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1

EIS-0229: Storage and Disposition of Weapons-Usable Fissile Materials |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

29: Storage and Disposition of Weapons-Usable Fissile 29: Storage and Disposition of Weapons-Usable Fissile Materials EIS-0229: Storage and Disposition of Weapons-Usable Fissile Materials Summary The EIS will evaluate the reasonable alternatives and potential environmental impacts for the proposed siting, construction, and operation of three types of facilities for plutonium disposition. Public Comment Opportunities None available at this time. Documents Available For Download September 5, 2007 EIS-0229: Supplement Analysis (September 2007) Storage of Surplus Plutonium Materials at the Savannah River Site November 14, 2003 EIS-0229: Record of Decision (November 2003) Storage and Disposition of Weapons-Usable Fissile Materials November 7, 2003 EIS-0229-SA-03: Supplement Analysis Fabrication of Mixed Oxide Fuel Lead Assemblies in Europe

2

Summary report of the screening process to determine reasonable alternatives for long-term storage and disposition of weapons-usable fissile materials  

SciTech Connect

Significant quantities of weapons-usable fissile materials (primarily plutonium and highly enriched uranium) have become surplus to national defense needs both in the US and Russia. These stocks of fissile materials pose significant dangers to national and international security. The dangers exist not only in the potential proliferation of nuclear weapons but also in the potential for environmental, safety and health consequences if surplus fissile materials are not properly managed. As announced in the Notice of Intent (NOI) to prepare a Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement (PEIS), the Department of Energy is currently conducting an evaluation process for disposition of surplus weapons-usable fissile materials determined surplus to National Security needs, and long-term storage of national security and programmatic inventories, and surplus weapons-usable fissile materials that are not able to go directly from interim storage to disposition. An extensive set of long-term storage and disposition options was compiled. Five broad long-term storage options were identified; thirty-seven options were considered for plutonium disposition; nine options were considered for HEU disposition; and eight options were identified for Uranium-233 disposition. Section 2 discusses the criteria used in the screening process. Section 3 describes the options considered, and Section 4 provides a detailed summary discussions of the screening results.

NONE

1995-03-29T23:59:59.000Z

3

Nonproliferation and arms control assessment of weapons-usable fissile material storage and excess plutonium disposition alternatives  

SciTech Connect

This report has been prepared by the Department of Energy`s Office of Arms Control and Nonproliferation (DOE-NN) with support from the Office of Fissile Materials Disposition (DOE-MD). Its purpose is to analyze the nonproliferation and arms reduction implications of the alternatives for storage of plutonium and HEU, and disposition of excess plutonium, to aid policymakers and the public in making final decisions. While this assessment describes the benefits and risks associated with each option, it does not attempt to rank order the options or choose which ones are best. It does, however, identify steps which could maximize the benefits and mitigate any vulnerabilities of the various alternatives under consideration.

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

4

Storage and Disposition of Weapons-Usable Fissile Materials  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

86 86 Federal Register / Vol. 63, No. 156 / Thursday, August 13, 1998 / Notices 1 SRS has been identified by DOE as the preferred site for the immobilization disposition facility. responsibilities are to (1) evaluate the standards of accreditation applied to applicant foreign medical schools; and (2) determine the comparability of those standards to standards for accreditation applied to United States medical schools. For Further Information Contact: Bonnie LeBold, Executive Director, National Committee on Foreign Medical Education and Accreditation, 7th and D Streets, S.W., Room 3082, ROB #3, Washington, D.C. 20202-7563. Telephone: (202) 260-3636. Beginning September 28, 1998, you may call to obtain the identity of the countries whose standards are to be evaluated during this

5

History of the US weapons-usable plutonium disposition program leading to DOE`s record of decision  

SciTech Connect

This report highlights important events and studies concerning surplus weapons-usable plutonium disposition in the United States. Included are major events that led to the creation of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Fissile Materials Disposition in 1994 and to that DOE office issuing the January 1997 Record of Decision for the Storage and Disposition of Weapons-Useable Fissile Materials Final Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement. Emphasis has been given to reactor-based plutonium disposition alternatives.

Spellman, D.J.; Thomas, J.F.; Bugos, R.G.

1997-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

6

Opportunities exist for the diversion of weapons-usable material at the front end of the fuel cycle, during which  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, North Korea, Pakistan, and South Africa. (South Africa abandoned its nuclear weapons in 1991. Libya in building a weapon once they had the fissile mate- rial. The science behind nuclear bombs is well known The coming expansion of nuclear power can be a security as well as an environmental blessing, but only

Laughlin, Robert B.

7

Record of decision for the Storage and Disposition of Weapons- Usable  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

14 14 Federal Register / Vol. 62, No. 13 / Tuesday, January 21, 1997 / Notices Responses: 18,620 Burden Hours: 64,310. Abstract: The LESCP is being conducted in response to the legislative requirement in P.L. 103-382, Section 1501 to assess the implementation of Title I and related education reforms. The information will be used to examine changes-over a 3-year period-that are occurring in schools and classrooms. Teachers and teacher aides will complete a mail survey, and district Title I administrators, principals, school-based staff, and parents will be interviewed during on- site field work. [FR Doc. 97-1307 Filed 1-17-97; 8:45 am] BILLING CODE 4000-01-P DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Record of decision for the Storage and Disposition of Weapons-Usable Fissile Materials Final Programmatic

8

Fissile Materials Disposition | National Nuclear Security Administration  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Fissile Materials Disposition | National Nuclear Security Administration Fissile Materials Disposition | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure Continuing Management Reform Countering Nuclear Terrorism About Us Our Programs Our History Who We Are Our Leadership Our Locations Budget Our Operations Media Room Congressional Testimony Fact Sheets Newsletters Press Releases Speeches Events Social Media Video Gallery Photo Gallery NNSA Archive Federal Employment Apply for Our Jobs Our Jobs Working at NNSA Blog Fissile Materials Disposition Home > About Us > Our Programs > Nonproliferation > Fissile Materials Disposition Fissile Materials Disposition Since the end of the Cold War, significant quantities of plutonium and

9

Fissile Material Disposition (MD) - Nuclear Engineering Division...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

a legacy of surplus fissile materials (primarily weapons-grade plutonium and highly enriched uranium) in the United States and the former Soviet Union. These materials pose a...

10

Criticality control in shipments of fissile materials  

SciTech Connect

This paper describes a procedure for finite-array criticality analysis to ensure criticality safety of shipments of fissile materials in US DOE-certified packages. After the procedure has been performed, one can obtain the minimum transport index and determine the maximum number of fissile packages allowable in a shipment that meets the 10 CFR 71 criticality safety requirements.

Liaw, J. R.; Liu, Y. Y.

2000-03-14T23:59:59.000Z

11

United States, International Partners Remove Last Remaining Weapons-Usable  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

States, International Partners Remove Last Remaining States, International Partners Remove Last Remaining Weapons-Usable Highly Enriched Uranium from Hungary, Set Nuclear Security Milestone United States, International Partners Remove Last Remaining Weapons-Usable Highly Enriched Uranium from Hungary, Set Nuclear Security Milestone November 4, 2013 - 2:09pm Addthis NEWS MEDIA CONTACT (202) 586-4940 WASHINGTON - The U.S. Department of Energy today announced under a multi-year international effort coordinated between Hungary, the United States, the Russian Federation, and the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA), the successful removal of all remaining highly enriched uranium (HEU) from Hungary. This makes Hungary the twelfth country to completely eliminate HEU from its borders since President Obama's 2009 announcement

12

Recovery of fissile materials from plutonium residues, miscellaneous spent nuclear fuel, and uranium fissile wastes  

SciTech Connect

A new process is proposed that converts complex feeds containing fissile materials into a chemical form that allows the use of existing technologies (such as PUREX and ion exchange) to recover the fissile materials and convert the resultant wastes to glass. Potential feed materials include (1) plutonium scrap and residue, (2) miscellaneous spent nuclear fuel, and (3) uranium fissile wastes. The initial feed materials may contain mixtures of metals, ceramics, amorphous solids, halides, and organics. 14 refs., 4 figs.

Forsberg, C.W.

1997-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

13

Office of Fissile Materials Disposition | National Nuclear Security...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Fissile Materials Disposition | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response...

14

Shipping container for fissile material  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The present invention is directed to a shipping container for the interstate transportation of enriched uranium materials. The shipping container is comprised of a rigid, high-strength, cylindrical-shaped outer vessel lined with thermal insulation. Disposed inside the thermal insulation and spaced apart from the inner walls of the outer vessel is a rigid, high-strength, cylindrical inner vessel impervious to liquid and gaseous substances and having the inner surfaces coated with a layer of cadmium to prevent nuclear criticality. The cadmium is, in turn, lined with a protective shield of high-density urethane for corrosion and wear protection. 2 figs.

Crowder, H.E.

1984-12-17T23:59:59.000Z

15

Recovery of fissile materials from nuclear wastes  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process is described for recovering fissile materials such as uranium, and plutonium, and rare earth elements, from complex waste feed material, and converting the remaining wastes into a waste glass suitable for storage or disposal. The waste feed is mixed with a dissolution glass formed of lead oxide and boron oxide resulting in oxidation, dehalogenation, and dissolution of metal oxides. Carbon is added to remove lead oxide, and a boron oxide fusion melt is produced. The fusion melt is essentially devoid of organic materials and halogens, and is easily and rapidly dissolved in nitric acid. After dissolution, uranium, plutonium, and rare earth elements are separated from the acid and recovered by processes such as PUREX or ion exchange. The remaining acid waste stream is vitrified to produce a waste glass suitable for storage or disposal. Potential waste feed materials include plutonium scrap and residue, miscellaneous spent nuclear fuel, and uranium fissile wastes. The initial feed materials may contain mixtures of metals, ceramics, amorphous solids, halides, organic material and other carbon-containing material.

Forsberg, Charles W.

1997-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

16

Recovery of fissile materials from nuclear wastes  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process for recovering fissile materials such as uranium, and plutonium, and rare earth elements, from complex waste feed material, and converting the remaining wastes into a waste glass suitable for storage or disposal. The waste feed is mixed with a dissolution glass formed of lead oxide and boron oxide resulting in oxidation, dehalogenation, and dissolution of metal oxides. Carbon is added to remove lead oxide, and a boron oxide fusion melt is produced. The fusion melt is essentially devoid of organic materials and halogens, and is easily and rapidly dissolved in nitric acid. After dissolution, uranium, plutonium and rare earth elements are separated from the acid and recovered by processes such as PUREX or ion exchange. The remaining acid waste stream is vitrified to produce a waste glass suitable for storage or disposal. Potential waste feed materials include plutonium scrap and residue, miscellaneous spent nuclear fuel, and uranium fissile wastes. The initial feed materials may contain mixtures of metals, ceramics, amorphous solids, halides, organic material and other carbon-containing material.

Forsberg, Charles W. (Oak Ridge, TN)

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

17

Fissile material disposition program: Screening of alternate immobilization candidates for disposition of surplus fissile materials  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

With the end of the Cold War, the world faces for the first time the need to dismantle vast numbers of ``excess`` nuclear weapons and dispose of the fissile materials they contain, together with fissile residues in the weapons production complex left over from the production of these weapons. If recently agreed US and Russian reductions are fully implemented, tens of thousands of nuclear weapons, containing a hundred tons or more of plutonium and hundreds of tonnes* of highly enriched uranium (HEU), will no longer be needed worldwide for military purposes. These two materials are the essential ingredients of nuclear weapons, and limits on access to them are the primary technical barrier to prospective proliferants who might desire to acquire a nuclear weapons capability. Theoretically, several kilograms of plutonium, or several times that amount of HEU, is sufficient to make a nuclear explosive device. Therefore, these materials will continue to be a potential threat to humanity for as long as they exist.

Gray, L.W.

1996-01-08T23:59:59.000Z

18

Fissile Materials Disposition | National Nuclear Security Administrati...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Materials Disposition Since the end of the Cold War, significant quantities of plutonium and highly enriched uranium have become surplus to the defense needs of both the...

19

EIS-0229: Record of Decision (November 2003) | Department of...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

for safe and secure storage of weapons-usable fissile materials (plutonium and highly enriched uranium HEU) and a strategy for the disposition of surplus weapons- usable...

20

EIS-0229: Record of Decision (January 1997) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

for safe and secure storage of weapons-usable fissile materials (plutonium and highly enriched uranium HEU) and a strategy for the disposition of surplus weapons- usable...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "weapons-usable fissile materials" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

DISSOLUTION OF FISSILE MATERIALS CONTAINING TANTALUM METAL  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The dissolution of composite materials containing plutonium (Pu) and tantalum (Ta) metals is currently performed in Phase I of the HB-Line facility. The conditions for the present flowsheet are the dissolution of 500 g of Pu metal in the 15 L dissolver using a 4 M nitric acid (HNO{sub 3}) solution containing 0.2 M potassium fluoride (KF) at 95 C for 4-6 h.[1] The Ta metal, which is essentially insoluble in HNO{sub 3}/fluoride solutions, is rinsed with process water to remove residual acid, and then burned to destroy classified information. During the initial dissolution campaign, the total mass of Pu and Ta in the dissolver charge was limited to nominally 300 g. The reduced amount of Pu in the dissolver charge coupled with significant evaporation of solution during processing of several dissolver charges resulted in the precipitation of a fluoride salt contain Pu. Dissolution of the salt required the addition of aluminum nitrate (Al(NO{sub 3}){sub 3}) and a subsequent undesired 4 h heating cycle. As a result of this issue, HB-Line Engineering requested the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) to optimize the dissolution flowsheet to reduce the cycle time, reduce the risk of precipitating solids, and obtain hydrogen (H{sub 2}) generation data at lower fluoride concentrations.[2] Using samples of the Pu/Ta composite material, we performed three experiments to demonstrate the dissolution of the Pu metal using HNO{sub 3} solutions containing 0.15 and 0.175 M KF. When 0.15 M KF was used in the dissolving solution, 95.5% of the Pu in the sample dissolved in approximately 6 h. The undissolved material included a small amount of Pu metal and plutonium oxide (PuO{sub 2}) solids. Complete dissolution of the metal would have likely occurred if the dissolution time had been extended. This assumption is based on the steady increase in the Pu concentration observed during the last several hours of the experiment. We attribute the formation of PuO{sub 2} to the complexation of fluoride by the Pu. The fluoride became unavailable to catalyze the dissolution of PuO{sub 2} as it formed on the surface of the metal. The mass of Pu dissolved is equivalent to the dissolution of 343 g of Pu in the HB-Line dissolvers. In the initial experiment with 0.175 M KF in the solution, we achieved complete dissolution of the Pu in 6 h. The mass of Pu dissolved scales to the dissolution of 358 g of Pu in the HB-Line dissolvers. The second experiment using 0.175 M KF was terminated after approximately 6 h following the dissolution of 92.7% of the Pu in the sample; however, dissolution of additional Pu was severely limited due to the slow dissolution rate observed beyond approximately 4 h. A small amount of PuO{sub 2} was also produced in the solution. The slow rate of dissolution was attributed to the diminishing surface area of the Pu and a reduction in the fluoride activity due to complexation with Pu. Given time (>4 h), the Pu metal may have dissolved using the original solution or a significant portion may have oxidized to PuO{sub 2}. If the metal oxidized to PuO{sub 2}, we expect little of the material would have dissolved due to the fluoride complexation and the low HNO{sub 3} concentration. The mass of Pu dissolved in the second experiment scales to the dissolution of 309 g of Pu in the HB-Line dissolvers. Based on the data from the Pu/Ta dissolution experiments we recommend the use of 4 M HNO{sub 3} containing 0.175 M KF for the dissolution of 300 g of Pu metal in the 15 L HB-Line dissolver. A dissolution temperature of nominally 95 C should allow for essentially complete dissolution of the metal in 6 h. Although the H{sub 2} concentration in the offgas from the experiments was at or below the detection limit of the gas chromatograph (GC) used in these experiments, small concentrations (dissolutions. Therefore, appropriate controls must be established to address the small H{sub 3} generation rates in accordance with this work and the earlier flowsheet demonstrated

Rudisill, T; Mark Crowder, M; Michael Bronikowski, M

2007-05-29T23:59:59.000Z

22

DISSOLUTION OF FISSILE MATERIALS CONTAINING TANTALUM METAL  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The dissolution of composite materials containing plutonium (Pu) and tantalum (Ta) metals is currently performed in Phase I of the HB-Line facility. The conditions for the present flowsheet are the dissolution of 500 g of Pu metal in the 15 L dissolver using a 4 M nitric acid (HNO{sub 3}) solution containing 0.2 M potassium fluoride (KF) at 95 C for 4-6 h.[1] The Ta metal, which is essentially insoluble in HNO{sub 3}/fluoride solutions, is rinsed with process water to remove residual acid, and then burned to destroy classified information. During the initial dissolution campaign, the total mass of Pu and Ta in the dissolver charge was limited to nominally 300 g. The reduced amount of Pu in the dissolver charge coupled with significant evaporation of solution during processing of several dissolver charges resulted in the precipitation of a fluoride salt contain Pu. Dissolution of the salt required the addition of aluminum nitrate (Al(NO{sub 3}){sub 3}) and a subsequent undesired 4 h heating cycle. As a result of this issue, HB-Line Engineering requested the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) to optimize the dissolution flowsheet to reduce the cycle time, reduce the risk of precipitating solids, and obtain hydrogen (H{sub 2}) generation data at lower fluoride concentrations.[2] Using samples of the Pu/Ta composite material, we performed three experiments to demonstrate the dissolution of the Pu metal using HNO{sub 3} solutions containing 0.15 and 0.175 M KF. When 0.15 M KF was used in the dissolving solution, 95.5% of the Pu in the sample dissolved in approximately 6 h. The undissolved material included a small amount of Pu metal and plutonium oxide (PuO{sub 2}) solids. Complete dissolution of the metal would have likely occurred if the dissolution time had been extended. This assumption is based on the steady increase in the Pu concentration observed during the last several hours of the experiment. We attribute the formation of PuO{sub 2} to the complexation of fluoride by the Pu. The fluoride became unavailable to catalyze the dissolution of PuO{sub 2} as it formed on the surface of the metal. The mass of Pu dissolved is equivalent to the dissolution of 343 g of Pu in the HB-Line dissolvers. In the initial experiment with 0.175 M KF in the solution, we achieved complete dissolution of the Pu in 6 h. The mass of Pu dissolved scales to the dissolution of 358 g of Pu in the HB-Line dissolvers. The second experiment using 0.175 M KF was terminated after approximately 6 h following the dissolution of 92.7% of the Pu in the sample; however, dissolution of additional Pu was severely limited due to the slow dissolution rate observed beyond approximately 4 h. A small amount of PuO{sub 2} was also produced in the solution. The slow rate of dissolution was attributed to the diminishing surface area of the Pu and a reduction in the fluoride activity due to complexation with Pu. Given time (>4 h), the Pu metal may have dissolved using the original solution or a significant portion may have oxidized to PuO{sub 2}. If the metal oxidized to PuO{sub 2}, we expect little of the material would have dissolved due to the fluoride complexation and the low HNO{sub 3} concentration. The mass of Pu dissolved in the second experiment scales to the dissolution of 309 g of Pu in the HB-Line dissolvers. Based on the data from the Pu/Ta dissolution experiments we recommend the use of 4 M HNO{sub 3} containing 0.175 M KF for the dissolution of 300 g of Pu metal in the 15 L HB-Line dissolver. A dissolution temperature of nominally 95 C should allow for essentially complete dissolution of the metal in 6 h. Although the H{sub 2} concentration in the offgas from the experiments was at or below the detection limit of the gas chromatograph (GC) used in these experiments, small concentrations (<3 vol %) of H{sub 2} are typically produced in the offgas during Pu metal dissolutions. Therefore, appropriate controls must be established to address the small H{sub 3} generation rates in accordance with this work and the earlier flowsheet demonstrated

Rudisill, T; Mark Crowder, M; Michael Bronikowski, M

2007-05-29T23:59:59.000Z

23

Method and apparatus for measuring reactivity of fissile material  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Given are a method and apparatus for measuring nondestructively and non-invasively (i.e., using no internal probing) the burnup, reactivity, or fissile content of any material which emits neutrons and which has fissionable components. No external neutron-emitting interrogation source or fissile material is used and no scanning is required, although if a profile is desired scanning can be used. As in active assays, here both reactivity and content of fissionable material can be measured. The assay is accomplished by altering the return flux of neutrons into the fuel assembly. The return flux is altered by changing the reflecting material. The existing passive neutron emissions in the material being assayed are used as the source of interrogating neutrons. Two measurements of either emitted neutron or emitted gamma-ray count rates are made and are then correlated to either reactivity, burnup, or fissionable content of the material being assayed, thus providing a measurement of either reactivity, burnup, or fissionable content of the material being assayed. Spent fuel which has been freshly discharged from a reactor can be assayed using this method and apparatus. Precisions of 1000 MWd/tU appear to be feasible.

Lee, David M. (Los Alamos, NM); Lindquist, Lloyd O. (Santa Fe, NM)

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

24

Some effects of packaging materials on critical arrays of fissile materials  

SciTech Connect

The surface density representation of array criticality provides a comprehensive display of criticality parameters of arrays of packaged fissile materials. The study leads to the following conclusions: (1) The mass limits established by the N 16.5 standard for air-spaced spherical units in water-reflected arrays may be adequate for transportation packages; (2) criticality assessments made for one fissile material can be extended to other materials which have defined equivalent masses for array criticality of air-spaced units; and (3) a uniform minimum margin of subcriticality can be established for transportation of packaged fissile materials.

Thomas, J.T.; Tang, J.S.

1977-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

25

Method and apparatus for measuring reactivity of fissile material  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Given are a method and apparatus for measuring nondestructively and noninvasively (i.e., using no internal probing) the burnup, reactivity, or fissile content of any material which emits neutrons and which has fissionable components. The assay is accomplished by altering the return flux of neutrons into the fuel assembly by means of changing the reflecting material. The existing passive neutron emissions in the material being assayed are used as the source of interrogating neutrons. Two measurements of either emitted neutron or emitted gamma-ray count rates are made and are then correlated to either reactivity, burnup, or fissionable content of the material being assayed, thus providing a measurement of either reactivity, burnup, or fissionable content of the material being assayed. Spent fuel which has been freshly discharged from a reactor can be assayed using this method and apparatus. Precisions of 1000 MWd/tU appear to be feasible.

Lee, D.M.; Lindquist, L.O.

1982-09-07T23:59:59.000Z

26

Audit Report on "Containers Suitable for Shipping Fissile Material", DOE/IG-0490  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

As a result of its weapons program activities, the Department of Energy (Department) has a significant inventory of surplus fissile materials. Within the Department, the National Nuclear Security...

27

An active system for the detection of special fissile material in small watercraft  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Due to increasing terrorist threats and illegal proliferation of nuclear material and technology, there is a need for increased research in the area of detection of smuggled fissile material, some of which is designated by the International Atomic Energy Agency as special fissile material. This thesis focuses on a hypothetical scenario in which a terrorist organization has managed to smuggle an amount of special fissile material onto a personal recreational watercraft and sail it into a marina. If the boat could be forced to go through a detector system, then the contents could be interrogated and a determination made of whether any special fissile material was aboard. This thesis examines the hypothesis that active interrogation may be used successfully in the detection of special fissile material in such an environment. It shows that it is feasible to use an active neutron system to detect a significant quantity of special fissile material onboard a small boat via the differential dieaway technique. The MCNP Monte Carlo transport code was used to simulate the use of a pulsed neutron generator to induce fission in the fissile material and then estimate the detector response. The detector modeled was based on elastic scattering-induced recoil protons using pure hydrogen gas. There was a significant difference between the system with and without the presence of fissile material, and the estimated detector response for the system with fissile material present was shown to be sufficiently greater than the response due to background radiation only. Additionally, dose was estimated and found to be small enough that the system would not likely pose a significant radiological health risk to passengers on the boat.

Johansen, Norman Alfan, III

2006-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

28

A system for the detection of concealed nuclear weapons and fissile material aboard cargo cotainerships  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A new approach to the detection of concealed nuclear weapons and fissile material aboard cargo containerships is proposed. The ship-based approach removes the constraints of current thinking by addressing the threat of ...

Gallagher, Shawn P., S.M. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

29

Supplement Analysis for the Storage of Surplus Plutonium Materials at the Savannah River Site (DOE/EIS-0229-SA-4)(09/05/07)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

9-SA-4 9-SA-4 SUPPLEMENT ANALYSIS STORAGE OF SURPLUS PLUTONIUM MATERIALS AT THE SAVANNAH RIVER SITE INTRODUCTION AND PURPOSE In April 2002, DOE decided to immediately consolidate long-term storage at the Savannah River Site (SRS) of surplus, non-pit weapons-usable plutonium then stored at the Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site (RFETS) (DOE, 2002a). That 2002 decision did not affect an earlier DOE decision made in the January 21, 1997, Record of Decision (ROD, DOE, 1997) for the Storage and Disposition of Weapons-Usable Fissile Materials Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement (Storage and Disposition PEIS, DOE, 1996) to continue storage of non-pit surplus plutonium at Hanford, the Idaho National Laboratory (INL), and the Los Alamos

30

Fissile and Non-Fissile Material Detection Using Nuclear Acoustic Resonance Signatures  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The objective of this project is to develop anovel technique for remote, non-destructive, non-radiation-based detection of materials of interest to Nonproliferation Programs. We propse the development of a detection system based on magnetic resonance principles (NAR), which would work where radiation detection is not possible. The approach would be non-intrusive, penetrating, applicable to many materials of interest for Nonproliferation, and be able to identify the nuclear samples under investigation.

Bernhard R. Tittmann; P.M. Lenahan; David Spears; Rhys Williams

2008-11-25T23:59:59.000Z

31

Estimating discharged plutonium using measurements of structural material activation products  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

As the US and Russia move to lower numbers of deployed nuclear weapons, transparency regarding the quantity of weapons usable fissile material available in each country may become more important. In some cases detailed historical information regarding material production at individual facilities may be incomplete or not readily available, e.g., at decommissioned facilities. In such cases tools may be needed to produce estimates of aggregate material production as part of a bilateral agreement. Such measurement techniques could also provide increased confidence in declared production quantities.

Charlton, W. S. (William S.); Lumley-Woodyear, A. de; Budlong-Sylvester, K. W. (Kory W.)

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

32

Nondestructive assay of fissile material samples in support of nuclear safeguards  

SciTech Connect

From nuclear science symposium; San Francisco, California, USA (14 Nov 1973). Samples of fissile material can be assayed by bombarding with 300- to 600- keV neutrons and counting delayed neutrons from fission. Interrogating neutron energy selection is based upon considerations of sample penetrability and insensitivity of response to nonfissile isotopes. Significant cost savings in nuclear safeguards and quality control are possible. (auth)

Evans, A.E. Jr.

1973-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

33

Proliferation resistance criteria for fissile material disposition issues  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The 1994 National Acdaemy of Sciences study ``Management and Disposition of Excess Weapons Plutonium`` defined options for reducing the national and international proliferation risks of materials declared excess to the nuclear weapons program. This paper proposes criteria for assessing the proliferation resistance of these options as well defining the ``Standards`` from the report. The criteria are general, encompassing all stages of the disposition process from storage through intermediate processing to final disposition including the facilities, processing technologies and materials, the level of safeguards for these materials, and the national/subnational threat to the materials.

Rutherford, D.A.; Fearey, B.L.; Markin, J.T.; Close, D.A. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States); Tolk, K.M.; Mangan, D.L. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Moore, L. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States)

1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

34

Glass material oxidation and dissolution system: Converting miscellaneous fissile materials to glass  

SciTech Connect

The cold war and the development of nuclear energy have resulted in significant inventories of miscellaneous fissile materials (MFMs). MFMs include (1) plutonium scrap and residue, (2) miscellaneous spent nuclear fuel (SNF), (3) certain hot cell wastes, and (4) many one-of-a-kind materials. Major concerns associated with the long-term management of these materials include: safeguards and nonproliferation issues; health, environment, and safety concerns. waste management requirements; and high storage costs. These issues can be addressed by converting the MFMs to glass for secure, long-term storage or repository disposal; however, conventional glass-making processes require oxide-like feed materials. Converting MFMs to oxide-like materials with subsequent vitrification is a complex and expensive process. A new vitrification process has been invented, the Glass Material Oxidation and Dissolution System (GMODS), which directly converts metals, ceramics, and amorphous solids to glass; oxidizes organics with the residue converted to glass; and converts chlorides to borosilicate glass and a secondary sodium chloride (NaCl) stream. Laboratory work has demonstrated the conversion of cerium (a plutonium surrogate), uranium, Zircaloy, stainless steel, multiple oxides, and other materials to glass. However, significant work is required to develop GMODS further for applications at an industrial scale. If implemented, GMODS will provide a new approach to manage these materials.

Forsberg, C.W.; Ferrada, J.J.

1996-03-19T23:59:59.000Z

35

Processing fissile material mixtures containing zirconium and/or carbon  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method of processing spent TRIZO-coated nuclear fuel may include adding fluoride to complex zirconium present in a dissolved TRIZO-coated fuel. Complexing the zirconium with fluoride may reduce or eliminate the potential for zirconium to interfere with the extraction of uranium and/or transuranics from fission materials in the spent nuclear fuel.

Johnson, Michael Ernest; Maloney, Martin David

2013-07-02T23:59:59.000Z

36

Disposition of excess fissile materials in deep boreholes  

SciTech Connect

As a result of recent changes throughout the world, a substantial inventory of excess separated plutonium is expected to result from dismantlement of US nuclear weapons. The safe and secure management and eventual disposition of this plutonium, and of a similar inventory in Russia, is a high priority. A variety of options (both interim and permanent) are under consideration to manage this material. The permanent solutions can be categorized into two broad groups: direct disposal and utilization. Plutonium utilization options have in common the generation of high-level radioactive waste which will be disposed of in a mined geologic disposal system to be developed for spent reactor fuel and defense high level waste. Other final disposition forms, such as plutonium metal, plutonium oxide and plutonium immobilized without high-level radiation sources may be better suited to placement in a custom facility. This paper discusses a leading candidate for such a facility; deep (several kilometer) borehole disposition. The deep borehole disposition concept involves placing excess plutonium deep into old stable rock formations with little free water present. The safety argument centers around ancient groundwater indicating lack of migration, and thus no expected communication with the accessible environment until the plutonium has decayed.

Halsey, W.G. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States); Danker, W. [USDOE, Washington, DC (United States); Morley, R. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States)

1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

37

A method for managing the storage of fissile materials using criticality indices  

SciTech Connect

This paper describes a method for criticality control at fissile material storage facilities. The method involves the use criticiality indices for storage canisters. The logic, methodology, and results for selected canisters are presented. A concept for an interactive computer program using the method is also introduced. The computer program can be used in real time (using precalulated data) to select a Criticality Index (CI) for a container when it is delivered to or packaged at a site. Criticality safety is assured by controlling the sum of the CIs at each storage location below a defined Emit value when containers are moved.

Philbin, J.S.; Harms, G.A.

1995-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

38

Development of a Fissile Materials Irradiation Capability for Advanced Fuel Testing at the MIT Research Reactor  

SciTech Connect

A fissile materials irradiation capability has been developed at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) Research Reactor (MITR) to support nuclear engineering studies in the area of advanced fuels. The focus of the expected research is to investigate the basic properties of advanced nuclear fuels using small aggregates of fissile material. As such, this program is intended to complement the ongoing fuel evaluation programs at test reactors. Candidates for study at the MITR include vibration-packed annular fuel for light water reactors and microparticle fuels for high-temperature gas reactors. Technical considerations that pertain to the design of the MITR facility are enumerated including those specified by 10 CFR 50 concerning the definition of a research reactor and those contained in a separate license amendment that was issued by the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission to MIT for these types of experiments. The former includes limits on the cross-sectional area of the experiment, the physical form of the irradiated material, and the removal of heat. The latter addresses experiment reactivity worth, thermal-hydraulic considerations, avoidance of fission product release, and experiment specific temperature scrams.

Hu Linwen; Bernard, John A.; Hejzlar, Pavel; Kohse, Gordon [Massachusetts Institute of Technology (United States)

2005-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

39

EXAFS and XANES analysis of plutonium and cerium edges from titanate ceramics for fissile materials disposal.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We report x-ray absorption near edge structure (XANES) and extended x-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) spectra from the plutonium L{sub III} edge and XANES from the cerium L{sub II} edge in prototype titanate ceramic hosts. The titanate ceramics studied are based upon the hafnium-pyrochlore and zirconolite mineral structures and will serve as an immobilization host for surplus fissile materials, containing as much as 10 weight % fissile plutonium and 20 weight % (natural or depleted) uranium. Three ceramic formulations were studied: one employed cerium as a ''surrogate'' element, replacing both plutonium and uranium in the ceramic matrix, another formulation contained plutonium in a ''baseline'' ceramic formulation, and a third contained plutonium in a formulation representing a high-impurity plutonium stream. The cerium XANES from the surrogate ceramic clearly indicates a mixed III-IV oxidation state for the cerium. In contrast, XANES analysis of the two plutonium-bearing ceramics shows that the plutonium is present almost entirely as Pu(IV) and occupies the calcium site in the zirconolite and pyrochlore phases. The plutonium EXAFS real-space structure shows a strong second-shell peak, clearly distinct from that of PuO{sub 2}, with remarkably little difference in the plutonium crystal chemistry indicated between the baseline and high-impurity formulations.

Fortner, J. A.; Kropf, A. J.; Bakel, A. J.; Hash, M. C.; Aase, S. B.; Buck, E. C.; Chamerlain, D. B.

1999-11-16T23:59:59.000Z

40

Reactor and Material Supply | Y-12 National Security Complex  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Reactor and Reactor and Material Supply Reactor and Material Supply Y-12 has processed highly enriched uranium for more than 60 years in support of the nation's defense. The end of the Cold War and ensuing strategic arms control treaties have resulted in an excess of HEU materials. In 1994, approximately 174 metric tons of weapons-usable HEU was declared surplus to defense needs. The HEU disposition program was established to make the surplus HEU unsuitable for use in weapons by blending it down to low-enriched uranium and to recover the economic value of the materials to the extent practical. In 2005, the Secretary of Energy announced that an additional 200 metric tons of HEU would be removed from further use as fissile material in U.S. nuclear weapons. Approximately 20 metric tons of this material will

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "weapons-usable fissile materials" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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41

DOE Amends Record of Decision for Plutonium Consolidation  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

DOE amended the Record of Decision (ROD) for the Storage and Disposition of Weapons-Usable Fissile Materials Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement. Specifically, DOE decided to take the...

42

ES-3100: A New Generation Shipping Container for Bulk Highly Enriched Uranium and Other Fissile Materials  

SciTech Connect

The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) is shipping bulk quantities of surplus fissile materials, primarily highly enriched uranium (HEU), over the next 15 to 20 years for disposition purposes. The U.S. Department of Transportation (DOT) specification 6M container is the package of choice for most of these shipments. However, the 6M does not conform to the Type B packaging requirements in the ''Code of Federal Regulations'' (10CFR71) and, for that reason, is being phased out for use in the secure transportation system of DOE. BWXT Y-12 is currently developing a package to replace the DOT 6M container for HEU disposition shipping campaigns. The new package is based on state-of-the-art, proven, and patented insulation technologies that have been successfully applied in the design of other packages. The new package, designated the ES-3100, will have a 50% greater capacity for HEU than the 6M and will be easier to use. Engineering analysis on the new package includes detailed dynamic impact finite element analysis (FEA). This analysis gives the ES-3100 a high probability of complying with regulatory requirements.

Arbital, J.G.; Byington, G.A.; Tousley, D.R.

2004-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

43

Direct conversion of surplus fissile materials, spent nuclear fuel, and other materials to high-level-waste glass  

SciTech Connect

With the end of the cold war the United States, Russia, and other countries have excess plutonium and other materials from the reductions in inventories of nuclear weapons. The United States Academy of Sciences (NAS) has recommended that these surplus fissile materials (SFMs) be processed so they are no more accessible than plutonium in spent nuclear fuel (SNF). This spent fuel standard, if adopted worldwide, would prevent rapid recovery of SFMs for the manufacture of nuclear weapons. The NAS recommended investigation of three sets of options for disposition of SFMs while meeting the spent fuel standard: (1) incorporate SFMs with highly radioactive materials and dispose of as waste, (2) partly burn the SFMs in reactors with conversion of the SFMs to SNF for disposal, and (3) dispose of the SFMs in deep boreholes. The US Government is investigating these options for SFM disposition. A new method for the disposition of SFMs is described herein: the simultaneous conversion of SFMs, SNF, and other highly radioactive materials into high-level-waste (HLW) glass. The SFMs include plutonium, neptinium, americium, and {sup 233}U. The primary SFM is plutonium. The preferred SNF is degraded SNF, which may require processing before it can be accepted by a geological repository for disposal.

Forsberg, C.W.; Elam, K.R.

1995-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

44

FATE OF FISSILE MATERIAL BOUND TO MONOSODIUM TITANATE DURING COOPER CATALYZED PEROXIDE OXIDATION OF TANK 48H WASTE  

SciTech Connect

At the Savannah River Site (SRS), Tank 48H currently holds approximately 240,000 gallons of slurry which contains potassium and cesium tetraphenylborate (TPB). A copper catalyzed peroxide oxidation (CCPO) reaction is currently being examined as a method for destroying the TPB present in Tank 48H. Part of the development of that process includes an examination of the fate of the Tank 48H fissile material which is adsorbed onto monosodium titanate (MST) particles. This report details results from experiments designed to examine the potential degradation of MST during CCPO processing and the subsequent fate of the adsorbed fissile material. Experiments were conducted to simulate the CCPO process on MST solids loaded with sorbates in a simplified Tank 48H simulant. Loaded MST solids were placed into the Tank 48H simplified simulant without TPB, and the experiments were then carried through acid addition (pH adjustment to 11), peroxide addition, holding at temperature (50 C) for one week, and finally NaOH addition to bring the free hydroxide concentration to a target concentration of 1 M. Testing was conducted without TPB to show the maximum possible impact on MST since the competing oxidation of TPB with peroxide was absent. In addition, the Cu catalyst was also omitted, which will maximize the interaction of H{sub 2}O{sub 2} with the MST; however, the results may be non-conservative assuming the Cu-peroxide active intermediate is more reactive than the peroxide radical itself. The study found that both U and Pu desorb from the MST when the peroxide addition begins, although to different extents. Virtually all of the U goes into solution at the beginning of the peroxide addition, whereas Pu reaches a maximum of {approx}34% leached during the peroxide addition. Ti from the MST was also found to come into solution during the peroxide addition. Therefore, Ti is present with the fissile in solution. After the peroxide addition is complete, the Pu and Ti are found to precipitate from solution, while the U remains in solution throughout the remaining processes, including pH adjustment to 1 M free hydroxide. The Ti is likely forming a peroxotitanate material, which can then resorb the leached Pu from solution, but has a low affinity for U. Since Pu was not detected in the SEMEDS studies, it cannot be conclusively determined in what form the Pu returns to the solids; however, the Pu likely resorbed onto the peroxotitanate material. Based on the results of this experiment, Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) recommends the following experiments to further examine the fate of fissile material in CCPO processing of Tank 48H: (1) Repeat with full simulant matrix (organic and Cu catalyst present along with simulated radioactive sludge); and (2) Repeat of the above test after selection of final conditions (i.e., pH, temperature) if they differ from conditions tested.

Taylor-Pashow, K.

