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Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "weapons nonproliferation policy" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


1

EIS-0218: Proposed Nuclear Weapons Nonproliferation Policy Concerning...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

18: Proposed Nuclear Weapons Nonproliferation Policy Concerning Foreign Research Reactor Spent Nuclear Fuel EIS-0218: Proposed Nuclear Weapons Nonproliferation Policy Concerning...

2

EIS-0218: Proposed Nuclear Weapons Nonproliferation Policy Concerning  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

18: Proposed Nuclear Weapons Nonproliferation Policy 18: Proposed Nuclear Weapons Nonproliferation Policy Concerning Foreign Research Reactor Spent Nuclear Fuel EIS-0218: Proposed Nuclear Weapons Nonproliferation Policy Concerning Foreign Research Reactor Spent Nuclear Fuel SUMMARY This study analyzes the potential environmental impacts of adopting a policy to manage foreign research reactor spent nuclear fuel containing uranium enriched in the United States. In particular, the study examines the comparative impacts of several alternative approaches to managing the spent fuel. The analysis demonstrates that the impacts on the environmental, workers and the general public of implementing any of the alternative management approaches would be small and within applicable Federal and state regulator limits. PUBLIC COMMENT OPPORTUNITIES

3

The future of the Non-Proliferation Treaty and U.S. nuclear weapons policy .  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??This thesis addresses the viability of the Treaty on the Non-Proliferation of Nuclear Weapons – NPT for short – in light of U.S. nuclear weapons… (more)

Claussen, Bjørn Ragnar

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

4

Record of Decision for the Final EIS on Proposed Nuclear Weapons Nonproliferation Policy Concerning Foreign Research Reactor Spent Nuclear Fuel  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

5091 5091 Friday May 17, 1996 Part IV Department of Energy Record of Decision for the Final Environmental Impact Statement on a Proposed Nuclear Weapons Nonproliferation Policy Concerning Foreign Research Reactor Spent Nuclear Fuel; Notice 25092 Federal Register / Vol. 61, No. 97 / Friday, May 17, 1996 / Notices DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Record of Decision for the Final Environmental Impact Statement on a Proposed Nuclear Weapons Nonproliferation Policy Concerning Foreign Research Reactor Spent Nuclear Fuel AGENCY: Department of Energy. ACTION: Record of decision. SUMMARY: DOE, in consultation with the Department of State, has decided to implement a new foreign research reactor spent fuel acceptance policy as specified in the Preferred Alternative contained in the Final Environmental Impact Statement on a Proposed

5

Technical Nonproliferation Policy Support (TNPS), Nonproliferation and  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Technical Nonproliferation Policy Support Technical Nonproliferation Policy Support (TNPS) Nonproliferation & National Security (NPNS) Overview Technical Nonproliferation Policy Support Strategic Trade Control Review of export license applications Multilateral Export Control Arrangements Interdiction Engagement & Training INECP INSEP GIPP Safeguards Concepts and Approaches Human Capital Development Additional Protocol Technical Assistance National Security Systems & Assessments National Security Information Systems Vulnerability Assessment Team (VAT) Radiation Detection & Response (RDR) Contact NPNS Other Major Programs Work with Argonne Contact us For Employees Site Map Help Join us on Facebook Follow us on Twitter NE Division on Flickr Nonproliferation and National Security Program Technical Nonproliferation Policy Support (TNPS)

6

US nuclear weapons policy  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We are closing chapter one'' of the nuclear age. Whatever happens to the Soviet Union and to Europe, some of the major determinants of nuclear policy will not be what they have been for the last forty-five years. Part of the task for US nuclear weapons policy is to adapt its nuclear forces and the oganizations managing them to the present, highly uncertain, but not urgently competitive situation between the US and the Soviet Union. Containment is no longer the appropriate watchword. Stabilization in the face of uncertainty, a more complicated and politically less readily communicable goal, may come closer. A second and more difficult part of the task is to deal with what may be the greatest potential source of danger to come out of the end of the cold war: the breakup of some of the cooperative institutions that managed the nuclear threat and were created by the cold war. These cooperative institutions, principally the North Atlantic Treaty Organization (NATO), the Warsaw Pact, the US-Japan alliance, were not created specifically to manage the nuclear threat, but manage it they did. A third task for nuclear weapons policy is that of dealing with nuclear proliferation under modern conditions when the technologies needed to field effective nuclear weapons systems and their command and control apparatus are ever more widely available, and the leverage over some potential proliferators, which stemmed from superpower military support, is likely to be on the wane. This paper will make some suggestions regarding these tasks, bearing in mind that the unsettled nature of that part of the world most likely to become involved in nuclear weapons decisions today must make any suggestions tentative and the allowance for surprise more than usually important.

May, M.

1990-12-05T23:59:59.000Z

7

Regimes At Work: The Nonproliferation Order And Indian Nuclear Policy .  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??This thesis claims that by constituting a certain range of possible identities for countries, the nuclear nonproliferation regime facilitated India's forging of non-weaponized nuclear deterrence… (more)

Sasikumar, Karthika

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

8

Policy Name: Weapons Policy Originating/Responsible Department: University Safety  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Policy Name: Weapons Policy Originating/Responsible Department: University Safety Approval the following concerns, obstacles, and risks: · Weapons (such as Firearms and Replica Weapons) have to display Weapons as an illustration or statement of their research; · Carleton University owns Weapons

Carleton University

9

United States Nuclear Energy and Non-Proliferation Policy  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

I believe that U.S. nuclear energy and non-proliferation policy is not well understood, and I hope ... I shall speak first about the role of nuclear energy within the context of overall energy policy, then about ...

Daniel P. Serwer

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

10

The doctrine of the nuclear-weapon states and the future of non-proliferation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Less than a year remains before the critical conference in April 1995 to review and extend the nuclear Non-Proliferation Treaty (NPT), the main international barrier to the proliferation of nuclear weapons. This is a critical moment for the United States. With the end of the Cold War, the likelihood of nuclear war with the states of the former Soviet Union has been radically reduced, but there is greatly increased concern over the potential threats from states or sub-state groups seeking to develop or acquire nuclear weapons and other weapons of mass destruction.

Panofsky, W.K.H.; Bunn, G.

1994-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

11

Policy on Firearms, Explosives, and Other Weapons  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Page | 1 Policy on Firearms, Explosives, and Other Weapons Responsible Administrative Unit for the Colorado School of Mines. Unregulated possession of weapons on the university campus creates forth the policy on the use and storage of firearms, explosives and other dangerous or illegal weapons

Szymczak, Andrzej

12

Yeshiva University Weapons Policy The possession of any weapon (as defined in local, state and federal statutes, and includes, without  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Yeshiva University Weapons Policy The possession of any weapon (as defined in local, state in criminal prosecution. In addition, the University reserves the right to confiscate the weapon. This Policy of whether the possessor is licensed to carry that weapon. Exceptions to this Policy may only be made

Yates, Andrew

13

U.S. weapons-usable plutonium disposition policy: Implementation of the MOX fuel option  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A comprehensive case study was conducted on the policy problem of disposing of US weapons-grade plutonium, which has been declared surplus to strategic defense needs. Specifically, implementation of the mixed-oxide fuel disposition option was examined in the context of national and international nonproliferation policy, and in contrast to US plutonium policy. The study reveals numerous difficulties in achieving effective implementation of the mixed-oxide fuel option including unresolved licensing and regulatory issues, technological uncertainties, public opposition, potentially conflicting federal policies, and the need for international assurances of reciprocal plutonium disposition activities. It is believed that these difficulties can be resolved in time so that the implementation of the mixed-oxide fuel option can eventually be effective in accomplishing its policy objective.

Woods, A.L. [ed.] [Amarillo National Resource Center for Plutonium, TX (United States); Gonzalez, V.L. [Texas A and M Univ., College Station, TX (United States). Dept. of Political Science

1998-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

14

Office Of NONprOliferatiON  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Of NONprOliferatiON Of NONprOliferatiON aNd iNterNatiONal Security July 2011 www.nnsa.doe.gov National Nuclear Security Administration ENERGY U.S. DEPARTMENT OF Develop and implement DOE/NNSA nonproliferation and arms control policy to reduce the risk of weapons of mass destruction. control the spread of WMD-related material, equipment, technology and expertise. Safeguard and Secure nuclear material to prevent its diversion, theft and sabotage. Negotiate, monitor and verify compliance with international nonproliferation and arms control treaties and agreements. NNSA's Office of Nonproliferation and international Security (NiS) provides leadership in the formulation and implementation of nonproliferation, nuclear security and arms control

15

Nuclear nonproliferation strategies for South Asia  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Continued expansion of the nuclear weapons capabilities of India and Pakistan, coupled with ongoing conflict between them, raises the probability of nuclear war in South Asia. A nuclear arms race between India and Pakistan could also harm efforts to discourage other nations from acquiring nuclear weapons. United States policy opposes the spread of nuclear weapons because proliferation increases threats to U.S. national security and to world peace and stability. However, there is debate on the dangers of an escalating arms race in South Asia. Steps taken by the United States and other countries to persuade India and Pakistan to end their nuclear weapons programs have had limited success, at most slowing down their pace. A complicating factor is that India maintains a nuclear capability in part to deter China, whereas Pakistan`s nuclear weapons capability is aimed at deterring India`s superior conventional and nuclear capabilities. Analysts and policy officials are divided on how to avoid an arms race in South Asia. The Clinton Administration has renewed efforts to break the deadlock over nonproliferation, but longstanding obstacles have blocked progress. Pakistan favors a regional approach to nonproliferation, while India insists on a global approach that treats the nuclear powers on an equal basis with non nuclear weapon countries. This report analyzes the nuclear capabilities of India and Pakistan and reviews several options for U.S. nonproliferation policy in South Asia.

Davis, Z.S.

1994-05-03T23:59:59.000Z

16

Reassessing U.S. nuclear weapons policy Harold Brown[1] and John Deutch[2  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 Reassessing U.S. nuclear weapons policy Harold Brown[1] and John Deutch[2] The end of the Cold policy objectives and risks compromising the value that nuclear weapons continue to make through. A declaratory U.S. policy of moving to eliminate nuclear weapons in a distant future will have no direct effect

Deutch, John

17

University Policy: Prohibiting Deadly and Offensive Weapons Page 1 of 2  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

University Policy: Prohibiting Deadly and Offensive Weapons Page 1 of 2 Governance & Policies WEAPONS Approved: October 26, 2004, President's Executive Cabinet Revised: June 12, 2012, President University adopts the following policy and procedure addressing the possession of deadly or offensive weapons

Hardy, Christopher R.

18

FIREARM/WEAPON PROCEDURE Following is The University of Montana's policy governing firearms and ammunitions. In  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

FIREARM/WEAPON PROCEDURE Following is The University of Montana's policy governing firearms area. A. Check-in Procedure 1. Request photo I.D. Weapons may only be accepted by those presenting a VALID photo ID. 2. Have owner read and sign the Weapon Contract . The officer checking in the weapon

Steele, Brian

19

Constraining potential nuclear-weapons proliferation from civilian reactors  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Cessation of the Cold War and renewed international attention to the proliferation of weapons of mass destruction are leading to national policies aimed at restraining nuclear-weapons proliferation that could occur through the nuclear-fuel cycle. Argonne, which has unique experience, technology, and capabilities, is one of the US national laboratories contributing to this nonproliferation effort.

Travelli, A.; Gaines, L.L.; Minkov, V.; Olson, A.P.; Snelgrove, J.

1993-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

20

Nonproliferation and arms control assessment of weapons-usable fissile material storage and excess plutonium disposition alternatives  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report has been prepared by the Department of Energy`s Office of Arms Control and Nonproliferation (DOE-NN) with support from the Office of Fissile Materials Disposition (DOE-MD). Its purpose is to analyze the nonproliferation and arms reduction implications of the alternatives for storage of plutonium and HEU, and disposition of excess plutonium, to aid policymakers and the public in making final decisions. While this assessment describes the benefits and risks associated with each option, it does not attempt to rank order the options or choose which ones are best. It does, however, identify steps which could maximize the benefits and mitigate any vulnerabilities of the various alternatives under consideration.

NONE

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "weapons nonproliferation policy" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

The Linkage Between Non-Proliferation, Deterrence Policy, Nuclear Testing and the Arms Race  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A major focal point for strengthening the Non-Proliferation Treaty (NPT), which is the central legal and political basis of the non-proliferation regime has been negotiation of a comprehensive test ban (CTB). ...

Lawrence Scheinman

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

22

Chapter 27 - Nuclear weapons  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract This chapter faces the realization that the same atoms that can produce life-saving electricity can also be used to construct weapons of mass destruction. Some facilities, such as enrichment and reprocessing, in the nuclear fuel cycle can also serve dual uses when considering proliferation. The original atomic bombs were constructed of highly enriched uranium and high-grade plutonium, but their development led to thermonuclear devices with much larger yields. Thus far, nuclear war has been avoided by policies such as mutual assured destruction and international agreements such as the Non-Proliferation Treaty. The International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) is charged with performing worldwide nuclear material safeguards inspections. The legacy of the nuclear weapons arms race has left considerable weapons-grade materials that must be dealt with.

Raymond L. Murray; Keith E. Holbert

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

23

US weapons-useable plutonium disposition policy: implementation of the MOX fuel option  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

US WEAPONS-USEABLE PLUTONIUM DISPOSITION POLICY: IMPLEMENTATION OF THE MOX FUEL OPTION A Thesis by VANESSA L. GONZALEZ Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas ARM University in partial fulfillment of the requirements... for the degree of MASTER OF ARTS August 1998 Major Subject: Political Science US WEAPONS-USEABLE PLUTONIUM DISPOSITION POLICY: IMPLEMENTATION OF THE MOX FUEL OPTION A Thesis by VANESSA L. GONZALEZ Submitted to Texas ARM University in partial fulfillment...

Gonzalez, Vanessa L

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

24

PUBLIC SAFETY WEAPON CONTRACT Following is the Public Safety Weapon Storage Contract. This contract outlines The University of Montana's policy  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

PUBLIC SAFETY WEAPON CONTRACT Following is the Public Safety Weapon Storage Contract. This contract requires all weapons (rifles, handguns, shotguns of any type or caliber including BB guns and pellet guns.) All weapons may only be checked-in AND checked-out by the owner of the weapon. The owner must always

Steele, Brian

25

To state the policy of LSU regarding the possession of firearms and dangerous weapons within its facilities and premises and  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

PURPOSE To state the policy of LSU regarding the possession of firearms and dangerous weapons other firearm from which a shot or shots are discharged by an explosive. Dangerous Weapons. Any gas, LSU prohibits the possession of firearms or other dangerous weapons within the campus residences

Harms, Kyle E.

26

Nonproliferation through delegation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Weapons Reductions and Nuclear Security Cooperation. Sarov,of Foreign Nuclear Installations: National Security Archive.Past: Nuclear Proliferation and American Security Policy.

Brown, Robert Louis

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

27

Strategic Trade Control: Nonproliferation Engagement and Training  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Nonproliferation Engagement and Training Nonproliferation & National Security (NPNS) Overview Technical Nonproliferation Policy Support Strategic Trade Control Review of export license applications Multilateral Export Control Arrangements Interdiction Engagement & Training INECP INSEP GIPP Safeguards Concepts and Approaches Human Capital Development Additional Protocol Technical Assistance National Security Systems & Assessments National Security Information Systems Vulnerability Assessment Team (VAT) Radiation Detection & Response (RDR) Contact NPNS Other Major Programs Work with Argonne Contact us For Employees Site Map Help Join us on Facebook Follow us on Twitter NE Division on Flickr Nonproliferation and National Security Program Technical Nonproliferation Policy Support (TNPS)

28

Nonproliferation | National Nuclear Security Administration  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

| National Nuclear Security Administration | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure Continuing Management Reform Countering Nuclear Terrorism About Us Our Programs Our History Who We Are Our Leadership Our Locations Budget Our Operations Media Room Congressional Testimony Fact Sheets Newsletters Press Releases Speeches Events Social Media Video Gallery Photo Gallery NNSA Archive Federal Employment Apply for Our Jobs Our Jobs Working at NNSA Blog Nonproliferation Home > About Us > Our Programs > Nonproliferation Nonproliferation One of the gravest threats the United States and the international community face is the possibility that terrorists or rogue nations will acquire nuclear weapons or other weapons of mass destruction (WMD). NNSA,

29

Proactive Intelligence for Nuclear Nonproliferation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The project described in this paper leverages predictive models for proliferation detection in order to assess the complementary questions of capability and intent as they relate to the potential for nuclear weapon development. The ability to proactively assess the likelihood of a state to engage in nuclear power acquisition and development for non-peaceful purposes is one of the greatest challenges for analysts and policy makers working on proliferation detection and deterrence. Of further difficulty is determining whether a state is at risk to provide indirect support for proliferation via the relationship between industrial input/output and the legal framework of trade. In general, it is possible to gather evidence about precursor activities to the achieved nuclear potential of a state that function as indicators of the state's intent to acquire and develop capabilities to support nuclear weapons. Reasoning with these indicators to predict intent and capability to proliferate is of utmost importance to facilitate nuclear safeguards, e.g. through proactive implementation of countermeasures. Such a predictive reasoning task is difficult to perform without computational aid. While the need for a proactive and multi-perspective approach to proliferation detection is widely recognized, there is a lamentable lack of computational tools applied directly to the task. Applications of predictive modeling to the domain of nuclear nonproliferation are limited to physical/chemical properties of nuclear materials, such as nuclear weapons simulations and stockpile stewardship. The aim of this project is to address this gap by leveraging methods and data from different mission areas in support of proliferation detection and prevention in innovative ways. More specifically, the approach implemented in this project combines methods in information analysis and probabilistic evidentiary reasoning with expert knowledge from discipline areas germane to proliferation detection, and evidence extracted from relevant data sources, to assess alternative hypotheses about specific proliferation detection problems.

Peterson, Danielle J.; Sanfilippo, Antonio P.; Baddeley, Robert L.; Franklin, Lyndsey

2008-05-12T23:59:59.000Z

30

SRS - Programs - Nonproliferation Programs  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

3/2012 3/2012 SEARCH GO spacer SRS Home Nonproliferation Programs In the crucial field of nuclear nonproliferation, SRS employee contributions helped to advance all three of the planned plutonium disposition facilities at the Savannah River Site: the Pit Disassembly and Conversion Facility (PDCF); Waste Solidification Building (WSB); and the Mixed Oxide (MOX) Fuel Fabrication Facility. A $345 million project, the WSB will process liquid waste from the MOX facility. After material is processed at the WSB, transuranic waste will be packaged and sent to the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant in New Mexico, and low-level waste will be packaged and sent to onsite or commercial off-site low-level waste disposal facilities. The mixed oxide fuel fabrication facility will be a major component in the United States' program to dispose of excess weapons grade plutonium.

31

Nuclear Nonproliferation Programs | ORNL  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Nuclear Nonproliferation Programs SHARE Nuclear Nonproliferation Programs image Oak Ridge National Laboratory covers the entire spectrum of nuclear nonproliferation work, from...

32

Nuclear Nonproliferation  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Nuclear Nonproliferation As more countries embrace nuclear power as a cost-effective and clean alternative to fossil fuels, the need exists to ensure that the nuclear fuel cycle is...

33

Nonproliferation and National Security Program - Nuclear Engineering  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Major Programs > Nonproliferation and Major Programs > Nonproliferation and National Security Program Nonproliferation & National Security (NPNS) Overview Technical Nonproliferation Policy Support Strategic Trade Control Review of export license applications Multilateral Export Control Arrangements Interdiction Engagement & Training INECP INSEP GIPP Safeguards Concepts and Approaches Human Capital Development Additional Protocol Technical Assistance National Security Systems & Assessments National Security Information Systems Vulnerability Assessment Team (VAT) Radiation Detection & Response (RDR) Contact NPNS Other Major Programs Work with Argonne Contact us For Employees Site Map Help Join us on Facebook Follow us on Twitter NE Division on Flickr Nonproliferation and National Security Program (NPNS)

34

Atoms for peace and the nonproliferation treaty: unintended consequences  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In April 2009, President Obama revived nonproliferation and arms control efforts with a speech calling for the worldwide abolition of nuclear weapons. His speech correctly acknowledged the threat of nuclear terrorism and the vulnerabilities of the related unsecure nuclear materials. Unfortunately, the president did not mention and has not mentioned in any speech the threat posed by at-risk radiological materials. Nonproliferation efforts have a well documented history of focus on special nuclear materials (fissionable weapons usable materials or SNM), and other key materials (chemical and biological) and technologies for a Weapon of Mass Destruction (WMD). Such intense focus on WMD related materials/technologies is essential for international safety and security and merit continued attention and funding. However, the perception that radioactive sealed sources (sources) are of less concern than WMD is unfortunate. These perceptions are based solely on the potentially enormous and tragic consequences associated with their deliberate or accidental misuse and proliferation concerns. However, there is a documented history of overemphasis on the nuclear threat at the expense of ignoring the far more likely and also devastating chemical and biological threats. The radiological threat should not be minimized or excluded from policy discussions and decisions on these far ranging scopes of threat to the international community. Sources have a long history of use; and a wider distribution worldwide than fissile materials. Pair this with their broad ranges in isotopes/activities along with scant national and international attention and mechanisms for their safe and secure management and it is not difficult to envision a deadly threat. Arguments that minimize or divert attention away from sources may have the effect of distracting necessary policy attention on preventing/mitigating a radiological dispersal event. The terrorist attacks on 9/11 should be a clear reminder of the inherent danger of diminishing or dismissing lower-level threats in exchange for enhanced focus on high priority special nuclear materials with the basis for this emphasis being solely on the magnitude of the consequences of a single event. Mitigating all possible or likely terrorist attacks is impossible; however, weaponized sources, in the form of a radiological dispersal device, have been a declared target material of Al-Qaida. Eisenhower's Atoms for Peace initiative promoted the spread of the paradoxical beneficial yet destructive properties of the atom. Typically, the focus of nonproliferation efforts focuses on the fissile materials associated with Weapons of Mass Destruction, with less emphasis on radioactive materials that could be used for a Weapon of Mass Disruption. Most nonproliferation policy discussion involves securing or preventing the diversion of weapons grade fissile materials (uranium (U) with concentration of over 90% of the isotope {sup 235}U (HEU) and plutonium with more than 90% of the isotope {sup 239}Pu), with scant attention given to the threat posed by a prolific quantity of sources spread worldwide. Further acerbating the problem of inattention, it appears that the momentum of the continued evolution in the beneficial applications of sources will only increase in the near future. Several expert studies have demonstrated on the potentially devastating economic, psychological and public health impacts of terrorist use of a radiological dispersal or radiation emitting device (ROD/RED) in a metropolis. The development of such a weapon, from the acquisition of the radioactive material to the technical knowledge needed to fashion it into an ROD, is many orders of magnitude easier than diverting enough fissile material for and fabrication/acquisition of a nuclear weapon. Unlike nuclear weapons, worldwide, there are many well documented accounts of accidental and purposeful diversions of radioactive materials from regulatory control. As of the end of 2008, the International Atomic Energy Agency's (IAEA) Illicit Trafficking Database had logge

Streeper, Charles Blamires [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

35

Change in the U.S. Nuclear Nonproliferation Policy toward India (1998-2005):Accommodating the Anomaly.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??For more than three decades, the U.S. prohibited the transfer of advanced nuclear technologies to India—a nonsignatory of the Nuclear Nonproliferation Treaty (NPT). In 1998,… (more)

Bhatia, Vandana

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

36

Revised ROD for FEIS on Proposed Nuclear Weapons Nonproliferation Policy Concerning Foreign Research Reactor Spent Nuclear Fuel (  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

720 720 Federal Register / Vol. 61, No. 144 / Thursday, July 25, 1996 / Notices 1995 (44 U. S. C. Chapter 35) requires that the Office of Management and Budget (OMB) provide interested Federal agencies and the public an early opportunity to comment on information collection requests. OMB may amend or waive the requirement for public consultation to the extent that public participation in the approval process would defeat the purpose of the information collection, violate State or Federal law, or substantially interfere with any agency's ability to perform its statutory obligations. The Director of the Information Resources Group publishes this notice containing proposed information collection requests prior to submission of these requests to OMB. Each proposed information collection,

37

Stopping the emergence of nuclear weapon states in the Third World: An examination of the Iraq weapons inspection program. Study project  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The end of the Gulf War and the implementation of United Nation (UN) resolutions uncovered an Iraqi multi-billion dollar nuclear weapons program. Iraq's ability to pursue this clandestine program for more than a decade, despite periodic inspections, suggest that the myriad of treaties and agreements designed to curb proliferation may be inadequate. Clearly more must be done to deter and counter the spread of these deadly weapon. The UN weapons inspections in Iraq provide insight into possible solutions to the proliferation of nuclear weapons technology in the developing world. This study examines the policy and operational aspects associated with an intrusive United Nations inspection program. In its final analysis, this paper suggests that an effective challenge inspection program is a necessary element in countering the spread of weapons of mass destruction. Further, it suggests that the UN, as the only internationally accepted enforcement organization, be fully engaged in nonproliferation issues and support the challenge inspection program.

Block, D.A.

1993-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

38

Stopping the spread of nuclear weapons. The Heritage lectures; No. 506  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This lecture is on the proliferation of nuclear arms. More precisely, it will be on how best to prevent the proliferation of nuclear arms. For as much as the policy community may disagree about the proper policies for preventing nuclear proliferation, the author thinks all share the goal of preventing proliferation. The best prescription for preventing all sorts of proliferation - biological, chemical, missile, and space technology, as well as nuclear is for the U.S. government to pursue a balanced non-proliferation policy. Such a balanced policy requires bringing four distinct approaches to addressing the proliferation problem together in a coherent fashion. These distinct approaches are: (1) deterring the use of the weapon in question, (2) defending against the use of the weapon in question, (3) destroying preemptively the weapon in question, and (4) controlling the spread of the weapon in question directly through arms control. In the authors view, a balanced and effective nonproliferation policy should not shun or slight any of these approaches. All make a unique contribution toward the whole and serve to reinforce one another in limiting the effects of proliferation and ultimately discouraging proliferation itself. This does not mean, however, that there is no requirement to make trade-offs among the four. Indeed, the real trick is assuring that there is an appropriate division of labor among the four. The author explains this general policy in terms of the specific challenges posed by the proliferation of nuclear arms.

Spring, B.

1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

39

Nuclear Deterrence in the Age of Nonproliferation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The fallacy of zero nuclear weapons, even as a virtual goal, is discussed. Because the complete abolition of nuclear weapons is not verifiable, nuclear weapons will always play a role in the calculus of assure, dissuade, deter and defeat (ADDD). However, the relative contribution of nuclear weapons to international security has diminished. To reconstitute the Cold War nuclear capability, with respect to both the nuclear weapons capability and their associated delivery systems, is fiscally daunting and not warranted due to competing budgetary pressures and their relative contribution to international security and nonproliferation. A proposed pathway to a sustainable nuclear weapons capability end-state is suggested which provides enough ADDD; a Dyad composed of fewer delivery and weapon systems, with trickle production at the National Laboratories and private sector to maintain capability and guard against technological surprise.

Richardson, J

2009-01-21T23:59:59.000Z

40

International Nonproliferation Export Control Program (INECP)  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Nonproliferation and Nonproliferation and National Security Program > TNPS > Strategic Trade Control > International Programs > INECP Nonproliferation & National Security (NPNS) Overview Technical Nonproliferation Policy Support Strategic Trade Control Review of export license applications Multilateral Export Control Arrangements Interdiction Engagement & Training INECP INSEP GIPP Safeguards Concepts and Approaches Human Capital Development Additional Protocol Technical Assistance National Security Systems & Assessments National Security Information Systems Vulnerability Assessment Team (VAT) Radiation Detection & Response (RDR) Contact NPNS Other Major Programs Work with Argonne Contact us For Employees Site Map Help Join us on Facebook Follow us on Twitter NE Division on Flickr

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "weapons nonproliferation policy" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

The USâ??India nuclear agreement: progress toward nuclear cooperation with India and a new paradigm in non-proliferation policy  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The enactment of the Henry J. Hyde United Statesâ??India Peaceful Atomic Energy Cooperation Act on December 18, 2006 opened the door to a sea change in US nuclear export policy toward India. The new legislation could reverse three decades of US nuclear non-proliferation policy by facilitating India's exemption from the requirement of full-scope safeguards as a prerequisite for nuclear trade and cooperation. Notwithstanding the Hyde Act, however, major US nuclear exports to India remain unlawful until further implementing steps are taken. This article outlines the history of the estranged nuclear trade relations between the US and India and the motivations for reviving substantial civil nuclear cooperation. It then describes the parties' recent agreements and the changes to US law necessary to fulfill those agreements. Finally, the article discusses the provisions of the Hyde Act itself and the remaining principal obstacles to USâ??India nuclear trade.

Jay R. Kraemer; Frank Aum

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

42

U.S. nuclear nonproliferation policy in the Northeast Asian region during the cold war: The South Korean case  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In over forty years of relations with the United States, South Korean decision-makers have had plenty of time to estimate the costs and benefits of acquiring nuclear weapons. The puzzle becomes why South Korea...

Michael J. Siler

1998-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

43

Nonproliferation and National Security - Nuclear Engineering Division  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Nonproliferation and Nonproliferation and National Security CAPABILITIES Overview Nuclear Systems Modeling and Design Analysis Nuclear Systems Technologies Risk and Safety Assessments Nonproliferation and National Security Materials Testing Engineering Computation & Design Engineering Experimentation Work with Argonne Contact us For Employees Site Map Help Join us on Facebook Follow us on Twitter NE on Flickr Celebrating the 70th Anniversary of Chicago Pile 1 (CP-1) Argonne OutLoud on Nuclear Energy Argonne Energy Showcase 2012 Capabilities Nonproliferation and National Security Bookmark and Share Nuclear Export Controls Nuclear Exports Controls We provide technical advisory services to DOE in the implementation of U.S. nonproliferation policy. This includes assessments of proliferation risks presented by emerging technologies and

44

EU STRATEGY AGAINST PROLIFERATION OF WEAPONS OF MASS DESTRUCTION  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

EU STRATEGY AGAINST PROLIFERATION OF WEAPONS OF MASS DESTRUCTION At Thessaloniki, the European Council adopted a Declaration on non-proliferation of Weapons of Mass Destruction. Member States made. The proliferation of weapons of mass destruction and their means of delivery such as ballistic missiles

Sussex, University of

45

Arms control and nonproliferation technologies. Fourth quarter 1992  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report includes information concerning: the Department of Energy`s Office of Arms Control and Nonproliferation; the nuclear inspections in Iraq, lessons for verification; detection technologies needed for each step of nuclear weapon development; nuclear proliferation problems; strengthening the nuclear reactor fuel cycle against proliferation; monitoring using unattended remote nondestructive assay; seismic monitoring in a proliferation environment; forensic science center, remote infrared spectrometry for nonproliferation applications; and acoustic instrument for identifying chemical munitions.

Staehle, G.; Talaber, C.; Stull, S.

1992-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

46

2005 Carnegie International Nonproliferation Conference | Department of  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

2005 Carnegie International Nonproliferation Conference 2005 Carnegie International Nonproliferation Conference 2005 Carnegie International Nonproliferation Conference November 7, 2005 - 12:36pm Addthis Remarks Prepared for Energy Secretary Sam Bodman I am very glad to be with all of you today. Let me just say to Rose and to everyone associated with the Carnegie Endowment that the Bush Administration values the work that you do. This is particularly so with this series of conferences dedicated to exploring the complicated issues of nonproliferation policy. And allow me to offer the congratulations of my Department to Director General El Baradei and the International Atomic Energy Agency for the award conferred last month by the Nobel Foundation. We should applaud the Agency's staff and all the member nations that come

47

2005 Carnegie International Nonproliferation Conference | Department of  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

5 Carnegie International Nonproliferation Conference 5 Carnegie International Nonproliferation Conference 2005 Carnegie International Nonproliferation Conference November 7, 2005 - 12:36pm Addthis Remarks Prepared for Energy Secretary Sam Bodman I am very glad to be with all of you today. Let me just say to Rose and to everyone associated with the Carnegie Endowment that the Bush Administration values the work that you do. This is particularly so with this series of conferences dedicated to exploring the complicated issues of nonproliferation policy. And allow me to offer the congratulations of my Department to Director General El Baradei and the International Atomic Energy Agency for the award conferred last month by the Nobel Foundation. We should applaud the Agency's staff and all the member nations that come

48

Virtual nuclear weapons  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The term virtual nuclear weapons proliferation and arsenals, as opposed to actual weapons and arsenals, has entered in recent years the American lexicon of nuclear strategy, arms control, and nonproliferation. While the term seems to have an intuitive appeal, largely due to its cyberspace imagery, its current use is still vague and loose. The author believes, however, that if the term is clearly delineated, it might offer a promising approach to conceptualizing certain current problems of proliferation. The first use is in a reference to an old problem that has resurfaced recently: the problem of growing availability of weapon-usable nuclear materials in civilian nuclear programs along with materials made `excess` to defense needs by current arms reduction and dismantlement. It is argued that the availability of these vast materials, either by declared nuclear-weapon states or by technologically advanced nonweapon states, makes it possible for those states to rapidly assemble and deploy nuclear weapons. The second use has quite a different set of connotations. It is derived conceptually from the imagery of computer-generated reality. In this use, one thinks of virtual proliferation and arsenals not in terms of the physical hardware required to make the bomb but rather in terms of the knowledge/experience required to design, assemble, and deploy the arsenal. Virtual weapons are a physics reality and cannot be ignored in a world where knowledge, experience, materials, and other requirements to make nuclear weapons are widespread, and where dramatic army reductions and, in some cases, disarmament are realities. These concepts are useful in defining a continuum of virtual capabilities, ranging from those at the low end that derive from general technology diffusion and the existence of nuclear energy programs to those at the high end that involve conscious decisions to develop or maintain militarily significant nuclear-weapon capabilities.

Pilat, J.F.

1997-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

49

On the dangers of C.I.S. specialists with nuclear weapons experience relocating to Third World countries: A Russian view. Nonproliferation Newsletter, February 1993: Volume 11, Issue 1  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This newsletter presents information on the effectiveness of rules and regulations; on the role of a qualified consultant in the possible design of a nuclear weapon for a Third World country; and on the possible dangers (and their elimination) of relocating nuclear technologists.

Hogsett, V.; Canavan, B. [eds.

1993-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

50

Of carrots and sticks or air power as a nonproliferation tool  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The proliferation of nuclear weapons has become one of the principal threats to international peace and security. Postwar revelations from Iraq demonstrate how close a determined nation can come to covertly developing nuclear weapons without detection. In the past two years the issue of nonproliferation has increased in importance and the regime is becoming more intrusive. On the other hand, a number of nations hostile to the international order are attempting to develop or otherwise obtain nuclear weapons These states include North Korea, Iran, and Iraq. This paper argues that the use or threat of force must be incorporated into the nonproliferation regime. When properly integrated into nonproliferation strategy, force offers positive effects in terms of deterrence, compellence, and defense. Thus, the paper calls for the institutionalization of force options into the nonproliferation tool kit, ideally as part of chapter 7 enforcement actions under the authority of the UN Security Council.

Wolf, F.R.

1994-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

51

TRACKING SURPLUS PLUTONIUM FROM WEAPONS TO DISPOSITION  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Supporting nuclear nonproliferation and global security principles, beginning in 1994 the United States has withdrawn more than 50 metric tons (MT) of government-controlled plutonium from potential use in nuclear weapons. The Department of Energy (DOE), including the National Nuclear Security Administration, established protocols for the tracking of this "excess" and "surplus" plutonium, and for reconciling the current storage and utilization of the plutonium to show that its management is consistent with the withdrawal policies. Programs are underway to ensure the safe and secure disposition of the materials that formed a major part of the weapons stockpile during the Cold War, and growing quantities have been disposed as waste, after which they are not included in traditional nuclear material control and accountability (NMC&A) data systems. A combination of resources is used to perform the reconciliations that form the basis for annual reporting to DOE, to U.S. Department of State, and to international partners including the International Atomic Energy Agency.

Allender, J.; Beams, J.; Sanders, K.; Myers, L.

