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  1. ACHP - Meeting the "Reasonable and Good Faith" Identification...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Standard in Section 106 Review Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library PermittingRegulatory Guidance - Supplemental Material: ACHP - Meeting the...

  2. ACHP - Recommended Approach for Consultation on Recovery of Significan...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    from Archeaological Sites Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library PermittingRegulatory Guidance - Supplemental Material: ACHP - Recommended...

  3. ACHP's Recommended Approach for Consultation on Recovery of Significan...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Archaeological Sites Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Web Site: ACHP's Recommended Approach for Consultation on Recovery of Significant...

  4. ACHP - Consultation with Indian Tribes in the Section 106 Review...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    106 Review Process: a Handbook Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library PermittingRegulatory Guidance - GuideHandbook: ACHP - Consultation with Indian...

  5. ACHP - Section 106 Applicant Toolkit | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION JEnvironmental Jump to:EAand Dalton JumpProgram |RecentSulfonate as aEnergy1ACE-II:ACHP -Section

  6. ACHP's Recommended Approach for Consultation on Recovery of Significant

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION JEnvironmental Jump to:EAand Dalton JumpProgram |RecentSulfonate as aEnergy1ACE-II:ACHP

  7. ACHP - Section 106 Regulations Flowchart | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIX ECoop IncIowa (UtilityMichigan)data bookresult9) JumpMultipleSpringsACHP - Section 106

  8. ACHP - Relationship of Section 106 to Other Laws | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION JEnvironmental Jump to:EAand Dalton JumpProgram |RecentSulfonate as aEnergy1ACE-II:ACHP -

  9. James Webb Space Telescope: PM Lessons Applied - Eric Smith,...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    James Webb Space Telescope: PM Lessons Applied - Eric Smith, Deputy Program Director, NASA James Webb Space Telescope: PM Lessons Applied - Eric Smith, Deputy Program Director,...

  10. Webb, Alabama: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page| Open Energy Information Serbia-EnhancingEt Al.,Turin,VillageWarrensourceCentreCounty,InformationWebb, Alabama:

  11. Aston Webb Building, Edgbaston campus, Birmingham, B15 2TT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Miall, Chris

    throughout the Open Day. Free tea and coffee will also be available in the Great Hall of the Aston Webb the day can be obtained here n Student ambassadors in green shirts are available all day on campus to help

  12. Student Competition: Siting Potential Dams at Camp Del Webb, Utah

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wamser, William Kyle

    2007-11-14

    Siting Potential Dams at Camp Del Webb, Utah Presented By: Kyle Wamser Problem ? Camp Del Webb is Lacking an Onsite Lake ? High Adventure Bases generally need aquatics ? Large lake nearby, but transportation is required ? Possible Solution... hillshade ? Finding Possible Lake Locations ? Added three potential dam sites ? Calculated watersheds ? Extended dams through terrain to prevent runoff on the sides ? Calculated watershed dam elevation, which identified lakes Results...

  13. Medicinal Herb REFERENCES AND FURTHER READING

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Doudna, Jennifer A.

    and Relieving Cough ­ In Chinese medicine, phlegm is the pathological accumulation of thick fluid in the respiratory and digestive tracts, as well as in the muscles and other body tissue. Symptoms include coughing menstruation; 3) Stagnant Lung Qi leading to wheezing cough and constriction in the chest. 9. Herbs

  14. Soils of Bell, Jefferson, Smith, Taylor and Webb Counties. 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fraps, G. S. (George Stronach)

    1922-01-01

    AGRICULTURAL EXPERIMENT STATION AGRICULTURAL AND MECHANICAL COLLEGE OF TEXAS W. B. BIZZELL, President BULLETIN NO . 301 SEPTEMBER, 1922 DIVISION OF CHEMISTRY SOILS OF BELL, JEFFERSON, SMITH, ?TAYLOR AND WEBB COUNTIES B. YOUNGBLOOD, DIRECTOR_, COLLEGE... ONES, A . M., Chief; Sheep and Goat Investigations R M Sherwood, B. S., Poultry Husbandman G. R. V?/ ARnEN, B. S., Animal Husbandman in Charge of Swine Investigations J. L. Lusn, Ph. D., Animalllushandman (genetics) L. M. MuRPHY, Wool Specialist...

  15. Introducing the Webb Spam Corpus: Using Email Spam to Identify Web Spam Automatically

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Caverlee, James

    Introducing the Webb Spam Corpus: Using Email Spam to Identify Web Spam Automatically Steve Webb as email spam has negatively impacted the user mes- saging experience, the rise of Web spam is threatening to severely degrade the quality of information on the World Wide Web. Fundamentally, Web spam is designed

  16. Research Opportunities 2014-15 bbeWleahciMrD Dr Michael Webb

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rzepa, Henry S.

    Research Opportunities 2014-15 bbeWleahciMrD 1 Dr Michael Webb m.e.webb@leeds.ac.uk phone: 0113 343 of active research projects, please visit the group website at: http://www.chem.leeds.ac.uk/MEW/ Protein Hironori MicrobiologyOpen (2012) 1, 298-310 Efficient N-Terminal Labeling of Proteins by Use of Sortase

  17. James Webb Throckmorton: the life and career of a southern frontier politician, 1825-1894 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Howell, Kenneth Wayne

    2005-08-29

    -1 JAMES WEBB THROCKMORTON: THE LIFE AND CAREER OF A SOUTHERN FRONTIER POLITICIAN, 1825-1894 A Dissertation by KENNETH WAYNE HOWELL Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree... of DOCTOR OF PHILOSOPHY May 2005 Major Subject: History ? 2005 KENNETH WAYNE HOWELL ALL RIGHTS RESERVED JAMES WEBB THROCKMORTON: THE LIFE AND CAREER OF A...

  18. Organic Greenhouse Container Herb Production in South Florida: Fertilizer and Potting Media1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Migliaccio, Kati White

    ABE 373 Organic Greenhouse Container Herb Production in South Florida: Fertilizer and Potting Media climate and high number of pest and disease pressures. Thus, greenhouse production of organic herbs may and fertilizers for organic herb production in greenhouses in this climate. Objectives Greenhouse trials were

  19. ROSANN WEBB COLLINS Associate Professor, Department of Information Systems and Decision Sciences

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jank, Wolfgang

    ROSANN WEBB COLLINS Associate Professor, Department of Information Systems and Decision Sciences-7800 ______________________________________________________________________________ EDUCATION Ph.D. 1993 University of Minnesota, Management Information Systems, Carlson School of Management M Carolina at Greensboro, Bachelor of Fine Arts CURRENT RESEARCH INTERESTS Global Information Systems: Focus

  20. Body Form, Locomotion and Foraging in Aquatic Vertebrates Author(s): P. W. Webb

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    DeWitt, Thomas J.

    and Foraging in Aquatic Vertebrates1 P. W. Webb Schoolof Natural Resources,Universityof Michigan, Ann Arbor & Conditions of Use, available at . http://www.jstor.org/page/info/about/policies/terms.jsp . JSTOR is a not. Locomotor specialists under-utilize smaller food items in exposed habitats. This resource is exploited

  1. Photo Gallery Photo 1. Flowering plant of the early-blooming, mountain forest understory herb

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Medrano, Mónica

    Photo Gallery Photo 1. Flowering plant of the early-blooming, mountain forest understory herb Helleborus foetidus (Ranunculaceae). Inflorescences are produced in early winter, each bearing 20­75 flowers

  2. The Mid-Infrared Instrument for the James Webb Space Telescope, III: MIRIM, The MIRI Imager

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bouchet, P; Lagage, P -O; Amiaux, J; Augueres, J -L; Bauwens, E; Blommaert, J A D L; Chen, C H; Detre, O H; Dicken, D; Dubreuil, D; Galdemard, Ph; Gastaud, R; Glasse, A; Gordon, K D; Gougnaud, F; Guillard, P; Justtanont, K; Krause, O; Leboeuf, D; Longval, Y; Martin, L; Mazy, E; Moreau, V; Olofsson, G; Ray, T P; Reess, J -M; Renotte, E; Ressler, M E; Ronayette, S; Salasca, S; Scheithauer, S; Sykes, J; Thelen, M P; Wells, M; Wright, D; Wright, G S

    2015-01-01

    In this article, we describe the MIRI Imager module (MIRIM), which provides broad-band imaging in the 5 - 27 microns wavelength range for the James Webb Space Telescope. The imager has a 0"11 pixel scale and a total unobstructed view of 74"x113". The remainder of its nominal 113"x113" field is occupied by the coronagraphs and the low resolution spectrometer. We present the instrument optical and mechanical design. We show that the test data, as measured during the test campaigns undertaken at CEA-Saclay, at the Rutherford Appleton Laboratory, and at the NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, indicate that the instrument complies with its design requirements and goals. We also discuss the operational requirements (multiple dithers and exposures) needed for optimal scientific utilization of the MIRIM.

  3. Warm molecular Hydrogen at high redshift with the James Webb Space Telescope

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Guillard, P; Lehnert, M D; Appleton, P N; Forêts, G Pineau des

    2015-01-01

    The build-up of galaxies is regulated by a complex interplay between gravitational collapse, galaxy merging and feedback related to AGN and star formation. The energy released by these processes has to dissipate for gas to cool, condense, and form stars. How gas cools is thus a key to understand galaxy formation. \\textit{Spitzer Space Telescope} infrared spectroscopy revealed a population of galaxies with weak star formation and unusually powerful H$_2$ line emission. This is a signature of turbulent dissipation, sustained by large-scale mechanical energy injection. The cooling of the multiphase interstellar medium is associated with emission in the H$_2$ lines. These results have profound consequences on our understanding of regulation of star formation, feedback and energetics of galaxy formation in general. The fact that H$_2$ lines can be strongly enhanced in high-redshift turbulent galaxies will be of great importance for the \\textit{James Webb Space Telescope} observations which will unveil the role tha...

  4. -SIMULATED EFFECTS OF HERB COMPETITION ON PLANTED QUERCUS FAGINEA -213 Applied Vegetation Science 6: 213-222, 2003

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Espigares, Tíscar

    ) biomass production of herbs. The TC treatment re- duced water availability more than the BGC treatment, in agreement with the most pronounced water stress in seedlings under TC conditions. BGC and TC treatments cropland. We produced three types of environment with respect to herb competition: absence of competition

  5. ACHP - Nationwide Programmatic Agreements | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION JEnvironmental Jump to:EAand Dalton JumpProgram |RecentSulfonate as aEnergy1ACE-II:

  6. Broadband calibration of R//V Ewing seismic sources M. Tolstoy, J. B. Diebold, S. C. Webb, D. R. Bohnenstiehl, E. Chapp,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bohnenstiehl, Delwayne

    increases, the impact of these activities, including shipping, naval oper- ations and seismic exploration., 2004]. [3] Seismic research, including oil exploration and geo- physical studies, has been ongoingBroadband calibration of R//V Ewing seismic sources M. Tolstoy, J. B. Diebold, S. C. Webb, D. R

  7. Humpback and Fin Whaling in the Gulf of Maine from 1800 to 1918 RANDALL R. REEVES, TIM D. SMITH, ROBERT L. WEBB, JOOKE ROBBINS, and PHILLIP J. CLAPHAM

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Humpback and Fin Whaling in the Gulf of Maine from 1800 to 1918 RANDALL R. REEVES, TIM D. SMITH, ROBERT L. WEBB, JOOKE ROBBINS, and PHILLIP J. CLAPHAM Introduction The Gulf of Maine is an oceanic body is with the Center for Coastal Studies, Provincetown, MA 02657. ABSTRACT--The history of whaling in the Gulf of Maine

  8. The Solar Sources of Geoeffective Structures D. F. Webb, 1;2 N. U. Crooker, 3 S. P. Plunkett, 4 and O. C. St. Cyr 5

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Webb, David F.

    1 The Solar Sources of Geoeffective Structures D. F. Webb, 1;2 N. U. Crooker, 3 S. P. Plunkett, 4 and O. C. St. Cyr 5 We review our current understanding of the solar sources of interplane­ tary follows that of the solar (sunspot) activity cycle. Recurrent sources are usu­ ally attributed to high

  9. Detectors for the James Webb Space Telescope Near-Infrared Spectrograph I: Readout Mode, Noise Model, and Calibration Considerations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bernard J. Rauscher; Ori Fox; Pierre Ferruit

    2007-06-15

    We describe how the James Webb Space Telescope (JWST) Near-Infrared Spectrograph's (NIRSpec's) detectors will be read out, and present a model of how noise scales with the number of multiple non-destructive reads sampling-up-the-ramp. We believe that this noise model, which is validated using real and simulated test data, is applicable to most astronomical near-infrared instruments. We describe some non-ideal behaviors that have been observed in engineering grade NIRSpec detectors, and demonstrate that they are unlikely to affect NIRSpec sensitivity, operations, or calibration. These include a HAWAII-2RG reset anomaly and random telegraph noise (RTN). Using real test data, we show that the reset anomaly is: (1) very nearly noiseless and (2) can be easily calibrated out. Likewise, we show that large-amplitude RTN affects only a small and fixed population of pixels. It can therefore be tracked using standard pixel operability maps.

  10. http://www.achp.gov/docs/ACHP%20ARCHAEOLOGY%20GUIDANCE.pdf

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefield Municipal GasAdministration Medal01 Sandia4)9 FederalRivers and Streams Metadata alsoHome *

  11. Carolyn Bliss, PhD Jeff Webb, PhD Carolan Ownby, PhD Director of LEAP Associate Director of LEAP c.ownby@leap.utah.edu

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Carolyn Bliss, PhD Jeff Webb, PhD Carolan Ownby, PhD Director of LEAP Associate Director of LEAP c-3104 Executive Assistant Program Assistant Jennifer Bauman, PhD Ann Engar, PhD Meg Harper, PhD j-Law LEAP Business LEAP Rebecca Larsen, PhD Stephen Maisch, PhD Belinda 'Otukolo Saltiban, PhD r

  12. Carolyn Bliss, PhD Jeff Webb, PhD Carolan Ownby, PhD Director of LEAP Associate Director of LEAP Assistant Director of LEAP

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tipple, Brett

    Carolyn Bliss, PhD Jeff Webb, PhD Carolan Ownby, PhD Director of LEAP Associate Director of LEAP 581-3104 Executive Assistant Program Assistant Jennifer Bauman, PhD Ann Engar, PhD Meg Harper, PhD j-Law LEAP Business LEAP Rebecca Larsen, PhD Stephen Maisch, PhD Jennifer Seagrave, PhD r

  13. Perilla frutescens (Labiatae) with some wild species,1) whose leaves and shoots are used as a food, medicinal herb,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Adams, Robert P.

    .9% sabinene, 19.8% linalool and 5.5% limonene. As for the extraction of reaction products, we performed SPME, medicinal herb, natural pigment and spice in Japan, China, Korea and Vietnam, and whose mericarps are also (solid phase micro extraction) as well as conven- tional solvent extraction, and compared these two

  14. Validation of the fast neutron spectrum in the coupled fast-thermal system HERBE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Avdic, S.; Pesic, M.; Marinkovic, P.

    1995-12-31

    Methods applied in the calculation and interpretation of the measurements of the fast neutron spectrum in the NERBE coupled fast-thermal system are validated in this paper. When advantages and disadvantages of a He-filled semi-conductor-sandwich detector are compared to other neutron detectors, the former is found more appropriate. The neutron detection is based on the reaction {sup 3}He(n,p)T + 0.764 MeV and simultaneous detection of the reaction products in the silicon diodes. The pulses from the diodes are amplified and shaped in separate {open_quotes}energy{close_quotes} channels and summed to produce a single pulse with height proportional to the energy of the incident neutron plus the Q value of the reaction. A well-known measuring system of the He neutron spectrometer is used for the HERBE fast neutron spectrum measurement and calibration in a thermal neutron field.

  15. ACHP - Recommended Approach for Consultation on Recovery of Significant

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIX ECoop IncIowa (UtilityMichigan)data bookresult9) JumpMultipleSprings Logo:ACAL

  16. ACHP - Section 106 Regulations Flowchart Explanatory Material | Open Energy

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIX ECoop IncIowa (UtilityMichigan)data bookresult9) JumpMultipleSprings

  17. Standard Guide for Irradiation of Dried Spices, Herbs, and Vegetable Seasonings to Control Pathogens and Other Microorganisms

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    2004-01-01

    1.1 This guide covers procedures for irradiation of dried spices, herbs, and vegetable seasonings for microbiological control. Generally, these items have moisture content of 4.5 to 12 % and are available in whole, ground, chopped, or other finely divided forms, or as blends. The blends may contain sodium chloride and minor amounts of dry food materials ordinarily used in such blends. 1.2 This guide covers absorbed doses ranging from 3 to 30 kiloGray (kGy). Note 1—U.S. regulations permit a maximum dose of 30 kGy. (See 21CFR 179.26 Irradiation in the Production, Processing and Handling of Food.) 1.3 The values stated in SI units are to be regarded as standard. No other units of measurement are included in this standard. 1.4 This standard does not purport to address all of the safety concerns, if any, associated with its use. It is the responsibility of the user of this standard to establish appropriate safety and health practices and determine the applicability of regulatory limitations prior to use.

  18. Jack bounces By Sharon Webb

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wapstra, Erik

    weeks' work with Tasmania's hydro power generator, Transcend, was a step in the right direction. Like

  19. The Honorable Wellington E. Webb

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefield Municipal Gas &SCE-SessionsSouth DakotaRobbins and700, 1. .&. ' , c 1afr -.:2yL: a,;. -:- * .'

  20. ACHP Letter to Energy Secretary Steven Chu on February 5, 2010

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:Financing ToolInternationalReportOffice | DepartmentVery1, in:QuarterlyA SolarAADensifiedAC|ACEEE

  1. ACHP - Consultation with Indian Tribes in the Section 106 Review Process: a

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION JEnvironmental Jump to:EAand Dalton JumpProgram |RecentSulfonate as aEnergy1ACE-II: Areas

  2. ACHP - Meeting the "Reasonable and Good Faith" Identification Standard in

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION JEnvironmental Jump to:EAand Dalton JumpProgram |RecentSulfonate as aEnergy1ACE-II: AreasSection

  3. ACHP Letter to Energy Secretary Steven Chu on February 5, 2010 | Department

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE: Alternative FuelsofProgram:Y-12 Beta-3 Racetracks25 AMOSystem forAAPGABENGOAACCESSINGACEEEParteof

  4. Pulte/Del Webb | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION JEnvironmental Jump to:EA EIS Report Url JumpTechnology JumpPrueba 1 JumpDistrict NoPulsarPulte/Del

  5. Vegetable & Herb Disease Control Products for Texas 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Black, Mark; Hess, Jesus F.

    1999-12-17

    Mushroom ..............................37 Okra ................................37 Onion and Relatives [chive, eschalot, garlic, leek, onion, scallion, shallot, etc.] ........................38 Pepper ...............................42 Potato...

  6. Webb City, Oklahoma: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page| Open Energy Information Serbia-EnhancingEt Al.,Turin,VillageWarrensourceCentreCounty,Information MappingCity,

  7. Webb County, Texas: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page| Open Energy Information Serbia-EnhancingEt Al.,Turin,VillageWarrensourceCentreCounty,Information

  8. Discovering associations with numeric variables Geoffrey I. Webb

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Webb, Geoff

    34¨&qs¥!&&`¨2©5¤£ "5a¤3`cI©)£ 3P¦©¨S "¤( &¥b"¡©¨Fb£ 5©#£ %a£ #©¨( (q )0¦"£ 3P£ r&8¥!)03P6¤5¤S"£ )05

  9. WEBB CHA PP ELL Climate scientist David Keith.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Yiling

    the amount of carbon they pump into the atmosphere--thanks to a major shift from coal to lower-carbon natural gas, an uptick in both efficiency and in renewable energy use, and, last but not least, the global

  10. Forest Research Audit and Risk Assurance Committee Judith Webb

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    of Appointment Date of Resignation NIL Other Public appointments Role Date of Appointment Date of Resignation New of Resignation NIL Close relations and friends Name Company Relationship to Senior Manager Trustee Ernest Cook of Resignation NIL Other Public appointments Role Date of Appointment Date of Resignation NIL Close relations

  11. The Honorable Wellington E. Webb 350 City County Building

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefield Municipal Gas &SCE-SessionsSouth DakotaRobbins and700, 1. .&. ' , c 1afr -.:2yL: a,;. -:- * .'-

  12. Herbs and Clearcutting: Reply to Elliot and Loftis and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Duffy, David Cameron

    microtopographic gradients (e.g., Bratton 1976;Peterson et al. 1990). We can dull Occam's razor with fur- ther ". ..depends on the dif- ference in R. maximum composi- tion.. .";and that "not sampling the entire community

  13. Well Herb Oils Pvt Ltd | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIX ECoop IncIowa (Utility Company)Idaho)Vossloh KiepeWebel Micro Power JVWeiserWelivit

  14. Building Application Stack Andrew Krioukov

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zakhor, Avideh

    %CH_SEQ" .EQ. @OPER) THEN RELEAS(@OPER,"%A%CH_SEQ")¶ 01110 C IF("SDH.ATS_E01.NORM" .EQ. OFF .AND. "%A%CHP1_SS" .EQ. @OPER) THEN RELEAS(@OPER,"%A%CHP1_SS")¶ 01120 C IF("SDH.ATS_E01.NORM" .EQ. OFF .AND. "%A%CHP2_SS" .EQ. @OPER) THEN RELEAS(@OPER,"%A%CHP2_SS")¶ 01130 C IF("SDH.ATS_E01.NORM" .EQ. OFF .AND. "%A%CHP3_SS

  15. COVER SHEET Webb, Robert (2001) Editorial Comment: Dec 2001 . Queensland Surveyor:pp. 5-5.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Roe, Paul

    2001-01-01

    's Peak" - the 100-year petroleum era is nearly over. Global oil production will peak some time between 2004 and 2008, and the world's production of crude oil "will fall, never to rise again. Running out: getting over our dependence on crude oil." The petroleum era is coming to a close. Fossil fuels are a one

  16. Depositional environment of upper Wilcox sandstones, Northeast Thompsonville field, Jim Hogg and Webb Counties, Texas 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tedford, Fredrick John

    1977-01-01

    to 200 ft thick at depths of 9, 390 to 13, 700 ft. The sandstones occur in a rapidly thickening section of black marine shale and are located some 20 mi downdip from upper Wilcox rocks that have been interpreted as a marine shelf facies. Cores from.... Funds were provided by General Crude Oil Company in the form of a fellowship grant. Mr. Dick Moore of General Crude supplied elec- tric logs and provided me with several valuable suggestions. Cores and core analyses were provided by Shell Oil Company...