2012-08-09T23:59:59.000Z

45

EIS-0229: Amended Record of Decision | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Decision Decision EIS-0229: Amended Record of Decision Storage and Disposition of Weapons-Usable Fissile Materials Final Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) is amending the Record of Decision (ROD) for the Storage and Disposition of Weapons-Usable Fissile Materials Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement (DOE/EIS-0229, 1996; Storage and Disposition PEIS). Specifically, DOE has decided to take the actions necessary to transfer approximately 2,511 additional 3013-compliant packages 1 containing surplus non-pit weapons-usable plutonium metals and oxides to the Savannah River Site (SRS), near Aiken, South Carolina. DOE/EIS-0229, Amended Record of Decision for the Storage and Disposition of Weapons-Usable Fissile Materials Final Programmatic Environmental Impact

46

Response to 'A comment on 'Signatures of fissile materials:High-energy gamma rays following fission,' by Zeev B. Alfassi'  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Prof. Alfassi has pointed out that radionuclides that are not fission products, but which emit {gamma} rays with energies E{sub {gamma}} > 3 MeV, can be produced by neutron irradiation. He suggested that the decays of such activation products would interfere with the identification of fissionable materials. However, the combination of the energy spectrum and the temporal variation of the fission product gamma rays can be used to distinguish fissionable material from other nuclides. The activation of nuclides that could produce interferences will depend upon the specifics of the cargo and, possibly, the local surroundings. As discussed in our original publication, in addition to the steel that Prof. Alfassi referred to in his Comment, we studied the activation of wood, polyethylene, aluminum, and sandstone. Activation by thermal neutrons will always occur, and Prof. Alfassi correctly points out that nuclides such as {sup 49}Ca and {sup 37}S can be formed in this way. These nuclides are representative of most potential interferences. Both {sup 48}Ca and {sup 36}S have very low isotopic abundances (0.187% and 0.02%, respectively) and small thermal neutron capture cross sections (0.20 barns and 0.98 barns, respectively). In addition, their half lives are more than an order of magnitude longer than the gross average observed from the fission products, and more than two orders of magnitude longer than the lifetimes of the shorter-lived fission products that contribute significantly to the total intensity in the energy range of interest. These differences make it possible to distinguish between fission products and thermal neutron activation products. Prof. Alfassi also pointed out that interferences, of which {sup 16}N is likely to be the most important, can be produced by fast neutron reactions. (As described in our original publication, we did not use a 14 MeV generator in our work.) Fortunately, a judicious choice of the source neutron energy can limit the extent of these interferences quite significantly. For example, the laboratory threshold for the reaction {sup 16}O(n,p){sup 16}N is 10.2 MeV, while that for the reaction {sup 19}F(n,{alpha}){sup 16}N is 1.6 MeV. Thus a source neutron energy around 5 MeV would completely eliminate the {sup 16}O(n,p){sup 16}N reaction and limit the {sup 19}F(n,{alpha}){sup 16}N reaction to that portion of the cargo in which neutrons with energies greater than 1.6 MeV were present. However, even in the presence of {sup 16}N, the energy spectrum and temporal variation of the fission product gamma rays should be decisive in distinguishing fissionable material from these interferences.

Norman, Eric B.; Prussin, Stanley G.; Larimer, Ruth-Mary; Shugart, Howard; Browne, Edgardo; Smith, Alan R.; McDonald, Richard J.; Nitsche, Heino; Gupta, Puja; Frank, Michael I.; Gosnell, Thomas B.

2004-06-03T23:59:59.000Z

47

Los Alamos National Laboratory summary plan to fabricate mixed oxide lead assemblies for the fissile material disposition program  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report summarizes an approach for using existing Los Alamos National Laboratory (Laboratory) mixed oxide (MOX) fuel-fabrication and plutonium processing capabilities to expedite and assure progress in the MOX/Reactor Plutonium Disposition Program. Lead Assembly MOX fabrication is required to provide prototypic fuel for testing in support of fuel qualification and licensing requirements. It is also required to provide a bridge for the full utilization of the European fabrication experience. In part, this bridge helps establish, for the first time since the early 1980s, a US experience base for meeting the safety, licensing, safeguards, security, and materials control and accountability requirements of the Department of Energy and Nuclear Regulatory Commission. In addition, a link is needed between the current research and development program and the production of disposition mission fuel. This link would also help provide a knowledge base for US regulators. Early MOX fabrication and irradiation testing in commercial nuclear reactors would provide a positive demonstration to Russia (and to potential vendors, designers, fabricators, and utilities) that the US has serious intent to proceed with plutonium disposition. This report summarizes an approach to fabricating lead assembly MOX fuel using the existing MOX fuel-fabrication infrastructure at the Laboratory.

Buksa, J.J.; Eaton, S.L.; Trellue, H.R.; Chidester, K.; Bowidowicz, M.; Morley, R.A.; Barr, M.

1997-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

48

HEU to LEU Conversion and Blending Facility: UNH blending alternative to produce LEU UNH for commercial use  

SciTech Connect

US DOE is examining options for disposing of surplus weapons-usable fissile materials and storage of all weapons-usable fissile materials. The nuclear material is converted to a form that is more proliferation-resistant than the original form. Examining options for increasing the proliferation resistance of highly enriched uranium (HEU) is part of this effort. Five technologies for blending HEU will be assessed. This document provides data to be used in the environmental impact analysis for the UNH blending HEU disposition option. Process requirements, resource needs, employment needs, waste/emissions from plant, hazards, accident scenarios, and intersite transportation are discussed.

1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

49

Nuclear Forensic Reference Materials (RM) for Attribution of ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Nuclear Materials • Fuel cycles • Limit fissile material production • Reactor conversion Securing SNM • Reliable inventories • Physical Security • ...

2012-12-06T23:59:59.000Z

50

PEIS data report: Upgrading the Y-12 Plant for long-term HEU storage  

SciTech Connect

The Department of Energy (DOE) is planning the future of weapons-capable fissile materials owned by the United States (U.S.). Under its Disposition Program, DOE is evaluating its options for: (a) storage of fissile materials needed for specific national programs, and (b) disposal of surplus fissile materials. In accordance with the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA), DOE is preparing the {open_quotes}Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement (PEIS) for Long-Term Storage and Disposition of Weapons-Usable Fissile Materials{close_quotes} (Disposition PEIS). This paper discusses storage options for highly enriched uranium at the Y-12 plant.

Everitt, D.A.; Johnson, J.P.; Phillips, J.K.; Snider, J.D.

1996-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

51

Development of an Air Transport Type A Fissile Package  

SciTech Connect

This paper presents the summary of testing by the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) to support development of a light weight (<140 lbs) air transport qualified Type A Fissile Packaging. The package design incorporates features and materials specifically designed to minimize packaging weight. The light weight package is being designed to provide confinement to the contents when subjected to the normal and hypothetical conditions required of an air transportable Type A Fissile radioactive material shipping package. The objective of these tests was to provide design input to the final design for the LORX Type A Fissile Air Transport Packaging when subjected to the performance requirements of the drop, crush and puncture probe test of 10CFR71. The post test evaluation of the prototype packages indicates that all of the tested designs would satisfactorily confine the content within the packaging. The differences in the performance of the prototypes varied significantly depending on the core materials and their relative densities. Information gathered from these tests is being used to develop the final design for the Department of Homeland Security.

Blanton, P.; Ebert, K.

2011-07-13T23:59:59.000Z

52

US-Russian Cooperation in Upgrading MC&A System at Rosatom Facilities: Measurement of Nuclear Materials  

SciTech Connect

Improve protection of weapons-usable nuclear material from theft or diversion through the development and support of a nationwide sustainable and effective Material Control and Accountability (MC&A) program based on material measurement. The material protection, control, and accountability (MPC&A) cooperation has yielded significant results in implementing MC&A measurements at Russian nuclear facilities: (1) Establishment of MEM WG and MEMS SP; (2) Infrastructure for development, certification, and distribution of RMs; and (3) Coordination on development and implementation of MMs.

Powell, Danny H [ORNL; Jensen, Bruce A [ORNL

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

53

Source modulation-correlation measurement for fissile mass flow in gas or liquid fissile streams  

SciTech Connect

The method of monitoring fissile mass flow on all three legs of a blending point, where the input is high-enriched uranium (HEU) and low-enriched uranium (LEU) and the product is PEU, can yield the fissile stream velocity and, with calibration, the [sup235]U content. The product of velocity and content integrated over the pipe gives the fissile mass flow in each leg. Also, the ratio of fissile contents in each pipe: HEU/LEU, HEU/PEU, and PEU/LEU, are obtained. By modulating the source on the input HEU pipe differently from that on the output pipe, the HEU gas can be tracked through the blend point. This method can be useful for monitoring flow velocity, fissile content, and fissile mass flow in HEU blenddown of UF[sub 6] if the pressures are high enough to contain some of the induced fission products. This method can also be used to monitor transfer of fissile liquids and other gases and liquids that emit radiation delayed from particle capture. These preliminary experiments with the Oak Ridge apparatus show that the method will work and the modeling is adequate.

Mihalczo, J.T.; March-Leuba, J.A.; Valentine, T.E.; Abston, R.A.; Mattingly, J.K.; Mullens, J.A.

1996-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

54

FMDP reactor alternative summary report. Volume 1 - existing LWR alternative  

SciTech Connect

Significant quantities of weapons-usable fissile materials [primarily plutonium and highly enriched uranium (HEU)] are becoming surplus to national defense needs in both the United States and Russia. These stocks of fissile materials pose significant dangers to national and international security. The dangers exist not only in the potential proliferation of nuclear weapons but also in the potential for environmental, safety, and health (ES&H) consequences if surplus fissile materials are not properly managed. This document summarizes the results of analysis concerned with existing light water reactor plutonium disposition alternatives.

Greene, S.R.; Bevard, B.B. [and others

1996-10-07T23:59:59.000Z

55

Techniques and methods in nuclear materials traceability  

SciTech Connect

The nonproliferation community is currently addressing concerns that the access to special nuclear materials may increase the illicit trafficking in weapons-usable materials from civil and/or weapons material stores and/or fuel cycles systems. Illicit nuclear traffic usually involves reduced quantities of nuclear materials perhaps as samplings of a potential protracted diversionary flow from sources to users. To counter illicit nuclear transactions requires the development of techniques and methods in nuclear material traceability as an important phase of a broad forensic analysis capability. This report discusses how isotopic signatures and correlation methods were applied to determine the origins of Highly Enriched Uranium (HEU) and Plutonium samples reported as illicit trafficking in nuclear materials.

Persiani, P.J.

1996-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

56

HEU to LEU Conversion and Blending Facility: UF{sub 6} blending alternative to produce LEU UF{sub 6} for commercial use  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

US DOE is examining options for disposing of surplus weapons-usable fissile materials and storage of all weapons-usable fissile materials; the nuclear material will be converted to a form more proliferation- resistant than the original form. Examining options for increasing the proliferation resistance of highly enriched uranium (HEU) is part of this effort. Five technologies for blending HEU will be assessed; blending as UF{sub 6} to produce a UF{sub 6} product for commercial use is one of them. This document provides data to be used in the environmental impact analysis for the UF{sub 6} blending HEU disposition option. Resource needs, employment needs, waste and emissions from plant, hazards, accident scenarios, and intersite transportation are discussed.

NONE

1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

57

HEU to LEU conversion and blending facility: Metal blending alternative to produce LEU oxide for disposal  

SciTech Connect

US DOE is examining options for disposing of surplus weapons-usable fissile materials and storage of all weapons-usable fissile materials. The nuclear material is converted to a form more proliferation- resistant than the original form. Blending HEU (highly enriched uranium) with less-enriched uranium to form LEU has been proposed as a disposition option. Five technologies are being assessed for blending HEU. This document provides data to be used in environmental impact analysis for the HEU-LEU disposition option that uses metal blending with an oxide waste product. It is divided into: mission and assumptions, conversion and blending facility descriptions, process descriptions and requirements, resource needs, employment needs, waste and emissions from plant, hazards discussion, and intersite transportation.

1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

58

Page not found | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

21 - 17530 of 28,560 results. 21 - 17530 of 28,560 results. Page EIS-0229: Storage and Disposition of Weapons-Usable Fissile Materials The EIS will evaluate the reasonable alternatives and potential environmental impacts for the proposed siting, construction, and operation of three types of facilities for plutonium disposition. http://energy.gov/nepa/eis-0229-storage-and-disposition-weapons-usable-fissile-materials Download Letter of Direction to Contractor The Department of Energy has issued a revised Disposal Authorization Statement (DAS) for the Savannah River Site Saltstone Disposal Facility (SDF), and authorizes the required start-up testing... http://energy.gov/em/downloads/letter-direction-contractor Download Terms and Conditions for EM Clean Up to the Office of Science This document outlines the terms and conditions for managing and funding

59

LIFE Materials: Overview of Fuels and Structural Materials Issues Volume 1  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The National Ignition Facility (NIF) project, a laser-based Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF) experiment designed to achieve thermonuclear fusion ignition and burn in the laboratory, is under construction at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) and will be completed in April of 2009. Experiments designed to accomplish the NIF's goal will commence in late FY2010 utilizing laser energies of 1 to 1.3 MJ. Fusion yields of the order of 10 to 20 MJ are expected soon thereafter. Laser initiated fusion-fission (LIFE) engines have now been designed to produce nuclear power from natural or depleted uranium without isotopic enrichment, and from spent nuclear fuel from light water reactors without chemical separation into weapons-attractive actinide streams. A point-source of high-energy neutrons produced by laser-generated, thermonuclear fusion within a target is used to achieve ultra-deep burn-up of the fertile or fissile fuel in a sub-critical fission blanket. Fertile fuels including depleted uranium (DU), natural uranium (NatU), spent nuclear fuel (SNF), and thorium (Th) can be used. Fissile fuels such as low-enrichment uranium (LEU), excess weapons plutonium (WG-Pu), and excess highly-enriched uranium (HEU) may be used as well. Based upon preliminary analyses, it is believed that LIFE could help meet worldwide electricity needs in a safe and sustainable manner, while drastically shrinking the nation's and world's stockpile of spent nuclear fuel and excess weapons materials. LIFE takes advantage of the significant advances in laser-based inertial confinement fusion that are taking place at the NIF at LLNL where it is expected that thermonuclear ignition will be achieved in the 2010-2011 timeframe. Starting from as little as 300 to 500 MW of fusion power, a single LIFE engine will be able to generate 2000 to 3000 MWt in steady state for periods of years to decades, depending on the nuclear fuel and engine configuration. Because the fission blanket in a fusion-fission hybrid system is subcritical, a LIFE engine can burn any fertile or fissile nuclear material, including un-enriched natural or depleted U and SNF, and can extract a very high percentage of the energy content of its fuel resulting in greatly enhanced energy generation per metric ton of nuclear fuel, as well as nuclear waste forms with vastly reduced concentrations of long-lived actinides. LIFE engines could thus provide the ability to generate vast amounts of electricity while greatly reducing the actinide content of any existing or future nuclear waste and extending the availability of low cost nuclear fuels for several thousand years. LIFE also provides an attractive pathway for burning excess weapons Pu to over 99% FIMA (fission of initial metal atoms) without the need for fabricating or reprocessing mixed oxide fuels (MOX). Because of all of these advantages, LIFE engines offer a pathway toward sustainable and safe nuclear power that significantly mitigates nuclear proliferation concerns and minimizes nuclear waste. An important aspect of a LIFE engine is the fact that there is no need to extract the fission fuel from the fission blanket before it is burned to the desired final level. Except for fuel inspection and maintenance process times, the nuclear fuel is always within the core of the reactor and no weapons-attractive materials are available outside at any point in time. However, an important consideration when discussing proliferation concerns associated with any nuclear fuel cycle is the ease with which reactor fuel can be converted to weapons usable materials, not just when it is extracted as waste, but at any point in the fuel cycle. Although the nuclear fuel remains in the core of the engine until ultra deep actinide burn up is achieved, soon after start up of the engine, once the system breeds up to full power, several tons of fissile material is present in the fission blanket. However, this fissile material is widely dispersed in millions of fuel pebbles, which can be tagged as individual accountable items, and thus made difficult to dive

Farmer, J

2008-09-08T23:59:59.000Z

60

Fusion-Fission Hybrid for Fissile Fuel Production without Processing  

SciTech Connect

Two scenarios are typically envisioned for thorium fuel cycles: 'open' cycles based on irradiation of {sup 232}Th and fission of {sup 233}U in situ without reprocessing or 'closed' cycles based on irradiation of {sup 232}Th followed by reprocessing, and recycling of {sup 233}U either in situ or in critical fission reactors. This study evaluates a third option based on the possibility of breeding fissile material in a fusion-fission hybrid reactor and burning the same fuel in a critical reactor without any reprocessing or reconditioning. This fuel cycle requires the hybrid and the critical reactor to use the same fuel form. TRISO particles embedded in carbon pebbles were selected as the preferred form of fuel and an inertial laser fusion system featuring a subcritical blanket was combined with critical pebble bed reactors, either gas-cooled or liquid-salt-cooled. The hybrid reactor was modeled based on the earlier, hybrid version of the LLNL Laser Inertial Fusion Energy (LIFE1) system, whereas the critical reactors were modeled according to the Pebble Bed Modular Reactor (PBMR) and the Pebble Bed Advanced High Temperature Reactor (PB-AHTR) design. An extensive neutronic analysis was carried out for both the hybrid and the fission reactors in order to track the fuel composition at each stage of the fuel cycle and ultimately determine the plant support ratio, which has been defined as the ratio between the thermal power generated in fission reactors and the fusion power required to breed the fissile fuel burnt in these fission reactors. It was found that the maximum attainable plant support ratio for a thorium fuel cycle that employs neither enrichment nor reprocessing is about 2. This requires tuning the neutron energy towards high energy for breeding and towards thermal energy for burning. A high fuel loading in the pebbles allows a faster spectrum in the hybrid blanket; mixing dummy carbon pebbles with fuel pebbles enables a softer spectrum in the critical reactors. This combination consumes about 20% of the thorium initially loaded in the hybrid reactor ({approx}200 GWd/tHM), partially during hybrid operation, but mostly during operation in the critical reactor. The plant support ratio is low compared to the one attainable using continuous fuel chemical reprocessing, which can yield a plant support ratio of about 20, but the resulting fuel cycle offers better proliferation resistance as fissile material is never separated from the other fuel components.

Fratoni, M; Moir, R W; Kramer, K J; Latkowski, J F; Meier, W R; Powers, J J

2012-01-02T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "weapons-usable fissile materials" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

CRUSH TESTING OF 9977 GENERAL PURPOSE FISSILE PACKAGINGS  

SciTech Connect

The 9977 General Purpose Fissile Package (GPFP) was designed in response to the adoption of the crush test requirement in the US regulations for packages for radioactive materials (10 CFR 71). This presentation on crush testing of the 9977 GPFP Reviews origins of Crush Test Requirements and implementation of crush test requirements in 10 CFR 71. SANDIA testing performed to support the rule making is reviewed. The differences in practice, on the part of the US Department of Energy from those required by the NRC for commercial purposes, are explained. The design features incorporated into the 9977 GPFP to enable it to withstand the crush test and the crush tests performed on the 9977 are described. Lessons learned from crush testing of GPFP packagings are given.

Smith, A.

2010-07-28T23:59:59.000Z

62

Proliferation Risks of Fusion Energy: Clandestine Production, Covert Production, and Breakout  

SciTech Connect

Nuclear proliferation risks from fusion associated with access to weapon-usable material can be divided into three main categories: 1) clandestine production of fissile material in an undeclared facility, 2) covert production of such material in a declared and safeguarded facility, and 3) use of a declared facility in a breakout scenario, in which a state begins production of fissile material without concealing the effort. In this paper we address each of these categories of risk from fusion. For each case, we find that the proliferation risk from fusion systems can be much lower than the equivalent risk from fission systems, if commercial fusion systems are designed to accommodate appropriate safeguards.

R.J. Goldston, A. Glaser, A.F. Ross

2009-08-13T23:59:59.000Z

63

Proliferation Risks of Magneetic Fusion Energy: Clandestine Production, Covert Production and Breakout  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Nuclear proliferation risks from magnetic fusion energy associated with access to weapon-usable materials can be divided into three main categories: (1) clandestine production of weapon-usable material in an undeclared facility, (2) covert production of such material inn a declared facility, and (3) use of a declared facility in a breakout scenario, in which a state begins production of fissile material without concealing the effort. In this paper we address each of these categories of risks from fusion. For each case, we find that the proliferation risk from fusion systems can be much lower than the equivalent risk from fission systems, if the fusion system is designed to accommodate appropriate safeguards.

A. Glaser and R.J. Goldston

2012-03-13T23:59:59.000Z

64

Plutonium Consolidation Amended ROD  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

6450-01-P] 6450-01-P] DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Amended Record of Decision: Storage of Surplus Plutonium Materials at the Savannah River Site AGENCY: Department of Energy ACTION: Amended Record of Decision SUMMARY: The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) is amending the Record of Decision (ROD) for the Storage and Disposition of Weapons-Usable Fissile Materials Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement (DOE/EIS-0229, 1996; Storage and Disposition PEIS). Specifically, DOE has decided to take the actions necessary to transfer approximately 2,511 additional 3013-compliant packages 1 containing surplus non-pit weapons-usable plutonium metals and oxides to the Savannah River Site (SRS), near Aiken, South Carolina. Approximately 2,300 containers will be transferred from the Hanford Site (Hanford) near

65

Supplement Analysis Plutonium Consolidation  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

9-SA-4 9-SA-4 SUPPLEMENT ANALYSIS STORAGE OF SURPLUS PLUTONIUM MATERIALS AT THE SAVANNAH RIVER SITE INTRODUCTION AND PURPOSE In April 2002, DOE decided to immediately consolidate long-term storage at the Savannah River Site (SRS) of surplus, non-pit weapons-usable plutonium then stored at the Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site (RFETS) (DOE, 2002a). That 2002 decision did not affect an earlier DOE decision made in the January 21, 1997, Record of Decision (ROD, DOE, 1997) for the Storage and Disposition of Weapons-Usable Fissile Materials Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement (Storage and Disposition PEIS, DOE, 1996) to continue storage of non-pit surplus plutonium at Hanford, the Idaho National Laboratory (INL), and the Los Alamos

66

DOE NCSP Review of TRUPACT-II/HalfPACT Fissile Limits  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Environmental Management (EM) Office of Nuclear Material & Spent Fuel, EM-21, tasked the CSSG to perform a scoping study to determine the feasibility of increasing the fissile mass loading limits for specified TRUPACT-II and HalfPACT packages and containers. The results of the scoping study may provide insights and technical guidance for establishing fissile mass loading limits at waste generator sites and at the waste repository. The goal is to reduce costs of transporting fissile material to the WIPP from EM's various closure sites. This report documents the results of the scoping study and demonstrates that it is feasible to significantly increase the fissile mass loading limits in the TRUPACT-II and HalfPACT packages and containers. Depending upon the particular payload containers used, the number of shipments to WIPP could be reduced by at least a factor of 2 and as much as a factor of 16 and the number of total payload containers required ''down-hole'' at WIPP could be reduced by at least a factor of 2 and as much as about 6. These cost savings result simply from applying a more realistic criticality analysis model rather than the very conservative, hypothetical, bounding analysis used to support the existing fissile mass loading limits. However, the applications of existing and developmental computational tools, nuclear data, and experiments from the DOE Nuclear Criticality Safety Program have the potential to further reduce transportation and disposal container costs on the order of 7% to 17%. It is suggested that EM proceed with an effort to do the required formal analyses and pursue SARP supplements to take advantage of these savings. The success of these analyses are dependent upon the availability of the majority of the infrastructure supported by the DOE Nuclear Criticality Safety Program as defined in the Five-Year Plan for the program. Finally, it should be noted that these potential cost savings are based only on a criticality safety feasibility study and do not take into account other technical factors from other disciplines that may or may not impact the final approved loadings. The CSSG concurs that the results of this scoping study addresses the tasking statement provided by EM-21.

Goluoglu, S.

2002-03-28T23:59:59.000Z

67

Characterization of fissile material using low energy neutron interrogation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The glaring need to develop methods for detecting and interdicting illicit nuclear trafficking has resulted in the exploration of various methods for active neutron interrogation, specifically for the presence of special ...

Padilla, Eduardo A

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

68

Some Aspects of Fissile Materials Recycling with Innovative ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Nano-structures of ?-SiC Formed by Pyrolosis of Agricultural Waste · Nanothermites: Unconventional Nanomaterials with High Energy Output · Next- generation ...

69

Remote detection of fissile material : Cherenkov counters for gamma detection  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The need for large-size detectors for long-range active interrogation (Al) detection has generated interest in water-based detector technologies. AI is done using external radiation sources to induce fission and to detect, ...

Erickson, Anna S

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

70

Impact of delayed neutron precursor mobility in fissile solution systems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A research version of the Monte Carlo software package MCNP6 is modified to incorporate advection and diffusion of delayed neutron precursors, resulting in the emission of delayed neutrons at locations different from the original fission sites. Results of two test problems, a pipe carrying flowing fissile solution and a sphere of fissile solution with precursor diffusion, show that the fission product mobility tends to perturb the fundamental mode, has a negative reactivity effect, and, perhaps most importantly, causes a decrease in the effective delayed neutron fraction. (authors)

Kiedrowski, B. C. [X-Computational Physics Div., Los Alamos National Laboratory, MS A143, P.O. Box 1663, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States)

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

71

Apparatus and method for quantitatively evaluating total fissile and total fertile nuclide content in samples  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Simultaneous photon and neutron interrogation of samples for the quantitative determination of total fissile nuclide and total fertile nuclide material present is made possible by the use of an electron accelerator. Prompt and delayed neutrons produced from resulting induced fissions are counted using a single detection system and allow the resolution of the contributions from each interrogating flux leading in turn to the quantitative determination sought. Detection limits for .sup.239 Pu are estimated to be about 3 mg using prompt fission neutrons and about 6 mg using delayed neutrons.

Caldwell, John T. (Los Alamos, NM); Kunz, Walter E. (Santa Fe, NM); Cates, Michael R. (Oak Ridge, TN); Franks, Larry A. (Santa Barbara, CA)

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

72

Office of Weapons Material Protection | National Nuclear Security...  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

located in closed cities. In some cases, these industrial sites are the size of small cities and contain hundreds of metric tons of highly attractive weapons-usable nuclear...

73

Highly enriched uranium (HEU) storage and disposition program plan  

SciTech Connect

Recent changes in international relations and other changes in national priorities have profoundly affected the management of weapons-usable fissile materials within the United States (US). The nuclear weapon stockpile reductions agreed to by the US and Russia have reduced the national security requirements for these fissile materials. National policies outlined by the US President seek to prevent the accumulation of nuclear weapon stockpiles of plutonium (Pu) and HEU, and to ensure that these materials are subjected to the highest standards of safety, security and international accountability. The purpose of the Highly Enriched Uranium (HEU) Storage and Disposition Program Plan is to define and establish a planned approach for storage of all HEU and disposition of surplus HEU in support of the US Department of Energy (DOE) Fissile Material Disposition Program. Elements Of this Plan, which are specific to HEU storage and disposition, include program requirements, roles and responsibilities, program activities (action plans), milestone schedules, and deliverables.

Arms, W.M.; Everitt, D.A.; O`Dell, C.L.

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

74

Sandia National Laboratories: National Security Missions: Internationa...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

national security through global technical engagement. Enhance security of vulnerable nuclear weapons stockpiles and weapons-usable nuclear material in countries of concern and...

75

Environmental Impact Statements (EIS) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

7 7 EIS-0158-S2: Final Supplemental Environmental Impact Statement Program Environmental Impact Report for the Sale of the Naval Petroleum Reserve No. 1 at Elk Hills, California September 1, 1997 EIS-0026-S2: Final Supplemental Environmental Impact Statement Carlsbad Area Office, Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Disposal Phase July 1, 1997 EIS-0213: Final Environmental Impact Statement Nez Perce Tribal Hatchery Program June 6, 1997 EIS-0200: Final Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement Managing Treatment, Storage, and Disposal of Radioactive and Hazardous Waste December 1, 1996 EIS-0229: Final Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement Storage and Disposition of Weapons-Usable Fissile Materials December 1, 1996 EIS-0198: Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement

76

U.S. weapons-usable plutonium disposition policy: Implementation of the MOX fuel option  

SciTech Connect

A comprehensive case study was conducted on the policy problem of disposing of US weapons-grade plutonium, which has been declared surplus to strategic defense needs. Specifically, implementation of the mixed-oxide fuel disposition option was examined in the context of national and international nonproliferation policy, and in contrast to US plutonium policy. The study reveals numerous difficulties in achieving effective implementation of the mixed-oxide fuel option including unresolved licensing and regulatory issues, technological uncertainties, public opposition, potentially conflicting federal policies, and the need for international assurances of reciprocal plutonium disposition activities. It is believed that these difficulties can be resolved in time so that the implementation of the mixed-oxide fuel option can eventually be effective in accomplishing its policy objective.

Woods, A.L. [ed.] [Amarillo National Resource Center for Plutonium, TX (United States); Gonzalez, V.L. [Texas A and M Univ., College Station, TX (United States). Dept. of Political Science

1998-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

77

DEVELOPMENT OF THE HS99 AIR TRANSPORT TYPE A FISSILE PACKAGE  

SciTech Connect

An air-transport Type A Fissile radioactive shipping package for the transport of special form uranium sources has been developed by the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) for the Department of Homeland Security. The Package model number is HS99 for Homeland Security Model 99. This paper presents the major design features of the HS99 and highlights engineered materials necessary for meeting the design requirements for this light-weight Type AF packaging. A discussion is provided demonstrating how the HS99 complies with the regulatory safety requirements of the Nuclear Regulatory Commission. The paper summarizes the results of structural testing to specified in 10 CFR 71 for Normal Conditions of Transport and Hypothetical Accident Conditions events. Planned and proposed future missions for this packaging are also addressed.

Blanton, P.; Eberl, K.

2012-07-10T23:59:59.000Z

78

HEU to LEU conversion and blending facility: UNH blending alternative to produce LEU oxide for disposal  

SciTech Connect

The United States Department of Energy (DOE) is examining options for the disposition of surplus weapons-usable fissile materials and storage of all weapons-usable fissile materials. Disposition is a process of use or disposal of material that results in the material being converted to a form that is substantially and inherently more proliferation-resistant than is the original form. Examining options for increasing the proliferation resistance of highly enriched uranium (HEU) is part of this effort. This report provides data to be used in the environmental impact analysis for the uranyl nitrate hexahydrate blending option to produce oxide for disposal. This the Conversion and Blending Facility (CBF) alternative will have two missions (1) convert HEU materials into HEU uranyl nitrate (UNH) and (2) blend the HEU uranyl nitrate with depleted and natural assay uranyl nitrate to produce an oxide that can be stored until an acceptable disposal approach is available. The primary emphasis of this blending operation will be to destroy the weapons capability of large, surplus stockpiles of HEU. The blended LEU product can only be made weapons capable again by the uranium enrichment process. The blended LEU will be produced as a waste suitable for storage or disposal.

1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

79

Apparatus and method for quantitatively evaluating total fissile and total fertile nuclide content in samples. [Patent application  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Simultaneous photon and neutron interrogation of samples for the quantitative determination of total fissile nuclide and total fertile nuclide material present is made possible by the use of an electron accelerator. Prompt and delayed neutrons produced from resulting induced fission are counted using a single detection system and allow the resolution of the contributions from each interrogating flux leading in turn to the quantitative determination sought. Detection limits for /sup 239/Pu are estimated to be about 3 mg using prompt fission neutrons and about 6 mg using delayed neutrons.

Caldwell, J.T.; Kunz, W.E.; Cates, M.R.; Franks, L.A.

1982-07-07T23:59:59.000Z

80

HEU to LEU conversion and blending facility: Oxide blending alternative to produce LEU oxide for commercial use  

SciTech Connect

The United States Department of Energy (DOE) is examining options for the disposition of surplus weapons-usable fissile materials and storage of all weapons-usable fissile materials. Disposition is a process of use or disposal of material that results in the material being converted to a form that is substantially and inherently more proliferation-resistant than the original form. Examining options for increasing the proliferation resistance of highly enriched uranium (HEU) is part of this effort. This document provides data to be used in the environmental impact analysis for the oxide blending HEU disposition option. This option provides for a yearly HEU throughput of 1 0 metric tons (MT) of uranium metal with an average U235 assay of 50% blended with 165 MT of natural assay triuranium octoxide (U{sub 3} O{sub 8}) per year to produce 177 MT of 4% U235 assay U{sub 3} O{sub 8}, for LWR fuel. Since HEU exists in a variety of forms and not necessarily in the form to be blended, worst case scenarios for preprocessing prior to blending will be assumed for HEU feed streams.

1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "weapons-usable fissile materials" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

MOX Lead Assembly Fabrication at the Savannah River Site  

SciTech Connect

The U. S. Department of Energy (DOE) announced its intent to prepare an Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) under the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) on the disposition of the nations weapon-usable surplus plutonium.This EIS is tiered from the Storage and Disposition of Weapons-Usable Fissile Material Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement issued in December 1996,and the associated Record of Decision issued on January, 1997. The EIS will examine reasonable alternatives and potential environmental impacts for the proposed siting, construction, and operation of three types of facilities for plutonium disposition. The three types of facilities are: a pit disassembly and conversion facility, a facility to immobilize surplus plutonium in a glass or ceramic form for disposition, and a facility to fabricate plutonium oxide into mixed oxide (MOX) fuel.As an integral part of the surplus plutonium program, Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) was tasked by the DOE Office of Fissile Material Disposition(MD) as the technical lead to organize and evaluate existing facilities in the DOE complex which may meet MD`s need for a domestic MOX fuel fabrication demonstration facility. The Lead Assembly (LA) facility is to produce 1 MT of usable test fuel per year for three years. The Savannah River Site (SRS) as the only operating plutonium processing site in the DOE complex, proposes two options to carry out the fabrication of MOX fuel lead test assemblies: an all Category I facility option and a combined Category I and non-Category I facilities option.

Geddes, R.L. [Westinghouse Savannah River Company, AIKEN, SC (United States); Spiker, D.L.; Poon, A.P.

1997-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

82

Testing of Liquid Scintillator Materials for Gamma and Neutron Detection  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The key fact about fissile material is that a sufficient quantity of the material can produce chains of fissions, including some very long chains. A chain of fissions will give rise to a detected burst of neutrons with longer chains generally producing larger bursts. These bursts produce distinctive time correlations in a detector near the multiplying material. These correlations are measurable and can be analyzed to infer attributes of the fissile material including fissile material mass, assembly neutron multiplication, characteristic fast fission chain evolution time scale, also known as the {alpha} time scale, thermalization time scale. The correlation signal is very robust with respect to background and to neutron absorbing material.

Verbeke, J M; Nakae, L; Kerr, P; Dietrich, D; Dougan, A

2009-06-19T23:59:59.000Z

83

Global threat reduction initiative Russian nuclear material removal progress  

SciTech Connect

In December 1999 representatives from the United States, the Russian Federation, and the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) started discussing a program to return to Russia Soviet- or Russian-supplied highly enriched uranium (HEU) fuel stored at the Russian-designed research reactors outside Russia. Trilateral discussions among the United States, Russian Federation, and the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) have identified more than 20 research reactors in 17 countries that have Soviet- or Russian-supplied HEU fuel. The Global Threat Reduction Initiative's Russian Research Reactor Fuel Return Program is an important aspect of the U.S. Government's commitment to cooperate with the other nations to prevent the proliferation of nuclear weapons and weapons-usable proliferation-attractive nuclear materials. To date, 496 kilograms of Russian-origin HEU have been shipped to Russia from Serbia, Latvia, Libya, Uzbekistan, Romania, Bulgaria, Poland, Germany, and the Czech Republic. The pilot spent fuel shipment from Uzbekistan to Russia was completed in April 2006. (author)

Cummins, Kelly [DOE/NNSA (United States); Bolshinsky, Igor [INL/NNSA (United States)

2008-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

84

Development of Self-Interrogation Neutron Resonance Densitometry (SINRD) to Measure the Fissile Content in Nuclear Fuel  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The development of non-destructive assay (NDA) capabilities to directly measure the fissile content in spent fuel is needed to improve the timely detection of the diversion of significant quantities of fissile material. Currently, the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) does not have effective NDA methods to verify spent fuel and recover continuity of knowledge in the event of a containment and surveillance systems failure. This issue has become increasingly critical with the worldwide expansion of nuclear power, adoption of enhanced safeguards criteria for spent fuel verification, and recent efforts by the IAEA to incorporate an integrated safeguards regime. In order to address these issues, the use of Self-Interrogation Neutron Resonance Densitometry (SINRD) has been developed to improve existing nuclear safeguards and material accountability measurements. The following characteristics of SINRD were analyzed: (1) ability to measure the fissile content in Light Water Reactors (LWR) fuel assemblies and (2) sensitivity and penetrability of SINRD to the removal of fuel pins from an assembly. The Monte Carlo Neutral Particle eXtended (MCNPX) transport code was used to simulate SINRD for different geometries. Experimental measurements were also performed with SINRD and were compared to MCNPX simulations of the experiment to verify the accuracy of the MCNPX model of SINRD. Based on the results from these simulations and measurements, we have concluded that SINRD provides a number of improvements over current IAEA verification methods. These improvements include: 1) SINRD provides absolute measurements of burnup independent of the operator’s declaration. 2) SINRD is sensitive to pin removal over the entire burnup range and can verify the diversion of 6% of fuel pins within 3? from LWR spent LEU and MOX fuel. 3) SINRD is insensitive to the boron concentration and initial fuel enrichment and can therefore be used at multiple spent fuel storage facilities. 4) The calibration of SINRD at one reactor facility carries over to reactor sites in different countries because it uses the ratio of fission chambers (FCs) that are not facility dependent. 5) SINRD can distinguish fresh and 1-cycle spent MOX fuel from 3- and 4-cycles spent LEU fuel without using reactor burnup codes.

Lafleur, Adrienne

2011-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

85

International Law and the War in Iraq  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

delivery systems; (3) not acquire or develop nuclear weaponsor nuclear-weapons-usable material or components; and (4)of all of Iraq’s nuclear-weapons materials. Resolution 687

Yoo, John C.

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

86

FMDP reactor alternative summary report: Volume 4, Evolutionary LWR alternative  

SciTech Connect

Significant quantities of weapons-usable fissile materials [primarily plutonium and highly enriched uranium (HEU)] have become surplus to national defense needs both in the United States and Russia. These stocks of fissile materials pose significant dangers to national and international security. The dangers exist not only in the potential proliferation of nuclear weapons but also in the potential for environmental, safety, and health (ES&H) consequences if surplus fissile materials are not properly managed. The purpose of this report is to provide schedule, cost, and technical information that will be used to support the Record of Process (ROD). Following the screening process, DOE/MD via its national laboratories initiated a more detailed analysis activity to further evaluate each of the ten plutonium disposition alternatives that survived the screening process. Three ``Alternative Teams,`` chartered by DOE and comprised of technical experts from across the DOE national laboratory complex, conducted these analyses. One team was chartered for each of the major disposition classes (borehole, immobilization, and reactors). During the last year and a half, the Fissile Materials Disposition Program (FMDP) Reactor Alternative Team (RxAT) has conducted extensive analyses of the cost, schedule, technical maturity, S&S, and other characteristics of reactor-based plutonium disposition. The results of the RxAT`s analyses of the existing LWR, CANDU, and partially complete LWR alternatives are documented in Volumes 1-3 of this report. This document (Volume 4) summarizes the results of these analyses for the ELWR-based plutonium disposition option.

NONE

1996-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

87

Disposal criticality analysis methodology for fissile waste forms  

SciTech Connect

A general methodology has been developed to evaluate the criticality potential of the wide range of waste forms planned for geologic disposal. The range of waste forms include commercial spent fuel, high level waste, DOE spent fuel (including highly enriched), MOX using weapons grade plutonium, and immobilized plutonium. The disposal of these waste forms will be in a container with sufficiently thick corrosion resistant barriers to prevent water penetration for up to 10,000 years. The criticality control for DOE spent fuel is primarily provided by neutron absorber material incorporated into the basket holding the individual assemblies. For the immobilized plutonium, the neutron absorber material is incorporated into the waste form itself. The disposal criticality analysis methodology includes the analysis of geochemical and physical processes that can breach the waste package and affect the waste forms within. The basic purpose of the methodology is to guide the criticality control features of the waste package design, and to demonstrate that the final design meets the criticality control licensing requirements. The methodology can also be extended to the analysis of criticality consequences (primarily increased radionuclide inventory), which will support the total performance assessment for the respository.