2013-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

52

Non-Proliferation Treaty at 25  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This article is a review of nuclear nonproliferation issues during the 25 years that have passed since the signing of the first nonproliferation treaty. A historical background is provided, both declared and undeclared nuclear powers are noted, and considerable attention is given to issues brought about by the dissolution of the Soviet Union and by the renegade actions of a number of signatories, e.g. Iraq, and several of the non-signatories. Present/future policies are discussed, as is the impact of the present Administration in Washington.

Cooper, M.H.

1995-01-20T23:59:59.000Z

53

Putting the Genie Back in the Bottle: The Science of Nuclear Non-Proliferation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. Some Bits of History. 2. Nuclear Weapons 101. 3. The Comprehensive Test Ban Treaty. 4. Testing The TestPutting the Genie Back in the Bottle: The Science of Nuclear Non-Proliferation Jerry Gilfoyle Physics Department, University of Richmond, Virginia Outline: 1. Some Bits of History. 2. Nuclear Weapons

Gilfoyle, Jerry

54

Presentation: DOE Nuclear Nonproliferation | Department of Energy  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

Presentation: DOE Nuclear Nonproliferation Presentation: DOE Nuclear Nonproliferation A briefing to the Secretary's Energy Advisory Board on DOE nuclear nonproliferation activities...

55

Technical solutions to nonproliferation challenges  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The threat of nuclear terrorism is real and poses a significant challenge to both U.S. and global security. For terrorists, the challenge is not so much the actual design of an improvised nuclear device (IND) but more the acquisition of the special nuclear material (SNM), either highly enriched uranium (HEU) or plutonium, to make the fission weapon. This paper provides two examples of technical solutions that were developed in support of the nonproliferation objective of reducing the opportunity for acquisition of HEU. The first example reviews technologies used to monitor centrifuge enrichment plants to determine if there is any diversion of uranium materials or misuse of facilities to produce undeclared product. The discussion begins with a brief overview of the basics of uranium processing and enrichment. The role of the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA), its safeguard objectives and how the technology evolved to meet those objectives will be described. The second example focuses on technologies developed and deployed to monitor the blend down of 500 metric tons of HEU from Russia's dismantled nuclear weapons to reactor fuel or low enriched uranium (LEU) under the U.S.-Russia HEU Purchase Agreement. This reactor fuel was then purchased by U.S. fuel fabricators and provided about half the fuel for the domestic power reactors. The Department of Energy established the HEU Transparency Program to provide confidence that weapons usable HEU was being blended down and thus removed from any potential theft scenario. Two measurement technologies, an enrichment meter and a flow monitor, were combined into an automated blend down monitoring system (BDMS) and were deployed to four sites in Russia to provide 24/7 monitoring of the blend down. Data was downloaded and analyzed periodically by inspectors to provide the assurances required.

Satkowiak, Lawrence [Director, Nonproliferation, Safeguards and Security Programs, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee (United States)

2014-05-09T23:59:59.000Z

56

Revision to the Record of Decision for the Proposed Nuclear Weapons Nonproliferation Policy Concerning Foreign Research Reactor Spent Nuclear Fuel (DOE/EIS-218) (7/19/00)  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

767 767 Federal Register / Vol. 65, No. 139 / Wednesday, July 19, 2000 / Notices The office is located in the Pentagon which is guarded. RETENTION AND DISPOSAL: Records are kept until the person is deceased or the person seeks removal of information, whichever is sooner. SYSTEM MANAGER(S) AND ADDRESS: Chief of Naval Operations (N09BC), 2000 Navy Pentagon, Washington, DC 20350-2000. NOTIFICATION PROCEDURE: Individuals seeking to determine whether information about themselves is contained in this system should address written inquiries to the Chief of Naval Operations (N09BC), 2000 Navy Pentagon, Washington, DC 20350-2000. RECORD ACCESS PROCEDURES: Individuals seeking access to information about themselves contained in this system should address written inquiries to the Chief of Naval

57

Supporting the President's Arms Control and Nonproliferation Agenda: Transparency and Verification for Nuclear Arms Reductions  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The President's arms control and nonproliferation agenda is still evolving and the details of initiatives supporting it remain undefined. This means that DOE, NNSA, NA-20, NA-24 and the national laboratories can help define the agenda, and the policies and the initiatives to support it. This will require effective internal and interagency coordination. The arms control and nonproliferation agenda is broad and includes the path-breaking goal of creating conditions for the elimination of nuclear weapons. Responsibility for various elements of the agenda will be widely scattered across the interagency. Therefore an interagency mapping exercise should be performed to identify the key points of engagement within NNSA and other agencies for creating effective policy coordination mechanisms. These can include informal networks, working groups, coordinating committees, interagency task forces, etc. It will be important for NA-20 and NA-24 to get a seat at the table and a functional role in many of these coordinating bodies. The arms control and nonproliferation agenda comprises both mature and developing policy initiatives. The more mature elements such as CTBT ratification and a follow-on strategic nuclear arms treaty with Russia have defined milestones. However, recent press reports indicate that even the START follow-on strategic arms pact that is planned to be complete by the end of 2009 may take significantly longer and be more expansive in scope. The Russians called for proposals to count non-deployed as well as deployed warheads. Other elements of the agenda such as FMCT, future bilateral nuclear arms reductions following a START follow-on treaty, nuclear posture changes, preparations for an international nuclear security summit, strengthened international safeguards and multilateral verification are in much earlier stages of development. For this reason any survey of arms control capabilities within the USG should be structured to address potential needs across the near-term (1-4) years and longer-term (5-10) years planning horizons. Some final observations include acknowledging the enduring nature of several key objectives on the Obama Administration's arms control and nonproliferation agenda. The CTBT, FMCT, bilateral nuclear arms reductions and strengthening the NPT have been sought by successive U.S. Administrations for nearly thirty years. Efforts towards negotiated arms control, although de-emphasized by the G.W. Bush Administration, have remained a pillar of U.S. national security strategy for decades and are likely to be of enduring if not increasing importance for decades to come. Therefore revitalization and expansion of USG capabilities in this area can be a positive legacy no matter what near-term arms control goals are achieved over the next four years. This is why it is important to reconstruct integrated bureaucratic, legislative, budgetary and diplomatic strategies to sustain the arms control and nonproliferation agenda. In this endeavor some past lessons must be taken to heart to avoid bureaucratic overkill and keep interagency policy-making and implementation structures lean and effective. On the Technical side a serious, sustained multilateral program to develop, down select and performance test nuclear weapons dismantlement verification technologies and procedures should be immediately initiated. In order to make this happen the United States and Russia should join with the UK and other interested states in creating a sustained, full-scale research and development program for verification at their respective nuc1ear weapons and defense establishments. The goals include development of effective technologies and procedures for: (1) Attribute measurement systems to certify nuclear warheads and military fissile materials; (2) Chain-of-custody methods to track items after they are authenticated and enter accountability; (3) Transportation monitoring; (4) Storage monitoring; (5) Fissile materials conversion verification. The remainder of this paper focuses on transparency and verification for nuclear arms a

Doyle, James E [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Meek, Elizabeth [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

58

Relaxation Seen in Nonproliferation Policy  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...The authors feel that OPEC has been as much the bearer...Oil prices are high and OPEC is important because energy...write, adding that if OPEC were abolished and its...little effect on world oil production and prices. As for how...Arab oil em-bargo of 1973.-LUTHER J. CARTER...

LUTHER J. CARTER

1979-10-05T23:59:59.000Z

59

What do we do with Nuclear Weapons Now?  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

What Do We Do with Nuclear Weapons Now? by Michael M. Maythe Future of U.S. Nuclear Weapons Policy MICHAEL M. MAY wasmajority in nuclear weapons states. Unlike chemical and

May, Michael M

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

60

Nonproliferation through delegation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Nuclear Weapons In a nuclear power plant, a nuclear reactionused for fuel in a nuclear power plant (Barnaby 1993). Theon converting nuclear power plants to fighting malaria with

Brown, Robert Louis

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "weapons nonproliferation policy" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Nuclear Weapons Journal  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Nuclear Weapons Journal Nuclear Weapons Journal x The Nuclear Weapons Journal ceased publication after Issue 2, 2009. Below are Nuclear Weapons Journal archived issues. Issue 2,...

62

Summary of the Nuclear Non-Proliferation Treaty  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Non-Proliferation Treaty rests on a basic bargain between the five declared nuclear-weapon states-the United States, Russia, Britain, France and China and 167 states that do not possess nuclear weapons. In addition, to the arms control and disarmaments commitments in Article VI, the parties pledge in the treaty`s pramble their determination to seek a comprehensive test ban (CTB) and express the understanding that in connection with the treaty on general and complete disarmament the parties should seek the cessation of manufacture of nuclear weapons, the liquidation of all their existing stock piles, and the elimination from national arsenals of nuclear weapons and means of their delivery. The author summaries key elements of these agreements.

NONE

1995-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

63

WEAPONS ON CAMPUS REGULATION WEAPONS ON CAMPUS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

WEAPONS ON CAMPUS REGULATION CHAPTER 20 WEAPONS ON CAMPUS 8VAC115-20-10. Definitions, including the Virginia Institute of Marine Science. "Weapon" means any firearm or any other weapon listed115-20-20. Possession of weapons prohibited. Possession or carrying of any weapon by any person

Lewis, Robert Michael

64

Disposition of plutonium from dismantled nuclear weapons: Fission options and comparisons  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Over the next decade, the United States expects to recover about 50 Mg of excess weapon plutonium and the Republic of Russia expects to recover a similar amount. Ensuring that these large quantities of high-grade material are not reused in nuclear weapons has drawn considerable attention. In response to this problem, the US Department of Energy (DOE) chartered the Plutonium Disposition Task Force (PDTF), in the summer of 1992, to assess a range of practical means for disposition of excess US plutonium. This report summarizes and compares the Fission Options'' provided to the Fission Working Group Review Committee (the committee) of the PDTF. The review by the committee was based on preliminary information received as of December 4, 1992, and as such the results summarized in this report should also be considered preliminary. The committee concluded that irradiation of excess weapon plutonium in fission reactors in conjunction with the generation of electricity and storing the spent fuel is a fast, cost-effective, and environmentally acceptable method of addressing the safeguards (diversion) issue. When applied appropriately, this method is consistent with current nonproliferation policy. The principal effect of implementing the fission options is at most a moderate addition of plutonium to that existing in commercial spent fuel. The amount of plutonium in commercial spent fuel by the year 2000 is estimated to be 300 Mg. The addition of 50 Mg of excess weapon plutonium, in this context, is not a determining factor, moreover, several of the fission options achieve substantial annihilation of plutonium.

Omberg, R.P. (Westinghouse Hanford Co., Richland, WA (United States)); Walter, C.E. (Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States))

1993-02-05T23:59:59.000Z

65

Disposition of plutonium from dismantled nuclear weapons: Fission options and comparisons  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Over the next decade, the United States expects to recover about 50 Mg of excess weapon plutonium and the Republic of Russia expects to recover a similar amount. Ensuring that these large quantities of high-grade material are not reused in nuclear weapons has drawn considerable attention. In response to this problem, the US Department of Energy (DOE) chartered the Plutonium Disposition Task Force (PDTF), in the summer of 1992, to assess a range of practical means for disposition of excess US plutonium. This report summarizes and compares the ``Fission Options`` provided to the Fission Working Group Review Committee (the committee) of the PDTF. The review by the committee was based on preliminary information received as of December 4, 1992, and as such the results summarized in this report should also be considered preliminary. The committee concluded that irradiation of excess weapon plutonium in fission reactors in conjunction with the generation of electricity and storing the spent fuel is a fast, cost-effective, and environmentally acceptable method of addressing the safeguards (diversion) issue. When applied appropriately, this method is consistent with current nonproliferation policy. The principal effect of implementing the fission options is at most a moderate addition of plutonium to that existing in commercial spent fuel. The amount of plutonium in commercial spent fuel by the year 2000 is estimated to be 300 Mg. The addition of 50 Mg of excess weapon plutonium, in this context, is not a determining factor, moreover, several of the fission options achieve substantial annihilation of plutonium.

Omberg, R.P. [Westinghouse Hanford Co., Richland, WA (United States); Walter, C.E. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States)

1993-02-05T23:59:59.000Z

66

Nonproliferation & Forensics | Argonne National Laboratory  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Nonproliferation & Nuclear Forensics Argonne strives to strengthen the nation's ability to detect, prevent, and interdict proliferation of nuclear, radiological, chemical, and...

67

Siegfried S. Hecker, Plutonium, and Nonproliferation  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

Siegfried S. Hecker, Plutonium Siegfried S. Hecker, Plutonium and Nuclear Nonproliferation Resources with Additional Information · Awards Siegfried S. Hecker Photo Credit: Courtesy of Los Alamos National Laboratory LeRoy Sanchez On September 17, 2009, U.S. Energy Secretary Steven Chu named Siegfried S. Hecker as a winner of the Enrico Fermi Award 'in recognition for his contributions to plutonium metallurgy, his broad scientific leadership and for his energetic and continuing efforts to reduce the danger of nuclear weapons around the globe. Dr. Hecker is credited with resolving a long-standing controversy involving the stability of certain structures (or phases) in plutonium alloys near equilibrium that arose from significant discrepancies between U.S. and former USSR research on plutonium metallurgy.'1

68

Putting the Genie Back in the Bottle: The Science of Nuclear Non-Proliferation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Putting the Genie Back in the Bottle: The Science of Nuclear Non-Proliferation Jerry Gilfoyle Physics Department, University of Richmond, Virginia Outline: 1. Some Bits of History. 2. Nuclear Weapons 101. 3. The Comprehensive Test Ban Treaty. 4. Testing The Test Ban Treaty. 5. Why should you care

Gilfoyle, Jerry

69

Nuclear proliferation: The diplomatic role of non-weaponized programs  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The end of the Cold War has not seen the end of reliance on nuclear weapons for deterrence or diplomacy purposes. The use of nuclear weapons for such purposes is as evident in the threshold states as in the nuclear powers. The nuclear weapon states used their nuclear weapons for deterrence, bargaining, and blackmail, even during the early years of the Cold War when the US was essentially non-Weaponized. In the nuclear non-Weaponized states in Asia a non-Weaponized deterrent relationship is developing between India and Pakistan and North Korea has used its nuclear program to restore diplomatic relations with the international community. The role of nuclear weapons in the post Cold War world is determined by the role of non-Weaponized programs in proliferating states. This paper describes examples in South Asia and the Korean peninsula and show that while an increased reliance on nuclear weapons programs may be a threat to the current non-proliferation regime, the focus on non-Weaponized programs rather than on weapons themselves actually improves international security by reducing the threat of nuclear war.

Reynolds, R.R.

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

70

IRAQ'S WEAPONS  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

AFTER TWO MONTHS OF snap inspections at hundreds of sites, United Nations inspectors cannot say that Iraq has weapons of mass destruction or that it is disarming. Because Iraq has not been forth-coming, questions remain about its chemical, biological, and ...

LOIS EMBER

2003-02-03T23:59:59.000Z

71

Reorganization bolsters nuclear nonproliferation capability  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Reorganization bolsters nuclear nonproliferation capability Reorganization bolsters nuclear nonproliferation capability Reorganization bolsters nuclear nonproliferation capability LANL has strengthened its capability in a key aspect of nuclear nonproliferation by combining two groups within its Global Security organization. June 27, 2012 Los Alamos National Laboratory sits on top of a once-remote mesa in northern New Mexico with the Jemez mountains as a backdrop to research and innovation covering multi-disciplines from bioscience, sustainable energy sources, to plasma physics and new materials. Los Alamos National Laboratory sits on top of a once-remote mesa in northern New Mexico with the Jemez mountains as a backdrop to research and innovation covering multi-disciplines from bioscience, sustainable energy sources, to plasma physics and new materials.

72

Chemical and biological nonproliferation program. FY99 annual report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document is the first of what will become an annual report documenting the progress made by the Chemical and Biological Nonproliferation Program (CBNP). It is intended to be a summary of the program's activities that will be of interest to both policy and technical audiences. This report and the annual CBNP Summer Review Meeting are important vehicles for communication with the broader chemical and biological defense and nonproliferation communities. The Chemical and Biological Nonproliferation Program Strategic Plan is also available and provides additional detail on the program's context and goals. The body of the report consists of an overview of the program's philosophy, goals and recent progress in the major program areas. In addition, an appendix is provided with more detailed project summaries that will be of interest to the technical community.

NONE

2000-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

73

Nonproliferation & International Security | National Nuclear Security  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Nonproliferation & International Security | National Nuclear Security Nonproliferation & International Security | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure Continuing Management Reform Countering Nuclear Terrorism About Us Our Programs Our History Who We Are Our Leadership Our Locations Budget Our Operations Media Room Congressional Testimony Fact Sheets Newsletters Press Releases Speeches Events Social Media Video Gallery Photo Gallery NNSA Archive Federal Employment Apply for Our Jobs Our Jobs Working at NNSA Blog Nonproliferation & International Security Home > About Us > Our Programs > Nonproliferation > Nonproliferation & International Security Nonproliferation & International Security

74

Nonproliferation & International Security | National Nuclear Security  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Nonproliferation & International Security | National Nuclear Security Nonproliferation & International Security | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure Continuing Management Reform Countering Nuclear Terrorism About Us Our Programs Our History Who We Are Our Leadership Our Locations Budget Our Operations Media Room Congressional Testimony Fact Sheets Newsletters Press Releases Speeches Events Social Media Video Gallery Photo Gallery NNSA Archive Federal Employment Apply for Our Jobs Our Jobs Working at NNSA Blog Nonproliferation & International Security Home > About Us > Our Programs > Nonproliferation > Nonproliferation & International Security Nonproliferation & International Security

75

Nuclear Nonproliferation Program Offices | National Nuclear Security  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Nonproliferation Program Offices | National Nuclear Security Nonproliferation Program Offices | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure Continuing Management Reform Countering Nuclear Terrorism About Us Our Programs Our History Who We Are Our Leadership Our Locations Budget Our Operations Media Room Congressional Testimony Fact Sheets Newsletters Press Releases Speeches Events Social Media Video Gallery Photo Gallery NNSA Archive Federal Employment Apply for Our Jobs Our Jobs Working at NNSA Blog Nuclear Nonproliferation Program Offices Home > About Us > Our Programs > Nonproliferation > Nuclear Nonproliferation Program Offices Nuclear Nonproliferation Program Offices One of the gravest threats the United States and the international

76

Nuclear Nonproliferation Program Offices | National Nuclear Security  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Nonproliferation Program Offices | National Nuclear Security Nonproliferation Program Offices | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure Continuing Management Reform Countering Nuclear Terrorism About Us Our Programs Our History Who We Are Our Leadership Our Locations Budget Our Operations Media Room Congressional Testimony Fact Sheets Newsletters Press Releases Speeches Events Social Media Video Gallery Photo Gallery NNSA Archive Federal Employment Apply for Our Jobs Our Jobs Working at NNSA Blog Nuclear Nonproliferation Program Offices Home > About Us > Our Programs > Nonproliferation > Nuclear Nonproliferation Program Offices Nuclear Nonproliferation Program Offices One of the gravest threats the United States and the international

77

Bret Knapp to head combined Weapons Engineering, Weapons Physics...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Weapons Engineering, Weapons Physics Directorates Bret Knapp to head combined Weapons Engineering, Weapons Physics Directorates at Los Alamos National Laboratory New leadership...

78

U.S. Removes Nine Metric Tons of Plutonium From Nuclear Weapons Stockpile |  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Removes Nine Metric Tons of Plutonium From Nuclear Weapons Removes Nine Metric Tons of Plutonium From Nuclear Weapons Stockpile U.S. Removes Nine Metric Tons of Plutonium From Nuclear Weapons Stockpile September 17, 2007 - 2:41pm Addthis Declaration Reinforces U.S. Commitment to Nonproliferation VIENNA, AUSTRIA - Secretary of Energy Samuel W. Bodman today announced that the Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) will remove nine metric tons of plutonium from further use as fissile material in U.S. nuclear weapons, signifying the Bush Administration's ongoing commitment to nonproliferation. Nine metric tons of plutonium is enough material to make over 1,000 nuclear weapons. The Secretary made today's announcement while speaking before the International Atomic Energy Agency's annual general conference.

79

U.S. Removes Nine Metric Tons of Plutonium From Nuclear Weapons Stockpile |  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

U.S. Removes Nine Metric Tons of Plutonium From Nuclear Weapons U.S. Removes Nine Metric Tons of Plutonium From Nuclear Weapons Stockpile U.S. Removes Nine Metric Tons of Plutonium From Nuclear Weapons Stockpile September 17, 2007 - 2:41pm Addthis Declaration Reinforces U.S. Commitment to Nonproliferation VIENNA, AUSTRIA - Secretary of Energy Samuel W. Bodman today announced that the Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) will remove nine metric tons of plutonium from further use as fissile material in U.S. nuclear weapons, signifying the Bush Administration's ongoing commitment to nonproliferation. Nine metric tons of plutonium is enough material to make over 1,000 nuclear weapons. The Secretary made today's announcement while speaking before the International Atomic Energy Agency's annual general conference.

80

Control of Nuclear Weapon Data  

Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

The directive establishes the policy, process and procedures for control of nuclear weapon data to ensure that dissemination of the information is restricted to individuals with appropriate clearances, approved authorization and valid need-to-know in keeping with the Atomic Energy Act (as amended) stipulation of ensuring common defense and security. Cancels DOE O 5610.2.

2011-07-21T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "weapons nonproliferation policy" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Improving weapons of mass destruction intelligence Arnold Kanter  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 Improving weapons of mass destruction intelligence Arnold Kanter The Scowcroft Group 900;2 Combating the spread of weapons of mass destruction (WMD) is one of the most important foreign policy of nuclear capability by sub-national states and the security of WMD weapons, materials, and technology

Deutch, John

82

U.S. Department of Energy and NTI Announce Key Nonproliferation Project  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

U.S. Department of Energy and NTI Announce Key Nonproliferation U.S. Department of Energy and NTI Announce Key Nonproliferation Project with Kazakhstan U.S. Department of Energy and NTI Announce Key Nonproliferation Project with Kazakhstan September 29, 2006 - 9:01am Addthis Agreement Reached To Downblend HEU and Convert Reactor WASHINGTON, D.C. - The U.S. Department of Energy and the Nuclear Threat Initiative (NTI) today announced that they have reached an important agreement-in-principle with the Government of Kazakhstan to move forward with the down-blending of highly enriched uranium (HEU) currently stored at Kazakhstan's Institute of Nuclear Physics. The agreement also calls for the conversion of the VVR-K research reactor to operate on low enriched uranium fuel instead of HEU, which can be used in nuclear weapons. The

83

Nuclear nonproliferation: Concerns with US delays in accepting foregin research reactors` spent fuel  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

One key US nonproliferation goal is to discourage use of highly enriched uranium fuel (HEU), which can be used to make nuclear bombs, in civilian nuclear programs worldwide. DOE`s Off-Site Fuels Policy for taking back spent HEU from foreign research reactors was allowed to expire due to environmental reasons. This report provides information on the effects of delays in renewing the Off-Site Fuels Policy on US nonproliferation goals and programs (specifically the reduced enrichment program), DOE`s efforts to renew the fuels policy, and the price to be charged to the operators of foreign reactors for DOE`s activities in taking back spent fuel.

NONE

1994-03-25T23:59:59.000Z

84

Brazil's Nuclear Program: Carter's Nonproliferation Policy Backfires  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...capable of producing cancer in the future, or...nuclear reactors and a uranium enrichment facil-ity...radiation including skin cancer, would be reduced...that ozone could be depleted by 3 to 23 percent...some long-term cancer risk, people are...to discover enough uranium in excess of its...

ALLEN L. HAMMOND

1977-02-18T23:59:59.000Z

85

Non-Proliferation | Department of Energy  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Non-Proliferation Non-Proliferation Non-Proliferation GC-52 provides legal advice to DOE regarding the transfer, storage or disposition of nuclear materials recovered by DOE for public health, safety or nonproliferation purposes. DOE's National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) operates several domestic and international programs aimed at securing vulnerable nuclear materials, such as orphan and disused sealed sources and foreign research reactor fuel, in support of nuclear nonproliferation and nuclear security initiatives. GC-52 also supports DOE in its interactions with other federal agencies, state and local governments, and the public. Applicable Laws Atomic Energy Act of 1954 Nuclear Non-Proliferation Act of 1978 National Nuclear Security Administration Act Further Information

86

BUILDING A CHEMICAL LASER WEAPON  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

BUILDING A CHEMICAL LASER WEAPON ... Under fire, Airborne Laser program director confronts challenges of revolutionary weapons system ...

WILLIAM G. SCHULZ

2004-12-20T23:59:59.000Z

87

Nonproliferation and National Security Multimedia - Argonne National  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Nonproliferation and National Security Nonproliferation and National Security > Multimedia Multimedia Nuclear Systems Analysis Engineering Analysis Nonproliferation and National Security Detection & Diagnostic Systems Engineering Development & Applications Argonne's Nuclear Science & Technology Legacy Other Multimedia Work with Argonne Contact us For Employees Site Map Help Join us on Facebook Follow us on Twitter NE on Flickr Bookmark and Share Nonproliferation and National Security: Multimedia Related Resources Nonproliferation and National Security Vulnerability Assessment Team (VAT) Click on the "Date" header to sort the videos/podcasts in chronological order (ascending or descending). You may also search for a specific keyword; click on the reset button refresh to remove the keyword filter and show again all the Videos/Podcasts.

88

Nonproliferation  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

p>

Representatives at the workshop were from Australia, Brazil, Canada, Japan, Jordan, Mexico, South Africa, Taiwan, The Netherlands, United Arab Emirates, United Kingdom...

89

Status of nuclear weapons material disposition in Russia  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The security of nuclear weapons and fissile material in Russia, the disposition of weapons-usable fissile material in Russia, the Clinton administration`s policies and programs for assisting Russia in improving its security over nuclear weapons and fissile material, and the disposal of Russian weapons-usable fissile materials are discussed in this paper. There are {approximately}30,000 nuclear warheads in the former Soviet Union, {approximately}1000 t of weapon-usable high-enriched uranium (HEU), {approximately} 160 t of separated plutonium in weapons or available for weapons, and {approximately}30 t of separated civil plutonium stored in Russia. Most, if not all, of these inventories are stored under inadequate conditions of physical security and of material control and accounting.

Cochran, T.B.

1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

90

Policies  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Cleanroom Policies (All policies are in .pdf format) After Hours Access Policy Booking and Login Policy Cleanroom Policy Equipment Use Policy Two-Person Rule Cleanroom Chemical...

91

Identification of nuclear weapons  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method and apparatus for non-invasively indentifying different types of nuclear weapons is disclosed. A neutron generator is placed against the weapon to generate a stream of neutrons causing fissioning within the weapon. A first detects the generation of the neutrons and produces a signal indicative thereof. A second particle detector located on the opposite side of the weapon detects the fission particles and produces signals indicative thereof. The signals are converted into a detected pattern and a computer compares the detected pattern with known patterns of weapons and indicates which known weapon has a substantially similar pattern. Either a time distribution pattern or noise analysis pattern, or both, is used. Gamma-neutron discrimination and a third particle detector for fission particles adjacent the second particle detector are preferably used. The neutrons are generated by either a decay neutron source or a pulled neutron particle accelerator.

Mihalczo, J.T.; King, W.T.

1987-04-10T23:59:59.000Z

92

Generalized weapon effectiveness modeling .  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??In this thesis, we compare weapon effectiveness methods to determine if current effectiveness models provide accurate results. The United States Military currently adheres to a… (more)

Anderson, Colin M.

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

93

Reconversion of nuclear weapons  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The nuclear predicament or nuclear option. Synopsis of three lectures : 1- The physical basis of nuclear technology. Physics of fission. Chain reaction in reactors and weapons. Fission fragments. Separration of isotopes. Radiochemistry.2- Nuclear reactors with slow and fast neutrons. Power, size, fuel and waste. Plutonium production. Dose rate, shielding and health hazard. The lessons of Chernobyl3- Nuclear weapons. Types, energy, blast and fallout. Fusion and hydrogen bombs. What to do with nuclear weapons when you cannot use them? Testing. Nonmilittary use. Can we get rid of the nuclear weapon? Nuclear proliferation. Is there a nuclear future?

Kapitza, Sergei P

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

94

Toward a nuclear weapons free world?  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Doubts about the wisdom of relying on nuclear weapons are as old as nuclear weapons themselves. But despite this questioning, nuclear weapons came to be seen as the indispensable element of American (indeed Western) security during the Cold War. By the 1970s and 1980s, however, discontent was growing about the intense US-Soviet nuclear arms competition, as it failed to provide any enduring improvement in security; rather, it was seen as creating ever greater risks and dangers. Arms control negotiations and limitations, adopted as a means to regulate the technical competition, may also have relieved some of the political pressures and dangers. But the balance of terror, and the fears of it, continued. The Strategic Defense Initiative (SDI) under President Reagan was a very different approach to escaping from the precarious protection of nuclear weapons, in that it sought a way to continue to defend the US and the West, but without the catastrophic risks of mutual deterrence. As such, SDI connoted unhappiness with the precarious nuclear balance and, for many, with nuclear weapons in general. The disappearance of the Warsaw Pact, the disintegration of the Soviet Union, and the sudden end of the Cold War seemed to offer a unique opportunity to fashion a new, more peaceful world order that might allow for fading away of nuclear weapons. Scholars have foreseen two different paths to a nuclear free world. The first is a fundamental improvement in the relationships between states such that nuclear weapons are no longer needed. The second path is through technological development, e.g., missile defenses which could provide effective protection against nuclear attacks. The paper discusses nuclear weapon policy in the US, views of other nuclear states, the future of nuclear weapons, and issues in a less-nuclear world.

Maaranen, S.A. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States). Center for International Security Affairs

1996-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

95

NNSA POLICY LETTER  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

POLICY LETTER POLICY LETTER Approved: 6-20-13 WEAPON QUALITY POLICY NATIONAL NUCLEAR SECURITY ADMINISTRATION Office of Defense Programs NAP-24 AVAILABLE ONLINE AT: INITIATED BY: http://hq.na.gov Weapon Quality Division THIS PAGE INTENTIONALLY LEFT BLANK NAP-24 1 6-20-13 WEAPON QUALITY POLICY 1. PURPOSE. The purpose of this document, NNSA Weapon Quality Policy (NAP-24), is to identify the quality requirements applicable to weapon activities of the NNSA, NNSA contractors and subcontractors. The requirements contained herein are in addition to the scope of quality requirements found in DOE Order 414.1D, Quality Assurance. NAP-24 establishes specific weapon and weapon-related product focused quality requirements for designing, producing and

96

The Nuclear Non-Proliferation Treaty and the Comprehensive Nuclear-Test-Ban Treaty, the relationship  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Nuclear Non-Proliferation Treaty (NPT) is the most important international security arrangement that we have that is protecting the world community and this has been true for many years. But it did not happen by accident, it is a strategic bargain in which 184 states gave up the right forever to acquire the most powerful weapon ever created in exchange for a commitment from the five states allowed to keep nuclear weapons under the NPT (U.S., U.K., Russia, France and China), to share peaceful nuclear technology and to engage in disarmament negotiations aimed at the ultimate elimination of their nuclear stockpiles. The most important part of this is the comprehensive nuclear test ban (CTBT); the thinking by the 184 NPT non-nuclear weapon states was and is that they understand that the elimination of nuclear weapon stockpiles is a long way off, but at least the NPT nuclear weapon states could stop testing the weapons. The CTBT has been ratified by 161 states but by its terms it can only come into force if 44 nuclear potential states ratify; 36 have of the 44 have ratified it, the remaining eight include the United States and seven others, most of whom are in effect waiting for the United States. No state has tested a nuclear weapon-except for complete outlier North Korea-in 15 years. There appears to be no chance that the U.S. Senate will approve the CTBT for ratification in the foreseeable future, but the NPT may not survive without it. Perhaps it is time to consider an interim measure, for the UN Security Council to declare that any future nuclear weapon test any time, anywhere is a 'threat to peace and security', in effect a violation of international law, which in today's world it clearly would be.

Graham, Thomas Jr. [7609 Glenbrook Rd., Bethesda, MD 20814 (United States)

2014-05-09T23:59:59.000Z

97

The future of nuclear weapons: Proliferation in South Asia  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The signing of the Intermediate-Range Nuclear Forces (INF) Treaty in December 1987, followed by the dramatic changes in East-West relations since 1989 and the more recent Soviet-American strategic arms limitation agreement, have greatly eased public concerns about the danger of nuclear war. The context has also changed for the Nonaligned Movement, which had made nuclear disarmament and condemnation of the concept of nuclear deterrence the primary themes of its multilateral disarmament diplomacy. More important would be the interrelationship among the states possessing nuclear weapons (Russia, Ukraine, Belarus, and Kazakhstan). In any case, there is little risk of a revival of nuclear competition. Both France and China have decided to sign the Treaty on the Nonproliferation of Nuclear Weapons (NPT); they are the only two nuclear-weapon states that have stayed outside the regime. Meanwhile, Brazil and Argentina have moved further down the nonproliferation road by engaging in confidence-building measures and moving closer to joining the Latin American nuclear-weapons-free zone established under the Treaty of Tlatelolco in 1967. South Africa has also agreed to embrace the NPT as well as a nuclear-weapons-free zone regime for the entire African continent, while North Korea has agreed to sign a safeguard agreement with the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA), thereby allowing in principle international inspection of its nuclear facilities. In the third world regions, the dangers of nuclear proliferation and competitive nuclear buildup are most pronounced in South Asia, a region where a variety of complicating problems exist: acute threat perceptions, historical emity, religious and sectarian animosity, ethnic antagonism, territorial disputes, ambitions for regional dominance, and domestic political instability. This chapter will focus primarily on South Asia, although references will also be made to other regions, where relevant. 17 refs.

Kamal, N. [Institute of Strategic Studies, Islamabada (Pakistan)

1992-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

98

Some facts about “weapon focus”  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Weapon focus” refers to the concentration of acrime witness's attention on a weapon, and the resultant reduction in ability to ... that subjects made more eye fixations on the weapon than on the check, and fixat...

Elizabeth F. Loftus; Geoffrey R. Loftus; Jane Messo

1987-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

99

Weapons Program Associate Directors named  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Program Associate Directors named Bob Webster has been named Associate Director for Weapon Physics and John Benner has been named Associate Director for Weapon Engineering and...

100

Title: Weapons on Campus Effective Date: October 1, 2011 Responsible Office: William & Mary Police  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Title: Weapons on Campus Effective Date: October 1, 2011 Responsible Office: William & Mary Police the prohibition on weapons, firearms, combustibles, and explosives. II. PURPOSE The purpose of this policy by restricting weapons possession on university property. III.DEFINITIONS "law enforcement officials" means

Shaw, Leah B.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "weapons nonproliferation policy" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Transparency in nuclear arms: Toward a nuclear weapons register  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In his press conference to present a {open_quotes}10-point non-proliferation initiative{close_quotes} last December, German Foreign Minister Klaus Kinkel included a proposal calling for an international register for nuclear weapons, analogous to the UN Conventional Arms Register. When German diplomats explained the initiative to their allies in London, Paris and Washington, they were sharply rebuffed. Apparently the three nuclear-weapon states were strongly opposed to the idea and therefore discouraged Germany from pursuing it further in the Conference on Disarmament (CD) in Geneva, where the ad hoc group on transparency in armaments would be an appropriate forum for further discussion. Faced with these cold responses, German diplomats shelved the idea for the time being and concentrated on initiatives that promised better chances for agreement, such as the comprehensive test ban (CTB) treaty currently under discussion, a fissile material cutoff agreement and an international plutonium management regime.

Mueller, H. [Peace Research Institute, Frankfurt (Germany)

1994-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

102

National Laboratory's Weapons Program  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Charles McMillan to lead Los Alamos National Laboratory's Weapons Program July 28, 2009 Los Alamos, New Mexico, July 28, 2009- Charles McMillan has been appointed the new principal...

