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  1. ACHP - Nationwide Programmatic Agreements | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Agreements Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Web Site: ACHP - Nationwide Programmatic Agreements Abstract This webpage lists the...

  2. ACHP - Section 106 Regulations Flowchart Explanatory Material...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Explanatory Material Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Web Site: ACHP - Section 106 Regulations Flowchart Explanatory Material Abstract This...

  3. Prototype Programmatic Agreement Guidance (ACHP, 2012) | Department of

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Energy Prototype Programmatic Agreement Guidance (ACHP, 2012) Prototype Programmatic Agreement Guidance (ACHP, 2012) Prototype programmatic agreements are a type of program alternative that the Advisory Council on Historic Preservation (ACHP) can designate to assist federal agencies in their efforts to comply with the requirements of Section 106 of the National Historic Preservation Act (16 U.S.C. 470f) and its implementing regulations (36 CFR Part 800). Prototype agreements may be used for

  4. ACHP's Recommended Approach for Consultation on Recovery of Significan...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    website provides guidance for section 106 consultation on the NHPA. Author Advisory Council on Historic Preservation Published ACHP, Date Not Provided DOI Not Provided Check for...

  5. ACHP - Section 106 Applicant Toolkit | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library PermittingRegulatory Guidance - GuideHandbook: ACHP - Section 106 Applicant ToolkitPermittingRegulatory GuidanceGuide...

  6. NEPA and NHPA: A Handbook for Integrating NEPA and Section 106 (CEQ and ACHP, 2013)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    In this document, the Council on Environmental Quality (CEQ) and the Advisory Council on Historic Preservation (ACHP) provide advice to Federal agencies, applicants, project sponsors, and...

  7. Protecting Historic Properties: A Citizen's Guide to Section 106 Review (ACHP, 2015)

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Section 106 of the National Historic Preservation Act of 1966 requires federal agencies to consider the effects of projects they carry out, approve, or fund on historic properties. The Section 106 review process is defined in Advisory Council on Historic Preservation (ACHP) regulations at 36 CFR Part 800, "Protection of Historic Properties." This ACHP publication explains how the public can become involved in the Section 106 process.

  8. James Webb Space Telescope: PM Lessons Applied - Eric Smith,...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    James Webb Space Telescope: PM Lessons Applied - Eric Smith, Deputy Program Director, NASA James Webb Space Telescope: PM Lessons Applied - Eric Smith, Deputy Program Director,...

  9. Webb County, Texas: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Apps Datasets Community Login | Sign Up Search Page Edit with form History Webb County, Texas: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates...

  10. Photo of the Week: The Webb Telescope's "Golden Spider" | Department of

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Energy The Webb Telescope's "Golden Spider" Photo of the Week: The Webb Telescope's "Golden Spider" September 14, 2012 - 2:32pm Addthis The James Webb Space Telescope is a large, infrared-optimized telescope that is anticipated to launch in 2018. The spider-like sheets and tubes of wires you see here are the Optical Telescope Simulator (OSIM) for the telescope itself. OSIM will help scientists prepare the Webb telescope for flight by generating a beam of light that the

  11. Active galactic nucleus and quasar science with aperture masking interferometry on the James Webb Space Telescope

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ford, K. E. Saavik; McKernan, Barry; Sivaramakrishnan, Anand; Martel, André R.; Koekemoer, Anton; Lafrenière, David; Parmentier, Sébastien

    2014-03-10

    Due to feedback from accretion onto supermassive black holes (SMBHs), active galactic nuclei (AGNs) are believed to play a key role in ΛCDM cosmology and galaxy formation. However, AGNs extreme luminosities and the small angular size of their accretion flows create a challenging imaging problem. We show that the James Webb Space Telescope's Near Infrared Imager and Slitless Spectrograph (JWST-NIRISS) Aperture Masking Interferometry (AMI) mode will enable true imaging (i.e., without any requirement of prior assumptions on source geometry) at ∼65 mas angular resolution at the centers of AGNs. This is advantageous for studying complex extended accretion flows around SMBHs and in other areas of angular-resolution-limited astrophysics. By simulating data sequences incorporating expected sources of noise, we demonstrate that JWST-NIRISS AMI mode can map extended structure at a pixel-to-pixel contrast of ∼10{sup –2} around an L = 7.5 point source, using short exposure times (minutes). Such images will test models of AGN feedback, fueling, and structure (complementary with ALMA observations), and are not currently supported by any ground-based IR interferometer or telescope. Binary point source contrast with NIRISS is ∼10{sup –4} (for observing binary nuclei in merging galaxies), significantly better than current ground-based optical or IR interferometry. JWST-NIRISS's seven-hole non-redundant mask has a throughput of 15%, and utilizes NIRISS's F277W (2.77 μm), F380M (3.8 μm), F430M (4.3 μm), and F480M (4.8 μm) filters. NIRISS's square pixels are 65 mas per side, with a field of view ∼2' × 2'. We also extrapolate our results to AGN science enabled by non-redundant masking on future 2.4 m and 16 m space telescopes working at long-UV to near-IR wavelengths.

  12. New Whole-House Solutions Case Study: Pulte Homes and Communities of Del Webb, Las Vegas Division, NV

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Pulte's Las Vegas has been a local leader in energy efficiency since 1997 when Nat Hodgson, Vice President of Construction for the Las Vegas Division of Pulte Homes and Communities of Del Webb teamed up with the U.S. Department of Energy's Building America team lead Building Science Corporation to build pilot homes in Las Vegas. Pulte has built 100% ENERGY STAR homes in the Las Vegas valley since 1999 and builds the most ENERGY STAR-labeled homes nationwide. In January 2009, Pulte opened its

  13. Section 106 Archaeology Guidance (ACHP, 2009)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Advisory Council on Historic Preservation's Section 106 guidance is designed to assist federal agencies in making effective management decisions about archaeological resources in completing the requirements of Section 106 of the National Historic Preservation Act (16 U.S.C. 470f) and its implementing regulations (36 CFR Part 800). This guidance highlights the decision-making role of the federal agency in the Section 106 process. It is also designed for use by State and Tribal Historic Preservation Officers, Indian tribes, Native Hawaiian organizations, and cultural resource management professionals when assisting federal agencies to meet their responsibilities under Section 106.

  14. http://www.achp.gov/docs/ACHP%20ARCHAEOLOGY%20GUIDANCE.pdf

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    B. Web-based presentation and long-term vision of assistance. This guidance is presented in an interactive, Web-based format as a series of questions and answers. It is designed to ...

  15. ACHP - Consultation with Indian Tribes in the Section 106 Review...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    requirements under the National Historic Preservation Act. Author Advisory Council on Historic Preservation Published Advisory Council on Historic Preservation, 2012...

  16. ACHP - Relationship of Section 106 to Other Laws | Open Energy...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Section 106 of the National Historic Preservation Act and other laws. Author Advisory Council on Historic Preservation Published Advisory Council on Historic Preservation, Date...

  17. ACHP - Recommended Approach for Consultation on Recovery of Significan...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    under Section 106 of the National historic Preservation Act of 1996. Author Advisory Council on Historic Preservation Published Advisory Council on Historic Preservation, 1999...

  18. ACHP - Meeting the "Reasonable and Good Faith" Identification...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    standard under section 106 of the National Historic Preservation Act. Author Advisory Council on Historic Preservation Published Advisory Council on Historic Preservation, 2014...

  19. ACHP - Section 106 Regulations Flowchart | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    under Section 106 of the National Historic Preservation Act. Author Advisory Council on Historic Preservation Published Advisory Council on Historic Preservation, 2001...

  20. Validation of the fast neutron spectrum in the coupled fast-thermal system HERBE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Avdic, S.; Pesic, M.; Marinkovic, P.

    1995-12-31

    Methods applied in the calculation and interpretation of the measurements of the fast neutron spectrum in the NERBE coupled fast-thermal system are validated in this paper. When advantages and disadvantages of a He-filled semi-conductor-sandwich detector are compared to other neutron detectors, the former is found more appropriate. The neutron detection is based on the reaction {sup 3}He(n,p)T + 0.764 MeV and simultaneous detection of the reaction products in the silicon diodes. The pulses from the diodes are amplified and shaped in separate {open_quotes}energy{close_quotes} channels and summed to produce a single pulse with height proportional to the energy of the incident neutron plus the Q value of the reaction. A well-known measuring system of the He neutron spectrometer is used for the HERBE fast neutron spectrum measurement and calibration in a thermal neutron field.

  1. The Honorable Wellington E. Webb

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    Program Division, : ,Office,of Eastern Area Programs: '. Office,of Environmental Restoration '. ?'Bechtold,'Denver CO ' ', R; Quillin,.State oi,Colorado ,, ,,: ' .

  2. The roles of arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF) in phytoremediation and tree-herb interactions in Pb contaminated soil

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Yang, Yurong; Liang, Yan; Han, Xiaozhen; Chiu, Tsan-Yu; Ghosh, Amit; Chen, Hui; Tang, Ming

    2016-02-04

    Understanding the roles of arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF) in plant interaction is essential for optimizing plant distribution to restore degraded ecosystems. Here, our study investigated the effects of AMF and the presence of legume or grass herbs on phytoremediation with a legume tree, Robinia pseudoacacia, in Pb polluted soil. In monoculture, mycorrhizal dependency of legumes was higher than that of grass, and AMF benefited the plant biomass of legumes but had no effect on grass. Mycorrhizal colonization of plant was enhanced by legume neighbors but inhibited by grass neighbor in co-culture system. N, P, S and Mg concentrations of mycorrhizalmore » legumes were larger than these of non-mycorrhizal legumes. Legume herbs decreased soil pH and thereby increased the Pb concentrations of plants. The neighbor effects of legumes shifted from negative to positive with increasing Pb stress levels, whereas grass provided a negative effect on the growth of legume tree. AMF enhanced the competition but equalized growth of legume-legume under unpolluted and Pb stress conditions, respectively. In conclusion, (1) AMF mediate plant interaction through directly influencing plant biomass, and/or indirectly influencing plant photosynthesis, macronutrient acquisition, (2) legume tree inoculated with AMF and co-planted with legume herbs provides an effective way for Pb phytoremediation.« less

  3. Consultation with Native Hawaiian Organizations in the Section 106 Review Process: A Handbook (ACHP, 2011)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The National Historic Preservation Act (NHPA) requires that, in carrying out the requirements of Section 106, "Protection of Historic Properties," each federal agency must consult with any Native Hawaiian organization that attaches religious and cultural significance to historic properties that may be affected by the agency's undertakings.

  4. ACHP Letter to Energy Secretary Steven Chu on February 5, 2010...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Letter from the Advisory Council on Historic Preservation to the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Secretary Steven Chu regarding Prototype Programmatic Agreement for complying with ...

  5. ACHP Letter to Energy Secretary Steven Chu on February 5, 2010

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Accordingly, I hereby designate the attached document as a Prototype Programmatic ... 106 for the EECBG, SEP, and WAP. The Prototype Programmatic Agreement (Prototype PA) ...

  6. Pulte/Del Webb | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    About Partnership with NREL Partnership with NREL Yes Partnership Type Test & Evaluation Partner Partnering Center within NREL Electricity Resources & Building Systems...

  7. Identification of nevadensin as an important herb-based constituent inhibiting estragole bioactivation and physiology-based biokinetic modeling of its possible in vivo effect

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Alhusainy, W.; Paini, A.; Punt, A.; Louisse, J.; Spenkelink, A.; Vervoort, J.; Delatour, T.; Scholz, G.; Schilter, B.; Adams, T.; Bladeren, P.J. van; Rietjens, I.M.C.M.

    2010-06-01

    Estragole is a natural constituent of several herbs and spices including sweet basil. In rodent bioassays, estragole induces hepatomas, an effect ascribed to estragole bioactivation to 1'-sulfooxyestragole resulting in DNA adduct formation. The present paper identifies nevadensin as a basil constituent able to inhibit DNA adduct formation in rat hepatocytes exposed to the proximate carcinogen 1'-hydroxyestragole and nevadensin. This inhibition occurs at the level of sulfotransferase (SULT)-mediated bioactivation of 1'-hydroxyestragole. The Ki for SULT inhibition by nevadensin was 4 nM in male rat and human liver fractions. Furthermore, nevadensin up to 20 {mu}M did not inhibit 1'-hydroxyestragole detoxification by glucuronidation and oxidation. The inhibition of SULT by nevadensin was incorporated into the recently developed physiologically based biokinetic (PBBK) rat and human models for estragole bioactivation and detoxification. The results predict that co-administration of estragole at a level inducing hepatic tumors in vivo (50 mg/kg bw) with nevadensin at a molar ratio of 0.06, representing the ratio of their occurrence in basil, results in almost 100% inhibition of the ultimate carcinogen 1'-sulfooxyestragole when assuming 100% uptake of nevadensin. Assuming 1% uptake, inhibition would still amount to more than 83%. Altogether these data point at a nevadensin-mediated inhibition of the formation of the ultimate carcinogenic metabolite of estragole, without reducing the capacity to detoxify 1'-hydroxyestragole via glucuronidation or oxidation. These data also point at a potential reduction of the cancer risk when estragole exposure occurs within a food matrix containing SULT inhibitors compared to what is observed upon exposure to pure estragole.

  8. Section 106 Consultation Between Federal Agencies and Indian Tribes Regarding Federal Permits, Licenses, and Assistance Questions and Answers (ACHP, 2008)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This Advisory Council on Historic Preservation guidance uses a question-and-answer format to explain issues related to Section 106 consultation between federal agencies and Indian tribes related to permits, licenses, and assistance.

  9. The Honorable Wellington E. Webb 350 City County Building

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    W. Alexander Willianp,301-427-1719 of'my staff. 'James W. Wagoner II : Director Off-SiteSavannah River Program Division' Office of Eastern Area Programs Office of Environmental ...

  10. NEPA and NHPA: A Handbook for Integrating NEPA and Section 106...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    NHPA: A Handbook for Integrating NEPA and Section 106 (CEQ and ACHP, 2013) NEPA and NHPA: A Handbook for Integrating NEPA and Section 106 (CEQ and ACHP, 2013) In this document, the ...

  11. Consultation with Indian Tribes in the Section 106 Review Process: A

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Handbook (ACHP, 2012) | Department of Energy Consultation with Indian Tribes in the Section 106 Review Process: A Handbook (ACHP, 2012) Consultation with Indian Tribes in the Section 106 Review Process: A Handbook (ACHP, 2012) Section 106 of the National Historic Preservation Act (NHPA) requires federal agencies to take into account the effects of their undertakings on historic properties and provide the Advisory Council on Historic Preservation (ACHP) reasonable opportunity to comment on

  12. Meeting the "Reasonable and Good Faith" Identification Standard in Section

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    106 Review (ACHP, 2011) | Department of Energy Meeting the "Reasonable and Good Faith" Identification Standard in Section 106 Review (ACHP, 2011) Meeting the "Reasonable and Good Faith" Identification Standard in Section 106 Review (ACHP, 2011) The Advisory Council on Historic Preservation (ACHP) regulations implementing Section 106 of the National Historic Preservation Act (36 CFR Part 800) require federal agencies to identify historic properties within the Area of

  13. Limitations on the Delegation of Authority by Federal Agencies to Initiate Tribal Consultation under Section 106 of National Historic Preservation Act (ACHP, 2011)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Advisory Council on Historic Preservation explains in this memo why federal agencies cannot delegate to applicants the responsibility for consultation with Indian tribes under Section 106 of the National Historic Preservation Act, unless expressly authorized by the Indian tribe to do so.

  14. Guidance for Indian Tribes and Native Hawaiian Organizations: What to Ask

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    the Federal Agency in the Section 106 Process (ACHP, 2013) | Department of Energy Guidance for Indian Tribes and Native Hawaiian Organizations: What to Ask the Federal Agency in the Section 106 Process (ACHP, 2013) Guidance for Indian Tribes and Native Hawaiian Organizations: What to Ask the Federal Agency in the Section 106 Process (ACHP, 2013) This guidance from the Advisory Council on Historic Preservation is intended to assist tribal and Native Hawaiian organization officials in

  15. Count Directive No. Title OPI Approval Date

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Preservation Award | Department of Energy Council Honors Oak Ridge's EM Program with Prestigious Historic Preservation Award Council Honors Oak Ridge's EM Program with Prestigious Historic Preservation Award August 15, 2016 - 12:35pm Addthis Left to right, ACHP Chairman Milford Wayne Donaldson; Knox Heritage Executive Director Kim Trent; OREM Manager Sue Cange; and ACHP Expert Member Robert Stanton with the Chairman’s Award for Achievement in Historic Preservation. Left to right, ACHP

  16. National Historic Preservation Act | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    goal of the National Historic Preservation Act (NHPA), which established the Advisory Council on Historic Preservation (ACHP) in 1966, is to have federal agencies act as...

  17. Property:Abbreviation | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Showing 25 pages using this property. (previous 25) (next 25) A Advisory Council on Historic Preservation + ACHP + Alabama Oil and Gas Board + OGB + Albany Water Gas...

  18. RAPID/Roadmap/11-FD-d (2) | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    the agency and ACHP may conclude the consultation and prepare an MOA without SHPO involvement. If a THPO terminates consultation and the undertaking is on or affecting historic...

  19. APPENDIX A DISTRIBUTION LIST Federal Government Agencies Army...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ... to non-Native communities. The ACHP should ... Turner: The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) is proposing to ... Smart Grid Technologies Program, which is funded through ...

  20. U.S. Department of Energy Historic Preservation Report | Department...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Programs (OWIP) ACHP Letter to Energy Secretary Steven Chu on February 5, 2010 PROTOTYPE PROGRAMMATIC AGREEMENT BETWEEN THE UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY, THE INSERT...

  1. Webb report adds support for choosing LPG as a motor fuel

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1990-01-01

    This article discusses a study on choosing propane and butane as an alternate transportation fuel (ATF). According to this article, the results of the study indicate that propane and butane have met two of the challenges facing selection of an ATF: there is a ready supply of the product and conversion equipment is easily available. Primary goals identified by the study are presented and discussed.

  2. 36 CFR Part 800: Protection of Historic Properties (2000, amended 2004)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Section 106 of the National Historic Preservation Act requires federal agencies to take into account the effects of their undertakings on historic properties and afford the Advisory Council on Historic Preservation (ACHP) a reasonable opportunity to comment on these undertakings. The ACHP's regulations at 36 CFR Part 800 establish the process that federal agencies must follow to comply with Section 106.