Davis, J.W. [Framatome Cogema Fuels, Las Vegas, NV (United States); Gottlieb, P. [TRW Environmental Safety Systems, Las Vegas, NV (United States)

1998-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

88

Measuring of fissile isotopes partial antineutrino spectra in direct experiment at nuclear reactor  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The direct measuring method is considered to get nuclear reactor antineutrino spectrum. We suppose to isolate partial spectra of the fissile isotopes by using the method of antineutrino spectrum extraction from the inverse beta decay positron spectrum applied at Rovno experiment. This admits to increase the accuracy of partial antineutrino spectra forming the total nuclear reactor spectrum. It is important for the analysis of the reactor core fuel composition and could be applied for non-proliferation purposes.

V. V. Sinev

2009-02-22T23:59:59.000Z

89

Measuring of fissile isotopes partial antineutrino spectra in direct experiment at nuclear reactor  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The direct measuring method is considered to get nuclear reactor antineutrino spectrum. We suppose to isolate partial spectra of the fissile isotopes by using the method of antineutrino spectrum extraction from the inverse beta decay positron spectrum applied at Rovno experiment. This admits to increase the accuracy of partial antineutrino spectra forming the total nuclear reactor spectrum. It is important for the analysis of the reactor core fuel composition and could be applied for non-proliferation purposes.

Sinev, V V

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

90

Fissile Flow and Enrichment Monitor for GCEP Advanced Safeguards Application  

SciTech Connect

This paper presents experimental data that demonstrate a concept for a {sup 235}U flow and enrichment monitor (FEMO) based on passive measurements of process equipment in gaseous centrifuge enrichment plants (GCEPs). The primary goal of the FEMO is to prevent, without using pipe penetrations or active interrogation with external sources, the production and diversion of undeclared nuclear material. This FEMO concept utilizes: (1) calibrated measurements of {sup 235}U density in cascade headers, and (2) measurements of pump inlet pressure and volumetric flow rate, which are correlated to the electrical power consumed by the GCEP pumps that transport UF{sub 6} from the cascade to the condensation cylinders. The {sup 235}U density is measured by counting 186 keV emissions using a NaI gamma detector located upstream of the pump. The pump inlet pressure and volumetric flow rate are determined using a correlation that is a function of the measured pump operational parameters (e.g., electric power consumption and rotational frequency) and the pumping configuration. The concept has been demonstrated in a low-pressure flow loop at Oak Ridge National Laboratory.

March-Leuba, Jose A [ORNL; Uckan, Taner [ORNL

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

91

Measurements on an inventory of mixed fissile materials in shipping containers  

SciTech Connect

An inventory contained a large number of previously unmeasured items, many with both uranium and plutonium. We have assembled a suite of instruments and measured the items in a variety of ways. This report first considers the measurements and deduced results in detail before summarizing the important differences with the declarations of the inventory`s database. The appendices referred to in this report are part of a classified version only and are not attached to this unclassified version. The classified report is by the same authors as this report, has the same title (which is unclassified), and is classified as {open_quotes}SRD.{close_quotes}

Rinard, P.M.; Krick, M.S.; Kelley, T.A. [and others

1997-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

92

Monte Carlo model of a low-energy neutron interrogation system for detecting fissile material  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

(cont.) Further MCNP simulations of the neutron source impinging on cargo containers suggest that this technique can respond, as expected, qualitatively differently to containers containing SNM from containers that do not. ...

Johnson, Erik D., Ph. D. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

93

Open Skies and monitoring a fissile materials cut-off treaty  

SciTech Connect

The Treaty on Open Skies (Open Skies) is intended among other things to provide, in the words of its preamble, means ``to facilitate the monitoring of compliance with existing or future arms control agreements.`` Open Skies permits overflights of the territory of member states by aircraft equipped with an array of sensors of various types. Their types and capabilities are treaty-limited. To find useful application in monitoring a cut-off treaty Open Skies would need to be amended. The number of signatories would need to be expanded so as to provide greater geographical coverage, and restrictions on sensor-array capabilities would need to be relaxed. To facilitate the detection of impending violations of a cut-off convention by Open Skies overflights, the data base provided by parties to the former should include among other things an enumeration of existing and former fuel cycle and research facilities including those converted to other uses, their precise geographic location, and a site plan.

Allentuck, J.; Lemley, J.R.

1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

94

Deep borehole disposition of surplus fissile materials-The site selection process  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

One option for disposing of excess weapons plutonium is to place it near the base of deep boreholes in stable crystalline rocks. The technology exists to immediately begin the design of this means of disposition and there are many attractive sites available within the conterminous US. The borehole system utilizes mainly natural barriers to preven migration of Pu and U to the Earth`s surface. Careful site selection ensures favorable geologic conditions that provide natural long-lived migration barriers; they include deep, extremely stable rock formations, strongly reducing brines that exhibit increasing salinity with depth, and most importantly, demonstrated isolation or non-communication of deep fluids with the biosphere for millions of years. This isolation is the most important characteristic, with the other conditions mainly being those that will enhance the potential of locating and maintaining the isolated zones. Candidate sites will probably be located on the craton in very old Precambrian crystalline rocks, most likely the center of a granitic pluton. The sites will be located in tectonically stable areas with no recent volcanic or seismic activity, and situated away from tectonic features that might become active in the near geologic future.

Heiken, G.; WoldeGabriel, G.; Morley, R.; Plannerer, H

1996-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

95

In situ removal of the ``hockey stick`` fissile material deposit at the East Tennessee Technology Park  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Prior to shutdown of the gaseous diffusion process at the Oak Ridge K-25 Plant (now East Tennessee Technology Park), leakage of humid air into the process piping and equipment caused reactions with UF{sub 6}, which produced nonvolatile uranyl fluoride (UO{sub 2}F{sub 2}) deposition and other solid uranium fluoride compounds. During the period 1988--1991, Lockheed Martin Energy Systems performed nondestructive analysis (NDA) radiological surveys of the K-25 Site process facilities that previously had contained or processed uranium. These surveys were made to estimate the mass and {sup 235}U assay of localized uranium deposits remaining within the process piping and equipment. Three deposits were identified that had sufficient mass to achieve criticality. Two of these, the horizontal pipe and the T pipe deposits, required the addition of a moderator before a criticality accident could occur. The third was a very large uranium deposit determined by NDA to be distributed annularly in the process piping. Because of the shape of the system, it came to be called the hockey stick deposit. Because of the foregoing concerns with the hockey stick deposit, it was decided to gain experience by removing the less hazardous smaller deposits with their less complicated geometries first. Thus, the horizontal pipe deposit, the simplest and least reactive case, was handled first, in June 1997. Next, the T pipe, which was an intersection of large-diameter pipes and which posed additional problems because of a more complex geometry, was handled in August 1997. From this experience, the deposit removal techniques and procedures were refined. In December 1997, this large deposit was removed, and the contents were placed in a safe array configuration.

Lewis, K.D.; Tollefson, D.A. [Lockheed Martin Energy Systems (United States)

1998-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

96

Feasibility analysis of scanning 100% of maritime cargo containers for fissile material  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

On August 3, 2007, President George W. Bush signed into law H.R. 1: Implementing Recommendations of the 9/11 Commission Act of 2007. The law mandates that 100% of air and maritime cargo must be scanned prior to entering ...

Foley, William E., III

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

97

B771 FS 2004.PDF  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

O O C K Y F L A T S C L O S U R E P R O J E C T "THE MOST DANGEROUS BUILDING IN AMERICA" READY FOR DEMOLITION K e y M i l e s t o n e s * 1953: Operations began in May * 1957: Large fire spread plutoni- um contamination throughout much of the building * 1993: Started stabilizing bottled plutonium solutions * 1994: Began draining plutonium solutions from tanks * 1997: High-priority plutonium solutions drained from all tanks * 1997: All weapons-usable special nuclear materials removed * 1998: Began draining and removing plutonium process pip- ing * 1999: High security area eliminated following removal of all attractive quantities of SNM "holdup" * 2001: Last plutonium liquids removed and treated * 2002: Last glovebox removed * 2003: Facility no longer contains quantities of fissile material that

98

International Nuclear Security  

SciTech Connect

This presentation discusses: (1) Definitions of international nuclear security; (2) What degree of security do we have now; (3) Limitations of a nuclear security strategy focused on national lock-downs of fissile materials and weapons; (4) What do current trends say about the future; and (5) How can nuclear security be strengthened? Nuclear security can be strengthened by: (1) More accurate baseline inventories; (2) Better physical protection, control and accounting; (3) Effective personnel reliability programs; (4) Minimize weapons-usable materials and consolidate to fewer locations; (5) Consider local threat environment when siting facilities; (6) Implement pledges made in the NSS process; and (7) More robust interdiction, emergency response and special operations capabilities. International cooperation is desirable, but not always possible.

Doyle, James E. [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2012-08-14T23:59:59.000Z

99

Commissioning Measurements and Experience Obtained from the Installation of a Fissile Mass Flow monitor in the URAL Electrochemical Integrated Plant (UEIP) in Novouralsk  

SciTech Connect

The Blend Down Monitoring System (BDMS) equipment sent earlier to the Ural Electrochemical Integrated Plant (UEIP) at Novouralsk, Russia, was installed and implemented successfully on February 2, 1999. The BDMS installation supports the highly enriched uranium (HEU) Transparency Implementation Program for material subject to monitoring under the HEU purchase agreement between the United States of America (USA) and the Russian Federation (RF). The BDMS consists of the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) Fissile (uranium-235) Mass Flow Monitor (FMFM) and the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) Enrichment Monitor (EM). Two BDMS?s for monitoring the Main and Reserve HEU blending process lines were installed at UEIP. Independent operation of the FMFM Main and FMFM Reserve was successfully demonstrated for monitoring the fissile mass flow as well as the traceability of HEU to the product low enriched uranium. The FMFM systems failed when both systems were activated during the calibration phase due to a synchronization problem between the systems. This operational failure was caused by the presence of strong electromagnetic interference (EMI) in the blend point. The source-modulator shutter motion of the two FMFM systems was not being properly synchronized because of EMI producing a spurious signal on the synchronization cable connecting the two FMFM cabinets. The signature of this failure was successfully reproduced at ORNL after the visit. This unexpected problem was eliminated by a hardware modification and software improvements during a recent visit (June 9-11, 1999) to UEIP, and both systems are now operating as expected.

March-Leuba, J.; Mastal, E.; Powell, D.; Sumner, J.; Uckan, T.; Vines, V.

1999-07-25T23:59:59.000Z

100

US, International Partners Remove Last Remaining HEU from Vietnam...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

and eliminating weapons-usable nuclear materials," said U.S. Secretary of Energy Ernest Moniz. "Today, with the complete removal of all highly enriched uranium from Vietnam, we can...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "weapons-usable fissile materials" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Fuel conditioning facility material accountancy  

SciTech Connect

The operation of the Fuel conditioning Facility (FCF) is based on the electrometallurgical processing of spent metallic reactor fuel. It differs significantly, therefore, from traditional PUREX process facilities in both processing technology and safeguards implications. For example, the fissile material is processed in FCF only in batches and is transferred within the facility only as solid, well-characterized items; there are no liquid steams containing fissile material within the facility, nor entering or leaving the facility. The analysis of a single batch lends itself also to an analytical relationship between the safeguards criteria, such as alarm limit, detection probability, and maximum significant amount of fissile material, and the accounting system`s performance, as it is reflected in the variance associated with the estimate of the inventory difference. This relation, together with the sensitivity of the inventory difference to the uncertainties in the measurements, allows a thorough evaluation of the power of the accounting system. The system for the accountancy of the fissile material in the FCF has two main components: a system to gather and store information during the operation of the facility, and a system to interpret this information with regard to meeting safeguards criteria. These are described and the precision of the inventory closure over one batch evaluated.

Yacout, A.M.; Bucher, R.G.; Orechwa, Y.

1995-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

102

Washington | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

August 27, 1998 August 27, 1998 EA-1260: Finding of No Significant Impact Transfer of 1100 Area, Southern Rail Connection and Rolling Stock, Hanford Site, Richland, Washington August 27, 1998 EA-1260: Final Environmental Assessment and Finding of No Significant Impact Transfer of 1100 Area, Southern Rail Connection and Rolling Stock, Hanford Site, Richland, Washington August 13, 1998 EIS-0229: Notice of Availability of the Amended Record of Decision Storage and Disposition of Weapons-Usable Fissile Materials August 1, 1998 EIS-0245-SA-01: Supplement Analysis Management of Spent Nuclear Fuel from the K Basins at the Hanford Site, Richland, Washington May 1, 1998 EIS-0189: Supplement Analysis Tank Waste Remediation System July 28, 1997 EA-1203: Final Environmental Assessment Trench 33 Widening in 218-W-5 Low-level Burial Ground, Hanford Site,

103

Page not found | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

71 - 8280 of 9,640 results. 71 - 8280 of 9,640 results. Download Audit Report: OAS-FS-13-04 Department of Energy's Fiscal Year 2012 Consolidated Financial Statement http://energy.gov/ig/downloads/audit-report-oas-fs-13-04 Download Desk Reference on DOE-Flex This document provides supplemental guidance on DOE's telework program (July 2011) http://energy.gov/hc/downloads/desk-reference-doe-flex Download DOE Amends Record of Decision for Plutonium Consolidation DOE amended the Record of Decision (ROD) for the Storage and Disposition of Weapons-Usable Fissile Materials Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement. Specifically, DOE decided to take the... http://energy.gov/em/downloads/doe-amends-record-decision-plutonium-consolidation Download TBA-0027- In the Matter of Clint Olson This Decision considers an Appeal of an Initial Agency Decision (IAD)

104

Page not found | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

31 - 23540 of 31,917 results. 31 - 23540 of 31,917 results. Download EIS-0229: Notice of Availability of the Amended Record of Decision Storage and Disposition of Weapons-Usable Fissile Materials http://energy.gov/nepa/downloads/eis-0229-notice-availability-amended-record-decision Download http://energy.gov/management/downloads-1 Page EA-1959: Eightmile Ranch Coho Acclimation Site, Okanogan County, Washington Bonneville Power Administration and USDA Forest Service, Okanogan-Wenatchee National Forest, are jointly preparing an EA to assess the potential environmental impacts of funding a proposal by the Confederated Tribes and Bands of the Yakama Nation to construct and operate a coho salmon acclimation pond at Eightmile Ranch, which is owned and operated by the Forest Service. BPA's Mid-Columbia Coho Restoration Program EIS

105

Page not found | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

01 - 8710 of 26,764 results. 01 - 8710 of 26,764 results. Download EIS-0229: Amended Record of Decision Storage and Disposition of Weapons-Usable Fissile Materials Final Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement http://energy.gov/nepa/downloads/eis-0229-amended-record-decision Download CX-005731: Categorical Exclusion Determination Seadrift Wind Turbine CX(s) Applied: B5.1 Date: 04/21/2011 Location(s): Calhoun County, Texas Office(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, Golden Field Office http://energy.gov/nepa/downloads/cx-005731-categorical-exclusion-determination Page Guidance Cybersecurity http://energy.gov/cio/office-chief-information-officer/services/guidance Page Annual Reports Note: Some of the following documents are in PDF and will require Adobe Reader for viewing. http://energy.gov/management/office-management/operational-management/freedom-information-act/documents/annual-reports

106

Page not found | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

21 - 26130 of 26,764 results. 21 - 26130 of 26,764 results. Download PSH-12-0100- In the Matter of Personnel Security Hearing On November 15, 2012, an OHA Hearing Officer issued a decision in which he concluded the DOE should not restore an individual's access authorization. A Local Security Office (LSO) raised certain... http://energy.gov/oha/downloads/psh-12-0100-matter-personnel-security-hearing Download DOE Amends Record of Decision for Plutonium Consolidation DOE amended the Record of Decision (ROD) for the Storage and Disposition of Weapons-Usable Fissile Materials Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement. Specifically, DOE decided to take the... http://energy.gov/em/downloads/doe-amends-record-decision-plutonium-consolidation Download Program Update: 1st Quarter 2011 The Program Update newsletter is produced every quarter and highlights

107

First experiment on fission transients in highly fissile spherical nuclei produced by fragmentation of radioactive beams  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We report on a novel experimental approach for studying the dissipative spreading of collective motion in a meta-stable nuclear system, using, for the first time, highly fissile nuclei with spherical shape. This was achieved by fragmentation of 45 radioactive heavy-ion beams at GSI, Darmstadt. The use of inverse kinematics and a dedicated experimental set-up allowed for the identification in atomic number of both fission fragments. From the width of their charge distributions, a transient time of (3.3 +/- 0.7) 10-21 s is deduced for initially spherical nuclei.

C. Schmitt; P. N. Nadtochy; A. Heinz; B. Jurado; A. Kelic; K. -H. Schmidt

2007-02-12T23:59:59.000Z

108

Apparatus for in situ determination of burnup, cooling time and fissile content of an irradiated nuclear fuel assembly in a fuel storage pond  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A detector head for in situ inspection of irradiated nuclear fuel assemblies submerged in a water-filled nuclear fuel storage pond. The detector head includes two parallel arms which extend from a housing and which are spaced apart so as to be positionable on opposite sides of a submerged fuel assembly. Each arm includes an ionization chamber and two fission chambers. One fission chamber in each arm is enclosed in a cadmium shield and the other fission chamber is unshielded. The ratio of the outputs of the shielded and unshielded fission chambers is used to determine the boron content of the pond water. Correcting for the boron content, the neutron flux and gamma ray intensity are then used to verify the declared exposure, cooling time and fissile material content of the irradiated fuel assembly.

Phillips, J.R.; Halbig, J.K.; Menlove, H.O.; Klosterbuer, S.F.

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

109

Apparatus for in situ determination of burnup, cooling time and fissile content of an irradiated nuclear fuel assembly in a fuel storage pond  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A detector head for in situ inspection of irradiated nuclear fuel assemblies submerged in a water-filled nuclear fuel storage pond. The detector head includes two parallel arms which extend from a housing and which are spaced apart so as to be positionable on opposite sides of a submerged fuel assembly. Each arm includes an ionization chamber and two fission chambers. One fission chamber in each arm is enclosed in a cadmium shield and the other fission chamber is unshielded. The ratio of the outputs of the shielded and unshielded fission chambers is used to determine the boron content of the pond water. Correcting for the boron content, the neutron flux and gamma ray intensity are then used to verify the declared exposure, cooling time and fissile material content of the irradiated fuel assembly.

Phillips, John R. (Los Alamos, NM); Halbig, James K. (Los Alamos, NM); Menlove, Howard O. (Los Alamos, NM); Klosterbuer, Shirley F. (Los Alamos, NM)

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

110

Influence of the Density Law on Various Fissile Single Unit and Array Storage Methods  

SciTech Connect

The advancement of computational technology has resulted in the wide-spread availability of powerful radiation transport Monte Carlo codes. Prevailing practices today rely heavily on Monte Carlo codes to provide the basis for assessing the reactivity of various fissile systems for nuclear criticality safety (NCS). In 1958, Weinberg and Wigner expressed their concerns on a 'deplorable trend in reactor design - the tendency to substitute a code for a theory'. Unfortunately, their concerns have largely become a reality in many modern NCS practices. lacking the time or information to understand the underlying neutron physics of the fissile system under consideration is indeed a deplorable trend. The purpose of this paper is to demonstrate that many features of criticality hand calculation methods are indeed based upon the fundamentals of the density law and that many correlations of important physics parameters can be more easily understood from such a perspective. Historically, the density law was recognized by many pioneers in the field, including during the Manhattan Project. However, it was by and large an 'oral tradition' in that bits and pieces of great physical insights of the pioneers were scattered in many earlier publications. This paper attempts to bring together some of the 'jewels' of the pioneers which might have been lost or forgotten.

Huang, S T

2011-03-02T23:59:59.000Z

111

Influence of the Density Law on Various Fissile Single Unit and Array Storage Methods  

SciTech Connect

The advancement of computational technology has resulted in the wide-spread availability of powerful radiation transport Monte Carlo codes. Prevailing practices today rely heavily on Monte Carlo codes to provide the basis for assessing the reactivity of various fissile systems for nuclear criticality safety (NCS). In 1958, Weinberg and Wigner expressed their concerns on a 'deplorable trend in reactor design - the tendency to substitute a code for a theory'. Unfortunately, their concerns have largely become a reality in many modern NCS practices. lacking the time or information to understand the underlying neutron physics of the fissile system under consideration is indeed a deplorable trend. The purpose of this paper is to demonstrate that many features of criticality hand calculation methods are indeed based upon the fundamentals of the density law and that many correlations of important physics parameters can be more easily understood from such a perspective. Historically, the density law was recognized by many pioneers in the field, including during the Manhattan Project. However, it was by and large an 'oral tradition' in that bits and pieces of great physical insights of the pioneers were scattered in many earlier publications. This paper attempts to bring together some of the 'jewels' of the pioneers which might have been lost or forgotten.

Huang, S T

2011-03-02T23:59:59.000Z

112

THERMAL TESTING OF PROTOTYPE GENERAL PURPOSE FISSILE PACKAGES USING A FURNACE  

SciTech Connect

The 9977/9978 General Purpose Fissile Package (GPFP) was designed by SRNL to replace the DOT 6M Specification Package and ship Plutonium and Uranium metals and oxides. Urethane foam was used for the overpack to ensure the package would withstand the 10CFR71.73(c)(2) crush test, which is a severe test for drum-type packages. In addition, it was necessary to confirm that the urethane foam configuration provided adequate thermal protection for the containment vessel during the subsequent 10CFR71.73(c)(4) thermal test. Development tests were performed on early prototype test specimens of different diameter overpacks and a range of urethane foam densities. The thermal test was performed using an industrial furnace. Test results were used to optimize the selection of package diameter and foam density, and provided the basis for design enhancements incorporated into the final package design.

Smith, A; Lawrence Gelder, L; Paul Blanton, P

2007-02-16T23:59:59.000Z

113

Direct fissile assay of enriched uranium using random self-interrogation and neutron coincidence response  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Apparatus and method for the direct, nondestructive evaluation of the .sup.235 U nuclide content of samples containing UF.sub.6, UF.sub.4, or UO.sub.2 utilizing the passive neutron self-interrogation of the sample resulting from the intrinsic production of neutrons therein. The ratio of the emitted neutron coincidence count rate to the total emitted neutron count rate is determined and yields a measure of the bulk fissile mass. The accuracy of the method is 6.8% (1.sigma.) for cylinders containing UF.sub.6 with enrichments ranging from 6% to 98% with measurement times varying from 3-6 min. The samples contained from below 1 kg to greater than 16 kg. Since the subject invention relies on fast neutron self-interrogation, complete sampling of the UF.sub.6 takes place, reducing difficulties arising from inhomogeneity of the sample which adversely affects other assay procedures.

Menlove, Howard O. (Los Alamos, NM); Stewart, James E. (Los Alamos, NM)

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

114

Direct fissile assay of enriched uranium using random self-interrogation and neutron coincidence response  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Apparatus and method for the direct, nondestructive evaluation of the /sup 235/U nuclide content of samples containing UF/sub 6/, UF/sub 4/, or UO/sub 2/ utilizing the passive neutron self-interrogation of the sample resulting from the intrinsic production of neutrons therein. The ratio of the emitted neutron coincidence count rate to the total emitted neutron count rate is determined and yields a measure of the bulk fissile mass. The accuracy of the method is 6.8% (1sigma) for cylinders containing UF/sub 6/ with enrichments ranging from 6% to 98% with measurement times varying from 3-6 min. The samples contained from below 1 kg to greater than 16 kg. Since the subject invention relies on fast neutron self-interrogation, complete sampling of the UF/sub 6/ takes place, reducing difficulties arising from inhomogeneity of the sample which adversely affects other assay procedures. 4 figs., 1 tab.

Menlove, H.O.; Stewart, J.E.

1985-02-04T23:59:59.000Z

115

Materials  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Materials Materials and methods are available as supplementary materials on Science Online. 16. W. Benz, A. G. W. Cameron, H. J. Melosh, Icarus 81, 113 (1989). 17. S. L. Thompson, H. S. Lauson, Technical Rep. SC-RR-710714, Sandia Nat. Labs (1972). 18. H. J. Melosh, Meteorit. Planet. Sci. 42, 2079 (2007). 19. S. Ida, R. M. Canup, G. R. Stewart, Nature 389, 353 (1997). 20. E. Kokubo, J. Makino, S. Ida, Icarus 148, 419 (2000). 21. M. M. M. Meier, A. Reufer, W. Benz, R. Wieler, Annual Meeting of the Meteoritical Society LXXIV, abstr. 5039 (2011). 22. C. B. Agnor, R. M. Canup, H. F. Levison, Icarus 142, 219 (1999). 23. D. P. O'Brien, A. Morbidelli, H. F. Levison, Icarus 184, 39 (2006). 24. R. M. Canup, Science 307, 546 (2005). 25. J. J. Salmon, R. M. Canup, Lunar Planet. Sci. XLIII, 2540 (2012). Acknowledgments: SPH simulation data are contained in tables S2 to S5 of the supplementary materials. Financial support

116

Material  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Li(Ni{sub 0.4}Co{sub 0.15}Al{sub 0.05}Mn{sub 0.4})O{sub 2} was investigated to understand the effect of replacement of the cobalt by aluminum on the structural and electrochemical properties. In situ X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) was performed, utilizing a novel in situ electrochemical cell, specifically designed for long-term X-ray experiments. The cell was cycled at a moderate rate through a typical Li-ion battery operating voltage range. (1.0-4.7 V) XAS measurements were performed at different states of charge (SOC) during cycling, at the Ni, Co, and the Mn edges, revealing details about the response of the cathode to Li insertion and extraction processes. The extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) region of the spectra revealed the changes of bond distance and coordination number of Ni, Co, and Mn absorbers as a function of the SOC of the material. The oxidation states of the transition metals in the system are Ni{sup 2+}, Co{sup 3+}, and Mn{sup 4+} in the as-made material (fully discharged), while during charging the Ni{sup 2+} is oxidized to Ni{sup 4+} through an intermediate stage of Ni{sup 3+}, Co{sup 3+} is oxidized toward Co{sup 4+}, and Mn was found to be electrochemically inactive and remained as Mn{sup 4+}. The EXAFS results during cycling show that the Ni-O changes the most, followed by Co-O, and Mn-O varies the least. These measurements on this cathode material confirmed that the material retains its symmetry and good structural short-range order leading to the superior cycling reported earlier.

Rumble, C.; Conry, T.E.; Doeff, Marca; Cairns, Elton J.; Penner-Hahn, James E.; Deb, Aniruddha

2010-06-14T23:59:59.000Z

117

THERMAL TESTING OF 9977 GENERAL PURPOSE FISSILE PACKAGE USING A POOL FIRE  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The 9977/9978 General Purpose Fissile Package (GPFP), has been designed as a cost-effective, user-friendly replacement for the DOT 6M Specification Package for transporting Plutonium and Uranium metals and oxides. To ensure the capability of the 9977 GPFP to withstand the regulatory crush test, urethane foam was chosen for the impact absorbing overpack. As part of the package development it was necessary to confirm that the urethane foam overpack would provide the required protection for the containment vessel during the thermal test portion of the Hypothetical Accident Conditions Sequential Tests. Development tests of early prototypes were performed, using a furnace. Based on the results of the development tests, detailed design enhancements were incorporated into the final design. Examples of the definitive 9977 design configuration were subjected to an all-engulfing pool fire test, as part of the HAC Sequential Tests, to support the application for certification. Testing has confirmed the package's ability to withstand the HAC thermal tests.

Smith, A; Cecil May, C; Lawrence Gelder, L; Glenn Abramczyk, G

2007-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

118

NUCLEAR FUEL MATERIAL  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An improved method is given for making the carbides of nuclear fuel material. The metal of the fuel material, which may be a fissile and/or fertile material, is transformed into a silicide, after which the silicide is comminuted to the desired particle size. This silicide is then carburized at an elevated temperature, either above or below the melting point of the silicide, to produce an intimate mixture of the carbide of the fuel material and the carbide of silicon. This mixture of the fuel material carbide and the silicon carbide is relatively stable in the presence of moisture and does not exhibit the highly reactive surface condition which is observed with fuel material carbides made by most other known methods. (AEC)

Goeddel, W.V.

1962-06-26T23:59:59.000Z

119

Detecting fission from special nuclear material sources  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A neutron detector system for discriminating fissile material from non-fissile material wherein a digital data acquisition unit collects data at high rate, and in real-time processes large volumes of data directly into information that a first responder can use to discriminate materials. The system comprises counting neutrons from the unknown source and detecting excess grouped neutrons to identify fission in the unknown source. The system includes a graphing component that displays the plot of the neutron distribution from the unknown source over a Poisson distribution and a plot of neutrons due to background or environmental sources. The system further includes a known neutron source placed in proximity to the unknown source to actively interrogate the unknown source in order to accentuate differences in neutron emission from the unknown source from Poisson distributions and/or environmental sources.

Rowland, Mark S. (Alamo, CA); Snyderman, Neal J. (Berkeley, CA)

2012-06-05T23:59:59.000Z

120

Use of a computer-assisted administrative control to enhance criticality safety in LLNL for fissile material disposition operations  

SciTech Connect

This paper deals primarily with the use of a two-person rule on the mass limit control. Main emphasis is placed on the appropriate use of a computer program to assist operators in carrying out mass control. An attempt will be exercised to compare the use of a mass control card system under a two-person rule with a computer-assist two-person system. The interface points relevant to criticality safety between computer and human operators will be identified. Features that will make a computer program useful in a multiple workstation application environment will be discussed along with the merits of the using the computer program. How such a computer-assist administrative control may be incorporated in the overall infrastructure for criticality safety will be analyzed. Suggestion of future development of using a computer program to enhance safety margin will also be made to stimulate further discussion on the application of computer technology for real-time criticality safety control.

Huang, Song T.; Lappa, D.A.; Chiao, Tang

1997-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "weapons-usable fissile materials" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Response to 'A comment on "Signatures of fissile materials: High-energy gamma rays following fission," by Zeev B. Alfassi'  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

high-energy ? rays following fission" by Zeev B. Alfassi ,radionuclides that are not fission products, but which emittemporal variation of the fission product gamma rays should

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

122

APPLICATION OF VACUUM SALT DISTILLATION TECHNOLOGY FOR THE REMOVAL OF FLUORIDE AND CHLORIDE FROM LEGACY FISSILE MATERIALS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Between September 2009 and January 2011, the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) and the Savannah River Site (SRS) HB-Line Facility designed, developed, tested, and successfully deployed a production-scale system for the distillation of sodium chloride (NaCl) and potassium chloride (KCl) from plutonium oxide (PuO{sub 2}). Subsequent efforts adapted the vacuum salt distillation (VSD) technology for the removal of chloride and fluoride from less-volatile halide salts at the same process temperature and vacuum. Calcium chloride (CaCl{sub 2}), calcium fluoride (CaF{sub 2}), and plutonium fluoride (PuF{sub 3}) were of particular concern. To enable the use of the same operating conditions for the distillation process, SRNL employed in situ exchange reactions to convert the less-volatile halide salts to compounds that facilitated the distillation of halide without removal of plutonium. SRNL demonstrated the removal of halide from CaCl{sub 2}, CaF{sub 2} and PuF{sub 3} below 1000 C using VSD technology.

Pierce, R.; Peters, T.

2011-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

123

Loose Nukes: Nuclear Material Security in G.P.Gilfoyle  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Shinrikyo and Osama bin Laden's group (two terrorist organi- zations) supposedly tried to obtain fissile material. #12;What Can An Opponent Do? · The opponents are nation-states (e.g. Iraq) and terrorist? · What can a terrorist organization do? ­ Acquiring the necessary technology to enrich uranium

Gilfoyle, Jerry

124

The environmental assessment of nuclear materials disposition options: A transportation perspective  

SciTech Connect

The US Department of Energy has undertaken a program to evaluate and select options for the long-term storage and disposition of fissile materials declared surplus to defense needs as a result of the end of the Cold War. The transport of surplus fissile material will be an important and highly visible aspect of the environmental impact studies and other planning documents required for implementation of the disposition options. This report defines the roles and requirements for transportation of fissile materials in the program, and discusses an existing methodology for determining the environmental impact in terms of risk. While it will be some time before specific alternatives are chosen that will permit the completion of detailed risk calculations, the analytical models for performing the probabilistic risk assessments already exist with much of the supporting data related to the transportation system. This report summarizes the various types of data required and identifies sources for that data.

Wilson, R.K.; Clauss, D.B.; Moyer, J.W.

1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

125

Porcelain enamel neutron absorbing material  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A porcelain enamel composition as a neutron absorbing material can be prepared of a major proportion by weight of a cadmium compound and a minor proportion of compound of boron, lithium and silicon. These compounds in the form of a porcelain enamel coating or layer on several alloys has been found to be particularly effective in enhancing the nuclear safety of equipment for use in the processing and storage of fissile material. The composition of the porcelain enamel coating can be tailored to match the coefficient of thermal expansion of the equipment to be coated and excellent coating adhesion can be achieved. 2 figs.

Iverson, D.C.

1987-11-20T23:59:59.000Z

126

Predicting fissile content of spent nuclear fuel assemblies with the passive neutron Albedo reactivity technique and Monte Carlo code emulation  

SciTech Connect

There is a great need in the safeguards community to be able to nondestructively quantify the mass of plutonium of a spent nuclear fuel assembly. As part of the Next Generation of Safeguards Initiative, we are investigating several techniques, or detector systems, which, when integrated, will be capable of quantifying the plutonium mass of a spent fuel assembly without dismantling the assembly. This paper reports on the simulation of one of these techniques, the Passive Neutron Albedo Reactivity with Fission Chambers (PNAR-FC) system. The response of this system over a wide range of spent fuel assemblies with different burnup, initial enrichment, and cooling time characteristics is shown. A Monte Carlo method of using these modeled results to estimate the fissile content of a spent fuel assembly has been developed. A few numerical simulations of using this method are shown. Finally, additional developments still needed and being worked on are discussed.

Conlin, Jeremy Lloyd [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Tobin, Stephen J [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2010-10-13T23:59:59.000Z

127

Blend Down Monitoring System Fissile Mass Flow Monitor Implementation at the ElectroChemical Plant, Zelenogorsk, Russia  

SciTech Connect

The implementation plans and preparations for installation of the Fissile Mass Flow Monitor (FMFM) equipment at the ElectroChemical Plant (ECP), Zelenogorsk, Russia, are presented in this report. The FMFM, developed at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, is part of the Blend Down Monitoring System (BDMS), developed for the U.S. Department of Energy Highly Enriched Uranium (HEU) Transparency Implementation Program. The BDMS provides confidence to the United States that the Russian nuclear facilities supplying the lower-assay ({approx}4%) product low enriched uranium (P-LEU) to the United States from down-blended weapons-grade HEU are meeting the nonproliferation goals of the government-to-government HEU Purchase Agreement, signed between the Russian Federation and the United States in 1993. The first BDMS has been operational at Ural Electrochemical Integrated Plant, Novouralsk, since February 1999 and is successfully providing HEU transparency data to the United States. The second BDMS was installed at ECP in February 2003. The FMFM makes use of a set of thermalized californium-252 ({sup 252}Cf) spontaneous neutron sources for a modulated fission activation of the UF{sub 6} gas stream for measuring the {sup 235}U fissile mass flow rate. To do this, the FMFM measures the transport time of the fission fragments created from the fission activation process under the modulated source to the downstream detectors by detecting the delayed gamma rays from the fission fragments. The FMFM provides unattended, nonintrusive measurements of the {sup 235}U mass flow in the HEU, LEU blend stock, and P-LEU process legs. The FMFM also provides the traceability of the HEU flow to the product process leg. This report documents the technical installation requirements and the expected operational characteristics of the ECP FMFM.

Uckan, T.

2005-11-11T23:59:59.000Z

128

Fissile Mass Flow Monitor Implementation for Transparency in HEU Blenddown at the URAL Electrochemical Integrated Plant (UEIP) in Novouralsk  

SciTech Connect

The Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) Fissile Mass Flow Monitor (FMFM) was deployed at the Ural Electrochemical Integrated Plant (UEIP) highly enriched uranium (HEU) blending facility in January and February 1999 at Novouralsk in Russia for the DOE HEU Transparency Program. The FMFM provides unattended monitoring of the fissile mass flow of the uranium hexafluoride (UF{sub 6}) gas in the process lines of HEU, the low enriched uranium (LEU) blend stock, and the product LEU (P-LEU) of the blending tee non-intrusively. To do this, uranium-235 (U-235) fissions are induced in the UF{sub 6} by a thermalized and modulated californium-252 (Cf-252) neutron source placed on each process line. A set of detectors, located downstream of source, measure delayed gamma rays emitted by the resulting fission fragments. The observed delay in the time correlated measurement between the source and the detector signal provides the velocity of UF{sub 6} and its amplitude is related to the U- 235 content in UF{sub 6}. An on-line computer controls the source modulator, processes the collected detector data, and displays the results. The UEIP Main and the Reserved process lines were implemented with minor modifications. The FMFM monitors the HEU blending operation by measuring UF{sub 6} flows in the process blending lines, and the traceability of the HEU flow from the blend point to the P-LEU. The detail operational characteristics of the FMFM software (FM2) and the measurement methodology used are presented.

March-Leuba, J.; Mastal, E.; Powell, D.; Sumner, J.; Uckan, T.; Vines, B.

1999-07-25T23:59:59.000Z

129

Materials of Criticality Safety Concern in Waste Packages  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

10 CFR 71.55 requires in part that the fissile material package remain subcritical when considering 'the most reactive credible configuration consistent with the chemical and physical form of the material'. As waste drums and packages may contain unlimited types of materials, determination of the appropriately bounding moderator and reflector materials to ensure compliance with 71.55 requires a comprehensive analysis. Such an analysis was performed to determine the materials or elements that produce the most reactive configuration with regards to both moderation and reflection of a Pu-239 system. The study was originally performed for the TRUPACT-II shipping package and thus the historical fissile mass limit for the package, 325 g Pu-239, was used [1]. Reactivity calculations were performed with the SCALE package to numerically assess the moderation or reflection merits of the materials [2]. Additional details and results are given in SAIC-1322-001 [3]. The development of payload controls utilizing process knowledge to determine the classification of special moderator and/or reflector materials and the associated fissile mass limit is also addressed. (authors)

Larson, S.L. [Science Applications International Corporation, 301 Laboratory Road, Oak Ridge, TN 37830 (United States); Day, B.A. [Washington TRU Solutions LLC, 4021 National Parks Highway, Carlsbad, NM 88220 (United States)

2006-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

130

Blend Down Monitoring System Fissile Mass Flow Monitor and its Implementation at the Siberian Chemical Enterprise, Seversk, Russia  

SciTech Connect

In this paper the implementation plans and preparations for installation of the Fissile Mass Flow Monitor (FMFM) equipment at the Siberian Chemical Enterprise (SChE), Seversk, Russia, are presented. The FMFM, developed by Oak Ridge National Laboratory, is part of the Blend Down Monitoring System (BDMS) for the U.S. Department of Energy Highly Enriched Uranium (HEU) Transparency Implementation Program. The BDMS provides confidence to the United States that the Russian nuclear facilities supplying the lower assay ({approx}4%) product low enriched uranium (PLEU) to the United States from down-blended weapon-grade HEU are meeting the nonproliferation goals of the government-to-government HEU purchase agreement signed between the Russian Federation and the United States in 1993. The first BDMS has been operational at Ural Electrochemical Integrated Plant, Novouralsk, since February 1999. The second BDMS has been operational at Electro Chemical Plant, Zelenogorsk, since March 2003. These systems are successfully providing HEU transparency data to the United States. The third BDMS was successfully installed on the HEU down-blending tee in the SChE Enrichment Plant in October 2004. The FMFM makes use of a set of thermalized {sup 252}Cf spontaneous neutron sources for modulated fission activation of the UF{sub 6} gas stream for measuring the {sup 235}U fissile mass flow rate. To do this, the FMFM measures the transport time of the fission fragments created from the fission activation process under the modulated source to the downstream detectors by detecting the delayed gamma rays from the fission fragments retained in the flow. The FMFM provides unattended nonintrusive measurements of the {sup 235}U mass flow of the UF{sub 6} gas in the blending tee legs of HEU, the LEU blend stock, and the resulting P-LEU. The FMFM also confirms that highly enriched UF{sub 6} gas identified in the HEU leg flows through the blending tee into the P-LEU leg. This report contains details of the SChE FMFM equipment characteristics as well as the technical installation requirements and the latest measurement results.