  17. The Mid-Infrared Instrument for the James Webb Space Telescope, VII: The MIRI Detectors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rieke, G H; Morrison, Jane E; Bergeron, L; Bouchet, Patrice; Garc?a-Mar?n, Macarena; Greene, T P; Regan, M W; Sukhatme, K G; Walker, Helen

    2015-01-01

    The MIRI Si:As IBC detector arrays extend the heritage technology from the Spitzer IRAC arrays to a 1024 x 1024 pixel format. We provide a short discussion of the principles of operation, design, and performance of the individual MIRI detectors, in support of a description of their operation in arrays provided in an accompanying paper (Ressler et al. (2015)). We then describe modeling of their response. We find that electron diffusion is an important component of their performance, although it was omitted in previous models. Our new model will let us optimize the bias voltage while avoiding avalanche gain. It also predicts the fraction of the IR-active layer that is depleted (and thus contributes to the quantum efficiency) as signal is accumulated on the array amplifier. Another set of models accurately predicts the nonlinearity of the detector-amplifier unit and has guided determination of the corrections for nonlinearity. Finally, we discuss how diffraction at the interpixel gaps and total internal reflecti...

  18. Erin Georgette (Wilkerson) Webb, Ph.D., P.E. Environmental Sciences Division

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Post, Wilfred M.

    Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee Technical Advisor, Temporary Detail, 2008-2009 Energy Education Research Experience, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, 2011 · Sara Ivy, Tennessee Governor's Academy National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee Adjunct Faculty, 2012 ­ present Department of Biosystems

  19. Morphological themes of informal housing in Colonias: impacts of sociocultural identity on Webb County housing form 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mohamed Kamal El Sayed Ibrahim, Azza

    2006-10-30

    ......................................................................................................... 7 Research Hypothesis......................................................................................................... 8 III LITERATURE REVIEW... Differentiation in the Trend of Porch Locations in the Three Colonias.......................................... 49 8 Differentiation in the Trend of Fence Availability in the Three Colonias ...................................... 50 9 Differentiation...

  20. Evidence of Structure in the Lymanff Forest Jochen Liske and John K. Webb

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liske, Jochen

    of Ly­ff forest absorption systems toward a group of eight closely spaced QSOs has been analysed to the spectra of a close group of eight QSOs with a mean redshift of 2.97. The data (Williger et al. 1996 in the spectra of a group of eight closely spaced QSOs as a function of wavelength and smoothing scale

  1. Numerical simulation of hourly temperatures at Webb Air Force Base, Texas 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hansen, James Edward

    1975-01-01

    125. 4 136. 0 5. 5 ? 7. 8 12 hr 66. 9 -8. 4 56. 7 -22. 3 73. 0 24 hr lo 1 19. 7 35. 3 ? 45. 9 -44. 2 Feb ruhr 1 exp smp1 2 exp smpl dev smpl Hatch 1 exp smpl 2 exp smpl dev smpl 177. 2 34. 0 164. 3 24. 3 132. 2 65. 5 -7. 9 45...

  2. Experimental Study of the NaK 31 S. C. Webb,3

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Huennekens, John

    . J. Jabbour,4 R. K. Namiotka,5 and J. Huennekens Dept. of Physics, 16 Memorial Dr. East, Lehigh­optical double resonance experiment to determine the NaK 31 state poten- tial energy curve. In the first step (v, J) ro-vibrational energy levels. These energy levels are then fit to a Dunham expansion

  3. Gas-Phase Diffusion in Porous Media: Comparison of Models Stephen W. Webb

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefield MunicipalTechnical Report:Speeding accessby aLED Street LightingFrom the Building to PROGWMGas-Phase

  4. Photo of the Week: The Webb Telescope's "Golden Spider" | Department of

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on DeliciousMathematicsEnergyInterested PartiesBuilding energy codesPhiladelhia Gas WorksAugust 3,PhotoPhotoEnergy

  5. 2122 Webb Center Norfolk, VA 23529 Telephone: (757) 683-3431 Fax: (757) 683-6220 REPORTING PROCESS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    sanctions; The student acknowledged the violation; The student accepted the proposed sanctions of the alleged violation warrants a response greater than a grade sanction; The student denied the allegation(s); or The student did not agree to faculty proposed sanctions. REFERRAL MATERIALS A copy of the signed Academic

  6. Thermophysical property predictions of propane, propylene and their mixtures by Benedict-Webb-Rubin type equations of state 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bengani, Pramod Kumar

    1990-01-01

    equation (1989): ln[ j = ? (Ar+ Br ' + Cr ? 'Dr ) [P (Pf'agner)i 1 i 5 3 J r, where T, : ? T/T& and r: ? 1 ? T, . The values of the constants obtained are, A = -6. 61637520 B = 1. 16175821 C = -1. /4473360 D = ? 1. 95674512 Values of the critical... by PRAMOD KI)MAR BENGANI Approved as to style and content by: P. T. Eubank (Chair of Comrnjttee) J. C. Holste (Member) Alan Let on (Member) R. W. Flu erfelt (Head of Department) December 1990 nl ABSTRACT Thermophysical Property Predictions...

  7. A Mackey Functor Version of a Conjecture of Alperin J. Th'evenaz and P.J. Webb

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Webb, Peter

    to construct Mackey functors M1 and M2 satisfying the condi- tions of Conjecture 3, but the construction we believes that Alperi* *n's conjecture is true then it is not a waste of time to study Conjecture 3 will be done by some natural construction and artificial constructions

  8. New Whole-House Solutions Case Study: Pulte Homes and Communities of Del Webb, Las Vegas Division, NV

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious RankADVANCED MANUFACTURINGEnergy Bills and Reduce Carbon Pollution |ofNewInsight Homes ofTradition

  9. Sumatran rice and miracle herbs: Local and international natural knowledge in late-colonial Guatemala

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brockmann, Sophie

    2014-01-01

    themselves to bringing ‘Enlightenment’ and ‘improvement’ to the region through natural history and other ‘useful arts’. Articles published in the Economic Society’s newspaper, the Gazeta de Guatemala, show that a socially and geographically wider network...

  10. The Role of Allelopathy, Heat, and Charred Wood in the Germination of Chaparral Herbs1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    on the effect of heating, at temperatures similar to those found in fire, and tests with wood ash alone failed

  11. Microsoft PowerPoint - Herb_Presentation 6-10-09 (2).ppt

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power Administration wouldMass map shines light on darkMicroorganisms toPalladium/28/2008Hentschel Chief,

  12. Modeling the Emergence of a Typological Anomaly: Vowel Nasalization in French

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kennedy Terry, Kristen; Webb, Eric Russell

    2013-01-01

    University Press. Kristen Kennedy Terry Eric Russell WebbDordrecht: Kluwer. Kristen Kennedy Terry and Eric RussellWebb, Eric, and Kristen Kennedy Terry. When Sound Change

  13. A Bigger Chill | Jefferson Lab

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Webb Space Telescope An artist's rendering of the James Webb Space Telescope. Image: NASA Ultracold refrigeration helps Jefferson Lab scientists peer into the innermost spaces...

  14. Transmission Infrared Spectroscopy of Methyl-and Ethyl-Terminated Silicon(111) Surfaces Lauren J. Webb, Sandrine Rivillon, David J. Michalak, Yves J. Chabal,*, and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Webb, Lauren J.

    in ambient air, forming a large number of surface electronic trap states.2 In contrast, alkylated Si surfaces tunneling micros- copy8 and low-energy electron diffraction studies9 have revealed both short-range and long-terminated Si(111) surfaces have a very low surface electron-hole recombination velocity,6 but oxidize rapidly

  15. The Chemical Composition of Some Soils of Angelina, Brazoria, Cameron, Cherokee, Delta, Lamar, Hidalgo, Lavaca, Montgomery, Nacogdoches, Robertson, Rusk, Webb and Wilson Counties. 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fraps, G. S. (George Stronach)

    1909-01-01

    and texture and showing a yellowish gray color. The ~rganic matter contained in the first few inches gives the surface soil a grayish color. The topography is rolling with excellent surface drainage. The soil is f*-,;:ly retentive of moisture, and when... overflows. T11e principal timber growth is pecan and ash. This is one of the most desirable soils of the bottom, as it is very fertile. has good drainage, and is easily cultivated. ll'rost of it is under cultivation at present. Sugar cane is thc principal...

  16. Research Activities in Physics at McGill University Cover image: A Star-Bursting Filament (from the group of Prof. Tracy Webb). The Herschel Space Observatory has

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shoubridge, Eric

    -3- Research Activities in Physics at McGill University #12;Cover image: A Star-Bursting Filament ..........................................................................................................The Challenge of Physics! 5 ......................................................................................................Condensed Matter Physics! 25

  17. Edinburgh Research Explorer A splicing-dependent transcriptional checkpoint associated with

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Millar, Andrew J.

    with prespliceosome formation Citation for published version: Chathoth, KT, Barrass, JD, Webb, S & Beggs, JD 2014, 'A Webb,1 and Jean D. Beggs1,* 1Wellcome Trust Centre for Cell Biology, University of Edinburgh, King

  18. Building America Whole-House Solutions for New Homes: Pulte Homes...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Pulte Homes and Communities of Del Webb, Las Vegas, Nevada Building America Whole-House Solutions for New Homes: Pulte Homes and Communities of Del Webb, Las Vegas, Nevada Case...

  19. Faculty Grading of Quantitative Problems: Are Values Consistent with Practice? Heather L. Petcovic, Herb Fynewever, Charles Henderson, Jacinta M. Mutambuki, and Jeffrey A. Barney

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Henderson, Charles

    to deduct points from solutions that may be correct Value 3: tendency to project correct thinking onto in a student solution but then grade in a way that either: · penalizes students for showing reasoning because hidden internal values conflict with expressed values, and develop the construct of "burden

  20. 4-102 Methane is heated in a rigid container. The final pressure of the methane is to be determined using the ideal gas equation and the Benedict-Webb-Rubin equation of state.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bahrami, Majid

    4-54 4-102 Methane is heated in a rigid container. The final pressure of the methane the ideal gas equation of state, Methane 100 kPa 20qC Q kPa229.7 K293 K673 kPa)100( 1 2 12 T T PP The specific molar volume of the methane is /kmolm36.24 kPa100 K)K)(293/kmolmkPa(8.314 3 3 1 1 21 P TRu vv (b

  1. Floods, Droughts, and Climate Change

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hook, Robert D.

    2003-01-01

    Review: Floods, Droughts, and Climate Change By MichaelCollier, & Robert H. Webb. Floods, Droughts, and Climateinformation about what floods and droughts can do. One photo

  2. Ship-based measurement of air-sea CO 2 exchange by eddy covariance

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Miller, Scott D; Marandino, Christa A; Saltzman, Eric S

    2010-01-01

    temperature, water vapor, and pressure fluctuations in thedue to water vapor, temperature, and pressure will affectand water vapor, respectively, and P is pressure [Webb et

  3. U.S. Department of Energy ENVIRONMENTAL MANAGEMENT ADVISORY BOARD

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    - NASA James Webb Space Telescope (NASA) Project Management Institute view on the pulse of the industry and PM challenges Economic environment as it affects project...

  4. Mikulski and Bolden Visit Goddard

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Christian, Eric

    . The recent completion of the critical design review for Webb and the delivery of all its instruments hardware in the Building 29 clean room. Photo credit: NASA/Goddard/Bill Hrybyk Reflecting on Webb Visits Goddard ­ 9 GCDC Science Fair Photo Gallery ­ 10 OutsideGoddard Audrey Haar ­ 12 On the cover

  5. Adam J. Rondinone Industry Liaison

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pennycook, Steve

    activities and represent Minority conference preferences. Mercury Export Ban Act ­ Public Law 110. Alexander-Webb Clean Energy Act of 2009 Authored with staff of Senator Webb Served as legislative assistant to Senator Alexander on science, climate and energy. #12; Co-wrote a variety of energy and climate

  6. Computationally-guided Design of Polymer Electrolytes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Computationally-guided Design of Polymer Electrolytes The Science Michael Webb Previous theoretical workRESEARCH HIGHLIGHTS Computationally-guided Design of Polymer Electrolytes From the Resnick Sustainability Institute Graduate Research Fellows at the California Institute of Technology Michael Webb #12;THE

  7. ACI ecotec GmbH | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIX ECoop IncIowa (UtilityMichigan)data bookresult9) JumpMultipleSpringsACHP - Section

  8. ADA ES Inc | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIX ECoop IncIowa (UtilityMichigan)data bookresult9) JumpMultipleSpringsACHP - SectionADA ES

  9. ADM Hamburg AG | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIX ECoop IncIowa (UtilityMichigan)data bookresult9) JumpMultipleSpringsACHP - SectionADA

  10. ADT | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIX ECoop IncIowa (UtilityMichigan)data bookresult9) JumpMultipleSpringsACHP - SectionADAADT

  11. AES Eastern Energy LP | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIX ECoop IncIowa (UtilityMichigan)data bookresult9) JumpMultipleSpringsACHP -

  12. AES Mendota Biomass Facility | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIX ECoop IncIowa (UtilityMichigan)data bookresult9) JumpMultipleSpringsACHP -Mendota

  13. AES Microplanet | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIX ECoop IncIowa (UtilityMichigan)data bookresult9) JumpMultipleSpringsACHP

  14. AG Land 2 | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIX ECoop IncIowa (UtilityMichigan)data bookresult9) JumpMultipleSpringsACHP2 Jump to:

  15. AG Land 4 | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIX ECoop IncIowa (UtilityMichigan)data bookresult9) JumpMultipleSpringsACHP2 Jump to:4 Jump

  16. AG Land 6 | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIX ECoop IncIowa (UtilityMichigan)data bookresult9) JumpMultipleSpringsACHP2 Jump to:4

  17. AIT-UNEP Regional Resource Centre for Asia and the Pacific | Open Energy

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIX ECoop IncIowa (UtilityMichigan)data bookresult9) JumpMultipleSpringsACHP2 Jump

  18. AP Holdings LLC (New York) | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIX ECoop IncIowa (UtilityMichigan)data bookresult9) JumpMultipleSpringsACHP2 JumpAP

  19. APN Starfirst, L.P. (Illinois) | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIX ECoop IncIowa (UtilityMichigan)data bookresult9) JumpMultipleSpringsACHP2 JumpAPAPN

  20. APN Starfirst, L.P. (Ohio) | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIX ECoop IncIowa (UtilityMichigan)data bookresult9) JumpMultipleSpringsACHP2 JumpAPAPNAPN

  1. APNA Energy | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIX ECoop IncIowa (UtilityMichigan)data bookresult9) JumpMultipleSpringsACHP2

  2. APOLO Solar | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIX ECoop IncIowa (UtilityMichigan)data bookresult9) JumpMultipleSpringsACHP2APOLO Solar

  3. APS Biomass I Biomass Facility | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIX ECoop IncIowa (UtilityMichigan)data bookresult9) JumpMultipleSpringsACHP2APOLO SolarAPS

  4. ARCH Venture Partners (Washington) | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIX ECoop IncIowa (UtilityMichigan)data bookresult9) JumpMultipleSpringsACHP2APOLO SolarAPS

  5. ARCO Products Co-Watson | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIX ECoop IncIowa (UtilityMichigan)data bookresult9) JumpMultipleSpringsACHP2APOLO

  6. AS 42.05, Alaska Public Utilities Regulatory Act | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIX ECoop IncIowa (UtilityMichigan)data bookresult9) JumpMultipleSpringsACHP2APOLOAS 42.05,

  7. ASAlliances Biofuels Defunct | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIX ECoop IncIowa (UtilityMichigan)data bookresult9) JumpMultipleSpringsACHP2APOLOAS

  8. ASEM Green Independent Power Producers Network | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIX ECoop IncIowa (UtilityMichigan)data bookresult9) JumpMultipleSpringsACHP2APOLOASASEM

  9. ONLINE DATA SUPPLEMENT 1. Specimen voucher information and GenBank accession numbers for 63 mtSSU and 62 nuLSU sequences included in this study. Sequences in

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lutzoni, François M.

    , Gilenstam 2603a (UPS) AY661673 AY661683 Cryptodiscus gloeocapsa Czech Republic, 16-02-2002 Palice (herb

  10. 2009 Sun-Yat-Sen University Applied Math. Dept. package tour Discover the beauty of Taiwan......

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wong, Ngai-Ching

    . Japanese started to plante medicinal herbs such as Quinine Sulfate in the mountain of Chihpen and Taimali

  11. Discover the beauty of Taiwan...... 2-day Trip to National Scenic Area of Huadong Eastern Coast & Rift Valley

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wong, Ngai-Ching

    . Japanese started to plante medicinal herbs such as Quinine Sulfate in the mountain of Chihpen and Taimali

  12. Assessment of the Web using Genetic Programming Reginald L. Walker \\Lambda

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fernandez, Thomas

    ``sassafras tea'' as the basis. Excite/ AltaVista NetCenter HotBot Infoseek LookSmart Yahoo! ``sassafras tea'' 336 91 0 126 337 73 +``sassafras tea'' +herb 66 21 0 5 66 0 ``sassafras tea'' NEAR herb 143311 ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ 143311 ­ ­ ``sassafras tea'' OR herb 555226 ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ ­ 555226 ­ ­ ``sassafras tea'' AND herb 679028

  13. College of Agricultural Sciences Cooperative Extension HarvestingandPreservingHerbsandSpices

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Guiltinan, Mark

    and Storing After harvesting, leaves and whole plants should be rinsed in cold water and patted dry. Herbs and, harvest, and preserve their own. The method used for harvesting herbs and spices is dependent on the plant for definitions of herbs and spices and additional historical information. Harvesting · Tools for harvesting can

  14. Assessment of the Web using Genetic Programming Reginald L. Walker

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fernandez, Thomas

    for each search engine using sassafras tea" as the basis. Excite AltaVista NetCenter HotBot Infoseek LookSmart Yahoo! sassafras tea" 336 91 0 126 337 73 + sassafras tea" +herb 66 21 0 5 66 0 sassafras tea" NEAR herb 143311 - - - - - - 143311 - - sassafras tea" OR herb 555226 - - - - - - 555226 - - sassafras tea

  15. 172 Journal of Cave and Karst Studies, December 1998 D.W. Webb, L.M. Page, S.J. Taylor and J.K. Krejca-The Current Status and Habitats of the Illinois Cave Amphipod, Gammarus acherondytes Hubricht and Mackin (Crustacea

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Taylor, Steven J.

    , rural dwellings, and several small communities. Throughout the area, small woodlots containing sinkholes

  16. Examining the Differences Between Pre-K Through Second Grade Teachers' Perceptions and Third Through Fourth Grade Teachers' Perceptions of Cultural Awareness and Beliefs in One Urban District 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Plimper, Ouida C.

    2010-07-14

    The purpose of this study was to examine archival data collected from the administration of the Cultural Awareness and Belief Inventory (CABI) (Webb-Johnson & Carter, 2005) in an urban district located in the southwestern ...