  3. Well Herb Oils Pvt Ltd | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Jaipur, Rajasthan, India Zip: 302 001 Product: Rajasthan-based firm focusing on jatropha cultivation. Coordinates: 26.89876, 75.79636 Show Map Loading map......

  4. NEPA and NHPA: A Handbook for Integrating NEPA and Section 106

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    In this document, the Council on Environmental Quality and the Advisory Council on Historic Preservation (ACHP) provide advice to Federal agencies, applicants, project sponsors, and consultants on...

  5. Transmission SEAB Presentation

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    "05 * Nine Agency MOU - Oct. 2009 * Transmission Cabinet * Designated 7 Pilot Projects DOD CEQ FERC USDA DOE ACHP EPA DOI DOC RRTT Pilot Projects RRTT Rapid Response Team for ...

  6. ORGANIZATION/GROUP

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    News Archive OREM News Archive RSS August 15, 2016 Left to right, ACHP Chairman Milford Wayne Donaldson; Knox Heritage Executive Director Kim Trent; OREM Manager Sue Cange; and ACHP Expert Member Robert Stanton with the Chairman's Award for Achievement in Historic Preservation. Council Honors Oak Ridge's EM Program with Prestigious Historic Preservation Award OAK RIDGE, Tenn. - The Oak Ridge Office of Environmental Management (OREM) was honored as a recipient of the prestigious Chairman's Award

  7. Microsoft Word - Minutes from March 2009 seismic LL panel 5-11-09.doc

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    009 Volume 4, Number 1 IN THIS ISSUE  DOE Wins ACHP Chairman's Award  Oak Ridge Hosts Energy Communities Alliance for Meeting and Secret Cities Festival  Hanford's B Reactor Named National Historic Landmark  National Trust Awards National Preservation Award for V-Site Restoration  Want to Receive Partners in Preservation?  Public Tours at Savannah River  Remember the ACHP  Status of National Park Service Manhattan Project Study  Touring the B Reactor at Hanford 

  8. Protecting Historic Properties: A Citizen's Guide to Section 106 Review (2015)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Section 106 of the National Historic Preservation Act of 1966 requires federal agencies to consider the effects of projects they carry out, approve, or fund on historic properties. The Section 106 review process is defined in Advisory Council on Historic Preservation (ACHP) regulations at 36 CFR Part 800, "Protection of Historic Properties." This ACHP publication explains how the public can become involved in the Section 106 process.

  9. Search for: All records | SciTech Connect

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    ... Reda, Ibrahim (2) Sengupta, Manajit (2) Webb, Craig (1) Save Results Save this search to ... Andreas, Afshin ; Newman, Martina ; Webb, Craig This presentation provides a high-level ...

  10. Microsoft PowerPoint - Herb_Presentation 6-10-09 (2).ppt

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Southeastern Power Administration 4 5 System Overview ... Pump Storage Facilities 8 Location : Upper Savannah River ... Units 75 MW 2002 Maximum Plant Capability: 648 MW ...

  11. Meeting the "Reasonable and Good Faith" Identification Standard in Section 106 Review (2011)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Advisory Council on Historic Preservation (ACHP) regulations implementing Section 106 of the National Historic Preservation Act (36 CFR Part 800) require federal agencies to identify historic properties within the Area of Potential Effects that may be affected by their undertakings. Section 800.4(b)(1) of these regulations states that federal agency officials shall make a "reasonable and good faith effort" to identify historic properties. This guidance explains how the ACHP determines whether a federal agency has made a reasonable and good faith effort to identify historic properties.

  12. Building America Whole-House Solutions for New Homes: Pulte Homes...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Pulte Homes and Communities of Del Webb, Las Vegas, Nevada Building America Whole-House Solutions for New Homes: Pulte Homes and Communities of Del Webb, Las Vegas, Nevada Case ...

  13. Prototype Programmatic Agreement Guidance

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Prototype programmatic agreements are a type of program alternative that the Advisory Council on Historic Preservation (ACHP) can designate to assist federal agencies in their efforts to comply with the requirements of Section 106 of the National Historic Preservation Act (16 U.S.C. 470f) and its implementing regulations (36 CFR Part 800). Prototype agreements may be used for the same type of program or undertaking in more than one case or area, and typically establish efficiencies and protocols for implementing these undertakings. This ACHP guidance describes the process for developing prototype agreements, the involvement of interested parties, and other important components to be considered when exploring the use of a prototype agreement as a program alternative.

  14. Re: Office of Weatherization and Intergovernmental Programs (OWIP) |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy Re: Office of Weatherization and Intergovernmental Programs (OWIP) Re: Office of Weatherization and Intergovernmental Programs (OWIP) In recent conversations between our agencies, the Department of Energy (DOE) requested the assistance of the Advisory Council on Historic Preservation (ACHP) in developing a tool that the Department of Energy could share with the States administering the Energy Efficiency and Conservation Block Grant (EECBG), State Energy Plan (SEP), and

  15. Office of Weatherization and Intergovernmental Programs (OWIP) | Department

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    of Energy Office of Weatherization and Intergovernmental Programs (OWIP) Office of Weatherization and Intergovernmental Programs (OWIP) information about OWIP Office of Weatherization and Intergovernmental Programs (OWIP) (46.13 KB) More Documents & Publications WPN 10-11: National Evaluation of the Weatherization Assistance Program Re: Office of Weatherization and Intergovernmental Programs (OWIP) ACHP Letter to Energy Secretary Steven Chu on February 5, 2010

  16. History | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    You are here Home » About Energy.gov » History History What's New in History July 13, 2016: DOE Receives Chairman's Award for Achievement in Historic Preservation July 13, 2016: DOE Receives Chairman's Award for Achievement in Historic Preservation The ACHP presents DOE and two local partners with the Chairman's Award for Historic Preservation for their efforts to restore and reuse the historic Alexander Inn in Oak Ridge, Tennessee. The "Guest House" was built to accommodate

  17. SR-06-04

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    6, 2004 Media Contact: Jim Giusti (803) 952-7697 Media Advisory: Historic Preservation Signing Ceremony Flag Ribbon Art Note To News Directors & Editors On July 8, 2004, at 3:30 p.m., the Savannah River Operations Office will host a ceremonial signing of a programmatic agreement between the U. S. Department of Energy (DOE), National Nuclear Security Administration, the South Carolina State Historic Preservation Office, and the Advisory Council on Historic Preservation (ACHP) for the

  18. 36 CFR PART 800 - Protection of Historic Preservation | Department of

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Energy 36 CFR PART 800 - Protection of Historic Preservation 36 CFR PART 800 - Protection of Historic Preservation 36 CFR PART 800 - Protection of Historic Preservation (145.15 KB) More Documents & Publications WPN 10-12: Historic Preservation Implementation Meeting the "Reasonable and Good Faith" Identification Standard in Section 106 Review (ACHP, 2011) Guidance for Indian Tribes and Native Hawaiian Organizations: What to Ask the Federal Agency in the Section 106 Process

  19. History | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    About Energy.gov » History History What's New in History July 13, 2016: DOE Receives Chairman's Award for Achievement in Historic Preservation July 13, 2016: DOE Receives Chairman's Award for Achievement in Historic Preservation The ACHP presents DOE and two local partners with the Chairman's Award for Historic Preservation for their efforts to restore and reuse the historic Alexander Inn in Oak Ridge, Tennessee. The "Guest House" was built to accommodate officials visiting the Oak

  20. Lessons Learned Quarterly Report, June 2013 | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    3 Lessons Learned Quarterly Report, June 2013 Lessons Learned Quarterly Report, June 2013 In this issue, we highlight recent guidance by the Council on Environmental Quality and Advisory Council on Historic Preservation to promote better integration of NEPA and Section 106 reviews and on the Federal Highway Administration's Every Day Counts initiative to better integrate planning and NEPA. Articles in this issue include: Integrating NEPA and NHPA Section 106 ACHP Extension of Programmatic

  1. Panel Discussion | OpenEI Community

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    on the project background and history, status updates, analysis summary and future directions. The day ended with a panel discussion, with members including Lee Webb...

  2. workshop | OpenEI Community

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    on the project background and history, status updates, analysis summary and future directions. The day ended with a panel discussion, with members including Lee Webb...

  3. NREL: Measurements and Characterization - Research Staff

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Vince Bollinger Anna Duda Ken Johnson Marc Landry Keith Layton Kevin O'Neill Steve Robbins Jeremy Webb Robert White Danny Yerks Printable Version Measurements &...

  4. Microsoft Word - Copyright Template.docx

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Webb and Wilshire 1980, has been identified as being a copyrighted material. As a general matter, copyright infringement would occur if this copyrighted work is reproduced,...

  5. A Bigger Chill | Jefferson Lab

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    An artist's rendering of the James Webb Space Telescope. Image: NASA Ultracold ... designing a new refrigeration plant for NASA Johnson Space Center that will be used in ...

  6. U.S. Department of Energy ENVIRONMENTAL MANAGEMENT ADVISORY BOARD

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    ... overall project management performance results Lessons learned - NASA James Webb Space Telescope (NASA) Project Management Institute view on the pulse of the industry and ...

  7. SSRL School 2007 on Hard X-ray Scattering: Techniques in MES

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    peak intensities, A. Vailionis SAXS, J. Pople Tuesday Afternoon, Bulk-Structure Techniques Structure characterization, A. Mehta In-situ scattering, S. Webb Amorphous...

  8. ENVIRONMENTAL MANAGEMENT ADVISORY BOARD U.S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    ... overall project management performance results Lessons learned - NASA James Webb Space Telescope (NASA) Project Management Institute view on the pulse of the industry and ...

  9. Structural Sequestration of Uranium in Bacteriogenic Manganese...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Sequestration of Uranium in Bacteriogenic Manganese Oxides Samuel M. Webb (Stanford ... Uranium is a key contaminant of concern at US DOE sites and shuttered mining and ore ...

  10. Building America Whole-House Solutions for New Homes: Pulte Homes and

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Communities of Del Webb, Las Vegas, Nevada | Department of Energy Pulte Homes and Communities of Del Webb, Las Vegas, Nevada Building America Whole-House Solutions for New Homes: Pulte Homes and Communities of Del Webb, Las Vegas, Nevada Case study of Pulte Homes-Las Vegas Division who teamed with Building America team Building Science Corporation to design HERS-54 homes with high-efficiency HVAC with ducts in conditioned space, jump ducts, and a fresh air intake; advanced framed walls;

  11. 2014 DOE Project Management Workshop Meeting the Challenge-Integrated...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    James Webb Space Telescope: PM Lessons Applied Eric Smith, Deputy Program Director, NASA 8:45 - 9:00 9:00 - 9:45 Victor Carter-Bey (PMI) 9:45 - 10:45 Steve Meador, Acting Dir ...

  12. N

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    N 0 0 4 0 0) P m 0 m W Lo Comparison of CFD Natural Convection and Conduction-only Models for Heat Transfer in the Yucca Mountain Project Drifts Teklu Hadgu, Stephen W. Webb, and ...

  13. OSTI, US Dept of Energy Office of Scientific and Technical Information...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    web portals, such as: Science Accelerator (DOE resources) Science.gov(U.S. federal agency science information) WorldWideScience.org (global science information) OSTI offers web-b...

  14. OSTIblog Articles in the American Association for the Advancement...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    web portals, such as: Science Accelerator (DOE resources) Science.gov(U.S. federal agency science information) WorldWideScience.org (global science information) OSTI offers web-b...

  15. MyNERSC Gives Users Easier Access to Data, Jobs, Wait Times

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    MyNERSC Gives Users Easier Access to Data, Jobs, Wait Times April 6, 2015 MyNERSC, a web-b... MyNERSC was originally developed 10 years ago, and in 2014 both the web and mobile ...

  16. Colorado School of Mines 2014 | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Colorado School of Mines 2014 Colorado School of Mines 2014 Back row: Alex Dell, Zachary Weber, Aaron Troyer, Cabe Bonner, Jeremy Webb. Front row: Katherine Rooney, Jyotsana Gandhi, Kevin Tan, Kelsey Wokasch. Photo from Colorado School of Mines. Back row: Alex Dell, Zachary Weber, Aaron Troyer, Cabe Bonner, Jeremy Webb. Front row: Katherine Rooney, Jyotsana Gandhi, Kevin Tan, Kelsey Wokasch. Photo from Colorado School of Mines. Project Description Named after the Greek god of the west wind, Team

  17. 350 City County Building

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    (. - ,- Department of Eilqgy Washington, DC20585 ,. i x \ .The Honorable Wellington E. Webb .' '. ' 350 City County Building / Denver, Colorado 80202 ., ; Dear Mayor Webb: ., ~, Secretary of Energy' Hazel O'Leary has announced's new approach to openness in the Department of Energy,(OOE) and its communications with the public. In support of this initiative, we,are pleased to forward the'enclosed'information related to the former Uhiversity of Denver Research Institute site in your, jurisdiction

  18. Appendix B - Chemical and Radiological Inventories for the CEMRC, pages 1-4

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    B-1 APPENDIX B CHEMICAL AND RADIOLOGICAL INVENTORIES FOR THE CEMRC The current inventories of chemicals and radiological materials at the Carlsbad Environmental Monitoring and Research Center (CEMRC) are provided in Tables B-1 and B-2, respectively. These tables were provided by Joel Webb, Director of the CEMRC, New Mexico State University (Webb 2002). Table B-1. Onsite CEMRC Chemical Inventory Chemical Name Amount Units SARA Limit Acetic Acid, Glacial 5,400 mL NA a Acetone 38 L NA AA Modifier

  19. Fermilab Today

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    marinated pork tenderloin with pineapple salsa - Green rice - Margarita cake with key lime cream cheese frosting Friday, March 6 Dinner - Avgolemono soup - Herb-crusted lamb...

  20. THANKSGIVING ACROSS, AMERICA

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    reserved) Salt and freshly ground pepper Stuffing (if desired; if not, use onion, apple and herbs for the cavity) Z tablespoons dark unsulfured molasses 2 tablespoons soy...

  1. PPPO News Archive | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    ... January 27, 2015 Herb Tyler, David Cassibry, and Roger Nelson review items for characterization. (Photo by Dylan Nichols, LATA Kentucky) Warehouse Cleanup Project Completed at ...

  2. Multifamily Projects | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Multifamily Projects Multifamily Projects Presents Energy Smart Colorado's approach to driving demand for multifamily residential energy efficiency upgrades. Energy Smart Colorado presentation (991.06 KB) More Documents & Publications Information Technology Tools for Multifamily Building Programs Track C - Market-Driven Research Solutions Building America Whole-House Solutions for New Homes: Pulte Homes and Communities of Del Webb, Las Vegas, Nevada

  3. Papers Published - April 1, 1999 - March 31, 2000

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    P.W. Stankus, T.N. Thompson, R.S. Towell, R.E. Tribble, M.A. Vasiliev, Y.C. Wang, Z.F. Wang, J.C. Webb, J.L. Willis, D.K. Wise and G.R. Young (FNAL E866NuSea Collaboration)...

  4. Columbia River System Operation Review : Final Environmental Impact Statement, Appendix D: Cultural Resources.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Columbia River System Operation Review

    1995-11-01

    This study attempts to identify and analyze the impacts of the System Operating Strategy (SOS) alternatives on cultural resources. The impacts include effects on Native American traditional cultural values, properties and practices. They also include effects on archeological or historic properties meeting the criteria of the National Register of Historic Places. In addition to responding to the requirements of the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA), this analysis addresses the requirements of the National Historic Preservation Act (NHPA), the Archeological Resources Protection Act (ARPA), the Native American Graves Protection and Repatriation Act (NAGPRA), the Native American Religious Freedom Act (NARFA), and other relevant legislation. To meet their legally mandated cultural resources requirements, the SOR agencies will develop agreements and Implementation Plans with the appropriate State Historic Preservation Officers (SHPOs), Tribes, and the Advisory Council on Historic Preservation (ACHP) detailing the measures necessary to best manage the resource. The planning and implementation activities will be staged over a number of years in consultation with affected Tribes.

  5. Using a cold radiometer to measure heat loads and survey heat leaks

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    DiPirro, M.; Tuttle, J.; Hait, T.; Shirron, P.

    2014-01-29

    We have developed an inexpensive cold radiometer for use in thermal/vacuum chambers to measure heat loads, characterize emissivity and specularity of surfaces and to survey areas to evaluate stray heat loads. We report here the results of two such tests for the James Webb Space Telescope to measure heat loads and effective emissivities of 2 major pieces of optical ground support equipment that will be used in upcoming thermal vacuum testing of the Telescope.