Uckan, T

2005-07-28T23:59:59.000Z

131

Critical masses of highly enriched uranium diluted with matrix material.  

SciTech Connect

Radioactive waste containing fissile material is frequently encountered in decontamination and decommissioning activities. For the most part, this waste is placed in containers or drums and stored in storage facilities. The amount of fissile material in each drum is generally small because of criticality safety limits that have been calculated with computer transport codes such as MCNP,1 KENO,2 or ONEDANT.3 To the best of our knowledge, no experimental critical mass data are available to verify the accuracy of these calculations or any calculations for systems containing fissile material (U-235, Pu-239, U-233) in contact with matrix material such as Al2O3, CaO, SiO2, Al, MgO, etc. The experiments presented in this paper establish the critical masses of highly enriched uranium foils diluted to various X/235U ratios with polyethylene and SiO2, polyethylene and aluminum, polyethylene and MgO, polyethylene and Gd, polyethylene and Fe, and moderated and reflected with polyethylene. In addition, these critical mass experimental data will be used to validate cross section data.

Sanchez, R. G. (Rene G.); Loaiza, D. J. (David J.); Kimpland, R. H. (Robert H.)

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

132

Angular Distributions of Fragments Originating from the Spontaneous Fission of Oriented Nuclei and Problem of the Conservation of the Spin Projection onto the Symmetry Axis of a Fissile Nucleus  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The concept of transition fission states, which was successfully used to describe the angular distributions of fragments for the spontaneous and low-energy induced fission of axisymmetric nuclei, proves to be correct if the spin projection onto the symmetry axis of a fissile nucleus is an integral of the motion for the external region from the descent of the fissile nucleus from the external fission barrier to the scission point. Upon heating a fissile nucleus in this region to temperatures of T {approx_equal} 1 MeV (this is predicted by many theoretical models of the fission process), the Coriolis interaction uniformly mixes the possible projections of the fissile-nucleus spin for the case of low spin values, this leading to the loss of memory about transition fission states in the asymptotic region where the angular distributions of fragments are formed. Within quantum-mechanical fission theory, which takes into account deviations from A. Bohr's formula, the angular distributions of fragments are calculated for spontaneously fissile nuclei aligned by an external magnetic field at ultralow temperatures, and it is shown that an analysis of experimental angular distributions of fragments would make it possible to solve the problem of spin-projection conservation for fissile nuclei in the external region.

Kadmensky, S.G.; Rodionova, L.V. [Voronezh State University, Universitetskaya pl. 1, Voronezh, 394693 (Russian Federation)

2005-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

133

DOE - Safety of Radioactive Material Transportation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Specific Activity Specific Activity Low Specific Activity (LSA) material means Class 7 (radioactive) material with limited specific activity which satisfies the descriptions and limits set forth below. Shielding materials surrounding the LSA material may not be considered in determining the estimated average specific activity of the package contents. LSA material must be in one of three groups: LSA-I (i) Ores containing only naturally occurring radionuclides (e.g., uranium, thorium) and uranium or thorium concentrates of such ores; or (ii) Solid unirradiated natural uranium or depleted uranium or natural thorium or their solid or liquid compounds or mixtures; or (iii) Class 7 (radioactive) material, other than fissile material, for which the A2 value is unlimited; or

134

Advanced research workshop: nuclear materials safety  

SciTech Connect

The Advanced Research Workshop (ARW) on Nuclear Materials Safety held June 8-10, 1998, in St. Petersburg, Russia, was attended by 27 Russian experts from 14 different Russian organizations, seven European experts from six different organizations, and 14 U.S. experts from seven different organizations. The ARW was conducted at the State Education Center (SEC), a former Minatom nuclear training center in St. Petersburg. Thirty-three technical presentations were made using simultaneous translations. These presentations are reprinted in this volume as a formal ARW Proceedings in the NATO Science Series. The representative technical papers contained here cover nuclear material safety topics on the storage and disposition of excess plutonium and high enriched uranium (HEU) fissile materials, including vitrification, mixed oxide (MOX) fuel fabrication, plutonium ceramics, reprocessing, geologic disposal, transportation, and Russian regulatory processes. This ARW completed discussions by experts of the nuclear materials safety topics that were not covered in the previous, companion ARW on Nuclear Materials Safety held in Amarillo, Texas, in March 1997. These two workshops, when viewed together as a set, have addressed most nuclear material aspects of the storage and disposition operations required for excess HEU and plutonium. As a result, specific experts in nuclear materials safety have been identified, know each other from their participation in t he two ARW interactions, and have developed a partial consensus and dialogue on the most urgent nuclear materials safety topics to be addressed in a formal bilateral program on t he subject. A strong basis now exists for maintaining and developing a continuing dialogue between Russian, European, and U.S. experts in nuclear materials safety that will improve the safety of future nuclear materials operations in all the countries involved because of t he positive synergistic effects of focusing these diverse backgrounds of nuclear experience on a common objectiveÑthe safe and secure storage and disposition of excess fissile nuclear materials.

Jardine, L J; Moshkov, M M

1999-01-28T23:59:59.000Z

135

Advanced Recovery and Integrated Extraction System (ARIES) Fiscal Year 1996 Annual Report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

President Clinton issued Nonprolferation and Export Control Policy in September 1993 in response to the growing threat of nuclear proliferation. Four months later, in January 1994, President Clinton and Russia's President Yeltsin issued a Joint Statement Between the United States and Russia on Nonprollfieration of Weapons of Mass Destruction and the Means of Their Delivery. President Clinton announced on 1 March 1995, that approximately 200 metric tons of US- origin weapons-usable fissile materials had been declared surplus to US defense needs. The Advanced Recovery and Integrated Extraction System (ARIES) Demonstration Project is one part of the scientific response to President Clinton's promise to reduce the nuclear weapons stockpile. The work accomplished on the ARIES Demonstration Project during fiscal year 1996, 10ctober 1995 through 30 September 1996, is described in this report. The Department of Energy (DOE), by forming the Office of Fissile Materials Disposition (OFMD), has initiated a Fissile Materials Disposition Program. The first step is the disassembly and conversion of weapons pits. Of the 200 metric tons of US surplus fissile material, approximately 50 tons are weapons plutonium, and of these 50 tons, 2/3 is contained in pits. Weapons plutonium wili be extracted from pits, rendered to an unclassified form, and converted to oxide. The plutonium oxide will then be dispositioned either by immobilization in a ceramic matrix or blended with uranium oxide, fabricated into ceramic pellets of mixed oxide (MOX) fuel, and "burned" in a commercial light water reactor. The purpose of ARIES is to demonstrate two major activities: (1) dismantlement of nuclear weapons, and (2) conversion of weapons-grade plutonium into a form required for long-term storage or in preparation for the disposition (immobilization m MOX fuel) that allows for international inspection and verification, and in accordance with safeguards regimes. Plutonium does not have to be declassified before storage; however, declassification allows plutonium to be placed under international safeguards and provides political irreversibility of the material. The OFMD sponsors the ARIES Program. The Los Alamos National Laboratory is the lead laboratory for the ARIES Demonstration Project with support from Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory and Sandia National Laboratories, New Mexico. Also, ARIES is the lead technical activity for nationaI plutonium disposition, as well as a major effort of the Los Alamos Nuclear Materials Disposition Project. The ARIES Project Leader, Timothy O. Nelson, is a technical staff member in the Advanced Technology Group (NMT-6) who is responsible for overall project management and system implementation.

David Dennison; Pamela W. Massey; Timothy O. Nelson

1998-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

136

Nonuniform character of the population of spin projections K for a fissile nucleus at the scission point and anisotropies in the angular distributions of fragments originating from the induced fission of nuclei  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

It is shown that the emergence of anisotropies in the angular distributions of fragments originating from the spontaneous and induced fission of oriented actinide nuclei is possible only if nonuniformities in the population of the projectionsM (K) of the fissile-nucleus spin onto the z axis of the laboratory frame (fissile-nucleus symmetry axis) appear simultaneously in the vicinity of the scission point but not in the vicinity of the outer saddle point of the deformation potential. The possibilities for creating the orientation of fissile nuclei for spontaneous and induced fission and the effect of these orientations on the anisotropies under analysis are considered. The role of Coriolis interaction as a unique source of the mixing of different-K fissile-nucleus states at all stages of the fission process is studied with allowance for the dynamical enhancement of this interaction for excited thermalized states of the nucleus involved that is characterized by a high energy density. It is shown that the absence of thermalization of excited states of the fissile nucleus that appear because of the effect of nonadiabaticity of its collective deformation motion in the vicinity of the scission point is a condition of conservation of the influence that transition fission states formed at the inner and outer fission barriers exerts on the distribution of the spin projections K for lowenergy spontaneous nuclear fission. It is confirmed that anisotropies observed in the angular distributions of fragments originating from the fission of nuclei that is induced by fast light particles (multiply charged ions) are due to the appearance of strongly excited equilibrium(nonequilibrium) states of the fissile nucleus in the vicinity of its scission point that have a Gibbs (non-Gibbs) distribution of projections K.

Kadmensky, S. G., E-mail: kadmensky@phys.vsu.ru [Voronezh State University (Russian Federation); Bunakov, V. E. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Petersburg Nuclear Physics Institute (Russian Federation); Kadmensky, S. S. [Voronezh State University (Russian Federation)

2012-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

137

Potential for and consequences of criticality resulting from hydrogeochemically concentrated fissile uranium blended with soil in low-level waste disposal facilities  

SciTech Connect

Evaluations were done to determine conditions that could permit nuclear criticality with fissile uranium in low-level-waste (LLW) facilities and to estimate potential radiation exposures to personnel if there were such an accident. Simultaneous hydrogeochemical and nuclear criticality studies were done (1) to identify some realistic scenarios for uranium migration and concentration increase at LLW disposal facilities, (2) to model groundwater transport and subsequent concentration via sorption or precipitation of uranium, (3) to evaluate the potential for nuclear criticality resulting from potential increases in uranium concentration over disposal limits, and (4) to estimate potential radiation exposures to personnel resulting from criticality consequences. The scope of the referenced work was restricted to uranium at an assumed 100 wt% {sup 235}U enrichment. Three outcomes of uranium concentration are possible: uranium concentration is increased to levels that do pose a criticality safety concern; uranium concentration is increased, but levels do not pose a criticality safety concern; or uranium concentration does not increase.

Hopper, C.M.; Parks, C.V.

1997-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

138

Dry Blending to Achieve Isotopic Dilution of Highly Enriched Uranium Oxide Materials  

SciTech Connect

The end of the cold war produced large amounts of excess fissile materials in the United States and Russia. The Department of Energy has initiated numerous activities to focus on identifying material management strategies for disposition of these excess materials. To date, many of these planning strategies have included isotopic dilution of highly enriched uranium as a means of reducing the proliferation and safety risks. Isotopic dilution by dry blending highly enriched uranium with natural and/or depleted uranium has been identified as one non-aqueous method to achieve these risk (proliferation and criticality safety) reductions. This paper reviews the technology of dry blending as applied to free flowing oxide materials.

Henry, Roger Neil; Chipman, Nathan Alan; Rajamani, R. K.

2001-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

139

Responsible stewardship of nuclear materials  

SciTech Connect

The ability to tap the massive energy potential of nuclear fission was first developed as a weapon to end a terrible world war. Nuclear fission is also a virtually inexhaustible energy resource, and is the only energy supply in certain areas in Russia, Kazakhstan and elsewhere. The potential link between civilian and military applications has been and continues to be a source of concern. With the end of the Cold War, this issue has taken a dramatic turn. The U.S. and Russia have agreed to reduce their nuclear weapons stockpiles by as much as two-thirds. This will make some 100 tonnes of separated plutonium and 500 tonnes of highly enriched uranium available, in a form that is obviously directly usable for weapons. The total world inventory of plutonium is now around 1000 tonnes and is increasing at 60-70 tonnes per year. There is even more highly enriched uranium. Fortunately the correct answer to what to do with excess weapons material is also the most attractive. It should be used and reused as fuel for fast reactors. Material in use (particularly nuclear material) is very easy to monitor and control, and is quite unattractive for diversion. Active management of fissile materials not only makes a major contribution to economic stability and well-being, but also simplifies accountability, inspection and other safeguards processes; provides a revenue stream to pay for the necessary safeguards; and, most importantly, limits the prospective world inventory of plutonium to only that which is used and useful.

Hannum, W.H.

1994-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

140

Neutron Correlations in Special Nuclear Materials, Experiments and Simulations  

SciTech Connect

Fissile materials emit neutrons with an unmistakable signature that can reveal characteristics of the material. We describe here measurements, simulations, and predicted signals expected and prospects for application of neutron correlation measurement methods to detection of special nuclear materials (SNM). The occurrence of fission chains in SNM can give rise to this distinctive, measurable time correlation signal. The neutron signals can be analyzed to detect the presence and to infer attributes of the SNM and surrounding materials. For instance, it is possible to infer attributes of an assembly containing a few kilograms of uranium, purely passively, using detectors of modest size in a reasonable time. Neutron signals of three radioactive sources are shown to illustrate the neutron correlation and analysis method. Measurements are compared with Monte Carlo calculations of the authenticated sources.

Verbeke, J; Dougan, A; Nakae, L; Sale, K; Snyderman, N

2007-06-05T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "weapons-usable fissile materials" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

NNSA Highly Enriched Uranium Removal Featured on The Rachel Maddow Show |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Highly Enriched Uranium Removal Featured on The Rachel Maddow Highly Enriched Uranium Removal Featured on The Rachel Maddow Show NNSA Highly Enriched Uranium Removal Featured on The Rachel Maddow Show March 22, 2012 - 11:37am Addthis NNSA Administrator Thomas D’Agostino appeared live last night to break the news with Rachel Maddow that all remaining weapons-usable material has been successfully removed from Mexico. | Photo courtesy of the NNSA. NNSA Administrator Thomas D'Agostino appeared live last night to break the news with Rachel Maddow that all remaining weapons-usable material has been successfully removed from Mexico. | Photo courtesy of the NNSA. Michael Hess Michael Hess Former Digital Communications Specialist, Office of Public Affairs What's the difference between HEU and LEU? Highly enriched uranium (HEU) has a greater than 20 percent

142

Current Comparison of Advanced Nuclear Fuel Cycles  

SciTech Connect

This paper compares potential nuclear fuel cycle strategies – once-through, recycling in thermal reactors, sustained recycle with a mix of thermal and fast reactors, and sustained recycle with fast reactors. Initiation of recycle starts the draw-down of weapons-usable material and starts accruing improvements for geologic repositories and energy sustainability. It reduces the motivation to search for potential second geologic repository sites. Recycle in thermal-spectru

Steven Piet; Trond Bjornard; Brent Dixon; Robert Hill; Gretchen Matthern; David Shropshire

2007-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

143

Plutonium Immobilization Project System Design Description for Can Loading System  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The purpose of this System Design Description (SDD) is to specify the system and component functions and requirements for the Can Loading System and provide a complete description of the system (design features, boundaries, and interfaces), principles of operation (including upsets and recovery), and the system maintenance approach. The Plutonium Immobilization Project (PIP) will immobilize up to 13 metric tons (MT) of U.S. surplus weapons usable plutonium materials.

Kriikku, E.

2001-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

144

Apparatus and method for quantitative assay of samples of transuranic waste contained in barrels in the presence of matrix material  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Apparatus and method for performing corrections for matrix material effects on the neutron measurements generated from analysis of transuranic waste drums using the differential-dieaway technique. By measuring the absorption index and the moderator index for a particular drum, correction factors can be determined for the effects of matrix materials on the ''observed'' quantity of fissile and fertile material present therein in order to determine the actual assays thereof. A barrel flux monitor is introduced into the measurement chamber to accomplish these measurements as a new contribution to the differential-dieaway technology. 9 figs.

Caldwell, J.T.; Herrera, G.C.; Hastings, R.D.; Shunk, E.R.; Kunz, W.E.

1987-08-28T23:59:59.000Z

145

Disposition options for {sup 233}U  

SciTech Connect

The United States is implementing a program to dispose of excess nuclear-weapons-usable materials--including {sup 233}U. A series of studies have identified multiple {sup 233}U disposition options, and these options are described herein. Most of the options involve adding depleted uranium containing {sup 238}U to the {sup 233}U. Converting the {sup 233}U into a mixture of <12 wt % {sup 233}U in {sup 238}U converts the weapons-usable {sup 233}U into nonweapons-usable {sup 233}U. For {sup 233}U that is considered waste, further isotopic dilution to <0.66 wt % {sup 233}U in {sup 238}U minimizes potential long-term repository criticality concerns and in many cases minimizes final waste volumes.

Forsberg, C.W.; Icenhour, A.S.; Krichinsky, A.M.

1998-04-27T23:59:59.000Z

146

MIXED-OXIDE FUEL USE IN COMMERCIAL LIGHT WATER REACTORS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In a Commission briefing on high-bumup fuel on March 25, 1997, the staff said that they would prepare a white paper on mixed-oxide (MOX) fuel in anticipation of a DOE program to bum excess weapons plutonium in commercial reactors. This memorandum and its attachment comprise that paper and are provided to inform the Commissioners of technical issues associated with such a program. More recently, on February 5, 1999, I was contacted by the Nuclear Control Institute regarding a paper they have written on this subject. They presented that paper to the staff in a public meeting on April 7, 1999. The Nuclear Control Institute's written paper had been provided to the staff earlier, and we have taken the paper into consideration in preparing this memorandum. Back-ground In January 1997, the U.S. Department of Energy released a record of decision for the storage and disposition of weapons-usable fissile materials. In this record, DOE recommended that excess weapons-grade plutonium be disposed of by two methods: (1) reconstituting the plutonium into mixed-oxide (MOX) fuel rods and burning it in current light water reactors, and (2) immobilizing the plutonium in glass logs with appropriate radioactive isotopes to deter theft prior to geologic disposal. Based on current information, it now appears that, if the MOX fuel method is utilized, fuel fabrication will take place at the Savannah River site in South Carolina with burning in nearby Westinghouse-type PWRs. Although DOE will probably not receive funding in FY 2000 for developing a license application, Congress has already given its approval for NRC licensing authority over a MOX fuel fabrication facility operated under

United States; William D. Travers

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

147

Characterization of candidate DOE sites for fabricating MOX fuel for lead assemblies  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Office of Fissile Materials Disposition (MD) of the Department of Energy (DOE) is directing the program to disposition US surplus weapons-usable plutonium. For the reactor option for disposition of this surplus plutonium, MD is seeking to contract with a consortium, which would include a mixed-oxide (MOX) fuel fabricator and a commercial US reactor operator, to fabricate and burn MOX fuel in existing commercial nuclear reactors. This option would entail establishing a MOX fuel fabrication facility under the direction of the consortium on an existing DOE site. Because of the lead time required to establish a MOX fuel fabrication facility and the need to qualify the MOX fuel for use in a commercial reactor, MD is considering the early fabrication of lead assemblies (LAs) in existing DOE facilities under the technical direction of the consortium. The LA facility would be expected to produce a minimum of 1 metric ton heavy metal per year and must be operational by June 2003. DOE operations offices were asked to identify candidate sites and facilities to be evaluated for suitability to fabricate MOX fuel LAs. Savannah River Site, Argonne National Laboratory-West, Hanford, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, and Los Alamos National Laboratory were identified as final candidates to host the LA project. A Site Evaluation Team (SET) worked with each site to develop viable plans for the LA project. SET then characterized the suitability of each of the five plans for fabricating MOX LAs using 28 attributes and documented the characterization to aid DOE and the consortium in selecting the site for the LA project. SET concluded that each option has relative advantages and disadvantages in comparison with other options; however, each could meet the requirements of the LA project as outlined by MD and SET.

Holdaway, R.F.; Miller, J.W.; Sease, J.D.; Moses, R.J.; O`Connor, D.G. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Carrell, R.D. [Technical Resources International, Inc., Richland, WA (United States); Jaeger, C.D. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Thompson, M.L.; Strasser, A.A. [Delta-21 Resources, Inc., Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

1998-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

148

Russian-U.S. joint program on the safe management of nuclear materials  

SciTech Connect

The Russian-US joint program on the safety of nuclear materials was initiated in response to the 1993 Tomsk-7 accident. The bases for this program are the common technical issues confronting the US and Russia in the safe management of excess weapons grade nuclear materials. The US and Russian weapons dismantlement process is producing hundreds of tons of excess Pu and HEU fissile materials. The US is on a two path approach for disposition of excess Pu: (1) use Pu in existing reactors and/or (2) immobilize Pu in glass or ceramics followed by geologic disposal. Russian plans are to fuel reactors with excess Pu. US and Russia are both converting and blending HEU into LEU for use in existing reactors. Fissile nuclear materials storage, handling, processing, and transportation will be occurring in both countries for tens of years. A table provides a history of the major events comprising the Russian-US joint program on the safety of nuclear materials. A paper delineating program efforts was delivered at the SPECTRUM '96 conference. This paper provides an update on program activities since then.

Witmer, F.E.; Krumpe, P.F. [Dept. of Energy, Washington, DC (US); Carlson, D.D. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (US)] [and others

1997-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

149

Development of a Weldable Neutron Absorbing Structural Material  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The National Spent Nuclear Fuel Program, located at the Idaho National Laboratory, coordinates and integrates national efforts in management and disposal of U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)-owned spent nuclear fuel. These management functions include development of standardized systems for packaging, storage, treatment, transport, and long-term disposal in the proposed Yucca Mountain Repository. Nuclear criticality control measures are needed in these systems to avoid restrictive fissile loading limits because of the enrichment and total quantity of fissile material in some types of the DOE spent nuclear fuel. This paper will outline the results to date of a metallurgical development program that is investigating the alloying of gadolinium into a nickel-chromium-molybdenum alloy matrix. Gadolinium has been chosen as the neutron absorption alloying element due to its high thermal neutron absorption cross section and low solubility in the expected repository environment. The nickel-chromium-molybdenum alloy family was chosen for its known corrosion performance, mechanical properties, and weldability. The workflow of this program includes chemical composition definition, primary melting and secondary refining studies, ingot conversion process evaluations, mechanical/physical properties and corrosion testing, welding studies, and national consensus codes, and standards work.

R. E. Mizia; W. L. Hurt; C. V. Robino; J. N. DuPont

2006-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

150

Nuclear Materials Identification System (NMIS) with Gamma Spectrometry for Attributes of Pu, HEU, and Detection of HE and Chemical Agents  

SciTech Connect

A combined Nuclear Materials Identification System (NMIS)-gamma ray spectrometry system can be used passively to obtain the following attributes of Pu: presence, fissile mass, 240/239 ratio, and metal vs. oxide. This system can also be used with a small, portable, DT neutron generator to measure the attributes of highly enriched uranium (HEU): presence, fissile mass, enrichment, metal vs. oxide; and detect the presence of high explosives (HE). For the passive system, time-dependent coincidence distributions can be used for the presence, fissile mass, metal vs. oxide for Pu, and gamma-ray spectrometry can be used for 239/240 ratio and presence. So presence can be confirmed by two methods. For the active system with a DT neutron generator, all four attributes for both Pu and HEU can be determined from various features of the time-dependent coincidence distribution measurements for both Pu and HEU. Active gamma ray spectrometry would also give presence and 240/239 ratio for Pu, enrichment for HEU, and metal vs. oxide for both. Active gamma ray spectrometry would determine the presence of HE. The various features of time-dependent coincidence distributions and gamma ray spectrometry that determine these attributes are discussed with some examples from previous determinations.

Mihalczo, J. T.; Mattingly, J. K.; Mullens, J. A.; Neal, J. S.

2002-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

151

Materials Science  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Materials Science. Summary: ... Description: Group focus in materials science (inkjet metrology, micro-macro, advanced characterizations). ...

2012-10-02T23:59:59.000Z

152

Atoms for peace and the nonproliferation treaty: unintended consequences  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In April 2009, President Obama revived nonproliferation and arms control efforts with a speech calling for the worldwide abolition of nuclear weapons. His speech correctly acknowledged the threat of nuclear terrorism and the vulnerabilities of the related unsecure nuclear materials. Unfortunately, the president did not mention and has not mentioned in any speech the threat posed by at-risk radiological materials. Nonproliferation efforts have a well documented history of focus on special nuclear materials (fissionable weapons usable materials or SNM), and other key materials (chemical and biological) and technologies for a Weapon of Mass Destruction (WMD). Such intense focus on WMD related materials/technologies is essential for international safety and security and merit continued attention and funding. However, the perception that radioactive sealed sources (sources) are of less concern than WMD is unfortunate. These perceptions are based solely on the potentially enormous and tragic consequences associated with their deliberate or accidental misuse and proliferation concerns. However, there is a documented history of overemphasis on the nuclear threat at the expense of ignoring the far more likely and also devastating chemical and biological threats. The radiological threat should not be minimized or excluded from policy discussions and decisions on these far ranging scopes of threat to the international community. Sources have a long history of use; and a wider distribution worldwide than fissile materials. Pair this with their broad ranges in isotopes/activities along with scant national and international attention and mechanisms for their safe and secure management and it is not difficult to envision a deadly threat. Arguments that minimize or divert attention away from sources may have the effect of distracting necessary policy attention on preventing/mitigating a radiological dispersal event. The terrorist attacks on 9/11 should be a clear reminder of the inherent danger of diminishing or dismissing lower-level threats in exchange for enhanced focus on high priority special nuclear materials with the basis for this emphasis being solely on the magnitude of the consequences of a single event. Mitigating all possible or likely terrorist attacks is impossible; however, weaponized sources, in the form of a radiological dispersal device, have been a declared target material of Al-Qaida. Eisenhower's Atoms for Peace initiative promoted the spread of the paradoxical beneficial yet destructive properties of the atom. Typically, the focus of nonproliferation efforts focuses on the fissile materials associated with Weapons of Mass Destruction, with less emphasis on radioactive materials that could be used for a Weapon of Mass Disruption. Most nonproliferation policy discussion involves securing or preventing the diversion of weapons grade fissile materials (uranium (U) with concentration of over 90% of the isotope {sup 235}U (HEU) and plutonium with more than 90% of the isotope {sup 239}Pu), with scant attention given to the threat posed by a prolific quantity of sources spread worldwide. Further acerbating the problem of inattention, it appears that the momentum of the continued evolution in the beneficial applications of sources will only increase in the near future. Several expert studies have demonstrated on the potentially devastating economic, psychological and public health impacts of terrorist use of a radiological dispersal or radiation emitting device (ROD/RED) in a metropolis. The development of such a weapon, from the acquisition of the radioactive material to the technical knowledge needed to fashion it into an ROD, is many orders of magnitude easier than diverting enough fissile material for and fabrication/acquisition of a nuclear weapon. Unlike nuclear weapons, worldwide, there are many well documented accounts of accidental and purposeful diversions of radioactive materials from regulatory control. As of the end of 2008, the International Atomic Energy Agency's (IAEA) Illicit Trafficking Database had logge

Streeper, Charles Blamires [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

153

Routine inspection effort required for verification of a nuclear material production cutoff convention  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

On 27 September 1993, President Clinton proposed {open_quotes}... a multilateral convention prohibiting the production of highly enriched uranium or plutonium for nuclear explosives purposes or outside of international safeguards.{close_quotes} The UN General Assembly subsequently adopted a resolution recommending negotiation of a non-discriminatory, multilateral, and internationally and effectively verifiable treaty (hereinafter referred to as {open_quotes}the Cutoff Convention{close_quotes}) banning the production of fissile material for nuclear weapons. The matter is now on the agenda of the Conference on Disarmament, although not yet under negotiation. This accord would, in effect, place all fissile material (defined as highly enriched uranium and plutonium) produced after entry into force (EIF) of the accord under international safeguards. {open_quotes}Production{close_quotes} would mean separation of the material in question from radioactive fission products, as in spent fuel reprocessing, or enrichment of uranium above the 20% level, which defines highly enriched uranium (HEU). Facilities where such production could occur would be safeguarded to verify that either such production is not occurring or that all material produced at these facilities is maintained under safeguards.

Dougherty, D.; Fainberg, A.; Sanborn, J.; Allentuck, J.; Sun, C.

1996-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

154

Non-electrical uses of thermal energy generated in the production of fissile fuel in fusion--fission reactors: a comparative economic parametric analysis for a hybrid with or without synthetic fuel production  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A parametric analysis has been carried out for testing the sensitivity of the synfuel production cost in relation to crucial economic and technologic quantities (investment costs of hybrid and synfuel plant, energy multiplication of the fission blanket, recirculating power fraction of the fusion driver, etc.). In addition, a minimum synfuel selling price has been evaluated, from which the fission--fusion--synfuel complex brings about a higher economic benefit than does the fusion--fission hybrid entirely devoted to fissile-fuel and electricity generation. Assuming an electricity cost of 2.7 cents/kWh, an annual investment cost per power unit of 4.2 to 6 $/GJ (132 to 189 k$/MWty) for the fission--fusion complex and 1.5 to 3 $/GJ (47 to 95 k$/MWty) for the synfuel plant, the synfuel production net cost (i.e., revenue = cost) varies between 6.5 and 8.6 $/GJ. These costs can compete with those obtained by other processes (natural gas reforming, resid partial oxidation, coal gasification, nuclear fission, solar electrolysis, etc.). This study points out a potential use of the fusion--fission hybrid other than fissile-fuel and electricity generation.

Tai, A.S.; Krakowski, R.A.

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

155

Advanced Materials  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Advanced Materials Advanced Materials Availability Technology Express Licensing Active Terahertz Metamaterial Devices Express Licensing Anion-Conducting Polymer, Composition, And...

156

Materials Characterization | Advanced Materials | ORNL  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Characterization Nuclear Forensics Scanning Probes Related Research Materials Theory and Simulation Energy Frontier Research Centers Advanced Materials Home | Science &...

157

Shipment of Small Quantities of Unspecified Radioactive Material in Chalfant Packagings  

SciTech Connect

In the post 6M era, radioactive materials package users are faced with the disciplined operations associated with use of Certified Type B packagings. Many DOE, commercial and academic programs have a requirement to ship and/or store small masses of poorly characterized or unspecified radioactive material. For quantities which are small enough to be fissile exempt and have low radiation levels, the materials could be transported in a package which provides the required containment level. Because their Chalfant type containment vessels meet the highest standard of containment (helium leak-tight), the 9975, 9977, and 9978 are capable of transporting any of these contents. The issues associated with certification of a high-integrity, general purpose package for shipping small quantities of unspecified radioactive material are discussed and certification of the packages for this mission is recommended.

Smith, Allen; Abramczyk, Glenn; Nathan, Steven; Bellamy, Steve

2009-06-12T23:59:59.000Z

158

Materials Science  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Materials Science Materials Science Materials Science1354608000000Materials ScienceSome of these resources are LANL-only and will require Remote Access./No/Questions? 667-5809library@lanl.gov Materials Science Some of these resources are LANL-only and will require Remote Access. Key Resources Data Sources Reference Organizations Journals Key Resources CINDAS Materials Property Databases video icon Thermophysical Properties of Matter Database (TPMD) Aerospace Structural Metals Database (ASMD) Damage Tolerant Design Handbook (DTDH) Microelectronics Packaging Materials Database (MPMD) Structural Alloys Handbook (SAH) Proquest Technology Collection Includes the Materials Science collection MRS Online Proceedings Library Papers presented at meetings of the Materials Research Society Data Sources

159

Reactor Materials  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The reactor materials crosscut effort will enable the development of innovative and revolutionary materials and provide broad-based, modern materials science that will benefit all four DOE-NE...

160

Materials - Assessment  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Materials Assessment The staff of the Energy Systems Division has a long history of technical and economic analysis of the production and recycling of materials for transportation...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "weapons-usable fissile materials" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Materials Science  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Materials Science science-innovationassetsimagesicon-science.jpg Materials Science National security depends on science and technology. The United States relies on Los Alamos...

162

Thermoelectric Materials  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Thermoelectric materials can generate electricity or provide cooling by converting thermal gradients to electricity or electricity to thermal gradients. More efficient thermoelectric materials would make feasible the widespread use of thermoelectric converters in mundane applications. This report summarizes the state-of-the-art of thermoelectric materials including currently available materials and applications, new developments, and future prospects.

2000-01-14T23:59:59.000Z

163

Magnetocaloric Materials  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Magnetic Materials for Energy Applications IV: Magnetocaloric Materials ... due to cost-effectiveness as well as superior magneto-thermal characteristics. ... metals and p-block elements can be explored in a time- and energy-saving manner.

164

Materials Science  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Materials Science. Summary: Key metrologies/systems: In situ spectroscopic ellipsometry, linear and non-linear spectroscopies ...

2012-10-02T23:59:59.000Z

165

Training Materials  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Training Materials. NIST Handbook 44 Self-Study Course. ... Chapter 3 – Organization and Format of NIST Handbook 44 DOC. ...

2011-08-10T23:59:59.000Z

166

Material matting  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Despite the widespread use of measured real-world materials, intuitive tools for editing measured reflectance datasets are still lacking. We present a solution inspired by natural image matting and texture synthesis to the material matting problem, ... Keywords: appearance models, material separation, matting, spatially-varying BRDFs, texture synthesis

Daniel Lepage; Jason Lawrence

2011-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

167

Materializing energy  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Motivated and informed by perspectives on sustainability and design, this paper draws on a diverse body of scholarly works related to energy and materiality to articulate a perspective on energy-as-materiality and propose a design approach of ... Keywords: design, design theory, energy, materiality, sustainability

James Pierce; Eric Paulos

2010-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

168

CF NEUTRON TIME OF FLIGHT TRANSMISSION FOR MATERIAL IDENTIFICATION FOR WEAPONS TRAINERS  

SciTech Connect

The neutron transmission, elastic scattering, and non elastic reactions can be used to distinguish various isotopes. Neutron transmission as a function of energy can be used in some cases to identify materials in unknown objects. A time tagged californium source that provides a fission spectrum of neutrons is a useful source for neutron time-of-flight (TOF) transmission measurements. Many nuclear weapons trainer units for a particular weapons system (no fissile, but of same weight and center of gravity) in shipping containers were returned to the National Nuclear Security Administration Y-12 National Security Complex in the mid 1990s. Nuclear Materials Identification System (NMIS) measurements with a time tagged californium neutron source were used to verify that these trainers did not contain fissile material. In these blind tests, the time distributions of neutrons through the containers were measured as a function of position to locate the approximate center of the trainer in the container. Measurements were also performed with an empty container. TOF template matching measurements were then performed at this location for a large number of units. In these measurements, the californium source was located on one end of the container and a proton recoil scintillator was located on the other end. The variations in the TOF transmission for times corresponding to 1 to 5 MeV were significantly larger than statistical. Further examination of the time distribution or the energy dependence revealed that these variations corresponded to the variations in the neutron cross section of aluminum averaged over the energy resolution of the californium TOF measurement with a flight path of about 90 cm. Measurements using different thicknesses of aluminum were also performed with the source and detector separated the same distance as for the trainer measurements. These comparison measurements confirmed that the material in the trainers was aluminum, and the total thickness of aluminum through the trainers was determined. This is an example of how californium transmission TOF measurements can be used to identify materials.

Mihalczo, John T [ORNL; Valentine, Timothy E [ORNL; Blakeman, Edward D [ORNL; Pare, Victor [ORNL

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

169

Materials Education Community  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Digital Resource Center Home. Materials Education. Materials Education. Established Materials Technologies. Magnesium · Superalloys. Emerging Materials ...

170

Emerging Materials Technologies  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Digital Resource Center Home. Materials Education. Materials Education. Established Materials Technologies. Magnesium · Superalloys. Emerging Materials ...

171

Established Materials Technologies  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Digital Resource Center Home. Materials Education. Materials Education. Established Materials Technologies. Magnesium · Superalloys. Emerging Materials ...

172

REQUIREMENTS FOR RAW MATERIALS IN AN EXPANDING NUCLEAR POWER ECONOMY  

SciTech Connect

The need for breeding does not appear to be highly cost for a moderately optimistic expanding nuclear power economy between 1960 and 2000. Since the expansion rate of the US nuclear economy is assumed to be high at least 2/3 of the U-235 recovered from natural uranium is used to supply reactor inventory. It is the remaining 1/3 of the available U-235 that can be saved by breeder breeders or a breeder and converter are the doubling time and a parameter expressing the total fissile inventory per magawatt of electricity. In fact, the need for new raw material in any given year is reduced more by specific power than by changing from a converter to a value of total inventory per magawatt of electricity and the content and value of plutonium or U-233 than on raw material cost. The use of 12% vs. 4% annual lease charge can change the inventory costs more significantly than either the Pu (or U-233)/U-235 value ratio or raw material cost. Net fuel burn costs vary more with the product of net conversion ratio and Pu (or U-233)/U-235 value ratio than with the cost of raw material. (auth)

Arnold, E.D.; Ullmann, J.W.

1959-01-20T23:59:59.000Z

173

THERMAL EVALUATION OF DRUM TYPE RADIOACTIVE MATERIAL PACKAGING ARRAYS IN STORAGE  

SciTech Connect

Drum type packages are routinely used to transport radioactive material (RAM) in the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) complex. These packages are designed to meet the federal regulations described in 10 CFR 71.[1] In recent years, there has been a greater need to use these packagings to store the excess fissile material, especially plutonium for long term storage. While the design requirements for safe transportation of these packagings are well defined, the requirements for safe long term storage are not well established. Since the RAM contents in the packagings produce decay heat, it is important that they are stored carefully to prevent overheating of the containment vessel (CV) seals to prevent any leakage and the impact limiter to maintain the package structural integrity. This paper analyzes different storage arrays for a typical 9977 packaging for thermal considerations and makes recommendations for their safe storage under normal operating conditions.

Gupta, N

2009-04-27T23:59:59.000Z

174

Minor Materials  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Table 1   Materials used in glass manufacture...Table 1 Materials used in glass manufacture Material Purpose Antimony oxide (Sb 2 O 3 ) Decolorizing and fining agent Aplite (K, Na, Ca, Mg, alumina silicate) Source of alumina Aragonite (CaCO 3 ) Source of calcium oxide Arsenic oxide (As 2 O 3 ) Fining and decolorizing agent Barite/barytes (BaSO 4 )...

175

Scintillator material  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An improved scintillator material comprising cerium fluoride is disclosed. Cerium fluoride has been found to provide a balance of good stopping power, high light yield and short decay constant that is superior to known scintillator materials such as thallium-doped sodium iodide, barium fluoride and bismuth germanate. As a result, cerium fluoride is favorably suited for use as a scintillator material in positron emission tomography.

Anderson, David F. (Batavia, IL); Kross, Brian J. (Aurora, IL)

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

176

Scintillator material  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An improved scintillator material comprising cerium fluoride is disclosed. Cerium fluoride has been found to provide a balance of good stopping power, high light yield and short decay constant that is superior to known scintillator materials such as thallium-doped sodium iodide, barium fluoride and bismuth germanate. As a result, cerium fluoride is favorably suited for use as a scintillator material in positron emission tomography. 4 figs.

Anderson, D.F.; Kross, B.J.

1994-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

177

Scintillator material  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An improved scintillator material comprising cerium fluoride is disclosed. Cerium fluoride has been found to provide a balance of good stopping power, high light yield and short decay constant that is superior to known scintillator materials such as thallium-doped sodium iodide, barium fluoride and bismuth germanate. As a result, cerium fluoride is favorably suited for use as a scintillator material in positron emission tomography. 4 figs.

Anderson, D.F.; Kross, B.J.

1992-07-28T23:59:59.000Z

178

Scintillator material  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An improved scintillator material comprising cerium fluoride is disclosed. Cerium fluoride has been found to provide a balance of good stopping power, high light yield and short decay constant that is superior to known scintillator materials such as thallium-doped sodium iodide, barium fluoride and bismuth germanate. As a result, cerium fluoride is favorably suited for use as a scintillator material in positron emission tomography.