  17. SAMPLE SYLLABUS PSYC 490 Self-Regulation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hopfinger, Joseph B.

    : Sheeran, P., & Webb, T. L. (2012). From goals to action. In H. Aarts & A. J. Elliot (Eds.), Goal in goal pursuit. In H. Aarts & A. J. Elliot (Eds.), Goal-directed behavior (pp. 231-264). New York

  18. Computationally-guided Design of Polymer Electrolytes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stoltz, Brian M.

    carbonates. #12;Computationally-guided Design of Polymer Electrolytes Project Summary Michael Webb RigidRESEARCH HIGHLIGHTS Computationally-guided Design of Polymer Electrolytes From the Resnick of Polymer Electrolytes Global Significance While progress of sustainable energy- harvesting techniques

  19. Civil, Environmental and Sustainable Engineering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Civil, Environmental and Sustainable Engineering (CESE) Del E. Webb School of Construction (DEWSC . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2 research Civil, Environmental and Sustainable Engineering) Construction Engineering Annual Report 2010 confronting engineering challenges School of Sustainable

  20. Ultrashallow junctions in Si using decaborane? A molecular dynamics simulation study

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Webb, Roger P.

    Kingdom Roger P. Webb Department of Electronic and Electrical Engineering, University of Surrey, Guildford of a family of around thirty boron hydrides6 but the advantage of this particular B cluster

  1. BRANDI M. BAUGHMAN Current position: Ph.D.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hergenrother, Paul J.

    and evaluating small molecules in model systems. (Read Finch's article, DOI: 10.1021/cb200506t) Published: March, The University of Tennessee Health Science Center, Re- search Advisor: Thomas R. Webb, St. Jude Children

  2. Evolution and functional classification of vertebrate gene deserts

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hardison, Ross C.

    . Loots,2 Marcelo A. Nobrega,3 Ross C. Hardison,4 Webb Miller,5,6 and Lisa Stubbs2 1 Energy, Environment physi- cal domains, and sequences that anchor genomic regions to spe- cific nuclear locations (Dorsett

  3. Environmental Health Education in Underserved Hispanic Communities 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ross, Jennifer Ann

    2013-12-12

    The focus of this study was to use environmental health education to improve topic-specific health literacy in two underserved Hispanic communities, Webb County and San Antonio. Hispanic communities may have disparities ...

  4. Human Resources & Rebecca Leinen

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Huang, Wei

    -Grounds Zone 4 Maintenance Health Systems Engineering Hospital Zone 1 Maintenance Operations Research Zone 2 Maintenance Environmental Resources Operations Cheryl Gomez Housing Facilities #12; Smeds Programs & Informatics Mark Webb Systems Engineering Office for Sustainability Maintenance

  5. The Ba'le For Your Entertainment: The Internet, SOPA, and Censorship

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sherriff, Mark S.

    : Thank you for contacIng my office regarding S.968, the PrevenIng Real Online Webb, United States Senator #12;Dear Dr. Sherriff: Thank you for contacIng

  6. Generalized Riemann integral R[superscript g] 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Perez, Kreemly Miguel

    1974-01-01

    versity. His permanent address is: Decanato de Ciencias "Pedro H. Urena" University Santo Domingo, Dom'inican Republic This thesis was typed by Mrs. Barbara Webb, TechPrep, College Station. ...

  7. School of Sustainable Engineering and the Built Environment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    of Construction (DEWSC) (Construction Management) Construction Engineering #12;school of biological and health, computer and energy engineering biofuels waste conversion to energy public health . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 Del E. Webb School of Construction

  8. Staunton folio, Virginia-West Virginia 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Darton, Nelson Horatio, 1865-1948.

    1894-01-01

    EVALUATION OF THE EFFECT OF PLANT GROWTH REGULATORS AND GOSSYM RECOMMENDATIONS ON COTTON FIBER QUALITY A Thesis by BRYAN WEBB SHAW Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements... Recommendations on Cotton Fiber Quality. (December 1990) Bryan Webb Shaw, B. S. , Texas A&M University Chair of Advisory Committee: Dr. Calvin B. Parnell, Jr. The objectives of this research were to quantify the effects of plant growth regulators on cotton...

  9. Effects of prescribed fire and varying stand basal area on nitrogen mineralization in a loblolly pine forest 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Webb, Bobby Glen

    1991-01-01

    EFFECTS OF PRESCRIBED FIRE AND VARYING STAND BASAL AREA ON NITROGEN MINERALIZATION IN A LOBLOLLY PINE FOREST A Thesis by BOBBY GLEN WEBB Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment... of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE August 1991 Major Subject: Forestry EFFECTS OF PRESCRIBED FIRE AND VARYING STAND BASAL AREA ON NITROGEN MINERALIZATION IN A LOBLOLLY PINE FOREST A Thesis by BOBBY GLEN WEBB Approved as to style...

  10. Survival of Salmonella typhimurium in soils amended with beef feedlot manure 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Webb, Jeffrey Allan

    1978-01-01

    SURVIVAL OF SALMONELLA TYPHIMURIUM IN SOILS AMENDED WITH BEEF FEEDLOT MANURE A Thesis by JEFFREY ALLAN WEBB Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirement for the degree of MASTER... OF SCIENCE August 1978 Major Subject: Soil Science SURVIVAL OF SALMONELLA TYPHIMURIUM IN SOILS AMENDED WITH BEEF FEEDLOT MANURE A Thesis JEFFREY ALLAN WEBB Approved as to style and content by: Chairman of Committee Head of Department) er (Member...

  11. Wednesday, February 11th Luncheon Hadley Room, Lincoln Campus Center Noon 1PM

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Massachusetts at Amherst, University of

    Baby Green Salad~Garlic and Herb Roasted Airline Chicken Breast~ ~Roasted Czajkowski Farm Potatoes~ Mixed Berry Cobbler with Maple Farms Ice Cream~Tea

  12. Fermilab Today

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    marinated pork tenderloin with pineapple salsa - Green rice - Margarita cake with key lime cream cheese frosting Friday, March 6 Dinner - Avgolemono soup - Herb-crusted lamb...

  13. THANKSGIVING ACROSS, AMERICA

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    reserved) Salt and freshly ground pepper Stuffing (if desired; if not, use onion, apple and herbs for the cavity) Z tablespoons dark unsulfured molasses 2 tablespoons soy...

  14. Revised July 2008 4-H Food Preservation Record

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tullos, Desiree

    , tomato) Pressure Canning (meat, poultry, fish, vegetable, tomato) Drying (fruit, vegetable, meat, herbs sugar, freezer) Freezing (fruit, vegetable, meal, main dish) New Skills I Learned in Food Preservation

  15. Teaching Direct Marketing and Small Farm Viability, 2nd Edition. Unit 3 - Community Supported Agriculture (CSA)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2015-01-01

    food production and marketing can bring. It also shows thatrelating to growing and marketing produce, herbs, and cutdual purpose: as a stable marketing opportunity for growers,

  16. Darwin College hall and formal weekly menus 6TH July 2015 Monday lunch Tuesday lunch Wednesday lunch Thursday lunch Friday lunch

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jackson, Sophie

    spinach potatoes, Roasted new potatoes Green beans Sugar snaps Medley of vegetables New potatoes with herb Main and street food dishes Main and street food dishes Main and street food dishes High tea Darwin with Thai green prawn curry and noodles Wild mushroom and truffle oil risotto with market herbs Southern

  17. Appendix 1. List of medicinal plants identified by Tamang people from the Chilime Village Development Committee of the Rasuwa district, Central Nepal

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Asselin, Hugo

    . Infusion taken as tea. 7. Artemisia indica Willd COMPOSITAE Titepati (Np), Chyanchin, Surchent (Tam) Herb, diarrhoea, dysentery, fever. Juice. 12. Bistorta affinis (D. Don) Greene POLYGONACEAE Muakui (Tam) Herb Root, leaf Diarrhoea and dysentery. Paste drunk as tea in the morning. 13. Cannabis sativa L. CANNABACEAE

  18. 1997 Oxford University Press 33893402Nucleic Acids Research, 1997, Vol. 25, No. 17 Gapped BLAST and PSI-BLAST: a new generation of

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Batzoglou, Serafim

    for Biotechnology Information, National Library of Medicine, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD 20894, USA, Alejandro A. Schäffer1, Jinghui Zhang, Zheng Zhang2, Webb Miller2 and David J. Lipman National Center, 1Laboratory of Genetic Disease Research, National Human Genome Research Institute, National

  19. SwRI Patents Southwest Research Institute -Page 1 of 85

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chapman, Clark R.

    ,720,184 5/13/2014 Use of Braking Energy to Augment Exhaust Heat for Improved Operation of Exhaust Aftertreatment Devices Cynthia C. Webb, Karl J Kreder III SwRI 8,714,121 5/6/2014 Split-Cycle Air Hybrid V

  20. 29 OCTOBER 2010 VOL 330 SCIENCE www.sciencemag.org584 CREDIT:CAMPBELLWEBB

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    cannot be stored, even in state-of-the- art seed banks (5). To contribute to the restoration efforts the global garden" (10 September, p. 1274) and in (6)], but we lack the financial and infrastructural SYLVESTER TAN,5 ICHIE TOMOAKI,18 CAMPBELL WEBB,2 TAKUO YAMAKURA,14 DAVID F. R. P. BURSLEM13 1 Ecosystem

  1. Role of Surface Oxides in the Formation of Solid-Electrolyte Interphases at Silicon Electrodes for Lithium-Ion Batteries

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Webb, Lauren J.

    for Lithium-Ion Batteries Kjell W. Schroder,,,§ Anthony G. Dylla,,§ Stephen J. Harris, Lauren J. Webb electrodes in lithium-ion batteries are still poorly understood. This lack of understanding inhibits of the SEI. KEYWORDS: lithium-ion batteries, solid-electrolyte interphase, SEI, TOF-SIMS, XPS, PCA 1

  2. Validation of an UV inversion algorithm using satellite and surface measurements

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zeng, Ning

    Validation of an UV inversion algorithm using satellite and surface measurements Pucai Wang UV-B radiation using both spectral and broadband measurements [Webb et al., 1997; Bigelow et al et al., 1995]. Ground-based instruments provide in situ measurements of current and historical UV

  3. Plans and Aspirations for Sensor and Platform Development

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Griffiths, Gwyn

    Engines Fuel Cells Courtesy Webb Research Corp. (top) & Dr C Eriksen, U. Washington (centre & bottom Hydride 370 · Methanol 6 200 · Hydrogen in nanotubes ~16 000 · Liquid Hydrogen 33 000 Source: Dyer, Sci;A bio-engineered fuel cell? Adenosine Triphosphate - ATP Adenosine Diphosphate - ATP O2 Organic

  4. NOAA TECHNICAL REPORTS National Marine Fisheries Service, Special Scientific Report-Fisheries Series

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    processing on the quality and yield of bay scallop meats. By N. B. Webb and F. B. Thomas. April 1971. iu + 11 by the Superintendent of Documents U.S Government Printing Office. Washington. D.C. 20402. 630. Blue crab meat. r. Preser:ation by freezing. July 1

  5. http://www.soc.soton.ac.uk/autosub Oceanographic surveys

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Griffiths, Gwyn

    , M Pebody, J R Perrett, A T Webb, M Squires & A Harris #12;Autosub-1 An AUV for Ocean Science u6.8 m - Mission 62 November 1996 Closest Approach to Beach Offshore Start Test Dive uDived to 2.5 m above bottom `ramps' - coherent structures in the upper few metres contrasting (top) along wind and (lower) across

  6. Long-term reproductive behaviour of woody plants across seven Bornean forest types in the Gunung

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    diversity Charles H. Cannon,1,2* Lisa M. Curran,3 Andrew J. Marshall4 and Mark Leighton5 1 Department canopy trees in the Dipterocarpaceae (Janzen 1974; Ashton et al. 1988; Curran et al. 1999; Curran & Leighton 2000; Curran & Webb 2000; Maycock et al. 2005). Several non-mutually exclusive mechanisms have

  7. HYDROLOGICAL PROCESSES Hydrol. Process. 22, 980986 (2008)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2008-01-01

    in their temperature. The results have consequences for thermally sensitive hydroecological processes and implications, especially when several sources of thermal energy are present, such as groundwater flow (Webb and Zhang, 1999 complexity in thermal regimes of surface water and their implications for ecological processes. A useful

  8. Two outfalls in an estuary: Optimal wasteload allocation Mathematical Sciences, Loughborough University, LE11 3TU, UK

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    water would be proportional to the oscillatory volumetric flow rate.Ê Accordingly, Webb & Tomlinson [2 tanks and pumps would be need to be available, allowing temporary excesses of wastewater to be stored dilution capacity merely involves multiplying the volumetric flow rate by a factor quantifying

  9. JEB Classics JJEEBBCCllaassssiiccss

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fish, Frank

    swimming energetics in animals (Webb, 1975). In his 1936 study, Gray used a rigid-body hydrodynamic model to that of a rigid model towed at the same speed, the muscles must be capable of generating energy at a rate at least that turbulent flow conditions existed in the boundary layer between the dolphin's skin and the water, because

  10. In order to swim, fish transfer momentum to the surrounding water by passing waves of bending down their bodies. By

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Long Jr., John H.

    trailing edge depth, are proportional to the mechanical power of the propulsive wave in elongated of the propulsive undulatory wave. To swim steadily at faster speeds, teleostean fishes increase both tail.g. Bainbridge, 1963; Hunter and Zweifel, 1971; Webb, 1988). The length of the propulsive wave is also modulated

  11. Project Icarus: Astronomical Considerations Relang to the Choice of Target Star 1. INTRODUCTION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Crawford, Ian

    R) docu- ment [1]. The most relevant ToR relating to the selection of the target star(s) are: ToR#3: "The, these imply a maximum realistic range of about 15 light-years from the Solar System. This would imply by Webb [5] and Crawford [6], and for Icarus specifically as a trade study conducted within Icarus Module

  12. Kindly supported by the Research School of Asia and the Pacific (http://asiapacific.anu.edu.au/researchschool/)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    scale structures Isabella Rosso 9.30 ­ 10:30 ENERGY and ADAPTATION Chair: Bob Webb Rooftop solar energy and governance with the focus on the voluntary carbon emissions trading scheme in China. Hao Zhang 11:00 ­ 12 Informal settlements and climate change issues in urban India. Sohail Ahmad Cultural Politics of Climate

  13. Martinkus docos show reality of Afghanistan war

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wapstra, Erik

    Martinkus docos show reality of Afghanistan war By ShAron Webb Journalist John Martinkus reels off the date he was kidnapped in the Iraq war as if it's perma- nently scratched on his brain. "It happened. It was terrible. I thought: Here we go." It's experiences like this that gave credibility to the television war

  14. Decadal-to interannual-scale source water variations in the Caribbean Sea recorded by Puerto Rican coral

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    South Florida, University of

    the wind-driven transport. Water K. H. Kilbourne Á T. M. Quinn College of Marine Science, University, 4412 Spicewood Springs Road, Austin, TX 78759-8500, USA T. P. Guilderson Center for Accelerator Mass Cruz, 1156 High Street, Santa Cruz, CA 95064, USA K. H. Kilbourne (&) Á R. S. Webb NOAA, Earth System

  15. Ministry of Environment Ecosystem Branch

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ministry of Environment Ecosystem Branch 2202 Main Mall University of British Columbia Vancouver aware of and which would definitely provide information applicable throughout the basin, is a study being proposed by Dr. Molly Webb. The last three years of this study will provide information

  16. Development of a universal measure of quadrupedal forelimb-hindlimb coordination using digital motion capture and computerised analysis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hamilton, Lindsay; Franklin, Robin J. M.; Jeffery, Nick D.

    2007-09-18

    :1282-1293. 24. Muir GD, Webb AA: Mini-review: assessment of behavioural recovery following spinal cord injury in rats. Eur J Neurosci 2000, 12:3079-3086. 25. Basso DM, Beattie MS, Bresnahan JC: A sensitive and reliable locomotor rating scale for open field...

  17. The Potential of Using Acoustical Emission to Detect Termites Within Wood1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    with the California SPCB result in litigation. Acoustic emission (AE) (the generation, transmission, and reception of energy in the form of vibrational waves in matter) (Kinsler and others 1982) offers (Hansen and others 1988, Webb and others 1988), in Japan the Formosan subterranean termite

  18. Freeze Branding Horses 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Householder, Doug; Webb, Gary; Wigington, Sam; Bruemmer, Jason

    2001-06-29

    , simpli- f_ied drawing of one hair shaft with its color (pigment) producing follicle (CF) and its growth follicle (GF), both shown below the skin. Doug Householder 1 , Gary Webb 2 , Sam Wigington 3 and Jason Bruemmer 4 Freeze Branding Horses Figure 1. Hair...

  19. Being Interactive oogle's popularity has turned link analysis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    in the refer- ring pages' authoritativeness.1 Links among pages induce a structure on the Web that has two espe the so-called surface Web, which consists, loosely speaking, of interlinked HTML pages. The deep WebBeing Interactive Deep Web Structure G oogle's popularity has turned link analysis into a major

  20. Edinburgh Research Explorer Influencing household energy practices: a critical review of UK

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Edinburgh, University of

    Edinburgh Research Explorer Influencing household energy practices: a critical review of UK smart & Webb, J 2014, 'Influencing household energy practices: a critical review of UK smart metering standards Commons Attribution License (http://creativecommons.org/ licenses/by/3.0), which permits unrestricted use

  1. The Astronomical, Astrobiological and Planetary Science Case for Interstellar Spaceflight 1. INTRODUCTION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Crawford, Ian

    ) interstellar spaceflight, as envisaged by the Daedalus [1] and Icarus [2] projects. In its long history by Webb [4] in the context of the Daedalus study, the scientific case for interstellar spaceflight mission architecture (as was the case for the Daedalus scientific payload [4]; see also the accompanying

  2. Phytologia (April 2010) 92(1) 31 GEOGRAPHIC VARIATION IN THE LEAF ESSENTIAL OILS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Adams, Robert P.

    CEDRUS WEBB. & BERTHOL. FROM MADEIRA AND THE CANARY ISLANDS. Robert P. Adams Biology Department, Baylor and Evolution Research Group (IPNA-CSIC), 38206 La Laguna, Tenerife, Canary Islands, Spain Susana S. Fontinha, Tenerife, Canary Islands, Spain ABSTRACT The volatile leaf oils of J. cedrus from Madeira, Gran Canaria, La

  3. Remote sensing of the solar site of interchange reconnection associated with the May 1997 magnetic cloud

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Berkeley, University of

    Remote sensing of the solar site of interchange reconnection associated with the May 1997 magnetic configuration at the source. Citation: Crooker, N. U., and D. F. Webb (2006), Remote sensing of the solar site be determined remotely from the direction of suprat

  4. International Conference on Machine Control & Guidance 2008 1 A Self Calibrating Attitude Determination System for

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    fuel usage [Webb, 2004]. Modern GPS equipment is capable of producing high quality position of automotive grade MEMS inertial sensors and a dual frequency survey grade GPS/GLONASS receiver to provide) Dual Frequency GPS/GLONASS Single Frequency GPS 400MHz PowerPC CPU 2-Axis Digital Compass Y Gyro (MEMS

  5. WaldL.doc 26/09/2002 In: Environmental Communication in the Information Society, W. Pillmann, K. Tochtermann

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Heinemann, Detlev

    , and Ann Webb7 Abstract The project SoDa (solar data) answers the needs of industry and research for infor on solar radiation is a critical issue for the use of solar energy and sev- eral environmental domains, Vienna, Austria, 2002. SoDa: a project for the integration and exploitation of networked solar radiation

  6. Susan Hermiller Curriculum Vitae -October 7, 2014

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hermiller, Susan

    . Hermiller, and R. Todd, 4-moves and the Dabkowski-Sahi invariant for knots, J. Knot Theory Ramifications 22 to Group Theory, PI (with J. Meier, K. Vogt- mann, and D. Webb), 10/2010-9/2012. NSF grant DMS 0855953 and J. Meakin), 2/2009-1/2011. NSF grant DMS 0070701, Conference on geometric and combinatorial methods

  7. Ecology, 84(10), 2003, pp. 26682679 2003 by the Ecological Society of America

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shine, Rick

    . PRINGLE,1 JONATHAN K. WEBB, AND RICHARD SHINE2 School of Biological Sciences, Building A08, University changes in other habitat attributes such as light intensity, air and ground temperatures, wind speed and small ranges may not be able to emigrate successfully, and local extinction may thus be tanta- mount

  8. Formal hall menus 23rd Guest night 23rd October and Christmas formals 9th

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    de Gispert, Adrià

    quail egg and chive dressing Starter Jasmine tea smoked duck, golden raisin and apple compote and greens Main course Olive oil poached fillet of Scottish salmon, green herb risotto, beans, Main course

  9. DINING.UMD.EDU WELCOME TO

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zeng, Ning

    AND GLUTEN-FREE CHOICES HAND-DIPPED UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND DAIRY SMALL BATCH ICE CREAM INCREDIBLE ETHNIC AND SALADS CRISP VEGETABLES, WHOLE GRAINS, FRESH HERBS AND COMFORT FOODS MEAT-FREE, DAIRY-FREE, NUT-FREE

  10. Safe Storage of Fresh Fruits and Vegetables 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Scott, Amanda

    2008-09-05

    Proper storage of fresh fruits and vegetables can help consumers avoid foodborne illness. This publication explains how to safely store apples, bananas, berries, beets, broccoli, carrots, corn, grapes, herbs, lettuce and greens, melons, nectarines...