  6. Reliability and Design Strength Limit Calculations on Diesel Particulate

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Filters | Department of Energy and Design Strength Limit Calculations on Diesel Particulate Filters Reliability and Design Strength Limit Calculations on Diesel Particulate Filters 2004 Diesel Engine Emissions Reduction (DEER) Confererence Presentation: Corning 2004_deer_webb.pdf (126.93 KB) More Documents & Publications Predicting Thermal Stress in Diesel Particulate Filters Environmental Effects on Power Electronic Devices Effect of Machining Procedures on the Strength of Ceramics for

  7. Thomas Jefferson High School for Science & Technology Wins Feb. 5 Virginia

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Science Bowl; Warwick High Wins Math and Science Challenges | Jefferson Lab Wins Feb. 5 Virginia Science Bowl; Warwick High Wins Math and Science Challenges Thomas Jefferson High School for Science & Technology Wins Feb. 5 Virginia Science Bowl; Warwick High Wins Math and Science Challenges fellowship The Thomas Jefferson High School for Science and Technology, Alexandria, won the Feb. 5 Virginia Regional High School Science Bowl. Pictured, left to right, are Coach Sharon Webb; Alexander

  8. Thomas Jefferson High School for Science & Technology wins the Virginia

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Regional Science Bowl | Jefferson Lab #38; Technology wins the Virginia Regional Science Bowl Thomas Jefferson High School for Science & Technology wins the Virginia Regional Science Bowl February 15, 2006 TJHSST Finishing in first place at the Virginia Regional High School Science Bowl was the team from the Thomas Jefferson High School for Science and Technology from Alexandria, Va. Pictured from left to right is Coach Sharon Webb, Charlotte Seid, Daniel Schafer, Lisa Marrone, Neel

  9. ARM - Blog Article

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    5, 2015 [Blog, Field Notes, SGP] Calibration Season Begins Bookmark and Share Editor's Note: Craig Webb, calibration technician at the Southern Great Plains site, sent this update. A view of a collection of radiometers taken from the now closed Tropical Western Pacific facility. A view of a collection of radiometers taken from the now closed Tropical Western Pacific facility. The ARM Climate Research Facility requires accurate measurements of solar radiation from radiometers used in ground-based

  10. Remarks for Quadrennial Energy Review Public Meeting June 19, 2014

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Filters | Department of Energy Confererence Presentation: Corning 2004_deer_webb.pdf (126.93 KB) More Documents & Publications Predicting Thermal Stress in Diesel Particulate Filters Environmental Effects on Power Electronic Devices Effect of Machining Procedures on the Strength of Ceramics for Advanced Diesel Engine Applications of Energy

    Presents international round-robin study to ensure quality of transport data and figure of merit of thermoelectric materials deer12_wang_2.pdf

  11. Evaluation of Improved Pyrgeometer Calibration Method

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Improved Pyrgeometer Calibration Method I. Reda, P. A. Gotseff, T. L. Stoffel, and C. Webb National Renewable Energy Laboratory Golden, Colorado Abstract Broadband longwave (atmospheric) irradiance measurements are important for determining the earth's total energy balance. The Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program has deployed more than 50 pyrgeometers for measuring the upwelling and downwelling longwave irradiance as part of Solar Infrared Station (SIRS), SKYRAD, and GNDRAD

  12. SSRL HEADLINES October 2010

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    4 October, 2010 ____________________________________________________________________________ Contents of this Issue: Science Highlight - Crystal Structure of NorM, a MATE Transmembrane Transporter Science Highlight - An Artificial Skin Sensitive Enough to be Bothered by a Fly From the Director of SSRL: Ready for the Next User Run Structural Genomics Research at SSRL Begins Exciting New Chapter LCLS/SSRL Users' Meeting Covers Recent Successes and Future Plans Sam Webb Honored with Lytle Award

  13. The Sample Preparation Laboratories | Sample Preparation Laboratories

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Cynthia Patty 1 Sam Webb 2 John Bargar 3 Arizona 4 Chemicals 5 Team Work 6 Bottles 7 Glass 8 Plan Ahead! See the tabs above for Laboratory Access and forms you'll need to complete. Equipment and Chemicals tabs detail resources already available on site. Avoid delays! Hazardous materials use may require a written Standard Operating Procedure (SOP) before you work. Check the Chemicals tab for more information. The Sample Preparation Laboratories The Sample Preparation Laboratories provide wet lab

  14. wilcox-99.PDF

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Traceability and Verification of Radiometer Calibrations at the Southern Great Plains Radiometer Calibration Facility S. M. Wilcox and I. Reda National Renewable Energy Laboratory Golden, Colorado D. A. Nelson and C. Webb Southern Great Plains Central Facility Introduction The Radiometer Calibration Facility at the Southern Great Plains (SGP) central facility annually calibrates more than 100 radiometers deployed for routine operations at the 22 SGP measurement sites. Among the factors that

  15. News Item

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    29, 2014 Time: 11:00 am Speaker: Prof. Kevin Webb, Purdue University Title: Nanostructured Materials for Optical Sensing, Control and Signal Processing Location: 67-3111 Chemla Room Hosted by Alex Weber-Bargioni Abstract: I summarize some of our recent accomplishments related to metamaterials, including the proposal of a graphene stack as the blackest material. Relying on fundamental principles, I suggest opportunities for the synthesis of new material mixtures, including active materials that

  16. Questions For Identification, Evaluation, and Ranking of Proposed Infrastructure Protection Activities

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    SAND2002-0877 Unlimited Release Printed April 2002 A Scalable Systems Approach for Critical Infrastructure Security Arnold B. Baker, Robert J. Eagan, Patricia K. Falcone, Joe M. Harris, Gilbert V. Herrera,W. Curtis Hines, Robert L. Hutchinson, Ajoy K. Moonka, Mark L. Swinson, Erik K. Webb, Tommy D. Woodall, and Gregory D. Wyss Prepared by Sandia National Laboratories Albuquerque, New Mexico 87185 and Livermore, California 94550 Sandia is a multiprogram laboratory operated by Sandia Corporation,

  17. Software Defined Networking for

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    big-data science Eric Pouyoul Chin Guok Inder Monga (presenting) SRS presentation November 15 th , Supercomputing 2012 Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory U.S. Department of Energy | Office of Science Acknowledgements Many folks at ESnet who helped with the deployment and planning * Sanjay Parab (CMU), Brian Tierney, John Christman, Mark Redman, Patrick Dorn among other ESnet NESG/OCS folks Ciena Collaborators: * Rodney Wilson, Marc Lyonnais, Joshua Foster, Bill Webb SRS Team * Andrew Lee,

  18. PowerPoint Presentation

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Energy laboratory managed by UChicago-Argonne, LLC Re-establishment of the MFRSR Calibration Facility at the SGP Dan Nelson 1 , Craig Webb 1 , Joseph Michalsky 2 , Gary Hodges 2 , Piotr Kiedron 2 , Patrick Disterhoft 2 , John Schmelzer 3 , Jerry Berndt 4 1 ACRF/SGP, Cherokee Nation Distributors, Stilwell, OK 2 National Oceanographic and Atmospheric Administration, Boulder, CO 3 Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland, WA 4 Consultant to NOAA, Everett, WA CSPHOT SWS 90/150 GHz Radiometer

  19. Microsoft Word - Kezunovic PSERC Webinar May 3 2016 Announcement

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Physical and Cyber Infrastructure Supporting the Future Grid Mladen Kezunovic Eugene E. Webb Professor Electrical Engineering Department Texas A&M University kezunov@ece.tamu.edu PSERC Public Webinar May 3, 2016 2:00-3:00 p.m. Eastern Time (11:00-12:00 p.m. Pacific) Description: The Power Systems Engineering Research Center (PSERC), an NSF Industry/University Cooperative Research Center, and the National Science Foundation Directorate for Computer and Information Science and Engineering

  20. December 2015 Most Viewed Documents for Geosciences | OSTI, US Dept of

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Energy Office of Scientific and Technical Information December 2015 Most Viewed Documents for Geosciences Tracers and Tracer Testing: Design, Implementation, Tracer Selection, and Interpretation Methods G. Michael Shook; Shannon L.; Allan Wylie (2004) 108 Gas-phase diffusion in porous media: Evaluation of an advective- dispersive formulation and the dusty-gas model including comparison to data for binary mixtures Webb, S.W. (1996) 73 Determination of effective porosity of mudrocks: a

  1. June 2015 Most Viewed Documents for Geosciences | OSTI, US Dept of Energy

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information June 2015 Most Viewed Documents for Geosciences Fundamental Research on Percussion Drilling: Improved rock mechanics analysis, advanced simulation technology, and full-scale laboratory investigations Michael S. Bruno (2005) 64 Gas-phase diffusion in porous media: Evaluation of an advective- dispersive formulation and the dusty-gas model including comparison to data for binary mixtures Webb, S.W. (1996) 53 Stress-dependent permeability of

  2. Beyond Pluto: The Search for the Edge

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    LOS ALAMOS, N.M., July 30, 2015-Los Alamos National Laboratory Fellow and physicist Herb Funsten will explore the edge of the solar system and anticipate its future as it moves ...

  3. Structure of Chinese Herbal-based Medicine Captured by ATP on a Human tRNA

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Synthetase | Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource Structure of Chinese Herbal-based Medicine Captured by ATP on a Human tRNA Synthetase Thursday, October 31, 2013 For thousands of years the Chinese have been using the Chang Shan herb (Dichroa febrifuga Lour) to treat malaria-induced fevers (1). The active ingredient in the herb was eventually shown to be a small molecule known as febrifugine. A halogenated derivative of febrifugine, called halofuginone (HF), has been tested in clinical

  4. SSRL HEADLINES June 2015

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    0 - June 2015 View the Archives **Note for Outlook users: For easier reading, please click the bar at the top of this message that reads "This message was converted to plain text" and select "Display as HTML."** Science Highlight thumbnail Multiscale Speciation of U and Pu at Chernobyl, Hanford, Los Alamos, McGuire AFB, Mayak, and Rocky Flats - Contacts: Steve Conradson (LANL/Synchrotron-SOLEIL) and Sam Webb (SSRL) When a geographical area is contaminated with radioactive

  5. untitled

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    George Baxley System Electrical Control Craftsman Jonesboro, AR Special thanks to: Mike Deihl Ruben Garcia Darrell Gilliam Maryann Henry William Hiller Laura Holman Beth Nielsen Donna Short Dolly Vaughn Aleta Wallace Bruce Webb Rutha Williams Jan Woolverton U P D AT E S O U T H W E S T E R N P O W E R A D M I N I S T R A T I O N J A N U A R Y - M A R C H 2 0 0 5 Southwestern Expands E-Government Options In keeping with the President's Expanding Electronic Government (E-Government) Initiative,

  6. untitled

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Elaine Webb Project Manager Bearskin Services Tulsa, Oklahoma Special thanks to: SWPA Ron Beck Marshall Boyken Kenny Broadaway Linda Dunham Steve Hill Ricky Jones Darlene Low Harry Mardirosian Jim McDonald Ernie Millsap Beth Nielsen Margaret Skidmore Tracey Stewart Carlos Valencia CNI/Bearskin Ashley Butler Vicki Clarke Ruben Garcia William Hiller Kathy O'Neal SW Division Corps Sherman Jones Vicksburg Dist. Corps Brian Westfall Dusty Wilson U P DAT E S O U T H W E S T E R N P O W E R A D M I N I

  7. Synchronized Biological Knowledge and Data Management: A Hybrid Approach

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stephan, Eric G.; Chin, George; Corrigan, Abbie L.; Klicker, Kyle R.; Sofia, Heidi J.

    2004-06-23

    The new systems approach to biology has created a great need for innovative database technologies. Biologists need new ways to integrate large scale data and concepts they form about the data during experimental and computational research. The Heuristic Entity Relationship Building Environment (HERBE) is a new prototypical architecture fusing data management technologies with knowledge management components. This hybrid approach enables the scientist to manage both their concepts and related data in a synchronized fashion. HERBE is currently being used for microbial research and in this paper we will describe how HERBE is used to capture microbial protein concepts grouped by organism, how the microbial proteins are reengineered into a combined knowledge on multiple microbial organisms, and how the data associated with the organisms can be mined. This paper also describes how the scientist’s evolving knowledge can be annotated by connecting the biologist’s knowledge to community resources such as the Gene Ontology.

  8. Douglas-fir/white spirea habitat type in central Idaho: Succession and management. Forest Service general technical report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Steele, R.; Geier-Hayes, K.

    1994-04-01

    The report describes a taxonomic system for classifying plant succession in the Douglas-fir/white spirea habitat type in central Idaho. A total of 10 potential tree layer types, 35 shrub types, and 45 herb layer types are categorized. Diagonostic keys based on indicator species assist field identification of the types. Discussion of management implications includes pocket gopher populations, success of planted and natural tree seedlings, big-game and livestock forage preferences, and responses of major shrub and herb layer species to disturbances.

  9. The Rosebud Sioux Tribe Strategic Energy Plan

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    And as I looked and wept, I saw that there stood on the north side of the starving camp a sacred man who was painted red all over his body, and he held a spear as he walked into the center of the people, and there he lay down and rolled. And when he got up, it was a fat bison standing there, and where the bison stood, a sacred herb sprang up right where the tree had been in the center of the nation's hoop. The herb grew and bore four blossoms on a single stem while I was looking - a blue, a

  10. EOS7C-ECBM Version 1.0

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    2012-11-14

    EOS7C is an equation of state module for the TOUGH2 program for CO2 or N2 in Methane (CH4) Reservoirs. In the present work, additions have been made to the EOS7C Version 1.0 module to include the Enhanced Coal Bed Methane (ECBM) modifications developed by Webb (2003). In addition, the Dusty Gas Model for gas-phase diffusion (Webb 2001) has been included. The ECBM modification to the EOS7C equation of state incorporate the extended Langmuir isothem formore » sorbing gases, including the change in porosity associated with the sorbed gas mass. Comparison to hand calculations for pure gas and binary mixture shows very good agreement. Application to a CO2 well injection problem by Law et al. (2002). The Dusty Model modification add options to calculate gas diffusion using the Dusty-Gas Model including separate and coupled approaches. Comparison to low-permeability pure gas diffusion data shows excellent agreement. The results from the DGM are compared to the Fick's Law behavior for diffusion across a capillary fringe. The differences between the models are small due to the relatively high permeability (10-11 m2) of the problem.« less

  11. Overstory and understory relationships in longleaf pine plantations 14 years after thinning and woody control.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Harrington, Timothy, B.

    2011-09-09

    To develop silvicultural strategies for restoring longleaf pine (Pinus palustris Mill.) savannas, mortality and growth of overstory pines and midstory hardwoods and abundance and species richness of herbs were studied for 14 years after pine thinning and nonpine woody control. Pine cover in thinned stands was about half of that in nonthinned stands through year 5, but it lagged by only 8% and 3% in years 9 and 14, respectively, because of vigorous crown responses. Despite a cumulative mortality of 64% of hardwood stems from prescribed fires in years 0, 4, and 9, hardwood basal area in thinned stands (2.1 m2/ha) was three times that in nonthinned stands (0.7 m2/ha) in year 14. Thinning was associated with 13%-22% more cover and six to eight more species of herbs in years 3-8 but only 6% more cover and two more species in year 14 because of accelerated growth of pine cover and hardwood basal area. However, similar increases in cover and richness of herb species in the woody control treatment were retained through year 14 because it had sustained reductions in hardwood and shrub abundance. Silvicultural strategies that substantially delay encroachment by pines, hardwoods, and shrubs will be those most effective at retaining herb species in longleaf pine savannas, including planting pines at wide spacing, periodic thinning and woody control, and frequent burning.

  12. CHALLENGES OF PRESERVING HISTORIC RESOURCES DURING THE D & D OF HIGHLY CONTAMINATED HISTORICALLY SIGNIFICANT PLUTONIUM PROCESS FACILITIES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    HOPKINS, A.M.

    2006-03-17

    The Manhattan Project was initiated to develop nuclear weapons for use in World War II. The Hanford Engineer Works (HEW) was established in eastern Washington State as a production complex for the Manhattan Project. A major product of the HEW was plutonium. The buildings and process equipment used in the early phases of nuclear weapons development are historically significant because of the new and unique work that was performed. When environmental cleanup became Hanford's central mission in 1991, the Department of Energy (DOE) prepared for the deactivation and decommissioning of many of the old process facilities. In many cases, the process facilities were so contaminated, they faced demolition. The National Historic Preservation Act (NHPA) requires federal agencies to evaluate the historic significance of properties under their jurisdiction for eligibility for inclusion in the National Register of Historic Places before altering or demolishing them so that mitigation through documentation of the properties can occur. Specifically, federal agencies are required to evaluate their proposed actions against the effect the actions may have on districts, sites, buildings or structures that ere included or eligible for inclusion in the National Register. In an agreement between the DOE'S Richland Operations Office (RL), the Washington State Historic Preservation Office (SHPO) and the Advisory Council on Historic Preservation (ACHP), the agencies concurred that the Hanford Site Historic District is eligible for listing on the National Register of Historic Places and that a Sitewide Treatment Plan would streamline compliance with the NHPA while allowing RL to manage the cleanup of the Hanford Site. Currently, many of the old processing buildings at the Plutonium Finishing Plant (PFP) are undergoing deactivation and decommissioning. RL and Fluor Hanford project managers at the PFP are committed to preserving historical artifacts of the plutonium production process. They

  13. Is there further evidence for spatial variation of fundamental constants?

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Berengut, J. C.; Flambaum, V. V.; King, J. A.; Curran, S. J.; Webb, J. K.

    2011-06-15

    Indications of spatial variation of the fine-structure constant, {alpha}, based on study of quasar absorption systems have recently been reported [J. K. Webb, J. A. King, M. T. Murphy, V. V. Flambaum, R. F. Carswell, and M. B. Bainbridge, arXiv:1008.3907.]. The physics that causes this {alpha}-variation should have other observable manifestations, and this motivates us to look for complementary astrophysical effects. In this paper we propose a method to test whether spatial variation of fundamental constants existed during the epoch of big bang nucleosynthesis and study existing measurements of deuterium abundance for a signal. We also examine existing quasar absorption spectra data that are sensitive to variation of the electron-to-proton mass ratio {mu} and x={alpha}{sup 2{mu}}g{sub p} for spatial variation.

  14. DETECTABILITY OF EXOPLANET PERIASTRON PASSAGE IN THE INFRARED

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kane, Stephen R.; Gelino, Dawn M.

    2011-11-01

    Characterization of exoplanets has matured in recent years, particularly through studies of exoplanetary atmospheres of transiting planets at infrared wavelengths. The primary source for such observations has been the Spitzer Space Telescope but these studies are anticipated to continue with the James Webb Space Telescope. A relatively unexplored region of exoplanet parameter space is the thermal detection of long-period eccentric planets during periastron passage. Here we describe the thermal properties and albedos of long-period giant planets along with the eccentricities of those orbits which allow them to remain within the habitable zone. We further apply these results to the known exoplanets by calculating temperatures and flux ratios for the IRAC passbands occupied by warm Spitzer, considering both low and high thermal redistribution efficiencies from the perspective of an observer. We conclude with recommendations on which targets are best suited for follow-up observations.

  15. Antitrust exemptions and immunities in natural resources development: illusion or reality

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Norris, R.L.

    1981-01-01

    Exemptions and immunities relate to those instances in which conduct that would otherwise have an anticompetitive effect are insulated from application of the antitrust laws. These exemptions or the insulation occurs through two processes, one by statutory exemption and the second by judicial construction, implied immunity. There are five express exemptions: the Webb-Pomerene Trade Export Act, the provisions for cooperation with the International Energy Program under the International Energy Act, the Defense Production Act of 1950, the small-business joint-venture exemption and finally the Clayton Act section 7 exemption for mergers or acquisitions that are approved by DOE or ICC. This is one of the 1950 amendments to the Clayton Act. A discussion of these and implied exemptions reviews several court cases to see if there is a common thread to indicate future developments.

  16. DETECTING INDUSTRIAL POLLUTION IN THE ATMOSPHERES OF EARTH-LIKE EXOPLANETS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lin, Henry W.; Abad, Gonzalo Gonzalez; Loeb, Abraham E-mail: ggonzalezabad@cfa.harvard.edu

    2014-09-01

    Detecting biosignatures, such as molecular oxygen in combination with a reducing gas, in the atmospheres of transiting exoplanets has been a major focus in the search for alien life. We point out that in addition to these generic indicators, anthropogenic pollution could be used as a novel biosignature for intelligent life. To this end, we identify pollutants in the Earth's atmosphere that have significant absorption features in the spectral range covered by the James Webb Space Telescope. We focus on tetrafluoromethane (CF{sub 4}) and trichlorofluoromethane (CCl{sub 3}F), which are the easiest to detect chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs) produced by anthropogenic activity. We estimate that ?1.2 days (?1.7 days) of total integration time will be sufficient to detect or constrain the concentration of CCl{sub 3}F (CF{sub 4}) to ?10 times the current terrestrial level.