Anderson, David F. (Batavia, IL); Kross, Brian J. (Aurora, IL)

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

179

Advanced Materials  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Advanced Materials Advanced Materials Advanced Materials Express Licensing Active Terahertz Metamaterial Devices Express Licensing Anion-Conducting Polymer, Composition, And Membrane Express Licensing Analysis Of Macromolecule, Liggands And Macromolecule-Lingand Complexes Express Licensing Carbon Microtubes Express Licensing Chemical Synthesis Of Chiral Conducting Polymers Express Licensing Forming Adherent Coatings Using Plasma Processing Express Licensing Hydrogen Scavengers Express Licensing Laser Welding Of Fused Quartz Express Licensing Multiple Feed Powder Splitter Negotiable Licensing Boron-10 Neutron Detectors for Helium-3 Replacement Negotiable Licensing Insensitive Extrudable Explosive Negotiable Licensing Durable Fuel Cell Membrane Electrode Assembly (MEA) Express Licensing Method of Synthesis of Proton Conducting Materials

180

Advanced Materials  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Conducting Materials Negotiable Licensing Microseismic Tracer Particles for Hydraulic Fracturing Negotiable Licensing A Photo-Stimulated Low Electron Temperature High Current...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "weapons-usable fissile materials" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Magnetic Materials  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Oct 27, 2009 ... Extreme magnetic fields (>2 tesla), especially when combined with temperature, are being shown to revolutionize materials processing and ...

182

materials processing  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... of the Stainless Steel Elaborated by the Duplex Procedure (Electric Furnace- VOD Installation) [pp. ... Materials Processing on a Solar Furnace Satellite [pp.

183

Materials Studio  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Jan 14, 2008 ... G. Fitzgerald; G. Goldbeck-Wood; P. Kung; M. Petersen; L. Subramanian; J. Wescott, " Materials Modeling from Quantum Mechanics to The ...

184

Nuclear Materials  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Materials and Fuels for the Current and Advanced Nuclear Reactors III ... response of oxide ceramics for nuclear applications through experiment, theory, and ...

185

Apparatus and method for identification of matrix materials in which transuranic elements are embedded using thermal neutron capture gamma-ray emission  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An invention is described that enables the quantitative simultaneous identification of the matrix materials in which fertile and fissile nuclides are embedded to be made along with the quantitative assay of the fertile and fissile materials. The invention also enables corrections for any absorption of neutrons by the matrix materials and by the measurement apparatus by the measurement of the prompt and delayed neutron flux emerging from a sample after the sample is interrogated by simultaneously applied neutrons and gamma radiation. High energy electrons are directed at a first target to produce gamma radiation. A second target receives the resulting pulsed gamma radiation and produces neutrons from the interaction with the gamma radiation. These neutrons are slowed by a moderator surrounding the sample and bathe the sample uniformly, generating second gamma radiation in the interaction. The gamma radiation is then resolved and quantitatively detected, providing a spectroscopic signature of the constituent elements contained in the matrix and in the materials within the vicinity of the sample. (LEW)

Close, D.A.; Franks, L.A.; Kocimski, S.M.

1984-08-16T23:59:59.000Z

186

Proliferation Resistant Nuclear Reactor Fuel  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Global appetite for fission power is projected to grow dramatically this century, and for good reason. Despite considerable research to identify new sources of energy, fission remains the most plentiful and practical alternative to fossil fuels. The environmental challenges of fossil fuel have made the fission power option increasingly attractive, particularly as we are forced to rely on reserves in ecologically fragile or politically unstable corners of the globe. Caught between a globally eroding fossil fuel reserve as well as the uncertainty and considerable costs in the development of fusion power, most of the world will most likely come to rely on fission power for at least the remainder of the 21st century. Despite inevitable growth, fission power faces enduring challenges in sustainability and security. One of fission power's greatest hurdles to universal acceptance is the risk of potential misuse for nefarious purposes of fissionable byproducts in spent fuel, such as plutonium. With this issue in mind, we have discussed intrinsic concepts in this report that are motivated by the premise that the utility, desirability, and applicability of nuclear materials can be reduced. In a general sense, the intrinsic solutions aim to reduce or eliminate the quantity of existing weapons usable material; avoid production of new weapons-usable material through enrichment, breeding, extraction; or employ engineering solutions to make the fuel cycle less useful or more difficult for producing weapons-usable material. By their nature, these schemes require modifications to existing fuel cycles. As such, the concomitants of these modifications require engagement from the nuclear reactor and fuel-design community to fully assess their effects. Unfortunately, active pursuit of any scheme that could further complicate the spread of domestic nuclear power will probably be understandably unpopular. Nevertheless, the nonproliferation and counterterrorism issues are paramount, and we posit that the exploration, development, and implementation of intrinsic mechanisms such as discussed here are part of a balanced approach aimed at preventing the misuse of nuclear material for nuclear-energy applications.

Gray, L W; Moody, K J; Bradley, K S; Lorenzana, H E

2011-02-18T23:59:59.000Z

187

Materials Science Advanced Materials News  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Contributes to Discovery of Novel Quantum Spin-Liquid Release Date ... Novel Filter Material Could Cut Natural Gas Refining Costs Release Date: 03 ...

2010-12-16T23:59:59.000Z

188

Materials Science Advanced Materials Portal  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... to Discovery of Novel Quantum Spin-Liquid. illustration of metal organic framework Novel Filter Material Could Cut Natural Gas Refining Costs. ...

2013-06-27T23:59:59.000Z

189

EIS-0240: Disposition of Surplus Highly Enriched Uranium  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The Department proposes to eliminate the proliferation threat of surplus highly enriched uranium (HEU) by blending it down to low enriched uranium (LEU), which is not weapons-usable. The EIS assesses the disposition of a nominal 200 metric tons of surplus HEU. The Preferred Alternative is, where practical, to blend the material for use as LEU and use overtime, in commercial nuclear reactor field to recover its economic value. Material that cannot be economically recovered would be blended to LEU for disposal as low-level radioactive waste.

190

Materials - Home  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

* Coatings & Lubricants * Coatings & Lubricants * Nanofluids * Deformation Joining * Recycling * Catalysts * Assessment * Illinois Center for Advanced Tribology Modeling, Simulation & Software Plug-In Hybrid Electric Vehicles PSAT Smart Grid Student Competitions Technology Analysis Transportation Research and Analysis Computing Center Working With Argonne Contact TTRDC Materials ring on liner reciprocating tester Tribology Lab: Ring-on-liner reciprocating tester. Argonne National Laboratory plays an important role in the Department of Energy's (DOE's) efforts to develop advanced materials for transportation. The materials are developed with DOE support from the EERE Office of Vehicle Technology and Office of Hydrogen, Fuel Cells, and Infrastructure Technologies in collaboration with worldwide industrial partners. Examples

191

A Program to Stabilize Nuclear Materials as Managed by the Plutonium Focus Area  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper describes the program to stabilize nuclear materials, consistent with the Department of Energy Office of Environmental Management (EM) plan, Accelerating Cleanup: Paths to Closure. The program is managed by the Plutonium Stabilization and Disposition Focus Area, which defines and manages technology development programs to stabilize nuclear materials and assure their subsequent safe storage and final disposition. The scope of the Plutonium Stabilization and Disposition Focus Area (PFA) activities includes non-weapons plutonium materials, special isotopes, and other fissile materials. The PFA provides solutions to site-specific and complex wide technology issues associated with plutonium remediation, stabilization, and preparation for disposition. Our paper describes an important programmatic function of the Department of Energy nuclear materials stabilization program, including the tie-in of policy to research needs and funding for the nuclear materials disposition area. The PFA uses a rigorous systems engineering determination of technology needs and gaps, under the guidance of a Technical Advisory Panel, consisting of complex-wide experts. The Research and Development planning provides an example for other waste areas and should be of interest to Research and Development managers. The materials disposition maps developed by the PFA and described in this paper provide an evaluation of research needs, data gaps and subsequent guidance for the development of technologies for nuclear materials disposition. This paper also addresses the PFA prioritization methodology and its ability to forecast actual time to implementation.

B. Kenley (Kenley Consulting); B. Scott; B. Seidel (ANL-W); D. Knecht (LMITCO); F. Southworth; K. Osborne (DOE-ID); N. Chipman; T. Creque

1999-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

192

Special nuclear materials cutoff exercise: Issues and lessons learned. Volume 1: Summary of exercise  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In a September 1993 address to the United Nations General Assembly, President Clinton announced a new nonproliferation and export control policy that established a framework for US efforts to prevent the proliferation of weapons of mass destruction. The new policy proposed that the US undertake a comprehensive approach to the growing accumulation of fissile material. One of the key elements was for the US to support a special nuclear materials (SNM) multilateral convention prohibiting the production of highly enriched uranium (HEU) or plutonium for nuclear explosives purposes or outside of international safeguards. This policy is often referred to as the President`s Cutoff Initiative or the Fissile Material Cutoff Treaty (FMCT). Because both the US Department of Energy (DOE) and foreign reprocessing facilities similar to PUREX will likely to be inspected under a FMCT, the DOE Office of Arms Control and Nonproliferation, Negotiations and Analysis Division (DOE/NN-41) tasked Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) to perform an information gathering exercise, the PUREX Exercise, using the Plutonium-Uranium Extraction (PUREX) Plant located on the Hanford Site in Washington State. PUREX is a former production reactor fuel reprocessing plant currently undergoing a transition to a ``decontamination and decommissioning (D&D) ready`` mode. The PUREX Exercise was conducted March 29--30, 1994, to examine aspects of the imposition of several possible cutoff regimes and to study verification of non-production of SNM for nuclear weapons purposes or outside of safeguards. A follow-up activity to further examine various additional verification regimes was held at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) on May 10, 1994.

Libby, R.A.; Davis, C. [Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States); Segal, J.E.; Stanbro, W.D. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States)

1995-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

193

thermoelectric materials  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

It has been proven that the maximum cooling temperature of a thermoelectric material can be increased by using either pulsed operation or graded Seebeck profiles. In this paper, we show that the maximum cooling temperature can be further increased by the pulsed operation of optimal inhomogeneous thermoelectric materials. A random sampling method is used to obtain the optimal electrical conductivity profile of inhomogeneous materials, which can achieve a much higher cooling temperature than the best uniform materials under the steady-state condition. Numerical simulations of pulsed operation are then carried out in the time domain. In the limit of low thermoelectric figure-of-merit ZT, the finite-difference time-domain simulations are verified by an analytical solution for homogeneous material. This numerical method is applied to high ZT BiTe materials and simulations show that the effective figure-of-merit can be improved by 153 % when both optimal graded electrical conductivity profiles and pulsed operation are used. 1.

Q Zhou; Z Bian; A Shakouri

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

194

Some thoughts on the nonproliferation of nuclear weapons  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper discusses factors controlling the dissemination of nuclear technologies and especially fissile materials.

Krikorian N.H.; Hawkins, H.T.

1996-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

195

Hardfacing material  

SciTech Connect

A method of producing a hard metallic material by forming a mixture containing at least 55% iron and at least one of boron, carbon, silicon and phosphorus. The mixture is formed into an alloy and cooled to form a metallic material having a hardness of greater than about 9.2 GPa. The invention includes a method of forming a wire by combining a metal strip and a powder. The metal strip and the powder are rolled to form a wire containing at least 55% iron and from two to seven additional elements including at least one of C, Si and B. The invention also includes a method of forming a hardened surface on a substrate by processing a solid mass to form a powder, applying the powder to a surface to form a layer containing metallic glass, and converting the glass to a crystalline material having a nanocrystalline grain size.

Branagan, Daniel J. (Iona, ID)

2012-01-17T23:59:59.000Z

196

THE ATTRACTIVENESS OF MATERIALS IN ADVANCED NUCLEAR FUEL CYCLES FOR VARIOUS PROLIFERATION AND THEFT SCENARIOS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We must anticipate that the day is approaching when details of nuclear weapons design and fabrication will become common knowledge. On that day we must be particularly certain that all special nuclear materials (SNM) are adequately accounted for and protected and that we have a clear understanding of the utility of nuclear materials to potential adversaries. To this end, this paper examines the attractiveness of materials mixtures containing SNM and alternate nuclear materials associated with the plutonium-uranium reduction extraction (Purex), uranium extraction (UREX), coextraction (COEX), thorium extraction (THOREX), and PYROX (an electrochemical refining method) reprocessing schemes. This paper provides a set of figures of merit for evaluating material attractiveness that covers a broad range of proliferant state and subnational group capabilities. The primary conclusion of this paper is that all fissile material must be rigorously safeguarded to detect diversion by a state and must be provided the highest levels of physical protection to prevent theft by subnational groups; no 'silver bullet' fuel cycle has been found that will permit the relaxation of current international safeguards or national physical security protection levels. The work reported herein has been performed at the request of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and is based on the calculation of 'attractiveness levels' that are expressed in terms consistent with, but normally reserved for, the nuclear materials in DOE nuclear facilities. The methodology and findings are presented. Additionally, how these attractiveness levels relate to proliferation resistance and physical security is discussed.

Bathke, C. G.; Ebbinghaus, Bartley B.; Collins, Brian A.; Sleaford, Brad W.; Hase, Kevin R.; Robel, Martin; Wallace, R. K.; Bradley, Keith S.; Ireland, J. R.; Jarvinen, G. D.; Johnson, M. W.; Prichard, Andrew W.; Smith, Brian W.

2012-08-29T23:59:59.000Z

197

Cryogenic Material Properties Database Cryogenic Material ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... properties. These include the Handbook on Materials for Superconducting Machinery and the LNG Materials & Fluids. Neither ...

2000-10-27T23:59:59.000Z

198

THERMAL UPGRADING OF 9977 RADIOACTIVE MATERIAL (RAM) TYPE B PACKAGE  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The 9977 package is a radioactive material package that was originally certified to ship Heat Sources and RTG contents up to 19 watts and it is now being reviewed to significantly expand its contents in support of additional DOE missions. Thermal upgrading will be accomplished by employing stacked 3013 containers, a 3013 aluminum spacer and an external aluminum sleeve for enhanced heat transfer. The 7th Addendum to the original 9977 package Safety Basis Report describing these modifications is under review for the DOE certification. The analyses described in this paper show that this well-designed and conservatively analyzed package can be upgraded to carry contents with decay heat up to 38 watts with some simple design modifications. The Model 9977 package has been designed as a replacement for the Department of Transportation (DOT) Fissile Specification 6M package. The 9977 package is a very versatile Type B package which is certified to transport and store a wide spectrum of radioactive materials. The package was analyzed quite conservatively to increase its usefulness and store different payload configurations. Its versatility is evident from several daughter packages such as the 9978 and H1700, and several addendums where the payloads have been modified to suit the Shipper's needs without additional testing.

Gupta, N.; Abramczyk, G.

2012-03-26T23:59:59.000Z

199

Green Materials  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Mar 6, 2013 ... Incorporation of Granite Waste Diamond Wire in Cementitious Matrices: ... determination method simplex from a stroke cement using standard CP-V, ... its property in building materials manufacture, alumina recovery, etc. ... as well as their changes during heat treatment were studied by XRD, FTIR and XPS.

200

Supplement to the Surplus Plutonium Disposition Draft Environmental Impact Statement  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

On May 22, 1997, DOE published a Notice of Intent in the Federal Register (62 Federal Register 28009) announcing its decision to prepare an environmental impact statement (EIS) that would tier from the analysis and decisions reached in connection with the ''Storage and Disposition of Weapons-Usable Fissile Materials Final Programmatic EIS (Storage and Disposition PEIS)''. ''The Surplus Plutonium Disposition Draft Environmental Impact Statement'' (SPD Draft EIS) (DOWEIS-0283-D) was prepared in accordance with NEPA and issued in July 1998. It identified the potential environmental impacts of reasonable alternatives for the proposed siting, construction, and operation of three facilities for plutonium disposition. These three facilities would accomplish pit disassembly and conversion, immobilization, and MOX fuel fabrication. For the alternatives that included MOX fuel fabrication, the draft also described the potential environmental impacts of using from three to eight commercial nuclear reactors to irradiate MOX fuel. The potential impacts were based on a generic reactor analysis that used actual reactor data and a range of potential site conditions. In May 1998, DCE initiated a procurement process to obtain MOX fuel fabrication and reactor irradiation services. The request for proposals defined limited activities that may be performed prior to issuance of the SPD EIS Record of Decision (ROD) including non-site-specific work associated with the development of the initial design for the MOX fuel fabrication facility, and plans (paper studies) for outreach, long lead-time procurements, regulatory management, facility quality assurance, safeguards, security, fuel qualification, and deactivation. No construction on the proposed MOX facility would begin before an SPD EIS ROD is issued. In March 1999, DOE awarded a contract to Duke Engineering & Services; COGEMA, Inc.; and Stone & Webster (known as DCS) to provide the requested services. The procurement process included the environmental review specified in DOE's NEPA regulations in 10 CFR 1021.216. The six reactors selected are Catawba Nuclear Station Units 1 and 2 in South Carolina McGuire Nuclear Station Units 1 and 2 in North Carolina, and North Anna Power Station Units 1 and 2 in Virginia. The Supplement describes the potential environmental impacts of using MOX fuel in these six specific reactors named in the DCS proposal as well as other program changes made since the SPD Draft EIS was published.

N /A

1999-05-14T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "weapons-usable fissile materials" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Nuclear reactor fissile isotopes antineutrino spectra  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Positron spectrum from inverse beta decay reaction on proton was measured in 1988-1990 as a result of neutrino exploration experiment. The measured spectrum has the largest statistics and lowest energy threshold between other neutrino experiments made that time at nuclear reactors. On base of the positron spectrum the standard antineutrino spectrum for typical reactor fuel composition was restored. In presented analysis the partial spectra forming this standard spectrum were extracted using specific method. They could be used for neutrino experiments data analysis made at any fuel composition of reactor core.

Sinev, V

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

202

Nuclear reactor fissile isotopes antineutrino spectra  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Positron spectrum from inverse beta decay reaction on proton was measured in 1988-1990 as a result of neutrino exploration experiment. The measured spectrum has the largest statistics and lowest energy threshold between other neutrino experiments made that time at nuclear reactors. On base of the positron spectrum the standard antineutrino spectrum for typical reactor fuel composition was restored. In presented analysis the partial spectra forming this standard spectrum were extracted using specific method. They could be used for neutrino experiments data analysis made at any fuel composition of reactor core.

V. Sinev

2012-07-30T23:59:59.000Z

203

MSD Molecular Materials - Argonne National Laboratories, Materials...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Home Molecular Materials Molecular Materials Group carries out synthesis and characterization of novel materials whose unique properties originate at the molecular level. Our...

204

Alloy materials  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An alloy that contains at least two metals and can be used as a substrate for a superconductor is disclosed. The alloy can contain an oxide former. The alloy can have a biaxial or cube texture. The substrate can be used in a multilayer superconductor, which can further include one or more buffer layers disposed between the substrate and the superconductor material. The alloys can be made a by process that involves first rolling the alloy then annealing the alloy. A relatively large volume percentage of the alloy can be formed of grains having a biaxial or cube texture.

Hans Thieme, Cornelis Leo (Westborough, MA); Thompson, Elliott D. (Coventry, RI); Fritzemeier, Leslie G. (Acton, MA); Cameron, Robert D. (Franklin, MA); Siegal, Edward J. (Malden, MA)

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

205

Photovoltaic Materials  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The goal of the current project was to help make the US solar industry a world leader in the manufacture of thin film photovoltaics. The overall approach was to leverage ORNL’s unique characterization and processing technologies to gain a better understanding of the fundamental challenges for solar cell processing and apply that knowledge to targeted projects with industry members. ORNL has the capabilities in place and the expertise required to understand how basic material properties including defects, impurities, and grain boundaries affect the solar cell performance. ORNL also has unique processing capabilities to optimize the manufacturing process for fabrication of high efficiency and low cost solar cells. ORNL recently established the Center for Advanced Thin-film Systems (CATS), which contains a suite of optical and electrical characterization equipment specifically focused on solar cell research. Under this project, ORNL made these facilities available to industrial partners who were interested in pursuing collaborative research toward the improvement of their product or manufacturing process. Four specific projects were pursued with industrial partners: Global Solar Energy is a solar industry leader in full scale production manufacturing highly-efficient Copper Indium Gallium diSelenide (CIGS) thin film solar material, cells and products. ORNL worked with GSE to develop a scalable, non-vacuum, solution technique to deposit amorphous or nanocrystalline conducting barrier layers on untextured stainless steel substrates for fabricating high efficiency flexible CIGS PV. Ferro Corporation’s Electronic, Color and Glass Materials (“ECGM”) business unit is currently the world’s largest supplier of metallic contact materials in the crystalline solar cell marketplace. Ferro’s ECGM business unit has been the world's leading supplier of thick film metal pastes to the crystalline silicon PV industry for more than 30 years, and has had operational cells and modules in the field for 25 years. Under this project, Ferro leveraged world leading analytical capabilities at ORNL to characterize the paste-to-silicon interface microstructure and develop high efficiency next generation contact pastes. Ampulse Corporation is developing a revolutionary crystalline-silicon (c-Si) thin-film solar photovoltaic (PV) technology. Utilizing uniquely-textured substrates and buffer materials from the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), and breakthroughs in Hot-Wire Chemical Vapor Deposition (HW-CVD) techniques in epitaxial silicon developed at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Ampulse is creating a solar technology that is tunable in silicon thickness, and hence in efficiency and economics, to meet the specific requirements of multiple solar PV applications. This project focused on the development of a high rate deposition process to deposit Si, Ge, and Si1-xGex films as an alternate to hot-wire CVD. Mossey Creek Solar is a start-up company with great expertise in the solar field. The primary interest is to create and preserve jobs in the solar sector by developing high-yield, low-cost, high-efficiency solar cells using MSC-patented and -proprietary technologies. The specific goal of this project was to produce large grain formation in thin, net-shape-thickness mc-Si wafers processed with high-purity silicon powder and ORNL's plasma arc lamp melting without introducing impurities that compromise absorption coefficient and carrier lifetime. As part of this project, ORNL also added specific pieces of equipment to enhance our ability to provide unique insight for the solar industry. These capabilities include a moisture barrier measurement system, a combined physical vapor deposition and sputtering system dedicated to cadmium-containing deposits, adeep level transient spectroscopy system useful for identifying defects, an integrating sphere photoluminescence system, and a high-speed ink jet printing system. These tools were combined with others to study the effect of defects on the performance of crystalline silicon and

Duty, C.; Angelini, J.; Armstrong, B.; Bennett, C.; Evans, B.; Jellison, G. E.; Joshi, P.; List, F.; Paranthaman, P.; Parish, C.; Wereszczak, A.

2012-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

206

Functional Materials for Energy | Advanced Materials | ORNL  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Energy Storage Fuel Cells Thermoelectrics Separations Materials Catalysis Sensor Materials Polymers and Composites Carbon Fiber Related Research Chemistry and Physics at Interfaces Materials Synthesis from Atoms to Systems Materials Characterization Materials Theory and Simulation Energy Frontier Research Centers Advanced Materials Home | Science & Discovery | Advanced Materials | Research Areas | Functional Materials for Energy SHARE Functional Materials for Energy The concept of functional materials for energy occupies a very prominent position in ORNL's research and more broadly the scientific research sponsored by DOE's Basic Energy Sciences. These materials facilitate the capture and transformation of energy, the storage of energy or the efficient release and utilization of stored energy. A different kind of

207

Materials Technology @ TMS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

ESTABLISHED MATERIALS TECHNOLOGIES ... Specifically, digital resources are available relating to materials for nuclear power, materials sustainability, and  ...

208

The Attractiveness of Materials in Advanced Nuclear Fuel Cycles for Various Proliferation and Theft Scenarios  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper is an extension to earlier studies1,2 that examined the attractiveness of materials mixtures containing special nuclear materials (SNM) and alternate nuclear materials (ANM) associated with the PUREX, UREX, COEX, THOREX, and PYROX reprocessing schemes. This study extends the figure of merit (FOM) for evaluating attractiveness to cover a broad range of proliferant state and sub-national group capabilities. The primary conclusion of this study is that all fissile material needs to be rigorously safeguarded to detect diversion by a state and provided the highest levels of physical protection to prevent theft by sub-national groups; no “silver bullet” has been found that will permit the relaxation of current international safeguards or national physical security protection levels. This series of studies has been performed at the request of the United States Department of Energy (DOE) and is based on the calculation of "attractiveness levels" that are expressed in terms consistent with, but normally reserved for nuclear materials in DOE nuclear facilities.3 The expanded methodology and updated findings are presented. Additionally, how these attractiveness levels relate to proliferation resistance and physical security are discussed.

Bathke, C. G.; Wallace, R. K.; Ireland, J. R.; Johnson, M. W.; Hase, Kevin R.; Jarvinen, G. D.; Ebbinghaus, B. B.; Sleaford, Brad W.; Bradley, Keith S.; Collins, Brian A.; Smith, Brian W.; Prichard, Andrew W.

2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

209

FIGARO : detecting nuclear materials using high-energy gamma rays for oxygen.  

SciTech Connect

Potential diversion of nuclear materials is a major international concern. Fissile (e.g., U, Pu) and other nuclear materials (e.g., D, Be) can be detected using 6-7 MeV gamma rays produced in the {sup 19}F(p,{alpha}{gamma}){sup 16}O reaction. These gamma rays will induce neutron emission via the photoneutron and photofission processes in nuclear materials. However, they are not energetic enough to generate significant numbers of neutrons from most common benign materials, thereby reducing the false alarm rate. Neutrons are counted using an array of BF3 counters in a polyethylene moderator. Experiments have shown a strong increase in neutron count rates for depleted uranium, Be, D{sub 2}O, and {sup 6}Li, and little or no increase for other materials (e.g., H{sub 2}O, SS, Cu, Al, C, {sup 7}Li). Gamma source measurements using solid targets of CaF{sub 2} and MgF{sub 2} and a SF{sub 6} gas target show that proton accelerator of 3 MeV and 10-100 microampere average current could lead to acceptable detection sensitivity.

Michlich, B. J.; Smith, D. L.; Massey, T. N.; Ingram, D.; Fessler, A.

2000-10-10T23:59:59.000Z

210

Information about Materials Properties  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Table 6   Examples of materials information required during detail design...identification Material class (metal, plastic, ceramic composite) Material subclass Material industry designation Material product form Material condition designation (temper, heat treatment, etc.) Material specification Material alternative names Material component designations (composite/assembly)...

211

Simulated Verification of Fuel Element Inventory in a Small Reactor Core Using the Nuclear Materials Identification System (NMIS)  

SciTech Connect

The International Panel on Climate Change projects that by 2050 the world energy demand may double. Although the primary focus for new nuclear power plants in industrialized nations is on large plants in the 1000-1600 MWe range, there is an increasing demand for small and medium reactors (SMRs). About half of the innovative SMR concepts are for small (<300 MWe) reactors with a 5-30 year life without on-site refueling. This type of reactor is also known as a battery-type reactor. These reactors are particularly attractive to countries with small power grids and for non-electrical purposes such as heating, hydrogen production, and seawater desalination. Traditionally, this type of reactor has been used in a nautical propulsion role. This type of reactor is designed as a permanently sealed unit to prevent the diversion of the uranium in the core by the user. However, after initial fabrication it will be necessary to verify that the newly fabricated reactor core contains the quantity of uranium that initially entered the fuel fabrication plant. In most instances, traditional inspection techniques can be used to perform this verification, but in certain situations the core design will be considered sensitive. Non-intrusive verification techniques must be utilized in these situations. The Nuclear Materials Identification System (NMIS) with imaging uses active interrogation and a fast time correlation processor to characterize fissile material. The MCNP-PoliMi computer code was used to simulate NMIS measurements of a small, sealed reactor core. Because most battery-type reactor designs are still in the early design phase, a more traditional design based on a Russian icebreaker core was used in the simulations. These simulations show how the radiography capabilities of the NMIS could be used to detect the diversion of fissile material by detecting void areas in the assembled core where fuel elements have been removed.

Grogan, Brandon R [ORNL; Mihalczo, John T [ORNL

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

212

Dissolution of Plutonium Scrub Alloy and Anode Heel Materials in H-Canyon  

SciTech Connect

H-Canyon has a ''gap'' in dissolver operations during the last three months of FY03. One group of material to be processed during the gap is pre-existing scrub alloy material. There are 14 cans of material containing approximately 3.8 kilograms of plutonium. Of the 14 cans, it was anticipated that four cans contain salts, two cans contain anode heel materials, and eight cans contain scrub alloy buttons. H-Canyon desires to process the materials using a flowsheet similar to the SS and C (sand, slag and crucible) dissolution flowsheet used in F-Canyon. The materials will be loaded into carbon steel cans and then placed into aluminum metal charging bundles. Samples were sent to Savannah River Technology Center (SRTC) for characterization and flowsheet testing -- four MSE salts, two anode heels, and seven scrub alloy buttons. SRTC dissolved and characterized each of the samples. Two of them, originally thought to be MSE salts, were found to be graphite mold materials and were unsuitable for processing in H-Canyon. Characterization studies confirmed that the identification of the remaining items as MSE salts, scrub alloy buttons, and anode heel materials was correct. The MSE salts and anode heels solids are comprised primarily of plutonium, potassium, sodium and chloride. Both the MSE salts and anode heels left behind small amounts of residual solids. The scrub alloy buttons are comprised primarily of plutonium and aluminum. The solids dissolve readily with light, effervescent gas generation at the material surface and only trace amounts of NOx generation. Of the seven button samples, four dissolved completely. Two button samples contained small amounts of tantalum that did not dissolve. The last of the seven scrub alloy samples left a trace amount of residual plutonium solids. It is anticipated that the presence of undissolved fissile material is a function of where the sample was located relative to the button surface.

PIERCE, RA

2004-04-12T23:59:59.000Z

213

Materials Science Evaluation Portal  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

NIST Home > Materials Science Evaluation Portal. Materials Science Evaluation Portal. Subject Areas. Modeling; Nondestructive; ...

2013-08-08T23:59:59.000Z

214

Materials Performance Staff  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Kinetics Staff; Materials Science and Engineering Division Staff Directory; MML Organization. Contact. Materials Performance ...

2013-08-20T23:59:59.000Z

215

Incorporation of Integral Fuel Burnable Absorbers Boron and Gadolinium into Zirconium-Alloy Fuel Clad Material  

SciTech Connect

Long-lived fuels require the use of higher enrichments of 235U or other fissile materials. Such high levels of fissile material lead to excessive fuel activity at the beginning of life. To counteract this excessive activity, integral fuel burnable absorbers (IFBA) are added to some rods in the fuel assembly. The two commonly used IFBA elements are gadolinium, which is added as gadolinium-oxide to the UO2 powder, and boron, which is applied as a zirconium-diboride coating on the UO2 pellets using plasma spraying or chemical vapor deposition techniques. The incorporation of IFBA into the fuel has to be performed in a nuclear-regulated facility that is physically separated from the main plant. These operations tend to be very costly because of their small volume and can add from 20 to 30% to the manufacturing cost of the fuel. Other manufacturing issues that impact cost and performance are maintaining the correct levels of dosing, the reduction in fuel melting point due to gadolinium-oxide additions, and parasitic neutron absorption at fuel's end-of-life. The goal of the proposed research is to develop an alternative approach that involves incorporation of boron or gadolinium into the outer surface of the fuel cladding material rather than as an additive to the fuel pellets. This paradigm shift will allow for the introduction of the IFBA in a non-nuclear regulated environment and will obviate the necessity of additional handling and processing of the fuel pellets. This could represent significant cost savings and potentially lead to greater reproducibility and control of the burnable fuel in the early stages of the reactor operation. The surface alloying is being performed using the IBEST (Ion Beam Surface Treatment) process developed at Sandia National Laboratories. IBEST involves the delivery of energetic ion beam pulses onto the surface of a material, near-surface melting, and rapid solidification. The non-equilibrium nature of such processing allows for surface alloying well in excess of the thermodynamically dictated solubility limits, an effect that is particularly relevant to this research due to the negligible solubility of boron and gadolinium in zirconium. University of Wisconsin is performing the near surface materials characterization and analysis, aiding Sandia in process optimization, and promoting educational activities. Westinghouse is performing process manufacturability and scale-up analysis and is performing autoclave testing of the surface treated samples. The duration of this NERI project is 2 years, from 9/2002 to 9/2004.

Sridharan, K.; Renk, T.J.; Lahoda, E.J.; Corradini, M.L

2004-12-14T23:59:59.000Z

216

Gas storage materials, including hydrogen storage materials  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A material for the storage and release of gases comprises a plurality of hollow elements, each hollow element comprising a porous wall enclosing an interior cavity, the interior cavity including structures of a solid-state storage material. In particular examples, the storage material is a hydrogen storage material such as a solid state hydride. An improved method for forming such materials includes the solution diffusion of a storage material solution through a porous wall of a hollow element into an interior cavity.

Mohtadi, Rana F; Wicks, George G; Heung, Leung K; Nakamura, Kenji

2013-02-19T23:59:59.000Z

217

Functional Materials for Energy | Advanced Materials | ORNL  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Energy Storage Fuel Cells Thermoelectrics Separations Materials Catalysis Sensor Materials Polymers and Composites Carbon Fiber Related Research Chemistry and Physics at...

218

Materials Science & Tech Division | Advanced Materials | ORNL  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

accident tolerant fuels, and providing the materials underpinning for fusion energy. The nuclear materials program leverages off both fundamental and applied capabilities within...

219

Sandia National Labs: Materials Science & Engineering, Materials...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

MATERIALS SCIENCE & ENGINEERING HOME OrganizationMission Capabilities Awards & Accomplishments Patents MATERIALS SCIENCE AND ENGINEERING CENTER Techniques 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 These are...

220

Materials Project: A Materials Genome Approach  

DOE Data Explorer (OSTI)

Technological innovation - faster computers, more efficient solar cells, more compact energy storage - is often enabled by materials advances. Yet, it takes an average of 18 years to move new materials discoveries from lab to market. This is largely because materials designers operate with very little information and must painstakingly tweak new materials in the lab. Computational materials science is now powerful enough that it can predict many properties of materials before those materials are ever synthesized in the lab. By scaling materials computations over supercomputing clusters, this project has computed some properties of over 80,000 materials and screened 25,000 of these for Li-ion batteries. The computations predicted several new battery materials which were made and tested in the lab and are now being patented. By computing properties of all known materials, the Materials Project aims to remove guesswork from materials design in a variety of applications. Experimental research can be targeted to the most promising compounds from computational data sets. Researchers will be able to data-mine scientific trends in materials properties. By providing materials researchers with the information they need to design better, the Materials Project aims to accelerate innovation in materials research.[copied from http://materialsproject.org/about] You will be asked to register to be granted free, full access.

Ceder, Gerbrand [MIT; Persson, Kristin [LBNL

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "weapons-usable fissile materials" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

DEVELOPMENT OF A NEW TYPE A(F)RADIOACTIVE MATERIAL PACKAGING FOR THE DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY  

SciTech Connect

In a coordinated effort, the Department of Transportation (DOT) and Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) proposed the elimination of the Specification Packaging from 49 CFR 173.[1] In accordance with the Federal Register, issued on October 1, 2004, new fabrication of Specification Packages would no longer be authorized. In accordance with the NRC final rulemaking published January 26, 2004, Specification Packagings are mandated by law to be removed from service no later than October 1, 2008. This coordinated effort and resulting rulemaking initiated a planned phase out of Specification Type B and Type A fissile (F) material transportation packages within the Department of Energy (DOE) and its subcontractors. One of the Specification Packages affected by this regulatory change is the UN1A2 Specification Package, per DOT 49 CFR 173.417(a)(6). To maintain continuing shipments of DOE materials currently transported in UN1A2 Specification Package after the existing authorization expires, a replacement Type A(F) material packaging design is under development by the Savannah River National Laboratory. This paper presents a summary of the prototype design effort and testing of the new Type A(F) Package development for the DOE. This paper discusses the progress made in the development of a Type A Fissile Packaging to replace the expiring 49 CFR UN1A2 Specification Fissile Package. The Specification Package was mostly a single-use waste disposal container. The design requirements and authorized radioactive material contents of the UN1A2 Specification Package were defined in 49 CFR. A UN1A2 Specification Package was authorized to ship up to 350 grams of U-235 in any enrichment and in any non-pyrophoric form. The design was specified as a 55-gallon 1A2 drum overpack with a body constructed from 18 gauge steel with a 16 gauge drum lid. Drum closure was specified as a standard 12-gauge ring closure. The inner product container size was not specified but was listed as any container that met Specification 7A requirements per 49 CFR 178.350. Specification 7A containers were required to withstand Type A packaging tests required by 49CFR173.465 with compliance demonstrated through testing, analysis or similarity to other containers. The maximum weight of the 7A product container, the radioactive content, and any internal packaging was limited to 200 lbs. The total gross weight for the UN1A2 Specification Package was limited to 350 lbs. No additional restrictions were applied. Authorization for use did not require the UN1A2 Specification Package to be tested to the Normal Conditions of Transport (NCT) and Hypothetical Accident Conditions (HAC) required for performance based, Type A(F) packages certified by the NRC or DOE. The Type A(F) Packaging design discussed in this paper is required to be in compliance with the regulatory safety requirements defined in Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) 10 CFR 71.41 through 71.47 and 10 CFR71.71. Sub-criticality of content must be maintained under the Hypothetical Accident Conditions specified under 10 CFR71.73. These federal regulations, and other applicable DOE Orders and Guides, govern design requirements for a Type A(F) package. Type A(F) packages with less than an A2 quantity of radioactive material are not required to have a leak testable boundary. With this exception a Type A(F) package design is subject to the same test requirements set forth for the design of a performance based Type B packaging.

Blanton, P.; Eberl, K.

2008-09-14T23:59:59.000Z

222

Materials Under Extremes | ORNL  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Materials Defect Physics Lightweight Related Research Functional Materials for Energy Chemistry and Physics at Interfaces Materials Synthesis from Atoms to Systems...

223

NETL: Advanced Research - Materials  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Performance Materials High Temperature Materials The environment inside a slagging gasifier is one of the worst imaginable from a materials standpoint. Another extreme...

224

Nuclear Materials Committee  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Nuclear Materials Committee is part of the Structural Materials Division. Our Mission: Includes the scientific and technical aspects of materials which are ...

225

Materials Transportation Testing & Analysis at Sandia National Laboratories  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Testing Testing Doug Ammerman, (505) 845-8158 Type B packages that transport radioactive materials must survive a sequence of full-scale (actual physical size) impact, puncture, fire, and immersion tests designed to replicate transportation accident conditions. The Hypothetical Accident Conditions (six tests as defined in 10 CFR Part 71.73) tests 1 through 4 (Drop, Crush, Puncture and Fire) are sequential, test 5 (Immersion) is performed on either a previously tested or untested package. Free Drop Test Crush Test Puncture Test Thermal Test Immersion Test [drop] Click to view picture [crush] Click to view picture [puncture] Click to view picture [thermal] Click to view picture [immersion] Click to view picture Dropping a package from 30 feet onto an unyielding target. (the unyielding target forces all of the deformation to be in the package, none in the target). The speed on impact is 44 feet per second or 30 miles per hour. Dropping a 1100 pound steel plate from 30 feet onto a package. This test is only required for packages weighing less than 1100 pounds. The speed on impact is 44 feet per second or 30 miles per hour. Dropping a package from 40 inches onto a welded, 6 inch diameter, steel spike. The speed on impact is 14.6 feet per second or 10 miles per hour. Placing a package 40 inches above a pool of burning fuel for 30 minutes at 800 degrees Celsius (1475 degrees Fahrenheit). Placing a package under 50 feet of water for 8 hours. Fissile material packages are also immersed under 3 feet of water for 8 hours sequentially after tests 1 through 4

226

Materials Technology @ TMS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

May 28, 2012 ... Administrative & Policy Manual .... Materials and Society: Energy Technology, Policy, and Education; Materials Processing and Production; and ...

227

Magnetic Materials Staff  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Materials Science and Engineering Division Staff Directory; MML Organization. Contact. Magnetic Materials Group Robert Shull, Group Leader. ...