  11. K Basins Sludge Treatment Project Phase 1

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Readiness Assessment Report Herb G. Sutter Michael Poirier Art W. Etchells Gary Smith Kris Thomas Jim J. Davis Paul Macbeth November 16, 2009 Prepared by the U.S....

  12. October 10, 2012 Postdoctoral Fellows funded by the BCSC

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Prigozhin, Leonid

    . Sales, James Rhodes Univ. FAIABD/Dryl. Biotechnologies Calcium metabolism in marine (2001) South Africa-herbivor (2001) Ecology, India Bertrand Boeken ratio between herbs and grasses productivity gradient. 16

  13. Phylogenetics and Biogeography of Aichryson Inferred from Chloroplast DNA Sequences

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    O'Leary, Thomas Ryan

    2009-07-02

    Aichryson (Crassulaceae) is a genus of succulent herbs that are endemic to the islands of Macaronesia. The current study provides the best estimate of maternal phylogeny in Aichryson to date. Multiple accessions of various taxa were recovered...

  14. Infrequent older adult-primary care provider discussion and documentation of dietary supplements

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jang, DJ; Tarn, DM

    2014-01-01

    Changes in herb and dietary supplement use in the U.S. adultnonmineral dietary supplements in a healthy elderly cohort.multivi- tamin and mineral supplement use to prevent cancer

  15. The response of understory herbaceous plants to nitrogen fertilization in forests of different land-use history

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fraterrigo, Jennifer

    Sciences, Mars Hill College, Mars Hill, NC 28754, USA c Department of Zoology, University of Wisconsin colonization. We examined the response of six forest herb taxa (Arisaema triphyllum, Cimicifuga racemosa

  16. A Case Study of the Infusion of Bioethics into a Medical School Curriculum 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wakefield, Karen June

    2014-04-25

    the healing of the mind. In addition, the early Mormon religious movement voiced opposi- tion to medical care by physicians. The Mormons accepted only roots and herbs for me- dicinal purposes and supported the right to forgo mandatory smallpox vaccinations...

  17. Webberville, Michigan: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page| Open Energy Information Serbia-EnhancingEt Al.,Turin,VillageWarrensourceCentreCounty,InformationWebb,

  18. Webberville, Texas: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page| Open Energy Information Serbia-EnhancingEt Al.,Turin,VillageWarrensourceCentreCounty,InformationWebb,Texas:

  19. Weber County, Utah: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page| Open Energy Information Serbia-EnhancingEt Al.,Turin,VillageWarrensourceCentreCounty,InformationWebb,Texas:Weber

  20. Rice Quality Factors: Implications For Management Decisions. 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Grant, Warren R.; Rister, Edward, M.; Brorsen, B. Wade

    1986-01-01

    . Review comments and suggestions from Bill Black, Bart Drees, Arthur Gerlow, Melvin Parker, James Stansel, Mo Way, Bill Webb, and Michael Wohlgenant are also appreciated. A special thanks to Kim Trant for editorial assistance. ... Rice Quality Factors... that grades are intended to measure are red rice, weed seeds, damaged kernels (including peck), off-color, chalk, and off-types of rice kernels. These factors should be negatively related to price, since they are all undesirable characteristics. 1 Graders...

  1. Nutrient Content of Beef Steaks as Influenced by USDA Quality Grade and Degree of Doneness 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Smith, Amanda M.

    2010-07-14

    for the designation as UNDERGRADUATE RESEARCH SCHOLAR A Senior Scholars Thesis by AMANDA MARIAN SMITH Approved by: Co-Research Advisors: Jeffrey W. Savell Kerri B. Harris Associate Dean for Undergraduate Research: Robert C. Webb Major: Animal... QUALITY GRADE AND DEGREE OF DONENESS A Senior Scholars Thesis by AMANDA MARIAN SMITH iii ABSTRACT Nutrient Content of Beef Steaks as Influenced by USDA Quality Grade and Degree of Doneness. (April 2010) Amanda Marian Smith Department...

  2. Retail Shelf-life Characteristics of Dry-aged Beef 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ulbrich, Carson

    2010-07-14

    SCHOLAR A Senior Scholars Thesis by CARSON JOSEPH ULBRICH RETAIL SHELF-LIFE CHARACTERISTICS OF DRY-AGED BEEF Approved by: Research Advisors: Jeffrey W. Savell Davey B. Griffin Associate Dean for Undergraduate Research: Robert C. Webb... ULBRICH iii ABSTRACT Retail Shelf-Life Characteristics of Dry-Aged Beef. (April 2010) Carson Joseph Ulbrich Department of Animal Science Texas A&M University Research Advisors: Drs. Jeffrey W. Savell and Davey B. Griffin Department...

  3. The Impact of Heat Transfer Enhancement Techniques on Energy Savings in the U.S. Industry 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rebello, W. J.; Peterson, G. R.; Sohal, M.

    1988-01-01

    hydrocarbons in kettle reboilers in refineries. Finned tubing is now available in corrosion resistant materials, such as, titanium, Inconel, Hastelloy and stain less steel. In the past, finning techniques were developed for ductile, easy... and Internally Finned Tubes", J.of Heat Transfer vlOO, nl,Feb. 1978. 12. R. L. Webb, "Performance Evalu tion Criteria for Use of Enhanced Heat Transfer Surfaces in Heat Exchanger Design", International Journal of Heat and Mass Transfer, v24, n4, pp715, 1981...

  4. Detrital Zircon Geochronology and Sequence Stratigraphy of the Eureka Quartzite Formation Adjacent to the Tooele Arch, Western Utah and Eastern Nevada 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lira, Mario Alberto

    2015-08-09

    GEOCHRONOLOGY AND SEQUENCE STRATIGRAPHY OF THE EUREKA QUARTZITE FORMATION ADJACENT TO THE TOOELE ARCH, WESTERN UTAH AND EASTERN NEVADA A Thesis by MARIO ALBERTO LIRA Submitted to the Office of Graduate and Professional Studies of Texas A&M University... or relatively thin between Early and Late Ordovician strata across the broad, west-east oriented Tooele Arch (Webb, 1956, 1958; Hintze, 1959). Detrital zircon geochronology of Middle-Late Ordovician quartz arenite suggests the source for the Ordovician quartz...

  5. Wedding Reception Menu Hors d' Oeuvres Buffet

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Collett Jr., Jeffrey L.

    vegetable platters with dips Coffee, decaf coffee, hot tea, iced tea, and ice water Select six items from include mixed field green platters with a choice of dressings, starch, seasonal vegetable, rolls, butter, coffee, decaf coffee, hot tea, iced tea, and ice water. Winter Park Mediterranean Herbed Chicken Sautéed

  6. INTRODUCTION Records of past environments are important to

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    González, Luis A.

    , and most herbs. Both proportion and biomass of C4 plants in North American prairies are highly correlated with mean annual precipitation (Epstein et al, 1997). The 13C values reflect both the proportion (Teeri., 1990) provide continuous, high- resolution 13C records reflecting the ratio of C3 to C4 plants growing

  7. Engineering Platinum ($10,000 and above)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Xiaorui "Ray"

    William Regenold, Jr. (deceased) John and Ann Tickle Charles and Jan VandenBulck Gold ($5,000-$9,999) Anatole Beck Howard and Debra Chambers Dr. Wayne and Sylvia Davis Dr. Herb McCoy, Jr. Dr. Edgar Jeffrey Arnold Ron Averill Raleigh and Mary Beckham William and Zora Bivens Michael and Cynthia Brady T

  8. Human Cytochrome P450 2E1: Functional Comparison to Cytochrome 2A13 and 2A6

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Blevins, Melanie

    2008-05-05

    for its broad (and in many cases overlaping) range of substrate specificities. Members of the CYP2 family are flxible nough to metabolize many potential toxins (e.g. drugs, herbs, and polutants). The lvels of thes xenobitic-metabolizing CYP450s may...

  9. THE IPM APP FOR PLANT PESTS UConn Extension The IPM app will provide direct access in the field to a database of information on plant pests, help the user identify the plant pest by

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Demurjian, Steven A.

    THE IPM APP FOR PLANT PESTS ­ UConn Extension The IPM app will provide direct access in the field to a database of information on plant pests, help the user identify the plant pest by comparing photos plants (herbs, vegetables, greens) Nursery and garden center plants: trees, shrubs, and perennials

  10. Jonah L. Larrick Student Center 900 Turpin St

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gough, Christopher M.

    at dining locations on campus. Used cooking oil from VCU Dining is processed and converted into clean. The garden is mixed use and garden beds can be rented for a low cost by the month or by the year. Faculty, staff, and students can rent beds and grow their own organic flowers, herbs, and vegetables

  11. Appendix 30 Fire Effects on Key Ecological Processes in Forested

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Appendix 30 Fire Effects on Key Ecological Processes in Forested Ecosystems The following paragraphs on fire effects on forest succession are from Stickney (1982) Forest Succession ...the severity of the pre-disturbance forest herb species also demonstrated the ability to survive fire, particularly those

  12. The Pulse Protocol: Energy Efficient Infrastructure Access

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Awerbuch, Baruch

    The Pulse Protocol: Energy Efficient Infrastructure Access Baruch Awerbuch, David Holmer, herb}@cs.jhu.edu Abstract-- We present the Pulse protocol which is designed for multi-hop wireless. The Pulse protocol utilizes a periodic flood initiated at the network gateways which provides both routing

  13. Forensic Bite Mark Identification Using Image Processing Glenn Flora

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tuceryan, Mihran

    of candidate dental models. The results are compared to identification results by human forensic odontologyForensic Bite Mark Identification Using Image Processing Methods Glenn Flora Department of Computer@iupui.edu Herb Blitzer Indiana Forensic Institute 338 South Arlington Ave, Suite 111 Indianapolis, IN 46219, USA

  14. Healthy Foods, Healthy Lives Institute Spring 2011 Grants Awarded

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Amin, S. Massoud

    and selling fresh fruits, vegetables, roots, herbs, and traditional crops at markets across the region, and to help them to market to broader commercial markets. This project, with the guidance of a farmer advisory will be a community assessment and strategic plan for a healthy Native-owned retail grocery store ("Good Heart Grocery

  15. Gerard's Herbal The OED defines the word `herbal' (n) as: `a book containing the names and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Flynn, E. Victor

    Burghley. He was clearly very fond of this garden, because in 1596 he published a list of all the plants and unlearned people'10 into thinking they were mandrakes. Most of the plants listed in the Herbal are supplied and descriptions of herbs, or of plants in general, with their properties and virtues; a treatise in plants

  16. Introduction Neutral grasslands occur throughout the UK on soils where the pH is within

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Introduction Neutral grasslands occur throughout the UK on soils where the pH is within the range 5 by grasses and herbs (Figure 1). The term `neutral', although indicative of soil pH, is more correctly descriptive of the species assemblage being neither markedly `calcifuge' (thriving in acid soils) nor

  17. A 16 000-year record of vegetational change in south-western Alaska as inferred from plant macrofossils

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hu, Feng Sheng

    , Vaccinium and Salix prevailed on the landscape before ca. 14 000 cal a BP. The shift from herb- to shrub-dominated tundra (Salix, subsequent Betula expansion) possibly reflects climatic warming at the beginning viridis ssp. crispa, Salix) between 10 000 and 4000 cal a BP. This Holocene vegetation type is comparable

  18. American Mineralogist, Volume 93, pages 698701, 2008 0003-004X/08/0004698$05.00/DOI: 10.2138/am.2008.2827 698

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Downs, Robert T.

    suggests that natural hydroxyl-bästnasite-(Nd) is most likely isotypic with hydroxyl and references therein). Among all REE-bearing mineral resources in the world, bästna- site, (REE)CO3F060283; http://rruff.info), donated by Herb Obodda. The chemical composition was determined

  19. Clemson University Cooperative Extension Service Reportto the People

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stuart, Steven J.

    , stimulated our local economy by: keeping people at work by educating and certifying workers in the food service, forestry and agriculture industries. keeping costs and waste down by teaching property owners: Vegetable Gardening, Organic Gardening, Making Compost and Mulch, Herb Gardening, Growing Blueberries, Figs

  20. Texas Plants Poisonous to Livestock. 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sperry, Omer Edison

    1964-01-01

    as wide and have somewhat thickened margins. DISTRIBUTION. Guajillo grows in great density in Texas, especially in the southern part of the Edwards Plateau and in the central and northern parts of the South Texas Plains. It extends from Terrell County... on the north to Webb County on the south and east- ward into Bee County. Scattered plants and small patches of guajillo are found in areas adjacent to the South Texas Plains and the Edwards Plateau and in the Trans-Pecos, especially in the Chisos Mountains...

  1. Ranching in the Kansas Flint Hills: Exploring the Built Forms of a Family Cattle Ranch

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Adams, Paula Graves

    1997-05-01

    in the Flint Hills 234 Sources Consulted 237 iv List of Figures Page 1.1 Adaptation of W. P. Webb's Land Regions of the United States 2 1.2 The Lazy Flying S Ranch, township 13, range 9, section 4 2 1.3 Periodization of key influences on the landscape 7 2... of concrete silo typical of the 1920s on Skyline Drive 127 5.9 Home ceramic block chicken coop, south elevation 128 5.10 Home ceramic block chicken coop, west elevation 128 5.11 Gus and Auguste Schultz, 1901 136 5.12 Ranch home of Mr. Samuel Fixx, Yampa, Colorado 137...

  2. Ovarian activity patterns of postpartum Holstein and Jersey cows of diverse genetic abilities for milk 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dachir, Shlomit

    1983-01-01

    OF FIGOAES Figur a Page Progester one profile of cow 123, i 1lustr sting time of ovulation and length of over ian cycles. E= standing estr us; S= seconder y signs of estr us; No no signs of estrus associated with the onset of over ian activity Pr... 41s32 days) . This finding is in agreement with the report of Fonseca et al. (1983) where the postpartum intervals to first standing estr us were 66. 9+33. 9 and 37. 2t27. 3 days for Holstein and Jersey. Unlike several previous r sports (Webb et...

  3. Fish Pond - 4 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Colin Crombie

    2006-01-01

    of MASTER OF SCIENCE August 1990 Major Subject: Wildlife and Fisheries Sciences PACTORS IMPLUEMCIMQ NIMTERIMQ DIVIMS DUCK USE OP COASTAL PONDS IM SCUTE TEXAS A Thesis by STEPHEN EMMETT ADAIR Approved as to style and content by: Milton W. Weller (Co...-Chair of Committee) William H. Riel, Jr. (Co-Chair of Committee) )a Jack M. Pay (Member) James W. Webb (Member) Devi J. Schmidly (Head f Department) August 1990 ABSTRACT Factors Influencing Wintering Diving Duck Use of Coastal Ponds in South Texas...

  4. Possibility in the Actual World

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Webb, Douglas J.

    Possibility in the Actual World Douglas J. Webb I. Introduction If one affirms an unrestricted law of bivalence, then there is a set of present truths that captures everything about the future. To begin, let me explain and briefly criticize... no other way the world (this world) can go. What is true cannot become false; hence what is true is logically fixed, or necessarily true. On the other hand, we suspect that in the reasoning just mentioned we are somehow confusing truth with necessity...

  5. Si(100) Surface-States - a Success for the (2x1) Asymmetric Dimer Model 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    BOWEN, MA; DOW, JD; Allen, Roland E.

    1982-01-01

    this work: The Joint Services Electronics Program (U.S. Army, U.S. Navy, and U.S. Air Force) under Contract No. N00014-79-C-0424, the Office of Naval Research under Contract No. N00014-77-C-0537, and the Department of Energy, Division of Materials.... Ngoc, and M. B. Webb, Surf. Sci. 75, 287 (1978). F. Jona, H. D. Shih, D. W. Jepsen, and P. M. Marcus, J. Phys. C 12, L455 (1979). ~M. J. Cardillo and G. E. Becker, Phys. Rev. B 21, 1497 (1980). ...

  6. Effect of excitability measured by blood glucose level, and degree of fatness on conception rate in breeding beef cows 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Johnston, Marvin Glenn

    1963-01-01

    from Texas A 6 M College. Upon graduation hs was commissioned a 2nd I, ieutanant in ths U. S. Air Force but did not serve on active duty until August 1957. In the six months i. nterim period hs was employed by Winrock Farms, Norrilton, Arkansas.... While i. n the Air Force, base assignmants included Maiden Air Base, Maiden, Missouri; Webb Ai. r Force Base, Big Spring, Texas; and Bergstrom Air Force Base, Austin, Texas. Upon release from active duty with the U?S. Air Force on September 30, 1960...

  7. Microsoft Word - Copyright Template.docx

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefield Municipal GasAdministration Medal01 Sandia4) AugustA.MOX Adventure6 Fed.2009, has been1990,Webb and

  8. Microsoft Word - Cover Sheet.doc

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefield Municipal GasAdministration Medal01 Sandia4) AugustA.MOX Adventure6 Fed.2009, has been1990,Webb

  9. Microsoft Word - Cover Sheet.doc

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefield Municipal GasAdministration Medal01 Sandia4) AugustA.MOX Adventure6 Fed.2009, has been1990,Webb2

  10. Building America Whole-House Solutions for New Homes: Pulte Homes and

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustmentsShirleyEnergyTher i n c i p a l DeInsulation at the Edge of a SlabCommunities of Del Webb, Las

  11. Building America Whole-House Solutions for New Homes: Quadrant Homes, Kent,

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustmentsShirleyEnergyTher i n c i p a l DeInsulation at the Edge of a SlabCommunities of Del Webb,

  12. Building America Whole-House Solutions for New Homes: Rural Development,

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustmentsShirleyEnergyTher i n c i p a l DeInsulation at the Edge of a SlabCommunities of Del Webb,Inc.,

  13. CHALLENGES OF PRESERVING HISTORIC RESOURCES DURING THE D & D OF HIGHLY CONTAMINATED HISTORICALLY SIGNIFICANT PLUTONIUM PROCESS FACILITIES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    HOPKINS, A.M.

    2006-03-17

    The Manhattan Project was initiated to develop nuclear weapons for use in World War II. The Hanford Engineer Works (HEW) was established in eastern Washington State as a production complex for the Manhattan Project. A major product of the HEW was plutonium. The buildings and process equipment used in the early phases of nuclear weapons development are historically significant because of the new and unique work that was performed. When environmental cleanup became Hanford's central mission in 1991, the Department of Energy (DOE) prepared for the deactivation and decommissioning of many of the old process facilities. In many cases, the process facilities were so contaminated, they faced demolition. The National Historic Preservation Act (NHPA) requires federal agencies to evaluate the historic significance of properties under their jurisdiction for eligibility for inclusion in the National Register of Historic Places before altering or demolishing them so that mitigation through documentation of the properties can occur. Specifically, federal agencies are required to evaluate their proposed actions against the effect the actions may have on districts, sites, buildings or structures that ere included or eligible for inclusion in the National Register. In an agreement between the DOE'S Richland Operations Office (RL), the Washington State Historic Preservation Office (SHPO) and the Advisory Council on Historic Preservation (ACHP), the agencies concurred that the Hanford Site Historic District is eligible for listing on the National Register of Historic Places and that a Sitewide Treatment Plan would streamline compliance with the NHPA while allowing RL to manage the cleanup of the Hanford Site. Currently, many of the old processing buildings at the Plutonium Finishing Plant (PFP) are undergoing deactivation and decommissioning. RL and Fluor Hanford project managers at the PFP are committed to preserving historical artifacts of the plutonium production process. They must also ensure the safety of workers and the full decontamination of buildings or artifacts if they are to be preserved. This paper discusses the real time challenges of working safely, decontaminating process equipment, preserving historical structures and artifacts and documenting their history at PFP.

  14. The Challenges of Preserving Historic Resources During the Deactivation and Decommissioning of Highly Contaminated Historically Significant Plutonium Process Facilities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hopkins, A.; Minette, M.; Sorenson, D.; Heineman, R.; Gerber, M. [Fluor Hanford, Inc., PO Box 1000 Richland WA 99352 (United States); Charboneau, S. [US Department of Energy PO Box 550, Richland WA 99352 (United States); Bond, F. [Washington State Department of Ecology, WDOE 3100 Port of Benton Blvd., Richland WA, 99354 (United States)

    2006-07-01

    The Manhattan Project was initiated to develop nuclear weapons for use in World War II. The Hanford Engineer Works (HEW) was established in eastern Washington State as a production complex for the Manhattan Project. A major product of the HEW was plutonium. The buildings and process equipment used in the early phases of nuclear weapons development are historically significant because of the new and unique work that was performed. When environmental cleanup became Hanford's central mission in 1991, the Department of Energy (DOE) prepared for the deactivation and decommissioning of many of the old process facilities. In many cases, the process facilities were so contaminated, they faced demolition. The National Historic Preservation Act (NHPA) requires federal agencies to evaluate the historic significance of properties under their jurisdiction for eligibility for inclusion in the National Register of Historic Places before altering or demolishing them so that mitigation through documentation of the properties can occur. Specifically, federal agencies are required to evaluate their proposed actions against the effect the actions may have on districts, sites, buildings or structures that are included or eligible for inclusion in the National Register. In an agreement between the DOE's Richland Operations Office (RL), the Washington State Historic Preservation Office (SHPO) and the Advisory Council on Historic Preservation (ACHP), the agencies concurred that the Hanford Site Historic District is eligible for listing on the National Register of Historic Places and that a Site-wide Treatment Plan would streamline compliance with the NHPA while allowing RL to manage the cleanup of the Hanford Site. Currently, many of the old processing buildings at the Plutonium Finishing Plant (PFP) are undergoing deactivation and decommissioning. RL and Fluor Hanford project managers at the PFP are committed to preserving historical artifacts of the plutonium production process. They must also ensure the safety of workers and the full decontamination of buildings or artifacts if they are to be preserved. This paper discusses the real time challenges of working safely, decontaminating process equipment, preserving historical structures and artifacts and documenting their history at PFP. (authors)

  15. Authoritarianism in the Conversation of Gestures

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Herb, Terry R.; Elliott Jr., Robert E.

