Three restoration strategies were formulated to deal with the differing conditions of the Upper Corridor, the Lower Corridor, and the Delta regions of the impacted area. Site preparation and planting of each area with mixtures of tree species were carried out to speed the restoration of the ecosystem. Species composition and selection were altered based on the current and expected hydrological regimes that the reforestation areas will be experiencing. Because of the operational design of the restoration project, a research program naturally followed to document the success. Many of those efforts are detailed here.

Nelson, E.A.

2000-01-05T23:59:59.000Z

204

The Role of Disturbance in Dry Tropical Forest Landscapes  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Disturbance can be defined as 'any relatively discrete event in time that disrupts ecosystem, community, or population structure and changes resources, substrate availability, or the physical environment'. This definition requires that the spatial and temporal scales of the system and disturbance be determined. Disturbances are typically characterized by their size, spatial distribution, frequency or return time, predictability, and magnitude (which includes both intensity and severity). These disturbance attributes set the parameters for the suite of species, both plant and animal, that can persist within a given system. As such, an understanding of seasonally dry tropical forests in Asia requires an understanding of disturbance within the region. However, disturbances are relatively poorly understood in dry tropical forests, partly because of the weak seasonality in temperature and high tree species diversity of these forests relative to most forest systems of the world. There are about 1,048,700 km{sup 2} of dry tropical forests worldwide and that only 3% of this land is in conservation status. In other words, 97% of the world's seasonally dry tropical forest is at risk of human disturbance. About half of this forest occurs in South America, where most of the conservation lands are located. Satellite imagery based on MODIS (Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer) data shows that only about 3.8% of the world's dry tropical forests are in Australia and South east Asia. The susceptibility of these forests to human disturbances is of great concern and is largely unstudied. Because natural disturbance regimes shape the ecosystem structure and are in many ways integral to these forest systems, it is critical to know how natural disturbance affects dry forest in order to understand the effects of human activities on these forests. Even basic information about disturbances in dry tropical forests is only recently available. Therefore this chapter brings together much of the available information from dry tropical forest throughout the world with the goal of developing an understanding of the role of disturbance in Asian dry forests. Most ecologists now recognize that disturbances, rather than being catastrophic agents of destruction, are a normal, perhaps even an integral, part of long-term system dynamics. The composition, structure, organization, and development and trophic dynamics of most forest systems are the products of disturbances. As an example, the forest composition for two disturbances in the Anaikatty Hills of Western Ghats were compared, where the low disturbance was from past logging followed by cutting and illicit felling and grazing and the high disturbance was due to human presence, past logging, and fuelwood collection. They found higher species richness and Shannon-Wiener diversity index for the low-disturbance forest (98 and 3.9, respectively) compared to the high-disturbance stand (45 and 2.71, respectively) as well as significant differences in mean basal area of trees, density of seedlings, number of species, density and diversity of shrubs, and number of species and diversity of herbs. Some ecological systems contain species that have evolved in response to disturbances. Adaptations typical of dry tropical forest plants are drought tolerance, seed dispersal mechanisms, and the ability to sprout subsequent to disturbance. In contrast, evidence was found that human disturbance in Kakamega Forest of western Kenya has significantly reduced allelic richness and heterozygosity, increased inbreeding, and slightly reduced gene flow in Prunus africana in the past century.