103

U.S. and Russia Reaffirm Commitment to Disposing of Weapon-Grade Plutonium  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Reaffirm Commitment to Disposing of Weapon-Grade Reaffirm Commitment to Disposing of Weapon-Grade Plutonium U.S. and Russia Reaffirm Commitment to Disposing of Weapon-Grade Plutonium July 13, 2006 - 3:05pm Addthis WASHINGTON, DC - U.S. Energy Secretary Samuel W. Bodman and Sergey Kiriyenko, the director of Russia's Federal Atomic Energy Agency, have signed a joint statement reaffirming their commitment to dispose of 34 metric tons of excess weapon-grade plutonium by irradiation in nuclear reactors. "This statement is a clear sign of our mutual commitment to keeping dangerous nuclear material out of the hands of terrorists. We look forward to working together with the Russians to ensure that this important nonproliferation project moves forward in both Russia and the United States," Secretary Bodman said.

104

The nuclear-weapon states and article VI of the NPT  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Non-Proliferation Treaty rests on a basic bargain between the five declared nuclear-weapon states - the United States, Russia, Britain, France and China and 167 states that do not possess nuclear weapons. In addition, to the arms control and disarmaments commitments in Article VI, the parties pledge in the treaty`s pramble their determination to seek a comprehensive test ban (CTB) and express the understanding that in connection with the treaty on general and complete disarmament the parties should seek the cessation of manufacture of nuclear weapons, the liquidation of all their existing stock piles, and the elimination from national arsenals of nuclear weapons and means of their delivery. The author discusses the status of these agreements and the extent to which they have been fulfilled.

Mendelsohn, J.; Lockwood, D.

1995-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

105

2011 Annual Planning Summary for Defense Nuclear Nonproliferation (NA-20)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The ongoing and projected Environmental Assessments and Environmental Impact Statements for 2011 and 2012 within Defense Nuclear Nonproliferation (NA-20).

106

The politics of verification: Limiting the testing of nuclear weapons  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

From 1982 to 1990, the United States and the Soviet Union renegotiated verification arrangements for two unratified arms control agreements that had nevertheless been observed since 1977: the Threshold Test Ban Treaty and the Peaceful Nuclear Explosions Treaty. The negotiations yielded new verification procedures, changed attitudes regarding Soviet compliance, and established useful precedents for further restrictions on nuclear testing. The negotiations also demonstrated how technical arguments can be misused to promote a particular political agenda-in this case, the continued testing of nuclear weapons. By misrepresenting the uncertainties in US monitoring procedures, and then falsely characterizing these uncertainties as a fatal flaw of seismic verification techniques, opponents of a nuclear test ban clouded the sensitive issue of verification enough to delay progress towards a complete ban on nuclear weapons testing. The primary obstacle to further restrictions on nuclear testing was not the feasibility of adequate verification, but rather the unwillingness of several US administrations to address the real question of whether the United States and other nuclear weapon states should, in the interest of global nuclear nonproliferation, end the development of new nuclear weapons designs that require confirmation by underground nuclear tests. 51 refs., 6 figs.

Vink, G.E. van der (IRIS Consortion on Seismology, Arlington, VA (United States)); Paine, C.E. (Natural Reources Defense Council, Washington, DC (United States))

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

107

Nonproliferation Test and Evaluation Complex - NPTEC  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Nonproliferation Test and Evaluation Complex, or NPTEC, is the world's largest facility for open air testing of hazardous toxic materials and biological simulants. NPTEC is used for testing, experimentation, and training for technologies that require the release of toxic chemicals or biological simulants into the environment.

None

2014-11-10T23:59:59.000Z

108

Nonproliferation Test and Evaluation Complex - NPTEC  

ScienceCinema (OSTI)

The Nonproliferation Test and Evaluation Complex, or NPTEC, is the world's largest facility for open air testing of hazardous toxic materials and biological simulants. NPTEC is used for testing, experimentation, and training for technologies that require the release of toxic chemicals or biological simulants into the environment.

None

2015-01-09T23:59:59.000Z

109

Framework for Proliferation Resistance and Physical Protection for Nonproliferation Impact Assessments.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report describes a framework for proliferation resistance and physical protection evaluation for the fuel cycle systems envisioned in the expansion of nuclear power for electricity generation. The methodology is based on an approach developed as part of the Generation IV technical evaluation framework and on a qualitative evaluation approach to policy factors similar to those that were introduced in previous Nonproliferation Impact Assessments performed by DOE.

Bari,R.

2008-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

110

Nuclear Nonproliferation and Arms Control Primer Prepared for the Blue Ribbon Commission on America’s Nuclear Future  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

To provide a brief overview of key arms control and nonproliferation arrangements for the layperson that may be relevant to the Commission's comprehensive review of policies for managing the back end of the nuclear fuel cycle. Primer would be published by the Commission and made publicly available, probably as an appendix to a larger Commission report.

Williams, Laura S.

2011-05-25T23:59:59.000Z

111

National Security, Weapons Science  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

National Security, Weapons Science National Security, Weapons Science /science-innovation/_assets/images/icon-science.jpg National Security, Weapons Science National security depends on science and technology. The United States relies on Los Alamos National Laboratory for the best of both. No place on Earth pursues a broader array of world-class scientific endeavors. Dual-Axis Radiographic Hydrodynamic Test Facility (DARHT) The Dual-Axis Radiographic Hydrodynamic Test Facility at LANL is part of the DOE's stockpile stewardship program. It uses two large X-ray machines to record three-dimensional interior images of materials. In most experiments, materials (including plutonium) undergo hydrodynamic shock to simulate the implosion process in nuclear bombs and/or the effects of severe hydrodynamic stress. The tests are described as "full-scale mockups

112

The US nuclear weapon infrastructure and a stable global nuclear weapon regime  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

US nuclear weapons capabilities -- extant force structure and nuclear weapons infrastructure as well as declared policy -- influence other nations' nuclear weapons postures, at least to some extent. This influence can be desirable or undesirable, and is, of course, a mixture of both. How strong the influence is, and its nature, are complicated, controversial, and -- in our view -- not well understood but often overstated. Divergent views about this influence and how it might shape the future global nuclear weapons regime seem to us to be the most serious impediment to reaching a national consensus on US weapons policy, force structure and supporting infrastructure. We believe that a paradigm shift to capability-based deterrence and dissuasion is not only consistent with the realities of the world and how it has changed, but also a desirable way for nuclear weapon postures and infrastructures to evolve. The US and other nuclear states could not get to zero nor even reduce nuclear arms and the nuclear profile much further without learning to manage latent capability. This paper has defined three principles for designing NW infrastructure both at the 'next plateau' and 'near zero.' The US can be a leader in reducing weapons and infrastructure and in creating an international regime in which capability gradually substitutes for weapons in being and is transparent. The current 'strategy' of not having policy or a Congressionally-approved plan for transforming the weapons complex is not leadership. If we can conform the US infrastructure to the next plateau and architect it in such a way that it is aligned with further arms reductions, it will have these benefits: The extant stockpile can be reduced in size, while the smaller stockpile still deters attack on the US and Allies. The capabilities of the infrastructure will dissuade emergence of new challenges/threats; if they emerge, nevertheless, the US will be able to deal with them in time. We will begin to transform the way other major powers view their nuclear capability. Finally, and though of less cosmic importance, it will save money in the long run.

Immele, John D [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Wagner, Richard L [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

113

Neutrino Counter Nuclear Weapon  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Radiations produced by neutrino-antineutrino annihilation at the Z0 pole can be used to heat up the primary stage of a thermonuclear warhead and can in principle detonate the device remotely. Neutrino-antineutrino annihilation can also be used as a tactical assault weapon to target hideouts that are unreachable by conventional means.

Tang, Alfred

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

114

ASSESSING IRAQ'S WEAPONS  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

IN THE MONTHS LEADING UP TO THE March 2003 invasion of Iraq, President George W. Bush and his top officials issued a litany of serious allegations about Iraq's weapons of mass destruction (WMD) and the threat they posed to the U.S. But their prime ...

LOIS R. EMBER

2004-10-25T23:59:59.000Z

115

Multiple smart weapons employment mechanism  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A digital communications armament network adaptor is described for carrying multiple smart weapons on a single wing pylon station of an aircraft, comprising: an aircraft having a weapons controller configured in compliance with MIL-STD 1553; multiple wing-mounted pylons on said aircraft, each providing a weapons station with communications and ejection and release mechanisms electrically connected to said controller for the airborne launch of smart weapons; a multiple ejector rack affixed to at least one pylon, said rack holding a plurality of smart weapons; and an electronic digital network connected between the controller and said rack-mounted smart weapons, said network located in said rack and including circuitry which receives coded digital communications from said controller and selectively rebroadcasts said communications to one of said smart weapons on said rack designated by said coded communications, thereby controlling all required functions of said designated smart weapon.

McGlynn, M.P.; Meiklejohn, W.D.

1993-07-20T23:59:59.000Z

116

IRAQ'S WEAPONS OF MASS DESTRUCTION  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

DESPITE SEVEN YEARS OF INtrusive United Nations inspections and decimation of Iraq's weapons of mass destruction, Iraq was able to sequester sizable stocks of chemical and biological weapons, some missiles to deliver them, and the scientific and technical ...

LOIS EMBER

2002-09-16T23:59:59.000Z

117

IRAQ HAD NO ILLICIT WEAPONS  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

TESTIFYING BEFORE THE SENate Armed Services Committee, chief U.S. weapons inspector Charles A. Duelfer outlined key findings of a report on Iraq's prewar weapons holdings that sharply undercut the Bush Administration's primary reason for invading Iraq....

LOIS EMBER

2004-10-11T23:59:59.000Z

118

Nuclear weapon detection categorization analysis  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This statement of work is for the Proof of Concept for nuclear weapon categories utility in Arms control. The focus of the project will be to collect, analyze and correlate Intrinsic Radiation (INRAD) calculation results for the purpose of defining measurable signatures that differentiate categories of nuclear weapons. The project will support START III negotiations by identifying categories of nuclear weapons. The categories could be used to clarify sub-limits on the total number of nuclear weapons.

NONE

1997-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

119

Test Procedure Conducted Energy Weapons  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Test Procedure for Conducted Energy Weapons Version 1.1 2010/07/31 #12;Contents Page 0.0 Disclaimer A TASER M26 13 Appendix B TASER X26 23 #12;1 Test Procedure for Conducted Energy Weapons 0.0 Disclaimer Energy Weapons ("CEWs") in a controlled and repeatable manner across jurisdictions. The consistent

Adler, Andy

120

Nuclear Security & Nonproliferation | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Safety » Nuclear Security & Safety » Nuclear Security & Nonproliferation Nuclear Security & Nonproliferation Highly trained nuclear emergency response personnel and more than 17,000 pounds of equipment were sent to Japan as part of the Department of Energy and National Nuclear Security Administration’s effort to assist Japanese personnel with nuclear issues related to the Fukushima nuclear power plant. Above, scientists, technicians and engineers from the National Nuclear Security Administration’s Nevada Site Office board an Air Force C-17. | Photo courtesy of NNSA. Highly trained nuclear emergency response personnel and more than 17,000 pounds of equipment were sent to Japan as part of the Department of Energy

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "weapons nonproliferation policy" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Interim Report of the Task Force on Nuclear Nonproliferation  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This interim report of the SEAB Task Force on Nuclear Nonproliferation sets forth its findings and recommendations to date in five timely and important areas

122

Tag: nuclear nonproliferation | Y-12 National Security Complex  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

nuclear ... Tag: nuclear nonproliferation Displaying 1 - 1 of 1... Category: News Jamaican Connection Y-12 joins Jamaica and Canada in helping a research reactor on the Caribbean...

123

Engagement and disarmament: A US National Security Strategy for biological weapons of mass destruction. Strategy research project  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The specter of biological weapons -- one of the three weapons of mass destruction (WMD) -- is an unusual and extraordinary threat to the national security of the United States. Since the U.S. unilaterally renounced biological warfare in 1969, biotechnology advances, aggressive nation-states, and terrorism have complicated a precarious balance of world and regional stability. U.S. shortfalls in biological warfare preparedness during the Persian Gulf War may convince potential adversaries that the U.S. is incapable of protecting its vital interests from biological assault. This paper examines the menace of biological weapons and global challenges to nonproliferation and counterproliferation. Analysis concludes that the United States can dissuade, deter, and defend against biological warfare and terrorism with an integrated national security strategy for Biological Weapons Engagement and Disarmament.

Moilanen, J.H.; McIntyre, A.J.; Johnson, D.V.

1995-04-18T23:59:59.000Z

124

Policies  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Policies Policies The Research Library provides a large collection of print and electronic books, journals, reports, conference proceedings and many audiovisual materials....

125

Towards a tactical nuclear weapons treaty? Is There a Role of IAEA Tools of Safeguards?  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In recent years, there is growing interest in formal negotiations on non-strategic or tactical nuclear weapons. With the negotiations of New START, there has been much speculation that a tactical nuclear weapons treaty should be included in the follow on to New START. This paper examines the current policy environment related to tactical weapons and some of the issues surrounding the definition of tactical nuclear weapons. We then map out the steps that would need to be taken in order to begin discussions on a tactical nuclear weapons treaty. These steps will review the potential role of the IAEA in verification of a tactical nuclear weapons treaty. Specifically, does IAEA involvement in various arms control treaties serve as a useful roadmap on how to overcome some of the issues pertaining to a tactical nuclear weapons treaty?

Saunders, Emily C. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Rowberry, Ariana N. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Fearey, Bryan L. [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2012-07-12T23:59:59.000Z

126

Bret Knapp to head combined Weapons Engineering, Weapons Physics  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Weapons Engineering, Weapons Physics Directorates Weapons Engineering, Weapons Physics Directorates Bret Knapp to head combined Weapons Engineering, Weapons Physics Directorates at Los Alamos National Laboratory New leadership position will allow for greater integration in the planning and execution of the stockpile stewardship program. August 18, 2009 Los Alamos National Laboratory sits on top of a once-remote mesa in northern New Mexico with the Jemez mountains as a backdrop to research and innovation covering multi-disciplines from bioscience, sustainable energy sources, to plasma physics and new materials. Los Alamos National Laboratory sits on top of a once-remote mesa in northern New Mexico with the Jemez mountains as a backdrop to research and innovation covering multi-disciplines from bioscience, sustainable energy

127

Will our nuclear weapons work?  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Will our nuclear weapons work? Will our nuclear weapons work? National Security Science magazine Latest Issue:April 2013 All Issues » submit Supercomputers are essential for assessing the health of the U.S. nuclear stockpile Supercomputers provide assurance by simulating nuclear weapons performance March 25, 2013 Graphic of a missile being tested through computer simulation Los Alamos uses supercomputers to make high-resolution 3D simulations that help to assess the health of nuclear weapons like this B-61 bomb. Contact Managing Editor Clay Dillingham Email The nuclear weapons in the U.S. stockpile were designed and built to be replaced with new designs and builds every 10 to 15 years. These weapons have lived beyond their expected lifespans. Supercomputers provide the high-resolution 3D simulations needed for

128

Evolution and resilience of the nuclear nonproliferation regime  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper introduces the concept of systems resilience as a new framework for thinking about the future of the nonproliferation regime. Resilience refers to the ability of a system to maintain its vital functions in the face of continuous and unpredictable change. First, I make the case that the nonproliferation regime can be viewed as a complex system. Next, I discuss key themes from the literature on systems resilience and apply them to the nonproliferation system: the difference between resilience and stability; the need for evolution to maintain function; the importance of functional diversity; and the concept of the adaptive cycle. I show that most existing nonproliferation strategies are aimed at stability rather than resilience and that the current nonproliferation system may be over-constrained by the cumulative evolution of strategies. According to the literature on systems resilience, this increases its vulnerability to collapse. I argue that the resilience of the nonproliferation system can be enhanced by increasing international participation in setting the nonproliferation agenda, developing general international response capabilities, focusing on non-coercive approaches to decreasing demand, and applying systems thinking more rigorously to nonproliferation.

Pregenzer, Arian L. [Senior Scientist, Retired, Sandia National Laboratories, 13013 Arroyo de Vista NE, Albuquerque, NM 87111 (United States)

2014-05-09T23:59:59.000Z

129

Chemical Weapons: The legacy of Operation Desert Storm. Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

United States and allied forces deploying in the 1991 War in the Persian Gulf region faced a formidable Iraqi offensive chemical weapons capability. This threat immediately challenged U.S. policy and resolve as outlined in the 1990 bilateral chemical weapons treaty with the Soviet Union. The necessity to assess retaliatory options, in the event of Iraqi chemical use, was apparent, and are evaluated in this analysis. The proliferation of chemical weapons worldwide, disarmament efforts, and chemical defense readiness are also reviewed in the context of the 1991 Gulf War. The conclusion that retaliation by conventional means alone as the only acceptable alternative supporting the presidential goal of increased stability in the Middle East is reached. Prospects for revitalized post-war multilateral chemical disarmament efforts, and a reduction in chemical warfare proliferation are also assessed. Recommendations for a post-war national chemical defense policy are made.

Henscheid, M.R.

1991-06-21T23:59:59.000Z

130

Report of a workshop on nuclear forces and nonproliferation Woodrow Wilson international center for scholars, Washington, DC October 28, 2010  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A workshop sponsored by the Los Alamos National Laboratory in cooperation with the Woodrow Wilson International Center for Scholars was held at the Wilson Center in Washington, DC, on October 28, 2010. The workshop addressed evolving nuclear forces and their impacts on nonproliferation in the context of the new strategic environment, the Obama Administration's Nuclear Posture Review and the 2010 NPT Review Conference. The discussions reflected the importance of the NPR for defining the role of US nuclear forces in dealing with 21st century threats and providing guidance for National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) and Department of Defense (DoD) programs and, for many but not all participants, highlighted its role in the successful outcome of the NPT RevCon. There was widespread support for the NPR and its role in developing the foundations for a sustainable nuclear-weapon program that addresses nuclear weapons, infrastructure and expertise in the broader nonproliferation, disarmament and international security contexts. However, some participants raised concerns about its implementation and its long-term effectiveness and sustainability.

Pilat, Joseph F [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2010-12-08T23:59:59.000Z

131

Joint DOE-PNC research on the use of transparency in support of nuclear nonproliferation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

PNC and LANL collaborated in research on the concept of transparency in nuclear nonproliferation. The research was based on the Action Sheet No. 21, which was signed in February 1996, ``The Joint Research on Transparency in Nuclear Nonproliferation`` under the ``Agreement between the Power Reactor and Nuclear Fuel Development Corporation of Japan (PNC) and the US Department of Energy (DOE) for Cooperation in Research and Development Concerning Nuclear Material Control and Accounting Measures for Safeguards and Nonproliferation``. The purpose of Action Sheet 21 is to provide a fundamental study on Transparency to clarify the means to improve worldwide acceptability for the nuclear energy from the nuclear nonproliferation point of view. This project consists of independent research and then joint discussion at workshops that address a series of topics and issues in transparency. The activities covered in Action Sheet 21 took place over a period of 18 months. Three workshops were held; the first and the third hosted by PNC in Tokyo, Japan and the second hosted by LANL in Los Alamos, New Mexico, US. The following is a summary of the three workshops. The first workshop addressed the policy environment of transparency. Each side presented its perspective on the following issues: (1) a definition of transparency, (2) reasons for transparency, (3) detailed goals of transparency and (4) obstacles to transparency. The topic of the second workshop was ``Development of Transparency Options.`` The activities accomplished were (1) identify type of facilities where transparency might be applied, (2) define criteria for applying transparency, and (3) delineate applicable transparency options. The goal of the third workshop, ``Technical Options for Transparency,`` was to (1) identify conceptual options for transparency system design; (2) identify instrumentation, measurement, data collection and data processing options; (3) identify data display options; and (4) identify technical options for reprocessing, enrichment, and MOX fuel fabrication facilities.

Mochiji, Toshiro; Keeney, R.; Tazaki, Makiko [Power Reactor and Nuclear Fuel Development Corp. (Japan). Office of Nuclear Nonproliferation; Nakhleh, C.; Puckett, J.; Stanbro, W. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States). Safeguards System Group

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

132

Policies  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Optimization Online Policy. Mission statement. Optimization Online is a repository of eprints about optimization and related topics. It facilitates quick ...

133

Weapons | National Nuclear Security Administration  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Weapons | National Nuclear Security Administration Weapons | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure Continuing Management Reform Countering Nuclear Terrorism About Us Our Programs Our History Who We Are Our Leadership Our Locations Budget Our Operations Media Room Congressional Testimony Fact Sheets Newsletters Press Releases Speeches Events Social Media Video Gallery Photo Gallery NNSA Archive Federal Employment Apply for Our Jobs Our Jobs Working at NNSA Blog Weapons Home > Our Mission > Managing the Stockpile > Weapons Weapons The New START Treaty, which was signed in 2010, between the United States and Russian Federation will cap the strategic deployed nuclear arsenals of each country at 1,550 warheads, a nearly 75% reduction compared with the

134

Nuclear weapon reliability evaluation methodology  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document provides an overview of those activities that are normally performed by Sandia National Laboratories to provide nuclear weapon reliability evaluations for the Department of Energy. These reliability evaluations are first provided as a prediction of the attainable stockpile reliability of a proposed weapon design. Stockpile reliability assessments are provided for each weapon type as the weapon is fielded and are continuously updated throughout the weapon stockpile life. The reliability predictions and assessments depend heavily on data from both laboratory simulation and actual flight tests. An important part of the methodology are the opportunities for review that occur throughout the entire process that assure a consistent approach and appropriate use of the data for reliability evaluation purposes.

Wright, D.L. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

1993-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

135

Weapon focus, arousal, and eyewitness memory  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Weapon focus refers to the decreased ability to ... by an eyewitness because of attention to a weapon present during that crime. In the first ... viewed a mock crime scene in which a weapon was either highly visi...

Thomas H. Kramer; Robert Buckhout; Paul Eugenio

1990-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

136

Eyewitness identification: Simulating the “Weapon effect”  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The present experiment investigates the effect of weapons on eyewitness recall and recognition using a ... experimental paradigm in which a syringe serves as weapon simulation. Contrary to previous weapon manipul...

Anne Maass; Günther Köhnken

1989-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

137

Security implications of the proliferation of weapons of mass destruction in the Middle East. Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The author argues that the Arab-Israeli conflict, the Iran-Iraq rivalry, and the lack of progress in the peace process are strong incentives for nations in the region to acquire weapons of mass destruction (WMD). He documents Israeli, Iranian, and Arab WMD programs and capabilities, referencing use of WMD in the region. He discusses the reasons why the major regional powers seek WMD capabilities and examines the nature of the proliferation dynamic as well as nonproliferation and counterproliferation approaches applicable to the region. The author offers several recommendations designed to strengthen these efforts and deal more effectively with causes of proliferation.

Hajjar, S.G.

1998-12-17T23:59:59.000Z

138

THUMBS DOWN ON DRUG WAR WEAPON  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

THUMBS DOWN ON DRUG WAR WEAPON ... Mycoherbicides have been viewed as a potentially potent weapon in the worldwide war on illicit drugs. ...

CHERYL HOGUE

2011-12-05T23:59:59.000Z

139

Numerical simulation investigations in weapon delivery probabilities .  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??The study of weapon delivery probabilities has historically been focused around analytical solutions and approximations for weapon delivery accuracy and effectiveness calculations. With the relatively… (more)

Peterson, Kristofer A.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

140

Uranium Weapons Components Successfully Dismantled | National...  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Successfully Dismantled March 20, 2007 Uranium Weapons Components Successfully Dismantled Oak Ridge, TN Continuing its efforts to reduce the size of the U.S. nuclear weapons...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "weapons nonproliferation policy" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Debunking Six Big Myths about Nuclear Weapons  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Debunking Six Big Myths about Nuclear Weapons National Security Science Latest Issue:December 2014 All Issues submit Debunking Six Big Myths about Nuclear Weapons Is it true...

142

Weapons production | Y-12 National Security Complex  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Weapons production Weapons production An effective production infrastructure is critical to national security. Y-12 continues to replace World War II-era facilities to increase...

143

Senior Adviser, Defense Nuclear Nonproliferation Programs Sector, Pacific  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Senior Adviser, Defense Nuclear Nonproliferation Programs Sector, Pacific Senior Adviser, Defense Nuclear Nonproliferation Programs Sector, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure Continuing Management Reform Countering Nuclear Terrorism About Us Our Programs Our History Who We Are Our Leadership Our Locations Budget Our Operations Media Room Congressional Testimony Fact Sheets Newsletters Press Releases Speeches Events Social Media Video Gallery Photo Gallery NNSA Archive Federal Employment Apply for Our Jobs Our Jobs Working at NNSA Blog Home > About Us > Who We Are > In The Spotlight > Steve Mladineo Senior Adviser, Defense Nuclear Nonproliferation Programs Sector, Pacific

144

Senior Adviser, Defense Nuclear Nonproliferation Programs Sector, Pacific  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Senior Adviser, Defense Nuclear Nonproliferation Programs Sector, Pacific Senior Adviser, Defense Nuclear Nonproliferation Programs Sector, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure Continuing Management Reform Countering Nuclear Terrorism About Us Our Programs Our History Who We Are Our Leadership Our Locations Budget Our Operations Media Room Congressional Testimony Fact Sheets Newsletters Press Releases Speeches Events Social Media Video Gallery Photo Gallery NNSA Archive Federal Employment Apply for Our Jobs Our Jobs Working at NNSA Blog Home > About Us > Who We Are > In The Spotlight > Steve Mladineo Senior Adviser, Defense Nuclear Nonproliferation Programs Sector, Pacific

145

Nonproliferation Graduate Fellowship Program Attracts High Caliber Young  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Graduate Fellowship Program Attracts High Caliber Young Graduate Fellowship Program Attracts High Caliber Young Professionals to Careers in Nonproliferation and National Security | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure Continuing Management Reform Countering Nuclear Terrorism About Us Our Programs Our History Who We Are Our Leadership Our Locations Budget Our Operations Media Room Congressional Testimony Fact Sheets Newsletters Press Releases Speeches Events Social Media Video Gallery Photo Gallery NNSA Archive Federal Employment Apply for Our Jobs Our Jobs Working at NNSA Blog Home > NNSA Blog > Nonproliferation Graduate Fellowship Program Attracts High Caliber ... Nonproliferation Graduate Fellowship Program Attracts High Caliber Young

146

Weapons in the City: Weapon Use in Chicago Homicide Cases.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??This study used data from the homicides in Chicago 1965-1995 dataset (N=9,340) to examine the relationship between the use of certain types of weapons in… (more)

Johnson, Natalie Jo

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

147

Nuclear weapon system risk assessment  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Probabilistic risk assessment (PRA) is a process for evaluating hazardous operations by considering what can go wrong, the likelihood of these undesired events, and the resultant consequences. Techniques used in PRA originated in the 1960s. Although there were early exploratory applications to nuclear weapons and other technologies, the first major application of these techniques was in the Reactor Safety Study, WASH-1400, {sup 1} in which the risks of nuclear power accidents were thoroughly investigated for the first time. Recently, these techniques have begun to be adapted to nuclear weapon system applications. This report discusses this application to nuclear weapon systems.

Carlson, D.D.

1993-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

148

A Role for Industry in Promoting Nuclear Security and Nonproliferation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Industry has a unique opportunity and critical role to play in strengthening governmental efforts to prevent the spread of nuclear, radiological, and dual-use materials and technologies that could be used in a nuclear or radiological weapon. Governmental regulations and policies are in effect at both the national and international levels to inhibit access to such materials and technologies by illegitimate end-users. However, the discovery of an illegal nuclear network, spearheaded by Pakistani scientist A Q Khan, increased international concern about what more could be done to prevent proliferation. Industry is well-poised and has a strong incentive to take a more proactive role to complement existing governmental efforts. Companies can be a tremendous help in ensuring that illicit diversions do not occur by increasing their oversight over the supply chain.

Hund, Gretchen; Seward, Amy M.; Elkhamri, Oksana O.

2009-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

149

Verifying a nuclear weapon`s response to radiation environments  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The process described in the paper is being applied as part of the design verification of a replacement component designed for a nuclear weapon currently in the active stockpile. This process is an adaptation of the process successfully used in nuclear weapon development programs. The verification process concentrates on evaluating system response to radiation environments, verifying system performance during and after exposure to radiation environments, and assessing system survivability.

Dean, F.F.; Barrett, W.H.

1998-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

150

Administrator D'Agostino on Nuclear Forces and Nonproliferation | National  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Nuclear Forces and Nonproliferation | National Nuclear Forces and Nonproliferation | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure Continuing Management Reform Countering Nuclear Terrorism About Us Our Programs Our History Who We Are Our Leadership Our Locations Budget Our Operations Media Room Congressional Testimony Fact Sheets Newsletters Press Releases Speeches Events Social Media Video Gallery Photo Gallery NNSA Archive Federal Employment Apply for Our Jobs Our Jobs Working at NNSA Blog Home > Media Room > Speeches > Administrator D'Agostino on Nuclear Forces and Nonproliferation Speech Administrator D'Agostino on Nuclear Forces and Nonproliferation Oct 28, 2010 As prepared for delivery at the Woodrow Wilson International Center for

151

EA-1238: Proposed Construction and Operation of the Nonproliferation and  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

38: Proposed Construction and Operation of the 38: Proposed Construction and Operation of the Nonproliferation and International Security Center, Los Alamos, New Mexico EA-1238: Proposed Construction and Operation of the Nonproliferation and International Security Center, Los Alamos, New Mexico SUMMARY This EA evaluates the environmental impacts for the proposal to construct and operate the Nonproliferation and International Security Center within the U.S. Department of Energy's Los Alamos National Laboratory Technical Area 3 located at Los Alamos, New Mexico. PUBLIC COMMENT OPPORTUNITIES None available at this time. DOCUMENTS AVAILABLE FOR DOWNLOAD July 22, 1999 EA-1238: Finding of No Significant Impact Proposed Construction and Operation of the Nonproliferation and International Security Center July 22, 1999

152

SciTech Connect: Arms control and nonproliferation technologies...  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

Non-Proliferation Experiment (NPE), conducted by the Department of Energy at the Nevada Test Site. Through an introduction and pictorial walk-through, Marv Denny and Jay Zucca of...

153

Risk in the Weapons Stockpile  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

When it comes to the nuclear weapons stockpile, risk must be as low as possible. Design and care to keep the stockpile healthy involves all aspects of risk management. Design diversity is a method that helps to mitigate risk.

Noone, Bailey C [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2012-08-14T23:59:59.000Z

154

Chapter 13 -Firearms, Weapons, Destructive Devices  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

53 Chapter 13 - Firearms, Weapons, Destructive Devices The Oregon Administrative Rules contain OAR Definitions (1) "Firearm" means a weapon or device, by whatever name known, which is designed to expel chemical action, and which is readily capable for use as a weapon. (2) "Weapon" means any knife having

155

OPEN FORUM ON THE CHEMICAL WEAPONS CONVENTION Challenges to the Chemical Weapons Ban  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

OPEN FORUM ON THE CHEMICAL WEAPONS CONVENTION Challenges to the Chemical Weapons Ban 1 MAY 2003 and Former Chairman of the Ad Hoc Committee on Chemical Weapons Conference on Disarmament PRESENTATIONS Chemical Weapons Destruction CHEMICAL WEAPONS DESTRUCTION IN THE RUSSIAN FEDERATION: Sergey Baranovsky

Sussex, University of

156

A Non-Proliferating Fuel Cycle: No Enrichment, Reprocessing or Accessible Spent Fuel - 12375  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Current fuel cycles offer a number of opportunities for access to plutonium, opportunities to create highly enriched uranium and access highly radioactive wastes to create nuclear weapons and 'dirty' bombs. The non-proliferating fuel cycle however eliminates or reduces such opportunities and access by eliminating the mining, milling and enrichment of uranium. The non-proliferating fuel cycle also reduces the production of plutonium per unit of energy created, eliminates reprocessing and the separation of plutonium from the spent fuel and the creation of a stream of high-level waste. It further simplifies the search for land based deep geologic repositories and interim storage sites for spent fuel in the USA by disposing of the spent fuel in deep sub-seabed sediments after storing the spent fuel at U.S. Navy Nuclear Shipyards that have the space and all of the necessary equipment and security already in place. The non-proliferating fuel cycle also reduces transportation risks by utilizing barges for the collection of spent fuel and transport to the Navy shipyards and specially designed ships to take the spent fuel to designated disposal sites at sea and to dispose of them there in deep sub-seabed sediments. Disposal in the sub-seabed sediments practically eliminates human intrusion. Potential disposal sites include Great Meteor East and Southern Nares Abyssal Plain. Such sites then could easily become international disposal sites since they occur in the open ocean. It also reduces the level of human exposure in case of failure because of the large physical and chemical dilution and the elimination of a major pathway to man-seawater is not potable. Of course, the recovery of uranium from sea water and the disposal of spent fuel in sub-seabed sediments must be proven on an industrial scale. All other technologies are already operating on an industrial scale. If externalities, such as reduced terrorist threats, environmental damage (including embedded emissions), long term care, reduced access to 'dirty' bomb materials, the social and political costs of siting new facilities and the psychological impact of no solution to the nuclear waste problem, were taken into account, the costs would be far lower than those of the present fuel cycle. (authors)

Parker, Frank L. [Vanderbilt University (United States)

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

157

Weapons Quality Assurance Qualification Standard  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

5-2008 5-2008 September 2008 DOE STANDARD WEAPON QUALITY ASSURANCE QUALIFICATION STANDARD NNSA Weapon Quality Assurance Technical Personnel U.S. Department of Energy AREA TRNG Washington, D.C. 20585 DISTRIBUTION STATEMENT A. Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. DOE-STD-1025-2008 This document is available on the Department of Energy Technical Standards Program Web Site at http://www.hss.energy.gov/nuclearsafety/techstds/ DOE-STD-1025-2008 iv INTENTIONALLY BLANK DOE-STD-1025-2008 v TABLE OF CONTENTS ACKNOWLEDGMENT ................................................................................................................ vii PURPOSE....................................................................................................................................

158

The Influence of Context on the “Weapon Focus” Effect  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Two experiments investigated context effects in “weapon focus.” In Experiment 1, undergraduates who ... . The results of both experiments imply that weapon focus may occur because weapons are sur...

Kerri L. Pickel

1999-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

159

Fighting Against the Invisible: The new weapons against chemical warfare  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Scientists. Types of Chemical Weapons. http://www.fas.org/Enzymatic systems The new weapons against chemical warfarebe reproducible in order for the weapon to be effective. To

Nguyen, Leana

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

160

Request For Records Disposition Authority-Nuclear Weapons | Department...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

For Records Disposition Authority-Nuclear Weapons This document identifies the nuclear weapon records generated by the Department of Energy's (DOE) Nuclear Weapons Complex Request...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "weapons nonproliferation policy" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Chlorine Gas: An Evolving Hazardous Material Threat and Unconventional Weapon  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

biological, and chemical weapons of warfare and terrorism.Threat and Unconventional Weapon Robert Jones, MD Brandonand as a terrorist weapon. This review will summarize recent

Jones, Robert; Wills, Brandon; Kang, Christopher

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

162

Production in the Digital Era: Commodity or Strategic Weapon?  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Commodity or Strategic Weapon? © John Zysman BRIE Workingproduction is a strategic weapon and when a commodity. Forproduction into a strategic weapon liking production to the

Zysman, John

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

163

Light Wars: The Bright Future of Laser Weapons  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Implications of Laser Weapons. Northrop Grumman. http://Goda. 2004. High energy laser weapons: technology overview.The Bright Future of Laser Weapons WAR TECH SPRING WAR TECH

Mistry, Hemma

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

164

DOE Defense Nuclear Nonproliferation DNN | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Defense Nuclear Nonproliferation DNN Defense Nuclear Nonproliferation DNN Jump to: navigation, search Name DOE Defense Nuclear Nonproliferation (DNN) Place Washington, Washington, DC Zip 20585 Product String representation "Washington D.C. ... ear operations." is too long. Coordinates 38.89037°, -77.031959° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":38.89037,"lon":-77.031959,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

165

Weapons engineering tritium facility overview  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Materials provide an overview of the Weapons Engineering Tritium Facility (WETF) as introductory material for January 2011 visit to SRS. Purpose of the visit is to discuss Safety Basis, Conduct of Engineering, and Conduct of Operations. WETF general description and general GTS program capabilities are presented in an unclassified format.