    1971-10-01

    AUTHORITARIANISM IN THE CONVERSATION OF GESTURES* Terry R. Herb and Robert F. Elliott, Jr. University of Alabama in Huntsville Current studies of attitudes have relied upon written responses and the most obvious form of communication, the verbal... appropriate to intensify nonverbal communication. As Goffman (1961: 106-110) has observed, the individual may perform the activities proscribed by the role but disidentify himself from it. The~ctof separating oneself from a role is termed role distance...

  16. International Bibliography of Vegetation Maps 2nd Edition

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ku?chler, A. W. (August William)

    1980-01-01

    . Parana-Uruguay c. Patagonia d. Mountain e. Marsh IV. Bushlands 8. a. Humid mountains b. Arid mountains c. Intermontanc valley d. Patagonia e. Inner coastal desert V. Deserts 9. a. Peruvian-Chilean b. Lomas c. Venezuelan sand-dunes d. Salt.... Bunch grasses, annual grasses and herbs, and shrubs 1. Tola heath puna 2. Paramo grassland: grasses 3. Tundra: low shrubs, mosses VI. Desert A. Coastal desert of Peru and Chile B. Fog vegetation of Peru Coast (lomas vegetation). Predominantly...

  17. Wavelength calibration of the JWST-MIRI medium resolution spectrometer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Martinez-Galarza, J R; Hernan-Caballero, A; Azzollini, R; Glasse, A; Kendrew, S; Brandl, B; Lahuis, F

    2010-01-01

    We present the wavelength and spectral resolution characterisation of the Integral Field Unit (IFU) Medium Resolution Spectrometer for the Mid-InfraRed Instrument (MIRI), to fly onboard the James Webb Space Telescope in 2014. We use data collected using the Verification Model of the instrument and develop an empirical method to calibrate properties such as wavelength range and resolving power in a portion of the spectrometer's full spectral range (5-28 microns). We test our results against optical models to verify the system requirements and combine them with a study of the fringing pattern in the instrument's detector to provide a more accurate calibration. We show that MIRI's IFU spectrometer will be able to produce spectra with a resolving power above R=2800 in the wavelength range 6.46-7.70 microns, and that the unresolved spectral lines are well fitted by a Gaussian profile.

  18. The Influence of Social Movements on Space Astronomy Policy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Harrisa, Hannah E

    2014-01-01

    Public engagement (PE) initiatives can lead to a long term public support of science. However most of the real impact of PE initiatives within the context of long-term science policy is not completely understood. An examination of the National Aeronautics and Space Administration's (NASA) Hubble Space Telescope, James Webb Space Telescope, and International Sun-Earth Explorer 3 reveal how large grassroots movements led by citizen scientists and space aficionados can have profound effects on public policy. We explore the role and relevance of public grassroots movements in the policy of space astronomy initiatives, present some recent cases which illustrate policy decisions involving broader interest groups, and consider new avenues of PE including crowdfunding and crowdsourcing.

  19. The Mid-Infrared Instrument for JWST, II: Design and Build

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wright, G S; Goodson, G B; Rieke, G H; Aitink-Kroes, Gabby; Amiaux, J; Aricha-Yanguas, Ana; Azzolini, Ruyman; Banks, Kimberly; Barrado-Navascues, D; Belenguer-Davila, T; Bloemmart, J A D L; Bouchet, Patrice; Brandl, B R; Colina, L; Detre, Ors; Diaz-Catala, Eva; Eccleston, Paul; Friedman, Scott D; Garcia-Marin, Macarena; Guedel, Manuel; Glasse, Alistair; Glauser, Adrian M; Greene, T P; Groezinger, Uli; Grundy, Tim; Hastings, Peter; Henning, Th; Hofferbert, Ralph; Hunter, Faye; Jessen, N C; Justtanont, K; Karnik, Avinash R; Khorrami, Mori A; Krause, Oliver; Labiano, Alvaro; Lagage, P -O; Langer, Ulrich; Lemke, Dietrich; Lim, Tanya; Lorenzo-Alvarez, Jose; Mazy, Emmanuel; McGowan, Norman; Meixner, M E; Morris, Nigel; Morrison, Jane E; Mueller, Friedrich; Norgaard-Nielson, H -U; Olofsson, Goeran; O'Sullivan, Brian; Pel, J -W; Penanen, Konstantin; Petach, M B; Pye, J P; Ray, T P; Renotte, Etienne; Renouf, Ian; Ressler, M E; Samara-Ratna, Piyal; Scheithauer, Silvia; Schneider, Analyn; Shaughnessy, Bryan; Stevenson, Tim; Sukhatme, Kalyani; Swinyard, Bruce; Sykes, Jon; Thatcher, John; Tikkanen, Tuomo; van Dishoeck, E F; Waelkens, C; Walker, Helen; Wells, Martyn; Zhender, Alex

    2015-01-01

    The Mid-InfraRed Instrument (MIRI) on the James Webb Space Telescope (JWST) provides measurements over the wavelength range 5 to 28.5 microns. MIRI has, within a single 'package', four key scientific functions: photometric imaging, coronagraphy, single-source low-spectral resolving power (R ~ 100) spectroscopy, and medium-resolving power (R ~ 1500 to 3500) integral field spectroscopy. An associated cooler system maintains MIRI at its operating temperature of design of MIRI, the primary design parameters, and their realization in terms of the 'as-built' instrument. It also describes the test program that led to delivery of the tested and calibrated Flight Model to NASA in 2012, and the confirmation after delivery of the key interface requirements.

  20. DETECTING INDUSTRIAL POLLUTION IN THE ATMOSPHERES OF EARTH-LIKE EXOPLANETS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lin, Henry W. [Harvard College, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Abad, Gonzalo Gonzalez; Loeb, Abraham, E-mail: henrylin@college.harvard.edu, E-mail: ggonzalezabad@cfa.harvard.edu, E-mail: aloeb@cfa.harvard.edu [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden St., Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States)

    2014-09-01

    Detecting biosignatures, such as molecular oxygen in combination with a reducing gas, in the atmospheres of transiting exoplanets has been a major focus in the search for alien life. We point out that in addition to these generic indicators, anthropogenic pollution could be used as a novel biosignature for intelligent life. To this end, we identify pollutants in the Earth's atmosphere that have significant absorption features in the spectral range covered by the James Webb Space Telescope. We focus on tetrafluoromethane (CF{sub 4}) and trichlorofluoromethane (CCl{sub 3}F), which are the easiest to detect chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs) produced by anthropogenic activity. We estimate that ?1.2 days (?1.7 days) of total integration time will be sufficient to detect or constrain the concentration of CCl{sub 3}F (CF{sub 4}) to ?10 times the current terrestrial level.

  1. Is there further evidence for spatial variation of fundamental constants?

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Berengut, J. C.; Flambaum, V. V.; King, J. A.; Curran, S. J.; Webb, J. K.

    2011-06-15

    Indications of spatial variation of the fine-structure constant, {alpha}, based on study of quasar absorption systems have recently been reported [J. K. Webb, J. A. King, M. T. Murphy, V. V. Flambaum, R. F. Carswell, and M. B. Bainbridge, arXiv:1008.3907.]. The physics that causes this {alpha}-variation should have other observable manifestations, and this motivates us to look for complementary astrophysical effects. In this paper we propose a method to test whether spatial variation of fundamental constants existed during the epoch of big bang nucleosynthesis and study existing measurements of deuterium abundance for a signal. We also examine existing quasar absorption spectra data that are sensitive to variation of the electron-to-proton mass ratio {mu} and x={alpha}{sup 2{mu}}g{sub p} for spatial variation.

  2. A Hubble Astrometry Initiative: Laying the Foundation for the Next-Generation Proper-Motion Survey of the Local Group

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kallivayalil, Nitya; Simon, Joshua D; Boylan-Kolchin, Michael; Deason, Alis J; Fritz, Tobias K; Geha, Marla; Sohn, Sangmo Tony; Weisz, Daniel R

    2015-01-01

    High-precision astrometry throughout the Local Group is a unique capability of the Hubble Space Telescope (HST), with potential for transformative science, including constraining the nature of dark matter, probing the epoch of reionization, and understanding key physics of galaxy evolution. While Gaia will provide unparalleled astrometric precision for bright stars in the inner halo of the Milky Way, HST is the only current mission capable of measuring accurate proper motions for systems at greater distances (> 80 kpc), which represents the vast majority of galaxies in the Local Group. The next generation of proper-motion measurements will require long time baselines, spanning many years to decades and possibly multiple telescopes, combining HST with the James Webb Space Telescope (JWST) or the Wide-Field Infrared Survey Telescope (WFIRST). However, the current HST allocation process is not conducive to such multi-cycle/multi-mission science, which will bear fruit primarily over many years. We propose an HST ...

  3. Image Registration for Stability Testing of MEMS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Memarsadeghi, Nargess; Blake, Peter N; Morey, Peter A; Landsman, Wayne B; Chambers, Victor J; Moseley, Samuel H; 10.1117/12.872076

    2013-01-01

    Image registration, or alignment of two or more images covering the same scenes or objects, is of great interest in many disciplines such as remote sensing, medical imaging, astronomy, and computer vision. In this paper, we introduce a new application of image registration algorithms. We demonstrate how through a wavelet based image registration algorithm, engineers can evaluate stability of Micro-Electro-Mechanical Systems (MEMS). In particular, we applied image registration algorithms to assess alignment stability of the MicroShutters Subsystem (MSS) of the Near Infrared Spectrograph (NIRSpec) instrument of the James Webb Space Telescope (JWST). This work introduces a new methodology for evaluating stability of MEMS devices to engineers as well as a new application of image registration algorithms to computer scientists.

  4. Modelling for post-dryout heat transfer and droplet sizes at low pressure and low flow conditions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jeong, H.Y.; No, H.C. [Korea Advanced Inst. of Science and Technology, Taejon (Korea, Republic of). Dept. of Nuclear Engineering] [Korea Advanced Inst. of Science and Technology, Taejon (Korea, Republic of). Dept. of Nuclear Engineering

    1996-10-01

    A correlation describing the initial droplet size just after the CHF position at low mass flux is suggested through regression analysis. The history-dependent post-dryout model of Varone and Rohsenow replaced by the Webb-Chen model for wall-vapor heat transfer is used as a reference model in the analysis. In the post-dryout region at low pressure and low flow, it is found that the suggested one-dimensional mechanistic model is valid only in the churn-turbulent flow regime (j*{sub g} = 0.5 {approximately} 4.5). It is also suggested that the droplet size generated from the churn-turbulent surface is dependent not only on the pressure but also on the vapor velocity. It turns out that the present model can predict the measured cladding and vapor temperatures within 20% and 15%, respectively.

  5. JWST observations of stellar occultations by solar system bodies and rings

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Santos-Sanz, P; Pinilla-Alonso, N; Stansberry, J; Lin, Z-Y; Zhang, Z-W; Vilenius, E; Müller, Th; Ortiz, J L; Braga-Ribas, F; Bosh, A; Duffard, R; Lellouch, E; Tancredi, G; Young, L

    2015-01-01

    In this paper we investigate the opportunities provided by the James Webb Space Telescope (JWST) for significant scientific advances in the study of solar system bodies and rings using stellar occultations. The strengths and weaknesses of the stellar occultation technique are evaluated in light of JWST's unique capabilities. We identify several possible JWST occultation events by minor bodies and rings, and evaluate their potential scientific value. These predictions depend critically on accurate a priori knowledge of the orbit of JWST near the Sun-Earth Lagrange-point 2 (L2). We also explore the possibility of serendipitous stellar occultations by very small minor bodies as a by-product of other JWST observing programs. Finally, to optimize the potential scientific return of stellar occultation observations, we identify several characteristics of JWST's orbit and instrumentation that should be taken into account during JWST's development.

  6. Uses and misuses of bioclimatic envelope modeling

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Araú jo, Miguel B.; Peterson, A. Townsend

    2012-07-01

    effects of global warming on biodiversity. BioScience 57:227–236. Bourg, N. A., W. J. McShea, and D. E. Gill. 2005. Putting a CART before the search: successful habitat prediction for a rare forest herb. Ecology 86:2793–2804. Breiman, L. 2001. Random...:131–144. Colwell, R. K., G. Brehm, C. L. Cardelu´s, A. C. Gilman, and J. T. Longino. 2008. Global warming, elevational range shifts, and lowland biotic attrition in the wet tropics. Science 322:258–261. de Siqueira, M. F., G. Durigan, P. de Marco Ju´nior, and A. T...

  7. Pueblo of Jemez Geothermal Feasibility Study Fianl Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    S.A. Kelley; N. Rogers; S. Sandberg; J. Witcher; J. Whittier

    2005-03-31

    This project assessed the feasibility of developing geothermal energy on the Pueblo of Jemez, with particular attention to the Red Rocks area. Geologic mapping of the Red Rocks area was done at a scale of 1:6000 and geophysical surveys identified a potential drilling target at a depth of 420 feet. The most feasible business identified to use geothermal energy on the reservation was a greenhouse growing culinary and medicinal herbs. Space heating and a spa were identified as two other likely uses of geothermal energy at Jemez Pueblo. Further geophysical surveys are needed to identify the depth to the Madera Limestone, the most likely host for a major geothermal reservoir.

  8. The development of a passive dosimeter for chlorine gas 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Montier, Earl Woodson

    1981-01-01

    I'HE DEVELOPMENT OF A PASSIVE DOSIMETER FOR CHLORINE GAS A Thesis EARL WOODSON MONTIER, JR. Submitt* d to the Graduate College of Texas A&M Cniversity in partial fulfillment of the requirement for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE December 198... Major Subject: Industrial Hygiene THE DEVELOPNENT CF A PASSIVE DOSII'%TER FOR CHLORINE GAS A Tbesis EARL %GODSON NONTIER JR. Appcoved as to style and content by: Chainman Co ttee ad of Depart ent 7 g Herbe' i'iembe December 981 ABSTRA CT...

  9. Newsfront 17 - 23 March 2008, Issue 58

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ghimire, Yubaraj

    has promised to compensate for the loss accrued to the school as a result of this theft. The company has taken a vast stretch of land in the outskirts of the capital to grow herbs. It was found using a pump-set and drilling machine using... , the irrigation and public infrastructure are only benefiting the landlords. They would say, if the government is going to redistribute land to us, the public money should be spent to help the landlords start business in the city. But once you compensate landlords...

  10. Nation Weekly May 23, 2004, Volume 1, Number 5

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Upadhyay, Akhilesh

    of painting. 32 Ram Man Dai By Sanjeev Uprety Ram Man Dai’s search for an all-purpose medical panacea began in 1960 when he started experimenting with various combinations of ghee, local herbs like saldhoop and gokuldhoop and fitkiri to create Himali Malam... the beginning of Jet Airways services in Nepal. Jet Airways, a private Indian air- line company, will have daily flights between Kathmandu and Delhi. One-way tickets for the economy class will cost Rs. 6,824 and Rs. 8,856 for business class. Euro 2004 Euro 2004...

  11. A new method for measurement of safety rod drop times

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pesic, M.; Stefanovic, D. ); Marinkovic, P. )

    1992-10-01

    In this paper, a new method for the accurate measurement of safety rod drop times is proposed. It is based on a fast electromagnetic transducer and an analog-to-digital converter (ADC) conected to a computer system. Evaluation of recorded data is conducted by a developed computer code. The first measurements performed at the HERBE fast-thermal RB reactor show that a relative uncertainty (confidence level 95%) of less than 6% can be achieved in determination of rod drop time (with time intervals ranging from 0.4-10.0 s). Further improvements in accuracy are possible.

  12. Wild Game -- Care and Cooking. 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Klussman, Wallace; Tribble, Marie; Mason, Louise; Reasonover, Frances; Cox, Maeona

    1963-01-01

    gamey flavor. t n 3 tablespoons minced onion Y2 cup mushrooms, sliced Y8 teaspoon crushed sage Y8 teaspoon crushed thyme Y8 teaspoon savory 6 strips bacon h p 2 pheasants, about 21;2 pounds each 2 teaspoons salt I Y2 cups long-grain rice 3 cups water 1... and mushroom and cook about 10 minutes. Add to rice along with herbs. Stuff bird lightly. Extra stuffing may be baked in a greased, covered casserole last 30 minutes of roasting time. Truss birds. See page 15. Brush birds with melted butter or margarine...

  13. Structure–inhibition relationship of ginsenosides towards UDP-glucuronosyltransferases (UGTs)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fang, Zhong-Ze [The First Affiliated Hospital of Liaoning Medical University, Jinzhou 121001 (China); Joint Center for Translational Medicine, Dalian Institute of Chemical Physics Chinese Academy of Sciences and The first Affiliated Hospital of Liaoning Medical University, No.457, Zhongshan Road, Dalian 116023 (China); Laboratory of Metabolism, Center for Cancer Research, National Cancer Institute, Bethesda, MD 20892 (United States); Cao, Yun-Feng [Key Laboratory of Contraceptives and Devices Research(NPFPC),Shanghai Engineer and Technology Research Center of Reproductive Health Drug and Devices, Shanghai Institute of Planned Parenthood Research, Shanghai 200032 (China); Joint Center for Translational Medicine, Dalian Institute of Chemical Physics Chinese Academy of Sciences and The first Affiliated Hospital of Liaoning Medical University, No.457, Zhongshan Road, Dalian 116023 (China); Hu, Cui-Min [Laboratory of Metabolism, Center for Cancer Research, National Cancer Institute, Bethesda, MD 20892 (United States); Hong, Mo; Sun, Xiao-Yu [Joint Center for Translational Medicine, Dalian Institute of Chemical Physics Chinese Academy of Sciences and The first Affiliated Hospital of Liaoning Medical University, No.457, Zhongshan Road, Dalian 116023 (China); Ge, Guang-Bo; Liu, Yong; Zhang, Yan-Yan; Yang, Ling [Laboratory of Pharmaceutical Resource Discovery, Dalian Institute of Chemical Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, 116023 Dalian (China); Sun, Hong-Zhi, E-mail: zzfang228@gmail.com [The First Affiliated Hospital of Liaoning Medical University, Jinzhou 121001 (China)

    2013-03-01

    The wide utilization of ginseng provides the high risk of herb–drug interaction (HDI) with many clinical drugs. The inhibition of ginsenosides towards drug-metabolizing enzymes (DMEs) has been regarded as an important reason for herb–drug interaction (HDI). Compared with the deep studies on the ginsenosides' inhibition towards cytochrome P450 (CYP), the inhibition of ginsenosides towards the important phase II enzymes UDP-glucuronosyltransferases (UGTs) remains to be unclear. The present study aims to evaluate the inhibition behavior of ginsenosides towards important UGT isoforms located in the liver and intestine using in vitro methods. The recombinant UGT isoform-catalyzed 4-methylumbelliferone (4-MU) glucuronidation reaction was employed as in vitro probe reaction. The results showed that structure-dependent inhibition existed for the inhibition of ginsenosides towards UGT isoforms. To clarify the possibility of in vivo herb–drug interaction induced by this kind of inhibition, the ginsenoside Rg{sub 3} was selected as an example, and the inhibition kinetic type and parameters (K{sub i}) were determined. Rg{sub 3} competitively inhibited UGT1A7, 2B7 and 2B15-catalyzed 4-MU glucuronidation reaction, and exerted noncompetitive inhibition towards UGT1A8-catalyzed 4-MU glucuronidation. The inhibition parameters (K{sub i} values) were calculated to be 22.6, 7.9, 1.9, and 2.0 ?M for UGT1A7, 1A8, 2B7 and 2B15. Using human maximum plasma concentration of Rg{sub 3} (400 ng/ml (0.5 ?M)) after intramuscular injection of 60 mg Rg{sub 3}, the area under the plasma concentration-time curve (AUC) was extrapolated to increase by 2.2%, 6.3%, 26.3%, and 25% for the co-administered drugs completely undergoing the metabolism catalyzed by UGT1A7, 1A8, 2B7 and 2B15, respectively. All these results indicated that the ginsenosides' inhibition towards UGT isoforms might be an important reason for ginseng–drug interaction. - Highlights: ? Structure-dependent inhibition of ginsenoside towards UDP-glucuronosyltransferases. ? Rg{sub 3}? inhibition towards UGT isoforms can induce in vivo drug–drug interaction. ? Broadening knowledge on ginsenosides' inhibition towards drug-metabolizing enzymes.