Dale, Virginia H [ORNL

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

205

SNO: solving the mystery of the missing neutrinos  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The end of an era came on 28 November 2006 when the Sudbury Neutrino Observatory (SNO) finally stopped data-taking after eight exciting years of discoveries. During this time the Observatory saw evidence that neutrinos, produced in the fusion of hydrogen in the solar core, change flavour while passing through the Sun on their way to the Earth. This observation explained the longstanding puzzle as to why previous experiments had seen fewer solar neutrinos than predicted and confirmed that these elusive particles have mass. Solar neutrinos were first detected in Ray Davis's radiochemical experiment in 1967, for which discovery he shared the 2002 Nobel Prize in Physics. Surprisingly he found only about a third of the number predicted from models of the Sun's output. This deficit, the so-called Solar Neutrino Problem, was confirmed by Kamiokande-II while other experiments saw related deficits of solar neutrinos. A possible explanation for this deficit, suggested by Gribov and Pontecorvo in 1969, was that some of the electron-type neutrinos, which are produced in the Sun, had ''oscillated'' into neutrinos that could not be detected in the Davis detector. The oscillation mechanism requires that neutrinos have non-zero mass. The unique advantage, which was pointed out by the late Herb Chen in 1985, of using heavy water (D{sub 2}O) to detect the neutrinos from {sup 8}B decays in the solar fusion process is that it enables both the number of electron-type and of all types of neutrinos to be measured. A comparison of the flux of electron-type neutrinos to that of all flavours could then reveal whether flavour transformation is the cause of the solar neutrino deficit. In heavy water neutrinos of all types can break a deuteron apart into its constituent proton and neutron (neutral-current reaction), while only electron-type neutrinos can change the deuteron into two protons and release an electron (charged-current reaction). SNO was designed by scientists from Canada, the USA and the UK to attain a detection rate of about 10 solar neutrinos per day using 1000 tonnes of heavy water. Neutrino interactions were detected by 9,456 photomultiplier tubes surrounding the heavy water, which was contained in a 12-m diameter acrylic sphere. This sphere was surrounded by 7000 tonnes of ultra-pure water to shield against radioactivity. Figure 1 shows the layout of the SNO detector, which is located about 2 km underground in Inco's Creighton nickel mine near Sudbury in Canada, to all but eliminate cosmic rays from reaching the detector. The pattern of hit photomultiplier tubes following the creation of an electron by an electron-type neutrino is shown in Figure 2.

Jelley, Nick; Poon, Alan

2007-03-30T23:59:59.000Z

206

Integration of the Mini-Sulfide Sulfite Anthraquinone (MSS-AQ) Pulping Process and Black Liquor Gasification in a Pulp Mill  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

As many of the recovery boilers and other pieces of large capital equipment of U.S. pulp mills are nearing the end of their useful life, the pulp and paper industry will soon need to make long-term investments in new technologies. The ability to install integrated, complete systems that are highly efficient will impact the industrys energy use for decades to come. Developing a process for these new systems is key to the adoption of state-of-the-art technologies in the Forest Products industry. This project defined an integrated process model that combines mini-sulfide sulfite anthraquinone (MSS-AQ) pulping and black liquor gasification with a proprietary desulfurization process developed by the Research Triangle Institute. Black liquor gasification is an emerging technology that enables the use of MSS-AQ pulping, which results in higher yield, lower bleaching cost, lower sulfur emissions, and the elimination of causticization requirements. The recently developed gas cleanup/absorber technology can clean the product gas to a state suitable for use in a gas turbine and also regenerate the pulping chemicals needed to for the MSS-AQ pulping process. The combination of three advanced technologies into an integrated design will enable the pulping industry to achieve a new level of efficiency, environmental performance, and cost savings. Because the three technologies are complimentary, their adoption as a streamlined package will ensure their ability to deliver maximum energy and cost savings benefits. The process models developed by this project will enable the successful integration of new technologies into the next generation of chemical pulping mills. When compared to the Kraft reference pulp, the MSS-AQ procedures produced pulps with a 10-15 % yield benefit and the ISO brightness was 1.5-2 times greater. The pulp refined little easier and had a slightly lower apparent sheet density (In both the cases). At similar levels of tear index the MSS-AQ pulps also produced a comparable tensile and burst index pulps. Product gas composition determined using computer simulations The results demonstrate that RVS-1 can effectively remove > 99.8% of the H2S present in simulated synthesis gas generated from the gasification of black liquor. This level of sulfur removal was consistent over simulated synthesis gas mixtures that contained from 6 to 9.5 vol % H2S.A significant amount of the sulfur in the simulated syngas was recovered as SO2 during regeneration. The average recovery of sulfur as SO2 was about 75%. Because these are first cycle results, this sulfur recovery is expected to improve. Developed WINGems model of the process.The total decrease in variable operating costs for the BLG process compared to the HERB was in excess of $6,200,000 per year for a mill producing 350,000 tons of pulp per year. This represents a decrease in operating cost of about $17.7/ton of oven dry pulp produced. There will be additional savings in labor and maintenance cost that has not been taken into account. The capital cost for the MSSAQ based gasifier system was estimated at $164,000,000, which is comparable to a High Efficiency Recovery Boiler. The return on investment was estimated at 4%. A gasifier replacement cannot be justified on its own, however if the recovery boiler needs to be replaced the MSSAQ gasifier system shows significantly higher savings. Before black liquor based gasifer technology can be commercialized more work is necessary. The recovery of the absorbed sulfur in the absorbent as sulfur dioxide is only 75%. This needs to be greater than 90% for economical operation. It has been suggested that as the number of cycles is increased the sulfur dioxide recovery might improve. Further research is necessary. Even though a significant amount of work has been done on a pilot scale gasifiers using liquors containing sulfur, both at low and high temperatures the lack of a commercial unit is an impediment to the implementation of the MSSAQ technology. The implementation of a commercial unit needs to be facilated before the benefits of