Najera, Larry [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2011-01-20T23:59:59.000Z

166

Memory impairment in the weapon focus effect  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Two experiments are reported in which postevent source of misinformation was manipulated within weaponpresent and weapon-absent scenarios. Participants viewed slides depicting either a weapon or a newspaper event...

Jo Saunders

2009-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

167

Värdig ett vapen; Worthy of a Weapon.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

?? The aim of this thesis is to interpret and discuss the weapon-graves of Viking Age Birka. The weapon-grave phenomenon is deemed differential in relation… (more)

Björk, Niklas

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

168

WEAPONS QUALITY ASSURANCE QUALIFICATION STANDARD REFERENCE GUIDE  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Weapon Weapon Quality Assurance Qualification Standard Reference Guide AUGUST 2009 This page is intentionally blank. Table of Contents i LIST OF FIGURES ...................................................................................................................... ii LIST OF TABLES ........................................................................................................................ ii ACRONYMS ................................................................................................................................ iv PURPOSE...................................................................................................................................... 1 SCOPE ...........................................................................................................................................

169

FY 2012 Budget Hearing Testimony on Nuclear Nonproliferation and Naval  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

on Nuclear Nonproliferation and Naval on Nuclear Nonproliferation and Naval Reactor Programs before the House Appropriations Committee, Energy and Water Development Subcommittee | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure Continuing Management Reform Countering Nuclear Terrorism About Us Our Programs Our History Who We Are Our Leadership Our Locations Budget Our Operations Media Room Congressional Testimony Fact Sheets Newsletters Press Releases Speeches Events Social Media Video Gallery Photo Gallery NNSA Archive Federal Employment Apply for Our Jobs Our Jobs Working at NNSA Blog Home > Media Room > Congressional Testimony > FY 2012 Budget Hearing Testimony on Nuclear ...

170

Statement on Defense Nuclear Nonproliferation and Naval Reactors Activities  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Defense Nuclear Nonproliferation and Naval Reactors Activities Defense Nuclear Nonproliferation and Naval Reactors Activities before the House Committee on Appropriations Subcommittee on Energy & Water Development | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure Continuing Management Reform Countering Nuclear Terrorism About Us Our Programs Our History Who We Are Our Leadership Our Locations Budget Our Operations Media Room Congressional Testimony Fact Sheets Newsletters Press Releases Speeches Events Social Media Video Gallery Photo Gallery NNSA Archive Federal Employment Apply for Our Jobs Our Jobs Working at NNSA Blog Home > Media Room > Congressional Testimony > Statement on Defense Nuclear

171

Nonproliferation Human Capital Development in Malaysia | National Nuclear  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Human Capital Development in Malaysia | National Nuclear Human Capital Development in Malaysia | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure Continuing Management Reform Countering Nuclear Terrorism About Us Our Programs Our History Who We Are Our Leadership Our Locations Budget Our Operations Media Room Congressional Testimony Fact Sheets Newsletters Press Releases Speeches Events Social Media Video Gallery Photo Gallery NNSA Archive Federal Employment Apply for Our Jobs Our Jobs Working at NNSA Blog Home > NNSA Blog > Nonproliferation Human Capital Development in Malaysia Nonproliferation Human Capital Development in Malaysia Posted By NNSA Public Affairs NNSA Blog Photo Credit: National University of Malaysia

172

FY 2012 Budget Hearing Testimony on Nuclear Nonproliferation and Naval  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

on Nuclear Nonproliferation and Naval on Nuclear Nonproliferation and Naval Reactor Programs before the House Appropriations Committee, Energy and Water Development Subcommittee | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure Continuing Management Reform Countering Nuclear Terrorism About Us Our Programs Our History Who We Are Our Leadership Our Locations Budget Our Operations Media Room Congressional Testimony Fact Sheets Newsletters Press Releases Speeches Events Social Media Video Gallery Photo Gallery NNSA Archive Federal Employment Apply for Our Jobs Our Jobs Working at NNSA Blog Home > Media Room > Congressional Testimony > FY 2012 Budget Hearing Testimony on Nuclear ...

173

Statement on Defense Nuclear Nonproliferation and Naval Reactors Activities  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Defense Nuclear Nonproliferation and Naval Reactors Activities Defense Nuclear Nonproliferation and Naval Reactors Activities before the House Committee on Appropriations Subcommittee on Energy & Water Development | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure Continuing Management Reform Countering Nuclear Terrorism About Us Our Programs Our History Who We Are Our Leadership Our Locations Budget Our Operations Media Room Congressional Testimony Fact Sheets Newsletters Press Releases Speeches Events Social Media Video Gallery Photo Gallery NNSA Archive Federal Employment Apply for Our Jobs Our Jobs Working at NNSA Blog Home > Media Room > Congressional Testimony > Statement on Defense Nuclear

174

Effects of Weapon Noise on Hearing  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...“In military spheres, the need for prevention of weapon noise-induced hearing loss is receiving ever-...

A. Dancer; R. Franke

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

175

The gas centrifuge and nuclear weapons proliferation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Uranium enrichment by centrifugation is the basis for the quick and efficient production of nuclear fuel-or nuclear weapons.

Wood, Houston G. [Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering Department, University of Virginia, Charlottesville, Virginia (United States); Glaser, Alexander [Woodrow Wilson School of Public and International Affairs, Program on Science, Technology and Environmental Policy, Princeton University, Princeton, New Jersey (United States); Kemp, R. Scott [Nuclear Science and Engineering Department, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, Massachusetts (United States)

2014-05-09T23:59:59.000Z

176

weapons material protection | National Nuclear Security Administration  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

weapons material protection | National Nuclear Security Administration Facebook Twitter Youtube Flickr RSS People Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering...

177

Chihuahua Jackets, Lego Weapons, and Vintage Bags  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Chihuahua Jackets, Lego Weapons, and Vintage Bags are signs of a trend. Keywords: commerce, consumer products, internet

Charles Day

2010-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

178

President Truman Orders Development of Thermonuclear Weapon ...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Orders Development of Thermonuclear Weapon | National Nuclear Security Administration Facebook Twitter Youtube Flickr RSS People Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing...

179

Strengthening the Biological and Toxin Weapons Convention  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Strengthening the Biological and Toxin Weapons Convention: Countering the Threat from Biological Weapons Presented to Parliament by the Secretary of State for Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs By Command of Her Majesty April 2002 Cm 5484 £5.00 #12;3 STRENGTHENING THE BIOLOGICAL AND TOXIN WEAPONS CONVENTION

Sussex, University of

180

MN4602 Crouch 2004 REASSESSING WEAPON SYSTEM  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

MN4602 Crouch 2004 REASSESSING WEAPON SYSTEM OPERATIONAL TEST & EVALUATION METHODOLOGIES LTC Thom support assessing a weapon systems true cost and performance characteristics? S1: Can/should cost methodologies adequately address weapon systems total ownership cost (TOC)? S3: Are there critical cost

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "weapons nonproliferation policy" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

International Criminalization of Chemical and Biological Weapons  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

International Criminalization of Chemical and Biological Weapons Matthew Meselson The American. As a biologist seeking the effective elimination of biological and chemical weapons and concerned with the need or chemical weapons or who order or direct anyone to engage in these activities. Prohibitions against

Sussex, University of

182

ORGANISATION FOR THE PROHIBITION OF CHEMICAL WEAPONS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ORGANISATION FOR THE PROHIBITION OF CHEMICAL WEAPONS CONVENTION ON THE PROHIBITION OF THE DEVELOPMENT, PRODUCTION, STOCKPILING AND USE OF CHEMICAL WEAPONS AND ON THEIR DESTRUCTION OPCW #12;#12;CONVENTION ON THE PROHIBITION OF THE DEVELOPMENT, PRODUCTION, STOCKPILING AND USE OF CHEMICAL WEAPONS

Sussex, University of

183

Nonproliferation Graduate Fellowship Program, Annual Report, Class of 2012  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This 32-pp annual report/brochure describes the accomplishments of the Class of 2012 of the Nonproliferation Graduate Fellowship Program (the last class of this program), which PNNL administers for the National Nuclear Security Administration. The time period covers Sept 2011 through June 2013.

McMakin, Andrea H.

2013-09-23T23:59:59.000Z

184

Former Nonproliferation Graduate Fellow Served at U.S. Mission  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Because of her training and professional experiences, Rosalyn Leitch, a Security Specialist at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory and former Nonproliferation Graduate Fellow with NIS (2012-2013) was able to transition into temporary assignment as UNVIE Acting Nuclear Security Attaché from November 2013 through February 2014.

Brim, Cornelia P.

2014-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

185

POLICY  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

3, 2013 3, 2013 POLICY * Successful execution of this research and development (R&D) program will materially contribute to U.S. supply of oil and gas both today and beyond the 10 year R&D horizon. It is the consensus of this Committee that the resource potential impacted by this technology program is significant and of major importance to the Nation. There is a critical need for a sustainable and consistent approach to the technology challenges facing unconventional resource development. * The Committee believes the Plan and the procedures followed in its development to be professional and inclusive, with a significant infusion of industry knowledge. * These Independents are faced with unique and ever more difficult technical challenges in developing new unconventional resources, yet they often lack the

186

Nonproliferation Boom Gives A Lift to the National Labs  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...Korea over its nascent nuclear weapons program, the...5-megawatt experimental nuclear reactor near theNorth...could extract waste fuel and process it to make plutonium for a nuclear weapon. But ifthe satellite...released during plutonium reprocessing to the thermal signature...

Christopher Anderson

1994-02-04T23:59:59.000Z

187

Secure or seclude : U.S. nuclear policy and nuclear states, a comparison of India and Pakistan.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??The U.S. has implemented a two-track nuclear policy since the Cold War. The first track is non-proliferation and the second track involves securing all nuclear… (more)

Chaney, Brent Buie

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

188

Nonproliferation - Tell-tale seals | ornl.gov  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

SHARE SHARE Nonproliferation - Tell-tale seals Using an Oak Ridge National Laboratory technology, inspectors of containers of nuclear material will be able to know with unprecedented confidence whether an intruder has tampered with a seal. The system uses a light source of entangled photons to verify the continuity of a fiber-based seal, according to Travis Humble, who led the development team. Entanglement is a feature of quantum physics that describes how two spatially disparate systems exhibit strong correlations in otherwise independent behaviors. The work, sponsored by the Defense Threat Reduction Agency, is vital to ensure compliance with nonproliferation treaties because inspectors must confirm the uninterrupted containment and surveillance of any nuclear material.

189

Consequence Management, Safeguards & Non-Proliferation Tools | ORNL  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Consequence Consequence Management, Safeguards, and Non-Proliferation Tools SHARE Consequence Management, Safeguards and Non-Proliferation Tools UF 6 Enrichment Facility Visualization of the gamma radiation field in a mock-up of a UF-6 enrichment facility. The solution was generated on a desktop computer using ORNL's Denovo SN transport code and ADVANTG interface, using geometry and material descriptions from an NRL SWORD input file. ORNL is a leader in developing state-of-the-art radiation transport modeling and simulation tools and in applying these tools to solve challenging problems in national and global nuclear security. Recent developments in high-performance, high-fidelity, deterministic Monte Carlo, and hybrid Monte Carlo/deterministic radiation transport codes within

190

Conducted Electrical Weapon Deployed Probe Wounds  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Deployment of probes is a common method of use for some handheld conducted electrical weapons (CEWs). Probe deployment allows for greater...

Donald M. Dawes M.D.; Jeffrey D. Ho M.D.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

191

Stridsvagn 122 och Remote Weapon Station.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

?? Den här uppsatsen behandlar stridsvagn122 och Remote Weapon Station (RWS). Det finns ett verkansglapp mellan dagens kalibrar 120 mm och 7,62 mm. Observationsmöjligheterna i… (more)

Sellberg, Martin

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

192

The National Nuclear Security Administration's Weapons Dismantlement...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

National Nuclear Security Administration's Weapons Dismantlement and Disposition Program OAS-L-13-06 January 2013 Department of Energy Washington, DC 20585 January 29, 2013...

193

Weapons assessment efficiencies through use of nondestructive...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Weapons assessment efficiencies through use of nondestructive laser gas sampling Nondestructive laser welding process far less expensive, no underground testing. June 8, 2012...

194

Direct-energy weapons: invisible and invincible? .  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??A military weapon is any tool used to increase the reach or power of a nation. Simply, it can be said that each era witnesses… (more)

Deveci, Bayram Mert.

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

195

Direct-energy weapons invisible and invincible? .  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??A military weapon is any tool used to increase the reach or power of a nation. Simply, it can be said that each era witnesses… (more)

Deveci, Bayram Mert.

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

196

Nuclear Explosive and Weapon Surety Program  

Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

The Order defines the Nuclear Explosive and Weapon Surety (NEWS) Program, which was established to prevent unintended/unauthorized detonation and deliberate unauthorized use of nuclear explosives.

2014-08-05T23:59:59.000Z

197

Weapons Dismantlement and Disposition NNSS Capabilities  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) has tasked the WDD working group to disposition the large inventory of legacy classified weapon components scattered across the complex.

Pat Arnold

2011-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

198

FAQS Reference Guide – Weapon Quality Assurance  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This reference guide addresses the competency statements in the August 2008 edition of DOE-STD-1025-2008, Weapon Quality Assurance Functional Area Qualification Standard.

199

Feasibility and options for purchasing nuclear weapons, highly enriched uranium (HEU) and plutonium from the former Soviet Union (FSU)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In response to a recent tasking from the National Security Council, this report seeks to analyze the possible options open to the US for purchasing, from the former Soviet Union (FSU) substantial quantities of plutonium and highly enriched uranium recovered from the accelerated weapons retirements and dismantlements that will soon be taking place. The purpose of this paper is to identify and assess the implications of some of the options that now appear to be open to the United States, it being recognized that several issues might have to be addressed in further detail if the US Government, on its own, or acting with others seeks to negotiate any such purchases on an early basis. As an outgrowth of the dissolution of the Soviet Union three of the C.I.S. republics now possessing nuclear weapons, namely the Ukraine, Belarus, and Kazakhstan, have stated that it is their goal, without undue delay, to become non-nuclear weapon states as defined in the Non-Proliferation Treaty. Of overriding US concern is the proliferation of nuclear weapons in the Third World, and the significant opportunity that the availability of such a large quantity of surplus weapons grade material might present in this regard, especially to a cash-starved FSU Republic. Additionally, the US, in its endeavor to drawdown its own arsenal, needs to assure itself that these materials are not being reconfigured into more modern weapons within the CIS in a manner which would be inconsistent with the stated intentions and publicized activities. The direct purchase of these valuable materials by the US government or by interested US private enterprises could alleviate these security concerns in a straightforward and very expeditious manner, while at the same time pumping vitally needed hard currency into the struggling CIS economy. Such a purchase would seem to be entirely consistent with the Congressional mandate indicated by the Soviet Nuclear Threat Reduction Act of 1991.

NONE

1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

200

INTEGRATION OF FACILITY MODELING CAPABILITIES FOR NUCLEAR NONPROLIFERATION ANALYSIS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Developing automated methods for data collection and analysis that can facilitate nuclear nonproliferation assessment is an important research area with significant consequences for the effective global deployment of nuclear energy. Facility modeling that can integrate and interpret observations collected from monitored facilities in order to ascertain their functional details will be a critical element of these methods. Although improvements are continually sought, existing facility modeling tools can characterize all aspects of reactor operations and the majority of nuclear fuel cycle processing steps, and include algorithms for data processing and interpretation. Assessing nonproliferation status is challenging because observations can come from many sources, including local and remote sensors that monitor facility operations, as well as open sources that provide specific business information about the monitored facilities, and can be of many different types. Although many current facility models are capable of analyzing large amounts of information, they have not been integrated in an analyst-friendly manner. This paper addresses some of these facility modeling capabilities and illustrates how they could be integrated and utilized for nonproliferation analysis. The inverse problem of inferring facility conditions based on collected observations is described, along with a proposed architecture and computer framework for utilizing facility modeling tools. After considering a representative sampling of key facility modeling capabilities, the proposed integration framework is illustrated with several examples.

Gorensek, M.; Hamm, L.; Garcia, H.; Burr, T.; Coles, G.; Edmunds, T.; Garrett, A.; Krebs, J.; Kress, R.; Lamberti, V.; Schoenwald, D.; Tzanos, C.; Ward, R.

2011-07-18T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "weapons nonproliferation policy" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

MCNPX-PoliMi for Nuclear Nonproliferation Applications  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In the past few years, efforts to develop new measurement systems to support nuclear nonproliferation and homeland security have increased substantially. Monte Carlo radiation transport is one of the simulation methods of choice for the analysis of data from existing systems and for the design of new measurement systems; it allows for accurate description of geometries, detailed modeling of particle-nucleus interactions, and event-by-event detection analysis. This paper describes the use of the Monte Carlo code MCNPX-PoliMi for nuclear-nonproliferation applications, with particular emphasis on the simulation of spontaneous and neutron-induced nuclear fission. In fact, of all possible neutron-nucleus interactions, neutron-induced fission is the most defining characteristic of special nuclear material (such as U-235 and Pu-239), which is the material of interest in nuclear-nonproliferation applications. The MCNP-PoliMi code was originally released from the Radiation Safety Shielding Center (RSSIC) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory in 2003 [1]; the MCNPX-PoliMi code contains many enhancements and is based on MCNPX ver. 2.7.0. MCNPX-PoliMi ver. 2.0 was released through RSICC in 2012 as a patch to MCNPX ver. 2.7.0 and as an executable [2].

S. A. Pozzi; S. D. Clarke; W. Walsh; E. C. Miller; J. Dolan; M. Flaska; B. M. Wieger; A. Enqvist; E. Padovani; J. K. Mattingly; D. L. Chichester; P. Peerani

2012-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

202

Quality Assurance Policy and Directives | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

GPG 017 DOE O 226.1B, Implementation of Department of Energy Oversight Policy DOENNSA Weapon Quality Policy (QC-1) DOE-STD-3020-2005, Specification for HEPA Filters used by DOE...

203

Policy Flash 2011-95 | Department of Energy  

Energy Savers [EERE]

5 Policy Flash 2011-95 On July 21, 2011, the Department issued a Contractor Requirements Document (CRD) for DOE O 452.8, Control of Nuclear Weapons Data Policy Flash 2011-950.pdf...

204

2012 Annual Planning Summary for NNSA Defense Nuclear NonProliferation  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The ongoing and projected Environmental Assessments and Environmental Impact Statements for 2012 and 2013 within the NNSA Defense Nuclear NonProliferation.

205

U.S. Department of Energy and NTI Announce Key Nonproliferation...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

Sign Agreement to Allow Nonproliferation and Threat Reduction Cooperation Secretary Bodman and Rosatom Director Kiriyenko Meet to Discuss U.S.-Russia Nuclear Security Progress...

206

SciTech Connect: Proceedings of the Symposium on the Non-Proliferation...  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

Symposium on the Non-Proliferation Experiment: Results and Implications for Test Ban Treaties, Rockville, Maryland, April 19-21, 1994 Citation Details In-Document Search Title:...

207

The Secretary of Energy Advisory Board (SEAB) Task Force on Nuclear Nonproliferation  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The Secretary of Energy Advisory Board (SEAB) Task Force on Nuclear Nonproliferation comprises SEAB members and individuals with expertise and experience in the technologies, institutions, and...

208

Weapons Activities/ Inertial Confinement Fusion Ignition  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

a safe, secure, and reliable nuclear weapons stockpile without underground testing. Science-based weapons and certify the stockpile without nuclear testing. The National Ignition Facility (NIF) extends HEDP under extreme conditions that approach the high energy density (HED) environments found in a nuclear

209

US?Ukraine stalemate over nuclear weapons  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

... Washington. Ukraine's opposition to the complete relinquishment of strategic nuclear weapons located on its soil is ... for the Advancement of Science (AAAS), focused on the disposal of nuclear weapons in Ukraine itself, while a United Nations symposium addressed the wider question of disarmament across the ...

Colin Macilwain

1993-10-14T23:59:59.000Z

210

Improved $?$-weapons for Higgs hunting  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In this work, we use the results from Higgs searches in the $\\gamma\\gamma$ and $\\tau\\tau$ decay channels at LHC and indirect bounds as BR$(B \\to X_s \\gamma)$ to constrain the parameter space of a generic MSSM Higgs sector. In particular, we include the latest CMS results that look for additional Higgs states with masses up to 1 TeV. We show that the $\\tau \\tau$ channel is the best and most accurate weapon in the hunt for new Higgs states beyond the Standard Model. We obtain that present experimental results rule out additional neutral Higgs bosons in a generic MSSM below 300 GeV for any value of $\\tan \\beta$ and, for instance, values of $\\tan \\beta$ above 30 are only possible for Higgs masses above 600 GeV. ATLAS stored data has the potential to render this bound obsolete in the near future.

G. Barenboim; C. Bosch; M. L. López-Ibáñez; O. Vives

2013-11-28T23:59:59.000Z

211

Iraq's secret nuclear weapons program  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

UN inspectors discovered an electromagnetic isotope separation factory that put Iraq just 18-30 months away from having enough material for a bomb. They also found European centrifuge technology and plans for an implosion device. The inspections of Iraq mandated by the United Nations as a cease-fire condition at the end of the Gulf War in February 1991 have revealed a clandestine nuclear materials production and weapons design program of unexpected size and sophistication. The total value of that program, in terms of equipment and personnel deployed between 1981 and 1991, may be on the order of $5-10 billion. The program employed an estimated 7000 scientist and 20,000 workers. 6 refs., 4 figs.

Davis, J.C. (Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States)); Kay, D.A. (Uranium Institute, London (United Kingdom))

1992-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

212

Study on Short Weapon in Traditional Martial Arts  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Short weapons were the general name of short handheld combating and fighting weapons in ancient China, and were called by ... with a variety of longer combating and fighting weapons. In ancient China, there were ...

Xiao-dao Chen

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

213

Weapon Scheduling Method for Cooperative Air-Defense Operation  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

By defining the weapon scheduling plan and weapon combat action, the mathematical formulation of weapon scheduling problem for cooperative air-defense operation ... the basis of discussing the primary constraints...

Liang Yu; Changfeng Xing…

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

214

Splenic Laceration and Pulmonary Contusion Injury From Bean Bag Weapon  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of a New Law Enforcement Weapon: The Police Bean Bag. Annevacuation from a bean bag weapon. Am Surg 2012. 78(1):E33-complication of a nonlethal weapon. J Trauma 2002. 5. Olivas

Patel, Amar; Toohey, Shannon; Osborn, Megan Boysen

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

215

Film as a Weapon: The Cultural Question in African Liberation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Film as a Weapon: JJx; Cultural Ouestion in Africanas a social and political weapon with definite points offilms serve as a material weapon in the hands of the class

Ayu, Iyorchia D.

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

216

Los Alamos National Laboratory names new head of weapons programs  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Laboratory names new head of weapons programs Los Alamos National Laboratory names new head of weapons programs Bret Knapp has been acting in that position since June 2011....

217

Fehner and Gosling, Atmospheric Nuclear Weapons Testing, 1951...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

Atmospheric Nuclear Weapons Testing, 1951-1963. Battlefield of the Cold War: The Nevada Test Site, Volume I Fehner and Gosling, Atmospheric Nuclear Weapons Testing, 1951-1963....

218

Laboratory's role in Cold War nuclear weapons testing program...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

70th anniversary lecture Laboratory's role in Cold War nuclear weapons testing program focus of next 70th anniversary lecture Lab's role in the development of nuclear weapons...

219

Passing good judgment, part 1: weapons designers with nuclear...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

2014 All Issues submit Passing good judgment, part 1: weapons designers with nuclear testing experience The nuclear weapons designers who developed their skills during...

220

Nuclear Explosive and Weapon Surety Program - DOE Directives...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

D, Nuclear Explosive and Weapon Surety Program by cdornburg Functional areas: Defense Nuclear Facility Safety and Health Requirement, Defense Programs, Nuclear Weapons Programs,...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "weapons nonproliferation policy" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Technology transfer and U.S. national security policy| The Joint Strike Fighter.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

?? This is a dissertation about United States international technology transfer policy relating to the Department of Defense (DOD) F-35 Joint Strike Fighter (JSF) weapons… (more)

Krueger, Richard D.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

222

Managing nuclear materials from retired weapons: An overview of U.S. plans, programs and goals  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In September 1993, the Congressional Office of Technology Assessment (OTA) published a report entitled ``Dismantling the Bomb and Managing the Nuclear Materials``. That study evaluated the current activities as well as the future challenges inherent in retiring many thousands of nuclear weapons in the US and Russia; dismantling the warheads; and safely and securely disposing of the constituent materials.The warhead dismantlement process has been underway for a few years in both nations but long-range plans and policies are still in the early stages of development. At present both the plutonium and highly-enriched uranium removed from retired weapons is stored temporarily awaiting decisions about its ultimate fate.

Johnson, P.A. [Office of Technology Assessment, Washington, DC (United States)

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

223

The origin of Iraq's nuclear weapons program: Technical reality and Western hypocrisy  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This report is based on a series of papers written between 1980 and 2005 on the origin of Iraq's nuclear weapons program, which was known to one of the authors in the late 1970s already, as well as to a number of other physicists, who independently tried without success to inform their governments and the public. It is concluded that at no point did the Western governments effectively try to stop Iraq's nuclear weapons program, which suggests that its existence was useful as a foreign policy tool, as is confirmed by its use as a major justification to wage two wars on Iraq.

Erkman, S; Hurni, J P; Klement, S; Erkman, Suren; Gsponer, Andre; Hurni, Jean-Pierre; Klement, Stephan

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

224

E-Print Network 3.0 - atmospheric nuclear weapon Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

weapon Search Powered by Explorit Topic List Advanced Search Sample search results for: atmospheric nuclear weapon...

225

E-Print Network 3.0 - atmospheric nuclear weapons Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

weapons Search Powered by Explorit Topic List Advanced Search Sample search results for: atmospheric nuclear weapons...

226

Weapon Systems Acquisition for Defense Forces  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Technology is changing the shape of warfare through multidimensional influences on the components of war-making machinery. Weapon system acquisitions by a country’s armed ... , owing to the longer life-period of

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

227

DIRECTED ENERGY WEAPONS (DEWs): A BIBLIOGRAPHY  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, 1980, v, 113, no. 5, p. 60-63. "AF Phillips Lab Looks at Space as Battleground." BMD Monitor, September on Blinding Laser Weapons." Laser Focus World, December 1995, v. 31, p. 62-64. Armstrong, Richard B. "Directed

228

Computational Challenges in Nuclear Weapons Simulation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

After a decade of experience, the Stockpile Stewardship Program continues to ensure the safety, security and reliability of the nation's nuclear weapons. The Advanced Simulation and Computing (ASCI) program was established to provide leading edge, high-end simulation capabilities needed to meet the program's assessment and certification requirements. The great challenge of this program lies in developing the tools and resources necessary for the complex, highly coupled, multi-physics calculations required to simulate nuclear weapons. This paper describes the hardware and software environment we have applied to fulfill our nuclear weapons responsibilities. It also presents the characteristics of our algorithms and codes, especially as they relate to supercomputing resource capabilities and requirements. It then addresses impediments to the development and application of nuclear weapon simulation software and hardware and concludes with a summary of observations and recommendations on an approach for working with industry and government agencies to address these impediments.

McMillain, C F; Adams, T F; McCoy, M G; Christensen, R B; Pudliner, B S; Zika, M R; Brantley, P S; Vetter, J S; May, J M

2003-08-29T23:59:59.000Z

229

Weapons Activities/ Advanced Simulation and Computing Campaign FY 2011 Congressional Budget  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Weapons Activities/ Advanced Simulation and Computing Campaign FY 2011 Congressional Budget weapons assessment and certification requirements including weapon codes, weapons science, computing testing to determine weapon behavior. As such, ASC simulations are central to our national security. Our

230

New Proposal for the Detection of Concealed Weapons: Electromagnetic Weapon Detection for Open Areas.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??Terrorist groups, hijackers, and people hiding guns and knifes are a constant and increasing threat Concealed weapon detection (CWO) has turned into one of the… (more)

Agurto Goya, Alan

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

231

hspthe harvard sussex program on chemical and biological weapons (CBW)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

hspthe harvard sussex program on chemical and biological weapons (CBW) Resource Guide of the use of chemical weapons Never to develop, produce, otherwise acquire, stockpile or retain chemical weapons Never to assist, encourage or induce, in any way, anyone to engag To destroy chemical weapons

Sussex, University of

232

AIR FORCE SPECIAL WEAPONS CENTER  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

HEADQUARTERS aII?y HEADQUARTERS aII?y 9 AIR FORCE SPECIAL WEAPONS CENTER 1 AIR FORCE SYSTEMS COMMAND . - KlRTlAND AIR FORCE BASE, NEW MEXICO - k FINAL REPORT O N AIR FORCE PARTICIPATION PROJECT RULISON .1 O c t o b e r 1969 P r e p a r e d by : CONT INENTAL TEST D I V I S ION DIRECTORATE OF NUCLEAR FIELD OPERATIONS This page intentionally left blank INDEX AIR FORCE PARTICIPATION I N PROJECT RULISON FINAL REPORT PARAGRAPH BASIC REPORT SUBJECT R e f e r e n c e s PAGE 2 G e n e r a l 1 3 P l a n n i n g 3 4 Command a n d C o n t r o l 5 O p e r a t i o n s , G r a n d ' J u n c t i o n M u n i c i p a l A i r p o r t . . ' A i r O p e r a t i o n s C e n t e r , He1 i c o p t e r P a d / ' 7.. - . M a t e r i e l : ' 8 M e d i c a l 1 9 R a d - S a f e C r a s h - R e s c u e S e c u r i t y 2 1 C o m m u n i c a t i o n s ~ d m i n i s t r a t ' i o n Summary ATTACHMENTS ATTACHMENT SUBJECI' 1 F r a g O r d e r 69-1 ( ~ r o j ' e c t RULISON) , AFSWC D

233

Office of Security Policy  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Office of Security Policy Office of Security Policy Mission and Functions The Office of Security Policy develops and promulgates safeguards and security policy governing the protection of National Security and other critical assets entrusted to the Department. Director's Perspective Welcome to the Office of Security Policy Jack Cowden, Director The Office of Security Policy analyzes, develops and interprets safeguards and security policy governing national security functions and the protection of related critical assets entrusted to the Department. This includes the protection of DOE nuclear facilities, nuclear weapons components, special nuclear materials and classified information. Our broad topical areas are organized as: Program Planning and Management, Protection Program Operations (which includes both physical security and protective forces), Information Security and Material Control and Accountability.

234

Future directions for arms control and nonproliferation. Conference summary  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report provides a summary of the presentations and discussions at the Spring 1994 CNSN-Wilton Park Conference. The Conference was one of a series on US-European security cooperation organized by The Center for National Security Negotiations (CNSN) of Science Applications International Corporation. These conferences bring together government and non-government experts, primarily from the United States and Europe, to discuss a range of regional and global security issues. The conferences provide an opportunity to explore, in a frank and off-the-record environment, common interests and concerns, as well as differences in approach that affect trans-Atlantic cooperation. This report is divided into the following three areas: (1) implementation of existing and pending agreements; (2) non-proliferation: prospects for trans-Atlantic cooperation; and (3) future directions in arms control.

Not Available

1994-07-06T23:59:59.000Z

235

Review of “American Scientists and Nuclear Weapons Policy  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Ever since Einstein’s now famous memorandum to President Roosevelt advocating the initiation of the atomic bomb effort, scientists have played an important role in U.S. politics, in particular in determining the

R. Gilpin; E. P. Wigner

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

236

Nuclear Safeguards and Nonproliferation Support | U.S. DOE Office of  

Office of Science (SC) Website

Nuclear Safeguards and Nonproliferation Support Nuclear Safeguards and Nonproliferation Support New Brunswick Laboratory (NBL) NBL Home About Programs Certified Reference Materials Program Measurement Evaluation Nuclear Safeguards and Nonproliferation Support Measurement Services Measurement Development Training Certified Reference Materials (CRMs) Training Categorical Exclusion Determinations News Contact Information New Brunswick Laboratory U.S. Department of Energy Building 350 9800 South Cass Avenue Argonne, IL 60439-4899 P: (630) 252-2442 (NBL) P: (630) 252-2767 (CRM sales) F: (630) 252-6256 E: usdoe.nbl@ch.doe.gov Programs Nuclear Safeguards and Nonproliferation Support Print Text Size: A A A RSS Feeds FeedbackShare Page New Brunswick Laboratory (NBL) is owned and operated by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). NBL is the U.S. Government's Certifying Authority for

237

History of US nuclear weapon safety assessment: The early years  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

From the beginnings of the U.S. nuclear weapons program, military and civilian dual- agency judgment has been fundamental to achieving nuclear weapon and weapon system safety. This interaction was initiated by the Atomic Energy Act of 1946, which created the Atomic Energy Commission (AEC). The principle of using dual-agency judgment has been perpetuated in the design and assessment of the weapon and weapon system acceptance process since that time. This fundamental approach is still used today in all phases of the weapon life. In this paper, an overview of the history and philosophy of the approach is described.

Spray, S.D.

1996-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

238

The history of nuclear weapon safety devices  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The paper presents the history of safety devices used in nuclear weapons from the early days of separables to the latest advancements in MicroElectroMechanical Systems (MEMS). Although the paper focuses on devices, the principles of Enhanced Nuclear Detonation Safety implementation will also be presented.

Plummer, D.W.; Greenwood, W.H.

1998-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

239

Weapons Activities/ Inertial Confinement Fusion Ignition  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, and reliability of the Nation's nuclear weapons without nuclear testing. The program provides this capability models that are used to assess and certify the stockpile without nuclear testing. The National Ignition that approach the high-energy density (HED) environments found in a nuclear explosion. Virtually all

240

Nuclear Explosive and Weapon Surety Program  

Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

All nuclear explosives and nuclear explosive operations require special safety, security, and use control consideration because of the potentially unacceptable consequences of an accident or unauthorized act; therefore, a Nuclear Explosive and Weapon Surety (NEWS) Program is established to prevent unintended/unauthorized detonation and deliberate unauthorized use of nuclear explosives.

2015-01-26T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "weapons nonproliferation policy" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

The monitoring and verification of nuclear weapons  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper partially reviews and updates the potential for monitoring and verification of nuclear weapons, including verification of their destruction. Cooperative monitoring with templates of the gamma-ray spectrum are an important tool, dependent on the use of information barriers.

Garwin, Richard L., E-mail: RLG2@us.ibm.com [IBM Fellow Emeritus, IBM Thomas J. Watson Research Center, P.O. Box 218, Yorktown Heights, NY 10598 (United States)

2014-05-09T23:59:59.000Z

242

Find and neutralize clandestine nuclear weapons  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The objective of finding nuclear material at entry portals is to provide a secure perimeter as large as a weapon damage radius so that operations could be conducted within it relatively unencumbered. The objective of wide area search for nuclear material to provide a safe zone of similar dimensions in an area in which it is not possible to maintain a secure perimeter, to provide assurance for civilians living at an area at risk, or to provide rapid, wide area search of regions that could conceal nuclear threats to forces in the field. This rapid, wide-area, and confident detection of nuclear materials is the essential first step in developing the ability to negate terrorist nuclear assemblies or weapons. The ability to detect and negate nuclear materials are necessary to prevent the forced, massive evacuation of urban populations or the disruption of military operations in response to terrorist threats. This paper describes the limitations to current sensors used for nuclear weapon detection and discusses a novel approach to nuclear weapon detection using a combination of directional information (imaging) and gamma ray energy (color) to produce a gamma ray color camera.

Canavan, G.H.

1997-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

243

Screening Techniques for use in the Chemical Weapon Field  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Chemical analysis is essential when dealing with issues associated with the Chemical Weapons Convention (CWC) and its requirement to destroy all chemical weapons. Chemical analysis is required to verify declarati...

Dr A. N. Trethewey

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

244

A meta-analytic review of the weapon focus effect  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This meta-analytic review examined 19 tests of the weapon focus effect—the hypothesis that the presence of a weapon during commission of a crime will negatively ... the perpetrator. A significant overall differen...