  14. "Observing and Analyzing" Images From a Simulated High Redshift Universe

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Morgan, Robert J; Scannapieco, Evan; Thacker, Robert J

    2015-01-01

    We investigate the high-redshift evolution of the restframe UV-luminosity function (LF) of galaxies via hydrodynamical cosmological simulations, coupled with an emulated observational astronomy pipeline that provides a direct comparison with observations. We do this by creating mock images and synthetic galaxy catalogs of approximately 100 square arcminute fields from the numerical model at redshifts ~ 4.5 to 10.4. We include the effects of dust extinction and the point spread function (PSF) for the Hubble WFC3 camera for comparison with space observations. We also include the expected zodiacal background to predict its effect on space observations, including future missions such as the James Webb Space Telescope (JWST). When our model catalogs are fitted to Schechter function parameters, we predict that the faint-end slope alpha of the LF evolves as alpha = -1.16 - 0.12 z over the redshift range z ~ 4.5 to 7.7, in excellent agreement with observations from e.g., Hathi et al. (2010). However, for redshifts z ...

  15. Unique Spectroscopy and Imaging of Mars with JWST

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Villanueva, Geronimo L; Clancy, Todd R; Encrenaz, Therese; Fouchet, Thierry; Hartogh, Paul; Lellouch, Emmanuel; Lopez-Valverde, Miguel A; Mumma, Michael J; Novak, Robert E; Smith, Michael D; Vandaele, Ann-Carine; Wolff, Michael J; Ferruit, Pierre; Milam, Stefanie N

    2015-01-01

    In this document, we summarize the main capabilities of the James Webb Space Telescope (JWST) for performing observations of Mars. The distinctive vantage point of JWST at the Sun-Earth Lagrange point (L2) will allow sampling the full observable disk, permitting the study of short-term phenomena, diurnal processes (across the East-West axis) and latitudinal processes between the hemispheres (including seasonal effects) with excellent spatial resolutions (0.07 arcsec at 2 {\\mu}m). Spectroscopic observations will be achievable in the 0.7-5 {\\mu}m spectral region with NIRSpec at a maximum resolving power of 2700, and with 8000 in the 1-1.25 {\\mu}m range. Imaging will be attainable with NIRCam at 4.3 {\\mu}m and with two narrow filters near 2 {\\mu}m, while the nightside will be accessible with several filters in the 0.5 to 2 {\\mu}m. Such a powerful suite of instruments will be a major asset for the exploration and characterization of Mars. Some science cases include the mapping of the water D/H ratio, investigatio...

  16. Infrared Transmission Spectra for Extrasolar Giant Planets

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    G. Tinetti; M. C. Liang; A. Vidal-Madjar; D. Ehrenreich; A. Lecavelier des Etangs; Y. Yung

    2006-11-06

    Among the hot Jupiters that transit their parent stars known to date, the two best candidates to be observed with transmission spectroscopy in the mid-infrared (MIR) are HD189733b and HD209458b, due to their combined characteristics of planetary density, orbital parameters and parent star distance and brightness. Here we simulate transmission spectra of these two planets during their primary eclipse in the MIR, and we present sensitivity studies of the spectra to the changes of atmospheric thermal properties, molecular abundances and C/O ratios. Our model predicts that the dominant species absorbing in the MIR on hot Jupiters are water vapor and carbon monoxide, and their relative abundances are determined by the C/O ratio. Since the temperature profile plays a secondary role in the transmission spectra of hot Jupiters compared to molecular abundances, future primary eclipse observations in the MIR of those objects might give an insight on EGP atmospheric chemistry. We find here that the absorption features caused by water vapor and carbon monoxide in a cloud-free atmosphere, are deep enough to be observable by the present and future generation of space-based observatories, such as Spitzer Space Telescope and James Webb Space Telescope. We discuss our results in light of the capabilities of these telescopes.

  17. Infrared emission from tidal disruption events --- probing the pc-scale dust content around galactic nuclei

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lu, Wenbin; Evans, Neal J

    2015-01-01

    Recent UV-optical surveys have been successful in finding tidal disruption events (TDEs), in which a star is tidally disrupted by a supermassive black hole (BH). These TDEs release a huge amount of radiation energy ~ 10^51-52 erg into the circum-nuclear medium. If the medium is dusty, most of the radiation energy will be absorbed by dust grains within ~ 1 pc from the BH and re-radiated in the infrared. We calculate the dust emission lightcurve from a 1-D radiative transfer model, taking into account the time-dependent heating, cooling and sublimation of dust grains. We show that the dust emission peaks at 3-10 microns and has typical luminosities ~ 10^42-43 erg/s (with sky covering factor of dusty clouds ranging from 0.1-1). This is detectable by current generation of telescopes. In the near future, James Webb Space Telescope will be able to perform photometric and spectroscopic measurements, in which silicate or polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) features may be found. Observations at rest-frame wavelengt...

  18. POPULATION III HYPERNOVAE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Smidt, Joseph; Whalen, Daniel J. [T-2, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States); Wiggins, Brandon K. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Brigham Young University, Provo, UT 84602 (United States); Even, Wesley; Fryer, Chris L. [CCS-2, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States); Johnson, Jarrett L., E-mail: dwhalen1999@gmail.com [XTD-PRI, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States)

    2014-12-20

    Population III supernovae have been of growing interest of late for their potential to directly probe the properties of the first stars, particularly the most energetic events that are visible near the edge of the observable universe. Until now, hypernovae, the unusually energetic Type Ib/c supernovae that are sometimes associated with gamma-ray bursts, have been overlooked as cosmic beacons at the highest redshifts. In this, the latest of a series of studies on Population III supernovae, we present numerical simulations of 25-50 M {sub ?} hypernovae and their light curves done with the Los Alamos RAGE and SPECTRUM codes. We find that they will be visible at z = 10-15 to the James Webb Space Telescope and z = 4-5 to the Wide-Field Infrared Survey Telescope, tracing star formation rates in the first galaxies and at the end of cosmological reionization. If, however, the hypernova crashes into a dense shell ejected by its progenitor, it is expected that a superluminous event will occur that may be seen at z ? 20 in the first generation of stars.

  19. The potential for detecting gamma-ray burst afterglows from population III stars with the next generation of infrared telescopes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Macpherson, D. [ICRAR, University of Western Australia, Crawley, WA 6009 (Australia); Coward, D. M. [School of Physics, University of Western Australia, Crawley, WA 6009 (Australia); Zadnik, M. G., E-mail: damien.macpherson@icrar.org [Department of Imaging and Applied Physics, Curtin University, Perth, WA 6845 (Australia)

    2013-12-10

    We investigate the detectability of a proposed population of gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) from the collapse of Population III (Pop III) stars. The James Webb Space Telescope (JWST) and Space Infrared Telescope for Cosmology and Astrophysics (SPICA) will be able to observe the late time infrared afterglows. We have developed a new method to calculate their detectability, which takes into account the fundamental initial mass function and formation rates of Pop III stars, from which we find the temporal variability of the afterglows and ultimately the length of time JWST and SPICA can detect them. In the range of plausible Pop III GRB parameters, the afterglows are always detectable by these instruments during the isotropic emission, for a minimum of 55 days and a maximum of 3.7 yr. The average number of detectable afterglows will be 2.96× 10{sup –5} per SPICA field of view (FOV) and 2.78× 10{sup –6} per JWST FOV. These are lower limits, using a pessimistic estimate of Pop III star formation. An optimal observing strategy with SPICA could identify a candidate orphan afterglow in ?1.3 yr, with a 90% probability of confirmation with further detailed observations. A beamed GRB will align with the FOV of the planned GRB detector Energetic X-ray Imaging Survey Telescope once every 9 yr. Pop III GRBs will be more easily detected by their isotropic emissions (i.e., orphan afterglows) rather than by their prompt emissions.

  20. Type IIP supernovae as cosmological probes: A SEAM distance to SN1999em

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Baron, E.; Nugent, Peter E.; Branch, David; Hauschildt, Peter H.

    2004-06-01

    Because of their intrinsic brightness, supernovae make excellent cosmological probes. We describe the spectral-fitting expanding atmosphere method (SEAM) for obtaining distances to Type IIP supernovae (SNe IIP) and present a distance to SN 1999em for which a Cepheid distance exists. Our models give results consistent with the Cepheid distance, even though we have not attempted to tune the underlying hydrodynamical model but have simply chosen the best fits. This is in contradistinction to the expanding photosphere method (EPM), which yields a distance to SN 1999em that is 50 percent smaller than the Cepheid distance. We emphasize the differences between the SEAM and the EPM. We show that the dilution factors used in the EPM analysis were systematically too small at later epochs. We also show that the EPM blackbody assumption is suspect. Since SNe IIP are visible to redshifts as high as z {approx}< 6, with the James Webb Space Telescope, the SEAM may be a valuable probe of the early universe.

  1. Dark Stars: A Review

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Katherine Freese; Tanja Rindler-Daller; Douglas Spolyar; Monica Valluri

    2015-01-10

    Dark Stars (DS) are stellar objects made (almost entirely) of ordinary atomic material but powered by the heat from Dark Matter (DM) annihilation (rather than by fusion). Weakly Interacting Massive Particles (WIMPs), among the best candidates for DM, can be their own antimatter and can accumulate inside the star, with their annihilation products thermalizing with and heating the DS. The resulting DSs are in hydrostatic and thermal equilibrium. The first phase of stellar evolution in the history of the Universe may have been dark stars. Though DM constituted only $star, this amount was sufficient to power the star for millions to billions of years. Depending on their DM environment, early DSs can become very massive ($>10^6 M_\\odot$), very bright ($>10^9 L_\\odot$), and potentially detectable with the James Webb Space Telescope (JWST). Once the DM runs out and the dark star dies, it may collapse to a black hole; thus DSs can provide seeds for the supermassive black holes observed throughout the Universe and at early times. Other sites for dark star formation exist in the Universe today in regions of high dark matter density such as the centers of galaxies. The current review briefly discusses DSs existing today but focuses on the early generation of dark stars.

  2. SUPERMASSIVE DARK STARS: DETECTABLE IN JWST

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Freese, Katherine; Ilie, Cosmin; Spolyar, Douglas; Valluri, Monica; Bodenheimer, Peter

    2010-06-20

    The first phase of stellar evolution in the history of the universe may be dark stars (DSs), powered by dark matter (DM) heating rather than by nuclear fusion. Weakly interacting massive particles (WIMPs), which may be their own antipartners, collect inside the first stars and annihilate to produce a heat source that can power the stars for millions to billions of years. In this paper, we show that these objects can grow to be supermassive dark stars (SMDSs) with masses {approx_gt}(10{sup 5}-10{sup 7}) M{sub sun}. The growth continues as long as DM heating persists, since DSs are large and cool (surface temperature {approx_lt}5 x 10{sup 4} K) and do not emit enough ionizing photons to prevent further accretion of baryons onto the star. The DM may be provided by two mechanisms: (1) gravitational attraction of DM particles on a variety of orbits not previously considered and (2) capture of WIMPs due to elastic scattering. Once the DM fuel is exhausted, the SMDS becomes a heavy main-sequence star; these stars eventually collapse to form massive black holes (BHs) that may provide seeds for supermassive BHs in the universe. SMDSs are very bright, with luminosities exceeding (10{sup 9}-10{sup 11}) L{sub sun}. We demonstrate that for several reasonable parameters, these objects will be detectable with the James Webb Space Telescope. Such an observational discovery would confirm the existence of a new phase of stellar evolution powered by DM.

  3. On the potential of the EChO mission to characterise gas giant atmospheres

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Barstow, Joanna K; Irwin, Patrick G J; Bowles, Neil; Fletcher, Leigh N; Lee, Jae-Min

    2012-01-01

    Space telescopes such as EChO (Exoplanet Characterisation Observatory) and JWST (James Webb Space Telescope) will be important for the future study of extrasolar planet atmospheres. Both of these missions are capable of performing high sensitivity spectroscopic measurements at moderate resolutions in the visible and infrared, which will allow the characterisation of atmospheric properties using primary and secondary transit spectroscopy. We use the NEMESIS radiative transfer and retrieval tool (Irwin et al. 2008, Lee et al. 2012) to explore the potential of the proposed EChO mission to solve the retrieval problem for a range of H2-He planets orbiting different stars. We find that EChO should be capable of retrieving temperature structure to ~200 K precision and detecting H2O, CO2 and CH4 from a single eclipse measurement for a hot Jupiter orbiting a Sun-like star and a hot Neptune orbiting an M star, also providing upper limits on CO and NH3. We provide a table of retrieval precisions for these quantities in ...

  4. The Number of Supernovae from Primordial Stars in the Universe

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    John H. Wise; Tom Abel

    2004-11-19

    Recent simulations of the formation of the first luminous objects in the universe predict isolated very massive stars to form in dark matter halos with virial temperatures large enough to allow significant amounts of molecular hydrogen to form. We construct a semi-analytic model based on the Press-Schechter formalism and calibrate the minimum halos mass that may form a primordial star with the results from extensive adaptive mesh refinement simulations. The model also includes star formation in objects with virial temperatures in excess of ten thousand Kelvin. The free parameters are tuned to match the optical depth measurements by the WMAP satellite. The models explicitly includes the negative feedback of the destruction of molecular hydrogen by a soft UV background which is computed self-consistently. We predict high redshift supernova rates as one of the most promising tools to test the current scenario of primordial star formation. The supernova rate from primordial stars peaks at redshifts ~20. Using an analytic model for the luminosities of pair-instability supernovae we predict observable magnitudes and discuss possible observational strategies. Such supernovae would release enough metals corresponding to a uniform enrichment to a few hundred thousands of solar metalicity. If some of these stars produce gamma ray bursts our rates will be directly applicable to understanding the anticipated results from the SWIFT satellite. This study highlights the great potential for the James Webb space telescope in probing cosmic structure at redshifts greater than 20.

  5. Final Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Webb, Robert C.; Kamon, Teruki; Toback, David; Safonov, Alexei; Dutta, Bhaskar; Dimitri, Nanopoulos; Pope, Christopher; White, James

    2013-11-18

    Overview The High Energy Physics Group at Texas A&M University is submitting this final report for our grant number DE-FG02-95ER40917. This grant has supported our wide range of research activities for over a decade. The reports contained here summarize the latest work done by our research team. Task A (Collider Physics Program): CMS & CDF Profs. T. Kamon, A. Safonov, and D. Toback co-lead the Texas A&M (TAMU) collider program focusing on CDF and CMS experiments. Task D: Particle Physics Theory Our particle physics theory task is the combined effort of Profs. B. Dutta, D. Nanopoulos, and C. Pope. Task E (Underground Physics): LUX & NEXT Profs. R. Webb and J. White(deceased) lead the Xenon-based underground research program consisting of two main thrusts: the first, participation in the LUX two-phase xenon dark matter search experiment and the second, detector R&D primarily aimed at developing future detectors for underground physics (e.g. NEXT and LZ).

  6. Flora of the Mayacmas Mountains. [Listing of 679 species in the Geysers Geothermal Resource area

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Neilson, J.A.

    1981-09-01

    This flora describes the plants that occur within the Mayacmas Mountain Range of northern California. It is the result of ten years of environmental assessment by the author in the Geysers Geothermal Resource area, located in the center of the Mayacmas Range. The flora includes notes on plant communities and ecology of the area, as well as habitat and collection data for most of the 679 species covered. Altogether 74 families, 299 genera and 679 species are included in the flora. The work is divided into eight subdivisions: trees; shrubs; ferns and fern allies; aquatic plants; tules, sedges, and rushes; lilies and related plants; dicot herbs; and grasses. Within each subdivision, family, genera and species are listed alphabetically. Keys are provided at the beginning of each subdivision. A unique combination of physical, environmental and geologic factors have resulted in a rich and diverse flora in the Mayacmas. Maps have been provided indicating known locations for species of rare or limited occurrence.

  7. The effects of refraction on transit transmission spectroscopy: application to Earth-like exoplanets

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Misra, Amit; Meadows, Victoria; Crisp, Dave

    2014-09-01

    We quantify the effects of refraction in transit transmission spectroscopy on spectral absorption features and on temporal variations that could be used to obtain altitude-dependent spectra for planets orbiting stars of different stellar types. We validate our model against altitude-dependent transmission spectra of the Earth from ATMOS and against lunar eclipse spectra from Pallé et al. We perform detectability studies to show the potential effects of refraction on hypothetical observations of Earth analogs with the James Webb Space Telescope NIRSPEC. Due to refraction, there will be a maximum tangent pressure level that can be probed during transit for each given planet-star system. We show that because of refraction, for an Earth-analog planet orbiting in the habitable zone of a Sun-like star only the top 0.3 bars of the atmosphere can be probed, leading to a decrease in the signal-to-noise ratio (S/N) of absorption features by 60%, while for an Earth-analog planet orbiting in the habitable zone of an M5V star it is possible to probe almost the entire atmosphere with minimal decreases in S/N. We also show that refraction can result in temporal variations in the transit transmission spectrum which may provide a way to obtain altitude-dependent spectra of exoplanet atmospheres. Additionally, the variations prior to ingress and subsequent to egress provide a way to probe pressures greater than the maximum tangent pressure that can be probed during transit. Therefore, probing the maximum range of atmospheric altitudes, and in particular the near-surface environment of an Earth-analog exoplanet, will require looking at out-of-transit refracted light in addition to the in-transit spectrum.

  8. DETECTION OF SUBSTRUCTURE IN THE GRAVITATIONALLY LENSED QUASAR MG0414+0534 USING MID-INFRARED AND RADIO VLBI OBSERVATIONS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    MacLeod, Chelsea L. [Physics Department, United States Naval Academy, Annapolis, MD 21403 (United States); Jones, Ramsey; Agol, Eric [Astronomy Department, University of Washington, Seattle, WA 98195 (United States); Kochanek, Christopher S., E-mail: macleod@usna.edu [Department of Astronomy and the Center for Cosmology and Astroparticle Physics, Ohio State University, Columbus, OH 43210 (United States)

    2013-08-10

    We present 11.2 {mu}m observations of the gravitationally lensed, radio-loud z{sub s} = 2.64 quasar MG0414+0534, obtained using the Michelle camera on Gemini North. We find a flux ratio anomaly of A2/A1 = 0.93 {+-} 0.02 for the quasar images A1 and A2. When combined with the 11.7 {mu}m measurements from Minezaki et al., the A2/A1 flux ratio is nearly 5{sigma} from the expected ratio for a model based on the two visible lens galaxies. The mid-IR flux ratio anomaly can be explained by a satellite (substructure), 0.''3 northeast of image A2, as can the detailed very long baseline interferometry (VLBI) structures of the jet produced by the quasar. When we combine the mid-IR flux ratios with high-resolution VLBI measurements, we find a best-fit mass between 10{sup 6.2} and 10{sup 7.5} M{sub Sun} inside the Einstein radius for a satellite substructure modeled as a singular isothermal sphere at the redshift of the main lens (z{sub l} = 0.96). We are unable to set an interesting limit on the mass to light ratio due to its proximity to the quasar image A2. While the observations used here were technically difficult, surveys of flux anomalies in gravitational lenses with the James Webb Space Telescope will be simple, fast, and should well constrain the abundance of substructure in dark matter halos.

  9. LUMINOUS SUPERNOVA-LIKE UV/OPTICAL/INFRARED TRANSIENTS ASSOCIATED WITH ULTRA-LONG GAMMA-RAY BURSTS FROM METAL-POOR BLUE SUPERGIANTS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kashiyama, Kazumi; Yajima, Hidenobu [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA 16802 (United States); Nakauchi, Daisuke; Nakamura, Takashi [Department of Physics, Kyoto University, Oiwake-cho, Kitashirakawa, Sakyo-ku, Kyoto 606-8502 (Japan); Suwa, Yudai, E-mail: kzk15@psu.edu [Yukawa Institute for Theoretical Physics, Kyoto University, Oiwake-cho, Kitashirakawa, Sakyo-ku, Kyoto 606-8502 (Japan)

    2013-06-10

    Metal-poor massive stars typically end their lives as blue supergiants (BSGs). Gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) from such progenitors could have an ultra-long duration of relativistic jets. For example, Population III (Pop III) GRBs at z {approx} 10-20 might be observable as X-ray-rich events with a typical duration of T{sub 90} {approx} 10{sup 4}(1 + z) s. The recent GRB111209A at z = 0.677 has an ultra-long duration of T{sub 90} {approx} 2.5 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 4} s and it has been suggested that its progenitor might have been a metal-poor BSG in the local universe. Here, we suggest that luminous UV/optical/infrared emission is associated with this new class of GRBs from metal-poor BSGs. Before the jet head breaks out of the progenitor envelope, the energy injected by the jet is stored in a hot plasma cocoon, which finally emerges and expands as a baryon-loaded fireball. We show that the photospheric emissions from the cocoon fireball could be intrinsically very bright (L{sub peak} {approx} 10{sup 42}-10{sup 44} erg s{sup -1}) in UV/optical bands ({epsilon}{sub peak} {approx} 10 eV) with a typical duration of {approx}100 days in the rest frame. Such cocoon emissions from Pop III GRBs might be detectable in infrared bands at {approx}years after Pop III GRBs at up to z {approx} 15 by upcoming facilities such as the James Webb Space Telescope. We also suggest that GRB111209A might have been rebrightening in UV/optical bands up to an AB magnitude of {approx}< 26. The cocoon emission from local metal-poor BSGs might have been observed previously as luminous supernovae without GRBs since they can be seen from the off-axis direction of the jet.