2012-10-09T23:59:59.000Z

228

Anisotropic Curie Temperature Materials  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Symposium, Magnetic Materials for Energy Applications -III. Presentation Title, Anisotropic Curie Temperature Materials. Author(s), Harsh Deep Chopra, Jason ...

229

Material Properties References  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Thermal Conductivity. LNG Materials and Fluids. Ed. ... Aluminum 3003. Linear thermal expansion. LNG Materials and Fluids. Ed. ...

2013-02-05T23:59:59.000Z

230

emerging materials - TMS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

…plenary discussion. Energy and Security; Nuclear Materials; Fuel Cells; Materials for Alternative Energy Applications. Advanced Metallic Composites and  ...

231

Bioinspired Materials Engineering  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Conference Tools for Materials Science & Technology 2014 ... structured functional materials with improved and designed (piezo )electrical, magnetic, optical, ...

232

Multiscale Modeling of Materials  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Oct 27, 2009 ... Parametric materials design integrating materials science, applied mechanics and quantum physics within a systems engineering framework ...

233

Radiation Shields Materials  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

About this Abstract. Meeting, Materials Science & Technology 2009. Symposium, Materials Solutions for the Nuclear Renaissance. Presentation Title, Radiation ...

234

Nanomechanical Materials Behavior Committee  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Nanomechanical Materials Behavior Committee is part of the Materials Processing & Manufacturing Division;. Our Mission: Focuses on the nanomechanical ...

235

Method for forming materials  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A material-forming tool and a method for forming a material are described including a shank portion; a shoulder portion that releasably engages the shank portion; a pin that releasably engages the shoulder portion, wherein the pin defines a passageway; and a source of a material coupled in material flowing relation relative to the pin and wherein the material-forming tool is utilized in methodology that includes providing a first material; providing a second material, and placing the second material into contact with the first material; and locally plastically deforming the first material with the material-forming tool so as mix the first material and second material together to form a resulting material having characteristics different from the respective first and second materials.

Tolle, Charles R. (Idaho Falls, ID); Clark, Denis E. (Idaho Falls, ID); Smartt, Herschel B. (Idaho Falls, ID); Miller, Karen S. (Idaho Falls, ID)

2009-10-06T23:59:59.000Z

236

Materials Informatics: Fast Track to New Materials  

SciTech Connect

Current methods for new materials development focus on either deeper fundamental-level studies or generation of large quantities of data. The data challenge in materials science is not only the volume of data being generated by many independent investigators, but its heterogeneity and also its complexity that must be transformed, analyzed, correlated and communicated. Materials informatics addresses these issues. Materials informatics is an emerging information-based field combining computational, statistical, and mathematical approaches with materials sciences for accelerating discovery and development of new materials. Within the informatic framework, the various different forms of information form a system architecture, an iterative cycle for transforming data into knowledge.

Ferris, Kim F.; Peurrung, Loni M.; Marder, James M.

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

237

NEWTON's Material Science References  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Material Science References Material Science References Do you have a great material science reference link? Please click our Ideas page. Featured Reference Links: Materials Research Society Materials Research Society The Materials Research Society has assembled many resources in its Materials Science Enthusiasts site. This site has information for the K-12 audience, general public, and materials science professionals. Material Science nanoHUB nanHUB.org is the place for nanotechnology research, education, and collaboration. There are Simulation Programs, Online Presentations, Courses, Learning Modules, Podcasts, Animations, Teaching Materials, and more. (Intened for high school and up) Materials Science Resources on the Web Materials Science Resources on the Web This site gives a good general introduction into material science. Sponsered by Iowa State, it talks about what material science is, ceramics and composites, and other topics.

238

Educational Material Science Games  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Material Science Games Material Science Games Do you have a great material science game? Please click our Ideas page. Featured Games: >KS2 Bitsize BBC - Materials KS2 Bitsize BBC - Materials Sponsored by the BBC, K2S Bitsize offers tons of free online science games including a section on materials. Learn about the changes in materials, changing states, heat, rocks, soils, solids, liquids, gases, and much more. Science Kids - Properties of Materials Science Kids - Properties of Materials Learn about the properties of materials as you experiment with a variety of objects in this great science activity for kids. Discover the interesting characteristics of materials; are they flexible, waterproof, strong or transparent? Characteristics of Materials - BBC Schools Characteristics of Materials - BBC Schools

239

Definition of Small Gram Quantity Contents for Type B Radioactive Material Transportation Packages: Activity-Based Content Limitations  

SciTech Connect

Since the 1960's, the Department of Transportation Specification (DOT Spec) 6M packages have been used extensively for transportation of Type B quantities of radioactive materials between Department of Energy (DOE) facilities, laboratories, and productions sites. However, due to the advancement of packaging technology, the aging of the 6M packages, and variability in the quality of the packages, the DOT implemented a phased elimination of the 6M specification packages (and other DOT Spec packages) in favor of packages certified to meet federal performance requirements. DOT issued the final rule in the Federal Register on October 1, 2004 requiring that use of the DOT Specification 6M be discontinued as of October 1, 2008. A main driver for the change was the fact that the 6M specification packagings were not supported by a Safety Analysis Report for Packaging (SARP) that was compliant with Title 10 of the Code of Federal Regulations part 71 (10 CFR 71). Therefore, materials that would have historically been shipped in 6M packages are being identified as contents in Type B (and sometimes Type A fissile) package applications and addenda that are to be certified under the requirements of 10 CFR 71. The requirements in 10 CFR 71 include that the Safety Analysis Report for Packaging (SARP) must identify the maximum radioactivity of radioactive constituents and maximum quantities of fissile constituents (10 CFR 71.33(b)(1) and 10 CFR 71.33(b)(2)), and that the application (i.e., SARP submittal or SARP addendum) demonstrates that the external dose rate (due to the maximum radioactivity of radioactive constituents and maximum quantities of fissile constituents) on the surface of the packaging (i.e., package and contents) not exceed 200 mrem/hr (10 CFR 71.35(a), 10 CFR 71.47(a)). It has been proposed that a 'Small Gram Quantity' of radioactive material be defined, such that, when loaded in a transportation package, the dose rates at external points of an unshielded packaging not exceed the regulatory limits prescribed by 10 CFR 71 for non-exclusive shipments. The mass of each radioisotope presented in this paper is limited by the radiation dose rate on the external surface of the package, which per the regulatory limit should not exceed 200 mrem/hr. The results presented are a compendium of allowable masses of a variety of different isotopes (with varying impurity levels of beryllium in some of the actinide isotopes) that, when loaded in an unshielded packaging, do not result in an external dose rate on the surface of the package that exceeds 190 mrem/hr (190 mrem/hr was chosen to provide 5% conservatism relative to the regulatory limit). These mass limits define the term 'Small Gram Quantity' (SGQ) contents in the context of radioactive material transportation packages. The term SGQ is isotope-specific and pertains to contents in radioactive material transportation packages that do not require shielding and still satisfy the external dose rate requirements. Since these calculated mass limits are for contents without shielding, they are conservative for packaging materials that provide some limited shielding or if the contents are placed into a shielded package. The isotopes presented in this paper were chosen as the isotopes that Department of Energy (DOE) sites most likely need to ship. Other more rarely shipped isotopes, along with industrial and medical isotopes, are planned to be included in subsequent extensions of this work.

Sitaraman, S; Kim, S; Biswas, D; Hafner, R; Anderson, B

2010-10-27T23:59:59.000Z

240

The Complete Burning of Weapons Grade Plutonium and Highly Enriched Uranium with (Laser Inertial Fusion-Fission Energy) LIFE Engine  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The National Ignition Facility (NIF) project, a laser-based Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF) experiment designed to achieve thermonuclear fusion ignition and burn in the laboratory, is under construction at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) and will be completed in April of 2009. Experiments designed to accomplish the NIF's goal will commence in late FY2010 utilizing laser energies of 1 to 1.3 MJ. Fusion yields of the order of 10 to 20 MJ are expected soon thereafter. Laser initiated fusion-fission (LIFE) engines have now been designed to produce nuclear power from natural or depleted uranium without isotopic enrichment, and from spent nuclear fuel from light water reactors without chemical separation into weapons-attractive actinide streams. A point-source of high-energy neutrons produced by laser-generated, thermonuclear fusion within a target is used to achieve ultra-deep burn-up of the fertile or fissile fuel in a sub-critical fission blanket. Fertile fuels including depleted uranium (DU), natural uranium (NatU), spent nuclear fuel (SNF), and thorium (Th) can be used. Fissile fuels such as low-enrichment uranium (LEU), excess weapons plutonium (WG-Pu), and excess highly-enriched uranium (HEU) may be used as well. Based upon preliminary analyses, it is believed that LIFE could help meet worldwide electricity needs in a safe and sustainable manner, while drastically shrinking the nation's and world's stockpile of spent nuclear fuel and excess weapons materials. LIFE takes advantage of the significant advances in laser-based inertial confinement fusion that are taking place at the NIF at LLNL where it is expected that thermonuclear ignition will be achieved in the 2010-2011 timeframe. Starting from as little as 300 to 500 MW of fusion power, a single LIFE engine will be able to generate 2000 to 3000 MWt in steady state for periods of years to decades, depending on the nuclear fuel and engine configuration. Because the fission blanket in a fusion-fission hybrid system is subcritical, a LIFE engine can burn any fertile or fissile nuclear material, including unenriched natural or depleted U and SNF, and can extract a very high percentage of the energy content of its fuel resulting in greatly enhanced energy generation per metric ton of nuclear fuel, as well as nuclear waste forms with vastly reduced concentrations of long-lived actinides. LIFE engines could thus provide the ability to generate vast amounts of electricity while greatly reducing the actinide content of any existing or future nuclear waste and extending the availability of low cost nuclear fuels for several thousand years. LIFE also provides an attractive pathway for burning excess weapons Pu to over 99% FIMA (fission of initial metal atoms) without the need for fabricating or reprocessing mixed oxide fuels (MOX). Because of all of these advantages, LIFE engines offer a pathway toward sustainable and safe nuclear power that significantly mitigates nuclear proliferation concerns and minimizes nuclear waste. An important aspect of a LIFE engine is the fact that there is no need to extract the fission fuel from the fission blanket before it is burned to the desired final level. Except for fuel inspection and maintenance process times, the nuclear fuel is always within the core of the reactor and no weapons-attractive materials are available outside at any point in time. However, an important consideration when discussing proliferation concerns associated with any nuclear fuel cycle is the ease with which reactor fuel can be converted to weapons usable materials, not just when it is extracted as waste, but at any point in the fuel cycle. Although the nuclear fuel remains in the core of the engine until ultra deep actinide burn up is achieved, soon after start up of the engine, once the system breeds up to full power, several tons of fissile material is present in the fission blanket. However, this fissile material is widely dispersed in millions of fuel pebbles, which can be tagged as individual accountable items, and thus made difficult to diver

Farmer, J C; Diaz de la Rubia, T; Moses, E

2008-12-23T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "weapons-usable fissile materials" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Advanced Materials Processing  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Feb 15, 2010... the copper bearing materials which did not contain inflammable materials due to a restriction on capacity of furnace waste heat boilers.

242

Advanced Materials | ORNL  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Research Areas Research Areas Research Highlights Facilities and Capabilities Science to Energy Solutions News & Awards Events and Conferences Supporting Organizations Directionally Solidified Materials Using high-temperature optical floating zone furnace to produce monocrystalline molybdenum alloy micro-pillars Home | Science & Discovery | Advanced Materials Advanced Materials | Advanced Materials SHARE ORNL has the nation's most comprehensive materials research program and is a world leader in research that supports the development of advanced materials for energy generation, storage, and use. We have core strengths in three main areas: materials synthesis, characterization, and theory. In other words, we discover and make new materials, we study their structure,

243

Material Properties References  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Cryogenics June 1962 p.230-235. Thermal Conductivity. LNG Materials and Fluids. Ed. ... Linear thermal expansion. LNG Materials and Fluids. Ed. ...

2013-02-05T23:59:59.000Z

244

Advanced Research Materials Program  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

materials requirements for all fossil energy systems, including materials for advanced power generation and coal fuels technologies. Examples of these technologies include coal...

245

TMS Materials Cyberinfrastructure Portal  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Materials Cyber- infrastructure Portal serves as an online access point to critical tools and resources—including computational models and materials ...

246

Material Design Tools  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Mar 12, 2012 ... In this presentation, we will discuss our activities in developing an infrastructure, named MaterialsGenome® (Trademark of MaterialsGenome, ...

247

Materials Technology @ TMS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Defining the data challenges associated with building the materials innovation infrastructure at the core of the U.S. Materials Genome Initiative (MGI) was the ...

248

Novel Materials and Phenomenon  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Mar 6, 2013 ... Magnetic Materials for Energy Applications -III: Novel Materials and ... In traditional Permanent Magnet Machines, such as motors and ...

249

MATERIALS TRANSFER AGREEMENT  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

MTAXX-XXX 1 MATERIAL TRANSFER AGREEMENT for Manufacturing Demonstration Facility and Carbon Fiber Technology Facility In order for the RECIPIENT to obtain materials, the RECIPIENT...

250

Photovoltaic Cell Materials  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Although crystalline silicon cells are the most common type, photovoltaic (PV), or solar cells, can be made of many semiconductor materials. Each material has unique strengths and characteristics...

251

Materials Technology @ TMS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

DOE Awards $45 Million to Deploy Advanced Transportation Technologies · Novel Electrode Material Offers Alternative for Li-ion Batteries · New Materials Make ...

252

IOMMMS Global Materials Forum  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Natural Fiber Composites – Significant Contribution to a Green Economy · Recent Development of Materials for Green Energy in Korea · The Role of Materials ...

253

Chapter 6: Materials  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

: Materials : Materials Material Selection Sustainable Building Materials System Integration Issues | Chapter 6 Material Selection Materials The use of durable, attractive, and environmentally responsible building materials is a key element of any high-performance building effort. The use of natural and healthy materials contributes to the well-being of the occupants and to a feeling of connection with the bounty of the natural world. Many construction materials have significant environ- mental impacts from pollutant releases, habitat destruc- tion, and depletion of natural resources. This can occur during extraction and acquisition of raw materials, pro- "Then I say the Earth belongs to duction and manufacturing processes, and transporta- tion. In addition, some construction materials can harm

254

NEWTON's Material Science Videos  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Material Science Videos Material Science Videos Do you have a great material science video? Please click our Ideas page. Featured Videos: University of Maryland - Material Science University of Maryland - Material Science The Department of Materials Science and Engineering offers a set of videos about various topics in material science to help students understand what material science is. Learn about plasma, polymers, liquid crystals and much more. LearnersTV.com - Material Science LearnersTV.com - Material Science LearnersTV.com offers a series of educational material science lectures that are available to the public for free. Learn about topics like polymers, non-crystalline solids, crystal geometry, phase diagrams, phase transformations and more. NanoWerk - Nanotechnology Videos NanoWerk - Nanotechnology Videos

255

Development of a container for the transportation and storage of plutonium bearing materials  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

There is a large backlog of plutonium contaminated materials at the Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site near Denver, Colorado, USA. The clean-up of this site requires this material to be packaged in such a way as to allow for efficient transportation to other sites or to a permanent geologic repository. Prior to off-site shipment of the material, it may be stored on-site for a period of time. For this reason, it is desirable to have a container capable of meeting the requirements for storage as well as the requirements for transportation. Most of the off-site transportation is envisioned to take place using the TRUPACT-II Type B package, with the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) as the destination. Prior to the development of this new container, the TRUPACT-II had a limit of 325 FGE (fissile gram equivalents) of plutonium due to criticality control concerns. Because of the relatively high plutonium content in the material to be transported, transporting 325 FGE per TRUPACT-II is uneconomical. Thus, the purpose of the new containers is to provide criticality control to increase the allowed TRUPACT-II payload and to provide a safe method for on-site storage prior to transport. This paper will describe the analysis and testing used to demonstrate that the Pipe Overpack Container provides safe on-site storage of plutonium bearing materials in unhardened buildings and provides criticality control during transportation within the TRUPACT-II. Analyses included worst-case criticality analyses, analyses of fork-lift time impacts, and analyses of roof structure collapse onto the container. Testing included dynamic crush tests, bare pipe impact tests, a 30-minute totally engulfing pool-fire test, and multiple package impact tests in end-on and side-on orientations.

Ammerman, D. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Geinitz, R.; Thorp, D. [Safe Sites of Colorado, Golden, CO (United States); Rivera, M. [Los Alamos Technology Associates, Golden, CO (United States)

1998-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

256

Permanent Magnet Materials  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Table 4   Applications of permanent magnet materials...material Primary reason for selection Alternative material Condition or reason favoring selection of alternative material Aircraft magnetos, military or civilian SmCo Maximum energy per unit volume Cast Alnico 5 Availability or cost restraint Alternators SmCo Compactness and reliability Ferrite...

257

Cementitious Materials Workshop - Presentations  

Cementitious Materials for Waste Treatment, Disposal, Remediation and Decommissioning Workshop. December 12-14, 2006

258

Cementitious Materials Workshop - Contacts  

Cementitious Materials for Waste Treatment, Disposal, Remediation and Decommissioning Workshop. December 12-14, 2006

259

Permanent Magnet Materials  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Table 4 Applications of permanent magnet materials...material Primary reason for selection Alternative material Condition or reason favoring selection of alternative material Aircraft magnetos, military or civilian SmCo Maximum energy per unit volume Cast Alnico 5 Availability or cost restraint Alternators SmCo Compactness and reliability Ferrite...

260

Materials Innovation Committee - TMS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... SMD Council, - General Committees, ---- Accreditation Committee, ---- Audit Committee, ---- Education Committee, ---- Materials and Society Committee ...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "weapons-usable fissile materials" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

About Materials Week '97  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

LINKS ABOUT INDIANAPOLIS · TOUR INFORMATION · STUDENT ACTIVITIES · SPECIAL EVENTS · MATERIALS EXPOSITION · CALENDAR OF EVENTS

262

Advanced Materials in MML  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Advanced Materials Characterization. Fusion Wall Development Research by Neutron Depth Profiling. < Previous 1 2 3 Next ». ...

2012-06-12T23:59:59.000Z

263

Plutonium Disposition Program | National Nuclear Security Administrati...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Plutonium Disposition Program Home > About Us > Our Programs > Nonproliferation > Fissile Materials Disposition > Plutonium Disposition Program Plutonium Disposition Program The...

264

Argonne Chemical Sciences & Engineering - Nuclear & Environmental...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Nuclear Fuel Cycle * Overview * Fissile Material * Chemical Process Models * Chemistry at Interfaces * Improved Safeguards Nuclear & Environmental Processes Home Closing the...

265

Joining of dissimilar materials  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method of joining dissimilar materials having different ductility, involves two principal steps: Decoration of the more ductile material's surface with particles of a less ductile material to produce a composite; and, sinter-bonding the composite produced to a joining member of a less ductile material. The joining method is suitable for joining dissimilar materials that are chemically inert towards each other (e.g., metal and ceramic), while resulting in a strong bond with a sharp interface between the two materials. The joining materials may differ greatly in form or particle size. The method is applicable to various types of materials including ceramic, metal, glass, glass-ceramic, polymer, cermet, semiconductor, etc., and the materials can be in various geometrical forms, such as powders, fibers, or bulk bodies (foil, wire, plate, etc.). Composites and devices with a decorated/sintered interface are also provided.

Tucker, Michael C; Lau, Grace Y; Jacobson, Craig P

2012-10-16T23:59:59.000Z

266

Comprehensive Nuclear Materials  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This book encompasses a rich seam of current information on the vast and multidisciplinary field of nuclear materials employed in fission and prototype fusion systems. Discussion includes both historical and contemporary international research in nuclear materials, from Actinides to Zirconium alloys, from the worlds leading scientists and engineers. Synthesizes pertinent current science to support the selection, assessment, validation and engineering of materials in extreme nuclear environments. The work discusses the major classes of materials suitable for usage in nuclear fission, fusion reactors and high power accelerators, and for diverse functions in fuels, cladding, moderator and control materials, structural, functional, and waste materials.

Konings, Dr. Rudy J. M. [European Commission Joint Research Centre; Allen, Todd R. [University of Wisconsin, Madison; Stoller, Roger E [ORNL; Yamanaka, Prof. Shinsuke [Osaka University

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

267

Materials science and engineering  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

During FY-96, work within the Materials Science and Engineering Thrust Area was focused on material modeling. Our motivation for this work is to develop the capability to study the structural response of materials as well as material processing. These capabilities have been applied to a broad range of problems, in support of many programs at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. These studies are described in (1) Strength and Fracture Toughness of Material Interfaces; (2) Damage Evolution in Fiber Composite Materials; (3) Flashlamp Envelope Optical Properties and Failure Analysis; (4) Synthesis and Processing of Nanocrystalline Hydroxyapatite; and (5) Room Temperature Creep Compliance of Bulk Kel-E.

Lesuer, D.R.

1997-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

268

Demonstration (DEMO) of Radio Frequency Identification (RFID) system for tracking and monitoring of nuclear materials.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The US Department of Energy (DOE) [Environmental Management (EM), Office of Packaging and Transportation (EM-45)] Packaging Certification Program (PCP) has developed a radiofrequency identification (RFID) tracking and monitoring system for the management of nuclear materials packages during storage and transportation. The system, developed by the PCP team at Argonne National Laboratory, involves hardware modification, application software development, secured database and web server development, and irradiation experiments. In April 2008, Argonne tested key features of the RFID tracking and monitoring system in a weeklong, 1700 mile (2736 km) demonstration employing 14 empty type B fissile material drums of three designs (models 9975, 9977 and ES-3100) that have been certified for shipment by the DOE and the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission. The demonstration successfully integrated global positioning system (GPS) technology for vehicle tracking, satellite/cellular (general packet radio service, or GPRS) technologies for wireless communication, and active RFID tags with multiple sensors (seal integrity, shock, temperature, humidity and battery status) on drums. In addition, the demonstration integrated geographic information system (GIS) technology with automatic alarm notifications of incidents and generated buffer zone reports for emergency response and management of staged incidents. The demonstration was sponsored by EM and the US National Nuclear Security Administration, with the participation of Argonne, Savannah River and Oak Ridge National Laboratories. Over 50 authorised stakeholders across the country observed the demonstration via secured Internet access. The DOE PCP and national laboratories are working on several RFID system implementation projects at selected DOE sites, as well as continuing device and systems development and widening applications beyond DOE sites and possibly beyond nuclear materials to include other radioactive materials.

Tsai, H. C.; Chen, K.; Liu, Y. Y.; Shuler, J. (Decision and Information Sciences); (USDOE)

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

269

Computer-Aided Materials Selection  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Table 42   Examples of materials information required during product design...identification Material class (metal, plastic, ceramic, composite) Material subclass Material industry designation Material product form Material condition designation (temper, heat treatment, etc.) Material specification Material alternative names Material component designations (composite/assembly)...

270

Lightweighting Materials | Clean Energy | ORNL  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

ORNL conducts lightweighting materials research in several areas: materials development, properties and manufacturing, computational materials science, and multi-material enabling...

271

EC Transmission Line Materials  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this document is to identify materials acceptable for use in the US ITER Project Office (USIPO)-supplied components for the ITER Electron cyclotron Heating and Current Drive (ECH&CD) transmission lines (TL), PBS-52. The source of material property information for design analysis shall be either the applicable structural code or the ITER Material Properties Handbook. In the case of conflict, the ITER Material Properties Handbook shall take precedence. Materials selection, and use, shall follow the guidelines established in the Materials Assessment Report (MAR). Materials exposed to vacuum shall conform to the ITER Vacuum Handbook. [Ref. 2] Commercial materials shall conform to the applicable standard (e.g., ASTM, JIS, DIN) for the definition of their grade, physical, chemical and electrical properties and related testing. All materials for which a suitable certification from the supplier is not available shall be tested to determine the relevant properties, as part of the procurement. A complete traceability of all the materials including welding materials shall be provided. Halogenated materials (example: insulating materials) shall be forbidden in areas served by the detritiation systems. Exceptions must be approved by the Tritium System and Safety Section Responsible Officers.

Bigelow, Tim S [ORNL

2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

272

CALMOS: Innovative device for the measurement of nuclear heating in material testing reactors  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An R and D program has been carried out since 2002 in order to improve gamma heating measurements in the 70 MWth OSIRIS Material Testing Reactor operated by CEA's Nuclear Energy Div. at the Saclay research center. Throughout this program an innovative calorimetric probe associated to a specific handling system has been designed in order to make measurements both along the fissile height and on the upper part of the core, where nuclear heating rates still remain high. Two mock-ups of the probe were manufactured and tested in 2005 and 2009 in ex-core area of OSIRIS reactor for the process validation, while a displacement system has been especially designed to move the probe axially. A final probe has been designed thanks to modeling results and to preliminary measurements obtained with mock-ups irradiated to a heating level of 2W/g, This paper gives an overview of the development, describes the calorimetric probe, and expected advantages such as the possibility to use complementary methods to get the nuclear heating measurement. Results obtained with mock-ups irradiated in ex-core area of the reactor are presented and discussed. (authors)

Carcreff, H. [Alternative Energies and Atomic Energy Commission CEA, Saclay Center, DEN/DANS/DRSN/SIREN, Gif Sur Yvette, 91191 (France)

2011-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

273

ARM - Public Information Materials  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

govPublicationsPublic Information Materials govPublicationsPublic Information Materials Publications Journal Articles Conference Documents Program Documents Technical Reports Publications Database Public Information Materials Image Library Videos Publication Resources Submit a Publication Publishing Procedures ARM Style Guide (PDF, 448KB) Acronyms Glossary Logos Contacts RSS for Publications Public Information Materials The ARM Climate Research Facility develops public information materials to communicate the purpose and objectives of the program to general audiences. These materials are designed to increase awareness of ARM Climate Research Facility goals and to document its scientific results to a lay audience. Public information materials include fact sheets, brochures, CDs, videos, press releases, and information packets. Approved materials are made

274

Materials/Condensed Matter  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Materials/Condensed Matter Print Materials/Condensed Matter Print Materials research provides the foundation on which the economic well being of our high-tech society rests. The impact of advanced materials ranges dramatically over every aspect of our modern world from the minutiae of daily life to the grand scale of our national economy. Invariably, however, breakthroughs to new technologies trace their origin both to fundamental research in the basic properties of condensed matter and to applied research aimed at manipulating properties (structural, physical, chemical, electrical, magnetic, optical, etc.). Increasingly, the frontiers of materials research include materials that are "strongly correlated," characterized by strong coupling between a material's electrons with other electrons, magnetism, or the material lattice itself. This coupling often results in novel behavior, such as superconductivity, that may lead to technologically important applications.

275

Structural Materials - Characterization  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Mar 14, 2012 ... Cr, are important structural materials for use in advanced nuclear ... holds promise for grain boundary engineering of surface and near-surface ... nuclear structural material Alloy 690 to illustrate the effects of shield gas, travel ...

276

Battery separator material  

SciTech Connect

A novel, improved battery separator material particularly adaptable for use in maintenance free batteries. The battery separator material includes a diatomaceous earth filler, an acrylate copolymer binder and a combination of fibers comprising polyolefin, polyester and glass fibers.

Bodendorf, W. J.

1985-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

277

Nanocomposites as thermoelectric materials  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Thermoelectric materials have attractive applications in electric power generation and solid-state cooling. The performance of a thermoelectric device depends on the dimensionless figure of merit (ZT) of the material, ...

Hao, Qing

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

278

Energy Absorbing Material  

To overcome limitations with cellular silicone foams, LLNL innovators have developed a new 3D energy absorbing material with tailored/engineered bulk-scale properties. The energy absorbing material has 3D patterned architectures specially designed for ...

279

Factors of material consumption  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Historic consumption trends for materials have been studied by many researchers, and, in order to identify the main drivers of consumption, special attention has been given to material intensity, which is the consumption ...

Silva Díaz, Pamela Cristina

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

280

Nanostructured composite reinforced material  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A family of materials wherein nanostructures and/or nanotubes are incorporated into a multi-component material arrangement, such as a metallic or ceramic alloy or composite/aggregate, producing a new material or metallic/ceramic alloy. The new material has significantly increased strength, up to several thousands of times normal and perhaps substantially more, as well as significantly decreased weight. The new materials may be manufactured into a component where the nanostructure or nanostructure reinforcement is incorporated into the bulk and/or matrix material, or as a coating where the nanostructure or nanostructure reinforcement is incorporated into the coating or surface of a "normal" substrate material. The nanostructures are incorporated into the material structure either randomly or aligned, within grains, or along or across grain boundaries.

Seals, Roland D. (Oak Ridge, TN); Ripley, Edward B. (Knoxville, TN); Ludtka, Gerard M. (Oak Ridge, TN)

2012-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "weapons-usable fissile materials" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

LANL: Materials Science Laboratory  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Materials Science Laboratory (MSL) is Materials Science Laboratory (MSL) is an interdisciplinary facility dedicated to research on current materials and those of future interest. It is a 56,000 square-foot modern facility that can be easily reconfigured to accom- modate new processes and operations. It compris- es 27 laboratories, 15 support rooms, and 60 offices. The MSL supports many distinct materi- als research topics, grouped into four focus areas: mechanical behavior, materials processing, syn- thesis, and characterization. Research within the MSL supports programs of national interest in defense, energy, and the basic sciences. The MSL is a non-classified area in the Materials Science Complex in close proximity to classified and other non-classified materials research facilities. The Materials Science

282

Orlando Materials Innovation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Ford Motor Company. Buddy Damm. Manager, Metallurgical Applications and Modeling Dept. The Timken Company. Frank Preli. Chief Engineer,. Materials and ...

283

Electronics Materials Staff  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Biomaterials Staff; Complex Fluids Staff; Sustainable Polymers Staff; Materials Science and Engineering Division Staff Directory; MML Organization. ...

2012-10-07T23:59:59.000Z

284

Standard Reference Materials  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Inn, KGW, Liggett, WS, and Hutchinson, JMR (1984), "The National Bureau of Standards Rocky Flats Soil Standard Reference Material," Nuclear ...

285

Enabling Materials Resource Sustainability  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Mar 6, 2013 ... REWAS 2013: Enabling Materials Resource Sustainability: Enabling Sustainability through Education and Consumer Awareness Sponsored ...

286

Materials and Society Initiatives  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

broader cross-section of TMS membership on topics including: resource sustainability, energy, environment, and sustainable materials design and processing.

287

Materials Reference Books  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Materials Science Reference Books. ... The Smithells Metals Reference Book Brandis and Brook; Butterworth-Heinemann; Published 1992; ISBN ...

2010-10-05T23:59:59.000Z

288

Materials Processing Fundamentals  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

About this Symposium. Meeting, 2010 TMS Annual Meeting & Exhibition. Symposium, Materials Processing Fundamentals. Sponsorship, The Minerals, Metals ...

289

Materials Processing & Manufacturing Division  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In its broadest scope, the Materials Processing & Manufacturing Division (MPMD) covers manufacturing from product design to production, integrating process ...

290

Materials Science/Crystallography  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Understanding the ormation of Methane Hydrate F ... J.247 agnetic Excitation Spectrum in Spin ... eutron Vibrational Spectroscopy of Organic Materials ...

2003-11-12T23:59:59.000Z

291

SRNL - Cementitious Materials Workshop  

... the Department of Energy, ... engineers, project managers, ... status and future direction of the cement materials technology in radioactive waste ...

292

Materials Technology @ TMS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Dec 10, 2010 ... ESTABLISHED MATERIALS TECHNOLOGIES ... A new, exciting development is the application of these techniques to biological systems, ...

293

Materials Technology @ TMS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Aug 13, 2012 ... ESTABLISHED MATERIALS TECHNOLOGIES ... These projects include the development and validation of modeling tools to deliver higher ...

294

Materials Analysis - TMS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Mar 17, 2004 ... 2004 TMS Annual Meeting & Exhibition: Materials Analysis: Understanding ... with the leading failure scenario based on visual observations.

295

Energetic Material – Explosives  

INL has invented a process for creating energetic materials, including trinitrotoluene (TNT).  By using a carbon dioxide environment, which reduces ...

296

Materials Processing Fundamentals  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Symposium, Materials Processing Fundamentals ... to be covered in the symposium are all aspects of the fundamentals, synthesis, analysis, design, monitoring, ...

297

Genomics of Electronic Materials  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Metamaterials; Highly correlated electron materials, eg superconductors, such as ... A near-field scanning microwave microscope for characterization ...

2013-08-08T23:59:59.000Z

298

What are Soft Materials  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... They form the basis of plastics used in consumer goods, automobiles ... important proteins within foods, preservative agents, and packaging materials. ...

2013-02-20T23:59:59.000Z

299

Inorganic Materials Group  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... experimental and computational materials science research. This work will help the US construction industry be competitive in advanced concrete ...

2011-11-08T23:59:59.000Z

300

Materials Technology @ TMS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Jul 10, 2012... for Learning and Dialogue on Energy Topics, Materials Sustainability ... and electronic equipment and infrastructure, energy production and ...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "weapons-usable fissile materials" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

MATERIALS PROCESSING FUNDAMENTALS: II  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Deodoro Trani Capocchi, Department of Metallurgical and Materials Engineering, Escola Politecnica de Universidade de Sao Paulo, Sao Paulo SP-

302

About - Materials Technology @ TMS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Administrative & Policy Manual. Scroll up. Scroll down. Technical Divisions Home · TMS Committees Home · Electronic, Magnetic & Photonic Materials ...

303

Materials Bowl application  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

PROMOTING THE GLOBAL SCIENCE AND ENGINEERING PROFESSIONS ... Bowl. Rules. Official Rules. 1. This contest is open to all Material Advantage ...

304

Materials Technology @ TMS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... MI; Elizabeth Holm, Carnegie Mellon University, Pittsburgh, PA; Peter Gumbsch, Fraunhofer Institute for Mechanics of Materials IWM, Freiburg, Germany.

305

Powder Materials Committee  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Powder Materials for Energy Efficiency in Transportation; January 2011: Organized By: Fernand Marquis Nanomaterials for Renewable Energy ...

306

Advanced neutron absorber materials  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A neutron absorbing material and method utilizing rare earth elements such as gadolinium, europium and samarium to form metallic glasses and/or noble base nano/microcrystalline materials, the neutron absorbing material having a combination of superior neutron capture cross sections coupled with enhanced resistance to corrosion, oxidation and leaching.

Branagan, Daniel J. (Idaho Falls, ID); Smolik, Galen R. (Idaho Falls, ID)

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

307

United States Government Department of Energy Memorandum  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

8-89) 8-89) EFG (07-90) United States Government Department of Energy Memorandum DATE: March 26, 2004 REPLY TO IG-30 (A03RL15) Audit Report No.: OAS-L-04-12 ATTN OF: SUBJECT: Audit of Consolidation of Hanford's Surplus Plutonium-Bearing Material TO: Assistant Secretary for Environmental Management INTRODUCTION AND OBJECTIVE The Department of Energy's (Department) Office of Environmental Management (EM) and National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) are responsible for stabilization, repackaging and safeguarding of about 13 metric tons of surplus weapons-usable plutonium or plutonium-bearing material (surplus plutonium). The Defense Nuclear Safety Board (DNFSB) agreed to the stabilization and repackaging as long as there would be a continued surveillance of the material.

308

Tailored Porous Materials  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Tailoring of porous materials involves not only chemical synthetic techniques for tailoring microscopic properties such as pore size, pore shape, pore connectivity, and pore surface reactivity, but also materials processing techniques for tailoring the meso- and the macroscopic properties of bulk materials in the form of fibers, thin films and monoliths. These issues are addressed in the context of five specific classes of porous materials: oxide molecular sieves, porous coordination solids, porous carbons, sol-gel derived oxides, and porous heteropolyanion salts. Reviews of these specific areas are preceded by a presentation of background material and review of current theoretical approaches to adsorption phenomena. A concluding section outlines current research needs and opportunities.

BARTON,THOMAS J.; BULL,LUCY M.; KLEMPERER,WALTER G.; LOY,DOUGLAS A.; MCENANEY,BRIAN; MISONO,MAKOTO; MONSON,PETER A.; PEZ,GUIDO; SCHERER,GEORGE W.; VARTULI,JAMES C.; YAGHI,OMAR M.

1999-11-09T23:59:59.000Z

309

Hydrogen Compatibility of Materials  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Compatibility of Materials Compatibility of Materials August 13, 2013 DOE EERE Fuel Cell Technologies Office Webinar Chris San Marchi Sandia National Laboratories Sandia National Laboratories is a multi-program laboratory managed and operated by Sandia Corporation, a wholly owned subsidiary of Lockheed Martin Corporation, for the U.S. Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration under contract DE-AC04-94AL85000 SAND2013-6278P 2 Webinar Objectives * Provide context for hydrogen embrittlement and hydrogen compatibility of materials - Distinguish embrittlement, compatibility and suitability - Examples of hydrogen embrittlement * Historical perspective - Previous work on hydrogen compatibility - Motivation of "Materials Guide" * Identify the landscape of materials compatibility documents

310

NEWTON's Material Science Archive  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Materials Science Archive: Materials Science Archive: Loading Most Recent Materials Science Questions: Hydrogen Compounds and Heat Conduction Weaving Carbon Nanotubes Metal as Electrical Conductor, Not Thermal Steel Changes with Age PETE, Ultraviolet Light, Benefits Strength of Yarn by Spinning Each Substance Unique Density Alloy versus Constituent Density Knowing When Material is Melted Crystalline Metal Versus Metallic Glass and Conduction Super Glue, Surgery, and Skin Silica Gel Teflon Non-Stick Property Salt Crystal Formation Lubricating Rubber Bands and Elasticity Materials for Venus Probe Crystalline Solids and Lowest Energy Sodium Polycarbonate and Salt Water Early Adhesives Surface Energy and Temperature Separating Polypropylene, Polyester, and Nylon Factors Effecting Polymer Flexibility

311

LIFE Materials: Fuel Cycle and Repository Volume 11  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The fusion-fission LIFE engine concept provides a path to a sustainable energy future based on safe, carbon-free nuclear power with minimal nuclear waste. The LIFE design ultimately offers many advantages over current and proposed nuclear energy technologies, and could well lead to a true worldwide nuclear energy renaissance. When compared with existing and other proposed future nuclear reactor designs, the LIFE engine exceeds alternatives in the most important measures of proliferation resistance and waste minimization. The engine needs no refueling during its lifetime. It requires no removal of fuel or fissile material generated in the LIFE engine. It leaves no weapons-attractive material at the end of life. Although there is certainly a need for additional work, all indications are that the 'back end' of the fuel cycle does not to raise any 'showstopper' issues for LIFE. Indeed, the LIFE concept has numerous benefits: (1) Per unit of electricity generated, LIFE engines would generate 20-30 times less waste (in terms of mass of heavy metal) requiring disposal in a HLW repository than does the current once-through fuel cycle. (2) Although there may be advanced fuel cycles that can compete with LIFE's low mass flow of heavy metal, all such systems require reprocessing, with attendant proliferation concerns; LIFE engines can do this without enrichment or reprocessing. Moreover, none of the advanced fuel cycles can match the low transuranic content of LIFE waste. (3) The specific thermal power of LIFE waste is initially higher than that of spent LWR fuel. Nevertheless, this higher thermal load can be managed using appropriate engineering features during an interim storage period, and could be accommodated in a Yucca-Mountain-like repository by appropriate 'staging' of the emplacement of waste packages during the operational period of the repository. The planned ventilation rates for Yucca Mountain would be sufficient for LIFE waste to meet the thermal constraints of the repository design. (4) A simple, but arguably conservative, estimate for the dose from a repository containing 63,000 MT of spent LIFE fuel would have similar performance to the currently planned Yucca Mountain Repository. This indicates that a properly designed 'LIFE Repository' would almost certainly meet the proposed Nuclear Regulatory Commission standards for dose to individuals, even though the waste in such a repository would have produced 20-30 times more generated electricity than the reference case for Yucca Mountain. The societal risk/benefit ratio for a LIFE repository would therefore be significantly better than for currently planned repositories for LWR fuel.