Nancy Mehrkens Steblay

1992-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

245

Ban On Foreign Scientists' Visits To Weapon Labs Lifted  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Ban On Foreign Scientists' Visits To Weapon Labs Lifted ... Once again, foreign scientists from "sensitive" countries may be able to work with U.S. scientists at Department of Energy nuclear weapons laboratories. ...

JEFF JOHNSON

2000-09-04T23:59:59.000Z

246

Exact and Heuristic Methods for the Weapon Target Assignment Problem  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The Weapon Target Assignment (WTA) problem is a fundamental problem arising in defense-related applications of operations research. This problem consists of optimally assigning n weapons to m targets so ...

Ahuja, Ravindra

2004-12-10T23:59:59.000Z

247

Choice of Weapons for the Truel Thomas S. Ferguson, UCLA  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Choice of Weapons for the Truel Thomas S. Ferguson, UCLA 1. Truels. The truel is the extension at each other's. 2. Choosing Weapons for the Shubik Truel 1 #12;In the Shubik truel, contestants A, B

Ferguson, Thomas S.

248

Nuclear Explosive and Weapons Surety Program - DOE Directives...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

been linked to this document. Show All Cancels: DOE O 5610.10, Nuclear Explosive and Weapon Surety Program on Apr 29, 1996 Canceled by: DOE O 452.1A, Nuclear Explosive and Weapon...

249

Exact and Heuristic Methods for the Weapon Target Assignment Problem  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The Weapon Target Assignment (WTA) problem is a fundamental problem arising in defense-related applications of operations research. This problem consists of optimally assigning n weapons to m targets so that the total ...

Ahuja, Ravindra K.

2004-04-02T23:59:59.000Z

250

Nuclear Weapon Surety Interface with the Department of Defense  

Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

This Order establishes Department of Energy and National Nuclear Security Administration requirements and responsibilities for addressing joint nuclear weapon and nuclear weapon system surety activities in conjunction with the Department of Defense. Cancels DOE O 452.6.

2009-05-14T23:59:59.000Z

251

Pathogens as weapons : the international security implications of biological warfare  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This dissertation assesses the international security implications of biological weapons and the strategic consequences of their proliferation. It examines the impact of biological weapons on four key areas of concern for ...

Koblentz, Gregory D

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

252

Microfabrication Policies  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Polcies Booking Login Policy Cleanroom Policy Equipment Use Policy 2 Person Rule Experimental Hall Policy After Hours Policy...

253

A New Method for Optimal Configuration of Weapon System  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This paper put forward a new method for Optimal Configuration of Weapon System (OCWS). It combines PROMETHEE II...

Dechao Zhou; Shiyan Sun; Qiang Wang

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

254

Sandia National Laboratories/Production Agency Weapon Waste Minimization Plan  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This Plan describes activities to reduce the usage of hazardous materials and the production of hazardous material waste during the development, production, stockpile, and retirement phases of war reserve nuclear weapons and nuclear weapon test units. Activities related to the development and qualification of more benign materials and processes for weapon production and the treatment and disposal of these materials from weapon retirement are described in separate plans.

Skinrood, A.C.; Radosevich, L.G.

1991-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

255

PHIL 20628/ Ethics of Emerging STV 20228 Weapons Technologies  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

PHIL 20628/ Ethics of Emerging STV 20228 Weapons Technologies TTh 11:00-12:15 204 DeBartolo Spring a research outline (narrative plus bibliography, minimum five pages) on a specific weapons technology about 20228 Spring 2011 Page 2 Ethics of Emerging Weapons Technologies Schedule: Date: Jan. 18 Jan. 20 Jan. 25

Howard, Don

256

INVASIONS AND INFECTIONS Invading with biological weapons: the importance of  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

INVASIONS AND INFECTIONS Invading with biological weapons: the importance of disease with introduced parasites), there is the potential that the disease can act as a `biological weapon' leading weapons ­ their diseases ­ with them, and concurrently, the emergence of disease within the native

White, Andrew

257

Towards Optimal Placement of Bio-Weapon Chris Kiekintveld  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Towards Optimal Placement of Bio-Weapon Detectors Chris Kiekintveld Department of Computer Science, USA Email: lolerma@episd.edu Abstract--Biological weapons are difficult and expensive to detect. Within a limited budget, we can afford a limited number of bio-weapon detector stations. It is therefore

Ward, Karen

258

GeoffBrumfiel,Washington Nuclear watchdogs and former weapons  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

GeoffBrumfiel,Washington Nuclear watchdogs and former weapons scientists are taking issue with a proposal to use weapons-grade uranium and plutonium at the US National Ignition Facility.The facility is supposed to help scientists assess the nation's ageing nuclear stockpile without testing the weapons

259

J. David Janiec Director for the Weapons and Energetics  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

J. David Janiec Director for the Weapons and Energetics Department Naval Air Systems Command Mr. J. David Janiec is the Director for the Weapons and Energetics Department of the Naval Air Systems Command teams for weapons systems, as well as leadership responsibility for over 100 contractors and over 200

260

American Economic Association How (Not) to Sell Nuclear Weapons  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

American Economic Association How (Not) to Sell Nuclear Weapons Author(s): Philippe Jehiel, Benny://www.jstor.org #12;How (Not)to Sell NuclearWeapons By PHILIPPEJEHIEL,BENNY MOLDOVANU, AND ENNio STACCHETTI) areinterestedto acquirefis- sionable material, or even complete weapon systems from Ukraine. Russia and the United

Franz, Sven Oliver

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "weapons nonproliferation policy" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

2012 Boise State University 1 Possession of Firearms/Weapons  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

© 2012 Boise State University 1 Possession of Firearms/Weapons on University Owned or Controlled for the regulation of the possession of firearms and other weapons on university owned and controlled premises · Scope ­ applies to all firearms and other weapons on university owned or controlled premises

Barrash, Warren

262

Structural adaptations to diverse fighting styles in sexually selected weapons  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Structural adaptations to diverse fighting styles in sexually selected weapons Erin L. McCullough1 11, 2014 (received for review May 22, 2014) The shapes of sexually selected weapons differ widely weapon shapes reflect structural adaptations to different fighting styles, yet explicit tests

Emlen, Douglas J.

263

Aegis Combat and Weapon Systems Overview 24 hours, $1495  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Aegis Combat and Weapon Systems Overview 24 hours, $1495 Launched from the Advanced Surface Missile that led to the initiation of Aegis. Topics Include: · AegisOverviewandHistory · AegisBMD · AegisWeaponSEprocessensuresthatsystemsaredevelopedtomeet affordable, operationally effective, and timely mission objectives. FocusonengineeringtheWeapon

Fork, Richard

264

PHIL 20628/ Ethics of Emerging STV 20228 Weapons Technologies  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

PHIL 20628/ Ethics of Emerging STV 20228 Weapons Technologies Spring 2011 Prof. Don Howard theirpeople, especially the poor. " Benedict joined every Pope since Pius XII in condemning nuclear weapons as inherently immoral because the nature of the technology is such that nuclear weapons inherently violates

Howard, Don

265

Management of the Department of Energy Nuclear Weapons Complex  

Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

The Order defines and affirms the authorities and responsibilities of the National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) for the management of the Department of Energy Nuclear Weapons Complex and emphasizes that the management of the United States nuclear weapons stockpile is the DOE's highest priority for the NNSA and the DOE Nuclear Weapons Complex. Cancels DOE O 5600.1.

2005-06-08T23:59:59.000Z

266

POLICY SECTIONS POLICY OFFICE  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

POLICY SECTIONS POLICY OFFICE POLICIES FORMS PROCEDURES UNIVERSITY POLICY #12;guide to WRITING POLICIES Administrative policies align opera- tions, set behavior expectations across the University system and communicate policy roles and responsibilities. You, as the policy owner or writer, have the important task

Minnesota, University of

267

F POLICY FLASH 2009-24  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

POLICY FLASH 2009-24 POLICY FLASH 2009-24 1 DATE: TO: FROM: r February 12,2009 Procurement Directors Office of Procurement and Assistance Management SUBJECT: Management of Excess Weapons Inventories and Selective Sensitive Equipment SUMMARY: A recent Office of Inspector General (OIG) audit identified opportunities for improving the Department of Energy (DOE) management of excess weapons and its processes for identifying and tracking of sensitive items. Specifically, the OIG recommended that DOE amend existing guidance to ensure that appropriate processes are in place to effectively manage excess inventories of weapons, and to ensure the timely declaration of excess weapons. The OIG also recommended that DOE update its guidance regarding the identification of high risklsensitive equipment.

268

Ionospheric measurements for the Non-Proliferation Experiment  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The detection of explosions using ionospheric techniques relies on measuring perturbations induced in radio propagation by acoustics waves which disturb the electron density of the ionosphere. Such techniques have been applied to the detection of atmospheric explosions, underground nuclear tests, earthquakes, and surface mining explosions. The nighttime ionosphere presents a difficulty for the detection of explosions because in the absence of solar ionization radiation the electron density in the altitude range of 90 to 200 km decays after sunset and perturbation effects are correspondingly reduced. On the other hand, acoustic waves produced by weak sources reach a maximum amplitude in the altitude range of 100 to 150 km and are highly attenuated at altitudes above 200 km. For safety reasons, most planned explosions are conducted during daylight which has limited the experimental measurements during nighttime. However a recent opportunity for a nighttime measurement occurred in connection with the Non-Proliferation Experiment which consisted of the detonation of a large chemical charge underground at the Nevada Test Site near midnight local time. the results, based on a new technique of using medium frequency radio transmissions provided by commercial broadcasts to detect explosion effects, were negative. The most likely explanation for the negative result is that the radio transmissions did not reflect at a low enough altitude to sense the perturbations produced by the acoustic waves.

Fitzgerald, T.J.

1994-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

269

Microsoft Word - NPNS  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Nuclear Engineering Nonproliferation and National Security (NPNS) The NPNS applies technical expertise to address global security threats. The focus is on finding and implementing practical solutions in order to realize nonproliferation and national security policy objectives. Technical Nonproliferation Policy Support (TNPS) deals with the strategic threat posed by the spread of weapons of mass destruction. Terrorist groups and rogue states will go to great lengths to acquire nuclear weapons and other WMDs. History shows that these groups exploit international commercial markets to acquire the materials, equipment, and technology for the clandestine facilities needed to build these weapons. TNPS activities comprise both technical proliferation analysis, from the macro (regime) level to the micro

270

FAQS Qualification Card - Weapon Quality Assurance | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Weapon Quality Assurance Weapon Quality Assurance FAQS Qualification Card - Weapon Quality Assurance A key element for the Department's Technical Qualification Programs is a set of common Functional Area Qualification Standards (FAQS) and associated Job Task Analyses (JTA). These standards are developed for various functional areas of responsibility in the Department, including oversight of safety management programs identified as hazard controls in Documented Safety Analyses (DSA). For each functional area, the FAQS identify the minimum technical competencies and supporting knowledge and skills for a typical qualified individual working in the area. FAQC-WeaponQualityAssurance.docx Description Weapon Quality Assurance Qualification Card More Documents & Publications DOE-STD-1025-2008

271

Eisenhower Halts Nuclear Weapons Testing | National Nuclear Security  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Eisenhower Halts Nuclear Weapons Testing | National Nuclear Security Eisenhower Halts Nuclear Weapons Testing | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure Continuing Management Reform Countering Nuclear Terrorism About Us Our Programs Our History Who We Are Our Leadership Our Locations Budget Our Operations Media Room Congressional Testimony Fact Sheets Newsletters Press Releases Speeches Events Social Media Video Gallery Photo Gallery NNSA Archive Federal Employment Apply for Our Jobs Our Jobs Working at NNSA Blog Home > About Us > Our History > NNSA Timeline > Eisenhower Halts Nuclear Weapons Testing Eisenhower Halts Nuclear Weapons Testing August 22, 1958 Washington, DC Eisenhower Halts Nuclear Weapons Testing

272

Weapons Are Prohibited On Campus University of California, Irvine Police Department  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Weapons Are Prohibited On Campus University of California, Irvine Police Department What is a weapon? A weapon is basically anything somebody could use to hurt or harm somebody else. Weapons could that could be used to hurt somebody else What kind of weapon can't I bring to school? Most weapons

Rose, Michael R.

273

The IAEA: Neutralizing Iraq's nuclear weapons potential  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

With support from UNSCOM and staff members from several countries, the IAEA has succeeded in identifying and destroying most of Iraq's nuclear weapons potential. IAEA activities in Iraq have also established a sound basis for long-term monitoring of Iraq. This will involve several procedures and techniques, including the periodic monitoring of Iraq's main bodies of water and unannounced visits of resident inspectors to plants, factories, and research centers.

Zifferero, M.

1993-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

274

Joint Statement on Future U.S.-Russia Nuclear Energy and Nonproliferation  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Joint Statement on Future U.S.-Russia Nuclear Energy and Joint Statement on Future U.S.-Russia Nuclear Energy and Nonproliferation Collaboration Following Russian Delegation Visit to the United States Joint Statement on Future U.S.-Russia Nuclear Energy and Nonproliferation Collaboration Following Russian Delegation Visit to the United States December 10, 2013 - 2:30pm Addthis News Media Contact (202) 586-4940 U.S. Secretary of Energy Ernest Moniz and State Corporation for Nuclear Energy (Rosatom) Director General Sergey Kirienko today held talks in Washington, D.C., about the future of U.S.-Russia collaborative work in the nuclear energy field, including nuclear research and development, commercial aspects of cooperation, nuclear safety, and nonproliferation. The meeting coincided with the arrival of the final shipment of low

275

What to do with 50,000 nuclear weapons?  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

While the world celebrates the peaceful disposal of nuclear weapons, energies now focus on their careful disassembly. Recently, the United States` main focus for dismantling has been the safe dispersal and storage of the various nuclear components and their uses for peaceful purposes rather than weapons of destruction. It should be noted that the treaties currently in effect do not require weapons to be dismantled, only that each country withdraw the weapons from the deployed status and remove the means of delivery. The US current program dismantles weapons into their various components. The disassembly of a nuclear weapon involves numerous components. Many of these components can be disposed of or recycled after changing their shape. The nuclear components create the most safety and proliferation concerns. These nuclear components typically consist of three materials: tritium, highly enriched uranium and plutonium. Some of these nuclear components will be placed in a strategic reserve, while other nuclear components will be declared surplus. Both tritium and uranium can be re-used. The tritium is repurified and used for the active weapons stockpile. The uranium can be blended down and used in commercial nuclear power plants. At this time, plutonium disposal is the most vexing challenge. This paper will briefly describe how a nuclear weapons works, the mission of the Pantex Plant which dismantles the weapons, and the research opportunities for use of dismantled nuclear weapon components.

Klein, D.E. [Univ. of Texas, Austin, TX (United States). Coll. of Engineering

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

276

Enforcement Guidance Supplement 01-01: Nuclear Weapon Program Enforcement  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Guidance Supplement 01-01: Nuclear Weapon Program Guidance Supplement 01-01: Nuclear Weapon Program Enforcement Issues Enforcement Guidance Supplement 01-01: Nuclear Weapon Program Enforcement Issues Section 1.3 of the Operational Procedures for Enforcement, published in June 1998, provides the opportunity for the Office of Price-Anderson Enforcement (OE) to periodically issue clarifying guidance regarding the processes used in its enforcement activities.This enforcement guidance focuses on the applicability of 10 CFR Part 830 to nuclear weapon programs and several related enforcement issues. Enforcement Guidance Supplement 01-01: Nuclear Weapon Program Enforcement Issues More Documents & Publications Enforcement Guidance Supplement 01-01: Nuclear Weapon Program Enforcement Issues Enforcement Guidance Supplement 00-03: Specific Issues on Applicability of

277

Enforcement Guidance Supplement 01-01: Nuclear Weapon Program Enforcement  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Enforcement Guidance Supplement 01-01: Nuclear Weapon Program Enforcement Guidance Supplement 01-01: Nuclear Weapon Program Enforcement Issues Enforcement Guidance Supplement 01-01: Nuclear Weapon Program Enforcement Issues Section 1.3 of the Operational Procedures for Enforcement, published in June 1998, provides the opportunity for the Office of Price-Anderson Enforcement (OE) to periodically issue clarifying guidance regarding the processes used in its enforcement activities. This enforcement guidance focuses on the applicability of 10 CFR Part 830 to nuclear weapon programs and several related enforcement issues. Enforcement Guidance Supplement 01-01: Nuclear Weapon Program Enforcement Issues More Documents & Publications Enforcement Guidance Supplement 01-01: Nuclear Weapon Program Enforcement Issues Enforcement Guidance Supplement 00-03: Specific Issues on Applicability of

278

Enforcement Guidance Supplement 01-01: Nuclear Weapon Program Enforcement  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Guidance Supplement 01-01: Nuclear Weapon Program Guidance Supplement 01-01: Nuclear Weapon Program Enforcement Issues Enforcement Guidance Supplement 01-01: Nuclear Weapon Program Enforcement Issues Section 1.3 of the Operational Procedures for Enforcement, published in June 1998, provides the opportunity for the Office of Price-Anderson Enforcement (OE) to periodically issue clarifying guidance regarding the processes used in its enforcement activities. This enforcement guidance focuses on the applicability of 10 CFR Part 830 to nuclear weapon programs and several related enforcement issues. Enforcement Guidance Supplement 01-01: Nuclear Weapon Program Enforcement Issues More Documents & Publications Enforcement Guidance Supplement 01-01: Nuclear Weapon Program Enforcement Issues Enforcement Guidance Supplement 00-03: Specific Issues on Applicability of

279

Systems engineering analysis of kinetic energy weapon concepts  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This study examines, from a systems engineering design perspective, the potential of kinetic energy weapons being used in the role of a conventional strategic weapon. Within the Department of Energy (DOE) complex, strategic weapon experience falls predominantly in the nuclear weapons arena. The techniques developed over the years may not be the most suitable methodologies for use in a new design/development arena. For this reason a more fundamental approach was pursued with the objective of developing an information base from which design decisions might be made concerning the conventional strategic weapon system concepts. The study examined (1) a number of generic missions, (2) the effects of a number of damage mechanisms from a physics perspective, (3) measures of effectiveness (MOE`s), and (4) a design envelope for kinetic energy weapon concepts. With the base of information a cut at developing a set of high-level system requirements was made, and a number of concepts were assessed against these requirements.

Senglaub, M.

1996-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

280

Recovery of weapon plutonium as feed material for reactor fuel  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report presents preliminary considerations for recovering and converting weapon plutonium from various US weapon forms into feed material for fabrication of reactor fuel elements. An ongoing DOE study addresses the disposition of excess weapon plutonium through its use as fuel for nuclear power reactors and subsequent disposal as spent fuel. The spent fuel would have characteristics similar to those of commercial power spent fuel and could be similarly disposed of in a geologic repository.

Armantrout, G.A.; Bronson, M.A.; Choi, Jor-Shan [and others

1994-03-16T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "weapons nonproliferation policy" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Nuclear Weapon Surety Interface with the Department of Defense  

Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

The Order prescribes how the Department of Energy participates with the Department of Defense (DoD) to ensure the surety (safety, security and control) of military nuclear weapon systems deployed around the world. The Order establishes National Nuclear Security Administration requirements and responsibilities for addressing joint nuclear weapon and nuclear weapon system surety activities in conjunction with the DoD. Cancels DOE O 5610.13. Canceled by DOE O 452.6A.

2006-10-19T23:59:59.000Z

282

The New Safeguards System in the Context of International Nonproliferation Policy  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

As befitted the occasion, the scene could be described as both businesslike and festive, but not without a touch of symbolism. On 22 September 1998 representatives of the 15 member states of the European Union, t...

Hartmut Blankenstein

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

283

EA-1137: Nonnuclear Consolidation Weapons Production Support Project for  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

137: Nonnuclear Consolidation Weapons Production Support 137: Nonnuclear Consolidation Weapons Production Support Project for the Kansas City Plant, Kansas City, Missouri EA-1137: Nonnuclear Consolidation Weapons Production Support Project for the Kansas City Plant, Kansas City, Missouri SUMMARY This EA evaluates the environmental impacts of the proposal to renovate an existing building at the U.S. Department of Energy Kansas City Plant to accommodate equipment, security and environmental controls, and building restoration upon project completion, including disposal of equipment and wastes. PUBLIC COMMENT OPPORTUNITIES None available at this time. DOCUMENTS AVAILABLE FOR DOWNLOAD December 21, 1995 EA-1137: Finding of No Significant Impact Nonnuclear Consolidation Weapons Production Support Project for the Kansas

284

Strategies for denaturing the weapons-grade plutonium stockpile  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In the next few years, approximately 50 metric tons of weapons-grade plutonium and 150 metric tons of highly-enriched uranium (HEU) may be removed from nuclear weapons in the US and declared excess. These materials represent a significant energy resource that could substantially contribute to our national energy requirements. HEU can be used as fuel in naval reactors, or diluted with depleted uranium for use as fuel in commercial reactors. This paper proposes to use the weapons-grade plutonium as fuel in light water reactors. The first such reactor would demonstrate the dual objectives of producing electrical power and denaturing the plutonium to prevent use in nuclear weapons.

Buckner, M.R.; Parks, P.B.

1992-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

285

Nuclear Explosive and Weapon Surety Program - DOE Directives...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

and use control consideration because of the potentially unacceptable consequences of an accident or unauthorized act; therefore, a Nuclear Explosive and Weapon Surety (NEWS)...

286

Enforcement Guidance Supplement 01-01: Nuclear Weapon Program...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

This enforcement guidance focuses on the applicability of 10 CFR Part 830 to nuclear weapon programs and several related enforcement issues. Enforcement Guidance Supplement 01-01:...

287

States That End Nuclear Weapons Programs: Implications For Iran.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??This thesis seeks to identify factors that cause countries to discontinue their nuclear weapons program using the qualitative case study method. Regime change, regional threats… (more)

Freeman, Shauna Marie

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

288

The Effect of Mortality Salience on Weapon Bias.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??e research tested the hypothesis that reminding individuals of their mortality would increase weapon bias as predicted by Terror Management Theory (TMT, Greenberg, Pyszczynski, &… (more)

Bradley, Kristopher, Irl

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

289

EGS 01-01: Nuclear Weapon Program Enforcement Issues  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

OF ENFORCEMENT AND INVESTIGATION SUBJECT: Enforcement Guidance Supplement 01-01: Nuclear Weapon Program Enforcement Issues Section 1.3 of the Operational Procedures for...

290

Enforcement Guidance Supplement 01-01, Nuclear Weapon Program...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

OF ENFORCEMENT AND INVESTIGATION SUBJECT: Enforcement Guidance Supplement 01-01: Nuclear Weapon Program Enforcement Issues Section 1.3 of the Operational Procedures for...

291

Office of Weapons Material Protection | National Nuclear Security...  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

that gradually transfers responsibility for maintaining the security systems to Russia. Related Topics material protection MPC&A SLD second line of defense weapons material...

292

A typological assessment of Iron Age weapons in South Italy.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??Master of Philosophy (MPhil)%%%Typologies, especially of spearheads, have been decried as inadequate by the archaeological community. They have prevented the synthetic study of ancient weapons… (more)

Inall, Yvonne Louise

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

293

Annular Core Research Reactor - Critical to Science-Based Weapons...  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Annular Core Research Reactor - Critical to Science-Based Weapons Design, Certification | National Nuclear Security Administration Facebook Twitter Youtube Flickr RSS People...

294

Reducing the Nuclear Weapons Stockpile | National Nuclear Security...  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

the Nuclear Weapons Stockpile | National Nuclear Security Administration Facebook Twitter Youtube Flickr RSS People Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering...

295

Sandia completes major overhaul of key nuclear weapons test facilities...  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

completes major overhaul of key nuclear weapons test facilities | National Nuclear Security Administration People Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering...

296

Clinton Extends Moratorium on Nuclear Weapons Testing | National...  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Clinton Extends Moratorium on Nuclear Weapons Testing | National Nuclear Security Administration Facebook Twitter Youtube Flickr RSS People Mission Managing the Stockpile...

297

A thousand suns : political motivations for nuclear weapons testing .  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??Nuclear weapon testing is the final step in the nuclear development process, an announcement of ability and strength. The consequences of a nuclear test are… (more)

Raas, Whitney

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

298

Network Policies  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Acceptable Use Policy About ESnet Our Mission The Network ESnet History Governance & Policies ESnet Policy Board ESCC Acceptable Use Policy Facility Data Policy Career...

299

Nuclear weapons, proliferation, and terrorism: U.S. response in the twenty-first century  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

As the remaining superpower in the post-Cold War world, the US needs to re-evaluate its policy toward the growing threat to US national interests and the effects of weapons of mass destruction (WMD), specifically nuclear devices, and their use by terrorist groups against US interests abroad. As the world reacts to the implosion of the former Soviet Union, there are increased numbers of nations and possibly terrorist groups trying to become players in the international arena. This study describes the ease of obtaining the scientific knowledge, plans, and materials to enable a terrorist`s construction of a nuclear device. It also analyzes motivation of terrorist groups, concluding that a nuclear weapon, capable of inflicting violence in the extreme, fulfills the terrorist`s goal of violence in support of a political agenda or to inspire radical change. Given the guidance from the national level, this study proposes a series of policy options available to the NCA for application in an aggressive counterproliferation policy. Finally, the US must rapidly reorganize its counterproliferation structure and methods to streamline a more aggressive approach that is recognized and feared by potential nuclear terrorists; augment current political efforts with a clearly defined counterproliferation military mission and associated doctrine.

DeLawter, D.A.

1998-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

300

NNSA Signs Memorandum with Kuwait to Increase Cooperation on Nuclear Safeguards and Nonproliferation  

ScienceCinema (OSTI)

On June 23, 2010, the National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) signed a Memorandum of Cooperation on nuclear safeguards and other nonproliferation topics with the Kuwait National Nuclear Energy Committee (KNNEC). NNSA Administrator Thomas D'Agostino and KNNEC's Secretary General, Dr. Ahmad Bishara, signed the memorandum at a ceremony at U.S. Department of Energy headquarters in Washington.

Thomas D'Agostino

2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "weapons nonproliferation policy" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

NNSA Signs Memorandum with Kuwait to Increase Cooperation on Nuclear Safeguards and Nonproliferation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

On June 23, 2010, the National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) signed a Memorandum of Cooperation on nuclear safeguards and other nonproliferation topics with the Kuwait National Nuclear Energy Committee (KNNEC). NNSA Administrator Thomas D'Agostino and KNNEC's Secretary General, Dr. Ahmad Bishara, signed the memorandum at a ceremony at U.S. Department of Energy headquarters in Washington.

Thomas D'Agostino

2010-06-23T23:59:59.000Z

302

Is there a future role for tactical nuclear weapon systems in the national military strategy. Study project  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper reviews the purpose and role that tactical nuclear weapon systems can provide in supporting the National Military Strategy (NMS), and recommends requirements be determined using a strategy based upon political, economic and military national interests versus the current target-based strategy. To draw implications for the NMS, the analysis reviews current strategic policy guidance, summarizes the current definition of deterrence theory, and provides rationales for maintaining tactical nuclear weapon systems for deterrence and warfighting in regional contingency operations against nuclear-capable forces. Based upon this analysis, recommendations are provided for joint planning, doctrine, and training initiatives needed to enhance the efficacy of the armed services in achieving national security policy objectives.

Stobbs, E.E.

1992-04-03T23:59:59.000Z

303

Technical analysis of US Army Weapons Systems and related advanced technologies of military interest. Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report summarizes the activities and accomplishments of an US Army technology security project designed to identify and develop effective policy guidelines for militarily critical technologies in specific Army systems and in broad generic technology areas of military interest, Individual systems analyses are documented in separate Weapons Systems Technical Assessments (WSTAs) and the general generic technology areas are evaluated in the Advanced Technology Assessment Reports (ATARs), However, specific details of these assessments are not addressed here, only recommendations regarding aspects of the defined approach, methodology, and format are provided and discussed.

NONE

1991-06-14T23:59:59.000Z

304

Out of (South) Africa: Pretoria`s nuclear weapons experience. Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The primary focus of this paper is the impact of key South African leaders on the successful developments and subsequent rollbacks of South Africa`s nuclear weapons capability. It highlights the key milestones in the development of South Africa`s nuclear weapon capability. It also relates how different groups within South Africa (scientists, politicians, military and technocrats) interacted to successfully produce South Africa`s nuclear deterrent. It emphasizes the pivotal influence of the senior political leadership to pursue nuclear rollback given the disadvantages of its nuclear means to achieve vital national interests. The conclusions drawn from flu`s effort are the South African nuclear program was an extreme response to its own identity Crisis. Nuclear weapons became a means to achieving a long term end of a closer affiliation with the West. A South Africa yearning to be identified as a Western nation and receive guarantees of its security rationalized the need for a nuclear deterrent. The deterrent was intended to draw in Western support to counter a feared total onslaught by Communist forces in the region. Two decades later, that same South Africa relinquished its nuclear deterrent and reformed its domestic policies to secure improved economic and political integration with the West.

Horton, R.E.

1998-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

305

UN Security Council: Iran violating ban on nuclear weapons programs  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

UN Security Council: Iran violating ban on nuclear weapons programs 7 September 2011 Denouncement weaponization of its nuclear program. The United States, Germany, France and Britain joined forces in exposing of its nuclear activities.' Rice said the installation of a uranium enrichment facility and heavy

306

Improved $\\tau$-weapons for Higgs hunting  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In this work, we use the results from Higgs searches in the $\\gamma\\gamma$ and $\\tau\\tau$ decay channels at LHC and indirect bounds as BR$(B \\to X_s \\gamma)$ to constrain the parameter space of a generic MSSM Higgs sector. In particular, we include the latest CMS results that look for additional Higgs states with masses up to 1 TeV. We show that the $\\tau \\tau$ channel is the best and most accurate weapon in the hunt for new Higgs states beyond the Standard Model. We obtain that present experimental results rule out additional neutral Higgs bosons in a generic MSSM below 300 GeV for any value of $\\tan \\beta$ and, for instance, values of $\\tan \\beta$ above 30 are only possible for Higgs masses above 600 GeV. ATLAS stored data has the potential to render this bound obsolete in the near future.

Barenboim, G; López-Ibáñez, M L; Vives, O

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

307

Sandia Weapon Intern Program visits KCP | National Nuclear Security  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Weapon Intern Program visits KCP | National Nuclear Security Weapon Intern Program visits KCP | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure Continuing Management Reform Countering Nuclear Terrorism About Us Our Programs Our History Who We Are Our Leadership Our Locations Budget Our Operations Media Room Congressional Testimony Fact Sheets Newsletters Press Releases Speeches Events Social Media Video Gallery Photo Gallery NNSA Archive Federal Employment Apply for Our Jobs Our Jobs Working at NNSA Blog Home > NNSA Blog > Sandia Weapon Intern Program visits KCP Sandia Weapon Intern Program visits KCP Posted By Office of Public Affairs Participants in Sandia's Weapon Intern Program recently visited and

308

On Supporting Weapon System Information Analysis with Ontology Model and Text Mining  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Issues and changes on weapon systems of a country is very critical ... system, especially focusing on information analysis of weapon systems. It categorizes all weapon systems, extracts their specification data, ...

Jung-Whoan Choi; Seungwoo Lee; Dongmin Seo…

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

309

Dynamic Weapon Target Assignment Method Based on Artificial Fish Swarm Algorithm  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Aiming at the problem of weapon target assignment when multiple weapon units on diverse battle platforms head off ... model of this problem is established. A weapon target assignment method based on Artificial Fi...

Chengfei Wang; Zhaohui Zhang; Runping Xu…

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

310

Functional significance of an unusual chela dimorphism in a marine decapod: specialization as a weapon?  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...a marine decapod: specialization as a weapon? Thomas Claverie * I. Philip Smith...enhanced the function of the chela as a weapon, while retaining functionality for feeding...interactions (i.e. to be effective weapons) than straight chelae. Understanding...

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

311

Probabilistic Representation of the Threat and Consequences of Weapon Attacks on Commercial  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Probabilistic Representation of the Threat and Consequences of Weapon Attacks on Commercial of the Threat and Consequences of Weapon Attacks on Commercial Aircraft CREATE Report 29 November 2005 John P FLIGHT PATH . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 20 WEAPON LETHALITY MODEL

Wang, Hai

312

Network-centric Warfare and the Globalization of Technology: Transforming simple tools into dangerous weapons  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

tools into dangerous weapons New applications of technology,made bombs are primary weapons for suicide also “flattened”in com- devices, and weapons to utilize in guerilla warfare.

Oh, Ann

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

313

CHEMICAL WEAPONS CONVENTION BULLETIN News, Background and Comment on Chemical and Biological Warfare Issues  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

CHEMICAL WEAPONS CONVENTION BULLETIN News, Background and Comment on Chemical and Biological DUPLICATION Graham S Pearson HSP Advisory Board The Biological and Toxin Weapons Convention (BTWC) was opened biological weapons and prohibit their development, produc- tion, stockpiling, acquisition and retention

Sussex, University of

314

ITAR Categories Category I -Firearms, Close Assault Weapons and Combat Shotguns  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ITAR Categories Category I - Firearms, Close Assault Weapons and Combat Shotguns Category II - Guns and Associated Equipment Category XVI - Nuclear Weapons, Design and Testing Related Items Category XVII Energy Weapons Category XIX - [Reserved] Category XX - Submersible Vessels, Oceanographic and Associated

315

Medical strategies to handle mass casualties from the use of biological weapons  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

chemical and biological weapons. BMJ. Oct 20 2001;323(7318):from the use of biological weapons Kristi L Koenig, MD,Aspects of Biological and Chemical Weapons. 1st ed. Geneva,

Koenig, Kristi L; Kahn, C A; Schultz, C H

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

316

A Methodology for Weapon System Availability Assessment, incorporating Failure, Damage and  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A Methodology for Weapon System Availability Assessment, incorporating Failure, Damage in a hostile environment, they are particularly vulnerable in sit- uations of unavailability. Military weapon principles for weapon systems modeling that integrate both system failure and system damage, as well

Boyer, Edmond

317

Weapons of mass distraction: Magicianship, misdirection, and the dark side of legitimation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Los Angeles Times 27: A1. Weapons of Mass Distraction Weber,G. Dawson, (Orig. pub. 1634). Weapons of Mass DistractionCentury Encounter with Nuclear Weapons. Columbus: Ohio State

Freudenburg, William R.; Alario, Margarita

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

318

Auratic Weapons, World War II, and Cultural Hegemony in The Lord of the Rings  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

LOS ANGELES AURATIC WEAPONS, WORLD WAR II, AND CULTURAL2 ABSTRACT Auratic Weapons, World War II, and CulturalTo begin, I look at weapons as the crux between the medieval

Silverstein, Michelle

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

319

Charles McMillan to lead Los Alamos National Laboratory's Weapons...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

McMillan to Lead Weapons Program Charles McMillan to lead Los Alamos National Laboratory's Weapons Program He will provide oversight and direction for the nuclear weapons program...

320

The Infantry Weapons Company Distribution Restriction: Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

FM 3-21.12 The Infantry Weapons Company July 2008 Distribution Restriction: Approved for public July 2008 The Infantry Weapons Company Contents Page PREFACE

US Army Corps of Engineers

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "weapons nonproliferation policy" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Marine Aviation Weapons and Tactics Squadron One (MAWTS-1) sleep, fatigue, and aviator performance study .  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??The Weapons and Tactics Instructor (WTI) course conducted at the Marine Aviation Weapons and Tactics Squadron One (MAWTS-1) command in Yuma, Arizona is considered the… (more)

Maynard, Pamelyn L.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

322

E-Print Network 3.0 - alamos thermonuclear weapon Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

thermonuclear weapon Search Powered by Explorit Topic List Advanced Search Sample search results for: alamos thermonuclear weapon Page: << < 1 2 3 4 5 > >> 1 Dr. Lodwick's research...

323

How to optimally interdict a belligerent project to develop a nuclear weapon .  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??Despite decades of energetic international control efforts, nuclear weapons technology continues to spread worldwide. To understand how these complex weapons programs can be developed, we… (more)

Skroch, Eric M.