  10. DISCRIMINATING BETWEEN CLOUDY, HAZY, AND CLEAR SKY EXOPLANETS USING REFRACTION

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Misra, Amit K.; Meadows, Victoria S.

    2014-11-01

    We propose a method to distinguish between cloudy, hazy, and clear sky (free of clouds and hazes) exoplanet atmospheres that could be applicable to upcoming large aperture space- and ground-based telescopes such as the James Webb Space Telescope (JWST) and the European Extremely Large Telescope (E-ELT). These facilities will be powerful tools for characterizing transiting exoplanets, but only after a considerable amount of telescope time is devoted to a single planet. A technique that could provide a relatively rapid means of identifying haze-free targets (which may be more valuable targets for characterization) could potentially increase the science return for these telescopes. Our proposed method utilizes broadband observations of refracted light in the out-of-transit spectrum. Light refracted through an exoplanet atmosphere can lead to an increase of flux prior to ingress and subsequent to egress. Because this light is transmitted at pressures greater than those for typical cloud and haze layers, the detection of refracted light could indicate a cloud- or haze-free atmosphere. A detection of refracted light could be accomplished in <10 hr for Jovian exoplanets with JWST and <5 hr for super-Earths/mini-Neptunes with E-ELT. We find that this technique is most effective for planets with equilibrium temperatures between 200 and 500 K, which may include potentially habitable planets. A detection of refracted light for a potentially habitable planet would strongly suggest the planet was free of a global cloud or haze layer, and therefore a promising candidate for follow-up observations.

  11. Water clouds in Y dwarfs and exoplanets

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Morley, Caroline V.; Fortney, Jonathan J.; Marley, Mark S.; Lupu, Roxana; Greene, Tom; Saumon, Didier; Lodders, Katharina

    2014-05-20

    The formation of clouds affects brown dwarf and planetary atmospheres of nearly all effective temperatures. Iron and silicate condense in L dwarf atmospheres and dissipate at the L/T transition. Minor species such as sulfides and salts condense in mid- to late T dwarfs. For brown dwarfs below T {sub eff} ? 450 K, water condenses in the upper atmosphere to form ice clouds. Currently, over a dozen objects in this temperature range have been discovered, and few previous theoretical studies have addressed the effect of water clouds on brown dwarf or exoplanetary spectra. Here we present a new grid of models that include the effect of water cloud opacity. We find that they become optically thick in objects below T {sub eff} ? 350-375 K. Unlike refractory cloud materials, water-ice particles are significantly nongray absorbers; they predominantly scatter at optical wavelengths through the J band and absorb in the infrared with prominent features, the strongest of which is at 2.8 ?m. H{sub 2}O, NH{sub 3}, CH{sub 4}, and H{sub 2} CIA are dominant opacity sources; less abundant species may also be detectable, including the alkalis, H{sub 2}S, and PH{sub 3}. PH{sub 3}, which has been detected in Jupiter, is expected to have a strong signature in the mid-infrared at 4.3 ?m in Y dwarfs around T {sub eff} = 450 K; if disequilibrium chemistry increases the abundance of PH{sub 3}, it may be detectable over a wider effective temperature range than models predict. We show results incorporating disequilibrium nitrogen and carbon chemistry and predict signatures of low gravity in planetary mass objects. Finally, we make predictions for the observability of Y dwarfs and planets with existing and future instruments, including the James Webb Space Telescope and Gemini Planet Imager.

  12. Natural vegetation at the proposed Reference Repository Location in southeastern Washington

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rickard, W.H.

    1988-02-01

    The dominant shrubs were sagebrush and spiny hopsage; the herbs were dominated by cheatgrass and Sandberg bluegrass. Spiny hopsage appeared to be vulnerable to burning and also to damage by off-road vehicular traffic. It appears to have little or no ability to reproduce through seedlings; once the existing plants are killed they are not likely to be replaced, even if seed-producing plants are nearby. The only pure stand of spiny hopsage known to exist on the Hanford Site is on and near study plot 2H. Sagebrush, like spiny hopsage, is killed by burning and by heavy vehicles. Sagebrush is capable of reproducing via seeds, indicating that it is an inherently aggressive species with a capacity to reestablish itself if parent plants are in the vicinity to act as seed sources. Alien, annual plants, especially cheatgrass, were a major contributor to the herbaceous canopy cover in plots 3S, 4S, and 5S. However, native perennial grasses, especially Sandberg bluegrass, were a major contributor to the canopy cover in plots 1S and 2H. These differences are probably caused by differences in soil properties (e.g., water retention capacity), rather than to historical disturbances such as livestock grazing or wildfire. Specimens of Sandwort, Arenaria franklinii, growing near the Reference Repository Location were collected for examination by taxonomists to determine if the specimens are of the variety A. f. thompsonii, a taxon currently listed as threatened in the state of Washington. 16 refs., 7 figs., 3 tabs.

  13. Life-threatening interaction between the root extract of Pueraria lobata and methotrexate in rats

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chiang, H.-M.; Fang, S.-H.; Wen, K.-C.; Hsiu, S.-L.; Tsai, Shang-Yuan; Hou, Y.-C.; Chi, Y.-C.; Lee Chao, Pei-Dawn . E-mail: pdlee@mail.cmu.edu.tw

    2005-12-15

    Isoflavone supplements are nowadays widely used as alternative for hormone replacement therapy. However, the safety remains unanswered. This study attempted to investigate the effect of Pueraria lobata root decoction (PLRD), an isoflavone-rich herb, on the pharmacokinetics of methotrexate (MTX), a bicarboxylate antimetabolite with narrow therapeutic window. Rats were orally and intravenously given methotrexate alone and coadministered with PLRD. Blood samples were withdrawn via cardiopuncture at specific time points after drug administration. Serum methotrexate concentrations were assayed by specific monoclonal fluorescence polarization immunoassay method. Pharmacokinetic parameters were calculated using noncompartment model of WINNONLIN for both oral and intravenous data of MTX. Our results showed that coadministration of 4.0 g/kg and 2.0 g/kg of PLRD significantly increased the AUC{sub 0-t} by 207.8% and 127.9%, prolonged the mean residence time (MRT) by 237.8 and 155.2%, respectively, finally resulted in surprisingly high mortalities of 57.1% and 14.3% in rats. When MTX was given intravenously, the coadministration of PLRD at 4.0 g/kg significantly increased the half-life by 53.9% and decreased the clearance by 47.9%. In conclusion, the coadministration of PLRD significantly decreased the elimination and resulted in markedly increased exposure of MTX in rats.

  14. Pipeline corridors through wetlands -- Impacts on plant communities: Little Timber Creek Crossing, Gloucester County, New Jersey. Topical report, August 1991--January 1993

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shem, L.M.; Zimmerman, R.E.; Alsum, S.K.; Van Dyke, G.D. |

    1994-12-01

    The goal of the Gas Research Institute Wetland Corridors Program is to document impacts of existing pipelines on the wetlands they traverse. To accomplish this goal, 12 existing wetland crossings were surveyed. These sites varied in elapsed time since pipeline construction, wetland type, pipeline installation techniques, and right-of-way (ROW) management practices. This report presents results of a survey conducted over the period of August 5--7, 1991, at the Little Timber Creek crossing in Gloucester County, New Jersey, where three pipelines, constructed in 1950, 1960, and 1990, cross the creek and associated wetlands. The old side of the ROW, created by the installation of the 1960 pipeline, was designed to contain a raised peat bed over the 1950 pipeline and an open-water ditch over the 1960 pipeline. The new portion of the ROW, created by installation of the 1990 pipeline, has an open-water ditch over the pipeline (resulting from settling of the backfill) and a raised peat bed (resulting from rebound of compacted peat). Both the old and new ROWs contain dense stands of herbs; the vegetation on the old ROW was more similar to that in the adjacent natural area than was vegetation in the new ROW. The ROW increased species and habitat diversity in the wetlands. It may contribute to the spread of purple loosestrife and affect species sensitive to habitat fragmentation.

  15. A Survey of Vegetation and Wildland Fire Hazards on the Nevada Test Site, September 2004

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bechtel Nevada

    2004-09-01

    In the spring of 2004 a survey was conducted by Bechtel Nevada Ecological Services on the Nevada Test Site to characterize vegetation resources and climatic components of the environment that contribute to wildland fires. The field surveyed assessed 211 sites along major Nevada Test Site corridors for the abundance of native perennial and annual species and invasive weeds. The abundance of fine-textured (grasses and herbs) and coarse-textured (woody) biomass was visually estimated on numerical scales ranging from one to five. Wildland fires are costly to control and to mitigate once they occur. Revegetation of burned areas is very slow without reseeding or transplanting with native species and other rehabilitation efforts. Untreated areas become much more vulnerable to future fires once invasive species, rather than native species, colonize a burned area.The annual assessment of wildland fire hazards on the Nevada Test Site is scheduled to be implemented each spring in the near future with results being reported directly to the U.S. Department of Energy and the Bechtel Nevada Fire Marshal.

  16. Restoring a disappearing ecosystem: the Longleaf Pine Savanna.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Harrington, Timothy B.; Miller, Karl V.; Park, Noreen

    2013-05-01

    Longleaf pine (Pinus palustris) savannas of the southeastern United States contain some of the worlds most diverse plant communities, along with a unique complement of wildlife. Their traditionally open canopy structure and rich understory of grasses and herbs were critical to their vigor. However, a long history of land-use practices such as logging, farming, and fire exclusion have reduced this once-widespread ecosystem to only 3 percent of its original range. At six longleaf pine plantations in South Carolina, Tim Harrington with the Pacific Northwest Research Station and collaborators with the Southern Research Station used various treatments (including prescribed burns, tree thinning, and herbicide applications) to alter the forest structure and tracked how successful each one was in advancing savanna restoration over a 14-year period. They found that typical planting densities for wood production in plantations create dense understory shade that excludes many native herbaceous species important to savannas and associated wildlife. The scientists found that although tree thinning alone did not result in sustained gains, a combination of controlled burning, thinning, and herbicide treatments to reduce woody plants was an effective strategy for recovering the savanna ecosystem. The scientists also found that these efforts must be repeated periodically for enduring benefits.

  17. Ecological outcomes and evaluation of success in passively restored southeastern depressional wetlands.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    De Steven, Diane; Sharitz, Rebecca R.; Barton, Christopher, D.

    2010-11-01

    Abstract: Depressional wetlands may be restored passively by disrupting prior drainage to recover original hydrology and relying on natural revegetation. Restored hydrology selects for wetland vegetation; however, depression geomorphology constrains the achievable hydroperiod, and plant communities are influenced by hydroperiod and available species pools. Such constraints can complicate assessments of restoration success. Sixteen drained depressions in South Carolina, USA, were restored experimentally by forest clearing and ditch plugging for potential crediting to a mitigation bank. Depressions were assigned to alternate revegetation methods representing desired targets of herbaceous and wet-forest communities. After five years, restoration progress and revegetation methods were evaluated. Restored hydroperiods differed among wetlands, but all sites developed diverse vegetation of native wetland species. Vegetation traits were influenced by hydroperiod and the effects of early drought, rather than by revegetation method. For mitigation banking, individual wetlands were assessed for improvement from pre-restoration condition and similarity to assigned reference type. Most wetlands met goals to increase hydroperiod, herb-species dominance, and wetland-plant composition. Fewer wetlands achieved equivalence to reference types because some vegetation targets were incompatible with depression hydroperiods and improbable without intensive management. The results illustrated a paradox in judging success when vegetation goals may be unsuited to system constraints.

  18. Foothills Parkway Section 8B Final Environmental Report, Volume 6, Appendix N

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Blasing, T.J.; Cada, G.F.; Carer, M.; Chin, S.M.; Dickerman, J.A.; Etnier, D.A.; Gibson, R.; Harvey, M.; Hatcher, B.; Lietzske, D.; Mann, L.K.; Mulholland, P.J.; Petrich, C.H.; Pounds, L.; Ranney, J.; Reed, R.M.; Ryan, P.F.; Schweitzer, M.; Smith, D.; Thomason, P.; Wade, M.C.

    1999-07-01

    In 1994, Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) was tasked by the National Park Service (NPS) to prepare an Environmental Report (ER) for Section 8B of the Foothills Parkway in the Great Smoky Mountains National Park (GSMNP). Section 8B represents 27.7 km (14.2 miles) of a total of 115 km (72 miles) of the planned Foothills Parkway and would connect the Cosby community on the east to the incorporated town of Pittman Center to the west. The major deliverables for the project are listed. From August 1995 through October 1996, NPS, GSMNP, and ORNL staff interacted with Federal Highway Administration staff to develop a conceptual design plan for Section 8B with the intent of protecting critical resources identified during the ER process to the extent possible. In addition, ORNL arranged for bioengineering experts to discuss techniques that might be employed on Section 8B with NPS, GSMNP, and ORNL staff during September 1996. For the purposes of this ER, there are two basic alternatives under consideration: (1) a build alternative and (2) a no-build alternative. Within the build alternative are a number of options including constructing Section 8B with no interchanges, constructing Section 8B with an interchange at SR 416 or U.S. 321, constructing Section 8B with a spur road on Webb Mountain, and considering operation of Section 8B both before and after the operation of Section 8C. The no-build alternative is considered the no-action alternative and is not to construct Section 8B. This volume of the ER documents the results of the architectural, historical, and cultural resources assessment for the entire Section 8B ROW that was completed in May 1995 to document the architectural, historical, and cultural resources located within the project area. The assessment included evaluation of the potential for cultural (i.e., rural historic) landscapes in the area of the ROW. The assessment showed that one National Register-listed property is located 0.3 mile south of the ROW, and seven properties appear to meet National Register criteria. For six of these seven sites, no audible or visual effects were predicted to result from the construction and operation of the build alternatives of Section 8B. Three areas were evaluated to determine if they could be considered rural historic landscapes: the Cosby Valley, Pittman Center, and Rocky Flats. None of these landscapes met National Register criteria for rural historic landscapes.

  19. Wise detections of known QSOs at redshifts greater than six

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Blain, Andrew W. [Physics and Astronomy, University of Leicester, 1 University Road, Leicester LE1 7RH (United Kingdom); Assef, Roberto; Stern, Daniel; Tsai, Chao-Wei; Eisenhardt, Peter [Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91109 (United States); Bridge, Carrie [California Institute of Technology, 249-17, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Benford, Dominic [Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States); Jarrett, Tom [Astronomy Department, University of Cape Town (South Africa); Cutri, Roc [Infrared Processing and Analysis Center, California Institute of Technology, MS100-22, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Petty, Sara [Virginia Tech, Department of Physics MC 0435, 910 Drillfield Drive, Blacksburg, VA 24061 (United States); Wu, Jingwen; Wright, Edward L., E-mail: ab520@le.ac.uk [Division of Astronomy and Astrophysics, University of California, Los Angeles, Physics and Astronomy Building, 430 Portola Plaza, Los Angeles, CA 90095-1547 (United States)

    2013-12-01

    We present WISE All-Sky mid-infrared (IR) survey detections of 55% (17/31) of the known QSOs at z > 6 from a range of surveys: the SDSS, the CFHT-LS, FIRST, Spitzer, and UKIDSS. The WISE catalog thus provides a substantial increase in the quantity of IR data available for these sources: 17 are detected in the WISE W1 (3.4 ?m) band, 16 in W2 (4.6 ?m), 3 in W3 (12 ?m), and 0 in W4 (22 ?m). This is particularly important with Spitzer in its warm-mission phase and no faint follow-up capability at wavelengths longward of 5 ?m until the launch of James Webb Space Telescope (JWST). WISE thus provides a useful tool for understanding QSOs found in forthcoming large-area optical/IR sky surveys using PanSTARRS, SkyMapper, VISTA, DES, and LSST. The rest-UV properties of the WISE-detected and the WISE-non-detected samples differ: the detections have brighter i/z-band magnitudes and redder rest-UV colors. This suggests that a more aggressive hunt for very high redshift QSOs by combining WISE W1 and W2 data with red, observed optical colors could be effective at least for a subset of dusty candidate QSOs. Stacking the WISE images of the WISE-non-detected QSOs indicates that they are, on average, significantly fainter than the WISE-detected examples, and are thus not narrowly missing detection in the WISE catalog. The WISE catalog detection of three of our sample in the W3 band indicates that their mid-IR flux can be detected individually, although there is no stacked W3 detection of sources detected in W1 but not W3. Stacking analyses of WISE data for large active galactic nucleus samples will be a useful tool, and high-redshift QSOs of all types will be easy targets for JWST.

  20. Deoxyelephantopin from Elephantopus scaber L. induces cell-cycle arrest and apoptosis in the human nasopharyngeal cancer CNE cells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Su, Miaoxian [Biology Programme (Formally Biology Dept.), School of Life Sciences, The Chinese University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong SAR (China)] [Biology Programme (Formally Biology Dept.), School of Life Sciences, The Chinese University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong SAR (China); Chung, Hau Yin, E-mail: anthonychung@cuhk.edu.hk [Biology Programme (Formally Biology Dept.), School of Life Sciences, The Chinese University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong SAR (China); Food and Nutritional Sciences Programme, School of Life Sciences, The Chinese University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong SAR (China); Li, Yaolan [Institute of Traditional Chinese Medicine and Natural Products, College of Pharmacy, Jinan University, Guangzhou (China) [Institute of Traditional Chinese Medicine and Natural Products, College of Pharmacy, Jinan University, Guangzhou (China); Guangdong Province Key Laboratory of Pharmacodynamic Constituents of TCM and New Drug Research, Guangzhou (China)

    2011-07-29

    Highlights: {yields} Deoxyelephantopin (ESD) inhibited cell proliferation in the human nasopharyngeal cancer CNE cells. {yields} ESD induced cell cycle arrest in S and G2/M phases via modulation of cell cycle regulatory proteins. {yields} ESD triggered apoptosis by dysfunction of mitochondria and induction of both intrinsic and extrinsic apoptotic signaling pathways. {yields} ESD also triggered Akt, ERK, and JNK signaling pathways. -- Abstract: Deoxyelephantopin (ESD), a naturally occurring sesquiterpene lactone present in the Chinese medicinal herb, Elephantopus scaber L. exerted anticancer effects on various cultured cancer cells. However, the cellular mechanisms by which it controls the development of the cancer cells are unavailable, particularly the human nasopharyngeal cancer CNE cells. In this study, we found that ESD inhibited the CNE cell proliferation. Cell cycle arrest in S and G2/M phases was also found. Western blotting analysis showed that modulation of cell cycle regulatory proteins was responsible for the ESD-induced cell cycle arrest. Besides, ESD also triggered apoptosis in CNE cells. Dysfunction in mitochondria was found to be associated with the ESD-induced apoptosis as evidenced by the loss of mitochondrial membrane potential ({Delta}{Psi}m), the translocation of cytochrome c, and the regulation of Bcl-2 family proteins. Despite the Western blotting analysis showed that both intrinsic and extrinsic apoptotic pathways (cleavage of caspases-3, -7, -8, -9, and -10) were triggered in the ESD-induced apoptosis, additional analysis also showed that the induction of apoptosis could be achieved by the caspase-independent manner. Besides, Akt, ERK and JNK pathways were found to involve in ESD-induced cell death. Overall, our findings provided the first evidence that ESD induced cell cycle arrest, and apoptosis in CNE cells. ESD could be a potential chemotherapeutic agent in the treatment of nasopharyngeal cancer (NPC).