Shaw, H; Blink, J A

2008-12-12T23:59:59.000Z

312

Materials Science Division - Argonne National Laboratories, Materials  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Home Home About MSD Information Awards Visit MSD Administrative Staff Division Personnel Research Research Groups Condensed Matter Theory Emerging Materials Energy Conversion and Storage Magnetic Films Molecular Materials Neutron and X-ray Scattering Superconductivity and Magnetism Surface Chemistry Synchrotron Radiation Studies Threat Detection and Analysis Group Research Areas Careers in MSD Internal Sites Search Front Slide 1 November 2013 - Patricia Dehmer (second from right), Deputy Director of Science Programs, DOE Office of Science, joined Argonne Director Eric Isaacs(left) and Associate Laboratory Director for Physical Sciences and Engineering Peter Littlewood(second from left) to tour the recently-opened Energy Sciences Building. Among Dehmer's stops was the crystal growth

313

Material Disposal Areas  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Material Disposal Areas Material Disposal Areas Material Disposal Areas Material Disposal Areas, also known as MDAs, are sites where material was disposed of below the ground surface in excavated pits, trenches, or shafts. Contact Environmental Communication & Public Involvement P.O. Box 1663 MS M996 Los Alamos, NM 87545 (505) 667-0216 Email Material Disposal Areas at LANL The following are descriptions and status updates of each MDA at LANL. To view a current fact sheet on the MDAs, click on LA-UR-13-25837 (pdf). MDA A MDA A is a Hazard Category 2 nuclear facility comprised of a 1.25-acre, fenced, and radiologically controlled area situated on the eastern end of Delta Prime Mesa. Delta Prime Mesa is bounded by Delta Prime Canyon to the north and Los Alamos Canyon to the south.

314

Nonconforming Material Process  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

11 Nonconforming Material / Product Process 11_0304 Page 1 of 6 11 Nonconforming Material / Product Process 11_0304 Page 1 of 6 EOTA - Business Process Document Title: Nonconforming Material / Product Process Document Number: P-011 Rev. 11_0304 Document Owner: Elizabeth Sousa Backup Owner: Melissa Otero Approver(s): Melissa Otero Parent Document: Q-001, Quality Manual Notify of Changes: EOTA Employees Referenced Document(s): F-015 Nonconformance Report, REG-003 Record Register, ISDP-002 Training Production Process P-011 Nonconforming Material / Product Process 11_0304 Page 2 of 6 Revision History: Rev. Description of Change A Initial Release 08_0416 Added verbiage CAR/PAR/IO to Step 2 P-011 Nonconforming Material / Product Process 11_0304 Page 3 of 6 I. Purpose To establish the process for nonconforming material to be identified, segregated and dispositioned to prevent its unintended

315

MST: Organizations: Organic Materials  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Adhesive Bonding Adhesive Bonding Composites Encapsulation Materials Characterization Mechanical Testing Molding, Thermoforming, & Compounding Organizations Organic Materials Composite-to-metal adhesive bond Experimental/analytical study of composit-to-metal adhesive bond. The Organic Materials department in the Advanced Manufacturing and Processing Laboratory provides innovative prototype fabrication, full service small lot production, materials technology, processing expertise, and a broad range of organic material characterization and mechanical testing techniques. We encapsulate, we join and bond, we foam, we analyze and image, we build composite structures. We strive to make you, our customers, successful! We partner with you to find the right combination of materials, processing, and fixturing that will result in the highest value

316

Absolute nuclear material assay  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method of absolute nuclear material assay of an unknown source comprising counting neutrons from the unknown source and providing an absolute nuclear material assay utilizing a model to optimally compare to the measured count distributions. In one embodiment, the step of providing an absolute nuclear material assay comprises utilizing a random sampling of analytically computed fission chain distributions to generate a continuous time-evolving sequence of event-counts by spreading the fission chain distribution in time.

Prasad, Manoj K. (Pleasanton, CA); Snyderman, Neal J. (Berkeley, CA); Rowland, Mark S. (Alamo, CA)

2010-07-13T23:59:59.000Z

317

Absolute nuclear material assay  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method of absolute nuclear material assay of an unknown source comprising counting neutrons from the unknown source and providing an absolute nuclear material assay utilizing a model to optimally compare to the measured count distributions. In one embodiment, the step of providing an absolute nuclear material assay comprises utilizing a random sampling of analytically computed fission chain distributions to generate a continuous time-evolving sequence of event-counts by spreading the fission chain distribution in time.

Prasad, Manoj K. (Pleasanton, CA); Snyderman, Neal J. (Berkeley, CA); Rowland, Mark S. (Alamo, CA)

2012-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

318

New Superconducting Materials  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Superconductors with higher superconducting transition temperatures, higher critical currents, and better mechanical properties would be valuable. This report presents criteria to guide the search for higher transition temperature materials. To determine if candidate materials are suitably metallic, the study carried out detailed electronic structure calculations. These calculations identified boron-containing hydrides as particularly promising as a new class of possible superconducting materials that ma...

1994-11-04T23:59:59.000Z

319

Materials Science & Tech Division | Advanced Materials | ORNL  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Supporting Organizations Supporting Organizations Center for Nanophase Materials Sciences Chemical Sciences Division Materials Science and Technology BES Chemical Sciences, Geosciences, and Biosciences Program BES Materials Sciences and Engineering Program Joint Institute For Advanced Materials Advanced Materials Home | Science & Discovery | Advanced Materials | Supporting Organizations | Materials Science and Technology SHARE Materials Science and Technology Division The Materials Science and Technology Division is unique within the Department of Energy (DOE) System with mission goals that extend from fundamental materials science to applied materials science and technology. One key component of the division is a strong Basic Energy Sciences (BES) portfolio that pushes the frontiers of materials theory, synthesis

320

NETL: Advanced Research - Materials  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

High Performance Materials > Chrome Oxide Refractory High Performance Materials > Chrome Oxide Refractory Advanced Research High Performance Materials Chrome Oxide Refractory One notable NETL success is the development of a chrome oxide refractory material capable of working in slagging gasifier conditions. In this project, researchers first determined that one of the major failure mechanisms for chrome oxide refractories exposed to the intense heat and corrosive environment was spalling, or the chipping or flaking of refractory material from an exposed face. They used this information to formulate a high-chrome oxide refractory composition that resists spalling, resulting in a refractory with a longer service life in the gasifier. Inside an ultrasupercritical (USC) pulverized coal power plant, materials are exposed to temperatures up to 760°C and pressures up to 5,000 psi. Operating a USC system can improve power plant efficiency up to 47% and reduce emissions. However, finding boiler and turbine materials that can hold up under extreme conditions requires new high-temperature metal alloys and ceramic coatings, as well as computational modeling research to optimize the processing of these materials. Advanced Research Materials Development program successes in this area include the following:

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "weapons-usable fissile materials" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Processing Materials for Properties  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Functional Products: Fuel Cells, Solar Cells, Flat Panel Display, LED,. Data Storage, Environmental (materials for CO2 sequestration, soil remediation, water

322

Cytomegalovirus Standard Reference Material  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... and reagent manufacturers in production of their own calibrants and standards. ... control materials which would be traceable to a NIST standard. ...

2013-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

323

Heterogeneous and Brittle Materials  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Structural materials are increasingly being required to be stronger and lighter in support of energy conservation and global security. At the same time they are ...

324

DETE TION MATERIALS  

owned subsidiary of Lockheed Martin Corporation, for the U.S. Department of Energy’s National Nuclear Security ... Enhanced detection of special nuclear materials

325

Composite of refractory material  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A composite refractory material composition comprises a boron carbide matrix and minor constituents of yttrium-boron-oxygen-carbon phases uniformly distributed throughout the boron carbide matrix.

Holcombe, Cressie E. (Knoxville, TN); Morrow, Marvin S. (Kingston, TN)

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

326

Materials Technology @ TMS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Feb 16, 2011 ... Lactic acid is a renewable starting material, produced by bacteria grown in vats of biomass, such as glucose and starch from plants. It has been ...

327

Materials Technology @ TMS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... the pace of advanced materials discovery, innovation, manufacture, and commercialization. At a White House event on June 24, the second anniversary of .

328

Materials Technology @ TMS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Jan 11, 2010 ... Advanced materials, off-shore wind power, quantum physics, nanoscience, and metrology are a few of the research areas that will be pursued ...

329

Integrated Computational Materials Education  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This short course is based on the Summer School for Integrated Computational Materials Education, which was developed to meet this need. We will present a ...

330

Hazardous Material Security (Maryland)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

All facilities processing, storing, managing, or transporting hazardous materials must be evaluated every five years for security issues. A report must be submitted to the Department of the...

331

Emerging Materials Technology  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Posted on: 6/19/2013 12:00:00 AM... As materials science and engineering expands to encompass new technologies, such as nanomaterials, biomaterials, and ...

332

Materials Technology @ TMS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Though well established as materials science and engineering fields, constant improvements are being made to the production of metals, the processing of ...

333

Ultrafine Grained Materials IV  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Nov 1, 2006 ... Print Book and CD-ROM: Advances in Superplasticity and Superplastic Forming 2004. Print Book: Ultrafine Grained Materials III. Print Book: ...

334

Characterization of Advanced Materials  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Mar 6, 2013 ... In this study, the binary and ternary thermal energy storage materials have been performed the phase equilibrium and characterization studies ...

335

Structural Materials II  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Mar 6, 2013 ... Materials Corrosion in Molten Fluoride Salts: Kumar Sridharan1; Robert Sellers1; Guiqiu Zheng1; Guoping Cao1; Mark Anderson1; Todd ...

336

Hydrogen Compatibility of Materials  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

materials data related to hydrogen embrittlement - Modeled after existing metals handbooks - Data culled from open literature * Peer-reviewed scientific articles * Public...

337

Composite of refractory material  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A composite refractory material composition comprises a boron carbide matrix and minor constituents of yttrium-boron-oxygen-carbon phases uniformly distributed throughout the boron carbide matrix.

Holcombe, C.E.; Morrow, M.S.

1994-07-19T23:59:59.000Z

338

Materials Degradation and Aging  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Aug 28, 2007 ... Improve plant capacity, reliability, and availability. Materials Degradation and Aging - An EPRI Nuclear Power Action Plan, Report No.

339

Materials Design Institute  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

enhancement. The materials community at LANL constitutes a very broad spectrum of cross-organizational interactions, and therefore, an inclusive multidisciplinary approach is...

340

Bioinspired Materials Engineering  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Novel bioinspired materials for sustainability and clean energy as emerging applications are also in the scope of the symposium. Presentations including ...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "weapons-usable fissile materials" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Materials - Deformation Joining  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

ways to combine advanced materials such as ceramic, intermetallics, cermets, and metal matrix composites (MMCs) together for use in complex vehicle engine components, as well as...

342

Materials and Society  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Electrical Energy Storage for Renewable Integration and Grid Applications: Status, Challenges and ... Materials R&D to Enable a Nuclear Energy Renaissance.

343

Exhibitor: STELLAR MATERIALS INC.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Booth #637 Detroit, Michigan. Thermbond is a unique new refractory material with features and benefits unavailable in traditional refractories. Thermbond is ...

344

Materials Technology @ TMS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Jan 7, 2013... engineering, computer science, mathematics, chemistry, biology, materials science, neutron research, and/or physics are eligible to nominate ...

345

Orlando Materials Innovation - TMS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We will create a materials innovation infrastructure with common resources for data and knowledge sharing that can be openly utilized for model development ...

346

Diagnostics and Structural Materials  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Feb 17, 2010 ... The entire MaRIE complex is predicated on a predictive theory, ... are primary candidate materials in fusion reactor cladding design due to their ...

347

Materials Technology @ TMS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Sep 9, 2009... achieve the ultimate goal of developing superconducting materials for real- world devices, such as zero-loss power transmission lines.

348

Materials Technology @ TMS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Mar 9, 2011 ... This team will focus on developing and manufacturing materials technologies that can be pushed to these extremes in next generation energy ...

349

Materials Reading Room  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

FEBRUARY 2004 ISSUE - "Materials Analysis: A Key to Unlocking the Mystery of ... Scenarios and Guidance (PDF); Future Female (Microsoft Word Document) ...

350

Standard Reference Materials  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... The Minerals, Metals and Material Society - TMS 2010 February 14-18, 2010 Booth #609 Washington State Convention Center Seattle, WA. ...

2011-03-02T23:59:59.000Z

351

Defects in Materials  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Sep 17, 2009... Kazuyuki Ueda3; Takashi Sekiguchi1; 1National Institute for Materials Science (NIMS); 2IMEM-CNR Institute; 3Toyota Technological Institute

352

Materials Technology @ TMS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Mar 1, 2013 ... Researchers at Penn State University have designed a special material ... and less power consumption than possible with current technology.

353

Multiphase and Multicomponent Materials  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The microstructure of the adhered material consisted of oxide ligaments ( nanowires, NWs) that served to attach the debris to tool steel surface as revealed by ...

354

Materials Technology @ TMS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Dec 12, 2010... in my opinion, is raising the consciousness of the materials science ... quality and human health is spreading more rapidly than innovation in ...

355

JOM - Materials Technology @ TMS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Mar 10, 2010 ... The garment represents a futuristic makeover of that traditional and popular clothing material standby, cotton. Scientists in the Textiles ...

356

Biological Materials Science Symposium  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The structure and properties of biological materials exhibit a breadth and complexity .... Protective Role of Arapaima Scales: Structure and Mechanical Behavior.

357

Materials Technology @ TMS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Apr 26, 2010... in part, on an earlier discovery by Jay Narayan, a 1999 TMS Fellow and John C. Fan Distinguished Chair Professor of Materials Science and ...

358

Electrochemistry of Porous Materials  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Dec 31, 2012 ... Electrochemistry of Porous Materials is the book under review. The book is written by Antonio Domenech Carbo,and published by CRC press.

359

Building Materials Portal  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... In the artificial ultraviolet (UV) weathering of materials, a need exists for weathering devices that can uniformly illuminate test specimens with ...

2013-04-08T23:59:59.000Z

360

Energy Absorbing Material  

To overcome limitations with cellular silicone foams, LLNL innovators have developed a new 3D energy absorbing material with tailored/engineered ...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "weapons-usable fissile materials" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Materials Technology @ TMS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Dec 17, 2009 ... Electronic, Magnetic & Photonic Materials .... will support the development of low- cost batteries for electric and plug-in hybrid electric vehicles.

362

Structural Materials Division  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Structural materials are everywhere ? from medical implants to skyscrapers ? and the SMD reflects that diversity in its thirteen technical committees. If you have ...

363

Structural Materials Division Council  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Structural materials are everywhere – from medical implants to skyscrapers – and the SMD reflects that diversity in its thirteen technical committees. If you have ...

364

Materials and Society Community  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

According to Apelian, another advantage for TMS in taking on the “Materials and Society challenge” is the diversity of its members and the array of viewpoints ...

365

Integrated Computational Materials Engineering  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Mar 4, 2013... behave if extrapolated to areas where data does not currently exist. ... With the executive directive of the Materials Genome Initiative (MGI), ...

366

Materials Technology @ TMS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Dec 12, 2010 ... Next-generation materials for renewable energy production and ... have made concerted efforts to work principles of industrial ecology and life ...

367

Materials Technology @ TMS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Aug 17, 2010... to the lithium ion-metal oxide batteries currently on the market. ... The team tested how much electricity the material could store after charging ...

368

Structural Materials III  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Mar 7, 2013 ... Materials and Fuels for the Current and Advanced Nuclear Reactors II: ... On the Evolution Late Blooming Phases in RPV Steels: Theoretical ...

369

Electrochemistry and Materials Properties  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Mar 6, 2013 ... In the frame of the development of a Molten Salt Fast Reactor concept, the corrosion behavior of structural metallic materials in contact with the ...

370

Composite Materials Committee  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Metal-Matrix Composites in Industry: A Database of Companies, Materials, and Products (TMS Members Only) · Technical Questions @ TMS: Metal-Matrix ...

371

Materials Technology @ TMS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Oct 5, 2010 ... A mechanical engineer who later became interested in materials science and biology, Suresh has done pioneering work studying the ...

372

Microwave Processing of Materials  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Furthermore, lower energy consumption is another aspect that the world should consider to cope with this matter. Microwave processing of materials is a clean, ...

373

Bearing Material Systems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Table 2   Single-metal bearing material systems...Bronze C C C D B 14 2 Electric motor bushings, home appliance bearings,

374

Materials Property Database (MPD)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Feb 8, 2007... generate the material data as a function of temperature. For Windows and Linux Pentium. CITATION: "Details of MPDB," JAHM Software, Inc..

375

Materials Technology @ TMS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Sep 30, 2011 ... Harvesting electricity from waste heat requires a material that is good at conducting electricity but poor at conducting heat. One of the most ...

376

Bioinspired Materials Engineering  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Bioinspired Crystal Growth by Organic/Inorganic Crystal Engineering · Bioinspired Materials Design from Renewable Resources · Biological Synthesis of TiNi ...

377

Materials Technology @ TMS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

May 22, 2009... smart grid technologies, batteries, and high-temperature materials) ... 15th Int'l Conference on Environmental Degradation in Nuclear Power ...

378

The Entire Material Science Archive  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Archives, Since January 2005 Table of Contents: Materials Scientist Two Phase Materials Nano-technology Projections Scents in Scented Candles Rubber Band Materials Metallic...

379

Vehicle Technologies Office: Propulsion Materials  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Materials Manufacturers use propulsion (or powertrain) materials in the components that move vehicles of every size and shape. Conventional vehicles use these materials in...

380

MULTISCALE PHENOMENA IN MATERIALS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This project developed and supported a technology base in nonequilibrium phenomena underpinning fundamental issues in condensed matter and materials science, and applied this technology to selected problems. In this way the increasingly sophisticated synthesis and characterization available for classes of complex electronic and structural materials provided a testbed for nonlinear science, while nonlinear and nonequilibrium techniques helped advance our understanding of the scientific principles underlying the control of material microstructure, their evolution, fundamental to macroscopic functionalities. The project focused on overlapping areas of emerging thrusts and programs in the Los Alamos materials community for which nonlinear and nonequilibrium approaches will have decisive roles and where productive teamwork among elements of modeling, simulations, synthesis, characterization and applications could be anticipated--particularly multiscale and nonequilibrium phenomena, and complex matter in and between fields of soft, hard and biomimetic materials. Principal topics were: (i) Complex organic and inorganic electronic materials, including hard, soft and biomimetic materials, self-assembly processes and photophysics; (ii) Microstructure and evolution in multiscale and hierarchical materials, including dynamic fracture and friction, dislocation and large-scale deformation, metastability, and inhomogeneity; and (iii) Equilibrium and nonequilibrium phases and phase transformations, emphasizing competing interactions, frustration, landscapes, glassy and stochastic dynamics, and energy focusing.

A. BISHOP

2000-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "weapons-usable fissile materials" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Critical Materials Strategy Summary  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

diplomacy. As the nation's leading funder of research on the physical sciences, DOE's capabilities with respect to materials research are substantial. Topics identified for priority research attention include rare earth substitutes in magnets, batteries, photovoltaic films and phosphors; environmentally sound mining and materials processing; and recycling. The eight programs and policies address risks, con- straints and opportunities across the supply chain,

382

Critical Materials Strategy Summary  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

diplomacy. As the nation's leading funder of research on the physical sciences, DOE's capabilities with respect to materials research are substantial. Topics identified for priority research attention include rare earth substitutes in magnets, batteries, photovoltaic films and phosphors; environmentally sound mining and materials processing; and recycling. The eight programs and policies address risks, con- straints and opportunities across the supply chain,

383

Nanocrystalline Heterojunction Materials  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Mesoporous nanocrystalline titanium dioxide heterojunction materials and methods of making the same are disclosed. In one disclosed embodiment, materials comprising a core of titanium dioxide and a shell of a molybdenum oxide exhibit a decrease in their photoadsorption energy as the size of the titanium dioxide core decreases.

Elder, Scott H. (Portland, OR); Su, Yali (Richland, WA); Gao, Yufei (Blue Bell, PA); Heald, Steve M. (Downers Grove, IL)

2004-02-03T23:59:59.000Z

384

Carbon Materials Breakout Group  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Materials Breakout Group Process Materials Breakout Group Process * Day 2, Thursday - Review results of Day 1 and modify if needed - Identify critical R&D needs - Outline R&D plan with key milestones - Report results to plenary Carbon Materials Breakout Group * Key Results - Target: get the science right to engineer carbon materials for hydrogen storage * Integrate theory, experiment, engineering * Understand mechanisms, effects, and interactions ranging from physisorption to chemisorption - Theory * Provide "directional" guidance for experiments (and vice- versa) * Provide baseline theory to elucidate parameters affecting the number and type of binding sites and the heat of their interaction with H2 (∆H ) for a broad range of (highly) modified carbon materials

385

Materials of Gasification  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The objective of this project was to accumulate and establish a database of construction materials, coatings, refractory liners, and transitional materials that are appropriate for the hardware and scale-up facilities for atmospheric biomass and coal gasification processes. Cost, fabricability, survivability, contamination, modes of corrosion, failure modes, operational temperatures, strength, and compatibility are all areas of materials science for which relevant data would be appropriate. The goal will be an established expertise of materials for the fossil energy area within WRI. This would be an effort to narrow down the overwhelming array of materials information sources to the relevant set which provides current and accurate data for materials selection for fossil fuels processing plant. A significant amount of reference material on materials has been located, examined and compiled. The report that describes these resources is well under way. The reference material is in many forms including texts, periodicals, websites, software and expert systems. The most important part of the labor is to refine the vast array of available resources to information appropriate in content, size and reliability for the tasks conducted by WRI and its clients within the energy field. A significant has been made to collate and capture the best and most up to date references. The resources of the University of Wyoming have been used extensively as a local and assessable location of information. As such, the distribution of materials within the UW library has been added as a portion of the growing document. Literature from recent journals has been combed for all pertinent references to high temperature energy based applications. Several software packages have been examined for relevance and usefulness towards applications in coal gasification and coal fired plant. Collation of the many located resources has been ongoing. Some web-based resources have been examined.

None

2005-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

386

ALPHA SPECTROMETRIC EVALUATION OF SRM-995 AS A POTENTIAL URANIUM/THORIUM DOUBLE TRACER SYSTEM FOR AGE-DATING URANIUM MATERIALS  

SciTech Connect

Uranium-233 (t{sub 1/2} {approx} 1.59E5 years) is an artificial, fissile isotope of uranium that has significant importance in nuclear forensics. The isotope provides a unique signature in determining the origin and provenance of uranium-bearing materials and is valuable as a mass spectrometric tracer. Alpha spectrometry was employed in the critical evaluation of a {sup 233}U standard reference material (SRM-995) as a dual tracer system based on the in-growth of {sup 229}Th (t{sub 1/2} {approx} 7.34E3 years) for {approx}35 years following radiochemical purification. Preliminary investigations focused on the isotopic analysis of standards and unmodified fractions of SRM-995; all samples were separated and purified using a multi-column anion-exchange scheme. The {sup 229}Th/{sup 233}U atom ratio for SRM-995 was found to be 1.598E-4 ({+-} 4.50%) using recovery-corrected radiochemical methods. Using the Bateman equations and relevant half-lives, this ratio reflects a material that was purified {approx} 36.8 years prior to this analysis. The calculated age is discussed in contrast with both the date of certification and the recorded date of last purification.

Beals, D.

2011-12-06T23:59:59.000Z

387

Vehicle Technologies Office: Propulsion Materials  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Materials Materials Manufacturers use propulsion (or powertrain) materials in the components that move vehicles of every size and shape. Conventional vehicles use these materials in components such as the engine, transmission, fuel system, and exhaust after-treatment systems. Electric drive vehicles use propulsion materials in their electric motors and power electronics. Developing advanced propulsion materials is essential to commercializing new, highly efficient automotive technologies that have technical requirements that existing powertrain materials cannot meet. The Vehicle Technology Office's (VTO) research in propulsion materials focuses on four areas: Materials for hybrid and electric drive systems Materials for high efficiency combustion engines Materials to enable energy recovery systems and control exhaust gases

388

Material Challenges and Perspectives  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

General history and principals of Li-ion battery, characterization techniques and terminology of its operation will be discussed and explained. Current Li-ion battery applications and comparison to other energy storage and conversion systems will be outlined. Chemistry, material and design of currently commercialized Li-ion batteries will be discussed including various electrode materials for cathodes and anodes. The electrode material candidates and its physical and chemical properties including crystal structure, capacity, cycling stability, cost and safety. Also, current limitations of Li-ion batteries will be discussed.

Choi, Daiwon; Wang, Wei; Yang, Zhenguo

2011-12-14T23:59:59.000Z

389

ATS materials/manufacturing  

SciTech Connect

The Materials/Manufacturing Technology subelement is a part of the base technology portion of the Advanced Turbine Systems (ATS) Program. The work in this subelement is being performed predominantly by industry with assistance from national laboratories and universities. The projects in this subelement are aimed toward hastening the incorporation of new materials and components in gas turbines. Work is currently ongoing on thermal barrier coatings (TBCs), the scale-up of single crystal airfoil manufacturing technologies, materials characterization, and technology information exchange. This paper presents highlights of the activities during the past year. 12 refs., 24 figs., 4 tabs.

Karnitz, M.A.; Wright, I.G.; Ferber, M.K. [and others

1997-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

390

NUCLEAR MATERIALS ACCOUNTING SYSTEMSMODERNIZATION INITIATIVE...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

NUCLEAR MATERIALS ACCOUNTING SYSTEMSMODERNIZATION INITIATIVE, IG-0556 NUCLEAR MATERIALS ACCOUNTING SYSTEMSMODERNIZATION INITIATIVE, IG-0556 The Department of Energy (Department),...

391

Chemical Transformations of Nanostructured Materials  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

About this Abstract. Meeting, Materials Science & Technology 2013. Symposium, Solution-based Processing for Ceramic Materials. Presentation Title, Chemical ...

392

Perspectives for Emerging Materials Professionals  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Mar 31, 2013 ... Materials Science and Engineering in the Canadian Oil Sands - Challenges & Opportunities · Materials Science and Engineering: The Gateway ...

393

Laser Application for Material Processing  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Oct 10, 2012 ... Advanced Materials, Processes and Applications for Additive Manufacturing: Laser Application for Material Processing Program Organizers: ...

394

Materials Science Programs and Projects  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Materials Science Programs & Projects. ... In this project we measure the fundamental electrical properties of materials from bulk to nanoscale from ...

2010-09-22T23:59:59.000Z

395

Mechanical Behavior of Materials Committee  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Mechanical Behavior of Materials Committee is part of the Structural Materials Division. Our Mission: Covers relationships between microstructure and

396

Computational Discovery of Novel Materials  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Jul 31, 2012 ... Design and Discovery of Novel Energy Materials · Design of ... Design of Multifunctional Material Architectures Using Topology Optimization.

397

Materials Genome Architecture and Framework  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Oct 8, 2012 ... The DARPA-AIM initiative broadened computational materials engineering to address acceleration of the materials development and ...

398

Argonne TDC: Material Transfer Agreements  

Material Transfer Agreements. Materials produced by researchers at Argonne National Laboratory are often of interest to the private sector.

399

Graphene Materials in the Flatland  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Graphene Materials in the Flatland. Purpose: ... The 2-dimensional material called graphene remained undiscovered until a few years ago. ...

2011-10-25T23:59:59.000Z

400

Materials at LANL  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Exploring the physics, chemistry, and metallurgy of materials has been a primary focus of Los Alamos National Laboratory since its inception. In the early 1940s, very little was known or understood about plutonium, uranium, or their alloys. In addition, several new ionic, polymeric, and energetic materials with unique properties were needed in the development of nuclear weapons. As the Laboratory has evolved, and as missions in threat reduction, defense, energy, and meeting other emerging national challenges have been added, the role of materials science has expanded with the need for continued improvement in our understanding of the structure and properties of materials and in our ability to synthesize and process materials with unique characteristics. Materials science and engineering continues to be central to this Laboratory's success, and the materials capability truly spans the entire laboratory - touching upon numerous divisions and directorates and estimated to include >1/3 of the lab's technical staff. In 2006, Los Alamos and LANS LLC began to redefine our future, building upon the laboratory's established strengths and promoted by strongly interdependent science, technology and engineering capabilities. Eight Grand Challenges for Science were set forth as a technical framework for bridging across capabilities. Two of these grand challenges, Fundamental Understanding of Materials and Superconductivity and Actinide Science. were clearly materials-centric and were led out of our organizations. The complexity of these scientific thrusts was fleshed out through workshops involving cross-disciplinary teams. These teams refined the grand challenge concepts into actionable descriptions to be used as guidance for decisions like our LDRD strategic investment strategies and as the organizing basis for our external review process. In 2008, the Laboratory published 'Building the Future of Los Alamos. The Premier National Security Science Laboratory,' LA-UR-08-1541. This document introduced three strategic thrusts that crosscut the Grand Challenges and define future laboratory directions and facilities: (1) Information Science and Technology enabl ing integrative and predictive science; (2) Experimental science focused on materials for the future; and (3) Fundamental forensic science for nuclear, biological, and chemical threats. The next step for the Materials Capability was to develop a strategic plan for the second thrust, Materials for the Future. within the context of a capabilities-based Laboratory. This work has involved extending our 2006-2007 Grand Challenge workshops, integrating materials fundamental challenges into the MaRIE definition, and capitalizing on the emerging materials-centric national security missions. Strategic planning workshops with broad leadership and staff participation continued to hone our scientific directions and reinforce our strength through interdependence. By the Fall of 2008, these workshops promoted our primary strength as the delivery of Predictive Performance in applications where Extreme Environments dominate and where the discovery of Emergent Phenomena is a critical. These planning efforts were put into action through the development of our FY10 LDRD Strategic Investment Plan where the Materials Category was defined to incorporate three central thrusts: Prediction and Control of Performance, Extreme Environments and Emergent Phenomena. As with all strategic planning, much of the benefit is in the dialogue and cross-fertilization of ideas that occurs during the process. By winter of 2008/09, there was much agreement on the evolving focus for the Materials Strategy, but there was some lingering doubt over Prediction and Control of Performance as one of the three central thrusts, because it overarches all we do and is, truly, the end goal for materials science and engineering. Therefore, we elevated this thrust within the overarching vision/mission and introduce the concept of Defects and Interfaces as a central thrust that had previously been implied but not clearly articulated.

Taylor, Antoinette J [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "weapons-usable fissile materials" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Materials at LANL  

SciTech Connect

Exploring the physics, chemistry, and metallurgy of materials has been a primary focus of Los Alamos National Laboratory since its inception. In the early 1940s, very little was known or understood about plutonium, uranium, or their alloys. In addition, several new ionic, polymeric, and energetic materials with unique properties were needed in the development of nuclear weapons. As the Laboratory has evolved, and as missions in threat reduction, defense, energy, and meeting other emerging national challenges have been added, the role of materials science has expanded with the need for continued improvement in our understanding of the structure and properties of materials and in our ability to synthesize and process materials with unique characteristics. Materials science and engineering continues to be central to this Laboratory's success, and the materials capability truly spans the entire laboratory - touching upon numerous divisions and directorates and estimated to include >1/3 of the lab's technical staff. In 2006, Los Alamos and LANS LLC began to redefine our future, building upon the laboratory's established strengths and promoted by strongly interdependent science, technology and engineering capabilities. Eight Grand Challenges for Science were set forth as a technical framework for bridging across capabilities. Two of these grand challenges, Fundamental Understanding of Materials and Superconductivity and Actinide Science. were clearly materials-centric and were led out of our organizations. The complexity of these scientific thrusts was fleshed out through workshops involving cross-disciplinary teams. These teams refined the grand challenge concepts into actionable descriptions to be used as guidance for decisions like our LDRD strategic investment strategies and as the organizing basis for our external review process. In 2008, the Laboratory published 'Building the Future of Los Alamos. The Premier National Security Science Laboratory,' LA-UR-08-1541. This document introduced three strategic thrusts that crosscut the Grand Challenges and define future laboratory directions and facilities: (1) Information Science and Technology enabl ing integrative and predictive science; (2) Experimental science focused on materials for the future; and (3) Fundamental forensic science for nuclear, biological, and chemical threats. The next step for the Materials Capability was to develop a strategic plan for the second thrust, Materials for the Future. within the context of a capabilities-based Laboratory. This work has involved extending our 2006-2007 Grand Challenge workshops, integrating materials fundamental challenges into the MaRIE definition, and capitalizing on the emerging materials-centric national security missions. Strategic planning workshops with broad leadership and staff participation continued to hone our scientific directions and reinforce our strength through interdependence. By the Fall of 2008, these workshops promoted our primary strength as the delivery of Predictive Performance in applications where Extreme Environments dominate and where the discovery of Emergent Phenomena is a critical. These planning efforts were put into action through the development of our FY10 LDRD Strategic Investment Plan where the Materials Category was defined to incorporate three central thrusts: Prediction and Control of Performance, Extreme Environments and Emergent Phenomena. As with all strategic planning, much of the benefit is in the dialogue and cross-fertilization of ideas that occurs during the process. By winter of 2008/09, there was much agreement on the evolving focus for the Materials Strategy, but there was some lingering doubt over Prediction and Control of Performance as one of the three central thrusts, because it overarches all we do and is, truly, the end goal for materials science and engineering. Therefore, we elevated this thrust within the overarching vision/mission and introduce the concept of Defects and Interfaces as a central thrust that had previously been implied but not clearly articulated.

Taylor, Antoinette J [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

402

Appendix B to the Minutes for the Nuclear Energy Research Advisory  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Appendix B to the Minutes for the Nuclear Energy Research Advisory Appendix B to the Minutes for the Nuclear Energy Research Advisory Subcommittee Meeting Appendix B to the Minutes for the Nuclear Energy Research Advisory Subcommittee Meeting Please include these additional remarks in your transmittal of the subject report to DOE's Office of Nuclear Energy, Science and Technology. Perhaps the greatest security threat to the United States today, and of paramount concern to American citizens since September 11, 2001, is that nuclear weapon-usable materials will be stolen, seized, or secretly diverted from nuclear facilities and then used by terrorists to develop and deliver a crude nuclear explosive device, or by a hostile proliferant state to develop more sophisticated nuclear weapons. This is not the time for the United States to be launching an international research effort to develop

403

Microsoft Word - Document7  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

of U.S. Secretary of Energy Spencer Abraham and Minister of the Russian Federation for Atomic Energy Aleksandr Rumyantsev on Cooperation to Transfer Russian-origin High-Enriched Uranium Research Reactor Fuel to the Russian Federation The U.S. Department of Energy and MinAtom of Russia recognize the great significance of cooperation in the issue of transferring high enriched uranium (HEU) research reactor fuel of Russian origin to the Russian Federation as a mutual contribution to the reduction of global stockpiles of weapons-usable nuclear materials and, therefore, to reducing the threat of international terrorism and preventing the proliferation of weapons of mass destruction. Such cooperation, which is being implemented with the active involvement of the

404

Nuclear Energy Research Advisory Subcommittee Meeting  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

to the Minutes for the to the Minutes for the Nuclear Energy Research Advisory Subcommittee Meeting September 30 to October 1, 2002 MEMORANDUM To: Chairman, Nuclear Energy Research Advisory Committee (NERAC) From: Thomas B. Cochran, Member of NERAC Date: October 16, 2002 Subject: "A Technology Roadmap on Generation IV Nuclear Energy Systems," a report of the NERAC Subcommittee on Generation IV Technology Planning Please include these additional remarks in your transmittal of the subject report to DOE's Office of Nuclear Energy, Science and Technology. Perhaps the greatest security threat to the United States today, and of paramount concern to American citizens since September 11, 2001, is that nuclear weapon- usable materials will be stolen, seized, or secretly diverted from nuclear facilities and then used by

405

Plutonium disposition via immobilization in ceramic or glass  

SciTech Connect

The management of surplus weapons plutonium is an important and urgent task with profound environmental, national, and international security implications. In the aftermath of the Cold War, Presidential Policy Directive 13, and various analyses by renown scientific, technical, and international policy organizations have brought about a focused effort within the Department of Energy to identify and implement paths for the long term disposition of surplus weapons- usable plutonium. The central goal of this effort is to render surplus weapons plutonium as inaccessible and unattractive for reuse in nuclear weapons as the much larger and growing stock of plutonium contained in spent fuel from civilian reactors. One disposition option being considered for surplus plutonium is immobilization, in which the plutonium would be incorporated into a glass or ceramic material that would ultimately be entombed permanently in a geologic repository for high-level waste.

Gray, L.W.; Kan, T.; Shaw, H.F.; Armantrout, A.

1997-03-05T23:59:59.000Z

406

Licensing issues associated with the use of mixed-oxide fuel in US commercial nuclear reactors  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

On January 14, 1997, the Department of Energy, as part of its Record of Decision on the storage and disposition of surplus nuclear weapons materials, committed to pursue the use of excess weapons-usable plutonium in the fabrication of mixed-oxide (MOX) fuel for consumption in existing commercial nuclear power plants. Domestic use of MOX fuel has been deferred since the late 1970s, principally due to nuclear proliferation concerns. This report documents a review of past and present literature (i.e., correspondence, reports, etc.) on the domestic use of MOX fuel and provides discussion on the technical and regulatory issues that must be addressed by DOE (and the utility/consortia selected by DOE to effect the MOX fuel consumption strategy) in obtaining approval from the Nuclear Regulatory Commission to use MOX fuel in one or a group of existing commercial nuclear power plants.

Williams, D.L. Jr.

1997-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

407

Materials research at CMAM  

SciTech Connect

The Centro de Micro Analisis de Materiales (CMAM) is a research centre of the Universidad Autonoma de Madrid dedicated to the modification and analysis of materials using ion beam techniques. The infrastructure, based on a HVEE 5MV tandem accelerator, provided with a coaxial Cockcroft Walton charging system, is fully open to research groups of the UAM, to other public research institutions and to private enterprises. The CMAM research covers a few important lines such as advanced materials, surface science, biomedical materials, cultural heritage, materials for energy production. The Centre gives as well support to university teaching and technical training. A detail description of the research infrastructures and their use statistics will be given. Some of the main research results will be presented to show the progress of research in the Centre in the past few years and to motivate the strategic plans for the forthcoming.

Zucchiatti, Alessandro [Centro de Micro Analisis de Materiales CMAM, Universidad Autonoma de Madrid, c/ Faraday 3, 28049 Madrid (Spain)

2013-07-18T23:59:59.000Z

408

Public Scoping Meeting Materials  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Public Scoping Meeting Materials Public Scoping Meeting Materials Public Scoping Meeting Materials Fact sheets, presentations, and other information from the Conversion EIS Public Scoping Meetings. The following materials were made available during the DUF6 Conversion EIS public scoping meetings held near Portsmouth, Ohio, Oak Ridge, Tennessee, and Paducah, Kentucky, November - December, 2001. Notice of Intent PDF Icon Notice of Intent to Prepare an Environmental Impact Statement for Depleted Uranium Hexafluoride Conversion Facilities 60 KB details Presentation PDF Icon Overview: Depleted Uranium Hexafluoride (DUF6) Management Program 5.97 MB details DUF6 Fact Sheets PDF Icon Overview of Depleted Uranium Hexafluoride Management Program 174 KB details PDF Icon NEPA Activities for the Depleted Uranium Hexafluoride Management Program

409

Fission reactors and materials  

SciTech Connect

The American-designed boiling water reactor and pressurized water reactor dominate the designs currently in use and under construction worldwide. As in all energy systems, materials problems have appeared during service; these include stress-corrosion of stainless steel pipes and heat exchangers and questions regarding crack behavior in pressure vessels. To obtain the maximum potential energy from our limited uranium supplies is is essential to develop the fast breeder reactor. The materials in these reactors are subjected to higher temperatures and neutron fluxes but lower pressures than in the water reactors. The performance required of the fuel elements is more arduous in the breeder than in water reactors. Extensive materials programs are in progress in test reactors and in large test rigs to ensure that materials will be available to meet these conditions.

Frost, B.R.T.