  17. LOS ALAMOS, N.M., Dec. 15, 2014-The Los Alamos National Laboratory Fellows list

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Laboratory Fellows for 2014 December 15, 2014 Honorees span sciences in physics, astrophysics, chemistry LOS ALAMOS, N.M., Dec. 15, 2014-The Los Alamos National Laboratory Fellows list expands by five this week as a new group of high achievers is named. The honorees this year are Christopher L. Fryer, Herbert O. Funsten, John C. Gordon, Jaqueline L. Kiplinger and David S. Moore. "The sustained scientific excellence demonstrated by the work of Chris, Herb, John, Jaqueline and David

  18. EM SSAB CHAIRS Bi-Monthly Conference Call

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    June 18, 2013 Participants Board Chairs/Representatives Site Staff Hanford Steve Hudson, Susan Leckband Shelley Cimon, Kim Ballinger, Sharon Braswell, Michael Turner Idaho Herb Bohrer, Harry Griffith, Peggy Hinman Nevada Kathleen Bienenstein Barbara Ulmer Northern New Mexico Carlos Valdez Lee Bishop, Menice Santistevan Oak Ridge David Martin, David Hemelright Melyssa Noe, Spencer Gross, Pete Osborne, Dave Adler Paducah Buz Smith, Eric Roberts Portsmouth Will Henderson Greg Simonton, Julie

  19. EM SSAB CHAIRS Bi-Monthly Conference Call

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    August 27, 2013 Participants Board Chairs/Representatives Site Staff Hanford Steve Hudson, Susan Leckband Kim Ballinger, Michael Turner Idaho Herb Bohrer Peggy Hinman Nevada Donna Hruska Kelly Snyder, Barbara Ulmer Northern New Mexico Carlos Valdez Lee Bishop, Menice Santistevan Oak Ridge David Hemelright Melyssa Noe, Spencer Gross, Pete Osborne Paducah Ralph Young Buz Smith, Eric Roberts Portsmouth Greg Simonton, Julie Galloway Savannah River Donald Bridges Gerri Flemming, Ashley Whitaker

  20. EM SSAB CHAIRS Bi-Monthly Conference Call

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    1/15/14 Chairs/Representatives: Hanford Steve Hudson, Susan Leckband, Kim Ballinger, Sharon Braswell Idaho Herb Bohrer, Lori McNamara Nevada Kathleen Bienenstein, Donna Hruska, Barbara Ulmer NNM Carlos Valdez, Doug Sayre, Lee Bishop, Christina Houston, Menice Santistevan Oak Ridge David Hemelright, Bruce Hicks, Melyssa Noe, Spencer Gross, Pete Osborne Paducah Ben Peterson, Ralph Young, Buz Smith, Eric Roberts, Jim Ethridge Portsmouth Will Henderson, Greg Simonton, Julie Galloway, Rick Greene

  1. EM SSAB CHAIRS Bi-Monthly Conference Call

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    December 15, 2014 Participants Board Chairs/Representatives Site Staff Hanford Steve Hudson, Susan Leckband Kristen Skopeck, Sharon Braswell Idaho Herb Bohrer, Harry Griffith Ann Riedesel Nevada Donna Hruska, Janice Keiserman Kelly Snyder, Barbara Ulmer Northern New Mexico Doug Sayre, Allison Majure Menice Santistevan Oak Ridge David Hemelright Pete Osborne, Dave Adler, Spencer Gross, Melyssa Noe Paducah Ben Peterson Robert Smith, Eric Roberts, Jim Ethridge Portsmouth Greg Simonton Savannah

  2. EM SSAB Chairs Conference Call

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Chairs Conference Call December 17, 2015 Participants Board Chairs/Representatives Site Staff Hanford Steve Hudson, Susan Leckband Kristen Skopeck, Sharon Braswell, Joni Grindstaff Idaho Herb Bohrer Jordan Davies Nevada Donna Hruska, Janice Keiserman Kelly Snyder, Barbara Ulmer Northern New Mexico Doug Sayre, Gerard Martinez Menice Santistevan, Mike Gardipe Oak Ridge Belinda Price, Alfreda Cook David Adler, Pete Osborne, Spencer Gross, Paducah Doreen (Renie) Barger Buz Smith, Eric Roberts

  3. EM SSAB Chairs Conference Call

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Chairs Conference Call March 23, 2016 Participants Board Chairs/Representatives Site Staff Hanford Steve Hudson, Susan Leckband Kristen Holmes Idaho Herb Bohrer Jordan Davies Nevada Donna Hruska, Janice Keiserman Kelly Snyder, Barbara Ulmer Northern New Mexico Doug Sayre, Gerard Martinez Menice Santistevan, Mike Gardipe Oak Ridge Alfreda Cook Pete Osborne Paducah Doreen (Renie) Barger Buz Smith, Eric Roberts, Mike Kemp Portsmouth Bob Berry Rick Greene, Julie Galloway Savannah River Harold Simon

  4. EM SSAB Chairs Conference Call

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    August 11, 2015 Participants Board Chairs/Representatives Site Staff Hanford Steve Hudson, Susan Leckband Kristen Skopeck, Sharon Braswell, Joni Grindstaff Idaho Herb Bohrer Melvin "Keith" Branter Nevada Donna Hruska, Janice Keiserman Kelly Snyder, Barbara Ulmer Northern New Mexico Doug Sayre Menice Santistevan Oak Ridge David Hemelright Pete Osborne, Spencer Gross, Paducah Ben Peterson Eric Roberts Portsmouth Will Henderson Savannah River Harold Simon de'Lisa Carrico DOE-HQ

  5. Honey Creek Middle School Wins National Science Competition - News Releases

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    | NREL Honey Creek Middle School Wins National Science Competition July 13, 2005 Golden, Colo. - Solar concentrators using highly efficient photovoltaic solar cells will reduce the cost of electricity from sunlight to competitive levels soon, attendees were told at a recent international conference on the subject. Herb Hayden of Arizona Public Service (APS) and Robert McConnell and Martha Symko-Davies of the U.S. Department of Energy's National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) organized

  6. hybridTalk.ppt

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Despite continued "packing" of transistors, performance is flatlining * New Constraints - 15 years of exponential clock rate growth has ended * But Moore's Law continues! - How do we use all of those transistors to keep performance increasing at historical rates? - Industry Response: #cores per chip doubles every 18 months instead of clock frequency! Figure courtesy of Kunle Olukotun, Lance Hammond, Herb Sutter, and Burton Smith NERSC Users Group Meeting 2009 3 Supercomputers are

  7. LANL, Sandia National Lab recognize New Mexico small businesses for

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    innovation LANL, Sandia National Lab recognize New Mexico small businesses for innovation LANL, Sandia recognized New Mexico small businesses for innovation Businesses include the Pueblo of Zia; Herbs, Etc.; Musicode Innovations; SAVSU Technologies; and Albuquerque Delicate Dentistry Inc. April 30, 2012 Aerial view of Los Alamos National Laboratory Aerial view of Los Alamos National Laboratory. Contact Steve Sandoval Communications Office (505) 665-9206 Email LOS ALAMOS, NEW MEXICO, April,

  8. Microsoft Word - Meeting Agenda.Draft.090814(Clean Version)

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Environmental Management Site-Specific Advisory Board Chairs Meeting September 17-18, 2014 Shilo Inn Convention Center, 780 Lindsay Boulevard, Idaho Falls, Idaho 83402 Wednesday, September 17 8:00 am - 8:25 am Welcome and Opening Remarks * Mayor Rebecca Casper, Idaho Falls (video) * Dave Borak, EM SSAB Designated Federal Officer * Rick Provencher, Manager, Idaho Operations Office * Jack Zimmerman, Deputy Manager, Idaho Cleanup Project * Herb Bohrer, INL CAB Chair 8:25 am - 8:30 am Overview of

  9. Beyond Pluto: The Search for the Edge of the Solar System focus of upcoming

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Frontiers in Science lectures Frontiers in Science lectures Beyond Pluto: The Search for the Edge of the Solar System focus of upcoming Frontiers in Science lectures Herb Funsten will explore the edge of the solar system and anticipate its future as it moves through our galactic neighborhood. July 30, 2015 IBEX spacecraft. Photo courtesy of NASA IBEX spacecraft. Photo courtesy of NASA Contact Los Alamos National Laboratory Steve Sandoval Communications Office (505) 665-9206 Email "In

  10. Cost Competitive Electricity from Photovoltaic Concentrators Called

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    'Imminent' - News Releases | NREL Cost Competitive Electricity from Photovoltaic Concentrators Called 'Imminent' July 13, 2005 Golden, Colo. - Solar concentrators using highly efficient photovoltaic solar cells will reduce the cost of electricity from sunlight to competitive levels soon, attendees were told at a recent international conference on the subject. Herb Hayden of Arizona Public Service (APS) and Robert McConnell and Martha Symko-Davies of the U.S. Department of Energy's National

  11. Foothills Parkway Section 8B Final Environmental Report, Volume 4, Appendices E-I

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Blasing, T.J.; Cada, G.F.; Carer, M.; Chin, S.M.; Dickerman, J.A.; Etnier, D.A.; Gibson, R.; Harvey, M.; Hatcher, B.; Lietzske, D.; Mann, L.K.; Mulholland, P.J.; Petrich, C.H.; Pounds, L.; Ranney, J.; Reed, R.M.; Ryan, P.F.; Schweitzer, M.; Smith, D.; Thomason, P.; Wade, M.C.

    1999-07-01

    In 1994, Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) was tasked by the National Park Service (NPS) to prepare an Environmental Report (ER) for Section 8B of the Foothills Parkway in the Great Smoky Mountains National Park (GSMNP). Section 8B represents 27.7 km (14.2 miles) of a total of 115 km (72 miles) of the planned Foothills Parkway and would connect the Cosby community on the east to the incorporated town of Pittman Center to the west. The major deliverables for the project are listed. From August 1995 through October 1996, NPS, GSMNP, and ORNL staff interacted with Federal Highway Administration staff to develop a conceptual design plan for Section 8B with the intent of protecting critical, resources identified during the ER process to the extent possible. In addition, ORNL arranged for bioengineering experts to discuss techniques that might be employed on Section 8B with NPS, GSMNP, and ORNL staff during September 1996. For the purposes of this ER, there are two basic alternatives under consideration: (1) a build alternative and (2) a no-build alternative. Within the build alternative are a number of options including constructing Section 8B with no interchanges, constructing Section 8B with an interchange at SR 416 or U.S. 321, constructing Section 8B with a spur road on Webb Mountain, and considering operation of Section 8B both before and after the operation of Section 8C. The no-build alternative is considered the no-action alternative and is not to construct Section 8B. This volume of the ER consists of Appendices E through I (all ecological survey reports), which are summarized individually in the sections that follow. The following conclusions result from the completion of these surveys and the ER impact analysis: (1) Forest clearing should be limited as much as possible; (2) Disturbed areas should be replanted with native trees; (3) Drainages should be bridged rather than leveled with cut and fill; (4) For areas of steep slopes and potential erosion

  12. Pueblo of Jemez Geothermal Feasibility Study Fianl Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    S.A. Kelley; N. Rogers; S. Sandberg; J. Witcher; J. Whittier

    2005-03-31

    This project assessed the feasibility of developing geothermal energy on the Pueblo of Jemez, with particular attention to the Red Rocks area. Geologic mapping of the Red Rocks area was done at a scale of 1:6000 and geophysical surveys identified a potential drilling target at a depth of 420 feet. The most feasible business identified to use geothermal energy on the reservation was a greenhouse growing culinary and medicinal herbs. Space heating and a spa were identified as two other likely uses of geothermal energy at Jemez Pueblo. Further geophysical surveys are needed to identify the depth to the Madera Limestone, the most likely host for a major geothermal reservoir.

  13. Operated by Los Alamos National Security, LLC for the U.S. Department of Energy's NNSA

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    LA-UR-14-26830 Los Alamos in Space Intelligence and Space Research Division Herb Funsten, ISR Division Chief Scientist Aug. 26, 2014 Operated by Los Alamos National Security, LLC for the U.S. Department of Energy's NNSA UNCLASSIFIED LA-UR-14-26830 Precipitating Events Slide 2 § 1952-1964 Advances in Nuclear Weapons - 1 st US (1952) and Soviet (1953) thermonuclear devices - Britain, France, and China join the club § 1958 Unilateral US & Russia moratoriums § 1959 US DARPA &

  14. A new method for measurement of safety rod drop times

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pesic, M.; Stefanovic, D. ); Marinkovic, P. )

    1992-10-01

    In this paper, a new method for the accurate measurement of safety rod drop times is proposed. It is based on a fast electromagnetic transducer and an analog-to-digital converter (ADC) conected to a computer system. Evaluation of recorded data is conducted by a developed computer code. The first measurements performed at the HERBE fast-thermal RB reactor show that a relative uncertainty (confidence level 95%) of less than 6% can be achieved in determination of rod drop time (with time intervals ranging from 0.4-10.0 s). Further improvements in accuracy are possible.

  15. Herbert Glaser | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Herbert Glaser About Us Herbert Glaser - Chief Counsel Herb Glaser_Leadership Page.jpg Prior to joining DOE's Loan Programs Office as Chief Counsel in November 2015, Herbert A. Glaser was in private practice with the international law firm of Haynes and Boone, LLP. Mr. Glaser previously served as managing partner of the firm's Washington, D.C. office and head of the firm-wide Projects practice. He previously served as Executive Vice President and General Counsel of OptiGlobe, Inc., a leading

  16. AmeriFlux US-Var Vaira Ranch- Ione

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Baldocchi, Dennis [University of California, Berkeley

    2016-01-01

    This is the AmeriFlux version of the carbon flux data for the site US-Var Vaira Ranch- Ione. Site Description - Located in the lower foothills of the Sierra Nevada Mountains on privately owned land, the Vaira Ranch site is classified as a grassland dominated by C3 annual grasses. Managed by local rancher, Fran Vaira, brush has been periodically removed for cattle grazing. Species include a variety of grasses and herbs, including purple false brome, smooth cat's ear, and rose clover. Growing season is confined to the wet season only, typically from October to early May.

  17. Thermodynamic properties of liquefied petroleum gases (LPG). Interim report 15 Aug 75-31 Jan 77 (final)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sallet, D.W.; Wu, K.F.

    1980-04-01

    The thermodynamic properties of several liquefied petroleum gases (with particular emphasis on propane) are discussed in detail. It is concluded that the widely used propane data by Stearns and George are too inconsistent and too inaccurate to be used for mass flow calculations of propane and propane mixtures through safety valves of rail tank cars. Accordingly, the thermodynamic properties of propane, propylene, n-butane, and a mixture of 65% (by mole) propane, 25% propylene, and 10% n-butane are recalculated using equations of states proposed by Benedict-Webb-Rubin (BWR) and by Starling. It is shown that Starling's equation results in thermodynamic properties which are more consistent and compare better with measured values than the BWR equation. Thermodynamic data for the four liquefied petroleum gases discussed above are calculated and presented in tabular form. In addition, predictions of pure propane mass flow rates (based upon isentropic), homogeneous equilibrium flow) are given. The influence of the thermodynamic data upon the predicted mass flow rates is demonstrated.

  18. ABSOLUTE FLUX CALIBRATION OF THE IRAC INSTRUMENT ON THE SPITZER SPACE TELESCOPE USING HUBBLE SPACE TELESCOPE FLUX STANDARDS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bohlin, R. C.; Gordon, K. D.; Deustua, S.; Ferguson, H. C.; Flanagan, K.; Kalirai, J.; Meixner, M.; Rieke, G. H.; Engelbracht, C.; Su, K. Y. L.; Ardila, D.; Tremblay, P.-E.

    2011-05-15

    The absolute flux calibration of the James Webb Space Telescope (JWST) will be based on a set of stars observed by the Hubble and Spitzer Space Telescopes. In order to cross-calibrate the two facilities, several A, G, and white dwarf stars are observed with both Spitzer and Hubble and are the prototypes for a set of JWST calibration standards. The flux calibration constants for the four Spitzer IRAC bands 1-4 are derived from these stars and are 2.3%, 1.9%, 2.0%, and 0.5% lower than the official cold-mission IRAC calibration of Reach et al., i.e., in agreement within their estimated errors of {approx}2%. The causes of these differences lie primarily in the IRAC data reduction and secondarily in the spectral energy distributions of our standard stars. The independent IRAC 8 {mu}m band-4 fluxes of Rieke et al. are about 1.5% {+-} 2% higher than those of Reach et al. and are also in agreement with our 8 {mu}m result.

  19. A DEEP KECK/NIRC2 SEARCH FOR THERMAL EMISSION FROM PLANETARY COMPANIONS ORBITING FOMALHAUT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Currie, Thayne; Cloutier, Ryan; Debes, John H.; Kenyon, Scott J.; Kaisler, Denise

    2013-11-01

    We present deep Keck/NIRC2 1.6 and 3.8 μm imaging of Fomalhaut to constrain the near-infrared brightness of Fomalhaut b, recently confirmed as a likely planet, and search for additional planets at r {sub proj} = 15-150 AU. Using advanced/novel point spread function subtraction techniques, we identify seven candidate substellar companions Fomalhaut b-like projected separations. However, multi-epoch data show them to be background objects. We set a new 3σ upper limit for Fomalhaut b's H-band brightness of m(H) ∼23.15 or 1.5-4.5 M{sub J} . We do not recover the possible point source reported from Spitzer/IRAC data: at its location detection limits are similar to those for Fomalhaut b. Our data when combined with other recent work rule out planets with masses and projected separations comparable to HR 8799 bcde and M > 3 M{sub J} planets at r {sub proj} > 45 AU. The James Webb Space Telescope will likely be required to shed substantial further light on Fomalhaut's planetary system in the next decade.