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

324

NNSA Policies | National Nuclear Security Administration  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

About Us > Our Operations > Management and Budget > NNSA Policy About Us > Our Operations > Management and Budget > NNSA Policy System > NNSA Policies NNSA Policies NNSA Policies (NAPs) impart policy and requirements unique to the Administration or provide short-term notices until more formal direction can be provided. NAP-4B Corporate Performance Process for M&O Contractors June 30, 2008 NAP-5 Standards Management October 16, 2002 NAP-6 FEOSH Program for NNSA Headquarters Employees December 19, 2002 NAP-7 NNSA's Acquisition and Assistance Policy Guidance December 9, 2002 NAP-14.1D Baseline Cyber Security Program December 14, 2012 NAP-21 Signed Governance and Oversight March 2, 2011 NAP-23 Transformational Governance and Oversight February 28, 2011 NAP-24 Weapons Quality Policy June 20, 2013 NAP-25 Management and Operating Contractor Business Meals and Light Refreshment

325

Stability of nuclear forces versus weapons of mass destruction  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The model derived for nuclear missile exchanges is used to describe the interaction between two forces, of which one has nuclear weapons and the other has weapons of mass destruction (WMD). The model equations are solved analytically for exchanges, costs, and stability indices by analytically minimizing the cost of first strikes. The analysis is restricted to theater operations, as WMD are inferior to nuclear weapons in strategic counter force operations, but quite adequate for theater operations against exposed forces. The analysis treats only in-theater forces as companion papers show that ex-theater forces, which enter as survivable forces, cancel out of the theater balances treated here. Optimal nuclear weapon and WMD allocations are proportional to the opponent`s carriers and inversely proportional to one`s own weapons. Thus, as WMD increase, WMD allocations to nuclear forces fall, reflecting a shift from damage limiting to inflicting damage with surviving forces. Nuclear weapon kill probabilities degrade rapidly against dispersed forces. As they fall, their allocation to WMD falls sharply as they become ineffective and are reallocated to value. Thus, damage limiting is primarily effective for undispersed forces, which produces an incentive for the nuclear side to use his weapons while they are still effective.

Canavan, G.H.

1997-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

326

Solid Phase Microextraction for the Analysis of Nuclear Weapons  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document is a compendium of answers to commonly asked questions about solid phase microextraction as it relates to the analysis of nuclear weapons. We have also included a glossary of terms associated with this analytical method as well as pertinent weapons engineering terminology. Microextraction is a new collection technique being developed to nonintrusively sample chemicals from weapon headspace gases for subsequent analysis. The chemicals that are being targeted outgas from the high explosives and other organic materials used in the weapon assembly. This technique is therefore a valuable tool to: (1) remotely detect and assess the aging of Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) and, in some cases, Sandia National Laboratory (SNL) organic materials; and (2) identify potential compatibility issues (i.e., materials interactions) that should be more carefully monitored during surveillance tear-downs. Microextraction is particularly attractive because of the practical constraints inherent to the weapon surveillance procedure. To remain transparent to other core surveillance activities and fall within nuclear safety guidelines, headspace analysis of the weapons requires a procedure that: (1) maintains ambient temperature conditions; (2) allows practical collection times of less than 20 min; (3) maintains the integrity of the weapon gas volume; (4) provides reproducible and quantitative results; and (5) can identify all possible targets.

Chambers, D M

2001-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

327

Fixed denial system for access control of nuclear weapons  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Fixed Denial System (FDS) is a simple, low cost, vertical, underground silo used to store individual nuclear weapons within secured areas of present storage sites. The normal storage position of each weapon is at or near the top of the shaft, allowing rapid operational weapon access and removal. In response to a threat, the weapon within a storage canister can be dropped to the bottom of the shaft where it is automatically locked in place. Once the alert condition is resolved and control of the site reestablished, the weapon canister is unlocked with a coded signal and retrieved. This system offers a high degree of hardening and access denial that is characteristic of Vertical Underground Storage (VUGS) systems. An aboveground test apparatus was constructed to demonstrate the feasibility of using a pneumatic air cushion, which is generated by the free-fall of the weapon container, to control impact velocity and descent time. Stockpile weapons that might be stored in the FDS include the W33, W48, W79, and the W54 ADM.

Willan, V.O.; Gustafson, E.C.

1981-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

328

The Physics and Nuclear Nonproliferation Goals of WATCHMAN: A WAter CHerenkov Monitor for ANtineutrinos  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This article describes the physics and nonproliferation goals of WATCHMAN, the WAter Cherenkov Monitor for ANtineutrinos. The baseline WATCHMAN design is a kiloton scale gadolinium-doped (Gd) light water Cherenkov detector, placed 13 kilometers from a civil nuclear reactor in the United States. In its first deployment phase, WATCHMAN will be used to remotely detect a change in the operational status of the reactor, providing a first- ever demonstration of the potential of large Gd-doped water detectors for remote reactor monitoring for future international nuclear nonproliferation applications. During its first phase, the detector will provide a critical large-scale test of the ability to tag neutrons and thus distinguish low energy electron neutrinos and antineutrinos. This would make WATCHMAN the only detector capable of providing both direction and flavor identification of supernova neutrinos. It would also be the third largest supernova detector, and the largest underground in the western hemisphere. In a...

Askins, M; Bernstein, A; Dazeley, S; Dye, S T; Handler, T; Hatzikoutelis, A; Hellfeld, D; Jaffke, P; Kamyshkov, Y; Land, B J; Learned, J G; Marleau, P; Mauger, C; Gann, G D Orebi; Roecker, C; Rountree, S D; Shokair, T M; Smy, M B; Svoboda, R; Sweany, M; Vagins, M R; van Bibber, K A; Vogelaar, R B; Wetstein, M J; Yeh, M

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

329

March 2, 2010 Morton Halperin Urges the U.S. to Reconsider its Nuclear Policy  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

March 2, 2010 Morton Halperin Urges the U.S. to Reconsider its Nuclear Policy Towards Russia University to discuss the role of nuclear weapons in the 21st Century, particularly the policies these requirements, the U.S. runs a policy that is not only costly, but dangerous. "The greatest nuclear threat

Qian, Ning

330

Fourth Generation Nuclear Weapons: Military effectiveness and collateral effects  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The paper begins with a general introduction and update to Fourth Generation Nuclear Weapons (FGNW), and then addresses some particularly important military aspects on which there has been only limited public discussion so far. These aspects concern the unique military characteristics of FGNWs which make them radically different from both nuclear weapons based on previous-generation nuclear-explosives and from conventional weapons based on chemical-explosives: yields in the 1 to 100 tons range, greatly enhanced coupling to targets, possibility to drive powerful shaped charged jets and forged fragments, enhanced prompt radiation effects, reduced collateral damage and residual radioactivity, etc.

Gsponer, A

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

331

Macroencapsulation Equivalency Guidance for Classified Weapon Components and NNSSWAC Compliance  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) complex has a surplus of classified legacy weapon components generated over the years with no direct path for disposal. The majority of the components have been held for uncertainty of future use or no identified method of sanitization or disposal. As more weapons are retired, there is an increasing need to reduce the amount of components currently in storage or on hold. A process is currently underway to disposition and dispose of the legacy/retired weapons components across the DOE complex.

Poling, J.

2012-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

332

Nuclear-weapon-free zones: Coming of age  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Nuclear-weapon-free-zone agreements present a potentially effective option to supplement international efforts to prevent the proliferation of nuclear weapons and roll back proliferation where it has already occurred. NWFZs can also be used to create mutually binding obligations that go beyond the current obligations under the NPT, without risking the potentially disastrous consequences of an amendment debate at the 1995 NPT Review and Extension Conference. The negotiations leading toward regional agreements could also contribute significantly toward reducing tensions and building confidence. In pursuing its national goal of preventing nuclear proliferation, the US should give greater priority and support to nuclear-weapon-free-zones.

Wolfsthal, J.B.

1993-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

333

A nuclear-weapon-free world: Desirable? Feasible?  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The authors seeks answers to two key questions: Is an nuclear-weapons-free-world (NWFW) desirable, and is it feasible? Organized into six parts, the book begins with a historical review of attempts to abolish nuclear weapons. Five subsequent parts address the desirability of an NWFW, its feasibility, alternative routes to this goal, and intermediate steps to this end. The authors deals with many obstacles and difficulties facing those who wish to progress from today`s world of 50,000 or more nuclear weapons to one where none exist and strong international verification assures that no rogue state will resurrect these dread devices.

Rotblat, J.; Steinberger, J.; Udgaonkar, B. [eds.

1993-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

334

Introduction to Pits and Weapons Systems (U)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A Nuclear Explosive Package includes the Primary, Secondary, Radiation Case and related components. This is the part of the weapon that produces nuclear yield and it converts mechanical energy into nuclear energy. The pit is composed of materials that allow mechanical energy to be converted to electromagnetic energy. Fabrication processes used are typical of any metal fabrication facility: casting, forming, machining and welding. Some of the materials used in pits include: Plutonium, Uranium, Stainless Steel, Beryllium, Titanium, and Aluminum. Gloveboxes are used for three reasons: (1) Protect workers and public from easily transported, finely divided plutonium oxides - (a) Plutonium is very reactive and produces very fine particulate oxides, (b) While not the 'Most dangerous material in the world' of Manhattan Project lore, plutonium is hazardous to health of workers if not properly controlled; (2) Protect plutonium from reactive materials - (a) Plutonium is extremely reactive at ambient conditions with several components found in air: oxygen, water, hydrogen, (b) As with most reactive metals, reactions with these materials may be violent and difficult to control, (c) As with most fabricated metal products, corrosion may significantly affect the mechanical, chemical, and physical properties of the product; and (3) Provide shielding from radioactive decay products: {alpha}, {gamma}, and {eta} are commonly associated with plutonium decay, as well as highly radioactive materials such as {sup 241}Am and {sup 238}Pu.

Kautz, D. [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2012-07-02T23:59:59.000Z

335

DOE's Former Rocky Flats Weapons Production Site to Become National  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Former Rocky Flats Weapons Production Site to Become National Former Rocky Flats Weapons Production Site to Become National Wildlife Refuge DOE's Former Rocky Flats Weapons Production Site to Become National Wildlife Refuge July 12, 2007 - 2:54pm Addthis WASHINGTON, DC - The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) today announced the transfer of nearly 4,000 acres of its former Rocky Flats nuclear weapons production site to the Department of the Interior's (DOI) U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (FWS) for use as a National Wildlife Refuge. After more than a decade of environmental cleanup work, the transfer creates the Rocky Flats National Wildlife Refuge, 16 miles northwest of Denver, Colorado, and marks completion of the regulatory milestones to transform a formerly contaminated site into an environmental asset. "The Department of Energy's environmental cleanup of the Rocky Flats

336

EA-1137: Nonnuclear Consolidation Weapons Production Support Project for  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

7: Nonnuclear Consolidation Weapons Production Support 7: Nonnuclear Consolidation Weapons Production Support Project for the Kansas City Plant Kansas City, Missouri EA-1137: Nonnuclear Consolidation Weapons Production Support Project for the Kansas City Plant Kansas City, Missouri SUMMARY This EA evaluates the environmental impacts of the proposal to renovate an existing building at the U.S. Department of Energy Kansas City Plant to accommodate equipment, security and environmental controls, and building restoration upon project completion, including disposal of equipment and wastes. PUBLIC COMMENT OPPORTUNITIES None available at this time. DOCUMENTS AVAILABLE FOR DOWNLOAD December 21, 1995 EA-1137: Finding of No Significant Impact Nonnuclear Consolidation Weapons Production Support Project for the Kansas City Plant Kansas City, Missouri

337

CRAD, Configuration Management - Los Alamos National Laboratory Weapons  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Configuration Management - Los Alamos National Laboratory Configuration Management - Los Alamos National Laboratory Weapons Facility CRAD, Configuration Management - Los Alamos National Laboratory Weapons Facility April 2004 A section of Appendix C to DOE G 226.1-2 "Federal Line Management Oversight of Department of Energy Nuclear Facilities." Consists of Criteria Review and Approach Documents (CRADs) used for an assessment of the Configuration Management program at the Los Alamos National Laboratory, Weapons Facility. CRADs provide a recommended approach and the types of information to gather to assess elements of a DOE contractor's programs. CRAD, Configuration Management - Los Alamos National Laboratory Weapons Facility More Documents & Publications CRAD, Configuration Management - Los Alamos National Laboratory TA 55 SST

338

Weapons assessment efficiencies through use of nondestructive laser gas  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Weapons assessment efficiencies through use of nondestructive laser Weapons assessment efficiencies through use of nondestructive laser gas sampling Weapons assessment efficiencies through use of nondestructive laser gas sampling Nondestructive laser welding process far less expensive, no underground testing. June 8, 2012 Nondestructive Laser Gas Sampling Nondestructive Laser Gas Sampling is expected to save several million dollars per year and requires no underground testing. "We're continually innovating and working to improve the way we do business, and NDLGS is a big step for us," said National Nuclear Security Administration Deputy Administrator for Defense Programs Don Cook. New weapons assessment technology engineered: nondestructive laser welding process far less expensive, no underground testing Valveless Laser Processing

339

Clinton Extends Moratorium on Nuclear Weapons Testing | National Nuclear  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Clinton Extends Moratorium on Nuclear Weapons Testing | National Nuclear Clinton Extends Moratorium on Nuclear Weapons Testing | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure Continuing Management Reform Countering Nuclear Terrorism About Us Our Programs Our History Who We Are Our Leadership Our Locations Budget Our Operations Media Room Congressional Testimony Fact Sheets Newsletters Press Releases Speeches Events Social Media Video Gallery Photo Gallery NNSA Archive Federal Employment Apply for Our Jobs Our Jobs Working at NNSA Blog Home > About Us > Our History > NNSA Timeline > Clinton Extends Moratorium on Nuclear Weapons Testing Clinton Extends Moratorium on Nuclear Weapons Testing July 03, 1993 Washington, DC

340

Nuclear Weapons Life Cycle | National Nuclear Security Administration  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Life Cycle | National Nuclear Security Administration Life Cycle | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure Continuing Management Reform Countering Nuclear Terrorism About Us Our Programs Our History Who We Are Our Leadership Our Locations Budget Our Operations Media Room Congressional Testimony Fact Sheets Newsletters Press Releases Speeches Events Social Media Video Gallery Photo Gallery NNSA Archive Federal Employment Apply for Our Jobs Our Jobs Working at NNSA Blog Nuclear Weapons Life Cycle Home > Our Mission > Managing the Stockpile > Nuclear Weapons Life Cycle Nuclear Weapons Life Cycle Nuclear weapons are developed, produced, and maintained in the stockpile, and then retired and dismantled. This sequence of events is known as the

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "weapons nonproliferation policy" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Grid-Based Resource Management of Naval Weapon Systems  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The continuous transformation of the Chinese navy into an integrated and network-centric capability requires a cooperative and distributed weapon resource management system. As one of the ... Service Architecture...

Bin Zeng; Tao Hu; ZiTang Li

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

342

Security and Use Control of Nuclear Explosives and Nuclear Weapons...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

security and use control (UC) elements of DOE O 452.1D, Nuclear Explosive and Weapon Surety (NEWS) Program, to ensure authorized use, when directed by proper authority,...

343

Paradigms of Development and Employment of Weapon Systems  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Weapons procurement decisions are extremely complex, with an unmanageable quantity of variables to take into account. The human brain, unable to process such a complex problem in a strictly rational way, seeks mechanisms ...

Gillespie, Daniel M.

2008-10-23T23:59:59.000Z

344

DOE's Former Rocky Flats Weapons Production Site to Become National...  

Energy Savers [EERE]

Flats nuclear weapons production site to the Department of the Interior's (DOI) U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (FWS) for use as a National Wildlife Refuge. After more than a...

345

Y-12, the Cold War, and nuclear weapons dismantlement ? Or:...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

a huge mission for Y-12 bringing about substantial growth and continued to do so until nuclear testing ended in 1992. The United States tested nuclear weapons from July 16, 1945...

346

Security and Control of Nuclear Explosives and Nuclear Weapons  

Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

This directive establishes requirements and responsibilities to prevent the deliberate unauthorized use of U.S. nuclear explosives and U.S. nuclear weapons. Cancels DOE O 452.4.

2001-12-17T23:59:59.000Z

347

Briefing, Classification of Nuclear Weapons-Related Information- June 2014  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This brief will familiarize individuals from agencies outside of DOE who may come in contact with RD and FRD with the procedures for identifying, classifying, marking, handling, and declassifying documents containing Nuclear Weapons-Related Information.

348

A Visual Analytics Approach to Structured Data Analysis to Enhance Nonproliferation and Arms Control Verification Activities  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Analysis activities for Nonproliferation and Arms Control verification require the use of many types of data. Tabular structured data, such as Excel spreadsheets and relational databases, have traditionally been used for data mining activities, where specific queries are issued against data to look for matching results. The application of visual analytics tools to structured data enables further exploration of datasets to promote discovery of previously unknown results. This paper discusses the application of a specific visual analytics tool to datasets related to the field of Arms Control and Nonproliferation to promote the use of visual analytics more broadly in this domain. Visual analytics focuses on analytical reasoning facilitated by interactive visual interfaces (Wong and Thomas 2004). It promotes exploratory analysis of data, and complements data mining technologies where known patterns can be mined for. Also with a human in the loop, they can bring in domain knowledge and subject matter expertise. Visual analytics has not widely been applied to this domain. In this paper, we will focus on one type of data: structured data, and show the results of applying a specific visual analytics tool to answer questions in the Arms Control and Nonproliferation domain. We chose to use the T.Rex tool, a visual analytics tool developed at PNNL, which uses a variety of visual exploration patterns to discover relationships in structured datasets, including a facet view, graph view, matrix view, and timeline view. The facet view enables discovery of relationships between categorical information, such as countries and locations. The graph tool visualizes node-link relationship patterns, such as the flow of materials being shipped between parties. The matrix visualization shows highly correlated categories of information. The timeline view shows temporal patterns in data. In this paper, we will use T.Rex with two different datasets to demonstrate how interactive exploration of the data can aid an analyst with arms control and nonproliferation verification activities. Using a dataset from PIERS (PIERS 2014), we will show how container shipment imports and exports can aid an analyst in understanding the shipping patterns between two countries. We will also use T.Rex to examine a collection of research publications from the IAEA International Nuclear Information System (IAEA 2014) to discover collaborations of concern. We hope this paper will encourage the use of visual analytics structured data analytics in the field of nonproliferation and arms control verification. Our paper outlines some of the challenges that exist before broad adoption of these kinds of tools can occur and offers next steps to overcome these challenges.

Gillen, David S.

2014-08-07T23:59:59.000Z

349

Reliability guarantees, demonstration, and control for weapon systems proposals  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

in partial fulfillment oi the requirements for the PHOPASSIOMAL LbiGkhr IM MMGIMKKRIMG January 1959 Ma)or Sub)sets Sleotrioal MngineeriIIg RELIABILITY GUARANIS, ISMONSTRATION& A53 CONTROL POR WEAPON SYSTEMS PROPOSALS ROSS ~~' WIN LANI' APProved... acouraoy, and warhead lethality are combined to yield weapon effectiveness, Zffeotivensss is then defined as the probability that any miss1le, after passing all presoribsd oheckouts and given a proper cosm3and, will sucoessfully launch& operate without...

Lanier, Ross Edwin

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

350

The unique signal concept for detonation safety in nuclear weapons  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of a unique signal (UQS) in a nuclear weapon system is to provide an unambiguous communication of intent to detonate from the UQS information input source device to a stronglink safety device in the weapon in a manner that is highly unlikely to be duplicated or simulated in normal environments and in a broad range of ill-defined abnormal environments. This report presents safety considerations for the design and implementation of UQSs in the context of the overall safety system.

Spray, S.D.; Cooper, J.A.

1993-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

351

these guidelines remain an unresolved issue. This means that the Secretariat cannot confirm that chemical weapons  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

that chemical weapons declared as OCW by states parties are, in fact, old chemical weapons. Because of this, all the provisions for chemical weapons. This would have major resource implications for the Secre- tariat no 3 Strengthening the Biological and Toxin Weapons Convention A further one week meeting, the tenth

Sussex, University of

352

Deterrence versus Preemption: Assessing U.S. Nuclear Policy  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Since coming into office in 2001, the Bush administration has enacted a series of controversial policies designed to create a more robust and more usable nuclear arsenal. From requiring new nuclear strike capabilities (including against non-nuclear countries), to threatening preemptive attacks, to investing billions of dollars in rebuilding the nuclear weapons production complex, the administration is systematically strengthening the role nuclear weapons play in defending the United States and its interests around the world. This presentation examines those policies and the thinking that underlies them. It questions the effectiveness of the administration's approach and explores some of the unintended consequences vis-a-vis U.S. policy toward North Korea, Iraq, Pakistan, and others. Finally, it takes a detailed look at current efforts to develop a new low-yield earth-penetrating nuclear weapon to destroy hardened underground facilities, assessing the feasibility of such a device and the potential effects of its use.

Schwartz, Stephen (Bulletin of the Atomic Scientists) [Bulletin of the Atomic Scientists

2003-03-19T23:59:59.000Z

353

Fraud Policy Governance Policy  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Fraud Policy Governance Policy © Victoria University of Wellington Page 1 1 Purpose The purpose of this policy is to address the risk of fraud and to lay out the actions the University will take when any suspected fraud is reported or discovered and should be read in conjunction with the Student Conduct Statute

Frean, Marcus

354

OFFICIAL POLICY Ethics Policy  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

OFFICIAL POLICY Ethics Policy 1.0 PREFACE It is the intent of this Ethics Policy to state those standards of ethical conduct that are expected of all members of the College Community. These standards must the minimum standards of ethical conduct that are required by South Carolina law and reflect the aspirations

Kasman, Alex

355

Spent nuclear fuel policies in historical perspective: An international comparison  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The purpose of this article is to explain why the world's nuclear power countries differ from each other with respect to their spent nuclear fuel (SNF) policies. The emergence and evolution of three principal SNF approaches are analyzed: direct disposal, reprocessing and SNF export. Five broad explanatory factors are identified and discussed in relation to the observed differences in policy outcomes: military ambitions and non-proliferation, technological culture, political culture and civil society, geological conditions, and energy policy. SNF policy outcomes can generally be seen to result from a complex interaction between these broad factors, but it is also possible to discern a number of important patterns. To the extent that the five factors may undergo far-reaching changes in the future, the historical experience of how they have shaped SNF policies also give a hint of possible future directions in SNF policymaking around the world.

Per Högselius

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

356

European Working Group on Non Lethal Weapons 6th European Symposium Page 1 TOWARDS A TEST STANDARD FOR CONDUCTED ENERGY WEAPONS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

European Working Group on Non Lethal Weapons ­ 6th European Symposium Page 1 TOWARDS A TEST STANDARD FOR CONDUCTED ENERGY WEAPONS Andy Adler, David Dawson Carleton University, Ottawa ON Canada ABSTRACT: Conducted Energy Weapons (CEWs) are increasingly used by police in many countries as a less

Adler, Andy

357

Administration Policy Complete Policy Title  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Administration Policy Complete Policy Title: McMaster University Alcohol Policy Policy Number, 1998 Supersedes/Amends Policy dated: May 11, 1998 Responsible Executive: Vice-President (Administration policy and the written copy held by the policy owner, the written copy prevails. INTRODUCTION Mc

Haykin, Simon

358

Order Module--DOE O 452.1D, NUCLEAR EXPLOSIVE AND WEAPON SURETY PROGRAM,  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Order Module--DOE O 452.1D, NUCLEAR EXPLOSIVE AND WEAPON SURETY Order Module--DOE O 452.1D, NUCLEAR EXPLOSIVE AND WEAPON SURETY PROGRAM, DOE O 452.2D, NUCLEAR EXPLOSIVE SAFETY Order Module--DOE O 452.1D, NUCLEAR EXPLOSIVE AND WEAPON SURETY PROGRAM, DOE O 452.2D, NUCLEAR EXPLOSIVE SAFETY "To prevent accidents and inadvertent or unauthorized use of U.S. nuclear weapons and nuclear explosives. In conjunction with the Department of Defense (DoD), to protect the public health and safety by providing dual-agency judgment and responsibility for the safety, security, and use control (surety) of nuclear weapons. To establish nuclear explosive surety standards and nuclear weapon design surety requirements. To address surety vulnerabilities during all phases of the nuclear weapon life cycle and to upgrade surety during weapon stockpile refurbishments and/or new weapon

359

Nuclear Weapons Testing Resumes | National Nuclear Security Administration  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Testing Resumes | National Nuclear Security Administration Testing Resumes | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure Continuing Management Reform Countering Nuclear Terrorism About Us Our Programs Our History Who We Are Our Leadership Our Locations Budget Our Operations Media Room Congressional Testimony Fact Sheets Newsletters Press Releases Speeches Events Social Media Video Gallery Photo Gallery NNSA Archive Federal Employment Apply for Our Jobs Our Jobs Working at NNSA Blog Home > About Us > Our History > NNSA Timeline > Nuclear Weapons Testing Resumes Nuclear Weapons Testing Resumes September 01, 1961 Washington, DC Nuclear Weapons Testing Resumes The Soviet Union breaks the nuclear test moratorium and the United States

360

Secretary Bodman Celebrates Clean Up Completion of Three Former Weapons  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Clean Up Completion of Three Former Clean Up Completion of Three Former Weapons Research and Production Sites in Ohio Secretary Bodman Celebrates Clean Up Completion of Three Former Weapons Research and Production Sites in Ohio January 19, 2007 - 9:59am Addthis Over 1,100 Acres in Fernald, Columbus and Ashtabula Restored CROSBY TOWNSHIP, OH - U.S. Secretary of Energy Samuel W. Bodman today certified that environmental cleanup is complete at three former weapons research and production facilities in Ohio. In a ceremony at the Fernald site, Secretary Bodman, joined by Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Administrator Stephen L. Johnson and U.S. Senator George Voinovich (R-OH), commemorated the efforts of thousands of workers for their contributions at the Fernald Closure site in Crosby Township, the Columbus Closure site at

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "weapons nonproliferation policy" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

FAQS Job Task Analyses - Weapons Quality Assurance Community  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

NA-121.3 Weapons Quality Assurance Community NA-121.3 Weapons Quality Assurance Community Consolidated JOB/TASK Analysis 12/2011 Job Analysis Worksheet for Tasks WQA Specialist Task Source Import. Freq. #1 Monitors, inspects, analyzes and investigates complex electrical, electronic, mechanical, electro-mechanical, and nuclear components, subassemblies, and assemblies associated with the manufacture of nuclear weapons and other non-nuclear components as applicable QC-1, WQAPM, DesgnDefn 4 3 #2 Conducts Quality Assurance Surveys (including Product Acceptance) and oversight activities of contractor operations QC-1, WQAPM 5 2 #3 Performs verification inspection (including Contractor Acceptance Verification) of product manufactured by NNSA Contractors, QAIP development, QADRs, nonconformance activities/requirements

362

SECURITY AND CONTROL OF NUCLEAR EXPLOSIVES AND NUCLEAR WEAPONS  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

http://www.nnsa.energy.gov Office of Nuclear Weapon Surety and Quality http://www.nnsa.energy.gov Office of Nuclear Weapon Surety and Quality SUPPLEMENTAL DIRECTIVE Approved: 7-7-11 IMPLEMENTATION AND EVALUATION OF CONTROLS TO PREVENT DELIBERATE UNAUTHORIZED USE NATIONAL NUCLEAR SECURITY ADMINISTRATION Office of Defense Programs NA SD 452.4 NA SD 452.4 1 7-7-11 IMPLEMENTATION AND EVALUATION OF CONTROLS TO PREVENT DELIBERATE UNAUTHORIZED USE 1. PURPOSE. This NNSA Supplemental Directive (SD) supports the requirements of DOE O 452.4B, Security and Use Control of Nuclear Explosives and Nuclear Weapons. Specifically, this SD supports the Order's requirements to implement deliberate unauthorized use (DUU) preventive measures for nuclear explosive operations (NEO) and associated activities and to perform independent evaluations to determine if NEOs

363

Los Alamos National Laboratory names new head of weapons programs  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Laboratory names new head of weapons programs Laboratory names new head of weapons programs Los Alamos National Laboratory names new head of weapons programs Bret Knapp has been acting in that position since June 2011. December 1, 2011 Los Alamos National Laboratory sits on top of a once-remote mesa in northern New Mexico with the Jemez mountains as a backdrop to research and innovation covering multi-disciplines from bioscience, sustainable energy sources, to plasma physics and new materials. Los Alamos National Laboratory sits on top of a once-remote mesa in northern New Mexico with the Jemez mountains as a backdrop to research and innovation covering multi-disciplines from bioscience, sustainable energy sources, to plasma physics and new materials. Contact Kevin Roark Communications Office (505) 665-9202

364

Tiny device can detect hidden nuclear weapons, materials  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Tiny Tiny device can detect hidden nuclear weapons, materials Director's Welcome Organization Achievements Highlights Fact Sheets, Brochures & Other Documents Multimedia Library About Nuclear Energy Nuclear Reactors Designed by Argonne Argonne's Nuclear Science and Technology Legacy Opportunities within NE Division Visit Argonne Work with Argonne Contact us For Employees Site Map Help Join us on Facebook Follow us on Twitter NE on Flickr Celebrating the 70th Anniversary of Chicago Pile 1 (CP-1) Argonne OutLoud on Nuclear Energy Argonne Energy Showcase 2012 Highlights Bookmark and Share Tiny device can detect hidden nuclear weapons, materials This tiny wafer can detect hidden nuclear weapons and materials NUCLEAR DETECTOR -- This small wafer could become the key component in

365

Managing nuclear weapons in a changing world: Proceedings  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Center for Security and Technology Studies was established at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory to support long-range technical studies on issues of importance to US national security. An important goal of the Center is to bring together Laboratory staff and the broader outside community through a program of technical studies, visitors, symposia, seminars, workshops, and publications. With this in mind, the Center and LLNL`s Defense Systems Program sponsored a conference on Managing Nuclear Weapons in a Changing World held on November 17--18,1992. The first day of the meeting focused on nuclear weapons issues in the major geographical areas of the world. On the second day, the conference participants discussed what could be done to manage, control, and account for nuclear weapons in this changing world. Each of the talks and the concluding panel discussion are being indexed as separate documents.

Not Available

1992-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

366

National Day of Remembrance HSS Honors Former Nuclear Weapons Program  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

National Day of Remembrance HSS Honors Former Nuclear Weapons National Day of Remembrance HSS Honors Former Nuclear Weapons Program Workers National Day of Remembrance HSS Honors Former Nuclear Weapons Program Workers October 28, 2013 - 3:11pm Addthis Color Guard | National Day of Remembrance - October 25, 2013 Color Guard | National Day of Remembrance - October 25, 2013 US Representative Dina Titus (1st Congressional District of Nevada) | National Day of Remembrance - October 25, 2013 US Representative Dina Titus (1st Congressional District of Nevada) | National Day of Remembrance - October 25, 2013 Mr. Al Tseu | National Day of Remembrance - October 25, 2013 Mr. Al Tseu | National Day of Remembrance - October 25, 2013 Mr. Glenn Podonsky, Chief Health Safety and Security Officer | National Day of Remembrance - October 25, 2013

367

EIS-0218: Record of Decision | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Record of Decision Record of Decision EIS-0218: Record of Decision Proposed Nuclear Weapons Nonproliferation Policy Concerning Foreign Research Reactor Spent Nuclear Fuel DOE, in consultation with the Department of State, has decided to implement a new foreign research reactor spent fuel acceptance policy as specified in the Preferred Alternative contained in the Final Environmental Impact Statement on a Proposed Nuclear Weapons Nonproliferation Policy Concerning Foreign Research Reactor Spent Nuclear Fuel (the Final EIS, DOE/EIS-218F of February 1996), subject to additional stipulations specified in Section VII of this Record of Decision. DOE/EIS-0218, Record of Decision for the Final EIS on Proposed Nuclear Weapons Nonproliferation Policy Concerning Foreign Research Reactor Spent

368

EIS-0218: Revised Record of Decision | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Nuclear Weapons Nonproliferation Policy Concerning Foreign Research Reactor Nuclear Weapons Nonproliferation Policy Concerning Foreign Research Reactor Spent Nuclear Fuel Subsequent to issuance of the Record of Decision on May 13, 1996, DOE, in consultation with the Department of State, determined that the need may arise during implementation of the policy for the United States to take title to spent nuclear fuel and target material from foreign research reactors located in countries with other-than-high-income economies at locations other than the port of entry into the United States. DOE/EIS-0218, Revised Record of Decision (ROD) for the Final Environmental Impact Statement (FEIS) on Proposed Nuclear Weapons Nonproliferation Policy Concerning Foreign Research Reactor Spent Nuclear Fuel, 61 FR 38720 (July 1996) More Documents & Publications

369

POLICY: A:VPFA # / Purchasing Policy PROCEDURES  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

POLICY: A:VPFA # / Purchasing Policy PROCEDURES: APPENDIX: Approved: April 1, 2013 Revised: Cross References: Purchasing Policy Capital Projects and Renovations Policy Conflict of Interest Policy Sustainability Policy Green Procurement Policy 1 of 9 PROCEDURES: Purchasing Policy AUTHORITY: University

Martin, Jeff

370

The Association between Cancers and Low Level Radiation: an evaluation of the epidemiological evidence at the Hanford Nuclear Weapons Facility  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and Rocky Flats Nuclear Weapons Plant. Rad Res 1989;120:19-at the Hanford Nuclear Weapons Facility MASTER DISTRIBUTIONAT T H E HANFORD NUCLEAR WEAPONS FACILITY JULIE BRITTON

Britton, Julie

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

371

Nonlethal Self-Defense, (Almost Entirely) Nonlethal Weapons, and the Rights to Keep and Bear Arms and Defend Life  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

apply to such nondeadly weapons. On balance, people’s rightAlmost Entirely) Nonlethal Weapons, and the Rights to KeepAlmost Entirely) Nonlethal Weapons, and the Rights To Keep

Volokh, Eugene

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

372

CRAD, Configuration Management- Los Alamos National Laboratory Weapons Facility  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

A section of Appendix C to DOE G 226.1-2 "Federal Line Management Oversight of Department of Energy Nuclear Facilities." Consists of Criteria Review and Approach Documents (CRADs) used for an assessment of the Configuration Management program at the Los Alamos National Laboratory, Weapons Facility.

373

Hot Cell Examination of Weapons-Grade MOX Fuel  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The U.S. Department of Energy has decided to dispose of a portion of the nation s surplus weapons-grade plutonium by reconstituting it into mixed oxide (MOX) fuel and irradiating it in commercial power reactors. Four lead assemblies were manufactured with weapons-grade MOX and irradiated to a maximum fuel rod burnup of 47.3 MWd/kg. As part of the fuel qualification process, five fuel rods with varying burnups and plutonium contents were selected from one of the assemblies and shipped to Oak Ridge National Laboratory for hot cell examination. This is the first hot cell examination of weapons-grade MOX fuel. The rods have been examined nondestructively with the ADEPT apparatus and are currently being destructively examined. Examinations completed to date include length measurements, visual examination, gamma scanning, profilometry, eddy-current testing, gas measurement and analysis, and optical metallography. Representative results of these examinations are reviewed and found to be consistent with predictions and with prior experience with reactor-grade MOX fuel. The results will be used to support licensing of weapons-grade MOX for batch use in commercial power reactors.

Morris, Robert Noel [ORNL; Bevard, Bruce Balkcom [ORNL; McCoy, Kevin [Areva NP

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

374

Disposition of weapons-grade plutonium in Westinghouse reactors  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We have studied the feasibility of using weapons-grade plutonium in the form of mixed-oxide (MOX) fuel in existing Westinghouse reactors. We have designed three transition cycles from an all LEU core to a partial MOX core. We found that four...

Alsaed, Abdelhalim Ali

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

375

Security and Use Control of Nuclear Explosives and Nuclear Weapons  

Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

This Order establishes requirements to implement the nuclear explosive security and use control elements of DOE O 452.1D, Nuclear Explosive and Weapon Surety (NEWS) Program, to ensure authorized use, when directed by proper authority, and protect against deliberate unauthorized acts/deliberate unauthorized use. Cancels DOE O 452.4A.