1981-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

410

Mesoporous carbon materials  

SciTech Connect

The invention is directed to a method for fabricating a mesoporous carbon material, the method comprising subjecting a precursor composition to a curing step followed by a carbonization step, the precursor composition comprising: (i) a templating component comprised of a block copolymer, (ii) a phenolic compound or material, (iii) a crosslinkable aldehyde component, and (iv) at least 0.5 M concentration of a strong acid having a pKa of or less than -2, wherein said carbonization step comprises heating the precursor composition at a carbonizing temperature for sufficient time to convert the precursor composition to a mesoporous carbon material. The invention is also directed to a mesoporous carbon material having an improved thermal stability, preferably produced according to the above method.

Dai, Sheng; Wang, Xiqing

2013-08-20T23:59:59.000Z

411

FOR MATERIALS LICENSEES  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

To request Commission approval to publish in the Federal Register a final rule that amends financial assurance requirements for certain materials licensees in 10 CFR Parts 30, 40, and 70. The amendments would bring financial assurance requirements more in line with actual decommissioning costs for these materials licensees. SUMMARY: This paper contains a final rule amending financial assurance requirements for certain materials licensees. Eight comments were received on the proposed rule. Staff analysis of these comments concludes that the only recommended change from the proposed rule should be to use the existing definitions of waste processor and waste collector in 10 CFR Part 20, Appendix G, rather than introducing a new definition of waste broker in the regulations. BACKGROUND: The staff notified the Commission of its intent to develop a rulemaking to amend financial assurance requirements for materials licensees in SECY-01-0084 (May, 9, 2001). The staff

William D. Travers; Thomas Fredrichs Nmss/dwm

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

412

Structural Materials Modeling  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Mar 5, 2013 ... Sponsored by: TMS Materials Processing and Manufacturing Division, TMS ... Fei Gao2; Kiran Solanki3; Xin Sun2; 1Mississippi State University; 2PNNL; ... A Multiscale Metal/Hydride Mechanical Model for Used-Fuel Zircaloy ...

413

The Materials of Medicine  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Oct 1, 2008 ... “The natural human desire to reduce the limitations caused by disability ... pushing this skyrocketing demand for biomedical materials and devices. ... real- time monitoring of hormone concentrations, gas concentrations, and ...

414

Material Safety Data Sheet  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Material Safety Data Sheet MSDS of LITHIUM POLYMER battery (total 3pages) 1. Product and Company Identification Product 1.1 Product Name: LITHIUM- POLYMER Battery 1.2 System:...

415

Automotive materials usage trends  

SciTech Connect

The materials composition of US passenger cars is traced from 1960 and projected into 1990's. Sales-weighted average vehicle-weight trends are analyzed in terms of shifts in the large/small car mix, downsizing, and downweighting. The growth in the usage of lightweight materials: -high strength steels, cast/wrought aluminum, plastics and composites - are examined in detail. Usage trends in a host of other materials such as alloy steels, zinc, lead, copper, etc. are also discussed. An approximate quantitative analysis of changes in the usage of steel by the automotive industry worldwide show that about 10% of total decline in Western-World steel consumption is accounted for by the automotive industry. An assessment is presented for automotive industry use of critical materials such as chromium in alloy steels/cast irons and the platinum group metals in exhaust-gas catalysts. 10 references, 13 figures, 9 tables.

Gjostein, N.A.

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

416

Small Building Material Loan  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The Alaska Housing Finance Corporation (AHFC) offers a Small Building Materials Loan for applicants to complete or renovate property located within a "small community", as defined in the AHFC [http...

417

Nanostructured Materials for Advanced  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of electric vehicles (EVs) and hybrid electric vehicles (HEVs). High energy and high power densitiesT Nanostructured Materials for Advanced Li-Ion Rechargeable Batteries THE RECENT INCREASE IN demand

Cao, Guozhong

418

Advanced material appearance modeling  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

For many years, appearance models in computer graphics focused on general models for reflectance functions coupled with texture maps. Recently, it has been recognized that even very common materials such as hair, skin, fabric, and rusting metal require ...

Julie Dorsey; Holly Rushmeier

2009-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

419

2010 Critical Materials Strategy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This report examines the role of rare earth metals and other materials in the clean energy economy. It was prepared by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) based on data collected and research performed during 2010.

420

Heavy Vehicle Propulsion Materials  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The objectives are to Provide Key Enabling Materials Technologies to Increase Energy Efficiency and Reduce Exhaust Emissions. The following goals are listed: Goal 1: By 3rd quarter 2002, complete development of materials enabling the maintenance or improvement of fuel efficiency {ge} 45% of class 7-8 truck engines while meeting the EPA/Justice Department ''Consent Decree'' for emissions reduction. Goal 2: By 4th quarter 2004, complete development of enabling materials for light-duty (class 1-2) diesel truck engines with efficiency over 40%, over a wide range of loads and speeds, while meeting EPA Tier 2 emission regulations. Goal 3: By 4th quarter 2006, complete development of materials solutions to enable heavy-duty diesel engine efficiency of 50% while meeting the emission reduction goals identified in the EPA proposed rule for heavy-duty highway engines.''

Ray Johnson

2000-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "weapons-usable fissile materials" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

Bespoke Materials Surfaces  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Bespoke Materials Surfaces Bespoke Materials Surfaces Background The Department of Energy (DOE) has established performance and efficiency goals for power generation systems which will improve the ability of the U.S. energy sector to produce electricity efficiently with less impact to the environment. Power systems showing the most promise for reaching these goals require corrosion resistance alloys able to perform at very high pressures and temperatures. Increasing both the

422

Biomimetic hydrogel materials  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Novel biomimetic hydrogel materials and methods for their preparation. Hydrogels containing acrylamide-functionalized carbohydrate, sulfoxide, sulfide or sulfone copolymerized with a hydrophilic or hydrophobic copolymerizing material selected from the group consisting of an acrylamide, methacrylamide, acrylate, methacrylate, vinyl and a derivative thereof present in concentration from about 1 to about 99 wt %. and methods for their preparation. The method of use of the new hydrogels for fabrication of soft contact lenses and biomedical implants.

Bertozzi, Carolyn (Albany, CA); Mukkamala, Ravindranath (Houston, TX); Chen, Qing (Albany, CA); Hu, Hopin (Albuquerque, NM); Baude, Dominique (Creteil, FR)

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

423

Biomimetic Hydrogel Materials  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Novel biomimetic hydrogel materials and methods for their preparation. Hydrogels containing acrylamide-functionalized carbohydrate, sulfoxide, sulfide or sulfone copolymerized with a hydrophilic or hydrophobic copolymerizing material selected from the group consisting of an acrylamide, methacrylamide, acrylate, methacrylate, vinyl and a derivative thereof present in concentration from about 1 to about 99 wt %. and methods for their preparation. The method of use of the new hydrogels for fabrication of soft contact lenses and biomedical implants.

Bertozzi, Carolyn (Albany, CA), Mukkamala, Ravindranath (Houston, TX), Chen, Oing (Albany, CA), Hu, Hopin (Albuquerque, NM), Baude, Dominique (Creteil, FR)

2003-04-22T23:59:59.000Z

424

Container for radioactive materials  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A container for housing a plurality of canister assemblies containing radioactive material and disposed in a longitudinally spaced relation within a carrier to form a payload package concentrically mounted within the container. The payload package includes a spacer for each canister assembly, said spacer comprising a base member longitudinally spacing adjacent canister assemblies from each other and a sleeve surrounding the associated canister assembly for centering the same and conducting heat from the radioactive material in a desired flow path.

Fields, Stanley R. (Richland, WA)

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

425

Nuclear Material Management Abstract  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Nevada Test Site (NTS) has transitioned from its historical and critical role of weapons testing to another critical role for the nation. This new role focuses on being a integral element in solving the multiple challenges facing the National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) with nuclear material management. NTS is positioned to be a solution for other NNSA sites challenged with safe nuclear materials storage and disposition. NNSA, with site involvement, is currently transforming the nuclear stockpile and supporting infrastructure to meet the 2030 vision. Efforts are under way to consolidate and modernize the production complex . With respect to the nuclear material stockpile, the NNSA sites are currently reducing the complex nuclear material inventory through disposition and consolidation. This includes moving material from other sites to NTS. State of the art nuclear material management and control practices at NTS are essential for NTS to ensure that assigned activities are accomplished in a safe, secure, efficient, and environmentally responsible manner. NTS activities and challenges will be addressed.

Jesse C. Schreiber

2007-07-10T23:59:59.000Z

426

ATS materials support  

SciTech Connect

The technology based portion of the Advanced Turbine System Program (ATS) contains several subelements which address generic technology issues for land-base gas turbine systems. One subelement is the Materials/Manufacturing Technology Program which is coordinated by DOE-Oak Ridge Operations and Oak Ridge National laboratory (ORNL) for the Department of Energy. The work in this subelement is being performed predominantly by industry with assistance from national laboratories and universities. Projects in this subelement are aimed toward hastening the incorporation of new materials and components in gas turbines. The materials manufacturing subelement was developed with input from gas turbine manufacturers, material suppliers, government laboratories and universities. Work is currently ongoing on thermal barrier coatings (TBCs), the scale-up of single-crystal airfoil manufacturing technologies, materials characterization and technology information exchange. Westinghouse Power Generation and Pratt and Whitney each have material programs to develop dependable TBCs that enable increased turbine inlet temperatures while maintaining airfoil substrate temperatures at levels to meet the ATS life goals. Howmet and PCC Airfoils each have projects to extend the capability of single-crystal complex-cored airfoil technology to larger sizes so that higher turbine inlet temperatures can be attained in land-based turbines in a cost-effective manner. Materials characterization tasks are ongoing on TBCs in support of the industrial projects. In addition, a project on long-term testing of ceramics and ceramic-matrix composites for gas turbines is being conducted in support of programs at Solar Turbines, Allison Engines, and Westinghouse Power Generation.

Karnitz, M.A.; Wright, I.G.; Ferber, M.K.; Holcomb, R.S. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Rawlins, M.H. [Dept. of Energy, Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

427

BUILDING MATERIALS RECLAMATION PROGRAM  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report describes work conducted on the Building Materials Reclamation Program for the period of September 2008 to August 2010. The goals of the project included selecting materials from the local construction and demolition (C&D) waste stream and developing economically viable reprocessing, reuse or recycling schemes to divert them from landfill storage. Educational resources as well as conceptual designs and engineering feasibility demonstrations were provided for various aspects of the work. The project was divided into two distinct phases: Research and Engineering Feasibility and Dissemination. In the Research Phase, a literature review was initiated and data collection commenced, an advisory panel was organized, and research was conducted to evaluate high volume C&D materials for nontraditional use; five materials were selected for more detailed investigations. In the Engineering Feasibility and Dissemination Phase, a conceptual study for a regional (Mecklenburg and surrounding counties) collection and sorting facility was performed, an engineering feasibility project to demonstrate the viability of recycling or reuse schemes was created, the literature review was extended and completed, and pedagogical materials were developed. Over the two-year duration of the project, all of the tasks and subtasks outlined in the original project proposal have been completed. The Final Progress Report, which briefly describes actual project accomplishments versus the tasks/subtasks of the original project proposal, is included in Appendix A of this report. This report describes the scientific/technical aspects (hypotheses, research/testing, and findings) of six subprojects that investigated five common C&D materials. Table 1 summarizes the six subprojects, including the C&D material studied and the graduate student and the faculty advisor on each subproject.

David C. Weggel; Shen-En Chen; Helene Hilger; Fabien Besnard; Tara Cavalline; Brett Tempest; Adam Alvey; Madeleine Grimmer; Rebecca Turner

2010-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

428

Microwave impregnation of porous materials with thermal energy storage materials  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method for impregnating a porous, non-metallic construction material with a solid phase-change material is described. The phase-change material in finely divided form is spread onto the surface of the porous material, after which the porous material is exposed to microwave energy for a time sufficient to melt the phase-change material. The melted material is spontaneously absorbed into the pores of the porous material. A sealing chemical may also be included with the phase-change material (or applied subsequent tc the phase-change material) to seal the surface of the porous material. Fire retardant chemicals may also be included with the phase-change materials. The treated construction materials are better able to absorb thermal energy and exhibit increased heat storage capacity.

Benson, D.K.; Burrows, R.W.

1991-03-13T23:59:59.000Z

429

Microwave impregnation of porous materials with thermal energy storage materials  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method for impregnating a porous, non-metallic construction material with a solid phase-change material is described. The phase-change material in finely divided form is spread onto the surface of the porous material, after which the porous material is exposed to microwave energy for a time sufficient to melt the phase-change material. The melted material is spontaneously absorbed into the pores of the porous material. A sealing chemical may also be included with the phase-change material (or applied subsequent to the phase-change material) to seal the surface of the porous material. Fire retardant chemicals may also be included with the phase-change materials. The treated construction materials are better able to absorb thermal energy and exhibit increased heat storage capacity.

Benson, D.K.; Burrows, R.W.

1992-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

430

Microwave impregnation of porous materials with thermal energy storage materials  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method for impregnating a porous, non-metallic construction material with a solid phase-change material is described. The phase-change material in finely divided form is spread onto the surface of the porous material, after which the porous material is exposed to microwave energy for a time sufficient to melt the phase-change material. The melted material is spontaneously absorbed into the pores of the porous material. A sealing chemical may also be included with the phase-change material (or applied subsequent to the phase-change material) to seal the surface of the porous material. Fire retardant chemicals may also be included with the phase-change materials. The treated construction materials are better able to absorb thermal energy and exhibit increased heat storage capacity.

Benson, D.K.; Burrows, R.W.

1993-04-13T23:59:59.000Z

431

Microwave impregnation of porous materials with thermal energy storage materials  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method for impregnating a porous, non-metallic construction material with a solid phase-change material is described. The phase-change material in finely divided form is spread onto the surface of the porous material, after which the porous material is exposed to microwave energy for a time sufficient to melt the phase-change material. The melted material is spontaneously absorbed into the pores of the porous material. A sealing chemical may also be included with the phase-change material (or applied subsequent to the phase-change material) to seal the surface of the porous material. Fire retardant chemicals may also be included with the phase-change materials. The treated construction materials are better able to absorb thermal energy and exhibit increased heat storage capacity.

Benson, David K. (Golden, CO); Burrows, Richard W. (Conifer, CO)

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

432

Status and prospects of advanced fissile fuel breeders  

SciTech Connect

Fusion--fission hybrid systems, fast breeder systems, and accelerator breeder systems were compared on a common basis using a simple economic model. Electricity prices based on system capital costs only were computed, and were plotted as functions of five key breeder system parameters. Nominally, hybrid system electricity costs were about twenty-five percent lower than fast breeder system electricity costs, and fast breeder system electricity costs were about forty percent lower than accelerator breeder system electricity costs. In addition, hybrid system electricity costs were very insensitive to key parameter variations on the average, fast breeder system electricity costs were moderately sensitive to key parameter variations on the average, and accelerator breeder system electricity costs were the most sensitive to key parameter variations on the average.

Kostoff, R.N.

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

433

ON INTERNATIONAL CRITICALITY CODES FOR FUEL PELLETS IN FISSILE SOLUTION  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The reference calculations, based on the APOLLO-Pic method implemented in the framework of this study, demonstrated that the actual reactivity variation (benchmark no 20) is a monotonic decrease with pellet "dissolution". At the opposite of the contributor's results, based on the international criticality code SCALE, the reactivity loss with dissolution is weak: bfref =- 3000 pcm compared to hpde =- 25 000 pcm (50 %; P.F = 0.6) The discrepancy is mainly due to 238v resonant absorption which can induce, in this fuel double heterogenity problem no 20, as much as- 30 000 pcm KQ underestimation. It was pointed out that design-oriented transport codes must be improved by accurate deterministic formalisms: PIC equivalence method, subgroup theory (WIMSE), ultrafine slowing-down calculation (ROWDS). Ultimate confirmation of the reference results presented in this paper should be provided by a set of critical experiments which mock-up hypothetical dissolver geometries.

A. Santamarina; H. J. Smith; Cea Drn/der/sprc Cadarache; A. Santamarina; H. J. Smith; Cea Drn/der/sprc Cadarache; Hj. Smith

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

434

Bioinspired Materials Design from Renewable Resources  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

About this Abstract. Meeting, Materials Science & Technology 2010. Symposium, Bioinspired Materials Engineering. Presentation Title, Bioinspired Materials ...

435

Midwestern Radioactive Materials Transportation Committee Agenda...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Midwestern Radioactive Materials Transportation Committee Agenda Midwestern Radioactive Materials Transportation Committee Agenda Midwestern Radioactive Materials Transportation...

436

Geothermal materials development  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Advances in the development of new materials, the commercial availabilities of which are essential for the attainment of Hydrothermal Category Level 1 and 2 Objectives, continue to be made in the Geothermal Materials Development Project. Many successes have already been accrued and the results transferred to industry. In FY 1990, the R D efforts were focused on reducing well drilling and completion costs and on mitigating corrosion in well casing. Activities on lost circulation control materials, CO{sub 2}- resistant lightweight cements, and thermally conductive corrosion and scale-resistant protective liner systems have reached the final development stages, and cost-shared field tests are planned for the FY 1991--1992 time frame. Technology transfer efforts on high temperature elastomers for use in drilling tools are continuing under Geothermal Drilling Organization (GDO) sponsorship.

Kukacka, L.E.

1991-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

437

Apparatus for dispensing material  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An apparatus capable of dispensing drops of material with volumes on the order of zeptoliters is described. In some embodiments of the inventive pipette the size of the droplets so dispensed is determined by the size of a hole, or channel, through a carbon shell encapsulating a reservoir that contains material to be dispensed. The channel may be formed by irradiation with an electron beam or other high-energy beam capable of focusing to a spot size less than about 5 nanometers. In some embodiments, the dispensed droplet remains attached to the pipette by a small thread of material, an atomic scale meniscus, forming a virtually free-standing droplet. In some embodiments the droplet may wet the pipette tip and take on attributes of supported drops. Methods for fabricating and using the pipette are also described.

Sutter, Peter Werner (Beach, NY); Sutter, Eli Anguelova (Beach, NY)

2011-07-05T23:59:59.000Z

438

Optimized nanoporous materials.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Nanoporous materials have maximum practical surface areas for electrical charge storage; every point in an electrode is within a few atoms of an interface at which charge can be stored. Metal-electrolyte interfaces make best use of surface area in porous materials. However, ion transport through long, narrow pores is slow. We seek to understand and optimize the tradeoff between capacity and transport. Modeling and measurements of nanoporous gold electrodes has allowed us to determine design principles, including the fact that these materials can deplete salt from the electrolyte, increasing resistance. We have developed fabrication techniques to demonstrate architectures inspired by these principles that may overcome identified obstacles. A key concept is that electrodes should be as close together as possible; this is likely to involve an interpenetrating pore structure. However, this may prove extremely challenging to fabricate at the finest scales; a hierarchically porous structure can be a worthy compromise.

Braun, Paul V. (University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Urbana, IL); Langham, Mary Elizabeth; Jacobs, Benjamin W.; Ong, Markus D.; Narayan, Roger J. (North Carolina State University, Raleigh, NC); Pierson, Bonnie E. (North Carolina State University, Raleigh, NC); Gittard, Shaun D. (North Carolina State University, Raleigh, NC); Robinson, David B.; Ham, Sung-Kyoung (Korea Basic Science Institute, Gangneung, South Korea); Chae, Weon-Sik (Korea Basic Science Institute, Gangneung, South Korea); Gough, Dara V. (University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Urbana, IL); Wu, Chung-An Max; Ha, Cindy M.; Tran, Kim L.

2009-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

439

Oxygen ion conducting materials  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An oxygen ion conducting ceramic oxide that has applications in industry including fuel cells, oxygen pumps, oxygen sensors, and separation membranes. The material is based on the idea that substituting a dopant into the host perovskite lattice of (La,Sr)MnO.sub.3 that prefers a coordination number lower than 6 will induce oxygen ion vacancies to form in the lattice. Because the oxygen ion conductivity of (La,Sr)MnO.sub.3 is low over a very large temperature range, the material exhibits a high overpotential when used. The inclusion of oxygen vacancies into the lattice by doping the material has been found to maintain the desirable properties of (La,Sr)MnO.sub.3, while significantly decreasing the experimentally observed overpotential.

Vaughey, John (Elmhurst, IL); Krumpelt, Michael (Naperville, IL); Wang, Xiaoping (Downers Grove, IL); Carter, J. David (Bolingbrook, IL)

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

440

Ion Beam Materials Lab  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Facilities » Facilities » Ion Beam Materials Lab Ion Beam Materials Lab A new research frontier awaits! Our door is open and we thrive on mutually beneficial partnerships, collaborations that drive innovations and new technologies. April 12, 2012 Ion Beam Danfysik Implanter High Voltage Terminal. Contact Yongqiang Wang (505) 665-1596 Email Devoted to the characterization and modification of surfaces through the use of ion beams The Ion Beam Materials Laboratory (IBML) is a Los Alamos National Laboratory resource devoted to the characterization and modification of surfaces through the use of ion beams. The IBML provides and operates the core facilities, while supporting the design and implementation of specific apparati needed for experiments requested by users of the facility. The result is a facility with

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "weapons-usable fissile materials" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

Nuclear breeder reactor fuel element with axial tandem stacking and getter  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A breeder reactor fuel element having a tandem arrangement of fissile and fertile fuel with a getter for fission product cesium disposed between the fissile and fertile sections. The getter is effective at reactor operating temperatures to isolate the cesium generated by the fissile material from reacting with the fertile fuel section.

Gibby, Ronald L. (Richland, WA); Lawrence, Leo A. (Kennewick, WA); Woodley, Robert E. (Richland, WA); Wilson, Charles N. (Richland, WA); Weber, Edward T. (Kennewick, WA); Johnson, Carl E. (Elk Grove, IL)

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

442

Thermal energy storage material  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A thermal energy storage material which is stable at atmospheric temperature and pressure and has a melting point higher than 32.degree.F. is prepared by dissolving a specific class of clathrate forming compounds, such as tetra n-propyl or tetra n-butyl ammonium fluoride, in water to form a substantially solid clathrate. The resultant thermal energy storage material is capable of absorbing heat from or releasing heat to a given region as it transforms between solid and liquid states in response to temperature changes in the region above and below its melting point.

Leifer, Leslie (Hancock, MI)

1976-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

443

Container for radioactive materials  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A container is claimed for housing a plurality of canister assemblies containing radioactive material. The several canister assemblies are stacked in a longitudinally spaced relation within a carrier to form a payload concentrically mounted within the container. The payload package includes a spacer for each canister assembly, said spacer comprising a base member longitudinally spacing adjacent canister assemblies from each other and sleeve surrounding the associated canister assembly for centering the same and conducting heat from the radioactive material in a desired flow path. 7 figures.

Fields, S.R.

1984-05-30T23:59:59.000Z

444

Materials for geothermal production  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Advances in the development of new materials continue to be made in the geothermal materials project. Many successes have already been accrued and the results used commercially. In FY 1991, work was focused on reducing well drilling, fluid transport and energy conversion costs. Specific activities performed included lightweight CO{sub 2}-resistant well cements, thermally conductive and scale resistant protective liner systems, chemical systems for lost circulation control, corrosion mitigation in process components at The Geysers, and elastomer-metal bonding systems. Efforts to transfer the technologies developed in these efforts to other energy-related sectors of the economy continued and considerable success was achieved.

Kukacka, L.E.

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

445

DISASTER PLAN Library Materials  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

New York: Neal-Schuman; 1992. Kahn, Miriam. Disaster Response and Prevention for Computer And DataDISASTER PLAN Library Materials For the University of Toronto Library System September 2013 disaster planning for archives, libraries and record centres. Second edition. Boston: Scarecrow Press, 2002

Sokolowski, Marla

446

Lead carbonate scintillator materials  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Improved radiation detectors containing lead carbonate or basic lead carbonate as the scintillator element are disclosed. Both of these scintillators have been found to provide a balance of good stopping power, high light yield and short decay constant that is superior to other known scintillator materials. The radiation detectors disclosed are favorably suited for use in general purpose detection and in medical uses.

Derenzo, Stephen E. (Pinole, CA); Moses, William W. (Berkeley, CA)

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

447

Advanced desiccant materials research  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The long-range goal of this task is to understand the role of surface phenomena in desiccant cooling materials. The background information includes a brief introduction to desiccant cooling systems (DCS) and the role of the desiccant as a system component. The purpose, background, rationale, and long-term technical approach for studying advanced desiccant materials are then treated. Experimental methods for measuring water vapor sorption by desiccants are described, and the rationale is then given for choosing a quartz crystal microbalance (QCM) for measuring sorption isotherms, rates, and cyclic stability. Background information is given about the QCM, including the quartz crystal resonator itself, the support structure for the quartz crystal, and the advantages and limitations of a QCM. The apparatus assembled and placed into operation during CY 1985 is described. The functions of the principal components of the equipment, i.e., the QCM, vacuum system, pressure gauges, residual gas analyzer, constant temperature bath, and data acquisition system, are described as they relate to the water vapor sorption measurements now under way. The criteria for narrowing the potential candidates as advanced desiccant materials for the initial studies are given. Also given is a list of 20 principal candidate materials identified based on the criteria and data available in the literature.

Czanderna, A.W.; Thomas, T.M.

1986-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

448

Recycle of battery materials  

SciTech Connect

Studies were conducted on the recycling of advanced battery system components for six different battery systems. These include: Nickel/Zinc, Nickel/Iron, Zinc/Chlorine, Zinc/Bromine, Sodium/Sulfur, and Lithium-Aluminum/Iron Sulfide. For each battery system, one or more processes has been developed which would permit recycling of the major or active materials.

Pemsler, J.P.; Spitz, R.A.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

449

Radiation in Building Materials  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

After years of studies and experiments scientists know that Radon is everywhere but found in high concentrations particularly in rocks and soil enriched in uranium Many of these rocks and soils are treated and compacted to create everyday building materials that are found in homes in which we live and work. A new

Iap Assignment; Katharine Chu

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

450

Battery paste expander material  

SciTech Connect

Battery paste expander material for the negative plate of a lead--acid storage battery had the following composition: finely divided carbon; barium sulfate; lignosulfonic acid; sulfur; carbohydrates; and Ca/sup 2 +/, Na/sup +/, and NH/sub 4//sup +/ ions. (RWR)

Limbert, J.L.; Procter, H.G.; Poe, D.T.

1971-10-26T23:59:59.000Z

451

New Materials for Spintronics  

SciTech Connect

One of the critical materials needs for the development of spin electronics is diluted magnetic semiconductors (DMS) which retain their ferromagnetism at and above room temperature. Spin polarization in DMS materials leads to the possibility of spin-polarized current injection into nonmagnetic semiconductor heterostructures. Such transport is of critical importance in the development of devices that utilize spin (e.g. spin-LEDs and spin-FETs). New magnetically-doped semiconducting oxides that show promise because of Curie points which exceed room temperature are currently being investigated in our lab and elsewhere. However, the detailed materials properties and mechanism(s) of magnetism in these systems have been elusive. In this talk, I will present recent results from our laboratory focused on the MBE synthesis and properties of these ferromagnetic oxide semiconductors. This work was funded by the PNNL Nanoscience and Technology Initiative, the US Department of Energy, Office of Science, Office of Basic Energy Sciences, Division of Materials Science and Engineering Physics, and the DARPA Spins in Semiconductors (SPINS) Initiative.

Chambers, Scott A.; Yoo, Young K.

2003-10-10T23:59:59.000Z

452

Old Electrochromic Materials  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Electrochromic Materials Electrochromic Materials DOE also supports the development of electrochromic coatings through several mechanisms. Three companies are engaged in development of commercial prototypes through the Electrochromics Initiative and an SBIR small business grant. LBNL and another DOE laboratory, the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) perform a variety of measurements to evaluate the energy performance and durability of these prototypes . Other research activities are intended to assist the efforts of the industry in general. At LBNL, research focuses on rapid development and analysis of electrode materials. Among recent accomplishments was the production of a stoichiometric form of Li0.5Ni0.5O by laser deposition and sputtering with excellent electrochromic properties. Dr. Stuart Cogan of EIC Laboratories tested the films and declared them to have "the highest coloration efficiency of any known anodic electrochromic material." EIC will test the films in their own devices in the near future. We also work on several binary electrodes produced by cosputtering from two targets simultaneously. For example, enhanced forms of tungsten oxide produced in this way have wide application because of the prevalence of tungsten oxide in today's devices. In addition to testing durability, NREL also investigates the degradation mechanisms which lead to failure in the hope of being able to correlate accelerated testing to real time failure as well as to diagnose and correct device problems.

453

Additive Manufacturing - Materials by Design  

Livermore materials scientists and engineers are designing and building new materials that will open up new spaces on many Ashby material selection charts, such as those for stiffness and density as well as thermal expansion and stiffness. This is ...

454

CRAD, Packaging and Transfer of Hazardous Materials and Materials of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Packaging and Transfer of Hazardous Materials and Materials Packaging and Transfer of Hazardous Materials and Materials of National Security Interest Assessment Plan CRAD, Packaging and Transfer of Hazardous Materials and Materials of National Security Interest Assessment Plan Performance Objective: Verify that packaging and transportation safety requirements of hazardous materials and materials of national security interest have been established and are in compliance with DOE Orders 461.1 and 460.1B Criteria: Verify that safety requirements for the proper packaging and transportation of DOE/NNSA offsite shipments and onsite transfers of hazardous materials and for modal transport have been established [DOE O 460.1B, 1, "Objectives"]. Verify that the contractor transporting a package of hazardous materials is in compliance with the requirements of the Hazardous Materials

455

NETL: Onsite Research- Materials Performance  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Materials Performance Onsite Research Materials Performance Emerging energy-production technologies such as gasification, solid oxide fuel cells, and ultra supercritical, fluidized...

456

Independent Materials Testing Laboratories, Inc.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... [02/L24] ASTM D2974 Moisture, Ash, and Organic Matter of Peat Material. ... Engaged in the Testing and/or Inspection of Materials Used in ...

2013-08-16T23:59:59.000Z

457

MULTIDISCIPLINARY FREE MATERIAL OPTIMIZATION 1 ...  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present a mathematical framework for the so-called multidisciplinary free material ... Free material optimization (FMO) is a branch of structural optimiza- tion.

458

Structural Materials - Irradiation Studies II  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Mar 15, 2012 ... Materials and Fuels for the Current and Advanced Nuclear Reactors: Structural Materials - Irradiation Studies II Sponsored by: The Minerals, ...

459

Materials for Infrastructure Applications - TMS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Jun 18, 2008 ... This presentation was given as part of the special Materials in Society session " Materials for Infrastructure: Building Bridges in the Global ...

460

OOF.File.Save.Materials  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... discussed in Section 2.6. The materials parameter is a Python list of names of Materials , eg, ['granite', 'schist', 'pumice'] . ...

2013-07-05T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "weapons-usable fissile materials" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


461

Sensors & Materials | Argonne National Laboratory  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

and engineering expertise to develop, test, and deploy sensors and materials to detect nuclear and radiological materials, chemical and biological agents and explosives. Argonne...

462

Sustainability: The Materials Role - TMS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Jul 2, 2008 ... home ... Improvements in processing, in materials substitution, in design to minimize materials usage, and in recycling of metals and polymers ...

463

Berkeley Lab - Materials Sciences Division  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

cultivate a collaborative and interdisciplinary approach to materials research and help train the next generation of materials scientists. Quick Facts Established in 1962 Number of...

464

Integrated Computational Materials Engineering (ICME)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The long term goal is to capture this information in efficient computational models and ... Generic Materials Property Data Storage and Retrieval for Alloy Material ...

465

Nuclear Materials Control and Accountability  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

data and reports on accountable nuclear material to NMMSS and Nuclear Materials Inventory Assessments.", to "The accounting system provides data for reporting on accountable...

466

Advanced Materials | More Science | ORNL  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

these new materials to industry. For example, an understanding of how defects form at the atomic level allows creation of improved materials that approach their theoretical...

467

Metallurgical and Materials Transactions. A.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Materials for Energy Systems will publish peer-reviewed, original research and review ... This monthly publication focuses on physical metallurgy and materials ...

468

Vehicle Technologies Office: Lightweight Materials  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

stiffness, and ductility) Improving their manufacturing (material cost, production rate, or yield) Developing alloys of advanced materials In the short term, replacing heavy...

469

Comparison of Thermal Insulation Materials.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??This thesis is about comparing of different thermal insulation materials of different manufactures. In our days there are a lot of different thermal insulation materials… (more)

Chaykovskiy, German

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

470

W.M.Tang_ESP PI Meeting_ANL_May,2013.pdf  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

of nuclear materials proliferation - No fissile materials required * Compact relative to solar, wind and biomass - Modest land usage * Not subject to daily, seasonal or regional...

471

ALTERNATE MATERIALS IN DESIGN OF RADIOACTIVE MATERIAL PACKAGES  

SciTech Connect

This paper presents a summary of design and testing of material and composites for use in radioactive material packages. These materials provide thermal protection and provide structural integrity and energy absorption to the package during normal and hypothetical accident condition events as required by Title 10 Part 71 of the Code of Federal Regulations. Testing of packages comprising these materials is summarized.

Blanton, P.; Eberl, K.

2010-07-09T23:59:59.000Z

472

Laser Detection Of Material Thickness  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Detection Of Material Thickness Detection Of Material Thickness Laser Detection Of Material Thickness There is provided a method for measuring material thickness. Available for thumbnail of Feynman Center (505) 665-9090 Email Laser Detection Of Material Thickness There is provided a method for measuring material thickness comprising: (a) contacting a surface of a material to be measured with a high intensity short duration laser pulse at a light wavelength which heats the area of contact with the material, thereby creating an acoustical pulse within the material: (b) timing the intervals between deflections in the contacted surface caused by the reverberation of acoustical pulses between the contacted surface and the opposite surface of the material: and (c) determining the thickness of the material by calculating the proportion of

473

Cool Roof Colored Materials  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Cool Roof Colored Materials Cool Roof Colored Materials Speaker(s): Hashem Akbari Date: May 29, 2003 - 12:00pm Location: Bldg. 90 Raising roof reflectivity from an existing 10-20% to about 60% can reduce cooling-energy use in buildings in excess of 20%. Cool roofs also result in a lower ambient temperature that further decreases the need for air conditioning and retards smog formation. Reflective roofing products currently available in the market are typically used for low-sloped roofs. For the residential buildings with steep-sloped roofs, non-white (colored) cool roofing products are generally not available and most consumers prefer colors other than white. In this collaborative project LBNL and ORNL are working with the roofing industry to develop and produce reflective, colored roofing products and make yhrm a market reality within three to

474

NEWTON: Determining Material Degradation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Determining Material Degradation Determining Material Degradation Name: Hamish Status: student Grade: 6-8 Location: CA Country: USA Date: Summer 2013 Question: I am working on a science project about photo-degradation of plastic film. My question is how much degraded a plastic film should be to say that it was 100% photo-degraded? The plastic film I am photo-degrading is turning into dust when I touch it, what level of degradation is that? Replies: Hi Hamish, Thanks for the question. You will need to define what you mean by photo-degraded. 100% photo-degraded could be that the film becomes translucent and lets through only blurry images. Or it could mean that the film turns to dust when you touch it. As long as you clearly state in your science project what you mean by 100% photo-degraded, you will be doing a good job.

475

Geothermal materials development activities  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This ongoing R&D program is a part of the Core Research Category of the Department of Energy/Geothermal Division initiative to accelerate the utilization of geothermal resources. High risk materials problems that if successfully solved will result in significant reductions in well drilling, fluid transport and energy conversion costs, are emphasized. The project has already developed several advanced materials systems that are being used by the geothermal industry and by Northeastern Electric, Gas and Steam Utilities. Specific topics currently being addressed include lightweight C0{sub 2}-resistant well cements, thermally conductive scale and corrosion resistant liner systems, chemical systems for lost circulation control, elastomer-metal bonding systems, and corrosion mitigation at the Geysers. Efforts to enhance the transfer of the technologies developed in these activities to other sectors of the economy are also underway.

Kukacka, L.E.

1993-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

476

NUCLEAR MATERIAL PACKAGING MANUAL  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The enclosed copy ofdraft DOE Manual M44I.I, Nuclear Material Packaging Manual, is forwarded for your review and comment. This satisfies commitment 5.1-3 in Appendix o ofthe implementation plan (IP) for recommendation 2005-1, Nuclear Material Packaging. The next milestone in Section 5.1 ofthe 2005-1 IP is forwarding the manual to the DOE 2005-1 Technical Review Board (TRB) by April 30, 2006 to begin the final TRB review. Therefore, your comments are requested by April 21, 2006, in order to allow one week for resolution and updating the manual before it is sent to the TRB. Please contact me at 301-903-4407 ifyou have any questions. t

The Honorable; A. J. Eggenberger; M. Whitaker Dr-i

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

477

Inorganic polymer engineering materials  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Phosphazene-based, inorganic-polymer composites have been produced and evaluated as potential engineering materials. The thermal, chemical, and mechanical properties of several different composites made from one polymer formulation have been measured. Measured properties are very good, and the composites show excellent promise for structural applications in harsh environments. Chopped fiberglass, mineral, cellulose, and woodflour filled composites were tested. Chopped fiberglass filled composites showed the best overall properties. The phosphazene composites are very hard and rigid. They have low dielectric constants and typical linear thermal expansion coefficients for polymers. In most cases, the phosphazene materials performed as well or better than analogous, commercially available, filled phenolic composites. After 3 to 5 weeks of exposure, both the phosphazene and phenolics were degraded to aqueous bases and acids. The glass filled phosphazene samples were least affected.

Stone, M.L.

1993-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

478

Materials - Recycling - Shredder Residue  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Recovering Materials from Shredder Residue Recovering Materials from Shredder Residue Obsolete automobiles, home appliances and other metal-containing scrap are shredded for the recovery of metals. More than 50% of the material shredded is automobiles. In the United States, shredders generate about 5 million tons of shredder residue every year. Similar amounts are produced in Europe and in the Pacific Rim. Because recycling shredder waste has not been profitable, most of it ends up in landfills; smaller amounts are incinerated. Argonne researchers have developed and tested a process to recover polymers and metals from shredder residue. A 2-ton/hr pilot plant, consisting of a mechanical separation facility and a six-stage wet density/froth flotation plant, was built at Argonne. In the mechanical part of the plant, the shredder waste was separated into five primary components: a polymer fraction (about 45% by weight), a residual metals concentrate (about 10% by weight), a polyurethane foam portion (about 5% by weight), an organic-rich fraction (about 25% by weight) and a metal oxides fraction (about 15% by weight). The polymer fraction was then separated further in the wet density/froth flotation system to recover individual plastic types or compatible families of polymers.

479

Materials Science and Engineering  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Materials Science and Engineering Materials Science and Engineering 1 Fe---Cr A lloys f or A dvanced N uclear E nergy A pplica9ons Ron S caMaterials Science and Engineering 2 Thermodynamic S tabiliza9on o f G rain S ize The concept is that non---equilibrium solutes introduced by mechanical alloying can segregate to grain b oundaries, p roducing

480

Vibrational Thermodynamics of Materials  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Abstract. The literature on vibrational thermodynamics of materials is reviewed. The emphasis is on metals and alloys, especially on the progress over the last decade in understanding differences in the vibrational entropy of different alloy phases and phase transformations. Some results on carbides, nitrides, oxides, hydrides and lithium-storage materials are also covered. Principles of harmonic phonons in alloys are organized into thermodynamic models for unmixing and ordering transformations on an Ising lattice, and extended for non-harmonic potentials. Owing to the high accuracy required for the phonon frequencies, quantitative predictions of vibrational entropy with analytical models prove elusive. Accurate tools for such calculations or measurements were challenging for many years, but are more accessible today. Ab-initio methods for calculating phonons in solids are summarized. The experimental techniques of calorimetry, inelastic neutron scattering, and inelastic x-ray scattering are explained with enough detail to show the issues of using these methods for investigations of vibrational thermodynamics. The explanations extend to methods of data analysis that affect the accuracy of thermodynamic information. It is sometimes possible to identify the structural and chemical origins of the differences in vibrational entropy of materials, and the number of these assessments is growing. There has been

Brent Fultz

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "weapons-usable fissile materials" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


481

Coated ceramic breeder materials  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A lithium containing ceramic breeder material is described which is coated with a neutron multiplier