  20. SUPERMASSIVE DARK STARS: DETECTABLE IN JWST

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Freese, Katherine; Ilie, Cosmin; Spolyar, Douglas; Valluri, Monica; Bodenheimer, Peter

    2010-06-20

    The first phase of stellar evolution in the history of the universe may be dark stars (DSs), powered by dark matter (DM) heating rather than by nuclear fusion. Weakly interacting massive particles (WIMPs), which may be their own antipartners, collect inside the first stars and annihilate to produce a heat source that can power the stars for millions to billions of years. In this paper, we show that these objects can grow to be supermassive dark stars (SMDSs) with masses {approx_gt}(10{sup 5}-10{sup 7}) M{sub sun}. The growth continues as long as DM heating persists, since DSs are large and cool (surface temperature {approx_lt}5 x 10{sup 4} K) and do not emit enough ionizing photons to prevent further accretion of baryons onto the star. The DM may be provided by two mechanisms: (1) gravitational attraction of DM particles on a variety of orbits not previously considered and (2) capture of WIMPs due to elastic scattering. Once the DM fuel is exhausted, the SMDS becomes a heavy main-sequence star; these stars eventually collapse to form massive black holes (BHs) that may provide seeds for supermassive BHs in the universe. SMDSs are very bright, with luminosities exceeding (10{sup 9}-10{sup 11}) L{sub sun}. We demonstrate that for several reasonable parameters, these objects will be detectable with the James Webb Space Telescope. Such an observational discovery would confirm the existence of a new phase of stellar evolution powered by DM.

  1. Type IIP supernovae as cosmological probes: A SEAM distance to SN1999em

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Baron, E.; Nugent, Peter E.; Branch, David; Hauschildt, Peter H.

    2004-06-01

    Because of their intrinsic brightness, supernovae make excellent cosmological probes. We describe the spectral-fitting expanding atmosphere method (SEAM) for obtaining distances to Type IIP supernovae (SNe IIP) and present a distance to SN 1999em for which a Cepheid distance exists. Our models give results consistent with the Cepheid distance, even though we have not attempted to tune the underlying hydrodynamical model but have simply chosen the best fits. This is in contradistinction to the expanding photosphere method (EPM), which yields a distance to SN 1999em that is 50 percent smaller than the Cepheid distance. We emphasize the differences between the SEAM and the EPM. We show that the dilution factors used in the EPM analysis were systematically too small at later epochs. We also show that the EPM blackbody assumption is suspect. Since SNe IIP are visible to redshifts as high as z {approx}< 6, with the James Webb Space Telescope, the SEAM may be a valuable probe of the early universe.

  2. The potential for detecting gamma-ray burst afterglows from population III stars with the next generation of infrared telescopes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Macpherson, D. [ICRAR, University of Western Australia, Crawley, WA 6009 (Australia); Coward, D. M. [School of Physics, University of Western Australia, Crawley, WA 6009 (Australia); Zadnik, M. G., E-mail: damien.macpherson@icrar.org [Department of Imaging and Applied Physics, Curtin University, Perth, WA 6845 (Australia)

    2013-12-10

    We investigate the detectability of a proposed population of gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) from the collapse of Population III (Pop III) stars. The James Webb Space Telescope (JWST) and Space Infrared Telescope for Cosmology and Astrophysics (SPICA) will be able to observe the late time infrared afterglows. We have developed a new method to calculate their detectability, which takes into account the fundamental initial mass function and formation rates of Pop III stars, from which we find the temporal variability of the afterglows and ultimately the length of time JWST and SPICA can detect them. In the range of plausible Pop III GRB parameters, the afterglows are always detectable by these instruments during the isotropic emission, for a minimum of 55 days and a maximum of 3.7 yr. The average number of detectable afterglows will be 2.96 10{sup 5} per SPICA field of view (FOV) and 2.78 10{sup 6} per JWST FOV. These are lower limits, using a pessimistic estimate of Pop III star formation. An optimal observing strategy with SPICA could identify a candidate orphan afterglow in ?1.3 yr, with a 90% probability of confirmation with further detailed observations. A beamed GRB will align with the FOV of the planned GRB detector Energetic X-ray Imaging Survey Telescope once every 9 yr. Pop III GRBs will be more easily detected by their isotropic emissions (i.e., orphan afterglows) rather than by their prompt emissions.

  3. Infrared tip of the red giant branch and distances to the MAFFEI/IC 342 group

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wu, Po-Feng; Tully, R. Brent; Jacobs, Bradley A.; Rizzi, Luca; Dolphin, Andrew E.; Karachentsev, Igor D.

    2014-07-01

    In this paper, we extend the use of the tip of the red giant branch (TRGB) method to near-infrared wavelengths from the previously used I-band, using the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) Wide Field Camera 3 (WFC3). Upon calibration of a color dependency of the TRGB magnitude, the IR TRGB yields a random uncertainty of ∼5% in relative distance. The IR TRGB methodology has an advantage over the previously used Advance Camera for Surveys F606W and F814W filter set for galaxies that suffer from severe extinction. Using the IR TRGB methodology, we obtain distances toward three principal galaxies in the Maffei/IC 342 complex, which are located at low Galactic latitudes. New distance estimates using the TRGB method are 3.45{sub −0.13}{sup +0.13} Mpc for IC 342, 3.37{sub −0.23}{sup +0.32} Mpc for Maffei 1, and 3.52{sub −0.30}{sup +0.32} Mpc for Maffei 2. The uncertainties are dominated by uncertain extinction, especially for Maffei 1 and Maffei 2. Our IR calibration demonstrates the viability of the TRGB methodology for observations with the James Webb Space Telescope.

  4. THE SPECTRAL EVOLUTION OF THE FIRST GALAXIES. II. SPECTRAL SIGNATURES OF LYMAN CONTINUUM LEAKAGE FROM GALAXIES IN THE REIONIZATION EPOCH

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zackrisson, Erik; Jensen, Hannes; Inoue, Akio K.

    2013-11-01

    The fraction of ionizing photons that escape (f{sub esc}) from z ?> 6 galaxies is an important parameter for assessing the role of these objects in the reionization of the universe, but the opacity of the intergalactic medium precludes a direct measurement of f{sub esc} for individual galaxies at these epochs. We argue that since f{sub esc} regulates the impact of nebular emission on the spectra of galaxies, it should nonetheless be possible to indirectly probe f{sub esc} well into the reionization epoch. As a first step, we demonstrate that by combining measurements of the rest-frame UV slope ? with the equivalent width of the H? emission line, galaxies with very high Lyman continuum escape fractions (f{sub esc} ? 0.5) should be identifiable up to z ? 9 through spectroscopy with the upcoming James Webb Space Telescope (JWST). By targeting strongly lensed galaxies behind low-redshift galaxy clusters, JWST spectra of sufficiently good quality can be obtained for M{sub 1500} ?< 16.0 galaxies at z ? 7 and for M{sub 1500} ?< 17.5 galaxies at z ? 9. Dust-obscured star formation may complicate the analysis, but supporting observations with ALMA or the planned SPICA mission may provide useful constraints on this effect.

  5. POPULATION III HYPERNOVAE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Smidt, Joseph; Whalen, Daniel J.; Wiggins, Brandon K.; Even, Wesley; Fryer, Chris L.; Johnson, Jarrett L.

    2014-12-20

    Population III supernovae have been of growing interest of late for their potential to directly probe the properties of the first stars, particularly the most energetic events that are visible near the edge of the observable universe. Until now, hypernovae, the unusually energetic Type Ib/c supernovae that are sometimes associated with gamma-ray bursts, have been overlooked as cosmic beacons at the highest redshifts. In this, the latest of a series of studies on Population III supernovae, we present numerical simulations of 25-50 M {sub ☉} hypernovae and their light curves done with the Los Alamos RAGE and SPECTRUM codes. We find that they will be visible at z = 10-15 to the James Webb Space Telescope and z = 4-5 to the Wide-Field Infrared Survey Telescope, tracing star formation rates in the first galaxies and at the end of cosmological reionization. If, however, the hypernova crashes into a dense shell ejected by its progenitor, it is expected that a superluminous event will occur that may be seen at z ∼ 20 in the first generation of stars.

  6. Final Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Webb, Robert C.; Kamon, Teruki; Toback, David; Safonov, Alexei; Dutta, Bhaskar; Dimitri, Nanopoulos; Pope, Christopher; White, James

    2013-11-18

    Overview The High Energy Physics Group at Texas A&M University is submitting this final report for our grant number DE-FG02-95ER40917. This grant has supported our wide range of research activities for over a decade. The reports contained here summarize the latest work done by our research team. Task A (Collider Physics Program): CMS & CDF Profs. T. Kamon, A. Safonov, and D. Toback co-lead the Texas A&M (TAMU) collider program focusing on CDF and CMS experiments. Task D: Particle Physics Theory Our particle physics theory task is the combined effort of Profs. B. Dutta, D. Nanopoulos, and C. Pope. Task E (Underground Physics): LUX & NEXT Profs. R. Webb and J. White(deceased) lead the Xenon-based underground research program consisting of two main thrusts: the first, participation in the LUX two-phase xenon dark matter search experiment and the second, detector R&D primarily aimed at developing future detectors for underground physics (e.g. NEXT and LZ).

  7. Structureinhibition relationship of ginsenosides towards UDP-glucuronosyltransferases (UGTs)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fang, Zhong-Ze; Cao, Yun-Feng; Hu, Cui-Min; Hong, Mo; Sun, Xiao-Yu; Ge, Guang-Bo; Liu, Yong; Zhang, Yan-Yan; Yang, Ling; Sun, Hong-Zhi

    2013-03-01

    The wide utilization of ginseng provides the high risk of herbdrug interaction (HDI) with many clinical drugs. The inhibition of ginsenosides towards drug-metabolizing enzymes (DMEs) has been regarded as an important reason for herbdrug interaction (HDI). Compared with the deep studies on the ginsenosides' inhibition towards cytochrome P450 (CYP), the inhibition of ginsenosides towards the important phase II enzymes UDP-glucuronosyltransferases (UGTs) remains to be unclear. The present study aims to evaluate the inhibition behavior of ginsenosides towards important UGT isoforms located in the liver and intestine using in vitro methods. The recombinant UGT isoform-catalyzed 4-methylumbelliferone (4-MU) glucuronidation reaction was employed as in vitro probe reaction. The results showed that structure-dependent inhibition existed for the inhibition of ginsenosides towards UGT isoforms. To clarify the possibility of in vivo herbdrug interaction induced by this kind of inhibition, the ginsenoside Rg{sub 3} was selected as an example, and the inhibition kinetic type and parameters (K{sub i}) were determined. Rg{sub 3} competitively inhibited UGT1A7, 2B7 and 2B15-catalyzed 4-MU glucuronidation reaction, and exerted noncompetitive inhibition towards UGT1A8-catalyzed 4-MU glucuronidation. The inhibition parameters (K{sub i} values) were calculated to be 22.6, 7.9, 1.9, and 2.0 ?M for UGT1A7, 1A8, 2B7 and 2B15. Using human maximum plasma concentration of Rg{sub 3} (400 ng/ml (0.5 ?M)) after intramuscular injection of 60 mg Rg{sub 3}, the area under the plasma concentration-time curve (AUC) was extrapolated to increase by 2.2%, 6.3%, 26.3%, and 25% for the co-administered drugs completely undergoing the metabolism catalyzed by UGT1A7, 1A8, 2B7 and 2B15, respectively. All these results indicated that the ginsenosides' inhibition towards UGT isoforms might be an important reason for ginsengdrug interaction. - Highlights: ? Structure-dependent inhibition of ginsenoside

  8. FINDING {eta} CAR ANALOGS IN NEARBY GALAXIES USING SPITZER. I. CANDIDATE SELECTION

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Khan, Rubab; Stanek, K. Z.; Kochanek, C. S. E-mail: kstanek@astronomy.ohio-state.edu

    2013-04-10

    The late-stage evolution of the most massive stars such as {eta} Carinae is controlled by the effects of mass loss, which may be dominated by poorly understood eruptive mass ejections. Understanding this population is challenging because no true analogs of {eta} Car have been clearly identified in the Milky Way or other galaxies. We utilize Spitzer IRAC images of seven nearby ({approx}< 4 Mpc) galaxies to search for such analogs. We find 34 candidates with a flat or rising mid-IR spectral energy distributions toward longer mid-infrared wavelengths that emit >10{sup 5} L{sub Sun} in the IRAC bands (3.6 to 8.0 {mu}m) and are not known to be background sources. Based on our estimates for the expected number of background sources, we expect that follow-up observations will show that most of these candidates are not dust enshrouded massive stars, with an expectation of only 6 {+-} 6 surviving candidates. Since we would detect true analogs of {eta} Car for roughly 200 years post-eruption, this implies that the rate of eruptions like {eta} Car is less than the core-collapse supernova rate. It is possible, however, that every M > 40 M{sub Sun} star undergoes such eruptions given our initial results. In Paper II we will characterize the candidates through further analysis and follow-up observations, and there is no barrier to increasing the galaxy sample by an order of magnitude. The primary limitation of the present search is that Spitzer's resolution limits us to the shorter wavelength IRAC bands. With the James Webb Space Telescope, such surveys can be carried out at the far more optimal wavelengths of 10-30 {mu}m, allowing identification of {eta} Car analogs for millennia rather than centuries post-eruption.

  9. DETECTION OF SUBSTRUCTURE IN THE GRAVITATIONALLY LENSED QUASAR MG0414+0534 USING MID-INFRARED AND RADIO VLBI OBSERVATIONS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    MacLeod, Chelsea L. [Physics Department, United States Naval Academy, Annapolis, MD 21403 (United States); Jones, Ramsey; Agol, Eric [Astronomy Department, University of Washington, Seattle, WA 98195 (United States); Kochanek, Christopher S., E-mail: macleod@usna.edu [Department of Astronomy and the Center for Cosmology and Astroparticle Physics, Ohio State University, Columbus, OH 43210 (United States)

    2013-08-10

    We present 11.2 {mu}m observations of the gravitationally lensed, radio-loud z{sub s} = 2.64 quasar MG0414+0534, obtained using the Michelle camera on Gemini North. We find a flux ratio anomaly of A2/A1 = 0.93 {+-} 0.02 for the quasar images A1 and A2. When combined with the 11.7 {mu}m measurements from Minezaki et al., the A2/A1 flux ratio is nearly 5{sigma} from the expected ratio for a model based on the two visible lens galaxies. The mid-IR flux ratio anomaly can be explained by a satellite (substructure), 0.''3 northeast of image A2, as can the detailed very long baseline interferometry (VLBI) structures of the jet produced by the quasar. When we combine the mid-IR flux ratios with high-resolution VLBI measurements, we find a best-fit mass between 10{sup 6.2} and 10{sup 7.5} M{sub Sun} inside the Einstein radius for a satellite substructure modeled as a singular isothermal sphere at the redshift of the main lens (z{sub l} = 0.96). We are unable to set an interesting limit on the mass to light ratio due to its proximity to the quasar image A2. While the observations used here were technically difficult, surveys of flux anomalies in gravitational lenses with the James Webb Space Telescope will be simple, fast, and should well constrain the abundance of substructure in dark matter halos.

  10. FIVE DEBRIS DISKS NEWLY REVEALED IN SCATTERED LIGHT FROM THE HUBBLE SPACE TELESCOPE NICMOS ARCHIVE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Soummer, Rémi; Perrin, Marshall D.; Pueyo, Laurent; Choquet, Élodie; Chen, Christine; Golimowski, David A.; Brendan Hagan, J.; Moerchen, Margaret; N'Diaye, Mamadou; Wolff, Schuyler; Debes, John; Hines, Dean C.; Mittal, Tushar; Rajan, Abhijith; Schneider, Glenn

    2014-05-10

    We have spatially resolved five debris disks (HD 30447, HD 35841, HD 141943, HD 191089, and HD 202917) for the first time in near-infrared scattered light by reanalyzing archival Hubble Space Telescope (HST)/NICMOS coronagraphic images obtained between 1999 and 2006. One of these disks (HD 202917) was previously resolved at visible wavelengths using the HST/Advanced Camera for Surveys. To obtain these new disk images, we performed advanced point-spread function subtraction based on the Karhunen-Loève Image Projection algorithm on recently reprocessed NICMOS data with improved detector artifact removal (Legacy Archive PSF Library And Circumstellar Environments (LAPLACE) Legacy program). Three of the disks (HD 30447, HD 35841, and HD 141943) appear edge-on, while the other two (HD 191089 and HD 202917) appear inclined. The inclined disks have been sculpted into rings; in particular, the disk around HD 202917 exhibits strong asymmetries. All five host stars are young (8-40 Myr), nearby (40-100 pc) F and G stars, and one (HD 141943) is a close analog to the young Sun during the epoch of terrestrial planet formation. Our discoveries increase the number of debris disks resolved in scattered light from 19 to 23 (a 21% increase). Given their youth, proximity, and brightness (V = 7.2-8.5), these targets are excellent candidates for follow-up investigations of planet formation at visible wavelengths using the HST/Space Telescope Imaging Spectrograph coronagraph, at near-infrared wavelengths with the Gemini Planet Imager and Very Large Telescope/SPHERE, and at thermal infrared wavelengths with the James Webb Space Telescope NIRCam and MIRI coronagraphs.

  11. DISCRIMINATING BETWEEN CLOUDY, HAZY, AND CLEAR SKY EXOPLANETS USING REFRACTION

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Misra, Amit K.; Meadows, Victoria S.

    2014-11-01

    We propose a method to distinguish between cloudy, hazy, and clear sky (free of clouds and hazes) exoplanet atmospheres that could be applicable to upcoming large aperture space- and ground-based telescopes such as the James Webb Space Telescope (JWST) and the European Extremely Large Telescope (E-ELT). These facilities will be powerful tools for characterizing transiting exoplanets, but only after a considerable amount of telescope time is devoted to a single planet. A technique that could provide a relatively rapid means of identifying haze-free targets (which may be more valuable targets for characterization) could potentially increase the science return for these telescopes. Our proposed method utilizes broadband observations of refracted light in the out-of-transit spectrum. Light refracted through an exoplanet atmosphere can lead to an increase of flux prior to ingress and subsequent to egress. Because this light is transmitted at pressures greater than those for typical cloud and haze layers, the detection of refracted light could indicate a cloud- or haze-free atmosphere. A detection of refracted light could be accomplished in <10 hr for Jovian exoplanets with JWST and <5 hr for super-Earths/mini-Neptunes with E-ELT. We find that this technique is most effective for planets with equilibrium temperatures between 200 and 500K, which may include potentially habitable planets. A detection of refracted light for a potentially habitable planet would strongly suggest the planet was free of a global cloud or haze layer, and therefore a promising candidate for follow-up observations.