2010-01-22T23:59:59.000Z

376

Security and Use Control of Nuclear Explosives and Nuclear Weapons  

Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

The Order establishes requirements to implement the nuclear explosive security and use control (UC) elements of DOE O 452.1D, Nuclear Explosive and Weapon Surety (NEWS) Program, to ensure authorized use, when directed by proper authority, and protect against deliberate unauthorized acts (DUAs), deliberate unauthorized use (DUU), and denial of authorized use (DAU).

2014-11-19T23:59:59.000Z

377

The role of nuclear weapons in the year 2000  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This publication presents the proceedings for the workshop, The Role of Nuclear Weapons in the Year 2000, held on October 22--24, 1990. The workshop participants considered the changing nature of deterrence and of our strategic relationship with the Soviet Union, the impact of nuclear proliferation on regional conflicts, and ways that the nuclear forces might be restructured to reflect new political circumstances.

Not Available

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

378

Nuclear Nonproliferation,  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

for Wireless Sensing, Sensory Substitution, Multi-rotor Damage Detection, Drill Vibration Reduction, Laser Ultrasonics for Non Destructive Evaluation T y p i c a l P r o j e...

379

Application of a remote image surveillance system in a robotic weapon  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

As one of the major steps toward a fully intelligent autonomous robotic weapon, we have made progress in three major ... and ZigBee wireless technology applied to a robotic weapon.

Chun-Chieh Wang; Kuo-Hsien Hsia; Kuo-Lan Su; Yi-Chun Hsieh…

2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

380

Software Implementation of Source Code Quality Analysis and Evaluation for Weapon Systems Software  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

DESIS(DEfense Software Information System) is being developed to manage and maintain weapon systems software as a whole in defense ... the system is to evaluate software quality of weapon systems, analyze whether...

Seill Kim; Youngkyu Park

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "weapons nonproliferation policy" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

IF GEORGE BUSH spent more time and money on mobilising Weapons of Mass  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

IF GEORGE BUSH spent more time and money on mobilising Weapons of Mass Salvation (WMS) in addition to combating Weapons of Mass Destruction (WMD), we might actually get somewhere in making this planet a safer

382

ORIGINAL PAPER Invading with biological weapons: the role of shared disease  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ORIGINAL PAPER Invading with biological weapons: the role of shared disease in ecological invasion. This scenario where the parasites acts as a "biological weapon" has been Theor Ecol (2009) 2:53­66 DOI 10.1007/s

Sherratt, Jonathan A.

383

Linking Legacies: Connecting the Cold War Nuclear Weapons Production Processes to Their Environmental Consequences  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This report described each step in the cycle of nuclear weapons production and defined for the first time a planned disposition path for all waste streams generated prior to 1992 as a result of weapons production.

384

AIM-98-3464 RECEIVED THE HISTORY OF NUCLEAR WEAPON SAFETY DEVICES  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

the thermal weaklink. The dual magnetic stronglink was fielded in the last weapon to enter the nuclear weapon stockpile. See Figure 6. Figure 6. MC383 1 Dual Stronglink Review...

385

E-Print Network 3.0 - america nuclear weapons Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

nuclear weapons Search Powered by Explorit Topic List Advanced Search Sample search results for: america nuclear weapons Page: << < 1 2 3 4 5 > >> 1 First strike Sixty years ago,...

386

Development of glass vitrification at SRL as a waste treatment technique for nuclear weapon components  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report discusses the development of vitrification for the waste treatment of nuclear weapons components at the Savannah River Site. Preliminary testing of surrogate nuclear weapon electronic waste shows that glass vitrification is a viable, robust treatment method.

Coleman, J.T.; Bickford, D.F.

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

387

Geochemistry of Chemical Weapon Breakdown Products on the Seafloor: 1,4-Thioxane in Seawater  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Geochemistry of Chemical Weapon Breakdown Products on the Seafloor: 1,4-Thioxane in Seawater ... The Chemical Weapons Convention mandates the active destruction of chemical weapon (CW) stockpiles held by nations on land, but does not address the far larger quantities of “abandoned” CW that await passive environmental decomposition following disposal on the sea floor. ... The comingling of disposed weapons material with anoxic hydrate bearing sediments is not theoretical. ...

Xin Zhang; Keith C. Hester; Oscar Mancillas; Edward T. Peltzer; Peter M. Walz; Peter G. Brewer

2009-01-02T23:59:59.000Z

388

Weapon Target Assignment Decision Based on Markov Decision Process in Air Defense  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This paper proposed a MDP based approach to resolve the weapon target assignment (WTA) problem in air...

Yaofei Ma; Chaohong Chou

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

389

Navy's Superlaser Is More Than a Weapon (Wired.com) | Jefferson...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

wired.comdangerroom201011navys-super-laser-wont-just-be-a-weapon Submitted: Wednesday, November 10, 2010...

390

E-Print Network 3.0 - aircraft missiles weapons Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Naval Research Summary: Program managers 467 Program managers Aircraft carriers Combat boots Combat ships Submarines Weapons... Axisymmetric Missile Configuration Hypersonic...

391

Dispersal and ejaculatory strategies associated with exaggeration of weapon in an armed beetle  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...strategies associated with exaggeration of weapon in an armed beetle Takashi Yamane Kensuke...Tsushima-naka 111, Okayama 700-8530, Japan Weapons used in male fighting can be costly to...investigated whether increased investment into weapons can generate evolutionary changes in mating...

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

392

A STATISTICAL SIGNAL PROCESSING APPROACH TO IMAGE FUSION FOR CONCELED WEAPON DETECTION1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A STATISTICAL SIGNAL PROCESSING APPROACH TO IMAGE FUSION FOR CONCELED WEAPON DETECTION1 J. Yang A statistical signal processing approach to multisensor image fusion is presented for concealed weapon detection weapon detection (CWD) applications [5,6]. 2. THE IMAGE FORMATION MODEL We model every coefficient

Blum, Rick

393

Dynamic Model for Assessing Impact of Regeneration Actions on System Availability: Application to Weapon Systems  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

to Weapon Systems Maxime Monnin, LAMIH, University of Valenciennes Benoit Iung, PhD, CRAN, Nancy University of unavailability. Military weapon systems can become unavailable due to system failures or damage to the system. This paper aims to define principles for weapon systems modeling that integrate both system failure

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

394

A SUBSPACE SIGNAL PROCESSING TECHNIQUE FOR CONCEALED WEAPONS Ahmed S. Ibrahim, K. J Ray Liu *  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A SUBSPACE SIGNAL PROCESSING TECHNIQUE FOR CONCEALED WEAPONS DETECTION Ahmed S. Ibrahim, K. J Ray, kjrliu}@umd.edu ABSTRACT Concealed weapons detection is one ofthe greatest challenges facing national security nowadays. Recently, it has been shown that each weapon can have a uniquefingerprint, which

Liu, K. J. Ray

395

Evolutionary trade-off between weapons and testes Leigh W. Simmons, and Douglas J. Emlen  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Evolutionary trade-off between weapons and testes Leigh W. Simmons, and Douglas J. Emlen doi:10-off between weapons and testes Leigh W. Simmons* and Douglas J. Emlen *Centre for Evolutionary Biology, School for fertilizations and investment in weapons used to obtain matings. In a within-species study, we prevented males

Emlen, Douglas J.

396

Mission Emphasis and the Determination of Needs for New Weapon Daniel Mark Gillespie  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Mission Emphasis and the Determination of Needs for New Weapon Systems by Daniel Mark Gillespie B and the Determination of Needs for New Weapon Systems by Daniel Mark Gillespie Submitted to the Engineering Systems in Engineering Systems ABSTRACT Efforts to understand the determination of needs of new weapon systems must take

de Weck, Olivier L.

397

String-and Permutation-Coded Genetic Algorithms for the Static Weapon-Target Assignment Problem  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

String- and Permutation-Coded Genetic Algorithms for the Static Weapon-Target Assignment Problem julstrom@stcloudstate.edu ABSTRACT In the Weapon-Target Assignment Problem, m enemy tar- gets are inbound, each with a value Vj representing the dam- age it may do. The defense has n weapons, and the prob

Julstrom, Bryant A.

398

The fitness advantage of a high-performance weapon JERRY F. HUSAK1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The fitness advantage of a high-performance weapon JERRY F. HUSAK1 *, A. KRISTOPHER LAPPIN2 Received 9 June 2008; accepted for publication 26 August 2008 Weapons used in combat between males are usually attributed to sexual selection, which operates via a fitness advantage for males with weapons

Husak, Jerry F.

399

TOWARDS A PORTABLE, MEMORY-EFFICIENT TEST SYSTEM FOR CONDUCTED ENERGY WEAPONS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

TOWARDS A PORTABLE, MEMORY-EFFICIENT TEST SYSTEM FOR CONDUCTED ENERGY WEAPONS Peyman Rahmati1. The proposed PTS has been de- velopped for the most widely used Conducted Energy Weapons (CEW), Taser X26, and memory-efficient. Index Terms-- Conducted Energy Weapons, Calibration, Electrical Stimulation

Adler, Andy

400

Author's personal copy Evaluating the costs of a sexually selected weapon: big horns at a  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Author's personal copy Evaluating the costs of a sexually selected weapon: big horns at a small assumption of sexual selection theory is that ornaments and weapons are costly. Such costs should maintain the reliability of ornaments and weapons as indicators of male quality, and therefore explain why choosy females

Emlen, Douglas J.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "weapons nonproliferation policy" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Underwater Bomb Trajectory Prediction for Stand-off Assault (Mine/IED) Breaching Weapon  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Underwater Bomb Trajectory Prediction for Stand-off Assault (Mine/IED) Breaching Weapon Fuse To support the development and evaluation of the Stand-off Assault Breaching Weapon Fuse Improvement (SOABWFI/surf zones to VSW-zone, i.e., the Stand-off Assault Breaching Weapon Fuse Improvement (SOABWFI) program. #12

Chu, Peter C.

402

Terahertz imaging of subjects with concealed weapons Jason C. Dickinson*a  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Terahertz imaging of subjects with concealed weapons Jason C. Dickinson*a , Thomas M. Goyettea for concealed weapons detection, the Submillimeter-Wave Technology Laboratory (STL) at the University-the-fly processing. Imagery at 1.56THz of human subjects with concealed weapons are presented and discussed

Massachusetts at Lowell, University of

403

hemical and biological weapons are rightly re-garded with a special sense of horror. Their  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

C hemical and biological weapons are rightly re- garded with a special sense of horror spread through a population. Moreover, chemical and biological weapons are especially attractive alter- natives for groups that lack the ability to construct nuclear weapons. The 1995 release of sarin gas

Spirtes, Peter

404

Systematic Assessment of Nation-States' Motivations and Capabilities to Produce Biological Weapons  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Systematic Assessment of Nation-States' Motivations and Capabilities to Produce Biological Weapons of Biological Weapons (BW) proliferation is important, but challenging. We describe and use a joint socio, ARO or the U.S. government. #12;Keywords: Arms races, biological weapons, bioweapons, arms control

405

EIGHTH SESSION OF THE CONFERENCE OF STATES PARTIES TO THE CHEMICAL WEAPONS CONVENTION  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 EIGHTH SESSION OF THE CONFERENCE OF STATES PARTIES TO THE CHEMICAL WEAPONS CONVENTION Declaration Proliferation of Weapons of Mass Destruction adopted by the EU Heads of State and Government at the Thessaloniki European Council on 20 June 2003 which stresses that the proliferation of weapons of mass destruction

Sussex, University of

406

that it has something to hide at these weapons laboratories? How can the  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

that it has something to hide at these weapons laboratories? How can the world know without to sidestep the testing protocols developed to adequately implement the Biological Weapons Convention cosigned. The post-attack atmosphere regarding terroristic use of biological weapons is, however, approaching hys

Newman, Stuart A.

407

Chapter Nine: Logic Clue Game (continued) Suspects, Weapons, and Scenes of the Crime  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Chapter Nine: Logic ­ Clue Game (continued) Suspects, Weapons, and Scenes of the Crime The following is a list of the possible suspects, murder weapons, and murder scenes. There are six suspects, six weapons, and nine rooms. Suspects: Mr. Green, Colonel Mustard, Mrs. Peacock, Professor Plum, Miss Scarlet

Morton, Dena - Department of Mathematics and Computer Science, Xavier University

408

THE US REJECTION OF THE PROTOCOL AT THE ELEVENTH HOUR DAMAGES INTERNATIONAL SECURITY AGAINST BIOLOGICAL WEAPONS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

BIOLOGICAL WEAPONS Graham S Pearson HSP Advisory Board The twenty-fourth session of the Ad Hoc Group and Toxin Weapons Convention (BWC) opened on 23 July (see Report from Geneva in this Bulletin). There had with others to conclude the negotiations on the Verification Protocol to strengthen the Biological Weapons

Sussex, University of

409

Weapon Design Patterns in Shooter Games Robert Giusti, Kenneth Hullett, Jim Whitehead  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Weapon Design Patterns in Shooter Games Robert Giusti, Kenneth Hullett, Jim Whitehead Augmented patterns grows. Action-oriented games focus heavily on players using weapons, but categorizations used for weapons are borrowed from real-world patterns, classifying them according to the physical inner- workings

Whitehead, James

410

HORRIFIC WEAPON OF WAR IS STILL DESTROYING LIVES By Mike Felker  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

HORRIFIC WEAPON OF WAR IS STILL DESTROYING LIVES By Mike Felker March 27 newspaper headline, and muscles could be destroyed and nerves severed. With horrific force, fragments of the weapon, along 45 Wed., April 13, 2005 #12;million to 50 million land mines in nearly 70 countries. All weapons

Plotkin, Joshua B.

411

Improving the nuclear data base for non-proliferation and homeland security  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Many of the technical advances in non-proliferation and homeland security require calculations of transport of neutrons and gamma-rays through materials. The nuclear data base on which these calculations are made must be of high quality in order for the calculated responses to be credible. At the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center, three spallation neutron sources are being used to provide high-quality cross section and structure data with reactions induced by neutrons. Neutron transmission, neutron-induced fission and capture cross sections, neutron emission in fission, and gamma-ray production by neutrons are principal areas of research. Furthermore, these sources are also being used to validate calculations of the characterization and response of new detectors and detection techniques. Current research activities are summarized here.

Haight, Robert C [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Bitteker, Leo J [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Couture, Aaron J [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Devlin, Matthew J [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Fotiadis, Nikolaos [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Gavron, Avigdor [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Hill, Tony S [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Laptev, Alexander B [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Nelson, Ronald O [Los Alamos National Laboratory; O'donnell, John M [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Taddeucci, Terry N [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Tovesson, Fredrik K [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Ulmann, John L [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Wender, Stephen A [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

412

The European Safeguards Research and Development Association Addresses Safeguards and Nonproliferation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The renaissance of efforts to expand the use of nuclear energy requires the parallel development of a renewed and more sophisticated work force. Growth in the nuclear sector with high standard of safety, safeguards and security requires skilled staff for design, operations, inspections etc. High-quality nuclear technology educational programs are diminished from past years, and the ability of universities to attract students and to meet future staffing requirements of the nuclear industry is becoming seriously compromised. Thus, education and training in nuclear engineering and sciences is one of the cornerstones for the nuclear sector. Teaching in the nuclear field still seems strongly influenced by national history but it is time to strengthen resources and collaborate. Moreover with the current nuclear security threats it becomes critical that nuclear technology experts master the basic principles not only of safety, but also of nuclear safeguards, nonproliferation and nuclear security. In Europe the European Nuclear Education Network (ENEN) Association has established the certificate 'European Master of Science in Nuclear Engineering (EMSNE)' as the classic nuclear engineering program covering reactor operation and nuclear safety. However, it does not include courses on nonproliferation, safeguards, or dual-use technologies. The lack of education in nuclear safeguards was tackled by the European Safeguards Research and Development Association (ESARDA), through development and implementation of safeguards course modules. Since 2005 the ESARDA Working Group, called the Training and Knowledge Management Working Group, (TKMWG) has worked with the Joint Research Centre (JRC) in Ispra, Italy to organize a Nuclear Safeguards and Nonproliferation course. This five-day course is held each spring at the JRC, and continues to show increasing interest as evidenced by the positive responses of international lecturers and students. The standard set of lectures covers a broad range of subjects, including nuclear material accountancy principles, legal definitions and the regulatory base and inspection tools and techniques. This 60% core part is given by representatives from regulatory bodies (The International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA), Institute for Radiological Protection and Nuclear Safety, Directorate General for Nuclear Energy and Transport), industry (AREVA, British Nuclear Group), and research (Stockholm University, Hamburg University, Joint Research Centre-Institute of Transuranic Elements, and Joint Research Centre-Institute for the Protection of the Citizen). The remaining part is completed with topical lectures addressed by invited lecturers, such as from Pacific Northwest National Laboratory and the IAEA addressing topics of physical protection, illicit trafficking, the Iraq case study, exercises, including satellite imagery interpretation etc. With this structure of a stable core plus a variable set of invited lectures, the course will remain sustainable and up-to-date. A syllabus provides the students a homogeneous set of information material in nuclear safeguards and nonproliferation matters at the European and international level. In this way, the ESARDA TKMWG aims to contribute to a two-fold scientific-technical and political-juridical education and training.

Janssens-Maenhout, Greet; Kusumi, R.; Daures, Pascal A.; Janssens, Willem; Dickman, Deborah A.

2010-06-16T23:59:59.000Z

413

Trade Policy  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In an otherwise insightful and thoughtful article, Sebastian Pfotenhauer (Trade Policy Is Science Policy,” Issues, Fall 2013) might better have entitled his contribution “Trade Policy Needs to Be Reconciled with Science ...

Ashford, Nicholas A.

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

414

EQUAL OPPORTUNITIES POLICY POLICY STATEMENT  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

EQUAL OPPORTUNITIES POLICY POLICY STATEMENT Imperial College London is committed to a policy Resources (HR) has overall responsibility for the formulation, implementation and monitoring of the policy that this policy is effective by: · advising the College's senior management, other appropriate members of staff

415

American perspectives on security : energy, environment, nuclear weapons, and terrorism : 2010.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We report findings from an Internet survey and a subset of questions administered by telephone among the American public in mid-2010 on US energy and environmental security. Key areas of investigation include public perceptions shaping the context for debate about a comprehensive national energy policy, and what levels of importance are assigned to various prospective energy technologies. Additionally, we investigate how public views on global climate change are evolving, how the public assesses the risks and benefits of nuclear energy, preferences for managing used nuclear fuel, and public trust in sources of scientific and technical information. We also report findings from a national Internet survey and a subset of questions administered by telephone in mid-2010 on public views of the relevance of US nuclear weapons today, support for strategic arms control, and assessments of the potential for nuclear abolition. Additionally, we analyze evolving public views of the threat of terrorism, assessments of progress in the struggle against terrorism, and tolerance for intrusive antiterror policies. Where possible, findings from each survey are compared with previous surveys in this series for analyses of trends.

Herron, Kerry Gale (University of Oklahoma, Norman, OK); Jenkins-Smith, Hank C. (University of Oklahoma, Norman, OK); Silva, Carol L. (University of Oklahoma, Norman, OK)

2011-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

416

Web Policies  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Web Policies Web Policies Accessibility The National Energy Research Scientific Computing Center (NERSC) is part of the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (Berkeley Lab), which...

417

United States, International Partners Remove Last Remaining Weapons-Usable  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

States, International Partners Remove Last Remaining States, International Partners Remove Last Remaining Weapons-Usable Highly Enriched Uranium from Hungary, Set Nuclear Security Milestone United States, International Partners Remove Last Remaining Weapons-Usable Highly Enriched Uranium from Hungary, Set Nuclear Security Milestone November 4, 2013 - 2:09pm Addthis NEWS MEDIA CONTACT (202) 586-4940 WASHINGTON - The U.S. Department of Energy today announced under a multi-year international effort coordinated between Hungary, the United States, the Russian Federation, and the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA), the successful removal of all remaining highly enriched uranium (HEU) from Hungary. This makes Hungary the twelfth country to completely eliminate HEU from its borders since President Obama's 2009 announcement

418

Enforcement Letter; Quality Assurance Deficiencies Related to Weapon Activities  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

2, 2005 2, 2005 Dr. Michael R. Anastasio Director Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory P.O. Box 808, L-001 Livermore, CA 94550 Subject: Enforcement Letter - Quality Assurance Deficiencies Related to Weapon Activities Dear Dr. Anastasio: This letter is to inform you of the Department of Energy's (DOE) concern regarding several quality assurance-related deficiencies involving actions by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) personnel. These deficiencies were associated with a cracked explosive event that occurred at the Pantex site in January 2004. The timing of this letter is intended to coincide with a DOE enforcement action stemming from this event. During the dismantlement of a retired nuclear weapon, for which LLNL was the design

419

Weapons testing data determines brain makes new neurons into adulthood  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

4 4 For immediate release: 06/10/2013 | NR-13-06-04 Weapons testing data determines brain makes new neurons into adulthood Anne M Stark, LLNL, (925) 422-9799, stark8@llnl.gov Image courtesy of National Institutes of Health. LIVERMORE, Calif. -- Using data derived from nuclear weapons testing of the 1950s and '60s, Lawrence Livermore scientists have found that a small portion of the human brain involved in memory makes new neurons well into adulthood. The research may have profound impacts on human behavior and mental health. The study supports the importance of investigating the therapeutic potential of applying adult neurogenesis to the treatment of age-related cognitive disorders. Neurogenesis is the process by which neurons are generated from neural stem

420

EGS 01-01: Nuclear Weapon Program Enforcement Issues  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Enforcement Guidance Supplement Enforcement Guidance Supplement EGS:01-01 Appendix E-Operational Procedures for Enforcement Department of Energy Washington, DC 20585 October 15, 2001 MEMORANDUM FOR: DOE PAAA COORDINATORS CONTRACTOR PAAA COORDINATORS FROM: R. KEITH CHRISTOPHER DIRECTOR OFFICE OF ENFORCEMENT AND INVESTIGATION SUBJECT: Enforcement Guidance Supplement 01-01: Nuclear Weapon Program Enforcement Issues Section 1.3 of the Operational Procedures for Enforcement, published in June 1998, provides the opportunity for the Office of Price-Anderson Enforcement (OE) to periodically issue clarifying guidance regarding the processes used in its enforcement activities. This enforcement guidance focuses on the applicability of 10 CFR Part 830 to nuclear weapon programs and several related enforcement issues.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "weapons nonproliferation policy" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

Crystalline ceramics: Waste forms for the disposal of weapons plutonium  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

At present, there are three seriously considered options for the disposition of excess weapons plutonium: (i) incorporation, partial burn-up and direct disposal of MOX-fuel; (ii) vitrification with defense waste and disposal as glass ``logs``; (iii) deep borehole disposal (National Academy of Sciences Report, 1994). The first two options provide a safeguard due to the high activity of fission products in the irradiated fuel and the defense waste. The latter option has only been examined in a preliminary manner, and the exact form of the plutonium has not been identified. In this paper, we review the potential for the immobilization of plutonium in highly durable crystalline ceramics apatite, pyrochlore, monazite and zircon. Based on available data, we propose zircon as the preferred crystalline ceramic for the permanent disposition of excess weapons plutonium.

Ewing, R.C.; Lutze, W. [New Mexico Univ., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Weber, W.J. [Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States)

1995-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

422

Radioactive ''hot spots'' from nuclear weapons test fallout  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In a paper presented on January 8, 1985, at the Health Physics Society Midyear Symposium, Franke and Alvarez claimed that radioactivity observed on the Savannah River Plant site on March 14, 1955, was the result of a reactor accident. The source of the observed radioactivity was, in fact, rainwater containing radioactive products from a nuclear weapon test made two days earlier in Nevada. The weapon test TEAPOT HORNET was shown to be the source of the contamination at the time, and this has been corroborated in two recent papers. The aim of this review is to show that the highly-localized radioactive fallout on the Savannah River Plant site was not unique but part of a widespread phenomenon occurring all over the United States in the 1950s and early 1960s. 18 references, 2 figures, 2 tables.

Sanders, S.M.

1985-02-11T23:59:59.000Z

423

A hazard separation system for dismantlement of nuclear weapon components  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Over the next decade, the US Department of Energy (DOE) must retire and dismantle many nuclear weapon systems. In support of this effort, Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) has developed the Hazard Separation System (HSS). The HSS combines abrasive waterjet cutting technology and real-time radiography. Using the HSS, operators determine the exact location of interior, hazardous sub-components and remove them through precision cutting. The system minimizes waste and maximizes the recovery of recyclable materials. During 1994, the HSS was completed and demonstrated. Weapon components processed during the demonstration period included arming, fusing, and firing units; preflight control units; neutron generator subassemblies; and x-units. Hazards removed included radioactive krytron tubes and gap tubes, thermal batteries, neutron generator tubes, and oil-filled capacitors. Currently, the HSS is being operated at SNL in a research and development mode to facilitate the transfer of the technology to other DOE facilities for support of their dismantlement operations.

Lutz, J.D.; Purvis, S.T.; Hospelhorn, R.L.; Thompson, K.R.

1995-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

424

Nuclear weapons in Ukraine: Hollow threat, wasting asset  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

When Ukrainian Prime Minister Leonid Kuchma declared on June 3 at a closed session of the Ukrainian parliament (Rada) that it should ratify START I and the May 1992 Lisbon Protocol, but temporarily retain some of the nuclear weapons on Ukrainian territory, concern increased over Kiev`s delay in carrying out its commitments to become a non-nuclear-weapon state. These continuing delays threaten an arms control process codified in START I and START II with far broader security implications. The delays and constant mixed signals from Kiev can be explained two ways, but a closer examination of each of the alternative security options Ukrainians are discussing shows they are built on false premises and would ultimately be counterproductive to genuine Ukrainian security.

Kincade, W.H.

1993-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

425

Nuclear energy in a nuclear weapon free world  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The prospect of a nuclear renaissance has revived a decades old debate over the proliferation and terrorism risks of the use of nuclear power. This debate in the last few years has taken on an added dimension with renewed attention to disarmament. Increasingly, concerns that proliferation risks may reduce the prospects for realizing the vision of a nuclear-weapon-free world are being voiced.

Pilat, Joseph [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

426

Comments on implementation: Contingency options for chemical weapons demilitarization  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The author discusses the need to formulate contingency options for complying with U.S./U.S.S.R. chemical weapon (C.W.) demilitarization timetables that start in 1992. These timetables could be overly optimistic in the face of emerging environmental concerns and potential political, technical, and operational difficulties. A similar approach may also be relevant to the situation in Iraq, where several years are likely to pass before a suitable C.W. destruction system is available for use.

Aroesty, J.

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

427

Operation TEAPOT, 1955 continental nuclear weapons test series. Technical report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report describes the activities of an estimated 11,000 DOD personnel, both military and civilian, in Operation TEAPOT, the fifth atmospheric nuclear weapons testing series conducted in Nevada from 18 February to 15 May 1955. Activities engaging DOD personnel included Exercise Desert Rock VI observer programs, troop tests, and technical service programs; AEC scientific and diagnostic experiments to evaluate the effects of the nuclear device; DOD operational programs; and air support.

Ponton, J.; Maag, C.; Wilkinson, M.; Shepanek, R.F.

1981-11-23T23:59:59.000Z

428

Long range planning at former nuclear weapon plants  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper discusses the approach to planning the cleanup of former nuclear weapon manufacturing plants. The limit of backward planning is the knowledge horizon. Extension of backward planning beyond this horizon is futile. Forward planning is the customary method for planning missions extending beyond that horizon. Planning the future of former plant sites is a political activity by political decision makers. Scientists, professional planners, and public interest groups have an advisory role in this activity.

Vrouwes, J.H. [EG & G Rocky Flats, Inc., Golden, CO (United States)

1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

429

Use of commercial manipulator to handle a nuclear weapon component  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) has developed a manipulator workcell to load and unload nuclear weapon pit assemblies from a cart. To develop this workcell, PNL procured a commercially available manipulator, equipped it with force-sensing and vision equipment, and developed manipulator control software. Manipulator workcell development demonstrated that commercially available manipulator systems can successfully perform this task if the appropriate manipulator is selected and the manipulator workcell tooling and software are carefully designed.

Baker, C.P.

1994-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

430

SNL/NM weapon hardware characterization process development report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report describes the process used by Sandia National Laboratories, New Mexico to characterize weapon hardware for disposition. The report describes the following basic steps: (1) the drawing search process and primary hazard identification; (2) the development of Disassembly Procedures (DPs), including demilitarization and sanitization requirements; (3) the generation of a ``disposal tree``; (4) generating RCRA waste disposal information; and (5) documenting the information. Additional data gathered during the characterization process supporting hardware grouping and recycle efforts is also discussed.

Graff, E.W.; Chambers, W.B.

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

431

Depleted-Uranium Weapons the Whys and Wherefores  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The only military application in which present-day depleted-uranium (DU) alloys out-perform tungsten alloys is long-rod penetration into a main battle-tank's armor. However, this advantage is only on the order of 10% and disappearing when the comparison is made in terms of actual lethality of complete anti-tank systems instead of laboratory-type steel penetration capability. Therefore, new micro- and nano-engineered tungsten alloys may soon out-perform existing DU alloys, enabling the production of tungsten munition which will be better than uranium munition, and whose overall life-cycle cost will be less due to the absence of the problems related to the radioactivity of uranium. The reasons why DU weapons have been introduced and used are analysed from the perspective that their radioactivity must have played an important role in the decision making process. It is found that DU weapons belong to the diffuse category of low-radiological-impact nuclear weapons to which emerging types of low-yield, i.e., fourth...

Gsponer, A

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

432

Nuclear non-proliferation regime effectiveness : an integrated methodology for analyzing highly enriched uranium production scenarios at gas centrifuge enrichment plants  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The dramatic change in the international security environment after the collapse of the bipolar system has had a negative impact on the effectiveness of the existing nuclear non-proliferation regime. Furthermore, the success ...

Kwak, Taeshin (Taeshin S.)

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

433

Western Michigan University is a weapon free school. By order of the Board of Trustees: "No person shall possess on university property any firearms or other dangerous weapons with the exception of  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Western Michigan University is a weapon free school. By order of the Board of Trustees: "No person shall possess on university property any firearms or other dangerous weapons with the exception of police officers, transfer agents licensed to carry weapons and persons using any such weapons for class

de Doncker, Elise

434

The nuclear dilemma and the just war tradition  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This book presents papers on the ethical aspects of nuclear weapons. Topics considered include the concept of a ''just'' war, national defense, political aspects, religion and politics, the failure of deterrence, conventional warfare, nuclear deterrence and democratic politics, the future of the nuclear debate, non-proliferation policy, arms control, national security, and government policies.

O'Brien, W.V.; Langan, J.

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

435

National Certification Methodology for the Nuclear Weapons Stockpile  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Lawrence Livermore and Los Alamos National Laboratories have developed a common framework and key elements of a national certification methodology called Quantification of Margins and Uncertainties (QMU). A spectrum from senior managers to weapons designers has been engaged in this activity at the two laboratories for on the order of a year to codify this methodology in an overarching and integrated paper. Following is the certification paper that has evolved. In the process of writing this paper, an important outcome has been the realization that a joint Livermore/Los Alamos workshop on QMU, focusing on clearly identifying and quantifying differences between approaches between the two labs plus developing an even stronger technical foundation on methodology, will be valuable. Later in FY03, such a joint laboratory workshop will be held. One of the outcomes of this workshop will be a new version of this certification paper. A comprehensive approach to certification must include specification of problem scope, development of system baseline models, formulation of standards of performance assessment, and effective procedures for peer review and documentation. This document concentrates on the assessment and peer review aspects of the problem. In addressing these points, a central role is played by a 'watch list' for weapons derived from credible failure modes and performance gate analyses. The watch list must reflect our best assessment of factors that are critical to weapons performance. High fidelity experiments and calculations as well as full exploitation of archival test data are essential to this process. Peer review, advisory groups and red teams play an important role in confirming the validity of the watch list. The framework for certification developed by the Laboratories has many basic features in common, but some significant differences in the detailed technical implementation of the overall methodology remain. Joint certification workshops held in June and December of 2001 and continued in 2002 have proven useful in developing the methodology, and future workshops should prove useful in further refining this framework. Each laboratory developed an approach to certification with some differences in detailed implementation. The general methodology introduces specific quantitative indicators for assessing confidence in our nuclear weapon stockpile. The quantitative indicators are based upon performance margins for key operating characteristics and components of the system, and these are compared to uncertainties in these factors. These criteria can be summarized in a quantitative metric (for each such characteristic) expressed as: (i.e., confidence in warhead performance depends upon CR significantly exceeding unity for all these characteristics). These Confidence Ratios are proposed as a basis for guiding technical and programmatic decisions on stockpile actions. This methodology already has been deployed in certifying weapons undergoing current life extension programs or component remanufacture. The overall approach is an adaptation of standard engineering practice and lends itself to rigorous, quantitative, and explicit criteria for judging the robustness of weapon system and component performance at a detailed level. There are, of course, a number of approaches for assessing these Confidence Ratios. The general certification methodology was publicly presented for the first time to a meeting of Strategic Command SAG in January 2002 and met with general approval. At that meeting, the Laboratories committed to further refine and develop the methodology through the implementation process. This paper reflects the refinement and additional development to date. There will be even further refinement at a joint laboratory workshop later in FY03. A common certification methodology enables us to engage in peer reviews and evaluate nuclear weapon systems on the basis of explicit and objective metrics. The clarity provided by such metrics enables each laboratory and our common customers to understand the meaning and logic

Goodwin, B T; Juzaitis, R J

2006-08-07T23:59:59.000Z

436

Policies, Procedures and Guidelines Complete Policy Title  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

processes to promote development and operation of sustainable buildings. #12;Policies, Procedures and Guidelines Complete Policy Title: Sustainable Building Policy Policy this electronic policy and the written copy held by the policy owner, the written copy prevails. Sustainable

Haykin, Simon

437

Radiological and Depleted Uranium Weapons: Environmental and Health Consequences  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The effects of nuclear weapons are due to the release of blast and thermal energy and the immediate and residual ionizing radiation energy. Most of the short-term damages to the environment and the human health are caused by the blast and thermal energies. Ionizing radiation energy received in large doses at high dose rates (victims of nuclear explosions) can produce acute radiation sickness and can even be lethal. Individuals having received lower radiation doses, or even high doses at low dose rates, may suffer from stochastic effects, primarily, the induction of cancer. Studies of exposed populations suggest the probability of developing a lethal cancer following low dose rate exposure is increased by approximately 5% for each Sv the whole-body receives. This risk is added, of course, to the risk of dying from cancer without exposure to radiation, which is more than 20% worldwide. For radiological weapons (radiological dispersion devices or dirty bombs), the health effects due to radiation are expected to be minor in most cases. Casualties will mainly occur due to the conventional explosive. Fear, panic, and decontamination costs will be the major effects. Significant radiation damage to individuals would likely be limited to very few persons. Depleted uranium (DU) weapons leave in the battlefield fragmented or intact DU penetrators as well as DU dust. The latter, if inhaled, could represent a radiological risk, especially to individuals spending some time in vehicles hit by DU munitions. All studies conducted so far have shown the outdoors doses to be so low not to represent a significant risk. For those spending 10 h per year in vehicles hit by DU munitions, the risk of developing a lethal cancer is slightly higher (?0.2%).

P.R. Danesi

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

438

2002-2003 Engineering Accomplishments: Unconventional Nuclear Weapons Detection  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Defense Threat Reduction Agency, DTRA, is a federal agency charged with safeguarding the nation from weapons of mass destruction, in particular nuclear weapons such as crude devices, and radiological dispersal devices (RDD), also known as dirty bombs. Both of which could be delivered using unconventional means such as by transporting them by a car or boat. Two years ago DTRA partnered with NNSA to evaluate commercially available technologies that could be deployed quickly to defend against threats posed by unconventional nuclear weapons under a program called the Unconventional Nuclear Warfare Defense (UNWD) Program. Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) was one of several National laboratories that participated in this program, which consisted in developing, deploying, and demonstrating detection systems suitable for military base protection. Two key contributions to this program by the LLNL team were the development of two Radiation Detection Buoys (RDB) deployed at Naval Base in Kings Bay in Georgia, and the Detection and Tracking System (DTS) demonstrated at Fort Leonard Wood Missouri, headquarters for the Total Force's Maneuver Support Center (MANSCEN). The RDB's were designed to detect the potential transportation of an unconventional nuclear or radiological weapon by a boat. The RDB's consisted of two commercial marine buoys instrumented with several types of detectors sensitive to gamma rays and neutrons, two key modes of energy emitted by radioactive materials. The engineering team selected a standard marine buoy as the overall system platform for this deployment since buoys are already designed to sustain the harsh marine environment, and also for their covertness, since once deployed, they look just like any other buoy on the water. Since this was the first time such a system was ever deployed, the team choose to instrument the buoys with a suite of different types of detectors with the goal to learn which detectors would be best suited for future deployments of this kind. This goal has now being achieved, and through a combination of computer modeling and experimental data, the team has gain the necessary knowledge to better understand the capabilities and limitations of RDB's, and the tradeoffs involve in the selection of the different detectors. The two LLNL RDB's are currently operational at Kings Bay, and the team is looking forward to another opportunity to design the next generation RDB's.