Hasan Jameel, North Carolina State University; Adrianna Kirkman, North Carolina State University; Ravi Chandran,Thermochem Recovery International Brian Turk Research Triangle Institute; Brian Green, Research Triangle Institute

2010-01-27T23:59:59.000Z

207

Integration of the Mini-Sulfide Sulfite Anthraquinone (MSS-AQ) Pulping Process and Black Liquor Gasification in a Pulp Mill  

SciTech Connect

As many of the recovery boilers and other pieces of large capital equipment of U.S. pulp mills are nearing the end of their useful life, the pulp and paper industry will soon need to make long-term investments in new technologies. The ability to install integrated, complete systems that are highly efficient will impact the industrys energy use for decades to come. Developing a process for these new systems is key to the adoption of state-of-the-art technologies in the Forest Products industry. This project defined an integrated process model that combines mini-sulfide sulfite anthraquinone (MSS-AQ) pulping and black liquor gasification with a proprietary desulfurization process developed by the Research Triangle Institute. Black liquor gasification is an emerging technology that enables the use of MSS-AQ pulping, which results in higher yield, lower bleaching cost, lower sulfur emissions, and the elimination of causticization requirements. The recently developed gas cleanup/absorber technology can clean the product gas to a state suitable for use in a gas turbine and also regenerate the pulping chemicals needed to for the MSS-AQ pulping process. The combination of three advanced technologies into an integrated design will enable the pulping industry to achieve a new level of efficiency, environmental performance, and cost savings. Because the three technologies are complimentary, their adoption as a streamlined package will ensure their ability to deliver maximum energy and cost savings benefits. The process models developed by this project will enable the successful integration of new technologies into the next generation of chemical pulping mills. When compared to the Kraft reference pulp, the MSS-AQ procedures produced pulps with a 10-15 % yield benefit and the ISO brightness was 1.5-2 times greater. The pulp refined little easier and had a slightly lower apparent sheet density (In both the cases). At similar levels of tear index the MSS-AQ pulps also produced a comparable tensile and burst index pulps. Product gas composition determined using computer simulations The results demonstrate that RVS-1 can effectively remove > 99.8% of the H2S present in simulated synthesis gas generated from the gasification of black liquor. This level of sulfur removal was consistent over simulated synthesis gas mixtures that contained from 6 to 9.5 vol % H2S.A significant amount of the sulfur in the simulated syngas was recovered as SO2 during regeneration. The average recovery of sulfur as SO2 was about 75%. Because these are first cycle results, this sulfur recovery is expected to improve. Developed WINGems model of the process.The total decrease in variable operating costs for the BLG process compared to the HERB was in excess of $6,200,000 per year for a mill producing 350,000 tons of pulp per year. This represents a decrease in operating cost of about $17.7/ton of oven dry pulp produced. There will be additional savings in labor and maintenance cost that has not been taken into account. The capital cost for the MSSAQ based gasifier system was estimated at $164,000,000, which is comparable to a High Efficiency Recovery Boiler. The return on investment was estimated at 4%. A gasifier replacement cannot be justified on its own, however if the recovery boiler needs to be replaced the MSSAQ gasifier system shows significantly higher savings. Before black liquor based gasifer technology can be commercialized more work is necessary. The recovery of the absorbed sulfur in the absorbent as sulfur dioxide is only 75%. This needs to be greater than 90% for economical operation. It has been suggested that as the number of cycles is increased the sulfur dioxide recovery might improve. Further research is necessary. Even though a significant amount of work has been done on a pilot scale gasifiers using liquors containing sulfur, both at low and high temperatures the lack of a commercial unit is an impediment to the implementation of the MSSAQ technology. The implementation of a commercial unit needs to be facilated before the benefits of

Hasan Jameel, North Carolina State University; Adrianna Kirkman, North Carolina State University; Ravi Chandran,Thermochem Recovery International Brian Turk Research Triangle Institute; Brian Green, Research Triangle Institute

2010-01-27T23:59:59.000Z