  12. Water clouds in Y dwarfs and exoplanets

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Morley, Caroline V.; Fortney, Jonathan J.; Marley, Mark S.; Lupu, Roxana; Greene, Tom; Saumon, Didier; Lodders, Katharina

    2014-05-20

    The formation of clouds affects brown dwarf and planetary atmospheres of nearly all effective temperatures. Iron and silicate condense in L dwarf atmospheres and dissipate at the L/T transition. Minor species such as sulfides and salts condense in mid- to late T dwarfs. For brown dwarfs below T {sub eff} ∼ 450 K, water condenses in the upper atmosphere to form ice clouds. Currently, over a dozen objects in this temperature range have been discovered, and few previous theoretical studies have addressed the effect of water clouds on brown dwarf or exoplanetary spectra. Here we present a new grid of models that include the effect of water cloud opacity. We find that they become optically thick in objects below T {sub eff} ∼ 350-375 K. Unlike refractory cloud materials, water-ice particles are significantly nongray absorbers; they predominantly scatter at optical wavelengths through the J band and absorb in the infrared with prominent features, the strongest of which is at 2.8 μm. H{sub 2}O, NH{sub 3}, CH{sub 4}, and H{sub 2} CIA are dominant opacity sources; less abundant species may also be detectable, including the alkalis, H{sub 2}S, and PH{sub 3}. PH{sub 3}, which has been detected in Jupiter, is expected to have a strong signature in the mid-infrared at 4.3 μm in Y dwarfs around T {sub eff} = 450 K; if disequilibrium chemistry increases the abundance of PH{sub 3}, it may be detectable over a wider effective temperature range than models predict. We show results incorporating disequilibrium nitrogen and carbon chemistry and predict signatures of low gravity in planetary mass objects. Finally, we make predictions for the observability of Y dwarfs and planets with existing and future instruments, including the James Webb Space Telescope and Gemini Planet Imager.

  13. Development of Advanced Continuum Models that Incorporate Nanomechanical Deformation into Engineering Analysis.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zimmerman, Jonathan A.; Jones, Reese E.; Templeton, Jeremy Alan; McDowell, David L.; Mayeur, Jason R.; Tucker, Garritt J.; Bammann, Douglas J.; Gao, Huajian

    2008-09-01

    .Delph, Remi Dingreville, James W. Foulk III, Robert J. Hardy, Richard Lehoucq, Alejandro Mota,Gregory J. Wagner, Edmund B. Webb III and Xiaowang Zhou. Support for this project was pro-vided by the Enabling Predictive Simulation Investment Area of Sandia's Laboratory DirectedResearch and Development (LDRD) program.5

  14. A COMPLETE SPECTROSCOPIC CHARACTERIZATION OF SO AND ITS ISOTOPOLOGUES UP TO THE TERAHERTZ DOMAIN

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Martin-Drumel, M. A.; Hindle, F.; Mouret, G.; Cuisset, A.; Cernicharo, J.

    2015-02-01

    In order to obtain accurate terahertz center frequencies for SO and its isotopologues, we have studied the absorption spectrum of SO, {sup 34}SO, and {sup 33}SO up to 2.5 THz using continuous-wave terahertz photomixing based on a frequency comb providing an accuracy down to 10 kHz. Sulfur monoxide was produced in a radio frequency discharge of air in a cell containing pure sulfur. Together with the strong absorption signal of the main isotopologue, transitions of {sup 34}SO ({sup 34}S: 4.21%) and {sup 33}SO ({sup 33}S: 0.75%) were observed in natural abundance. The newly observed transitions constitute an extension of the observed rotational quantum numbers of the molecule toward higher N values, allowing an improvement of the molecular parameters for the three species. An isotopically invariant fit has been performed based on pure rotational and ro-vibrational transitions of all SO isotopologues, enabling their accurate line position prediction at higher frequencies. Thanks to this new set of parameters, it is now possible to predict with very high accuracy the frequencies of the ro-vibrational lines. This should enable the research of SO in the mid-IR using ground-based IR telescopes, space-based telescope archives (Infrared Space Observatory, Spitzer), and future space missions such as the James Webb Space Telescope. This set of parameters is particularly well adapted for the detection of SO lines in O-rich evolved stars or in molecular clouds in absorption against bright IR sources.

  15. The effects of refraction on transit transmission spectroscopy: application to Earth-like exoplanets

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Misra, Amit; Meadows, Victoria; Crisp, Dave

    2014-09-01

    We quantify the effects of refraction in transit transmission spectroscopy on spectral absorption features and on temporal variations that could be used to obtain altitude-dependent spectra for planets orbiting stars of different stellar types. We validate our model against altitude-dependent transmission spectra of the Earth from ATMOS and against lunar eclipse spectra from Pallé et al. We perform detectability studies to show the potential effects of refraction on hypothetical observations of Earth analogs with the James Webb Space Telescope NIRSPEC. Due to refraction, there will be a maximum tangent pressure level that can be probed during transit for each given planet-star system. We show that because of refraction, for an Earth-analog planet orbiting in the habitable zone of a Sun-like star only the top 0.3 bars of the atmosphere can be probed, leading to a decrease in the signal-to-noise ratio (S/N) of absorption features by 60%, while for an Earth-analog planet orbiting in the habitable zone of an M5V star it is possible to probe almost the entire atmosphere with minimal decreases in S/N. We also show that refraction can result in temporal variations in the transit transmission spectrum which may provide a way to obtain altitude-dependent spectra of exoplanet atmospheres. Additionally, the variations prior to ingress and subsequent to egress provide a way to probe pressures greater than the maximum tangent pressure that can be probed during transit. Therefore, probing the maximum range of atmospheric altitudes, and in particular the near-surface environment of an Earth-analog exoplanet, will require looking at out-of-transit refracted light in addition to the in-transit spectrum.

  16. Legacy extragalactic UV survey (LEGUS) with the Hubble space telescope. I. Survey description

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Calzetti, D.; Andrews, J. E.; Lee, J. C.; Sabbi, E.; Ubeda, L.; Bright, S. N.; Aloisi, A.; Brown, T. M.; Christian, C.; Cignoni, M.; Adamo, A.; Smith, L. J.; Chandar, R.; Clayton, G. C.; Silva, R. da; Mink, S. E. de; Dobbs, C.; Elmegreen, B. G.; Elmegreen, D. M.; and others

    2015-02-01

    The Legacy ExtraGalactic UV Survey (LEGUS) is a Cycle 21 Treasury program on the Hubble Space Telescope aimed at the investigation of star formation and its relation with galactic environment in nearby galaxies, from the scales of individual stars to those of ∼kiloparsec-size clustered structures. Five-band imaging from the near-ultraviolet to the I band with the Wide-Field Camera 3 (WFC3), plus parallel optical imaging with the Advanced Camera for Surveys (ACS), is being collected for selected pointings of 50 galaxies within the local 12 Mpc. The filters used for the observations with the WFC3 are F275W(λ2704 Å), F336W(λ3355 Å), F438W(λ4325 Å), F555W(λ5308 Å), and F814W(λ8024 Å); the parallel observations with the ACS use the filters F435W(λ4328 Å), F606W(λ5921 Å), and F814W(λ8057 Å). The multiband images are yielding accurate recent (≲50 Myr) star formation histories from resolved massive stars and the extinction-corrected ages and masses of star clusters and associations. The extensive inventories of massive stars and clustered systems will be used to investigate the spatial and temporal evolution of star formation within galaxies. This will, in turn, inform theories of galaxy evolution and improve the understanding of the physical underpinning of the gas–star formation relation and the nature of star formation at high redshift. This paper describes the survey, its goals and observational strategy, and the initial scientific results. Because LEGUS will provide a reference survey and a foundation for future observations with the James Webb Space Telescope and with ALMA, a large number of data products are planned for delivery to the community.

  17. AN IMAGE-PLANE ALGORITHM FOR JWST'S NON-REDUNDANT APERTURE MASK DATA

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Greenbaum, Alexandra Z.; Pueyo, Laurent; Sivaramakrishnan, Anand; Lacour, Sylvestre

    2015-01-10

    The high angular resolution technique of non-redundant masking (NRM) or aperture masking interferometry (AMI) has yielded images of faint protoplanetary companions of nearby stars from the ground. AMI on James Webb Space Telescope (JWST)'s Near Infrared Imager and Slitless Spectrograph (NIRISS) has a lower thermal background than ground-based facilities and does not suffer from atmospheric instability. NIRISS AMI images are likely to have 90%-95% Strehl ratio between 2.77 and 4.8 μm. In this paper we quantify factors that limit the raw point source contrast of JWST NRM. We develop an analytic model of the NRM point spread function which includes different optical path delays (pistons) between mask holes and fit the model parameters with image plane data. It enables a straightforward way to exclude bad pixels, is suited to limited fields of view, and can incorporate effects such as intra-pixel sensitivity variations. We simulate various sources of noise to estimate their effect on the standard deviation of closure phase, σ{sub CP} (a proxy for binary point source contrast). If σ{sub CP} < 10{sup –4} radians—a contrast ratio of 10 mag—young accreting gas giant planets (e.g., in the nearby Taurus star-forming region) could be imaged with JWST NIRISS. We show the feasibility of using NIRISS' NRM with the sub-Nyquist sampled F277W, which would enable some exoplanet chemistry characterization. In the presence of small piston errors, the dominant sources of closure phase error (depending on pixel sampling, and filter bandwidth) are flat field errors and unmodeled variations in intra-pixel sensitivity. The in-flight stability of NIRISS will determine how well these errors can be calibrated by observing a point source. Our results help develop efficient observing strategies for space-based NRM.

  18. Cluster candidates around low-power radio galaxies at z ? 1-2 in cosmos

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Castignani, G.; Celotti, A.; De Zotti, G.; Chiaberge, M.; Norman, C.

    2014-09-10

    We search for high-redshift (z ?1-2) galaxy clusters using low power radio galaxies (FR I) as beacons and our newly developed Poisson probability method based on photometric redshift information and galaxy number counts. We use a sample of 32 FR Is within the Cosmic Evolution Survey (COSMOS) field from the Chiaberge et al. catalog. We derive a reliable subsample of 21 bona fide low luminosity radio galaxies (LLRGs) and a subsample of 11 high luminosity radio galaxies (HLRGs), on the basis of photometric redshift information and NRAO VLA Sky Survey radio fluxes. The LLRGs are selected to have 1.4 GHz rest frame luminosities lower than the fiducial FR I/FR II divide. This also allows us to estimate the comoving space density of sources with L {sub 1.4} ? 10{sup 32.3} erg s{sup 1} Hz{sup 1} at z ? 1.1, which strengthens the case for a strong cosmological evolution of these sources. In the fields of the LLRGs and HLRGs we find evidence that 14 and 8 of them reside in rich groups or galaxy clusters, respectively. Thus, overdensities are found around ?70% of the FR Is, independently of the considered subsample. This rate is in agreement with the fraction found for low redshift FR Is and it is significantly higher than that for FR IIs at all redshifts. Although our method is primarily introduced for the COSMOS survey, it may be applied to both present and future wide field surveys such as Sloan Digital Sky Survey Stripe 82, LSST, and Euclid. Furthermore, cluster candidates found with our method are excellent targets for next generation space telescopes such as James Webb Space Telescope.

  19. A SIMPLE TECHNIQUE FOR PREDICTING HIGH-REDSHIFT GALAXY EVOLUTION

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Behroozi, Peter S.; Silk, Joseph

    2015-01-20

    We show that the ratio of galaxies' specific star formation rates (SSFRs) to their host halos' specific mass accretion rates (SMARs) strongly constrains how the galaxies' stellar masses, SSFRs, and host halo masses evolve over cosmic time. This evolutionary constraint provides a simple way to probe z > 8 galaxy populations without direct observations. Tests of the method with galaxy properties at z = 4 successfully reproduce the known evolution of the stellar mass-halo mass (SMHM) relation, galaxy SSFRs, and the cosmic star formation rate (CSFR) for 5 < z < 8. We then predict the continued evolution of these properties for 8 < z < 15. In contrast to the nonevolution in the SMHM relation at z < 4, the median galaxy mass at fixed halo mass increases strongly at z > 4. We show that this result is closely linked to the flattening in galaxy SSFRs at z > 2 compared to halo SMARs; we expect that average galaxy SSFRs at fixed stellar mass will continue their mild evolution to z ? 15. The expected CSFR shows no breaks or features at z > 8.5; this constrains both reionization and the possibility of a steep falloff in the CSFR at z = 9-10. Finally, we make predictions for stellar mass and luminosity functions for the James Webb Space Telescope, which should be able to observe one galaxy with M {sub *} ? 10{sup 8} M {sub ?} per 10{sup 3}Mpc{sup 3} at z = 9.6 and one such galaxy per 10{sup 4}Mpc{sup 3} at z = 15.

  20. Transit confirmation and improved stellar and planet parameters for the super-Earth HD 97658 b and its host star

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Van Grootel, V.; Gillon, M.; Scuflaire, R.; Valencia, D.; Madhusudhan, N.; Demory, B.-O.; Queloz, D.; Dragomir, D.; Howe, A. R.; Burrows, A. S.; Deming, D.; Ehrenreich, D.; Lovis, C.; Mayor, M.; Pepe, F.; Segransan, D.; Udry, S.; Seager, S.

    2014-05-01

    Super-Earths transiting nearby bright stars are key objects that simultaneously allow for accurate measurements of both their mass and radius, providing essential constraints on their internal composition. We present here the confirmation, based on Spitzer transit observations, that the super-Earth HD 97658 b transits its host star. HD 97658 is a low-mass (M {sub *} = 0.77 0.05 M {sub ?}) K1 dwarf, as determined from the Hipparcos parallax and stellar evolution modeling. To constrain the planet parameters, we carry out Bayesian global analyses of Keck-High Resolution Echelle Spectrometer (Keck-HIRES) radial velocities and Microvariability and Oscillations of STars (MOST) and Spitzer photometry. HD 97658 b is a massive (M{sub P}=7.55{sub ?0.79}{sup +0.83} M{sub ?}) and large (R{sub P}=2.247{sub ?0.095}{sup +0.098}R{sub ?} at 4.5 ?m) super-Earth. We investigate the possible internal compositions for HD 97658 b. Our results indicate a large rocky component, of at least 60% by mass, and very little H-He components, at most 2% by mass. We also discuss how future asteroseismic observations can improve the knowledge of the HD 97658 system, in particular by constraining its age. Orbiting a bright host star, HD 97658 b will be a key target for upcoming space missions such as the Transiting Exoplanet Survey Satellite (TESS), the Characterizing Exoplanet Satellite (CHEOPS), the Planetary Transits and Oscillations of stars (PLATO), and the James Webb Space Telescope to characterize thoroughly its structure and atmosphere.

  1. AmeriFlux CA-SF3 Saskatchewan - Western Boreal, forest burned in 1998.

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Amiro, Brian [University of Manitoba; Canadian Forest Service

    2016-01-01

    This is the AmeriFlux version of the carbon flux data for the site CA-SF3 Saskatchewan - Western Boreal, forest burned in 1998.. Site Description - The 1998 burn site (F98) was in the east part of Prince Albert National Park, Saskatchewan, in the Waskesiu Fire, ignited by lightning that burned about 1700 ha in July 1998. The pre-fire forest consisted of jack pine and black spruce stands, with some intermixed aspen. The fire was severe, consuming much of the top layer of organic soil and killing all trees. In 2001, much of the regenerating vegetation consisted of aspen saplings about 1 m tall and shorter jack pine and black spruce seedlings. An overstory of dead, leafless jack pine trees dominated at a height of 18 m. Sparse grass and herbs, such as fireweed (Epilobium angustifolium L.) covered the ground. There were a large number of fallen dead trees, mostly perched above the ground and not decomposing quickly.

  2. Flora of the Mayacmas Mountains. [Listing of 679 species in the Geysers Geothermal Resource area

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Neilson, J.A.

    1981-09-01

    This flora describes the plants that occur within the Mayacmas Mountain Range of northern California. It is the result of ten years of environmental assessment by the author in the Geysers Geothermal Resource area, located in the center of the Mayacmas Range. The flora includes notes on plant communities and ecology of the area, as well as habitat and collection data for most of the 679 species covered. Altogether 74 families, 299 genera and 679 species are included in the flora. The work is divided into eight subdivisions: trees; shrubs; ferns and fern allies; aquatic plants; tules, sedges, and rushes; lilies and related plants; dicot herbs; and grasses. Within each subdivision, family, genera and species are listed alphabetically. Keys are provided at the beginning of each subdivision. A unique combination of physical, environmental and geologic factors have resulted in a rich and diverse flora in the Mayacmas. Maps have been provided indicating known locations for species of rare or limited occurrence.

  3. Preliminary study on mercury uptake by Rosmarinus officinalis L. (Rosemary) in a mining area (Mt. Amiata, Italy)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Barghigiani, C.; Ristori, T.

    1995-04-01

    Among the different plants analyzed to assess environmental mercury contamination of mining areas, lichens are those most studied, followed by brooms together with pine, which was also used in other areas, and spruce. Other species, both naturally occurring and cultivated, have also been studied. This work reports on the results of mercury uptake and accumulation in rosemary in relation to metal concentrations in both air and soil. R. officinalis is a widespread endemic Mediterranean evergreen shrub, which in Italy grows naturally and is also cultivated as a culinary herb. This research was carried out in Tuscany (Italy), in the Mt. Amiata area, which is characterized by the presence of cinnabar (HgS) deposits and has been used for mercury extraction and smelting from Etruscan times until 1980, and in the country near the town of Pisa, 140 km away from Mt. Amiata. 16 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

  4. Foothills Parkway Section 8B Final Environmental Report, Volume 3, Appendix D

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Blasing, T.J.; Cada, G.F.; Carer, M.; Chin, S.M.; Dickerman, J.A.; Etnier, D.A.; Gibson, R.; Harvey, M.; Hatcher, B.; Lietzske, D.; Mann, L.K.; Mulholland, P.J.; Petrich, C.H.; Pounds, L.; Ranney, J.; Reed, R.M.; Ryan, P.F.; Schweitzer, M.; Smith, D.; Thomason, P.; Wade, M.C.