Hernandez, J E; Valentine, J

2004-04-09T23:59:59.000Z

439

Tags and seals for controling nuclear materials, Arms control and nonproliferation technologies. Second quarter 1993  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This issue of Arms Control and Nonproliferation Technologies summarizes demonstrations and addresses related topics. The first article, ``Basic Nuclear Material Control and Accountability Concepts as Might be Applied to the Uranium from the US-Russian HEU Purchase,`` describes safeguards sybsystems necessary for effective nuclear material safeguards. It also presents a general discussion on HEU-to-low-enrichment uranium (LEU) commingling processes and suggests applicable key measurement points. The second article, ``A Framework for Evaluating Tamper-Indicating-Device Technologies (TIDs),`` describes their uses, proper selection, and evaluation. The final three articles discuss the tags and seals applications and general characteristics of several nuclear material containers: the Type 30B uranium hexafluoride container, the AT-400R container, and the DOT Specification 6M container for SNM. Finally, the Appendix displays short descriptions and illustrations of seven tags and seals, including: the E-cup and wire seal, the python seal, the secure loop inspectable tag/seal (SLITS), bolt-and-loop type electronic identification devices, and the shrink-wrap seal.

Staehle, G; Talaber, C; Stull, S; Moulthrop, P [eds.

1993-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

440

ESnet Policy Board  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

ESnet Policy Board About ESnet Our Mission The Network ESnet History Governance & Policies ESnet Policy Board ESCC Acceptable Use Policy Facility Data Policy Career Opportunities...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "weapons nonproliferation policy" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

Facility Data Policy  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Facility Data Policy About ESnet Our Mission The Network ESnet History Governance & Policies ESnet Policy Board ESCC Acceptable Use Policy Facility Data Policy Career Opportunities...

442

Derivation of models for nuclear weapon terrorist arming and detonation risk analysis  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report investigates "use control" for the on-site arming and detonation, by terrorists, of stored weapon systems. We investigate both components of weapon "use control", which we define as: (1) weapon "use denial" * that we model as a probability, Pj (denial), that represents the chances that terrorists attempting to arm a type j weapon will commit a non-recoverable error, and (2) weapon "use delay" that we model as a random variable, Tj , that represents the arming delay imposed by the use control features of a type j weapon, before detonation can occur. Using information pertaining to the physical security system at a storage site, the postulated terrorist attack force size, and simulated combat engagement outcomes, we formulate the frequency, fj , and probability, P(dj ), of on-site detonation, for generic weapon types j. We derive a model that disjoins the performance of site physical security, from that for weapon use control, if the use control random variable Tj has a Uniform or histogram distribution. This is an especially significant result where most complex distributions can be adequately approximated with a histogram. Hence, we can conduct combat simulations to obtain the physical security performance of a specific storage site independent of the use control features associated with specific weapon types that are stored, or might be stored, at the site. In turn, we can obtain the use control performance for various weapon types, independent of where they are stored and the physical security systems surrounding them. Our models can then mathematically combine physical security performance and weapon use control performance for any combination of storage facility and weapon type.

Parziale, A A

1998-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

443

International auspices for the storage of spent nuclear fuel as a nonproliferation measure  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The maintenance of spent nuclear fuel from power reactors will pose problems regardless of how or when the debate over reprocessing is resolved. At present, many reactor sites contain significant buildups of spent fuel stored in holding pools, and no measure short of shutting down reactors with no remaining storage capacity will alleviate the need for away-from-reactor storage. Although the federal government has committed itself to dealing with the spent fuel problem, no solution has been reached, largely because of a debate over differing projections of storage capacity requirements. Proliferation of weapons grade nuclear material in many nations presents another pressing issue. If nations with small nuclear programs are forced to deal with their own spent fuel accumulations, they will either have to reprocess it indigenously or contract to have it reprocessed in a foreign reprocessing plant. In either case, these nations may eventually possess sufficient resources to assemble a nuclear weapon. The problem of spent fuel management demands real global solutions, and further delay in solving the problem of spent nuclear fuel accumulation, both nationally and globally, can benefit only a small class of elected officials in the short term and may inflict substantial costs on the American public, and possibly the world. (JMT)

O'Brien, J.N.

1981-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

444

The evolution of the Weapon System Reform Act of 2009 (Public Law 111-23) .  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??In evaluating the implications of the Weapon System Acquisition Reform Act of 2009 (WSARA), we compare the position of prior acquisition acts and DoD acquisition… (more)

McWhorter, Michael

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

445

Dragon's Claws the Improvised Explosive Device (IED) as a weapon of strategic influence .  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??The purpose of this research is to identify how the Improvised Explosive Device (IED) is being used as a "weapon of strategic influence" by insurgent… (more)

Martin, James Kennedy

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

446

Cost effective analysis comparing the small diameter bomb and the joint standoff weapon (A+ Variant) .  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??This MBA project investigated and analyzed the cost effectiveness of implementing the Joint Standoff Weapon A+ (JSOW A+) variant versus the Small Diameter Bomb (SDB).… (more)

Stevens, Brett

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

447

Application of a network perspective to DoD weapon system acquisition: an exploratory study .  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??One of the foundations of military command and control is that authority must match responsibility. Yet in weapon system acquisition, a program manager is responsible… (more)

Mantz, Ryan D.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

448

Development of the Joint Stand Off Weapon (JSOW) Moving Target Capability: AGM-154 Block Three program.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

?? U. S. Naval Tactical Aviation capabilities are continually analyzed for capability gaps. This analysis has identified the need for a medium range standoff weapon… (more)

Turco, Kyle Travis

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

449

Nuclear dependence| The Russian Federation's future reliance on nuclear weapons for national security.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

?? The Russian Federation's reliance on nuclear weapons for national security will steadily increase over time. Based on current evidence and historical data, the Russian… (more)

Lukszo, Adam J.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

450

An Approximate Dynamic Programming Approach to Financial Execution for Weapon System Programs .  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??During each twelve month fiscal year (FY) cycle weapon system programs across the Department of Defense (DoD) are expected to execute their allocated budgets in… (more)

Morman, Erich

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

451

Public Health Implications of Mass Rape as a Weapon of War.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

?? Although rape and other forms of sexual violence have historically been present during wartime, it has recently become a strategic weapon of war in… (more)

Ayele, Missale

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

452

A generalized decision model for naval weapon procurement: Multi-attribute decision making.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??For any given reason, every year many countries spend a lot of money purchasing at least one weapon. Due to the secret character of the… (more)

Chang, Jin O

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

453

Formulation of an Integrated Robust Design and Tactics Optimization Process for Undersea Weapon Systems.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??In the current Navy environment of undersea weapons development, the engineering aspect of design is decoupled from the development of the tactics with which the… (more)

Frits, Andrew P.

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

454

E-Print Network 3.0 - atomic weapons research Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

and model nuclear weapon performance in three dimensions. LIFE EXTENSION PROGRAMS: By upgrading Source: Rhoads, James - Space Telescope Science Institute Collection: Physics 9...

455

E-Print Network 3.0 - atomic weapons establishment Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Applied Science at the Atomic Weapons... Establishment in the United Kingdom, where he led the science and engineering organization responsible... at Los Alamos National...

456

Forensic Analysis of Human DNA from Samples Contaminated with Biological Weapons Agents .  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??The use of biological agents as potential weapons has been a concern of security agencies for many years. Security agencies require alternative field protocols for… (more)

Timbers, Jason

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

457

Regime Security Theory: Why Do States With No Clear Strategic Security Concerns Obtain Nuclear Weapons? .  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??Current realist explanations of why states decide to develop nuclear weapons cannot account for the behavior of states that lack a clear strategic threat. An… (more)

Beasley, Matthew

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

458

Anti-satellite weapons : threats, laws and the uncertain future of space.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??Satellite capabilities greatly enhance both the military and civilian sectors of society. Anti-satellite (ASAT) weapons pose a serious risk to all satellites. Chapter One of… (more)

Hart, Brandon L.

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

459

Abolishing the taboo: President Eisenhower and the permissible use of nuclear weapons for national security.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??As president, Dwight Eisenhower believed that nuclear weapons, both fission and fusion, were permissible and desirable assets to help protect U.S. national security against the… (more)

Jones, Brian Madison

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

460

E-Print Network 3.0 - asset-based dynamic weapon Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

smartphone and tap... &S) weapon. Examples include shooting galleries with air rifles, paint- ball and laser tag systems, and any Source: Greenberg, Albert - IP Network and...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "weapons nonproliferation policy" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


461

E-Print Network 3.0 - army weapon systems Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Games Summary: &S) weapon. Examples include shooting galleries with air rifles, paint- ball and laser tag systems, and any... . DISCUSSION Related Work. Other game and...

462

COLLOQUIUM: Risks of Nuclear Weapons Use in an Era of Proliferation...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Risks of Nuclear Weapons Use in an Era of Proliferation, Cyber Warfare and Terrorism Dr. Bruce G. Blair Princeton University The United States and eight other countries...

463

E-Print Network 3.0 - atomic weapon tests Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

By dissembling random nuclear weapons in the stockpile and closely inspecting and testing... explosives and nuclear materials at the Nevada Test Site to gather diagnostic...

464

Strategic culture and non-nuclear weapon outcomes: the cases of Australia, South Africa and Sweden .  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??This thesis uses a "strategic culture" approach to gain insights into non-nuclear weapon outcomes in Australia, South Africa and Sweden. Strategic culture refers to the… (more)

Poore, S.E.

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

465

The Treaty for the Prohibition of Nuclear Weapons in Latin America and the Caribbean  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Treaty for the Prohibition of Nuclear Weapons in Latin America and the Caribbean, known as the Treaty of Tlatelolco, seeks to establish a nuclear-weapon-free zone (NWFZ) that will extend from the US-Mexican border to Antarctica`s territorial boundaries, including large areas of open ocean. Under the treaty, signatory states pledge not to test, use, produce, manufacture or acquire nuclear weapons; to use nuclear materials and facilities {open_quotes}exclusively for peaceful purposes;{close_quotes} and not to permit the stationing or development of nuclear weapons on their territories.

NONE

1994-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

466

LANL | Physics | Nuclear Weapons and Global Security Data Analysis  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Nuclear Weapons and Global Security Data Analysis Nuclear Weapons and Global Security Data Analysis Physics Division applies advanced imaging techniques to many applications, from brain imaging to neutron imaging in inertial fusion to threat detection from airborne cameras. A particular strength is the quantitative analysis of penetrating radiography using techniques such as the Bayesian Inference Engine (BIE). An example from the Nuclear Event Analysis Team shows a test object (Figure 1) that is subsequently radiographed using the Dual-Axis Radiography Hydrodynamic Test (DARHT) facility. Figures 2 and 3 show the radiograph and the inferred density of the object using the BIE, which can be compared to the known object to determine accurate error estimation. Test object Figure 1. The test object consists of a 1 cm-radius cavity void surrounded by a 4.5 cm radius surrogate fissile material of tungsten, tantalum, or depleted uranium. This sphere is surrounded by a 6.5 cm-radius copper sphere. At is thickest point, the tantalum test object has an areal density of 180 g/cm2, equivalent to 9" of steel.

467

Steps toward a Middle East free of nuclear weapons  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In the aftermath of the Gulf War, all eyes are focused on the dangers of proliferation in the Middle East. President Bush, in his postwar address to Congress, called for immediate action to control the proliferation of weapons of mass destruction and the missiles used to deliver them, warning that it would be tragic if the nations of the Middle East and Persian Gulf were now, in the wake of war, to embark on a new arms race. Secretary of State James Baker has recently returned from a tour of the region, and consultations on proliferation were reportedly high on his agenda. At the same time, the fierce political antagonisms and unbridled military competitions that have long characterized the Middle East leave many skeptical as to what can realistically be done. While all states in the region - including Israel - have publicly supported the idea of establishing a nuclear-weapon-free zone (NWFZ) in the Middle East, doubt over the feasibility of the proposal runs high. Why on earth, it is asked, would Israelis give up the protection of their nuclear monopoly What assurances from their Arab adversaries or from the US could possibly replace this ultimate deterrent

Leonard, J.

1991-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

468

Policies | Argonne Leadership Computing Facility  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Accounts Policy Account Sponsorship & Retention Policy ALCC Quarterly Report Policy ALCF Acknowledgment Policy Data Policy INCITE Quarterly Report Policy Job Scheduling Policy on...

469

Terminating Safeguards on Excess Special Nuclear Material: Defense TRU Waste Clean-up and Nonproliferation - 12426  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Department of Energy (DOE) and the National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) manages defense nuclear material that has been determined to be excess to programmatic needs and declared waste. When these wastes contain plutonium, they almost always meet the definition of defense transuranic (TRU) waste and are thus eligible for disposal at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP). The DOE operates the WIPP in a manner that physical protections for attractiveness level D or higher special nuclear material (SNM) are not the normal operating condition. Therefore, there is currently a requirement to terminate safeguards before disposal of these wastes at the WIPP. Presented are the processes used to terminate safeguards, lessons learned during the termination process, and how these approaches might be useful for future defense TRU waste needing safeguards termination prior to shipment and disposal at the WIPP. Also described is a new criticality control container, which will increase the amount of fissile material that can be loaded per container, and how it will save significant taxpayer dollars. Retrieval, compliant packaging and shipment of retrievably stored legacy TRU waste has dominated disposal operations at WIPP since it began operations 12 years ago. But because most of this legacy waste has successfully been emplaced in WIPP, the TRU waste clean-up focus is turning to newly-generated TRU materials. A major component will be transuranic SNM, currently managed in safeguards-protected vaults around the weapons complex. As DOE and NNSA continue to consolidate and shrink the weapons complex footprint, it is expected that significant quantities of transuranic SNM will be declared surplus to the nation's needs. Safeguards termination of SNM varies due to the wide range of attractiveness level of the potential material that may be directly discarded as waste. To enhance the efficiency of shipping waste with high TRU fissile content to WIPP, DOE designed an over-pack container, similar to the pipe component, called the criticality control over-pack, which will significantly enhance the efficiency of disposal. Hundreds of shipments of transuranic SNM, suitably packaged to meet WIPP waste acceptance criteria and with safeguards terminated have been successfully emplaced at WIPP (primarily from the Rocky Flats site clean-up) since WIPP opened. DOE expects that thousands more may eventually result from SNM consolidation efforts throughout the weapons complex. (authors)

Hayes, Timothy [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Carlsbad Operations Group (United States); Nelson, Roger [Department Of Energy, Carlsbad Operations Office (United States)

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

470

INTERIM POLICY JANUARY 9, 2004  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

INTERIM POLICY JANUARY 9, 2004 CORNELL UNIVERSITY POLICY LIBRARY Health and Safety POLICY 2 _________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________ POLICY STATEMENT. _________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________ REASON FOR POLICY

Chen, Tsuhan

471

REGIONBASED IMAGE FUSION SCHEME FOR CONCEALED WEAPON Zhong Zhang and Rick S. Blum  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

REGION­BASED IMAGE FUSION SCHEME FOR CONCEALED WEAPON DETECTION Zhong Zhang and Rick S. Blum and recognition of objects. A particular case of interest is where images from possibly different types of sensors are to be combined. Concealed weapon detection (CWD) is one interesting application. An image fusion scheme

Blum, Rick

472

Please do not shoot the pianist. Criteria for recognizing ancient lithic weapon use  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract The paper by Rots & Plisson in JAS has initiated an interesting debate about the methodologies applied in identifying lithic weapons. Some of their criticisms are discussed and some clarification of the criteria for recognizing wear patterns is proposed. The relevance of working within a general historical/anthropological model to contextualize ancient weapon use is highlighted.

Talía Lazuén

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

473

Abdus Salam: A Reappraisal. Part II Salam's Part in the Pakistani Nuclear Weapon Programme  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Salam's biographies claim that he was opposed to Pakistan's nuclear weapon programme. This is somewhat strange given that he was the senior Science Advisor to the Pakistan government for at least some of the period between 1972 when the programme was initiated and 1998 when a successful nuclear weapon test was carried out. I look at the evidence for his participation in the programme.

Dombey, Norman

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

474

Abdus Salam: A Reappraisal. Part II Salam's Part in the Pakistani Nuclear Weapon Programme  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Salam's biographies claim that he was opposed to Pakistan's nuclear weapon programme. This is somewhat strange given that he was the senior Science Advisor to the Pakistan government for at least some of the period between 1972 when the programme was initiated and 1998 when a successful nuclear weapon test was carried out. I look at the evidence for his participation in the programme.

Norman Dombey

2011-12-10T23:59:59.000Z

475

Assurance and assessment techniques for nuclear weapon related software  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Sandia National Laboratories has the qualification evaluation responsibility for the design of certain components intended for use in nuclear weapons. Specific techniques in assurance and assessment have been developed to provide the quality evidence that the software has been properly qualified for use. Qualification Evaluation is a process for assessing the suitability of either a process used to develop or manufacture the product, or the product itself The qualification process uses a team approach to evaluating a product or process, chaired by a Quality Assurance professional, with other members representing the design organization, the systems organization, and the production agency. Suitable for use implies that adequate and appropriate definition and documentation has been produced and formally released, adequate verification and validation activities have taken place to ensure proper operation, and the software product meets all requirements, explicitly or otherwise.

Blackledge, M.A. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States). Quality Engineering Department

1993-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

476

Assurance and assessment techniques for nuclear weapon related software  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Sandia National Laboratories has the qualification evaluation responsibility for the design of certain components intended for use in nuclear weapons. Specific techniques in assurance and assessment have been developed to provide the quality evidence that the software has been properly qualified for use. Qualification Evaluation is a process for assessing the suitability of either a process used to develop or manufacture the product, or the product itself. The qualification process uses a team approach to evaluating a product or process, chaired by a Quality Assurance professional, with other members representing the design organization, the systems organization, and the production agency. Suitable for use implies that adequate and appropriate definition and documentation has been produced and formally released, adequate verification and validation activities have taken place to ensure proper operation, and the software product meets all requirements, explicitly or otherwise.

Blackledge, M.A.

1993-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

477

Safety issues in robotic handling of nuclear weapon parts  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Robotic systems are being developed by the Intelligent Systems and Robotics Center at Sandia National Laboratories to perform automated handling tasks with radioactive weapon parts. These systems will reduce the occupational radiation exposure to workers by automating operations that are currently performed manually. The robotic systems at Sandia incorporate several levels of mechanical, electrical, and software safety for handling hazardous materials. For example, tooling used by the robot to handle radioactive parts has been designed with mechanical features that allow the robot to release its payload only at designated locations in the robotic workspace. In addition, software processes check for expected and unexpected situations throughout the operations. Incorporation of features such as these provides multiple levels of safety for handling hazardous or valuable payloads with automated intelligent systems.

Drotning, W.; Wapman, W.; Fahrenholtz, J.

1993-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

478

Assurance and assessment techniques for nuclear weapon related software  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Sandia National Laboratories has the qualification evaluation responsibility for the design of certain components intended for use in nuclear weapons. Specific techniques in assurance and assessment have been developed to provide the quality evidence that the software has been properly qualified for use. Qualification Evaluation is a process for assessing the suitability of either a process used to develop or manufacture the product, or the product itself. The qualification process uses a team approach to evaluating a product or process, chaired by a Quality Assurance professional, with other members representing the design organization, the systems organization, and the production agency. Suitable for use implies that adequate and appropriate definition and documentation has been produced and formally released, adequate verification and validation activities have taken place to ensure proper operation, and the software product meets all requirements, explicitly or otherwise.

Blackledge, M.A.

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

479

Nuclear proliferation and civilian nuclear power. Report of the Nonproliferation Alternative Systems Assessment Program. Volume IV. Commercial potential  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This volume of the Nonproliferation Alternative Systems Assessment Program (NASAP) report provides time and cost estimates for positioning new nuclear power systems for commercial deployment. The assessment also estimates the rates at which the new systems might penetrate the domestic market, assuming the continuing viability of the massive light-water reactor network that now exists worldwide. This assessment does not recommend specific, detailed program plans and budgets for individual systems; however, it is clear from this analysis that any of the systems investigated could be deployed if dictated by national interest.

Not Available

1980-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

480

EA-1035: Relocation of the Weapons Component Testing Facility Los Alamos  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

35: Relocation of the Weapons Component Testing Facility Los 35: Relocation of the Weapons Component Testing Facility Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico EA-1035: Relocation of the Weapons Component Testing Facility Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico SUMMARY This EA evaluates the environmental impacts of the proposal to relocate the Weapons Component Testing Facility from Building 450 to Building 207, both within Technical Area 16, at the U.S. Department of Energy's Los Alamos National Laboratory. PUBLIC COMMENT OPPORTUNITIES None available at this time. DOCUMENTS AVAILABLE FOR DOWNLOAD February 10, 1995 EA-1035: Finding of No Significant Impact Relocation of the Weapons Component Testing Facility Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico February 10, 1995 EA-1035: Final Environmental Assessment

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481

U.S. Nuclear Weapons Strategy Delivered to Congress | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Nuclear Weapons Strategy Delivered to Congress Nuclear Weapons Strategy Delivered to Congress U.S. Nuclear Weapons Strategy Delivered to Congress July 24, 2007 - 2:55pm Addthis WASHINGTON, DC -U.S. Secretary of Energy Samuel W. Bodman joined the U.S. Secretaries of Defense and State in sending to Congress the Bush Administration's nuclear weapons strategy. This document not only describes the history of nuclear deterrence during the Cold War, but reinforces how deterrence applies to present and future security threats, and what a nuclear stockpile of the 21st century will need to look like in order to meet those threats. The strategy emphasizes President Bush's goal of maintaining a credible nuclear deterrent with the lowest possible number of nuclear weapons. It is consistent with the Moscow Treaty that sets U.S. and Russian

482

U.S. Nuclear Weapons Strategy Delivered to Congress | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

U.S. Nuclear Weapons Strategy Delivered to Congress U.S. Nuclear Weapons Strategy Delivered to Congress U.S. Nuclear Weapons Strategy Delivered to Congress July 24, 2007 - 2:55pm Addthis WASHINGTON, DC -U.S. Secretary of Energy Samuel W. Bodman joined the U.S. Secretaries of Defense and State in sending to Congress the Bush Administration's nuclear weapons strategy. This document not only describes the history of nuclear deterrence during the Cold War, but reinforces how deterrence applies to present and future security threats, and what a nuclear stockpile of the 21st century will need to look like in order to meet those threats. The strategy emphasizes President Bush's goal of maintaining a credible nuclear deterrent with the lowest possible number of nuclear weapons. It is consistent with the Moscow Treaty that sets U.S. and Russian

483

U.S. No Longer Building Any Nuclear Weapons | National Nuclear Security  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

No Longer Building Any Nuclear Weapons | National Nuclear Security No Longer Building Any Nuclear Weapons | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure Continuing Management Reform Countering Nuclear Terrorism About Us Our Programs Our History Who We Are Our Leadership Our Locations Budget Our Operations Media Room Congressional Testimony Fact Sheets Newsletters Press Releases Speeches Events Social Media Video Gallery Photo Gallery NNSA Archive Federal Employment Apply for Our Jobs Our Jobs Working at NNSA Blog Home > About Us > Our History > NNSA Timeline > U.S. No Longer Building Any Nuclear Weapons U.S. No Longer Building Any Nuclear Weapons May 10, 1992 Washington, DC U.S. No Longer Building Any Nuclear Weapons

484

The interaction between clothing and air weapon pellets  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Comparatively few studies have been carried out on air weapon injuries yet there are significant number of injuries and fatalities caused by these low power weapons because of their availability and the public perception that because they need no licence they are assumed to be safe. In this study ballistic gel was tested by Bloom and rupture tests to check on consistency of production. Two series of tests were carried out firing into unclothed gel blocks and blocks loosely covered by different items of clothing to simulate attire (tee shirt, jeans, fleece, and jacket). The damage to the clothing caused by different shaped pellets when fired at different ranges was examined. The apparent hole size was affected by the shape of pellet (round, pointed, flat and hollow point) and whether damage was predominantly caused by pushing yarn to one side or by laceration of the yarn through cutting or tearing. The study also compared penetration into clothed gel and unclothed gel under identical conditions, and loose clothing greatly reduced penetration. With loose clothing at 9.1 m range clothing reduced penetration to 50–70% of the penetration of unclothed gel but at 18.3 m range only 7 out of 36 shots penetrated the gel. This cannot be accounted for by the energy loss at the longer range (3–7% reduction from 9.1 m to 18.3 m range in unclothed gels) and it is suggested that impulse may have a role to play. Shots that did not penetrate the gel were used to estimate the possible stopping time for the pellet (around 75 ?s) and force (1700 N) or stress (100 MPa) required to bring the pellet to a halt. Even with these low energy projectiles, cloth fibres were entrained in the gel showing the potential for penetration of the body and subsequent infection.

G. Wightman; K. Wark; J. Thomson

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

485

Plus c`est la meme chose: The future of nuclear weapons in Europe  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Since the end of the Cold War, the United States perhaps more than any other nuclear weapon state has deeply questioned the future role of nuclear weapons, both in a strategic sense and in Europe. It is probably the United States that has raised the most questions about the continuing need for and efficacy of nuclear weapons, and has expressed the greatest concerns about the negative consequences of continuing nuclear weapons deployment. In the US, this period of questioning has now come to a pause, if not a conclusion. In late 1994 the United States decided to continue to pursue reductions in numbers of nuclear weapons as well as other changes designed to reduce the dangers associated with the possession of nuclear weapons. But at the same time the US concluded that some number of nuclear forces would continue to be needed for national security for the foreseeable future. These necessary nuclear forces include a continuing but greatly reduced stockpile of nuclear bombs deployed in Europe under NATO`s New Strategic Concept. If further changes to the US position on nuclear weapons in Europe are to occur, it is likely to be after many years, and only in the context of dramatic additional improvements in the political and geo-political climate in and around Europe. The future role of nuclear weapons in Europe, as discussed in this report, depends in part on past and future decisions by the United States. but it must also be noted that other states that deploy nuclear weapons in Europe--Britain, France, and Russia, as well as the NATO alliance--have shown little inclination to discontinue their deployment of such weapons, whatever the United States might choose to do in the future.

Maaranen, S.A.

1996-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

486

Energy Policy ] (  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

energy consumption on a per capita or per productivity basis (e.g. kWh/capita, kWh/GDP), are widely usedEnergy Policy ] (

Jacobson, Arne

487

Detection of Chemical Weapon Agents and Simulants Using Chemical Ionization Reaction Time-of-Flight Mass Spectrometry  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Detection of Chemical Weapon Agents and Simulants Using Chemical Ionization Reaction Time-of-Flight Mass Spectrometry ... Chemical weapons were first used on a large scale in warfare in World War 1, where chlorine and sulfur mustard were used extensively. ... Many analytical methods have been developed for the detection of the active chemical constituents of chemical weapons, chemical weapon agents (CWAs), and their breakdown products in soil,5-9 groundwater,10,11 and air. ...

Rebecca L. Cordell; Kerry A. Willis; Kevin P. Wyche; Robert S. Blake; Andrew M. Ellis; Paul S. Monks

2007-09-26T23:59:59.000Z

488

English Language Policy 1 English Language Policy  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

English Language Policy 1 English Language Policy Abstract This policy sets out UTS's requirements their courses of study. Dates Policy or amendment approved Policy or amendment takes effect Policy is due for review (up to 5 years) 03/11/2010 22/11/2010 11/2015 Policy amendment approved 02/11/2011 Approved

University of Technology, Sydney

489

Information Security Policy Policy Title Information Security Policy  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Information Security Policy Policy Title Information Security Policy Responsible Executive Vice President of Information Technology and CIO Jay Dominick Responsible Office Office of Information Technology, Operations and Planning Endorsed by Information Security Policy Committee Contact Chief Information Security

Rowley, Clarence W.

490

Subject:Persons With Weapons at UW Madison Date:Wed, 19 Oct 2011 14:27:43 -0400 (EDT)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Subject:Persons With Weapons at UW Madison Date:Wed, 19 Oct 2011 14:27:43 -0400 (EDT) From law goes into effect on November 1, 2011 all weapons will remain prohibited in UW Madison buildings. If you see a person who is not a police officer in uniform carrying a weapon in a UW Madison building

Balser, Teri C.

491

Opportunities exist for the diversion of weapons-usable material at the front end of the fuel cycle, during which  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Opportunities exist for the diversion of weapons-usable material at the front end of the fuel cycle of proliferation: The more places in which this work is done, the harder it is to monitor. Weapons have been, North Korea, Pakistan, and South Africa. (South Africa abandoned its nuclear weapons in 1991. Libya

Laughlin, Robert B.

492

Convention on the Prohibition of the Development, Production and Stockpiling of Bacteriological (Biological) and Toxin Weapons and  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

(Biological) and Toxin Weapons and on Their Destruction Signed at London, Moscow and Washington on 10 April and complete disarmament, including the prohibition and elimination of all types of weapons of mass destruction and bacteriological (biological) weapons and their elimination, through effective measures, will facilitate

Sussex, University of

493

A Method to Optimize Ship Maneuvers for the Coordination of Hardkill and Softkill Weapons within a Frigate  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A Method to Optimize Ship Maneuvers for the Coordination of Hardkill and Softkill Weapons within hardkill and softkill weapon systems is an important aspect of command and control for a Frigate. Since the effectiveness of a particular weapon varies depending on the orientation of the Frigate with respect

Kropf, Peter

494

vol. 166, no. 3 the american naturalist september 2005 Weapon Performance, Not Size, Determines Mating Success and Potential  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

vol. 166, no. 3 the american naturalist september 2005 Weapon Performance, Not Size, Determines the head (i.e., jaws and associated musculature) as a weapon when territorial interactions escalate to fights, we tested the hypothesis that weapon performance (i.e., bite force) is a better predictor

Husak, Jerry F.

495

May 2013 Office of the Director DONhrFAQ@navy.mil DON Civilians Help Create Navy's First Laser Weapon  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Navy's First Laser Weapon Department of the Navy (DON) civilians from Office of Naval Research (ONR down drones and disabling small boats. The Department's Laser Weapon System (LaWS) will be the first of electrically powered solid-state laser weapons developed by civilians that give sailors and marines flexibility

496

Fissile Material Disposition Program: Deep borehole disposal Facility PEIS date input report for immobilized disposal. Immobilized disposal of plutonium in coated ceramic pellets in grout with canisters. Version 3.0  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Following President Clinton`s Non-Proliferation Initiative, launched in September, 1993, an Interagency Working Group (IWG) was established to conduct a comprehensive review of the options for the disposition of weapons-usable fissile materials from nuclear weapons dismantlement activities in the United States and the former Soviet Union. The IWG review process will consider technical, nonproliferation, environmental budgetary, and economic considerations in the disposal of plutonium. The IWG is co-chaired by the White House Office of Science and Technology Policy and the National Security Council. The Department of Energy (DOE) is directly responsible for the management, storage, and disposition of all weapons-usable fissile material. The Department of Energy has been directed to prepare a comprehensive review of long-term options for Surplus Fissile Material (SFM) disposition, taking into account technical, nonproliferation, environmental, budgetary, and economic considerations.

Wijesinghe, A.M.; Shaffer, R.J.

1996-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

497

Loose Nukes: Nuclear Material Security in G.P.Gilfoyle  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-standing policy of nuclear nonproliferation. · A nuclear blast would have horrific consequences; loss of lifeLoose Nukes: Nuclear Material Security in Russia G.P.Gilfoyle Physics Department, University of Richmond, Virginia Outline: 1. Nuclear Weapons 101 2. What are loose nukes and why should you care? 3. What

Gilfoyle, Jerry

498

Techniques to evaluate the importance of common cause degradation on reliability and safety of nuclear weapons.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

As the nuclear weapon stockpile ages, there is increased concern about common degradation ultimately leading to common cause failure of multiple weapons that could significantly impact reliability or safety. Current acceptable limits for the reliability and safety of a weapon are based on upper limits on the probability of failure of an individual item, assuming that failures among items are independent. We expanded the current acceptable limits to apply to situations with common cause failure. Then, we developed a simple screening process to quickly assess the importance of observed common degradation for both reliability and safety to determine if further action is necessary. The screening process conservatively assumes that common degradation is common cause failure. For a population with between 100 and 5000 items we applied the screening process and conclude the following. In general, for a reliability requirement specified in the Military Characteristics (MCs) for a specific weapon system, common degradation is of concern if more than 100(1-x)% of the weapons are susceptible to common degradation, where x is the required reliability expressed as a fraction. Common degradation is of concern for the safety of a weapon subsystem if more than 0.1% of the population is susceptible to common degradation. Common degradation is of concern for the safety of a weapon component or overall weapon system if two or more components/weapons in the population are susceptible to degradation. Finally, we developed a technique for detailed evaluation of common degradation leading to common cause failure for situations that are determined to be of concern using the screening process. The detailed evaluation requires that best estimates of common cause and independent failure probabilities be produced. Using these techniques, observed common degradation can be evaluated for effects on reliability and safety.

Darby, John L.

2011-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

499

International Safeguards Technology and Policy Education and Training Pilot Programs  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A major focus of the National Nuclear Security Administration-led Next Generation Safeguards Initiative (NGSI) is the development of human capital to meet present and future challenges to the safeguards regime. An effective university-level education in safeguards and related disciplines is an essential element in a layered strategy to rebuild the safeguards human resource capacity. NNSA launched two pilot programs in 2008 to develop university level courses and internships in association with James, Martin Center for Nonproliferation Studies (CNS) at the Monterey Institute of International Studies (MIIS) and Texas A&M University (TAMU). These pilot efforts involved 44 students in total and were closely linked to hands-on internships at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) and Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL). The Safeguards and Nuclear Material Management pilot program was a collaboration between TAMU, LANL, and LLNL. The LANL-based coursework was shared with the students undertaking internships at LLNL via video teleconferencing. A weeklong hands-on exercise was also conducted at LANL. A second pilot effort, the International Nuclear Safeguards Policy and Information Analysis pilot program was implemented at MIIS in cooperation with LLNL. Speakers from MIIS, LLNL, and other U.S. national laboratories (LANL, BNL) delivered lectures for the audience of 16 students. The majority of students were senior classmen or new master's degree graduates from MIIS specializing in nonproliferation policy studies. The two pilots programs concluded with an NGSI Summer Student Symposium, held at LLNL, where 20 students participated in LLNL facility tours and poster sessions. The value of bringing together the students from the technical and policy pilots was notable and will factor into the planning for the continued refinement of the two programs in the coming years.

Dreicer, M; Anzelon, G A; Essner, J T; Dougan, A D; Doyle, J; Boyer, B; Hypes, P; Sokava, E; Wehling, F; Martin, J; Charlton, W

2009-06-16T23:59:59.000Z

500

Risks of non-lethal weapon use: Case studies of three French victims of stinger grenades  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The development of non-lethal weapons started in the 1960s. In France, they have been used by the police for about 10 years. We relate the cases of three French women, victims of stinger grenades, non-lethal weapons recently adopted by the French law enforcement to distract and disperse crowds. The three victims presented serious injuries requiring emergency surgical care. One lost her eye. Based on these cases, we discuss the lethal character of these weapons and propose measures to be taken to prevent their dramatic consequences. Although the danger is obviously less than for firearms, stinger grenades are nonetheless potentially lethal and cause serious physical injuries.

V. Scolan; C. Herry; M. Carreta; C. Stahl; L. Barret; J.P. Romanet; F. Paysant

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z