  1. Triptolide, a diterpenoid triepoxide, induces antitumor proliferation via activation of c-Jun NH{sub 2}-terminal kinase 1 by decreasing phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase activity in human tumor cells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Miyata, Yoshiki [Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Tokyo University of Pharmacy and Life Science, School of Pharmacy, Hachioji, Tokyo 192-0392 (Japan); Sato, Takashi [Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Tokyo University of Pharmacy and Life Science, School of Pharmacy, Hachioji, Tokyo 192-0392 (Japan)]. E-mail: satotak@ps.toyaku.ac.jp; Ito, Akira [Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Tokyo University of Pharmacy and Life Science, School of Pharmacy, Hachioji, Tokyo 192-0392 (Japan)

    2005-11-04

    Triptolide, a diterpenoid triepoxide extracted from the Chinese herb Tripterygium wilfordii Hook f., exerts antitumorigenic actions against several tumor cells, but the intracellular target signal molecule(s) for this antitumorigenesis activity of triptolide remains to be identified. In the present study, we demonstrated that triptolide, in a dose-dependent manner, inhibited the proliferation of human fibrosarcoma HT-1080, human squamous carcinoma SAS, and human uterine cervical carcinoma SKG-II cells. In addition, triptolide was found to decrease phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K) activity. A PI3K inhibitor, LY-294002, mimicked the triptolide-induced antiproliferative activity in HT-1080, SAS, and SKG-II cells. There was no change in the activity of Akt or protein kinase C (PKC), both of which are downstream effectors in the PI3K pathway. Furthermore, the phosphorylation of Ras, Raf, and mitogen-activated protein/extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2 was not modified in HT-1080 cells treated with triptolide. However, the phosphorylation of c-Jun NH{sub 2}-terminal kinase 1 (JNK1) was found to increase in both triptolide- and LY-294002-treated cells. Furthermore, the triptolide-induced inhibition of HT-1080 cell proliferation was not observed by JNK1 siRNA-treatment. These results provide novel evidence that PI3K is a crucial target molecule in the antitumorigenic action of triptolide. They further suggest a possible triptolide-induced inhibitory signal for tumor cell proliferation that is initiated by the decrease in PI3K activity, which in turn leads to the augmentation of JNK1 phosphorylation via the Akt and/or PKC-independent pathway(s). Moreover, it is likely that the activation of JNK1 is required for the triptolide-induced inhibition of tumor proliferation.

  2. Mechanical Properties of Gels; Stress from Confined Fluids

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    George W. Scherer

    2009-12-01

    Abstract for Grant DE-FG02-97ER45642 Period: 1997-2002 Mechanical Properties of Gels 2002-2008 Stress from Confined Fluids Principal investigator: Prof. George W. Scherer Dept. Civil & Env. Eng./PRISM Eng. Quad. E-319 Princeton, NJ 08544 USA Recipient organization: Trustees of Princeton University 4 New South Princeton, NJ 08544 USA Abstract: The initial stage of this project, entitled Mechanical Properties of Gels, was dedicated to characterizing and explaining the properties of inorganic gels. Such materials, made by sol-gel processing, are of interest for fabrication of films, fibers, optical devices, advanced insulation and other uses. However, their poor mechanical properties are an impediment in some applications, so understanding the origin of these properties could lead to enhanced performance. Novel experimental methods were developed and applied to measure the stiffness and permeability of gels and aerogels. Numerical simulations were developed to reproduce the growth process of the gels, resulting in structures whose mechanical properties matched the measurements. The models showed that the gels are formed by the growth of relatively robust clusters of molecules that are joined by tenuous links whose compliance compromises the stiffness of the structure. Therefore, synthetic methods that enhance the links could significantly increase the rigidity of such gels. The next stage of the project focused on Stress from Confined Fluids. The first problem of interest was the enhanced thermal expansion coefficient of water that we measured in the nanometric pores of cement paste. This could have a deleterious effect on the resistance of concrete to rapid heating in fires, because the excessive thermal expansion of water in the pores of the concrete could lead to spalling and collapse. A series of experiments demonstrated that the expansion of water increases as the pore size decreases. To explain this behavior, we undertook a collaboration with Prof. Stephen Garofalini (Rutgers), who has developed the best simulations of water ever reported by use of molecular dynamics. Simulated heating of water in small pores provided quantitative agreement with experiments, and showed that the origin of the high expansion is the altered structure of water in the first two molecular layers adjacent to the pore wall. The final focus of the project was to understand the damage done by crystals growing in small pores. For example, the primary cause of damage to ancient monuments in the Mediterranean Basin is growth of salt crystals in the pores of the stone. Salt may enter stone as a result of capillary rise of groundwater, by leaching of mortar joints, deposition of marine spray, or reactions with atmospheric pollutants (such as oxides of nitrogen or sulfur). As the water evaporates, the salt solution becomes supersaturated and crystals precipitate. Stress results, because the salt usually repels the minerals in the pore walls. Our goal was to identify the factors contributing to the repulsion, so that we could develop a chemical treatment to reduce the repulsion and hence the stress. (We have recently demonstrated an effective treatment as part of a separately funded study.) In collaboration with Prof. Garofalini, molecular dynamics simulations have been done that correctly reproduce the structure of water around dissolved ions of sodium and chloride. We simulated the interaction between crystals of sodium chloride and quartz, and found that this particular system exhibits attractive forces, in agreement with experiment. The origin of the attraction is the orientation of dipolar water molecules near the surfaces of the crystals. Similar calculations now must be done in systems, such as potassium chloride and quartz, where the interaction is repulsive. This grant supported the education of two doctoral students, Hang-Shing Ma (Ph.D., 2002) and Melanie Webb (Ph.D. expected 2010), three post-doctoral researchers, Joachim Gross, Gudrun Reichenauer, and Shuangyan (Sonia) Xu, and five undergraduates (for senior theses or independent projects

  3. Valuation of environmental quality and eco-cultural attributes in Northwestern Idaho: Native Americans are more concerned than Caucasians

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Burger, Joanna, E-mail: burger@biology.rutgers.edu [Division of Life Sciences, Nelson Biological Laboratory, Consortium for Risk Evaluation with Stakeholder Participation, Piscataway, NJ 08854-8082 (United States) [Division of Life Sciences, Nelson Biological Laboratory, Consortium for Risk Evaluation with Stakeholder Participation, Piscataway, NJ 08854-8082 (United States); Environmental and Occupational Health Sciences Institute, Rutgers University, Piscataway, NJ 08854-8082 (United States)

    2011-01-15

    Valuation of features of habitats and ecosystems usually encompasses the goods and services that ecosystems provide, but rarely also examine how people value ecological resources in terms of eco-cultural and sacred activities. The social, sacred, and cultural aspects of ecosystems are particularly important to Native Americans, but western science has rarely examined the importance of eco-cultural attributes quantitatively. In this paper I explore differences in ecosystem evaluations, and compare the perceptions and evaluations of places people go for consumptive and non-consumptive resource use with evaluations of the same qualities for religious and sacred places. Qualities of ecosystems included goods (abundant fish and crabs, butterflies and flowers, clean water), services (complexity of nature, lack of radionuclides that present a health risk), and eco-cultural attributes (appears unspoiled, scenic horizons, noise-free). Native Americans and Caucasians were interviewed at a Pow Wow at Post Falls, Idaho, which is in the region with the Department of Energy's Hanford Site, known for its storage of radioactive wastes and contamination. A higher percentage of Native American subjects engaged in consumptive and religious activities than did Caucasians. Native Americans engaged in higher rates of many activities than did Caucasians, including commune with nature, pray or meditate, fish or hunt, collect herbs, and conduct vision quests or other ceremonies. For nearly all attributes, there was no difference in the relative ratings given by Native Americans for characteristics of sites used for consumption/non-consumptive activities compared to religious/sacred places. However, Caucasians rated nearly all attributes lower for religious/sacred places than they did for places where they engaged in consumptive or non-consumptive activities. Native Americans were less concerned with distance from home for consumptive/non-consumptive activities, compared to religious activities. - Research Highlights: {yields} A higher percentage of Native Americans engaged in consumptive and religious activities than did Caucasians interviewed. {yields} Caucasians rated environmental attributes as more important for consumptive and non-consumptive activities than they did for places where they engaged in religious/cultural ones. {yields} Native Americans rated environmental attributes as equally important regardless of the activities performed. {yields} Eco-cultural attributes (such as 'appears unspoiled') were rated as high as ecosystem services (e.g. unpolluted water).

  4. Inhibition of CYP1 by berberine, palmatine, and jatrorrhizine: Selectivity, kinetic characterization, and molecular modeling

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lo, Sheng-Nan [National Research Institute of Chinese Medicine, Taipei 112, Taiwan, ROC (China); Institute of Biopharmaceutical Sciences, National Yang-Ming University, Taipei 112, Taiwan, ROC (China); Chang, Yu-Ping; Tsai, Keng-Chang [National Research Institute of Chinese Medicine, Taipei 112, Taiwan, ROC (China); Chang, Chia-Yu [National Research Institute of Chinese Medicine, Taipei 112, Taiwan, ROC (China); Institute of Medical Sciences, Taipei Medical University, Taipei 101, Taiwan, ROC (China); Wu, Tian-Shung [Department of Chemistry, National Chung-Kung University, Tainan 701, Taiwan, ROC (China); Ueng, Yune-Fang, E-mail: ueng@nricm.edu.tw [National Research Institute of Chinese Medicine, Taipei 112, Taiwan, ROC (China); Institute of Biopharmaceutical Sciences, National Yang-Ming University, Taipei 112, Taiwan, ROC (China); Institute of Medical Sciences, Taipei Medical University, Taipei 101, Taiwan, ROC (China)

    2013-11-01

    Cytochrome P450 (P450, CYP) 1 family plays a primary role in the detoxification and bioactivation of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons. Human CYP1A1, CYP1A2, and CYP1B1 exhibit differential substrate specificity and tissue distribution. Berberine, palmatine, and jatrorrhizine are protoberberine alkaloids present in several medicinal herbs, such as Coptis chinensis (Huang-Lian) and goldenseal. These protoberberines inhibited CYP1A1.1- and CYP1B1.1-catalyzed 7-ethoxyresorufin O-deethylation (EROD) activities, whereas CYP1A2.1 activity was barely affected. Kinetic analysis revealed that berberine noncompetitively inhibited EROD activities of CYP1A1.1 and CYP1B1.1, whereas palmatine and jatrorrhizine caused either competitive or mixed type of inhibition. Among protoberberines, berberine caused the most potent and selective inhibitory effect on CYP1B1.1 with the least K{sub i} value of 44 ± 16 nM. Berberine also potently inhibited CYP1B1.1 activities toward 7-ethoxycoumarin and 7-methoxyresorufin, whereas the inhibition of benzo(a)pyrene hydroxylation activity was less pronounced. Berberine inhibited the polymorphic variants, CYP1B1.3 (V432L) and CYP1B1.4 (N453S), with IC{sub 50} values comparable to that for CYP1B1.1 inhibition. Berberine-mediated inhibition was abolished by a mutation of Asn228 to Thr in CYP1B1.1, whereas the inhibition was enhanced by a reversal mutation of Thr223 to Asn in CYP1A2.1. This result in conjugation with the molecular modeling revealed the crucial role of hydrogen-bonding interaction of Asn228 on CYP1B1.1 with the methoxy moiety of berberine. These findings demonstrate that berberine causes a selective CYP1B1-inhibition, in which Asn228 appears to be crucial. The inhibitory effects of berberine on CYP1B1 activities toward structurally diverse substrates can be different. - Highlights: • Berberine preferentially inhibited CYP1B1 activity. • Berberine caused similar inhibitory effects on CYP1B1.1, CYP1B1.3 and CYP1B1.4. • Asn228 in CYP1B1 was an important residue for berberine-mediated inhibition.

  5. CO2 EFFECTS ON MOJAVE DESERT PLANT INTERACTIONS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    L. A. DEFALCO; G. C. FERNANDEZ; S. D. SMITH; R. S. NOWAK

    2004-01-01

    Seasonal and interannual droughts characteristic of deserts have the potential to modify plant interactions as atmospheric CO{sub 2} concentrations continue to rise. At the Nevada Desert FACE (free-air CO{sub 2} enrichment) facility in the northern Mojave Desert, the effects of elevated atmospheric C02 (550 vs. ambient {approx}360 {micro}mol mol{sup -1}) on plant interactions were examined during two years of high and low rainfall. Results suggest that CO{sub 2} effects on the interaction between native species and their understory herbs are dependent on the strength of competition when rainfall is plentiful, but are unimportant during annual drought. Seasonal rainfall for 1999 was 23% the long-term average for the area, and neither elevated CO{sub 2} nor the low production of herbaceous neighbors had an effect on relative growth rate (RGR, d{sup -1}) and reproductive effort (RE, number of flowers g{sup -1}) for Achnatherum hymenoides (early season perennial C{sub 3} grass), Pleuraphis rigida (late season perennial C{sub 4} grass), and Larrea tridentata (evergreen C{sub 3} shrub). In contrast, 1998 received 213% the average rainfall. Consequently, the decrease in RGR and increase in RE for Achnatherum, whose period of growth overlaps directly with that of its neighbors, was exaggerated at elevated CO{sub 2}. However, competitive effects of neighbors on Eriogonum trichopes (a winter annual growing in shrub interspaces), Pleuraphis and Larrea were not affected by elevated CO{sub 2}, and possible explanations are discussed. Contrary to expectations, the invasive annual neighbor Bromus madritensis ssp. rubens had little influence on target plant responses because densities in 1998 and 1999 at this site were well below those found in other studies where it has negatively affected perennial plant growth. The extent that elevated CO{sub 2} reduces the performance of Achnatherum in successive years to cause its loss from the plant community depends more on future pressure from herbaceous neighbors and less on the extent that CO{sub 2} enhances Achnatherum growth during periods of severe drought.

  6. Operational restoration of the Pen Branch bottomland hardwood and swamp wetlands - the research setting

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nelson, E.A.

    2000-01-05

    The Savannah River Swamp is a 3020 Ha forested wetland on the floodplain of the Savannah River and is located on the Department of Energy's Savannah River Site (SRS) near Aiken, SC. Historically the swamp consisted of approximately 50 percent bald cypress-water tupelo stands, 40 percent mixed bottomland hardwood stands, and 10 percent shrub, marsh, and open water. Creek corridors were typical of Southeastern bottomland hardwood forests. The hydrology was controlled by flooding of the Savannah River and by flow from four creeks that drain into the swamp prior to flow into the Savannah River. Upstream dams have caused some alteration of the water levels and timing of flooding within the floodplain. Major impacts to the swamp hydrology occurred with the completion of the production reactors and one coal-fired powerhouse at the SRS in the early 1950's. Water was pumped from the Savannah River, through secondary heat exchangers of the reactors, and discharged into three of the tributary streams that flow into the swamp. Flow in one of the tributaries, Pen Branch, was typically 0.3 m3 s-1 (10-20) cfs prior to reactor pumping and 11.0 m3 s-1 (400 cfs) during pumping. This continued from 1954 to 1988 at various levels. The sustained increases in water volume resulted in overflow of the original stream banks and the creation of additional floodplains. Accompanying this was considerable erosion of the original stream corridor and deposition of a deep silt layer on the newly formed delta. Heated water was discharged directly into Pen Branch and water temperature in the stream often exceeded 65 degrees C. The nearly continuous flooding of the swamp, the thermal load of the water, and the heavy silting resulted in complete mortality of the original vegetation in large areas of the floodplain. In the years since pumping was reduced, early succession has begun in some affected areas. Most of this has been herbs, grasses, and shrubs. Areas that have seedlings are generally willow thickets that support a lower diversity of wildlife. No volunteer seedlings of heavy-seeded hardwoods or cypress have been found in the corridor areas. Research was conducted to determine methods to reintroduce tree species characteristic of more mature forested wetlands. Three restoration strategies were formulated to deal with the differing conditions of the Upper Corridor, the Lower Corridor, and the Delta regions of the impacted area. Site preparation and planting of each area with mixtures of tree species were carried out to speed the restoration of the ecosystem. Species composition and selection were altered based on the current and expected hydrological regimes that the reforestation areas will be experiencing. Because of the operational design of the restoration project, a research program naturally followed to document the success. Many of those efforts are detailed here.

  7. SNO: solving the mystery of the missing neutrinos

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jelley, Nick; Poon, Alan

    2007-03-30

    The end of an era came on 28 November 2006 when the Sudbury Neutrino Observatory (SNO) finally stopped data-taking after eight exciting years of discoveries. During this time the Observatory saw evidence that neutrinos, produced in the fusion of hydrogen in the solar core, change flavour while passing through the Sun on their way to the Earth. This observation explained the longstanding puzzle as to why previous experiments had seen fewer solar neutrinos than predicted and confirmed that these elusive particles have mass. Solar neutrinos were first detected in Ray Davis's radiochemical experiment in 1967, for which discovery he shared the 2002 Nobel Prize in Physics. Surprisingly he found only about a third of the number predicted from models of the Sun's output. This deficit, the so-called Solar Neutrino Problem, was confirmed by Kamiokande-II while other experiments saw related deficits of solar neutrinos. A possible explanation for this deficit, suggested by Gribov and Pontecorvo in 1969, was that some of the electron-type neutrinos, which are produced in the Sun, had ''oscillated'' into neutrinos that could not be detected in the Davis detector. The oscillation mechanism requires that neutrinos have non-zero mass. The unique advantage, which was pointed out by the late Herb Chen in 1985, of using heavy water (D{sub 2}O) to detect the neutrinos from {sup 8}B decays in the solar fusion process is that it enables both the number of electron-type and of all types of neutrinos to be measured. A comparison of the flux of electron-type neutrinos to that of all flavours could then reveal whether flavour transformation is the cause of the solar neutrino deficit. In heavy water neutrinos of all types can break a deuteron apart into its constituent proton and neutron (neutral-current reaction), while only electron-type neutrinos can change the deuteron into two protons and release an electron (charged-current reaction). SNO was designed by scientists from Canada, the USA and the UK to attain a detection rate of about 10 solar neutrinos per day using 1000 tonnes of heavy water. Neutrino interactions were detected by 9,456 photomultiplier tubes surrounding the heavy water, which was contained in a 12-m diameter acrylic sphere. This sphere was surrounded by 7000 tonnes of ultra-pure water to shield against radioactivity. Figure 1 shows the layout of the SNO detector, which is located about 2 km underground in Inco's Creighton nickel mine near Sudbury in Canada, to all but eliminate cosmic rays from reaching the detector. The pattern of hit photomultiplier tubes following the creation of an electron by an electron-type neutrino is shown in Figure 2.

  8. Integration of the Mini-Sulfide Sulfite Anthraquinone (MSS-AQ) Pulping Process and Black Liquor Gasification in a Pulp Mill

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hasan Jameel, North Carolina State University; Adrianna Kirkman, North Carolina State University; Ravi Chandran,Thermochem Recovery International Brian Turk Research Triangle Institute; Brian Green, Research Triangle Institute

    2010-01-27

    As many of the recovery boilers and other pieces of large capital equipment of U.S. pulp mills are nearing the end of their useful life, the pulp and paper industry will soon need to make long-term investments in new technologies. The ability to install integrated, complete systems that are highly efficient will impact the industry’s energy use for decades to come. Developing a process for these new systems is key to the adoption of state-of-the-art technologies in the Forest Products industry. This project defined an integrated process model that combines mini-sulfide sulfite anthraquinone (MSS-AQ) pulping and black liquor gasification with a proprietary desulfurization process developed by the Research Triangle Institute. Black liquor gasification is an emerging technology that enables the use of MSS-AQ pulping, which results in higher yield, lower bleaching cost, lower sulfur emissions, and the elimination of causticization requirements. The recently developed gas cleanup/absorber technology can clean the product gas to a state suitable for use in a gas turbine and also regenerate the pulping chemicals needed to for the MSS-AQ pulping process. The combination of three advanced technologies into an integrated design will enable the pulping industry to achieve a new level of efficiency, environmental performance, and cost savings. Because the three technologies are complimentary, their adoption as a streamlined package will ensure their ability to deliver maximum energy and cost savings benefits. The process models developed by this project will enable the successful integration of new technologies into the next generation of chemical pulping mills. When compared to the Kraft reference pulp, the MSS-AQ procedures produced pulps with a 10-15 % yield benefit and the ISO brightness was 1.5-2 times greater. The pulp refined little easier and had a slightly lower apparent sheet density (In both the cases). At similar levels of tear index the MSS-AQ pulps also produced a comparable tensile and burst index pulps. Product gas composition determined using computer simulations The results demonstrate that RVS-1 can effectively remove > 99.8% of the H2S present in simulated synthesis gas generated from the gasification of black liquor. This level of sulfur removal was consistent over simulated synthesis gas mixtures that contained from 6 to 9.5 vol % H2S.A significant amount of the sulfur in the simulated syngas was recovered as SO2 during regeneration. The average recovery of sulfur as SO2 was about 75%. Because these are first cycle results, this sulfur recovery is expected to improve. Developed WINGems model of the process.The total decrease in variable operating costs for the BLG process compared to the HERB was in excess of $6,200,000 per year for a mill producing 350,000 tons of pulp per year. This represents a decrease in operating cost of about $17.7/ton of oven dry pulp produced. There will be additional savings in labor and maintenance cost that has not been taken into account. The capital cost for the MSSAQ based gasifier system was estimated at $164,000,000, which is comparable to a High Efficiency Recovery Boiler. The return on investment was estimated at 4%. A gasifier replacement cannot be justified on its own, however if the recovery boiler needs to be replaced the MSSAQ gasifier system shows significantly higher savings. Before black liquor based gasifer technology can be commercialized more work is necessary. The recovery of the absorbed sulfur in the absorbent as sulfur dioxide is only 75%. This needs to be greater than 90% for economical operation. It has been suggested that as the number of cycles is increased the sulfur dioxide recovery might improve. Further research is necessary. Even though a significant amount of work has been done on a pilot scale gasifiers using liquors containing sulfur, both at low and high temperatures the lack of a commercial unit is an impediment to the implementation of the MSSAQ technology. The implementation of a commercial unit needs to be facilated before the benefits of