    1999-07-01

    In 1994, Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) was tasked by the National Park Service (NPS) to prepare an Environmental Report (ER) for Section 8B of the Foothills Parkway in the Great Smoky Mountains National Park (GSMNP). Section 8B represents 27.7 km (14.2 miles) of a total of 115 km (72 miles) of the planned Foothills Parkway and would connect the Cosby community on the east to the incorporated town of Pittman Center to the west. The major deliverables for the project are listed. From August 1995 through October 1996, NPS, GSMNP, and ORNL staff interacted with Federal Highway Administration staff to develop a conceptual design plan for Section 8B with the intent of protecting critical resources identified during the ER process to the extent possible. In addition, ORNL arranged for bioengineering experts to discuss techniques that might be employed on Section 8B with NPS, GSMNP, and ORNL staff during September 1996. For the purposes of this ER, there are two basic alternatives under consideration: (1) a build alternative and (2) a no-build alternative. Within the build alternative are a number of options including constructing Section 8B with no interchanges, constructing Section 8B with an interchange at SR416 or U.S. 321, constructing Section 8B with a spur road on Webb Mountain, and considering operation of Section 8B both before and after the operation of Section 8C. The no-build alternative is considered the no-action alternative and is not to construct Section 8B. This volume of the ER inventories the fishes and benthic macroinvertebrates inhabiting the aquatic ecosystems potentially affected by the proposed construction of Section 8B. Stream biological surveys were completed at 31 stream sites during the Fall of 1994. The sampling strategy for both invertebrates and fish was to survey the different taxa from all available habitats. For benthic invertebrates, a standardized qualitative manual collection technique was employed for all 31 stations. For fish

  5. The most luminous z ∼ 9-10 galaxy candidates yet found: The luminosity function, cosmic star-formation rate, and the first mass density estimate at 500 Myr

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Oesch, P. A.; Illingworth, G. D.; Magee, D.; Van Dokkum, P. G.; Momcheva, I.; Ashby, M. L. N.; Fazio, G. G.; Huang, J.-S.; Willner, S. P.; Gonzalez, V.; Trenti, M.; Brammer, G. B.; Skelton, R. E.; Spitler, L. R.

    2014-05-10

    We present the discovery of four surprisingly bright (H {sub 160} ∼ 26-27 mag AB) galaxy candidates at z ∼ 9-10 in the complete HST CANDELS WFC3/IR GOODS-N imaging data, doubling the number of z ∼ 10 galaxy candidates that are known, just ∼500 Myr after the big bang. Two similarly bright sources are also detected in a reanalysis of the GOODS-S data set. Three of the four galaxies in GOODS-N are significantly detected at 4.5σ-6.2σ in the very deep Spitzer/IRAC 4.5 μm data, as is one of the GOODS-S candidates. Furthermore, the brightest of our candidates (at z = 10.2 ± 0.4) is robustly detected also at 3.6 μm (6.9σ), revealing a flat UV spectral energy distribution with a slope β = –2.0 ± 0.2, consistent with demonstrated trends with luminosity at high redshift. Thorough testing and use of grism data excludes known low-redshift contamination at high significance, including single emission-line sources, but as-yet unknown low redshift sources could provide an alternative solution given the surprising luminosity of these candidates. Finding such bright galaxies at z ∼ 9-10 suggests that the luminosity function for luminous galaxies might evolve in a complex way at z > 8. The cosmic star formation rate density still shows, however, an order-of-magnitude increase from z ∼ 10 to z ∼ 8 since the dominant contribution comes from low-luminosity sources. Based on the IRAC detections, we derive galaxy stellar masses at z ∼ 10, finding that these luminous objects are typically 10{sup 9} M {sub ☉}. This allows for a first estimate of the cosmic stellar mass density at z ∼ 10 resulting in log{sub 10} ρ{sub ∗}=4.7{sub −0.8}{sup +0.5} M {sub ☉} Mpc{sup –3} for galaxies brighter than M {sub UV} ∼ –18. The remarkable brightness, and hence luminosity, of these z ∼ 9-10 candidates will enable deep spectroscopy to determine their redshift and nature, and highlights the opportunity for the James Webb Space Telescope to map the buildup of

  6. FINDING η CAR ANALOGS IN NEARBY GALAXIES USING Spitzer. II. IDENTIFICATION OF AN EMERGING CLASS OF EXTRAGALACTIC SELF-OBSCURED STARS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Khan, Rubab; Kochanek, C. S.; Stanek, K. Z.; Gerke, Jill

    2015-02-01

    Understanding the late-stage evolution of the most massive stars such as η Carinae is challenging because no true analogs of η Car have been clearly identified in the Milky Way or other galaxies. In Khan et al., we utilized Spitzer IRAC images of 7 nearby (≲ 4 Mpc) galaxies to search for such analogs, and found 34 candidates with flat or red mid-IR spectral energy distributions. Here, in Paper II, we present our characterization of these candidates using multi-wavelength data from the optical through the far-IR. Our search detected no true analogs of η Car, which implies an eruption rate that is a fraction 0.01 ≲ F ≲ 0.19 of the core-collapse supernova (ccSN) rate. This is roughly consistent with each M {sub ZAMS} ≳ 70 M {sub ☉} star undergoing one or two outbursts in its lifetime. However, we do identify a significant population of 18 lower luminosity (log (L/L {sub ☉}) ≅ 5.5-6.0) dusty stars. Stars enter this phase at a rate that is a fraction 0.09 ≲ F ≲ 0.55 of the ccSN rate, and this is consistent with all 25 < M {sub ZAMS} < 60 M {sub ☉} stars undergoing an obscured phase at most lasting a few thousand years once or twice. These phases constitute a negligible fraction of post-main-sequence lifetimes of massive stars, which implies that these events are likely to be associated with special periods in the evolution of the stars. The mass of the obscuring material is of order ∼M {sub ☉}, and we simply do not find enough heavily obscured stars for theses phases to represent more than a modest fraction (∼10% not ∼50%) of the total mass lost by these stars. In the long term, the sources that we identified will be prime candidates for detailed physical analysis with the James Webb Space Telescope.

  7. KECK SPECTROSCOPY OF 3 < z < 7 FAINT LYMAN BREAK GALAXIES: THE IMPORTANCE OF NEBULAR EMISSION IN UNDERSTANDING THE SPECIFIC STAR FORMATION RATE AND STELLAR MASS DENSITY

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stark, Daniel P.; Robertson, Brant; Schenker, Matthew A.; Ellis, Richard; McLure, Ross; Dunlop, James

    2013-02-15

    > 4 than previously thought, supporting up to a 5 Multiplication-Sign increase between z {approx_equal} 2 and 7. Such a trend is much closer to theoretical expectations. Given our findings, we discuss the prospects for verifying quantitatively the nebular emission line strengths prior to the launch of the James Webb Space Telescope.

  8. Constraining the minimum luminosity of high redshift galaxies through gravitational lensing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mashian, Natalie; Loeb, Abraham E-mail: aloeb@cfa.harvard.edu

    2013-12-01

    We simulate the effects of gravitational lensing on the source count of high redshift galaxies as projected to be observed by the Hubble Frontier Fields program and the James Webb Space Telescope (JWST) in the near future. Taking the mass density profile of the lensing object to be the singular isothermal sphere (SIS) or the Navarro-Frenk-White (NFW) profile, we model a lens residing at a redshift of z{sub L} = 0.5 and explore the radial dependence of the resulting magnification bias and its variability with the velocity dispersion of the lens, the photometric sensitivity of the instrument, the redshift of the background source population, and the intrinsic maximum absolute magnitude (M{sub max}) of the sources. We find that gravitational lensing enhances the number of galaxies with redshifts z∼> 13 detected in the angular region θ{sub E}/2 ≤ θ ≤ 2θ{sub E} (where θ{sub E} is the Einstein angle) by a factor of ∼ 3 and 1.5 in the HUDF (df/dν{sub 0} ∼ 9 nJy) and medium-deep JWST surveys (df/dν{sub 0} ∼ 6 nJy). Furthermore, we find that even in cases where a negative magnification bias reduces the observed number count of background sources, the lensing effect improves the sensitivity of the count to the intrinsic faint-magnitude cut-off of the Schechter luminosity function. In a field centered on a strong lensing cluster, observations of z∼> 6 and z∼> 13 galaxies with JWST can be used to infer this cut-off magnitude for values as faint as M{sub max} ∼ -14.4 and -16.1 mag (L{sub min} ≈ 2.5 × 10{sup 26} and 1.2 × 10{sup 27} erg s{sup −1} Hz{sup −1}) respectively, within the range bracketed by existing theoretical models. Gravitational lensing may therefore offer an effective way of constraining the low-luminosity cut-off of high-redshift galaxies.

  9. Foothills Parkway Section 8B Final Environmental Report, Volume 5, Appendices J-M

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Blasing, T.J.; Cada, G.F.; Carer, M.; Chin, S.M.; Dickerman, J.A.; Etnier, D.A.; Gibson, R.; Harvey, M.; Hatcher, B.; Lietzske, D.; Mann, L.K.; Mulholland, P.J.; Petrich, C.H.; Pounds, L.; Ranney, J.; Reed, R.M.; Ryan, P.F.; Schweitzer, M.; Smith, D.; Thomason, P.; Wade, M.C.

    1999-07-01

    In 1994, Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) was tasked by the National Park Service (NPS) to prepare an Environmental Report (ER) for Section 8B of the Foothills Parkway in the Great Smoky Mountains National Park (GSMNP). Section 8B represents 27.7 km (14.2 miles) of a total of 115 km (72 miles) of the planned Foothills Parkway and would connect the Cosby community on the east to the incorporated town of Pittman Center to the west. The major deliverables for the project are listed. From August 1995 through October 1996, NPS, GSMNP, and ORNL staff interacted with Federal Highway Administration staff to develop a conceptual design plan for Section 8B with the intent of protecting critical resources identified during the ER process to the extent possible. In addition, ORNL arranged for bioengineering experts to discuss techniques that might be employed on Section 8B with NPS, GSMNP, and ORNL staff during September 1996. For the purposes of this ER, there are two basic alternatives under consideration: (1) a build alternative and (2) a no-build alternative. Within the build alternative are a number of options including constructing Section 8B with no interchanges, constructing Section 8B with an interchange at SR 416 or U.S. 321, constructing Section 8B with a spur road on Webb Mountain, and considering operation of Section 8B both before and after the operation of Section 8C. The no-build alternative is considered the no-action alternative and is not to construct Section 8B. This volume of the ER consists of Appendices J through M, which describe potential impacts regarding traffic, noise, and aesthetics. The results of the traffic studies described in these appendices resulted in the following conclusions: Unacceptable levels of service will occur on numerous roads within and outside of the park increasingly in the Mure based upon current and future regional growth. However, the results of the traffic assessment indicated that there would be no significant or

  10. Foothills Parkway Section 8B Final Environmental Report, Volume 6, Appendix N

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Blasing, T.J.; Cada, G.F.; Carer, M.; Chin, S.M.; Dickerman, J.A.; Etnier, D.A.; Gibson, R.; Harvey, M.; Hatcher, B.; Lietzske, D.; Mann, L.K.; Mulholland, P.J.; Petrich, C.H.; Pounds, L.; Ranney, J.; Reed, R.M.; Ryan, P.F.; Schweitzer, M.; Smith, D.; Thomason, P.; Wade, M.C.

    1999-07-01

    In 1994, Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) was tasked by the National Park Service (NPS) to prepare an Environmental Report (ER) for Section 8B of the Foothills Parkway in the Great Smoky Mountains National Park (GSMNP). Section 8B represents 27.7 km (14.2 miles) of a total of 115 km (72 miles) of the planned Foothills Parkway and would connect the Cosby community on the east to the incorporated town of Pittman Center to the west. The major deliverables for the project are listed. From August 1995 through October 1996, NPS, GSMNP, and ORNL staff interacted with Federal Highway Administration staff to develop a conceptual design plan for Section 8B with the intent of protecting critical resources identified during the ER process to the extent possible. In addition, ORNL arranged for bioengineering experts to discuss techniques that might be employed on Section 8B with NPS, GSMNP, and ORNL staff during September 1996. For the purposes of this ER, there are two basic alternatives under consideration: (1) a build alternative and (2) a no-build alternative. Within the build alternative are a number of options including constructing Section 8B with no interchanges, constructing Section 8B with an interchange at SR 416 or U.S. 321, constructing Section 8B with a spur road on Webb Mountain, and considering operation of Section 8B both before and after the operation of Section 8C. The no-build alternative is considered the no-action alternative and is not to construct Section 8B. This volume of the ER documents the results of the architectural, historical, and cultural resources assessment for the entire Section 8B ROW that was completed in May 1995 to document the architectural, historical, and cultural resources located within the project area. The assessment included evaluation of the potential for cultural (i.e., rural historic) landscapes in the area of the ROW. The assessment showed that one National Register-listed property is located 0.3 mile south of the ROW

  11. CANDELS: THE CONTRIBUTION OF THE OBSERVED GALAXY POPULATION TO COSMIC REIONIZATION

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Finkelstein, Steven L.; Pawlik, Andreas H.; Papovich, Casey; Ryan, Russell E.; Ferguson, Henry C.; Koekemoer, Anton M.; Grogin, Norman A.; Dickinson, Mark; Finlator, Kristian; Giavalisco, Mauro; Cooray, Asantha; Dunlop, James S.; Faber, Sandy M.; Kocevski, Dale D.

    2012-10-20

    reionization, or <13% (2{sigma}) if the luminosity function extends to a limiting magnitude of M {sub UV} = -13. These escape fractions are sufficient to sustain an ionized IGM by z = 6. Current constraints on the high-redshift galaxy population imply that the volume ionized fraction of the IGM, while consistent with unity at z {<=} 6, appears to drop at redshifts not much higher than 7, consistent with a number of complementary reionization probes. If faint galaxies dominated the ionizing photon budget at z = 6-7, future extremely deep observations with the James Webb Space Telescope will probe deep enough to directly observe them, providing an indirect constraint on the global ionizing photon escape fraction.

  12. Pipeline corridors through wetlands -- Impacts on plant communities: Little Timber Creek Crossing, Gloucester County, New Jersey. Topical report, August 1991--January 1993

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shem, L.M.; Zimmerman, R.E.; Alsum, S.K.; Van Dyke, G.D. |

    1994-12-01

    The goal of the Gas Research Institute Wetland Corridors Program is to document impacts of existing pipelines on the wetlands they traverse. To accomplish this goal, 12 existing wetland crossings were surveyed. These sites varied in elapsed time since pipeline construction, wetland type, pipeline installation techniques, and right-of-way (ROW) management practices. This report presents results of a survey conducted over the period of August 5--7, 1991, at the Little Timber Creek crossing in Gloucester County, New Jersey, where three pipelines, constructed in 1950, 1960, and 1990, cross the creek and associated wetlands. The old side of the ROW, created by the installation of the 1960 pipeline, was designed to contain a raised peat bed over the 1950 pipeline and an open-water ditch over the 1960 pipeline. The new portion of the ROW, created by installation of the 1990 pipeline, has an open-water ditch over the pipeline (resulting from settling of the backfill) and a raised peat bed (resulting from rebound of compacted peat). Both the old and new ROWs contain dense stands of herbs; the vegetation on the old ROW was more similar to that in the adjacent natural area than was vegetation in the new ROW. The ROW increased species and habitat diversity in the wetlands. It may contribute to the spread of purple loosestrife and affect species sensitive to habitat fragmentation.

  13. Life-threatening interaction between the root extract of Pueraria lobata and methotrexate in rats

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chiang, H.-M.; Fang, S.-H.; Wen, K.-C.; Hsiu, S.-L.; Tsai, Shang-Yuan; Hou, Y.-C.; Chi, Y.-C.; Lee Chao, Pei-Dawn . E-mail: pdlee@mail.cmu.edu.tw

    2005-12-15

    Isoflavone supplements are nowadays widely used as alternative for hormone replacement therapy. However, the safety remains unanswered. This study attempted to investigate the effect of Pueraria lobata root decoction (PLRD), an isoflavone-rich herb, on the pharmacokinetics of methotrexate (MTX), a bicarboxylate antimetabolite with narrow therapeutic window. Rats were orally and intravenously given methotrexate alone and coadministered with PLRD. Blood samples were withdrawn via cardiopuncture at specific time points after drug administration. Serum methotrexate concentrations were assayed by specific monoclonal fluorescence polarization immunoassay method. Pharmacokinetic parameters were calculated using noncompartment model of WINNONLIN for both oral and intravenous data of MTX. Our results showed that coadministration of 4.0 g/kg and 2.0 g/kg of PLRD significantly increased the AUC{sub 0-t} by 207.8% and 127.9%, prolonged the mean residence time (MRT) by 237.8 and 155.2%, respectively, finally resulted in surprisingly high mortalities of 57.1% and 14.3% in rats. When MTX was given intravenously, the coadministration of PLRD at 4.0 g/kg significantly increased the half-life by 53.9% and decreased the clearance by 47.9%. In conclusion, the coadministration of PLRD significantly decreased the elimination and resulted in markedly increased exposure of MTX in rats.

  14. Ecosystem management: Controlling biological invasion in an Illinois nature preserve

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thelen, C.S.; Schulz, K.E.

    1995-12-01

    Understanding the nature and effects of human interaction with the landscape is an important aspect of environmental decisionmaking. Often, human action alters the composition and distribution of organisms. In the North American central Midwest, human occupation has decimated native woodlands, which endure as habitat islands in a highly fragmented natural landscape dominated by intensive agriculture and permeated by invasive exotic species. The alterations in the landscape have affected the structure and function of the few remaining intact forests by altering the environment experienced by tree and herb species. A frequent invader of forest understories throughout the central Midwest is Vinca minor, a horticultural groundcover, yet this species has not previously been studied as a woodland invader. We tested the hypothesis that native understory species were excluded from colonized areas, and that tree seedling growth was suppressed. Using study plots in Knobeloch Woods Nature Preserve, St. Clair County, Illinois, we measured the effect of Vinca colonization on understory composition and diversity, by comparing colonized and uncolonized plots. We also related understory characteristics to soil and canopy properties. Finally, to evaluate an ongoing program to control the invasion in the field, we tested the hypothesis that simultaneous cutting and herbicide treatment had increased the diversity of native understory species. We hope with this study to provide fact-based recommendations for management of midwestern nature preserves experiencing exotic plant invasions.

  15. AmeriFlux US-Ton Tonzi Ranch

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Baldocchi, Dennis [University of California, Berkeley

    2016-01-01

    This is the AmeriFlux version of the carbon flux data for the site US-Ton Tonzi Ranch. Site Description - Located in the lower foothills of the Sierra Nevada Mountains, the Tonzi Ranch site is classified as an oak savanna woodland on privately owned land. Managed by local rancher, Russell Tonzi, brush has been periodically removed for cattle grazing. The overstory is dominated by blue oak trees (40% of total vegetation) with intermittent grey pine trees (3 trees/ha). Understory species include a variety of grasses and herbs, including purple false brome, smooth cat's ear, and rose clover. These two distinctive layers operate in and out from one another. Growing season of the understory is confined to the wet season only, typically from October to early May. In contrast, the deciduous blue oak trees are dormant during the rainy winter months and reach maximum LAI in April. The blue oak ecosystem rings the Great Central Valley of California, inhabiting the lower reaches of the Sierra Nevada foothills.

  16. Restoring a disappearing ecosystem: the Longleaf Pine Savanna.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Harrington, Timothy B.; Miller, Karl V.; Park, Noreen

    2013-05-01

    Longleaf pine (Pinus palustris) savannas of the southeastern United States contain some of the worlds most diverse plant communities, along with a unique complement of wildlife. Their traditionally open canopy structure and rich understory of grasses and herbs were critical to their vigor. However, a long history of land-use practices such as logging, farming, and fire exclusion have reduced this once-widespread ecosystem to only 3 percent of its original range. At six longleaf pine plantations in South Carolina, Tim Harrington with the Pacific Northwest Research Station and collaborators with the Southern Research Station used various treatments (including prescribed burns, tree thinning, and herbicide applications) to alter the forest structure and tracked how successful each one was in advancing savanna restoration over a 14-year period. They found that typical planting densities for wood production in plantations create dense understory shade that excludes many native herbaceous species important to savannas and associated wildlife. The scientists found that although tree thinning alone did not result in sustained gains, a combination of controlled burning, thinning, and herbicide treatments to reduce woody plants was an effective strategy for recovering the savanna ecosystem. The scientists also found that these efforts must be repeated periodically for enduring benefits.

  17. AmeriFlux US-Dk1 Duke Forest-open field

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Novick, Kim [Indiana University; Oishi, Chris [USDA Forest Service; Stoy, Paul [Montana State University

    2016-01-01

    This is the AmeriFlux version of the carbon flux data for the site US-Dk1 Duke Forest-open field. Site Description - The Duke Forest grass field is approximately 480×305 m, dominated by the C3 grass Festuca arundinacea Shreb. (tall fescue) includes minor components of C3 herbs and the C4 grass Schizachyrium scoparium (Michx.) Nash, not considered here. The site was burned in 1979 and is mowed annually during the summer for hay according to local practices. Lai, C.T. and G.G. Katul, 2000, "The dynamic role of root-water uptake in coupling potential to actual transpiration" , Advances in Water Resources, 23, 427-439; Novick , K.A., P. C. Stoy, G. G. Katul, D. S. Ellsworth, M. B. S. Siqueira, J. Juang, R. Oren, 2004, Carbon dioxide and water vapor exchange in a warm temperate grassland, Oecologia, 138, 259-274; Stoy PC, Katul GG, Siqueira MBS, Juang J-Y, McCarthy HR, Oishi AC, Uebelherr JM, Kim H-S, Oren R (2006). Separating the effects of climate and vegetation on evapotranspiration along a successional chronosequence in the southeastern U.S. Global Change Biology 12:2115-2135

  18. A Survey of Vegetation and Wildland Fire Hazards on the Nevada Test Site, September 2004

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bechtel Nevada

    2004-09-01

    In the spring of 2004 a survey was conducted by Bechtel Nevada Ecological Services on the Nevada Test Site to characterize vegetation resources and climatic components of the environment that contribute to wildland fires. The field surveyed assessed 211 sites along major Nevada Test Site corridors for the abundance of native perennial and annual species and invasive weeds. The abundance of fine-textured (grasses and herbs) and coarse-textured (woody) biomass was visually estimated on numerical scales ranging from one to five. Wildland fires are costly to control and to mitigate once they occur. Revegetation of burned areas is very slow without reseeding or transplanting with native species and other rehabilitation efforts. Untreated areas become much more vulnerable to future fires once invasive species, rather than native species, colonize a burned area.The annual assessment of wildland fire hazards on the Nevada Test Site is scheduled to be implemented each spring in the near future with results being reported directly to the U.S. Department of Energy and the Bechtel Nevada Fire Marshal.

  19. Ecological outcomes and evaluation of success in passively restored southeastern depressional wetlands.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    De Steven, Diane; Sharitz, Rebecca R.; Barton, Christopher, D.

    2010-11-01

    Abstract: Depressional wetlands may be restored passively by disrupting prior drainage to recover original hydrology and relying on natural revegetation. Restored hydrology selects for wetland vegetation; however, depression geomorphology constrains the achievable hydroperiod, and plant communities are influenced by hydroperiod and available species pools. Such constraints can complicate assessments of restoration success. Sixteen drained depressions in South Carolina, USA, were restored experimentally by forest clearing and ditch plugging for potential crediting to a mitigation bank. Depressions were assigned to alternate revegetation methods representing desired targets of herbaceous and wet-forest communities. After five years, restoration progress and revegetation methods were evaluated. Restored hydroperiods differed among wetlands, but all sites developed diverse vegetation of native wetland species. Vegetation traits were influenced by hydroperiod and the effects of early drought, rather than by revegetation method. For mitigation banking, individual wetlands were assessed for improvement from pre-restoration condition and similarity to assigned reference type. Most wetlands met goals to increase hydroperiod, herb-species dominance, and wetland-plant composition. Fewer wetlands achieved equivalence to reference types because some vegetation targets were incompatible with depression hydroperiods and improbable without intensive management. The results illustrated a paradox in judging success when vegetation goals may be unsuited to system constraints.

  20. Natural vegetation at the proposed Reference Repository Location in southeastern Washington

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rickard, W.H.

    1988-02-01

    The dominant shrubs were sagebrush and spiny hopsage; the herbs were dominated by cheatgrass and Sandberg bluegrass. Spiny hopsage appeared to be vulnerable to burning and also to damage by off-road vehicular traffic. It appears to have little or no ability to reproduce through seedlings; once the existing plants are killed they are not likely to be replaced, even if seed-producing plants are nearby. The only pure stand of spiny hopsage known to exist on the Hanford Site is on and near study plot 2H. Sagebrush, like spiny hopsage, is killed by burning and by heavy vehicles. Sagebrush is capable of reproducing via seeds, indicating that it is an inherently aggressive species with a capacity to reestablish itself if parent plants are in the vicinity to act as seed sources. Alien, annual plants, especially cheatgrass, were a major contributor to the herbaceous canopy cover in plots 3S, 4S, and 5S. However, native perennial grasses, especially Sandberg bluegrass, were a major contributor to the canopy cover in plots 1S and 2H. These differences are probably caused by differences in soil properties (e.g., water retention capacity), rather than to historical disturbances such as livestock grazing or wildfire. Specimens of Sandwort, Arenaria franklinii, growing near the Reference Repository Location were collected for examination by taxonomists to determine if the specimens are of the variety A. f. thompsonii, a taxon currently listed as threatened in the state of Washington. 16 refs., 7 figs., 3 tabs.

  1. A NEW INFRARED COLOR CRITERION FOR THE SELECTION OF 0 < z < 7 AGNs: APPLICATION TO DEEP FIELDS AND IMPLICATIONS FOR JWST SURVEYS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Messias, H.; Afonso, J.; Salvato, M.; Mobasher, B.; Hopkins, A. M.

    2012-08-01

    It is widely accepted that observations at mid-infrared (mid-IR) wavelengths enable the selection of galaxies with nuclear activity, which may not be revealed even in the deepest X-ray surveys. Many mid-IR color-color criteria have been explored to accomplish this goal and tested thoroughly in the literature. Besides missing many low-luminosity active galactic nuclei (AGNs), one of the main conclusions is that, with increasing redshift, the contamination by non-active galaxies becomes significant (especially at z {approx}> 2.5). This is problematic for the study of the AGN phenomenon in the early universe, the main goal of many of the current and future deep extragalactic surveys. In this work new near- and mid-IR color diagnostics are explored, aiming for improved efficiency-better completeness and less contamination-in selecting AGNs out to very high redshifts. We restrict our study to the James Webb Space Telescope wavelength range (0.6-27 {mu}m). The criteria are created based on the predictions by state-of-the-art galaxy and AGN templates covering a wide variety of galaxy properties, and tested against control samples with deep multi-wavelength coverage (ranging from the X-rays to radio frequencies). We show that the colors K{sub s} - [4.5], [4.5] - [8.0], and [8.0] - [24] are ideal as AGN/non-AGN diagnostics at, respectively, z {approx}< 1, 1 {approx}< z {approx}< 2.5, and z {approx}> 2.5-3. However, when the source redshift is unknown, these colors should be combined. We thus develop an improved IR criterion (using K{sub s} and IRAC bands, KI) as a new alternative at z {approx}< 2.5. KI does not show improved completeness (50%-60% overall) in comparison to commonly used Infrared Array Camera (IRAC) based AGN criteria, but is less affected by non-AGN contamination (revealing a >50%-90% level of successful AGN selection). We also propose KIM (using K{sub s} , IRAC, and MIPS 24 {mu}m bands, KIM), which aims to select AGN hosts from local distances to as far

  2. Mechanical Properties of Gels; Stress from Confined Fluids

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    George W. Scherer

    2009-12-01

    Garofalini (Rutgers), who has developed the best simulations of water ever reported by use of molecular dynamics. Simulated heating of water in small pores provided quantitative agreement with experiments, and showed that the origin of the high expansion is the altered structure of water in the first two molecular layers adjacent to the pore wall. The final focus of the project was to understand the damage done by crystals growing in small pores. For example, the primary cause of damage to ancient monuments in the Mediterranean Basin is growth of salt crystals in the pores of the stone. Salt may enter stone as a result of capillary rise of groundwater, by leaching of mortar joints, deposition of marine spray, or reactions with atmospheric pollutants (such as oxides of nitrogen or sulfur). As the water evaporates, the salt solution becomes supersaturated and crystals precipitate. Stress results, because the salt usually repels the minerals in the pore walls. Our goal was to identify the factors contributing to the repulsion, so that we could develop a chemical treatment to reduce the repulsion and hence the stress. (We have recently demonstrated an effective treatment as part of a separately funded study.) In collaboration with Prof. Garofalini, molecular dynamics simulations have been done that correctly reproduce the structure of water around dissolved ions of sodium and chloride. We simulated the interaction between crystals of sodium chloride and quartz, and found that this particular system exhibits attractive forces, in agreement with experiment. The origin of the attraction is the orientation of dipolar water molecules near the surfaces of the crystals. Similar calculations now must be done in systems, such as potassium chloride and quartz, where the interaction is repulsive. This grant supported the education of two doctoral students, Hang-Shing Ma (Ph.D., 2002) and Melanie Webb (Ph.D. expected 2010), three post-doctoral researchers, Joachim Gross, Gudrun Reichenauer

  3. Protocatechuic aldehyde inhibits migration and proliferation of vascular smooth muscle cells and intravascular thrombosis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Moon, Chang Yoon; Endocrinology, Brain Korea 21 Project for Medical Science, Institute of Endocrine Research, and Severance Integrative Research Institute for Cerebral and Cardiovascular Disease, Yonsei University College of Medicine, Seoul ; Ku, Cheol Ryong; Cho, Yoon Hee; Lee, Eun Jig

    2012-06-22

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Protocatechuic aldehyde (PCA) inhibits ROS production in VSMCs. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer PCA inhibits proliferation and migration in PDGF-induced VSMCs. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer PCA has anti-platelet effects in ex vivo rat whole blood. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We report the potential therapeutic role of PCA in atherosclerosis. -- Abstract: The migration and proliferation of vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs) and formation of intravascular thrombosis play crucial roles in the development of atherosclerotic lesions. This study examined the effects of protocatechuic aldehyde (PCA), a compound isolated from the aqueous extract of the root of Salvia miltiorrhiza, an herb used in traditional Chinese medicine to treat a variety of vascular diseases, on the migration and proliferation of VSMCs and platelets due to platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF). DNA 5-bromo-2 Prime -deoxy-uridine (BrdU) incorporation and wound-healing assays indicated that PCA significantly attenuated PDGF-induced proliferation and migration of VSMCs at a pharmacologically relevant concentration (100 {mu}M). On a molecular level, we observed down-regulation of the phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K)/Akt and the mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) pathways, both of which regulate key enzymes associated with migration and proliferation. We also found that PCA induced S-phase arrest of the VSMC cell cycle and suppressed cyclin D2 expression. In addition, PCA inhibited PDGF-BB-stimulated reactive oxygen species production in VSMCs, indicating that PCA's antioxidant properties may contribute to its suppression of PDGF-induced migration and proliferation in VSMCs. Finally, PCA exhibited an anti-thrombotic effect related to its inhibition of platelet aggregation, confirmed with an aggregometer. Together, these findings suggest a potential therapeutic role of PCA in the treatment of atherosclerosis and angioplasty-induced vascular restenosis.

  4. Magnolol protects neurons against ischemia injury via the downregulation of p38/MAPK, CHOP and nitrotyrosine

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chen, Jiann-Hwa; Kuo, Hsing-Chun; Lee, Kam-Fai; Tsai, Tung-Hu

    2014-09-15

    Magnolol is isolated from the herb Magnolia officinalis, which has been demonstrated to exert pharmacological effects. Our aim was to investigate whether magnolol is able to act as an anti-inflammatory agent that brings about neuroprotection using a global ischemic stroke model and to determine the mechanisms involved. Rats were treated with and without magnolol after ischemia reperfusion brain injury by occlusion of the two common carotid arteries. The inflammatory cytokine production in serum and the volume of infarction in the brain were measured. The proteins present in the brains obtained from the stroke animal model (SAM) and control animal groups with and without magnolol treatment were compared. Magnolol reduces the total infarcted volume by 15% and 30% at dosages of 10 and 30 mg/kg, respectively, compared to the untreated SAM group. The levels of acute inflammatory cytokines, including interleukin-1 beta, tumor necrosis factor alpha, and interleukin-6 were attenuated by magnolol. Magnolol was also able to suppress the production of nitrotyrosine, 4-hydroxy-2-nonenal (4-HNE), inducible NO synthase (iNOS), various phosphorylated p38 mitogen-activated protein kinases and various C/EBP homologues. Furthermore, this modulation of ischemia injury factors in the SAM model group treated with magnolol seems to result from a suppression of reactive oxygen species production and the upregulation of p-Akt and nuclear factor kappa-light-chain-enhancer of activated B cells (NF-κB). These findings confirm the anti-oxidative properties of magnolol, including the inhibition of ischemic injury to neurons; this protective effect seems to involve changes in the in vivo activity of Akt, GSK3β and NF-κB. - Graphical abstract: Schematic presentation of the signaling pathways involved in magnolol inhibited transient global ischemia brain apoptosis and inflammation in rats. The effect of magnolol on the scavenger of ROS, which inhibits p38 MAPK and CHOP protein inactivation

  5. CO2 EFFECTS ON MOJAVE DESERT PLANT INTERACTIONS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    L. A. DEFALCO; G. C. FERNANDEZ; S. D. SMITH; R. S. NOWAK

    2004-01-01

    Seasonal and interannual droughts characteristic of deserts have the potential to modify plant interactions as atmospheric CO{sub 2} concentrations continue to rise. At the Nevada Desert FACE (free-air CO{sub 2} enrichment) facility in the northern Mojave Desert, the effects of elevated atmospheric C02 (550 vs. ambient {approx}360 {micro}mol mol{sup -1}) on plant interactions were examined during two years of high and low rainfall. Results suggest that CO{sub 2} effects on the interaction between native species and their understory herbs are dependent on the strength of competition when rainfall is plentiful, but are unimportant during annual drought. Seasonal rainfall for 1999 was 23% the long-term average for the area, and neither elevated CO{sub 2} nor the low production of herbaceous neighbors had an effect on relative growth rate (RGR, d{sup -1}) and reproductive effort (RE, number of flowers g{sup -1}) for Achnatherum hymenoides (early season perennial C{sub 3} grass), Pleuraphis rigida (late season perennial C{sub 4} grass), and Larrea tridentata (evergreen C{sub 3} shrub). In contrast, 1998 received 213% the average rainfall. Consequently, the decrease in RGR and increase in RE for Achnatherum, whose period of growth overlaps directly with that of its neighbors, was exaggerated at elevated CO{sub 2}. However, competitive effects of neighbors on Eriogonum trichopes (a winter annual growing in shrub interspaces), Pleuraphis and Larrea were not affected by elevated CO{sub 2}, and possible explanations are discussed. Contrary to expectations, the invasive annual neighbor Bromus madritensis ssp. rubens had little influence on target plant responses because densities in 1998 and 1999 at this site were well below those found in other studies where it has negatively affected perennial plant growth. The extent that elevated CO{sub 2} reduces the performance of Achnatherum in successive years to cause its loss from the plant community depends more on future pressure

  6. Integration of the Mini-Sulfide Sulfite Anthraquinone (MSS-AQ) Pulping Process and Black Liquor Gasification in a Pulp Mill

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hasan Jameel, North Carolina State University; Adrianna Kirkman, North Carolina State University; Ravi Chandran,Thermochem Recovery International Brian Turk Research Triangle Institute; Brian Green, Research Triangle Institute

    2010-01-27

    produced a comparable tensile and burst index pulps. Product gas composition determined using computer simulations The results demonstrate that RVS-1 can effectively remove > 99.8% of the H2S present in simulated synthesis gas generated from the gasification of black liquor. This level of sulfur removal was consistent over simulated synthesis gas mixtures that contained from 6 to 9.5 vol % H2S.A significant amount of the sulfur in the simulated syngas was recovered as SO2 during regeneration. The average recovery of sulfur as SO2 was about 75%. Because these are first cycle results, this sulfur recovery is expected to improve. Developed WINGems model of the process.The total decrease in variable operating costs for the BLG process compared to the HERB was in excess of $6,200,000 per year for a mill producing 350,000 tons of pulp per year. This represents a decrease in operating cost of about $17.7/ton of oven dry pulp produced. There will be additional savings in labor and maintenance cost that has not been taken into account. The capital cost for the MSSAQ based gasifier system was estimated at $164,000,000, which is comparable to a High Efficiency Recovery Boiler. The return on investment was estimated at 4%. A gasifier replacement cannot be justified on its own, however if the recovery boiler needs to be replaced the MSSAQ gasifier system shows significantly higher savings. Before black liquor based gasifer technology can be commercialized more work is necessary. The recovery of the absorbed sulfur in the absorbent as sulfur dioxide is only 75%. This needs to be greater than 90% for economical operation. It has been suggested that as the number of cycles is increased the sulfur dioxide recovery might improve. Further research is necessary. Even though a significant amount of work has been done on a pilot scale gasifiers using liquors containing sulfur, both at low and high temperatures the lack of a commercial unit is an impediment to the implementation of the MSSAQ